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Sample records for retrovir zidovudine azt

  1. Zidovudine (Retrovir) update.

    PubMed Central

    Rachlis, A R

    1990-01-01

    Zidovudine (AZT) is the first antiretroviral agent to be licensed for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Since the initial placebo-controlled trial showing improved survival among patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or symptomatic HIV infection (AIDS-related complex [ARC]) zidovudine has been evaluated in other stages of HIV infection. This review offers physicians who treat patients with HIV infection a comprehensive analysis of the current data on the clinical efficacy of zidovudine in various stages of HIV infection and on zidovudine's adverse effects. After a search of MEDLINE for pertinent articles published since 1985, controlled studies and studies of long-term zidovudine therapy, of zidovudine therapy for HIV-related conditions and of the incidence and management of adverse reactions were evaluated. In addition, abstracts from international meetings were reviewed. No significant difference in clinical outcome was found between high-dose and low-dose zidovudine therapy, but there were significantly fewer toxic effects in the low-dose group. In two other studies zidovudine was found to delay disease progression in patients with asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic HIV infection who had an absolute CD4 count of less than 0.5 x 10(9)/L; the low incidence of adverse reactions may have been due to either the early stage of the infection or the low dose used. The demonstration of zidovudine-resistant isolates after at least 6 months of therapy has yet to be correlated with clinical deterioration. When to begin zidovudine therapy among asymptomatic patients with a CD4 count of less than 0.5 x 10(9)/L remains unclear. Zidovudine can be used safely to delay progression to AIDS or ARC in certain patients with asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic HIV infection and can prolong survival in those with more severe infection. Further studies are necessary to identify indicators that could better define when to start treatment and

  2. Combination strategies to enhance transdermal permeation of zidovudine (AZT).

    PubMed

    Thomas, N S; Panchagnula, R

    2003-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of simultaneous application of two penetration enhancers of different chemical classes or a chemical penetration enhancer and current application on permeation of zidovudine (AZT) across rat skin. Ex vivo permeation of AZT using combinations of cineole or menthol in vehicle with either oleic acid/linolenic acid or 0.5 mA/cm2 anodal current application for 6 h was studied. Penetration enhancers were significantly different in enhancing the permeability of AZT across rat skin and are in the decreasing order of activity: linolenic acid > menthol > oleic acid > cineole > vehicle. The combination of cineole and oleic acid synergistically enhanced transdermal flux of AZT in addition to reducing lag time. However, this was not observed for combinations of menthol with oleic or linolenic acid. On the other hand, the simultaneous application of current with menthol and cineole significantly increased cumulative amounts of AZT permeating during the course of current application and reduced the lag time but failed to further increase steady state flux of AZT. These results suggest that a combination of two penetration enhancers of different classes or the simultaneous use of iontophoresis and a penetration enhancer may be advantageous to achieve permeation enhancement with low risk of skin damage.

  3. Reversal of brain metabolic abnormalities following treatment of AIDS dementia complex with 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine (AZT, zidovudine): a PET-FDG study

    SciTech Connect

    Brunetti, A.; Berg, G.; Di Chiro, G.; Cohen, R.M.; Yarchoan, R.; Pizzo, P.A.; Broder, S.; Eddy, J.; Fulham, M.J.; Finn, R.D.

    1989-05-01

    Brain glucose metabolism was evaluated in four patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) dementia complex using (/sup 18/F)fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and positron emission tomography (PET) scans at the beginning of therapy with 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine (AZT, zidovudine), and later in the course of therapy. In two patients, baseline, large focal cortical abnormalities of glucose utilization were reversed during the course of therapy. In the other two patients, the initial PET study did not reveal pronounced focal alterations, while the post-treatment scans showed markedly increased cortical glucose metabolism. The improved cortical glucose utilization was accompanied in all patients by immunologic and neurologic improvement. PET-FDG studies can detect cortical metabolic abnormalities associated with AIDS dementia complex, and may be used to monitor the metabolic improvement in response to AZT treatment.

  4. High Incidence of Zidovudine Induced Anaemia in HIV Infected Patients in Southern Odisha.

    PubMed

    Dash, Kaibalya Ranjan; Meher, Lalit Kumar; Hui, P K; Behera, S K; Nayak, S N

    2015-06-01

    Zidovudine (AZT), a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor was the first breakthrough in AIDS therapy in 1990.This study was conducted with an aim to determine prevalence of AZT induced anaemia in HIV infected patients initiated on AZT containing anti retroviral therapy(ART) regimen and also to find out any risk factor for causing AZT induced anaemia. Study was carried out in ART centre, M.K.C.G, MCH, Berhampur between Jan 2009 and Dec 2011. HIV infected patients registered at ART centre were treated according to National AIDS Control Organisation (NACO) guidelines. Patients (n = 1221) with Hb >8 gm/dl were prescribed AZT based ART regimen. Patients having anaemia (<8 gm/dl) were excluded from the study. Correlation of baseline characteristics (age, sex, weight, Hb level, CD4 count, World Health Organization (WHO) clinical stage) with risk of developing anaemia was also calculated. 178 (14.6 %) patients on AZT regimen developed anaemia. Patients with low CD4 count were more prone to develop severe anaemia. Age, sex, weight, WHO clinical stage had no relation with development of anaemia. Incidence of AZT induced anaemia was very high and patients having low CD4 count were more susceptible to develop anaemia.

  5. Zidovudine and isoniazid induced liver toxicity and oxidative stress: Evaluation of mitigating properties of silibinin.

    PubMed

    Raghu, Ramanathan; Karthikeyan, Sivanesan

    2016-09-01

    HIV/AIDS patients are more prone for opportunistic TB infections and they are administered the combined regimen of anti-retroviral drug zidovudine (AZT) and isoniazid (INH) for therapy. However, AZT+INH treatment has been documented to induce injury and remedial measures to prevent this adversity are not clearly defined. Silibinin (SBN) is a natural hepatoprotective principle isolated from medicinal plant Silybum marianum and is currently used for therapy of various liver diseases. This study investigate the hepatotoxic potentials of AZT alone, INH alone and AZT+INH treatments and the mitigating potentials of SBN against these drugs induced toxic insults of liver in rats. Separate groups of rats (n=6 in each group) were administered AZT alone (50mg/kg b.w.), INH alone (25mg/kg, b.w.), AZT+INH (50mg/kg, b.w. and 25mg/kg, b.w.), SBN alone (100mg/kg, b.w.) and SBN+AZT+INH daily for sub-chronic period of 45days orally. The control rats received saline/propylene glycol. INH alone and AZT+INH-induced parenchymal cell injury and cholestasis of liver was evidenced by highly significant increase in the activities of marker enzymes (aspartate and alanine transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, argino succinic acid lyase), bilirubin, protein, oxidative stress parameters (lipid peroxidation, superoxide dismutase, catalase, reduced glutathione, vitamins C and E) and membrane bound ATPases were evaluated in serum/liver tissue homogenates. Histopathological studies show ballooning degradation, inflammatory lesions, lipid deposition and hydropic changes in the liver tissue. All the above biochemical and pathological changes induced by AZT+INH treatments were mitigated in rats receiving SBN simultaneously with these hepatotoxins, indicating its hepatoprotective and antioxidant potentials against AZT+INH-induced hepatotoxicity. The moderate hepatoprotective and oxidant potentials of SBN could be due to its low bioavailability and this deficiency could be prevented by supplementation of

  6. Zidovudine and isoniazid induced liver toxicity and oxidative stress: Evaluation of mitigating properties of silibinin.

    PubMed

    Raghu, Ramanathan; Karthikeyan, Sivanesan

    2016-09-01

    HIV/AIDS patients are more prone for opportunistic TB infections and they are administered the combined regimen of anti-retroviral drug zidovudine (AZT) and isoniazid (INH) for therapy. However, AZT+INH treatment has been documented to induce injury and remedial measures to prevent this adversity are not clearly defined. Silibinin (SBN) is a natural hepatoprotective principle isolated from medicinal plant Silybum marianum and is currently used for therapy of various liver diseases. This study investigate the hepatotoxic potentials of AZT alone, INH alone and AZT+INH treatments and the mitigating potentials of SBN against these drugs induced toxic insults of liver in rats. Separate groups of rats (n=6 in each group) were administered AZT alone (50mg/kg b.w.), INH alone (25mg/kg, b.w.), AZT+INH (50mg/kg, b.w. and 25mg/kg, b.w.), SBN alone (100mg/kg, b.w.) and SBN+AZT+INH daily for sub-chronic period of 45days orally. The control rats received saline/propylene glycol. INH alone and AZT+INH-induced parenchymal cell injury and cholestasis of liver was evidenced by highly significant increase in the activities of marker enzymes (aspartate and alanine transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, argino succinic acid lyase), bilirubin, protein, oxidative stress parameters (lipid peroxidation, superoxide dismutase, catalase, reduced glutathione, vitamins C and E) and membrane bound ATPases were evaluated in serum/liver tissue homogenates. Histopathological studies show ballooning degradation, inflammatory lesions, lipid deposition and hydropic changes in the liver tissue. All the above biochemical and pathological changes induced by AZT+INH treatments were mitigated in rats receiving SBN simultaneously with these hepatotoxins, indicating its hepatoprotective and antioxidant potentials against AZT+INH-induced hepatotoxicity. The moderate hepatoprotective and oxidant potentials of SBN could be due to its low bioavailability and this deficiency could be prevented by supplementation of

  7. Structural basis of HIV-1 resistance to AZT by excision.

    PubMed

    Tu, Xiongying; Das, Kalyan; Han, Qianwei; Bauman, Joseph D; Clark, Arthur D; Hou, Xiaorong; Frenkel, Yulia V; Gaffney, Barbara L; Jones, Roger A; Boyer, Paul L; Hughes, Stephen H; Sarafianos, Stefan G; Arnold, Eddy

    2010-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) develops resistance to 3'-azido-2',3'-deoxythymidine (AZT, zidovudine) by acquiring mutations in reverse transcriptase that enhance the ATP-mediated excision of AZT monophosphate from the 3' end of the primer. The excision reaction occurs at the dNTP-binding site, uses ATP as a pyrophosphate donor, unblocks the primer terminus and allows reverse transcriptase to continue viral DNA synthesis. The excision product is AZT adenosine dinucleoside tetraphosphate (AZTppppA). We determined five crystal structures: wild-type reverse transcriptase-double-stranded DNA (RT-dsDNA)-AZTppppA; AZT-resistant (AZTr; M41L D67N K70R T215Y K219Q) RT-dsDNA-AZTppppA; AZTr RT-dsDNA terminated with AZT at dNTP- and primer-binding sites; and AZTr apo reverse transcriptase. The AMP part of AZTppppA bound differently to wild-type and AZTr reverse transcriptases, whereas the AZT triphosphate part bound the two enzymes similarly. Thus, the resistance mutations create a high-affinity ATP-binding site. The structure of the site provides an opportunity to design inhibitors of AZT-monophosphate excision.

  8. Structural basis of HIV-1 resistance to AZT by excision

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, Xiongying; Das, Kalyan; Han, Qianwei; Bauman, Joseph D.; Clark, Jr., Arthur D.; Hou, Xiaorong; Frenkel, Yulia V.; Gaffney, Barbara L.; Jones, Roger A.; Boyer, Paul L.; Hughes, Stephen H.; Sarafianos, Stefan G.; Arnold, Eddy

    2011-11-23

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) develops resistance to 3'-azido-2',3'-deoxythymidine (AZT, zidovudine) by acquiring mutations in reverse transcriptase that enhance the ATP-mediated excision of AZT monophosphate from the 3' end of the primer. The excision reaction occurs at the dNTP-binding site, uses ATP as a pyrophosphate donor, unblocks the primer terminus and allows reverse transcriptase to continue viral DNA synthesis. The excision product is AZT adenosine dinucleoside tetraphosphate (AZTppppA). We determined five crystal structures: wild-type reverse transcriptase-double-stranded DNA (RT-dsDNA)-AZTppppA; AZT-resistant (AZTr; M41L D67N K70R T215Y K219Q) RT-dsDNA-AZTppppA; AZTr RT-dsDNA terminated with AZT at dNTP- and primer-binding sites; and AZTr apo reverse transcriptase. The AMP part of AZTppppA bound differently to wild-type and AZTr reverse transcriptases, whereas the AZT triphosphate part bound the two enzymes similarly. Thus, the resistance mutations create a high-affinity ATP-binding site. The structure of the site provides an opportunity to design inhibitors of AZT-monophosphate excision.

  9. Zidovudine disposition during hemodialysis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tartaglione, T A; Holeman, E; Opheim, K; Smith, T; Collier, A C

    1990-01-01

    Zidovudine (azidothymidine, AZT) disposition was examined during a hemodialysis session in an HIV-infected male with mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis. Serum concentrations of zidovudine and its glucuronidated inactive metabolite (G-ZDV) were measured by HPLC. Zidovudine pharmacokinetics were similar to previous reports in patients with normal renal function, however, G-ZDV concentrations were significantly elevated (23-440 times zidovudine concentration). Hemodialysis did not appreciably reduce zidovudine or G-ZDV levels. Significance of chronically elevated G-ZDV levels is unknown.

  10. Short course of AZT halves HIV-1 perinatal transmission.

    PubMed

    Morris, K

    1998-02-28

    The ACTG 076 trial assessed the ability of zidovudine (AZT) to prevent the transmission of HIV from mother to child. In that trial, women received 100 mg of AZT 5 times daily beginning from 14-34 gestational weeks, then intravenous AZT during labor. This approach, followed by the administration of AZT to infants for 6 weeks, led to an 8% mother-to-child HIV transmission rate compared to 23% with placebo. Drug therapy proven in the ACTG 076 trial has now become the basis for current practice in developed countries. Placebo-controlled clinical trials were later launched in selected developing countries to assess the effect upon vertical transmission of providing only a short course of AZT therapy to HIV-infected mothers. In Thailand, 397 HIV-infected pregnant women were randomized to take orally either placebo or 300 mg of AZT twice daily from 36 weeks of gestation, then 300 mg every 3 hours during labor. Infants did not receive AZT and the women did not breast-feed. Kaplan-Meier analysis found a perinatal HIV-1 transmission rate of 18.6% in the placebo group and 9.2% in the treatment group. Based upon these preliminary data, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), who collaborated with the Thai Ministry of Public Health in the study, announced on February 18 that all women in the CDC's Cote d'Ivoire collaboration will now receive active AZT treatment. Use of a placebo group in the Cote d'Ivoire study helped to identify the effect of the country's limited obstetric services upon neonatal mortality. UNAIDS is hosting an international meeting in March to find ways of rapidly and effectively implementing these and other data. In future perinatal trials, placebo arms should either be dropped or replaced with the CDC short-course regimen. PMID:9500334

  11. Zidovudine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Retrovir® I.V. Infusion ... care provider may tell you to stop your infusion if you have a mechanical problem (such as ... or catheter); if you have to stop an infusion, call your health care provider immediately so your ...

  12. Human inter-individual variability in metabolism and genotoxic response to zidovudine

    SciTech Connect

    Olivero, Ofelia A. Ming, Jessica M.; Das, Shreyasi; Vazquez, Irma L.; Richardson, Diana L.; Weston, Ainsley; Poirier, Miriam C.

    2008-04-15

    A mainstay of the antiretroviral drugs used for therapy of HIV-1, zidovudine (AZT) is genotoxic and becomes incorporated into DNA. Here we explored host inter-individual variability in AZT-DNA incorporation, by AZT radioimmunoassay (RIA), using 19 different strains of normal human mammary epithelial cells (NHMECs) exposed for 24 h to 200 {mu}M AZT. Twelve of the 19 NHMEC strains showed detectable AZT-DNA incorporation levels (16 to 259 molecules of AZT/10{sup 6} nucleotides), while 7 NHMEC strains did not show detectable AZT-DNA incorporation. In order to explore the basis for this variability, we compared the 2 NHMEC strains that showed the highest levels of AZT-DNA incorporation (H1 and H2) with 2 strains showing no detectable AZT-DNA incorporation (L1 and L2). All 4 strains had similar ({>=} 80%) cell survival, low levels of accumulation of cells in S-phase, and no relevant differences in response to the direct-acting mutagen bleomycin (BLM). Finally, when levels of thymidine kinase 1 (TK1), the first enzyme in the pathway for incorporation of AZT into DNA, were determined by Western blot analysis in all 19 NHMEC strains at 24 h of AZT exposure, higher TK1 protein levels were found in the 12 strains showing AZT-DNA incorporation, compared to the 7 showing no incorporation (p = 0.0005, Mann-Whitney test). Furthermore, strains L1 and L2, which did not show AZT-DNA incorporation at 24 h, did have measurable incorporation by 48 and 72 h. These data suggest that variability in AZT-DNA incorporation may be modulated by inter-individual differences in the rate of induction of TK1 in response to AZT exposure.

  13. Mitochondrial myopathy caused by long-term zidovudine therapy.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, M C; Illa, I; Pezeshkpour, G H; Laukaitis, J P; Cohen, B; Griffin, J L

    1990-04-19

    Both infection with the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) and zidovudine (formerly called azidothymidine [AZT]) cause myopathy. To identify criteria for distinguishing zidovudine-induced myopathy from that caused by primary HIV infection, we reviewed the histochemical, immunocytochemical, and electron-microscopical features of muscle-biopsy specimens from 20 HIV-positive patients with myopathy (15 of whom had been treated with zidovudine) and compared the findings with the patients' clinical course and response to various therapies. Among the zidovudine-treated patients, the myopathy responded to prednisone in four, to the discontinuation of zidovudine in eight, and to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in two. Numerous "ragged-red" fibers, indicative of abnormal mitochondria with paracrystalline inclusions, were found in the biopsy specimens from the zidovudine-treated patients but not in those from the other patients. The number of these fibers appeared to correlate with the severity of the myopathy. All the patients, regardless of whether they had been treated with zidovudine, had inflammatory myopathy characterized by degenerating fibers, cytoplasmic bodies, and endomysial infiltrates consisting of CD8+ cells (mean +/- SD, 60.7 +/- 6.4 percent) and macrophages (39.2 +/- 6.4 percent) associated with Class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC-I) antigens (HLA-A, -B, and -C antigens) in the muscle fibers. The numbers and percentages of CD8+ cells and macrophages were similar in both the zidovudine-treated and the untreated HIV-positive patients. Specimens obtained on repeat muscle biopsy from two patients in whom the myopathy responded to the discontinuation of zidovudine showed remarkable histologic improvement. We conclude that long-term therapy with zidovudine can cause a toxic mitochondrial myopathy, which coexists with a T-cell-mediated inflammatory myopathy that is restricted to MHC-I antigen, and is indistinguishable from the myopathy

  14. Nasal chitosan microparticles target a zidovudine prodrug to brain HIV sanctuaries.

    PubMed

    Dalpiaz, Alessandro; Fogagnolo, Marco; Ferraro, Luca; Capuzzo, Antonio; Pavan, Barbara; Rassu, Giovanna; Salis, Andrea; Giunchedi, Paolo; Gavini, Elisabetta

    2015-11-01

    Zidovudine (AZT) is an antiretroviral drug that is a substrate of active efflux transporters (AETs) that extrude the drug from the central nervous system (CNS) and macrophages, which are considered to be sanctuaries of HIV. The conjugation of AZT to ursodeoxycholic acid is known to produce a prodrug (UDCA-AZT) that is able to elude the AET systems, indicating the potential ability of this prodrug to act as a carrier of AZT in the CNS and in macrophages. Here, we demonstrate that UDCA-AZT is able to permeate and remain in murine macrophages with an efficiency twenty times higher than that of AZT. Moreover, we propose the nasal administration of this prodrug in order to induce its uptake into the CNS. Chitosan chloride-based microparticles (CP) were prepared by spray-drying and were characterized with respect to size, morphology, density, water uptake and the dissolution profile of UDCA-AZT. The CP sample was then nasally administered to rats. All in vitro and in vivo measurements were also performed for a CP parent physical mixture. The CP sample was able to increase the dissolution rate of UDCA-AZT and to reduce water uptake with respect to its parent physical mixture, inducing better uptake of UDCA-AZT into the cerebrospinal fluid of rats, where the prodrug can act as an AZT carrier in macrophages. PMID:26427553

  15. Cycle arrest and aneuploidy induced by zidovudine in murine embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Campos, P B; Sartore, R C; Ramalho, B L; Costa, E S; Rehen, S K

    2012-07-01

    Zidovudine (3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine; AZT) is a nucleoside analogue widely used for the treatment of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Medical guidelines recommend the use of AZT by pregnant women in order to reduce risk of HIV vertical transmission. Although it is efficacious, little is known about the side effects of AZT on embryonic development. In this sense, we used murine embryonic stem (mES) cells as a model to investigate the consequences of AZT exposure for embryogenesis. Firstly, mES colonies were incubated with AZT (50 or 100 μM) and cell cycle profile was evaluated. While 27.7 ± 5.43% of untreated mES cells were in G2/M phase, this percentage raised to 45.96 ± 4.18% after AZT exposure (100 μM). To identify whether accumulation of cells in G2/M phase could be related to chromosome missegregation with consequent cell cycle arrest, aneuploidy rate was evaluated after AZT treatment. Untreated colonies presented 39.6 ± 8.4% of cells aneuploid, while after AZT 100 μM treatment, the proportion of aneuploid cells raised to 67.8 ± 3.4% with prevalence of chromosome loss. This event was accompanied by micronuclei formation as AZT 100 μM treated mES cells presented a 2-fold increase compared to untreated ones. These data suggest that AZT exerts genotoxic effects and increases chromosome instability at early stages of embryonic development.

  16. AZT, rodent somatic and germ cell mutagenicity and reproductive toxicity tests

    SciTech Connect

    Shelby, M.D.; Russell, L.B.; Generoso, W.

    1995-11-01

    AZT (3`-axido-3`-deoxythymidine, Zidovudine) is the most widely used therapeutic agent in the treatment of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Use of AZT has not been limited to HIV-seropositive individuals or to those with symptoms of AIDS. It has also been used as a chemoprophylactic agent in people accidentally exposed to HIV-contaminated body fluids, and to HIV-seropositive pregnant women to prevent infection of the fetus. Because of these latter uses, it is particularly important to determine whether long-term health effects might be associated with AZT exposure. Tests have been conducted to determine the in vivo genetic toxicity of AZT in mice. Dominant-lethal and morphological-specific-locus tests were conducted in males using 2 daily initraperitoneal injections of 750 mg/kg. The dominant-lethal test was negative for all germ cell stages from differentiating spermatogonia to mature sperm. Likewise, no evidence of the induction of specific locus mutations was observed in either spermatogonial stem cells or poststem-cell stages. Further, tests for effects on male and female reproduction and in utero development indicate a lack of effects. These results, along with preliminary clinical reports that birth outcomes are normal in newborns exposed to AZT in utero, are encouraging with regard to the risks to offspring of parents exposed to AZT, either prior to or during pregnancy. However, positive results in mouse bone marrow micronucleus tests and one report on the induction of chromosomal aberrations in the lymphocytes of AIDS patients on AZT therapy indicate that further studies are needed on the potential of AZT to adversely affect the long-term health of exposed individuals.

  17. Zidovudine-induced mitochondrial myopathy is associated with muscle carnitine deficiency and lipid storage.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, M C; Leon-Monzon, M E; Bernardini, I; Gahl, W A; Jay, C A

    1994-04-01

    The use of zidovudine (AZT) for the treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) induces a DNA-depleting mitochondrial myopathy, which is histologically characterized by the presence of muscle fibers with "ragged-red"-like features, red-rimmed or empty cracks, granular degeneration, and rods (AZT fibers). Because dysfunctioning muscle mitochondria may lead to defects of beta-oxidation of fatty acids, we examined the degree of neutral fat accumulation and muscle carnitine levels in the muscle biopsy specimens from 21 patients with AZT-induced myopathic symptoms of varying severity. Six patients with no AZT fibers had normal endomyofibrillar lipid deposits and muscle carnitine levels; 7 patients with fewer than 5 AZT fibers per field had a mild (+) to moderate (++) increase in lipid droplets, and reduced muscle carnitine levels (3 patients); and 8 patients with more than 5 AZT fibers had severe muscle changes, a ++ to marked ( ) increase in lipid droplets, and reduced muscle carnitine levels (6 patients). Serial sections showed lipid globules often within "cracks" or vacuoles of the abnormal muscle fibers. We conclude that the muscle mitochondrial impairment caused by AZT results in (1) accumulation of lipid within the muscle fibers owing to poor utilization of long-chain fatty acids, (2) reduction of muscle carnitine levels probably due to decreased carnitine uptake by the muscle, and (3) depletion of energy stores within the muscle fibers. The findings may have potential therapeutic implications in the treatment of AZT-induced myopathic symptoms using oral carnitine supplementation.

  18. Prolonged perinatal AZT administration and early maternal separation: effects on social and emotional behaviour of periadolescent mice.

    PubMed

    Venerosi, Aldina; Cirulli, Francesca; Capone, Francesca; Alleva, Enrico

    2003-02-01

    Zidovudine (AZT) is an effective treatment in preventing perinatal transmission of HIV-1; however, a continuous re-evaluation of the risk-benefit ratio of human exposure to this drug is suggested by both clinical and animal studies. The objective of this study was to assess the medium and long-term effects of pre-postnatal AZT treatment on mouse social and emotional behaviour and the possible interactions between AZT exposure and disruptions in the mother-infant relationship. Pregnant CD-1 mice were administered per os with AZT (160 mg/kg) from pregnancy day 10, throughout delivery, to lactation day 10. In half of the litters, the offspring was separated from the mother for 3 h from postnatal days 2 (PND2) to PND14. On PND35, a 30-min social interaction test was performed and corticosterone levels were measured at the end of the session. On PND80, long-term effects of AZT on emotionality were assess by means of an elevated plus-maze. Results indicate that, on PND35, previous AZT exposure affected social behaviour of the experimental subjects, reducing aggressive interactions in males, while decreasing investigative behaviours in females. At adulthood, AZT inhibited exploratory behaviour in the plus-maze while increasing the frequency of risk-assessment postures in male mice. As for maternal deprivation, this early manipulation exerted a pro-aggressive effect in adolescent male mice, deprived subjects being overall characterised by higher activity levels and a deficit in habituation, an effect also observed in the plus-maze. A significant interaction between AZT and maternal deprivation was found for affiliative behaviours. As for corticosterone levels, no AZT effect was found, while maternal deprivation tended to reduce elevations of this hormone in response to stressful stimuli. Overall results from this study indicate that both AZT exposure and maternal deprivation induced gender-dependent changes in social and emotional behaviour both during adolescence and at

  19. Improved Safety, Bioavailability and Pharmacokinetics of Zidovudine through Lactoferrin Nanoparticles during Oral Administration in Rats

    PubMed Central

    C., Bhaskar; Golla, Kishore; Kondapi, Anand K.

    2015-01-01

    Zidovudine (AZT) is one of the most referred antiretroviral drug. In spite of its higher bioavailability (50–75%) the most important reason of its cessation are bone marrow suppression, anemia, neutropenia and various organs related toxicities. This study aims at the improvement of oral delivery of AZT through its encapsulation in lactoferrin nanoparticles (AZT-lactonano). The nanoparticles (NPs) are of 50–60 nm in size and exhibit 67% encapsulation of the AZT. They are stable in simulated gastric and intestinal fluids. Anti-HIV-1 activity of AZT remains unaltered in nanoformulation in acute infection. The bioavailability and tissue distribution of AZT is higher in blood followed by liver and kidney. AZT-lactonano causes the improvement of pharmacokinetic profile as compared to soluble AZT; a more than 4 fold increase in AUC and AUMC in male and female rats. The serum Cmax for AZT-lactonano was increased by 30%. Similarly there was nearly 2-fold increase in Tmax and t1/2. Our in vitro study confirms that, the endosomal pH is ideal for drug release from NPs and shows constant release from up to 96h. Bone marrow micronucleus assay show that nanoformulation exhibits approximately 2fold lower toxicity than soluble form. Histopathological and biochemical analysis further confirms that less or no significant organ toxicities when nanoparticles were used. AZT-lactonano has shown its higher efficacy, low organs related toxicities, improved pharmacokinetics parameter while keeping the antiviral activity intact. Thus, the nanoformulation are safe for the target specific drug delivery. PMID:26461917

  20. Radiosensitization effect of zidovudine on human malignant glioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Fuxiang; Liao Zhengkai; Dai Jing; Xiong Jie; Xie CongHua; Luo Zhiguo; Liu Shiquan; Zhou Yunfeng . E-mail: yfzhouwhu@163.com

    2007-03-09

    Telomeres are shortened with each cell division and play an important role in maintaining chromosomal integrity and function. Telomerase, responsible for telomere synthesis, is activated in 90% of human tumor cells but seldom in normal somatic cells. Zidovudine (AZT) is a reverse transcriptase inhibitor. In this study, we have investigated the effects of {gamma}-radiation in combination with AZT on telomerase activity (TA), telomere length, DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs), DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), and the changes in radiosensitivity of human malignant glioma cell line U251. The results showed that the TA was suppressed by AZT but enhanced by irradiation, resulting in a deceleration of restored rate of shortened telomere, decreased repair rate of DNA strand breaks, and increased radiosensitivity of U251 cells. Our results suggested that telomerase activity and telomere length may serve as markers for estimating the efficacy of cancer radiotherapy and reverse transcriptase inhibitors, such as AZT, may be used clinically as a new radiosensitizer in cancer radiotherapy.

  1. Brain uptake of a Zidovudine prodrug after nasal administration of solid lipid microparticles.

    PubMed

    Dalpiaz, Alessandro; Ferraro, Luca; Perrone, Daniela; Leo, Eliana; Iannuccelli, Valentina; Pavan, Barbara; Paganetto, Guglielmo; Beggiato, Sarah; Scalia, Santo

    2014-05-01

    Our previous results demonstrated that a prodrug obtained by the conjugation of the antiretroviral drug zidovudine (AZT) with ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) represents a potential carrier for AZT in the central nervous system, thus possibly increasing AZT efficiency as an anti-HIV drug. Based on these results and in order to enhance AZT brain targeting, the present study focuses on solid lipid microparticles (SLMs) as a carrier system for the nasal administration of UDCA-AZT prodrug. SLMs were produced by the hot emulsion technique, using tristearin and stearic acid as lipidic carriers, whose mean diameters were 16 and 7 μm, respectively. SLMs were of spherical shape, and their prodrug loading was 0.57 ± 0.03% (w/w, tristearin based) and 1.84 ± 0.02% (w/w, stearic acid based). The tristearin SLMs were able to control the prodrug release, whereas the stearic acid SLMs induced a significant increase of the dissolution rate of the free prodrug. The free prodrug was rapidly hydrolyzed in rat liver homogenates with a half-life of 2.7 ± 0.14 min (process completed within 30 min). The tristearin SLMs markedly enhanced the stability of the prodrug (75% of the prodrug still present after 30 min), whereas the stabilization effect of the stearic acid SLMs was lower (14% of the prodrug still present after 30 min). No AZT and UDCA-AZT were detected in the rat cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) after an intravenous prodrug administration (200 μg). Conversely, the nasal administration of stearic acid based SLMs induced the uptake of the prodrug in the CSF, demonstrating the existence of a direct nose-CNS pathway. In the presence of chitosan, the CSF prodrug uptake increased six times, up to 1.5 μg/mL within 150 min after nasal administration. The loaded SLMs appear therefore as a promising nasal formulation for selective zidovudine brain uptake. PMID:24717116

  2. Ultrastructural characteristics and DNA immunocytochemistry in human immunodeficiency virus and zidovudine-associated myopathies.

    PubMed

    Pezeshkpour, G; Illa, I; Dalakas, M C

    1991-12-01

    Electron microscopic features of muscle biopsies from 13 human immunodeficiency (HIV)-positive patients who had myopathy while receiving zidovudine (AZT) were compared with biopsies from five patients with HIV-induced myopathy who were not treated with AZT. All specimens showed disorganization of the myofibrillar structures, along with a varying degree of nemaline (rod) bodies, vacuolization, inflammation, and endothelial tubuloreticular profiles. One untreated and all AZT-treated patients had cytoplasmic bodies, which in the latter were abundant, large, and irregular. Two untreated patients had a peculiar osmiophilic destruction of the muscle fibers, with numerous tubuloreticular profiles in the endothelial cells and brisk inflammation that included lymphoplasmatoid cells. The AZT-treated group had ubiquitous abnormal mitochondria that complemented the presence of ragged red fibers seen by light microscopy. There was subsarcolemmal proliferation of mitochondria, with marked variation in size and shape and proliferation or disorganization of their cristae. Paracrystalline inclusions were seen in one patient. Blind re-examination of the electron micrographs showed abnormal mitochondria that readily distinguished patients with AZT-associated myopathy from those with untreated HIV-induced myopathy. Immunocytochemistry using antibodies to single- and double-stranded DNA revealed severe reduction of mitochondrial DNA compared with the normal nuclear DNA. Although the myopathies associated with HIV and AZT share common myopathologic features, the mitochondrial abnormalities are unique to the AZT-treated patients. Since mitochondrial DNA is specifically reduced, the structural changes noted on electron microscopy are probably associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. Zidovudine, a DNA chain terminator that inhibits the mitochondrial gamma-DNA polymerase, is toxic to muscle mitochondria.

  3. Molecular geometry, vibrational spectra, atomic charges, frontier molecular orbital and Fukui function analysis of antiviral drug zidovudine.

    PubMed

    Ramkumaar, G R; Srinivasan, S; Bhoopathy, T J; Gunasekaran, S

    2012-12-01

    The solid phase FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of zidovudine (AZT) were recorded in the regions 4000-400 and 3500-100 cm(-1), respectively. The optimized geometry, frequency and intensity of the vibrational bands of zidovudine were obtained by the Restricted Hartree-Fock (RHF) density functional theory (DFT) with complete relaxation in the potential energy surface using 6-31G(d,p) basis set. The harmonic vibrational frequencies for zidovudine were calculated and the scaled values have been compared with experimental values of FTIR and FT-Raman spectra. The observed and the calculated frequencies are found to be in good agreement. The harmonic vibrational wave numbers and intensities of vibrational bands of zidovudine with its cation and anion were calculated and compared with the neutral AZT. The DFT calculated HOMO and LUMO energies shows that charge transfer occurs within the molecule. The electron density-based local reactivity descriptors such as Fukui functions were calculated to explain the chemical selectivity or reactivity site in AZT.

  4. Molecular geometry, vibrational spectra, atomic charges, frontier molecular orbital and Fukui function analysis of antiviral drug zidovudine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramkumaar, G. R.; Srinivasan, S.; Bhoopathy, T. J.; Gunasekaran, S.

    2012-12-01

    The solid phase FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of zidovudine (AZT) were recorded in the regions 4000-400 and 3500-100 cm-1, respectively. The optimized geometry, frequency and intensity of the vibrational bands of zidovudine were obtained by the Restricted Hartree-Fock (RHF) density functional theory (DFT) with complete relaxation in the potential energy surface using 6-31G(d,p) basis set. The harmonic vibrational frequencies for zidovudine were calculated and the scaled values have been compared with experimental values of FTIR and FT-Raman spectra. The observed and the calculated frequencies are found to be in good agreement. The harmonic vibrational wave numbers and intensities of vibrational bands of zidovudine with its cation and anion were calculated and compared with the neutral AZT. The DFT calculated HOMO and LUMO energies shows that charge transfer occurs within the molecule. The electron density-based local reactivity descriptors such as Fukui functions were calculated to explain the chemical selectivity or reactivity site in AZT.

  5. Perceived compliance with AZT dosing among a sample of African-American drug users.

    PubMed

    Williams, M; Bowen, A; Ross, M; Freeman, R; Elwood, W

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this report was to present findings from a pilot study conducted to explore the associations between sociodemographic, drug use, and health belief factors and perceived compliance with zidovudine (AZT) among African-American drug users. Data were collected in Washington, DC, USA from individuals who were African-American; were recent or current drug injectors or crack smokers; were HIV-seropositive, and were receiving treatment for HIV infection. Participants were recruited through local organizations that provide services to HIV-infected persons. Participants were interviewed using a questionnaire that solicited sociodemographic, lifetime and current drug use, current sexual behaviours, health status, HIV and drug treatment history, and health belief data. Analyses were limited to individuals currently using an illicit substance and who had received AZT during their medical treatment. Parametric (Pearson's r) and nonparametric (Spearman's rho) statistics were used to assess correlations between perceived compliance with AZT dosing and independent variables. As the study was intended to be both descriptive and exploratory, the level of statistical significance was set at 0.10, rather than the customary 0.05. Antiretroviral medications recognized and recalled by participants are presented. The most commonly recalled medication was AZT. Slightly less than one-third of participants reported being completely compliant with an AZT regimen. Perceived compliance was found to be negatively associated with 5 variables: age, homelessness, number of injections in the previous 30 days, trading sex for drugs, and the perception that AIDS is no longer a serious disease since the development of new antiretroviral medications. Intensity of feelings of joy, fear, and the belief that taking more anti-HIV medications would result in better health were found to be positively correlated. Bivariate associations between perceived compliance and sociodemographic, drug use

  6. Antiretroviral Drugs Used in the Treatment of HIV Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... 6 months Retrovir zidovudine, azidothymidine, AZT, ZDV 19-Mar-87 3.5 months Trizivir abacavir, zidovudine, and ... months Viramune XR (Extended Release) nevirapine, NVP 25-Mar-11 9.9 months Protease Inhibitors (PIs) Brand ...

  7. Delavirdine in Combination with Zidovudine in Treatment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Infected Patients: Evaluation of Efficacy and Emergence of Viral Resistance in a Randomized, Comparative Phase III Trial

    PubMed Central

    Joly, Véronique; Moroni, Mauro; Concia, Ercole; Lazzarin, Adriano; Hirschel, Bernard; Jost, Josef; Chiodo, Francesco; Bentwich, Zvi; Love, W. Campbell; Hawkins, David A.; Wilkins, Edmund G. L.; Gatell, Aritigas J.; Vetter, Norbert; Greenwald, Cynthia; Freimuth, William W.; de Cian, Wanda

    2000-01-01

    We compared the activity of delavirdine (DLV) plus zidovudine (AZT) (n = 300) with that of AZT (n = 297) against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. DLV exerted a transient antiviral effect, and mutations for resistance to DLV were found in more than 90% of subjects at week 12. The K103N mutation, which confers nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor cross-resistance, was found in 85% of the patients. PMID:11036040

  8. Parameterization of AZT-A widely used nucleoside inhibitor of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Alexandra T. P.; Fernandes, Pedro A.; Ramos, Maria J.

    Seven nucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors are currently used in the clinical treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). These substrate analogues block DNA synthesis by the viral enzyme RT. However, the emergence of resistant variants of RT allied to their long-term toxicity requires the design of new and better RT inhibitors, with long-term in vivo efficacy. In this work we used density functional theory (DFT) calculations to develop a set of molecular mechanics (MM) parameters committed to the AMBER force field for one of the most used in the clinic nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs): zidovudine (AZT). These parameters were tested by comparing the optimized geometries of AZT at both the DFT and MM levels of theory. The ability of the new parameters to reproduce the torsional energy of the azide group was also verified by scanning the surface in MM with the new parameters and comparing the results with the same potential energy surface (PES) at the DFT level. Finally, the parameters were validated through classical MD simulations of AZT in aqueous environment.

  9. XPC is essential for nucleotide excision repair of zidovudine-induced DNA damage in human hepatoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Qiangen; Beland, Frederick A.; Chang, Ching-Wei; Fang Jialong

    2011-03-01

    Zidovudine (3'-azido-3'-dexoythymidine, AZT), a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, can be incorporated into DNA and cause DNA damage. The mechanisms underlying the repair of AZT-induced DNA damage are unknown. To investigate the pathways involved in the recognition and repair of AZT-induced DNA damage, human hepatoma HepG2 cells were incubated with AZT for 2 weeks and the expression of DNA damage signaling pathways was determined using a pathway-based real-time PCR array. Compared to control cultures, damaged DNA binding and nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathways showed significantly increased gene expression. Further analysis indicated that AZT treatment increased the expression of genes associated with NER, including XPC, XPA, RPA1, GTF2H1, and ERCC1. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the protein levels of XPC and GTF2H1 were also significantly up-regulated. To explore further the function of XPC in the repair of AZT-induced DNA damage, XPC expression was stably knocked down by 71% using short hairpin RNA interference. In the XPC knocked-down cells, 100 {mu}M AZT treatment significantly increased [{sup 3}H]AZT incorporation into DNA, decreased the total number of viable cells, increased the release of lactate dehydrogenase, induced apoptosis, and caused a more extensive G2/M cell cycle arrest when compared to non-transfected HepG2 cells or HepG2 cells transfected with a scrambled short hairpin RNA sequence. Overall, these data indicate that XPC plays an essential role in the NER repair of AZT-induced DNA damage.

  10. Mucoadhesive Nanostructured Polyelectrolyte Complexes as Potential Carrier to Improve Zidovudine Permeability.

    PubMed

    Pedreiro, Liliane Neves; Stringhetti, Beatriz; Cury, Ferreira; Gremião, Maria Palmira Daflon

    2016-02-01

    Mucoadhesive drug delivery systems have been widely investigated as a strategic to allow the raising of intestinal residence time of drugs and the intimate contact with the intestinal mucosa, both factors that increase the local concentration gradient. Zidovudine (AZT) mucoadhesive nanostructured polyelectrolyte complexes were obtained by chitosan (CS)-hypromellose phthalate (HP) interactions in order to favor the permeability through biological membranes and the AZT absorption. Particle size and morphology analyses showed the obtaining of nanoparticulate delivery systems, with AZT loaded about of 65%. The characterization by DSC, X-ray diffraction and FTIR showed a new crystalline structure formed in which the drug remained molecularly dispersed, without changing this structure. The reduced release rates in the simulated gastric medium and the control of release rates in simulated intestinal medium of AZT were demonstrated by in vitro release studies. The nanoparticles liquid uptake ability associated to the mucoadhesiveness by electronic interaction between the particles and mucus revealed that the drug delivery system developed in this work is a promising approach to improve the permeation of this drug throughout the intestinal mucosa. PMID:27433574

  11. Fourier transform infrared spectra and normal mode analysis of drug molecules: Zidovudine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Nivedita; Prabhakar, Santosh; Singh, R. A.

    2013-03-01

    The FTIR spectra of zidovudine molecule have been recorded in the range 4000-400 cm-1. The title compound is used as a drug against AIDS or HIV. The molecular structure, fundamental vibrational frequencies and intensities of vibrational bands are evaluated using density functional theory (DFT) using BLYP, B3LYP, B3PW91 and MPW1PW91 methods with 6-31+G(d,p) standard basis set. Comparison of simulated spectra with the experimental spectrum provides important informations and the ability of the computational method to describe the vibrational modes. These calculations have allowed finding most stable conformational structure of AZT. Calculated results of the title compound indicate that the drug molecule has syn orientation. The glycosidic bond in AZT and a minimum-energy structure in which the glycosy torsion angle χ and torsion angle γ values are consistent with those in the conformation of AZT in the AZT5-triphosphate bound to HIV RT is determined.

  12. Neurotoxic effects of AZT on developing and adult neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Meryem; Laywell, Eric D.

    2015-01-01

    Azidothymidine (AZT) is a synthetic, chain-terminating nucleoside analog used to treat HIV-1 infection. While AZT is not actively transported across the blood brain barrier, it does accumulate at high levels in cerebrospinal fluid, and subsequently diffuses into the overlying parenchyma. Due to the close anatomical proximity of the neurogenic niches to the ventricular system, we hypothesize that diffusion from CSF exposes neural stem/progenitor cells and their progeny to biologically relevant levels of AZT sufficient to perturb normal cell functions. We employed in vitro and in vivo models of mouse neurogenesis in order to assess the effects of AZT on developing and adult neurogenesis. Using in vitro assays we show that AZT reduces the population expansion potential of neural stem/progenitor cells by inducing senescence. Additionally, in a model of in vitro neurogenesis AZT severely attenuates neuroblast production. These effects are mirrored in vivo by clinically-relevant animal models. We show that in utero AZT exposure perturbs both population expansion and neurogenesis among neural stem/progenitor cells. Additionally, a short-term AZT regimen in adult mice suppresses subependymal zone neurogenesis. These data reveal novel negative effects of AZT on neural stem cell biology. Given that the sequelae of HIV infection often include neurologic deficits—subsumed under AIDS Dementia Complex (Brew, 1999)—it is important to determine to what extent AZT negatively affects neurological function in ways that contribute to, or exacerbate, ADC in order to avoid attributing iatrogenic drug effects to the underlying disease process, and thereby skewing the risk/benefit analysis of AZT therapy. PMID:25852464

  13. Neurotoxic effects of AZT on developing and adult neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Demir, Meryem; Laywell, Eric D

    2015-01-01

    Azidothymidine (AZT) is a synthetic, chain-terminating nucleoside analog used to treat HIV-1 infection. While AZT is not actively transported across the blood brain barrier, it does accumulate at high levels in cerebrospinal fluid, and subsequently diffuses into the overlying parenchyma. Due to the close anatomical proximity of the neurogenic niches to the ventricular system, we hypothesize that diffusion from CSF exposes neural stem/progenitor cells and their progeny to biologically relevant levels of AZT sufficient to perturb normal cell functions. We employed in vitro and in vivo models of mouse neurogenesis in order to assess the effects of AZT on developing and adult neurogenesis. Using in vitro assays we show that AZT reduces the population expansion potential of neural stem/progenitor cells by inducing senescence. Additionally, in a model of in vitro neurogenesis AZT severely attenuates neuroblast production. These effects are mirrored in vivo by clinically-relevant animal models. We show that in utero AZT exposure perturbs both population expansion and neurogenesis among neural stem/progenitor cells. Additionally, a short-term AZT regimen in adult mice suppresses subependymal zone neurogenesis. These data reveal novel negative effects of AZT on neural stem cell biology. Given that the sequelae of HIV infection often include neurologic deficits-subsumed under AIDS Dementia Complex (Brew, 1999)-it is important to determine to what extent AZT negatively affects neurological function in ways that contribute to, or exacerbate, ADC in order to avoid attributing iatrogenic drug effects to the underlying disease process, and thereby skewing the risk/benefit analysis of AZT therapy. PMID:25852464

  14. Evaluation of Microemulsion and Lamellar Liquid Crystalline Systems for Transdermal Zidovudine Delivery.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, André Luis Menezes; Silva, José Alexsandro da; Lira, Ana Amélia Moreira; Conceição, Tamara Matos Freire; Nunes, Rogéria de Souza; de Albuquerque Junior, Ricardo Luiz Cavalcanti; Sarmento, Victor Hugo Vitorino; Leal, Leila Bastos; de Santana, Davi Pereira

    2016-07-01

    This study proposed to investigate and to compare colloidal carrier systems containing Zidovudine (3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine) (AZT) for transdermal administration and optimization of antiretroviral therapy. Microemulsion (ME) and lamellar phase (LP) liquid crystal were obtained and selected from pseudoternary diagrams previously developed. Small-angle X-ray scattering and rheology analysis confirmed the presence of typical ME and liquid crystalline structures with lamellar arrangement, respectively. Both colloidal carrier systems, ME, and LP remained stable, homogeneous, and isotropic after AZT addition. In vitro permeation study (using pig ear skin) showed that the amount of permeated drug was higher for ME compared to the control and LP, obtaining a permeation enhancing effect on the order of approximately 2-fold (p < 0.05). Microscopic examination after in vivo skin irritation studies using mice suggested few histological changes in the skin of animals treated with the ME compared to the control group (hydrogel). Thus, ME proved to be adequate and have promising effects, being able to promote the drug permeation without causing apparent skin irritation. On the order hand, LP functioned as a drug reservoir reducing AZT partitioning into the skin. PMID:27220471

  15. Metabolism and pharmacokinetics of the combination Zidovudine plus Lamivudine in the adult Erythrocebus patas monkey determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Divi, Rao L.; Doerge, Daniel R.; Twaddle, Nathan C.; Shockley, Marie E.; St Claire, Marisa C.; Harbaugh, Jeffrey W.; Harbaugh, Steven W.; Poirier, Miriam C.

    2008-01-15

    Because of their similarity to humans, non-human primates constitute useful preclinical models in which to examine potential human drug toxicities. Antiretroviral nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) toxicity is currently under investigation in Erythrocebus patas monkeys, and whereas NRTI pharmacokinetics have been studied in other monkey species, pharmacokinetics for Zidovudine plus Lamivudine (AZT/3TC) dosing have not been reported in the patas. Here we present 24 h serum pharmacokinetic parameters after a single oral exposure to the combination of AZT (40 mg) and 3TC (24 mg), doses equivalent to a human daily dose of Combivir (registered) . The patas (n = 3) AZT/3TC pharmacokinetic profiles were similar to those seen in other primate species. Average maximum serum concentrations (C{sub max}) for AZT and 3TC were 2.35 and 2.65 {mu}g/ml, respectively, and were observed at 0.83 h (T{sub max}). C{sub max} was 13.34 {mu}g/ml for the AZT-glucuronide (AZT-G) and was 0.023 {mu}g/ml for the potentially toxic minor metabolite 3'-amino-3'-deoxythymidine (AMT), both occurring at about 1 h after dosing. Similar elimination half-times, 0.70 and 0.68 h{sup -1}, were found for AZT and AZT-G, respectively, while 3TC was eliminated about half as fast (0.33 h{sup -1}) resulting in AUC{sub (0-{infinity})} values of 6.97 {mu}g/ml h for 3TC, 2.99 {mu}g/ml h for AZT, 20.5 {mu}g/ml h for AZT-G and 0.002 for AMT 6.97 {mu}g/ml h. This study shows similar metabolism and pharmacokinetics for oral administration of AZT/3TC in the adult patas monkey, other primate species and humans. The data validate the use of the patas monkey for studies of NRTI toxicity.

  16. [Rapid development of anemia in a HIV-positive patient with alpha-thalassemia after zidovudine therapy].

    PubMed

    Altinbaş, Akif; Ozkaya, Gülşen; Büyükaşik, Yahya; Unal, Serhat

    2007-07-01

    Anemia, which may develop due to direct effect of the virus or indirect effect of zidovudine a widely used antiviral agent for the treatment, is not an uncommon complication in human immundeficiency virus (HIV) infections. In this report, a 26 years old male HIV positive patient who developed rapid anemia in the HAART (Highly active anti-retroviral therapy) protocol including zidovudine, was presented. The patient has been followed since May 2003 without anti-retroviral therapy. He was diagnosed as alpha-thalassemia trait, because of the low mean red blood cell volume (MCV), high red blood cell count and living in an Mediterranian country. However, no treatment for thalassemia had been given in this period, since the other laboratory findings [hemoglobin, hematocrit, red cell distribution width index (RDWI), iron and iron binding capacity, transferrin saturation and ferritin levels] were normal. During the follow-up of patient, HAART protocol with zidovudine, lamivudine and indinavir, was started depending on the findings of low CD4+ T-cell count (443/mm3) and high HIV serum load (1,330,000 copies/ml). In the second month of the therapy the hemoglobin level decreased to 12.9 gr/dL, and then to 9.9 gr/dL in the fourth month, while it was 14.5 gr/dL before anti-retroviral therapy. Although the patient had no hemolysis findings, and his serum folic acid level was normal, folbiol treatment was initiated with the possibility of the presence of folic acid deficiency at cellular level. Anemia resolved with folic acid replacement without discontinuation of zidovudine or a reduction in dosage. It was thought that the presence of alpha-thalassemia co-morbidity has facilitated the development of anti-retroviral-induced anemia in this patient. As a result, it is concluded that thalassemia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of anemia in HIV positive patients, especially for the ones from Mediterranian countries.

  17. Lack of interaction between zidovudine and 4-methyl-amino-antipyrine, the active metabolite of metamizole, in human liver in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bacracheva, N; Kamali, F

    1995-06-01

    Zidovudine (AZT) is eliminated by extensive metabolism to an ether glucuronide (GAZT). The nonnarcotic analgesic metamizole (dipyrone) is a typical polydrug, the active metabolite being 4-methyl-amino-antipyrine (4-MAA). About 20% of 4-MAA is excreted in the form of glucuronide in the urine. The aim of this study was to investigate whether 4-MAA inhibits the glucuronidation of AZT, by comparing the GAZT formed in the presence and absence of 4-MAA in the microsomal fractions. Microsomal fractions were obtained from 6 human livers. AZT and 4-MAA were added in concentrations of 1 mmole, corresponding to the therapeutically relevant plasma concentrations of both drugs. Incubation time was 20 min. Concentrations of GAZT were measured using reverse-phase HPLC (high performance liquid chromatography). The mean value of GAZT formed in the microsomal samples without the addition of 4-MAA was 1.87 +/- 0.74 pmole/mg protein. In the presence of 4-MAA, the concentrations averaged 1.77 +/- 0.77 pmole/mg protein, and did not differ significantly from those measured without 4-MAA. In conclusion, the glucuronidation of AZT is not inhibited by 4-MAA, the main active metabolite of metamizole. From the in vitro findings it is predicted that concomitant metamizole administration may fail to enhance by metabolic interference the AZT concentrations under therapy.

  18. Pharmacokinetics and safety of oral levofloxacin in human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals receiving concomitant zidovudine.

    PubMed Central

    Chien, S C; Chow, A T; Rogge, M C; Williams, R R; Hendrix, C W

    1997-01-01

    This phase I, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel-design study was conducted to evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetics of levofloxacin in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected subjects concomitantly receiving a stable regimen of zidovudine (AZT). Sixteen HIV-infected males with CD4-cell counts ranging from 100 to 550 and not experiencing significant AZT intolerance were enrolled. Subjects received levofloxacin (350 mg of levofloxacin hemihydrate) or a placebo (eight subjects per treatment group) as a single oral dose on day 1, multiple doses every 8 h from days 3 to 9, and a single dose on day 10. On days 1 and 10, an AZT dose (100 mg) was administered concurrently with the study drug. In between these doses, AZT was administered according to the regimen used by the subject prior to entering the study up to a maximum of 500 mg/day. Plasma levofloxacin concentrations were monitored for 36 h after levofloxacin dosing on day 1, immediately prior to the morning doses on days 3 to 9, and for 72 h after dosing on day 10. Plasma AZT concentrations were monitored on day 0 for baseline (for 6 h after the AZT dose) and for 4 h after the AZT doses on days 1 and 10. Levofloxacin was rapidly absorbed (time to maximum plasma concentration, approximately 1.0 h) and extensively distributed in the body with an apparent volume of distribution of approximately 104 liters (approximately 1.34 liters/kg). Steady-state conditions on day 10 were confirmed. Pharmacokinetic profiles of levofloxacin from single doses and multiple (three-times-daily) doses were similar, with a moderate accumulation (observed day 10-to-day 1 ratio of the maximum plasma concentration, approximately 185% versus expected 169%; for the corresponding ratio of the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 8 h [AUC(0-8)], the values were observed 217% versus expected 169%) at steady state. Mean average steady-state peak plasma concentration, plasma levofloxacin concentration at the

  19. Human Serum Albumin Complexed with Myristate and AZT

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Lili; Yang, Feng; Chen, Liqing; Meehan, Edward J.; Huang, Mingdong

    2008-06-16

    3'-Azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT) is the first clinically effective drug for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus infection. The drug interaction with human serum albumin (HSA) has been an important component in understanding its mechanism of action, especially in drug distribution and in drug-drug interaction on HSA in the case of multi-drug therapy. We present here crystal structures of a ternary HSA-Myr-AZT complex and a quaternary HSA-Myr-AZT-SAL complex (Myr, myristate; SAL, salicylic acid). From this study, a new drug binding subsite on HSA Sudlow site 1 was identified. The presence of fatty acid is needed for the creation of this subsite due to fatty acid induced conformational changes of HSA. Thus, the Sudlow site 1 of HSA can be divided into three non-overlapped subsites: a SAL subsite, an indomethacin subsite and an AZT subsite. Binding of a drug to HSA often influences simultaneous binding of other drugs. From the HSA-Myr-AZT-SAL complex structure, we observed the coexistence of two drugs (AZT and SAL) in Sudlow site 1 and the competition between these two drugs in subdomain IB. These results provide new structural information on HSA-drug interaction and drug-drug interaction on HSA.

  20. Retroviral vector production.

    PubMed

    Miller, A Dusty

    2014-01-01

    In this unit, the basic protocol generates stable cell lines that produce retroviral vectors that carry selectable markers. Also included are an alternate protocol that applies when the retroviral vector does not carry a selectable marker, and another alternate protocol for rapidly generating retroviral vector preparations by transient transfection. A support protocol describes construction of the retroviral vectors. The methods for generating virus from retroviral vector plasmids rely on the use of packaging cells that synthesize all of the retroviral proteins but do not produce replication-competent virus. Additional protocols detail plasmid transfection, virus titration, assay for replication-competent virus, and histochemical staining to detect transfer of a vector encoding alkaline phosphatase.

  1. Analysis of the Zidovudine Resistance Mutations T215Y, M41L, and L210W in HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Paul L.; Das, Kalyan; Arnold, Eddy

    2015-01-01

    Although anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) therapies have become more sophisticated and more effective, drug resistance continues to be a major problem. Zidovudine (azidothymidine; AZT) was the first nucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor (NRTI) approved for the treatment of HIV-1 infections and is still being used, particularly in the developing world. This drug targets the conversion of single-stranded RNA to double-stranded DNA by HIV-1 RT. However, resistance to the drug quickly appeared both in viruses replicating in cells in culture and in patients undergoing AZT monotherapy. The primary resistance pathway selects for mutations of T215 that change the threonine to either a tyrosine or a phenylalanine (T215Y/F); this resistance pathway involves an ATP-dependent excision mechanism. The pseudo-sugar ring of AZT lacks a 3′ OH; RT incorporates AZT monophosphate (AZTMP), which blocks the end of the viral DNA primer. AZT-resistant forms of HIV-1 RT use ATP in an excision reaction to unblock the 3′ end of the primer strand, allowing its extension by RT. The T215Y AZT resistance mutation is often accompanied by two other mutations, M41L and L210W. In this study, the roles of these mutations, in combination with T215Y, were examined to determine whether they affect polymerization and excision by HIV-1 RT. The M41L mutation appears to help restore the DNA polymerization activity of RT containing the T215Y mutation and also enhances AZTMP excision. The L210W mutation plays a similar role, but it enhances excision by RTs that carry the T215Y mutation when ATP is present at a low concentration. PMID:26324274

  2. Analysis of the Zidovudine Resistance Mutations T215Y, M41L, and L210W in HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Paul L; Das, Kalyan; Arnold, Eddy; Hughes, Stephen H

    2015-12-01

    Although anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) therapies have become more sophisticated and more effective, drug resistance continues to be a major problem. Zidovudine (azidothymidine; AZT) was the first nucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor (NRTI) approved for the treatment of HIV-1 infections and is still being used, particularly in the developing world. This drug targets the conversion of single-stranded RNA to double-stranded DNA by HIV-1 RT. However, resistance to the drug quickly appeared both in viruses replicating in cells in culture and in patients undergoing AZT monotherapy. The primary resistance pathway selects for mutations of T215 that change the threonine to either a tyrosine or a phenylalanine (T215Y/F); this resistance pathway involves an ATP-dependent excision mechanism. The pseudo-sugar ring of AZT lacks a 3' OH; RT incorporates AZT monophosphate (AZTMP), which blocks the end of the viral DNA primer. AZT-resistant forms of HIV-1 RT use ATP in an excision reaction to unblock the 3' end of the primer strand, allowing its extension by RT. The T215Y AZT resistance mutation is often accompanied by two other mutations, M41L and L210W. In this study, the roles of these mutations, in combination with T215Y, were examined to determine whether they affect polymerization and excision by HIV-1 RT. The M41L mutation appears to help restore the DNA polymerization activity of RT containing the T215Y mutation and also enhances AZTMP excision. The L210W mutation plays a similar role, but it enhances excision by RTs that carry the T215Y mutation when ATP is present at a low concentration. PMID:26324274

  3. Alternating and intermittent regimens of zidovudine (3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine) and dideoxycytidine (2',3'-dideoxycytidine) in the treatment of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and AIDS-related complex.

    PubMed

    Skowron, G; Merigan, T C

    1990-05-21

    The deoxynucleoside analogues 2',3'-dideoxy-cytidine (ddC) and 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (zidovudine, AZT) are active as single agents in conferring immunologic and virologic benefits in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or AIDS-related complex. Both drugs, however, produce dose-limiting toxicities. AZT is associated with unacceptable levels of bone marrow suppression, and ddC can cause painful peripheral neuropathy. The different toxicity profiles of these two drugs provide the rationale for testing them in alternating dosing combinations in an attempt to retain the antiretroviral activity of each against human immunodeficiency virus, while reducing the toxicities of both. A preliminary trial showed that 200 mg AZT given orally every four hours for seven-day periods, alternating with ddC at 0.03 mg/kg body weight orally every four hours for seven-day periods is a promising treatment regimen. An expanded multicenter study is evaluating ddC at 0.01 mg/kg and 0.03 mg/kg alternating with AZT at 200 mg in weekly or monthly periods. Weekly intermittent doses of AZT at 200 mg and ddC at 0.03 mg/kg are also being tested. The rationale and methods of the trial are discussed.

  4. Retroviral DNA Integration

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The integration of a DNA copy of the viral RNA genome into host chromatin is the defining step of retroviral replication. This enzymatic process is catalyzed by the virus-encoded integrase protein, which is conserved among retroviruses and LTR-retrotransposons. Retroviral integration proceeds via two integrase activities: 3′-processing of the viral DNA ends, followed by the strand transfer of the processed ends into host cell chromosomal DNA. Herein we review the molecular mechanism of retroviral DNA integration, with an emphasis on reaction chemistries and architectures of the nucleoprotein complexes involved. We additionally discuss the latest advances on anti-integrase drug development for the treatment of AIDS and the utility of integrating retroviral vectors in gene therapy applications. PMID:27198982

  5. Didanosine and zidovudine resistance patterns in clinical isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 as determined by a replication endpoint concentration assay.

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, G X; McGrath, J M; Ladd, E A; Hammer, S M

    1992-01-01

    Reports of in vitro resistance of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) to zidovudine (AZT) have raised concerns about the development of resistance to other dideoxynucleosides in clinical use. To address this, we have developed a screening assay which supports the growth of clinical isolates and have applied this to a series of paired isolates from patients entered into a phase I trial of didanosine (DDI). Thirteen patients (10 with AIDS, 3 with AIDS-related complex) who had been exposed to AZT for a mean of 6.5 months (range, 1 to 13 months) were treated with DDI at 750 mg/day. Paired isolates were obtained pretherapy and after a mean of 58 weeks (range, 21 to 90) of DDI therapy by coculture of peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (PBLs) with phytohemagglutinin-stimulated donor PBLs. Isolates were passaged only one additional time in PBLs and then tested in parallel in a microtiter assay with phytohemagglutinin-stimulated donor PBLs as targets. PBLs were infected with 10(5) 50% tissue culture infectious doses per 10(7) cells and exposed to DDI (1 to 50 microM) or AZT (0.01 to 100 microM), and supernatants were assayed for the HIV p24 antigen at 7 days postinfection. Control AZT-susceptible and resistant isolates were included. The median pre- and posttherapy DDI susceptibilities of the 13 pairs of isolates were 10.0 microM (range, 1 to 25 microM) and 17.5 microM (range, 2.5 to 50 microM), respectively (P = 0.036; Wilcoxon signed-rank test). These studies thus indicated that (i) the susceptibility to DDI tends to mildly decrease with drug exposure; (ii) the susceptibility to AZT improves with time off AZT; (iii) baseline susceptibilities to DDI have a wide range, and the CD4 response may correlate with the initial susceptibility; and (iv) a PBL-based microtiter assay is useful for screening clinical isolated for dideoxynucleoside susceptibility profiles. PMID:1510414

  6. Investigation of the Role of Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (Bcrp/Abcg2) on Pharmacokinetics and Central Nervous System Penetration of Abacavir and Zidovudine in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Nagdeep; Shaik, Naveed; Pan, Guoyu; Terasaki, Tetsuya; Mukai, Chisato; Kitagaki, Shinji; Miyakoshi, Naoki; Elmquist, William F.

    2016-01-01

    Many anti-human immunodeficiency virus 1 nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors have low central nervous system (CNS) distribution due in part to active efflux transport at the blood-brain barrier. We have previously shown that zidovudine (AZT) and abacavir (ABC) are in vitro substrates for the efflux transport protein breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp) 1. We evaluated the influence of Bcrp1 on plasma pharmacokinetics and brain penetration of zidovudine and abacavir in wild-type and Bcrp1-deficient (Bcrp1−/−) FVB mice. There was no difference in either area under the concentration-time profiles for plasma (AUCplasma) or brain (AUCbrain) for zidovudine between the wild-type and Bcrp1−/− mice. The AUCplasma of abacavir was 20% lower in the Bcrp1−/− mice, whereas the AUCbrain was 20% greater. This difference resulted in a 1.5-fold increase in abacavir brain exposure in the Bcrp1−/− mice. The effect of selective and nonselective transport inhibitors on the ABC brain/plasma ratio at a single time point was evaluated. 3-(6-Isobutyl-9-methoxy-1,4-dioxo-1,2,3,4,6,7,12,12a-octahydropyrazino[1′,2′:1,6]pyrido[3,4-b]indol-3-yl)-propionicacid tert-butyl ester (Ko143), N[4[2-(6, 7-dimethoxy-3,4-dihydro-1H-isoquinolin-2-yl)ethyl]phenyl]-5-methoxy-9-oxo-10H-acridine-4-carboxamide (GF120918), probenecid, and Pluronic P85 increased abacavir plasma concentrations in the wild-type mice. Abacavir plasma concentrations in Bcrp1−/− mice were increased by (R)-4-((1aR,6R,10bS)-1,2-difluoro-1,1a,6,10b-tetrahydrodibenzo(a,e)cyclopropa(c)cycloheptan-6-yl)-α-((5-quinoloyloxy)methyl)-1-piperazineethanol trihydrochloride (LY335979), GF120918, and probenecid, but not by Ko143. Brain/plasma concentration ratios in both the wild-type and Bcrp1−/− mice were increased by the P-glycoprotein inhibitors LY335979 and GF120918, but not by BCRP-selective inhibitors. These data indicate that deletion of Bcrp1 has little influence on the pharmacokinetics or brain

  7. Avian Retroviral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Justice, James; Beemon, Karen L.

    2013-01-01

    Avian retroviruses have undergone intense study since the beginning of the 20th century. They were originally identified as cancer-inducing filterable agents in chicken neoplasms. Since their discovery, the study of these simple retroviruses has contributed greatly to our understanding of retroviral replication and cancer. Avian retroviruses are continuing to evolve and have great economic importance in the poultry industry worldwide. The aim of this review is to provide a broad overview of the genome, pathology, and replication of avian retroviruses. Notable gaps in our current knowledge are highlighted, and areas where avian retroviruses differ from other retrovirus are also emphasized. PMID:24011707

  8. Low-dose, sublingual AZT-monophosphate therapy for HIV+ patients?

    PubMed

    Johnson, S

    2001-03-01

    AZT concentrations as low as 0.001 mg/l inhibit viral replication, while concentrations above 0.3 mg/l cause considerable damage to erythroid, myeloid progenitor cells and inhibit blastogenesis in mononuclear cells. Furthermore, AZT must be converted first to monophosphate and then to diphosphate and finally to triphosphate by the same enzyme: thymidine kinase (TK). Therefore, large doses of AZT overwhelm TK, causing massive production of monophosphate and reducing the production of di and triphosphate. Yet the recommended dosage of 100 mg AZT every 4 hours results in a peak concentration of 0.5 mg/l and a trough concentration of 0.1 mg/l (harmful to human cells and resulting in reduced production of triphosphate). On the other hand, sublingual administration of 1 mg AZT monophosphate every 8 hours (since the intracellular half life of AZT triphosphate is 3 hours) would be desirable, resulting in more damage to the virus and less harm to the patient. Finally, the small dose of monophosphate ensures that most of the AZT be converted to triphosphate, greatly increasing the efficiency and reducing the likelihood of the virus developing resistance due to reverse transcriptase binding to the similar but non inhibiting mono and diphosphate. PMID:11359372

  9. Retroviral integration: Site matters

    PubMed Central

    Demeulemeester, Jonas; De Rijck, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Here, we review genomic target site selection during retroviral integration as a multistep process in which specific biases are introduced at each level. The first asymmetries are introduced when the virus takes a specific route into the nucleus. Next, by co‐opting distinct host cofactors, the integration machinery is guided to particular chromatin contexts. As the viral integrase captures a local target nucleosome, specific contacts introduce fine‐grained biases in the integration site distribution. In vivo, the established population of proviruses is subject to both positive and negative selection, thereby continuously reshaping the integration site distribution. By affecting stochastic proviral expression as well as the mutagenic potential of the virus, integration site choice may be an inherent part of the evolutionary strategies used by different retroviruses to maximise reproductive success. PMID:26293289

  10. Now we know our AZTs, is it safe for kids and me?

    PubMed

    Parks, V E

    1995-01-01

    The National Institute of Allergies and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) has altered its pediatric HIV study (ACTG 152) to eliminate the AZT only arm because children taking AZT alone were progressing faster to opportunistic infections and death than children in the other drug groups. This has caused similar alterations in other trials using AZT alone, but it has also lent credence to the notion that AZT has little or no benefit used as a single agent in children. Additionally, the ACTG 152 results will most likely mean a stronger emphasis on individualized care that depends less on clinical trial data and more on clinical practice. No clinical trials directly compare to the results of ACTG 152, however. In adults, AZT generally appeared either equivalent or better than the AZT/ddI combination. Several questions about ddI therapy in children, such as dosage tolerance, convenience, cost, and choosing the right therapy for the child, remain unanswered. ACTG 152 results (available in 1995) will not provide all the answers that parents of HIV-infected children will need. There is hope that experts in pediatric HIV infection who previously met to develop anti-HIV and prophylaxis guidelines for children will reconvene in anticipation of final ACTG 152 analysis.

  11. AztD, a Periplasmic Zinc Metallochaperone to an ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter System in Paracoccus denitrificans.

    PubMed

    Handali, Melody; Roychowdhury, Hridindu; Neupane, Durga P; Yukl, Erik T

    2015-12-11

    Bacterial ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters of transition metals are essential for acquisition of necessary elements from the environment. A large number of Gram-negative bacteria, including human pathogens, have a fourth conserved gene of unknown function adjacent to the canonical permease, ATPase, and solute-binding protein (SBP) genes of the AztABC zinc transporter system. To assess the function of this putative accessory factor (AztD) from Paracoccus denitrificans, we have analyzed its transcriptional regulation, metal binding properties, and interaction with the SBP (AztC). Transcription of the aztD gene is significantly up-regulated under conditions of zinc starvation. Recombinantly expressed AztD purifies with slightly substoichiometric zinc from the periplasm of Escherichia coli and is capable of binding up to three zinc ions with high affinity. Size exclusion chromatography and a simple intrinsic fluorescence assay were used to determine that AztD as isolated is able to transfer bound zinc nearly quantitatively to apo-AztC. Transfer occurs through a direct, associative mechanism that prevents loss of metal to the solvent. These results indicate that AztD is a zinc chaperone to AztC and likely functions to maintain zinc homeostasis through interaction with the AztABC system. This work extends our understanding of periplasmic zinc trafficking and the function of chaperones in this process.

  12. Zidovudine and Lamivudine for HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Peter L.; Rower, Joseph E.

    2010-01-01

    Zidovudine and lamivudine (ZDV and 3TC) are long-standing nucleoside analog-reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) with extensive clinical experience in a wide spectrum of patients from in utero through childhood and adult ages. The safety profiles of both drugs are well-known and side effects for ZDV most commonly include nausea/vomiting, fatigue, anemia/neutopenia, and lipoatrophy; while 3TC is well-tolerated. ZDV-3TC is currently a viable alternative NRTI backbone for initial three-drug therapy of HIV infection when tenofovir disoproxil fumarate-emtricitabine (TDF-FTC) cannot be used because of a relative or absolute contraindication. ZDV-3TC continue to be viable alternatives for children, pregnant women and in resource limited settings where other recommended options are not readily available. ZDV-3TC penetrate the Central Nervous System (CNS) well, which makes ZDV-3TC attractive for use in patients with HIV-associated neurological deficits. Additional benefits of these drugs may include the use of ZDV in combination with certain NRTIs to exert selective pressure to prevent particular drug resistance mutations from developing, and giving a short course of ZDV-3TC to prevent resistance after prophylactic single dose nevirapine. PMID:20953318

  13. Gene targeting with retroviral vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, J.; Bernstein, A. )

    1989-04-01

    The authors have designed and constructed integration-defective retroviral vectors to explore their potential for gene targeting in mammalian cells. Two nonoverlapping deletion mutants of the bacterial neomycin resistance (neo) gene were used to detect homologous recombination events between viral and chromosomal sequences. Stable neo gene correction events were selected at a frequency of approximately 1 G418/sup r/ cell per 3 x 10/sup 6/ infected cells. Analysis of the functional neo gene in independent targeted cell clones indicated that unintegrated retroviral linear DNA recombined with the target by gene conversion for variable distances into regions of nonhomology. In addition, transient neo gene correction events which were associated with the complete loss of the chromosomal target sequences were observed. These results demonstrated that retroviral vectors can recombine with homologous chromosomal sequences in rodent and human cells.

  14. Purification and Injection of Retroviral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Ayumu; Zhao, Chunmei; Suh, Hoonkyo; Gage, Fred H

    2015-10-01

    Retroviral vectors are powerful tools for genetic manipulation. This protocol discusses the production, purification, and use of replication-deficient retroviral vectors based on Moloney murine leukemia virus and lentivirus. It also describes the injection of a retroviral vector into the dentate gyrus of young adult mice to fluorescently label live murine brain tissue.

  15. Retroviral infections of small animals.

    PubMed

    Dunham, Stephen P; Graham, Elizabeth

    2008-07-01

    Retroviral infections are particularly important in cats, which are commonly infected with feline leukemia virus and feline immunodeficiency virus. This article describes the biology of these viruses and explores current issues regarding vaccination and diagnosis. The seeming lack of a recognized retrovirus infection in dogs is speculated on, and current and potential future therapies are discussed.

  16. A model for the immune system response to HIV: AZT treatment studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kirschner, D.E. . Dept. of Mathematics); Perelson, A.S. )

    1993-01-01

    We use mathematical models to describe the interaction of the immune system with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Our model includes T-lymphocytes and macrophages, cells which can be infected with the virus. Using our model we compare the efficacy of AZT treatments given at different stages of disease progression in order to predict when treatment should be initiated.

  17. Quantitative determination of zidovudine diaryl phosphate triester pro-drugs in rat plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Meixiang; Xie, Baoying; Tang, Guo; Hu, Anfu; Fang, Meijuan; Wu, Zhen; Zhao, Yufen

    2008-12-15

    A rapid, simple, and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/ESI-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for quantitative analysis of 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (zidovudine, AZT) diaryl phosphate triester pro-drugs, in rat plasma using 2',3'-dideoxy-2'3'-didehydrothymidine (d4T) as internal standard (IS). The analytes were extracted from rat plasma with methanol after protein precipitation. The compounds were separated by HPLC with gradient elution (on a Shim-pack VP-ODS C(18) analytical column using a mobile phase of methanol/10mM ammonium acetate). All the analytes were detected in positive ion mode using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). The method was validated and the specificity, linearity, lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ), precision, accuracy, recoveries and stability were determined. LLOQs were 10 ng mL(-1) for M1, M2, M3, M4, and M5, respectively. Correlation coefficient (r) values for the linear range of 10-10,000 ng mL(-1) were greater than 0.999 for all the analytes. The intra-day and inter-day precision and accuracy were higher than 7.13%. The relative and absolute recovery was above 72% and no matrix effects were observed for all the analytes. This validated method provides a modern, rapid, and robust procedure for the pharmacokinetic studies of the pro-drugs after intravenous administration to rats. Some important results of AZT diaryl phosphate triester pro-drugs concerning chemical effect on pharmacokinetic performance are also studied. PMID:19118970

  18. Retroviral Integrase: Then and Now.

    PubMed

    Andrake, Mark D; Skalka, Anna Marie

    2015-11-01

    The retroviral integrases are virally encoded, specialized recombinases that catalyze the insertion of viral DNA into the host cell's DNA, a process that is essential for virus propagation. We have learned a great deal since the existence of an integrated form of retroviral DNA (the provirus) was first proposed by Howard Temin in 1964. Initial studies focused on the genetics and biochemistry of avian and murine virus DNA integration, but the pace of discovery increased substantially with advances in technology, and an influx of investigators focused on the human immunodeficiency virus. We begin with a brief account of the scientific landscape in which some of the earliest discoveries were made, and summarize research that led to our current understanding of the biochemistry of integration. A more detailed account of recent analyses of integrase structure follows, as they have provided valuable insights into enzyme function and raised important new questions.

  19. Efficient syntheses of [¹¹C]zidovudine and its analogs by convenient one-pot palladium(0)-copper(I) co-mediated rapid C-[¹¹C]methylation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhouen; Doi, Hisashi; Koyama, Hiroko; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Suzuki, Masaaki

    2014-06-30

    The nucleosides zidovudine (AZT), stavudine (d4T), and telbivudine (LdT) are approved for use in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections. To promote positron emission tomography (PET) imaging studies on their pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and applications in cancer diagnosis, a convenient one-pot method for Pd(0)-Cu(I) co-mediated rapid C-C coupling of [(11)C]methyl iodide with stannyl precursor was successfully established and applied to synthesize the PET tracers [(11)C]zidovudine, [(11)C]stavudine, and [(11)C]telbivudine. After HPLC purification and radiopharmaceutical formulation, the desired PET tracers were obtained with high radioactivity (6.4-7.0 GBq) and specific radioactivity (74-147 GBq/µmol) and with high chemical (>99%) and radiochemical (>99.5%) purities. This one-pot Pd(0)-Cu(I) co-mediated rapid C-[(11)C]methylation also worked well for syntheses of [methyl-(11)C]thymidine and [methyl-(11)C]4'-thiothymidine, resulting twice the radioactivity of those prepared by a previous two-pot method. The mechanism of one-pot Pd(0)-Cu(I) co-mediated rapid C-[(11)C]methylation was also discussed.

  20. Risk of HIV dementia and opportunistic brain disease in AIDS and zidovudine therapy

    PubMed Central

    Baldeweg, T.; Catalan, J.; Gazzard, B.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine the incidence of HIV dementia and opportunistic brain disease in AIDS relative to the use of licensed antiretoviral medication (zidovudine, zalcitabine, didanosine, and stavudine).
METHOD—Medical records were evaluated retrospectively in a longitudinal cohort of 1109 patients with AIDS during the period 1991-4. Treatment groups were defined by start and duration of zidovudine treatment, the drugs used most often during this period were: (a) no zidovudine, (b) zidovudine before AIDS, (c) zidovudine before and after AIDS, and (d) zidovudine used in AIDS. Main outcome measures were cumulative incidence and survival from AIDS to onset of HIV dementia, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), cerebral toxoplasmosis, and primary CNS lymphoma.
RESULTS—Risk of brain disease including HIV dementia and opportunistic brain disease was reduced in patients who started zidovudine before AIDS and continued in AIDS (relative risk (RR) 0.55, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.36-0.84) as well as zidovudine initiated in AIDS (RR 0.27, 95% CI 0.17-0.45) compared with untreated subjects. Treatment effects were not constant over time, decreasing by 14%-32% for each six months of follow up. This was supported by unadjusted incidences across groups stratified by duration of zidovudine use, indicating reduced risk with treatment for up to 18 months but not with longer duration of use of zidovudine. Other antiretroviral drugs had no significant effect, although these were used by only 14% of patients in this cohort.
CONCLUSION—The time limited but effective neuroprotection offered by zidovudine monotherapy for <18 months suggests that non-specific mechanisms of cerebral immunological defence may benefit from antiretroviral treatment. Due to the limitations of a retrospective study these findings require confirmation and further investigation in the context of current combination drug treatments.

 PMID:9667558

  1. Protective cellular retroviral immunity requires both CD4+ and CD8+ immune T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hom, R C; Finberg, R W; Mullaney, S; Ruprecht, R M

    1991-01-01

    We have found previously that postexposure chemoprophylaxis with 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (also known as zidovudine or AZT) in combination with recombinant human alpha A/D interferon fully protected mice exposed to a lethal dose of Rauscher murine leukemia virus (RLV) against viremia and disease. After cessation of therapy, over 90% of these mice were able to resist rechallenge with live RLV, thus demonstrating an acquired immunity. Adoptive cell transfer of 4 x 10(7) cells from immunized mice fully protected naive recipients from viremia and splenomegaly after RLV challenge. However, when these immune T cells were fractionated into CD4+ and CD8+ subpopulations, only partial protection was found when 4 x 10(7) T cells of either subset were given. Full protection against RLV challenge was seen again when the T-cell subsets from immunized mice were recombined and transferred at the same number into naive mice. We conclude that cellular immunity alone is protective and that both CD4+ and CD8+ cell types are required for conferring full protection against live virus challenge. Images PMID:1898666

  2. Continuum Theory of Retroviral Capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. T.; Bruinsma, R. F.; Gelbart, W. M.

    2006-02-01

    We present a self-assembly phase diagram for the shape of retroviral capsids, based on continuum elasticity theory. The spontaneous curvature of the capsid proteins drives a weakly first-order transition from spherical to spherocylindrical shapes. The conical capsid shape which characterizes the HIV-1 retrovirus is never stable under unconstrained energy minimization. Only under conditions of fixed volume and/or fixed spanning length can the conical shape be a minimum energy structure. Our results indicate that, unlike the capsids of small viruses, retrovirus capsids are not uniquely determined by the molecular structure of the constituent proteins but depend in an essential way on physical constraints present during assembly.

