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Sample records for retrovirus perv expression

  1. How Active Are Porcine Endogenous Retroviruses (PERVs)?

    PubMed Central

    Denner, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) represent a risk factor if porcine cells, tissues, or organs were to be transplanted into human recipients to alleviate the shortage of human transplants; a procedure called xenotransplantation. In contrast to human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs), which are mostly defective and not replication-competent, PERVs are released from normal pig cells and are infectious. PERV-A and PERV-B are polytropic viruses infecting cells of several species, among them humans; whereas PERV-C is an ecotropic virus infecting only pig cells. Virus infection was shown in co-culture experiments, but also in vivo, in the pig, leading to de novo integration of proviruses in certain organs. This was shown by measurement of the copy number per cell, finding different numbers in different organs. In addition, recombinations between PERV-A and PERV-C were observed and the recombinant PERV-A/C were found to be integrated in cells of different organs, but not in the germ line of the animals. Here, the evidence for such in vivo activities of PERVs, including expression as mRNA, protein and virus particles, de novo infection and recombination, will be summarised. These activities make screening of pigs for provirus number and PERV expression level difficult, especially when only blood or ear biopsies are available for analysis. Highly sensitive methods to measure the copy number and the expression level will be required when selecting pigs with low copy number and low expression of PERV as well as when inactivating PERVs using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated nuclease (CRISPR/Cas) technology. PMID:27527207

  2. Generation of neutralising antibodies against porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs)

    SciTech Connect

    Kaulitz, Danny; Fiebig, Uwe; Eschricht, Magdalena; Wurzbacher, Christian; Kurth, Reinhard; Denner, Joachim

    2011-03-01

    Antibodies neutralising porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) were induced in different animal species by immunisation with the transmembrane envelope protein p15E. These antibodies recognised epitopes, designated E1, in the fusion peptide proximal region (FPPR) of p15E, and E2 in the membrane proximal external region (MPER). E2 is localised in a position similar to that of an epitope in the transmembrane envelope protein gp41 of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1), recognised by the monoclonal antibody 4E10 that is broadly neutralising. To detect neutralising antibodies specific for PERV, a novel assay was developed, which is based on quantification of provirus integration by real-time PCR. In addition, for the first time, highly effective neutralising antibodies were obtained by immunisation with the surface envelope protein of PERV. These data indicate that neutralising antibodies can be induced by immunisation with both envelope proteins.

  3. Porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV) and its transmission characteristics: a study of the New Zealand designated pathogen-free herd.

    PubMed

    Garkavenko, O; Wynyard, S; Nathu, D; Simond, D; Muzina, M; Muzina, Z; Scobie, L; Hector, R D; Croxson, M C; Tan, P; Elliott, B R

    2008-01-01

    Previously a strategy for monitoring of pigs intended for cell transplantation was developed and successfully applied to several representative herds in New Zealand. A designated pathogen-free (DPF) herd has been chosen as a good candidate for xenotransplantation. This herd has previously tested free of infectious agents relevant to xenotransplantation and we present here an in depth study of porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV) transmission. A panel of assays that describes the constraints for the transmission of PERV has been suggested. It includes a) infectivity test in coculture of DPF pig primary cells with both human and pig target cell lines; b) RT activity in supernatant of stimulated primary cells from DPF pigs; c) viral load in donor's blood plasma; d) PERV proviral copy number in DPF pig genome; e) PERV class C prevalence in the herd and its recombination potential. There was no evidence of PERV transmission from DPF pig tissue to either pig or human cells. Additionally, there was no evidence of PERV RNA present in pig blood plasma. PERV copy number differs in individual pigs from as low as 3 copies to 30 copies and the presence of PERV-C varied between animals and breeds. In all DPF pigs tested, a specific locus for PERV-C potentially associated with the recombination of PERV in miniature swine was absent. Presented data on the PERV transmission allows us to classify the DPF potential donors as "null" or noninfectious pigs.

  4. Cytotoxic Effects during Knock Out of Multiple Porcine Endogenous Retrovirus (PERV) Sequences in the Pig Genome by Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFN).

    PubMed

    Semaan, Marwan; Ivanusic, Daniel; Denner, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Xenotransplantation has been proposed as a solution to the shortage of suitable human donors for transplantation and pigs are currently favoured as donor animals. However, xenotransplantation may be associated with the transmission of zoonotic microorganisms. Whereas most porcine microorganisms representing a risk for the human recipient may be eliminated by designated pathogen free breeding, multiple copies of porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) are integrated in the genome of all pigs and cannot be eliminated this way. PERVs are released as infectious particles and infect human cells. The zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) technology allows knocking out specifically cellular genes, however it was not yet used to eliminate multiple integrated proviral sequences with a strong conservation in the target sequence. To reduce the risk of horizontal PERV transmission and to knock out as many as possible proviruses, for the first time the powerful tool of the ZFN technology was used. ZFN were designed to bind specifically to sequences conserved in all known replication-competent proviruses. Expression and transport of the ZFN into the nucleus was shown by Western blot analysis, co-localisation analysis, PLA and FRET. Survival of transfected cells was analysed using fluorescent ZFN and cell counting. After transfection a strong expression of the ZFN proteins and a co-localisation of the expressed ZFN proteins were shown. However, expression of the ZFN was found to be extremely toxic for the transfected cells. The induced cytotoxicity was likely due to the specific cutting of the high copy number of the PERV proviruses, which is also commonly observed when ZFN with low specificity cleave numerous off-target sites in a genome. This is the first attempt to knock out multiple, nearly identical, genes in a cellular genome using ZFN. The attempt failed, and other strategies should be used to prevent PERV transmission.

  5. Infection Barriers to Successful Xenotransplantation Focusing on Porcine Endogenous Retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Tönjes, Ralf R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Xenotransplantation may be a solution to overcome the shortage of organs for the treatment of patients with organ failure, but it may be associated with the transmission of porcine microorganisms and the development of xenozoonoses. Whereas most microorganisms may be eliminated by pathogen-free breeding of the donor animals, porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) cannot be eliminated, since these are integrated into the genomes of all pigs. Human-tropic PERV-A and -B are present in all pigs and are able to infect human cells. Infection of ecotropic PERV-C is limited to pig cells. PERVs may adapt to host cells by varying the number of LTR-binding transcription factor binding sites. Like all retroviruses, they may induce tumors and/or immunodeficiencies. To date, all experimental, preclinical, and clinical xenotransplantations using pig cells, tissues, and organs have not shown transmission of PERV. Highly sensitive and specific methods have been developed to analyze the PERV status of donor pigs and to monitor recipients for PERV infection. Strategies have been developed to prevent PERV transmission, including selection of PERV-C-negative, low-producer pigs, generation of an effective vaccine, selection of effective antiretrovirals, and generation of animals transgenic for a PERV-specific short hairpin RNA inhibiting PERV expression by RNA interference. PMID:22491774

  6. Differential sensitivity of porcine endogenous retrovirus to APOBEC3-mediated inhibition.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Han; Kim, Jin Ha; Jung, Yong-Tae

    2015-08-01

    Pigs are considered to be suitable xenotransplantation organ donors. However, the risk of pathogen transmission from pigs to humans is a major concern in the transplantation of porcine tissues. The porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) PERV-A, PERV-A/C, and PERV-B can infect human cells, but PERV-C is an ecotropic virus infecting only pig cells. Thus, several strategies have been proposed to reduce PERV transmission in xenograft recipients. Human APOBEC3G (huA3G) is a single-strand DNA cytosine deaminase, which inactivates the coding capacity of the virus by deamination of cDNA cytosines to uracils. This reaction occurs within the (-) DNA strand during reverse transcription, resulting in a G-to-A mutation in the (+) strand. While recent data have shown that PERV-B is severely inhibited by huA3G and porcine A3Z2-Z3 (poA3F) in a pseudotype assay, little is known about PERV-C. Here, we compare the antiretroviral activities of huA3G, huA3F and poA3Z2-Z3 against PERV-C. Our data show that APOBEC3 was packaged into PERV-C particles and inhibited PERV-C replication in a dose-dependent manner. PERV-C infectivity was strongly inhibited by poA3Z2-Z3, but it did not markedly reduce PERV-B infectivity. This suggests that PERV-C Gag interacts efficiently with poA3Z2-Z3. In addition, we constructed stably huA3G- and poA3Z2-Z3-expressing 293-PERV-PK-CIRCE cells (human 293 cells infected with PK15-derived PERVs) to examine whether PERV is resistant to poA3Z2-Z3 in a virus-spreading assay. The stably expressed huA3G and poA3Z2-Z3 were more packaging-competent than transiently expressed APOBEC3 proteins. These results suggest that poA3Z2-Z3 can inhibit PERV replication in a pseudotype assay as well as in a virus-spreading assay.

  7. Converging strategies in expression of human complex retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Cavallari, Ilaria; Rende, Francesca; D'Agostino, Donna M; Ciminale, Vincenzo

    2011-08-01

    The discovery of human retroviruses in the early 1980s revealed the existence of viral-encoded non-structural genes that were not evident in previously described animal retroviruses. Based on the absence or presence of these additional genes retroviruses were classified as 'simple' and 'complex', respectively. Expression of most of these extra genes is achieved through the generation of alternatively spliced mRNAs. The present review summarizes the genetic organization and expression strategies of human complex retroviruses and highlights the converging mechanisms controlling their life cycles.

  8. Converging Strategies in Expression of Human Complex Retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Cavallari, Ilaria; Rende, Francesca; D'Agostino, Donna M.; Ciminale, Vincenzo

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of human retroviruses in the early 1980s revealed the existence of viral-encoded non-structural genes that were not evident in previously described animal retroviruses. Based on the absence or presence of these additional genes retroviruses were classified as ‘simple’ and ‘complex’, respectively. Expression of most of these extra genes is achieved through the generation of alternatively spliced mRNAs. The present review summarizes the genetic organization and expression strategies of human complex retroviruses and highlights the converging mechanisms controlling their life cycles. PMID:21994786

  9. The International Xenotransplantation Association consensus statement on conditions for undertaking clinical trials of porcine islet products in type 1 diabetes--chapter 5: Strategies to prevent transmission of porcine endogenous retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Denner, Joachim; Schuurman, Henk-Jan; Patience, Clive

    2009-01-01

    Xenotransplantation using porcine cells, tissues, or organs may offer a potential solution for the shortage of allogeneic human organs. Prior to the clinical use of porcine xenotransplants, three main hurdles must be overcome: immunologic rejection, physiologic incompatibility, and risk of transmission of porcine pathogens. Designated pathogen-free breeding of pigs can prevent transmission of most porcine microbes. However, this is not possible in the case of porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERV), which are integrated in the pig genome and can infect human cells in vitro. In order to assess the probability of transmission of PERV, a careful screening of the source pig herd is recommended. Two types of PERV are present in pigs, human-tropic PERV-A and PERV-B, which are both present in the genome of all pigs, and PERV-C, which is not ubiquitous and infects only pig cells. In addition to these viruses, recombinant PERV-A/C viruses have recently been described that (i) are able to infect human cells; (ii) are characterized by high titre replication; and (iii) are associated with proviruses that are de novo integrated in the DNA of somatic pig cells, but not yet in the pig germ line. The risks presented by PERV-A/C recombinant viruses could easily be eliminated by using pigs not containing PERV-C in their germ line, thereby effectively preventing recombination with PERV-A. Selection of PERV-C-free animals, if possible, therefore reduces the risk of PERV-A/C transmission to humans. Although it is unclear whether PERV-C may be transmitted in vivo from pig-to-pig, an infection of PERV-C-free animals with this virus may be prevented. To select pigs with low-level expression of PERV-A and PERV-B, it is recommended to apply assays based on real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), which enables discrimination between pigs with high-level expression and low-level expression. Screening xenotransplant recipients for PERV transmission can be done in a

  10. Retroviruses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varmus, Harold

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the growth, development, and unusual parasitic nature of the retrovirus community. Reviews these infectious cancer-causing agents as models for the study of fundamental biological problems, tools for genetic manipulations, and problems posed by their pathogenic potential in humans and animal hosts where they cause diseases such as…

  11. Expression and function of endogenous retroviruses in the placenta.

    PubMed

    Denner, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Although the expression of endogenous retroviruses in the placenta of numerous species was observed a long time ago, their physiological function during gestation was demonstrated only very recently. Expression of retroviral envelope proteins, also called syncytins, in the placenta allows generation of the multinuclear syncytiotrophoblast as an outer cellular layer of the placenta by fusion of the trophoblast cells. This fusion process is crucial for the development of the placenta and for successful pregnancy. It is still unclear whether the immunosuppressive properties of the transmembrane envelope protein of the endogenous retroviruses expressed in the placenta contribute to immunosuppression to prevent the rejection of the semiallotransplant embryo. The presence of placenta cells expressing retroviral envelope proteins surrounded by immune cells deep in the maternal tissue supports an immunosuppressive function. It is important to emphasize that during evolution different species utilized ('enslaved') different endogenous retroviruses and that two or more endogenous retroviruses are involved in placentogenesis in each species.

  12. Reappraisal of biosafety risks posed by PERVs in xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Louz, Derrick; Bergmans, Hans E; Loos, Birgit P; Hoeben, Rob C

    2008-01-01

    Donor materials of porcine origin could potentially provide an alternative source of cells, tissues or whole organs for transplantation to humans, but is hampered by the health risk posed by infection with porcine viruses. Although pigs can be bred in such a way that all known exogenous microorganisms are eliminated, this is not feasible for all endogenous pathogens, such as the porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) which are present in the germline of pigs as proviruses. Upon transplantation, PERV proviruses would be transferred to the human recipient along with the xenograft. If xenotransplantation stimulates or facilitates replication of PERVs in the new hosts, a risk exists for adaptation of the virus to humans and subsequent spread of these viruses. In a worst-case scenario, this might result in the emergence of a new viral disease. Although the concerns for disease potential of PERVs are easing, only limited pre-clinical and clinical data are available. Small-scale, well-designed and carefully controlled clinical trials would provide more evidence on the safety of this approach and allow a better appreciation of the risks involved. It is therefore important to have a framework of protective measures and monitoring protocols in place to facilitate such initially small scale clinical trials. This framework will raise ethical and social considerations regarding acceptability. PMID:17987669

  13. Reappraisal of biosafety risks posed by PERVs in xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Louz, Derrick; Bergmans, Hans E; Loos, Birgit P; Hoeben, Rob C

    2008-01-01

    Donor materials of porcine origin could potentially provide an alternative source of cells, tissues or whole organs for transplantation to humans, but is hampered by the health risk posed by infection with porcine viruses. Although pigs can be bred in such a way that all known exogenous microorganisms are eliminated, this is not feasible for all endogenous pathogens, such as the porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) which are present in the germline of pigs as proviruses. Upon transplantation, PERV proviruses would be transferred to the human recipient along with the xenograft. If xenotransplantation stimulates or facilitates replication of PERVs in the new hosts, a risk exists for adaptation of the virus to humans and subsequent spread of these viruses. In a worst-case scenario, this might result in the emergence of a new viral disease. Although the concerns for disease potential of PERVs are easing, only limited pre-clinical and clinical data are available. Small-scale, well-designed and carefully controlled clinical trials would provide more evidence on the safety of this approach and allow a better appreciation of the risks involved. It is therefore important to have a framework of protective measures and monitoring protocols in place to facilitate such initially small scale clinical trials. This framework will raise ethical and social considerations regarding acceptability.

  14. Distribution of Porcine Endogenous Retrovirus in Different Organs of the Hybrid of a Landrace and a Jeju Domestic Pig in Korea.

    PubMed

    Yoon, J K; Choi, J; Lee, H J; Cho, Y; Gwon, Y D; Jang, Y; Kim, S; Choi, H; Lee, J H; Kim, Y B

    2015-01-01

    Xenotransplantation offers a solution to the shortage of available organs for transplantation, and the pig represents an ideal source of such organs. However, porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV), whose genome is integrated in pigs, has been suggested to pose a potential risk of xenotransmission. Expression of PERVs in different organs of pigs was carefully measured at DNA, mRNA, and protein levels, providing information valuable for the application of pig organs in xenotransplantation. An analysis of PERV DNA showed that a very similar number of PERV copies was present in the genome of all organs, whereas mRNA and protein levels of PERV varied depending on the organ, with kidney, liver, and spleen expressing high levels of both mRNA and protein. In contrast, mRNA and protein levels were dissimilar in the lung and brain, where mRNA levels were low but protein levels were high. This discrepancy indicates that mRNA levels are not always reflected in protein expression. In addition, the difference between mRNA and protein highlights the importance of choosing the proper analysis method for diagnosing viral infection. In summary, this study provides insight into the distribution of PERV in various organs at the DNA, mRNA, and protein levels, and also informs the proper selection of tissues or organs for future clinical xenotransplantation. PMID:26293098

  15. Distribution of Porcine Endogenous Retrovirus in Different Organs of the Hybrid of a Landrace and a Jeju Domestic Pig in Korea.

    PubMed

    Yoon, J K; Choi, J; Lee, H J; Cho, Y; Gwon, Y D; Jang, Y; Kim, S; Choi, H; Lee, J H; Kim, Y B

    2015-01-01

    Xenotransplantation offers a solution to the shortage of available organs for transplantation, and the pig represents an ideal source of such organs. However, porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV), whose genome is integrated in pigs, has been suggested to pose a potential risk of xenotransmission. Expression of PERVs in different organs of pigs was carefully measured at DNA, mRNA, and protein levels, providing information valuable for the application of pig organs in xenotransplantation. An analysis of PERV DNA showed that a very similar number of PERV copies was present in the genome of all organs, whereas mRNA and protein levels of PERV varied depending on the organ, with kidney, liver, and spleen expressing high levels of both mRNA and protein. In contrast, mRNA and protein levels were dissimilar in the lung and brain, where mRNA levels were low but protein levels were high. This discrepancy indicates that mRNA levels are not always reflected in protein expression. In addition, the difference between mRNA and protein highlights the importance of choosing the proper analysis method for diagnosing viral infection. In summary, this study provides insight into the distribution of PERV in various organs at the DNA, mRNA, and protein levels, and also informs the proper selection of tissues or organs for future clinical xenotransplantation.

  16. Identification of full-length proviral DNA of porcine endogenous retrovirus from Chinese Wuzhishan miniature pigs inbred.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuyuan; Lv, Maomin; Xu, Shu; Wu, Jianmin; Tian, Kegong; Zhang, Jingang

    2010-07-01

    Existence of porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV) hinders pigs to be used in clinical xenotransplantation to alleviate the shortage of human transplants. Chinese miniature pigs are potential organ donors for xenotransplantation in China. However, so far, an adequate level of information on the molecular characteristics of PERV from Chinese miniature pigs has not been available. We described here the cloning and characterization of full-length proviral DNA of PERV from Chinese Wuzhishan miniature pigs inbred (WZSP). Full-length nucleotide sequences of PERV-WZSP and other PERVs were aligned and phylogenetic tree was constructed from deduced amino-acid sequences of env. The results demonstrated that the full-length proviral DNA of PERV-WZSP belongs to gammaretrovirus and shares high similarity with other PERVs. Sequence analysis also suggested that different patterns of LTR existed in the same porcine germ line and partial PERV-C sequence may recombine with PERV-A sequence in LTR.

  17. PCR-based cloning and immunocytological titration of infectious porcine endogenous retrovirus subgroup A and B.

    PubMed

    Bartosch, Birke; Weiss, Robin A; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro

    2002-09-01

    Two pig endogenous retroviruses (PERV), PERV-A and -B, productively infect human cells and are therefore considered to constitute a potential risk in pig-to-human xenotransplantation. A PCR-based cloning technique to isolate infectious PERV proviruses was established. Overlapping 3' half and 5' halves of PERV proviral genomes were amplified using DNA extracted from human 293 cells infected with PERV-A or -B. These clones were fused at a unique restriction site in the overlapping region and tested for their infectivity. Representative constructs possessed the same infectious properties as their parent isolates. We also developed a polyclonal anti-PERV serum by using recombinant PERV capsid protein derived from one of the infectious constructs as immunogen and established an immunocytological method for detection and titration of PERV infection. This detection method proved to be more sensitive than the current method of choice (transfer of MLV-lacZ vectors) for infectivity assessment of PERV. These findings should be considered for future characterization of PERV isolates.

  18. Porcine endogenous retrovirus-A/C: biochemical properties of its integrase and susceptibility to raltegravir.

    PubMed

    Demange, Antonin; Yajjou-Hamalian, Halima; Gallay, Kathy; Luengo, Catherine; Beven, Véronique; Leroux, Aurélie; Confort, Marie-Pierre; Al Andary, Elsy; Gouet, Patrice; Moreau, Karen; Ronfort, Corinne; Blanchard, Yannick

    2015-10-01

    Porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) are present in the genomes of pig cells. The PERV-A/C recombinant virus can infect human cells and is a major risk of zoonotic disease in the case of xenotransplantation of pig organs to humans. Raltegravir (RAL) is a viral integrase (IN) inhibitor used in highly active antiretroviral treatment. In the present study, we explored the potential use of RAL against PERV-A/C. We report (i) a three-dimensional model of the PERV-A/C intasome complexed with RAL, (ii) the sensitivity of PERV-A/C IN to RAL in vitro and (iii) the sensitivity of a PERV-A/C-IRES-GFP recombinant virus to RAL in cellulo. We demonstrated that RAL is a potent inhibitor against PERV-A/C IN and PERV-A/C replication with IC50s in the nanomolar range. To date, the use of retroviral inhibitors remains the only way to control the risk of zoonotic PERV infection during pig-to-human xenotransplantation.

  19. Porcine endogenous retrovirus-A/C: biochemical properties of its integrase and susceptibility to raltegravir.

    PubMed

    Demange, Antonin; Yajjou-Hamalian, Halima; Gallay, Kathy; Luengo, Catherine; Beven, Véronique; Leroux, Aurélie; Confort, Marie-Pierre; Al Andary, Elsy; Gouet, Patrice; Moreau, Karen; Ronfort, Corinne; Blanchard, Yannick

    2015-10-01

    Porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) are present in the genomes of pig cells. The PERV-A/C recombinant virus can infect human cells and is a major risk of zoonotic disease in the case of xenotransplantation of pig organs to humans. Raltegravir (RAL) is a viral integrase (IN) inhibitor used in highly active antiretroviral treatment. In the present study, we explored the potential use of RAL against PERV-A/C. We report (i) a three-dimensional model of the PERV-A/C intasome complexed with RAL, (ii) the sensitivity of PERV-A/C IN to RAL in vitro and (iii) the sensitivity of a PERV-A/C-IRES-GFP recombinant virus to RAL in cellulo. We demonstrated that RAL is a potent inhibitor against PERV-A/C IN and PERV-A/C replication with IC50s in the nanomolar range. To date, the use of retroviral inhibitors remains the only way to control the risk of zoonotic PERV infection during pig-to-human xenotransplantation. PMID:26296914

  20. Evolutionary Spread and Recombination of Porcine Endogenous Retroviruses in the Suiformes

    PubMed Central

    Niebert, Marcus; Tönjes, Ralf R.

    2005-01-01

    Different Suiformes with increasing phylogenetic distance to the common pig (Sus scrofa) were assayed for the presence of porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERV) in general (pol gene), while the distribution of long terminal repeat (LTR) types (with or without repeats in U3) and env genes (classes A, B, and C) were determined in detail. PERV was not detectable in the most distantly related species, while classes PERV-A and PERV-B are present in Suiformes originating in the Pliocene epoch, and class PERV-C was detectable only in S. scrofa and in closely related species originating in the Holocene epoch. This distribution pattern of PERV classes is in line with our previous study on the age of PERV (45) and suggests an African origin of about 7.5 million years ago (MYA) and a gradual spread of PERV through the Suiformes. It seems likely that PERV-C originated more recently (1.5 to 3.5 MYA) by recombination with a homologue of unknown descent, while the origin of the repeatless LTR was a separate event approximately 3.5 MYA. PMID:15596862

  1. Chemiluminescent Detection for Estimating Relative Copy Numbers of Porcine Endogenous Retrovirus Proviruses from Chinese Minipigs Based on Magnetic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haowen; Liu, Ming; Zhou, Bingcong; Deng, Yan; He, Nongyue; Jiang, Hesheng; Guo, Yafen; Lan, Ganqiu; Jiang, Qinyang; Yang, Xiurong; Li, Zhiyang

    2016-06-01

    Chinese Bama minipigs could be potential donors for the supply of xenografts because they are genetically stable, highly inbred, and inexpensive. However, porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV) is commonly integrated in pig genomes and could cause a cross-species infection by xenotransplantation. For screening out the pigs with low copy numbers of PERV proviruses, we have developed a novel semiquantitative analysis approach based on magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and chemiluminescence (CL) for estimating relative copy numbers (RCNs) of PERV proviruses in Chinese Bama minipigs. The CL intensities of PERV proviruses and the housekeeping gene glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) were respectively determined with this method, and the RCNs of PERV proviruses were calculated by the equation: RCN of PERV provirus = CL intensity of PERV provirus/CL intensity of GAPDH. The results showed that PERVs were integrated in the genomes of Bama minipigs at different copy numbers, and the copy numbers of PERV-C subtype were greatly low. Two Bama minipigs with low copy numbers of PERV proviruses were detected out and could be considered as xenograft donor candidates. Although only semiquantitation can be achieved, this approach has potential for screening out safe and suitable pig donors for xenotransplantation. PMID:27427744

  2. Genome Structure and Thymic Expression of an Endogenous Retrovirus in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Ching-Hung; Steiner, Lisa A.

    2004-01-01

    In a search for previously unknown genes that are required for lymphocyte development in zebrafish, a retroviral sequence was identified in a subtracted thymus cDNA library and in genomic DNA libraries. The provirus is 11.2 kb and contains intact open reading frames for the gag, pol, and env genes, as well as nearly identical flanking long terminal repeat sequences. As determined by in situ hybridization, the thymus appears to be a major tissue for retroviral expression in both larval and adult fish. Several viral transcripts were found by Northern blotting in the adult thymus. The provirus was found at the same genomic locus in sperm from four fish, suggesting that it is an endogenous retrovirus. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that it is closest to, yet distinct from, the cluster of murine leukemia virus-related retroviruses, suggesting that this virus represents a new group of retroviruses. PMID:14694121

  3. Retrovirus-mediated insertion of expressed and non-expressed genes at identical chromosomal locations.

    PubMed Central

    Berwin, B; Barklis, E

    1993-01-01

    During retrovirus replication, a cellularly derived tRNA is annealed to the viral RNA at the primer binding site (PBS) to prime reverse transcription, and both the tRNA and the PBS become copied and matched together on complementary proviral DNA strands prior to integration. Using a viral PBS single base pair mutant which affects provirus expression in undifferentiated cells, we show that reversion to wild type (wt) occurs at a frequency of approximately 50%. Daughter cell lines containing wt or mutant proviruses at identical chromosomal sites have been isolated, supporting a model where an integrated PBS-mismatched provirus was copied before mismatch correction could occur. Virus expression in daughter cells containing the mutant provirus was 100-fold higher than in cells bearing the wt counterpart. Additionally, proviral 5' DNA and cellular 5' flanking DNA became methylated in daughter cells containing wt but not mutant integrants. These results strongly support the current model of retrovirus reverse transcription, and indicate that the wt PBS region contains an element which suppresses virus expression and directs the methylation of viral and neighboring cellular DNA. Images PMID:8506135

  4. Evaluation of Cynomolgus Macaque (Macaca fascicularis) Endogenous Retrovirus Expression Following Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Angie K.; Willer, David O.; Skokovets, Olena; Iwajomo, Oluwadamilola H.; Chan, Jacqueline K.; MacDonald, Kelly S.

    2012-01-01

    Human endogenous retrovirus type K (HERV-K) transcripts are upregulated in the plasma of HIV-infected individuals and have been considered as targets for an HIV vaccine. We evaluated cynomolgus macaque endogenous retrovirus (CyERV) mRNA expression by RT-qPCR in PBMCs isolated from a cohort of animals previously utilized in a live attenuated SIV vaccine trial. CyERV env transcript levels decreased following vaccination (control and vaccine groups) and CyERV env and gag mRNA expression was decreased following acute SIV-infection, whereas during chronic SIV infection, CyERV transcript levels were indistinguishable from baseline. Reduced susceptibility to initial SIV infection, as measured by the number of SIV challenges required for infection, was associated with increased CyERV transcript levels in PBMCs. In vitro analysis revealed that SIV infection of purified CD4+ T-cells did not alter CyERV gene expression. This study represents the first evaluation of ERV expression in cynomolgus macaques following SIV infection, in an effort to assess the utility of cynomolgus macaques as an animal model to evaluate ERVs as a target for an HIV/SIV vaccine. This non-human primate model system does not recapitulate what has been observed to date in the plasma of HIV-infected humans suggesting that further investigation at the cellular level is required to elucidate the impact of HIV/SIV infection on endogenous retrovirus expression. PMID:22768246

  5. Phosphatidylserine treatment relieves the block to retrovirus infection of cells expressing glycosylated virus receptors

    PubMed Central

    Coil, David A; Miller, A Dusty

    2005-01-01

    Background A major determinant of retrovirus host range is the presence or absence of appropriate cell-surface receptors required for virus entry. Often orthologs of functional receptors are present in a wide range of species, but amino acid differences can render these receptors non-functional. In some cases amino acid differences result in additional N-linked glycosylation that blocks virus infection. The latter block to retrovirus infection can be overcome by treatment of cells with compounds such as tunicamycin, which prevent the addition of N-linked oligosaccharides. Results We have discovered that treatment of cells with liposomes composed of phosphatidylserine (PS) can also overcome the block to infection mediated by N-linked glycosylation. Importantly, this effect occurs without apparent change in the glycosylation state of the receptors for these viruses. This effect occurs with delayed kinetics compared to previous results showing enhancement of virus infection by PS treatment of cells expressing functional virus receptors. Conclusion We have demonstrated that PS treatment can relieve the block to retrovirus infection of cells expressing retroviral receptors that have been rendered non-functional by glycosylation. These findings have important implications for the current model describing inhibition of virus entry by receptor glycosylation. PMID:16091143

  6. Restriction of Porcine Endogenous Retrovirus by Porcine APOBEC3 Cytidine Deaminases ▿

    PubMed Central

    Dörrschuck, Eva; Fischer, Nicole; Bravo, Ignacio G.; Hanschmann, Kay-Martin; Kuiper, Heidi; Spötter, Andreas; Möller, Ronny; Cichutek, Klaus; Münk, Carsten; Tönjes, Ralf R.

    2011-01-01

    Xenotransplantation of porcine cells, tissues, and organs shows promise to surmount the shortage of human donor materials. Among the barriers to pig-to-human xenotransplantation are porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERV) since functional representatives of the two polytropic classes, PERV-A and PERV-B, are able to infect human embryonic kidney cells in vitro, suggesting that a xenozoonosis in vivo could occur. To assess the capacity of human and porcine cells to counteract PERV infections, we analyzed human and porcine APOBEC3 (A3) proteins. This multigene family of cytidine deaminases contributes to the cellular intrinsic immunity and act as potent inhibitors of retroviruses and retrotransposons. Our data show that the porcine A3 gene locus on chromosome 5 consists of the two single-domain genes A3Z2 and A3Z3. The evolutionary relationships of the A3Z3 genes reflect the evolutionary history of mammals. The two A3 genes encode at least four different mRNAs: A3Z2, A3Z3, A3Z2-Z3, and A3Z2-Z3 splice variant A (SVA). Porcine and human A3s have been tested toward their antiretroviral activity against PERV and murine leukemia virus (MuLV) using novel single-round reporter viruses. The porcine A3Z2, A3Z3 and A3Z2-Z3 were packaged into PERV particles and inhibited PERV replication in a dose-dependent manner. The antiretroviral effect correlated with editing by the porcine A3s with a trinucleotide preference for 5′ TGC for A3Z2 and A3Z2-Z3 and 5′ CAC for A3Z3. These results strongly imply that human and porcine A3s could inhibit PERV replication in vivo, thereby reducing the risk of infection of human cells by PERV in the context of pig-to-human xenotransplantation. PMID:21307203

  7. Extended Analysis of the In Vitro Tropism of Porcine Endogenous Retrovirus

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Carolyn A.; Wong, Susan; VanBrocklin, Matthew; Federspiel, Mark J.

    2000-01-01

    We previously reported that mitogenic activation of porcine peripheral blood mononuclear cells resulted in production of porcine endogenous retrovirus(es) (PERV[s]) capable of productively infecting human cells (C. Wilson et al., J. Virol. 72:3082–3087, 1998). We now extend that analysis to show that additional passage of isolated virus, named here PERV-NIH, through a human cell line yielded a viral population with a higher titer of infectious virus on human cells than the initial isolate. We show that in a single additional passage on a human cell line, the increase in infectivity for human cells is accounted for by selection against variants carrying pig-tropic envelope sequences (PERV-C) as well as by enrichment for replication-competent genomes. Sequence analysis of the envelope cDNA present in virions demonstrated that the envelope sequence of PERV-NIH is related to but distinct from previously reported PERV envelopes. The in vitro host range of PERV was studied in human primary cells and cell lines, as well as in cell lines from nonhuman primate and other species. This analysis reveals three patterns of susceptibility to infection among these host cells: (i) cells are resistant to infection in our assay; (ii) cells are infected by virus, as viral RNA is detected in the supernatant by reverse transcription-PCR, but the cells are not permissive to productive replication and spread; and (iii) cells are permissive to low-level productive replication. Certain cell lines were permissive for efficient productive infection and spread. These results may prove useful in designing appropriate animal models to assess the in vivo infectivity properties of PERV. PMID:10590090

  8. Regulated expression of a complete human beta-globin gene encoded by a transmissible retrovirus vector.

    PubMed Central

    Cone, R D; Weber-Benarous, A; Baorto, D; Mulligan, R C

    1987-01-01

    We introduced a human beta-globin gene into murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells by infection with recombinant retroviruses containing the complete genomic globin sequence. The beta-globin gene was correctly regulated during differentiation, steady-state mRNA levels being induced 5- to 30-fold after treatment of the cells with the chemical inducer dimethyl sulfoxide. Studies using vectors which yield integrated proviruses lacking transcriptional enhancer sequences indicated that neither retroviral transcription nor the retroviral enhancer sequences themselves had any obvious effect on expression of the globin gene. Viral RNA expression also appeared inducible, being considerably depressed in uninduced MEL cells but approaching normal wild-type levels after dimethyl sulfoxide treatment. We provide data which suggest that the control point for both repression and subsequent activation of virus expression in MEL cells lies in the viral enhancer element. Images PMID:3029570

  9. Genotyping of Porcine Endogenous Retroviruses from a Family of Miniature Swine

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Gary; Wood, James; Suling, Kristen; Arn, Scott; Sachs, David H.; Schuurman, Henk-Jan; Patience, Clive

    2004-01-01

    The identification of animals in an inbred miniature swine herd that consistently fail to produce replication- competent humantropic porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV) has prompted studies on the biology of PERV in transmitter and nontransmitter animals. We analyzed PERV RNA transcript profiles in a family of inbred miniature swine (SLAd/d haplotype) in which individual members differed in their capacity to generate humantropic and ecotropic (i.e., pigtropic) virus. We identified unique HaeIII and HpaII gag restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) profiles resulting from single nucleotide polymorphisms in blood cells; these were found only in animals that produced humantropic PERV. These HaeIII and HpaII gag RFLP profiles proved to be components of humantropic PERV as they were transmitted to 293 human target cells in vitro. The humantropic HaeIII and HpaII gag RFLP genotypes in the family of study were not present in other miniature swine in the herd that produced humantropic PERV, indicating that these RFLP profiles relate specifically to this family's lineage. PMID:14671113

  10. Retroviral safety: analyses of phylogeny, prevalence and polymorphisms of porcine endogenous retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Niebert, Marcus; Kurth, Reinhard; Tönjes, Ralf R

    2003-01-01

    Porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERV) are discussed as putative infectious agents in xenotransplantation (XTx). PERV classes A, B, and C harboring different envelope proteins and two types of long terminal repeat (LTR) structures exist. One type of LTR contains a distinct repeat structure in U3, while the other is repeat-less and confers poor transcriptional activity. As the different LTR structures were found to be distributed unequally among the proviruses, we were interested in determining which LTR is the ancestor. Since replication-competent PERV can still be found today suggesting an evolutionary recent origin, we investigated the distribution and prevalence of six well-characterized and chromosomally assigned PERV in individuals of five different pig (Suidae, Sus scrofa) subspecies. Our studies revealed a heterogenous distribution of replication-competent PERV among individuals as well as among subspecies. The age of PERV was calculated to be 7.6 x 10(6) years, whereby the repeat-less LTR type evolved approximately 3.4 x 10(6) years ago being the phylogenetically younger structure. The age correlates with the time of separation between pigs and their closest relatives, american-borne peccaries (Tayassuidae, Pecari tajacu), 7.4 x 10(6) years ago.

  11. Exploiting position effects and the gypsy retrovirus insulator to engineer precisely expressed transgenes.

    PubMed

    Markstein, Michele; Pitsouli, Chrysoula; Villalta, Christians; Celniker, Susan E; Perrimon, Norbert

    2008-04-01

    A major obstacle to creating precisely expressed transgenes lies in the epigenetic effects of the host chromatin that surrounds them. Here we present a strategy to overcome this problem, employing a Gal4-inducible luciferase assay to systematically quantify position effects of host chromatin and the ability of insulators to counteract these effects at phiC31 integration loci randomly distributed throughout the Drosophila genome. We identify loci that can be exploited to deliver precise doses of transgene expression to specific tissues. Moreover, we uncover a previously unrecognized property of the gypsy retrovirus insulator to boost gene expression to levels severalfold greater than at most or possibly all un-insulated loci, in every tissue tested. These findings provide the first opportunity to create a battery of transgenes that can be reliably expressed at high levels in virtually any tissue by integration at a single locus, and conversely, to engineer a controlled phenotypic allelic series by exploiting several loci. The generality of our approach makes it adaptable to other model systems to identify and modify loci for optimal transgene expression. PMID:18311141

  12. Expression of Human Endogenous Retrovirus-W Including Syncytin-1 in Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Maliniemi, Pilvi; Vincendeau, Michelle; Mayer, Jens; Frank, Oliver; Hahtola, Sonja; Karenko, Leena; Carlsson, Emilia; Mallet, Francois; Seifarth, Wolfgang; Leib-Mösch, Christine; Ranki, Annamari

    2013-01-01

    The pathomechanism of mycosis fungoides (MF), the most common type of primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs) and a malignancy of non-recirculating, skin-resident T-cells, is unknown albeit underlying viral infections have been sought for. Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) are ancient retroviral sequences in the human genome and their transcription is often deregulated in cancers. We explored the transcriptional activity of HERV sequences in a total of 34 samples comprising MF and psoriasis skin lesions, as well as corresponding non-malignant skin using a retrovirus-specific microarray and quantitative RT-PCR. To identify active HERV-W loci, we cloned the HERV-W specific RT-PCR products, sequenced the cDNA clones and assigned the sequences to HERV-W loci. Finally, we used immunohistochemistry on MF patient and non-malignant inflammatory skin samples to confirm specific HERV-encoded protein expression. Firstly, a distinct, skin-specific transcription profile consisting of five constitutively active HERV groups was established. Although individual variability was common, HERV-W showed significantly increased transcription in MF lesions compared to clinically intact skin from the same patient. Predominantly transcribed HERV-W loci were found to be located in chromosomes 6q21 and 7q21.2, chromosomal regions typically altered in CTCL. Surprisingly, we also found the expression of 7q21.2/ERVWE1-encoded Syncytin-1 (Env) protein in MF biopsies and expression of Syncytin-1 was seen in malignant lymphocytes, especially in the epidermotropic ones, in 15 of 30 cases studied. Most importantly, no Syncytin-1 expression was detected in inflammatory dermatosis (Lichen ruber planus) with skin-homing, non-malignant T lymphocytes. The expression of ERVWE1 mRNA was further confirmed in 3/7 MF lesions analyzed. Our observations strengthen the association between activated HERVs and cancer. The study offers a new perspective into the pathogenesis of CTCL since we demonstrate

  13. Expression of the env gene from the avian endogenous retrovirus ALVE and regulation by miR-155.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xuming; Zhu, Wenqi; Chen, Shihao; Liu, Yangyang; Sun, Zhen; Geng, Tuoyu; Wang, Xiaoyan; Gao, Bo; Song, Chengyi; Qin, Aijian; Cui, Hengmi

    2016-06-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are important retroelements that reside in host genomes. However, ERV expression patterns and regulatory mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEFs) and MSB1 cells infected with Marek's disease virus (MDV) exhibited significantly increased expression of env from the endogenous retrovirus ALVE. In contrast, env expression was significantly lower in CEF and MSB1 cells infected with exogenous avian leukosis virus J (ALVJ) at the early infection stage. Furthermore, env was found to be ubiquitously expressed in various chicken tissues, with high expression in certain tissues at 2 days of age and low levels in most tissues, including immune organs (thymus, spleen and bursa) as well as the brain and heart, at 35 days of age. Sequence analysis revealed miR-155 target sites in env transcripts, which was verified using a firefly luciferase reporter assay, and treatment with miR-155 agomir significantly decreased levels of env transcripts in MSB1 and CEF cells. Together, these findings suggest that the env gene from the endogenous retrovirus ALVE is regulated by miR-155. PMID:27016933

  14. Endogenous retrovirus HC2 pol fragments in the squirrel monkey: expression, evolution, and phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Yi, J-M; Kim, T-H; Huh, J-I; Nakamura, S; Takenaka, O; Lee, W-H; Hyun, B-H; Kim, H-S

    2003-11-01

    Human endogenous retrovirus HC2 is an incomplete provirus containing the entire gag and pol genes and a 3' LTR, whereas the 5' LTR and env gene are missing. We investigated expression of the HC2 pol gene in the squirrel monkey ( Saimiri sciureus) by RT-PCR. The pol gene was expressed in cerebellum, liver, lung, and spleen of the squirrel monkey, but not in six other tissues tested. RT-PCR products were cloned and sequenced resulting in seven sequences that were analyzed. These sequences showed 73.7-89.2% sequence similarity to HC2 pol genes present in the human genome. No frameshifts or termination codons caused by deletion/insertion or point mutation were found in clones SM-HC27-1 and SM-HC27-4 isolated from squirrel monkey lung tissues. Phylogenetic analysis showed that HC2 pol elements from the squirrel monkey were randomly clustered with those in human genome and the genomes of other nonhuman primates, indicating that substantial evolution of the HC2 elements occurred prior to primate speciation with additional evolution of the elements, independent of each other, after speciation.

  15. Expression-analysis of the human endogenous retrovirus HERV-K in human astrocytic tumors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The human endogenous retrovirus K (HERV-K) has been acquired by the genome of human ancestors million years ago. It is the most complete of the HERVs with transcriptionally active gag, pol and env genes. Splice variants of env, which are rec, 1.5 kb transcript and Np9 have been suggested to be tumorigenic. Transcripts of HERV-K have been detected in a multitude of human cancers. However, no such reports are available concerning glioblastomas (GBM), the most common malignant brain tumor in adults. Patients have a limited prognosis of 14.6 months in median, despite standard treatment. Therefore, we elucidated whether HERV-K transcripts could be detected in these tumors and serve as new molecular target for treatment. Findings We analyzed human GBM cell lines, tissue samples from patients and primary cell cultures of different passages for HERV-K full length mRNA and env, rec and 1.5 kb transcripts. While the GBM cell lines U138, U251, U343 and GaMG displayed weak and U87 strong expression of the full length HERV-K, the splice products could not be detected, despite a weak expression of env mRNA in U87 cells. Very few tissue samples from patients showed weak expression of env mRNA, but none of the rec or 1.5 kb transcripts. Primary cells expressed the 1.5 kb transcript weakly in early passages, but lost HERV-K expression with extended culture time. Conclusions These data suggest that HERV-K splice products do not play a role in human malignant gliomas and therefore, are not suitable as targets for new therapy regimen. PMID:24642114

  16. Relative age of proviral porcine endogenous retrovirus sequences in Sus scrofa based on the molecular clock hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Tönjes, Ralf R; Niebert, Marcus

    2003-11-01

    Porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERV) are discussed as putative infectious agents in xenotransplantation. PERV classes A, B, and C harbor different envelope proteins. Two different types of long terminal repeat (LTR) structures exist, of which both are present only in PERV-A. One type of LTR contains a distinct repeat structure in U3, while the other is repeatless, conferring a lower level of transcriptional activity. Since the different LTR structures are distributed unequally among the proviruses and, apparently, PERV is the only virus harboring two different LTR structures, we were interested in determining which LTR is the ancestor. Replication-competent viruses can still be found today, suggesting an evolutionary recent origin. Our studies revealed that the age of PERV is at most 7.6 x 10(6) years, whereas the repeatless LTR type evolved approximately 3.4 x 10(6) years ago, being the phylogenetically younger structure. The age determined for PERV correlates with the time of separation between pigs (Suidae, Sus scrofa) and their closest relatives, American-born peccaries (Tayassuidae, Pecari tajacu), 7.4 x 10(6) years ago.

  17. Relative Age of Proviral Porcine Endogenous Retrovirus Sequences in Sus scrofa Based on the Molecular Clock Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Tönjes, Ralf R.; Niebert, Marcus

    2003-01-01

    Porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERV) are discussed as putative infectious agents in xenotransplantation. PERV classes A, B, and C harbor different envelope proteins. Two different types of long terminal repeat (LTR) structures exist, of which both are present only in PERV-A. One type of LTR contains a distinct repeat structure in U3, while the other is repeatless, conferring a lower level of transcriptional activity. Since the different LTR structures are distributed unequally among the proviruses and, apparently, PERV is the only virus harboring two different LTR structures, we were interested in determining which LTR is the ancestor. Replication-competent viruses can still be found today, suggesting an evolutionary recent origin. Our studies revealed that the age of PERV is at most 7.6 × 106 years, whereas the repeatless LTR type evolved approximately 3.4 × 106 years ago, being the phylogenetically younger structure. The age determined for PERV correlates with the time of separation between pigs (Suidae, Sus scrofa) and their closest relatives, American-born peccaries (Tayassuidae, Pecari tajacu), 7.4 × 106 years ago. PMID:14581574

  18. Koala retroviruses: characterization and impact on the life of koalas.

    PubMed

    Denner, Joachim; Young, Paul R

    2013-10-23

    Koala retroviruses (KoRV) have been isolated from wild and captive koalas in Australia as well as from koala populations held in zoos in other countries. They are members of the genus Gammaretrovirus, are most closely related to gibbon ape leukemia virus (GaLV), feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV) and are likely the result of a relatively recent trans-species transmission from rodents or bats. The first KoRV to be isolated, KoRV-A, is widely distributed in the koala population in both integrated endogenous and infectious exogenous forms with evidence from museum specimens older than 150 years, indicating a relatively long engagement with the koala population. More recently, additional subtypes of KoRV that are not endogenized have been identified based on sequence differences and host cell receptor specificity (KoRV-B and KoRV-J). A specific association with fatal lymphoma and leukemia has been recently suggested for KoRV-B. In addition, it has been proposed that the high viral loads found in many animals may lead to immunomodulation resulting in a higher incidence of diseases such as chlamydiosis. Although the molecular basis of this immunomodulation is still unclear, purified KoRV particles and a peptide corresponding to a highly conserved domain in the envelope protein have been shown to modulate cytokine expression in vitro, similar to that induced by other gammaretroviruses. While much is still to be learned, KoRV induced lymphoma/leukemia and opportunistic disease arising as a consequence of immunomodulation are likely to play an important role in the stability of koala populations both in the wild and in captivity.

  19. Study of Full-Length Porcine Endogenous Retrovirus Genomes with Envelope Gene Polymorphism in a Specific-Pathogen-Free Large White Swine Herd

    PubMed Central

    Bösch, Steffi; Arnauld, Claire; Jestin, André

    2000-01-01

    Specific-pathogen-free (SPF) swine appear to be the most appropriate candidate for pig to human xenotransplantation. Still, the risk of endogenous retrovirus transmission represents a major obstacle, since two human-tropic porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) had been characterized in vitro (P. Le Tissier, J. P. Stoye, Y. Takeuchi, C. Patience, and R. A. Weiss, Nature 389:681–682, 1997). Here we addressed the question of PERV distribution in a French Large White SPF pig herd in vivo. First, PCR screening for previously described PERV envelope genes envA, envB, and envC (D. E. Akiyoshi, M. Denaro, H. Zhu, J. L. Greenstein, P. Banerjee, and J. A. Fishman, J. Virol. 72:4503–4507, 1998; Le Tissier et al., op. cit.). demonstrated ubiquity of envA and envB sequences, whereas envC genes were absent in some animals. On this basis, selective out-breeding of pigs of remote origin might be a means to reduce proviral load in organ donors. Second, we investigated PERV genome carriage in envC negative swine. Eleven distinct full-length PERV transcripts were isolated. The sequence of the complete envelope open reading frame was determined. The deduced amino acid sequences revealed the existence of four clones with functional and five clones with defective PERV PK-15 A- and B-like envelope sequences. The occurrence of easily detectable levels of PERV variants in different pig tissues in vivo heightens the need to assess PERV transmission in xenotransplantation animal models. PMID:10954559

  20. PD-L1 Expression on Retrovirus-Infected Cells Mediates Immune Escape from CD8+ T Cell Killing

    PubMed Central

    Neff, C. Preston; Gibbert, Kathrin; Dietze, Kirsten K.; Werner, Tanja; Liu, Jia; Chen, Lieping; Lang, Karl S.; Palmer, Brent E.; Dittmer, Ulf; Zelinskyy, Gennadiy

    2015-01-01

    Cytotoxic CD8+ T Lymphocytes (CTL) efficiently control acute virus infections but can become exhausted when a chronic infection develops. Signaling of the inhibitory receptor PD-1 is an important mechanism for the development of virus-specific CD8+ T cell dysfunction. However, it has recently been shown that during the initial phase of infection virus-specific CD8+ T cells express high levels of PD-1, but are fully competent in producing cytokines and killing virus-infected target cells. To better understand the role of the PD-1 signaling pathway in CD8+ T cell cytotoxicity during acute viral infections we analyzed the expression of the ligand on retrovirus-infected cells targeted by CTLs. We observed increased levels of PD-L1 expression after infection of cells with the murine Friend retrovirus (FV) or with HIV. In FV infected mice, virus-specific CTLs efficiently eliminated infected target cells that expressed low levels of PD-L1 or that were deficient for PD-L1 but the population of PD-L1high cells escaped elimination and formed a reservoir for chronic FV replication. Infected cells with high PD-L1 expression mediated a negative feedback on CD8+ T cells and inhibited their expansion and cytotoxic functions. These findings provide evidence for a novel immune escape mechanism during acute retroviral infection based on PD-L1 expression levels on virus infected target cells. PMID:26484769

  1. Expression of the Human Endogenous Retrovirus HTDV/HERV-K Is Enhanced by Cellular Transcription Factor YY1

    PubMed Central

    Knössl, Michael; Löwer, Roswitha; Löwer, Johannes

    1999-01-01

    The human endogenous retrovirus HTDV/HERV-K, which resides in moderate copy numbers in the human genome, is expressed in a cell-type-specific manner, predominantly in teratocarcinoma cells. We have analyzed the regulatory potential of the 5′ enhancer of the HERV-K long terminal repeat. Protein extracts of HERV-K-expressing teratocarcinoma cell lines (GH and Tera2) and nonexpressing HeLa and HepG2 cells form different protein complexes on the enhancer sequence as detected by electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). Using competition EMSAs, DNase I footprinting, and supershift experiments, we localized the binding site of these complexes to a 20-bp sequence within the enhancer and showed that the transcription factor YY1 is one component of the HERV-K enhancer complex. Replacement of the YY1 binding site with unrelated sequences reduced expression of the luciferase gene as a reporter in transient-transfection assays. PMID:9882329

  2. Characterization of chicken c-ski oncogene products expressed by retrovirus vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Sutrave, P.; Copeland, T.D.; Hughes, S.H. ); Showalter, S.D. )

    1990-06-01

    The authors have constructed replication-competent avian retrovirus vectors that contain two of the three known types of chicken c-{ital ski} cDNAs and a third vector that contains a truncated c-{ital ski} cDNA. They developed antisera that recognize the c-{ital ski} proteins made by the three transforming c-{ital ski} viruses. All three proteins (apparent molecular masses, 50, 60, and 90 kilodaltons) are localized primarily in the nucleus. The proteins are differentially phosphorylated; immunofluorescence also suggests that there are differences in subnuclear localization of the c-{ital ski} proteins and that c-{ital ski} protein is associated with condensed chromatin in dividing cells.

  3. Characterization of a Xenopus tropicalis Endogenous Retrovirus with Developmental and Stress-Dependent Expression ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Sinzelle, L.; Carradec, Q.; Paillard, E.; Bronchain, O. J.; Pollet, N.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the identification and characterization of XTERV1, a full-length endogenous retrovirus (ERV) within the genome of the western clawed frog (Xenopus tropicalis). XTERV1 contains all the basic genetic elements common to ERVs, including the classical 5′-long terminal repeat (LTR)-gag-pol-env-3′-LTR architecture, as well as conserved functional motifs inherent to each retroviral protein. Using phylogenetic analysis, we show that XTERV1 is related to the Epsilonretrovirus genus. The X. tropicalis genome harbors a single full-length copy with intact gag and pol open reading frames that localizes to the centromeric region of chromosome 5. About 10 full-length defective copies of XTERV1 are found interspersed in the genome, and 2 of them could be assigned to chromosomes 1 and 3. We find that XTERV1 genes are zygotically transcribed in a regulated spatiotemporal manner during frog development, including metamorphosis. Moreover, XTERV1 transcription is upregulated under certain cellular stress conditions, including cytotoxic and metabolic stresses. Interestingly, XTERV1 Env is found to be homologous to FR47, a protein upregulated following cold exposure in the freeze-tolerant wood frog (Rana sylvatica). In addition, we find that R. sylvatica FR47 mRNA originated from a retroviral element. We discuss the potential role(s) of ERVs in physiological processes in vertebrates. PMID:21159866

  4. Evasion from proteasomal degradation by mutated Fos proteins expressed from FBJ-MSV and FBR-MSV osteosarcomatogenic retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Acquaviva, Claire; Bossis, Guillaume; Ferrara, Patrizia; Brockly, Frédérique; Jariel-Encontre, Isabelle; Piechaczyk, Marc

    2002-09-01

    c-Fos proto-oncoprotein is highly unstable, which is crucial for rapid gene expression shut-off and control of its intrinsic oncogenic potential. It is massively degraded by the proteasome in vivo in various situations. Although there is evidence that c-Fos can be ubiquitinylated in vitro, the unambiguous demonstration that ubiquitinylation is necessary for recognition and subsequent hydrolysis by the proteasome in vivo is still lacking. Moreover, genetic analysis have also indicated that c-Fos can be addressed to the proteasome via different mechanisms depending on the conditions studied. c-Fos has been transduced by two murine osteosarcomatogenic retroviruses under mutated forms which are more stable and more oncogenic. The stabilization is not simply accounted for by simple deletion of a C-terminal c-Fos destabilizer but, rather, by a complex balance between opposing destabilizing and stabilizing mutations. Though mutations in viral Fos proteins confer full resistance to proteasomal degradation, stabilization is limited because mutations also entail sensitivity to (an) unidentified proteolytic system(s). This observation is consistent with the idea that Fos-expressing viruses have evolved gene expression controls that avoid high protein accumulation-linked apoptosis.

  5. Pseudotyped retroviruses for infecting axolotl.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Tzu-Hsing; Whited, Jessica L

    2015-01-01

    The ability to introduce DNA elements into host cells and analyze the effects has revolutionized modern biology. Here we describe a protocol to generate Moloney murine leukemia virus (MMLV)-based, replication-incompetent pseudotyped retrovirus capable of infecting axolotls and incorporating genetic information into their genome. When pseudotyped with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-G glycoprotein, the retroviruses can infect a broad range of proliferative axolotl cell types. However, if the retrovirus is pseudotyped with an avian sarcoma leukosis virus (ASLV)-A envelope protein, only axolotl cells experimentally manipulated to express the cognate tumor virus A (TVA) receptor can be targeted by infections. These strategies enable robust transgene expression over many cell divisions, cell lineage tracing, and cell subtype targeting for gene expression.

  6. Pseudotyped retroviruses for infecting axolotl.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Tzu-Hsing; Whited, Jessica L

    2015-01-01

    The ability to introduce DNA elements into host cells and analyze the effects has revolutionized modern biology. Here we describe a protocol to generate Moloney murine leukemia virus (MMLV)-based, replication-incompetent pseudotyped retrovirus capable of infecting axolotls and incorporating genetic information into their genome. When pseudotyped with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-G glycoprotein, the retroviruses can infect a broad range of proliferative axolotl cell types. However, if the retrovirus is pseudotyped with an avian sarcoma leukosis virus (ASLV)-A envelope protein, only axolotl cells experimentally manipulated to express the cognate tumor virus A (TVA) receptor can be targeted by infections. These strategies enable robust transgene expression over many cell divisions, cell lineage tracing, and cell subtype targeting for gene expression. PMID:25740482

  7. Development of retrovirus vectors useful for expressing genes in cultured murine embryonal cells and hematopoietic cells in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Guild, B C; Finer, M H; Housman, D E; Mulligan, R C

    1988-01-01

    A series of retrovirus vectors were constructed in which cellular promoter elements derived from the chicken beta-actin and human histone H4 genes were introduced within the proviral transcriptional unit of Moloney murine leukemia virus in order to promote expression of inserted sequences. Each of these vectors gave rise to high titer of virus capable of transferring the expected proviral structure to cells. Inclusion of normal 5' splice sequences or a portion of viral gag sequences in these constructions resulted in significant increases in virus titer. Each construction was transcriptionally active in NIH 3T3 cells and in undifferentiated F9 cells. One of the vectors, HSG-neo, which contained the human histone H4 promoter, was shown to be transcriptionally active in hematopoietic cells derived from long-term reconstituted bone marrow transplant recipients engrafted with transduced stem cells. These vectors should be of general use for obtaining efficient gene expression in embryonal and hematopoietic cells. Images PMID:3418785

  8. Review on porcine endogenous retrovirus detection assays—impact on quality and safety of xenotransplants

    PubMed Central

    Godehardt, Antonia W; Rodrigues Costa, Michael; Tönjes, Ralf R

    2015-01-01

    Xenotransplantation of porcine organs, tissues, and cells inherits a risk for xenozoonotic infections. Viable tissues and cells intended for transplantation have to be considered as potentially contaminated non-sterile products. The demands on microbial testing, based on the regulatory requirements, are often challenging due to a restricted shelf life or the complexity of the product itself. In Europe, the regulatory framework for xenogeneic cell therapy is based on the advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP) regulation (2007), the EMA CHMP Guideline on xenogeneic cell-based medicinal products (2009), as well as the WHO and Council of Europe recommendations. In the USA, FDA guidance for industry (2003) regulates the use of xenotransplants. To comply with the regulations, validated test methods need to be established that reveal the microbial status of a transplant within its given shelf life, complemented by strictly defined action alert limits and supported by breeding in specific pathogen-free (SPF) facilities. In this review, we focus on assays for the detection of the porcine endogenous retroviruses PERV-A/-B/-C, which exhibit highly polymorphic proviral loci in pig genomes. PERVs are transmitted vertically and cannot be completely eliminated by breeding or gene knock out technology. PERVs entail a public health concern that will persist even if no evidence of PERV infection of xenotransplant recipients in vivo has been revealed yet. Nevertheless, infectious risks must be minimized by full assessment of pigs as donors by combining different molecular screening assays for sensitive and specific detection as well as a functional analysis of the infectivity of PERV including an adequate monitoring of recipients. PMID:25641488

  9. Mapping full-length porcine endogenous retroviruses in a large white pig.

    PubMed

    Herring, C; Quinn, G; Bower, R; Parsons, N; Logan, N A; Brawley, A; Elsome, K; Whittam, A; Fernandez-Suarez, X M; Cunningham, D; Onions, D; Langford, G; Scobie, L

    2001-12-01

    Xenotransplantation may bridge the widening gap between the shortage of donor organs and the increasing number of patients waiting for transplantation. However, a major safety issue is the potential cross-species transmission of porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERV). This problem could be resolved if it is possible to produce pigs that do not contain replication-competent copies of this virus. In order to determine the feasibility of this, we have determined the number of potentially replication-competent full-length PERV proviruses and obtained data on their integration sites within the porcine genome. We have screened genomic DNA libraries from a Large White pig for potentially intact proviruses. We identified six unique PERV B proviruses that were apparently intact in all three genes, while the majority of isolated proviruses were defective in one or more genes. No intact PERV A proviruses were found in this pig, despite the identification of multiple defective A proviruses. Genotyping of 30 unrelated pigs for these unique proviruses showed a heterogeneous distribution. Two proviruses were uncommon, present in 7 of 30 and 3 of 30 pigs, while three were each present in 24 of 30 pigs, and one was present in 30 of 30 animals examined. Our data indicate that few PERV proviruses in Large White pigs are capable of productive infection and suggest that many could be removed by selective breeding. Further studies are required to determine if all potentially functional proviruses could be removed by breeding or whether gene knockout techniques will be required to remove the residuum. PMID:11711616

  10. A DNA element that regulates expression of an endogenous retrovirus during F9 cell differentiation is E1A dependent.

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, B T; Satyamoorthy, K; Solter, D; Basu, A; Xu, M Q; Weinmann, R; Howe, C C

    1992-01-01

    The retinoic acid-induced differentiation of F9 cells into parietal endoderm-like cells activates transcription of the endogenous mouse retrovirus, the intracisternal A-particle (IAP). To investigate the elements that control IAP gene differentiation-specific expression, we used methylation interference, Southwestern (DNA-protein), and transient-transfection assays and identified the IAP-proximal enhancer (IPE) element that directs differentiation-specific expression. We find that the IPE is inactive in undifferentiated F9 cells and active in differentiated parietal endoderm-like PYS-2 cells. Three proteins of 40, 60, and 68 kDa bind to the sequence GAGTAGAC located between nucleotides -53 and -47 within the IPE. The 40- and 68-kDa proteins from both the undifferentiated and differentiated cells exhibit similar DNA-binding activities. However, the 60-kDa protein from differentiated cells has greater binding activity than that from undifferentiated cells, suggesting a role for this protein in F9 differentiation-specific expression of the IAP gene. The IAP gene is negatively regulated by the adenovirus E1A proteins, and the E1A sequence responsible for repression is located at the N terminus, between amino acids 2 and 67. The DNA sequence that is the target of E1A repression also maps to the IPE element. Colocalization of the differentiation-specific and E1A-sensitive elements to the same protein-binding site within the IPE suggests that the E1A-like activity functions in F9 cells to repress IAP gene expression. Activation of the IAP gene may result when the E1A-like activity is lost or inactivated during F9 cell differentiation, followed by binding of the 60-kDa positive regulatory protein to the enhancer element. Images PMID:1406664

  11. R Region Sequences in the Long Terminal Repeat of a Murine Retrovirus Specifically Increase Expression of Unspliced RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Trubetskoy, Alla M.; Okenquist, Sharon A.; Lenz, Jack

    1999-01-01

    A stem-loop structure at the 5′ end of the R region of the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the murine leukemia virus SL3 and other type C mammalian retroviruses is important for maximum levels of expression of a reporter gene under the control of the viral LTR. This element, termed the R region stem-loop (RSL), has a small effect on transcriptional initiation and no effect on RNA polymerase processivity. Its major effect is on posttranscriptional processing of LTR-driven transcripts. Here we tested whether the RSL affected the production of RNAs from a full-length SL3 genome. Mutation of the RSL in the 5′ LTR of SL3 reduced the cytoplasmic levels of full-length viral transcripts but not those of spliced, env mRNA transcripts. Thus, the RSL specifically affected the cytoplasmic levels of the unspliced viral RNA. To test further whether the effect was specific for unspliced transcripts, a system was devised in which the expression of a reporter gene under the control of the viral LTR was tested in the presence or absence of an intron. Mutation of the RSL resulted in only about a twofold decline in the level of reporter gene expression when the transcripts contained an intron. However, when the intron was removed, mutation of the RSL reduced expression of the reporter gene about 10- to 60-fold in various cell lines. The secondary structure of the RSL was essential for its activity on the intronless transcript. Thus, the RSL appears to be important for the cytoplasmic accumulation of unspliced viral RNA and unspliced RNA from chimeric transcription units under the control of the viral LTR. PMID:10074206

  12. R region sequences in the long terminal repeat of a murine retrovirus specifically increase expression of unspliced RNAs.

    PubMed

    Trubetskoy, A M; Okenquist, S A; Lenz, J

    1999-04-01

    A stem-loop structure at the 5' end of the R region of the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the murine leukemia virus SL3 and other type C mammalian retroviruses is important for maximum levels of expression of a reporter gene under the control of the viral LTR. This element, termed the R region stem-loop (RSL), has a small effect on transcriptional initiation and no effect on RNA polymerase processivity. Its major effect is on posttranscriptional processing of LTR-driven transcripts. Here we tested whether the RSL affected the production of RNAs from a full-length SL3 genome. Mutation of the RSL in the 5' LTR of SL3 reduced the cytoplasmic levels of full-length viral transcripts but not those of spliced, env mRNA transcripts. Thus, the RSL specifically affected the cytoplasmic levels of the unspliced viral RNA. To test further whether the effect was specific for unspliced transcripts, a system was devised in which the expression of a reporter gene under the control of the viral LTR was tested in the presence or absence of an intron. Mutation of the RSL resulted in only about a twofold decline in the level of reporter gene expression when the transcripts contained an intron. However, when the intron was removed, mutation of the RSL reduced expression of the reporter gene about 10- to 60-fold in various cell lines. The secondary structure of the RSL was essential for its activity on the intronless transcript. Thus, the RSL appears to be important for the cytoplasmic accumulation of unspliced viral RNA and unspliced RNA from chimeric transcription units under the control of the viral LTR.

  13. Characterization of CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses after genetic immunization with retrovirus vectors expressing different forms of the hepatitis B virus core and e antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, K; Sällberg, M; O'Dea, J; Banks, T; Driver, D; Sauter, S; Chang, S M; Jolly, D J; Mento, S J; Milich, D R; Lee, W T

    1997-01-01

    Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) activity appears to play an important role in resolving hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, and the ability to induce such responses remains an important goal for developing effective immunotherapeutics. A panel of recombinant retrovirus vectors expressing different forms of the HBV core antigen (HBcAg) or e antigen (eAg) were found to induce antigen-specific major histocompatibility complex-restricted CTL responses in both mice and macaques. In addition, a novel retrovirus vector expressing an HBcAg-neomycin phosphotransferase II (HBc-Neo) fusion protein [LHBc-NEO(6A3)], which allows the measurement of the anti-Neo antibody response as a means of directly tracking biological activity of the vector, was generated. Doses greater than 10(7) CFU were necessary to induce CTL responses in H-2(k) mice. Intramuscular injections with 10(8) CFU of the LHBc-NEO(6A3) retrovirus vector into rhesus monkeys induced HBc/eAg-specific antibody production and CD8+ CTLs. The CTL response from one of the two responder rhesus monkeys was directed against a 9-residue peptide, GELMTLATW, at positions 63 to 71 of the HBc/eAg sequence. The CTL response is long lived, being detectable as late as 16 weeks after immunization, and can be boosted upon reimmunization. The potent ability of recombinant retrovirus vectors to induce HBcAg- and eAg-specific CTL responses may prove beneficial as a therapeutic treatment for chronic hepatitis B infection. PMID:9094605

  14. Retroviruses: Gaining an Understanding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiSpezio, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    Contrasted are DNA viruses, RNA viruses, and RNA retroviruses. The structure, genome, and replication of retroviruses are discussed. The discovery, structure, and action of the HIV virus are described. A list of 17 references is included. (CW)

  15. Expression of the human endogenous retrovirus-K transmembrane envelope, Rec and Np9 proteins in melanomas and melanoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Büscher, Kristina; Hahn, Silvia; Hofmann, Maja; Trefzer, Uwe; Ozel, Muhsin; Sterry, Wolfram; Löwer, Johannes; Löwer, Roswitha; Kurth, Reinhard; Denner, Joachim

    2006-06-01

    The human endogenous retrovirus-K encodes two potential tumor proteins, Rec and Np9. Rec is related to the Rev protein of HIV-1 and has been shown to be associated with tumor development in nude mice. Having shown the expression of human endogenous retrovirus-K in human melanomas and melanoma cell lines, tools were developed to allow the expression of the transmembrane envelope, Rec and Np9 mRNA and proteins to be studied in more detail. The expression of spliced env, rec and np9 was investigated by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction using a set of primers developed to discriminate between full-length and spliced mRNA. Env-specific, Rec-specific and Np9-specific antisera were produced, characterized and used to study protein expression in melanomas and melanoma cell lines by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and Western blot analyses. Existence of human endogenous retrovirus-K Rec and Np9-specific antibodies in the sera of melanoma patients were analyzed by Western blot of immunofluorescence studies. The expression of both spliced env and rec mRNA was detected in 39% of the melanomas and in 40% of the melanoma cell lines and np9 mRNA was detected in 29 and 21%, respectively. In normal neonatal melanocytes, spliced rec mRNA was detected in the absence of spliced env mRNA. Using antisera specific for Rec and Np9, Rec protein was found in 14% of the melanomas but Np9 in none. In addition, cell surface expression of the putatively immunosuppressive transmembrane envelope protein and release of virus particles were shown. Antibodies specific for neither Rec nor Np9 were detected. The transmembrane envelope protein, Rec and Np9 proteins are expressed in melanoma cells with a pattern similar to that seen in teratocarcinoma cell lines. Additional experiments are needed to determine their involvement, if any, in cell proliferation and tumor progression.

  16. Expression of endogenous retroviruses is negatively regulated by the pluripotency marker Rex1/Zfp42

    PubMed Central

    Guallar, D.; Pérez-Palacios, R.; Climent, M.; Martínez-Abadía, I.; Larraga, A.; Fernández-Juan, M.; Vallejo, C.; Muniesa, P.; Schoorlemmer, J.

    2012-01-01

    Rex1/Zfp42 is a Yy1-related zinc-finger protein whose expression is frequently used to identify pluripotent stem cells. We show that depletion of Rex1 levels notably affected self-renewal of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells in clonal assays, in the absence of evident differences in expression of marker genes for pluripotency or differentiation. By contrast, marked differences in expression of several endogenous retroviral elements (ERVs) were evident upon Rex1 depletion. We demonstrate association of REX1 to specific elements in chromatin-immunoprecipitation assays, most strongly to muERV-L and to a lower extent to IAP and musD elements. Rex1 regulates muERV-L expression in vivo, as we show altered levels upon transient gain-and-loss of Rex1 function in pre-implantation embryos. We also find REX1 can associate with the lysine-demethylase LSD1/KDM1A, suggesting they act in concert. Similar to REX1 binding to retrotransposable elements (REs) in ES cells, we also detected binding of the REX1 related proteins YY1 and YY2 to REs, although the binding preferences of the two proteins were slightly different. Altogether, we show that Rex1 regulates ERV expression in mouse ES cells and during pre-implantation development and suggest that Rex1 and its relatives have evolved as regulators of endogenous retroviral transcription. PMID:22844087

  17. Retrovirus-mediated expression of preprosomatostatin: posttranslational processing, intracellular storage, and secretion in GH3 pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Stoller, T J; Shields, D

    1988-12-01

    Somatostatin (SRIF) is a 14-amino acid peptide hormone that is synthesized as part of a larger precursor, preproSRIF, consisting of a signal peptide and a proregion of 80-90 amino acids. The mature hormone, which is located at the carboxyl terminus of the precursor, is preceded by a single pair of basic amino acids. We are studying preproSRIF to investigate intracellular sorting, proteolytic processing, and storage of peptide hormone precursors in the secretory pathway. We used a retroviral expression vector to achieve the high levels of precursor synthesis which are necessary for detailed characterization of processing intermediates and mature somatostatin. Recombinant retroviruses containing RNA transcripts encoding anglerfish preproSRIF I were used to infect rat pituitary GH3 cells which secrete growth hormone and prolactin, neither of which are substrates for endoproteolytic cleavage. In these cells preproSRIF was accurately processed to the mature hormone with an efficiency of approximately 75%. Of the newly synthesized mature SRIF, 55% was sorted into the regulated secretory pathway and released in response to the secretagogue 8-Br-cAMP. The remaining 45% of mature SRIF and residual unprocessed precursor was rapidly secreted. In contrast to SRIF, only 5% of newly synthesized endogenous growth hormone was stored intracellularly, whereas 95% was sorted to the constitutive pathway and secreted rapidly with kinetics identical to proSRIF. Our results show that proSRIF processing is not necessarily dependent on a specific protease found only in SRIF-producing cells and suggest that proteolytic cleavage is not restricted to cells that process endogenous hormones. Moreover, these results demonstrate that GH3 cells have the capacity to discriminate between endogenous and foreign hormones and target the foreign molecule significantly more efficiently to the regulated secretory pathway. PMID:2904447

  18. Retrovirus Packaging Cells Expressing the Mus dunni Endogenous Virus Envelope Facilitate Transduction of CHO and Primary Hematopoietic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wolgamot, Greg; Rasko, John E. J.; Miller, A. Dusty

    1998-01-01

    Mus dunni endogenous virus (MDEV) infects a wide variety of cell types from many different species. To take advantage of this broad host range, we have constructed packaging cells (PD223) that produce virions bearing the MDEV envelope. PD223 cells are able to package Moloney murine leukemia virus-based vectors at a titer of 4 × 105 infectious units per ml in the absence of contaminating replication-competent retrovirus. Vectors packaged by PD223 cells are able to transduce CHO cells, which are resistant to transduction by many retroviruses, at ≥25-fold higher efficiency than vectors having other pseudotypes. A vector packaged by PD223 was found to be among the most efficient for transducing primary baboon and human CD34+ cells. PMID:9811768

  19. Expression of the Drosophila retrovirus gypsy as ultrastructurally detectable particles in the ovaries of flies carrying a permissive flamenco allele.

    PubMed

    Lécher, P; Bucheton, A; Pélisson, A

    1997-09-01

    The endogenous retrovirus gypsy is controlled by the Drosophila gene flamenco (flam). New insertions of gypsy occur in any individual Drosophila if its mother is homozygous for the flam1 permissive allele and contains functional gypsy proviruses. The ovaries of flam1 females also contain high amounts of gypsy RNAs. Unexpectedly however, gypsy derepression does not occur in the flam1 female germ-line proper but in the somatic follicular epithelium of the ovary. Since extracts from these females are able to efficiently infect the germ-line of a strain devoid of active gypsy proviruses, we assume that a similar kind of germ-line infection, which would occur inside the flam1 females themselves, could be required for gypsy insertions to occur in their progeny. This hypothesis was confirmed by electron microscopy observations showing that non-enveloped intracytoplasmic particles containing gypsy RNAs accumulate in the apical region of the flam1 follicle cells, close to specific membrane domains to which the gypsy envelope proteins are targeted, whereas both are absent in the flam+ controls. Low amounts of similar virus-like particles were also observed in flam1 oocytes, but it is not yet known whether they entered passively or as a result of membrane fusion. This is the first report of the beginning of a retrovirus cycle in invertebrates and these observations should be taken into account when explaining the maternal effect of the flamenco gene on the multiplication of gypsy proviruses. PMID:9292028

  20. Macroevolution of complex retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Katzourakis, Aris; Gifford, Robert J; Tristem, Michael; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Pybus, Oliver G

    2009-09-18

    Retroviruses can leave a "fossil record" in their hosts' genomes in the form of endogenous retroviruses. Foamy viruses, complex retroviruses that infect mammals, have been notably absent from this record. We have found an endogenous foamy virus within the genomes of sloths and show that foamy viruses were infecting mammals more than 100 million years ago and codiverged with their hosts across an entire geological era. Our analysis highlights the role of evolutionary constraint in maintaining viral genome structure and indicates that accessory genes and mammalian mechanisms of innate immunity are the products of macroevolutionary conflict played out over a geological time scale.

  1. Macroevolution of complex retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Katzourakis, Aris; Gifford, Robert J; Tristem, Michael; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Pybus, Oliver G

    2009-09-18

    Retroviruses can leave a "fossil record" in their hosts' genomes in the form of endogenous retroviruses. Foamy viruses, complex retroviruses that infect mammals, have been notably absent from this record. We have found an endogenous foamy virus within the genomes of sloths and show that foamy viruses were infecting mammals more than 100 million years ago and codiverged with their hosts across an entire geological era. Our analysis highlights the role of evolutionary constraint in maintaining viral genome structure and indicates that accessory genes and mammalian mechanisms of innate immunity are the products of macroevolutionary conflict played out over a geological time scale. PMID:19762636

  2. An Evolutionarily Young Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus) Endogenous Retrovirus Identified from Next Generation Sequence Data.

    PubMed

    Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Mayer, Jens; Alquezar-Planas, David E; Greenwood, Alex D

    2015-11-01

    Transcriptome analysis of polar bear (Ursus maritimus) tissues identified sequences with similarity to Porcine Endogenous Retroviruses (PERV). Based on these sequences, four proviral copies and 15 solo long terminal repeats (LTRs) of a newly described endogenous retrovirus were characterized from the polar bear draft genome sequence. Closely related sequences were identified by PCR analysis of brown bear (Ursus arctos) and black bear (Ursus americanus) but were absent in non-Ursinae bear species. The virus was therefore designated UrsusERV. Two distinct groups of LTRs were observed including a recombinant ERV that contained one LTR belonging to each group indicating that genomic invasions by at least two UrsusERV variants have recently occurred. Age estimates based on proviral LTR divergence and conservation of integration sites among ursids suggest the viral group is only a few million years old. The youngest provirus was polar bear specific, had intact open reading frames (ORFs) and could potentially encode functional proteins. Phylogenetic analyses of UrsusERV consensus protein sequences suggest that it is part of a pig, gibbon and koala retrovirus clade. The young age estimates and lineage specificity of the virus suggests UrsusERV is a recent cross species transmission from an unknown reservoir and places the viral group among the youngest of ERVs identified in mammals. PMID:26610552

  3. An Evolutionarily Young Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus) Endogenous Retrovirus Identified from Next Generation Sequence Data

    PubMed Central

    Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Mayer, Jens; Alquezar-Planas, David E.; Greenwood, Alex D.

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptome analysis of polar bear (Ursus maritimus) tissues identified sequences with similarity to Porcine Endogenous Retroviruses (PERV). Based on these sequences, four proviral copies and 15 solo long terminal repeats (LTRs) of a newly described endogenous retrovirus were characterized from the polar bear draft genome sequence. Closely related sequences were identified by PCR analysis of brown bear (Ursus arctos) and black bear (Ursus americanus) but were absent in non-Ursinae bear species. The virus was therefore designated UrsusERV. Two distinct groups of LTRs were observed including a recombinant ERV that contained one LTR belonging to each group indicating that genomic invasions by at least two UrsusERV variants have recently occurred. Age estimates based on proviral LTR divergence and conservation of integration sites among ursids suggest the viral group is only a few million years old. The youngest provirus was polar bear specific, had intact open reading frames (ORFs) and could potentially encode functional proteins. Phylogenetic analyses of UrsusERV consensus protein sequences suggest that it is part of a pig, gibbon and koala retrovirus clade. The young age estimates and lineage specificity of the virus suggests UrsusERV is a recent cross species transmission from an unknown reservoir and places the viral group among the youngest of ERVs identified in mammals. PMID:26610552

  4. An Evolutionarily Young Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus) Endogenous Retrovirus Identified from Next Generation Sequence Data.

