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Sample records for reveal distinct functions

  1. Single-cell analysis reveals functionally distinct classes within the planarian stem cell compartment

    PubMed Central

    van Wolfswinkel, Josien C.; Wagner, Daniel E.; Reddien, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    Planarians are flatworms capable of regenerating any missing body region. This capacity is mediated by neoblasts, a proliferative cell population that contains pluripotent stem cells. Although population-based studies have revealed many neoblast characteristics, whether functionally distinct classes exist within this population is unclear. Here, we used high-dimensional single-cell transcriptional profiling from over a thousand individual neoblasts to directly compare gene expression fingerprints during homeostasis and regeneration. We identified two prominent neoblast classes that we named ζ (zeta) and σ (sigma). Zeta-neoblasts encompass specified cells that give rise to an abundant postmitotic lineage including epidermal cells, and are not required for regeneration. By contrast, sigma-neoblasts proliferate in response to injury, possess broad lineage capacity, and can give rise to zeta-neoblasts. These findings present a new view of planarian neoblasts, in which the population is comprised of two major and functionally distinct cellular compartments. PMID:25017721

  2. Single-cell analysis reveals functionally distinct classes within the planarian stem cell compartment.

    PubMed

    van Wolfswinkel, Josien C; Wagner, Daniel E; Reddien, Peter W

    2014-09-04

    Planarians are flatworms capable of regenerating any missing body region. This capacity is mediated by neoblasts, a proliferative cell population that contains pluripotent stem cells. Although population-based studies have revealed many neoblast characteristics, whether functionally distinct classes exist within this population is unclear. Here, we used high-dimensional single-cell transcriptional profiling from over a thousand individual neoblasts to directly compare gene expression fingerprints during homeostasis and regeneration. We identified two prominent neoblast classes that we named ζ (zeta) and σ (sigma). Zeta-neoblasts encompass specified cells that give rise to an abundant postmitotic lineage, including epidermal cells, and are not required for regeneration. By contrast, sigma-neoblasts proliferate in response to injury, possess broad lineage capacity, and can give rise to zeta-neoblasts. These findings indicate that planarian neoblasts comprise two major and functionally distinct cellular compartments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Tagging methyl-CpG-binding domain proteins reveals different spatiotemporal expression and supports distinct functions.

    PubMed

    Wood, Kathleen H; Johnson, Brian S; Welsh, Sarah A; Lee, Jun Y; Cui, Yue; Krizman, Elizabeth; Brodkin, Edward S; Blendy, Julie A; Robinson, Michael B; Bartolomei, Marisa S; Zhou, Zhaolan

    2016-04-01

    DNA methylation is recognized by methyl-CpG-binding domain (MBD) proteins. Multiple MBDs are linked to neurodevelopmental disorders in humans and mice. However, the functions of MBD2 are poorly understood. We characterized Mbd2 knockout mice and determined spatiotemporal expression of MBDs and MBD2-NuRD (nucleosome remodeling deacetylase) interactions. We analyzed behavioral phenotypes, generated biotin-tagged MBD1 and MBD2 knockin mice, and performed biochemical studies of MBD2-NuRD. Most behavioral measures are minimally affected in Mbd2 knockout mice. In contrast to other MBDs, MBD2 shows distinct expression patterns. Unlike most MBDs, MBD2 is ubiquitously expressed in all tissues examined and appears dispensable for brain functions measured in this study. We provide novel genetic tools and reveal new directions to investigate MBD2 functions in vivo.

  4. Tagging methyl-CpG-binding domain proteins reveals different spatiotemporal expression and supports distinct functions

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Kathleen H; Johnson, Brian S; Welsh, Sarah A; Lee, Jun Y; Cui, Yue; Krizman, Elizabeth; Brodkin, Edward S; Blendy, Julie A; Robinson, Michael B; Bartolomei, Marisa S; Zhou, Zhaolan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: DNA methylation is recognized by methyl-CpG-binding domain (MBD) proteins. Multiple MBDs are linked to neurodevelopmental disorders in humans and mice. However, the functions of MBD2 are poorly understood. We characterized Mbd2 knockout mice and determined spatiotemporal expression of MBDs and MBD2–NuRD (nucleosome remodeling deacetylase) interactions. Experimental procedures: We analyzed behavioral phenotypes, generated biotin-tagged MBD1 and MBD2 knockin mice, and performed biochemical studies of MBD2–NuRD. Results: Most behavioral measures are minimally affected in Mbd2 knockout mice. In contrast to other MBDs, MBD2 shows distinct expression patterns. Conclusion: Unlike most MBDs, MBD2 is ubiquitously expressed in all tissues examined and appears dispensable for brain functions measured in this study. We provide novel genetic tools and reveal new directions to investigate MBD2 functions in vivo. PMID:27066839

  5. Functional Analysis of GLRX5 Mutants Reveals Distinct Functionalities of GLRX5 Protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Wang, Yongwei; Anderson, Gregory J; Camaschella, Clara; Chang, Yanzhong; Nie, Guangjun

    2016-01-01

    Glutaredoxin 5 (GLRX5) is a 156 amino acid mitochondrial protein that plays an essential role in mitochondrial iron-sulfur cluster transfer. Mutations in this protein were reported to result in sideroblastic anemia and variant nonketotic hyperglycinemia in human. Recently, we have characterized a Chinese congenital sideroblastic anemia patient who has two compound heterozygous missense mutations (c. 301 A>C and c. 443 T>C) in his GLRX5 gene. Herein, we developed a GLRX5 knockout K562 cell line and studied the biochemical functions of the identified pathogenic mutations and other conserved amino acids with predicted essential functions. We observed that the K101Q mutation (due to c. 301 A>C mutation) may prevent the binding of [Fe-S] to GLRX5 protein, while L148S (due to c. 443 T>C mutation) may interfere with [Fe-S] transfer from GLRX5 to iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1), mitochondrial aconitase (m-aconitase) and ferrochelatase. We also demonstrated that L148S is functionally complementary to the K51del mutant with respect to Fe/S-ferrochelatase, Fe/S-IRP1, Fe/S-succinate dehydrogenase, and Fe/S-m-aconitase biosynthesis and lipoylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the mutations of highly conserved amino acid residues in GLRX5 protein can have different effects on downstream Fe/S proteins. Collectively, our current work demonstrates that GLRX5 protein is multifunctional in [Fe-S] protein synthesis and maturation and defects of the different amino acids of the protein will lead to distinct effects on downstream Fe/S biosynthesis.

  6. Genomic analysis reveals distinct mechanisms and functional classes of SOX10-regulated genes in melanocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fufa, Temesgen D.; Harris, Melissa L.; Watkins-Chow, Dawn E.; Levy, Denise; Gorkin, David U.; Gildea, Derek E.; Song, Lingyun; Safi, Alexias; Crawford, Gregory E.; Sviderskaya, Elena V.; Bennett, Dorothy C.; Mccallion, Andrew S.; Loftus, Stacie K.; Pavan, William J.

    2015-01-01

    SOX10 is required for melanocyte development and maintenance, and has been linked to melanoma initiation and progression. However, the molecular mechanisms by which SOX10 guides the appropriate gene expression programs necessary to promote the melanocyte lineage are not fully understood. Here we employ genetic and epigenomic analysis approaches to uncover novel genomic targets and previously unappreciated molecular roles of SOX10 in melanocytes. Through global analysis of SOX10-binding sites and epigenetic characteristics of chromatin states, we uncover an extensive catalog of SOX10 targets genome-wide. Our findings reveal that SOX10 predominantly engages ‘open’ chromatin regions and binds to distal regulatory elements, including novel and previously known melanocyte enhancers. Integrated chromatin occupancy and transcriptome analysis suggest a role for SOX10 in both transcriptional activation and repression to regulate functionally distinct classes of genes. We demonstrate that distinct epigenetic signatures and cis-regulatory sequence motifs predicted to bind putative co-regulatory transcription factors define SOX10-activated and SOX10-repressed target genes. Collectively, these findings uncover a central role of SOX10 as a global regulator of gene expression in the melanocyte lineage by targeting diverse regulatory pathways. PMID:26206884

  7. The Proteomic Investigation of Chromatin Functional Domains Reveals Novel Synergisms among Distinct Heterochromatin Components*

    PubMed Central

    Soldi, Monica; Bonaldi, Tiziana

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin is a highly dynamic, well-structured nucleoprotein complex of DNA and proteins that controls virtually all DNA transactions. Chromatin dynamicity is regulated at specific loci by the presence of various associated proteins, histones, post-translational modifications, histone variants, and DNA methylation. Until now the characterization of the proteomic component of chromatin domains has been held back by the challenge of enriching distinguishable, homogeneous regions for subsequent mass spectrometry analysis. Here we describe a modified protocol for chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with quantitative proteomics based on stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture to identify known and novel histone modifications, variants, and complexes that specifically associate with silent and active chromatin domains. Our chromatin proteomics strategy revealed unique functional interactions among various chromatin modifiers, suggesting new regulatory pathways, such as a heterochromatin-specific modulation of DNA damage response involving H2A.X and WICH, both enriched in silent domains. Chromatin proteomics expands the arsenal of tools for deciphering how all the distinct protein components act together to enforce a given region-specific chromatin status. PMID:23319141

  8. Feeding characteristics reveal functional distinctions among browsing herbivorous fishes on coral reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streit, Robert P.; Hoey, Andrew S.; Bellwood, David R.

    2015-12-01

    The removal of macroalgal biomass by fishes is a key process on coral reefs. Numerous studies have identified the fish species responsible for removing mature macroalgae, and have identified how this varies spatially, temporally, and among different algal types. None, however, have considered the behavioural and morphological traits of the browsing fishes and how this may influence the removal of macroalgal material. Using video observations of fish feeding on the brown macroalga Sargassum polycystum, we quantified the feeding behaviour and morphology of the four dominant browsing species on the Great Barrier Reef ( Kyphosus vaigiensis, Naso unicornis, Siganus canaliculatus, and Siganus doliatus). The greatest distinction between species was the algal material they targeted. K. vaigiensis and N. unicornis bit on the entire macroalgal thallus in approximately 90 % of bites. In contrast, Si. canaliculatus and Si. doliatus avoided biting the stalks, with 80-98 % of bites being on the macroalgal leaves only. This distinctive grouping into `entire thallus-biters' versus `leaf-biters' was not supported by size-standardized measures of biting morphology. Rather, species-specific adult body sizes, tooth shape, and feeding behaviour appear to underpin this functional distinction, with adults of the two larger fish species ( N. unicornis and K. vaigiensis) eating the entire macroalgal thallus, while the two smaller species ( Si. canaliculatus and Si. doliatus) bite only leaves. These findings caution against assumed homogeneity within this, and potentially other, functional groups on coral reefs. As functional redundancy within the macroalgal browsers is limited, the smaller `leaf-biting' species are unlikely to be able to compensate functionally for the loss of larger `entire thallus-biting' species.

  9. Neurodegenerative disease mutations in TREM2 reveal a functional surface and distinct loss-of-function mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Kober, Daniel L.; Alexander-Brett, Jennifer M.; Karch, Celeste M.; Cruchaga, Carlos; Colonna, Marco; Holtzman, Michael J.; Brett, Thomas J.

    2016-12-20

    Genetic variations in the myeloid immune receptor TREM2 are linked to several neurodegenerative diseases. To determine how TREM2 variants contribute to these diseases, we performed structural and functional studies of wild-type and variant proteins. Our 3.1 Å TREM2 crystal structure revealed that mutations found in Nasu-Hakola disease are buried whereas Alzheimer’s disease risk variants are found on the surface, suggesting that these mutations have distinct effects on TREM2 function. Biophysical and cellular methods indicate that Nasu-Hakola mutations impact protein stability and decrease folded TREM2 surface expression, whereas Alzheimer’s risk variants impact binding to a TREM2 ligand. Additionally, the Alzheimer’s risk variants appear to epitope map a functional surface on TREM2 that is unique within the larger TREM family. These findings provide a guide to structural and functional differences among genetic variants of TREM2, indicating that therapies targeting the TREM2 pathway should be tailored to these genetic and functional differences with patient-specific medicine approaches for neurodegenerative disorders.

  10. Neurodegenerative disease mutations in TREM2 reveal a functional surface and distinct loss-of-function mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Kober, Daniel L; Alexander-Brett, Jennifer M; Karch, Celeste M; Cruchaga, Carlos; Colonna, Marco; Holtzman, Michael J; Brett, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variations in the myeloid immune receptor TREM2 are linked to several neurodegenerative diseases. To determine how TREM2 variants contribute to these diseases, we performed structural and functional studies of wild-type and variant proteins. Our 3.1 Å TREM2 crystal structure revealed that mutations found in Nasu-Hakola disease are buried whereas Alzheimer’s disease risk variants are found on the surface, suggesting that these mutations have distinct effects on TREM2 function. Biophysical and cellular methods indicate that Nasu-Hakola mutations impact protein stability and decrease folded TREM2 surface expression, whereas Alzheimer’s risk variants impact binding to a TREM2 ligand. Additionally, the Alzheimer’s risk variants appear to epitope map a functional surface on TREM2 that is unique within the larger TREM family. These findings provide a guide to structural and functional differences among genetic variants of TREM2, indicating that therapies targeting the TREM2 pathway should be tailored to these genetic and functional differences with patient-specific medicine approaches for neurodegenerative disorders. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20391.001 PMID:27995897

  11. Functional chromatography reveals three natural products that target the same protein with distinct mechanisms of action

    PubMed Central

    Kang, MinJin; Wu, Tongde; Wijeratne, E. M. Kithsiri; Lau, Eric C.; Mason, Damian J.; Mesa, Celestina; Tillotson, Joseph; Zhang, Donna D.; Gunatilaka, A. A. Leslie; La Clair, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Access to lead compounds with defined molecular targets continues to be a barrier to the translation of natural product resources. As a solution, we have developed a system that uses discreet, recombinant proteins as the vehicles for natural product isolation. Here, we describe the use of this functional chromatographic method to identify natural products that bind to the AAA+ chaperone, p97, a promising cancer target. Application of this method to a panel of fungal and plant extracts identified rheoemodin, 1-hydroxydehydroherbarin and phomapyrrolidone A as distinct p97 modulators. Excitingly, each of these molecules displayed a unique mechanism of p97 modulation. This discovery provides strong support for the application of functional chromatography to the discovery of protein modulators that would likely escape traditional high-throughput or phenotypic screening platforms. PMID:25125376

  12. Functional chromatography reveals three natural products that target the same protein with distinct mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min Jin; Wu, Tongde; Wijeratne, E M Kithsiri; Lau, Eric C; Mason, Damian J; Mesa, Celestina; Tillotson, Joseph; Zhang, Donna D; Gunatilaka, A A Leslie; La Clair, James J; Chapman, Eli

    2014-09-22

    Access to lead compounds with defined molecular targets continues to be a barrier to the translation of natural product resources. As a solution, we developed a system that uses discrete, recombinant proteins as the vehicles for natural product isolation. Here, we describe the use of this functional chromatographic method to identify natural products that bind to the AAA+ chaperone, p97, a promising cancer target. Application of this method to a panel of fungal and plant extracts identified rheoemodin, 1-hydroxydehydroherbarin, and phomapyrrolidone A as distinct p97 modulators. Excitingly, each of these molecules displayed a unique mechanism of p97 modulation. This discovery provides strong support for the application of functional chromatography to the discovery of protein modulators that would likely escape traditional high-throughput or phenotypic screening platforms. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Analysis of regulatory network topology reveals functionally distinct classes of microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xueping; Lin, Jimmy; Zack, Donald J.; Mendell, Joshua T.; Qian, Jiang

    2008-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) negatively regulate the expression of target genes at the post-transcriptional level. Little is known about the crosstalk between miRNAs and transcription factors (TFs). Here we provide data suggesting that the interaction patterns between TFs and miRNAs can influence the biological functions of miRNAs. From this global survey, we find that a regulated feedback loop, in which two TFs regulate each other and one miRNA regulates both of the factors, is the most significantly overrepresented network motif. Mathematical modeling shows that the miRNA in this motif stabilizes the feedback loop to resist environmental perturbation, providing one mechanism to explain the robustness of developmental programs that is contributed by miRNAs. Furthermore, on the basis of a network motif profile analysis, we demonstrate the existence of two classes of miRNAs with distinct network topological properties. The first class of miRNAs is regulated by a large number of TFs, whereas the second is regulated by only a few TFs. The differential expression level of the two classes of miRNAs in embryonic developmental stages versus adult tissues suggests that the two classes may have fundamentally different biological functions. Our results demonstrate that the TFs and miRNAs extensively interact with each other and the biological functions of miRNAs may be wired in the regulatory network topology. PMID:18927108

  14. Multiple repetitions reveal functionally- and anatomically-distinct patterns of hippocampal activity during continuous recognition memory

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jeffrey D.; Muftuler, L. Tugan; Rugg, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    We used a continuous recognition procedure that included multiple presentations of test items, along with high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), to investigate the relationship between item novelty and recognition-related activity in the medial temporal lobe (MTL). In several regions of hippocampus and parahippocampal cortex, activity elicited by new items exceeded that for old items, whereas no MTL regions exhibited greater activity for old items. Critically, anatomically-distinct regions of MTL were engaged by item novelty in two different ways, as evidenced by statistically-dissociable profiles of activity. In bilateral medial hippocampus and left posterior parahippocampal cortex, activity followed a categorical profile in which it was greater for new than old items but did not differ further with additional presentations of old items. By contrast, effects in adjacent regions of right lateral hippocampus and left parahippocampal cortex were graded, whereby activity declined linearly with respect to each successive item presentation. These findings suggest that the relationship between hippocampal (and parahippocampal) activity and continuous psychological dimensions, such as item novelty, cannot be captured by a unitary function. PMID:18548578

  15. Distinct Functional Roles of Cardiac Mitochondrial Subpopulations Revealed by a 3D Simulation Model

    PubMed Central

    Hatano, Asuka; Okada, Jun-ichi; Washio, Takumi; Hisada, Toshiaki; Sugiura, Seiryo

    2015-01-01

    Experimental characterization of two cardiac mitochondrial subpopulations, namely, subsarcolemmal mitochondria (SSM) and interfibrillar mitochondria (IFM), has been hampered by technical difficulties, and an alternative approach is eagerly awaited. We previously developed a three-dimensional computational cardiomyocyte model that integrates electrophysiology, metabolism, and mechanics with subcellular structure. In this study, we further developed our model to include intracellular oxygen diffusion, and determined whether mitochondrial localization or intrinsic properties cause functional variations. For this purpose, we created two models: one with equal SSM and IFM properties and one with IFM having higher activity levels. Using these two models to compare the SSM and IFM responses of [Ca2+], tricarboxylic acid cycle activity, [NADH], and mitochondrial inner membrane potential to abrupt changes in pacing frequency (0.25–2 Hz), we found that the reported functional differences between these subpopulations appear to be mostly related to local [Ca2+] heterogeneity, and variations in intrinsic properties only serve to augment these differences. We also examined the effect of hypoxia on mitochondrial function. Under normoxic conditions, intracellular oxygen is much higher throughout the cell than the half-saturation concentration for oxidative phosphorylation. However, under limited oxygen supply, oxygen is mostly exhausted in SSM, leaving the core region in an anoxic condition. Reflecting this heterogeneous oxygen environment, the inner membrane potential continues to decrease in IFM, whereas it is maintained to nearly normal levels in SSM, thereby ensuring ATP supply to this region. Our simulation results provide clues to understanding the origin of functional variations in two cardiac mitochondrial subpopulations and their differential roles in maintaining cardiomyocyte function as a whole. PMID:26039174

  16. Patch clamp studies of human sperm under physiological ionic conditions reveal three functionally and pharmacologically distinct cation channels.

    PubMed

    Mansell, S A; Publicover, S J; Barratt, C L R; Wilson, S M

    2014-05-01

    Whilst fertilizing capacity depends upon a K(+) conductance (GK) that allows the spermatozoon membrane potential (Vm) to be held at a negative value, the characteristics of this conductance in human sperm are virtually unknown. We therefore studied the biophysical/pharmacological properties of the K(+) conductance in spermatozoa from normal donors held under voltage/current clamp in the whole cell recording configuration. Our standard recording conditions were designed to maintain quasi-physiological, Na(+), K(+) and Cl(-) gradients. Experiments that explored the effects of ionic substitution/ion channel blockers upon membrane current/potential showed that resting Vm was dependent upon a hyperpolarizing K(+) current that flowed via channels that displayed only weak voltage dependence and limited (∼7-fold) K(+) versus Na(+) selectivity. This conductance was blocked by quinidine (0.3 mM), bupivacaine (3 mM) and clofilium (50 µM), NNC55-0396 (2 µM) and mibefradil (30 µM), but not by 4-aminopyridine (2 mM, 4-AP). Progesterone had no effect upon the hyperpolarizing K(+) current. Repolarization after a test depolarization consistently evoked a transient inward 'tail current' (ITail) that flowed via a second population of ion channels with poor (∼3-fold) K(+) versus Na(+) selectivity. The activity of these channels was increased by quinidine, 4-AP and progesterone. Vm in human sperm is therefore dependent upon a hyperpolarizing K(+) current that flows via channels that most closely resemble those encoded by Slo3. Although 0.5 µM progesterone had no effect upon these channels, this hormone did activate the pharmacologically distinct channels that mediate ITail. In conclusion, this study reveals three functionally and pharmacologically distinct cation channels: Ik, ITail, ICatSper.

  17. Systematic Mapping of WNT-FZD Protein Interactions Reveals Functional Selectivity by Distinct WNT-FZD Pairs*

    PubMed Central

    Dijksterhuis, Jacomijn P.; Baljinnyam, Bolormaa; Stanger, Karen; Sercan, Hakki O.; Ji, Yun; Andres, Osler; Rubin, Jeffrey S.; Hannoush, Rami N.; Schulte, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    The seven-transmembrane-spanning receptors of the FZD1–10 class are bound and activated by the WNT family of lipoglycoproteins, thereby inducing a complex network of signaling pathways. However, the specificity of the interaction between mammalian WNT and FZD proteins and the subsequent signaling cascade downstream of the different WNT-FZD pairs have not been systematically addressed to date. In this study, we determined the binding affinities of various WNTs for different members of the FZD family by using bio-layer interferometry and characterized their functional selectivity in a cell system. Using purified WNTs, we show that different FZD cysteine-rich domains prefer to bind to distinct WNTs with fast on-rates and slow off-rates. In a 32D cell-based system engineered to overexpress FZD2, FZD4, or FZD5, we found that WNT-3A (but not WNT-4, -5A, or -9B) activated the WNT-β-catenin pathway through FZD2/4/5 as measured by phosphorylation of LRP6 and β-catenin stabilization. Surprisingly, different WNT-FZD pairs showed differential effects on phosphorylation of DVL2 and DVL3, revealing a previously unappreciated DVL isoform selectivity by different WNT-FZD pairs in 32D cells. In summary, we present extensive mapping of WNT-FZD cysteine-rich domain interactions complemented by analysis of WNT-FZD pair functionality in a unique cell system expressing individual FZD isoforms. Differential WNT-FZD binding and selective functional readouts suggest that endogenous WNT ligands evolved with an intrinsic natural bias toward different downstream signaling pathways, a phenomenon that could be of great importance in the design of FZD-targeting drugs. PMID:25605717

  18. Modeling autosomal recessive cutis laxa type 1C in mice reveals distinct functions for Ltbp-4 isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Bultmann-Mellin, Insa; Conradi, Anne; Maul, Alexandra C.; Dinger, Katharina; Wempe, Frank; Wohl, Alexander P.; Imhof, Thomas; Wunderlich, F. Thomas; Bunck, Alexander C.; Nakamura, Tomoyuki; Koli, Katri; Bloch, Wilhelm; Ghanem, Alexander; Heinz, Andrea; von Melchner, Harald; Sengle, Gerhard; Sterner-Kock, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed an important role for LTBP-4 in elastogenesis. Its mutational inactivation in humans causes autosomal recessive cutis laxa type 1C (ARCL1C), which is a severe disorder caused by defects of the elastic fiber network. Although the human gene involved in ARCL1C has been discovered based on similar elastic fiber abnormalities exhibited by mice lacking the short Ltbp-4 isoform (Ltbp4S−/−), the murine phenotype does not replicate ARCL1C. We therefore inactivated both Ltbp-4 isoforms in the mouse germline to model ARCL1C. Comparative analysis of Ltbp4S−/− and Ltbp4-null (Ltbp4−/−) mice identified Ltbp-4L as an important factor for elastogenesis and postnatal survival, and showed that it has distinct tissue expression patterns and specific molecular functions. We identified fibulin-4 as a previously unknown interaction partner of both Ltbp-4 isoforms and demonstrated that at least Ltbp-4L expression is essential for incorporation of fibulin-4 into the extracellular matrix (ECM). Overall, our results contribute to the current understanding of elastogenesis and provide an animal model of ARCL1C. PMID:25713297

  19. Distinct and shared functions of ALS-associated proteins TDP-43, FUS and TAF15 revealed by multisystem analyses.

    PubMed

    Kapeli, Katannya; Pratt, Gabriel A; Vu, Anthony Q; Hutt, Kasey R; Martinez, Fernando J; Sundararaman, Balaji; Batra, Ranjan; Freese, Peter; Lambert, Nicole J; Huelga, Stephanie C; Chun, Seung J; Liang, Tiffany Y; Chang, Jeremy; Donohue, John P; Shiue, Lily; Zhang, Jiayu; Zhu, Haining; Cambi, Franca; Kasarskis, Edward; Hoon, Shawn; Ares, Manuel; Burge, Christopher B; Ravits, John; Rigo, Frank; Yeo, Gene W

    2016-07-05

    The RNA-binding protein (RBP) TAF15 is implicated in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). To compare TAF15 function to that of two ALS-associated RBPs, FUS and TDP-43, we integrate CLIP-seq and RNA Bind-N-Seq technologies, and show that TAF15 binds to ∼4,900 RNAs enriched for GGUA motifs in adult mouse brains. TAF15 and FUS exhibit similar binding patterns in introns, are enriched in 3' untranslated regions and alter genes distinct from TDP-43. However, unlike FUS and TDP-43, TAF15 has a minimal role in alternative splicing. In human neural progenitors, TAF15 and FUS affect turnover of their RNA targets. In human stem cell-derived motor neurons, the RNA profile associated with concomitant loss of both TAF15 and FUS resembles that observed in the presence of the ALS-associated mutation FUS R521G, but contrasts with late-stage sporadic ALS patients. Taken together, our findings reveal convergent and divergent roles for FUS, TAF15 and TDP-43 in RNA metabolism.

  20. Distinct and shared functions of ALS-associated proteins TDP-43, FUS and TAF15 revealed by multisystem analyses

    PubMed Central

    Kapeli, Katannya; Pratt, Gabriel A.; Vu, Anthony Q.; Hutt, Kasey R.; Martinez, Fernando J.; Sundararaman, Balaji; Batra, Ranjan; Freese, Peter; Lambert, Nicole J.; Huelga, Stephanie C.; Chun, Seung J.; Liang, Tiffany Y.; Chang, Jeremy; Donohue, John P.; Shiue, Lily; Zhang, Jiayu; Zhu, Haining; Cambi, Franca; Kasarskis, Edward; Hoon, Shawn; Ares Jr., Manuel; Burge, Christopher B.; Ravits, John; Rigo, Frank; Yeo, Gene W.

    2016-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein (RBP) TAF15 is implicated in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). To compare TAF15 function to that of two ALS-associated RBPs, FUS and TDP-43, we integrate CLIP-seq and RNA Bind-N-Seq technologies, and show that TAF15 binds to ∼4,900 RNAs enriched for GGUA motifs in adult mouse brains. TAF15 and FUS exhibit similar binding patterns in introns, are enriched in 3′ untranslated regions and alter genes distinct from TDP-43. However, unlike FUS and TDP-43, TAF15 has a minimal role in alternative splicing. In human neural progenitors, TAF15 and FUS affect turnover of their RNA targets. In human stem cell-derived motor neurons, the RNA profile associated with concomitant loss of both TAF15 and FUS resembles that observed in the presence of the ALS-associated mutation FUS R521G, but contrasts with late-stage sporadic ALS patients. Taken together, our findings reveal convergent and divergent roles for FUS, TAF15 and TDP-43 in RNA metabolism. PMID:27378374

  1. Extinction of cocaine self-administration reveals functionally and temporally distinct dopaminergic signals in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Stuber, Garret D; Wightman, R Mark; Carelli, Regina M

    2005-05-19

    While Pavlovian and operant conditioning influence drug-seeking behavior, the role of rapid dopamine signaling in modulating these processes is unknown. During self-administration of cocaine, two dopaminergic signals, measured with 100 ms resolution, occurred immediately before and after the lever press (termed pre- and post-response dopamine transients). Extinction of self-administration revealed that these two signals were functionally distinct. Pre-response transients, which could reflect the motivation to obtain the drug, did not decline during extinction. Remarkably, post-response dopamine transients attenuated as extinction progressed, suggesting that they encode the learned association between environmental cues and cocaine. A third type of dopamine transient, not time locked to overt stimuli, decreased in frequency during extinction and correlated with calculated cocaine concentrations. These results show that dopamine release transients involved in different aspects of cocaine self-administration are highly plastic--differentially governed by motivation, learned associations linked with environmental stimuli, and the pharmacological actions of cocaine.

  2. Distinct functions for ERKs?

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Alison C

    2006-01-01

    The Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK signaling pathway is one of the best understood signal routes in cells. Recent studies add complexity to this cascade by indicating that the two ERK kinases, ERK1 (p44ERK1) and ERK2 (p42ERK2), may have distinct functions. PMID:16879721

  3. Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging reveals distinct brain activity in heavy cannabis users - a multi-voxel pattern analysis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, H; Skosnik, P D; Pruce, B J; Brumbaugh, M S; Vollmer, J M; Fridberg, D J; O'Donnell, B F; Hetrick, W P; Newman, S D

    2014-11-01

    Chronic cannabis use can cause cognitive, perceptual and personality alterations, which are believed to be associated with regional brain changes and possible changes in connectivity between functional regions. This study aims to identify the changes from resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. A two-level multi-voxel pattern analysis was proposed to classify male cannabis users from normal controls. The first level analysis works on a voxel basis and identifies clusters for the input of a second level analysis, which works on the functional connectivity between these regions. We found distinct clusters for male cannabis users in the middle frontal gyrus, precentral gyrus, superior frontal gyrus, posterior cingulate cortex, cerebellum and some other regions. Based on the functional connectivity of these clusters, a high overall accuracy rate of 84-88% in classification accuracy was achieved. High correlations were also found between the overall classification accuracy and Barrett Barrett Impulsiveness Scale factor scores of attention and motor. Our result suggests regional differences in the brains of male cannabis users that span from the cerebellum to the prefrontal cortex, which are associated with differences in functional connectivity. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. In-vitro characterization of androgen receptor mutations associated with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome reveals distinct functional deficits.

    PubMed

    Werner, R; Zhan, J; Gesing, J; Struve, D; Hiort, O

    2008-01-01

    Adequate androgen receptor (AR) function is crucial for male sex development and maintenance of secondary male characteristics. Mutations in the AR lead to androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) characterized by an end-organ resistance to androgens. The clinical appearance of individuals with 46,XY karyotype and an AR mutation varies widely from normal male to the ultimate completely female phenotype of complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS). We have analyzed the androgen receptor missense mutations P723S, P904S, and H917R, clinically associated with CAIS, which were described to have a normal maximum androgen binding (Bmax) but elevated equilibrium dissociation constants (Kd's) and compared their properties with the F916X deletion mutant, leading to the loss of the last four amino acids of the AR. Functional analysis allowed a quantitative and qualitative discrimination of these mutants in transactivation, amino-terminal/carboxy-terminal (N/C)-interaction, and coactivation capacity, varying widely with each distinct mutation. We conclude that mutations in the AR have to be characterized meticulously, not only to prove any quantitative functional deficit as a proof of consequence, but also to gain knowledge on qualitative functional properties. This is necessary as a possible link to genotype-phenotype correlation in AIS, but also with respect to medical decision making in CAIS.

  5. Complete identification of E-selectin ligands on neutrophils reveals distinct functions of PSGL-1, ESL-1, and CD44.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Andrés; Peired, Anna J; Wild, Martin K; Vestweber, Dietmar; Frenette, Paul S

    2007-04-01

    The selectins and their ligands are required for leukocyte extravasation during inflammation. Several glycoproteins have been suggested to bind to E-selectin in vitro, but the complete identification of its physiological ligands has remained elusive. Here, we showed that E-selectin ligand-1 (ESL-1), P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1), and CD44 encompassed all endothelial-selectin ligand activity on neutrophils by using gene- and RNA-targeted loss of function. PSGL-1 played a major role in the initial leukocyte capture, whereas ESL-1 was critical for converting initial tethers into steady slow rolling. CD44 controlled rolling velocity and mediated E-selectin-dependent redistribution of PSGL-1 and L-selectin to a major pole on slowly rolling leukocytes through p38 signaling. These results suggest distinct and dynamic contributions of these three glycoproteins in selectin-mediated neutrophil adhesion and signaling.

  6. Gene Set-Based Integrative Analysis Revealing Two Distinct Functional Regulation Patterns in Four Common Subtypes of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Ming; Chuang, Chi-Mu; Wang, Mong-Lien; Yang, Yi-Ping; Chuang, Jen-Hua; Yang, Ming-Jie; Yen, Ming-Shyen; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Chang, Cheng-Chang

    2016-08-05

    Clear cell (CCC), endometrioid (EC), mucinous (MC) and high-grade serous carcinoma (SC) are the four most common subtypes of epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC). The widely accepted dualistic model of ovarian carcinogenesis divided EOCs into type I and II categories based on the molecular features. However, this hypothesis has not been experimentally demonstrated. We carried out a gene set-based analysis by integrating the microarray gene expression profiles downloaded from the publicly available databases. These quantified biological functions of EOCs were defined by 1454 Gene Ontology (GO) term and 674 Reactome pathway gene sets. The pathogenesis of the four EOC subtypes was investigated by hierarchical clustering and exploratory factor analysis. The patterns of functional regulation among the four subtypes containing 1316 cases could be accurately classified by machine learning. The results revealed that the ERBB and PI3K-related pathways played important roles in the carcinogenesis of CCC, EC and MC; while deregulation of cell cycle was more predominant in SC. The study revealed that two different functional regulation patterns exist among the four EOC subtypes, which were compatible with the type I and II classifications proposed by the dualistic model of ovarian carcinogenesis.

  7. K-shell Analysis Reveals Distinct Functional Parts in an Electron Transfer Network and Its Implications for Extracellular Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dewu; Li, Ling; Shu, Chuanjun; Sun, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is capable of extracellular electron transfer (EET) and hence has attracted considerable attention. The EET pathways mainly consist of c-type cytochromes, along with some other proteins involved in electron transfer processes. By whole genome study and protein interactions inquisition, we constructed a large-scale electron transfer network containing 2276 interactions among 454 electron transfer related proteins in S. oneidensis MR-1. Using the k-shell decomposition method, we identified and analyzed distinct parts of the electron transfer network. We found that there was a negative correlation between the k s (k-shell values) and the average DR_100 (disordered regions per 100 amino acids) in every shell, which suggested that disordered regions of proteins played an important role during the formation and extension of the electron transfer network. Furthermore, proteins in the top three shells of the network are mainly located in the cytoplasm and inner membrane; these proteins can be responsible for transfer of electrons into the quinone pool in a wide variety of environmental conditions. In most of the other shells, proteins are broadly located throughout the five cellular compartments (cytoplasm, inner membrane, periplasm, outer membrane, and extracellular), which ensures the important EET ability of S. oneidensis MR-1. Specifically, the fourth shell was responsible for EET and the c-type cytochromes in the remaining shells of the electron transfer network were involved in aiding EET. Taken together, these results show that there are distinct functional parts in the electron transfer network of S. oneidensis MR-1, and the EET processes could achieve high efficiency through cooperation through such an electron transfer network.

  8. K-shell Analysis Reveals Distinct Functional Parts in an Electron Transfer Network and Its Implications for Extracellular Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Dewu; Li, Ling; Shu, Chuanjun; Sun, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is capable of extracellular electron transfer (EET) and hence has attracted considerable attention. The EET pathways mainly consist of c-type cytochromes, along with some other proteins involved in electron transfer processes. By whole genome study and protein interactions inquisition, we constructed a large-scale electron transfer network containing 2276 interactions among 454 electron transfer related proteins in S. oneidensis MR-1. Using the k-shell decomposition method, we identified and analyzed distinct parts of the electron transfer network. We found that there was a negative correlation between the ks (k-shell values) and the average DR_100 (disordered regions per 100 amino acids) in every shell, which suggested that disordered regions of proteins played an important role during the formation and extension of the electron transfer network. Furthermore, proteins in the top three shells of the network are mainly located in the cytoplasm and inner membrane; these proteins can be responsible for transfer of electrons into the quinone pool in a wide variety of environmental conditions. In most of the other shells, proteins are broadly located throughout the five cellular compartments (cytoplasm, inner membrane, periplasm, outer membrane, and extracellular), which ensures the important EET ability of S. oneidensis MR-1. Specifically, the fourth shell was responsible for EET and the c-type cytochromes in the remaining shells of the electron transfer network were involved in aiding EET. Taken together, these results show that there are distinct functional parts in the electron transfer network of S. oneidensis MR-1, and the EET processes could achieve high efficiency through cooperation through such an electron transfer network. PMID:27148219

  9. Quantitative Imaging of Cholinergic Interneurons Reveals a Distinctive Spatial Organization and a Functional Gradient across the Mouse Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Götz, Jürgen; Bertran-Gonzalez, Jesus

    2016-01-01

    Information processing in the striatum requires the postsynaptic integration of glutamatergic and dopaminergic signals, which are then relayed to the output nuclei of the basal ganglia to influence behavior. Although cellularly homogeneous in appearance, the striatum contains several rare interneuron populations which tightly modulate striatal function. Of these, cholinergic interneurons (CINs) have been recently shown to play a critical role in the control of reward-related learning; however how the striatal cholinergic network is functionally organized at the mesoscopic level and the way this organization influences striatal function remains poorly understood. Here, we systematically mapped and digitally reconstructed the entire ensemble of CINs in the mouse striatum and quantitatively assessed differences in densities, spatial arrangement and neuropil content across striatal functional territories. This approach demonstrated that the rostral portion of the striatum contained a higher concentration of CINs than the caudal striatum and that the cholinergic content in the core of the ventral striatum was significantly lower than in the rest of the regions. Additionally, statistical comparison of spatial point patterns in the striatal cholinergic ensemble revealed that only a minor portion of CINs (17%) aggregated into cluster and that they were predominantly organized in a random fashion. Furthermore, we used a fluorescence reporter to estimate the activity of over two thousand CINs in naïve mice and found that there was a decreasing gradient of CIN overall function along the dorsomedial-to-ventrolateral axis, which appeared to be independent of their propensity to aggregate within the striatum. Altogether this work suggests that the regulation of striatal function by acetylcholine across the striatum is highly heterogeneous, and that signals originating in external afferent systems may be principally determining the function of CINs in the striatum. PMID:27314496

  10. Yeast DNA ligase IV mutations reveal a nonhomologous end joining function of BRCT1 distinct from XRCC4/Lif1 binding

    PubMed Central

    Chiruvella, Kishore K.; Renard, Brian M.; Birkeland, Shanda R.; Sunder, Sham; Liang, Zhuobin; Wilson, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    LIG4/Dnl4 is the DNA ligase that (re)joins DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) via nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), an activity supported by binding of its tandem BRCT domains to the ligase accessory protein XRCC4/Lif1. We screened a panel of 88 distinct ligase mutants to explore the structure-function relationships of the yeast Dnl4 BRCT domains and inter-BRCT linker in NHEJ. Screen results suggested two distinct classes of BRCT mutations with differential effects on Lif1 interaction as compared to NHEJ completion. Validated constructs confirmed that D800K and GG(868:869)AA mutations, which target the Lif1 binding interface, showed a severely defective Dnl4-Lif1 interaction but a less consistent and often small decrease in NHEJ activity in some assays, as well as nearly normal levels of Dnl4 accumulation at DSBs. In contrast, mutants K742A and KTT(742:744)ATA, which target the β3-α2 region of the first BRCT domain, substantially decreased NHEJ function commensurate with a large defect in Dnl4 recruitment to DSBs, despite a comparatively greater preservation of the Lif1 interaction. Together, these separation-of-function mutants indicate that Dnl4 BRCT1 supports DSB recruitment and NHEJ in a manner distinct from Lif1 binding and reveal a complexity of Dnl4 BRCT domain functions in support of stable DSB association. PMID:25457772

  11. Yeast DNA ligase IV mutations reveal a nonhomologous end joining function of BRCT1 distinct from XRCC4/Lif1 binding.

    PubMed

    Chiruvella, Kishore K; Renard, Brian M; Birkeland, Shanda R; Sunder, Sham; Liang, Zhuobin; Wilson, Thomas E

    2014-12-01

    LIG4/Dnl4 is the DNA ligase that (re)joins DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) via nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), an activity supported by binding of its tandem BRCT domains to the ligase accessory protein XRCC4/Lif1. We screened a panel of 88 distinct ligase mutants to explore the structure–function relationships of the yeast Dnl4 BRCT domains and inter-BRCT linker in NHEJ. Screen results suggested two distinct classes of BRCT mutations with differential effects on Lif1 interaction as compared to NHEJ completion. Validated constructs confirmed that D800K and GG(868:869)AA mutations, which target the Lif1 binding interface, showed a severely defective Dnl4–Lif1 interaction but a less consistent and often small decrease in NHEJ activity in some assays, as well as nearly normal levels of Dnl4 accumulation at DSBs. In contrast, mutants K742A and KTT(742:744)ATA, which target the β3-α2 region of the first BRCT domain, substantially decreased NHEJ function commensurate with a large defect in Dnl4 recruitment to DSBs, despite a comparatively greater preservation of the Lif1 interaction. Together, these separation-of-function mutants indicate that Dnl4 BRCT1 supports DSB recruitment and NHEJ in a manner distinct from Lif1 binding and reveal a complexity of Dnl4 BRCT domain functions in support of stable DSB association.

  12. Transcranial magnetic stimulation reveals two functionally distinct stages of motor cortex involvement during perception of emotional body language.

    PubMed

    Borgomaneri, Sara; Gazzola, Valeria; Avenanti, Alessio

    2015-09-01

    Studies indicate that perceiving emotional body language recruits fronto-parietal regions involved in action execution. However, the nature of such motor activation is unclear. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) we provide correlational and causative evidence of two distinct stages of motor cortex engagement during emotion perception. Participants observed pictures of body expressions and categorized them as happy, fearful or neutral while receiving TMS over the left or right motor cortex at 150 and 300 ms after picture onset. In the early phase (150 ms), we observed a reduction of excitability for happy and fearful emotional bodies that was specific to the right hemisphere and correlated with participants' disposition to feel personal distress. This 'orienting' inhibitory response to emotional bodies was also paralleled by a general drop in categorization accuracy when stimulating the right but not the left motor cortex. Conversely, at 300 ms, greater excitability for negative, positive and neutral movements was found in both hemispheres. This later motor facilitation marginally correlated with participants' tendency to assume the psychological perspectives of others and reflected simulation of the movement implied in the neutral and emotional body expressions. These findings highlight the motor system's involvement during perception of emotional bodies. They suggest that fast orienting reactions to emotional cues--reflecting neural processing necessary for visual perception--occur before motor features of the observed emotional expression are simulated in the motor system and that distinct empathic dispositions influence these two neural motor phenomena. Implications for theories of embodied simulation are discussed.

  13. Extracellular Matrix Proteome and Phosphoproteome of Potato Reveals Functionally Distinct and Diverse Canonical and Non-Canonical Proteoforms

    PubMed Central

    Elagamey, Eman; Narula, Kanika; Sinha, Arunima; Aggarwal, Pooja Rani; Ghosh, Sudip; Chakraborty, Niranjan; Chakraborty, Subhra

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) has a molecular machinery composed of diverse proteins and proteoforms that combine properties of tensile strength with extensibility exhibiting growth-regulatory functions and self- and non-self-recognition. The identification of ECM proteoforms is the prerequisite towards a comprehensive understanding of biological functions accomplished by the outermost layer of the cell. Regulatory mechanisms of protein functions rely on post-translational modifications, phosphorylation in particular, affecting enzymatic activity, interaction, localization and stability. To investigate the ECM proteoforms, we have isolated the cell wall proteome and phosphoproteome of a tuberous crop, potato (Solanum tuberosum). LC-MS/MS analysis led to the identification of 38 proteins and 35 phosphoproteins of known and unknown functions. The findings may provide a better understanding of biochemical machinery and the integrated protein and phosphoprotein network of ECM for future functional studies of different developmental pathways and guidance cues in mechanosensing and integrity signaling. PMID:28248230

  14. Disruption of aminergic signalling reveals novel compounds with distinct inhibitory effects on mosquito reproduction, locomotor function and survival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Silke; Rende, Ermelinda; Crisanti, Andrea; Nolan, Tony

    2014-07-01

    Insecticide resistance amongst disease vectors is a growing problem and novel compounds are needed. Biogenic amines are important for neurotransmission and we have recently shown a potential role for these in mosquito fertility. Here, we dissected the relative contribution of different aminergic signalling pathways to biological processes essential for vectorial capacity such as fertility, locomotion and survival by injecting agonists and antagonists and showed that octopaminergic/tyraminergic signalling is essential for oviposition and hatching rate. We show that egg melanisation is regulated by adrenergic signalling, whose disruption causes premature melanisation specifically through the action of tyramine. In addition to this, co-injection of tyramine with DOPA, the precursor of melanin, had a strong cumulative negative effect on mosquito locomotion and survival. Dopaminergic and serotonergic antagonists such as amitriptyline and citalopram recapitulate this effect. Together these results reveal potential new target sites for the development of future mosquito sterilants and insecticides.

  15. The functional analysis of distinct tospovirus movement proteins (NSM) reveals different capabilities in tubule formation, cell-to-cell and systemic virus movement among the tospovirus species.

    PubMed

    Leastro, Mikhail O; Pallás, Vicente; Resende, Renato O; Sánchez-Navarro, Jesús A

    2017-01-02

    The lack of infectious tospovirus clones to address reverse genetic experiments has compromised the functional analysis of viral proteins. In the present study we have performed a functional analysis of the movement proteins (NSM) of four tospovirus species Bean necrotic mosaic virus (BeNMV), Chrysanthemum stem necrosis virus (CSNV), Tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV) and Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), which differ biologically and molecularly, by using the Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) model system. All NSM proteins were competent to: i) support the cell-to-cell and systemic transport of AMV, ii) generate tubular structures on infected protoplast and iii) transport only virus particles. However, the NSM of BeNMV (one of the most phylogenetically distant species) was very inefficient to support the systemic transport. Deletion assays revealed that the C-terminal region of the BeNMV NSM, but not that of the CSNV, TCSV and TSWV NSM proteins, was dispensable for cell-to-cell transport, and that all the non-functional C-terminal NSM mutants were unable to generate tubular structures. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis revealed that the C-terminus of the BeNMV NSM was not required for the interaction with the cognate nucleocapsid protein, showing a different protein organization when compared with other movement proteins of the '30K family'. Overall, our results revealed clearly differences in functional aspects among movement proteins from divergent tospovirus species that have a distinct biological behavior.

  16. Modeling-Dependent Protein Characterization of the Rice Aldehyde Dehydrogenase (ALDH) Superfamily Reveals Distinct Functional and Structural Features

    PubMed Central

    Kotchoni, Simeon O.; Jimenez-Lopez, Jose C.; Gao, Dongying; Edwards, Vincent; Gachomo, Emma W.; Margam, Venu M.; Seufferheld, Manfredo J.

    2010-01-01

    The completion of the rice genome sequence has made it possible to identify and characterize new genes and to perform comparative genomics studies across taxa. The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) gene superfamily encoding for NAD(P)+-dependent enzymes is found in all major plant and animal taxa. However, the characterization of plant ALDHs has lagged behind their animal- and prokaryotic-ALDH homologs. In plants, ALDHs are involved in abiotic stress tolerance, male sterility restoration, embryo development and seed viability and maturation. However, there is still no structural property-dependent functional characterization of ALDH protein superfamily in plants. In this paper, we identify members of the rice ALDH gene superfamily and use the evolutionary nesting events of retrotransposons and protein-modeling–based structural reconstitution to report the genetic and molecular and structural features of each member of the rice ALDH superfamily in abiotic/biotic stress responses and developmental processes. Our results indicate that rice-ALDHs are the most expanded plant ALDHs ever characterized. This work represents the first report of specific structural features mediating functionality of the whole families of ALDHs in an organism ever characterized. PMID:20634950

  17. Mouse models of Casc3 reveal developmental functions distinct from other components of the exon junction complex.

    PubMed

    Mao, Hanqian; Brown, Hannah E; Silver, Debra L

    2017-01-01

    The exon junction complex (EJC) is a multiprotein complex integral to mRNA metabolism. Biochemistry and genetic studies have concluded that the EJC is composed of four core proteins, MAGOH, EIF4A3, RBM8A, and CASC3. Yet recent studies in Drosophila indicate divergent physiological functions for Barentsz, the mammalian Casc3 ortholog, raising the question as to whether CASC3 is a constitutive component of the EJC. This issue remains poorly understood, particularly in an in vivo mammalian context. We previously found that haploinsufficiency for Magoh, Eif4a3, or Rbm8a disrupts neuronal viability and neural progenitor proliferation, resulting in severe microcephaly. Here, we use two new Casc3 mouse alleles to demonstrate developmental phenotypes that sharply contrast those of other core EJC components. Homozygosity for either null or hypomorphic Casc3 alleles led to embryonic and perinatal lethality, respectively. Compound embryos lacking Casc3 expression were smaller with proportionately reduced brain size. Mutant brains contained fewer neurons and progenitors, but no apoptosis, all phenotypes explained by developmental delay. This finding, which contrasts with severe neural phenotypes evident in other EJC mutants, indicates Casc3 is largely dispensable for brain development. In the developing brain, CASC3 protein expression is substoichiometric relative to MAGOH, EIF4A3, and RBM8A. Taken together, this argues that CASC3 is not an essential EJC component in brain development and suggests it could function in a tissue-specific manner.

  18. Joint torques in a freely walking insect reveal distinct functions of leg joints in propulsion and posture control.

    PubMed

    Dallmann, Chris J; Dürr, Volker; Schmitz, Josef

    2016-01-27

    Determining the mechanical output of limb joints is critical for understanding the control of complex motor behaviours such as walking. In the case of insect walking, the neural infrastructure for single-joint control is well described. However, a detailed description of the motor output in form of time-varying joint torques is lacking. Here, we determine joint torques in the stick insect to identify leg joint function in the control of body height and propulsion. Torques were determined by measuring whole-body kinematics and ground reaction forces in freely walking animals. We demonstrate that despite strong differences in morphology and posture, stick insects show a functional division of joints similar to other insect model systems. Propulsion was generated by strong depression torques about the coxa-trochanter joint, not by retraction or flexion/extension torques. Torques about the respective thorax-coxa and femur-tibia joints were often directed opposite to fore-aft forces and joint movements. This suggests a posture-dependent mechanism that counteracts collapse of the leg under body load and directs the resultant force vector such that strong depression torques can control both body height and propulsion. Our findings parallel propulsive mechanisms described in other walking, jumping and flying insects, and challenge current control models of insect walking.

  19. Joint torques in a freely walking insect reveal distinct functions of leg joints in propulsion and posture control

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Determining the mechanical output of limb joints is critical for understanding the control of complex motor behaviours such as walking. In the case of insect walking, the neural infrastructure for single-joint control is well described. However, a detailed description of the motor output in form of time-varying joint torques is lacking. Here, we determine joint torques in the stick insect to identify leg joint function in the control of body height and propulsion. Torques were determined by measuring whole-body kinematics and ground reaction forces in freely walking animals. We demonstrate that despite strong differences in morphology and posture, stick insects show a functional division of joints similar to other insect model systems. Propulsion was generated by strong depression torques about the coxa–trochanter joint, not by retraction or flexion/extension torques. Torques about the respective thorax–coxa and femur–tibia joints were often directed opposite to fore–aft forces and joint movements. This suggests a posture-dependent mechanism that counteracts collapse of the leg under body load and directs the resultant force vector such that strong depression torques can control both body height and propulsion. Our findings parallel propulsive mechanisms described in other walking, jumping and flying insects, and challenge current control models of insect walking. PMID:26791608

  20. Conditional Deletion of Atoh1 Reveals Distinct Critical Periods for Survival and Function of Hair Cells in the Organ of Corti

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Tiantian; Seymour, Michelle L.; Zhang, Hongyuan; Pereira, Fred A.

    2013-01-01

    Atonal homolog1 (Atoh1) encodes a basic helix–loop–helix protein that is the first transcription factor to be expressed in differentiating hair cells. Previous work suggests that expression of Atoh1 in prosensory precursors is necessary for the differentiation and survival of hair cells, but it is not clear whether Atoh1 is required exclusively for these processes, or whether it regulates other functions later during hair cell maturation. We used EGFP-tagged Atoh1 knock-in mice to demonstrate for the first time that Atoh1 protein is expressed in hair cell precursors several days before the appearance of differentiated markers, but not in the broad pattern expected of a proneural gene. We conditionally deleted Atoh1 at different points in hair cell development and observe a rapid onset of hair cell defects, suggesting that the Atoh1 protein is unstable in differentiating hair cells and is necessary through an extended phase of their differentiation. Conditional deletion of Atoh1 reveals multiple functions in hair cell survival, maturation of stereociliary bundles, and auditory function. We show the presence of distinct critical periods for Atoh1 in each of these functions, suggesting that Atoh1 may be directly regulating many aspects of hair cell function. Finally, we show that the supporting cell death that accompanies loss of Atoh1 in hair cells is likely caused by the abortive trans-differentiation of supporting cells into hair cells. Together our data suggest that Atoh1 regulates multiple aspects of hair cell development and function. PMID:23761906

  1. Structural and functional dissection reveals distinct roles of Ca2+-binding sites in the giant adhesin SiiE of Salmonella enterica

    PubMed Central

    Klingl, Stefan; Sandmann, Achim; Taccardi, Nicola; Sticht, Heinrich; Muller, Yves A.; Hensel, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The giant non-fimbrial adhesin SiiE of Salmonella enterica mediates the first contact to the apical site of epithelial cells and enables subsequent invasion. SiiE is a 595 kDa protein composed of 53 repetitive bacterial immunoglobulin (BIg) domains and the only known substrate of the SPI4-encoded type 1 secretion system (T1SS). The crystal structure of BIg50-52 of SiiE revealed two distinct Ca2+-binding sites per BIg domain formed by conserved aspartate or glutamate residues. In a mutational analysis Ca2+-binding sites were disrupted by aspartate to serine exchange at various positions in the BIg domains of SiiE. Amounts of secreted SiiE diminish with a decreasing number of intact Ca2+-binding sites. BIg domains of SiiE contain distinct Ca2+-binding sites, with type I sites being similar to other T1SS-secreted proteins and type II sites newly identified in SiiE. We functionally and structurally dissected the roles of type I and type II Ca2+-binding sites in SiiE, as well as the importance of Ca2+-binding sites in various positions of SiiE. Type I Ca2+-binding sites were critical for efficient secretion of SiiE and a decreasing number of type I sites correlated with reduced secretion. Type II sites were less important for secretion, stability and surface expression of SiiE, however integrity of type II sites in the C-terminal portion was required for the function of SiiE in mediating adhesion and invasion. PMID:28558023

  2. A Global Census of Fission Yeast Deubiquitinating Enzyme Localization and Interaction Networks Reveals Distinct Compartmentalization Profiles and Overlapping Functions in Endocytosis and Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Kouranti, Ilektra; McLean, Janel R.; Feoktistova, Anna; Liang, Ping; Johnson, Alyssa E.; Roberts-Galbraith, Rachel H.; Gould, Kathleen L.

    2010-01-01

    Ubiquitination and deubiquitination are reciprocal processes that tune protein stability, function, and/or localization. The removal of ubiquitin and remodeling of ubiquitin chains is catalyzed by deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs), which are cysteine proteases or metalloproteases. Although ubiquitination has been extensively studied for decades, the complexity of cellular roles for deubiquitinating enzymes has only recently been explored, and there are still several gaps in our understanding of when, where, and how these enzymes function to modulate the fate of polypeptides. To address these questions we performed a systematic analysis of the 20 Schizosaccharomyces pombe DUBs using confocal microscopy, proteomics, and enzymatic activity assays. Our results reveal that S. pombe DUBs are present in almost all cell compartments, and the majority are part of stable protein complexes essential for their function. Interestingly, DUB partners identified by our study include the homolog of a putative tumor suppressor gene not previously linked to the ubiquitin pathway, and two conserved tryptophan-aspartate (WD) repeat proteins that regulate Ubp9, a DUB that we show participates in endocytosis, actin dynamics, and cell polarity. In order to understand how DUB activity affects these processes we constructed multiple DUB mutants and find that a quintuple deletion of ubp4 ubp5 ubp9 ubp15 sst2/amsh displays severe growth, polarity, and endocytosis defects. This mutant allowed the identification of two common substrates for five cytoplasmic DUBs. Through these studies, a common regulatory theme emerged in which DUB localization and/or activity is modulated by interacting partners. Despite apparently distinct cytoplasmic localization patterns, several DUBs cooperate in regulating endocytosis and cell polarity. These studies provide a framework for dissecting DUB signaling pathways in S. pombe and may shed light on DUB functions in metazoans. PMID:20838651

  3. Mutagenesis of N-terminal residues of feline foamy virus Gag reveals entirely distinct functions during capsid formation, particle assembly, Gag processing and budding.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Betts, Matthew J; Lei, Janet; Wei, Guochao; Bao, Qiuying; Kehl, Timo; Russell, Robert B; Löchelt, Martin

    2016-08-22

    Foamy viruses (FVs) of the Spumaretrovirinae subfamily are distinct retroviruses, with many features of their molecular biology and replication strategy clearly different from those of the Orthoretroviruses, such as human immunodeficiency, murine leukemia, and human T cell lymphotropic viruses. The FV Gag N-terminal region is responsible for capsid formation and particle budding via interaction with Env. However, the critical residues or motifs in this region and their functional interaction are currently ill-defined, especially in non-primate FVs. Mutagenesis of N-terminal Gag residues of feline FV (FFV) reveals key residues essential for either capsid assembly and/or viral budding via interaction with the FFV Env leader protein (Elp). In an in vitro Gag-Elp interaction screen, Gag mutations abolishing particle assembly also interfered with Elp binding, indicating that Gag assembly is a prerequisite for this highly specific interaction. Gradient sedimentation analyses of cytosolic proteins indicate that wild-type Gag is mostly assembled into virus capsids. Moreover, proteolytic processing of Gag correlates with capsid assembly and is mostly, if not completely, independent from particle budding. In addition, Gag processing correlates with the presence of packaging-competent FFV genomic RNA suggesting that Pol encapsidation via genomic RNA is a prerequisite for Gag processing. Though an appended heterogeneous myristoylation signal rescues Gag particle budding of mutants unable to form capsids or defective in interacting with Elp, it fails to generate infectious particles that co-package Pol, as evidenced by a lack of Gag processing. Changes in proteolytic Gag processing, intracellular capsid assembly, particle budding and infectivity of defined N-terminal Gag mutants highlight their essential, distinct and only partially overlapping roles during viral assembly and budding. Discussion of these findings will be based on a recent model developed for Gag

  4. Distinct pattern separation related transfer functions in human CA3/dentate and CA1 revealed using high-resolution fMRI and variable mnemonic similarity.

    PubMed

    Lacy, Joyce W; Yassa, Michael A; Stark, Shauna M; Muftuler, L Tugan; Stark, Craig E L

    2011-01-01

    Producing and maintaining distinct (orthogonal) neural representations for similar events is critical to avoiding interference in long-term memory. Recently, our laboratory provided the first evidence for separation-like signals in the human CA3/dentate. Here, we extended this by parametrically varying the change in input (similarity) while monitoring CA1 and CA3/dentate for separation and completion-like signals using high-resolution fMRI. In the CA1, activity varied in a graded fashion in response to increases in the change in input. In contrast, the CA3/dentate showed a stepwise transfer function that was highly sensitive to small changes in input.

  5. Mutant Allele-Specific Uncoupling of PENETRATION3 Functions Reveals Engagement of the ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter in Distinct Tryptophan Metabolic Pathways1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xunli; Dittgen, Jan; Piślewska-Bednarek, Mariola; Molina, Antonio; Schneider, Bernd; Doubský, Jan; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Schulze-Lefert, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) PENETRATION (PEN) genes quantitatively contribute to the execution of different forms of plant immunity upon challenge with diverse leaf pathogens. PEN3 encodes a plasma membrane-resident pleiotropic drug resistance-type ATP-binding cassette transporter and is thought to act in a pathogen-inducible and PEN2 myrosinase-dependent metabolic pathway in extracellular defense. This metabolic pathway directs the intracellular biosynthesis and activation of tryptophan-derived indole glucosinolates for subsequent PEN3-mediated efflux across the plasma membrane at pathogen contact sites. However, PEN3 also functions in abiotic stress responses to cadmium and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA)-mediated auxin homeostasis in roots, raising the possibility that PEN3 exports multiple functionally unrelated substrates. Here, we describe the isolation of a pen3 allele, designated pen3-5, that encodes a dysfunctional protein that accumulates in planta like wild-type PEN3. The specific mutation in pen3-5 uncouples PEN3 functions in IBA-stimulated root growth modulation, callose deposition induced with a conserved peptide epitope of bacterial flagellin (flg22), and pathogen-inducible salicylic acid accumulation from PEN3 activity in extracellular defense, indicating the engagement of multiple PEN3 substrates in different PEN3-dependent biological processes. We identified 4-O-β-d-glucosyl-indol-3-yl formamide (4OGlcI3F) as a pathogen-inducible, tryptophan-derived compound that overaccumulates in pen3 leaf tissue and has biosynthesis that is dependent on an intact PEN2 metabolic pathway. We propose that a precursor of 4OGlcI3F is the PEN3 substrate in extracellular pathogen defense. These precursors, the shared indole core present in IBA and 4OGlcI3F, and allele-specific uncoupling of a subset of PEN3 functions suggest that PEN3 transports distinct indole-type metabolites in distinct biological processes. PMID:26023163

  6. Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging reveals distinct brain activity in heavy cannabis users – a multi-voxel pattern analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, H; Skosnik, PD; Pruce, BJ; Brumbaugh, MS; Vollmer, JM; Fridberg, DJ; O’Donnell, BF; Hetrick, WP; Newman, SD

    2015-01-01

    Chronic cannabis use can cause cognitive, perceptual and personality alterations, which are believed to be associated with regional brain changes and possible changes in connectivity between functional regions. This study aims to identify the changes from resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. A two-level multi-voxel pattern analysis was proposed to classify male cannabis users from normal controls. The first level analysis works on a voxel basis and identifies clusters for the input of a second level analysis, which works on the functional connectivity between these regions. We found distinct clusters for male cannabis users in the middle frontal gyrus, precentral gyrus, superior frontal gyrus, posterior cingulate cortex, cerebellum and some other regions. Based on the functional connectivity of these clusters, a high overall accuracy rate of 84–88% in classification accuracy was achieved. High correlations were also found between the overall classification accuracy and Barrett Barrett Impulsiveness Scale factor scores of attention and motor. Our result suggests regional differences in the brains of male cannabis users that span from the cerebellum to the prefrontal cortex, which are associated with differences in functional connectivity. PMID:25237118

  7. Interventions to Reduce Spasticity and Improve Function in People With Chronic Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury: Distinctions Revealed by Different Analytical Methods.

    PubMed

    Duffell, Lynsey D; Brown, Geoffrey L; Mirbagheri, Mehdi M

    2015-07-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in impaired function, and ankle joint spasticity is a common secondary complication. Different interventions have been trialed with variable results. We investigated the effects of pharmacological and physical (locomotor training) interventions on function in people living with incomplete motor function loss caused by SCI and used different analytical techniques to understand whether functional levels affect recovery with different interventions. Participants with an incomplete SCI were assigned to 3 groups: no intervention, Lokomat, or tizanidine. Outcome measures were the 10-m walk test, 6-minute walk test, and the Timed Up and Go. Participants were classified in 2 ways: (1) based on achieving an improvement above the minimally important difference (MID) and (2) using growth mixture modeling (GMM). Functional levels of participants who achieved the MID were compared and random coefficient regression (RCR) was used to assess recovery in GMM classes. Overall, walking speed and endurance improved, with no difference between interventions. Only a small number of participants achieved the MID. Both MID and GMM-RCR analyses revealed that tizanidine improved endurance in high-functioning participants. GMM-RCR classification also showed that speed and mobility improved after locomotor training. Improvements in function were achieved in a limited number of people with SCI. Using the MID and GMM techniques, differences in responses to interventions between high-and low-functioning participants could be identified. These techniques may, therefore, have potential to be used for characterizing therapeutic effects resulting from different interventions. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Cell-based approach for 3D reconstruction of lymphatic capillaries in vitro reveals distinct functions of HGF and VEGF-C in lymphangiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gibot, Laure; Galbraith, Todd; Kloos, Bryan; Das, Suvendu; Lacroix, Dan A; Auger, François A; Skobe, Mihaela

    2016-02-01

    Regeneration of lymphatic vessels is important for treatment of various disorders of lymphatic system and for restoration of lymphatic function after surgery. We have developed a method for generating a human 3D lymphatic vascular construct. In this system, human lymphatic endothelial cells, co-cultured with fibroblasts, spontaneously organized into a stable 3D lymphatic capillary network without the use of any exogenous factors. In vitro-generated lymphatic capillaries exhibited the major molecular and ultra-structural features of native, human lymphatic microvasculature: branches in the three dimensions, wide lumen, blind ends, overlapping borders, adherens and tight junctions, anchoring filaments, lack of mural cells, and poorly developed basement membrane. Furthermore, we show that fibroblast-derived VEGF-C and HGF cooperate in the formation of lymphatic vasculature by activating ERK1/2 signaling, and demonstrate distinct functions of HGF/c-Met and VEGF-C/VEGFR-3 in lymphangiogenesis. This lymphatic vascular construct is expected to facilitate studies of lymphangiogenesis in vitro and it holds promise as a strategy for regeneration of lymphatic vessels and treatment of lymphatic disorders in various conditions.

  9. Whole-genome microarray analysis and functional characterization reveal distinct gene expression profiles and patterns in two mouse models of ileal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Avula, Leela Rani; Knapen, Dries; Buckinx, Roeland; Vergauwen, Lucia; Adriaensen, Dirk; Van Nassauw, Luc; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre

    2012-08-06

    Although a number of intestinal inflammatory conditions pertain to the ileum, whole-genome gene expression analyses in animal models of ileal inflammation are lacking to date. Therefore, we aimed to identify and characterize alterations in gene expression in the acutely inflamed ileum of two murine models of intestinal inflammation, namely intestinal schistosomiasis and TNBS-induced ileitis, compared to healthy controls. To this end, we used whole-genome microarrays, followed by bioinformatics analyses to detect over-represented Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways and Gene Ontology categories. Following screening of almost all known mouse genes and transcripts represented on the array, intestinal schistosomiasis and TNBS-induced ileitis yielded 207 and 1417 differentially expressed genes, respectively, with only 30 overlapping concordantly changed genes. Functional category groups consisting of complement and coagulation cascades, extracellular matrix (ECM)-receptor interaction, Fc epsilon receptor I signaling pathways and protein activation cascade, cell adhesion categories were over-represented in the differential gene list of intestinal schistosomiasis. Antigen processing and presentation, cell adhesion molecules, ABC transporters, Toll-like receptor signaling pathways and response to chemical stimulus categories were over-represented in the differential gene list of TNBS-induced ileitis. Although cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, intestinal immune network for IgA production, focal adhesion pathways and immune, inflammatory and defense response categories were over-represented in the differential gene lists of both inflammation models, the vast majority of the associated genes and changes were unique to each model. This study characterized two models of ileal inflammation at a whole-genome level and outlined distinct gene expression profiles and patterns in the two models. The results indicate that intestinal schistosomiasis involves Th2

  10. Distinct Pattern Separation Related Transfer Functions in Human CA3/Dentate and CA1 Revealed Using High-Resolution fMRI and Variable Mnemonic Similarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacy, Joyce W.; Yassa, Michael A.; Stark, Shauna M.; Muftuler, L. Tugan; Stark, Craig E. L.

    2011-01-01

    Producing and maintaining distinct (orthogonal) neural representations for similar events is critical to avoiding interference in long-term memory. Recently, our laboratory provided the first evidence for separation-like signals in the human CA3/dentate. Here, we extended this by parametrically varying the change in input (similarity) while…

  11. Distinct Pattern Separation Related Transfer Functions in Human CA3/Dentate and CA1 Revealed Using High-Resolution fMRI and Variable Mnemonic Similarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacy, Joyce W.; Yassa, Michael A.; Stark, Shauna M.; Muftuler, L. Tugan; Stark, Craig E. L.

    2011-01-01

    Producing and maintaining distinct (orthogonal) neural representations for similar events is critical to avoiding interference in long-term memory. Recently, our laboratory provided the first evidence for separation-like signals in the human CA3/dentate. Here, we extended this by parametrically varying the change in input (similarity) while…

  12. HLA Class I-T Cell Epitopes from trans-Sialidase Proteins Reveal Functionally Distinct Subsets of CD8+ T Cells in Chronic Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, María G.; Postan, Miriam; Weatherly, D. Brent; Albareda, María C.; Sidney, John; Sette, Alessandro; Olivera, Carina; Armenti, Alejandro H.

    2008-01-01

    Background Previously, we identified a set of HLA-A020.1-restricted trans-sialidase peptides as targets of CD8+ T cell responses in HLA-A0201+ individuals chronically infected by T. cruzi. Methods and Findings Herein, we report the identification of peptides encoded by the same trans-sialidase gene family that bind alleles representative of the 6 most common class I HLA-supertypes. Based on a combination of bioinformatic predictions and HLA-supertype considerations, a total of 1001 epitopes predicted to bind to HLA A01, A02, A03, A24, B7 and B44 supertypes was selected. Ninety-six supertype-binder epitopes encoded by multiple trans-sialidase genes were tested for the ability to stimulate a recall CD8+ T cell response in the peripheral blood from subjects with chronic T. cruzi infection regardless the HLA haplotype. An overall hierarchy of antigenicity was apparent, with the A02 supertype peptides being the most frequently recognized in the Chagas disease population followed by the A03 and the A24 supertype epitopes. CD8+ T cell responses to promiscuous epitopes revealed that the CD8+ T cell compartment specific for T. cruzi displays a functional profile with T cells secreting interferon-γ alone as the predominant pattern and very low prevalence of single IL-2-secreting or dual IFN-γ/IL-2 secreting T cells denoting a lack of polyfunctional cytokine responses in chronic T. cruzi infection. Conclusions This study identifies a set of T. cruzi peptides that should prove useful for monitoring immune competence and changes in infection and disease status in individuals with chronic Chagas disease. PMID:18846233

  13. Genome-wide functional analysis of CREB/long-term memory-dependent transcription reveals distinct basal and memory gene expression programs.

    PubMed

    Lakhina, Vanisha; Arey, Rachel N; Kaletsky, Rachel; Kauffman, Amanda; Stein, Geneva; Keyes, William; Xu, Daniel; Murphy, Coleen T

    2015-01-21

    Induced CREB activity is a hallmark of long-term memory, but the full repertoire of CREB transcriptional targets required specifically for memory is not known in any system. To obtain a more complete picture of the mechanisms involved in memory, we combined memory training with genome-wide transcriptional analysis of C. elegans CREB mutants. This approach identified 757 significant CREB/memory-induced targets and confirmed the involvement of known memory genes from other organisms, but also suggested new mechanisms and novel components that may be conserved through mammals. CREB mediates distinct basal and memory transcriptional programs at least partially through spatial restriction of CREB activity: basal targets are regulated primarily in nonneuronal tissues, while memory targets are enriched for neuronal expression, emanating from CREB activity in AIM neurons. This suite of novel memory-associated genes will provide a platform for the discovery of orthologous mammalian long-term memory components.

  14. Genome-wide Functional Analysis of CREB/Long-Term Memory-Dependent Transcription Reveals Distinct Basal and Memory Gene Expression Programs

    PubMed Central

    Lakhina, Vanisha; Arey, Rachel N.; Kaletsky, Rachel; Kauffman, Amanda; Stein, Geneva; Keyes, William; Xu, Daniel; Murphy, Coleen T.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Induced CREB activity is a hallmark of long-term memory, but the full repertoire of CREB transcriptional targets required specifically for memory is not known in any system. To obtain a more complete picture of the mechanisms involved in memory, we combined memory training with genome-wide transcriptional analysis of C. elegans CREB mutants. This approach identified 757 significant CREB/memory-induced targets and confirmed the involvement of known memory genes from other organisms, but also suggested new mechanisms and novel components that may be conserved through mammals. CREB mediates distinct basal and memory transcriptional programs at least partially through spatial restriction of CREB activity: basal targets are regulated primarily in nonneuronal tissues, while memory targets are enriched for neuronal expression, emanating from CREB activity in AIM neurons. This suite of novel memory-associated genes will provide a platform for the discovery of orthologous mammalian long-term memory components. PMID:25611510

  15. Single-atom imino substitutions at A9 and A10 reveal distinct effects on the fold and function of the hairpin ribozyme catalytic core.

    PubMed

    Spitale, Robert C; Volpini, Rosaria; Mungillo, Michael V; Krucinska, Jolanta; Cristalli, Gloria; Wedekind, Joseph E

    2009-08-25

    The hairpin ribozyme cleaves a phosphodiester bond within a cognate substrate. Structural and biochemical data indicate the conserved A9 and A10 bases reside close to the scissile bond but make distinct contributions to catalysis. To investigate these residues, we replaced the imino moiety of each base with N1-deazaadenosine. This single-atom change resulted in an 8-fold loss in k(obs) for A9 and displacement of the base from the active site; no effects were observed for A10. We propose that the imino moiety of A9 promotes a key water-mediated contact that favors transition-state formation, which suggests an enhanced chemical repertoire for RNA.

  16. Functional analysis of COP1 and SPA orthologs from Physcomitrella and rice during photomorphogenesis of transgenic Arabidopsis reveals distinct evolutionary conservation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Plants have evolved light sensing mechanisms to optimally adapt their growth and development to the ambient light environment. The COP1/SPA complex is a key negative regulator of light signaling in the well-studied dicot Arabidopsis thaliana. COP1 and members of the four SPA proteins are part of an E3 ubiquitin ligase that acts in darkness to ubiquitinate several transcription factors involved in light responses, thereby targeting them for degradation by the proteasome. While COP1 is also found in humans, SPA proteins appear specific to plants. Here, we have functionally addressed evolutionary conservation of COP1 and SPA orthologs from the moss Physcomitrella, the monocot rice and the dicot Arabidopsis. Results To this end, we analyzed the activities of COP1- and SPA-like proteins from Physcomitrella patens and rice when expressed in Arabidopsis. Expression of rice COP1 and Physcomitrella COP1 protein sequences predominantly complemented all phenotypic aspects of the viable, hypomorphic cop1-4 mutant and the null, seedling-lethal cop1-5 mutant of Arabidopsis: rice COP1 fully rescued the constitutive-photomorphogenesis phenotype in darkness and the leaf expansion defect of cop1 mutants, while it partially restored normal photoperiodic flowering in cop1. Physcomitrella COP1 partially restored normal seedling growth and flowering time, while it fully restored normal leaf expansion in the cop1 mutants. In contrast, expression of a SPA ortholog from Physcomitrella (PpSPAb) in Arabidopsis spa mutants did not rescue any facet of the spa mutant phenotype, suggesting that the PpSPAb protein is not functionally conserved or that the Arabidopsis function evolved after the split of mosses and seed plants. The SPA1 ortholog from rice (OsSPA1) rescued the spa mutant phenotype in dark-grown seedlings, but did not complement any spa mutant phenotype in light-grown seedlings or in adult plants. Conclusion Our results show that COP1 protein sequences from Physcomitrella

  17. Functional analysis of COP1 and SPA orthologs from Physcomitrella and rice during photomorphogenesis of transgenic Arabidopsis reveals distinct evolutionary conservation.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Aashish; Dickopf, Stephen; Ullrich, Kristian K; Rensing, Stefan A; Hoecker, Ute

    2014-07-01

    Plants have evolved light sensing mechanisms to optimally adapt their growth and development to the ambient light environment. The COP1/SPA complex is a key negative regulator of light signaling in the well-studied dicot Arabidopsis thaliana. COP1 and members of the four SPA proteins are part of an E3 ubiquitin ligase that acts in darkness to ubiquitinate several transcription factors involved in light responses, thereby targeting them for degradation by the proteasome. While COP1 is also found in humans, SPA proteins appear specific to plants. Here, we have functionally addressed evolutionary conservation of COP1 and SPA orthologs from the moss Physcomitrella, the monocot rice and the dicot Arabidopsis. To this end, we analyzed the activities of COP1- and SPA-like proteins from Physcomitrella patens and rice when expressed in Arabidopsis. Expression of rice COP1 and Physcomitrella COP1 protein sequences predominantly complemented all phenotypic aspects of the viable, hypomorphic cop1-4 mutant and the null, seedling-lethal cop1-5 mutant of Arabidopsis: rice COP1 fully rescued the constitutive-photomorphogenesis phenotype in darkness and the leaf expansion defect of cop1 mutants, while it partially restored normal photoperiodic flowering in cop1. Physcomitrella COP1 partially restored normal seedling growth and flowering time, while it fully restored normal leaf expansion in the cop1 mutants. In contrast, expression of a SPA ortholog from Physcomitrella (PpSPAb) in Arabidopsis spa mutants did not rescue any facet of the spa mutant phenotype, suggesting that the PpSPAb protein is not functionally conserved or that the Arabidopsis function evolved after the split of mosses and seed plants. The SPA1 ortholog from rice (OsSPA1) rescued the spa mutant phenotype in dark-grown seedlings, but did not complement any spa mutant phenotype in light-grown seedlings or in adult plants. Our results show that COP1 protein sequences from Physcomitrella, rice and Arabidopsis have

  18. Dissociable effects of anodal and cathodal tDCS reveal distinct functional roles for right parietal cortex in the detection of single and competing stimuli.