  3. Preparation and quantification of pseudotyped retroviral vector.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hong; Kwon, Young Jik

    2008-01-01

    Retroviral vectors have been widely used for research and clinical trials in gene therapy because of their high transduction efficiency. Retroviruses interact with target cells through their surface molecules (i.e., envelope proteins) and cellular receptors, which limit the susceptibility of target cells to retroviral vectors. Murine leukemia retrovirus (MuLV) pseudotyped with vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein (VSV-G) overcomes the species barrier and is more resistant to mechanical and biochemical inactivation. A cell line producing VSV-G pseudotyped MuLV vector can be established by transfecting 293T cells expressing Gag, Pol, and VSV-G (293 GPG cell line) with a retroviral vector plasmid. Transduction potency of the resulting VSV-G pseudotyped MuLV retroviral supernatant can be quantified by titration, electron microscopy (EM), and the reverse transcriptase (RT) assay. These protocols provide methods to prepare and quantify a pseudotyped retroviral vector with high transduction rates for most types of target cells.

  4. Avian retroviral expression of luciferase.

    PubMed

    Garber, E A; Rosenblum, C I; Chute, H T; Scheidel, L M; Chen, H

    1991-12-01

    Biologically active replication-competent (subgroups A, B, and C) and replication-defective Rous sarcoma virus-derived vectors containing the cDNA encoding firefly luciferase as a reporter gene were constructed. In these retroviral vectors, luciferase is expressed from a spliced subgenomic mRNA. A biologically active replication-defective UR2 virus-derived vector expressing the reporter gene as a gag-luciferase fusion protein from an unspliced genomic mRNA was also constructed. The luciferase reporter gene was used because it lacks homology with chicken genomic sequences and because a rapid and sensitive direct enzymatic assay is available to monitor luciferase expression in retrovirus-infected cells. The levels of luciferase expression in luciferase recombinant retrovirus-infected chicken embryo fibroblasts are greater than 10(3) higher than that detected in uninfected cells or in cells infected with retroviral vectors carrying other genes. Endpoint dilution titration experiments demonstrated that one infected cell can be detected in a background of 10(3) uninfected cells. The vectors are stable in tissue culture and high level expression of the unselected luciferase reporter gene is maintained. The vectors were used to express luciferase in chicken embryos, demonstrating the potential utility of luciferase as a reporter in vivo.

  5. Resolution of Specific Nucleotide Mismatches by Wild-Type and AZT-Resistant Reverse Transcriptases during HIV-1 Replication.

    PubMed

    Kharytonchyk, Siarhei; King, Steven R; Ndongmo, Clement B; Stilger, Krista L; An, Wenfeng; Telesnitsky, Alice

    2016-06-01

    A key contributor to HIV-1 genetic variation is reverse transcriptase errors. Some mutations result because reverse transcriptase (RT) lacks 3' to 5' proofreading exonuclease and can extend mismatches. However, RT also excises terminal nucleotides to a limited extent, and this activity contributes to AZT resistance. Because HIV-1 mismatch resolution has been studied in vitro but only indirectly during replication, we developed a novel system to study mismatched base pair resolution during HIV-1 replication in cultured cells using vectors that force template switching at defined locations. These vectors generated mismatched reverse transcription intermediates, with proviral products diagnostic of mismatch resolution mechanisms. Outcomes for wild-type (WT) RT and an AZT-resistant (AZT(R)) RT containing a thymidine analog mutation set-D67N, K70R, D215F, and K219Q-were compared. AZT(R) RT did not excise terminal nucleotides more frequently than WT, and for the majority of tested mismatches, both WT and AZT(R) RTs extended mismatches in more than 90% of proviruses. However, striking enzyme-specific differences were observed for one mispair, with WT RT preferentially resolving dC-rC pairs either by excising the mismatched base or switching templates prematurely, while AZT(R) RT primarily misaligned the primer strand, causing deletions via dislocation mutagenesis. Overall, the results confirmed HIV-1 RT's high capacity for mismatch extension during virus replication and revealed dramatic differences in aberrant intermediate resolution repertoires between WT and AZT(R) RTs on one mismatched replication intermediate. Correlating mismatch extension frequencies observed here with reported viral mutation rates suggests a complex interplay of nucleotide discrimination and mismatch extension drives HIV-1 mutagenesis. PMID:27075671

  6. Retroviral recombination during reverse transcription.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, D W; Duesberg, P H

    1990-03-01

    After mixed infection, up to half of related retroviruses are recombinants. During infection, retroviral RNA genomes are first converted to complementary DNA (cDNA) and then to double-stranded DNA. Thus recombination could occur during reverse transcription, by RNA template switching, or after reverse transcription, by breakage and reunion of DNA. It has not been possible to distinguish between these two potential mechanisms of recombination because both single-stranded cDNA and double-stranded proviral DNA exist in infected cells during the eclipse period. Therefore we have analyzed for recombinant molecules among cDNA products transcribed in vitro from RNA of disrupted virions. Since recombinants from allelic parents can only be distinguished from parental genomes by point mutations, we have examined the cDNAs from virions with distinct genetic structures for recombinant-specific size and sequence markers. The parents share a common internal allele that allows homology-directed recombination, but each contains specific flanking sequences. One parent is a synthetically altered Harvey murine sarcoma virus RNA that lacks a retroviral 3' terminus but carries a Moloney murine retrovirus-derived envelope gene (env) fragment 3' of its transforming ras gene. The other parent is intact Moloney virus. Using a Harvey-specific 5' primer and a Moloney-specific 3' primer, we have found recombinant cDNAs with the polymerase chain reaction, proving directly that retroviruses can recombine during reverse transcription unassisted by cellular enzymes, probably by template switching during cDNA synthesis. The recombinants that were obtained in vitro were identical with those obtained in parallel experiments in vivo.

  7. Early features of zidovudine-associated myopathy: histopathological findings and clinical correlations.

    PubMed

    Cupler, E J; Danon, M J; Jay, C; Hench, K; Ropka, M; Dalakas, M C

    1995-01-01

    Zidovudine-induced myopathy is characterized by reversible muscle weakness, wasting, myalgia, fatigue, and elevated creatine kinase (CK). Some zidovudine-treated patients with normal muscle strength experience excessive fatigue, myalgia, or transient mild CK elevations that improve when zidovudine is stopped. To determine the cause of these symptoms, we studied 13 physically fit, HIV-infected men who developed fatigue, myalgia, and reduced endurance, while taking zidovudine for a mean period of 20 months (2-39 months), with neurological evaluation and muscle biopsy processed for enzyme histochemistry and electron microscopy (EM). All subjects had normal muscle strength. In 6 of the 13 patients, muscle biopsies were normal by enzyme histochemistry. EM, however, demonstrated proliferation of normal or abnormal mitochondria, and increased amounts of lipid, glycogen, and lipofuscin. Electromyographic (EMG) studies (5/5) and serum CK (6/6) were normal. The other 7 individuals had signs of moderate to severe mitochondrial abnormalities shown by both light microscopy and EM, characterized by severe destruction, vacuolization, and rare paracrystalline inclusions. Most had elevated CK (4 out of 7) and normal EMG (5 out of 7). The severity of morphological abnormalities did not correlate with duration of HIV infection, zidovudine therapy, or zidovudine dosage. We conclude that in zidovudine-treated patients, symptoms of fatigue, myalgia, reduced endurance, and exercise intolerance represent early signs of zidovudine-induced mitochondriotoxicity, which causes an energy shortage within the muscle fibers even when muscle strength is still normal. Zidovudine, a DNA chain terminator, results in overt myopathy when a critical threshold of molecular, histological, and biochemical dysfunction of mitochondria is crossed, which seems to vary between individuals.

  8. Cost effectiveness analysis of early zidovudine treatment of HIV infected patients.

    PubMed

    Oddone, E Z; Cowper, P; Hamilton, J D; Matchar, D B; Hartigan, P; Samsa, G; Simberkoff, M; Feussner, J R

    1993-11-20

    OBJECTIVE--To compare cost effectiveness of early and later treatment with zidovudine for patients infected with HIV. DESIGN--Markov chain analysis of cost effectiveness based on results of use of health care and efficacy from a trial of zidovudine treatment. SETTING--Seven Veterans Affairs medical centres in the United States. SUBJECTS--338 patients with symptomatic HIV infection and a lymphocyte count of 200 x 10(6) to 500 x 10(6) CD4 cells/l. INTERVENTIONS--Zidovudine 1500 mg/day started either at recruitment to the trial or when CD4 cell count fell below 200 x 10(6)/l. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Health care costs and rates of disease progression between six clinical states of HIV infection. RESULTS--Patients given early treatment with zidovudine remained without AIDS for an extra two months at a cost of $10,750 for each extra month without AIDS (at 1991 costs). Cost effectiveness ratio was most sensitive to the cost of zidovudine and to the quality of life of patients receiving early treatment. At treatment of 500 mg/day the cost effectiveness ratio for early treatment was $5432 for each extra month without AIDS. Patients given early treatment experienced more side effects, and if their quality of life was devalued by 8% compared with patients treated later the two treatments were equivalent in terms of quality adjusted months of life without AIDS. CONCLUSIONS--Early treatment with zidovudine is expensive and is very sensitive to the cost of zidovudine and to potential reductions in quality of life of patients who experience side effects. Doctors should reconsider early treatment with zidovudine for patients who experience side effects that substantially compromise their quality of life. PMID:8257887

  9. Retroviral Diversity and Distribution in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Herniou, Elisabeth; Martin, Joanne; Miller, Karen; Cook, James; Wilkinson, Mark; Tristem, Michael

    1998-01-01

    We used the PCR to screen for the presence of endogenous retroviruses within the genomes of 18 vertebrate orders across eight classes, concentrating on reptilian, amphibian, and piscine hosts. Thirty novel retroviral sequences were isolated and characterized by sequencing approximately 1 kb of their encoded protease and reverse transcriptase genes. Isolation of novel viruses from so many disparate hosts suggests that retroviruses are likely to be ubiquitous within all but the most basal vertebrate classes and, furthermore, gives a good indication of the overall retroviral diversity within vertebrates. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that viruses clustering with (but not necessarily closely related to) the spumaviruses and murine leukemia viruses are widespread and abundant in vertebrate genomes. In contrast, we were unable to identify any viruses from hosts outside of mammals and birds which grouped with the other five currently recognized retroviral genera: the lentiviruses, human T-cell leukemia-related viruses, avian leukemia virus-related retroviruses, type D retroviruses, and mammalian type B retroviruses. There was also some indication that viruses isolated from individual vertebrate classes tended to cluster together in phylogenetic reconstructions. This implies that the horizontal transmission of at least some retroviruses, between some vertebrate classes, occurs relatively infrequently. It is likely that many of the retroviral sequences described here are distinct enough from those of previously characterized viruses to represent novel retroviral genera. PMID:9621058

  10. Studies of retroviral infection in humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Marsden, Matthew D; Zack, Jerome A

    2015-05-01

    Many important aspects of human retroviral infections cannot be fully evaluated using only in vitro systems or unmodified animal models. An alternative approach involves the use of humanized mice, which consist of immunodeficient mice that have been transplanted with human cells and/or tissues. Certain humanized mouse models can support robust infection with human retroviruses including different strains of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV). These models have provided wide-ranging insights into retroviral biology, including detailed information on primary infection, in vivo replication and pathogenesis, latent/persistent reservoir formation, and novel therapeutic interventions. Here we describe the humanized mouse models that are most commonly utilized to study retroviral infections, and outline some of the important discoveries that these models have produced during several decades of intensive research.

  11. Studies of retroviral infection in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Marsden, Matthew D.; Zack, Jerome A.

    2015-01-01

    Many important aspects of human retroviral infections cannot be fully evaluated using only in vitro systems or unmodified animal models. An alternative approach involves the use of humanized mice, which consist of immunodeficient mice that have been transplanted with human cells and/or tissues. Certain humanized mouse models can support robust infection with human retroviruses including different strains of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV). These models have provided wide-ranging insights into retroviral biology, including detailed information on primary infection, in vivo replication and pathogenesis, latent/persistent reservoir formation, and novel therapeutic interventions. Here we describe the humanized mouse models that are most commonly utilized to study retroviral infections, and outline some of the important discoveries that these models have produced during several decades of intensive research. PMID:25680625

  12. Bats and Rodents Shape Mammalian Retroviral Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jie; Tachedjian, Gilda; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) represent past retroviral infections and accordingly can provide an ideal framework to infer virus-host interaction over their evolutionary history. In this study, we target high quality Pol sequences from 7,994 Class I and 8,119 Class II ERVs from 69 mammalian genomes and surprisingly find that retroviruses harbored by bats and rodents combined occupy the major phylogenetic diversity of both classes. By analyzing transmission patterns of 30 well-defined ERV clades, we corroborate the previously published observation that rodents are more competent as originators of mammalian retroviruses and reveal that bats are more capable of receiving retroviruses from non-bat mammalian origins. The powerful retroviral hosting ability of bats is further supported by a detailed analysis revealing that the novel bat gammaretrovirus, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum retrovirus, likely originated from tree shrews. Taken together, this study advances our understanding of host-shaped mammalian retroviral evolution in general. PMID:26548564

  13. Transplacental Exposure to AZT Induces Adverse Neurochemical and Behavioral Effects in a Mouse Model: Protection by L-Acetylcarnitine

    PubMed Central

    Venerosi Pesciolini, Aldina; Tramutola, Antonella; Ajmone-Cat, Maria Antonietta; Cinque, Carlo; Alemà, Giovanni Sebastiano; Giovine, Angela; Peluso, Gianfranco; Minghetti, Luisa; Nicolai, Raffaella; Calamandrei, Gemma; Casolini, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Maternal-fetal HIV-1 transmission can be prevented by administration of AZT, alone or in combination with other antiretroviral drugs to pregnant HIV-1-infected women and their newborns. In spite of the benefits deriving from this life-saving prophylactic therapy, there is still considerable uncertainty on the potential long-term adverse effects of antiretroviral drugs on exposed children. Clinical and experimental studies have consistently shown the occurrence of mitochondrial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress following prenatal treatment with antiretroviral drugs, and clinical evidence suggests that the developing brain is one of the targets of the toxic action of these compounds possibly resulting in behavioral problems. We intended to verify the effects on brain and behavior of mice exposed during gestation to AZT, the backbone of antiretroviral therapy during human pregnancy. We hypothesized that glutamate, a neurotransmitter involved in excitotoxicity and behavioral plasticity, could be one of the major actors in AZT-induced neurochemical and behavioral alterations. We also assessed the antioxidant and neuroprotective effect of L-acetylcarnitine, a compound that improves mitochondrial function and is successfully used to treat antiretroviral-induced polyneuropathy in HIV-1 patients. We found that transplacental exposure to AZT given per os to pregnant mice from day 10 of pregnancy to delivery impaired in the adult offspring spatial learning and memory, enhanced corticosterone release in response to acute stress, increased brain oxidative stress also at birth and markedly reduced expression of mGluR1 and mGluR5 subtypes and GluR1 subunit of AMPA receptors in the hippocampus. Notably, administration during the entire pregnancy of L-acetylcarnitine was effective in preventing/ameliorating the neurochemical, neuroendocrine and behavioral adverse effects induced by AZT in the offspring. The present preclinical findings provide a mechanistic hypothesis for

  14. HIV-1 sensitivity to zidovudine: a consensus culture technique validated by genotypic analysis of the reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Brun-Vézinet, F; Ingrand, D; Deforges, L; Gochi, K; Ferchal, F; Schmitt, M P; Jung, M; Masquelier, B; Aubert, J; Buffet-Janvresse, C

    1992-05-01

    In order to select and standardize a reliable assay for the analysis of sensitivity of HIV isolates to AZT, we have compared two culture methods. The first assay (Cell-Associated Isolate Sensitivity Assay: CAISA) quantified AZT-resistant HIV isolates by end-point dilution cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in the presence of various concentrations of AZT. In the second assay (Cell-Free Isolate Sensitivity Assay: CFISA), following a conventional isolation of HIV, dilutions of infected cell-free supernatants were cultivated with fresh normal donor PBMCs in the presence of increasing concentrations of AZT. Samples from 64 untreated and AZT-treated patients were studied by CAISA (41), CFISA (43) or both assays (20). The CFISA, which allows the determination of titration parameters with respect to various kinetics patterns of viral replication was selected, and some of the CFISA phenotypically characterized isolates were further studied by nucleotide sequence analysis of the reverse transcriptase gene. CFISA showed that isolates from untreated patients were susceptible to AZT while the frequency of resistance increased with the duration of therapy. Genotypic analysis of CFISA-resistant isolates exhibited mutations at crucial positions, particularly at residue 215. We consider CFISA as a consensus culture technique for longitudinal studies of isolates from patients receiving AZT or other analogs of nucleosides.

  15. Retroviral Transduction of Murine Primary T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, James; Sadelain, Michel; Brentjens, Renier

    2016-01-01

    Summary In comparison to human T cells, efficient retroviral gene transfer and subsequent expansion of murine primary T cells is more difficult to achieve. Herein, we describe an optimized gene transfer protocol utilizing an ecotropic viral vector to transduce primary murine T cells activated with magnetic beads coated with agonistic anti-CD3 and CD28 antibodies. Activated T cells are subsequently centrifuged (spinoculated) on RetroNectin-coated tissue culture plates in the context of retroviral supernatant. Variables found to be critical to high gene transfer and subsequent efficient T cell expansion included CD3/CD28 magnetic bead to cell ratio, time from T cell activation to initial spinoculation, frequency of T cell spinoculation, interleukin-2 concentration in the medium, and the initial purity of the T cell preparation. PMID:19110621

  16. Retroviral DNA Transposition: Themes and Variations.

    PubMed

    Skala, Anna Marie

    2014-10-01

    Retroviruses and LTR retrotransposons are transposable elements that encapsidate the RNAs that are intermediates in the transposition of DNA copies of their genomes (proviruses), from one cell (or one locus) to another. Mechanistic similarities in DNA transposase enzymes and retroviral/retrotransposon integrases underscore the close evolutionary relationship among these elements. The retroviruses are very ancient infectious agents, presumed to have evolved from Ty3/Gypsy LTR retrotransposons (1), and DNA copies of their sequences can be found embedded in the genomes of most, if not all, members of the tree of life. All retroviruses share a specific gene arrangement and similar replication strategies. However, given their ancestries and occupation of diverse evolutionary niches, it should not be surprising that unique sequences have been acquired in some retroviral genomes and that the details of the mechanism by which their transposition is accomplished can vary. While every step in the retrovirus lifecycle is, in some sense, relevant to transposition, this Chapter focuses mainly on the early phase of retroviral replication, during which viral DNA is synthesized and integrated into its host genome. Some of the initial studies that set the stage for current understanding are highlighted, as well as more recent findings obtained through use of an ever-expanding technological toolbox including genomics, proteomics, and siRNA screening. Persistence in the area of structural biology has provided new insight into conserved mechanisms as well as variations in detail among retroviruses, which can also be instructive.

  17. The design of artificial retroviral restriction factors

    SciTech Connect

    Yap, Melvyn W.; Mortuza, Gulnahar B.; Taylor, Ian A.; Stoye, Jonathan P.

    2007-09-01

    In addition to the ability to bind the retroviral capsid protein, the retroviral restriction factors Fv1, Trim5{alpha} and Trim5-CypA share the common property of containing sequences that promote self-association. Otherwise Fv1 and Trim5{alpha} appear unrelated. Mutational analyses showed that restriction was invariably lost when changes designed to disrupt the sequences responsible for multimerization were introduced. A novel restriction protein could be obtained by substituting sequences from the self-associating domain of Fv1 for the Trim5 sequences in Trim5-CypA. Similarly, a fusion protein containing cyclophilin A joined to arfaptin2, a protein known to form extended dimers, was also shown to restrict HIV-1. Hence, multimerization of a capsid-binding domain could be the common minimum design feature for capsid-dependent retroviral restriction factors. However, not all domains that promote multimerization can substitute for the N-terminal domains of Fv1 and Trim5{alpha}. Moreover, only CypA can provide a capsid-binding site with different N-terminal domains. It is suggested that the spatial relationship between the multiple target binding sites may be important for restriction.

  18. Retroviral DNA Transposition: Themes and Variations

    PubMed Central

    Skalka, Anna Marie

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Retroviruses and LTR retrotransposons are transposable elements that encapsidate the RNAs that are intermediates in the transposition of DNA copies of their genomes (proviruses), from one cell (or one locus) to another. Mechanistic similarities in DNA transposase enzymes and retroviral/retrotransposon integrases underscore the close evolutionary relationship among these elements. The retroviruses are very ancient infectious agents, presumed to have evolved from Ty3/Gypsy LTR retrotransposons (1), and DNA copies of their sequences can be found embedded in the genomes of most, if not all, members of the tree of life. All retroviruses share a specific gene arrangement and similar replication strategies. However, given their ancestries and occupation of diverse evolutionary niches, it should not be surprising that unique sequences have been acquired in some retroviral genomes and that the details of the mechanism by which their transposition is accomplished can vary. While every step in the retrovirus lifecycle is, in some sense, relevant to transposition, this Chapter focuses mainly on the early phase of retroviral replication, during which viral DNA is synthesized and integrated into its host genome. Some of the initial studies that set the stage for current understanding are highlighted, as well as more recent findings obtained through use of an ever-expanding technological toolbox including genomics, proteomics, and siRNA screening. Persistence in the area of structural biology has provided new insight into conserved mechanisms as well as variations in detail among retroviruses, which can also be instructive. PMID:25844274

  19. Impact of HIV Infection and Zidovudine Therapy on RBC Parameters and Urine Methylmalonic Acid Levels

    PubMed Central

    Adediran, Adewumi; Osunkalu, Vincent; Wakama, Tamunomieibi; John-Olabode, Sarah; Akinbami, Akinsegun; Uche, Ebele; Akanmu, Sulaimon

    2016-01-01

    Background. Anaemia is a common complication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of HIV infection and zidovudine on red blood cells (RBC) parameters and urine methylmalonic acid (UMMA) levels in patients with HIV infection. Material and Methods. A cross-sectional study involving 114 subjects, 94 of which are HIV-infected nonanaemic and 20 HIV negative subjects (Cg) as control. Full blood count parameters and urine methylmalonic acid (UMMA) level of each subject were determined. Associations were determined by Chi-square test and logistic regression statistics where appropriate. Results. Subjects on zidovudine-based ART had mean MCV (93 fL) higher than that of control group (82.9 fL) and ART-naïve (85.9 fL) subjects and the highest mean RDW. Mean UMMA level, which reflects vitamin B12 level status, was high in all HIV-infected groups but was significantly higher in ART-naïve subjects than in ART-experienced subjects. Conclusion. Although non-zidovudine therapy may be associated with macrocytosis (MCV > 95 fL), zidovudine therapy and ART naivety may not. Suboptimal level of vitamin B12 as measured by high UMMA though highest in ART-naïve subjects was common in all HIV-infected subjects. PMID:26989408

  20. Impact of HIV Infection and Zidovudine Therapy on RBC Parameters and Urine Methylmalonic Acid Levels.

    PubMed

    Adediran, Adewumi; Osunkalu, Vincent; Wakama, Tamunomieibi; John-Olabode, Sarah; Akinbami, Akinsegun; Uche, Ebele; Akanmu, Sulaimon

    2016-01-01

    Background. Anaemia is a common complication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of HIV infection and zidovudine on red blood cells (RBC) parameters and urine methylmalonic acid (UMMA) levels in patients with HIV infection. Material and Methods. A cross-sectional study involving 114 subjects, 94 of which are HIV-infected nonanaemic and 20 HIV negative subjects (Cg) as control. Full blood count parameters and urine methylmalonic acid (UMMA) level of each subject were determined. Associations were determined by Chi-square test and logistic regression statistics where appropriate. Results. Subjects on zidovudine-based ART had mean MCV (93 fL) higher than that of control group (82.9 fL) and ART-naïve (85.9 fL) subjects and the highest mean RDW. Mean UMMA level, which reflects vitamin B12 level status, was high in all HIV-infected groups but was significantly higher in ART-naïve subjects than in ART-experienced subjects. Conclusion. Although non-zidovudine therapy may be associated with macrocytosis (MCV > 95 fL), zidovudine therapy and ART naivety may not. Suboptimal level of vitamin B12 as measured by high UMMA though highest in ART-naïve subjects was common in all HIV-infected subjects. PMID:26989408

  1. In Utero Exposure of Female CD-1 Mice to AZT and/or 3TC: I. Persistence of Microscopic Lesions in Cardiac Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Salina M.; March, Thomas H.; Carter, Meghan M.; McCash, Consuelo L.; Seilkop, Steven K.; Poirier, Miriam C.; Walker, Dale M.

    2010-01-01

    The current study was designed to delineate temporal changes in cardiomyocytes and mitochondria at the light and electron microscopic levels in hearts of mice exposed transplacentally to commonly used nucleoside analogs (NRTIs). Pregnant CD-1 mice were given 80 mg AZT/kg, 40 mg 3TC/kg, 80 mg AZT/kg plus 40 mg 3TC/kg, or vehicle alone during the last 7 days of gestation, and hearts from female mouse pups were examined at 13 and 26 weeks postpartum for histopathological or ultrastructural changes in cross-sections of both the ventricles and the interventricular septum. Using light microscopy and special staining techniques, transplacental exposure to AZT, 3TC, or AZT/3TC was shown to induce significant histopathological changes in myofibrils; these changes were more widespread at 13 weeks than at 26 weeks postpartum. While most light microscopic lesions resolved, some became more severe between 13 and 26 weeks postpartum. Transplacental NRTI exposure also resulted in progressive drug-specific changes in the number and ultrastructural integrity of cardiac mitochondria. These light and electron microscopic findings show that a subset of changes in cardiac mitochondria and myofibrils persisted and progressed months after transplacental exposure of an animal model to NRTIs, with combined AZT/3TC exposure yielding additive effects compared with either drug alone. PMID:20101476

  2. Pharmacokinetics of zidovudine dosed twice daily according to World Health Organization weight bands in Ugandan HIV-infected children.

    PubMed

    Fillekes, Quirine; Kendall, Lindsay; Kitaka, Sabrina; Mugyenyi, Peter; Musoke, Philippa; Ndigendawani, Milly; Bwakura-Dangarembizi, Mutsa; Gibb, Diana M; Burger, David; Walker, Ann Sarah

    2014-05-01

    Data on zidovudine pharmacokinetics in children dosed using World Health Organization weight bands are limited. About 45 HIV-infected, Ugandan children, 3.4 (2.6-6.2) years, had intensive pharmacokinetic sampling. Geometric mean zidovudine AUC0-12h was 3.0 h.mg/L, which is higher than previously observed in adults, and was independently higher in those receiving higher doses, younger and underweight children. Higher exposure was also marginally associated with lower hemoglobin.

  3. Retroviral Integrase Structure and DNA Recombination Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, Alan; Cherepanov, Peter

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Due to the importance of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase as a drug target, the biochemistry and structural aspects of retroviral DNA integration have been the focus of intensive research during the past three decades. The retroviral integrase enzyme acts on the linear double-stranded viral DNA product of reverse transcription. Integrase cleaves specific phosphodiester bonds near the viral DNA ends during the 3′ processing reaction. The enzyme then uses the resulting viral DNA 3′-OH groups during strand transfer to cut chromosomal target DNA, which simultaneously joins both viral DNA ends to target DNA 5′-phosphates. Both reactions proceed via direct transesterification of scissile phosphodiester bonds by attacking nucleophiles: a water molecule for 3′ processing, and the viral DNA 3′-OH for strand transfer. X-ray crystal structures of prototype foamy virus integrase-DNA complexes revealed the architectures of the key nucleoprotein complexes that form sequentially during the integration process and explained the roles of active site metal ions in catalysis. X-ray crystallography furthermore elucidated the mechanism of action of HIV-1 integrase strand transfer inhibitors, which are currently used to treat AIDS patients, and provided valuable insights into the mechanisms of viral drug resistance. PMID:25705574

  4. Effect of gamma radiation on retroviral recombination.

    PubMed

    Hu, W S; Temin, H M

    1992-07-01

    To elucidate the mechanism(s) of retroviral recombination, we exposed virions to gamma radiation prior to infecting target cells. By using previously described spleen necrosis virus-based vectors containing multiple markers, recombinant proviruses were studied after a single round of retrovirus replication. The current models of retroviral recombination predict that breaking virion RNA should promote minus-strand recombination (forced copy-choice model), decrease or not affect plus-strand recombination (strand displacement/assimilation model), and shift plus-strand recombination towards the 3' end of the genome. However, we found that while gamma irradiation of virions reduced the amount of recoverable viral RNA, it did not primarily cause breaks. Thus, the frequency of selected recombinants was not significantly altered with greater doses of radiation. In spite of this, the irradiation did decrease the number of recombinants with only one internal template switch. As a result, the average number of additional internal template switches in the recombinant proviruses increased from 0.7 to 1.4 as infectivity decreased to 6%. The unselected internal template switches tended to be 5' of the selected crossover even in the recombinants from irradiated viruses, inconsistent with a plus-strand recombination mechanism.

  5. Photolysis of three antiviral drugs acyclovir, zidovudine and lamivudine in surface freshwater and seawater.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chengzhi; Chen, Jingwen; Xie, Qing; Wei, Xiaoxuan; Zhang, Ya-nan; Fu, Zhiqiang

    2015-11-01

    Photodegradation is an important elimination process for many pharmaceuticals in surface waters. In this study, photodegradation of three antiviral drugs, acyclovir, zidovudine, and lamivudine, was investigated in pure water, freshwater, and seawater under the irradiation of simulated sunlight. Results showed that zidovudine was easily transformed via direct photolysis, while acyclovir and lamivudine were mainly transformed via indirect photolysis. We found that in freshwater, nitrate enhanced the photodegradation of the three antiviral drugs, bicarbonate promoted the photodegradation of acyclovir, and dissolved organic matter (DOM) accelerated the photolysis of acyclovir and lamivudine. In seawater, the photolysis of acyclovir was not susceptible to Cl(-), Br(-) and ionic strength; however, the photolysis of zidovudine was inhibited by Cl(-) and Br(-), and the photolysis of lamivudine was enhanced by Cl(-), Br(-) and ionic strength. Second-order reaction rate constants for the three antiviral drugs with (1)O2 (k1O2) and OH (kOH) were also measured. These results are important for fate and ecological risk assessment of the antiviral drugs in natural waters. PMID:26295538

  6. Zidovudine, abacavir and lamivudine increase the radiosensitivity of human esophageal squamous cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuan; Wang, Cong; Guan, Shanghui; Liu, Yuan; Han, Lihui; Cheng, Yufeng

    2016-07-01

    Telomerase is a type of reverse transcriptase that is overexpressed in almost all human tumor cells, but not in normal tissues, which provides an opportunity for radiosensitization targeting telomerase. Zidovudine, abacavir and lamivudine are reverse transcriptase inhibitors that have been applied in clinical practice for several years. We sought to explore the radiosensitization effect of these three drugs on human esophageal cancer cell lines. Eca109 and Eca9706 cells were treated with zidovudine, abacavir and lamivudine for 48 h before irradiation was administered. Samples were collected 1 h after irradiation. Clonal efficiency assay was used to evaluate the effect of the combination of these drugs with radiation doses of 2, 4, 6 and 8 Gy. DNA damage was measured by comet assay. Telomerase activity (TA) and relative telomere length (TL) were detected and evaluated by real-time PCR. Apoptosis rates were assessed by flow cytometric analysis. The results showed that all the drugs tested sensitized the esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cell lines to radiation through an increase in radiation-induced DNA damage and cell apoptosis, deregulation of TA and decreasing the shortened TL caused by radiation. Each of the drugs investigated (zidovudine, abacavir and lamivudine) could be used for sensitizing human esophageal cancer cell lines to radiation. Consequently, the present study supports the potential of these three drugs as therapeutic agents for the radiosensitization of esophageal squamous cell cancer. PMID:27220342

  7. Formation of aminyl radicals on electron attachment to AZT: Abstraction from the sugar phosphate backbone vs. one-electron oxidation of Guanine

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Amitava; Khanduri, Deepti; Pottiboyina, Venkata; Rice, Cory T.; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    Employing electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, we have characterized the radicals formed in 3′-Azido-3′-deoxythymidine (3′-AZT) and in its 5′-analog 5′-azido-5′-deoxythymidine (5′-AZT) after electron attachment in γ-irradiated aqueous (H2O or D2O) glassy (7.5 M LiCl) systems. ESR spectral studies and theoretical calculations show that the predominant site of electron capture in 3′-AZT and in 5′-AZT is at the azide group and not at the thymine moiety. The azide group in AZT is therefore more electron affinic than the most electron affinic DNA base, thymine. Electron attachment to 3′-AZT and 5′-AZT results in an unstable azide anion radical intermediate (RN3•−) that is too short lived to be observed in our work even at 77 K. At 77 K we observe the neutral aminyl radical (RNH•) after loss of N2 from RN3•− followed by protonation of nitrene anion radical (RN•−) to give RNH•. The expected RN•− intermediate is not observed as protonation from water is complete at 77 K even in under highly basic conditions. Formation of RND• in D2O solutions confirms water as the source of the NH proton in the RNH•. Our assignments to these radicals are aided by DFT calculations for hyperfine coupling constants which closely match the experimental values. On annealing to higher temperatures (ca. 160–170 K), RNH• undergoes bimolecular hydrogen abstraction reactions from the thymine methyl group and the sugar moiety resulting in the formation of the thymine allyl radical (UCH2•) and two sugar radicals - C3′•, C5′•. RNH• also results in one-electron oxidation of the guanine base in 3′-AZG. This work provides a potential mechanism for the reported radiosensitization effects of AZT. PMID:20575557

  8. Use of Endogenous Retroviral Sequences (ERVs) and structural markers for retroviral phylogenetic inference and taxonomy

    PubMed Central

    Jern, Patric; Sperber, Göran O; Blomberg, Jonas

    2005-01-01

    Background Endogenous retroviral sequences (ERVs) are integral parts of most eukaryotic genomes and vastly outnumber exogenous retroviruses (XRVs). ERVs with a relatively complete structure were retrieved from the genetic archives of humans and chickens, diametrically opposite representatives of vertebrate retroviruses (over 3300 proviruses), and analyzed, using a bioinformatic program, RetroTector©, developed by us. This rich source of proviral information, accumulated in a local database, and a collection of XRV sequences from the literature, allowed the reconstruction of a Pol based phylogenetic tree, more extensive than previously possible. The aim was to find traits useful for classification and evolutionary studies of retroviruses. Some of these traits have been used by others, but they are here tested in a wider context than before. Results In the ERV collection we found sequences similar to the XRV-based genera: alpha-, beta-, gamma-, epsilon- and spumaretroviruses. However, the occurrence of intermediates between them indicated an evolutionary continuum and suggested that taxonomic changes eventually will be necessary. No delta or lentivirus representatives were found among ERVs. Classification based on Pol similarity is congruent with a number of structural traits. Acquisition of dUTPase occurred three times in retroviral evolution. Loss of one or two NC zinc fingers appears to have occurred several times during evolution. Nucleotide biases have been described earlier for lenti-, delta- and betaretroviruses and were here confirmed in a larger context. Conclusion Pol similarities and other structural traits contribute to a better understanding of retroviral phylogeny. "Global" genomic properties useful in phylogenies are i.) translational strategy, ii.) number of Gag NC zinc finger motifs, iii.) presence of Pro N-terminal dUTPase (dUTPasePro), iv.) presence of Pro C-terminal G-patch and v.) presence of a GPY/F motif in the Pol integrase (IN) C

  9. Optimizing retroviral gene expression for effective therapies.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, Michael N; Skipper, Kristian Alsbjerg; Anakok, Omer

    2013-04-01

    With their ability to integrate their genetic material into the target cell genome, retroviral vectors (RV) of both the gamma-retroviral (γ-RV) and lentiviral vector (LV) classes currently remain the most efficient and thus the system of choice for achieving transgene retention and therefore potentially long-term expression and therapeutic benefit. However, γ-RV and LV integration comes at a cost in that transcription units will be present within a native chromatin environment and thus be subject to epigenetic effects (DNA methylation, histone modifications) that can negatively impact on their function. Indeed, highly variable expression and silencing of γ-RV and LV transgenes especially resulting from promoter DNA methylation is well documented and was the cause of the failure of gene therapy in a clinical trial for X-linked chronic granulomatous disease. This review will critically explore the use of different classes of genetic control elements that can in principle reduce vector insertion site position effects and epigenetic-mediated silencing. These transcriptional regulatory elements broadly divide themselves into either those with a chromatin boundary or border function (scaffold/matrix attachment regions, insulators) or those with a dominant chromatin remodeling and transcriptional activating capability (locus control regions,, ubiquitous chromatin opening elements). All these types of elements have their strengths and weaknesses within the constraints of a γ-RV and LV backbone, showing varying degrees of efficacy in improving reproducibility and stability of transgene function. Combinations of boundary and chromatin remodeling; transcriptional activating elements, which do not impede vector production; transduction efficiency; and stability are most likely to meet the requirements within a gene therapy context especially when targeting a stem cell population.

  10. Is Sjögren's syndrome a retroviral disease?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Circumstantial evidence suggests that retroviruses play a role in the pathogenesis of Sjögren's syndrome. Such evidence, derived from studies of patients with Sjögren's syndrome, includes the following: the presence of serum antibodies cross-reactive with retroviral Gag proteins; the occurrence of reverse transcriptase activity in salivary glands; the detection of retroviral antigens, retrovirus-like particles, or novel retroviral sequences in salivary glands; the occurrence of Sjögren's syndrome-like illnesses in patients having confirmed systematic infections with retroviruses such as human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) and human T lymphotropic virus type 1; and the beneficial effect of anti-retroviral treatment on the occurrence of HIV-1-associated sicca syndrome. Additional evidence is provided by animal models. PMID:21489323

  11. Transient gene expression mediated by integrase-defective retroviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Seung Shin; Dan, Kazuyuki; Chono, Hideto; Chatani, Emi; Mineno, Junichi; Kato, Ikunoshin

    2008-04-18

    Nonintegrating retroviral vectors were produced from a Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV)-based retroviral vector system by introducing a point mutation into the integrase (IN) gene of the packaging plasmid. The efficacy of IN-defective retroviral vectors was measured through the transient expression of ZsGreen or luciferase in human cell lines. The IN-defective retroviral vectors could transduce target cells efficiently, but their gene expression was transient and lower than that seen with the integrating vectors. IN-defective retroviral vector gene expression decreased to background levels in fewer than 10 days. Southern blot analysis of transduced K562 cells confirmed the loss of a detectable vector sequence by 15 days. The residual integration activity of the IN-defective vector was 1000- to 10,000-fold lower than that of the integrating vector. These results demonstrate that the IN-defective retroviral vectors can provide a useful tool for efficient transient gene expression targeting of primary hematopoietic stem cells and lymphoid cells.

  12. Multiple Metal Binding Domains Enhance the Zn(II) Selectivity of the Divalent Metal Ion Transporter AztA

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, T.; Reyes-Caballero, H.; Li, C.; Scott, R.A.; Giedroc, D.P.

    2009-06-03

    Transition metal-transporting P{sub 1B}-type CPx ATPases play crucial roles in mediating metal homeostasis and resistance in all cells. The degree to which N-terminal metal binding domains (MBDs) confer metal specificity to the transporter is unclear. We show that the two MBDs of the Zn/Cd/Pb effluxing pump Anabaena AztA are functionally nonequivalent, but only with respect to zinc resistance. Inactivation of the a-MBD largely abrogates resistance to high intracellular Zn(II) levels, whereas inactivation of the b-MBD is not as deleterious. In contrast, inactivation of either the a- or b-MBD has little measurable impact on Cd(II) and Pb(II) resistance. The membrane proximal b-MBD binds Zn(II) with a higher affinity than the distal N-terminal a-MBD. Facile Zn(II)-specific intermolecular transfer from the a-MBD to the higher-affinity b-MBD is readily observed by {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N HSQC spectroscopy. Unlike Zn(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II) form saturated 1:1 S{sub 4} or S{sub 3}(O/N) complexes with AztA{sup aHbH}, where a single metal ion bridges the two MBDs. We propose that the tandem MBDs enhance Zn(II)-specific transport, while stabilizing a non-native inter-MBD Cd/Pb cross-linked structure that is a poor substrate and/or regulator for the transporter.

  13. Haemoglobin recovery among HIV-1 infected patients on zidovudine-based antiretroviral therapy and other regimens in north-central Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Parrish, Deidra D; Blevins, Meridith; Megazzini, Karen M; Shepherd, Bryan E; Mohammed, Mukhtar Y; Wester, C William; Vermund, Sten H; Aliyu, Muktar H

    2014-04-01

    We conducted a study to assess trends in haemoglobin recovery among HIV-infected patients initiated on zidovudine-based combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) stratified by baseline haemoglobin level. Haemoglobin data from non-pregnant adult patients initiating cART in rural north-central Nigeria between June 2009 and May 2011 were analysed using a linear mixed effects model to assess the interaction between time, zidovudine-containing regimen and baseline haemoglobin level on the outcome of subsequent haemoglobin level. Best-fit curves were created for baseline haemoglobin in the 10th, 25th, 75th and 90th percentiles. We included 313 patients with 736 measures of haemoglobin in the analysis (239 on zidovudine and 74 on non-zidovudine-containing regimens). Median haemoglobin increased over time in both groups, with differences in haemoglobin response over time related to baseline haemoglobin levels and zidovudine use (p = 0.003). The groups of patients on zidovudine at the 10th and 90th percentiles had downward sloping curves while all other groups had upward trending haemoglobin levels. Although haemoglobin levels increased overall for patients on zidovudine-containing regimens, for those in the 10th and 90th percentiles haemoglobin levels trended downward over time. These results have implications for decisions regarding when to initiate, switch from or avoid the use of zidovudine.

  14. Retroviral integration into minichromosomes in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Pryciak, P M; Sil, A; Varmus, H E

    1992-01-01

    We describe here the use of chromatin as a target for retroviral integration in vitro. Extracts of cells newly infected with murine leukemia virus (MLV) provided the source of integration activity, and yeast TRP1ARS1 and SV40 minichromosomes served as simple models for chromatin. Both minichromosomes were used as targets for integration, with efficiencies comparable with that of naked DNA. In addition, under some reaction conditions the minichromosomes behaved as if they were used preferentially over naked DNAs in the same reaction. Mapping of integration sites by cloning and sequencing recombinants revealed that the integration machinery does not display a preference for nucleosome-free, nuclease-sensitive regions. The distributions of integration sites in TRP1ARS1 minichromosomes and a naked DNA counterpart were grossly similar, but in a detailed analysis the distribution in minichromosomes was found to be significantly more ordered: the sites displayed a periodic spacing of approximately 10 bp, many sites sustained multiple insertions and there was sequence bias at the target sites. These results are in accord with a model in which the integration machinery has preferential access to the exposed face of the nucleosomal DNA helix. The population of potential sites in chromatin therefore becomes more limited, in a manner dictated by the rotational orientation of the DNA sequence around the nucleosome core, and those sites are used more frequently than in naked DNA. Images PMID:1310932

  15. Membrane-mediated interaction between retroviral capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Nguyen, Toan

    2012-02-01

    A retrovirus is an RNA virus that is replicated through a unique strategy of reverse transcription. Unlike regular enveloped viruses which are assembled inside the host cells, the assembly of retroviral capsids happens right on the cell membrane. During the assembly process, the partially formed capsids deform the membrane, giving rise to an elastic energy. When two such partial capsids approach each other, this elastic energy changes. Or in other words, the two partial capsids interact with each other via the membrane. This membrane mediated interaction between partial capsids plays an important role in the kinetics of the assembly process. In this work, this membrane mediated interaction is calculated both analytically and numerically. It is worth noting that the diferential equation determining the membrane shape in general nonlinear and cannot be solved analytically,except in the linear region of small deformations. And it is exactly the nonlinear regime that is important for the assembly kinetics of retroviruses as it provides a large energy barrier. The theory developed here is applicable to more generic cases of membrane mediated interactions between two membrane-embedded proteins.

  16. Structural basis for retroviral integration into nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Maskell, Daniel P; Renault, Ludovic; Serrao, Erik; Lesbats, Paul; Matadeen, Rishi; Hare, Stephen; Lindemann, Dirk; Engelman, Alan N; Costa, Alessandro; Cherepanov, Peter

    2015-07-16

    Retroviral integration is catalysed by a tetramer of integrase (IN) assembled on viral DNA ends in a stable complex, known as the intasome. How the intasome interfaces with chromosomal DNA, which exists in the form of nucleosomal arrays, is currently unknown. Here we show that the prototype foamy virus (PFV) intasome is proficient at stable capture of nucleosomes as targets for integration. Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy reveals a multivalent intasome-nucleosome interface involving both gyres of nucleosomal DNA and one H2A-H2B heterodimer. While the histone octamer remains intact, the DNA is lifted from the surface of the H2A-H2B heterodimer to allow integration at strongly preferred superhelix location ±3.5 positions. Amino acid substitutions disrupting these contacts impinge on the ability of the intasome to engage nucleosomes in vitro and redistribute viral integration sites on the genomic scale. Our findings elucidate the molecular basis for nucleosome capture by the viral DNA recombination machinery and the underlying nucleosome plasticity that allows integration.

  17. Structural basis for retroviral integration into nucleosomes

    PubMed Central

    Maskell, Daniel P.; Renault, Ludovic; Serrao, Erik; Lesbats, Paul; Matadeen, Rishi; Hare, Stephen; Lindemann, Dirk; Engelman, Alan N.; Costa, Alessandro; Cherepanov, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Retroviral integration is catalyzed by a tetramer of integrase (IN) assembled on viral DNA ends in a stable complex, known as the intasome1,2. How the intasome interfaces with chromosomal DNA, which exists in the form of nucleosomal arrays, is currently unknown. Here we show that the prototype foamy virus (PFV) intasome is proficient at stable capture of nucleosomes as targets for integration. Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (EM) reveals a multivalent intasome-nucleosome interface involving both gyres of nucleosomal DNA and one H2A-H2B heterodimer. While the histone octamer remains intact, the DNA is lifted from the surface of the H2A-H2B heterodimer to allow integration at strongly preferred superhelix location (SHL) ±3.5 positions. Amino acid substitutions disrupting these contacts impinge on the ability of the intasome to engage nucleosomes in vitro and redistribute viral integration sites on the genomic scale. Our findings elucidate the molecular basis for nucleosome capture by the viral DNA recombination machinery and the underlying nucleosome plasticity that allows integration. PMID:26061770

  18. Pharmacokinetics of Zidovudine Dosed Twice Daily According to World Health Organization Weight Bands in Ugandan HIV-infected Children

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Data on zidovudine pharmacokinetics in children dosed using World Health Organization weight bands are limited. About 45 HIV-infected, Ugandan children, 3.4 (2.6–6.2) years, had intensive pharmacokinetic sampling. Geometric mean zidovudine AUC0–12h was 3.0 h.mg/L, which is higher than previously observed in adults, and was independently higher in those receiving higher doses, younger and underweight children. Higher exposure was also marginally associated with lower hemoglobin. PMID:24736440

  19. Effect of zidovudine on survival of patients with AIDS in Australia.

    PubMed

    Solomon, P J; Wilson, S R; Swanson, C E; Cooper, D A

    1990-09-01

    Since the first case of AIDS in Australia was diagnosed in December 1982, there have been substantial improvements in the treatment of AIDS-related conditions. In particular, zidovudine was widely introduced into clinical practice in Australia in June 1987. In order to evaluate its effect, we compared the survival of patients diagnosed before and after July 31, 1987 using data available in early 1989. Survival distributions were compared by means of Kaplan-Meier curves and by fitting exponential survival models incorporating a special feature of the data. Before August 1, 1987 the overall distribution of survival times for patients with AIDS in Australia is well described by an exponential distribution with a mean of 1.04 years. The corresponding median survival time for this period was 8.8 months. For patients diagnosed with AIDS after July 31, 1987 the median survival time had not been attained by December 31, 1988. However, the estimated mean survival time increased to 2.7 years. Survival times were found to be remarkably stable over the different regions of Australia. We have shown that substantial improvements in survival of patients diagnosed with AIDS in Australia are associated with the widespread availability of zidovudine from mid 1987. To the best of our knowledge this study is the first of its kind to show a major shift in the distribution of survival associated with the introduction of antiviral therapy. PMID:2392071

  20. The Host RNAs in Retroviral Particles.

    PubMed

    Telesnitsky, Alice; Wolin, Sandra L

    2016-01-01

    As they assemble, retroviruses encapsidate both their genomic RNAs and several types of host RNA. Whereas limited amounts of messenger RNA (mRNA) are detectable within virion populations, the predominant classes of encapsidated host RNAs do not encode proteins, but instead include endogenous retroelements and several classes of non-coding RNA (ncRNA), some of which are packaged in significant molar excess to the viral genome. Surprisingly, although the most abundant host RNAs in retroviruses are also abundant in cells, unusual forms of these RNAs are packaged preferentially, suggesting that these RNAs are recruited early in their biogenesis: before associating with their cognate protein partners, and/or from transient or rare RNA populations. These RNAs' packaging determinants differ from the viral genome's, and several of the abundantly packaged host ncRNAs serve cells as the scaffolds of ribonucleoprotein particles. Because virion assembly is equally efficient whether or not genomic RNA is available, yet RNA appears critical to the structural integrity of retroviral particles, it seems possible that the selectively encapsidated host ncRNAs might play roles in assembly. Indeed, some host ncRNAs appear to act during replication, as some transfer RNA (tRNA) species may contribute to nuclear import of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcription complexes, and other tRNA interactions with the viral Gag protein aid correct trafficking to plasma membrane assembly sites. However, despite high conservation of packaging for certain host RNAs, replication roles for most of these selectively encapsidated RNAs-if any-have remained elusive. PMID:27548206

  1. The Host RNAs in Retroviral Particles

    PubMed Central

    Telesnitsky, Alice; Wolin, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    As they assemble, retroviruses encapsidate both their genomic RNAs and several types of host RNA. Whereas limited amounts of messenger RNA (mRNA) are detectable within virion populations, the predominant classes of encapsidated host RNAs do not encode proteins, but instead include endogenous retroelements and several classes of non-coding RNA (ncRNA), some of which are packaged in significant molar excess to the viral genome. Surprisingly, although the most abundant host RNAs in retroviruses are also abundant in cells, unusual forms of these RNAs are packaged preferentially, suggesting that these RNAs are recruited early in their biogenesis: before associating with their cognate protein partners, and/or from transient or rare RNA populations. These RNAs’ packaging determinants differ from the viral genome’s, and several of the abundantly packaged host ncRNAs serve cells as the scaffolds of ribonucleoprotein particles. Because virion assembly is equally efficient whether or not genomic RNA is available, yet RNA appears critical to the structural integrity of retroviral particles, it seems possible that the selectively encapsidated host ncRNAs might play roles in assembly. Indeed, some host ncRNAs appear to act during replication, as some transfer RNA (tRNA) species may contribute to nuclear import of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcription complexes, and other tRNA interactions with the viral Gag protein aid correct trafficking to plasma membrane assembly sites. However, despite high conservation of packaging for certain host RNAs, replication roles for most of these selectively encapsidated RNAs—if any—have remained elusive. PMID:27548206

  2. Circular structures in retroviral and cellular genomes.

    PubMed

    Albert, F G; Bronson, E C; Fitzgerald, D J; Anderson, J N

    1995-10-01

    A computer program for predicting DNA bending from nucleotide sequence was used to identify circular structures in retroviral and cellular genomes. An 830-base pair circular structure was located in a control region near the center of the genome of the human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-I). This unusual structure displayed relatively smooth planar bending throughout its length. The structure is conserved in diverse isolates of HIV-I, HIV-II, and simian immunodeficiency viruses, which implies that it is under selective constraints. A search of all sequences in the GenBank data base was carried out in order to identify similar circular structures in cellular DNA. The results revealed that the structures are associated with a wide range of sequences that undergo recombination, including most known examples of DNA inversion and subtelomeric translocation systems. Circular structures were also associated with replication and transposition systems where DNA looping has been implicated in the generation of large protein-DNA complexes. Experimental evidence for the structures was provided by studies which demonstrated that two sequences detected as circular by computer preferentially formed covalently closed circles during ligation reactions in vitro when compared to nonbent fragments, bent fragments with noncircular shapes, and total genomic DNA. In addition, a single T-->C substitution in one of these sequences rendered it less planar as seen by computer analysis and significantly reduced its rate of ligase-catalyzed cyclization. These results permit us to speculate that intrinsically circular structures facilitate DNA looping during formation of the large protein-DNA complexes that are involved in site- and region-specific recombination and in other genomic processes. PMID:7559522

  3. Retroviral restriction factors and infectious risk in xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Meije, Y; Tönjes, R R; Fishman, J A

    2010-07-01

    The clinical application of xenotransplantation poses immunologic, ethical, and microbiologic challenges. Significant progress has been made in the investigation of each of these areas. Among concerns regarding infectious risks for human xenograft recipients is the identification in swine of infectious agents including porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERV) that are capable of replication in some human cell lines. PERV replication has, however, been difficult to demonstrate in primate-derived cell lines and in preclinical studies of non-human primates receiving porcine xenografts. Endogenous 'retroviral restriction factors' are intracellular proteins and components of the innate immune system that act at various steps in retroviral replication. Recent studies suggest that some of these factors may have applications in the management of endogenous retroviruses in xenotransplantation. The risks of PERV infection and the potential role of retroviral restriction factors in xenotransplantation are reviewed in detail.

  4. Retroviral proteases and their roles in virion maturation.

    PubMed

    Konvalinka, Jan; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Müller, Barbara

    2015-05-01

    Proteolytic processing of viral polyproteins is essential for retrovirus infectivity. Retroviral proteases (PR) become activated during or after assembly of the immature, non-infectious virion. They cleave viral polyproteins at specific sites, inducing major structural rearrangements termed maturation. Maturation converts retroviral enzymes into their functional form, transforms the immature shell into a metastable state primed for early replication events, and enhances viral entry competence. Not only cleavage at all PR recognition sites, but also an ordered sequence of cleavages is crucial. Proteolysis is tightly regulated, but the triggering mechanisms and kinetics and pathway of morphological transitions remain enigmatic. Here, we outline PR structures and substrate specificities focusing on HIV PR as a therapeutic target. We discuss design and clinical success of HIV PR inhibitors, as well as resistance development towards these drugs. Finally, we summarize data elucidating the role of proteolysis in maturation and highlight unsolved questions regarding retroviral maturation.

  5. Retroviral env glycoprotein trafficking and incorporation into virions.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    Together with the Gag protein, the Env glycoprotein is a major retroviral structural protein and is essential for forming infectious virus particles. Env is synthesized, processed, and transported to certain microdomains at the plasma membrane and takes advantage of the same host machinery for its trafficking as that used by cellular glycoproteins. Incorporation of Env into progeny virions is probably mediated by the interaction between Env and Gag, in some cases with the additional involvement of certain host factors. Although several general models have been proposed to explain the incorporation of retroviral Env glycoproteins into virions, the actual mechanism for this process is still unclear, partly because structural data on the Env protein cytoplasmic tail is lacking. This paper presents the current understanding of the synthesis, trafficking, and virion incorporation of retroviral Env proteins.

  6. Polyaromatic hydrocarbons of smoked cured muscle foods prepared by Canadian Tl'azt'en and Llheidli T'enneh First Nation communities.

    PubMed

    Kitts, David D; Chen, Xiu-Min; Broda, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Tl'azt'en and Lheidli T'enneh First Nation communities have traditionally used smoking, drying, and salting of fish and game as preservation methods to enhance food security. Our results showed that levels of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were significantly higher in smoked salmon samples compared to moose meats, and further, that PAH contents were also dependent on the duration of smoke processing. Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) was not detected in fresh or partially smoked foods, but was present in both fully smoked moose (1.4 μg/kg) and fully smoked salmon (3.6 μg/kg) meats, respectively. The total concentrations of PAH present in fully smoked meats using traditional smoke processing methods employed by Tl'azt'en and Lheidli T'enneh nations indicate that a risk assessment is required to determine the safety of these smoke-processed foods. PMID:23030651

  7. Neutralizing antibody and anti-retroviral drug sensitivities of HIV-1 isolates resistant to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Pugach, Pavel; Ketas, Thomas J.; Michael, Elizabeth; Moore, John P.

    2008-08-01

    The small molecule CCR5 inhibitors are a new class of drugs for treating infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). They act by binding to the CCR5 co-receptor and preventing its use during HIV-1-cell fusion. Escape mutants can be raised against CCR5 inhibitors in vitro and will arise when these drugs are used clinically. Here, we have assessed the responses of CCR5 inhibitor-resistant viruses to other anti-retroviral drugs that act by different mechanisms, and their sensitivities to neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). The rationale for the latter study is that the resistance pathway for CCR5 inhibitors involves changes in the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env), which are also targets for NAbs. The escape mutants CC101.19 and D1/85.16 were selected for resistance to AD101 and vicriviroc (VVC), respectively, from the primary R5 HIV-1 isolate CC1/85. Each escape mutant was cross-resistant to other small molecule CCR5 inhibitors (aplaviroc, maraviroc, VVC, AD101 and CMPD 167), but sensitive to protein ligands of CCR5: the modified chemokine PSC-RANTES and the humanized MAb PRO-140. The resistant viruses also retained wild-type sensitivity to the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) zidovudine, the non-nucleoside RTI nevirapine, the protease inhibitor atazanavir and other attachment and fusion inhibitors that act independently of CCR5 (BMS-806, PRO-542 and enfuvirtide). Of note is that the escape mutants were more sensitive than the parental CC1/85 isolate to a subset of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies and to some sera from HIV-1-infected people, implying that sequence changes in Env that confer resistance to CCR5 inhibitors can increase the accessibility of some NAb epitopes. The need to preserve NAb resistance may therefore be a constraint upon how escape from CCR5 inhibitors occurs in vivo.

  8. 'Click' chemistry synthesis and capillary electrophoresis study of 1,4-linked 1,2,3-triazole AZT-systemin conjugate.

    PubMed

    Dobkowski, Michał; Szychowska, Aleksandra; Pieszko, Małgorzata; Miszka, Anna; Wojciechowska, Monika; Alenowicz, Magdalena; Ruczyński, Jarosław; Rekowski, Piotr; Celewicz, Lech; Barciszewski, Jan; Mucha, Piotr

    2014-09-01

    The Cu(I) catalyzed Huisgen 1,3-dipolar azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) was applied for a nucleoside-peptide bioconjugation. Systemin (Sys), an 18-aa plant signaling peptide naturally produced in response to wounding or pathogen attack, was chemically synthesized as its N-propynoic acid functionalized analog (Prp-Sys) using the SPPS. Next, CuAAC was applied to conjugate Prp-Sys with 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine (AZT), a model cargo molecule. 1,4-Linked 1,2,3-triazole AZT-Sys conjugate was designed to characterize the spreading properties and ability to translocate of cargo molecules of systemin. CuAAC allowed the synthesis of the conjugate in a chemoselective and regioselective manner, with high purity and yield. The presence of Cu(I) ions generated in situ drove the CuAAC reaction to completion within a few minutes without any by-products. Under typical separation conditions of phosphate 'buffer' at low pH and uncoated fused bare-silica capillary, an increasing peak intensity assigned to triazole-linked AZT-Sys conjugate was observed using capillary electrophoresis (CE) during CuAAC. CE analysis showed that systemin peptides are stable in tomato leaf extract for up to a few hours. CE-ESI-MS revealed that the native Sys and its conjugate with AZT are translocated through the tomato stem and can be directly detected in stem exudates. The results show potential application of systemin as a transporter of low molecular weight cargo molecules in tomato plant and of CE method to characterize a behavior of plant peptides and its analogs. PMID:24889517

  9. Host factors involved in retroviral budding and release.

    PubMed

    Martin-Serrano, Juan; Neil, Stuart J D

    2011-06-16

    The plasma membrane is the final barrier that enveloped viruses must cross during their egress from the infected cell. Here, we review recent insights into the cell biology of retroviral assembly and release; these insights have driven a new understanding of the host proteins, such as the ESCRT machinery, that are used by retroviruses to promote their final separation from the host cell. We also review antiviral host factors such as tetherin, which can directly inhibit the release of retroviral particles. These studies have illuminated the role of the lipid bilayer as the unexpected target for virus restriction by the innate immune response.

  10. Haematological Safety of Perinatal Zidovudine in Pregnant HIV-1–Infected Women in Thailand: Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Briand, Nelly; Lallemant, Marc; Jourdain, Gonzague; Techapalokul, Somnuek; Tunthanathip, Preecha; Suphanich, Surachet; Chanpoo, Truengta; Traisathit, Patrinee; McIntosh, Kenneth; Coeur, Sophie Le

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To respond to the primary safety objective of the Perinatal HIV Prevention Trial 1 (PHPT-1) by studying the evolution of haematological parameters according to zidovudine exposure duration in HIV-1−infected pregnant women. Design: Multicenter, randomized, double-blind, controlled trial of different durations of zidovudine prophylaxis. Setting: 27 hospitals in Thailand. Participants: 1,436 HIV-infected pregnant women in PHPT-1. Intervention: Zidovudine prophylaxis initiation at 28 or 35 wk gestation. Outcome measures: Haemoglobin level, leucocytes, total lymphocyte counts, and absolute neutrophil counts were measured at 26, 32, and 35 wk and at delivery. The evolution of haematological parameters was estimated between 26 and 35 wk (zidovudine/placebo) and between 35 wk and delivery to compare a long versus short zidovudine exposure. For each parameter, linear mixed models were adjusted on baseline sociodemographic variables, HIV clinical stage, CD4 count, and viral load. Results: Between 26 and 35 wk, haemoglobin, leucocytes, and absolute neutrophil counts decreased in zidovudine-exposed compared to unexposed women (mean difference [95% CI] −0.4 [−0.5 to −0.3], −423 [−703 to −142], −485 [−757 to −213], respectively). However, between 35 wk and delivery, the haematological parameters increased faster in women exposed to long rather than short durations of zidovudine (0.1 [0.0 to 0.1]; 105 [18 to 191]; 147 [59 to 234], respectively). At delivery, the differences were not statistically significant, except for mean haemoglobin level, which remained slightly lower in the long zidovudine treatment group (difference: 0.2 g/dl). Zidovudine had no negative impact on the absolute lymphocyte counts. Conclusion: Zidovudine initiated at 28 wk gestation rather than 35 wk had a transient negative impact on the evolution of haematological parameters, which was largely reversed by delivery despite continuation of zidovudine. This result provides

  11. Simple and rapid RP-HPLC method for simultaneous determination of acyclovir and zidovudine in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Megha; Nautiyal, Pragya; Jain, Surendra; Jain, Deepti

    2010-01-01

    Combination therapy with acyclovir and zidovudine is used for the treatment of herpes-infected immunocompromised patients. In the view of the optimal drug concentrations (minimum effective concentrations) for viral suppression and avoidance of drug toxicity, monitoring of drug levels has been considered essential to determine drug concentrations in plasma after administration of a dose of acyclovir and zidovudine. A simple, precise, and rapid RP-HPLC method has been developed for this purpose. Chromatographic separation was performed using methanol-water (50 + 50, v/v), pH 2.5 adjusted with orthophosphoric acid, as an isocratic mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.8 mL/min with an Inertsil ODS (C18) column (5 microm particle size, 250 x 4.60 mm id). Detection was carried out using a UV photo diode array detector at 258 nm. The plasma samples were prepared by a protein precipitation method. The retention time for acyclovir and zidovudine was 3.5 +/- 0.2 and 6.2 +/- 0.3 min, respectively. The method was linear in the range of 200-1800 and 400-3600 ng/mL with LOQ of 200 ng (SD = +/-1.4) and 400 ng (SD = +/-0.9) for zidovudine and acyclovir, respectively, in plasma. The mean accuracy was 98.0 and 96.4%, with average extraction recovery of 64.8 +/- 2.1 and 77.5 +/- 1.7% for lower nominal concentrations of acyclovir and zidovudine, respectively.

  12. Zidovudine Oral

    MedlinePlus

    ... cell in the blood and cause anemia and muscle disorders. When used alone or in combination with other ... swelling of the muscle, anemia, a history of alcohol abuse, or bleeding or other blood problems.tell ...

  13. Concurrent zidovudine levels in semen and serum determined by radioimmunoassay in patients with AIDS or AIDS-related complex

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, K.; Chinnock, B.J.; Quinn, R.P.; Fletcher, C.V.; de Miranda, P.; Balfour, H.H.

    1988-05-27

    Zidovudine was present in the semen and serum of six patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome or the related complex who were receiving 200 mg of the drug orally every four to six hours. Mean semen zidovudine levels (as measured by a new radioimmunoassay) in samples collected 0.75 to 1.25 hours after oral dosing were 3.63 to 7.19 ..mu..mol/L. Levels in semen samples collected 3.0 to 4.5 hours after oral dosing were 1.68 to 6.43 ..mu..mol/L. These values are above the in vitro minimum inhibitory concentration for the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Mean serum concentrations at the early and late times after oral dosing were 0.22 to 3.07 ..mu..mol/L and 0.10 to 1.42 ..mu..mol/L, respectively. Ratios of semen/serum zidovudine levels ranged from 1.3 to 20.4. It is possible that a pH-dependent trapping mechanism, which has been described in the prostate for other antibiotics, was responsible for the relatively high semen levels observed.

  14. In vitro Evaluation of the Effect of Combination of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Polymers on Controlled Release Zidovudine Matrix Tablets.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, S; Radhakrishnan, M; Ravi, M; Prasannakumar, B; Kalyani, J

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to prepare and characterize controlled-release matrix tablets of zidovudine using hydrophilic HPMC K4 M or Carbopol 934 alone or in combination with hydrophobic ethyl cellulose. Release kinetics was evaluated by using USP XXIV dissolution apparatus No.2 (paddle) type. Scanning electron microscopy was used to visualize the effect of dissolution medium on matrix tablet surface. The in vitro results of controlled - release zidovudine tablets were compared with conventional marketed tablet Zidovir. The in vitro drug release study revealed that HPMC K4 M or Carbopol 934 preparation was able to sustain the drug release near to 6 hours. Combining HPMC K4 M or Carbopol 934 with ethyl cellulose sustained the drug release for nearly 12 h. The in vitro evaluation showed that the drug release may be by diffusion along with erosion. Results suggest that the developed controlled-release tablets of zidovudine could perform therapeutically better than marketed dosage forms, leading to improve efficacy, controlling the release and better patient compliance. PMID:20046771

  15. [Transgene complete silencing may associate with rearrangement of retroviral vector].

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Xiao, Lejia; Ma, Qingxin; Zhai, Fen; Ren, Sichong; Li, Changlong

    2011-04-01

    Transgene silencing is one of two major obstacles in both basic biomedical research for transgene and clinical practice of gene therapy. Based on the model of HT1080 cell clones, which transduced single copy of retroviral vector MGPN2, the mechanism of transgene silencing was explored in this investigation by a serial molecular techniques. In the HT1080 cell clone that absence of GFP protein synthesized, no significant aberration of epigenetic modification was detected, but the transcript size and the sequence changed that resulted in the reading frame shift. In addition to chromosomal position effect leading to transgene silencing, the transcript reading frame shift associated with retroviral vector rearrangements could induce complete silencing of transgene.

  16. Convergent capture of retroviral superantigens by mammalian herpesviruses

    PubMed Central

    Aswad, Amr; Katzourakis, Aris

    2015-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer from retroviruses to mammals is well documented and extensive, but is rare between unrelated viruses with distinct genome types. Three herpesviruses encode a gene with similarity to a retroviral superantigen gene (sag) of the unrelated mouse mammary tumour virus (MMTV). We uncover ancient retroviral sags in over 20 mammals to reconstruct their shared history with herpesviral sags, revealing that the acquisition is a convergent evolutionary event. A retrovirus circulating in South American primates over 10 million years ago was the source of sag in two monkey herpesviruses, and a different retrovirus was the source of sag in a Peruvian rodent herpesvirus. We further show through a timescaled phylogenetic analysis that a cross-species transmission of monkey herpesviruses occurred after the acquisition of sag. These results reveal that a diverse range of ancient sag-containing retroviruses independently donated sag twice from two separate lineages that are distinct from MMTV. PMID:26400439

  17. Intrinsic retroviral reactivation in human preimplantation embryos and pluripotent cells

    PubMed Central

    Grow, Edward J.; Flynn, Ryan A.; Chavez, Shawn L.; Bayless, Nicholas L.; Wossidlo, Mark; Wesche, Daniel; Martin, Lance; Ware, Carol; Blish, Catherine A.; Chang, Howard Y.; Reijo Pera, Renee A.; Wysocka, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Summary Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are remnants of ancient retroviral infections, which comprise nearly 8% of the human genome1. The most recently acquired human ERV is HERV-K (HML-2), which repeatedly infected the primate lineage both before and after the divergence of humans and chimpanzees2,3. Unlike most other human ERVs, HERV-K retained multiple copies of intact open reading frames (ORFs) encoding retroviral proteins4. However, HERV-K is transcriptionally silenced by the host with exception of certain pathological contexts, such as germ cell tumors, melanoma, or HIV infection5–7. Here we demonstrate that DNA hypomethylation at LTR elements representing the most recent genomic integrations, together with transactivation by OCT4, synergistically facilitate HERV-K expression. Consequently, HERV-K is transcribed during normal human embryogenesis beginning with embryonic genome activation (EGA) at the 8-cell stage, continuing through the emergence of epiblast cells in pre-implantation blastocysts, and ceasing during hESC derivation from blastocyst outgrowths. Remarkably, HERV-K viral-like particles and Gag proteins are detected in human blastocysts, indicating that early human development proceeds in the presence of retroviral products. We further show that overexpression of one such product, HERV-K accessory protein Rec, in a pluripotent cell line is sufficient to increase IFITM1 levels on the cell surface and inhibit viral infection, suggesting at least one mechanism through which HERV-K can induce viral restriction pathways in early embryonic cells. Moreover, Rec directly binds a subset of cellular RNAs and modulates their ribosome occupancy, arguing that complex interactions between retroviral proteins and host factors can fine-tune regulatory properties of early human development. PMID:25896322

  18. Retroviruses and inflammatory myopathies in humans and primates.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, M C

    1993-11-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the human T cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV-1), the human foamy retrovirus and the simian immunodeficiency viruses have been associated with the development of an inflammatory myopathy in humans and primates. The myopathy caused by HIV and HTLV-1 is not due to direct infection of the muscle by these viruses, but rather due to an immunopathologic process triggered by the viruses, mediated by autoaggressive CD8+ cells in the context of MHC-class I antigen expression. This has been based on a series of studies utilizing immunocytochemistry, in situ hybridization, polymerase chain reaction, and co-cultivation of human myotubes with the viruses or with HIV-1 and HTLV-1-infected homologous lymphoid cells. Because the clinical, histological and immunological picture of patients with retroviral-associated inflammatory myopathies is identical to that of patients with retroviral-negative inflammatory myopathy, there is a reasonable possibility that retroviruses may be candidate viruses in triggering inflammatory myopathies. In recent years, the antiretroviral drug AZT (Zidovudine), commonly used for the treatment of AIDS, has been shown to cause a distinct mitochondrial myopathy characterized by depletion of the muscle mitochondrial DNA due to AZT's ability to inhibit the gamma-DNA polymerase of the mitochondrial matrix. Distinction of the AZT-myopathy is clinically important because it responds to discontinuation of AZT and to administration of another antiretroviral agent such as ddI or ddC.

  19. Retroviral Vectors: Post Entry Events and Genomic Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Nowrouzi, Ali; Glimm, Hanno; von Kalle, Christof; Schmidt, Manfred

    2011-01-01

    The curative potential of retroviral vectors for somatic gene therapy has been demonstrated impressively in several clinical trials leading to sustained long-term correction of the underlying genetic defect. Preclinical studies and clinical monitoring of gene modified hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in patients have shown that biologically relevant vector induced side effects, ranging from in vitro immortalization to clonal dominance and oncogenesis in vivo, accompany therapeutic efficiency of integrating retroviral gene transfer systems. Most importantly, it has been demonstrated that the genotoxic potential is not identical among all retroviral vector systems designed for clinical application. Large scale viral integration site determination has uncovered significant differences in the target site selection of retrovirus subfamilies influencing the propensity for inducing genetic alterations in the host genome. In this review we will summarize recent insights gained on the mechanisms of insertional mutagenesis based on intrinsic target site selection of different retrovirus families. We will also discuss examples of side effects occurring in ongoing human gene therapy trials and future prospectives in the field. PMID:21994741

  20. Genotoxicity of retroviral hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Trobridge, Grant D

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Retroviral vectors have been developed for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy and have successfully cured X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), adenosine deaminase deficiency (ADA-SCID), adrenoleukodystrophy, and Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome. However, in HSC gene therapy clinical trials, genotoxicity mediated by integrated vector proviruses has led to clonal expansion, and in some cases frank leukemia. Numerous studies have been performed to understand the molecular basis of vector-mediated genotoxicity with the aim of developing safer vectors and safer gene therapy protocols. These genotoxicity studies are critical to advancing HSC gene therapy. Areas covered This review provides an introduction to the mechanisms of retroviral vector genotoxicity. It also covers advances over the last 20 years in designing safer gene therapy vectors, and in integration site analysis in clinical trials and large animal models. Mechanisms of retroviral-mediated genotoxicity, and the risk factors that contribute to clonal expansion and leukemia in HSC gene therapy are introduced. Expert opinion Continued research on virus–host interactions and next-generation vectors should further improve the safety of future HSC gene therapy vectors and protocols. PMID:21375467

  1. Synthesis of zidovudine derivatives with anti-HIV-1 and antibacterial activities.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumar, Palaniappan; Long, Jing; Swetha, Raparla; Shruthi, Vaidyanathan; Wang, Rui-Rui; Preethi, Srinivasan; Yogeeswari, Perumal; Zheng, Yong-Tang; Sriram, Dharmarajan

    2009-02-01

    Twelve novel zidovudine derivatives were prepared by modifying 5 '-hydroxyl group of sugar moiety (1-8) and 5-methyl group of thymidine nucleus (9-12) and characterized spectrally. The compounds were evaluated for anti-HIV-1, antitubercular and antibacterial activities. Compound (3-azido-tetrahydro-5- (3,4-dihydro-5-methyl-2,4-dioxopyrimidin-1(2H)-yl)furan-2-yl)methyl 7-(4-(2-phenylacetoyloxy)-3,5- dimethylpiperazin-1-yl)-5-(2-phenylacetoyloxyamino)-1-cyclopropyl-6,8-difluoro-1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline-3-carboxylate (5) was found to be the most potent anti-HIV-1 agent with EC(50) of 0.0012 microM against HIV-1(IIIB) and CC(50) of 34.05 microM against MT-4 with selectivity index of 28,375. Compound 5 inhibited Mycobacterium tuberculosis with MIC of 1.72 microM and inhibited four pathogenic bacteria with MIC of less than 1 microM. PMID:19219739

  2. Composite alginate hydrogel microparticulate delivery system of zidovudine hydrochloride based on counter ion induced aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Harekrishna; Rao, P. Venkateswar; Panda, Sanjay Kumar; Biswal, Asim Kumar; Parida, Kirti Ranjan; Dash, Jharana

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The present study deals with preparation of zidovudine loaded microparticle by counter ion induced aggregation method. During this study effect of polyacrylates and hypromellose polymers on release study were investigated. Materials and Methods: The ion induced aggregated alginate based microparticles were characterized for surface morphology, particle size analysis, drug entrapment study, in-vitro study, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) study. Results and Discussion: The result showed Eudragit RL-100 (ERL) based formulations had smoother surface as well as their mean particle sizes were found greater compared with Eudragit RS-100 (ERS) microparticles. Furthermore, drug entrapments were found to be more in ERL formulae as compared with ERS. RL3 released 101.05% drug over a period of 8th h and followed Higuchi profile and Fickian diffusion. Moreover, data obtained illustrated that, higher amount of quaternary ammonium group, alkali value, and glass transition temperature may be possible reason for improving permeability of ERL based formulations. It was also noticed, hyroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) K4M premium grade polymer sustained drug release more than HPMC K15M. In addition, drug-excipient interaction study was carried out by FTIR and DSC study. PMID:25298940

  3. Efficient conditional gene expression following transplantation of retrovirally transduced bone marrow stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jie-Yu; Mackay, Fabienne; Alderuccio, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Retroviral gene therapy combined with bone marrow stem cell transplantation can be used to generate mice with ectopic gene expression in the bone marrow compartment in a quick and cost effective manner when compared to generating and maintaining transgenic mouse lines. However a limitation of this procedure is the lack of cell specificity in gene expression that is associated with the use of endogenous retroviral promoters. Restricting gene expression to specific cell subsets utilising tissue-specific promoter driven retroviral vectors is a challenge. Here we describe the generation of conditional expression of retrovirally encoded genes in specific bone marrow derived cell lineages utilising a Cre-dependent retroviral vector. By utilising Lck and CD19 restricted Cre transgenic bone marrow stem cells, we generate chimeric animals with T or B lymphocyte restricted gene expression respectively. The design of the Cre-dependent retroviral vector enables expression of encoded MOG and GFP genes only in association with Cre mediated DNA inversion. Importantly this strategy does not significantly increase the size of the retroviral vector; as such we are able to generate bone marrow chimeric animals with significantly higher chimerism levels than previous studies utilising Cre-dependent retroviral vectors and Cre transgenic bone marrow stem cells. This demonstrates that the use of Cre-dependent retroviral vectors is able to yield high chimerism levels for experimental use and represent a viable alternative to generating transgenic animals.

  4. Nanoencapsulation and characterization of zidovudine on poly(L-lactide) and poly(L-lactide)-poly(ethylene glycol)-blend nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mainardes, Rubiana Mara; Gremião, Maria Palmira Daflon

    2012-11-01

    In this work, the antiretroviral zidovudine was encapsulated on biodegradable poly(L-lactide) (PLA) or poly(L-lactide)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLA-PEG)-blend nanoparticles by the double-emulsion solvent-evaporation method. The PLA-PEG blend was obtained by the physical mixture of the isolated polymers in organic solvent, whose PEG content ranges from 5 to 50 g in the blends. The physicochemical characteristics of the nanoparticles were evaluated applying particle-size and zeta-potential analyses, scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The release rate of zidovudine from the nanoparticles was investigated as well. The drug encapsulation efficiencies were around 50%, and the mean diameters of the nanoparticles were less than 400 nm. The PEG presence influenced all of the analyzed physicochemical parameters. The amount of drug released increases with the PEG presence in the blend. Therefore, the investigated nanoparticles are very promising carriers for zidovudine.

  5. The NRTIs Lamivudine, Stavudine and Zidovudine Have Reduced HIV-1 Inhibitory Activity in Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Lachlan R.; Tachedjian, Gilda; Ellett, Anne M.; Roche, Michael J.; Cheng, Wan-Jung; Guillemin, Gilles J.; Brew, Bruce J.; Turville, Stuart G.; Wesselingh, Steve L.; Gorry, Paul R.; Churchill, Melissa J.

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 establishes infection in astrocytes and macroage-lineage cells of the central nervous system (CNS). Certain antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) can penetrate the CNS, and are therefore often used in neurologically active combined antiretroviral therapy (Neuro-cART) regimens, but their relative activity in the different susceptible CNS cell populations is unknown. Here, we determined the HIV-1 inhibitory activity of CNS-penetrating ARVs in astrocytes and macrophage-lineage cells. Primary human fetal astrocytes (PFA) and the SVG human astrocyte cell line were used as in vitro models for astrocyte infection, and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) were used as an in vitro model for infection of macrophage-lineage cells. The CNS-penetrating ARVs tested were the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) abacavir (ABC), lamivudine (3TC), stavudine (d4T) and zidovudine (ZDV), the non-NRTIs efavirenz (EFV), etravirine (ETR) and nevirapine (NVP), and the integrase inhibitor raltegravir (RAL). Drug inhibition assays were performed using single-round HIV-1 entry assays with luciferase viruses pseudotyped with HIV-1 YU-2 envelope or vesicular stomatitis virus G protein (VSV-G). All the ARVs tested could effectively inhibit HIV-1 infection in macrophages, with EC90s below concentrations known to be achievable in the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF). Most of the ARVs had similar potency in astrocytes, however the NRTIs 3TC, d4T and ZDV had insufficient HIV-1 inhibitory activity in astrocytes, with EC90s 12-, 187- and 110-fold greater than achievable CSF concentrations, respectively. Our data suggest that 3TC, d4T and ZDV may not adequately target astrocyte infection in vivo, which has potential implications for their inclusion in Neuro-cART regimens. PMID:23614033

  6. Preparation and Use of Retroviral Vectors for Labeling, Imaging, and Genetically Manipulating Cells.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Ayumu; Zhao, Chunmei; Suh, Hoonkyo; Gage, Fred H

    2015-10-01

    Retroviral vectors are a powerful technology for achieving long-term genetic manipulation. This introduction provides some background on replication-deficient retroviral vectors based on Moloney murine leukemia virus and lentivirus. Details, examples, and associated protocols are provided for using these vectors to fluorescently label, genetically alter, and image both live and fixed murine brain tissue.

  7. Effect of zidovudine and Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia prophylaxis on progression of HIV-1 infection to AIDS. The Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Graham, N M; Zeger, S L; Park, L P; Phair, J P; Detels, R; Vermund, S H; Ho, M; Saah, A J

    1991-08-01

    Although used widely, the effectiveness of zidovudine therapy and primary prophylaxis for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) in HIV-1-infected individuals, has not been assessed in a large cohort. We have done an observational study between October, 1986, and October, 1990, of a cohort of 2145 HIV-1-seropositive men and 371 who seroconverted during the study. A Markov chain transitional analysis was used to examine the effect of zidovudine and PCP prophylaxis on the probability of progression of HIV-1 infection to AIDS (after 6, 12, 18, and 24 months) after follow-up visits categorised into one of six disease states. The six starting states were based on CD4+ lymphocyte counts and the presence of HIV-related symptoms. Use of pre-AIDS zidovudine and PCP prophylaxis was associated with significant reductions in rates of progression to AIDS at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months for participants starting with less than 350 CD4+ lymphocytes/microliter. For those starting with 350 or more CD4+ lymphocytes/microliter, non-significant protective trends were seen during 12, 18, and 24 month intervals. In multivariate log-linear models virtually all the treatment effect was due to zidovudine. However, after adjusting for the effects of zidovudine, PCP prophylaxis reduced significantly the probability of progression to a first episode of PCP during 6, 12, 18, and 24 month intervals. This study suggests that early primary PCP prophylaxis is effective in preventing first episodes of PCP, and that the efficacy of zidovudine demonstrated in clinical trials can be translated to the population level. PMID:1677108

  8. Resistance detected by pyrosequencing following zidovudine monotherapy for prevention of HIV-1 mother-to-child-transmission.