    PubMed

    Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Mayer, Jens; Alquezar-Planas, David E; Greenwood, Alex D

    2015-11-24

    Transcriptome analysis of polar bear (Ursus maritimus) tissues identified sequences with similarity to Porcine Endogenous Retroviruses (PERV). Based on these sequences, four proviral copies and 15 solo long terminal repeats (LTRs) of a newly described endogenous retrovirus were characterized from the polar bear draft genome sequence. Closely related sequences were identified by PCR analysis of brown bear (Ursus arctos) and black bear (Ursus americanus) but were absent in non-Ursinae bear species. The virus was therefore designated UrsusERV. Two distinct groups of LTRs were observed including a recombinant ERV that contained one LTR belonging to each group indicating that genomic invasions by at least two UrsusERV variants have recently occurred. Age estimates based on proviral LTR divergence and conservation of integration sites among ursids suggest the viral group is only a few million years old. The youngest provirus was polar bear specific, had intact open reading frames (ORFs) and could potentially encode functional proteins. Phylogenetic analyses of UrsusERV consensus protein sequences suggest that it is part of a pig, gibbon and koala retrovirus clade. The young age estimates and lineage specificity of the virus suggests UrsusERV is a recent cross species transmission from an unknown reservoir and places the viral group among the youngest of ERVs identified in mammals.

  5. Endogenous Retroviruses and Human Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Lebedev, Yuri; Sverdlov, Eugene

    2002-01-01

    Humans share about 99% of their genomic DNA with chimpanzees and bonobos; thus, the differences between these species are unlikely to be in gene content but could be caused by inherited changes in regulatory systems. Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) comprise ∼ 5% of the human genome. The LTRs of ERVs contain many regulatory sequences, such as promoters, enhancers, polyadenylation signals and factor-binding sites. Thus, they can influence the expression of nearby human genes. All known human-specific LTRs belong to the HERV-K (human ERV) family, the most active family in the human genome. It is likely that some of these ERVs could have integrated into regulatory regions of the human genome, and therefore could have had an impact on the expression of adjacent genes, which have consequently contributed to human evolution. This review discusses possible functional consequences of ERV integration in active coding regions. PMID:18629260

  6. Murine retroviruses control class I major histocompatibility antigen gene expression via a trans effect at the transcriptional level.

    PubMed

    Wilson, L D; Flyer, D C; Faller, D V

    1987-07-01

    Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) and Moloney murine sarcoma virus (M-MSV) exert a regulatory effect on the class I genes of the murine major histocompatibility complex (MHC). We have previously shown that M-MuLV infection of mouse fibroblasts results in a substantial increase in cell surface expression of H-2K, H-2D, and H-2L proteins, whereas M-MSV, upon coinfection of the same cells, is apparently able to override the MuLV-induced increase in H-2 expression. As a result of this modulation, immune recognition of the infected cells is profoundly altered. Our efforts have been directed toward elucidating the molecular basis for this phenomenon. We report here that stimulation of interferon production as a result of infection with MuLV does not occur and, therefore, is not the cause of MuLV-induced enhancement of MHC expression. Control of H-2 class I and beta 2-microglobulin gene expression by M-MuLV, and probably by M-MSV, takes place at the transcriptional level as indicated by nuclear runoff studies and analysis of steady-state mRNA levels. Our demonstration that M-MuLV controls expression of widely separated endogenous cellular genes (those coding for H-2D, H-2K, H-2L, and beta 2-microglobulin), transfected class I MHC genes, and unintegrated chimeric genes consisting of fragments of class I MHC genes linked to sequences encoding a procaryotic enzyme, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, suggests that M-MuLV exerts its effect in trans and not by proviral integration in the vicinity of the H-2 gene complex. Finally, we show that the sequences of at least one MHC gene, which are responsive to trans regulation by M-MuLV, lie within 1.2 kilobases upstream of the initiation codon for that gene.

  7. Lack of retrovirus gene expression in somatic cell hybrids of friend cells and teratocarcinoma cells with a teratocarcinoma phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Asche, W; Colletta, G; Warnecke, G; Nobis, P; Pennie, S; King, R M; Ostertag, W

    1984-01-01

    Two types of hybrids between cells with erythroid phenotype (Friend cells) and teratocarcinoma cells can be distinguished: cell hybrids with an erythroid phenotype, which release or can be induced to release large amounts of Friend spleen focus-forming virus (F-SFFV) on exposure to bromodeoxyuridine and cell hybrids with a teratocarcinoma phenotype, which do not release Friend virus and are not inducible for F-SFFV release. In this paper, we attempted to relate these differences to the expression of F-SFFV and Friend murine leukemia virus (F-MuLV) functions. Teratocarcinoma phenotype hybrids retained F-SFFV-and F-MuLV-related provirus sequences. They did not express F-SFFV- or F-MuLV-related RNA or proteins. The hybrids differentiated to endoderm-like cells on exposure to retinoic acid or hexamethylene-bis -acetamide. These cells, in contrast to the teratocarcinoma phenotype (uninduced) cells expressing SSEA-1-like antigens, did not express SSEA-1-like antigens; they formed typical, prekeratin-staining cytoskeletal structures and could be induced to release mouse interferon. The differentiating cells, but not the uninduced teratocarcinoma hybrids, were infected productively with F-MuLV or the F-MuLV--F-SFFV complex. They, however, did not express endogenous F-SFFV. Endogenous F-SFFV functions could not be rescued by infection with F-MuLV. Induction of teratocarcinoma hybrids with retinoic acid did not activate endogenous F-MuLV or F-SFFV transcription or protein synthesis. These data demonstrated two control mechanisms of Friend virus repression: one which acted trans during formation of the cell hybrids and was maintained only in teratocarcinoma phenotype cells and the other which acted cis and was still operative during induction of endodermal differentiation. Images PMID:6727874

  8. Retroviruses and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Alfahad, Tariq; Nath, Avindra

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive, invariably fatal neurologic disorder resulting from upper and lower motor neuron degeneration, which typically develops during the sixth or seventh decade of life, and is diagnosed based on standard clinical criteria. Its underlying cause remains undetermined. The disease may occur with increased frequency within certain families, often in association with specific genomic mutations, while some sporadic cases have been linked to environmental toxins or trauma. Another possibility, first proposed in the 1970s, is that retroviruses play a role in pathogenesis. In this paper, we review the published literature for evidence that ALS is associated either with infection by an exogenous retrovirus or with the expression of human endogenous retroviral (HERV) sequences in cells of the central nervous system. A small percentage of persons infected with the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) or human T cell leukemia virus-1 (HTLV-1) develop ALS-like syndromes. While HTLV-1 associated ALS-like syndrome has several features that may distinguish it from classical ALS, HIV-infected patients may develop neurological manifestations that resemble classical ALS although it occurs at a younger age and they may show a dramatic improvement following the initiation of antiretroviral therapy. However, most patients with probable or definite ALS show no evidence of HIV-1 or HTLV-1 infection. In contrast, recent reports have shown a stronger association with HERV, as analysis of serum samples, and postmortem brain tissue from a number of patients with a classical ALS has revealed significantly increased expression of HERV-K, compared to controls. These findings suggest that endogenous retroviral elements are involved in the pathophysiology of ALS, but there is no evidence that they are the primary cause of the syndrome. PMID:23707220

  9. Efficient retrovirus-mediated transfer and expression of a human adenosine deaminase gene in diploid skin fibroblasts from an adenosine deaminase-deficient human

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T.D.; Hock, R.A.; Osborne, W.R.A.; Miller, A.D.

    1987-02-01

    Skin fibroblasts might be considered suitable recipients for therapeutic genes to cure several human genetic diseases; however, these cells are resistant to gene transfer by most methods. The authors studied the ability of retroviral vectors to transfer genes into normal human diploid skin fibroblasts. Retroviruses carrying genes for neomycin or hygromycin B resistance conferred drug resistance to greater than 50% of the human fibroblasts after a single exposure to virus-containing medium. This represents at least a 500-fold increase in efficiency over other methods. Transfer was achieved in the absence of helper virus by using amphotropic retrovirus-packaging cells. A retrovirus vector containing a human adenosine deaminase (ADA) cDNA was constructed and used to infect ADA/sup -/ fibroblasts from a patient with ADA deficiency. The infected cells produced 12-fold more ADA enzyme than fibroblasts from normal individuals and were able to rapidly metabolize exogenous deoxyadenosine and adenosine, metabolites that accumulate in plasma in ADA-deficient patients and are responsible for the severe combined immunodeficiency in these patients. These experiments indicate the potential of retrovirus-mediated gene transfer into human fibroblasts for gene therapy.

  10. Retrovirus-mediated expression of preprosomatostatin in rat pituitary GH3 cells: targeting of somatostatin to the regulated secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, N; Liker, H; Stoller, T; D'Ambra, R; Shields, D

    1989-10-01

    Somatostatin (SRIF) is a 14-amino acid peptide hormone that is synthesized as part of a larger precursor, prepro-SRIF, consisting of a signal peptide and a proregion of 80-90 amino acids; mature SRIF is located at the carboxyl-terminus of the precursor. We have used a recombinant retroviral expression vector encoding anglerfish prepor-SRIF-I to infect rat pituitary GH3 cells. The aim of these studies was to investigate the intracellular storage and secretion of the total pool of endogenous GH compared to that of SRIF. Several clonal lines of GH3 cells expressing high or low levels of SRIF were treated with TRH, forskolin, or depolarizing concentrations of potassium, and the levels of intracellular and secreted GH or SRIF were determined using highly sensitive RIAs. Approximately 65% of the total GH was secreted basally, whereas less than 20% of the SRIF-immunoreactive material was basally secreted. Forskolin treatment or potassium depolarization stimulated GH release, but only about 50% above basal levels. In contrast, SRIF secretion was stimulated approximately 5-fold in response to these secretagogues. Based on its lower basal rate of secretion compared to GH and its enhanced release in response to a variety of secretagogues, we conclude that the heterologously expressed SRIF is preferentially targeted to the regulated pathway in GH3 cells. PMID:2575212

  11. Immunising with the transmembrane envelope proteins of different retroviruses including HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Denner, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    The induction of neutralizing antibodies is a promising way to prevent retrovirus infections. Neutralizing antibodies are mainly directed against the envelope proteins, which consist of two molecules, the surface envelope (SU) protein and the transmembrane envelope (TM) protein. Antibodies broadly neutralizing the human immunodeficiencvy virus-1 (HIV-1) and binding to the TM protein gp41 of the virus have been isolated from infected individuals. Their epitopes are located in the membrane proximal external region (MPER). Since there are difficulties to induce such neutralizing antibodies as basis for an effective AIDS vaccine, we performed a comparative analysis immunising with the TM proteins of different viruses from the family Retroviridae. Both subfamilies, the Orthoretrovirinae and the Spumaretrovirinae were included. In this study, the TM proteins of three gammaretroviruses including (1) the porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV), (2) the Koala retrovirus (KoRV), (3) the feline leukemia virus (FeLV), of two lentiviruses, HIV-1, HIV-2, and of two spumaviruses, the feline foamy virus (FFV) and the primate foamy virus (PFV) were used for immunisation. Whereas in all immunisation studies binding antibodies were induced, neutralizing antibodies were only found in the case of the gammaretroviruses. The induced antibodies were directed against the MPER and the fusion peptide proximal region (FPPR) of their TM proteins; however only the antibodies against the MPER were neutralizing. Most importantly, the epitopes in the MPER were localized in the same position as the epitopes of the antibodies broadly neutralizing HIV-1 in the TM protein gp41 of HIV-1, indicating that the MPER is an effective target for the neutralization of retroviruses. PMID:23249763

  12. Human endogenous retrovirus type W envelope expression in blood and brain cells provides new insights into multiple sclerosis disease

    PubMed Central

    Germi, Raphaëlle; Bernard, Corinne; Garcia-Montojo, Marta; Deluen, Cécile; Farinelli, Laurent; Faucard, Raphaël; Veas, Francisco; Stefas, Ilias; Fabriek, Babs O; Van-Horssen, Jack; Van-der-Valk, Paul; Gerdil, Claire; Mancuso, Roberta; Saresella, Marina; Clerici, Mario; Marcel, Sébastien; Creange, Alain; Cavaretta, Rosella; Caputo, Domenico; Arru, Giannina; Morand, Patrice; Lang, Alois B; Sotgiu, Stefano; Ruprecht, Klemens; Rieckmann, Peter; Villoslada, Pablo; Chofflon, Michel; Boucraut, Jose; Pelletier, Jean; Hartung, Hans-Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background: The envelope protein from multiple sclerosis (MS) associated retroviral element (MSRV), a member of the Human Endogenous Retroviral family ‘W’ (HERV-W), induces dysimmunity and inflammation. Objective: The objective of this study was to confirm and specify the association between HERV-W/MSRV envelope (Env) expression and MS. Methods: 103 MS, 199 healthy controls (HC) and controls with other neurological diseases (28), chronic infections (30) or autoimmunity (30) were analysed with an immunoassay detecting Env in serum. Env RNA or DNA copy numbers in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were determined by a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Env was detected by immunohistology in the brains of patients with MS with three specific monoclonals. Results: Env antigen was detected in a serum of 73% of patients with MS with similar prevalence in all clinical forms, and not in chronic infection, systemic lupus, most other neurological diseases and healthy donors (p<0.01). Cases with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (5/8) and rare HC (4/103) were positive. RNA expression in PBMC and DNA copy numbers were significantly elevated in patients with MS versus HC (p<0.001). In patients with MS, DNA copy numbers were significantly increased in chronic progressive MS (secondary progressive MS vs relapsing–remitting MS (RRMS) p<0.001; primary progressive MS vs RRMS –<0.02). Env protein was evidenced in macrophages within MS brain lesions with particular concentrations around vascular elements. Conclusion: The association between MS disease and the MSRV-type HERV-W element now appears quite strong, as evidenced ex-vivo from serum and PBMC with post-mortem confirmation in brain lesions. Chronic progressive MS, RRMS and clinically isolated syndrome show different ELISA (Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay) and/or PCR profiles suggestive of an increase with disease evolution, and amplicon sequencing confirms the association with

  13. Retroviruses Hijack Chromatin Loops to Drive Oncogene Expression and Highlight the Chromatin Architecture around Proto-Oncogenic Loci

    PubMed Central

    Pattison, Jillian M.; Wright, Jason B.; Cole, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of the genome consists of intergenic and non-coding DNA sequences shown to play a major role in different gene regulatory networks. However, the specific potency of these distal elements as well as how these regions exert function across large genomic distances remains unclear. To address these unresolved issues, we closely examined the chromatin architecture around proto-oncogenic loci in the mouse and human genomes to demonstrate a functional role for chromatin looping in distal gene regulation. Using cell culture models, we show that tumorigenic retroviral integration sites within the mouse genome occur near existing large chromatin loops and that this chromatin architecture is maintained within the human genome as well. Significantly, as mutagenesis screens are not feasible in humans, we demonstrate a way to leverage existing screens in mice to identify disease relevant human enhancers and expose novel disease mechanisms. For instance, we characterize the epigenetic landscape upstream of the human Cyclin D1 locus to find multiple distal interactions that contribute to the complex cis-regulation of this cell cycle gene. Furthermore, we characterize a novel distal interaction upstream of the Cyclin D1 gene which provides mechanistic evidence for the abundant overexpression of Cyclin D1 occurring in multiple myeloma cells harboring a pathogenic translocation event. Through use of mapped retroviral integrations and translocation breakpoints, our studies highlight the importance of chromatin looping in oncogene expression, elucidate the epigenetic mechanisms crucial for distal cis-regulation, and in one particular instance, explain how a translocation event drives tumorigenesis through upregulation of a proto-oncogene. PMID:25799187

  14. KOALA RETROVIRUS: A REVIEW.

    PubMed

    Kinney, Matthew E; Pye, Geoffrey W

    2016-06-01

    Koala retrovirus (KoRV) is a gammaretrovirus that has been identified in both captive and free-ranging koalas ( Phascolarctos cinereus ) with variable geographic distribution in Australia. KoRV is capable of both exogenous and endogenous transmission, which provides an interesting research platform for scientists to study active retrovirus endogenization into a host genome and offers veterinary scientists an opportunity to examine the clinical consequences of KoRV infection in koalas. Causation between KoRV and frequently recognized clinical conditions associated with immune suppression and neoplasia in koalas has not been definitively established, however research continues to evaluate a potential association. Three KoRV variants, KoRV-A, KoRV-B, and KoRV-J, have been the most thoroughly described and preliminary evidence suggests KoRV variability may be fundamental in host pathogenicity. In addition to reviewing what is currently known about KoRV, this article discusses treatment, management, and future research directions.

  15. KOALA RETROVIRUS: A REVIEW.

    PubMed

    Kinney, Matthew E; Pye, Geoffrey W

    2016-06-01

    Koala retrovirus (KoRV) is a gammaretrovirus that has been identified in both captive and free-ranging koalas ( Phascolarctos cinereus ) with variable geographic distribution in Australia. KoRV is capable of both exogenous and endogenous transmission, which provides an interesting research platform for scientists to study active retrovirus endogenization into a host genome and offers veterinary scientists an opportunity to examine the clinical consequences of KoRV infection in koalas. Causation between KoRV and frequently recognized clinical conditions associated with immune suppression and neoplasia in koalas has not been definitively established, however research continues to evaluate a potential association. Three KoRV variants, KoRV-A, KoRV-B, and KoRV-J, have been the most thoroughly described and preliminary evidence suggests KoRV variability may be fundamental in host pathogenicity. In addition to reviewing what is currently known about KoRV, this article discusses treatment, management, and future research directions. PMID:27468008

  16. Computational Evaluation of the Strict Master and Random Template Models of Endogenous Retrovirus Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Fabrícia F.; Rodrigo, Allen G.

    2016-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are DNA sequences that are able to replicate and move within and between host genomes. Their mechanism of replication is also shared with endogenous retroviruses (ERVs), which are also a type of TE that represent an ancient retroviral infection within animal genomes. Two models have been proposed to explain TE proliferation in host genomes: the strict master model (SMM), and the random template (or transposon) model (TM). In SMM only a single copy of a given TE lineage is able to replicate, and all other genomic copies of TEs are derived from that master copy. In TM, any element of a given family is able to replicate in the host genome. In this paper, we simulated ERV phylogenetic trees under variations of SMM and TM. To test whether current phylogenetic programs can recover the simulated ERV phylogenies, DNA sequence alignments were simulated and maximum likelihood trees were reconstructed and compared to the simulated phylogenies. Results indicate that visual inspection of phylogenetic trees alone can be misleading. However, if a set of statistical summaries is calculated, we are able to distinguish between models with high accuracy by using a data mining algorithm that we introduce here. We also demonstrate the use of our data mining algorithm with empirical data for the porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV), an ERV that is able to replicate in human and pig cells in vitro. PMID:27649303

  17. Computational Evaluation of the Strict Master and Random Template Models of Endogenous Retrovirus Evolution.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Fabrícia F; Rodrigo, Allen G

    2016-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are DNA sequences that are able to replicate and move within and between host genomes. Their mechanism of replication is also shared with endogenous retroviruses (ERVs), which are also a type of TE that represent an ancient retroviral infection within animal genomes. Two models have been proposed to explain TE proliferation in host genomes: the strict master model (SMM), and the random template (or transposon) model (TM). In SMM only a single copy of a given TE lineage is able to replicate, and all other genomic copies of TEs are derived from that master copy. In TM, any element of a given family is able to replicate in the host genome. In this paper, we simulated ERV phylogenetic trees under variations of SMM and TM. To test whether current phylogenetic programs can recover the simulated ERV phylogenies, DNA sequence alignments were simulated and maximum likelihood trees were reconstructed and compared to the simulated phylogenies. Results indicate that visual inspection of phylogenetic trees alone can be misleading. However, if a set of statistical summaries is calculated, we are able to distinguish between models with high accuracy by using a data mining algorithm that we introduce here. We also demonstrate the use of our data mining algorithm with empirical data for the porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV), an ERV that is able to replicate in human and pig cells in vitro. PMID:27649303

  18. Protein of macaques against infection with simian type D retrovirus (SRV-1) by immunization with recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the envelope glycoproteins of either SRV-1 or Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (SRV-3).

    PubMed Central

    Brody, B A; Hunter, E; Kluge, J D; Lasarow, R; Gardner, M; Marx, P A

    1992-01-01

    Rhesus macaques were immunized with live vaccinia virus recombinants expressing the envelope glycoproteins (gp70 and gp22) of simian type D retrovirus (SRV), serotype 1 or 3. All of the animals immunized with either the SRV-1 env or the SRV-3 env vaccinia virus recombinant developed neutralizing antibodies against the homologous SRV. In addition, both groups developed cross-reactive antibodies and were protected against an intravenous live-virus challenge with SRV-1. The four control animals immunized with a vaccinia virus recombinant expressing the G protein of respiratory syncytial virus were not protected against the same SRV-1 challenge. Although SRV-1 and SRV-3 immune sera showed cross-neutralization, they failed to neutralize a separate, more distantly related serotype, SRV-2, in an in vitro assay. These findings are consistent with the known degree of serologic and genetic relatedness of these three SRV strains. Images PMID:1316495

  19. Sensitivity analysis of retrovirus HTLV-1 transactivation.

    PubMed

    Corradin, Alberto; Di Camillo, Barbara; Ciminale, Vincenzo; Toffolo, Gianna; Cobelli, Claudio

    2011-02-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 is a human retrovirus endemic in many areas of the world. Although many studies indicated a key role of the viral protein Tax in the control of viral transcription, the mechanisms controlling HTLV-1 expression and its persistence in vivo are still poorly understood. To assess Tax effects on viral kinetics, we developed a HTLV-1 model. Two parameters that capture both its deterministic and stochastic behavior were quantified: Tax signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), which measures the effect of stochastic phenomena on Tax expression as the ratio between the protein steady-state level and the variance of the noise causing fluctuations around this value; t(1/2), a parameter representative of the duration of Tax transient expression pulses, that is, of Tax bursts due to stochastic phenomena. Sensitivity analysis indicates that the major determinant of Tax SNR is the transactivation constant, the system parameter weighting the enhancement of retrovirus transcription due to transactivation. In contrast, t(1/2) is strongly influenced by the degradation rate of the mRNA. In addition to shedding light into the mechanism of Tax transactivation, the obtained results are of potential interest for novel drug development strategies since the two parameters most affecting Tax transactivation can be experimentally tuned, e.g. by perturbing protein phosphorylation and by RNA interference.

  20. Novel Denisovan and Neanderthal retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Adam; Huntley, Derek; Aiewsakun, Pakorn; Kanda, Ravinder K; Lynn, Claire; Tristem, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Following the recent availability of high-coverage genomes for Denisovan and Neanderthal hominids, we conducted a screen for endogenized retroviruses, identifying six novel, previously unreported HERV-K(HML2) elements (HERV-K is human endogenous retrovirus K). These elements are absent from the human genome (hg38) and appear to be unique to archaic hominids. These findings provide further evidence supporting the recent activity of the HERV-K(HML2) group, which has been implicated in human disease. They will also provide insights into the evolution of archaic hominids.

  1. Mechanism of action of regulatory proteins encoded by complex retroviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, B R

    1992-01-01

    Complex retroviruses are distinguished by their ability to control the expression of their gene products through the action of virally encoded regulatory proteins. These viral gene products modulate both the quantity and the quality of viral gene expression through regulation at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. The most intensely studied retroviral regulatory proteins, termed Tat and Rev, are encoded by the prototypic complex retrovirus human immunodeficiency virus type 1. However, considerable information also exists on regulatory proteins encoded by human T-cell leukemia virus type I, as well as several other human and animal complex retroviruses. In general, these data demonstrate that retrovirally encoded transcriptional trans-activators can exert a similar effect by several very different mechanisms. In contrast, posttranscriptional regulation of retroviral gene expression appears to occur via a single pathway that is probably dependent on the recruitment of a highly conserved cellular cofactor. These two shared regulatory pathways are proposed to be critical to the ability of complex retroviruses to establish chronic infections in the face of an ongoing host immune response. Images PMID:1406488

  2. Human retroviruses and AIDS 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, G.; Korber, B.; Wain-Hobson, S.; Jeang, Kuan-Teh; Henderson, L.E.; Pavlakis, G.N.

    1995-01-01

    This compendium, including accompanying floppy diskettes, is the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts it comprises: (I) Nucleic Acid Alignments and Sequences; (II) Amino Acid Alignments; (III) Analysis; (IV) Related Sequences; (V) Database communications.

  3. Tracing the origin of retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Doolittle, R F; Feng, D F

    1992-01-01

    Reverse transcriptase sequences, which are fundamental to retrovirus existence, are widely distributed in the living world. Phylogenies based on their sequences set vertebrate retroviruses apart as relatively modern creations. Their nearest evolutionary relatives are a large group of transposable elements that have all the standard retrovirus equipment except spliced envelope proteins. The distribution of these elements suggests a long-standing presence predating the radiation of plants, fungi, and animals. There is another large group of elements, LINEs, that also contain recognizable reverse transcriptase sequences and which likely diverged even earlier, as evidenced by their presence in trypanosomes and other protists. They lack tRNA priming sites--which they could have lost--but they do exhibit characteristic eukaryotic polyadenylation. These elements are problematic in that the sequences are so degenerate in most instances that it is not possible to identify the accessory enzymes or structural proteins with any confidence, leaving major gaps in our reconstruction of events. Even with these gaps, however, the historical beginnings of retroviruses can be traced back to events coincident with the prokaryotic invasion of primitive eukaryotes.

  4. Multifunctional facets of retrovirus integrase

    PubMed Central

    Grandgenett, Duane P; Pandey, Krishan K; Bera, Sibes; Aihara, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    The retrovirus integrase (IN) is responsible for integration of the reverse transcribed linear cDNA into the host DNA genome. First, IN cleaves a dinucleotide from the 3’ OH blunt ends of the viral DNA exposing the highly conserved CA sequence in the recessed ends. IN utilizes the 3’ OH ends to catalyze the concerted integration of the two ends into opposite strands of the cellular DNA producing 4 to 6 bp staggered insertions, depending on the retrovirus species. The staggered ends are repaired by host cell machinery that results in a permanent copy of the viral DNA in the cellular genome. Besides integration, IN performs other functions in the replication cycle of several studied retroviruses. The proper organization of IN within the viral internal core is essential for the correct maturation of the virus. IN plays a major role in reverse transcription by interacting directly with the reverse transcriptase and by binding to the viral capsid protein and a cellular protein. Recruitment of several other host proteins into the viral particle are also promoted by IN. IN assists with the nuclear transport of the preintegration complex across the nuclear membrane. With several retroviruses, IN specifically interacts with different host protein factors that guide the preintegration complex to preferentially integrate the viral genome into specific regions of the host chromosomal target. Human gene therapy using retrovirus vectors is directly affected by the interactions of IN with these host factors. Inhibitors directed against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) IN bind within the active site of IN containing viral DNA ends thus preventing integration and subsequent HIV/AIDS. PMID:26322168

  5. Crystallin gene expression and lentoid body formation in quail embryo neuroretina cultures transformed by the oncogenic retrovirus Mill Hill 2 or Rous sarcoma virus.

    PubMed Central

    Simonneau, L; Crisanti, P; Lorinet, A M; Alliot, F; Courtois, Y; Calothy, G; Pessac, B

    1986-01-01

    The lens-specific proteins alpha and delta crystallins and lentoid bodies, structures that follow a differentiation pathway similar to that of the lens, regularly appear after 4 to 5 weeks in quail embryo neuroretina monolayer cultures. We have investigated the effects of the avian oncogenic retroviruses Mill Hill 2 and Rous sarcoma virus on this process. Quail embryo neuroretina cells transformed by Mill Hill 2 virus were established into permanent cultures that synthesized alpha and delta crystallins and contained stem cells for the production of lentoid bodies. In contrast, transformation with the Rous sarcoma virus mutant tsNY-68 blocked the appearance of mRNA crystallins, but cytoplasmic alpha and delta crystallin mRNA and alpha crystallin appeared 44 h after a shift to the nonpermissive temperature. However, delta crystallins and lentoid bodies were only present after 7 days. The crystallins of transformed quail neuroretina cultures were immunologically indistinguishable from those of quail lenses and of normal quail embryo neuroretina cultures. Images PMID:3025609

  6. Effects of retroviruses on host genome function.

    PubMed

    Jern, Patric; Coffin, John M

    2008-01-01

    For millions of years, retroviral infections have challenged vertebrates, occasionally leading to germline integration and inheritance as ERVs, genetic parasites whose remnants today constitute some 7% to 8% of the human genome. Although they have had significant evolutionary side effects, it is useful to view ERVs as fossil representatives of retroviruses extant at the time of their insertion into the germline and not as direct players in the evolutionary process itself. Expression of particular ERVs is associated with several positive physiological functions as well as certain diseases, although their roles in human disease as etiological agents, possible contributing factors, or disease markers-well demonstrated in animal models-remain to be established. Here we discuss ERV contributions to host genome structure and function, including their ability to mediate recombination, and physiological effects on the host transcriptome resulting from their integration, expression, and other events.

  7. Complete nucleotide sequence and transcriptional analysis of snakehead fish retrovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Hart, D; Frerichs, G N; Rambaut, A; Onions, D E

    1996-01-01

    The complete genome of the snakehead fish retrovirus has been cloned and sequenced, and its transcriptional profile in cell culture has been determined. The 11.2-kb provirus displays a complex expression pattern capable of encoding accessory proteins and is unique in the predicted location of the env initiation codon and signal peptide upstream of gag and the common splice donor site. The virus is distinguishable from all known retrovirus groups by the presence of an arginine tRNA primer binding site. The coding regions are highly divergent and show a number of unusual characteristics, including a large Gag coiled-coil region, a Pol domain of unknown function, and a long, lentiviral-like, Env cytoplasmic domain. Phylogenetic analysis of the Pol sequence emphasizes the divergent nature of the virus from the avian and mammalian retroviruses. The snakehead virus is also distinct from a previously characterized complex fish retrovirus, suggesting that discrete groups of these viruses have yet to be identified in the lower vertebrates. PMID:8648695

  8. Complete nucleotide sequence and transcriptional analysis of snakehead fish retrovirus.

    PubMed

    Hart, D; Frerichs, G N; Rambaut, A; Onions, D E

    1996-06-01

    The complete genome of the snakehead fish retrovirus has been cloned and sequenced, and its transcriptional profile in cell culture has been determined. The 11.2-kb provirus displays a complex expression pattern capable of encoding accessory proteins and is unique in the predicted location of the env initiation codon and signal peptide upstream of gag and the common splice donor site. The virus is distinguishable from all known retrovirus groups by the presence of an arginine tRNA primer binding site. The coding regions are highly divergent and show a number of unusual characteristics, including a large Gag coiled-coil region, a Pol domain of unknown function, and a long, lentiviral-like, Env cytoplasmic domain. Phylogenetic analysis of the Pol sequence emphasizes the divergent nature of the virus from the avian and mammalian retroviruses. The snakehead virus is also distinct from a previously characterized complex fish retrovirus, suggesting that discrete groups of these viruses have yet to be identified in the lower vertebrates.

  9. Host factors exploited by retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Goff, Stephen P

    2007-04-01

    Retroviruses make a long and complex journey from outside the cell to the nucleus in the early stages of infection, and then an equally long journey back out again in the late stages of infection. Ongoing efforts are identifying an enormous array of cellular proteins that are used by the viruses in the course of their travels. These host factors are potential new targets for therapeutic intervention.

  10. Jaagsiekte Sheep Retrovirus Biology and Oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hofacre, Andrew; Fan, Hung

    2010-01-01

    Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV) is the causative agent of a lung cancer in sheep known as ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma (OPA). The disease has been identified around the world in several breeds of sheep and goats, and JSRV infection typically has a serious impact on affected flocks. In addition, studies on OPA are an excellent model for human lung carcinogenesis. A unique feature of JSRV is that its envelope (Env) protein functions as an oncogene. The JSRV Env-induced transformation or oncogenesis has been studied in a variety of cell systems and in animal models. Moreover, JSRV studies have provided insights into retroviral genomic RNA export/expression mechanisms. JSRV encodes a trans-acting factor (Rej) within the env gene necessary for the synthesis of Gag protein from unspliced viral RNA. This review summarizes research pertaining to JSRV-induced pathogenesis, Env transformation, and other aspects of JSRV biology. PMID:21994634

  11. Endogenous Retroviruses in the Genomics Era.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Welkin E

    2015-11-01

    Endogenous retroviruses comprise millions of discrete genetic loci distributed within the genomes of extant vertebrates. These sequences, which are clearly related to exogenous retroviruses, represent retroviral infections of the deep past, and their abundance suggests that retroviruses were a near-constant presence throughout the evolutionary history of modern vertebrates. Endogenous retroviruses contribute in myriad ways to the evolution of host genomes, as mutagens and as sources of genetic novelty (both coding and regulatory) to be acted upon by the twin engines of random genetic drift and natural selection. Importantly, the richness and complexity of endogenous retrovirus data can be used to understand how viruses spread and adapt on evolutionary timescales by combining population genetics and evolutionary theory with a detailed understanding of retrovirus biology (gleaned from the study of extant retroviruses). In addition to revealing the impact of viruses on organismal evolution, such studies can help us better understand, by looking back in time, how life-history traits, as well as ecological and geological events, influence the movement of viruses within and between populations. PMID:26958910

  12. Heterogeneity of koala retrovirus isolates.

    PubMed

    Shimode, Sayumi; Nakagawa, So; Yoshikawa, Rokusuke; Shojima, Takayuki; Miyazawa, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    Koala retrovirus (KoRV) is a gammaretrovirus which may induce immune suppression, leukemia and lymphoma in koalas. Currently three KoRV subgroups (A, B, and J) have been reported. Our phylogenetic analysis suggests that KoRV-B and KoRV-J should be classified as the same subgroup. In long terminal repeat (LTR), a KoRV-B isolate has four 17 bp tandem repeats named direct repeat (DR)-1, while a KoRV-J isolate (strain OJ-4) has three 37 bp tandem repeats named DR-2. We also found that the promoter activity of the KoRV-J strain OJ-4 is stronger than that of original KoRV-A, suggesting that KoRV-J may replicate more efficiently than KoRV-A.

  13. The discovery of endogenous retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Robin A

    2006-01-01

    When endogenous retroviruses (ERV) were discovered in the late 1960s, the Mendelian inheritance of retroviral genomes by their hosts was an entirely new concept. Indeed Howard M Temin's DNA provirus hypothesis enunciated in 1964 was not generally accepted, and reverse transcriptase was yet to be discovered. Nonetheless, the evidence that we accrued in the pre-molecular era has stood the test of time, and our hypothesis on ERV, which one reviewer described as 'impossible', proved to be correct. Here I recount some of the key observations in birds and mammals that led to the discovery of ERV, and comment on their evolution, cross-species dispersion, and what remains to be elucidated. PMID:17018135

  14. Expression of human factor IX in rabbit hepatocytes by retrovirus-mediated gene transfer: Potential for gene therapy of hemophilia B

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, A.R. Puget Sound Blood Center, Seattle, WA ); Darlington, G. ); Armentano, D.; Woo, S.L.C.

    1990-08-01

    Hemophilia B (Christmas disease) is a chromosome X-linked blood clotting disorder which results when factor IX is deficient or functionally defective. The enzyme is synthesized in the liver, and the existence of animal models for this genetic disease will permit the development of somatic gene therapy protocols aimed at transfer of the functional gene into the liver. The authors report the construction of an N2-based recombinant retroviral vector, NCMVFIX, for efficient transfer and expression of human factor IX cDNA in primary rabbit hepatocytes. In this construct the human cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter directs the expression of factor IX. Hepatocytes were isolated from 3-week-old New Zealand White rabbits, infected with the recombinant virus, and analyzed for secretion of active factor IX. The infected rabbit hepatocytes produced human factor IX that is indistinguishable from enzyme derived from normal human plasma. The recombinant protein is sufficiently {gamma}-carboxylated and is functionally active in clotting assays. These results establish the feasibility of using infected hepatocytes for the expression of this protein and are a step toward the goal of correcting hemophilia B by hepatic gene transfer.

  15. Expression of human factor IX in rabbit hepatocytes by retrovirus-mediated gene transfer: potential for gene therapy of hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Armentano, D; Thompson, A R; Darlington, G; Woo, S L

    1990-08-01

    Hemophilia B (Christmas disease) is a chromosome X-linked blood clotting disorder which results when factor IX is deficient or functionally defective. The enzyme is synthesized in the liver, and the existence of animal models for this genetic disease will permit the development of somatic gene therapy protocols aimed at transfer of the functional gene into the liver. We report the construction of an N2-based recombinant retroviral vector, NCMVFIX, for efficient transfer and expression of human factor IX cDNA in primary rabbit hepatocytes. In this construct the human cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter directs the expression of factor IX. Hepatocytes were isolated from 3-week-old New Zealand White rabbits, infected with the recombinant virus, and analyzed for secretion of active factor IX. The infected rabbit hepatocytes produced human factor IX that is indistinguishable from enzyme derived from normal human plasma. The recombinant protein is sufficiently gamma-carboxylated and is functionally active in clotting assays. These results establish the feasibility of using infected hepatocytes for the expression of this protein and are a step toward the goal of correcting hemophilia B by hepatic gene transfer.

  16. Retrovirus-induced interference with collagen I gene expression in Mov13 fibroblasts is maintained in the absence of DNA methylation.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, H; Hartung, S; Breindl, M

    1991-01-01

    We have studied the role of DNA methylation in repression of the murine alpha 1 type I collagen (COL1A1) gene in Mov13 fibroblasts. In Mov13 mice, a retroviral provirus has inserted into the first intron of the COL1A1 gene and blocks its expression at the level of transcriptional initiation. We found that regulatory sequences in the COL1A1 promoter region that are involved in the tissue-specific regulation of the gene are unmethylated in collagen-expressing wild-type fibroblasts and methylated in Mov13 fibroblasts, confirming and extending earlier observations. To directly assess the role of DNA methylation in the repression of COL1A1 gene transcription, we treated Mov13 fibroblasts with the demethylating agent 5-azacytidine. This treatment resulted in a demethylation of the COL1A1 regulatory sequences but failed to activate transcription of the COL1A1 gene. Moreover, the 5-azacytidine treatment induced a transcription-competent chromatin structure in the retroviral sequences but not in the COL1A1 promoter. In DNA transfection and microinjection experiments, we found that the provirus interfered with transcriptional activity of the COL1A1 promoter in Mov13 fibroblasts but not in Xenopus laevis oocytes. In contrast, the wild-type COL1A1 promoter was transcriptionally active in Mov13 fibroblasts. These experiments showed that the COL1A1 promoter is potentially transcriptionally active in the presence of proviral sequences and that Mov13 fibroblasts contain the trans-acting factors required for efficient COL1A1 gene expression. Our results indicate that the provirus insertion in Mov13 can inactivate COL1A1 gene expression at several levels. It prevents the developmentally regulated establishment of a transcription-competent methylation pattern and chromatin structure of the COL1A1 domain and, in the absence of DNA methylation, appears to suppress the COL1A1 promoter in a cell-specific manner, presumably by assuming a dominant chromatin structure that may be

  17. HERVd: database of human endogenous retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Paces, Jan; Pavlícek, Adam; Paces, Václav

    2002-01-01

    The human endogenous retroviruses database (HERVd) is maintained at the Institute of Molecular Genetics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, and is accessible via the World Wide Web at http://herv.img.cas.cz. The HERVd provides complex information on and analysis of retroviral elements found in the human genome. It can be used for searches of individual HERV families, identification of HERV parts, graphical output of HERV structures, comparison of HERVs and identification of retrovirus integration sites.

  18. Retrovirus vectors bearing jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus Env transduce human cells by using a new receptor localized to chromosome 3p21.3.

    PubMed

    Rai, S K; DeMartini, J C; Miller, A D

    2000-05-01

    Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV) is a type D retrovirus associated with a contagious lung tumor of sheep, ovine pulmonary carcinoma. Other than sheep, JSRV is known to infect goats, but there is no evidence of human infection. Until now it has not been possible to study the host range for JSRV because of the inability to grow this virus in culture. Here we show that the JSRV envelope protein (Env) can be used to pseudotype Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV)-based retrovirus vectors and that such vectors can transduce human cells in culture. We constructed hybrid retrovirus packaging cells that express the JSRV Env and the MoMLV Gag-Pol proteins and can produce JSRV-pseudotype vectors at titers of up to 10(6) alkaline phosphatase-positive focus-forming units/ml. Using this high-titer virus, we have studied the host range for JSRV, which includes sheep, human, monkey, bovine, dog, and rabbit cells but not mouse, rat, or hamster cells. Considering the inability of the JSRV-pseudotype vector to transduce hamster cells, we used the hamster cell line-based Stanford G3 panel of whole human genome radiation hybrids to phenotypically map the JSRV receptor (JVR) gene within the p21.3 region of human chromosome 3. JVR is likely a new retrovirus receptor, as none of the previously identified retrovirus receptors localizes to the same position. Several chemokine receptors that have been shown to serve as coreceptors for lentivirus infection are clustered in the same region of chromosome 3; however, careful examination shows that the JSRV receptor does not colocalize with any of these genes. PMID:10775607

  19. Generation of fibrosarcomas in vivo by a retrovirus that expresses the normal B chain of platelet-derived growth factor and mimics the alternative splice pattern of the v-sis oncogene.

    PubMed Central

    Pech, M; Gazit, A; Arnstein, P; Aaronson, S A

    1989-01-01

    A retrovirus containing the entire human platelet-derived growth factor B-chain (PDGF-B) gene was constructed in order to investigate the in vivo biological activity of its encoded growth factor. When this virus was introduced into newborn mice, it reproducibly generated fibrosarcomas at the site of inoculation. Proviruses in each fibrosarcoma analyzed had lost 149 nucleotides downstream of the PDGF-B coding region. This deletion originated from an alternative or aberrant splice event that occurred within exon 7 of the PDGF-B gene and mimicked the v-sis oncogene. Thus, deletion of this region may be necessary for efficient retrovirus replication or for more potent transforming function. Evidence that the normal growth factor coding sequence was unaltered derived from RNase protection studies and immunoprecipitation analysis. Tumors were generally polyclonal but demonstrated clonal subpopulations. Moreover, tumor-derived cell lines became monoclonal within a few tissue culture passages and rapidly formed tumors in vivo. These findings argue that overexpression of the normal human PDGF-B gene product under retrovirus control can induce the fully malignant phenotype. Images PMID:2649890

  20. Risks linked to endogenous retroviruses for vaccine production: a general overview.

    PubMed

    Dewannieux, Marie; Ribet, David; Heidmann, Thierry

    2010-05-01

    Mammalian genomes contain a heavy load of retroelements, which are mobile sequences requiring reverse transcription for their amplification. A significant proportion of these elements is of retroviral origin, with thousands of sequences resembling the integrated form of infectious retroviruses with two LTRs bordering internal regions homologous to the gag, pol, and env genes. These elements, named endogenous retroviruses (ERVs), are thought to be the remnants of ancestral germline infections by active retroviruses, which have thereafter been transmitted in a Mendelian manner. The sequencing of several mammalian genomes has allowed a comprehensive study of their ERVs. They can be grouped according to sequence homologies into 10-100 families per genome, each containing a few to several hundred elements. Strong similarities between ERVs and present-day retroviruses can be inferred from phylogenetic analyses performed on the pol or env genes, suggesting a common history. As a general rule, most ERVs are old and degenerated, with their open reading frames disrupted, but a few proviruses have retained intact genes and the corresponding proteins can thus be expressed. Some elements still contain gag and pol genes that drive the synthesis of viral particles, as well as envelope genes whose product can be incorporated on their cognate or heterologous viral particles. This presentation will review the general properties of endogenous retroviruses, in relation with their possible consequences on vaccine production.

  1. Koala Retroviruses: Evolution and Disease Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenqin; Eiden, Maribeth V

    2015-11-01

    A retroviral etiology for malignant neoplasias in koalas has long been suspected. Evidence for retroviral involvement was bolstered in 2000 by the isolation of a koala retrovirus (KoRV), now termed KoRV-A. KoRV-A is an endogenous retrovirus-a retrovirus that infects germ cells-a feature that makes it a permanent resident of the koala genome. KoRV-A lacks the genetic diversity of an exogenous retrovirus, a quality associated with the ability of a retrovirus to cause neoplasias. In 2013, a second KoRV isolate, KoRV-B, was obtained from koalas with lymphomas in the Los Angeles Zoo. Unlike KoRV-A, which is present in the genomes of all koalas in the United States, KoRV-B is restricted in its distribution and is associated with host pathology (neoplastic disease). Here, our current understanding of the evolution of endogenous and exogenous KoRVs, and the relationship between them, is reviewed to build a perspective on the future impact of these viruses on koala sustainability.

  2. Koala Retroviruses: Evolution and Disease Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenqin; Eiden, Maribeth V

    2015-11-01

    A retroviral etiology for malignant neoplasias in koalas has long been suspected. Evidence for retroviral involvement was bolstered in 2000 by the isolation of a koala retrovirus (KoRV), now termed KoRV-A. KoRV-A is an endogenous retrovirus-a retrovirus that infects germ cells-a feature that makes it a permanent resident of the koala genome. KoRV-A lacks the genetic diversity of an exogenous retrovirus, a quality associated with the ability of a retrovirus to cause neoplasias. In 2013, a second KoRV isolate, KoRV-B, was obtained from koalas with lymphomas in the Los Angeles Zoo. Unlike KoRV-A, which is present in the genomes of all koalas in the United States, KoRV-B is restricted in its distribution and is associated with host pathology (neoplastic disease). Here, our current understanding of the evolution of endogenous and exogenous KoRVs, and the relationship between them, is reviewed to build a perspective on the future impact of these viruses on koala sustainability. PMID:26958909

  3. Retrovirus-based vectors for transient and permanent cell modification.

    PubMed

    Schott, Juliane W; Hoffmann, Dirk; Schambach, Axel

    2015-10-01

    Retroviral vectors are commonly employed for long-term transgene expression via integrating vector technology. However, three alternative retrovirus-based platforms are currently available that allow transient cell modification. Gene expression can be mediated from either episomal DNA or RNA templates, or selected proteins can be directly transferred through retroviral nanoparticles. The different technologies are functionally graded with respect to safety, expression magnitude and expression duration. Improvement of the initial technologies, including modification of vector designs, targeted increase in expression strength and duration as well as improved safety characteristics, has allowed maturation of retroviral systems into efficient and promising tools that meet the technological demands of a wide variety of potential application areas.

  4. In between: Gypsy in Drosophila melanogaster Reveals New Insights into Endogenous Retrovirus Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Touret, Franck; Guiguen, François; Greenland, Timothy; Terzian, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Retroviruses are RNA viruses that are able to synthesize a DNA copy of their genome and insert it into a chromosome of the host cell. Sequencing of different eukaryote genomes has revealed the presence of many such endogenous retroviral sequences. The mechanisms by which these retroviral sequences have colonized the genome are still unknown, and the endogenous retrovirus gypsy of Drosophila melanogaster is a powerful experimental model for deciphering this process in vivo. Gypsy is expressed in a layer of somatic cells, and then transferred into the oocyte by an unknown mechanism. This critical step is the start of the endogenization process. Moreover gypsy has been shown to have infectious properties, probably due to its envelope gene acquired from a baculovirus. Recently we have also shown that gypsy maternal transmission is reduced in the presence of the endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia. These studies demonstrate that gypsy is a unique and powerful model for understanding the endogenization of retroviruses. PMID:25502325

  5. A natural allele of Nxf1/TAP supresses retrovirus insertional mutations

    PubMed Central

    Floyd, Jennifer A.; Gold, David A.; Concepcion, Dorothy; Poon, Tiffany H.; Wang, Xiaobo; Keithley, Elizabeth; Chen, Dan; Ward, Erica J.; Chinn, Steven B.; Friedman, Rick A.; Yu, Hon-Tsen; Moriwaki, Kazuo; Shiroishi, Toshihiko; Hamilton, Bruce A.

    2009-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses have shaped the evolution of mammalian genomes. Host genes that control the effects of retrovirus insertions are therefore of great interest. The Modifier-of-vibrator-1 locus controls level of correctly processed mRNA from genes mutated by endogenous retrovirus insertions into introns, including the pitpnvb tremor mutation and the Eya1BOR model of human branchiootorenal syndrome. Positional complementation cloning identifies Mvb1 as the nuclear export factor Nxf1, providing an unexpected link between mRNA export receptor and pre-mRNA processing. Population structure of the suppressing allele in wild M. m. castaneus suggests selective advantage. A congenic Mvb1CAST allele is a useful tool for modifying gene expression from existing mutations and could be used to manipulate engineered mutations containing retroviral elements. PMID:14517553

  6. Human retroviruses and AIDS 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Korber, B.; Foley, B.; Leitner, T.

    1997-12-01

    This compendium is the result of an effort to compile, organize, and rapidly publish as much relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses as possible. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the four parts that it comprises: (1) Nucleic Acid Alignments, (2) Amino Acid Alignments, (3) Reviews and Analyses, and (4) Related Sequences. Information within all the parts is updated throughout the year on the Web site, http://hiv-web.lanl.gov. This year we are not including floppy diskettes as the entire compendium is available both at our Web site and at our ftp site. If you need floppy diskettes please contact either Bette Korber (btk@t10.lanl.gov) or Kersti Rock (karm@t10.lanl.gov) by email or fax ((505) 665-4453). While this publication could take the form of a review or sequence monograph, it is not so conceived. Instead, the literature from which the database is derived has simply been summarized and some elementary computational analyses have been performed upon the data. Interpretation and commentary have been avoided insofar as possible so that the reader can form his or her own judgments concerning the complex information. The exception to this are reviews submitted by experts in areas deemed of particular and basic importance to research involving AIDS viral sequence information. These are included in Part III, and are contributed by scientists with particular expertise in the area of interest. In addition to the general descriptions below of the parts of the compendium, the user should read the individual introductions for each part.

  7. Human endogenous retroviruses: friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Weiss, Robin A

    2016-01-01

    The integration of proviral DNA into host chromosomal DNA as an obligatory step in the replication cycle of retroviruses is a natural event of genetic recombination between virus and host. When integration occurs in cells of the germ line, it results in mendelian inheritance of viral sequences that we call endogenous retroviruses (ERV) and HERV for humans. HERVs and host often establish a symbiotic relationship, especially in the placenta and in pluripotent embryonic stem cells, but HERVs occasionally have deleterious consequences for the host. This special issue of APMIS features the fascinating relationships between HERV and humans in health and disease. PMID:26818257

  8. Rapid retrovirus titration using competitive polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Tafuro, S; Zentilin, L; Falaschi, A; Giacca, M

    1996-08-01

    A quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) procedure has been developed for rapid retrovirus titration. This procedure, which is based on the simultaneous amplification of the sample with known amounts of a competitor DNA fragment (competitive PCR), was used for the quantification of viral RNA genomes in retrovirus-producing cell clone supernatants and of proviral DNA molecules formed at 24 h after infection of different reference cell lines. The results obtained from the analysis of several samples indicated that proviral DNA quantification is in complete agreement with the number of selectable colonies in a standard colony assay. Conversely, the number of viral RNA genomes in the producer cell clone supernatants is a poor predictor of the actual efficiency of infection. Repeated competitive PCR experiments for provirus copy number determination at different times after transduction indicated that the number of proviral DNA molecules remains stable over time, suggesting stable integration into the host genome. The developed procedure is rapid and simple, is applicable to retroviral constructs not containing a selectable gene and can be used to directly measure the efficiency of infection of any target cell type, thus overcoming the problem of the dependency of retroviral titer determination on the rate of expression of a selectable gene and on the efficiency of colony formation of a reference cell line.

  9. Retroviruses and inflammatory myopathies in humans and primates.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, M C

    1993-11-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the human T cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV-1), the human foamy retrovirus and the simian immunodeficiency viruses have been associated with the development of an inflammatory myopathy in humans and primates. The myopathy caused by HIV and HTLV-1 is not due to direct infection of the muscle by these viruses, but rather due to an immunopathologic process triggered by the viruses, mediated by autoaggressive CD8+ cells in the context of MHC-class I antigen expression. This has been based on a series of studies utilizing immunocytochemistry, in situ hybridization, polymerase chain reaction, and co-cultivation of human myotubes with the viruses or with HIV-1 and HTLV-1-infected homologous lymphoid cells. Because the clinical, histological and immunological picture of patients with retroviral-associated inflammatory myopathies is identical to that of patients with retroviral-negative inflammatory myopathy, there is a reasonable possibility that retroviruses may be candidate viruses in triggering inflammatory myopathies. In recent years, the antiretroviral drug AZT (Zidovudine), commonly used for the treatment of AIDS, has been shown to cause a distinct mitochondrial myopathy characterized by depletion of the muscle mitochondrial DNA due to AZT's ability to inhibit the gamma-DNA polymerase of the mitochondrial matrix. Distinction of the AZT-myopathy is clinically important because it responds to discontinuation of AZT and to administration of another antiretroviral agent such as ddI or ddC.

  10. Pseudotyped retroviruses for infecting axolotl in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Whited, Jessica L; Tsai, Stephanie L; Beier, Kevin T; White, Jourdan N; Piekarski, Nadine; Hanken, James; Cepko, Constance L; Tabin, Clifford J

    2013-03-01

    Axolotls are poised to become the premiere model system for studying vertebrate appendage regeneration. However, very few molecular tools exist for studying crucial cell lineage relationships over regeneration or for robust and sustained misexpression of genetic elements to test their function. Furthermore, targeting specific cell types will be necessary to understand how regeneration of the diverse tissues within the limb is accomplished. We report that pseudotyped, replication-incompetent retroviruses can be used in axolotls to permanently express markers or genetic elements for functional study. These viruses, when modified by changing their coat protein, can infect axolotl cells only when they have been experimentally manipulated to express the receptor for that coat protein, thus allowing for the possibility of targeting specific cell types. Using viral vectors, we have found that progenitor populations for many different cell types within the blastema are present at all stages of limb regeneration, although their relative proportions change with time.

  11. Human Endogenous Retrovirus Group E and Its Involvement in Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Le Dantec, Christelle; Vallet, Sophie; Brooks, Wesley H.; Renaudineau, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Human endogenous retrovirus group E (HERV-E) elements are stably integrated into the human genome, transmitted vertically in a Mendelian manner, and are endowed with transcriptional activity as alternative promoters or enhancers. Such effects are under the control of the proviral long terminal repeats (LTR) that are organized into three HERV-E phylogenetic subgroups, namely LTR2, LTR2B, and LTR2C. Moreover, HERV-E expression is tissue-specific, and silenced by epigenetic constraints that may be disrupted in cancer, autoimmunity, and human placentation. Interest in HERV-E with regard to these conditions has been stimulated further by concerns regarding the capacity of HERV-E elements to modify the expression of neighboring genes and/or to produce retroviral proteins, including immunosuppressive env peptides, which in turn may induce (auto)-antibody (Ab) production. Finally, better understanding of HERV-E elements may have clinical applications for prevention, diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy. PMID:25785516

  12. Tetherin/BST-2 promotes dendritic cell activation and function during acute retrovirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sam X.; Barrett, Bradley S.; Guo, Kejun; Kassiotis, George; Hasenkrug, Kim J.; Dittmer, Ulf; Gibbert, Kathrin; Santiago, Mario L.

    2016-01-01

    Tetherin/BST-2 is a host restriction factor that inhibits retrovirus release from infected cells in vitro by tethering nascent virions to the plasma membrane. However, contradictory data exists on whether Tetherin inhibits acute retrovirus infection in vivo. Previously, we reported that Tetherin-mediated inhibition of Friend retrovirus (FV) replication at 2 weeks post-infection correlated with stronger natural killer, CD4+ T and CD8+ T cell responses. Here, we further investigated the role of Tetherin in counteracting retrovirus replication in vivo. FV infection levels were similar between wild-type (WT) and Tetherin KO mice at 3 to 7 days post-infection despite removal of a potent restriction factor, Apobec3/Rfv3. However, during this phase of acute infection, Tetherin enhanced myeloid dendritic cell (DC) function. DCs from infected, but not uninfected, WT mice expressed significantly higher MHC class II and the co-stimulatory molecule CD80 compared to Tetherin KO DCs. Tetherin-associated DC activation during acute FV infection correlated with stronger NK cell responses. Furthermore, Tetherin+ DCs from FV-infected mice more strongly stimulated FV-specific CD4+ T cells ex vivo compared to Tetherin KO DCs. The results link the antiretroviral and immunomodulatory activity of Tetherin in vivo to improved DC activation and MHC class II antigen presentation. PMID:26846717

  13. Neuropeptide Y Negatively Influences Monocyte Recruitment to the Central Nervous System during Retrovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Tyson A.; Du, Min; Carmody, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Monocyte infiltration into the CNS is a hallmark of several viral infections of the central nervous system (CNS), including retrovirus infection. Understanding the factors that mediate monocyte migration in the CNS is essential for the development of therapeutics that can alter the disease process. In the current study, we found that neuropeptide Y (NPY) suppressed monocyte recruitment to the CNS in a mouse model of polytropic retrovirus infection. NPY−/− mice had increased incidence and kinetics of retrovirus-induced neurological disease, which correlated with a significant increase in monocytes in the CNS compared to wild-type mice. Both Ly6Chi inflammatory and Ly6Clo alternatively activated monocytes were increased in the CNS of NPY−/− mice following virus infection, suggesting that NPY suppresses the infiltration of both cell types. Ex vivo analysis of myeloid cells from brain tissue demonstrated that infiltrating monocytes expressed high levels of the NPY receptor Y2R. Correlating with the expression of Y2R on monocytes, treatment of NPY−/− mice with a truncated, Y2R-specific NPY peptide suppressed the incidence of retrovirus-induced neurological disease. These data demonstrate a clear role for NPY as a negative regulator of monocyte recruitment into the CNS and provide a new mechanism for suppression of retrovirus-induced neurological disease. IMPORTANCE Monocyte recruitment to the brain is associated with multiple neurological diseases. However, the factors that influence the recruitment of these cells to the brain are still not well understood. In the current study, we found that neuropeptide Y, a protein produced by neurons, affected monocyte recruitment to the brain during retrovirus infection. We show that mice deficient in NPY have increased influx of monocytes into the brain and that this increase in monocytes correlates with neurological-disease development. These studies provide a mechanism by which the nervous system, through

  14. [Endogenous retroviruses are associated with autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Nexø, Bjørn A; Jensen, Sara B; Hansen, Bettina; Laska, Magdalena J

    2016-06-13

    Retroviruses can be transmitted in two fundamentally different ways: 1) They can be horizontally transmitted as infectious virus, or 2) they can integrate in the germ line and be transmitted to offspring and the offsprings' offspring as DNA. The latter is called endogenous viruses. The mode of transmission is called vertical. Viral variants of importance for development of disease must be more frequent among diseased persons than among healthy individuals. Multiple sclerosis, diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis are all associated with sets of endogenouos retroviruses but not the same sets. If a virus grows and this contributes to disease, one should be able to alleviate disease with antiretroviral drugs. We call for clinical trials to elucidate this issue. PMID:27292833

  15. Retrovirus maturation-an extraordinary structural transformation.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Simone; Schur, Florian Km; Briggs, John Ag

    2016-06-01

    Retroviruses such as HIV-1 assemble and bud from infected cells in an immature, non-infectious form. Subsequently, a series of proteolytic cleavages catalysed by the viral protease leads to a spectacular structural rearrangement of the viral particle into a mature form that is competent to fuse with and infect a new cell. Maturation involves changes in the structures of protein domains, in the interactions between protein domains, and in the architecture of the viral components that are assembled by the proteins. Tight control of proteolytic cleavages at different sites is required for successful maturation, and the process is a major target of antiretroviral drugs. Here we will describe what is known about the structures of immature and mature retrovirus particles, and about the maturation process by which one transitions into the other. Despite a wealth of available data, fundamental questions about retroviral maturation remain unanswered. PMID:27010119

  16. Human endogenous retrovirus K10 encodes a functional integrase.

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Y; Ayukawa, T; Ishikawa, T; Kanda, T; Yoshiike, K

    1996-01-01

    We cloned a human endogenous retrovirus K1O DNA fragment encoding integrase and expressed it as a fusion protein with Escherichia coli maltose-binding protein. Integrase activities were measured in vitro by using a double-stranded oligonucleotide as a substrate mimicking viral long terminal repeats (LTR). The fusion protein was highly active for both terminal cleavage and strand transfer in the presence of Mn2+ on the K1O LTR substrate. It was also active on both Rous sarcoma virus and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 LTR substrates, whereas Rous sarcoma virus and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrases were active only on their corresponding LTR substrates. The results strongly suggest that K1O encodes a functional integrase with relaxed substrate specificity. PMID:8627815

  17. Gamma-Retrovirus Integration Marks Cell Type-Specific Cancer Genes: A Novel Profiling Tool in Cancer Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Gilroy, Kathryn L.; Terry, Anne; Naseer, Asif; de Ridder, Jeroen; Wang, Weiwei; Carpenter, Eric; Mason, Andrew; Wong, Gane K-S.; Kilbey, Anna; Neil, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Retroviruses have been foundational in cancer research since early studies identified proto-oncogenes as targets for insertional mutagenesis. Integration of murine gamma-retroviruses into the host genome favours promoters and enhancers and entails interaction of viral integrase with host BET/bromodomain factors. We report that this integration pattern is conserved in feline leukaemia virus (FeLV), a gamma-retrovirus that infects many human cell types. Analysis of FeLV insertion sites in the MCF-7 mammary carcinoma cell line revealed strong bias towards active chromatin marks with no evidence of significant post-integration growth selection. The most prominent FeLV integration targets had little overlap with the most abundantly expressed transcripts, but were strongly enriched for annotated cancer genes. A meta-analysis based on several gamma-retrovirus integration profiling (GRIP) studies in human cells (CD34+, K562, HepG2) revealed a similar cancer gene bias but also remarkable cell-type specificity, with prominent exceptions including a universal integration hotspot at the long non-coding RNA MALAT1. Comparison of GRIP targets with databases of super-enhancers from the same cell lines showed that these have only limited overlap and that GRIP provides unique insights into the upstream drivers of cell growth. These observations elucidate the oncogenic potency of the gamma-retroviruses and support the wider application of GRIP to identify the genes and growth regulatory circuits that drive distinct cancer types. PMID:27097319

  18. Koala retrovirus: a genome invasion in real time

    PubMed Central

    Stoye, Jonathan P

    2006-01-01

    Koalas are currently undergoing a wave of germline infections by the retrovirus KoRV. Study of this phenomenon not only provides an opportunity for understanding the processes regulating retrovirus endogenization but may also be essential to preventing the extinction of the species. PMID:17118218

  19. Biochemical and proteomic characterization of retrovirus Gag based microparticles carrying melanoma antigens

    PubMed Central

    Kurg, Reet; Reinsalu, Olavi; Jagur, Sergei; Õunap, Kadri; Võsa, Liisi; Kasvandik, Sergo; Padari, Kärt; Gildemann, Kiira; Ustav, Mart

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles are membraneous particles released by a variety of cells into the extracellular microenvironment. Retroviruses utilize the cellular vesiculation pathway for virus budding/assembly and the retrovirus Gag protein induces the spontaneous formation of microvesicles or virus-like particles (VLPs) when expressed in the mammalian cells. In this study, five different melanoma antigens, MAGEA4, MAGEA10, MART1, TRP1 and MCAM, were incorporated into the VLPs and their localization within the particles was determined. Our data show that the MAGEA4 and MAGEA10 proteins as well as MCAM are expressed on the surface of VLPs. The compartmentalization of exogenously expressed cancer antigens within the VLPs did not depend on the localization of the protein within the cell. Comparison of the protein content of VLPs by LC-MS/MS-based label-free quantitative proteomics showed that VLPs carrying different cancer antigens are very similar to each other, but differ to some extent from VLPs without recombinant antigen. We suggest that retrovirus Gag based virus-like particles carrying recombinant antigens have a potential to be used in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27403717

  20. Human retroviruses and AIDS, 1991. [CONTAINS GLOSSARY

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, G.; Korber, B. ); Berzofsky, J.A.; Pavlakis, G.N. ); Smith, R.F. )

    1991-05-01

    This compendium and the accompanying floppy diskettes are the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses.The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts that it comprises: (1) HIV and SIV Nucleotide Sequences; (2) Amino Acid Sequences; (3) Analyses; (4) Related Sequences; and (5) Database Communications. Information within all the parts is updated at least twice in each year, which accounts for the modes of binding and pagination in the compendium.

  1. Control of RFM strain endogenous retrovirus in RFM mouse cells.

    PubMed

    Tennant, R W; Otten, J A; Wang, T W; Liou, R S; Brown, A; Yang, W K

    1983-01-01

    RFM/Un mice express an endogenous type C retrovirus throughout their life span in many tissues; primary or established embryo fibroblast cell cultures do not express a virus but can be induced by exposure to 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine. All of our sources yielded a single ecotropic virus (RFV) which appeared to be related more closely to the endogenous N-tropic virus (WN1802N) of BALB/c mice than to Gross leukemia virus on the basis of two-dimensional gel electropherograms of virion proteins. No xenotropic or recombinant viruses were isolated by cocultivation techniques. RFV is N-tropic, and RFM/Un cells possess the Fv-1n allele, as indicated by restriction of B-tropic virus and susceptibility to Gross strain N-tropic virus. However, RFM cells are highly resistant to RFV and other endogenous N-tropic viruses. This resistance is expressed by two-hit titration kinetics and by inhibition of viral linear duplex DNA formation. This is similar to the effects of the Fv-1 locus, but preliminary work has shown no apparent genetic linkage between the two restrictions. The relative strength of the restriction, the presence of a single class of ecotropic virus, and the absence of recombinant viruses suggest that in RFM mice virus is expressed only in cells in which it is induced and not by cell-to-cell transmission.

  2. Human endogenous retroviruses in neurologic disease.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Tove

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses are pathogenic - in other species than the human. Disease associations for Human Endogenous RetroViruses (HERVs) are emerging, but so far an unequivocal pathogenetic cause-effect relationship has not been established. A role for HERVs has been proposed in neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases as diverse as multiple sclerosis (MS) and schizophrenia (SCZ). Particularly for MS, many aspects of the activation and involvement of specific HERV families (HERV-H/F and HERV-W/MSRV) have been reported, both for cells in the circulation and in the central nervous system. Notably envelope genes and their gene products (Envs) appear strongly associated with the disease. For SCZ, for ALS, and for HIV-associated dementia (HAD), indications are accumulating for involvement of the HERV-K family, and also HERV-H/F and/or HERV-W. Activation is reasonably a prerequisite for causality as most HERV sequences remain quiescent in non-pathological conditions, so the importance of regulatory pathways and epigenetics involved in regulating HERV activation, derepression, and also involvement of retroviral restriction factors, is emerging. HERV-directed antiretrovirals have potential as novel therapeutic paradigms in neurologic disease, particularly in MS. The possible protective or ameliorative effects of antiretroviral therapy in MS are substantiated by reports that treatment of HIV infection may be associated with a significantly decreased risk of MS. Further studies of HERVs, their role in neurologic diseases, and their potential as therapeutic targets are essential. PMID:26818266

  3. The potential role of retroviruses in autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    In the last 20 years research in Immunology underwent fundamental changes. Most importantly, the identification of the key role of innate immune pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that recognize evolutionarily conserved molecular patterns on infectious pathogens. This results in priming of innate immune cells, which in turn activate and direct the adaptive immune response. Progress in innate immune recognition instigated the current working hypothesis, that recognition of endogenous ligands by PRRs results in innate immune cell activation (autoinflammation) or activation of adaptive cells, with self-reactive antigen receptors (autoimmunity). In particular, nucleic acid-sensing innate immune receptors seem to be prime candidates for a mechanistic understanding of autoreactive activation of the immune system. However, it remains uncertain what the actual source of nucleic acid ligands is and what other signals are needed to drive activation of autoreactive innate immune cells and break self-tolerance of the adaptive immune system. Here, I will review our present understanding about whether the infection with exogenous retroviruses or the reactivation of endogenous retroviruses might play an etiological role in certain autoimmune conditions of humans and murine experimental models.

  4. Endogenous retrovirus and radiation-induced leukemia in the RMF mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Tennant, R.W.; Boone, L.R.; Lalley, P.; Yang, W.K.

    1982-01-01

    The induction of myeloid leukemia in irradiated RFM/Un mice has been associated with retrovirus infection. However, two characteristics of this strain complicate efforts to define the role of the virus. This strain possesses only one inducible host range class of endogenous virus and a unique gene, in addition to the Fv-1/sup n/ locus, which specifically restricts exogenous infection by endogenous viruses. These characteristics possibly account for absence of recombinant viruses in this strain, even though virus is amply expressed during most of the animal's life span. We have examined further the distribution of retrovirus sequences and the chromosomal locus of the inducible virus in this strain. This report describes evidence for additional viral sequences in cells of a radiation-induced myeloid leukemia line and discusses the possible origin of these added copies.

  5. Wolbachia Influences the Maternal Transmission of the gypsy Endogenous Retrovirus in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Touret, Franck; Guiguen, François

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The endosymbiotic bacteria of the genus Wolbachia are present in most insects and are maternally transmitted through the germline. Moreover, these intracellular bacteria exert antiviral activity against insect RNA viruses, as in Drosophila melanogaster, which could explain the prevalence of Wolbachia bacteria in natural populations. Wolbachia is maternally transmitted in D. melanogaster through a mechanism that involves distribution at the posterior pole of mature oocytes and then incorporation into the pole cells of the embryos. In parallel, maternal transmission of several endogenous retroviruses is well documented in D. melanogaster. Notably, gypsy retrovirus is expressed in permissive follicle cells and transferred to the oocyte and then to the offspring by integrating into their genomes. Here, we show that the presence of Wolbachia wMel reduces the rate of gypsy insertion into the ovo gene. However, the presence of Wolbachia does not modify the expression levels of gypsy RNA and envelope glycoprotein from either permissive or restrictive ovaries. Moreover, Wolbachia affects the pattern of distribution of the retroviral particles and the gypsy envelope protein in permissive follicle cells. Altogether, our results enlarge the knowledge of the antiviral activity of Wolbachia to include reducing the maternal transmission of endogenous retroviruses in D. melanogaster. PMID:25182324

  6. Drosophila germline invasion by the endogenous retrovirus gypsy: involvement of the viral env gene.

    PubMed

    Pelisson, A; Mejlumian, L; Robert, V; Terzian, C; Bucheton, A

    2002-10-01

    The endogenous retrovirus gypsy is expressed at high levels in mutant flamenco female flies. Gypsy viral particles extracted from such flies can infect naive flamenco individuals raised in the presence of these extracts mixed into their food. This results in the integration of new proviruses into the germline genome. These proviruses can then increase their copy number by (1) expression in the flamenco female somatic cells, (2) transfer into the oocyte and (3) integration into the genome of the progeny. Surprisingly, unlike the infection observed in the feeding experiments, this strategy of endogenous proviral multiplication does not seem to involve the expression of the viral env gene. PMID:12225916

  7. A Modified γ-Retrovirus Vector for X-Linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hacein-Bey-Abina, S.; Pai, S.-Y.; Gaspar, H.B.; Armant, M.; Berry, C.C.; Blanche, S.; Bleesing, J.; Blondeau, J.; de Boer, H.; Buckland, K.F.; Caccavelli, L.; Cros, G.; De Oliveira, S.; Fernández, K.S.; Guo, D.; Harris, C.E.; Hopkins, G.; Lehmann, L.E.; Lim, A.; London, W.B.; van der Loo, J.C.M.; Malani, N.; Male, F.; Malik, P.; Marinovic, M.A.; McNicol, A.-M.; Moshous, D.; Neven, B.; Oleastro, M.; Picard, C.; Ritz, J.; Rivat, C.; Schambach, A.; Shaw, K.L.; Sherman, E.A.; Silberstein, L.E.; Six, E.; Touzot, F.; Tsytsykova, A.; Xu-Bayford, J.; Baum, C.; Bushman, F.D.; Fischer, A.; Kohn, D.B.; Filipovich, A.H.; Notarangelo, L.D.; Cavazzana, M.; Williams, D.A.; Thrasher, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND In previous clinical trials involving children with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), a Moloney murine leukemia virus–based γ-retrovirus vector expressing interleukin-2 receptor γ-chain (γc) complementary DNA successfully restored immunity in most patients but resulted in vector-induced leukemia through enhancer-mediated mutagenesis in 25% of patients. We assessed the efficacy and safety of a self-inactivating retrovirus for the treatment of SCID-X1. METHODS We enrolled nine boys with SCID-X1 in parallel trials in Europe and the United States to evaluate treatment with a self-inactivating (SIN) γ-retrovirus vector containing deletions in viral enhancer sequences expressing γc (SIN-γc). RESULTS All patients received bone marrow–derived CD34+ cells transduced with the SIN-γc vector, without preparative conditioning. After 12.1 to 38.7 months of follow-up, eight of the nine children were still alive. One patient died from an overwhelming adenoviral infection before reconstitution with genetically modified T cells. Of the remaining eight patients, seven had recovery of peripheral-blood T cells that were functional and led to resolution of infections. The patients remained healthy thereafter. The kinetics of CD3+ T-cell recovery was not significantly different from that observed in previous trials. Assessment of insertion sites in peripheral blood from patients in the current trial as compared with those in previous trials revealed significantly less clustering of insertion sites within LMO2 , MECOM, and other lymphoid proto-oncogenes in our patients. CONCLUSIONS This modified γ-retrovirus vector was found to retain efficacy in the treatment of SCID-X1. The long-term effect of this therapy on leukemogenesis remains unknown. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others; ClinicalTrials.gov numbers, NCT01410019, NCT01175239, and NCT01129544.) PMID:25295500

  8. Efficient intracellular retrotransposition of an exogenous primate retrovirus genome

    PubMed Central

    Heinkelein, Martin; Pietschmann, Thomas; Jármy, Gergely; Dressler, Marco; Imrich, Horst; Thurow, Jana; Lindemann, Dirk; Bock, Michael; Moebes, Astrid; Roy, Jacqueline; Herchenröder, Ottmar; Rethwilm, Axel

    2000-01-01

    The foamy virus (FV) subgroup of Retroviridae reverse transcribe their RNA (pre-)genome late in the replication cycle before leaving an infected cell. We studied whether a marker gene-transducing FV vector is able to shuttle to the nucleus and integrate into host cell genomic DNA. While a potential intracellular retrotransposition of vectors derived from other retroviruses was below the detection limit of our assay, we found that up to 5% of cells transfected with the FV vector were stably transduced, harboring 1 to ∼10 vector integrants. Generation of the integrants depended on expression of functional capsid, reverse transcriptase and integrase proteins, and did not involve an extracellular step. PCR analysis of the U3 region of the 5′ long terminal repeat and determination of proviral integration sites showed that a reverse transcription step had taken place to generate the integrants. Co-expression of a mutated envelope allowing particle egress and avoiding extracellular infection resulted in a significantly increased rescue of cells harboring integrants, suggesting that accumulation of proviruses via intracellular retrotransposition represents an integral part of the FV replication strategy. PMID:10880456

  9. Searching for Common Mammalian Retroviruses in Pediatric Idiopathic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Jeziorski, Eric; Foulongne, Vincent; Ludwig, Catherine; Louhaem, Djamel; Rodiere, Michel; Sitbon, Marc; Courgnaud, Valérie

    2016-03-01

    Mammalian retroviruses cause a variety of diseases in their hosts, including hematological and immunodeficiency disorders. Both human T-cell leukemia (HTLV) and human immunodeficiency (HIV) viruses originated from several independent zoonotic transmissions, indicating that cross-species transmissions from animal to humans may still occur. Thus, as the risk for retroviral transmissions from animals to humans increase, we investigated whether mammalian retroviruses are involved in selected pediatric idiopathic diseases whose symptoms evoke retroviral infections. Blood samples, sera, and synovial fluids, or bone marrow cells were collected from pediatric patients under 18 years of age with different autoimmune idiopathic diseases. Overall, we screened clinical samples from 110 children using sensitive nested and semi-nested PCR strategies targeting env genes, and a C-type retrovirus reverse transcriptase (RT) activity kit. All clinical samples were free of retroviral signatures, indicating the unlikelihood of an etiological role of the retroviruses we assessed in the pediatric diseases we tested.