    PubMed

    Filmer, Hannah L; Dux, Paul E; Mattingley, Jason B

    2015-07-01

    Spatial attention can be used to direct neural processing resources to a subset of task-relevant or otherwise salient items within the environment. Such selective processes are particularly important for resolving competition between multiple stimuli. Deficits in processing single stimuli can arise after damage to parietal, frontal and temporal brain regions, as is typical in patients with contralesional spatial neglect. By contrast, deficits in processing multiple competing stimuli may arise specifically following lesions of the posterior parietal cortex (PPC), as occurs in the disorder of spatial extinction. It remains unclear, however, whether mechanisms involved in selecting single and competing stimuli reflect the same or dissociable neural operations within the PPC. To address this issue, in separate sessions, we applied transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to the left or right PPC and measured the effect on detecting and discriminating single and competing visual stimulus events. Our results revealed reliable tDCS modulations of stimulus processing, specific to the right PPC, as well as a dissociation in the detection of single and competing stimuli. For the right PPC only, single stimuli presented to the left (contralateral) visual field were affected selectively by anodal tDCS, whereas competing stimuli across the two visual fields were affected by both anodal and cathodal tDCS. These contrasting effects of anodal and cathodal tDCS on perception of single and competing stimuli suggest dissociable neural coding properties within the right PPC.

  19. Genome-wide analysis of translational efficiency reveals distinct but overlapping functions of yeast DEAD-box RNA helicases Ded1 and eIF4A

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Neelam Dabas; Zhou, Fujun; Ingolia, Nicholas T.; Hinnebusch, Alan G.

    2015-01-01

    DEAD-box RNA helicases eIF4A and Ded1 are believed to promote translation initiation by resolving mRNA secondary structures that impede ribosome attachment at the mRNA 5′ end or subsequent scanning of the 5′ UTR, but whether they perform unique or overlapping functions in vivo is poorly understood. We compared the effects of mutations in Ded1 or eIF4A on global translational efficiencies (TEs) in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by ribosome footprint profiling. Despite similar reductions in bulk translation, inactivation of a cold-sensitive Ded1 mutant substantially reduced the TEs of >600 mRNAs, whereas inactivation of a temperature-sensitive eIF4A variant encoded by tif1-A79V (in a strain lacking the ortholog TIF2) yielded <40 similarly impaired mRNAs. The broader requirement for Ded1 did not reflect more pervasive secondary structures at low temperature, as inactivation of temperature-sensitive and cold-sensitive ded1 mutants gave highly correlated results. Interestingly, Ded1-dependent mRNAs exhibit greater than average 5′ UTR length and propensity for secondary structure, implicating Ded1 in scanning through structured 5′ UTRs. Reporter assays confirmed that cap-distal stem–loop insertions increase dependence on Ded1 but not eIF4A for efficient translation. While only a small fraction of mRNAs shows a heightened requirement for eIF4A, dependence on eIF4A is correlated with requirements for Ded1 and 5′ UTR features characteristic of Ded1-dependent mRNAs. Our findings suggest that Ded1 is critically required to promote scanning through secondary structures within 5′ UTRs, and while eIF4A cooperates with Ded1 in this function, it also promotes a step of initiation common to virtually all yeast mRNAs. PMID:26122911

  20. Structure–function analyses of a pertussis-like toxin from pathogenic Escherichia coli reveal a distinct mechanism of inhibition of trimeric G-proteins

    PubMed Central

    Littler, Dene R.; Ang, Sheng Y.; Moriel, Danilo G.; Kocan, Martina; Kleifeld, Oded; Johnson, Matthew D.; Tran, Mai T.; Paton, Adrienne W.; Paton, James C.; Summers, Roger J.; Schembri, Mark A.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Beddoe, Travis

    2017-01-01

    Pertussis-like toxins are secreted by several bacterial pathogens during infection. They belong to the AB5 virulence factors, which bind to glycans on host cell membranes for internalization. Host cell recognition and internalization are mediated by toxin B subunits sharing a unique pentameric ring-like assembly. Although the role of pertussis toxin in whooping cough is well-established, pertussis-like toxins produced by other bacteria are less studied, and their mechanisms of action are unclear. Here, we report that some extra-intestinal Escherichia coli pathogens (i.e. those that reside in the gut but can spread to other bodily locations) encode a pertussis-like toxin that inhibits mammalian cell growth in vitro. We found that this protein, EcPlt, is related to toxins produced by both nontyphoidal and typhoidal Salmonella serovars. Pertussis-like toxins are secreted as disulfide-bonded heterohexamers in which the catalytic ADP-ribosyltransferase subunit is activated when exposed to the reducing environment in mammalian cells. We found here that the reduced EcPlt exhibits large structural rearrangements associated with its activation. We noted that inhibitory residues tethered within the NAD+-binding site by an intramolecular disulfide in the oxidized state dissociate upon the reduction and enable loop restructuring to form the nucleotide-binding site. Surprisingly, although pertussis toxin targets a cysteine residue within the α subunit of inhibitory trimeric G-proteins, we observed that activated EcPlt toxin modifies a proximal lysine/asparagine residue instead. In conclusion, our results reveal the molecular mechanism underpinning activation of pertussis-like toxins, and we also identified differences in host target specificity. PMID:28663369

  1. Structure-function analyses of a pertussis-like toxin from pathogenic Escherichia coli reveal a distinct mechanism of inhibition of trimeric G-proteins.

    PubMed

    Littler, Dene R; Ang, Sheng Y; Moriel, Danilo G; Kocan, Martina; Kleifeld, Oded; Johnson, Matthew D; Tran, Mai T; Paton, Adrienne W; Paton, James C; Summers, Roger J; Schembri, Mark A; Rossjohn, Jamie; Beddoe, Travis

    2017-09-08

    Pertussis-like toxins are secreted by several bacterial pathogens during infection. They belong to the AB5 virulence factors, which bind to glycans on host cell membranes for internalization. Host cell recognition and internalization are mediated by toxin B subunits sharing a unique pentameric ring-like assembly. Although the role of pertussis toxin in whooping cough is well-established, pertussis-like toxins produced by other bacteria are less studied, and their mechanisms of action are unclear. Here, we report that some extra-intestinal Escherichia coli pathogens (i.e. those that reside in the gut but can spread to other bodily locations) encode a pertussis-like toxin that inhibits mammalian cell growth in vitro We found that this protein, EcPlt, is related to toxins produced by both nontyphoidal and typhoidal Salmonella serovars. Pertussis-like toxins are secreted as disulfide-bonded heterohexamers in which the catalytic ADP-ribosyltransferase subunit is activated when exposed to the reducing environment in mammalian cells. We found here that the reduced EcPlt exhibits large structural rearrangements associated with its activation. We noted that inhibitory residues tethered within the NAD(+)-binding site by an intramolecular disulfide in the oxidized state dissociate upon the reduction and enable loop restructuring to form the nucleotide-binding site. Surprisingly, although pertussis toxin targets a cysteine residue within the α subunit of inhibitory trimeric G-proteins, we observed that activated EcPlt toxin modifies a proximal lysine/asparagine residue instead. In conclusion, our results reveal the molecular mechanism underpinning activation of pertussis-like toxins, and we also identified differences in host target specificity. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Functional characterization of a StyS sensor kinase reveals distinct domains associated with intracellular and extracellular sensing of styrene in P. putida CA-3.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Niall D; Mooney, Aisling; O'Mahony, Mark; Dobson, Alan Dw

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial two-component systems (TCSs) are of vital importance in the translation of rapidly changing environmental conditions into appropriate cellular regulatory responses enabling adaptation, growth, and survival. The diverse range of environmental signals that TCSs can process, coupled with discrete modular domains within TCS proteins, offers considerable potential for the rational design of bio-sensor and/or bio-reporter strains. In this study we functionally characterize the multi-domain StyS sensor kinase associated with sensing of the aromatic pollutant styrene by Pseudomonas putida CA-3. Deletion analysis of discrete domains was performed and the ability of the truncated StyS sensor proteins to activate a cognate reporter system in an E. coli host assessed. The essential histidine kinase and PAS input domains were identified for StyS dependent activation of the reporter system. However, co-expression of an ABC-transporter protein StyE, previously linked to styrene transport in P. putida CA-3, enabled activation of the reporter system with a StyS construct containing a non-essential PAS input domain, suggesting a novel role for intracellular detection and/or activation. Site directed mutagenesis and amino acid deletions were employed to further characterize the PAS sensing domains of both input regions. The potential implications of these findings in the use of multi-domain sensor kinases in rational design strategies and the potential link between transport and intracellular sensing are discussed.

  3. Functional characterization of a StyS sensor kinase reveals distinct domains associated with intracellular and extracellular sensing of styrene in P. putida CA-3

    PubMed Central

    O'Leary, Niall D; Mooney, Aisling; O'Mahony, Mark; Dobson, Alan DW

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial two-component systems (TCSs) are of vital importance in the translation of rapidly changing environmental conditions into appropriate cellular regulatory responses enabling adaptation, growth, and survival. The diverse range of environmental signals that TCSs can process, coupled with discrete modular domains within TCS proteins, offers considerable potential for the rational design of bio-sensor and/or bio-reporter strains. In this study we functionally characterize the multi-domain StyS sensor kinase associated with sensing of the aromatic pollutant styrene by Pseudomonas putida CA-3. Deletion analysis of discrete domains was performed and the ability of the truncated StyS sensor proteins to activate a cognate reporter system in an E. coli host assessed. The essential histidine kinase and PAS input domains were identified for StyS dependent activation of the reporter system. However, co-expression of an ABC-transporter protein StyE, previously linked to styrene transport in P. putida CA-3, enabled activation of the reporter system with a StyS construct containing a non-essential PAS input domain, suggesting a novel role for intracellular detection and/or activation. Site directed mutagenesis and amino acid deletions were employed to further characterize the PAS sensing domains of both input regions. The potential implications of these findings in the use of multi-domain sensor kinases in rational design strategies and the potential link between transport and intracellular sensing are discussed. PMID:24637704

  4. Global analysis of physical and functional RNA targets of hnRNP L reveals distinct sequence and epigenetic features of repressed and enhanced exons

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Brian S.; Tapescu, Iulia; Allon, Samuel J.; Mallory, Michael J.; Qiu, Jinsong; Lake, Robert J.; Fan, Hua-Ying; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Lynch, Kristen W.

    2015-01-01

    HnRNP L is a ubiquitous splicing-regulatory protein that is critical for the development and function of mammalian T cells. Previous work has identified a few targets of hnRNP L-dependent alternative splicing in T cells and has described transcriptome-wide association of hnRNP L with RNA. However, a comprehensive analysis of the impact of hnRNP L on mRNA expression remains lacking. Here we use next-generation sequencing to identify transcriptome changes upon depletion of hnRNP L in a model T-cell line. We demonstrate that hnRNP L primarily regulates cassette-type alternative splicing, with minimal impact of hnRNP L depletion on transcript abundance, intron retention, or other modes of alternative splicing. Strikingly, we find that binding of hnRNP L within or flanking an exon largely correlates with exon repression by hnRNP L. In contrast, exons that are enhanced by hnRNP L generally lack proximal hnRNP L binding. Notably, these hnRNP L-enhanced exons share sequence and context features that correlate with poor nucleosome positioning, suggesting that hnRNP may enhance inclusion of a subset of exons via a cotranscriptional or epigenetic mechanism. Our data demonstrate that hnRNP L controls inclusion of a broad spectrum of alternative cassette exons in T cells and suggest both direct RNA regulation as well as indirect mechanisms sensitive to the epigenetic landscape. PMID:26437669

  5. Analysis of the Fam181 gene family during mouse development reveals distinct strain-specific expression patterns, suggesting a role in nervous system development and function.

    PubMed

    Marks, Matthias; Pennimpede, Tracie; Lange, Lisette; Grote, Phillip; Herrmann, Bernhard G; Wittler, Lars

    2016-01-10

    During somitogenesis differential gene expression can be observed for so-called cyclic genes, which display expression changes with a periodicity of 120min in the mouse. In screens to identify novel cyclic genes in murine embryos, Fam181b was predicted to be an oscillating gene in the presomitic mesoderm (psm). This gene, and its closely related paralog Fam181a, belong to the thus far uncharacterized Fam181 gene family. Here we describe the expression of Fam181b and Fam181a during murine embryonic development. In addition, we confirm oscillation of Fam181b in the psm in-phase with targets of, and regulated by, Notch signaling. Fam181b expression in the psm, as well as in the lateral plate mesoderm, was found to be affected by genetic background. We show that Fam181a and b exhibit partially overlapping mRNA expression patterns, and encode for proteins containing highly-conserved motifs, which predominantly localize to the nucleus. A Fam181b loss-of-function model was generated and found to result in no obvious phenotype.

  6. Distinct functions of the laminin β LN domain and collagen IV during cardiac extracellular matrix formation and stabilization of alary muscle attachments revealed by EMS mutagenesis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Drosophila heart (dorsal vessel) is a relatively simple tubular organ that serves as a model for several aspects of cardiogenesis. Cardiac morphogenesis, proper heart function and stability require structural components whose identity and ways of assembly are only partially understood. Structural components are also needed to connect the myocardial tube with neighboring cells such as pericardial cells and specialized muscle fibers, the so-called alary muscles. Results Using an EMS mutagenesis screen for cardiac and muscular abnormalities in Drosophila embryos we obtained multiple mutants for two genetically interacting complementation groups that showed similar alary muscle and pericardial cell detachment phenotypes. The molecular lesions underlying these defects were identified as domain-specific point mutations in LamininB1 and Cg25C, encoding the extracellular matrix (ECM) components laminin β and collagen IV α1, respectively. Of particular interest within the LamininB1 group are certain hypomorphic mutants that feature prominent defects in cardiac morphogenesis and cardiac ECM layer formation, but in contrast to amorphic mutants, only mild defects in other tissues. All of these alleles carry clustered missense mutations in the laminin LN domain. The identified Cg25C mutants display weaker and largely temperature-sensitive phenotypes that result from glycine substitutions in different Gly-X-Y repeats of the triple helix-forming domain. While initial basement membrane assembly is not abolished in Cg25C mutants, incorporation of perlecan is impaired and intracellular accumulation of perlecan as well as the collagen IV α2 chain is detected during late embryogenesis. Conclusions Assembly of the cardiac ECM depends primarily on laminin, whereas collagen IV is needed for stabilization. Our data underscore the importance of a correctly assembled ECM particularly for the development of cardiac tissues and their lateral connections. The mutational

  7. Distinct functions of the laminin β LN domain and collagen IV during cardiac extracellular matrix formation and stabilization of alary muscle attachments revealed by EMS mutagenesis in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hollfelder, Dominik; Frasch, Manfred; Reim, Ingolf

    2014-06-17

    The Drosophila heart (dorsal vessel) is a relatively simple tubular organ that serves as a model for several aspects of cardiogenesis. Cardiac morphogenesis, proper heart function and stability require structural components whose identity and ways of assembly are only partially understood. Structural components are also needed to connect the myocardial tube with neighboring cells such as pericardial cells and specialized muscle fibers, the so-called alary muscles. Using an EMS mutagenesis screen for cardiac and muscular abnormalities in Drosophila embryos we obtained multiple mutants for two genetically interacting complementation groups that showed similar alary muscle and pericardial cell detachment phenotypes. The molecular lesions underlying these defects were identified as domain-specific point mutations in LamininB1 and Cg25C, encoding the extracellular matrix (ECM) components laminin β and collagen IV α1, respectively. Of particular interest within the LamininB1 group are certain hypomorphic mutants that feature prominent defects in cardiac morphogenesis and cardiac ECM layer formation, but in contrast to amorphic mutants, only mild defects in other tissues. All of these alleles carry clustered missense mutations in the laminin LN domain. The identified Cg25C mutants display weaker and largely temperature-sensitive phenotypes that result from glycine substitutions in different Gly-X-Y repeats of the triple helix-forming domain. While initial basement membrane assembly is not abolished in Cg25C mutants, incorporation of perlecan is impaired and intracellular accumulation of perlecan as well as the collagen IV α2 chain is detected during late embryogenesis. Assembly of the cardiac ECM depends primarily on laminin, whereas collagen IV is needed for stabilization. Our data underscore the importance of a correctly assembled ECM particularly for the development of cardiac tissues and their lateral connections. The mutational analysis suggests that the β6/β3/

  8. Large-Scale Fusion of Gray Matter and Resting-State Functional MRI Reveals Common and Distinct Biological Markers across the Psychosis Spectrum in the B-SNIP Cohort.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Meda, Shashwath A; Keshavan, Matcheri S; Tamminga, Carol A; Sweeney, John A; Clementz, Brett A; Schretlen, David J; Calhoun, Vince D; Lui, Su; Pearlson, Godfrey D

    2015-01-01

    To investigate whether aberrant interactions between brain structure and function present similarly or differently across probands with psychotic illnesses [schizophrenia (SZ), schizoaffective disorder (SAD), and bipolar I disorder with psychosis (BP)] and whether these deficits are shared with their first-degree non-psychotic relatives. A total of 1199 subjects were assessed, including 220 SZ, 147 SAD, 180 psychotic BP, 150 first-degree relatives of SZ, 126 SAD relatives, 134 BP relatives, and 242 healthy controls (1). All subjects underwent structural MRI (sMRI) and resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) scanning. Joint-independent component analysis (jICA) was used to fuse sMRI gray matter and rs-fMRI amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations data to identify the relationship between the two modalities. jICA revealed two significantly fused components. The association between functional brain alteration in a prefrontal-striatal-thalamic-cerebellar network and structural abnormalities in the default mode network was found to be common across psychotic diagnoses and correlated with cognitive function, social function, and schizo-bipolar scale scores. The fused alteration in the temporal lobe was unique to SZ and SAD. The above effects were not seen in any relative group (including those with cluster-A personality). Using a multivariate-fused approach involving two widely used imaging markers, we demonstrate both shared and distinct biological traits across the psychosis spectrum. Furthermore, our results suggest that the above traits are psychosis biomarkers rather than endophenotypes.

  9. Loss-of-Function Analysis Reveals Distinct Requirements of the Translation Initiation Factors eIF4E, eIF4E-3, eIF4G and eIF4G2 in Drosophila Spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sanjay; Lasko, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression has a key role in many cellular and developmental processes. Spermatogenesis involves a complex developmental program that includes changes in cell cycle dynamics and dramatic cellular remodeling. Translational control is critical for spermatogenesis in Drosophila as many mRNAs synthesized in the spermatocytes are translated only much later during spermatid differentiation. Testes-specific translation initiation factors eIF4E-3 and eIF4G2 are essential specifically for male fertility. However, details of their roles during different stages of spermatogenesis are unknown, and the role of canonical translation initiation factors in spermatogenesis remains unexplored. In this study, we addressed the functional role of eIF4E-1, eIF4E-3, eIF4G and eIF4G2 in testes development and formation of mature sperm. Using the UAS-Gal4 system and RNA interference, we systematically knocked down these four genes in different stages of germ cell development, and in the somatic cells. Our results show that eIF4E-1 function in early germ cells and the surrounding somatic cells is critical for spermatogenesis. Both eIF4E-1 and eIF4E-3 are required in spermatocytes for chromosome condensation and cytokinesis during the meiotic stages. Interestingly, we find that eIF4G knockdown did not affect male fertility while eIF4G2 has distinct functions during spermatogenesis; it is required in early germ cells for proper meiotic divisions and spermatid elongation while its abrogation in spermatocytes caused meiotic arrest. Double knockdown of eIF4G and eIF4G2 shows that these proteins act redundantly during the early stages of spermatogenesis. Taken together, our analysis reveals spatio-temporal roles of the canonical and testes-specific translation initiation factors in coordinating developmental programs during spermatogenesis. PMID:25849588

  10. Loss-of-function analysis reveals distinct requirements of the translation initiation factors eIF4E, eIF4E-3, eIF4G and eIF4G2 in Drosophila spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sanjay; Lasko, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression has a key role in many cellular and developmental processes. Spermatogenesis involves a complex developmental program that includes changes in cell cycle dynamics and dramatic cellular remodeling. Translational control is critical for spermatogenesis in Drosophila as many mRNAs synthesized in the spermatocytes are translated only much later during spermatid differentiation. Testes-specific translation initiation factors eIF4E-3 and eIF4G2 are essential specifically for male fertility. However, details of their roles during different stages of spermatogenesis are unknown, and the role of canonical translation initiation factors in spermatogenesis remains unexplored. In this study, we addressed the functional role of eIF4E-1, eIF4E-3, eIF4G and eIF4G2 in testes development and formation of mature sperm. Using the UAS-Gal4 system and RNA interference, we systematically knocked down these four genes in different stages of germ cell development, and in the somatic cells. Our results show that eIF4E-1 function in early germ cells and the surrounding somatic cells is critical for spermatogenesis. Both eIF4E-1 and eIF4E-3 are required in spermatocytes for chromosome condensation and cytokinesis during the meiotic stages. Interestingly, we find that eIF4G knockdown did not affect male fertility while eIF4G2 has distinct functions during spermatogenesis; it is required in early germ cells for proper meiotic divisions and spermatid elongation while its abrogation in spermatocytes caused meiotic arrest. Double knockdown of eIF4G and eIF4G2 shows that these proteins act redundantly during the early stages of spermatogenesis. Taken together, our analysis reveals spatio-temporal roles of the canonical and testes-specific translation initiation factors in coordinating developmental programs during spermatogenesis.

  11. Morphologically and Functionally Distinct Lipid Droplet Subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuyan; Wang, Yang; Cui, Liujuan; Deng, Yaqin; Xu, Shimeng; Yu, Jinhai; Cichello, Simon; Serrero, Ginette; Ying, Yunshu; Liu, Pingsheng

    2016-01-01

    Lipid droplet (LD), a multi-functional organelle, is often found to associate with other cellular membranous structures and vary in size in a given cell, which may be related to their functional diversity. Here we established a method to separate LD subpopulations from isolated CHO K2 LDs into three different size categories. The subpopulation with smallest LDs was nearly free of ER and other membranous structures while those with larger LDs contained intact ER. These distinct subpopulations of LDs differed in their protein composition and ability to recruit proteins. This method was also applicable to LDs obtained from other sources, such as Huh7 cells, mouse liver and brown adipose tissue, et al. We developed an in vitro assay requiring only isolated LDs, Coenzyme A, and ATP to drive lipid synthesis. The LD subpopulation nearly depleted of ER was able to incorporate fatty acids into triacylglycerol and phospholipids. Together, our data demonstrate that LDs in a given cell are heterogeneous in size and function, and suggest that LDs are one of cellular lipid synthetic organelles. PMID:27386790

  12. Membrane Protein Profiling of Human Colon Reveals Distinct Regional Differences *

    PubMed Central

    van der Post, Sjoerd; Hansson, Gunnar C.

    2014-01-01

    The colonic epithelium is a highly dynamic system important for the regulation of ion and water homeostasis via absorption and secretion and for the maintenance of a protective barrier between the outer milieu and the inside of the body. These processes are known to gradually change along the length of the colon, although a complete characterization at the protein level is lacking. We therefore analyzed the membrane proteome of isolated human (n = 4) colonic epithelial cells from biopsies obtained via routine colonoscopy for four segments along the large intestine: ascending, transverse, descending, and sigmoid colon. Label-free quantitative proteomic analyses using high-resolution mass spectrometry were performed on enriched membrane proteins. The results showed a stable level for the majority of membrane proteins but a distinct decrease in proteins associated with bacterial sensing, cation transport, and O-glycosylation in the proximal to distal regions. In contrast, proteins involved in microbial defense and anion transport showed an opposing gradient and increased toward the distal end. The gradient of ion-transporter proteins could be directly related to previously observed ion transport activities. All individual glycosyltransferases required for the O-glycosylation of the major colonic mucin MUC2 were observed and correlated with the known glycosylation variation along the colon axis. This is the first comprehensive quantitative dataset of membrane protein abundance along the human colon and will add to the knowledge of the physiological function of the different regions of the colonic mucosa. Mass spectrometry data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with the identifier PXD000987. PMID:24889196

  13. Distinct Soil Bacterial Communities Revealed under a Diversely Managed Agroecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Shange, Raymon S.; Ankumah, Ramble O.; Ibekwe, Abasiofiok M.; Zabawa, Robert; Dowd, Scot E.

    2012-01-01

    Land-use change and management practices are normally enacted to manipulate environments to improve conditions that relate to production, remediation, and accommodation. However, their effect on the soil microbial community and their subsequent influence on soil function is still difficult to quantify. Recent applications of molecular techniques to soil biology, especially the use of 16S rRNA, are helping to bridge this gap. In this study, the influence of three land-use systems within a demonstration farm were evaluated with a view to further understand how these practices may impact observed soil bacterial communities. Replicate soil samples collected from the three land-use systems (grazed pine forest, cultivated crop, and grazed pasture) on a single soil type. High throughput 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing was used to generate sequence datasets. The different land use systems showed distinction in the structure of their bacterial communities with respect to the differences detected in cluster analysis as well as diversity indices. Specific taxa, particularly Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, and classes of Proteobacteria, showed significant shifts across the land-use strata. Families belonging to these taxa broke with notions of copio- and oligotrphy at the class level, as many of the less abundant groups of families of Actinobacteria showed a propensity for soil environments with reduced carbon/nutrient availability. Orders Actinomycetales and Solirubrobacterales showed their highest abundance in the heavily disturbed cultivated system despite the lowest soil organic carbon (SOC) values across the site. Selected soil properties ([SOC], total nitrogen [TN], soil texture, phosphodiesterase [PD], alkaline phosphatase [APA], acid phosphatase [ACP] activity, and pH) also differed significantly across land-use regimes, with SOM, PD, and pH showing variation consistent with shifts in community structure and composition. These results suggest that use of pyrosequencing

  14. Distinct soil bacterial communities revealed under a diversely managed agroecosystem.

    PubMed

    Shange, Raymon S; Ankumah, Ramble O; Ibekwe, Abasiofiok M; Zabawa, Robert; Dowd, Scot E

    2012-01-01

    Land-use change and management practices are normally enacted to manipulate environments to improve conditions that relate to production, remediation, and accommodation. However, their effect on the soil microbial community and their subsequent influence on soil function is still difficult to quantify. Recent applications of molecular techniques to soil biology, especially the use of 16S rRNA, are helping to bridge this gap. In this study, the influence of three land-use systems within a demonstration farm were evaluated with a view to further understand how these practices may impact observed soil bacterial communities. Replicate soil samples collected from the three land-use systems (grazed pine forest, cultivated crop, and grazed pasture) on a single soil type. High throughput 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing was used to generate sequence datasets. The different land use systems showed distinction in the structure of their bacterial communities with respect to the differences detected in cluster analysis as well as diversity indices. Specific taxa, particularly Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, and classes of Proteobacteria, showed significant shifts across the land-use strata. Families belonging to these taxa broke with notions of copio- and oligotrphy at the class level, as many of the less abundant groups of families of Actinobacteria showed a propensity for soil environments with reduced carbon/nutrient availability. Orders Actinomycetales and Solirubrobacterales showed their highest abundance in the heavily disturbed cultivated system despite the lowest soil organic carbon (SOC) values across the site. Selected soil properties ([SOC], total nitrogen [TN], soil texture, phosphodiesterase [PD], alkaline phosphatase [APA], acid phosphatase [ACP] activity, and pH) also differed significantly across land-use regimes, with SOM, PD, and pH showing variation consistent with shifts in community structure and composition. These results suggest that use of pyrosequencing

  15. Mapping Phylogenetic Trees to Reveal Distinct Patterns of Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, Michelle; Colijn, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary relationships are frequently described by phylogenetic trees, but a central barrier in many fields is the difficulty of interpreting data containing conflicting phylogenetic signals. We present a metric-based method for comparing trees which extracts distinct alternative evolutionary relationships embedded in data. We demonstrate detection and resolution of phylogenetic uncertainty in a recent study of anole lizards, leading to alternate hypotheses about their evolutionary relationships. We use our approach to compare trees derived from different genes of Ebolavirus and find that the VP30 gene has a distinct phylogenetic signature composed of three alternatives that differ in the deep branching structure. Key words: phylogenetics, evolution, tree metrics, genetics, sequencing. PMID:27343287

  16. Distinct Cortical Pathways for Music and Speech Revealed by Hypothesis-Free Voxel Decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Norman-Haignere, Sam

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The organization of human auditory cortex remains unresolved, due in part to the small stimulus sets common to fMRI studies and the overlap of neural populations within voxels. To address these challenges, we measured fMRI responses to 165 natural sounds and inferred canonical response profiles (“components”) whose weighted combinations explained voxel responses throughout auditory cortex. This analysis revealed six components, each with interpretable response characteristics despite being unconstrained by prior functional hypotheses. Four components embodied selectivity for particular acoustic features (frequency, spectrotemporal modulation, pitch). Two others exhibited pronounced selectivity for music and speech, respectively, and were not explainable by standard acoustic features. Anatomically, music and speech selectivity concentrated in distinct regions of non-primary auditory cortex. However, music selectivity was weak in raw voxel responses, and its detection required a decomposition method. Voxel decomposition identifies primary dimensions of response variation across natural sounds, revealing distinct cortical pathways for music and speech. PMID:26687225

  17. Network Analysis Reveals Distinct Clinical Syndromes Underlying Acute Mountain Sickness

    PubMed Central

    Hall, David P.; MacCormick, Ian J. C.; Phythian-Adams, Alex T.; Rzechorzek, Nina M.; Hope-Jones, David; Cosens, Sorrel; Jackson, Stewart; Bates, Matthew G. D.; Collier, David J.; Hume, David A.; Freeman, Thomas; Thompson, A. A. Roger; Baillie, John Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is a common problem among visitors at high altitude, and may progress to life-threatening pulmonary and cerebral oedema in a minority of cases. International consensus defines AMS as a constellation of subjective, non-specific symptoms. Specifically, headache, sleep disturbance, fatigue and dizziness are given equal diagnostic weighting. Different pathophysiological mechanisms are now thought to underlie headache and sleep disturbance during acute exposure to high altitude. Hence, these symptoms may not belong together as a single syndrome. Using a novel visual analogue scale (VAS), we sought to undertake a systematic exploration of the symptomatology of AMS using an unbiased, data-driven approach originally designed for analysis of gene expression. Symptom scores were collected from 292 subjects during 1110 subject-days at altitudes between 3650 m and 5200 m on Apex expeditions to Bolivia and Kilimanjaro. Three distinct patterns of symptoms were consistently identified. Although fatigue is a ubiquitous finding, sleep disturbance and headache are each commonly reported without the other. The commonest pattern of symptoms was sleep disturbance and fatigue, with little or no headache. In subjects reporting severe headache, 40% did not report sleep disturbance. Sleep disturbance correlates poorly with other symptoms of AMS (Mean Spearman correlation 0.25). These results challenge the accepted paradigm that AMS is a single disease process and describe at least two distinct syndromes following acute ascent to high altitude. This approach to analysing symptom patterns has potential utility in other clinical syndromes. PMID:24465370

  18. Network analysis reveals distinct clinical syndromes underlying acute mountain sickness.

    PubMed

    Hall, David P; MacCormick, Ian J C; Phythian-Adams, Alex T; Rzechorzek, Nina M; Hope-Jones, David; Cosens, Sorrel; Jackson, Stewart; Bates, Matthew G D; Collier, David J; Hume, David A; Freeman, Thomas; Thompson, A A Roger; Baillie, John Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is a common problem among visitors at high altitude, and may progress to life-threatening pulmonary and cerebral oedema in a minority of cases. International consensus defines AMS as a constellation of subjective, non-specific symptoms. Specifically, headache, sleep disturbance, fatigue and dizziness are given equal diagnostic weighting. Different pathophysiological mechanisms are now thought to underlie headache and sleep disturbance during acute exposure to high altitude. Hence, these symptoms may not belong together as a single syndrome. Using a novel visual analogue scale (VAS), we sought to undertake a systematic exploration of the symptomatology of AMS using an unbiased, data-driven approach originally designed for analysis of gene expression. Symptom scores were collected from 292 subjects during 1110 subject-days at altitudes between 3650 m and 5200 m on Apex expeditions to Bolivia and Kilimanjaro. Three distinct patterns of symptoms were consistently identified. Although fatigue is a ubiquitous finding, sleep disturbance and headache are each commonly reported without the other. The commonest pattern of symptoms was sleep disturbance and fatigue, with little or no headache. In subjects reporting severe headache, 40% did not report sleep disturbance. Sleep disturbance correlates poorly with other symptoms of AMS (Mean Spearman correlation 0.25). These results challenge the accepted paradigm that AMS is a single disease process and describe at least two distinct syndromes following acute ascent to high altitude. This approach to analysing symptom patterns has potential utility in other clinical syndromes.

  19. Intracranial electroencephalography reveals two distinct similarity effects during item recognition

    PubMed Central

    van Vugt, Marieke K.; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Sekuler, Robert; Litt, Brian; Brandt, Armin; Baltuch, Gordon; Kahana, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Behavioral studies of visual recognition memory indicate that old/new decisions reflect both the similarity of the probe to the studied items (probe–item similarity) and the similarities among the studied items themselves (list homogeneity). Recording intracranial electroencephalography from 1,155 electrodes across 15 patients, we examined the oscillatory correlates of probe–item similarity and homogeneity effects in short-term recognition memory for synthetic faces. Frontal areas show increases in low-frequency oscillations with both probe–item and item–item similarity, whereas temporal lobe areas show distinct oscillatory correlates for probe–item similarity and homogeneity in the gamma band. We discuss these frontal low-frequency effects and the dissociation in the temporal lobe in terms of recent computational models of visual recognition memory. PMID:19615982

  20. Radial stretch reveals distinct populations of mechanosensitive mammalian somatosensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Martha R. C.; Bautista, Diana M.; Wu, Karin; Haeberle, Henry; Lumpkin, Ellen A.; Julius, David

    2008-01-01

    Primary afferent somatosensory neurons mediate our sense of touch in response to changes in ambient pressure. Molecules that detect and transduce thermal stimuli have been recently identified, but mechanisms underlying mechanosensation, particularly in vertebrate organisms, remain enigmatic. Traditionally, mechanically evoked responses in somatosensory neurons have been assessed one cell at a time by recording membrane currents in response to application of focal pressure, suction, or osmotic challenge. Here, we used radial stretch in combination with live-cell calcium imaging to gain a broad overview of mechanosensitive neuronal subpopulations. We found that different stretch intensities activate distinct subsets of sensory neurons as defined by size, molecular markers, or pharmacological attributes. In all subsets, stretch-evoked responses required extracellular calcium, indicating that mechanical force triggers calcium influx. This approach extends the repertoire of stimulus paradigms that can be used to examine mechanotransduction in mammalian sensory neurons, facilitating future physiological and pharmacological studies. PMID:19060212

  1. Genetic and Modeling Approaches Reveal Distinct Components of Impulsive Behavior.

    PubMed

    Nautiyal, Katherine M; Wall, Melanie M; Wang, Shuai; Magalong, Valerie M; Ahmari, Susanne E; Balsam, Peter D; Blanco, Carlos; Hen, René

    2017-01-18

    Impulsivity is an endophenotype found in many psychiatric disorders including substance use disorders, pathological gambling, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Two behavioral features often considered in impulsive behavior are behavioral inhibition (impulsive action) and delayed gratification (impulsive choice). However, the extent to which these behavioral constructs represent distinct facets of behavior with discrete biological bases is unclear. To test the hypothesis that impulsive action and impulsive choice represent statistically independent behavioral constructs in mice, we collected behavioral measures of impulsivity in a single cohort of mice using well-validated operant behavioral paradigms. Mice with manipulation of serotonin 1B receptor (5-HT1BR) expression were included as a model of disordered impulsivity. A factor analysis was used to characterize correlations between the measures of impulsivity and to identify covariates. Using two approaches, we dissociated impulsive action from impulsive choice. First, the absence of 5-HT1BRs caused increased impulsive action, but not impulsive choice. Second, based on an exploratory factor analysis, a two-factor model described the data well, with measures of impulsive action and choice separating into two independent factors. A multiple-indicator multiple-causes analysis showed that 5-HT1BR expression and sex were significant covariates of impulsivity. Males displayed increased impulsivity in both dimensions, whereas 5-HT1BR expression was a predictor of increased impulsive action only. These data support the conclusion that impulsive action and impulsive choice are distinct behavioral phenotypes with dissociable biological influences that can be modeled in mice. Our work may help inform better classification, diagnosis, and treatment of psychiatric disorders, which present with disordered impulsivity.Neuropsychopharmacology advance online publication, 18 January 2017; doi:10.1038/npp.2016.277.

  2. Dynamic Changes in Amygdala Psychophysiological Connectivity Reveal Distinct Neural Networks for Facial Expressions of Basic Emotions

    PubMed Central

    Diano, Matteo; Tamietto, Marco; Celeghin, Alessia; Weiskrantz, Lawrence; Tatu, Mona-Karina; Bagnis, Arianna; Duca, Sergio; Geminiani, Giuliano; Cauda, Franco; Costa, Tommaso

    2017-01-01

    The quest to characterize the neural signature distinctive of different basic emotions has recently come under renewed scrutiny. Here we investigated whether facial expressions of different basic emotions modulate the functional connectivity of the amygdala with the rest of the brain. To this end, we presented seventeen healthy participants (8 females) with facial expressions of anger, disgust, fear, happiness, sadness and emotional neutrality and analyzed amygdala’s psychophysiological interaction (PPI). In fact, PPI can reveal how inter-regional amygdala communications change dynamically depending on perception of various emotional expressions to recruit different brain networks, compared to the functional interactions it entertains during perception of neutral expressions. We found that for each emotion the amygdala recruited a distinctive and spatially distributed set of structures to interact with. These changes in amygdala connectional patters characterize the dynamic signature prototypical of individual emotion processing, and seemingly represent a neural mechanism that serves to implement the distinctive influence that each emotion exerts on perceptual, cognitive, and motor responses. Besides these differences, all emotions enhanced amygdala functional integration with premotor cortices compared to neutral faces. The present findings thus concur to reconceptualise the structure-function relation between brain-emotion from the traditional one-to-one mapping toward a network-based and dynamic perspective. PMID:28345642

  3. Dynamic Changes in Amygdala Psychophysiological Connectivity Reveal Distinct Neural Networks for Facial Expressions of Basic Emotions.

    PubMed

    Diano, Matteo; Tamietto, Marco; Celeghin, Alessia; Weiskrantz, Lawrence; Tatu, Mona-Karina; Bagnis, Arianna; Duca, Sergio; Geminiani, Giuliano; Cauda, Franco; Costa, Tommaso

    2017-03-27

    The quest to characterize the neural signature distinctive of different basic emotions has recently come under renewed scrutiny. Here we investigated whether facial expressions of different basic emotions modulate the functional connectivity of the amygdala with the rest of the brain. To this end, we presented seventeen healthy participants (8 females) with facial expressions of anger, disgust, fear, happiness, sadness and emotional neutrality and analyzed amygdala's psychophysiological interaction (PPI). In fact, PPI can reveal how inter-regional amygdala communications change dynamically depending on perception of various emotional expressions to recruit different brain networks, compared to the functional interactions it entertains during perception of neutral expressions. We found that for each emotion the amygdala recruited a distinctive and spatially distributed set of structures to interact with. These changes in amygdala connectional patters characterize the dynamic signature prototypical of individual emotion processing, and seemingly represent a neural mechanism that serves to implement the distinctive influence that each emotion exerts on perceptual, cognitive, and motor responses. Besides these differences, all emotions enhanced amygdala functional integration with premotor cortices compared to neutral faces. The present findings thus concur to reconceptualise the structure-function relation between brain-emotion from the traditional one-to-one mapping toward a network-based and dynamic perspective.

  4. Two distinct microbial communities revealed in the sponge Cinachyrella

    PubMed Central

    Cuvelier, Marie L.; Blake, Emily; Mulheron, Rebecca; McCarthy, Peter J.; Blackwelder, Patricia; Thurber, Rebecca L. Vega; Lopez, Jose V.

    2014-01-01

    Marine sponges are vital components of benthic and coral reef ecosystems, providing shelter and nutrition for many organisms. In addition, sponges act as an essential carbon and nutrient link between the pelagic and benthic environment by filtering large quantities of seawater. Many sponge species harbor a diverse microbial community (including Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryotes), which can constitute up to 50% of the sponge biomass. Sponges of the genus Cinachyrella are common in Caribbean and Floridian reefs and their archaeal and bacterial microbiomes were explored here using 16S rRNA gene tag pyrosequencing. Cinachyrella specimens and seawater samples were collected from the same South Florida reef at two different times of year. In total, 639 OTUs (12 archaeal and 627 bacterial) belonging to 2 archaeal and 21 bacterial phyla were detected in the sponges. Based on their microbiomes, the six sponge samples formed two distinct groups, namely sponge group 1 (SG1) with lower diversity (Shannon-Weiner index: 3.73 ± 0.22) and SG2 with higher diversity (Shannon-Weiner index: 5.95 ± 0.25). Hosts' 28S rRNA gene sequences further confirmed that the sponge specimens were composed of two taxa closely related to Cinachyrella kuekenthalli. Both sponge groups were dominated by Proteobacteria, but Alphaproteobacteria were significantly more abundant in SG1. SG2 harbored many bacterial phyla (>1% of sequences) present in low abundance or below detection limits (<0.07%) in SG1 including: Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi, Gemmatimonadetes, Nitrospirae, PAUC34f, Poribacteria, and Verrucomicrobia. Furthermore, SG1 and SG2 only had 95 OTUs in common, representing 30.5 and 22.4% of SG1 and SG2's total OTUs, respectively. These results suggest that the sponge host may exert a pivotal influence on the nature and structure of the microbial community and may only be marginally affected by external environment parameters. PMID:25408689

  5. Phylogeography of red muntjacs reveals three distinct mitochondrial lineages.

    PubMed

    Martins, Renata F; Fickel, Jörns; Le, Minh; van Nguyen, Thanh; Nguyen, Ha M; Timmins, Robert; Gan, Han Ming; Rovie-Ryan, Jeffrine J; Lenz, Dorina; Förster, Daniel W; Wilting, Andreas

    2017-01-26

    The members of the genus Muntiacus are of particular interest to evolutionary biologists due to their extreme chromosomal rearrangements and the ongoing discussions about the number of living species. Red muntjacs have the largest distribution of all muntjacs and were formerly considered as one species. Karyotype differences led to the provisional split between the Southern Red Muntjac (Muntiacus muntjak) and the Northern Red Muntjac (M. vaginalis), but uncertainties remain as, so far, no phylogenetic study has been conducted. Here, we analysed whole mitochondrial genomes of 59 archival and 16 contemporaneous samples to resolve uncertainties about their taxonomy and used red muntjacs as model for understanding the evolutionary history of other species in Southeast Asia. We found three distinct matrilineal groups of red muntjacs: Sri Lankan red muntjacs (including the Western Ghats) diverged first from other muntjacs about 1.5 Mya; later northern red muntjacs (including North India and Indochina) and southern red muntjacs (Sundaland) split around 1.12 Mya. The diversification of red muntjacs into these three main lineages was likely promoted by two Pleistocene barriers: one through the Indian subcontinent and one separating the Indochinese and Sundaic red muntjacs. Interestingly, we found a high level of gene flow within the populations of northern and southern red muntjacs, indicating gene flow between populations in Indochina and dispersal of red muntjacs over the exposed Sunda Shelf during the Last Glacial Maximum. Our results provide new insights into the evolution of species in South and Southeast Asia as we found clear genetic differentiation in a widespread and generalist species, corresponding to two known biogeographical barriers: The Isthmus of Kra and the central Indian dry zone. In addition, our molecular data support either the delineation of three monotypic species or three subspecies, but more importantly these data highlight the conservation

  6. Galectins distinctively regulate central monocyte and macrophage function.

    PubMed

    Paclik, Daniela; Werner, Lael; Guckelberger, Olaf; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Sturm, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages link the innate and adaptive immune systems and protect the host from the outside world. In inflammatory disorders their activation leads to tissue damage. Galectins have emerged as central regulators of the immune system. However, if they regulate monocyte/macrophage physiology is still unknown. Binding of Gal-1, Gal-2, Gal-3 and Gal-4 to monocytes/macrophages, activation, cytokine secretion and apoptosis were determined by FACS, migration by Transwell system and phagocytosis by phagotest. Supernatants from macrophages co-cultured with galectins revealed their influence on T-cell function. In our study Gal-1, Gal-2, Gal-4, and partly Gal-3 bound to monocytes/macrophages. Galectins prevented Salmonella-induced MHCII upregulation. Cytokine release was distinctly induced by different galectins. T-cell activation was significantly restricted by supernatants of macrophages co-cultured in the presence of Gal-2 or Gal-4. Furthermore, all galectins tested significantly inhibited monocyte migration. Finally, we showed for the first time that galectins induce potently monocyte, but not macrophage apoptosis. Our study provides evidence that galectins distinctively modulate central monocyte/macrophage function. By inhibiting T-cell function via macrophage priming, we show that galectins link the innate and adaptive immune systems and provide new insights into the action of sugar-binding proteins. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. TIM-3 Regulates Distinct Functions in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ocaña-Guzman, Ranferi; Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis; Sada-Ovalle, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    The transmembrane protein TIM-3 is a type I protein expressed by sub-types of lymphoid cells, such as lymphocytes Th1, Th17, Tc1, NK, as well as in myeloid cells. Scientific evidence indicates that this molecule acts as a negative regulator of T lymphocyte activation and that its expression is modified in viral infections or autoimmune diseases. In addition to evidence from lymphoid cells, the function of TIM-3 has been investigated in myeloid cells, such as monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells (DC), where studies have demonstrated that it can regulate cytokine production, cell activation, and the capture of apoptotic bodies. Despite these advances, the function of TIM-3 in myeloid cells and the molecular mechanisms that this protein regulates are not yet fully understood. This review examines the most recent evidence concerning the function of TIM-3 when expressed in myeloid cells, primarily macrophages, and the potential impact of that function on the field of basic immunology.

  8. Vibrio cholerae Classical Biotype Strains Reveal Distinct Signatures in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Munirul; Islam, M. Tarequl; Rashed, Shah Manzur; Johura, Fatema-tuz; Bhuiyan, Nurul A.; Delgado, Gabriela; Morales, Rosario; Mendez, Jose Luis; Navarro, Armando; Watanabe, Haruo; Hasan, Nur-A; Colwell, Rita R.

    2012-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 classical (CL) biotype caused the fifth and sixth pandemics, and probably the earlier cholera pandemics, before the El Tor (ET) biotype initiated the seventh pandemic in Asia in the 1970s by completely displacing the CL biotype. Although the CL biotype was thought to be extinct in Asia and although it had never been reported from Latin America, V. cholerae CL and ET biotypes, including a hybrid ET, were found associated with areas of cholera endemicity in Mexico between 1991 and 1997. In this study, CL biotype strains isolated from areas of cholera endemicity in Mexico between 1983 and 1997 were characterized in terms of major phenotypic and genetic traits and compared with CL biotype strains isolated in Bangladesh between 1962 and 1989. According to sero- and biotyping data, all V. cholerae strains tested had the major phenotypic and genotypic characteristics specific for the CL biotype. Antibiograms revealed the majority of the Bangladeshi strains to be resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, furazolidone, ampicillin, and gentamicin, while the Mexican strains were sensitive to all of these drugs, as well as to ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, and tetracycline. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of NotI-digested genomic DNA revealed characteristic banding patterns for all of the CL biotype strains although the Mexican strains differed from the Bangladeshi strains in 1 to 2 DNA bands. The difference was subtle but consistent, as confirmed by the subclustering patterns in the PFGE-based dendrogram, and can serve as a regional signature, suggesting the pre-1991 existence and evolution of the CL biotype strains in the Americas, independent from Asia. PMID:22518867

  9. Vibrio cholerae classical biotype strains reveal distinct signatures in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Alam, Munirul; Islam, M Tarequl; Rashed, Shah Manzur; Johura, Fatema-tuz; Bhuiyan, Nurul A; Delgado, Gabriela; Morales, Rosario; Mendez, Jose Luis; Navarro, Armando; Watanabe, Haruo; Hasan, Nur-A; Colwell, Rita R; Cravioto, Alejandro

    2012-07-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 classical (CL) biotype caused the fifth and sixth pandemics, and probably the earlier cholera pandemics, before the El Tor (ET) biotype initiated the seventh pandemic in Asia in the 1970s by completely displacing the CL biotype. Although the CL biotype was thought to be extinct in Asia and although it had never been reported from Latin America, V. cholerae CL and ET biotypes, including a hybrid ET, were found associated with areas of cholera endemicity in Mexico between 1991 and 1997. In this study, CL biotype strains isolated from areas of cholera endemicity in Mexico between 1983 and 1997 were characterized in terms of major phenotypic and genetic traits and compared with CL biotype strains isolated in Bangladesh between 1962 and 1989. According to sero- and biotyping data, all V. cholerae strains tested had the major phenotypic and genotypic characteristics specific for the CL biotype. Antibiograms revealed the majority of the Bangladeshi strains to be resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, furazolidone, ampicillin, and gentamicin, while the Mexican strains were sensitive to all of these drugs, as well as to ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, and tetracycline. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of NotI-digested genomic DNA revealed characteristic banding patterns for all of the CL biotype strains although the Mexican strains differed from the Bangladeshi strains in 1 to 2 DNA bands. The difference was subtle but consistent, as confirmed by the subclustering patterns in the PFGE-based dendrogram, and can serve as a regional signature, suggesting the pre-1991 existence and evolution of the CL biotype strains in the Americas, independent from Asia.

  10. Apo raver1 structure reveals distinct RRM domain orientations

    SciTech Connect

    Rangarajan, Erumbi S.; Lee, Jun Hyuck; Izard, Tina

    2012-09-17

    Raver1 is a multifunctional protein that modulates both alternative splicing and focal adhesion assembly by binding to the nucleoplasmic splicing repressor polypyrimidine tract protein (PTB) or to the cytoskeletal proteins vinculin and {alpha}-actinin. The amino-terminal region of raver1 has three RNA recognition motif (RRM1, RRM2, and RRM3) domains, and RRM1 interacts with the vinculin tail (Vt) domain and vinculin mRNA. We previously determined the crystal structure of the raver1 RRM1-3 domains in complex with Vt at 2.75 {angstrom} resolution. Here, we report crystal structure of the unbound raver1 RRM1-3 domains at 2 {angstrom} resolution. The apo structure reveals that a bound sulfate ion disrupts an electrostatic interaction between the RRM1 and RRM2 domains, triggering a large relative domain movement of over 30{sup o}. Superposition with other RNA-bound RRM structures places the sulfate ion near the superposed RNA phosphate group suggesting that this is the raver1 RNA binding site. While several single and some tandem RRM domain structures have been described, to the best of our knowledge, this is the second report of a three-tandem RRM domain structure.

  11. TIM-3 Regulates Distinct Functions in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ocaña-Guzman, Ranferi; Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis; Sada-Ovalle, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    The transmembrane protein TIM-3 is a type I protein expressed by sub-types of lymphoid cells, such as lymphocytes Th1, Th17, Tc1, NK, as well as in myeloid cells. Scientific evidence indicates that this molecule acts as a negative regulator of T lymphocyte activation and that its expression is modified in viral infections or autoimmune diseases. In addition to evidence from lymphoid cells, the function of TIM-3 has been investigated in myeloid cells, such as monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells (DC), where studies have demonstrated that it can regulate cytokine production, cell activation, and the capture of apoptotic bodies. Despite these advances, the function of TIM-3 in myeloid cells and the molecular mechanisms that this protein regulates are not yet fully understood. This review examines the most recent evidence concerning the function of TIM-3 when expressed in myeloid cells, primarily macrophages, and the potential impact of that function on the field of basic immunology. PMID:27379093

  12. Molecular interrogation of hypothalamic organization reveals distinct dopamine neuronal subtypes.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Roman A; Zeisel, Amit; Bakker, Joanne; Girach, Fatima; Hellysaz, Arash; Tomer, Raju; Alpár, Alán; Mulder, Jan; Clotman, Frédéric; Keimpema, Erik; Hsueh, Brian; Crow, Ailey K; Martens, Henrik; Schwindling, Christian; Calvigioni, Daniela; Bains, Jaideep S; Máté, Zoltán; Szabó, Gábor; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Zhang, Ming-Dong; Rendeiro, Andre; Farlik, Matthias; Uhlén, Mathias; Wulff, Peer; Bock, Christoph; Broberger, Christian; Deisseroth, Karl; Hökfelt, Tomas; Linnarsson, Sten; Horvath, Tamas L; Harkany, Tibor

    2017-02-01

    The hypothalamus contains the highest diversity of neurons in the brain. Many of these neurons can co-release neurotransmitters and neuropeptides in a use-dependent manner. Investigators have hitherto relied on candidate protein-based tools to correlate behavioral, endocrine and gender traits with hypothalamic neuron identity. Here we map neuronal identities in the hypothalamus by single-cell RNA sequencing. We distinguished 62 neuronal subtypes producing glutamatergic, dopaminergic or GABAergic markers for synaptic neurotransmission and harboring the ability to engage in task-dependent neurotransmitter switching. We identified dopamine neurons that uniquely coexpress the Onecut3 and Nmur2 genes, and placed these in the periventricular nucleus with many synaptic afferents arising from neuromedin S(+) neurons of the suprachiasmatic nucleus. These neuroendocrine dopamine cells may contribute to the dopaminergic inhibition of prolactin secretion diurnally, as their neuromedin S(+) inputs originate from neurons expressing Per2 and Per3 and their tyrosine hydroxylase phosphorylation is regulated in a circadian fashion. Overall, our catalog of neuronal subclasses provides new understanding of hypothalamic organization and function.

  13. Local interneurons define functionally distinct regions within lobster olfactory glomeruli

    PubMed

    Wachowiak; Diebel; Ache

    1997-01-01

    Whole-cell recording coupled with biocytin injection revealed four types of interneurons intrinsic to the olfactory lobe (OL) of the spiny lobster Panulirus argus. Each type of neuron had a distinct pattern of arborization within the three anatomically defined regions of OL glomeruli (cap, subcap and base). Type I interneurons innervated all three regions, while types II, III and IV branched only in the cap, subcap and base, respectively. Type I interneurons responded to electrical stimulation of the antennular (olfactory) nerve with a burst of 1­20 action potentials and a 1­10 s depolarization. Type II (cap) interneurons responded to the same input with a burst of 1­3 action potentials followed by a shorter hyperpolarization. Type III (subcap) interneurons responded with a burst of 1­6 action potentials followed by a delayed, 0.5­4 s depolarization. Type IV (base) interneurons responded with a brief depolarization or a burst of 1­3 action potentials followed by a 1 s hyperpolarization. The regionalized arborization and the different response properties of the type II, III and IV interneurons strongly imply that lobster olfactory glomeruli contain functionally distinct regions, a feature that should be useful in understanding the multiple synaptic pathways involved in processing olfactory input.

  14. Genomic and transcriptomic analyses reveal distinct biological functions for cold shock proteins (VpaCspA and VpaCspD) in Vibrio parahaemolyticus CHN25 during low-temperature survival.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chunhua; Sun, Boyi; Liu, Taigang; Zheng, Huajun; Gu, Wenyi; He, Wei; Sun, Fengjiao; Wang, Yaping; Yang, Meicheng; Bei, Weicheng; Peng, Xu; She, Qunxin; Xie, Lu; Chen, Lanming

    2017-06-05

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus causes serious seafood-borne gastroenteritis and death in humans. Raw seafood is often subjected to post-harvest processing and low-temperature storage. To date, very little information is available regarding the biological functions of cold shock proteins (CSPs) in the low-temperature survival of the bacterium. In this study, we determined the complete genome sequence of V. parahaemolyticus CHN25 (serotype: O5:KUT). The two main CSP-encoding genes (VpacspA and VpacspD) were deleted from the bacterial genome, and comparative transcriptomic analysis between the mutant and wild-type strains was performed to dissect the possible molecular mechanisms that underlie low-temperature adaptation by V. parahaemolyticus. The 5,443,401-bp V. parahaemolyticus CHN25 genome (45.2% G + C) consisted of two circular chromosomes and three plasmids with 4,724 predicted protein-encoding genes. One dual-gene and two single-gene deletion mutants were generated for VpacspA and VpacspD by homologous recombination. The growth of the ΔVpacspA mutant was strongly inhibited at 10 °C, whereas the VpacspD gene deletion strongly stimulated bacterial growth at this low temperature compared with the wild-type strain. The complementary phenotypes were observed in the reverse mutants (ΔVpacspA-com, and ΔVpacspD-com). The transcriptome data revealed that 12.4% of the expressed genes in V. parahaemolyticus CHN25 were significantly altered in the ΔVpacspA mutant when it was grown at 10 °C. These included genes that were involved in amino acid degradation, secretion systems, sulphur metabolism and glycerophospholipid metabolism along with ATP-binding cassette transporters. However, a low temperature elicited significant expression changes for 10.0% of the genes in the ΔVpacspD mutant, including those involved in the phosphotransferase system and in the metabolism of nitrogen and amino acids. The major metabolic pathways that were altered by the dual-gene deletion

  15. Distinct Cortical Pathways for Music and Speech Revealed by Hypothesis-Free Voxel Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Norman-Haignere, Sam; Kanwisher, Nancy G; McDermott, Josh H

    2015-12-16

    The organization of human auditory cortex remains unresolved, due in part to the small stimulus sets common to fMRI studies and the overlap of neural populations within voxels. To address these challenges, we measured fMRI responses to 165 natural sounds and inferred canonical response profiles ("components") whose weighted combinations explained voxel responses throughout auditory cortex. This analysis revealed six components, each with interpretable response characteristics despite being unconstrained by prior functional hypotheses. Four components embodied selectivity for particular acoustic features (frequency, spectrotemporal modulation, pitch). Two others exhibited pronounced selectivity for music and speech, respectively, and were not explainable by standard acoustic features. Anatomically, music and speech selectivity concentrated in distinct regions of non-primary auditory cortex. However, music selectivity was weak in raw voxel responses, and its detection required a decomposition method. Voxel decomposition identifies primary dimensions of response variation across natural sounds, revealing distinct cortical pathways for music and speech. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterisation of two alcohol acyltransferases from kiwifruit (Actinidia spp.) reveals distinct substrate preferences.

    PubMed

    Günther, Catrin S; Chervin, Christian; Marsh, Ken B; Newcomb, Richard D; Souleyre, Edwige J F

    2011-06-01

    Volatile esters are key compounds of kiwifruit flavour and are formed by alcohol acyltransferases that belong to the BAHD acyltransferase superfamily. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to screen kiwifruit-derived expressed sequence tags with proposed acyltransferase function in order to select ripening-specific sequences and test their involvement in alcohol acylation. The screening criterion was for at least 10-fold increased transcript accumulation in ripe compared with unripe kiwifruit and in response to ethylene. Recombinant expression in yeast revealed alcohol acyltransferase activity for Actinidia-derived AT1, AT16 and the phylogenetically distinct AT9, using various alcohol and acyl-CoA substrates. Functional characterisation of AT16 and AT9 demonstrated striking differences in their substrate preferences and apparent catalytic efficiencies (V'(max)K(m)(-1)). Thus revealing benzoyl-CoA:alcohol O-acyltransferase activity for AT16 and acetyl-CoA:alcohol O-acyltransferase activity for AT9. Both kiwifruit-derived enzymes displayed higher reaction rates with butanol compared with ethanol, even though ethanol is the main alcohol in ripe fruit. Since ethyl acetate and ethyl benzoate are major esters in ripe kiwifruit, we suggest that fruit characteristic volatile profiles result from a combination of substrate availability and specificity of individual alcohol acyltransferases.

  17. Mass cytometry reveals a distinct immunoprofile of operational tolerance in pediatric liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lau, Audrey H; Vitalone, Matthew J; Haas, Kelly; Shawler, Todd; Esquivel, Carlos O; Berquist, William E; Martinez, Olivia M; Castillo, Ricardo O; Krams, Sheri M

    2016-12-01

    Long-term IS in transplant patients has significant morbidity, poorer quality of life, and substantial economic costs. TOL, defined as graft acceptance without functional impairment in the absence of IS, has been achieved in some pediatric LT recipients. Using mass cytometry, peripheral blood immunotyping was performed to characterize differences between tolerant patients and patients who are stable on single-agent IS. Single-cell mass cytometry was performed using blood samples from a single-center pediatric LT population of operationally tolerant patients to comprehensively characterize the immune cell populations in the tolerant state compared with patients on chronic low-dose IS. Specific T-cell populations of interest were confirmed by flow cytometry. This high-dimensional phenotypic analysis revealed distinct immunoprofiles between transplant populations as well as a CD4(+) TOT (CD4(+) CD5(+) CD25(+) CD38(-/lo) CD45RA) that correlates with tolerance in pediatric LT recipients. In TOL patients, the TOT was significantly increased as compared to patients stable on low levels of IS. This TOT cell was confirmed by flow cytometry and is distinct from classic Treg cells. These results demonstrate the power of mass cytometry to discover significant immune cell signatures that have diagnostic potential. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Comparative RNA-Seq transcriptome analyses reveal distinct metabolic pathways in diabetic nerve and kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Hinder, Lucy M; Park, Meeyoung; Rumora, Amy E; Hur, Junguk; Eichinger, Felix; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Kretzler, Matthias; Brosius, Frank C; Feldman, Eva L

    2017-03-08

    Treating insulin resistance with pioglitazone normalizes renal function and improves small nerve fibre function and architecture; however, it does not affect large myelinated nerve fibre function in mouse models of type 2 diabetes (T2DM), indicating that pioglitazone affects the body in a tissue-specific manner. To identify distinct molecular pathways regulating diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) and nephropathy (DN), as well those affected by pioglitazone, we assessed DPN and DN gene transcript expression in control and diabetic mice with or without pioglitazone treatment. Differential expression analysis and self-organizing maps were then used in parallel to analyse transcriptome data. Differential expression analysis showed that gene expression promoting cell death and the inflammatory response was reversed in the kidney glomeruli but unchanged or exacerbated in sciatic nerve by pioglitazone. Self-organizing map analysis revealed that mitochondrial dysfunction was normalized in kidney and nerve by treatment; however, conserved pathways were opposite in their directionality of regulation. Collectively, our data suggest inflammation may drive large fibre dysfunction, while mitochondrial dysfunction may drive small fibre dysfunction in T2DM. Moreover, targeting both of these pathways is likely to improve DN. This study supports growing evidence that systemic metabolic changes in T2DM are associated with distinct tissue-specific metabolic reprogramming in kidney and nerve and that these changes play a critical role in DN and small fibre DPN pathogenesis. These data also highlight the potential dangers of a 'one size fits all' approach to T2DM therapeutics, as the same drug may simultaneously alleviate one complication while exacerbating another.

  19. Distinctive Pattern of Behavioral Functioning in Angelman Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, Jane A.; Feldman, Maurice A.

    1999-01-01

    A study compared 27 participants with Angelman syndrome to clinical and community participants (n=948) with developmental disabilities of mixed etiology to determine whether Angelman syndrome is associated with a distinctive patterns of behavioral functioning. Those with Angelman syndrome had significantly lower scores on measures of irritability…

  20. Metabolic network analysis revealed distinct routes of deletion effects between essential and non-essential genes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing; Zhang, Xun; Ung, Choong Yong; Chen, Yu Zong; Li, Baowen

    2012-04-01

    Interest in essential genes has arisen recently given their importance in antimicrobial drug development. Although knockouts of essential genes are commonly known to cause lethal phenotypes, there is insufficient understanding on the intermediate changes followed by genetic perturbation and to what extent essential genes correlate to other genes. Here, we characterized the gene knockout effects by using a list of affected genes, termed as 'damage lists'. These damage lists were identified through a refined cascading failure approach that was based on a previous topological flux balance analysis. Using an Escherichia coli metabolic network, we incorporated essentiality information into damage lists and revealed that the knockout of an essential gene mainly affects a large range of other essential genes whereas knockout of a non-essential gene only interrupts other non-essential genes. Also, genes sharing common damage lists tend to have the same essentiality. We extracted 72 core functional modules from the common damage lists of essential genes and demonstrated their ability to halt essential metabolites production. Overall, our network analysis revealed that essential and non-essential genes propagated their deletion effects via distinct routes, conferring mechanistic explanation to the observed lethality phenotypes of essential genes.

  1. A Chemical Genetic Approach Reveals Distinct Mechanisms of EphB Signaling During Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Soskis, Michael J.; Ho, Hsin-Yi Henry; Bloodgood, Brenda L.; Robichaux, Michael A.; Malik, Athar N.; Ataman, Bulent; Rubin, Alex A.; Zieg, Janine; Zhang, Chao; Shokat, Kevan M.; Sharma, Nikhil; Cowan, Christopher W.; Greenberg, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    EphB receptor tyrosine kinases control multiple steps in nervous system development. However, it remains unclear whether EphBs regulate these different developmental processes directly or indirectly. In addition, as EphBs signal through multiple mechanisms, it has been challenging to define which signaling functions of EphBs regulate particular developmental events. To address these issues, we engineered triple knockin mice in which the kinase activity of three neuronally expressed EphBs can be rapidly, reversibly, and specifically blocked. Using these mice we demonstrate that the tyrosine kinase activity of EphBs is required for axon guidance in vivo. By contrast, EphB-mediated synaptogenesis occurs normally when the kinase activity of EphBs is inhibited suggesting that EphBs mediate synapse development by an EphB tyrosine kinase-independent mechanism. Taken together, these experiments reveal that EphBs control axon guidance and synaptogenesis by distinct mechanisms, and provide a new mouse model for dissecting EphB function in development and disease. PMID:23143520

  2. Two distinct forms of functional lateralization in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Gotts, Stephen J.; Jo, Hang Joon; Wallace, Gregory L.; Saad, Ziad S.; Cox, Robert W.; Martin, Alex

    2013-01-01

    The hemispheric lateralization of certain faculties in the human brain has long been held to be beneficial for functioning. However, quantitative relationships between the degree of lateralization in particular brain regions and the level of functioning have yet to be established. Here we demonstrate that two distinct forms of functional lateralization are present in the left vs. the right cerebral hemisphere, with the left hemisphere showing a preference to interact more exclusively with itself, particularly for cortical regions involved in language and fine motor coordination. In contrast, right-hemisphere cortical regions involved in visuospatial and attentional processing interact in a more integrative fashion with both hemispheres. The degree of lateralization present in these distinct systems selectively predicted behavioral measures of verbal and visuospatial ability, providing direct evidence that lateralization is associated with enhanced cognitive ability. PMID:23959883

  3. Different Functions of Phylogenetically Distinct Bacterial Complex I Isozymes

    PubMed Central

    Spero, Melanie A.; Brickner, Joshua R.; Mollet, Jordan T.; Pisithkul, Tippapha; Amador-Noguez, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (complex I) is a bioenergetic enzyme that transfers electrons from NADH to quinone, conserving the energy of this reaction by contributing to the proton motive force. While the importance of NADH oxidation to mitochondrial aerobic respiration is well documented, the contribution of complex I to bacterial electron transport chains has been tested in only a few species. Here, we analyze the function of two phylogenetically distinct complex I isozymes in Rhodobacter sphaeroides, an alphaproteobacterium that contains well-characterized electron transport chains. We found that R. sphaeroides complex I activity is important for aerobic respiration and required for anaerobic dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) respiration (in the absence of light), photoautotrophic growth, and photoheterotrophic growth (in the absence of an external electron acceptor). Our data also provide insight into the functions of the phylogenetically distinct R. sphaeroides complex I enzymes (complex IA and complex IE) in maintaining a cellular redox state during photoheterotrophic growth. We propose that the function of each isozyme during photoheterotrophic growth is either NADH synthesis (complex IA) or NADH oxidation (complex IE). The canonical alphaproteobacterial complex I isozyme (complex IA) was also shown to be important for routing electrons to nitrogenase-mediated H2 production, while the horizontally acquired enzyme (complex IE) was dispensable in this process. Unlike the singular role of complex I in mitochondria, we predict that the phylogenetically distinct complex I enzymes found across bacterial species have evolved to enhance the functions of their respective electron transport chains. IMPORTANCE Cells use a proton motive force (PMF), NADH, and ATP to support numerous processes. In mitochondria, complex I uses NADH oxidation to generate a PMF, which can drive ATP synthesis. This study analyzed the function of complex I in bacteria, which contain more

  4. A chimeric prokaryotic pentameric ligand–gated channel reveals distinct pathways of activation

    SciTech Connect

    Schmandt, Nicolaus; Velisetty, Phanindra; Chalamalasetti, Sreevatsa V.; Stein, Richard A.; Bonner, Ross; Talley, Lauren; Parker, Mark D.; Mchaourab, Hassane S.; Yee, Vivien C.; Lodowski, David T.; Chakrapani, Sudha

    2015-09-28

    Recent high resolution structures of several pentameric ligand–gated ion channels have provided unprecedented details of their molecular architecture. However, the conformational dynamics and structural rearrangements that underlie gating and allosteric modulation remain poorly understood. We used a combination of electrophysiology, double electron–electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy, and x-ray crystallography to investigate activation mechanisms in a novel functional chimera with the extracellular domain (ECD) of amine-gated Erwinia chrysanthemi ligand–gated ion channel, which is activated by primary amines, and the transmembrane domain of Gloeobacter violaceus ligand–gated ion channel, which is activated by protons. We found that the chimera was independently gated by primary amines and by protons. The crystal structure of the chimera in its resting state, at pH 7.0 and in the absence of primary amines, revealed a closed-pore conformation and an ECD that is twisted with respect to the transmembrane region. Amine- and pH-induced conformational changes measured by DEER spectroscopy showed that the chimera exhibits a dual mode of gating that preserves the distinct conformational changes of the parent channels. Collectively, our findings shed light on both conserved and divergent features of gating mechanisms in this class of channels, and will facilitate the design of better allosteric modulators.

  5. A chimeric prokaryotic pentameric ligand–gated channel reveals distinct pathways of activation

    DOE PAGES

    Schmandt, Nicolaus; Velisetty, Phanindra; Chalamalasetti, Sreevatsa V.; ...

    2015-09-28

    Recent high resolution structures of several pentameric ligand–gated ion channels have provided unprecedented details of their molecular architecture. However, the conformational dynamics and structural rearrangements that underlie gating and allosteric modulation remain poorly understood. We used a combination of electrophysiology, double electron–electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy, and x-ray crystallography to investigate activation mechanisms in a novel functional chimera with the extracellular domain (ECD) of amine-gated Erwinia chrysanthemi ligand–gated ion channel, which is activated by primary amines, and the transmembrane domain of Gloeobacter violaceus ligand–gated ion channel, which is activated by protons. We found that the chimera was independently gated by primarymore » amines and by protons. The crystal structure of the chimera in its resting state, at pH 7.0 and in the absence of primary amines, revealed a closed-pore conformation and an ECD that is twisted with respect to the transmembrane region. Amine- and pH-induced conformational changes measured by DEER spectroscopy showed that the chimera exhibits a dual mode of gating that preserves the distinct conformational changes of the parent channels. Collectively, our findings shed light on both conserved and divergent features of gating mechanisms in this class of channels, and will facilitate the design of better allosteric modulators.« less

  6. A chimeric prokaryotic pentameric ligand–gated channel reveals distinct pathways of activation

    PubMed Central

    Schmandt, Nicolaus; Velisetty, Phanindra; Chalamalasetti, Sreevatsa V.; Stein, Richard A.; Bonner, Ross; Talley, Lauren; Parker, Mark D.; Mchaourab, Hassane S.; Yee, Vivien C.; Lodowski, David T.

    2015-01-01

    Recent high resolution structures of several pentameric ligand–gated ion channels have provided unprecedented details of their molecular architecture. However, the conformational dynamics and structural rearrangements that underlie gating and allosteric modulation remain poorly understood. We used a combination of electrophysiology, double electron–electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy, and x-ray crystallography to investigate activation mechanisms in a novel functional chimera with the extracellular domain (ECD) of amine-gated Erwinia chrysanthemi ligand–gated ion channel, which is activated by primary amines, and the transmembrane domain of Gloeobacter violaceus ligand–gated ion channel, which is activated by protons. We found that the chimera was independently gated by primary amines and by protons. The crystal structure of the chimera in its resting state, at pH 7.0 and in the absence of primary amines, revealed a closed-pore conformation and an ECD that is twisted with respect to the transmembrane region. Amine- and pH-induced conformational changes measured by DEER spectroscopy showed that the chimera exhibits a dual mode of gating that preserves the distinct conformational changes of the parent channels. Collectively, our findings shed light on both conserved and divergent features of gating mechanisms in this class of channels, and will facilitate the design of better allosteric modulators. PMID:26415570

  7. fMRI reveals two distinct cerebral networks subserving speech motor control.

    PubMed

    Riecker, A; Mathiak, K; Wildgruber, D; Erb, M; Hertrich, I; Grodd, W; Ackermann, H

    2005-02-22

    There are few data on the cerebral organization of motor aspects of speech production and the pathomechanisms of dysarthric deficits subsequent to brain lesions and diseases. The authors used fMRI to further examine the neural basis of speech motor control. In eight healthy volunteers, fMRI was performed during syllable repetitions synchronized to click trains (2 to 6 Hz; vs a passive listening task). Bilateral hemodynamic responses emerged at the level of the mesiofrontal and sensorimotor cortex, putamen/pallidum, thalamus, and cerebellum (two distinct activation spots at either side). In contrast, dorsolateral premotor cortex and anterior insula showed left-sided activation. Calculation of rate/response functions revealed a negative linear relationship between repetition frequency and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal change within the striatum, whereas both cerebellar hemispheres exhibited a step-wise increase of activation at approximately 3 Hz. Analysis of the temporal dynamics of the BOLD effect found the various cortical and subcortical brain regions engaged in speech motor control to be organized into two separate networks (medial and dorsolateral premotor cortex, anterior insula, and superior cerebellum vs sensorimotor cortex, basal ganglia, and inferior cerebellum). These data provide evidence for two levels of speech motor control bound, most presumably, to motor preparation and execution processes. They also help to explain clinical observations such as an unimpaired or even accelerated speaking rate in Parkinson disease and slowed speech tempo, which does not fall below a rate of 3 Hz, in cerebellar disorders.

  8. Natural Microbial Assemblages Reflect Distinct Organismal and Functional Partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmes, P.; Andersson, A.; Kalnejais, L. H.; Verberkmoes, N. C.; Lefsrud, M. G.; Wexler, M.; Singer, S. W.; Shah, M.; Bond, P. L.; Thelen, M. P.; Hettich, R. L.; Banfield, J. F.

    2007-12-01

    The ability to link microbial community structure to function has long been a primary focus of environmental microbiology. With the advent of community genomic and proteomic techniques, along with advances in microscopic imaging techniques, it is now possible to gain insights into the organismal and functional makeup of microbial communities. Biofilms growing within highly acidic solutions inside the Richmond Mine (Iron Mountain, Redding, California) exhibit distinct macro- and microscopic morphologies. They are composed of microorganisms belonging to the three domains of life, including archaea, bacteria and eukarya. The proportion of each organismal type depends on sampling location and developmental stage. For example, mature biofilms floating on top of acid mine drainage (AMD) pools exhibit layers consisting of a densely packed bottom layer of the chemoautolithotroph Leptospirillum group II, a less dense top layer composed mainly of archaea, and fungal filaments spanning across the entire biofilm. The expression of cytochrome 579 (the most highly abundant protein in the biofilm, believed to be central to iron oxidation and encoded by Leptospirillum group II) is localized at the interface of the biofilm with the AMD solution, highlighting that biofilm architecture is reflected at the functional gene expression level. Distinct functional partitioning is also apparent in a biological wastewater treatment system that selects for distinct polyphosphate accumulating organisms. Community genomic data from " Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis" dominated activated sludge has enabled high mass-accuracy shotgun proteomics for identification of key metabolic pathways. Comprehensive genome-wide alignment of orthologous proteins suggests distinct partitioning of protein variants involved in both core-metabolism and specific metabolic pathways among the dominant population and closely related species. In addition, strain- resolved proteogenomic analysis of the AMD biofilms

  9. Dynamic remodeling of microbial biofilms by functionally distinct exopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Chew, Su Chuen; Kundukad, Binu; Seviour, Thomas; van der Maarel, Johan R C; Yang, Liang; Rice, Scott A; Doyle, Patrick; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2014-08-05

    Biofilms are densely populated communities of microbial cells protected and held together by a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. The structure and rheological properties of the matrix at the microscale influence the retention and transport of molecules and cells in the biofilm, thereby dictating population and community behavior. Despite its importance, quantitative descriptions of the matrix microstructure and microrheology are limited. Here, particle-tracking microrheology in combination with genetic approaches was used to spatially and temporally study the rheological contributions of the major exopolysaccharides Pel and Psl in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Psl increased the elasticity and effective cross-linking within the matrix, which strengthened its scaffold and appeared to facilitate the formation of microcolonies. Conversely, Pel reduced effective cross-linking within the matrix. Without Psl, the matrix becomes more viscous, which facilitates biofilm spreading. The wild-type biofilm decreased in effective cross-linking over time, which would be advantageous for the spreading and colonization of new surfaces. This suggests that there are regulatory mechanisms to control production of the exopolysaccharides that serve to remodel the matrix of developing biofilms. The exopolysaccharides were also found to have profound effects on the spatial organization and integration of P. aeruginosa in a mixed-species biofilm model of P. aeruginosa-Staphylococcus aureus. Pel was required for close association of the two species in mixed-species microcolonies. In contrast, Psl was important for P. aeruginosa to form single-species biofilms on top of S. aureus biofilms. Our results demonstrate that Pel and Psl have distinct physical properties and functional roles during biofilm formation. Importance: Most bacteria grow as biofilms in the environment or in association with eukaryotic hosts. Removal of biofilms that form on surfaces is a challenge in clinical

  10. A crack problem with four distinct harmonic functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sih, G. C.; Kassir, M. K.