    PubMed

    Olson, Scott C; Ngo-Giang-Huong, Nicole; Beck, Ingrid; Deng, Wenjie; Britto, Paula; Shapiro, David E; Bumgarner, Roger E; Mullins, James I; Van Dyke, Russell B; Jourdain, Gonzague; Frenkel, Lisa M

    2015-07-31

    To prevent mother-to-child-transmission of HIV-1, the 2010 WHO guidelines recommended prenatal zidovudine (ZDV) monotherapy (option A). To determine if ZDV monotherapy selects for HIV resistance in antiretroviral-naive women during pregnancy, specimens from 50 individuals were examined using pyrosequencing. ZDV-resistance mutations were detected at delivery in seven women (14%, 95% confidence interval 6.6-26.5%). These data raise the question whether women administered ZDV monotherapy for prevention of mother-to-child-transmission could have higher risk of virologic failure when later started on combination antiretroviral therapy, as has been demonstrated following single-dose nevirapine prophylaxis. PMID:26244386

  9. Retroviral Transcriptional Regulation and Embryonic Stem Cells: War and Peace

    PubMed Central

    Schlesinger, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Retroviruses have evolved complex transcriptional enhancers and promoters that allow their replication in a wide range of tissue and cell types. Embryonic stem (ES) cells, however, characteristically suppress transcription of proviruses formed after infection by exogenous retroviruses and also of most members of the vast array of endogenous retroviruses in the genome. These cells have unusual profiles of transcribed genes and are poised to make rapid changes in those profiles upon induction of differentiation. Many of the transcription factors in ES cells control both host and retroviral genes coordinately, such that retroviral expression patterns can serve as markers of ES cell pluripotency. This overlap is not coincidental; retrovirus-derived regulatory sequences are often used to control cellular genes important for pluripotency. These sequences specify the temporal control and perhaps “noisy” control of cellular genes that direct proper cell gene expression in primitive cells and their differentiating progeny. The evidence suggests that the viral elements have been domesticated for host needs, reflecting the wide-ranging exploitation of any and all available DNA sequences in assembling regulatory networks. PMID:25547290

  10. Population Pharmacokinetics Study of Recommended Zidovudine Doses in HIV-1-Infected Children

    PubMed Central

    Treluyer, Jean-Marc; Frange, Pierre; Urien, Saik; Foissac, Frantz; Bouazza, Naim; Benaboud, Sihem; Blanche, Stephane; Hirt, Déborah

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to describe the pharmacokinetics of zidovudine (ZDV) and its biotransformation to its metabolite, 3*-azido-3*-deoxy-5*-glucuronylthymidine (G-ZDV), in HIV-infected children, to identify factors that influence the pharmacokinetics of ZDV, and to compare and evaluate the doses recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). ZDV concentrations in 782 samples and G-ZDV concentrations in 554 samples from 247 children ranging in age from 0.5 to 18 years were retrospectively measured. A population pharmacokinetic model was developed with NONMEM software (version 6.2), and the pharmacokinetics of ZDV were best described by a one-compartment model with first-order absorption and elimination. The effect of body weight on the apparent elimination clearance and volume of distribution was significant. The mean population parameter estimates were as follows: absorption rate, 2.86 h−1; apparent elimination clearance, 89.7 liters · h−1 (between-subject variability, 0.701 liters · h−1); apparent volume of distribution, 229 liters (between-subject variability, 0.807 liters); metabolic formation rate constant, 12.6 h−1 (between-subject variability, 0.352 h−1); and elimination rate constant of G-ZDV, 2.27 h−1. On the basis of simulations with FDA and WHO dosing recommendations, the probabilities of observing efficient exposures (doses resulting in exposures of between 3 and 5 mg/liter · h) with less adverse events (doses resulting in exposures below 8.4 mg/liter · h) were higher when the FDA recommendations than when the WHO recommendations were followed. In order to improve the FDA recommendations, ZDV doses should be reconsidered for the weight band (WB) of 20 to 40 kg. The most appropriate doses should be decreased from 9 to 8 mg/kg of body weight twice a day (BID) for the WB from 20 to 29.9 kg and from 300 to 250 mg BID for the WB from 30 to 39.9 kg. The highest dose, 300 mg BID, should be

  11. Retroviral Infection of hES Cells Produces Random-like Integration Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Kwang-il

    2012-01-01

    Retroviral integration provides us with a powerful tool to realize prolonged gene expressions that are often critical to gene therapy. However, the perturbation of gene regulations in host cells by viral genome integration can lead to detrimental effects, yielding cancer. The oncogenic potential of retroviruses is linked to the preference of retroviruses to integrate into genomic regions that are enriched in gene regulatory elements. To better navigate the double-edged sword of retroviral integration we need to understand how retroviruses select their favored genomic loci during infections. In this study I showed that in addition to host proteins that tether retroviral pre-integration complexes to specific genomic regions, the epigenetic architecture of host genome might strongly affect retroviral integration patterns. Specifically, retroviruses showed their characteristic integration preference in differentiated somatic cells. In contrast, retroviral infections of hES cells, which are known to display decondensed chromatin, produced random-like integration patterns lacking of strong preference for regulatory-element-rich genomic regions. Better identification of the cellular and viral factors that determine retroviral integration patterns will facilitate the design of retroviral vectors for safer use in gene therapy. PMID:22526396

  12. Formulation and in vitro, in vivo evaluation of extended- release matrix tablet of zidovudine: influence of combination of hydrophilic and hydrophobic matrix formers.

    PubMed

    Kuksal, Atul; Tiwary, Ashok K; Jain, Narendra K; Jain, Subheet

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to prepare and characterize extended-release matrix tablets of zidovudine using hydrophilic Eudragit RLPO and RSPO alone or their combination with hydrophobic ethyl cellulose. Release kinetics was evaluated by using United States Pharmacopeia (USP)-22 type I dissolution apparatus. Scanning electron microscopy was used to visualize the effect of dissolution medium on matrix tablet surface. Furthermore, the in vitro and in vivo newly formulated sustained-release zidovudine tablets were compared with conventional marketed tablet (Zidovir, Cipla Ltd, Mumbai, India). The in-vitro drug release study revealed that either Eudragit preparation was able to sustain the drug release only for 6 hours (94.3% +/- 4.5% release). Combining Eudragit with ethyl cellulose sustained the drug release for 12 hours (88.1% +/- 4.1% release). Fitting the in vitro drug release data to Korsmeyer equation indicated that diffusion along with erosion could be the mechanism of drug release. In vivo investigation in rabbits showed sustained-release pharmacokinetic profile of zidovudine from the matrix tablets formulated using combination of Eudragits and ethylcellulose. In conclusion, the results suggest that the developed sustained-release tablets of zidovudine could perform therapeutically better than conventional dosage forms, leading to improve efficacy and better patient compliance. PMID:16584139

  13. Abacavir, zidovudine, or stavudine as paediatric tablets for African HIV-infected children (CHAPAS-3): an open-label, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Mulenga, Veronica; Musiime, Victor; Kekitiinwa, Adeodata; Cook, Adrian D; Abongomera, George; Kenny, Julia; Chabala, Chisala; Mirembe, Grace; Asiimwe, Alice; Owen-Powell, Ellen; Burger, David; McIlleron, Helen; Klein, Nigel; Chintu, Chifumbe; Thomason, Margaret J; Kityo, Cissy; Walker, A Sarah; Gibb, Diana M

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background WHO 2013 guidelines recommend universal treatment for HIV-infected children younger than 5 years. No paediatric trials have compared nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) in first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Africa, where most HIV-infected children live. We aimed to compare stavudine, zidovudine, or abacavir as dual or triple fixed-dose-combination paediatric tablets with lamivudine and nevirapine or efavirenz. Methods In this open-label, parallel-group, randomised trial (CHAPAS-3), we enrolled children from one centre in Zambia and three in Uganda who were previously untreated (ART naive) or on stavudine for more than 2 years with viral load less than 50 copies per mL (ART experienced). Computer-generated randomisation tables were incorporated securely within the database. The primary endpoint was grade 2–4 clinical or grade 3/4 laboratory adverse events. Analysis was intention to treat. This trial is registered with the ISRCTN Registry number, 69078957. Findings Between Nov 8, 2010, and Dec 28, 2011, 480 children were randomised: 156 to stavudine, 159 to zidovudine, and 165 to abacavir. After two were excluded due to randomisation error, 156 children were analysed in the stavudine group, 158 in the zidovudine group, and 164 in the abacavir group, and followed for median 2·3 years (5% lost to follow-up). 365 (76%) were ART naive (median age 2·6 years vs 6·2 years in ART experienced). 917 grade 2–4 clinical or grade 3/4 laboratory adverse events (835 clinical [634 grade 2]; 40 laboratory) occurred in 104 (67%) children on stavudine, 103 (65%) on zidovudine, and 105 (64%), on abacavir (p=0·63; zidovudine vs stavudine: hazard ratio [HR] 0·99 [95% CI 0·75–1·29]; abacavir vs stavudine: HR 0·88 [0·67–1·15]). At 48 weeks, 98 (85%), 81 (80%) and 95 (81%) ART-naive children in the stavudine, zidovudine, and abacavir groups, respectively, had viral load less than 400 copies per mL (p=0·58); most ART

  14. Detection of a human intracisternal A-type retroviral particle antigenically related to HIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garry, R. F.; Fermin, C. D.; Hart, D. J.; Alexander, S. S.; Donehower, L. A.; Luo-Zhang, H.

    1990-01-01

    Sjogren's syndrome is an autoimmune disease that is characterized by dryness of the mouth and eyes. The loss of salivary and lacrimal gland function is accompanied by lymphocytic infiltration. Because similar symptoms and glandular pathology are observed in certain persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a search was initiated for a possible retroviral etiology in this syndrome. A human intracisternal A-type retroviral particle that is antigenically related to HIV was detected in lymphoblastoid cells exposed to homogenates of salivary tissue from patients with Sjogren's syndrome. Comparison of this retroviral particle to HIV indicates that they are distinguishable by several ultrastructural, physical, and enzymatic criteria.

  15. Retroviral-like element in a marine invertebrate.

    PubMed Central

    Springer, M S; Davidson, E H; Britten, R J

    1991-01-01

    Retroviral-like elements (RL elements) include retroviruses and long terminal repeat (LTR)-containing retrotransposons. We report the presence of sea urchin RL elements (termed SURL) in eight species of sea urchins and find that these RL elements belong to several subfamilies. The complete DNA sequence of one SURL element in Tripneustes gratilla is 5266 base pairs long, including 254-nucleotide-long identical long terminal repeats (LTRs). It contains a single open reading frame nearly 4 kilobases long including the gag and pol genes. Comparison of conserved DNA sequences of RL elements from different sea urchin species indicates that active elements have been inserting copies into echinoid genomes for at least 200 million years. PMID:1717978

  16. Retroviral display in gene therapy, protein engineering, and vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Urban, Johannes H; Merten, Christoph A

    2011-01-21

    The display and analysis of proteins expressed on biological surfaces has become an attractive tool for the study of molecular interactions in enzymology, protein engineering, and high-throughput screening. Among the growing number of established display systems, retroviruses offer a unique and fully mammalian platform for the expression of correctly folded and post-translationally modified proteins in the context of cell plasma membrane-derived particles. This is of special interest for therapeutic applications such as gene therapy and vaccine development and also offers advantages for the engineering of mammalian proteins toward customized binding affinities and catalytic activities. This review critically summarizes the basic concepts and applications of retroviral display and analyses its benefits in comparison to other display techniques.

  17. Replication of human immunodeficiency virus in monocytes. Granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) potentiates viral production yet enhances the antiviral effect mediated by 3'-azido- 2'3'-dideoxythymidine (AZT) and other dideoxynucleoside congeners of thymidine

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    We have investigated the influence of granulocyte-macrophage CSF (GM- CSF) on the replication of HIV-1 in cells of monocyte/macrophage (M/M) lineage, and its effect on the anti-HIV activity of several 2'3'- dideoxynucleoside congeners of thymidine in these cells in vitro. We found that replication of both HTLV-IIIBa-L (a monocytotropic strain of HIV-1) and HTLV-IIIB (a lymphocytotropic strain) is markedly enhanced in M/M, but not in lymphocytes exposed to GM-CSF in culture. Moreover, GM-CSF reduced the dose of HIV required to obtain productive infection in M/M. Even in the face of this increased infection, GM-CSF also enhanced the net anti-HIV activity of 3'-azido-2'3'-dideoxythymidine (AZT) and several related congeners: 2'3'-dideoxythymidine (ddT), 2'3'- dideoxy-2'3'-didehydrothymidine (D4T), and 3'-azido-2'3'-dideoxyuridine (AZddU). Inhibition of viral replication in GM-CSF-exposed M/M was achieved with concentrations of AZT and related drugs, which were 10- 100 times lower than those inhibitory for HIV-1 in monocytes in the absence of GM-CSF. Other dideoxynucleosides not related to AZT showed unchanged or decreased anti-HIV activity in GM-CSF-exposed M/M. To investigate the possible biochemical basis for these effects, we evaluated the metabolism of several drugs in M/M exposed to GM-CSF. We observed in these cells markedly increased levels of both parent and mono-, di-, and triphosphate anabolites of AZT and D4T compared with M/M not exposed to GM-CSF. By contrast, only limited increases of endogenous competing 2'-deoxynucleoside-5'-triphosphate pools were observed after GM-CSF exposure. Thus, the ratio of AZT-5'- triphosphate/2'-deoxythymidine-5'-triphosphate and 2'3'-dideoxy-2'3'- didehydrothymidine-5'-triphosphate/2'-deoxythymi dine- 5'-triphosphate is several-fold higher in GM-CSF-exposed M/M, and this may account for the enhanced activity of such drugs in these cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that GM-CSF increases HIV-1 replication in M

  18. Development of a liquid chromatographic assay for an anti-HIV tablet containing lamivudine, zidovudine and TMC278.HCL.

    PubMed

    Pendela, M; Van Gyseghem, E; Van den Mooter, G; Baert, L; Rosier, J; Hoogmartens, J; Adams, E

    2009-02-20

    A liquid chromatographic method was developed to analyse a tablet containing three anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) compounds: lamivudine, zidovudine and a compound with the code name TMC278.HCl. Due to the presence of UV absorbing chromophores in the three active components, a single LC method with UV detection was developed. A Hypersil BDS C(18) column was used as stationary phase and the assay was performed with gradient elution using mobile phases containing acetonitrile, 0.2M potassium dihydrogen phosphate and water. The sample pretreatment is performed by treating the formulation with dimethyl sulfoxide-water (1:1) followed by filtration. After method development, the influence of the different chromatographic parameters on the separation, the interference of other active compounds and excipients, the repeatability and the linearity were investigated. The method was shown to be robust, selective, linear and repeatable. Finally, the content of the compounds in the tablet was determined.

  19. Comparative Application of PLS and PCR Methods to Simultaneous Quantitative Estimation and Simultaneous Dissolution Test of Zidovudine - Lamivudine Tablets.

    PubMed

    Üstündağ, Özgür; Dinç, Erdal; Özdemir, Nurten; Tilkan, M Günseli

    2015-01-01

    In the development strategies of new drug products and generic drug products, the simultaneous in-vitro dissolution behavior of oral dosage formulations is the most important indication for the quantitative estimation of efficiency and biopharmaceutical characteristics of drug substances. This is to force the related field's scientists to improve very powerful analytical methods to get more reliable, precise and accurate results in the quantitative analysis and dissolution testing of drug formulations. In this context, two new chemometric tools, partial least squares (PLS) and principal component regression (PCR) were improved for the simultaneous quantitative estimation and dissolution testing of zidovudine (ZID) and lamivudine (LAM) in a tablet dosage form. The results obtained in this study strongly encourage us to use them for the quality control, the routine analysis and the dissolution test of the marketing tablets containing ZID and LAM drugs.

  20. Approaches to interferon combination therapy in the treatment of AIDS.

    PubMed

    Krown, S E

    1990-02-01

    High-dose interferon alfa (IFN alfa) therapy induces an overall response rate of 25% to 30% in unselected patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related Kaposi's sarcoma. Up to 50% of patients with relatively preserved immune reactivity respond to treatment. However, when dosages of 20 x 10(6) units or more per day are used to induce responses, constitutional and hematologic side effects may be significant. Therefore, efforts are being made to lower the effective dose of IFN alfa. One effort involves combining IFN alfa with zidovudine (AZT; Retrovir; Burroughs Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC). These agents act synergistically to block the multiplication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in vitro. The drugs act at different points in the HIV multiplication cycle, which may explain their synergistic interaction. In addition, AZT enhances certain immune functions that have been correlated with a positive IFN alfa response. Preliminary clinical trials indicate that antitumor responses in Kaposi's sarcoma are seen with dosages of IFN alfa as low as 4.5 x 10(6) units per day when combined with AZT. However, the combination of IFN alfa and AZT may also produce dose-limiting hematologic side effects; these effects may limit the usefulness of the drug combination. Strategies for ameliorating these toxicities through the use of additional agents are discussed.

  1. Investigating the dissolution profiles of amoxicillin, metronidazole, and zidovudine formulations used in Trinidad and Tobago, West Indies.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Arlene Villarroel; Zuo, Jieyu; Löbenberg, Raimar

    2014-10-01

    Trinidad and Tobago is a twin-island Republic in the Caribbean and like many developing countries, it has included generic drugs on the national drug formulary to decrease the financial burden of pharmaceutical medications. However, to ensure that medications received by patients are beneficial, generic drugs need to be interchangeable with the innovator which has demonstrated safety, efficacy, and quality. The objective of the study was to compare the dissolution profiles and weight variations for different formulations of amoxicillin, metronidazole, and zidovudine that are on the national drug formulary and marketed in Trinidad and Tobago. All the products investigated are categorized as class 1 drugs according to the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) and the dissolution profiles were assessed according to the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for interchangeability between products. The similarity factor, f 2, was used to determine sameness between the products. No generic formulation was found to be similar to Amoxil® 500-mg capsules. The two generic products for metronidazole 200-mg tablets demonstrated more than 85% drug release within 15 min in all three of the buffers; however, their 400-mg counterparts did not fulfill this requirement. The zidovudine 300-mg tablet complied with the requirements in buffer pH 4.5 and simulated gastric fluid (SGF) but not for simulated intestinal fluid (SIF). Some Class 1 pharmaceutical formulations may possess the same active ingredient and amount of drug but may show significant differences to in vitro equivalence requirements. Nevertheless, the dissolution process is suitable to detect these variations.

  2. Superior Effectiveness of Zidovudine Compared With Tenofovir When Combined With Nevirapine-based Antiretroviral Therapy in a Large Nigerian Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Scarsi, Kimberly K.; Eisen, Geoffrey; Darin, Kristin M.; Meloni, Seema T.; Rawizza, Holly E.; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric J.; Agbaji, Oche O.; Onwujekwe, Daniel I.; Gashau, Wadzani; Nkado, Reuben; Okonkwo, Prosper; Murphy, Robert L.; Kanki, Phyllis J.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Despite sparse efficacy data, tenofovir–emtricitabine or tenofovir–lamivudine plus nevirapine is used in many resource-constrained settings. Methods. This retrospective cohort study included patients initiating nevirapine-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) with either tenofovir–emtricitabine or lamivudine (tenofovir group) or zidovudine–lamivudine (zidovudine group). Clinical, virologic, and immunologic evaluations were performed at baseline and every 6 months. Virologic failure was defined as 2 consecutive human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-RNA values >1000 copies/mL. Patients were included from ART initiation until time of failure, regimen switch, discontinuation, or last HIV-RNA measurement. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to model factors influencing time to failure. Bias due to dependent censoring was investigated via inverse probability weighted pooled logistic regression. Results. A total of 5547 patients were evaluated; 1484 (26.8%) were in the tenofovir group and 4063 (73.2%) were in the zidovudine group. In the adjusted model, tenofovir regimen (hazard ratio [HR], 1.47; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.21–1.79) and higher baseline log10 HIV-RNA (HR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.03–1.28) were associated with virologic failure. Higher baseline log10 CD4+ cell count (HR, 0.50; 95% CI, .40–.63) and increasing age (HR, 0.98; 95% CI, .97–.99) decreased the risk of virologic failure. Inverse probability weighting results were consistent with the primary analysis. Conclusions. Compared with zidovudine–lamivudine, the use of tenofovir–lamivudine or emtricitabine in combination with nevirapine was a strong predictor of virologic failure in our cohort, which was not explained by other risk factors or criteria for regimen selection. PMID:26561532

  3. Retroviral Vectors for Analysis of Viral Mutagenesis and Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Rawson, Jonathan M.O.; Mansky, Louis M.

    2014-01-01

    Retrovirus population diversity within infected hosts is commonly high due in part to elevated rates of replication, mutation, and recombination. This high genetic diversity often complicates the development of effective diagnostics, vaccines, and antiviral drugs. This review highlights the diverse vectors and approaches that have been used to examine mutation and recombination in retroviruses. Retroviral vectors for these purposes can broadly be divided into two categories: those that utilize reporter genes as mutation or recombination targets and those that utilize viral genes as targets of mutation or recombination. Reporter gene vectors greatly facilitate the detection, quantification, and characterization of mutants and/or recombinants, but may not fully recapitulate the patterns of mutagenesis or recombination observed in native viral gene sequences. In contrast, the detection of mutations or recombination events directly in viral genes is more biologically relevant but also typically more challenging and inefficient. We will highlight the advantages and disadvantages of the various vectors and approaches used as well as propose ways in which they could be improved. PMID:25254386

  4. The Effect of Life History on Retroviral Genome Invasions

    PubMed Central

    Kanda, Ravinder K.; Coulson, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERV), or the remnants of past retroviral infections that are no longer active, are found in the genomes of most vertebrates, typically constituting approximately 10% of the genome. In some vertebrates, particularly in shorter-lived species like rodents, it is not unusual to find active endogenous retroviruses. In longer-lived species, including humans where substantial effort has been invested in searching for active ERVs, it is unusual to find them; to date none have been found in humans. Presumably the chance of detecting an active ERV infection is a function of the length of an ERV epidemic. Intuitively, given that ERVs or signatures of past ERV infections are passed from parents to offspring, we might expect to detect more active ERVs in species with longer generation times, as it should take more years for an infection to run its course in longer than in shorter lived species. This means the observation of more active ERV infections in shorter compared to longer-lived species is paradoxical. We explore this paradox using a modeling approach to investigate factors that influence ERV epidemic length. Our simple epidemiological model may explain why we find evidence of active ERV infections in shorter rather than longer-lived species. PMID:25692467

  5. Retroviral DNA Integration Directed by HIV Integration Protein in Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushman, Frederic D.; Fujiwara, Tamio; Craigie, Robert

    1990-09-01

    Efficient retroviral growth requires integration of a DNA copy of the viral RNA genome into a chromosome of the host. As a first step in analyzing the mechanism of integration of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) DNA, a cell-free system was established that models the integration reaction. The in vitro system depends on the HIV integration (IN) protein, which was partially purified from insect cells engineered to express IN protein in large quantities. Integration was detected in a biological assay that scores the insertion of a linear DNA containing HIV terminal sequences into a λ DNA target. Some integration products generated in this assay contained five-base pair duplications of the target DNA at the recombination junctions, a characteristic of HIV integration in vivo; the remaining products contained aberrant junctional sequences that may have been produced in a variation of the normal reaction. These results indicate that HIV IN protein is the only viral protein required to insert model HIV DNA sequences into a target DNA in vitro.

  6. Retroviral vectors for analysis of viral mutagenesis and recombination.

    PubMed

    Rawson, Jonathan M O; Mansky, Louis M

    2014-09-24

    Retrovirus population diversity within infected hosts is commonly high due in part to elevated rates of replication, mutation, and recombination. This high genetic diversity often complicates the development of effective diagnostics, vaccines, and antiviral drugs. This review highlights the diverse vectors and approaches that have been used to examine mutation and recombination in retroviruses. Retroviral vectors for these purposes can broadly be divided into two categories: those that utilize reporter genes as mutation or recombination targets and those that utilize viral genes as targets of mutation or recombination. Reporter gene vectors greatly facilitate the detection, quantification, and characterization of mutants and/or recombinants, but may not fully recapitulate the patterns of mutagenesis or recombination observed in native viral gene sequences. In contrast, the detection of mutations or recombination events directly in viral genes is more biologically relevant but also typically more challenging and inefficient. We will highlight the advantages and disadvantages of the various vectors and approaches used as well as propose ways in which they could be improved.

  7. The effect of life history on retroviral genome invasions.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Ravinder K; Coulson, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERV), or the remnants of past retroviral infections that are no longer active, are found in the genomes of most vertebrates, typically constituting approximately 10% of the genome. In some vertebrates, particularly in shorter-lived species like rodents, it is not unusual to find active endogenous retroviruses. In longer-lived species, including humans where substantial effort has been invested in searching for active ERVs, it is unusual to find them; to date none have been found in humans. Presumably the chance of detecting an active ERV infection is a function of the length of an ERV epidemic. Intuitively, given that ERVs or signatures of past ERV infections are passed from parents to offspring, we might expect to detect more active ERVs in species with longer generation times, as it should take more years for an infection to run its course in longer than in shorter lived species. This means the observation of more active ERV infections in shorter compared to longer-lived species is paradoxical. We explore this paradox using a modeling approach to investigate factors that influence ERV epidemic length. Our simple epidemiological model may explain why we find evidence of active ERV infections in shorter rather than longer-lived species.

  8. Larger Mammalian Body Size Leads to Lower Retroviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Katzourakis, Aris; Magiorkinis, Gkikas; Lim, Aaron G.; Gupta, Sunetra; Belshaw, Robert; Gifford, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Retroviruses have been infecting mammals for at least 100 million years, leaving descendants in host genomes known as endogenous retroviruses (ERVs). The abundance of ERVs is partly determined by their mode of replication, but it has also been suggested that host life history traits could enhance or suppress their activity. We show that larger bodied species have lower levels of ERV activity by reconstructing the rate of ERV integration across 38 mammalian species. Body size explains 37% of the variance in ERV integration rate over the last 10 million years, controlling for the effect of confounding due to other life history traits. Furthermore, 68% of the variance in the mean age of ERVs per genome can also be explained by body size. These results indicate that body size limits the number of recently replicating ERVs due to their detrimental effects on their host. To comprehend the possible mechanistic links between body size and ERV integration we built a mathematical model, which shows that ERV abundance is favored by lower body size and higher horizontal transmission rates. We argue that because retroviral integration is tumorigenic, the negative correlation between body size and ERV numbers results from the necessity to reduce the risk of cancer, under the assumption that this risk scales positively with body size. Our model also fits the empirical observation that the lifetime risk of cancer is relatively invariant among mammals regardless of their body size, known as Peto's paradox, and indicates that larger bodied mammals may have evolved mechanisms to limit ERV activity. PMID:25033295

  9. Biochemical characterization of a multi-drug resistant HIV-1 subtype AG reverse transcriptase: antagonism of AZT discrimination and excision pathways and sensitivity to RNase H inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Anna; Corona, Angela; Spöring, Imke; Jordan, Mareike; Buchholz, Bernd; Maccioni, Elias; Di Santo, Roberto; Bodem, Jochen; Tramontano, Enzo; Wöhrl, Birgitta M.

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed a multi-drug resistant (MR) HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT), subcloned from a patient-derived subtype CRF02_AG, harboring 45 amino acid exchanges, amongst them four thymidine analog mutations (TAMs) relevant for high-level AZT (azidothymidine) resistance by AZTMP excision (M41L, D67N, T215Y, K219E) as well as four substitutions of the AZTTP discrimination pathway (A62V, V75I, F116Y and Q151M). In addition, K65R, known to antagonize AZTMP excision in HIV-1 subtype B was present. Although MR-RT harbored the most significant amino acid exchanges T215Y and Q151M of each pathway, it exclusively used AZTTP discrimination, indicating that the two mechanisms are mutually exclusive and that the Q151M pathway is obviously preferred since it confers resistance to most nucleoside inhibitors. A derivative was created, additionally harboring the TAM K70R and the reversions M151Q as well as R65K since K65R antagonizes excision. MR-R65K-K70R-M151Q was competent of AZTMP excision, whereas other combinations thereof with only one or two exchanges still promoted discrimination. To tackle the multi-drug resistance problem, we tested if the MR-RTs could still be inhibited by RNase H inhibitors. All MR-RTs exhibited similar sensitivity toward RNase H inhibitors belonging to different inhibitor classes, indicating the importance of developing RNase H inhibitors further as anti-HIV drugs. PMID:26850643

  10. Biochemical characterization of a multi-drug resistant HIV-1 subtype AG reverse transcriptase: antagonism of AZT discrimination and excision pathways and sensitivity to RNase H inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Anna; Corona, Angela; Spöring, Imke; Jordan, Mareike; Buchholz, Bernd; Maccioni, Elias; Di Santo, Roberto; Bodem, Jochen; Tramontano, Enzo; Wöhrl, Birgitta M

    2016-03-18

    We analyzed a multi-drug resistant (MR) HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT), subcloned from a patient-derived subtype CRF02_AG, harboring 45 amino acid exchanges, amongst them four thymidine analog mutations (TAMs) relevant for high-level AZT (azidothymidine) resistance by AZTMP excision (M41L, D67N, T215Y, K219E) as well as four substitutions of the AZTTP discrimination pathway (A62V, V75I, F116Y and Q151M). In addition, K65R, known to antagonize AZTMP excision in HIV-1 subtype B was present. Although MR-RT harbored the most significant amino acid exchanges T215Y and Q151M of each pathway, it exclusively used AZTTP discrimination, indicating that the two mechanisms are mutually exclusive and that the Q151M pathway is obviously preferred since it confers resistance to most nucleoside inhibitors. A derivative was created, additionally harboring the TAM K70R and the reversions M151Q as well as R65K since K65R antagonizes excision. MR-R65K-K70R-M151Q was competent of AZTMP excision, whereas other combinations thereof with only one or two exchanges still promoted discrimination. To tackle the multi-drug resistance problem, we tested if the MR-RTs could still be inhibited by RNase H inhibitors. All MR-RTs exhibited similar sensitivity toward RNase H inhibitors belonging to different inhibitor classes, indicating the importance of developing RNase H inhibitors further as anti-HIV drugs. PMID:26850643

  11. Improved retroviral suicide gene transfer in colon cancer cell lines after cell synchronization with methotrexate

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cancer gene therapy by retroviral vectors is mainly limited by the level of transduction. Retroviral gene transfer requires target cell division. Cell synchronization, obtained by drugs inducing a reversible inhibition of DNA synthesis, could therefore be proposed to precondition target cells to retroviral gene transfer. We tested whether drug-mediated cell synchronization could enhance the transfer efficiency of a retroviral-mediated gene encoding herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) in two colon cancer cell lines, DHDK12 and HT29. Methods Synchronization was induced by methotrexate (MTX), aracytin (ara-C) or aphidicolin. Gene transfer efficiency was assessed by the level of HSV-TK expression. Transduced cells were driven by ganciclovir (GCV) towards apoptosis that was assessed using annexin V labeling by quantitative flow cytometry. Results DHDK12 and HT29 cells were synchronized in S phase with MTX but not ara-C or aphidicolin. In synchronized DHDK12 and HT29 cells, the HSV-TK transduction rates were 2 and 1.5-fold higher than those obtained in control cells, respectively. Furthermore, the rate of apoptosis was increased two-fold in MTX-treated DHDK12 cells after treatment with GCV. Conclusions Our findings indicate that MTX-mediated synchronization of target cells allowed a significant improvement of retroviral HSV-tk gene transfer, resulting in an increased cell apoptosis in response to GCV. Pharmacological control of cell cycle may thus be a useful strategy to optimize the efficiency of retroviral-mediated cancer gene therapy. PMID:21970612

  12. A convenient method for positive selection of retroviral producing cells generating vectors devoid of selectable markers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lai; Tsuji, Kazuhide; Mostowski, Howard; Otsu, Makoto; Candotti, Fabio; Rosenberg, Amy S

    2004-06-01

    Early retroviral vectors containing both a therapeutic gene and a dominant selectable marker gene, offered some distinct advantages with respect to gene therapy, in that they simplified the generation, isolation, and titration of retroviral producer cell clones, as well as the evaluation and selection of successfully targeted cells. However, a number of problems were engendered by this strategy: the promoter driving the selectable marker gene could interfere with transcription of the therapeutic gene, and immune responses could be induced to cells expressing foreign proteins of selection marker origin. Simplified retroviral vectors, which lack a selection marker gene, were constructed to address these problems, but the inability to use a selection marker has made identification and cloning of virus producing transfected cells a heavy burden. To maintain the benefits of simplified retroviral vectors, while providing a facile means to select packaging cells transfected with retroviral DNA, we cloned the bacterial selection marker gene encoding neomycin phosphotransferase (neo) into the plasmid backbone of the vector, but outside of the provirus, resulting in efficient selection of transfected packaging cells and generation of packaged virus which lacks the neo gene. This novel approach generates greater numbers of high infectious titer producing clones, after selection in G418 media, than does a co-transfection approach, due to integration of higher construct copy numbers per cell. No transmission of the selection marker gene to target cells was observed following retroviral transduction. Thus, our strategy eliminates the adverse consequences of a selection-based method, while diminishing the burden of identification of packaging cells transfected with vectors devoid of selectable markers.

  13. Retroviral RNA identified in the cerebrospinal fluids and brains of individuals with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Håkan; Bachmann, Silke; Schröder, Johannes; McArthur, Justin; Torrey, E. Fuller; Yolken, Robert H.

    2001-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a serious brain disease of uncertain etiology. A role for retroviruses in the etiopathogenesis of some cases of schizophrenia has been postulated on the basis of clinical and epidemiological observations. We found sequences homologous to retroviral pol genes in the cell-free cerebrospinal fluids (CSFs) of 10 of 35 (29%) individuals with recent-onset schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Retroviral sequences also were identified in the CSFs of 1 of 20 individuals with chronic schizophrenia. However, retroviral sequences were not identified in any of the CSFs obtained from 22 individuals with noninflammatory neurological diseases or from 30 individuals without evidence of neurological or psychiatric diseases (χ2 = 19.25, P < 0.001). The nucleotide sequences identified in the CSFs of the individuals with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were related to those of the human endogenous retroviral (HERV)-W family of endogenous retroviruses and to other retroviruses in the murine leukemia virus genus. Transcription of RNA homologous to members of the HERV-W family of retroviruses also was found to be up-regulated differentially in the frontal cortex regions of brains obtained postmortem from individuals with schizophrenia, as compared with corresponding tissue from individuals without psychiatric diseases. The transcriptional activation of certain retroviral elements within the central nervous system may be associated with the development of schizophrenia in at least some individuals. The further characterization of retroviral elements within the central nervous system of individuals with schizophrenia might lead to improved methods for the diagnosis and management of this disorder. PMID:11296294

  14. Amperometric sensing of anti-HIV drug zidovudine on Ag nanofilm-multiwalled carbon nanotubes modified glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Rafati, Amir Abbas; Afraz, Ahmadreza

    2014-06-01

    The zidovudine (ZDV) is the first drug approved for the treatment of HIV virus infection. The detection and determination of this drug are very importance in human serum because of its undesirable effects. A new ZDV sensor was fabricated on the basis of nanocomposite of silver nanofilm (Ag-NF) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) immobilized on glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The modified electrodes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) techniques. Results showed that the electrodeposited silver has a nanofilm structure and further electrochemical studies showed that the prepared nanocomposite has high electrocatalytic activity and is appropriate for using in sensors. The amperometric technique under optimal conditions is used for the determination of ZDV ranging from 0.1 to 400ppm (0.37μM-1.5mM) with a low detection limit of 0.04ppm (0.15μM) (S/N=3) and good sensitivity. The prepared sensor possessed accurate and rapid response to ZDV and shows an average recovery of 98.6% in real samples.

  15. Quantum chemical modelling of reactivity and selectivity of 1,2-dithiolanes towards retroviral and cellular zinc fingers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topol, Igor A.; Nemukhin, Alexander V.; Burt, Stanley K.

    Interactions of 1,2-dithiolane species with zinc-containing sites, which mimic the zinc finger domains of retroviral and the cellular zinc finger proteins, have been investigated by quantum chemistry tools. According to the calculations, the immediate domains of zinc binding sites in the cellular and retroviral zinc fingers interact differently with such agents of the disulphide family. Thus, when approaching the model cellular-type domains, the molecules of 1,2-dithiolanes experience considerable potential barriers along the reaction path. However, these species react practically barrier-less with the model retroviral-type domains at the correlated DFT level. The results of the quantum chemical modelling provide firm support to the selectivity of 1,2-dithiolanes towards retroviral and cellular zinc fingers. This can be of great practical importance for the design of therapeutics that accomplish functional inactivation of the zinc fingers of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) retroviral type nucleocapsid protein NCp7.

  16. Retroviral-mediated IL-2 gene transfer into murine neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Cho, H S; Song, J Y; Park, C Y; Lyu, C J; Kim, B S; Kim, K Y

    2000-02-01

    We used retroviral-mediated gene transfer of the human interleukin (IL)-2 gene into murine neuroblastoma cells to investigate whether locally-secreted IL-2 is able to influence the generation of anti-tumor immune responses. Supernatant obtained from cultures of approximately 1 x 10(6) IL-2 gene-transduced, G-418 selected neuro-2a cells was assayed for human IL-2 production by ELISA kit. First, to estimate whether the local secretion of IL-2 from the genetically-modified tumor cells would affect their tumorigenicity in vivo, IL-2-secreting neuro-2a cells were s.c. injected into A/J mice and tumor growth was measured weekly. And to estimate whether IL-2 transfected neuroblastoma cells protect mice from tumor development after wild-type tumor cell challenge, IL-2-secreting neuro-2a cells were s.c. injected into A/J mice. Seven days after IL-2 gene-transfected neuroblastoma cell injection, unmodified neuro-2a cells were s.c. injected into the contralateral site of A/J mice and tumor growth was measured weekly. Finally, to estimate IL-2 effect on pre-established large tumor burdens, IL-2-secreting neuro-2a cells were s.c. injected into A/J mice with established tumor and its growth was measured weekly. The IL-2 gene-transduced neuro-2a clones secreted 120.25-177.3 IU of IL-2 per ml per 10(6) cells during 24 hr. None of the mice injected with IL-2-secreting neuro-2a cells developed tumors within 6 weeks, while all of the mice injected with wild-type neuro-2a cells developed tumors. Immunization of mice with IL-2 gene-transfected, irradiated neuro-2a cells protected these animals against a subsequent challenge with wild-type tumor cells. Finally, the size of large neuroblastomas decreased after IL-2-secreting neuro-2a cell injection into mice. Local secretion of IL-2 gene-transduced tumor cells abrogates their tumorigenicity and induces protective immunity and may inhibit the growth of neuroblastoma.

  17. Genome adaptations of a tripartite motif protein for retroviral defense in cattle and sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tripartite motif (TRIM) genes encode proteins composed of RING, B-box, and coiled coil motif domains. Primate TRIM5' has been shown to be a primary determinant of retroviral host cell range restriction in primates. TRIM5 restriction was originally thought to be a primate-specific defense mechanism...

  18. Retroviral GAG proteins recruit AGO2 on viral RNAs without affecting RNA accumulation and translation.

    PubMed

    Bouttier, Manuella; Saumet, Anne; Peter, Marion; Courgnaud, Valérie; Schmidt, Ute; Cazevieille, Chantal; Bertrand, Edouard; Lecellier, Charles-Henri

    2012-01-01

    Cellular micro(mi)RNAs are able to recognize viral RNAs through imperfect micro-homologies. Similar to the miRNA-mediated repression of cellular translation, this recognition is thought to tether the RNAi machinery, in particular Argonaute 2 (AGO2) on viral messengers and eventually to modulate virus replication. Here, we unveil another pathway by which AGO2 can interact with retroviral mRNAs. We show that AGO2 interacts with the retroviral Group Specific Antigen (GAG) core proteins and preferentially binds unspliced RNAs through the RNA packaging sequences without affecting RNA stability or eliciting translation repression. Using RNAi experiments, we provide evidences that these interactions, observed with both the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) and the primate foamy virus 1 (PFV-1), are required for retroviral replication. Taken together, our results place AGO2 at the core of the retroviral life cycle and reveal original AGO2 functions that are not related to miRNAs and translation repression.

  19. Statistical analysis of sparse infection data and its implications for retroviral treatment trials in primates.

    PubMed

    Spouge, J L

    1992-08-15

    Reports on retroviral primate trials rarely publish any statistical analysis. Present statistical methodology lacks appropriate tests for these trials and effectively discourages quantitative assessment. This paper describes the theory behind VACMAN, a user-friendly computer program that calculates statistics for in vitro and in vivo infectivity data. VACMAN's analysis applies to many retroviral trials using i.v. challenges and is valid whenever the viral dose-response curve has a particular shape. Statistics from actual i.v. retroviral trials illustrate some unappreciated principles of effective animal use: dilutions other than 1:10 can improve titration accuracy; infecting titration animals at the lowest doses possible can lower challenge doses; and finally, challenging test animals in small trials with more virus than controls safeguards against false successes, "reuses" animals, and strengthens experimental conclusions. The theory presented also explains the important concept of viral saturation, a phenomenon that may cause in vitro and in vivo titrations to agree for some retroviral strains and disagree for others.

  20. Rapid titration of retroviral vectors encoding intracellular antigens by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Sladek, T L; Jacobberger, J W

    1990-06-01

    Flow cytometry was used to detect cells infected with retroviral vectors encoding both simian virus 40 large T antigen and G418 resistance after indirect immunofluorescence staining using a T-antigen-specific monoclonal antibody and a fluorescein-conjugated secondary antibody. Titers of viral stocks determined by flow cytometry were equivalent to those determined by quantitation of G418-resistant colonies.

  1. Retroviral vectors elevate coexpressed protein levels in trans through cap-dependent translation

    PubMed Central

    Gou, Yongqiang; Byun, Hyewon; Zook, Adam E.; B. Singh, Gurvani; Nash, Andrea K.; Lozano, Mary M.; Dudley, Jaquelin P.

    2015-01-01

    Retroviruses cause immunodeficiency and cancer but also are used as vectors for the expression of heterologous genes. Nevertheless, optimal translation of introduced genes often is not achieved. Here we show that transfection into mammalian cells of lentiviral or gammaretroviral vectors, including those with specific shRNAs, increased expression of a cotransfected gene relative to standard plasmid vectors. Levels of most endogenous cellular proteins were unchanged. Transfer of lentiviral vector sequences into a standard plasmid conferred the ability to give increased expression of cotransfected genes (superinduction). Superinduction by the retroviral vector was not dependent on the cell type or species, the type of reporter gene, or the method of transfection. No differences were detected in the IFN, unfolded protein, or stress responses in the presence of retroviral vectors. RT-PCRs revealed that RNA levels of cotransfected genes were unchanged during superinduction, yet Western blotting, pulse labeling, and the use of bicistronic vectors showed increased cap-dependent translation of cointroduced genes. Expression of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase target 4E-BP1, but not the mTOR inhibitor Torin 1, preferentially inhibited superinduction relative to basal protein expression. Furthermore, transcription of lentiviral vector sequences from a doxycycline-inducible promoter eliminated superinduction, consistent with a DNA-triggered event. Thus, retroviral DNA increased translation of cointroduced genes in trans by an mTOR-independent signaling mechanism. Our experiments have broad applications for the design of retroviral vectors for transfections, DNA vaccines, and gene therapy. PMID:25737543

  2. XPB mediated retroviral cDNA degradation coincides with entry to the nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Yoder, Kristine E.; Roddick, William; Hoellerbauer, Pia; Fishel, Richard

    2011-02-20

    Retroviruses must integrate their cDNA to a host chromosome, but a significant fraction of retroviral cDNA is degraded before integration. XPB and XPD are part of the TFIIH complex which mediates basal transcription and DNA nucleotide excision repair. Retroviral infection increases when XPB or XPD are mutant. Here we show that inhibition of mRNA or protein synthesis does not affect HIV cDNA accumulation suggesting that TFIIH transcription activity is not required for degradation. Other host factors implicated in the stability of cDNA are not components of the XPB and XPD degradation pathway. Although an increase of retroviral cDNA in XPB or XPD mutant cells correlates with an increase of integrated provirus, the integration efficiency of pre-integration complexes is unaffected. Finally, HIV and MMLV cDNA degradation appears to coincide with nuclear import. These results suggest that TFIIH mediated cDNA degradation is a nuclear host defense against retroviral infection.

  3. Statistical analysis of sparse infection data and its implications for retroviral treatment trials in primates.

    PubMed Central

    Spouge, J L

    1992-01-01

    Reports on retroviral primate trials rarely publish any statistical analysis. Present statistical methodology lacks appropriate tests for these trials and effectively discourages quantitative assessment. This paper describes the theory behind VACMAN, a user-friendly computer program that calculates statistics for in vitro and in vivo infectivity data. VACMAN's analysis applies to many retroviral trials using i.v. challenges and is valid whenever the viral dose-response curve has a particular shape. Statistics from actual i.v. retroviral trials illustrate some unappreciated principles of effective animal use: dilutions other than 1:10 can improve titration accuracy; infecting titration animals at the lowest doses possible can lower challenge doses; and finally, challenging test animals in small trials with more virus than controls safeguards against false successes, "reuses" animals, and strengthens experimental conclusions. The theory presented also explains the important concept of viral saturation, a phenomenon that may cause in vitro and in vivo titrations to agree for some retroviral strains and disagree for others. PMID:1323844

  4. Multiple oesophago-respiratory fistulae: sequelae of pulmonary tuberculosis in retroviral infection

    PubMed Central

    Low, Soo Fin; Ngiu, Chai Soon; Hing, Erica Yee; Abu Bakar, Norzailin

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) is a common infectious disease worldwide. However, mediastinal tuberculous lymphadenitis complicated by oesophageal involvement and oesophago-respiratory fistula is now uncommon due to improved anti-tuberculous regimes and better general awareness. The overall incidence of acquired oesophago-respiratory fistula due to infection is low, and therefore, the lesion is not often a frontrunner in differential diagnosis. Still, tuberculous oesophago-respiratory fistulae can potentially occur in patients with retroviral disease, as they tend to have atypical and more virulent manifestations. In this study, we report the case of multiple oesophago-respiratory fistulae in a patient with PTB and retroviral disease, and highlight the computed tomography features of these lesions as an atypical presentation of PTB in retroviral disease. Clinicians should suspect oesophago-respiratory fistulae if patients present with Ono’s sign, and remain particularly vigilant for patients with underlying PTB and retroviral disease, as early diagnosis and treatment could help to reduce mortality. PMID:24347038

  5. Regional Anthropometry Changes in Antiretroviral-Naïve Persons Initiating a Zidovudine-Containing Regimen in Mbarara, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Vanessa; Medard, Bitekyerezo; Taseera, Kabanda; Chakera, Ali J.; Andia, Irene; Emenyonu, Nneka; Hunt, Peter W.; Martin, Jeffrey; Scherzer, Rebecca; Weiser, Sheri D.; Bangsberg, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Lipodystrophy is commonly reported in Africa after antiretroviral therapy (ART) is initiated, but few studies have objectively measured changes in body composition. Body composition was determined in 76 HIV-infected participants from Mbarara, Uganda after starting a thymidine-analog regimen, and annual change was determined using repeated measures analysis. We measured skinfolds (tricep, thigh, subscapular, and abdomen), circumferences (arm, hip, thigh, waist), and total lean and fat mass (using bioelectric impedance analysis). A cross-sectional sample of 49 HIV-uninfected participants was studied for comparison. At baseline, most body composition measures were lower in HIV-infected than uninfected participants, but waist circumference was similar. After 12 months on ART, there was little difference in body composition measures between HIV-infected and uninfected participants; median waist circumference appeared higher in HIV-infected participants (79 vs. 75 cm; p = 0.090). Among HIV-infected participants, increases were observed in total lean and fat mass, circumference, and skinfold measures; only the increase in tricep skinfold did not reach statistical significance (+1.05 mm; 95% confidence interval: −0.24, 2.34; p = 0.11). Regional anthropometry in peripheral and central body sites increased over 12 months after ART initiation in HIV-infected persons from southwestern Uganda, suggesting a restoration to health. Gains in the tricep skinfold, a reliable marker of subcutaneous fat, appeared blunted, which could indicate an inhibitory effect of zidovudine on peripheral subcutaneous fat recovery. PMID:21128866

  6. High-resolution structure of a retroviral protease folded as a monomer

    SciTech Connect

    Gilski, Miroslaw; Kazmierczyk, Maciej; Krzywda, Szymon; Zábranská, Helena; Cooper, Seth; Popović, Zoran; Khatib, Firas; DiMaio, Frank; Thompson, James; Baker, David; Pichová, Iva; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2011-11-01

    The crystal structure of Mason–Pfizer monkey virus protease folded as a monomer has been solved by molecular replacement using a model generated by players of the online game Foldit. The structure shows at high resolution the details of a retroviral protease folded as a monomer which can guide rational design of protease dimerization inhibitors as retroviral drugs. Mason–Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV), a D-type retrovirus assembling in the cytoplasm, causes simian acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (SAIDS) in rhesus monkeys. Its pepsin-like aspartic protease (retropepsin) is an integral part of the expressed retroviral polyproteins. As in all retroviral life cycles, release and dimerization of the protease (PR) is strictly required for polyprotein processing and virion maturation. Biophysical and NMR studies have indicated that in the absence of substrates or inhibitors M-PMV PR should fold into a stable monomer, but the crystal structure of this protein could not be solved by molecular replacement despite countless attempts. Ultimately, a solution was obtained in mr-rosetta using a model constructed by players of the online protein-folding game Foldit. The structure indeed shows a monomeric protein, with the N- and C-termini completely disordered. On the other hand, the flap loop, which normally gates access to the active site of homodimeric retropepsins, is clearly traceable in the electron density. The flap has an unusual curled shape and a different orientation from both the open and closed states known from dimeric retropepsins. The overall fold of the protein follows the retropepsin canon, but the C{sup α} deviations are large and the active-site ‘DTG’ loop (here NTG) deviates up to 2.7 Å from the standard conformation. This structure of a monomeric retropepsin determined at high resolution (1.6 Å) provides important extra information for the design of dimerization inhibitors that might be developed as drugs for the treatment of retroviral infections

  7. Zidovudine-induced nail hyper-pigmentation in 45-year-old women prescribed for HIV/tuberculosis co-infection

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Vishal R.; Sadiq, Shamiya; Khajuria, Vijay; Mahajan, Annil; Sharma, Sudhaa; Gillani, Zahid

    2016-01-01

    Zidovudine is an important component of first-line antiretroviral treatment regimens used to manage HIV and tuberculosis (TB) co-infection. Nail pigmentation is documented both in adult as well as pediatric HIV patients, but to the best of our knowledge, it has not been reported in 45-year-old women of HIV/TB co-infection. Such an adverse drugs reactions (ADR), although is harmless and reversible, psychological aspects of such ADR may be immense to the extent that it can negatively affect the compliance and result in therapeutic failure. Thus, it is worth reporting. PMID:27134481

  8. Characterization of thermal and rheological properties of zidovudine, lamivudine and plasticizer blends with ethyl cellulose to assess their suitability for hot melt extrusion.

    PubMed

    Maru, Shital M; de Matas, Marcel; Kelly, Adrian; Paradkar, Anant

    2011-11-20

    The influence of antiretroviral drugs and plasticizers on the rheological and thermal characteristics of ethyl cellulose formulations intended for hot melt extrusion has been investigated. Antiretroviral drugs used were zidovudine and lamivudine, whilst plasticizers included triethylcitrate (TEC) and polyethylene glycol (PEG-6000). Physical mixtures containing ethyl cellulose with varying concentrations of drugs and plasticizers were characterized using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and parallel plate oscillatory rheometry. The viscosity of physical mixtures containing both drugs was lower than observed for pure ethyl cellulose, indicating that the drugs had a plasticizing effect. This was confirmed by lowering of the glass transition temperature (Tg) of ethyl cellulose. At the highest loading of 40% by weight, lamivudine appeared to become saturated within the polymer, causing an increase in viscosity and showing evidence of recrystallization upon cooling. Both TEC and PEG-6000 were found to lower the Tg of ethyl cellulose, although PEG-6000 recrystallized upon cooling which makes it unsuitable for use in the proposed controlled release formulations. Both plasticizers were also shown to reduce the viscosity of ethyl cellulose, more significantly so for TEC. The results indicate that ethyl cellulose formulations containing up to 40% by weight of zidovudine, not more than 30% by weight of lamivudine, with 5-10% by weight of TEC as the plasticizer are suitable for processing by hot melt extrusion. PMID:21925600

  9. Formulation and optimization of coated PLGA – Zidovudine nanoparticles using factorial design and in vitro in vivo evaluations to determine brain targeting efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Peter Christoper, G.V.; Vijaya Raghavan, C.; Siddharth, K.; Siva Selva Kumar, M.; Hari Prasad, R.

    2013-01-01

    In the current study zidovudine loaded PLGA nanoparticles were prepared, coated and further investigated for its effectiveness in brain targeting. IR and DSC studies were performed to determine the interaction between excipients used and to find out the nature of drug in the formulation. Formulations were prepared by adopting 23 factorial designs to evaluate the effects of process and formulation variables. The prepared formulations were subjected for in vitro and in vivo evaluations. In vitro evaluations showed particle size below 100 nm, entrapment efficiency of formulations ranges of 28–57%, process yield of 60–76% was achieved and drug release for the formulations were in the range of 50–85%. The drug release from the formulations was found to follow Higuchi release pattern, n–value obtained after Korsemeyer plot was in the range of 0.56–0.78. In vivo evaluations were performed in mice after intraperitoneal administration of zidovudine drug solution, uncoated and coated formulation. Formulation when coated with Tween 80 achieved a higher concentration in the brain than that of the drug in solution and of the uncoated formulation. Stability studies indicated that there was no degradation of the drug in the formulation after 90 days of preparation when stored in refrigerated condition. PMID:24648825

  10. Retroviral vector silencing during iPS cell induction: an epigenetic beacon that signals distinct pluripotent states.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Akitsu; Ellis, James

    2008-11-01

    Retroviral vectors are transcriptionally silent in pluripotent stem cells. This feature has been potently applied in studies that reprogram somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. By delivering the four Yamanaka factors in retroviral vectors, high expression is obtained in fibroblasts to induce the pluripotent state. Partial reprogramming generates Class I iPS cells that express the viral transgenes and endogenous pluripotency genes. Full-reprogramming in Class II iPS cells silences the vectors as the endogenous genes maintain the pluripotent state. Thus, retroviral vector silencing serves as a beacon marking the fully reprogrammed pluripotent state. Here we review known silencer elements, and the histone modifying and DNA methylation pathways, that silence retroviral and lentiviral vectors in pluripotent stem cells. Both retroviral and lentiviral vectors are influenced by position effects and often exhibit variegated expression. The best vector designs facilitate full-reprogramming and subsequent retroviral silencing, which is required for directed-differentiation. Current retroviral reprogramming methods can be immediately applied to create patient-specific iPS cell models of human disease, however, future clinical applications will require novel chemical or other reprogramming methods that reduce or eliminate the integrated vector copy number load. Nevertheless, retroviral vectors will continue to play an important role in genetically correcting patient iPS cell models. We anticipate that novel pluripotent-specific reporter vectors will select for isolation of high quality human iPS cell lines, and select against undifferentiated pluripotent cells during regenerative medicine to prevent teratoma formation after transplantation.

  11. Adeno-associated virus Rep-mediated targeting of integrase-defective retroviral vector DNA circles into human chromosome 19

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shuohao; Kawabe, Yoshinori; Ito, Akira; Kamihira, Masamichi

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is capable of targeted integration in human cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrase-defective retroviral vector (IDRV) enables a circular DNA delivery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A targeted integration system of IDRV DNA using the AAV integration mechanism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Targeted IDRV integration ameliorates the safety concerns for retroviral vectors. -- Abstract: Retroviral vectors have been employed in clinical trials for gene therapy owing to their relative large packaging capacity, alterable cell tropism, and chromosomal integration for stable transgene expression. However, uncontrollable integrations of transgenes are likely to cause safety issues, such as insertional mutagenesis. A targeted transgene integration system for retroviral vectors, therefore, is a straightforward way to address the insertional mutagenesis issue. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is the only known virus capable of targeted integration in human cells. In the presence of AAV Rep proteins, plasmids possessing the p5 integration efficiency element (p5IEE) can be integrated into the AAV integration site (AAVS1) in the human genome. In this report, we describe a system that can target the circular DNA derived from non-integrating retroviral vectors to the AAVS1 site by utilizing the Rep/p5IEE integration mechanism. Our results showed that after G418 selection 30% of collected clones had retroviral DNA targeted at the AAVS1 site.

  12. Retroviral E-DNA: persistence and gene expression in nondividing immune cells.

    PubMed

    Cara, Andrea; Klotman, Mary E

    2006-11-01

    Following retroviral infection of cells, not only is the proviral DNA integrated into the host genome, but there is also an accumulation of unintegrated extrachromosomal DNA (E-DNA), both linear and circular. Although the integrated DNA is responsible for the production of viral proteins and new viral progeny, the role of E-DNA has remained uncertain. Several reports have shown that E-DNA is transcriptionally active producing both RNA, as well as viral proteins and that circular E-DNA can persist in nondividing cells, raising questions regarding the potential consequences of this reservoir. Furthermore, integrase inhibitors, presently in clinical trials, shifts the balance of proviral DNA to the E-DNA form. This review is focused on recent work in this field with an emphasis on exploring the potential role of E-DNA in both pathogenesis of retroviral infections, especially HIV-1, and as a tool to deliver and express genes.

  13. Immune Protection of Retroviral Vectors Upon Molecular Painting with the Complement Regulatory Protein CD59.

    PubMed

    Heider, Susanne; Kleinberger, Sandra; Kochan, Feliks; Dangerfield, John A; Metzner, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchoring is a type of post-translational modification that allows proteins to be presented on the exterior side of the cell membrane. Purified glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein can spontaneously re-insert into lipid bilayer membranes in a process termed Molecular Painting. Here, we demonstrate the possibility of inserting purified, recombinant CD59 into virus particles produced from a murine retroviral producer cell line. CD59 is a regulator of the complement system that helps protect healthy cells from the lytic activity of the complement cascade. In this study, we could show that Molecular Painting confers protection from complement activity upon murine retroviral vector particles. Indeed, increased infectivity of CD59-modified virus particles was observed upon challenge with human serum, indicating that Molecular Painting is suitable for modulating the immune system in gene therapy or vaccination applications. PMID:27170144

  14. Efficiency of retroviral transduction into hematopoietic cells by cocultivation procedure does not correlate with viral titer.

    PubMed

    Bagnis, C; Chischportich, C; Imbert, A M; Van den Broeke, A; Cornet, V; Mannoni, P

    1997-01-01

    Relative transduction efficiency with retroviral vector-producing clones was assayed by cocultivating TF-1, a human CD34+ hematopoietic cell line and YR-2, a sheep B-lymphoid cell line, with LacZ containing vector-producing cells, and then by scoring the percentage of X-Gal+ cells. At the same time, viral titer was estimated by titration assay with murine fibroblasts. Results clearly demonstrated a lack of correlation between viral titer and efficiency of transduction into hematopoietic cells, which depends neither on the type of packaging cell line, PG-13 and GP-envAM12 in this study, nor on the type of LacZ containing retroviral vector. These results strongly favor consideration of interactions between producers and target cells of the study for the screening of producing cell lines.

  15. Dichotomy between T Cell and B Cell Tolerance to Neonatal Retroviral Infection Permits T Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mavrommatis, Bettina; Baudino, Lucie; Levy, Prisca; Merkenschlager, Julia; Eksmond, Urszula; Donnarumma, Tiziano; Young, George; Stoye, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Elucidation of the immune requirements for control or elimination of retroviral infection remains an important aim. We studied the induction of adaptive immunity to neonatal infection with a murine retrovirus, under conditions leading to immunological tolerance. We found that the absence of either maternal or offspring adaptive immunity permitted efficient vertical transmission of the retrovirus. Maternal immunodeficiency allowed the retrovirus to induce central Th cell tolerance in the infected offspring. In turn, this compromised the offspring’s ability to mount a protective Th cell–dependent B cell response. However, in contrast to T cells, offspring B cells were not centrally tolerized and retained their ability to respond to the infection when provided with T cell help. Thus, escape of retrovirus-specific B cells from deletional tolerance offers the opportunity to induce protective retroviral immunity by restoration of retrovirus-specific T cell help, suggesting similar T cell immunotherapies for persistent viral infections. PMID:27647833

  16. Hypoxia- and radiation-inducible, breast cell-specific targeting of retroviral vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lipnik, Karoline; Greco, Olga; Scott, Simon; Knapp, Elzbieta; Mayrhofer, Elisabeth; Rosenfellner, Doris; Guenzburg, Walter H.; Salmons, Brian; Hohenadl, Christine . E-mail: christine.hohenadl@vu-wien.ac.at

    2006-05-25

    To facilitate a more efficient radiation and chemotherapy of mammary tumours, synthetic enhancer elements responsive to hypoxia and ionizing radiation were coupled to the mammary-specific minimal promoter of the murine whey acidic protein (WAP) encoding gene. The modified WAP promoter was introduced into a retroviral promoter conversion (ProCon) vector. Expression of a transduced reporter gene in response to hypoxia and radiation was analysed in stably infected mammary cancer cell lines and an up to 9-fold increase in gene expression demonstrated in comparison to the respective basic vector. Expression analyses in vitro, moreover, demonstrated a widely preserved mammary cell-specific promoter activity. For in vivo analyses, xenograft tumours consisting of infected human mammary adenocarcinoma cells were established in SCID/beige mice. Immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated a hypoxia-specific, markedly increased WAP promoter-driven expression in these tumours. Thus, this retroviral vector will facilitate a targeted gene therapeutic approach exploiting the unique environmental condition in solid tumours.

  17. Expression of human. alpha. sub 1 -antitrypsin in dogs after autologous transplantation of retroviral transduced hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, M.A.; Baley, P.; Rothenberg, S.; Leland, F; Fleming, L.; Ponder, K.P.; Liu, Tajen; Finegold, M.; Darlington, G.; Pokorny, W.; Woo, S.L.C. )

    1992-01-01

    The liver represents an excellent organ for gene therapy since many genetic disorders result from the deficiency of liver-specific gene products. The authors have previously demonstrated that transgenic mouse hepatocytes can be heterologously transplanted into congenic recipients where they survived indefinitely and continued to function as hepatocytes. Here they demonstrate the autologous transplantation of retrovirally transduced canine hepatocytes. In two animals they have transplanted hepatocytes transduced with a retroviral vector containing the human {alpha}{sub 1}-antitrypsin cDNA under transcriptional control of the cytomegalovirus promotor. Both animals had significant human {alpha}{sub 1}-antitrypsin in the serum for 1 month. The results suggest that gene therapy of hepatic deficiencies may be achieved by hepatocellular transplantation after genetic reconstruction with the use of promoters of cellular genes that are active in the normal liver.

  18. Retroviral envelope gene captures and syncytin exaptation for placentation in marsupials.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, Guillaume; Vernochet, Cécile; Carradec, Quentin; Souquere, Sylvie; Mulot, Baptiste; Catzeflis, François; Nilsson, Maria A; Menzies, Brandon R; Renfree, Marilyn B; Pierron, Gérard; Zeller, Ulrich; Heidmann, Odile; Dupressoir, Anne; Heidmann, Thierry

    2015-02-01

    Syncytins are genes of retroviral origin captured by eutherian mammals, with a role in placentation. Here we show that some marsupials-which are the closest living relatives to eutherian mammals, although they diverged from the latter ∼190 Mya-also possess a syncytin gene. The gene identified in the South American marsupial opossum and dubbed syncytin-Opo1 has all of the characteristic features of a bona fide syncytin gene: It is fusogenic in an ex vivo cell-cell fusion assay; it is specifically expressed in the short-lived placenta at the level of the syncytial feto-maternal interface; and it is conserved in a functional state in a series of Monodelphis species. We further identify a nonfusogenic retroviral envelope gene that has been conserved for >80 My of evolution among all marsupials (including the opossum and the Australian tammar wallaby), with evidence for purifying selection and conservation of a canonical immunosuppressive domain, but with only limited expression in the placenta. This unusual captured gene, together with a third class of envelope genes from recently endogenized retroviruses-displaying strong expression in the uterine glands where retroviral particles can be detected-plausibly correspond to the different evolutionary statuses of a captured retroviral envelope gene, with only syncytin-Opo1 being the present-day bona fide syncytin active in the opossum and related species. This study would accordingly recapitulate the natural history of syncytin exaptation and evolution in a single species, and definitely extends the presence of such genes to all major placental mammalian clades.

  19. Thyroid epithelial cell transformation by a retroviral vector expressing SV40 large T.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, J. S.; Lemoine, L.; Lemoine, N. R.; Williams, E. D.; Wynford-Thomas, D.

    1989-01-01

    A recombinant murine retroviral vector encoding the SV40 virus large T antigen was used to infect stably an immortal line of differentiated rat thyroid epithelial cells, FRTL-5. Expression of SV40 T transformed these cells to anchorage independence and tumorigenicity but did not alter morphology or abolish tissue-specific functions and growth factor requirements. The resulting phenotype provides a model of well-differentiated human thyroid cancer. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:2544221

  20. Retroviral envelope gene captures and syncytin exaptation for placentation in marsupials

    PubMed Central

    Cornelis, Guillaume; Vernochet, Cécile; Carradec, Quentin; Souquere, Sylvie; Mulot, Baptiste; Catzeflis, François; Nilsson, Maria A.; Menzies, Brandon R.; Renfree, Marilyn B.; Pierron, Gérard; Zeller, Ulrich; Heidmann, Odile; Dupressoir, Anne; Heidmann, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Syncytins are genes of retroviral origin captured by eutherian mammals, with a role in placentation. Here we show that some marsupials—which are the closest living relatives to eutherian mammals, although they diverged from the latter ∼190 Mya—also possess a syncytin gene. The gene identified in the South American marsupial opossum and dubbed syncytin-Opo1 has all of the characteristic features of a bona fide syncytin gene: It is fusogenic in an ex vivo cell–cell fusion assay; it is specifically expressed in the short-lived placenta at the level of the syncytial feto–maternal interface; and it is conserved in a functional state in a series of Monodelphis species. We further identify a nonfusogenic retroviral envelope gene that has been conserved for >80 My of evolution among all marsupials (including the opossum and the Australian tammar wallaby), with evidence for purifying selection and conservation of a canonical immunosuppressive domain, but with only limited expression in the placenta. This unusual captured gene, together with a third class of envelope genes from recently endogenized retroviruses—displaying strong expression in the uterine glands where retroviral particles can be detected—plausibly correspond to the different evolutionary statuses of a captured retroviral envelope gene, with only syncytin-Opo1 being the present-day bona fide syncytin active in the opossum and related species. This study would accordingly recapitulate the natural history of syncytin exaptation and evolution in a single species, and definitely extends the presence of such genes to all major placental mammalian clades. PMID:25605903

  1. Significance of murine retroviral mutagenesis for identification of disease genes in human acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Erkeland, Stefan J; Verhaak, Roel G W; Valk, Peter J M; Delwel, Ruud; Löwenberg, Bob; Touw, Ivo P

    2006-01-15

    Retroviral insertion mutagenesis is considered a powerful tool to identify cancer genes in mice, but its significance for human cancer has remained elusive. Moreover, it has recently been debated whether common virus integrations are always a hallmark of tumor cells and contribute to the oncogenic process. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease with a variable response to treatment. Recurrent cytogenetic defects and acquired mutations in regulatory genes are associated with AML subtypes and prognosis. Recently, gene expression profiling (GEP) has been applied to further risk stratify AML. Here, we show that mouse leukemia genes identified by retroviral insertion mutagenesis are more frequently differentially expressed in distinct subclasses of adult and pediatric AML than randomly selected genes or genes located more distantly from a virus integration site. The candidate proto-oncogenes showing discriminative expression in primary AML could be placed in regulatory networks mainly involved in signal transduction and transcriptional control. Our data support the validity of retroviral insertion mutagenesis in mice for human disease and indicate that combining these murine screens for potential proto-oncogenes with GEP in human AML may help to identify critical disease genes and novel pathogenetic networks in leukemia.

  2. Leukemia induction after a single retroviral vector insertion in Evi1 or Prdm16.

    PubMed

    Modlich, U; Schambach, A; Brugman, M H; Wicke, D C; Knoess, S; Li, Z; Maetzig, T; Rudolph, C; Schlegelberger, B; Baum, C

    2008-08-01

    Insertional activation of cellular proto-oncogenes by replication-defective retroviral vectors can trigger clonal dominance and leukemogenesis in animal models and clinical trials. Here, we addressed the leukemogenic potential of vectors expressing interleukin-2 receptor common gamma-chain (IL2RG), the coding sequence required for correction of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency. Similar to conventional gamma-retroviral vectors, self-inactivating (SIN) vectors with strong internal enhancers also triggered profound clonal imbalance, yet with a characteristic insertion preference for a window located downstream of the transcriptional start site. Controls including lentivirally transduced cells revealed that ectopic IL2RG expression was not sufficient to trigger leukemia. After serial bone marrow transplantation involving 106 C57Bl6/J mice monitored for up to 18 months, we observed leukemic progression of six distinct clones harboring gamma-retroviral long terminal repeat (LTR) or SIN vector insertions in Evi1 or Prdm16, two functionally related genes. Three leukemic clones had single vector integrations, and identical clones manifested with a remarkably similar latency and phenotype in independent recipients. We conclude that upregulation of Evi1 or Prdm16 was sufficient to initiate a leukemogenic cascade with consistent intrinsic dynamics. Our study also shows that insertional mutagenesis is required for leukemia induction by IL2RG vectors, a risk to be addressed by improved vector design.

  3. Bicistronic retroviral vectors for combining myeloprotection with cell-surface marking.

    PubMed

    Hildinger, M; Schilz, A; Eckert, H G; Bohn, W; Fehse, B; Zander, A; Ostertag, W; Baum, C

    1999-07-01

    We have developed a retroviral vector coexpressing the multidrug-resistance 1 (MDR1) cDNA for inducing cancer drug resistance and the truncated version of the low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor (DeltaLNGFR) for cell-surface marking of transduced cells. The vector is based on the FMEV backbone which mediates high levels of gene expression in hematopoietic cells. To achieve optimal expression levels of both cDNAs, untranslated regions from MDR1 and DeltaLNGFR were removed and three different connections were tested: retroviral splice signals, an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) from encephalomyocarditis virus, and an internal promoter from the chicken beta-actin gene. As determined by two-color flow cytometry, the best correlation of the expression of both cDNAs was obtained using the vector SF1mSdelta which utilized retroviral splice signals for co-expression. Simultaneous expression of both cDNAs at the single cell level was also shown by confocal laser microscopy. Lymphoid and hematopoietic progenitor cells, including primary human CD34+ cells, transduced with SF1mSdelta acquired dominant multidrug resistance. Transduced primary CD34+ cells could be enriched in vitro based on expression of DeltaLNGFR, avoiding exposure to cytostatic agents. Thus, monitoring the selection of chemotherapy-resistant cells and analyzing their biological properties may be alleviated, both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:10455430

  4. Cryo-EM reveals a novel octameric integrase structure for β-retroviral intasome function

    PubMed Central

    Ballandras-Colas, Allison; Brown, Monica; Cook, Nicola J.; Dewdney, Tamaria G.; Demeler, Borries; Cherepanov, Peter; Lyumkis, Dmitry; Engelman, Alan N.

    2016-01-01

    Retroviral integrase (IN) catalyzes the integration of viral DNA (vDNA) into host target (tDNA), which is an essential step in the lifecycle of all retroviruses1. Prior structural characterization of IN-vDNA complexes, or intasomes, from the spumavirus prototype foamy virus (PFV) revealed a functional IN tetramer2–5, and it is generally believed that intasomes derived from other retroviral genera will employ tetrameric IN6–9. However, the intasomes of orthoretroviruses, which include all known pathogenic species, have not been characterized structurally. Using single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and X-ray crystallography, we determine here an unexpected octameric IN architecture for the β-retrovirus mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) intasome. The structure is composed of two core IN dimers, which interact with the vDNA ends and structurally mimic the PFV IN tetramer, and two flanking IN dimers that engage the core structure via their IN C-terminal domains (CTDs). Contrary to the belief that tetrameric IN components are sufficient to catalyze integration, the flanking IN dimers were necessary for MMTV IN activity. The IN octamer solves a conundrum for the β- as well as α-retroviruses by providing critical CTDs to the intasome core that cannot be provided in cis due to evolutionarily restrictive catalytic core domain (CCD)-CTD linker regions. The octameric architecture of the MMTV intasome provides a new paradigm for the structural basis of retroviral DNA integration. PMID:26887496

  5. Rapid Transcriptional Pulsing Dynamics of High Expressing Retroviral Transgenes in Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Mandy Y. M.; Rival-Gervier, Sylvie; Pasceri, Peter; Ellis, James

    2012-01-01

    Single cell imaging studies suggest that transcription is not continuous and occurs as discrete pulses of gene activity. To study mechanisms by which retroviral transgenes can transcribe to high levels, we used the MS2 system to visualize transcriptional dynamics of high expressing proviral integration sites in embryonic stem (ES) cells. We established two ES cell lines each bearing a single copy, self-inactivating retroviral vector with a strong ubiquitous human EF1α gene promoter directing expression of mRFP fused to an MS2-stem-loop array. Transfection of MS2-EGFP generated EGFP focal dots bound to the mRFP-MS2 stem loop mRNA. These transcription foci colocalized with the transgene integration site detected by immunoFISH. Live tracking of single cells for 20 minutes detected EGFP focal dots that displayed frequent and rapid fluctuations in transcription over periods as short as 25 seconds. Similarly rapid fluctuations were detected from focal doublet signals that colocalized with replicated proviral integration sites by immunoFISH, consistent with transcriptional pulses from sister chromatids. We concluded that retroviral transgenes experience rapid transcriptional pulses in clonal ES cell lines that exhibit high level expression. These events are directed by a constitutive housekeeping gene promoter and may provide precedence for rapid transcriptional pulsing at endogenous genes in mammalian stem cells. PMID:22606340

  6. Cross- and Co-Packaging of Retroviral RNAs and Their Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Lizna M.; Rizvi, Tahir A.; Mustafa, Farah

    2016-01-01

    Retroviruses belong to the family Retroviridae and are ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles that contain a dimeric RNA genome. Retroviral particle assembly is a complex process, and how the virus is able to recognize and specifically capture the genomic RNA (gRNA) among millions of other cellular and spliced retroviral RNAs has been the subject of extensive investigation over the last two decades. The specificity towards RNA packaging requires higher order interactions of the retroviral gRNA with the structural Gag proteins. Moreover, several retroviruses have been shown to have the ability to cross-/co-package gRNA from other retroviruses, despite little sequence homology. This review will compare the determinants of gRNA encapsidation among different retroviruses, followed by an examination of our current understanding of the interaction between diverse viral genomes and heterologous proteins, leading to their cross-/co-packaging. Retroviruses are well-known serious animal and human pathogens, and such a cross-/co-packaging phenomenon could result in the generation of novel viral variants with unknown pathogenic potential. At the same time, however, an enhanced understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in these specific interactions makes retroviruses an attractive target for anti-viral drugs, vaccines, and vectors for human gene therapy. PMID:27727192

  7. Homo- and hetero-dimerization of human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 2B7 (UGT2B7) wild type and its allelic variants affect zidovudine glucuronidation activity.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lingmin; Qian, Sainan; Xiao, Yongsheng; Sun, Hongying; Zeng, Su

    2015-05-01

    Most human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT; EC 2.4.1.17) genes contain non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) which cause amino acid substitutions. Allelic variants caused by nsSNPs may exhibit absent or reduced enzyme activity. UGT2B7 is one of the most important UGTs that glucuronidates abundant endobiotics and xenobiotics, such as estriol, morphine, and anticancer drugs. Three nsSNPs, UGT2B7*71S (211G>T), UGT2B7*2 (802C>T) and UGT2B7*5 (1192G>A) are observed in the UGT2B7 gene, and they code for allozymes UGT2B7*71S (A71S), UGT2B7*2 (H268Y), and UGT2B7*5 (D398N). UGT2B7 has been observed to form oligomers that affect its enzymatic activity and in this study, we investigated protein-protein interactions among UGT2B7 allozymes wild type (WT), A71S, H268Y and D398N, by performing a systematic quantitative fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) analysis in combination with co-immunoprecipitation assay. Quantitative FRET analysis revealed that UGT2B7 allozymes formed homo- and hetero-dimers and showed distinct features in donor-acceptor distances. Both codon 71 and codon 268 in the N-terminal domain were involved in the dimeric interaction. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments also proved that UGT2B7 allozymes formed stable dimers. The glucuronidation activities of homo- and hetero-dimers were further tested with zidovudine as the substrate. An increase in activity was observed when WT hetero-dimerized with A71S compared with homo-dimers, while both H268Y and D398N impaired the activity of WT and A71S by forming hetero-dimers. In addition, zidovudine glucuronidation activity is associated with FRET distance. These findings provide insights into the consequences of amino acid substitution in UGT2B7 on zidovudine glucuronidation and the association between protein-protein interaction and glucuronidation activity. PMID:25770680

  8. TRIM5α Degradation via Autophagy Is Not Required for Retroviral Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Imam, Sabrina; Talley, Sarah; Nelson, Rachel S.; Dharan, Adarsh; O'Connor, Christopher; Hope, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT TRIM5α is an interferon-inducible retroviral restriction factor that prevents infection by inducing the abortive disassembly of capsid cores recognized by its C-terminal PRY/SPRY domain. The mechanism by which TRIM5α mediates the disassembly of viral cores is poorly understood. Previous studies demonstrated that proteasome inhibitors abrogate the ability of TRIM5α to induce premature core disassembly and prevent reverse transcription; however, viral infection is still inhibited, indicating that the proteasome is partially involved in the restriction process. Alternatively, we and others have observed that TRIM5α associates with proteins involved in autophagic degradation pathways, and one recent study found that autophagic degradation is required for the restriction of retroviruses by TRIM5α. Here, we show that TRIM5α is basally degraded via autophagy in the absence of restriction-sensitive virus. We observe that the autophagy markers LC3b and lysosome-associated membrane protein 2A (LAMP2A) localize to a subset of TRIM5α cytoplasmic bodies, and inhibition of lysosomal degradation with bafilomycin A1 increases this association. To test the requirement for macroautophagy in restriction, we examined the ability of TRIM5α to restrict retroviral infection in cells depleted of the autophagic mediators ATG5, Beclin1, and p62. In all cases, restriction of retroviruses by human TRIM5α, rhesus macaque TRIM5α, and owl monkey TRIM-Cyp remained potent in cells depleted of these autophagic effectors by small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown or clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas9 genome editing. Collectively, these results are consistent with observations that the turnover of TRIM5α proteins is sensitive to autophagy inhibition; however, the data presented here do not support observations that the inhibition of autophagy abrogates retroviral restriction by TRIM5 proteins. IMPORTANCE Restriction factors are a class of

  9. Lamivudine and Zidovudine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Talk to your pharmacist or contact your local garbage/recycling department to learn about take-back programs in your community. See the FDA's Safe Disposal of Medicines website (http://goo.gl/c4Rm4p) for ...

  10. Response to antiretroviral therapy (ART): comparing women with previous use of zidovudine monotherapy (ZDVm) in pregnancy with ART naïve women

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Short-term zidovudine monotherapy (ZDVm) remains an option for some pregnant HIV-positive women not requiring treatment for their own health but may affect treatment responses once antiretroviral therapy (ART) is subsequently started. Methods Data were obtained by linking two UK studies: the UK Collaborative HIV Cohort (UK CHIC) study and the National Study of HIV in Pregnancy and Childhood (NSHPC). Treatment responses were assessed for 2028 women initiating ART at least one year after HIV-diagnosis. Outcomes were compared using logistic regression, proportional hazards regression or linear regression. Results In adjusted analyses, ART-naïve (n = 1937) and ZDVm-experienced (n = 91) women had similar increases in CD4 count and a similar proportion achieving virological suppression; both groups had a low risk of AIDS. Conclusions In this setting, antenatal ZDVm exposure did not adversely impact on outcomes once ART was initiated for the woman’s health. PMID:24593018

  11. Lineage-Specific Expansions of Retroviral Insertions within the Genomes of African Great Apes but Not Humans and Orangutans

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Retroviral infections of the germline have the potential to episodically alter gene function and genome structure during the course of evolution. Horizontal transmissions between species have been proposed, but little evidence exists for such events in the human/great ape lineage of evolution. Based on analysis of finished BAC chimpanzee genome sequence, we characterize a retroviral element (Pan troglodytes endogenous retrovirus 1 [PTERV1]) that has become integrated in the germline of African great ape and Old World monkey species but is absent from humans and Asian ape genomes. We unambiguously map 287 retroviral integration sites and determine that approximately 95.8% of the insertions occur at non-orthologous regions between closely related species. Phylogenetic analysis of the endogenous retrovirus reveals that the gorilla and chimpanzee elements share a monophyletic origin with a subset of the Old World monkey retroviral elements, but that the average sequence divergence exceeds neutral expectation for a strictly nuclear inherited DNA molecule. Within the chimpanzee, there is a significant integration bias against genes, with only 14 of these insertions mapping within intronic regions. Six out of ten of these genes, for which there are expression data, show significant differences in transcript expression between human and chimpanzee. Our data are consistent with a retroviral infection that bombarded the genomes of chimpanzees and gorillas independently and concurrently, 3–4 million years ago. We speculate on the potential impact of such recent events on the evolution of humans and great apes. PMID:15737067

  12. Direct injection of a recombinant retroviral vector induces human immunodeficiency virus-specific immune responses in mice and nonhuman primates.