  10. Searching for Common Mammalian Retroviruses in Pediatric Idiopathic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Jeziorski, Eric; Foulongne, Vincent; Ludwig, Catherine; Louhaem, Djamel; Rodiere, Michel; Sitbon, Marc; Courgnaud, Valérie

    2016-03-01

    Mammalian retroviruses cause a variety of diseases in their hosts, including hematological and immunodeficiency disorders. Both human T-cell leukemia (HTLV) and human immunodeficiency (HIV) viruses originated from several independent zoonotic transmissions, indicating that cross-species transmissions from animal to humans may still occur. Thus, as the risk for retroviral transmissions from animals to humans increase, we investigated whether mammalian retroviruses are involved in selected pediatric idiopathic diseases whose symptoms evoke retroviral infections. Blood samples, sera, and synovial fluids, or bone marrow cells were collected from pediatric patients under 18 years of age with different autoimmune idiopathic diseases. Overall, we screened clinical samples from 110 children using sensitive nested and semi-nested PCR strategies targeting env genes, and a C-type retrovirus reverse transcriptase (RT) activity kit. All clinical samples were free of retroviral signatures, indicating the unlikelihood of an etiological role of the retroviruses we assessed in the pediatric diseases we tested. PMID:27102168

  11. A Novel Recombinant Retrovirus in the Genomes of Modern Birds Combines Features of Avian and Mammalian Retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Henzy, Jamie E.; Gifford, Robert J.; Johnson, Welkin E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) represent ancestral sequences of modern retroviruses or their extinct relatives. The majority of ERVs cluster alongside exogenous retroviruses into two main groups based on phylogenetic analyses of the reverse transcriptase (RT) enzyme. Class I includes gammaretroviruses, and class II includes lentiviruses and alpha-, beta-, and deltaretroviruses. However, analyses of the transmembrane subunit (TM) of the envelope glycoprotein (env) gene result in a different topology for some retroviruses, suggesting recombination events in which heterologous env sequences have been acquired. We previously demonstrated that the TM sequences of five of the six genera of orthoretroviruses can be divided into three types, each of which infects a distinct set of vertebrate classes. Moreover, these classes do not always overlap the host range of the associated RT classes. Thus, recombination resulting in acquisition of a heterologous env gene could in theory facilitate cross-species transmissions across vertebrate classes, for example, from mammals to reptiles. Here we characterized a family of class II avian ERVs, “TgERV-F,” that acquired a mammalian gammaretroviral env sequence. Although TgERV-F clusters near a sister clade to alpharetroviruses, its genome also has some features of betaretroviruses. We offer evidence that this unusual recombinant has circulated among several avian orders and may still have infectious members. In addition to documenting the infection of a nongalliform avian species by a mammalian retrovirus, TgERV-F also underscores the importance of env sequences in reconstructing phylogenies and supports a possible role for env swapping in allowing cross-species transmissions across wide taxonomic distances. IMPORTANCE Retroviruses can sometimes acquire an envelope gene (env) from a distantly related retrovirus. Since env is a key determinant of host range, such an event affects the host range of the recombinant virus and

  12. The retrovirus HTLV-1 inserts an ectopic CTCF-binding site into the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Satou, Yorifumi; Miyazato, Paola; Ishihara, Ko; Yaguchi, Hiroko; Melamed, Anat; Miura, Michi; Fukuda, Asami; Nosaka, Kisato; Watanabe, Takehisa; Rowan, Aileen G.; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus that causes malignant and inflammatory diseases in ∼10% of infected people. A typical host has between 104 and 105 clones of HTLV-1–infected T lymphocytes, each clone distinguished by the genomic integration site of the single-copy HTLV-1 provirus. The HTLV-1 bZIP (HBZ) factor gene is constitutively expressed from the minus strand of the provirus, whereas plus-strand expression, required for viral propagation to uninfected cells, is suppressed or intermittent in vivo, allowing escape from host immune surveillance. It remains unknown what regulates this pattern of proviral transcription and latency. Here, we show that CTCF, a key regulator of chromatin structure and function, binds to the provirus at a sharp border in epigenetic modifications in the pX region of the HTLV-1 provirus in T cells naturally infected with HTLV-1. CTCF is a zinc-finger protein that binds to an insulator region in genomic DNA and plays a fundamental role in controlling higher order chromatin structure and gene expression in vertebrate cells. We show that CTCF bound to HTLV-1 acts as an enhancer blocker, regulates HTLV-1 mRNA splicing, and forms long-distance interactions with flanking host chromatin. CTCF-binding sites (CTCF-BSs) have been propagated throughout the genome by transposons in certain primate lineages, but CTCF binding has not previously been described in present-day exogenous retroviruses. The presence of an ectopic CTCF-BS introduced by the retrovirus in tens of thousands of genomic locations has the potential to cause widespread abnormalities in host cell chromatin structure and gene expression. PMID:26929370

  13. Multiple invasions of an infectious retrovirus in cat genomes.

    PubMed

    Shimode, Sayumi; Nakagawa, So; Miyazawa, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are remnants of ancient retroviral infections of host germ-line cells. While most ERVs are defective, some are active and express viral proteins. The RD-114 virus is a replication-competent feline ERV, and several feline cell lines produce infectious RD-114 viral particles. All domestic cats are considered to have an ERV locus encoding a replication-competent RD-114 virus in their genomes; however, the locus has not been identified. In this study, we investigated RD-114 virus-related proviral loci in genomes of domestic cats, and found that none were capable of producing infectious viruses. We also found that all domestic cats have an RD-114 virus-related sequence on chromosome C2, termed RDRS C2a, but populations of the other RDRSs are different depending on the regions where cats live or breed. Our results indicate that RDRS C2a, the oldest RD-114-related provirus, entered the host genome before an ancestor of domestic cats started diverging and the other new RDRSs might have integrated into migrating cats in Europe. We also show that infectious RD-114 virus can be resurrected by the recombination between two non-infectious RDRSs. From these data, we conclude that cats do not harbor infectious RD-114 viral loci in their genomes and RD-114-related viruses invaded cat genomes multiple times. PMID:25641657

  14. Discovery of unfixed endogenous retrovirus insertions in diverse human populations

    PubMed Central

    Wildschutte, Julia Halo; Williams, Zachary H.; Montesion, Meagan; Subramanian, Ravi P.; Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Coffin, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) have contributed to more than 8% of the human genome. The majority of these elements lack function due to accumulated mutations or internal recombination resulting in a solitary (solo) LTR, although members of one group of human ERVs (HERVs), HERV-K, were recently active with members that remain nearly intact, a subset of which is present as insertionally polymorphic loci that include approximately full-length (2-LTR) and solo-LTR alleles in addition to the unoccupied site. Several 2-LTR insertions have intact reading frames in some or all genes that are expressed as functional proteins. These properties reflect the activity of HERV-K and suggest the existence of additional unique loci within humans. We sought to determine the extent to which other polymorphic insertions are present in humans, using sequenced genomes from the 1000 Genomes Project and a subset of the Human Genome Diversity Project panel. We report analysis of a total of 36 nonreference polymorphic HERV-K proviruses, including 19 newly reported loci, with insertion frequencies ranging from <0.0005 to >0.75 that varied by population. Targeted screening of individual loci identified three new unfixed 2-LTR proviruses within our set, including an intact provirus present at Xq21.33 in some individuals, with the potential for retained infectivity. PMID:27001843

  15. Multiple invasions of an infectious retrovirus in cat genomes

    PubMed Central

    Shimode, Sayumi; Nakagawa, So; Miyazawa, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are remnants of ancient retroviral infections of host germ-line cells. While most ERVs are defective, some are active and express viral proteins. The RD-114 virus is a replication-competent feline ERV, and several feline cell lines produce infectious RD-114 viral particles. All domestic cats are considered to have an ERV locus encoding a replication-competent RD-114 virus in their genomes; however, the locus has not been identified. In this study, we investigated RD-114 virus-related proviral loci in genomes of domestic cats, and found that none were capable of producing infectious viruses. We also found that all domestic cats have an RD-114 virus-related sequence on chromosome C2, termed RDRS C2a, but populations of the other RDRSs are different depending on the regions where cats live or breed. Our results indicate that RDRS C2a, the oldest RD-114-related provirus, entered the host genome before an ancestor of domestic cats started diverging and the other new RDRSs might have integrated into migrating cats in Europe. We also show that infectious RD-114 virus can be resurrected by the recombination between two non-infectious RDRSs. From these data, we conclude that cats do not harbor infectious RD-114 viral loci in their genomes and RD-114-related viruses invaded cat genomes multiple times. PMID:25641657

  16. Multiple invasions of an infectious retrovirus in cat genomes.

    PubMed

    Shimode, Sayumi; Nakagawa, So; Miyazawa, Takayuki

    2015-02-02

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are remnants of ancient retroviral infections of host germ-line cells. While most ERVs are defective, some are active and express viral proteins. The RD-114 virus is a replication-competent feline ERV, and several feline cell lines produce infectious RD-114 viral particles. All domestic cats are considered to have an ERV locus encoding a replication-competent RD-114 virus in their genomes; however, the locus has not been identified. In this study, we investigated RD-114 virus-related proviral loci in genomes of domestic cats, and found that none were capable of producing infectious viruses. We also found that all domestic cats have an RD-114 virus-related sequence on chromosome C2, termed RDRS C2a, but populations of the other RDRSs are different depending on the regions where cats live or breed. Our results indicate that RDRS C2a, the oldest RD-114-related provirus, entered the host genome before an ancestor of domestic cats started diverging and the other new RDRSs might have integrated into migrating cats in Europe. We also show that infectious RD-114 virus can be resurrected by the recombination between two non-infectious RDRSs. From these data, we conclude that cats do not harbor infectious RD-114 viral loci in their genomes and RD-114-related viruses invaded cat genomes multiple times.

  17. Discovery of unfixed endogenous retrovirus insertions in diverse human populations.

    PubMed

    Wildschutte, Julia Halo; Williams, Zachary H; Montesion, Meagan; Subramanian, Ravi P; Kidd, Jeffrey M; Coffin, John M

    2016-04-19

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) have contributed to more than 8% of the human genome. The majority of these elements lack function due to accumulated mutations or internal recombination resulting in a solitary (solo) LTR, although members of one group of human ERVs (HERVs), HERV-K, were recently active with members that remain nearly intact, a subset of which is present as insertionally polymorphic loci that include approximately full-length (2-LTR) and solo-LTR alleles in addition to the unoccupied site. Several 2-LTR insertions have intact reading frames in some or all genes that are expressed as functional proteins. These properties reflect the activity of HERV-K and suggest the existence of additional unique loci within humans. We sought to determine the extent to which other polymorphic insertions are present in humans, using sequenced genomes from the 1000 Genomes Project and a subset of the Human Genome Diversity Project panel. We report analysis of a total of 36 nonreference polymorphic HERV-K proviruses, including 19 newly reported loci, with insertion frequencies ranging from <0.0005 to >0.75 that varied by population. Targeted screening of individual loci identified three new unfixed 2-LTR proviruses within our set, including an intact provirus present at Xq21.33 in some individuals, with the potential for retained infectivity.

  18. Pan-vertebrate comparative genomics unmasks retrovirus macroevolution.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Alexander; Cornwallis, Charlie K; Jern, Patric

    2015-01-13

    Although extensive research has demonstrated host-retrovirus microevolutionary dynamics, it has been difficult to gain a deeper understanding of the macroevolutionary patterns of host-retrovirus interactions. Here we use recent technological advances to infer broad patterns in retroviral diversity, evolution, and host-virus relationships by using a large-scale phylogenomic approach using endogenous retroviruses (ERVs). Retroviruses insert a proviral DNA copy into the host cell genome to produce new viruses. ERVs are provirus insertions in germline cells that are inherited down the host lineage and consequently present a record of past host-viral associations. By mining ERVs from 65 host genomes sampled across vertebrate diversity, we uncover a great diversity of ERVs, indicating that retroviral sequences are much more prevalent and widespread across vertebrates than previously appreciated. The majority of ERV clades that we recover do not contain known retroviruses, implying either that retroviral lineages are highly transient over evolutionary time or that a considerable number of retroviruses remain to be identified. By characterizing the distribution of ERVs, we show that no major vertebrate lineage has escaped retroviral activity and that retroviruses are extreme host generalists, having an unprecedented ability for rampant host switching among distantly related vertebrates. In addition, we examine whether the distribution of ERVs can be explained by host factors predicted to influence viral transmission and find that internal fertilization has a pronounced effect on retroviral colonization of host genomes. By capturing the mode and pattern of retroviral evolution and contrasting ERV diversity with known retroviral diversity, our study provides a cohesive framework to understand host-virus coevolution better.

  19. Pan-vertebrate comparative genomics unmasks retrovirus macroevolution

    PubMed Central

    Hayward, Alexander; Cornwallis, Charlie K.; Jern, Patric

    2015-01-01

    Although extensive research has demonstrated host-retrovirus microevolutionary dynamics, it has been difficult to gain a deeper understanding of the macroevolutionary patterns of host–retrovirus interactions. Here we use recent technological advances to infer broad patterns in retroviral diversity, evolution, and host–virus relationships by using a large-scale phylogenomic approach using endogenous retroviruses (ERVs). Retroviruses insert a proviral DNA copy into the host cell genome to produce new viruses. ERVs are provirus insertions in germline cells that are inherited down the host lineage and consequently present a record of past host–viral associations. By mining ERVs from 65 host genomes sampled across vertebrate diversity, we uncover a great diversity of ERVs, indicating that retroviral sequences are much more prevalent and widespread across vertebrates than previously appreciated. The majority of ERV clades that we recover do not contain known retroviruses, implying either that retroviral lineages are highly transient over evolutionary time or that a considerable number of retroviruses remain to be identified. By characterizing the distribution of ERVs, we show that no major vertebrate lineage has escaped retroviral activity and that retroviruses are extreme host generalists, having an unprecedented ability for rampant host switching among distantly related vertebrates. In addition, we examine whether the distribution of ERVs can be explained by host factors predicted to influence viral transmission and find that internal fertilization has a pronounced effect on retroviral colonization of host genomes. By capturing the mode and pattern of retroviral evolution and contrasting ERV diversity with known retroviral diversity, our study provides a cohesive framework to understand host–virus coevolution better. PMID:25535393

  20. Clinical Aspects of Feline Retroviruses: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Katrin

    2012-01-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) are retroviruses with global impact on the health of domestic cats. The two viruses differ in their potential to cause disease. FeLV is more pathogenic, and was long considered to be responsible for more clinical syndromes than any other agent in cats. FeLV can cause tumors (mainly lymphoma), bone marrow suppression syndromes (mainly anemia), and lead to secondary infectious diseases caused by suppressive effects of the virus on bone marrow and the immune system. Today, FeLV is less commonly diagnosed than in the previous 20 years; prevalence has been decreasing in most countries. However, FeLV importance may be underestimated as it has been shown that regressively infected cats (that are negative in routinely used FeLV tests) also can develop clinical signs. FIV can cause an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome that increases the risk of opportunistic infections, neurological diseases, and tumors. In most naturally infected cats, however, FIV itself does not cause severe clinical signs, and FIV-infected cats may live many years without any health problems. This article provides a review of clinical syndromes in progressively and regressively FeLV-infected cats as well as in FIV-infected cats. PMID:23202500

  1. Direct transformation of rodent fibroblasts by jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus DNA

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Naoyoshi; Palmarini, Massimo; Murgia, Claudio; Fan, Hung

    2001-01-01

    Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV) is the causative agent of ovine pulmonary carcinoma, a unique animal model for human bronchioalveolar carcinoma. We previously isolated a JSRV proviral clone and showed that it was both infectious and oncogenic. Thus JSRV is necessary and sufficient for the development of ovine pulmonary carcinoma, but no data are available on the mechanisms of transformation. Inspection of the JSRV genome reveals standard retroviral genes, but no evidence for a viral oncogene. However, an alternate ORF in pol (orf-x) might be a candidate for a transforming gene. We tested whether the JSRV genome might encode a transforming gene by transfecting an expression plasmid for JSRV [pCMVJS21, driven by the cytomegalovirus (CMV) immediate early promoter] into mouse NIH 3T3 cells. Foci of transformed cells appeared in the transfected cultures 2–3 weeks posttransfection; cloned transformants showed anchorage independence for growth, and they expressed JSRV RNA. These results indicate that the JRSV genome contains information with direct transforming potential for NIH 3T3 cells. Transfection of a mutated version of pCMVJS21 in which the orf-x protein was terminated by two stop codons also gave transformed foci. Thus, orf-x was eliminated as the candidate transforming gene. In addition, another derivative of pCMVJS21 (pCMVJS21ΔGP) in which the gag, pol (and orf-x) coding sequences were deleted also gave transformed foci. These results indicate that the envelope gene carries the transforming potential. This is an unusual example of a native retroviral structural protein with transformation potential. PMID:11296288

  2. Towards liver-directed gene therapy: retrovirus-mediated gene transfer into human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Grossman, M; Raper, S E; Wilson, J M

    1991-11-01

    Liver-directed gene therapy is being considered in the treatment of inherited metabolic diseases. One approach we are considering is the transplantation of autologous hepatocytes that have been genetically modified with recombinant retroviruses ex vivo. We describe, in this report, techniques for isolating human hepatocytes and efficiently transducing recombinant genes into primary cultures. Hepatocytes were isolated from tissue of four different donors, plated in primary culture, and exposed to recombinant retroviruses expressing either the LacZ reporter gene or the cDNA for rabbit LDL receptor. The efficiency of gene transfer under optimal conditions, as determined by Southern blot analysis, varied from a maximum of one proviral copy per cell to a minimum of 0.1 proviral copy per cell. Cytochemical assays were used to detect expression of the recombinant derived proteins, E. coli beta-galactosidase and rabbit LDL receptor. Hepatocytes transduced with the LDL receptor gene expressed levels of receptor protein that exceeded the normal endogenous levels. The ability to isolate and genetically modify human hepatocytes, as described in this report, is an important step towards the development of liver-directed gene therapies in humans. PMID:1767337

  3. About the origin of retroviruses and the co-evolution of the gypsy retrovirus with the Drosophila flamenco host gene.

    PubMed

    Pélisson, A; Teysset, L; Chalvet, F; Kim, A; Prud'homme, N; Terzian, C; Bucheton, A

    1997-01-01

    The gypsy element of Drosophila melanogaster is the first retrovirus identified so far in invertebrates. According to phylogenetic data, gypsy belongs to the same group as the Ty3 class of LTR-retrotransposons, which suggests that retroviruses evolved from this kind of retroelements before the radiation of vertebrates. There are other invertebrate retroelements that are also likely to be endogenous retroviruses because they share with gypsy some structural and functional retroviral-like characteristics. Gypsy is controlled by a Drosophila gene called flamenco, the restrictive alleles of which maintain the retrovirus in a repressed state. In permissive strains, functional gypsy elements transpose at high frequency and produce infective particles. Defective gypsy proviruses located in pericentromeric heterochromatin of all strains seem to be very old components of the genome of Drosophila melanogaster, which indicates that gypsy invaded this species, or an ancestor, a long time ago. At that time, Drosophila melanogaster presumably contained permissive alleles of the flamenco gene. One can imagine that the species survived to the increase of genetic load caused by the retroviral invasion because restrictive alleles of flamenco were selected. The characterization of a retrovirus in Drosophila, one of the most advanced model organisms for molecular genetics, provides us with an exceptional clue to study how a species can resist a retroviral invasion. PMID:9440256

  4. Role of the gag and pol genes of human immunodeficiency virus in the morphogenesis and maturation of retrovirus-like particles expressed by recombinant vaccinia virus: an ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Hoshikawa, N; Kojima, A; Yasuda, A; Takayashiki, E; Masuko, S; Chiba, J; Sata, T; Kurata, T

    1991-10-01

    An ultrastructural study was performed on rabbit epithelial RK-13 cells and CD4+ human T lymphocyte lines infected with various recombinant vaccinia viruses (RVVs) expressing genes of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV): the mature p17 or p24 gag domain alone, the entire or truncated gag gene, the reverse transcriptase domain, or the gag-pol genes with a frameshift mutation. Cells infected with RVVs that produced the gag polyprotein with a predicted Mr of more than 48K showed budding and release of HIV-like particles into the extracellular space. These particles were not observed in cells expressing a truncated gag gene (p17 and p24 regions). Mature HIV-like particles were observed extracellularly when the entire gag gene and the protease region of the pol gene were expressed. In contrast, in cells infected with RVVs that contained the gag-pol gene with a frameshift mutation, neither recognizable budding structures nor extracellular HIV-like particles could be detected. These results suggest that the gag gene, particularly its 3' terminus, is necessary for the assembly of HIV particles. In addition, the protease region of the pol gene seems to be required for morphological maturation of HIV particles, but complete proteolytic cleavage of the gag protein may prevent bud formation.

  5. Genome-wide reexamination of endogenous retroviruses in Rattus norvegicus.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Etxebarria, Koldo; Jugo, Begoña M

    2016-07-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are remnants of retroviral infections that are present in a large number of vertebrate genomes. Based on the proposal that the rat could act as a reservoir of retroviruses, rat ERVs were analysed in silico using a whole-genome approach. To enrich the detected ERV groups, we applied an upgraded approach based on the hidden Markov model. We found 2637 elements that were classified into the following groups: 9 groups of Class I; 15 of Class II, 7 of them previously described; 1 of Class III; and 3 groups whose classification was unclear but were distantly related to Class I. Sixteen ERV groups seemed to be specific to rat. The high number of rat-specific groups might be related to the contact of rats with retroviruses and their role as a reservoir. In addition, the env gene of the more extended groups seemed to be undetectable.

  6. Human APOBEC3 proteins, retrovirus restriction, and HIV drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Haché, Guylaine; Mansky, Louis M; Harris, Reuben S

    2006-01-01

    Over 40 million people worldwide currently have HIV/AIDS. Many antiretroviral drugs have proven effective, but drug-resistant HIV variants frequently emerge to thwart treatment efforts. Reverse transcription errors undoubtedly contribute to drug resistance, but additional significant sources of viral genetic variation are debatable. The human APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G proteins can potently inhibit retrovirus infection by a mechanism that involves retroviral cDNA cytosine deamination. Here we review the current knowledge on the mechanism of APOBEC3-dependent retrovirus restriction and discuss whether this innate host-defense system actively contributes to HIV genetic variation.

  7. Modulating Drug Resistance by Targeting BCRP/ABCG2 Using Retrovirus-Mediated RNA Interference

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jianhui; Liu, Wenlan; Deng, Tingting; Li, Zigang; Jin, Yi; Hu, Zhangli

    2014-01-01

    Background The BCRP/ABCG2 transporter, which mediates drug resistance in many types of cells, depends on energy provided by ATP hydrolysis. Here, a retrovirus encoding a shRNA targeting the ATP-binding domain of this protein was used to screen for highly efficient agents that could reverse drug resistance and improve cell sensitivity to drugs, thus laying the foundation for further studies and applications. Methodology/Principal Findings To target the ATP-binding domain of BCRP/ABCG2, pLenti6/BCRPsi shRNA recombinant retroviruses, with 20 bp target sequences starting from the 270th, 745th and 939th bps of the 6th exon, were constructed and packaged. The pLenti6/BCRPsi retroviruses (V-BCRPi) that conferred significant knockdown effects were screened using a drug-sensitivity experiment and flow cytometry. The human choriocarcinoma cell line JAR, which highly expresses endogenous BCRP/ABCG2, was injected under the dorsal skin of a hairless mouse to initiate a JAR cytoma. After injecting V-BCRPi-infected JAR tumor cells into the dorsal skin of hairless mice, BCRP/ABCG2 expression in the tumor tissue was determined using immunohistochemistry, fluorescent quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analyses. After intraperitoneal injection of BCRP/ABCG2-tolerant 5-FU, the tumor volume, weight change, and apoptosis rate of the tumor tissue were determined using in situ hybridization. V-BCRPi increased the sensitivity of the tumor histiocytes to 5-FU and improved the cell apoptosis-promoting effects of 5-FU in the tumor. Conclusions/Significance The goal of the in vivo and in vitro studies was to screen for an RNA interference recombinant retrovirus capable of stably targeting the ATP-binding domain of BCRP/ABCG2 (V-BCRPi) to inhibit its function. A new method to improve the chemo-sensitivity of breast cancer and other tumor cells was discovered, and this method could be used for gene therapy and functional studies of malignant tumors. PMID:25076217

  8. Multiple sclerosis retrovirus-like envelope gene: Role of the chromosome 20 insertion

    PubMed Central

    Varadé, Jezabel; García-Montojo, Marta; de la Hera, Belén; Camacho, Iris; García-Martínez, Mª. Ángel; Arroyo, Rafael; Álvarez-Lafuente, Roberto; Urcelay, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Background The genetic basis involved in multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility was not completely revealed by genome-wide association studies. Part of it could lie in repetitive sequences, as those corresponding to human Endogenous Retroviruses (HERVs). Retrovirus-like particles were isolated from MS patients and the genome of the MS-associated retrovirus (MSRV) was the founder of the HERV-W family. We aimed to ascertain which chromosomal origin encodes the pathogenic ENV protein by genomic analysis of the HERV-W insertions. Methods/results In silico analyses allowed to uncover putative open reading frames containing the specific sequence previously reported for MSRV-like envelope (env) detection. Out of the 261 genomic insertions of HERV-W env, only 9 copies harbor the specific primers and probe featuring MSRV-like env. The copy from chromosome 20 was further studied considering its size, a truncated homologue of the functional HERV-W env sequence encoding syncytin. High Resolution Melting analysis of this sequence identified two single nucleotide polymorphisms, subsequently genotyped by Taqman chemistry in 668 MS patients and 678 healthy controls. No significant association of these polymorphisms with MS risk was evidenced. Transcriptional activity of this MSRV-like env copy was detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients and controls. RNA expression levels of chromosome 20-specific MSRV-like env did not show significant differences between MS patients and controls, neither were related to genotypes of the two mentioned polymorphisms. Conclusions The lack of association with MS risk of the identified polymorphisms together with the transcription results discard chromosome 20 as genomic origin of MSRV-like env. PMID:26675450

  9. Retrovirus-mediated conditional immortalization and analysis of established cell lines of osteoclast precursor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kawata, Shigehisa; Suzuki, Jun; Maruoka, Masahiro; Mizutamari, Megumi; Ishida-Kitagawa, Norihiro; Yogo, Keiichiro; Jat, Parmjit S.; Shishido, Tomoyuki . E-mail: shishid@bs.naist.jp

    2006-11-10

    Osteoclast precursor cells (OPCs) have previously been established from bone marrow cells of SV40 temperature-sensitive T antigen-expressing transgenic mice. Here, we use retrovirus-mediated gene transfer to conditionally immortalize OPCs by expressing temperature-sensitive large T antigen (tsLT) from wild type bone marrow cells. The immortalized OPCs proliferated at the permissive temperature of 33.5 deg. C, but stopped growing at the non-permissive temperature of 39 deg. C. In the presence of receptor activator of NF{kappa}B ligand (RANKL), the OPCs differentiated into tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive cells and formed multinucleate osteoclasts at 33.5 deg. C. From these OPCs, we cloned two types of cell lines. Both differentiated into TRAP-positive cells, but one formed multinucleate osteoclasts while the other remained unfused in the presence of RANKL. These results indicate that the established cell lines are useful for analyzing mechanisms of differentiation, particularly multinucleate osteoclast formation. Retrovirus-mediated conditional immortalization should be a useful method to immortalize OPCs from primary bone marrow cells.

  10. Inhibition of West Nile Virus Replication by Retrovirus-Delivered Small Interfering RNA in Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yongbo; Wu, Chengxiang; Wu, Jianguo; Nerurkar, Vivek R.; Yanagihara, Richard; Lu, Yuanan

    2010-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) has been responsible for the largest outbreaks of arboviral encephalitis in U.S. history. No specific drug is currently available for the effective treatment of WNV infection. To exploit RNA interference as a potential therapeutic approach, a Moloney murine leukemia virus-based retrovirus vector was used to effectively deliver WNV-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) into human neuroblastoma HTB-11 cells. Viral plaque assays demonstrated that transduced cells were significantly refractory to WNV replication, as compared to untransduced control cells (P< 0.05), which correlated with the reduced expression of target viral genes and respective viral proteins. Therefore, retrovirus-mediated delivery of siRNA for gene silencing can be used to study the specific functions of viral genes associated with replication and may have potential therapeutic applications. PMID:18360908

  11. Removal of endogenous retrovirus-like particles from CHO-cell derived products using Q sepharose fast flow chromatography.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Daniel M; Lute, Scott; Brorson, Kurt; Blank, Gregory S; Chen, Qi; Yang, Bin

    2009-01-01

    Retrovirus-like particles (RVLPs) that are expressed during the production of monoclonal antibodies in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell cultures must be removed during product recovery. Anion exchange chromatography (AEX) performed in product flow-through mode, a common component in the purification of monoclonal antibodies, has been shown to provide robust removal of a related retrovirus model, but it's ability to remove the actual RVLP impurities has not been directly investigated. We have determined the ability of a typical Q sepharose process to remove actual CHO RVLP impurities. Using small scale experiments with three model antibodies, we observe that this AEX process is capable of effectively removing both in-process and spiked RVLPs from different feedstocks containing different mAb products. In addition, we show that this AEX process also achieves a similarly high degree of RVLP removal during large scale manufacturing operations.

  12. Identification and characterization of two closely related unclassifiable endogenous retroviruses in pythons (Python molurus and Python curtus).

    PubMed

    Huder, Jon B; Böni, Jürg; Hatt, Jean-Michel; Soldati, Guido; Lutz, Hans; Schüpbach, Jörg

    2002-08-01

    Boid inclusion body disease (BIBD) is a fatal disorder of boid snakes that is suspected to be caused by a retrovirus. In order to identify this agent, leukocyte cultures (established from Python molurus specimens with symptoms of BIBD or kept together with such diseased animals) were assessed for reverse transcriptase (RT) activity. Virus from cultures exhibiting high RT activity was banded on sucrose density gradients, and the RT peak fraction was subjected to highly efficient procedures for the identification of unknown particle-associated retroviral RNA. A 7-kb full retroviral sequence was identified, cloned, and sequenced. This virus contained intact open reading frames (ORFs) for gag, pro, pol, and env, as well as another ORF of unknown function within pol. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the virus is distantly related to viruses from both the B and D types and the mammalian C type but cannot be classified. It is present as a highly expressed endogenous retrovirus in all P. molurus individuals; a closely related, but much less expressed virus was found in all tested Python curtus individuals. All other boid snakes tested, including Python regius, Python reticulatus, Boa constrictor, Eunectes notaeus, and Morelia spilota, were virus negative, independent of whether they had BIBD or not. Virus isolated from P. molurus could not be transmitted to the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of B. constrictor or P. regius. Thus, there is no indication that this novel virus, which we propose to name python endogenous retrovirus (PyERV), is causally linked with BIBD.

  13. Identification and Characterization of Two Closely Related Unclassifiable Endogenous Retroviruses in Pythons (Python molurus and Python curtus)

    PubMed Central

    Huder, Jon B.; Böni, Jürg; Hatt, Jean-Michel; Soldati, Guido; Lutz, Hans; Schüpbach, Jörg

    2002-01-01

    Boid inclusion body disease (BIBD) is a fatal disorder of boid snakes that is suspected to be caused by a retrovirus. In order to identify this agent, leukocyte cultures (established from Python molurus specimens with symptoms of BIBD or kept together with such diseased animals) were assessed for reverse transcriptase (RT) activity. Virus from cultures exhibiting high RT activity was banded on sucrose density gradients, and the RT peak fraction was subjected to highly efficient procedures for the identification of unknown particle-associated retroviral RNA. A 7-kb full retroviral sequence was identified, cloned, and sequenced. This virus contained intact open reading frames (ORFs) for gag, pro, pol, and env, as well as another ORF of unknown function within pol. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the virus is distantly related to viruses from both the B and D types and the mammalian C type but cannot be classified. It is present as a highly expressed endogenous retrovirus in all P. molurus individuals; a closely related, but much less expressed virus was found in all tested Python curtus individuals. All other boid snakes tested, including Python regius, Python reticulatus, Boa constrictor, Eunectes notaeus, and Morelia spilota, were virus negative, independent of whether they had BIBD or not. Virus isolated from P. molurus could not be transmitted to the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of B. constrictor or P. regius. Thus, there is no indication that this novel virus, which we propose to name python endogenous retrovirus (PyERV), is causally linked with BIBD. PMID:12097574

  14. Defective herpes simplex virus type 1 vectors harboring gag, pol, and env genes can be used to rescue defective retrovirus vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Savard, N; Cosset, F L; Epstein, A L

    1997-01-01

    A retroviral packaging transcription unit was constructed in which the Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) gag-pol and env genes are expressed under the control of herpesvirus regulatory sequences. This transcription unit, lacking long terminal repeats, primer binding sites, and most of the retrovirus packaging signal but retaining both retroviral donor and acceptor splice sites, was cloned into a herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) amplicon plasmid, and amplicon vectors (the gag-pol-env [GPE] vectors) were generated by using a defective HSV-1 vector as helper virus. The GPE vector population was used to infect human TE671 cells (ATCC CRL 8805), harboring a lacZ provirus (TE-lac2 cells), and supernatants of infected cells were collected and filtered at different times after infection. These supernatants were found to contain infectious ecotropic lacZ retroviral particles, as shown both by reverse transcription-PCR and by their ability to transduce a beta-galactosidase activity to murine NIH 3T3 cells but not to human TE671 cells. The titer of retroviral vectors released by GPE vector-infected TE-lac2 cells increased with the dose of infectious amplicon particles. Retrovirus vector production was inhibited by superinfection with helper virus, indicating that helper virus coinfection negatively interfered with retrovirus production. Induction of retrovirus vectors by GPE vectors was neutralized by anti-HSV-1 but not by anti-MoMLV antiserum, while transduction of beta-galactosidase activity to NIH 3T3 cells by supernatants of GPE vector-infected TE-lac2 cells was neutralized by anti-MoMLV antiserum. These results demonstrate that HSV-1 GPE amplicon vectors can rescue defective lacZ retrovirus vectors and suggest that they could be used as a sort of launching ramp to fire defective retrovirus vectors from within virtually any in vitro or in vivo cell type containing defective retroviral vectors. PMID:9094692

  15. Enhanced proliferation of primary rat type II pneumocytes by Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus envelope protein

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Chassidy; Jahid, Sohail; Voelker, Dennis R.; Fan Hung

    2011-04-10

    Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV) is the causative agent of a contagious lung cancer in sheep. The envelope protein (Env) is the oncogene, as it can transform cell lines in culture and induce tumors in animals, although the mechanisms for transformation are not yet clear because a system to perform transformation assays in differentiated type II pneumocytes does not exist. In this study we report culture of primary rat type II pneumocytes in conditions that favor prolonged expression of markers for type II pneumocytes. Env-expressing cultures formed more colonies that were larger in size and were viable for longer periods of time compared to vector control samples. The cells that remained in culture longer were confirmed to be derived from type II pneumocytes because they expressed surfactant protein C, cytokeratin, displayed alkaline phosphatase activity and were positive for Nile red. This system will be useful to study JSRV Env in the targets of transformation.

  16. Inhibiting DNA methylation causes an interferon response in cancer via dsRNA including endogenous retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Chiappinelli, Katherine B.; Strissel, Pamela L.; Desrichard, Alexis; Li, Huili; Henke, Christine; Akman, Benjamin; Hein, Alexander; Rote, Neal S.; Cope, Leslie M.; Snyder, Alexandra; Makarov, Vladimir; Buhu, Sadna; Slamon, Dennis J.; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Pardoll, Drew M.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Zahnow, Cynthia A.; Mergoub, Taha; Chan, Timothy A.; Baylin, Stephen B.; Strick, Reiner

    2015-01-01

    Summary We show that DNA methyltransferase inhibitors (DNMTis) upregulate immune signaling in cancer through the viral defense pathway. In ovarian cancer (OC), DNMTis trigger cytosolic sensing of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) causing a Type I Interferon response and apoptosis. Knocking down dsRNA sensors TLR3 and MAVS reduces this response twofold, and blocking interferon beta or its receptor abrogates it. Upregulation of hypermethylated endogenous retrovirus (ERV) genes accompanies the response and ERV overexpression activates the response. Basal levels of ERV and viral defense gene expression significantly correlate in primary OC and the latter signature separates primary samples for multiple tumor types from The Cancer Genome Atlas into low versus high expression groups. In melanoma patients treated with an immune checkpoint therapy, high viral defense signature expression in tumors significantly associates with durable clinical response and DNMTi treatment sensitizes to anti-CTLA4 therapy in a pre-clinical melanoma model. PMID:26317466

  17. Detection of the human endogenous retrovirus ERV3-encoded Env-protein in human tissues using antibody-based proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Chen; Atterby, Christina; Edqvist, Per-Henrik; Pontén, Fredrik; Zhang, Wei Wei; Larsson, Erik; Ryan, Frank P

    2014-01-01

    Objectives There is growing evidence to suggest that human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) have contributed to human evolution, being expressed in development, normal physiology and disease. A key difficulty in the scientific evaluation of this potential viral contribution is the accurate demonstration of virally expressed protein in specific human cells and tissues. In this study, we have adopted the endogenous retrovirus, ERV3, as our test model in developing a reliable high-capacity methodology for the expression of such endogenous retrovirus-coded protein. Design Two affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies to ERV3 Env-encoded protein were generated to detect the corresponding protein expression pattern in specific human cells, tissues and organs. Participants Sampling included normal tissues from 144 individuals ranging from childhood to old age. This included more than forty different tissues and organs and some 216 different cancer tissues representing the twenty commonest forms of human cancer. Setting The Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University and Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. Main Outcome Measures The potential expression at likely physiological level of the ERV3Env encoded protein in a wide range of human cells, tissues and organs. Results We found that ERV3 encoded Env protein is expressed at substantive levels in placenta, testis, adrenal gland, corpus luteum, Fallopian tubes, sebaceous glands, astrocytes, bronchial epithelium and the ducts of the salivary glands. Substantive expression was also seen in a variety of epithelial cells as well as cells known to undergo fusion in inflammation and in normal physiology, including fused macrophages, myocardium and striated muscle. This contrasted strongly with the low levels expressed in other tissues types. These findings suggest that this virus plays a significant role in human physiology and may also play a possible role in disease. Conclusion This technique can now be extended to the study

  18. An elastic model of partial budding of retroviruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Nguyen, Toan

    2008-03-01

    Retroviruses are characterized by their unique infection strategy of reverse transcription, in which the genetic information flows from RNA back to DNA. The most well known representative is the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Unlike budding of traditional enveloped viruses, retrovirus budding happens together with the formation of spherical virus capsids at the cell membrane. Led by this unique budding mechanism, we proposed an elastic model of retrovirus budding in this work. We found that if the lipid molecules of the membrane are supplied fast enough from the cell interior, the budding always proceeds to completion. In the opposite limit, there is an optimal size of partially budded virions. The zenith angle of these partially spherical capsids, α, is given by α˜(2̂/κσ)^1/4, where κ is the bending modulus of the membrane, σ is the surface tension of the membrane, and τ characterizes the strength of capsid protein interaction. If τ is large enough such that α˜π, the budding is complete. Our model explained many features of retrovirus partial budding observed in experiments.

  19. Pathology of tumors in fish associated with retroviruses: a review.

    PubMed

    Coffee, L L; Casey, J W; Bowser, P R

    2013-05-01

    Thirteen proliferative diseases in fish have been associated in the literature with 1 or more retroviruses. Typically, these occur as seasonal epizootics affecting farmed and wild fish, and most lesions resolve spontaneously. Spontaneous resolution and lifelong resistance to reinfection are 2 features of some piscine retrovirus-induced tumors that have stimulated research interest in this field. The purpose of this review is to present the reader with the epidemiological and morphological features of proliferative diseases in fish that have been associated with retroviruses by 1 or more of the following methods: detection of C-type retrovirus-like particles or reverse transcriptase activity in tumor tissues; successful tumor transmission trials using well-characterized, tumor-derived, cell-free inocula; or molecular characterization of the virus from spontaneous and experimentally induced tumors. Two of the diseases included in this review, European smelt spawning papillomatosis and bicolor damselfish neurofibromatosis, at one time were attributed to a retroviral etiology, but both are now believed to involve additional viral agents based on more recent investigations. We include the latter 2 entities to update the reader about these developments.

  20. Multiple sclerosis and human T-cell lymphotropic retroviruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koprowski, Hilary; Defreitas, Elaine C.; Harper, Mary E.; Sandberg-Wollheim, Magnhild; Sheremata, William A.; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie; Saxinger, Carl W.; Feinberg, Mark B.; Wong-Staal, Flossie; Gallo, Robert C.

    1985-11-01

    A combination of different types of data suggests that some multiple sclerosis patients respond immunologically to, and have cerebrospinal T cells containing, a retrovirus that is related to, but distinct from, the three types of human T-cell lymphotropic viruses. The role of this virus in multiple sclerosis is uncertain.

  1. Pathology of tumors in fish associated with retroviruses: a review.

    PubMed

    Coffee, L L; Casey, J W; Bowser, P R

    2013-05-01

    Thirteen proliferative diseases in fish have been associated in the literature with 1 or more retroviruses. Typically, these occur as seasonal epizootics affecting farmed and wild fish, and most lesions resolve spontaneously. Spontaneous resolution and lifelong resistance to reinfection are 2 features of some piscine retrovirus-induced tumors that have stimulated research interest in this field. The purpose of this review is to present the reader with the epidemiological and morphological features of proliferative diseases in fish that have been associated with retroviruses by 1 or more of the following methods: detection of C-type retrovirus-like particles or reverse transcriptase activity in tumor tissues; successful tumor transmission trials using well-characterized, tumor-derived, cell-free inocula; or molecular characterization of the virus from spontaneous and experimentally induced tumors. Two of the diseases included in this review, European smelt spawning papillomatosis and bicolor damselfish neurofibromatosis, at one time were attributed to a retroviral etiology, but both are now believed to involve additional viral agents based on more recent investigations. We include the latter 2 entities to update the reader about these developments. PMID:23456970

  2. Human Endogenous Retrovirus and Neuroinflammation in Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Faucard, Raphaël; Madeira, Alexandra; Gehin, Nadège; Authier, François-Jérôme; Panaite, Petrica-Adrian; Lesage, Catherine; Burgelin, Ingrid; Bertel, Mélanie; Bernard, Corinne; Curtin, François; Lang, Aloïs B.; Steck, Andreas J.; Perron, Hervé; Kuntzer, Thierry; Créange, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Background Human endogenous retroviruses HERV-W encode a pro-inflammatory protein, named MSRV-Env from its original identification in Multiple Sclerosis. Though not detected in various neurological controls, MSRV-Env was found in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathies (CIDPs). This study investigated the expression of MSRV in CIDP and evaluated relevant MSRV-Env pathogenic effects. Methods 50 CIDP patients, 19 other neurological controls (ONDs) and 65 healthy blood donors (HBDs) were recruited from two different countries. MSRV-env and -pol transcripts, IL6 and CXCL10 levels were quantified from blood samples. MSRV-Env immunohistology was performed in distal sensory nerves from CIDP and neurological controls biopsies. MSRV-Env pathogenic effects and mode of action were assayed in cultured primary human Schwann cells (HSCs). Findings In both cohorts, MSRV-env and -pol transcripts, IL6 positivity prevalence and CXCL10 levels were significantly elevated in CIDP patients when compared to HBDs and ONDs (statistically significant in all comparisons). MSRV-Env protein was detected in Schwann cells in 5/7 CIDP biopsies. HSC exposed to or transfected with MSRV-env presented a strong increase of IL6 and CXCL10 transcripts and protein secretion. These pathogenic effects on HSC were inhibited by GNbAC1, a highly specific and neutralizing humanized monoclonal antibody targeting MSRV-Env. Interpretation The present study showed that MSRV-Env may trigger the release of critical immune mediators proposed as instrumental factors involved in the pathophysiology of CIDP. Significant MSRV-Env expression was detected in a significant proportion of patients with CIDP, in which it may play a role according to its presently observed effects on Schwann cells along with previously known effects on immune cells. Experimental results also suggest that a biomarker-driven therapeutic strategy targeting this protein with a neutralizing antibody such as GNbAC1

  3. Seroprevalence of retrovirus in North American captive macropodidae.

    PubMed

    Georoff, Timothy A; Joyner, Priscilla H; Hoover, John P; Payton, Mark E; Pogranichniy, Roman M

    2008-09-01

    Laboratory records of serology results from captive macropodidae sampled between 1997 and 2005 were reviewed to assess the seroprevalence of retrovirus exposure. Serum samples from 269 individuals (136 males, 133 females) representing 10 species of macropods housed in 31 North American captive collections were analyzed for retrovirus antibody using an indirect immunofluorescent assay. The prevalence of positive antibody titers comparing male versus female, between species, between age groups, and among animals with identified parentage was examined by nonparametric statistical analyses. Median age of animals at time of sample collection was 36 mo (range 2-201 mo). Total percentage seropositive was 20.4%. Serum antibody was detected in 31 of 47 (66.0%) tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii), nine of 24 (37.5%) yellow-footed rock wallaby (Petrogale xanthopus), four of 11 (36.4%) swamp wallaby (Wallabia bicolor), 10 of 80 (12.5%) red-necked wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus), and one of 54 (1.9%) parma wallaby (Macropus parma). No individuals of western gray kangaroo (n=3) (Macropus fuliginosus), eastern gray kangaroo (n=19) (Macropus giganteus), common wallaroo (n=6) (Macropus robustus), red kangaroo (n=11) (Macropus rufus), or Matschie's tree kangaroo (n=14) (Dendrolagus matschiei) were positive for retrovirus antibody. These results demonstrate that five species of captive macropods have a history of exposure to retrovirus, with the highest percentage seropositive and highest statistical correlation in M. eugenii (pair-wise Fisher's exact test, alpha = 0.05). Additionally, one wild-caught M. eugenii was confirmed seropositive during quarantine period, indicating that retrovirus exposure may exist in wild populations.

  4. Lack of antiviral antibody response in koalas infected with koala retroviruses (KoRV).

    PubMed

    Fiebig, Uwe; Keller, Martina; Möller, Annekatrin; Timms, Peter; Denner, Joachim

    2015-02-16

    Many wild koalas are infected with the koala retrovirus, KoRV, some of which suffer from lymphoma and chlamydial disease. Three subgroups, KoRV-A, KoRV-B and KoRV-J, have so far been described. It is well known that other closely related gammaretroviruses can induce tumours and severe immunodeficiencies in their respective hosts and a possible role for KoRV infection in lymphoma and chlamydial disease in koalas has been suggested. In many wild koalas, KoRV-A has become endogenised, i.e., it is integrated in the germ-line and is passed on with normal cellular genes. In this study, sera from koalas in European zoos and from wild animals in Australia were screened for antibodies against KoRV-A. These naturally infected animals all carry endogenous KoRV-A and two zoo animals are also infected with KoRV-B. The antibody response is generally an important diagnostic tool for detecting retrovirus infections. However, when Western blot analyses were performed using purified virus or recombinant proteins corresponding to KoRV-A, none of the koalas tested positive for specific antibodies, suggesting a state of tolerance. These results have implications for koala vaccination, as they suggest that therapeutic immunisation of animals carrying and expressing endogenous KoRV-A will not be successful. However, it remains unclear whether these animals can be immunised against KoRV-B and immunisation of uninfected koalas could still be worthwhile.

  5. Lack of antiviral antibody response in koalas infected with koala retroviruses (KoRV).

    PubMed

    Fiebig, Uwe; Keller, Martina; Möller, Annekatrin; Timms, Peter; Denner, Joachim

    2015-02-16

    Many wild koalas are infected with the koala retrovirus, KoRV, some of which suffer from lymphoma and chlamydial disease. Three subgroups, KoRV-A, KoRV-B and KoRV-J, have so far been described. It is well known that other closely related gammaretroviruses can induce tumours and severe immunodeficiencies in their respective hosts and a possible role for KoRV infection in lymphoma and chlamydial disease in koalas has been suggested. In many wild koalas, KoRV-A has become endogenised, i.e., it is integrated in the germ-line and is passed on with normal cellular genes. In this study, sera from koalas in European zoos and from wild animals in Australia were screened for antibodies against KoRV-A. These naturally infected animals all carry endogenous KoRV-A and two zoo animals are also infected with KoRV-B. The antibody response is generally an important diagnostic tool for detecting retrovirus infections. However, when Western blot analyses were performed using purified virus or recombinant proteins corresponding to KoRV-A, none of the koalas tested positive for specific antibodies, suggesting a state of tolerance. These results have implications for koala vaccination, as they suggest that therapeutic immunisation of animals carrying and expressing endogenous KoRV-A will not be successful. However, it remains unclear whether these animals can be immunised against KoRV-B and immunisation of uninfected koalas could still be worthwhile. PMID:25596496

  6. Transcriptome Analysis of ESTs from a Chaetognath Reveals a Deep-Branching Clade of Retrovirus-Like Retrotransposons

    PubMed Central

    Barthélémy, Roxane M; Casanova, Jean-Paul; Faure, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Chaetognaths constitute a small marine phylum exhibiting several characteristic which are highly unusual in animal genomes, including two classes of both rRNA and protein ribosomal genes. As in this phylum presence of retrovirus-like elements has never been documented, analysis of a published expressed sequence tag (EST) collection of the chaetognath Spadella cephaloptera has been made. Twelve sequences representing transcript sections of reverse transcriptase domain of active retrotransposons were isolated from~11,000 ESTs. Five of them are originated from Gypsy retrovirus-like elements, whereas the other are transcripts from a Bel-Pao LTR-retrotransposon, a Penelope-like element and LINE retrotransposons. Moreover, a part of a putative integrase has also been found. Phylogenetic analyses suggest a deep-branching clade of the retrovirus-like elements, which is in agreement with the probably Cambrian origin of the phylum. Moreover, retrotransposons have not been found in telomeric-like transcripts which are probably constituted by both vertebrate and arthropod canonical repeats. PMID:19440464

  7. Retroviruses 2004: Review of the 2004 Cold Spring Harbor Retroviruses conference

    PubMed Central

    Freed, Eric O; Ross, Susan R

    2004-01-01

    For the past several decades, retrovirologists from around the world have gathered in late May at the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratories in New York to present their studies in formal talks and posters, and to discuss their ongoing research informally at the bar or on the beach. As organizers of the 2004 Cold Spring Harbor Retroviruses Conference, we have been asked by the editors of Retrovirology to prepare a review of the meeting for publication on-line. Our goal in this review is not to provide a detailed description of data presented at the meeting but rather to highlight some of the significant developments reported this year. The review is structured in a manner that parallels the organization of the meeting; beginning with the entry phase of the replication cycle, proceeding with post-entry events, assembly and release, integration, reverse transcription, pathogenesis/host factors, RNA-related events (transcription, processing, export, and packaging) and finishing with antivirals. While the most striking developments this year involved post-entry events and assembly/release, significant progress was made towards elucidating a number of aspects of the retroviral replication cycle. PMID:15357866

  8. cis-acting regulatory elements within gag genes of avian retroviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Arrigo, S; Yun, M; Beemon, K

    1987-01-01

    A cis-acting enhancer element has been detected within the gag gene of several avian retroviruses, including Rous sarcoma virus, Fujinami sarcoma virus, and the endogenous Rous-associated virus-0. A consensus enhancer core sequence, GTGGTTTG, is present in all of these viral genomes, approximately 900 bases downstream from the site of initiation of transcription. When an internal fragment derived from the gag gene of any of these viruses (spanning nucleotides 533 to approximately 1149) was inserted into a plasmid containing the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (cat) gene under control of the simian virus 40 promoter, 9- or 21-fold enhancement of CAT expression was observed after transfection into mouse L cells and chicken embryo fibroblasts, respectively. This enhancement was not dependent on the position of insertion of the gag fragment into the plasmid. However, there was a strong dependence on orientation, with higher levels of CAT expression in constructs in which the 5' end of the gag fragment was nearest to the promoter, suggesting a possible negative regulatory element at the 3' end of this fragment. Deletion of the 3' end of the insert resulted in a gag fragment, containing nucleotides 533 to 1017, which enhanced expression equally in either orientation. When the gag fragment was inserted into a plasmid containing the cat gene under the control of an intact Rous sarcoma virus long terminal repeat, it induced a two- to threefold increase in CAT activity and CAT mRNA levels. Translation of the gag fragment did not appear to be necessary for the observed enhancement, since two insertional mutations resulting in frameshifts in the gag insert did not affect CAT expression. However, deletion of a 330-base internal fragment from the gag insert restored a basal level of CAT activity. These results suggest that retroviruses have regulatory elements within their genes distinct from those in the long terminal repeats that flank the genes. Images PMID:3031470

  9. SAMHD1 knockout mice: modeling retrovirus restriction in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li

    2013-11-20

    The host dNTP hydrolase SAMHD1 acts as a viral restriction factor to inhibit the replication of several retroviruses and DNA viruses in non-cycling human immune cells. However, understanding the physiological role of mammalian SAMHD1 has been elusive due to the lack of an animal model. Two recent studies reported the generation of samhd1 knockout mouse models for investigating the restriction of HIV-1 vectors and endogenous retroviruses in vivo. Both studies suggest that SAMHD1 is important for regulating the intracellular dNTP pool and the intrinsic immunity against retroviral infection, despite different outcomes of HIV-1 vector transduction in these mouse models. Here I discuss the significance of these new findings and the future directions in studying SAMHD1-mediated retroviral restriction.

  10. Virus-coded DNA endonuclease from avian retrovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Golomb, M; Grandgenett, D P; Mason, W

    1981-01-01

    Reverse transcriptase from avian retrovirus has a physically associated DNA endonuclease with novel substrate and cofactor requirements. A similar endonuclease activity copurifies with pp32, a protein from viral cores that has been identified with the non-alpha region of the beta subunit of reverse transcriptase. Several temperature-sensitive mutants of avian retrovirus with thermolabile DNA polymerase were tested for thermal sensitivity of their DNA endonuclease activity. Two pol mutants of Rous sarcoma virus, ts335 and ts337, had thermolabile DNA endonuclease; a temperature-resistant revertant of ts335 had a heat-stable DNA endonuclease. DNA endonuclease is therefore a product of the pol gene and an integral part of the reverse transcriptase. A second class of pol mutants, typified by ts568 and ts553, had thermolabile DNA polymerase, but heat-stable DNA endonuclease. PMID:6165835

  11. Vaccination against δ-retroviruses: the bovine leukemia virus paradigm.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Gerónimo; Rodríguez, Sabrina M; de Brogniez, Alix; Gillet, Nicolas; Golime, Ramarao; Burny, Arsène; Jaworski, Juan-Pablo; Alvarez, Irene; Vagnoni, Lucas; Trono, Karina; Willems, Luc

    2014-06-20

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) and human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) are closely related d-retroviruses that induce hematological diseases. HTLV-1 infects about 15 million people worldwide, mainly in subtropical areas. HTLV-1 induces a wide spectrum of diseases (e.g., HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis) and leukemia/lymphoma (adult T-cell leukemia). Bovine leukemia virus is a major pathogen of cattle, causing important economic losses due to a reduction in production, export limitations and lymphoma-associated death. In the absence of satisfactory treatment for these diseases and besides the prevention of transmission, the best option to reduce the prevalence of d-retroviruses is vaccination. Here, we provide an overview of the different vaccination strategies in the BLV model and outline key parameters required for vaccine efficacy.

  12. Identification and Characterization of an Exogenous Retrovirus from Atlantic Salmon Swim Bladder Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Thomas A.; Quackenbush, Sandra L.; Sutton, Claudia; Casey, Rufina N.; Bowser, Paul R.; Casey, James W.

    2006-01-01

    A novel piscine retrovirus has been identified in association with an outbreak of leiomyosarcoma in the swim bladders of Atlantic salmon. The complete nucleotide sequence of the Atlantic salmon swim bladder sarcoma virus (SSSV) provirus is 10.9 kb in length and shares a structure and transcriptional profile similar to those of murine leukemia virus-like simple retroviruses. SSSV appears unique to simple retroviruses by not harboring sequences in the Atlantic salmon genome. Additionally, SSSV differs from other retroviruses in potentially utilizing a methionine tRNA primer binding site. SSSV-associated tumors contain high proviral copy numbers (greater than 30 per cell) and a polyclonal integration pattern. Phylogenetic analysis based on reverse transcriptase places SSSV with zebrafish endogenous retrovirus (ZFERV) between the Gammaretrovirus and Epsilonretrovirus genera. Large regions of continuous homology between SSSV and ZFERV Gag, Pol, and Env suggest that these viruses represent a new group of related piscine retroviruses. PMID:16501103

  13. Identification, characterization and comparative genomics of chimpanzee endogenous retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Polavarapu, Nalini; Bowen, Nathan J; McDonald, John F

    2006-01-01

    Background Retrotransposons, the most abundant and widespread class of eukaryotic transposable elements, are believed to play a significant role in mutation and disease and to have contributed significantly to the evolution of genome structure and function. The recent sequencing of the chimpanzee genome is providing an unprecedented opportunity to study the functional significance of these elements in two closely related primate species and to better evaluate their role in primate evolution. Results We report here that the chimpanzee genome contains at least 42 separate families of endogenous retroviruses, nine of which were not previously identified. All but two (CERV 1/PTERV1 and CERV 2) of the 42 families of chimpanzee endogenous retroviruses were found to have orthologs in humans. Molecular analysis (PCR and Southern hybridization) of CERV 2 elements demonstrates that this family is present in chimpanzee, bonobo, gorilla and old-world monkeys but absent in human, orangutan and new-world monkeys. A survey of endogenous retroviral positional variation between chimpanzees and humans determined that approximately 7% of all chimpanzee-human INDEL variation is associated with endogenous retroviral sequences. Conclusion Nine families of chimpanzee endogenous retroviruses have been transpositionally active since chimpanzees and humans diverged from a common ancestor. Seven of these transpositionally active families have orthologs in humans, one of which has also been transpositionally active in humans since the human-chimpanzee divergence about six million years ago. Comparative analyses of orthologous regions of the human and chimpanzee genomes have revealed that a significant portion of INDEL variation between chimpanzees and humans is attributable to endogenous retroviruses and may be of evolutionary significance. PMID:16805923

  14. Apparatus for testing for infection by a retrovirus

    DOEpatents

    Layne, Scott P.; Beugelsdijk, Tony J.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus for testing specimens for infection by a retrovirus is described. The apparatus comprises a process controller including a communications module for translating user commands into test instrument suite commands and a means for communicating specimen test results to a user. The apparatus further comprises a test instrument suite including a means for treating the specimen to manifest an observable result and a detector for measuring the observable result.

  15. Treatment against human endogenous retrovirus: a possible personalized medicine approach for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Curtin, François; Perron, Hervé; Faucard, Raphael; Porchet, Hervé; Lang, Alois B

    2015-10-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERV) represent about 8 % of the human genome. Some of these genetic elements are expressed in pathological circumstances. A HERV protein, the multiple sclerosis-associated retrovirus (MSRV) envelope protein (MSRV-Env), is expressed in the blood and active brain lesions of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. It possesses pro-inflammatory and myelinotoxic properties. The patterns of expression and pathogenic properties of MSRV-Env make it a relevant drug target for MS therapeutics-in particular for preventing neurodegeneration, a key component of progressive forms of MS. An immunoglobulin G4 monoclonal antibody (mAb), called GNbAC1, has been developed to neutralize this pathogenic target. After showing neutralizing effects in vitro and in mouse models of MS, GNbAC1 is now in phase II clinical development. MSRV-related biomarkers such as MSRV-Env and MSRV polymerase (MSRV-Pol) gene transcripts are overexpressed in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid of patients with MS. These biomarkers may have prognostic value for long-term MS evolution, and their transcription levels in blood decline during treatments with GNbAC1, which has also been reported in patients administered reference MS drugs such as natalizumab or interferon-β. GNbAC1 as a new MSRV-Env-antagonist mAb could be a specific and causal treatment for MS, with a particular application for progressive forms of the disease. For possible use in companion diagnostic tests, MSRV-associated biomarkers could open the door to a personalized therapeutic approach for MS.

  16. Treatment against human endogenous retrovirus: a possible personalized medicine approach for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Curtin, François; Perron, Hervé; Faucard, Raphael; Porchet, Hervé; Lang, Alois B

    2015-10-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERV) represent about 8 % of the human genome. Some of these genetic elements are expressed in pathological circumstances. A HERV protein, the multiple sclerosis-associated retrovirus (MSRV) envelope protein (MSRV-Env), is expressed in the blood and active brain lesions of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. It possesses pro-inflammatory and myelinotoxic properties. The patterns of expression and pathogenic properties of MSRV-Env make it a relevant drug target for MS therapeutics-in particular for preventing neurodegeneration, a key component of progressive forms of MS. An immunoglobulin G4 monoclonal antibody (mAb), called GNbAC1, has been developed to neutralize this pathogenic target. After showing neutralizing effects in vitro and in mouse models of MS, GNbAC1 is now in phase II clinical development. MSRV-related biomarkers such as MSRV-Env and MSRV polymerase (MSRV-Pol) gene transcripts are overexpressed in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid of patients with MS. These biomarkers may have prognostic value for long-term MS evolution, and their transcription levels in blood decline during treatments with GNbAC1, which has also been reported in patients administered reference MS drugs such as natalizumab or interferon-β. GNbAC1 as a new MSRV-Env-antagonist mAb could be a specific and causal treatment for MS, with a particular application for progressive forms of the disease. For possible use in companion diagnostic tests, MSRV-associated biomarkers could open the door to a personalized therapeutic approach for MS. PMID:26376649

  17. Identification, characterization, and comparative genomic distribution of the HERV-K (HML-2) group of human endogenous retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Integration of retroviral DNA into a germ cell may lead to a provirus that is transmitted vertically to that host's offspring as an endogenous retrovirus (ERV). In humans, ERVs (HERVs) comprise about 8% of the genome, the vast majority of which are truncated and/or highly mutated and no longer encode functional genes. The most recently active retroviruses that integrated into the human germ line are members of the Betaretrovirus-like HERV-K (HML-2) group, many of which contain intact open reading frames (ORFs) in some or all genes, sometimes encoding functional proteins that are expressed in various tissues. Interestingly, this expression is upregulated in many tumors ranging from breast and ovarian tissues to lymphomas and melanomas, as well as schizophrenia, rheumatoid arthritis, and other disorders. Results No study to date has characterized all HML-2 elements in the genome, an essential step towards determining a possible functional role of HML-2 expression in disease. We present here the most comprehensive and accurate catalog of all full-length and partial HML-2 proviruses, as well as solo LTR elements, within the published human genome to date. Furthermore, we provide evidence for preferential maintenance of proviruses and solo LTR elements on gene-rich chromosomes of the human genome and in proximity to gene regions. Conclusions Our analysis has found and corrected several errors in the annotation of HML-2 elements in the human genome, including mislabeling of a newly identified group called HML-11. HML-elements have been implicated in a wide array of diseases, and characterization of these elements will play a fundamental role to understand the relationship between endogenous retrovirus expression and disease. PMID:22067224

  18. A Computational Model for Predicting RNase H Domain of Retrovirus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sijia; Zhang, Xinman; Han, Jiuqiang

    2016-01-01

    RNase H (RNH) is a pivotal domain in retrovirus to cleave the DNA-RNA hybrid for continuing retroviral replication. The crucial role indicates that RNH is a promising drug target for therapeutic intervention. However, annotated RNHs in UniProtKB database have still been insufficient for a good understanding of their statistical characteristics so far. In this work, a computational RNH model was proposed to annotate new putative RNHs (np-RNHs) in the retroviruses. It basically predicts RNH domains through recognizing their start and end sites separately with SVM method. The classification accuracy rates are 100%, 99.01% and 97.52% respectively corresponding to jack-knife, 10-fold cross-validation and 5-fold cross-validation test. Subsequently, this model discovered 14,033 np-RNHs after scanning sequences without RNH annotations. All these predicted np-RNHs and annotated RNHs were employed to analyze the length, hydrophobicity and evolutionary relationship of RNH domains. They are all related to retroviral genera, which validates the classification of retroviruses to a certain degree. In the end, a software tool was designed for the application of our prediction model. The software together with datasets involved in this paper can be available for free download at https://sourceforge.net/projects/rhtool/files/?source=navbar. PMID:27574780

  19. A Computational Model for Predicting RNase H Domain of Retrovirus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinman; Han, Jiuqiang

    2016-01-01

    RNase H (RNH) is a pivotal domain in retrovirus to cleave the DNA-RNA hybrid for continuing retroviral replication. The crucial role indicates that RNH is a promising drug target for therapeutic intervention. However, annotated RNHs in UniProtKB database have still been insufficient for a good understanding of their statistical characteristics so far. In this work, a computational RNH model was proposed to annotate new putative RNHs (np-RNHs) in the retroviruses. It basically predicts RNH domains through recognizing their start and end sites separately with SVM method. The classification accuracy rates are 100%, 99.01% and 97.52% respectively corresponding to jack-knife, 10-fold cross-validation and 5-fold cross-validation test. Subsequently, this model discovered 14,033 np-RNHs after scanning sequences without RNH annotations. All these predicted np-RNHs and annotated RNHs were employed to analyze the length, hydrophobicity and evolutionary relationship of RNH domains. They are all related to retroviral genera, which validates the classification of retroviruses to a certain degree. In the end, a software tool was designed for the application of our prediction model. The software together with datasets involved in this paper can be available for free download at https://sourceforge.net/projects/rhtool/files/?source=navbar. PMID:27574780

  20. On board a raft or boat in the retrovirus sea

    PubMed Central

    Svoboda, Jan

    2016-01-01

    This article summarizes the essential steps in understanding the chicken Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) genome association with a nonpermissive rodent host cell genome. This insight was made possible by in-depth study of RSV-transformed rat XC cells, which were called virogenic because they indefinitely carry virus genetic information in the absence of any infectious virus production. However, the virus was rescued by association of XC cells with chicken fibroblasts, allowing cell fusion between both partners. This and additional studies led to the interpretation that the RSV genome gets integrated into the host cell genome as a provirus. Study of additional rodent virogenic cell lines provided evidence that the transcript of oncogene v-src can be transmitted to other retroviruses and produce cell transformation by itself. As discussed in the text, two main questions related to nonpermissiveness to retrovirus infection remain to be solved. The first is changes in the retrovirus envelope gene allowing virus entry into a nonpermissive cell. The second is the nature of the permissive cell functions required by the nonpermissive cell to ensure infectious virus production. Both lines of investigation are being pursued. PMID:27035994

  1. Structural analysis of membrane-bound retrovirus capsid proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Barklis, E; McDermott, J; Wilkens, S; Schabtach, E; Schmid, M F; Fuller, S; Karanjia, S; Love, Z; Jones, R; Rui, Y; Zhao, X; Thompson, D

    1997-01-01

    We have developed a system for analysis of histidine-tagged (His-tagged) retrovirus core (Gag) proteins, assembled in vitro on lipid monolayers consisting of egg phosphatidylcholine (PC) plus the novel lipid DHGN. DHGN was shown to chelate nickel by atomic absorption spectrometry, and DHGN-containing monolayers specifically bound gold conjugates of His-tagged proteins. Using PC + DHGN monolayers, we examined membrane-bound arrays of an N-terminal His-tagged Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) capsid (CA) protein, His-MoCA, and in vivo studies suggest that in vitro-derived His-MoCA arrays reflect some of the Gag protein interactions which occur in assembling virus particles. The His-MoCA proteins formed extensive two-dimensional (2D) protein crystals, with reflections out to 9.5 A resolution. The image-analyzed 2D projection of His-MoCA arrays revealed a distinct cage-like network. The asymmetry of the individual building blocks of the network led to the formation of two types of hexamer rings, surrounding protein-free cage holes. These results predict that Gag hexamers constitute a retrovirus core substructure, and that cage hole sizes define an exclusion limit for entry of retrovirus envelope proteins, or other plasma membrane proteins, into virus particles. We believe that the 2D crystallization method will permit the detailed analysis of retroviral Gag proteins and other His-tagged proteins. PMID:9135137

  2. The relationship between the flamenco gene and gypsy in Drosophila: how to tame a retrovirus.

    PubMed

    Bucheton, A

    1995-09-01

    For a long time, retroviruses have been considered to be restricted to vertebrates. However, the genome of insects contains elements like gypsy in Drosophila melanogaster that are strikingly similar to vertebrate proviruses of retroviruses, which were considered to be transposable elements. Recent results indicate that gypsy has infective properties and is therefore a retrovirus, the first to be identified in invertebrates. It is normally repressed by a host gene called flamenco, which apparently controls the transposition and infective properties of gypsy. This provides an exceptional experimental model to investigate the genetic relationships between retroviruses and their hosts. PMID:7482786

  3. Regulatory evolution of innate immunity through co-option of endogenous retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Chuong, Edward B; Elde, Nels C; Feschotte, Cédric

    2016-03-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are abundant in mammalian genomes and contain sequences modulating transcription. The impact of ERV propagation on the evolution of gene regulation remains poorly understood. We found that ERVs have shaped the evolution of a transcriptional network underlying the interferon (IFN) response, a major branch of innate immunity, and that lineage-specific ERVs have dispersed numerous IFN-inducible enhancers independently in diverse mammalian genomes. CRISPR-Cas9 deletion of a subset of these ERV elements in the human genome impaired expression of adjacent IFN-induced genes and revealed their involvement in the regulation of essential immune functions, including activation of the AIM2 inflammasome. Although these regulatory sequences likely arose in ancient viruses, they now constitute a dynamic reservoir of IFN-inducible enhancers fueling genetic innovation in mammalian immune defenses. PMID:26941318

  4. Regulatory evolution of innate immunity through co-option of endogenous retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Chuong, Edward B.; Elde, Nels C.; Feschotte, Cédric

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are abundant in mammalian genomes and contain sequences modulating transcription. How ERV propagation impacts the evolution of gene regulation remains poorly understood. Here we show that ERVs have shaped the evolution of a transcriptional network underlying the interferon (IFN) response, a major branch of innate immunity. We found that lineage-specific ERVs have dispersed numerous IFN-inducible enhancers independently in diverse mammalian genomes. CRISPR-Cas9 deletion of a subset of these ERV elements in the human genome impaired expression of adjacent IFN-induced genes and revealed their involvement in the regulation of essential immune functions, including activation of the AIM2 inflammasome. While these regulatory sequences likely arose in ancient viruses, they now constitute a dynamic reservoir of IFN-inducible enhancers fueling genetic innovation in mammalian immune defenses. PMID:26941318

  5. Transcriptional activity of human endogenous retrovirus in Albanian children with autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Balestrieri, Emanuela; Cipriani, Chiara; Matteucci, Claudia; Capodicasa, Natale; Pilika, Anita; Korca, Ina; Sorrentino, Roberta; Argaw-Denboba, Ayele; Bucci, Ilaria; Miele, Martino Tony; Coniglio, Antonella; Alessandrelli, Riccardo; Sinibaldi Vallebona, Paola

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies suggest that autism spectrum disorders (ASD) result from interactions between genetic and environmental factors, whose possible links could be represented by epigenetic mechanisms. Here, we investigated the transcriptional activity of three human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) families, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from Albanian ASD children, by quantitative real-time PCR. We aimed to confirm the different expression profile already found in Italian ASD children, and to highlight any social and family health condition emerging from information gathered through a questionnaire, to be included among environmental risk factors. The presence of increased HERV-H transcriptional activity in all autistic patients could be understood as a constant epigenetic imprinting of the disease, potentially useful for early diagnosis and for the development of effective novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:27602423

  6. V-cbl, an oncogene from a dual-recombinant murine retrovirus that induces early B-lineage lymphomas

    SciTech Connect

    Langdon, W.Y.; Klinken, S.P. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, MD ); Hartley, J.W.; Morse, H.C. III ); Ruscetti, S.K. )

    1989-02-01

    Cas NS-1 is an acutely transforming murine retrovirus that induces pre-B and pro-B cell lymphomas. Molecular cloning showed it was generated from the ecotropic Cas-Br-M virus by sequential recombinations with endogenous retroviral sequences and a cellular oncogene. The oncogene sequence shows no homology with known oncogenes but some similarity to the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4. A 100-kDa gag-cbl fusion protein, with no detectable kinase activity, is responsible for the cellular transformation. The cellular homologue of v-cbl, present in mouse and human DNA, is expressed in a range of hemopoietic lineages.

  7. Regulation of the Human Endogenous Retrovirus K (HML-2) Transcriptome by the HIV-1 Tat Protein

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Hernandez, Marta J.; Cavalcoli, James D.; Sartor, Maureen A.; Contreras-Galindo, Rafael; Meng, Fan; Dai, Manhong; Dube, Derek; Saha, Anjan K.; Gitlin, Scott D.; Omenn, Gilbert S.; Kaplan, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Approximately 8% of the human genome is made up of endogenous retroviral sequences. As the HIV-1 Tat protein activates the overall expression of the human endogenous retrovirus type K (HERV-K) (HML-2), we used next-generation sequencing to determine which of the 91 currently annotated HERV-K (HML-2) proviruses are regulated by Tat. Transcriptome sequencing of total RNA isolated from Tat- and vehicle-treated peripheral blood lymphocytes from a healthy donor showed that Tat significantly activates expression of 26 unique HERV-K (HML-2) proviruses, silences 12, and does not significantly alter the expression of the remaining proviruses. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR validation of the sequencing data was performed on Tat-treated PBLs of seven donors using provirus-specific primers and corroborated the results with a substantial degree of quantitative similarity. IMPORTANCE The expression of HERV-K (HML-2) is tightly regulated but becomes markedly increased following infection with HIV-1, in part due to the HIV-1 Tat protein. The findings reported here demonstrate the complexity of the genome-wide regulation of HERV-K (HML-2) expression by Tat. This work also demonstrates that although HERV-K (HML-2) proviruses in the human genome are highly similar in terms of DNA sequence, modulation of the expression of specific proviruses in a given biological situation can be ascertained using next-generation sequencing and bioinformatics analysis. PMID:24872592

  8. [Toward an unpublished method of detecting human retroviruses: activation of HIV-1 LacZ recombinant provirus by the tat gene product].

    PubMed

    Bonnerot, C; Savatier, N; Nicolas, J F

    1988-01-01

    For a few of retroviruses, the level of synthesis of viral proteins is greatly increased in the presence of a transactivator gene which is encoded by the virus. For instance, for HIV, TAT acts on target sequences present in the viral long terminal repeat (LTR). HIV-1 recombinant retrovirus (RRV), where the gag, pol and part of env genes have been exchanged for the reporter nlsLacZ gene, expresses the reporter gene only in presence of TAT. When the RRV is tat defective, this activity can be complemented by tat present on a second molecule. The expression of nlsLacZ can then be detected by a simple histochemical staining. If this complementation can also be provided by a wild type virus, then their detection and titration would be greatly simplified.

  9. Safety of human blood products: inactivation of retroviruses by heat treatment at 60 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Hilfenhaus, J; Mauler, R; Friis, R; Bauer, H

    1985-04-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) can be transferred to patients by blood transfusions or human blood preparations, such as cryoprecipitates or factor VIII concentrates. Retroviruses have been discussed as infectious AIDS agents and more recently human T-lymphotropic retroviruses designated as HTLV type III and LAV (lymphadenopathy-associated virus) have been isolated from AIDS patients. Whether heat treatment at 60 degrees C (pasteurization) of liquid human plasma protein preparations inactivates retroviruses was therefore investigated. Pasteurization had already been included in the routine manufacturing process of human plasma protein preparations in order to guarantee safety with regard to hepatitis B. Since high titer preparations of human retroviruses were not available, heat inactivation was studied using Rous sarcoma virus added to the various plasma protein preparations tested. This retrovirus which was obtained in preparations of 6.0 log10 FFU/ml was shown to be at least as heat stable as two mammalian retroviruses studied, i.e., feline and simian sarcoma virus. In all of eight different plasma protein preparations tested, Rous sarcoma virus was completely inactivated after a heat treatment lasting no longer than 4 hr. It is thus concluded that pasteurization of liquid plasma protein preparations at 60 degrees C over a period of 10 hr must confer safety to these products with respect to AIDS, provided that the AIDS agents are retroviruses of comparable heat stability as Rous sarcoma virus and the mammalian retroviruses tested.

  10. A paradigm for virus-host coevolution: Sequential counter-adaptations between endogenous and exogenous retroviruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are remnants of ancient retroviral infections of the host germline transmitted vertically from generation to generation. It is hypothesized that during evolution some ERVs were used by the host to drive extinction of exogenous horizontally-transmitted retroviruses. Se...

  11. Divergent and dynamic activity of endogenous retroviruses in burn patients and their inflammatory potential.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang-Hoon; Rah, HyungChul; Green, Tajia; Lee, Young-Kwan; Lim, Debora; Nemzek, Jean; Wahl, Wendy; Greenhalgh, David; Cho, Kiho

    2014-04-01

    Genes constitute ~3% of the human genome, whereas human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) represent ~8%. We examined post-burn HERV expression in patients' blood cells, and the inflammatory potentials of the burn-associated HERVs were evaluated. Buffy coat cells, collected at various time points from 11 patients, were screened for the expression of eight HERV families, and we identified their divergent expression profiles depending on patient, HERV, and time point. The population of expressed HERV sequences was patient-specific, suggesting HERVs' inherent genomic polymorphisms and/or differential expression potentials depending on characteristics of patients and courses of injury response. Some HERVs were shared among the patients, while the others were divergent. Interestingly, one burn-associated HERV gag gene from a patient's genome induced IL-6, IL-1β, Ptgs-2, and iNOS. These findings demonstrate that injury stressors initiate divergent HERV responses depending on patient, HERV, and disease course and implicate HERVs as genetic elements contributing to polymorphic injury pathophysiology.