    1972-01-01

    The problem of an elastic solid containing a semi-infinite plane crack subjected to concentrated shears parallel to the edge of the crack is considered. A closed form solution using four distinct harmonic functions (none of which can be taken arbitrarily) is found to satisfy the finite displacement and inverse square root stress singularity at the edge of the crack. Explicit expressions in terms of elementary functions are given for the distribution of stress and displacement in the solid. These are obtained by employing Fourier and Kontorovich-Lebedev integral transforms and certain singular solutions of Laplace equations in three dimensions. The variations of the intensity of the local stress field along the crack border are shown graphically. An example is presented, which is in contrast with the conclusion established in the literature that one of the four Papkovich-Neuber functions in three-dimensional elasticity may be arbitrarily set to zero.

  11. Auditory abnormalities in autism: toward functional distinctions among findings.

    PubMed

    Kellerman, Gabriella R; Fan, Jin; Gorman, Jack M

    2005-09-01

    Recently, findings on a wide range of auditory abnormalities among individuals with autism have been reported. To date, functional distinctions among these varied findings are poorly established. Such distinctions should be of interest to clinicians and researchers alike given their potential therapeutic and experimental applications. This review suggests three general trends among these findings as a starting point for future analyses. First, studies of auditory perception of linguistic and social auditory stimuli among individuals with autism generally have found impaired perception versus normal controls. Such findings may correlate with impaired language and communication skills and social isolation observed among individuals with autism. Second, studies of auditory perception of pitch and music among individuals with autism generally have found enhanced perception versus normal controls. These findings may correlate with the restrictive and highly focused behaviors observed among individuals with autism. Third, findings on the auditory perception of non-linguistic, non-musical stimuli among autism patients resist any generalized conclusions. Ultimately, as some researchers have already suggested, the distinction between impaired global processing and enhanced local processing may prove useful in making sense of apparently discordant findings on auditory abnormalities among individuals with autism.

  12. Distinct Genetic Lineages of Bactrocera caudata (Insecta: Tephritidae) Revealed by COI and 16S DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Phaik-Eem; Tan, Ji; Suana, I. Wayan; Eamsobhana, Praphathip; Yong, Hoi Sen

    2012-01-01

    The fruit fly Bactrocera caudata is a pest species of economic importance in Asia. Its larvae feed on the flowers of Cucurbitaceae such as Cucurbita moschata. To-date it is distinguished from related species based on morphological characters. Specimens of B. caudata from Peninsular Malaysia and Indonesia (Bali and Lombok) were analysed using the partial DNA sequences of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) and 16S rRNA genes. Both gene sequences revealed that B. caudata from Peninsular Malaysia was distinctly different from B. caudata of Bali and Lombok, without common haplotype between them. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two distinct clades, indicating distinct genetic lineage. The uncorrected ‘p’ distance for COI sequences between B. caudata of Malaysia-Thailand-China and B. caudata of Bali-Lombok was 5.65%, for 16S sequences from 2.76 to 2.99%, and for combined COI and 16S sequences 4.45 to 4.46%. The ‘p’ values are distinctly different from intraspecific ‘p’ distance (0–0.23%). Both the B. caudata lineages are distinctly separated from related species in the subgenus Zeugodacus – B. ascita, B. scutellata, B. ishigakiensis, B. diaphora, B. tau, B. cucurbitae, and B. depressa. Molecular phylogenetic analysis indicates that the B. caudata lineages are closely related to B. ascita sp. B, and form a clade with B. scutellata, B. ishigakiensis, B. diaphora and B. ascita sp. A. This study provides additional baseline for the phylogenetic relationships of Bactrocera fruit flies of the subgenus Zeugodacus. Both the COI and 16S genes could be useful markers for the molecular differentiation and phylogenetic analysis of tephritid fruit flies. PMID:22615962

  13. Distinct genetic lineages of Bactrocera caudata (Insecta: Tephritidae) revealed by COI and 16S DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Lim, Phaik-Eem; Tan, Ji; Suana, I Wayan; Eamsobhana, Praphathip; Yong, Hoi Sen

    2012-01-01

    The fruit fly Bactrocera caudata is a pest species of economic importance in Asia. Its larvae feed on the flowers of Cucurbitaceae such as Cucurbita moschata. To-date it is distinguished from related species based on morphological characters. Specimens of B. caudata from Peninsular Malaysia and Indonesia (Bali and Lombok) were analysed using the partial DNA sequences of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) and 16S rRNA genes. Both gene sequences revealed that B. caudata from Peninsular Malaysia was distinctly different from B. caudata of Bali and Lombok, without common haplotype between them. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two distinct clades, indicating distinct genetic lineage. The uncorrected 'p' distance for COI sequences between B. caudata of Malaysia-Thailand-China and B. caudata of Bali-Lombok was 5.65%, for 16S sequences from 2.76 to 2.99%, and for combined COI and 16S sequences 4.45 to 4.46%. The 'p' values are distinctly different from intraspecific 'p' distance (0-0.23%). Both the B. caudata lineages are distinctly separated from related species in the subgenus Zeugodacus - B. ascita, B. scutellata, B. ishigakiensis, B. diaphora, B. tau, B. cucurbitae, and B. depressa. Molecular phylogenetic analysis indicates that the B. caudata lineages are closely related to B. ascita sp. B, and form a clade with B. scutellata, B. ishigakiensis, B. diaphora and B. ascita sp. A. This study provides additional baseline for the phylogenetic relationships of Bactrocera fruit flies of the subgenus Zeugodacus. Both the COI and 16S genes could be useful markers for the molecular differentiation and phylogenetic analysis of tephritid fruit flies.

  14. Comparative genomics reveals distinct host-interacting traits of three major human-associated propionibacteria.

    PubMed

    Mak, Tim N; Schmid, Monika; Brzuszkiewicz, Elzbieta; Zeng, Guanghong; Meyer, Rikke; Sfanos, Karen S; Brinkmann, Volker; Meyer, Thomas F; Brüggemann, Holger

    2013-09-22

    Propionibacteria are part of the human microbiota. Many studies have addressed the predominant colonizer of sebaceous follicles of the skin, Propionibacterium acnes, and investigated its association with the skin disorder acne vulgaris, and lately with prostate cancer. Much less is known about two other propionibacterial species frequently found on human tissue sites, Propionibacterium granulosum and Propionibacterium avidum. Here we analyzed two and three genomes of P. granulosum and P. avidum, respectively, and compared them to two genomes of P. acnes; we further highlight differences among the three cutaneous species with proteomic and microscopy approaches. Electron and atomic force microscopy revealed an exopolysaccharide (EPS)-like structure surrounding P. avidum cells, that is absent in P. acnes and P. granulosum. In contrast, P. granulosum possesses pili-like appendices, which was confirmed by surface proteome analysis. The corresponding genes were identified; they are clustered with genes encoding sortases. Both, P. granulosum and P. avidum lack surface or secreted proteins for predicted host-interacting factors of P. acnes, including several CAMP factors, sialidases, dermatan-sulphate adhesins, hyaluronidase and a SH3 domain-containing lipoprotein; accordingly, only P. acnes exhibits neuraminidase and hyaluronidase activities. These functions are encoded on previously unrecognized island-like regions in the genome of P. acnes. Despite their omnipresence on human skin little is known about the role of cutaneous propionibacteria. All three species are associated with a variety of diseases, including postoperative and device-related abscesses and infections. We showed that the three organisms have evolved distinct features to interact with their human host. Whereas P. avidum and P. granulosum produce an EPS-like surface structure and pili-like appendices, respectively, P. acnes possesses a number of unique surface-exposed proteins with host

  15. Genus-Wide Screening Reveals Four Distinct Types of Structural Plastid Genome Organization in Pelargonium (Geraniaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Röschenbleck, Joachim; Weinl, Stefan; Kudla, Jörg; Müller, Kai F.

    2017-01-01

    Geraniaceae are known for their unusual plastid genomes (plastomes), with the genus Pelargonium being most conspicuous with regard to plastome size and gene organization as judged by the sequenced plastomes of P. x hortorum and P. alternans. However, the hybrid origin of P. x hortorum and the uncertain phylogenetic position of P. alternans obscure the events that led to these extraordinary plastomes. Here, we examine all plastid reconfiguration hotspots for 60 Pelargonium species across all subgenera using a PCR and sequencing approach. Our reconstruction of the rearrangement history revealed four distinct plastome types. The ancestral plastome configuration in the two subgenera Magnipetala and Pelargonium is consistent with that of the P. alternans plastome, whereas that of the subgenus Parvulipetala deviates from this organization by one synapomorphic inversion in the trnNGUU–ndhF region. The plastome of P. x hortorum resembles those of one group of the subgenus Paucisignata, but differs from a second group by another inversion in the psaI–psaJ region. The number of microstructural changes and amount of repetitive DNA are generally elevated in all inverted regions. Nucleotide substitution rates correlate positively with the number of indels in all regions across the different subgenera. We also observed lineage- and species-specific changes in the gene content, including gene duplications and fragmentations. For example, the plastid rbcL–psaI region of Pelargonium contains a highly variable accD-like region. Our results suggest alternative evolutionary paths under possibly changing modes of plastid transmission and indicate the non-functionalization of the plastid accD gene in Pelargonium. PMID:28172771

  16. Compositionally distinct nuclear pore complexes of functionally distinct dimorphic nuclei in the ciliate Tetrahymena

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Masaaki; Osakada, Hiroko; Mori, Chie; Fukuda, Yasuhiro; Nagao, Koji; Obuse, Chikashi

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The nuclear pore complex (NPC), a gateway for nucleocytoplasmic trafficking, is composed of ∼30 different proteins called nucleoporins. It remains unknown whether the NPCs within a species are homogeneous or vary depending on the cell type or physiological condition. Here, we present evidence for compositionally distinct NPCs that form within a single cell in a binucleated ciliate. In Tetrahymena thermophila, each cell contains both a transcriptionally active macronucleus (MAC) and a germline micronucleus (MIC). By combining in silico analysis, mass spectrometry analysis for immuno-isolated proteins and subcellular localization analysis of GFP-fused proteins, we identified numerous novel components of MAC and MIC NPCs. Core members of the Nup107–Nup160 scaffold complex were enriched in MIC NPCs. Strikingly, two paralogs of Nup214 and of Nup153 localized exclusively to either the MAC or MIC NPCs. Furthermore, the transmembrane components Pom121 and Pom82 localize exclusively to MAC and MIC NPCs, respectively. Our results argue that functional nuclear dimorphism in ciliates is likely to depend on the compositional and structural specificity of NPCs. PMID:28386019

  17. Compositionally distinct nuclear pore complexes of functionally distinct dimorphic nuclei in ciliate Tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Masaaki; Osakada, Hiroko; Mori, Chie; Fukuda, Yasuhiro; Nagao, Koji; Obuse, Chikashi; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2017-04-06

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC), a gateway for nucleocytoplasmic trafficking, is composed of about 30 different proteins called nucleoporins. It remains unknown whether the NPCs within a species are homogeneous or vary depending on the cell type, or physiological condition. Here, we present evidence for compositionally distinct NPCs that form within a single cell in a binucleated ciliate. In Tetrahymena thermophila, each cell contains both a transcriptionally-active macronucleus (MAC) and a germline micronucleus (MIC). By combining in silico analysis, mass spectrometry analysis for immuno-isolated proteins, and subcellular localization analysis of GFP fused proteins, we identified numerous novel components of MAC and MIC NPCs. Core members of the Nup107-160 scaffold complex were enriched in MIC NPCs. Strikingly, two paralogs of Nup214 and of Nup153 localized exclusively to either MAC or MIC NPCs. Furthermore, the transmembrane components Pom121 and Pom82 localize exclusively to MAC and MIC NPCs, respectively. Our results argue that functional nuclear dimorphism in ciliates is likely to depend on compositional and structural specificity of NPCs.

  18. Systematic analysis of reportedly distinct populations of multipotent bone marrow-derived stem cells reveals a lack of distinction.

    PubMed

    Lodie, Tracey A; Blickarz, Courtney E; Devarakonda, Tara J; He, Chufa; Dash, Ajeeta B; Clarke, Jennifer; Gleneck, Kristen; Shihabuddin, Lamya; Tubo, Ross

    2002-10-01

    Adult human bone marrow-derived stem cells, having the ability to differentiate into cells of multiple lineages, have been isolated and propagated by varied protocols, including positive (CD105(+))/negative (CD45(-)GlyA(-)) selection with immunomagnetic beads, or direct plating into selective culture media. Each substratum-adherent cell population was subjected to a systematic analysis of their cell surface markers and differentiation potential. In the initial stages of culture, each cell population proliferated slowly, reaching confluence in 10-14 days. Adherent cells proliferated at similar rates whether cultured in serum-free medium supplemented with basic fibroblast growth factor, medium containing 2% fetal bovine serum (FBS) supplemented with epidermal growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor, or medium containing 10% FBS alone. Cell surface marker analysis revealed that more than 95% of the cells were positive for CD105/endoglin, a putative mesenchymal stem cell marker, and negative for CD34, CD31, and CD133, markers of hematopoietic, endothelial, and neural stem cells, respectively, regardless of cell isolation and propagation method. CD44 expression was variable, apparently dependent on serum concentration. Functional similarity of the stem cell populations was also observed, with each different cell population expressing the cell type-specific markers beta-tubulin, type II collagen, and desmin, and demonstrating endothelial tube formation when cultured under conditions favoring neural, cartilage, muscle, and endothelial cell differentiation, respectively. On the basis of these data, adult human bone marrow-derived stem cells cultured in adherent monolayer are virtually indistinguishable, both physically and functionally, regardless of the method of isolation or proliferative expansion.

  19. Distinctive Genome Reduction Rates Revealed by Genomic Analyses of Two Coxiella-Like Endosymbionts in Ticks

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, Yuval; Lalzar, Itai; Klasson, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Genome reduction is a hallmark of symbiotic genomes, and the rate and patterns of gene loss associated with this process have been investigated in several different symbiotic systems. However, in long-term host-associated coevolving symbiont clades, the genome size differences between strains are normally quite small and hence patterns of large-scale genome reduction can only be inferred from distant relatives. Here we present the complete genome of a Coxiella-like symbiont from Rhipicephalus turanicus ticks (CRt), and compare it with other genomes from the genus Coxiella in order to investigate the process of genome reduction in a genus consisting of intracellular host-associated bacteria with variable genome sizes. The 1.7-Mb CRt genome is larger than the genomes of most obligate mutualists but has a very low protein-coding content (48.5%) and an extremely high number of identifiable pseudogenes, indicating that it is currently undergoing genome reduction. Analysis of encoded functions suggests that CRt is an obligate tick mutualist, as indicated by the possible provisioning of the tick with biotin (B7), riboflavin (B2) and other cofactors, and by the loss of most genes involved in host cell interactions, such as secretion systems. Comparative analyses between CRt and the 2.5 times smaller genome of Coxiella from the lone star tick Amblyomma americanum (CLEAA) show that many of the same gene functions are lost and suggest that the large size difference might be due to a higher rate of genome evolution in CLEAA generated by the loss of the mismatch repair genes mutSL. Finally, sequence polymorphisms in the CRt population sampled from field collected ticks reveal up to one distinct strain variant per tick, and analyses of mutational patterns within the population suggest that selection might be acting on synonymous sites. The CRt genome is an extreme example of a symbiont genome caught in the act of genome reduction, and the comparison between CLEAA and CRt

  20. Distinctive Genome Reduction Rates Revealed by Genomic Analyses of Two Coxiella-Like Endosymbionts in Ticks.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Yuval; Lalzar, Itai; Klasson, Lisa

    2015-05-28

    Genome reduction is a hallmark of symbiotic genomes, and the rate and patterns of gene loss associated with this process have been investigated in several different symbiotic systems. However, in long-term host-associated coevolving symbiont clades, the genome size differences between strains are normally quite small and hence patterns of large-scale genome reduction can only be inferred from distant relatives. Here we present the complete genome of a Coxiella-like symbiont from Rhipicephalus turanicus ticks (CRt), and compare it with other genomes from the genus Coxiella in order to investigate the process of genome reduction in a genus consisting of intracellular host-associated bacteria with variable genome sizes. The 1.7-Mb CRt genome is larger than the genomes of most obligate mutualists but has a very low protein-coding content (48.5%) and an extremely high number of identifiable pseudogenes, indicating that it is currently undergoing genome reduction. Analysis of encoded functions suggests that CRt is an obligate tick mutualist, as indicated by the possible provisioning of the tick with biotin (B7), riboflavin (B2) and other cofactors, and by the loss of most genes involved in host cell interactions, such as secretion systems. Comparative analyses between CRt and the 2.5 times smaller genome of Coxiella from the lone star tick Amblyomma americanum (CLEAA) show that many of the same gene functions are lost and suggest that the large size difference might be due to a higher rate of genome evolution in CLEAA generated by the loss of the mismatch repair genes mutSL. Finally, sequence polymorphisms in the CRt population sampled from field collected ticks reveal up to one distinct strain variant per tick, and analyses of mutational patterns within the population suggest that selection might be acting on synonymous sites. The CRt genome is an extreme example of a symbiont genome caught in the act of genome reduction, and the comparison between CLEAA and CRt

  1. Expression and evolution of functionally distinct haemoglobin genes in plants.

    PubMed

    Hunt, P W; Watts, R A; Trevaskis, B; Llewelyn, D J; Burnell, J; Dennis, E S; Peacock, W J

    2001-11-01

    Haemoglobin genes have been found in a number of plant species, but the number of genes known has been too small to allow effective evolutionary inferences. We present nine new non-symbiotic haemoglobin sequences from a range of plants, including class 1 haemoglobins from cotton, Citrus and tomato, class 2 haemoglobins from cotton, tomato, sugar beet and canola and two haemoglobins from the non-vascular plants, Marchantia polymorpha (a liverwort) and Physcomitrella patens (a moss). Our molecular phylogenetic analysis of all currently known non-symbiotic haemoglobin genes and a selection of symbiotic haemoglobins have confirmed the existence of two distinct classes of haemoglobin genes in the dicots. It is likely that all dicots have both class 1 and class 2 non-symbiotic haemoglobin genes whereas in monocots we have detected only class 1 genes. The symbiotic haemoglobins from legumes and Casuarina are related to the class 2 non-symbiotic haemoglobins, whilst the symbiotic haemoglobin from Parasponia groups with the class 1 non-symbiotic genes. Probably, there have been two independent recruitments of symbiotic haemoglobins. Although the functions of the two non-symbiotic haemoglobins remain unknown, their patterns of expression within plants suggest different functions. We examined the expression in transgenic plants of the two non-symbiotic haemoglobins from Arabidopsis using promoter fusions to a GUS reporter gene. The Arabidopsis GLB1 and GLB2 genes are likely to be functionally distinct. The class 2 haemoglobin gene (GLB2) is expressed in the roots, leaves and inflorescence and can be induced in young plants by cytokinin treatment in contrast to the class 1 gene (GLB1) which is active in germinating seedlings and can be induced by hypoxia and increased sucrose supply, but not by cytokinin treatment.

  2. Distinct physiological functions of thiol peroxidase isoenzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Park, S G; Cha, M K; Jeong, W; Kim, I H

    2000-02-25

    A new type of peroxidase ("thiol peroxidase"; TPx) having cysteine as the primary site of catalysis has been discovered from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. In addition to two yeast TPx isoforms (TSA I and TSA II/AHPC1) previously described, three additional TPx homologues were identified by analysis of the open reading frame data base for Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Three novel isoforms showed a distinct thiol peroxidase activity supported by thioredoxin, and appeared to be distinctively localized in cytoplasm, mitochondria, and nucleus. Each isoform was named after its subcellular localization such as cytoplasmic TPx I (cTPx I or TSA I), cTPx II, cTPx III (TSA II/AHPC1), mitochondrial TPx (mTPx), and nuclear TPx (nTPx). Their transcriptional activities suggest that cTPx I and cTPx III are the most predominant isoforms among the five type isoforms. Transcriptional activities of TPx isoenzymes during yeast life span were quite different from each other. Unlike other TPx null mutants, cTPx I null mutant was hypersensitive to various oxidants except for 4-nitroquinoline N-oxide. The null mutant was more resistant toward 4-nitroquinoline N-oxide and acidic culture than its wild type. The severe growth retardation of cTPx II mutant resulted in accumulation of G(1)-phased cells. Based on kinetic properties of five isoforms, their subcellular localizations, and distinct physiology of each null mutant, we discussed the physiological functions of five types of TPx isoenzymes in yeast throughout the full growth cycle.

  3. Super-resolution imaging reveals distinct chromatin folding for different epigenetic states.

    PubMed

    Boettiger, Alistair N; Bintu, Bogdan; Moffitt, Jeffrey R; Wang, Siyuan; Beliveau, Brian J; Fudenberg, Geoffrey; Imakaev, Maxim; Mirny, Leonid A; Wu, Chao-ting; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-01-21

    Metazoan genomes are spatially organized at multiple scales, from packaging of DNA around individual nucleosomes to segregation of whole chromosomes into distinct territories. At the intermediate scale of kilobases to megabases, which encompasses the sizes of genes, gene clusters and regulatory domains, the three-dimensional (3D) organization of DNA is implicated in multiple gene regulatory mechanisms, but understanding this organization remains a challenge. At this scale, the genome is partitioned into domains of different epigenetic states that are essential for regulating gene expression. Here we investigate the 3D organization of chromatin in different epigenetic states using super-resolution imaging. We classified genomic domains in Drosophila cells into transcriptionally active, inactive or Polycomb-repressed states, and observed distinct chromatin organizations for each state. All three types of chromatin domains exhibit power-law scaling between their physical sizes in 3D and their domain lengths, but each type has a distinct scaling exponent. Polycomb-repressed domains show the densest packing and most intriguing chromatin folding behaviour, in which chromatin packing density increases with domain length. Distinct from the self-similar organization displayed by transcriptionally active and inactive chromatin, the Polycomb-repressed domains are characterized by a high degree of chromatin intermixing within the domain. Moreover, compared to inactive domains, Polycomb-repressed domains spatially exclude neighbouring active chromatin to a much stronger degree. Computational modelling and knockdown experiments suggest that reversible chromatin interactions mediated by Polycomb-group proteins play an important role in these unique packaging properties of the repressed chromatin. Taken together, our super-resolution images reveal distinct chromatin packaging for different epigenetic states at the kilobase-to-megabase scale, a length scale that is directly

  4. Coral transcriptome and bacterial community profiles reveal distinct Yellow Band Disease states in Orbicella faveolata

    PubMed Central

    Closek, Collin J; Sunagawa, Shinichi; DeSalvo, Michael K; Piceno, Yvette M; DeSantis, Todd Z; Brodie, Eoin L; Weber, Michele X; Voolstra, Christian R; Andersen, Gary L; Medina, Mónica

    2014-01-01

    Coral diseases impact reefs globally. Although we continue to describe diseases, little is known about the etiology or progression of even the most common cases. To examine a spectrum of coral health and determine factors of disease progression we examined Orbicella faveolata exhibiting signs of Yellow Band Disease (YBD), a widespread condition in the Caribbean. We used a novel combined approach to assess three members of the coral holobiont: the coral-host, associated Symbiodinium algae, and bacteria. We profiled three conditions: (1) healthy-appearing colonies (HH), (2) healthy-appearing tissue on diseased colonies (HD), and (3) diseased lesion (DD). Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis revealed health state-specific diversity in Symbiodinium clade associations. 16S ribosomal RNA gene microarrays (PhyloChips) and O. faveolata complimentary DNA microarrays revealed the bacterial community structure and host transcriptional response, respectively. A distinct bacterial community structure marked each health state. Diseased samples were associated with two to three times more bacterial diversity. HD samples had the highest bacterial richness, which included components associated with HH and DD, as well as additional unique families. The host transcriptome under YBD revealed a reduced cellular expression of defense- and metabolism-related processes, while the neighboring HD condition exhibited an intermediate expression profile. Although HD tissue appeared visibly healthy, the microbial communities and gene expression profiles were distinct. HD should be regarded as an additional (intermediate) state of disease, which is important for understanding the progression of YBD. PMID:24950107

  5. Distinct functional programming of human fetal and adult monocytes.

    PubMed

    Krow-Lucal, Elisabeth R; Kim, Charles C; Burt, Trevor D; McCune, Joseph M

    2014-03-20

    Preterm birth affects 1 out of 9 infants in the United States and is the leading cause of long-term neurologic handicap and infant mortality, accounting for 35% of all infant deaths in 2008. Although cytokines including interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-10 (IL-10), IL-6, and IL-1 are produced in response to in utero infection and are strongly associated with preterm labor, little is known about how human fetal immune cells respond to these cytokines. We demonstrate that fetal and adult CD14(+)CD16(-) classical monocytes are distinct in terms of basal transcriptional profiles and in phosphorylation of signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) in response to cytokines. Fetal monocytes phosphorylate canonical and noncanonical STATs and respond more strongly to IFN-γ, IL-6, and IL-4 than adult monocytes. We demonstrate a higher ratio of SOCS3 to IL-6 receptor in adult monocytes than in fetal monocytes, potentially explaining differences in STAT phosphorylation. Additionally, IFN-γ signaling results in upregulation of antigen presentation and costimulatory machinery in adult, but not fetal, monocytes. These findings represent the first evidence that primary human fetal and adult monocytes are functionally distinct, potentially explaining how these cells respond differentially to cytokines implicated in development, in utero infections, and the pathogenesis of preterm labor.

  6. Comprehensive Expression Map of Transcription Regulators in the Adult Zebrafish Telencephalon Reveals Distinct Neurogenic Niches

    PubMed Central

    Diotel, Nicolas; Rodriguez Viales, Rebecca; Armant, Olivier; März, Martin; Ferg, Marco; Rastegar, Sepand; Strähle, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish has become a model to study adult vertebrate neurogenesis. In particular, the adult telencephalon has been an intensely studied structure in the zebrafish brain. Differential expression of transcriptional regulators (TRs) is a key feature of development and tissue homeostasis. Here we report an expression map of 1,202 TR genes in the telencephalon of adult zebrafish. Our results are summarized in a database with search and clustering functions to identify genes expressed in particular regions of the telencephalon. We classified 562 genes into 13 distinct patterns, including genes expressed in the proliferative zone. The remaining 640 genes displayed unique and complex patterns of expression and could thus not be grouped into distinct classes. The neurogenic ventricular regions express overlapping but distinct sets of TR genes, suggesting regional differences in the neurogenic niches in the telencephalon. In summary, the small telencephalon of the zebrafish shows a remarkable complexity in TR gene expression. The adult zebrafish telencephalon has become a model to study neurogenesis. We established the expression pattern of more than 1200 transcription regulators (TR) in the adult telencephalon. The neurogenic regions express overlapping but distinct sets of TR genes suggesting regional differences in the neurogenic potential. J. Comp. Neurol. 523:1202–1221, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25556858

  7. ASCL1 and NEUROD1 Reveal Heterogeneity in Pulmonary Neuroendocrine Tumors and Regulate Distinct Genetic Programs.

    PubMed

    Borromeo, Mark D; Savage, Trisha K; Kollipara, Rahul K; He, Min; Augustyn, Alexander; Osborne, Jihan K; Girard, Luc; Minna, John D; Gazdar, Adi F; Cobb, Melanie H; Johnson, Jane E

    2016-08-02

    Small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) is a high-grade pulmonary neuroendocrine tumor. The transcription factors ASCL1 and NEUROD1 play crucial roles in promoting malignant behavior and survival of human SCLC cell lines. Here, we find that ASCL1 and NEUROD1 identify heterogeneity in SCLC, bind distinct genomic loci, and regulate mostly distinct genes. ASCL1, but not NEUROD1, is present in mouse pulmonary neuroendocrine cells, and only ASCL1 is required in vivo for tumor formation in mouse models of SCLC. ASCL1 targets oncogenic genes including MYCL1, RET, SOX2, and NFIB while NEUROD1 targets MYC. ASCL1 and NEUROD1 regulate different genes that commonly contribute to neuronal function. ASCL1 also regulates multiple genes in the NOTCH pathway including DLL3. Together, ASCL1 and NEUROD1 distinguish heterogeneity in SCLC with distinct genomic landscapes and distinct gene expression programs. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Quantitative proteomic analyses of mammary organoids reveals distinct signatures after exposure to environmental chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Katherine E.; Lemieux, George A.; Hassis, Maria E.; Olshen, Adam B.; Fisher, Susan J.; Werb, Zena

    2016-01-01

    Common environmental contaminants such as bisphenols and phthalates and persistent contaminants such as polychlorinated biphenyls are thought to influence tissue homeostasis and carcinogenesis by acting as disrupters of endocrine function. In this study we investigated the direct effects of exposure to bisphenol A (BPA), mono-n-butyl phthalate (Pht), and polychlorinated biphenyl 153 (PCB153) on the proteome of primary organotypic cultures of the mouse mammary gland. At low-nanomolar doses each of these agents induced distinct effects on the proteomes of these cultures. Although BPA treatment produced effects that were similar to those induced by estradiol, there were some notable differences, including a reduction in the abundance of retinoblastoma-associated protein and increases in the Rho GTPases Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) and cell division cycle protein CDC42. Both Pht and PCB153 induced changes that were distinct from those induced by estrogen, including decreased levels of the transcriptional corepressor C-terminal binding protein 1. Interestingly, the three chemicals appeared to alter the abundance of distinct splice forms of many proteins as well as the abundance of several proteins that regulate RNA splicing. Our combined results indicate that the three classes of chemical have distinct effects on the proteome of normal mouse mammary cultures, some estrogen-like but most estrogen independent, that influence diverse biological processes including apoptosis, cell adhesion, and proliferation. PMID:26903627

  9. Open chromatin reveals the functional maize genome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Every cellular process mediated through nuclear DNA must contend with chromatin. As results from ENCODE show, open chromatin assays can efficiently integrate across diverse regulatory elements, revealing functional non-coding genome. In this study, we use a MNase hypersensitivity assay to discover o...

  10. The Anthropocene is functionally and stratigraphically distinct from the Holocene.

    PubMed

    Waters, Colin N; Zalasiewicz, Jan; Summerhayes, Colin; Barnosky, Anthony D; Poirier, Clément; Gałuszka, Agnieszka; Cearreta, Alejandro; Edgeworth, Matt; Ellis, Erle C; Ellis, Michael; Jeandel, Catherine; Leinfelder, Reinhold; McNeill, J R; Richter, Daniel deB; Steffen, Will; Syvitski, James; Vidas, Davor; Wagreich, Michael; Williams, Mark; Zhisheng, An; Grinevald, Jacques; Odada, Eric; Oreskes, Naomi; Wolfe, Alexander P

    2016-01-08

    Human activity is leaving a pervasive and persistent signature on Earth. Vigorous debate continues about whether this warrants recognition as a new geologic time unit known as the Anthropocene. We review anthropogenic markers of functional changes in the Earth system through the stratigraphic record. The appearance of manufactured materials in sediments, including aluminum, plastics, and concrete, coincides with global spikes in fallout radionuclides and particulates from fossil fuel combustion. Carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus cycles have been substantially modified over the past century. Rates of sea-level rise and the extent of human perturbation of the climate system exceed Late Holocene changes. Biotic changes include species invasions worldwide and accelerating rates of extinction. These combined signals render the Anthropocene stratigraphically distinct from the Holocene and earlier epochs. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. The FN400 is functionally distinct from the N400.

    PubMed

    Bridger, Emma K; Bader, Regine; Kriukova, Olga; Unger, Kerstin; Mecklinger, Axel

    2012-11-15

    The FN400 refers to the early midfrontally-distributed difference between ERPs elicited by old and new items, which operates in a way consistent with a neural marker of familiarity-based recognition. Double dissociations between the FN400 and a later ERP index of recollection provide some of the most compelling evidence in support of dual-process models to date. It has recently been claimed, however, that there is no evidence that the FN400 is functionally distinct from the N400 index of implicit semantic priming (Voss, J., and Federmeier, K., FN400 potentials are functionally identical to N400 potentials and reflect semantic processing during recognition testing, Psychophysiology, 48, 532-546, 2011), challenging inferences made on the basis of this effect. We argue that the design employed to make this claim is flawed because it comprised a semantic priming manipulation embedded within a continuous recognition test which enabled recognition contrasts to be confounded by semantic processes in a number of ways. Here, ERPs were recorded from a design which avoided these confounds by employing a semantic priming paradigm which also served as the encoding phase for a surprise subsequent recognition test phase. An N400 effect elicited in the semantic priming task demonstrated the established centro-parietal maximum, whereas the difference between correctly responded to old and new ERPs in the recognition test was maximal over frontal sites in the same time window. When direct comparisons of the electrophysiological correlates of semantic priming and episodic recognition are recorded in a paradigm in which the two are not confounded, the FN400 reflects a qualitatively distinct effect from the N400. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Mitotic History Reveals Distinct Stem Cell Populations and Their Contributions to Hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Säwén, Petter; Lang, Stefan; Mandal, Pankaj; Rossi, Derrick J; Soneji, Shamit; Bryder, David

    2016-03-29

    Homeostasis of short-lived blood cells is dependent on rapid proliferation of immature precursors. Using a conditional histone 2B-mCherry-labeling mouse model, we characterize hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and progenitor proliferation dynamics in steady state and following several types of induced stress. HSC proliferation following HSC transplantation into lethally irradiated mice is fundamentally different not only from native hematopoiesis but also from other stress contexts. Whereas transplantation promoted sustained, long-term proliferation of HSCs, both cytokine-induced mobilization and acute depletion of selected blood cell lineages elicited very limited recruitment of HSCs to the proliferative pool. By coupling mCherry-based analysis of proliferation history with multiplex gene expression analyses on single cells, we have found that HSCs can be stratified into four distinct subtypes. These subtypes have distinct molecular signatures and differ significantly in their reconstitution potentials, showcasing the power of tracking proliferation history when resolving functional heterogeneity of HSCs.

  13. Quantitative image analysis reveals distinct structural transitions during aging in Caenorhabditis elegans tissues.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Josiah; Iser, Wendy B; Chow, David K; Goldberg, Ilya G; Wolkow, Catherine A

    2008-07-30

    Aging is associated with functional and structural declines in many body systems, even in the absence of underlying disease. In particular, skeletal muscles experience severe declines during aging, a phenomenon termed sarcopenia. Despite the high incidence and severity of sarcopenia, little is known about contributing factors and development. Many studies focus on functional aspects of aging-related tissue decline, while structural details remain understudied. Traditional approaches for quantifying structural changes have assessed individual markers at discrete intervals. Such approaches are inadequate for the complex changes associated with aging. An alternative is to consider changes in overall morphology rather than in specific markers. We have used this approach to quantitatively track tissue architecture during adulthood and aging in the C. elegans pharynx, the neuromuscular feeding organ. Using pattern recognition to analyze aged-grouped pharynx images, we identified discrete step-wise transitions between distinct morphologies. The morphology state transitions were maintained in mutants with pharynx neurotransmission defects, although the pace of the transitions was altered. Longitudinal measurements of pharynx function identified a predictive relationship between mid-life pharynx morphology and function at later ages. These studies demonstrate for the first time that adult tissues undergo distinct structural transitions reflecting postdevelopmental events. The processes that underlie these architectural changes may contribute to increased disease risk during aging, and may be targets for factors that alter the aging rate. This work further demonstrates that pattern analysis of an image series offers a novel and generally accessible approach for quantifying morphological changes and identifying structural biomarkers.

  14. Scanning Electron Microscopy Reveals Two Distinct Classes of Erythroblastic Island Isolated from Adult Mammalian Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Jia Hao; McAllan, Bronwyn M; Fraser, Stuart T

    2016-04-01

    Erythroblastic islands are multicellular clusters in which a central macrophage supports the development and maturation of red blood cell (erythroid) progenitors. These clusters play crucial roles in the pathogenesis observed in animal models of hematological disorders. The precise structure and function of erythroblastic islands is poorly understood. Here, we have combined scanning electron microscopy and immuno-gold labeling of surface proteins to develop a better understanding of the ultrastructure of these multicellular clusters. The erythroid-specific surface antigen Ter-119 and the transferrin receptor CD71 exhibited distinct patterns of protein sorting during erythroid cell maturation as detected by immuno-gold labeling. During electron microscopy analysis we observed two distinct classes of erythroblastic islands. The islands varied in size and morphology, and the number and type of erythroid cells interacting with the central macrophage. Assessment of femoral marrow isolated from a cavid rodent species (guinea pig, Cavis porcellus) and a marsupial carnivore species (fat-tailed dunnarts, Sminthopsis crassicaudata) showed that while the morphology of the central macrophage varied, two different types of erythroblastic islands were consistently identifiable. Our findings suggest that these two classes of erythroblastic islands are conserved in mammalian evolution and may play distinct roles in red blood cell production.

  15. Relationship between Distinct African Cholera Epidemics Revealed via MLVA Haplotyping of 337 Vibrio cholerae Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Sandra; Miwanda, Berthe; Sadji, Adodo Yao; Thefenne, Hélène; Jeddi, Fakhri; Rebaudet, Stanislas; de Boeck, Hilde; Bidjada, Bawimodom; Depina, Jean-Jacques; Bompangue, Didier; Abedi, Aaron Aruna; Koivogui, Lamine; Keita, Sakoba; Garnotel, Eric; Plisnier, Pierre-Denis; Ruimy, Raymond; Thomson, Nicholas; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques; Piarroux, Renaud

    2015-01-01

    Background Since cholera appeared in Africa during the 1970s, cases have been reported on the continent every year. In Sub-Saharan Africa, cholera outbreaks primarily cluster at certain hotspots including the African Great Lakes Region and West Africa. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we applied MLVA (Multi-Locus Variable Number Tandem Repeat Analysis) typing of 337 Vibrio cholerae isolates from recent cholera epidemics in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Zambia, Guinea and Togo. We aimed to assess the relationship between outbreaks. Applying this method, we identified 89 unique MLVA haplotypes across our isolate collection. MLVA typing revealed the short-term divergence and microevolution of these Vibrio cholerae populations to provide insight into the dynamics of cholera outbreaks in each country. Our analyses also revealed strong geographical clustering. Isolates from the African Great Lakes Region (DRC and Zambia) formed a closely related group, while West African isolates (Togo and Guinea) constituted a separate cluster. At a country-level scale our analyses revealed several distinct MLVA groups, most notably DRC 2011/2012, DRC 2009, Zambia 2012 and Guinea 2012. We also found that certain MLVA types collected in the DRC persisted in the country for several years, occasionally giving rise to expansive epidemics. Finally, we found that the six environmental isolates in our panel were unrelated to the epidemic isolates. Conclusions/Significance To effectively combat the disease, it is critical to understand the mechanisms of cholera emergence and diffusion in a region-specific manner. Overall, these findings demonstrate the relationship between distinct epidemics in West Africa and the African Great Lakes Region. This study also highlights the importance of monitoring and analyzing Vibrio cholerae isolates. PMID:26110870

  16. Relationship between Distinct African Cholera Epidemics Revealed via MLVA Haplotyping of 337 Vibrio cholerae Isolates.

    PubMed

    Moore, Sandra; Miwanda, Berthe; Sadji, Adodo Yao; Thefenne, Hélène; Jeddi, Fakhri; Rebaudet, Stanislas; de Boeck, Hilde; Bidjada, Bawimodom; Depina, Jean-Jacques; Bompangue, Didier; Abedi, Aaron Aruna; Koivogui, Lamine; Keita, Sakoba; Garnotel, Eric; Plisnier, Pierre-Denis; Ruimy, Raymond; Thomson, Nicholas; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques; Piarroux, Renaud

    2015-01-01

    Since cholera appeared in Africa during the 1970s, cases have been reported on the continent every year. In Sub-Saharan Africa, cholera outbreaks primarily cluster at certain hotspots including the African Great Lakes Region and West Africa. In this study, we applied MLVA (Multi-Locus Variable Number Tandem Repeat Analysis) typing of 337 Vibrio cholerae isolates from recent cholera epidemics in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Zambia, Guinea and Togo. We aimed to assess the relationship between outbreaks. Applying this method, we identified 89 unique MLVA haplotypes across our isolate collection. MLVA typing revealed the short-term divergence and microevolution of these Vibrio cholerae populations to provide insight into the dynamics of cholera outbreaks in each country. Our analyses also revealed strong geographical clustering. Isolates from the African Great Lakes Region (DRC and Zambia) formed a closely related group, while West African isolates (Togo and Guinea) constituted a separate cluster. At a country-level scale our analyses revealed several distinct MLVA groups, most notably DRC 2011/2012, DRC 2009, Zambia 2012 and Guinea 2012. We also found that certain MLVA types collected in the DRC persisted in the country for several years, occasionally giving rise to expansive epidemics. Finally, we found that the six environmental isolates in our panel were unrelated to the epidemic isolates. To effectively combat the disease, it is critical to understand the mechanisms of cholera emergence and diffusion in a region-specific manner. Overall, these findings demonstrate the relationship between distinct epidemics in West Africa and the African Great Lakes Region. This study also highlights the importance of monitoring and analyzing Vibrio cholerae isolates.

  17. Two distinct functions for PI3-kinases in macropinocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Hoeller, Oliver; Bolourani, Parvin; Clark, Jonathan; Stephens, Len R.; Hawkins, Phillip T.; Weiner, Orion D.; Weeks, Gerald; Kay, Robert R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Class-1 PI3-kinases are major regulators of the actin cytoskeleton, whose precise contributions to chemotaxis, phagocytosis and macropinocytosis remain unresolved. We used systematic genetic ablation to examine this question in growing Dictyostelium cells. Mass spectroscopy shows that a quintuple mutant lacking the entire genomic complement of class-1 PI3-kinases retains only 10% of wild-type PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 levels. Chemotaxis to folate and phagocytosis of bacteria proceed normally in the quintuple mutant but macropinocytosis is abolished. In this context PI3-kinases show specialized functions, only one of which is directly linked to gross PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 levels: macropinosomes originate in patches of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3, with associated F-actin-rich ruffles, both of which depend on PI3-kinase 1/2 (PI3K1/2) but not PI3K4, whereas conversion of ruffles into vesicles requires PI3K4. A biosensor derived from the Ras-binding domain of PI3K1 suggests that Ras is activated throughout vesicle formation. Binding assays show that RasG and RasS interact most strongly with PI3K1/2 and PI3K4, and single mutants of either Ras have severe macropinocytosis defects. Thus, the fundamental function of PI3-kinases in growing Dictyostelium cells is in macropinocytosis where they have two distinct functions, supported by at least two separate Ras proteins. PMID:23843627

  18. ELK1 uses different DNA binding modes to regulate functionally distinct classes of target genes.

    PubMed

    Odrowaz, Zaneta; Sharrocks, Andrew D

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic transcription factors are grouped into families and, due to their similar DNA binding domains, often have the potential to bind to the same genomic regions. This can lead to redundancy at the level of DNA binding, and mechanisms are required to generate specific functional outcomes that enable distinct gene expression programmes to be controlled by a particular transcription factor. Here we used ChIP-seq to uncover two distinct binding modes for the ETS transcription factor ELK1. In one mode, other ETS transcription factors can bind regulatory regions in a redundant fashion; in the second, ELK1 binds in a unique fashion to another set of genomic targets. Each binding mode is associated with different binding site features and also distinct regulatory outcomes. Furthermore, the type of binding mode also determines the control of functionally distinct subclasses of genes and hence the phenotypic response elicited. This is demonstrated for the unique binding mode where a novel role for ELK1 in controlling cell migration is revealed. We have therefore uncovered an unexpected link between the type of binding mode employed by a transcription factor, the subsequent gene regulatory mechanisms used, and the functional categories of target genes controlled.

  19. Attending to the present: mindfulness meditation reveals distinct neural modes of self-reference

    PubMed Central

    Farb, Norman A. S.; Segal, Zindel V.; Mayberg, Helen; Bean, Jim; McKeon, Deborah; Fatima, Zainab

    2007-01-01

    It has long been theorised that there are two temporally distinct forms of self-reference: extended self-reference linking experiences across time, and momentary self-reference centred on the present. To characterise these two aspects of awareness, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine monitoring of enduring traits (’narrative’ focus, NF) or momentary experience (’experiential’ focus, EF) in both novice participants and those having attended an 8 week course in mindfulness meditation, a program that trains individuals to develop focused attention on the present. In novices, EF yielded focal reductions in self-referential cortical midline regions (medial prefrontal cortex, mPFC) associated with NF. In trained participants, EF resulted in more marked and pervasive reductions in the mPFC, and increased engagement of a right lateralised network, comprising the lateral PFC and viscerosomatic areas such as the insula, secondary somatosensory cortex and inferior parietal lobule. Functional connectivity analyses further demonstrated a strong coupling between the right insula and the mPFC in novices that was uncoupled in the mindfulness group. These results suggest a fundamental neural dissociation between two distinct forms of self-awareness that are habitually integrated but can be dissociated through attentional training: the self across time and in the present moment. PMID:18985137

  20. Open chromatin reveals the functional maize genome

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers-Melnick, Eli; Vera, Daniel L.; Bass, Hank W.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular processes mediated through nuclear DNA must contend with chromatin. Chromatin structural assays can efficiently integrate information across diverse regulatory elements, revealing the functional noncoding genome. In this study, we use a differential nuclease sensitivity assay based on micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion to discover open chromatin regions in the maize genome. We find that maize MNase-hypersensitive (MNase HS) regions localize around active genes and within recombination hotspots, focusing biased gene conversion at their flanks. Although MNase HS regions map to less than 1% of the genome, they consistently explain a remarkably large amount (∼40%) of heritable phenotypic variance in diverse complex traits. MNase HS regions are therefore on par with coding sequences as annotations that demarcate the functional parts of the maize genome. These results imply that less than 3% of the maize genome (coding and MNase HS regions) may give rise to the overwhelming majority of phenotypic variation, greatly narrowing the scope of the functional genome. PMID:27185945

  1. An analysis toolbox to explore mesenchymal migration heterogeneity reveals adaptive switching between distinct modes

    PubMed Central

    Shafqat-Abbasi, Hamdah; Kowalewski, Jacob M; Kiss, Alexa; Gong, Xiaowei; Hernandez-Varas, Pablo; Berge, Ulrich; Jafari-Mamaghani, Mehrdad; Lock, John G; Strömblad, Staffan

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal (lamellipodial) migration is heterogeneous, although whether this reflects progressive variability or discrete, 'switchable' migration modalities, remains unclear. We present an analytical toolbox, based on quantitative single-cell imaging data, to interrogate this heterogeneity. Integrating supervised behavioral classification with multivariate analyses of cell motion, membrane dynamics, cell-matrix adhesion status and F-actin organization, this toolbox here enables the detection and characterization of two quantitatively distinct mesenchymal migration modes, termed 'Continuous' and 'Discontinuous'. Quantitative mode comparisons reveal differences in cell motion, spatiotemporal coordination of membrane protrusion/retraction, and how cells within each mode reorganize with changed cell speed. These modes thus represent distinctive migratory strategies. Additional analyses illuminate the macromolecular- and cellular-scale effects of molecular targeting (fibronectin, talin, ROCK), including 'adaptive switching' between Continuous (favored at high adhesion/full contraction) and Discontinuous (low adhesion/inhibited contraction) modes. Overall, this analytical toolbox now facilitates the exploration of both spontaneous and adaptive heterogeneity in mesenchymal migration. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11384.001 PMID:26821527

  2. Bacterial community analysis of beef cattle feedlots reveals that pen surface is distinct from feces.

    PubMed

    Durso, Lisa M; Harhay, Gregory P; Smith, Timothy P L; Bono, James L; DeSantis, Todd Z; Clawson, Michael L

    2011-05-01

    The surface of beef cattle feedlot pens is commonly conceptualized as being packed uncomposted manure. Despite the important role that the feedlot pen may play in the transmission of veterinary and zoonotic pathogens, the bacterial ecology of feedlot surface material is not well understood. Our present study characterized the bacterial communities of the beef cattle feedlot pen surface material using 3647 full-length 16S rDNA sequences, and we compared the community composition of feedlot pens to the fecal source material. The feedlot surface composite was represented by members of the phylum Actinobacteria (42%), followed by Firmicutes (24%), Bacteroidetes (24%), and Proteobacteria (9%). The feedlot pen surface material bacterial communities were clearly distinct from those of the feces from animals in the same pen. Comparisons with previously published results of feces from the animals in the same pen reveal that, of 139 genera identified, only 25 were present in both habitats. These results indicate that, microbiologically, the feedlot pen surface material is separate and distinct from the fecal source material, suggesting that bacteria that originate in cattle feces face different selection pressures and survival challenges during their tenure in the feedlot pen, as compared to their residence in the gastrointestinal tract.

  3. Proteome approaches combined with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed a distinctive biofilm physiology in Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed

    Serra, Diego Omar; Lücking, Genia; Weiland, Florian; Schulz, Stefan; Görg, Angelika; Yantorno, Osvaldo Miguel; Ehling-Schulz, Monika

    2008-12-01

    Proteome analysis was combined with whole-cell metabolic fingerprinting to gain insight into the physiology of mature biofilm in Bordetella pertussis, the agent responsible for whooping cough. Recent reports indicate that B. pertussis adopts a sessile biofilm as a strategy to persistently colonize the human host. However, since research in the past mainly focused on the planktonic lifestyle of B. pertussis, knowledge on biofilm formation of this important human pathogen is still limited. Comparative studies were carried out by combining 2-DE and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy with multivariate statistical methods. These complementary approaches demonstrated that biofilm development has a distinctive impact on B. pertussis physiology. Results from MALDI-TOF/MS identification of proteins together with results from FT-IR spectroscopy revealed the biosynthesis of a putative acidic-type polysaccharide polymer as the most distinctive trait of B. pertussis life in a biofilm. Additionally, expression of proteins known to be involved in cellular regulatory circuits, cell attachment and virulence was altered in sessile cells, which strongly suggests a significant impact of biofilm development on B. pertussis pathogenesis. In summary, our work showed that the combination of proteomics and FT-IR spectroscopy with multivariate statistical analysis provides a powerful tool to gain further insight into bacterial lifestyles.

  4. High diversity and distinctive community structure of bacteria on glaciers in China revealed by 454 pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Zhou, Yu-Guang; Xin, Yu-Hua

    2015-12-01

    The bacterial diversity, community structure and preliminary microbial biogeographic pattern were assessed on glacier surfaces, including three northern glaciers (cold glaciers) and three southern glaciers (temperate glaciers) in China that experienced distinct climatic conditions. Pyrosequencing revealed that bacterial diversities were surprisingly high. With respect to operational taxonomic units (OTUs), Proteobacteria was the most dominant phylum on the glacier surfaces, especially Betaproteobacteria. Significant differences of the bacterial communities were observed between northern and southern glacier surfaces. The rare and abundant populations showed similar clustering patterns to the whole community. The analysis of the culturable bacterial compositions from four glaciers supported this conclusion. Redundancy analysis (RDA) and partial Mantel tests indicated that annual mean temperature, as well as geographical distance, was significantly correlated with the bacterial communities on the glaciers. It was inferred that bacterial communities on northern and southern glacier surfaces experienced different climate, water and nutrient patterns, and consequently evolved different lifestyles.

  5. Global analysis of gene expression in pulmonary fibrosis reveals distinct programs regulating lung inflammation and fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, Naftali; Allard, John D.; Pittet, Jean F.; Zuo, Fengrong; Griffiths, Mark J. D.; Morris, David; Huang, Xiaozhu; Sheppard, Dean; Heller, Renu A.

    2000-02-01

    The molecular mechanisms of pulmonary fibrosis are poorly understood. We have used oligonucleotide arrays to analyze the gene expression programs that underlie pulmonary fibrosis in response to bleomycin, a drug that causes lung inflammation and fibrosis, in two strains of susceptible mice (129 and C57BL/6). We then compared the gene expression patterns in these mice with 129 mice carrying a null mutation in the epithelial-restricted integrin 6 subunit (6/-), which develop inflammation but are protected from pulmonary fibrosis. Cluster analysis identified two distinct groups of genes involved in the inflammatory and fibrotic responses. Analysis of gene expression at multiple time points after bleomycin administration revealed sequential induction of subsets of genes that characterize each response. The availability of this comprehensive data set should accelerate the development of more effective strategies for intervention at the various stages in the development of fibrotic diseases of the lungs and other organs.

  6. Distinct binding mode of multikinase inhibitor lenvatinib revealed by biochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Kiyoshi; Ikemori-Kawada, Megumi; Jestel, Anja; von König, Konstanze; Funahashi, Yasuhiro; Matsushima, Tomohiro; Tsuruoka, Akihiko; Inoue, Atsushi; Matsui, Junji

    2015-01-08

    Lenvatinib is an oral multikinase inhibitor that selectively inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors 1 to 3 and other proangiogenic and oncogenic pathway-related receptor tyrosine kinases. To elucidate the origin of the potency of lenvatinib in VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) inhibition, we conducted a kinetic interaction analysis of lenvatinib with VEGFR2 and X-ray analysis of the crystal structure of VEGFR2-lenvatinib complexes. Kinetic analysis revealed that lenvatinib had a rapid association rate constant and a relatively slow dissociation rate constant in complex with VEGFR2. Co-crystal structure analysis demonstrated that lenvatinib binds at its ATP mimetic quinoline moiety to the ATP binding site and to the neighboring region via a cyclopropane ring, adopting an Asp-Phe-Gly (DFG)-"in" conformation. These results suggest that lenvatinib is very distinct in its binding mode of interaction compared to the several approved VEGFR2 kinase inhibitors.

  7. Reconstructing dynamic mental models of facial expressions in prosopagnosia reveals distinct representations for identity and expression.

    PubMed

    Richoz, Anne-Raphaëlle; Jack, Rachael E; Garrod, Oliver G B; Schyns, Philippe G; Caldara, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    The human face transmits a wealth of signals that readily provide crucial information for social interactions, such as facial identity and emotional expression. Yet, a fundamental question remains unresolved: does the face information for identity and emotional expression categorization tap into common or distinct representational systems? To address this question we tested PS, a pure case of acquired prosopagnosia with bilateral occipitotemporal lesions anatomically sparing the regions that are assumed to contribute to facial expression (de)coding (i.e., the amygdala, the insula and the posterior superior temporal sulcus--pSTS). We previously demonstrated that PS does not use information from the eye region to identify faces, but relies on the suboptimal mouth region. PS's abnormal information use for identity, coupled with her neural dissociation, provides a unique opportunity to probe the existence of a dichotomy in the face representational system. To reconstruct the mental models of the six basic facial expressions of emotion in PS and age-matched healthy observers, we used a novel reverse correlation technique tracking information use on dynamic faces. PS was comparable to controls, using all facial features to (de)code facial expressions with the exception of fear. PS's normal (de)coding of dynamic facial expressions suggests that the face system relies either on distinct representational systems for identity and expression, or dissociable cortical pathways to access them. Interestingly, PS showed a selective impairment for categorizing many static facial expressions, which could be accounted for by her lesion in the right inferior occipital gyrus. PS's advantage for dynamic facial expressions might instead relate to a functionally distinct and sufficient cortical pathway directly connecting the early visual cortex to the spared pSTS. Altogether, our data provide critical insights on the healthy and impaired face systems, question evidence of deficits

  8. Molecular analysis of aggressive renal cell carcinoma with unclassified histology reveals distinct subsets

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying-Bei; Xu, Jianing; Skanderup, Anders Jacobsen; Dong, Yiyu; Brannon, A. Rose; Wang, Lu; Won, Helen H.; Wang, Patricia I.; Nanjangud, Gouri J.; Jungbluth, Achim A.; Li, Wei; Ojeda, Virginia; Hakimi, A. Ari; Voss, Martin H.; Schultz, Nikolaus; Motzer, Robert J.; Russo, Paul; Cheng, Emily H.; Giancotti, Filippo G.; Lee, William; Berger, Michael F.; Tickoo, Satish K.; Reuter, Victor E.; Hsieh, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinomas with unclassified histology (uRCC) constitute a significant portion of aggressive non-clear cell renal cell carcinomas that have no standard therapy. The oncogenic drivers in these tumours are unknown. Here we perform a molecular analysis of 62 high-grade primary uRCC, incorporating targeted cancer gene sequencing, RNA sequencing, single-nucleotide polymorphism array, fluorescence in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry and cell-based assays. We identify recurrent somatic mutations in 29 genes, including NF2 (18%), SETD2 (18%), BAP1 (13%), KMT2C (10%) and MTOR (8%). Integrated analysis reveals a subset of 26% uRCC characterized by NF2 loss, dysregulated Hippo–YAP pathway and worse survival, whereas 21% uRCC with mutations of MTOR, TSC1, TSC2 or PTEN and hyperactive mTORC1 signalling are associated with better clinical outcome. FH deficiency (6%), chromatin/DNA damage regulator mutations (21%) and ALK translocation (2%) distinguish additional cases. Altogether, this study reveals distinct molecular subsets for 76% of our uRCC cohort, which could have diagnostic and therapeutic implications. PMID:27713405

  9. Venus trap in the mouse embryo reveals distinct molecular dynamics underlying specification of first embryonic lineages.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Jens-Erik; Panavaite, Laura; Gunther, Stefan; Wennekamp, Sebastian; Groner, Anna C; Pigge, Anton; Salvenmoser, Stefanie; Trono, Didier; Hufnagel, Lars; Hiiragi, Takashi

    2015-08-01

    Mammalian development begins with the segregation of embryonic and extra-embryonic lineages in the blastocyst. Recent studies revealed cell-to-cell gene expression heterogeneity and dynamic cell rearrangements during mouse blastocyst formation. Thus, mechanistic understanding of lineage specification requires quantitative description of gene expression dynamics at a single-cell resolution in living embryos. However, only a few fluorescent gene expression reporter mice are available and quantitative live image analysis is limited so far. Here, we carried out a fluorescence gene-trap screen and established reporter mice expressing Venus specifically in the first lineages. Lineage tracking, quantitative gene expression and cell position analyses allowed us to build a comprehensive lineage map of mouse pre-implantation development. Our systematic analysis revealed that, contrary to the available models, the timing and mechanism of lineage specification may be distinct between the trophectoderm and the inner cell mass. While expression of our trophectoderm-specific lineage marker is upregulated in outside cells upon asymmetric divisions at 8- and 16-cell stages, the inside-specific upregulation of the inner-cell-mass marker only becomes evident at the 64-cell stage. This study thus provides a framework toward systems-level understanding of embryogenesis marked by high dynamicity and stochastic variability.

  10. Assembly and structure of Lys33-linked polyubiquitin reveals distinct conformations

    PubMed Central

    Kristariyanto, Yosua Adi; Choi, Soo-Youn; Rehman, Syed Arif Abdul; Ritorto, Maria Stella; Campbell, David G; Morrice, Nicholas A; Toth, Rachel; Kulathu, Yogesh

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitylation regulates a multitude of biological processes and this versatility stems from the ability of ubiquitin (Ub) to form topologically different polymers of eight different linkage types. Whereas some linkages have been studied in detail, other linkage types including Lys33-linked polyUb are poorly understood. In the present study, we identify an enzymatic system for the large-scale assembly of Lys33 chains by combining the HECT (homologous to the E6–AP C-terminus) E3 ligase AREL1 (apoptosis-resistant E3 Ub protein ligase 1) with linkage selective deubiquitinases (DUBs). Moreover, this first characterization of the chain selectivity of AREL1 indicates its preference for assembling Lys33- and Lys11-linked Ub chains. Intriguingly, the crystal structure of Lys33-linked diUb reveals that it adopts a compact conformation very similar to that observed for Lys11-linked diUb. In contrast, crystallographic analysis of Lys33-linked triUb reveals a more extended conformation. These two distinct conformational states of Lys33-linked polyUb may be selectively recognized by Ub-binding domains (UBD) and enzymes of the Ub system. Importantly, our work provides a method to assemble Lys33-linked polyUb that will allow further characterization of this atypical chain type. PMID:25723849

  11. Phylogeography of Y-Chromosome Haplogroup I Reveals Distinct Domains of Prehistoric Gene Flow in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Rootsi, Siiri; Magri, Chiara; Kivisild, Toomas; Benuzzi, Giorgia; Help, Hela; Bermisheva, Marina; Kutuev, Ildus; Barać, Lovorka; Peričić, Marijana; Balanovsky, Oleg; Pshenichnov, Andrey; Dion, Daniel; Grobei, Monica; Zhivotovsky, Lev A.; Battaglia, Vincenza; Achilli, Alessandro; Al-Zahery, Nadia; Parik, Jüri; King, Roy; Cinnioğlu, Cengiz; Khusnutdinova, Elsa; Rudan, Pavao; Balanovska, Elena; Scheffrahn, Wolfgang; Simonescu, Maya; Brehm, Antonio; Goncalves, Rita; Rosa, Alexandra; Moisan, Jean-Paul; Chaventre, Andre; Ferak, Vladimir; Füredi, Sandor; Oefner, Peter J.; Shen, Peidong; Beckman, Lars; Mikerezi, Ilia; Terzić, Rifet; Primorac, Dragan; Cambon-Thomsen, Anne; Krumina, Astrida; Torroni, Antonio; Underhill, Peter A.; Santachiara-Benerecetti, A. Silvana; Villems, Richard; Semino, Ornella

    2004-01-01

    To investigate which aspects of contemporary human Y-chromosome variation in Europe are characteristic of primary colonization, late-glacial expansions from refuge areas, Neolithic dispersals, or more recent events of gene flow, we have analyzed, in detail, haplogroup I (Hg I), the only major clade of the Y phylogeny that is widespread over Europe but virtually absent elsewhere. The analysis of 1,104 Hg I Y chromosomes, which were identified in the survey of 7,574 males from 60 population samples, revealed several subclades with distinct geographic distributions. Subclade I1a accounts for most of Hg I in Scandinavia, with a rapidly decreasing frequency toward both the East European Plain and the Atlantic fringe, but microsatellite diversity reveals that France could be the source region of the early spread of both I1a and the less common I1c. Also, I1b*, which extends from the eastern Adriatic to eastern Europe and declines noticeably toward the southern Balkans and abruptly toward the periphery of northern Italy, probably diffused after the Last Glacial Maximum from a homeland in eastern Europe or the Balkans. In contrast, I1b2 most likely arose in southern France/Iberia. Similarly to the other subclades, it underwent a postglacial expansion and marked the human colonization of Sardinia ∼9,000 years ago. PMID:15162323

  12. DISTINCT FUNCTIONS OF SOCIAL SUPPORT AND COGNITIVE FUNCTION AMONG OLDER ADULTS

    PubMed Central

    Sims, Regina C.; Hosey, Megan; Levy, Shellie-Anne; Whitfield, Keith E.; Katzel, Leslie I.; Waldstein, Shari R.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Study Context Social support has been shown to buffer cognitive decline in older adults; however, few studies have examined the association of distinct functions of perceived social support and cognitive function. The current study examined the relations between distinct functions of social support and numerous cognitive domains in older adults. Methods Data were derived from a cross-sectional, correlational study of cardiovascular risk factors, cognitive function, and neuroimaging. The participants were 175 older adults with a mean age of 66.32. A number of neuropsychological tests and the Interpersonal Support Evaluation List were administered. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to determine cross-sectional relations of social support to cognitive function after controlling for age, gender, education, depressive symptomatology, systolic blood pressure, body-mass index, total cholesterol, and fasting glucose. Results No significant positive relations were found between distinct functions of social support and cognitive function in any domain; however, inverse relations emerged such that greater social support across several functions was associated with poorer nonverbal memory and response inhibition. Conclusion Results suggest that the receipt of social support may be a burden for some older adults. Within the current study, fluid cognitive abilities reflected this phenomenon. The mechanism through which social support is associated with poorer cognitive function in some domains deserves further exploration. PMID:24467699

  13. Distinct functions of social support and cognitive function among older adults.

    PubMed

    Sims, Regina C; Hosey, Megan; Levy, Shellie-Anne; Whitfield, Keith E; Katzel, Leslie I; Waldstein, Shari R

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/STUDY CONTEXT: Social support has been shown to buffer cognitive decline in older adults; however, few studies have examined the association of distinct functions of perceived social support and cognitive function. The current study examined the relations between distinct functions of social support and numerous cognitive domains in older adults. Data were derived from a cross-sectional, correlational study of cardiovascular risk factors, cognitive function, and neuroimaging. The participants were 175 older adults with a mean age of 66.32. A number of neuropsychological tests and the Interpersonal Support Evaluation List were administered. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to determine cross-sectional relations of social support to cognitive function after controlling for age, gender, education, depressive symptomatology, systolic blood pressure, body mass index, total cholesterol, and fasting glucose. No significant positive relations were found between distinct functions of social support and cognitive function in any domain; however, inverse relations emerged such that greater social support across several functions was associated with poorer nonverbal memory and response inhibition. Results suggest that the receipt of social support may be a burden for some older adults. Within the current study, fluid cognitive abilities reflected this phenomenon. The mechanism through which social support is associated with poorer cognitive function in some domains deserves further exploration.

  14. Do Distinct Functional Dyspepsia Subtypes Exist in Children?

    PubMed

    Turco, Rossella; Russo, Marina; Martinelli, Massimo; Castiello, Rosa; Coppola, Vincenzo; Miele, Erasmo; Staiano, Annamaria

    2016-03-01

    Two different subtypes of functional dyspepsia (FD) are recognized in adults: epigastric pain syndrome (EPS) and postprandial distress syndrome (PDS). The aim of the study was to assess the presence of FD subtypes in childhood at diagnosis and to observe changes at follow-up. A total of 100 patients with a diagnosis of FD based on pediatric Rome III criteria were consecutively enrolled. FD subtypes were successively classified through adult Rome III classification. Children were revaluated after 6 months of follow-up (T1). At T0, 17 (17%) of 100 patients were classified as EPS, whereas 47 (47%) of 100 patients fulfilled criteria for PDS. In 36 (36%) of 100 children an overlap between the 2 subtypes was identified. Nausea was significantly higher in PDS and overlap groups when compared with EPS (χ = 21.7, P = 0.0001; χ = 20.7, P = 0.0001). Headache was significantly increased in PDS and overlap groups compared with patients with EPS (χ = 9.8, P = 0.001; χ = 13.1, P = 0.0001, respectively). At T1 among children belonging to PDS group at enrolment, 9 of 47 (19.1%) changed to EPS group, and 9 of 47 (19.1%) changed to the overlap group. Five (29.4%) of 17 patients and 2 (11.8%) of 17 children diagnosed as having EPS at T0 switched to PDS and overlap group, respectively. Of the 36 patients with overlap at enrollment, 11 (30.6%) satisfied criteria for PDS, and 7 (19.4%) switched to EPS group. Two distinct FD subtypes are identifiable in pediatric population. A high percentage of overlap and a variation of subtype over time were found, suggesting a common pathophysiologic mechanism.

  15. Dynamic Remodeling of Microbial Biofilms by Functionally Distinct Exopolysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Su Chuen; Kundukad, Binu; Seviour, Thomas; van der Maarel, Johan R. C.; Yang, Liang; Rice, Scott A.; Doyle, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Biofilms are densely populated communities of microbial cells protected and held together by a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. The structure and rheological properties of the matrix at the microscale influence the retention and transport of molecules and cells in the biofilm, thereby dictating population and community behavior. Despite its importance, quantitative descriptions of the matrix microstructure and microrheology are limited. Here, particle-tracking microrheology in combination with genetic approaches was used to spatially and temporally study the rheological contributions of the major exopolysaccharides Pel and Psl in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Psl increased the elasticity and effective cross-linking within the matrix, which strengthened its scaffold and appeared to facilitate the formation of microcolonies. Conversely, Pel reduced effective cross-linking within the matrix. Without Psl, the matrix becomes more viscous, which facilitates biofilm spreading. The wild-type biofilm decreased in effective cross-linking over time, which would be advantageous for the spreading and colonization of new surfaces. This suggests that there are regulatory mechanisms to control production of the exopolysaccharides that serve to remodel the matrix of developing biofilms. The exopolysaccharides were also found to have profound effects on the spatial organization and integration of P. aeruginosa in a mixed-species biofilm model of P. aeruginosa-Staphylococcus aureus. Pel was required for close association of the two species in mixed-species microcolonies. In contrast, Psl was important for P. aeruginosa to form single-species biofilms on top of S. aureus biofilms. Our results demonstrate that Pel and Psl have distinct physical properties and functional roles during biofilm formation. PMID:25096883

  16. Distinct populations of innate CD8+ T cells revealed in a CXCR3 reporter mouse.

    PubMed

    Oghumu, Steve; Dong, Ran; Varikuti, Sanjay; Shawler, Todd; Kampfrath, Thomas; Terrazas, Cesar A; Lezama-Davila, Claudio; Ahmer, Brian M M; Whitacre, Caroline C; Rajagopalan, Sanjay; Locksley, Richard; Sharpe, Arlene H; Satoskar, Abhay R

    2013-03-01

    CXCR3, expressed mainly on activated T and NK cells, is implicated in a host of immunological conditions and can contribute either to disease resolution or pathology. We report the generation and characterization of a novel CXCR3 internal ribosome entry site bicistronic enhanced GFP reporter (CIBER) mouse in which enhanced GFP expression correlates with surface levels of CXCR3. Using CIBER mice, we identified two distinct populations of innate CD8(+) T cells based on constitutive expression of CXCR3. We demonstrate that CXCR3(+) innate CD8(+) T cells preferentially express higher levels of Ly6C and CD122, but lower levels of CCR9 compared with CXCR3(-) innate CD8(+) T cells. Furthermore, we show that CXCR3(+) innate CD8(+) T cells express higher transcript levels of antiapoptotic but lower levels of proapoptotic factors, respond more robustly to IL-2 and IL-15, and produce significantly more IFN-γ and granzyme B. Interestingly, CXCR3(+) innate CD8(+) T cells do not respond to IL-12 or IL-18 alone, but produce significant amounts of IFN-γ on stimulation with a combination of these cytokines. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that CXCR3(+) and CXCR3(-) innate CD8(+) T cells are phenotypically and functionally distinct. These newly generated CIBER mice provide a novel tool for studying the role of CXCR3 and CXCR3-expressing cells in vivo.

  17. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Distinct Gene Expression Profiles in Eosinophilic and Noneosinophilic Chronic Rhinosinusitis with Nasal Polyps

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiqing; Gao, Zhiqiang; Wang, Huaishan; Li, Taisheng; He, Wei; Lv, Wei; Zhang, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP), one of the most prevalent chronic diseases, is characterized by persistent inflammation of sinonasal mucosa. However, the pathogenesis of CRSwNP remains unclear. Here, we performed next-generation RNA sequencing and a comprehensive bioinformatics analyses to characterize the transcriptome profiles, including mRNAs and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), in patients with eosinophilic and noneosinophilic CRSwNP. A total of 1917 novel lncRNAs and 280 known lncRNAs were identified. We showed eosinophilic CRSwNP (ECRSwNP) and noneosinophilic CRSwNP (non-ECRSwNP) display distinct transcriptome profiles. We identified crucial pathways, including inflammatory, immune response and extracellular microenvironment, connected to the pathogenetic mechanism of CRSwNP. We also discovered key lncRNAs differentially expressed, including lncRNA XLOC_010280, which regulates CCL18 and eosinophilic inflammation. The qRT-PCR and in situ RNA hybridization results verified the key differentially expressed genes. The feature of distinct transcriptomes between ECRSwNP and non-ECRSwNP suggests the necessity to develop specific biomarkers and personalized therapeutic strategies. Our findings lay a solid foundation for subsequent functional studies of mRNAs and lncRNAs as diagnostic and therapeutic targets in CRSwNP by providing a candidate reservoir. PMID:27216292

  18. An Overexpression Screen of Toxoplasma gondii Rab-GTPases Reveals Distinct Transport Routes to the Micronemes

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, Katrin; Kamin, Dirk; Rittweger, Eva; Wilkes, Jonathan; Flammer, Halley; Mahler, Sabine; Heng, Joanne; Tonkin, Christopher J.; Langsley, Gordon; Hell, Stefan W.; Carruthers, Vernon B.; Ferguson, David J. P.; Meissner, Markus

    2013-01-01

    The basic organisation of the endomembrane system is conserved in all eukaryotes and comparative genome analyses provides compelling evidence that the endomembrane system of the last common eukaryotic ancestor (LCEA) is complex with many genes required for regulated traffic being present. Although apicomplexan parasites, causative agents of severe human and animal diseases, appear to have only a basic set of trafficking factors such as Rab-GTPases, they evolved unique secretory organelles (micronemes, rhoptries and dense granules) that are sequentially secreted during invasion of the host cell. In order to define the secretory pathway of apicomplexans, we performed an overexpression screen of Rabs in Toxoplasma gondii and identified Rab5A and Rab5C as important regulators of traffic to micronemes and rhoptries. Intriguingly, we found that not all microneme proteins traffic depends on functional Rab5A and Rab5C, indicating the existence of redundant microneme targeting pathways. Using two-colour super-resolution stimulated emission depletion (STED) we verified distinct localisations of independent microneme proteins and demonstrate that micronemal organelles are organised in distinct subsets or subcompartments. Our results suggest that apicomplexan parasites modify classical regulators of the endocytic system to carryout essential parasite-specific roles in the biogenesis of their unique secretory organelles. PMID:23505371

  19. Cortical connectivity maps reveal anatomically distinct areas in the parietal cortex of the rat.

    PubMed

    Wilber, Aaron A; Clark, Benjamin J; Demecha, Alexis J; Mesina, Lilia; Vos, Jessica M; McNaughton, Bruce L

    2014-01-01

    A central feature of theories of spatial navigation involves the representation of spatial relationships between objects in complex environments. The parietal cortex has long been linked to the processing of spatial visual information and recent evidence from single unit recording in rodents suggests a role for this region in encoding egocentric and world-centered frames. The rat parietal cortex can be subdivided into four distinct rostral-caudal and medial-lateral regions, which includes a zone previously characterized as secondary visual cortex. At present, very little is known regarding the relative connectivity of these parietal subdivisions. Thus, we set out to map the connectivity of the entire anterior-posterior and medial-lateral span of this region. To do this we used anterograde and retrograde tracers in conjunction with open source neuronal segmentation and tracer detection tools to generate whole brain connectivity maps of parietal inputs and outputs. Our present results show that inputs to the parietal cortex varied significantly along the medial-lateral, but not the rostral-caudal axis. Specifically, retrosplenial connectivity is greater medially, but connectivity with visual cortex, though generally sparse, is more significant laterally. Finally, based on connection density, the connectivity between parietal cortex and hippocampus is indirect and likely achieved largely via dysgranular retrosplenial cortex. Thus, similar to primates, the parietal cortex of rats exhibits a difference in connectivity along the medial-lateral axis, which may represent functionally distinct areas.

  20. Proteomic analyses reveal distinct chromatin-associated and soluble transcription factor complexes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xu; Wang, Wenqi; Wang, Jiadong; Malovannaya, Anna; Xi, Yuanxin; Li, Wei; Guerra, Rudy; Hawke, David H; Qin, Jun; Chen, Junjie

    2015-01-01

    The current knowledge on how transcription factors (TFs), the ultimate targets and executors of cellular signalling pathways, are regulated by protein–protein interactions remains limited. Here, we performed proteomics analyses of soluble and chromatin-associated complexes of 56 TFs, including the targets of many signalling pathways involved in development and cancer, and 37 members of the Forkhead box (FOX) TF family. Using tandem affinity purification followed by mass spectrometry (TAP/MS), we performed 214 purifications and identified 2,156 high-confident protein–protein interactions. We found that most TFs form very distinct protein complexes on and off chromatin. Using this data set, we categorized the transcription-related or unrelated regulators for general or specific TFs. Our study offers a valuable resource of protein–protein interaction networks for a large number of TFs and underscores the general principle that TFs form distinct location-specific protein complexes that are associated with the different regulation and diverse functions of these TFs. PMID:25609649

  1. Fungi have three tetraspanin families with distinct functions

    PubMed Central

    Lambou, Karine; Tharreau, Didier; Kohler, Annegret; Sirven, Catherine; Marguerettaz, Mélanie; Barbisan, Crystel; Sexton, Adrienne C; Kellner, Ellen M; Martin, Francis; Howlett, Barbara J; Orbach, Marc J; Lebrun, Marc-Henri

    2008-01-01

    Background Tetraspanins are small membrane proteins that belong to a superfamily encompassing 33 members in human and mouse. These proteins act as organizers of membrane-signalling complexes. So far only two tetraspanin families have been identified in fungi. These are Pls1, which is required for pathogenicity of the plant pathogenic ascomycetes, Magnaporthe grisea, Botrytis cinerea and Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, and Tsp2, whose function is unknown. In this report, we describe a third family of tetraspanins (Tsp3) and a new family of tetraspanin-like proteins (Tpl1) in fungi. We also describe expression of some of these genes in M. grisea and a basidiomycete, Laccaria bicolor, and also their functional analysis in M. grisea. Results The exhaustive search for tetraspanins in fungal genomes reveals that higher fungi (basidiomycetes and ascomycetes) contain three families of tetraspanins (Pls1, Tsp2 and Tsp3) with different distribution amongst phyla. Pls1 is found in ascomycetes and basidiomycetes, whereas Tsp2 is restricted to basidiomycetes and Tsp3 to ascomycetes. A unique copy of each of PLS1 and TSP3 was found in ascomycetes in contrast to TSP2, which has several paralogs in the basidiomycetes, Coprinus cinereus and Laccaria bicolor. A tetraspanin-like family (Tpl1) was also identified in ascomycetes. Transcriptional analyses in various tissues of L. bicolor and M. grisea showed that PLS1 and TSP2 are expressed in all tissues in L. bicolor and that TSP3 and TPL1 are overexpressed in the sexual fruiting bodies (perithecia) and mycelia of M. grisea, suggesting that these genes are not pseudogenes. Phenotypic analysis of gene replacementmutants Δtsp3 and Δtpl1 of M. grisea revealed a reduction of the pathogenicity only on rice, in contrast to Δpls1 mutants, which are completely non-pathogenic on barley and rice. Conclusion A new tetraspanin family (Tsp3) and a tetraspanin-like protein family (Tpl1) have been identified in fungi. Functional analysis by gene

  2. Emergence of Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 4: Phylogenetic Analysis Reveals Three Distinct Epidemiological Profiles ▿

    PubMed Central

    de Bruijne, Joep; Schinkel, Janke; Prins, Maria; Koekkoek, Sylvie M.; Aronson, Sem J.; van Ballegooijen, Marijn W.; Reesink, Hendrik W.; Molenkamp, Richard; van de Laar, Thijs J. W.