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, M J; Laube, L S; Lee, V; Austin, M; Chada, S; Anderson, C G; Townsend, K; Jolly, D J; Warner, J F

    1994-01-01

    The cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response plays an important role in controlling the severity and duration of viral infections. Immunization by direct in vivo administration of retroviral vector particles represents an efficient means of introducing and expressing genes and, subsequently, the proteins they encode in vivo in mammalian cells. In this manner foreign proteins can be provided to the endogenous, class I major histocompatibility complex antigen presentation pathway leading to CTL activation. A nonreplicating recombinant retroviral vector, encoding the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) IIIB envelope and rev proteins, has been developed and examined for stimulation of immune responses in mouse, rhesus macaque, and baboon models. Animals were immunized by direct intramuscular injection of the retroviral vector particles. Vector-immunized mice, macaques, and baboons generated long-lived CD8+, major histocompatibility complex-restricted CTL responses that were HIV-1 protein specific. The CTL responses were found to be dependent on the ability of the retroviral vector to transduce cells. The vector also elicited HIV-1 envelope-specific antibody responses in mice and baboons. These studies demonstrate the ability of a retroviral vector encoding HIV-1 proteins to stimulate cellular and humoral immune responses and suggest that retrovector immunization may provide an effective means of inducing or augmenting CTL responses in HIV-1-infected individuals. PMID:8035504

  13. [Screening of drug resistent gene by cyclical packaging rescue of hepatocellular carcinoma retroviral cDNA libraries].

    PubMed

    Dai, Wenyan; Zhu, Ruiyu; Jin, Jian

    2016-02-01

    Multidrug resistant genes are highly expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma that seriousty affects the effect of chemotherapy. Screening of resistant genes from HCC cells and studying its mechanism of drug resistance will be helpful to improve the effecacy of chemotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma. Here we described an alternative method called cyclical packaging rescue (CPR). First we constructed a retrovirus cDNA library of hepatoma cells and used it to infect fibroblasts. Then we added drugs to screen survival cells. The survival cells, stably integrated helper-free retroviral libraries, were recovered rapidly after transfection with plasmids expressing retroviral gag-pol and env genes. Through this method, retroviral RNAs were directly repackaged into new infectious virions. Recovered retroviral supernatant was then used to reinfect fresh target cells. When performed in concert with selection using functional assays, cDNAs regulating functional responses could be identified by enrichment through multiple rounds of retroviral library recovery and retransmission. Using CPR, we obtained several cDNAs. After a preliminary detection, we found Ribosomal protein S11 (RPS11), Ribosomal protein L6 (RPL6), Ribosomal protein L11 (RPL11), Ribosomal protein L24 (RPL24) possibly had drug resistant function. PMID:27382770

  14. [Screening of drug resistent gene by cyclical packaging rescue of hepatocellular carcinoma retroviral cDNA libraries].

    PubMed

    Dai, Wenyan; Zhu, Ruiyu; Jin, Jian

    2016-02-01

    Multidrug resistant genes are highly expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma that seriousty affects the effect of chemotherapy. Screening of resistant genes from HCC cells and studying its mechanism of drug resistance will be helpful to improve the effecacy of chemotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma. Here we described an alternative method called cyclical packaging rescue (CPR). First we constructed a retrovirus cDNA library of hepatoma cells and used it to infect fibroblasts. Then we added drugs to screen survival cells. The survival cells, stably integrated helper-free retroviral libraries, were recovered rapidly after transfection with plasmids expressing retroviral gag-pol and env genes. Through this method, retroviral RNAs were directly repackaged into new infectious virions. Recovered retroviral supernatant was then used to reinfect fresh target cells. When performed in concert with selection using functional assays, cDNAs regulating functional responses could be identified by enrichment through multiple rounds of retroviral library recovery and retransmission. Using CPR, we obtained several cDNAs. After a preliminary detection, we found Ribosomal protein S11 (RPS11), Ribosomal protein L6 (RPL6), Ribosomal protein L11 (RPL11), Ribosomal protein L24 (RPL24) possibly had drug resistant function.

  15. Developmental-stage-specific expression and regulation of an amphotropic retroviral receptor in hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, C; Bank, A

    1996-01-01

    Expression of the transmembrane receptor protein Ram-1 may be critical to optimizing retroviral gene transfer. Ram-1 acts as both a sodium-dependent phosphate transporter and a receptor for amphotropic retroviruses. We previously reported detectable Ram-1 in murine hematopoietic fetal liver cells (FLC) despite resistance of these cells to amphotropic retroviral transduction (infection). We document here that Ram-1 expression is completely absent in murine yolk sac cells from days 9.5 through 13.5 of ontogeny and first appears at low levels in midgestational FLC between days 13.5 and 14.5. In addition, Ram-1 expression is detected only in more differentiated populations within FLC, day 14.5, and not in those highly enriched for stem cells, indicating developmental regulation of Ram-1 during murine hematopoiesis. Others have reported the in vitro use of phosphate-free medium as a stimulus to increase levels of Ram-1 mRNA in nonhematopoietic cells. We now demonstrate that Ram-1 poly(A)+ mRNA increases significantly following culture of FLC in phosphate-free medium. Further, transduction of FLC in phosphate-free medium with an amphotropic retrovirus containing the multiple drug resistance gene leads to gene transfer not observed previously. These data demonstrate that (i) the normal resistance of FLC to amphotropic transduction is most likely due to an insufficient number of Ram-1 molecules for efficient retroviral recognition and binding, and (ii) Ram-1 can be upregulated by increasing the need for phosphate transport across the cell membrane. PMID:8754824

  16. Large-scale clinical-grade retroviral vector production in a fixed-bed bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuyan; Olszewska, Malgorzata; Qu, Jinrong; Wasielewska, Teresa; Bartido, Shirley; Hermetet, Gregory; Sadelain, Michel; Rivière, Isabelle

    2015-04-01

    The successful genetic engineering of patient T cells with γ-retroviral vectors expressing chimeric antigen receptors or T-cell receptors for phase II clinical trials and beyond requires the large-scale manufacture of high-titer vector stocks. The production of retroviral vectors from stable packaging cell lines using roller bottles or 10- to 40-layer cell factories is limited by a narrow harvest window, labor intensity, open-system operations, and the requirement for significant incubator space. To circumvent these shortcomings, we optimized the production of vector stocks in a disposable fixed-bed bioreactor using good manufacturing practice-grade packaging cell lines. High-titer vector stocks were harvested over 10 days, representing a much broader harvest window than the 3-day harvest afforded by cell factories. For PG13 and 293Vec packaging cells, the average vector titer and the vector stocks' yield in the bioreactor were higher by 3.2- to 7.3-fold, and 5.6- to 13.1-fold, respectively, than those obtained in cell factories. The vector production was 10.4 and 18.6 times more efficient than in cell factories for PG13 and 293Vec cells, respectively. Furthermore, the vectors produced from the fixed-bed bioreactors passed the release test assays for clinical applications. Therefore, a single vector lot derived from 293Vec is suitable to transduce up to 500 patients cell doses in the context of large clinical trials using chimeric antigen receptors or T-cell receptors. These findings demonstrate for the first time that a robust fixed-bed bioreactor process can be used to produce γ-retroviral vector stocks scalable up to the commercialization phase.

  17. Large-scale Clinical-grade Retroviral Vector Production in a Fixed-Bed Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiuyan; Olszewska, Malgorzata; Qu, Jinrong; Wasielewska, Teresa; Bartido, Shirley; Hermetet, Gregory; Sadelain, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The successful genetic engineering of patient T cells with γ-retroviral vectors expressing chimeric antigen receptors or T-cell receptors for phase II clinical trials and beyond requires the large-scale manufacture of high-titer vector stocks. The production of retroviral vectors from stable packaging cell lines using roller bottles or 10- to 40-layer cell factories is limited by a narrow harvest window, labor intensity, open-system operations, and the requirement for significant incubator space. To circumvent these shortcomings, we optimized the production of vector stocks in a disposable fixed-bed bioreactor using good manufacturing practice–grade packaging cell lines. High-titer vector stocks were harvested over 10 days, representing a much broader harvest window than the 3-day harvest afforded by cell factories. For PG13 and 293Vec packaging cells, the average vector titer and the vector stocks’ yield in the bioreactor were higher by 3.2- to 7.3-fold, and 5.6- to 13.1-fold, respectively, than those obtained in cell factories. The vector production was 10.4 and 18.6 times more efficient than in cell factories for PG13 and 293Vec cells, respectively. Furthermore, the vectors produced from the fixed-bed bioreactors passed the release test assays for clinical applications. Therefore, a single vector lot derived from 293Vec is suitable to transduce up to 500 patients cell doses in the context of large clinical trials using chimeric antigen receptors or T-cell receptors. These findings demonstrate for the first time that a robust fixed-bed bioreactor process can be used to produce γ-retroviral vector stocks scalable up to the commercialization phase. PMID:25751502

  18. Retroviral vectors containing Tet-controlled bidirectional transcription units for simultaneous regulation of two gene activities

    PubMed Central

    Loew, Rainer; Vigna, Elisa; Lindemann, Dirk; Naldini, Luigi; Bujard, Herman

    2006-01-01

    In this study retroviral self-inactivating (SIN)-vectors were constructed, that allow simultaneous regulation of two genes by integration of bidirectional Tet controlled transcription units. Marker genes (luciferase and eGFP) were expressed under the control of various bidirectional promoters Ptetbis, in order to determine (i) the fraction of HtTA-1 cells exhibiting tight doxycycline (Dox) dependent control; (ii) possible effects of the vector backbone on the regulation of gene transcription; (iii) the possibility for crosstalk between different minimal promoters within Ptetbi. When HtTA-1 cells, constitutively expressing the Tet-Transactivator (tTA), were transduced by S2f-lMCg retroviral vector, a high percentage (40) of the cell population displayed tight regulation (5000 fold) of Ptetbi activity over a wide range of Dox concentrations. As a result of our comparative study on the activity of virus derived minimal promoters (from MMTV, HIV and CMV), a clear hierarchy of activity as well as a different sensitivity to external influences among the various promoters studied was observed. Furthermore, our results strongly support the idea, that viral elements such as part of the MuLV pol/env region significantly affect the regulation capacity of an integrate. Taking into account our observations as outlined above, we succeeded in generating significantly optimized Tet regulated retroviral vectors. The application of such a one-step transfer system for Ptet controlled genes would be of particular relevance to applications where cellular systems do not allow prolonged selection procedures as it is the case with primary cells considered for ex vivo gene therapy. PMID:19565004

  19. DNA minicircles clarify the specific role of DNA structure on retroviral integration

    PubMed Central

    Pasi, Marco; Mornico, Damien; Volant, Stevenn; Juchet, Anna; Batisse, Julien; Bouchier, Christiane; Parissi, Vincent; Ruff, Marc; Lavery, Richard; Lavigne, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin regulates the selectivity of retroviral integration into the genome of infected cells. At the nucleosome level, both histones and DNA structure are involved in this regulation. We propose a strategy that allows to specifically study a single factor: the DNA distortion induced by the nucleosome. This strategy relies on mimicking this distortion using DNA minicircles (MCs) having a fixed rotational orientation of DNA curvature, coupled with atomic-resolution modeling. Contrasting MCs with linear DNA fragments having identical sequences enabled us to analyze the impact of DNA distortion on the efficiency and selectivity of integration. We observed a global enhancement of HIV-1 integration in MCs and an enrichment of integration sites in the outward-facing DNA major grooves. Both of these changes are favored by LEDGF/p75, revealing a new, histone-independent role of this integration cofactor. PFV integration is also enhanced in MCs, but is not associated with a periodic redistribution of integration sites, thus highlighting its distinct catalytic properties. MCs help to separate the roles of target DNA structure, histone modifications and integrase (IN) cofactors during retroviral integration and to reveal IN-specific regulation mechanisms. PMID:27439712

  20. Mechanism of Nucleic Acid Chaperone Function of Retroviral Nuceleocapsid (NC) Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouzina, Ioulia; Vo, My-Nuong; Stewart, Kristen; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Cruceanu, Margareta; Williams, Mark

    2006-03-01

    Recent studies have highlighted two main activities of HIV-1 NC protein contributing to its function as a universal nucleic acid chaperone. Firstly, it is the ability of NC to weakly destabilize all nucleic acid,(NA), secondary structures, thus resolving the kinetic traps for NA refolding, while leaving the annealed state stable. Secondly, it is the ability of NC to aggregate NA, facilitating the nucleation step of bi-molecular annealing by increasing the local NA concentration. In this work we use single molecule DNA stretching and gel-based annealing assays to characterize these two chaperone activities of NC by using various HIV-1 NC mutants and several other retroviral NC proteins. Our results suggest that two NC functions are associated with its zinc fingers and cationic residues, respectively. NC proteins from other retroviruses have similar activities, although expressed to a different degree. Thus, NA aggregating ability improves, and NA duplex destabilizing activity decreases in the sequence: MLV NC, HIV NC, RSV NC. In contrast, HTLV NC protein works very differently from other NC proteins, and similarly to typical single stranded NA binding proteins. These features of retroviral NCs co-evolved with the structure of their genomes.

  1. DNA minicircles clarify the specific role of DNA structure on retroviral integration.

    PubMed

    Pasi, Marco; Mornico, Damien; Volant, Stevenn; Juchet, Anna; Batisse, Julien; Bouchier, Christiane; Parissi, Vincent; Ruff, Marc; Lavery, Richard; Lavigne, Marc

    2016-09-19

    Chromatin regulates the selectivity of retroviral integration into the genome of infected cells. At the nucleosome level, both histones and DNA structure are involved in this regulation. We propose a strategy that allows to specifically study a single factor: the DNA distortion induced by the nucleosome. This strategy relies on mimicking this distortion using DNA minicircles (MCs) having a fixed rotational orientation of DNA curvature, coupled with atomic-resolution modeling. Contrasting MCs with linear DNA fragments having identical sequences enabled us to analyze the impact of DNA distortion on the efficiency and selectivity of integration. We observed a global enhancement of HIV-1 integration in MCs and an enrichment of integration sites in the outward-facing DNA major grooves. Both of these changes are favored by LEDGF/p75, revealing a new, histone-independent role of this integration cofactor. PFV integration is also enhanced in MCs, but is not associated with a periodic redistribution of integration sites, thus highlighting its distinct catalytic properties. MCs help to separate the roles of target DNA structure, histone modifications and integrase (IN) cofactors during retroviral integration and to reveal IN-specific regulation mechanisms. PMID:27439712

  2. Long terminal repeat of murine retroviral DNAs: sequence analysis, host-proviral junctions, and preintegration site.

    PubMed Central

    Van Beveren, C; Rands, E; Chattopadhyay, S K; Lowy, D R; Verma, I M

    1982-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the long terminal repeat (LTR) of three murine retroviral DNAs has been determined. The data indicate that the U5 region (sequences originating from the 5' end of the genome) of various LTRs is more conserved than the U3 region (sequences from the 3' end of the genome). The location and sequence of the control elements such as the 5' cap, "TATA-like" sequences, "CCAAT-box," and presumptive polyadenylic acid addition signal AATAAA in the various LTRs are nearly identical. Some murine retroviral DNAs contain a duplication of sequences within the LTR ranging in size from 58 to 100 base pairs. A variant of molecularly cloned Moloney murine sarcoma virus DNA in which one of the two LTRs integrated into the viral DNA was also analyzed. A 4-base-pair duplication was generated at the site of integration of LTR in the viral DNA. The host-viral junction of two molecularly cloned AKR-murine leukemia virus DNAs (clones 623 and 614) was determined. In the case of AKR-623 DNA, a 3- or 4-base-pair direct repeat of cellular sequences flanking the viral DNA was observed. However, AKR-614 DNA contained a 5-base-pair repeat of cellular sequences. The nucleotide sequence of the preintegration site of AKR-623 DNA revealed that the cellular sequences duplicated during integration are present only once. Finally, a striking homology between the sequences flanking the preintegration site and viral LTRs was observed. Images PMID:6281466

  3. Detection of sequences homologous to human retroviral DNA in multiple sclerosis by gene amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, S.J.; Ehrlich, G.D.; Abbott, M.A.; Hurwitz, B.J.; Waldmann, T.A.; Poiesz, B.J. )

    1989-04-01

    Twenty-one patients with multiple sclerosis, chronic progressive type, were examined for DNA sequences homologous to a human retrovirus. Genomic DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells was analyzed for the presence of homologous sequences to the human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type I (HTLV-I) long terminal repeat, 3{prime} gag, pol, and env domains by the enzymatic in vitro gene amplification technique, polymerase chain reaction. Positive identification of homologous pol sequences was made in the amplified DNA from six of these patients (29%). Three of these six patients (14%) also tested positive for the env region, but not for the other regions tested. In contrast, none of the samples from 35 normal individuals studied was positive when amplified and tested with the same primers and probes. Comparison of patterns obtained from controls and from patients with adult T-cell leukemia or tropical spastic paraparesis suggests that the DNA sequences identified are exogenous to the human genome and may correspond to a human retroviral species. The data support the detection of a human retroviral agent in some patients with multiple sclerosis.

  4. Viral and Cellular Requirements for the Nuclear Entry of Retroviral Preintegration Nucleoprotein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Matreyek, Kenneth A.; Engelman, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Retroviruses integrate their reverse transcribed genomes into host cell chromosomes as an obligate step in virus replication. The nuclear envelope separates the chromosomes from the cell cytoplasm during interphase, and different retroviral groups deal with this physical barrier in different ways. Gammaretroviruses are dependent on the passage of target cells through mitosis, where they are believed to access chromosomes when the nuclear envelope dissolves for cell division. Contrastingly, lentiviruses such as HIV-1 infect non-dividing cells, and are believed to enter the nucleus by passing through the nuclear pore complex. While numerous virally encoded elements have been proposed to be involved in HIV-1 nuclear import, recent evidence has highlighted the importance of HIV-1 capsid. Furthermore, capsid was found to be responsible for the viral requirement of various nuclear transport proteins, including transportin 3 and nucleoporins NUP153 and NUP358, during infection. In this review, we describe our current understanding of retroviral nuclear import, with emphasis on recent developments on the role of the HIV-1 capsid protein. PMID:24103892

  5. Early onset of autoimmune disease by the retroviral integrase inhibitor raltegravir.

    PubMed

    Beck-Engeser, Gabriele B; Eilat, Dan; Harrer, Thomas; Jäck, Hans-Martin; Wabl, Matthias

    2009-12-01

    Raltegravir is a recently, Food and Drug Administration-approved, small-molecule drug that inhibits retroviral integrase, thereby preventing HIV DNA from inserting itself into the human genome. We report here that the activity profile of raltegravir on the replication of murine leukemia virus is similar to that for HIV, and that the drug specifically affects autoimmune disease in mice, in which endogenous retroelements are suspected to play a role. While NZW and BALB/c mice, which do not succumb to autoimmune disease, are not affected by raltegravir, lupus-prone (NZBxNZW) F(1) mice die of glomerulonephritis more than a month earlier than untreated mice. Raltegravir-treated NZB mice, which share the H-2 haplotype with BALB/c mice, but which are predisposed to autoimmune hemolytic anemia, develop auto-antibodies to their red blood cells >3 months earlier than untreated mice of the same strain. Because nonautoimmune mice are not affected by raltegravir, we consider off-target effects unlikely and attribute the exacerbation of autoimmunity to the inhibition of retroviral integrase. PMID:19923437

  6. Retroviral Retention Activates a Syk-Dependent HemITAM in Human Tetherin

    PubMed Central

    Galão, Rui Pedro; Pickering, Suzanne; Curnock, Rachel; Neil, Stuart J.D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Tetherin (BST2/CD317) restricts the release of enveloped viral particles from infected cells. Coupled to this virion retention, hominid tetherins induce proinflammatory gene expression via activating NF-κB. We investigated the events initiating this tetherin-induced signaling and show that physical retention of retroviral particles induces the phosphorylation of conserved tyrosine residues in the cytoplasmic tails of tetherin dimers. This phosphorylation induces the recruitment of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), which is required for downstream NF-κB activation, indicating that the tetherin cytoplasmic tail resembles the hemi-immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (hemITAMs) found in C-type lectin pattern recognition receptors. Retroviral-induced tetherin signaling is coupled to the cortical actin cytoskeleton via the Rac-GAP-containing protein RICH2 (ARHGAP44), and a naturally occurring tetherin polymorphism with reduced RICH2 binding exhibits decreased phosphorylation and NF-κB activation. Thus, upon virion retention, this linkage to the actin cytoskeleton likely triggers tetherin phosphorylation and subsequent signal transduction to induce an antiviral state. PMID:25211072

  7. The impact of maternal anti-retroviral therapy on cytokine profile in the uninfected neonates.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Taissa M; Hygino, Joana; Blanco, Bernardo; Xavier, Luciana; Araújo-Lima, Carlos Fernando; Guillermo, Landi V C; Bittencourt, Vera Carolina B; Guimarães, Vander; Andrade, Arnaldo F B; Bento, Cleonice A M

    2013-09-01

    The number of HIV-infected young women has been increasing since the beginning of the AIDS epidemic. The objective of the present study was to investigate the impact of anti-retroviral treatment (ART) of HIV-1-infected pregnant women (PW) on cytokine profile of uninfected neonates. Our results demonstrated that higher levels of IL-1β and TNF-α associated with lower IL-10 production were detected in the plasma obtained from neonates born from ART-treated PW. Furthermore, the production of TNF- α and IFN-γ was also significantly higher in polyclonally-activated T cells from those neonates. This elevated pro-inflammatory pattern detected by these activated-T cells was not associated to HIV-1 antigens sensitization. Finally, ART-exposed neonates showed to be born with lower weight, and it was inversely correlated with maternal peripheral TNF-a level. In summary, the data presented here suggest a significant disturbance in cytokine network of HIV-1-uninfected neonates exposed to potent anti-retroviral schemes during pregnancy.

  8. Endogenous non-retroviral RNA virus elements evidence a novel type of antiviral immunity

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Tomoyuki; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vertebrate genomes contain many virus-related sequences derived from both retroviruses and non-retroviral RNA and DNA viruses. Such non-retroviral RNA sequences are possibly produced by reverse-transcription and integration of viral mRNAs of ancient RNA viruses using retrotransposon machineries. We refer to this process as transcript reversion. During an ancient bornavirus infection, transcript reversion may have left bornavirus-related sequences, known as endogenous bornavirus-like nucleoproteins (EBLNs), in the genome. We have recently demonstrated that all Homo sapiens EBLNs are expressed in at least one tissue. Because species with EBLNs appear relatively protected against infection by a current bornavirus, Borna disease virus, it is speculated that EBLNs play some roles in antiviral immunity, as seen with some endogenous retroviruses. EBLNs can function as dominant negative forms of viral proteins, small RNAs targeting viral sequences, or DNA or RNA elements modulating the gene expression. Growing evidence reveals that various RNA viruses are reverse-transcribed and integrated into the genome of infected cells, suggesting transcript reversion generally occurs during ongoing infection. Considering this, transcript reversion-mediated interference with related viruses may be a novel type of antiviral immunity in vertebrates. Understanding the biological significance of transcript reversion will provide novel insights into host defenses against viral infections. PMID:27510928

  9. Retroviral intasomes search for a target DNA by 1D diffusion which rarely results in integration

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Nathan D.; Lopez Jr, Miguel A.; Hanne, Jeungphill; Peake, Mitchell B.; Lee, Jong-Bong; Fishel, Richard; Yoder, Kristine E.

    2016-01-01

    Retroviruses must integrate their linear viral cDNA into the host genome for a productive infection. Integration is catalysed by the retrovirus-encoded integrase (IN), which forms a tetramer or octamer complex with the viral cDNA long terminal repeat (LTR) ends termed an intasome. IN removes two 3′-nucleotides from both LTR ends and catalyses strand transfer of the recessed 3′-hydroxyls into the target DNA separated by 4–6 bp. Host DNA repair restores the resulting 5′-Flap and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) gap. Here we have used multiple single molecule imaging tools to determine that the prototype foamy virus (PFV) retroviral intasome searches for an integration site by one-dimensional (1D) rotation-coupled diffusion along DNA. Once a target site is identified, the time between PFV strand transfer events is 470 ms. The majority of PFV intasome search events were non-productive. These observations identify new dynamic IN functions and suggest that target site-selection limits retroviral integration. PMID:27108531

  10. Passive Immunotherapy for Retroviral Disease: Influence of Major Histocompatibility Complex Type and T-Cell Responsiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasenkrug, Kim J.; Brooks, Diane M.; Chesebro, Bruce

    1995-11-01

    Administration of virus-specific antibodies is known to be an effective early treatment for some viral infections. Such immunotherapy probably acts by antibody-mediated neutralization of viral infectivity and is often thought to function independently of T-cell-mediated immune responses. In the present experiments, we studied passive antibody therapy using Friend murine leukemia virus complex as a model for an immunosuppressive retroviral disease in adult mice. The results showed that antibody therapy could induce recovery from a well-established retroviral infection. However, the success of therapy was dependent on the presence of both CD4^+ and CD8^+ T lymphocytes. Thus, cell-mediated responses were required for recovery from infection even in the presence of therapeutic levels of antibody. The major histocompatibility type of the mice was also an important factor determining the relative success of antibody therapy in this system, but it was less critical for low-dose than for high-dose infections. Our results imply that limited T-cell responsiveness as dictated by major histocompatibility genes and/or stage of disease may have contributed to previous immunotherapy failures in AIDS patients. Possible strategies to improve the efficacy of future therapies are discussed.

  11. Endogenous retroviral long terminal repeats within the HLA-DQ locus.

    PubMed Central

    Kambhu, S; Falldorf, P; Lee, J S

    1990-01-01

    Two endogenous retroviral long terminal repeats (LTRs) were found in the human major histocompatibility complex locus HLA-DQ. The solo LTRs, unlinked to retrovirus structural genes, are located approximately 5 kilobases apart from each other and in the same transcriptional orientation, which is opposite to that for the HLA-DQB1 gene. These elements exhibit greater than 90% homology to the LTRs of the human endogenous retrovirus HERV-K10. The conservation of putative regulatory elements found within the LTRs and their position relative to the HLA-DQB1 gene suggest that these elements may confer distinct regulatory properties on genes in the HLA-DQ region. Polymorphic variation between different HLA haplotypes for the presence of the LTRs at this location and of the molecular architecture within this subregion is supported by polymerase chain reaction and Southern blot analysis. Comparisons of chromosomes with and without the LTRs in this region will provide a unique opportunity in the human genome to analyze transposition or integration of retroviral sequences. Images PMID:2114643

  12. Murine hematopoietic reconstitution after tagging and selection of retrovirally transduced bone marrow cells

    PubMed Central

    García-Hernández, B.; Castellanos, A.; López, A.; Orfao, A.; Sánchez-García, I.

    1997-01-01

    A major problem facing the effective treatment of patients with cancer is how to get the specific antitumor agent into every tumor cell. In this report we describe the use of a strategy that, by using retroviral vectors encoding a truncated human CD5 cDNA, allows the selection of only the infected cells, and we show the ability to obtain, before bone marrow transplantation, a population of 5-fluouraci-treated murine bone marrow cells that are 100% marked. This marked population of bone marrow cells is able to reconstitute the hematopoietic system in lethally irradiated mice, indicating that the surface marker lacks deleterious effects on the functionality of bone marrow cells. No gross abnormalities in hematopoiesis were detected in mice repopulated with CD5-expressing cells. Nevertheless, a significant proportion of the hematopoietic cells no longer expresses the surface marker CD5 in the 9-month-old recipient mice. This transcriptional inactivity of the proviral long terminal repeat (LTR) was accompanied by de novo methylation of the proviral sequences. Our results show that the use of the CD5 as a retrovirally encoded marker enables the rapid, efficient, and nontoxic selection in vitro of infected primary cells, which can entirely reconstitute the hematopoietic system in mice. These results should now greatly enhance the power of studies aimed at addressing questions such as generation of cancer-negative hematopoiesis. PMID:9371830

  13. Selection of TAR RNA-Binding Chameleon Peptides by Using a Retroviral Replication System

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Baode; Calabro, Valerie; Wainberg, Mark A.; Frankel, Alan D.

    2004-01-01

    The interaction between the arginine-rich motif (ARM) of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Tat protein and TAR RNA is essential for Tat activation and viral replication. Two related lentiviruses, bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) and Jembrana disease virus (JDV), also require Tat ARM-TAR interactions to mediate activation, but the viruses have evolved different RNA-binding strategies. Interestingly, the JDV ARM can act as a “chameleon,” adopting both the HIV and BIV TAR binding modes. To examine how RNA-protein interactions may evolve in a viral context and possibly to identify peptides that recognize HIV TAR in novel ways, we devised a retroviral system based on HIV replication to amplify and select for RNA binders. We constructed a combinatorial peptide library based on the BIV Tat ARM and identified peptides that, like the JDV Tat ARM, also function through HIV TAR, revealing unexpected sequence characteristics of an RNA-binding chameleon. The results suggest that a retroviral screening approach may help identify high-affinity TAR binders and may provide new insights into the evolution of RNA-protein interactions. PMID:14722301

  14. Detection of retroviral super-infection from non-invasive samples.

    PubMed

    Goffe, Adeelia S; Blasse, Anja; Mundry, Roger; Leendertz, Fabian H; Calvignac-Spencer, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    While much attention has been focused on the molecular epidemiology of retroviruses in wild primate populations, the correlated question of the frequency and nature of super-infection events, i.e., the simultaneous infection of the same individual host with several strains of the same virus, has remained largely neglected. In particular, methods possibly allowing the investigation of super-infection from samples collected non-invasively (such as faeces) have never been properly compared. Here, we fill in this gap by assessing the costs and benefits of end-point dilution PCR (EPD-PCR) and multiple bulk-PCR cloning, as applied to a case study focusing on simian foamy virus super-infection in wild chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). We show that, although considered to be the gold standard, EPD-PCR can lead to massive consumption of biological material when only low copy numbers of the target are expected. This constitutes a serious drawback in a field in which rarity of biological material is a fundamental constraint. In addition, we demonstrate that EPD-PCR results (single/multiple infection; founder strains) can be well predicted from multiple bulk-PCR clone experiments, by applying simple statistical and network analyses to sequence alignments. We therefore recommend the implementation of the latter method when the focus is put on retroviral super-infection and only low retroviral loads are encountered. PMID:22590569

  15. High Expression of Endogenous Retroviral Envelope Gene in the Equine Fetal Part of the Placenta.

    PubMed

    Stefanetti, Valentina; Marenzoni, Maria Luisa; Passamonti, Fabrizio; Cappelli, Katia; Garcia-Etxebarria, Koldo; Coletti, Mauro; Capomaccio, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are proviral phases of exogenous retroviruses that have co-evolved with vertebrate genomes for millions of years. Previous studies have identified the envelope (env) protein genes of retroviral origin preferentially expressed in the placenta which suggests a role in placentation based on their membrane fusogenic capacity and therefore they have been named syncytins. Until now, all the characterized syncytins have been associated with three invasive placentation types: the endotheliochorial (Carnivora), the synepitheliochorial (Ruminantia), and the hemochorial placentation (human, mouse) where they play a role in the syncytiotrophoblast formation. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate whether EqERV env RNA is expressed in horse tissues as well and investigate if the horse, possessing an epitheliochorial placenta, has "captured" a common retroviral env gene with syncytin-like properties in placental tissues. Interestingly, although in the equine placenta there is no syncytiotrophoblast layer at the maternal-fetal interface, our results showed that EqERV env RNA is highly expressed at that level, as expected for a candidate syncytin-like gene but with reduced abundance in the other somatic tissues (nearly 30-fold lower) thus suggesting a possible role in the placental tissue. Although the horse is one of the few domestic animals with a sequenced genome, few studies have been conducted about the EqERV and their expression in placental tissue has never been investigated. PMID:27176223

  16. Improved self-inactivating retroviral vectors derived from spleen necrosis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Olson, P; Nelson, S; Dornburg, R

    1994-01-01

    Self-inactivating (SIN) retroviral vectors contain a deletion spanning most of the right long terminal repeat's (LTR's) U3 region. Reverse transcription copies this deletion to both LTRs. As a result, there is no transcription from the 5' LTR, preventing further replication. Many previously developed SIN vectors, however, had reduced titers or were genetically unstable. Earlier, we reported that certain SIN vectors derived from spleen necrosis virus (SNV) experienced reconstitution of the U3-deleted LTR at high frequencies. This reconstitution occurred on the DNA level and appeared to be dependent on defined vector sequences. To study this phenomenon in more detail, we developed an almost completely U3-free retroviral vector. The promoter and enhancer of the left LTR were replaced with those of the cytomegalovirus immediate-early genes. This promoter swap did not impair the level of transcription or alter its start site. Our data indicate that SNV contains a strong initiator which resembles that of human immunodeficiency virus. We show that the vectors replicate with efficiencies similar to those of vectors possessing two wild-type LTRs. U3-deleted vectors carrying the hygromycin B phosphotransferase gene did not observably undergo LTR reconstitution, even when replicated in helper cells containing SNV-LTR sequences. However, vectors carrying the neomycin resistance gene did undergo LTR reconstitution with the use of homologous helper cell LTR sequences as template. This supports our earlier finding that sequences within the neomycin resistance gene can trigger recombination. Images PMID:7933088

  17. Phase 2 study of the efficacy and safety of the combination of arsenic trioxide, interferon alpha, and zidovudine in newly diagnosed chronic adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL).

    PubMed

    Kchour, Ghada; Tarhini, Mahdi; Kooshyar, Mohamad-Mehdi; El Hajj, Hiba; Wattel, Eric; Mahmoudi, Mahmoud; Hatoum, Hassan; Rahimi, Hossein; Maleki, Masoud; Rafatpanah, Houshang; Rezaee, S A Rahim; Yazdi, Mojtaba Tabatabaei; Shirdel, Abbas; de Thé, Hugues; Hermine, Olivier; Farid, Reza; Bazarbachi, Ali

    2009-06-25

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) is resistant to chemotherapy and carries a dismal prognosis particularly for the acute and lymphoma subtypes. Promising results were obtained with the combination of zidovudine and interferon-alpha. Chronic ATL has a relatively better outcome, but poor long-term survival is noted when patients are managed with a watchful-waiting policy or with chemotherapy. In ATL cell lines, arsenic trioxide shuts off constitutive NF-kappaB activation and potentiates interferon-alpha apoptotic effects through proteasomal degradation of Tax. Clinically, arsenic/interferon therapy exhibits some efficacy in refractory aggressive ATL patients. These results prompted us to investigate the efficacy and safety of the combination of arsenic, interferon-alpha, and zidovudine in 10 newly diagnosed chronic ATL patients. An impressive 100% response rate was observed including 7 complete remissions, 2 complete remissions but with more than 5% circulating atypical lymphocytes, and 1 partial response. Responses were rapid and no relapse was noted. Side effects were moderate and mostly hematologic. In conclusion, treatment of chronic ATL with arsenic, interferon-alpha, and zidovudine is feasible and exhibits an impressive response rate with moderate toxicity. Long-term follow up will clarify whether this will translate to disease cure. Overall, these clinical results strengthen the concept of oncogene-targeted cancer therapy.

  18. Recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated high-efficiency, transient expression of the murine cationic amino acid transporter (ecotropic retroviral receptor) permits stable transduction of human HeLa cells by ecotropic retroviral vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Bertran, J; Miller, J L; Yang, Y; Fenimore-Justman, A; Rueda, F; Vanin, E F; Nienhuis, A W

    1996-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus has a broad host range, is nonpathogenic, and integrates into a preferred location on chromosome 19, features that have fostered development of recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAV) as gene transfer vectors for therapeutic applications. We have used an rAAV to transfer and express the murine cationic amino acid transporter which functions as the ecotropic retroviral receptor, thereby rendering human cells conditionally susceptible to infection by an ecotropic retroviral vector. The proportion of human HeLa cells expressing the receptor at 60 h varied as a function of the multiplicity of infection (MOI) with the rAAV. Cells expressing the ecotropic receptor were efficiently transduced with an ecotropic retroviral vector encoding a nucleus-localized form of beta-galactosidase. Cells coexpressing the ecotropic receptor and nucleus-localized beta-galactosidase were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and cell lines were recovered by cloning at limiting dilution. After growth in culture, all clones contained the retroviral vector genome, but fewer than 10% (3 of 47) contained the rAAV genome and continued to express the ecotropic receptor. The ecotropic receptor coding sequences in the rAAV genome were under the control of a tetracycline-modulated promoter. In the presence of tetracycline, receptor expression was low and the proportion of cells transduced by the ecotropic retroviral vector was decreased. Modulation of receptor expression was achieved with both an episomal and an integrated form of the rAAV genome. These data establish that functional gene expression from an rAAV genome can occur transiently without genome integration. PMID:8794313

  19. Avian retroviral RNA encapsidation: reexamination of functional 5' RNA sequences and the role of nucleocapsid Cys-His motifs.

    PubMed Central

    Aronoff, R; Hajjar, A M; Linial, M L

    1993-01-01

    RNA packaging signals (psi) from the 5' ends of murine and avian retroviral genomes have previously been shown to direct encapsidation of heterologous mRNA into the retroviral virion. The avian 5' packaging region has now been further characterized, and we have defined a 270-nucleotide sequence, A psi, which is sufficient to direct packaging of heterologous RNA. Identification of the A psi sequence suggests that several retroviral cis-acting sequences contained in psi+ (the primer binding site, the putative dimer linkage sequence, and the splice donor site) are dispensable for specific RNA encapsidation. Subgenomic env mRNA is not efficiently encapsidated into particles, even though the A psi sequence is present in this RNA. In contrast, spliced heterologous psi-containing RNA is packaged into virions as efficiently as unspliced species; thus splicing per se is not responsible for the failure of env mRNA to be encapsidated. We also found that an avian retroviral mutant deleted for both nucleocapsid Cys-His boxes retains the capacity to encapsidate RNA containing psi sequences, although this RNA is unstable and is thus difficult to detect in mature particles. Electron microscopy reveals that virions produced by this mutant lack a condensed core, which may allow the RNA to be accessible to nucleases. Images PMID:8380070

  20. Retroviral-mediated gene therapy for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma: an innovative approach for cancer therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Huber, B E; Richards, C A; Krenitsky, T A

    1991-01-01

    An approach involving retroviral-mediated gene therapy for the treatment of neoplastic disease is described. This therapeutic approach is called "virus-directed enzyme/prodrug therapy" (VDEPT). The VDEPT approach exploits the transcriptional differences between normal and neoplastic cells to achieve selective killing of neoplastic cells. We now describe development of the VDEPT approach for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. Replication-defective, amphotrophic retroviruses were constructed containing a chimeric varicella-zoster virus thymidine kinase (VZV TK) gene that is transcriptionally regulated by either the hepatoma-associated alpha-fetoprotein or liver-associated albumin transcriptional regulatory sequences. Subsequent to retroviral infection, expression of VZV TK was limited to either alpha-fetoprotein- or albumin-positive cells, respectively. VZV TK metabolically activated the nontoxic prodrug 6-methoxypurine arabinonucleoside (araM), ultimately leading to the formation of the cytotoxic anabolite adenine arabinonucleoside triphosphate (araATP). Cells that selectively expressed VZV TK became selectively sensitive to araM due to the VZV TK-dependent anabolism of araM to araATP. Hence, these retroviral-delivered chimeric genes generated tissue-specific expression of VZV TK, tissue-specific anabolism of araM to araATP, and tissue-specific cytotoxicity due to araM exposure. By utilizing such retroviral vectors, araM was anabolized to araATP in hepatoma cells, producing a selective cytotoxic effect. Images PMID:1654555

  1. Association of murine lupus and thymic full-length endogenous retroviral expression maps to a bone marrow stem cell

    SciTech Connect

    Krieg, A.M.; Gourley, M.F.; Steinberg, A.D. )

    1991-05-01

    Recent studies of thymic gene expression in murine lupus have demonstrated 8.4-kb (full-length size) modified polytropic (Mpmv) endogenous retroviral RNA. In contrast, normal control mouse strains do not produce detectable amounts of such RNA in their thymuses. Prior studies have attributed a defect in experimental tolerance in murine lupus to a bone marrow stem cell rather than to the thymic epithelium; in contrast, infectious retroviral expression has been associated with the thymic epithelium, rather than with the bone marrow stem cell. The present study was designed to determine whether the abnormal Mpmv expression associated with murine lupus mapped to thymic epithelium or to a marrow precursor. Lethally irradiated control and lupus-prone mice were reconstituted with T cell depleted bone marrow; one month later their thymuses were studied for endogenous retroviral RNA and protein expression. Recipients of bone marrow from nonautoimmune donors expressed neither 8.4-kb Mpmv RNA nor surface MCF gp70 in their thymuses. In contrast, recipients of bone marrow from autoimmune NZB or BXSB donors expressed thymic 8.4-kb Mpmv RNA and mink cell focus-forming gp70. These studies demonstrate that lupus-associated 8.4-kb Mpmv endogenous retroviral expression is determined by bone marrow stem cells.

  2. Characterization of rodent models of HIV-gp120 and anti-retroviral-associated neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Victoria C J; Blackbeard, Julie; Segerdahl, Andrew R; Hasnie, Fauzia; Pheby, Timothy; McMahon, Stephen B; Rice, Andrew S C

    2007-10-01

    A distal symmetrical sensory peripheral neuropathy is frequently observed in people living with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1). This neuropathy can be associated with viral infection alone, probably involving a role for the envelope glycoprotein gp120; or a drug-induced toxic neuropathy associated with the use of nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors as a component of highly active anti-retroviral therapy. In order to elucidate the mechanisms underlying drug-induced neuropathy in the context of HIV infection, we have characterized pathological events in the peripheral and central nervous system following systemic treatment with the anti-retroviral agent, ddC (Zalcitabine) with or without the concomitant delivery of HIV-gp120 to the rat sciatic nerve (gp120+ddC). Systemic ddC treatment alone is associated with a persistent mechanical hypersensitivity (33% decrease in limb withdrawal threshold) that when combined with perineural HIV-gp120 is exacerbated (48% decrease in threshold) and both treatments result in thigmotactic (anxiety-like) behaviour. Immunohistochemical studies revealed little ddC-associated alteration in DRG phenotype, as compared with known changes following perineural HIV-gp120. However, the chemokine CCL2 is significantly expressed in the DRG of rats treated with perineural HIV-gp120 and/or ddC and there is a reduction in intraepidermal nerve fibre density, comparable to that seen in herpes zoster infection. Moreover, a spinal gliosis is apparent at times of peak behavioural sensitivity that is exacerbated in gp120+ddC as compared to either treatment alone. Treatment with the microglial inhibitor, minocycline, is associated with delayed onset of hypersensitivity to mechanical stimuli in the gp120+ddC model and reversal of some measures of thigmotaxis. Finally, the hypersensitivity to mechanical stimuli was sensitive to systemic treatment with gabapentin, morphine and the cannabinoid WIN 55,212-2, but not with

  3. Gamma-Retroviral Vectors Enveloped with an Antibody and an Engineered Fusogenic Protein Achieved Antigen-Specific Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Haiguang; Zeigler, Leslie; Joo, Kye-Il; Cho, Taehoon; Lei, Yuning; Wang, Pin

    2008-01-01

    Development of methods to engineer gamma-retroviral vectors capable of transducing target cells in a cell-specific manner could impact the future of the clinical application of gene therapy as well as the understanding of the biology of transfer gene vectors. Two molecular events are critical for controlling the entry of gamma-retroviral vectors to target cells: binding to cell-surface receptors and the subsequent fusion of viral vector membrane and cellular membrane. In this report, we evaluated a method to incorporate a membrane-bound antibody and a fusogenic molecule to provide binding and fusion functions respectively, into gamma-retroviral vectors for targeted gene delivery. An anti-CD20 antibody and a fusogenic protein derived from Sindbis virus glycoprotein could be efficiently co-displayed on the surface of viral vectors. Vectors bearing anti-CD20 antibody conferred their binding specificity to cells expressing CD20. Enhanced in vitro transduction towards CD20-expressing cells was observed for gamma-retroviral vectors displaying both an antibody and a fusogen. We found that the biological activity of the fusogen played an important role on the efficiency of such a targeting strategy and were able to engineer several mutant forms of the fusogen exhibiting elevated fusion function to improve the overall efficiency of targeted transduction. We devised an animal model to show that subcutaneous injection of such engineered vectors to the areas xenografted with target cells could achieve targeted gene delivery in vivo. Taken together, we demonstrated as proof-of-principle a flexible and modular two-molecule strategy for engineering targeting gamma-retroviral vectors. PMID:18435481

  4. Evaluation of in-vitro cytotoxicity and cellular uptake efficiency of zidovudine-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles modified with Aloe Vera in glioma cells.

    PubMed

    K S, Joshy; Sharma, Chandra P; Kalarikkal, Nandakumar; Sandeep, K; Thomas, Sabu; Pothen, Laly A

    2016-09-01

    Zidovudine loaded solid lipid nanoparticles of stearic acid modified with Aloe Vera (AV) have been prepared via simple emulsion solvent evaporation method which showed excellent stability at room temperature and refrigerated condition. The nanoparticles were examined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), which revealed the overlap of the AV absorption peak with the absorption peak of modified stearic acid nanoparticles. The inclusion of AV to stearic acid decreased the crystallinity and improved the hydrophilicity of lipid nanoparticles and thereby improved the drug loading efficacy of lipid nanoparticles. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging revealed that, the average particle size of unmodified (bare) nanoparticles was 45.66±12.22nm and modified solid lipid nanoparticles showed an average size of 265.61±80.44nm. Solid lipid nanoparticles with well-defined morphology were tested in vitro for their possible application in drug delivery. Cell culture studies using C6 glioma cells on the nanoparticles showed enhanced growth and proliferation of cells without exhibiting any toxicity. In addition, normal cell morphology and improved uptake were observed by fluorescence microscopy images of rhodamine labeled modified solid lipid nanoparticles compared with unmodified nanoparticles. The cellular uptake study suggested that these nanoparticles could be a promising drug delivery system to enhance the uptake of antiviral drug by brain cells and it could be a suitable drug carrier system for the treatment of HIV. PMID:27207037

  5. A new class of retroviral and satellite encoded small RNAs emanates from mammalian centromeres.

    PubMed

    Carone, Dawn M; Longo, Mark S; Ferreri, Gianni C; Hall, Laura; Harris, Melissa; Shook, Nicole; Bulazel, Kira V; Carone, Benjamin R; Obergfell, Craig; O'Neill, Michael J; O'Neill, Rachel J

    2009-02-01

    The transcriptional framework of the eukaryotic centromere core has been described in budding yeast and rice, but for most eukaryotes and all vertebrates it remains largely unknown. The lack of large pericentric repeats in the tammar wallaby has made it possible to map and identify the transcriptional units at the centromere in a mammalian species for the first time. We show that these transcriptional units, comprised of satellites and a retrovirus, are bound by centromere proteins and that they are the source of a novel class of small RNA. The endogenous retrovirus from which these small RNAs are derived is now known to be in the centromere domain of several vertebrate classes. The discovery of this new RNA form brings together several independent lines of evidence that point to a conserved retroviral-encoded processed RNA entity within eukaryotic centromeres.

  6. Characterization and use of a recombinant retroviral system for the analysis of drug resistant HIV.

    PubMed

    Medina, D J; Tung, P P; Nelson, C J; Sathya, B; Casareale, D; Strair, R K

    1998-04-01

    A recombinant retroviral system was used for the analysis of early HIV breakthrough infection in the presence of antiviral drugs. The use of replication-defective HIV allowed a quantitative analysis of a single cycle of infection. This report characterizes this recombinant HIV system and demonstrates it's validity in comparison to standard assays. It is demonstrated that the protease inhibitor XM323 inhibits both early and late events in the HIV life-cycle, while dextran sulphate inhibits only early events. In addition, it is shown that this system can be used for detecting and quantitating drug resistant HIV. Thus, the use of this system may provide both novel information about the stage of the viral life-cycle inhibited and a preliminary assessment of the mechanism(s) responsible for breakthrough infection in the presence of antiretroviral drugs. PMID:9626950

  7. Interleukin-encoding adenoviral vectors as genetic adjuvant for vaccination against retroviral infection.

    PubMed

    Ohs, Inga; Windmann, Sonja; Wildner, Oliver; Dittmer, Ulf; Bayer, Wibke

    2013-01-01

    Interleukins (IL) are cytokines with stimulatory and modulatory functions in the immune system. In this study, we have chosen interleukins which are involved in the enhancement of TH2 responses and B cell functions to analyze their potential to improve a prophylactic adenovirus-based anti-retroviral vaccine with regard to antibody and virus-specific CD4(+) T cell responses. Mice were vaccinated with an adenoviral vector which encodes and displays the Friend Virus (FV) surface envelope protein gp70 (Ad.pIXgp70) in combination with adenoviral vectors encoding the interleukins IL4, IL5, IL6, IL7 or IL23. Co-application of Ad.pIXgp70 with Ad.IL5, Ad.IL6 or Ad.IL23 resulted in improved protection with high control over FV-induced splenomegaly and reduced viral loads. Mice co-immunized with adenoviral vectors encoding IL5 or IL23 showed increased neutralizing antibody responses while mice co-immunized with Ad.IL6 or Ad.IL23 showed improved FV-specific CD4(+) T cell responses compared to mice immunized with Ad.pIXgp70 alone. We show that the co-application of adenoviral vectors encoding specific interleukins is suitable to improve the vaccination efficacy of an anti-retroviral vaccine. Improved protection correlated with improved CD4(+) T cell responses and especially with higher neutralizing antibody titers. The co-application of selected interleukin-encoding adenoviral vectors is a valuable tool for vaccination with regard to enhancement of antibody mediated immunity.

  8. Feline mediastinal lymphoma: a retrospective study of signalment, retroviral status, response to chemotherapy and prognostic indicators.

    PubMed

    Fabrizio, Francesca; Calam, Amy E; Dobson, Jane M; Middleton, Stephanie A; Murphy, Sue; Taylor, Samantha S; Schwartz, Anita; Stell, Anneliese J

    2014-08-01

    Historically, feline mediastinal lymphoma has been associated with young age, positive feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) status, Siamese breed and short survival times. Recent studies following widespread FeLV vaccination in the UK are lacking. The aim of this retrospective multi-institutional study was to re-evaluate the signalment, retroviral status, response to chemotherapy, survival and prognostic indicators in feline mediastinal lymphoma cases in the post-vaccination era. Records of cats with clinical signs associated with a mediastinal mass and cytologically/histologically confirmed lymphoma were reviewed from five UK referral centres (1998-2010). Treatment response, survival and prognostic indicators were assessed in treated cats with follow-up data. Fifty-five cases were reviewed. The median age was 3 years (range, 0.5-12 years); 12 cats (21.8%) were Siamese; and the male to female ratio was 3.2:1.0. Five cats were FeLV-positive and two were feline immunodeficiency-positive. Chemotherapy response and survival was evaluated in 38 cats. Overall response was 94.7%; complete (CR) and partial response (PR) rates did not differ significantly between protocols: COP (cyclophosphamide, vincristine, prednisone) (n = 26, CR 61.5%, PR 34.0%); Madison-Wisconsin (MW) (n = 12, CR 66.7%, PR 25.0%). Overall median survival was 373 days (range, 20-2015 days) (COP 484 days [range, 20-980 days]; MW 211 days [range, 24-2015 days] [P = 0.892]). Cats achieving CR survived longer (980 days vs 42 days for PR; P = 0.032). Age, breed, sex, location (mediastinal vs mediastinal plus other sites), retroviral status and glucocorticoid pretreatment did not affect response or survival. Feline mediastinal lymphoma cases frequently responded to chemotherapy with durable survival times, particularly in cats achieving CR. The prevalence of FeLV-antigenaemic cats was low; males and young Siamese cats appeared to be over-represented.

  9. Size distribution of retrovirally marked lineages matches prediction from population measurements of cell cycle behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, Li; Hayes, Nancy L.; Takahashi, Takao; Caviness, Verne S Jr; Nowakowski, Richard S.

    2002-01-01

    Mechanisms that regulate neuron production in the developing mouse neocortex were examined by using a retroviral lineage marking method to determine the sizes of the lineages remaining in the proliferating population of the ventricular zone during the period of neuron production. The distribution of clade sizes obtained experimentally in four different injection-survival paradigms (E11-E13, E11-E14, E11-E15, and E12-E15) from a total of over 500 labeled lineages was compared with that obtained from three models in which the average behavior of the proliferating population [i.e., the proportion of cells remaining in the proliferative population (P) vs. that exiting the proliferative population (Q)] was quantitatively related to lineage size distribution. In model 1, different proportions of asymmetric, symmetric terminal, and symmetric nonterminal cell divisions coexisted during the entire developmental period. In model 2, the developmental period was divided into two epochs: During the first, asymmetric and symmetric nonterminal cell divisions occurred, but, during the second, asymmetric and symmetric terminal cell divisions occurred. In model 3, the shifts in P and Q are accounted for by changes in the proportions of the two types of symmetric cell divisions without the inclusion of any asymmetric cell divisions. The results obtained from the retroviral experiments were well accounted for by model 1 but not by model 2 or 3. These findings demonstrate that: 1) asymmetric and both types of symmetric cell divisions coexist during the entire period of neurogenesis in the mouse, 2) neuron production is regulated in the proliferative population by the independent decisions of the two daughter cells to reenter S phase, and 3) neurons are produced by both asymmetric and symmetric terminal cell divisions. In addition, the findings mean that cell death and/or tangential movements of cells in the proliferative population occur at only a low rate and that there are no

  10. Development of retroviral vectors for insertional mutagenesis in medaka haploid cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fan; Liu, Qizhi; Yuan, Yongming; Hong, Yunhan

    2015-12-01

    Insertional mutagenesis (IM) by retrovirus (RV) is a high-throughput approach for interrogating gene functions in model species. Haploid cell provides a unique system for genetic screening by IM and prosperous progress has been achieved in mammal cells. However, little was known in lower vertebrate cells. Here, we report development of retroviral vectors (rvSAchCVgfp, rvSAchCVpf and rvSAchSTpf) and establishment of IM library in medaka haploid cells. Each vector contains a modified gene trapping (GT) cassette, which could extend the mutated cell population including GT insertions not in-frame or in weakly expressed genes. Virus titration determined by flow cytometry showed that rvSAchSTpf possessed the highest supernatant virus titer (1.5×10(5)TU/ml) in medaka haploid cell, while rvSAchCVpf produced the lowest titer (2.8×10(4)TU/ml). However, quantification of proviral DNAs in transduced cells by droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) demonstrated that the "real titer" may be similar among the three vectors. Furthermore, an IM library was established by FACS of haploid cells transduced with rvSAchCVgfp at a MOI of 0.1. A single copy RV integration in the majority of cells was confirmed by ddPCR in the library. Notably, there was a significant decrease of haploid cell percentage after FACS, suggesting potential trapping for survival/growth essential genes. Our results demonstrated successful development of retroviral vectors for IM in medaka haploid cells, serving for haploid genetic screening of host factors for virus infection and genes underlying certain cellular processes in fish model.

  11. Regulation of human heme oxygenase in endothelial cells by using sense and antisense retroviral constructs.

    PubMed

    Quan, S; Yang, L; Abraham, N G; Kappas, A

    2001-10-01

    Our objective was to determine whether overexpression and underexpression of human heme oxygenase (HHO)-1 could be controlled on a long-term basis by introduction of the HO-1 gene in sense (S) and antisense (AS) orientation with an appropriate vector into endothelial cells. Retroviral vector (LXSN) containing viral long terminal repeat promoter-driven human HO-1 S (LSN-HHO-1) and LXSN vectors containing HHO-1 promoter (HOP)-controlled HHO-1 S and AS (LSN-HOP-HHO-1 and LSN-HOP-HHO-1-AS) sequences were constructed and used to transfect rat lung microvessel endothelial cells (RLMV cells) and human dermal microvessel endothelial cells (HMEC-1 cells). RLMV cells transduced with HHO-1 S expressed human HO-1 mRNA and HO-1 protein associated with elevation in total HO activity compared with nontransduced cells. Vector-mediated expression of HHO-1 S or AS under control of HOP resulted in effective production of HO-1 or blocked induction of endogenous human HO-1 in HMEC-1 cells, respectively. Overexpression of HO-1 AS was associated with a long-term decrease (45%) of endogenous HO-1 protein and an increase (167%) in unmetabolized exogenous heme in HMEC-1 cells. Carbon monoxide (CO) production in HO-1 S- or AS-transduced HMEC-1 cells after heme treatment was increased (159%) or decreased (50%), respectively, compared with nontransduced cells. HO-2 protein levels did not change. These findings demonstrate that HHO-1 S and AS retroviral constructs are functional in enhancing and reducing HO activity, respectively, and thus can be used to regulate cellular heme levels, the activity of heme-dependent enzymes, and the rate of heme catabolism to CO and bilirubin.

  12. Sites of Retroviral DNA Integration: From Basic Research to Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Serrao, Erik; Engelman, Alan N.

    2016-01-01

    One of the most crucial steps in the life cycle of a retrovirus is the integration of the viral DNA (vDNA) copy of the RNA genome into the genome of an infected host cell. Integration provides for efficient viral gene expression as well as for the segregation of the viral genomes to daughter cells upon cell division. Some integrated viruses are not well expressed, and cells latently infected with HIV-1 can resist the action of potent antiretroviral drugs and remain dormant for decades. Intensive research has been dedicated to understanding the catalytic mechanism of integration, as well as the viral and cellular determinants that influence integration site distribution throughout the host genome. In this review we summarize the evolution of techniques that have been used to recover and map retroviral integration sites, from the early days that first indicated that integration could occur in multiple cellular DNA locations, to current technologies that map upwards of millions of unique integration sites from single in vitro integration reactions or cell culture infections. We further review important insights gained from the use of such mapping techniques, including the monitoring of cell clonal expansion in patients treated with retrovirus-based gene therapy vectors, or AIDS patients on suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). These insights span from integrase (IN) enzyme sequence preferences within target DNA (tDNA) at the sites of integration, to the roles of host cellular proteins in mediating global integration distribution, to the potential relationship between genomic location of vDNA integration site and retroviral latency. PMID:26508664

  13. Anti-Retroviral Lectins Have Modest Effects on Adherence of Trichomonas vaginalis to Epithelial Cells In Vitro and on Recovery of Tritrichomonas foetus in a Mouse Vaginal Model

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Aparajita; Ratner, Daniel M.; Ryan, Christopher M.; Johnson, Patricia J.; O’Keefe, Barry R.; Secor, W. Evan; Anderson, Deborah J.; Robbins, Phillips W.; Samuelson, John

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis causes vaginitis and increases the risk of HIV transmission by heterosexual sex, while Tritrichomonas foetus causes premature abortion in cattle. Our goals were to determine the effects, if any, of anti-retroviral lectins, which are designed to prevent heterosexual transmission of HIV, on adherence of Trichomonas to ectocervical cells and on Tritrichomonas infections in a mouse model. We show that Trichomonas Asn-linked glycans (N-glycans), like those of HIV, bind the mannose-binding lectin (MBL) that is part of the innate immune system. N-glycans of Trichomonas and Tritrichomonas bind anti-retroviral lectins (cyanovirin-N and griffithsin) and the 2G12 monoclonal antibody, each of which binds HIV N-glycans. Binding of cyanovirin-N appears to be independent of susceptibility to metronidazole, the major drug used to treat Trichomonas. Anti-retroviral lectins, MBL, and galectin-1 cause Trichomonas to self-aggregate and precipitate. The anti-retroviral lectins also increase adherence of ricin-resistant mutants, which are less adherent than parent cells, to ectocervical cell monolayers and to organotypic EpiVaginal tissue cells. Topical application of either anti-retroviral lectins or yeast N-glycans decreases by 40 to 70% the recovery of Tritrichomonas from the mouse vagina. These results, which are explained by a few simple models, suggest that the anti-retroviral lectins have a modest potential for preventing or treating human infections with Trichomonas. PMID:26252012

  14. Type A-like retroviral particles in a metastatic intestinal adenocarcinoma in an emerald tree boa (Corallus caninus).

    PubMed

    Orós, J; Lorenzo, H; Andrada, M; Recuero, J

    2004-09-01

    A metastatic intestinal papillary adenocarcinoma was diagnosed histologically in an emerald tree boa (Corallus caninus). Metastasis was detected in the liver, both kidneys, lung, and coelomic wall. Ultrastructural examination of the metastatic intestinal epithelial cells in the liver revealed the presence of a moderate number of viral particles that most closely resembled type A retroviral particles and were mainly associated with granular endoplasmic reticulum membranes. This case is the first description of type A-like retroviral particles in a neoplasm of a snake. The role of the virions in the etiology of the intestinal adenocarcinoma is uncertain. In addition, this is the first confirmed report of a metastatic intestinal adenocarcinoma in a snake.

  15. Spectrum of imaging appearances of intracranial cryptococcal infection in HIV/AIDS patients in the anti-retroviral therapy era.

    PubMed

    Offiah, Curtis E; Naseer, Aisha

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans infection is the most common fungal infection of the central nervous system (CNS) in advanced human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients, but remains a relatively uncommon CNS infection in both the immunocompromised and immunocompetent patient population, rendering it a somewhat elusive and frequently overlooked diagnosis. The morbidity and mortality associated with CNS cryptococcal infection can be significantly reduced by early recognition of the imaging appearances by the radiologist in order to focus and expedite clinical management and treatment. The emergence and evolution of anti-retroviral therapy have also impacted significantly on the imaging appearances, morbidity, and mortality of this neuro-infection. The constellation of varied imaging appearances associated with cryptococcal CNS infection in the HIV and AIDS population in the era of highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) will be presented in this review. PMID:26564776

  16. Poly(ethylene oxide/propylene oxide) copolymer thermo-reversible gelling system for the enhancement of intranasal zidovudine delivery to the brain.

    PubMed

    Ved, Parag M; Kim, Kwonho

    2011-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the olfactory transfer of zidovudine (ZDV) after intranasal (IN) administration and to assess the effect of thermoreversible gelling system on its absorption and brain uptake. The nasal formulation was prepared by dissolving ZDV in pH 5.5 phosphate buffer solution comprising of 20% polyethylene oxide/propylene oxide (Poloxamer 407, PLX) as thermoreversible gelling agent and 0.1% n-tridecyl-β-D-maltoside (TDM) as permeation enhancer. This formulation exhibited a sufficient stability and an optimum gelation profile at 27-30 °C. The in vitro permeation studies across the freshly excised rabbit nasal mucosa showed a 53% increase in the permeability of ZDV from the formulation. For in vivo evaluation, the drug concentrations in the plasma, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and six different regions of the brain tissues, i.e. olfactory bulb (OB), olfactory tract (OT), anterior, middle and posterior segments of cerebrum (CB), and cerebellum (CL) were determined by LC/MS method following IV and IN administration in rabbits at a dose of 1mg/kg. The IN administration of Poloxamer 407 and TDM based formulation showed a systemic bioavailability of 29.4% while exhibiting a 4 times slower absorption process (t(max) = 20 min) than control solution (t(max) = 5 min). The CSF and brain ZDV levels achieved after IN administration of the gelling formulation were approximately 4.7-56 times greater than those attained after IV injection. The pharmacokinetic and brain distribution studies revealed that a polar antiviral compound, ZDV could preferentially transfer into the CSF and brain tissue via an alternative pathway, possibly olfactory route after intranasal administration. PMID:21356294

  17. Poly(ethylene oxide/propylene oxide) copolymer thermo-reversible gelling system for the enhancement of intranasal zidovudine delivery to the brain.

    PubMed

    Ved, Parag M; Kim, Kwonho

    2011-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the olfactory transfer of zidovudine (ZDV) after intranasal (IN) administration and to assess the effect of thermoreversible gelling system on its absorption and brain uptake. The nasal formulation was prepared by dissolving ZDV in pH 5.5 phosphate buffer solution comprising of 20% polyethylene oxide/propylene oxide (Poloxamer 407, PLX) as thermoreversible gelling agent and 0.1% n-tridecyl-β-D-maltoside (TDM) as permeation enhancer. This formulation exhibited a sufficient stability and an optimum gelation profile at 27-30 °C. The in vitro permeation studies across the freshly excised rabbit nasal mucosa showed a 53% increase in the permeability of ZDV from the formulation. For in vivo evaluation, the drug concentrations in the plasma, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and six different regions of the brain tissues, i.e. olfactory bulb (OB), olfactory tract (OT), anterior, middle and posterior segments of cerebrum (CB), and cerebellum (CL) were determined by LC/MS method following IV and IN administration in rabbits at a dose of 1mg/kg. The IN administration of Poloxamer 407 and TDM based formulation showed a systemic bioavailability of 29.4% while exhibiting a 4 times slower absorption process (t(max) = 20 min) than control solution (t(max) = 5 min). The CSF and brain ZDV levels achieved after IN administration of the gelling formulation were approximately 4.7-56 times greater than those attained after IV injection. The pharmacokinetic and brain distribution studies revealed that a polar antiviral compound, ZDV could preferentially transfer into the CSF and brain tissue via an alternative pathway, possibly olfactory route after intranasal administration.

  18. Structural and functional studies of murine Mbo I repeat LTR (MRL) retroviral genes on the Y chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Ch'ang, L.Y.; Hoyt, P.R.; Wang, T.H.; Kanagala, R.; Henley, D.C.; Yang, D.M.; Yang, W.K. )

    1991-03-15

    The mouse genome harbors approximately 200 copies of MRL retroviral elements (or MuRRs) that are preferentially expressed in the reproductive system. The MRL retroviral gene family is wildly distributed in the genus Mus. About 10% of the elements are located on the Y chromosome and the abundance is probably due to gene amplification. Multiple copies of Y chromosome-specific MRL retroviral sequences are present only in the genome of M spretus and M. musculus. Structural and sequence analyses revealed a truncation of the male-specific MRL elements isolated from a BALB/c mouse DNA library. Consequently, two-thirds of an intact LTR was retained at the 5{prime} end and the 3{prime} structure was disrupted immediately downstream of the pol gene with a concomitant loss of the 3{prime} LTR. Southern analysis of male and female mouse DNA confirmed that sequences adjacent to the 3{prime} breakpoint were Y chromosome specific. These sequences are length polymorphic in nature and appear to be co-amplified with MRL retroviral genes on the Y chromosome. A collinear cDNA of 9.5 kb containing fused MRL and Y chromosome sequences was also isolated from a testis library. The LTR of male-specific MRL elements was unable to drive the expression of the bacterial CAT gene in cultured mouse NIH/3T3 and mink CCL64 cells. However, when its enhancer domain was linked to an SV40 promoter, the CAT gene was expressed at a significant level. Differential binding activities to male-specific MRL were found in nuclear extracts of the liver, kidney, and testis.

  19. Induction of methotrexate resistance by retroviral-mediated transfer of a mutant dihydrofolate reductase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ricciardone, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX), a folate analog which inhibits the enzyme dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), is an effective antineoplastic drug. However, MTX-induced myelosuppression limits the effectiveness of this agent. Selective induction of MTX resistance in bone marrow stem cells, prior to treatment with MTX, might prevent this toxicity and improve the therapeutic index of the drug. In these studies drug resistance was transferred to mouse and human bone marrow stem cells by retroviral expression vectors containing coding sequences of a mutant DHFR with a decreased affinity for MTX. Three retroviral expression vectors were analyzed. The CIS DR vector contained the mutant DHFR gene inserted into the replication-defective amphotropic 4070 virus, Cistor. The other vectors contained the mutant DHFR inserted into either the env region (SDHT1) or gag-pol region (SDHT2) of a replication-defective spleen focus-forming virus. All three constructs induced approximately a 200-fold resistance to MTX when transfected into NIH3T3 cells. Amphotropic infectious retroviruses were obtained by transfecting the mutant DHFR vectors into a packaging cell line, which supplied the gag, pol, and env proteins for virus production. Virus titers of 4.5 x 10/sup 3/ colony-forming units (CFU)/ml (CIS DR), 1.5 x 10/sup 4/ CFU/ml (SDHT2), and 5 x 10/sup 5/ CFU/ml (SDHT1) were measured by the transfer of MTX resistance to NIH3T3 cells. The amphotropic SDHT1 virus efficiently induced MTX resistance in cells of several species, including mouse NIH3T3 cells (5 x 10/sup 5/ CFU/ml), monkey CV1 cells (4 x 10/sup 3/ CFU/ml), and human MCF-7 cells (6 x 10/sup 4/ CFU/ml). When cocultured with SDHT1 virus-producing cells, both mouse and human bone marrow cells could be infected and rendered resistant to MTX. Mouse cytotoxic T lymphocytes and mouse helper T lymphocytes can also be made resistant to MTX.

  20. Quantitative analysis of recombination between YFP and CFP genes of FRET biosensors introduced by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Komatsubara, Akira T; Matsuda, Michiyuki; Aoki, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Biosensors based on the principle of Förster (or fluorescence) resonance energy transfer (FRET) have been developed to visualize spatio-temporal dynamics of signalling molecules in living cells. Many of them adopt a backbone of intramolecular FRET biosensor with a cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) as donor and acceptor, respectively. However, there remains the difficulty of establishing cells stably expressing FRET biosensors with a YFP and CFP pair by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer, due to the high incidence of recombination between YFP and CFP genes. To address this, we examined the effects of codon-diversification of YFP on the recombination of FRET biosensors introduced by lentivirus or retrovirus. The YFP gene that was fully codon-optimized to E.coli evaded the recombination in lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer, but the partially codon-diversified YFP did not. Further, the length of spacer between YFP and CFP genes clearly affected recombination efficiency, suggesting that the intramolecular template switching occurred in the reverse-transcription process. The simple mathematical model reproduced the experimental data sufficiently, yielding a recombination rate of 0.002-0.005 per base. Together, these results show that the codon-diversified YFP is a useful tool for expressing FRET biosensors by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer. PMID:26290434

  1. Inhibition Profiling of Retroviral Protease Inhibitors Using an HIV-2 Modular System

    PubMed Central

    Mahdi, Mohamed; Szojka, Zsófia; Mótyán, János András; Tőzsér, József

    2015-01-01

    Retroviral protease inhibitors (PIs) are fundamental pillars in the treatment of HIV infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Currently used PIs are designed against HIV-1, and their effect on HIV-2 is understudied. Using a modular HIV-2 protease cassette system, inhibition profiling assays were carried out for protease inhibitors both in enzymatic and cell culture assays. Moreover, the treatment-associated resistance mutations (I54M, L90M) were introduced into the modular system, and comparative inhibition assays were performed to determine their effect on the susceptibility of the protease. Our results indicate that darunavir, saquinavir, indinavir and lopinavir were very effective HIV-2 protease inhibitors, while tipranavir, nelfinavir and amprenavir showed a decreased efficacy. I54M, L90M double mutation resulted in a significant reduction in the susceptibility to most of the inhibitors with the exception of tipranavir. To our knowledge, this modular system constitutes a novel approach in the field of HIV-2 protease characterization and susceptibility testing. PMID:26633459

  2. Effects of retroviral envelope-protein cleavage upon trafficking, incorporation, and membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Apte, Swapna; Sanders, David Avram

    2010-09-15

    Retroviral envelope glycoproteins undergo proteolytic processing by cellular subtilisin-like proprotein convertases at a polybasic amino-acid site in order to produce the two functional subunits, SU and TM. Most previous studies have indicated that envelope-protein cleavage is required for rendering the protein competent for promoting membrane fusion and for virus infectivity. We have investigated the role of proteolytic processing of the Moloney murine leukemia virus envelope-protein through site-directed mutagenesis of the residues near the SU-TM cleavage site and have established that uncleaved glycoprotein is unable either to be incorporated into virus particles efficiently or to induce membrane fusion. Additionally, the results suggest that cleavage of the envelope protein plays an important role in intracellular trafficking of protein via the cellular secretory pathway. Based on our results it was concluded that a positively charged residue located at either P2 or P4 along with the arginine at P1 is essential for cleavage.

  3. Integration site and clonal expansion in human chronic retroviral infection and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Niederer, Heather A; Bangham, Charles R M

    2014-10-31

    Retroviral vectors have been successfully used therapeutically to restore expression of genes in a range of single-gene diseases, including several primary immunodeficiency disorders. Although clinical trials have shown remarkable results, there have also been a number of severe adverse events involving malignant outgrowth of a transformed clonal population. This clonal expansion is influenced by the integration site profile of the viral integrase, the transgene expressed, and the effect of the viral promoters on the neighbouring host genome. Infection with the pathogenic human retrovirus HTLV-1 also causes clonal expansion of cells containing an integrated HTLV-1 provirus. Although the majority of HTLV-1-infected people remain asymptomatic, up to 5% develop an aggressive T cell malignancy. In this review we discuss recent findings on the role of the genomic integration site in determining the clonality and the potential for malignant transformation of cells carrying integrated HTLV-1 or gene therapy vectors, and how these results have contributed to the understanding of HTLV-1 pathogenesis and to improvements in gene therapy vector safety.

  4. Evidence of retroviral etiology for disseminated neoplasia in cockles (Cerastoderma edule).

    PubMed

    Romalde, Jesús L; Luz Vilariño, M; Beaz, Roxana; Rodríguez, José M; Díaz, Seila; Villalba, Antonio; Carballal, María J

    2007-02-01

    Epizootiologic outbreaks of disseminated neoplasia have been reported in association with massive mortalities of various bivalve species. In cockles, Cerastoderma edule, this pathological condition was described in Ireland and France. Since 1997, different populations affected by this pathology have been detected in Galicia (NW Spain). Transmission electron microscopy allowed the visualization of virus-like particles in neoplastic cells, resembling a retrovirus-like agent. To confirm this hypothesis, we used a commercial kit for detection and quantification of reverse transcriptase (RT) activity, based on the use of bromo-deoxyuridine triphosphate (BrdUTP) and a BrdU binding antibody conjugated to alkaline phosphatase. In addition, we developed a product-enhanced RT assay using RNA of hepatitis A virus as a template. These two assays showed positive RT activity in 90.9 and 81.8% of samples, respectively, from cockles displaying disseminated neoplasia as determined by light microscopy. These results strongly support the hypothesis of retroviral etiology for this pathological condition.

  5. Variable stability of a selectable provirus after retroviral vector gene transfer into human cells.

    PubMed Central

    Jolly, D J; Willis, R C; Friedmann, T

    1986-01-01

    Human lymphoblasts deficient in the enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) were infected with an amphotropic helper-free retroviral vector expressing human HPRT cDNA. The stability and expression of the HPRT provirus in five cell lines with different proviral integration sites were examined by determining HPRT mutation and reversion frequencies and by blot hybridization studies. Mutation to the HPRT-negative phenotype occurred at frequencies of approximately 4 X 10(-5) to 3 X 10(-6) per generation. Most mutations in each of the five cell lines were associated with partial or complete deletions or rearrangements of the provirus. Several mutants retained a grossly intact HPRT provirus, and in one such mutant HPRT shutdown resulted from a revertible epigenetic mechanism that was not associated with global changes in proviral methylation. Therefore, mutation and shutdown of the HPRT provirus in human lymphoblasts result from mechanisms similar to those reported for several other avian and mammalian replication-competent retroviruses. Images PMID:3023873

  6. Retroviral infection of non-dividing cells: Old and new perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, Masahiro; Emerman, Michael . E-mail: memerman@fhcrc.org

    2006-01-05

    The dependence of retroviral replication on cell proliferation was described as early as 1958, although different classes of retroviruses are able to infect non-dividing cells with different efficiencies. For example, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other lentiviruses infect most non-dividing cells nearly as well as dividing cells, while the gammaretroviruses such as the murine leukemia virus (MLV) cannot infect non-dividing cells, and other retroviruses have intermediate phenotypes. One exception to the ability of HIV to infect non-dividing cells involves resting CD4+ T cells in vitro where there are multiple restrictions. However, recent data show that there is massive infection of non-activated CD4+ T cell during acute infection which suggests that the situation is different in vivo. Finally, much work trying to explain the difference between HIV and MLV in non-dividing cells has focused on describing the ability of HIV to enter the nucleus during interphase. However, we suggest that events in the viral lifecycle other than nuclear import may be more important in determining the ability of a given retrovirus to infect non-dividing cells.

  7. Single molecule DNA interaction kinetics of retroviral nucleic acid chaperone proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid (NC) proteins are essential for several viral replication processes including specific genomic RNA packaging and reverse transcription. The nucleic acid chaperone activity of NC facilitates the latter process. In this study, we use single molecule biophysical methods to quantify the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NC and Gag and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) NC. We find that the nucleic acid interaction properties of these proteins differ significantly, with HIV-1 NC showing rapid protein binding kinetics, significant duplex destabilization, and strong DNA aggregation, all properties that are critical components of nucleic acid chaperone activity. In contrast, HTLV-1 NC exhibits significant destabilization activity but extremely slow DNA interaction kinetics and poor aggregating capability, which explains why HTLV-1 NC is a poor nucleic acid chaperone. To understand these results, we developed a new single molecule method for quantifying protein dissociation kinetics, and applied this method to probe the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant HIV-1 and HTLV-1 NC. We find that mutations to aromatic and charged residues strongly alter the proteins' nucleic acid interaction kinetics. Finally, in contrast to HIV-1 NC, HIV-1 Gag, the nucleic acid packaging protein that contains NC as a domain, exhibits relatively slow binding kinetics, which may negatively impact its ability to act as a nucleic acid chaperone.

  8. Retroviral Transduction of Bone Marrow Progenitor Cells to Generate T-cell Receptor Retrogenic Mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Thomas; Shevchenko, Ivan; Sprouse, Maran L; Bettini, Maria; Bettini, Matthew L

    2016-01-01

    T cell receptor (TCR) signaling is essential in the development and differentiation of T cells in the thymus and periphery, respectively. The vast array of TCRs proves studying a specific antigenic response difficult. Therefore, TCR transgenic mice were made to study positive and negative selection in the thymus as well as peripheral T cell activation, proliferation and tolerance. However, relatively few TCR transgenic mice have been generated specific to any given antigen. Thus, studies involving TCRs of varying affinities for the same antigenic peptide have been lacking. The generation of a new TCR transgenic line can take six or more months. Additionally, any specific backcrosses can take an additional six months. In order to allow faster generation and screening of multiple TCRs, a protocol for retroviral transduction of bone marrow was established with stoichiometric expression of the TCRα and TCRβ chains and the generation of retrogenic mice. Each retrogenic mouse is essentially a founder, virtually negating a founder effect, while the length of time to generate a TCR retrogenic is cut from six months to approximately six weeks. Here we present a rapid and flexible alternative to TCR transgenic mice that can be expressed on any chosen background with any particular TCR. PMID:27500835

  9. Immunomodulatory effects of human neuroblastoma cells transduced with a retroviral vector encoding interleukin-2.

    PubMed

    Leimig, T; Foreman, N; Rill, D; Coze, C; Holladay, M; Brenner, M

    1994-12-01

    We have investigated whether retroviral mediated transfer of the IL-2 gene renders human neuroblastoma cells immunogenic, justifying their use in a clinical tumor immunization study. Fourteen neuroblastoma cell lines were established from patients with disseminated neuroblastoma and transduced with the vector G1Ncvl2, which contains the neomycin phosphotransferase gene and the cDNA of the human interleukin-2 gene. Clones secreting > 150 pg/10(6) cells/24 h of IL-2 were selected for further study. Secretion of IL-2 was maintained for at least 3 weeks in nonselective media, implying that production of the cytokine would continue under in vivo conditions. Co-culture of IL-2 transduced cell lines with patient lymphocytes induced potent cytotoxic activity against both transduced and parental neuroblastoma cell lines. This activity was HLA unrestricted, and predominantly mediated by CD16+ or CD56+ and CD8- lymphocytes. These data form the preclinical justification for our current immunization protocol for patients with relapsed or resistant neuroblastoma.

  10. Gene Modification of Human Natural Killer Cells Using a Retroviral Vector.

    PubMed

    Kellner, Joshua N; Cruz, Conrad R; Bollard, Catherine M; Yvon, Eric S

    2016-01-01

    As part of the innate immune system, natural killer (NK) cells are regarded as promising effector cells for adoptive cell therapy approaches to treat patients with cancer. In some cases, genetic modification of the NK cells may be considered but such manipulation has to be integrated into the expansion method to allow the generation of clinically relevant numbers of gene-modified NK cells. Therefore, an efficient gene transfer procedure is needed.Our group developed a retrovirus-based transduction protocol capable of robust expansion of gene-modified NK cells with a high rate of transgene expression. Actively dividing cells is a prerequisite for efficient gene transfer when using a retroviral vector. In the procedure presented here, strong activation of the NK cells was provided by a combination of IL-15 and the K-562 feeder cells. Beside the interest in developing a simple procedure compliant with good manufacturing practice (GMP) for the production of therapeutic products, this approach also provides a valuable means of generating genetically modified primary NK cells for future preclinical studies. PMID:27177668

  11. Retroviral transduction of hematopoietic progenitors derived from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Menendez, Pablo; Wang, Lisheng; Cerdan, Chantal; Bhatia, Mickie

    2006-01-01

    It has been recently identified that cytokines and BMP-4 promote hematopoiesis from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) and that, before hematopoietic commitment, a rare subpopulation of cells lacking CD45, but expressing PECAM-1, Flk-1, and VE-cadherin (hereinafter termed CD45(neg)PFV precursors), are exclusively responsible for hematopoietic cell fate on cytokine stimulation. Efficient strategies to stably transduce these hematopoietic precursors specifically generated from hESCs would provide a novel and desirable tool to study hematopoietic development through the introduction and characterization of candidate genes suspected to regulate self-renewal processes of hESC-derived hematopoietic cells or dynamically track hESC-derived hematopoietic stem cells in vivo. To date, only transient transfection and stable transduction using lentiviral vectors have been reported in undifferentiated hESC followed by random and spontaneous differentiation into different cell types. However, protocols for stable transduction of hematopoietic progenitors prospectively derived from hESC need to be developed yet. In the present chapter, we described detailed methods on the recently characterized and optimized GALV-pseudotyped retroviral gene transfer strategy to stably transduce the hematopoietic progenitor cells prospectively derived from CD45(neg)PFV hemogenic precursors as a vital tool to study hematopoietic development and to characterize candidate genes suspected to eventually confer robust and sustained repopulating ability to hESC-derived hematopoietic cells.