  12. Human Endogenous Retrovirus HERV-Fc1 Association with Multiple Sclerosis Susceptibility: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    García-Montojo, Marta; Alcina, Antonio; Fedetz, María; Alloza, Iraide; Astobiza, Ianire; Leyva, Laura; Fernández, Oscar; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Antigüedad, Alfredo; Arroyo, Rafael; Álvarez-Lafuente, Roberto; Vandenbroeck, Koen; Matesanz, Fuencisla; Urcelay, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Background Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) are repetitive sequences derived from ancestral germ-line infections by exogenous retroviruses and different HERV families have been integrated in the genome. HERV-Fc1 in chromosome X has been previously associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) in Northern European populations. Additionally, HERV-Fc1 RNA levels of expression have been found increased in plasma of MS patients with active disease. Considering the North-South latitude gradient in MS prevalence, we aimed to evaluate the role of HERV-Fc1on MS risk in three independent Spanish cohorts. Methods A single nucleotide polymorphism near HERV-Fc1, rs391745, was genotyped by Taqman chemistry in a total of 2473 MS patients and 3031 ethnically matched controls, consecutively recruited from: Northern (569 patients and 980 controls), Central (883 patients and 692 controls) and Southern (1021 patients and 1359 controls) Spain. Our results were pooled in a meta-analysis with previously published data. Results Significant associations of the HERV-Fc1 polymorphism with MS were observed in two Spanish cohorts and the combined meta-analysis with previous data yielded a significant association [rs391745 C-allele carriers: pM-H = 0.0005; ORM-H (95% CI) = 1.27 (1.11–1.45)]. Concordantly to previous findings, when the analysis was restricted to relapsing remitting and secondary progressive MS samples, a slight enhancement in the strength of the association was observed [pM-H = 0.0003, ORM-H (95% CI) = 1.32 (1.14–1.53)]. Conclusion Association of the HERV-Fc1 polymorphism rs391745 with bout-onset MS susceptibility was confirmed in Southern European cohorts. PMID:24594754

  13. The human endogenous retrovirus K Rev response element coincides with a predicted RNA folding region.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, J; Bogerd, H; Le, S Y; Cullen, B R

    2000-01-01

    Human endogenous retrovirus K (HERV-K) is the name given to an approximately 30-million-year-old family of endogenous retroviruses present at >50 copies per haploid human genome. Previously, the HERV-K were shown to encode a nuclear RNA export factor, termed K-Rev, that is the functional equivalent of the H-Rev protein encoded by human immunodeficiency virus type 1. HERV-K was also shown to contain a cis-acting target element, the HERV-K Rev response element (K-RRE), that allowed the nuclear export of linked RNA transcripts in the presence of either K-Rev or H-Rev. Here, we demonstrate that the functionally defined K-RRE coincides with a statistically highly significant unusual RNA folding region and present a potential RNA secondary structure for the approximately 416-nt K-RRE. Both in vitro and in vivo assays of sequence specific RNA binding were used to map two primary binding sites for K-Rev, and one primary binding site for H-Rev, within the K-RRE. Of note, all three binding sites map to discrete predicted RNA stem-loop subdomains within the larger K-RRE structure. Although almost the entire 416-nt K-RRE was required for the activation of nuclear RNA export in cells expressing K-Rev, mutational inactivation of the binding sites for K-Rev resulted in the selective loss of the K-RRE response to K-Rev but not to H-Rev. Together, these data strongly suggest that the K-RRE, like the H-RRE, coincides with an extensive RNA secondary structure and identify specific sites within the K-RRE that can recruit either K-Rev or H-Rev to HERV-K RNA transcripts. PMID:11105755

  14. Human endogenous retrovirus-K(II) envelope induction protects neurons during HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Rakesh K; Rudnick, Wallis; Antony, Joseph M; Maingat, Ferdinand; Ellestad, Kristofor K; Wheatley, Blaise M; Tönjes, Ralf R; Power, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) are differentially expressed depending on the cell type and physiological circumstances. HERV-K has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several diseases although the functional consequences of its expression remain unknown. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection causes neuroinflammation with neuronal damage and death. Herein, we investigated HERV-K(II)/(HML-2) envelope (Env) expression and its actions in the brain during HIV/AIDS. HERV-K(II) Env expression was assessed in healthy brain tissues, autopsied HIV HIV- infected (HIV+) and uninfected (HIV-) brains and in neural cell cultures by real time RT-PCR, massively parallel (deep) sequencing, immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. Neuronal and neural stem cells expressing HERV-K(II) Env were analyzed in assays of host responses including cellular viability, immune responses and neurobehavioral outcomes. Deep sequencing of human brain transcriptomes disclosed that RNA sequences encoded by HERV-K were among the most abundant HERV sequences detected in human brain. Comparison of different cell types revealed that HERV-K(II) env RNA abundance was highest in cultured human neurons but was suppressed by epidermal growth factor exposure. HERV-K(II) Env immunoreactivity was increased in the cerebral cortex from persons with HIV/AIDS, principally localized in neurons. Human neuronal cells transfected with HERV-K(II) Env exhibited increased NGF and BDNF expression. Expression of HERV-K(II) Env in neuronal cells increased cellular viability and prevented neurotoxicity mediated by HIV-1 Vpr. Intracerebral delivery of HERV-K(II) Env expressed by neural stem cells suppressed TNF-α expression and microglial activation while also improving neurobehavioral deficits in vpr/RAG1-/- mice. HERV-K(II) Env was highly expressed in human neurons, especially during HIV/AIDS, but in addition exerted neuroprotective effects. These findings imply that HERV gene products might exert adaptive

  15. A Paradigm for Virus–Host Coevolution: Sequential Counter-Adaptations between Endogenous and Exogenous Retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Arnaud, Frederick; Caporale, Marco; Varela, Mariana; Biek, Roman; Chessa, Bernardo; Alberti, Alberto; Golder, Matthew; Mura, Manuela; Zhang, Ya-ping; Yu, Li; Pereira, Filipe; DeMartini, James C; Leymaster, Kreg; Spencer, Thomas E; Palmarini, Massimo

    2007-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are remnants of ancient retroviral infections of the host germline transmitted vertically from generation to generation. It is hypothesized that some ERVs are used by the host as restriction factors to block the infection of pathogenic retroviruses. Indeed, some ERVs efficiently interfere with the replication of related exogenous retroviruses. However, data suggesting that these mechanisms have influenced the coevolution of endogenous and/or exogenous retroviruses and their hosts have been more difficult to obtain. Sheep are an interesting model system to study retrovirus-host coevolution because of the coexistence in this animal species of two exogenous (i.e., horizontally transmitted) oncogenic retroviruses, Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus and Enzootic nasal tumor virus, with highly related and biologically active endogenous retroviruses (enJSRVs). Here, we isolated and characterized the evolutionary history and molecular virology of 27 enJSRV proviruses. enJSRVs have been integrating in the host genome for the last 5–7 million y. Two enJSRV proviruses (enJS56A1 and enJSRV-20), which entered the host genome within the last 3 million y (before and during speciation within the genus Ovis), acquired in two temporally distinct events a defective Gag polyprotein resulting in a transdominant phenotype able to block late replication steps of related exogenous retroviruses. Both transdominant proviruses became fixed in the host genome before or around sheep domestication (∼ 9,000 y ago). Interestingly, a provirus escaping the transdominant enJSRVs has emerged very recently, most likely within the last 200 y. Thus, we determined sequentially distinct events during evolution that are indicative of an evolutionary antagonism between endogenous and exogenous retroviruses. This study strongly suggests that endogenization and selection of ERVs acting as restriction factors is a mechanism used by the host to fight retroviral infections. PMID

  16. The discovery of HTLV-1, the first pathogenic human retrovirus.

    PubMed

    Coffin, John M

    2015-12-22

    After the discovery of retroviral reverse transcriptase in 1970, there was a flurry of activity, sparked by the "War on Cancer," to identify human cancer retroviruses. After many false claims resulting from various artifacts, most scientists abandoned the search, but the Gallo laboratory carried on, developing both specific assays and new cell culture methods that enabled them to report, in the accompanying 1980 PNAS paper, identification and partial characterization of human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV; now known as HTLV-1) produced by a T-cell line from a lymphoma patient. Follow-up studies, including collaboration with the group that first identified a cluster of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) cases in Japan, provided conclusive evidence that HTLV was the cause of this disease. HTLV-1 is now known to infect at least 4-10 million people worldwide, about 5% of whom will develop ATL. Despite intensive research, knowledge of the viral etiology has not led to improvement in treatment or outcome of ATL. However, the technology for discovery of HTLV and acknowledgment of the existence of pathogenic human retroviruses laid the technical and intellectual foundation for the discovery of the cause of AIDS soon afterward. Without this advance, our ability to diagnose and treat HIV infection most likely would have been long delayed.

  17. The discovery of HTLV-1, the first pathogenic human retrovirus

    PubMed Central

    Coffin, John M.

    2015-01-01

    After the discovery of retroviral reverse transcriptase in 1970, there was a flurry of activity, sparked by the “War on Cancer,” to identify human cancer retroviruses. After many false claims resulting from various artifacts, most scientists abandoned the search, but the Gallo laboratory carried on, developing both specific assays and new cell culture methods that enabled them to report, in the accompanying 1980 PNAS paper, identification and partial characterization of human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV; now known as HTLV-1) produced by a T-cell line from a lymphoma patient. Follow-up studies, including collaboration with the group that first identified a cluster of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) cases in Japan, provided conclusive evidence that HTLV was the cause of this disease. HTLV-1 is now known to infect at least 4–10 million people worldwide, about 5% of whom will develop ATL. Despite intensive research, knowledge of the viral etiology has not led to improvement in treatment or outcome of ATL. However, the technology for discovery of HTLV and acknowledgment of the existence of pathogenic human retroviruses laid the technical and intellectual foundation for the discovery of the cause of AIDS soon afterward. Without this advance, our ability to diagnose and treat HIV infection most likely would have been long delayed. PMID:26696625

  18. Selection of an avian retrovirus mutant with extended receptor usage.

    PubMed Central

    Taplitz, R A; Coffin, J M

    1997-01-01

    Receptor recognition by avian retroviruses is thought to involve the interaction of two regions of the SU protein, hr1 and hr2, with the host cell surface receptor. These regions exhibit considerable variation, concordant with differences in receptor usage among the many avian leukosis virus subgroups. We hypothesize that some retroviruses have altered receptor usage in response to selective pressures imposed by receptor polymorphisms in their hosts. To test this hypothesis, we passaged td-Pr-RSV-B on cocultured permissive chicken (C/E) and nonpermissive quail (QT6/BD) cells. A variant virus with an expanded host range was identified at passage 29 and ultimately shown to be identical in sequence to td-Pr-RSV-B, except for changes at codons 155 and 156 of SU amino acid corresponding to two amino acid changes within hr1. Superinfection resistance studies suggest that the variant virus recognizes the subgroup B receptor on chicken cells and the subgroup E receptor on quail cells. These findings indicate that altered receptor usage can be conferred by small changes in env and may point to a key region for receptor interaction. Further, they demonstrate the evolutionary potential of retroviral env genes to alter receptor usage in response to appropriate selective pressure. PMID:9311868

  19. Physical and functional interactions of human endogenous retrovirus proteins Np9 and rec with the promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger protein.

    PubMed

    Denne, Miriam; Sauter, Marlies; Armbruester, Vivienne; Licht, Jonathan D; Roemer, Klaus; Mueller-Lantzsch, Nikolaus

    2007-06-01

    Only few of the human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) sequences in the human genome can produce proteins. We have previously reported that (i) patients with germ cell tumors often make antibodies against proteins encoded by HERV-K elements, (ii) expression of the HERV-K rec gene in transgenic mice can interfere with germ cell development and induce carcinoma in situ, and (iii) HERV-K np9 transcript is overproduced in many tumors including breast cancers. Here we document that both Np9 and Rec physically and functionally interact with the promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF) tumor suppressor, a transcriptional repressor and chromatin remodeler implicated in cancer and the self-renewal of spermatogonial stem cells. Interaction is mediated via two different central and C-terminal domains of Np9 and Rec and the C-terminal zinc fingers of PLZF. One major target of PLZF is the c-myc proto-oncogene. Coexpression of Np9 and Rec with PLZF abrogates the transcriptional repression of the c-myc gene promoter by PLZF and results in c-Myc overproduction, altered expression of c-Myc-regulated genes, and corresponding effects on cell proliferation and survival. Thus, the human endogenous retrovirus proteins Np9 and Rec may act oncogenically by derepressing c-myc through the inhibition of PLZF.

  20. Pseudotypes of vesicular stomatitis virus with the envelope properties of mammalian and primate retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Schnitzer, T J; Weiss, R A; Zavada, J

    1977-09-01

    By employing improved techniques it has been possible to produce and characterize a representative spectrum of mammalian and primate retrovirus pseudotypes of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Selection of appropriate cell lines for both the production and subsequent detection of the VSV pseudotypes has been the most important factor in permitting their demonstration. The host range for penetration of these retrovirus pseudotypes of VSV has been defined and found to differ from that reported for the replication of the corresponding retroviruses. Additionally, retroviruses having an identical host range for replication were distinguishable by differences in their host range for penetration, implying that restriction of replication may be occurring by different mechanisms. Studies of the plaque-forming efficiency of retrovirus pseudotypes of VSV in cell lines nonpermissive for replication of the corresponding retroviruses permitted a distinction to be made between the restriction of replication occurring as a consequence of postpenetration events and that occurring as a consequence of a block of penetration itself. The demonstration of primate retrovirus pseudotypes of VSV permits the use of VSV as a probe for the detection of this group of viruses. PMID:197255

  1. Characterizing novel endogenous retroviruses from genetic variation inferred from short sequence reads

    PubMed Central

    Mourier, Tobias; Mollerup, Sarah; Vinner, Lasse; Hansen, Thomas Arn; Kjartansdóttir, Kristín Rós; Guldberg Frøslev, Tobias; Snogdal Boutrup, Torsten; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Willerslev, Eske; Hansen, Anders J.

    2015-01-01

    From Illumina sequencing of DNA from brain and liver tissue from the lion, Panthera leo, and tumor samples from the pike-perch, Sander lucioperca, we obtained two assembled sequence contigs with similarity to known retroviruses. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that the pike-perch retrovirus belongs to the epsilonretroviruses, and the lion retrovirus to the gammaretroviruses. To determine if these novel retroviral sequences originate from an endogenous retrovirus or from a recently integrated exogenous retrovirus, we assessed the genetic diversity of the parental sequences from which the short Illumina reads are derived. First, we showed by simulations that we can robustly infer the level of genetic diversity from short sequence reads. Second, we find that the measures of nucleotide diversity inferred from our retroviral sequences significantly exceed the level observed from Human Immunodeficiency Virus infections, prompting us to conclude that the novel retroviruses are both of endogenous origin. Through further simulations, we rule out the possibility that the observed elevated levels of nucleotide diversity are the result of co-infection with two closely related exogenous retroviruses. PMID:26493184

  2. The retrovirus pol gene encodes a product required for DNA integration: identification of a retrovirus int locus.

    PubMed Central

    Panganiban, A T; Temin, H M

    1984-01-01

    We mutagenized cloned spleen necrosis virus DNA to identify a region of the retrovirus genome encoding a polypeptide required for integration of viral DNA. Five plasmids bearing different lesions in the 3' end of the pol gene were examined for the ability to integrate or replicate following transfection of chicken embryo fibroblasts. Transfection with one of these DNAs resulted in the generation of mutant virus incapable of integrating but able to replicate at low levels; this phenotype is identical to that of mutants bearing alterations in the cis-acting region, att. To determine whether the 3' end of the pol gene encodes a protein that interacts with att, we did a complementation experiment. Cells were first infected with an att- virus and then superinfected with the integration-deficient virus containing a lesion in the pol gene and a wild-type att site. The results showed that the att- virus provided a transacting function allowing integration of viral DNA derived from the mutant bearing a wild-type att site. Thus, the 3' end of the pol gene serves as an "int" locus and encodes a protein mediating integration of retrovirus DNA through interaction with att. Images PMID:6083562

  3. Pert analysis of endogenous retroviruses induced from K-BALB mouse cells treated with 5-iododeoxyuridine: a potential strategy for detection of inducible retroviruses from vaccine cell substrates.

    PubMed

    Khan, A S; Sears, J F

    2001-01-01

    The activation of an endogenous, infectious retrovirus in a cell substrate that is used for the production of biologics is an important safety concern, especially in the case of live, viral vaccines, where there are minimal purification and inactivation steps in order to preserve high vaccine potency. Extensive analysis has been done to evaluate various chemical agents for the induction of endogenous retroviruses in murine and avian cells; however, similar studies have not been done with cells of other species, especially human and non-human primates, that are used in vaccine production. To develop a strategy for optimal induction and sensitive detection of endogenous, infectious retroviruses in currently used or potential vaccine cell substrates, we have initially investigated the use of a state-of-the-art, highly-sensitive, product-enhanced reverse transcriptase (PERT) assay for evaluating the kinetics of retrovirus induction and replication in 5-iododeoxyuridine (IdU)-treated K-BALB mouse cells, where endogenous retrovirus activation has previously been described. In general, the overall kinetics of virus production were similar to those of previous studies in that two peaks of RT activity were seen on long-term culture of IdU-treated K-BALB cells; however, retrovirus activation was detected earlier under our induction conditions and with greater sensitivity using the PERT assay, where 1-10 virions were detected in 1 microl equivalent of the test sample, without concentration. Furthermore, the PERT activity corresponded to the presence of infectious, murine leukaemia viruses (MuLVs) induced from K-BALB cells. Based upon these results, a strategy is proposed using the PERT assay for detection of inducible, endogenous retroviruses in vaccine cell substrates.

  4. A new pathway in the generation of defective retrovirus DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, J C; Swanstrom, R

    1985-01-01

    We used a retrovirus shuttle vector to make molecular clones of circular viral DNA from infected cells. One-third of the molecules examined had deletions that started within or near the U5 domain of the long terminal repeat (LTR) region and extended a variable distance toward the gag gene. We present evidence that some of these deletions arose by cleavage of a single LTR unit, in contrast to the cleavage of tandem LTR units associated with the integration reaction. These results suggest that in the formation of defective circular DNA, the U5 domain can be recognized and cleaved in the absence of an adjacent U3 domain. The cleavage of isolated U5 domains may represent an important mechanism responsible for the generation of certain forms of both defective circular DNA and defective integrated DNA. Images PMID:4068144

  5. The ability of multimerized cyclophilin A to restrict retrovirus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Javanbakht, Hassan; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Yuan Wen; Yeung, Darwin F.; Li Xing; Song Byeongwoon; Sodroski, Joseph

    2007-10-10

    In owl monkeys, the typical retroviral restriction factor of primates, TRIM5{alpha}, is replaced by TRIMCyp. TRIMCyp consists of the TRIM5 RING, B-box 2 and coiled-coil domains, as well as the intervening linker regions, fused with cyclophilin A. TRIMCyp restricts infection of retroviruses, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), with capsids that can bind cyclophilin A. The TRIM5 coiled coil promotes the trimerization of TRIMCyp. Here we show that cyclophilin A that is oligomeric as a result of fusion with a heterologous multimer exhibits substantial antiretroviral activity. The addition of the TRIM5 RING, B-box 2 and Linker 2 to oligomeric cyclophilin A generated a protein with antiretroviral activity approaching that of wild-type TRIMCyp. Multimerization increased the binding of cyclophilin A to the HIV-1 capsid, promoting accelerated uncoating of the capsid and restriction of infection.

  6. Inside the Envelope: Endogenous Retrovirus-K Env as a Biomarker and Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Nadeau, Marie-Josée; Manghera, Mamneet; Douville, Renée N.

    2015-01-01

    Due to multiple ancestral human retroviral germ cell infections, the modern human genome is strewn with relics of these infections, termed endogenous retroviruses (ERVs). ERV expression has been silenced due to negative selective pressures and genetic phenomena such as mutations and epigenetic silencing. Nonetheless, select ERVs have retained the capacity to be damaging to their host when reawakened. Much of the current research on the ERVK Env protein strongly suggests a causal or contributive role in the pathogenesis of various cancers, autoimmune and infectious diseases. Additionally, there is a small body of research suggesting that ERVK Env has been domesticated for use in placental development, akin to the ERVW syncytin. Though much is left to ascertain, the innate immune response to ERVK Env expression has been partially characterized and appears to be due to a region located in the transmembrane domain of the Env protein. In this review, we aim to highlight ERVK Env as a biomarker for inflammatory conditions and explore its use as a future therapeutic target for cancers, HIV infection and neurological disease. PMID:26617584

  7. Gene profiling of the erythro- and megakaryoblastic leukaemias induced by the Graffi murine retrovirus

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Acute erythro- and megakaryoblastic leukaemias are associated with very poor prognoses and the mechanism of blastic transformation is insufficiently elucidated. The murine Graffi leukaemia retrovirus induces erythro- and megakaryoblastic leukaemias when inoculated into NFS mice and represents a good model to study these leukaemias. Methods To expand our understanding of genes specific to these leukaemias, we compared gene expression profiles, measured by microarray and RT-PCR, of all leukaemia types induced by this virus. Results The transcriptome level changes, present between the different leukaemias, led to the identification of specific cancerous signatures. We reported numerous genes that may be potential oncogenes, may have a function related to erythropoiesis or megakaryopoiesis or have a poorly elucidated physiological role. The expression pattern of these genes has been further tested by RT-PCR in different samples, in a Friend erythroleukaemic model and in human leukaemic cell lines. We also screened the megakaryoblastic leukaemias for viral integrations and identified genes targeted by these integrations and potentially implicated in the onset of the disease. Conclusions Taken as a whole, the data obtained from this global gene profiling experiment have provided a detailed characterization of Graffi virus induced erythro- and megakaryoblastic leukaemias with many genes reported specific to the transcriptome of these leukaemias for the first time. PMID:20102610

  8. Loss of retrovirus production in JB/RH melanoma cells transfected with H-2Kb and TAP-1 genes.

    PubMed

    Li, M; Xu, F; Muller, J; Huang, X; Hearing, V J; Gorelik, E

    1999-01-20

    JB/RH1 melanoma cells, as well as other melanomas of C57BL/6 mice (B16 and JB/MS), express a common melanoma-associated antigen (MAA) encoded by an ecotropic melanoma-associated retrovirus (MelARV). JB/RH1 cells do not express the H-2Kb molecules due to down-regulation of the H-2Kb and TAP-1 genes. When JB/RH1 cells were transfected with the H-2Kb and cotransfected with the TAP-1 gene, it resulted in the appearance of H-2Kb molecules and an increase in their immunogenicity, albeit they lost expression of retrovirus-encoded MAA recognized by MM2-9B6 mAb. Loss of MAA was found to result from a complete and stable elimination of ecotropic MelARV production in the H-2Kb/TAP-1-transfected JB/RH1 cells. Northern blot analysis showed no differences in ecotropic retroviral messages in MelARV-producing and -nonproducing melanoma cells, suggesting that loss of MelARV production was not due to down-regulation of MelARV transcription. Southern blot analysis revealed several rearrangements in the proviral DNA of H-2Kb-positive JB/RH1 melanoma cells. Sequence analysis of the ecotropic proviral DNA from these cells showed numerous nucleotide substitutions, some of which resulted in the appearance of a novel intraviral PstI restriction site and the loss of a HindIII restriction site in the pol region. PCR amplification of the proviral DNAs indicates that an ecotropic provirus found in the H-2Kb-positive cells is novel and does not preexist in the parental H-2Kb-negative melanoma cells. Conversely, the ecotropic provirus of the parental JB/RH1 cells was not amplifable from the H-2Kb-positive cells. Our data indicate that stable loss of retroviral production in the H-2Kb/TAP-1-transfected melanoma cells is probably due to the induction of recombination between a productive ecotropic MelARV and a defective nonecotropic provirus leading to the generation of a defective ecotropic provirus and the loss of MelARV production and expression of the retrovirus-encoded MAA.

  9. The role of human endogenous retroviruses in brain development and function.

    PubMed

    Mortelmans, Kristien; Wang-Johanning, Feng; Johanning, Gary L

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous retroviral sequences are spread throughout the genome of all humans, and make up about 8% of the genome. Despite their prevalence, the function of human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) in humans is largely unknown. In this review we focus on the brain, and evaluate studies in animal models that address mechanisms of endogenous retrovirus activation in the brain and central nervous system (CNS). One such study in mice found that TRIM28, a protein critical for mouse early development, regulates transcription and silencing of endogenous retroviruses in neural progenitor cells. Another intriguing finding in human brain cells and mouse models was that endogenous retrovirus HERV-K appears to be protective against neurotoxins. We also report on studies that associate HERVs with human diseases of the brain and CNS. There is little doubt of an association between HERVs and a number of CNS diseases. However, a cause and effect relationship between HERVs and these diseases has not yet been established.

  10. Ruthenium red preserves glycoprotein peplomers of C-type retroviruses for transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fassel, T A; Raisch, K P; Chetty, N; Grossberg, S E; Kushnaryov, V M

    1998-07-01

    Peplomers, the glycoprotein projections of the outer viral envelope, are distinctive for many viruses. Peplomers of retroviral C-type particles are fragile and are not preserved in standard preparations for transmission electron microscopy of thin sections, whereas the peplomers of B- and D- type retroviruses are usually preserved. Ruthenium red, extensively used in transmission electron microscopy to enhance the preservation of glycosylated proteins, was used in the preparation of three retrovirus-producing lymphoblastoid cell lines: murine SC-1 cells producing the C-type murine leukemia retrovirus LP-BM5 that causes immunodeficiency, human DG-75 cells producing a murine leukemia retrovirus, and human C5/MJ cells producing human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I). Fixation of cells was carried out with ruthenium red present in the glutaraldehyde, osmium tetroxide, and the ethanol dehydration through the 70% ethanol step. The detailed structure of peplomers of these three different viruses was well preserved. PMID:9735881

  11. Rat marrow stromal cells rapidly transduced with a self-inactivating retrovirus synthesize L-DOPA in vitro.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, E J; Reger, R L; Alexander, G M; Class, R; Azizi, S A; Prockop, D J

    2001-08-01

    Autologous bone marrow stromal cells engineered to produce 3,4,-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) can potentially be used as donor cells for neural transplantation in Parkinson's disease. Here, we examined the possibility of using several different promoters and either a self-inactivating retrovirus (pSIR) or standard retroviruses to introduce into marrow stromal cells (MSCs), the two genes necessary for the cells to synthesize L-DOPA. pSIR vectors were constructed using the mouse phosphoglycerate kinase-1 (PGK) promoter or the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter to drive expression of either a GFP reporter gene or a bicistronic sequence containing the genes for human tyrosine hydroxylase type I (TH) and rat GTP cyclohydrolase I (GC) separated by an internal ribosome entry site (IRES). rMSCs were successfully transduced with both standard retroviral vectors and pSIR containing the PGK promoter. Transduced rMSCs expressed GFP (90.4--94.4% of cells) or were able to synthesize and secrete L-DOPA (89.0--283 pmols/10(6) cells/h). After transduced rMSCs were plated at low density (3--6 cells/cm(2)), the cells expanded over 1000-fold in 3--4 weeks, and the rMSCs continued to either express GFP or produce L-DOPA. Furthermore, two high-expressing clones were isolated and expanded at low-density from rMSCs transduced with pSIR driven by the PGK promoter (97.0% GFP+ or 1096.0 pmols L-DOPA/10(6) cells/h).

  12. Insertional oncogenesis by non-acute retroviruses: implications for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hung; Johnson, Chassidy

    2011-04-01

    Retroviruses cause cancers in a variety of animals and humans. Research on retroviruses has provided important insights into mechanisms of oncogenesis in humans, including the discovery of viral oncogenes and cellular proto-oncogenes. The subject of this review is the mechanisms by which retroviruses that do not carry oncogenes (non-acute retroviruses) cause cancers. The common theme is that these tumors result from insertional activation of cellular proto-oncogenes by integration of viral DNA. Early research on insertional activation of proto-oncogenes in virus-induced tumors is reviewed. Research on non-acute retroviruses has led to the discovery of new proto-oncogenes through searches for common insertion sites (CISs) in virus-induced tumors. Cooperation between different proto-oncogenes in development of tumors has been elucidated through the study of retrovirus-induced tumors, and retroviral infection of genetically susceptible mice (retroviral tagging) has been used to identify cellular proto-oncogenes active in specific oncogenic pathways. The pace of proto-oncogene discovery has been accelerated by technical advances including PCR cloning of viral integration sites, the availability of the mouse genome sequence, and high throughput DNA sequencing. Insertional activation has proven to be a significant risk in gene therapy trials to correct genetic defects with retroviral vectors. Studies on non-acute retroviral oncogenesis provide insight into the potential risks, and the mechanisms of oncogenesis.

  13. HIV-1 Interacts with Human Endogenous Retrovirus K (HML-2) Envelopes Derived from Human Primary Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Brinzevich, Daria; Young, George R.; Sebra, Robert; Ayllon, Juan; Maio, Susan M.; Deikus, Gintaras; Chen, Benjamin K.; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Simon, Viviana

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) are viruses that have colonized the germ line and spread through vertical passage. Only the more recently acquired HERVs, such as the HERV-K (HML-2) group, maintain coding open reading frames. Expression of HERV-Ks has been linked to different pathological conditions, including HIV infection, but our knowledge on which specific HERV-Ks are expressed in primary lymphocytes currently is very limited. To identify the most expressed HERV-Ks in an unbiased manner, we analyzed their expression patterns in peripheral blood lymphocytes using Pacific Biosciences (PacBio) single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing. We observe that three HERV-Ks (KII, K102, and K18) constitute over 90% of the total HERV-K expression in primary human lymphocytes of five different donors. We also show experimentally that two of these HERV-K env sequences (K18 and K102) retain their ability to produce full-length and posttranslationally processed envelope proteins in cell culture. We show that HERV-K18 Env can be incorporated into HIV-1 but not simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) particles. Moreover, HERV-K18 Env incorporation into HIV-1 virions is dependent on HIV-1 matrix. Taken together, we generated high-resolution HERV-K expression profiles specific for activated human lymphocytes. We found that one of the most abundantly expressed HERV-K envelopes not only makes a full-length protein but also specifically interacts with HIV-1. Our findings raise the possibility that these endogenous retroviral Env proteins could directly influence HIV-1 replication. IMPORTANCE Here, we report the HERV-K expression profile of primary lymphocytes from 5 different healthy donors. We used a novel deep-sequencing technology (PacBio SMRT) that produces the long reads necessary to discriminate the complexity of HERV-K expression. We find that primary lymphocytes express up to 32 different HERV-K envelopes, and that at least two of the most expressed Env proteins

  14. Postinhibitory rebound neurons and networks are disrupted in retrovirus-induced spongiform neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Davey, Robert A.; Lynch, William P.

    2014-01-01

    Certain retroviruses induce progressive spongiform motor neuron disease with features resembling prion diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. With the neurovirulent murine leukemia virus (MLV) FrCasE, Env protein expression within glia leads to postsynaptic vacuolation, cellular effacement, and neuronal loss in the absence of neuroinflammation. To understand the physiological changes associated with MLV-induced spongiosis, and its neuronal specificity, we employed patch-clamp recordings and voltage-sensitive dye imaging in brain slices of the mouse inferior colliculus (IC), a midbrain nucleus that undergoes extensive spongiosis. IC neurons characterized by postinhibitory rebound firing (PIR) were selectively affected in FrCasE-infected mice. Coincident with Env expression in microglia and in glia characterized by NG2 proteoglycan expression (NG2 cells), rebound neurons (RNs) lost PIR, became hyperexcitable, and were reduced in number. PIR loss and hyperexcitability were reversed by raising internal calcium buffer concentrations in RNs. PIR-initiated rhythmic circuits were disrupted, and spontaneous synchronized bursting and prolonged depolarizations were widespread. Other IC neuron cell types and circuits within the same degenerative environment were unaffected. Antagonists of NMDA and/or AMPA receptors reduced burst firing in the IC but did not affect prolonged depolarizations. Antagonists of L-type calcium channels abolished both bursts and slow depolarizations. IC infection by the nonneurovirulent isogenic virus Friend 57E (Fr57E), whose Env protein is structurally similar to FrCasE, showed no RN hyperactivity or cell loss; however, PIR latency increased. These findings suggest that spongiform neurodegeneration arises from the unique excitability of RNs, their local regulation by glia, and the disruption of this relationship by glial expression of abnormal protein. PMID:25252336

  15. Genetic Engineering of T cells to Target HERV-K, an Ancient Retrovirus on Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthy, Janani; Rabinovich, Brian A.; Mi, Tiejuan; Switzer, Kirsten C.; Olivares, Simon; Maiti, Sourindra N.; Plummer, Joshua B.; Singh, Harjeet; Kumaresan, Pappanaicken R.; Huls, Helen M.; Wang-Johanning, Feng; Cooper, Laurence J.N.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The human endogenous retrovirus (HERV-K) envelope (env) protein is a tumor- associated antigen expressed on melanoma, but not normal cells. This study was designed to engineer a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) on T cell surface, such that they target tumors in advanced stages of melanoma. Experimental Design Expression of HERV-K protein was analyzed in 220 melanoma samples (with various stages of disease) and 139 normal organ donor tissues using immuno-histochemical (IHC) analysis. HERV-K env-specific CAR derived from mouse monoclonal antibody was introduced into T cells using the transposon-based Sleeping Beauty (SB) system. HERV-K env-specific CAR+ T cells were expanded ex vivo on activating and propagating cells (AaPC), and characterized for CAR expression and specificity. This includes evaluating the HERV-K-specific CAR+ T cells for their ability to kill A375-SM metastasized tumors in a mouse xenograft model. Results We detected HERV-K env protein on melanoma, but not in normal tissues. After electroporation of T cells and selection on HERV-K+ AaPC, over 95% of genetically-modified T cells expressed the CAR with an effector memory phenotype and lysed HERV-K env+ tumor targets in an antigen specific manner. Even though there is apparent shedding of this TAA from tumor cells which can be recognized by HERV-K env-specific CAR+ T cells, we observed a significant anti-tumor effect. Conclusion Adoptive cellular immunotherapy with HERV-K env-specific CAR+ T cells represents a clinically-appealing treatment strategy for advanced-stage melanoma and provides an approach for targeting this TAA on other solid tumors. PMID:25829402

  16. Postinhibitory rebound neurons and networks are disrupted in retrovirus-induced spongiform neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Davey, Robert A; Sivaramakrishnan, Shobhana; Lynch, William P

    2014-08-01

    Certain retroviruses induce progressive spongiform motor neuron disease with features resembling prion diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. With the neurovirulent murine leukemia virus (MLV) FrCasE, Env protein expression within glia leads to postsynaptic vacuolation, cellular effacement, and neuronal loss in the absence of neuroinflammation. To understand the physiological changes associated with MLV-induced spongiosis, and its neuronal specificity, we employed patch-clamp recordings and voltage-sensitive dye imaging in brain slices of the mouse inferior colliculus (IC), a midbrain nucleus that undergoes extensive spongiosis. IC neurons characterized by postinhibitory rebound firing (PIR) were selectively affected in FrCasE-infected mice. Coincident with Env expression in microglia and in glia characterized by NG2 proteoglycan expression (NG2 cells), rebound neurons (RNs) lost PIR, became hyperexcitable, and were reduced in number. PIR loss and hyperexcitability were reversed by raising internal calcium buffer concentrations in RNs. PIR-initiated rhythmic circuits were disrupted, and spontaneous synchronized bursting and prolonged depolarizations were widespread. Other IC neuron cell types and circuits within the same degenerative environment were unaffected. Antagonists of NMDA and/or AMPA receptors reduced burst firing in the IC but did not affect prolonged depolarizations. Antagonists of L-type calcium channels abolished both bursts and slow depolarizations. IC infection by the nonneurovirulent isogenic virus Friend 57E (Fr57E), whose Env protein is structurally similar to FrCasE, showed no RN hyperactivity or cell loss; however, PIR latency increased. These findings suggest that spongiform neurodegeneration arises from the unique excitability of RNs, their local regulation by glia, and the disruption of this relationship by glial expression of abnormal protein. PMID:25252336

  17. Comparative and functional studies of Drosophila species invasion by the gypsy endogenous retrovirus.

    PubMed

    Mejlumian, Lucine; Pélisson, Alain; Bucheton, Alain; Terzian, Christophe

    2002-01-01

    Gypsy is an endogenous retrovirus of Drosophila melanogaster. Phylogenetic studies suggest that occasional horizontal transfer events of gypsy occur between Drosophila species. gypsy possesses infective properties associated with the products of the envelope gene that might be at the origin of these interspecies transfers. We report here the existence of DNA sequences putatively encoding full-length Env proteins in the genomes of Drosophila species other than D. melanogaster, suggesting that potentially infective gypsy copies able to spread between sexually isolated species can occur. The ability of gypsy to invade the genome of a new species is conditioned by its capacity to be expressed in the naive genome. The genetic basis for the regulation of gypsy activity in D. melanogaster is now well known, and it has been assigned to an X-linked gene called flamenco. We established an experimental simulation of the invasion of the D. melanogaster genome by gypsy elements derived from other Drosophila species, which demonstrates that these non- D. melanogaster gypsy elements escape the repression exerted by the D. melanogaster flamenco gene. PMID:11805056

  18. Retrovirus-induced insertional mutagenesis: mechanism of collagen mutation in Mov13 mice.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, D D; Wu, H; Hartung, S; Breindl, M; Jaenisch, R

    1991-01-01

    The Mov13 mouse strain carries a mutation in the alpha 1(I) procollagen gene which is due to the insertion of a Moloney murine leukemia provirus into the first intron. This insertion results in the de novo methylation of the provirus and flanking DNA, the alteration of chromatin structure, and the transcriptional inactivity of the collagen promoter. To address the mechanism of mutagenesis, we reintroduced a cloned and therefore demethylated version of the Mov13 mutant allele into mouse fibroblasts. The transfected gene was not transcribed, indicating that the transcriptional defect was not due to the hypermethylation. Rather, this result strongly suggests that the mutation is due to the displacement or disruption of cis-acting regulatory DNA sequences within the first intron. We also constructed a Mov13 variant allele containing a single long terminal repeat instead of the whole provirus. This construct also failed to express mRNA, indicating that the Mov13 mutation does not revert by provirus excision as has been observed for other retrovirus-induced mutations. Images PMID:1922037

  19. Escape from R-peptide deletion in a {gamma}-retrovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Irene C.; Eckhardt, Manon; Brynza, Julia; Collins, Mary K.; Cichutek, Klaus; Buchholz, Christian J.

    2011-09-30

    The R peptide in the cytoplasmic tail (C-tail) of {gamma}-retroviral envelope proteins (Env) prevents membrane fusion before budding. To analyse its role in the formation of replication competent, infectious particles, we developed chimeric murine leukaemia viruses (MLV) with unmodified or R-peptide deleted Env proteins of the gibbon ape leukaemia virus (GaLV). While titres of these viruses were unaffected, R-peptide deficiency led to strongly impaired spreading. Most remarkably, we isolated an escape mutant which had restored an open reading frame for a C-terminal extension of the truncated C-tail. A reconstituted virus encoding this escape C-tail replicated in cell culture. In contrast to R-peptide deficient Env, particle incorporation of the escape Env was effective due to an enhanced protein expression and restored intracellular co-localisation with Gag proteins. Our data demonstrate that the R peptide not only regulates membrane fusion but also mediates efficient Env protein particle incorporation in {gamma}-retrovirus infected cells.

  20. Dynamic regulation of human endogenous retroviruses mediates factor-induced reprogramming and differentiation potential.

    PubMed

    Ohnuki, Mari; Tanabe, Koji; Sutou, Kenta; Teramoto, Ito; Sawamura, Yuka; Narita, Megumi; Nakamura, Michiko; Tokunaga, Yumie; Nakamura, Masahiro; Watanabe, Akira; Yamanaka, Shinya; Takahashi, Kazutoshi

    2014-08-26

    Pluripotency can be induced in somatic cells by overexpressing transcription factors, including POU class 5 homeobox 1 (OCT3/4), sex determining region Y-box 2 (SOX2), Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4), and myelocytomatosis oncogene (c-MYC). However, some induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) exhibit defective differentiation and inappropriate maintenance of pluripotency features. Here we show that dynamic regulation of human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) is important in the reprogramming process toward iPSCs, and in re-establishment of differentiation potential. During reprogramming, OCT3/4, SOX2, and KLF4 transiently hyperactivated LTR7s--the long-terminal repeats of HERV type-H (HERV-H)--to levels much higher than in embryonic stem cells by direct occupation of LTR7 sites genome-wide. Knocking down LTR7s or long intergenic non-protein coding RNA, regulator of reprogramming (lincRNA-RoR), a HERV-H-driven long noncoding RNA, early in reprogramming markedly reduced the efficiency of iPSC generation. KLF4 and LTR7 expression decreased to levels comparable with embryonic stem cells once reprogramming was complete, but failure to resuppress KLF4 and LTR7s resulted in defective differentiation. We also observed defective differentiation and LTR7 activation when iPSCs had forced expression of KLF4. However, when aberrantly expressed KLF4 or LTR7s were suppressed in defective iPSCs, normal differentiation was restored. Thus, a major mechanism by which OCT3/4, SOX2, and KLF4 promote human iPSC generation and reestablish potential for differentiation is by dynamically regulating HERV-H LTR7s.

  1. Overexpression of fasciculation and elongation protein ζ-1 (FEZ1) induces a post-entry block to retroviruses in cultured cells

    PubMed Central

    Naghavi, Mojgan H.; Hatziioannou, Theodora; Gao, Guangxia; Goff, Stephen P.

    2005-01-01

    Two mutant Rat2 fibroblast cell lines, R3-2 and R4-7, have been previously isolated by a selection for retrovirus resistance. We have now further analyzed the basis of the block to retroviral infection in the R3-2 line. Using Affymetrix GeneChip analysis, several genes were identified as differentially expressed in the mutant R3-2 line compared with the wild-type cells. One of the candidate gene products, FEZ1 (fasciculation and elongation protein ζ-1), a protein kinase C (PKC)ζ-interacting protein homologous to the Caenorhabditis elegans synaptic transport protein UNC-76, was found to be up-regulated >30-fold in the resistant R3-2 line. FEZ1 overexpression in Rat2 cells conferred a potent resistance to infection by genetically marked retroviruses, and the degree of retroviral resistance in both Rat2 fibroblasts and 293T cells tightly correlated with the expression level of FEZ1 transcripts. FEZ1-overexpressing Rat2 cells showed a similar phenotype to that of the mutant R3-2 line: Infection resulted in normal viral DNA synthesis but a reduction in the formation of circular DNA, indicating a block after reverse transcription but before nuclear entry. Partial knockdown of FEZ1 expression in R3-2 by RNA interference (RNAi) significantly reduced the resistance of this line to infection. Thus, our data suggest that FEZ1 overexpression is sufficient to explain the resistant phenotype of R3-2 cells and identify FEZ1 as a new gene capable of causing retrovirus resistance. PMID:15879557

  2. Flamenco, a gene controlling the gypsy retrovirus of drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Prud`homme, N.; Gans, M.; Masson, M.; Terzian, C.; Bucheton, A.

    1995-02-01

    Gypsy is an endogenous retrovirus of Drosophila melanogaster. It is table and does not transpose with detectable frequencies in most Drosophila strains. However, we have characterized unstable strains, known as MG, in which it transposes at high frequency. These stocks contain more copies of gypsy than usual stocks. Transposition results in mutations in several genes such as ovo and cut. They are stable and are due to gypsy insertions. Integrations into the ovo{sup D1} female sterile-dominant mutation result in a null allele of the gene and occurrence of fertile females. This phenomenon, known as the ovo{sup D1} reversion assay, can be used to quantitate gypsy activity. We have shown that the properties of MG strains result from mutation of a host gene that we called flamenco (flam). It has a strict maternal effect on gypsy mobilization: transposition occurs at high frequency only in the germ line of the progeny of females homozygous for mutations of the gene. It is located at position 65.9 (20A1-3) on the X chromosome. The mutant allele present in MG strains is essentially recessive. Flamenco seems to control the infective properties of gypsy. 40 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. Isolation of koala retroviruses from koalas in Japan.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Takayuki; Shojima, Takayuki; Yoshikawa, Rokusuke; Ohata, Takuji

    2011-01-01

    Koala retrovirus (KoRV) is considered to be associated with leukemia, lymphoma and immunodeficiency-like diseases in koalas. We therefore conducted a pilot study of KoRV infection in five Queensland koalas in Kobe Municipal Oji Zoo. By polymerase chain reaction to detect partial env and pol genes of KoRV in genomic DNA isolated from whole blood and feces, all five koalas were found to be positive for KoRV proviruses. We succeeded in culturing koala lymphocytes from less than 1 ml blood for over 14 days in the presence of recombinant human interleukin-2. By coculturing the lymphocytes with human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T cells, we isolated KoRVs from all five koalas. We designated these isolates as strains OJ-1 to OJ-5. By electron microscopy, we observed C-type retroviral particles in HEK 293T cells chronically infected with KoRV strain OJ-4. This is the first report on the isolation of KoRV from koalas in a Japanese zoo.

  4. Flamenco, a gene controlling the gypsy retrovirus of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Prud'homme, N; Gans, M; Masson, M; Terzian, C; Bucheton, A

    1995-02-01

    Gypsy is an endogenous retrovirus of Drosophila melanogaster. It is stable and does not transpose with detectable frequencies in most Drosophila strains. However, we have characterized unstable strains, known as MG, in which it transposes at high frequency. These stocks contain more copies of gypsy than usual stocks. Transposition results in mutations in several genes such as ovo and cut. They are stable and are due to gypsy insertions. Integrations into the ovoD1 female sterile-dominant mutation result in a null allele of the gene and occurrence of fertile females. This phenomenon, known as the ovoD1 reversion assay, can be used to quantitate gypsy activity. We have shown that the properties of MG strains result from mutation of a host gene that we called flamenco (flam). It has a strict maternal effect on gypsy mobilization: transposition occurs at high frequency only in the germ line of the progeny of females homozygous for mutations of the gene. It is located at position 65.9 (20A1-3) on the X chromosome. The mutant allele present in MG strains is essentially recessive. Flamenco seems to control the infective properties of gypsy. PMID:7713426

  5. Retroviruses and yeast retrotransposons use overlapping sets of host genes

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Becky; Aye, Michael; Baldi, Pierre; Beliakova-Bethell, Nadejda; Cheng, Henry; Dou, Yimeng; Liou, Willy; Sandmeyer, Suzanne

    2005-01-01

    A collection of 4457 Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants deleted for nonessential genes was screened for mutants with increased or decreased mobilization of the gypsylike retroelement Ty3. Of these, 64 exhibited increased and 66 decreased Ty3 transposition compared with the parental strain. Genes identified in this screen were grouped according to function by using GOnet software developed as part of this study. Gene clusters were related to chromatin and transcript elongation, translation and cytoplasmic RNA processing, vesicular trafficking, nuclear transport, and DNA maintenance. Sixty-six of the mutants were tested for Ty3 proteins and cDNA. Ty3 cDNA and transposition were increased in mutants affected in nuclear pore biogenesis and in a subset of mutants lacking proteins that interact physically or genetically with a replication clamp loader. Our results suggest that nuclear entry is linked mechanistically to Ty3 cDNA synthesis but that host replication factors antagonize Ty3 replication. Some of the factors we identified have been previously shown to affect Ty1 transposition and others to affect retroviral budding. Host factors, such as these, shared by distantly related Ty retroelements and retroviruses are novel candidates for antiviral targets. PMID:15837808

  6. Genome-based identification of cancer genes by proviral tagging in mouse retrovirus-induced T-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Kim, Rachel; Trubetskoy, Alla; Suzuki, Takeshi; Jenkins, Nancy A; Copeland, Neal G; Lenz, Jack

    2003-02-01

    The identification of tumor-inducing genes is a driving force for elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying cancer. Many retroviruses induce tumors by insertion of viral DNA adjacent to cellular oncogenes, resulting in altered expression and/or structure of the encoded proteins. The availability of the mouse genome sequence now allows analysis of retroviral common integration sites in murine tumors to be used as a genetic screen for identification of large numbers of candidate cancer genes. By positioning the sequences of inverse PCR-amplified, virus-host junction fragments within the mouse genome, 19 target genes were identified in T-cell lymphomas induced by the retrovirus SL3-3. The candidate cancer genes included transcription factors (Fos, Gfi1, Lef1, Myb, Myc, Runx3, and Sox3), all three D cyclins, Ras signaling pathway components (Rras2/TC21 and Rasgrp1), and Cmkbr7/CCR7. The most frequent target was Rras2. Insertions as far as 57 kb away from the transcribed portion were associated with substantially increased transcription of Rras2, and no coding sequence mutations, including those typically involved in Ras activation, were detected. These studies demonstrate the power of genome-based analysis of retroviral insertion sites for cancer gene discovery, identify several new genes worth examining for a role in human cancer, and implicate the pathways in which those genes act in lymphomagenesis. They also provide strong genetic evidence that overexpression of unmutated Rras2 contributes to tumorigenesis, thus suggesting that it may also do so if it is inappropriately expressed in human tumors.

  7. Genome-Based Identification of Cancer Genes by Proviral Tagging in Mouse Retrovirus-Induced T-Cell Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Rachel; Trubetskoy, Alla; Suzuki, Takeshi; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Copeland, Neal G.; Lenz, Jack

    2003-01-01

    The identification of tumor-inducing genes is a driving force for elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying cancer. Many retroviruses induce tumors by insertion of viral DNA adjacent to cellular oncogenes, resulting in altered expression and/or structure of the encoded proteins. The availability of the mouse genome sequence now allows analysis of retroviral common integration sites in murine tumors to be used as a genetic screen for identification of large numbers of candidate cancer genes. By positioning the sequences of inverse PCR-amplified, virus-host junction fragments within the mouse genome, 19 target genes were identified in T-cell lymphomas induced by the retrovirus SL3-3. The candidate cancer genes included transcription factors (Fos, Gfi1, Lef1, Myb, Myc, Runx3, and Sox3), all three D cyclins, Ras signaling pathway components (Rras2/TC21 and Rasgrp1), and Cmkbr7/CCR7. The most frequent target was Rras2. Insertions as far as 57 kb away from the transcribed portion were associated with substantially increased transcription of Rras2, and no coding sequence mutations, including those typically involved in Ras activation, were detected. These studies demonstrate the power of genome-based analysis of retroviral insertion sites for cancer gene discovery, identify several new genes worth examining for a role in human cancer, and implicate the pathways in which those genes act in lymphomagenesis. They also provide strong genetic evidence that overexpression of unmutated Rras2 contributes to tumorigenesis, thus suggesting that it may also do so if it is inappropriately expressed in human tumors. PMID:12525640

  8. Prevalence of antibodies to 3 retroviruses in a captive colony of macaque monkeys.

    PubMed

    Daniel, M D; Letvin, N L; Sehgal, P K; Schmidt, D K; Silva, D P; Solomon, K R; Hodi, F S; Ringler, D J; Hunt, R D; King, N W

    1988-04-15

    The prevalence of antibodies to 3 retroviruses in the macaque colony of the New England Regional Primate Research Center (NERPRC) was determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay procedures as well as radioimmunoprecipitation-SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and indirect immunofluorescence tests. Out of 848 macaques, 3 (0.35%) had antibodies to simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), 27 (3.2%) had antibodies to simian T-lymphotropic virus type I (STLV-1) and approximately 285 (34%) had antibodies to type D retrovirus. Of 3 macaques infected with SIV, 2 were rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and I was a cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis). STLV-1 and D retrovirus infection occurred in all 4 macaque species examined. SIV, STLV-1 and D retroviruses were isolated from sero-positive macaques. The low prevalence of SIV infection suggests that SIV is not being readily transmitted among macaques at NERPRC; this contrasts markedly with the high SIV prevalence in some captive mangabey colonies. In contrast to African green monkeys from eastern Africa, 160 Caribbean green monkeys examined showed no sign of SIV infection. These results provide a framework for monitoring spontaneous disease associated with infection by these 3 retroviruses and will help in further definition of STLV-1 and SIV infection of non-human primates as animal models for human disease.

  9. A novel approach to achieving modular retrovirus clearance for a parvovirus filter.

    PubMed

    Stuckey, Juliana; Strauss, Daniel; Venkiteshwaran, Adith; Gao, Jinxin; Luo, Wen; Quertinmont, Michelle; O'Donnell, Sean; Chen, Dayue

    2014-01-01

    Viral filtration is routinely incorporated into the downstream purification processes for the production of biologics produced in mammalian cell cultures (MCC) to remove potential viral contaminants. In recent years, the use of retentive filters designed for retaining parvovirus (~20 nm) has become an industry standard in a conscious effort to further improve product safety. Since retentive filters remove viruses primarily by the size exclusion mechanism, it is expected that filters designed for parvovirus removal can effectively clear larger viruses such as retroviruses (~100 nm). In an attempt to reduce the number of viral clearance studies, we have taken a novel approach to demonstrate the feasibility of claiming modular retrovirus clearance for Asahi Planova 20N filters. Porcine parvovirus (PPV) and xenotropic murine leukemia virus (XMuLV) were co-spiked into six different feedstreams and then subjected to laboratory scale Planova 20N filtration. Our results indicate that Planova 20N filters consistently retain retroviruses and no retrovirus has ever been detected in the filtrates even when significant PPV breakthrough is observed. Based on the data from multiple in-house viral validation studies and the results from the co-spiking experiments, we have successfully claimed a modular retrovirus clearance of greater than 6 log10 reduction factors (LRF) to support clinical trial applications in both USA and Europe.

  10. A novel approach to achieving modular retrovirus clearance for a parvovirus filter.

    PubMed

    Stuckey, Juliana; Strauss, Daniel; Venkiteshwaran, Adith; Gao, Jinxin; Luo, Wen; Quertinmont, Michelle; O'Donnell, Sean; Chen, Dayue

    2014-01-01

    Viral filtration is routinely incorporated into the downstream purification processes for the production of biologics produced in mammalian cell cultures (MCC) to remove potential viral contaminants. In recent years, the use of retentive filters designed for retaining parvovirus (~20 nm) has become an industry standard in a conscious effort to further improve product safety. Since retentive filters remove viruses primarily by the size exclusion mechanism, it is expected that filters designed for parvovirus removal can effectively clear larger viruses such as retroviruses (~100 nm). In an attempt to reduce the number of viral clearance studies, we have taken a novel approach to demonstrate the feasibility of claiming modular retrovirus clearance for Asahi Planova 20N filters. Porcine parvovirus (PPV) and xenotropic murine leukemia virus (XMuLV) were co-spiked into six different feedstreams and then subjected to laboratory scale Planova 20N filtration. Our results indicate that Planova 20N filters consistently retain retroviruses and no retrovirus has ever been detected in the filtrates even when significant PPV breakthrough is observed. Based on the data from multiple in-house viral validation studies and the results from the co-spiking experiments, we have successfully claimed a modular retrovirus clearance of greater than 6 log10 reduction factors (LRF) to support clinical trial applications in both USA and Europe. PMID:24123923

  11. Optimized Expression of IL-12 Cytokine Family | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute's Human Retrovirus Section is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize methods for improved expression of IL-12 family cytokines.

  12. Human endogenous retrovirus protein Rec interacts with the testicular zinc-finger protein and androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Sabine; Sauter, Marlies; Schmitt, Martina; Baumert, Bianca; Best, Barbara; Boese, Annette; Roemer, Klaus; Mueller-Lantzsch, Nikolaus

    2010-06-01

    More than 2000 human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) sequences are present in the human genome, yet only a few are intact and able to produce proteins. The normal functions of these, if any, are unknown, but some HERV proteins have been implicated in cancers, in particular germ-cell cancers. For instance, it has been documented that (i) patients with germ-cell tumours frequently produce antibodies against HERV proteins; (ii) transgenic mice expressing HERV-K (HML-2) rec are prone to testicular carcinoma in situ; and (iii) Rec can bind and suppress a guardian of germline stem-cell pluripotency, the promyelocytic leukaemia zinc-finger protein (PLZF). This study identified the PLZF-related testicular zinc-finger protein (TZFP) as a binding partner of HERV-K (HML-2) Rec. Interactions occurred via the N- and C-terminal domains of Rec and the C-terminal DNA-binding zinc-finger domain of TZFP (aa 375-450). Not much is known about the function of TZFP. The protein is expressed predominantly in the testis, where it functions as a transcriptional repressor that is active during specific stages of spermatogenesis. The most intensely studied function of TZFP is that of a co-repressor of the activated androgen receptor (AR). Here, it was shown that Rec can form a trimeric complex with TZFP and AR, and can relieve the TZFP-mediated repression of AR-induced transactivation. In addition, Rec was able to overcome the direct transcriptional repression by TZFP of the c-myc gene promoter in reporter assays. Thus, HERV-K (HML-2) Rec may function as an oncoprotein by de-repressing oncogenic transcription factors such as AR.

  13. Identification of an ancient endogenous retrovirus, predating the divergence of the placental mammals

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Adam; Nolan, Alison; Watson, Jason; Tristem, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The evolutionary arms race between mammals and retroviruses has long been recognized as one of the oldest host–parasite interactions. Rapid evolution rates in exogenous retroviruses have often made accurate viral age estimations highly problematic. Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs), however, integrate into the germline of their hosts, and are subjected to their evolutionary rates. This study describes, for the first time, a retroviral orthologue predating the divergence of placental mammals, giving it a minimum age of 104–110 Myr. Simultaneously, other orthologous selfish genetic elements (SGEs), inserted into the ERV sequence, provide evidence for the oldest individual mammalian-wide interspersed repeat and medium-reiteration frequency interspersed repeat mammalian repeats, with the same minimum age. The combined use of shared SGEs and reconstruction of viral orthologies defines new limits and increases maximum ‘lookback’ times, with subsequent implications for the field of paleovirology. PMID:23938752

  14. Endogenous Retroviruses in Fish Genomes: From Relics of Past Infections to Evolutionary Innovations?

    PubMed

    Naville, Magali; Volff, Jean-Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    The increasing availability of fish genome sequences has allowed to gain new insights into the diversity and host distribution of retroviruses in fish and other vertebrates. This distribution can be assessed through the identification and analysis of endogenous retroviruses, which are proviral remnants of past infections integrated in genomes. Retroviral sequences are probably important for evolution through their ability to induce rearrangements and to contribute regulatory and coding sequences; they may also protect their host against new infections. We argue that the current mass of genome sequences will soon strongly improve our understanding of retrovirus diversity and evolution in aquatic animals, with the identification of new/re-emerging elements and host resistance genes that restrict their infectivity.

  15. Endogenous Retroviruses in Fish Genomes: From Relics of Past Infections to Evolutionary Innovations?

    PubMed Central

    Naville, Magali; Volff, Jean-Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    The increasing availability of fish genome sequences has allowed to gain new insights into the diversity and host distribution of retroviruses in fish and other vertebrates. This distribution can be assessed through the identification and analysis of endogenous retroviruses, which are proviral remnants of past infections integrated in genomes. Retroviral sequences are probably important for evolution through their ability to induce rearrangements and to contribute regulatory and coding sequences; they may also protect their host against new infections. We argue that the current mass of genome sequences will soon strongly improve our understanding of retrovirus diversity and evolution in aquatic animals, with the identification of new/re-emerging elements and host resistance genes that restrict their infectivity. PMID:27555838

  16. Effects of chronic methamphetamine exposure on heart function in uninfected and retrovirus-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qianli; Montes, Sergio; Larson, Douglas F; Watson, Ronald R

    2002-07-12

    Methamphetamine (MA) increases catecholamine levels, which have detrimental effects on heart function through vasoconstriction, myocardial hypertrophy, and fibrosis. Murine retrovirus infection induces dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The present study investigated the cardiovascular effects of chronic MA treatment on uninfected and retrovirus-infected mice. C57BL/6 mice were studied after 12 weeks treatment. The four study groups were (group I) uninfected, MA placebo; (group II) infected, MA placebo; (group III) uninfected, MA treatment; and (group IV) infected and MA treatment. MA injections were given i.p. once a day for 5 days/week with a increasing dose from 15 mg/kg to 40 mg/kg. Left ventricular mechanics were measured in situ a using Millar conductance catheter system for pressure-volume loop analysis. Cardiac pathology was determined with histological analysis. In the uninfected mice, the load independent contractile parameters, pre-load recruitable stroke work (PRSW) and dP/dt(max) vs. Ved, significantly decreased by 32% and 35% in MA treated mice when compared to the saline injected mice. In retrovirus-infected mice, although there were no significant difference in Ees, PRSW, and dP/dt(max) vs. Ved due to MA treatment, they were increased 45%, 15% and 42% respectively when compared to saline treated mice. No further lowered heart function during murine AIDS may be due to the counteraction of the retroviral DCM and the MA induced myocardial fibrosis and hypertrophy (thickening of the ventricular walls). This is supported by increases in the End-diastolic volume (Ved, 38%) and End-systolic volume (Ves, 84%) in the retrovirus-infected saline injected mice, the decreases of 33% and 17% in the uninfected MA-treated mice, but no significant changes in the retrovirus-infected MA treated mice when compared to uninfected saline injected mice. These data suggest that MA induced myocardial cellular changes compensate for retrovirus induced DCM. PMID:12084392

  17. Cross-Species Transmission and Differential Fate of an Endogenous Retrovirus in Three Mammal Lineages.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Xiaoyu; Feschotte, Cédric

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) arise from retroviruses chromosomally integrated in the host germline. ERVs are common in vertebrate genomes and provide a valuable fossil record of past retroviral infections to investigate the biology and evolution of retroviruses over a deep time scale, including cross-species transmission events. Here we took advantage of a catalog of ERVs we recently produced for the bat Myotis lucifugus to seek evidence for infiltration of these retroviruses in other mammalian species (>100) currently represented in the genome sequence database. We provide multiple lines of evidence for the cross-ordinal transmission of a gammaretrovirus endogenized independently in the lineages of vespertilionid bats, felid cats and pangolin ~13-25 million years ago. Following its initial introduction, the ERV amplified extensively in parallel in both bat and cat lineages, generating hundreds of species-specific insertions throughout evolution. However, despite being derived from the same viral species, phylogenetic and selection analyses suggest that the ERV experienced different amplification dynamics in the two mammalian lineages. In the cat lineage, the ERV appears to have expanded primarily by retrotransposition of a single proviral progenitor that lost infectious capacity shortly after endogenization. In the bat lineage, the ERV followed a more complex path of germline invasion characterized by both retrotransposition and multiple infection events. The results also suggest that some of the bat ERVs have maintained infectious capacity for extended period of time and may be still infectious today. This study provides one of the most rigorously documented cases of cross-ordinal transmission of a mammalian retrovirus. It also illustrates how the same retrovirus species has transitioned multiple times from an infectious pathogen to a genomic parasite (i.e. retrotransposon), yet experiencing different invasion dynamics in different mammalian hosts. PMID

  18. Cross-Species Transmission and Differential Fate of an Endogenous Retrovirus in Three Mammal Lineages.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Xiaoyu; Feschotte, Cédric

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) arise from retroviruses chromosomally integrated in the host germline. ERVs are common in vertebrate genomes and provide a valuable fossil record of past retroviral infections to investigate the biology and evolution of retroviruses over a deep time scale, including cross-species transmission events. Here we took advantage of a catalog of ERVs we recently produced for the bat Myotis lucifugus to seek evidence for infiltration of these retroviruses in other mammalian species (>100) currently represented in the genome sequence database. We provide multiple lines of evidence for the cross-ordinal transmission of a gammaretrovirus endogenized independently in the lineages of vespertilionid bats, felid cats and pangolin ~13-25 million years ago. Following its initial introduction, the ERV amplified extensively in parallel in both bat and cat lineages, generating hundreds of species-specific insertions throughout evolution. However, despite being derived from the same viral species, phylogenetic and selection analyses suggest that the ERV experienced different amplification dynamics in the two mammalian lineages. In the cat lineage, the ERV appears to have expanded primarily by retrotransposition of a single proviral progenitor that lost infectious capacity shortly after endogenization. In the bat lineage, the ERV followed a more complex path of germline invasion characterized by both retrotransposition and multiple infection events. The results also suggest that some of the bat ERVs have maintained infectious capacity for extended period of time and may be still infectious today. This study provides one of the most rigorously documented cases of cross-ordinal transmission of a mammalian retrovirus. It also illustrates how the same retrovirus species has transitioned multiple times from an infectious pathogen to a genomic parasite (i.e. retrotransposon), yet experiencing different invasion dynamics in different mammalian hosts.

  19. Cross-Species Transmission and Differential Fate of an Endogenous Retrovirus in Three Mammal Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Xiaoyu; Feschotte, Cédric

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) arise from retroviruses chromosomally integrated in the host germline. ERVs are common in vertebrate genomes and provide a valuable fossil record of past retroviral infections to investigate the biology and evolution of retroviruses over a deep time scale, including cross-species transmission events. Here we took advantage of a catalog of ERVs we recently produced for the bat Myotis lucifugus to seek evidence for infiltration of these retroviruses in other mammalian species (>100) currently represented in the genome sequence database. We provide multiple lines of evidence for the cross-ordinal transmission of a gammaretrovirus endogenized independently in the lineages of vespertilionid bats, felid cats and pangolin ~13–25 million years ago. Following its initial introduction, the ERV amplified extensively in parallel in both bat and cat lineages, generating hundreds of species-specific insertions throughout evolution. However, despite being derived from the same viral species, phylogenetic and selection analyses suggest that the ERV experienced different amplification dynamics in the two mammalian lineages. In the cat lineage, the ERV appears to have expanded primarily by retrotransposition of a single proviral progenitor that lost infectious capacity shortly after endogenization. In the bat lineage, the ERV followed a more complex path of germline invasion characterized by both retrotransposition and multiple infection events. The results also suggest that some of the bat ERVs have maintained infectious capacity for extended period of time and may be still infectious today. This study provides one of the most rigorously documented cases of cross-ordinal transmission of a mammalian retrovirus. It also illustrates how the same retrovirus species has transitioned multiple times from an infectious pathogen to a genomic parasite (i.e. retrotransposon), yet experiencing different invasion dynamics in different mammalian hosts. PMID

  20. Isolation of a retrovirus and a herpesvirus from a captive California sea lion.

    PubMed

    Kennedy-Stoskopf, S; Stoskopf, M K; Eckhaus, M A; Strandberg, J D

    1986-04-01

    A non-oncogenic retrovirus was isolated from an explanted skin biopsy from a captive California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) with a history of recurring skin lesions. The morphology of the viral particles in electron photomicrographs was characteristic of a foamy virus, a retrovirus in the subfamily Spumavirinae. Viral cytopathic effects consistent with foamy virus infection were observed in subsequent explants of skin and lymph nodes and co-cultivated peripheral blood leukocytes. The sea lion with the persistent foamy virus infection later died from pericarditis caused by Pasteurella multocida. A herpesvirus was isolated from explants of lung. PMID:3012127

  1. Effect of pentosan polysulfate (SP 54) on the reverse transcriptase activity of several retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Sydow, G; Klöcking, H P

    1987-01-01

    Pentosan polysulfate (SP 54), a low molecular weight sulfated polysaccharide, was studied in vitro for its effect on the reverse transcriptase activity of seven retroviruses. Six of them possess an enzyme with high sensitivity against SP 54, while the enzyme of one virus (bovine leucosis virus) proved to be insensitive within the concentration range tested. In comparison with other polyanionic compounds so far tested, SP 54 seems to be one of the most active in vitro inhibitors of retrovirus-specific reverse transcriptase. PMID:2445339

  2. The Long Terminal Repeat of Jaagsiekte Sheep Retrovirus Is Preferentially Active in Differentiated Epithelial Cells of the Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Palmarini, Massimo; Datta, Shoibal; Omid, Reza; Murgia, Claudio; Fan, Hung

    2000-01-01

    Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV) is the etiologic agent of a contagious bronchioloalveolar carcinoma of sheep known as sheep pulmonary adenomatosis (SPA; ovine pulmonary carcinoma). JSRV is unique among retroviruses because it transforms the alveolar type II cells and the nonciliated bronchiolar cells (Clara cells) of the lungs; these cells are where JSRV is specifically expressed in both naturally and experimentally SPA-affected sheep. In this study, we investigated the cell specificity of JSRV expression. By transient-transfection assays of 23 different cell lines with a reporter plasmid driven by the JSRV long terminal repeat (LTR), pJS21-luc, we found that the JSRV LTR is preferentially active in cell lines derived from type II pneumocytes and Clara cells (MLE-15 and mtCC1-2 mouse cell lines). Reporter assays using progressive 5′ deletions of pJS21-luc allowed us to establish that the JSRV enhancers are able to activate the JSRV proximal promoter in MLE-15 and mtCC1-2 cells, but they have very low activity in mouse cells of other lineages (e.g., NIH 3T3). The JSRV enhancers are able to activate heterologous promoters in both MLE-15 and 3T3 cells, although optimal activity is achieved in MLE-15 cells only with the homologous JSRV promoter. Thus, JSRV cell-specific LTR activity appears to result from an interaction between the enhancer elements and the JSRV proximal promoter elements. By mutation analysis, we established that an upstream NF-κB-like element appears to be responsible for approximately 50% of the JSRV LTR transcriptional activity in MLE-15 cells. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed evidence of a factor(s) that binds to this sequence. Antibody supershift experiments indicated that the factor(s) is not related to NF-κB component p50 or p52. This factor also appeared to be present in cells that do not support a high level of JSRV expression. Finally the JSRV21 LTR contains putative enhancer binding motifs for transcription factors such

  3. Identification of Active Loci of a Human Endogenous Retrovirus in Neurons of Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Douville, Renée; Liu, Jiankai; Rothstein, Jeffrey; Nath, Avindra

    2010-01-01

    Background Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by the progressive loss of motor neurons, of unknown etiology. Previous studies showed reverse transcriptase in serum of ALS patients at levels comparable to HIV-infected patients; however, the source and significance of the retroviral elements is uncertain. Methods Expression of a human endogenous retrovirus (HERV-K), was determined in autopsy brain tissue of patients with ALS and compared to control populations, by real time polymerase chain reaction followed by sequencing of the amplified genes and confirmed by immunostaining. Results HERV-K pol transcripts were increased in patients with ALS compared to those with chronic systemic illness, but could not be detected in Parkinson’s disease or in the accidental death controls. Sequencing revealed several actively transcribed loci in the HML-2 and 3 subfamilies of HERV-K, with a specific pattern of expression including intact open reading frames and the transcription of a unique locus in ALS. The frequency of intact pol transcripts was highest in the motor cortex and the reverse transcriptase protein was localized to cortical neurons of ALS patients. HERV-K expression strongly correlated with TDP-43, a multi-functional protein known to be dysregulated in ALS. Interpretation We have identified a specific pattern of HERV-K expression in ALS, which may potentially define the pathophysiology of ALS. Targeting of activated genome-encoded retroviral elements may open new prospects for the treatment of ALS. PMID:21280084

  4. A Novel Function of RNAs Arising From the Long Terminal Repeat of Human Endogenous Retrovirus 9 in Cell Cycle Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lai; Elkahloun, Abdel G.; Candotti, Fabio; Grajkowski, Andrzej; Beaucage, Serge L.; Petricoin, Emanuel F.; Calvert, Valerie; Juhl, Hartmut; Mills, Frederick; Mason, Karen; Shastri, Neal; Chik, Josh; Xu, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    The human genome contains approximately 50 copies of the replication-defective human endogenous retrovirus 9 (ERV-9) and thousands of copies of its solitary long term repeat (sLTR) element. While some sLTRs are located upstream of critical genes and have enhancer activity, other sLTRs are located within introns and may be transcribed as RNAs. We found that intronic RNAs arising from U3 sLTRs of ERV-9 were expressed as both sense (S) and antisense (AS) transcripts in all human cells tested but that expression levels differed in malignant versus nonmalignant cells. In nonmalignant cells, AS was expressed at higher levels than S and at higher levels than in malignant cells; in malignant cells, AS was expressed at amounts equivalent to those of S RNA. Critically, U3 AS RNA was found to physically bind to key transcription factors for cellular proliferation, including NF-Y, p53, and sp1, indicating that such RNA transcripts may function as decoy targets or traps for NF-Y and thus inhibit the growth of human cancer cells. Indeed, short U3 oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) based on these RNA sequences ably inhibited proliferation of cancer cell lines driven by cyclins B1/B2, the gene targets of NF-Y. PMID:23097441

  5. Modulation of cGMP by human HO-1 retrovirus gene transfer in pulmonary microvessel endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Nader G; Quan, Shuo; Mieyal, Paul A; Yang, Liming; Burke-Wolin, Theresa; Mingone, Christopher J; Goodman, Alvin I; Nasjletti, Alberto; Wolin, Michael S

    2002-11-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) stimulates guanylate cyclase (GC) and increases guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) levels. We transfected rat-lung pulmonary endothelial cells with a retrovirus-mediated human heme oxygenase (hHO)-1 gene. Pulmonary cells that expressed hHO-1 exhibited a fourfold increase in HO activity associated with decreases in the steady-state levels of heme and cGMP without changes in soluble GC (sGC) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS) proteins or basal nitrite production. Heme elicited significant increases in CO production and intracellular cGMP levels in both pulmonary endothelial and pulmonary hHO-1-expressing cells. N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), an inhibitor of NOS, significantly decreased cGMP levels in heme-treated pulmonary endothelial cells but not heme-treated hHO-1-expressing cells. In the presence of exogenous heme, CO and cGMP levels in hHO-1-expressing cells exceeded the corresponding levels in pulmonary endothelial cells. Acute exposure of endothelial cells to SnCl2, which is an inducer of HO-1, increased cGMP levels, whereas chronic exposure decreased heme and cGMP levels. These results indicate that prolonged overexpression of HO-1 ultimately decreases sGC activity by limiting the availability of cellular heme. Heme activates sGC and enhances cGMP levels via a mechanism that is largely insensitive to NOS inhibition.

  6. Ancestral Mutations Acquired in Refrex-1, a Restriction Factor against Feline Retroviruses, during its Cooption and Domestication

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Jumpei; Baba, Takuya; Kawasaki, Junna

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are remnants of ancestral retroviral infections of germ cells. Retroviral endogenization is an adaptation process for the host genome, and ERVs are gradually attenuated or inactivated by mutation. However, some ERVs that have been “domesticated” by their hosts eventually gain physiological functions, such as placentation or viral resistance. We previously reported the discovery of Refrex-1, a soluble antiretroviral factor in domestic cats that specifically inhibits infection by feline leukemia virus subgroup D (FeLV-D), a chimeric virus of FeLV, and a feline ERV, ERV-DC. Refrex-1 is a truncated envelope protein (Env) encoded by both ERV-DC7 and ERV-DC16 proviral loci. Here, we reconstituted ancestral and functional Env from ERV-DC7 and ERV-DC16 envelope genes (env) by inducing reverse mutations. Unexpectedly, ERV-DC7 and ERV-DC16 full-length Env (ERV-DC7 fl and ERV-DC16 fl), reconstructed by removing stop codons, did not produce infectious viral particles. ERV-DC7 fl and ERV-DC16 fl were highly expressed in cells but were not cleaved into surface subunits (SU) and transmembrane subunits, nor were they incorporated into virions. G407R/N427I-A429T and Y431D substitutions within the SU C-terminal domain of ERV-DC7 fl and ERV-DC16 fl, respectively, caused these dysfunctions. The residues glycine 407 and tyrosine 431 are relatively conserved among infectious gammaretroviruses, and their substitution causes the same dysfunctions as the tested retroviruses. Our results reveal that specific mutations within the SU C-terminal domain suppressed Env cleavage and incorporation into virions and indicate that these mutations contributed to the domestication of Refrex-1 through multistep events that occurred in the postintegration period. IMPORTANCE Domestic cats are colonized with various exogenous retroviruses (exRVs), such as feline leukemia virus (FeLV), and their genomes contain numerous ERVs, some of which are replication

  7. Endogenous Retrovirus Insertion in the KIT Oncogene Determines White and White spotting in Domestic Cats

    PubMed Central

    David, Victor A.; Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn; Wallace, Andrea Coots; Roelke, Melody; Kehler, James; Leighty, Robert; Eizirik, Eduardo; Hannah, Steven S.; Nelson, George; Schäffer, Alejandro A.; Connelly, Catherine J.; O’Brien, Stephen J.; Ryugo, David K.

    2014-01-01

    The Dominant White locus (W) in the domestic cat demonstrates pleiotropic effects exhibiting complete penetrance for absence of coat pigmentation and incomplete penetrance for deafness and iris hypopigmentation. We performed linkage analysis using a pedigree segregating White to identify KIT (Chr. B1) as the feline W locus. Segregation and sequence analysis of the KIT gene in two pedigrees (P1 and P2) revealed the remarkable retrotransposition and evolution of a feline endogenous retrovirus (FERV1) as responsible for two distinct phenotypes of the W locus, Dominant White, and white spotting. A full-length (7125 bp) FERV1 element is associated with white spotting, whereas a FERV1 long terminal repeat (LTR) is associated with all Dominant White individuals. For purposes of statistical analysis, the alternatives of wild-type sequence, FERV1 element, and LTR-only define a triallelic marker. Taking into account pedigree relationships, deafness is genetically linked and associated with this marker; estimated P values for association are in the range of 0.007 to 0.10. The retrotransposition interrupts a DNAase I hypersensitive site in KIT intron 1 that is highly conserved across mammals and was previously demonstrated to regulate temporal and tissue-specific expression of KIT in murine hematopoietic and melanocytic cells. A large-population genetic survey of cats (n = 270), representing 30 cat breeds, supports our findings and demonstrates statistical significance of the FERV1 LTR and full-length element with Dominant White/blue iris (P < 0.0001) and white spotting (P < 0.0001), respectively. PMID:25085922

  8. Endogenous retrovirus insertion in the KIT oncogene determines white and white spotting in domestic cats.

    PubMed

    David, Victor A; Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn; Wallace, Andrea Coots; Roelke, Melody; Kehler, James; Leighty, Robert; Eizirik, Eduardo; Hannah, Steven S; Nelson, George; Schäffer, Alejandro A; Connelly, Catherine J; O'Brien, Stephen J; Ryugo, David K

    2014-10-01

    The Dominant White locus (W) in the domestic cat demonstrates pleiotropic effects exhibiting complete penetrance for absence of coat pigmentation and incomplete penetrance for deafness and iris hypopigmentation. We performed linkage analysis using a pedigree segregating White to identify KIT (Chr. B1) as the feline W locus. Segregation and sequence analysis of the KIT gene in two pedigrees (P1 and P2) revealed the remarkable retrotransposition and evolution of a feline endogenous retrovirus (FERV1) as responsible for two distinct phenotypes of the W locus, Dominant White, and white spotting. A full-length (7125 bp) FERV1 element is associated with white spotting, whereas a FERV1 long terminal repeat (LTR) is associated with all Dominant White individuals. For purposes of statistical analysis, the alternatives of wild-type sequence, FERV1 element, and LTR-only define a triallelic marker. Taking into account pedigree relationships, deafness is genetically linked and associated with this marker; estimated P values for association are in the range of 0.007 to 0.10. The retrotransposition interrupts a DNAase I hypersensitive site in KIT intron 1 that is highly conserved across mammals and was previously demonstrated to regulate temporal and tissue-specific expression of KIT in murine hematopoietic and melanocytic cells. A large-population genetic survey of cats (n = 270), representing 30 cat breeds, supports our findings and demonstrates statistical significance of the FERV1 LTR and full-length element with Dominant White/blue iris (P < 0.0001) and white spotting (P < 0.0001), respectively. PMID:25085922

  9. HIV infection reveals widespread expansion of novel centromeric human endogenous retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Galindo, Rafael; Kaplan, Mark H; He, Shirley; Contreras-Galindo, Angie C; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Marta J; Kappes, Ferdinand; Dube, Derek; Chan, Susana M; Robinson, Dan; Meng, Fan; Dai, Manhong; Gitlin, Scott D; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Omenn, Gilbert S; Markovitz, David M

    2013-09-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) make up 8% of the human genome. The HERV-K (HML-2) family is the most recent group of these viruses to have inserted into the genome, and we have detected the activation of HERV-K (HML-2) proviruses in the blood of patients with HIV-1 infection. We report that HIV-1 infection activates expression of a novel HERV-K (HML-2) provirus, termed K111, present in multiple copies in the centromeres of chromosomes throughout the human genome yet not annotated in the most recent human genome assembly. Infection with HIV-1 or stimulation with the HIV-1 Tat protein leads to the activation of K111 proviruses. K111 is present as a single copy in the genome of the chimpanzee, yet K111 is not found in the genomes of other primates. Remarkably, K111 proviruses appear in the genomes of the extinct Neanderthal and Denisovan, while modern humans have at least 100 K111 proviruses spread across the centromeres of 15 chromosomes. Our studies suggest that the progenitor K111 integrated before the Homo-Pan divergence and expanded in copy number during the evolution of hominins, perhaps by recombination. The expansion of K111 provides sequence evidence suggesting that recombination between the centromeres of various chromosomes took place during the evolution of humans. K111 proviruses show significant sequence variations in each individual centromere, which may serve as markers in future efforts to annotate human centromere sequences. Further, this work is an example of the potential to discover previously unknown genomic sequences through the analysis of nucleic acids found in the blood of patients.

  10. Endogenous retrovirus insertion in the KIT oncogene determines white and white spotting in domestic cats.

    PubMed

    David, Victor A; Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn; Wallace, Andrea Coots; Roelke, Melody; Kehler, James; Leighty, Robert; Eizirik, Eduardo; Hannah, Steven S; Nelson, George; Schäffer, Alejandro A; Connelly, Catherine J; O'Brien, Stephen J; Ryugo, David K

    2014-08-01

    The Dominant White locus (W) in the domestic cat demonstrates pleiotropic effects exhibiting complete penetrance for absence of coat pigmentation and incomplete penetrance for deafness and iris hypopigmentation. We performed linkage analysis using a pedigree segregating White to identify KIT (Chr. B1) as the feline W locus. Segregation and sequence analysis of the KIT gene in two pedigrees (P1 and P2) revealed the remarkable retrotransposition and evolution of a feline endogenous retrovirus (FERV1) as responsible for two distinct phenotypes of the W locus, Dominant White, and white spotting. A full-length (7125 bp) FERV1 element is associated with white spotting, whereas a FERV1 long terminal repeat (LTR) is associated with all Dominant White individuals. For purposes of statistical analysis, the alternatives of wild-type sequence, FERV1 element, and LTR-only define a triallelic marker. Taking into account pedigree relationships, deafness is genetically linked and associated with this marker; estimated P values for association are in the range of 0.007 to 0.10. The retrotransposition interrupts a DNAase I hypersensitive site in KIT intron 1 that is highly conserved across mammals and was previously demonstrated to regulate temporal and tissue-specific expression of KIT in murine hematopoietic and melanocytic cells. A large-population genetic survey of cats (n = 270), representing 30 cat breeds, supports our findings and demonstrates statistical significance of the FERV1 LTR and full-length element with Dominant White/blue iris (P < 0.0001) and white spotting (P < 0.0001), respectively.