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 4 (HCV-4) infection is considered to be difficult to treat and has become increasingly prevalent in European countries, including The Netherlands. Using a molecular epidemiological approach, the present study investigates the genetic diversity and evolutionary origin of HCV-4 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Phylogenetic analysis of the NS5B sequences (668 bp) obtained from 133 patients newly diagnosed with HCV-4 infection over the period from 1999 to 2008 revealed eight distinct HCV-4 subtypes; the majority of HCV-4 isolates were of subtypes 4d (57%) and 4a (37%). Three distinct monophyletic clusters were identified, with each one having a specific epidemiological profile: (i) Egyptian immigrants infected with HCV-4a (n = 46), (ii) Dutch patients with a history of injecting drug use infected with HCV-4d (n = 44), and (iii) Dutch human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) infected with HCV-4d (n = 26). Subsequent molecular clock analyses confirmed that the emergence of HCV-4 within these three risk groups coincided with (i) the parenteral antischistosomal therapy campaigns in Egypt (1920 to 1960), (ii) the popularity of injecting drug use in The Netherlands (1960 to 1990), and (iii) the rise in high-risk sexual behavior among MSM after the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (1996 onwards). Our data show that in addition to the influx of HCV-4 strains from countries where HCV-4 is endemic, the local spread of HCV-4d affecting injecting drug users and, in recent years, especially HIV-positive MSM will further increase the relative proportion of HCV-4-infected patients in The Netherlands. HCV-4-specific agents are drastically needed to improve treatment response rates and decrease the future burden of HCV-4-related disease. PMID:19794040

  3. Xenon and iodine reveal multiple distinct exotic xenon components in Efremovka "nanodiamonds"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmour, J. D.; Holland, G.; Verchovsky, A. B.; Fisenko, A. V.; Crowther, S. A.; Turner, G.

    2016-03-01

    We identify new xenon components in a nanodiamond-rich residue from the reduced CV3 chondrite Efremovka. We demonstrate for the first time that these, and the previously identified xenon components Xe-P3 and Xe-P6, are associated with elevated I/Xe ratios. The 129I/127I ratio associated with xenon loss from these presolar compositions during processing on planetesimals in the early solar system was (0.369 ± 0.019) × 10-4, a factor of 3-4 lower than the canonical value. This suggests either incorporation of iodine into carbonaceous grains before the last input of freshly synthesized 129I to the solar system's precursor material, or loss of noble gases during processing of planetesimals around 30 Myr after solar system formation. The xenon/iodine ratios and model closure ages were revealed by laser step pyrolysis analysis of a neutron-irradiated, coarse-grained nanodiamond separate. Three distinct low temperature compositions are identified by characteristic I/Xe ratios and 136Xe/132Xe ratios. There is some evidence of multiple compositions with distinct I/Xe ratios in the higher temperature releases associated with Xe-P6. The presence of iodine alongside Q-Xe and these components in nanodiamonds constrains the pathway by which extreme volatiles entered the solid phase and may facilitate the identification of their carriers. There is no detectable iodine contribution to the presolar Xe-HL component, which is released at intermediate temperatures; this suggests a distinct trapping process. Releases associated with the other components all include significant contributions of 128Xe produced from iodine by neutron capture during reactor irradiation. We propose a revised model relating the origin of Xe-P3 (which exhibits an s-process deficit) through a ;Q-process; to the Q component (which makes the dominant contribution to the heavy noble gas budget of primitive material). The Q-process incorporates noble gases and iodine into specific carbonaceous phases with mass

  4. Distinct functional determinants of influenza hemagglutinin-mediated membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Ivanovic, Tijana; Harrison, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    Membrane fusion is the critical step for infectious cell penetration by enveloped viruses. We have previously used single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics to study the molecular mechanism of influenza-virus envelope fusion. Published data on fusion inhibition by antibodies to the 'stem' of influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) now allow us to incorporate into simulations the provision that some HAs are inactive. We find that more than half of the HAs are unproductive even for virions with no bound antibodies, but that the overall mechanism is extremely robust. Determining the fraction of competent HAs allows us to determine their rates of target-membrane engagement. Comparison of simulations with data from H3N2 and H1N1 viruses reveals three independent functional variables of HA-mediated membrane fusion closely linked to neutralization susceptibility. Evidence for compensatory changes in the evolved mechanism sets the stage for studies aiming to define the molecular constraints on HA evolvability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11009.001 PMID:26613408

  5. Hierarchical modularity in ERα transcriptional network is associated with distinct functions and implicates clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Tang, Binhua; Hsu, Hang-Kai; Hsu, Pei-Yin; Bonneville, Russell; Chen, Su-Shing; Huang, Tim H-M; Jin, Victor X

    2012-01-01

    Recent genome-wide profiling reveals highly complex regulation networks among ERα and its targets. We integrated estrogen (E2)-stimulated time-series ERα ChIP-seq and gene expression data to identify the ERα-centered transcription factor (TF) hubs and their target genes, and inferred the time-variant hierarchical network structures using a Bayesian multivariate modeling approach. With its recurrent motif patterns, we determined three embedded regulatory modules from the ERα core transcriptional network. The GO analyses revealed the distinct biological function associated with each of three embedded modules. The survival analysis showed the genes in each module were able to render a significant survival correlation in breast cancer patient cohorts. In summary, our Bayesian statistical modeling and modularity analysis not only reveals the dynamic properties of the ERα-centered regulatory network and associated distinct biological functions, but also provides a reliable and effective genomic analytical approach for the analysis of dynamic regulatory network for any given TF.

  6. Distinctive time-lagged resting-state networks revealed by simultaneous EEG-fMRI.

    PubMed

    Feige, Bernd; Spiegelhalder, Kai; Kiemen, Andrea; Bosch, Oliver G; Tebartz van Elst, Ludger; Hennig, Jürgen; Seifritz, Erich; Riemann, Dieter

    2017-01-15

    Functional activation as evidenced by blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) functional MRI changes or event-related EEG is known to closely follow patterns of stimulation or self-paced action. Any lags are compatible with axonal conduction velocities and neural integration times. The important analysis of resting state networks is generally based on the assumption that these principles also hold for spontaneous fluctuations in brain activity. Previous observations using simultaneous EEG and fMRI indicate that slower processes, with delays in the seconds range, determine at least part of the relationship between spontaneous EEG and fMRI. To assess this relationship systematically, we used deconvolution analysis of EEG-fMRI during the resting state, assessing the relationship between EEG frequency bands and fMRI BOLD across the whole brain while allowing for time lags of up to 10.5s. Cluster analysis, identifying similar BOLD time courses in relation to EEG band power peaks, showed a clear segregation of functional subsystems of the brain. Our analysis shows that fMRI BOLD increases commonly precede EEG power increases by seconds. Most zero-lag correlations, on the other hand, were negative. This indicates two main distinct neuromodulatory mechanisms: an "idling" mechanism of simultaneous electric and metabolic network anticorrelation and a "regulatory" mechanism in which metabolic network activity precedes increased EEG power by some seconds. This has to be taken into consideration in further studies which address the causal and functional relationship of metabolic and electric brain activity patterns. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Phosphoproteomics Reveals Distinct Modes of Mec1/ATR Signaling During DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Francisco Meirelles Bastos; Kim, Dongsung; Cussiol, Jose Renato; Das, Jishnu; Jeong, Min Cheol; Doerfler, Lillian; Schmidt, Kristina Hildegard; Yu, Haiyuan; Smolka, Marcus Bustamante

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The Mec1/Tel1 kinases (human ATR/ATM) play numerous roles in the DNA replication stress response. Despite the multi-functionality of these kinases, studies of their in vivo action have mostly relied on a few well-established substrates. Here we employed a combined genetic-phosphoproteomic approach to monitor Mec1/Tel1 signaling in a systematic, unbiased and quantitative manner. Unexpectedly, we find that Mec1 is highly active during normal DNA replication, at levels comparable or higher than Mec1’s activation state induced by replication stress. This “replication-correlated” mode of Mec1 action requires the 9-1-1 clamp and the Dna2 lagging-strand factor, and is distinguishable from Mec1’s action in activating the downstream kinase Rad53. We propose that Mec1/ATR performs key functions during ongoing DNA synthesis that are distinct from their canonical checkpoint role during replication stress. PMID:25752575

  8. Two distinct pools of B12 analogs reveal community interdependencies in the ocean.

    PubMed

    Heal, Katherine R; Qin, Wei; Ribalet, Francois; Bertagnolli, Anthony D; Coyote-Maestas, Willow; Hmelo, Laura R; Moffett, James W; Devol, Allan H; Armbrust, E Virginia; Stahl, David A; Ingalls, Anitra E

    2017-01-10

    Organisms within all domains of life require the cofactor cobalamin (vitamin B12), which is produced only by a subset of bacteria and archaea. On the basis of genomic analyses, cobalamin biosynthesis in marine systems has been inferred in three main groups: select heterotrophic Proteobacteria, chemoautotrophic Thaumarchaeota, and photoautotrophic Cyanobacteria. Culture work demonstrates that many Cyanobacteria do not synthesize cobalamin but rather produce pseudocobalamin, challenging the connection between the occurrence of cobalamin biosynthesis genes and production of the compound in marine ecosystems. Here we show that cobalamin and pseudocobalamin coexist in the surface ocean, have distinct microbial sources, and support different enzymatic demands. Even in the presence of cobalamin, Cyanobacteria synthesize pseudocobalamin-likely reflecting their retention of an oxygen-independent pathway to produce pseudocobalamin, which is used as a cofactor in their specialized methionine synthase (MetH). This contrasts a model diatom, Thalassiosira pseudonana, which transported pseudocobalamin into the cell but was unable to use pseudocobalamin in its homolog of MetH. Our genomic and culture analyses showed that marine Thaumarchaeota and select heterotrophic bacteria produce cobalamin. This indicates that cobalamin in the surface ocean is a result of de novo synthesis by heterotrophic bacteria or via modification of closely related compounds like cyanobacterially produced pseudocobalamin. Deeper in the water column, our study implicates Thaumarchaeota as major producers of cobalamin based on genomic potential, cobalamin cell quotas, and abundance. Together, these findings establish the distinctive roles played by abundant prokaryotes in cobalamin-based microbial interdependencies that sustain community structure and function in the ocean.

  9. Distinct outcomes of CRL–Nedd8 pathway inhibition reveal cancer cell plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Rulina, Anastasia V; Mittler, Frédérique; Obeid, Patricia; Gerbaud, Sophie; Guyon, Laurent; Sulpice, Eric; Kermarrec, Frédérique; Assard, Nicole; Dolega, Monika E; Gidrol, Xavier; Balakirev, Maxim Y

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of protein degradation by blocking Cullin-RING E3 ligases (CRLs) is a new approach in cancer therapy though of unknown risk because CRL inhibition may stabilize both oncoproteins and tumor suppressors. Probing CRLs in prostate cancer cells revealed a remarkable plasticity of cells with TMPRSS2-ERG translocation. CRL suppression by chemical inhibition or knockdown of RING component RBX1 led to reversible G0/G1 cell cycle arrest that prevented cell apoptosis. Conversely, complete blocking of CRLs at a higher inhibitor dose-induced cytotoxicity that was amplified by knockdown of CRL regulator Cand1. We analyzed cell signaling to understand how varying degrees of CRL inhibition translated to distinct cell fates. Both tumor suppressor and oncogenic cell signaling pathways and transcriptional activities were affected, with pro-metastatic Wnt/β-catenin as the most upregulated. Suppression of the NF-κB pathway contributed to anti-apoptotic effect, and androgen receptor (AR) and ERG played decisive, though opposite, roles: AR was involved in protective quiescence, whereas ERG promoted apoptosis. These data define AR–ERG interaction as a key plasticity and survival determinant in prostate cancer and suggest supplementary treatments that may overcome drug resistance mechanisms regulated by AR–ERG interaction. PMID:27906189

  10. Investigation at the atomic level of homologous enzymes reveals distinct reaction paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoi, Ioanna; Schwartz, Steven D.

    2015-03-01

    Bacterial enzymes Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae 5' -Methylthioadenosine nucleosidases (MTANs) have different binding affinities for the same transition state analogue. This was surprising as these enzymes share 60% sequence identity, have almost identical active sites and act under the same mechanism. We performed Transition Path Sampling simulations of both enzymes to reveal the atomic details of the catalytic chemical step, to explain the inhibitor affinity differences. Unlike EcMTAN, VcMTAN has multiple distinct transition states, which is an indication that multiple sets of coordinated protein motions can reach a transition state. We also identified the important residues that participate in each enzyme's reaction coordinate and explained their contribution. Subtle dynamic differences manifest in difference of reaction coordinate and transition state structure and also suggest that MTANs differ from most ribosyl transferases. As experimental approaches report averages regarding reaction coordinate information, this study offers, previously unavailable, detailed knowledge to the explanation of bacterial MTANs catalytic mechanism, and could have a significant impact on pharmaceutical design. We acknowledge the support of the National Institutes of Health through Grant GM068036.

  11. Source-based morphometry reveals distinct patterns of aberrant brain volume in delusional infestation.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Robert Ch; Huber, Markus; Lepping, Peter; Sambataro, Fabio; Depping, Malte S; Karner, Martin; Freudenmann, Roland W

    2014-01-03

    Little is known about the neural correlates of delusional infestation (DI), the delusional belief to be infested with pathogens. So far, evidence comes mainly from case reports and case series. We investigated brain morphology in 16 DI patients and 16 healthy controls using structural magnetic resonance imaging and a multivariate data analysis technique, i.e. source-based morphometry (SBM). In addition, we explored differences in brain structure in patient subgroups based on disease aetiology. SBM revealed two patterns exhibiting significantly (p<0.05, Bonferroni-corrected) lower grey and higher white matter volume in DI patients compared to controls. Lower grey matter volume was found in medial prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, medial temporal lobe structures (parahippocampus and hippocampus), sensorimotor cortices, bilateral insula and thalamus and inferior parietal regions. Higher white matter volume was found in medial and middle frontal and temporal cortices, left insula and lentiform nucleus. Grey matter volume was abnormal in both "psychiatric" (primary DI and DI associated with an affective disorder) and "organic" DI (DI due to a medical condition). In contrast, aberrant white matter volume was only confirmed for the "organic" DI patient subgroup. These results suggest prefrontal, temporal, parietal, insular, thalamic and striatal dysfunction underlying DI. Moreover, the data suggest that aetiologically distinct presentations of DI share similar patterns of abnormal grey matter volume, whereas aberrant white matter volume appears to be restricted to organic cases. © 2013.

  12. Quantitative proteomics reveals distinct differences in the protein content of outer membrane vesicle vaccines.

    PubMed

    van de Waterbeemd, Bas; Mommen, Geert P M; Pennings, Jeroen L A; Eppink, Michel H; Wijffels, René H; van der Pol, Leo A; de Jong, Ad P J M

    2013-04-05

    At present, only vaccines containing outer membrane vesicles (OMV) have successfully stopped Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B epidemics. These vaccines however require detergent-extraction to remove endotoxin, which changes immunogenicity and causes production difficulties. To investigate this in more detail, the protein content of detergent-extracted OMV is compared with two detergent-free alternatives. A novel proteomics strategy has been developed that allows quantitative analysis of many biological replicates despite inherent multiplex restrictions of dimethyl labeling. This enables robust statistical analysis of relative protein abundance. The comparison with detergent-extracted OMV reveales that detergent-free OMV are enriched with membrane (lipo)proteins and contain less cytoplasmic proteins due to a milder purification process. These distinct protein profiles are substantiated with serum blot proteomics, confirming enrichment with immunogenic proteins in both detergent-free alternatives. Therefore, the immunogenic protein content of OMV vaccines depends at least partially on the purification process. This study demonstrates that detergent-free OMV have a preferred composition.

  13. Achromobacter Species Isolated from Cystic Fibrosis Patients Reveal Distinctly Different Biofilm Morphotypes

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Signe M.; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Meyer, Rikke L.

    2016-01-01

    Achromobacter species have attracted attention as emerging pathogens in cystic fibrosis. The clinical significance of Achromobacter infection is not yet fully elucidated; however, their intrinsic resistance to antimicrobials and ability to form biofilms renders them capable of establishing long-term chronic infections. Still, many aspects of Achromobacter biofilm formation remain uncharacterized. In this study, we characterized biofilm formation in clinical isolates of Achromobacter and investigated the effect of challenging the biofilm with antimicrobials and/or enzymes targeting the extracellular matrix. In vitro biofilm growth and subsequent visualization by confocal microscopy revealed distinctly different biofilm morphotypes: a surface-attached biofilm morphotype of small aggregates and an unattached biofilm morphotype of large suspended aggregates. Aggregates consistent with our in vitro findings were visualized in sputum samples from cystic fibrosis patients using an Achromobacter specific peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) probe, confirming the presence of Achromobacter biofilms in the CF lung. High antibiotic tolerance was associated with the biofilm phenotype, and biocidal antibiotic concentrations were up to 1000 fold higher than for planktonic cultures. Treatment with DNase or subtilisin partially dispersed the biofilm and reduced the tolerance to specific antimicrobials, paving the way for further research into using dispersal mechanisms to improve treatment strategies. PMID:27681927

  14. Methylome sequencing in triple-negative breast cancer reveals distinct methylation clusters with prognostic value.

    PubMed

    Stirzaker, Clare; Zotenko, Elena; Song, Jenny Z; Qu, Wenjia; Nair, Shalima S; Locke, Warwick J; Stone, Andrew; Armstong, Nicola J; Robinson, Mark D; Dobrovic, Alexander; Avery-Kiejda, Kelly A; Peters, Kate M; French, Juliet D; Stein, Sandra; Korbie, Darren J; Trau, Matt; Forbes, John F; Scott, Rodney J; Brown, Melissa A; Francis, Glenn D; Clark, Susan J

    2015-02-02

    Epigenetic alterations in the cancer methylome are common in breast cancer and provide novel options for tumour stratification. Here, we perform whole-genome methylation capture sequencing on small amounts of DNA isolated from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue from triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and matched normal samples. We identify differentially methylated regions (DMRs) enriched with promoters associated with transcription factor binding sites and DNA hypersensitive sites. Importantly, we stratify TNBCs into three distinct methylation clusters associated with better or worse prognosis and identify 17 DMRs that show a strong association with overall survival, including DMRs located in the Wilms tumour 1 (WT1) gene, bi-directional-promoter and antisense WT1-AS. Our data reveal that coordinated hypermethylation can occur in oestrogen receptor-negative disease, and that characterizing the epigenetic framework provides a potential signature to stratify TNBCs. Together, our findings demonstrate the feasibility of profiling the cancer methylome with limited archival tissue to identify regulatory regions associated with cancer.

  15. Achromobacter Species Isolated from Cystic Fibrosis Patients Reveal Distinctly Different Biofilm Morphotypes.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Signe M; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Meyer, Rikke L

    2016-09-14

    Achromobacter species have attracted attention as emerging pathogens in cystic fibrosis. The clinical significance of Achromobacter infection is not yet fully elucidated; however, their intrinsic resistance to antimicrobials and ability to form biofilms renders them capable of establishing long-term chronic infections. Still, many aspects of Achromobacter biofilm formation remain uncharacterized. In this study, we characterized biofilm formation in clinical isolates of Achromobacter and investigated the effect of challenging the biofilm with antimicrobials and/or enzymes targeting the extracellular matrix. In vitro biofilm growth and subsequent visualization by confocal microscopy revealed distinctly different biofilm morphotypes: a surface-attached biofilm morphotype of small aggregates and an unattached biofilm morphotype of large suspended aggregates. Aggregates consistent with our in vitro findings were visualized in sputum samples from cystic fibrosis patients using an Achromobacter specific peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) probe, confirming the presence of Achromobacter biofilms in the CF lung. High antibiotic tolerance was associated with the biofilm phenotype, and biocidal antibiotic concentrations were up to 1000 fold higher than for planktonic cultures. Treatment with DNase or subtilisin partially dispersed the biofilm and reduced the tolerance to specific antimicrobials, paving the way for further research into using dispersal mechanisms to improve treatment strategies.

  16. A systems approach reveals distinct metabolic strategies among the NCI-60 cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Aurich, Maike K.; Fleming, Ronan M. T.; Thiele, Ines

    2017-01-01

    The metabolic phenotype of cancer cells is reflected by the metabolites they consume and by the byproducts they release. Here, we use quantitative, extracellular metabolomic data of the NCI-60 panel and a novel computational method to generate 120 condition-specific cancer cell line metabolic models. These condition-specific cancer models used distinct metabolic strategies to generate energy and cofactors. The analysis of the models’ capability to deal with environmental perturbations revealed three oxotypes, differing in the range of allowable oxygen uptake rates. Interestingly, models based on metabolomic profiles of melanoma cells were distinguished from other models through their low oxygen uptake rates, which were associated with a glycolytic phenotype. A subset of the melanoma cell models required reductive carboxylation. The analysis of protein and RNA expression levels from the Human Protein Atlas showed that IDH2, which was an essential gene in the melanoma models, but not IDH1 protein, was detected in normal skin cell types and melanoma. Moreover, the von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor (VHL) protein, whose loss is associated with non-hypoxic HIF-stabilization, reductive carboxylation, and promotion of glycolysis, was uniformly absent in melanoma. Thus, the experimental data supported the predicted role of IDH2 and the absence of VHL protein supported the glycolytic and low oxygen phenotype predicted for melanoma. Taken together, our approach of integrating extracellular metabolomic data with metabolic modeling and the combination of different network interrogation methods allowed insights into the metabolism of cells. PMID:28806730

  17. Metagenomic investigation of the geologically unique Hellenic Volcanic Arc reveals a distinctive ecosystem with unexpected physiology.

    PubMed

    Oulas, Anastasis; Polymenakou, Paraskevi N; Seshadri, Rekha; Tripp, H James; Mandalakis, Manolis; Paez-Espino, A David; Pati, Amrita; Chain, Patrick; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Carey, Steven; Kilias, Stephanos; Christakis, Christos; Kotoulas, Georgios; Magoulas, Antonios; Ivanova, Natalia N; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2016-04-01

    Hydrothermal vents represent a deep, hot, aphotic biosphere where chemosynthetic primary producers, fuelled by chemicals from Earth's subsurface, form the basis of life. In this study, we examined microbial mats from two distinct volcanic sites within the Hellenic Volcanic Arc (HVA). The HVA is geologically and ecologically unique, with reported emissions of CO2 -saturated fluids at temperatures up to 220°C and a notable absence of macrofauna. Metagenomic data reveals highly complex prokaryotic communities composed of chemolithoautotrophs, some methanotrophs, and to our surprise, heterotrophs capable of anaerobic degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons. Our data suggest that aromatic hydrocarbons may indeed be a significant source of carbon in these sites, and instigate additional research into the nature and origin of these compounds in the HVA. Novel physiology was assigned to several uncultured prokaryotic lineages; most notably, a SAR406 representative is attributed with a role in anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation. This dataset, the largest to date from submarine volcanic ecosystems, constitutes a significant resource of novel genes and pathways with potential biotechnological applications.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of urea transporter knockout mice reveals two distinct types of renal pelvic abnormality

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Vinitha; Harbaugh, Calista; Dietz, John R.; Fenton, Robert A.; Kim, Soo Mi; Castrop, Hayo; Schnermann, Jurgen; Knepper, Mark A.; Chou, Chung-Lin; Anderson, Stasia A.

    2008-01-01

    Many transgenic and knockout mouse models with increased urine flow have been noted to have structural abnormalities of the renal pelvis and renal inner medulla. Here, we describe an approach for in vivo study of such abnormalities in mice using high resolution contrast enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The studies were carried out in mice in which the UT-A isoform 1 and 3 urea transporters had been deleted (UT-A1/3-/- mice). The experiments revealed three distinct variations in the appearance of the renal pelvis in these mice: 1) normal kidneys with no accumulation of contrast agent in the renal pelvis; 2) frank right-sided unilateral hydronephrosis with marked atrophy of the renal medulla, seen relatively infrequently; and 3) a renal pelvic reflux pattern characterized by the presence of contrast agent in the renal pelvis surrounding the renal inner medulla, with no substantial atrophy of the renal medulla, seen in most UT-A1/3-/- mice with advancing age. The reflux pattern was also found in aquaporin-1 knockout mice. UT-A1/3-/- mice also manifested increased mean arterial pressure. Feeding the UT-A1/3-/- mice a low protein diet did not prevent the demonstrated abnormalities of the renal pelvis. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of real time imaging of renal pelvic structure in genetically manipulated mice, providing a tool for non-destructive, temporal studies of kidney structure. PMID:18854850

  19. Highly distinct chromosomal structures in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), as revealed by molecular cytogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Iwata-Otsubo, Aiko; Lin, Jer-Young; Gill, Navdeep; Jackson, Scott A

    2016-05-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp) is an important legume, particularly in developing countries. However, little is known about its genome or chromosome structure. We used molecular cytogenetics to characterize the structure of pachytene chromosomes to advance our knowledge of chromosome and genome organization of cowpea. Our data showed that cowpea has highly distinct chromosomal structures that are cytologically visible as brightly DAPI-stained heterochromatic regions. Analysis of the repetitive fraction of the cowpea genome present at centromeric and pericentromeric regions confirmed that two retrotransposons are major components of pericentromeric regions and that a 455-bp tandem repeat is found at seven out of 11 centromere pairs in cowpea. These repeats likely evolved after the divergence of cowpea from common bean and form chromosomal structure unique to cowpea. The integration of cowpea genetic and physical chromosome maps reveals potential regions of suppressed recombination due to condensed heterochromatin and a lack of pairing in a few chromosomal termini. This study provides fundamental knowledge on cowpea chromosome structure and molecular cytogenetics tools for further chromosome studies.

  20. Holistic atlases of functional networks and interactions reveal reciprocal organizational architecture of cortical function.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jinglei; Jiang, Xi; Li, Xiang; Zhu, Dajiang; Zhang, Shu; Zhao, Shijie; Chen, Hanbo; Zhang, Tuo; Hu, Xintao; Han, Junwei; Ye, Jieping; Guo, Lei; Liu, Tianming

    2015-04-01

    For decades, it has been largely unknown to what extent multiple functional networks spatially overlap/interact with each other and jointly realize the total cortical function. Here, by developing novel sparse representation of whole-brain fMRI signals and by using the recently publicly released large-scale Human Connectome Project high-quality fMRI data, we show that a number of reproducible and robust functional networks, including both task-evoked and resting state networks, are simultaneously distributed in distant neuroanatomic areas and substantially spatially overlapping with each other, thus forming an initial collection of holistic atlases of functional networks and interactions (HAFNIs). More interestingly, the HAFNIs revealed two distinct patterns of highly overlapped regions and highly specialized regions and exhibited that these two patterns of areas are reciprocally localized, revealing a novel organizational principle of cortical function.

  1. Conditional anterograde tracing reveals distinct targeting of individual serotonin cell groups (B5-B9) to the forebrain and brainstem.

    PubMed

    Muzerelle, Aude; Scotto-Lomassese, Sophie; Bernard, Jean François; Soiza-Reilly, Mariano; Gaspar, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Serotoninergic innervation of the central nervous system is provided by hindbrain raphe nuclei (B1-B9). The extent to which each raphe subdivision has distinct topographic organization of their projections is still unclear. We provide a comprehensive description of the main targets of the rostral serotonin (5-HT) raphe subgroups (B5-B9) in the mouse brain. Adeno-associated viruses that conditionally express GFP under the control of the 5-HT transporter promoter were used to label small groups of 5-HT neurons in the dorsal (B7d), ventral (B7v), lateral (B7l), and caudal (B6) subcomponents of the dorsal raphe (DR) nucleus as well as in the rostral and caudal parts of the median raphe (MR) nucleus (B8 and B5, respectively), and in the supralemniscal (B9) cell group. We illustrate the distinctive and largely non-overlapping projection areas of these cell groups: for instance, DR (B7) projects to basal parts of the forebrain, such as the amygdala, whereas MR (B8) is the main 5-HT source to the hippocampus, septum, and mesopontine tegmental nuclei. Distinct subsets of B7 have preferential brain targets: B7v is the main source of 5-HT for the cortex and amygdala while B7d innervates the hypothalamus. We reveal for the first time the target areas of the B9 cell group, demonstrating projections to the caudate, prefrontal cortex, substantia nigra, locus coeruleus and to the raphe cell groups. The broad topographic organization of the different raphe subnuclei is likely to underlie the different functional roles in which 5-HT has been implicated in the brain. The present mapping study could serve as the basis for genetically driven specific targeting of the different subcomponents of the mouse raphe system.

  2. Distinct enzyme combinations in AKAP signalling complexes permit functional diversity.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Naoto; Langeberg, Lorene K; Scott, John D

    2005-11-01

    Specificity in cell signalling can be influenced by the targeting of different enzyme combinations to substrates. The A-kinase anchoring protein AKAP79/150 is a multivalent scaffolding protein that coordinates the subcellular localization of second-messenger-regulated enzymes, such as protein kinase A, protein kinase C and protein phosphatase 2B. We developed a new strategy that combines RNA interference of the endogenous protein with a protocol that selects cells that have been rescued with AKAP79/150 forms that are unable to anchor selected enzymes. Using this approach, we show that AKAP79/150 coordinates different enzyme combinations to modulate the activity of two distinct neuronal ion channels: AMPA-type glutamate receptors and M-type potassium channels. Utilization of distinct enzyme combinations in this manner provides a means to expand the repertoire of cellular events that the same AKAP modulates.

  3. Quantification of Cell Edge Velocities and Traction Forces Reveals Distinct Motility Modules during Cell Spreading

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yunfei; Xenias, Harry; Spielman, Ingrid; Shneidman, Anna V.; David, Lawrence A.; Döbereiner, Hans-Günther; Wiggins, Chris H.; Sheetz, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    Actin-based cell motility and force generation are central to immune response, tissue development, and cancer metastasis, and understanding actin cytoskeleton regulation is a major goal of cell biologists. Cell spreading is a commonly used model system for motility experiments – spreading fibroblasts exhibit stereotypic, spatially-isotropic edge dynamics during a reproducible sequence of functional phases: 1) During early spreading, cells form initial contacts with the surface. 2) The middle spreading phase exhibits rapidly increasing attachment area. 3) Late spreading is characterized by periodic contractions and stable adhesions formation. While differences in cytoskeletal regulation between phases are known, a global analysis of the spatial and temporal coordination of motility and force generation is missing. Implementing improved algorithms for analyzing edge dynamics over the entire cell periphery, we observed that a single domain of homogeneous cytoskeletal dynamics dominated each of the three phases of spreading. These domains exhibited a unique combination of biophysical and biochemical parameters – a motility module. Biophysical characterization of the motility modules revealed that the early phase was dominated by periodic, rapid membrane blebbing; the middle phase exhibited continuous protrusion with very low traction force generation; and the late phase was characterized by global periodic contractions and high force generation. Biochemically, each motility module exhibited a different distribution of the actin-related protein VASP, while inhibition of actin polymerization revealed different dependencies on barbed-end polymerization. In addition, our whole-cell analysis revealed that many cells exhibited heterogeneous combinations of motility modules in neighboring regions of the cell edge. Together, these observations support a model of motility in which regions of the cell edge exhibit one of a limited number of motility modules that, together

  4. Replication-coupled chromatin assembly of newly synthesized histones: distinct functions for the histone tail domains.

    PubMed

    Ejlassi-Lassallette, Aïda; Thiriet, Christophe

    2012-02-01

    The maintenance of the genome during replication requires the assembly of nucleosomes with newly synthesized histones. Achieving the deposition of newly synthesized histones in chromatin implies their transport from the cytoplasm to the nucleus at the replication sites. Several lines of evidence have revealed critical functions of the histone tail domains in these conserved cellular processes. In this review, we discuss the role of the amino termini of the nucleosome building blocks, H2A/H2B and H3/H4, in different model systems. The experimental data showed that H2A/H2B tails and H3/H4 tails display distinct functions in nuclear import and chromatin assembly. Furthermore, we describe recent studies exploiting the unique properties of the slime mold, Physarum polycephalum , that have advanced understanding of the function of the highly conserved replication-dependent diacetylation of H4.

  5. Transcriptomic analysis reveals distinct resistant response by physcion and chrysophanol against cucumber powdery mildew

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanping; Tian, Shilin; Yang, Xiaojun; Wang, Xin; Guo, Yuhai

    2016-01-01

    Physcion and chrysophanol induce defense responses against powdery mildew in cucumbers. The combination of these two compounds has synergistic interaction against the disease. We performed RNA-seq on cucumber leaf samples treated with physcion and chrysophanol alone and with their combination. We generated 17.6 Gb of high-quality sequencing data (∼2 Gb per sample) and catalogued the expressions profiles of 12,293 annotated cucumber genes in each sample. We identified numerous differentially expressed genes that exhibited distinct expression patterns among the three treatments. The gene expression patterns of the Chr and Phy treatments were more similar to each other than to the Phy × Chr treatment. The Phy × Chr treatment induced the highest number of differentially expressed genes. This dramatic transcriptional change after Phy × Chr treatment leaves reflects that physcion combined with chrysophanol treatment was most closely associated with induction of disease resistance. The analysis showed that the combination treatment caused expression changes of numerous defense-related genes. These genes have known or potential roles in structural, chemical and signaling defense responses and were enriched in functional gene categories potentially responsible for cucumber resistance. These results clearly demonstrated that disease resistance in cucumber leaves was significantly influenced by the combined physcion and chrysophanol treatment. Thus, physcion and chrysophanol are appealing candidates for further investigation of the gene expression and associated regulatory mechanisms related to the defense response. PMID:27231648

  6. Extensive cargo identification reveals distinct biological roles of the 12 importin pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Makoto; Morinaka, Yuriko; Imai, Kenichiro; Kose, Shingo; Horton, Paul; Imamoto, Naoko

    2017-01-01

    Vast numbers of proteins are transported into and out of the nuclei by approximately 20 species of importin-β family nucleocytoplasmic transport receptors. However, the significance of the multiple parallel transport pathways that the receptors constitute is poorly understood because only limited numbers of cargo proteins have been reported. Here, we identified cargo proteins specific to the 12 species of human import receptors with a high-throughput method that employs stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture, an in vitro reconstituted transport system, and quantitative mass spectrometry. The identified cargoes illuminated the manner of cargo allocation to the receptors. The redundancies of the receptors vary widely depending on the cargo protein. Cargoes of the same receptor are functionally related to one another, and the predominant protein groups in the cargo cohorts differ among the receptors. Thus, the receptors are linked to distinct biological processes by the nature of their cargoes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21184.001 PMID:28117667

  7. A comprehensive Plasmodium falciparum protein interaction map reveals a distinct architecture of a core interactome

    PubMed Central

    Wuchty, Stefan; Adams, John H.; Ferdig, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    We derive a map of protein interactions in the parasite P. falciparum from conserved interactions in S. cerevisiae, C. elegans, D. melanogaster and E. coli and pool them with experimental interaction data. The application of a clique-percolation algorithm allows us to find overlapping clusters, strongly correlated with yeast specific conserved protein complexes. Such clusters contain core activities that govern gene expression, largely dominated by components of protein production and degradation processes as well as RNA metabolism. A critical role of protein hubs in the interactome of P. falciparum is supported by their appearance in multiple clusters and the tendencies of their interactions to reach into many distinct protein clusters. Parasite proteins with a human ortholog tend to appear in single complexes. Annotating each protein with the stage where it is maximally expressed we observe a high level of cluster integrity in the ring stage. While we find no signal in the trophozoite phase, expression patterns are reversed in the schizont phase, implying a preponderance of parasite specific functions in this late, invasive schizont stage. As such, the inference of potential protein interactions and their analysis contributes to our understanding of the parasite, indicating basic pathways and processes as unique targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:19333996

  8. Conserved Hydration Sites in Pin1 Reveal a Distinctive Water Recognition Motif in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Barman, Arghya; Smitherman, Crystal; Souffrant, Michael; Gadda, Giovanni; Hamelberg, Donald

    2016-01-25

    Structurally conserved water molecules are important for biomolecular stability, flexibility, and function. X-ray crystallographic studies of Pin1 have resolved a number of water molecules around the enzyme, including two highly conserved water molecules within the protein. The functional role of these localized water molecules remains unknown and unexplored. Pin1 catalyzes cis/trans isomerizations of peptidyl prolyl bonds that are preceded by a phosphorylated serine or threonine residue. Pin1 is involved in many subcellular signaling processes and is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of several life threatening diseases. Here, we investigate the significance of these structurally conserved water molecules in the catalytic domain of Pin1 using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, free energy calculations, analysis of X-ray crystal structures, and circular dichroism (CD) experiments. MD simulations and free energy calculations suggest the tighter binding water molecule plays a crucial role in maintaining the integrity and stability of a critical hydrogen-bonding network in the active site. The second water molecule is exchangeable with bulk solvent and is found in a distinctive helix-turn-coil motif. Structural bioinformatics analysis of nonredundant X-ray crystallographic protein structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) suggest this motif is present in several other proteins and can act as a water site, akin to the calcium EF hand. CD experiments suggest the isolated motif is in a distorted PII conformation and requires the protein environment to fully form the α-helix-turn-coil motif. This study provides valuable insights into the role of hydration in the structural integrity of Pin1 that can be exploited in protein engineering and drug design.

  9. Analysis of Exocyst Subunit EXO70 Family Reveals Distinct Membrane Polar Domains in Tobacco Pollen Tubes.

    PubMed

    Sekereš, Juraj; Pejchar, Přemysl; Šantrůček, Jiří; Vukašinović, Nemanja; Žárský, Viktor; Potocký, Martin

    2017-03-01

    The vesicle-tethering complex exocyst is one of the crucial cell polarity regulators. The EXO70 subunit is required for the targeting of the complex and is represented by many isoforms in angiosperm plant cells. This diversity could be partly responsible for the establishment and maintenance of membrane domains with different composition. To address this hypothesis, we employed the growing pollen tube, a well-established cell polarity model system, and performed large-scale expression, localization, and functional analysis of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) EXO70 isoforms. Various isoforms localized to different regions of the pollen tube plasma membrane, apical vesicle-rich inverted cone region, nucleus, and cytoplasm. The overexpression of major pollen-expressed EXO70 isoforms resulted in growth arrest and characteristic phenotypic deviations of tip swelling and apical invaginations. NtEXO70A1a and NtEXO70B1 occupied two distinct and mutually exclusive plasma membrane domains. Both isoforms partly colocalized with the exocyst subunit NtSEC3a at the plasma membrane, possibly forming different exocyst complex subpopulations. NtEXO70A1a localized to the small area previously characterized as the site of exocytosis in the tobacco pollen tube, while NtEXO70B1 surprisingly colocalized with the zone of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Both NtEXO70A1a and NtEXO70B1 colocalized to different degrees with markers for the anionic signaling phospholipids phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and phosphatidic acid. In contrast, members of the EXO70 C class, which are specifically expressed in tip-growing cells, exhibited exocytosis-related functional effects in pollen tubes despite the absence of apparent plasma membrane localization. Taken together, our data support the existence of multiple membrane-trafficking domains regulated by different EXO70-containing exocyst complexes within a single cell. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Col-OSSOS: z-Band Photometry Reveals Three Distinct TNO Surface Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pike, Rosemary E.; Fraser, Wesley C.; Schwamb, Megan E.; Kavelaars, J. J.; Marsset, Michael; Bannister, Michele T.; Lehner, Matthew J.; Wang, Shiang-Yu; Alexandersen, Mike; Chen, Ying-Tung; Gladman, Brett J.; Gwyn, Stephen; Petit, Jean-Marc; Volk, Kathryn

    2017-09-01

    Several different classes of trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) have been identified based on their optical and near-infrared colors. As part of the Colours of the Outer Solar System Origins Survey (Col-OSSOS), we have obtained g-, r-, and z-band photometry of 26 TNOs using Subaru and Gemini Observatories. Previous color surveys have not utilized z-band reflectance, and the inclusion of this band reveals significant surface reflectance variations between sub-populations. The colors of TNOs in g - r and r - z show obvious structure, and appear consistent with the previously measured bi-modality in g - r. The distribution of colors of the two dynamically excited surface types can be modeled using the two-component mixing models from Fraser & Brown. With the combination of g - r and r - z, the dynamically excited classes can be separated cleanly into red and neutral surface classes. In g - r and r - z, the two dynamically excited surface groups are also clearly distinct from the cold classical TNO surfaces, which are red, with g-r≳ 0.85 and r - z ≲ 0.6, while all dynamically excited objects with similar g - r colors exhibit redder r - z colors. The z-band photometry makes it possible for the first time to differentiate the red excited TNO surfaces from the red cold classical TNO surfaces. The discovery of different r - z colors for these cold classical TNOs makes it possible to search for cold classical surfaces in other regions of the Kuiper Belt and to completely separate cold classical TNOs from the dynamically excited population, which overlaps in orbital parameter space.

  11. Distinct evolutionary trajectories of primary high-grade serous ovarian cancers revealed through spatial mutational profiling

    PubMed Central

    Bashashati, Ali; Ha, Gavin; Tone, Alicia; Ding, Jiarui; Prentice, Leah M; Roth, Andrew; Rosner, Jamie; Shumansky, Karey; Kalloger, Steve; Senz, Janine; Yang, Winnie; McConechy, Melissa; Melnyk, Nataliya; Anglesio, Michael; Luk, Margaret TY; Tse, Kane; Zeng, Thomas; Moore, Richard; Zhao, Yongjun; Marra, Marco A; Gilks, Blake; Yip, Stephen; Huntsman, David G; McAlpine, Jessica N; Shah, Sohrab P

    2013-01-01

    High-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC) is characterized by poor outcome, often attributed to the emergence of treatment-resistant subclones. We sought to measure the degree of genomic diversity within primary, untreated HGSCs to examine the natural state of tumour evolution prior to therapy. We performed exome sequencing, copy number analysis, targeted amplicon deep sequencing and gene expression profiling on 31 spatially and temporally separated HGSC tumour specimens (six patients), including ovarian masses, distant metastases and fallopian tube lesions. We found widespread intratumoural variation in mutation, copy number and gene expression profiles, with key driver alterations in genes present in only a subset of samples (eg PIK3CA, CTNNB1, NF1). On average, only 51.5% of mutations were present in every sample of a given case (range 10.2–91.4%), with TP53 as the only somatic mutation consistently present in all samples. Complex segmental aneuploidies, such as whole-genome doubling, were present in a subset of samples from the same individual, with divergent copy number changes segregating independently of point mutation acquisition. Reconstruction of evolutionary histories showed one patient with mixed HGSC and endometrioid histology, with common aetiologic origin in the fallopian tube and subsequent selection of different driver mutations in the histologically distinct samples. In this patient, we observed mixed cell populations in the early fallopian tube lesion, indicating that diversity arises at early stages of tumourigenesis. Our results revealed that HGSCs exhibit highly individual evolutionary trajectories and diverse genomic tapestries prior to therapy, exposing an essential biological characteristic to inform future design of personalized therapeutic solutions and investigation of drug-resistance mechanisms. PMID:23780408

  12. Methylation profiling of choroid plexus tumors reveals 3 clinically distinct subgroups

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Christian; Sill, Martin; Ruland, Vincent; Witten, Anika; Hartung, Stefan; Kordes, Uwe; Jeibmann, Astrid; Beschorner, Rudi; Keyvani, Kathy; Bergmann, Markus; Mittelbronn, Michel; Pietsch, Torsten; Felsberg, Jörg; Monoranu, Camelia M.; Varlet, Pascale; Hauser, Peter; Olar, Adriana; Grundy, Richard G.; Wolff, Johannes E.; Korshunov, Andrey; Jones, David T.; Bewerunge-Hudler, Melanie; Hovestadt, Volker; von Deimling, Andreas; Pfister, Stefan M.; Paulus, Werner; Capper, David; Hasselblatt, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background Choroid plexus tumors are intraventricular neoplasms derived from the choroid plexus epithelium. A better knowledge of molecular factors involved in choroid plexus tumor biology may aid in identifying patients at risk for recurrence. Methods Methylation profiles were examined in 29 choroid plexus papillomas (CPPs, WHO grade I), 32 atypical choroid plexus papillomas (aCPPs, WHO grade II), and 31 choroid plexus carcinomas (CPCs, WHO grade III) by Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 Bead Chip Array. Results Unsupervised hierarchical clustering identified 3 subgroups: methylation cluster 1 (pediatric CPP and aCPP of mainly supratentorial location), methylation cluster 2 (adult CPP and aCPP of mainly infratentorial location), and methylation cluster 3 (pediatric CPP, aCPP, and CPC of supratentorial location). In methylation cluster 3, progression-free survival (PFS) accounted for a mean of 72 months (CI, 55-89 mo), whereas only 1 of 42 tumors of methylation clusters 1 and 2 progressed (P< .001). On stratification of outcome data according to WHO grade, all CPCs clustered within cluster 3 and were associated with shorter overall survival (mean, 105 mo [CI, 81-128 mo]) and PFS (mean, 55 mo [CI, 36-73 mo]). The aCPP of methylation cluster 3 also progressed frequently (mean, 69 mo [CI, 44-93 mo]), whereas no tumor progression was observed in aCPP of methylation clusters 1 and 2 (P< .05). Only 1 of 29 CPPs recurred. Conclusions Methylation profiling of choroid plexus tumors reveals 3 distinct subgroups (ie, pediatric low-risk choroid plexus tumors [cluster 1], adult low-risk choroid plexus tumors [cluster 2], and pediatric high-risk choroid plexus tumors [cluster 3]) and may provide useful prognostic information in addition to histopathology. PMID:26826203

  13. Arabidopsis fhl/fhy1 double mutant reveals a distinct cytoplasmic action of phytochrome A

    PubMed Central

    Rösler, Jutta; Klein, Ilse; Zeidler, Mathias

    2007-01-01

    Phytochrome A (phyA) plays an important role during germination and early seedling development. Because phyA is the primary photoreceptor for the high-irradiance response and the very-low-fluence response, it can trigger development not only in red and far-red (FR) light but also in a wider range of light qualities. Although phyA action is generally associated with translocation to the nucleus and regulation of transcription, there is evidence for additional cytoplasmic functions. Because nuclear accumulation of phyA has been shown to depend on far-red-elongated hypocotyl 1 (FHY1) and FHL (FHY1-like), investigation of phyA function in a double fhl/fhy1 mutant might be valuable in revealing the mechanism of phyA translocation and possible cytoplasmic functions. In fhl/fhy1, the FR-triggered nuclear translocation of phyA could no longer be detected but could be restored by transgenic expression of CFP:FHY1. Whereas the fhl/fhy1 mutant showed a phyA phenotype in respect to hypocotyl elongation and cotyledon opening under high-irradiance response conditions as well as a typical phyA germination phenotype under very-low-fluence response conditions, fhl/fhy1 showed no phenotype with respect to the phyA-dependent abrogation of negative gravitropism in blue light and in red-enhanced phototropism, demonstrating clear cytoplasmic functions of phyA. Disturbance of phyA nuclear import in fhl/fhy1 led to formation of FR-induced phyA:GFP cytoplasmic foci resembling the sequestered areas of phytochrome. FHY1 and FHL play crucial roles in phyA nuclear translocation and signaling. Thus the double-mutant fhl/fhy1 allows nuclear and cytoplasmic phyA functions to be separated, leading to the novel identification of cytoplasmic phyA responses. PMID:17566111

  14. Arabidopsis fhl/fhy1 double mutant reveals a distinct cytoplasmic action of phytochrome A.

    PubMed

    Rösler, Jutta; Klein, Ilse; Zeidler, Mathias

    2007-06-19

    Phytochrome A (phyA) plays an important role during germination and early seedling development. Because phyA is the primary photoreceptor for the high-irradiance response and the very-low-fluence response, it can trigger development not only in red and far-red (FR) light but also in a wider range of light qualities. Although phyA action is generally associated with translocation to the nucleus and regulation of transcription, there is evidence for additional cytoplasmic functions. Because nuclear accumulation of phyA has been shown to depend on far-red-elongated hypocotyl 1 (FHY1) and FHL (FHY1-like), investigation of phyA function in a double fhl/fhy1 mutant might be valuable in revealing the mechanism of phyA translocation and possible cytoplasmic functions. In fhl/fhy1, the FR-triggered nuclear translocation of phyA could no longer be detected but could be restored by transgenic expression of CFP:FHY1. Whereas the fhl/fhy1 mutant showed a phyA phenotype in respect to hypocotyl elongation and cotyledon opening under high-irradiance response conditions as well as a typical phyA germination phenotype under very-low-fluence response conditions, fhl/fhy1 showed no phenotype with respect to the phyA-dependent abrogation of negative gravitropism in blue light and in red-enhanced phototropism, demonstrating clear cytoplasmic functions of phyA. Disturbance of phyA nuclear import in fhl/fhy1 led to formation of FR-induced phyA:GFP cytoplasmic foci resembling the sequestered areas of phytochrome. FHY1 and FHL play crucial roles in phyA nuclear translocation and signaling. Thus the double-mutant fhl/fhy1 allows nuclear and cytoplasmic phyA functions to be separated, leading to the novel identification of cytoplasmic phyA responses.

  15. Two Distinct Central Serotonin Receptors with Different Physiological Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peroutka, Stephen J.; Lebovitz, Richard M.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    1981-05-01

    Two distinct serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) receptors designated serotonin 1 and serotonin 2 bind tritium-labeled serotonin and tritium-labeled spiroperidol, respectively. Drug potencies at serotonin 2 sites, but not at serotonin 1 sites, predict their effects on the ``serotonin behavioral syndrome,'' indicating that serotonin 2 sites mediate these behaviors. The limited correlation of drug effects with regulation by guanine nucleotides suggests that serotonin 1 sites might be linked to adenylate cyclase. Drug specificities of serotonin-elicited synaptic inhibition and excitation may reflect serotonin 1 and serotonin 2 receptor interactions, respectively.

  16. Proteomic Stable Isotope Probing Reveals Taxonomically Distinct Patterns in Amino Acid Assimilation by Coastal Marine Bacterioplankton

    PubMed Central

    Bryson, Samuel; Li, Zhou; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Hettich, Robert L.; Mayali, Xavier; Pan, Chongle

    2016-01-01

    . IMPORTANCE An estimated 50 gigatons of carbon is annually fixed within marine systems, of which heterotrophic microbial populations process nearly half. These communities vary in composition and activity across spatial and temporal scales, so understanding how these changes affect global processes requires the delineation of functional roles for individual members. In a step toward ascertaining these roles, we applied proteomic stable isotope probing to quantify the assimilation of organic carbon from DFAAs into microbial protein biomass, since the turnover of DFAAs accounts for a substantial fraction of marine microbial carbon metabolism that is directed into biomass production. We conducted experiments at two coastal North Pacific locations and found taxonomically distinct responses. This approach allowed us to compare amino acid assimilation by specific bacterioplankton populations and characterize their allocation of this substrate among cellular functions. PMID:27822523

  17. Proteomic Stable Isotope Probing Reveals Taxonomically Distinct Patterns in Amino Acid Assimilation by Coastal Marine Bacterioplankton.

    PubMed

    Bryson, Samuel; Li, Zhou; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Hettich, Robert L; Mayali, Xavier; Pan, Chongle; Mueller, Ryan S

    2016-01-01

    . IMPORTANCE An estimated 50 gigatons of carbon is annually fixed within marine systems, of which heterotrophic microbial populations process nearly half. These communities vary in composition and activity across spatial and temporal scales, so understanding how these changes affect global processes requires the delineation of functional roles for individual members. In a step toward ascertaining these roles, we applied proteomic stable isotope probing to quantify the assimilation of organic carbon from DFAAs into microbial protein biomass, since the turnover of DFAAs accounts for a substantial fraction of marine microbial carbon metabolism that is directed into biomass production. We conducted experiments at two coastal North Pacific locations and found taxonomically distinct responses. This approach allowed us to compare amino acid assimilation by specific bacterioplankton populations and characterize their allocation of this substrate among cellular functions.

  18. Crystal Structure of Human Soluble Adenylate Cyclase Reveals a Distinct, Highly Flexible Allosteric Bicarbonate Binding Pocket

    PubMed Central

    Saalau-Bethell, Susanne M; Berdini, Valerio; Cleasby, Anne; Congreve, Miles; Coyle, Joseph E; Lock, Victoria; Murray, Christopher W; O'Brien, M Alistair; Rich, Sharna J; Sambrook, Tracey; Vinkovic, Mladen; Yon, Jeff R; Jhoti, Harren

    2014-01-01

    Soluble adenylate cyclases catalyse the synthesis of the second messenger cAMP through the cyclisation of ATP and are the only known enzymes to be directly activated by bicarbonate. Here, we report the first crystal structure of the human enzyme that reveals a pseudosymmetrical arrangement of two catalytic domains to produce a single competent active site and a novel discrete bicarbonate binding pocket. Crystal structures of the apo protein, the protein in complex with α,β-methylene adenosine 5′-triphosphate (AMPCPP) and calcium, with the allosteric activator bicarbonate, and also with a number of inhibitors identified using fragment screening, all show a flexible active site that undergoes significant conformational changes on binding of ligands. The resulting nanomolar-potent inhibitors that were developed bind at both the substrate binding pocket and the allosteric site, and can be used as chemical probes to further elucidate the function of this protein. PMID:24616449

  19. Clonal Dynamics Reveal Two Distinct Populations of Basal Cells in Slow-Turnover Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Julie K.; Rulands, Steffen; Wilkinson, Adam C.; Wuidart, Aline; Ousset, Marielle; Van Keymeulen, Alexandra; Göttgens, Berthold; Blanpain, Cédric; Simons, Benjamin D.; Rawlins, Emma L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Epithelial lineages have been studied at cellular resolution in multiple organs that turn over rapidly. However, many epithelia, including those of the lung, liver, pancreas, and prostate, turn over slowly and may be regulated differently. We investigated the mouse tracheal epithelial lineage at homeostasis by using long-term clonal analysis and mathematical modeling. This pseudostratified epithelium contains basal cells and secretory and multiciliated luminal cells. Our analysis revealed that basal cells are heterogeneous, comprising approximately equal numbers of multipotent stem cells and committed precursors, which persist in the basal layer for 11 days before differentiating to luminal fate. We confirmed the molecular and functional differences within the basal population by using single-cell qRT-PCR and further lineage labeling. Additionally, we show that self-renewal of short-lived secretory cells is a feature of homeostasis. We have thus revealed early luminal commitment of cells that are morphologically indistinguishable from stem cells. PMID:26119728

  20. Dual-tagged amyloid-β precursor protein reveals distinct transport pathways of its N- and C-terminal fragments.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Christine; Muresan, Virgil; Ladescu Muresan, Zoia

    2014-03-15

    The amyloid-β precursor protein (APP), a type I transmembrane protein genetically associated with Alzheimer's disease, has a complex biology that includes proteolytic processing into potentially toxic fragments, extensive trafficking and multiple, yet poorly-defined functions. We recently proposed that a significant fraction of APP is proteolytically cleaved in the neuronal soma into N- and C-terminal fragments (NTFs and CTFs), which then target independently of each other to separate destinations in the cell. Here, we prove this concept with live imaging and immunolocalization of two dual, N- and C-termini-tagged APP constructs: CFP-APP-YFP [containing the fluorescent tags, cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)] and FLAG-APP-Myc. When expressed at low levels in neuronal cells, these constructs are processed into differently tagged NTFs and CTFs that reveal distinct distributions and characteristics of transport. Like the endogenous N- and C-terminal epitopes of APP, the FLAG-tagged NTFs are present in trains of vesicles and tubules that localize to short filaments, which often immunostain for acetylated tubulin, whereas the Myc-tagged CTFs are detected on randomly distributed vesicle-like structures. The experimental treatments that selectively destabilize the acetylated microtubules abrogate the distribution of NTFs along filaments, without altering the random distribution of CTFs. These results indicate that the NTFs and CTFs are recruited to distinct transport pathways and reach separate destinations in neurons, where they likely accomplish functions independent of the parental, full-length APP. They also point to a compartment associated with acetylated microtubules in the neuronal soma--not the neurite terminals--as a major site of APP cleavage, and segregation of NTFs from CTFs.

  1. Dual-tagged amyloid-β precursor protein reveals distinct transport pathways of its N- and C-terminal fragments

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Christine; Muresan, Virgil; Ladescu Muresan, Zoia

    2014-01-01

    The amyloid-β precursor protein (APP), a type I transmembrane protein genetically associated with Alzheimer's disease, has a complex biology that includes proteolytic processing into potentially toxic fragments, extensive trafficking and multiple, yet poorly-defined functions. We recently proposed that a significant fraction of APP is proteolytically cleaved in the neuronal soma into N- and C-terminal fragments (NTFs and CTFs), which then target independently of each other to separate destinations in the cell. Here, we prove this concept with live imaging and immunolocalization of two dual, N- and C-termini-tagged APP constructs: CFP-APP-YFP [containing the fluorescent tags, cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)] and FLAG-APP-Myc. When expressed at low levels in neuronal cells, these constructs are processed into differently tagged NTFs and CTFs that reveal distinct distributions and characteristics of transport. Like the endogenous N- and C-terminal epitopes of APP, the FLAG-tagged NTFs are present in trains of vesicles and tubules that localize to short filaments, which often immunostain for acetylated tubulin, whereas the Myc-tagged CTFs are detected on randomly distributed vesicle-like structures. The experimental treatments that selectively destabilize the acetylated microtubules abrogate the distribution of NTFs along filaments, without altering the random distribution of CTFs. These results indicate that the NTFs and CTFs are recruited to distinct transport pathways and reach separate destinations in neurons, where they likely accomplish functions independent of the parental, full-length APP. They also point to a compartment associated with acetylated microtubules in the neuronal soma—not the neurite terminals—as a major site of APP cleavage, and segregation of NTFs from CTFs. PMID:24203698

  2. Genome-Wide Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Conserved and Distinct Molecular Mechanisms of Al Resistance in Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench) Leaves.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei Wei; Xu, Jia Meng; Jin, Jian Feng; Lou, He Qiang; Fan, Wei; Yang, Jian Li

    2017-08-27

    Being an Al-accumulating crop, buckwheat detoxifies and tolerates Al not only in roots but also in leaves. While much progress has recently been made toward Al toxicity and resistance mechanisms in roots, little is known about the molecular basis responsible for detoxification and tolerance processes in leaves. Here, we carried out transcriptome analysis of buckwheat leaves in response to Al stress (20 µM, 24 h). We obtained 33,931 unigenes with 26,300 unigenes annotated in the NCBI database, and identified 1063 upregulated and 944 downregulated genes under Al stress. Functional category analysis revealed that genes related to protein translation, processing, degradation and metabolism comprised the biological processes most affected by Al, suggesting that buckwheat leaves maintain flexibility under Al stress by rapidly reprogramming their physiology and metabolism. Analysis of genes related to transcription regulation revealed that a large proportion of chromatin-regulation genes are specifically downregulated by Al stress, whereas transcription factor genes are overwhelmingly upregulated. Furthermore, we identified 78 upregulated and 22 downregulated genes that encode transporters. Intriguingly, only a few genes were overlapped with root Al-regulated transporter genes, which include homologs of AtMATE, ALS1, STAR1, ALS3 and a divalent ion symporter. In addition, we identified a subset of genes involved in development, in which genes associated with flowering regulation were important. Based on these data, it is proposed that buckwheat leaves develop conserved and distinct mechanisms to cope with Al toxicity.

  3. Genome-Wide Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Conserved and Distinct Molecular Mechanisms of Al Resistance in Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench) Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei Wei; Xu, Jia Meng; Jin, Jian Feng; Lou, He Qiang; Fan, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Being an Al-accumulating crop, buckwheat detoxifies and tolerates Al not only in roots but also in leaves. While much progress has recently been made toward Al toxicity and resistance mechanisms in roots, little is known about the molecular basis responsible for detoxification and tolerance processes in leaves. Here, we carried out transcriptome analysis of buckwheat leaves in response to Al stress (20 µM, 24 h). We obtained 33,931 unigenes with 26,300 unigenes annotated in the NCBI database, and identified 1063 upregulated and 944 downregulated genes under Al stress. Functional category analysis revealed that genes related to protein translation, processing, degradation and metabolism comprised the biological processes most affected by Al, suggesting that buckwheat leaves maintain flexibility under Al stress by rapidly reprogramming their physiology and metabolism. Analysis of genes related to transcription regulation revealed that a large proportion of chromatin-regulation genes are specifically downregulated by Al stress, whereas transcription factor genes are overwhelmingly upregulated. Furthermore, we identified 78 upregulated and 22 downregulated genes that encode transporters. Intriguingly, only a few genes were overlapped with root Al-regulated transporter genes, which include homologs of AtMATE, ALS1, STAR1, ALS3 and a divalent ion symporter. In addition, we identified a subset of genes involved in development, in which genes associated with flowering regulation were important. Based on these data, it is proposed that buckwheat leaves develop conserved and distinct mechanisms to cope with Al toxicity. PMID:28846612

  4. Three acetylcholinesterases of the pinewood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus: insights into distinct physiological functions.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jae Soon; Lee, Dae-Weon; Choi, Jae Young; Je, Yeon Ho; Koh, Young Ho; Lee, Si Hyeock

    2011-02-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) plays a key role in postsynaptic transmission in most animals. Nematodes encode multiple AChEs, implying its functional diversity. To explore physiological functions of multiple AChEs, three distinct AChEs (BxACE-1, BxACE-2, and BxACE-3) were identified and characterized from the pinewood nematode. Sequencing comparison with Torpedo AChE and Caenorhabditis elegans ACEs identified choline-binding site, catalytic triad functional site, three internal disulfide bonds and aromatic residues for the catalytic gorge. Transcriptional profiling by quantitative real-time PCR revealed that BxACE-3 is more actively transcribed than BxACE-1 (2-3 times) and BxACE-2 (9-18 times) in both propagative and dispersal stages. The three BxACEs were functionally expressed using baculovirus system. Kinetic analysis of in vitro-expressed BxACEs revealed that the substrate specificity was highest in BxACE-1 whereas the catalytic efficiency was highest in BxACE-2. In inhibition assay, BxACE-3 showed the lowest inhibition rate. Taken together, it appears that both BxACE-1 and BxACE-2 play common but non-overlapping roles in synaptic transmission, whereas BxACE-3 may have non-neuronal functions. The current findings should provide valuable insights into the evolutionary process and various physiological roles of AChE.

  5. Comparative Genome Analyses Reveal Distinct Structure in the Saltwater Crocodile MHC

    PubMed Central

    Jaratlerdsiri, Weerachai; Deakin, Janine; Godinez, Ricardo M.; Shan, Xueyan; Peterson, Daniel G.; Marthey, Sylvain; Lyons, Eric; McCarthy, Fiona M.; Isberg, Sally R.; Higgins, Damien P.; Chong, Amanda Y.; John, John St; Glenn, Travis C.; Ray, David A.; Gongora, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a dynamic genome region with an essential role in the adaptive immunity of vertebrates, especially antigen presentation. The MHC is generally divided into subregions (classes I, II and III) containing genes of similar function across species, but with different gene number and organisation. Crocodylia (crocodilians) are widely distributed and represent an evolutionary distinct group among higher vertebrates, but the genomic organisation of MHC within this lineage has been largely unexplored. Here, we studied the MHC region of the saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) and compared it with that of other taxa. We characterised genomic clusters encompassing MHC class I and class II genes in the saltwater crocodile based on sequencing of bacterial artificial chromosomes. Six gene clusters spanning ∼452 kb were identified to contain nine MHC class I genes, six MHC class II genes, three TAP genes, and a TRIM gene. These MHC class I and class II genes were in separate scaffold regions and were greater in length (2–6 times longer) than their counterparts in well-studied fowl B loci, suggesting that the compaction of avian MHC occurred after the crocodilian-avian split. Comparative analyses between the saltwater crocodile MHC and that from the alligator and gharial showed large syntenic areas (>80% identity) with similar gene order. Comparisons with other vertebrates showed that the saltwater crocodile had MHC class I genes located along with TAP, consistent with birds studied. Linkage between MHC class I and TRIM39 observed in the saltwater crocodile resembled MHC in eutherians compared, but absent in avian MHC, suggesting that the saltwater crocodile MHC appears to have gene organisation intermediate between these two lineages. These observations suggest that the structure of the saltwater crocodile MHC, and other crocodilians, can help determine the MHC that was present in the ancestors of archosaurs. PMID:25503521

  6. Comparative genome analyses reveal distinct structure in the saltwater crocodile MHC.

    PubMed

    Jaratlerdsiri, Weerachai; Deakin, Janine; Godinez, Ricardo M; Shan, Xueyan; Peterson, Daniel G; Marthey, Sylvain; Lyons, Eric; McCarthy, Fiona M; Isberg, Sally R; Higgins, Damien P; Chong, Amanda Y; John, John St; Glenn, Travis C; Ray, David A; Gongora, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a dynamic genome region with an essential role in the adaptive immunity of vertebrates, especially antigen presentation. The MHC is generally divided into subregions (classes I, II and III) containing genes of similar function across species, but with different gene number and organisation. Crocodylia (crocodilians) are widely distributed and represent an evolutionary distinct group among higher vertebrates, but the genomic organisation of MHC within this lineage has been largely unexplored. Here, we studied the MHC region of the saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) and compared it with that of other taxa. We characterised genomic clusters encompassing MHC class I and class II genes in the saltwater crocodile based on sequencing of bacterial artificial chromosomes. Six gene clusters spanning ∼452 kb were identified to contain nine MHC class I genes, six MHC class II genes, three TAP genes, and a TRIM gene. These MHC class I and class II genes were in separate scaffold regions and were greater in length (2-6 times longer) than their counterparts in well-studied fowl B loci, suggesting that the compaction of avian MHC occurred after the crocodilian-avian split. Comparative analyses between the saltwater crocodile MHC and that from the alligator and gharial showed large syntenic areas (>80% identity) with similar gene order. Comparisons with other vertebrates showed that the saltwater crocodile had MHC class I genes located along with TAP, consistent with birds studied. Linkage between MHC class I and TRIM39 observed in the saltwater crocodile resembled MHC in eutherians compared, but absent in avian MHC, suggesting that the saltwater crocodile MHC appears to have gene organisation intermediate between these two lineages. These observations suggest that the structure of the saltwater crocodile MHC, and other crocodilians, can help determine the MHC that was present in the ancestors of archosaurs.

  7. Neuropeptidomics Mass Spectrometry Reveals Signaling Networks Generated by Distinct Protease Pathways in Human Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, Vivian; Bandeira, Nuno

    2015-12-01

    Neuropeptides regulate intercellular signaling as neurotransmitters of the central and peripheral nervous systems, and as peptide hormones in the endocrine system. Diverse neuropeptides of distinct primary sequences of various lengths, often with post-translational modifications, coordinate and integrate regulation of physiological functions. Mass spectrometry-based analysis of the diverse neuropeptide structures in neuropeptidomics research is necessary to define the full complement of neuropeptide signaling molecules. Human neuropeptidomics has notable importance in defining normal and dysfunctional neuropeptide signaling in human health and disease. Neuropeptidomics has great potential for expansion in translational research opportunities for defining neuropeptide mechanisms of human diseases, providing novel neuropeptide drug targets for drug discovery, and monitoring neuropeptides as biomarkers of drug responses. In consideration of the high impact of human neuropeptidomics for health, an observed gap in this discipline is the few published articles in human neuropeptidomics compared with, for example, human proteomics and related mass spectrometry disciplines. Focus on human neuropeptidomics will advance new knowledge of the complex neuropeptide signaling networks participating in the fine control of neuroendocrine systems. This commentary review article discusses several human neuropeptidomics accomplishments that illustrate the rapidly expanding diversity of neuropeptides generated by protease processing of pro-neuropeptide precursors occurring within the secretory vesicle proteome. Of particular interest is the finding that human-specific cathepsin V participates in producing enkephalin and likely other neuropeptides, indicating unique proteolytic mechanisms for generating human neuropeptides. The field of human neuropeptidomics has great promise to solve new mechanisms in disease conditions, leading to new drug targets and therapeutic agents for human

  8. Targeted exome sequencing reveals distinct pathogenic variants in Iranians with colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ashktorab, Hassan; Mokarram, Pooneh; Azimi, Hamed; Olumi, Hasti; Varma, Sudhir; Nickerson, Michael L.; Brim, Hassan

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) is currently used to establish mutational profiles in many multigene diseases such as colorectal cancer (CRC), which is on the rise in many parts of the developing World including, Iran. Little is known about its genetic hallmarks in these populations. AIM To identify variants in 15 CRC-associated genes in patients of Iranian descent. RESULTS There were 51 validated variants distributed on 12 genes: 22% MSH3 (n = 11/51), 10% MSH6 (n = 5/51), 8% AMER1 (n = 4/51), 20% APC (n = 10/51), 2% BRAF (n = 1/51), 2% KRAS (n = 1/51), 12% PIK3CA (n = 6/51), 8% TGFβR2A (n = 4/51), 2% SMAD4 (n = 1/51), 4% SOX9 (n = 2/51), 6% TCF7L2 (n = 3/51), and 6% TP53 (n = 3/51). Most known and distinct variants were in mismatch repair genes (MMR, 32%) and APC (20%). Among oncogenes, PIK3CA was the top target (12%). MATERIALS AND METHODS CRC specimens from 63 Shirazi patients were used to establish the variant' profile on an Ion Torrent platform by targeted exome sequencing. To rule-out technical artifacts, the variants were validated in 13 of these samples using an Illumina NGS platform. Validated variants were annotated and compared to variants from publically available databases. An in-silico functional analysis was performed. MSI status of the analyzed samples was established. CONCLUSION These results illustrate for the first time CRC mutational profile in Iranian patients. MSH3, MSH6, APC and PIK3CA genes seem to play a bigger role in the path to cancer in this population. These findings will potentially lead to informed genetic diagnosis protocol and targeted therapeutic strategies. PMID:28002797

  9. Proteogenomics of Pristionchus pacificus reveals distinct proteome structure of nematode models

    PubMed Central

    Borchert, Nadine; Dieterich, Christoph; Krug, Karsten; Schütz, Wolfgang; Jung, Stephan; Nordheim, Alfred; Sommer, Ralf J.; Macek, Boris

    2010-01-01

    Pristionchus pacificus is a nematode model organism whose genome has recently been sequenced. To refine the genome annotation we performed transcriptome and proteome analysis and gathered comprehensive experimental information on gene expression. Transcriptome analysis on a 454 Life Sciences (Roche) FLX platform generated >700,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from two normalized EST libraries, whereas proteome analysis on an LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer detected >27,000 nonredundant peptide sequences from more than 4000 proteins at sub-parts-per-million (ppm) mass accuracy and a false discovery rate of <1%. Retraining of the SNAP gene prediction algorithm using the gene expression data led to a decrease in the number of previously predicted protein-coding genes from 29,000 to 24,000 and refinement of numerous gene models. The P. pacificus proteome contains a high proportion of small proteins with no known homologs in other species (“pioneer” proteins). Some of these proteins appear to be products of highly homologous genes, pointing to their common origin. We show that >50% of all pioneer genes are transcribed under standard culture conditions and that pioneer proteins significantly contribute to a unimodal distribution of predicted protein sizes in P. pacificus, which has an unusually low median size of 240 amino acids (26.8 kDa). In contrast, the predicted proteome of Caenorhabditis elegans follows a distinct bimodal protein size distribution, with significant functional differences between small and large protein populations. Combined, these results provide the first catalog of the expressed genome of P. pacificus, refinement of its genome annotation, and the first comparison of related nematode models at the proteome level. PMID:20237107

  10. Neuropeptidomics Mass Spectrometry Reveals Signaling Networks Generated by Distinct Protease Pathways in Human Systems.

    PubMed

    Hook, Vivian; Bandeira, Nuno

    2015-12-01

    Neuropeptides regulate intercellular signaling as neurotransmitters of the central and peripheral nervous systems, and as peptide hormones in the endocrine system. Diverse neuropeptides of distinct primary sequences of various lengths, often with post-translational modifications, coordinate and integrate regulation of physiological functions. Mass spectrometry-based analysis of the diverse neuropeptide structures in neuropeptidomics research is necessary to define the full complement of neuropeptide signaling molecules. Human neuropeptidomics has notable importance in defining normal and dysfunctional neuropeptide signaling in human health and disease. Neuropeptidomics has great potential for expansion in translational research opportunities for defining neuropeptide mechanisms of human diseases, providing novel neuropeptide drug targets for drug discovery, and monitoring neuropeptides as biomarkers of drug responses. In consideration of the high impact of human neuropeptidomics for health, an observed gap in this discipline is the few published articles in human neuropeptidomics compared with, for example, human proteomics and related mass spectrometry disciplines. Focus on human neuropeptidomics will advance new knowledge of the complex neuropeptide signaling networks participating in the fine control of neuroendocrine systems. This commentary review article discusses several human neuropeptidomics accomplishments that illustrate the rapidly expanding diversity of neuropeptides generated by protease processing of pro-neuropeptide precursors occurring within the secretory vesicle proteome. Of particular interest is the finding that human-specific cathepsin V participates in producing enkephalin and likely other neuropeptides, indicating unique proteolytic mechanisms for generating human neuropeptides. The field of human neuropeptidomics has great promise to solve new mechanisms in disease conditions, leading to new drug targets and therapeutic agents for human

  11. Connectivity-based parcellation reveals distinct cortico-striatal connectivity fingerprints in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Balsters, Joshua H; Mantini, Dante; Wenderoth, Nicole

    2017-02-08

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) has been associated with abnormal synaptic development causing a breakdown in functional connectivity. However, when measured at the macro scale using resting state fMRI, these alterations are subtle and often difficult to detect due to the large heterogeneity of the pathology. Recently, we outlined a novel approach for generating robust biomarkers of resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (RS-fMRI) using connectivity based parcellation of gross morphological structures to improve single-subject reproducibility and generate more robust connectivity fingerprints. Here we apply this novel approach to investigating the organization and connectivity strength of the cortico-striatal system in a large sample of ASD individuals and typically developed (TD) controls (N=130 per group). Our results showed differences in the parcellation of the striatum in ASD. Specifically, the putamen was found to be one single structure in ASD, whereas this was split into anterior and posterior segments in an age, IQ, and head movement matched TD group. An analysis of the connectivity fingerprints revealed that the group differences in clustering were driven by differential connectivity between striatum and the supplementary motor area, posterior cingulate cortex, and posterior insula. Our approach for analysing RS-fMRI in clinical populations has provided clear evidence that cortico-striatal circuits are organized differently in ASD. Based on previous task-based segmentations of the striatum, we believe that the anterior putamen cluster present in TD, but not in ASD, likely contributes to social and language processes.

  12. Phosphoproteomic dynamics of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) reveals shared and distinct components of dehydration response.

    PubMed

    Subba, Pratigya; Barua, Pragya; Kumar, Rajiv; Datta, Asis; Soni, Kamlesh Kumar; Chakraborty, Subhra; Chakraborty, Niranjan

    2013-11-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is a ubiquitous regulatory mechanism that plays critical roles in transducing stress signals to bring about coordinated intracellular responses. To gain better understanding of dehydration response in plants, we have developed a differential phosphoproteome in a food legume, chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.). Three-week-old chickpea seedlings were subjected to progressive dehydration by withdrawing water, and the changes in the phosphorylation status of a large repertoire of proteins were monitored. The proteins were resolved by 2-DE and stained with phosphospecific fluorescent Pro-Q Diamond dye. Mass spectrometric analysis led to the identification of 91 putative phosphoproteins, presumably involved in a variety of functions including cell defense and rescue, photosynthesis and photorespiration, molecular chaperones, and ion transport, among others. Multiple sites of phosphorylation were predicted on several key elements, which include both the regulatory as well as the functional proteins. A critical survey of the phosphorylome revealed a DREPP (developmentally regulated plasma membrane protein) plasma membrane polypeptide family protein, henceforth designated CaDREPP1. The transcripts of CaDREPP1 were found to be differentially regulated under dehydration stress, further corroborating the proteomic results. This work provides new insights into the possible phosphorylation events triggered by the conditions of progressive water-deficit in plants.