  12. An Alix fragment potently inhibits HIV-1 budding: characterization of binding to retroviral YPXL late domains.

    PubMed

    Munshi, Utpal M; Kim, Jaewon; Nagashima, Kunio; Hurley, James H; Freed, Eric O

    2007-02-01

    The retroviral structural protein, Gag, contains small peptide motifs known as late domains that promote efficient virus release from the infected cell. In addition to the well characterized PTAP late domain, the p6 region of HIV-1 Gag contains a binding site for the host cell protein Alix. To better understand the functional role of the Gag/Alix interaction, we overexpressed an Alix fragment composed of residues 364-716 (Alix 364-716) and examined the effect on release of wild type (WT) and Alix binding site mutant HIV-1. We observed that Alix 364-716 expression significantly inhibited WT virus release and Gag processing and that mutation of the Alix binding site largely relieved this inhibition. Furthermore, Alix 364-716 expression induced a severe defect on WT but not mutant particle morphology. Intriguingly, the impact of Alix 364-716 expression on HIV-1 release and Gag processing was markedly different from that induced by mutation of the Alix binding site in p6. The association of Alix 364-716 with HIV-1 and equine infectious anemia virus late domains was quantitatively evaluated by isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance techniques, and the effects of mutations in these viral sequences on Alix 364-716 binding was determined. This study identifies a novel Alix-derived dominant negative inhibitor of HIV-1 release and Gag processing and provides quantitative information on the interaction between Alix and viral late domains.

  13. Host factors in retroviral integration and the selection of integration target sites

    PubMed Central

    Craigie, Robert; Bushman, Frederic D.

    2015-01-01

    In order to replicate, a retrovirus must integrate a DNA copy of the viral RNA genome into a chromosome of the host cell. The study of retroviral integration has advanced considerably in the last few years. Here we focus on host factor interactions and the linked area of integration targeting. Genome-wide screens for cellular factors affecting HIV replication have identified a series of host cell proteins that may mediate subcellular trafficking of integration complexes, nuclear import, and integration target site selection. The cell transcriptional co-activator protein LEDGF/p75 has been identified as a tethering factor important for HIV integration, and recently, BET proteins (Brd2, 4, and 4) have been identified as tethering factors for the gammaretroviruses. A new class of HIV inhibitors has been developed targeting the HIV-1 IN-LEDGF binding site, though surprisingly these inhibitors appear to block assembly late during replication and do not act at the integration step. Going forward, genome-wide studies of HIV-host interactions offer many new starting points to investigate HIV replication and identify potential new inhibitor targets. PMID:26104434

  14. Effects of Hormonal Contraception on Anti-Retroviral Drug Metabolism, Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Thurman, Andrea Ries; Anderson, Sharon; Doncel, Gustavo F

    2014-01-01

    Among women, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is most prevalent in those of reproductive age. These women are also at risk of unintended or mistimed pregnancies. Hormonal contraceptives (HCs) are one of the most commonly used methods of family planning world-wide. Therefore concurrent use of HC among women on anti-retroviral medications (ARVs) is increasingly common. ARVs are being investigated and have been approved for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), and therefore drug-drug interactions must also be considered in HIV-1 negative women who want to prevent both unintended pregnancy and HIV-1 infection. This article will review four main interactions: (1) the effect of HCs on ARV pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) during therapy, (2) the effect of ARVs on HC PK and PD, (3) the role of drug transporters on drug-drug interactions and (4) ongoing research into the effect of HCs on pre-exposure prophylaxis PK and PD. PMID:24521428

  15. Community perspective on the INSIGHT Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment (START) trial.

    PubMed

    Geffen, N; Aagaard, P; Corbelli, G M; Meulbroek, M; Peavy, D; Rappoport, C; Schwarze, S; Collins, S

    2015-04-01

    Determining when to start antiretroviral treatment (ART) is vitally important for people living with HIV. Yet the optimal point at which to start to maximize clinical benefit remains unknown. In the absence of randomized studies, current guidelines rely on conflicting observational data and expert opinion, and consequently diverge on this point. In the USA, ART is recommended irrespective of CD4 cell count. The World Health Organization now recommends starting ART at a CD4 cell count of 500 cells/μL, while the threshold for the UK and South Africa remains at 350 cells/μL. The Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment (START) study, one of the largest clinical trials on the treatment of HIV infection, will answer this question. START compares two treatment strategies: immediate treatment at a CD4 cell count of 500 cells/μL or higher versus deferring treatment until the CD4 cell count decreases to 350 cells/μL or until AIDS develops. START includes seven substudies, five of which will clarify the relative contributions of HIV and ART in common comorbidities. START is fully enrolled and expected to be completed in 2016. HIV advocates support the study's design and have been involved from inception to enrolment. The trial will produce rigorous data on the benefits and risks of earlier treatment. It will inform policy and treatment advocacy globally, benefitting the health of HIV-positive people.

  16. Treatment of mice with 5-azacytidine efficiently activates silent retroviral genomes in different tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Jaenisch, R; Schnieke, A; Harbers, K

    1985-01-01

    The drug 5-azacytidine was injected into mice to activate silent retroviral genomes. The Mov-7 and Mov-10 substrains of mice were used, each of which carries a Moloney murine leukemia provirus with mutations in the coding regions at nonidentical positions. These proviral genomes are highly methylated and are not expressed in the animal. A single injection of the drug into postnatal mice induced transcription of the endogenous defective proviral genomes in thymus, spleen, and liver at 3 days after treatment. No viral transcription was detected in the brain of drug-exposed animals. When postnatal Mov-7/Mov-10 F1 mice were treated with the drug, infectious virus was generated efficiently and resulted in virus spread and viremia in all animals by 3 weeks of age. In contrast, infectious virus was not generated in F1 mice that had been treated during gestation with up to sublethal doses of the drug. Our results demonstrate that injection of 5-azacytidine can be used to efficiently and reproducibly activate silent genes in different cell populations of postnatal mice. Images PMID:2579397

  17. Effect of cell lysates on retroviral transduction efficiency of cells in suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Beauchesne, Pascal R; Bruce, Katherine J; Bowen, Bruce D; Piret, James M

    2010-04-15

    Recombinant retroviruses are effective vectors able to integrate transgenes into the target cell's genome to achieve longer-term expression. This study investigates the effect of cell lysis products, a common cell culture by-product, on the transduction of suspension cells by gammaretroviral vectors. Cell lysates derived from human and murine suspension cell lines significantly increased the transduction of human TF-1 and K-562 cell lines by gibbon ape leukemia virus-pseudotyped retroviral vectors without altering tropism. The transduction efficiency of TF-1 cells increased as a function of lysate concentration and decreased with increasing target cell concentrations. This was adequately predicted using a saturation equation based on the lysed-to-target cell concentration ratio, R, where: Fold increase = 1+Fold_(Max) (R/(K_(L)+R)). Lysate completely masked the effects of fibronectin when the two were added in combination. With protamine sulfate, the transduction efficiency was increased by lysate to 58% from 20% for protamine sulfate alone. Overall, the presence of cell lysate significantly influenced the outcome of the transduction process, either alone or in the presence of protamine sulfate or fibronectin. PMID:20014140

  18. MuLV IN Mutants Responsive to HDAC Inhibitors Enhance Transcription from Unintegrated Retroviral DNA

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, William M.; Wu, Dai-tze; Amin, Vaibhav; Aiyer, Sriram; Roth, Monica J.

    2012-01-01

    For Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV), sustained viral infections require expression from an integrated provirus. For many applications, non-integrating retroviral vectors have been utilized to avoid the unwanted effects of integration, however, the level of expression from unintegrated DNA is significantly less than that of integrated provirus. We find that unintegrated DNA expression can be increased in the presence of HDAC inhibitors, such as TSA, when applied in combination with integrase (IN) mutations. These mutants include an active site mutation as well as catalytically active INs bearing mutations of K376 in the MuLV C-terminal domain of IN. MuLV IN K376 is homologous to K266 in HIV-1 IN, a known substrate for acetylation. The MuLV IN protein is acetylated by p300 in vitro, however, the effect of HDAC inhibitors on gene expression from unintegrated DNA is not dependent on the acetylation state of MuLV IN K376. PMID:22365328

  19. Inhibition of HMGI-C protein synthesis suppresses retrovirally induced neoplastic transformation of rat thyroid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Berlingieri, M T; Manfioletti, G; Santoro, M; Bandiera, A; Visconti, R; Giancotti, V; Fusco, A

    1995-01-01

    Elevated expression of the three high-mobility group I (HMGI) proteins (HMGI, HMGY, and HMGI-C) has previously been correlated with the presence of a highly malignant phenotype in epithelial and fibroblastic rat thyroid cells and in experimental thyroid, lung, mammary, and skin carcinomas. Northern (RNA) blot and run-on analyses demonstrated that the induction of HMGI genes in transformed thyroid cells occurs at the transcriptional level. An antisense methodology to block HMGI-C protein synthesis was then used to analyze the role of this protein in the process of thyroid cell transformation. Transfection of an antisense construct for the HMGI-C cDNA into normal thyroid cells, followed by infection with transforming myeloproliferative sarcoma virus or Kirsten murine sarcoma virus, generated cell lines that expressed significant levels of the retroviral transforming oncogenes v-mos or v-ras-Ki and removed the dependency on thyroid-stimulating hormones. However, in contrast with untransfected cells or cells transfected with the sense construct, those containing the antisense construct did not demonstrate the appearance of any malignant phenotypic markers (growth in soft agar and tumorigenicity in athymic mice). A great reduction of the HMGI-C protein levels and the absence of the HMGI(Y) proteins was observed in the HMGI-C antisense-transfected, virally infected cells. Therefore, the HMGI-C protein seems to play a key role in the transformation of these thyroid cells. PMID:7862147

  20. Foxp3-dependent transformation of human primary CD4+ T lymphocytes by the retroviral protein tax.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Huan; Cheng, Hua

    2015-10-23

    The retroviral Tax proteins of human T cell leukemia virus type 1 and 2 (HTLV-1 and -2) are highly homologous viral transactivators. Both viral proteins can immortalize human primary CD4+ memory T cells, but when expressed alone they rarely transform T cells. In the present study, we found that the Tax proteins displayed a differential ability to immortalize human CD4+Foxp3+ T cells with characteristic expression of CTLA-4 and GITR. Because epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was reportedly expressed and activated in a subset of CD4+Foxp3+ T cells, we introduced an activated EGFR into Tax-immortalized CD4+Foxp3+ T cells. We observed that these modified cells were grown independently of exogenous IL-2, correlating with a T cell transformation phenotype. In Tax-immortalized CD4+Foxp3- T cells, ectopic expression of Foxp3 was a prerequisite for Tax transformation of T cells. Accordingly, treatment of the transformed T cells with erlotinib, a selective inhibitor of EGFR, induced degradation of EGFR in lysosome, consequently causing T cell growth inhibition. Further, we identified autophagy as a crucial cellular survival pathway for the transformed T cells. Silencing key autophagy molecules including Beclin1, Atg5 and PI3 kinase class III (PI3KC3) resulted in drastic impairment of T cell growth. Our data, therefore, unveiled a previously unidentified role of Foxp3 in T cell transformation, providing a molecular basis for HTLV-1 transformation of CD4+Foxp3+ T cells.

  1. OLIGOMERIZATION OF A RETROVIRAL MATRIX PROTEIN IS FACILITATED BY BACKBONE FLEXIBILITY ON NS TIMESCALE

    PubMed Central

    Srb, Pavel; Vlach, Jiří; Prchal, Jan; Grocký, Marián; Ruml, Tomáš; Lang, Jan; Hrabal, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Oligomerization capacity of the retroviral matrix protein is an important feature that affects assembly of immature virions and their interaction with cellular membrane. A combination of NMR relaxation measurements and advanced analysis of molecular dynamics simulation trajectory provided an unprecedentedly detailed insight into internal mobility of matrix proteins of the Mason-Pfizer monkey virus. Strong evidences have been obtained that the oligomerization capacity of the wild type matrix protein is closely related to the enhanced dynamics of several parts of its backbone on ns timescale. Increased flexibility has been observed for two regions: the loop between α-helices α2 and α3 and the C-terminal half of α-helix α3 which accommodate amino acid residues that form the oligomerization interface. On the other hand, matrix mutant R55F that has changed structure and does not exhibit any specific oligomerization in solution was found considerably more rigid. Our results document that conformational selection mechanism together with induced fit and favorable structural pre-organization play an important role in the control of the oligomerization process. PMID:21366213

  2. Retroviral-mediated gene transfer and expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase in primary mouse hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, H.; Armentano, D.; Mackenzie-Graham, L.; Shen, R.F.; Darlington, G.; Ledley, F.D.; Woo, S.L.C. )

    1988-11-01

    Genetic therapy for phenylketonuria (severe phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency) may require introduction of a normal phenylalanine hydroxylase gene into hepatic cells of patients. The authors report development of a recombinant retrovirus based on the N2 vector for gene transfer and expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase cDNA in primary mouse hepatocytes. This construct contains an internal promoter of the human {alpha}{sub 1}-antitrypsin gene driving transcription of the phenylalanine hydroxylase cDNA. Primary mouse hepatocytes were isolated from newborn mice, infected with the recombinant virus, and selected for expression of the neomycin-resistance gene. Hepatocytes transformed with the recombinant virus contained high levels of human phenylalanine hydroxylase mRNA transcripts originating from the retroviral and internal promoters. These results demonstrate that the transcriptional regulatory elements of the {alpha}{sub 1} antitrypsin gene retain their tissue-specific function in the recombinant provirus and establish a method for efficient transfer and high-level expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase in primary hepatocytes.

  3. Acceptor sites for retroviral integrations map near DNase I-hypersensitive sites in chromatin.

    PubMed Central

    Vijaya, S; Steffen, D L; Robinson, H L

    1986-01-01

    Seven cellular loci with acceptor sites for retroviral integrations have been mapped for the presence of DNase I-hypersensitive sites in chromatin. Integrations in three of these loci, chicken c-erbB, rat c-myc, and a rat locus, dsi-1, had been selected for in retrovirus-induced tumors. Of the remaining four, two, designated dsi-3 and dsi-4, harbored acceptor sites for apparently unselected integrations of Moloney murine leukemia virus in a Moloney murine leukemia virus-induced thymoma, and two, designated C and F, harbored unselected acceptor sites for Moloney murine leukemia virus integrations in a rat fibroblast cell line. Each acceptor site mapped to within 500 base pairs of a DNase I-hypersensitive site. In the analyses of the unselected integrations, six hypersensitive sites were observed in 39 kilobases of DNA. The four acceptor sites in this DNA were localized between 0.05 and 0.43 kilobases of a hypersensitive site. The probability of this close association occurring by chance was calculated to be extremely low. Hypersensitive sites were mapped in cells representing the lineage in which integration had occurred as well as in an unrelated lineage. In six of the seven acceptor loci hypersensitive sites could not be detected in the unrelated lineage. Our results indicate that retroviruses preferentially integrate close to DNase I-hypersensitive sites and that many of these sites are expressed in some but not all cells. Images PMID:3490582

  4. Retroviral Infection of Murine Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Embryoid Body Cells for Analysis of Hematopoietic Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bikorimana, Emmanuel; Lapid, Danica; Choi, Hyewon; Dahl, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are an outstanding model for elucidating the molecular mechanisms of cellular differentiation. They are especially useful for investigating the development of early hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). Gene expression in ESCs can be manipulated by several techniques that allow the role for individual molecules in development to be determined. One difficulty is that expression of specific genes often has different phenotypic effects dependent on their temporal expression. This problem can be circumvented by the generation of ESCs that inducibly express a gene of interest using technology such as the doxycycline-inducible transgene system. However, generation of these inducible cell lines is costly and time consuming. Described here is a method for disaggregating ESC-derived embryoid bodies (EBs) into single cell suspensions, retrovirally infecting the cell suspensions, and then reforming the EBs by hanging drop. Downstream differentiation is then evaluated by flow cytometry. Using this protocol, it was demonstrated that exogenous expression of a microRNA gene at the beginning of ESC differentiation blocks HPC generation. However, when expressed in EB derived cells after nascent mesoderm is produced, the microRNA gene enhances hematopoietic differentiation. This method is useful for investigating the role of genes after specific germ layer tissue is derived. PMID:25350134

  5. Critical assessment of lifelong phenotype correction in hyperbilirubinemic Gunn rats after retroviral mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T H; Aubert, D; Bellodi-Privato, M; Flageul, M; Pichard, V; Jaidane-Abdelghani, Z; Myara, A; Ferry, N

    2007-09-01

    Among inherited diseases of the liver, Crigler-Najjar type 1 disease (CN-1), which results from complete deficiency in bilirubin UDP-glucuronosyltransferase activity (B-UGT1), is an attractive target for gene therapy studies. Hyperbilirubinemic Gunn rats, a model of CN-1, were injected at 2 days of age with lentiviral or oncoretroviral vectors encoding the human B-UGT1. After injection, bilirubinemia was normalized for up to 95 weeks. Bilirubin conjugates were present in the bile, demonstrating liver transduction. PCR and enzyme activity analysis confirmed gene and phenotype correction in liver. We observed that when using a strong viral promoter, a complete correction was achieved with less than 5% of B-UGT1 copy per haploid genome and after a reconstitution of 12% B-UGT1 normal activity. Liver histology remained normal throughout the experiment and tissue distribution analysis revealed preferential hepatocyte transduction after systemic delivery. Finally, no adverse immune response occurred even after induction of nonspecific liver inflammation, suggesting immune ignorance to the therapeutic protein. Our present results document the lifelong safety of gene therapy for CN-1 with retroviral vectors. They offer a better delineation of liver gene correction level required to achieve complete correction of bilirubinemia and pave the way for future clinical application of gene therapy for inherited liver disorders.

  6. Immunoglobulin somatic hypermutation by APOBEC3/Rfv3 during retroviral infection.

    PubMed

    Halemano, Kalani; Guo, Kejun; Heilman, Karl J; Barrett, Bradley S; Smith, Diana S; Hasenkrug, Kim J; Santiago, Mario L

    2014-05-27

    Somatic hypermutation (SHM) is an integral process in the development of high-affinity antibodies that are important for recovery from viral infections and vaccine-induced protection. Ig SHM occurs predominantly in germinal centers (GC) via the enzymatic activity of activation-induced deaminase (AID). In contrast, the evolutionarily related apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide 3 (APOBEC3) proteins are known to restrict retroviruses, including HIV-1. We previously reported that mouse APOBEC3 encodes Recovery from Friend virus 3 (Rfv3), a classical resistance gene in mice that promotes the neutralizing antibody response against retrovirus infection. We now show that APOBEC3/Rfv3 complements AID in driving Ig SHM during retrovirus infection. Analysis of antibody sequences from retrovirus-specific hybridomas and GC B cells from infected mice revealed Ig heavy-chain V genes with significantly increased C-to-T and G-to-A transitions in wild-type as compared with APOBEC3-defective mice. The context of the mutations was consistent with APOBEC3 but not AID mutational activity. These findings help explain the role of APOBEC3/Rfv3 in promoting the neutralizing antibody responses essential for recovery from retroviral infection and highlight APOBEC3-mediated deamination as a previously unidentified mechanism for antibody diversification in vivo.

  7. Inhibition Profiling of Retroviral Protease Inhibitors Using an HIV-2 Modular System.

    PubMed

    Mahdi, Mohamed; Szojka, Zsófia; Mótyán, János András; Tőzsér, József

    2015-12-01

    Retroviral protease inhibitors (PIs) are fundamental pillars in the treatment of HIV infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Currently used PIs are designed against HIV-1, and their effect on HIV-2 is understudied. Using a modular HIV-2 protease cassette system, inhibition profiling assays were carried out for protease inhibitors both in enzymatic and cell culture assays. Moreover, the treatment-associated resistance mutations (I54M, L90M) were introduced into the modular system, and comparative inhibition assays were performed to determine their effect on the susceptibility of the protease. Our results indicate that darunavir, saquinavir, indinavir and lopinavir were very effective HIV-2 protease inhibitors, while tipranavir, nelfinavir and amprenavir showed a decreased efficacy. I54M, L90M double mutation resulted in a significant reduction in the susceptibility to most of the inhibitors with the exception of tipranavir. To our knowledge, this modular system constitutes a novel approach in the field of HIV-2 protease characterization and susceptibility testing. PMID:26633459

  8. A correlation between dexamethasone inducibility and basal expression levels of retroviral vector proviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Duch, M; Paludan, K; Lovmand, J; Pedersen, L; Jørgensen, P; Pedersen, F S

    1993-01-01

    Identical transcription units inserted at different positions of mammalian chromosomes may vary widely in transcriptional activity. We have used a set of ten cell clones with random unselected single integrations of retroviral vectors to study such position effects. The vector used carries a neo gene driven by the Akv murine leukemia virus long terminal repeat that has only a weak promoter-enhancer activity in the target cell, the lymphoid cell line L691. Under transient expression conditions, the strength of the Akv promoter-enhancer in the L691 cells is increased by dexamethasone. In cell clones with single vector integrations, a correlation is observed between the non-induced expression levels and the degree of dexamethasone induction. The strongest relative induction is found for the integrated vectors with the lowest non-induced expression levels and approaches the inducibility under transient expression. These results indicate that expression levels are composed of distinct contributions from the integrated vector and from the site of integration and are best explained in terms of a model in which the sites of chromosomal integration exert variable positive enhancer effects upon vector transcription. Images PMID:8233826

  9. Early upper digestive tract side effects of zidovudine with tenofovir plus emtricitabine in West African adults with high CD4 counts

    PubMed Central

    Ouattara, Eric; Danel, Christine; Moh, Raoul; Gabillard, Delphine; Peytavin, Gilles; Konan, Romuald; Carrou, Jérome Le; Bohoussou, Franck; Eholie, Serge P; Anglaret, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Tenofovir (TDF) with emtricitabine (FTC) and zidovudine (ZDV) is a recognized alternate first-line antiretroviral (ART) regimen for patients who cannot start treatment with non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). Clinical studies comparing TDF+FTC+ZDV to other regimens are lacking. Methods Participants in a trial of early ART in Côte d'Ivoire (Temprano ANRS 12136) started treatment with TDF/FTC plus either efavirenz (EFV) or ZDV (HIV-1+2 dually infected patients and women refusing contraception or previously treated with nevirapine). We compared rates of upper digestive serious adverse events (sAEs) between TDF/FTC+EFV and TDF/FTC+ZDV patients during the first six months of treatment. sAEs were defined as either grade 3–4 AEs or persistent grade 1–2 AEs leading to drug discontinuation. Results A total of 197 patients (76% women, median CD4 count 395/mm3) started therapy with TDF/FTC, 126 with EFV and 71 with ZDV. During the first six months of ART, 94 patients had digestive AEs (nausea/vomiting) of any grade (EFV 36/126, 29%; ZDV 58/71, 82%, p<0.0001), including 20 sAEs (EFV 3/126, 5%; ZDV 17/71, 24%, p<0.0001). In-patients on TDF/FTC+ZDV with digestive AEs, the median time to the first symptom was two days (IQR: 1–4). Plasma ZDV (Cmax) distributions and pill ZDV dosages were normal. Patients with digestive AEs had higher haemoglobin levels and tended to have higher body mass indices and more frequent past histories of cotrimoxazole (CTX) prophylaxis. Conclusions We observed an unexpectedly high rate of digestive sAEs in West African adults, mostly women, who started a 3-nuc ART with TDF/FTC+ZDV in Côte d'Ivoire. These adults were participating in a trial of early ART and had much higher CD4 counts than those who currently routinely start ART in sub-Saharan Africa. They all received CTX concomitantly with ZDV. We suggest that further early prescriptions of TDF+XTC+ZDV should be carefully monitored and that whenever possible

  10. Cost-Effectiveness of Tenofovir Instead of Zidovudine for Use in First-Line Antiretroviral Therapy in Settings without Virological Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    von Wyl, Viktor; Cambiano, Valentina; Jordan, Michael R.; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Miners, Alec; Pillay, Deenan; Lundgren, Jens; Phillips, Andrew N.

    2012-01-01

    Background The most recent World Health Organization (WHO) antiretroviral treatment guidelines recommend the inclusion of zidovudine (ZDV) or tenofovir (TDF) in first-line therapy. We conducted a cost-effectiveness analysis with emphasis on emerging patterns of drug resistance upon treatment failure and their impact on second-line therapy. Methods We used a stochastic simulation of a generalized HIV-1 epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa to compare two strategies for first-line combination antiretroviral treatment including lamivudine, nevirapine and either ZDV or TDF. Model input parameters were derived from literature and, for the simulation of resistance pathways, estimated from drug resistance data obtained after first-line treatment failure in settings without virological monitoring. Treatment failure and cost effectiveness were determined based on WHO definitions. Two scenarios with optimistic (no emergence; base) and pessimistic (extensive emergence) assumptions regarding occurrence of multidrug resistance patterns were tested. Results In the base scenario, cumulative proportions of treatment failure according to WHO criteria were higher among first-line ZDV users (median after six years 36% [95% simulation interval 32%; 39%]) compared with first-line TDF users (31% [29%; 33%]). Consequently, a higher proportion initiated second-line therapy (including lamivudine, boosted protease inhibitors and either ZDV or TDF) in the first-line ZDV user group 34% [31%; 37%] relative to first-line TDF users (30% [27%; 32%]). At the time of second-line initiation, a higher proportion (16%) of first-line ZDV users harboured TDF-resistant HIV compared with ZDV-resistant viruses among first-line TDF users (0% and 6% in base and pessimistic scenarios, respectively). In the base scenario, the incremental cost effectiveness ratio with respect to quality adjusted life years (QALY) was US$83 when TDF instead of ZDV was used in first-line therapy (pessimistic scenario: US$ 315), which

  11. Pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of zidovudine and its glucuronidated metabolite in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection and hepatic disease (AIDS Clinical Trials Group protocol 062).

    PubMed Central

    Moore, K H; Raasch, R H; Brouwer, K L; Opheim, K; Cheeseman, S H; Eyster, E; Lemon, S M; van der Horst, C M

    1995-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of zidovudine (ZDV) are established in patients with various stages of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease. This study was conducted to determine the pharmacokinetic parameters of ZDV in patients with asymptomatic HIV infection and liver disease. HIV-infected volunteers with normal renal function were stratified according to the severity of liver disease (seven of eight were classified as mild). Each subject received a single intravenous dose of ZDV (120 mg) on the first day, followed by a single oral dose of ZDV (200 mg) on the second day. Blood samples were obtained over a 8-h collection interval, and concentrations of ZDV and its glucuronidated metabolite (GZDV) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. The following pharmacokinetic parameters were obtained after oral administration of ZDV to HIV-infected patients with mild hepatic disease; these values were compared with previously reported data in healthy volunteers. The area under the curve (AUC) (1,670 +/- 192 ng.h/ml), maximum concentration of drug in serum (1,751 +/- 180 ng/ml), and half-life (2.04 +/- 0.38 h) of ZDV were increased, while the apparent oral clearance (1.57 +/- 0.31 liter/h/kg of body weight) was decreased; AUC (7,685 +/- 1,222 ng.h/ml) and maximum concentration of drug in serum (5,220 +/- 1,350 ng/ml) of GZDV and the AUC ratio of GZDV to ZDV (2.79 +/- 0.43) after oral administration were decreased. ZDV absolute bioavailability was 0.75 +/- 0.15 in HIV-infected patients with hepatic disease. Although the ZDV apparent oral clearance was not impaired as significantly as in patients with biopsy-proven cirrhosis, our results suggest that ZDV, could accumulate in HIV-infected patients with mild hepatic disease because of impaired formation of GZDV. Patients with mild hepatic disease may require dosage adjustment to avoid accumulation of ZDV after extended therapy. PMID:8593010

  12. Anaemia and zidovudine-containing antiretroviral therapy in paediatric antiretroviral programmes in the IeDEA Paediatric West African Database to evaluate AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Renner, Lorna A; Dicko, Fatoumata; Kouéta, Fla; Malateste, Karen; Gueye, Ramatoulaye D; Aka, Edmond; Eboua, Tanoh K; Azondékon, Alain; Okomo, Uduok; Touré, Pety; Ekouévi, Didier; Leroy, Valeriane

    2013-01-01

    Introduction There is a risk of anaemia among HIV-infected children on antiretroviral therapy (ART) containing zidovudine (ZDV) recommended in first-line regimens in the WHO guidelines. We estimated the risk of severe anaemia after initiation of a ZDV-containing regimen in HIV-infected children included in the IeDEA West African database. Methods Standardized collection of data from HIV-infected children (positive PCR<18 months or positive serology ≥18 months) followed up in HIV programmes was included in the regional IeDEA West Africa collaboration. Ten clinical centres from seven countries contributed (Benin, Burkina Faso, Côte d'Ivoire, Gambia, Ghana, Mali and Senegal) to this collection. Inclusion criteria were age <16 years and starting ART. We explored the data quality of haemoglobin documentation over time and the incidence and predictors of severe anaemia (Hb<7g/dL) per 100 child-years of follow-up over the duration of first-line antiretroviral therapy. Results As of December 2009, among the 2933 children included in the collaboration, 45% were girls, median age was five years; median CD4 cell percentage was 13%; median weight-for-age z-score was −2.7; and 1772 (60.4%) had a first-line ZDV-containing regimen. At baseline, 70% of the children with a first-line ZDV-containing regimen had a haemoglobin measure available versus 76% in those not on ZDV (p≤0.01): the prevalence of severe anaemia was 3.0% (n=38) in the ZDV group versus 10.2% (n=89) in those without (p<0. 01). Over the first-line follow-up, 58.9% of the children had ≥1 measure of haemoglobin available in those exposed to ZDV versus 60.4% of those not (p=0.45). Severe anaemia occurred in 92 children with an incidence of 2.47 per 100 child-years of follow-up in those on a ZDV-containing regimen versus 4.25 in those not (p≤0.01). Adjusted for age at ART initiation and first-line regimen, a weight-for-age z-score ≤−3 was a strong predictor associated with a 5.59 times risk of severe

  13. Protease Inhibitor Resistance Analysis in the MONARK Trial Comparing First-Line Lopinavir-Ritonavir Monotherapy to Lopinavir-Ritonavir plus Zidovudine and Lamivudine Triple Therapy▿

    PubMed Central

    Delaugerre, Constance; Flandre, Philippe; Chaix, Marie Laure; Ghosn, Jade; Raffi, François; Dellamonica, Pierre; Jaeger, H.; Shürmann, D.; Cohen-Codar, Isabelle; Ngo Van, Philippe; Norton, Michael; Taburet, Anne-Marie; Delfraissy, Jean-François; Rouzioux, Christine

    2009-01-01

    The MONARK study was a pilot randomized trial comparing the safety and efficacy of lopinavir-ritonavir (LPV/r) monotherapy to those of LPV/r-zidovudine-lamivudine triple therapy for antiretroviral-naïve human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected patients. Resistance testing was performed at the time of initial screening and at the time of virological failure (defined to include low-level viremia with >50 and <400 HIV-1 virus RNA copies/ml of plasma). Changes from the baseline sequences, including mutations noted on the 2008 International AIDS Society—USA list of resistance-associated protease mutations, were considered. Drug resistance testing was performed for 38 patients (5 of 53 on triple therapy and 33 of 83 on monotherapy). By week 96 (W96), virus samples from 18 of 33 patients in the monotherapy arm showed changes from baseline sequences, and 5 of these patients had viruses with major protease inhibitor (PI) resistance-associated mutations (M46I at W40, L76V at W48, M46I and L76V at W48, L10F and V82A at W72, and L76V at W84). Data on virus phenotypes detected at the time of initial screening and the time of virological failure were available for four patients in whom major PI resistance mutations developed, and these data revealed a mean increase of 2.2-fold (range, 0.75- to 4.6-fold) in the LPV 50% inhibitory concentration. All three patients in whom the L76V PI resistance mutation developed were infected with HIV-1 subtype CRF02_AG. In the triple-therapy group, no major PI resistance mutation was selected among the three patients with protease changes by W48. No association between the baseline CD4 cell count and the viral load, the W4 and final viral loads, or the final LPV trough concentration and the emergence of a major PI resistance mutation was found. Major PI resistance-associated mutations were detected in 5 (6%) of 83 patients treated with LPV/r monotherapy, suggesting that LPV/r monotherapy is an inappropriate first option. The

  14. [Construction of recombinant retroviral vector carrying Lab gene of foot-and-mouth disease virus and its expression in bovine kidney (MDBK) cells].

    PubMed

    Cong, Guozheng; Zhou, Jianhua; Gao, Shandian; Du, Junzheng; Shao, Junjun; Lin, Tong; Chang, Huiyun; Xie, Qingge

    2008-05-01

    In this study, foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) strain OA/58 RNAs were used as templates for RT-PCR. By the molecular cloning, the Lab gene encoding leader protease called Lpro were cloned in retroviral vector pBPSTR1 to obtain reconstruction retroviral vector termed pBPSTR1-Lab. At different concentrations of puromycin and tetracycline respectively in the cell culture mediums, the growth of bovine kidney cells (MDBK) showed that the optimal puromycin resistant selection concentration was 3 microg/mL and tetracycline regulatory concentration was 1 microg/mL. Pseudotyped retroviral virus particles were produced by transiently co-tansfecting GP2-293 cells with a retroviral vector DNA and VSV-G plasmid. Then MDBK cells were infected by pseudotyped retroviral virus and were continually seeded in the medium at the optimal tetracycline regulatory concentration and puromycin selection concentration for 12 days to obtain puromycin resistant colonies whose genomes contained the Lab gene. After tetracycline removal, synthesis of Lpro induced severe morphological changes in the puromycin resistant MDBK cells. PCR and Western blotting proved that a stable MDBK cell line inducibly expressing the Lab gene under the control of tetracycline was obtained. The experiment might provide a basis for studying that Lpro of FMDV plays an important role in MDBK cell pathogenesis.

  15. Non-hominid TP63 lacks retroviral LTRs but contains a novel conserved upstream exon.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Ulrike; Dobbelstein, Matthias

    2011-06-15

    We have recently identified novel isoforms of human p63, with specific expression in testicular germ cells. The synthesis of these p63 mRNA species is driven by the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the endogenous retrovirus ERV9. This LTR was inserted upstream of the previously known TP63 exons roughly 15 million years ago, leading to the expression of novel exons and the synthesis of germline-specific transactivating p63 (GTAp63) isoforms in humans and great apes (Beyer et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2011; 108:3624-9). However, this study did not reveal whether similar upstream exons can also be found in the TP63 genes of non-hominid animals. Here we performed rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) to identify a novel upstream exon of murine TP63, located in the 5' position from the previously described start of transcription. This exon, termed "exon U3" in our previous publication, is conserved within a broad range of mammalian species, including hominids. However, in contrast to the human TP63 gene structure, the murine exon U3 represented the most upstream transcribed sequence of TP63. Murine exon U3 is then alternatively spliced to acceptor sites within exon 1 or upstream of exon 2, resulting in two different available translational start sites. p63 mRNAs comprising exon U3 are detectable in various tissues, with no particular preference for testicular cells. Thus, whereas the retroviral LTR in hominid species results in strictly germline-associated p63 isoforms, the upstream exon in non-hominids fails to confer this tissue specificity. This notion strongly supports the concept that the synthesis of a testis-specific p63 isoform is a recently acquired, unique feature of humans and great apes.

  16. Ophthalmic manifestations of HIV in the highly active anti-retroviral therapy era.

    PubMed

    Mowatt, L

    2013-01-01

    HIV-related eye disease can be classified as retinal HIV microangiopathy, opportunistic infections, neuro-ophthalmic manifestations and unusual malignancies. There is a 52-100% lifetime accumulative risk of HIV patients developing eye problems. Seventy-seven per cent of patients with ocular manifestations of HIV had CD4 counts < 200 cells/μL. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the most prevalent opportunistic infection, however, Africa has a low incidence of this, and more commonly squamous cell carcinoma, compared to the western hemisphere. Due to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), the anti-CMV therapy may be discontinued if the CD4+ T cell count is > 100 cells/μL for a minimum of three months. Despite HAART, patients with a CD4 count < 50 cells/μL have a similar risk of developing CMV retinitis as compared to the pre-HAART era. Opportunistic infections include CMV, herpetic retinopathy (progressive outer retinal necrosis - PORN), less commonly toxoplasmosis, pneumocystis and cryptococcus. Malignancies associated with HIV include Kaposi's sarcoma and conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma. Cranial nerve palsies, optic disc swelling and atrophy are characteristic neuro-ophthalmic features. They usually occur secondary to meningitis/encephalitis (from cryptococcus and tuberculosis). With the advent of HAART, new complications have developed in CMV retinitis: immune recovery uveitis (IRU) and cystoid macula oedema (CMO). Immune recovery uveitis occurs in 71% of patients if HAART is started before the induction of the anti-CMV treatment. However, this is reduced to 31% if HAART is started after the induction treatment. Molluscum contagiosum and Kaposi's sarcoma can spontaneously resolve on HAART. Highly active anti-retroviral therapy has reduced the frequencies of opportunistic infections and improved the remission duration in HIV patients. PMID:24756590

  17. Packaging cell line characteristics and optimizing retroviral vector titer: the National Gene Vector Laboratory experience.

    PubMed

    Reeves, L; Smucker, P; Cornetta, K

    2000-10-10

    During the production of clinical-grade retroviral vector supernatant, we noted significant differences in the lactate production and glucose consumption of various producer cell lines submitted to the National Gene Vector Laboratory (NGVL). Since differences in growth characteristics could be important in determining the optimal culture conditions for maximizing titer, we studied the growth characteristics of three commonly used packaging cell lines: PA317, PG13 and GP+envAM12. A transformed phenotype, assessed by the ability to form colonies in semisolid media, was evident in all three packaging cell lines tested. In confluent cultures, the rates of glucose consumption and lactate production (per cell per hour) were similar for the three lines tested, but the growth rate and culture density varied. PA317 and PG13 continued to expand after reaching confluence, resulting in higher cell densities and subsequent rapid depletion of glucose within the 24-hr observation period. When the cell lines were evaluated for titer optimization, the slower growing packaging cell line GP+envAM12 generally provided the highest titer after 8 hr of culture in confluent roller bottles, while most vectors introduced into PA317 and PG13 cells yielded optimal titers after 24 hr of culture. We also found that the improved titers obtained by culturing cells at 32 degrees C previously reported for PA317 cells do not apply to other packaging cell lines. In particular, PG13 rapidly lost titer when grown at the lower temperature. Our findings suggest that optimization of titer requires careful consideration of the culture conditions, which should be individualized for the vector producer cell line.

  18. Local sequence targeting in the AID/APOBEC family differentially impacts retroviral restriction and antibody diversification.

    PubMed

    Kohli, Rahul M; Maul, Robert W; Guminski, Amy F; McClure, Rhonda L; Gajula, Kiran S; Saribasak, Huseyin; McMahon, Moira A; Siliciano, Robert F; Gearhart, Patricia J; Stivers, James T

    2010-12-24

    Nucleic acid cytidine deaminases of the activation-induced deaminase (AID)/APOBEC family are critical players in active and innate immune responses, playing roles as target-directed, purposeful mutators. AID specifically deaminates the host immunoglobulin (Ig) locus to evolve antibody specificity, whereas its close relative, APOBEC3G (A3G), lethally mutates the genomes of retroviral pathogens such as HIV. Understanding the basis for the target-specific action of these enzymes is essential, as mistargeting poses significant risks, potentially promoting oncogenesis (AID) or fostering drug resistance (A3G). AID prefers to deaminate cytosine in WRC (W = A/T, R = A/G) motifs, whereas A3G favors deamination of CCC motifs. This specificity is largely dictated by a single, divergent protein loop in the enzyme family that recognizes the DNA sequence. Through grafting of this substrate-recognition loop, we have created enzyme variants of A3G and AID with altered local targeting to directly evaluate the role of sequence specificity on immune function. We find that grafted loops placed in the A3G scaffold all produced efficient restriction of HIV but that foreign loops in the AID scaffold compromised hypermutation and class switch recombination. Local targeting, therefore, appears alterable for innate defense against retroviruses by A3G but important for adaptive antibody maturation catalyzed by AID. Notably, AID targeting within the Ig locus is proportionally correlated to its in vitro ability to target WRC sequences rather than non-WRC sequences. Although other mechanisms may also contribute, our results suggest that local sequence targeting by AID/APOBEC3 enzymes represents an elegant example of co-evolution of enzyme specificity with its target DNA sequence.

  19. Ophthalmic manifestations of HIV in the highly active anti-retroviral therapy era.

    PubMed

    Mowatt, L

    2013-01-01

    HIV-related eye disease can be classified as retinal HIV microangiopathy, opportunistic infections, neuro-ophthalmic manifestations and unusual malignancies. There is a 52-100% lifetime accumulative risk of HIV patients developing eye problems. Seventy-seven per cent of patients with ocular manifestations of HIV had CD4 counts < 200 cells/μL. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the most prevalent opportunistic infection, however, Africa has a low incidence of this, and more commonly squamous cell carcinoma, compared to the western hemisphere. Due to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), the anti-CMV therapy may be discontinued if the CD4+ T cell count is > 100 cells/μL for a minimum of three months. Despite HAART, patients with a CD4 count < 50 cells/μL have a similar risk of developing CMV retinitis as compared to the pre-HAART era. Opportunistic infections include CMV, herpetic retinopathy (progressive outer retinal necrosis - PORN), less commonly toxoplasmosis, pneumocystis and cryptococcus. Malignancies associated with HIV include Kaposi's sarcoma and conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma. Cranial nerve palsies, optic disc swelling and atrophy are characteristic neuro-ophthalmic features. They usually occur secondary to meningitis/encephalitis (from cryptococcus and tuberculosis). With the advent of HAART, new complications have developed in CMV retinitis: immune recovery uveitis (IRU) and cystoid macula oedema (CMO). Immune recovery uveitis occurs in 71% of patients if HAART is started before the induction of the anti-CMV treatment. However, this is reduced to 31% if HAART is started after the induction treatment. Molluscum contagiosum and Kaposi's sarcoma can spontaneously resolve on HAART. Highly active anti-retroviral therapy has reduced the frequencies of opportunistic infections and improved the remission duration in HIV patients.

  20. Cost-effectiveness of anti-retroviral therapy at a district hospital in southern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Bikilla, Asfaw Demissie; Jerene, Degu; Robberstad, Bjarne; Lindtjørn, Bernt

    2009-01-01

    Background As the resource implications of expanding anti-retroviral therapy (ART) are likely to be large, there is a need to explore its cost-effectiveness. So far, there is no such information available from Ethiopia. Objective To assess the cost-effectiveness of ART for routine clinical practice in a district hospital setting in Ethiopia. Methods We estimated the unit cost of HIV-related care from the 2004/5 fiscal year expenditure of Arba Minch Hospital in southern Ethiopia. We estimated outpatient and inpatient service use from HIV-infected patients who received care and treatment at the hospital between January 2003 and March 2006. We measured the health effect as life years gained (LYG) for patients receiving ART compared with those not receiving such treatment. The study adopted a health care provider perspective and included both direct and overhead costs. We used Markov model to estimate the lifetime costs, health benefits and cost-effectiveness of ART. Findings ART yielded an undiscounted 9.4 years expected survival, and resulted in 7.1 extra LYG compared to patients not receiving ART. The lifetime incremental cost is US$2,215 and the undiscounted incremental cost per LYG is US$314. When discounted at 3%, the additional LYG decreases to 5.5 years and the incremental cost per LYG increases to US$325. Conclusion The undiscounted and discounted incremental costs per LYG from introducing ART were less than the per capita GDP threshold at the base year. Thus, ART could be regarded as cost-effective in a district hospital setting in Ethiopia. PMID:19615069

  1. p62/sequestosome-1 associates with and sustains the expression of retroviral restriction factor TRIM5alpha.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Christopher; Pertel, Thomas; Gray, Seth; Robia, Seth L; Bakowska, Joanna C; Luban, Jeremy; Campbell, Edward M

    2010-06-01

    TRIM5 proteins mediate a potent block to the cross-species transmission of retroviruses, the most well known being the TRIM5alpha protein from rhesus macaques, which potently inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. This restriction occurs at an early stage in the replication cycle and is mediated by the binding of TRIM5 proteins to determinants present in the retroviral capsid. TRIM5alpha, as well as other TRIM family proteins, has been shown to be regulated by interferons (IFN). Here we show that TRIM5alpha associates with another IFN-induced gene, sequestosome-1/p62 (p62). p62 plays a role in several signal transduction cascades that are important for maintaining the antiviral state of cells. Here we demonstrate that p62 localizes to both human and rhesus macaque TRIM5alpha cytoplasmic bodies, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) analysis demonstrates that these proteins closely associate in these structures. When p62 expression was knocked down via small interfering RNA (siRNA), the number of TRIM5alpha cytoplasmic bodies and the level of TRIM5alpha protein expression were reduced in cell lines stably expressing epitope-tagged versions of TRIM5alpha. In accordance with these data, p62 knockdown resulted in reduced TRIM5alpha-mediated retroviral restriction in cells expressing epitope-tagged TRIM5alpha or expressing endogenously expressed human TRIM5alpha. p62 may therefore operate to enhance TRIM5alpha-mediated retroviral restriction, contributing to the antiviral state of cells following IFN treatment.

  2. Gamma-Retroviral Vector Design for the Co-Expression of Artificial microRNAs and Therapeutic Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Park, Tristen S.; Zhang, Ling; Zheng, Zhili; Morgan, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    To generate γ-retroviral vectors for stable conjoint expression of artificial microRNAs (amiR) and therapeutic genes in primary human lymphocytes, and to identify the design parameters that are key for successful vector generation. Gamma-retroviral vectors were designed to co-express both amiRs and a linked reporter gene, truncated CD34 (tCD34). Artificial miRs based on microRNAs miR-16, miR-142, miR-146b, miR-150, miR155, and miR-223 were inserted into sites within the intron of the vector and tested for tCD34 expression by flow cytometry (FACS). Different constructs were assembled with amiRs targeted to knockdown expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1) or programmed cell death 1 (PDCD1, PD-1). Three of the six amiRs maintained tCD34 expression. Expansion of primary human T cells transduced with these amiR vectors, as well as transgene expression, were equivalent to control engineered T cells over a 40-day period. Knockdown of SOCS1 RNA and PD-1 expression by FACS was shown to vary between constructs, dependent on either the specific short interfering RNA sequence used in the amiR, or the microRNA backbone and location in the vector intron. Gamma-retroviral vectors that both efficiently knockdown endogenous gene expression and maintain linked transgene production can be produced, but empirical vector evaluations were best suited for optimal construct analysis. PMID:25019196

  3. Synthesis of acyclothymidine triphosphate and alpha-P-boranotriphosphate and their substrate properties with retroviral reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Dobrikov, Mikhail; Liu, Hongyan; Shaw, Barbara Ramsay

    2003-07-10

    [reaction: see text] The first example of an acyclonucleoside alpha-P-boranotriphosphate has been synthesized via a phosphoramidite approach in a one-pot reaction with good yield. The presence of the alpha-P-BH(3) in 5b results in a 9-fold increase in efficiency of incorporation by MMLV retroviral reverse transcriptase relative to non-boronated 5a in pre-steady-state conditions. The preliminary results indicate that acyclonucleoside alpha-P-boranotriphosphates may have promising applications as a probe of enzyme mechanisms and in the design of new antiviral drugs.

  4. Retroviral sequence located in border region of short unique region and short terminal repeat of Md5 strain of Marek's disease virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Endoh, D; Ito, M; Cho, K O; Kon, Y; Morimura, T; Hayashi, M; Kuwabara, M

    1998-02-01

    A 246-base pair (bp) retroviral sequence, which was homologous to a long terminal repeat of avian erythroblastosis virus (AEV), was detected and cloned from Md5 strain (Md5) of Marek's disease virus type 1 (MDV1) by representational difference analysis (RDA). The retroviral sequence was thought to be located in the border region of short unique region (U(s) and short terminal repeat (TRs), but did not exist in the border region of U(s) and the inverted short repeat (IRs) of the Md5 genome. A cloned fragment of the US/TRs border region of the Md5 genome showed a construction of U-E'-R-U'-E-TRs with the regions designated as follows: E, expanded TRs reported by Jones et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 90, 3855, 1993]; E', a partial copy of the expanded TRs; R, the retroviral sequence detected in Md5 genome; U, TRs-end sequence of U(s); U', a partial copy of TRs-end sequence of U(s). The sequence unit indicated as E'-R-U' was thought to be heterogeneously repeated in the Md5 genome. Since this retroviral sequence reportedly did not exist in the original stock of Md5, the retroviral sequence is thought to be inserted in the Md5 genome without experimental co-infection of avian cells with retrovirus and MDV1. These results suggest that RDA could be useful for the detection of retroviral sequences in the herpesvirus genome.

  5. A new family of retroviral long terminal repeat elements in the human genome identified by their homologies to an element 5{prime} to the spider monkey haptoglobin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, L.M.; Maeda, N.

    1995-06-10

    A new family of retroviral long terminal repeats that we name Spm-LTR has been identified as a result of DNA sequence comparisons between the entire Gen-Bank databank and an element, SPHP, located 5{prime} to the haptoglobin gene of spider monkeys. The 18 human Spm-LTR sequences so identified fall into three subtypes. There is no sequence similarity between Spm-LTR elements and any endogenous retroviral LTR sequences previously reported except for general features that define LTRs. However, a previously described repeated sequence (MER-4) forms a portion of the Spm-LTR sequence. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. Lack of evidence for retroviral infections formerly related to chronic fatigue in Spanish Fibromyalgia patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    present evidence of any of the two types of retroviral infection formerly associated to chronic fatigue does not rule out the possibility that other viruses are involved in inciting or maintaining fibromyalgia and/or chronic fatigue conditions. PMID:24216038

  7. Factors Determining the Risk of Inadvertent Retroviral Transduction of Male Germ Cells After In Utero Gene Transfer in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Park, Paul J.; Colletti, Evan; Ozturk, Ferhat; Wood, Josh A.; Tellez, Joe; Almeida-Porada, Graça

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The possibility of permanent genetic changes to the germline is central to the bioethics of in utero gene therapy (IUGT) because of the concern of inadvertent potentially deleterious alterations to the gene pool. Despite presumed protection of the male germline due to early germ cell (GC) compartmentalization, we reported that GCs within the developing ovine testes are transduced at low levels after retrovirus-mediated IUGT, thus underscoring the need for a thorough understanding of GC development in clinically predictive models to determine the optimal time to perform IUGT and avoid germline modification. In the present studies, we used the fetal sheep model to analyze GCs for phenotype, location, proliferation, and incidence of transduction after IUGT at various fetal ages to learn when during development the nascent germline is likely to be at greatest risk of retrovirus-mediated alteration. Our studies show that although GCs were transduced at all injection ages, the levels of transduction varied by nearly 700-fold as a function of the age at transfer. After remaining largely quiescent as they migrated to/settled within nascent sex cords, GCs began active cycling before cord closure was complete, suggesting this is likely the point at which they would be most susceptible to retroviral transduction. Furthermore, we observed that compartmentalization of GCs continued into early postnatal life, suggesting the male germline may be vulnerable to low-level inadvertent retroviral vector modification throughout fetal life, but that this risk can be minimized by performing IUGT later in gestation. PMID:19301473

  8. The retroviral restriction ability of SAMHD1, but not its deoxynucleotide triphosphohydrolase activity, is regulated by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    White, Tommy E; Brandariz-Nuñez, Alberto; Valle-Casuso, Jose Carlos; Amie, Sarah; Nguyen, Laura Anh; Kim, Baek; Tuzova, Marina; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe

    2013-04-17

    SAMHD1 is a cellular enzyme that depletes intracellular deoxynucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) and inhibits the ability of retroviruses, notably HIV-1, to infect myeloid cells. Although SAMHD1 is expressed in both cycling and noncycling cells, the antiviral activity of SAMHD1 is limited to noncycling cells. We determined that SAMHD1 is phosphorylated on residue T592 in cycling cells but that this phosphorylation is lost when cells are in a noncycling state. Reverse genetic experiments revealed that SAMHD1 phosphorylated on residue T592 is unable to block retroviral infection, but this modification does not affect the ability of SAMHD1 to decrease cellular dNTP levels. SAMHD1 contains a target motif for cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (cdk1) ((592)TPQK(595)), and cdk1 activity is required for SAMHD1 phosphorylation. Collectively, these findings indicate that phosphorylation modulates the ability of SAMHD1 to block retroviral infection without affecting its ability to decrease cellular dNTP levels.

  9. Retroviral envelope syncytin capture in an ancestrally diverged mammalian clade for placentation in the primitive Afrotherian tenrecs.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, Guillaume; Vernochet, Cécile; Malicorne, Sébastien; Souquere, Sylvie; Tzika, Athanasia C; Goodman, Steven M; Catzeflis, François; Robinson, Terence J; Milinkovitch, Michel C; Pierron, Gérard; Heidmann, Odile; Dupressoir, Anne; Heidmann, Thierry

    2014-10-14

    Syncytins are fusogenic envelope (env) genes of retroviral origin that have been captured for a function in placentation. Syncytins have been identified in Euarchontoglires (primates, rodents, Leporidae) and Laurasiatheria (Carnivora, ruminants) placental mammals. Here, we searched for similar genes in species that retained characteristic features of primitive mammals, namely the Malagasy and mainland African Tenrecidae. They belong to the superorder Afrotheria, an early lineage that diverged from Euarchotonglires and Laurasiatheria 100 Mya, during the Cretaceous terrestrial revolution. An in silico search for env genes with full coding capacity within a Tenrecidae genome identified several candidates, with one displaying placenta-specific expression as revealed by RT-PCR analysis of a large panel of Setifer setosus tissues. Cloning of this endogenous retroviral env gene demonstrated fusogenicity in an ex vivo cell-cell fusion assay on a panel of mammalian cells. Refined analysis of placental architecture and ultrastructure combined with in situ hybridization demonstrated specific expression of the gene in multinucleate cellular masses and layers at the materno-fetal interface, consistent with a role in syncytium formation. This gene, which we named "syncytin-Ten1," is conserved among Tenrecidae, with evidence of purifying selection and conservation of fusogenic activity. To our knowledge, it is the first syncytin identified to date within the ancestrally diverged Afrotheria superorder.

  10. Modulation of Moloney leukemia virus long terminal repeat transcriptional activity by the murine CD4 silencer in retroviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Indraccolo, S; Minuzzo, S; Habeler, W; Zamarchi, R; Fregonese, A; Günzburg, W H; Salmons, B; Uckert, W; Chieco-Bianchi, L; Amadori, A

    2000-10-10

    We investigated whether CD4 gene regulatory sequences might be useful for developing transcriptionally targeted Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MLV)-based retroviral vectors for gene expression specifically in CD4(+) cells. We could modulate Mo-MLV long terminal repeat (LTR) activity by inserting a 438-bp-long fragment containing the murine CD4 silencer in the LTR of the vector; both beta-galactosidase and green fluorescent protein reporter gene activities were strongly down-regulated in both murine and human CD8(+) cells, but not in CD4(+) lymphoid cell lines and freshly isolated lymphocytes transduced with this vector, compared with the findings using a control vector carrying wild-type LTRs. Titration experiments on NIH-3T3 cells revealed that inclusion of the CD4 silencer in the LTRs did not reduce the titer of the vectors. These findings indicate that a cellular silencer can be successfully included in retroviral vectors, where it maintains its transcription-regulatory function, thus suggesting a novel approach to transcriptional targeting.

  11. Genome-Wide Analysis of Transposon and Retroviral Insertions Reveals Preferential Integrations in Regions of DNA Flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Vrljicak, Pavle; Tao, Shijie; Varshney, Gaurav K.; Quach, Helen Ngoc Bao; Joshi, Adita; LaFave, Matthew C.; Burgess, Shawn M.; Sampath, Karuna

    2016-01-01

    DNA transposons and retroviruses are important transgenic tools for genome engineering. An important consideration affecting the choice of transgenic vector is their insertion site preferences. Previous large-scale analyses of Ds transposon integration sites in plants were done on the basis of reporter gene expression or germ-line transmission, making it difficult to discern vertebrate integration preferences. Here, we compare over 1300 Ds transposon integration sites in zebrafish with Tol2 transposon and retroviral integration sites. Genome-wide analysis shows that Ds integration sites in the presence or absence of marker selection are remarkably similar and distributed throughout the genome. No strict motif was found, but a preference for structural features in the target DNA associated with DNA flexibility (Twist, Tilt, Rise, Roll, Shift, and Slide) was observed. Remarkably, this feature is also found in transposon and retroviral integrations in maize and mouse cells. Our findings show that structural features influence the integration of heterologous DNA in genomes, and have implications for targeted genome engineering. PMID:26818075

  12. Comprehensive profiling of retroviral integration sites using target enrichment methods from historical koala samples without an assembled reference genome.

    PubMed

    Cui, Pin; Löber, Ulrike; Alquezar-Planas, David E; Ishida, Yasuko; Courtiol, Alexandre; Timms, Peter; Johnson, Rebecca N; Lenz, Dorina; Helgen, Kristofer M; Roca, Alfred L; Hartman, Stefanie; Greenwood, Alex D

    2016-01-01

    Background. Retroviral integration into the host germline results in permanent viral colonization of vertebrate genomes. The koala retrovirus (KoRV) is currently invading the germline of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) and provides a unique opportunity for studying retroviral endogenization. Previous analysis of KoRV integration patterns in modern koalas demonstrate that they share integration sites primarily if they are related, indicating that the process is currently driven by vertical transmission rather than infection. However, due to methodological challenges, KoRV integrations have not been comprehensively characterized. Results. To overcome these challenges, we applied and compared three target enrichment techniques coupled with next generation sequencing (NGS) and a newly customized sequence-clustering based computational pipeline to determine the integration sites for 10 museum Queensland and New South Wales (NSW) koala samples collected between the 1870s and late 1980s. A secondary aim of this study sought to identify common integration sites across modern and historical specimens by comparing our dataset to previously published studies. Several million sequences were processed, and the KoRV integration sites in each koala were characterized. Conclusions. Although the three enrichment methods each exhibited bias in integration site retrieval, a combination of two methods, Primer Extension Capture and hybridization capture is recommended for future studies on historical samples. Moreover, identification of integration sites shows that the proportion of integration sites shared between any two koalas is quite small.

  13. Comprehensive profiling of retroviral integration sites using target enrichment methods from historical koala samples without an assembled reference genome

    PubMed Central

    Alquezar-Planas, David E.; Ishida, Yasuko; Courtiol, Alexandre; Timms, Peter; Johnson, Rebecca N.; Lenz, Dorina; Helgen, Kristofer M.; Roca, Alfred L.; Hartman, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    Background. Retroviral integration into the host germline results in permanent viral colonization of vertebrate genomes. The koala retrovirus (KoRV) is currently invading the germline of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) and provides a unique opportunity for studying retroviral endogenization. Previous analysis of KoRV integration patterns in modern koalas demonstrate that they share integration sites primarily if they are related, indicating that the process is currently driven by vertical transmission rather than infection. However, due to methodological challenges, KoRV integrations have not been comprehensively characterized. Results. To overcome these challenges, we applied and compared three target enrichment techniques coupled with next generation sequencing (NGS) and a newly customized sequence-clustering based computational pipeline to determine the integration sites for 10 museum Queensland and New South Wales (NSW) koala samples collected between the 1870s and late 1980s. A secondary aim of this study sought to identify common integration sites across modern and historical specimens by comparing our dataset to previously published studies. Several million sequences were processed, and the KoRV integration sites in each koala were characterized. Conclusions. Although the three enrichment methods each exhibited bias in integration site retrieval, a combination of two methods, Primer Extension Capture and hybridization capture is recommended for future studies on historical samples. Moreover, identification of integration sites shows that the proportion of integration sites shared between any two koalas is quite small. PMID:27069793

  14. Retroviral envelope syncytin capture in an ancestrally diverged mammalian clade for placentation in the primitive Afrotherian tenrecs

    PubMed Central

    Cornelis, Guillaume; Vernochet, Cécile; Malicorne, Sébastien; Souquere, Sylvie; Tzika, Athanasia C.; Goodman, Steven M.; Catzeflis, François; Robinson, Terence J.; Milinkovitch, Michel C.; Pierron, Gérard; Heidmann, Odile; Dupressoir, Anne; Heidmann, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Syncytins are fusogenic envelope (env) genes of retroviral origin that have been captured for a function in placentation. Syncytins have been identified in Euarchontoglires (primates, rodents, Leporidae) and Laurasiatheria (Carnivora, ruminants) placental mammals. Here, we searched for similar genes in species that retained characteristic features of primitive mammals, namely the Malagasy and mainland African Tenrecidae. They belong to the superorder Afrotheria, an early lineage that diverged from Euarchotonglires and Laurasiatheria 100 Mya, during the Cretaceous terrestrial revolution. An in silico search for env genes with full coding capacity within a Tenrecidae genome identified several candidates, with one displaying placenta-specific expression as revealed by RT-PCR analysis of a large panel of Setifer setosus tissues. Cloning of this endogenous retroviral env gene demonstrated fusogenicity in an ex vivo cell–cell fusion assay on a panel of mammalian cells. Refined analysis of placental architecture and ultrastructure combined with in situ hybridization demonstrated specific expression of the gene in multinucleate cellular masses and layers at the materno–fetal interface, consistent with a role in syncytium formation. This gene, which we named “syncytin-Ten1,” is conserved among Tenrecidae, with evidence of purifying selection and conservation of fusogenic activity. To our knowledge, it is the first syncytin identified to date within the ancestrally diverged Afrotheria superorder. PMID:25267646

  15. Comprehensive profiling of retroviral integration sites using target enrichment methods from historical koala samples without an assembled reference genome.

    PubMed

    Cui, Pin; Löber, Ulrike; Alquezar-Planas, David E; Ishida, Yasuko; Courtiol, Alexandre; Timms, Peter; Johnson, Rebecca N; Lenz, Dorina; Helgen, Kristofer M; Roca, Alfred L; Hartman, Stefanie; Greenwood, Alex D

    2016-01-01

    Background. Retroviral integration into the host germline results in permanent viral colonization of vertebrate genomes. The koala retrovirus (KoRV) is currently invading the germline of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) and provides a unique opportunity for studying retroviral endogenization. Previous analysis of KoRV integration patterns in modern koalas demonstrate that they share integration sites primarily if they are related, indicating that the process is currently driven by vertical transmission rather than infection. However, due to methodological challenges, KoRV integrations have not been comprehensively characterized. Results. To overcome these challenges, we applied and compared three target enrichment techniques coupled with next generation sequencing (NGS) and a newly customized sequence-clustering based computational pipeline to determine the integration sites for 10 museum Queensland and New South Wales (NSW) koala samples collected between the 1870s and late 1980s. A secondary aim of this study sought to identify common integration sites across modern and historical specimens by comparing our dataset to previously published studies. Several million sequences were processed, and the KoRV integration sites in each koala were characterized. Conclusions. Although the three enrichment methods each exhibited bias in integration site retrieval, a combination of two methods, Primer Extension Capture and hybridization capture is recommended for future studies on historical samples. Moreover, identification of integration sites shows that the proportion of integration sites shared between any two koalas is quite small. PMID:27069793

  16. Genome-wide retroviral insertional tagging of genes involved in cancer in Cdkn2a-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Lund, Anders H; Turner, Geoffrey; Trubetskoy, Alla; Verhoeven, Els; Wientjens, Ellen; Hulsman, Danielle; Russell, Robert; DePinho, Ronald A; Lenz, Jack; van Lohuizen, Maarten

    2002-09-01

    We have used large-scale insertional mutagenesis to identify functional landmarks relevant to cancer in the recently completed mouse genome sequence. We infected Cdkn2a(-/-) mice with Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMuLV) to screen for loci that can participate in tumorigenesis in collaboration with loss of the Cdkn2a-encoded tumor suppressors p16INK4a and p19ARF. Insertional mutagenesis by the latent retrovirus was synergistic with loss of Cdkn2a expression, as indicated by a marked acceleration in the development of both myeloid and lymphoid tumors. We isolated 747 unique sequences flanking retroviral integration sites and mapped them against the mouse genome sequence databases from Celera and Ensembl. In addition to 17 insertions targeting gene loci known to be cancer-related, we identified a total of 37 new common insertion sites (CISs), of which 8 encode components of signaling pathways that are involved in cancer. The effectiveness of large-scale insertional mutagenesis in a sensitized genetic background is demonstrated by the preference for activation of MAP kinase signaling, collaborating with Cdkn2a loss in generating the lymphoid and myeloid tumors. Collectively, our results show that large-scale retroviral insertional mutagenesis in genetically predisposed mice is useful both as a system for identifying genes underlying cancer and as a genetic framework for the assignment of such genes to specific oncogenic pathways.

  17. Infection by retroviral vectors outside of their host range in the presence of replication-defective adenovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, R M; Wang, M; Steffen, D; Ledley, F D

    1995-01-01

    Retrovirus infection is normally limited to cells within a specific host range which express a cognate receptor that is recognized by the product of the env gene. We describe retrovirus infection of cells outside of their normal host range when the infection is performed in the presence of a replication-defective adenovirus (dl312). In the presence of adenovirus, several different ecotropic vectors are shown to infect human cell lines (HeLa and PLC/PRF), and a xenotropic vector is shown to infect murine cells (NIH 3T3). Infectivity is demonstrated by 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside (X-Gal) staining, selection with G418 for neomycin resistance, and PCR identification of the provirus in infected cells. Infectivity is quantitatively dependent upon both the concentration of adenovirus (10(6) to 10(8) PFU/ml) and the concentration of retrovirus. Infection requires the simultaneous presence of adenovirus in the retrovirus infection medium and is not stimulated by preincubation and removal of adenovirus from the cells before retrovirus infection. The presence of adenovirus is shown to enhance the uptake of fluorescently labeled retrovirus particles into cells outside of their normal host range, demonstrating that the adenovirus enhances viral entry into cells in the absence of the recognized cognate receptor. This observation suggests new opportunities for developing safe retroviral vectors for gene therapy and new mechanisms for the pathogenesis of retroviral disease. PMID:7853530

  18. FDA-Approved HIV Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... and acronyms) Brand Name FDA Approval Date Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NRTIs) NRTIs block reverse transcriptase, an enzyme HIV ... AZT, ZDV) Retrovir March 19, 1987 Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NNRTIs) NNRTIs bind to and later alter reverse ...

  19. ISOLATION OF AN ACTIVE LV1 GENE FROM CATTLE INDICATES THAT TRIPARTITE MOTIF PROTEIN-MEDIATED INNATE IMMUNITY TO RETROVIRAL INFECTION IS WIDESPREAD AMONG MAMMALS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lv1/TRIM5alpha (tripartite motif 5alpha) has recently emerged as an important factor influencing species-specific permissivity to retroviral infection in a range of primates, including humans. Old World monkey TRIM5alpha blocks human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infectivity, and the human a...

  20. Kinetics and Epigenetics of Retroviral Silencing in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells Defined by Deletion of the D4Z4 Element

    PubMed Central

    Rival-Gervier, Sylvie; Lo, Mandy YM; Khattak, Shahryar; Pasceri, Peter; Lorincz, Matthew C; Ellis, James

    2013-01-01

    Retroviral vectors are silenced in embryonic stem (ES) cells by epigenetic mechanisms whose kinetics are poorly understood. We show here that a 3′D4Z4 insulator directs retroviral expression with persistent but variable expression for up to 5 months. Combining an internal 3′D4Z4 with HS4 insulators in the long terminal repeats (LTRs) shows that these elements cooperate, and defines the first retroviral vector that fully escapes long-term silencing. Using FLP recombinase to induce deletion of 3′D4Z4 from the provirus in ES cell clones, we established retroviral silencing at many but not all integration sites. This finding shows that 3′D4Z4 does not target retrovirus integration into favorable epigenomic domains but rather protects the transgene from silencing. Chromatin analyses demonstrate that 3′D4Z4 blocks the spread of heterochromatin marks including DNA methylation and repressive histone modifications such as H3K9 methylation. In addition, our deletion system reveals three distinct kinetic classes of silencing (rapid, gradual or not silenced), in which multiple epigenetic pathways participate in silencing at different integration sites. We conclude that vectors with both 3′D4Z4 and HS4 insulator elements fully block silencing, and may have unprecedented utility for gene transfer applications that require long-term gene expression in pluripotent stem (PS) cells. PMID:23752310

  1. Cognitive and Behavioural Correlates of Non-Adherence to HIV Anti-Retroviral Therapy: Theoretical and Practical Insight for Clinical Psychology and Health Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Begley, Kim; McLaws, Mary-Louise; Ross, Michael W.; Gold, Julian

    2008-01-01

    This cross-sectional study identified variables associated with protease inhibitor (PI) non-adherence in 179 patients taking anti-retroviral therapy. Univariate analyses identified 11 variables associated with PI non-adherence. Multiple logistic regression modelling identified three predictors of PI non-adherence: low adherence self-efficacy and…

  2. Synthesis, molecular structure and physicochemical properties of bis(3‧-azido-3‧-deoxythymidin-5‧-yl) carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raviolo, Mónica A.; Williams, Patricia A. M.; Etcheverry, Susana B.; Piro, Oscar E.; Castellano, Eduardo E.; Gualdesi, Maria S.; Briñón, Margarita C.

    2010-04-01

    3'-Azido-3'-deoxythymidine (zidovudine, AZT), a synthetic analog of natural nucleoside thymidine, has been used extensively in AIDS treatments. We report here the synthesis, X-ray crystal and molecular structure, NMR, IR and Raman spectra and the thermal behavior of a novel carbonate of AZT [(AZT-O) 2C dbnd O], prepared by the reaction of zidovudine with carbonyldiimidazole. The carbonate compound, C 21H 24N 10O 9, crystallizes in the tetragonal space group P4 12 12 with a = b = 15.284(1), c = 21.695(1) Å, and Z = 8 molecules per unit cell. It consists of two AZT moieties of closely related conformations which are bridged by a carbonyl group to adopt a folded Z-like shape.

  3. An Efficient Large-Scale Retroviral Transduction Method Involving Preloading the Vector into a RetroNectin-Coated Bag with Low-Temperature Shaking

    PubMed Central

    Dodo, Katsuyuki; Chono, Hideto; Saito, Naoki; Tanaka, Yoshinori; Tahara, Kenichi; Nukaya, Ikuei; Mineno, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    In retroviral vector-mediated gene transfer, transduction efficiency can be hampered by inhibitory molecules derived from the culture fluid of virus producer cell lines. To remove these inhibitory molecules to enable better gene transduction, we had previously developed a transduction method using a fibronectin fragment-coated vessel (i.e., the RetroNectin-bound virus transduction method). In the present study, we developed a method that combined RetroNectin-bound virus transduction with low-temperature shaking and applied this method in manufacturing autologous retroviral-engineered T cells for adoptive transfer gene therapy in a large-scale closed system. Retroviral vector was preloaded into a RetroNectin-coated bag and incubated at 4°C for 16 h on a reciprocating shaker at 50 rounds per minute. After the supernatant was removed, activated T cells were added to the bag. The bag transduction method has the advantage of increasing transduction efficiency, as simply flipping over the bag during gene transduction facilitates more efficient utilization of the retroviral vector adsorbed on the top and bottom surfaces of the bag. Finally, we performed validation runs of endoribonuclease MazF-modified CD4+ T cell manufacturing for HIV-1 gene therapy and T cell receptor-modified T cell manufacturing for MAGE-A4 antigen-expressing cancer gene therapy and achieved over 200-fold (≥1010) and 100-fold (≥5×109) expansion, respectively. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the large-scale closed transduction system is highly efficient for retroviral vector-based T cell manufacturing for adoptive transfer gene therapy, and this technology is expected to be amenable to automation and improve current clinical gene therapy protocols. PMID:24454964

  4. An efficient large-scale retroviral transduction method involving preloading the vector into a RetroNectin-coated bag with low-temperature shaking.

    PubMed

    Dodo, Katsuyuki; Chono, Hideto; Saito, Naoki; Tanaka, Yoshinori; Tahara, Kenichi; Nukaya, Ikuei; Mineno, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    In retroviral vector-mediated gene transfer, transduction efficiency can be hampered by inhibitory molecules derived from the culture fluid of virus producer cell lines. To remove these inhibitory molecules to enable better gene transduction, we had previously developed a transduction method using a fibronectin fragment-coated vessel (i.e., the RetroNectin-bound virus transduction method). In the present study, we developed a method that combined RetroNectin-bound virus transduction with low-temperature shaking and applied this method in manufacturing autologous retroviral-engineered T cells for adoptive transfer gene therapy in a large-scale closed system. Retroviral vector was preloaded into a RetroNectin-coated bag and incubated at 4°C for 16 h on a reciprocating shaker at 50 rounds per minute. After the supernatant was removed, activated T cells were added to the bag. The bag transduction method has the advantage of increasing transduction efficiency, as simply flipping over the bag during gene transduction facilitates more efficient utilization of the retroviral vector adsorbed on the top and bottom surfaces of the bag. Finally, we performed validation runs of endoribonuclease MazF-modified CD4(+) T cell manufacturing for HIV-1 gene therapy and T cell receptor-modified T cell manufacturing for MAGE-A4 antigen-expressing cancer gene therapy and achieved over 200-fold (≥ 10(10)) and 100-fold (≥ 5 × 10(9)) expansion, respectively. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the large-scale closed transduction system is highly efficient for retroviral vector-based T cell manufacturing for adoptive transfer gene therapy, and this technology is expected to be amenable to automation and improve current clinical gene therapy protocols.

  5. An Optimized GD2-Targeting Retroviral Cassette for More Potent and Safer Cellular Therapy of Neuroblastoma and Other Cancers.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Simon; Straathof, Karin; Himoudi, Nourredine; Anderson, John; Pule, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the commonest extra cranial solid cancer of childhood. Despite escalation of treatment regimens, a significant minority of patients die of their disease. Disialoganglioside (GD2) is consistently expressed at high-levels in neuroblastoma tumors, which have been targeted with some success using therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. GD2 is also expressed in a range of other cancer but with the exception of some peripheral nerves is largely absent from non-transformed tissues. Chimeric Antigen Receptors (CARs) are artificial type I proteins which graft the specificity of a monoclonal antibody onto a T-cell. Clinical data with early CAR designs directed against GD2 have shown some promise in Neuroblastoma. Here, we describe a GD2-targeting CAR retroviral cassette, which has been optimized for CAR T-cell persistence, efficacy and safety.

  6. Structure-function Studies of Nucleocytoplasmic Transport of Retroviral Genomic RNA by mRNA Export Factor TAP

    SciTech Connect

    M Teplova; L Wohlbold; N Khin; E Izaurralde; D Patel

    2011-12-31

    mRNA export is mediated by the TAP-p15 heterodimer, which belongs to the family of NTF2-like export receptors. TAP-p15 heterodimers also bind to the constitutive transport element (CTE) present in simian type D retroviral RNAs, and they mediate the export of viral unspliced RNAs to the host cytoplasm. We have solved the crystal structure of the RNA recognition and leucine-rich repeat motifs of TAP bound to one symmetrical half of the CTE RNA. L-shaped conformations of protein and RNA are involved in a mutual molecular embrace on complex formation. We have monitored the impact of structure-guided mutations on binding affinities in vitro and transport assays in vivo. Our studies define the principles by which CTE RNA subverts the mRNA export receptor TAP, thereby facilitating the nuclear export of viral genomic RNAs, and, more generally, provide insights on cargo RNA recognition by mRNA export receptors.

  7. Identification of regulators of the innate immune response to cytosolic DNA and retroviral infection by an integrative approach

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mark N; Roy, Matthew; Ong, Shao-En; Mertins, Philipp; Villani, Alexandra-Chloé; Li, Weibo; Dotiwala, Farokh; Sen, Jayita; Doench, John G; Orzalli, Megan H; Kramnik, Igor; Knipe, David M; Lieberman, Judy; Carr, Steven A; Hacohen, Nir

    2013-01-01

    The innate immune system senses viral DNA that enters mammalian cells, or in aberrant situations self-DNA, and triggers type I interferon production. Here we present an integrative approach that combines quantitative proteomics, genomics and small molecule perturbations to identify genes involved in this pathway. We silenced 809 candidate genes, measured the response to dsDNA and connected resulting hits with the known signaling network. We identified ABCF1 as a critical protein that associates with dsDNA and the DNA-sensing components HMGB2 and IFI204. We also found that CDC37 regulates the stability of the signaling molecule TBK1 and that chemical inhibition of the CDC37-HSP90 interaction and several other pathway regulators potently modulates the innate immune response to DNA and retroviral infection. PMID:23263557

  8. An Optimized GD2-Targeting Retroviral Cassette for More Potent and Safer Cellular Therapy of Neuroblastoma and Other Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Simon; Straathof, Karin; Himoudi, Nourredine; Anderson, John; Pule, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the commonest extra cranial solid cancer of childhood. Despite escalation of treatment regimens, a significant minority of patients die of their disease. Disialoganglioside (GD2) is consistently expressed at high-levels in neuroblastoma tumors, which have been targeted with some success using therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. GD2 is also expressed in a range of other cancer but with the exception of some peripheral nerves is largely absent from non-transformed tissues. Chimeric Antigen Receptors (CARs) are artificial type I proteins which graft the specificity of a monoclonal antibody onto a T-cell. Clinical data with early CAR designs directed against GD2 have shown some promise in Neuroblastoma. Here, we describe a GD2-targeting CAR retroviral cassette, which has been optimized for CAR T-cell persistence, efficacy and safety. PMID:27030986

  9. Rearrangements of chicken immunoglobulin genes in lymphoid cells transformed by the avian retroviral oncogene v-rel.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Lim, M Y; Bose, H; Bishop, J M

    1988-01-01

    The retroviral oncogene v-rel transforms poorly characterized lymphoid cells. We have explored the nature of these cells by analyzing the configuration and expression of immunoglobulin genes in chicken hemopoietic cells transformed by v-rel. None of the transformed cells expressed their immunoglobulin genes. The cells fell into three classes: class I cells have their immunoglobulin genes potentially in an embryonic configuration; class II and class III cells have lost one copy of the lambda light chain locus and have one copy of the heavy chain locus rearranged into a configuration that differs from what is found in mature B cells. In class II cells, the other heavy chain locus may be in embryonic configuration, whereas it is deleted in class III cells. The first of these classes may represent the earliest stage of the lymphoid lineage yet encountered among virus-transformed cells, whereas the second and third classes represent an apparently anomalous rearrangement whose origin remains unknown.

  10. Targeted and highly efficient gene transfer into CD4+ cells by a recombinant human immunodeficiency virus retroviral vector.

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, T; Fujii, H; Mitsuya, H; Nienhuis, A W

    1991-01-01

    We have established a recombinant HIV gene transfer system based on transient expression of the HIV packaging functions and a recombinant vector genome in monkey kidney Cos cells. The recombinant HIV retroviral vector introduced the neoR gene into CD4+ cells with high efficiency, comparable to that achieved with the highest titer amphotropic murine recombinant retrovirus. Vector preparations were devoid of replication competent, infectious HIV. Gene transfer was dependent on CD4 expression, as shown by expression of the CD4 gene in HeLa cells, and could be inhibited by soluble CD4. This specific and efficient gene transfer system may be useful for development of gene therapy for which T cells are the desired targets. Images PMID:1885765

  11. Accelerated generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells with retroviral transduction and chemical inhibitors under physiological hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Hidenori; Hashimoto, Yoshiya; Nakada, Akira; Shigeno, Keiji; Nakamura, Tatsuo

    2012-01-13

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are generated from somatic cells by the forced expression of a defined set of pluripotency-associated transcription factors. Human iPS cells can be propagated indefinitely, while maintaining the capacity to differentiate into all cell types in the body except for extra-embryonic tissues. This technology not only represents a new way to use individual-specific stem cells for regenerative medicine but also constitutes a novel method to obtain large amounts of disease-specific cells for biomedical research. Despite their great potential, the long reprogramming process (up to 1month) remains one of the most significant challenges facing standard virus-mediated methodology. In this study, we report the accelerated generation of human iPS cells from adipose-derived stem (ADS) cells, using a new combination of chemical inhibitors under a setting of physiological hypoxia in conjunction with retroviral transduction of Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and L-Myc. Under optimized conditions, we observed human embryonic stem (ES)-like cells as early as 6 days after the initial retroviral transduction. This was followed by the emergence of fully reprogrammed cells bearing Tra-1-81-positive and DsRed transgene-silencing properties on day 10. The resulting cell lines resembled human ES cells in many respects including proliferation rate, morphology, pluripotency-associated markers, global gene expression patterns, genome-wide DNA methylation states, and the ability to differentiate into all three of the germ layers, both in vitro and in vivo. Our method, when combined with chemical inhibitors under conditions of physiological hypoxia, offers a powerful tool for rapidly generating bona fide human iPS cells and facilitates the application of iPS cell technology to biomedical research. PMID:22172948

  12. Correlates of Adherence and Treatment Failure Among Kenyan Patients on Long-term Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ochieng, Washingtone; Kitawi, Rose C.; Nzomo, Timothy J.; Mwatelah, Ruth S.; Kimulwo, Maureen J.; Ochieng, Dorothy J.; Kinyua, Joyceline; Lagat, Nancy; Onyango, Kevin O.; Lwembe, Raphael M.; Mwamburi, Mkaya; Ogutu, Bernhards R.; Oloo, Florence A.; Aman, Rashid

    2015-01-01

    Background Universal access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is still elusive in most developing nations. We asked whether peer support influenced adherence and treatment outcome and if a single viral load (VL) could define treatment failure in a resource-limited setting. Methods A multi-center longitudinal and cross-sectional survey of VL, CD4 T-cells and adherence in 546 patients receiving HAART for up to 228 months. VL and CD4 counts were determined using m2000 Abbott RealTime HIV-1 assay and FACS respectively. Adherence was assessed based on pill-count and on self-report. Results Respectively, 55.8%, 22.2% and 22% of the patients had good, fair and poor adherence. Adherence, peer support and regimen but not HIV disclosure, age or gender, independently correlated with VL and durability of treatment in a multivariate analysis (p<0.001). Treatment failure was 35.9% using sequential VL but ranged between 27% and 35% using alternate single VL cross-sectional definitions. More patients failed stavudine (41.2%) than zidovudine (37.4%) or tenofovir (28.8%, P=0.043) treatment arms. Peer support correlated positively with adherence (χ2, p<0.001), with non-adherence highest in the stavudine arm. VL before the time of regimen switch was comparable between patients switching and those not switching treatment. Moreover, 36% of those switching still failed second-line regimen. Conclusion Weak adherence support and inaccessible VL testing threaten to compromise the success of HAART scale-up in Kenya. To hasten ART monitoring and decision-making, we suggest strengthening patient-focused adherence programs, optimizing and aligning regimen to WHO standards, and a single point-of-care VL testing when multiple tests are unavailable. PMID:26009836

  13. Lack of competition results in efficient packaging of heterologous murine retroviral RNAs and reticuloendotheliosis virus encapsidation-minus RNAs by the reticuloendotheliosis virus helper cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Embretson, J E; Temin, H M

    1987-01-01

    We constructed recombinant reticuloendotheliosis virus (Rev)-derived and murine leukemia virus-derived vectors to characterize the specificity of packaging retroviral RNAs in Rev proteins. Using this approach, we further localized the Rev encapsidation sequence (E) to a 144-nucleotide region and determined that there are sequences in both the 5' and 3' halves of this region which are necessary in cis for viral replication. We found that the Rev E, like the murine leukemia virus E (psi), is position independent (R. Mann and D. Baltimore, J. Virol. 54:401-407, 1986). Also, a 156-nucleotide region of the Rev intron enhanced replication in a cis-acting fashion in the presence, but not in the absence, of helper virus. Finally, we showed that packaging of E- and heterologous retroviral genomes occurred efficiently in the Rev helper cell in the absence of competing E-containing (E+) viral RNAs. Images PMID:3039161

  14. Removal of inhibitory substances with recombinant fibronectin-CH-296 plates enhances the retroviral transduction efficiency of CD34(+)CD38(-) bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Chono, H; Yoshioka, H; Ueno, M; Kato, I

    2001-09-01

    In retroviral gene transduction, the efficiency of viral infection was reduced by the proteoglycans and some other materials secreted by the producer lines. In order to remove these inhibitors we have developed the rFN-CH-296-facilitated protocol. Because the rFN-CH-296 molecule has strong ability to bind a retroviral vector, rFN-CH-296 bound plates are utilized to wash out the unbound putative inhibitors present in a virus supernatant. The gene transduction efficiencies of human CD34(+)CD38(-) BMCs with a GALV-pseudotyped vector and the rFN-CH-296-facilitated protocol were compared with the protocol without a coating plate with CH-296, the mean gene transduction efficiencies being found to be 95.5 and 71.1%, respectively.