  11. Highly efficient in vitro and in vivo delivery of functional RNAs using new versatile MS2-chimeric retrovirus-like particles

    PubMed Central

    Prel, Anne; Caval, Vincent; Gayon, Régis; Ravassard, Philippe; Duthoit, Christine; Payen, Emmanuel; Maouche-Chretien, Leila; Creneguy, Alison; Nguyen, Tuan Huy; Martin, Nicolas; Piver, Eric; Sevrain, Raphaël; Lamouroux, Lucille; Leboulch, Philippe; Deschaseaux, Frédéric; Bouillé, Pascale; Sensébé, Luc; Pagès, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    RNA delivery is an attractive strategy to achieve transient gene expression in research projects and in cell- or gene-based therapies. Despite significant efforts investigating vector-directed RNA transfer, there is still a requirement for better efficiency of delivery to primary cells and in vivo. Retroviral platforms drive RNA delivery, yet retrovirus RNA-packaging constraints limit gene transfer to two genome-molecules per viral particle. To improve retroviral transfer, we designed a dimerization-independent MS2-driven RNA packaging system using MS2-Coat-retrovirus chimeras. The engineered chimeric particles promoted effective packaging of several types of RNAs and enabled efficient transfer of biologically active RNAs in various cell types, including human CD34+ and iPS cells. Systemic injection of high-titer particles led to gene expression in mouse liver and transferring Cre-recombinase mRNA in muscle permitted widespread editing at the ROSA26 locus. We could further show that the VLPs were able to activate an osteoblast differentiation pathway by delivering RUNX2- or DLX5-mRNA into primary human bone-marrow mesenchymal-stem cells. Thus, the novel chimeric MS2-lentiviral particles are a versatile tool for a wide range of applications including cellular-programming or genome-editing. PMID:26528487

  12. Proviral-activated c-erbB is leukemogenic but not sarcomagenic: characterization of a replication-competent retrovirus containing the activated c-erbB.

    PubMed Central

    Pelley, R J; Moscovici, C; Hughes, S; Kung, H J

    1988-01-01

    Avian leukosis virus (ALV) induces erythroblastosis in chickens by integrating its DNA into the host c-erbB locus and by activating expression of truncated c-erbB transcripts. Although there is a 100% correlation of c-erbB activation with ALV-induced erythroblastosis, direct evidence that the activated c-erbB is oncogenic has not been established. We have constructed a replication-competent retrovirus containing the activated c-erbB to investigate its transforming potential. The Rous c-erbB virus (REB-c) was constructed by inserting the activated c-erbB cDNA into a Rous sarcoma virus vector in place of src. When transfected into transformed quail fibroblasts (QT6), the REB-c construct stably integrates and expresses c-erbB-specific transcripts and produces infectious virus. The REB-c retrovirus produces short-latency polyclonal erythroblastosis in chickens. However, in contrast to avian erythroblastosis virus which contains v-erbB, the REB-c construct does not transform chicken embryo fibroblasts in vitro, nor does the REB-c virus produce sarcomas when injected into the wing web of chickens. Our results provide the first direct evidence that the activated c-erbB which lacks the amino-terminal extracellular domain but which retains the entire carboxy-terminal sequences is leukemogenic but not sarcomagenic. Images PMID:2833627

  13. Discovery of a Novel Retrovirus Sequence in an Australian Native Rodent (Melomys burtoni): A Putative Link between Gibbon Ape Leukemia Virus and Koala Retrovirus

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Greg; Clarke, Daniel; McKee, Jeff; Young, Paul; Meers, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Gibbon ape leukaemia virus (GALV) and koala retrovirus (KoRV) share a remarkably close sequence identity despite the fact that they occur in distantly related mammals on different continents. It has previously been suggested that infection of their respective hosts may have occurred as a result of a species jump from another, as yet unidentified vertebrate host. To investigate possible sources of these retroviruses in the Australian context, DNA samples were obtained from 42 vertebrate species and screened using PCR in order to detect proviral sequences closely related to KoRV and GALV. Four proviral partial sequences totalling 2880 bases which share a strong similarity with KoRV and GALV were detected in DNA from a native Australian rodent, the grassland melomys, Melomys burtoni. We have designated this novel gammaretrovirus Melomys burtoni retrovirus (MbRV). The concatenated nucleotide sequence of MbRV shares 93% identity with the corresponding sequence from GALV-SEATO and 83% identity with KoRV. The geographic ranges of the grassland melomys and of the koala partially overlap. Thus a species jump by MbRV from melomys to koalas is conceivable. However the genus Melomys does not occur in mainland South East Asia and so it appears most likely that another as yet unidentified host was the source of GALV. PMID:25251014

  14. Discovery of a novel retrovirus sequence in an Australian native rodent (Melomys burtoni): a putative link between gibbon ape leukemia virus and koala retrovirus.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Greg; Clarke, Daniel; McKee, Jeff; Young, Paul; Meers, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Gibbon ape leukaemia virus (GALV) and koala retrovirus (KoRV) share a remarkably close sequence identity despite the fact that they occur in distantly related mammals on different continents. It has previously been suggested that infection of their respective hosts may have occurred as a result of a species jump from another, as yet unidentified vertebrate host. To investigate possible sources of these retroviruses in the Australian context, DNA samples were obtained from 42 vertebrate species and screened using PCR in order to detect proviral sequences closely related to KoRV and GALV. Four proviral partial sequences totalling 2880 bases which share a strong similarity with KoRV and GALV were detected in DNA from a native Australian rodent, the grassland melomys, Melomys burtoni. We have designated this novel gammaretrovirus Melomys burtoni retrovirus (MbRV). The concatenated nucleotide sequence of MbRV shares 93% identity with the corresponding sequence from GALV-SEATO and 83% identity with KoRV. The geographic ranges of the grassland melomys and of the koala partially overlap. Thus a species jump by MbRV from melomys to koalas is conceivable. However the genus Melomys does not occur in mainland South East Asia and so it appears most likely that another as yet unidentified host was the source of GALV. PMID:25251014

  15. Discovery of a novel retrovirus sequence in an Australian native rodent (Melomys burtoni): a putative link between gibbon ape leukemia virus and koala retrovirus.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Greg; Clarke, Daniel; McKee, Jeff; Young, Paul; Meers, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Gibbon ape leukaemia virus (GALV) and koala retrovirus (KoRV) share a remarkably close sequence identity despite the fact that they occur in distantly related mammals on different continents. It has previously been suggested that infection of their respective hosts may have occurred as a result of a species jump from another, as yet unidentified vertebrate host. To investigate possible sources of these retroviruses in the Australian context, DNA samples were obtained from 42 vertebrate species and screened using PCR in order to detect proviral sequences closely related to KoRV and GALV. Four proviral partial sequences totalling 2880 bases which share a strong similarity with KoRV and GALV were detected in DNA from a native Australian rodent, the grassland melomys, Melomys burtoni. We have designated this novel gammaretrovirus Melomys burtoni retrovirus (MbRV). The concatenated nucleotide sequence of MbRV shares 93% identity with the corresponding sequence from GALV-SEATO and 83% identity with KoRV. The geographic ranges of the grassland melomys and of the koala partially overlap. Thus a species jump by MbRV from melomys to koalas is conceivable. However the genus Melomys does not occur in mainland South East Asia and so it appears most likely that another as yet unidentified host was the source of GALV.

  16. Human endogenous retrovirus rec interferes with germ cell development in mice and may cause carcinoma in situ, the predecessor lesion of germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Galli, Uwe M; Sauter, Marlies; Lecher, Bernd; Maurer, Simone; Herbst, Hermann; Roemer, Klaus; Mueller-Lantzsch, Nikolaus

    2005-04-28

    Germ cell tumors (GCTs) are among the most common malignancies in young men. We have previously documented that patients with GCT frequently produce serum antibodies directed against proteins encoded by human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) type K sequences. Transcripts originating from the env gene of HERV-K, including the rec-relative of human immunodeficiency virus rev, are highly expressed in GCTs. We report here that mice that inducibly express HERV-K rec show a disturbed germ cell development and may exhibit, by 19 months of age, changes reminiscent of carcinoma in situ, the predecessor lesion of classic seminoma in humans. This provides the first direct evidence that the expression of a human endogenous retroviral gene previously established as a marker in human germ cell tumors may contribute to organ-specific tumorigenesis in a transgenic mouse model.

  17. Shell disorder, immune evasion and transmission behaviors among human and animal retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Goh, Gerard Kian-Meng; Dunker, A Keith; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2015-08-01

    This study involves measurements of percentages of intrinsic disorder (PIDs) in the GAG protein shells of various retroviruses. Unique patterns of shell protein disorder can be seen especially when GAG proteins (matrix M, capsid C, and nucleocapsid N) of primate and non-primate retroviruses are compared. HIV-1 presents the most unique pattern of disorder distribution with generally high levels of disorder in all three proteins, while EIAV (PIDs:: 26, 29, 13) is diametrically different from HIV-1 (N C M PIDs: 39.5 ± 3.0, 44.5 ± 2.6, 56.5 ± 10.8). The HTLV viruses (CPID: 32.8 ± 3.4) resemble HIV-2 (C PID: 26.6 ± 2.9) with a moderately disordered capsid. Totally distinct patterns, however, are seen for the non-primate retroviruses. They generally have highly disordered nucleocapsids (PID > 65%) and more ordered outer shells especially the matrix. These characteristics might be attributed to the differences in the way the retroviruses are transmitted, with non-primate viruses having greater non-sexual transmission components such as oral-fecal transmission. These differences are also evolutionarily related to the ways the viruses evade the host immune systems, and thus, have implications for oncolytic virotherapy and animal models in vaccine research. The importance of protein shell disorder in immune evasion, as related to the case of HIV-1, and the difficult search for its vaccines are highlighted.

  18. Host Control of Insect Endogenous Retroviruses: Small RNA Silencing and Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Fablet, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses are relics of ancient infections from retroviruses that managed to integrate into the genome of germline cells and remained vertically transmitted from parent to progeny. Subsequent to the endogenization process, these sequences can move and multiply in the host genome, which can have deleterious consequences and disturb genomic stability. Natural selection favored the establishment of silencing pathways that protect host genomes from the activity of endogenous retroviruses. RNA silencing mechanisms are involved, which utilize piRNAs. The response to exogenous viral infections uses siRNAs, a class of small RNAs that are generated via a distinct biogenesis pathway from piRNAs. However, interplay between both pathways has been identified, and interactions with anti-bacterial and anti-fungal immune responses are also suspected. This review focuses on Diptera (Arthropods) and intends to compile pieces of evidence showing that the RNA silencing pathway of endogenous retrovirus regulation is not independent from immunity and the response to infections. This review will consider the mechanisms that allow the lasting coexistence of viral sequences and host genomes from an evolutionary perspective. PMID:25412365

  19. [Ultrastructural analysis of the action of centrophenoxine on retrovirus-transformed cells].

    PubMed

    Popov, V I; Mantsygin, Iu A; Tatariunas, A B; Allakhverdov, B L

    1989-06-01

    The ultrastructure of hybridoma cells cultured with 5.10(-4) centrophenoxine (CP) has been studied. It is shown that CP effects hybridomas and prevents retrovirus exocytosis. The effect of CP on Ca-calmodulin system associated with cytoskeleton is suggested.

  20. Exploring the effects of immunity and life history on the dynamics of an endogenous retrovirus.

    PubMed

    Kanda, R K; Tristem, M; Coulson, T

    2013-09-19

    Mammalian DNA is littered with the signatures of past retroviral infections. For example, at least 8% of the human genome can be attributed to endogenous retroviruses (ERVs). We take a single-locus approach to develop a simple susceptible-infected-recovered model to investigate the circumstances under which a disease-causing retrovirus can become incorporated into the host genome and spread through the host population if it were to confer an immunological advantage. In the absence of any fitness benefit provided by the long terminal repeat (LTR), we conclude that signatures of ERVs are likely to go to fixation within a population when the probability of evolving cellular/humoral immunity to a related exogenous version of the virus is extremely small. We extend this model to examine whether changing the speed of the host life history influences the likelihood that an exogenous retrovirus will incorporate and spread to fixation. Our results reveal the parameter space under which incorporation of exogenous retroviruses into a host genome may be beneficial to the host. In our final model, we find that the likelihood of an LTR reaching fixation in a host population is not strongly affected by host life history.

  1. Unmasking immune sensing of retroviruses: interplay between innate sensors and host effectors.

    PubMed

    van Montfoort, Nadine; Olagnier, David; Hiscott, John

    2014-12-01

    Retroviruses can selectively trigger an array of innate immune responses through various PRR. The identification and the characterization of the molecular basis of retroviral DNA sensing by the DNA sensors IFI16 and cGAS has been one of the most exciting developments in viral immunology in recent years. DNA sensing by these cytosolic sensors not only leads to the initiation of the type I interferon (IFN) antiviral response and the induction of the inflammatory response, but also triggers cell death mechanisms including pyroptosis and apoptosis in retrovirus-infected cells, thereby providing important insights into the pathophysiology of chronic retroviral infection. Host restriction factors such as SAMHD1 and Trex1 play important roles in regulating innate immune sensing, and have led to the idea that innate immune defense and host restriction actually converge at different levels to determine the outcome of retroviral infection. In this review, we discuss the sensing of retroviruses by cytosolic DNA sensors, the relevance of host factors during retroviral infection, and the interplay between host factors and the innate antiviral response in different cell types, within the context of two human pathogenic retroviruses - human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) and human T cell-leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1).

  2. The activation of human endogenous retrovirus K (HERV-K) is implicated in melanoma cell malignant transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Serafino, A. Balestrieri, E.; Pierimarchi, P.; Matteucci, C.; Moroni, G.; Oricchio, E.; Rasi, G.; Mastino, A.; Spadafora, C.; Garaci, E.; Vallebona, P. Sinibaldi

    2009-03-10

    Melanoma development is a multi-step process arising from a series of genetic and epigenetic events. Although the sequential stages involved in progression from melanocytes to malignant melanoma are clearly defined, our current understanding of the mechanisms leading to melanoma onset is still incomplete. Growing evidence show that the activation of endogenous retroviral sequences might be involved in transformation of melanocytes as well as in the increased ability of melanoma cells to escape immune surveillance. Here we show that human melanoma cells in vitro undergo a transition from adherent to a more malignant, non-adherent phenotype when exposed to stress conditions. Melanoma-derived non-adherent cells are characterized by an increased proliferative potential and a decreased expression of both HLA class I molecules and Melan-A/MART-1 antigen, similarly to highly malignant cells. These phenotypic and functional modifications are accompanied by the activation of human endogenous retrovirus K expression (HERV-K) and massive production of viral-like particles. Down-regulation of HERV-K expression by RNA interference prevents the transition from the adherent to the non-adherent growth phenotype in low serum. These results implicate HERV-K in at least some critical steps of melanoma progression.

  3. Human RNA “Rumor” Viruses: the Search for Novel Human Retroviruses in Chronic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Voisset, Cécile; Weiss, Robin A.; Griffiths, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Summary: Retroviruses are an important group of pathogens that cause a variety of diseases in humans and animals. Four human retroviruses are currently known, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1, which causes AIDS, and human T-lymphotropic virus type 1, which causes cancer and inflammatory disease. For many years, there have been sporadic reports of additional human retroviral infections, particularly in cancer and other chronic diseases. Unfortunately, many of these putative viruses remain unproven and controversial, and some retrovirologists have dismissed them as merely “human rumor viruses.” Work in this field was last reviewed in depth in 1984, and since then, the molecular techniques available for identifying and characterizing retroviruses have improved enormously in sensitivity. The advent of PCR in particular has dramatically enhanced our ability to detect novel viral sequences in human tissues. However, DNA amplification techniques have also increased the potential for false-positive detection due to contamination. In addition, the presence of many families of human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) within our DNA can obstruct attempts to identify and validate novel human retroviruses. Here, we aim to bring together the data on “novel” retroviral infections in humans by critically examining the evidence for those putative viruses that have been linked with disease and the likelihood that they represent genuine human infections. We provide a background to the field and a discussion of potential confounding factors along with some technical guidelines. In addition, some of the difficulties associated with obtaining formal proof of causation for common or ubiquitous agents such as HERVs are discussed. PMID:18322038

  4. The MDS1-EVI1 gene complex as a retrovirus integration site: impact on behavior of hematopoietic cells and implications for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Métais, Jean-Yves; Dunbar, Cynthia E

    2008-03-01

    Gene therapy trials have been performed with virus-based vectors that have the ability to integrate permanently into genomic DNA and thus allow prolonged expression of corrective genes after transduction of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Adverse events observed during the X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency gene therapy trial revealed a significant risk of genotoxicity related to retrovirus vector integration and activation of adjacent proto-oncogenes, with several cases of T-cell leukemia linked to vector activation of the LMO2 gene. In patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), rhesus macaques, and mice receiving hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells transduced with retrovirus vectors, a highly non-random pattern of vector integration has been reported. The most striking finding has been overrepresentation of integrations in one specific genomic locus, a complex containing the MDS1 and the EVI1 genes. Most evidence suggests that this overrepresentation is primarily due to a modification of primitive myeloid cell behavior by overexpression of EVI1 or MDS1-EVI1, as opposed to a specific predilection for integration at this site. Three different proteins can be produced from this complex locus: MDS1, MDS1-EVI1, and EVI1. This review will summarize current knowledge regarding this locus and its gene products, with specific focus on issues with relevance to gene therapy, leukemogenesis, and hematopoiesis. Insights into the mechanisms that result in altered hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis when this locus is dysregulated could improve the safety of gene therapy in the future.

  5. The Retroviruses Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 and Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus Adopt Radically Different Strategies To Regulate Promoter-Proximal Polyadenylation

    PubMed Central

    Furger, Andre; Monks, Joan; Proudfoot, Nick J.

    2001-01-01

    Maximal gene expression in retroviruses requires that polyadenylation in the 5′ long terminal repeat (LTR) is suppressed. In human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) the promoter-proximal poly(A) site is blocked by interaction of U1 snRNP with the closely positioned major splice donor site (MSD) 200 nucleotides downstream. Here we investigated whether the same mechanism applies to down-regulate 5′ LTR polyadenylation in Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV). Although the same molecular architecture is present in both viruses, the MoMLV poly(A) signal in the 5′ LTR is active whether or not the MSD is mutated. This surprising difference between the two retroviruses is not due to their actual poly(A) signals or MSD sequences, since exchange of either element between the two viral sequences does not alter their ability to regulate 5′ LTR poly(A) site use. Instead we demonstrate that sequence between the cap and AAUAAA is required for MSD-dependent poly(A) regulation in HIV-1, indicating a key role for this part of the LTR in poly(A) site suppression. We also show that the MoMLV poly(A) signal is an intrinsically weak RNA-processing signal. This suggests that in the absence of a poly(A) site suppression mechanism, MoMLV is forced to use a weak poly(A) signal. PMID:11689654

  6. Custom human endogenous retroviruses dedicated microarray identifies self-induced HERV-W family elements reactivated in testicular cancer upon methylation control

    PubMed Central

    Gimenez, Juliette; Montgiraud, Cécile; Pichon, Jean-Philippe; Bonnaud, Bertrand; Arsac, Maud; Ruel, Karine; Bouton, Olivier; Mallet, François

    2010-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are an inherited part of the eukaryotic genomes, and represent ∼400 000 loci in the human genome. Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) can be divided into distinct families, composed of phylogenetically related but structurally heterogeneous elements. The majority of HERVs are silent in most physiological contexts, whereas a significant expression is observed in pathological contexts, such as cancers. Owing to their repetitive nature, few of the active HERV elements have been accurately identified. In addition, there are no criteria defining the active promoters among HERV long-terminal repeats (LTRs). Hence, it is difficult to understand the HERV (de)regulation mechanisms and their implication on the physiopathology of the host. We developed a microarray to specifically detect the LTR-containing transcripts from the HERV-H, HERV-E, HERV-W and HERV-K(HML-2) families. HERV transcriptome was analyzed in the placenta and seven normal/tumoral match-pair samples. We identified six HERV-W loci overexpressed in testicular cancer, including a usually placenta-restricted transcript of ERVWE1. For each locus, specific overexpression was confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR, and comparison of the activity of U3 versus U5 regions suggested a U3-promoted transcription coupled with 5′R initiation. The analysis of DNA from tumoral versus normal tissue revealed that hypomethylation of U3 promoters in tumors is a prerequisite for their activation. PMID:20053729

  7. Transcriptional activation of lck by retrovirus promoter insertion between two lymphoid-specific promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Adler, H T; Reynolds, P J; Kelley, C M; Sefton, B M

    1988-01-01

    p56lck, a member of the src family of cytoplasmic tyrosine protein kinases, is expressed primarily in lymphoid cells. Previous RNase protection data demonstrated the existence of at least two lck mRNAs (type I and type II) with different 5' untranslated regions in most T cells. These have been found here to arise from two separate promoters. S1 nuclease analysis and primer extension were used to locate the site of initiation of type I lck mRNA. The nucleotide sequence of the region upstream of this start site contains no classical promoter motifs. A cDNA clone of type II lck mRNA was isolated. The promoter of this mRNA must be more than 10 kilobases upstream of the type I promoter region. In two murine thymoma cell lines, LSTRA and Thy19, lck is expressed at elevated levels as a result of Moloney murine leukemia virus retrovirus promoter insertion. p56lck is encoded in these cells by a hybrid virus-lck mRNA containing the 5' untranslated region of Moloney virus mRNA. The structures and the sites of integration of the proviruses upstream of lck in these cells were examined by molecular cloning and Southern analysis. A truncated and rearranged provirus, flanked by 554 nucleotides (nt) of duplicated cellular sequences, was found 962 nt upstream of the start site for type I lck mRNA in LSTRA cells. What appears to be a Moloney mink cytopathic focus-forming provirus was found between 584 to 794 nt upstream of the start site for type I lck mRNA in Thy19 cells. Thus in both tumor cell lines, viral DNA is present between the promoters for type I and type II lck mRNAs. Comparison of the sequences of the 5' ends of the lck and c-src genes suggests that divergence of these two genes involved exon shuffling and that a homolog of the neuronal c-src(+) exon is not present in lck. Images PMID:2845126

  8. A Single Amino Acid Substitution in a Segment of the CA Protein within Gag That Has Similarity to Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Blocks Infectivity of a Human Endogenous Retrovirus K Provirus in the Human Genome ▿

    PubMed Central

    Heslin, David J.; Murcia, Pablo; Arnaud, Frederick; Van Doorslaer, Koenraad; Palmarini, Massimo; Lenz, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Human endogenous retrovirus K (HERV-K) is the most intact retrovirus in the human genome. However, no single HERV-K provirus in the human genome today appears to be infectious. Since the Gag protein is the central component for the production of retrovirus particles, we investigated the abilities of Gag from two HERV-K proviruses to support production of virus-like particles and viral infectivity. HERV-K113 has full-length open reading frames for all viral proteins, while HERV-K101 has a full-length gag open reading frame and is expressed in human male germ cell tumors. The Gag of HERV-K101 allowed production of viral particles and infectivity, although at lower levels than observed with a consensus sequence Gag. Thus, including HERV-K109, at least two HERV-K proviruses in human genome today have functional Gag proteins. In contrast, HERV-K113 Gag supported only very low levels of particle production, and no infectivity was detectable due to a single amino acid substitution (I516M) near the extreme C terminus of the CA protein within Gag. The sequence of this portion of HERV-K CA showed similarities to that of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and other primate immunodeficiency viruses. The extreme C terminus of CA may be a general determinant of retrovirus particle production. In addition, precise mapping of the defects in HERV-K proviruses as was done here identifies the key polymorphisms that need to be analyzed to assess the possible existence of infectious HERV-K alleles within the human population. PMID:19004950

  9. IL-2-independent and TNFα-dependent Expansion of Vβ5+ Natural Regulatory T Cells During Retrovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Lara; Joedicke, Jara J.; Carmody, Aaron B.; Messer, Ronald J.; Kassiotis, George; Dudley, Jaquelin P.; Dittmer, Ulf; Hasenkrug, Kim J.

    2013-01-01

    Friend virus (FV) infection of mice induces the expansion and activation of regulatory T cells (Tregs) that dampen acute immune responses and promote the establishment and maintenance of chronic infection. Adoptive transfer experiments and the expression of Neuropilin 1 indicate that these cells are predominantly natural Tregs rather than virus-specific conventional CD4+ T cells that converted into induced Tregs. Analysis of Treg TCR Vβ chain usage revealed a broadly distributed polyclonal response with a high proportionate expansion of the Vβ5+ Treg subset, which are known to be responsive to endogenous retrovirus-encoded superantigens. In contrast to the major population of Tregs, the Vβ5+ subset expressed markers of terminally differentiated effector cells, and their expansion was associated with the level of the antiviral CD8+ T cell response rather than the level of FV infection. Surprisingly, the expansion and accumulation of the Vβ5+ Tregs was IL-2 independent but dependent upon TNFα. These experiments reveal a subset-specific Treg induction by a new pathway. PMID:23645880

  10. Human endogenous retrovirus HERV-K(HML-2) proviruses with Rec protein coding capacity and transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Jens; Ehlhardt, Sandra; Seifert, Markus; Sauter, Marlies; Müller-Lantzsch, Nikolaus; Mehraein, Yasmin; Zang, Klaus-Dieter; Meese, Eckart

    2004-04-25

    The human endogenous retrovirus family HERV-K(HML-2) encodes the so-called Rec protein that displays functional similarities to the HIV(REV) protein. The number of proviruses producing Rec protein was hitherto unknown. We therefore analyzed the human genome sequence data and determined seven HERV-K(HML-2) proviruses potentially capable of producing Rec both on the mRNA and the protein level. We analyzed Rec mRNA expression in the Tera-1 cell line and in synovial tissue, and in the expressed sequence tag (EST) database. Diagnostic nucleotides assigned transcriptionally active and Rec-encoding proviruses to human chromosomes 6, 7, 11, and 12. Differently spliced mRNAs were also identified. The various active proviruses encode almost identical Rec proteins. Our study contributes to the understanding of the biology of HERV-K(HML-2) Rec protein. Our study further demonstrates that minor sequence differences among proviruses allow assigning HERV transcripts to particular proviral loci. Extended studies will eventually yield a more complete image of HERV transcription, regulation, and biological significance in diverse human tissues.

  11. Retrovirus-mediated gene transfer corrects DNA repair defect of xeroderma pigmentosum cells of complementation groups A, B and C.

    PubMed

    Zeng, L; Quilliet, X; Chevallier-Lagente, O; Eveno, E; Sarasin, A; Mezzina, M

    1997-10-01

    With the aim to devise a long-term gene therapy protocol for skin cancers in individuals affected by the inherited autosomal recessive xeroderma pigmentosum we transferred the human DNA repair XPA, XPB/ERCC3 and XPC cDNAs, by using the recombinant retroviral vector LXSN, into primary and immortalized fibroblasts obtained from two XP-A, one XP-B (associated with Cockayne's syndrome) and two XP-C patients. After transduction, the complete correction of DNA repair deficiency and functional expression of the transgenes were monitored by UV survival, unscheduled DNA synthesis and recovery of RNA synthesis, and Western blots. The results show that the recombinant retroviruses are highly efficient vectors to transfer and stably express the human DNA repair genes in XP cells and correct the defect of DNA repair of group A, B and C. With our previous results with XPD/ERCC2, the present work extends further promising issues for the gene therapy strategy for most patients suffering from this cancer-prone syndrome. PMID:9415314

  12. Evidence for a piwi-dependent RNA silencing of the gypsy endogenous retrovirus by the Drosophila melanogaster flamenco gene.

    PubMed

    Sarot, Emeline; Payen-Groschêne, Geneviève; Bucheton, Alain; Pélisson, Alain

    2004-03-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, the endogenous retrovirus gypsy is repressed by the functional alleles (restrictive) of an as-yet-uncloned heterochromatic gene called flamenco. Using gypsy-lacZ transcriptional fusions, we show here that this repression takes place not only in the follicle cells of restrictive ovaries, as was previously observed, but also in restrictive larval female gonads. Analyses of the role of gypsy cis-regulatory sequences in the control of gypsy expression are also presented. They rule out the hypothesis that gypsy would contain a single binding region for a putative Flamenco repressor. Indeed, the ovarian expression of a chimeric yp3-lacZ construct was shown to become sensitive to the Flamenco regulation when any of three different 5'-UTR gypsy sequences (ranging from 59 to 647 nucleotides) was incorporated into the heterologous yp3-lacZ transcript. The piwi mutation, which is known to affect RNA-mediated homology-dependent transgene silencing, was also shown to impede the repression of gypsy in restrictive female gonads. Finally, a RNA-silencing model is also supported by the finding in ovaries of short RNAs (25-27 nucleotides long) homologous to sequences from within the gypsy 5'-UTR. PMID:15082550

  13. Infection with human retroviruses other than HIV-1: HIV-2, HTLV-1, HTLV-2, HTLV-3 and HTLV-4.

    PubMed

    Nicolás, David; Ambrosioni, Juan; Paredes, Roger; Marcos, M Ángeles; Manzardo, Christian; Moreno, Asunción; Miró, José M

    2015-08-01

    HIV-1 is the most prevalent retrovirus, with over 30 million people infected worldwide. Nevertheless, infection caused by other human retroviruses like HIV-2, HTLV-1, HTLV-2, HTLV-3 and HTLV-4 is gaining importance. Initially confined to specific geographical areas, HIV-2, HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 are becoming a major concern in non-endemic countries due to international migration flows. Clinical manifestations of retroviruses range from asymptomatic carriers to life-threatening conditions, such as AIDS in HIV-2 infection or adult T-cell lymphoma/leukemia or tropical spastic paraparesis in HTLV-1 infection. HIV-2 is naturally resistant to some antiretrovirals frequently used to treat HIV-1 infection, but it does have effective antiretroviral therapy options. Unfortunately, HTLV still has limited therapeutic options. In this article, we will review the epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic, pathogenic and therapeutic aspects of infections caused by these human retroviruses.

  14. Elimination of type D retrovirus infection from group-housed rhesus monkeys using serial testing and removal.

    PubMed

    Lerche, N W; Marx, P A; Gardner, M B

    1991-04-01

    Type D retrovirus was successfully eliminated from an infected population of group-housed rhesus monkeys by serial testing of all animals for virus and antibody and subsequent removal of positives. This population of 53 rhesus had been housed together for 1 year prior to the initiation of the test and removal program, with six deaths from type D retrovirus-induced immunodeficiency disease occurring during this period. No new infections were detected after four rounds of testing. Of the 47 animals present at the start of the testing program, 17 (35%) remained after the elimination of type D virus from this group. These animals and their offspring have remained healthy and antibody negative for more than 2 years. These results demonstrate that elimination of type D retroviruses from rhesus macaque colonies is feasible, and that the objective of establishing and maintaining retrovirus-free colonies is realistic and achievable.

  15. Identification of BC005512 as a DNA Damage Responsive Murine Endogenous Retrovirus of GLN Family Involved in Cell Growth Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuanfeng; Qi, Xinming; Gong, Likun; Xing, Guozhen; Chen, Min; Miao, Lingling; Yao, Jun; Suzuki, Takayoshi; Furihata, Chie; Luan, Yang; Ren, Jin

    2012-01-01

    Genotoxicity assessment is of great significance in drug safety evaluation, and microarray is a useful tool widely used to identify genotoxic stress responsive genes. In the present work, by using oligonucleotide microarray in an in vivo model, we identified an unknown gene BC005512 (abbreviated as BC, official full name: cDNA sequence BC005512), whose expression in mouse liver was specifically induced by seven well-known genotoxins (GTXs), but not by non-genotoxins (NGTXs). Bioinformatics revealed that BC was a member of the GLN family of murine endogenous retrovirus (ERV). However, the relationship to genotoxicity and the cellular function of GLN are largely unknown. Using NIH/3T3 cells as an in vitro model system and quantitative real-time PCR, BC expression was specifically induced by another seven GTXs, covering diverse genotoxicity mechanisms. Additionally, dose-response and linear regression analysis showed that expression level of BC in NIH/3T3 cells strongly correlated with DNA damage, measured using the alkaline comet assay,. While in p53 deficient L5178Y cells, GTXs could not induce BC expression. Further functional studies using RNA interference revealed that down-regulation of BC expression induced G1/S phase arrest, inhibited cell proliferation and thus suppressed cell growth in NIH/3T3 cells. Together, our results provide the first evidence that BC005512, a member from GLN family of murine ERV, was responsive to DNA damage and involved in cell growth regulation. These findings could be of great value in genotoxicity predictions and contribute to a deeper understanding of GLN biological functions. PMID:22514700

  16. Characterization of resistance to rhabdovirus and retrovirus infection in a human myeloid cell line.

    PubMed

    Boso, Guney; Somia, Nikunj V

    2015-01-01

    Viruses interact with various permissive and restrictive factors in host cells throughout their replication cycle. Cell lines that are non-permissive to viral infection have been particularly useful in discovering host cell proteins involved in viral life cycles. Here we describe the characterization of a human myeloid leukemia cell line, KG-1, that is resistant to infection by retroviruses and a Rhabdovirus. We show that KG-1 cells are resistant to infection by Vesicular Stomatits Virus as well as VSV Glycoprotein (VSVG) pseudotyped retroviruses due to a defect in binding. Moreover our results indicate that entry by xenotropic retroviral envelope glycoprotein RD114 is impaired in KG-1 cells. Finally we characterize a post- entry block in the early phase of the retroviral life cycle in KG-1 cells that renders the cell line refractory to infection. This cell line will have utility in discovering proteins involved in infection by VSV and HIV-1.

  17. Endogenous Type D Retrovirus in a Marsupial, the Common Brushtail Possum (Trichosurus vulpecula)

    PubMed Central

    Baillie, Gregory J.; Wilkins, Richard J.

    2001-01-01

    We have sequenced and characterized an endogenous type D retrovirus, which we have named TvERV(D), from the genome of an Australian marsupial, the common brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula). Intact TvERV(D) gag, pro, pol, and env open reading frames were detected in the possum genome. TvERV(D) was classified as a type D retrovirus, most closely related to those of Old World monkeys, New World monkeys, and mice, based on phylogenetic analyses and genetic organization. Approximately 30 TvERV(D) proviruses are present in the genomes of possums, as detected by Southern hybridization. However, variability in fragment patterns between possums was observed and suggests recent (or ongoing) retrotranspositional activity. PMID:11160757

  18. Are human endogenous retroviruses pathogenic? An approach to testing the hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Young, George R; Stoye, Jonathan P; Kassiotis, George

    2013-01-01

    A number of observations have led researchers to postulate that, despite being replication-defective, human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) may have retained the potential to cause or contribute to disease. However, mechanisms of HERV pathogenicity might differ substantially from those of modern infectious retroviruses or of the infectious precursors of HERVs. Therefore, novel pathways of HERV involvement in disease pathogenesis should be investigated. Recent technological advances in sequencing and bioinformatics are making this task increasingly feasible. The accumulating knowledge of HERV biology may also facilitate the definition and general acceptance of criteria that establish HERV pathogenicity. Here, we explore possible mechanisms whereby HERVs may cause disease and examine the evidence that either has been or should be obtained in order to decisively address the pathogenic potential of HERVs. PMID:23864388

  19. dUTPase: the frequently overlooked enzyme encoded by many retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Hizi, Amnon; Herzig, Eytan

    2015-08-12

    Retroviruses are among the best studied viruses in last decades due to their pivotal involvement in cellular processes and, most importantly, in causing human diseases, most notably-acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) that is triggered by human immunodeficiency viruses types 1 and 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2, respectively). Numerous studied were conducted to understand the involvement of the three cardinal retroviral enzymes, reverse transcriptase, integrase and protease, in the life cycle of the viruses. These studies have led to the development of many inhibitors of these enzymes as anti-retroviral specific drugs that are used for routine treatments of HIV/AIDS patients. Interestingly, a fourth virus-encoded enzyme, the deoxyuridine 5'-triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase (dUTPase) is also found in several major retroviral groups. The presence and the importance of this enzyme to the life cycle of retroviruses were usually overlooked by most retrovirologists, although the occurrence of dUTPases, particularly in beta-retroviruses and in non-primate retroviruses, is known for more than 20 years. Only more recently, retroviral dUTPases were brought into the limelight and were shown in several cases to be essential for viral replication. Therefore, it is likely that future studies on this enzyme will advance our knowledge to a level that will allow designing novel, specific and potent anti-dUTPase drugs that are effective in combating retroviral diseases. The aim of this review is to give concise background information on dUTPases in general and to summarize the most relevant data on retroviral dUTPases and their involvement in the replication processes and pathogenicity of the viruses, as well as in possibly-associated human diseases.

  20. Mechanisms employed by retroviruses to exploit host factors for translational control of a complicated proteome.

    PubMed

    Bolinger, Cheryl; Boris-Lawrie, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    Retroviruses have evolved multiple strategies to direct the synthesis of a complex proteome from a single primary transcript. Their mechanisms are modulated by a breadth of virus-host interactions, which are of significant fundamental interest because they ultimately affect the efficiency of virus replication and disease pathogenesis. Motifs located within the untranslated region (UTR) of the retroviral RNA have established roles in transcriptional trans-activation, RNA packaging, and genome reverse transcription; and a growing literature has revealed a necessary role of the UTR in modulating the efficiency of viral protein synthesis. Examples include a 5' UTR post-transcriptional control element (PCE), present in at least eight retroviruses, that interacts with cellular RNA helicase A to facilitate cap-dependent polyribosome association; and 3' UTR constitutive transport element (CTE) of Mason-Pfizer monkey virus that interacts with Tap/NXF1 and SR protein 9G8 to facilitate RNA export and translational utilization. By contrast, nuclear protein hnRNP E1 negatively modulates HIV-1 Gag, Env, and Rev protein synthesis. Alternative initiation strategies by ribosomal frameshifting and leaky scanning enable polycistronic translation of the cap-dependent viral transcript. Other studies posit cap-independent translation initiation by internal ribosome entry at structural features of the 5' UTR of selected retroviruses. The retroviral armamentarium also commands mechanisms to counter cellular post-transcriptional innate defenses, including protein kinase R, 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase and the small RNA pathway. This review will discuss recent and historically-recognized insights into retrovirus translational control. The expanding knowledge of retroviral post-transcriptional control is vital to understanding the biology of the retroviral proteome. In a broad perspective, each new insight offers a prospective target for antiviral therapy and strategic improvement of gene

  1. Impact of cellular autophagy on viruses: Insights from hepatitis B virus and human retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is a protein degradative process important for normal cellular metabolism. It is apparently used also by cells to eliminate invading pathogens. Interestingly, many pathogens have learned to subvert the cell’s autophagic process. Here, we review the interactions between viruses and cells in regards to cellular autophagy. Using findings from hepatitis B virus and human retroviruses, HIV-1 and HTLV-1, we discuss mechanisms used by viruses to usurp cellular autophagy in ways that benefit viral replication. PMID:23110561

  2. HIV-1 Infection Leads to Increased Transcription of Human Endogenous Retrovirus HERV-K (HML-2) Proviruses In Vivo but Not to Increased Virion Production

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Neeru; Maldarelli, Frank; Mellors, John

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recent studies suggest that human endogenous retrovirus group K (HERV-K) provirus expression plays a role in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection. In particular, RNA from the HML-2 subgroup of HERV-K proviruses has been reported to be highly expressed at the cellular level and detectable in the plasma of HIV-1-infected patients, suggestive of virion production and, perhaps, replication. In this study, we developed an HML-2-specific quantitative-PCR assay that detects 51 of the 89 known HML-2 proviruses in the human genome. Plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from HIV-negative controls and HIV-1-infected patients were collected for analysis of HML-2 RNA expression. Contrary to previous reports, we did not detect high levels of HML-2 RNA in the plasma of HIV-1-infected patients, but we did observe a significant increase of HML-2 RNA in total PBMCs compared to HIV-negative controls. The level of HML-2 expression in PBMCs does not appear to be related to patient use of antiretrovirals or to HIV-1 plasma RNA, cellular RNA, or cellular DNA levels. To investigate the source of HML-2 RNA expression, patient PBMCs were sorted into CD3+ CD4+, CD3+ CD8+, CD3− CD14+, and CD3− CD20+ cell subsets and then analyzed for HML-2 RNA levels. No single cell subset was enriched for HML-2 RNA expression in HIV-1-infected patients, but there appears to be substantial variability in the level of HML-2 expression depending on the cell type. IMPORTANCE Here, we report that human endogenous retrovirus group K (HERV-K) (HML-2) proviruses are expressed at significantly higher levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with HIV-1 infection than in those from uninfected individuals. However, contrary to previous reports, this expression did not lead to detectable virions in the plasma of these patients. In addition, we found that HML-2 proviruses were expressed in multiple blood cell types from HIV-1-infected individuals, and the magnitude of

  3. High-frequency deletion in recovered retrovirus vectors containing exogenous DNA with promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Emerman, M; Temin, H M

    1984-01-01

    We previously described infectious retrovirus vectors constructed from spleen necrosis virus which contain the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene and the mouse alpha-globin gene (K. Shimotohno and H. M. Temin, Nature [London] 299:255-268, 1982). In the present study we report that when TK- chicken cells infected with a virus containing the mouse alpha-globin promoter and other 5' noncoding sequences in addition to the alpha-globin coding sequences were selected for thymidine kinase (TK) activity, all virus-producing TK+ cell clones shed virus with a deletion. These deletions were of different sizes and included the mouse alpha-globin coding sequences and the mouse alpha-globin transcriptional promoter. One of the deleted viruses was molecularly cloned. DNA sequencing showed that the deleted sequences are flanked by a short direct repeat. This deleted virus was also shown to have an advantage over the nondeleted parent both in multiplication and in its specific TK-transforming unit titer. In contrast to the results described above, TK+ cell clones established with viruses that contained only the coding sequences from the mouse alpha-globin gene did not delete and were stable over many cell passages. The implications of the high-frequency deletion of the viruses with internal promoters are discussed in terms of the evolution of retroviruses and the construction of retrovirus vectors. Images PMID:6321798

  4. Evidence for the persistence of an active endogenous retrovirus (ERVE) in humans.

    PubMed

    Naveira, Horacio; Bello, Xabier; Abal-Fabeiro, José Luis; Maside, Xulio

    2014-10-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) account for nearly half (44 %) of the human genome. However, their overall activity has been steadily declining over the past 35-50 million years, so that <0.05 % of TEs are presumably still "alive" (potentially transposable) in human populations. All the active elements are retrotransposons, either autonomous (LINE-1 and possibly the endogenous retrovirus ERVK), or non-autonomous (Alu and SVA, whose transposition is dependent on the LINE-1 enzymatic machinery). Here we show that a lineage of the endogenous retrovirus ERVE was recently engaged in ectopic recombination events and may have at least one potentially fully functional representative, initially reported as a novel retrovirus isolated from blood cells of a Chinese patient with chronic myeloid leukemia, which bears signals of positive selection on its envelope region. Altogether, there is strong evidence that ERVE should be included in the short list of potentially active TEs, and we give clues on how to identify human specific insertions of this element that are likely to be segregating in some of our populations.

  5. [Additive effect of marihuana and retrovirus in the anergy of natural killer cells in mice].

    PubMed

    Ongrádi, J; Specter, S; Horváth, A; Friedman, H

    1999-01-10

    Among the immunosuppressive effects of marijuana, impairment of natural killer cell activity is significant. HIV also inhibits these cells. Friend leukemia virus complex and its helper component Rowson-Parr virus induce early immunosuppression in mice resembling human AIDS, and late leukemia, providing a small animal AIDS model. Leukemia susceptible BALB/c and resistant C57BL/6 mice were infected with these viruses. At different time points, their natural killer cells separated from spleens were treated with 0 to 10 micrograms/ml tetrahydrocannabinol, subsequently mixed with Yac-1 target cells for 4 and 18 h. The natural killer cell activity in both mouse strains infected by either virus complex or helper virus weakened on days 2 to 4 postinfection, normalized by day 8 and enhanced on days 11 to 14. Natural killer cell activity upon the effect of low concentration (1.0 to 2.5 micrograms/ml) of tetrahydrocannabinol slightly increased in BALB/c, was unaffected in C57BL/6, especially in 18 h assays. In the combined effects of marijuana and retrovirus, damages by marijuana dominated over those of retroviruses. Inhibition or reactive enhancement of natural killer cell activity on the effect of viruses are similar to those of infected but marijuana-free counterparts, but on the level of uninfected cells treated with marijuana. The effects of marijuana and retrovirus are additive resulting in anergy of natural killer cells.

  6. Determination of infectious retrovirus concentration from colony-forming assay with quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young Jik; Hung, Gene; Anderson, W French; Peng, Ching-An; Yu, Hong

    2003-05-01

    The colony formation assay is the most commonly used titration method for defining the concentration of replication-incompetent murine leukemia virus-derived retroviral vectors. However, titer varies with target cell type and number, transduction time, and concentration of polycation (e.g., Polybrene). Moreover, because most of the viruses cannot encounter target cells due to Brownian motion, their short half-lives, and the requirement for target cell division for activity, the actual infectious retrovirus concentration in the collected supernatant is higher than the viral titer. Here we correlate the physical viral particle concentration with the infectious virus concentration and colony formation titer with the help of a mathematical model. Ecotropic murine leukemia retrovirus supernatant, collected from the GP+E86/LNCX retroviral vector producer cell line, was concentrated by centrifugation and further purified by a sucrose density gradient. The physical concentration of purified viral vectors was determined by direct particle counting with an electron microscope. The concentrations of fresh and concentrated supernatant were determined by a quantitative reverse transcriptase activity assay. Titration of all supernatants by neomycin-resistant colony formation assay was also performed. There were 767 +/- 517 physical viral particles per infectious CFU in the crude viral supernatant. However, the infectious viral concentration determined by mathematical simulation was 143 viral particles per infectious unit, which is more consistent with the concentration determined by particle counting in purified viral solution. Our results suggest that the mathematical model can be used to extract a more accurate and reliable concentration of infectious retrovirus.

  7. One hundred twenty years of koala retrovirus evolution determined from museum skins.

    PubMed

    Ávila-Arcos, María C; Ho, Simon Y W; Ishida, Yasuko; Nikolaidis, Nikolas; Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Hönig, Karin; Medina, Rebeca; Rasmussen, Morten; Fordyce, Sarah L; Calvignac-Spencer, Sébastien; Willerslev, Eske; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Helgen, Kristofer M; Roca, Alfred L; Greenwood, Alex D

    2013-02-01

    Although endogenous retroviruses are common across vertebrate genomes, the koala retrovirus (KoRV) is the only retrovirus known to be currently invading the germ line of its host. KoRV is believed to have first infected koalas in northern Australia less than two centuries ago. We examined KoRV in 28 koala museum skins collected in the late 19th and 20th centuries and deep sequenced the complete proviral envelope region from five northern Australian specimens. Strikingly, KoRV env sequences were conserved among koalas collected over the span of a century, and two functional motifs that affect viral infectivity were fixed across the museum koala specimens. We detected only 20 env polymorphisms among the koalas, likely representing derived mutations subject to purifying selection. Among northern Australian koalas, KoRV was already ubiquitous by the late 19th century, suggesting that KoRV evolved and spread among koala populations more slowly than previously believed. Given that museum and modern koalas share nearly identical KoRV sequences, it is likely that koala populations, for more than a century, have experienced increased susceptibility to diseases caused by viral pathogenesis.

  8. Inhibition of catecholamine degradation ameliorates while chemical sympathectomy aggravates the severity of acute Friend retrovirus infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Bloemker, Dominique; Mollerus, Sina; Gibbert, Kathrin; Dittmer, Ulf; del Rey, Adriana; Schedlowski, Manfred; Engler, Harald

    2016-05-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) might be involved in the pathogenesis and progression of retroviral infections. However, experimental data are scarce and findings inconsistent. Here, we investigated the role of the SNS during acute infection with Friend virus (FV), a pathogenic murine retrovirus that causes polyclonal proliferation of erythroid precursor cells and splenomegaly in adult mice. Experimental animals were infected with FV complex, and viral load, spleen weight, and splenic noradrenaline (NA) concentration was analyzed until 25 days post infection. Results show that FV infection caused a massive but transient depletion in splenic NA during the acute phase of the disease. At the peak of the virus-induced splenomegaly, splenic NA concentration was reduced by about 90% compared to naïve uninfected mice. Concurrently, expression of the catecholamine degrading enzymes monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) was significantly upregulated in immune cells of the spleen. Pharmacological inhibition of MAO-A and COMT by the selective inhibitors clorgyline and 3,5-dinitrocatechol, respectively, efficiently blocked NA degradation and significantly reduced viral load and virus-induced splenomegaly. In contrast, chemical sympathectomy prior to FV inoculation aggravated the acute infection and extended the duration of the disease. Together these findings demonstrate that catecholamine availability at the site of viral replication is an important factor affecting the course of retroviral infections. PMID:26880342

  9. Proviral amplification of the Gypsy endogenous retrovirus of Drosophila melanogaster involves env-independent invasion of the female germline.

    PubMed

    Chalvet, F; Teysset, L; Terzian, C; Prud'homme, N; Santamaria, P; Bucheton, A; Pélisson, A

    1999-05-01

    Gypsy is an infectious endogenous retrovirus of Drosophila melanogaster. The gypsy proviruses replicate very efficiently in the genome of the progeny of females homozygous for permissive alleles of the flamenco gene. This replicative transposition is correlated with derepression of gypsy expression, specifically in the somatic cells of the ovaries of the permissive mothers. The determinism of this amplification was studied further by making chimeric mothers containing different permissive/restrictive and somatic/germinal lineages. We show here that the derepression of active proviruses in the permissive soma is necessary and sufficient to induce proviral insertions in the progeny, even if the F1 flies derive from restrictive germ cells devoid of active proviruses. Therefore, gypsy endogenous multiplication results from the transfer of some gypsy-encoded genetic material from the soma towards the germen of the mother and its subsequent insertion into the chromosomes of the progeny. This transfer, however, is not likely to result from retroviral infection of the germline. Indeed, we also show here that the insertion of a tagged gypsy element, mutant for the env gene, occurs at high frequency, independently of the production of gypsy Env proteins by any transcomplementing helper. The possible role of the env gene for horizontal transfer to new hosts is discussed. PMID:10228177

  10. Recombinant retroviruses pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein mediate both stable gene transfer and pseudotransduction in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, H F; Tan, C; Ory, D; Sadelain, M

    1997-08-01

    It is essential for the study of T-cell function and the improvement of adoptive cell therapies to efficiently generate large populations of human primary T cells that reliably express foreign genes. This goal is achieved by using recombinant retroviruses pseudotyped with either the gibbon ape leukemia virus (GaLV) envelope or the vesicular stomatitis virus G (VSV-G) glycoprotein. We show here that both retroviral particles mediate stable gene transfer in CD4+ and in CD8+ peripheral blood lymphocytes cultured under optimized conditions. However, VSV-G-pseudotyped virions may cause transduction artifacts that must be carefully excluded. The VSV-G virions require 10- to 100-fold higher concentrations of infectious particles to achieve levels of gene transfer comparable to GaLV-virions. Nonetheless, the physical stability of VSV-G-coated particles enables the concentration of viral stocks to 10(9) infectious particles per milliliter or more.

  11. Further Evidence that Human Endogenous Retrovirus K102 is a Replication Competent Foamy Virus that may Antagonize HIV-1 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Laderoute, Marian P.; Larocque, Louise J.; Giulivi, Antonio; Diaz-Mitoma, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The goals of the research were to determine if a foamy effect on macrophages was due to human endogenous retrovirus K102 (HERV-K102) replication, and to further address its potential significance in HIV-1 infection. Methods: An RT-PCR HERV-K HML-2 pol method was used to screen the unknown HERV, and isolated bands were sent for sequencing. Confirmation of RNA expression was performed by a real time quantitative PCR (qPCR) pol ddCt method. Rabbit antibodies to Env peptides were used to assess expression by immunohistology and processing of Env by western blots. A qPCR pol ddCt method to ascertain genomic copy number was performed on genomic DNA isolated from plasma comparing HIV-1 exposed seronegative (HESN) commercial sex workers (CSW) to normal controls and contrasted with HIV-1 patients. Results: HERV-K102 expression, particle production and replication were associated with foamy macrophage generation in the cultures of cord blood mononuclear cells under permissive conditions. A five-fold increased HERV-K102 pol genomic copy number was found in the HESN cohort over normal which was not found in HIV-1 positive patients (p=0.0005). Conclusions: This work extends the evidence that HERV-K102 has foamy virus attributes, is replication competent, and is capable of high replication rate in vivo and in vitro. This may be the first characterization of a replication-competent, foamy-like virus of humans. High particle production inferred by increased integration in the HESN cohort over HIV-1 patients raises the issue of the clinical importance of HERV-K102 particle production as an early protective innate immune response against HIV-1 replication. PMID:26793281

  12. Lack of detection of a putative retrovirus associated with haemic neoplasia in the soft shell clam Mya arenaria.

    PubMed

    AboElkhair, M; Iwamoto, T; Clark, K F; McKenna, P; Siah, A; Greenwood, S J; Berthe, F C J; Casey, J W; Cepica, A

    2012-01-01

    Haemic neoplasia (HN) is a leukemia-like disease that affects at least 20 species of marine bivalves including soft shell clam, Mya arenaria. Since the disease was discovered in 1969, the etiology remains unknown. A retroviral etiology has been suggested based on the detection of reverse transcriptase activity and electron microscopic observation of retroviral-like particles using negative staining. To date, however no virus isolate and no retroviral sequence from HN has been obtained. Moreover, transmission of the disease by cell-free filtrate from affected clams has not been reproduced. In the current study, we reinvestigated the association of HN with a putative retrovirus. Sucrose gradient centrifugation followed by assessment of reverse transcriptase activity, electrophoretic analysis of protein and RNA, and electron microscopic examinations of fractions corresponding to retroviral density were employed. Detection of retroviral pol sequences using degenerate RT-PCR approaches was also attempted. Our results showed visible bands at the expected density of retrovirus in HN-positive and HN-negative clam tissues and both with reverse transcriptase activity. Electron microscopy, RNA analysis, protein analysis, and PCR systems targeting the pol gene of retroviruses did not however provide clear evidence supporting presence of a retrovirus. We point out that the retrovirus etiology of HN of Mya arenaria proposed some 25 years ago should be reconsidered in the absence of a virus isolate or virus sequences.

  13. Serum Antibody Response to Koala Retrovirus Antigens Varies in Free-Ranging Koalas ( Phascolarctos cinereus ) in Australia: Implications for Vaccine Design.

    PubMed

    Waugh, Courtney; Gillett, Amber; Polkinghorne, Adam; Timms, Peter

    2016-04-28

    Little is known about the immune response in the koala ( Phascolarctos cinereus ) to its retroviruses. Koala retroviruses (KoRVs) have been linked to neoplasia in wild and captive koalas, but there is no treatment available. We tested the KoRV-specific serum immunoglobulin G antibody response in nonimmunized and immunized koalas.

  14. Serum Antibody Response to Koala Retrovirus Antigens Varies in Free-Ranging Koalas ( Phascolarctos cinereus ) in Australia: Implications for Vaccine Design.

    PubMed

    Waugh, Courtney; Gillett, Amber; Polkinghorne, Adam; Timms, Peter

    2016-04-28

    Little is known about the immune response in the koala ( Phascolarctos cinereus ) to its retroviruses. Koala retroviruses (KoRVs) have been linked to neoplasia in wild and captive koalas, but there is no treatment available. We tested the KoRV-specific serum immunoglobulin G antibody response in nonimmunized and immunized koalas. PMID:27054470

  15. The population history of endogenous retroviruses in mule deer (Odocoileus heminous)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kamath, Pauline L.; Elleder, Daniel; Bao, Le; Cross, Paul C.; Powell, John H.; Poss, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Mobile elements are powerful agents of genomic evolution and can be exceptionally informative markers for investigating species and population-level evolutionary history. While several studies have utilized retrotransposon-based insertional polymorphisms to resolve phylogenies, few population studies exist outside of humans. Endogenous retroviruses are LTR-retrotransposons derived from retroviruses that have become stably integrated in the host genome during past infections and transmitted vertically to subsequent generations. They offer valuable insight into host-virus co-evolution and a unique perspective on host evolutionary history because they integrate into the genome at a discrete point in time. We examined the evolutionary history of a cervid endogenous gammaretrovirus (CrERVγ) in mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus). We sequenced 14 CrERV proviruses (CrERV-in1 to -in14), and examined the prevalence and distribution of 13 proviruses in 262 deer among 15 populations from Montana, Wyoming, and Utah. CrERV absence in white-tailed deer (O. virginianus), identical 5′ and 3′ long terminal repeat (LTR) sequences, insertional polymorphism, and CrERV divergence time estimates indicated that most endogenization events occurred within the last 200000 years. Population structure inferred from CrERVs (F ST = 0.008) and microsatellites (θ = 0.01) was low, but significant, with Utah, northwestern Montana, and a Helena herd being particularly differentiated. Clustering analyses indicated regional structuring, and non-contiguous clustering could often be explained by known translocations. Cluster ensemble results indicated spatial localization of viruses, specifically in deer from northeastern and western Montana. This study demonstrates the utility of endogenous retroviruses to elucidate and provide novel insight into both ERV evolutionary history and the history of contemporary host populations.

  16. Proliferation of endogenous retroviruses in the early stages of a host germ line invasion.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Yasuko; Zhao, Kai; Greenwood, Alex D; Roca, Alfred L

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) comprise 8% of the human genome and are common in all vertebrate genomes. The only retrovirus known to be currently transitioning from exogenous to endogenous form is the koala retrovirus (KoRV), making koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) ideal for examining the early stages of retroviral endogenization. To distinguish endogenous from exogenous KoRV proviruses, we isolated koala genomic regions flanking KoRV integration sites. In three wild southern Australian koalas, there were fewer KoRV loci than in three captive Queensland koalas, consistent with reports that southern Australian koalas carry fewer KoRVs. Of 39 distinct KoRV proviral loci examined in a sire-dam-progeny triad, all proved to be vertically transmitted and endogenous; none was exogenous. Of the 39 endogenous KoRVs (enKoRVs), only one was present in the genomes of both the sire and the dam, suggesting that, at this early stage in the retroviral invasion of a host germ line, very large numbers of ERVs have proliferated at very low frequencies in the koala population. Sequence divergence between the 5'- and 3'-long terminal repeats (LTRs) of a provirus can be used as a molecular clock. Within each of ten enKoRVs, the 5'-LTR sequence was identical to the 3'-LTR sequence, suggesting a maximum age for enKoRV invasion of the koala germ line of approximately 22,200-49,900 years ago, although a much younger age is possible. Across the ten proviruses, seven LTR haplotypes were detected, indicating that at least seven different retroviral sequences had entered the koala germ line.

  17. Proliferation of Endogenous Retroviruses in the Early Stages of a Host Germ Line Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Yasuko; Zhao, Kai; Greenwood, Alex D.; Roca, Alfred L.

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) comprise 8% of the human genome and are common in all vertebrate genomes. The only retrovirus known to be currently transitioning from exogenous to endogenous form is the koala retrovirus (KoRV), making koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) ideal for examining the early stages of retroviral endogenization. To distinguish endogenous from exogenous KoRV proviruses, we isolated koala genomic regions flanking KoRV integration sites. In three wild southern Australian koalas, there were fewer KoRV loci than in three captive Queensland koalas, consistent with reports that southern Australian koalas carry fewer KoRVs. Of 39 distinct KoRV proviral loci examined in a sire–dam–progeny triad, all proved to be vertically transmitted and endogenous; none was exogenous. Of the 39 endogenous KoRVs (enKoRVs), only one was present in the genomes of both the sire and the dam, suggesting that, at this early stage in the retroviral invasion of a host germ line, very large numbers of ERVs have proliferated at very low frequencies in the koala population. Sequence divergence between the 5′- and 3′-long terminal repeats (LTRs) of a provirus can be used as a molecular clock. Within each of ten enKoRVs, the 5′-LTR sequence was identical to the 3′-LTR sequence, suggesting a maximum age for enKoRV invasion of the koala germ line of approximately 22,200–49,900 years ago, although a much younger age is possible. Across the ten proviruses, seven LTR haplotypes were detected, indicating that at least seven different retroviral sequences had entered the koala germ line. PMID:25261407

  18. Proliferation of endogenous retroviruses in the early stages of a host germ line invasion.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Yasuko; Zhao, Kai; Greenwood, Alex D; Roca, Alfred L

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) comprise 8% of the human genome and are common in all vertebrate genomes. The only retrovirus known to be currently transitioning from exogenous to endogenous form is the koala retrovirus (KoRV), making koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) ideal for examining the early stages of retroviral endogenization. To distinguish endogenous from exogenous KoRV proviruses, we isolated koala genomic regions flanking KoRV integration sites. In three wild southern Australian koalas, there were fewer KoRV loci than in three captive Queensland koalas, consistent with reports that southern Australian koalas carry fewer KoRVs. Of 39 distinct KoRV proviral loci examined in a sire-dam-progeny triad, all proved to be vertically transmitted and endogenous; none was exogenous. Of the 39 endogenous KoRVs (enKoRVs), only one was present in the genomes of both the sire and the dam, suggesting that, at this early stage in the retroviral invasion of a host germ line, very large numbers of ERVs have proliferated at very low frequencies in the koala population. Sequence divergence between the 5'- and 3'-long terminal repeats (LTRs) of a provirus can be used as a molecular clock. Within each of ten enKoRVs, the 5'-LTR sequence was identical to the 3'-LTR sequence, suggesting a maximum age for enKoRV invasion of the koala germ line of approximately 22,200-49,900 years ago, although a much younger age is possible. Across the ten proviruses, seven LTR haplotypes were detected, indicating that at least seven different retroviral sequences had entered the koala germ line. PMID:25261407

  19. The population history of endogenous retroviruses in mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus).

    PubMed

    Kamath, Pauline L; Elleder, Daniel; Bao, Le; Cross, Paul C; Powell, John H; Poss, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Mobile elements are powerful agents of genomic evolution and can be exceptionally informative markers for investigating species and population-level evolutionary history. While several studies have utilized retrotransposon-based insertional polymorphisms to resolve phylogenies, few population studies exist outside of humans. Endogenous retroviruses are LTR-retrotransposons derived from retroviruses that have become stably integrated in the host genome during past infections and transmitted vertically to subsequent generations. They offer valuable insight into host-virus co-evolution and a unique perspective on host evolutionary history because they integrate into the genome at a discrete point in time. We examined the evolutionary history of a cervid endogenous gammaretrovirus (CrERVγ) in mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus). We sequenced 14 CrERV proviruses (CrERV-in1 to -in14), and examined the prevalence and distribution of 13 proviruses in 262 deer among 15 populations from Montana, Wyoming, and Utah. CrERV absence in white-tailed deer (O. virginianus), identical 5' and 3' long terminal repeat (LTR) sequences, insertional polymorphism, and CrERV divergence time estimates indicated that most endogenization events occurred within the last 200000 years. Population structure inferred from CrERVs (F ST = 0.008) and microsatellites (θ = 0.01) was low, but significant, with Utah, northwestern Montana, and a Helena herd being particularly differentiated. Clustering analyses indicated regional structuring, and non-contiguous clustering could often be explained by known translocations. Cluster ensemble results indicated spatial localization of viruses, specifically in deer from northeastern and western Montana. This study demonstrates the utility of endogenous retroviruses to elucidate and provide novel insight into both ERV evolutionary history and the history of contemporary host populations.

  20. The DNA Copy Number of Human Endogenous Retrovirus-W (MSRV-Type) Is Increased in Multiple Sclerosis Patients and Is Influenced by Gender and Disease Severity

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Montojo, Marta; Dominguez-Mozo, María; Arias-Leal, Ana; Garcia-Martinez, Ángel; De las Heras, Virginia; Casanova, Ignacio; Faucard, Raphaël; Gehin, Nadège; Madeira, Alexandra; Arroyo, Rafael; Curtin, François; Alvarez-Lafuente, Roberto; Perron, Hervé

    2013-01-01

    Background Multiple Sclerosis is an autoimmune disease more prevalent in women than in men. Multiple Sclerosis Associated Retrovirus element (MSRV) is a member of type-W endogenous retrovirus family (HERV-W), known to be associated to MS. Most HERVs are unable to replicate but MSRV expression associated with reverse-transcriptase activity in MS would explain reported DNA copy number increase in MS patients. A potential link between HERV-W copies on chromosome X and gender differential prevalence has been suggested. The present study addresses MSRV-type DNA load in relation with the gender differences and clinical status in MS and healthy controls. Results 178 MS patients (62.9% women) and 124 controls (56.5% women) were included. MSRV env load (copies/pg of DNA) was analyzed by real time qPCR with specific primers and probe for its env gene, in DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). MSRV load was more elevated in MS patients than in controls (p = 4.15e-7). MS women presented higher MSRV load than control women (p = 0.009) and MS men also had higher load than control men (p = 2.77e-6). Besides, women had higher levels than men, both among patients (p = 0.007) and controls (p = 1.24e-6). Concordantly, EDSS and MSSS scores were higher among female patients with an elevated MSRV load (p = 0.03 and p = 0.04, respectively). Conclusions MSRV increases its copy number in PBMC of MS patients and particularly in women with high clinical scores. This may explain causes underlying the higher prevalence of MS in women. The association with the clinical severity calls for further investigations on MSRV load in PBMCs as a biomarker for MS. PMID:23308264

  1. Gypsy endogenous retrovirus maintains potential infectivity in several species of Drosophilids

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Sequences homologous to the gypsy retroelement from Drosophila melanogaster are widely distributed among drosophilids. The structure of gypsy includes an open reading frame resembling the retroviral gene env, which is responsible for the infectious properties of retroviruses. Results In this study we report molecular and phylogeny analysis of the complete env gene from ten species of the obscura group of the genus Drosophila and one species from the genus Scaptomyza. Conclusion The results indicate that in most cases env sequences could produce a functional Env protein and therefore maintain the infectious capability of gypsy in these species. PMID:18976468

  2. [Microspectrofluorometric analysis of the effect of centrophenoxine on lipofuscin granules of hybridoma (Retrovirus-transformed) cells].

    PubMed

    Tatariunas, A B

    1990-04-01

    The increase of the own luminescence lipofuscin granules (LG) in the course of single and repeated ultraviolet (UV) excitations (365 nm) in hybridoma (retrovirus transformed) cells cultured with or without 5 x 10(-4) M centrophenoxine (CP) was studied by microspectrofluorometric method. It was shown that CP influences only the rate of photochemical changes of chromophores in LG. Kinetic patterns of the own luminescence intensity of LG at the wavelength of 540 nm during excitation by UV permit one to suggest the occurrence of the cyclic chromophore changes.

  3. Identification of a novel subgroup of Koala retrovirus from Koalas in Japanese zoos.

    PubMed

    Shojima, Takayuki; Yoshikawa, Rokusuke; Hoshino, Shigeki; Shimode, Sayumi; Nakagawa, So; Ohata, Takuji; Nakaoka, Rie; Miyazawa, Takayuki

    2013-09-01

    We identified a new subgroup of koala retrovirus (KoRV), named KoRV-J, which utilizes thiamine transport protein 1 as a receptor instead of the Pit-1 receptor used by KoRV (KoRV-A). By subgroup-specific PCR, KoRV-J and KoRV-A were detected in 67.5 and 100% of koalas originating from koalas from northern Australia, respectively. Altogether, our results indicate that the invasion of the koala population by KoRV-J may have occurred more recently than invasion by KoRV-A.

  4. Characterization of a Novel Murine Retrovirus Mixture That Facilitates Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Hook, Lauren M.; Jude, Brooke A.; Ter-Grigorov, Victor S.; Hartley, Janet W.; Morse III, Herbert C.; Trainin, Zeev; Toder, Vladimir; Chervonsky, Alexander V.; Golovkina, Tatyana V.

    2002-01-01

    A new virus previously arose in BALB/c females mated repeatedly to C57BL/6 (B6) males and then injected with fixed, activated B6 male spleen cells (V. S. Ter-Grigorov, O. Krifuks, E. Liubashevsky, A. Nyska, Z. Trainin, and V. Toder, Nat. Med. 3:37-41, 1997). In the present study, BALB/cJ mice inoculated with virus-containing plasma from affected mice developed splenomegaly, which was caused by increased numbers of Sca-1+ Lin− hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and their differentiated progeny. Biological and molecular analyses of a new virus revealed a mixture of murine leukemia viruses (MuLVs). These MuLVs comprised ecotropic and mink lung cell focus-forming (MCF) virus classes and are termed Rauscher-like MuLVs because they bear numerous similarities to the ecotropic and MCF viruses of the Rauscher MuLV complex but do not include a spleen focus-forming virus. The ecotropic virus component alone transferred some disease characteristics, while MCF virus alone did not. Thus, we have described a novel virus mixture, termed Rauscher-like MuLV, that causes an increase in hematopoiesis due to activation of pluripotent HSC. Experiments using mice and a protocol that replicated the pregnancy and immunization strategy of the original experiment demonstrated that endogenous BALB/c mouse ecotropic and xenotropic MuLVs are activated by these treatments. Emv1 was expressed in the spleens of multiparous mice but not in those of virgin mice, and Bxv1Emv1-pseudotyped MuLVs were recovered following injection of fixed, activated B6 cells. Thus, multiple pregnancies and allostimuli appear to have provided the signals required for activation of and recombination among endogenous viruses and could have resulted in generation of the Rauscher-like MuLV mixture. PMID:12414952

  5. Transcriptional and functional studies of Human Endogenous Retrovirus envelope EnvP(b) and EnvV genes in human trophoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Amandine Thiery, Maxime Lafond, Julie Barbeau, Benoit

    2012-03-30

    HERV (Human Endogenous Retrovirus)-encoded envelope proteins are implicated in the development of the placenta. Indeed, Syncytin-1 and -2 play a crucial role in the fusion of human trophoblasts, a key step in placentation. Other studies have identified two other HERV env proteins, namely EnvP(b) and EnvV, both expressed in the placenta. In this study, we have fully characterized both env transcripts and their expression pattern and have assessed their implication in trophoblast fusion. Through RACE analyses, standard spliced transcripts were detected, while EnvV transcripts demonstrated alternative splicing at its 3 Prime end. Promoter activity and expression of both genes were induced in forskolin-stimulated BeWo cells and in primary trophoblasts. Although we have confirmed the fusogenic activity of EnvP(b), overexpression or silencing experiments revealed no impact of this protein on trophoblast fusion. Our results demonstrate that both env genes are expressed in human trophoblasts but are not required for syncytialization.

  6. Ectopic lymphokine gene expression in human peripheral blood lymphocytes in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, C.A.; Kang, Joonsoo; Hozumi, Nobumichi Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario )

    1992-02-01

    An animal model to study the effects of ectopic expression of cytokines involved in cell growth and differentiation has been established. Retrovirus vectors containing the human interleukin 6 cDNA were used to produce high titer virus-producing lines. Human peripheral blood lymphocytes (hPBLs) were successfully infected with the retrovirus and engrafted into severe combined immunodeficient mice. The majority of the animals were engrafted with hPBLs, as determined by the presence of human glucose phosphate isomerase. Furthermore, six of seven mice engrafted with hPBLs infected with high titer virus and detectable hPBLs present in the spleen expressed the retroviral human interleukin 6 gene. Importantly, human interleukin 6 protein was expressed at physiologically significant levels in these mice. These results demonstrate that models for human disease and immunotherapy involving retrovirus-mediated gene transfer into human cells can be developed in mice.

  7. Sequence variation of koala retrovirus transmembrane protein p15E among koalas from different geographic regions.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Yasuko; McCallister, Chelsea; Nikolaidis, Nikolas; Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Helgen, Kristofer M; Greenwood, Alex D; Roca, Alfred L

    2015-01-15

    The koala retrovirus (KoRV), which is transitioning from an exogenous to an endogenous form, has been associated with high mortality in koalas. For other retroviruses, the envelope protein p15E has been considered a candidate for vaccine development. We therefore examined proviral sequence variation of KoRV p15E in a captive Queensland and three wild southern Australian koalas. We generated 163 sequences with intact open reading frames, which grouped into 39 distinct haplotypes. Sixteen distinct haplotypes comprising 139 of the sequences (85%) coded for the same polypeptide. Among the remaining 23 haplotypes, 22 were detected only once among the sequences, and each had 1 or 2 non-synonymous differences from the majority sequence. Several analyses suggested that p15E was under purifying selection. Important epitopes and domains were highly conserved across the p15E sequences and in previously reported exogenous KoRVs. Overall, these results support the potential use of p15E for KoRV vaccine development.

  8. The human retrovirus XMRV in prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Robert H; Nguyen, Carvell; Weight, Christopher J; Klein, Eric A

    2010-07-01

    Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is an authentic, newly recognized human retrovirus first identified in prostate cancer tissues from men with a deficiency in the innate immunity gene RNASEL. At present, studies have detected XMRV at widely different rates in prostate cancer cases (0-27%) and in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS; 0-67%). Indirect or direct modes of carcinogenesis by XMRV have been suggested depending on whether the virus was found in stroma or malignant epithelium. Viral replication in the prostate might be affected by androgens, which stimulate XMRV through a transcriptional enhancer site in viral DNA. By contrast, host restriction factors, such as APOBEC3 and tetherin, inhibit virus replication. Immune dysfunction mediated by XMRV has been suggested as a possible factor in CFS. Recent studies show that some existing antiretroviral drugs suppress XMRV infections and diagnostic assays are under development. Although other retroviruses of the same genus as XMRV (gammaretroviruses) cause cancer and neurological disease in animals, whether XMRV is a cause of either prostate cancer or CFS remains unknown. Emerging science surrounding XMRV is contributing to our knowledge of retroviral infections while focusing intense interest on two major human diseases.

  9. Messenger RNA- Versus Retrovirus-Based Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Reprogramming Strategies: Analysis of Genomic Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Steichen, Clara; Luce, Eléanor; Maluenda, Jérôme; Tosca, Lucie; Moreno-Gimeno, Inmaculada; Desterke, Christophe; Dianat, Noushin; Goulinet-Mainot, Sylvie; Awan-Toor, Sarah; Burks, Deborah; Marie, Joëlle; Weber, Anne; Tachdjian, Gérard; Melki, Judith

    2014-01-01

    The use of synthetic messenger RNAs to generate human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is particularly appealing for potential regenerative medicine applications, because it overcomes the common drawbacks of DNA-based or virus-based reprogramming strategies, including transgene integration in particular. We compared the genomic integrity of mRNA-derived iPSCs with that of retrovirus-derived iPSCs generated in strictly comparable conditions, by single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and copy number variation (CNV) analyses. We showed that mRNA-derived iPSCs do not differ significantly from the parental fibroblasts in SNP analysis, whereas retrovirus-derived iPSCs do. We found that the number of CNVs seemed independent of the reprogramming method, instead appearing to be clone-dependent. Furthermore, differentiation studies indicated that mRNA-derived iPSCs differentiated efficiently into hepatoblasts and that these cells did not load additional CNVs during differentiation. The integration-free hepatoblasts that were generated constitute a new tool for the study of diseased hepatocytes derived from patients’ iPSCs and their use in the context of stem cell-derived hepatocyte transplantation. Our findings also highlight the need to conduct careful studies on genome integrity for the selection of iPSC lines before using them for further applications. PMID:24736403

  10. Messenger RNA- versus retrovirus-based induced pluripotent stem cell reprogramming strategies: analysis of genomic integrity.

    PubMed

    Steichen, Clara; Luce, Eléanor; Maluenda, Jérôme; Tosca, Lucie; Moreno-Gimeno, Inmaculada; Desterke, Christophe; Dianat, Noushin; Goulinet-Mainot, Sylvie; Awan-Toor, Sarah; Burks, Deborah; Marie, Joëlle; Weber, Anne; Tachdjian, Gérard; Melki, Judith; Dubart-Kupperschmitt, Anne

    2014-06-01

    The use of synthetic messenger RNAs to generate human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is particularly appealing for potential regenerative medicine applications, because it overcomes the common drawbacks of DNA-based or virus-based reprogramming strategies, including transgene integration in particular. We compared the genomic integrity of mRNA-derived iPSCs with that of retrovirus-derived iPSCs generated in strictly comparable conditions, by single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and copy number variation (CNV) analyses. We showed that mRNA-derived iPSCs do not differ significantly from the parental fibroblasts in SNP analysis, whereas retrovirus-derived iPSCs do. We found that the number of CNVs seemed independent of the reprogramming method, instead appearing to be clone-dependent. Furthermore, differentiation studies indicated that mRNA-derived iPSCs differentiated efficiently into hepatoblasts and that these cells did not load additional CNVs during differentiation. The integration-free hepatoblasts that were generated constitute a new tool for the study of diseased hepatocytes derived from patients' iPSCs and their use in the context of stem cell-derived hepatocyte transplantation. Our findings also highlight the need to conduct careful studies on genome integrity for the selection of iPSC lines before using them for further applications.

  11. Hybridization Capture Reveals Evolution and Conservation across the Entire Koala Retrovirus Genome

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Yasuko; Cui, Pin; Vielgrader, Hanna; Helgen, Kristofer M.; Roca, Alfred L.; Greenwood, Alex D.

    2014-01-01

    The koala retrovirus (KoRV) is the only retrovirus known to be in the midst of invading the germ line of its host species. Hybridization capture and next generation sequencing were used on modern and museum DNA samples of koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) to examine ca. 130 years of evolution across the full KoRV genome. Overall, the entire proviral genome appeared to be conserved across time in sequence, protein structure and transcriptional binding sites. A total of 138 polymorphisms were detected, of which 72 were found in more than one individual. At every polymorphic site in the museum koalas, one of the character states matched that of modern KoRV. Among non-synonymous polymorphisms, radical substitutions involving large physiochemical differences between amino acids were elevated in env, potentially reflecting anti-viral immune pressure or avoidance of receptor interference. Polymorphisms were not detected within two functional regions believed to affect infectivity. Host sequences flanking proviral integration sites were also captured; with few proviral loci shared among koalas. Recently described variants of KoRV, designated KoRV-B and KoRV-J, were not detected in museum samples, suggesting that these variants may be of recent origin. PMID:24752422

  12. Unique spectrum of activity of prosimian TRIM5alpha against exogenous and endogenous retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Rahm, Nadia; Yap, Melvyn; Snoeck, Joke; Zoete, Vincent; Muñoz, Miguel; Radespiel, Ute; Zimmermann, Elke; Michielin, Olivier; Stoye, Jonathan P; Ciuffi, Angela; Telenti, Amalio

    2011-05-01

    Lentiviruses, the genus of retrovirus that includes HIV-1, rarely endogenize. Some lemurs uniquely possess an endogenous lentivirus called PSIV ("prosimian immunodeficiency virus"). Thus, lemurs provide the opportunity to study the activity of host defense factors, such as TRIM5α, in the setting of germ line invasion. We characterized the activities of TRIM5α proteins from two distant lemurs against exogenous retroviruses and a chimeric PSIV. TRIM5α from gray mouse lemur, which carries PSIV in its genome, exhibited the narrowest restriction activity. One allelic variant of gray mouse lemur TRIM5α restricted only N-tropic murine leukemia virus (N-MLV), while a second variant restricted N-MLV and, uniquely, B-tropic MLV (B-MLV); both variants poorly blocked PSIV. In contrast, TRIM5α from ring-tailed lemur, which does not contain PSIV in its genome, revealed one of the broadest antiviral activities reported to date against lentiviruses, including PSIV. Investigation into the antiviral specificity of ring-tailed lemur TRIM5α demonstrated a major contribution of a 32-amino-acid expansion in variable region 2 (v2) of the B30.2/SPRY domain to the breadth of restriction. Data on lemur TRIM5α and the prediction of ancestral simian sequences hint at an evolutionary scenario where antiretroviral specificity is prominently defined by the lineage-specific expansion of the variable loops of B30.2/SPRY. PMID:21345948

  13. Hybridization capture reveals evolution and conservation across the entire Koala retrovirus genome.

    PubMed

    Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Siracusa, Matthew C; Nikolaidis, Nikolas; Ishida, Yasuko; Cui, Pin; Vielgrader, Hanna; Helgen, Kristofer M; Roca, Alfred L; Greenwood, Alex D

    2014-01-01

    The koala retrovirus (KoRV) is the only retrovirus known to be in the midst of invading the germ line of its host species. Hybridization capture and next generation sequencing were used on modern and museum DNA samples of koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) to examine ca. 130 years of evolution across the full KoRV genome. Overall, the entire proviral genome appeared to be conserved across time in sequence, protein structure and transcriptional binding sites. A total of 138 polymorphisms were detected, of which 72 were found in more than one individual. At every polymorphic site in the museum koalas, one of the character states matched that of modern KoRV. Among non-synonymous polymorphisms, radical substitutions involving large physiochemical differences between amino acids were elevated in env, potentially reflecting anti-viral immune pressure or avoidance of receptor interference. Polymorphisms were not detected within two functional regions believed to affect infectivity. Host sequences flanking proviral integration sites were also captured; with few proviral loci shared among koalas. Recently described variants of KoRV, designated KoRV-B and KoRV-J, were not detected in museum samples, suggesting that these variants may be of recent origin.