  13. Comparison of phylogenetically distinct Histoplasma strains reveals evolutionarily divergent virulence strategies.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, Victoria E; Williams, Corinne L; Goldman, William E

    2014-07-01

    Infection with the dimorphic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum results from the inhalation of contaminated soil. Disease outcome is variable and depends on the immune status of the host, number of organisms inhaled, and the H. capsulatum strain. H. capsulatum is divided into seven distinct clades based on phylogenetic analyses, and strains from two separate clades have been identified in North America (denoted as NAm strains). We characterized an H. capsulatum isolate (WU24) from the NAm 1 lineage in relation to two other well-characterized Histoplasma isolates, the Panamanian strain G186A and the NAm 2 strain G217B. We determined that WU24 is a chemotype II strain and requires cell wall α-(1,3)-glucan for successful in vitro infection of macrophages. In a mouse model of histoplasmosis, WU24 exhibited a disease profile that was very similar to that of strain G186A at a high sublethal dose; however, at this dose G217B had markedly different kinetics. Surprisingly, infection with a lower dose mitigated many of the differences during the course of infection. The observed differences in fungal burden, disease kinetics, symptomology, and cytokine responses all indicate that there is a sophisticated relationship between host and fungus that drives the development and progression of histoplasmosis. Importance: Histoplasmosis has a wide range of clinical manifestations, presenting as mild respiratory distress, acute respiratory infection, or a life-threatening disseminated disease most often seen in immunocompromised patients. Additionally, the outcome appears to be dependent on the amount and strain of fungus inhaled. In this study, we characterized a recent clinical H. capsulatum isolate that was collected from an HIV(+) individual in North America. In contrast to other isolates from the same lineage, this strain, WU24, infected both macrophages and wild-type mice. We determined that in contrast to many other North American strains, WU24 infection of macrophages is

  14. Distinct modes of mature and precursor tRNA binding to Escherichia coli RNase P RNA revealed by NAIM analyses.

    PubMed Central

    Heide, C; Busch, S; Feltens, R; Hartmann, R K

    2001-01-01

    We have analyzed by nucleotide analog interference mapping (NAIM) pools of precursor or mature tRNA molecules, carrying a low level of Rp-RMPalphaS (R = A, G, I) or Rp-c7-deaza-RMPalphaS (R = A, G) modifications, to identify functional groups that contribute to the specific interaction with and processing efficiency by Escherichia coli RNase P RNA. The majority of interferences were found in the acceptor stem, T arm, and D arm, including the strongest effects observed at positions G19, G53, A58, and G71. In some cases (interferences at G5, G18, and G71), the affected functional groups are candidates for direct contacts with RNase P RNA. Several modifications disrupt intramolecular tertiary contacts known to stabilize the authentic tRNA fold. Such indirect interference effects were informative as well, because they allowed us to compare the structural constraints required for ptRNA processing versus product binding. Our ptRNA processing and mature tRNA binding NAIM analyses revealed overlapping but nonidentical patterns of interference effects, suggesting that substrate binding and cleavage involves binding modes or conformational states distinct from the binding mode of mature tRNA, the product of the reaction. PMID:11345434

  15. Three functionally distinct classes of C-fibre nociceptors in primates.

    PubMed

    Wooten, Matthew; Weng, Hao-Jui; Hartke, Timothy V; Borzan, Jasenka; Klein, Amanda H; Turnquist, Brian; Dong, Xinzhong; Meyer, Richard A; Ringkamp, Matthias

    2014-06-20

    In primates, C-fibre polymodal nociceptors are broadly classified into two groups based on mechanosensitivity. Here we demonstrate that mechanically sensitive polymodal nociceptors that respond either quickly (QC) or slowly (SC) to a heat stimulus differ in responses to a mild burn, heat sensitization, conductive properties and chemosensitivity. Superficially applied capsaicin and intradermal injection of β-alanine, an MrgprD agonist, excite vigorously all QCs. Only 40% of SCs respond to β-alanine, and their response is only half that of QCs. Mechanically insensitive C-fibres (C-MIAs) are β-alanine insensitive but vigorously respond to capsaicin and histamine with distinct discharge patterns. Calcium imaging reveals that β-alanine and histamine activate distinct populations of capsaicin-responsive neurons in primate dorsal root ganglion. We suggest that histamine itch and capsaicin pain are peripherally encoded in C-MIAs, and that primate polymodal nociceptive afferents form three functionally distinct subpopulations with β-alanine responsive QC fibres likely corresponding to murine MrgprD-expressing, non-peptidergic nociceptive afferents.

  16. Distinct Brca1 Mutations Differentially Reduce Hematopoietic Stem Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Mgbemena, Victoria E; Signer, Robert A J; Wijayatunge, Ranjula; Laxson, Travis; Morrison, Sean J; Ross, Theodora S

    2017-01-24

    BRCA1 is a well-known DNA repair pathway component and a tissue-specific tumor suppressor. However, its role in hematopoiesis is uncertain. Here, we report that a cohort of patients heterozygous for BRCA1 mutations experienced more hematopoietic toxicity from chemotherapy than those with BRCA2 mutations. To test whether this reflects a requirement for BRCA1 in hematopoiesis, we generated mice with Brca1 mutations in hematopoietic cells. Mice homozygous for a null Brca1 mutation in the embryonic hematopoietic system (Vav1-iCre;Brca1(F22-24/F22-24)) developed hematopoietic defects in early adulthood that included reduced hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Although mice homozygous for a huBRCA1 knockin allele (Brca1(BRCA1/BRCA1)) were normal, mice with a mutant huBRCA1/5382insC allele and a null allele (Mx1-Cre;Brca1(F22-24/5382insC)) had severe hematopoietic defects marked by a complete loss of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Our data show that Brca1 is necessary for HSC maintenance and normal hematopoiesis and that distinct mutations lead to different degrees of hematopoietic dysfunction.

  17. The distinctive role of executive functions in implicit emotion regulation.

    PubMed

    Sperduti, Marco; Makowski, Dominique; Arcangeli, Margherita; Wantzen, Prany; Zalla, Tiziana; Lemaire, Stéphane; Dokic, Jérôme; Pelletier, Jérôme; Piolino, Pascale

    2017-02-01

    Several theoretical models stress the role of executive functions in emotion regulation (ER). However, most of the previous studies on ER employed explicit regulatory strategies that could have engaged executive functions, beyond regulatory processes per se. Recently, there has been renewed interest in implicit forms of ER, believed to be closer to daily-life requirements. While various studies have shown that implicit and explicit ER engage partially overlapping neurocognitive processes, the contribution of different executive functions in implicit ER has not been investigated. In the present study, we presented participants with negatively valenced pictures of varying emotional intensity preceded by short texts describing them as either fictional or real. This manipulation was meant to induce a spontaneous emotional down-regulation. We recorded electrodermal activity (EDA) and subjective reports of emotion arousal. Executive functions (updating, switching, and inhibition) were also assessed. No difference was found between the fictional and real condition on EDA. A diminished self-reported arousal was observed, however, when pictures were described as fictional for high- and mild-intensity material, but not for neutral material. The amount of down-regulation in the fictional condition was found to be predicted by interindividual variability in updating performances, but not by the other measures of executive functions, suggesting its implication even in implicit forms of ER. The relationship between down-regulation and updating was significant only for high-intensity material. We discuss the role of updating in relation to the consciousness of one's emotional state.

  18. Analysis of gene expression during parabolic flights reveals distinct early gravity responses in Arabidopsis roots.

    PubMed

    Aubry-Hivet, D; Nziengui, H; Rapp, K; Oliveira, O; Paponov, I A; Li, Y; Hauslage, J; Vagt, N; Braun, M; Ditengou, F A; Dovzhenko, A; Palme, K

    2014-01-01

    Plant roots are among most intensively studied biological systems in gravity research. Altered gravity induces asymmetric cell growth leading to root bending. Differential distribution of the phytohormone auxin underlies root responses to gravity, being coordinated by auxin efflux transporters from the PIN family. The objective of this study was to compare early transcriptomic changes in roots of Arabidopsis thaliana wild type, and pin2 and pin3 mutants under parabolic flight conditions and to correlate these changes to auxin distribution. Parabolic flights allow comparison of transient 1-g, hypergravity and microgravity effects in living organisms in parallel. We found common and mutation-related genes differentially expressed in response to transient microgravity phases. Gene ontology analysis of common genes revealed lipid metabolism, response to stress factors and light categories as primarily involved in response to transient microgravity phases, suggesting that fundamental reorganisation of metabolic pathways functions upstream of a further signal mediating hormonal network. Gene expression changes in roots lacking the columella-located PIN3 were stronger than in those deprived of the epidermis and cortex cell-specific PIN2. Moreover, repetitive exposure to microgravity/hypergravity and gravity/hypergravity flight phases induced an up-regulation of auxin responsive genes in wild type and pin2 roots, but not in pin3 roots, suggesting a critical function of PIN3 in mediating auxin fluxes in response to transient microgravity phases. Our study provides important insights towards understanding signal transduction processes in transient microgravity conditions by combining for the first time the parabolic flight platform with the transcriptome analysis of different genetic mutants in the model plant, Arabidopsis. © 2013 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  19. The distinction in radiobiology between medical and public health functions

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, V.P.; Wielopolski, L.

    1995-12-31

    Starting with the classical threshold-sigmoid Medical-Toxicological plot, reasons are advanced for why the coordinates of this function are not appropriate for the analysis of Public Health-Epidemiological data. Misunderstanding with respect to both the level of biological organization and the word ``dose`` are pointed out, which explain why Public Health-Epidemiological data, anomalously, yield linear functions on medical-toxicological coordinates. It is then shown why substantially different coordinates must be used to obtain a function that describes properly and completely the cancer data obtained from epidemiological studies on the atomic bomb survivors. Arguments are put forth that seriously weaken the current interpretation of the ``linear, no-threshold hypothesis``. Reasons are advanced for why, if the amount of radiation energy is expressed in the proper terms, the numerical value for the cancer ``risk coefficient`` becomes substantially smaller than it now is.

  20. Nuclear stability and transcriptional directionality separate functionally distinct RNA species.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Robin; Refsing Andersen, Peter; Valen, Eivind; Core, Leighton J; Bornholdt, Jette; Boyd, Mette; Heick Jensen, Torben; Sandelin, Albin

    2014-11-12

    Mammalian genomes are pervasively transcribed, yielding a complex transcriptome with high variability in composition and cellular abundance. Although recent efforts have identified thousands of new long non-coding (lnc) RNAs and demonstrated a complex transcriptional repertoire produced by protein-coding (pc) genes, limited progress has been made in distinguishing functional RNA from spurious transcription events. This is partly due to present RNA classification, which is typically based on technical rather than biochemical criteria. Here we devise a strategy to systematically categorize human RNAs by their sensitivity to the ribonucleolytic RNA exosome complex and by the nature of their transcription initiation. These measures are surprisingly effective at correctly classifying annotated transcripts, including lncRNAs of known function. The approach also identifies uncharacterized stable lncRNAs, hidden among a vast majority of unstable transcripts. The predictive power of the approach promises to streamline the functional analysis of known and novel RNAs.

  1. Identification of RNA Binding Proteins Associated with Dengue Virus RNA in Infected Cells Reveals Temporally Distinct Host Factor Requirements

    PubMed Central

    Viktorovskaya, Olga V.; Greco, Todd M.; Cristea, Ileana M.; Thompson, Sunnie R.

    2016-01-01

    Background There are currently no vaccines or antivirals available for dengue virus infection, which can cause dengue hemorrhagic fever and death. A better understanding of the host pathogen interaction is required to develop effective therapies to treat DENV. In particular, very little is known about how cellular RNA binding proteins interact with viral RNAs. RNAs within cells are not naked; rather they are coated with proteins that affect localization, stability, translation and (for viruses) replication. Methodology/Principal Findings Seventy-nine novel RNA binding proteins for dengue virus (DENV) were identified by cross-linking proteins to dengue viral RNA during a live infection in human cells. These cellular proteins were specific and distinct from those previously identified for poliovirus, suggesting a specialized role for these factors in DENV amplification. Knockdown of these proteins demonstrated their function as viral host factors, with evidence for some factors acting early, while others late in infection. Their requirement by DENV for efficient amplification is likely specific, since protein knockdown did not impair the cell fitness for viral amplification of an unrelated virus. The protein abundances of these host factors were not significantly altered during DENV infection, suggesting their interaction with DENV RNA was due to specific recruitment mechanisms. However, at the global proteome level, DENV altered the abundances of proteins in particular classes, including transporter proteins, which were down regulated, and proteins in the ubiquitin proteasome pathway, which were up regulated. Conclusions/Significance The method for identification of host factors described here is robust and broadly applicable to all RNA viruses, providing an avenue to determine the conserved or distinct mechanisms through which diverse viruses manage the viral RNA within cells. This study significantly increases the number of cellular factors known to interact with

  2. Are The Dorsal and Ventral Hippocampus functionally distinct structures?

    PubMed Central

    Fanselow, Michael S.; Dong, Hong-Wei

    2009-01-01

    One literature treats the hippocampus as a purely cognitive structure involved in memory; another treats it as a regulator of emotion whose dysfunction leads to psychopathology. We review behavioral, anatomical, and gene expression studies that together support a functional segmentation into 3 hippocampal compartments dorsal, intermediate and ventral. The dorsal hippocampus, which corresponds to the posterior hippocampus in primates, performs primarily cognitive functions. The ventral (anterior in primates) relates to stress, emotion and affect. Strikingly, gene expression in the dorsal hippocampus correlates with cortical regions involved in information processing, while genes expressed in the ventral hippocampus correlate with regions involved in emotion and stress (amygdala and hypothalamus). PMID:20152109

  3. Live imaging of nascent RNA dynamics reveals distinct types of transcriptional pulse regulation

    PubMed Central

    Muramoto, Tetsuya; Cannon, Danielle; Gierliński, Marek; Corrigan, Adam; Barton, Geoffrey J.; Chubb, Jonathan R.

    2012-01-01

    Transcription of genes can be discontinuous, occurring in pulses or bursts. It is not clear how properties of transcriptional pulses vary between different genes. We compared the pulsing of five housekeeping and five developmentally induced genes by direct imaging of single gene transcriptional events in individual living Dictyostelium cells. Each gene displayed its own transcriptional signature, differing in probability of firing and pulse duration, frequency, and intensity. In contrast to the prevailing view from both prokaryotes and eukaryotes that transcription displays binary behavior, strongly expressed housekeeping genes altered the magnitude of their transcriptional pulses during development. These nonbinary “tunable” responses may be better suited than stochastic switch behavior for housekeeping functions. Analysis of RNA synthesis kinetics using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching implied modulation of housekeeping-gene pulse strength occurs at the level of transcription initiation rather than elongation. In addition, disparities between single cell and population measures of transcript production suggested differences in RNA stability between gene classes. Analysis of stability using RNAseq revealed no major global differences in stability between developmental and housekeeping transcripts, although strongly induced RNAs showed unusually rapid decay, indicating tight regulation of expression. PMID:22529358

  4. Live imaging of nascent RNA dynamics reveals distinct types of transcriptional pulse regulation.

    PubMed

    Muramoto, Tetsuya; Cannon, Danielle; Gierlinski, Marek; Corrigan, Adam; Barton, Geoffrey J; Chubb, Jonathan R

    2012-05-08

    Transcription of genes can be discontinuous, occurring in pulses or bursts. It is not clear how properties of transcriptional pulses vary between different genes. We compared the pulsing of five housekeeping and five developmentally induced genes by direct imaging of single gene transcriptional events in individual living Dictyostelium cells. Each gene displayed its own transcriptional signature, differing in probability of firing and pulse duration, frequency, and intensity. In contrast to the prevailing view from both prokaryotes and eukaryotes that transcription displays binary behavior, strongly expressed housekeeping genes altered the magnitude of their transcriptional pulses during development. These nonbinary "tunable" responses may be better suited than stochastic switch behavior for housekeeping functions. Analysis of RNA synthesis kinetics using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching implied modulation of housekeeping-gene pulse strength occurs at the level of transcription initiation rather than elongation. In addition, disparities between single cell and population measures of transcript production suggested differences in RNA stability between gene classes. Analysis of stability using RNAseq revealed no major global differences in stability between developmental and housekeeping transcripts, although strongly induced RNAs showed unusually rapid decay, indicating tight regulation of expression.

  5. A novel functionally distinct subtype of striatal neuropeptide Y interneuron.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-Sandoval, Osvaldo; Tecuapetla, Fatuel; Unal, Bengi; Shah, Fulva; Koós, Tibor; Tepper, James M

    2011-11-16

    We investigated the properties of neostriatal neuropeptide Y (NPY)-expressing interneurons in transgenic GFP (green fluorescent protein)-NPY reporter mice. In vitro whole-cell recordings and biocytin staining demonstrated the existence of a novel class of neostriatal NPY-expressing GABAergic interneurons that exhibit electrophysiological, neurochemical, and morphological properties strikingly different from those of previously described NPY-containing, plateau-depolarization low-threshold spike (NPY-PLTS) interneurons. The novel NPY interneuron type (NPY-neurogliaform) differed from previously described NPY-PLTS interneurons by exhibiting a significantly lower input resistance and hyperpolarized membrane potential, regular, nonaccommodating spiking in response to depolarizing current injections, and an absence of plateau depolarizations or low-threshold spikes. NPY-neurogliaform interneurons were also easily distinguished morphologically by their dense, compact, and highly branched dendritic and local axonal arborizations that contrasted sharply with the sparse and extended axonal and dendritic arborizations of NPY-PLTS interneurons. Furthermore, NPY-neurogliaform interneurons did not express immunofluorescence for somatostatin or nitric oxide synthase that was ubiquitous in NPY-PLTS interneurons. IPSP/Cs could only rarely be elicited in spiny projection neurons (SPNs) in paired recordings with NPY-PLTS interneurons. In contrast, the probability of SPN innervation by NPY-neurogliaform interneurons was extremely high, the synapse very reliable (no failures were observed), and the resulting postsynaptic response was a slow, GABA(A) receptor-mediated IPSC that has not been previously described in striatum but that has been elicited from NPY-GABAergic neurogliaform interneurons in cortex and hippocampus. These properties suggest unique and distinctive roles for NPY-PLTS and NPY-neurogliaform interneurons in the integrative properties of the neostriatum.

  6. A NOVEL FUNCTIONALLY DISTINCT SUBTYPE OF STRIATAL NPY INTERNEURON

    PubMed Central

    Ibáñez-Sandoval, Osvaldo; Tecuapetla, Fatuel; Unal, Bengi; Shah, Fulva; Koós, Tibor; Tepper, James M.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the properties of neostriatal neuropeptide Y (NPY)-expressing interneurons in transgenic green fluorescent protein (GFP)-NPY reporter mice. In vitro whole cell recordings and biocytin staining demonstrated the existence of a novel class of neostriatal NPY-expressing GABAergic interneurons that exhibit electrophysiological, neurochemical and morphological properties strikingly different from those of previously described NPY-containing, plateau-depolarization low-threshold spike (NPY-PLTS) interneurons. The novel NPY interneuron type (NPY-neurogliaform) differed from previously described NPY-PLTS interneurons by exhibiting a significantly lower input resistance and hyperpolarized membrane potential, regular, non-accommodating spiking in response to depolarizing current injections and an absence of plateau depolarizations or low threshold spikes. NPY-neurogliaform interneurons were also easily distinguished morphologically by their dense compact and highly branched dendritic and local axonal arborizations that contrasted sharply with the sparse and extended axonal and dendritic arborizations of NPY-PLTS interneurons. Further, NPY-neurogliaform interneurons did not express immunofluorescence for somatostatin or nitric oxide synthase that was ubiquitous in NPY-PLTS interneurons. IPSP/Cs could only rarely be elicited in spiny projection neurons (SPN) in paired recordings with NPY-PLTS interneurons. In contrast, the probability of SPN innervation by NPY-neurogliaform interneurons was extremely high, the synapse very reliable (no failures were observed), and the resulting postsynaptic response was a slow, GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic current (IPSC) that has not been previously described in striatum, but that has been elicited from NPY-GABAergic neurogliaform interneurons in cortex and hippocampus. These properties suggest unique and distinctive roles for NPY-PLTS and NPY-neurogliaform interneurons in the integrative properties of the

  7. Coordinated and Distinct Functions of Velvet Proteins in Fusarium verticillioides

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Nan; Zhang, Hanxing; Hu, Chengcheng; Wang, Wenzhao; Calvo, Ana M.; Harris, Steven D.; Chen, She

    2014-01-01

    Velvet-domain-containing proteins are broadly distributed within the fungal kingdom. In the corn pathogen Fusarium verticillioides, previous studies showed that the velvet protein F. verticillioides VE1 (FvVE1) is critical for morphological development, colony hydrophobicity, toxin production, and pathogenicity. In this study, tandem affinity purification of FvVE1 revealed that FvVE1 can form a complex with the velvet proteins F. verticillioides VelB (FvVelB) and FvVelC. Phenotypic characterization of gene knockout mutants showed that, as in the case of FvVE1, FvVelB regulated conidial size, hyphal hydrophobicity, fumonisin production, and oxidant resistance, while FvVelC was dispensable for these biological processes. Comparative transcriptional analysis of eight genes involved in the ROS (reactive oxygen species) removal system revealed that both FvVE1 and FvVelB positively regulated the transcription of a catalase-encoding gene, F. verticillioides CAT2 (FvCAT2). Deletion of FvCAT2 resulted in reduced oxidant resistance, providing further explanation of the regulation of oxidant resistance by velvet proteins in the fungal kingdom. PMID:24792348

  8. Multiple nuclear loci reveal the distinctiveness of the threatened, Neotropical Pinus chiapensis

    Treesearch

    John Syring; Rafael F. del Castillo; Richard Cronn; Aaron Liston

    2007-01-01

    Pinus chiapensis is a threatened species of pine from southern Mexico and Guatemala. It was first described as a disjunct variety of P. strobus from the eastern United States and Canada. Subsequent morphological work indicates that P. chinpensis is a distinct species, but this interpretation is controversial. To...

  9. TLR-exosomes exhibit distinct kinetics and effector function

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Swetha; Su, Michelle; Ravishankar, Shashidhar; Moore, James; Head, PamelaSara; Dixon, J. Brandon; Vannberg, Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    The innate immune system is vital to rapidly responding to pathogens and Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a critical component of this response. Nanovesicular exosomes play a role in immunity, but to date their exact contribution to the dissemination of the TLR response is unknown. Here we show that exosomes from TLR stimulated cells can largely recapitulate TLR activation in distal cells in vitro. We can abrogate the action-at-a-distance signaling of exosomes by UV irradiation, demonstrating that RNA is crucial for their effector function. We are the first to show that exosomes derived from poly(I:C) stimulated cells induce in vivo macrophage M1-like polarization within murine lymph nodes. These poly(I:C) exosomes demonstrate enhanced trafficking to the node and preferentially recruit neutrophils as compared to control exosomes. This work definitively establishes the differential effector function for exosomes in communicating the TLR activation state of the cell of origin. PMID:28290538

  10. The distinct C-terminal acidic domains of HMGB proteins are functionally relevant in Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    de Abreu da Silva, Isabel Caetano; Carneiro, Vitor Coutinho; Vicentino, Amanda Roberta Revoredo; Aguilera, Estefania Anahi; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo; Thiengo, Silvana; Fernandez, Monica Ammon; Fantappié, Marcelo Rosado

    2016-04-01

    The Schistosoma mansoni High Mobility Group Box (HMGB) proteins SmHMGB1, SmHMGB2 and SmHMGB3 share highly conserved HMG box DNA binding domains but have significantly different C-terminal acidic tails. Here, we used three full-length and tailless forms of the S. mansoni HMGB proteins to examine the functional roles of their acidic tails. DNA binding assays revealed that the different lengths of the acidic tails among the three SmHMGB proteins significantly and distinctively influenced their DNA transactions. Spectroscopic analyses indicated that the longest acidic tail of SmHMGB3 contributes to the structural stabilisation of this protein. Using immunohistochemical analysis, we showed distinct patterns of SmHMGB1, SmHMGB2 and SmHMGB3 expression in different tissues of adult worms. RNA interference approaches indicated a role for SmHMGB2 and SmHMGB3 in the reproductive system of female worms, whereas for SmHMGB1 no clear phenotype was observed. Schistosome HMGB proteins can be phosphorylated, acetylated and methylated. Importantly, the acetylation and methylation of schistosome HMGBs were greatly enhanced upon removal of the acidic tail. These data support the notion that the C-terminal acidic tails dictate the differences in the structure, expression and function of schistosome HMGB proteins. Copyright © 2016 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Mineral and organic growing media have distinct community structure, stability and functionality in soilless culture systems

    PubMed Central

    Grunert, Oliver; Hernandez-Sanabria, Emma; Vilchez-Vargas, Ramiro; Jauregui, Ruy; Pieper, Dietmar H.; Perneel, Maaike; Van Labeke, Marie-Christine; Reheul, Dirk; Boon, Nico

    2016-01-01

    The choice of soilless growing medium for plant nutrition, growth and support is crucial for improving the eco-sustainability of the production in horticultural systems. As our current understanding of the functional microbial communities inhabiting this ecosystem is still limited, we examined the microbial community development of the two most important growing media (organic and mineral) used in open soilless horticultural systems. We aimed to identify factors that influence community composition over time, and to compare the distribution of individual taxa across growing media, and their potential functionality. High throughput sequencing analysis revealed a distinctive and stable microbial community in the organic growing medium. Humidity, pH, nitrate-N, ammonium-N and conductivity were uncovered as the main factors associated with the resident bacterial communities. Ammonium-N was correlated with Rhizobiaceae abundance, while potential competitive interactions among both Methylophilaceae and Actinobacteridae with Rhizobiaceae were suggested. Our results revealed that soilless growing media are unique niches for diverse bacterial communities with temporal functional stability, which may possibly impact the resistance to external forces. These differences in communities can be used to develop strategies to move towards a sustainable horticulture with increased productivity and quality. PMID:26728128

  12. Phylogenetic relationships and protein modelling revealed two distinct subfamilies of group II HKT genes between crop and model grasses.

    PubMed

    Ariyarathna, H A Chandima K; Francki, Michael G

    2016-07-01

    Molecular evolution of large protein families in closely related species can provide useful insights on structural functional relationships. Phylogenetic analysis of the grass-specific group II HKT genes identified two distinct subfamilies, I and II. Subfamily II was represented in all species, whereas subfamily I was identified only in the small grain cereals and possibly originated from an ancestral gene duplication post divergence from the coarse grain cereal lineage. The core protein structures were highly analogous despite there being no more than 58% amino acid identity between members of the two subfamilies. Distinctly variable regions in known functional domains, however, indicated functional divergence of the two subfamilies. The subsets of codons residing external to known functional domains predicted signatures of positive Darwinian selection potentially identifying new domains of functional divergence and providing new insights on the structural function and relationships between protein members of the two subfamilies.

  13. Evolution of distinct EGF domains with specific functions

    PubMed Central

    Wouters, Merridee A.; Rigoutsos, Isidore; Chu, Carmen K.; Feng, Lina L.; Sparrow, Duncan B.; Dunwoodie, Sally L.

    2005-01-01

    EGF domains are extracellular protein modules cross-linked by three intradomain disulfides. Past studies suggest the existence of two types of EGF domain with three-disulfides, human EGF-like (hEGF) domains and complement C1r-like (cEGF) domains, but to date no functional information has been related to the two different types, and they are not differentiated in sequence or structure databases. We have developed new sequence patterns based on the different C-termini to search specifically for the two types of EGF domains in sequence databases. The exhibited sensitivity and specificity of the new pattern-based method represents a significant advancement over the currently available sequence detection techniques. We re-annotated EGF sequences in the latest release of Swiss-Prot looking for functional relationships that might correlate with EGF type. We show that important post-translational modifications of three-disulfide EGFs, including unusual forms of glycosylation and post-translational proteolytic processing, are dependent on EGF subtype. For example, EGF domains that are shed from the cell surface and mediate intercellular signaling are all hEGFs, as are all human EGF receptor family ligands. Additional experimental data suggest that functional specialization has accompanied subtype divergence. Based on our structural analysis of EGF domains with three-disulfide bonds and comparison to laminin and integrin-like EGF domains with an additional inter-domain disulfide, we propose that these hEGF and cEGF domains may have arisen from a four-disulfide ancestor by selective loss of different cysteine residues. PMID:15772310

  14. Comparative Analysis of RNA Families Reveals Distinct Repertoires for Each Domain of Life

    PubMed Central

    Hoeppner, Marc P.; Gardner, Paul P.; Poole, Anthony M.

    2012-01-01

    The RNA world hypothesis, that RNA genomes and catalysts preceded DNA genomes and genetically-encoded protein catalysts, has been central to models for the early evolution of life on Earth. A key part of such models is continuity between the earliest stages in the evolution of life and the RNA repertoires of extant lineages. Some assessments seem consistent with a diverse RNA world, yet direct continuity between modern RNAs and an RNA world has not been demonstrated for the majority of RNA families, and, anecdotally, many RNA functions appear restricted in their distribution. Despite much discussion of the possible antiquity of RNA families, no systematic analyses of RNA family distribution have been performed. To chart the broad evolutionary history of known RNA families, we performed comparative genomic analysis of over 3 million RNA annotations spanning 1446 families from the Rfam 10 database. We report that 99% of known RNA families are restricted to a single domain of life, revealing discrete repertoires for each domain. For the 1% of RNA families/clans present in more than one domain, over half show evidence of horizontal gene transfer (HGT), and the rest show a vertical trace, indicating the presence of a complex protein synthesis machinery in the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA) and consistent with the evolutionary history of the most ancient protein-coding genes. However, with limited interdomain transfer and few RNA families exhibiting demonstrable antiquity as predicted under RNA world continuity, our results indicate that the majority of modern cellular RNA repertoires have primarily evolved in a domain-specific manner. PMID:23133357

  15. Comparative analysis of RNA families reveals distinct repertoires for each domain of life.

    PubMed

    Hoeppner, Marc P; Gardner, Paul P; Poole, Anthony M

    2012-01-01

    The RNA world hypothesis, that RNA genomes and catalysts preceded DNA genomes and genetically-encoded protein catalysts, has been central to models for the early evolution of life on Earth. A key part of such models is continuity between the earliest stages in the evolution of life and the RNA repertoires of extant lineages. Some assessments seem consistent with a diverse RNA world, yet direct continuity between modern RNAs and an RNA world has not been demonstrated for the majority of RNA families, and, anecdotally, many RNA functions appear restricted in their distribution. Despite much discussion of the possible antiquity of RNA families, no systematic analyses of RNA family distribution have been performed. To chart the broad evolutionary history of known RNA families, we performed comparative genomic analysis of over 3 million RNA annotations spanning 1446 families from the Rfam 10 database. We report that 99% of known RNA families are restricted to a single domain of life, revealing discrete repertoires for each domain. For the 1% of RNA families/clans present in more than one domain, over half show evidence of horizontal gene transfer (HGT), and the rest show a vertical trace, indicating the presence of a complex protein synthesis machinery in the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA) and consistent with the evolutionary history of the most ancient protein-coding genes. However, with limited interdomain transfer and few RNA families exhibiting demonstrable antiquity as predicted under RNA world continuity, our results indicate that the majority of modern cellular RNA repertoires have primarily evolved in a domain-specific manner.

  16. Mutagenesis of GATA motifs controlling the endoderm regulator elt-2 reveals distinct dominant and secondary cis-regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Du, Lawrence; Tracy, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Cis-regulatory elements (CREs) are crucial links in developmental gene regulatory networks, but in many cases, it can be difficult to discern whether similar CREs are functionally equivalent. We found that despite similar conservation and binding capability to upstream activators, different GATA cis-regulatory motifs within the promoter of the C. elegans endoderm regulator elt-2 play distinctive roles in activating and modulating gene expression throughout development. We fused wild-type and mutant versions of the elt-2 promoter to a gfp reporter and inserted these constructs as single copies into the C. elegans genome. We then counted early embryonic gfp transcripts using single-molecule RNA FISH (smFISH) and quantified gut GFP fluorescence. We determined that a single primary dominant GATA motif located -527 bp upstream of the elt-2 start codon was necessary for both embryonic activation and later maintenance of transcription, while nearby secondary GATA motifs played largely subtle roles in modulating postembryonic levels of elt-2. Mutation of the primary activating site increased low-level spatiotemporally ectopic stochastic transcription, indicating that this site acts repressively in non-endoderm cells. Our results reveal that CREs with similar GATA factor binding affinities in close proximity can play very divergent context-dependent roles in regulating the expression of a developmentally critical gene in vivo. PMID:26896592

  17. Mutagenesis of GATA motifs controlling the endoderm regulator elt-2 reveals distinct dominant and secondary cis-regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Du, Lawrence; Tracy, Sharon; Rifkin, Scott A

    2016-04-01

    Cis-regulatory elements (CREs) are crucial links in developmental gene regulatory networks, but in many cases, it can be difficult to discern whether similar CREs are functionally equivalent. We found that despite similar conservation and binding capability to upstream activators, different GATA cis-regulatory motifs within the promoter of the C. elegans endoderm regulator elt-2 play distinctive roles in activating and modulating gene expression throughout development. We fused wild-type and mutant versions of the elt-2 promoter to a gfp reporter and inserted these constructs as single copies into the C. elegans genome. We then counted early embryonic gfp transcripts using single-molecule RNA FISH (smFISH) and quantified gut GFP fluorescence. We determined that a single primary dominant GATA motif located 527bp upstream of the elt-2 start codon was necessary for both embryonic activation and later maintenance of transcription, while nearby secondary GATA motifs played largely subtle roles in modulating postembryonic levels of elt-2. Mutation of the primary activating site increased low-level spatiotemporally ectopic stochastic transcription, indicating that this site acts repressively in non-endoderm cells. Our results reveal that CREs with similar GATA factor binding affinities in close proximity can play very divergent context-dependent roles in regulating the expression of a developmentally critical gene in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. KRAS insertion mutations are oncogenic and exhibit distinct functional properties

    PubMed Central

    White, Yasmine; Bagchi, Aditi; Van Ziffle, Jessica; Inguva, Anagha; Bollag, Gideon; Zhang, Chao; Carias, Heidi; Dickens, David; Loh, Mignon; Shannon, Kevin; Firestone, Ari J.

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic KRAS mutations introduce discrete amino acid substitutions that reduce intrinsic Ras GTPase activity and confer resistance to GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs). Here we discover a partial duplication of the switch 2 domain of K-Ras encoding a tandem repeat of amino acids G60_A66dup in a child with an atypical myeloproliferative neoplasm. K-Ras proteins containing this tandem duplication or a similar five amino acid E62_A66dup mutation identified in lung and colon cancers transform the growth of primary myeloid progenitors and of Ba/F3 cells. Recombinant K-RasG60_A66dup and K-RasE62_A66dup proteins display reduced intrinsic GTP hydrolysis rates, accumulate in the GTP-bound conformation and are resistant to GAP-mediated GTP hydrolysis. Remarkably, K-Ras proteins with switch 2 insertions are impaired for PI3 kinase binding and Akt activation, and are hypersensitive to MEK inhibition. These studies illuminate a new class of oncogenic KRAS mutations and reveal unexpected plasticity in oncogenic Ras proteins that has diagnostic and therapeutic implications. PMID:26854029

  19. The structure of a conserved piezo channel domain reveals a topologically distinct β sandwich fold.

    PubMed

    Kamajaya, Aron; Kaiser, Jens T; Lee, Jonas; Reid, Michelle; Rees, Douglas C

    2014-10-07

    Piezo has recently been identified as a family of eukaryotic mechanosensitive channels composed of subunits containing over 2,000 amino acids, without recognizable sequence similarity to other channels. Here, we present the crystal structure of a large, conserved extramembrane domain located just before the last predicted transmembrane helix of C. elegans PIEZO, which adopts a topologically distinct β sandwich fold. The structure was also determined of a point mutation located on a conserved surface at the position equivalent to the human PIEZO1 mutation found in dehydrated hereditary stomatocytosis patients (M2225R). While the point mutation does not change the overall domain structure, it does alter the surface electrostatic potential that may perturb interactions with a yet-to-be-identified ligand or protein. The lack of structural similarity between this domain and any previously characterized fold, including those of eukaryotic and bacterial channels, highlights the distinctive nature of the Piezo family of eukaryotic mechanosensitive channels.

  20. Distinct Functional Connectivities Predict Clinical Response with Emotion Regulation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Fresco, David M; Roy, Amy K; Adelsberg, Samantha; Seeley, Saren; García-Lesy, Emmanuel; Liston, Conor; Mennin, Douglas S

    2017-01-01

    Despite the success of available medical and psychosocial treatments, a sizable subgroup of individuals with commonly co-occurring disorders, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and major depressive disorder (MDD), fail to make sufficient treatment gains thereby prolonging their deficits in life functioning and satisfaction. Clinically, these patients often display temperamental features reflecting heightened sensitivity to underlying motivational systems related to threat/safety and reward/loss (e.g., somatic anxiety) as well as inordinate negative self-referential processing (e.g., worry, rumination). This profile may reflect disruption in two important neural networks associated with emotional/motivational salience (e.g., salience network) and self-referentiality (e.g., default network, DN). Emotion Regulation Therapy (ERT) was developed to target this hypothesized profile and its neurobehavioral markers. In the present study, 22 GAD patients (with and without MDD) completed resting state MRI scans before receiving 16 sessions of ERT. To test study these hypotheses, we examined the associations between baseline patterns of intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC) of the insula and of hubs within the DN (anterior and dorsal medial prefrontal cortex [MPFC] and posterior cingulate cortex [PCC]) and treatment-related changes in worry, somatic anxiety symptoms and decentering. Results suggest that greater treatment linked reductions in worry were associated with iFC clusters in both the insular and parietal cortices. Greater treatment linked gains in decentering, a metacognitive process that involves the capacity to observe items that arise in the mind with healthy psychological distance that is targeted by ERT, was associated with iFC clusters in the anterior and posterior DN. The current study adds to the growing body of research implicating disruptions in the default and salience networks as promising targets of treatment for GAD with and without co-occurring MDD.

  1. Distinct Functional Connectivities Predict Clinical Response with Emotion Regulation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fresco, David M.; Roy, Amy K.; Adelsberg, Samantha; Seeley, Saren; García-Lesy, Emmanuel; Liston, Conor; Mennin, Douglas S.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the success of available medical and psychosocial treatments, a sizable subgroup of individuals with commonly co-occurring disorders, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and major depressive disorder (MDD), fail to make sufficient treatment gains thereby prolonging their deficits in life functioning and satisfaction. Clinically, these patients often display temperamental features reflecting heightened sensitivity to underlying motivational systems related to threat/safety and reward/loss (e.g., somatic anxiety) as well as inordinate negative self-referential processing (e.g., worry, rumination). This profile may reflect disruption in two important neural networks associated with emotional/motivational salience (e.g., salience network) and self-referentiality (e.g., default network, DN). Emotion Regulation Therapy (ERT) was developed to target this hypothesized profile and its neurobehavioral markers. In the present study, 22 GAD patients (with and without MDD) completed resting state MRI scans before receiving 16 sessions of ERT. To test study these hypotheses, we examined the associations between baseline patterns of intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC) of the insula and of hubs within the DN (anterior and dorsal medial prefrontal cortex [MPFC] and posterior cingulate cortex [PCC]) and treatment-related changes in worry, somatic anxiety symptoms and decentering. Results suggest that greater treatment linked reductions in worry were associated with iFC clusters in both the insular and parietal cortices. Greater treatment linked gains in decentering, a metacognitive process that involves the capacity to observe items that arise in the mind with healthy psychological distance that is targeted by ERT, was associated with iFC clusters in the anterior and posterior DN. The current study adds to the growing body of research implicating disruptions in the default and salience networks as promising targets of treatment for GAD with and without co-occurring MDD

  2. Comparative phylogeography and population genetics within Buteo lineatus reveals evidence of distinct evolutionary lineages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hull, J.M.; Strobel, Bradley N.; Boal, C.W.; Hull, A.C.; Dykstra, C.R.; Irish, A.M.; Fish, A.M.; Ernest, H.B.

    2008-01-01

    Traditional subspecies classifications may suggest phylogenetic relationships that are discordant with evolutionary history and mislead evolutionary inference. To more accurately describe evolutionary relationships and inform conservation efforts, we investigated the genetic relationships and demographic histories of Buteo lineatus subspecies in eastern and western North America using 21 nuclear microsatellite loci and 375-base pairs of mitochondrial control region sequence. Frequency based analyses of mitochondrial sequence data support significant population distinction between eastern (B. l. lineatus/alleni/texanus) and western (B. l. elegans) subspecies of B. lineatus. This distinction was further supported by frequency and Bayesian analyses of the microsatellite data. We found evidence of differing demographic histories between regions; among eastern sites, mitochondrial data suggested that rapid population expansion occurred following the end of the last glacial maximum, with B. l. texanus population expansion preceding that of B. l. lineatus/alleni. No evidence of post-glacial population expansion was detected among western samples (B. l. elegans). Rather, microsatellite data suggest that the western population has experienced a recent bottleneck, presumably associated with extensive anthropogenic habitat loss during the 19th and 20th centuries. Our data indicate that eastern and western populations of B. lineatus are genetically distinct lineages, have experienced very different demographic histories, and suggest management as separate conservation units may be warranted. ?? 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Temporal stability and representational distinctiveness: Key functions of orthographic working memory

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Vanessa; Fischer-Baum, Simon; Capasso, Rita; Miceli, Gabriele; Rapp, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    A primary goal of working memory research has been to understand the mechanisms that permit working memory systems to effectively maintain the identity and order of the elements held in memory for sufficient time as to allow for their selection and transfer to subsequent processing stages. Based on the performance of two individuals with acquired dysgraphia affecting orthographic WM (the graphemic buffer) we present evidence of two distinct and dissociable functions of orthographic WM. One function is responsible for maintaining the temporal stability of letters held in orthographic WM, while the other is responsible for maintaining their representational distinctiveness. The failure to maintain temporal stability and representational distinctiveness give rise, respectively, to decay and interference effects that manifest themselves in distinctive error patterns, including distinct serial position effects. The findings we report have implications beyond our understanding of orthographic WM, as the need to maintain temporal stability and representational distinctiveness in WM is common across cognitive domains. PMID:22248210

  4. Dual Transcriptome Profiling of Leishmania-Infected Human Macrophages Reveals Distinct Reprogramming Signatures.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Maria Cecilia; Dillon, Laura A L; Belew, Ashton Trey; Bravo, Hector Corrada; Mosser, David M; El-Sayed, Najib M

    2016-05-10

    Macrophages are mononuclear phagocytes that constitute a first line of defense against pathogens. While lethal to many microbes, they are the primary host cells of Leishmania spp. parasites, the obligate intracellular pathogens that cause leishmaniasis. We conducted transcriptomic profiling of two Leishmania species and the human macrophage over the course of intracellular infection by using high-throughput RNA sequencing to characterize the global gene expression changes and reprogramming events that underlie the interactions between the pathogen and its host. A systematic exclusion of the generic effects of large-particle phagocytosis revealed a vigorous, parasite-specific response of the human macrophage early in the infection that was greatly tempered at later time points. An analogous temporal expression pattern was observed with the parasite, suggesting that much of the reprogramming that occurs as parasites transform into intracellular forms generally stabilizes shortly after entry. Following that, the parasite establishes an intracellular niche within macrophages, with minimal communication between the parasite and the host cell later during the infection. No significant difference was observed between parasite species transcriptomes or in the transcriptional response of macrophages infected with each species. Our comparative analysis of gene expression changes that occur as mouse and human macrophages are infected by Leishmania spp. points toward a general signature of the Leishmania-macrophage infectome. Little is known about the transcriptional changes that occur within mammalian cells harboring intracellular pathogens. This study characterizes the gene expression signatures of Leishmania spp. parasites and the coordinated response of infected human macrophages as the pathogen enters and persists within them. After accounting for the generic effects of large-particle phagocytosis, we observed a parasite-specific response of the human macrophages early in

  5. Genome-wide Evidence Reveals that African and Eurasian Golden Jackals Are Distinct Species.

    PubMed

    Koepfli, Klaus-Peter; Pollinger, John; Godinho, Raquel; Robinson, Jacqueline; Lea, Amanda; Hendricks, Sarah; Schweizer, Rena M; Thalmann, Olaf; Silva, Pedro; Fan, Zhenxin; Yurchenko, Andrey A; Dobrynin, Pavel; Makunin, Alexey; Cahill, James A; Shapiro, Beth; Álvares, Francisco; Brito, José C; Geffen, Eli; Leonard, Jennifer A; Helgen, Kristofer M; Johnson, Warren E; O'Brien, Stephen J; Van Valkenburgh, Blaire; Wayne, Robert K

    2015-08-17

    The golden jackal of Africa (Canis aureus) has long been considered a conspecific of jackals distributed throughout Eurasia, with the nearest source populations in the Middle East. However, two recent reports found that mitochondrial haplotypes of some African golden jackals aligned more closely to gray wolves (Canis lupus), which is surprising given the absence of gray wolves in Africa and the phenotypic divergence between the two species. Moreover, these results imply the existence of a previously unrecognized phylogenetically distinct species despite a long history of taxonomic work on African canids. To test the distinct-species hypothesis and understand the evolutionary history that would account for this puzzling result, we analyzed extensive genomic data including mitochondrial genome sequences, sequences from 20 autosomal loci (17 introns and 3 exon segments), microsatellite loci, X- and Y-linked zinc-finger protein gene (ZFX and ZFY) sequences, and whole-genome nuclear sequences in African and Eurasian golden jackals and gray wolves. Our results provide consistent and robust evidence that populations of golden jackals from Africa and Eurasia represent distinct monophyletic lineages separated for more than one million years, sufficient to merit formal recognition as different species: C. anthus (African golden wolf) and C. aureus (Eurasian golden jackal). Using morphologic data, we demonstrate a striking morphologic similarity between East African and Eurasian golden jackals, suggesting parallelism, which may have misled taxonomists and likely reflects uniquely intense interspecific competition in the East African carnivore guild. Our study shows how ecology can confound taxonomy if interspecific competition constrains size diversification. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Functionally distinct regions for spatial processing and sensory motor integration in the planum temporale.

    PubMed

    Isenberg, A Lisette; Vaden, Kenneth I; Saberi, Kourosh; Muftuler, L Tugan; Hickok, Gregory

    2012-10-01

    There has been much debate recently over the functional role played by the planum temporale (PT) within the context of the dorsal auditory processing stream. Some studies indicate that regions in the PT support spatial hearing and other auditory functions, whereas others demonstrate sensory-motor response properties. This multifunctionality has led to the claim that the PT is performing a common computational pattern matching operation, then routing the signals (spatial, object, sensory-motor) into an appropriate processing stream. An alternative possibility is that the PT is functionally subdivided with separate regions supporting various functions. We assess this possibility using a within subject fMRI block design. DTI data were also collected to examine connectivity. There were four auditory conditions: stationary noise, moving noise, listening to pseudowords, and shadowing pseudowords (covert repetition). Contrasting the shadow and listen conditions should activate regions specific to sensory-motor processes, while contrasting the stationary and moving noise conditions should activate regions involved in spatial hearing. Subjects (N = 16) showed greater activation for shadowing in left posterior PT, area Spt, when the shadow and listen conditions were contrasted. The motion vs. stationary noise contrast revealed greater activation in a more medial and anterior portion of left PT. Seeds from these two contrasts were then used to guide the DTI analysis in an examination of connectivity via streamline tractography, which revealed different patterns of connectivity. Findings support a heterogeneous model of the PT, with functionally distinct regions for sensory-motor integration and processes involved in auditory spatial perception. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Concurrent Vaccination with two distinct vaccine platforms targeting the same antigen generates phenotypically and functionally distinct T-cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Boehm, Amanda L.; Higgins, Jack; Franzusoff, Alex; Schlom, Jeffrey; Hodge, James W.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Studies comparing two or more vaccine platforms have historically evaluated each platform based on its ability to induce an immune response and may conclude that one vaccine is more efficacious than the other(s), leading to a recommendation for development of the more effective vaccine for clinical studies. Alternatively, these studies have documented the advantages of a diversified prime and boost regimen due to amplification of the antigen-specific T-cell population. We hypothesize here that two vaccine platforms targeting the same antigen might induce shared and distinct antigen-specific T-cell populations, and examined the possibility that two distinct vaccines could be used concomitantly. Experimental design Using recombinant poxvirus and yeast vaccines, we compared the T-cell populations induced by these two platforms in terms of serum cytokine response, T-cell gene expression, T-cell receptor phenotype, antigen-specific cytokine expression, T-cell avidity, and T-cell antigen-specific tumor cell lysis. Results These studies demonstrate for the first time that vaccination with a recombinant poxvirus platform (rV/F-CEA/TRICOM) or a heat-killed yeast vaccine platform (yeast-CEA) elicits T-cell populations with both shared and unique phenotypic and functional characteristics. Furthermore, both the antigen and the vector play a role in the induction of distinct T-cell populations. Conclusions In this study, we demonstrate that concurrent administration of two vaccines targeting the same antigen induces a more diverse T-cell population that leads to enhanced antitumor efficacy. These studies provide the rationale for future clinical studies investigating concurrent administration of vaccine platforms targeting a single antigen to enhance the antigen-specific immune response. PMID:19756595

  8. Plasmodium alveolins possess distinct but structurally and functionally related multi-repeat domains.

    PubMed

    Al-Khattaf, Fatimah S; Tremp, Annie Z; Dessens, Johannes T

    2015-02-01

    The invasive and motile life stages of malaria parasites (merozoite, ookinete and sporozoite) possess a distinctive cortical structure termed the pellicle. The pellicle is characterised by a double-layered 'inner membrane complex' (IMC) located underneath the plasma membrane, which is supported by a cytoskeletal structure termed the subpellicular network (SPN). The SPN consists of intermediate filaments, whose major constituents include a family of proteins called alveolins. Here, we re-appraise the alveolins in the genus Plasmodium with respect to their repertoire, structure and interrelatedness. Amongst 13 family members identified, we distinguish two domain types that, albeit distinct at the primary structure level, are structurally related and contain tandem repeats with a consensus 12-amino acid periodicity. Analysis in Plasmodium berghei of the most divergent alveolin, PbIMC1d, reveals a zoite-specific expression in ookinetes and a subcellular localisation in the pellicle, consistent with its predicted role as a SPN component. Knockout of PbIMC1d gives rise to a wild-type phenotype with respect to ookinete morphogenesis, tensile strength, gliding motility and infectivity, presenting the first example of apparent functional redundancy amongst alveolin family members.

  9. Distinct functional contributions of primary sensory and association areas to audiovisual integration in object categorization.

    PubMed

    Werner, Sebastian; Noppeney, Uta

    2010-02-17

    Multisensory interactions have been demonstrated in a distributed neural system encompassing primary sensory and higher-order association areas. However, their distinct functional roles in multisensory integration remain unclear. This functional magnetic resonance imaging study dissociated the functional contributions of three cortical levels to multisensory integration in object categorization. Subjects actively categorized or passively perceived noisy auditory and visual signals emanating from everyday actions with objects. The experiment included two 2 x 2 factorial designs that manipulated either (1) the presence/absence or (2) the informativeness of the sensory inputs. These experimental manipulations revealed three patterns of audiovisual interactions. (1) In primary auditory cortices (PACs), a concurrent visual input increased the stimulus salience by amplifying the auditory response regardless of task-context. Effective connectivity analyses demonstrated that this automatic response amplification is mediated via both direct and indirect [via superior temporal sulcus (STS)] connectivity to visual cortices. (2) In STS and intraparietal sulcus (IPS), audiovisual interactions sustained the integration of higher-order object features and predicted subjects' audiovisual benefits in object categorization. (3) In the left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (vlPFC), explicit semantic categorization resulted in suppressive audiovisual interactions as an index for multisensory facilitation of semantic retrieval and response selection. In conclusion, multisensory integration emerges at multiple processing stages within the cortical hierarchy. The distinct profiles of audiovisual interactions dissociate audiovisual salience effects in PACs, formation of object representations in STS/IPS and audiovisual facilitation of semantic categorization in vlPFC. Furthermore, in STS/IPS, the profiles of audiovisual interactions were behaviorally relevant and predicted subjects

  10. Distinct Subglacial Drainage Patterns Revealed in High-Resolution Mapping of Basal Radar Reflectivity across Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, W.; Schroeder, D. M.; Seroussi, H. L.; Creyts, T. T.; Palmer, S. J.; Bell, R. E.

    2016-12-01

    Subglacial water beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet is linked to changes in sliding rate in both theoretical and field-based studies. These can lead to massive, widespread speed-ups or, conversely, very little response from the ice sheet. While distinct modes of subglacial drainage have been proposed to cause these different responses, the absence of Greenland-wide hydrological observations makes it difficult to examine how shifts in drainage occur and what controls them. By combining NASA IceBridge radar-sounding and ice-sheet modeling, we identified distinct subglacial drainage patterns across Greenland. Specifically, we examine Russell Glacier as a southern Greenland example and the Petermann-Humboldt glacier system as a northern example. In southern Greenland at Russell Glacier, the distribution of subglacial water varies seasonally depending on the surface melt supply and is strongly controlled by bed topography and properties. In the winter, water is stored on bedrock ridges but is absent in deep sediment-filled troughs. In the summer, water drains to the deep troughs that focus this water, flooding the bed to intensify sliding. Conversely, the subglacial drainage systems in northern Greenland are distinctly different. Beneath Petermann and Humboldt, subglacial water is present throughout the year and primarily fed by basal melt in the upstream reaches. In Petermann, this basal water is focused by the deep topography along the main ice trunk. These drainage networks are continuous up to 180 km from the glacier terminus, and likely facilitate the onset of fast flow. In contrast, in Humboldt the flat topography and the lack of water focusing produce more broadly distributed networks rather than locally focused systems. In Humboldt, onset of fast flow develops much closer to the ice edge where surface meltwater may contribute to the subglacial water budget. Our results provide insights into the relationship between surface melt, basal topography and properties over

  11. VgrG and PAAR Proteins Define Distinct Versions of a Functional Type VI Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Cianfanelli, Francesca R.; Alcoforado Diniz, Juliana; Guo, Manman; De Cesare, Virginia; Trost, Matthias; Coulthurst, Sarah J.

    2016-01-01

    The Type VI secretion system (T6SS) is widespread among bacterial pathogens and acts as an effective weapon against competitor bacteria and eukaryotic hosts by delivering toxic effector proteins directly into target cells. The T6SS utilises a bacteriophage-like contractile machinery to expel a puncturing device based on a tube of Hcp topped with a VgrG spike, which can be extended by a final tip from a PAAR domain-containing protein. Effector proteins are believed to be delivered by specifically associating with particular Hcp, VgrG or PAAR proteins, either covalently (‘specialised’) or non-covalently (‘cargo’ effectors). Here we used the T6SS of the opportunistic pathogen Serratia marcescens, together with integratecd genetic, proteomic and biochemical approaches, to elucidate the role of specific VgrG and PAAR homologues in T6SS function and effector specificity, revealing new aspects and unexpected subtleties in effector delivery by the T6SS. We identified effectors, both cargo and specialised, absolutely dependent on a particular VgrG for delivery to target cells, and discovered that other cargo effectors can show a preference for a particular VgrG. The presence of at least one PAAR protein was found to be essential for T6SS function, consistent with designation as a ‘core’ T6SS component. We showed that specific VgrG-PAAR combinations are required to assemble a functional T6SS and that the three distinct VgrG-PAAR assemblies in S. marcescens exhibit distinct effector specificity and efficiency. Unexpectedly, we discovered that two different PAAR-containing Rhs proteins can functionally pair with the same VgrG protein. Showing that accessory EagR proteins are involved in these interactions, native VgrG-Rhs-EagR complexes were isolated and specific interactions between EagR and cognate Rhs proteins identified. This study defines an essential yet flexible role for PAAR proteins in the T6SS and highlights the existence of distinct versions of the

  12. Identifying Two Groups of Entitled Individuals: Cluster Analysis Reveals Emotional Stability and Self-Esteem Distinction.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Michael L; LoPilato, Alexander C; Campbell, W Keith; Miller, Joshua D

    2016-12-01

    The present study hypothesized that there exist two distinct groups of entitled individuals: grandiose-entitled, and vulnerable-entitled. Self-report scores of entitlement were collected for 916 individuals using an online platform. Model-based cluster analyses were conducted on the individuals with scores one standard deviation above mean (n = 159) using the five-factor model dimensions as clustering variables. The results support the existence of two groups of entitled individuals categorized as emotionally stable and emotionally vulnerable. The emotionally stable cluster reported emotional stability, high self-esteem, more positive affect, and antisocial behavior. The emotionally vulnerable cluster reported low self-esteem and high levels of neuroticism, disinhibition, conventionality, psychopathy, negative affect, childhood abuse, intrusive parenting, and attachment difficulties. Compared to the control group, both clusters reported being more antagonistic, extraverted, Machiavellian, and narcissistic. These results suggest important differences are missed when simply examining the linear relationships between entitlement and various aspects of its nomological network.

  13. Genomic Analyses of Breast Cancer Progression Reveal Distinct Routes of Metastasis Emergence

    PubMed Central

    Krøigård, Anne Bruun; Larsen, Martin Jakob; Brasch-Andersen, Charlotte; Lænkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Knoop, Ann S.; Jensen, Jeanette Dupont; Bak, Martin; Mollenhauer, Jan; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A.

    2017-01-01

    A main controversy in cancer research is whether metastatic abilities are present in the most advanced clone of the primary tumor or result from independently acquired aberrations in early disseminated cancer cells as suggested by the linear and the parallel progression models, respectively. The genetic concordance between different steps of malignant progression is mostly unexplored as very few studies have included cancer samples separated by both space and time. We applied whole exome sequencing and targeted deep sequencing to 26 successive samples from six patients with metastatic estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer. Our data provide support for both linear and parallel progression towards metastasis. We report for the first time evidence of metastasis-to-metastasis seeding in breast cancer. Our results point to three distinct routes of metastasis emergence. This may have profound clinical implications and provides substantial novel molecular insights into the timing and mutational evolution of breast cancer metastasis. PMID:28276460

  14. An eye-to-hand magnet effect reveals distinct spatial interference in motor planning and execution.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Brian A; Cluff, Tyler; Lyons, James; Balasubramaniam, Ramesh

    2013-03-01

    An important question in oculomanual control is whether motor planning and execution modulate interference between motion of the eyes and hands. Here we investigated oculomanual interference using a novel paradigm that required saccadic eye movements and unimanual finger tapping. We examined finger trajectories for spatial interference caused by concurrent saccades. The first experiment used synchronous cues so that saccades and taps shared a common timekeeping goal. We found that finger trajectories showed bilateral interference where either finger was attracted in the direction of the accompanying saccade. The second experiment avoided interference due to shared planning resources by examining interference caused by reactive saccades. Here, we observed a lesser degree of execution-dependent coupling where the finger trajectory deviated only when reactive saccades were directed toward the hemifield of the responding hand. Our results show that distinct forms of eye-to-hand coupling emerge according to the demands of the task.

  15. Physical versus psychological social stress in male rats reveals distinct cardiovascular, inflammatory and behavioral consequences.

    PubMed

    Finnell, Julie E; Lombard, Calliandra M; Padi, Akhila R; Moffitt, Casey M; Wilson, L Britt; Wood, Christopher S; Wood, Susan K

    2017-01-01

    Repeated exposure to social stress can precipitate the development of psychosocial disorders including depression and comorbid cardiovascular disease. While a major component of social stress often encompasses physical interactions, purely psychological stressors (i.e. witnessing a traumatic event) also fall under the scope of social stress. The current study determined whether the acute stress response and susceptibility to stress-related consequences differed based on whether the stressor consisted of physical versus purely psychological social stress. Using a modified resident-intruder paradigm, male rats were either directly exposed to repeated social defeat stress (intruder) or witnessed a male rat being defeated. Cardiovascular parameters, behavioral anhedonia, and inflammatory cytokines in plasma and the stress-sensitive locus coeruleus were compared between intruder, witness, and control rats. Surprisingly intruders and witnesses exhibited nearly identical increases in mean arterial pressure and heart rate during acute and repeated stress exposures, yet only intruders exhibited stress-induced arrhythmias. Furthermore, re-exposure to the stress environment in the absence of the resident produced robust pressor and tachycardic responses in both stress conditions indicating the robust and enduring nature of social stress. In contrast, the long-term consequences of these stressors were distinct. Intruders were characterized by enhanced inflammatory sensitivity in plasma, while witnesses were characterized by the emergence of depressive-like anhedonia, transient increases in systolic blood pressure and plasma levels of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase. The current study highlights that while the acute cardiovascular responses to stress were identical between intruders and witnesses, these stressors produced distinct differences in the enduring consequences to stress, suggesting that witness stress may be more likely to produce long-term cardiovascular

  16. Deep sequencing reveals distinct patterns of DNA methylation in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung H.; Dhanasekaran, Saravana M.; Prensner, John R.; Cao, Xuhong; Robinson, Daniel; Kalyana-Sundaram, Shanker; Huang, Christina; Shankar, Sunita; Jing, Xiaojun; Iyer, Matthew; Hu, Ming; Sam, Lee; Grasso, Catherine; Maher, Christopher A.; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Mehra, Rohit; Kominsky, Hal D.; Siddiqui, Javed; Yu, Jindan; Qin, Zhaohui S.; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.

    2011-01-01

    Beginning with precursor lesions, aberrant DNA methylation marks the entire spectrum of prostate cancer progression. We mapped the global DNA methylation patterns in select prostate tissues and cell lines using MethylPlex–next-generation sequencing (M-NGS). Hidden Markov model–based next-generation sequence analysis identified ∼68,000 methylated regions per sample. While global CpG island (CGI) methylation was not differential between benign adjacent and cancer samples, overall promoter CGI methylation significantly increased from ∼12.6% in benign samples to 19.3% and 21.8% in localized and metastatic cancer tissues, respectively (P-value < 2 × 10−16). We found distinct patterns of promoter methylation around transcription start sites, where methylation occurred not only on the CGIs, but also on flanking regions and CGI sparse promoters. Among the 6691 methylated promoters in prostate tissues, 2481 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) are cancer-specific, including numerous novel DMRs. A novel cancer-specific DMR in the WFDC2 promoter showed frequent methylation in cancer (17/22 tissues, 6/6 cell lines), but not in the benign tissues (0/10) and normal PrEC cells. Integration of LNCaP DNA methylation and H3K4me3 data suggested an epigenetic mechanism for alternate transcription start site utilization, and these modifications segregated into distinct regions when present on the same promoter. Finally, we observed differences in repeat element methylation, particularly LINE-1, between ERG gene fusion-positive and -negative cancers, and we confirmed this observation using pyrosequencing on a tissue panel. This comprehensive methylome map will further our understanding of epigenetic regulation in prostate cancer progression. PMID:21724842

  17. Optogenetic activation reveals distinct roles of PIP3 and Akt in adipocyte insulin action.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yingke; Nan, Di; Fan, Jiannan; Bogan, Jonathan S; Toomre, Derek

    2016-05-15

    Glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4; also known as SLC2A4) resides on intracellular vesicles in muscle and adipose cells, and translocates to the plasma membrane in response to insulin. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt signaling pathway plays a major role in GLUT4 translocation; however, a challenge has been to unravel the potentially distinct contributions of PI3K and Akt (of which there are three isoforms, Akt1-Akt3) to overall insulin action. Here, we describe new optogenetic tools based on CRY2 and the N-terminus of CIB1 (CIBN). We used these 'Opto' modules to activate PI3K and Akt selectively in time and space in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. We validated these tools using biochemical assays and performed live-cell kinetic analyses of IRAP-pHluorin translocation (IRAP is also known as LNPEP and acts as a surrogate marker for GLUT4 here). Strikingly, Opto-PIP3 largely mimicked the maximal effects of insulin stimulation, whereas Opto-Akt only partially triggered translocation. Conversely, drug-mediated inhibition of Akt only partially dampened the translocation response of Opto-PIP3 In spatial optogenetic studies, focal targeting of Akt to a region of the cell marked the sites where IRAP-pHluorin vesicles fused, supporting the idea that local Akt-mediated signaling regulates exocytosis. Taken together, these results indicate that PI3K and Akt play distinct roles, and that PI3K stimulates Akt-independent pathways that are important for GLUT4 translocation.

  18. Distinct signatures of diversifying selection revealed by genome analysis of respiratory tract and invasive bacterial populations.

    PubMed

    Shea, Patrick R; Beres, Stephen B; Flores, Anthony R; Ewbank, Amy L; Gonzalez-Lugo, Javier H; Martagon-Rosado, Alexandro J; Martinez-Gutierrez, Juan C; Rehman, Hina A; Serrano-Gonzalez, Monica; Fittipaldi, Nahuel; Ayers, Stephen D; Webb, Paul; Willey, Barbara M; Low, Donald E; Musser, James M

    2011-03-22

    Many pathogens colonize different anatomical sites, but the selective pressures contributing to survival in the diverse niches are poorly understood. Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is a human-adapted bacterium that causes a range of infections. Much effort has been expended to dissect the molecular basis of invasive (sterile-site) infections, but little is known about the genomes of strains causing pharyngitis (streptococcal "sore throat"). Additionally, there is essentially nothing known about the genetic relationships between populations of invasive and pharyngitis strains. In particular, it is unclear if invasive strains represent a distinct genetic subpopulation of strains that cause pharyngitis. We compared the genomes of 86 serotype M3 GAS pharyngitis strains with those of 215 invasive M3 strains from the same geographical location. The pharyngitis and invasive groups were highly related to each other and had virtually identical phylogenetic structures, indicating they belong to the same genetic pool. Despite the overall high degree of genetic similarity, we discovered that strains from different host environments (i.e., throat, normally sterile sites) have distinct patterns of diversifying selection at the nucleotide level. In particular, the pattern of polymorphisms in the hyaluronic acid capsule synthesis operon was especially different between the two strain populations. This finding was mirrored by data obtained from full-genome analysis of strains sequentially cultured from nonhuman primates. Our results answer the long-standing question of the genetic relationship between GAS pharyngitis and invasive strains. The data provide previously undescribed information about the evolutionary history of pathogenic microbes that cause disease in different anatomical sites.

  19. Large-scale tectonic cycles in Europe revealed by distinct Pb isotope provinces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blichert-Toft, Janne; Delile, Hugo; Lee, Cin-Ty; Stos-Gale, Zofia; Billström, Kjell; Andersen, Tom; Hannu, Huhma; Albarède, Francis

    2016-10-01

    Lead isotopic systematics of U-poor minerals, such as sulfides and feldspars, can provide unique insights into the origin and evolution of continents because these minerals "freeze in" the Pb isotopic composition of the crust during major tectonothermal events, allowing the history of a continent to be told through Pb isotopes. Lead model ages constrain the timing of crust formation while time-integrated U/Pb, Th/Pb, and Th/U ratios shed light onto key geochemical processes associated with continent formation. Using ˜6800 Pb isotope measurements of primarily lead ores and minor K-feldspar, we mapped out the Pb isotope systematics across Europe and the Mediterranean. Lead model ages define spatially distinct age provinces, consistent with major tectonic events ranging from the Paleozoic to the Proterozoic and latest Archean. However, the regions defined by time-integrated U/Pb and Th/Pb ratios cut across the boundaries of age provinces, with high U/Pb systematics characterizing most of southern Europe. Magmatic influx, followed by segregation of dense sulfide-rich mafic cumulates, resulted in foundering of U- and Th-poor lower crust, thereby changing the bulk composition of the continental crust and leading to distinct time-integrated U-Th/Pb provinces. We show that the tectonic assembly of small crustal fragments leaves the crust largely undifferentiated, whereas the formation of supercontinents results in fundamental changes in the composition of the crust, identifiable in time and space by means of Pb isotope systematics. Observations based on Pb isotopes open up a new perspective on possible relationships between crustal thickness and geodynamic processes, in particular the role of crustal foundering into the mantle and the mechanisms responsible for the existence of cratons.

  20. Physical versus psychological social stress in male rats reveals distinct cardiovascular, inflammatory and behavioral consequences

    PubMed Central

    Padi, Akhila R.; Moffitt, Casey M.; Wilson, L. Britt; Wood, Christopher S.; Wood, Susan K.

    2017-01-01

    Repeated exposure to social stress can precipitate the development of psychosocial disorders including depression and comorbid cardiovascular disease. While a major component of social stress often encompasses physical interactions, purely psychological stressors (i.e. witnessing a traumatic event) also fall under the scope of social stress. The current study determined whether the acute stress response and susceptibility to stress-related consequences differed based on whether the stressor consisted of physical versus purely psychological social stress. Using a modified resident-intruder paradigm, male rats were either directly exposed to repeated social defeat stress (intruder) or witnessed a male rat being defeated. Cardiovascular parameters, behavioral anhedonia, and inflammatory cytokines in plasma and the stress-sensitive locus coeruleus were compared between intruder, witness, and control rats. Surprisingly intruders and witnesses exhibited nearly identical increases in mean arterial pressure and heart rate during acute and repeated stress exposures, yet only intruders exhibited stress-induced arrhythmias. Furthermore, re-exposure to the stress environment in the absence of the resident produced robust pressor and tachycardic responses in both stress conditions indicating the robust and enduring nature of social stress. In contrast, the long-term consequences of these stressors were distinct. Intruders were characterized by enhanced inflammatory sensitivity in plasma, while witnesses were characterized by the emergence of depressive-like anhedonia, transient increases in systolic blood pressure and plasma levels of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase. The current study highlights that while the acute cardiovascular responses to stress were identical between intruders and witnesses, these stressors produced distinct differences in the enduring consequences to stress, suggesting that witness stress may be more likely to produce long-term cardiovascular

  1. Distinct profiles of alpha7 nAChR positive allosteric modulation revealed by structurally diverse chemotypes.

    PubMed

    Grønlien, Jens Halvard; Håkerud, Monika; Ween, Hilde; Thorin-Hagene, Kirsten; Briggs, Clark A; Gopalakrishnan, Murali; Malysz, John

    2007-09-01

    Selective modulation of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) is thought to regulate processes impaired in schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, and other dementias. One approach to target alpha7 nAChRs is by positive allosteric modulation. Structurally diverse compounds, including PNU-120596, 4-naphthalene-1-yl-3a,4,5,9b-tetrahydro-3-H-cyclopenta[c]quinoline-8-sulfonic acid amide (TQS), and 5-hydroxyindole (5-HI) have been identified as positive allosteric modulators (PAMs), but their receptor interactions and pharmacological profiles remain to be fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated interactions of these compounds at human alpha7 nAChRs, expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, along with genistein, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Genistein was found to function as a PAM. Two types of PAM profiles were observed. 5-HI and genistein predominantly affected the apparent peak current (type I) whereas PNU-120596 and TQS increased the apparent peak current and evoked a distinct weakly decaying current (type II). Concentration-responses to agonists [ACh, 3-[(3E)-3-[(2,4-dimethoxyphenyl)methylidene]-5,6-dihydro-4H-pyridin-2-yl]pyridine dihydrochloride (GTS-21), and N-[(3R)-1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl]-4-chlorobenzamide hydrochloride (PNU-282987)] were potentiated by both types, although type II PAMs had greater effects. When applied after alpha7 nAChRs were desensitized, type II, but not type I, PAMs could reactivate alpha7 currents. Both types of PAMs also increased the ACh-evoked alpha7 window currents, with type II PAMs generally showing larger potentiation. None of the PAMs tested increased nicotine-evoked Ca(2+) transients in human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing human alpha4beta2 or alpha3beta4 nAChRs, although some inhibition was noted for 5-HI, genistein, and TQS. In summary, our studies reveal two distinct alpha7 PAM profiles, which could offer unique opportunities for modulating alpha7 nAChRs in vivo and in the development of novel

  2. Revealing neuronal function through microelectrode array recordings

    PubMed Central

    Obien, Marie Engelene J.; Deligkaris, Kosmas; Bullmann, Torsten; Bakkum, Douglas J.; Frey, Urs

    2015-01-01

    Microelectrode arrays and microprobes have been widely utilized to measure neuronal activity, both in vitro and in vivo. The key advantage is the capability to record and stimulate neurons at multiple sites simultaneously. However, unlike the single-cell or single-channel resolution of intracellular recording, microelectrodes detect signals from all possible sources around every sensor. Here, we review the current understanding of microelectrode signals and the techniques for analyzing them. We introduce the ongoing advancements in microelectrode technology, with focus on achieving higher resolution and quality of recordings by means of monolithic integration with on-chip circuitry. We show how recent advanced microelectrode array measurement methods facilitate the understanding of single neurons as well as network function. PMID:25610364

  3. Revealing remodeler function: Varied and unique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastlund, Allen

    Chromatin remodelers perform a necessary and required function for the successful expression of our genetic code. By modifying, shifting, or ejecting nucleosomes from the chromatin structure they allow access to the underlying DNA to the rest of the cell's machinery. This research has focused on two major remodeler motors from major families of chromatin remodelers: the trimeric motor domain of RSC and the motor domain of the ISWI family, ISWI. Using primarily stopped-flow spectrofluorometry, I have categorized the time-dependent motions of these motor domains along their preferred substrate, double-stranded DNA. Combined with collected ATP utilization data, I present the subsequent analysis and associated conclusions that stem from the underlying assumptions and models. Interestingly, there is little in common between the investigated proteins aside from their favored medium. While RSC exhibits modest translocation characteristics and highly effective motion with the ability for large molecular forces, ISWI is not only structurally different but highly inefficient in its motion leading to difficulties in determining its specific translocation mechanics. While chromatin remodeling is a ubiquitous facet of eukaryotic life, there remains much to be understood about their general mechanisms.

  4. Alternate transcripts of a floral developmental regulator have both distinct and redundant functions in opium poppy

    PubMed Central

    Hands, Philip; Vosnakis, Nikolaos; Betts, Donna; Irish, Vivian F.; Drea, Sinéad

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims The MADS-box transcription factor AGAMOUS (AG) is an important regulator of stamen and fruit identity as well as floral meristem determinacy in a number of core eudicots and monocots. However, its role outside of these groups has not been assessed explicitly. Examining its role in opium poppy, a basal eudicot, could uncover much about the evolution and development of flower and fruit development in the angiosperms. Methods AG orthologues were isolated by degenerate RT-PCR and the gene sequence and structure examined; gene expression was characterized using in situ hybridization and the function assessed using virus-induced gene silencing. Key Results In opium poppy, a basal eudicot, the AGAMOUS orthologue is alternatively spliced to produce encoded products that vary at the C-terminus, termed PapsAG-1 and PapsAG-2. Both transcripts are expressed at high levels in stamens and carpels. The functional implications of this alternative transcription were examined using virus-induced gene silencing and the results show that PapsAG-1 has roles in stamen and carpel identity, reflecting those found for Arabidopsis AG. In contrast, PapsAG-2, while displaying redundancy in these functions, has a distinctive role in aspects of carpel development reflected in septae, ovule and stigma defects seen in the loss-of-function line generated. Conclusions These results describe the first explicit functional analysis of an AG-clade gene in a basal eudicot; illustrate one of the few examples of the functional consequences of alternative splicing in transcription factors and reveal the importance of alternative transcription, as well as gene duplication, as a driving force in evolution. PMID:21385783

  5. Distinct Particle Morphologies Revealed through Comparative Parallel Analyses of Retrovirus-Like Particles.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jessica L; Cao, Sheng; Maldonado, Jose O; Zhang, Wei; Mansky, Louis M

    2016-09-15

    The Gag protein is the main retroviral structural protein, and its expression alone is usually sufficient for production of virus-like particles (VLPs). In this study, we sought to investigate-in parallel comparative analyses-Gag cellular distribution, VLP size, and basic morphological features using Gag expression constructs (Gag or Gag-YFP, where YFP is yellow fluorescent protein) created from all representative retroviral genera: Alpharetrovirus, Betaretrovirus, Deltaretrovirus, Epsilonretrovirus, Gammaretrovirus, Lentivirus, and Spumavirus. We analyzed Gag cellular distribution by confocal microscopy, VLP budding by thin-section transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and general morphological features of the VLPs by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). Punctate Gag was observed near the plasma membrane for all Gag constructs tested except for the representative Beta- and Epsilonretrovirus Gag proteins. This is the first report of Epsilonretrovirus Gag localizing to the nucleus of HeLa cells. While VLPs were not produced by the representative Beta- and Epsilonretrovirus Gag proteins, the other Gag proteins produced VLPs as confirmed by TEM, and morphological differences were observed by cryo-TEM. In particular, we observed Deltaretrovirus-like particles with flat regions of electron density that did not follow viral membrane curvature, Lentivirus-like particles with a narrow range and consistent electron density, suggesting a tightly packed Gag lattice, and Spumavirus-like particles with large envelope protein spikes and no visible electron density associated with a Gag lattice. Taken together, these parallel comparative analyses demonstrate for the first time the distinct morphological features that exist among retrovirus-like particles. Investigation of these differences will provide greater insights into the retroviral assembly pathway. Comparative analysis among retroviruses has been critically important in enhancing our understanding of

  6. Distinct Particle Morphologies Revealed through Comparative Parallel Analyses of Retrovirus-Like Particles

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jessica L.; Cao, Sheng; Maldonado, Jose O.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Gag protein is the main retroviral structural protein, and its expression alone is usually sufficient for production of virus-like particles (VLPs). In this study, we sought to investigate—in parallel comparative analyses—Gag cellular distribution, VLP size, and basic morphological features using Gag expression constructs (Gag or Gag-YFP, where YFP is yellow fluorescent protein) created from all representative retroviral genera: Alpharetrovirus, Betaretrovirus, Deltaretrovirus, Epsilonretrovirus, Gammaretrovirus, Lentivirus, and Spumavirus. We analyzed Gag cellular distribution by confocal microscopy, VLP budding by thin-section transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and general morphological features of the VLPs by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). Punctate Gag was observed near the plasma membrane for all Gag constructs tested except for the representative Beta- and Epsilonretrovirus Gag proteins. This is the first report of Epsilonretrovirus Gag localizing to the nucleus of HeLa cells. While VLPs were not produced by the representative Beta- and Epsilonretrovirus Gag proteins, the other Gag proteins produced VLPs as confirmed by TEM, and morphological differences were observed by cryo-TEM. In particular, we observed Deltaretrovirus-like particles with flat regions of electron density that did not follow viral membrane curvature, Lentivirus-like particles with a narrow range and consistent electron density, suggesting a tightly packed Gag lattice, and Spumavirus-like particles with large envelope protein spikes and no visible electron density associated with a Gag lattice. Taken together, these parallel comparative analyses demonstrate for the first time the distinct morphological features that exist among retrovirus-like particles. Investigation of these differences will provide greater insights into the retroviral assembly pathway. IMPORTANCE Comparative analysis among retroviruses has been critically important in

  7. Large-scale transcriptome comparison reveals distinct gene activations in wheat responding to stripe rust and powdery mildew.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Yang, Yongzheng; Wang, Changyou; Liu, Min; Li, Hao; Fu, Ying; Wang, Yajuan; Nie, Yingbin; Liu, Xinlun; Ji, Wanquan

    2014-10-15

    Stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici; Pst) and powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici; Bgt) are important diseases of wheat (Triticum aestivum) worldwide. Similar mechanisms and gene transcripts are assumed to be involved in the host defense response because both pathogens are biotrophic fungi. The main objective of our study was to identify co-regulated mRNAs that show a change in expression pattern after inoculation with Pst or Bgt, and to identify mRNAs specific to the fungal stress response. The transcriptome of the hexaploid wheat line N9134 inoculated with the Chinese Pst race CYR 31 was compared with that of the same line inoculated with Bgt race E09 at 1, 2, and 3 days post-inoculation. Infection by Pst and Bgt affected transcription of 23.8% of all T. aestivum genes. Infection by Bgt triggered a more robust alteration in gene expression in N9134 compared with the response to Pst infection. An array of overlapping gene clusters with distinctive expression patterns provided insight into the regulatory differences in the responses to Bgt and Pst infection. The differentially expressed genes were grouped into seven enriched Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways in Bgt-infected leaves and four pathways in Pst-infected leaves, while only two pathways overlapped. In the plant-pathogen interaction pathway, N9134 activated a higher number of genes and pathways in response to Bgt infection than in response to Pst invasion. Genomic analysis revealed that the wheat genome shared some microbial genetic fragments, which were specifically induced in response to Bgt and Pst infection. Taken together, our findings indicate that the responses of wheat N9134 to infection by Bgt and Pst shows differences in the pathways and genes activated. The mass sequence data for wheat-fungus interaction generated in this study provides a powerful platform for future functional and molecular research on wheat-fungus interactions.