  15. The Resistance of Retroviral Vectors Produced from Human Cells to Serum Inactivation In Vivo and In Vitro Is Primate Species Dependent

    PubMed Central

    DePolo, Nicholas J.; Harkleroad, Cataline E.; Bodner, Mordechai; Watt, Andrew T.; Anderson, Carol G.; Greengard, Judith S.; Murthy, Krishna K.; Dubensky, Thomas W.; Jolly, Douglas J.

    1999-01-01

    The ability to deliver genes as therapeutics requires an understanding of the vector pharmacokinetics similar to that required for conventional drugs. A first question is the half-life of the vector in the bloodstream. Retroviral vectors produced in certain human cell lines differ from vectors produced in nonhuman cell lines in being substantially resistant to inactivation in vitro by human serum complement (F. L. Cosset, Y. Takeuchi, J. L. Battini, R. A. Weiss, and M. K. Collins, J. Virol. 69:7430–7436, 1995). Thus, use of human packaging cell lines (PCL) may produce vectors with longer half-lives, resulting in more-efficacious in vivo gene therapy. However, survival of human PCL-produced vectors in vivo following systemic administration has not been explored. In this investigation, the half-lives of retroviral vectors packaged by either canine D17 or human HT1080 PCL were measured in the bloodstreams of macaques and chimpanzees. Human PCL-produced vectors exhibited significantly higher concentrations of circulating biologically active vector at the earliest time points measured (>1,000-fold in chimpanzees), as well as substantially extended half-lives, compared to canine PCL-produced vectors. In addition, the circulation half-life of human PCL-produced vector was longer in chimpanzees than in macaques. This was consistent with in vitro findings which demonstrated that primate serum inactivation of vector produced from human PCL increased with increasing phylogenetic distance from humans. These results establish that in vivo retroviral vector half-life correlates with in vitro resistance to complement. Furthermore, these findings should influence the choice of animal models used to evaluate retroviral-vector-based therapies. PMID:10400768

  16. Accelerated generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells with retroviral transduction and chemical inhibitors under physiological hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, Hidenori; Hashimoto, Yoshiya; Nakada, Akira; Shigeno, Keiji; Nakamura, Tatsuo

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Very rapid generation of human iPS cells under optimized conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Five chemical inhibitors under hypoxia boosted reprogramming. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We performed genome-wide DNA methylation analysis. -- Abstract: Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are generated from somatic cells by the forced expression of a defined set of pluripotency-associated transcription factors. Human iPS cells can be propagated indefinitely, while maintaining the capacity to differentiate into all cell types in the body except for extra-embryonic tissues. This technology not only represents a new way to use individual-specific stem cells for regenerative medicine but also constitutes a novel method to obtain large amounts of disease-specific cells for biomedical research. Despite their great potential, the long reprogramming process (up to 1 month) remains one of the most significant challenges facing standard virus-mediated methodology. In this study, we report the accelerated generation of human iPS cells from adipose-derived stem (ADS) cells, using a new combination of chemical inhibitors under a setting of physiological hypoxia in conjunction with retroviral transduction of Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and L-Myc. Under optimized conditions, we observed human embryonic stem (ES)-like cells as early as 6 days after the initial retroviral transduction. This was followed by the emergence of fully reprogrammed cells bearing Tra-1-81-positive and DsRed transgene-silencing properties on day 10. The resulting cell lines resembled human ES cells in many respects including proliferation rate, morphology, pluripotency-associated markers, global gene expression patterns, genome-wide DNA methylation states, and the ability to differentiate into all three of the germ layers, both in vitro and in vivo. Our method, when combined with chemical inhibitors under conditions of physiological hypoxia, offers a powerful tool for rapidly

  17. Effects of T592 phosphomimetic mutations on tetramer stability and dNTPase activity of SAMHD1 can not explain the retroviral restriction defect

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Akash; Wang, Zhonghua; White, Tommy; Buffone, Cindy; Nguyen, Laura A.; Shepard, Caitlin N.; Kim, Baek; Demeler, Borries; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Ivanov, Dmitri N.

    2016-01-01

    SAMHD1, a dNTP triphosphohydrolase, contributes to interferon signaling and restriction of retroviral replication. SAMHD1-mediated retroviral restriction is thought to result from the depletion of cellular dNTP pools, but it remains controversial whether the dNTPase activity of SAMHD1 is sufficient for restriction. The restriction ability of SAMHD1 is regulated in cells by phosphorylation on T592. Phosphomimetic mutations of T592 are not restriction competent, but appear intact in their ability to deplete cellular dNTPs. Here we use analytical ultracentrifugation, fluorescence polarization and NMR-based enzymatic assays to investigate the impact of phosphomimetic mutations on SAMHD1 tetramerization and dNTPase activity in vitro. We find that phosphomimetic mutations affect kinetics of tetramer assembly and disassembly, but their effects on tetramerization equilibrium and dNTPase activity are insignificant. In contrast, the Y146S/Y154S dimerization-defective mutant displays a severe dNTPase defect in vitro, but is indistinguishable from WT in its ability to deplete cellular dNTP pools and to restrict HIV replication. Our data suggest that the effect of T592 phosphorylation on SAMHD1 tetramerization is not likely to explain the retroviral restriction defect, and we hypothesize that enzymatic activity of SAMHD1 is subject to additional cellular regulatory mechanisms that have not yet been recapitulated in vitro. PMID:27511536

  18. Effects of T592 phosphomimetic mutations on tetramer stability and dNTPase activity of SAMHD1 can not explain the retroviral restriction defect.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Akash; Wang, Zhonghua; White, Tommy; Buffone, Cindy; Nguyen, Laura A; Shepard, Caitlin N; Kim, Baek; Demeler, Borries; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Ivanov, Dmitri N

    2016-01-01

    SAMHD1, a dNTP triphosphohydrolase, contributes to interferon signaling and restriction of retroviral replication. SAMHD1-mediated retroviral restriction is thought to result from the depletion of cellular dNTP pools, but it remains controversial whether the dNTPase activity of SAMHD1 is sufficient for restriction. The restriction ability of SAMHD1 is regulated in cells by phosphorylation on T592. Phosphomimetic mutations of T592 are not restriction competent, but appear intact in their ability to deplete cellular dNTPs. Here we use analytical ultracentrifugation, fluorescence polarization and NMR-based enzymatic assays to investigate the impact of phosphomimetic mutations on SAMHD1 tetramerization and dNTPase activity in vitro. We find that phosphomimetic mutations affect kinetics of tetramer assembly and disassembly, but their effects on tetramerization equilibrium and dNTPase activity are insignificant. In contrast, the Y146S/Y154S dimerization-defective mutant displays a severe dNTPase defect in vitro, but is indistinguishable from WT in its ability to deplete cellular dNTP pools and to restrict HIV replication. Our data suggest that the effect of T592 phosphorylation on SAMHD1 tetramerization is not likely to explain the retroviral restriction defect, and we hypothesize that enzymatic activity of SAMHD1 is subject to additional cellular regulatory mechanisms that have not yet been recapitulated in vitro. PMID:27511536

  19. Molecular purging of multiple myeloma cells by ex-vivo culture and retroviral transduction of mobilized-blood CD34+ cells

    PubMed Central

    Deola, Sara; Scaramuzza, Samantha; Birolo, Roberto Sciarretta; Cergnul, Massimiliano; Ficara, Francesca; Dando, Jonathan; Voena, Claudia; Vai, Sergio; Monari, Marta; Pogliani, Enrico; Corneo, Gianmarco; Peccatori, Jacopo; Selleri, Silvia; Bordignon, Claudio; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Aiuti, Alessandro; Bregni, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Background Tumor cell contamination of the apheresis in multiple myeloma is likely to affect disease-free and overall survival after autografting. Objective To purge myeloma aphereses from tumor contaminants with a novel culture-based purging method. Methods We cultured myeloma-positive CD34+ PB samples in conditions that retained multipotency of hematopoietic stem cells, but were unfavourable to survival of plasma cells. Moreover, we exploited the resistance of myeloma plasma cells to retroviral transduction by targeting the hematopoietic CD34+ cell population with a retroviral vector carrying a selectable marker (the truncated form of the human receptor for nerve growth factor, ΔNGFR). We performed therefore a further myeloma purging step by selecting the transduced cells at the end of the culture. Results Overall recovery of CD34+ cells after culture was 128.5%; ΔNGFR transduction rate was 28.8% for CD34+ cells and 0% for CD138-selected primary myeloma cells, respectively. Recovery of CD34+ cells after ΔNGFR selection was 22.3%. By patient-specific Ig-gene rearrangements, we assessed a decrease of 0.7–1.4 logs in tumor load after the CD34+ cell selection, and up to 2.3 logs after culture and ΔNGFR selection. Conclusion We conclude that ex-vivo culture and retroviral-mediated transduction of myeloma leukaphereses provide an efficient tumor cell purging. PMID:17626627

  20. Flanking-sequence exponential anchored–polymerase chain reaction amplification: a sensitive and highly specific method for detecting retroviral integrant–host–junction sequences

    PubMed Central

    Pule, MA; Rousseau, A; Vera, J; Heslop, HE; Brenner, MK; Vanin, EF

    2009-01-01

    Background Retroviral vectors are regularly used to transduce stem cells and their derivatives for experimental and therapeutic purposes. Because these vectors integrate semi-randomly into the cellular genome, analysis of integranated retroviral DNA/host cell DNA junctions (IHJ) facilitates clonality studies of engrafted cells, allowing their differentiation, survival and fate to be tracked. In the case of any adverse events, IHJ analysis can allow the identification of potentially oncogenic integration sites. At present, most measures to assess IHJ are complex, insensitive and may be subject to IHJ selection bias inherent to the technology used. Methods We have developed and validated a simple but effective technique for generating libraries of IHJ, which we term flanking-sequence exponential anchored–polymerase chain reaction (FLEA-PCR). Flanking-sequence random anchoring is used as an alternative to restriction enzyme digestion and cassette ligation to allow consistent detection of IHJ and decrease bias. Results Individual clones from plasmid libraries can be sequenced and assembled using custom-written software, and FLEA-PCR smears can be analyzed by capillary electrophoresis after digestion with restriction enzymes. Discussion This approach can readily analyze complex mixtures of IHJ, allowing localization of these sequences to their genomic sites. This approach should simplify analysis of retroviral integration. PMID:18821360

  1. Primate genome gain and loss: a bone dysplasia, muscular dystrophy, and bone cancer syndrome resulting from mutated retroviral-derived MTAP transcripts.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Vanegas, Olga; Camacho, Sandra Catalina; Till, Jacob; Miranda-Lorenzo, Irene; Terzo, Esteban; Ramirez, Maria Celeste; Schramm, Vern; Cordovano, Grace; Watts, Giles; Mehta, Sarju; Kimonis, Virginia; Hoch, Benjamin; Philibert, Keith D; Raabe, Carsten A; Bishop, David F; Glucksman, Marc J; Martignetti, John A

    2012-04-01

    Diaphyseal medullary stenosis with malignant fibrous histiocytoma (DMS-MFH) is an autosomal-dominant syndrome characterized by bone dysplasia, myopathy, and bone cancer. We previously mapped the DMS-MFH tumor-suppressing-gene locus to chromosomal region 9p21-22 but failed to identify mutations in known genes in this region. We now demonstrate that DMS-MFH results from mutations in the most proximal of three previously uncharacterized terminal exons of the gene encoding methylthioadenosine phosphorylase, MTAP. Intriguingly, two of these MTAP exons arose from early and independent retroviral-integration events in primate genomes at least 40 million years ago, and since then, their genomic integration has gained a functional role. MTAP is a ubiquitously expressed homotrimeric-subunit enzyme critical to polyamine metabolism and adenine and methionine salvage pathways and was believed to be encoded as a single transcript from the eight previously described exons. Six distinct retroviral-sequence-containing MTAP isoforms, each of which can physically interact with archetype MTAP, have been identified. The disease-causing mutations occur within one of these retroviral-derived exons and result in exon skipping and dysregulated alternative splicing of all MTAP isoforms. Our results identify a gene involved in the development of bone sarcoma, provide evidence of the primate-specific evolution of certain parts of an existing gene, and demonstrate that mutations in parts of this gene can result in human disease despite its relatively recent origin.

  2. Simultaneous measurement of intracellular triphosphate metabolites of zidovudine, lamivudine and abacavir (carbovir) in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells by combined anion exchange solid phase extraction and LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Brian L; Poston, Philip A; Neal, Erin F; Slaughter, Clive; Rodman, John H

    2007-05-01

    All nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) must first be metabolized to their triphosphate forms in order to be active against HIV. Zidovudine (ZDV), abacavir (ABC) and lamivudine (3TC) have proven to be an efficacious combination. In order simultaneously to measure intracellular levels of the triphosphates (-TP) of ZDV, ABC (carbovir, CBV) and 3TC, either together or individually, we have developed a cartridge-LC-MS/MS method. The quantitation range was 2.5-250 pg/microl for 3TC-TP, 0.1-10.0 pg/microl for ZDV-TP and 0.05-5.00 pg/microl for CBV-TP. This corresponds to 0.1-11.0 pmol 3TC-TP per million cells, 4-375 fmol ZDV-TP per million cells and 2-200 fmol CBV-TP per million cells, extracted from 10 million cells. Patient samples demonstrated measured levels in the middle regions of our standard curves both at pre-dose and 4h post-dose times. PMID:17197254

  3. Imported Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome–Related Histoplasmosis in Metropolitan France: A Comparison of Pre–Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy and Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy Eras

    PubMed Central

    Peigne, Vincent; Dromer, Françoise; Elie, Caroline; Lidove, Olivier; Lortholary, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum var. capsulatum infection is rare outside disease-endemic areas. Clinical presentation and outcome of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome–related histoplasmosis are unknown in non-endemic areas with wide access to highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART). Retrospective analysis of cases recorded at the French National Reference Center for Mycoses and Antifungals during two decades: pre-HAART (1985–1994) and HAART (1997–2006). Clinical features and outcome of all adults with proven acquired immunodeficiency syndrome–related histoplasmosis were compared between the two periods. One hundred four patients were included (40 during the pre-HAART era and 64 during the HAART era). Diagnosis was established a mean of 62 days after onset of symptoms. One-year overall mortality rates decreased from 53% (pre-HAART era) to 22% (HAART era). Diagnosis during the pre-HAART era and an older age were the only independent factors associated with death. Histoplasmosis is a rare invasive fungal infection outside disease-endemic areas. Its prognosis improved significantly during the HAART era. PMID:22049053

  4. Imported acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related histoplasmosis in metropolitan France: a comparison of pre-highly active anti-retroviral therapy and highly active anti-retroviral therapy eras.

    PubMed

    Peigne, Vincent; Dromer, Françoise; Elie, Caroline; Lidove, Olivier; Lortholary, Olivier

    2011-11-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum var. capsulatum infection is rare outside disease-endemic areas. Clinical presentation and outcome of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related histoplasmosis are unknown in non-endemic areas with wide access to highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART). Retrospective analysis of cases recorded at the French National Reference Center for Mycoses and Antifungals during two decades: pre-HAART (1985-1994) and HAART (1997-2006). Clinical features and outcome of all adults with proven acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related histoplasmosis were compared between the two periods. One hundred four patients were included (40 during the pre-HAART era and 64 during the HAART era). Diagnosis was established a mean of 62 days after onset of symptoms. One-year overall mortality rates decreased from 53% (pre-HAART era) to 22% (HAART era). Diagnosis during the pre-HAART era and an older age were the only independent factors associated with death. Histoplasmosis is a rare invasive fungal infection outside disease-endemic areas. Its prognosis improved significantly during the HAART era.

  5. IMMORTALIZATION OF HUMAN AND RHESUS MACAQUE PRIMARY ANTIGEN-SPECIFIC T CELLS BY RETROVIRALLY TRANSDUCED TELOMERASE REVERSE TRANSCRIPTASE

    PubMed Central

    Barsov, Eugene V.

    2011-01-01

    Human and rhesus macaque primary antigen-specific T cells derived from infected or immunized individuals or animals are a valuable material with which to study cellular immune responses against pathogens and tumors. Antigen-specific T cells can be expanded in vitro but have a finite proliferative life span. After a limited period in culture, primary T cells undergo replicative senescence and stop dividing. This restricts their applicability to short term experiments and complicates their use in adoptive immunotherapy. The proliferative life span of primary human and rhesus macaque T cells can be considerably extended by ectopically expressed human telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT). Antigen-specific T cells transduced with TERT-expressing retroviral vectors can proliferate and expand in culture for long periods of time while maintaining their primary T cell characteristics including antigen-specific responses. Thus, TERT-immortalized T cells are an important and valuable resource for studying T cell immune responses and, potentially, for adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:22048804

  6. HIV-1 and two avian retroviral 5' untranslated regions bind orthologous human and chicken RNA binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Stake, Matthew; Singh, Deepali; Singh, Gatikrushna; Marcela Hernandez, J; Kaddis Maldonado, Rebecca; Parent, Leslie J; Boris-Lawrie, Kathleen

    2015-12-01

    Essential host cofactors in retrovirus replication bind cis-acting sequences in the 5'untranslated region (UTR). Although host RBPs are crucial to all aspects of virus biology, elucidating their roles in replication remains a challenge to the field. Here RNA affinity-coupled-proteomics generated a comprehensive, unbiased inventory of human and avian RNA binding proteins (RBPs) co-isolating with 5'UTRs of HIV-1, spleen necrosis virus and Rous sarcoma virus. Applying stringent biochemical and statistical criteria, we identified 185 RBP; 122 were previously implicated in retrovirus biology and 63 are new to the 5'UTR proteome. RNA electrophoretic mobility assays investigated paralogs present in the common ancestor of vertebrates and one hnRNP was identified as a central node to the biological process-anchored networks of HIV-1, SNV, and RSV 5' UTR-proteomes. This comprehensive view of the host constituents of retroviral RNPs is broadly applicable to investigation of viral replication and antiviral response in both human and avian cell lineages.

  7. Annotation and visualization of endogenous retroviral sequences using the Distributed Annotation System (DAS) and eBioX

    PubMed Central

    Martínez Barrio, Álvaro; Lagercrantz, Erik; Sperber, Göran O; Blomberg, Jonas; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik

    2009-01-01

    Background The Distributed Annotation System (DAS) is a widely used network protocol for sharing biological information. The distributed aspects of the protocol enable the use of various reference and annotation servers for connecting biological sequence data to pertinent annotations in order to depict an integrated view of the data for the final user. Results An annotation server has been devised to provide information about the endogenous retroviruses detected and annotated by a specialized in silico tool called RetroTector. We describe the procedure to implement the DAS 1.5 protocol commands necessary for constructing the DAS annotation server. We use our server to exemplify those steps. Data distribution is kept separated from visualization which is carried out by eBioX, an easy to use open source program incorporating multiple bioinformatics utilities. Some well characterized endogenous retroviruses are shown in two different DAS clients. A rapid analysis of areas free from retroviral insertions could be facilitated by our annotations. Conclusion The DAS protocol has shown to be advantageous in the distribution of endogenous retrovirus data. The distributed nature of the protocol is also found to aid in combining annotation and visualization along a genome in order to enhance the understanding of ERV contribution to its evolution. Reference and annotation servers are conjointly used by eBioX to provide visualization of ERV annotations as well as other data sources. Our DAS data source can be found in the central public DAS service repository, , or at . PMID:19534743

  8. Retroviral reverse transcriptase inhibitory activity in Thai herbs and spices: screening with Moloney murine leukemia viral enzyme.

    PubMed

    Suthienkul, O; Miyazaki, O; Chulasiri, M; Kositanont, U; Oishi, K

    1993-12-01

    Fifty-seven Thai herbs and spices were examined for their retroviral reverse transcriptase inhibitory activity. All herbs and spices were extracted with hot-water and methanol. Reverse transcriptase inhibitory activity of the extracts was determined by using Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus reverse transcriptase (M-MuLV-RT) reacted with 3H-dTTP and radioactivity measured with a scintillation counter. Eighty-one per cent (46/57) of hot-water extracts and 54% (31/57) of methanol extracts showed inhibitory activities. At a concentration of 125 micrograms/ml, 13% (6/46) of hot-water extracts, namely Eugenia caryophyllus Bullock et Harrison, Phyllanthus urinaria Linn., Terminalia belerica Roxb., Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn., Psidium guajava Linn. and Lawsonia inermis Linn., had a relative inhibitory ratio (IR) over 50%. They showed ratios of 100%, 91%, 75%, 74%, 61% and 60%, respectively. For methanol extracts, only 10% (3/31) had IR values over 50%. They were T. belerica, E. caryophyllus and N. nucifera which exhibited IR values of 83%, 54% and 54%, respectively. PMID:7524165

  9. Various cells retrovirally transduced with N-acetylgalactosoamine-6-sulfate sulfatase correct Morquio skin fibroblasts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Toietta, G; Severini, G M; Traversari, C; Tomatsu, S; Sukegawa, K; Fukuda, S; Kondo, N; Tortora, P; Bordignon, C

    2001-11-01

    Gene therapy may provide a long-term approach to the treatment of mucopolysaccharidoses. As a first step toward the development of an effective gene therapy for mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (Morquio syndrome), a recombinant retroviral vector, LGSN, derived from the LXSN vector, containing a full-length human wildtype N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS) cDNA, was produced. Severe Morquio and normal donor fibroblasts were transduced by LGSN. GALNS activity in both Morquio and normal transduced cells was several fold higher than normal values. To measure the variability of GALNS expression among different transduced cells, we transduced normal and Morquio lymphoblastoid B cells and PBLs, human keratinocytes, murine myoblasts C2C12, and rabbit synoviocytes HIG-82 with LGSN. In all cases, an increase of GALNS activity after transduction was measured. In Morquio cells co-cultivated with enzyme-deficient transduced cells, we demonstrated enzyme uptake and persistence of GALNS activity above normal levels for up to 6 days. The uptake was mannose-6-phosphate dependent. Furthermore, we achieved clear evidence that LGSN transduction of Morquio fibroblasts led to correction of the metabolic defect. These results provide the first evidence that GALNS may be delivered either locally or systematically by various cells in an ex vivo gene therapy of MPS IVA. PMID:11686941

  10. Mesenchymal stromal cells retrovirally transduced with prodrug-converting genes are suitable vehicles for cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Ďuriniková, E; Kučerová, L; Matúšková, M

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) possess a set of several fairly unique properties which make them ideally suitable both for cellular therapies and regenerative medicine. These include: relative ease of isolation, the ability to differentiate along mesenchymal and non-mesenchymal lineages in vitro and the ability to be extensively expanded in culture without a loss of differentiative capacity. MSC are not only hypoimmunogenic, but they mediate immunosuppression upon transplantation, and possess pronounced anti-inflammatory properties. They are able to home to damaged tissues, tumors, and metastases following systemic administration. The ability of homing holds big promise for tumor-targeted delivery of therapeutic agents. Viruses are naturally evolved vehicles efficiently transferring their genes into host cells. This ability made them suitable for engineering vector systems for the delivery of genes of interest. MSC can be retrovirally transduced with genes encoding prodrug-converting genes (suicide genes), which are not toxic per se, but catalyze the formation of highly toxic metabolites following the application of a nontoxic prodrug. The homing ability of MSC holds advantages compared to virus vehicles which display many shortcomings in effective delivery of the therapeutic agents. Gene therapies mediated by viruses are limited by their restricted ability to track cancer cells infiltrating into the surrounding tissue, and by their low migratory capacity towards tumor. Thus combination of cellular therapy and gene delivery is an attractive option - it protects the vector from immune surveillance, and supports targeted delivery of a therapeutic gene/protein to the tumor site.

  11. Retroviral induction of GSK-3β expression blocks the stimulatory action of physical exercise on the maturation of newborn neurons.

    PubMed

    Llorens-Martín, María; Teixeira, Catia M; Jurado-Arjona, Jerónimo; Rakwal, Randeep; Shibato, Junko; Soya, Hideaki; Ávila, Jesús

    2016-09-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) is a key process for certain types of hippocampal-dependent learning. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is accompanied by memory deficits related to alterations in AHN. Given that the increased activity of GSK-3β has been related to alterations in the population of hippocampal granule neurons in AD patients, we designed a novel methodology by which to induce selective GSK-3β overexpression exclusively in newborn granule neurons. To this end, we injected an rtTA-IRES-EGFP-expressing retrovirus into the hippocampus of tTO-GSK-3β mice. Using this novel retroviral strategy, we found that GSK-3β caused a cell-autonomous impairment of the morphological and synaptic maturation of newborn neurons. In addition, we examined whether GSK-3β overexpression in newborn neurons limits the effects of physical activity. While physical exercise increased the number of dendritic spines, the percentage of mushroom spines, and the head diameter of the same in tet-OFF cells, these effects were not triggered in tet-ON cells. This observation suggests that GSK-3β blocks the stimulatory actions of exercise. Given that the activity of GSK-3β is increased in the brains of individuals with AD, these data may be relevant for non-pharmacological therapies for AD. PMID:27010990

  12. A Retroviral CRISPR-Cas9 System for Cellular Autism-Associated Phenotype Discovery in Developing Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Michael R.; Fricano-Kugler, Catherine J.; Getz, Stephanie A.; Skelton, Patrick D.; Lee, Jeonghoon; Rizzuto, Christian P.; Geller, Joseph S.; Li, Meijie; Luikart, Bryan W.

    2016-01-01

    Retroviruses expressing a fluorescent protein, Cas9, and a small guide RNA are used to mimic nonsense PTEN mutations from autism patients in developing mouse neurons. We compare the cellular phenotype elicited by CRISPR-Cas9 to those elicited using shRNA or Cre/Lox technologies and find that knockdown or knockout (KO) produced a corresponding moderate or severe neuronal hypertrophy in all cells. In contrast, the Cas9 approach produced missense and nonsense Pten mutations, resulting in a mix of KO-equivalent hypertrophic and wild type-like phenotypes. Importantly, despite this mixed phenotype, the neuronal hypertrophy resulting from Pten loss was evident on average in the population of manipulated cells. Having reproduced the known Pten KO phenotype using the CRISPR-Cas9 system we design viruses to target a gene that has recently been associated with autism, KATNAL2. Katnal2 deletion in the mouse results in decreased dendritic arborization of developing neurons. We conclude that retroviral implementation of the CRISPR-Cas9 system is an efficient system for cellular phenotype discovery in wild-type animals. PMID:27161796

  13. Safety testing for replication-competent retrovirus associated with gibbon ape leukemia virus-pseudotyped retroviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Reeves, L; Cornetta, K

    2001-01-01

    The potential pathogenicity of replication-competent retroviruses (RCR) requires vigilant testing to exclude inadvertent contamination of clinical gene therapy vector products with RCR. Pseudotyped vectors using the gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV) envelope have entered into clinical trials but specific recommendations regarding methods for screening of vector product and analysis of clinical samples have not been set forth. Unfortunately, current screening assays used for detecting amphotropic RCR are not suitable for GALV-pseudotyped RCR. We modified the extended S+/L- assay for RCR detection by using human 293 cells for virus amplification. Of five cell lines tested, 293 cells were selected because they combined a high transduction efficiency and an ability to generate RCR at high titer. After optimizing the amplification assay, a dilution of GALV virus could consistently be detected at a dilution of 10(-6). In coculture experiments, one GALV-infected cell could be consistently detected in 10(6) uninfected cells. A PCR-based assay was developed that was capable of detecting 100 copies of a GALV envelope containing plasmid diluted in 1 microg of DNA obtained from uninfected cells. PCR was also able to detect one GALV-infected cell in 10(6) uninfected cells. These assays will be suitable for testing of vector preparations and for monitoring of clinical samples from patients treated in clinical gene therapy protocols. The assays developed are similar in methodology and sensitivity to those currently used for certification of amphotropic retroviral vectors. PMID:11177543

  14. Human-specific endogenous retroviral insert serves as an enhancer for the schizophrenia-linked gene PRODH

    PubMed Central

    Suntsova, Maria; Gogvadze, Elena V.; Salozhin, Sergey; Gaifullin, Nurshat; Eroshkin, Fedor; Dmitriev, Sergey E.; Martynova, Natalia; Kulikov, Kirill; Malakhova, Galina; Tukhbatova, Gulnur; Bolshakov, Alexey P.; Ghilarov, Dmitry; Garazha, Andrew; Aliper, Alexander; Cantor, Charles R.; Solokhin, Yuri; Roumiantsev, Sergey; Balaban, Pavel; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Buzdin, Anton

    2013-01-01

    Using a systematic, whole-genome analysis of enhancer activity of human-specific endogenous retroviral inserts (hsERVs), we identified an element, hsERVPRODH, that acts as a tissue-specific enhancer for the PRODH gene, which is required for proper CNS functioning. PRODH is one of the candidate genes for susceptibility to schizophrenia and other neurological disorders. It codes for a proline dehydrogenase enzyme, which catalyses the first step of proline catabolism and most likely is involved in neuromediator synthesis in the CNS. We investigated the mechanisms that regulate hsERVPRODH enhancer activity. We showed that the hsERVPRODH enhancer and the internal CpG island of PRODH synergistically activate its promoter. The enhancer activity of hsERVPRODH is regulated by methylation, and in an undermethylated state it can up-regulate PRODH expression in the hippocampus. The mechanism of hsERVPRODH enhancer activity involves the binding of the transcription factor SOX2, whch is preferentially expressed in hippocampus. We propose that the interaction of hsERVPRODH and PRODH may have contributed to human CNS evolution. PMID:24218577

  15. HIV-1 and two avian retroviral 5' untranslated regions bind orthologous human and chicken RNA binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Stake, Matthew; Singh, Deepali; Singh, Gatikrushna; Marcela Hernandez, J; Kaddis Maldonado, Rebecca; Parent, Leslie J; Boris-Lawrie, Kathleen

    2015-12-01

    Essential host cofactors in retrovirus replication bind cis-acting sequences in the 5'untranslated region (UTR). Although host RBPs are crucial to all aspects of virus biology, elucidating their roles in replication remains a challenge to the field. Here RNA affinity-coupled-proteomics generated a comprehensive, unbiased inventory of human and avian RNA binding proteins (RBPs) co-isolating with 5'UTRs of HIV-1, spleen necrosis virus and Rous sarcoma virus. Applying stringent biochemical and statistical criteria, we identified 185 RBP; 122 were previously implicated in retrovirus biology and 63 are new to the 5'UTR proteome. RNA electrophoretic mobility assays investigated paralogs present in the common ancestor of vertebrates and one hnRNP was identified as a central node to the biological process-anchored networks of HIV-1, SNV, and RSV 5' UTR-proteomes. This comprehensive view of the host constituents of retroviral RNPs is broadly applicable to investigation of viral replication and antiviral response in both human and avian cell lineages. PMID:26584240

  16. Scale-up and manufacturing of clinical-grade self-inactivating γ-retroviral vectors by transient transfection.

    PubMed

    van der Loo, J C M; Swaney, W P; Grassman, E; Terwilliger, A; Higashimoto, T; Schambach, A; Baum, C; Thrasher, A J; Williams, D A; Nordling, D L; Reeves, L; Malik, P

    2012-03-01

    The need for γ-retroviral (gRV) vectors with a self-inactivating (SIN) design for clinical application has prompted a shift in methodology of vector manufacturing from the traditional use of stable producer lines to transient transfection-based techniques. Herein, we set out to define and optimize a scalable manufacturing process for the production of gRV vectors using transfection in a closed-system bioreactor in compliance with current good manufacturing practices (cGMP). The process was based on transient transfection of 293T cells on Fibra-Cel disks in the Wave Bioreactor. Cells were harvested from tissue culture flasks and transferred to the bioreactor containing Fibra-Cel in the presence of vector plasmid, packaging plasmids and calcium-phosphate in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium and 10% fetal bovine serum. Virus supernatant was harvested at 10-14 h intervals. Using optimized procedures, a total of five ecotropic cGMP-grade gRV vectors were produced (9 liters each) with titers up to 3.6 × 10(7) infectious units per milliliter on 3T3 cells. One GMP preparation of vector-like particles was also produced. These results describe an optimized process for the generation of SIN viral vectors by transfection using a disposable platform that allows for the generation of clinical-grade viral vectors without the need for cleaning validation in a cost-effective manner.

  17. Scale-up and manufacturing of clinical-grade self-inactivating γ-retroviral vectors by transient transfection

    PubMed Central

    van der Loo, JCM; Swaney, WP; Grassman, E; Terwilliger, A; Higashimoto, T; Schambach, A; Baum, C; Thrasher, AJ; Williams, DA; Nordling, DL; Reeves, L; Malik, P

    2014-01-01

    The need for γ-retroviral (gRV) vectors with a self-inactivating (SIN) design for clinical application has prompted a shift in methodology of vector manufacturing from the traditional use of stable producer lines to transient transfection-based techniques. Herein, we set out to define and optimize a scalable manufacturing process for the production of gRV vectors using transfection in a closed-system bioreactor in compliance with current good manufacturing practices (cGMP). The process was based on transient transfection of 293T cells on Fibra-Cel disks in the Wave Bioreactor. Cells were harvested from tissue culture flasks and transferred to the bioreactor containing Fibra-Cel in the presence of vector plasmid, packaging plasmids and calcium-phosphate in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium and 10% fetal bovine serum. Virus supernatant was harvested at 10–14 h intervals. Using optimized procedures, a total of five ecotropic cGMP-grade gRV vectors were produced (9 liters each) with titers up to 3.6×107 infectious units per milliliter on 3T3 cells. One GMP preparation of vector-like particles was also produced. These results describe an optimized process for the generation of SIN viral vectors by transfection using a disposable platform that allows for the generation of clinical-grade viral vectors without the need for cleaning validation in a cost-effective manner. PMID:21753795

  18. Scale-up and manufacturing of clinical-grade self-inactivating γ-retroviral vectors by transient transfection.

    PubMed

    van der Loo, J C M; Swaney, W P; Grassman, E; Terwilliger, A; Higashimoto, T; Schambach, A; Baum, C; Thrasher, A J; Williams, D A; Nordling, D L; Reeves, L; Malik, P

    2012-03-01

    The need for γ-retroviral (gRV) vectors with a self-inactivating (SIN) design for clinical application has prompted a shift in methodology of vector manufacturing from the traditional use of stable producer lines to transient transfection-based techniques. Herein, we set out to define and optimize a scalable manufacturing process for the production of gRV vectors using transfection in a closed-system bioreactor in compliance with current good manufacturing practices (cGMP). The process was based on transient transfection of 293T cells on Fibra-Cel disks in the Wave Bioreactor. Cells were harvested from tissue culture flasks and transferred to the bioreactor containing Fibra-Cel in the presence of vector plasmid, packaging plasmids and calcium-phosphate in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium and 10% fetal bovine serum. Virus supernatant was harvested at 10-14 h intervals. Using optimized procedures, a total of five ecotropic cGMP-grade gRV vectors were produced (9 liters each) with titers up to 3.6 × 10(7) infectious units per milliliter on 3T3 cells. One GMP preparation of vector-like particles was also produced. These results describe an optimized process for the generation of SIN viral vectors by transfection using a disposable platform that allows for the generation of clinical-grade viral vectors without the need for cleaning validation in a cost-effective manner. PMID:21753795

  19. Human gene transfer: Characterization of human tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes as vehicles for retroviral-mediated gene transfer in man

    SciTech Connect

    Kasid, A.; Morecki, S.; Aebersold, P.; Cornetta, K.; Culver, K.; Freeman, S.; Director, E.; Lotze, M.T.; Blaese, R.M.; Anderson, W.F.; Rosenberg, S.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) are cells generated from tumor suspensions cultured in interleukin 2 that can mediate cancer regression when adoptively transferred into mice or humans. Since TILs proliferate rapidly in vitro, recirculate, and preferentially localize at the tumor site in vivo, they provide an attractive model for delivery of exogenous genetic material into man. To determine whether efficient gene transfer into TILs is feasible. The authors transduced human TILs with the bacterial gene for neomycin-resistance (Neo{sup R}) using the retroviral vector N2. The transduced TIL populations were stable and polyclonal with respect to the intact Neo{sup R} gene integration and expressed high levels of neomycin phosphotransferase activity. The Neo{sup R} gene insertion did not alter the in vitro growth pattern and interleukin 2 dependence of the transduced TILs. Analyses of T-cell receptor gene rearrangement for {beta}- and {gamma}-chain genes revealed the oligoclonal nature of the TIL populations with no major change in the DNA rearrangement patterns or the levels of mRNA expression of the {beta} and {gamma} chains following transduction and selection of TILs in the neomycin analog G418. Human TILs expressed mRNA for tumor necrosis factors ({alpha} and {beta}) and interleukin 2 receptor P55. This pattern of cytokine-mRNA expression was not significantly altered following the transduction of TILs. The studies demonstrate the feasibility of TILs as suitable cellular vehicles for the introduction of therapeutic genes into patients receiving autologous TILs.

  20. A Retroviral CRISPR-Cas9 System for Cellular Autism-Associated Phenotype Discovery in Developing Neurons.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michael R; Fricano-Kugler, Catherine J; Getz, Stephanie A; Skelton, Patrick D; Lee, Jeonghoon; Rizzuto, Christian P; Geller, Joseph S; Li, Meijie; Luikart, Bryan W

    2016-05-10

    Retroviruses expressing a fluorescent protein, Cas9, and a small guide RNA are used to mimic nonsense PTEN mutations from autism patients in developing mouse neurons. We compare the cellular phenotype elicited by CRISPR-Cas9 to those elicited using shRNA or Cre/Lox technologies and find that knockdown or knockout (KO) produced a corresponding moderate or severe neuronal hypertrophy in all cells. In contrast, the Cas9 approach produced missense and nonsense Pten mutations, resulting in a mix of KO-equivalent hypertrophic and wild type-like phenotypes. Importantly, despite this mixed phenotype, the neuronal hypertrophy resulting from Pten loss was evident on average in the population of manipulated cells. Having reproduced the known Pten KO phenotype using the CRISPR-Cas9 system we design viruses to target a gene that has recently been associated with autism, KATNAL2. Katnal2 deletion in the mouse results in decreased dendritic arborization of developing neurons. We conclude that retroviral implementation of the CRISPR-Cas9 system is an efficient system for cellular phenotype discovery in wild-type animals.

  1. Retroviral insertional activation of the c-myb proto-oncogene in a Marek's disease T-lymphoma cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Le Rouzic, E; Perbal, B

    1996-01-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) is an avian herpesvirus that causes, in chickens, a lymphoproliferative disease characterized by malignant transformation of T lymphocytes. The rapid onset of polyclonal tumors indicates the existence of MDV-encoded oncogenic products. However, the molecular basis of MDV-induced lymphoproliferative disease and latency remains largely unclear. Several lines of evidence suggest that MDV and Rous-associated virus (RAV) might cooperate in the development of B-cell lymphomas induced by RAV. Our present results indicate for the first time that MDV and RAV might also act synergistically in the development of T-cell lymphomas. We report an example of an MDV-transformed T-lymphoblastoid cell line (T9) expressing high levels of a truncated C-MYB protein as a result of RAV integration within one c-myb allele. The chimeric RAV-c-myb mRNA species initiated in the 5' long terminal repeat of RAV are deprived of sequences corresponding to c-myb exons 1 to 3. The attenuation of MDV oncogenicity has been strongly related to structural changes in the MDV BamHI-D and BamHI-H DNA fragments. We have established that both DNA restriction fragments are rearranged in the T9 MDV-transformed cells. Our results suggest that retroviral insertional activation of the c-myb proto-oncogene is a critical factor involved in the maintenance of the transformed phenotype and the tumorigenic potential of this T-lymphoma cell line. PMID:8892859

  2. Tomato thymidine kinase is subject to inefficient TTP feedback regulation.

    PubMed

    Larsen, N B; Munch-Petersen, B; Piškur, J

    2014-01-01

    A promising suicide gene therapy system to treat gliomas has been reported: the thymidine kinase 1 from tomato (toTK1) combined with the nucleoside analog pro-drug zidovudine (azidothymidine, AZT), which is known to penetrate the blood-brain barrier. Transduction with toTK1 has been found to efficiently increase the sensitivity of human glioblastoma cells to AZT, and nude rats with intracranial glioblastoma grafts have shown significantly improved survival when treated with the toTK1/AZT system. We show in our paper that the strong suicidal effect of AZT together with toTK1 may be explained by reduced TTP-mediated feedback inhibition of the AZT phosphorylation. PMID:24940681

  3. Development and validation of an HPLC-UV method for simultaneous determination of zidovudine, lamivudine, and nevirapine in human plasma and its application to pharmacokinetic study in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Utpal; Das, Ayan; Roy, Bikash; Choudhury, Hira; Gorain, Bapi; Pal, Tapan Kumar

    2013-06-01

    A simple, rapid, and sensitive high performance liquid chromatographic method with UV detection has been developed and validated according to the FDA guidelines for the quantitation of zidovudine (ZDV), lamivudine (LMV), and nevirapine (NVR) in human plasma. The sample was prepared by simple liquid-liquid extraction. Chromatographic separation was carried out in a Hypersil BDS, C(18) column (250 mm × 4.6 mm; 5 µm particle size) with simple mobile phase composition of 0.1 M ammonium acetate buffer in 0.5% acetic acid, v/v and methanol (40:60, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.85 ml min(-1) where detector was set at 270 nm with a total run time of 10 min which is very short for simultaneous estimation of three analytes in plasma. The method was linear over the concentration range of 50-3000, 50-2000 and 10-3000 ng ml(-1) with lower limit of quantifications (LLOQ) of 50, 50, and 10 ng ml(-1) for ZDV, LMV, and NVR, respectively. Accuracy and precision values of both within-run and between-run obtained from six different sets of three quality control (QC) samples along with the LLOQ analyzed in separate occasions for all the analytes ranged from 94.47-99.71% and 0.298-3.507%, respectively. Extraction recovery of analytes in plasma samples was above 90.16%. In stability tests, all the analytes in human plasma were stable during storage and assay procedure. The developed and validated method was successfully applied to quantitative determination of the three analytes in plasma for pharmacokinetic study in 12 healthy human volunteers. PMID:22374835

  4. Providing anti-retroviral therapy in the context of self-perceived stigma: a mixed methods study from Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Tarimo, Edith A M; George, John

    2014-04-01

    Adherence to anti-retroviral treatment (ART) has been a significant step towards improving quality of life among people living with HIV. However, stigma has been described to influence adherence to ART. A cross-sectional mixed methods study was conducted to explore factors related to stigma and perceived influence of stigma on adherence to treatment amongst ART-prescribed patients and health care providers, respectively in Tanzania. Stigma was assessed through interviewer administered survey among 295 patients. The results from patients showed that 279/295 (95%) were satisfied with the services provided at the Care and Treatment Centres (CTCs). The set up of CTCs 107/295 (36%), and queuing at the CTCs 88/295 (30%) were associated with stigma (P < 0.001). The perceived influence of stigma on adherence to ART was assessed using focus group discussions (FGDs) of 33 health care providers (HCPs). Through FGDs, HCPs perceived the set up of CTCs as friendly yet violated confidentiality. The HCPs reported that ART-prescribed patients hide identifiable cards to avoid being recognised by other people. Some patients were reported to rush to avoid familiar faces, and due to the rush they picked wrong medicines. Also some patients were reported to throw away manufacturers' box with dosage instructions written on the box, resulting in use of doses contrary to the prescriptions. We conclude that despite the fact that most patients were satisfied with the services provided at the CTCs, it is important that HCPs provide dosage instructions on another piece of paper or use disposable bags. A common dispensing window for all patients regardless of the diagnosis may be useful to minimize stigma. Also HCPs may introduce appointment system to avoid long queue at the CTCs.

  5. Generation of a high-titer retroviral vector capable of expressing high levels of the human beta-globin gene.

    PubMed

    Sadelain, M; Wang, C H; Antoniou, M; Grosveld, F; Mulligan, R C

    1995-07-18

    Retrovirus-mediated gene transfer into hematopoietic cells may provide a means of treating both inherited and acquired diseases involving hematopoietic cells. Implementation of this approach for disorders resulting from mutations affecting the beta-globin gene (e.g., beta-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia), however, has been hampered by the inability to generate recombinant viruses able to efficiently and faithfully transmit the necessary sequences for appropriate gene expression. We have addressed this problem by carefully examining the interactions between retroviral and beta-globin gene sequences which affect vector transmission, stability, and expression. First, we examined the transmission properties of a large number of different recombinant proviral genomes which vary both in the precise nature of vector, beta-globin structural gene, and locus control region (LCR) core sequences incorporated and in the placement and orientation of those sequences. Through this analysis, we identified one specific vector, termed M beta 6L, which carries both the human beta-globin gene and core elements HS2, HS3, and HS4 from the LCR and faithfully transmits recombinant proviral sequences to cells with titers greater than 10(6) per ml. Populations of murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells transduced by this virus expressed levels of human beta-globin transcript which, on a per gene copy basis, were 78% of the levels detected in an MEL-derived cell line, Hu11, which carries human chromosome 11, the site of the beta-globin locus. Analysis of individual transduced MEL cell clones, however, indicated that, while expression was detected in every clone tested (n = 17), the levels of human beta-globin treatment varied between 4% and 146% of the levels in Hu11. This clonal variation in expression levels suggests that small beta-globin LCR sequences may not provide for as strict chromosomal position-independent expression of beta-globin as previously suspected, at least in the context of

  6. Deciphering the impact of parameters influencing transgene expression kinetics after repeated cell transduction with integration-deficient retroviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Schott, Juliane W; Jaeschke, Nico M; Hoffmann, Dirk; Maetzig, Tobias; Ballmaier, Matthias; Godinho, Tamaryin; Cathomen, Toni; Schambach, Axel

    2015-05-01

    Lentiviral and gammaretroviral vectors are state-of-the-art tools for transgene expression within target cells. The integration of these vectors can be deliberately suppressed to derive a transient gene expression system based on extrachromosomal circular episomes with intact coding regions. These episomes can be used to deliver DNA templates and to express RNA or protein. Importantly, transient gene transfer avoids the genotoxic side effects of integrating vectors. Restricting their applicability, episomes are rapidly lost upon dilution in dividing target cells. Addressing this limitation, we could establish comparably stable percentages of transgene-positive cells over prolonged time periods in proliferating cells by repeated transductions. Flow cytometry was applied for kinetic analyses to decipher the impact of individual parameters on the kinetics of fluoroprotein expression after episomal retransduction and to visualize sequential and simultaneous transfer of heterologous fluoroproteins. Expression windows could be exactly timed by the number of transduction steps. The kinetics of signal loss was affected by the cell proliferation rate. The transfer of genes encoding fluoroproteins with different half-lives revealed a major impact of protein stability on temporal signal distribution and accumulation, determining optimal retransduction intervals. In addition, sequential transductions proved broad applicability in different cell types and using different envelope pseudotypes without receptor overload. Stable percentages of cells coexpressing multiple transgenes could be generated upon repeated coadministration of different episomal vectors. Alternatively, defined patterns of transgene expression could be recapitulated by sequential transductions. Altogether, we established a methodology to control and adjust a temporally defined window of transgene expression using retroviral episomal vectors. Combined with the highly efficient cell entry of these vectors while

  7. Clonal contributions of small numbers of retrovirally marked hematopoietic stem cells engrafted in unirradiated neonatal W/Wv mice.

    PubMed

    Capel, B; Hawley, R; Covarrubias, L; Hawley, T; Mintz, B

    1989-06-01

    Mice were repopulated with small numbers of retrovirally marked hematopoietic cells operationally definable as totipotent hematopoietic stem cells, without engraftment of cells at later stages of hematopoiesis, in order to facilitate analysis of stem cell clonal histories. This result depended upon the use of unirradiated W/Wv newborn recipients. Before transplantation, viral integration markers were introduced during cocultivation of fetal liver or bone marrow cells with helper cell lines exporting defective recombinant murine retroviruses of the HHAM series. Omission of selection in culture [although the vector contained the bacterial neomycin-resistance (neo) gene] also limited the proportion of stem cells that were virally labeled. Under these conditions, engraftment was restricted to a small population of marked and unmarked normal donor stem cells, due to their competitive advantage over the corresponding defective cells of the mutant hosts. A relatively simple and coherent pattern emerged, of one or a few virally marked clones, in contrast to previous studies. In order to establish the totipotent hematopoietic stem cell identity of the engrafted cells, tissues were sampled for viral and inbred-strain markers for periods close to one year after transplantation. The virally labeled clones were characterized as stem cell clones by their extensive self-renewal and by formation of the wide range of myeloid and lymphoid lineages tested. Results clearly documented concurrent contributions of cohorts of stem cells to hematopoiesis. A given stem cell can increase or decrease its proliferative activity, become completely inactive or lost, or become active after a long latent period. The contribution of a single clone present in a particular lineage was usually between 5% and 20%. PMID:2567516

  8. Effects of Homology Length in the Repeat Region on Minus-Strand DNA Transfer and Retroviral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Que; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2001-01-01

    Homology between the two repeat (R) regions in the retroviral genome mediates minus-strand DNA transfer during reverse transcription. We sought to define the effects of R homology lengths on minus-strand DNA transfer. We generated five murine leukemia virus (MLV)-based vectors that contained identical sequences but different lengths of the 3′ R (3, 6, 12, 24 and 69 nucleotides [nt]); 69 nt is the full-length MLV R. After one round of replication, viral titers from the vector with a full-length downstream R were compared with viral titers generated from the other four vectors with reduced R lengths. Viral titers generated from vectors with R lengths reduced to one-third (24 nt) or one-sixth (12 nt) that of the wild type were not significantly affected; however, viral titers generated from vectors with only 3- or 6-nt homology in the R region were significantly lower. Because expression and packaging of the RNA were similar among all the vectors, the differences in the viral titers most likely reflected the impact of the homology lengths on the efficiency of minus-strand DNA transfer. The molecular nature of minus-strand DNA transfer was characterized in 63 proviruses. Precise R-to-R transfer was observed in most proviruses generated from vectors with 12-, 24-, or 69-nt homology in R, whereas aberrant transfers were predominantly used to generate proviruses from vectors with 3- or 6-nt homology. Reverse transcription using RNA transcribed from an upstream promoter, termed read-in RNA transcripts, resulted in most of the aberrant transfers. These data demonstrate that minus-strand DNA transfer is homology driven and a minimum homology length is required for accurate and efficient minus-strand DNA transfer. PMID:11134294

  9. Prevalence and distribution of the GBV-C/HGV among HIV-1-infected patients under anti-retroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Alcalde, Rosana; Nishiya, Anna; Casseb, Jorge; Inocêncio, Lilian; Fonseca, Luiz A M; Duarte, Alberto J S

    2010-08-01

    Infection with GB virus C (GBV-C) or hepatitis G virus (HGV) is highly prevalent among HIV/AIDS patients. GBV-C/HGV viremia has not been associated with liver disease and seems to slow HIV disease progression. To study the GBV-C/HGV genotypes prevalence among HIV/AIDS patients and its association with HIV viral load (VL) and CD4+ lymphocyte counts. From February 2003 to February 2004, we analyzed 210 HIV-1-infected subjects who were on anti-retroviral therapy (ART). For 63 of them a PCR-nested to the non-coding 5' (5'NCR) region of the GBV-C/HGV was done, and for 49 a DNA direct sequencing was done. A phylogenetic analysis was performed by PHYLIP program. 63 (30%) of the HIV-1-infected patients were co-infected with GBV-C/HGV. The phylogenetic analysis revealed the following genotypes (and respective relative frequencies): 1 (10%), 2a (41%), 2b (43%), and 3 (6%). Co-infected patients presented lower HIV-1 VL and higher T CD4+ lymphocyte cells counts as compared with patients negative for GBV-C/HGV sequences (log=4.52 vs. 4.71, p=0.036), and T CD4+ lymphocyte counts (cells/mm(3)=322.6 vs. 273.5, p=0.081, respectively). T CD4+ cells counts equal to, or higher than, 200/mm(3) were significantly more common among co-infected patients than among HIV-infected-only patients (p=0.042). The lowest T CD4+ cells counts were associated with genotype 1 and the highest with genotype 2b (p=0.05). The GBV-C/HGV infection prevalence was 30% among HIV-1-infected subjects, and was associated with lower VL and higher CD4+ lymphocyte counts. GBV-C/HGV genotype 2b may be associated with better immunological response. PMID:20420864

  10. A novel, Q-PCR based approach to measuring endogenous retroviral clearance by capture protein A chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Lute, Scott; Norling, Lenore; Hong, Connie; Safta, Aurelia; O'Connor, Deborah; Bernstein, Lisa J; Wang, Hua; Blank, Greg; Brorson, Kurt; Chen, Qi

    2009-04-01

    Quantification of virus removal by the purification process during production is required for clinical use of biopharmaceuticals. The current validation approach for virus removal by chromatography steps typically involves time-consuming spiking experiments with expensive model viruses at bench scale. Here we propose a novel, alternative approach that can be applied in at least one instance: evaluating retroviral clearance by protein A chromatography. Our strategy uses a quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) assay that quantifies the endogenous type C retrovirus-like particle genomes directly in production Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell culture harvests and protein A pools. This eliminates the need to perform spiking with model viruses, and measures the real virus from the process. Using this new approach, clearance values were obtained that was comparable to those from the old model-virus spike/removal approach. We tested the concept of design space for CHO retrovirus removal using samples from a protein A characterization study, where a wide range of chromatographic operating conditions were challenged, including load density, flow rate, wash, pooling, temperature, and resin life cycles. Little impact of these variables on CHO retrovirus clearance was found, arguing for implementation of the design space approach for viral clearance to support operational ranges and manufacturing excursions. The viral clearance results from Q-PCR were confirmed by an orthogonal quantitative product-enhanced reverse transcriptase (Q-PERT) assay that quantifies CHO retrovirus by their reverse transcriptase (RT) enzyme activity. Overall, our results demonstrate that protein A chromatography is a robust retrovirus removal step and CHO retrovirus removal can be directly measured at large scale using Q-PCR assays.

  11. A phenyl-thiadiazolylidene-amine derivative ejects zinc from retroviral nucleocapsid zinc fingers and inactivates HIV virions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sexual acquisition of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) through mucosal transmission may be prevented by using topically applied agents that block HIV transmission from one individual to another. Therefore, virucidal agents that inactivate HIV virions may be used as a component in topical microbicides. Results Here, we have identified 2-methyl-3-phenyl-2H-[1,2,4]thiadiazol-5-ylideneamine (WDO-217) as a low-molecular-weight molecule that inactivates HIV particles. Both HIV-1 and HIV-2 virions pretreated with this compound were unable to infect permissive cells. Moreover, WDO-217 was able to inhibit infections of a wide spectrum of wild-type and drug-resistant HIV-1, including clinical isolates, HIV-2 and SIV strains. Whereas the capture of virus by DC-SIGN was unaffected by the compound, it efficiently prevented the transmission of DC-SIGN-captured virus to CD4+ T-lymphocytes. Interestingly, exposure of virions to WDO-217 reduced the amount of virion-associated genomic RNA as measured by real-time RT-qPCR. Further mechanism-of-action studies demonstrated that WDO-217 efficiently ejects zinc from the zinc fingers of the retroviral nucleocapsid protein NCp7 and inhibits the cTAR destabilization properties of this protein. Importantly, WDO-217 was able to eject zinc from both zinc fingers, even when NCp7 was bound to oligonucleotides, while no covalent interaction between NCp7 and WDO-217 could be observed. Conclusion This compound is a new lead structure that can be used for the development of a new series of NCp7 zinc ejectors as candidate topical microbicide agents. PMID:23146561

  12. Cytokine-independent growth and clonal expansion of a primary human CD8+ T-cell clone following retroviral transduction with the IL-15 gene.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Cary; Jones, Stephanie A; Cohen, Cyrille J; Zheng, Zhili; Kerstann, Keith; Zhou, Juhua; Robbins, Paul F; Peng, Peter D; Shen, Xinglei; Gomes, Theotonius J; Dunbar, Cynthia E; Munroe, David J; Stewart, Claudia; Cornetta, Kenneth; Wangsa, Danny; Ried, Thomas; Rosenberg, Steven A; Morgan, Richard A

    2007-06-15

    Malignancies arising from retrovirally transduced hematopoietic stem cells have been reported in animal models and human gene therapy trials. Whether mature lymphocytes are susceptible to insertional mutagenesis is unknown. We have characterized a primary human CD8(+) T-cell clone, which exhibited logarithmic ex vivo growth in the absence of exogenous cytokine support for more than 1 year after transduction with a murine leukemia virus-based vector encoding the T-cell growth factor IL-15. Phenotypically, the clone was CD28(-), CD45RA(-), CD45RO(+), and CD62L(-), a profile consistent with effector memory T lymphocytes. After gene transfer with tumor-antigen-specific T-cell receptors, the clone secreted IFN-gamma upon encountering tumor targets, providing further evidence that they derived from mature lymphocytes. Gene-expression analyses revealed no evidence of insertional activation of genes flanking the retroviral insertion sites. The clone exhibited constitutive telomerase activity, and the presence of autocrine loop was suggested by impaired cell proliferation following knockdown of IL-15R alpha expression. The generation of this cell line suggests that nonphysiologic expression of IL-15 can result in the long-term in vitro growth of mature human T lymphocytes. The cytokine-independent growth of this line was a rare event that has not been observed in other IL-15 vector transduction experiments or with any other integrating vector system. It does not appear that the retroviral vector integration sites played a role in the continuous growth of this cell clone, but this remains under investigation.

  13. Capture of syncytin-Mar1, a Fusogenic Endogenous Retroviral Envelope Gene Involved in Placentation in the Rodentia Squirrel-Related Clade

    PubMed Central

    Redelsperger, François; Cornelis, Guillaume; Vernochet, Cécile; Tennant, Bud C.; Catzeflis, François; Mulot, Baptiste; Heidmann, Odile; Dupressoir, Anne

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Syncytin genes are fusogenic envelope protein (env) genes of retroviral origin that have been captured for a function in placentation. Within rodents, two such genes have previously been identified in the mouse-related clade, allowing a demonstration of their essential role via knockout mice. Here, we searched for similar genes in a second major clade of the Rodentia order, the squirrel-related clade, taking advantage of the complete sequencing of the ground squirrel Ictidomys tridecemlineatus genome. In silico search for env genes with full coding capacity identified several candidate genes with one displaying placenta-specific expression, as revealed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis of a large panel of tissues. This gene belongs to a degenerate endogenous retroviral element, with recognizable hallmarks of an integrated provirus. Cloning of the gene in an expression vector for ex vivo cell-cell fusion and pseudotype assays demonstrated fusogenicity on a large panel of mammalian cells. In situ hybridization on placenta sections showed specific expression in domains where trophoblast cells fuse into a syncytiotrophoblast at the fetomaternal interface, consistent with a role in syncytium formation. Finally, we show that the gene is conserved among the tribe Marmotini, thus dating its capture back to about at least 25 million years ago, with evidence for purifying selection and conservation of fusogenic activity. This gene that we named syncytin-Mar1 is distinct from all seven Syncytin genes identified to date in eutherian mammals and is likely to be a major effector of placentation in its related clade. IMPORTANCE Syncytin genes are fusogenic envelope genes of retroviral origin, ancestrally captured for a function in placentation. Within rodents, two such genes had been previously identified in the mouse-related clade. Here, in the squirrel-related rodent clade, we identified the envelope gene of an endogenous retrovirus with all the

  14. Capture of syncytin-Mar1, a fusogenic endogenous retroviral envelope gene involved in placentation in the Rodentia squirrel-related clade.

    PubMed

    Redelsperger, François; Cornelis, Guillaume; Vernochet, Cécile; Tennant, Bud C; Catzeflis, François; Mulot, Baptiste; Heidmann, Odile; Heidmann, Thierry; Dupressoir, Anne

    2014-07-01

    Syncytin genes are fusogenic envelope protein (env) genes of retroviral origin that have been captured for a function in placentation. Within rodents, two such genes have previously been identified in the mouse-related clade, allowing a demonstration of their essential role via knockout mice. Here, we searched for similar genes in a second major clade of the Rodentia order, the squirrel-related clade, taking advantage of the complete sequencing of the ground squirrel Ictidomys tridecemlineatus genome. In silico search for env genes with full coding capacity identified several candidate genes with one displaying placenta-specific expression, as revealed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis of a large panel of tissues. This gene belongs to a degenerate endogenous retroviral element, with recognizable hallmarks of an integrated provirus. Cloning of the gene in an expression vector for ex vivo cell-cell fusion and pseudotype assays demonstrated fusogenicity on a large panel of mammalian cells. In situ hybridization on placenta sections showed specific expression in domains where trophoblast cells fuse into a syncytiotrophoblast at the fetomaternal interface, consistent with a role in syncytium formation. Finally, we show that the gene is conserved among the tribe Marmotini, thus dating its capture back to about at least 25 million years ago, with evidence for purifying selection and conservation of fusogenic activity. This gene that we named syncytin-Mar1 is distinct from all seven Syncytin genes identified to date in eutherian mammals and is likely to be a major effector of placentation in its related clade. Importance: Syncytin genes are fusogenic envelope genes of retroviral origin, ancestrally captured for a function in placentation. Within rodents, two such genes had been previously identified in the mouse-related clade. Here, in the squirrel-related rodent clade, we identified the envelope gene of an endogenous retrovirus with all the features of a

  15. Down-regulation of CD81 tetraspanin in human cells producing retroviral-based particles: tailoring vector composition.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, A F; Guerreiro, M R; Santiago, V M; Dalba, C; Klatzmann, D; Alves, P M; Carrondo, M J T; Coroadinha, A S

    2011-11-01

    Retroviral-derived biopharmaceuticals (RV) target numerous therapeutic applications, from gene therapy to virus-like particle (rVLP)-based vaccines. During particle formation, beside the pseudotyped envelope proteins, RV can incorporate proteins derived from the virus producer cells (VPC). This may be detrimental by reducing the amounts of the pseudotyped envelope and/or by incorporating protein capable of inducing immune responses when non-human VPC are used. Manipulating the repertoire of VPC proteins integrated onto the vector structure is an underexplored territory and should provide valuable insights on potential targets to improve vector pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. In this work, human HEK 293 cells producing retrovirus-like particles (rVLPs) and infectious RV vectors were used to prove the concept of customizing RV composition by manipulating cellular protein content. The tetraspanin CD81 was chosen since it is significantly incorporated in the RV membrane, conferring to the vector significant immunogenicity when used in mice. RNA interference-mediated by shRNA lentiviral vector transduction was efficiently used to silence CD81 expression (up to 99%) and the rVLPs produced by knocked-down cells lack CD81. Silenced clones were analyzed for cell proliferation, morphological changes, susceptibility to oxidative stress conditions, and rVLP productivities. The results showed that the down-regulation of VPC proteins requires close monitoring for possible side effects on cellular production performance. Yet, they confirm that it is possible to change the composition of host-derived immunogens in RV by altering cellular protein content with no detriment for vector productivity and titers. This constitutes an important manipulation tool in vaccinology--by exploiting the potential adjuvant effect of VPC proteins or using them as fusion agents to other proteins of interest to be exposed on the vector membrane--and in gene therapy, by reducing the

  16. Generation of a high-titer retroviral vector capable of expressing high levels of the human beta-globin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Sadelain, M; Wang, C H; Antoniou, M; Grosveld, F; Mulligan, R C

    1995-01-01

    Retrovirus-mediated gene transfer into hematopoietic cells may provide a means of treating both inherited and acquired diseases involving hematopoietic cells. Implementation of this approach for disorders resulting from mutations affecting the beta-globin gene (e.g., beta-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia), however, has been hampered by the inability to generate recombinant viruses able to efficiently and faithfully transmit the necessary sequences for appropriate gene expression. We have addressed this problem by carefully examining the interactions between retroviral and beta-globin gene sequences which affect vector transmission, stability, and expression. First, we examined the transmission properties of a large number of different recombinant proviral genomes which vary both in the precise nature of vector, beta-globin structural gene, and locus control region (LCR) core sequences incorporated and in the placement and orientation of those sequences. Through this analysis, we identified one specific vector, termed M beta 6L, which carries both the human beta-globin gene and core elements HS2, HS3, and HS4 from the LCR and faithfully transmits recombinant proviral sequences to cells with titers greater than 10(6) per ml. Populations of murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells transduced by this virus expressed levels of human beta-globin transcript which, on a per gene copy basis, were 78% of the levels detected in an MEL-derived cell line, Hu11, which carries human chromosome 11, the site of the beta-globin locus. Analysis of individual transduced MEL cell clones, however, indicated that, while expression was detected in every clone tested (n = 17), the levels of human beta-globin treatment varied between 4% and 146% of the levels in Hu11. This clonal variation in expression levels suggests that small beta-globin LCR sequences may not provide for as strict chromosomal position-independent expression of beta-globin as previously suspected, at least in the context of

  17. Characterization of Leukemia-Inducing Genes Using a Proto-Oncogene/Homeobox Gene Retroviral Human cDNA Library in a Mouse In Vivo Model.

    PubMed

    Jang, Su Hwa; Lee, Sohyun; Chung, Hee Yong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a method to screen a large number of potential driver mutations of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) using a retroviral cDNA library and murine bone marrow transduction-transplantation system. As a proof-of-concept, murine bone marrow (BM) cells were transduced with a retroviral cDNA library encoding well-characterized oncogenes and homeobox genes, and the virus-transduced cells were transplanted into lethally irradiated mice. The proto-oncogenes responsible for leukemia initiation were identified by PCR amplification of cDNA inserts from genomic DNA isolated from leukemic cells. In an initial screen of ten leukemic mice, the MYC proto-oncogene was detected in all the leukemic mice. Of ten leukemic mice, 3 (30%) had MYC as the only transgene, and seven mice (70%) had additional proto-oncogene inserts. We repeated the same experiment after removing MYC-related genes from the library to characterize additional leukemia-inducing gene combinations. Our second screen using the MYC-deleted proto-oncogene library confirmed MEIS1and the HOX family as cooperating oncogenes in leukemia pathogenesis. The model system we introduced in this study will be valuable in functionally screening novel combinations of genes for leukemogenic potential in vivo, and the system will help in the discovery of new targets for leukemia therapy.

  18. C terminal retroviral-type zinc finger domain from the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein is structurally similar to the N-terminal zinc finger domain

    SciTech Connect

    South, T.L.; Blake, P.R. ); Hare, D.R.; Summers, M.F. )

    1991-06-25

    Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopic and computational methods were employed for the structure determination of an 18-residue peptide with the amino acid sequence of the C-terminal retriviral-type (r.t.) zinc finger domain from the nucleocapsid protein (NCP) of HIV-1 (Zn(HIV1-F2)). Unlike results obtained for the first retroviral-type zinc finger peptide, Zn (HIV1-F1) broad signals indicative of confomational lability were observed in the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum of An(HIV1-F2) at 25 C. The NMR signals narrowed upon cooling to {minus}2 C, enabling complete {sup 1}H NMR signal assignment via standard two-dimensional (2D) NMR methods. Distance restraints obtained from qualitative analysis of 2D nuclear Overhauser effect (NOESY) data were sued to generate 30 distance geometry (DG) structures with penalties in the range 0.02-0.03 {angstrom}{sup 2}. All structures were qualitatively consistent with the experimental NOESY spectrum based on comparisons with 2D NOESY back-calculated spectra. These results indicate that the r.t. zinc finger sequences observed in retroviral NCPs, simple plant virus coat proteins, and in a human single-stranded nucleic acid binding protein share a common structural motif.

  19. Structure of the Brd4 ET domain bound to a C-terminal motif from γ-retroviral integrases reveals a conserved mechanism of interaction

    PubMed Central

    Crowe, Brandon L.; Larue, Ross C.; Yuan, Chunhua; Hess, Sonja; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Foster, Mark P.

    2016-01-01

    The bromodomain and extraterminal domain (BET) protein family are promising therapeutic targets for a range of diseases linked to transcriptional activation, cancer, viral latency, and viral integration. Tandem bromodomains selectively tether BET proteins to chromatin by engaging cognate acetylated histone marks, and the extraterminal (ET) domain is the focal point for recruiting a range of cellular and viral proteins. BET proteins guide γ-retroviral integration to transcription start sites and enhancers through bimodal interaction with chromatin and the γ-retroviral integrase (IN). We report the NMR-derived solution structure of the Brd4 ET domain bound to a conserved peptide sequence from the C terminus of murine leukemia virus (MLV) IN. The complex reveals a protein–protein interaction governed by the binding-coupled folding of disordered regions in both interacting partners to form a well-structured intermolecular three-stranded β sheet. In addition, we show that a peptide comprising the ET binding motif (EBM) of MLV IN can disrupt the cognate interaction of Brd4 with NSD3, and that substitutions of Brd4 ET residues essential for binding MLV IN also impair interaction of Brd4 with a number of cellular partners involved in transcriptional regulation and chromatin remodeling. This suggests that γ-retroviruses have evolved the EBM to mimic a cognate interaction motif to achieve effective integration in host chromatin. Collectively, our findings identify key structural features of the ET domain of Brd4 that allow for interactions with both cellular and viral proteins. PMID:26858406

  20. SIN Retroviral Vectors Expressing COL7A1 Under Human Promoters for Ex Vivo Gene Therapy of Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Titeux, Matthias; Pendaries, Valérie; Zanta-Boussif, Maria A; Décha, Audrey; Pironon, Nathalie; Tonasso, Laure; Mejia, José E; Brice, Agnes; Danos, Olivier; Hovnanian, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in COL7A1 encoding type VII collagen which forms key structures (anchoring fibrils) for dermal–epidermal adherence. Patients suffer since birth from skin blistering, and develop severe local and systemic complications resulting in poor prognosis. We lack a specific treatment for RDEB, but ex vivo gene transfer to epidermal stem cells shows a therapeutic potential. To minimize the risk of oncogenic events, we have developed new minimal self-inactivating (SIN) retroviral vectors in which the COL7A1 complementary DNA (cDNA) is under the control of the human elongation factor 1α (EF1α) or COL7A1 promoters. We show efficient ex vivo genetic correction of primary RDEB keratinocytes and fibroblasts without antibiotic selection, and use either of these genetically corrected cells to generate human skin equivalents (SEs) which were grafted onto immunodeficient mice. We achieved long-term expression of recombinant type VII collagen with restored dermal–epidermal adherence and anchoring fibril formation, demonstrating in vivo functional correction. In few cases, rearranged proviruses were detected, which were probably generated during the retrotranscription process. Despite this observation which should be taken under consideration for clinical application, this preclinical study paves the way for a therapy based on grafting the most severely affected skin areas of patients with fully autologous SEs genetically corrected using a SIN COL7A1 retroviral vector. PMID:20485266

  1. SEROPREVALENCE OF Toxoplasma gondii (Nicole & Manceaux, 1909) AND RETROVIRAL STATUS OF CLIENT-OWNED PET CATS (Felis catus, Linnaeus, 1758) IN RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, Bethânia Ferreira; Brener, Beatriz; Gershony, Liza; Willi, Liliane; Labarthe, Norma; Pereira, Cássia; Mendes-De-Almeida, Flavya

    2014-01-01

    Cats, as definitive host, play an important role in the transmission of Toxoplasma gondii. This study aimed to establish the seroprevalence of anti-T. gondii immunoglobulins G and M, and determine the frequency of oocysts in the feces of the domestic cat population in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We also aimed to study the association between T. gondii infection and age, sex, breed, lifestyle, diet and retroviral infection. A total of 108 cats were included in the study and fecal samples of 54 of those cats were obtained. Only 5.6% of the cats were seropositive for anti-T. gondii immunoglobulins using the indirect hemagglutination test. None of the 54 cats presented oocysts in their fecal samples. Although not statistically significant, males, mixed-breed, free-roaming and cats aged two years and older were found to be more exposed. Age, lifestyle and the use of litter boxes were found to play an important role as risk factors. Anemia and retroviral infections were independent of T. gondii infection. No antibodies were detected in the majority of cats (94.4%), indicating that those cats had never been exposed to the parasite and, therefore, once infected, they could present the risk of shedding large numbers of oocysts into the environment. PMID:24878997

  2. Structure of the Brd4 ET domain bound to a C-terminal motif from γ-retroviral integrases reveals a conserved mechanism of interaction.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Brandon L; Larue, Ross C; Yuan, Chunhua; Hess, Sonja; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Foster, Mark P

    2016-02-23

    The bromodomain and extraterminal domain (BET) protein family are promising therapeutic targets for a range of diseases linked to transcriptional activation, cancer, viral latency, and viral integration. Tandem bromodomains selectively tether BET proteins to chromatin by engaging cognate acetylated histone marks, and the extraterminal (ET) domain is the focal point for recruiting a range of cellular and viral proteins. BET proteins guide γ-retroviral integration to transcription start sites and enhancers through bimodal interaction with chromatin and the γ-retroviral integrase (IN). We report the NMR-derived solution structure of the Brd4 ET domain bound to a conserved peptide sequence from the C terminus of murine leukemia virus (MLV) IN. The complex reveals a protein-protein interaction governed by the binding-coupled folding of disordered regions in both interacting partners to form a well-structured intermolecular three-stranded β sheet. In addition, we show that a peptide comprising the ET binding motif (EBM) of MLV IN can disrupt the cognate interaction of Brd4 with NSD3, and that substitutions of Brd4 ET residues essential for binding MLV IN also impair interaction of Brd4 with a number of cellular partners involved in transcriptional regulation and chromatin remodeling. This suggests that γ-retroviruses have evolved the EBM to mimic a cognate interaction motif to achieve effective integration in host chromatin. Collectively, our findings identify key structural features of the ET domain of Brd4 that allow for interactions with both cellular and viral proteins.

  3. Retroviral microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Harwig, Alex; Das, Atze T; Berkhout, Ben

    2014-08-01

    Eukaryotic cells and several DNA viruses encode miRNAs to regulate the expression of specific target genes. It has been controversial whether RNA viruses can encode such miRNAs as miRNA excision may lead to cleavage of the viral RNA genome. We will focus on the retrovirus family, HIV-1 in particular, and discuss the production of virus-encoded miRNAs and their putative function in the viral replication cycle. An intricate scenario of multi-layer virus-host interactions becomes apparent with small RNAs as the regulatory molecules.

  4. Elevated rate of fixation of endogenous retroviral elements in Haplorhini TRIM5 and TRIM22 genomic sequences: impact on transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Diehl, William E; Johnson, Welkin E; Hunter, Eric

    2013-01-01

    All genes in the TRIM6/TRIM34/TRIM5/TRIM22 locus are type I interferon inducible, with TRIM5 and TRIM22 possessing antiviral properties. Evolutionary studies involving the TRIM6/34/5/22 locus have predominantly focused on the coding sequence of the genes, finding that TRIM5 and TRIM22 have undergone high rates of both non-synonymous nucleotide replacements and in-frame insertions and deletions. We sought to understand if divergent evolutionary pressures on TRIM6/34/5/22 coding regions have selected for modifications in the non-coding regions of these genes and explore whether such non-coding changes may influence the biological function of these genes. The transcribed genomic regions, including the introns, of TRIM6, TRIM34, TRIM5, and TRIM22 from ten Haplorhini primates and one prosimian species were analyzed for transposable element content. In Haplorhini species, TRIM5 displayed an exaggerated interspecies variability, predominantly resulting from changes in the composition of transposable elements in the large first and fourth introns. Multiple lineage-specific endogenous retroviral long terminal repeats (LTRs) were identified in the first intron of TRIM5 and TRIM22. In the prosimian genome, we identified a duplication of TRIM5 with a concomitant loss of TRIM22. The transposable element content of the prosimian TRIM5 genes appears to largely represent the shared Haplorhini/prosimian ancestral state for this gene. Furthermore, we demonstrated that one such differentially fixed LTR provides for species-specific transcriptional regulation of TRIM22 in response to p53 activation. Our results identify a previously unrecognized source of species-specific variation in the antiviral TRIM genes, which can lead to alterations in their transcriptional regulation. These observations suggest that there has existed long-term pressure for exaptation of retroviral LTRs in the non-coding regions of these genes. This likely resulted from serial viral challenges and provided a

  5. Retroviral transduction of interferon-γ cDNA into a nonimmunogenic murinefibrosarcoma: generation of T cells in draining lymph nodes capable of treating established parental metastatic tumor

    PubMed Central

    Shiloni, Eitan; Karp, Stephen E.; Custer, Mary C.; Shilyansky, Joel; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Mulé, James J.

    2008-01-01

    Gene modification of tumor cells with the cDNA for interferon γ (IFNγ) has been shown to increase the immunogenicity of some tumor cells. In order to explore further the possible therapeutic relevance of these previous findings, two clones of the nonimmunogenic MCA-102 fibrosarcoma of C57BL/6 origin were retrovirally transduced with the cDNA encoding murine IFNγ. 102.4JK (4JK), a clone with relatively high major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I expression, and 102.24JK (24JK), a clone with low expression of surface MHC class I molecules. Retroviral transduction of tumor cells with the cDNA encoding for IFNγ resulted in a substantial up-regulation of MHC class I surface expression in the 24JK clone but little change of class I in the 4JK clone. In an attempt to generate antitumor lymphocytes, these gene-modified cells were inoculated into mouse footpads and draining lymph nodes (DLN) were removed, dispersed, and cultured in vitro for 10 days with irradiated tumor cells and interleukin-2. DLN from mice bearing either unmodified tumor or tumor transduced with cDNA encoding neomycin resistance (NeoR) or IFNγ, were used to treat recipients harboring 3-day pulmonary metastases induced by the parental, unmodified tumor. Treatment with DLN cells obtained following the injection of 24JK tumor cells modified with the gene for IFNγ significantly reduced the number of pulmonary metastases in four separate experiments, compared to groups treated by DLN cells generated from inoculation of either the unmodified, parental 24JK clone or the same clone transduced with the NeoR gene only. In contrast, DLN cells induced either by IFNγ-transduced 4JK (high expression of MHC class I) or an unmodified 4JK tumor (moderate expression of MHC class I) had significant but equal therapeutic efficacy. Although the in vitro growth rate of tumor cell lines was unaffected by the insertion of the mouse IFNγ cDNA, their in vivo (s.c.) growth rates were significantly slower than those

  6. Considerations in the rationale, design and methods of the Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment (START) study

    PubMed Central

    Babiker, Abdel G; Emery, Sean; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Gordin, Fred M; Grund, Birgit; Lundgren, Jens D; Neaton, James D; Pett, Sarah L; Phillips, Andrew; Touloumi, Giota; Vjecha, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Background Untreated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is characterized by progressive depletion of CD4+ T lymphocyte (CD4) count leading to the development of opportunistic diseases (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)), and more recent data suggest that HIV is also associated with an increased risk of serious non-AIDS (SNA) diseases including cardiovascular, renal, and liver diseases and non-AIDS-defining cancers. Although combination antiretroviral treatment (ART) has resulted in a substantial decrease in morbidity and mortality in persons with HIV infection, viral eradication is not feasible with currently available drugs. The optimal time to start ART for asymptomatic HIV infection is controversial and remains one of the key unanswered questions in the clinical management of HIV-infected individuals. Purpose In this article, we outline the rationale and methods of the Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment (START) study, an ongoing multicenter international trial designed to assess the risks and benefits of initiating ART earlier than is currently practiced. We also describe some of the challenges encountered in the design and implementation of the study and how these challenges were addressed. Methods A total of 4000 study participants who are HIV type 1 (HIV-1) infected, ART naïve with CD4 count > 500 cells/μL are to be randomly allocated in a 1:1 ratio to start ART immediately (early ART) or defer treatment until CD4 count is <350 cells/ μL (deferred ART) and followed for a minimum of 3 years. The primary outcome is time to AIDS, SNA, or death. The study had a pilot phase to establish feasibility of accrual, which was set as the enrollment of at least 900 participants in the first year. Results Challenges encountered in the design and implementation of the study included the limited amount of data on the risk of a major component of the primary endpoint (SNA) in the study population, changes in treatment guidelines when the pilot

  7. SAMHD1, the Aicardi-Goutières syndrome gene and retroviral restriction factor, is a phosphorolytic ribonuclease rather than a hydrolytic ribonuclease.

    PubMed

    Ryoo, Jeongmin; Hwang, Sung-Yeon; Choi, Jongsu; Oh, Changhoon; Ahn, Kwangseog

    2016-09-01

    SAMHD1 plays diverse roles in innate immunity, autoimmune diseases and HIV restriction, but the mechanisms involved are still unclear. SAMHD1 has been reported to have both dNTPase and RNase activities. However, whether SAMHD1 possesses RNase activity remains highly controversial. Here, we found that, unlike conventional hydrolytic exoribonucleases, SAMHD1 requires inorganic phosphate to degrade RNA substrates and produces nucleotide diphosphates rather than nucleoside monophosphates, which indicated that SAMHD1 is a phosphorolytic but not hydrolytic 3'-5' exoribonuclease. Furthermore, SAMHD1 preferentially cleaved single-stranded RNAs comprising A20 or U20, whereas neither C20 nor G20 was susceptible to SAMHD1-mediated degradation. Our findings will facilitate more advanced studies into the role of the SAMHD1 RNase function in the cellular pathogenesis implicated in nucleic acid-triggered inflammatory responses and the anti-retroviral function of SAMHD1. PMID:27387229

  8. Retroviral and psuedogene insertion sites reveal the lineage of human salivary and pancreatic amylase genes from a single gene during primate evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelson, L.C.; Snow, C.M.; Meisler, M.H. . Dept. of Human Genetics); Wiebauer, K. )

    1990-06-01

    The authors have analyzed the junction regions of inserted elements within the human amylase gene complex. This complex contains five genes which are expressed at high levels either in the pancreas or in the parotid gland. The proximal 5{prime}-flanking regions of these genes contain two inserted elements. A {gamma}-actin pseudogene is located at a position 20 base pairs upstream of the first coding exon. All of the amylase genes contain this insert. The subsequent insertion of an endogenous retrovirus interrupted the {gamma}-actin pseudogene within its 3{prime}-untranslated region. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the inserted elements associated with each of the five human amylase genes has revealed a series of molecular events during the recent history of this gene family. The data indicate that the entire gene family was generated during primate evolution from one ancestral gene copy and that the retroviral insertion activated a cryptic promoter.

  9. HIV reverse transcriptase gene mutations in anti-retroviral treatment naïve rural people living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Mohanakrishnan, K; Kasthuri, A; Amsavathani, S K; Sumathi, G

    2015-01-01

    This study is designed to find out the mutational variations of reverse transcriptase (RT) gene of HIV, after the traditional drug usage among anti-retroviral therapy naïve rural people living with HIV/AIDS. HIV Reactive patients, who were exposed for indigenous medicines such as Siddha, Ayurveda etc., for a minimum period of 6 months were taken for this study. Among 40 patients, two samples (5.55%) demonstrated high-level mutational resistance variations for nucleoside RT inhibitor (NRTI) and non-NRTI. The predominant polymorphisms detected were K122E (91.7%), V60I (91.7%), V35T (89%), Q207E (89%), D177E (89%), T200A (86.1%), S48T (83.33%), K173A (80.6%).

  10. HIV reverse transcriptase gene mutations in anti-retroviral treatment naïve rural people living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Mohanakrishnan, K; Kasthuri, A; Amsavathani, S K; Sumathi, G

    2015-01-01

    This study is designed to find out the mutational variations of reverse transcriptase (RT) gene of HIV, after the traditional drug usage among anti-retroviral therapy naïve rural people living with HIV/AIDS. HIV Reactive patients, who were exposed for indigenous medicines such as Siddha, Ayurveda etc., for a minimum period of 6 months were taken for this study. Among 40 patients, two samples (5.55%) demonstrated high-level mutational resistance variations for nucleoside RT inhibitor (NRTI) and non-NRTI. The predominant polymorphisms detected were K122E (91.7%), V60I (91.7%), V35T (89%), Q207E (89%), D177E (89%), T200A (86.1%), S48T (83.33%), K173A (80.6%). PMID:26470965

  11. The connection between serious life events, anti-retroviral adherence, and mental health among HIV-positive individuals in the Western Cape, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Brinkley-Rubinstein, Lauren; Chadwick, Caleb; Graci, Matt

    2013-01-01

    South Africa currently has one of the world's largest rates of HIV infection. A majority of the existing research focuses on individual risk behaviors that lead to increased risk of HIV contraction while also acknowledging the importance of the social and contextual determinants of HIV transmission and disease progression. Therefore, the present study aims to understand the ways in which experience of serious life events increases risk of both adherence lapse and mental illness in HIV-positive populations. Strikingly, our findings suggest that HIV-positive individuals are approximately 24 times as likely to have an anti-retroviral adherence lapse and are nearly four times likely to report mental health issues if they have experienced a recent serious life event. Implications of our results include the incorporation of socially relevant assessment tools and the development of interventions that address social and contextual issues for effecting adherence behaviors.

  12. Control of graft-versus-host disease with maintenance of the graft-versus-leukemia effect in a murine allogeneic transplant model using retrovirally transduced murine suicidal lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kornblau, Steven M.; Aycox, Preston G.; Stephens, L. Clifton; McCue, David; Champlin, Richard E.; Marini, Frank C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Limited clinical trials have validated the hypothesis of controlling graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) arising from stem cell transplant utilizing suicidal T-lymphocytes that have been transduced to express the HSV-TK gene. However, clinical utility has been limited by diminished T-cell function arising from the production process. To evaluate strategies for harnessing the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect while improving the safety and function of suicidal lymphocytes, we have developed techniques to produce fully functional, retrovirally transduced, HSV-TK–positive murine T cells (TK+TC). Methods Utilizing a murine major histocompatibility complex–matched transplant model, we evaluated the ability of TK+TC to generate a GVL effect and the ability to control GVHD in experiments where we varied the dose of TK+TC, ganciclovir (GCV) dose, the start of GCV administration (day 4, 7, 10, 13, 15, or 19) posttransplantation, and the GCV administration route (osmotic pump versus intraperitoneal). Results At TK+TC doses in excess of the standard lethal dose (SLD) of unmanipulated T-cells, GCV administration completely (2 × SLD) and partially (4 × SLD) controlled GVHD. Additionally, GVHD remained reversible despite delaying administration of GCV for a week after GVHD developed. Importantly, GVHD was controlled with a 1-log but not 2-log reduction in GCV dose, and this “partial suicide” preserved more circulating TK+TC compared with standard-dose GCV. Survival of leukemia-positive mice receiving TK+TC and GCV was significantly increased compared with control cohorts not receiving GCV or transplanted with unmanipulated T cells, thereby demonstrating a GVL effect. Conclusion Retrovirally transduced suicidal lymphocytes generate a potent GVL effect while simultaneously enabling control of GVHD, which results in improved leukemia and GVHD-free survival. PMID:17577932

  13. Genetic variation of the HIV-1 integrase region in newly diagnosed anti-retroviral drug-naïve patients with HIV/AIDS in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, J-Y; Kim, E-J; Choi, J-Y; Kwon, O-K; Kim, G J; Choi, S Y; Kim, S S

    2011-08-01

    The survival time of HIV/AIDS patients in Korea has increased since HAART (highly active anti-retroviral therapy) was introduced. However, the occurrence of drug-resistant strains requires new anti-retroviral drugs, one of which, an integrase inhibitor (INI), was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2007. INIs have been used for therapy in many countries and are about to be employed in Korea. Therefore, it is important to identify basic mutant variants prior to the introduction of INIs in order to estimate their efficacy. To monitor potential drug-resistant INI mutations in Korean HIV/AIDS patients, the polymorphism of the int gene was investigated together with the pol gene using a genotypic assay for 75 randomly selected Korean HIV-1 patients newly diagnosed in 2007. The drug-resistant mutation sequences were analysed using the Stanford HIV DB and the International AIDS Society resistance testing-USA panel (IAS-USA). Seventy strains of Korean subtype B were compared with foreign subtype-B strains, and there were no significantly different variants of the int gene region in the study population. Major mutation sites in the integrase (E92Q, F121Y, G140A/S, Y143C/R, Q148H/R/K and N155H) were not detected, and only a few minor mutation sites (L74M, V151I, E157Q, V165I, I203M, S230N and D232N) were identified in 21 strains (28%). Resistance due to mutations in the pol gene was observed in a single strain (1.3%) resistant to protease inhibitors (PIs) and in four strains (5.3%) resistant to reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTIs). In summary, this demonstrates that INIs will be susceptible to drug naïve HIV/AIDS patients in Korea.

  14. Posttranscriptional regulation of retroviral gene expression: primary RNA transcripts play three roles as pre-mRNA, mRNA, and genomic RNA

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Jason; Weil, Jason; Beemon, Karen

    2013-01-01

    After reverse transcription of the retroviral RNA genome and integration of the DNA provirus into the host genome, host machinery is used for viral gene expression along with viral proteins and RNA regulatory elements. Here, we discuss co-transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of retroviral gene expression, comparing simple and complex retroviruses. Cellular RNA polymerase II synthesizes full-length viral primary RNA transcripts that are capped and polyadenylated. All retroviruses generate a singly spliced env mRNA from this primary transcript, which encodes the viral glycoproteins. In addition, complex viral RNAs are alternatively spliced to generate accessory proteins, such as Rev, which is involved in posttranscriptional regulation of HIV-1 RNA. Importantly, the splicing of all retroviruses is incomplete; they must maintain and export a fraction of their primary RNA transcripts. This unspliced RNA functions both as the major mRNA for Gag and Pol proteins and as the packaged genomic RNA. Different retroviruses export their unspliced viral RNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm by either Tap-dependent or Rev/CRM1-dependent routes. Translation of the unspliced mRNA involves frame-shifting or termination codon suppression so that the Gag proteins, which make up the capsid, are expressed more abundantly than the Pol proteins, which are the viral enzymes. After the viral polyproteins assemble into viral particles and bud from the cell membrane, a viral encoded protease cleaves them. Some retroviruses have evolved mechanisms to protect their unspliced RNA from decay by nonsense-mediated RNA decay and to prevent genome editing by the cellular APOBEC deaminases. PMID:23754689

  15. Human immunodeficiency virus inhibition is prolonged by 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine alternating with 2',3'-dideoxycytidine compared with 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine alone.

    PubMed Central

    Spector, S A; Ripley, D; Hsia, K

    1989-01-01

    The inhibition of the lymphadenopathy-associated virus strain of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) by alternating regimens of two dideoxynucleosides, 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT) (zidovudine) and 2',3'-dideoxycytidine (ddC), was determined in CEM cells. Cultures infected with virus for 2 h were treated with clinically achievable concentrations of AZT, ddC, or a 3-day-alternating regimen of AZT and ddC. Media were completely changed every 3 days and replaced with antiviral agent, and virus production was assayed by p24 antigen and virus-specific DNA. Cells treated with no antiviral agent exhibited breakthrough infection by day 6 in culture, whereas cells treated with 0.1, 1.0, or 3.0 microM AZT had a prolonged time to viral breakthrough. For each regimen of AZT alternating with 0.05 or 0.1 microM ddC, there was consistently prolonged HIV inhibition compared with continuous treatment with AZT alone. The viral suppression achieved with the alternating combinations required AZT as well as ddC and was superior to 3 days of treatment with ddC alternating with 3 days of no antiretroviral treatment. Levels of unintegrated HIV DNA paralleled the detection of p24 antigen, with the most prolonged inhibition of virus-specific DNA occurring with AZT alternating with ddC (compared with all regimens except continuous treatment with ddC). These data suggest that alternating regimens of AZT and ddC not only might decrease toxicity associated with the two drugs but may prove to be more efficacious than AZT alone. PMID:2548440

  16. Selection of functional tRNA primers and primer binding site sequences from a retroviral combinatorial library: identification of new functional tRNA primers in murine leukemia virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Anders H.; Duch, Mogens; Pedersen, Finn Skou

    2000-01-01

    Retroviral reverse transcription is initiated from a cellular tRNA molecule and all known exogenous isolates of murine leukemia virus utilise a tRNAPro molecule. While several studies suggest flexibility in murine leukemia virus primer utilisation, studies on human immunodeficiency virus and avian retroviruses have revealed evidence of molecular adaptation towards the specific tRNA isoacceptor used as replication primer. In this study, murine leukemia virus tRNA utilisation is investigated by in vivo screening of a retroviral vector combinatorial library with randomised primer binding sites. While most of the selected primer binding sites are complementary to the 3′-end of tRNAPro, we also retrieved PBS sequences matching four other tRNA molecules and demonstrate that Akv murine leukemia virus vectors may efficiently replicate using tRNAArg(CCU), tRNAPhe(GAA) and a hitherto unknown human tRNASer(CGA). PMID:10637332

  17. Evaluation of the association between Addiction Severity Index and depression with adherence to anti-retroviral therapy among HIV infected patients.

    PubMed

    Paydary, Koosha; Ekhtiari, Hamed; Noori, Mehri; Rad, Mona V; Hajiabdolbaghi, Mahboubeh; SeyedAlinaghi, SeyedAhmad

    2015-01-01

    Adequate adherence to anti-retroviral therapy is required to achieve viral suppression and desirable treatment outcomes among HIV patients. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between adherence and severity of substance use as well as adherence and severity of depressive symptoms among Iranian HIV patients. In a prospective study, HIV patients with current substance use were assessed for adherence level via self report and pill count methods, severity of depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory- II) and substance use (Addiction Severity Index) during a three months follow up after initiating antiretroviral therapy. The adherence level, severity of depressive symptoms and substance use were assessed one month, two months and three months after initiation of anti-retroviral therapy. Addiction Severity Index (ASI) composite scores were calculated for each domain and the associations between ASI domains and adherence as well as severity of depressive symptoms and adherence were assessed. Twenty six HIV patients with current substance use disorder completed the study. At the end of the first month, adherence to therapy via pill count and self-report were 80%±31.9% and 85.12%±32%, respectively. At the end of the second month, adherence to therapy via pill count and self report were 87%±32% and 93.94%±23% respectively. At the end of the third month, the measured adherence via pill count and self report were 85%±33.7% and 90.1%±25.7% respectively. Adherence was higher among married patients and those who used reminder systems. Composite scores of the medical status and psychiatric status were related to higher adherence after first month. Substance use was inversely associated with adherence at the second follow up (r=-0.4, p=0.04). Also, severity of depressive symptoms was not related to adherence level. The repeated measurement analysis showed a significant decrease in psychiatric status domain of the ASI composite score after three months

  18. Effects of PPARγ and RBP4 Gene Variants on Metabolic Syndrome in HIV-Infected Patients with Anti-Retroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Yuan-Pin; Lee, Nan-Yao; Lin, Sheng-Hsiang; Chang, Ho-Ching; Wu, Chi-Jung; Chang, Chia-Ming; Chen, Po-Lin; Lin, Hsiao-Ju; Wu, Yi-Hui; Tsai, Pei-Jane

    2012-01-01

    Background PPARγ and RBP4 are known to regulate lipid and glucose metabolism and insulin resistance. The influences of PPARγ (C1431T and Pro12Ala) and RBP4 (−803GA) polymorphisms on metabolic syndrome in HIV-infected patients receiving anti-retroviral therapy were examined in this study. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study of HIV-1 infected adults with antiretroviral therapy for more than one year in the National Cheng Kung University Hospital was conducted. The gene polymorphisms were determined by quantitative PCR. Results Ninety-one patients were included in the study. Eighty-two (90.1%) patients were males with a mean age of 44.4 years. For the C1431T polymorphism in PPARγ, while patients with the T allele (48.4%) had trends toward lower rate of hypertriglyceridemia, the borderline significance together with insignificant power did not support the protective effect of the T allele against development of hypertriglyceridemia. For the Pro12Ala polymorphism in PPARγ, although patients with the Pro/Ala genotype (8.8%) had a higher level of serum LDL (138.0 vs. 111.5 mg/dl, P = 0.04) and trends toward higher rates of hypercholesterolemia and serum LDL>110 mg/dl, these variables were found to be independent of the Pro/Ala genotype in the multivariate analysis. For the −803GA polymorphism in RBP4, patients with the A allele (23.1%) more often had insulin resistance (HOMA>3.8; 33.3 vs. 8.7%, P = 0.01) and more often received anti-hypoglycemic drugs (14.3 vs. 1.4%, P = 0.04). The detrimental effect of the A allele in RBP4 −803GA polymorphism on development of insulin resistance was supported by the multivariate analysis adjusting for covariates. Conclusion The impacts of PPARγ C1431T and Pro12Ala polymorphisms on metabolism in HIV-infected patients are not significant. RBP4 −803GA polymorphism has increased risk of insulin resistance in HIV-infected patients with anti-retroviral therapy. PMID:23145084

  19. Retroviral delivery of GAD-IgG fusion construct induces tolerance and modulates diabetes: a role for CD4+ regulatory T cells and TGF-beta?

    PubMed

    Song, L; Wang, J; Wang, R; Yu, M; Sun, Y; Han, G; Li, Y; Qian, J; Scott, D W; Kang, Y; Soukhareva, N; Shen, B

    2004-10-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that antigen-specific tolerance could be induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated B cells retrovirally transduced with an immunoglobulin-antigen (or epitope-containing peptide) fusion construct. To investigate the mechanism of this gene therapy system, we now adapted this approach to immunotherapy of spontaneous diabetes in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, a T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease triggered, in part, by a pathogenic response to glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) 65. We demonstrate that LPS-stimulated splenocytes, retrovirally transfected with GAD-IgG fusion construct, induce a significant antigen-specific hyporesponsiveness at both cellular and humoral levels and reduce the incidence of diabetes in female NOD mice. Parallel with disease protection, we observed a prolonged increase of the numbers of CD4+CD25+ T cells in the periphery of GAD-IgG-treated mice, compared to those treated with a control IgG vector, both in the prediabetic period and persisting even 8 months after gene therapy. This increase appeared to be induced by the repeated stimulation of the antigen in the periphery instead of a result of differentiation of T-cell precursor in the thymus. Moreover, CD4+CD25+ T cells induced by GAD-IgG fusion construct were capable of suppressing the proliferative response of CD4+CD25- T cells in vitro; and ablation of the activity of CD4+CD25+ T cells by blocking antibody against CD25 could reverse GAD-specific T-cell hyporesponsiveness. These results suggested that CD4+CD25+ T-cell subset induced in GAD-IgG-treated NOD mice represented the regulatory or suppressive CD4+CD25+ T cells (Treg) and might play an important role in the induction and maintenance of tolerance in NOD mice. Furthermore, the numbers of splenic CD4+CD62L+ regulatory T cells in GAD-IgG-treated mice during the prediabetic period and serum TGF-beta levels in 34-38-week-old GAD-IgG-protected mice were also increased, compared to control IgG-treated ones

  20. Assessment of arterial elasticity among HIV-positive participants with high CD4 cell counts: a substudy of the INSIGHT Strategic Timing of Anti Retroviral Treatment trial

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Jason V.; Engen, Nicole Wyman; Huppler Hullsiek, Katherine; Stephan, Christoph; Jain, Mamta K.; Munderi, Paula; Pett, Sarah; Duprez, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Both HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART) may increase cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Assessments of vascular function and structure can be used to study the pathogenesis and progression of CVD, including the effects of ART and other interventions. Methods We review available methods to assess vascular (dys)function and report our experience using analysis of the diastolic blood pressure (BP) waveform to estimate arterial elasticity among a subset of participants in the Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment (START) trial. Linear regression was used to study cross-sectional associations between baseline clinical factors and small or large arterial elasticity. Results Arterial elasticity measurement was chosen for its improved measurement reproducibility over other methodologies and the potential of small arterial elasticity to predict clinical risk. Analysis of baseline data demonstrates that small artery elasticity is impaired (lower) with older age and differs by race and between geographic region. No HIV-specific factors studied remained significantly associated with arterial elasticity in multivariate models. Conclusion Longitudinal analyses in this substudy will provide essential randomised data to study the effects of early ART initiation on the progression of vascular disease among a diverse global population. When combined with future biomarker analyses and clinical outcomes in START, these findings will expand our understanding of the pathogenesis of HIV-related CVD. PMID:25711329

  1. Impaired phagocytosis among patients infected by the human immunodeficiency virus: implication for a role of highly active anti-retroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Michailidis, C; Giannopoulos, G; Vigklis, V; Armenis, K; Tsakris, A; Gargalianos, P

    2012-03-01

    In patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, neutrophil and monocyte functions, including phagocytosis, are impaired. The purpose of this study was to investigate changes of phagocytic function and respiratory burst occurring over the course of patients infected by the HIV-1 virus. Treatment-naive patients (group B), patients receiving highly active anti-retroviral treatment (HAART) (group C) and patients in which HAART has failed (group D) were studied and compared with healthy volunteers (group A). Phagocytosis and oxidative burst were evaluated using commercially available kits. Results clearly denote a significant decrease of the phagocytic function of both cell types of groups B and C compared with group A. Among group C patients, those in the upper quartile of CD4 increase had higher oxidative burst compared with patients of the other quartiles. In addition, comparisons clearly showed a lower degree of phagocytic function and of oxidative burst of both monocytes and neutrophils of group D compared with group B. Finally, it was found that monocyte and neutrophil function was correlated inversely to the change in viral load, i.e. the greater the decrease of viral load, the better the phagocytic and oxidative activity. Innate immunity defects appear to be present in HIV-positive patients, regarding phagocytic activity and oxidative burst of monocytes and neutrophils. These defects are greatly influenced by the level of treatment efficacy, with emphasis on CD4 cell counts and viral load. PMID:22288593

  2. Gene-Corrected Fibroblast Therapy for Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa using a Self-Inactivating COL7A1 Retroviral Vector.

    PubMed

    Jacków, Joanna; Titeux, Matthias; Portier, Soizic; Charbonnier, Soëli; Ganier, Clarisse; Gaucher, Sonia; Hovnanian, Alain

    2016-07-01

    Patients with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) lack type VII collagen and therefore have severely impaired dermal-epidermal stability causing recurrent skin and mucosal blistering. There is currently no specific approved treatment for RDEB. We present preclinical data showing that intradermal injections of genetically corrected patient-derived RDEB fibroblasts using a Good Manufacturing Practices grade self-inactivating COL7A1 retroviral vector reverse the disease phenotype in a xenograft model in nude mice. We obtained 50% transduction efficiency in primary human RDEB fibroblasts with an average low copy number (range = 1-2) of integrated provirus. Transduced fibroblasts showed strong type VII collagen re-expression, improved adhesion properties, normal proliferative capabilities, and viability in vitro. We show that a single intradermal injection of 3 × 10(6) genetically corrected RDEB fibroblasts beneath RDEB skin equivalents grafted onto mice allows type VII collagen deposition, anchoring fibril formation at the dermal-epidermal junction, and improved dermal-epidermal adherence 2 months after treatment, supporting functional correction in vivo. Gene-corrected fibroblasts previously showed no tumorigenicity. These data show the efficacy and safety of gene-corrected fibroblast therapy using a self-inactivating vector that has now been good manufacturing grade-certified and pave the way for clinical translation to treat nonhealing wounds in RDEB patients. PMID:26994967

  3. An innovative method to identify autoantigens expressed on the endothelial cell surface: serological identification system for autoantigens using a retroviral vector and flow cytometry (SARF).

    PubMed

    Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Fujii, Hiroshi; Ono, Masao; Watanabe, Ryu; Ishii, Tomonori; Harigae, Hideo

    2013-01-01

    Autoantibodies against integral membrane proteins are usually pathogenic. Although anti-endothelial cell antibodies (AECAs) are considered to be critical, especially for vascular lesions in collagen diseases, most molecules identified as autoantigens for AECAs are localized within the cell and not expressed on the cell surface. For identification of autoantigens, proteomics and expression library analyses have been performed for many years with some success. To specifically target cell-surface molecules in identification of autoantigens, we constructed a serological identification system for autoantigens using a retroviral vector and flow cytometry (SARF). Here, we present an overview of recent research in AECAs and their target molecules and discuss the principle and the application of SARF. Using SARF, we successfully identified three different membrane proteins: fibronectin leucine-rich transmembrane protein 2 (FLRT2) from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) from a patient with rheumatoid arthritis, and Pk (Gb3/CD77) from an SLE patient with hemolytic anemia, as targets for AECAs. SARF is useful for specific identification of autoantigens expressed on the cell surface, and identification of such interactions of the cell-surface autoantigens and pathogenic autoantibodies may enable the development of more specific intervention strategies in autoimmune diseases.

  4. An Innovative Method to Identify Autoantigens Expressed on the Endothelial Cell Surface: Serological Identification System for Autoantigens Using a Retroviral Vector and Flow Cytometry (SARF)

    PubMed Central

    Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Fujii, Hiroshi; Ono, Masao; Watanabe, Ryu; Ishii, Tomonori; Harigae, Hideo

    2013-01-01

    Autoantibodies against integral membrane proteins are usually pathogenic. Although anti-endothelial cell antibodies (AECAs) are considered to be critical, especially for vascular lesions in collagen diseases, most molecules identified as autoantigens for AECAs are localized within the cell and not expressed on the cell surface. For identification of autoantigens, proteomics and expression library analyses have been performed for many years with some success. To specifically target cell-surface molecules in identification of autoantigens, we constructed a serological identification system for autoantigens using a retroviral vector and flow cytometry (SARF). Here, we present an overview of recent research in AECAs and their target molecules and discuss the principle and the application of SARF. Using SARF, we successfully identified three different membrane proteins: fibronectin leucine-rich transmembrane protein 2 (FLRT2) from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) from a patient with rheumatoid arthritis, and Pk (Gb3/CD77) from an SLE patient with hemolytic anemia, as targets for AECAs. SARF is useful for specific identification of autoantigens expressed on the cell surface, and identification of such interactions of the cell-surface autoantigens and pathogenic autoantibodies may enable the development of more specific intervention strategies in autoimmune diseases. PMID:23401699

  5. Highly efficient gene transfer using a retroviral vector into murine T cells for preclinical chimeric antigen receptor-expressing T cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Kusabuka, Hotaka; Fujiwara, Kento; Tokunaga, Yusuke; Hirobe, Sachiko; Nakagawa, Shinsaku; Okada, Naoki

    2016-04-22

    Adoptive immunotherapy using chimeric antigen receptor-expressing T (CAR-T) cells has attracted attention as an efficacious strategy for cancer treatment. To prove the efficacy and safety of CAR-T cell therapy, the elucidation of immunological mechanisms underlying it in mice is required. Although a retroviral vector (Rv) is mainly used for the introduction of CAR to murine T cells, gene transduction efficiency is generally less than 50%. The low transduction efficiency causes poor precision in the functional analysis of CAR-T cells. We attempted to improve the Rv gene transduction protocol to more efficiently generate functional CAR-T cells by optimizing the period of pre-cultivation and antibody stimulation. In the improved protocol, gene transduction efficiency to murine T cells was more than 90%. In addition, almost all of the prepared murine T cells expressed CAR after puromycin selection. These CAR-T cells had antigen-specific cytotoxic activity and secreted multiple cytokines by antigen stimulation. We believe that our optimized gene transduction protocol for murine T cells contributes to the advancement of T cell biology and development of immunotherapy using genetically engineered T cells.

  6. T cell anergy and activation are associated with suboptimal humoral responses to measles revaccination in HIV-infected children on anti-retroviral therapy in Nairobi, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Buechler, M B; Newman, L P; Chohan, B H; Njoroge, A; Wamalwa, D; Farquhar, C

    2015-09-01

    HIV-infected children are less capable of mounting and maintaining protective humoral responses to vaccination against measles compared to HIV-uninfected children. This poses a public health challenge in countries with high HIV burdens. Administration of anti-retroviral therapy (ART) and revaccinating children against measles is one approach to increase measles immunity in HIV-infected children, yet it is not effective in all cases. Immune anergy and activation during HIV infection are factors that could influence responses to measles revaccination. We utilized a flow cytometry-based approach to examine whether T cell anergy and activation were associated with the maintenance of measles-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibodies generated in response to measles revaccination in a cohort of HIV-infected children on ART in Nairobi, Kenya. Children who sustained measles-specific IgG for at least 1 year after revaccination displayed significantly lower programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) surface expression on CD8(+) T cells on a per-cell basis and exhibited less activated CD4(+) T cells compared to those unable to maintain detectable measles-specific antibodies. Children in both groups were similar in age and sex, CD4(+) T cell frequency, duration of ART treatment and HIV viral load at enrolment. These data suggest that aberrant T cell anergy and activation are associated with the impaired ability to sustain an antibody response to measles revaccination in HIV-infected children on ART. PMID:25739813

  7. The captured retroviral envelope syncytin-A and syncytin-B genes are conserved in the Spalacidae together with hemotrichorial placentation.

    PubMed

    Vernochet, Cécile; Redelsperger, François; Harper, Francis; Souquere, Sylvie; Catzeflis, François; Pierron, Gérard; Nevo, Eviatar; Heidmann, Thierry; Dupressoir, Anne

    2014-12-01

    Syncytins are fusogenic envelope (env) genes of retroviral origin that have been captured for a function in placentation. Multiple independent events of syncytin gene capture were found to have occurred in primates, rodents, lagomorphs, carnivores, and ruminants. In the mouse, two syncytin-A and -B genes are present, which trigger the formation of the two-layered placental syncytiotrophoblast at the maternal-fetal interface, a structure classified as hemotrichorial. Here, we identified syncytin-A and -B orthologous genes in the genome of all Muroidea species analyzed, thus dating their capture back to about at least 40 million years ago, with evidence that they evolved under strong purifying selection. We further show, in the divergent Spalacidae lineage (blind mole rats [Spalax]), that both syncytins have conserved placenta-specific expression, as revealed by RT-PCR analysis of a panel of Spalax galili tissues, and display fusogenic activity, using ex vivo cell-cell fusion assays. Refined analysis of the placental architecture and ultrastructure revealed that the Spalax placenta displays a hemotrichorial organization of the interhemal membranes, as similarly observed for other Muroidea species, yet with only one trophoblastic cell layer being clearly syncytialized. In situ hybridization experiments further localized syncytin transcripts at the level of these differentiated interhemal membranes. These findings argue for a role of syncytin gene capture in the establishment of the original hemotrichorial placenta of Muroidea, and more generally in the diversity of placental structures among mammals.

  8. Phase I Trial of a Pathotropic Retroviral Vector Expressing a Cytocidal Cyclin G1 Construct (Rexin-G) in Patients With Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Galanis, Evanthia; Carlson, Stephanie K; Foster, Nathan R; Lowe, Val; Quevedo, Fernando; McWilliams, Robert R; Grothey, Axel; Jatoi, Aminah; Alberts, Steven R; Rubin, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Rexin-G is a pathotropic retroviral vector displaying a von Willebrand factor–targeting motif and expressing a dominant negative cyclin G1 gene. We undertook a phase I trial of intravenous (IV) administration of Rexin-G in patients with gemcitabine refractory, metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Twelve patients were treated. Dose escalation was performed from a dose of 1 × 1011 colony forming units (CFU) per cycle to 6 × 1011 CFU per cycle. The treatment was well tolerated. One dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) at dose level 2 (1.5 × 1011 CFU per cycle) was observed, consisting of grade 3 transaminitis. There was no detection of replication-competent virus in patients’ peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) or viral integration in DNA obtained from PBMCs, and no development of neutralizing antibodies. No evidence of antitumor activity was observed. The best objective response was progressive disease in 11 of the 12 study patients, while 1 patient showed radiographically stable disease with clinical deterioration and increase in the CA19.9 tumor marker. Median time to progression was 32 days. The median duration of survival of the study patients was 3.5 months from treatment initiation. Rexin-G is well tolerated in doses up to 6 × 1011 CFU in patients with recurrent pancreatic cancer, but there was no evidence of clinical antitumor activity. PMID:18388964

  9. Syncytin-A and syncytin-B, two fusogenic placenta-specific murine envelope genes of retroviral origin conserved in Muridae

    PubMed Central

    Dupressoir, Anne; Marceau, Geoffroy; Vernochet, Cécile; Bénit, Laurence; Kanellopoulos, Colette; Sapin, Vincent; Heidmann, Thierry

    2005-01-01

    Recently, we and others have identified two human endogenous retroviruses that entered the primate lineage 25–40 million years ago and that encode highly fusogenic retroviral envelope proteins (syncytin-1 and -2), possibly involved in the formation of the placenta syncytiotrophoblast layer generated by trophoblast cell fusion at the materno–fetal interface. A systematic in silico search throughout mouse genome databases presently identifies two fully coding envelope genes, present as unique copies and unrelated to any known murine endogenous retrovirus, that we named syncytin-A and -B. Quantitative RT-PCR demonstrates placenta-specific expression for both genes, with increasing transcript levels in this organ from 9.5 to 14.5 days postcoitum. In situ hybridization of placenta cryosections further localizes these transcripts in the syncytiotrophoblast-containing labyrinthine zona. Consistently, we show that both genes can trigger cell–cell fusion in ex vivo transfection assays, with distinct cell type specificities suggesting different receptor usage. Genes orthologous to syncytin-A and -B and disclosing a striking conservation of their coding status are found in all Muridae tested (mouse, rat, gerbil, vole, and hamster), dating their entry into the rodent lineage ≈20 million years ago. Together, these data strongly argue for a critical role of syncytin-A and -B in murine syncytiotrophoblast formation, thus unraveling a rather unique situation where two pairs of endogenous retroviruses, independently acquired by the primate and rodent lineages, would have been positively selected for a convergent physiological role. PMID:15644441

  10. Quantification of reverse transcriptase activity by real-time PCR as a fast and accurate method for titration of HIV, lenti- and retroviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Vermeire, Jolien; Naessens, Evelien; Vanderstraeten, Hanne; Landi, Alessia; Iannucci, Veronica; Van Nuffel, Anouk; Taghon, Tom; Pizzato, Massimo; Verhasselt, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Quantification of retroviruses in cell culture supernatants and other biological preparations is required in a diverse spectrum of laboratories and applications. Methods based on antigen detection, such as p24 for HIV, or on genome detection are virus specific and sometimes suffer from a limited dynamic range of detection. In contrast, measurement of reverse transcriptase (RT) activity is a generic method which can be adapted for higher sensitivity using real-time PCR quantification (qPCR-based product-enhanced RT (PERT) assay). We present an evaluation of a modified SYBR Green I-based PERT assay (SG-PERT), using commercially available reagents such as MS2 RNA and ready-to-use qPCR mixes. This assay has a dynamic range of 7 logs, a sensitivity of 10 nU HIV-1 RT and outperforms p24 ELISA for HIV titer determination by lower inter-run variation, lower cost and higher linear range. The SG-PERT values correlate with transducing and infectious units in HIV-based viral vector and replication-competent HIV-1 preparations respectively. This assay can furthermore quantify Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus-derived vectors and can be performed on different instruments, such as Roche Lightcycler® 480 and Applied Biosystems ABI 7300. We consider this test to be an accurate, fast and relatively cheap method for retroviral quantification that is easily implemented for use in routine and research laboratories.

  11. Simplified generation of high-titer retrovirus producer cells for clinically relevant retroviral vectors by reversible inclusion of a lox-P-flanked marker gene.

    PubMed

    Loew, Rainer; Selevsek, Nathalie; Fehse, Boris; von Laer, Dorothee; Baum, Christopher; Fauser, Axel; Kuehlcke, Klaus

    2004-05-01

    Retroviral producer cells are generated by the introduction of a viral genome into "helper" cell lines containing all the necessary components for viral packaging and the release of infectious particles. The selection of high-titer vector producer cells is most efficient if the vector genome encodes a selectable marker, while it is extremely tedious to select high-titer producer clones if the transgene cannot be detected and selected directly. Here we describe the development of a screening system that uses reversible integration of lox-P-flanked eGFP as a qualitative and quantitative marker gene in two different vector systems, greatly facilitating the selection of viral producer cells. After selection and titration of high-titer viral producer cells based on eGFP expression, the eGFP gene could be removed from the provirus by transient introduction of Cre-recombinase into the producer cells, thus allowing the production of therapeutic relevant vectors expressing solely the gene of interest. However, after removal of the marker gene a slight but consistent increase in viral titers compared to the respective control vectors was found, independent of the transgene or backbone used. The single lox-P site retained in the vector backbone does not affect gene expression level or fidelity of RNA processing.

  12. Retention of HIV-Infected Children in the First 12 Months of Anti-Retroviral Therapy and Predictors of Attrition in Resource Limited Settings: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Christiana; McFarland, Elizabeth J.

    2016-01-01

    Current UNAIDS goals aimed to end the AIDS epidemic set out to ensure that 90% of all people living with HIV know their status, 90% initiate and continue life-long anti-retroviral therapy (ART), and 90% achieve viral load suppression. In 2014 there were an estimated 2.6 million children under 15 years of age living with HIV, of which only one-third were receiving ART. Little literature exists describing retention of HIV-infected children in the first year on ART. We conducted a systematic search for English language publications reporting on retention of children with median age at ART initiation less than ten years in resource limited settings. The proportion of children retained in care on ART and predictors of attrition were identified. Twelve studies documented retention at one year ranging from 71–95% amongst 31877 African children. Among the 5558 children not retained, 4082 (73%) were reported as lost to follow up (LFU) and 1476 (27%) were confirmed to have died. No studies confirmed the outcomes of children LFU. Predictors of attrition included younger age, shorter duration of time on ART, and severe immunosuppression. In conclusion, significant attrition occurs in children in the first 12 months after ART initiation, the majority attributed to LFU, although true outcomes of children labeled as LFU are unknown. Focused efforts to ensure retention and minimize early mortality are needed as universal ART for children is scaled up. PMID:27280404

  13. The B30.2(SPRY) Domain of the Retroviral Restriction Factor TRIM5α Exhibits Lineage-Specific Length and Sequence Variation in Primates

    PubMed Central

    Song, Byeongwoon; Gold, Bert; O'hUigin, Colm; Javanbakht, Hassan; Li, Xing; Stremlau, Matthew; Winkler, Cheryl; Dean, Michael; Sodroski, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    Tripartite motif (TRIM) proteins are composed of RING, B-box 2, and coiled coil domains. Some TRIM proteins, such as TRIM5α, also possess a carboxy-terminal B30.2(SPRY) domain and localize to cytoplasmic bodies. TRIM5α has recently been shown to mediate innate intracellular resistance to retroviruses, an activity dependent on the integrity of the B30.2 domain, in particular primate species. An examination of the sequences of several TRIM proteins related to TRIM5 revealed the existence of four variable regions (v1, v2, v3, and v4) in the B30.2 domain. Species-specific variation in TRIM5α was analyzed by amplifying, cloning, and sequencing nonhuman primate TRIM5 orthologs. Lineage-specific expansion and sequential duplication occurred in the TRIM5α B30.2 v1 region in Old World primates and in v3 in New World monkeys. We observed substitution patterns indicative of selection bordering these particular B30.2 domain variable elements. These results suggest that occasional, complex changes were incorporated into the TRIM5α B30.2 domain at discrete time points during the evolution of primates. Some of these time points correspond to periods during which primates were exposed to retroviral infections, based on the appearance of particular endogenous retroviruses in primate genomes. The results are consistent with a role for TRIM5α in innate immunity against retroviruses. PMID:15857996

  14. Gypsy transposition correlates with the production of a retroviral envelope-like protein under the tissue-specific control of the Drosophila flamenco gene.

    PubMed

    Pélisson, A; Song, S U; Prud'homme, N; Smith, P A; Bucheton, A; Corces, V G

    1994-09-15

    Gypsy displays striking similarities to vertebrate retroviruses, including the presence of a yet uncharacterized additional open reading frame (ORF3) and the recent evidence for infectivity. It is mobilized with high frequency in the germline of the progeny of females homozygous for the flamenco permissive mutation. We report the characterization of a gypsy subgenomic ORF3 RNA encoding typical retroviral envelope proteins. In females, env expression is strongly repressed by one copy of the non-permissive allele of flamenco. A less dramatic reduction in the accumulation of other transcripts and retrotranscripts is also observed. These effects correlate well with the inhibition of gypsy transposition in the progeny of these females, and are therefore likely to be responsible for this phenomenon. The effects of flamenco on gypsy expression are apparently restricted to the somatic follicle cells that surround the maternal germline. Moreover, permissive follicle cells display a typically polarized distribution of gypsy RNAs and envelope proteins, both being mainly accumulated at the apical pole, close to the oocyte. We propose a model suggesting that gypsy germinal transposition might occur only in individuals that have maternally inherited enveloped gypsy particles due to infection of the maternal germline by the soma. PMID:7925283

  15. Efficient retroviral transduction of human B-lymphoid and myeloid progenitors: marked inhibition of their growth by the Pax5 transgene

    PubMed Central

    Sekine, Rieko; Kitamura, Toshio; Tsuji, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    We applied a coculture system for the genetic manipulation of human B-lymphoid and myeloid progenitor cells using murine bone marrow stromal cell support, and investigated the effects of forced Pax5 expression in both cell types. Cytokine-stimulated cord blood CD34+ cells could be transduced at 85% efficiency and 95% cell viability by a single 24-h infection with RD114-pseudotyped retroviral vectors, produced by the packaging cell line Plat-F and bicistronic vector plasmids pMXs-Ig, pMYs-Ig, or pMCs-Ig, encoding EGFP. Infected CD34+ cells were seeded onto HESS-5 cells in the presence of stem cell factor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, allowing the extensive production of B progenitors and granulocytic cells. We examined the cell number and CD34, CD33, CD19, and CD20 lambda and kappa expressions by flow cytometry. Ectopic expression of Pax5 in CD34+ cells resulted in small myeloid progenitors coexpressing CD33 and CD19 and inhibited myeloid differentiation. After 6 weeks, the number of Pax5-transduced CD19+ cells was 40-fold lower than that of control cells. However, the expression of CD20 and the κ/λ chain on Pax5-transduced CD19+ cells suggests that the Pax5 transgene may not interfere with their differentiation. This report is the first to describe the effects of forced Pax5 expression in human hematopoietic progenitors. PMID:18415655

  16. A highly efficient retroviral vector allows detection of the transforming activity of the human c-fps/fes proto-oncogene.

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, R A; Lowy, D R; Vass, W C; Velu, T J

    1989-01-01

    We have constructed an efficient new retroviral vector containing strong promoting elements derived from the Friend murine leukemia virus (F-MuLV) long terminal repeat (LTR) and have used the vector to demonstrate that overexpression of human c-fps/fes can transform established mouse cells. When a c-fps/fes cDNA was cloned into the vector, this viral DNA and the recovered virus induced very high levels of the c-fps/fes product NCP92 and tumorigenic transformation of NIH 3T3 cells. Compared with an isogenic vector under control of a Moloney MuLV-derived LTR, the vector driven by the F-MuLV LTR induced 3- to 10-times-higher levels of expression of c-fps/fes, a higher level of phosphotyrosine in cellular proteins, and a virus whose transforming activity was 2 orders of magnitude greater. We conclude (i) that normal c-fps/fes can induce morphologic transformation and that its transforming activity is a function of the level of expression of NCP92 and (ii) that the vector based on the F-MuLV LTR is more efficient than the vector driven by a Moloney MuLV LTR in inducing high levels of expression and measurable biological activity. Images PMID:2685357

  17. Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells in the Duodenum of Individuals Diagnosed with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis Are Uniquely Immunoreactive to Antibodies to Human Endogenous Retroviral Proteins

    PubMed Central

    De Meirleir, Kenny L.; Khaiboullina, Svetlana F.; Frémont, Marc; Hulstaert, Jan; Rizvanov, Albert A.; Palotás, András; Lombardi, Vincent C.

    2013-01-01

    Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) is a debilitating illness of unknown etiology characterized by neurocognitive dysfunction, inflammation, immune abnormalities and gastrointestinal distress. An increasing body of evidence suggests that disruptions in the gut may contribute to the induction of neuroinflammation. Therefore, reports of human endogenous retroviral (HERV) expression in association with neuroinflammatory diseases prompted us to investigate the gut of individuals with ME for the presence of HERV proteins. In eight out of 12 individuals with ME, immunoreactivity to HERV proteins was observed in duodenal biopsies. In contrast, no immunoreactivity was detected in any of the eight controls. Immunoreactivity to HERV Gag and Env proteins was uniquely co-localized in hematopoietic cells expressing the C-type lectin receptor CLEC4C (CD303/BDCA2), the co-stimulatory marker CD86 and the class II major histocompatibility complex HLA-DR, consistent with plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). Although the significance of HERVs present in the pDCs of individuals with ME has yet to be determined, these data raise the possibility of an involvment of pDCs and HERVs in ME pathology. To our knowledge, this report describes the first direct association between pDCs and HERVs in human disease. PMID:23422476

  18. Quantification of Reverse Transcriptase Activity by Real-Time PCR as a Fast and Accurate Method for Titration of HIV, Lenti- and Retroviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Vermeire, Jolien; Naessens, Evelien; Vanderstraeten, Hanne; Landi, Alessia; Iannucci, Veronica; Van Nuffel, Anouk; Taghon, Tom; Pizzato, Massimo; Verhasselt, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Quantification of retroviruses in cell culture supernatants and other biological preparations is required in a diverse spectrum of laboratories and applications. Methods based on antigen detection, such as p24 for HIV, or on genome detection are virus specific and sometimes suffer from a limited dynamic range of detection. In contrast, measurement of reverse transcriptase (RT) activity is a generic method which can be adapted for higher sensitivity using real-time PCR quantification (qPCR-based product-enhanced RT (PERT) assay). We present an evaluation of a modified SYBR Green I-based PERT assay (SG-PERT), using commercially available reagents such as MS2 RNA and ready-to-use qPCR mixes. This assay has a dynamic range of 7 logs, a sensitivity of 10 nU HIV-1 RT and outperforms p24 ELISA for HIV titer determination by lower inter-run variation, lower cost and higher linear range. The SG-PERT values correlate with transducing and infectious units in HIV-based viral vector and replication-competent HIV-1 preparations respectively. This assay can furthermore quantify Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus-derived vectors and can be performed on different instruments, such as Roche Lightcycler® 480 and Applied Biosystems ABI 7300. We consider this test to be an accurate, fast and relatively cheap method for retroviral quantification that is easily implemented for use in routine and research laboratories. PMID:23227216

  19. Mechanism of B-box 2 domain-mediated higher-order assembly of the retroviral restriction factor TRIM5α

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Jonathan M; Roganowicz, Marcin D; Skorupka, Katarzyna; Alam, Steven L; Christensen, Devin; Doss, Ginna; Wan, Yueping; Frank, Gabriel A; Ganser-Pornillos, Barbie K; Sundquist, Wesley I; Pornillos, Owen

    2016-01-01

    Restriction factors and pattern recognition receptors are important components of intrinsic cellular defenses against viral infection. Mammalian TRIM5α proteins are restriction factors and receptors that target the capsid cores of retroviruses and activate ubiquitin-dependent antiviral responses upon capsid recognition. Here, we report crystallographic and functional studies of the TRIM5α B-box 2 domain, which mediates higher-order assembly of TRIM5 proteins. The B-box can form both dimers and trimers, and the trimers can link multiple TRIM5α proteins into a hexagonal net that matches the lattice arrangement of capsid subunits and enables avid capsid binding. Two modes of conformational flexibility allow TRIM5α to accommodate the variable curvature of retroviral capsids. B-box mediated interactions also modulate TRIM5α’s E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, by stereochemically restricting how the N-terminal RING domain can dimerize. Overall, these studies define important molecular details of cellular recognition of retroviruses, and how recognition links to downstream processes to disable the virus. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16309.001 PMID:27253059

  20. Cost estimates of HIV care and treatment with and without anti-retroviral therapy at Arba Minch Hospital in southern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Bikilla, Asfaw Demissie; Jerene, Degu; Robberstad, Bjarne; Lindtjorn, Bernt

    2009-01-01

    Background Little is known about the costs of HIV care in Ethiopia. Objective To estimate the average per person year (PPY) cost of care for HIV patients with and without anti-retroviral therapy (ART) in a district hospital. Methods Data on costs and utilization of HIV-related services were taken from Arba Minch Hospital (AMH) in southern Ethiopia. Mean annual outpatient and inpatient costs and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. We adopted a district hospital perspective and focused on hospital costs. Findings PPY average (95% CI) costs under ART were US$235.44 (US$218.11–252.78) and US$29.44 (US$24.30–34.58) for outpatient and inpatient care, respectively. Estimates for the non-ART condition were US$38.12 (US$34.36–41.88) and US$80.88 (US$63.66–98.11) for outpatient and inpatient care, respectively. The major cost driver under the ART scheme was cost of ART drugs, whereas it was inpatient care and treatment in the non-ART scheme. Conclusion The cost profile of ART at a district hospital level may be useful in the planning and budgeting of implementing ART programs in Ethiopia. Further studies that focus on patient costs are warranted to capture all patterns of service use and relevant costs. Economic evaluations combining cost estimates with clinical outcomes would be useful for ranking of ART services. PMID:19364399

  1. Impaired phagocytosis among patients infected by the human immunodeficiency virus: implication for a role of highly active anti-retroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Michailidis, C; Giannopoulos, G; Vigklis, V; Armenis, K; Tsakris, A; Gargalianos, P

    2012-01-01

    In patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, neutrophil and monocyte functions, including phagocytosis, are impaired. The purpose of this study was to investigate changes of phagocytic function and respiratory burst occurring over the course of patients infected by the HIV-1 virus. Treatment-naive patients (group B), patients receiving highly active anti-retroviral treatment (HAART) (group C) and patients in which HAART has failed (group D) were studied and compared with healthy volunteers (group A). Phagocytosis and oxidative burst were evaluated using commercially available kits. Results clearly denote a significant decrease of the phagocytic function of both cell types of groups B and C compared with group A. Among group C patients, those in the upper quartile of CD4 increase had higher oxidative burst compared with patients of the other quartiles. In addition, comparisons clearly showed a lower degree of phagocytic function and of oxidative burst of both monocytes and neutrophils of group D compared with group B. Finally, it was found that monocyte and neutrophil function was correlated inversely to the change in viral load, i.e. the greater the decrease of viral load, the better the phagocytic and oxidative activity. Innate immunity defects appear to be present in HIV-positive patients, regarding phagocytic activity and oxidative burst of monocytes and neutrophils. These defects are greatly influenced by the level of treatment efficacy, with emphasis on CD4 cell counts and viral load. PMID:22288593

  2. Immune stimulatory potential of B7.1 and B7.2 retrovirally transduced melanoma cells: suppression by interleukin 10.

    PubMed Central

    Dummer, R.; Yue, F. Y.; Pavlovic, J.; Geertsen, R.; Döhring, C.; Moelling, K.; Burg, G.

    1998-01-01

    The immunostimulatory capacities of B7.1-and B7.2- expressing melanoma cells were investigated. A365, 960306 and 950504 melanomas, established from nodular melanoma lesions, were retrovirally transduced. Irradiated B7-, B7.1+ and B7.2+ melanoma cells were co-cultured with autologous or allogeneic peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Proliferation was assessed by [3H]thymidine uptake. mRNA encoding for interleukin 2 (IL-2), IL-4, IL-10 and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) was determined. IFN-gamma, IL-2, IL-4 and IL-10 secretion were quantitated by ELISA. B7.1+ and B7.2+ melanomas induced proliferation of PBMCs and mRNA for IL-2 and IFN-gamma. After co-incubation of transduced melanoma cells with PBMCs, high levels of IL-10 were detectable in the supernatant. The presence of neutralizing anti-IL-10 antibodies resulted in enhanced proliferation and IL-2 and IFN-gamma secretion. Our data indicate that B7.1- and B7.2-transduced melanoma cells trigger lymphocytic proliferation with transcription of IL-10, IL-2 and IFN-gamma. Blocking of IL-10 augments these effects. Gene therapy protocols using tumour cells as a vaccine have to consider the adverse effects of IL-10. Images Figure 3 PMID:9652756

  3. A Modular Lentiviral and Retroviral Construction System to Rapidly Generate Vectors for Gene Expression and Gene Knockdown In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Geiling, Benjamin; Vandal, Guillaume; Posner, Ada R.; de Bruyns, Angeline; Dutchak, Kendall L.; Garnett, Samantha; Dankort, David

    2013-01-01

    The ability to express exogenous cDNAs while suppressing endogenous genes via RNAi represents an extremely powerful research tool with the most efficient non-transient approach being accomplished through stable viral vector integration. Unfortunately, since traditional restriction enzyme based methods for constructing such vectors are sequence dependent, their construction is often difficult and not amenable to mass production. Here we describe a non-sequence dependent Gateway recombination cloning system for the rapid production of novel lentiviral (pLEG) and retroviral (pREG) vectors. Using this system to recombine 3 or 4 modular plasmid components it is possible to generate viral vectors expressing cDNAs with or without inhibitory RNAs (shRNAmirs). In addition, we demonstrate a method to rapidly produce and triage novel shRNAmirs for use with this system. Once strong candidate shRNAmirs have been identified they may be linked together in tandem to knockdown expression of multiple targets simultaneously or to improve the knockdown of a single target. Here we demonstrate that these recombinant vectors are able to express cDNA and effectively knockdown protein expression using both cell culture and animal model systems. PMID:24146852

  4. Structural and Kinetic Characterization of Thymidine Kinase from Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Recio, Eliseo; Nettleship, Joanne E.; Rada, Heather; González-Pacanowska, Dolores; Wilson, Keith S.

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania spp. is a protozoan parasite and the causative agent of leishmaniasis. Thymidine kinase (TK) catalyses the transfer of the γ-phosphate of ATP to 2’-deoxythymidine (dThd) forming thymidine monophosphate (dTMP). L. major Type II TK (LmTK) has been previously shown to be important for infectivity of the parasite and therefore has potential as a drug target for anti-leishmanial therapy. In this study, we determined the enzymatic properties and the 3D structures of holo forms of the enzyme. LmTK efficiently phosphorylates dThd and dUrd and has high structural homology to TKs from other species. However, it significantly differs in its kinetic properties from Trypanosoma brucei TK since purines are not substrates of the enzyme and dNTPs such as dUTP inhibit LmTK. The enzyme had Km and kcat values for dThd of 1.1 μM and 2.62 s-1 and exhibits cooperative binding for ATP. Additionally, we show that the anti-retroviral prodrug zidovudine (3-azido-3-deoxythymidine, AZT) and 5’-modified dUrd can be readily phosphorylated by LmTK. The production of recombinant enzyme at a level suitable for structural studies was achieved by the construction of C-terminal truncated versions of the enzyme and the use of a baculoviral expression system. The structures of the catalytic core of LmTK in complex with dThd, the negative feedback regulator dTTP and the bi-substrate analogue AP5dT, were determined to 2.74, 3.00 and 2.40 Å, respectively, and provide the structural basis for exclusion of purines and dNTP inhibition. The results will aid the process of rational drug design with LmTK as a potential target for anti-leishmanial drugs. PMID:25978379

  5. Genotoxicity profile of azidothymidine in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Andreas; Koenig, Julie; Schmitt, Georg; Singer, Thomas; Guérard, Melanie

    2013-10-01

    Azidothymidine (Zidovudine, AZT) is part of the standard care of treatment for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome since many years. A great number of studies on the genotoxic potential of AZT have been published, but no comprehensive hypothesis yet explains all observations. We investigated a multitude of genotoxic endpoints, both in vitro and in vivo, with the goal to complete the picture. The mutagenic potential of AZT in bacteria was found to be restricted to strains with an "ochre" target sequence and could be abrogated both by thymidine supplementation and rat liver S9 mix. Single-strand breaks in mammalian cells were detected in the comet assay after short-term treatment (3h) with AZT, which did not induce micronuclei. The latter were mainly seen after prolonged exposure (24 and 48h) and are probably not directly related to AZT incorporation into DNA. Our data demonstrate that short-term exposure to low AZT concentrations does not induce biologically relevant micronucleation. Only treatment with high concentrations of AZT for prolonged time periods manifests in substantial micronucleus induction. Furthermore, we found that high concentrations of thymidine have no effect in the comet assay but increase micronucleus frequency in a manner very similar to AZT. These results lead us to the following hypothesis: AZT is triphosphorylated and then incorporated into DNA strands, leading to mutations and cytotoxicity. Cellular attempts to repair these DNA lesions as well as stalled replication forks due to chain termination are detectable with the comet assay. Increased micronucleus frequency is likely related to nucleotide pool imbalance. PMID:23811827

  6. SIV antigen immunization induces transient antigen-specific T cell responses and selectively activates viral replication in draining lymph nodes in retroviral suppressed rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background HIV infection causes a qualitative and quantitative loss of CD4+ T cell immunity. The institution of anti-retroviral therapy (ART) restores CD4+ T cell responses to many pathogens, but HIV-specific responses remain deficient. Similarly, therapeutic immunization with HIV antigens of chronically infected, ART treated subjects results in poor induction of HIV-specific CD4 responses. In this study, we used a macaque model of ART treatment during chronic infection to study the virologic consequences of SIV antigen stimulation in lymph nodes early after immunization. Rhesus CMV (RhCMV) seropositive, Mamu A*01 positive rhesus macaques were chronically infected with SIVmac251 and treated with ART. The immune and viral responses to SIV gag and RhCMV pp65 antigen immunization in draining lymph nodes and peripheral blood were analyzed. Animals were immunized on contralateral sides with SIV gag and RhCMV pp65 encoding plasmids, which allowed lymph nodes draining each antigen to be obtained at the same time from the same animal for direct comparison. Results We observed that both SIV and RhCMV immunizations stimulated transient antigen-specific T cell responses in draining lymph nodes. The RhCMV-specific responses were potent and sustained (50 days post-immunization) in the periphery, while the SIV-specific responses were transient and extinguished quickly. The SIV antigen stimulation selectively induced transient SIV replication in draining lymph nodes. Conclusions The data are consistent with a model whereby viral replication in response to SIV antigen stimulation limits the generation of SIV antigen-specific responses and suggests a potential mechanism for the early loss and poor HIV-specific CD4+ T cell response observed in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:21752277

  7. In vivo selection of CD4(+) T cells transduced with a gamma-retroviral vector expressing a single-chain intrabody targeting HIV-1 tat.

    PubMed

    Braun, Stephen E; Taube, Ran; Zhu, Quan; Wong, Fay Eng; Murakami, Akikazu; Kamau, Erick; Dwyer, Markryan; Qiu, Gang; Daigle, Janet; Carville, Angela; Johnson, R Paul; Marasco, Wayne A

    2012-09-01

    We evaluated the potential of an anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Tat intrabody (intracellular antibody) to promote the survival of CD4(+) cells after chimeric simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)/HIV (SHIV) infection in rhesus macaques. Following optimization of stimulation and transduction conditions, purified CD4(+) T cells were transduced with GaLV-pseudotyped retroviral vectors expressing either an anti-HIV-1 Tat or a control single-chain intrabody. Ex vivo intrabody-gene marking was highly efficient, averaging four copies per CD4(+) cell. Upon reinfusion of engineered autologous CD4(+) cells into two macaques, high levels of gene marking (peak of 0.6% and 6.8% of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and 0.3% or 2.2% of the lymph node cells) were detected in vivo. One week post cell infusion, animals were challenged with SHIV 89.6p and the ability of the anti-HIV Tat intrabody to promote cell survival was evaluated. The frequency of genetically modified CD4(+) T cells progressively decreased, concurrent with loss of CD4(+) cells and elevated viral loads in both animals. However, CD4(+) T cells expressing the therapeutic anti-Tat intrabody exhibited a relative survival advantage over an 8- and 21-week period compared with CD4(+) cells expressing a control intrabody. In one animal, this survival benefit of anti-Tat transduced cells was associated with a reduction in viral load. Overall, these results indicate that a retrovirus-mediated anti-Tat intrabody provided significant levels of gene marking in PBMCs and peripheral tissues and increased relative survival of transduced cells in vivo.

  8. Delayed initiation of anti-retroviral therapy in TB/HIV co-infected patients, Sanyati District, Zimbabwe, 2011-2012

    PubMed Central

    Maponga, Brian Abel; Chirundu, Daniel; Gombe, Notion Tafara; Tshimanga, Mufuta; Bangure, Donewell; Takundwa, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculosis (TB) remains a public health problem and is driven by HIV. Recent studies indicate that anti-retroviral therapy (ART) initiated during the first two months of anti-TB treatment (ATT) reduces risk of HIV morbidity and mortality. In Sanyati district, 14% of TB/HIV co-infected patients were initiated on ART during TB treatment, in 2010. The study was conducted to determine the magnitude and determinants of delay in ART initiation, in TB/HIV co-infected patients. Methods An analytic cross sectional study was conducted at three study sites in Sanyati district. The outcome was delayed ART initiation, being failure to be initiated on ART during the first two months of ATT. Respondents were interviewed using pre-tested questionnaires. Epi-Info™ was used to generate frequencies, means, odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Stratified and logistic regression analysis was done. Results Of the 186 respondents, 63% had delayed ART initiation. Median delay from initiation of ATT to ART was 48 days (Q1=20; Q3=82). Risk factors for delayed ART initiation were: being treated for TB first time, AOR=2.23 (p=0.03); initially registered for HIV care outside Sanyati, AOR=3.08 (p<0.01); staying more than 5km from a clinic, AOR=3.29 (p<0.01). Enabling factors for early ART initiation was having a family member on ART, AOR=0.23 (p<0.01). Conclusion Significant delay and barriers to ART initiation were identified. Decentralization of ART initiation should be expedited. ART initiation should be expedited in patients with identified risk factors for delaying ART initiation. Peer support should be strengthened in families and community. Periodic evaluation of magnitude of delay and impact of early ART initiation in TB/HIV patients is recommended. PMID:26401222

  9. Dendritic cells retrovirally overexpressing IL-12 induce strong Th1 responses to inhaled antigen in the lung but fail to revert established Th2 sensitization.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, Harmjan; Heirman, Carlo; Hijdra, Daniëlle; Muskens, Femke; Willart, Monique; van Meirvenne, Sonja; Thielemans, Kris; Hoogsteden, Henk C; Lambrecht, Bart N

    2004-11-01

    It has been postulated that low-level interleukin (IL)-12 production of antigen-presenting cells is associated with the risk of developing atopic asthma. To study the relationship between IL-12 production capacity of dendritic cells (DCs) and development of T helper type 2 (Th2) responses in the lung, we genetically engineered DCs to constutively overexpress bioactive IL-12. Retrovirally mediated overexpression of IL-12 in DCs strongly polarized naive ovalbumin (OVA)-specific CD4+ T cells toward Th1 effector cells in vitro. After intratracheal injection, OVA-pulsed IL-12-overexpressing DCs failed to induce Th2 responses in vivo and no longer primed mice for Th2-dependent eosinophilic airway inflammation upon OVA aerosol challenge, readily observed in mice immunized with sham-transfected, OVA-pulsed DCs. Analysis of a panel of cytokines and chemokines in the lung demonstrated that the lack of Th2 sensitization was accompanied by increased production of the Th1 cytokine interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), chemokines induced by IFN-gamma, and the immunoregulatory cytokine IL-10. When Th2 priming was induced using OVA/alum prior to intratracheal DC administration, DCs constitutively expressing IL-12 were no longer capable of preventing eosinophilic airway inflammation and even enhanced it. These data show directly that high-level expression of IL-12 in DCs prevents the development of Th2 sensitization. Enhancing IL-12 production in DCs should be seen as a primary prevention strategy for atopic disorders. Enhancing IL-12 production in DCs is less likely to be of benefit in already Th2-sensitized individuals. PMID:15316032

  10. Critical Variables affecting clinical-grade production of the self-inactivating gamma-retroviral vector for the treatment of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    van der Loo, JCM; Swaney, WP; Grassman, E; Terwilliger, A; Higashimoto, T; Schambach, A; Hacein-Bey-Abina, S; Nordling, DL; Cavazzana-Calvo, M; Thrasher, AJ; Williams, DA; Reeves, L; Malik, P

    2014-01-01

    Patients with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) were successfully cured following gene therapy with a gamma-retroviral vector (gRV) expressing the common gamma chain of the interleukin-2 receptor (IL2RG). However, 5 of 20 patients developed leukemia from activation of cellular proto-oncogenes by viral enhancers in the long-terminal repeats (LTR) of the integrated vector. These events prompted the design of a gRV vector with self-inactivating (SIN) LTRs to enhance vector safety. Herein we report on the production of a clinical-grade SIN IL2RG gRV pseudotyped with the Gibbon Ape Leukemia Virus envelope for a new gene therapy trial for SCID-X1, and highlight variables that were found to be critical for transfection-based large-scale SIN gRV production. Successful clinical production required careful selection of culture medium without pre-added glutamine, reduced exposure of packaging cells to cell-dissociation enzyme, and presence of cations in wash buffer. The clinical vector was high titer; transduced 68–70% normal human CD34 + cells, as determined by colony-forming unit assays and by xenotransplantation in immunodeficient NOD.CB17-Prkdcscid/J (nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID)) and NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ (NOD/SCID gamma (NSG))) mice; and resulted in the production of T cells in vitro from human SCID-X1 CD34 + cells. The vector was certified and released for the treatment of SCID-X1 in a multi-center international phase I/II trial. PMID:22551777

  11. Adherence to anti-retroviral therapy & factors associated with it: a community based cross-sectional study from West Bengal, India

    PubMed Central

    Pahari, Sobha; Roy, Sitesh; Mandal, Alpana; Kuila, Shymal; Panda, Samiran

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Failure to adhere to anti-retroviral therapy (ART) can lead to a range of unfavourable consequences impacting upon people living with HIV (PLH) and society. It is, therefore, paramount that ART adherence is measured in a reliable manner and factors associated with adherence are identified. Lack of such data from West Bengal necessitated undertaking the current study. Methods: Participants were included during August-October, 2011 from three Drop-In-Centres (DICs) from the three districts of West Bengal, India. ART-adherence was calculated by using formula based on pill-count and records collected from ART-card in possession of each of the 128 consenting adult PLH. Information on self-reported adherence, socio-demography, and adherence influencing issues was also collected through interviewer-administered questionnaire. Results: Of the 128 PLH, 99 (77%) and 93 (73%) PLH had ≥90 per cent and ≥95 per cent adherence, respectively to ART. Conversely, subjective reporting captured much higher proportion of PLH as ‘well adherent’; a finding having implications for ongoing ART programme. Factors, independently associated with poor adherence (<90%), were ‘7th to 12th month period of ART intake’ (adjusted OR=9.5; 90% CI 1.9 - 47.3; P=0.02) and ‘non-disclosure of HIV status to family members’ (adjusted OR=4; 90% CI 1.3 - 13; P=0.05. Results at 95 per cent adherence cut-off were similar. Interpretation & conclusions: Enabling environment, which would encourage people to disclose their HIV status and in turn seek adherence partners from families and beyond and ongoing adherence-counselling appear to be important issues in the programme. Relevance of these study findings in wider context is conceivable. PMID:26458346

  12. Self-reported side-effects of anti-retroviral treatment among IDUs: a 7-year longitudinal study (APROCO-COPILOTE COHORT ANRS CO-8).

    PubMed

    Carrieri, Maria Patrizia; Villes, Virginie; Raffi, François; Protopopescu, Camelia; Preau, Marie; Salmon, Dominique; Taieb, Audrey; Lang, Jean-Marie; Verdon, Renaud; Chene, Geneviève; Spire, Bruno

    2007-08-01

    The introduction of potent anti-retroviral treatment (ART) has transformed HIV disease into a chronic condition with the prospect, for the patient, of strict adherence to effective but life-long treatments. Within this framework, a major issue that can negatively affect adherence is the side-effects of the treatment. To date, studies documenting how individuals HIV-infected through drug injection (IDUs) experience ART-related side effects are sparse. Longitudinal data collected from the APROCO-COPILOTE cohort have been used to compare the experience of ART-related side-effects who have been HIV-infected via injecting drug use and non-IDU patients. A 20-item list was used to collect self-reported side-effects over a 7-year follow up period. Of 922 patients, 15% were IDUs. At any given visit, IDUs reported a significantly higher number of side-effects and had approximately twice the risk of reporting any side effect than non-IDUs. Most commonly reported side-effects were dry skin, fatigue, vomiting, bone troubles, insomnia. After adjustment for social conditions, depressive symptoms, use of sleeping pills and time since HIV diagnosis, IDUs reported experiencing significantly more side-effects than non-IDUs. Whether or not this is related to sensitivity to pain or to other comorbidities is difficult to establish. Further research is needed to understand how substitution treatment can mediate the relationship between exposure to opioids and side-effects. Providing appropriate care to reduce side-effects, thereby increasing adherence to ART in this population, remains a major challenge especially in those countries scaling up ART. Incorporating symptom management and improving access to analgesic medications within a model of comprehensive care for HIV-infected IDUs, could reduce the impact of drug-related and HIV-related harms and induce better long-term treatment outcomes and quality of life. PMID:17689377

  13. 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine drug interactions. Screening for inhibitors in human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Rajaonarison, J F; Lacarelle, B; Catalin, J; Placidi, M; Rahmani, R

    1992-01-01

    Zidovudine is a widely used antiretroviral drug active against human immunodeficiency virus. The drug interactions of this compound, which are primarily eliminated as a glucuronide, have not yet been extensively studied. Because zidovudine is frequently combined with other drugs, complete knowledge of interactions is essential to optimize AIDS therapy. We therefore screened the effect of 55 molecules, representative of 20 different therapeutic classes, on 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT) glucuronidation by human liver microsomes. We demonstrate that many drugs caused more than 15% inhibition of AZT glucuronidation in vitro, whereas major antibiotics (ceftazidine, isoniazid, aminoglycosides, macrolides, and sulfamides), antivirals (2',3'-dideoxycytidine, 2',3'-dideoxyinosine, and acyclovir), flucytosine, metronidazole, acetaminophen, and ranitidine had no effect. For compounds that appeared to inhibit AZT glucuronidation, extrapolation to the clinical situation must take into account both the in vitro apparent Ki values and the usual expected plasma level for the coadministered drug. By considering these parameters, this work indicates that clinically relevant inhibition of AZT glucuronidation may be observed with the following drugs: cefoperazone, penicillin G, amoxicilin, piperacillin, chloramphenicol, vancomycin, miconazole, rifampicin, phenobarbital, carbamazepine, phenytoin, valproic acid, quinidine, phenylbutazone, ketoprofen, probenecid, and propofol. Complementary clinical and pharmacokinetic studies should be performed to validate these assumptions.

  14. Feasibility of Performing Multiple Point of Care Testing for HIV Anti-Retroviral Treatment Initiation and Monitoring from Multiple or Single Fingersticks

    PubMed Central

    Gous, Natasha; Scott, Lesley; Potgieter, Joachim; Ntabeni, Lumka; Enslin, Sharon; Newman, Ronel; Stevens, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    Background Point of Care testing (POCT) provides on-site, rapid, accessible results. With current South African anti-retroviral treatment guidelines, up to 4 fingersticks /patient/clinic visit could be required if utilizing POC. We determined the feasibility and accuracy of a nurse performing multiple POCT on multiple fingersticks followed by simplification of the process by performance of multiple POC on a single fingerstick. Method and Findings Random HIV positive adult patients presenting at a HIV treatment clinic in South Africa, for ART initiation/ monitoring, were approached to participate in the study between April-June 2012. Phase I: n=150 patients approached for multiple POCT on multiple fingersticks. Phase II: n=150 patients approached for multiple POCT on a single fingerstick. The following POC tests were performed by a dedicated nurse: PIMA (CD4), HemoCue (hemoglobin), Reflotron (alanine aminotransferase, creatinine). A venepuncture specimen was taken for predicate laboratory methodology. Normal laboratory ranges and Royal College of Pathologists Australasia (RCPA) allowable differences were used as guidelines for comparison. In 67% of participants, ≥3 tests were requested per visit. All POCT were accurate but ranged in variability. Phase I: Hemoglobin was accurate (3.2%CV) while CD4, alanine aminotransferase and creatinine showed increased variability (16.3%CV; 9.3%CV; 12.9%CV respectively). PIMA generated a misclassification of 12.4%. Phase II: Hemoglobin, alanine aminotransferase and creatinine showed good accuracy (3.2%CV, 8.7%CV, 6.4%CV respectively) with increased variability on CD4 (12.4%CV) but low clinical misclassification (4.1%). No trends were observed for the sequence in which POC was performed on a single fingerstick. Overall, PIMA CD4 generated the highest error rate (16-19%). Conclusions Multiple POCT for ART initiation and/or monitoring can be performed practically by a dedicated nurse on multiple fingersticks. The process is as

  15. A replication-competent retrovirus arising from a split-function packaging cell line was generated by recombination events between the vector, one of the packaging constructs, and endogenous retroviral sequences.

    PubMed

    Chong, H; Starkey, W; Vile, R G

    1998-04-01

    Previously we reported the presence of a replication-competent retrovirus in supernatant from a vector-producing line derived from a widely used split-function amphotropic packaging cell line. Rigorous routine screening of all retroviral stocks produced in our laboratory has not, previously or since, indicated the presence of such a virus. Replication-competent retroviruses have never previously been used in our laboratory, and stringent screening of all routinely used cell lines has not revealed the presence of any helper viruses. Therefore, it is highly unlikely that this virus represents an adventitious cross-contaminant or had been imported unknowingly with our cell line stocks. PCR studies with DNA from infected cell lines and Northern blot analysis and reverse transcriptase PCR with RNA from infected cells suggest that the helper virus arose by recombination events, at sites of partial homology, between sequences in the vector, one of the packaging constructs, and endogenous retroviral elements. These recombinations were not present in stocks of the packaging cell line or in an initial stock of the vector-producing line, indicating that these events occurred while the vector-producing line was being passaged for harvest of supernatant stocks. PMID:9525583

  16. Cost-effectiveness of models for prevention of vertical HIV transmission – voluntary counseling and testing and choices of drug regimen

    PubMed Central

    Teerawattananon, Yot; Vos, Theo; Tangcharoensathien, Viroj; Mugford, Miranda

    2005-01-01

    Objectives From a health care provider prospective, to assess the cost-effectiveness of four Antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens given in addition to voluntary counselling and testing (VCT) for preventing mother-to-child transmission of HIV: a) Zidovudine (AZT); b) Nevirapine (NVP); c) a combination of AZT for early antenatal attenders and NVP for late arrivals; and d) combined administration of AZT and NVP and to assess the incremental cost-effectiveness of adding a second VCT session in late pregnancy. Design & Setting We examine a hypothetical cohort of 100,000 pregnancies as a decision model. Cost and outcome parameters are estimated as they would apply under Thai routine health service conditions. Effectiveness probabilities are based on best available evidence, from systematic reviews where possible. The main outcome is the number of cases of paediatric HIV averted. Results The combining administration of AZT and NVP is the most cost-effective drug option. One VCT session with AZT+NVP averts 337 cases of infection at 556 USD per case averted, while two VCT with the same drug regimen averts 16 additional cases at cost of 1,266 USD per infection averted. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of moving from 1VCT, AZT+NVP to 2VCT, AZT+NVP is 16,000 USD per additional averted case, which is much lower than the recommended threshold value for HIV infection averted in Thailand. Multivariate uncertainty analysis supports the findings, showing that at a threshold of 35,000 USD, 2VCT, AZT+NVP is preferable to other VCT and drug strategies. Conclusion Interventions for preventing mother-to-child transmission of HIV are cost-effective. Further costs and negative effects of drug resistance, are unlikely to outweigh the social benefits of reduce transmission of HIV. This model suggests that the new drug regimen is a cost-effective option in the Thai health system at currently accepted thresholds for adopting health technologies. PMID:16026626

  17. Plant thymidine kinase 1: a novel efficient suicide gene for malignant glioma therapy.

    PubMed

    Khan, Zahidul; Knecht, Wolfgang; Willer, Mette; Rozpedowska, Elzbieta; Kristoffersen, Peter; Clausen, Anders Ranegaard; Munch-Petersen, Birgitte; Almqvist, Per M; Gojkovic, Zoran; Piskur, Jure; Ekström, Tomas J

    2010-06-01

    The prognosis for malignant gliomas remains poor, and new treatments are urgently needed. Targeted suicide gene therapy exploits the enzymatic conversion of a prodrug, such as a nucleoside analog, into a cytotoxic compound. Although this therapeutic strategy has been considered a promising regimen for central nervous system (CNS) tumors, several obstacles have been encountered such as inefficient gene transfer to the tumor cells, limited prodrug penetration into the CNS, and inefficient enzymatic activity of the suicide gene. We report here the cloning and successful application of a novel thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) from the tomato plant, with favorable characteristics in vitro and in vivo. This enzyme (toTK1) is highly specific for the nucleoside analog prodrug zidovudine (azidothymidine, AZT), which is known to penetrate the blood-brain barrier. An important feature of toTK1 is that it efficiently phosphorylates its substrate AZT not only to AZT monophosphate, but also to AZT diphosphate, with excellent kinetics. The efficiency of the toTK1/AZT system was confirmed when toTK1-transduced human glioblastoma (GBM) cells displayed a 500-fold increased sensitivity to AZT compared with wild-type cells. In addition, when neural progenitor cells were used as delivery vectors for toTK1 in intracranial GBM xenografts in nude rats, substantial attenuation of tumor growth was achieved in animals exposed to AZT, and survival of the animals was significantly improved compared with controls. The novel toTK1/AZT suicide gene therapy system in combination with stem cell-mediated gene delivery promises new treatment of malignant gliomas. PMID:20154339

  18. HIV-1 antiretrovirals induce oxidant injury and increase intima-media thickness in an atherogenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Bo; Hebert, Valeria Y.; Khandelwal, Alok R.; Stokes, Karen Y.; Dugas, Tammy R.

    2009-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests HIV patients are at a greater risk for developing atherosclerosis. However, clinical investigations have generated conflicting results with regard to whether antiretrovirals are independently involved in the development of HIV-associated atherosclerosis. By administering antiretrovirals in an atherogenic mouse model, we determined whether two commonly prescribed antiretrovirals, the protease inhibitor indinavir and the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor AZT, can induce premature atherosclerosis. C57BL/6 mice were administered an atherogenic diet ± AZT, indinavir, or AZT plus indinavir for 20 weeks. Aortic intima-media thickness (IMT) and cross-sectional area (CSA) were determined. Compared to controls, treatment with AZT, indinavir or AZT plus indinavir, significantly increased aortic IMT and CSA. This suggests that antiretrovirals can directly exacerbate atherogenesis, in the absence of interaction with a retroviral infection. To elucidate the role of oxidant injury in the drug-induced initiation of atherosclerosis, a separate group of mice were treated for two weeks with an atherogenic diet ± AZT, indinavir or AZT plus indinavir. Aortic reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and glutathione/glutathione disulfide (GSH/GSSG) ratios, as well as plasma levels of 8-isoprostanes (8-iso-PGF2α and lipids were determined. At 2 weeks, aortic ROS was increased and GSH/GSSG ratios were decreased in all antiretroviral treatment groups. Plasma 8-iso-PGF2α was increased in the AZT and AZT plus indinavir treated groups. At 20 weeks, increased ROS production was maintained for the AZT and indinavir treatment groups, and increased 8-iso-PGF2α levels remained elevated in the AZT treatment group. Cholesterol levels were moderately elevated in the AZT and AZT plus indinavir treated groups at 2 but not 20 weeks. Conversely, indinavir treatment increased plasma cholesterol at 20 but not 2 weeks. Thus, though effects on plasma lipid

  19. Micronuclei induced by reverse transcriptase inhibitors in mononucleated and binucleated cells as assessed by the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the clastogenic and/or aneugenic potential of three nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (zidovudine - AZT, lamivudine - 3TC and stavudine - d4T) using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay in human lymphocyte cultures. All three inhibitors produced a positive response when tested in binucleated cells. The genotoxicity of AZT and 3TC was restricted to binucleated cells since there was no significant increase in the frequency of micronuclei in mononucleated cells. This finding indicated that AZT and 3TC caused chromosomal breakage and that their genotoxicity was related to a clastogenic action. In addition to the positive response observed with d4T in binucleated cells, this drug also increased the frequency of micronuclei in mononucleated cells, indicating clastogenic and aneugenic actions. Since the structural differences between AZT and 3TC and AZT and d4T involve the 3' position in the 2'-deoxyribonucleoside and in an unsaturated 2',3',dideoxyribose, respectively, we suggest that an unsaturated 2', 3', dideoxyribose is responsible for the clastogenic and aneugenic actions of d4T. PMID:21637587

  20. Early limited antiretroviral therapy is superior to deferred therapy in HIV-infected South African infants: results from the CHER (Children with HIV Early antiRetroviral) Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Cotton, Mark F; Violari, Avy; Otwombe, Kennedy; Panchia, Ravindre; Dobbels, Els; Rabie, Helena; Josipovic, Deirdre; Liberty, Afaff; Lazarus, Erica; Innes, Steve; van Rensburg, Anita Janse; Pelser, Wilma; Truter, Handre; Madhi, Shabir A; Handelsman, Edward; Jean-Philippe, Patrick; McIntyre, James A; Gibb, Diana M; Babiker, Abdel G

    2014-01-01

    Background Interim results from the CHER trial showed that early antiretroviral therapy (ART) was life-saving for HIV-infected infants. Given limited options and potential for toxicity with life-long ART, CHER compared early limited ART with deferred ART. Methods CHER was an open 3-arm trial in HIV-infected asymptomatic infants aged <12 weeks with CD4% ≥25%. Infants were randomized to deferred (ART-Def) or immediate ART for 40weeks (ART-40W) or 96weeks (ART-96W), followed by interruption. Criteria for ART initiation in ART-Def and re-initiation after interruption were CD4% <25% in infancy; otherwise <20% or CDC severe stage B or stage C disease. Lopinavir-ritonavir, zidovudine, lamivudine was the first-line regimen at ART initiation and re-initiation. The primary endpoint was time-to-failure of first-line ART (immunological/clinical/virological) or death. Comparisons were by intent-to-treat, using time-to-event methods. Findings 377 infants were enrolled: median age 7.4weeks; CD4% 35% and HIV RNA log 5.7copies/ml. Median follow-up was 4.8 years; 34 (9%) were lost-to-follow-up. Median time to ART initiation in ART-Def was 20 (IQR 16–25) weeks. Time to restarting ART after interruption was 33 (26–45) weeks in ART-40W and 70 (35–109) weeks in ART-96W; at trial end 19% and 32% respectively, remained off ART. Proportions of follow-up time spent on ART were 81%, 70% and 69% in ART-Def, ART-40W and ART-96W arms. 48/125(38%), 32/126(25%) and 26/126(21%) children reached the primary endpoint; hazard ratio (95%CI), relative to ART-Def, was 0.59(0.38-0.93, p=0.02) for ART-40W and 0.47(0.27-0.76, p=0.002) for ART-96W. Seven children (3 ART-Def, 3 ART-40W, 1 ART-96W) switched to second-line ART. Interpretation Early limited ART had superior clinical/immunological outcome with no evidence of excess disease progression during subsequent interruption and less overall ART exposure than deferred ART. Longer time on primary ART permits longer subsequent interruption with

  1. EMdeCODE: a novel algorithm capable of reading words of epigenetic code to predict enhancers and retroviral integration sites and to identify H3R2me1 as a distinctive mark of coding versus non-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Santoni, Federico Andrea

    2013-02-01

    Existence of some extra-genetic (epigenetic) codes has been postulated since the discovery of the primary genetic code. Evident effects of histone post-translational modifications or DNA methylation over the efficiency and the regulation of DNA processes are supporting this postulation. EMdeCODE is an original algorithm that approximate the genomic distribution of given DNA features (e.g. promoter, enhancer, viral integration) by identifying relevant ChIPSeq profiles of post-translational histone marks or DNA binding proteins and combining them in a supermark. EMdeCODE kernel is essentially a two-step procedure: (i) an expectation-maximization process calculates the mixture of epigenetic factors that maximize the Sensitivity (recall) of the association with the feature under study; (ii) the approximated density is then recursively trimmed with respect to a control dataset to increase the precision by reducing the number of false positives. EMdeCODE densities improve significantly the prediction of enhancer loci and retroviral integration sites with respect to previous methods. Importantly, it can also be used to extract distinctive factors between two arbitrary conditions. Indeed EMdeCODE identifies unexpected epigenetic profiles specific for coding versus non-coding RNA, pointing towards a new role for H3R2me1 in coding regions.

  2. Mitochondrial compromise in 3-year old patas monkeys exposed in utero to human-equivalent antiretroviral therapies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongmin; Shim Park, Eunwoo; Gibbons, Alexander T; Shide, Eric D; Divi, Rao L; Woodward, Ruth A; Poirier, Miriam C

    2016-08-01

    Antiretroviral (ARV) drug therapy, given during pregnancy for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1), induces fetal mitochondrial dysfunction in some children. However, the persistence/reversibility of that dysfunction is unclear. Here we have followed Erythrocebus patas (patas) monkey offspring for up to 3 years of age (similar in development to a 15-year old human) after exposure of the dams to human-equivalent in utero ARV exposure protocols. Pregnant patas dams (3-5/exposure group) were given ARV drug combinations that included zidovudine (AZT)/lamivudine (3TC)/abacavir (ABC), or AZT/3TC/nevirapine (NVP), for the last 10 weeks (50%) of gestation. Infants kept for 1 and 3 years also received drug for the first 6 weeks of life. In offpsring at birth, 1 and 3 years of age mitochondrial morphology, examined by electron microscopy (EM), was compromised compared to the unexposed controls. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), measured by hybrid capture chemiluminescence assay (HCCA) was depleted in hearts of patas exposed to AZT/3TC/NVP at all ages (P < 0.05), but not in those exposed to AZT/3TC/ABC at any age. Compared to unexposed controls, mitochondrial reserve capacity oxygen consumption rate (OCR by Seahorse) in cultured bone marrow mesenchymal fibroblasts from 3-year-old patas offspring was ∼50% reduced in AZT/3TC/ABC-exposed patas (P < 0.01), but not in AZT/3TC/NVP-exposed patas. Overall the data show that 3-year-old patas sustain persistent mitochondrial dysfunction as a result of perinatal ARV drug exposure. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 57:526-534, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Mitochondrial compromise in 3-year old patas monkeys exposed in utero to human-equivalent antiretroviral therapies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongmin; Shim Park, Eunwoo; Gibbons, Alexander T; Shide, Eric D; Divi, Rao L; Woodward, Ruth A; Poirier, Miriam C

    2016-08-01

    Antiretroviral (ARV) drug therapy, given during pregnancy for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1), induces fetal mitochondrial dysfunction in some children. However, the persistence/reversibility of that dysfunction is unclear. Here we have followed Erythrocebus patas (patas) monkey offspring for up to 3 years of age (similar in development to a 15-year old human) after exposure of the dams to human-equivalent in utero ARV exposure protocols. Pregnant patas dams (3-5/exposure group) were given ARV drug combinations that included zidovudine (AZT)/lamivudine (3TC)/abacavir (ABC), or AZT/3TC/nevirapine (NVP), for the last 10 weeks (50%) of gestation. Infants kept for 1 and 3 years also received drug for the first 6 weeks of life. In offpsring at birth, 1 and 3 years of age mitochondrial morphology, examined by electron microscopy (EM), was compromised compared to the unexposed controls. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), measured by hybrid capture chemiluminescence assay (HCCA) was depleted in hearts of patas exposed to AZT/3TC/NVP at all ages (P < 0.05), but not in those exposed to AZT/3TC/ABC at any age. Compared to unexposed controls, mitochondrial reserve capacity oxygen consumption rate (OCR by Seahorse) in cultured bone marrow mesenchymal fibroblasts from 3-year-old patas offspring was ∼50% reduced in AZT/3TC/ABC-exposed patas (P < 0.01), but not in AZT/3TC/NVP-exposed patas. Overall the data show that 3-year-old patas sustain persistent mitochondrial dysfunction as a result of perinatal ARV drug exposure. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 57:526-534, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27452341

  4. Cardiac mitochondrial compromise in 1-yr-old Erythrocebus patas monkeys perinatally-exposed to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Divi, Rao L; Leonard, Sarah L; Kuo, Maryanne M; Walker, Brettania L; Orozco, Christine C; St Claire, Marisa C; Nagashima, Kunio; Harbaugh, Steven W; Harbaugh, Jeffrey W; Thamire, Chandrasekhar; Sable, Craig A; Poirier, Miriam C

    2005-01-01

    Hearts from 1-yr-old Erythrocebus patas monkeys were examined after in utero and 6-wk-postbirth exposure to antiretroviral nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs). Protocols were modeled on those given to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1-infected pregnant women. NRTIs were administered daily to the dams for the last 20% or 50% of gestation, and to the infants for 6 wk after birth. Exposures included: no drug (n = 4); Zidovudine, 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT; n = 4); AZT/Lamivudine, (-)-beta-L-2', 3'-Dideoxy-3'-thiacytidine (Epivir, 3TC) (n = 4); AZT/Didanosine (Videx, ddI) (n = 4); and Stavudine (Zerit, d4T)/3TC (n = 4). Echocardiograms and clinical chemistry showed no drug-related changes, but the d4T/3TC-exposed fetuses at 6 and 12 mo had increased white cell counts (p < 0.05). At 1 yr of age, oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) enzyme activities were similar in heart mitochondria from all groups. Mitochondrial pathology, that included clones of damaged mitochondria (p < 0.05), was found in hearts of all 1-yr drug-exposed infants. Levels of mtDNA were elevated (p < 0.05) in hearts of all NRTI-exposed monkeys in the following order: control < d4T/3TC < AZT < AZT/3TC < AZT/ddI. The clinical status of NRTI-exposed infants, as evidenced by behavior, clinical chemistry, OXPHOS activity and echocardiogram, was normal. However, extensive mitochondrial damage with clusters of similar-appearing damaged heart mitochondria observed by electron microscopy, and an increase in mtDNA quantity, that persisted at 1 yr of age, suggest the potential for cardiotoxicity later in life.

  5. Potent and selective inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 and HIV-2 replication by a class of bicyclams interacting with a viral uncoating event.

    PubMed Central

    De Clercq, E; Yamamoto, N; Pauwels, R; Baba, M; Schols, D; Nakashima, H; Balzarini, J; Debyser, Z; Murrer, B A; Schwartz, D

    1992-01-01

    A series of bicyclams have been shown to be potent and selective inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The compounds are inhibitory to the replication of various HIV-1 and HIV-2 strains in various human T-cell systems, including peripheral blood lymphocytes, at 0.14-1.4 microM, without being toxic to the host cells at 2.2 mM. The bicyclam JM2763 is active against 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (zidovudine; AZT)-resistant HIV-1 strains and acts additively with AZT. Mechanism of action studies revealed that the bicyclams (i.e., JM2763) interact with an early event of the retrovirus replicative cycle, which could be tentatively identified as a viral uncoating event. Images PMID:1608936

  6. Pulmonary function in an international sample of HIV-positive, treatment-naïve adults with CD4 counts >500 cells/μL: a substudy of the INSIGHT Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment trial

    PubMed Central

    KUNISAKI, Ken M.; NIEWOEHNER, Dennis E.; COLLINS, Gary; NIXON, Daniel E.; TEDALDI, Ellen; AKOLO, Christopher; KITYO, Cissy; KLINKER, Hartwig; LA ROSA, Alberto; CONNETT, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To describe the prevalence and correlates of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in a multicentre international cohort of persons living with HIV (PLWH). Methods We performed a cross-sectional analysis of adult PLWH, naïve to HIV treatment, with baseline CD4 cell count >500 cells/μL enrolled in the Pulmonary Substudy of the Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment trial. We collected standardised, quality-controlled spirometry. COPD was defined as forced expiratory volume in one second/forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) ratio less than the lower limit of normal. Results Among 1026 participants from 80 sites and 20 countries, median (IQR) age was 36 (30, 44) years, 29% were female, and time since HIV diagnosis was 1.2 (0.4, 3.5) years. Baseline CD4 cell count was 648 (583, 767) cells/μL, viral load was 4.2 (3.5, 4.7) log10 copies/mL, and 10% had viral load ≤400 copies/mL despite lack of HIV treatment. Current/former/never smokers comprised 28%/11%/61% of the cohort, respectively. COPD was present in 6.8% of participants, and varied by age, smoking status, and region. 48% of those with COPD reported lifelong nonsmoking. In multivariable regression, age and pack-years of smoking had the strongest associations with FEV1/FVC ratio (p<0.0001). There were significant differences between the effect of region on FEV1/FVC ratio (p=0.010). Conclusions Our data suggest that among PLWH, naïve to HIV treatment and with CD4 cell count >500 cells/μL, smoking and age are important factors related to COPD. Smoking cessation should remain a high global priority for clinical care and research in PLWH. PMID:25711330

  7. An Inducible Retroviral Expression System for Tandem Affinity Purification Mass-Spectrometry-Based Proteomics Identifies Mixed Lineage Kinase Domain-like Protein (MLKL) as an Heat Shock Protein 90 (HSP90) Client.

    PubMed

    Bigenzahn, Johannes W; Fauster, Astrid; Rebsamen, Manuele; Kandasamy, Richard K; Scorzoni, Stefania; Vladimer, Gregory I; Müller, André C; Gstaiger, Matthias; Zuber, Johannes; Bennett, Keiryn L; Superti-Furga, Giulio

    2016-03-01

    Tandem affinity purification-mass spectrometry (TAP-MS) is a popular strategy for the identification of protein-protein interactions, characterization of protein complexes, and entire networks. Its employment in cellular settings best fitting the relevant physiology is limited by convenient expression vector systems. We developed an easy-to-handle, inducible, dually selectable retroviral expression vector allowing dose- and time-dependent control of bait proteins bearing the efficient streptavidin-hemagglutinin (SH)-tag at their N- or C termini. Concomitant expression of a reporter fluorophore allows to monitor bait-expressing cells by flow cytometry or microscopy and enables high-throughput phenotypic assays. We used the system to successfully characterize the interactome of the neuroblastoma RAS viral oncogene homolog (NRAS) Gly12Asp (G12D) mutant and exploited the advantage of reporter fluorophore expression by tracking cytokine-independent cell growth using flow cytometry. Moreover, we tested the feasibility of studying cytotoxicity-mediating proteins with the vector system on the cell death-inducing mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) Ser358Asp (S358D) mutant. Interaction proteomics analysis of MLKL Ser358Asp (S358D) identified heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) as a high-confidence interacting protein. Further phenotypic characterization established MLKL as a novel HSP90 client. In summary, this novel inducible expression system enables SH-tag-based interaction studies in the cell line proficient for the respective phenotypic or signaling context and constitutes a valuable tool for experimental approaches requiring inducible or traceable protein expression.

  8. Prediction of drug-resistance using genotypic and docking analysis among anti-retroviral therapy naïve and first-line treatment failures in Salem, Tamil Nadu, India.

    PubMed

    Dharmalingam, Thirunavukkarasu; Udhaya, V; Umaarasu, T; Elangovan, V; Rajesh, S V; Shanmugam, Gnanendra

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of drug resistance among HIV-positive patients undergoing Anti- Retroviral Therapy (ART) with poor adherence to the HAART is a major concern in India. As the HIV accumulates the key mutations, the drug resistance occurs, that pose challenges to the ART regimens currently being used. Thus, the present study was carried out among the ART- naïve patients attending ART Centre at Salem district, Tamil Nadu, India. The mutations that concern the drug resistance were discriminated by determining the viral load before and after 6 months. The drug resistance was analyzed by HIV genotyping from the patients possessing a viral load of >1000 copies/mL after 6 months of ART. The mutations pertaining to drug resistance were analyzed by the online Stanford HIV Database. The 3D structures of the RT were modeled and the drugs used in the first-line regimens were docked to explore the effect of mutations on the binding pattern of the drugs. Among the 250 patients, the viral load data were obtained for 213 patients. The study found 23 patients with both virological and immunological failures and HIV drug mutations were also revealed by genotyping. The mutations of I135R/T/V/X, L178 I/M, M184V/I, D67N, K70R, and K103N were the most common among these 23 patients. The present study revealed that the NACO recommended first-line ART regimen is efficient in most of the patients attending ART center. The emergence of drug resistance of HIV variant is common even under the best circumstance of ART. This study reveals that there is a necessity for the implementation of improved and economically systematic attempt that allows the clinicians to make a rational choice of therapy regimen to overcome the first-line therapy failures among the ART- naive.

  9. High-level expression of cancer/testis antigen NY-ESO-1 and human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in dendritic cells with a bicistronic retroviral vector.

    PubMed

    Batchu, R B; Moreno, A M; Szmania, S; Gupta, S K; Zhan, F; Rosen, N; Kozlowski, M; Spencer, T; Spagnoli, G C; Shaughnessy, J; Barlogie, B; Tricot, G; van Rhee, F

    2003-09-20

    Tumor-specific genes delivered to dendritic cells (DCs) have been used for the generation of cytotoxic T cells (CTLs), but their application has been limited on the one hand by low viral titers resulting in low transduction efficiency and poor protein production, and on the other hand by immunogenicity of the selectable marker and poor viability of the DCs. We addressed these limitations by creating a multipurpose master vector (pMV) and cloning the tumor gene NY-ESO-1, which is highly expressed in more than 50% of advanced myeloma patients. pMV was constructed from a Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MuLV)-based retroviral backbone with the following features: (1) an extended packaging signal to achieve high viral titers, (2) a splice acceptor region to facilitate protein production, (3) a nonimmunogenic selectable marker, dihydrofolate reductase-L22Y (DHFR(L22Y)), to exclude the generation of CTLs against the selectable marker, (4) an internal ribosomal entry site between the tumor-specific gene (NY-ESO-1) and the selectable marker DHFR(L22Y) for coexpression of two heterologous gene products from a single bicistronic mRNA, minimizing the possibility of differential expression of these two genes, and (5) human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) cDNA driven by the human T-lymphotropic virus promoter to enhance DC function and viability. Recombinant virus of pMV-NY-ESO-1 was generated with vesicular stomatitis virus G envelope protein (VSV-G) in the GP2-293 cell line for efficient transduction. We present evidence that the DC phenotype is unaltered after transduction and that more than 85% of DCs express NY-ESO-1, which secrete approximately 40 ng of GM-CSF per 10(6) DCs. PMID:14503968

  10. The test of the layout of polarimeter "UFP" on the telescope AZT-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levchenko, T. A.; Nevodovskyi, P. V.; Vidmachenko, A. P.; Morozhenko, O. V.; Saryboha, H. V.; Zbrutsky, O. V.; Ivakhiv, O. V.

    2016-05-01

    Main Astronomical Observatory of NAS of Ukraine in cooperation with the National Technical University of Ukraine "KPI" and National University "Lviv Polytechnic" for a long time working on the design of an optical polarimeter to study of the stratospheric layer of the Earth using of orbital satellite. During this time, was accumulated a large experience of such work, and was established a layout of compact ultraviolet polarimeter (UFP) on board of satellite

  11. Competitive PCR for Quantification of BM5d Proviral DNA in Mice with AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Casabianca, Anna; Vallanti, Giuliana; Magnani, Mauro

    1998-01-01

    Murine AIDS in C57BL/6 mice is caused by a unique mixture of murine leukemia viruses. We report the use of a competitive PCR to detect and quantitate BM5d proviral DNA. This assay allowed discrimination among endogenous wild-type murine retroviruses and BM5d sequences. Furthermore, the method was subsequently used to evaluate the amount of BM5d in infected mice and in infected AZT (zidovudine)-treated mice, providing an effective way to quantitatively evaluate drug efficacy in the murine AIDS model. PMID:9666028

  12. Theoretical and experimental studies of the stability of drug-drug interact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Monica F. R.; Alves, Lariza D. S.; Nadvorny, Daniela; Soares-Sobrinho, José L.; Rolim-Neto, Pedro J.

    2016-11-01

    Several factors can intervene in the molecular properties and consequently in the stability of drugs. The molecular complexes formation often occur due to favor the formation of hydrogen bonds, leading the system to configuration more energy stable. This work we aim to investigate through theoretical and experimental methods the relation between stability and properties of molecular complexes the molecular complex formed between the drugs, efavirenz (EFV), lamivudine (3TC) and zidovudine (AZT). With this study was possible determining the most stable complex formed between the compounds evaluated. In addition the energy and structural properties of the complex formed in relation to its individual components allowed us to evaluate the stability of the same.

  13. Heterogeneity in Retroviral Nucleocapsid Protein Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landes, Christy

    2009-03-01

    Time-resolved single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy was used to study the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) nucleocapsid protein (NC) chaperone activity as compared to that of the HIV-1 NC protein. HTLV-1 NC contains two zinc fingers with each having a CCHC binding motif similar to HIV-1 NC. HIV-1 NC is required for recognition and packaging of the viral RNA and is also a nucleic acid chaperone protein that facilitates nucleic acid restructuring during reverse transcription. Because of similarities in structures between the two retroviruses, we have used single-molecule fluorescence energy transfer to investigate the chaperoning activity of HTLV-1 NC protein. The results indicate that HTLV-1 NC protein induces structural changes by opening the transactivation response (TAR)-DNA hairpin to an even greater extent than HIV-1 NC. However, unlike HIV-1 NC, HTLV-1 NC does not chaperone the strand-transfer reaction involving TAR-DNA. These results suggest that despite its effective destabilization capability, HTLV-1 NC is not as effective at overall chaperone function as is its HIV-1 counterpart.

  14. Retroviral Transmission and Breast-feeding.

    PubMed

    van De Perre, Philippe; Cartoux, Michel

    1995-09-01

    Transmission of animal retroviruses has been demonstrated both for oncogenic retroviruses and animal lentiviruses. In humans, breast-feeding is the major route for mother-to-child transmission of Human T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma Virus type I (HTLV-I). HTLV-I transmission by breast milk is associated with ingestion of infected cells and can be prevented by formula-feeding. Breast-feeding transmission of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) has only been recently recognized as responsible for one to two thirds of mother-to-child transmission in breast-fed populations. A primary HIV-1 infection acquired in mothers after the baby has begun breast-feeding is associated with a particularly high risk of transmission. Breast milk transmission appears to result from the coexistence of HIV-1 and an inadequate humoral response in milk. Due to the dramatic impact of formula-feeding on child morbidity and mortality, it is suggested that present recommendation continue to promote breast-feeding in women living in settings where infectious diseases and malnutrition are the primary causes of infant deaths, as in many developing countries. On the other hand, in settings where infectious diseases and malnutrition are not the primary causes of infant deaths, as in most of the developed world, mothers with a proven HIV-1 infection should be advised not to breast-feed their babies.

  15. Genetic diversity of koala retroviral envelopes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenqin; Gorman, Kristen; Santiago, Jan Clement; Kluska, Kristen; Eiden, Maribeth V

    2015-03-01

    Genetic diversity, attributable to the low fidelity of reverse transcription, recombination and mutation, is an important feature of infectious retroviruses. Under selective pressure, such as that imposed by superinfection interference, gammaretroviruses commonly adapt their envelope proteins to use alternative receptors to overcome this entry block. The first characterized koala retroviruses KoRV subgroup A (KoRV-A) were remarkable in their absence of envelope genetic variability. Once it was determined that KoRV-A was present in all koalas in US zoos, regardless of their disease status, we sought to isolate a KoRV variant whose presence correlated with neoplastic malignancies. More than a decade after the identification of KoRV-A, we isolated a second subgroup of KoRV, KoRV-B from koalas with lymphomas. The envelope proteins of KoRV-A and KoRV-B are sufficiently divergent to confer the ability to bind and employ distinct receptors for infection. We have now obtained a number of additional KoRV envelope variants. In the present studies we report these variants, and show that they differ from KoRV-A and KoRV-B envelopes in their host range and superinfection interference properties. Thus, there appears to be considerable variation among KoRVs envelope genes suggesting genetic diversity is a factor following the KoRV-A infection process.

  16. Genetic diversity of koala retroviral envelopes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenqin; Gorman, Kristen; Santiago, Jan Clement; Kluska, Kristen; Eiden, Maribeth V

    2015-03-01

    Genetic diversity, attributable to the low fidelity of reverse transcription, recombination and mutation, is an important feature of infectious retroviruses. Under selective pressure, such as that imposed by superinfection interference, gammaretroviruses commonly adapt their envelope proteins to use alternative receptors to overcome this entry block. The first characterized koala retroviruses KoRV subgroup A (KoRV-A) were remarkable in their absence of envelope genetic variability. Once it was determined that KoRV-A was present in all koalas in US zoos, regardless of their disease status, we sought to isolate a KoRV variant whose presence correlated with neoplastic malignancies. More than a decade after the identification of KoRV-A, we isolated a second subgroup of KoRV, KoRV-B from koalas with lymphomas. The envelope proteins of KoRV-A and KoRV-B are sufficiently divergent to confer the ability to bind and employ distinct receptors for infection. We have now obtained a number of additional KoRV envelope variants. In the present studies we report these variants, and show that they differ from KoRV-A and KoRV-B envelopes in their host range and superinfection interference properties. Thus, there appears to be considerable variation among KoRVs envelope genes suggesting genetic diversity is a factor following the KoRV-A infection process. PMID:25789509

  17. 3'-Azido-3'-deoxythymidine resistance suppressed by a mutation conferring human immunodeficiency virus type 1 resistance to nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Larder, B A

    1992-01-01

    Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase (NNRT) inhibitors (R82913; (+)-S-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-9-chloro-5-methyl-6-(3-methyl-2-butenyl)- imidazo[4,5,1-jk][1,4]-benzodiazepin-2(1H)-thione; Cl-TIBO; and BI-RG-587, nevirapine) were used to select resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) variants by passage in cell cultures of wild-type or 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (zidovudine; AZT)-resistant strains. Similar to other NNRT inhibitors, Cl-TIBO induced a single mutation (Y181 to C) in reverse transcriptase (RT) that accounted for the resistance. BI-RG-587 induced a different mutation (V106-->A) in AZT resistance backgrounds. A series of viable HIV-1 variants was constructed by site-directed mutagenesis of the RT, which harbored multiple drug resistance mutations, including Y181 to C. HIV-1 that was co-resistant to NNRT inhibitors and 2',3'-dideoxyinosine resulted when a 2',3'-dideoxyinosine resistance mutation (L74 to V) was also present in RT. By contrast, however, the Y181 to C mutation in an AZT resistance background significantly suppressed resistance to AZT, while it conferred resistance to NNRT inhibitors. However, the V106-->A substitution did not cause suppression of preexisting AZT resistance. Since certain combinations of nucleoside analogs and NNRT inhibitors might result in the development of co-resistance, careful analysis of clinical isolates obtained during combination therapy will be needed to determine the potential significance of these observations. PMID:1282792

  18. Efavirenz Promotes β-Secretase Expression and Increased Aβ1-40,42 via Oxidative Stress and Reduced Microglial Phagocytosis: Implications for HIV Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND)

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lecia A. M.; Jin, Jingji; Ferrell, Darren; Sadic, Edin; Obregon, Demian; Smith, Adam J.; Tan, Jun; Giunta, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Efavirenz (EFV) is among the most commonly used antiretroviral drugs globally, causes neurological symptoms that interfere with adherence and reduce tolerability, and may have central nervous system (CNS) effects that contribute in part to HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) in patients on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Thus we evaluated a commonly used EFV containing regimen: EFV/zidovudine (AZT)/lamivudine (3TC) in murine N2a cells transfected with the human “Swedish” mutant form of amyloid precursor protein (SweAPP N2a cells) to assess for promotion of amyloid-beta (Aβ) production. Treatment with EFV or the EFV containing regimen generated significantly increased soluble amyloid beta (Aβ), and promoted increased β-secretase-1 (BACE-1) expression while 3TC, AZT, or, vehicle control did not significantly alter these endpoints. Further, EFV or the EFV containing regimen promoted significantly more mitochondrial stress in SweAPP N2a cells as compared to 3TC, AZT, or vehicle control. We next tested the EFV containing regimen in Aβ - producing Tg2576 mice combined or singly using clinically relevant doses. EFV or the EFV containing regimen promoted significantly more BACE-1 expression and soluble Aβ generation while 3TC, AZT, or vehicle control did not. Finally, microglial Aβ phagocytosis was significantly reduced by EFV or the EFV containing regimen but not by AZT, 3TC, or vehicle control alone. These data suggest the majority of Aβ promoting effects of this cART regimen are dependent upon EFV as it promotes both increased production, and decreased clearance of Aβ peptide. PMID:24759994

  19. Formulation, In Vitro and In Vivo Pharmacokinetics of Anti-HIV Vaginal Bioadhesive Gel

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, A; Bhowmik, B B; Thakur, Y S

    2011-01-01

    Inexpensive and female-controlled pre-exposure prophylaxis strategies to prevent mucosal transmission of the virus, is urgently needed with the rising prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 and HIV2) infections in women. Zidovudine-loaded bioadhesive vaginal gel may become one of the very useful strategies, as it can be used not only for controlled release but also for enhancing bioavailability. Drug delivery through vaginal gel is a promising area for continued research with the aim of achieving controlled release with enhanced bioavailability over longer periods of time. The aim of the study was to develop a newer prolong releasing Zidovudine (AZT) bioadhesive vaginal gel to treat HIV infections with increased patient convenience. AZT-loaded bioadhesive vaginal gel was prepared successfully by using cold mechanical method. F3 formulation containing carbopol–HPMC (1:3) was selected and evaluated in order to achieve objectives of this study. In vitro drug release study of F3 showed in 24 h drug released following case I Fickian (n ≤ 0.5) transport mechanism, and in vivo drug release was found much better (Tmax), (Cmax), and bioavailability (F) comparison with oral pour drug solution. It was also showed good extrudability, spreadability, and bioadhesive strength. A generalized protocol, for the further research, in this area will surely expected to yield significant outcome with improved drug delivery system. PMID:21731351

  20. Rapid in vitro selection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 resistant to 3'-thiacytidine inhibitors due to a mutation in the YMDD region of reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed Central

    Tisdale, M; Kemp, S D; Parry, N R; Larder, B A

    1993-01-01

    Resistant variants of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) have been selected by limited passage in MT4 cells of both wild-type and 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT, zidovudine)-resistant strains with the nucleoside analogues (-)-2'-deoxy-3'-thiacytidine (3TC) and (-)-2'-deoxy-5-fluoro-3'-thiacytidine (FTC). Virus variants selected independently were crossresistant to both inhibitors. This rapid in vitro selection of resistant virus has not previously been seen with nucleoside analogues but is reminiscent of that observed with the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. However, passage of wild-type virus with a combination of AZT and FTC appreciably delayed emergence of FTC-resistant virus. DNA sequence analysis of the reverse transcriptase coding region from FTC-resistant virus revealed changes at codon 184 in the highly conserved Tyr, Met, Asp, Asp (YMDD) region. When the mutation Met184-->Val was introduced into the infectious clone HXB2, this change alone accounted for the resistance (> 1000-fold) seen with both 3TC and FTC, and for a 5- to 15-fold reduction in sensitivity to their (+) enantiomers. It had no effect on susceptibility to AZT or nevirapine and minimal effect on susceptibility to 2',3'-dideoxyinosine and 2',3'-dideoxycytidine. To determine the influence of this mutation in a background of mutations conferring resistance to AZT and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, a series of HIV-1 variants were created by site-directed mutagenesis. All mutants with Met184-->Val were cross-resistant to 3TC and FTC. The Met184-->Val mutation did not influence nevirapine resistance, but resistance to AZT was suppressed. Similar suppression of AZT resistance was seen with Tyr181-->Cys. Interestingly, when both Met184-->Val and Tyr181-->Cys substitutions were present, highly resistant virus reverted to complete AZT sensitivity. Assessment of the interactive effects of multiple drug-resistance mutations may help to establish a rationale for

  1. Compartmentalized accumulation of cAMP near complexes of multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4) and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) contributes to drug-induced diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Moon, Changsuk; Zhang, Weiqiang; Ren, Aixia; Arora, Kavisha; Sinha, Chandrima; Yarlagadda, Sunitha; Woodrooffe, Koryse; Schuetz, John D; Valasani, Koteswara Rao; de Jonge, Hugo R; Shanmukhappa, Shiva Kumar; Shata, Mohamed Tarek M; Buddington, Randal K; Parthasarathi, Kaushik; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2015-05-01

    Diarrhea is one of the most common adverse side effects observed in ∼7% of individuals consuming Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs. The mechanism of how these drugs alter fluid secretion in the gut and induce diarrhea is not clearly understood. Several drugs are either substrates or inhibitors of multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4), such as the anti-colon cancer drug irinotecan and an anti-retroviral used to treat HIV infection, 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT). These drugs activate cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-mediated fluid secretion by inhibiting MRP4-mediated cAMP efflux. Binding of drugs to MRP4 augments the formation of MRP4-CFTR-containing macromolecular complexes that is mediated via scaffolding protein PDZK1. Importantly, HIV patients on AZT treatment demonstrate augmented MRP4-CFTR complex formation in the colon, which defines a novel paradigm of drug-induced diarrhea.

  2. Effects of antiretroviral dideoxynucleosides on polymorphonuclear leukocyte function.

    PubMed Central

    Roilides, E; Venzon, D; Pizzo, P A; Rubin, M

    1990-01-01

    Dideoxynucleosides (zidovudine[AZT], dideoxycytidine[ddC], and dideoxyinosine[ddI]) are promising new agents for the management of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infections. In light of recent data demonstrating defects in the polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) bactericidal activity of HIV-1-infected patients and since many chemotherapeutic agents affect PMN function, we examined their effects on the function of PMNs from both healthy and HIV-1-infected individuals in vitro. AZT (0.1 to 25 microM), ddC (0.01 to 1 microM), and ddI (0.2 to 50 microM) had no effect on viability, chemotaxis to N-fromylmethionyl leucyl phenylalanine, phagocytosis of Candida albicans or Staphylococcus aureus, or superoxide production following stimulation by N-formylmethionyl leucyl phenylalanine. Killing of C. albicans was not affected by AZT but was enhanced by 0.1 and 1 microM ddc (a 1 microM, killing was 26.0 +/- 2.02% compared with 17.0 +/- 0.73% for controls: P = 0.006) and 0.2 to 50 microM ddI (at 10 microM, killing was 25.0 +/- 0.68% compared with 17.8 +/- 0.91% for controls; P = 0.002). Killing of S. aureus was unchanged by AZT and ddC but was significantly enhanced by ddI at 0.2 to 20 microM (at 2 microM, killing was 71.2 +/- 5.57% compared with 51.4 +/- 6.29% for controls; P = 0.0045). In addition, the preexisting defective bactericidal capacity of PMNs from HIV-1-infected patients was enhanced by ddI (P less than 0.025). Potential enhancement by these dideoxynucleosides of certain PMN functions of HIV-1-infected patients deserves further study. PMID:2178334

  3. 3'-Azido-3'-deoxythymidine prevents induction of murine acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in C57BL/10 mice infected with LP-BM5 murine leukemia viruses, a possible animal model for antiretroviral drug screening.

    PubMed Central

    Ohnota, H; Okada, Y; Ushijima, H; Kitamura, T; Komuro, K; Mizuochi, T

    1990-01-01

    Adult C57BL/10 mice (H-2b Fv-1b) inoculated with LP-BM5 murine leukemia virus develop a disease which has many features in common with human acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), in particular abnormal lymphoproliferation and severe immunodeficiency. In the present study, we examined the possibility that this murine AIDS (MAIDS) model would be useful for evaluating antiretrovirus drugs in vivo through the use of a well-defined antiretrovirus drug, the reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor (H. Mitsuya, K.J. Weinhold, P.A. Furman, M.H. St. Claire, S. Nusinoff-Lehrman, R.C. Gallo, D. Bolognesi, D.W. Barry, and S. Broder, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 82:7096-7100, 1985) 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT). We evaluated the effect of AZT treatment on de novo virus infection as well as on the induction of immunodeficiency by various parameters, including RT activity in serum, splenomegaly, proliferative responses against alloantigens and mitogens, soluble-antigen-presenting cell activity, and immunoglobulin G levels in serum. Our results demonstrated that AZT treatment of C57BL/10 mice infected with LP-BM5 murine leukemia virus efficiently prevented the induction of immunodeficiency if started at the time of virus inoculation. Starting AZT treatment 1 week later provided only a partial protective effect. Starting AZT treatment 2 weeks later was associated with suppression of RT activity in serum but no prevention of immunosuppression. This MAIDS model may allow rapid and cost-effective screening for antiretrovirus drugs targeted against retroviral functions shared between human AIDS and MAIDS, such as those encoded by gag, pol, or env. PMID:1693056

  4. Antiretroviral drugs.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Erik

    2010-10-01

    In October 2010, it will be exactly 25 years ago that the first antiretroviral drug, AZT (zidovudine, 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine), was described. It was the first of 25 antiretroviral drugs that in the past 25 years have been formally licensed for clinical use. These antiretroviral drugs fall into seven categories [nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NtRTIs), non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), protease inhibitors (PIs), fusion inhibitors (FIs), co-receptor inhibitors (CRIs) and integrase inhibitors (INIs). The INIs (i.e. raltegravir) represent the most recent advance in the search for effective and selective anti-HIV agents. Combination of several anti-HIV drugs [often referred to as highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)] has drastically altered AIDS from an almost uniformly fatal disease to a chronic manageable one.

  5. Theoretical and experimental studies of the stability of drug-drug interact.

    PubMed

    Soares, Monica F R; Alves, Lariza D S; Nadvorny, Daniela; Soares-Sobrinho, José L; Rolim-Neto, Pedro J

    2016-11-01

    Several factors can intervene in the molecular properties and consequently in the stability of drugs. The molecular complexes formation often occur due to favor the formation of hydrogen bonds, leading the system to configuration more energy stable. This work we aim to investigate through theoretical and experimental methods the relation between stability and properties of molecular complexes the molecular complex formed between the drugs, efavirenz (EFV), lamivudine (3TC) and zidovudine (AZT). With this study was possible determining the most stable complex formed between the compounds evaluated. In addition the energy and structural properties of the complex formed in relation to its individual components allowed us to evaluate the stability of the same. PMID:27267283

  6. Single-photon emission computed tomography in human immunodeficiency virus encephalopathy: A preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Masdeu, J.C.; Yudd, A.; Van Heertum, R.L.; Grundman, M.; Hriso, E.; O'Connell, R.A.; Luck, D.; Camli, U.; King, L.N. )

    1991-08-01

    Depression or psychosis in a previously asymptomatic individual infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) may be psychogenic, related to brain involvement by the HIV or both. Although prognosis and treatment differ depending on etiology, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are usually unrevealing in early HIV encephalopathy and therefore cannot differentiate it from psychogenic conditions. Thirty of 32 patients (94%) with HIV encephalopathy had single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) findings that differed from the findings in 15 patients with non-HIV psychoses and 6 controls. SPECT showed multifocal cortical and subcortical areas of hypoperfusion. In 4 cases, cognitive improvement after 6-8 weeks of zidovudine (AZT) therapy was reflected in amelioration of SPECT findings. CT remained unchanged. SPECT may be a useful technique for the evaluation of HIV encephalopathy.

  7. Inflammatory and toxic myopathies.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, M C

    1992-10-01

    The major advances in the immunopathogenesis and treatment of inflammatory myopathies, and the main criteria that distinguish polymyositis (PM) from dermatomyositis (DM) or inclusion-body myositis (IBM) are presented. The origin and implications of the amyloid and ubiquitin deposits found within the vacuolated fibers of patients with IBM are considered. The pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and human T-cell lymphotrophic virus (HTLV)-I-associated PM is presented, and the role of retroviruses in triggering PM, even in the absence of detectable viral genome within the muscle fibers, is discussed. In addition, three toxic myopathies with distinct morphologic, biochemical, or molecular characteristics, caused by zidovudine [azidothymidine (AZT) myopathy], the cholesterol-lowering-agent myopathy (CLAM), and the combination of blocking agents with corticosteroids are presented.

  8. Therapy may explain recent deficits in AIDS incidence.

    PubMed

    Gail, M H; Rosenberg, P S; Goedert, J J

    1990-01-01

    Since the middle of 1987, fewer consistently defined AIDS cases have been reported than expected among homosexual and bisexual men in the United States. This "AIDS deficit" was greater among homosexual and bisexual men in New York City, San Francisco, and Los Angeles, but was also striking among all homosexual and bisexual men in the United States. Deficits were virtually absent among intravenous drug users (IVDUs) in the United States. Three independent sources of data--placebo-controlled trials, pharmaceutical company reports, and the San Francisco Men's Health Study--were used to demonstrate that the amounts of zidovudine (AZT) given prophylactically to those at highest risk of AIDS since March 1987 have been sufficient to account for most of the observed AIDS deficits. Other advances in the medical care of pre-AIDS patients may have combined with AZT to produce the deficits. Other hypothesized explanations were examined and found insufficient to account for the observed AIDS deficits, including: (a) a sudden halt in new human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections during the early or mid-1980s; (b) misspecification of the distribution of AIDS incubation times following HIV infection; (c) increasing delays in the reporting of AIDS cases; (d) changes in the surveillance definition of AIDS in 1987; and (e) evolution of attenuated HIV strains. The hypothesis that therapy is affecting national AIDS rates has important implications. Failure to take the effects of therapy into account can lead to serious underestimates by back-calculation of the cumulative numbers infected with HIV and of AIDS incidence over the longer term. Moreover, it appears that AIDS incidence could be retarded in underserved groups, such as IVDUs, by making AZT and other state-of-the-art treatments readily available to AIDS-free patients with advanced immunodeficiency.

  9. Peripheral neuropathy and antiretroviral drugs.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, M C

    2001-03-01

    Patients treated with nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) develop a varying degree of myopathy or neuropathy after long-term therapy. Zidovudine (AZT) causes myopathy; zalcitabine (ddC), didanosine (ddl) and lamuvidine (3TC) cause neuropathy; stavudine (d4T) and fialuridine (FIAU) cause neuropathy or myopathy and lactic acidosis. The tissue distribution of phosphorylases responsible for phosphorylation of NRTIs relates to their selective tissue toxicity. The myopathy is characterized by muscle wasting, myalgia, fatigue, weakness and elevation of CK. The neuropathy is painful, sensory and axonal. In vitro, NRTIs inhibit the gamma-DNA polymerase, responsible for replication of mtDNA, and cause mtDNA dysfunction. In vivo, patients treated with AZT, the best studied NRTI, develop a mitochondrial myopathy with mtDNA depletion, deficiency of COX (complex IV), intracellular fat accumulation, high lactate production and marked phosphocreatine depletion, as determined with in vivo MRS spectroscopy, due to impaired oxidative phosphorylation. Animals or cultured cells treated with NRTIs develop neuropathy, myopathy, or cell destruction with similar changes in the mitochondria. There is evidence that the NRTI-related neuropathy is also due to mitochondrial toxicity. The NRTIs (AZT, ddC, ddl, d4T, 3TC) contain azido groups that compete with natural thymidine triphosphate as substrates of DNA pol-gamma and terminate mtDNA synthesis. In contrast, FIAU that contains 3'-OH groups serves as an alternate substrate for thymidine triphosphate with DNA pol-gamma and is incorporated into the DNA causing permanent mtDNA dysfunction. The NRTI-induced mitochondrial dysfunction has an influence on the clinical application of these agents, especially at high doses and when combined. They have produced in humans a new category of acquired mitochondrial toxins that cause clinical manifestations resembling the genetic mitochondrial disorders.

  10. Murine cardiac mtDNA: effects of transgenic manipulation of nucleoside phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Kohler, James J; Hosseini, Seyed H; Cucoranu, Ioan; Hoying-Brandt, Amy; Green, Elgin; Johnson, David; Wittich, Bree; Srivastava, Jaya; Ivey, Kristopher; Fields, Earl; Russ, Rodney; Raper, C Michael; Santoianni, Robert; Lewis, William

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial toxicity results from pyrimidine nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) for HIV/AIDS. In the heart, this can deplete mitochondrial (mt) DNA and cause cardiac dysfunction (eg, left ventricle hypertrophy, LVH). Four unique transgenic, cardiac-targeted overexpressors (TGs) were generated to determine their individual impact on native mitochondrial biogenesis and effects of NRTI administration on development of mitochondrial toxicity. TGs included cardiac-specific overexpression of native thymidine kinase 2 (TK2), two pathogenic TK2 mutants (H121N and I212N), and a mutant of mtDNA polymerase, pol-γ (Y955C). Each was treated with antiretrovirals (AZT-HAART, 3 or 10 weeks, zidovudine (AZT) + lamivudine (3TC) + indinavir, or vehicle control). Parameters included left ventricle (LV) performance (echocardiography), LV mtDNA abundance (real-time PCR), and mitochondrial fine structure (electron microscopy, EM) as a function of duration of treatment and presence of TG. mtDNA abundance significantly decreased in Y955C TG, increased in TK2 native and I212N TGs, and was unchanged in H121N TGs at 10 weeks regardless of treatment. Y955C and I212N TGs exhibited LVH during growth irrespective of treatment. Y955C TGs exhibited cardiomyopathy (CM) at 3 and 10 weeks irrespective of treatment, whereas H121N and I212N TGs exhibited CM only after 10 weeks AZT-HAART. EM features were consistent with cardiac dysfunction. mtDNA abundance and cardiac functional changes were related to TG expression of mitochondrially related genes, mutations thereof, and NRTIs. PMID:19079325

  11. Multitasking: Making the Most out of the Retroviral Envelope.

    PubMed

    Varela, Mariana; Palmarini, Massimo

    2010-08-01

    Evasion of the host's immune system is a required step for the establishment of viral infection. In this article, we discuss the recent findings of Heidmann and colleagues demonstrating that some retroviruses possess an immune suppressive (IS) domain "encrypted" within their envelope glycoprotein that is required to establish a successful infection in immunocompetent hosts [1].

  12. Retroviral DNA Sequences as a Means for Determining Ancient Diets

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Perez, Jessica I.; Cano, Raul J.; Narganes-Storde, Yvonne; Chanlatte-Baik, Luis; Toranzos, Gary A.

    2015-01-01

    For ages, specialists from varying fields have studied the diets of the primeval inhabitants of our planet, detecting diet remains in archaeological specimens using a range of morphological and biochemical methods. As of recent, metagenomic ancient DNA studies have allowed for the comparison of the fecal and gut microbiomes associated to archaeological specimens from various regions of the world; however the complex dynamics represented in those microbial communities still remain unclear. Theoretically, similar to eukaryote DNA the presence of genes from key microbes or enzymes, as well as the presence of DNA from viruses specific to key organisms, may suggest the ingestion of specific diet components. In this study we demonstrate that ancient virus DNA obtained from coprolites also provides information reconstructing the host’s diet, as inferred from sequences obtained from pre-Columbian coprolites. This depicts a novel and reliable approach to determine new components as well as validate the previously suggested diets of extinct cultures and animals. Furthermore, to our knowledge this represents the first description of the eukaryotic viral diversity found in paleofaeces belonging to pre-Columbian cultures. PMID:26660678

  13. Participation of subgenomic retroviral mRNAs in recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, L H; Stacey, D W

    1982-01-01

    Envelope glycoprotein (env) mRNA from avian retroviruses was injected into cells transformed by env-deleted Bryan Rous sarcoma virus [RSV(-)]. The genetic deficiency of RSV(-) was complemented, and infectious transforming virus was released for many days after these injections. The long-term activity of the injected env mRNA is believed to be due to reverse transcription of the injected RNA after its incorporation into virus particles. The resulting subgenomic provirus, presumed to be integrated into host DNA, is able to direct the continuous synthesis of additional env mRNA. In some of these cultures, replication-competent viruses appeared many days after injection. The analysis by RNase T1 oligonucleotide fingerprinting showed that the RNA of these virus genomes contained oligonucleotides characteristic of both RSV(-) and the env mRNA injected. In all viruses analyzed the 5' two-thirds and the 3' terminus of the genome were derived from RSV(-) and the env gene from the injected mRNA. Our results thus strongly indicate that these viruses were generated via recombination between RSV(-) and env mRNA. The demonstration of involvement of an mRNA sequence in recombination may be of importance in the divergence of retroviruses and in the mechanism of interaction between retroviruses and host nucleotide sequences. Images PMID:6178841

  14. Monitoring Retroviral RNA Dimerization In Vivo via Hammerhead Ribozyme Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Bijay K.; Scherer, Lisa; Zelby, Laurie; Bertrand, Edouard; Rossi, John J.

    1998-01-01

    We have used a strategy for colocalization of Psi (Ψ)-tethered ribozymes and targets to demonstrate that Ψ sequences are capable of specific interaction in the cytoplasm of both packaging and nonpackaging cells. These results indicate that current in vitro dimerization models may have in vivo counterparts. The methodology used may be applied to further genetic analyses on Ψ domain interactions in vivo. PMID:9733882

  15. Production of transgenic chickens using an avian retroviral vector

    SciTech Connect

    Kopchick, J.; Mills, E.; Rosenblum C.; Taylor, J.; Kelder, B.; Smith, J.; Chen, H.

    1987-05-01

    The authors efforts to insert genes into the chicken germ line are dependent upon the ability of exogenous avian retroviruses to infect chicken germ cells. They have used a transformation defective Schmidt Ruppin A strain of Rous Sarcoma Virus (RSV-SRA) in their initial experiments. The general protocol involved generating RSV-SRA viremic female chickens (Go), which shed exogenous virus via the oviduct. As the fertilized egg passes through the oviduct, embryonic cells are exposed to the virus. If the germ cell precursors are infected by the virus, offspring (G1) should be generated which are capable of passing the viral DNA to the next generation (G2). Fifteen viremic G1 males were selected for breeding and progeny testing. Since male chickens do not congenitally pass retroviruses through semen, production of viremic G2 offspring indicates germ line DNA transmission. This is confirmed by DNA analysis of the experimental chickens. Using a specific probe for exogenous retrovirus, they have detected the presence of RSV-SRA DNA in viremic chickens. Southern DNA analysis revealed junction fragments for RSV-SRA DNA in viremic G2 chickens, but not in non-viremic siblings. Furthermore, DNA isolated from various tissues of a viremic G2 chicken showed an identical DNA junction fragment pattern, indicating all tissues were derived from the same embryonic cell which contained integrated provirus. To date they have generated 50 transgenic chickens.

  16. Activation of the Retroviral Budding Factor ALIX▿†

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Qianting; Landesman, Michael B.; Chung, Hyo-Young; Dierkers, Adam; Jeffries, Cy M.; Trewhella, Jill; Hill, Christopher P.; Sundquist, Wesley I.

    2011-01-01

    The cellular ALIX protein functions within the ESCRT pathway to facilitate intralumenal endosomal vesicle formation, the abscission stage of cytokinesis, and enveloped virus budding. Here, we report that the C-terminal proline-rich region (PRR) of ALIX folds back against the upstream domains and auto-inhibits V domain binding to viral late domains. Mutations designed to destabilize the closed conformation of the V domain opened the V domain, increased ALIX membrane association, and enhanced virus budding. These observations support a model in which ALIX activation requires dissociation of the autoinhibitory PRR and opening of the V domain arms. PMID:21715492

  17. T helper cell activation and human retroviral pathogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, K F; Heeney, J L

    1996-01-01

    T helper (Th) cells are of central importance in regulating many critical immune effector mechanisms. The profile of cytokines produced by Th cells correlates with the type of effector cells induced during the immune response to foreign antigen. Th1 cells induce the cell-mediated immune response, while Th2 cells drive antibody production. Th cells are the preferential targets of human retroviruses. Infections with human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV) or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) result in the expansion of Th cells by the action of HTLV (adult T-cell leukemia) or the progressive loss of T cells by the action of HIV (AIDS). Both retrovirus infections impart a high-level activation state in the host immune cells as well as systemically. However, diverging responses to this activation state have contrasting effects on the Th-cell population. In HIV infection, Th-cell loss has been attributed to several mechanisms, including a selective elimination of cells by apoptosis. The induction of apoptosis in HIV infection is complex, with many different pathways able to induce cell death. In contrast, infection of Th cells with HTLV-1 affords the cell a protective advantage against apoptosis. This advantage may allow the cell to escape immune surveillance, providing the opportunity for the development of Th-cell cancer. In this review, we will discuss the impact of Th-cell activation and general immune activation on human retrovirus expression with a focus upon Th-cell function and the progression to disease. PMID:8987361

  18. Retroviral DNA Sequences as a Means for Determining Ancient Diets.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Perez, Jessica I; Cano, Raul J; Narganes-Storde, Yvonne; Chanlatte-Baik, Luis; Toranzos, Gary A

    2015-01-01

    For ages, specialists from varying fields have studied the diets of the primeval inhabitants of our planet, detecting diet remains in archaeological specimens using a range of morphological and biochemical methods. As of recent, metagenomic ancient DNA studies have allowed for the comparison of the fecal and gut microbiomes associated to archaeological specimens from various regions of the world; however the complex dynamics represented in those microbial communities still remain unclear. Theoretically, similar to eukaryote DNA the presence of genes from key microbes or enzymes, as well as the presence of DNA from viruses specific to key organisms, may suggest the ingestion of specific diet components. In this study we demonstrate that ancient virus DNA obtained from coprolites also provides information reconstructing the host's diet, as inferred from sequences obtained from pre-Columbian coprolites. This depicts a novel and reliable approach to determine new components as well as validate the previously suggested diets of extinct cultures and animals. Furthermore, to our knowledge this represents the first description of the eukaryotic viral diversity found in paleofaeces belonging to pre-Columbian cultures. PMID:26660678

  19. Predictors of Persistent Anaemia in the First Year of Antiretroviral Therapy: A Retrospective Cohort Study from Goma, the Democratic Republic of Congo

    PubMed Central

    Akilimali, Pierre Zalagile; Kashala-Abotnes, Espérance; Musumari, Patou Masika; Kayembe, Patrick Kalambayi; Tylleskar, Thorkild; Mapatano, Mala Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background Anaemia is associated with adverse outcomes including early death in the first year of antiretroviral therapy (ART). This study reports on the factors associated with persistent anaemia among HIV-infected patients initiating ART in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DR Congo). Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study and analyzed data from patients receiving HIV care between January 2004 and December 2012 at two major hospitals in Goma, DR Congo. Haemoglobin concentrations of all patients on ART regimen were obtained prior to and within one year of ART initiation. A logistic regression model was used to identify the predictors of persistent anaemia after 12 months of ART. Results Of 756 patients, 69% of patients were anaemic (IC95%: 65.7–72.3) at baseline. After 12 months of follow up, there was a 1.2 g/dl average increase of haemoglobin concentration (P < 0.001) with differences depending on the therapeutic regimen. Patients who received zidovudine (AZT) gained less than those who did not receive AZT (0.99 g/dl vs 1.33 g/dl; p< 0.001). Among 445 patient who had anaemia at the beginning, 33% (147/445) had the condition resolved. Among patients with anaemia at ART initiation, those who did not receive cotrimoxazole prophylaxis before starting ART(AOR 3.89; 95% CI 2.09–7.25; P < 0.001) and a AZT initial regimen (AOR 2.19; 95% CI 1.36–3.52; P < 0.001) were significantly at risk of persistent anaemia. Conclusions More than two thirds of patients had anaemia at baseline. The AZT-containing regimen and absence of cotrimoxazole prophylaxis before starting ART were associated with persistent anaemia 12 months, after initiation of treatment. Considering the large proportion of patients with persistence of anaemia at 12 months, we suggest that it is necessary to conduct a large study to assess anaemia among HIV-infected patients in Goma. PMID:26474481

  20. Current HIV clinical trial design issues.

    PubMed

    Lange, J M

    1995-01-01

    Aids-free time and survival time of people with HIV infection has gradually increased since the first clinical trial of zidovudine(AZT) in 1987. This change in pattern of disease course has, however, made it difficult for current clinical trials to rely on "hard" clinical end points, such as progression to AIDS or death, to demonstrate antiretroviral efficacy. These trials must continue for a number of years and enroll large numbers of patients; as a result, maintaining patients on protocolled therapy is difficult to achieve. Furthermore, patients can be prevented from reaching clinical end points by prophylaxis of opportunistic infections. Combined with the move toward treating individuals earlier in the course of infection, current clinical trials using "hard" clinical end points are unlikely to demonstrate drug efficacy. The concept of using "soft" clinical end points and laboratory end points such as decline in CD4 cell count to a threshold value, was first introduced in study EACG 020 of patients with early stage infection, and made it possible for this study to demonstrate the efficacy of AZT in this patient population. Further accurate markers of disease progression are required for current clinical trials. There is growing consensus that the primary end point of any antiviral drug study should be the effect of the drug on the virus itself. It is now possible to quantify viral burden and to assess the amount of virus present in different tissues. To validate viral load as a marker of disease progression, it is necessary to achieve a profound and long-term reduction in viral load. It is very likely that this will be achieved only in studies of multiple combination therapy at early stages of infection. Moreover, clinical trials are required to validate the use of viral load. In the meantime, regulatory authorities should be encouraged to license drugs on the basis of viral load data with the provision of intense post-licensing follow-up.

  1. Effectiveness of the first district-wide programme for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV in South Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Coetzee, David; Hilderbrand, Katherine; Boulle, Andrew; Draper, Beverley; Abdullah, Fareed; Goemaere, Eric

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to estimate the field efficacy of the first routine programme for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) initiated in South Africa, in the subdistrict of Khayelitsha. METHODS: A consecutive sample of 658 mother-infant pairs, identified from the PMTCT register from 1 March to 30 November 2003, were identified for enrolment in this study. Details of the regimen received were established and HIV status of the infants at between 6 and 10 weeks of age was determined by qualitative DNA polymerase chain reaction. Zidovudine (AZT) was provided antenatally from week 34 of gestation and during labour. Infant formula milk was-offered to mothers who chose not to breastfeed. The protocol was amended in July 2003 such that women who had received < 2 weeks of treatment with AZT were given a single dose of nevirapine (NVP) at the onset of labour, and the infant received a weight-adjusted dose of NVP within 72 h of delivery. RESULTS: Of the 535 mother-infant pairs (81%) eventually included in the study, 410 (77%) received an effective PMTCT intervention according to the protocol. The rate of transmission of HIV from mother to child was 8.8% (95% confidence interval (CI), 6.2-10.9). A maternal age of > 25 years was the only significant independent risk factor for transmission (odds ratio, 2.12; 95% CI, 1.14-4.07). CONCLUSION: The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of a large-scale PMTCT programme in an urban public-sector setting. PMID:16175822

  2. Prenatal exposure to anti-HIV drugs. long-term neurobehavioral effects of lamivudine (3TC) in CD-1 mice.

    PubMed

    Calamandrei, G; Venerosi, A; Branchi, I; Valanzano, A; Alleva, E

    2000-01-01

    The present study was aimed at investigating the long-term effects of prenatal exposure to lamivudine (3TC), an antiretroviral drug used in clinical practice alone or in combination with zidovudine (AZT) to prevent mother-to-child transmission of the HIV virus. Pregnant CD-1 mice were given per os twice daily either 3TC at different doses (125, 250, or 500 mg/kg) or vehicle solution (NaCl 0. 9%) from pregnancy day 10 to delivery. Offspring behavior was examined on postnatal day 35 in a 20-min social interaction test. At adulthood different behavioral endpoints were analyzed, including locomotor activity and exploration in an open field following administration of the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine (2 mg/kg), spatial learning in either radial arm or Morris water maze, virgin female behavior in a maternal induction test, and pain sensitivity in a hot-plate test (52 +/- 0.1 degrees C). Our findings confirm the low neurotoxicity of 3TC in comparison to AZT. However some significant behavioral alterations were found, namely (1) a decrease in immobility in the open field test, (2) an increase in the responsiveness to scopolamine shown by the 500-mg/kg 3TC mice (sniffing behavior) in the open field, and (3) a longer escape latency in the first day of the reversal phase in the Morris task (particularly marked in the 250-mg/kg treatment group). No significant changes in either pain sensitivity, social/affiliative, or maternal behavior were found, although a higher occurrence of aggressive behavior toward foster pups was noted in both 125- and 500-mg/kg 3TC females.

  3. Incidence and predictors of severe anemia in Asian HIV-infected children using first-line antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bunupuradah, Torsak; Kariminia, Azar; Chan, Kwai-Cheng; Ramautarsing, Reshmie; Huy, Bui Vu; Han, Ning; Nallusamy, Revathy; Hansudewechakul, Rawiwan; Saphonn, Vonthanak; Sirisanthana, Virat; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Kurniati, Nia; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Yusoff, Nik Khairulddin Nik; Razali, Kamarul; Fong, Siew Moy; Sohn, Annette H.; Lumbiganon, Pagakrong

    2014-01-01

    Objective There are limited data on treatment-related anemia in Asian HIV-infected children. Methods Data from Asian HIV-infected children aged <18 years on first-line highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) were used. Children who had preexisting severe anemia at baseline were excluded. Anemia was graded by using the DAIDS 2004 table. Potential risk factors of severe anemia were assessed by logistic regression. Results Data from 1,648 children (51.9% female, 62.8% WHO stage 3/4) were analyzed. Median (IQR) age was 6.8 (3.7–9.6) years, CD4% was 9 (3–16)% and plasma HIV-RNA was 5.2 (4.7–5.6) log10 copies/ml at HAART initiation in those with available testing. The most common regimens were stavudine/lamivudine/nevirapine (42%) and zidovudine/lamivudine/nevirapine (25%). Severe anemia was identified in 47 (2.9%) children after a median time of 6 months after HAART initiation with an incidence rate of 5.4 per 100 child-years. Mild anemia or moderate anemia at baseline (p=0.024 and p=0.005, respectively), previous or current use of zidovudine (p<0.0001 and p=0.013, respectively), and male sex (p=0.008) were associated with severe anemia. Higher weight-for-age z-score (p=0.004) was protective. Conclusions The incidence of severe anemia in Asian HIV-infected children after HAART initiation was low and mainly occurred during the first few months after HAART initiation. Mild to moderate anemia at baseline and using AZT were independent risk factors of developing severe anemia. PMID:23764352

  4. A Rapid Screening Assay Identifies Monotherapy with Interferon-ß and Combination Therapies with Nucleoside Analogs as Effective Inhibitors of Ebola Virus.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Stephen D S; Majchrzak-Kita, Beata; Racine, Trina; Kozlowski, Hannah N; Baker, Darren P; Hoenen, Thomas; Kobinger, Gary P; Fish, Eleanor N; Branch, Donald R

    2016-01-01

    To date there are no approved antiviral drugs for the treatment of Ebola virus disease (EVD). While a number of candidate drugs have shown limited efficacy in vitro and/or in non-human primate studies, differences in experimental methodologies make it difficult to compare their therapeutic effectiveness. Using an in vitro model of Ebola Zaire replication with transcription-competent virus like particles (trVLPs), requiring only level 2 biosafety containment, we compared the activities of the type I interferons (IFNs) IFN-α and IFN-ß, a panel of viral polymerase inhibitors (lamivudine (3TC), zidovudine (AZT) tenofovir (TFV), favipiravir (FPV), the active metabolite of brincidofovir, cidofovir (CDF)), and the estrogen receptor modulator, toremifene (TOR), in inhibiting viral replication in dose-response and time course studies. We also tested 28 two- and 56 three-drug combinations against Ebola replication. IFN-α and IFN-ß inhibited viral replication 24 hours post-infection (IC50 0.038μM and 0.016μM, respectively). 3TC, AZT and TFV inhibited Ebola replication when used alone (50-62%) or in combination (87%). They exhibited lower IC50 (0.98-6.2μM) compared with FPV (36.8μM), when administered 24 hours post-infection. Unexpectedly, CDF had a narrow therapeutic window (6.25-25μM). When dosed >50μM, CDF treatment enhanced viral infection. IFN-ß exhibited strong synergy with 3TC (97.3% inhibition) or in triple combination with 3TC and AZT (95.8% inhibition). This study demonstrates that IFNs and viral polymerase inhibitors may have utility in EVD. We identified several 2 and 3 drug combinations with strong anti-Ebola activity, confirmed in studies using fully infectious ZEBOV, providing a rationale for testing combination therapies in animal models of lethal Ebola challenge. These studies open up new possibilities for novel therapeutic options, in particular combination therapies, which could prevent and treat Ebola infection and potentially reduce drug

  5. Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Activity, Intracellular Metabolism, and Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of 2′-Deoxy-3′-Oxa-4′-Thiocytidine

    PubMed Central

    de Muys, Jean-Marc; Gourdeau, Henriette; Nguyen-Ba, Nghe; Taylor, Debra L.; Ahmed, Parvin S.; Mansour, Tarek; Locas, Celine; Richard, Nathalie; Wainberg, Mark A.; Rando, Robert F.

    1999-01-01

    The racemic nucleoside analogue 2′-deoxy-3′-oxa-4′-thiocytidine (dOTC) is in clinical development for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 (HIV-1) infection. dOTC is structurally related to lamivudine (3TC), but the oxygen and sulfur in the furanosyl ring are transposed. Intracellular metabolism studies showed that dOTC is phosphorylated within cells via the deoxycytidine kinase pathway and that approximately 2 to 5% of dOTC is converted into the racemic triphosphate derivatives, which had measurable half-lives (2 to 3 hours) within cells. Both 5′-triphosphate (TP) derivatives of dOTC were more potent than 3TC-TP at inhibiting HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) in vitro. The Ki values for dOTC-TP obtained against human DNA polymerases α, β, and γ were 5,000-, 78-, and 571-fold greater, respectively, than those for HIV RT (28 nM), indicating a good selectivity for the viral enzyme. In culture experiments, dOTC is a potent inhibitor of primary isolates of HIV-1, which were obtained from antiretroviral drug-naive patients as well as from nucleoside therapy-experienced (3TC- and/or zidovudine [AZT]-treated) patients. The mean 50% inhibitory concentration of dOTC for drug-naive isolates was 1.76 μM, rising to only 2.53 and 2.5 μM for viruses resistant to 3TC and viruses resistant to 3TC and AZT, respectively. This minimal change in activity is in contrast to the more dramatic changes observed when 3TC or AZT was evaluated against these same viral isolates. In tissue culture studies, the 50% toxicity levels for dOTC, which were determined by using [3H]thymidine uptake as a measure of logarithmic-phase cell proliferation, was greater than 100 μM for all cell lines tested. In addition, after 14 days of continuous culture, at concentrations up to 10 μM, no measurable toxic effect on HepG2 cells or mitochondrial DNA replication within these cells was observed. When administered orally to rats, dOTC was well absorbed, with a bioavailability

  6. Anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 activity, intracellular metabolism, and pharmacokinetic evaluation of 2'-deoxy-3'-oxa-4'-thiocytidine.

    PubMed

    de Muys, J M; Gourdeau, H; Nguyen-Ba, N; Taylor, D L; Ahmed, P S; Mansour, T; Locas, C; Richard, N; Wainberg, M A; Rando, R F

    1999-08-01

    The racemic nucleoside analogue 2'-deoxy-3'-oxa-4'-thiocytidine (dOTC) is in clinical development for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 (HIV-1) infection. dOTC is structurally related to lamivudine (3TC), but the oxygen and sulfur in the furanosyl ring are transposed. Intracellular metabolism studies showed that dOTC is phosphorylated within cells via the deoxycytidine kinase pathway and that approximately 2 to 5% of dOTC is converted into the racemic triphosphate derivatives, which had measurable half-lives (2 to 3 hours) within cells. Both 5'-triphosphate (TP) derivatives of dOTC were more potent than 3TC-TP at inhibiting HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) in vitro. The K(i) values for dOTC-TP obtained against human DNA polymerases alpha, beta, and gamma were 5,000-, 78-, and 571-fold greater, respectively, than those for HIV RT (28 nM), indicating a good selectivity for the viral enzyme. In culture experiments, dOTC is a potent inhibitor of primary isolates of HIV-1, which were obtained from antiretroviral drug-naive patients as well as from nucleoside therapy-experienced (3TC- and/or zidovudine [AZT]-treated) patients. The mean 50% inhibitory concentration of dOTC for drug-naive isolates was 1.76 microM, rising to only 2.53 and 2.5 microM for viruses resistant to 3TC and viruses resistant to 3TC and AZT, respectively. This minimal change in activity is in contrast to the more dramatic changes observed when 3TC or AZT was evaluated against these same viral isolates. In tissue culture studies, the 50% toxicity levels for dOTC, which were determined by using [(3)H]thymidine uptake as a measure of logarithmic-phase cell proliferation, was greater than 100 microM for all cell lines tested. In addition, after 14 days of continuous culture, at concentrations up to 10 microM, no measurable toxic effect on HepG2 cells or mitochondrial DNA replication within these cells was observed. When administered orally to rats, dOTC was well absorbed, with a

  7. A Rapid Screening Assay Identifies Monotherapy with Interferon-ß and Combination Therapies with Nucleoside Analogs as Effective Inhibitors of Ebola Virus

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Stephen D. S.; Majchrzak-Kita, Beata; Racine, Trina; Kozlowski, Hannah N.; Baker, Darren P.; Hoenen, Thomas; Kobinger, Gary P.; Fish, Eleanor N.; Branch, Donald R.

    2016-01-01

    To date there are no approved antiviral drugs for the treatment of Ebola virus disease (EVD). While a number of candidate drugs have shown limited efficacy in vitro and/or in non-human primate studies, differences in experimental methodologies make it difficult to compare their therapeutic effectiveness. Using an in vitro model of Ebola Zaire replication with transcription-competent virus like particles (trVLPs), requiring only level 2 biosafety containment, we compared the activities of the type I interferons (IFNs) IFN-α and IFN-ß, a panel of viral polymerase inhibitors (lamivudine (3TC), zidovudine (AZT) tenofovir (TFV), favipiravir (FPV), the active metabolite of brincidofovir, cidofovir (CDF)), and the estrogen receptor modulator, toremifene (TOR), in inhibiting viral replication in dose-response and time course studies. We also tested 28 two- and 56 three-drug combinations against Ebola replication. IFN-α and IFN-ß inhibited viral replication 24 hours post-infection (IC50 0.038μM and 0.016μM, respectively). 3TC, AZT and TFV inhibited Ebola replication when used alone (50–62%) or in combination (87%). They exhibited lower IC50 (0.98–6.2μM) compared with FPV (36.8μM), when administered 24 hours post-infection. Unexpectedly, CDF had a narrow therapeutic window (6.25–25μM). When dosed >50μM, CDF treatment enhanced viral infection. IFN-ß exhibited strong synergy with 3TC (97.3% inhibition) or in triple combination with 3TC and AZT (95.8% inhibition). This study demonstrates that IFNs and viral polymerase inhibitors may have utility in EVD. We identified several 2 and 3 drug combinations with strong anti-Ebola activity, confirmed in studies using fully infectious ZEBOV, providing a rationale for testing combination therapies in animal models of lethal Ebola challenge. These studies open up new possibilities for novel therapeutic options, in particular combination therapies, which could prevent and treat Ebola infection and potentially reduce drug

  8. Drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Varga, Zoltán V; Ferdinandy, Peter; Liaudet, Lucas; Pacher, Pál

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondria has an essential role in myocardial tissue homeostasis; thus deterioration in mitochondrial function eventually leads to cardiomyocyte and endothelial cell death and consequent cardiovascular dysfunction. Several chemical compounds and drugs have been known to directly or indirectly modulate cardiac mitochondrial function, which can account both for the toxicological and pharmacological properties of these substances. In many cases, toxicity problems appear only in the presence of additional cardiovascular disease conditions or develop months/years following the exposure, making the diagnosis difficult. Cardiotoxic agents affecting mitochondria include several widely used anticancer drugs [anthracyclines (Doxorubicin/Adriamycin), cisplatin, trastuzumab (Herceptin), arsenic trioxide (Trisenox), mitoxantrone (Novantrone), imatinib (Gleevec), bevacizumab (Avastin), sunitinib (Sutent), and sorafenib (Nevaxar)], antiviral compound azidothymidine (AZT, Zidovudine) and several oral antidiabetics [e.g., rosiglitazone (Avandia)]. Illicit drugs such as alcohol, cocaine, methamphetamine, ecstasy, and synthetic cannabinoids (spice, K2) may also induce mitochondria-related cardiotoxicity. Mitochondrial toxicity develops due to various mechanisms involving interference with the mitochondrial respiratory chain (e.g., uncoupling) or inhibition of the important mitochondrial enzymes (oxidative phosphorylation, Szent-Györgyi-Krebs cycle, mitochondrial DNA replication, ADP/ATP translocator). The final phase of mitochondrial dysfunction induces loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and an increase in mitochondrial oxidative/nitrative stress, eventually culminating into cell death. This review aims to discuss the mechanisms of mitochondrion-mediated cardiotoxicity of commonly used drugs and some potential cardioprotective strategies to prevent these toxicities. PMID:26386112

  9. A post‐partum single‐dose TDF/FTC tail does not prevent the selection of NNRTI resistance in women receiving pre‐partum ZDV and intrapartum single‐dose nevirapine to prevent mother‐to‐ child HIV‐1 transmission

    PubMed Central

    Paredes, Roger; Parboosing, Raveen; Moodley, Pravi; Singh, Lavanya; Naidoo, Anneta; Gordon, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Although the rates of vertical transmission of HIV in the developing world have improved to around 3% in countries like South Africa, resistance to antiretrovirals (ARV) used in Prevention of Mother‐to‐Child transmission (pMTCT) strategies may thwart such outcomes and affect the efficacy of future ARV regimens in mothers and children. This study conducted in Durban, South Africa, between 2010 and 2013 found a high rate of nevirapine (NVP) resistance among women receiving Zidovudine (AZT) from 14 weeks gestation, single dose nevirapine (sd NVP) at the onset of labor and a single dose of coformulated Tenofovir/Emtricitabine (TDF/FTC) postpartum. Using Sanger sequencing, high and intermediate levels of nevirapine (NVP) resistance were detected in 15/44 (34%) and in 1/44 (2%) of women tested, respectively. Most subjects selected the K103N mutation (22% (10/45) of all patients and 66% (10/15) of those with high‐level NVP resistance). Such rate of NVP resistance is comparable to studies where only sd NVP was used. In conclusion, a post‐partum single‐dose TDF/FTC tail does not prevent the selection of NNRTI resistance in women receiving pre‐partum ZDV and intrapartum sd NVP to prevent mother‐to‐child HIV‐1 transmission. J. Med. Virol. 87:1662–1667, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Medical Virology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25940687

  10. Arsenic trioxide and interferon-alpha synergize to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I-transformed cells.

    PubMed

    Bazarbachi, A; El-Sabban, M E; Nasr, R; Quignon, F; Awaraji, C; Kersual, J; Dianoux, L; Zermati, Y; Haidar, J H; Hermine, O; de Thé, H

    1999-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL). ATL is an aggressive proliferation of mature activated T cells associated with a poor prognosis. The combination of the antiviral agents, zidovudine (AZT) and interferon (IFN), is a potent treatment of ATL. Recently, arsenic trioxide (As) was shown to be an effective treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). We have tested the effects of the combination of As and IFN on cell proliferation, cell cycle phases distribution, and apoptosis in ATL-derived or control T-cell lines. A high synergistic effect between IFN and As was observed in ATL-derived cell lines in comparison to the control cell lines, with a dramatic inhibition of cell proliferation, G1 arrest, and induction of apoptosis. Similar results were obtained with fresh leukemia cells derived from an ATL patient. Although the mechanisms involved are unclear, these results could provide a rational basis for combined As and IFN treatments in ATL. PMID:9864171

  11. Toxicity of nucleoside analogues used to treat AIDS and the selectivity of the mitochondrial DNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Harold; Hanes, Jeremiah; Johnson, Kenneth A

    2003-12-23

    Incorporation of nucleoside analogues by the mitochondrial DNA polymerase has been implicated as the primary cause underlying many of the toxic side effects of these drugs in HIV therapy. Recent success in reconstituting recombinant human enzyme has afforded a detailed mechanistic analysis of the reactions governing nucleotide selectivity of the polymerase and the proofreading exonuclease. The toxic side effects of nucleoside analogues are correlated with the kinetics of incorporation by the mitochondrial DNA polymerase, varying over 6 orders of magnitude in the sequence zalcitabine (ddC) > didanosine (ddI metabolized to ddA) > stavudine (d4T) > lamivudine (3TC) > tenofovir (PMPA) > zidovudine (AZT) > abacavir (metabolized to carbovir, CBV). In this review, we summarize our current efforts to examine the mechanistic basis for nucleotide selectivity by the mitochondrial DNA polymerase and its role in mitochondrial toxicity of nucleoside analogues used to treat AIDS and other viral infections. We will also discuss the promise and underlying challenges for the development of new analogues with lower toxicity.

  12. Characterization of Human Endogenous Retroviral Elements in the Blood of HIV-1-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Contreras-Galindo, Rafael; Kaplan, Mark H.; Contreras-Galindo, Angie C.; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Marta J.; Ferlenghi, Ilaria; Giusti, Fabiola; Lorenzo, Eric; Gitlin, Scott D.; Dosik, Michael H.; Yamamura, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported finding the RNA of a type K human endogenous retrovirus, HERV-K (HML-2), at high titers in the plasma of HIV-1-infected and cancer patients (R. Contreras-Galindo et al., J. Virol. 82:9329–9236, 2008.). The extent to which the HERV-K (HML-2) proviruses become activated and the nature of their activated viral RNAs remain important questions. Therefore, we amplified and sequenced the full-length RNA of the env gene of the type 1 and 2 HERV-K (HML-2) viruses collected from the plasma of seven HIV-1-infected patients over a period of 1 to 3 years and from five breast cancer patients in order to reconstruct the genetic evolution of these viruses. HERV-K (HML-2) RNA was found in plasma fractions of HIV-1 patients at a density of ∼1.16 g/ml that contained both immature and correctly processed HERV-K (HML-2) proteins and virus-like particles that were recognized by anti-HERV-K (HML-2) antibodies. RNA sequences from novel HERV-K (HML-2) proviruses were discovered, including K111, which is specifically active during HIV-1 infection. Viral RNA arose from complete proviruses and proviruses devoid of a 5′ long terminal repeat, suggesting that the expression of HERV-K (HML-2) RNA in these patients may involve sense and antisense transcription. In HIV-1-infected individuals, the HERV-K (HML-2) viral RNA showed evidence of frequent recombination, accumulation of synonymous rather than nonsynonymous mutations, and conserved N-glycosylation sites, suggesting that some of the HERV-K (HML-2) viral RNAs have undergone reverse transcription and are under purifying selection. In contrast, HERV-K (HML-2) RNA sequences found in the blood of breast cancer patients showed no evidence of recombination and exhibited only sporadic viral mutations. This study suggests that HERV-K (HML-2) is active in HIV-1-infected patients, and the resulting RNA message reveals previously undiscovered HERV-K (HML-2) genomic sequences. PMID:22031938

  13. IgA testing for diagnosis of retroviral infections in the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Ridel, P R; Artus, J C; Capron, A

    1991-01-01

    In Guadeloupe, a Caribbean island with a high prevalence of HTLV-I infected subjects, the percentage of false positive results for HIV IgG is high, requiring additional time and expense for confirmatory tests. This article describes a simple way of overcoming this problem. First, all IgG and IgG immune complexes are removed by protein G treatment, and then IgA enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the Western blot test are performed with minor modification of commercially available kits.

  14. Host restriction factors in retroviral infection: promises in virus-host interaction.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yong-Hui; Jeang, Kuan-Teh; Tokunaga, Kenzo

    2012-12-20

    Retroviruses have an intricate life cycle. There is much to be learned from studying retrovirus-host interactions. Among retroviruses, the primate lentiviruses have one of the more complex genome structures with three categories of viral genes: structural, regulatory, and accessory genes. Over time, we have gained increasing understanding of the lentivirus life cycle from studying host factors that support virus replication. Similarly, studies on host restriction factors that inhibit viral replication have also made significant contributions to our knowledge. Here, we review recent progress on the rapidly growing field of restriction factors, focusing on the antiretroviral activities of APOBEC3G, TRIM5, tetherin, SAMHD1, MOV10, and cellular microRNAs (miRNAs), and the counter-activities of Vif, Vpu, Vpr, Vpx, and Nef.

  15. Regions identity between the genome of vertebrates and non-retroviral families of insect viruses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The scope of our understanding of the evolutionary history between viruses and animals is limited. The fact that the recent availability of many complete insect virus genomes and vertebrate genomes as well as the ability to screen these sequences makes it possible to gain a new perspective insight into the evolutionary interaction between insect viruses and vertebrates. This study is to determine the possibility of existence of sequence identity between the genomes of insect viruses and vertebrates, attempt to explain this phenomenon in term of genetic mobile element, and try to investigate the evolutionary relationship between these short regions of identity among these species. Results Some of studied insect viruses contain variable numbers of short regions of sequence identity to the genomes of vertebrate with nucleotide sequence length from 28 bp to 124 bp. They are found to locate in multiple sites of the vertebrate genomes. The ontology of animal genes with identical regions involves in several processes including chromatin remodeling, regulation of apoptosis, signaling pathway, nerve system development and some enzyme-like catalysis. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that at least some short regions of sequence identity in the genomes of vertebrate are derived the ancestral of insect viruses. Conclusion Short regions of sequence identity were found in the vertebrates and insect viruses. These sequences played an important role not only in the long-term evolution of vertebrates, but also in promotion of insect virus. This typical win-win strategy may come from natural selection. PMID:22073942

  16. Retroviral induction of acute lymphoproliferative disease and profound immunosuppression in adult C57BL/6 mice

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    We have shown that a mixture of murine leukemia viruses (MuLV) causes the acute onset of lymphoproliferation and immunosuppression when injected into adult C57BL/6 mice. The ecotropic/MCF (mink cell focus- inducing) mixture of MuLV stimulates polyclonal B lymphocyte proliferation and differentiation to antibody-secreting cells. Serum Ig levels are elevated for all isotypes except IgA. The viral infection leads to a rapid decline in T lymphocyte responses to mitogens and alloantigens, as well as a decrease in helper cell activity. Specific antibody responses to both T-dependent and T-independent antigens are impaired, and the response of B lymphocytes to mitogens is abolished. The profound immunosuppression seems to be due to the MuLV-induced polyclonal activation of lymphocytes. No active suppression of normal lymphocyte responses by cells from virus-infected mice was observed. The disease induced by the LP-BM5 MuLV isolate thus seems a promising model for the study of lymphocyte activation and the mechanisms of retrovirus-induced immunosuppression. PMID:2984305

  17. New bioinformatic tool for quick identification of functionally relevant endogenous retroviral inserts in human genome.

    PubMed

    Garazha, Andrew; Ivanova, Alena; Suntsova, Maria; Malakhova, Galina; Roumiantsev, Sergey; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Buzdin, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) and LTR retrotransposons (LRs) occupy ∼8% of human genome. Deep sequencing technologies provide clues to understanding of functional relevance of individual ERVs/LRs by enabling direct identification of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) and other landmarks of functional genomic elements. Here, we performed the genome-wide identification of human ERVs/LRs containing TFBS according to the ENCODE project. We created the first interactive ERV/LRs database that groups the individual inserts according to their familial nomenclature, number of mapped TFBS and divergence from their consensus sequence. Information on any particular element can be easily extracted by the user. We also created a genome browser tool, which enables quick mapping of any ERV/LR insert according to genomic coordinates, known human genes and TFBS. These tools can be used to easily explore functionally relevant individual ERV/LRs, and for studying their impact on the regulation of human genes. Overall, we identified ∼110,000 ERV/LR genomic elements having TFBS. We propose a hypothesis of "domestication" of ERV/LR TFBS by the genome milieu including subsequent stages of initial epigenetic repression, pa