  14. Are human endogenous retroviruses triggers of autoimmune diseases? Unveiling associations of three diseases and viral loci.

    PubMed

    Nexø, Bjørn A; Villesen, Palle; Nissen, Kari K; Lindegaard, Hanne M; Rossing, Peter; Petersen, Thor; Tarnow, Lise; Hansen, Bettina; Lorenzen, Tove; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim; Jensen, Sara B; Bahrami, Shervin; Lajer, Maria; Schmidt, Kathrine L M; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Junker, Peter; Laska, Magdalena J

    2016-02-01

    Autoimmune diseases encompass a plethora of conditions in which the immune system attacks its own tissue, identifying them as foreign. Multiple factors are thought to contribute to the development of immune response to self, including differences in genotypes, hormonal milieu, and environmental factors. Viruses including human endogenous retroviruses have long been linked to the occurrence of autoimmunity, but never proven to be causative factors. Endogenous viruses are retroviral sequences embedded in the host germline DNA and transmitted vertically through successive generations in a Mendelian manner. In this study by means of genetic epidemiology, we have searched for the involvement of endogenous retroviruses in three selected autoimmune diseases: multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and rheumatoid arthritis. We found that at least one human endogenous retroviral locus was associated with each of the three diseases. Although there was a significant overlap, most loci only occurred in one of the studied disease. Remarkably, within each disease, there was a statistical interaction (synergy) between two loci. Additional synergy between retroviral loci and human lymphocyte antigens is reported for multiple sclerosis. We speculate the possibility that recombinants or mixed viral particles are formed and that the resulting viruses stimulate the innate immune system, thereby initiating the autoimmune response. PMID:26091722

  15. A retrovirus isolated from cell lines derived from neurofibromas in bicolor damselfish (Pomacentrus partitus).

    PubMed

    Schmale, M C; Aman, M R; Gill, K A

    1996-06-01

    Damselfish neurofibromatosis (DNF) is a naturally occurring, neoplastic disease affecting bicolor damselfish (Pomacentrus partitus) living on coral reefs in southern Florida, USA. The disease consists of multiple neurofibromas, neurofibrosarcomas and chromatophoromas and has been proposed as an animal model for neurofibromatosis type 1 in humans. DNF is transmissible by injection of crude tumour homogenates, cell-free filtrates of homogenates or cells from tumour cell lines. An analysis of tumorigenic cell lines derived from fish with spontaneous or experimentally induced DNF revealed virus particles budding from cells and present in conditioned media. The 90-110 nm particles resembled type C retroviruses. This virus exhibited a buoyant density of 1.14-1.17 g/cm2 in sucrose, at least six virus proteins of 15 to 80 kDa and reverse transcriptase (RT) activity. RT activity was maximized with a poly(rC).oligo(dG) template.primer combination and Mn2+ at a concentration of 0.5-1.0 mM. The optimum temperature for RT was determined to be 20 degrees C, a finding consistent with the ambient temperatures encountered by this species. This retrovirus, tentatively named damselfish neurofibromatosis virus (DNFV) may be the aetiological agent of DNF. Whether DNFV or another, as yet unidentified, virus is the cause of DNF, this agent may be unique in virus oncogenesis; neoplastic transformation of the cell types involved in DNF, Schwann cells and chromatophores, has not been documented in any other transmissible tumour.

  16. Sequence variation of koala retrovirus transmembrane protein p15E among koalas from different geographic regions.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Yasuko; McCallister, Chelsea; Nikolaidis, Nikolas; Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Helgen, Kristofer M; Greenwood, Alex D; Roca, Alfred L

    2015-01-15

    The koala retrovirus (KoRV), which is transitioning from an exogenous to an endogenous form, has been associated with high mortality in koalas. For other retroviruses, the envelope protein p15E has been considered a candidate for vaccine development. We therefore examined proviral sequence variation of KoRV p15E in a captive Queensland and three wild southern Australian koalas. We generated 163 sequences with intact open reading frames, which grouped into 39 distinct haplotypes. Sixteen distinct haplotypes comprising 139 of the sequences (85%) coded for the same polypeptide. Among the remaining 23 haplotypes, 22 were detected only once among the sequences, and each had 1 or 2 non-synonymous differences from the majority sequence. Several analyses suggested that p15E was under purifying selection. Important epitopes and domains were highly conserved across the p15E sequences and in previously reported exogenous KoRVs. Overall, these results support the potential use of p15E for KoRV vaccine development. PMID:25462343

  17. Chromosomal distribution of endogenous Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus proviral sequences in the sheep genome.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Jonathan; Lyon, Monique; Bishop, Jeanette; Vaiman, Anne; Cribiu, Edmond; Mornex, Jean-François; Brown, Susan; Knudson, Dennis; DeMartini, James; Leroux, Caroline

    2003-09-01

    A family of endogenous retroviruses (enJSRV) closely related to Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV) is ubiquitous in domestic and wild sheep and goats. Southern blot hybridization studies indicate that there is little active replication or movement of the enJSRV proviruses in these species. Two approaches were used to investigate the distribution of proviral loci in the sheep genome. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to metaphase chromosome spreads using viral DNA probes was used to detect loci on chromosomes. Hybridization signals were reproducibly detected on seven sheep chromosomes and eight goat chromosomes in seven cell lines. In addition, a panel of 30 sheep-hamster hybrid cell lines, each of which carries one or more sheep chromosomes and which collectively contain the whole sheep genome, was examined for enJSRV sequences. DNA from each of the lines was used as a template for PCR with JSRV gag-specific primers. A PCR product was amplified from 27 of the hybrid lines, indicating that JSRV gag sequences are found on at least 15 of the 28 sheep chromosomes, including those identified by FISH. Thus, enJSRV proviruses are essentially randomly distributed among the chromosomes of sheep and goats. FISH and/or Southern blot hybridization on DNA from several of the sheep-hamster hybrid cell lines suggests that loci containing multiple copies of enJSRV are present on chromosomes 6 and 9. The origin and functional significance of these arrays is not known. PMID:12915578

  18. Distribution of endogenous type B and type D sheep retrovirus sequences in ungulates and other mammals.

    PubMed

    Hecht, S J; Stedman, K E; Carlson, J O; DeMartini, J C

    1996-04-16

    The jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV), which appears to be a type B/D retrovirus chimera, has been incriminated as the cause of ovine pulmonary carcinoma. Recent studies suggest that the sequences related to this virus are found in the genomes of normal sheep and goats. To learn whether there are breeds of sheep that lack the endogenous viral sequences and to study their distribution among other groups of mammals, we surveyed several domestic sheep and goat breeds, other ungulates, and various mammal groups for sequences related to JSRV. Probes prepared from the envelope (SU) region of JSRV and the capsid (CA) region of a Peruvian type D virus related to JSRV were used in Southern blot hybridization with genomic DNA followed by low- and high-stringency washes. Fifteen to 20 CA and SU bands were found in all members of the 13 breeds of domestic sheep and 6 breeds of goats tested. There were similar findings in 6 wild Ovis and Capra genera. Within 22 other genera of Bovidae including domestic cattle, and 7 other families of Artiodactyla including Cervidae, there were usually a few CA or SU bands at low stringency and rare bands at high stringency. Among 16 phylogenetically distant genera, there were generally fewer bands hybridizing with either probe. These results reveal wide-spread phylogenetic distribution of endogenous type B and type D retroviral sequences related to JSRV among mammals and argue for further investigation of their potential role in disease. PMID:8622932

  19. The histone methyltransferase SETDB1 represses endogenous and exogenous retroviruses in B lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Patrick L.; Kyle, Katherine E.; Egawa, Takeshi; Shinkai, Yoichi; Oltz, Eugene M.

    2015-01-01

    Genome stability relies on epigenetic mechanisms that enforce repression of endogenous retroviruses (ERVs). Current evidence suggests that distinct chromatin-based mechanisms repress ERVs in cells of embryonic origin (histone methylation dominant) vs. more differentiated cells (DNA methylation dominant). However, the latter aspect of this model has not been tested. Remarkably, and in contrast to the prevailing model, we find that repressive histone methylation catalyzed by the enzyme SETDB1 is critical for suppression of specific ERV families and exogenous retroviruses in committed B-lineage cells from adult mice. The profile of ERV activation in SETDB1-deficient B cells is distinct from that observed in corresponding embryonic tissues, despite the loss of repressive chromatin modifications at all ERVs. We provide evidence that, on loss of SETDB1, ERVs are activated in a lineage-specific manner depending on the set of transcription factors available to target proviral regulatory elements. These findings have important implications for genome stability in somatic cells, as well as the interface between epigenetic repression and viral latency. PMID:26100872

  20. Integrated process optimization: lessons from retrovirus and virus-like particle production.

    PubMed

    Cruz, P E; Maranga, L; Carrondo, M J T

    2002-11-13

    The optimization of production and purification processes is usually approached by engineers from a strictly biotechnological point of view. The present paper envisages the definition and application of an optimization model that takes into account the impact of both biological and technological issues upon the optimization protocols and strategies. For this purpose, the optimization of three analogous but different systems comprising animal cell growth and bioparticle production is presented. These systems were: human immunodeficiency 1 (HIV-1) and porcine parvovirus (PPV) virus-like particles (VLPs) produced in insect cells and retrovirus produced in mammalian cells. For the systematization of the optimization process four levels of optimization were defined-product, technology, design and integration. In this paper, the limits of each of the optimization levels defined are discussed by applying the concept to the systems described. This analysis leads to decisions regarding the production of VLPs and retrovirus as well as on the points relevant for further process development. Finally, the definition of the objective function or performance index, the possible strategies and tools for bioprocess optimization are described. Although developed from the three described processes, this approach can, based on the recent literature evidence reviewed here, be applied more universally for the process development of complex biopharmaceuticals.

  1. Utility of next-generation RNA-sequencing in identifying chimeric transcription involving human endogenous retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Sokol, Martin; Jessen, Karen Margrethe; Pedersen, Finn Skou

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have shown that human endogenous retroviruses and endogenous retrovirus-like repeats (here collectively HERVs) impose direct regulation on human genes through enhancer and promoter motifs present in their long terminal repeats (LTRs). Although chimeric transcription in which novel gene isoforms containing retroviral and human sequence are transcribed from viral promoters are commonly associated with disease, regulation by HERVs is beneficial in other settings; for example, in human testis chimeric isoforms of TP63 induced by an ERV9 LTR protect the male germ line upon DNA damage by inducing apoptosis, whereas in the human globin locus the γ- and β-globin switch during normal hematopoiesis is mediated by complex interactions of an ERV9 LTR and surrounding human sequence. The advent of deep sequencing or next-generation sequencing (NGS) has revolutionized the way researchers solve important scientific questions and develop novel hypotheses in relation to human genome regulation. We recently applied next-generation paired-end RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) together with chromatin immunoprecipitation with sequencing (ChIP-seq) to examine ERV9 chimeric transcription in human reference cell lines from Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE). This led to the discovery of advanced regulation mechanisms by ERV9s and other HERVs across numerous human loci including transcription of large gene-unannotated genomic regions, as well as cooperative regulation by multiple HERVs and non-LTR repeats such as Alu elements. In this article, well-established examples of human gene regulation by HERVs are reviewed followed by a description of paired-end RNA-seq, and its application in identifying chimeric transcription genome-widely. Based on integrative analyses of RNA-seq and ChIP-seq, data we then present novel examples of regulation by ERV9s of tumor suppressor genes CADM2 and SEMA3A, as well as transcription of an unannotated region. Taken together, this article highlights

  2. The xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related retrovirus debate continues at first international workshop.

    PubMed

    Stoye, Jonathan P; Silverman, Robert H; Boucher, Charles A; Le Grice, Stuart F J

    2010-12-22

    The 1st International Workshop on Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-Related Retrovirus (XMRV), co-sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, The Department of Health and Human Services and Abbott Diagnostics, was convened on September 7/8, 2010 on the NIH campus, Bethesda, MD. Attracting an international audience of over 200 participants, the 2-day event combined a series of plenary talks with updates on different aspects of XMRV research, addressing basic gammaretrovirus biology, host response, association of XMRV with chronic fatigue syndrome and prostate cancer, assay development and epidemiology. The current status of XMRV research, concerns among the scientific community and suggestions for future actions are summarized in this meeting report.

  3. Functional T lymphocytes are required for a murine retrovirus-induced immunodeficiency disease (MAIDS)

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Athymic nu/nu mice were found to be resistant to the immunodeficiency disease and lethality induced in normal mice by the injection of the LP- BM5 mixture of murine retroviruses (LP-BM5 MuLV). Susceptibility to disease induction was reconstituted by injection of nu/nu mice with purified, mature T lymphocytes. The extent of viral replication of both the ecotropic and mink cell focus forming (MCF) components of LP-BM5 MuLV was equivalent in both nu/nu and normal animals. Retrovirally- induced immunodeficiency disease in mice (MAIDS) is thus dependent upon the presence of functional T lymphocytes, and high virus titers in athymic mice have little or no effect on the immune system. PMID:3035057

  4. Efficient retrovirus-mediated transfer of cell-cycle control genes to transformed cells.

    PubMed

    Strauss, B E; Costanzi-Strauss, E

    1999-07-01

    The use of gene therapy continues to be a promising, yet elusive, alternative for the treatment of cancer. The origins of cancer must be well understood so that the therapeutic gene can be chosen with the highest chance of successful tumor regression. The gene delivery system must be tailored for optimum transfer of the therapeutic gene to the target tissue. In order to accomplish this, we study models of G1 cell-cycle control in both normal and transformed cells in order to understand the reasons for uncontrolled cellular proliferation. We then use this information to choose the gene to be delivered to the cells. We have chosen to study p16, p21, p53 and pRb gene transfer using the pCL-retrovirus. Described here are some general concepts and specific results of our work that indicate continued hope for the development of genetically based cancer treatments.

  5. The sequence of carnation etched ring virus DNA: comparison with cauliflower mosaic virus and retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Hull, R.; Sadler, J.; Longstaff, M.

    1986-01-01

    Carnation etched ring virus (CERV) DNA comprises 7932 bp. CERV primer binding sites and overall genome organization are similar to those of the related cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV). The six open reading frames of CERV showed amino acid homology (50-80%) with CaMV ORFs I-VI; no homologues of CaMV ORFs VII or VIII were found. CERV ORFs 1-5 interface each other with the sequence ATGA. The comparison of CERV ORF5 with CaMV ORFV highlighted regions which show homologies to retrovirus gag/pol protease, RNase H and DNA polymerase domains; the possibility that the DNA polymerase domain comprises two subdomains, operating off different templates, is discussed. Both CERV and CaMV ORFs I have sequence homology to tobacco mosaic virus P30 and plastocyanin. PMID:16453731

  6. Neutralizing antibody prevents type D retrovirus viremia in Celebes black macaques.

    PubMed

    Wilson, B J; Shiigi, S M; Zeigler, J L; Olson, L C; Malley, A; Howard, C F

    1986-08-01

    The Celebes black macaque (Macaca nigra) colony at the Oregon Regional Primate Research Center has a high incidence of simian acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (SAIDS-RF) that may be caused by type D retrovirus type 2 (SRV-2). During the spring and autumn screening of the colony, seven monkeys previously aviremic were found to be viremic on the basis of the Raji co-culture assay. These monkeys and control groups were selected for further study, which included titration of neutralizing antibody activity and immunofluorescent antibody (IFA) activity before and at the time that the animals became viremic. Results indicated that neutralizing antibody was not present before or at the time that monkeys became viremic and that control monkeys who were IFA+ and did not become viremic had high levels of neutralizing antibody. The IFA titre did not change significantly or predictably at the time the animals became viremic.

  7. Identification of cellular factors required for the budding of koala retrovirus.

    PubMed

    Shimode, Sayumi; Nakaoka, Rie; Hoshino, Shigeki; Abe, Masumi; Shogen, Hiroko; Yasuda, Jiro; Miyazawa, Takayuki

    2013-07-01

    Koala retrovirus (KoRV) is a unique gammaretrovirus that is currently endogenizing into its host and considered to be associated with leukemia, lymphoma and immunosuppression in koalas (Phascolactos cinereus). In this study, it was demonstrated that WWP2 or WWP2-like E3 ubiquitin ligases possessing the WW domain closely related to WWP2 and Vps4A/B are involved in KoRV budding. These data suggest that KoRV Gag recruits the cellular endosomal sorting complex required for transport machinery through interaction of the PPPY L-domain with the WW domain(s) of WWP2 and that progeny virions are released from cells by utilizing the multivesicular body sorting pathway.

  8. Characterization and partial nucleotide sequence of endogenous type C retrovirus segments in human chromosomal DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Repaske, R; O'Neill, R R; Steele, P E; Martin, M A

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-six different murine leukemia virus (MuLV)-related clones have been isolated from a human DNA library and characterized by restriction enzyme mapping and reciprocal nucleic acid hybridization reactions. The sequence of approximately 2,600 nucleotides, spanning more than 4.0 kilobases, of one of the MuLV-related cloned human DNAs was also determined. The deduced amino acid sequence permitted the alignment of this prototype cloned human DNA segment with the p12 gag, p30 gag, p10 gag, and pol regions of Moloney MuLV. A majority of the endogenous type C retrovirus-related segments present in human DNA are approximately 6.0 kilobases in size and appear to contain a deletion of env sequences. Images PMID:6298769

  9. Evolution of Foamy Viruses: The Most Ancient of All Retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Rethwilm, Axel; Bodem, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that foamy viruses (FVs) are the oldest retroviruses (RVs) that we know and coevolved with their hosts for several hundred million years. This coevolution may have contributed to the non-pathogenicity of FVs, an important factor in development of foamy viral vectors in gene therapy. However, various questions on the molecular evolution of FVs remain still unanswered. The analysis of the spectrum of animal species infected by exogenous FVs or harboring endogenous FV elements in their genome is pivotal. Furthermore, animal studies might reveal important issues, such as the identification of the FV in vivo target cells, which than require a detailed characterization, to resolve the molecular basis of the accuracy with which FVs copy their genome. The issues of the extent of FV viremia and of the nature of the virion genome (RNA vs. DNA) also need to be experimentally addressed. PMID:24072062

  10. Investigating human T cell lymphotropic retrovirus (HTLV) Tax function with molecular and immunophenotypic techniques.

    PubMed

    Forlani, Greta; Accolla, Roberto S; Tosi, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    Human T cell Lymphotropic Viruses 1 and 2 (HTLV-1 and HTLV-2) are the first described human retroviruses. HTLV-1 is the causative agent of an aggressive malignancy of CD4+ T lymphocytes named adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) and of a chronic neurological disease known as HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). HTLV-2 shares many similarities with HTLV-1, but displays lower or absent association to diseases. Among the proteins encoded by HTLVs, the viral transactivator Tax exerts an essential role in viral transcription as well as in cell transformation. Different experimental methods to study Tax activity on HTLV-LTR promoter and Tax subcellular distribution are described. Emphasis is given to the functional and physical interaction between Tax-1/Tax-2 and cellular cofactors which may have an impact on the infectivity process of the HTLVs and on the capacity of cell transformation.

  11. Purification of proteins specifically binding human endogenous retrovirus K long terminal repeat by affinity elution chromatography.

    PubMed

    Trubetskoy, D O; Zavalova, L L; Akopov, S B; Nikolaev, L G

    2002-11-01

    A novel affinity elution procedure for purification of DNA-binding proteins was developed and employed to purify to near homogeneity the proteins recognizing a 21 base pair sequence within the long terminal repeat of human endogenous retroviruses K. The approach involves loading the initial protein mixture on a heparin-agarose column and elution of protein(s) of interest with a solution of double-stranded oligonucleotide containing binding sites of the protein(s). The affinity elution has several advantages over conventional DNA-affinity chromatography: (i) it is easier and faster, permitting to isolate proteins in a 1 day-one stage procedure; (ii) yield of a target protein is severalfold higher than that in DNA-affinity chromatography; (iii) it is not necessary to prepare a special affinity support for each factor to be isolated. Theaffinity elution could be a useful alternative to conventional DNA-affinity chromatography.

  12. Analysis of jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV) envelope protein domains in transformation.

    PubMed

    Hull, Stacey; Lim, Joohyun; Hamil, Alexander; Nitta, Takayuki; Fan, Hung

    2012-12-01

    Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV) is the causative agent of a transmissible lung cancer in sheep. A unique feature is that JSRV envelope protein is also the oncogene for this virus. Previous studies have identified the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of the envelope transmembrane (TM) protein as critical for transformation although other regions of Env have also been implicated. In this study, the roles of other Env regions in transformation were investigated. Chimeras between JSRV Env and the Env of a related non-oncogenic endogenous retrovirus (enJSRV, 5F16) were used. A chimera containing the membrane-spanning region (MSR) of enJSRV inserted into JSRV Env showed substantially reduced transformation, indicating that the MSR plays a role in transformation. Transformation by this chimera was highly dependent on both Ras/Raf/MEK/MAPK and PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling. A chimera containing the two amino acids in the TM ectodomain that distinguish JSRV and enJSRV showed modestly reduced transformation. Chimeras in the SU protein indicated that the amino terminal region of SU contributes to transformation, while the C-terminal part is not important. To test if Env trimerization is important for transformation, we mutated a leucine-rich sequence in the putative trimerization domain in the ectodomain of TM (Tri-M). This mutant could not transform cells and it did not oligomerize. However, Tri-M could complement a non-transforming mutant CT mutant (Y590F) so oligomerization is not necessary for at least some aspects of transformation. These experiments provide new insight into the regions and residues of JSRV Env protein necessary for oncogenic transformation.

  13. Distribution of a macaque immunosuppressive type D retrovirus in neural, lymphoid, and salivary tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Lackner, A.A.; Rodriguez, M.H.; Bush, C.E.; Munn, R.J.; Kwang, Hweising; Moore, P.F.; Osborn, K.G.; Marx, P.A.; Gardner, M.B.; Lowenstine, L.J. )

    1988-06-01

    Simian acquired immune deficiency syndrome (SAIDS) in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) at the California Primate Research Center is caused by a type D retrovirus designated SAIDS retrovirus serotype 1 (SRV-1). This syndrome is characterized by profound immunosuppression and death associated with opportunistic infections. Neurologic signs and lesions have not been described as part of this syndrome. The distribution of SRV-1 in the salivary glands, lymph nodes, spleens, thymuses, and brains of eight virus-infected rhesus macaques was examined by immunohistochemistry. Electron microscopy, in situ RNA hybridization, and Southern blot hybridization were also performed on selected tissues to detect viral particles, RNA, and DNA, respectively. In seven of eight SRV-1-infected animals, the transmembrane envelope glycoprotein (gp20) of SRV-1 was present in three or more tissues, but never in the brain. In the remaining animal, no viral antigen was detected in any tissue. In this same group of animals, viral nucleic acid was detected in the lymph nodes of six of six animals by Southern blot hybridization, in the salivary glands of two of five animals by both Southern blot and in situ hybridizations, and, surprisingly, in the brains of three of three animals by Southern blot and of three of five animals by in situ hybridization, including the one animal in which viral gp20 was undetectable. None of these animals had neurologic signs or lesions. The detection of viral nucleic acid in the absence of viral antigen in the brain suggests latent SRV-1 infection of the central nervous system.

  14. Evolutionary Relationships among Extinct and Extant Sloths: The Evidence of Mitogenomes and Retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Slater, Graham J; Cui, Pin; Forasiepi, Analía M; Lenz, Dorina; Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Voirin, Bryson; de Moraes-Barros, Nadia; MacPhee, Ross D E; Greenwood, Alex D

    2016-02-14

    Macroevolutionary trends exhibited by retroviruses are complex and not entirely understood. The sloth endogenized foamy-like retrovirus (SloEFV), which demonstrates incongruence in virus-host evolution among extant sloths (Order Folivora), has not been investigated heretofore in any extinct sloth lineages and its premodern history within folivorans is therefore unknown. Determining retroviral coevolutionary trends requires a robust phylogeny of the viral host, but the highly reduced modern sloth fauna (6 species in 2 genera) does not adequately represent what was once a highly diversified clade (∼100 genera) of placental mammals. At present, the amount of molecular data available for extinct sloth taxa is limited, and analytical results based on these data tend to conflict with phylogenetic inferences made on the basis of morphological studies. To augment the molecular data set, we applied hybridization capture and next-generation Illumina sequencing to two extinct and three extant sloth species to retrieve full mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) from the hosts and the polymerase gene of SloEFV. The results produced a fully resolved and well-supported phylogeny that supports dividing crown families into two major clades: 1) The three-toed sloth, Bradypus, and Nothrotheriidae and 2) Megalonychidae, including the two-toed sloth, Choloepus, and Mylodontidae. Our calibrated time tree indicates that the Miocene epoch (23.5 Ma), particularly its earlier part, was an important interval for folivoran diversification. Both extant and extinct sloths demonstrate multiple complex invasions of SloEFV into the ancestral sloth germline followed by subsequent introgressions across different sloth lineages. Thus, sloth mitogenome and SloEFV evolution occurred separately and in parallel among sloths.

  15. [Pathological Diagnoses and Whole-genome Sequence Analyses of the Jaagsiekte Sheep Retrovirus in Xinjiang, China].

    PubMed

    Yang, Sufang; Liang, Tian; Zhao, Qingliang; Zhang, Dianqing; Si Junqiang; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Xia; Sheng, Jinliang

    2015-05-01

    To carry out pathologic diagnoses and whole-genome sequence analyses of the Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV) in Xinjiang, China, we first observed sheep suspected to have the JSRV. Then, the extracted virus suspension was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Total RNAs from lungs of JSRV-infected sheep were extracted and reverse-transcribed using a cDNA synthesis kit. Six pairs of primers were designed according to the exogenous reference virus strain (AF105220). Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was carried out from JSRV-infected tissue, and the whole genome of the JSRV sequenced. Our results showed: flow of nasal fluid ("wheelbarrow test"); different sizes of adenoma lesions in the lungs; papillary hyperplasia of alveolar epithelial cells; alveolar cavity filled with macrophages; dissolute nuclei in central lesions. TEM revealed JSRV particles with a diameter of 88 nm to 125. 4 nm. The full-length of the viral genome sequence was 7456 bp. BLAST analyses showed nucleotide homology of 96% and 95% compared with that of the representative strain from the USA (AF105220) and UK (AF357971). Nucleotide homology was 89.8% and 89.9% compared with the endogenous Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus, Inner Mongolia strain (DQ838493) and USA strain (EF680300). The specific pathogenic amino-acid sequence "YXXM" was found in the TM district, similar to the exogenous JSRV: this gene has been reported to be oncogenic. This is the first report of the complete genomic sequence of the exogenous JSRV from Xinjiang, and could lay the foundation for study of the biological characteristics and pathogenic mechanisms of the pulmonary adenomatosis virus in sheep. PMID:26470525

  16. Evolutionary Relationships among Extinct and Extant Sloths: The Evidence of Mitogenomes and Retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Slater, Graham J.; Cui, Pin; Forasiepi, Analía M.; Lenz, Dorina; Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Voirin, Bryson; de Moraes-Barros, Nadia; MacPhee, Ross D. E.; Greenwood, Alex D.

    2016-01-01

    Macroevolutionary trends exhibited by retroviruses are complex and not entirely understood. The sloth endogenized foamy-like retrovirus (SloEFV), which demonstrates incongruence in virus–host evolution among extant sloths (Order Folivora), has not been investigated heretofore in any extinct sloth lineages and its premodern history within folivorans is therefore unknown. Determining retroviral coevolutionary trends requires a robust phylogeny of the viral host, but the highly reduced modern sloth fauna (6 species in 2 genera) does not adequately represent what was once a highly diversified clade (∼100 genera) of placental mammals. At present, the amount of molecular data available for extinct sloth taxa is limited, and analytical results based on these data tend to conflict with phylogenetic inferences made on the basis of morphological studies. To augment the molecular data set, we applied hybridization capture and next-generation Illumina sequencing to two extinct and three extant sloth species to retrieve full mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) from the hosts and the polymerase gene of SloEFV. The results produced a fully resolved and well-supported phylogeny that supports dividing crown families into two major clades: 1) The three-toed sloth, Bradypus, and Nothrotheriidae and 2) Megalonychidae, including the two-toed sloth, Choloepus, and Mylodontidae. Our calibrated time tree indicates that the Miocene epoch (23.5 Ma), particularly its earlier part, was an important interval for folivoran diversification. Both extant and extinct sloths demonstrate multiple complex invasions of SloEFV into the ancestral sloth germline followed by subsequent introgressions across different sloth lineages. Thus, sloth mitogenome and SloEFV evolution occurred separately and in parallel among sloths. PMID:26878870

  17. Partial molecular cloning of the JHK retrovirus using gammaretrovirus consensus PCR primers

    PubMed Central

    Halligan, Brian D; Sun, Hai-Yuan; Kushnaryov, Vladimir M; Grossberg, Sidney E

    2013-01-01

    The JHK virus (JHKV) was previously described as a type C retrovirus that has some distinctive ultrastructural features and replicates constitutively in a human B-lymphoblastoid cell line, JHK-3. In order to facilitate the cloning of sequences from JHKV, a series of partially degenerate consensus retroviral PCR primers were created by a data-driven design approach based on an alignment of 14 diverse gammaretroviral genomes. These primers were used in the PCR amplification of purified JHK virion cDNA, and ana lysis of the resulting amplified sequence indicates that the JHKV is in the murine leukemia virus (MLV) family. The JHK sequence is nearly identical to the corresponding region of the Bxv-1 endogenous mouse retrovirus (GenBank accession AC115959) and distinct from XMRV. JHKV gag-specific amplification was demonstrated with nucleic acids from uncultivated, frozen, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of the index patient, but not in PBMCs from nine healthy blood donors. Unlike earlier reports, in which MLV-like sequences were identified in human source material, which may have been due to murine contamination, budding retrovirions were demonstrated repeatedly by electron microscopy in uncultivated lymphocytes of the index patient that were morphologically identical in their development to the virions in the JHK-3 cells, and immunological evidence was obtained that the index patient produced IgG antibodies that bound to the budding viral particles in patient PBMCs and in the JHK-3 cells. These data indicate that the patient had been infected by JHKV, lending significance to the demonstration of JHKV amplicons in nucleic acids of the patient’s PBMCs. In future studies, the PCR primer sets described herein may expand the detection of an amplifiable subset of viruses related to MLV. PMID:24159361

  18. Distribution of endogenous type B and type D sheep retrovirus sequences in ungulates and other mammals.

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, S J; Stedman, K E; Carlson, J O; DeMartini, J C

    1996-01-01

    The jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV), which appears to be a type B/D retrovirus chimera, has been incriminated as the cause of ovine pulmonary carcinoma. Recent studies suggest that the sequences related to this virus are found in the genomes of normal sheep and goats. To learn whether there are breeds of sheep that lack the endogenous viral sequences and to study their distribution among other groups of mammals, we surveyed several domestic sheep and goat breeds, other ungulates, and various mammal groups for sequences related to JSRV. Probes prepared from the envelope (SU) region of JSRV and the capsid (CA) region of a Peruvian type D virus related to JSRV were used in Southern blot hybridization with genomic DNA followed by low- and high-stringency washes. Fifteen to 20 CA and SU bands were found in all members of the 13 breeds of domestic sheep and 6 breeds of goats tested. There were similar findings in 6 wild Ovis and Capra genera. Within 22 other genera of Bovidae including domestic cattle, and 7 other families of Artiodactyla including Cervidae, there were usually a few CA or SU bands at low stringency and rare bands at high stringency. Among 16 phylogenetically distant genera, there were generally fewer bands hybridizing with either probe. These results reveal wide-spread phylogenetic distribution of endogenous type B and type D retroviral sequences related to JSRV among mammals and argue for further investigation of their potential role in disease. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8622932

  19. Evolutionary Relationships among Extinct and Extant Sloths: The Evidence of Mitogenomes and Retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Slater, Graham J; Cui, Pin; Forasiepi, Analía M; Lenz, Dorina; Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Voirin, Bryson; de Moraes-Barros, Nadia; MacPhee, Ross D E; Greenwood, Alex D

    2016-03-01

    Macroevolutionary trends exhibited by retroviruses are complex and not entirely understood. The sloth endogenized foamy-like retrovirus (SloEFV), which demonstrates incongruence in virus-host evolution among extant sloths (Order Folivora), has not been investigated heretofore in any extinct sloth lineages and its premodern history within folivorans is therefore unknown. Determining retroviral coevolutionary trends requires a robust phylogeny of the viral host, but the highly reduced modern sloth fauna (6 species in 2 genera) does not adequately represent what was once a highly diversified clade (∼100 genera) of placental mammals. At present, the amount of molecular data available for extinct sloth taxa is limited, and analytical results based on these data tend to conflict with phylogenetic inferences made on the basis of morphological studies. To augment the molecular data set, we applied hybridization capture and next-generation Illumina sequencing to two extinct and three extant sloth species to retrieve full mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) from the hosts and the polymerase gene of SloEFV. The results produced a fully resolved and well-supported phylogeny that supports dividing crown families into two major clades: 1) The three-toed sloth, Bradypus, and Nothrotheriidae and 2) Megalonychidae, including the two-toed sloth, Choloepus, and Mylodontidae. Our calibrated time tree indicates that the Miocene epoch (23.5 Ma), particularly its earlier part, was an important interval for folivoran diversification. Both extant and extinct sloths demonstrate multiple complex invasions of SloEFV into the ancestral sloth germline followed by subsequent introgressions across different sloth lineages. Thus, sloth mitogenome and SloEFV evolution occurred separately and in parallel among sloths. PMID:26878870

  20. The ecology of primate retroviruses - an assessment of 12 years of retroviral studies in the Taï national park area, Côte d׳Ivoire.

    PubMed

    Gogarten, Jan F; Akoua-Koffi, Chantal; Calvignac-Spencer, Sebastien; Leendertz, Siv Aina J; Weiss, Sabrina; Couacy-Hymann, Emmanuel; Koné, Inza; Peeters, Martine; Wittig, Roman M; Boesch, Christophe; Hahn, Beatrice H; Leendertz, Fabian H

    2014-07-01

    The existence and genetic make-up of most primate retroviruses was revealed by studies of bushmeat and fecal samples from unhabituated primate communities. For these, detailed data on intra- and within-species contact rates are generally missing, which makes identification of factors influencing transmission a challenging task. Here we present an assessment of 12 years of research on primate retroviruses in the Taï National Park area, Côte d'Ivoire. We discuss insights gained into the prevalence, within- and cross-species transmission of primate retroviruses (including towards local human populations) and the importance of virus-host interactions in determining cross-species transmission risk. Finally we discuss how retroviruses ecology and evolution may change in a shifting environment and identify avenues for future research.

  1. Avian retroviral expression of luciferase.

    PubMed

    Garber, E A; Rosenblum, C I; Chute, H T; Scheidel, L M; Chen, H

    1991-12-01

    Biologically active replication-competent (subgroups A, B, and C) and replication-defective Rous sarcoma virus-derived vectors containing the cDNA encoding firefly luciferase as a reporter gene were constructed. In these retroviral vectors, luciferase is expressed from a spliced subgenomic mRNA. A biologically active replication-defective UR2 virus-derived vector expressing the reporter gene as a gag-luciferase fusion protein from an unspliced genomic mRNA was also constructed. The luciferase reporter gene was used because it lacks homology with chicken genomic sequences and because a rapid and sensitive direct enzymatic assay is available to monitor luciferase expression in retrovirus-infected cells. The levels of luciferase expression in luciferase recombinant retrovirus-infected chicken embryo fibroblasts are greater than 10(3) higher than that detected in uninfected cells or in cells infected with retroviral vectors carrying other genes. Endpoint dilution titration experiments demonstrated that one infected cell can be detected in a background of 10(3) uninfected cells. The vectors are stable in tissue culture and high level expression of the unselected luciferase reporter gene is maintained. The vectors were used to express luciferase in chicken embryos, demonstrating the potential utility of luciferase as a reporter in vivo.

  2. Tracking interspecies transmission and long-term evolution of an ancient retrovirus using the genomes of modern mammals.

    PubMed

    Diehl, William E; Patel, Nirali; Halm, Kate; Johnson, Welkin E

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian genomes typically contain hundreds of thousands of endogenous retroviruses (ERVs), derived from ancient retroviral infections. Using this molecular 'fossil' record, we reconstructed the natural history of a specific retrovirus lineage (ERV-Fc) that disseminated widely between ~33 and ~15 million years ago, corresponding to the Oligocene and early Miocene epochs. Intercontinental viral spread, numerous instances of interspecies transmission and emergence in hosts representing at least 11 mammalian orders, and a significant role for recombination in diversification of this viral lineage were also revealed. By reconstructing the canonical retroviral genes, we identified patterns of adaptation consistent with selection to maintain essential viral protein functions. Our results demonstrate the unique potential of the ERV fossil record for studying the processes of viral spread and emergence as they play out across macro-evolutionary timescales, such that looking back in time may prove insightful for predicting the long-term consequences of newly emerging viral infections. PMID:26952212

  3. Single-tube fluorescent product-enhanced reverse transcriptase assay with Ampliwax (STF-PERT) for retrovirus quantitation.

    PubMed

    Sears, Johnna F; Khan, Arifa S

    2003-03-01

    A TaqMan fluorescent probe-based product enhanced reverse transcriptase (RT) assay is described in which the RT and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) steps are set-up in a single tube, in two compartments separated by Ampliwax (designated as single-tube fluorescent product-enhanced reverse transcriptase assay (STF-PERT)). This simplification of the two-step method resulted in increased assay reproducibility and handling efficiency while maintaining the sensitivity of the PERT assay (<10 virions). The STF-PERT assay can be used to quantitate low amounts of retrovirus in clinical and research materials and to evaluate retrovirus contamination in cell substrates and biological products in human use.

  4. Express

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Express ; CASRN 101200 - 48 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effect

  5. Role of the Human Endogenous Retrovirus HERV-K18 in Autoimmune Disease Susceptibility: Study in the Spanish Population and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lamas, José Ramón; de la Encarnación, Ana; Arroyo, Rafael; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín

    2013-01-01

    Background Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) are genomic sequences that resulted from ancestral germ-line infections by exogenous retroviruses and therefore are transmitted in a Mendelian fashion. Increased HERV expression and antibodies to HERV antigens have been found in various autoimmune diseases. HERV-K18 in chromosome 1 was previously associated with type one diabetes and multiple sclerosis (MS). The etiology of these complex conditions has not been completely elucidated even after the powerful genome wide association studies (GWAS) performed. Nonetheless, this approach does not scrutinize the repetitive sequences within the genome, and part of the missing heritability could lie behind these sequences. We aimed at evaluating the role of HERV-K18 in chromosome 1 on autoimmune disease susceptibility. Methods Two HERV-K18 SNPs (97Y/C and 154W/Stop substitutions) conforming three haplotypes were genotyped in Spanish cohorts of multiple sclerosis (n = 942), rheumatoid arthritis (n = 462) and ethnically matched controls (n = 601). Our findings were pooled in a meta-analysis including 5312 autoimmune patients and 4032 controls. Results Significant associations of both HERV-K18 polymorphisms in chromosome 1 with MS patients stratified by HLA-DRB1*15∶01 were observed [97Y/C p = 0.02; OR (95% CI) = 1.5 (1.04–2.17) and 154W/Stop: p = 0.001; OR (95% CI) = 1.6 (1.19–2.16)]. Combined meta-analysis of the previously published association studies of HERV-K18 with different autoimmune diseases, together with data derived from Spanish cohorts, yielded a significant association of the HERV-K18.3 haplotype [97Y–154W: pM-H = 0.0008; ORM-H (95% CI) = 1.22 (1.09–1.38)]. Conclusion Association of the HERV-K18.3 haplotype in chromosome 1 with autoimmune-disease susceptibility was confirmed through meta-analysis. PMID:23634223

  6. Protective effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on endotoxin shock in mice with retrovirus-induced immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Toki, S; Hiromatsu, K; Aoki, Y; Makino, M; Yoshikai, Y

    1997-10-01

    Mice with retrovirus-induced murine acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (MAIDS) were hypersensitive to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lethal shock accompanied by marked elevations of systematic interleukin 1beta (IL-beta) and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) after LPS challenge. Pretreatment with 10 microg of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) protected MAIDS mice from hypersensitivity to LPS-induced lethal shock and this protection was concomitant with suppression of IFN-gamma production.

  7. Functional genomics reveals relationships between the retrovirus-like Ty1 element and its host Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Jacqulyn L; Coleman, Laura E; Raymond, Adam S; Goodson, Summer G; Pittard, William S; Tsui, Circe; Devine, Scott E

    2003-01-01

    Retroviruses and their relatives, the long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons, carry out complex life cycles within the cells of their hosts. We have exploited a collection of gene deletion mutants developed by the Saccharomyces Genome Deletion Project to perform a functional genomics screen for host factors that influence the retrovirus-like Ty1 element in yeast. A total of 101 genes that presumably influence many different aspects of the Ty1 retrotransposition cycle were identified from our analysis of 4483 homozygous diploid deletion strains. Of the 101 identified mutants, 46 had significantly altered levels of Ty1 cDNA, whereas the remaining 55 mutants had normal levels of Ty1 cDNA. Thus, approximately half of the mutants apparently affected the early stages of retrotransposition leading up to the assembly of virus-like particles and cDNA replication, whereas the remaining half affected steps that occur after cDNA replication. Although most of the mutants retained the ability to target Ty1 integration to tRNA genes, 2 mutants had reduced levels of tRNA gene targeting. Over 25% of the gene products identified in this study were conserved in other organisms, suggesting that this collection of host factors can serve as a starting point for identifying host factors that influence LTR retroelements and retroviruses in other organisms. Overall, our data indicate that Ty1 requires a large number of cellular host factors to complete its retrotransposition cycle efficiently. PMID:12871900

  8. HTLV-3/4 and simian foamy retroviruses in humans: discovery, epidemiology, cross-species transmission and molecular virology.

    PubMed

    Gessain, Antoine; Rua, Réjane; Betsem, Edouard; Turpin, Jocelyn; Mahieux, Renaud

    2013-01-01

    Non-human primates are considered to be likely sources of viruses that can infect humans and thus pose a significant threat to human population. This is well illustrated by some retroviruses, as the simian immunodeficiency viruses and the simian T lymphotropic viruses, which have the ability to cross-species, adapt to a new host and sometimes spread. This leads to a pandemic situation for HIV-1 or an endemic one for HTLV-1. Here, we present the available data on the discovery, epidemiology, cross-species transmission and molecular virology of the recently discovered HTLV-3 and HTLV-4 deltaretroviruses, as well as the simian foamy retroviruses present in different human populations at risk, especially in central African hunters. We discuss also the natural history in humans of these retroviruses of zoonotic origin (magnitude and geographical distribution, possible inter-human transmission). In Central Africa, the increase of the bushmeat trade during the last decades has opened new possibilities for retroviral emergence in humans, especially in immuno-compromised persons.

  9. Human Endogenous Retrovirus K (HML-2) Elements in the Plasma of People with Lymphoma and Breast Cancer ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Contreras-Galindo, Rafael; Kaplan, Mark H.; Leissner, Philippe; Verjat, Thibault; Ferlenghi, Ilaria; Bagnoli, Fabio; Giusti, Fabiola; Dosik, Michael H.; Hayes, Daniel F.; Gitlin, Scott D.; Markovitz, David M.

    2008-01-01

    Actively replicating endogenous retroviruses entered the human genome millions of years ago and became a stable part of the inherited genetic material. They subsequently acquired multiple mutations, leading to the assumption that these viruses no longer replicate. However, certain human tumor cell lines have been shown to release endogenous retroviral particles. Here we show that RNA from human endogenous retrovirus K (HERV-K) (HML-2), a relatively recent entrant into the human genome, can be found in very high titers in the plasma of patients with lymphomas and breast cancer as measured by either reverse transcriptase PCR or nucleic acid sequence-based amplification. Further, these titers drop dramatically with cancer treatment. We also demonstrate the presence of reverse transcriptase and viral RNA in plasma fractions that contain both immature and correctly processed HERV-K (HML-2) Gag and envelope proteins. Finally, using immunoelectron microscopy, we show the presence of HERV-K (HML-2) virus-like particles in the plasma of lymphoma patients. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that elements of the endogenous retrovirus HERV-K (HML-2) can be found in the blood of modern-day humans with certain cancers. PMID:18632860

  10. Activation of the c-H-ras proto-oncogene by retrovirus insertion and chromosomal rearrangement in a Moloney leukemia virus-induced T-cell leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Ihle, J N; Smith-White, B; Sisson, B; Parker, D; Blair, D G; Schultz, A; Kozak, C; Lunsford, R D; Askew, D; Weinstein, Y

    1989-01-01

    A rearrangement of the c-H-ras locus was detected in a T-cell line (DA-2) established from a Moloney leukemia virus-induced tumor. This rearrangement was associated with the high-level expression of H-ras RNA and the H-ras gene product, p21. DNA from DA-2 cells transformed fibroblasts in DNA transfection experiments, and the transformed fibroblasts contained the rearranged H-ras locus. The rearrangement involved one allele and was present in tissue from the primary tumor from which the cell line was isolated. Cloning and sequencing of the rearranged allele and comparison with the normal allele demonstrated that the rearrangement was complex and probably resulted from the integration of a retrovirus in the H-ras locus between a 5' noncoding exon and the first coding exon and a subsequent homologous recombination between this provirus and another newly acquired provirus also located on chromosome 7. These events resulted in the translocation of the coding exons of the H-ras locus away from the 5' noncoding exon region to a new genomic site on chromosome 7. Sequencing of the coding regions of the gene failed to detect mutations in the 12th, 13th, 59th, or 61st codons. The possible reasons for the complexity of the rearrangement and the significance of the activation of the H-ras locus to T-cell transformation are discussed. Images PMID:2542606

  11. The long terminal repeat of an endogenous retrovirus induces alternative splicing and encodes an additional carboxy-terminal sequence in the human leptin receptor.

    PubMed

    Kapitonov, V V; Jurka, J

    1999-02-01

    The evolution of mammalian protein structure and regulation, specifically transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation, may include among its tools the use of abundant retroviral long terminal repeats (LTRs). In particular, LTRs may be turned into switches for alternative splicing. This type of regulatory pathway is illustrated by the alternative splicing in the human leptin receptor (OBR). The human leptin receptor is involved in the control of important biological processes including energy expenditure, production of sex hormones, and activation of hemopoietic cells. OBRa and OBRb are the two major, alternatively spliced forms of the leptin receptor, called the "short form" and the "long form," respectively. We report that the OBRa short form is the result of a double splicing event which occurs within the LTR of the endogenous retrovirus HERV-K. Working as a switch of alternative splicing, this LTR also encodes the terminal 67 amino acid residues in OBRa. We suggest the possibility of transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of OBR expression by steroids that bind the LTR.

  12. Infectious Entry Pathway Mediated by the Human Endogenous Retrovirus K Envelope Protein

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Lindsey R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs), the majority of which exist as degraded remnants of ancient viruses, comprise approximately 8% of the human genome. The youngest human ERVs (HERVs) belong to the HERV-K(HML-2) subgroup and were endogenized within the past 1 million years. The viral envelope protein (ENV) facilitates the earliest events of endogenization (cellular attachment and entry), and here, we characterize the requirements for HERV-K ENV to mediate infectious cell entry. Cell-cell fusion assays indicate that a minimum of two events are required for fusion, proteolytic processing by furin-like proteases and exposure to acidic pH. We generated an infectious autonomously replicating recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) in which the glycoprotein was replaced by HERV-K ENV. HERV-K ENV imparts an endocytic entry pathway that requires dynamin-mediated membrane scission and endosomal acidification but is distinct from clathrin-dependent or macropinocytic uptake pathways. The lack of impediments to the replication of the VSV core in eukaryotic cells allowed us to broadly survey the HERV-K ENV-dictated tropism. Unlike extant betaretroviral envelopes, which impart a narrow species tropism, we found that HERV-K ENV mediates broad tropism encompassing cells from multiple mammalian and nonmammalian species. We conclude that HERV-K ENV dictates an evolutionarily conserved entry pathway and that the restriction of HERV-K to primate genomes reflects downstream stages of the viral replication cycle. IMPORTANCE Approximately 8% of the human genome is of retroviral origin. While many of those viral genomes have become inactivated, some copies of the most recently endogenized human retrovirus, HERV-K, can encode individual functional proteins. Here, we characterize the envelope protein (ENV) of the virus to define how it mediates infection of cells. We demonstrate that HERV-K ENV undergoes a proteolytic processing step and triggers membrane fusion in response to

  13. [Ecology and social organization of African tropical forest primates: aid in understanding retrovirus transmission].

    PubMed

    Tutin, C E

    2000-07-01

    The risk of transmission of primate viruses to humans is great because of their genetic proximity. It is now clear that the HIV group of retroviruses came from primates and that the origin of HIV1 is the chimpanzee subspecies of Central Africa, Pan troglodytes troglodytes. Many African primates are natural hosts of retroviruses and details of the natural history of both hosts and viruses are essential to understand the evolution of the latter. Data on the demography, ecology and behaviour of three species of primates (gorillas, chimpanzees and mandrills), studied in the Lopé Reserve in Central Gabon since 1983, are analysed to identify the factors that allow, or favour, disease transmission within each species, between different species and between primates and humans. The comparison of the relative degree of risk suggests that of the three species, chimpanzees are the most susceptible to exposure to infection both from conspecifics and from other species. With respect to humans, the comparative analysis suggests greater exposure to viruses of mandrills and gorillas than to those of chimpanzees. For primates, major risk factors are: large social groups; bites inflicted in fights; social grooming; and predation on mammals. However, given that contacts between social groups of the same species are rare, the spread of a virus through a population will be slow and uncertain. Hunting wild animals is the behaviour most likely to provide transmission routes for primate viruses into human populations because of the high probability of blood-blood contact. Not only the hunters themselves, but also women who prepare bush meat for cooking and people involved in trade of carcasses are at high risk of transmission of pathogens. Hunting of bush meat is increasing in Central Africa due to the economic recession and the spread of logging into the forests of the interior of the region. To counter the significant risk of transmission of known, as well as new, diseases from primates

  14. Viral Engineering of Chimeric Antigen Receptor Expression on Murine and Human T Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Hammill, Joanne A; Afsahi, Arya; Bramson, Jonathan L; Helsen, Christopher W

    2016-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of a bolus of tumor-specific T lymphocytes into cancer patients is a promising therapeutic strategy. In one approach, tumor specificity is conferred upon T cells via engineering expression of exogenous receptors, such as chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). Here, we describe the generation and production of both murine and human CAR-engineered T lymphocytes using retroviruses. PMID:27581020

  15. Detection of Avian Retroviruses in Vaccines by Amplification on DF-1 Cells with Immunostaining and Fluorescent Product-Enhanced Reverse Transcriptase Endpoint Methods

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Dominique; Riou, Patrice; Armanet, Corinne; Edamura, Kerrie Nichol; Martinho, Briolange; Serres, Aurelie; Jacouton, Severine; Detrez, Valerie; McNeil, Bryan; Schreiber, Martha; Gaillac, David; Bonnevay, Thierry; Gisonni-Lex, Lucy; Mallet, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    In order to ensure the safety of vaccines produced on avian cells, rigorous testing for the absence of avian retroviruses must be performed. Current methods used to detect avian retroviruses often exhibit a high invalid-test/false-positive rate, rely on hard-to-secure reagents, and/or have readouts that are difficult to standardize. Herein, we describe the development and validation of two consistent and sensitive methods for the detection of avian retroviruses in vaccines: viral amplification on DF-1 cells followed by immunostaining for the detection of avian leukosis virus (ALV) and viral amplification on DF-1 cells followed by fluorescent product-enhanced reverse transcriptase (F-PERT) for the detection of all avian retroviruses. Both assays share an infectivity stage on DF-1 cells followed by a different endpoint readout depending on the retrovirus to be detected. Validation studies demonstrated a limit of detection of one 50% cell culture infectious dose (CCID50)/ml for retrovirus in a 30-ml test inoculum volume for both methods, which was as sensitive as a classical method used in the vaccine industry, namely, viral amplification on primary chicken embryo fibroblasts followed by the complement fixation test for avian leukosis virus (COFAL). Furthermore, viral amplification on DF-1 cells followed by either immunostaining or F-PERT demonstrated a sensitivity that exceeds the regulatory requirements for detection of ALV strains. A head-to-head comparison of the two endpoint methods showed that viral amplification on DF-1 cells followed by F-PERT is a suitable method to be used as a stand-alone test to ensure that vaccine preparations are free from infectious avian retroviruses. PMID:23467603

  16. Selective Involvement of the Checkpoint Regulator VISTA in Suppression of B-Cell, but Not T-Cell, Responsiveness by Monocytic Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells from Mice Infected with an Immunodeficiency-Causing Retrovirus.

    PubMed

    Green, Kathy A; Wang, Li; Noelle, Randolph J; Green, William R

    2015-09-01

    Inhibition of T-cell responses in tumor microenvironments by myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) is widely accepted. We demonstrated augmentation of monocytic MDSCs whose suppression of not only T-cell, but also B-cell, responsiveness paralleled the immunodeficiency during LP-BM5 retrovirus infection. MDSCs inhibited T cells by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)/nitric oxide (NO), but uniquely, inhibition of B cells was ~50% dependent each on iNOS/NO and the MDSC-expressed negative-checkpoint regulator VISTA. Blockade with a combination of iNOS/NO and VISTA caused additive or synergistic abrogation of MDSC-mediated suppression of B-cell responsiveness.

  17. Evidence for retrovirus and paramyxovirus infection of multiple bat species in china.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lihong; Li, Min; Li, Linmiao; Monagin, Corina; Chmura, Aleksei A; Schneider, Bradley S; Epstein, Jonathan H; Mei, Xiaolin; Shi, Zhengli; Daszak, Peter; Chen, Jinping

    2014-05-16

    Bats are recognized reservoirs for many emerging zoonotic viruses of public health importance. Identifying and cataloguing the viruses of bats is a logical approach to evaluate the range of potential zoonoses of bat origin. We characterized the fecal pathogen microbiome of both insectivorous and frugivorous bats, incorporating 281 individual bats comprising 20 common species, which were sampled in three locations of Yunnan province, by combining reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays and next-generation sequencing. Seven individual bats were paramyxovirus-positive by RT-PCR using degenerate primers, and these paramyxoviruses were mainly classified into three genera (Rubulavirus, Henipavirus and Jeilongvirus). Various additional novel pathogens were detected in the paramyxovirus-positive bats using Illumina sequencing. A total of 7066 assembled contigs (≥200 bp) were constructed, and 105 contigs matched eukaryotic viruses (of them 103 belong to 2 vertebrate virus families, 1 insect virus, and 1 mycovirus), 17 were parasites, and 4913 were homologous to prokaryotic microorganisms. Among the 103 vertebrate viral contigs, 79 displayed low identity (<70%) to known viruses including human viruses at the amino acid level, suggesting that these belong to novel and genetically divergent viruses. Overall, the most frequently identified viruses, particularly in bats from the family Hipposideridae, were retroviruses. The present study expands our understanding of the bat virome in species commonly found in Yunnan, China, and provides insight into the overall diversity of viruses that may be capable of directly or indirectly crossing over into humans.

  18. Two Closely Related but Distinct Retroviruses Are Associated with Walleye Discrete Epidermal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    LaPierre, Lorie A.; Holzschu, Donald L.; Wooster, Greg A.; Bowser, Paul R.; Casey, James W.

    1998-01-01

    Walleye discrete epidermal hyperplasia (WEH) is a hyperproliferative skin disease that is prevalent on adult walleye fish throughout North America. We have identified two retroviruses associated with WEH, designated here as walleye epidermal hyperplasia virus type 1 and type 2 (WEHV1 and WEHV2), that are closely related to one another (77% identity) and to walleye dermal sarcoma virus (64% identity) within the polymerase region. WEHV1 and/or WEHV2 viral DNA was readily detected by PCR in hyperplastic tissue samples, but only low levels of viral DNA were detected in uninvolved skin. Southern blot analysis showed one to three copies of integrated WEHV2 viral DNA in lesions but did not detect WEHV2 viral DNA in uninvolved skin from the same fish. Northern blots detected abundant levels of WEHV1 and/or WEHV2 virion RNA transcripts of approximately 13 kb in hyperplastic tissue, but virion RNA was not observed in uninvolved skin and muscle. These results suggest that WEHV1 and WEHV2 are the causative agents of discrete epidermal hyperplasia. PMID:9525688

  19. Structural and Biochemical Studies of ALIX/AlP1 and Its Role in Retrovirus Budding

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher,R.; Chung, H.; Zhai, Q.; Robinson, H.; Sundquist, W.; Hill, C.

    2007-01-01

    ALIX/AIP1 functions in enveloped virus budding, endosomal protein sorting, and many other cellular processes. Retroviruses, including HIV-1, SIV, and EIAV, bind and recruit ALIX through YPXnL late-domain motifs (X = any residue; n = 1-3). Crystal structures reveal that human ALIX is composed of an N-terminal Bro1 domain and a central domain that is composed of two extended three-helix bundles that form elongated arms that fold back into a 'V.'. The structures also reveal conformational flexibility in the arms that suggests that the V domain may act as a flexible hinge in response to ligand binding. YPXnL late domains bind in a conserved hydrophobic pocket on the second arm near the apex of the V, whereas CHMP4/ESCRT-III proteins bind a conserved hydrophobic patch on the Bro1 domain, and both interactions are required for virus budding. ALIX therefore serves as a flexible, extended scaffold that connects retroviral Gag proteins to ESCRT-III and other cellular-budding machinery.

  20. Isolation of an MH2 retrovirus mutant temperature sensitive for macrophage but not fibroblast transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Palmieri, S

    1986-01-01

    A conditional mutant of the MH2 avian retrovirus, termed ts41MH2, was isolated. Unlike wtMH2, ts41MH2 permitted transformed macrophages to differentiate during a 5- to 7-day temperature shift from 37 to 42 degrees C. Mutant-infected cells incubated at 42 degrees C exhibited a flattened morphology and then fused to form giant multinucleated cells that closely resembled normal macrophage maturation in vitro. These differentiated cells reacted strongly with a myeloid-macrophage-specific monoclonal antibody. The process of differentiation was inhibited when ts41MH2-transformed nonproducer clones were superinfected before the temperature shift with the myc gene-containing MC29 or OK10 viruses. By contrast, no inhibition was observed in clones superinfected with the MH2-PA200 virus that contains only the mil gene. The mutant also demonstrated a reduced oncogenic potential relative to that of wtMH2 when it was inoculated intravenously into young birds. However, in contrast to the results obtained with hematopoietic cells, none of the five fibroblast transformation parameters tested for ts41MH2 were altered from those induced by wtMH2. These results suggest that the mutation in ts41MH2 is located in a region of myc required for macrophage transformation, but not required for fibroblast transformation. Images PMID:3005642

  1. A rapid screening procedure for the identification of high-titer retrovirus packaging clones.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, B; Pereira, D S; Wu, X; Dick, J E; Ellis, J

    1997-07-01

    We have developed a viral RNA (vRNA) dot blot assay for rapid identification of high-titer retrovirus vector production by packaging cell clones. The procedure employs Trizol LS reagent to purify vRNA from packaging cell supernatants, a sensitive dot blot assay, and Phosphorlmager technology to quantify packaged viral genomes in 2 days. Experiments performed on viral supernatants of known biological titer demonstrated that the vRNA dot blot assay was extremely sensitive and that dot intensity correlated directly with viral titer. It is often necessary to analyze approximately 100 virus producing cell clones, making this method useful as a rapid screen to identify the highest virus producing clones. The vRNA dot blot assay consistently identified a subset of candidate high-titer producer cell clones. In three independent screens the supernatant with the highest biological titer was produced by one of the previously defined candidate high-titer producer clones. Our procedure greatly facilitates virus titration by: (1) rapidly eliminating the vast majority of low-titer producer cell clones; (2) accurately identifying the subset of candidate high-titer producer clones for further biological titration and assessment of the proviral genomic structure; and (3) reducing laborious tissue culture manipulations to a minimum. Furthermore, the reliance of this method on molecular detection makes it ideally suited for the isolation of high-titer clones lacking a drug selection marker.

  2. Analysis of orthologous retrovirus-like elements in the white-footed mouse, Peromyscus leucopus.

    PubMed

    Sawby, R; Wichman, H A

    1997-01-01

    Three loci in the genome of the white-footed mouse, Peromyscus leucopus, were examined for the presence or absence of orthologous copies of the retrovirus-like element mys using polymerase chain reaction. We examined these loci in 28 mice collected throughout the P. leucopus species range. Mys insertions were present in only one of the individuals examined at the mys-1 and mys-7 loci. Conversely, the mys-6 element was found in several individuals, but the presence of this element was limited to northern latitudes. Because the long terminal repeats (LTRs) of a given element are expected to be identical at the time of retrotransposition into the genome, and to accumulate changes over evolutionary time, within-element LTR sequence comparisons can be used to estimate the relative age of insertions. Within-element LTR differences are greater in mys-6 than in mys-1 or mys-7. The LTRs from orthologous mys-6 elements of six mice were sequenced. The alignment revealed 13 of the 22 differences between the right and left LTRs that were shared by all orthologous mys-6 sites, suggesting that relative to its time of insertion into the genome, mys-6 has only recently spread across the northern part of the species range.

  3. Second National Conference on Human Retroviruses. Good news, bad news, and no news.

    PubMed

    Del Rio, C

    1995-04-01

    The second annual National Conference on Human Retroviruses and Related Infections was held in Washington, D.C., January 29-February 2, 1995. Lectures addressed such topics as viral dynamics, United States AIDS epidemiology, immunopathogenesis, antiretroviral therapy, and HIV vaccines. Symposia were held on the interactivity of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and AIDS, the causes leading to long-term nonprogressors, and factors causing individuals to be exposed but uninfected. Oral presentations reviewed the following: 1) a study on the efficacy of oral ganciclovir for prevention of CMV disease in CMV-seropositive, HIV-infected individuals with CD4 counts of 50 or less; 2) data supporting rifabutin prophylaxis against MAC infection once the CD4 count is below 100; 3) the safety of the screened blood supply in the United States; 4) ACTG 063, a study examining the use of AZT with and without acyclovir; 5) perinatal transmission; and 6) four independent studies examining the efficacy of 3TC (lamivudine) as part of a combination of antiretroviral drugs in HIV-infected patients who were both AZT-naive and AZT-experienced.

  4. Evidence for retrovirus infections in green turtles Chelonia mydas from the Hawaiian islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casey, R.N.; Quackenbush, S.L.; Work, T.M.; Balazs, G.H.; Bowser, P.R.; Casey, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    Apparently normal Hawaiian green turtles Chelonia mydas and those displaying fibropapillomas were analyzed for infection by retroviruses. Strikingly, all samples were positive for polymerase enhanced reverse transcriptase (PERT) with levels high enough to quantitate by the conventional reverse transcriptase (RT) assay. However, samples of skin, even from asymptomatic turtles, were RT positive, although the levels of enzyme activity in healthy turtles hatched and raised in captivity were much lower than those observed in asymptomatic free-ranging turtles. Turtles with fibropapillomas displayed a broad range of reverse transcriptase activity. Skin and eye fibropapillomas and a heart tumor were further analyzed and shown to have reverse transcriptase activity that banded in a sucrose gradient at 1.17 g ml-1. The reverse transcriptase activity purified from the heart tumor displayed a temperature optimum of 37??C and showed a preference for Mn2+ over Mg2+. Sucrose gradient fractions of this sample displaying elevated reverse transcriptase activity contained primarily retrovitalsized particles with prominent envelope spikes, when negatively stained and examined by electron microscopy. Sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis of gradient-purified virions revealed a conserved profile among 4 independent tumors and showed 7 prominent proteins having molecular weights of 116, 83, 51, 43, 40, 20 and 14 kDa. The data suggest that retroviral infections are widespread in Hawaiian green turtles and a comprehensive investigation is warranted to address the possibility that these agents cause green turtle fibropapillomatosis (GTFP).

  5. The flamenco locus controls the gypsy and ZAM retroviruses and is required for Drosophila oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mével-Ninio, Maryvonne; Pelisson, Alain; Kinder, Jennifer; Campos, Ana Regina; Bucheton, Alain

    2007-04-01

    In Drosophila, the as yet uncloned heterochromatic locus flamenco (flam) controls mobilization of the endogenous retrovirus gypsy through the repeat-associated small interfering (rasi) RNA silencing pathway. Restrictive alleles (flamR) downregulate accumulation of gypsy transcripts in the somatic follicular epithelium of the ovary. In contrast, permissive alleles (flamP) are unable to repress gypsy. DIP1, the closest transcription unit to a flam-insertional mutation, was considered as a good candidate to be a gypsy regulator, since it encodes a dsRNA-binding protein. To further characterize the locus we analyzed P-induced flam mutants and generated new mutations by transposon mobilization. We show that flam is required somatically for morphogenesis of the follicular epithelium, the tissue where gypsy is repressed. This developmental activity is necessary to control gypsy and another retroelement, ZAM. We also show that flam is not DIP1, as none of the new permissive mutants affect the DIP1 coding sequence. In addition, two deletions removing DIP1 coding sequences do not affect any of the flamenco functions. Our results suggest that flamenco extends proximally to DIP1, spanning >130 kb of transposon-rich heterochromatin. We propose a model explaining the multiple functions of this large heterochromatic locus. PMID:17277359

  6. Controlling Endogenous Retroviruses and Their Chimeric Transcripts During Natural Reprogramming in the Oocyte.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ai Khim; Knowles, Barbara B

    2015-07-15

    Complete genomic reprogramming happens twice during the life of a genome, once during the formation of gametes in their parents and once after their union at fertilization. For that matter complete genomic reprogramming happens twice in the same parental cell, the oocyte, when it is forming and after it matures and receives the paternal gamete. Control of these processes in this unique single cell is epigenetic, and our understanding of it is based on information gleaned from imprinting, X chromosome inactivation, and activation and silencing of endogenous retroviruses (ERV). Activation of ERVs is attributed to demethylation of chromatin and DNA, whereas silencing requires methylation, attributed to the nuage proteins, which engage the Piwi-interacting RNA pathway and other posttranscriptional mechanisms. This reprogramming process has evolved throughout speciation because in mammals, but not fish, flies and worms, nuage-component muations affect male and female gametogenesis differentially. Transcription of ERVs is derepressed in both sexes in nuage-mutant mice, but whereas males are sterile, females are fertile. Using a proteomic approach we now report molecular interactions between nuage proteins and components of the oocyte cytoplasmic lattice and speculate how this interaction could preserve ERV/host chimeric gene products affecting female fertility. PMID:26116732

  7. Construction and characterization of an infectious molecular clone of Koala retrovirus.

    PubMed

    Shojima, Takayuki; Hoshino, Shigeki; Abe, Masumi; Yasuda, Jiro; Shogen, Hiroko; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Miyazawa, Takayuki

    2013-05-01

    Koala retrovirus (KoRV) is a gammaretrovirus that is currently endogenizing into koalas. Studies on KoRV infection have been hampered by the lack of a replication-competent molecular clone. In this study, we constructed an infectious molecular clone, termed plasmid pKoRV522, of a KoRV isolate (strain Aki) from a koala reared in a Japanese zoo. The virus KoRV522, derived from pKoRV522, grew efficiently in human embryonic kidney (HEK293T) cells, attaining 10(6) focus-forming units/ml. Several mutations in the Gag (L domain) and Env regions reported to be involved in reduction in viral infection/production in vitro are found in pKoRV522, yet KoRV522 replicated well, suggesting that any effects of these mutations are limited. Indeed, a reporter virus pseudotyped with pKoRV522 Env was found to infect human, feline, and mink cell lines efficiently. Analyses of KoRV L-domain mutants showed that an additional PPXY sequence, PPPY, in Gag plays a critical role in KoRV budding. Altogether, our results demonstrate the construction and characterization of the first infectious molecular clone of KoRV. The infectious clone reported here will be useful for elucidating the mechanism of endogenization of the virus in koalas and screening for antiretroviral drugs for KoRV-infected koalas.

  8. The role of genes domesticated from LTR retrotransposons and retroviruses in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko; Ishino, Fumitoshi

    2012-01-01

    The acquisition of multiple genes from long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons occurred in mammals. Genes belonging to a sushi-ichi-related retrotransposon homologs (SIRH) family emerged around the time of the establishment of two viviparous mammalian groups, marsupials and eutherians. These genes encode proteins that are homologous to a retrotransposon Gag capsid protein and sometimes also have a Pol-like region. We previously demonstrated that PEG10 (SIRH1) and PEG11/RTL1 (SIRH2) play essential but different roles in placental development. PEG10 is conserved in both the marsupials and the eutherians, while PEG11/RTL1 is a eutherian-specific gene, suggesting that these two domesticated genes were deeply involved in the evolution of mammals via the establishment of the viviparous reproduction system. In this review, we introduce the roles of PEG10 and PEG11/RTL1 in mammalian development and evolution, and summarize the other genes domesticated from LTR retrotransposons and endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) in mammals. We also point out the importance of DNA methylation in inactivating and neutralizing the integrated retrotransposons and ERVs in the process of domestication. PMID:22866050

  9. Evolutionary dynamics of endogenous Jaagsiekte sheep retroviruses proliferation in the domestic sheep, mouflon and Pyrenean chamois.

    PubMed

    Sistiaga-Poveda, M; Jugo, B M

    2014-06-01

    The oncogenic exogenous Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV), responsible for ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma, has several endogenous counterparts termed enJSRVs. Although many of these elements have been inactivated over time by the accumulation of deleterious mutations or internal recombination leading to solo long terminal repeat (LTR) formation, several members of enJSRVs have been identified as nearly intact and probably represent recent integration events. To determine the level of enJSRV polymorphism in the sheep population and related species, we have undertaken a study by characterizing enJSRVs copies and independent integration sites in six domestic sheep and two wild species of the sheep lineage. enJSRVs copies were detected by amplifying the env-LTR region by PCR, and for the detection of the insertion sites, we used two approaches: (1) an in silico approach based on the recently published Sheep Reference Genome Assembly (OARv3.0) and (2) an experimental approach based on PCR suppression and inverse PCR techniques. In total, 103 enJSRV sequences were generated across 10 individuals and enJSRV integrations were found on 11 of the 28 sheep chromosomes. These findings suggest that there are still uncharacterized enJSRVs, and that some of the integration sites are variable among the different species, breeds of the same species, subspecies and geographic locations.

  10. Human retroviruses and AIDS 1996. A compilation and analysis of nucleic acid and amino acid sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, G.; Foley, B.; Korber, B.; Mellors, J.W.; Jeang, K.T.; Wain-Hobson, S.

    1997-04-01

    This compendium and the accompanying floppy diskettes are the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts that it comprises: (1) Nuclear Acid Alignments and Sequences; (2) Amino Acid Alignments; (3) Analysis; (4) Related Sequences; and (5) Database Communications. Information within all the parts is updated throughout the year on the Web site, http://hiv-web.lanl.gov. While this publication could take the form of a review or sequence monograph, it is not so conceived. Instead, the literature from which the database is derived has simply been summarized and some elementary computational analyses have been performed upon the data. Interpretation and commentary have been avoided insofar as possible so that the reader can form his or her own judgments concerning the complex information. In addition to the general descriptions of the parts of the compendium, the user should read the individual introductions for each part.

  11. Comparative Methylation of ERVWE1/Syncytin-1 and Other Human Endogenous Retrovirus LTRs in Placenta Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Gimenez, Juliette; Montgiraud, Cécile; Oriol, Guy; Pichon, Jean-Philippe; Ruel, Karine; Tsatsaris, Vassilis; Gerbaud, Pascale; Frendo, Jean-Louis; Evain-Brion, Danièle; Mallet, François

    2009-01-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) are globally silent in somatic cells. However, some HERVs display high transcription in physiological conditions. In particular, ERVWE1, ERVFRDE1 and ERV3, three proviruses of distinct families, are highly transcribed in placenta and produce envelope proteins associated with placenta development. As silencing of repeated elements is thought to occur mainly by DNA methylation, we compared the methylation of ERVWE1 and related HERVs to appreciate whether HERV methylation relies upon the family, the integration site, the tissue, the long terminal repeat (LTR) function or the associated gene function. CpG methylation of HERV-W LTRs in placenta-associated tissues was heterogeneous but a joint epigenetic control was found for ERVWE1 5′LTR and its juxtaposed enhancer, a mammalian apparent LTR retrotransposon. Additionally, ERVWE1, ERVFRDE1 and ERV3 5′LTRs were all essentially hypomethylated in cytotrophoblasts during pregnancy, but showed distinct and stage-dependent methylation profiles. In non-cytotrophoblastic cells, they also exhibited different methylation profiles, compatible with their respective transcriptional activities. Comparative analyses of transcriptional activity and LTR methylation in cell lines further sustained a role for methylation in the control of functional LTRs. These results suggest that HERV methylation might not be family related but copy-specific, and related to the LTR function and the tissue. In particular, ERVWE1 and ERV3 could be developmentally epigenetically regulated HERVs. PMID:19561344

  12. Retrovirus-mediated transfer of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase and connexin26 genes in pancreatic cells results in variable efficiency on the bystander killing: implications for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Carrió, M; Mazo, A; López-Iglesias, C; Estivill, X; Fillat, C

    2001-10-01

    Currently, there is no effective treatment for pancreatic cancer and prodrug-activating gene therapy with the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (HSV-tk) in combination with ganciclovir (GCV) has been suggested as a candidate approach against this disease. In the present study, we have evaluated the efficacy of the HSV-tk/GCV treatment in a panel of pancreatic tumor cells (NP-9, NP-18, NP-31) and the potentiation of the cytotoxic effect in combination with the overexpression of the connexin 26 gene (Cx26). Pancreatic cells transduced with a retrovirus containing the HSV-tk gene showed different sensitivities to GCV that seemed to be independent of HSV-tk expression levels. The extent of the bystander effect also varied among the pancreatic tumor cells and correlated with the level of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC). Transduction of the pancreatic tumor cells with a retrovirus carrying the connexin 26 gene resulted in high levels of connexin 26 expression and in an increase in the GJIC that correlated to an extent in the bystander effect in both NP-9Cx26 and NP-18Cx26 cells. Neither an increment in GJIC nor an increase in the bystander killing was detected in NP-31Cx26. The bystander effect in NP-18 Cx26 cells was also prevented by the long term inhibitor of GJIC, 18-alpha-glycyrrhetinic acid (AGA). Together, these results demonstrate that pancreatic tumor cells are highly different as regards the susceptibility to HSV-tk/GCV treatment. Moreover, they indicate that overexpression of the Cx26 gene does not always correspond to an increase in GJIC although they clearly suggest the role of GJIC in mediating the bystander effect.

  13. Phylogeny-Directed Search for Murine Leukemia Virus-Like Retroviruses in Vertebrate Genomes and in Patients Suffering from Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Blomberg, Jonas; Sheikholvaezin, Ali; Elfaitouri, Amal; Blomberg, Fredrik; Sjösten, Anna; Mattson Ulfstedt, Johan; Pipkorn, Rüdiger; Källander, Clas; Öhrmalm, Christina; Sperber, Göran

    2011-01-01

    Gammaretrovirus-like sequences occur in most vertebrate genomes. Murine Leukemia Virus (MLV) like retroviruses (MLLVs) are a subset, which may be pathogenic and spread cross-species. Retroviruses highly similar to MLLVs (xenotropic murine retrovirus related virus (XMRV) and Human Mouse retrovirus-like RetroViruses (HMRVs)) reported from patients suffering from prostate cancer (PC) and myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) raise the possibility that also humans have been infected. Structurally intact, potentially infectious MLLVs occur in the genomes of some mammals, especially mouse. Mouse MLLVs contain three major groups. One, MERV G3, contained MLVs and XMRV/HMRV. Its presence in mouse DNA, and the abundance of xenotropic MLVs in biologicals, is a source of false positivity. Theoretically, XMRV/HMRV could be one of several MLLV transspecies infections. MLLV pathobiology and diversity indicate optimal strategies for investigating XMRV/HMRV in humans and raise ethical concerns. The alternatives that XMRV/HMRV may give a hard-to-detect “stealth” infection, or that XMRV/HMRV never reached humans, have to be considered. PMID:22315600

  14. Endogenous New World primate retrovirus: interspecies antigenic determinants shared with the major structural protein of type-D RNA viruses of Old World monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Hino, S; Tronick, S R; Heberling, R L; Kalter, S S; Hellman, A; Aaronson, S A

    1977-01-01

    A reverse transcriptase-containing virus has recently been isolated from a squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus). Molecular hybridization studies demonstrate that the squirrel monkey retrovirus (SMRV) is endogenous to this New World primate, yet lacks detectable nucleotide sequence homology with cellular DNAs of representative Old World primates or with the genomes of previously isolated Old World primate retroviruses. The 35,000-dalton major structural protein (p35) of SMRV was purified and shown to possess antigenic determinants distinct from those of known retroviruses. While SMRV was found to lack antigenic determinants broadly shared among mammalian type-C viruses, immunologic crossreactivity was demonstrated between SMRV p35 and the major structural protein (p26) of Mason-Pfizer monkey virus, a prototype type-D retrovirus of Old World monkeys. These findings support the concept that SMRV and Mason-Pfizer monkey virus are evolutionarily related, and raise the possibility that a progenitor of type-D retroviruses became genetically associated with primates at a very early time in their evolution. PMID:74833

  15. Gene structure and expression

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, J. )

    1990-01-01

    This book describes the structure of genes in molecular terms and summarizes present knowledge about how their activity is regulated. It covers a range of topics, including a review of the structure and replication of DNA, transcription and translation, prokaryotic and eukaryotic gene organization and expression, retroviruses and oncogenes. The book also includes a chapter on the methodology of DNA manipulation including sections on site-directed mutagenesis, the polymerase chain reaction, reporter genes and restriction fragment length polymorphisms. The hemoglobin gene system and the genetics of the proteins of the immune system are presented in the latter half of the book to show the structure and expression of the most well-studied systems in higher eukaryotes. The final chapter reviews the differences between prokaryotic and the eukaryotic genomes.