  8. Secretome Profiling of Periodontal Ligament from Deciduous and Permanent Teeth Reveals a Distinct Expression Pattern of Laminin Chains

    PubMed Central

    Giovani, Priscila A.; Salmon, Cristiane R.; Martins, Luciane; Paes Leme, Adriana F.; Rebouças, Pedro; Puppin Rontani, Regina M.; Mofatto, Luciana S.; Sallum, Enilson A.; Nociti, Francisco H.; Kantovitz, Kamila R.

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that there are histological and functional distinctions between the periodontal ligament (PDL) of deciduous (DecPDL) and permanent (PermPDL) teeth. Thus, we hypothesized that DecPDL and PermPDL display differences in the constitutive expression of genes/proteins involved with PDL homeostasis. Primary PDL cell cultures were obtained for DecPDL (n = 3) and PermPDL (n = 3) to allow us to perform label-free quantitative secretome analysis. Although a highly similar profile was found between DecPDL and PermPDL cells, comparative secretome analysis evidenced that one of the most stickling differences involved cell adhesion molecules, including laminin subunit gamma 1 (LAMC1) and beta 2 (LAMB2). Next, total RNA and protein extracts were obtained from fresh PDL tissues of deciduous (n = 6) and permanent (n = 6) teeth, and Western blotting and qPCR analysis were used to validate our in vitro findings. Western blot analysis confirmed that LAMC1 was increased in DecPDL fresh tissues (p<0.05). Furthermore, qPCR data analysis revealed that mRNA levels for laminin subunit beta 1 (LAMB1), beta 3 (LAMB3), LAMC1, and gamma 2 (LAMC2) were higher in DecPDL fresh tissues, whereas transcripts for LAMB2 were increased in PermPDL (p<0.05). In conclusion, the differential expression of laminin chains in DecPDL and PermPDL suggests an involvement of laminin-dependent pathways in the control of physiological differences between them. PMID:27149379

  9. Secretome Profiling of Periodontal Ligament from Deciduous and Permanent Teeth Reveals a Distinct Expression Pattern of Laminin Chains.

    PubMed

    Giovani, Priscila A; Salmon, Cristiane R; Martins, Luciane; Paes Leme, Adriana F; Rebouças, Pedro; Puppin Rontani, Regina M; Mofatto, Luciana S; Sallum, Enilson A; Nociti, Francisco H; Kantovitz, Kamila R

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that there are histological and functional distinctions between the periodontal ligament (PDL) of deciduous (DecPDL) and permanent (PermPDL) teeth. Thus, we hypothesized that DecPDL and PermPDL display differences in the constitutive expression of genes/proteins involved with PDL homeostasis. Primary PDL cell cultures were obtained for DecPDL (n = 3) and PermPDL (n = 3) to allow us to perform label-free quantitative secretome analysis. Although a highly similar profile was found between DecPDL and PermPDL cells, comparative secretome analysis evidenced that one of the most stickling differences involved cell adhesion molecules, including laminin subunit gamma 1 (LAMC1) and beta 2 (LAMB2). Next, total RNA and protein extracts were obtained from fresh PDL tissues of deciduous (n = 6) and permanent (n = 6) teeth, and Western blotting and qPCR analysis were used to validate our in vitro findings. Western blot analysis confirmed that LAMC1 was increased in DecPDL fresh tissues (p<0.05). Furthermore, qPCR data analysis revealed that mRNA levels for laminin subunit beta 1 (LAMB1), beta 3 (LAMB3), LAMC1, and gamma 2 (LAMC2) were higher in DecPDL fresh tissues, whereas transcripts for LAMB2 were increased in PermPDL (p<0.05). In conclusion, the differential expression of laminin chains in DecPDL and PermPDL suggests an involvement of laminin-dependent pathways in the control of physiological differences between them.

  10. Nonpolarized signaling reveals two distinct modes of 3D cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Gavara, Núria; Chadwick, Richard S.

    2012-01-01

    We search in this paper for context-specific modes of three-dimensional (3D) cell migration using imaging for phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PIP3) and active Rac1 and Cdc42 in primary fibroblasts migrating within different 3D environments. In 3D collagen, PIP3 and active Rac1 and Cdc42 were targeted to the leading edge, consistent with lamellipodia-based migration. In contrast, elongated cells migrating inside dermal explants and the cell-derived matrix (CDM) formed blunt, cylindrical protrusions, termed lobopodia, and Rac1, Cdc42, and PIP3 signaling was nonpolarized. Reducing RhoA, Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), or myosin II activity switched the cells to lamellipodia-based 3D migration. These modes of 3D migration were regulated by matrix physical properties. Specifically, experimentally modifying the elasticity of the CDM or collagen gels established that nonlinear elasticity supported lamellipodia-based migration, whereas linear elasticity switched cells to lobopodia-based migration. Thus, the relative polarization of intracellular signaling identifies two distinct modes of 3D cell migration governed intrinsically by RhoA, ROCK, and myosin II and extrinsically by the elastic behavior of the 3D extracellular matrix. PMID:22547408

  11. Cell Cycle and Cell Size Dependent Gene Expression Reveals Distinct Subpopulations at Single-Cell Level

    PubMed Central

    Dolatabadi, Soheila; Candia, Julián; Akrap, Nina; Vannas, Christoffer; Tesan Tomic, Tajana; Losert, Wolfgang; Landberg, Göran; Åman, Pierre; Ståhlberg, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Cell proliferation includes a series of events that is tightly regulated by several checkpoints and layers of control mechanisms. Most studies have been performed on large cell populations, but detailed understanding of cell dynamics and heterogeneity requires single-cell analysis. Here, we used quantitative real-time PCR, profiling the expression of 93 genes in single-cells from three different cell lines. Individual unsynchronized cells from three different cell lines were collected in different cell cycle phases (G0/G1 – S – G2/M) with variable cell sizes. We found that the total transcript level per cell and the expression of most individual genes correlated with progression through the cell cycle, but not with cell size. By applying the random forests algorithm, a supervised machine learning approach, we show how a multi-gene signature that classifies individual cells into their correct cell cycle phase and cell size can be generated. To identify the most predictive genes we used a variable selection strategy. Detailed analysis of cell cycle predictive genes allowed us to define subpopulations with distinct gene expression profiles and to calculate a cell cycle index that illustrates the transition of cells between cell cycle phases. In conclusion, we provide useful experimental approaches and bioinformatics to identify informative and predictive genes at the single-cell level, which opens up new means to describe and understand cell proliferation and subpopulation dynamics. PMID:28179914

  12. Iron isotopes reveal distinct dissolved iron sources and pathways in the intermediate versus deep Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abadie, Cyril; Lacan, Francois; Radic, Amandine; Pradoux, Catherine; Poitrasson, Franck

    2017-01-01

    As an essential micronutrient, iron plays a key role in oceanic biogeochemistry. It is therefore linked to the global carbon cycle and climate. Here, we report a dissolved iron (DFe) isotope section in the South Atlantic and Southern Ocean. Throughout the section, a striking DFe isotope minimum (light iron) is observed at intermediate depths (200-1,300 m), contrasting with heavier isotopic composition in deep waters. This unambiguously demonstrates distinct DFe sources and processes dominating the iron cycle in the intermediate and deep layers, a feature impossible to see with only iron concentration data largely used thus far in chemical oceanography. At intermediate depths, the data suggest that the dominant DFe sources are linked to organic matter remineralization, either in the water column or at continental margins. In deeper layers, however, abiotic non-reductive release of Fe (desorption, dissolution) from particulate iron—notably lithogenic—likely dominates. These results go against the common but oversimplified view that remineralization of organic matter is the major pathway releasing DFe throughout the water column in the open ocean. They suggest that the oceanic iron cycle, and therefore oceanic primary production and climate, could be more sensitive than previously thought to continental erosion (providing lithogenic particles to the ocean), particle transport within the ocean, dissolved/particle interactions, and deep water upwelling. These processes could also impact the cycles of other elements, including nutrients.

  13. Motor learning in childhood reveals distinct mechanisms for memory retention and re-learning

    PubMed Central

    Musselman, Kristin E.; Roemmich, Ryan T.; Garrett, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Adults can easily learn and access multiple versions of the same motor skill adapted for different conditions (e.g., walking in water, sand, snow). Following even a single session of adaptation, adults exhibit clear day-to-day retention and faster re-learning of the adapted pattern. Here, we studied the retention and re-learning of an adapted walking pattern in children aged 6–17 yr. We found that all children, regardless of age, showed adult-like patterns of retention of the adapted walking pattern. In contrast, children under 12 yr of age did not re-learn faster on the next day after washout had occurred—they behaved as if they had never adapted their walking before. Re-learning could be improved in younger children when the adaptation time on day 1 was increased to allow more practice at the plateau of the adapted pattern, but never to adult-like levels. These results show that the ability to store a separate, adapted version of the same general motor pattern does not fully develop until adolescence, and furthermore, that the mechanisms underlying the retention and rapid re-learning of adapted motor patterns are distinct. PMID:27084930

  14. Mass spectrometry-based quantitative metabolomics revealed a distinct lipid profile in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yunping; Zhou, Bingsen; Su, Mingming; Baxter, Sarah; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Zhao, Xueqing; Yen, Yun; Jia, Wei

    2013-04-12

    Breast cancer accounts for the largest number of newly diagnosed cases in female cancer patients. Although mammography is a powerful screening tool, about 20% of breast cancer cases cannot be detected by this method. New diagnostic biomarkers for breast cancer are necessary. Here, we used a mass spectrometry-based quantitative metabolomics method to analyze plasma samples from 55 breast cancer patients and 25 healthy controls. A number of 30 patients and 20 age-matched healthy controls were used as a training dataset to establish a diagnostic model and to identify potential biomarkers. The remaining samples were used as a validation dataset to evaluate the predictive accuracy for the established model. Distinct separation was obtained from an orthogonal partial least squares-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) model with good prediction accuracy. Based on this analysis, 39 differentiating metabolites were identified, including significantly lower levels of lysophosphatidylcholines and higher levels of sphingomyelins in the plasma samples obtained from breast cancer patients compared with healthy controls. Using logical regression, a diagnostic equation based on three metabolites (lysoPC a C16:0, PC ae C42:5 and PC aa C34:2) successfully differentiated breast cancer patients from healthy controls, with a sensitivity of 98.1% and a specificity of 96.0%.

  15. mtDNA variation of aboriginal Siberians reveals distinct genetic affinities with Native Americans.

    PubMed Central

    Torroni, A; Sukernik, R I; Schurr, T G; Starikorskaya, Y B; Cabell, M F; Crawford, M H; Comuzzie, A G; Wallace, D C

    1993-01-01

    The mtDNA variation of 411 individuals from 10 aboriginal Siberian populations was analyzed in an effort to delineate the relationships between Siberian and Native American populations. All mtDNAs were characterized by PCR amplification and restriction analysis, and a subset of them was characterized by control region sequencing. The resulting data were then compiled with previous mtDNA data from Native Americans and Asians and were used for phylogenetic analyses and sequence divergence estimations. Aboriginal Siberian populations exhibited mtDNAs from three (A, C, and D) of the four haplogroups observed in Native Americans. However, none of the Siberian populations showed mtDNAs from the fourth haplogroup, group B. The presence of group B deletion haplotypes in East Asian and Native American populations but their absence in Siberians raises the possibility that haplogroup B could represent a migratory event distinct from the one(s) which brought group A, C, and D mtDNAs to the Americas. Our findings support the hypothesis that the first humans to move from Siberia to the Americas carried with them a limited number of founding mtDNAs and that the initial migration occurred between 17,000-34,000 years before present. Images Figure 4 PMID:7688933

  16. Iron isotopes reveal distinct dissolved iron sources and pathways in the intermediate versus deep Southern Ocean.

    PubMed

    Abadie, Cyril; Lacan, Francois; Radic, Amandine; Pradoux, Catherine; Poitrasson, Franck

    2017-01-31

    As an essential micronutrient, iron plays a key role in oceanic biogeochemistry. It is therefore linked to the global carbon cycle and climate. Here, we report a dissolved iron (DFe) isotope section in the South Atlantic and Southern Ocean. Throughout the section, a striking DFe isotope minimum (light iron) is observed at intermediate depths (200-1,300 m), contrasting with heavier isotopic composition in deep waters. This unambiguously demonstrates distinct DFe sources and processes dominating the iron cycle in the intermediate and deep layers, a feature impossible to see with only iron concentration data largely used thus far in chemical oceanography. At intermediate depths, the data suggest that the dominant DFe sources are linked to organic matter remineralization, either in the water column or at continental margins. In deeper layers, however, abiotic non-reductive release of Fe (desorption, dissolution) from particulate iron-notably lithogenic-likely dominates. These results go against the common but oversimplified view that remineralization of organic matter is the major pathway releasing DFe throughout the water column in the open ocean. They suggest that the oceanic iron cycle, and therefore oceanic primary production and climate, could be more sensitive than previously thought to continental erosion (providing lithogenic particles to the ocean), particle transport within the ocean, dissolved/particle interactions, and deep water upwelling. These processes could also impact the cycles of other elements, including nutrients.

  17. The time course of contrast masking reveals two distinct mechanisms of human surround suppression

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Yury; McKee, Suzanne P.

    2010-01-01

    We explored the time course of surround suppression and found clear evidence for two distinct mechanisms: one strong, transient, and largely monocular, the other weaker, sustained, and binocular. We measured detection thresholds for a Gabor target at 8 deg eccentricity surrounded by a large annulus of matching spatial frequency and orientation. At short stimulus durations surround suppression was very strong, but the suppression strength decreased precipitously for durations longer than ~100 msec. The strong transient component did not transfer between the eyes and occurred almost instantaneously (<1 frame delay, 12 msec) irrespective of the separation between target and surround. Both suppression components were tightly tuned to orientation, peaking at target orientation, but neither was tuned to target spatial phase. These results are in good agreement with surround suppression properties measured in macaque V1 neurons. The absence of interocular transfer, the strong orientation selectivity, and the high propagation speed incommensurate with slow horizontal connections in V1 suggest that the transient component of suppression originates between input layers and the subsequent layers in V1. PMID:19271891

  18. Myf5 haploinsufficiency reveals distinct cell fate potentials for adult skeletal muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gayraud-Morel, Barbara; Chrétien, Fabrice; Jory, Aurélie; Sambasivan, Ramkumar; Negroni, Elisa; Flamant, Patricia; Soubigou, Guillaume; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Di Santo, James; Cumano, Ana; Mouly, Vincent; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim

    2012-04-01

    Skeletal muscle stem cell fate in adult mice is regulated by crucial transcription factors, including the determination genes Myf5 and Myod. The precise role of Myf5 in regulating quiescent muscle stem cells has remained elusive. Here we show that most, but not all, quiescent satellite cells express Myf5 protein, but at varying levels, and that resident Myf5 heterozygous muscle stem cells are more primed for myogenic commitment compared with wild-type satellite cells. Paradoxically however, heterotypic transplantation of Myf5 heterozygous cells into regenerating muscles results in higher self-renewal capacity compared with wild-type stem cells, whereas myofibre regenerative capacity is not altered. By contrast, Pax7 haploinsufficiency does not show major modifications by transcriptome analysis. These observations provide a mechanism linking Myf5 levels to muscle stem cell heterogeneity and fate by exposing two distinct and opposing phenotypes associated with Myf5 haploinsufficiency. These findings have important implications for how stem cell fates can be modulated by crucial transcription factors while generating a pool of responsive heterogeneous cells.

  19. Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 (ITS1) based sequence typing reveals phylogenetically distinct Ascaris population.

    PubMed

    Das, Koushik; Chowdhury, Punam; Ganguly, Sandipan

    2015-01-01

    Taxonomic differentiation among morphologically identical Ascaris species is a debatable scientific issue in the context of Ascariasis epidemiology. To explain the disease epidemiology and also the taxonomic position of different Ascaris species, genome information of infecting strains from endemic areas throughout the world is certainly crucial. Ascaris population from human has been genetically characterized based on the widely used genetic marker, internal transcribed spacer1 (ITS1). Along with previously reported and prevalent genotype G1, 8 new sequence variants of ITS1 have been identified. Genotype G1 was significantly present among female patients aged between 10 to 15 years. Intragenic linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis at target locus within our study population has identified an incomplete LD value with potential recombination events. A separate cluster of Indian isolates with high bootstrap value indicate their distinct phylogenetic position in comparison to the global Ascaris population. Genetic shuffling through recombination could be a possible reason for high population diversity and frequent emergence of new sequence variants, identified in present and other previous studies. This study explores the genetic organization of Indian Ascaris population for the first time which certainly includes some fundamental information on the molecular epidemiology of Ascariasis.

  20. Iron isotopes reveal distinct dissolved iron sources and pathways in the intermediate versus deep Southern Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Abadie, Cyril; Lacan, Francois; Radic, Amandine; Pradoux, Catherine; Poitrasson, Franck

    2017-01-01

    As an essential micronutrient, iron plays a key role in oceanic biogeochemistry. It is therefore linked to the global carbon cycle and climate. Here, we report a dissolved iron (DFe) isotope section in the South Atlantic and Southern Ocean. Throughout the section, a striking DFe isotope minimum (light iron) is observed at intermediate depths (200–1,300 m), contrasting with heavier isotopic composition in deep waters. This unambiguously demonstrates distinct DFe sources and processes dominating the iron cycle in the intermediate and deep layers, a feature impossible to see with only iron concentration data largely used thus far in chemical oceanography. At intermediate depths, the data suggest that the dominant DFe sources are linked to organic matter remineralization, either in the water column or at continental margins. In deeper layers, however, abiotic non-reductive release of Fe (desorption, dissolution) from particulate iron—notably lithogenic—likely dominates. These results go against the common but oversimplified view that remineralization of organic matter is the major pathway releasing DFe throughout the water column in the open ocean. They suggest that the oceanic iron cycle, and therefore oceanic primary production and climate, could be more sensitive than previously thought to continental erosion (providing lithogenic particles to the ocean), particle transport within the ocean, dissolved/particle interactions, and deep water upwelling. These processes could also impact the cycles of other elements, including nutrients. PMID:28096366

  1. Distinct polyadenylation landscapes of diverse human tissues revealed by a modified PA-seq strategy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Polyadenylation is a key regulatory step in eukaryotic gene expression and one of the major contributors of transcriptome diversity. Aberrant polyadenylation often associates with expression defects and leads to human diseases. Results To better understand global polyadenylation regulation, we have developed a polyadenylation sequencing (PA-seq) approach. By profiling polyadenylation events in 13 human tissues, we found that alternative cleavage and polyadenylation (APA) is prevalent in both protein-coding and noncoding genes. In addition, APA usage, similar to gene expression profiling, exhibits tissue-specific signatures and is sufficient for determining tissue origin. A 3′ untranslated region shortening index (USI) was further developed for genes with tandem APA sites. Strikingly, the results showed that different tissues exhibit distinct patterns of shortening and/or lengthening of 3′ untranslated regions, suggesting the intimate involvement of APA in establishing tissue or cell identity. Conclusions This study provides a comprehensive resource to uncover regulated polyadenylation events in human tissues and to characterize the underlying regulatory mechanism. PMID:24025092

  2. Molecular Integrative Clustering of Asian Gastric Cell Lines Revealed Two Distinct Chemosensitivity Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Choong, Meng Ling; Tan, Shan Ho; Tan, Tuan Zea; Manesh, Sravanthy; Ngo, Anna; Yong, Jacklyn W. Y.; Yang, Henry He; Lee, May Ann

    2014-01-01

    Cell lines recapitulate cancer heterogeneity without the presence of interfering tissue found in primary tumor. Their heterogeneous characteristics are reflected in their multiple genetic abnormalities and variable responsiveness to drug treatments. In order to understand the heterogeneity observed in Asian gastric cancers, we have performed array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) on 18 Asian gastric cell lines. Hierarchical clustering and single-sample Gene Set Enrichment Analysis were performed on the aCGH data together with public gene expression data of the same cell lines obtained from the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia. We found a large amount of genetic aberrations, with some cell lines having 13 fold more aberrations than others. Frequently mutated genes and cellular pathways are identified in these Asian gastric cell lines. The combined analyses of aCGH and expression data demonstrate correlation of gene copy number variations and expression profiles in human gastric cancer cells. The gastric cell lines can be grouped into 2 integrative clusters (ICs). Gastric cells in IC1 are enriched with gene associated with mitochondrial activities and oxidative phosphorylation while cells in IC2 are enriched with genes associated with cell signaling and transcription regulations. The two clusters of cell lines were shown to have distinct responsiveness towards several chemotherapeutics agents such as PI3 K and proteosome inhibitors. Our molecular integrative clustering provides insight into critical genes and pathways that may be responsible for the differences in survival in response to chemotherapy. PMID:25343454

  3. Comparative Physiological and Proteomic Analysis Reveal Distinct Regulation of Peach Skin Quality Traits by Altitude

    PubMed Central

    Karagiannis, Evangelos; Tanou, Georgia; Samiotaki, Martina; Michailidis, Michail; Diamantidis, Grigorios; Minas, Ioannis S.; Molassiotis, Athanassios

    2016-01-01

    The role of environment in fruit physiology has been established; however, knowledge regarding the effect of altitude in fruit quality traits is still lacking. Here, skin tissue quality characters were analyzed in peach fruit (cv. June Gold), harvested in 16 orchards located in low (71.5 m mean), or high (495 m mean) altitutes sites. Data indicated that soluble solids concentration and fruit firmness at commercial harvest stage were unaffected by alitute. Peach grown at high-altitude environment displayed higher levels of pigmentation and specific antioxidant-related activity in their skin at the commercial harvest stage. Skin extracts from distinct developmental stages and growing altitudes exhibited different antioxidant ability against DNA strand-scission. The effects of altitude on skin tissue were further studied using a proteomic approach. Protein expression analysis of the mature fruits depicted altered expression of 42 proteins that are mainly involved in the metabolic pathways of defense, primary metabolism, destination/storage and energy. The majority of these proteins were up-regulated at the low-altitude region. High-altitude environment increased the accumulation of several proteins, including chaperone ClpC, chaperone ClpB, pyruvate dehydrogenase E1, TCP domain class transcription factor, and lipoxygenase. We also discuss the altitude-affected protein variations, taking into account their potential role in peach ripening process. This study provides the first characterization of the peach skin proteome and helps to improve our understanding of peach's response to altitude. PMID:27891143

  4. A mitochondrial analysis reveals distinct founder effect signatures in Canarian and Balearic goats.

    PubMed

    Ferrando, A; Manunza, A; Jordana, J; Capote, J; Pons, A; Pais, J; Delgado, T; Atoche, P; Cabrera, B; Martínez, A; Landi, V; Delgado, J V; Argüello, A; Vidal, O; Lalueza-Fox, C; Ramírez, O; Amills, M

    2015-08-01

    In the course of human migrations, domestic animals often have been translocated to islands with the aim of assuring food availability. These founder events are expected to leave a genetic footprint that may be recognised nowadays. Herewith, we have examined the mitochondrial diversity of goat populations living in the Canarian and Balearic archipelagos. Median-joining network analysis produced very distinct network topologies for these two populations. Indeed, a majority of Canarian goats shared a single ancestral haplotype that segregated in all sampled islands, suggesting a single founder effect followed by a stepping-stone pattern of diffusion. This haplotype also was present in samples collected from archaeological assemblies at Gran Canaria and Lanzarote, making evident its widespread distribution in ancient times. In stark contrast, goats from Majorca and Ibiza did not share any mitochondrial haplotypes, indicating the occurrence of two independent founder events. Furthermore, in Majorcan goats, we detected the segregation of the mitochondrial G haplogroup that has only been identified in goats from Egypt, Iran and Turkey. This finding suggests the translocation of Asian and/or African goats to Majorca, possibly as a consequence of the Phoenician and Carthaginian colonisations of this island.

  5. Nonpolarized signaling reveals two distinct modes of 3D cell migration.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Ryan J; Gavara, Núria; Chadwick, Richard S; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2012-04-30

    We search in this paper for context-specific modes of three-dimensional (3D) cell migration using imaging for phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PIP3) and active Rac1 and Cdc42 in primary fibroblasts migrating within different 3D environments. In 3D collagen, PIP3 and active Rac1 and Cdc42 were targeted to the leading edge, consistent with lamellipodia-based migration. In contrast, elongated cells migrating inside dermal explants and the cell-derived matrix (CDM) formed blunt, cylindrical protrusions, termed lobopodia, and Rac1, Cdc42, and PIP3 signaling was nonpolarized. Reducing RhoA, Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), or myosin II activity switched the cells to lamellipodia-based 3D migration. These modes of 3D migration were regulated by matrix physical properties. Specifically, experimentally modifying the elasticity of the CDM or collagen gels established that nonlinear elasticity supported lamellipodia-based migration, whereas linear elasticity switched cells to lobopodia-based migration. Thus, the relative polarization of intracellular signaling identifies two distinct modes of 3D cell migration governed intrinsically by RhoA, ROCK, and myosin II and extrinsically by the elastic behavior of the 3D extracellular matrix.

  6. Metabolomic Profiles of Body Mass Index in the Framingham Heart Study Reveal Distinct Cardiometabolic Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jennifer E; Larson, Martin G; Ghorbani, Anahita; Cheng, Susan; Chen, Ming-Huei; Keyes, Michelle; Rhee, Eugene P; Clish, Clary B; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Gerszten, Robert E; Wang, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Although obesity and cardiometabolic traits commonly overlap, underlying pathways remain incompletely defined. The association of metabolite profiles across multiple cardiometabolic traits may lend insights into the interaction of obesity and metabolic health. We sought to investigate metabolic signatures of obesity and related cardiometabolic traits in the community using broad-based metabolomic profiling. We evaluated the association of 217 assayed metabolites and cross-sectional as well as longitudinal changes in cardiometabolic traits among 2,383 Framingham Offspring cohort participants. Body mass index (BMI) was associated with 69 of 217 metabolites (P<0.00023 for all), including aromatic (tyrosine, phenylalanine) and branched chain amino acids (valine, isoleucine, leucine). Additional metabolic pathways associated with BMI included the citric acid cycle (isocitrate, alpha-ketoglutarate, aconitate), the tryptophan pathway (kynurenine, kynurenic acid), and the urea cycle. There was considerable overlap in metabolite profiles between BMI, abdominal adiposity, insulin resistance [IR] and dyslipidemia, modest overlap of metabolite profiles between BMI and hyperglycemia, and little overlap with fasting glucose or elevated blood pressure. Metabolite profiles were associated with longitudinal changes in fasting glucose, but the involved metabolites (ornithine, 5-HIAA, aminoadipic acid, isoleucine, cotinine) were distinct from those associated with baseline glucose or other traits. Obesity status appeared to "modify" the association of 9 metabolites with IR. For example, bile acid metabolites were strongly associated with IR among obese but not lean individuals, whereas isoleucine had a stronger association with IR in lean individuals. In this large-scale metabolite profiling study, body mass index was associated with a broad range of metabolic alterations. Metabolite profiling highlighted considerable overlap with abdominal adiposity, insulin resistance, and

  7. Distinct Lineages of Schistocephalus Parasites in Threespine and Ninespine Stickleback Hosts Revealed by DNA Sequence Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Nicole; Heins, David C.; Andersen, Ryan O.; Barber, Iain; Cresko, William A.

    2011-01-01

    Parasitic interactions are often part of complex networks of interspecific relationships that have evolved in biological communities. Despite many years of work on the evolution of parasitism, the likelihood that sister taxa of parasites can co-evolve with their hosts to specifically infect two related lineages, even when those hosts occur sympatrically, is still unclear. Furthermore, when these specific interactions occur, the molecular and physiological basis of this specificity is still largely unknown. The presence of these specific parasitic relationships can now be tested using molecular markers such as DNA sequence variation. Here we test for specific parasitic relationships in an emerging host-parasite model, the stickleback-Schistocephalus system. Threespine and ninespine stickleback fish are intermediate hosts for Schistocephalus cestode parasites that are phenotypically very similar and have nearly identical life cycles through plankton, stickleback, and avian hosts. We analyzed over 2000 base pairs of COX1 and NADH1 mitochondrial DNA sequences in 48 Schistocephalus individuals collected from threespine and ninespine stickleback hosts from disparate geographic regions distributed across the Northern Hemisphere. Our data strongly support the presence of two distinct clades of Schistocephalus, each of which exclusively infects either threespine or ninespine stickleback. These clades most likely represent different species that diverged soon after the speciation of their stickleback hosts. In addition, genetic structuring exists among Schistocephalus taken from threespine stickleback hosts from Alaska, Oregon and Wales, although it is much less than the divergence between hosts. Our findings emphasize that biological communities may be even more complex than they first appear, and beg the question of what are the ecological, physiological, and genetic factors that maintain the specificity of the Schistocephalus parasites and their stickleback hosts. PMID

  8. Surface-based morphometry reveals distinct cortical thickness and surface area profiles in Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    Green, Tamar; Fierro, Kyle C; Raman, Mira M; Saggar, Manish; Sheau, Kristen E; Reiss, Allan L

    2016-04-01

    Morphometric investigations of brain volumes in Williams syndrome (WS) consistently show significant reductions in gray matter volume compared to controls. Cortical thickness (CT) and surface area (SA) are two constituent parts of cortical gray matter volume that are considered genetically distinguishable features of brain morphology. Yet, little is known about the independent contribution of cortical CT and SA to these volumetric differences in WS. Thus, our objectives were: (i) to evaluate whether the microdeletion in chromosome 7 associated with WS has a distinct effect on CT and SA, and (ii) to evaluate age-related variations in CT and SA within WS. We compared CT and SA values in 44 individuals with WS to 49 age- and sex-matched typically developing controls. Between-group differences in CT and SA were evaluated across two age groups: young (age range 6.6-18.9 years), and adults (age range 20.2-51.5 years). Overall, we found contrasting effects of WS on cortical thickness (increases) and surface area (decreases). With respect to brain topography, the between-group pattern of CT differences showed a scattered pattern while the between-group surface area pattern was widely distributed throughout the brain. In the adult subgroup, we observed a cluster of increases in cortical thickness in WS across the brain that was not observed in the young subgroup. Our findings suggest that extensive early reductions in surface area are the driving force for the overall reduction in brain volume in WS. The age-related cortical thickness findings might reflect delayed or even arrested development of specific brain regions in WS. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Plant and animal aquaporins crosstalk: what can be revealed from distinct perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sutka, Moira; Amodeo, Gabriela; Ozu, Marcelo

    2017-09-04

    Aquaporins (AQPs) can be revisited from a distinct and complementary perspective: the outcome from analyzing them from both plant and animal studies. (1) The approach in the study. Diversity found in both kingdoms contrasts with the limited number of crystal structures determined within each group. While the structure of almost half of mammal AQPs was resolved, only a few were resolved in plants. Strikingly, the animal structures resolved are mainly derived from the AQP2-lineage, due to their important roles in water homeostasis regulation in humans. The difference could be attributed to the approach: relevance in animal research is emphasized on pathology and in consequence drug screening that can lead to potential inhibitors, enhancers and/or regulators. By contrast, studies on plants have been mainly focused on the physiological role that AQPs play in growth, development and stress tolerance. (2) The transport capacity. Besides the well-described AQPs with high water transport capacity, large amount of evidence confirms that certain plant AQPs can carry a large list of small solutes. So far, animal AQP list is more restricted. In both kingdoms, there is a great amount of evidence on gas transport, although there is still an unsolved controversy around gas translocation as well as the role of the central pore of the tetramer. (3) More roles than expected. We found it remarkable that the view of AQPs as specific channels has evolved first toward simple transporters to molecules that can experience conformational changes triggered by biochemical and/or mechanical signals, turning them also into signaling components and/or behave as osmosensor molecules.

  10. Blood Transcriptional Profiling Reveals Immunological Signatures of Distinct States of Infection of Humans with Leishmania infantum

    PubMed Central

    Gardinassi, Luiz Gustavo; Garcia, Gustavo Rocha; Costa, Carlos Henrique Nery; Costa Silva, Vladimir; de Miranda Santos, Isabel Kinney Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) can be lethal if untreated; however, the majority of human infections with the etiological agents are asymptomatic. Using Illumina Bead Chip microarray technology, we investigated the patterns of gene expression in blood of active VL patients, asymptomatic infected individuals, patients under remission of VL and controls. Computational analyses based on differential gene expression, gene set enrichment, weighted gene co-expression networks and cell deconvolution generated data demonstrating discriminative transcriptional signatures. VL patients exhibited transcriptional profiles associated with pathways and gene modules reflecting activation of T lymphocytes via MHC class I and type I interferon signaling, as well as an overall down regulation of pathways and gene modules related to myeloid cells, mainly due to differences in the relative proportions of monocytes and neutrophils. Patients under remission of VL presented heterogeneous transcriptional profiles associated with activation of T lymphocytes via MHC class I, type I interferon signaling and cell cycle and, importantly, transcriptional activity correlated with activation of Notch signaling pathway and gene modules that reflected increased proportions of B cells after treatment of disease. Asymptomatic and uninfected individuals presented similar gene expression profiles, nevertheless, asymptomatic individuals exhibited particularities which suggest an efficient regulation of lymphocyte activation and a strong association with a type I interferon response. Of note, we validated a set of target genes by RT-qPCR and demonstrate the robustness of expression data acquired by microarray analysis. In conclusion, this study profiles the immune response during distinct states of infection of humans with Leishmania infantum with a novel strategy that indicates the molecular pathways that contribute to the progression of the disease, while also providing insights into transcriptional

  11. The Crystal Structure of Streptococcus pyogenes Uridine Phosphorylase Reveals a Distinct Subfamily of Nucleoside Phosphorylases

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, Timothy H.; Christoffersen, S.; Allan, Paula W.; Parker, William B.; Piskur, Jure; Serra, I.; Terreni, M.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2011-09-20

    Uridine phosphorylase (UP), a key enzyme in the pyrimidine salvage pathway, catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of uridine or 2'-deoxyuridine to uracil and ribose 1-phosphate or 2'-deoxyribose 1-phosphate. This enzyme belongs to the nucleoside phosphorylase I superfamily whose members show diverse specificity for nucleoside substrates. Phylogenetic analysis shows Streptococcus pyogenes uridine phosphorylase (SpUP) is found in a distinct branch of the pyrimidine subfamily of nucleoside phosphorylases. To further characterize SpUP, we determined the crystal structure in complex with the products, ribose 1-phosphate and uracil, at 1.8 {angstrom} resolution. Like Escherichia coli UP (EcUP), the biological unit of SpUP is a hexamer with an ?/? monomeric fold. A novel feature of the active site is the presence of His169, which structurally aligns with Arg168 of the EcUP structure. A second active site residue, Lys162, is not present in previously determined UP structures and interacts with O2 of uracil. Biochemical studies of wild-type SpUP showed that its substrate specificity is similar to that of EcUP, while EcUP is {approx}7-fold more efficient than SpUP. Biochemical studies of SpUP mutants showed that mutations of His169 reduced activity, while mutation of Lys162 abolished all activity, suggesting that the negative charge in the transition state resides mostly on uracil O2. This is in contrast to EcUP for which transition state stabilization occurs mostly at O4.

  12. Large-scale experimental landscapes reveal distinctive effects of patch shape and connectivity on arthropod communities.

    SciTech Connect

    Orrock, John, L.; Curler, Gregory, R.; Danielson, Brent, J.; Coyle, David. R.

    2011-09-14

    The size, shape, and isolation of habitat patches can affect organism behavior and population dynamics, but little is known about the relative role of shape and connectivity in affecting ecological communities at large spatial scales. Using six sampling sessions from July 2001 until August 2002, we collected 33,685 arthropods throughout seven 12-ha experimental landscapes consisting of clear-cut patches surrounded by a matrix of mature pine forest. Patches were explicitly designed to manipulate connectivity (via habitat corridors) independently of area and edge effects. We found that patch shape, rather than connectivity, affected ground-dwelling arthropod richness and beta diversity (i.e. turnover of genera among patches). Arthropod communities contained fewer genera and exhibited less turnover in high-edge connected and high-edge unconnected patches relative to low-edge unconnected patches of similar area. Connectivity, rather than patch shape, affected the evenness of ground-dwelling arthropod communities; regardless of patch shape, high-edge connected patches had lower evenness than low- or high-edge unconnected patches. Among the most abundant arthropod orders, increased richness in low-edge unconnected patches was largely due to increased richness of Coleoptera, whereas Hymenoptera played an important role in the lower evenness in connected patches and patterns of turnover. These findings suggest that anthropogenic habitat alteration can have distinct effects on ground-dwelling arthropod communities that arise due to changes in shape and connectivity. Moreover, this work suggests that corridors, which are common conservation tools that change both patch shape and connectivity, can have multiple effects on arthropod communities via different mechanisms, and each effect may alter components of community structure.

  13. Distinct cognitive control mechanisms as revealed by modality-specific conflict adaptation effects.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guochun; Nan, Weizhi; Zheng, Ya; Wu, Haiyan; Li, Qi; Liu, Xun

    2017-04-01

    Cognitive control is essential to resolve conflict in stimulus-response compatibility (SRC) tasks. The SRC effect in the current trial is reduced after an incongruent trial as compared with a congruent trial, a phenomenon being termed conflict adaptation (CA). The CA effect is found to be domain-specific, such that it occurs when adjacent trials contain the same type of conflict, but disappears when the conflicts are of different types. Similar patterns have been observed when tasks involve different modalities, but the modality-specific effect may have been confounded by task switching. In the current study, we investigated whether or not cognitive control could transfer across auditory and visual conflicts when task-switching was controlled. Participants were asked to respond to a visual or auditory (Experiments 1A/B) stimulus, with conflict coming from either the same or a different modality. CA effects showed modality-specific patterns. To account for potential confounding effects caused by differences in task-irrelevant properties, we specifically examined the influence of task-irrelevant properties on CA effects within the visual modality (Experiments 2A/B). Significant CA effects were observed across different conflicts from distinct task-irrelevant properties, ruling out that the lack of cross-modal CA effects in Experiments 1A/B resulted from differences in task-irrelevant information. Task-irrelevant properties were further matched in Experiments 3A/B to examine the pure effect of modality. Results replicated Experiments 1A/B showing robust modality-specific CA effects. Taken together, we provide supporting evidences that modality affects cognitive control in conflict resolution, which should be taken into account in theories of cognitive control. (PsycINFO Database Record

  14. Mitochondrial DNA reveals distinct evolutionary histories for Jewish populations in Yemen and Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Non, Amy L; Al-Meeri, Ali; Raaum, Ryan L; Sanchez, Luisa F; Mulligan, Connie J

    2011-01-01

    Southern Arabia and the Horn of Africa are important geographic centers for the study of human population history because a great deal of migration has characterized these regions since the first emergence of humans out of Africa. Analysis of Jewish groups provides a unique opportunity to investigate more recent population histories in this area. Mitochondrial DNA is used to investigate the maternal evolutionary history and can be combined with historical and linguistic data to test various population histories. In this study, we assay mitochondrial control region DNA sequence and diagnostic coding variants in Yemenite (n = 45) and Ethiopian (n = 41) Jewish populations, as well as in neighboring non-Jewish Yemeni (n = 50) and Ethiopian (previously published Semitic speakers) populations. We investigate their population histories through a comparison of haplogroup distributions and phylogenetic networks. A high frequency of sub-Saharan African L haplogroups was found in both Jewish populations, indicating a significant African maternal contribution unlike other Jewish Diaspora populations. However, no identical haplotypes were shared between the Yemenite and Ethiopian Jewish populations, suggesting very little gene flow between the populations and potentially distinct maternal population histories. These new data are also used to investigate alternate population histories in the context of historical and linguistic data. Specifically, Yemenite Jewish mitochondrial diversity reflects potential descent from ancient Israeli exiles and shared African and Middle Eastern ancestry with little evidence for large-scale conversion of local Yemeni. In contrast, the Ethiopian Jewish population appears to be a subset of the larger Ethiopian population suggesting descent primarily through conversion of local women.

  15. Simultaneous Single Molecule Fluorescence and Conductivity Studies Reveal Distinct Classes of Aβ Species on Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Schauerte, Joseph A.; Wong, Pamela T.; Wisser, Kathleen C.; Ding, Hao; Steel, Duncan G.; Gafni, Ari

    2010-01-01

    The extracellular senile plaques prevalent in brain tissue in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are composed of amyloid fibrils formed by the Aβ peptide. These fibrils have been traditionally believed to feature in neurotoxicity; however, numerous recent studies provide evidence that cytotoxicity in AD may be associated with low molecular weight oligomers of Aβ that associate with neuronal membranes and may lead to membrane permeabilization and disruption of the ion balance in the cell. The underlying mechanism leading to disruption of the membrane is the subject of many recent studies. Here we report the application of single molecule optical detection, using fluorescently labeled human Aβ40, combined with membrane conductivity measurements, to monitor the interaction of single oligomeric peptide structures with model planar black lipid membranes (BLM). In a qualitative study, we show that the binding of Aβ to the membrane can be described by three distinctly different behaviors, depending on the Aβ monomer concentration. For concentrations much below 10 nM, there is uniform binding of monomers over the surface of the membrane with no evidence of oligomer formation or membrane permeabilization. Between 10 nM and a few 100 nM, the uniform monomer binding is accompanied by the presence of peptide species ranging from dimers to small oligomers. The dimers are not found to permeabilize the membrane but the larger oligomers lead to permeabilization with individual oligomers producing ion conductances of less than 10 pS/pore. At higher concentration, perhaps beyond physiologically relevant concentrations, larger extended and dynamic structures are found with large conductance (100's of pS) suggesting major disruption of the membrane. PMID:20201586

  16. Comparative Plasmodium gene overexpression reveals distinct perturbation of sporozoite transmission by profilin

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yuko; Hliscs, Marion; Dunst, Josefine; Goosmann, Christian; Brinkmann, Volker; Montagna, Georgina N.; Matuschewski, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium relies on actin-based motility to migrate from the site of infection and invade target cells. Using a substrate-dependent gliding locomotion, sporozoites are able to move at fast speed (1–3 μm/s). This motility relies on a minimal set of actin regulatory proteins and occurs in the absence of detectable filamentous actin (F-actin). Here we report an overexpression strategy to investigate whether perturbations of F-actin steady-state levels affect gliding locomotion and host invasion. We selected two vital Plasmodium berghei G-actin–binding proteins, C-CAP and profilin, in combination with three stage-specific promoters and mapped the phenotypes afforded by overexpression in all three extracellular motile stages. We show that in merozoites and ookinetes, additional expression does not impair life cycle progression. In marked contrast, overexpression of C-CAP and profilin in sporozoites impairs circular gliding motility and salivary gland invasion. The propensity for productive motility correlates with actin accumulation at the parasite tip, as revealed by combinations of an actin-stabilizing drug and transgenic parasites. Strong expression of profilin, but not C-CAP, resulted in complete life cycle arrest. Comparative overexpression is an alternative experimental genetic strategy to study essential genes and reveals effects of regulatory imbalances that are not uncovered from deletion-mutant phenotyping. PMID:27226484

  17. Distinct subclonal tumour responses to therapy revealed by circulating cell-free DNA

    PubMed Central

    Gremel, G.; Lee, R. J.; Girotti, M. R.; Mandal, A. K.; Valpione, S.; Garner, G.; Ayub, M.; Wood, S.; Rothwell, D. G.; Fusi, A.; Wallace, A.; Brady, G.; Dive, C.; Dhomen, N.; Lorigan, P.; Marais, R.

    2016-01-01

    Background The application of precision medicine in oncology requires in-depth characterisation of a patient's tumours and the dynamics of their responses to treatment. Patients and methods We used next-generation sequencing of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) to monitor the response of a KIT p.L576P-mutant metastatic vaginal mucosal melanoma to sequential targeted, immuno- and chemotherapy. Results Despite a KIT mutation, the response to imatinib was mixed. Unfortunately, tumours were not accessible for molecular analysis. To study the mechanism underlying the mixed clinical response, we carried out whole-exome sequencing and targeted longitudinal analysis of cfDNA. This revealed two tumour subclones; one with a KIT mutation that responded to imatinib and a second KIT-wild-type subclone that did not respond to imatinib. Notably, the subclones also responded differently to immunotherapy. However, both subclones responded to carboplatin/paclitaxel, and although the KIT-wild-type subclone progressed after chemotherapy, it responded to subsequent re-administration of paclitaxel. Conclusion We show that cfDNA can reveal tumour evolution and subclonal responses to therapy even when biopsies are not available. PMID:27502704

  18. Niche partition of Bacteriovorax operational taxonomic units along salinity and temporal gradients in the Chesapeake Bay reveals distinct estuarine strains.

    PubMed

    Pineiro, Silvia; Chauhan, Ashvini; Berhane, Timkhite-kulu; Athar, Rana; Zheng, Guili; Wang, Cynthia; Dickerson, Tamar; Liang, Xiaobing; Lymperopoulou, Despoina S; Chen, Huan; Christman, Mary; Louime, Clifford; Babiker, Wisal; Stine, O Colin; Williams, Henry N

    2013-04-01

    The predatory Bacteriovorax are Gram-negative bacteria ubiquitous in saltwater systems that prey upon other Gram-negative bacteria in a similar manner to the related genus Bdellovibrio. Among the phylogenetically defined clusters of Bacteriovorax, cluster V has only been isolated from estuaries suggesting that it may be a distinct estuarine phylotype. To assess this hypothesis, the spatial and temporal distribution of cluster V and other Bacteriovorax phylogenetic assemblages along the salinity gradient of Chesapeake Bay were determined. Cluster V was expected to be found in significantly greater numbers in low to moderate salinity waters compared to high salinity areas. The analyses of water and sediment samples from sites in the bay revealed cluster V to be present at the lower salinity and not high salinity sites, consistent with it being an estuarine phylotype. Cluster IV had a similar distribution pattern and may also be specifically adapted to estuaries. While the distribution of clusters V and IV were similar for salinity, they were distinct on temperature gradients, being found in cooler and in warmer temperatures, respectively. The differentiation of phylotype populations along the salinity and temporal gradients in Chesapeake Bay revealed distinct niches inhabited by different phylotypes of Bacteriovorax and unique estuarine phylotypes.

  19. Phosphorylation of Synaptojanin Differentially Regulates Endocytosis of Functionally Distinct Synaptic Vesicle Pools

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Junhua; Wang, Liping; Lee, Joo Yeun; Chen, Chun-Kan

    2016-01-01

    The rapid replenishment of synaptic vesicles through endocytosis is crucial for sustaining synaptic transmission during intense neuronal activity. Synaptojanin (Synj), a phosphoinositide phosphatase, is known to play an important role in vesicle recycling by promoting the uncoating of clathrin following synaptic vesicle uptake. Synj has been shown to be a substrate of the minibrain (Mnb) kinase, a fly homolog of the dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A); however, the functional impacts of Synj phosphorylation by Mnb are not well understood. Here we identify that Mnb phosphorylates Synj at S1029 in Drosophila. We find that phosphorylation of Synj at S1029 enhances Synj phosphatase activity, alters interaction between Synj and endophilin, and promotes efficient endocytosis of the active cycling vesicle pool (also referred to as exo-endo cycling pool) at the expense of reserve pool vesicle endocytosis. Dephosphorylated Synj, on the other hand, is deficient in the endocytosis of the active recycling pool vesicles but maintains reserve pool vesicle endocytosis to restore total vesicle pool size and sustain synaptic transmission. Together, our findings reveal a novel role for Synj in modulating reserve pool vesicle endocytosis and further indicate that dynamic phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of Synj differentially maintain endocytosis of distinct functional synaptic vesicle pools. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Synaptic vesicle endocytosis sustains communication between neurons during a wide range of neuronal activities by recycling used vesicle membrane and protein components. Here we identify that Synaptojanin, a protein with a known role in synaptic vesicle endocytosis, is phosphorylated at S1029 in vivo by the Minibrain kinase. We further demonstrate that the phosphorylation status of Synaptojanin at S1029 differentially regulates its participation in the recycling of distinct synaptic vesicle pools. Our results reveal a new role for

  20. Impedance Responses Reveal β2-Adrenergic Receptor Signaling Pluridimensionality and Allow Classification of Ligands with Distinct Signaling Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Stallaert, Wayne; Dorn, Jonas F.; van der Westhuizen, Emma; Audet, Martin; Bouvier, Michel

    2012-01-01

    The discovery that drugs targeting a single G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) can differentially modulate distinct subsets of the receptor signaling repertoire has created a challenge for drug discovery at these important therapeutic targets. Here, we demonstrate that a single label-free assay based on cellular impedance provides a real-time integration of multiple signaling events engaged upon GPCR activation. Stimulation of the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) in living cells with the prototypical agonist isoproterenol generated a complex, multi-featured impedance response over time. Selective pharmacological inhibition of specific arms of the β2AR signaling network revealed the differential contribution of Gs-, Gi- and Gβγ-dependent signaling events, including activation of the canonical cAMP and ERK1/2 pathways, to specific components of the impedance response. Further dissection revealed the essential role of intracellular Ca2+ in the impedance response and led to the discovery of a novel β2AR-promoted Ca2+ mobilization event. Recognizing that impedance responses provide an integrative assessment of ligand activity, we screened a collection of β-adrenergic ligands to determine if differences in the signaling repertoire engaged by compounds would lead to distinct impedance signatures. An unsupervised clustering analysis of the impedance responses revealed the existence of 5 distinct compound classes, revealing a richer signaling texture than previously recognized for this receptor. Taken together, these data indicate that the pluridimensionality of GPCR signaling can be captured using integrative approaches to provide a comprehensive readout of drug activity. PMID:22242170

  1. Feasibility study of spectral pattern recognition reveals distinct classes of volcanic tremor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unglert, K.; Jellinek, A. M.

    2017-04-01

    Systematic investigations of the similarities and differences among volcanic tremor at a range of volcano types may hold crucial information about the plausibility of inferred source mechanisms, which, in turn, may be important for eruption forecasting. However, such studies are rare, in part because of an intrinsic difficulty with identifying tremor signals within very long time series of volcano seismic data. Accordingly, we develop an efficient tremor detection algorithm and identify over 12,000h of volcanic tremor on 24 stations at Kīlauea, Okmok, Pavlof, and Redoubt volcanoes. We estimate spectral content over 5-minute tremor windows, and apply a novel combination of Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and hierarchical clustering to identify patterns in the tremor spectra. Analyzing several stations from a given volcano together reveals different styles of tremor within individual volcanic settings. In addition to identifying tremor properties common to all stations in a given network, we find localized tremor signals including those related to processes such as lahars or dike intrusions that are only observed on some of the stations within a network. Subsequent application of our analysis to a combination of stations from the different volcanoes reveals that at least three main tremor classes can be detected across all settings. Whereas a regime with a ridge of high power distributed over 1-2Hz and a gradual decay of spectral power towards higher frequencies is observed dominantly at three volcanoes (Kīlauea, Okmok, Redoubt) with magma reservoirs centered at less than 5km below sea level (b.s.l.), a spectrum with a steeper slope and a narrower peak at 1-2Hz is observed only in association with open vents (Kīlauea and Pavlof). A third regime with a peak at approximately 3Hz is confined to two stratovolcanoes (Pavlof and Redoubt). These observations suggest generic relationships between the spectral character of the observed signals and volcano

  2. Novel Model of Tendon Regeneration Reveals Distinct Cell Mechanisms Underlying Regenerative and Fibrotic Tendon Healing

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Kristen; Chien, Chun; Bell, Rebecca; Laudier, Damien; Tufa, Sara F.; Keene, Douglas R.; Andarawis-Puri, Nelly; Huang, Alice H.

    2017-01-01

    To date, the cell and molecular mechanisms regulating tendon healing are poorly understood. Here, we establish a novel model of tendon regeneration using neonatal mice and show that neonates heal via formation of a ‘neo-tendon’ that differentiates along the tendon specific lineage with functional restoration of gait and mechanical properties. In contrast, adults heal via fibrovascular scar, aberrant differentiation toward cartilage and bone, with persistently impaired function. Lineage tracing identified intrinsic recruitment of Scx-lineage cells as a key cellular mechanism of neonatal healing that is absent in adults. Instead, adult Scx-lineage tenocytes are not recruited into the defect but transdifferentiate into ectopic cartilage; in the absence of tenogenic cells, extrinsic αSMA-expressing cells persist to form a permanent scar. Collectively, these results establish an exciting model of tendon regeneration and uncover a novel cellular mechanism underlying regenerative vs non-regenerative tendon healing. PMID:28332620

  3. Nicotine Dependence Reveals Distinct Responses from Neurons and Their Resident Nicotinic Receptors in Medial Habenula

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Pei-Yu; McIntosh, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are the molecular target of nicotine. nAChRs in the medial habenula (MHb) have recently been shown to play a role in nicotine dependence, but it is not clear which nAChR subtypes or MHb neuron types are most important. To identify MHb nAChRs and/or cell types that play a role in nicotine dependence, we studied these receptors and cells with brain slice electrophysiology using both acute and chronic nicotine application. Cells in the ventroinferior (MHbVI) and ventrolateral MHb (MHbVL) subregions expressed functional nAChRs with different pharmacology. Further, application of nicotine to cells in these subregions led to different action potential firing patterns. The latter result was correlated with a differing ability of nicotine to induce nAChR desensitization. Chronic nicotine caused functional upregulation of nAChRs selectively in MHbVI cells, but did not change nAChR function in MHbVL. Importantly, firing responses were also differentially altered in these subregions following chronic nicotine. MHbVI neurons treated chronically with nicotine exhibited enhanced basal pacemaker firing but a blunted nicotine-induced firing response. MHbVL neurons did not change their firing properties in response to chronic nicotine. Together, these results suggest that acute and chronic nicotine differentially affect nAChR function and output of cells in MHb subregions. Because the MHb extensively innervates the interpeduncular nucleus, an area critical for both affective and somatic signs of withdrawal, these results could reflect some of the neurophysiological changes thought to occur in the MHb to the interpeduncular nucleus circuit in human smokers. PMID:26429939

  4. SINE polymorphism reveals distinct strains of Entamoeba histolytica from North India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shraddha; Banyal, Neha; Singh, Mukul; Mandal, A K; Bhattacharya, Sudha; Paul, Jaishree

    2017-04-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is an intestinal parasite causing significant morbidity and mortality in the developing world. More tools are needed to understand the epidemiology and molecular pathogenesis of amebiasis. Virulence pattern of E. histolytica could be linked with the genotype of a strain. Several loci showing insertion polymorphism of retrotransposable short interspersed nuclear elements EhSINE1 and EhSINE2 have been reported among laboratory strains of E. histolytica. The present study was undertaken to validate this observation in clinical isolates from north India. Our results indicate that the Indian samples show a different propensity of SINE retention or loss at two of the polymorphic loci compared with non-Indian samples. Statistical analysis of different loci revealed Locus 17 of EhSINE1as a potential geographical marker for distinguishing Indian isolates from non Indian isolates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Integrative analysis of RNA, translation, and protein levels reveals distinct regulatory variation across humans

    PubMed Central

    Cenik, Can; Cenik, Elif Sarinay; Byeon, Gun W.; Grubert, Fabian; Candille, Sophie I.; Spacek, Damek; Alsallakh, Bilal; Tilgner, Hagen; Araya, Carlos L.; Tang, Hua; Ricci, Emiliano; Snyder, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating the consequences of genetic differences between humans is essential for understanding phenotypic diversity and personalized medicine. Although variation in RNA levels, transcription factor binding, and chromatin have been explored, little is known about global variation in translation and its genetic determinants. We used ribosome profiling, RNA sequencing, and mass spectrometry to perform an integrated analysis in lymphoblastoid cell lines from a diverse group of individuals. We find significant differences in RNA, translation, and protein levels suggesting diverse mechanisms of personalized gene expression control. Combined analysis of RNA expression and ribosome occupancy improves the identification of individual protein level differences. Finally, we identify genetic differences that specifically modulate ribosome occupancy—many of these differences lie close to start codons and upstream ORFs. Our results reveal a new level of gene expression variation among humans and indicate that genetic variants can cause changes in protein levels through effects on translation. PMID:26297486

  6. Biogeography of Oenococcus oeni Reveals Distinctive but Nonspecific Populations in Wine-Producing Regions

    PubMed Central

    El Khoury, Mariette; Campbell-Sills, Hugo; Salin, Franck; Guichoux, Erwan; Claisse, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Understanding the mechanisms behind the typicity of regional wines inevitably brings attention to microorganisms associated with their production. Oenococcus oeni is the main bacterial species involved in wine and cider making. It develops after the yeast-driven alcoholic fermentation and performs the malolactic fermentation, which improves the taste and aromatic complexity of most wines. Here, we have evaluated the diversity and specificity of O. oeni strains in six regions. A total of 235 wines and ciders were collected during spontaneous malolactic fermentations and used to isolate 3,212 bacterial colonies. They were typed by multilocus variable analysis, which disclosed a total of 514 O. oeni strains. Their phylogenetic relationships were evaluated by a second typing method based on single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. Taken together, the results indicate that each region holds a high diversity of strains that constitute a unique population. However, strains present in each region belong to diverse phylogenetic groups, and the same groups can be detected in different regions, indicating that strains are not genetically adapted to regions. In contrast, greater strain identity was seen for cider, white wine, or red wine of Burgundy, suggesting that genetic adaptation to these products occurred. IMPORTANCE This study reports the isolation, genotyping, and geographic distribution analysis of the largest collection of O. oeni strains performed to date. It reveals that there is very high diversity of strains in each region, the majority of them being detected in a single region. The study also reports the development of an SNP genotyping method that is useful for analyzing the distribution of O. oeni phylogroups. The results show that strains are not genetically adapted to regions but to specific types of wines. They reveal new phylogroups of strains, particularly two phylogroups associated with white wines and red wines of Burgundy. Taken together

  7. Comparative Plasmodium gene overexpression reveals distinct perturbation of sporozoite transmission by profilin.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuko; Hliscs, Marion; Dunst, Josefine; Goosmann, Christian; Brinkmann, Volker; Montagna, Georgina N; Matuschewski, Kai

    2016-07-15

    Plasmodium relies on actin-based motility to migrate from the site of infection and invade target cells. Using a substrate-dependent gliding locomotion, sporozoites are able to move at fast speed (1-3 μm/s). This motility relies on a minimal set of actin regulatory proteins and occurs in the absence of detectable filamentous actin (F-actin). Here we report an overexpression strategy to investigate whether perturbations of F-actin steady-state levels affect gliding locomotion and host invasion. We selected two vital Plasmodium berghei G-actin-binding proteins, C-CAP and profilin, in combination with three stage-specific promoters and mapped the phenotypes afforded by overexpression in all three extracellular motile stages. We show that in merozoites and ookinetes, additional expression does not impair life cycle progression. In marked contrast, overexpression of C-CAP and profilin in sporozoites impairs circular gliding motility and salivary gland invasion. The propensity for productive motility correlates with actin accumulation at the parasite tip, as revealed by combinations of an actin-stabilizing drug and transgenic parasites. Strong expression of profilin, but not C-CAP, resulted in complete life cycle arrest. Comparative overexpression is an alternative experimental genetic strategy to study essential genes and reveals effects of regulatory imbalances that are not uncovered from deletion-mutant phenotyping. © 2016 Sato et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  8. Whole-stream 13C tracer addition reveals distinct fates of newly fixed carbon.

    PubMed

    Hotchkiss, Erin R; Hall, Robert O

    2015-02-01

    Many estimates of freshwater carbon (C) fluxes focus on inputs, processing, and storage of terrestrial C; yet inland waters have high rates of internally fixed (autochthonous) C production. Some fraction of newly fixed C may be released as biologically available, dissolved organic C (DOC) and stimulate microbial-driven biogeochemical cycles soon after fixation, but the fate of autochthonous C is difficult to measure directly. Tracing newly fixed C can increase our understanding of fluxes and fate of autochthonous C in the context of freshwater food webs and C cycling. We traced autochthonous C fixation and fate using a dissolved inorganic C stable isotope addition (13C(DIC)). We added 13C(DIC) to North Fork French Creek, Wyoming, USA during two days in August. We monitored changes in 13C pools, fluxes, and storage for 44 d after the addition. Two-compartment flux models were used to quantify net release of newly fixed 13C(DOC) and 13C(DIC) into the water column. We compared net 13C fixation with tracer 13C(DIC) removal and gross primary production (GPP) to account for the mass of tracer fixed, released, lost to the atmosphere, and exported downstream. Much of the fixed C turned over rapidly and did not enter longer-term storage pools. Net C fixed was 70% of GPP measured with O2. Algae likely released the remaining 30% via 13C(DOC) exudation and respiration of newly fixed C. Primary producers released 13C(DOC) at rates of up to 16% per day during the 13C addition, but exudation of new labile C declined to near zero by day 6. DIC production from newly fixed C accounted for 21% of ecosystem respiration the day after the 13C addition. All measured organic C (OC) pools were enriched with 13C 1 d after the tracer addition. 20% of fixed 13C remained in benthic OC by day 44, and average residence time of autochthonous C in benthic OC was 62 d. Newly fixed C had two distinct fates: short-term (< 1 week) exudation and respiration or longer-term storage and downstream export

  9. Distinct regions of medial rostral prefrontal cortex supporting social and nonsocial functions

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Iain D. M.; Dumontheil, Iroise; Simons, Jon S.; Frith, Christopher D.; Burgess, Paul W.

    2007-01-01

    While some recent neuroimaging studies have implicated medial rostral prefrontal cortex (MPFC) in ‘mentalizing’ and self-reflection, others have implicated this region in attention towards perceptual vs self-generated information. In order to reconcile these seemingly contradictory findings, we used fMRI to investigate MPFC activity related to these two functions in a factorial design. Participants performed two separate tasks, each of which alternated between ‘stimulus-oriented phases’ (SO), where participants attended to task-relevant perceptual information, and ‘stimulus-independent phases’ (SI), where participants performed the same tasks in the absence of such information. In half of the blocks (‘mentalizing condition’), participants were instructed that they were performing these tasks in collaboration with an experimenter; in other blocks (‘non-mentalizing condition’), participants were instructed that the experimenter was not involved. In fact, the tasks were identical in these conditions. Neuroimaging data revealed adjacent but clearly distinct regions of activation within MPFC related to (i) mentalizing vs non-mentalizing conditions (relatively caudal/superior) and (ii) SO vs SI attention (relatively rostral/inferior). These results generalized from one task to the other, suggesting a new axis of functional organization within MPFC. PMID:18985143

  10. Distinct phytochrome actions in nonvascular plants revealed by targeted inactivation of phytobilin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Rong; Su, Yi-shin; Tu, Shih-Long

    2012-01-01

    The red/far-red light photoreceptor phytochrome mediates photomorphological responses in plants. For light sensing and signaling, phytochromes need to associate with open-chain tetrapyrrole molecules as the chromophore. Biosynthesis of tetrapyrrole chromophores requires members of ferredoxin-dependent bilin reductases (FDBRs). It was shown that LONG HYPOCOTYL 2 (HY2) is the only FDBR in flowering plants producing the phytochromobilin (PΦB) for phytochromes. However, in the moss Physcomitrella patens, we found a second FDBR that catalyzes the formation of phycourobilin (PUB), a tetrapyrrole pigment usually found as the protein-bound form in cyanobacteria and red algae. Thus, we named the enzyme PUB synthase (PUBS). Severe photomorphogenic phenotypes, including the defect of phytochrome-mediated phototropism, were observed in Physcomitrella patens when both HY2 and PUBS were disrupted by gene targeting. This indicates HY2 and PUBS function redundantly in phytochrome-mediated responses of nonvascular plants. Our studies also show that functional PUBS orthologs are found in selected lycopod and chlorophyte genomes. Using mRNA sequencing for transcriptome profiling, we demonstrate that expression of the majority of red-light-responsive genes are misregulated in the pubs hy2 double mutant. These studies showed that moss phytochromes rapidly repress expression of genes involved in cell wall organization, transcription, hormone responses, and protein phosphorylation but activate genes involved in photosynthesis and stress signaling during deetiolation. We propose that, in nonvascular plants, HY2 and PUBS produce structurally different but functionally similar chromophore precursors for phytochromes. Holophytochromes regulate biological processes through light signaling to efficiently reprogram gene expression for vegetative growth in the light. PMID:22566621

  11. Biogeography of Oenococcus oeni Reveals Distinctive but Nonspecific Populations in Wine-Producing Regions.

    PubMed

    El Khoury, Mariette; Campbell-Sills, Hugo; Salin, Franck; Guichoux, Erwan; Claisse, Olivier; Lucas, Patrick M

    2017-02-01

    Understanding the mechanisms behind the typicity of regional wines inevitably brings attention to microorganisms associated with their production. Oenococcus oeni is the main bacterial species involved in wine and cider making. It develops after the yeast-driven alcoholic fermentation and performs the malolactic fermentation, which improves the taste and aromatic complexity of most wines. Here, we have evaluated the diversity and specificity of O. oeni strains in six regions. A total of 235 wines and ciders were collected during spontaneous malolactic fermentations and used to isolate 3,212 bacterial colonies. They were typed by multilocus variable analysis, which disclosed a total of 514 O. oeni strains. Their phylogenetic relationships were evaluated by a second typing method based on single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. Taken together, the results indicate that each region holds a high diversity of strains that constitute a unique population. However, strains present in each region belong to diverse phylogenetic groups, and the same groups can be detected in different regions, indicating that strains are not genetically adapted to regions. In contrast, greater strain identity was seen for cider, white wine, or red wine of Burgundy, suggesting that genetic adaptation to these products occurred. This study reports the isolation, genotyping, and geographic distribution analysis of the largest collection of O. oeni strains performed to date. It reveals that there is very high diversity of strains in each region, the majority of them being detected in a single region. The study also reports the development of an SNP genotyping method that is useful for analyzing the distribution of O. oeni phylogroups. The results show that strains are not genetically adapted to regions but to specific types of wines. They reveal new phylogroups of strains, particularly two phylogroups associated with white wines and red wines of Burgundy. Taken together, the results shed

  12. Coevolved Mutations Reveal Distinct Architectures for Two Core Proteins in the Bacterial Flagellar Motor

    PubMed Central

    Pandini, Alessandro; Kleinjung, Jens; Rasool, Shafqat; Khan, Shahid

    2015-01-01

    Switching of bacterial flagellar rotation is caused by large domain movements of the FliG protein triggered by binding of the signal protein CheY to FliM. FliG and FliM form adjacent multi-subunit arrays within the basal body C-ring. The movements alter the interaction of the FliG C-terminal (FliGC) “torque” helix with the stator complexes. Atomic models based on the Salmonella entrovar C-ring electron microscopy reconstruction have implications for switching, but lack consensus on the relative locations of the FliG armadillo (ARM) domains (amino-terminal (FliGN), middle (FliGM) and FliGC) as well as changes during chemotaxis. The generality of the Salmonella model is challenged by the variation in motor morphology and response between species. We studied coevolved residue mutations to determine the unifying elements of switch architecture. Residue interactions, measured by their coevolution, were formalized as a network, guided by structural data. Our measurements reveal a common design with dedicated switch and motor modules. The FliM middle domain (FliMM) has extensive connectivity most simply explained by conserved intra and inter-subunit contacts. In contrast, FliG has patchy, complex architecture. Conserved structural motifs form interacting nodes in the coevolution network that wire FliMM to the FliGC C-terminal, four-helix motor module (C3-6). FliG C3-6 coevolution is organized around the torque helix, differently from other ARM domains. The nodes form separated, surface-proximal patches that are targeted by deleterious mutations as in other allosteric systems. The dominant node is formed by the EHPQ motif at the FliMMFliGM contact interface and adjacent helix residues at a central location within FliGM. The node interacts with nodes in the N-terminal FliGc α-helix triad (ARM-C) and FliGN. ARM-C, separated from C3-6 by the MFVF motif, has poor intra-network connectivity consistent with its variable orientation revealed by structural data. ARM-C could

  13. Extensive weight loss reveals distinct gene expression changes in human subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Mardinoglu, Adil; Heiker, John T.; Gärtner, Daniel; Björnson, Elias; Schön, Michael R.; Flehmig, Gesine; Klöting, Nora; Krohn, Knut; Fasshauer, Mathias; Stumvoll, Michael; Nielsen, Jens; Blüher, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Weight loss has been shown to significantly improve Adipose tissue (AT) function, however changes in AT gene expression profiles particularly in visceral AT (VAT) have not been systematically studied. Here, we tested the hypothesis that extensive weight loss in response to bariatric surgery (BS) causes AT gene expression changes, which may affect energy and lipid metabolism, inflammation and secretory function of AT. We assessed gene expression changes by whole genome expression chips in AT samples obtained from six morbidly obese individuals, who underwent a two step BS strategy with sleeve gastrectomy as initial and a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass as second step surgery after 12 ± 2 months. Global gene expression differences in VAT and subcutaneous (S)AT were analyzed through the use of genome-scale metabolic model (GEM) for adipocytes. Significantly altered gene expressions were PCR-validated in 16 individuals, which also underwent a two-step surgery intervention. We found increased expression of cell death-inducing DFFA-like effector a (CIDEA), involved in formation of lipid droplets in both fat depots in response to significant weight loss. We observed that expression of the genes associated with metabolic reactions involved in NAD+, glutathione and branched chain amino acid metabolism are significantly increased in AT depots after surgery-induced weight loss. PMID:26434764

  14. Comprehensive Tissue-Specific Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Distinct Regulatory Programs during Early Tomato Fruit Development.

    PubMed

    Pattison, Richard J; Csukasi, Fabiana; Zheng, Yi; Fei, Zhangjun; van der Knaap, Esther; Catalá, Carmen

    2015-08-01

    Fruit formation and early development involve a range of physiological and morphological transformations of the various constituent tissues of the ovary. These developmental changes vary considerably according to tissue type, but molecular analyses at an organ-wide level inevitably obscure many tissue-specific phenomena. We used laser-capture microdissection coupled to high-throughput RNA sequencing to analyze the transcriptome of ovaries and fruit tissues of the wild tomato species Solanum pimpinellifolium. This laser-capture microdissection-high-throughput RNA sequencing approach allowed quantitative global profiling of gene expression at previously unobtainable levels of spatial resolution, revealing numerous contrasting transcriptome profiles and uncovering rare and cell type-specific transcripts. Coexpressed gene clusters linked specific tissues and stages to major transcriptional changes underlying the ovary-to-fruit transition and provided evidence of regulatory modules related to cell division, photosynthesis, and auxin transport in internal fruit tissues, together with parallel specialization of the pericarp transcriptome in stress responses and secondary metabolism. Analysis of transcription factor expression and regulatory motifs indicated putative gene regulatory modules that may regulate the development of different tissues and hormonal processes. Major alterations in the expression of hormone metabolic and signaling components illustrate the complex hormonal control underpinning fruit formation, with intricate spatiotemporal variations suggesting separate regulatory programs.

  15. agr receptor mutants reveal distinct modes of inhibition by staphylococcal autoinducing peptides

    PubMed Central

    Geisinger, Edward; Muir, Tom W.; Novick, Richard P.

    2009-01-01

    Through the agr quorum-sensing system, staphylococci secrete unique autoinducing peptides (AIPs) and detect their concentration via the AgrC transmembrane receptor, coordinating local bacterial population density with global changes in gene expression. Unique AIP and AgrC variants exist within and between species, and although autologous interactions lead to agr activation, heterologous interactions usually lead to cross-inhibition, resulting in natural quorum-sensing interference. To gain insight into the mechanisms responsible for these phenomena at the level of the receptor, we used random mutagenesis to isolate variants of Staphylococcus aureus AgrC-I with constitutive activity. Constitutive mutations in the sensor domain of the receptor were localized to the last transmembrane helix, whereas those in the histidine kinase domain were mostly clustered to a region near the phosphorylation site histidine. Analysis of these mutants with a range of noncognate AIPs revealed that inhibition is manifested by inverse agonism in certain heterologous pairings and by neutral antagonism in others. In addition, we isolated and characterized an AgrC sensor domain mutant with dramatically broadened activation specificity and reduced sensitivity to inhibition, identifying a single amino acid as a critical determinant of ligand-mediated inhibition. These results suggest that certain noncognate AIPs stabilize an inhibitory receptor conformation that may be a critical feature of the ligand–receptor interaction not initially appreciated in previous analyses of agr inhibition. PMID:19147840

  16. Intact-Brain Analyses Reveal Distinct Information Carried by SNc Dopamine Subcircuits.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Talia N; Shilyansky, Carrie; Davidson, Thomas J; Evans, Kathryn E; Beier, Kevin T; Zalocusky, Kelly A; Crow, Ailey K; Malenka, Robert C; Luo, Liqun; Tomer, Raju; Deisseroth, Karl

    2015-07-30

    Recent progress in understanding the diversity of midbrain dopamine neurons has highlighted the importance--and the challenges--of defining mammalian neuronal cell types. Although neurons may be best categorized using inclusive criteria spanning biophysical properties, wiring of inputs, wiring of outputs, and activity during behavior, linking all of these measurements to cell types within the intact brains of living mammals has been difficult. Here, using an array of intact-brain circuit interrogation tools, including CLARITY, COLM, optogenetics, viral tracing, and fiber photometry, we explore the diversity of dopamine neurons within the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). We identify two parallel nigrostriatal dopamine neuron subpopulations differing in biophysical properties, input wiring, output wiring to dorsomedial striatum (DMS) versus dorsolateral striatum (DLS), and natural activity patterns during free behavior. Our results reveal independently operating nigrostriatal information streams, with implications for understanding the logic of dopaminergic feedback circuits and the diversity of mammalian neuronal cell types. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Different human gut models reveal the distinct fermentation patterns of Arabinoxylan versus inulin.

    PubMed

    Van den Abbeele, Pieter; Venema, Koen; Van de Wiele, Tom; Verstraete, Willy; Possemiers, Sam

    2013-10-16

    Different in vitro models have been developed to assess how food compounds affect the human gut microbiota. Using two such models (SHIME(R) and TIM-2), we compared how long-chain arabinoxylan (LC-AX), a wheat-derived potentially prebiotic fiber, and inulin (IN), a well-established prebiotic compound, modulate SCFA production and bifidobacteria composition. While both the SHIME and TIM-2 differ in experimental design, they both demonstrated that LC-AX and IN specifically increased the health-promoting metabolites propionate and butyrate, respectively. Furthermore, LC-AX stimulated Bifidobacterium longum, while IN stimulated other bifidobacteria including Bifidobacterium adolescentis. The SHIME experiment also revealed that effects of LC-AX were more persistent during the 2-week wash-out period. These results confirm a recent in vivo study, during which humanized rats were treated with the same LC-AX/IN. In conclusion, results from different human gut models suggest that, besides IN, LC-AX are promising prebiotic candidates with high specificity toward Bifidobacterium longum and a selective propionate increase.