  16. Staufen-1 interacts with the human endogenous retrovirus family HERV-K(HML-2) rec and gag proteins and increases virion production.

    PubMed

    Hanke, Kirsten; Hohn, Oliver; Liedgens, Linda; Fiddeke, Katharina; Wamara, Jula; Kurth, Reinhard; Bannert, Norbert

    2013-10-01

    The human endogenous retrovirus family HERV-K(HML-2) Rec protein is an RNA transport factor that enhances nuclear export of intron-containing retroviral transcripts. Using the yeast two-hybrid approach, we have newly identified human Staufen-1 as a Rec-interacting protein. The interaction was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation experiments, and the relevant site in Staufen-1 has been mapped to double-stranded RNA binding domain 4 (RBD4). Staufen-1 is in several aspects functionally related to retroviral RNA transport proteins. It binds mRNAs and targets its ribonuclear cargo to polysomes for efficient translation. We observed an accumulation of Staufen-1 in the nucleus of Rec-expressing cells and colocalization in the nucleoli as well as in the cytoplasm. Overexpression of Staufen-1 resulted in a 5-fold enhancement in nuclear export and/or translation of unspliced HERV-K(HML-2) viral RNAs in the presence of Rec and its Rec-responsive element (RcRE) binding site together with a clear increase in virus production. Staufen-1 was previously shown to interact with the Gag protein of HIV-1, promoting Gag oligomerization and RNA encapsidation. We demonstrate here that Staufen-1 also binds to the Gag protein of HERV-K(HML-2). Under stress conditions, Rec colocalizes with Staufen-1 in stress granules in cells that express viral RNA but not in mRNA-decay-related processing bodies. Our results suggest a new role for Staufen-1 as a cellular Rec and HERV-K(HML-2) Gag cofactor.

  17. Interference of the life cycle of fish nodavirus with fish retrovirus.

    PubMed

    Lee, K W; Chi, S C; Cheng, T M

    2002-10-01

    Interference of the life cycle of grouper nervous necrosis virus (GNNV), a member of the Nodaviridae, genus Betanodavirus, by snakehead retrovirus (SnRV) has been studied in vitro. SGF-1, a new fish cell line that is persistently infected with SnRV, was induced by inoculating SnRV into the grouper fin cell line GF-1. Culture supernatants and cell pellets from both GNNV-infected SGF-1 and GF-1 cells were collected and employed for virus productivity analysis. The yields of GNNV RNA and capsid protein in GNNV-infected SGF-1 cells were similar to those in GNNV-infected GF-1 cells. However, when GF-1 cells were used for titration, the titre of the culture supernatant from GNNV-infected SGF-1 cells was much higher than that from GNNV-infected GF-1 cells. The titration result suggested that SnRV enhanced the infection or cytopathic effect (CPE) of GNNV during GNNV and SnRV coinfection of the GF-1 cell titration system, although SnRV cannot induce any CPE in GF-1 cells alone, nor can it increase the yield of GNNV after GNNV superinfection of SGF-1 cells. Moreover, GNNV cDNA was detected in both the pellet and the supernatant from GNNV-infected SGF-1 cells. This result indicated that SnRV reverse-transcribed the GNNV single-stranded genomic RNA into cDNA during GNNV superinfection of SGF-1 cells and created a new cDNA stage in the life cycle of the fish nodavirus.

  18. An exogenous retrovirus isolated from koalas with malignant neoplasias in a US zoo.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenqin; Stadler, Cynthia K; Gorman, Kristen; Jensen, Nathaniel; Kim, David; Zheng, HaoQiang; Tang, Shaohua; Switzer, William M; Pye, Geoffrey W; Eiden, Maribeth V

    2013-07-01

    Leukemia and lymphoma account for more than 60% of deaths in captive koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) in northeastern Australia. Although the endogenizing gammaretrovirus koala endogenous retrovirus (KoRV) was isolated from these koalas, KoRV has not been definitively associated with leukemogenesis. We performed KoRV screening in koalas from the San Diego Zoo, maintained for more than 45 y with very limited outbreeding, and the Los Angeles Zoo, maintained by continuously assimilating captive-born Australian koalas. San Diego Zoo koalas are currently free of malignant neoplasias and were infected with only endogenous KoRV, which we now term subtype "KoRV-A," whereas Los Angeles Zoo koalas with lymphomas/leukemias are infected in addition to KoRV-A by a unique KoRV we term subtype "KoRV-B." KoRV-B is most divergent in the envelope protein and uses a host receptor distinct from KoRV-A. KoRV-B also has duplicated enhancer regions in the LTR associated with increased pathology in gammaretroviruses. Whereas KoRV-A uses the sodium-dependent phosphate transporter 1 (PiT1) as a receptor, KoRV-B employs a different receptor, the thiamine transporter 1 (THTR1), to infect cells. KoRV-B is transmitted from dam to offspring through de novo infection, rather than via genetic inheritance like KoRV-A. Detection of KoRV-B in native Australian koalas should provide a history, and a mode for remediation, of leukemia/lymphoma currently endemic in this population.

  19. Endogenous retrovirus induces leukemia in a xenograft mouse model for primary myelofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Triviai, Ioanna; Ziegler, Marion; Bergholz, Ulla; Oler, Andrew J.; Stübig, Thomas; Prassolov, Vladimir; Fehse, Boris; Kozak, Christine A.; Kröger, Nicolaus; Stocking, Carol

    2014-01-01

    The compound immunodeficiencies in nonobese diabetic (NOD) inbred mice homozygous for the Prkdcscid and Il2rgnull alleles (NSG mice) permit engraftment of a wide-range of primary human cells, enabling sophisticated modeling of human disease. In studies designed to define neoplastic stem cells of primary myelofibrosis (PMF), a myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by profound disruption of the hematopoietic microenvironment, we observed a high frequency of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in NSG mice. AML was of mouse origin, confined to PMF-xenografted mice, and contained multiple clonal integrations of ecotropic murine leukemia virus (E-MuLV). Significantly, MuLV replication was not only observed in diseased mice, but also in nontreated NSG controls. Furthermore, in addition to the single ecotropic endogenous retrovirus (eERV) located on chromosome 11 (Emv30) in the NOD genome, multiple de novo germ-line eERV integrations were observed in mice from each of four independent NSG mouse colonies. Analysis confirmed that E-MuLV originated from the Emv30 provirus and that recombination events were not necessary for virus replication or AML induction. Pathogenicity is thus likely attributable to PMF-mediated paracrine stimulation of mouse myeloid cells, which serve as targets for retroviral infection and transformation, as evidenced by integration into the Evi1 locus, a hotspot for retroviral-induced myeloid leukemia. This study thus corroborates a role of paracrine stimulation in PMF disease progression, underlines the importance of target cell type and numbers in MuLV-induced disease, and mandates awareness of replicating MuLV in NOD immunodeficient mice, which can significantly influence experimental results and their interpretation. PMID:24912157

  20. Endogenous retrovirus induces leukemia in a xenograft mouse model for primary myelofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Triviai, Ioanna; Ziegler, Marion; Bergholz, Ulla; Oler, Andrew J; Stübig, Thomas; Prassolov, Vladimir; Fehse, Boris; Kozak, Christine A; Kröger, Nicolaus; Stocking, Carol

    2014-06-10

    The compound immunodeficiencies in nonobese diabetic (NOD) inbred mice homozygous for the Prkdc(scid) and Il2rg(null) alleles (NSG mice) permit engraftment of a wide-range of primary human cells, enabling sophisticated modeling of human disease. In studies designed to define neoplastic stem cells of primary myelofibrosis (PMF), a myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by profound disruption of the hematopoietic microenvironment, we observed a high frequency of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in NSG mice. AML was of mouse origin, confined to PMF-xenografted mice, and contained multiple clonal integrations of ecotropic murine leukemia virus (E-MuLV). Significantly, MuLV replication was not only observed in diseased mice, but also in nontreated NSG controls. Furthermore, in addition to the single ecotropic endogenous retrovirus (eERV) located on chromosome 11 (Emv30) in the NOD genome, multiple de novo germ-line eERV integrations were observed in mice from each of four independent NSG mouse colonies. Analysis confirmed that E-MuLV originated from the Emv30 provirus and that recombination events were not necessary for virus replication or AML induction. Pathogenicity is thus likely attributable to PMF-mediated paracrine stimulation of mouse myeloid cells, which serve as targets for retroviral infection and transformation, as evidenced by integration into the Evi1 locus, a hotspot for retroviral-induced myeloid leukemia. This study thus corroborates a role of paracrine stimulation in PMF disease progression, underlines the importance of target cell type and numbers in MuLV-induced disease, and mandates awareness of replicating MuLV in NOD immunodeficient mice, which can significantly influence experimental results and their interpretation.

  1. Integration and Fixation Preferences of Human and Mouse Endogenous Retroviruses Uncovered with Functional Data Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pini, Alessia; Chiaromonte, Francesca; Makova, Kateryna D.

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs), the remnants of retroviral infections in the germ line, occupy ~8% and ~10% of the human and mouse genomes, respectively, and affect their structure, evolution, and function. Yet we still have a limited understanding of how the genomic landscape influences integration and fixation of ERVs. Here we conducted a genome-wide study of the most recently active ERVs in the human and mouse genome. We investigated 826 fixed and 1,065 in vitro HERV-Ks in human, and 1,624 fixed and 242 polymorphic ETns, as well as 3,964 fixed and 1,986 polymorphic IAPs, in mouse. We quantitated >40 human and mouse genomic features (e.g., non-B DNA structure, recombination rates, and histone modifications) in ±32 kb of these ERVs’ integration sites and in control regions, and analyzed them using Functional Data Analysis (FDA) methodology. In one of the first applications of FDA in genomics, we identified genomic scales and locations at which these features display their influence, and how they work in concert, to provide signals essential for integration and fixation of ERVs. The investigation of ERVs of different evolutionary ages (young in vitro and polymorphic ERVs, older fixed ERVs) allowed us to disentangle integration vs. fixation preferences. As a result of these analyses, we built a comprehensive model explaining the uneven distribution of ERVs along the genome. We found that ERVs integrate in late-replicating AT-rich regions with abundant microsatellites, mirror repeats, and repressive histone marks. Regions favoring fixation are depleted of genes and evolutionarily conserved elements, and have low recombination rates, reflecting the effects of purifying selection and ectopic recombination removing ERVs from the genome. In addition to providing these biological insights, our study demonstrates the power of exploiting multiple scales and localization with FDA. These powerful techniques are expected to be applicable to many other genomic investigations

  2. Orchestrating the Selection and Packaging of Genomic RNA by Retroviruses: An Ensemble of Viral and Host Factors

    PubMed Central

    Kaddis Maldonado, Rebecca J.; Parent, Leslie J.

    2016-01-01

    Infectious retrovirus particles contain two copies of unspliced viral RNA that serve as the viral genome. Unspliced retroviral RNA is transcribed in the nucleus by the host RNA polymerase II and has three potential fates: (1) it can be spliced into subgenomic messenger RNAs (mRNAs) for the translation of viral proteins; or it can remain unspliced to serve as either (2) the mRNA for the translation of Gag and Gag–Pol; or (3) the genomic RNA (gRNA) that is packaged into virions. The Gag structural protein recognizes and binds the unspliced viral RNA to select it as a genome, which is selected in preference to spliced viral RNAs and cellular RNAs. In this review, we summarize the current state of understanding about how retroviral packaging is orchestrated within the cell and explore potential new mechanisms based on recent discoveries in the field. We discuss the cis-acting elements in the unspliced viral RNA and the properties of the Gag protein that are required for their interaction. In addition, we discuss the role of host factors in influencing the fate of the newly transcribed viral RNA, current models for how retroviruses distinguish unspliced viral mRNA from viral genomic RNA, and the possible subcellular sites of genomic RNA dimerization and selection by Gag. Although this review centers primarily on the wealth of data available for the alpharetrovirus Rous sarcoma virus, in which a discrete RNA packaging sequence has been identified, we have also summarized the cis- and trans-acting factors as well as the mechanisms governing gRNA packaging of other retroviruses for comparison. PMID:27657110

  3. Immunotherapy of Murine Retrovirus-Induced Acquired Immunodeficiency by CD4 T Regulatory Cell Depletion and PD-1 Blockade ▿

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen; Green, William R.

    2011-01-01

    LP-BM5 retrovirus induces a complex disease featuring an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome termed murine AIDS (MAIDS) in susceptible strains of mice, such as C57BL/6 (B6). CD4 T helper effector cells are required for MAIDS induction and progression of viral pathogenesis. CD8 T cells are not needed for viral pathogenesis, but rather, are essential for protection from disease in resistant strains, such as BALB/c. We have discovered an immunodominant cytolytic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope encoded in a previously unrecognized LP-BM5 retroviral alternative (+1 nucleotide [nt]) gag translational open reading frame. CTLs specific for this cryptic gag epitope are the basis of protection from LP-BM5-induced immunodeficiency in BALB/c mice, and the inability of B6 mice to mount an anti-gag CTL response appears critical to the initiation and progression of LP-BM5-induced MAIDS. However, uninfected B6 mice primed by LP-BM5-induced tumors can generate CTL responses to an LP-BM5 retrovirus infection-associated epitope(s) that is especially prevalent on such MAIDS tumor cells, indicating the potential to mount a protective CD8 T-cell response. Here, we utilized this LP-BM5 retrovirus-induced disease system to test whether modulation of normal immune down-regulatory mechanisms can alter retroviral pathogenesis. Thus, following in vivo depletion of CD4 T regulatory (Treg) cells and/or selective interruption of PD-1 negative signaling in the CD8 T-cell compartment, retroviral pathogenesis was significantly decreased, with the combined treatment of CD4 Treg cell depletion and PD-1 blockade working in a synergistic fashion to substantially reduce the induction of MAIDS. PMID:21917983

  4. Conference highlights of the 16th International Conference on Human Retrovirology: HTLV and related retroviruses, 26-30 June 2013, Montreal, Canada.

    PubMed

    Barbeau, Benoit; Hiscott, John; Bazarbachi, Ali; Carvalho, Edgar; Jones, Kathryn; Martin, Fabiola; Matsuoka, Masao; Murphy, Edward L; Ratner, Lee; Switzer, William M; Watanabe, Toshiki

    2014-02-24

    The 16th International Conference on Human Retrovirology: HTLV and Related Retroviruses was held in Montreal, Québec from June 26th to June 30th, 2013 and was therefore hosted by a Canadian city for the first time. The major topic of the meeting was human T-lymphotropic viruses (HTLVs) and was covered through distinct oral and poster presentation sessions: clinical research, animal models, immunology, molecular and cellular biology, human endogenous and emerging exogenous retroviruses and virology. In this review, highlights of the meeting are provided by different experts for each of these research areas.

  5. Conference Highlights of the 16th International Conference on Human Retrovirology: HTLV and Related Retroviruses, 26–30 June 2013, Montreal, Canada

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The 16th International Conference on Human Retrovirology: HTLV and Related Retroviruses was held in Montreal, Québec from June 26th to June 30th, 2013 and was therefore hosted by a Canadian city for the first time. The major topic of the meeting was human T-lymphotropic viruses (HTLVs) and was covered through distinct oral and poster presentation sessions: clinical research, animal models, immunology, molecular and cellular biology, human endogenous and emerging exogenous retroviruses and virology. In this review, highlights of the meeting are provided by different experts for each of these research areas. PMID:24558960

  6. Comprehensive analysis of human endogenous retrovirus group HERV-W locus transcription in multiple sclerosis brain lesions by high-throughput amplicon sequencing.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Katja; Richter, Christin; Backes, Christina; Meese, Eckart; Ruprecht, Klemens; Mayer, Jens

    2013-12-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) of the HERV-W group comprise hundreds of loci in the human genome. Deregulated HERV-W expression and HERV-W locus ERVWE1-encoded Syncytin-1 protein have been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the actual transcription of HERV-W loci in the MS context has not been comprehensively analyzed. We investigated transcription of HERV-W in MS brain lesions and white matter brain tissue from healthy controls by employing next-generation amplicon sequencing of HERV-W env-specific reverse transcriptase (RT) PCR products, thus revealing transcribed HERV-W loci and the relative transcript levels of those loci. We identified more than 100 HERV-W loci that were transcribed in the human brain, with a limited number of loci being predominantly transcribed. Importantly, relative transcript levels of HERV-W loci were very similar between MS and healthy brain tissue samples, refuting deregulated transcription of HERV-W env in MS brain lesions, including the high-level-transcribed ERVWE1 locus encoding Syncytin-1. Quantitative RT-PCR likewise did not reveal differences in MS regarding HERV-W env general transcript or ERVWE1- and ERVWE2-specific transcript levels. However, we obtained evidence for interindividual differences in HERV-W transcript levels. Reporter gene assays indicated promoter activity of many HERV-W long terminal repeats (LTRs), including structurally incomplete LTRs. Our comprehensive analysis of HERV-W transcription in the human brain thus provides important information on the biology of HERV-W in MS lesions and normal human brain, implications for study design, and mechanisms by which HERV-W may (or may not) be involved in MS.

  7. Lack of association between polymorphic copies of endogenous Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (enJSRVs) and Ovine Pulmonary Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sistiaga-Poveda, Maialen; Larruskain, Amaia; Mateo-Abad, Maider; Jugo, Begoña M

    2016-03-15

    Ovine Pulmonary Adenocarcinoma (OPA) is a retrovirus-induced lung tumor of sheep, goat and mouflon, and its etiologic agent, Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV) is the only virus known to cause a naturally occurred lung adenocarcinoma. The oncogenic JSRV has several endogenous counterparts termed enJSRVs, some of which have been shown to interfere with JSRV replication at early and late stages of the retroviral cycle inhibiting JSRV exit from the cell, and thus, protecting sheep against the infection. In this work, Latxa sheep breed animals were classified depending on the presence/absence of OPA-characteristic clinical lesions in the lung. Using a PCR genotyping method and a logistic regression-based association study, five polymorphic enJSRV copies were analyzed in 49 OPA positive sheep and 124 control individuals. Our results showed that the frequency of the provirus enJSRV-16 is much higher in Latxa sheep breed than in other breeds, suggesting a recent proliferation of this provirus in the studied breed. However, no polymorphic enJSRV was found to be statistically associated with the susceptibility/resistance to OPA development. PMID:26931391

  8. Tracking interspecies transmission and long-term evolution of an ancient retrovirus using the genomes of modern mammals

    PubMed Central

    Diehl, William E; Patel, Nirali; Halm, Kate; Johnson, Welkin E

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian genomes typically contain hundreds of thousands of endogenous retroviruses (ERVs), derived from ancient retroviral infections. Using this molecular 'fossil' record, we reconstructed the natural history of a specific retrovirus lineage (ERV-Fc) that disseminated widely between ~33 and ~15 million years ago, corresponding to the Oligocene and early Miocene epochs. Intercontinental viral spread, numerous instances of interspecies transmission and emergence in hosts representing at least 11 mammalian orders, and a significant role for recombination in diversification of this viral lineage were also revealed. By reconstructing the canonical retroviral genes, we identified patterns of adaptation consistent with selection to maintain essential viral protein functions. Our results demonstrate the unique potential of the ERV fossil record for studying the processes of viral spread and emergence as they play out across macro-evolutionary timescales, such that looking back in time may prove insightful for predicting the long-term consequences of newly emerging viral infections. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12704.001 PMID:26952212

  9. The HERV-K Human Endogenous Retrovirus Envelope Protein Antagonizes Tetherin Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lemaître, Cécile; Harper, Francis; Pierron, Gérard

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Endogenous retroviruses are the remnants of past retroviral infections that are scattered within mammalian genomes. In humans, most of these elements are old degenerate sequences that have lost their coding properties. The HERV-K(HML2) family is an exception: it recently amplified in the human genome and corresponds to the most active proviruses, with some intact open reading frames and the potential to encode viral particles. Here, using a reconstructed consensus element, we show that HERV-K(HML2) proviruses are able to inhibit Tetherin, a cellular restriction factor that is active against most enveloped viruses and acts by keeping the viral particles attached to the cell surface. More precisely, we identify the Envelope protein (Env) as the viral effector active against Tetherin. Through immunoprecipitation experiments, we show that the recognition of Tetherin is mediated by the surface subunit of Env. Similar to Ebola glycoprotein, HERV-K(HML2) Env does not mediate Tetherin degradation or cell surface removal; therefore, it uses a yet-undescribed mechanism to inactivate Tetherin. We also assessed all natural complete alleles of endogenous HERV-K(HML2) Env described to date for their ability to inhibit Tetherin and found that two of them (out of six) can block Tetherin restriction. However, due to their recent amplification, HERV-K(HML2) elements are extremely polymorphic in the human population, and it is likely that individuals will not all possess the same anti-Tetherin potential. Because of Tetherin's role as a restriction factor capable of inducing innate immune responses, this could have functional consequences for individual responses to infection. IMPORTANCE Tetherin, a cellular protein initially characterized for its role against HIV-1, has been proven to counteract numerous enveloped viruses. It blocks the release of viral particles from producer cells, keeping them tethered to the cell surface. Several viruses have developed strategies to

  10. Molecular characteristics of Human Endogenous Retrovirus type-W in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Perron, H; Hamdani, N; Faucard, R; Lajnef, M; Jamain, S; Daban-Huard, C; Sarrazin, S; LeGuen, E; Houenou, J; Delavest, M; Moins-Teisserenc, H; Moins-Teiserenc, H; Bengoufa, D; Yolken, R; Madeira, A; Garcia-Montojo, M; Gehin, N; Burgelin, I; Ollagnier, G; Bernard, C; Dumaine, A; Henrion, A; Gombert, A; Le Dudal, K; Charron, D; Krishnamoorthy, R; Tamouza, R; Leboyer, M

    2012-12-04

    Epidemiological and genome-wide association studies of severe psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD), suggest complex interactions between multiple genetic elements and environmental factors. The involvement of genetic elements such as Human Endogenous Retroviruses type 'W' family (HERV-W) has consistently been associated with SZ. HERV-W envelope gene (env) is activated by environmental factors and encodes a protein displaying inflammation and neurotoxicity. The present study addressed the molecular characteristics of HERV-W env in SZ and BD. Hundred and thirty-six patients, 91 with BD, 45 with SZ and 73 healthy controls (HC) were included. HERV-W env transcription was found to be elevated in BD (P<10-4) and in SZ (P=0.012) as compared with HC, but with higher values in BD than in SZ group (P<0.01). The corresponding DNA copy number was paradoxically lower in the genome of patients with BD (P=0.0016) or SZ (P<0.0003) than in HC. Differences in nucleotide sequence of HERV-W env were found between patients with SZ and BD as compared with HC, as well as between SZ and BD. The molecular characteristics of HERV-W env also differ from what was observed in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and may represent distinct features of the genome of patients with BD and SZ. The seroprevalence for Toxoplasma gondii yielded low but significant association with HERV-W transcriptional level in a subgroup of BD and SZ, suggesting a potential role in particular patients. A global hypothesis of mechanisms inducing such major psychoses is discussed, placing HERV-W at the crossroads between environmental, genetic and immunological factors. Thus, particular infections would act as activators of HERV-W elements in earliest life, resulting in the production of an HERV-W envelope protein, which then stimulates pro-inflammatory and neurotoxic cascades. This hypothesis needs to be further explored as it may yield major changes in our understanding and treatment of

  11. Human retroviruses in leukaemia and AIDS: reflections on their discovery, biology and epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Karpas, Abraham

    2004-11-01

    The study of retroviruses has had a profound impact by unveiling an unusual form of viral replication: the multiplication of RNA viruses via a proviral DNA, for which Jan Svoboda provided the experimental model over forty years ago. In 1970 Temin, Mizutani and Baltimore discovered that this group of viruses contains a unique enzyme catalysing the synthesis of a DNA copy of the viral RNA: reverse transcriptase (RT). The discovery of RT has itself had an enormous impact on molecular biology in general, but also stimulated many premature claims of its detection in human disease. Claims by Gallo's laboratory that the cytoplasm of human leukaemia cells contained RT proved to be unfounded, as did his report in collaboration with Weiss that myeloid leukaemia contained HL23 virus, this organism proving not to be human but a laboratory contaminant of three monkey viruses. Conclusive demonstration of a retroviral involvement in human leukaemia was first provided in 1981 by Hinuma and his associates, showing that adult T-cell leukaemia (ATL), a rare form of leukaemia endemic to south-west Japan, is caused by a new retrovirus (ATLV). Other publications in December 1980 and through 1981 claimed the discovery of a new human T-cell leukaemia virus involved in mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary's syndrome (SS). This virus was termed HTLV by Gallo. The nucleotide sequence of ATLV is strongly conserved, that of my 1983 isolate from a black British ATL patient being practically identical with the Japanese virus isolates. After AIDS was recognised in 1981 by Gottlieb and coworkers as a new human disease, several papers were published by Gallo and his associates during 1983-4, invoking the oncovirus responsible for adult T-cell leukaemia as the cause of AIDS. In 1983 the French scientist Barré-Sinoussi and her colleagues succeeded in isolating a new agent in the disease, a lentivirus, which they named LAV. The French immunologist Klatzmann and his colleagues discovered that LAV killed

  12. An avian, oncogenic retrovirus replicates in vivo in more than 50% of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes from an endangered grouse

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reoccurring infection of reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV), an avian oncogenic retrovirus, has been a major obstacle in attempts to breed and release an endangered grouse, the Attwater's prairie chicken (Tympanicus cupido attwateri). REV infection of these birds in breeding facilities was found to r...

  13. The distribution of endogenous chicken retrovirus sequences in the DNA of galliform birds does not coincide with avian phylogenetic relationships.

    PubMed

    Frisby, D P; Weiss, R A; Roussel, M; Stehelin, D

    1979-07-01

    The chicken is a domesticated form of Red Jungle-fowl (Gallus gallus), which belongs to the Pheasant family (Phasianidae) within the order Galliformes. Domestic chickens carry the genome of the endogenous retrovirus RAV-O as DNA sequences integrated into host chromosomes transmitted through the germ line. We have examined the presence and distribution of RAV-O-related sequences in the DNA of Red Junglefowl and other closely related species of Junglefowl, as well as more distantly related Pheasants and Quail. DNA sequences homologous to RAV-O were analyzed by molecular hybridization in liquid and after electrophoresis of restriction endonuclease fragments. The presence of RAV-O-related sequences in avian DNA does not correlate with phylogenetic relationships. Under stringent conditions of hybridization in liquid, DNA sequences homologous to RAV-O cDNA were detected at high levels (greater than 80% homology( only in the genomes of the domestic chicken and its phylogenetic ancestor, the Red Junglefowl (Gallus gallus). The DNA of two other species of Gallus (G. sonnerati, Sonnerat's Junglefowl and G. varius, Green Junglefowl), of Ring-necked Pheasant and of Japanese Quail contained sequences with less than 10% homology to RAV-O cDNA. Under conditions permitting mismatching, however, Ring-necked Pheasant DNA hybridized up to 50% of the RAV-O cDNA, and Quail DNA 24%, whereas the extent of hybridization to Sonnerat's and Green Junglefowl DNA was not markedly increased. Analysis of restriction enzyme digests revealed several distinct fragments of DNA hybridizing to chick retrovirus cDNA in both Red Junglefowl and domestic chicken, and multiple fragments in DNA from two species of Phasianus. No fragments with sequences related to chicken retroviruses were found, however, in digests of DNA prepared from Sonnerat's, Ceylonese and Green Junglefowl, from two other Pheasant genera (Chrysolophus and Lophura), or from one Quail genus (Coturnix). Thus the DNA of three Junglefowl

  14. Human Endogenous Retrovirus Type K (HERV-K) Particles Package and Transmit HERV-K–Related Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Contreras-Galindo, Rafael; Kaplan, Mark H.; Dube, Derek; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Marta J.; Chan, Susana; Meng, Fan; Dai, Manhong; Omenn, Gilbert S.; Gitlin, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human endogenous retroviruses (HERV) make up 8% of the human genome. While the youngest of these retroviruses, HERV-K(HML-2), termed HK2, is able to code for all viral proteins and produce virus-like particles, it is not known if these virus particles package and transmit HK2-related sequences. Here, we analyzed the capacity of HK2 for packaging and transmitting HK2 sequences. We created an HK2 probe, termed Bogota, which can be packaged into HK2 viruses, and transfected it into cells that make HK2 particles. Supernatants of the transfected cells, which contained HK2 viral particles, then were added to target cells, and the transmissibility of the HK2 Bogota reporter was tracked by G418 resistance. Our studies revealed that contemporary HK2 virions produced by some teratocarcinoma and breast cancer cell lines, as well as by peripheral blood lymphocytes from lymphoma patients, can package HK2 Bogota probes, and these viruses transmitted these probes to other cells. After transmission, HK2 Bogota transcripts undergo reverse transcription, a step impaired by antiretroviral agents or by introduction of mutations into the probe sequences required for reverse transcription. HK2 viruses were more efficiently transmitted in the presence of HK2 Rec or HIV-1 Tat and Vif. Transmitted Bogota probes formed episomes but did not integrate into the cellular genome. Resistance to integration might explain the relatively low number of HK2 insertions that were acquired during the last 25 million years of evolution. Whether transient transmission of modern HK2 sequences, which encode two putative oncoproteins, can lead to disease remains to be studied. IMPORTANCE Retroviruses invaded the genome of human ancestors over the course of millions of years, yet these viruses generally have been inactivated during evolution, with only remnants of these infectious sequences remaining in the human genome. One of these viruses, termed HK2, still is capable of producing virus particles

  15. Surveys of endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) in the freshwater crocodile (Crocodylus johnstoni) suggest that ERVs in Crocodylus spp. vary between species.

    PubMed

    Chong, Amanda Y; Kjeldsen, Shannon R; Gongora, Jaime

    2015-04-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are one of many families of transposable elements present in vertebrate genomes. We have examined the ERV complement of the freshwater crocodile (Crocodylus johnstoni) in order to investigate the diversity of ERVs present and possibility of ERV or retroviral activity in a diseased individual of this species. Amplification and sequencing of the highly conserved retroviral pro-pol domains revealed high levels of sequence variation in these ERVs. Phylogenetic analyses of these ERVs and those previously identified in other crocodilian species suggest that although many crocodilians share the same ERV lineages, the relative numbers of retroelement insertions from each of these lineages may vary greatly between species. The data generated in this study provide evidence for the presence of a unique and varied complement of ERVs in crocodilians. This study has also demonstrated the presence of species-specific evolution in ancient retroviral infections.

  16. Not so bad after all: retroviruses and long terminal repeat retrotransposons as a source of new genes in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Naville, M; Warren, I A; Haftek-Terreau, Z; Chalopin, D; Brunet, F; Levin, P; Galiana, D; Volff, J-N

    2016-04-01

    Viruses and transposable elements, once considered as purely junk and selfish sequences, have repeatedly been used as a source of novel protein-coding genes during the evolution of most eukaryotic lineages, a phenomenon called 'molecular domestication'. This is exemplified perfectly in mammals and other vertebrates, where many genes derived from long terminal repeat (LTR) retroelements (retroviruses and LTR retrotransposons) have been identified through comparative genomics and functional analyses. In particular, genes derived from gag structural protein and envelope (env) genes, as well as from the integrase-coding and protease-coding sequences, have been identified in humans and other vertebrates. Retroelement-derived genes are involved in many important biological processes including placenta formation, cognitive functions in the brain and immunity against retroelements, as well as in cell proliferation, apoptosis and cancer. These observations support an important role of retroelement-derived genes in the evolution and diversification of the vertebrate lineage. PMID:26899828

  17. Changes in lymphocyte and macrophage subsets due to morphine and ethanol treatment during a retrovirus infection causing murine AIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, R.R.; Prabhala, R.H.; Darban, H.R.; Yahya, M.D.; Smith, T.L.

    1988-01-01

    The number of lymphocytes of various subsets were not significantly changed by the ethanol exposure except those showing activation markers which were reduced. The percentage of peripheral blood cells showing markers for macrophage functions and their activation were significantly reduced after binge use of ethanol. Ethanol retarded suppression of cells by retroviral infection. However by 25 weeks of infection there was a 8.6% survival in the ethanol fed mice infected with retrovirus which was much less than virally infected controls. Morphine treatment also increased the percentage of cells with markers for macrophages and activated macrophages in virally infected mice, while suppressing them in uninfected mice. The second and third morphine injection series suppressed lymphocyte T-helper and T-suppressor cells, but not total T cells. However, suppression by morphine was significantly less during retroviral disease than suppression caused by the virus only. At 25 weeks of infection 44.8% of morphine treated, infected mice survived.

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of dUTPase from Mason–Pfizer monkey retrovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Barabás, Orsolya; Németh, Veronika; Vértessy, Beáta G.

    2006-04-01

    Deoxyuridine 5′-triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase from Mason–Pfizer monkey retrovirus (M-PMV dUTPase) is a betaretroviral member of the dUTPase enzyme family. The nucleocapsid-free dUTPase (48426 Da) was co-crystallized with a dUTP substrate analogue using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Deoxyuridine 5′-triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase from Mason–Pfizer monkey retrovirus (M-PMV dUTPase) is a betaretroviral member of the dUTPase enzyme family. In the mature M-PMV virion, this enzyme is present as the C-terminal domain of the fusion protein nucleocapsid-dUTPase. The homotrimeric organization characteristic of dUTPases is retained in this bifunctional fusion protein. The fusion protein supposedly plays a role in adequate localization of dUTPase activity in the vicinity of nucleic acids during reverse transcription and integration. Here, the nucleocapsid-free dUTPase (48 426 Da) was cocrystallized with a dUTP substrate analogue using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The obtained crystals belong to the primitive hexagonal space group P6{sub 3}, with unit-cell parameters a = 60.6, b = 60.6, c = 63.6 Å, α = 90, β = 90, γ = 120°. Native and PtCl{sub 4}-derivative data sets were collected using synchrotron radiation to 1.75 and 2.3 Å, respectively. Phasing was successfully performed by isomorphous replacement combined with anomalous scattering.

  19. Retroviral restriction factors and infectious risk in xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Meije, Y; Tönjes, R R; Fishman, J A

    2010-07-01

    The clinical application of xenotransplantation poses immunologic, ethical, and microbiologic challenges. Significant progress has been made in the investigation of each of these areas. Among concerns regarding infectious risks for human xenograft recipients is the identification in swine of infectious agents including porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERV) that are capable of replication in some human cell lines. PERV replication has, however, been difficult to demonstrate in primate-derived cell lines and in preclinical studies of non-human primates receiving porcine xenografts. Endogenous 'retroviral restriction factors' are intracellular proteins and components of the innate immune system that act at various steps in retroviral replication. Recent studies suggest that some of these factors may have applications in the management of endogenous retroviruses in xenotransplantation. The risks of PERV infection and the potential role of retroviral restriction factors in xenotransplantation are reviewed in detail.

  20. HERV-K(HML-2), the Best Preserved Family of HERVs: Endogenization, Expression, and Implications in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hohn, Oliver; Hanke, Kirsten; Bannert, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Retroviruses that have the ability to infect germ line cells can become an integral and inherited part of the host genome. About 8% of the human chromosomal DNA consists of sequences derived from infections by retroviruses that presumably circulated 2–40 millions of years ago, and some elements are actually much older. Post-insertional recombinations, deletions, and mutations have rendered all known human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) non-infectious. However some, particularly the most recently acquired proviruses of the HERV-K(HML-2) family, can expresses viral proteins and produce viral particles. In this review we will first discuss the major aspects of the endogenization process and peculiarities of the different HERV-K families. We will then focus on the genes and proteins encoded by HERV-K(HML-2) as well as inactivation of these proviruses by postinsertional mutations and their inhibition by antiretroviral factors. After describing the evolutionary interplay between host and endogenous retrovirus we will delve deeper into the currently limited understanding of HERV-K and its possible association with disease, particularly tumorigenesis. PMID:24066280

  1. Posttranscriptional regulation of retroviral gene expression: primary RNA transcripts play three roles as pre-mRNA, mRNA, and genomic RNA

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Jason; Weil, Jason; Beemon, Karen

    2013-01-01

    After reverse transcription of the retroviral RNA genome and integration of the DNA provirus into the host genome, host machinery is used for viral gene expression along with viral proteins and RNA regulatory elements. Here, we discuss co-transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of retroviral gene expression, comparing simple and complex retroviruses. Cellular RNA polymerase II synthesizes full-length viral primary RNA transcripts that are capped and polyadenylated. All retroviruses generate a singly spliced env mRNA from this primary transcript, which encodes the viral glycoproteins. In addition, complex viral RNAs are alternatively spliced to generate accessory proteins, such as Rev, which is involved in posttranscriptional regulation of HIV-1 RNA. Importantly, the splicing of all retroviruses is incomplete; they must maintain and export a fraction of their primary RNA transcripts. This unspliced RNA functions both as the major mRNA for Gag and Pol proteins and as the packaged genomic RNA. Different retroviruses export their unspliced viral RNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm by either Tap-dependent or Rev/CRM1-dependent routes. Translation of the unspliced mRNA involves frame-shifting or termination codon suppression so that the Gag proteins, which make up the capsid, are expressed more abundantly than the Pol proteins, which are the viral enzymes. After the viral polyproteins assemble into viral particles and bud from the cell membrane, a viral encoded protease cleaves them. Some retroviruses have evolved mechanisms to protect their unspliced RNA from decay by nonsense-mediated RNA decay and to prevent genome editing by the cellular APOBEC deaminases. PMID:23754689

  2. Primate retroviruses: immunological cross-reactivity between major structural proteins of new and old world primate virus isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Devare, S G; Arthur, L O; Fine, D L; Stephenson, J R

    1978-01-01

    The major 35,000-molecular-weight internal antigen (p35) of the squirrel monkey retrovirus (SMRV) was isolated and partially characterized. Immunological analysis of SMRV p35 led to the demonstration of antigenic determinants common to SMRV and the Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV). A broadly reactive competition immunoassay was developed utilizing antiserum to MPMV to precipitate 125I-labeled SMRV p35. Although the major structural proteins of MPMV and SMRV competed with equal efficiency in this assay, type B and type C oncornavirus proteins lacked detectable reactivity. Antibodies reactive with the major structural proteins of both MPMV and SMRV were observed in sera of several normal rhesus monkeys with known prior exposure to MPMV-infected animals. These findings demonstrate the ability of sera from naturally immunized primates to recognize broadly reactive interspecies antigenic determinants shared by the major structural proteins of type D oncornaviruses, and they suggest possible horizontal transmission of MPMV among rhesus monkeys. Although sera from a number of squirrel monkeys contained antibody to SMRV p35, the possibility that this latter reactivity was due to endogenous virus activation rather than horizontal transmission cannot be ruled out. PMID:76686

  3. Capsid-binding retrovirus restriction factors: discovery, restriction specificity and implications for the development of novel therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Ramos, Marta; Stoye, Jonathan P

    2013-12-01

    The development of drugs against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection has been highly successful, and numerous combinational treatments are currently available. However, the risk of the emergence of resistance and the toxic effects associated with prolonged use of antiretroviral therapies have emphasized the need to consider alternative approaches. One possible area of investigation is provided by the properties of restriction factors, cellular proteins that protect organisms against retroviral infection. Many show potent viral inhibition. Here, we describe the discovery, properties and possible therapeutic uses of the group of restriction factors known to interact with the capsid core of incoming retroviruses. This group comprises Fv1, TRIM5α and TRIMCypA: proteins that all act shortly after virus entry into the target cell and block virus replication at different stages prior to integration of viral DNA into the host chromosome. They have different origins and specificities, but share general structural features required for restriction, with an N-terminal multimerization domain and a C-terminal capsid-binding domain. Their overall efficacy makes it reasonable to ask whether they might provide a framework for developing novel antiretroviral strategies.

  4. Facial paralysis and lymphocytic facial neuritis in a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) positive for simian retrovirus type D2.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Anna L; Colby, Lesley A; Bergin, Ingrid L

    2011-12-01

    Simian retrovirus type D (SRVD) is a naturally occurring betaretrovirus in nonhuman primates of the genus Macaca. Infection can lead to a variety of clinical, hematologic, and histopathologic abnormalities. We report an unusual clinical presentation of facial paralysis and histologic lymphocytic neuritis in an SRVD type 2 (SRVD2)-infected rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) with a catheter-associated vena caval thrombus, anemia, thrombocytopenia, and multisystemic lymphoid hyperplasia. At initial presentation, a right atrial mass was detected by echocardiography. The macaque was clinically asymptomatic but had persistent anemia, thrombocytopenia, hyperglobulinemia, and later neutropenia. It was seropositive for SRV and PCR-positive for SRVD 2. Approximately 1 mo after initial presentation, the macaque developed right facial paralysis and was euthanized. Histologic lesions included lymphoplasmacytic aggregates affecting multiple organs, consistent with SRV-related lymphoid hyperplasia. The right facial nerve showed lymphoplasmacytic inflammation. The nerve itself was negative immunohistochemically for SRV antigen, but antigen was present infrequently in pericapillary lymphoid cells within the facial nerve and abundantly within lymphoid aggregates in the adjacent parotid salivary gland, bone marrow, and soft tissue. Known neurotropic viruses could not be identified. Given the widespread inflammation in this macaque, particularly in the area surrounding the facial nerve, lymphocytic neuritis and facial paralysis likely were an indirect effect of SRV infection due to local extension of SRV-related inflammation in the surrounding tissue.

  5. Protein sequence comparisons show that the 'pseudoproteases' encoded by poxviruses and certain retroviruses belong to the deoxyuridine triphosphatase family.

    PubMed Central

    McGeoch, D J

    1990-01-01

    Amino acid sequence comparisons show extensive similarities among the deoxyuridine triphosphatases (dUTPases) of Escherichia coli and of herpesviruses, and the 'protease-like' or 'pseudoprotease' sequences encoded by certain retroviruses in the oncovirus and lentivirus families and by poxviruses. These relationships suggest strongly that the 'pseudoproteases' actually are dUTPases, and have not arisen by duplication of an oncovirus protease gene as had been suggested. The herpesvirus dUTPase sequences differ from the others in that they are longer (about 370 residues, against around 140) and one conserved element ('Motif 3') is displaced relative to its position in the other sequences; a model involving internal duplication of the herpesvirus gene can account effectively for these observations. Sequences closely similar to Motif 3 are also found in phosphofructokinases, where they form part of the active site and fructose phosphate binding structure; thus these sequences may represent a class of structural element generally involved in phosphate transfer to and from glycosides. PMID:2165588

  6. ‘There and back again’: revisiting the pathophysiological roles of human endogenous retroviruses in the post-genomic era

    PubMed Central

    Magiorkinis, Gkikas; Belshaw, Robert; Katzourakis, Aris

    2013-01-01

    Almost 8% of the human genome comprises endogenous retroviruses (ERVs). While they have been shown to cause specific pathologies in animals, such as cancer, their association with disease in humans remains controversial. The limited evidence is partly due to the physical and bioethical restrictions surrounding the study of transposons in humans, coupled with the major experimental and bioinformatics challenges surrounding the association of ERVs with disease in general. Two biotechnological landmarks of the past decade provide us with unprecedented research artillery: (i) the ultra-fine sequencing of the human genome and (ii) the emergence of high-throughput sequencing technologies. Here, we critically assemble research about potential pathologies of ERVs in humans. We argue that the time is right to revisit the long-standing questions of human ERV pathogenesis within a robust and carefully structured framework that makes full use of genomic sequence data. We also pose two thought-provoking research questions on potential pathophysiological roles of ERVs with respect to immune escape and regulation. PMID:23938753

  7. Human endogenous retrovirus K solo-LTR formation and insertional polymorphisms: Implications for human and viral evolution

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Jennifer F.; Coffin, John M.

    2004-01-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) are a potential source of genetic diversity in the human genome. Although many of these elements have been inactivated over time by the accumulation of deleterious mutations or internal recombination leading to solo-LTR formation, several members of the HERV-K family have been identified that remain nearly intact and probably represent recent integration events. To determine whether HERV-K elements have caused recent changes in the human genome, we have undertaken a study of the level of HERV-K polymorphism that exists in the human population. By using a high-resolution unblotting technique, we analyzed 13 human-specific HERV-K elements in 18 individuals. We found that solo LTRs have formed at five of these loci. These results enable the estimation of HERV solo-LTR formation in the human genome and indicate that these events occur much more frequently than described in inbred mice. Detailed sequence analysis of one provirus shows that solo-LTR formation occurred at least three separate times in recent history. An unoccupied preintegration site also was present at this locus in two individuals, indicating that although the age of this provirus is estimated to be ≈1.2 million years, it has not yet become fixed in the human population. PMID:14757818

  8. Safety testing for replication-competent retrovirus associated with gibbon ape leukemia virus-pseudotyped retroviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Reeves, L; Cornetta, K

    2001-01-01

    The potential pathogenicity of replication-competent retroviruses (RCR) requires vigilant testing to exclude inadvertent contamination of clinical gene therapy vector products with RCR. Pseudotyped vectors using the gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV) envelope have entered into clinical trials but specific recommendations regarding methods for screening of vector product and analysis of clinical samples have not been set forth. Unfortunately, current screening assays used for detecting amphotropic RCR are not suitable for GALV-pseudotyped RCR. We modified the extended S+/L- assay for RCR detection by using human 293 cells for virus amplification. Of five cell lines tested, 293 cells were selected because they combined a high transduction efficiency and an ability to generate RCR at high titer. After optimizing the amplification assay, a dilution of GALV virus could consistently be detected at a dilution of 10(-6). In coculture experiments, one GALV-infected cell could be consistently detected in 10(6) uninfected cells. A PCR-based assay was developed that was capable of detecting 100 copies of a GALV envelope containing plasmid diluted in 1 microg of DNA obtained from uninfected cells. PCR was also able to detect one GALV-infected cell in 10(6) uninfected cells. These assays will be suitable for testing of vector preparations and for monitoring of clinical samples from patients treated in clinical gene therapy protocols. The assays developed are similar in methodology and sensitivity to those currently used for certification of amphotropic retroviral vectors. PMID:11177543

  9. Investigation of Human Cancers for Retrovirus by Low-Stringency Target Enrichment and High-Throughput Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Vinner, Lasse; Mourier, Tobias; Friis-Nielsen, Jens; Gniadecki, Robert; Dybkaer, Karen; Rosenberg, Jacob; Langhoff, Jill Levin; Cruz, David Flores Santa; Fonager, Jannik; Izarzugaza, Jose M. G.; Gupta, Ramneek; Sicheritz-Ponten, Thomas; Brunak, Søren; Willerslev, Eske; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Hansen, Anders Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Although nearly one fifth of all human cancers have an infectious aetiology, the causes for the majority of cancers remain unexplained. Despite the enormous data output from high-throughput shotgun sequencing, viral DNA in a clinical sample typically constitutes a proportion of host DNA that is too small to be detected. Sequence variation among virus genomes complicates application of sequence-specific, and highly sensitive, PCR methods. Therefore, we aimed to develop and characterize a method that permits sensitive detection of sequences despite considerable variation. We demonstrate that our low-stringency in-solution hybridization method enables detection of <100 viral copies. Furthermore, distantly related proviral sequences may be enriched by orders of magnitude, enabling discovery of hitherto unknown viral sequences by high-throughput sequencing. The sensitivity was sufficient to detect retroviral sequences in clinical samples. We used this method to conduct an investigation for novel retrovirus in samples from three cancer types. In accordance with recent studies our investigation revealed no retroviral infections in human B-cell lymphoma cells, cutaneous T-cell lymphoma or colorectal cancer biopsies. Nonetheless, our generally applicable method makes sensitive detection possible and permits sequencing of distantly related sequences from complex material. PMID:26285800

  10. The role of molecular mimicry and other factors in the association of Human Endogenous Retroviruses and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Trela, Malgorzata; Nelson, Paul N; Rylance, Paul B

    2016-01-01

    Human Endogenous Retroviruses (HERVs) have been implicated in autoimmune and other diseases. Molecular mimicry has been postulated as a potential mechanism of autoimmunity. Exogenous viruses have also been reported to be associated with the same diseases, as have genetic and environmental factors. If molecular mimicry were to be shown to be an initiating mechanism of some autoimmune diseases, then therapeutic options of blocking antibodies and peptides might be of benefit in halting diseases at the outset. Bioinformatic and molecular modelling techniques have been employed to investigate molecular mimicry and the evidence for the association of HERVs and autoimmunity is reviewed. The most convincing evidence for molecular mimicry is in rheumatoid arthritis, where HERV K-10 shares amino acid sequences with IgG1Fc, a target for rheumatoid factor. Systemic lupus erythematosus is an example of a condition associated with several autoantibodies, and several endogenous and exogenous viruses have been reported to be associated with the disease. The lack of a clear link between one virus and this condition, and the spectrum of clinical manifestations, suggests that genetic, environmental and the inflammatory response to a virus or viruses might also be major factors in the pathogenesis of lupus and other autoimmune conditions. Where there are strong associations between a virus and an autoimmune condition, such as in hepatitis C and cryoglobulinaemia, the use of bioinformatics and molecular modelling can also be utilized to help to understand the role of molecular mimicry in how HERVs might trigger disease.

  11. Selective cell targeting and lineage tracing of human induced pluripotent stem cells using recombinant avian retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Laura; Seemann, Petra; Kurtz, Andreas; Hecht, Jochen; Contzen, Jörg; Gossen, Manfred; Stachelscheid, Harald

    2015-12-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) differentiate into multiple cell types. Selective cell targeting is often needed for analyzing gene function by overexpressing proteins in a distinct population of hiPSC-derived cell types and for monitoring cell fate in response to stimuli. However, to date, this has not been possible, as commonly used viruses enter the hiPSC via ubiquitously expressed receptors. Here, we report for the first time the application of a heterologous avian receptor, the tumor virus receptor A (TVA), to selectively transduce TVA(+) cells in a mixed cell population. Expression of the TVA surface receptor via genetic engineering renders cells susceptible for infection by avian leucosis virus (ALV). We generated hiPSC lines with this stably integrated, ectopic TVA receptor gene that expressed the receptor while retaining pluripotency. The undifferentiated hiPSC(TVA+) as well as their differentiating progeny could be infected by recombinant ALV (so-called RCAS virus) with high efficiency. Due to incomplete receptor blocking, even sequential infection of differentiating or undifferentiated TVA(+) cells was possible. In conclusion, the TVA/RCAS system provides an efficient and gentle gene transfer system for hiPSC and extends our possibilities for selective cell targeting and lineage tracing studies.

  12. Endogenous retrovirus EAV-HP linked to blue egg phenotype in Mapuche fowl.

    PubMed

    Wragg, David; Mwacharo, Joram M; Alcalde, José A; Wang, Chen; Han, Jian-Lin; Gongora, Jaime; Gourichon, David; Tixier-Boichard, Michèle; Hanotte, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Oocyan or blue/green eggshell colour is an autosomal dominant trait found in native chickens (Mapuche fowl) of Chile and in some of their descendants in European and North American modern breeds. We report here the identification of an endogenous avian retroviral (EAV-HP) insertion in oocyan Mapuche fowl and European breeds. Sequencing data reveals 100% retroviral identity between the Mapuche and European insertions. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis of European oocyan chicken indicates over-expression of the SLCO1B3 gene (P<0.05) in the shell gland and oviduct. Predicted transcription factor binding sites in the long terminal repeats (LTR) indicate AhR/Ar, a modulator of oestrogen, as a possible promoter/enhancer leading to reproductive tissue-specific over-expression of the SLCO1B3 gene. Analysis of all jungle fowl species Gallus sp. supports the retroviral insertion to be a post-domestication event, while identical LTR sequences within domestic chickens are in agreement with a recent de novo mutation. PMID:23990950

  13. Endogenous Retrovirus EAV-HP Linked to Blue Egg Phenotype in Mapuche Fowl

    PubMed Central

    Alcalde, José A.; Wang, Chen; Han, Jian-Lin; Gongora, Jaime; Gourichon, David; Tixier-Boichard, Michèle; Hanotte, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Oocyan or blue/green eggshell colour is an autosomal dominant trait found in native chickens (Mapuche fowl) of Chile and in some of their descendants in European and North American modern breeds. We report here the identification of an endogenous avian retroviral (EAV-HP) insertion in oocyan Mapuche fowl and European breeds. Sequencing data reveals 100% retroviral identity between the Mapuche and European insertions. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis of European oocyan chicken indicates over-expression of the SLCO1B3 gene (P<0.05) in the shell gland and oviduct. Predicted transcription factor binding sites in the long terminal repeats (LTR) indicate AhR/Ar, a modulator of oestrogen, as a possible promoter/enhancer leading to reproductive tissue-specific over-expression of the SLCO1B3 gene. Analysis of all jungle fowl species Gallus sp. supports the retroviral insertion to be a post-domestication event, while identical LTR sequences within domestic chickens are in agreement with a recent de novo mutation. PMID:23990950

  14. Defective virus is associated with induction of murine retrovirus-induced immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, S K; Morse, H C; Makino, M; Ruscetti, S K; Hartley, J W

    1989-01-01

    C57BL/6 mice infected with a mixture of murine leukemia viruses (MuLV) develop a syndrome characterized by lymphoproliferation and profound immunodeficiency. Analyses of this viral mixture (LP-BM5 MuLV) showed that it includes replication-competent ecotropic and mink cell focus-inducing MuLV and defective viruses with genome sizes of 3.8-6.5 kilobases. The ecotropic and mink cell focus-inducing MuLV biologically cloned from the mixture did not induce disease, whereas viral preparations containing the ecotropic MuLV and 4.8-kilobase defective virus were active. Cells producing the 4.8-kilobase defective virus expressed an unusual gag-encoded polyprotein of Mr 60,000. Images PMID:2542949

  15. Immunogenicity of Bivalent Human Papillomavirus DNA Vaccine Using Human Endogenous Retrovirus Envelope-Coated Baculoviral Vectors in Mice and Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hee-Jung; Hur, Yoon-Ki; Cho, Youn-Dong; Kim, Mi-Gyeong; Lee, Hoon-Taek; Oh, Yu-Kyoung; Kim, Young Bong

    2012-01-01

    Human papillomavirus is known to be the major pathogen of cervical cancer. Here, we report the efficacy of a bivalent human papillomavirus type 16 and 18 DNA vaccine system following repeated dosing in mice and pigs using a recombinant baculovirus bearing human endogenous retrovirus envelope protein (AcHERV) as a vector. The intramuscular administration of AcHERV-based HPV16L1 and HPV18L1 DNA vaccines induced antigen-specific serum IgG, vaginal IgA, and neutralizing antibodies to levels comparable to those achieved using the commercially marketed vaccine Cervarix. Similar to Cervarix, AcHERV-based bivalent vaccinations completely blocked subsequent vaginal challenge with HPV type-specific pseudovirions. However, AcHERV-based bivalent vaccinations induced significantly higher cell-mediated immune responses than Cervarix, promoting 4.5- (HPV16L1) and 3.9-(HPV18L1) fold higher interferon-γ production in splenocytes upon stimulation with antigen type-specific pseudovirions. Repeated dosing did not affect the immunogenicity of AcHERV DNA vaccines. Three sequential immunizations with AcHERV-HP18L1 DNA vaccine followed by three repeated dosing with AcHERV-HP16L1 over 11 weeks induced an initial production of anti-HPV18L1 antibody followed by subsequent induction of anti-HPV16L1 antibody. Finally, AcHERV-based bivalent DNA vaccination induced antigen-specific serum IgG immune responses in pigs. These results support the further development of AcHERV as a bivalent human papillomavirus DNA vaccine system for use in preventing the viral infection as well as treating the infected women by inducing both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. Moreover, the possibility of repeated dosing indicates the utility of AcHERV system for reusable vectors of other viral pathogen vaccines. PMID:23209698

  16. Disparities in outcomes for African American and Latino subjects in the Flexible Initial Retrovirus Suppressive Therapies (FIRST) trial.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Thomas P; Bartsch, Glenn; Zhang, Yafeng; Tedaldi, Ellen; Absalon, Judith; Mannheimer, Sharon; Thomas, Avis; MacArthur, Rodger D

    2010-05-01

    To benefit maximally from antiretroviral therapy, patients with HIV infection must enter care before their disease is advanced and adhere to care. We sought to determine if and where on this continuum of care racial/ethnic disparities were evident. Data from the Flexible Initial Retrovirus Suppressive Therapies (FIRST) trial, which evaluated three strategies for initial HIV therapy, were compared for White, African American, and Latino subjects. Outcomes included progression of disease and death, HIV viral suppression, and change in CD4(+) cell count. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for known predictors of survival. There were 1357 subjects, including 368 non-Latino white, 751 non-Latino African American, and 238 Latino subjects. At baseline, the two latter groups were more likely to have had AIDS and had lower CD4(+) cell counts than white subjects. In follow-up, African American subjects had lower self-reported adherence to therapy, lower CD4(+) cell count increases, and lower odds of viral suppression. African American and Latino subjects had unadjusted hazard ratios of progression of disease or death of 1.57 (1.17, 2.10; p = 0.0025) and 1.57 (1.09, 2.26; p = 0.02), respectively. Adjusting for baseline differences and differences in adherence, CD4(+) cell count change, and viral suppression accounted for the disparities in outcomes. Opportunities to reduce disparities in outcomes for African American and Latino patients exist along the continuum of HIV care. Efforts to promote access to HIV testing and care and to improve adherence have the potential to reduce racial/ethnic disparities in outcomes of patients with HIV infection.

  17. Genomic landscapes of endogenous retroviruses unveil intricate genetics of conventional and genetically-engineered laboratory mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang-Hoon; Lim, Debora; Chiu, Sophia; Greenhalgh, David; Cho, Kiho

    2016-04-01

    Laboratory strains of mice, both conventional and genetically engineered, have been introduced as critical components of a broad range of studies investigating normal and disease biology. Currently, the genetic identity of laboratory mice is primarily confirmed by surveying polymorphisms in selected sets of "conventional" genes and/or microsatellites in the absence of a single completely sequenced mouse genome. First, we examined variations in the genomic landscapes of transposable repetitive elements, named the TREome, in conventional and genetically engineered mouse strains using murine leukemia virus-type endogenous retroviruses (MLV-ERVs) as a probe. A survey of the genomes from 56 conventional strains revealed strain-specific TREome landscapes, and certain families (e.g., C57BL) of strains were discernible with defined patterns. Interestingly, the TREome landscapes of C3H/HeJ (toll-like receptor-4 [TLR4] mutant) inbred mice were different from its control C3H/HeOuJ (TLR4 wild-type) strain. In addition, a CD14 knock-out strain had a distinct TREome landscape compared to its control/backcross C57BL/6J strain. Second, an examination of superantigen (SAg, a "TREome gene") coding sequences of mouse mammary tumor virus-type ERVs in the genomes of the 46 conventional strains revealed a high diversity, suggesting a potential role of SAgs in strain-specific immune phenotypes. The findings from this study indicate that unexplored and intricate genomic variations exist in laboratory mouse strains, both conventional and genetically engineered. The TREome-based high-resolution genetics surveillance system for laboratory mice would contribute to efficient study design with quality control and accurate data interpretation. This genetics system can be easily adapted to other species ranging from plants to humans.

  18. Genomic landscapes of endogenous retroviruses unveil intricate genetics of conventional and genetically-engineered laboratory mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang-Hoon; Lim, Debora; Chiu, Sophia; Greenhalgh, David; Cho, Kiho

    2016-04-01

    Laboratory strains of mice, both conventional and genetically engineered, have been introduced as critical components of a broad range of studies investigating normal and disease biology. Currently, the genetic identity of laboratory mice is primarily confirmed by surveying polymorphisms in selected sets of "conventional" genes and/or microsatellites in the absence of a single completely sequenced mouse genome. First, we examined variations in the genomic landscapes of transposable repetitive elements, named the TREome, in conventional and genetically engineered mouse strains using murine leukemia virus-type endogenous retroviruses (MLV-ERVs) as a probe. A survey of the genomes from 56 conventional strains revealed strain-specific TREome landscapes, and certain families (e.g., C57BL) of strains were discernible with defined patterns. Interestingly, the TREome landscapes of C3H/HeJ (toll-like receptor-4 [TLR4] mutant) inbred mice were different from its control C3H/HeOuJ (TLR4 wild-type) strain. In addition, a CD14 knock-out strain had a distinct TREome landscape compared to its control/backcross C57BL/6J strain. Second, an examination of superantigen (SAg, a "TREome gene") coding sequences of mouse mammary tumor virus-type ERVs in the genomes of the 46 conventional strains revealed a high diversity, suggesting a potential role of SAgs in strain-specific immune phenotypes. The findings from this study indicate that unexplored and intricate genomic variations exist in laboratory mouse strains, both conventional and genetically engineered. The TREome-based high-resolution genetics surveillance system for laboratory mice would contribute to efficient study design with quality control and accurate data interpretation. This genetics system can be easily adapted to other species ranging from plants to humans. PMID:26779669

  19. Enhanced propagation of fish nodaviruses in BF-2 cells persistently infected with snakehead retrovirus (SnRV).

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, Toyohiko; Kokawa, Yuki; Wakayama, Takako; Kinoshita, Shinichi; Yoshimizu, Mamoru

    2008-03-01

    Fish nodaviruses are causative agents of viral nervous necrosis causing high mortality in cultured marine fishes around the world. The first successful isolation of fish nodavirus was made with SSN-1 cells, which are persistently infected with snakehead retrovirus (SnRV). In the present study, a BF-2 cell line persistently infected with SnRV (PI-BF-2) was established to evaluate the influence of SnRV on the production of fish nodavirus. The PI-BF-2 cells were slightly more slender than BF-2 cells, but no difference was observed in propagation rate between both cell lines. No difference was observed in production of SnRV between PI-BF-2 and SSN-1 cell lines. Although both PI-BF-2 and BF-2 cell lines showed no cytopathic effect (CPE) after inoculation of striped jack nervous necrosis virus (SJNNV) and redspotted grouper nervous necrosis virus (RGNNV), these fish nodaviruses could be amplified in BF-2 cells, and moreover, production of fish nodaviruses in the PI-BF-2 cell line was more than 40 times higher than in BF-2 cells. Thus, it was concluded that BF-2 cell permissiveness to fish nodaviruses was enhanced by persistent infection with SnRV. Furthermore, homologous cDNA to genomic RNA of SJNNV was detected from both PI-BF-2 and SSN-1 cell lines persistently infected with SnRV. The amount of nodavirus cDNA in SJNNV-inoculated PI-BF-2 cells was clearly lower than that in SJNNV-inoculated SSN-1 cells.

  20. Human Endogenous Retrovirus Type K Antibodies and mRNA as Serum Biomarkers of Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang-Johanning, Feng; Li, Ming; Esteva, Francisco J.; Hess, Kenneth R.; Yin, Bingnan; Rycaj, Kiera; Plummer, Joshua B.; Garza, Jeremy G.; Ambs, Stefan; Johanning, Gary L.

    2013-01-01

    A simple and accurate test to detect early-stage breast cancer has not been developed. Previous studies indicate that the level of human endogenous retrovirus type K (group HERV-K(HML-2)) transcription may be increased in human breast tumors. We hypothesized that HERV-K(HML-2) reactivation can serve as a biomarker for early detection of breast cancer. Serum samples were collected from women without cancer (controls) and patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive breast cancer. ELISA assays were employed to detect serum anti-HERV-K(HML-2) antibody titers. RNA was extracted from sera and analyzed by real-time RT-PCR to quantitate the level of HERV-K(HML-2) mRNA. We measured significantly higher serum mRNA and serum antibody titers against HERV-K(HML-2) proteins in women with DCIS and stage I disease than in women without cancer. At optimized cutoffs for the antibody titers, the assay produced an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.89 (95% confidence interval 0.77 to 1.00) for DCIS and of 0.95 (95% confidence interval 0.89 to 1.00) for invasive breast cancer. These AUCs are comparable to those observed for mammograms. We also found that serum HERV-K(HML-2) mRNA tended to be higher in breast cancer patients with a primary tumor who later on developed the metastatic disease than in patients who did not develop cancer metastasis. Our results show that HERV-K(HML-2) antibodies and mRNA are already elevated in the blood at an early stage of breast cancer, and further increase in patients who are at risk of developing a metastatic disease. PMID:23873154

  1. Selection of Reversions and Suppressors of a Mutation in the CBF Binding Site of a Lymphomagenic Retrovirus

    PubMed Central

    Martiney, Marita J.; Rulli, Karen; Beaty, Robert; Levy, Laura S.; Lenz, Jack

    1999-01-01

    The retrovirus SL3 induces T-cell lymphomas in mice. The transcriptional enhancer in the long terminal repeat (LTR) of SL3 contains two 72-bp repeats. Each repeat contains a binding site for the transcription factor CBF (also called AML1). The CBF binding sites are called core elements. SAA is a mutant that is identical to SL3 except for the presence of a single-base-pair substitution in each of the two core elements. This mutation significantly attenuates viral lymphomagenicity. Most lymphomas that occur in SAA-infected mice contain proviruses with reversions or second-site suppressor mutations within the core element. We examined the selective pressures that might account for the predominance of the reversions and suppressor mutations in tumor proviruses by analyzing when proviruses with altered core sequences became abundant during the course of lymphomagenesis. Altered core sequences were easily detected in thymus DNAs by 4 to 6 weeks after SAA infection of mice, well before lymphomas were grossly evident. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that viruses with the core sequence alterations emerged because they replicated more effectively in mice than SAA. The number of 72-bp tandem, repeats in the viral LTR was found to vary, presumably as a consequence of reverse transcriptase slippage during polymerization. Proviruses with two repeats predominated in the thymuses of SAA- and SL3-infected mice before lymphomas developed, although LTRs with one or three repeats were also present. This suggested that two was the optimal number of 72-bp repeats for viral replication. However, in lymphomas, proviruses with three or four repeats usually predominated. This suggested that a late step in the process of lymphomagenesis led to the abundance of proviruses with additional repeats. We hypothesize that proviruses with additional 72-bp repeats endowed the cells containing them with a selective growth advantage. PMID:10438850

  2. Sequence and Transcriptional Analyses of the Fish Retroviruses Walleye Epidermal Hyperplasia Virus Types 1 and 2: Evidence for a Gene Duplication

    PubMed Central

    LaPierre, Lorie A.; Holzschu, Donald L.; Bowser, Paul R.; Casey, James W.

    1999-01-01

    Walleye epidermal hyperplasia virus types 1 and 2 (WEHV1 and WEHV2, respectively) are associated with a hyperproliferative skin lesion on walleyes that appears and regresses seasonally. We have determined the complete nucleotide sequences and transcriptional profiles of these viruses. WEHV1 and WEHV2 are large, complex retroviruses of 12,999 and 13,125 kb in length, respectively, that are closely related to one another and to walleye dermal sarcoma virus (WDSV). These walleye retroviruses contain three open reading frames, orfA, orfB, and orfC, in addition to gag, pol, and env. orfA and orfB are adjacent to one another and located downstream of env. The OrfA proteins were previously identified as cyclin D homologs that may contribute to the induction of cell proliferation leading to epidermal hyperplasia and dermal sarcoma. The sequence analysis of WEHV1 and WEHV2 revealed that the OrfB proteins are distantly related to the OrfA proteins, suggesting that orfB arose by gene duplication. Presuming that the precursor of orfA and orfB was derived from a cellular cyclin, these genes are the first accessory genes of complex retroviruses that can be traced to a cellular origin. WEHV1, WEHV2, and WDSV are the only retroviruses that have an open reading frame, orfC, of considerable size (ca. 130 amino acids) in the leader region preceding gag. While we were unable to predict a function for the OrfC proteins, they are more conserved than OrfA and OrfB, suggesting that they may be biologically important to the viruses. The transcriptional profiles of WEHV1 and WEHV2 were also similar to that of WDSV; Northern blot analyses detected only low levels of the orfA transcripts in developing lesions, whereas abundant levels of genomic, env, orfA, and orfB transcripts were detected in regressing lesions. The splice donors and acceptors of individual transcripts were identified by reverse transcriptase PCR. The similarities of WEHV1, WEHV2, and WDSV suggest that these viruses use

  3. Human Retroviruses and AIDS. A compilation and analysis of nucleic acid and amino acid sequences: I--II; III--V

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, G.; Korber, B.; Wain-Hobson, S.; Smith, R.F.; Pavlakis, G.N.

    1993-12-31

    This compendium and the accompanying floppy diskettes are the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts that it comprises: (I) HIV and SIV Nucleotide Sequences; (II) Amino Acid Sequences; (III) Analyses; (IV) Related Sequences; and (V) Database Communications. Information within all the parts is updated at least twice in each year, which accounts for the modes of binding and pagination in the compendium.

  4. Development and characterization of an Fv-1-sensitive retrovirus-packaging system: single-hit titration kinetics observed in restrictive cells.

    PubMed

    Boone, L R; Innes, C L; Glover, P L; Linney, E

    1989-06-01

    We have constructed an RNA-packaging-deficient mutant of N-tropic murine leukemia virus WN1802N by removal of 330 nucleotides located between the upstream long terminal repeat and the start of the gag gene region. Transfection into mink CCL64 cells produced a cell line capable of packaging retrovirus vectors into ecotropic, Fv-1 N-tropic virions. Using retrovirus vectors that confer resistance to the antibiotic G418, we demonstrated that the magnitude of restriction in BALB/3T3 and SIM.R cells (both Fv-1b/b) and in RFM/3T3 cells (Fv-1nr/nr) is approximately 100-fold compared with that in AKR or NIH 3T3 cells (both Fv-1n/n). Furthermore, titration kinetics were single hit in restrictive cells. Colonies of antibiotic-resistant cells recovered after infection of genotypically restrictive cultures were phenotypically restrictive when reinfected, ruling out selection of stably nonrestrictive subpopulations. These results suggest that the ability to infect some fraction of cells in a genotypically restrictive culture does not require specific abrogation and that multihit kinetics may not be an essential feature of Fv-1 restriction.

  5. All Three Variable Regions of the TRIM5α B30.2 Domain Can Contribute to the Specificity of Retrovirus Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Ohkura, Sadayuki; Yap, Melvyn W.; Sheldon, Tom; Stoye, Jonathan P.

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed the contribution of TRIM5α to retrovirus restriction in cells from a variety of primate species. TRIM5α consists of a tripartite motif (the RBCC domain) followed by a B30.2 domain. The B30.2 domain is thought to be involved in determination of restriction specificity and contains three variable regions. To investigate the relationship between the phylogeny of primate TRIM5α and retrovirus restriction specificity, a series of chimeric TRIM5α consisting of the human RBCC domain followed by the B30.2 domain from various primates was constructed. These constructs showed restriction profiles largely consistent with the origin of the B30.2 domain. Restriction specificity was further investigated with a variety of TRIM5αs containing mixed or mutated B30.2 domains. This study revealed the importance of all three variable regions for determining restriction specificity. Based on the molecular structures of other PRYSPRY domains solved recently, a model for the molecular structure of the B30.2 domain of TRIM5α was developed. The model revealed that the variable regions of the B30.2 domain are present as loops located on one side of the B30.2 core structure. It is hypothesized that these three loops form a binding surface for virus and that evolutionary changes in any one of the loops can alter restriction specificity. PMID:16912305

  6. Identification of Novel, Highly Expressed Retroviral MicroRNAs in Cells Infected by Bovine Foamy Virus

    PubMed Central

    Whisnant, Adam W.; Kehl, Timo; Bao, Qiuying; Materniak, Magdalena; Kuzmak, Jacek; Löchelt, Martin

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT While numerous viral microRNAs (miRNAs) expressed by DNA viruses, especially herpesvirus family members, have been reported, there have been very few reports of miRNAs derived from RNA viruses. Here we describe three miRNAs expressed by bovine foamy virus (BFV), a member of the spumavirus subfamily of retroviruses, in both BFV-infected cultured cells and BFV-infected cattle. All three viral miRNAs are initially expressed in the form of an ∼122-nucleotide (nt) pri-miRNA, encoded within the BFV long terminal repeat U3 region, that is subsequently cleaved to generate two pre-miRNAs that are then processed to yield three distinct, biologically active miRNAs. The BFV pri-miRNA is transcribed by RNA polymerase III, and the three resultant mature miRNAs were found to contribute a remarkable ∼70% of all miRNAs expressed in BFV-infected cells. These data document the second example of a retrovirus that is able to express viral miRNAs by using embedded proviral RNA polymerase III promoters. IMPORTANCE Foamy viruses are a ubiquitous family of nonpathogenic retroviruses that have potential as gene therapy vectors in humans. Here we demonstrate that bovine foamy virus (BFV) expresses high levels of three viral microRNAs (miRNAs) in BFV-infected cells in culture and also in infected cattle. The BFV miRNAs are unusual in that they are initially transcribed by RNA polymerase III as a single, ∼122-nt pri-miRNA that is subsequently processed to release three fully functional miRNAs. The observation that BFV, a foamy virus, is able to express viral miRNAs in infected cells adds to emerging evidence that miRNA expression is a common, albeit clearly not universal, property of retroviruses and suggests that these miRNAs may exert a significant effect on viral replication in vivo. PMID:24522910

  7. Single residues in the surface subunits of oncogenic sheep retrovirus envelopes distinguish receptor-mediated triggering for fusion at low pH and infection

    SciTech Connect

    Cote, Marceline; Zheng, Yi-Min; Albritton, Lorraine M.; Liu, Shan-Lu

    2011-12-20

    Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV) and enzootic nasal tumor virus (ENTV) are two closely related oncogenic retroviruses that share the same cellular receptor yet exhibit distinct fusogenicity and infectivity. Here, we find that the low fusogenicity of ENTV envelope protein (Env) is not because of receptor binding, but lies in its intrinsic insensitivity to receptor-mediated triggering for fusion at low pH. Distinct from JSRV, shedding of ENTV surface (SU) subunit into culture medium was not enhanced by a soluble form of receptor, Hyal2 (sHyal2), and sHyal2 was unable to effectively inactivate the ENTV pseudovirions. Remarkably, replacing either of the two amino acid residues, N191 or S195, located in the ENTV SU with the corresponding JSRV residues, H191 or G195, markedly increased the Env-mediated membrane fusion activity and infection. Reciprocal amino acid substitutions also partly switched the sensitivities of ENTV and JSRV pseudovirions to sHyal2-mediated SU shedding and inactivation. While N191 is responsible for an extra N-linked glycosylation of ENTV SU relative to that of JSRV, S195 possibly forms a hydrogen bond with a surrounding amino acid residue. Molecular modeling of the pre-fusion structure of JSRV Env predicts that the segment of SU that contains H191 to G195 contacts the fusion peptide and suggests that the H191N and G195S changes seen in ENTV may stabilize its pre-fusion structure against receptor priming and therefore modulate fusion activation by Hyal2. In summary, our study reveals critical determinants in the SU subunits of JSRV and ENTV Env proteins that likely regulate their local structures and thereby differential receptor-mediated fusion activation at low pH, and these findings explain, at least in part, their distinct viral infectivity.

  8. Embryonic expression of endogenous retroviral RNAs in somatic tissues adjacent to the Oikopleura germline

    PubMed Central

    Henriet, Simon; Sumic, Sara; Doufoundou-Guilengui, Carlette; Jensen, Marit Flo; Grandmougin, Camille; Fal, Kateryna; Thompson, Eric; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Chourrout, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Selective pressure to maintain small genome size implies control of transposable elements, and most old classes of retrotransposons are indeed absent from the very compact genome of the tunicate Oikopleura dioica. Nonetheless, two families of retrotransposons are present, including the Tor elements. The gene organization within Tor elements is similar to that of LTR retrotransposons and retroviruses. In addition to gag and pol, many Tor elements carry a third gene encoding viral envelope-like proteins (Env) that may mediate infection. We show that the Tor family contains distinct classes of elements. In some classes, env mRNA is transcribed from the 5′LTR as in retroviruses. In others, env is transcribed from an additional promoter located downstream of the 5′LTR. Tor Env proteins are membrane-associated glycoproteins which exhibit some features of viral membrane fusion proteins. Whereas some elements are expressed in the adult testis, many others are specifically expressed in embryonic somatic cells adjacent to primordial germ cells. Such embryonic expression depends on determinants present in the Tor elements and not on their surrounding genomic environment. Our study shows that unusual modes of transcription and expression close to the germline may contribute to the proliferation of Tor elements. PMID:25779047

  9. High Expression of Endogenous Retroviral Envelope Gene in the Equine Fetal Part of the Placenta.

    PubMed

    Stefanetti, Valentina; Marenzoni, Maria Luisa; Passamonti, Fabrizio; Cappelli, Katia; Garcia-Etxebarria, Koldo; Coletti, Mauro; Capomaccio, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are proviral phases of exogenous retroviruses that have co-evolved with vertebrate genomes for millions of years. Previous studies have identified the envelope (env) protein genes of retroviral origin preferentially expressed in the placenta which suggests a role in placentation based on their membrane fusogenic capacity and therefore they have been named syncytins. Until now, all the characterized syncytins have been associated with three invasive placentation types: the endotheliochorial (Carnivora), the synepitheliochorial (Ruminantia), and the hemochorial placentation (human, mouse) where they play a role in the syncytiotrophoblast formation. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate whether EqERV env RNA is expressed in horse tissues as well and investigate if the horse, possessing an epitheliochorial placenta, has "captured" a common retroviral env gene with syncytin-like properties in placental tissues. Interestingly, although in the equine placenta there is no syncytiotrophoblast layer at the maternal-fetal interface, our results showed that EqERV env RNA is highly expressed at that level, as expected for a candidate syncytin-like gene but with reduced abundance in the other somatic tissues (nearly 30-fold lower) thus suggesting a possible role in the placental tissue. Although the horse is one of the few domestic animals with a sequenced genome, few studies have been conducted about the EqERV and their expression in placental tissue has never been investigated. PMID:27176223

  10. Expression of functional human EGF receptor on murine bone marrow cells.

    PubMed Central

    von Rüden, T; Wagner, E F

    1988-01-01

    The human epidermal growth factor-receptor (EGF-R) was introduced into primary mouse bone marrow cells (BMC), utilizing retrovirus mediated gene transfer. Cultivation of infected BMC in the presence of interleukin-3 (IL-3) led to the outgrowth of IL-3 dependent myeloid cells, which efficiently expressed functional EGF-R, exhibiting its two characteristic affinity states. EGF acts on these cells synergistically with IL-3 in stimulating DNA synthesis and cell proliferation even under IL-3 saturation conditions. However, EGF was not sufficient to replace the requirement for IL-3. In contrast, EGF was able to maintain proliferation of a factor-dependent hemopoietic cell line (FDC-P1) infected with the EGF-R retrovirus in the absence of IL-3, but these cells did not respond to EGF in the presence of IL-3. No influence of EGF on IL-3 induced mast cell differentiation of BMC expressing the EGF-R could be observed by histological criteria. These data show that the expression of EGF-R alone is not sufficient to induce or maintain cell proliferation in IL-3 dependent bone marrow derived cells, although it can do so in established hemopoietic cell lines. Images PMID:3053164

  11. Effect of Chemical Modification and Fragmentation on Antigenic Determinants of Internal Protein p30 and Surface Glycoprotein gp70 of Type C Retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Versteegen, Rosemary J.; Oroszlan, Stephen

    1980-01-01

    The effects of protein modification on the antigenic determinants of p30 and gp70 of type C retroviruses were investigated by using solid-phase competition radioimmunoassays. Proteins were modified by reduction with 2-mercaptoethanol and subsequent carboxymethylation of SH groups with iodoacetamide or by amidination of α and ε amino groups with methylacetimidate. The type-specific determinants of gp70 were found to be conformational in nature, as they were destroyed by these chemical modifications. Group- and interspecies-specific determinants of gp70 antigens, however, appear to be sequential and do not involve residues susceptible to these chemical reagents. Conformation-dependent type-specific determinants of p30 were affected only by methylacetimidate. Group- and interspecies-specific determinants of p30 are similar to those of gp70 in that they also appear to be sequential antigenic sites. Therefore, the broadly reactive group- and interspecies-specific determinants of gp70 and p30 can be followed into small peptides. Accordingly, a cyanogen bromide cleavage fragment derived from the carboxyl-terminal one-third of Rauscher leukemia virus p30 was found to carry group-specific determinants but no detectable interspecies-specific determinants. In contrast, a peptide obtained by limited trypsin cleavage of p30, which was derived from the NH2-terminal region of the protein, contained at least one of the interspecies determinants shared with feline leukemia virus p27. Images PMID:6154154

  12. Reciprocal relationship of T regulatory cells and monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells in LP-BM5 murine retrovirus-induced immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Megan A; Vella, Jennifer L; Green, William R

    2016-02-01

    Immunomodulatory cellular subsets, including myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and T regulatory cells (Tregs), contribute to the immunosuppressive tumour microenvironment and are targets of immunotherapy, but their role in retroviral-associated immunosuppression is less well understood. Due to known crosstalk between Tregs and MDSCs in the tumour microenvironment, and also their hypothesized involvement during human immunodeficiency virus/simian immunodeficiency virus infection, studying the interplay between these immune cells during LP-BM5 retrovirus-induced murine AIDS is of interest. IL-10-producing FoxP3+ Tregs expanded after LP-BM5 infection. Following in vivo adoptive transfer of natural Treg (nTreg)-depleted CD4+T-cells, and subsequent LP-BM5 retroviral infection, enriched monocytic MDSCs (M-MDSCs) from these nTreg-depleted mice displayed altered phenotypic subsets. In addition, M-MDSCs from LP-BM5-infected nTreg-depleted mice exhibited increased suppression of T-cell, but not B-cell, responses, compared with M-MDSCs derived from non-depleted LP-BM5-infected controls. Additionally, LP-BM5-induced M-MDSCs modulated the production of IL-10 by FoxP3+ Tregs in vitro. These collective data highlight in vitro and for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, in vivo reciprocal modulation between retroviral-induced M-MDSCs and Tregs, and may provide insight into the immunotherapeutic targeting of such regulatory cells during retroviral infection.