  18. Dual Transcriptome Profiling of Leishmania-Infected Human Macrophages Reveals Distinct Reprogramming Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Maria Cecilia; Dillon, Laura A. L.; Belew, Ashton Trey; Bravo, Hector Corrada; Mosser, David M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Macrophages are mononuclear phagocytes that constitute a first line of defense against pathogens. While lethal to many microbes, they are the primary host cells of Leishmania spp. parasites, the obligate intracellular pathogens that cause leishmaniasis. We conducted transcriptomic profiling of two Leishmania species and the human macrophage over the course of intracellular infection by using high-throughput RNA sequencing to characterize the global gene expression changes and reprogramming events that underlie the interactions between the pathogen and its host. A systematic exclusion of the generic effects of large-particle phagocytosis revealed a vigorous, parasite-specific response of the human macrophage early in the infection that was greatly tempered at later time points. An analogous temporal expression pattern was observed with the parasite, suggesting that much of the reprogramming that occurs as parasites transform into intracellular forms generally stabilizes shortly after entry. Following that, the parasite establishes an intracellular niche within macrophages, with minimal communication between the parasite and the host cell later during the infection. No significant difference was observed between parasite species transcriptomes or in the transcriptional response of macrophages infected with each species. Our comparative analysis of gene expression changes that occur as mouse and human macrophages are infected by Leishmania spp. points toward a general signature of the Leishmania-macrophage infectome. PMID:27165796

  19. Various genotypes of Mycobacterium leprae from Mexico reveal distinct geographic distribution.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Masanori; Gonzalez, Alberto Vargas; Estrada, Iris; Carreño-Martinez, Cristina; Fafutis-Morris, Mary

    2009-09-01

    To classify Mycobacterium leprae isolates from multiple areas in Mexico based on variable number of tandem repeats of 6 base within the rpoT gene and three single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), and to analyse their geographic distribution in the context of the origin of leprosy in Mexico. Analysis for rpoT genotyping of 64 samples collected in the west and southwestern areas revealed that 46 isolates were of the 4 copy type and 18 isolates were of the 3 copy type. All samples from the eastern coastal area (n = 24) and from the Yucatan peninsula (n = 12) were of the 3 copy type. Six isolates from the west and southwestern area were SNP-type 1, 13 isolates were SNP-type 2 and 45 isolates were SNP-type 3. Nineteen of 24 isolates from the eastern coastal area were SNP-type 3 and one was SNP-type 4. Seven isolates from the Yucatan peninsula were SNP-type 3 and one was SNP-type 4. The difference of the proportion of each genotype between the western areas and the eastern areas indicated the expansion of leprosy through different paths in Mexico.

  20. Microarrays with Varying Carbohydrate Density Reveal Distinct Subpopulations of Serum Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Oyelaran, Oyindasola; Li, Qian; Farnsworth, David; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C.

    2009-01-01

    Antigen arrays have become important tools for profiling complex mixtures of proteins such as serum antibodies. These arrays can be used to better understand immune responses, discover new biomarkers, and guide the development of vaccines. Nevertheless, they are not perfect and improved array designs would enhance the information derived from this technology. In this study, we describe and evaluate a strategy for varying antigen density on an array and then use the array to study binding of lectins, monoclonal antibodies, and serum antibodies. To vary density, neoglycoproteins containing differing amounts of carbohydrate were synthesized and used to make a carbohydrate microarray with variations in both structure and density. We demonstrate that this method provides variations in density on the array surface within a range that is relevant for biological recognition events. The array was used to evaluate density dependent binding properties of three lectins (Vicia villosa lectin B4, Helix pomatia agglutinin, and soybean agglutinin) and three monoclonal antibodies (HBTn-1, B1.1, and Bric111) that bind the tumor-associated Tn antigen. In addition, serum antibodies were profiled from 30 healthy donors. The results show that variations in antigen density are required to detect the full spectrum of antibodies that bind a particular antigen and can be used to reveal differences in antibody populations between individuals that are not detectable using a single antigen density. PMID:19366269

  1. Large-scale analysis of chromosomal aberrations in cancer karyotypes reveals two distinct paths to aneuploidy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Chromosomal aneuploidy, that is to say the gain or loss of chromosomes, is the most common abnormality in cancer. While certain aberrations, most commonly translocations, are known to be strongly associated with specific cancers and contribute to their formation, most aberrations appear to be non-specific and arbitrary, and do not have a clear effect. The understanding of chromosomal aneuploidy and its role in tumorigenesis is a fundamental open problem in cancer biology. Results We report on a systematic study of the characteristics of chromosomal aberrations in cancers, using over 15,000 karyotypes and 62 cancer classes in the Mitelman Database. Remarkably, we discovered a very high co-occurrence rate of chromosome gains with other chromosome gains, and of losses with losses. Gains and losses rarely show significant co-occurrence. This finding was consistent across cancer classes and was confirmed on an independent comparative genomic hybridization dataset of cancer samples. The results of our analysis are available for further investigation via an accompanying website. Conclusions The broad generality and the intricate characteristics of the dichotomy of aneuploidy, ranging across numerous tumor classes, are revealed here rigorously for the first time using statistical analyses of large-scale datasets. Our finding suggests that aneuploid cancer cells may use extra chromosome gain or loss events to restore a balance in their altered protein ratios, needed for maintaining their cellular fitness. PMID:21714908

  2. NMR based serum metabolomics reveals a distinctive signature in patients with Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Guleria, Anupam; Pratap, Avadhesh; Dubey, Durgesh; Rawat, Atul; Chaurasia, Smriti; Sukesh, Edavalath; Phatak, Sanat; Ajmani, Sajal; Kumar, Umesh; Khetrapal, Chunni Lal; Bacon, Paul; Misra, Ramnath; Kumar, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    Management of patient with Lupus Nephritis (LN) continues to remain a challenge for the treating physicians because of considerable morbidity and even mortality. The search of biomarkers in serum and urine is a focus of researchers to unravel new targets for therapy. In the present study, the utility of NMR-based serum metabolomics has been evaluated for the first time in discriminating LN patients from non-nephritis lupus patients (SLE) and further to get new insights into the underlying disease processes for better clinical management. Metabolic profiling of sera obtained from 22 SLE patients, 40 LN patients and 30 healthy controls (HC) were performed using high resolution 1D 1H-CPMG and diffusion edited NMR spectra to identify the potential molecular biomarkers. Using multivariate analysis, we could distinguish SLE and LN patients from HC and LN from SLE patients. Compared to SLE patients, the LN patients had increased serum levels of lipid metabolites (including LDL/VLDL lipoproteins), creatinine and decreased levels of acetate. Our results revealed that metabolic markers especially lipids and acetate derived from NMR spectroscopy has high sensitivity and specificity to distinguish LN among SLE patients and has the potential to be a useful adjunctive tool in diagnosis and clinical management of LN. PMID:27739464

  3. Revealing Shared and Distinct Gene Network Organization in Arabidopsis Immune Responses by Integrative Analysis1

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiaobao; Jiang, Zhenhong; Peng, You-Liang; Zhang, Ziding

    2015-01-01

    Pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) and effector-triggered immunity (ETI) are two main plant immune responses to counter pathogen invasion. Genome-wide gene network organizing principles leading to quantitative differences between PTI and ETI have remained elusive. We combined an advanced machine learning method and modular network analysis to systematically characterize the organizing principles of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) PTI and ETI at three network resolutions. At the single network node/edge level, we ranked genes and gene interactions based on their ability to distinguish immune response from normal growth and successfully identified many immune-related genes associated with PTI and ETI. Topological analysis revealed that the top-ranked gene interactions tend to link network modules. At the subnetwork level, we identified a subnetwork shared by PTI and ETI encompassing 1,159 genes and 1,289 interactions. This subnetwork is enriched in interactions linking network modules and is also a hotspot of attack by pathogen effectors. The subnetwork likely represents a core component in the coordination of multiple biological processes to favor defense over development. Finally, we constructed modular network models for PTI and ETI to explain the quantitative differences in the global network architecture. Our results indicate that the defense modules in ETI are organized into relatively independent structures, explaining the robustness of ETI to genetic mutations and effector attacks. Taken together, the multiscale comparisons of PTI and ETI provide a systems biology perspective on plant immunity and emphasize coordination among network modules to establish a robust immune response. PMID:25614062

  4. Quantitative Proteomics Reveal Distinct Protein Regulations Caused by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans within Subgingival Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Kai; Bostanci, Nagihan; Selevsek, Nathalie; Thurnheer, Thomas; Belibasakis, Georgios N.

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an infectious disease that causes the inflammatory destruction of the tooth-supporting (periodontal) tissues, caused by polymicrobial biofilm communities growing on the tooth surface. Aggressive periodontitis is strongly associated with the presence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in the subgingival biofilms. Nevertheless, whether and how A. actinomycetemcomitans orchestrates molecular changes within the biofilm is unclear. The aim of this work was to decipher the interactions between A. actinomycetemcomitans and other bacterial species in a multi-species biofilm using proteomic analysis. An in vitro 10-species “subgingival” biofilm model, or its derivative that included additionally A. actinomycetemcomitans, were anaerobically cultivated on hydroxyapatite discs for 64 h. When present, A. actinomycetemcomitans formed dense intra-species clumps within the biofilm mass, and did not affect the numbers of the other species in the biofilm. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was used to identify the proteomic content of the biofilm lysate. A total of 3225 and 3352 proteins were identified in the biofilm, in presence or absence of A. actinomycetemcomitans, respectively. Label-free quantitative proteomics revealed that 483 out of the 728 quantified bacterial proteins (excluding those of A. actinomycetemcomitans) were accordingly regulated. Interestingly, all quantified proteins from Prevotella intermedia were up-regulated, and most quantified proteins from Campylobacter rectus, Streptococcus anginosus, and Porphyromonas gingivalis were down-regulated in presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Enrichment of Gene Ontology pathway analysis showed that the regulated groups of proteins were responsible primarily for changes in the metabolic rate, the ferric iron-binding, and the 5S RNA binding capacities, on the universal biofilm level. While the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans did not affect the numeric composition or absolute

  5. Quantitative proteomics reveal distinct protein regulations caused by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans within subgingival biofilms.

    PubMed

    Bao, Kai; Bostanci, Nagihan; Selevsek, Nathalie; Thurnheer, Thomas; Belibasakis, Georgios N

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an infectious disease that causes the inflammatory destruction of the tooth-supporting (periodontal) tissues, caused by polymicrobial biofilm communities growing on the tooth surface. Aggressive periodontitis is strongly associated with the presence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in the subgingival biofilms. Nevertheless, whether and how A. actinomycetemcomitans orchestrates molecular changes within the biofilm is unclear. The aim of this work was to decipher the interactions between A. actinomycetemcomitans and other bacterial species in a multi-species biofilm using proteomic analysis. An in vitro 10-species "subgingival" biofilm model, or its derivative that included additionally A. actinomycetemcomitans, were anaerobically cultivated on hydroxyapatite discs for 64 h. When present, A. actinomycetemcomitans formed dense intra-species clumps within the biofilm mass, and did not affect the numbers of the other species in the biofilm. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was used to identify the proteomic content of the biofilm lysate. A total of 3225 and 3352 proteins were identified in the biofilm, in presence or absence of A. actinomycetemcomitans, respectively. Label-free quantitative proteomics revealed that 483 out of the 728 quantified bacterial proteins (excluding those of A. actinomycetemcomitans) were accordingly regulated. Interestingly, all quantified proteins from Prevotella intermedia were up-regulated, and most quantified proteins from Campylobacter rectus, Streptococcus anginosus, and Porphyromonas gingivalis were down-regulated in presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Enrichment of Gene Ontology pathway analysis showed that the regulated groups of proteins were responsible primarily for changes in the metabolic rate, the ferric iron-binding, and the 5S RNA binding capacities, on the universal biofilm level. While the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans did not affect the numeric composition or absolute protein

  6. Improved Flow Cytometric Assessment Reveals Distinct Microvesicle (Cell-Derived Microparticle) Signatures in Joint Diseases

    PubMed Central

    György, Bence; Szabó, Tamás G.; Turiák, Lilla; Wright, Matthew; Herczeg, Petra; Lédeczi, Zsigmond; Kittel, Ágnes; Polgár, Anna; Tóth, Kálmán; Dérfalvi, Beáta; Zelenák, Gergő; Böröcz, István; Carr, Bob; Nagy, György; Vékey, Károly; Gay, Steffen; Falus, András; Buzás, Edit I.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Microvesicles (MVs), earlier referred to as microparticles, represent a major type of extracellular vesicles currently considered as novel biomarkers in various clinical settings such as autoimmune disorders. However, the analysis of MVs in body fluids has not been fully standardized yet, and there are numerous pitfalls that hinder the correct assessment of these structures. Methods In this study, we analyzed synovial fluid (SF) samples of patients with osteoarthritis (OA), rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). To assess factors that may confound MV detection in joint diseases, we used electron microscopy (EM), Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (NTA) and mass spectrometry (MS). For flow cytometry, a method commonly used for phenotyping and enumeration of MVs, we combined recent advances in the field, and used a novel approach of differential detergent lysis for the exclusion of MV-mimicking non-vesicular signals. Results EM and NTA showed that substantial amounts of particles other than MVs were present in SF samples. Beyond known MV-associated proteins, MS analysis also revealed abundant plasma- and immune complex-related proteins in MV preparations. Applying improved flow cytometric analysis, we demonstrate for the first time that CD3+ and CD8+ T-cell derived SF MVs are highly elevated in patients with RA compared to OA patients (p = 0.027 and p = 0.009, respectively, after Bonferroni corrections). In JIA, we identified reduced numbers of B cell-derived MVs (p = 0.009, after Bonferroni correction). Conclusions Our results suggest that improved flow cytometric assessment of MVs facilitates the detection of previously unrecognized disease-associated vesicular signatures. PMID:23185418

  7. Genomic DNA Methylation Analyses Reveal the Distinct Profiles in Castor Bean Seeds with Persistent Endosperms1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tianquan; Dong, Xue; Li, De-Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Investigations of genomic DNA methylation in seeds have been restricted to a few model plants. The endosperm genomic DNA hypomethylation has been identified in angiosperm, but it is difficult to dissect the mechanism of how this hypomethylation is established and maintained because endosperm is ephemeral and disappears with seed development in most dicots. Castor bean (Ricinus communis), unlike Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), endosperm is persistent throughout seed development, providing an excellent model in which to dissect the mechanism of endosperm genomic hypomethylation in dicots. We characterized the DNA methylation-related genes encoding DNA methyltransferases and demethylases and analyzed their expression profiles in different tissues. We examined genomic methylation including CG, CHG, and CHH contexts in endosperm and embryo tissues using bisulfite sequencing and revealed that the CHH methylation extent in endosperm and embryo was, unexpectedly, substantially higher than in previously studied plants, irrespective of the CHH percentage in their genomes. In particular, we found that the endosperm exhibited a global reduction in CG and CHG methylation extents relative to the embryo, markedly switching global gene expression. However, CHH methylation occurring in endosperm did not exhibit a significant reduction. Combining with the expression of 24-nucleotide small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) mapped within transposable element (TE) regions and genes involved in the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway, we demonstrate that the 24-nucleotide siRNAs played a critical role in maintaining CHH methylation and repressing the activation of TEs in persistent endosperm development. This study discovered a novel genomic DNA methylation pattern and proposes the potential mechanism occurring in dicot seeds with persistent endosperm. PMID:27208275

  8. Angiogenesis Interactome and Time Course Microarray Data Reveal the Distinct Activation Patterns in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Liang-Hui; Lee, Esak; Bader, Joel S.; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis involves stimulation of endothelial cells (EC) by various cytokines and growth factors, but the signaling mechanisms are not completely understood. Combining dynamic gene expression time-course data for stimulated EC with protein-protein interactions associated with angiogenesis (the “angiome”) could reveal how different stimuli result in different patterns of network activation and could implicate signaling intermediates as points for control or intervention. We constructed the protein-protein interaction networks of positive and negative regulation of angiogenesis comprising 367 and 245 proteins, respectively. We used five published gene expression datasets derived from in vitro assays using different types of blood endothelial cells stimulated by VEGFA (vascular endothelial growth factor A). We used the Short Time-series Expression Miner (STEM) to identify significant temporal gene expression profiles. The statistically significant patterns between 2D fibronectin and 3D type I collagen substrates for telomerase-immortalized EC (TIME) show that different substrates could influence the temporal gene activation patterns in the same cell line. We investigated the different activation patterns among 18 transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptors, and experimentally measured the protein level of the tyrosine-kinase receptors VEGFR1, VEGFR2 and VEGFR3 in human umbilical vein EC (HUVEC) and human microvascular EC (MEC). The results show that VEGFR1–VEGFR2 levels are more closely coupled than VEGFR1–VEGFR3 or VEGFR2–VEGFR3 in HUVEC and MEC. This computational methodology can be extended to investigate other molecules or biological processes such as cell cycle. PMID:25329517

  9. Distinct patterns of functional and effective connectivity between perirhinal cortex and other cortical regions in recognition memory and perceptual discrimination.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Edward B; Protzner, Andrea B; McCormick, Cornelia; McLean, D Adam; Poppenk, Jordan; Cate, Anthony D; Köhler, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally, the medial temporal lobe (MTL) is thought to be dedicated to declarative memory. Recent evidence challenges this view, suggesting that perirhinal cortex (PrC), which interfaces the MTL with the ventral visual pathway, supports highly integrated object representations in recognition memory and perceptual discrimination. Even with comparable representational demands, perceptual and memory tasks differ in numerous task demands and the subjective experience they evoke. Here, we tested whether such differences are reflected in distinct patterns of connectivity between PrC and other cortical regions, including differential involvement of prefrontal control processes. We examined functional magnetic resonance imaging data for closely matched perceptual and recognition memory tasks for faces that engaged right PrC equivalently. Multivariate seed analyses revealed distinct patterns of interactions: Right ventrolateral prefrontal and posterior cingulate cortices exhibited stronger functional connectivity with PrC in recognition memory; fusiform regions were part of the pattern that displayed stronger functional connectivity with PrC in perceptual discrimination. Structural equation modeling revealed distinct patterns of effective connectivity that allowed us to constrain interpretation of these findings. Overall, they demonstrate that, even when MTL structures show similar involvement in recognition memory and perceptual discrimination, differential neural mechanisms are reflected in the interplay between the MTL and other cortical regions.

  10. Mistletoe lectin I in complex with galactose and lactose reveals distinct sugar-binding properties

    SciTech Connect

    Mikeska, Ruth; Arni, Raghuvir; Mikhailov, Albert; Gabdoulkhakov, Azat; Voelter, Wolfgang; Betzel, Christian

    2005-01-01

    The structures of mistletoe lectin I in complex with lactose and galactose reveal differences in binding by the two known sites in subdomains α1 and γ2 and suggest the presence of a third low-affinity site in subdomain β1. The structures of mistletoe lectin I (ML-I) from Viscum album complexed with lactose and galactose have been determined at 2.3 Å resolution and refined to R factors of 20.9% (R{sub free} = 23.6%) and 20.9 (R{sub free} = 24.6%), respectively. ML-I is a heterodimer and belongs to the class of ribosome-inactivating proteins of type II, which consist of two chains. The A-chain has rRNA N-glycosidase activity and irreversibly inhibits eukaryotic ribosomes. The B-chain is a lectin and preferentially binds to galactose-terminated glycolipids and glycoproteins on cell membranes. Saccharide binding is performed by two binding sites in subdomains α1 and γ2 of the ML-I B-chain separated by ∼62 Å from each other. The favoured binding of galactose in subdomain α1 is achieved via hydrogen bonds connecting the 4-hydroxyl and 3-hydroxyl groups of the sugar moiety with the side chains of Asp23B, Gln36B and Lys41B and the main chain of 26B. The aromatic ring of Trp38B on top of the preferred binding pocket supports van der Waals packing of the apolar face of galactose and stabilizes the sugar–lectin complex. In the galactose-binding site II of subdomain γ2, Tyr249B provides the hydrophobic stacking and the side chains of Asp235B, Gln238B and Asn256B are hydrogen-bonding partners for galactose. In the case of the galactose-binding site I, the 2-hydroxyl group also stabilizes the sugar–protein complex, an interaction thus far rarely detected in galactose-specific lectins. Finally, a potential third low-affinity galactose-binding site in subunit β1 was identified in the present ML-I structures, in which a glycerol molecule from the cryoprotectant buffer has bound, mimicking the sugar compound.

  11. Distinct Viral Lineages from Fish and Amphibians Reveal the Complex Evolutionary History of Hepadnaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Dill, Jennifer A.; Camus, Alvin C.; Leary, John H.; Di Giallonardo, Francesca; Holmes, Edward C.

    2016-01-01

    novel hepadnavirus from a fish and the first hepadnavirus genome from an amphibian. The novel fish hepadnavirus, sampled from bluegills, was more closely related to mammalian hepadnaviruses than to other fish viruses. This phylogenetic pattern reveals that, although hepadnaviruses have likely been associated with vertebrates for hundreds of millions of years, they have also been characterized by species jumping across wide phylogenetic distances. PMID:27334580

  12. Distinct Quantitative Computed Tomography Emphysema Patterns Are Associated with Physiology and Function in Smokers

    PubMed Central

    San José Estépar, Raúl; Mendoza, Carlos S.; Hersh, Craig P.; Laird, Nan; Crapo, James D.; Lynch, David A.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Washko, George R.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Emphysema occurs in distinct pathologic patterns, but little is known about the epidemiologic associations of these patterns. Standard quantitative measures of emphysema from computed tomography (CT) do not distinguish between distinct patterns of parenchymal destruction. Objectives: To study the epidemiologic associations of distinct emphysema patterns with measures of lung-related physiology, function, and health care use in smokers. Methods: Using a local histogram-based assessment of lung density, we quantified distinct patterns of low attenuation in 9,313 smokers in the COPDGene Study. To determine if such patterns provide novel insights into chronic obstructive pulmonary disease epidemiology, we tested for their association with measures of physiology, function, and health care use. Measurements and Main Results: Compared with percentage of low-attenuation area less than −950 Hounsfield units (%LAA-950), local histogram-based measures of distinct CT low-attenuation patterns are more predictive of measures of lung function, dyspnea, quality of life, and health care use. These patterns are strongly associated with a wide array of measures of respiratory physiology and function, and most of these associations remain highly significant (P < 0.005) after adjusting for %LAA-950. In smokers without evidence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the mild centrilobular disease pattern is associated with lower FEV1 and worse functional status (P < 0.005). Conclusions: Measures of distinct CT emphysema patterns provide novel information about the relationship between emphysema and key measures of physiology, physical function, and health care use. Measures of mild emphysema in smokers with preserved lung function can be extracted from CT scans and are significantly associated with functional measures. PMID:23980521

  13. Validation of endothelin B receptor antibodies reveals two distinct receptor-related bands on Western blot.

    PubMed

    Barr, Travis P; Kornberg, Daniel; Montmayeur, Jean-Pierre; Long, Melinda; Reichheld, Stephen; Strichartz, Gary R

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies are important tools for the study of protein expression but are often used without full validation. In this study, we used Western blots to characterize antibodies targeted to the N or C terminal (NT or CT, respectively) and the second or third intracellular loop (IL2 or IL3, respectively) of the endothelin B receptor (ETB). The IL2-targeted antibody accurately detected endogenous ETB expression in rat brain and cultured rat astrocytes by labeling a 50-kDa band, the expected weight of full-length ETB. However, this antibody failed to detect transfected ETB in HEK293 cultures. In contrast, the NT-targeted antibody accurately detected endogenous ETB in rat astrocyte cultures and transfected ETB in HEK293 cultures by labeling a 37-kDa band but failed to detect endogenous ETB in rat brain. Bands detected by the CT- or IL3-targeted antibody were found to be unrelated to ETB. Our findings show that functional ETB can be detected at 50 or 37kDa on Western blot, with drastic differences in antibody affinity for these bands. The 37-kDa band likely reflects ETB processing, which appears to be dependent on cell type and/or culture condition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Superresolution imaging reveals structurally distinct periodic patterns of chromatin along pachytene chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, David; Redl, Stefan; Best, Gerrit; Borsos, Máté; Tiwari, Vijay K.; Tachibana-Konwalski, Kikuë; Ketting, René F.; Parekh, Sapun H.; Cremer, Christoph; Birk, Udo J.

    2015-01-01

    During meiosis, homologous chromosomes associate to form the synaptonemal complex (SC), a structure essential for fertility. Information about the epigenetic features of chromatin within this structure at the level of superresolution microscopy is largely lacking. We combined single-molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) with quantitative analytical methods to describe the epigenetic landscape of meiotic chromosomes at the pachytene stage in mouse oocytes. DNA is found to be nonrandomly distributed along the length of the SC in condensed clusters. Periodic clusters of repressive chromatin [trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine (Lys) 27 (H3K27me3)] are found at 500-nm intervals along the SC, whereas one of the ends of the SC displays a large and dense cluster of centromeric histone mark [trimethylation of histone H3 at Lys 9 (H3K9me3)]. Chromatin associated with active transcription [trimethylation of histone H3 at Lys 4 (H3K4me3)] is arranged in a radial hair-like loop pattern emerging laterally from the SC. These loops seem to be punctuated with small clusters of H3K4me3 with an average spread larger than their periodicity. Our findings indicate that the nanoscale structure of the pachytene chromosomes is constrained by periodic patterns of chromatin marks, whose function in recombination and higher order genome organization is yet to be elucidated. PMID:26561583

  15. Distinct role of hydration water in protein misfolding and aggregation revealed by fluctuating thermodynamics analysis.

    PubMed

    Chong, Song-Ho; Ham, Sihyun

    2015-04-21

    Protein aggregation in aqueous cellular environments is linked to diverse human diseases. Protein aggregation proceeds through a multistep process initiated by conformational transitions, called protein misfolding, of monomer species toward aggregation-prone structures. Various forms of aggregate species are generated through the association of misfolded monomers including soluble oligomers and amyloid fibrils. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms and driving forces involved in the misfolding and subsequent association has been a central issue for understanding and preventing protein aggregation diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and type II diabetes. In this Account, we provide a thermodynamic perspective of the misfolding and aggregation of the amyloid-beta (Aβ) protein implicated in Alzheimer's disease through the application of fluctuating thermodynamics. This approach "dissects" the conventional thermodynamic characterization of the end states into the one of the fluctuating processes connecting them, and enables one to analyze variations in the thermodynamic functions that occur during the course of protein conformational changes. The central quantity in this approach is the solvent-averaged effective energy, f = Eu + Gsolv, comprising the protein potential energy (Eu) and the solvation free energy (Gsolv), whose time variation reflects the protein dynamics on the free energy landscape. Protein configurational entropy is quantified by the magnitude of fluctuations in f. We find that misfolding of the Aβ monomer when released from a membrane environment to an aqueous phase is driven by favorable changes in protein potential energy and configurational entropy, but it is also accompanied by an unfavorable increase in solvation free energy. The subsequent dimerization of the misfolded Aβ monomers occurs in two steps. The first step, where two widely separated monomers come into contact distance, is driven by water-mediated attraction, that is, by a

  16. Multiparametric profiling of non–small-cell lung cancers reveals distinct immunophenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Lizotte, Patrick H.; Ivanova, Elena V.; Awad, Mark M.; Jones, Robert E.; Keogh, Lauren; Liu, Hongye; Dries, Ruben; Herter-Sprie, Grit S.; Santos, Abigail; Feeney, Nora B.; Paweletz, Cloud P.; Kulkarni, Meghana M.; Bass, Adam J.; Rustgi, Anil K.; Yuan, Guo-Cheng; Kufe, Donald W.; Jänne, Pasi A.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Sholl, Lynette M.; Hodi, F. Stephen; Richards, William G.; Bueno, Raphael; English, Jessie M.; Bittinger, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Immune checkpoint blockade improves survival in a subset of patients with non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but robust biomarkers that predict response to PD-1 pathway inhibitors are lacking. Furthermore, our understanding of the diversity of the NSCLC tumor immune microenvironment remains limited. METHODS. We performed comprehensive flow cytometric immunoprofiling on both tumor and immune cells from 51 NSCLCs and integrated this analysis with clinical and histopathologic characteristics, next-generation sequencing, mRNA expression, and PD-L1 immunohistochemistry (IHC). RESULTS. Cytometric profiling identified an immunologically “hot” cluster with abundant CD8+ T cells expressing high levels of PD-1 and TIM-3 and an immunologically “cold” cluster with lower relative abundance of CD8+ T cells and expression of inhibitory markers. The “hot” cluster was highly enriched for expression of genes associated with T cell trafficking and cytotoxic function and high PD-L1 expression by IHC. There was no correlation between immunophenotype and KRAS or EGFR mutation, or patient smoking history, but we did observe an enrichment of squamous subtype and tumors with higher mutation burden in the “hot” cluster. Additionally, approximately 20% of cases had high B cell infiltrates with a subset producing IL-10. CONCLUSIONS. Our results support the use of immune-based metrics to study response and resistance to immunotherapy in lung cancer. FUNDING. The Robert A. and Renée E. Belfer Family Foundation, Expect Miracles Foundation, Starr Cancer Consortium, Stand Up to Cancer Foundation, Conquer Cancer Foundation, International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, National Cancer Institute (R01 CA205150), and the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation. PMID:27699239

  17. Quantitative MS-based enzymology of caspases reveals distinct protein substrate specificities, hierarchies, and cellular roles.

    PubMed

    Julien, Olivier; Zhuang, Min; Wiita, Arun P; O'Donoghue, Anthony J; Knudsen, Giselle M; Craik, Charles S; Wells, James A

    2016-04-05

    Proteases constitute the largest enzyme family, yet their biological roles are obscured by our rudimentary understanding of their cellular substrates. There are 12 human caspases that play crucial roles in inflammation and cell differentiation and drive the terminal stages of cell death. Recent N-terminomics technologies have begun to enumerate the diverse substrates individual caspases can cleave in complex cell lysates. It is clear that many caspases have shared substrates; however, few data exist about the catalytic efficiencies (kcat/KM) of these substrates, which is critical to understanding their true substrate preferences. In this study, we use quantitative MS to determine the catalytic efficiencies for hundreds of natural protease substrates in cellular lysate for two understudied members: caspase-2 and caspase-6. Most substrates are new, and the cleavage rates vary up to 500-fold. We compare the cleavage rates for common substrates with those found for caspase-3, caspase-7, and caspase-8, involved in apoptosis. There is little correlation in catalytic efficiencies among the five caspases, suggesting each has a unique set of preferred substrates, and thus more specialized roles than previously understood. We synthesized peptide substrates on the basis of protein cleavage sites and found similar catalytic efficiencies between the protein and peptide substrates. These data suggest the rates of proteolysis are dominated more by local primary sequence, and less by the tertiary protein fold. Our studies highlight that global quantitative rate analysis for posttranslational modification enzymes in complex milieus for native substrates is critical to better define their functions and relative sequence of events.

  18. Multiparametric profiling of non-small-cell lung cancers reveals distinct immunophenotypes.

    PubMed

    Lizotte, Patrick H; Ivanova, Elena V; Awad, Mark M; Jones, Robert E; Keogh, Lauren; Liu, Hongye; Dries, Ruben; Almonte, Christina; Herter-Sprie, Grit S; Santos, Abigail; Feeney, Nora B; Paweletz, Cloud P; Kulkarni, Meghana M; Bass, Adam J; Rustgi, Anil K; Yuan, Guo-Cheng; Kufe, Donald W; Jänne, Pasi A; Hammerman, Peter S; Sholl, Lynette M; Hodi, F Stephen; Richards, William G; Bueno, Raphael; English, Jessie M; Bittinger, Mark A; Wong, Kwok-Kin

    2016-09-08

    BACKGROUND. Immune checkpoint blockade improves survival in a subset of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but robust biomarkers that predict response to PD-1 pathway inhibitors are lacking. Furthermore, our understanding of the diversity of the NSCLC tumor immune microenvironment remains limited. METHODS. We performed comprehensive flow cytometric immunoprofiling on both tumor and immune cells from 51 NSCLCs and integrated this analysis with clinical and histopathologic characteristics, next-generation sequencing, mRNA expression, and PD-L1 immunohistochemistry (IHC). RESULTS. Cytometric profiling identified an immunologically "hot" cluster with abundant CD8(+) T cells expressing high levels of PD-1 and TIM-3 and an immunologically "cold" cluster with lower relative abundance of CD8(+) T cells and expression of inhibitory markers. The "hot" cluster was highly enriched for expression of genes associated with T cell trafficking and cytotoxic function and high PD-L1 expression by IHC. There was no correlation between immunophenotype and KRAS or EGFR mutation, or patient smoking history, but we did observe an enrichment of squamous subtype and tumors with higher mutation burden in the "hot" cluster. Additionally, approximately 20% of cases had high B cell infiltrates with a subset producing IL-10. CONCLUSIONS. Our results support the use of immune-based metrics to study response and resistance to immunotherapy in lung cancer. FUNDING. The Robert A. and Renée E. Belfer Family Foundation, Expect Miracles Foundation, Starr Cancer Consortium, Stand Up to Cancer Foundation, Conquer Cancer Foundation, International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, National Cancer Institute (R01 CA205150), and the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation.

  19. Quantitative MS-based enzymology of caspases reveals distinct protein substrate specificities, hierarchies, and cellular roles

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Min; Wiita, Arun P.; O’Donoghue, Anthony J.; Knudsen, Giselle M.; Craik, Charles S.; Wells, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Proteases constitute the largest enzyme family, yet their biological roles are obscured by our rudimentary understanding of their cellular substrates. There are 12 human caspases that play crucial roles in inflammation and cell differentiation and drive the terminal stages of cell death. Recent N-terminomics technologies have begun to enumerate the diverse substrates individual caspases can cleave in complex cell lysates. It is clear that many caspases have shared substrates; however, few data exist about the catalytic efficiencies (kcat/KM) of these substrates, which is critical to understanding their true substrate preferences. In this study, we use quantitative MS to determine the catalytic efficiencies for hundreds of natural protease substrates in cellular lysate for two understudied members: caspase-2 and caspase-6. Most substrates are new, and the cleavage rates vary up to 500-fold. We compare the cleavage rates for common substrates with those found for caspase-3, caspase-7, and caspase-8, involved in apoptosis. There is little correlation in catalytic efficiencies among the five caspases, suggesting each has a unique set of preferred substrates, and thus more specialized roles than previously understood. We synthesized peptide substrates on the basis of protein cleavage sites and found similar catalytic efficiencies between the protein and peptide substrates. These data suggest the rates of proteolysis are dominated more by local primary sequence, and less by the tertiary protein fold. Our studies highlight that global quantitative rate analysis for posttranslational modification enzymes in complex milieus for native substrates is critical to better define their functions and relative sequence of events. PMID:27006500

  20. 5D imaging approaches reveal the formation of distinct intracellular cAMP spatial gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rich, Thomas C.; Annamdevula, Naga; Trinh, Kenny; Britain, Andrea L.; Mayes, Samuel A.; Griswold, John R.; Deal, Joshua; Hoffman, Chase; West, Savannah; Leavesley, Silas J.

    2017-02-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a ubiquitous second messenger known to differentially regulate many cellular functions. Several lines of evidence suggest that the distribution of cAMP within cells is not uniform. However, to date, no studies have measured the kinetics of 3D cAMP distributions within cells. This is largely due to the low signal-tonoise ratio of FRET-based probes. We previously reported that hyperspectral imaging improves the signal-to-noise ratio of FRET measurements. Here we utilized hyperspectral imaging approaches to measure FRET signals in five dimensions (5D) - three spatial (x, y, z), wavelength (λ), and time (t) - allowing us to visualize cAMP gradients in pulmonary endothelial cells. cAMP levels were measured using a FRET-based sensor (H188) comprised of a cAMP binding domain sandwiched between FRET donor and acceptor - Turquoise and Venus fluorescent proteins. We observed cAMP gradients in response to 0.1 or 1 μM isoproterenol, 0.1 or 1 μM PGE1, or 50 μM forskolin. Forskolin- and isoproterenol-induced cAMP gradients formed from the apical (high cAMP) to basolateral (low cAMP) face of cells. In contrast, PGE1-induced cAMP gradients originated from both the basolateral and apical faces of cells. Data suggest that 2D (x,y) studies of cAMP compartmentalization may lead to erroneous conclusions about the existence of cAMP gradients, and that 3D (x,y,z) studies are required to assess mechanisms of signaling specificity. Results demonstrate that 5D imaging technologies are powerful tools for measuring biochemical processes in discrete subcellular domains.

  1. Distinct functions of neuromedin u and neuromedin s in orange-spotted grouper.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuisheng; Xiao, Ling; Liu, Qiongyu; Zheng, Binbin; Chen, Huapu; Liu, Xiaochun; Zhang, Yong; Lin, Haoran

    2015-10-01

    Neuromedin U (NMU) and neuromedin S (NMS) play inhibitory roles in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis in mammals. However, their functions are not clearly established in teleost fish. In the present study, nmu and nms homologs were identified in several fish species. Subsequently, their cDNA sequences were cloned from the orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides). Sequence analysis showed that the orange-spotted grouper Nmu proprotein contains a 21-amino acid mature Nmu peptide (Nmu-21). The Nms proprotein lost the typical mature Nms peptide, but it retains a putative 34-amino acid peptide (Nmsrp). In situ hybridization revealed that nmu- and nms-expressing cells are mainly localized in the hypothalamic regions associated with appetite regulation. Food deprivation decreased the hypothalamic nmu mRNA levels but induced an increase of nms mRNA levels. Periprandial expression analysis showed that hypothalamic expression of nmu increased significantly at 3 h post-feeding, while nms expression was elevated at the normal feeding time. I.p. injection of synthetic Nmu-21 peptide suppressed the hypothalamic neuropeptide y (npy) expression, while Nmsrp administration significantly increased the expression of npy and orexin in orange-spotted grouper. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of LH beta subunit (lhβ) and gh in the pituitary were significantly down-regulated after Nmu-21 peptide administration, while Nmsrp was able to significantly stimulate the expression of FSH beta subunit (fshβ), prolactin (prl), and somatolaction (sl). Our results indicate that nmu and nms possess distinct neuroendocrine functions and pituitary functions in the orange spotted grouper. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  2. Zebrafish mesonephric renin cells are functionally conserved and comprise two distinct morphological populations.

    PubMed

    Rider, Sebastien A; Christian, Helen C; Mullins, Linda J; Howarth, Amelia R; MacRae, Calum A; Mullins, John J

    2017-04-01

    Zebrafish provide an excellent model in which to assess the role of the renin-angiotensin system in renal development, injury, and repair. In contrast to mammals, zebrafish kidney organogenesis terminates with the mesonephros. Despite this, the basic functional structure of the nephron is conserved across vertebrates. The relevance of teleosts for studies relating to the regulation of the renin-angiotensin system was established by assessing the phenotype and functional regulation of renin-expressing cells in zebrafish. Transgenic fluorescent reporters for renin (ren), smooth muscle actin (acta2), and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-beta (pdgfrb) were studied to determine the phenotype and secretory ultrastructure of perivascular renin-expressing cells. Whole kidney ren transcription responded to altered salinity, pharmacological renin-angiotensin system inhibition, and renal injury. Mesonephric ren-expressing cells occupied niches at the preglomerular arteries and afferent arterioles, forming intermittent epithelioid-like multicellular clusters exhibiting a granular secretory ultrastructure. In contrast, renin cells of the efferent arterioles were thin bodied and lacked secretory granules. Renin cells expressed the perivascular cell markers acta2 and pdgfrb Transcriptional responses of ren to physiological challenge support the presence of a functional renin-angiotensin system and are consistent with the production of active renin. The reparative capability of the zebrafish kidney was harnessed to demonstrate that ren transcription is a marker for renal injury and repair. Our studies demonstrate substantive conservation of renin regulation across vertebrates, and ultrastructural studies of renin cells reveal at least two distinct morphologies of mesonephric perivascular ren-expressing cells.

  3. Differential expression of two distinct functional isoforms of melanopsin (Opn4) in the mammalian retina.

    PubMed

    Pires, Susana S; Hughes, Steven; Turton, Michael; Melyan, Zare; Peirson, Stuart N; Zheng, Lei; Kosmaoglou, Maria; Bellingham, James; Cheetham, Michael E; Lucas, Robert J; Foster, Russell G; Hankins, Mark W; Halford, Stephanie

    2009-09-30

    Melanopsin is the photopigment that confers photosensitivity to a subset of retinal ganglion cells (pRGCs) that regulate many non-image-forming tasks such as the detection of light for circadian entrainment. Recent studies have begun to subdivide the pRGCs on the basis of morphology and function, but the origin of these differences is not yet fully understood. Here we report the identification of two isoforms of melanopsin from the mouse Opn4 locus, a previously described long isoform (Opn4L) and a novel short isoform (Opn4S) that more closely resembles the sequence and structure of rat and human melanopsins. Both isoforms, Opn4L and Opn4S, are expressed in the ganglion cell layer of the retina, traffic to the plasma membrane and form a functional photopigment in vitro. Quantitative PCR revealed that Opn4S is 40 times more abundant than Opn4L. The two variants encode predicted proteins of 521 and 466 aa and only differ in the length of their C-terminal tails. Antibodies raised to isoform-specific epitopes identified two discrete populations of melanopsin-expressing RGCs, those that coexpress Opn4L and Opn4S and those that express Opn4L only. Recent evidence suggests that pRGCs show a range of anatomical subtypes, which may reflect the functional diversity reported for mouse Opn4-mediated light responses. The distinct isoforms of Opn4 described in this study provide a potential molecular basis for generating this diversity, and it seems likely that their differential expression plays a role in generating the variety of pRGC light responses found in the mammalian retina.

  4. Distinct stages of the translation elongation cycle revealed by sequencing ribosome-protected mRNA fragments

    PubMed Central

    Lareau, Liana F; Hite, Dustin H; Hogan, Gregory J; Brown, Patrick O

    2014-01-01

    During translation elongation, the ribosome ratchets along its mRNA template, incorporating each new amino acid and translocating from one codon to the next. The elongation cycle requires dramatic structural rearrangements of the ribosome. We show here that deep sequencing of ribosome-protected mRNA fragments reveals not only the position of each ribosome but also, unexpectedly, its particular stage of the elongation cycle. Sequencing reveals two distinct populations of ribosome footprints, 28–30 nucleotides and 20–22 nucleotides long, representing translating ribosomes in distinct states, differentially stabilized by specific elongation inhibitors. We find that the balance of small and large footprints varies by codon and is correlated with translation speed. The ability to visualize conformational changes in the ribosome during elongation, at single-codon resolution, provides a new way to study the detailed kinetics of translation and a new probe with which to identify the factors that affect each step in the elongation cycle. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01257.001 PMID:24842990

  5. The functionally distinct hemoglobins of the Arctic spotted wolffish Anarhichas minor.

    PubMed

    Verde, Cinzia; Carratore, Vito; Riccio, Antonio; Tamburrini, Maurizio; Parisi, Elio; Di Prisco, Guido

    2002-09-27

    The Arctic fish Anarhichas minor, a benthic sedentary species, displays high hemoglobin multiplicity. The three major hemoglobins (Hb 1, Hb 2, and Hb 3) show important functional differences in pH and organophosphate regulation, subunit cooperativity, and response of oxygen binding to temperature. Hb 1 and Hb 2 display a low, effector-enhanced Bohr effect and no Root effect. In contrast, Hb 3 displays pronounced Bohr and Root effects, accompanied by strong organophosphate regulation. Hb 1 has the beta (beta(1)) chain in common with Hb 2; Hb 3 and Hb 2 share the alpha (alpha(2)) chain. The amino acid sequences have been established. Several substitutions in crucial positions were observed, such as Cys in place of C-terminal His in the beta(1) chain of Hb 1 and Hb 2. In Hb 3, Val E11 of the beta(2) chain is replaced by Ile. Homology modeling revealed an unusual structure of the Hb 3 binding site of inositol hexakisphoshate. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that only Hb 2 displays higher overall similarity with the major Antarctic hemoglobins. The oxygen transport system of A. minor differs remarkably from those of Antarctic Notothenioidei, indicating distinct evolutionary pathways in the regulatory mechanisms of the fish respiratory system in the two polar environments.

  6. Cerebellar on-beam and lateral inhibition: two functionally distinct circuits.

    PubMed

    Cohen, D; Yarom, Y

    2000-04-01

    Optical imaging of voltage-sensitive dyes in an isolated cerebellum preparation was used to study the spatiotemporal functional organization of the inhibitory systems in the cerebellar cortex. Responses to surface stimulation of the cortex reveal two physiologically distinct inhibitory systems, which we refer to as lateral and on-beam inhibition following classical terminology. Lateral inhibition occurs throughout the area responding to a stimulus, whereas on-beam inhibition is confined to the area directly excited by parallel fibers. The time course of the lateral inhibition is twice as long as that of the on-beam inhibition. Both inhibitory responses increase with stimulus intensity, but the lateral inhibition has a lower threshold, and it saturates at lower stimulus intensity. The amplitude of the on-beam inhibition is linearly related to the excitation at the same location, whereas that of the lateral inhibition is linearly related to the excitation at the center of the beam. Repetitive stimulation is required to activate on-beam inhibition, whereas the same stimulus paradigm reveals prolonged depression of the lateral inhibition. We conclude that lateral inhibition reflects the activation of molecular layer interneurons, and its major role is to increase the excitability of the activated area by disinhibition. The on-beam inhibition most likely reflects Golgi cell inhibition of granule cells. However, Purkinje cell collateral inhibition of Golgi cells cannot be excluded. Both possibilities suggest that the role of the on-beam inhibition is to efficiently modulate, in time and space, the mossy fiber input to the cerebellar cortex.

  7. Mechanisms of Sound Localization in Two Functionally Distinct Regions of the Auditory Cortex.

    PubMed

    Razak, Khaleel A; Yarrow, Stuart; Brewton, Dustin

    2015-12-09

    The auditory cortex is necessary for sound localization. The mechanisms that shape bicoordinate spatial representation in the auditory cortex remain unclear. Here, we addressed this issue by quantifying spatial receptive fields (SRFs) in two functionally distinct cortical regions in the pallid bat. The pallid bat uses echolocation for obstacle avoidance and listens to prey-generated noise to localize prey. Its cortex contains two segregated regions of response selectivity that serve echolocation and localization of prey-generated noise. The main aim of this study was to compare 2D SRFs between neurons in the noise-selective region (NSR) and the echolocation region [frequency-modulated sweep-selective region (FMSR)]. The data reveal the following major differences between these two regions: (1) compared with NSR neurons, SRF properties of FMSR neurons were more strongly dependent on sound level; (2) as a population, NSR neurons represent a broad region of contralateral space, while FMSR selectivity was focused near the midline at sound levels near threshold and expanded considerably with increasing sound levels; and (3) the SRF size and centroid elevation were correlated with the characteristic frequency in the NSR, but not the FMSR. These data suggest different mechanisms of sound localization for two different behaviors. Previously, we reported that azimuth is represented by predictable changes in the extent of activated cortex. The present data indicate how elevation constrains this activity pattern. These data suggest a novel model for bicoordinate spatial representation that is based on the extent of activated cortex resulting from the overlap of binaural and tonotopic maps. Unlike the visual and somatosensory systems, spatial information is not directly represented at the sensory receptor epithelium in the auditory system. Spatial locations are computed by integrating neural binaural properties and frequency-dependent pinna filtering, providing a useful model

  8. Distinct protein domains and expression patterns confer divergent axon guidance functions for Drosophila Robo receptors.

    PubMed

    Spitzweck, Bettina; Brankatschk, Marko; Dickson, Barry J

    2010-02-05

    The orthogonal array of axon pathways in the Drosophila CNS is constructed in part under the control of three Robo family axon guidance receptors: Robo1, Robo2 and Robo3. Each of these receptors is responsible for a distinct set of guidance decisions. To determine the molecular basis for these functional specializations, we used homologous recombination to create a series of 9 "robo swap" alleles: expressing each of the three Robo receptors from each of the three robo loci. We demonstrate that the lateral positioning of longitudinal axon pathways relies primarily on differences in gene regulation, not distinct combinations of Robo proteins as previously thought. In contrast, specific features of the Robo1 and Robo2 proteins contribute to their distinct functions in commissure formation. These specializations allow Robo1 to prevent crossing and Robo2 to promote crossing. These data demonstrate how diversification of expression and structure within a single family of guidance receptors can shape complex patterns of neuronal wiring.

  9. Distinct functions of dispersed GATA factor complexes at an endogenous gene locus.

    PubMed

    Grass, Jeffrey A; Jing, Huie; Kim, Shin-Il; Martowicz, Melissa L; Pal, Saumen; Blobel, Gerd A; Bresnick, Emery H

    2006-10-01

    The reciprocal expression of GATA-1 and GATA-2 during hematopoiesis is an important determinant of red blood cell development. Whereas Gata2 is preferentially transcribed early in hematopoiesis, elevated GATA-1 levels result in GATA-1 occupancy at sites upstream of the Gata2 locus and transcriptional repression. GATA-2 occupies these sites in the transcriptionally active locus, suggesting that a "GATA switch" abrogates GATA-2-mediated positive autoregulation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) coupled with genomic microarray analysis and quantitative ChIP analysis with GATA-1-null cells expressing an estrogen receptor ligand binding domain fusion to GATA-1 revealed additional GATA switches 77 kb upstream of Gata2 and within intron 4 at +9.5 kb. Despite indistinguishable GATA-1 occupancy at -77 kb and +9.5 kb versus other GATA switch sites, GATA-1 functioned uniquely at the different regions. GATA-1 induced histone deacetylation at and near Gata2 but not at the -77 kb region. The -77 kb region, which was DNase I hypersensitive in both active and inactive states, conferred equivalent enhancer activities in GATA-1- and GATA-2-expressing cells. By contrast, the +9.5 kb region exhibited considerably stronger enhancer activity in GATA-2- than in GATA-1-expressing cells, and other GATA switch sites were active only in GATA-1- or GATA-2-expressing cells. Chromosome conformation capture analysis demonstrated higher-order interactions between the -77 kb region and Gata2 in the active and repressed states. These results indicate that dispersed GATA factor complexes function via long-range chromatin interactions and qualitatively distinct activities to regulate Gata2 transcription.

  10. Cellular dynamics of regeneration reveals role of two distinct Pax7 stem cell populations in larval zebrafish muscle repair

    PubMed Central

    Pipalia, Tapan G.; Koth, Jana; Roy, Shukolpa D.; Hammond, Christina L.; Kawakami, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Heterogeneity of stem cells or their niches is likely to influence tissue regeneration. Here we reveal stem/precursor cell diversity during wound repair in larval zebrafish somitic body muscle using time-lapse 3D confocal microscopy on reporter lines. Skeletal muscle with incision wounds rapidly regenerates both slow and fast muscle fibre types. A swift immune response is followed by an increase in cells at the wound site, many of which express the muscle stem cell marker Pax7. Pax7+ cells proliferate and then undergo terminal differentiation involving Myogenin accumulation and subsequent loss of Pax7 followed by elongation and fusion to repair fast muscle fibres. Analysis of pax7a and pax7b transgenic reporter fish reveals that cells expressing each of the duplicated pax7 genes are distinctly localised in uninjured larvae. Cells marked by pax7a only or by both pax7a and pax7b enter the wound rapidly and contribute to muscle wound repair, but each behaves differently. Low numbers of pax7a-only cells form nascent fibres. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that the more numerous pax7b-marked cells frequently fuse to pre-existing fibres, contributing more strongly than pax7a-only cells to repair of damaged fibres. pax7b-marked cells are more often present in rows of aligned cells that are observed to fuse into a single fibre, but more rarely contribute to nascent regenerated fibres. Ablation of a substantial portion of nitroreductase-expressing pax7b cells with metronidazole prior to wounding triggered rapid pax7a-only cell accumulation, but this neither inhibited nor augmented pax7a-only cell-derived myogenesis and thus altered the cellular repair dynamics during wound healing. Moreover, pax7a-only cells did not regenerate pax7b cells, suggesting a lineage distinction. We propose a modified founder cell and fusion-competent cell model in which pax7a-only cells initiate fibre formation and pax7b cells contribute to fibre growth. This newly discovered cellular

  11. Common and Distinctive Functions of the Hippo Effectors Taz and Yap in Skeletal Muscle Stem Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Sun, Congshan; De Mello, Vanessa; Mohamed, Abdalla; Ortuste Quiroga, Huascar P; Garcia-Munoz, Amaya; Al Bloshi, Abdullah; Tremblay, Annie M; von Kriegsheim, Alexander; Collie-Duguid, Elaina; Vargesson, Neil; Matallanas, David; Wackerhage, Henning; Zammit, Peter S

    2017-08-01

    Hippo pathway downstream effectors Yap and Taz play key roles in cell proliferation and regeneration, regulating gene expression especially via Tead transcription factors. To investigate their role in skeletal muscle stem cells, we analyzed Taz in vivo and ex vivo in comparison with Yap. Small interfering RNA knockdown or retroviral-mediated expression of wild-type human or constitutively active TAZ mutants in satellite cells showed that TAZ promoted proliferation, a function shared with YAP. However, at later stages of myogenesis, TAZ also enhanced myogenic differentiation of myoblasts, whereas YAP inhibits such differentiation. Functionally, while muscle growth was mildly affected in Taz (gene Wwtr1(-/-) ) knockout mice, there were no overt effects on regeneration. Conversely, conditional knockout of Yap in satellite cells of Pax7(Cre-ERT2/+) : Yap(fl) °(x/fl) °(x) :Rosa26(Lacz) mice produced a regeneration deficit. To identify potential mechanisms, microarray analysis showed many common TAZ/YAP target genes, but TAZ also regulates some genes independently of YAP, including myogenic genes such as Pax7, Myf5, and Myod1 (ArrayExpress-E-MTAB-5395). Proteomic analysis revealed many novel binding partners of TAZ/YAP in myogenic cells, but TAZ also interacts with proteins distinct from YAP that are often involved in myogenesis and aspects of cytoskeleton organization (ProteomeXchange-PXD005751). Neither TAZ nor YAP bind members of the Wnt destruction complex but both regulated expression of Wnt and Wnt-cross talking genes with known roles in myogenesis. Finally, TAZ operates through Tead4 to enhance myogenic differentiation. In summary, Taz and Yap have overlapping functions in promoting myoblast proliferation but Taz then switches to enhance myogenic differentiation. Stem Cells 2017;35:1958-1972. © 2017 The Authors. The Authors Stem Cells published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  12. On Determinatives and the Category-Function Distinction: A Reply to Brett Reynolds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenchuk, Iryna; Ahmed, Amer

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the arguments made in the article "Determiners, Feline Marsupials, and the Category-Function Distinction: A Critique of ELT Grammars" by Brett Reynolds recently published in the "TESL Canada Journal" (2013). In our response, we demonstrate that the author's arguments are problematic on both…

  13. Guiding Cell Attachment in 3D Microscaffolds Selectively Functionalized with Two Distinct Adhesion Proteins.

    PubMed

    Richter, Benjamin; Hahn, Vincent; Bertels, Sarah; Claus, Tanja K; Wegener, Martin; Delaittre, Guillaume; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher; Bastmeyer, Martin

    2017-02-01

    The combination of three different photoresists into a single direct laser written 3D microscaffold permits functionalization with two bioactive full-length proteins. The cell-instructive microscaffolds consist of a passivating framework equipped with light activatable constituents featuring distinct protein-binding properties. This allows directed cell attachment of epithelial or fibroblast cells in 3D.

  14. Distinct Patterns of Grey Matter Abnormality in High-Functioning Autism and Asperger's Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlonan, Grainne M.; Suckling, John; Wong, Naikei; Cheung, Vinci; Lienenkaemper, Nina; Cheung, Charlton; Chua, Siew E.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Autism exists across a wide spectrum and there is considerable debate as to whether children with Asperger's syndrome, who have normal language milestones, should be considered to comprise a subgroup distinct other from high-functioning children with autism (HFA), who have a history of delayed language development. Magnetic resonance…

  15. Distinct Patterns of Grey Matter Abnormality in High-Functioning Autism and Asperger's Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlonan, Grainne M.; Suckling, John; Wong, Naikei; Cheung, Vinci; Lienenkaemper, Nina; Cheung, Charlton; Chua, Siew E.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Autism exists across a wide spectrum and there is considerable debate as to whether children with Asperger's syndrome, who have normal language milestones, should be considered to comprise a subgroup distinct other from high-functioning children with autism (HFA), who have a history of delayed language development. Magnetic resonance…

  16. Shared and distinctive origins and correlates of adult attachment representations: the developmental organization of romantic functioning.

    PubMed

    Haydon, Katherine C; Collins, W A; Salvatore, Jessica E; Simpson, Jeffry A; Roisman, Glenn I

    2012-01-01

    To test proposals regarding the hierarchical organization of adult attachment, this study examined developmental origins of generalized and romantic attachment representations and their concurrent associations with romantic functioning. Participants (N=112) in a 35-year prospective study completed the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) and Current Relationship Interview (CRI). Two-way analysis of variance tested interactive associations of AAI and CRI security with infant attachment, early parenting quality, preschool ego resiliency, adolescent friendship quality, and adult romantic functioning. Both representations were associated with earlier parenting and core attachment-related romantic behavior, but romantic representations had distinctive links to ego resiliency and relationship-specific romantic behaviors. Attachment representations were independent and did not interactively predict romantic functioning, suggesting that they confer somewhat distinctive benefits for romantic functioning. © 2012 The Authors. Child Development © 2012 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  17. Shared and Distinctive Origins and Correlates of Adult Attachment Representations: The Developmental Organization of Romantic Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Haydon, Katherine C.; Collins, W. Andrew; Salvatore, Jessica E.; Simpson, Jeffry A.; Roisman, Glenn I.

    2012-01-01

    To test proposals regarding the hierarchical organization of adult attachment, this study examined developmental origins of generalized and romantic attachment representations and their concurrent associations with romantic functioning. Participants (N = 112) in a 35-year prospective study completed the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) and Current Relationship Interview (CRI). Two-way ANOVAs tested interactive associations of AAI and CRI security with infant attachment, early parenting quality, preschool ego resiliency, adolescent friendship quality, and adult romantic functioning. Both representations were associated with earlier parenting and core attachment-related romantic behavior, but romantic representations had distinctive links to ego resiliency and relationship-specific romantic behaviors. Attachment representations were independent and did not interactively predict romantic functioning, suggesting that they confer somewhat distinctive benefits for romantic functioning. PMID:22694197

  18. Transgenic Mouse Lines Subdivide External Segment of the Globus Pallidus (GPe) Neurons and Reveal Distinct GPe Output Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Mastro, Kevin J.; Bouchard, Rachel S.; Holt, Hiromi A. K.

    2014-01-01

    Cell-type diversity in the brain enables the assembly of complex neural circuits, whose organization and patterns of activity give rise to brain function. However, the identification of distinct neuronal populations within a given brain region is often complicated by a lack of objective criteria to distinguish one neuronal population from another. In the external segment of the globus pallidus (GPe), neuronal populations have been defined using molecular, anatomical, and electrophysiological criteria, but these classification schemes are often not generalizable across preparations and lack consistency even within the same preparation. Here, we present a novel use of existing transgenic mouse lines, Lim homeobox 6 (Lhx6)–Cre and parvalbumin (PV)–Cre, to define genetically distinct cell populations in the GPe that differ molecularly, anatomically, and electrophysiologically. Lhx6–GPe neurons, which do not express PV, are concentrated in the medial portion of the GPe. They have lower spontaneous firing rates, narrower dynamic ranges, and make stronger projections to the striatum and substantia nigra pars compacta compared with PV–GPe neurons. In contrast, PV–GPe neurons are more concentrated in the lateral portions of the GPe. They have narrower action potentials, deeper afterhyperpolarizations, and make stronger projections to the subthalamic nucleus and parafascicular nucleus of the thalamus. These electrophysiological and anatomical differences suggest that Lhx6–GPe and PV–GPe neurons participate in different circuits with the potential to contribute to different aspects of motor function and dysfunction in disease. PMID:24501350

  19. In vitro reassembly of the ribose ATP-binding cassette transporter reveals a distinct set of transport complexes.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Matthew C; Simon, Michael J; Erramilli, Satchal K; Zhang, Huide; Zaitseva, Jelena; Hermodson, Mark A; Stauffacher, Cynthia V

    2015-02-27

    Bacterial ATP-binding cassette (ABC) importers are primary active transporters that are critical for nutrient uptake. Based on structural and functional studies, ABC importers can be divided into two distinct classes, type I and type II. Type I importers follow a strict alternating access mechanism that is driven by the presence of the substrate. Type II importers accept substrates in a nucleotide-free state, with hydrolysis driving an inward facing conformation. The ribose transporter in Escherichia coli is a tripartite complex consisting of a cytoplasmic ATP-binding cassette protein, RbsA, with fused nucleotide binding domains; a transmembrane domain homodimer, RbsC2; and a periplasmic substrate binding protein, RbsB. To investigate the transport mechanism of the complex RbsABC2, we probed intersubunit interactions by varying the presence of the substrate ribose and the hydrolysis cofactors, ATP/ADP and Mg(2+). We were able to purify a full complex, RbsABC2, in the presence of stable, transition state mimics (ATP, Mg(2+), and VO4); a RbsAC complex in the presence of ADP and Mg(2+); and a heretofore unobserved RbsBC complex in the absence of cofactors. The presence of excess ribose also destabilized complex formation between RbsB and RbsC. These observations suggest that RbsABC2 shares functional traits with both type I and type II importers, as well as possessing unique features, and employs a distinct mechanism relative to other ABC transporters.

  20. Nonclinical and Clinical Enterococcus faecium Strains, but Not Enterococcus faecalis Strains, Have Distinct Structural and Functional Genomic Features

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Bae

    2014-01-01

    Certain strains of Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis contribute beneficially to animal health and food production, while others are associated with nosocomial infections. To determine whether there are structural and functional genomic features that are distinct between nonclinical (NC) and clinical (CL) strains of those species, we analyzed the genomes of 31 E. faecium and 38 E. faecalis strains. Hierarchical clustering of 7,017 orthologs found in the E. faecium pangenome revealed that NC strains clustered into two clades and are distinct from CL strains. NC E. faecium genomes are significantly smaller than CL genomes, and this difference was partly explained by significantly fewer mobile genetic elements (ME), virulence factors (VF), and antibiotic resistance (AR) genes. E. faecium ortholog comparisons identified 68 and 153 genes that are enriched for NC and CL strains, respectively. Proximity analysis showed that CL-enriched loci, and not NC-enriched loci, are more frequently colocalized on the genome with ME. In CL genomes, AR genes are also colocalized with ME, and VF are more frequently associated with CL-enriched loci. Genes in 23 functional groups are also differentially enriched between NC and CL E. faecium genomes. In contrast, differences were not observed between NC and CL E. faecalis genomes despite their having larger genomes than E. faecium. Our findings show that unlike E. faecalis, NC and CL E. faecium strains are equipped with distinct structural and functional genomic features indicative of adaptation to different environments. PMID:24141120

  1. Single Particle Tracking reveals two distinct environments for CD4 receptors at the surface of living T lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Mascalchi, Patrice; Lamort, Anne Sophie; Salome, Laurence; Dumas, Fabrice

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied the diffusion of single CD4 receptors on living lymphocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study reveals that CD4 receptors have either a random or confined diffusion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dynamics of unconfined CD4 receptors was accelerated by a temperature raise. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dynamics of confined CD4 receptors was unchanged by a temperature raise. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our results suggest the existence of two different environments for CD4 receptors. -- Abstract: We investigated the lateral diffusion of the HIV receptor CD4 at the surface of T lymphocytes at 20 Degree-Sign C and 37 Degree-Sign C by Single Particle Tracking using Quantum Dots. We found that the receptors presented two major distinct behaviors that were not equally affected by temperature changes. About half of the receptors showed a random diffusion with a diffusion coefficient increasing upon raising the temperature. The other half of the receptors was permanently or transiently confined with unchanged dynamics on raising the temperature. These observations suggest that two distinct subpopulations of CD4 receptors with different environments are present at the surface of living T lymphocytes.

  2. Distinct representations of numerical and non-numerical order in the human intraparietal sulcus revealed by multivariate pattern recognition.

    PubMed

    Zorzi, Marco; Di Bono, Maria Grazia; Fias, Wim

    2011-05-15

    Neuroimaging studies of numerical cognition have pointed to the horizontal segment of the intraparietal sulcus (hIPS) as the neural correlate of numerical representations in humans. However, the specificity of hIPS for numbers remains controversial. For example, its activation during numerical comparison cannot be distinguished from activation during ordinal judgments on non-numerical sequences such as letters (Fias et al., 2007, J. Neuroscience). Based on the hypothesis that the fine-grained distinction between representations of numerical vs. letter order in hIPS might simply be invisible to conventional fMRI data analysis, we used support vector machines (SVM) to reanalyse the data of Fias et al. (2007). We show that classifiers trained on hIPS voxels can discriminate between number comparison and letter comparison, even though the two tasks produce the same metric of behaviour. Voxels discriminating between the two conditions were consistent across subjects and contribution analysis revealed maps of distinct sets of voxels implicated in the processing of numerical vs. alphabetical order in bilateral hIPS. These results reconcile the neuroimaging data with the neuropsychological evidence suggesting dissociations between numbers and other non-numerical ordered sequences, and demonstrate that multivariate analyses are fundamental to address fine-grained theoretical issues with fMRI studies.

  3. CILAIR-Based Secretome Analysis of Obese Visceral and Subcutaneous Adipose Tissues Reveals Distinctive ECM Remodeling and Inflammation Mediators

    PubMed Central

    Roca-Rivada, Arturo; Belen Bravo, Susana; Pérez-Sotelo, Diego; Alonso, Jana; Isabel Castro, Ana; Baamonde, Iván; Baltar, Javier; Casanueva, Felipe F.; Pardo, María

    2015-01-01

    In the context of obesity, strong evidences support a distinctive pathological contribution of adipose tissue depending on its anatomical site of accumulation. Therefore, subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) has been lately considered metabolically benign compared to visceral fat (VAT), whose location is associated to the risk of developing cardiovascular disease, insulin resistance, and other associated comorbidities. Under the above situation, the chronic local inflammation that characterizes obese adipose tissue, has acquired a major role on the pathogenesis of obesity. In this work, we have analyzed for the first time human obese VAT and SAT secretomes using an improved quantitative proteomic approach for the study of tissue secretomes, Comparison of Isotope-Labeled Amino acid Incorporation Rates (CILAIR). The use of double isotope-labeling-CILAIR approach to analyze VAT and SAT secretomes allowed the identification of location-specific secreted proteins and its differential secretion. Additionally to the very high percentage of identified proteins previously implicated in obesity or in its comorbidities, this approach was revealed as a useful tool for the study of the obese adipose tissue microenvironment including extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling and inflammatory status. The results herein presented reinforce the fact that VAT and SAT depots have distinct features and contribute differentially to metabolic disease. PMID:26198096

  4. An integrative and comparative study of pan-cancer transcriptomes reveals distinct cancer common and specific signatures

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhen; Zhang, Shihua

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the commonalities and specificities across tumor lineages, we perform a systematic pan-cancer transcriptomic study across 6744 specimens. We find six pan-cancer subnetwork signatures which relate to cell cycle, immune response, Sp1 regulation, collagen, muscle system and angiogenesis. Moreover, four pan-cancer subnetwork signatures demonstrate strong prognostic potential. We also characterize 16 cancer type-specific subnetwork signatures which show diverse implications to somatic mutations, somatic copy number aberrations, DNA methylation alterations and clinical outcomes. Furthermore, some of them are strongly correlated with histological or molecular subtypes, indicating their implications with tumor heterogeneity. In summary, we systematically explore the pan-cancer common and cancer type-specific gene subnetwork signatures across multiple cancers, and reveal distinct commonalities and specificities among cancers at transcriptomic level. PMID:27633916

  5. Exome Sequencing Reveals De Novo WDR45 Mutations Causing a Phenotypically Distinct, X-Linked Dominant Form of NBIA

    PubMed Central

    Haack, Tobias B.; Hogarth, Penelope; Kruer, Michael C.; Gregory, Allison; Wieland, Thomas; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Graf, Elisabeth; Sanford, Lynn; Meyer, Esther; Kara, Eleanna; Cuno, Stephan M.; Harik, Sami I.; Dandu, Vasuki H.; Nardocci, Nardo; Zorzi, Giovanna; Dunaway, Todd; Tarnopolsky, Mark; Skinner, Steven; Frucht, Steven; Hanspal, Era; Schrander-Stumpel, Connie; Héron, Delphine; Mignot, Cyril; Garavaglia, Barbara; Bhatia, Kailash; Hardy, John; Strom, Tim M.; Boddaert, Nathalie; Houlden, Henry H.; Kurian, Manju A.; Meitinger, Thomas; Prokisch, Holger; Hayflick, Susan J.

    2012-01-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) is a group of genetic disorders characterized by abnormal iron deposition in the basal ganglia. We report that de novo mutations in WDR45, a gene located at Xp11.23 and encoding a beta-propeller scaffold protein with a putative role in autophagy, cause a distinctive NBIA phenotype. The clinical features include early-onset global developmental delay and further neurological deterioration (parkinsonism, dystonia, and dementia developing by early adulthood). Brain MRI revealed evidence of iron deposition in the substantia nigra and globus pallidus. Males and females are phenotypically similar, an observation that might be explained by somatic mosaicism in surviving males and germline or somatic mutations in females, as well as skewing of X chromosome inactivation. This clinically recognizable disorder is among the more common forms of NBIA, and we suggest that it be named accordingly as beta-propeller protein-associated neurodegeneration. PMID:23176820

  6. Holistic systems biology approaches to molecular mechanisms of human helper T cell differentiation to functionally distinct subsets.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; Lönnberg, T; Lahesmaa, R

    2013-08-01

    Current knowledge of helper T cell differentiation largely relies on data generated from mouse studies. To develop therapeutical strategies combating human diseases, understanding the molecular mechanisms how human naïve T cells differentiate to functionally distinct T helper (Th) subsets as well as studies on human differentiated Th cell subsets is particularly valuable. Systems biology approaches provide a holistic view of the processes of T helper differentiation, enable discovery of new factors and pathways involved and generation of new hypotheses to be tested to improve our understanding of human Th cell differentiation and immune-mediated diseases. Here, we summarize studies where high-throughput systems biology approaches have been exploited to human primary T cells. These studies reveal new factors and signalling pathways influencing T cell differentiation towards distinct subsets, important for immune regulation. Such information provides new insights into T cell biology and into targeting immune system for therapeutic interventions.

  7. Functional Diversification of Hsp40: Distinct J-Protein Functional Requirements for Two Prions Allow for Chaperone-Dependent Prion Selection

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Milan J.; Sporn, Zachary A.; Hines, Justin K.

    2014-01-01

    Yeast prions are heritable amyloid aggregates of functional yeast proteins; their propagation to subsequent cell generations is dependent upon fragmentation of prion protein aggregates by molecular chaperone proteins. Mounting evidence indicates the J-protein Sis1 may act as an amyloid specificity factor, recognizing prion and other amyloid aggregates and enabling Ssa and Hsp104 to act in prion fragmentation. Chaperone interactions with prions, however, can be affected by variations in amyloid-core structure resulting in distinct prion variants or ‘strains’. Our genetic analysis revealed that Sis1 domain requirements by distinct variants of [PSI +] are strongly dependent upon overall variant stability. Notably, multiple strong [PSI +] variants can be maintained by a minimal construct of Sis1 consisting of only the J-domain and glycine/phenylalanine-rich (G/F) region that was previously shown to be sufficient for cell viability and [RNQ +] prion propagation. In contrast, weak [PSI +] variants are lost under the same conditions but maintained by the expression of an Sis1 construct that lacks only the G/F region and cannot support [RNQ +] propagation, revealing mutually exclusive requirements for Sis1 function between these two prions. Prion loss is not due to [PSI +]-dependent toxicity or dependent upon a particular yeast genetic background. These observations necessitate that Sis1 must have at least two distinct functional roles that individual prions differentially require for propagation and which are localized to the glycine-rich domains of the Sis1. Based on these distinctions, Sis1 plasmid-shuffling in a [PSI +]/[RNQ +] strain permitted J-protein-dependent prion selection for either prion. We also found that, despite an initial report to the contrary, the human homolog of Sis1, Hdj1, is capable of [PSI +] prion propagation in place of Sis1. This conservation of function is also prion-variant dependent, indicating that only one of the two Sis1-prion

  8. Functional diversification of hsp40: distinct j-protein functional requirements for two prions allow for chaperone-dependent prion selection.

    PubMed

    Harris, Julia M; Nguyen, Phil P; Patel, Milan J; Sporn, Zachary A; Hines, Justin K

    2014-07-01

    Yeast prions are heritable amyloid aggregates of functional yeast proteins; their propagation to subsequent cell generations is dependent upon fragmentation of prion protein aggregates by molecular chaperone proteins. Mounting evidence indicates the J-protein Sis1 may act as an amyloid specificity factor, recognizing prion and other amyloid aggregates and enabling Ssa and Hsp104 to act in prion fragmentation. Chaperone interactions with prions, however, can be affected by variations in amyloid-core structure resulting in distinct prion variants or 'strains'. Our genetic analysis revealed that Sis1 domain requirements by distinct variants of [PSI+] are strongly dependent upon overall variant stability. Notably, multiple strong [PSI+] variants can be maintained by a minimal construct of Sis1 consisting of only the J-domain and glycine/phenylalanine-rich (G/F) region that was previously shown to be sufficient for cell viability and [RNQ+] prion propagation. In contrast, weak [PSI+] variants are lost under the same conditions but maintained by the expression of an Sis1 construct that lacks only the G/F region and cannot support [RNQ+] propagation, revealing mutually exclusive requirements for Sis1 function between these two prions. Prion loss is not due to [PSI+]-dependent toxicity or dependent upon a particular yeast genetic background. These observations necessitate that Sis1 must have at least two distinct functional roles that individual prions differentially require for propagation and which are localized to the glycine-rich domains of the Sis1. Based on these distinctions, Sis1 plasmid-shuffling in a [PSI+]/[RNQ+] strain permitted J-protein-dependent prion selection for either prion. We also found that, despite an initial report to the contrary, the human homolog of Sis1, Hdj1, is capable of [PSI+] prion propagation in place of Sis1. This conservation of function is also prion-variant dependent, indicating that only one of the two Sis1-prion functions may have

  9. Identification of Functionally Distinct Na-HCO3 Co-Transporters in Colon

    PubMed Central

    Barmeyer, Christian; Ye, Jeff Huaqing; Soroka, Carol; Geibel, Peter; Hingsammer, Lukas M.; Weitgasser, Laurence; Atway, Danny; Geibel, John P.; Binder, Henry J.; Rajendran, Vazhaikkurichi M.

    2013-01-01

    Na-HCO3 cotransport (NBC) regulates intracellular pH (pHi) and HCO3 secretion in rat colon. NBC has been characterized as a 5,5′-diisothiocyanato-2-2′-stilbene (DIDS)-sensitive transporter in several tissues, while the colonic NBC is sensitive to both amiloride and DIDS. In addition, the colonic NBC has been identified as critical for pHi regulation as it is activated by intravesicular acid pH. Molecular studies have identified several characteristically distinct NBC isoforms [i.e. electrogenic (NBCe) and electroneutral (NBCn)] that exhibit tissue specific expression. This study was initiated to establish the molecular identity and specific function of NBC isoforms in rat colon. Northern blot and reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) analyses revealed that electrogenic NBCe1B or NBCe1C (NBCe1B/C) isoform is predominantly expressed in proximal colon, while electroneutral NBCn1C or NBCn1D (NBCn1C/D) is expressed in both proximal and distal colon. Functional analyses revealed that amiloride-insensitive, electrogenic, pH gradient-dependent NBC activity is present only in basolateral membranes of proximal colon. In contrast, amiloride-sensitive, electroneutral, [H+]-dependent NBC activity is present in both proximal and distal colon. Both electrogenic and electroneutral NBC activities are saturable processes with an apparent Km for Na of 7.3 and 4.3 mM, respectively; and are DIDS-sensitive with apparent Ki of 8.9 and 263.8 µM, respectively. In addition to Na-H exchanger isoform-1 (NHE1), pHi acidification is regulated by a HCO3-dependent mechanism that is HOE694-insensitive in colonic crypt glands. We conclude from these data that electroneutral, amiloride-sensitive NBC is encoded by NBCn1C/D and is present in both proximal and distal colon, while NBCe1B/C encodes electrogenic, amiloride-insensitive Na-HCO3 cotransport in proximal colon. We also conclude that NBCn1C/D regulates HCO3-dependent HOE694-insensitive Na-HCO3 cotransport and plays a critical role in p

  10. Distinct herpesvirus resistances and immune responses of three gynogenetic clones of gibel carp revealed by comprehensive transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fan-Xiang; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Qi-Ya; Mou, Cheng-Yan; Li, Zhi; Deng, Yuan-Sheng; Zhou, Li; Gui, Jian-Fang

    2017-07-24

    Gibel carp is an important aquaculture species in China, and a herpesvirus, called as Carassius auratus herpesvirus (CaHV), has hampered the aquaculture development. Diverse gynogenetic clones of gibel carp have been identified or created, and some of them have been used as aquaculture varieties, but their resistances to herpesvirus and the underlying mechanism remain unknown. To reveal their susceptibility differences, we firstly performed herpesvirus challenge experiments in three gynogenetic clones of gibel carp, including the leading variety clone A(+), candidate variety clone F and wild clone H. Three clones showed distinct resistances to CaHV. Moreover, 8772, 8679 and 10,982 differentially expressed unigenes (DEUs) were identified from comparative transcriptomes between diseased individuals and control individuals of clone A(+), F and H, respectively. Comprehensive analysis of the shared DEUs in all three clones displayed common defense pathways to the herpesvirus infection, activating IFN system and suppressing complements. KEGG pathway analysis of specifically changed DEUs in respective clones revealed distinct immune responses to the herpesvirus infection. The DEU numbers identified from clone H in KEGG immune-related pathways, such as "chemokine signaling pathway", "Toll-like receptor signaling pathway" and others, were remarkably much more than those from clone A(+) and F. Several IFN-related genes, including Mx1, viperin, PKR and others, showed higher increases in the resistant clone H than that in the others. IFNphi3, IFI44-like and Gig2 displayed the highest expression in clone F and IRF1 uniquely increased in susceptible clone A(+). In contrast to strong immune defense in resistant clone H, susceptible clone A(+) showed remarkable up-regulation of genes related to apoptosis or death, indicating that clone A(+) failed to resist virus offensive and evidently induced apoptosis or death. Our study is the first attempt to screen distinct resistances and

  11. Structure of the SOCS4-ElonginB/C Complex Reveals a Distinct SOCS Box Interface and the Molecular Basis for SOCS-Dependent EGFR Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Bullock, Alex N.; Rodriguez, Maria C.; Debreczeni, Judit É.; Songyang, Zhou; Knapp, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    Summary Tyrosine kinase signaling is tightly controlled by negative feedback inhibitors including suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS). SOCS assemble as SH2 domain substrate recognition modules in ElonginB/C-cullin ubiquitin ligases. In accordance, SOCS4 reduces STAT3 signaling from EGFR through increased receptor degradation. Variable C-termini in SOCS4–SOCS7 exclude these family members from a SOCS2-type domain arrangement in which a strictly conserved C terminus determines domain packing. The structure of the SOCS4-ElonginC-ElonginB complex reveals a distinct SOCS structural class. The N-terminal ESS helix functionally replaces the CIS/SOCS1–SOCS3 family C terminus in a distinct SH2-SOCS box interface that facilitates further interdomain packing between the extended N- and C-terminal regions characteristic for this subfamily. Using peptide arrays and calorimetry the STAT3 site in EGFR (pY1092) was identified as a high affinity SOCS4 substrate (KD = 0.5 μM) revealing a mechanism for EGFR degradation. SOCS4 also bound JAK2 and KIT with low micromolar affinity, whereas SOCS2 was specific for GH-receptor. PMID:17997974

  12. Distinct functional properties of isoamylase-type starch debranching enzymes in monocot and dicot leaves.

    PubMed

    Facon, Maud; Lin, Qiaohui; Azzaz, Abdelhamid M; Hennen-Bierwagen, Tracie A; Myers, Alan M; Putaux, Jean-Luc; Roussel, Xavier; D'Hulst, Christophe; Wattebled, Fabrice

    2013-11-01

    Isoamylase-type starch debranching enzymes (ISA) play important roles in starch biosynthesis in chloroplast-containing organisms, as shown by the strict conservation of both catalytically active ISA1 and the noncatalytic homolog ISA2. Functional distinctions exist between species, although they are not understood yet. Numerous plant tissues require both ISA1 and ISA2 for normal starch biosynthesis, whereas monocot endosperm and leaf exhibit nearly normal starch metabolism without ISA2. This study took in vivo and in vitro approaches to determine whether organism-specific physiology or evolutionary divergence between monocots and dicots is responsible for distinctions in ISA function. Maize (Zea mays) ISA1 was expressed in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) lacking endogenous ISA1 or lacking both native ISA1 and ISA2. The maize protein functioned in Arabidopsis leaves to support nearly normal starch metabolism in the absence of any native ISA1 or ISA2. Analysis of recombinant enzymes showed that Arabidopsis ISA1 requires ISA2 as a partner for enzymatic function, whereas maize ISA1 was active by itself. The electrophoretic mobility of recombinant and native maize ISA differed, suggestive of posttranslational modifications in vivo. Sedimentation equilibrium measurements showed recombinant maize ISA1 to be a dimer, in contrast to previous gel permeation data that estimated the molecular mass as a tetramer. These data demonstrate that evolutionary divergence between monocots and dicots is responsible for the distinctions in ISA1 function.

  13. Genomic reconstruction of the history of extant populations of India reveals five distinct ancestral components and a complex structure.

    PubMed

    Basu, Analabha; Sarkar-Roy, Neeta; Majumder, Partha P

    2016-02-09

    India, occupying the center stage of Paleolithic and Neolithic migrations, has been underrepresented in genome-wide studies of variation. Systematic analysis of genome-wide data, using multiple robust statistical methods, on (i) 367 unrelated individuals drawn from 18 mainland and 2 island (Andaman and Nicobar Islands) populations selected to represent geographic, linguistic, and ethnic diversities, and (ii) individuals from populations represented in the Human Genome Diversity Panel (HGDP), reveal four major ancestries in mainland India. This contrasts with an earlier inference of two ancestries based on limited population sampling. A distinct ancestry of the populations of Andaman archipelago was identified and found to be coancestral to Oceanic populations. Analysis of ancestral haplotype blocks revealed that extant mainland populations (i) admixed widely irrespective of ancestry, although admixtures between populations was not always symmetric, and (ii) this practice was rapidly replaced by endogamy about 70 generations ago, among upper castes and Indo-European speakers predominantly. This estimated time coincides with the historical period of formulation and adoption of sociocultural norms restricting intermarriage in large social strata. A similar replacement observed among tribal populations was temporally less uniform.

  14. Genomic reconstruction of the history of extant populations of India reveals five distinct ancestral components and a complex structure

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Analabha; Sarkar-Roy, Neeta; Majumder, Partha P.

    2016-01-01

    India, occupying the center stage of Paleolithic and Neolithic migrations, has been underrepresented in genome-wide studies of variation. Systematic analysis of genome-wide data, using multiple robust statistical methods, on (i) 367 unrelated individuals drawn from 18 mainland and 2 island (Andaman and Nicobar Islands) populations selected to represent geographic, linguistic, and ethnic diversities, and (ii) individuals from populations represented in the Human Genome Diversity Panel (HGDP), reveal four major ancestries in mainland India. This contrasts with an earlier inference of two ancestries based on limited population sampling. A distinct ancestry of the populations of Andaman archipelago was identified and found to be coancestral to Oceanic populations. Analysis of ancestral haplotype blocks revealed that extant mainland populations (i) admixed widely irrespective of ancestry, although admixtures between populations was not always symmetric, and (ii) this practice was rapidly replaced by endogamy about 70 generations ago, among upper castes and Indo-European speakers predominantly. This estimated time coincides with the historical period of formulation and adoption of sociocultural norms restricting intermarriage in large social strata. A similar replacement observed among tribal populations was temporally less uniform. PMID:26811443

  15. Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorders Using Temporally-Distinct Resting-State Functional Connectivity Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Chong-Yaw; Yap, Pew-Thian; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI) is dynamic in nature since neural activities constantly change over the time and are dominated by repeating brief activations and deactivations involving many brain regions. Each region participates in multiple brain functions and is part of various functionally distinct but spatially overlapping networks. Functional connectivity computed as correlations over the entire time series always overlooks inter-region interactions that often occur repeatedly and dynamically in time, limiting its application to disease diagnosis. Aims We develop a novel framework that uses short-time activation patterns of brain connectivity to better detect subtle disease-induced disruptions of brain connectivity. A clustering algorithm is first used to temporally decompose R-fMRI time series into distinct clusters with similar spatial distribution of neural activity based on the assumption that functionally distinct networks should be largely temporally distinct since brain states do not simultaneously coexist in general. A Pearson correlation-based functional connectivity network is then constructed for each cluster to allow for better exploration of spatiotemporal dynamics of individual neural activity. To reduce significant inter-subject variability and to remove possible spurious connections, we use a group-constrained sparse regression model to construct a backbone sparse network for each cluster and use it to weight the corresponding Pearson correlation network. Results The proposed method outperforms the conventional static, temporally-dependent fully-connected correlation-based networks by at least 7% on a publicly available autism dataset. We were able to reproduce similar results using data from other centers. Conclusions By combining the advantages of temporal independence and group-constrained sparse regression, our method improves autism diagnosis. PMID:26821773

  16. Profound regulation of neonatal CA1 rat hippocampal GABAergic transmission by functionally distinct kainate receptor populations

    PubMed Central

    Maingret, François; Lauri, Sari E; Taira, Tomi; Isaac, John TR

    2005-01-01

    Neonatal hippocampus exhibits distinct patterns of network activity that are dependent on the interaction between inhibitory and excitatory transmission. Kainate receptors are ideally positioned to regulate this activity by virtue of their ability to regulate presynaptic function in GABAergic interneurones. Indeed, kainate receptors are highly expressed in neonatal hippocampal interneurones, yet the role and mechanisms by which they might regulate neonatal circuitry are unexplored. To address this we investigated the kainate receptor-dependent regulation of GABAergic transmission onto neonatal CA1 pyramidal neurones. Kainate receptor activation produced two distinct opposing effects, a very large increase in the frequency of spontaneous IPSCs, and a robust depression of evoked GABAergic transmission. The up-regulation of spontaneous transmission was due to activation of somatodendritic and axonal receptors while the depression of evoked transmission could be fully accounted for by a direct regulation of GABA release by kainate receptors located at the terminals. None of the effects of kainate receptor agonists were sensitive to GABAB receptor antagonists, nor was there any postsynaptic kainate receptor-dependent effects observed in CA1 pyramidal cells that could account for our findings. Our data demonstrate that kainate receptors profoundly regulate neonatal CA1 GABAergic circuitry by two distinct opposing mechanisms, and indicate that these two effects are mediated by functionally distinct populations of receptors. Thus kainate receptors are strategically located to play a critical role in shaping early hippocampal network activity and by virtue of this have a key role in hippocampal development. PMID:15946969

  17. In Vitro Reassembly of the Ribose ATP-binding Cassette Transporter Reveals a Distinct Set of Transport Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    Clifton, Matthew C.; Simon, Michael J.; Erramilli, Satchal K.; Zhang, Huide; Zaitseva, Jelena; Hermodson, Mark A.; Stauffacher, Cynthia V.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial ATP-binding cassette (ABC) importers are primary active transporters that are critical for nutrient uptake. Based on structural and functional studies, ABC importers can be divided into two distinct classes, type I and type II. Type I importers follow a strict alternating access mechanism that is driven by the presence of the substrate. Type II importers accept substrates in a nucleotide-free state, with hydrolysis driving an inward facing conformation. The ribose transporter in Escherichia coli is a tripartite complex consisting of a cytoplasmic ATP-binding cassette protein, RbsA, with fused nucleotide binding domains; a transmembrane domain homodimer, RbsC2; and a periplasmic substrate binding protein, RbsB. To investigate the transport mechanism of the complex RbsABC2, we probed intersubunit interactions by varying the presence of the substrate ribose and the hydrolysis cofactors, ATP/ADP and Mg2+. We were able to purify a full complex, RbsABC2, in the presence of stable, transition state mimics (ATP, Mg2+, and VO4); a RbsAC complex in the presence of ADP and Mg2+; and a heretofore unobserved RbsBC complex in the absence of cofactors. The presence of excess ribose also destabilized complex formation between RbsB and RbsC. These observations suggest that RbsABC2 shares functional traits with both type I and type II importers, as well as possessing unique features, and employs a distinct mechanism relative to other ABC transporters. PMID:25533465

  18. Distinct Signal Transduction Pathways Downstream of the (P)RR Revealed by Microarray and ChIP-chip Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Zaade, Daniela; Schmitz, Jennifer; Benke, Eileen; Klare, Sabrina; Seidel, Kerstin; Kirsch, Sebastian; Goldin-Lang, Petra; Zollmann, Frank S.; Unger, Thomas; Funke-Kaiser, Heiko

    2013-01-01

    The (pro)renin receptor ((P)RR) signaling is involved in different pathophysiologies ranging from cardiorenal end-organ damage via diabetic retinopathy to tumorigenesis. We have previously shown that the transcription factor promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF) is an adaptor protein of the (P)RR. Furthermore, recent publications suggest that major functions of the (P)RR are mediated ligand-independently by its transmembrane and intracellular part, which acts as an accessory protein of V-ATPases. The transcriptome and recruitmentome downstream of the V-ATPase function and PLZF in the context of the (P)RR are currently unknown. Therefore, we performed a set of microarray and chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-chip experiments using siRNA against the (P)RR, stable overexpression of PLZF, the PLZF translocation inhibitor genistein and the specific V-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin to dissect transcriptional pathways downstream of the (P)RR. We were able to identify distinct and overlapping genetic signatures as well as novel real-time PCR-validated target genes of the different molecular functions of the (P)RR. Moreover, bioinformatic analyses of our data confirm the role of (P)RŔs signal transduction pathways in cardiovascular disease and tumorigenesis. PMID:23469216

  19. Human germline and pan-cancer variomes and their distinct functional profiles.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yang; Karagiannis, Konstantinos; Zhang, Haichen; Dingerdissen, Hayley; Shamsaddini, Amirhossein; Wan, Quan; Simonyan, Vahan; Mazumder, Raja

    2014-10-01

    Identification of non-synonymous single nucleotide variations (nsSNVs) has exponentially increased due to advances in Next-Generation Sequencing technologies. The functional impacts of these variations have been difficult to ascertain because the corresponding knowledge about sequence functional sites is quite fragmented. It is clear that mapping of variations to sequence functional features can help us better understand the pathophysiological role of variations. In this study, we investigated the effect of nsSNVs on more than 17 common types of post-translational modification (PTM) sites, active sites and binding sites. Out of 1 705 285 distinct nsSNVs on 259 216 functional sites we identified 38 549 variations that significantly affect 10 major functional sites. Furthermore, we found distinct patterns of site disruptions due to germline and somatic nsSNVs. Pan-cancer analysis across 12 different cancer types led to the identification of 51 genes with 106 nsSNV affected functional sites found in 3 or more cancer types. 13 of the 51 genes overlap with previously identified Significantly Mutated Genes (Nature. 2013 Oct 17;502(7471)). 62 mutations in these 13 genes affecting functional sites such as DNA, ATP binding and various PTM sites occur across several cancers and can be prioritized for additional validation and investigations.

  20. Profiles of Executive Function Across Children with Distinct Brain Disorders: Traumatic Brain Injury, Stroke, and Brain Tumor.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Gabriel C; Antonini, Tanya N; Anderson, Vicki; Vannatta, Kathryn A; Salley, Christina G; Bigler, Erin D; Taylor, H Gerry; Gerhardt, Cynthia; Rubin, Kenneth; Dennis, Maureen; Lo, Warren; Mackay, Mark T; Gordon, Anne; Hajek Koterba, Christine; Gomes, Alison; Greenham, Mardee; Owen Yeates, Keith

    2017-08-01

    This study examined whether children with distinct brain disorders show different profiles of strengths and weaknesses in executive functions, and differ from children without brain disorder. Participants were children with traumatic brain injury (N=82; 8-13 years of age), arterial ischemic stroke (N=36; 6-16 years of age), and brain tumor (N=74; 9-18 years of age), each with a corresponding matched comparison group consisting of children with orthopedic injury (N=61), asthma (N=15), and classmates without medical illness (N=68), respectively. Shifting, inhibition, and working memory were assessed, respectively, using three Test of Everyday Attention: Children's Version (TEA-Ch) subtests: Creature Counting, Walk-Don't-Walk, and Code Transmission. Comparison groups did not differ in TEA-Ch performance and were merged into a single control group. Profile analysis was used to examine group differences in TEA-Ch subtest scaled scores after controlling for maternal education and age. As a whole, children with brain disorder performed more poorly than controls on measures of executive function. Relative to controls, the three brain injury groups showed significantly different profiles of executive functions. Importantly, post hoc tests revealed that performance on TEA-Ch subtests differed among the brain disorder groups. Results suggest that different childhood brain disorders result in distinct patterns of executive function deficits that differ from children without brain disorder. Implications for clinical practice and future research are discussed. (JINS, 2017, 23, 529-538).

  1. Ectopic expression in the giant fiber system of Drosophila reveals distinct roles for roundabout (Robo), Robo2, and Robo3 in dendritic guidance and synaptic connectivity.

    PubMed

    Godenschwege, Tanja A; Simpson, Julie H; Shan, Xiaoliang; Bashaw, Greg J; Goodman, Corey S; Murphey, Rodney K

    2002-04-15

    The Roundabout (Robo) receptors have been intensively studied for their role in regulating axon guidance in the embryonic nervous system, whereas a role in dendritic guidance has not been explored. In the adult giant fiber system of Drosophila, we have revealed that ectopic Robo expression can regulate the growth and guidance of specific motor neuron dendrites, whereas Robo2 and Robo3 have no effect. We also show that the effect of Robo on dendritic guidance can be suppressed by Commissureless coexpression. Although we confirmed a role for all three Robo receptors in giant fiber axon guidance, the strong axon guidance alterations caused by overexpression of Robo2 or Robo3 have no effect on synaptic connectivity. In contrast, Robo overexpression in the giant fiber seems to directly interfere with synaptic function. We conclude that axon guidance, dendritic guidance, and synaptogenesis are separable processes and that the different Robo family members affect them distinctly.

  2. Key herbivores reveal limited functional redundancy on inshore coral reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, C. L.; van de Leemput, I. A.; Depczynski, M.; Hoey, A. S.; Bellwood, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Marine ecosystems are facing increasing exposure to a range of stressors and declines in critical ecological functions. The likelihood of further loss of functions and resilience is dependent, in part, on the extent of functional redundancy (i.e. the capacity of one species to functionally compensate for the loss of another species) within critical functional groups. We used multiple metrics; species richness, generic richness, abundance and reserve capacity (i.e. the relative number of individuals available to fulfil the function if the numerically dominant species is lost), as indicators to assess the potential functional redundancy of four functional groups of herbivorous fishes (browsers, excavators, grazers and scrapers) in two of the worlds' most intact coral reef ecosystems: the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) and Ningaloo Reef in Western Australia. We found marked variations in potential redundancy among habitats within each reef system and functional groups. Despite negligible fishing of herbivorous fishes, coastal habitats in both reef systems had lower functional redundancy compared to offshore locations for all herbivorous fishes collectively and the four functional groups independently. This pattern was consistent in all four indicators of redundancy. The potential vulnerability of these coastal habitats is highlighted by recent shifts from coral to macroalgal dominance on several coastal reefs of the GBR. Our approach provides a simple yet revealing evaluation of potential functional redundancy. Moreover, it highlights the spatial variation in potential vulnerability and resilience of reef systems.

  3. The function of words: distinct neural correlates for words denoting differently manipulable objects.

    PubMed

    Rueschemeyer, Shirley-Ann; van Rooij, Daan; Lindemann, Oliver; Willems, Roel M; Bekkering, Harold

    2010-08-01

    Recent research indicates that language processing relies on brain areas dedicated to perception and action. For example, processing words denoting manipulable objects has been shown to activate a fronto-parietal network involved in actual tool use. This is suggested to reflect the knowledge the subject has about how objects are moved and used. However, information about how to use an object may be much more central to the conceptual representation of an object than information about how to move an object. Therefore, there may be much more fine-grained distinctions between objects on the neural level, especially related to the usability of manipulable objects. In the current study, we investigated whether a distinction can be made between words denoting (1) objects that can be picked up to move (e.g., volumetrically manipulable objects: bookend, clock) and (2) objects that must be picked up to use (e.g., functionally manipulable objects: cup, pen). The results show that functionally manipulable words elicit greater levels of activation in the fronto-parietal sensorimotor areas than volumetrically manipulable words. This suggests that indeed a distinction can be made between different types of manipulable objects. Specifically, how an object is used functionally rather than whether an object can be displaced with the hand is reflected in semantic representations in the brain.

  4. Distinct circuit-dependent functions of presynaptic neurexin-3 at GABAergic and glutamatergic synapses

    PubMed Central

    Aoto, Jason; Földy, Csaba; Ilcus, Silviana Maria Ciurea; Tabuchi, Katsuhiko; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    α- and β-neurexins are presynaptic cell-adhesion molecules whose general importance for synaptic transmission is well documented. The specific functions of neurexins, however, remain largely unknown because no conditional neurexin knockouts are available, and because targeting all α- and β-neurexins produced by a particular gene is challenging. Using newly-generated constitutive and conditional knockout mice that target all neurexin-3α and -3β isoforms, we here show that neurexin-3 is differentially required for distinct synaptic functions in different brain regions. Specifically, we find that in cultured neurons and acute slices of the hippocampus, presynaptic neurexin-3 mediates trans-synaptic regulation of postsynaptic AMPA-receptors via its extracellular sequences. In cultured neurons and acute slices of the olfactory bulb, however, presynaptic neurexin-3 is selectively required for GABA release by a mechanism involving its intracellular sequences. Thus, our data demonstrate that neurexin-3 performs distinct essential pre- or postsynaptic functions in different brain regions by distinct mechanisms. PMID:26030848

  5. Structure-Function from the Outside In: Long-range Tertiary Contacts in RNA Exhibit Distinct Catalytic Roles†

    PubMed Central

    Benz-Moy, Tara L.; Herschlag, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The conserved catalytic core of the Tetrahymena group I ribozyme is encircled by peripheral elements. We have carried out a detailed structure-function study of the five long-range tertiary contacts that fasten these distal elements together. Mutational ablation of each of the tertiary contacts destabilizes the folded ribozyme, indicating a role of the peripheral elements in overall stability. Once folded, three of the five tertiary contact mutants exhibit defects in overall catalysis that range from 20- to 100-fold. These and the subsequent results indicate that the structural ring of peripheral elements does not act as a unitary element; rather, individual connections have distinct roles as further revealed by kinetic and thermodynamic dissection of the individual reaction steps. Ablation of P14 or the metal ion core/metal ion core receptor (MC/MCR) destabilizes docking of the substrate-containing P1 helix into tertiary interactions with the ribozyme’s conserved core. In contrast, ablation of the L9/P5 contact weakens binding of the guanosine nucleophile by slowing its association, without affecting P1 docking. The P13 and tetraloop/tetraloop receptor (TL/TLR) mutations had little functional effect and small, local structural changes, as revealed by hydroxyl radical footprinting, whereas the P14, MC/MCR, and L9/P5 mutants show structural changes distal from the mutation site. These changes extended into regions of the catalytic core involved in docking or guanosine binding. Thus, distinct allosteric pathways couple the long-range tertiary contacts to functional sites within the conserved core. This modular functional specialization may represent a fundamental strategy in RNA structure-function interrelationships. PMID:21815635

  6. Revealing quantum correlation by negativity of the Wigner function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghiabadi, Razieh; Akhtarshenas, Seyed Javad; Sarbishaei, Mohsen

    2016-05-01

    We analyze two two-mode continuous variable separable states with the same marginal states. We adopt the definition of classicality in the form of well-defined positive Wigner function describing the state and find that although the states possess positive local Wigner functions, they exhibit negative Wigner functions for the global states. Using the negativity of Wigner function as an indicator of nonclassicality, we show that despite these states possess different negativities of the Wigner function, they do not reveal this difference as phase space nonclassicalities such as negativity of the Mandel Q parameter or quadrature squeezing. We then concentrate on quantum correlation of these states and show that quantum discord and local quantum uncertainty, as two well-defined measures of quantum correlation, manifest the difference between negativity of the Wigner functions. The non-Gaussianity of these states is also examined and show that the difference in behavior of their non-Gaussianity is the same as the difference between negativity of their Wigner functions. We also investigate the influence of correlation rank criterion and find that when the states can be produced locally from classical states, the Wigner functions cannot reveal their quantum correlations.

  7. Characterization of traumatic brain injury in human brains reveals distinct cellular and molecular changes in contusion and pericontusion.

    PubMed

    Harish, Gangadharappa; Mahadevan, Anita; Pruthi, Nupur; Sreenivasamurthy, Sreelakshmi K; Puttamallesh, Vinuth N; Keshava Prasad, Thottethodi Subrahmanya; Shankar, Susarla Krishna; Srinivas Bharath, Muchukunte Mukunda

    2015-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) contributes to fatalities and neurological disabilities worldwide. While primary injury causes immediate damage, secondary events contribute to long-term neurological defects. Contusions (Ct) are primary injuries correlated with poor clinical prognosis, and can expand leading to delayed neurological deterioration. Pericontusion (PC) (penumbra), the region surrounding Ct, can also expand with edema, increased intracranial pressure, ischemia, and poor clinical outcome. Analysis of Ct and PC can therefore assist in understanding the pathobiology of TBI and its management. This study on human TBI brains noted extensive neuronal, astroglial and inflammatory changes, alterations in mitochondrial, synaptic and oxidative markers, and associated proteomic profile, with distinct differences in Ct and PC. While Ct displayed petechial hemorrhages, thrombosis, inflammation, neuronal pyknosis, and astrogliosis, PC revealed edema, vacuolation of neuropil, axonal loss, and dystrophic changes. Proteomic analysis demonstrated altered immune response, synaptic, and mitochondrial dysfunction, among others, in Ct, while PC displayed altered regulation of neurogenesis and cytoskeletal architecture, among others. TBI brains displayed oxidative damage, glutathione depletion, mitochondrial dysfunction, and loss of synaptic proteins, with these changes being more profound in Ct. We suggest that analysis of markers specific to Ct and PC may be valuable in the evaluation of TBI pathobiology and therapeutics. We have characterized the primary injury in human traumatic brain injury (TBI). Contusions (Ct) - the injury core displayed hemorrhages, inflammation, and astrogliosis, while the surrounding pericontusion (PC) revealed edema, vacuolation, microglial activation, axonal loss, and dystrophy. Proteomic analysis demonstrated altered immune response, synaptic and mitochondrial dysfunction in Ct, and altered regulation of neurogenesis and cytoskeletal architecture in

  8. The contribution of Islet1-expressing splanchnic mesoderm cells to distinct branchiomeric muscles reveals significant heterogeneity in head muscle development.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Elisha; Monovich, Amir; Tirosh-Finkel, Libbat; Harrelson, Zachary; Rousso, Tal; Rinon, Ariel; Harel, Itamar; Evans, Sylvia M; Tzahor, Eldad

    2008-02-01

    During embryogenesis, paraxial mesoderm cells contribute skeletal muscle progenitors, whereas cardiac progenitors originate in the lateral splanchnic mesoderm (SpM). Here we focus on a subset of the SpM that contributes to the anterior or secondary heart field (AHF/SHF), and lies adjacent to the cranial paraxial mesoderm (CPM), the precursors for the head musculature. Molecular analyses in chick embryos delineated the boundaries between the CPM, undifferentiated SpM progenitors of the AHF/SHF, and differentiating cardiac cells. We then revealed the regionalization of branchial arch mesoderm: CPM cells contribute to the proximal region of the myogenic core, which gives rise to the mandibular adductor muscle. SpM cells contribute to the myogenic cells in the distal region of the branchial arch that later form the intermandibular muscle. Gene expression analyses of these branchiomeric muscles in chick uncovered a distinct molecular signature for both CPM- and SpM-derived muscles. Islet1 (Isl1) is expressed in the SpM/AHF and branchial arch in both chick and mouse embryos. Lineage studies using Isl1-Cre mice revealed the significant contribution of Isl1(+) cells to ventral/distal branchiomeric (stylohyoid, mylohyoid and digastric) and laryngeal muscles. By contrast, the Isl1 lineage contributes to mastication muscles (masseter, pterygoid and temporalis) to a lesser extent, with virtually no contribution to intrinsic and extrinsic tongue muscles or extraocular muscles. In addition, in vivo activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway in chick embryos resulted in marked inhibition of Isl1, whereas inhibition of this pathway increased Isl1 expression. Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, the contribution of Isl1(+) SpM cells to a subset of branchiomeric skeletal muscles.

  9. Proteomics Analysis Reveals Distinct Corona Composition on Magnetic Nanoparticles with Different Surface Coatings: Implications for Interactions with Primary Human Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Carmen; Pernemalm, Maria; Kohonen, Pekka; Laurent, Sophie; Hultenby, Kjell; Vahter, Marie; Lehtiö, Janne; Toprak, Muhammet S; Fadeel, Bengt

    2015-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have emerged as promising contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. The influence of different surface coatings on the biocompatibility of SPIONs has been addressed, but the potential impact of the so-called corona of adsorbed proteins on the surface of SPIONs on their biological behavior is less well studied. Here, we determined the composition of the plasma protein corona on silica-coated versus dextran-coated SPIONs using mass spectrometry-based proteomics approaches. Notably, gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis revealed distinct protein corona compositions for the two different SPIONs. Relaxivity of silica-coated SPIONs was modulated by the presence of a protein corona. Moreover, the viability of primary human monocyte-derived macrophages was influenced by the protein corona on silica-coated, but not dextran-coated SPIONs, and the protein corona promoted cellular uptake of silica-coated SPIONs, but did not affect internalization of dextran-coated SPIONs.

  10. Comparative analysis of ITS1 nucleotide sequence reveals distinct genetic difference between Brugia malayi from Northeast Borneo and Thailand.

    PubMed

    Fong, Mun-Yik; Noordin, Rahmah; Lau, Yee-Ling; Cheong, Fei-Wen; Yunus, Muhammad Hafiznur; Idris, Zulkarnain Md

    2013-01-01

    Brugia malayi is one of the parasitic worms which causes lymphatic filariasis in humans. Its geographical distribution includes a large part of Asia. Despite its wide distribution, very little is known about the genetic variation and molecular epidemiology of this species. In this study, the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) nucleotide sequences of B. malayi from microfilaria-positive human blood samples in Northeast Borneo Island were determined, and compared with published ITS1 sequences of B. malayi isolated from cats and humans in Thailand. Multiple alignment analysis revealed that B. malayi ITS1 sequences from Northeast Borneo were more similar to each other than to those from Thailand. Phylogenetic trees inferred using Neighbour-Joining and Maximum Parsimony methods showed similar topology, with 2 distinct B. malayi clusters. The first cluster consisted of Northeast Borneo B. malayi isolates, whereas the second consisted of the Thailand isolates. The findings of this study suggest that B. malayi in Borneo Island has diverged significantly from those of mainland Asia, and this has implications for the diagnosis of B. malayi infection across the region using ITS1-based molecular techniques.

  11. Long-term In Vivo Calcium Imaging of Astrocytes Reveals Distinct Cellular Compartment Responses to Sensory Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Stobart, Jillian L; Ferrari, Kim David; Barrett, Matthew J P; Stobart, Michael J; Looser, Zoe J; Saab, Aiman S; Weber, Bruno

    2016-11-19

    Localized, heterogeneous calcium transients occur throughout astrocytes, but the characteristics and long-term stability of these signals, particularly in response to sensory stimulation, remain unknown. Here, we used a genetically encoded calcium indicator and an activity-based image analysis scheme to monitor astrocyte calcium activity in vivo. We found that different subcellular compartments (processes, somata, and endfeet) displayed distinct signaling characteristics. Closer examination of individual signals showed that sensory stimulation elevated the number of specific types of calcium peaks within astrocyte processes and somata, in a cortical layer-dependent manner, and that the signals became more synchronous upon sensory stimulation. Although mice genetically lacking astrocytic IP3R-dependent calcium signaling (Ip3r2-/-) had fewer signal peaks, the response to sensory stimulation was sustained, suggesting other calcium pathways are also involved. Long-term imaging of astrocyte populations revealed that all compartments reliably responded to stimulation over several months, but that the location of the response within processes may vary. These previously unknown characteristics of subcellular astrocyte calcium signals provide new insights into how astrocytes may encode local neuronal circuit activity. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Four tropical, closely related fern species belonging to the genus Adiantum L. are genetically distinct as revealed by ISSR fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Korpelainen, Helena; de Britto, John; Doublet, Jérémy; Pravin, Sahaya

    2005-11-01

    The level and pattern of genetic variation was analyzed in four species of the fern genus Adiantum L., A. hispidulum Sw., A. incisum Forrsk., A. raddianum C.Presl, and A. zollingeri Mett. ex Kuhn, originating from South India, using the ISSR fingerprinting method. The populations of Adiantum possessed a considerable level of genetic variation, the diversity indices ranging from 0.284 to 0.464. Only 12% of the ISSR markers found were restricted to one species only, and 54% were detected in all four species. The analysis of molecular variance revealed that 71.1% of variation was present within populations. The proportion of variation detected among species was only 18.5% while the proportion of variation among populations within species equalled 10.4%. Despite the low level of intrageneric differentiation, the discriminant analysis and clustering of genetic distances indicated that the four Adiantum species are genetically distinct. The F(ST) values calculated for the species were low, varying from 0.089 to 0.179. No linkage disequilibrium was detected between the loci. Such low level of differentiation among populations and the presence of linkage equilibrium reflect that the life history of Adiantum ferns apparently involves common or relatively common sexuality, effective wind-dispersal of spores and outcrossing.

  13. Single-cell RNA-seq reveals distinct injury responses in different types of DRG sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ganlu; Huang, Kevin; Hu, Youjin; Du, Guizhen; Xue, Zhigang; Zhu, Xianmin; Fan, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury leads to various injury-induced responses in sensory neurons including physiological pain, neuronal cell death, and nerve regeneration. In this study, we performed single-cell RNA-sequencing (scRNA-seq) analysis of mouse nonpeptidergic nociceptors (NP), peptidergic nociceptors (PEP), and large myelinated sensory neurons (LM) under both control and injury conditions at 3 days after sciatic nerve transection (SNT). After performing principle component and weighted gene co-expression network analysis, we categorized dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons into different subtypes and discovered co-regulated injury-response genes including novel regeneration associated genes (RAGs) in association with neuronal development, protein translation and cytoplasm transportation. In addition, we found significant up-regulation of the genes associated with cell death such as Pdcd2 in a subset of NP neurons after axotomy, implicating their actions in neuronal cell death upon nerve injury. Our study revealed the distinctive and sustained heterogeneity of transcriptomic responses to injury at single neuron level, implicating the involvement of different gene regulatory networks in nerve regeneration, neuronal cell death and neuropathy in different population of DRG neurons. PMID:27558660

  14. Characterization of CLL exosomes reveals a distinct microRNA signature and enhanced secretion by activation of BCR signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Yuh-Ying; Ozer, Hatice Gulcin; Lehman, Amy M.; Maddocks, Kami; Yu, Lianbo; Byrd, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple studies show that chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells are heavily dependent on their microenvironment for survival. Communication between CLL cells and the microenvironment is mediated through direct cell contact, soluble factors, and extracellular vesicles. Exosomes are small particles enclosed with lipids, proteins, and small RNAs that can convey biological materials to surrounding cells. Our data herein demonstrate that CLL cells release significant amounts of exosomes in plasma that exhibit abundant CD37, CD9, and CD63 expression. Our work also pinpoints the regulation of B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling in the release of CLL exosomes: BCR activation by α-immunoglobulin (Ig)M induces exosome secretion, whereas BCR inactivation via ibrutinib impedes α-IgM-stimulated exosome release. Moreover, analysis of serial plasma samples collected from CLL patients on an ibrutinib clinical trial revealed that exosome plasma concentration was significantly decreased following ibrutinib therapy. Furthermore, microRNA (miR) profiling of plasma-derived exosomes identified a distinct exosome microRNA signature, including miR-29 family, miR-150, miR-155, and miR-223 that have been associated with CLL disease. Interestingly, expression of exosome miR-150 and miR-155 increases with BCR activation. In all, this study successfully characterized CLL exosomes, demonstrated the control of BCR signaling in the release of CLL exosomes, and uncovered a disease-relevant exosome microRNA profile. PMID:25833959

  15. Characterization of CLL exosomes reveals a distinct microRNA signature and enhanced secretion by activation of BCR signaling.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Yuh-Ying; Ozer, Hatice Gulcin; Lehman, Amy M; Maddocks, Kami; Yu, Lianbo; Johnson, Amy J; Byrd, John C

    2015-05-21

    Multiple studies show that chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells are heavily dependent on their microenvironment for survival. Communication between CLL cells and the microenvironment is mediated through direct cell contact, soluble factors, and extracellular vesicles. Exosomes are small particles enclosed with lipids, proteins, and small RNAs that can convey biological materials to surrounding cells. Our data herein demonstrate that CLL cells release significant amounts of exosomes in plasma that exhibit abundant CD37, CD9, and CD63 expression. Our work also pinpoints the regulation of B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling in the release of CLL exosomes: BCR activation by α-immunoglobulin (Ig)M induces exosome secretion, whereas BCR inactivation via ibrutinib impedes α-IgM-stimulated exosome release. Moreover, analysis of serial plasma samples collected from CLL patients on an ibrutinib clinical trial revealed that exosome plasma concentration was significantly decreased following ibrutinib therapy. Furthermore, microRNA (miR) profiling of plasma-derived exosomes identified a distinct exosome microRNA signature, including miR-29 family, miR-150, miR-155, and miR-223 that have been associated with CLL disease. Interestingly, expression of exosome miR-150 and miR-155 increases with BCR activation. In all, this study successfully characterized CLL exosomes, demonstrated the control of BCR signaling in the release of CLL exosomes, and uncovered a disease-relevant exosome microRNA profile.

  16. Phylogeography of lions (Panthera leo ssp.) reveals three distinct taxa and a late Pleistocene reduction in genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Ross; Shapiro, Beth; Barnes, Ian; Ho, Simon Y W; Burger, Joachim; Yamaguchi, Nobuyuki; Higham, Thomas F G; Wheeler, H Todd; Rosendahl, Wilfried; Sher, Andrei V; Sotnikova, Marina; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Baryshnikov, Gennady F; Martin, Larry D; Harington, C Richard; Burns, James A; Cooper, Alan

    2009-04-01

    Lions were the most widespread carnivores in the late Pleistocene, ranging from southern Africa to the southern USA, but little is known about the evolutionary relationships among these Pleistocene populations or the dynamics that led to their extinction. Using ancient DNA techniques, we obtained mitochondrial sequences from 52 individuals sampled across the present and former range of lions. Phylogenetic analysis revealed three distinct clusters: (i) modern lions, Panthera leo; (ii) extinct Pleistocene cave lions, which formed a homogeneous population extending from Europe across Beringia (Siberia, Alaska and western Canada); and (iii) extinct American lions, which formed a separate population south of the Pleistocene ice sheets. The American lion appears to have become genetically isolated around 340 000 years ago, despite the apparent lack of significant barriers to gene flow with Beringian populations through much of the late Pleistocene. We found potential evidence of a severe population bottleneck in the cave lion during the previous interstadial, sometime after 48 000 years, adding to evidence from bison, mammoths, horses and brown bears that megafaunal populations underwent major genetic alterations throughout the last interstadial, potentially presaging the processes involved in the subsequent end-Pleistocene mass extinctions.

  17. Lack of Energy: An Important and Distinct Component of HIV-Related Fatigue and Daytime Function

    PubMed Central

    Aouizerat, Bradley E.; Gay, Caryl L.; Lerdal, Anners; Portillo, Carmen J.; Lee, Kathryn A.

    2012-01-01

    Context Fatigue is a prevalent symptom among adults living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). There is increasing evidence that fatigue and energy are related, yet distinct constructs. Although HIV-related fatigue has been well studied, little is known about perceived energy and how it relates to fatigue, individual characteristics, and other symptoms. Objectives To describe the experience of perceived energy in adults with HIV and evaluate its relationship to demographic and clinical characteristics as well as symptoms of fatigue, sleep disturbance, anxiety, depression, and daytime function. Methods The design was descriptive, comparative, and correlational. The sample of 318 adults with HIV completed a demographic questionnaire, the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale, and measures of fatigue, sleep disturbance, anxiety, depressive symptoms, and daytime function. Medical records were reviewed for disease and treatment data. Participants who reported a lack of energy were compared with those who did not on demographic, clinical, and symptom variables. Regression models of perceived energy and its interference with daytime function also were evaluated. Results Perceived lack of energy was highly prevalent (65%) and more strongly related to interference with daytime function than more general measures of fatigue severity, even when controlling for other characteristics and symptoms. Like other aspects of fatigue, lack of energy was associated with sleep disturbance, anxiety, and depressive symptoms. Lack of energy was more strongly related to morning fatigue than to evening fatigue. Conclusion Lack of energy interferes with daytime function and is not just the inverse of fatigue but a distinct perception that differs from fatigue. PMID:22917712

  18. Complex pectin metabolism by gut bacteria reveals novel catalytic functions

    PubMed Central

    Baslé, Arnaud; Gray, Joseph; Venditto, Immacolata; Briggs, Jonathon; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Labourel, Aurore; Terrapon, Nicolas; Buffetto, Fanny; Nepogodiev, Sergey; Xiao, Yao; Field, Robert A.; Zhu, Yanping; O’Neil, Malcolm A.; Urbanowicz, Breeana R.; York, William S.; Davies, Gideon J.; Abbott, D. Wade; Ralet, Marie-Christine; Martens, Eric C.; Henrissat, Bernard; Gilbert, Harry J.

    2017-01-01

    Carbohydrate polymers drive microbial diversity in the human gut microbiota. It is unclear, however, whether bacterial consortia or single organisms are required to depolymerize highly complex glycans. Here we show that the gut bacterium Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron utilizes the most structurally complex glycan known; the plant pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan-II, cleaving all but one of its 21 distinct glycosidic linkages. We show that rhamnogalacturonan-II side-chain and backbone deconstruction are coordinated, to overcome steric constraints, and that degradation reveals previously undiscovered enzyme families and novel catalytic activities. The degradome informs revision of the current structural model of RG-II and highlights how individual gut bacteria orchestrate manifold enzymes to metabolize the most challenging glycans in the human diet. PMID:28329766

  19. Processing of different types of social threat in shyness: Preliminary findings of distinct functional neural connectivity.

    PubMed

    Tang, Alva; Beaton, Elliott A; Tatham, Erica; Schulkin, Jay; Hall, Geoffrey B; Schmidt, Louis A

    2016-01-01

    Current theory suggests that the processing of different types of threat is supported by distinct neural networks. Here we tested whether there are distinct neural correlates associated with different types of threat processing in shyness. Using fMRI and multivariate techniques, we compared neural responses and functional connectivity during the processing of imminent (i.e., congruent angry/angry face pairs) and ambiguous (i.e., incongruent angry/neutral face pairs) social threat in young adults selected for high and low shyness. To both types of threat processing, non-shy adults recruited a right medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) network encompassing nodes of the default mode network involved in automatic emotion regulation, whereas shy adults recruited a right dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) network encompassing nodes of the frontoparietal network that instantiate active attentional and cognitive control. Furthermore, in shy adults, the mPFC interacted with the dACC network for ambiguous threat, but with a distinct network encompassing nodes of the salience network for imminent threat. These preliminary results expand our understanding of right mPFC function associated with temperamental shyness. They also provide initial evidence for differential neural networks associated with shy and non-shy profiles in the context of different types of social threat processing.

  20. RNA-seq Analysis Reveals Unique Transcriptome Signatures in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients with Distinct Autoantibody Specificities

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Richa; Chauhan, Sudhir Kumar; Singh, Vikas Vikram; Rai, Madhukar; Rai, Geeta

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients exhibit immense heterogeneity which is challenging from the diagnostic perspective. Emerging high throughput sequencing technologies have been proved to be a useful platform to understand the complex and dynamic disease processes. SLE patients categorised based on autoantibody specificities are reported to have differential immuno-regulatory mechanisms. Therefore, we performed RNA-seq analysis to identify transcriptomics of SLE patients with distinguished autoantibody specificities. The SLE patients were segregated into three subsets based on the type of autoantibodies present in their sera (anti-dsDNA+ group with anti-dsDNA autoantibody alone; anti-ENA+ group having autoantibodies against extractable nuclear antigens (ENA) only, and anti-dsDNA+ENA+ group having autoantibodies to both dsDNA and ENA). Global transcriptome profiling for each SLE patients subsets was performed using Illumina® Hiseq-2000 platform. The biological relevance of dysregulated transcripts in each SLE subsets was assessed by ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) software. We observed that dysregulation in the transcriptome expression pattern was clearly distinct in each SLE patients subsets. IPA analysis of transcripts uniquely expressed in different SLE groups revealed specific biological pathways to be affected in each SLE subsets. Multiple cytokine signaling pathways were specifically dysregulated in anti-dsDNA+ patients whereas Interferon signaling was predominantly dysregulated in anti-ENA+ patients. In anti-dsDNA+ENA+ patients regulation of actin based motility by Rho pathway was significantly affected. The granulocyte gene signature was a common feature to all SLE subsets; however, anti-dsDNA+ group showed relatively predominant expression of these genes. Dysregulation of Plasma cell related transcripts were higher in anti-dsDNA+ and anti-ENA+ patients as compared to anti-dsDNA+ ENA+. Association of specific canonical pathways with the uniquely

  1. The hidden anatomy of paranasal sinuses reveals biogeographically distinct morphotypes in the nine-banded armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus)

    PubMed Central

    Hautier, Lionel; de Thoisy, Benoit; Delsuc, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    pair of caudal frontal sinuses constitutes an unexpected morphological diagnostic feature for this potentially distinct species. Our results demonstrate the benefits of studying overlooked internal morphological structures in supposedly cryptic species revealed by molecular data. It also illustrates the under-exploited potential of the highly variable paranasal sinuses of armadillos for systematic studies. PMID:28828240

  2. Functional diversity of Robo receptor immunoglobulin domains promotes distinct axon guidance decisions.

    PubMed

    Evans, Timothy A; Bashaw, Greg J

    2010-03-23

    Recognition molecules of the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily control axon guidance in the developing nervous system. Ig-like domains are among the most widely represented protein domains in the human genome, and the number of Ig superfamily proteins is strongly correlated with cellular complexity. In Drosophila, three Roundabout (Robo) Ig superfamily receptors respond to their common Slit ligand to regulate axon guidance at the midline: Robo and Robo2 mediate midline repulsion, Robo2 and Robo3 control longitudinal pathway selection, and Robo2 can promote midline crossing. How these closely related receptors mediate distinct guidance functions is not understood. We report that the differential functions of Robo2 and Robo3 are specified by their ectodomains and do not reflect differences in cytoplasmic signaling. Functional modularity of Robo2's ectodomain facilitates multiple guidance decisions: Ig1 and Ig3 of Robo2 confer lateral positioning activity, whereas Ig2 confers promidline crossing activity. Robo2's distinct functions are not dependent on greater Slit affinity but are instead due in part to differences in multimerization and receptor-ligand stoichiometry conferred by Robo2's Ig domains. Together, our findings suggest that diverse responses to the Slit guidance cue are imparted by intrinsic structural differences encoded in the extracellular Ig domains of the Robo receptors.

  3. Functionally Distinct Tendons From Elastin Haploinsufficient Mice Exhibit Mild Stiffening and Tendon-Specific Structural Alteration.

    PubMed

    Eekhoff, Jeremy D; Fang, Fei; Kahan, Lindsey G; Espinosa, Gabriela; Cocciolone, Austin J; Wagenseil, Jessica E; Mecham, Robert P; Lake, Spencer P

    2017-11-01

    Elastic fibers are present in low quantities in tendon, where they are located both within fascicles near tenocytes and more broadly in the interfascicular matrix (IFM). While elastic fibers have long been known to be significant in the mechanics of elastin-rich tissue (i.e., vasculature, skin, lungs), recent studies have suggested a mechanical role for elastic fibers in tendons that is dependent on specific tendon function. However, the exact contribution of elastin to properties of different types of tendons (e.g., positional, energy-storing) remains unknown. Therefore, this study purposed to evaluate the role of elastin in the mechanical properties and collagen alignment of functionally distinct supraspinatus tendons (SSTs) and Achilles tendons (ATs) from elastin haploinsufficient (HET) and wild type (WT) mice. Despite the significant decrease in elastin in HET tendons, a slight increase in linear stiffness of both tendons was the only significant mechanical effect of elastin haploinsufficiency. Additionally, there were significant changes in collagen nanostructure and subtle alteration to collagen alignment in the AT but not the SST. Hence, elastin may play only a minor role in tendon mechanical properties. Alternatively, larger changes to tendon mechanics may have been mitigated by developmental compensation of HET tendons and/or the role of elastic fibers may be less prominent in smaller mouse tendons compared to the larger bovine and human tendons evaluated in previous studies. Further research will be necessary to fully elucidate the influence of various elastic fiber components on structure-function relationships in functionally distinct tendons.

  4. Simple Separation of Functionally Distinct Populations of Lamin-Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Berk, Jason M; Wilson, Katherine L

    2016-01-01

    The inner membrane of the nuclear envelope (NE) is home to hundreds of integral membrane proteins (NE transmembrane proteins, "NETs") with conserved or tissue-specific roles in genome organization and nuclear function. Nearly all characterized NETs bind A- or B-type lamins directly. However, hundreds of NETs remain uncharacterized, collectively posing an enormous gap that must be bridged to understand nuclear function and genome biology. We provide technically simple protocols for the separation and recovery of functionally distinct populations of NETs and A-type lamins. This protocol was developed for emerin, an inner nuclear membrane protein that binds lamins and barrier-to-autointegration factor (BANF1) as a component of nuclear lamina structure, and has diverse roles in nuclear assembly, signaling, and gene regulation. This protocol separates easily solubilized ("easy") populations of nuclear lamina proteins (emerin, lamin A, BAF) from "sonication-dependent" populations. Depending on cell type, the "easy" and "sonication-dependent" fractions each contain up to about half the available emerin, A-type lamins, and BAF, whereas B-type lamins and histone H3 are predominantly sonication dependent. The two populations of emerin have distinct posttranslational modifications, and only one population associates with BAF. This method may be useful for functional screening or analysis of other lamin-associated proteins, including novel NETs emerging from proteomic studies.

  5. Large-Scale Meta-Analysis of Human Medial Frontal Cortex Reveals Tripartite Functional Organization

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Luke J.; Banich, Marie T.; Wager, Tor D.; Yarkoni, Tal

    2016-01-01

    The functional organization of human medial frontal cortex (MFC) is a subject of intense study. Using fMRI, the MFC has been associated with diverse psychological processes, including motor function, cognitive control, affect, and social cognition. However, there have been few large-scale efforts to comprehensively map specific psychological functions to subregions of medial frontal anatomy. Here we applied a meta-analytic data-driven approach to nearly 10,000 fMRI studies to identify putatively separable regions of MFC and determine which psychological states preferentially recruit their activation. We identified regions at several spatial scales on the basis of meta-analytic coactivation, revealing three broad functional zones along a rostrocaudal axis composed of 2–4 smaller subregions each. Multivariate classification analyses aimed at identifying the psychological functions most strongly predictive of activity in each region revealed a tripartite division within MFC, with each zone displaying a relatively distinct functional signature. The posterior zone was associated preferentially with motor function, the middle zone with cognitive control, pain, and affect, and the anterior with reward, social processing, and episodic memory. Within each zone, the more fine-grained subregions showed distinct, but subtler, variations in psychological function. These results provide hypotheses about the functional organization of medial prefrontal cortex that can be tested explicitly in future studies. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Activation of medial frontal cortex in fMRI studies is associated with a wide range of psychological states ranging from cognitive control to pain. However, this high rate of activation makes it challenging to determine how these various processes are topologically organized across medial frontal anatomy. We conducted a meta-analysis across nearly 10,000 studies to comprehensively map psychological states to discrete subregions in medial frontal cortex

  6. Genome-wide location analysis reveals distinct transcriptional circuitry by paralogous regulators Foxa1 and Foxa2.

    PubMed

    Bochkis, Irina M; Schug, Jonathan; Ye, Diana Z; Kurinna, Svitlana; Stratton, Sabrina A; Barton, Michelle C; Kaestner, Klaus H

    2012-01-01

    Gene duplication is a powerful driver of evolution. Newly duplicated genes acquire new roles that are relevant to fitness, or they will be lost over time. A potential path to functional relevance is mutation of the coding sequence leading to the acquisition of novel biochemical properties, as analyzed here for the highly homologous paralogs Foxa1 and Foxa2 transcriptional regulators. We determine by genome-wide location analysis (ChIP-Seq) that, although Foxa1 and Foxa2 share a large fraction of binding sites in the liver, each protein also occupies distinct regulatory elements in vivo. Foxa1-only sites are enriched for p53 binding sites and are frequently found near genes important to cell cycle regulation, while Foxa2-restricted sites show only a limited match to the forkhead consensus and are found in genes involved in steroid and lipid metabolism. Thus, Foxa1 and Foxa2, while redundant during development, have evolved divergent roles in the adult liver, ensuring the maintenance of both genes during evolution.

  7. Genome-Wide Location Analysis Reveals Distinct Transcriptional Circuitry by Paralogous Regulators Foxa1 and Foxa2

    PubMed Central

    Bochkis, Irina M.; Schug, Jonathan; Ye, Diana Z.; Kurinna, Svitlana; Stratton, Sabrina A.; Barton, Michelle C.; Kaestner, Klaus H.

    2012-01-01

    Gene duplication is a powerful driver of evolution. Newly duplicated genes acquire new roles that are relevant to fitness, or they will be lost over time. A potential path to functional relevance is mutation of the coding sequence leading to the acquisition of novel biochemical properties, as analyzed here for the highly homologous paralogs Foxa1 and Foxa2 transcriptional regulators. We determine by genome-wide location analysis (ChIP-Seq) that, although Foxa1 and Foxa2 share a large fraction of binding sites in the liver, each protein also occupies distinct regulatory elements in vivo. Foxa1-only sites are enriched for p53 binding sites and are frequently found near genes important to cell cycle regulation, while Foxa2-restricted sites show only a limited match to the forkhead consensus and are found in genes involved in steroid and lipid metabolism. Thus, Foxa1 and Foxa2, while redundant during development, have evolved divergent roles in the adult liver, ensuring the maintenance of both genes during evolution. PMID:22737085

  8. Cells Respond to Distinct Nanoparticle Properties with Multiple Strategies As Revealed by Single-Cell RNA-Seq

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Hugh D.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Chrisler, William B.; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Hu, Dehong; Szymanski, Craig J.; Xie, Yumei; Melby, Eric S.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Taylor, Ronald C.; Grate, Eva K.; Cooley, Scott K.; McDermott, Jason E.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Orr, Galya

    2016-11-22

    The impact of distinct nanoparticle (NP) properties on cellular response and ultimately human health is unclear. This gap is partially due to experimental difficulties in achieving uniform NP loads in the studied cells, creating heterogeneous populations with some cells “overloaded” while other cells are loaded with few or no NPs. Yet gene expression studies have been conducted in the population as a whole, identifying generic responses, while missing unique responses due to signal averaging across many cells, each carrying different loads. Here we applied single-cell RNA-Seq to alveolar epithelial cells carrying defined loads of aminated or carboxylated quantum dots (QDs), showing higher or lower toxicity, respectively. Interestingly, cells carrying lower loads responded with multiple strategies, mostly with upregulated processes, which were nonetheless coherent and unique to each QD type. In contrast, cells carrying higher loads responded more uniformly, with mostly downregulated processes that were shared across QD types. Strategies unique to aminated QDs showed strong upregulation of stress responses, coupled in some cases with regulation of cell cycle, protein synthesis and organelle activities. In contrast, strategies unique to carboxylated QDs showed upregulation of DNA repair and RNA activities, and decreased regulation of cell division, coupled in some cases with upregulation of stress responses and ATP related functions. Together, our studies suggest scenarios where higher NP loads lock cells into uniform responses, mostly shutdown of cellular processes, whereas lower loads allow for unique responses to each NP type that are more diversified, proactive defenses or repairs of the NP insults.

  9. Ultrafast optical recording reveals distinct capsaicin-induced ion dynamics along single nociceptive neurite terminals in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Robert H.; Katz, Ben; Lev, Shaya; Binshtok, Alexander M.

    2017-07-01

    Pain signals are detected by terminals of nociceptive peripheral fibers situated among the keratinocytes and epithelial cells. Despite being key structures for pain-related stimuli detection and transmission, little is known about the functional organization of terminals. This is mainly due to their minute size, rendering them largely inaccessible by conventional experimental approaches. Here, we report the implementation of an ultrafast optical recording approach for studying cultured neurite terminals, which are readily accessible for assay manipulations. Using this approach, we were able to study capsaicin-induced calcium and sodium dynamics in the nociceptive processes, at a near-action potential time resolution. The approach was sensitive enough to detect differences in latency, time-to-peak, and amplitude of capsaicin-induced ion transients along the terminal neurites. Using this approach, we found that capsaicin evokes distinctive calcium signals along the neurite. At the terminal, the signal was insensitive to voltage-gated sodium channel blockers, and showed slower kinetics and smaller signal amplitudes, compared with signals that were measured further up the neurite. These latter signals were mainly abolished by sodium channel blockers. We propose this ultrafast optical recording approach as a model for studying peripheral terminal signaling, forming a basis for studying pain mechanisms in normal and pathological states.

  10. Optogenetic fMRI reveals distinct, frequency-dependent networks recruited by dorsal and intermediate hippocampus stimulations

    PubMed Central

    Weitz, Andrew J.; Fang, Zhongnan; Lee, Hyun Joo; Fisher, Robert S.; Smith, Wesley C.; Choy, ManKin; Liu, Jia; Lin, Peter; Rosenberg, Matthew; Lee, Jin Hyung

    2014-01-01

    Although the connectivity of hippocampal circuits has been extensively studied, the way in which these connections give rise to large-scale dynamic network activity remains unknown. Here, we used optogenetic fMRI to visualize the brain network dynamics evoked by different frequencies of stimulation of two distinct neuronal populations within dorsal and intermediate hippocampus. Stimulation of excitatory cells in intermediate hippocampus caused widespread cortical and subcortical recruitment at high frequencies, whereas stimulation in dorsal hippocampus led to activity primarily restricted to hippocampus across all frequencies tested. Sustained hippocampal responses evoked during high-frequency stimulation of either location predicted seizure-like afterdischarges in video-EEG experiments, while the widespread activation evoked by high-frequency stimulation of intermediate hippocampus predicted behavioral seizures. A negative BOLD signal observed in dentate gyrus during dorsal, but not intermediate, hippocampus stimulation is proposed to underlie the mechanism for these differences. Collectively, our results provide insight into the dynamic function of hippocampal networks and their role in seizures. PMID:25462689

  11. Distinct intraspecific variations of garlic (Allium sativum L.) revealed by the exon-intron sequences of the alliinase gene.

    PubMed

    Endo, Aki; Imai, Yukiko; Nakamura, Mizuho; Yanagisawa, Eri; Taguchi, Takaaki; Torii, Kosuke; Okumura, Hidenobu; Ichinose, Koji

    2014-04-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum L.) has been used worldwide as a food and for medicinal purposes since early times. Garlic cultivars exhibit considerable morphological diversity despite the fact that they are mostly sterile and are grown only by vegetative propagation of cloves. Considerable recombination occurs in garlic genomes, including the genes involved in secondary metabolites. We examined the genomic DNAs (gDNAs) from garlic, encoding alliinase, a key enzyme involved in organosulfur metabolism in Allium plants. The 1.7-kb gDNA fragments, covering three exons (2, 3, and 4) and all four introns, were amplified from total DNAs prepared from garlic samples produced in Asia and Europe, leading to 73 sequences in total: Japan (JPN), China (CHN), India (IND), Spain (ESP), and France (FRA). The exon sequences were highly conserved among all the sequences, probably reflecting the fully functional alliinase associated with the flavor quality. Distinct intraspecific variations were detected for all four intron sequences, leading to the haplotype classifications. A close relationship between JPN and CHN was observed for all four introns, whereas IND showed a more divergent distribution. ESP and FRA afforded clearly different variants compared with those from Asian sequences. The present study provides information that could be useful in the development of an additional molecular marker for garlic authentication and quality control.

  12. MASTICATORY FUNCTION OF OBESE CANDIDATES TO BARIATRIC SURGERY FROM DISTINCT SOCIOECONOMIC CLASSES

    PubMed Central

    PASSERI, Celso Roberto; ANDRADE, Jacira Alves Caracik de Camargo; TOMAL, Karla Thaíza; PRACUCHO, Eduardo Marcucci; de CAMPOS, Livia Paschoalino; SALES-PERES, Silvia Helena de Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Obesity and metabolic syndrome can be labeled as worldwide outbreak; thus, both have led to serious public health problem. Oral health can be worsened by both, obesity and metabolic syndrome. Tooth loss harms masticatory function, essential status to whom will be submitted to bariatric surgery. Aim: Assess masticatory function of obese candidates to bariatric surgery, who belong to distinct socioeconomic class range, in order to recognize hazard factors and the bias of socioeconomic factor in this context. Methods: Observational cross-section study, with samples comprised by two groups of patients, with distinct socioeconomic class range, one of them belonging to public health system (SUSG) and the other to private clinic (CPG), candidates to bariatric surgery. Were assessed anthropometric data, comorbidities and medicines usage, blood tests, habits and the number of dental functional units. Results: The groups SUSG and CPG were homogeneous taking into account gender (p=0,890) and age range (p=0,170). The number of dental functional units was higher in the private group (p<0.001). The impaired masticatory function was rather present among public group (p<0.001) and female gender (p<0,001). Regarded as blood tests, fasting glucose was higher in female in SUSG (p<0,001). The following hazard factors have corroborated to have patients rated as impaired masticatory function: belong to public service (OR: 8.420, p=0.003), higher age (OR: 1.186, p<0.001), female gender (OR: 0.153, p=0.029), diabetes mellitus (OR: 2.545, p=0.045) and smokers (OR: 2.951, p=0.043). Conclusion: The general health and masticatory function of female SUSG were worse, highlighting the socioeconomic condition as hazard factor. PMID:27683777

  13. Analysis of Exocyst Subunit EXO70 Family Reveals Distinct Membrane Polar Domains in Tobacco Pollen Tubes1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Šantrůček, Jiří; Vukašinović, Nemanja

    2017-01-01

    The vesicle-tethering complex exocyst is one of the crucial cell polarity regulators. The EXO70 subunit is required for the targeting of the complex and is represented by many isoforms in angiosperm plant cells. This diversity could be partly responsible for the establishment and maintenance of membrane domains with different composition. To address this hypothesis, we employed the growing pollen tube, a well-established cell polarity model system, and performed large-scale expression, localization, and functional analysis of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) EXO70 isoforms. Various isoforms localized to different regions of the pollen tube plasma membrane, apical vesicle-rich inverted cone region, nucleus, and cytoplasm. The overexpression of major pollen-expressed EXO70 isoforms resulted in growth arrest and characteristic phenotypic deviations of tip swelling and apical invaginations. NtEXO70A1a and NtEXO70B1 occupied two distinct and mutually exclusive plasma membrane domains. Both isoforms partly colocalized with the exocyst subunit NtSEC3a at the plasma membrane, possibly forming different exocyst complex subpopulations. NtEXO70A1a localized to the small area previously characterized as the site of exocytosis in the tobacco pollen tube, while NtEXO70B1 surprisingly colocalized with the zone of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Both NtEXO70A1a and NtEXO70B1 colocalized to different degrees with markers for the anionic signaling phospholipids phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and phosphatidic acid. In contrast, members of the EXO70 C class, which are specifically expressed in tip-growing cells, exhibited exocytosis-related functional effects in pollen tubes despite the absence of apparent plasma membrane localization. Taken together, our data support the existence of multiple membrane-trafficking domains regulated by different EXO70-containing exocyst complexes within a single cell. PMID:28082718

  14. Duplicated C-class MADS-box genes reveal distinct roles in gynostemium development in Cymbidium ensifolium (Orchidaceae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Shih-Yu; Lee, Pei-Fang; Lee, Yung-I; Hsiao, Yu-Yun; Chen, You-Yi; Pan, Zhao-Jun; Liu, Zhong-Jian; Tsai, Wen-Chieh

    2011-03-01

    The orchid floral organs represent novel and effective structures for attracting pollination vectors. In addition, to avoid inbreeding, the androecium and gynoecium are united in a single structure termed the gynostemium. Identification of C-class MADS-box genes regulating reproductive organ development could help determine the level of homology with the current ABC model of floral organ identity in orchids. In this study, we isolated and characterized two C-class AGAMOUS-like genes, denoted CeMADS1 and CeMADS2, from Cymbidium ensifolium. These two genes showed distinct spatial and temporal expression profiles, which suggests their functional diversification during gynostemium development. Furthermore, the expression of CeMADS1 but not CeMADS2 was eliminated in the multitepal mutant whose gynostemium is replaced by a newly emerged flower, and this ecotopic flower continues to produce sepals and petals centripetally. Protein interaction relationships among CeMADS1, CeMADS2 and E-class PeMADS8 proteins were assessed by yeast two-hybrid analysis. Both CeMADS1 and CeMADS2 formed homodimers and heterodimers with each other and the E-class PeMADS protein. Furthermore, transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing CeMADS1 or CeMADS2 showed limited growth of primary inflorescence. Thus, CeMADS1 may have a pivotal C function in reproductive organ development in C. ensifolium. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists.

  15. Multilocus sequence analysis of Anaplasma phagocytophilum reveals three distinct lineages with different host ranges in clinically ill French cattle.

    PubMed

    Chastagner, Amélie; Dugat, Thibaud; Vourc'h, Gwenaël; Verheyden, Hélène; Legrand, Loïc; Bachy, Véronique; Chabanne, Luc; Joncour, Guy; Maillard, Renaud; Boulouis, Henri-Jean; Haddad, Nadia; Bailly, Xavier; Leblond, Agnès

    2014-12-09

    Molecular epidemiology represents a powerful approach to elucidate the complex epidemiological cycles of multi-host pathogens, such as Anaplasma phagocytophilum. A. phagocytophilum is a tick-borne bacterium that affects a wide range of wild and domesticated animals. Here, we characterized its genetic diversity in populations of French cattle; we then compared the observed genotypes with those found in horses, dogs, and roe deer to determine whether genotypes of A. phagocytophilum are shared among different hosts. We sampled 120 domesticated animals (104 cattle, 13 horses, and 3 dogs) and 40 wild animals (roe deer) and used multilocus sequence analysis on nine loci (ankA, msp4, groESL, typA, pled, gyrA, recG, polA, and an intergenic region) to characterize the genotypes of A. phagocytophilum present. Phylogenic analysis revealed three genetic clusters of bacterial variants in domesticated animals. The two principal clusters included 98% of the bacterial genotypes found in cattle, which were only distantly related to those in roe deer. One cluster comprised only cattle genotypes, while the second contained genotypes from cattle, horses, and dogs. The third contained all roe deer genotypes and three cattle genotypes. Geographical factors could not explain this clustering pattern. These results suggest that roe deer do not contribute to the spread of A. phagocytophilum in cattle in France. Further studies should explore if these different clusters are associated with differing disease severity in domesticated hosts. Additionally, it remains to be seen if the three clusters of A. phagocytophilum genotypes in cattle correspond to distinct epidemiological cycles, potentially involving different reservoir hosts.

  16. Promiscuous binding of invariant chain-derived CLIP peptide to distinct HLA-I molecules revealed in leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    van Luijn, Marvin M; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A; Lampen, Margit H; van Veelen, Peter A; Zevenbergen, Adri; Kester, Michel G D; de Ru, Arnoud H; Ossenkoppele, Gert J; van Hall, Thorbald; van Ham, S Marieke

    2012-01-01

    Antigen presentation by HLA class I (HLA-I) and HLA class II (HLA-II) complexes is achieved by proteins that are specific for their respective processing pathway. The invariant chain (Ii)-derived peptide CLIP is required for HLA-II-mediated antigen presentation by stabilizing HLA-II molecules before antigen loading through transient and promiscuous binding to different HLA-II peptide grooves. Here, we demonstrate alternative binding of CLIP to surface HLA-I molecules on leukemic cells. In HLA-II-negative AML cells, we found plasma membrane display of the CLIP peptide. Silencing Ii in AML cells resulted in reduced HLA-I cell surface display, which indicated a direct role of CLIP in the HLA-I antigen presentation pathway. In HLA-I-specific peptide eluates from B-LCLs, five Ii-derived peptides were identified, of which two were from the CLIP region. In vitro peptide binding assays strikingly revealed that the eluted CLIP peptide RMATPLLMQALPM efficiently bound to four distinct HLA-I supertypes (-A2, -B7, -A3, -B40). Furthermore, shorter length variants of this CLIP peptide also bound to these four supertypes, although in silico algorithms only predicted binding to HLA-A2 or -B7. Immunization of HLA-A2 transgenic mice with these peptides did not induce CTL responses. Together these data show a remarkable promiscuity of CLIP for binding to a wide variety of HLA-I molecules. The found participation of CLIP in the HLA-I antigen presentation pathway could reflect an aberrant mechanism in leukemic cells, but might also lead to elucidation of novel processing pathways or immune escape mechanisms.

  17. In vivo electrophysiological recordings in amygdala subnuclei reveal selective and distinct responses to a behaviorally identified predator odor.

    PubMed

    Govic, Antonina; Paolini, Antonio G

    2015-03-01

    Chemosensory cues signaling predators reliably stimulate innate defensive responses in rodents. Despite the well-documented role of the amygdala in predator odor-induced fear, evidence for the relative contribution of the specific nuclei that comprise this structurally heterogeneous structure is conflicting. In an effort to clarify this we examined neural activity, via electrophysiological recordings, in amygdala subnuclei to controlled and repeated presentations of a predator odor: cat urine. Defensive behaviors, characterized by avoidance, decreased exploration, and increased risk assessment, were observed in adult male hooded Wistar rats (n = 11) exposed to a cloth impregnated with cat urine. Electrophysiological recordings of the amygdala (777 multiunit clusters) were subsequently obtained in freely breathing anesthetized rats exposed to cat urine, distilled water, and eugenol via an air-dilution olfactometer. Recorded units selectively responded to cat urine, and frequencies of responses were distributed differently across amygdala nuclei; medial amygdala (MeA) demonstrated the greatest frequency of responses to cat urine (51.7%), followed by the basolateral and basomedial nuclei (18.8%) and finally the central amygdala (3.0%). Temporally, information transduction occurred primarily from the cortical amygdala and MeA (ventral divisions) to other amygdala nuclei. Interestingly, MeA subnuclei exhibited distinct firing patterns to predator urine, potentially revealing aspects of the underlying neurocircuitry of predator odor processing and defensiveness. These findings highlight the critical involvement of the MeA in processing olfactory cues signaling predator threat and converge with previous studies to indicate that amygdala regulation of predator odor-induced fear is restricted to a particular set of subnuclei that primarily include the MeA, particularly the ventral divisions. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Phylogenetic Reassessment of Antarctic Tetillidae (Demospongiae, Tetractinellida) Reveals New Genera and Genetic Similarity among Morphologically Distinct Species

    PubMed Central

    Carella, Mirco; Agell, Gemma; Cárdenas, Paco; Uriz, Maria J.

    2016-01-01

    Species of Tetillidae are distributed worldwide. However, some genera are unresolved and only a few genera and species of this family have been described from the Antarctic. The incorporation of 25 new COI and 18S sequences of Antarctic Tetillidae to those used recently for assessing the genera phylogeny, has allowed us to improve the resolution of some poorly resolved nodes and to confirm the monophyly of previously identified clades. Classical genera such as Craniella recovered their traditional diagnosis by moving the Antarctic Tetilla from Craniella, where they were placed in the previous family phylogeny, to Antarctotetilla gen. nov. The morphological re-examination of specimens used in the previous phylogeny and their comparison to the type material revealed misidentifications. The proposed monotypic new genus Levantinella had uncertain phylogenetic relationships depending on the gene partition used. Two more clades would require the inclusion of additional species to be formally established as new genera. The parsimony tree based on morphological characters and the secondary structure of the 18S (V4 region) almost completely matched the COI M1-M6 and the COI+18S concatenated phylogenies. Morphological synapomorphies have been identified for the genera proposed. New 15 28S (D3-D5) and 11 COI I3-M11 partitions were exclusively sequenced for the Antarctic species subset. Remarkably, species within the Antarctic genera Cinachyra (C. barbata and C. antarctica) and Antarctotetilla (A. leptoderma, A. grandis, and A. sagitta), which are clearly distinguishable morphologically, were not genetically differentiated with any of the markers assayed. Thus, as it has been reported for other Antarctic sponges, both the mitochondrial and nuclear partitions used did not differentiate species that were well characterized morphologically. Antarctic Tetillidae offers a rare example of genetically cryptic (with the traditional markers used for sponges), morphologically distinct

  19. Dynamics of Dual Infection with Campylobacter jejuni Strains in Chickens Reveals Distinct Strain-to-Strain Variation in Infection Ecology

    PubMed Central

    Wigley, Paul; Humphrey, Suzanne; Kemmett, Kirsty; Lacharme-Lora, Lizeth; Humphrey, Tom; Williams, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Although multiple genotypes of Campylobacter jejuni may be isolated from the same commercial broiler flock, little is known about the infection dynamics of different genotypes within individuals or their colonization sites within the gut. Single experimental infections with C. jejuni M1 (sequence type 137, clonal complex 45) and C. jejuni 13126 (sequence type 21, clonal complex 21) revealed that 13126 colonized the ceca at significantly higher levels. The dissemination and colonization sites of the two C. jejuni strains then were examined in an experimental broiler flock. Two 33-day-old broiler chickens were infected with M1 and two with 13126, and 15 birds were left unchallenged. Cloacal swabs were taken postinfection to determine the colonization and shedding of each strain. By 2 days postinfection (dpi), 8/19 birds were shedding M1 whereas none were shedding 13126. At 8 dpi, all birds were shedding both strains. At 18 dpi, liver and cecal levels of each isolate were quantified, while in 10 birds they also were quantified at nine sites throughout the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. 13126 was found throughout the GI tract, while M1 was largely restricted to the ceca and colon. The livers of 7/19 birds were culture positive for 13126 only. These data show that 13126 has a distinctly different infection biology than strain M1. It showed slower colonization of the lower GI tract but was more invasive and able to colonize at a high level throughout the GI tract. The finding that C. jejuni strains have markedly different infection ecologies within the chicken has implications for control in the poultry industry and suggests that the contamination risk of edible tissues is dependent on the isolate involved. PMID:25107966

  20. Image-based cytometry reveals three distinct subsets of activated granulocytes based on phagocytosis and oxidative burst.

    PubMed

    McFarlin, Brian K; Williams, Randall R; Venable, Adam S; Dwyer, Karen C; Haviland, David L

    2013-08-01

    Granulocytes play a key role in innate immunity and the most common functional assays are phagocytosis and oxidative burst. The purpose of this technical note is to use image-based flow cytometry to divide activated granulocytes into unique subsets based on their degree of phagocytosis and oxidative burst in response to different experimental incubations. Prior to the experiments, all reagents were titered to determine the lowest dose that resulted in an acceptable signal to noise ratio. Heparinized, whole blood (100 µl) was mixed with one of two bioparticles (E. coli and S. aureus) and DHE (10 µg/ml) and incubated for 5, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100, 120, and 140 min in a 37°C water bath. An additional tube kept on ice was used as a negative control. All subsequent processing steps were completed on ice in the dark to minimize additional activation of cells. After the 37°C incubation, N-ethylmaleimide (15 mM) was added to halt phagocytosis, preventing the uptake of additional microparticles. Suspensions were labeled with CD66b-APC and CD45-APCeFluor780 for 60 min and a fix/lyse solution was added. Prior to acquisition, 7AAD was added to stain nuclear DNA. A minimum of 5,000 granulocyte (CD66b+) events were acquired using a Millipore-Amnis FlowSight equipped with blue (488 nm, 60 mW), red (642 nm, 100 mW), and side scatter (785 nm, 12 mW) lasers. Samples were compensated and analyzed using Amnis IDEAS software (v.5.0.983.0). Image-based analysis allowed us to divide activated granulocytes into three distinct subsets, whose relative abundance changed as a function of both bioparticle type and incubation length. The method described in this technical note represents a potential novel adaptation to common methods of assessing granulocyte function. More research is needed to test and validate our image-based method in clinical conditions that impair granulocyte function.

  1. Solution NMR structures of the C-domain of Tetrahymena cytoskeletal protein Tcb2 reveal distinct calcium-induced structural rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Adina M; Honts, Jerry E; Sleister, Heidi M; Fowler, C Andrew

    2016-11-01

    Tcb2 is a calcium-binding protein that localizes to the membrane-associated skeleton of the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila with hypothesized roles in ciliary movement, cell cortex signaling, and pronuclear exchange. Tcb2 has also been implicated in a unique calcium-triggered, ATP-independent type of contractility exhibited by filamentous networks isolated from the Tetrahymena cytoskeleton. To gain insight into Tcb2's structure-function relationship and contractile properties, we determined solution NMR structures of its C-terminal domain in the calcium-free and calcium-bound states. The overall architecture is similar to other calcium-binding proteins, with paired EF-hand calcium-binding motifs. Comparison of the two structures reveals that Tcb2-C's calcium-induced conformational transition differs from the prototypical calcium sensor calmodulin, suggesting that the two proteins play distinct functional roles in Tetrahymena and likely have different mechanisms of target recognition. Future studies of the full-length protein and the identification of Tcb2 cellular targets will help establish the molecular basis of Tcb2 function and its unique contractile properties. Proteins 2016; 84:1748-1756. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Incomplete deletion of IL-4Rα by LysM(Cre) reveals distinct subsets of M2 macrophages controlling inflammation and fibrosis in chronic schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Vannella, Kevin M; Barron, Luke; Borthwick, Lee A; Kindrachuk, Kristen N; Narasimhan, Prakash Babu; Hart, Kevin M; Thompson, Robert W; White, Sandra; Cheever, Allen W; Ramalingam, Thirumalai R; Wynn, Thomas A

    2014-09-01

    Mice expressing a Cre recombinase from the lysozyme M-encoding locus (Lyz2) have been widely used to dissect gene function in macrophages and neutrophils. Here, we show that while naïve resident tissue macrophages from IL-4Rαf(lox/delta)LysM(Cre) mice almost completely lose IL-4Rα function, a large fraction of macrophages elicited by sterile inflammatory stimuli, Schistosoma mansoni eggs, or S. mansoni infection, fail to excise Il4rα. These F4/80(hi)CD11b(hi) macrophages, in contrast to resident tissue macrophages, express lower levels of Lyz2 explaining why this population resists LysM(Cre)-mediated deletion. We show that in response to IL-4 and IL-13, Lyz2(lo)IL-4Rα(+) macrophages differentiate into an arginase 1-expressing alternatively-activated macrophage (AAM) population, which slows the development of lethal fibrosis in schistosomiasis. In contrast, we identified Lyz2(hi)IL-4Rα(+) macrophages as the key subset of AAMs mediating the downmodulation of granulomatous inflammation in chronic schistosomiasis. Our observations reveal a limitation on using a LysMCre mouse model to study gene function in inflammatory settings, but we utilize this limitation as a means to demonstrate that distinct populations of alternatively activated macrophages control inflammation and fibrosis in chronic schistosomiasis.

  3. Two critical and functionally distinct stages of face and body perception.

    PubMed

    Pitcher, David; Goldhaber, Tanya; Duchaine, Bradley; Walsh, Vincent; Kanwisher, Nancy

    2012-11-07

    Cortical regions that respond preferentially to particular object categories, such as faces and bodies, are essential for visual perception of these object categories. Howeve