  13. Characterization of retrovirus-based reporter viruses pseudotyped with the precursor membrane and envelope glycoproteins of four serotypes of dengue viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, H.-P.; Hsieh, S.-C.; King, C.-C.; Wang, W.-K.

    2007-11-25

    In this study, we successfully established retrovirus-based reporter viruses pseudotyped with the precursor membrane and envelope (PrM/E) proteins of each of the four serotypes of dengue viruses, which caused the most important arboviral diseases in this century. Co-sedimentation of the dengue E protein and HIV-1 core proteins by sucrose gradient analysis of the pseudotype reporter virus of dengue virus type 2, D2(HIVluc), and detection of HIV-1 core proteins by immunoprecipitation with anti-E monoclonal antibody suggested that dengue viral proteins were incorporated into the pseudotype viral particles. The infectivity in target cells, as assessed by the luciferase activity, can be inhibited by the lysosomotropic agents, suggesting a pH-dependent mechanism of entry. Amino acid substitutions of the leucine at position 107, a critical residue at the fusion loop of E protein, with lysine resulted in severe impairment in infectivity, suggesting that entry of the pseudotype reporter virus is mediated through the fusogenic properties of E protein. With more and more dengue viral sequences available from different outbreaks worldwide, this sensitive and convenient tool has the potential to facilitate molecular characterization of the PrM/E proteins of dengue field isolates.

  14. Induction of ebolavirus cross-species immunity using retrovirus-like particles bearing the Ebola virus glycoprotein lacking the mucin-like domain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The genus Ebolavirus includes five distinct viruses. Four of these viruses cause hemorrhagic fever in humans. Currently there are no licensed vaccines for any of them; however, several vaccines are under development. Ebola virus envelope glycoprotein (GP1,2) is highly immunogenic, but antibodies frequently arise against its least conserved mucin-like domain (MLD). We hypothesized that immunization with MLD-deleted GP1,2 (GPΔMLD) would induce cross-species immunity by making more conserved regions accessible to the immune system. Methods To test this hypothesis, mice were immunized with retrovirus-like particles (retroVLPs) bearing Ebola virus GPΔMLD, DNA plasmids (plasmo-retroVLP) that can produce such retroVLPs in vivo, or plasmo-retroVLP followed by retroVLPs. Results Cross-species neutralizing antibody and GP1,2-specific cellular immune responses were successfully induced. Conclusion Our findings suggest that GPΔMLD presented through retroVLPs may provide a strategy for development of a vaccine against multiple ebolaviruses. Similar vaccination strategies may be adopted for other viruses whose envelope proteins contain highly variable regions that may mask more conserved domains from the immune system. PMID:22273269

  15. The use of standard and relaxed hybridization conditions to detect two classes of sequences related to type-D retroviruses in the DNAs of primates.

    PubMed

    Drohan, W; Colcher, D; Schlom, J

    1978-11-21

    Using standard hybridization conditions (68 degrees C and 0.4 M sodium phosphate) and assaying for RNAase-resistant RNA . DNA duplexes in the presence of 2 X SSC (1 X SSC is 0.15 M NaCl and 0.015 M sodium citrate), sequences representing approx. 20% of the Mason-Pfizer virus (MPV) genome have previously been shown to be endogenous in DNAs of all Old World monkeys examined (Drohan, W., Colcher, D., Schochetman, G. and Schlom, J. (1977) J. Virol. 23, 36--43). We now report that titration of both the temperature at which hybridizations are carried out and the Na+ concentration at which 125I-labeled MPV RNA . DNA hybrids are scored, reveals a second class of sequences related to the MPV genome in the DNAs of primates. These MPV-related sequences, which are similar to an additional 40% of the MPV genome, are detected when the temperature of hybridization is reduced to 54 degrees C and when the resulting 125I-labeled RNA . DNA duplexes are scored for RNAase resistance in 8 X SSC. These sequences are found in the DNAs of all Old World monkeys examined, and the Tm values of the hybrid duplexes are approx. 6--7 degrees C lower than those of the hybrid duplexes formed using standard conditions. These studies further demonstrate the wide distribution of type-D retrovirus sequences in primates.

  16. TLR ligand induced IL-6 counter-regulates the anti-viral CD8+ T cell response during an acute retrovirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Weimin; Dietze, Kirsten K.; Gibbert, Kathrin; Lang, Karl S.; Trilling, Mirko; Yan, Huimin; Wu, Jun; Yang, Dongliang; Lu, Mengji; Roggendorf, Michael; Dittmer, Ulf; Liu, Jia

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists contribute to the control of viral infection by augmenting virus-specific CD8+ T-cell responses. It is also well established that signaling by TLRs results in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin 6 (IL-6). However, how these pro-inflammatory cytokines influence the virus-specific CD8+ T-cell response during the TLR agonist stimulation remained largely unknown. Here, we investigated the role of TLR-induced IL-6 in shaping virus-specific CD8+ T-cell responses in the Friend retrovirus (FV) mouse model. We show that the TLR agonist induced IL-6 counter-regulates effector CD8+ T-cell responses. IL-6 potently inhibited activation and cytokine production of CD8+ T cells in vitro. This effect was mediated by a direct stimulation of CD8+ T cells by IL-6, which induced upregulation of STAT3 phosphorylation and SOCS3 and downregulated STAT4 phosphorylation and T-bet. Moreover, combining TLR stimulation and IL-6 blockade during an acute FV infection resulted in enhanced virus-specific CD8+ T-cell immunity and better control of viral replication. These results have implications for our understanding of the role of TLR induced pro-inflammatory cytokines in regulating effector T cell responses and for the development of therapeutic strategies to overcome T cell dysfunction in chronic viral infections. PMID:25994622

  17. Length distribution of long interspersed nucleotide elements (LINEs) and processed pseudogenes of human endogenous retroviruses: implications for retrotransposition and pseudogene detection.

    PubMed

    Pavlícek, Adam; Paces, Jan; Zíka, Radek; Hejnar, Jirí

    2002-10-30

    Deciphering the human genome includes reliable identification and structural characterization of individual retrotransposon elements. The most active group of autonomous transposable elements, the long interspersed nuclear elements (LINE), transpose themselves as well as other RNAs, including those of human endogenous retroviruses (HERV). During this transposition, however, the LINE-encoded reverse transcriptase (RT) often abortively dissociates from the RNA template, leaving a prematurely terminated, 5' truncated copy. We have analyzed the length distributions of LINEs and of processed pseudogenes derived from HERV-W. As expected, we have found that the majority of 5' truncated LINEs and HERV-W processed pseudogenes show a prevalence of very short elements terminated close to the 3' end. On the other hand, the number of complete elements is far above the expectation. The characteristic distribution in both cases indicates two important conclusions: (i) dissociation of LINE RT from the template cannot be fully explained by low processivity of RT modelled as a stochastic, Poisson-type process. (ii) Currently cited numbers of pseudogenes within the human genome are underestimated, since a large percentage of pseudogenes are terminated in the 3' untranslated region and remain undetectable in translated homology searches of protein databases against the human genome.

  18. A stable human-derived packaging cell line for production of high titer retrovirus/vesicular stomatitis virus G pseudotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Ory, D S; Neugeboren, B A; Mulligan, R C

    1996-01-01

    We have generated a human 293-derived retroviral packaging cell line (293GPG) capable of producing high titers of recombinant Moloney murine leukemia virus particles that have incorporated the vesicular stomatitis virus G (VSV-G) protein. To achieve expression of the retroviral gag-pol polyprotein, the precise coding sequences for gag-pol were introduced into a vector which utilizes totally nonretroviral signals for gene expression. Because constitutive expression of the VSV-G protein is toxic in 293 cells, we used the tetR/VP 16 transactivator and teto minimal promoter system for inducible, tetracycline-regulatable expression of VSV-G. After stable transfection of the 293GPG packaging cell line with the MFG.SnlsLacZ retroviral vector construct, it was possible to readily isolate stable virus-producing cell lines with titers approaching 10(7) colony-forming units/ml. Transient transfection of 293GPG cells using a modified version of MFG.SnlsLacZ, in which the cytomegalovirus IE promoter was used to drive transcription of the proviral genome, led to titers of approximately 10(6) colony-forming units/ml. The retroviral/VSV-G pseudotypes generated using 293GPG cells were significantly more resistant to human complement than commonly used amphotropic vectors and could be highly concentrated (> 1000-fold). This new packaging cell line may prove to be particularly useful for assessing the potential use of retroviral vectors for direct in vivo gene transfer. The design of the cell line also provides at least theoretical advantages over existing cell lines with regard to the possible release of replication-competent virus. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8876147

  19. v-src induces clonal sarcomas and rapid metastasis following transduction with a replication-defective retrovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Stoker, A.W.; Sieweke, M.H. )

    1989-12-01

    v-src is an effective carcinogen when expressed from Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) in vivo. Whereas RSV tumors require sustained oncogene expression, their growth is largely a balance between viral recruitment of tissues and host immune destruction of infected cells. The authors have therefore examined the tumorigenic potential of v-src in the absence of viral recruitment and viral antigen expression. v-src was introduced with high efficiency into chicken wing web tissues using replication-defective (rd) retroviral vectors. Clonal sarcomas were induced rapidly, and furthermore, v-src potentiated metastatic progression in {approx} 0.1%-1% of tumor clones with unexpectedly short latency. rd vectors proved effective not only in transducing v-src into tissues but also as insertional markers of tumor clonality. The rd vector present in most primary and metastatic tumors was a highly truncated form of RSV derived by viral transmission of spliced v-src mRNA; this vector should thus avoid viral recruitment and host anti-viral immune reaction through its complete lack of viral structural genes. Under such conditions v-src maintains strong carcinogenicity in vivo when restricted to clonal tumor growth and can confer rapid metastatic potential on a discrete subset of tumor clones.

  20. Polymorphic changes of cell phenotype caused by elevated expression of an exogenous NEU proto-oncogene.

    PubMed

    Tarakhovsky, A M; Resnikov, M; Zaichuk, T; Tugusheva, M V; Butenko, Z A; Prassolov, V S

    1990-03-01

    The NEU proto-oncogene encodes a 185,000 dalton transmembrane glycoprotein with extensive homology to epidermal growth factor receptor. In the current study the effect of exogenous NEU expression on phenotype and growth properties of cells established lines was examined. The replication defective retroviruses were used to express constitutively NEU cDNA in the Rat-1, NIH3T3 and Balb/c3T3 cells. In spite of the practically similar NEU mRNA and protein content in infected cells only in Balb/c3T3 cells, high NEU expression ultimately led to oncogenic transformation. The Rat-1 cells were practically insensitive to oncogenic action of NEU. Subpopulation divergency with respect to NEU-dependent transformation was also revealed in infected NIH3T3 cells. These results suggest the existence of unknown host-specific factor(s) determining the response of cells to NEU overexpression.

  1. Expression of human factor IX in rat capillary endothelial cells: Toward somatic gene therapy for hemophilia B

    SciTech Connect

    Shounan Yao; Wilson, J.M.; Nabel, E.G.; Kurachi, Sumiko; Hachiya, H.L.; Kurachi, Kotoku )

    1991-09-15

    In aiming to develop a gene therapy approach for hemophilia B, the authors expressed and characterized human factor IX in rat capillary endothelial cells (CECs). Moloney murine leukemia virus-derived retrovirus vectors that contain human factor IX cDNA linked to heterologous promoters and the neomycin-resistant gene were constructed and employed to prepare recombinant retroviruses. Rat CECs and NIH 3T3 cells infected with these viruses were selected with the neomycin analogue, G418 sulfate, and tested for expression of factor IX. A construct with the factor IX cDNA under direct control by long terminal repeat gave the highest level of expression as quantitated by immunoassays as well as clotting activity assays. A single RNA transcript of 4.4 kilobases predicted by the construct and a recombinant factor IX were found. The recombinant human factor IX produced showed full clotting activity, demonstrating that CECs have an efficient mechanism for posttranslational modifications, including {gamma}-carboxylation, essential for its biological activity. These results, in addition to other properties of the endothelium, including large number of cells, accessibility, and direct contact with the circulating blood, suggest that CECs can serve as an efficient drug delivery vehicle producing factor IX in a somatic gene therapy for hemophilia B.

  2. Evolutionary conservation of a molecular machinery for export and expression of mRNAs with retained introns

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baomin; Rekosh, David

    2015-01-01

    Intron retention is one of the least studied forms of alternative splicing. Through the use of retrovirus and other model systems, it was established many years ago that mRNAs with retained introns are subject to restriction both at the level of nucleocytoplasmic export and cytoplasmic expression. It was also demonstrated that specific cis-acting elements in the mRNA could serve to bypass these restrictions. Here we show that one of these elements, the constitutive transport element (CTE), first identified in the retrovirus MPMV and subsequently in the human NXF1 gene, is a highly conserved element. Using GERP analysis, CTEs with strong primary sequence homology, predicted to display identical secondary structure, were identified in NXF genes from >30 mammalian species. CTEs were also identified in the predicted NXF1 genes of zebrafish and coelacanths. The CTE from the zebrafish NXF1 was shown to function efficiently to achieve expression of mRNA with a retained intron in human cells in conjunction with zebrafish Nxf1 and cofactor Nxt proteins. This demonstrates that all essential functional components for expression of mRNA with retained introns have been conserved from fish to man. PMID:25605961

  3. Evolutionary conservation of a molecular machinery for export and expression of mRNAs with retained introns.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baomin; Rekosh, David; Hammarskjold, Marie-Louise

    2015-03-01

    Intron retention is one of the least studied forms of alternative splicing. Through the use of retrovirus and other model systems, it was established many years ago that mRNAs with retained introns are subject to restriction both at the level of nucleocytoplasmic export and cytoplasmic expression. It was also demonstrated that specific cis-acting elements in the mRNA could serve to bypass these restrictions. Here we show that one of these elements, the constitutive transport element (CTE), first identified in the retrovirus MPMV and subsequently in the human NXF1 gene, is a highly conserved element. Using GERP analysis, CTEs with strong primary sequence homology, predicted to display identical secondary structure, were identified in NXF genes from >30 mammalian species. CTEs were also identified in the predicted NXF1 genes of zebrafish and coelacanths. The CTE from the zebrafish NXF1 was shown to function efficiently to achieve expression of mRNA with a retained intron in human cells in conjunction with zebrafish Nxf1 and cofactor Nxt proteins. This demonstrates that all essential functional components for expression of mRNA with retained introns have been conserved from fish to man.

  4. Evaluation of the immunomodulatory and antiviral effects of the cytokine combination IFN-α and IL-7 in the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus and Friend retrovirus mouse infection models.

    PubMed

    Audigé, Annette; Hofer, Ursula; Dittmer, Ulf; van den Broek, Maries; Speck, Roberto F

    2011-10-01

    Existing therapies for chronic viral infections are still suboptimal or have considerable side effects, so new therapeutic strategies need to be developed. One option is to boost the host's immune response with cytokines. We have recently shown in an acute ex vivo HIV infection model that co-administration of interferon (IFN)-α and interleukin (IL)-7 allows us to combine the potent anti-HIV activity of IFN-α with the beneficial effects of IL-7 on T-cell survival and function. Here we evaluated the effect of combining IFN-α and IL-7 on viral replication in vivo in the chronic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and acute Friend retrovirus (FV) infection models. In the chronic LCMV model, cytokine treatment was started during the early replication phase (i.e., on day 7 post-infection [pi]). Under the experimental conditions used, exogenous IFN-α inhibited FV replication, but had no effect on viral replication in the LCMV model. There was no therapeutic benefit of IL-7 either alone or in combination with IFN-α in either of the two infection models. In the LCMV model, dose-dependent effects of the cytokine combination on T-cell phenotype/function were observed. It is possible that these effects would translate into antiviral activity in re-challenged mice. It is also possible that another type of IFN-α/β or induction of endogenous IFN-α/β alone or in combination with IL-7 would have antiviral activity in the LCMV model. Furthermore, we cannot exclude that some effect on viral titers would have been seen at later time points not investigated here (i.e., beyond day 34 pi). Finally, IFN-α/IL-7 may inhibit the replication of other viruses. Thus it might be worth testing these cytokines in other in vivo models of chronic viral infections.

  5. Impairment of blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier properties by retrovirus-activated T lymphocytes: reduction in cerebrospinal fluid-to-blood efflux of prostaglandin E2.

    PubMed

    Khuth, Seng Thuon; Strazielle, Nathalie; Giraudon, Pascale; Belin, Marie-Françoise; Ghersi-Egea, Jean-François

    2005-09-01

    The choroid plexus epithelium forms the interface between the blood and the CSF. In conjunction with the tight junctions restricting the paracellular pathway, polarized specific transport systems in the choroidal epithelium allow a fine regulation of CSF-borne biologically active mediators. The highly vascularized stroma delimited by the choroidal epithelium can be a reservoir for retrovirus-infected or activated immune cells. In this work, new insight in the implication of the blood-CSF barrier in neuroinfectious and inflammatory diseases is provided by using a differentiated cellular model of the choroidal epithelium, exposed to infected T lymphocytes. We demonstrate that T cells activated by a retroviral infection, but not non-infected cells, reduce the transporter-mediated CSF-to-blood efflux of organic anions, in particular that of the potent pro-inflammatory prostaglandin PGE2, via the release of soluble factors. A moderate alteration of the paracellular permeability also occurs. We identified the viral protein Tax, oxygenated free radicals, matrix-metalloproteinases and pro-inflammatory cytokines as active molecules released during the exposure of the epithelium to infected T cells. Among them, tumour necrosis factor and interleukin 1 are directly involved in the mechanism underlying the decrease in some choroidal organic anion efflux. Given the strong involvement of CSF-borne PGE2 in sickness behaviour syndrome, these data suggest that the blood-CSF barrier plays an important role in the pathophysiology of neuroinflammation and neuroinfection, via changes in the transport processes controlling the CSF biodisposition of PGE2. PMID:16026393

  6. Sequence comparison in the crossover region of an oncogenic avian retrovirus recombinant and its nononcogenic parent: Genetic regions that control growth rate and oncogenic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Tsichlis, P.N.; Donehower, L.; Hager, G.; Zeller, N.; Malavarca, R.; Astrin, S.; Skalka, A.M.

    1982-11-01

    NTRE is an avian retrovirus recombinant of the endogeneous nononcogenic Rous-associated virus-0 (RAV-0) and the oncogenic, exogeneous, transformation-defective (td) Prague strain of Rous sarcoma virus B (td-PrRSV-B). Oligonucleotide mapping had shown that the recombinant virus is indistinguishable from its RAV-0 parent except for the 3'-end sequences, which were derived from td-PrRSV-B. However, the virus exhibits properties which are typical of an exogenous virus: it grows to high titers in tissue culture, and it is oncogenic in vivo. To accurately define the genetic region responsible for these properties, the authors determined the nucleotide sequences of the recombinant and its RAV-0 parent by using molecular clones of their DNA. These were compared with sequences already available for PrRSV-C, a virus closely related to the exogenous parent td-PrRSV-B. The results suggested that the crossover event which generated NTRE 7 took place in a region -501 to -401 nucleotides from the 3' end of the td-PrRSV parental genome and that sequences to the right of the recombination region were responsible for its growth properties and oncogenic potential. Since the exogenous-virus-specific sequences are expected to be missing from transformation-defective mutants of the Schmidt-Ruppin strain of RSV, which, like other exogeneous viruses, grow to high tiers in tissue culture and are oncogenic in vivo, the authors concluded that the growth properties and oncogenic potential of the exogeneous viruses are determined by sequences in the U3 region of the long terminal repeat. However, the authors propose that the exogeneous-virus-specific region may play a role in determining the oncogenic spectrum of a given oncogenic virus.

  7. Differentially-Expressed Pseudogenes in HIV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Aditi; Brown, C Titus; Zheng, Yong-Hui; Adami, Christoph

    2015-10-01

    Not all pseudogenes are transcriptionally silent as previously thought. Pseudogene transcripts, although not translated, contribute to the non-coding RNA pool of the cell that regulates the expression of other genes. Pseudogene transcripts can also directly compete with the parent gene transcripts for mRNA stability and other cell factors, modulating their expression levels. Tissue-specific and cancer-specific differential expression of these "functional" pseudogenes has been reported. To ascertain potential pseudogene:gene interactions in HIV-1 infection, we analyzed transcriptomes from infected and uninfected T-cells and found that 21 pseudogenes are differentially expressed in HIV-1 infection. This is interesting because parent genes of one-third of these differentially-expressed pseudogenes are implicated in HIV-1 life cycle, and parent genes of half of these pseudogenes are involved in different viral infections. Our bioinformatics analysis identifies candidate pseudogene:gene interactions that may be of significance in HIV-1 infection. Experimental validation of these interactions would establish that retroviruses exploit this newly-discovered layer of host gene expression regulation for their own benefit.

  8. FGF-7 expression enhances the performance of bioengineered skin.

    PubMed

    Erdag, Gulsun; Medalie, Daniel A; Rakhorst, Hinne; Krueger, Gerald G; Morgan, Jeffrey R

    2004-07-01

    To improve the performance of bioengineered skin, we used a recombinant retrovirus encoding FGF-7 to modify diploid human keratinocytes genetically. Control or FGF-7-expressing keratinocytes were seeded onto acellular human dermis to form bioengineered skin. Gene-modified skin secreted significant levels of FGF-7 and formed a thicker and hyperproliferative epidermis with about four times the number of cells per square centimeter. Secretion of an endogenous trophic factor, VEGF, was increased approximately 5-fold. Migration of FGF-7-expressing keratinocytes was stimulated as was the self-healing of bioengineered skin expressing FGF-7. When tested in a bacterial infection model, the antimicrobial properties of FGF-7-expressing skin were increased >500-fold against both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. After transplantation to full-thickness wounds on athymic mice, skin expressing FGF-7 was revascularized more rapidly. These results demonstrate that genetic modification can be used to enhance performance and that expression of FGF-7 augments several properties important to the wound-healing properties of bioengineered skin. PMID:15233944

  9. Gene expression array analyses predict increased proto-oncogene expression in MMTV induced mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Popken-Harris, Pamela; Kirchhof, Nicole; Harrison, Ben; Harris, Lester F

    2006-08-01

    Exogenous infection by milk-borne mouse mammary tumor viruses (MMTV) typically induce mouse mammary tumors in genetically susceptible mice at a rate of 90-95% by 1 year of age. In contrast to other transforming retroviruses, MMTV acts as an insertional mutagen and under the influence of steroid hormones induces oncogenic transformation after insertion into the host genome. As these events correspond with increases in adjacent proto-oncogene transcription, we used expression array profiling to determine which commonly associated MMTV insertion site proto-oncogenes were transcriptionally active in MMTV induced mouse mammary tumors. To verify our gene expression array results we developed real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays for the common MMTV insertion site genes found in RIII/Sa mice (int-1/wnt-1, int-2/fgf-3, int-3/Notch 4, and fgf8/AIGF) as well as two genes that were consistently up regulated (CCND1, and MAT-8) and two genes that were consistently down regulated (FN1 and MAT-8) in the MMTV induced tumors as compared to normal mammary gland. Finally, each tumor was also examined histopathologically. Our expression array findings support a model whereby just one or a few common MMTV insertions into the host genome sets up a dominant cascade of events that leave a characteristic molecular signature.

  10. Retrovirus-induced murine acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: natural history of infection and differing susceptibility of inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Hartley, J W; Fredrickson, T N; Yetter, R A; Makino, M; Morse, H C

    1989-03-01

    C57BL mice (Fv-1b) develop a severe immunodeficiency disease following inoculation as adults with LP-BM5 murine leukemia virus (MuLV), a derivative of Duplan-Laterjet virus which contains B-tropic ecotropic and mink cell focus-inducing MuLVs and a putative defective genome which may be the proximal cause of disease. The stages of development of this disease were defined for C57BL mice on the basis of lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly; histopathological changes consistent with B-cell activation; and alterations in expression of cell surface antigens affected by proliferation of T cells, B cells, and macrophages. By using this disease profile as a standard, the response of adult mice of various inbred strains and selected F1 hybrids was compared. We show that although the strains which are highly sensitive are of the Fv-1b genotype (i.e., permissive for B-tropic MuLVs), certain Fv-1b strains, e.g., BALB/c and A/J, are resistant to murine acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, whereas certain Fv-1n strains (permissive for N-tropic MuLVs but restrictive for B-tropic MuLVs), notably P/N, BDP, and AKR, show moderate sensitivity and (C57BL/6 x CBA/N)F1 mice (Fv-1n/b and thus dually restrictive) are of relatively high susceptibility. The results of virus recovery tests suggest that apparently anomalous sensitivity, based on predicted Fv-1 restriction, may reflect MuLV induction and/or mutation to provide a helper virus for which the host is permissive.

  11. Retrovirus-induced murine acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: natural history of infection and differing susceptibility of inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, J W; Fredrickson, T N; Yetter, R A; Makino, M; Morse, H C

    1989-01-01

    C57BL mice (Fv-1b) develop a severe immunodeficiency disease following inoculation as adults with LP-BM5 murine leukemia virus (MuLV), a derivative of Duplan-Laterjet virus which contains B-tropic ecotropic and mink cell focus-inducing MuLVs and a putative defective genome which may be the proximal cause of disease. The stages of development of this disease were defined for C57BL mice on the basis of lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly; histopathological changes consistent with B-cell activation; and alterations in expression of cell surface antigens affected by proliferation of T cells, B cells, and macrophages. By using this disease profile as a standard, the response of adult mice of various inbred strains and selected F1 hybrids was compared. We show that although the strains which are highly sensitive are of the Fv-1b genotype (i.e., permissive for B-tropic MuLVs), certain Fv-1b strains, e.g., BALB/c and A/J, are resistant to murine acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, whereas certain Fv-1n strains (permissive for N-tropic MuLVs but restrictive for B-tropic MuLVs), notably P/N, BDP, and AKR, show moderate sensitivity and (C57BL/6 x CBA/N)F1 mice (Fv-1n/b and thus dually restrictive) are of relatively high susceptibility. The results of virus recovery tests suggest that apparently anomalous sensitivity, based on predicted Fv-1 restriction, may reflect MuLV induction and/or mutation to provide a helper virus for which the host is permissive. Images PMID:2536830

  12. Hypoxia inhibits Moloney murine leukemia virus expression in activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Puppo, Maura; Bosco, Maria Carla; Federico, Maurizio; Pastorino, Sandra; Varesio, Luigi

    2007-02-01

    Hypoxia, a local decrease in oxygen tension, occurring in many pathological processes, modifies macrophage (Mphi) gene expression and function. Here, we provide the first evidence that hypoxia inhibits transgene expression driven by the Moloney murine leukemia virus-long terminal repeats (MoMLV-LTR) in IFN-gamma-activated Mphi. Hypoxia silenced the expression of several MoMLV-LTR-driven genes, including v-myc, enhanced green fluorescence protein, and env, and was effective in different mouse Mphi cell lines and on distinct MoMLV backbone-based viruses. Down-regulation of MoMLV mRNA occurred at the transcriptional level and was associated with decreased retrovirus production, as determined by titration experiments, suggesting that hypoxia may control MoMLV retroviral spread through the suppression of LTR activity. In contrast, genes driven by the CMV or the SV40 promoter were up-regulated or unchanged by hypoxia, indicating a selective inhibitory activity on the MoMLV promoter. It is interesting that hypoxia was ineffective in suppressing MoMLV-LTR-controlled gene expression in T or fibroblast cell lines, suggesting a Mphi lineage-selective action. Finally, we found that MoMLV-mediated gene expression in Mphi was also inhibited by picolinic acid, a tryptophan catabolite with hypoxia-like activity and Mphi-activating properties, suggesting a pathophysiological role of this molecule in viral resistance and its possible use as an antiviral agent.

  13. Genome-wide Profiling Reveals Remarkable Parallels Between Insertion Site Selection Properties of the MLV Retrovirus and the piggyBac Transposon in Primary Human CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gogol-Döring, Andreas; Ammar, Ismahen; Gupta, Saumyashree; Bunse, Mario; Miskey, Csaba; Chen, Wei; Uckert, Wolfgang; Schulz, Thomas F; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Ivics, Zoltán

    2016-01-01

    The inherent risks associated with vector insertion in gene therapy need to be carefully assessed. We analyzed the genome-wide distributions of Sleeping Beauty (SB) and piggyBac (PB) transposon insertions as well as MLV retrovirus and HIV lentivirus insertions in human CD4+ T cells with respect to a panel of 40 chromatin states. The distribution of SB transposon insertions displayed the least deviation from random, while the PB transposon and the MLV retrovirus showed unexpected parallels across all chromatin states. Both MLV and PB insertions are enriched at transcriptional start sites (TSSs) and co-localize with BRD4-associated sites. We demonstrate physical interaction between the PB transposase and bromodomain and extraterminal domain proteins (including BRD4), suggesting convergent evolution of a tethering mechanism that directs integrating genetic elements into TSSs. We detect unequal biases across the four systems with respect to targeting genes whose deregulation has been previously linked to serious adverse events in gene therapy clinical trials. The SB transposon has the highest theoretical chance of targeting a safe harbor locus in the human genome. The data underscore the significance of vector choice to reduce the mutagenic load on cells in clinical applications. PMID:26755332

  14. A replication-competent retrovirus arising from a split-function packaging cell line was generated by recombination events between the vector, one of the packaging constructs, and endogenous retroviral sequences.

    PubMed

    Chong, H; Starkey, W; Vile, R G

    1998-04-01

    Previously we reported the presence of a replication-competent retrovirus in supernatant from a vector-producing line derived from a widely used split-function amphotropic packaging cell line. Rigorous routine screening of all retroviral stocks produced in our laboratory has not, previously or since, indicated the presence of such a virus. Replication-competent retroviruses have never previously been used in our laboratory, and stringent screening of all routinely used cell lines has not revealed the presence of any helper viruses. Therefore, it is highly unlikely that this virus represents an adventitious cross-contaminant or had been imported unknowingly with our cell line stocks. PCR studies with DNA from infected cell lines and Northern blot analysis and reverse transcriptase PCR with RNA from infected cells suggest that the helper virus arose by recombination events, at sites of partial homology, between sequences in the vector, one of the packaging constructs, and endogenous retroviral elements. These recombinations were not present in stocks of the packaging cell line or in an initial stock of the vector-producing line, indicating that these events occurred while the vector-producing line was being passaged for harvest of supernatant stocks. PMID:9525583

  15. Protective Efficacy of a Human Endogenous Retrovirus Envelope-Coated, Nonreplicable, Baculovirus-Based Hemagglutin Vaccine against Pandemic Influenza H1N1 2009

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong-Ki; Cho, Yeon-Dong; Heo, Yoon-Ki; Cho, Han-Sam; Choi, Tae-Jin; Poo, Ha-Ryoung; Oh, Yu-Kyoung; Kim, Young Bong

    2013-01-01

    Despite the advantages of DNA vaccines, overcoming their lower efficacy relative to that of conventional vaccines remains a challenge. Here, we constructed a human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) envelope-coated, nonreplicable, baculovirus-based HA vaccine against swine influenza A/California/04/2009(H1N1) hemagglutin (HA) (AcHERV-sH1N1-HA) as an alternative to conventional vaccines and evaluated its efficacy in two strains of mice, BALB/c and C57BL/6. A commercially available, killed virus vaccine was used as a positive control. Mice were intramuscularly administered AcHERV-sH1N1-HA or the commercial vaccine and subsequently given two booster injections. Compared with the commercial vaccine, AcHERV-sH1N1-HA induced significantly higher levels of cellular immune responses in both BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. Unlike cellular immune responses, humoral immune responses depended on the strain of mice. Following immunization with AcHERV-sH1N1-HA, C57BL/6 mice showed HA-specific IgG titers 10- to 100-fold lower than those of BALB/c mice. In line with the different levels of humoral immune responses, the survival of immunized mice after intranasal challenge with sH1N1 virus (A/California/04/2009) depended on the strain. After challenge with 10-times the median lethal dose (MLD50) of sH1N1 virus, 100% of BALB/c mice immunized with the commercial vaccine or AcHERV-sH1N1-HA survived. In contrast, C57BL/6 mice immunized with AcHERV-sH1N1-HA or the commercial vaccine showed 60% and 70% survival respectively, after challenge with sH1N1 virus. In all mice, virus titers and results of histological analyses of lung tissues were consistent with the survival data. Our results indicate the importance of humoral immune response as a major defense system against influenza viral infection. Moreover, the complete survival of BALB/c mice immunized with AcHERV-sH1N1-HA after challenge with sH1N1 virus suggests the potential of baculoviral vector-based vaccines to achieve an efficacy comparable to

  16. Expression of LINE-1 retroposons is essential for murine preimplantation development.

    PubMed

    Beraldi, Rosanna; Pittoggi, Carmine; Sciamanna, Ilaria; Mattei, Elisabetta; Spadafora, Corrado

    2006-03-01

    In higher eukaryotes, reverse transcriptase (RT) activities are encoded by a variety of endogenous retroviruses and retrotransposable elements. We previously found that mouse preimplantation embryos are endowed with an endogenous RT activity. Inhibition of that activity by the non nucleosidic inhibitor nevirapine or by microinjection of anti-RT antibody caused early embryonic developmental arrest. Those experiments indicated that RT is required for early development, but did not identify the responsible coding elements. We now show that microinjection of morpholino-modified antisense oligonucleotides targeting the 5' end region of active LINE-1 retrotransposons in murine zygotes irreversibly arrests preimplantation development at the two- and four-cell stages; the overall level of functional RT is concomitantly downregulated in arrested embryos. Furthermore, we show that the induction of embryo developmental arrest is associated with a substantial reprogramming of gene expression. Together, these results support the conclusion that expression of LINE-1 retrotransposons is required for early embryo preimplantation development.

  17. Generation of a high-titer retroviral vector capable of expressing high levels of the human beta-globin gene.

    PubMed

    Sadelain, M; Wang, C H; Antoniou, M; Grosveld, F; Mulligan, R C

    1995-07-18

    Retrovirus-mediated gene transfer into hematopoietic cells may provide a means of treating both inherited and acquired diseases involving hematopoietic cells. Implementation of this approach for disorders resulting from mutations affecting the beta-globin gene (e.g., beta-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia), however, has been hampered by the inability to generate recombinant viruses able to efficiently and faithfully transmit the necessary sequences for appropriate gene expression. We have addressed this problem by carefully examining the interactions between retroviral and beta-globin gene sequences which affect vector transmission, stability, and expression. First, we examined the transmission properties of a large number of different recombinant proviral genomes which vary both in the precise nature of vector, beta-globin structural gene, and locus control region (LCR) core sequences incorporated and in the placement and orientation of those sequences. Through this analysis, we identified one specific vector, termed M beta 6L, which carries both the human beta-globin gene and core elements HS2, HS3, and HS4 from the LCR and faithfully transmits recombinant proviral sequences to cells with titers greater than 10(6) per ml. Populations of murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells transduced by this virus expressed levels of human beta-globin transcript which, on a per gene copy basis, were 78% of the levels detected in an MEL-derived cell line, Hu11, which carries human chromosome 11, the site of the beta-globin locus. Analysis of individual transduced MEL cell clones, however, indicated that, while expression was detected in every clone tested (n = 17), the levels of human beta-globin treatment varied between 4% and 146% of the levels in Hu11. This clonal variation in expression levels suggests that small beta-globin LCR sequences may not provide for as strict chromosomal position-independent expression of beta-globin as previously suspected, at least in the context of

  18. Human Retroviruses: Methods and Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Gongpu; Zhang, Peijun

    2015-01-01

    Summary After virus fusion with a target cell, the viral core is released into the host cell cytoplasm and undergoes a controlled disassembly process, termed uncoating, before or as reverse transcription takes place. The cellular protein TRIM5α is a host cell restriction factor that blocks HIV-1 infection in rhesus macaque cells by targeting the viral capsid and inducing premature uncoating. The molecular mechanism of the interaction between capsid and TRIM5α remains unclear. Here, we describe an approach that utilizes cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) to examine the structural changes exerted on HIV-1 capsid (CA) assembly by TRIM5α binding. The TRIM5α interaction sites on CA assembly were further dissected by combining cryoEM with pair-wise cysteine mutations that crosslink CA either within a CA hexamer or between CA hexamers. Based on the structural information from cryoEM and crosslinking results from in vitro CA assemblies and purified intact HIV-1 cores, we demonstrate that direct binding of TRIM5α CC-SPRY domains to the viral capsid results in disruption and fragmentation of the surface lattice of HIV-1 capsid, specifically at inter-hexamer interfaces. The method described here can be easily adopted to study other important interactions in multi-protein complexes. PMID:24158810

  19. Developmental-stage-specific expression and regulation of an amphotropic retroviral receptor in hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, C; Bank, A

    1996-01-01

    Expression of the transmembrane receptor protein Ram-1 may be critical to optimizing retroviral gene transfer. Ram-1 acts as both a sodium-dependent phosphate transporter and a receptor for amphotropic retroviruses. We previously reported detectable Ram-1 in murine hematopoietic fetal liver cells (FLC) despite resistance of these cells to amphotropic retroviral transduction (infection). We document here that Ram-1 expression is completely absent in murine yolk sac cells from days 9.5 through 13.5 of ontogeny and first appears at low levels in midgestational FLC between days 13.5 and 14.5. In addition, Ram-1 expression is detected only in more differentiated populations within FLC, day 14.5, and not in those highly enriched for stem cells, indicating developmental regulation of Ram-1 during murine hematopoiesis. Others have reported the in vitro use of phosphate-free medium as a stimulus to increase levels of Ram-1 mRNA in nonhematopoietic cells. We now demonstrate that Ram-1 poly(A)+ mRNA increases significantly following culture of FLC in phosphate-free medium. Further, transduction of FLC in phosphate-free medium with an amphotropic retrovirus containing the multiple drug resistance gene leads to gene transfer not observed previously. These data demonstrate that (i) the normal resistance of FLC to amphotropic transduction is most likely due to an insufficient number of Ram-1 molecules for efficient retroviral recognition and binding, and (ii) Ram-1 can be upregulated by increasing the need for phosphate transport across the cell membrane. PMID:8754824

  20. Tumor-targeted inhibition by a novel strategy - mimoretrovirus expressing siRNA targeting the Pokemon gene.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhiqiang; Wang, Huaizhi; Jia, Zhengcai; Shi, Jinglei; Tang, Jun; Mao, Liwei; Liu, Hongli; Deng, Yijing; He, Yangdong; Ruan, Zhihua; Li, Jintao; Wu, Yuzhang; Ni, Bing

    2010-12-01

    Pokemon gene has crucial but versatile functions in cell differentiation, proliferation and tumorigenesis. It is a master regulator of the ARF-HDM2-p53 and Rb-E2F pathways. The facts that the expression of Pokemon is essential for tumor formation and many kinds of tumors over-express the Pokemon gene make it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention for cancer treatment. In this study, we used an RNAi strategy to silence the Pokemon gene in a cervical cancer model. To address the issues involving tumor specific delivery and durable expression of siRNA, we applied the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide ligand and polylysine (K(18)) fusion peptide to encapsulate a recombinant retrovirus plasmid expressing a siRNA targeting the Pokemon gene and produced the 'mimoretrovirus'. At charge ratio 2.0 of fusion peptide/plasmid, the mimoretrovirus formed stable and homogenous nanoparticles, and provided complete DNase I protection and complete gel retardation. This nanoparticle inhibited SiHa cell proliferation and invasion, while it promoted SiHa cell apoptosis. The binding of the nanoparticle to SiHa cells was mediated via the RGD-integrin α(v)β(3) interaction, as evidenced by the finding that unconjugated RGD peptide inhibited this binding significantly. This tumor-targeting mimoretrovirus exhibited excellent anti-tumor capacity in vivo in a nude mouse model. Moreover, the mimoretrovirus inhibited tumor growth with a much higher efficiency than recombinant retrovirus expressing siRNA or the K(18)/P4 nanoparticle lacking the RGD peptide. Results suggest that the RNAi/RGD-based mimoretrovirus developed in this study represents a novel anti-tumor strategy that may be applicable to most research involving cancer therapy and, thus, has promising potential as a cervical cancer treatment. PMID:20879980

  1. Tumor-targeted inhibition by a novel strategy - mimoretrovirus expressing siRNA targeting the Pokemon gene.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhiqiang; Wang, Huaizhi; Jia, Zhengcai; Shi, Jinglei; Tang, Jun; Mao, Liwei; Liu, Hongli; Deng, Yijing; He, Yangdong; Ruan, Zhihua; Li, Jintao; Wu, Yuzhang; Ni, Bing

    2010-12-01

    Pokemon gene has crucial but versatile functions in cell differentiation, proliferation and tumorigenesis. It is a master regulator of the ARF-HDM2-p53 and Rb-E2F pathways. The facts that the expression of Pokemon is essential for tumor formation and many kinds of tumors over-express the Pokemon gene make it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention for cancer treatment. In this study, we used an RNAi strategy to silence the Pokemon gene in a cervical cancer model. To address the issues involving tumor specific delivery and durable expression of siRNA, we applied the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide ligand and polylysine (K(18)) fusion peptide to encapsulate a recombinant retrovirus plasmid expressing a siRNA targeting the Pokemon gene and produced the 'mimoretrovirus'. At charge ratio 2.0 of fusion peptide/plasmid, the mimoretrovirus formed stable and homogenous nanoparticles, and provided complete DNase I protection and complete gel retardation. This nanoparticle inhibited SiHa cell proliferation and invasion, while it promoted SiHa cell apoptosis. The binding of the nanoparticle to SiHa cells was mediated via the RGD-integrin α(v)β(3) interaction, as evidenced by the finding that unconjugated RGD peptide inhibited this binding significantly. This tumor-targeting mimoretrovirus exhibited excellent anti-tumor capacity in vivo in a nude mouse model. Moreover, the mimoretrovirus inhibited tumor growth with a much higher efficiency than recombinant retrovirus expressing siRNA or the K(18)/P4 nanoparticle lacking the RGD peptide. Results suggest that the RNAi/RGD-based mimoretrovirus developed in this study represents a novel anti-tumor strategy that may be applicable to most research involving cancer therapy and, thus, has promising potential as a cervical cancer treatment.

  2. In vitro production and titration assays of B-tropic retroviruses isolated from C57BL mouse tumors induced by radiation leukemia virus (RadLV-Rs): effect of dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Guillemain, B; Astier, T; Mamoun, R; Duplan, J F

    1980-01-01

    The effect of dexamethasone (DXM) on the replication and titration assays of B-ecotropic radiation leukemia virus (RadLV-Rs) isolates was examined. The drug was shown to enhance in vitro virus release by otherwise low producer permissive cells. DXM also stimulated infectivity and focus formation in murine S+L--permissive cells and shortened the time-appearance of virus-induced foci. In contrast to foci observed in nontreated cultures, which are generally abortive and composed of only a few morphologically transformed cells, those obtained with DXM were comparable to those induced by ecotropic retroviruses with a potent helper activity for murine sarcoma virus. In addition, DXM increased virus-induced XC cell fusion. These fundamental data allowed a more abundant in vitro production of the B-ecotropic RadLV-Rs virus isolates as well as precise infectivity titration assays.

  3. Retroviral retargeting by envelopes expressing an N-terminal binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Cosset, F L; Morling, F J; Takeuchi, Y; Weiss, R A; Collins, M K; Russell, S J

    1995-01-01

    We have engineered ecotropic Moloney murine leukemia virus-derived envelopes targeted to cell surface molecules expressed on human cells by the N-terminal insertion of polypeptides able to bind either Ram-1 phosphate transporter (the first 208 amino acids of amphotropic murine leukemia virus surface protein) or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) (the 53 amino acids of EGF). Both envelopes were correctly processed and incorporated into viral particles. Virions carrying these envelopes could specifically bind the new cell surface receptors. Virions targeted to Ram-1 could infect human cells, although the efficiency was reduced compared with that of virions carrying wild-type amphotropic murine leukemia virus envelopes. The infectivity of virions targeted to EGFR was blocked at a postbinding step, and our results suggest that EGFR-bound virions were rapidly trafficked to lysosomes. These data suggest that retroviruses require specific properties of cell surface molecules to allow the release of viral cores into the correct cell compartment. PMID:7666532

  4. Basic calcium phosphate crystal-induced Egr-1 expression stimulates mitogenesis in human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Xiao R.; Sun Yubo; Wenger, Leonor; Cheung, Herman S. . E-mail: hcheung@med.miami.edu

    2005-05-13

    Previously, we have reported that basic calcium phosphate (BCP) crystals stimulate mitogenesis and synthesis of matrix metalloproteinases in cultured human foreskin and synovial fibroblasts. However, the detailed mechanisms involved are still unclear. In the present study, using RT-PCR and Egr-1 promoter analysis we showed that BCP crystals could stimulate early growth response gene Egr-1 transcription through a PKC{alpha}-dependent p44/p42 MAPK pathway. Using a retrovirus gene expression system (Clontech) to overexpress Egr-1 in human fibroblast BJ-1 cells resulted in promotion of mitogenesis measured either by MTT cell proliferation analysis or by direct cell counting. The results demonstrate that Egr-1 may play a key role in mediating BCP crystal-induced synovial fibroblast mitogenesis.

  5. Expression of Endogenous Betaretroviruses in the Ovine Uterus: Effects of Neonatal Age, Estrous Cycle, Pregnancy, and Progesterone

    PubMed Central

    Palmarini, Massimo; Gray, C. Allison; Carpenter, Karen; Fan, Hung; Bazer, Fuller W.; Spencer, Thomas E.

    2001-01-01

    The ovine genome contains 15 to 20 copies of endogenous retroviruses (enJSRVs) highly related to the oncogenic jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV) and enzootic nasal tumor virus. enJSRVs are highly expressed in the endometrial lumenal epithelia (LE) and glandular epithelia (GE) of the ovine uterus. The effects of neonatal age, estrous cycle, pregnancy, and progesterone on expression of enJSRVs in the ovine uterus were determined. Expression of enJSRV RNAs was absent from the uterus of ewes at birth, but enJSRV RNAs were expressed specifically in the LE and developing GE from postnatal day (PND) 7 to PND 56. In adult ewes, enJSRV RNAs were detected only in the epithelia of the uterine endometrium, as well as epithelia of the oviduct, cervix, and vagina. In cyclic ewes, endometrial enJSRV RNA abundance was lowest on day 1, increased 12-fold between days 1 and 13, and then decreased to day 15. In pregnant ewes, levels of endometrial enJSRV RNAs were high on day 11, increased to day 13, and then decreased to day 19. In day 17 and 19 conceptuses, enJSRV RNAs were also detected in binucleate cells of the trophectoderm. Immunoreactive JSRV capsid and envelope proteins were detected in the endometrial LE and GE, as well as in the binucleate cells of the conceptus. In transfection assays utilizing ovine endometrial LE cells, progesterone increased transcriptional activity of several enJSRV long terminal repeats. Collectively, these results indicate that transcription of enJSRVs in the endometrial epithelia of the ovine uterus is increased by progesterone and might support a role for enJSRVs in conceptus-endometrium interactions during the peri-implantation period and early placental morphogenesis. PMID:11689612

  6. Who's Expressing in "Expressive Writing"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Janine

    In an attempt to understand what expressive writing means to themselves and to their students, teachers should explore and reflect on various questions regarding expressive writing theories and practices. For many, self-expression is the basis of all serious writing and an important stage in any act of learning, so it is essential to uncover the…

  7. Expression of young HERV-H loci in the course of colorectal carcinoma and correlation with molecular subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Naville, Magali; Bressan, Cédric; Hühns, Maja; Gock, Michael; Kühn, Florian; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Trillet-Lenoir, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    Background Expression of the human endogenous retrovirus (HERV)-H family has been associated with colorectal carcinomas (CRC), yet no individual HERV-H locus expression has been thoroughly correlated with clinical data. Here, we characterized HERV-H reactivations in clinical CRC samples by integrating expression profiles, molecular patterns and clinical data. Expression of relevant HERV-H sequences was analyzed by qRT-PCR on two well-defined clinical cohorts (n = 139 pairs of tumor and adjacent normal colon tissue) including samples from adenomas (n = 21) and liver metastases (n = 16). Correlations with clinical and molecular data were assessed. Results CRC specific HERV-H sequences were validated and found expressed throughout CRC disease progression. Correlations between HERV-H expression and lymph node invasion of tumor cells (p = 0.0006) as well as microsatellite instable tumors (p < 0.0001) were established. No association with regard to age, tumor localization, grading or common mutations became apparent. Interestingly, CRC expressed elements belonged to specific young HERV-H subfamilies and their 5′ LTR often presented active histone marks. Conclusion These results suggest a functional role of HERV-H sequences in colorectal carcinogenesis. The pronounced connection with microsatellite instability warrants a more detailed investigation. Thus, HERV-H sequences in addition to tumor specific mutations may represent clinically relevant, truly CRC specific markers for diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:26517682

  8. Symbiotic Expressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernecky, Robert; Herhut, Stephan; Scholz, Sven-Bodo

    We introduce symbiotic expressions, a method for algebraic simplification within a compiler, in lieu of an SMT solver, such as Yices or the Omega Calculator. Symbiotic expressions are compiler-generated expressions, temporarily injected into a program's abstract syntax tree (AST). The compiler's normal optimizations interpret and simplify those expressions, making their results available for the compiler to use as a basis for decisions about further optimization of the source program. The expressions are symbiotic, in the sense that both parties benefit: an optimization benefits, by using the compiler itself to simplify expressions that have been attached, lamprey-like, to the AST by the optimization; the program being compiled benefits, from improved run-time in both serial and parallel environments.

  9. Domain structure of the Moloney murine leukemia virus reverse transcriptase: mutational analysis and separate expression of the DNA polymerase and RNase H activities.

    PubMed Central

    Tanese, N; Goff, S P

    1988-01-01

    The reverse transcriptase of Moloney murine leukemia virus, like that of all retroviruses, exhibits a DNA polymerase activity capable of synthesis on RNA or DNA templates and an RNase H activity with specificity for RNA in the form of an RNA.DNA hybrid. We have generated a library of linker insertion mutants of the Moloney murine leukemia virus enzyme expressed in bacteria and assayed these mutants for both enzymatic activities. Those mutations affecting the DNA polymerase activity were clustered in the 5'-proximal two-thirds of the gene, and those affecting RNase H were in the remaining 3' one-third. Based on these maps, plasmids were made that expressed each one of the domains separately; assays of the proteins encoded by these plasmids showed that each domain exhibited only the expected activity. Images PMID:2450347

  10. Expression of reverse transcriptase genes in Fulvia fulva.

    PubMed

    McHale, M T; Roberts, I N; Talbot, N J; Oliver, R P

    1989-01-01

    Antibodies raised against intercellular fluid antigens isolated from diseased tomato leaves have revealed that the fungal pathogen Fulvia fulva expresses genes for a fungal reverse transcriptase (RNA-dependent DNA polymerase). This enzyme is required for the replication of retroviruses and retroviral-like transposable elements and could provide a mechanism for increasing the mutation rate of fungal pathogens, perhaps explaining their ability to evolve new races rapidly. We report here the DNA sequence of a 225-bp clone from a lambda gt11 genomic library of F. fulva. This clone, designated P5, exhibits a high degree of sequence homology with the reverse transcriptase (pol) gene of the Drosophila melanogaster copia-like retrotransposon 17.6. Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA of F. fulva showed that P5-related sequences are moderately reiterated with 30-100 copies, some of which exhibit restriction fragment length polymorphism in different races of the pathogen. Western blot analysis of extracts from F. fulva with antibodies raised to purified reverse transcriptase (from human immunodeficiency virus-1) revealed immunoreactive proteins. Reverse transcriptase previously has been detected in a variety of organisms including yeast, insects, protozoa, and mammals, but to our knowledge, this is the first report of its occurrence in filamentous fungi.

  11. Inhibition of simian immunodeficiency virus by foamy virus vectors expressing siRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jeonghae; Nadeau, Peter; Zucali, James R.; Johnson, Calvin M.; Mergia, Ayalew . E-mail: mergiaa@mail.vetmed.ufl.edu

    2005-12-20

    Viral vectors available for gene therapy are either inefficient or suffer from safety concerns for human applications. Foamy viruses are non-pathogenic retroviruses that offer several unique opportunities for gene transfer in various cell types from different species. In this report, we describe the use of simian foamy virus type 1 (SFV-1) vector to examine the efficacy of therapeutic genes. Hairpin short-interfering RNA (siRNA) that targets the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) rev/env was placed under the control of the PolIII U6 snRNA promoter for expression and screened for silencing target genes using cognate target-reporter fusions. We have identified an effective siRNA (designated R2) which reduces the rev and env gene expression by 89% and 95%, respectively. Using the simian foamy virus type 1 (SFV-1) based vector, we delivered the PolIII expressed R2 siRNA into cultured cells and challenged with SIV. The results show that the R2 siRNA is a potent inhibitor of SIV replication as determined by p27 expression and reverse transcriptase assays. Vectors based on a non-pathogenic SFV-1 vector may provide a safe and efficient alternative to currently available vectors, and the SIV model will help devise protocols for effective anti-HIV gene therapy.

  12. Gene co-expression networks in human brain identify epigenetic modifications in alcohol dependence

    PubMed Central

    Ponomarev, Igor; Wang, Shi; Zhang, Lingling; Harris, R Adron; Mayfield, R Dayne

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol abuse causes widespread changes in gene expression in human brain, some of which contribute to alcohol dependence. Previous microarray studies identified individual genes as candidates for alcohol phenotypes, but efforts to generate an integrated view of molecular and cellular changes underlying alcohol addiction are lacking. Here, we applied a novel systems approach to transcriptome profiling in postmortem human brains and generated a systemic view of brain alterations associated with alcohol abuse. We identified critical cellular components and previously unrecognized epigenetic determinants of gene co-expression relationships and discovered novel markers of chromatin modifications in alcoholic brain. Higher expression levels of endogenous retroviruses and genes with high GC content in alcoholics were associated with DNA hypomethylation and increased histone H3K4 tri-methylation, suggesting a critical role of epigenetic mechanisms in alcohol addiction. Analysis of cell type – specific transcriptomes revealed remarkable consistency between molecular profiles and cellular abnormalities in alcoholic brain. Based on evidence from this study and others, we generated a systems hypothesis for the central role of chromatin modifications in alcohol dependence that integrates epigenetic regulation of gene expression with pathophysiological and neuroadaptive changes in alcoholic brain. Our results offer implications for epigenetic therapeutics in alcohol and drug addiction. PMID:22302827

  13. Simplified generation of high-titer retrovirus producer cells for clinically relevant retroviral vectors by reversible inclusion of a lox-P-flanked marker gene.

    PubMed

    Loew, Rainer; Selevsek, Nathalie; Fehse, Boris; von Laer, Dorothee; Baum, Christopher; Fauser, Axel; Kuehlcke, Klaus

    2004-05-01

    Retroviral producer cells are generated by the introduction of a viral genome into "helper" cell lines containing all the necessary components for viral packaging and the release of infectious particles. The selection of high-titer vector producer cells is most efficient if the vector genome encodes a selectable marker, while it is extremely tedious to select high-titer producer clones if the transgene cannot be detected and selected directly. Here we describe the development of a screening system that uses reversible integration of lox-P-flanked eGFP as a qualitative and quantitative marker gene in two different vector systems, greatly facilitating the selection of viral producer cells. After selection and titration of high-titer viral producer cells based on eGFP expression, the eGFP gene could be removed from the provirus by transient introduction of Cre-recombinase into the producer cells, thus allowing the production of therapeutic relevant vectors expressing solely the gene of interest. However, after removal of the marker gene a slight but consistent increase in viral titers compared to the respective control vectors was found, independent of the transgene or backbone used. The single lox-P site retained in the vector backbone does not affect gene expression level or fidelity of RNA processing.

  14. Comparison of promoter activities for efficient expression into human B cells and haematopoietic progenitors with adenovirus Ad5/F35.

    PubMed

    Cayer, Marie-Pierre; Drouin, Mathieu; Sea, Serey-Phorn; Forest, Audrey; Côté, Serge; Simard, Carl; Boyer, Lucie; Jacques, Annie; Pineault, Nicolas; Jung, Daniel

    2007-04-30

    Adenoviral gene transfer into human B lymphocytes and haematopoietic progenitors would allow the characterization of their function on cellular growth, differentiation and survival. Efficient gene expression is however strongly dependent on the promoter used. In this study, we investigated the relative strength of various promoters by following and measuring the expression of the reporter gene EYFP in human peripheral B lymphocytes, cord blood CD34(+) cells and the megakaryocytic cell line M-07e. The murine PGK promoter provided the best level of transgene expression in CD34(+) cells among the four promoters tested, followed closely by the CMV promoter, and to a lesser extend by a CMV promoter with a beta-globin/IgG chimeric intron, whereas the human CD40 promoter provided the lowest levels of expression. In contrast, the strongest promoters in B lymphocytes were the two CMV promoters. Surprisingly, even the best promoters were unable to induce transgene expression in more than 75-80% of the primary B and CD34(+) cells, even though 100% of the cells were infected. Finally and in contrast to retroviruses, only a minority of B lymphocytes and CD34(+) cells were able to induce the transcription of IRES-containing bicistronic expression cassettes from adenovirus.

  15. New Phase of Growth for Xenogeneic-Based Bioartificial Organs

    PubMed Central

    Pitkin, Zorina

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we examine the advanced clinical development of bioartificial organs and describe the challenges to implementing such systems into patient care. The case for bioartificial organs is evident: they are meant to reduce patient morbidity and mortality caused by the persistent shortage of organs available for allotransplantation. The widespread introduction and adoption of bioengineered organs, incorporating cells and tissues derived from either human or animal sources, would help address this shortage. Despite the decades of development, the variety of organs studied and bioengineered, and continuous progress in the field, only two bioengineered systems are currently commercially available: Apligraf® and Dermagraft® are both approved by the FDA to treat diabetic foot ulcers, and Apligraf® is approved to treat venous leg ulcers. Currently, no products based on xenotransplantation have been approved by the FDA. Risk factors include immunological barriers and the potential infectivity of porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV), which is unique to xenotransplantation. Recent breakthroughs in gene editing may, however, mitigate risks related to PERV. Because of its primary role in interrupting progress in xenotransplantation, we present a risk assessment for PERV infection, and conclude that the formerly high risk has been reduced to a moderate level. Advances in gene editing, and more broadly in the field, may make it more likely than ever before that bioartificial organs will alleviate the suffering of patients with organ failure. PMID:27657057

  16. Alternative splicing within the chicken c-ets-1 locus: implications for transduction within the E26 retrovirus of the c-ets proto-oncogene.

    PubMed Central

    Leprince, D; Duterque-Coquillaud, M; Li, R P; Henry, C; Flourens, A; Debuire, B; Stehelin, D

    1988-01-01

    Two overlapping c-ets-1 cDNA clones were isolated which contained the alpha and beta genomic sequences homologous to the 5' end of v-ets not detected in the previously described c-ets RNA species or proteins. Nucleotide sequencing demonstrated that these cDNAs corresponded to the splicing of alpha and beta to a common set of 3' exons (a through F) already found in the p54c-ets-1 mRNA. They contained an open reading frame of 1,455 nucleotides which could encode a polypeptide of 485 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 53 kilodaltons. However, when expressed in COS-1 cells, the cDNAs directed the synthesis of a protein with an apparent molecular mass in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of 68 kilodaltons, p68c-ets-1, comigrating with a protein expressed at low levels in normal chicken spleen cells. These two proteins were shown to be identical by partial digestion with protease V8. Northern (RNA) blot hybridization analysis with the p68c-ets-1 -specific sequence and RNase protection experiments showed that the corresponding mRNA was expressed in normal chicken spleen and not in normal chicken thymus or in various T lymphoid cell lines. Thus, two closely related proteins, having distinct amino-terminal parts, are generated within the same locus by alternative addition of different 5' exons, alpha and beta or I54, respectively, onto a common set of 3' exons (a to F). Finally, we demonstrate that an aberrant splicing event between a cryptic splice donor site in c-myb exon E6 and the normal splice acceptor site of c-ets-1 exon alpha involved in the genesis of the E26 myb-ets sequence. Images PMID:2841475

  17. On the use of double FLP recognition targets (FRTs) in the LTR of retroviruses for the construction of high producer cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Karreman, S; Hauser, H; Karreman, C

    1996-01-01

    A pilot experiment for the construction of a hamster derived, high producer cell line using site specific recombination is described. In the experiment chromosomal loci with intrinsic high expression characteristics were sought via infection with a retroviral construct, containing double FRT sites and subsequent screening for overproduction of an encoded markergene. These sites were then targeted with a second vector, that recombined via the FLP/FRT system from Saccharomyces cerevisiae yielding cells that had the second construct at exactly the same position as the first. By using retroviral vectors with double and single FRT sites, respectively, stable clones can be created that can no longer be excised with FLP. PMID:8649977

  18. Heme oxygenase-1 gene expression modulates angiotensin II-induced increase in blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liming; Quan, Shuo; Nasjletti, Alberto; Laniado-Schwartzman, Michal; Abraham, Nader G

    2004-06-01

    The heme-heme oxygenase (HO) system has been implicated in the regulation of vascular reactivity and blood pressure. This study examines the notion that overexpression of HO decreases pressor responsiveness to angiotensin II (Ang II). Five-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats received an intraleft ventricular injection of approximately 5x10(9) cfu/mL of retroviruses containing human HO-1 sense (LSN-HHO-1), rat HO-1 antisense (LSN-RHO-1-AS), or control retrovirus (LXSN). Three months later, rats were instrumented with femoral arterial and venous catheters for mean arterial pressure (MAP) determination and Ang II administration, respectively. Rats injected with LSN-HHO-1, but not with LXSN, expressed human HO-1 mRNA and protein in several tissues. BP increased with administration of Ang II in rats expressing and not expressing human HO-1. However, the Ang II-induced pressor response (mm Hg) in LSN-HHO-1 rats (16+/-3, 27+/-3, and 38+/-3 at 0.5, 2, and 10 ng) was surpassed (P<0.05) in LXSN rats (23+/-1, 37+/-2, and 52+/-2 at 0.5, 2, and 10 ng). Importantly, treating LSN-HHO-1 rats with the HO inhibitor tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP) enhanced (P<0.05) the Ang II-induced pressor response to a level not different from that observed in LXSN rats. Rats injected with LSN-RHO-1-AS showed a decrease in renal HO-1 protein expression and HO activity relative to control LXSN rats. Administration of Ang II (0.1 to 2 ng) caused small (4 to 5 mm Hg) but significant increases in MAP in rats injected with LSN-RHO-1-AS (P<0.05) compared with rats injected with LXSN. These data demonstrate that overexpression of HO-1 brings about a reduction in pressor responsiveness to Ang II, which is most likely due to increased generation of an HO-1 product, presumably CO, with the ability to inhibit vascular reactivity to constrictor stimuli.

  19. Extracellular matrix-remodeling metalloproteinases and infection of the central nervous system with retrovirus human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I).

    PubMed

    Giraudon, P; Buart, S; Bernard, A; Thomasset, N; Belin, M F

    1996-06-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their inhibitors (TIMPs) are involved in physiological processes and contribute to the phenotype of several pathological conditions associated with uncontrolled tissue degradation. In the central nervous system (CNS), MMPs are thought to play a role in cell migration and synaptic plasticity. We have investigated the expression, regulation and possible role of MMPs and TIMPs during infection of glial cells with human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I), the causative agent of a progressive chronic myelopathy, TSP/HAM. The major alteration consists in a high increase in MMP-9 secretion and TIMP-2 mRNA expression. Cytokines TNF alpha and IL1 alpha, induced in glial cells during HTLV-I infection, promote the upregulation of MMP-9. In addition, cerebrospinal fluid from TSP/HAM patients contain high MMP-9 level. The exact role of dysregulated MMPs/TIMPs in the pathogenesis of TSP/HAM is not known; however, functions of these proteases in physiological processes should provide valuable clues. MMPs can affect the blood-brain barrier and the intercellular connectivity by degrading the extracellular matrix of endothelial and neural cells. They can be involved in autoimmunity by generating preformed specific peptides from myelin components. Finally, they can direct and prolong TNF activity in the CNS by converting its inactive precursor into active molecules. PMID:8844825

  20. Nemo-like kinase (NLK) expression in osteoblastic cells and suppression of osteoblastic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nifuji, Akira; Ideno, Hisashi; Ohyama, Yoshio; Takanabe, Rieko; Araki, Ryoko; Abe, Masumi; Noda, Masaki; Shibuya, Hiroshi

    2010-04-15

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) regulate proliferation and differentiation in osteoblasts. The vertebral homologue of nemo, nemo-like kinase (NLK), is an atypical MAPK that targets several signaling components, including the T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/Lef1) transcription factor. Recent studies have shown that NLK forms a complex with the histone H3-K9 methyltransferase SETDB1 and suppresses peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma:: action in the mesenchymal cell line ST2. Here we investigated whether NLK regulates osteoblastic differentiation. We showed that NLK mRNA is expressed in vivo in osteoblasts at embryonic day 18.5 (E18.5) mouse calvariae. By using retrovirus vectors, we performed forced expression of NLK in primary calvarial osteoblasts (pOB cells) and the mesenchymal cell line ST2. Wild-type NLK (NLK-WT) suppressed alkaline phosphatase activity and expression of bone marker genes such as alkaline phosphatase, type I procollagen, runx2, osterix, steopontin and osteocalcin in these cells. NLK-WT also decreased type I collagen protein expression in pOB and ST2 cells. Furthermore, mineralized nodule formation was reduced in pOB cells overexpressing NLK-WT. In contrast, kinase-negative form of NLK (NLK-KN) did not suppress or partially suppress ALP activity and bone marker gene expression in pOB and ST2 cells. NLK-KN did not suppress nodule formation in pOB cells. In addition to forced expression, suppression of endogenous NLK expression by siRNA increased bone marker gene expression in pOB and ST2 cells. Finally, transcriptional activity analysis of gene promoters revealed that NLK-WT suppressed Wnt1 activation of TOP flash promoter and Runx2 activation of the osteocalcin promoter. Taken together, these results suggest that NLK negatively regulates osteoblastic differentiation.

  1. A comparison of eukaryotic viral 5'-leader sequences as enhancers of mRNA expression in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Gallie, D R; Sleat, D E; Watts, J W; Turner, P C; Wilson, T M

    1987-01-01

    The 5'-untranslated leader sequences of several plant RNA viruses, and a portion of the 5'-leader of an animal retrovirus, were tested for their ability to enhance expression of contiguous open reading frames for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) or beta-glucuronidase (GUS) in tobacco mesophyll protoplasts, Escherichia coli and oocytes of Xenopus laevis. Translation of capped or uncapped transcripts was substantially enhanced in almost all systems by the leader sequence of either the U1 or SPS strain of TMV. All leader sequences, except that of TYMV, stimulated expression of 5'-capped GUS mRNA with the native prokaryotic initiation codon context, in electroporated protoplasts. Only the TMV leaders enhanced translation of uncapped GUS mRNAs in protoplasts and increased expression of uncapped CAT mRNA in microinjected X. laevis oocytes. In oocytes, the TYMV leader sequence was inhibitory. In transformed E. coli, the TMV-U1 leader enhanced expression of both the native and eukaryotic context forms of GUS mRNA about 7.5-fold, despite the absence of a Shine-Dalgarno region in any of the transcripts. The absolute levels of GUS activity were all about 6-fold higher with mRNAs containing the native initiation codon context. In E. coli, the leaders of AlMV RNA4 and TYMV were moderately stimulatory whereas those of BMV RNA3, RSV and the SPS strain of TMV enhanced GUS expression by only 2- to 3-fold. Images PMID:2825117

  2. Retroviral-mediated gene transfer and expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase in primary mouse hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, H.; Armentano, D.; Mackenzie-Graham, L.; Shen, R.F.; Darlington, G.; Ledley, F.D.; Woo, S.L.C. )

    1988-11-01

    Genetic therapy for phenylketonuria (severe phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency) may require introduction of a normal phenylalanine hydroxylase gene into hepatic cells of patients. The authors report development of a recombinant retrovirus based on the N2 vector for gene transfer and expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase cDNA in primary mouse hepatocytes. This construct contains an internal promoter of the human {alpha}{sub 1}-antitrypsin gene driving transcription of the phenylalanine hydroxylase cDNA. Primary mouse hepatocytes were isolated from newborn mice, infected with the recombinant virus, and selected for expression of the neomycin-resistance gene. Hepatocytes transformed with the recombinant virus contained high levels of human phenylalanine hydroxylase mRNA transcripts originating from the retroviral and internal promoters. These results demonstrate that the transcriptional regulatory elements of the {alpha}{sub 1} antitrypsin gene retain their tissue-specific function in the recombinant provirus and establish a method for efficient transfer and high-level expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase in primary hepatocytes.

  3. The Secondary Structure of the R Region of a Murine Leukemia Virus Is Important for Stimulation of Long Terminal Repeat-Driven Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Cupelli, Lisa; Okenquist, Sharon A.; Trubetskoy, Alla; Lenz, Jack

    1998-01-01

    In addition to their role in reverse transcription, the R-region sequences of some retroviruses affect viral transcription. The first 28 nucleotides of the R region within the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the murine type C retrovirus SL3 were predicted to form a stem-loop structure. We tested whether this structure affected the transcriptional activity of the viral LTR. Mutations that altered either side of the stem and thus disrupted base pairing were generated. These decreased the level of expression of a reporter gene under the control of viral LTR sequences about 5-fold in transient expression assays and 10-fold in cells stably transformed with the LTR-reporter plasmids. We also generated a compensatory mutant in which both the ascending and descending sides of the stem were mutated such that the nucleotide sequence was different but the predicted secondary structure was maintained. Most of the activity of the wild-type SL3 element was restored in this mutant. Thus, the stem-loop structure was important for the maximum activity of the SL3 LTR. Primer extension analysis indicated that the stem-loop structure affected the levels of cytoplasmic RNA. Nuclear run-on assays indicated that deletion of the R region had a small effect on transcriptional initiation and no effect on RNA polymerase processivity. Thus, the main effect of the R-region element was on one or more steps that occurred after the template was transcribed by RNA polymerase. This finding implied that the main function of the R-region element involved RNA processing. R-region sequences of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 or mouse mammary tumor virus could not replace the SL3 element. R-region sequences from an avian reticuloendotheliosis virus partially substituted for the SL3 sequences. R-region sequences from Moloney murine leukemia virus or feline leukemia virus did function in place of the SL3 element. Thus, the R region element appears to be a general feature of the mammalian type C genus of

  4. The secondary structure of the R region of a murine leukemia virus is important for stimulation of long terminal repeat-driven gene expression.

    PubMed

    Cupelli, L; Okenquist, S A; Trubetskoy, A; Lenz, J

    1998-10-01

    In addition to their role in reverse transcription, the R-region sequences of some retroviruses affect viral transcription. The first 28 nucleotides of the R region within the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the murine type C retrovirus SL3 were predicted to form a stem-loop structure. We tested whether this structure affected the transcriptional activity of the viral LTR. Mutations that altered either side of the stem and thus disrupted base pairing were generated. These decreased the level of expression of a reporter gene under the control of viral LTR sequences about 5-fold in transient expression assays and 10-fold in cells stably transformed with the LTR-reporter plasmids. We also generated a compensatory mutant in which both the ascending and descending sides of the stem were mutated such that the nucleotide sequence was different but the predicted secondary structure was maintained. Most of the activity of the wild-type SL3 element was restored in this mutant. Thus, the stem-loop structure was important for the maximum activity of the SL3 LTR. Primer extension analysis indicated that the stem-loop structure affected the levels of cytoplasmic RNA. Nuclear run-on assays indicated that deletion of the R region had a small effect on transcriptional initiation and no effect on RNA polymerase processivity. Thus, the main effect of the R-region element was on one or more steps that occurred after the template was transcribed by RNA polymerase. This finding implied that the main function of the R-region element involved RNA processing. R-region sequences of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 or mouse mammary tumor virus could not replace the SL3 element. R-region sequences from an avian reticuloendotheliosis virus partially substituted for the SL3 sequences. R-region sequences from Moloney murine leukemia virus or feline leukemia virus did function in place of the SL3 element. Thus, the R region element appears to be a general feature of the mammalian type C genus of

  5. Generation of a high-titer retroviral vector capable of expressing high levels of the human beta-globin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Sadelain, M; Wang, C H; Antoniou, M; Grosveld, F; Mulligan, R C

    1995-01-01

    Retrovirus-mediated gene transfer into hematopoietic cells may provide a means of treating both inherited and acquired diseases involving hematopoietic cells. Implementation of this approach for disorders resulting from mutations affecting the beta-globin gene (e.g., beta-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia), however, has been hampered by the inability to generate recombinant viruses able to efficiently and faithfully transmit the necessary sequences for appropriate gene expression. We have addressed this problem by carefully examining the interactions between retroviral and beta-globin gene sequences which affect vector transmission, stability, and expression. First, we examined the transmission properties of a large number of different recombinant proviral genomes which vary both in the precise nature of vector, beta-globin structural gene, and locus control region (LCR) core sequences incorporated and in the placement and orientation of those sequences. Through this analysis, we identified one specific vector, termed M beta 6L, which carries both the human beta-globin gene and core elements HS2, HS3, and HS4 from the LCR and faithfully transmits recombinant proviral sequences to cells with titers greater than 10(6) per ml. Populations of murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells transduced by this virus expressed levels of human beta-globin transcript which, on a per gene copy basis, were 78% of the levels detected in an MEL-derived cell line, Hu11, which carries human chromosome 11, the site of the beta-globin locus. Analysis of individual transduced MEL cell clones, however, indicated that, while expression was detected in every clone tested (n = 17), the levels of human beta-globin treatment varied between 4% and 146% of the levels in Hu11. This clonal variation in expression levels suggests that small beta-globin LCR sequences may not provide for as strict chromosomal position-independent expression of beta-globin as previously suspected, at least in the context of

  6. Altered Immune Cytokine Expression Associated with KoRV B Infection and Season in Captive Koalas

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Damien P.

    2016-01-01

    Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) populations are increasingly vulnerable and one of the main threats is chlamydial infection. Koala retrovirus (KoRV) has been proposed as an underlying cause of the koala’s susceptibility to infection with Chlamydia and high rates of lymphoid neoplasia; however, the regionally ubiquitous, endogenous nature of this virus suggests that KoRV A infection is not sufficient for immune suppression to occur. A recently discovered exogenous variant of KoRV, KoRV B, has several structural elements that cause increased pathogenicity in related retroviruses and was associated with lymphoid neoplasia in one study. The present study assesses whether KoRV B infection is associated with alterations in immune function. Cytokine gene expression by mitogen stimulated lymphocytes of KoRV B positive (n = 5–6) and negative (n = 6–7) captive koalas was evaluated by qPCR four times (April 2014-February 2015) to control for seasonal variation. Key immune genes in the Th1 pathway (IFNγ, TNFα), Th2 pathway (IL 10, IL4, IL6) and Th17 pathway (IL17A), along with CD4:CD8 ratio, were assessed. KoRV B positive koalas showed significantly increased up-regulation of IL17A and IL10 in three out of four sampling periods and IFNγ, IL6, IL4 and TNFα in two out of four. IL17A is an immune marker for chlamydial pathogenesis in the koala; increased expression of IL17A in KoRV B positive koalas, and concurrent immune dysregulation, may explain the differences in susceptibility to chlamydial infection and severity of disease seen between individuals and populations. There was also marked seasonal variation in up-regulation for most of the cytokines and the CD4:CD8 ratio. The up-regulation in both Th1 and Th2 cytokines mirrors changes associated with immune dysregulation in humans and felids as a result of retroviral infections. This is the first report of altered immune expression in koalas infected by an exogenous variant of KoRV and also the first report of

  7. Microarray-based Identification of Individual HERV Loci Expression: Application to Biomarker Discovery in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pérot, Philippe; Cheynet, Valérie; Decaussin-Petrucci, Myriam; Oriol, Guy; Mugnier, Nathalie; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire; Ruffion, Alain; Mallet, François

    2013-01-01

    The prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is the main diagnostic biomarker for prostate cancer in clinical use, but it lacks specificity and sensitivity, particularly in low dosage values1​​. ‘How to use PSA' remains a current issue, either for diagnosis as a gray zone corresponding to a concentration in serum of 2.5-10 ng/ml which does not allow a clear differentiation to be made between cancer and noncancer2 or for patient follow-up as analysis of post-operative PSA kinetic parameters can pose considerable challenges for their practical application3,4. Alternatively, noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) are emerging as key molecules in human cancer, with the potential to serve as novel markers of disease, e.g. PCA3 in prostate cancer5,6 and to reveal uncharacterized aspects of tumor biology. Moreover, data from the ENCODE project published in 2012 showed that different RNA types cover about 62% of the genome. It also appears that the amount of transcriptional regulatory motifs is at least 4.5x higher than the one corresponding to protein-coding exons. Thus, long terminal repeats (LTRs) of human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs)