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Sample records for reveals putative mobile

  1. Genome comparison and context analysis reveals putative mobile forms of restriction–modification systems and related rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Furuta, Yoshikazu; Abe, Kentaro; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2010-01-01

    The mobility of restriction–modification (RM) gene complexes and their association with genome rearrangements is a subject of active investigation. Here we conducted systematic genome comparisons and genome context analysis on fully sequenced prokaryotic genomes to detect RM-linked genome rearrangements. RM genes were frequently found to be linked to mobility-related genes such as integrase and transposase homologs. They were flanked by direct and inverted repeats at a significantly high frequency. Insertion by long target duplication was observed for I, II, III and IV restriction types. We found several RM genes flanked by long inverted repeats, some of which had apparently inserted into a genome with a short target duplication. In some cases, only a portion of an apparently complete RM system was flanked by inverted repeats. We also found a unit composed of RM genes and an integrase homolog that integrated into a tRNA gene. An allelic substitution of a Type III system with a linked Type I and IV system pair, and allelic diversity in the putative target recognition domain of Type IIG systems were observed. This study revealed the possible mobility of all types of RM systems, and the diversity in their mobility-related organization. PMID:20071371

  2. Exoproteome of Staphylococcus aureus reveals putative determinants of nasal carriage.

    PubMed

    Muthukrishnan, Gowrishankar; Quinn, Gerry A; Lamers, Ryan P; Diaz, Carolyn; Cole, Amy L; Chen, Sixue; Cole, Alexander M

    2011-04-01

    Due to the increasing prevalence of nosocomial and community-acquired antibiotic resistant Staphylococcus aureus (SA), understanding the determinants of SA nasal carriage has become a major imperative. Previous research has revealed many host and bacterial factors that contribute to SA nasal carriage. To assess bacterial factors that facilitate nasal carriage, we compared the exoproteome of a nasal carrier strain of SA to a genetically similar noncarrier strain. Additionally, the carrier strain biofilm exoproteome was also compared against its planktonic counterpart. Using high throughput proteomics, it was observed that the carrier strain of SA secretes a greater number of proteins that may promote successful colonization of the human nose, including cell attachment and immunoevasive proteins, than the noncarrier strain. Similarly, SA carrier strain biofilm exoproteome contains a greater number of immunoevasive proteins than its planktonic counterpart. Analysis of the most abundant immunoevasive proteins revealed that Staphylococcal protein A was present at significantly higher levels in carrier than in noncarrier strains of SA, suggesting an association with nasal carriage. While further analyses of specific differences between carrier and noncarrier strains of SA are required, many of the differentially expressed proteins identified can be considered to be putative determinants of nasal carriage.

  3. Exoproteome of Staphylococcus aureus reveals putative determinants of nasal carriage

    PubMed Central

    Muthukrishnan, Gowrishankar; Quinn, Gerry A.; Lamers, Ryan P.; Diaz, Carolyn; Cole, Amy L.; Chen, Sixue; Cole, Alexander M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Due to the increasing prevalence of nosocomial and community-acquired antibiotic resistant Staphylococcus aureus (SA), understanding the determinants of SA nasal carriage has become a major imperative. Previous research has revealed many host and bacterial factors that contribute to SA nasal carriage. To assess bacterial factors that facilitate nasal carriage, we compared the exoproteome of a nasal carrier strain of SA to a genetically similar non-carrier strain. Additionally, the carrier strain biofilm exoproteome was also compared against its planktonic counterpart. Using high throughput proteomics, it was observed that the carrier strain of SA secretes a greater number of proteins that may promote successful colonization of the human nose, including cell attachment and immunoevasive proteins, than the non-carrier strain. Similarly, SA carrier strain biofilm exoproteome contains a greater number of immunoevasive proteins than its planktonic counterpart. Analysis of the most abundant immunoevasive proteins revealed that Staphylococcal protein A was present at significantly higher levels in carrier than in non-carrier strains of SA, suggesting an association with nasal carriage. While further analyses of specific differences between carrier and non-carrier strains of SA are required, many of the differentially expressed proteins identified can be considered to be putative determinants of nasal carriage. PMID:21338050

  4. The intracellular mobility of NPY and a putative mitochondrial form of NPY in neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Kaipio, Katja; Pesonen, Ullamari

    2009-01-30

    Preproneuropeptide Y is a precursor peptide to mature neuropeptide Y (NPY), which is a universally expressed peptide in the central and peripheral nervous system. NPY is normally routed to endoplasmic reticulum and secretory vesicles in cells, which secrete NPY. In our previous studies, we found a functional Leucine7 to Proline7 (L7P) polymorphism in the signal peptide sequence of preproNPY. This polymorphism affects the secretion of NPY and causes multiple physiological effects in humans. The sequence of NPY mRNA contains two in frame kozak sequences that allow translation initiation to shift, and translation of two proteins. In addition to mature NPY(1-36) also a putative truncated NPY(17-36) with mitochondrial targeting signal is produced. The purpose of this study was to investigate the protein mobility of the putative mitochondrial fragment and the effect of the L7P polymorphism on the cellular level using GFP tagged constructs. The mobility was studied with fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique in a neuronal cell line. We found that the mobility of the secretory vesicles with NPY(1-36) in cells with L7P genotype was increased in comparison to vesicle mobility in cells with the more abundant L7L genotype. The mobility in the cells with the putative mitochondrial construct was found to be very low. According to the results of the present study, the mitochondrial truncated peptide stays in the mitochondrion. It can be hypothesized that this could be one of the factors affecting energy balance of the membranes of the mitochondrion.

  5. Molecular Profiling of the Developing Lacrimal Gland Reveals Putative Role of Notch Signaling in Branching Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dvoriantchikova, Galina; Tao, Wensi; Pappas, Steve; Gaidosh, Gabriel; Tse, David T.; Ivanov, Dmitry; Pelaez, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Although normal function of the lacrimal gland is essential for vision (and thus for human well-being), the lacrimal gland remains rather poorly understood at a molecular level. The purpose of this study was to identify new genes and signaling cascades involved in lacrimal gland development. Methods To identify these genes, we used microarray analysis to compare the gene expression profiles of developing (embryonic) and adult lacrimal glands. Differential data were validated by quantitative RT-PCR, and several corresponding proteins were confirmed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. To evaluate the role of NOTCH signaling in lacrimal gland (LG) development, we used the NOTCH inhibitor DAPT and conditional Notch1 knockouts. Results Our microarray data and an in silico reconstruction of cellular networks revealed significant changes in the expression patterns of genes from the NOTCH, WNT, TGFβ, and Hedgehog pathways, all of which are involved in the regulation of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Our study also revealed new putative lacrimal gland stem cell/progenitor markers. We found that inhibiting Notch signaling both increases the average number of lacrimal gland lobules and reduces the size of each lobule. Conclusions Our findings suggest that NOTCH-, WNT-, TGFβ-, and Hedgehog-regulated EMT transition are critical mechanisms in lacrimal gland development and morphogenesis. Our data also supports the hypothesis that NOTCH signaling regulates branching morphogenesis in the developing lacrimal gland by suppressing cleft formation. PMID:28192800

  6. Genetic examination of the putative skull of Jan Kochanowski reveals its female sex.

    PubMed

    Kupiec, Tomasz; Branicki, Wojciech

    2011-06-01

    We report the results of genetic examination of the putative skull of Jan Kochanowski (1530-1584), a great Polish renaissance poet. The skull was retrieved in 1791 by historian Tadeusz Czacki from the Kochanowski family tomb and became the property of the Czartoryskis Museum in Krakow. An anthropological study in 1926 questioned its male origin, which raised doubts about its authenticity. Our report presents genetic evidence that resolves this dispute. From the sole tooth we obtained a sufficient amount of DNA to perform the analysis of nuclear markers. The analysis of the sex-informative part of intron 1 in amelogenin, genotyped using AmpFiSTR® NGM PCR Amplification Kit and Powerplex® ESI17 Kit human identification systems, revealed the female origin of the tooth. The female origin was further confirmed by the analysis of a portion of amelogenin intron 2, a microsatellite marker located on the X chromosome, as well as by a lack of signal from Y chromosomal microsatellite markers and the sex-determining region Y marker. Data obtained for two hypervariable regions, HVI and HVII, in mitochondrial DNA showed that mtDNA haplotype was relatively frequent among contemporary Europeans. The analysis of a set of single nucleotide polymorphisms relevant for prediction of the iris color indicated an 87% probability that the woman had hazel or brown eye color.

  7. Genetic examination of the putative skull of Jan Kochanowski reveals its female sex

    PubMed Central

    Kupiec, Tomasz; Branicki, Wojciech

    2011-01-01

    We report the results of genetic examination of the putative skull of Jan Kochanowski (1530-1584), a great Polish renaissance poet. The skull was retrieved in 1791 by historian Tadeusz Czacki from the Kochanowski family tomb and became the property of the Czartoryskis Museum in Krakow. An anthropological study in 1926 questioned its male origin, which raised doubts about its authenticity. Our report presents genetic evidence that resolves this dispute. From the sole tooth we obtained a sufficient amount of DNA to perform the analysis of nuclear markers. The analysis of the sex-informative part of intron 1 in amelogenin, genotyped using AmpFiSTR® NGM PCR Amplification Kit and Powerplex® ESI17 Kit human identification systems, revealed the female origin of the tooth. The female origin was further confirmed by the analysis of a portion of amelogenin intron 2, a microsatellite marker located on the X chromosome, as well as by a lack of signal from Y chromosomal microsatellite markers and the sex-determining region Y marker. Data obtained for two hypervariable regions, HVI and HVII, in mitochondrial DNA showed that mtDNA haplotype was relatively frequent among contemporary Europeans. The analysis of a set of single nucleotide polymorphisms relevant for prediction of the iris color indicated an 87% probability that the woman had hazel or brown eye color. PMID:21674838

  8. Stringent comparative sequence analysis reveals SOX10 as a putative inhibitor of glial cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, Chetna; Law, William D; Rodríguez-Molina, José F; Prasad, Arjun B; Song, Lingyun; Crawford, Gregory E; Mullikin, James C; Svaren, John; Antonellis, Anthony

    2016-11-07

    The transcription factor SOX10 is essential for all stages of Schwann cell development including myelination. SOX10 cooperates with other transcription factors to activate the expression of key myelin genes in Schwann cells and is therefore a context-dependent, pro-myelination transcription factor. As such, the identification of genes regulated by SOX10 will provide insight into Schwann cell biology and related diseases. While genome-wide studies have successfully revealed SOX10 target genes, these efforts mainly focused on myelinating stages of Schwann cell development. We propose that less-biased approaches will reveal novel functions of SOX10 outside of myelination. We developed a stringent, computational-based screen for genome-wide identification of SOX10 response elements. Experimental validation of a pilot set of predicted binding sites in multiple systems revealed that SOX10 directly regulates a previously unreported alternative promoter at SOX6, which encodes a transcription factor that inhibits glial cell differentiation. We further explored the utility of our computational approach by combining it with DNase-seq analysis in cultured Schwann cells and previously published SOX10 ChIP-seq data from rat sciatic nerve. Remarkably, this analysis enriched for genomic segments that map to loci involved in the negative regulation of gliogenesis including SOX5, SOX6, NOTCH1, HMGA2, HES1, MYCN, ID4, and ID2. Functional studies in Schwann cells revealed that: (1) all eight loci are expressed prior to myelination and down-regulated subsequent to myelination; (2) seven of the eight loci harbor validated SOX10 binding sites; and (3) seven of the eight loci are down-regulated upon repressing SOX10 function. Our computational strategy revealed a putative novel function for SOX10 in Schwann cells, which suggests a model where SOX10 activates the expression of genes that inhibit myelination during non-myelinating stages of Schwann cell development. Importantly, the

  9. Bacterial DNA Sifted from the Trichoplax adhaerens (Animalia: Placozoa) Genome Project Reveals a Putative Rickettsial Endosymbiont

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, Timothy; Gillespie, Joseph J.; Nordberg, Eric K.; Azad, Abdu F.; Sobral, Bruno W.

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic genome sequencing projects often yield bacterial DNA sequences, data typically considered as microbial contamination. However, these sequences may also indicate either symbiont genes or lateral gene transfer (LGT) to host genomes. These bacterial sequences can provide clues about eukaryote–microbe interactions. Here, we used the genome of the primitive animal Trichoplax adhaerens (Metazoa: Placozoa), which is known to harbor an uncharacterized Gram-negative endosymbiont, to search for the presence of bacterial DNA sequences. Bioinformatic and phylogenomic analyses of extracted data from the genome assembly (181 bacterial coding sequences [CDS]) and trace read archive (16S rDNA) revealed a dominant proteobacterial profile strongly skewed to Rickettsiales (Alphaproteobacteria) genomes. By way of phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA and 113 proteins conserved across proteobacterial genomes, as well as identification of 27 rickettsial signature genes, we propose a Rickettsiales endosymbiont of T. adhaerens (RETA). The majority (93%) of the identified bacterial CDS belongs to small scaffolds containing prokaryotic-like genes; however, 12 CDS were identified on large scaffolds comprised of eukaryotic-like genes, suggesting that T. adhaerens might have recently acquired bacterial genes. These putative LGTs may coincide with the placozoan’s aquatic niche and symbiosis with RETA. This work underscores the rich, and relatively untapped, resource of eukaryotic genome projects for harboring data pertinent to host–microbial interactions. The nature of unknown (or poorly characterized) bacterial species may only emerge via analysis of host genome sequencing projects, particularly if these species are resistant to cell culturing, as are many obligate intracellular microbes. Our work provides methodological insight for such an approach. PMID:23475938

  10. Analysis of the Dendrobium officinale transcriptome reveals putative alkaloid biosynthetic genes and genetic markers.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xu; Li, Ying; Li, Chunfang; Luo, Hongmei; Wang, Lizhi; Qian, Jun; Luo, Xiang; Xiang, Li; Song, Jingyuan; Sun, Chao; Xu, Haibin; Yao, Hui; Chen, Shilin

    2013-09-15

    Dendrobium officinale Kimura et Migo (Orchidaceae) is a traditional Chinese medicinal plant. The stem contains an alkaloid that is the primary bioactive component. However, the details of alkaloid biosynthesis have not been effectively explored because of the limited number of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) available in GenBank. In this study, we analyzed RNA isolated from the stem of D. officinale using a single half-run on the Roche 454 GS FLX Titanium platform to generate 553,084 ESTs with an average length of 417 bases. The ESTs were assembled into 36,407 unique putative transcripts. A total of 69.97% of the unique sequences were annotated, and a detailed view of alkaloid biosynthesis was obtained. Functional assignment based on Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) terms revealed 69 unique sequences representing 25 genes involved in alkaloid backbone biosynthesis. A series of qRT-PCR experiments confirmed that the expression levels of 5 key enzyme-encoding genes involved in alkaloid biosynthesis are greater in the leaves of D. officinale than in the stems. Cytochrome P450s, aminotransferases, methyltransferases, multidrug resistance protein (MDR) transporters and transcription factors were screened for possible involvement in alkaloid biosynthesis. Furthermore, a total of 1061 simple sequence repeat motifs (SSR) were detected from 36,407 unigenes. Dinucleotide repeats were the most abundant repeat type. Of these, 179 genes were associated with a metabolic pathway in KEGG. This study is the first to produce a large volume of transcriptome data from D. officinale. It extends the foundation to facilitate gene discovery in D. officinale and provides an important resource for the molecular genetic and functional genomic studies in this species. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Transcriptome Analysis of the Entomopathogenic Oomycete Lagenidium giganteum Reveals Putative Virulence Factors

    PubMed Central

    Quiroz Velasquez, Paula F.; Abiff, Sumayyah K.; Fins, Katrina C.; Conway, Quincy B.; Salazar, Norma C.; Delgado, Ana Paula; Dawes, Jhanelle K.; Douma, Lauren G.

    2014-01-01

    A combination of 454 pyrosequencing and Sanger sequencing was used to sample and characterize the transcriptome of the entomopathogenic oomycete Lagenidium giganteum. More than 50,000 high-throughput reads were annotated through homology searches. Several selected reads served as seeds for the amplification and sequencing of full-length transcripts. Phylogenetic analyses inferred from full-length cellulose synthase alignments revealed that L giganteum is nested within the peronosporalean galaxy and as such appears to have evolved from a phytopathogenic ancestor. In agreement with the phylogeny reconstructions, full-length L. giganteum oomycete effector orthologs, corresponding to the cellulose-binding elicitor lectin (CBEL), crinkler (CRN), and elicitin proteins, were characterized by domain organizations similar to those of pathogenicity factors of plant-pathogenic oomycetes. Importantly, the L. giganteum effectors provide a basis for detailing the roles of canonical CRN, CBEL, and elicitin proteins in the infectious process of an oomycete known principally as an animal pathogen. Finally, phylogenetic analyses and genome mining identified members of glycoside hydrolase family 5 subfamily 27 (GH5_27) as putative virulence factors active on the host insect cuticle, based in part on the fact that GH5_27 genes are shared by entomopathogenic oomycetes and fungi but are underrepresented in nonentomopathogenic genomes. The genomic resources gathered from the L. giganteum transcriptome analysis strongly suggest that filamentous entomopathogens (oomycetes and fungi) exhibit convergent evolution: they have evolved independently from plant-associated microbes, have retained genes indicative of plant associations, and may share similar cores of virulence factors, such as GH5_27 enzymes, that are absent from the genomes of their plant-pathogenic relatives. PMID:25107973

  12. Characterization of a Novel Putative Xer-Dependent Integrative Mobile Element Carrying the bla(NMC-A) Carbapenemase Gene, Inserted into the Chromosome of Members of the Enterobacter cloacae Complex.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, Alberto; D'Andrea, Marco Maria; Di Pilato, Vincenzo; Viaggi, Bruno; Torricelli, Francesca; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2015-10-01

    An Enterobacter ludwigii strain was isolated during routine screening of a Japanese patient for carriage of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. PCR analysis revealed the blaNMC-A carbapenemase gene. Whole-genome sequencing revealed that blaNMC-A was inserted in the chromosome and associated with a novel 29.1-kb putative Xer-dependent integrative mobile element, named EludIMEX-1. Bioinformatic analysis identified similar elements in the genomes of an Enterobacter asburiae strain and of other Enterobacter cloacae complex strains, confirming the mobile nature of this element.

  13. Characterization of a Novel Putative Xer-Dependent Integrative Mobile Element Carrying the blaNMC-A Carbapenemase Gene, Inserted into the Chromosome of Members of the Enterobacter cloacae Complex

    PubMed Central

    Antonelli, Alberto; D'Andrea, Marco Maria; Di Pilato, Vincenzo; Viaggi, Bruno; Torricelli, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    An Enterobacter ludwigii strain was isolated during routine screening of a Japanese patient for carriage of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. PCR analysis revealed the blaNMC-A carbapenemase gene. Whole-genome sequencing revealed that blaNMC-A was inserted in the chromosome and associated with a novel 29.1-kb putative Xer-dependent integrative mobile element, named EludIMEX-1. Bioinformatic analysis identified similar elements in the genomes of an Enterobacter asburiae strain and of other Enterobacter cloacae complex strains, confirming the mobile nature of this element. PMID:26248383

  14. A simplified sequence-based identification scheme for Bordetella reveals several putative novel species.

    PubMed

    Spilker, Theodore; Leber, Amy L; Marcon, Mario J; Newton, Duane W; Darrah, Rebecca; Vandamme, Peter; Lipuma, John J

    2014-02-01

    The differentiation of Bordetella species, particularly those causing human infection, is problematic. We found that sequence analysis of an internal fragment of nrdA allowed differentiation of the currently named Bordetella species. Analysis of 107 "Bordetella" isolates recovered almost exclusively from human respiratory tract specimens identified several putative novel species.

  15. A putative mobile genetic element carrying a novel type IIF restriction-modification system (PluTI)

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Feroz; Furuta, Yoshikazu; Kawai, Mikihiko; Kaminska, Katarzyna H.; Ishikawa, Ken; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2010-01-01

    Genome comparison and genome context analysis were used to find a putative mobile element in the genome of Photorhabdus luminescens, an entomopathogenic bacterium. The element is composed of 16-bp direct repeats in the terminal regions, which are identical to a part of insertion sequences (ISs), a DNA methyltransferase gene homolog, two genes of unknown functions and an open reading frame (ORF) (plu0599) encoding a protein with no detectable sequence similarity to any known protein. The ORF (plu0599) product showed DNA endonuclease activity, when expressed in a cell-free expression system. Subsequently, the protein, named R.PluTI, was expressed in vivo, purified and found to be a novel type IIF restriction enzyme that recognizes 5′-GGCGC/C-3′ (/ indicates position of cleavage). R.PluTI cleaves a two-site supercoiled substrate at both the sites faster than a one-site supercoiled substrate. The modification enzyme homolog encoded by plu0600, named M.PluTI, was expressed in Escherichia coli and shown to protect DNA from R.PluTI cleavage in vitro, and to suppress the lethal effects of R.PluTI expression in vivo. These results suggested that they constitute a restriction–modification system, present on the putative mobile element. Our approach thus allowed detection of a previously uncharacterized family of DNA-interacting proteins. PMID:20071747

  16. Genome Sequencing of Autism-Affected Families Reveals Disruption of Putative Noncoding Regulatory DNA.

    PubMed

    Turner, Tychele N; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Duyzend, Michael H; McClymont, Sarah A; Hook, Paul W; Iossifov, Ivan; Raja, Archana; Baker, Carl; Hoekzema, Kendra; Stessman, Holly A; Zody, Michael C; Nelson, Bradley J; Huddleston, John; Sandstrom, Richard; Smith, Joshua D; Hanna, David; Swanson, James M; Faustman, Elaine M; Bamshad, Michael J; Stamatoyannopoulos, John; Nickerson, Deborah A; McCallion, Andrew S; Darnell, Robert; Eichler, Evan E

    2016-01-07

    We performed whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of 208 genomes from 53 families affected by simplex autism. For the majority of these families, no copy-number variant (CNV) or candidate de novo gene-disruptive single-nucleotide variant (SNV) had been detected by microarray or whole-exome sequencing (WES). We integrated multiple CNV and SNV analyses and extensive experimental validation to identify additional candidate mutations in eight families. We report that compared to control individuals, probands showed a significant (p = 0.03) enrichment of de novo and private disruptive mutations within fetal CNS DNase I hypersensitive sites (i.e., putative regulatory regions). This effect was only observed within 50 kb of genes that have been previously associated with autism risk, including genes where dosage sensitivity has already been established by recurrent disruptive de novo protein-coding mutations (ARID1B, SCN2A, NR3C2, PRKCA, and DSCAM). In addition, we provide evidence of gene-disruptive CNVs (in DISC1, WNT7A, RBFOX1, and MBD5), as well as smaller de novo CNVs and exon-specific SNVs missed by exome sequencing in neurodevelopmental genes (e.g., CANX, SAE1, and PIK3CA). Our results suggest that the detection of smaller, often multiple CNVs affecting putative regulatory elements might help explain additional risk of simplex autism. Copyright © 2016 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Transcriptome analysis reveals putative genes involved in iridoid biosynthesis in Rehmannia glutinosa.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peng; Song, Shuhui; Zhou, Lili; Zhang, Bing; Qi, Jianjun; Li, Xianen

    2012-10-23

    Rehmannia glutinosa, one of the most widely used herbal medicines in the Orient, is rich in biologically active iridoids. Despite their medicinal importance, no molecular information about the iridoid biosynthesis in this plant is presently available. To explore the transcriptome of R. glutinosa and investigate genes involved in iridoid biosynthesis, we used massively parallel pyrosequencing on the 454 GS FLX Titanium platform to generate a substantial EST dataset. Based on sequence similarity searches against the public sequence databases, the sequences were first annotated and then subjected to Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) based analysis. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that the 454 assembly contained a set of genes putatively involved in iridoid biosynthesis. Significantly, homologues of the secoiridoid pathway genes that were only identified in terpenoid indole alkaloid producing plants were also identified, whose presence implied that route II iridoids and route I iridoids share common enzyme steps in the early stage of biosynthesis. The gene expression patterns of four prenyltransferase transcripts were analyzed using qRT-PCR, which shed light on their putative functions in tissues of R. glutinosa. The data explored in this study will provide valuable information for further studies concerning iridoid biosynthesis.

  18. Genome Sequencing of Autism-Affected Families Reveals Disruption of Putative Noncoding Regulatory DNA

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Tychele N.; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Duyzend, Michael H.; McClymont, Sarah A.; Hook, Paul W.; Iossifov, Ivan; Raja, Archana; Baker, Carl; Hoekzema, Kendra; Stessman, Holly A.; Zody, Michael C.; Nelson, Bradley J.; Huddleston, John; Sandstrom, Richard; Smith, Joshua D.; Hanna, David; Swanson, James M.; Faustman, Elaine M.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Stamatoyannopoulos, John; Nickerson, Deborah A.; McCallion, Andrew S.; Darnell, Robert; Eichler, Evan E.

    2016-01-01

    We performed whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of 208 genomes from 53 families affected by simplex autism. For the majority of these families, no copy-number variant (CNV) or candidate de novo gene-disruptive single-nucleotide variant (SNV) had been detected by microarray or whole-exome sequencing (WES). We integrated multiple CNV and SNV analyses and extensive experimental validation to identify additional candidate mutations in eight families. We report that compared to control individuals, probands showed a significant (p = 0.03) enrichment of de novo and private disruptive mutations within fetal CNS DNase I hypersensitive sites (i.e., putative regulatory regions). This effect was only observed within 50 kb of genes that have been previously associated with autism risk, including genes where dosage sensitivity has already been established by recurrent disruptive de novo protein-coding mutations (ARID1B, SCN2A, NR3C2, PRKCA, and DSCAM). In addition, we provide evidence of gene-disruptive CNVs (in DISC1, WNT7A, RBFOX1, and MBD5), as well as smaller de novo CNVs and exon-specific SNVs missed by exome sequencing in neurodevelopmental genes (e.g., CANX, SAE1, and PIK3CA). Our results suggest that the detection of smaller, often multiple CNVs affecting putative regulatory elements might help explain additional risk of simplex autism. PMID:26749308

  19. The dJ/dS Ratio Test Reveals Hundreds of Novel Putative Cancer Drivers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Han; Xing, Ke; He, Xionglei

    2015-01-01

    Computational tools with a balanced sensitivity and specificity in identification of candidate cancer drivers are highly desired. In this study, we propose a new statistical test, namely the dJ/dS ratio test, to compute the relative mutation rate of exon/intron junction sites (dJ) to synonymous sites (dS); observation of dJ/dS ratio larger than 1 in cancer indicates positive selection for splicing deregulation, a signature of cancer driver genes. Using this method, we analyzed the data from The Cancer Genome Atlas and identified hundreds of novel putative cancer drivers. Interestingly, these genes are highly enriched in biological processes related to the development and maintenance of multicellularity, paralleling a previous finding that cancer evolves back to be unicellular by knocking down the multicellularity-associated genetic network. PMID:25873590

  20. Putative glycosyltransferases and other plant Golgi apparatus proteins are revealed by LOPIT proteomics.

    PubMed

    Nikolovski, Nino; Rubtsov, Denis; Segura, Marcelo P; Miles, Godfrey P; Stevens, Tim J; Dunkley, Tom P J; Munro, Sean; Lilley, Kathryn S; Dupree, Paul

    2012-10-01

    The Golgi apparatus is the central organelle in the secretory pathway and plays key roles in glycosylation, protein sorting, and secretion in plants. Enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of complex polysaccharides, glycoproteins, and glycolipids are located in this organelle, but the majority of them remain uncharacterized. Here, we studied the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) membrane proteome with a focus on the Golgi apparatus using localization of organelle proteins by isotope tagging. By applying multivariate data analysis to a combined data set of two new and two previously published localization of organelle proteins by isotope tagging experiments, we identified the subcellular localization of 1,110 proteins with high confidence. These include 197 Golgi apparatus proteins, 79 of which have not been localized previously by a high-confidence method, as well as the localization of 304 endoplasmic reticulum and 208 plasma membrane proteins. Comparison of the hydrophobic domains of the localized proteins showed that the single-span transmembrane domains have unique properties in each organelle. Many of the novel Golgi-localized proteins belong to uncharacterized protein families. Structure-based homology analysis identified 12 putative Golgi glycosyltransferase (GT) families that have no functionally characterized members and, therefore, are not yet assigned to a Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes database GT family. The substantial numbers of these putative GTs lead us to estimate that the true number of plant Golgi GTs might be one-third above those currently annotated. Other newly identified proteins are likely to be involved in the transport and interconversion of nucleotide sugar substrates as well as polysaccharide and protein modification.

  1. Expressed sequence tags reveal genetic diversity and putative virulence factors of the pathogenic oomycete Pythium insidiosum.

    PubMed

    Krajaejun, Theerapong; Khositnithikul, Rommanee; Lerksuthirat, Tassanee; Lowhnoo, Tassanee; Rujirawat, Thidarat; Petchthong, Thanom; Yingyong, Wanta; Suriyaphol, Prapat; Smittipat, Nat; Juthayothin, Tada; Phuntumart, Vipaporn; Sullivan, Thomas D

    2011-07-01

    Oomycetes are unique eukaryotic microorganisms that share a mycelial morphology with fungi. Many oomycetes are pathogenic to plants, and a more limited number are pathogenic to animals. Pythium insidiosum is the only oomycete that is capable of infecting both humans and animals, and causes a life-threatening infectious disease, called "pythiosis". In the majority of pythiosis patients life-long handicaps result from the inevitable radical excision of infected organs, and many die from advanced infection. Better understanding P. insidiosum pathogenesis at molecular levels could lead to new forms of treatment. Genetic and genomic information is lacking for P. insidiosum, so we have undertaken an expressed sequence tag (EST) study, and report on the first dataset of 486 ESTs, assembled into 217 unigenes. Of these, 144 had significant sequence similarity with known genes, including 47 with ribosomal protein homology. Potential virulence factors included genes involved in antioxidation, thermal adaptation, immunomodulation, and iron and sterol binding. Effectors resembling pathogenicity factors of plant-pathogenic oomycetes were also discovered, such as, a CBEL-like protein (possible involvement in host cell adhesion and hemagglutination), a putative RXLR effector (possibly involved in host cell modulation) and elicitin-like (ELL) proteins. Phylogenetic analysis mapped P. insidiosum ELLs to several novel clades of oomycete elicitins (ELIs), and homology modeling predicted that P. insidiosum ELLs should bind sterols. Most of the P. insidiosum ESTs showed homology to sequences in the genome or EST databases of other oomycetes, but one putative gene, with unknown function, was found to be unique to P. insidiosum. The EST dataset reported here represents the first steps in identifying genes of P. insidiosum and beginning transcriptome analysis. This genetic information will facilitate understanding of pathogenic mechanisms of this devastating pathogen. Copyright © 2011 The

  2. Multilocus sequence data reveal dozens of putative cryptic species in a radiation of endemic Californian mygalomorph spiders (Araneae, Mygalomorphae, Nemesiidae).

    PubMed

    Leavitt, Dean H; Starrett, James; Westphal, Michael F; Hedin, Marshal

    2015-10-01

    We use mitochondrial and multi-locus nuclear DNA sequence data to infer both species boundaries and species relationships within California nemesiid spiders. Higher-level phylogenetic data show that the California radiation is monophyletic and distantly related to European members of the genus Brachythele. As such, we consider all California nemesiid taxa to belong to the genus Calisoga Chamberlin, 1937. Rather than find support for one or two taxa as previously hypothesized, genetic data reveal Calisoga to be a species-rich radiation of spiders, including perhaps dozens of species. This conclusion is supported by multiple mitochondrial barcoding analyses, and also independent analyses of nuclear data that reveal general genealogical congruence. We discovered three instances of sympatry, and genetic data indicate reproductive isolation when in sympatry. An examination of female reproductive morphology does not reveal species-specific characters, and observed male morphological differences for a subset of putative species are subtle. Our coalescent species tree analysis of putative species lays the groundwork for future research on the taxonomy and biogeographic history of this remarkable endemic radiation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The dJ/dS Ratio Test Reveals Hundreds of Novel Putative Cancer Drivers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Han; Xing, Ke; He, Xionglei

    2015-08-01

    Computational tools with a balanced sensitivity and specificity in identification of candidate cancer drivers are highly desired. In this study, we propose a new statistical test, namely the dJ/dS ratio test, to compute the relative mutation rate of exon/intron junction sites (dJ) to synonymous sites (dS); observation of dJ/dS ratio larger than 1 in cancer indicates positive selection for splicing deregulation, a signature of cancer driver genes. Using this method, we analyzed the data from The Cancer Genome Atlas and identified hundreds of novel putative cancer drivers. Interestingly, these genes are highly enriched in biological processes related to the development and maintenance of multicellularity, paralleling a previous finding that cancer evolves back to be unicellular by knocking down the multicellularity-associated genetic network. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin reveals a putative mechanism of conformational activation for protease entrapment

    SciTech Connect

    Fyfe, Cameron D.; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Wall, Daniel M.; Burchmore, Richard J. S.; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel

    2015-06-30

    The X-ray structure of protease-cleaved E. coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. Bacterial α-2-macroglobulins have been suggested to function in defence as broad-spectrum inhibitors of host proteases that breach the outer membrane. Here, the X-ray structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. In this competitive mechanism, protease cleavage of the bait-region domain results in the untethering of an intrinsically disordered region of this domain which disrupts native interdomain interactions that maintain E. coli α-2-macroglobulin in the inactivated form. The resulting global conformational change results in entrapment of the protease and activation of the thioester bond that covalently links to the attacking protease. Owing to the similarity in structure and domain architecture of Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin and human α-2-macroglobulin, this protease-activation mechanism is likely to operate across the diverse members of this group.

  5. Molecular modeling of a tandem two pore domain potassium channel reveals a putative binding site for general anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Bertaccini, Edward J; Dickinson, Robert; Trudell, James R; Franks, Nicholas P

    2014-12-17

    Anesthetics are thought to mediate a portion of their activity via binding to and modulation of potassium channels. In particular, tandem pore potassium channels (K2P) are transmembrane ion channels whose current is modulated by the presence of general anesthetics and whose genetic absence has been shown to confer a level of anesthetic resistance. While the exact molecular structure of all K2P forms remains unknown, significant progress has been made toward understanding their structure and interactions with anesthetics via the methods of molecular modeling, coupled with the recently released higher resolution structures of homologous potassium channels to act as templates. Such models reveal the convergence of amino acid regions that are known to modulate anesthetic activity onto a common three- dimensional cavity that forms a putative anesthetic binding site. The model successfully predicts additional important residues that are also involved in the putative binding site as validated by the results of suggested experimental mutations. Such a model can now be used to further predict other amino acid residues that may be intimately involved in the target-based structure-activity relationships that are necessary for anesthetic binding.

  6. Characterization of a Spontaneous Nonmagnetic Mutant of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense Reveals a Large Deletion Comprising a Putative Magnetosome Island

    PubMed Central

    Schübbe, Sabrina; Kube, Michael; Scheffel, André; Wawer, Cathrin; Heyen, Udo; Meyerdierks, Anke; Madkour, Mohamed H.; Mayer, Frank; Reinhardt, Richard; Schüler, Dirk

    2003-01-01

    Frequent spontaneous loss of the magnetic phenotype was observed in stationary-phase cultures of the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1. A nonmagnetic mutant, designated strain MSR-1B, was isolated and characterized. The mutant lacked any structures resembling magnetosome crystals as well as internal membrane vesicles. The growth of strain MSR-1B was impaired under all growth conditions tested, and the uptake and accumulation of iron were drastically reduced under iron-replete conditions. A large chromosomal deletion of approximately 80 kb was identified in strain MSR-1B, which comprised both the entire mamAB and mamDC clusters as well as further putative operons encoding a number of magnetosome-associated proteins. A bacterial artificial chromosome clone partially covering the deleted region was isolated from the genomic library of wild-type M. gryphiswaldense. Sequence analysis of this fragment revealed that all previously identified mam genes were closely linked with genes encoding other magnetosome-associated proteins within less than 35 kb. In addition, this region was remarkably rich in insertion elements and harbored a considerable number of unknown gene families which appeared to be specific for magnetotactic bacteria. Overall, these findings suggest the existence of a putative large magnetosome island in M. gryphiswaldense and other magnetotactic bacteria. PMID:13129949

  7. Characterization of a spontaneous nonmagnetic mutant of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense reveals a large deletion comprising a putative magnetosome island.

    PubMed

    Schübbe, Sabrina; Kube, Michael; Scheffel, André; Wawer, Cathrin; Heyen, Udo; Meyerdierks, Anke; Madkour, Mohamed H; Mayer, Frank; Reinhardt, Richard; Schüler, Dirk

    2003-10-01

    Frequent spontaneous loss of the magnetic phenotype was observed in stationary-phase cultures of the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1. A nonmagnetic mutant, designated strain MSR-1B, was isolated and characterized. The mutant lacked any structures resembling magnetosome crystals as well as internal membrane vesicles. The growth of strain MSR-1B was impaired under all growth conditions tested, and the uptake and accumulation of iron were drastically reduced under iron-replete conditions. A large chromosomal deletion of approximately 80 kb was identified in strain MSR-1B, which comprised both the entire mamAB and mamDC clusters as well as further putative operons encoding a number of magnetosome-associated proteins. A bacterial artificial chromosome clone partially covering the deleted region was isolated from the genomic library of wild-type M. gryphiswaldense. Sequence analysis of this fragment revealed that all previously identified mam genes were closely linked with genes encoding other magnetosome-associated proteins within less than 35 kb. In addition, this region was remarkably rich in insertion elements and harbored a considerable number of unknown gene families which appeared to be specific for magnetotactic bacteria. Overall, these findings suggest the existence of a putative large magnetosome island in M. gryphiswaldense and other magnetotactic bacteria.

  8. Characterization of a putative NsrR homologue in Streptomyces venezuelae reveals a new member of the Rrf2 superfamily.

    PubMed

    Munnoch, John T; Martinez, Ma Teresa Pellicer; Svistunenko, Dimitri A; Crack, Jason C; Le Brun, Nick E; Hutchings, Matthew I

    2016-09-08

    Members of the Rrf2 superfamily of transcription factors are widespread in bacteria but their functions are largely unexplored. The few that have been characterized in detail sense nitric oxide (NsrR), iron limitation (RirA), cysteine availability (CymR) and the iron sulfur (Fe-S) cluster status of the cell (IscR). In this study we combined ChIP- and dRNA-seq with in vitro biochemistry to characterize a putative NsrR homologue in Streptomyces venezuelae. ChIP-seq analysis revealed that rather than regulating the nitrosative stress response like Streptomyces coelicolor NsrR, Sven6563 binds to a conserved motif at a different, much larger set of genes with a diverse range of functions, including a number of regulators, genes required for glutamine synthesis, NADH/NAD(P)H metabolism, as well as general DNA/RNA and amino acid/protein turn over. Our biochemical experiments further show that Sven6563 has a [2Fe-2S] cluster and that the switch between oxidized and reduced cluster controls its DNA binding activity in vitro. To our knowledge, both the sensing domain and the putative target genes are novel for an Rrf2 protein, suggesting Sven6563 represents a new member of the Rrf2 superfamily. Given the redox sensitivity of its Fe-S cluster we have tentatively named the protein RsrR for Redox sensitive response Regulator.

  9. Characterization of a putative NsrR homologue in Streptomyces venezuelae reveals a new member of the Rrf2 superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Munnoch, John T.; Martinez, Ma Teresa Pellicer; Svistunenko, Dimitri A.; Crack, Jason C.; Le Brun, Nick E.; Hutchings, Matthew I.

    2016-01-01

    Members of the Rrf2 superfamily of transcription factors are widespread in bacteria but their functions are largely unexplored. The few that have been characterized in detail sense nitric oxide (NsrR), iron limitation (RirA), cysteine availability (CymR) and the iron sulfur (Fe-S) cluster status of the cell (IscR). In this study we combined ChIP- and dRNA-seq with in vitro biochemistry to characterize a putative NsrR homologue in Streptomyces venezuelae. ChIP-seq analysis revealed that rather than regulating the nitrosative stress response like Streptomyces coelicolor NsrR, Sven6563 binds to a conserved motif at a different, much larger set of genes with a diverse range of functions, including a number of regulators, genes required for glutamine synthesis, NADH/NAD(P)H metabolism, as well as general DNA/RNA and amino acid/protein turn over. Our biochemical experiments further show that Sven6563 has a [2Fe-2S] cluster and that the switch between oxidized and reduced cluster controls its DNA binding activity in vitro. To our knowledge, both the sensing domain and the putative target genes are novel for an Rrf2 protein, suggesting Sven6563 represents a new member of the Rrf2 superfamily. Given the redox sensitivity of its Fe-S cluster we have tentatively named the protein RsrR for Redox sensitive response Regulator. PMID:27605472

  10. A Multilocus Sequence Typing Scheme Implies Population Structure and Reveals Several Putative Novel Achromobacter Species

    PubMed Central

    Spilker, Theodore; Vandamme, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The genus Achromobacter currently is comprised of seven species, including Achromobacter xylosoxidans, an opportunistic and nosocomial pathogen that displays broad-spectrum antimicrobial resistance and is recognized as causing chronic respiratory tract infection in persons with cystic fibrosis (CF). To enable strain typing for global epidemiologic investigations, to clarify the taxonomy of “Achromobacter-like” strains, and to elucidate the population structure of this genus, we developed a genus-level multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme. We employed in silico analyses of whole-genome sequences of several phylogenetically related genera, including Bordetella, Burkholderia, Cupriavidus, Herminiimonas, Janthinobacterium, Methylibium, and Ralstonia, for selecting loci and designing PCR primers. Using this MLST scheme, we analyzed 107 genetically diverse Achromobacter isolates cultured from biologic specimens from CF and non-CF patients, 1 isolate recovered from sludge, and an additional 39 strains obtained from culture collections. Sequence data from these 147 strains, plus three recently genome-sequenced Achromobacter strains, were assigned to 129 sequence types based on seven loci. Calculation of the nucleotide divergence of concatenated locus sequences within and between MLST clusters confirmed the seven previously named Achromobacter species and revealed 14 additional genogroups. Indices of association showed significant linkage disequilibrium in all of the species/genogroups able to be tested, indicating that each group has a clonal population structure. No clear segregation of species/genogroups between CF and non-CF sources was found. PMID:22785192

  11. A multilocus sequence typing scheme implies population structure and reveals several putative novel Achromobacter species.

    PubMed

    Spilker, Theodore; Vandamme, Peter; Lipuma, John J

    2012-09-01

    The genus Achromobacter currently is comprised of seven species, including Achromobacter xylosoxidans, an opportunistic and nosocomial pathogen that displays broad-spectrum antimicrobial resistance and is recognized as causing chronic respiratory tract infection in persons with cystic fibrosis (CF). To enable strain typing for global epidemiologic investigations, to clarify the taxonomy of "Achromobacter-like" strains, and to elucidate the population structure of this genus, we developed a genus-level multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme. We employed in silico analyses of whole-genome sequences of several phylogenetically related genera, including Bordetella, Burkholderia, Cupriavidus, Herminiimonas, Janthinobacterium, Methylibium, and Ralstonia, for selecting loci and designing PCR primers. Using this MLST scheme, we analyzed 107 genetically diverse Achromobacter isolates cultured from biologic specimens from CF and non-CF patients, 1 isolate recovered from sludge, and an additional 39 strains obtained from culture collections. Sequence data from these 147 strains, plus three recently genome-sequenced Achromobacter strains, were assigned to 129 sequence types based on seven loci. Calculation of the nucleotide divergence of concatenated locus sequences within and between MLST clusters confirmed the seven previously named Achromobacter species and revealed 14 additional genogroups. Indices of association showed significant linkage disequilibrium in all of the species/genogroups able to be tested, indicating that each group has a clonal population structure. No clear segregation of species/genogroups between CF and non-CF sources was found.

  12. Analysis of putative nonulosonic acid biosynthesis pathways in Archaea reveals a complex evolutionary history.

    PubMed

    Kandiba, Lina; Eichler, Jerry

    2013-08-01

    Sialic acids and the other nonulosonic acid sugars, legionaminic acid and pseudaminic acid, are nine carbon-containing sugars that can be detected as components of the glycans decorating proteins and other molecules in Eukarya and Bacteria. Yet, despite the prevalence of N-glycosylation in Archaea and the variety of sugars recruited for the archaeal version of this post-translational modification, only a single report of a nonulosonic acid sugar in an archaeal N-linked glycan has appeared. Hence, to obtain a clearer picture of nonulosonic acid sugar biosynthesis capability in Archaea, 122 sequenced genomes were scanned for the presence of genes involved in the biogenesis of these sugars. The results reveal that while Archaea and Bacteria share a common route of sialic acid biosynthesis, numerous archaeal nonulosonic acid sugar biosynthesis pathway components were acquired from elsewhere via various routes. Still, the limited number of Archaea encoding components involved in the synthesis of nonulosonic acid sugars implies that such saccharides are not major components of glycans in this domain.

  13. In vivo and in vitro NMR spectroscopy reveal a putative novel inborn error involving polyol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Moolenaar, S H; van der Knaap, M S; Engelke, U F; Pouwels, P J; Janssen-Zijlstra, F S; Verhoeven, N M; Jakobs, C; Wevers, R A

    2001-05-01

    In vivo NMR spectroscopy was performed on the brain of a patient with a leukoencephalopathy, revealing unknown resonances between 3.5 and 4.0 ppm. In addition, urine and CSF of the patient were measured using high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. Also in these in vitro spectra, unknown resonances were observed in the 3.5-4.0 ppm region. Homonuclear (1)H two-dimensional J-resolved spectroscopy (JRES) and (1)H-(1)H correlation spectroscopy (COSY) were performed on the patient's urine for more accurate assignment of resonances. The NMR spectroscopic studies showed that the unknown resonances could be assigned to arabinitol and ribitol. This was confirmed using gas chromatography. The arabinitol was identified as D-arabinitol. The patient is likely to suffer from an as yet unknown inborn error of metabolism affecting D-arabinitol and ribitol metabolism. The primary molecular defect has not been found yet. Urine spectra of patients suffering from diabetes mellitus or galactosemia were recorded for comparison. Resonances outside the 3.2-4.0 ppm region, which are the most easy to recognize in body fluid spectra, allow easy recognition of various sugars and polyols. The paper shows that NMR spectroscopy in body fluids may help identifying unknown resonances observed in in vivo NMR spectra. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Conservation of hydrophobicity within viral envelope glycoproteins reveals a putative hepatitis C virus fusion peptide.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A; O'Leary, J M; Pollock, S; Zitzmann, N

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism(s) by which hepatitis C virus (HCV) enters and infects cells remains unknown. Identifying the HCV fusion peptide(s) and understanding the early stages of infection may provide new opportunities for improved antiviral therapy. The HCV envelope glycoprotein E2 is thought to be a class II fusion protein. Class II fusion proteins are exemplified by the E protein of the tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) and the E1 protein of the Semliki Forest virus (SFV). Analysis of the hydrophobicity profiles of four HCV E2 envelope glycoproteins revealed a region with a conserved three-pronged pattern of hydrophobicity, termed the tridentate (TD) region. The primary sequence of the TD region is highly conserved in all 490 HCV strains currently reported. The known fusion peptide loops of TBEV and SFV share the characteristic TD region hydrophobicity profile and significant sequence conservation in the TD region was identified in the E and E1 glycoproteins of members of the Flaviviridae and Togaviridae families, respectively. The HCV TD region peptides have membranotropic activity; in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, the HCV TD region peptides insert into in a biomimetic bilayer in a similar manner to the TBEV fusion peptide and the peptides induce effective mixing of lipid membranes in a liposome fusion assay. Together these results indicate that the highly conserved TD region of the HCV E2 protein is a fusion peptide candidate and may be an important factor in the class II fusion mechanism.

  15. Structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin reveals a putative mechanism of conformational activation for protease entrapment

    PubMed Central

    Fyfe, Cameron D.; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Wall, Daniel M.; Burchmore, Richard J. S.; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial α-2-macroglobulins have been suggested to function in defence as broad-spectrum inhibitors of host proteases that breach the outer membrane. Here, the X-ray structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. In this competitive mechanism, protease cleavage of the bait-region domain results in the untethering of an intrinsically disordered region of this domain which disrupts native interdomain interactions that maintain E. coli α-2-macroglobulin in the inactivated form. The resulting global conformational change results in entrapment of the protease and activation of the thioester bond that covalently links to the attacking protease. Owing to the similarity in structure and domain architecture of Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin and human α-2-macro­globulin, this protease-activation mechanism is likely to operate across the diverse members of this group. PMID:26143919

  16. The structure of KPN03535 (gi|152972051), a novel putative lipoprotein from Klebsiella pneumoniae, reveals an OB-fold

    PubMed Central

    Das, Debanu; Kozbial, Piotr; Han, Gye Won; Carlton, Dennis; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Chiu, Michelle; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Ellrott, Kyle; Elsliger, Marc-André; Ernst, Dustin; Farr, Carol L.; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grzechnik, Anna; Grant, Joanna C.; Jin, Kevin K.; Johnson, Hope A.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Krishna, S. Sri; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Miller, Mitchell D.; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Oommachen, Silvya; Paulsen, Jessica; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Wooten, Tiffany; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    KPN03535 (gi|152972051) is a putative lipoprotein of unknown function that is secreted by Klebsiella pneumoniae MGH 78578. The crystal structure reveals that despite a lack of any detectable sequence similarity to known structures, it is a novel variant of the OB-fold and structurally similar to the bacterial Cpx-pathway protein NlpE, single-stranded DNA-binding (SSB) proteins and toxins. K. pneumoniae MGH 78578 forms part of the normal human skin, mouth and gut flora and is an opportunistic pathogen that is linked to about 8% of all hospital-acquired infections in the USA. This structure provides the foundation for further investigations into this divergent member of the OB-fold family. PMID:20944219

  17. Comparative Genomics of the Zoonotic Pathogen Ehrlichia chaffeensis Reveals Candidate Type IV Effectors and Putative Host Cell Targets

    PubMed Central

    Noroy, Christophe; Meyer, Damien F.

    2017-01-01

    During infection, some intracellular pathogenic bacteria use a dedicated multiprotein complex known as the type IV secretion system to deliver type IV effector (T4E) proteins inside the host cell. These T4Es allow the bacteria to evade host defenses and to subvert host cell processes to their own advantage. Ehrlichia chaffeensis is a tick-transmitted obligate intracellular pathogenic bacterium, which causes human monocytic ehrlichiosis. Using comparative whole genome analysis, we identified the relationship between eight available E. chaffeensis genomes isolated from humans and show that these genomes are highly conserved. We identified the candidate core type IV effectome of E. chaffeensis and some conserved intracellular adaptive strategies. We assigned the West Paces strain to genetic group II and predicted the repertoires of T4Es encoded by E. chaffeensis genomes, as well as some putative host cell targets. We demonstrated that predicted T4Es are preferentially distributed in gene sparse regions of the genome. In addition to the identification of the two known type IV effectors of Anaplasmataceae, we identified two novel candidates T4Es, ECHLIB_RS02720 and ECHLIB_RS04640, which are not present in all E. chaffeensis strains and could explain some variations in inter-strain virulence. We also identified another novel candidate T4E, ECHLIB_RS02720, a hypothetical protein exhibiting EPIYA, and NLS domains as well as a classical type IV secretion signal, suggesting an important role inside the host cell. Overall, our results agree with current knowledge of Ehrlichia molecular pathogenesis, and reveal novel candidate T4Es that require experimental validation. This work demonstrates that comparative effectomics enables identification of important host pathways targeted by the bacterial pathogen. Our study, which focuses on the type IV effector repertoires among several strains of E. chaffeensis species, is an original approach and provides rational putative targets

  18. Global transcription profiling reveals differential responses to chronic nitrogen stress and putative nitrogen regulatory components in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Yong-Mei; Wang, Rong-Lin; Zhu, Tong; Rothstein, Steven J

    2007-01-01

    Background A large quantity of nitrogen (N) fertilizer is used for crop production to achieve high yields at a significant economic and environmental cost. Efforts have been directed to understanding the molecular basis of plant responses to N and identifying N-responsive genes in order to manipulate their expression, thus enabling plants to use N more efficiently. No studies have yet delineated these responses at the transcriptional level when plants are grown under chronic N stress and the understanding of regulatory elements involved in N response is very limited. Results To further our understanding of the response of plants to varying N levels, a growth system was developed where N was the growth-limiting factor. An Arabidopsis whole genome microarray was used to evaluate global gene expression under different N conditions. Differentially expressed genes under mild or severe chronic N stress were identified. Mild N stress triggered only a small set of genes significantly different at the transcriptional level, which are largely involved in various stress responses. Plant responses were much more pronounced under severe N stress, involving a large number of genes in many different biological processes. Differentially expressed genes were also identified in response to short- and long-term N availability increases. Putative N regulatory elements were determined along with several previously known motifs involved in the responses to N and carbon availability as well as plant stress. Conclusion Differentially expressed genes identified provide additional insights into the coordination of the complex N responses of plants and the components of the N response mechanism. Putative N regulatory elements were identified to reveal possible new components of the regulatory network for plant N responses. A better understanding of the complex regulatory network for plant N responses will help lead to strategies to improve N use efficiency. PMID:17705847

  19. Complete WO Phage Sequences Reveal Their Dynamic Evolutionary Trajectories and Putative Functional Elements Required for Integration into the Wolbachia Genome▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Kohjiro; Furukawa, Seiichi; Nikoh, Naruo; Sasaki, Tetsuhiko; Fukatsu, Takema

    2009-01-01

    Wolbachia endosymbionts are ubiquitously found in diverse insects including many medical and hygienic pests, causing a variety of reproductive phenotypes, such as cytoplasmic incompatibility, and thereby efficiently spreading in host insect populations. Recently, Wolbachia-mediated approaches to pest control and management have been proposed, but the application of these approaches has been hindered by the lack of genetic transformation techniques for symbiotic bacteria. Here, we report the genome and structure of active bacteriophages from a Wolbachia endosymbiont. From the Wolbachia strain wCauB infecting the moth Ephestia kuehniella two closely related WO prophages, WOcauB2 of 43,016 bp with 47 open reading frames (ORFs) and WOcauB3 of 45,078 bp with 46 ORFs, were characterized. In each of the prophage genomes, an integrase gene and an attachment site core sequence were identified, which are putatively involved in integration and excision of the mobile genetic elements. The 3′ region of the prophages encoded genes with sequence motifs related to bacterial virulence and protein-protein interactions, which might represent effector molecules that affect cellular processes and functions of their host bacterium and/or insect. Database searches and phylogenetic analyses revealed that the prophage genes have experienced dynamic evolutionary trajectories. Genes similar to the prophage genes were found across divergent bacterial phyla, highlighting the active and mobile nature of the genetic elements. We suggest that the active WO prophage genomes and their constituent sequence elements would provide a clue to development of a genetic transformation vector for Wolbachia endosymbionts. PMID:19592535

  20. Mobilization of horizontally acquired island 2 is induced in planta in the phytopathogen Pectobacterium atrosepticum SCRI1043 and involves the putative relaxase ECA0613 and quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Vanga, Bhanupratap R; Ramakrishnan, Pavithra; Butler, Ruth C; Toth, Ian K; Ronson, Clive W; Jacobs, Jeanne M E; Pitman, Andrew R

    2015-11-01

    Integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs) contribute to the rapid evolution of bacterial pathogens via horizontal gene transfer of virulence determinants. ICEs have common mechanisms for transmission, yet the cues triggering this process under natural environmental or physiological conditions are largely unknown. In this study, mobilization of the putative ICE horizontally acquired island 2 (HAI2), present in the chromosome of the phytopathogen Pectobacterium atrosepticum SCRI1043, was examined during infection of the host plant potato. Under these conditions, mobilization of HAI2 increased markedly compared with in vitro cultures. In planta-induced mobilization of HAI2 was regulated by quorum sensing and involved the putative ICE-encoded relaxase ECA0613. Disruption of ECA0613 also reduced transcription of genes involved in production of coronafacic acid (Cfa), the major virulence factor harboured on HAI2, whereas their expression was unaffected in the quorum-sensing (expI) mutant. Thus, suppression of cfa gene expression was not regulated by the mobilization of the ICE per se, but was due directly to inactivation of the relaxase. The identification of genetic factors associated solely with in planta mobilization of an ICE demonstrates that this process is highly adapted to the natural environment of the bacterial host and can influence the expression of virulence determinants.

  1. Cryo-electron microscopy structure of human peroxiredoxin-3 filament reveals the assembly of a putative chaperone.

    PubMed

    Radjainia, Mazdak; Venugopal, Hariprasad; Desfosses, Ambroise; Phillips, Amy J; Yewdall, N Amy; Hampton, Mark B; Gerrard, Juliet A; Mitra, Alok K

    2015-05-05

    Peroxiredoxins (Prxs) are a ubiquitous class of thiol-dependent peroxidases that play an important role in the protection and response of cells to oxidative stress. The catalytic unit of typical 2-Cys Prxs are homodimers, which can self-associate to form complex assemblies that are hypothesized to have signaling and chaperone activity. Mitochondrial Prx3 forms dodecameric toroids, which can further stack to form filaments, the so-called high-molecular-weight (HMW) form that has putative holdase activity. We used single-particle analysis and helical processing of electron cryomicroscopy images of human Prx3 filaments induced by low pH to generate a ∼7-Å resolution 3D structure of the HMW form, the first such structure for a 2-Cys Prx. The pseudo-atomic model reveals interactions that promote the stacking of the toroids and shows that unlike previously reported data, the structure can accommodate a partially folded C terminus. The HMW filament lumen displays hydrophobic patches, which we hypothesize bestow holdase activity.

  2. Genetic and Genomic Diversity Studies of Acacia Symbionts in Senegal Reveal New Species of Mesorhizobium with a Putative Geographical Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Diouf, Fatou; Diouf, Diegane; Klonowska, Agnieszka; Le Queré, Antoine; Bakhoum, Niokhor; Fall, Dioumacor; Neyra, Marc; Parrinello, Hugues; Diouf, Mayecor; Ndoye, Ibrahima; Moulin, Lionel

    2015-01-01

    Acacia senegal (L) Willd. and Acacia seyal Del. are highly nitrogen-fixing and moderately salt tolerant species. In this study we focused on the genetic and genomic diversity of Acacia mesorhizobia symbionts from diverse origins in Senegal and investigated possible correlations between the genetic diversity of the strains, their soil of origin, and their tolerance to salinity. We first performed a multi-locus sequence analysis on five markers gene fragments on a collection of 47 mesorhizobia strains of A. senegal and A. seyal from 8 localities. Most of the strains (60%) clustered with the M. plurifarium type strain ORS 1032T, while the others form four new clades (MSP1 to MSP4). We sequenced and assembled seven draft genomes: four in the M. plurifarium clade (ORS3356, ORS3365, STM8773 and ORS1032T), one in MSP1 (STM8789), MSP2 (ORS3359) and MSP3 (ORS3324). The average nucleotide identities between these genomes together with the MLSA analysis reveal three new species of Mesorhizobium. A great variability of salt tolerance was found among the strains with a lack of correlation between the genetic diversity of mesorhizobia, their salt tolerance and the soils samples characteristics. A putative geographical pattern of A. senegal symbionts between the dryland north part and the center of Senegal was found, reflecting adaptations to specific local conditions such as the water regime. However, the presence of salt does not seem to be an important structuring factor of Mesorhizobium species. PMID:25658650

  3. Genetic and genomic diversity studies of Acacia symbionts in Senegal reveal new species of Mesorhizobium with a putative geographical pattern.

    PubMed

    Diouf, Fatou; Diouf, Diegane; Klonowska, Agnieszka; Le Queré, Antoine; Bakhoum, Niokhor; Fall, Dioumacor; Neyra, Marc; Parrinello, Hugues; Diouf, Mayecor; Ndoye, Ibrahima; Moulin, Lionel

    2015-01-01

    Acacia senegal (L) Willd. and Acacia seyal Del. are highly nitrogen-fixing and moderately salt tolerant species. In this study we focused on the genetic and genomic diversity of Acacia mesorhizobia symbionts from diverse origins in Senegal and investigated possible correlations between the genetic diversity of the strains, their soil of origin, and their tolerance to salinity. We first performed a multi-locus sequence analysis on five markers gene fragments on a collection of 47 mesorhizobia strains of A. senegal and A. seyal from 8 localities. Most of the strains (60%) clustered with the M. plurifarium type strain ORS 1032T, while the others form four new clades (MSP1 to MSP4). We sequenced and assembled seven draft genomes: four in the M. plurifarium clade (ORS3356, ORS3365, STM8773 and ORS1032T), one in MSP1 (STM8789), MSP2 (ORS3359) and MSP3 (ORS3324). The average nucleotide identities between these genomes together with the MLSA analysis reveal three new species of Mesorhizobium. A great variability of salt tolerance was found among the strains with a lack of correlation between the genetic diversity of mesorhizobia, their salt tolerance and the soils samples characteristics. A putative geographical pattern of A. senegal symbionts between the dryland north part and the center of Senegal was found, reflecting adaptations to specific local conditions such as the water regime. However, the presence of salt does not seem to be an important structuring factor of Mesorhizobium species.

  4. Cytoplasmic dynamics reveals two modes of nucleoid-dependent mobility.

    PubMed

    Stylianidou, Stella; Kuwada, Nathan J; Wiggins, Paul A

    2014-12-02

    It has been proposed that forces resulting from the physical exclusion of macromolecules from the bacterial nucleoid play a central role in organizing the bacterial cell, yet this proposal has not been quantitatively tested. To investigate this hypothesis, we mapped the generic motion of large protein complexes in the bacterial cytoplasm through quantitative analysis of thousands of complete cell-cycle trajectories of fluorescently tagged ectopic MS2-mRNA complexes. We find the motion of these complexes in the cytoplasm is strongly dependent on their spatial position along the long axis of the cell, and that their dynamics are consistent with a quantitative model that requires only nucleoid exclusion and membrane confinement. This analysis also reveals that the nucleoid increases the mobility of MS2-mRNA complexes, resulting in a fourfold increase in diffusion coefficients between regions of the lowest and highest nucleoid density. These data provide strong quantitative support for two modes of nucleoid action: the widely accepted mechanism of nucleoid exclusion in organizing the cell and a newly proposed mode, in which the nucleoid facilitates rapid motion throughout the cytoplasm.

  5. Putatively novel serotypes and the potential for reduced vaccine effectiveness: capsular locus diversity revealed among 5405 pneumococcal genomes

    PubMed Central

    van Tonder, Andries J.; Bray, James E.; Quirk, Sigríður J.; Haraldsson, Gunnsteinn; Jolley, Keith A.; Maiden, Martin C. J.; Hoffmann, Steen; Bentley, Stephen D.; Haraldsson, Ásgeir; Erlendsdóttir, Helga; Kristinsson, Karl G.; Brueggemann, Angela B.

    2017-01-01

    The pneumococcus is a leading global pathogen and a key virulence factor possessed by the majority of pneumococci is an antigenic polysaccharide capsule (‘serotype’), which is encoded by the capsular (cps) locus. Approximately 100 different serotypes are known, but the extent of sequence diversity within the cps loci of individual serotypes is not well understood. Investigating serotype-specific sequence variation is crucial to the design of sequence-based serotyping methodology, understanding pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) effectiveness and the design of future PCVs. The availability of large genome datasets makes it possible to assess population-level variation among pneumococcal serotypes and in this study 5405 pneumococcal genomes were used to investigate cps locus diversity among 49 different serotypes. Pneumococci had been recovered between 1916 and 2014 from people of all ages living in 51 countries. Serotypes were deduced bioinformatically, cps locus sequences were extracted and variation was assessed within the cps locus, in the context of pneumococcal genetic lineages. Overall, cps locus sequence diversity varied markedly: low to moderate diversity was revealed among serogroups/types 1, 3, 7, 9, 11 and 22; whereas serogroups/types 6, 19, 23, 14, 15, 18, 33 and 35 displayed high diversity. Putative novel and/or hybrid cps loci were identified among all serogroups/types apart from 1, 3 and 9. This study demonstrated that cps locus sequence diversity varied widely between serogroups/types. Investigation of the biochemical structure of the polysaccharide capsule of major variants, particularly PCV-related serotypes and those that appear to be novel or hybrids, is warranted. PMID:28133541

  6. Transcriptomics Analysis Reveals Putative Genes Involved in Biofilm Formation and Biofilm-associated Drug Resistance of Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Seneviratne, Chaminda J; Suriyanarayanan, Tanujaa; Swarup, Sanjay; Chia, Kuan Hui Burton; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Zhang, Chengfei

    2017-06-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is a gram-positive bacterium associated with endodontic infections and is capable of forming biofilms that can confer drug resistance to the bacterium, resulting in treatment failure. Current knowledge on E. faecalis drug resistance is of a limited and conflicting nature. The present study examined the genetic basis of E. faecalis biofilm formation and drug resistance using a RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq)-based transcriptome approach. Eighteen clinical isolates of E. faecalis were screened for their biofilm formation abilities using the crystal violet assay, colony counting, and confocal imaging. Selected isolates were then evaluated for antibiotic susceptibility in planktonic and biofilm growth modes followed by RNA-Seq analysis of E. faecalis planktonic, biofilm, and vancomycin-treated biofilm samples and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes mapping in order to identify genes associated with biofilm formation and drug resistance of E. faecalis. All 18 clinical isolates retained biofilm formation ability and were classified as strong, weak, or laboratory American Type Culture Collection strainlike biofilm formers. Interestingly, both the strong and weak biofilm-forming isolates were uniformly resistant to ampicillin and vancomycin at the treated concentrations (256-4096 μg/mL). RNA-Seq analysis of these isolates identified a total of 163 and 101 differentially regulated genes in planktonic versus biofilm and vancomycin-treated biofilm versus biofilm comparisons, respectively, with significant differences in arsenic resistance operon genes arsR and arsD, sporulation regulatory gene paiA, ABC drug transporter classes, and penicillin-binding proteins. The present transcriptomic study revealed putative genes associated with E. faecalis biofilm formation and drug resistance, which will provide a foundation for improved therapeutic strategies against E. faecalis infections in the future. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists

  7. Ancient Pb and Ti mobilization revealed by Scanning Ion Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusiak, Monika A.; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Wilde, Simon A.

    2014-05-01

    Zircons from strongly layered early Archean ortho- and paragneisses in ultra-high temperature (UHT) metamorphic rocks of the Napier Complex, Enderby Land, East Antarctica are characterized by complex U-Th-Pb systematics [1,2,3]. A large number of zircons from three samples, Gage Ridge, Mount Sones and Dallwitz Nunatak, are reversely discordant (U/Pb ages older than 207Pb/206Pb ages) with the oldest date of 3.9 Ga [4] (for the grain from Gage Ridge orthogneiss). To further investigate this process, we utilized a novel high spatial resolution Scanning Ion Imaging technique on the CAMECA IMS 1280 at the Natural History Museum in Stockholm. Areas of 70 μm x 70 μm were selected for imaging in mono- and multicollection modes using a ~2 μm rastered primary beam to map out the distribution of 48Ti, 89Y, 180Hf, 232Th, 238U, 204Pb, 206Pb and 207Pb. The ion maps reveal variable distribution of certain elements within analysed grains that can be compared to their CL response. Yttrium, together with U and Th, exhibits zonation visible on the CL images, Hf shows expected minimal variation. Unusual patchiness is visible in the map for Ti and Pb distribution. The bright patches with enhanced signal do not correspond to any zones or to crystal imperfections (e.g. cracks). The presence of patchy titanium is likely to affect Ti-in-zircon thermometry, and patchy Pb affecting 207Pb/206Pb ages, usually considered as more robust for Archean zircons. Using the WinImage program, we produced 207Pb/206Pb ratio maps that allow calculation of 207Pb/206Pb ages for spots of any size within the frame of the picture and at any time after data collection. This provides a new and unique method for obtaining age information from zircon. These maps show areas of enhanced brightness where the 207Pb/206Pb ratio is higher and demonstrate that within these small areas (μm scale) the apparent 207Pb/206Pb age is older, in some of these patches even > 4 Ga. These data are a result of ancient Pb

  8. Comparative genomics of Clostridium bolteae and Clostridium clostridioforme reveals species-specific genomic properties and numerous putative antibiotic resistance determinants.

    PubMed

    Dehoux, Pierre; Marvaud, Jean Christophe; Abouelleil, Amr; Earl, Ashlee M; Lambert, Thierry; Dauga, Catherine

    2016-10-21

    Clostridium bolteae and Clostridium clostridioforme, previously included in the complex C. clostridioforme in the group Clostridium XIVa, remain difficult to distinguish by phenotypic methods. These bacteria, prevailing in the human intestinal microbiota, are opportunistic pathogens with various drug susceptibility patterns. In order to better characterize the two species and to obtain information on their antibiotic resistance genes, we analyzed the genomes of six strains of C. bolteae and six strains of C. clostridioforme, isolated from human infection. The genome length of C. bolteae varied from 6159 to 6398 kb, and 5719 to 6059 CDSs were detected. The genomes of C. clostridioforme were smaller, between 5467 and 5927 kb, and contained 5231 to 5916 CDSs. The two species display different metabolic pathways. The genomes of C. bolteae contained lactose operons involving PTS system and complex regulation, which contribute to phenotypic differentiation from C. clostridioforme. The Acetyl-CoA pathway, similar to that of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, a major butyrate producer in the human gut, was only found in C. clostridioforme. The two species have also developed diverse flagella mobility systems contributing to gut colonization. Their genomes harboured many CDSs involved in resistance to beta-lactams, glycopeptides, macrolides, chloramphenicol, lincosamides, rifampin, linezolid, bacitracin, aminoglycosides and tetracyclines. Overall antimicrobial resistance genes were similar within a species, but strain-specific resistance genes were found. We discovered a new group of genes coding for rifampin resistance in C. bolteae. C. bolteae 90B3 was resistant to phenicols and linezolide in producing a 23S rRNA methyltransferase. C. clostridioforme 90A8 contained the VanB-type Tn1549 operon conferring vancomycin resistance. We also detected numerous genes encoding proteins related to efflux pump systems. Genomic comparison of C. bolteae and C. clostridiofrome revealed

  9. Transcriptome Analysis of Blunt Snout Bream (Megalobrama amblycephala) Reveals Putative Differential Expression Genes Related to Growth and Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fu-Gui; Chen, Jie; Jiang, Xia-Yun; Zou, Shu-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala) is an important freshwater aquaculture species, but it is sensitive to hypoxia. No transcriptome data related to growth and hypoxia response are available for this species. In this study, we performed de novo transcriptome sequencing for the liver and gills of the fast-growth family and slow-growth family derived from ‘Pujiang No.1’ F10 blunt snout bream that were under hypoxic stress and normoxia, respectively. The fish were divided into the following 4 groups: fast-growth family under hypoxic stress, FH; slow-growth family under hypoxic stress, SH; fast-growth family under normoxia, FN; and slow-growth family under normoxia, SN. A total of 185 million high-quality reads were obtained from the normalized cDNA of the pooled samples, which were assembled into 465,582 contigs and 237,172 transcripts. A total of 31,338 transcripts from the same locus (unigenes) were annotated and assigned to 104 functional groups, and 23,103 unigenes were classified into seven main categories, including 45 secondary KEGG pathways. A total of 22,255 (71%) known putative unigenes were found to be shared across the genomes of five model fish species and mammals, and a substantial number (9.4%) of potentially novel genes were identified. When 6,639 unigenes were used in the analysis of differential expression (DE) genes, the number of putative DE genes related to growth pathways in FH, SH, SN and FN was 159, 118, 92 and 65 in both the liver and gills, respectively, and the number of DE genes related to hypoxic response was 57, 33, 23 and 21 in FH, FN, SH and SN, respectively. Our results suggest that growth performance of the fast-growth family should be due to complex mutual gene regulatory mechanisms of these putative DE genes between growth and hypoxia. PMID:26554582

  10. Single-cell lineage tracking analysis reveals that an established cell line comprises putative cancer stem cells and their heterogeneous progeny

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Sachiko; Rancourt, Ann; Sato, Yukiko; Satoh, Masahiko S.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian cell culture has been used in many biological studies on the assumption that a cell line comprises putatively homogeneous clonal cells, thereby sharing similar phenotypic features. This fundamental assumption has not yet been fully tested; therefore, we developed a method for the chronological analysis of individual HeLa cells. The analysis was performed by live cell imaging, tracking of every single cell recorded on imaging videos, and determining the fates of individual cells. We found that cell fate varied significantly, indicating that, in contrast to the assumption, the HeLa cell line is composed of highly heterogeneous cells. Furthermore, our results reveal that only a limited number of cells are immortal and renew themselves, giving rise to the remaining cells. These cells have reduced reproductive ability, creating a functionally heterogeneous cell population. Hence, the HeLa cell line is maintained by the limited number of immortal cells, which could be putative cancer stem cells. PMID:27003384

  11. Phloem Proteomics Reveals New Lipid-Binding Proteins with a Putative Role in Lipid-Mediated Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Barbaglia, Allison M.; Tamot, Banita; Greve, Veronica; Hoffmann-Benning, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Global climate changes inversely affect our ability to grow the food required for an increasing world population. To combat future crop loss due to abiotic stress, we need to understand the signals responsible for changes in plant development and the resulting adaptations, especially the signaling molecules traveling long-distance through the plant phloem. Using a proteomics approach, we had identified several putative lipid-binding proteins in the phloem exudates. Simultaneously, we identified several complex lipids as well as jasmonates. These findings prompted us to propose that phloem (phospho-) lipids could act as long-distance developmental signals in response to abiotic stress, and that they are released, sensed, and moved by phloem lipid-binding proteins (Benning et al., 2012). Indeed, the proteins we identified include lipases that could release a signaling lipid into the phloem, putative receptor components, and proteins that could mediate lipid-movement. To test this possible protein-based lipid-signaling pathway, three of the proteins, which could potentially act in a relay, are characterized here: (I) a putative GDSL-motif lipase (II) a PIG-P-like protein, with a possible receptor-like function; (III) and PLAFP (phloem lipid-associated family protein), a predicted lipid-binding protein of unknown function. Here we show that all three proteins bind lipids, in particular phosphatidic acid (PtdOH), which is known to participate in intracellular stress signaling. Genes encoding these proteins are expressed in the vasculature, a prerequisite for phloem transport. Cellular localization studies show that the proteins are not retained in the endoplasmic reticulum but surround the cell in a spotted pattern that has been previously observed with receptors and plasmodesmatal proteins. Abiotic signals that induce the production of PtdOH also regulate the expression of GDSL-lipase and PLAFP, albeit in opposite patterns. Our findings suggest that while all three

  12. Phloem proteomics reveals new lipid-binding proteins with a putative role in lipid-mediated signaling

    DOE PAGES

    Barbaglia, Allison M.; Tamot, Banita; Greve, Veronica; ...

    2016-04-28

    Global climate changes inversely affect our ability to grow the food required for an increasing world population. To combat future crop loss due to abiotic stress, we need to understand the signals responsible for changes in plant development and the resulting adaptations, especially the signaling molecules traveling long-distance through the plant phloem. Using a proteomics approach, we had identified several putative lipid-binding proteins in the phloem exudates. Simultaneously, we identified several complex lipids as well as jasmonates. These findings prompted us to propose that phloem (phospho-) lipids could act as long-distance developmental signals in response to abiotic stress, and thatmore » they are released, sensed, and moved by phloem lipid-binding proteins (Benning et al., 2012). Indeed, the proteins we identified include lipases that could release a signaling lipid into the phloem, putative receptor components, and proteins that could mediate lipid-movement. To test this possible protein-based lipid-signaling pathway, three of the proteins, which could potentially act in a relay, are characterized here: (I) a putative GDSL-motif lipase (II) a PIG-P-like protein, with a possible receptor-like function; (III) and PLAFP (phloem lipid-associated family protein), a predicted lipid-binding protein of unknown function. Here we show that all three proteins bind lipids, in particular phosphatidic acid (PtdOH), which is known to participate in intracellular stress signaling. Genes encoding these proteins are expressed in the vasculature, a prerequisite for phloem transport. Cellular localization studies show that the proteins are not retained in the endoplasmic reticulum but surround the cell in a spotted pattern that has been previously observed with receptors and plasmodesmatal proteins. Abiotic signals that induce the production of PtdOH also regulate the expression of GDSL-lipase and PLAFP, albeit in opposite patterns. Our findings suggest that while all

  13. Phloem proteomics reveals new lipid-binding proteins with a putative role in lipid-mediated signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Barbaglia, Allison M.; Tamot, Banita; Greve, Veronica; Hoffmann-Benning, Susanne

    2016-04-28

    Global climate changes inversely affect our ability to grow the food required for an increasing world population. To combat future crop loss due to abiotic stress, we need to understand the signals responsible for changes in plant development and the resulting adaptations, especially the signaling molecules traveling long-distance through the plant phloem. Using a proteomics approach, we had identified several putative lipid-binding proteins in the phloem exudates. Simultaneously, we identified several complex lipids as well as jasmonates. These findings prompted us to propose that phloem (phospho-) lipids could act as long-distance developmental signals in response to abiotic stress, and that they are released, sensed, and moved by phloem lipid-binding proteins (Benning et al., 2012). Indeed, the proteins we identified include lipases that could release a signaling lipid into the phloem, putative receptor components, and proteins that could mediate lipid-movement. To test this possible protein-based lipid-signaling pathway, three of the proteins, which could potentially act in a relay, are characterized here: (I) a putative GDSL-motif lipase (II) a PIG-P-like protein, with a possible receptor-like function; (III) and PLAFP (phloem lipid-associated family protein), a predicted lipid-binding protein of unknown function. Here we show that all three proteins bind lipids, in particular phosphatidic acid (PtdOH), which is known to participate in intracellular stress signaling. Genes encoding these proteins are expressed in the vasculature, a prerequisite for phloem transport. Cellular localization studies show that the proteins are not retained in the endoplasmic reticulum but surround the cell in a spotted pattern that has been previously observed with receptors and plasmodesmatal proteins. Abiotic signals that induce the production of PtdOH also regulate the expression of GDSL-lipase and PLAFP, albeit in opposite patterns. Our findings suggest that while all three

  14. New Putative Chloroplast Vesicle Transport Components and Cargo Proteins Revealed Using a Bioinformatics Approach: An Arabidopsis Model

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Nadir Zaman; Lindquist, Emelie; Aronsson, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Proteins and lipids are known to be transported to targeted cytosolic compartments in vesicles. A similar system in chloroplasts is suggested to transfer lipids from the inner envelope to the thylakoids. However, little is known about both possible cargo proteins and the proteins required to build a functional vesicle transport system in chloroplasts. A few components have been suggested, but only one (CPSAR1) has a verified location in chloroplast vesicles. This protein is localized in the donor membrane (envelope) and vesicles, but not in the target membrane (thylakoids) suggesting it plays a similar role to a cytosolic homologue, Sar1, in the secretory pathway. Thus, we hypothesized that there may be more similarities, in addition to lipid transport, between the vesicle transport systems in the cytosol and chloroplast, i.e. similar vesicle transport components, possible cargo proteins and receptors. Therefore, using a bioinformatics approach we searched for putative chloroplast components in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, corresponding mainly to components of the cytosolic vesicle transport system that may act in coordination with previously proposed COPII chloroplast homologues. We found several additional possible components, supporting the notion of a fully functional vesicle transport system in chloroplasts. Moreover, we found motifs in thylakoid-located proteins similar to those of COPII vesicle cargo proteins, supporting the hypothesis that chloroplast vesicles may transport thylakoid proteins from the envelope to the thylakoid membrane. Several putative cargo proteins are involved in photosynthesis, thus we propose the existence of a novel thylakoid protein pathway that is important for construction and maintenance of the photosynthetic machinery. PMID:23573218

  15. Serial analysis of gene expression in sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) leaves revealed alternative C4 metabolism and putative antisense transcripts.

    PubMed

    Calsa, Tercilio; Figueira, Antonio

    2007-04-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) is a highly efficient biomass and sugar producing crop. Leaf reactions have been considered as potential rate-limiting step for sucrose accumulation in sugarcane stalks. To characterize the sugarcane leaf transcriptome, field-grown mature leaves from cultivar "SP80-3280" were analyzed using Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE). From 480 sequenced clones, 9,482 valid tags were extracted, with 5,227 unique sequences, from which 3,659 (70%) matched at least a sugarcane assembled sequence (SAS) with putative function; while 872 tags (16.7%) matched SAS with unknown function; 523 (10%) matched SAS without a putative annotation; and only 173 (3.3%) did not match any sugarcane ESTs. Based on gene ontology (GO), photosystem (PS) I reaction center was identified as the most frequent gene product location, followed by the remaining sites of PS I, PS II and thylakoid complexes. For metabolic processes, photosynthesis light harvesting complexes; carbon fixation; and chlorophyll biosynthesis were the most enriched GO-terms. Considering the alternative photosynthetic C(4) cycles, tag frequencies related to phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and aspartate aminotransferase compared to those for NADP(+)-malic enzyme (NADP-ME) and NADP-malate dehydrogenase, suggested that PEPCK-type decarboxylation appeared to predominate over NADP-ME in mature leaves, although both may occur, opposite to currently assumed in sugarcane. From the unique tag set, 894 tags (17.1%) were assigned as potentially derived from antisense transcripts, while 73 tags (1.4%) were assigned to more than one SAS, suggesting the occurrence of alternative processing. The occurrence of antisense was validated by quantitative reverse transcription amplification. Sugarcane leaf transcriptome provided new insights for functional studies associated with sucrose synthesis and accumulation.

  16. Deep Sequencing Analysis of RNAs from Citrus Plants Grown in a Citrus Sudden Death-Affected Area Reveals Diverse Known and Putative Novel Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Emilyn E.; Coletta-Filho, Helvécio D.; Nouri, Shahideh; Falk, Bryce W.; Nerva, Luca; Oliveira, Tiago S.; Dorta, Silvia O.; Machado, Marcos A.

    2017-01-01

    Citrus sudden death (CSD) has caused the death of approximately four million orange trees in a very important citrus region in Brazil. Although its etiology is still not completely clear, symptoms and distribution of affected plants indicate a viral disease. In a search for viruses associated with CSD, we have performed a comparative high-throughput sequencing analysis of the transcriptome and small RNAs from CSD-symptomatic and -asymptomatic plants using the Illumina platform. The data revealed mixed infections that included Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) as the most predominant virus, followed by the Citrus sudden death-associated virus (CSDaV), Citrus endogenous pararetrovirus (CitPRV) and two putative novel viruses tentatively named Citrus jingmen-like virus (CJLV), and Citrus virga-like virus (CVLV). The deep sequencing analyses were sensitive enough to differentiate two genotypes of both viruses previously associated with CSD-affected plants: CTV and CSDaV. Our data also showed a putative association of the CSD-symptomatic plants with a specific CSDaV genotype and a likely association with CitPRV as well, whereas the two putative novel viruses showed to be more associated with CSD-asymptomatic plants. This is the first high-throughput sequencing-based study of the viral sequences present in CSD-affected citrus plants, and generated valuable information for further CSD studies. PMID:28441782

  17. Genetic Characterization of Plasmodium Putative Pantothenate Kinase Genes Reveals Their Essential Role in Malaria Parasite Transmission to the Mosquito

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Robert J.; Cornillot, Emmanuel; Abraham, Amanah; Molina, Emily; Nation, Catherine S.; Ben Mamoun, Choukri; Aly, Ahmed S. I.

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic machinery for the biosynthesis of Coenzyme A (CoA) from exogenous pantothenic acid (Vitamin B5) has long been considered as an excellent target for the development of selective antimicrobials. Earlier studies in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum have shown that pantothenate analogs interfere with pantothenate phosphorylation and block asexual blood stage development. Although two eukaryotic-type putative pantothenate kinase genes (PanK1 and PanK2) have been identified in all malaria parasite species, their role in the development of Plasmodium life cycle stages remains unknown. Here we report on the genetic characterization of PanK1 and PanK2 in P. yoelii. We show that P. yoelii parasites lacking either PanK1 or PanK2 undergo normal asexual stages development and sexual stages differentiation, however they are severely deficient in ookinete, oocyst and sporozoite formation inside the mosquito vector. Quantitative transcriptional analyses in wild-type and knockout parasites demonstrate an important role for these genes in the regulation of expression of other CoA biosynthesis genes. Together, our data provide the first genetic evidence for the importance of the early steps of pantothenate utilization in the regulation of CoA biosynthesis and malaria parasite transmission to Anopheles mosquitoes. PMID:27644319

  18. Analyses of copy number variation reveal putative susceptibility loci in MTX-induced mouse neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianhua; Wang, Xiuwei; Guan, Tao; Xiang, Qian; Wang, Mingsheng; Zhang, Zhi; Guan, Zhen; Wang, Guoliang; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Xie, Qiu; Li, Guannan; Guo, Jin; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Zhengguo; Niu, Bo; Zhang, Ting

    2014-09-01

    Copy number variations (CNVs) are thought to act as an important genetic mechanism underlying phenotypic heterogeneity. Impaired folate metabolism can result in neural tube defects (NTDs). However, the precise nature of the relationship between low folate status and NTDs remains unclear. Using an array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) assay, we investigated whether CNVs could be detected in the NTD embryonic neural tissues of methotrexate (MTX)-induced folate dysmetabolism pregnant C57BL/6 mice and confirmed the findings with quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). The CNVs were then comprehensively investigated using bioinformatics methods to prioritize candidate genes. We measured dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) activity and concentrations of folate and relevant metabolites in maternal serum using enzymologic method and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). Three high confidence CNVs on XqA1.1, XqA1.1-qA2, and XqE3 were found in the NTD embryonic neural tissues. Twelve putative genes and three microRNAs were identified as potential susceptibility candidates in MTX-induced NTDs and possible roles in NTD pathogenesis. DHFR activity and 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-MeTHF), 5-formyltetrahydrofolate (5-FoTHF), and S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) concentrations of maternal serum decreased significantly after MTX injection. These findings suggest that CNVs caused by defects in folate metabolism lead to NTD, and further support the hypothesis that folate dysmetabolism is a direct cause for CNVs in MTX-induced NTDs.

  19. Genetic Characterization of Plasmodium Putative Pantothenate Kinase Genes Reveals Their Essential Role in Malaria Parasite Transmission to the Mosquito.

    PubMed

    Hart, Robert J; Cornillot, Emmanuel; Abraham, Amanah; Molina, Emily; Nation, Catherine S; Ben Mamoun, Choukri; Aly, Ahmed S I

    2016-09-20

    The metabolic machinery for the biosynthesis of Coenzyme A (CoA) from exogenous pantothenic acid (Vitamin B5) has long been considered as an excellent target for the development of selective antimicrobials. Earlier studies in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum have shown that pantothenate analogs interfere with pantothenate phosphorylation and block asexual blood stage development. Although two eukaryotic-type putative pantothenate kinase genes (PanK1 and PanK2) have been identified in all malaria parasite species, their role in the development of Plasmodium life cycle stages remains unknown. Here we report on the genetic characterization of PanK1 and PanK2 in P. yoelii. We show that P. yoelii parasites lacking either PanK1 or PanK2 undergo normal asexual stages development and sexual stages differentiation, however they are severely deficient in ookinete, oocyst and sporozoite formation inside the mosquito vector. Quantitative transcriptional analyses in wild-type and knockout parasites demonstrate an important role for these genes in the regulation of expression of other CoA biosynthesis genes. Together, our data provide the first genetic evidence for the importance of the early steps of pantothenate utilization in the regulation of CoA biosynthesis and malaria parasite transmission to Anopheles mosquitoes.

  20. Comparative genomics reveals mobile pathogenicity chromosomes in Fusarium

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Li Jun; van der Does, H. C.; Borkovich, Katherine A.; Coleman, Jeffrey J.; Daboussi, Marie-Jose; Di Pietro, Antonio; Dufresne, Marie; Freitag, Michael; Grabherr, Manfred; Henrissat, Bernard; Houterman, Petra M.; Kang, Seogchan; Shim, Won-Bo; Wolochuk, Charles; Xie, Xiaohui; Xu, Jin Rong; Antoniw, John; Baker, Scott E.; Bluhm, Burton H.; Breakspear, Andrew; Brown, Daren W.; Butchko, Robert A.; Chapman, Sinead; Coulson, Richard; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Danchin, Etienne G.; Diener, Andrew; Gale, Liane R.; Gardiner, Donald; Goff, Steven; Hammond-Kossack, Kim; Hilburn, Karen; Hua-Van, Aurelie; Jonkers, Wilfried; Kazan, Kemal; Kodira, Chinnappa D.; Koehrsen, Michael; Kumar, Lokesh; Lee, Yong Hwan; Li, Liande; Manners, John M.; Miranda-Saavedra, Diego; Mukherjee, Mala; Park, Gyungsoon; Park, Jongsun; Park, Sook Young; Proctor, Robert H.; Regev, Aviv; Ruiz-Roldan, M. C.; Sain, Divya; Sakthikumar, Sharadha; Sykes, Sean; Schwartz, David C.; Turgeon, Barbara G.; Wapinski, Ilan; Yoder, Olen; Young, Sarah; Zeng, Qiandong; Zhou, Shiguo; Galagan, James; Cuomo, Christina A.; Kistler, H. Corby; Rep, Martijn

    2010-03-18

    Fusarium species are among the most important phytopathogenic and toxigenic fungi, having significant impact on crop production and animal health. Distinctively, members of the F. oxysporum species complex exhibit wide host range but discontinuously distributed host specificity, reflecting remarkable genetic adaptability. To understand the molecular underpinnings of diverse phenotypic traits and their evolution in Fusarium, we compared the genomes of three economically important and phylogenetically related, yet phenotypically diverse plant-pathogenic species, F. graminearum, F. verticillioides and F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. Our analysis revealed greatly expanded lineage-specific (LS) genomic regions in F. oxysporum that include four entire chromosomes, accounting for more than one-quarter of the genome. LS regions are rich in transposons and genes with distinct evolutionary profiles but related to pathogenicity. Experimentally, we demonstrate for the first time the transfer of two LS chromosomes between strains of F. oxysporum, resulting in the conversion of a non-pathogenic strain into a pathogen. Transfer of LS chromosomes between otherwise genetically isolated strains explains the polyphyletic origin of host specificity and the emergence of new pathogenic lineages in the F. oxysporum species complex, putting the evolution of fungal pathogenicity into a new perspective.

  1. Fine mapping of shattering locus Br2 reveals a putative chromosomal inversion polymorphism between the two lineages of Aegilops tauschii.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengzhi; Zhu, Huilan; Gill, Bikram S; Li, Wanlong

    2015-04-01

    This work laid the foundation for cloning of shattering gene Br2 and provided first line of evidence that two major Aegilops tauschii lineages are differentiated by an inversion polymorphism. Chromosome inversions often accompany population differentiation and capture local adaptation during speciation. Aegilops tauschii, the D-genome donor species of hexaploid wheat, consists of two genetically isolated lineages, L1 and L2, but little is known about the genetic mechanisms underlying the population differentiation in this diploid species. During fine mapping of the shattering gene Br2 using a large F2 population derived from a cross between TA1604 (an L1 accession) and AL8/78 (an L2 accession), we found contrasting patterns of crossover distribution in the Br2 interval and neighboring regions despite the high local gene synteny with Brachypodium distachyon and rice. Br2 was localized in a 0.08-cM interval, and 13 marker loci formed a block, where single-crossovers were completely suppressed, but double-crossovers were enriched with a recombination rate of ~11 cM/Mb. In contrast, in a neighboring region no double-crossover was recovered, but single-crossover rate reached 24 cM/Mb, which is much higher than the genome-wide average. This result suggests a putative inversion polymorphism between the parental lines in the Br2 region. Genotyping using the markers from the Br2 region divided a collection of 55 randomly sampled A. tauschii accessions into two major groups, and they are largely genetically isolated. The two groups correspond to the L1 and L2 lineages based on their geographic distribution patterns. This provides first evidence that inversions may underlie the evolution of A. tauschii lineages. The presence of inter-lineage inversions may complicate map-based cloning in A. tauschii and transfer of useful traits to wheat.

  2. De novo sequencing analysis of the Rosa roxburghii fruit transcriptome reveals putative ascorbate biosynthetic genes and EST-SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiuqin; Zhang, Xue; Lu, Min; He, Yong; An, Huaming

    2015-04-25

    Rosa roxburghii Tratt. is a well-known ornamental rose species native to China. In addition, the fruits of this species are valued for their nutritional and medicinal characteristics, especially their high ascorbic acid (AsA) levels. Nevertheless, AsA biosynthesis in R. roxburghii fruit has not been explored in detail because of a lack of genomic resources for this species. High-throughput transcriptomic sequencing generating large volumes of transcript sequence data can aid in gene discovery and molecular marker development. In this study, we generated more than 53 million clean reads using Illumina paired-end sequencing technology. De novo assembly yielded 106,590 unigenes, with an average length of 343 bp. On the basis of sequence similarity to known proteins, 9301 and 2393 unigenes were classified into Gene Ontology and Clusters of Orthologous Group categories, respectively. There were 7480 unigenes assigned to 124 pathways in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Gene and Genome pathway database. BLASTx searches identified 498 unique putative transcripts encoding various transcription factors, some known to regulate fruit development. qRT-PCR validated the expressions of most of the genes encoding the main enzymes involved in ascorbate biosynthesis. In addition, 9131 potential simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci were identified among the unigenes. One hundred and two primer pairs were synthesized and 71 pairs produced an amplification product during initial screening. Among the amplified products, 30 were polymorphic in the 16 R. roxburghii germplasms tested. Our study was the first to produce a large volume of transcriptome data from R. roxburghii. The resulting sequence collection is a valuable resource for gene discovery and marker-assisted selective breeding in this rose species.

  3. Mobilization of Intracellular Copper by Gossypol and Apogossypolone Leads to Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Cell Death: Putative Anticancer Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zubair, Haseeb; Azim, Shafquat; Khan, Husain Yar; Ullah, Mohammad Fahad; Wu, Daocheng; Singh, Ajay Pratap; Hadi, Sheikh Mumtaz; Ahmad, Aamir

    2016-06-20

    There is compelling evidence that serum, tissue and intracellular levels of copper are elevated in all types of cancer. Copper has been suggested as an important co-factor for angiogenesis. It is also a major metal ion present inside the nucleus, bound to DNA bases, particularly guanine. We have earlier proposed that the interaction of phenolic-antioxidants with intracellular copper leads to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that ultimately serve as DNA cleaving agents. To further validate our hypothesis we show here that the antioxidant gossypol and its semi-synthetic derivative apogossypolone induce copper-mediated apoptosis in breast MDA-MB-231, prostate PC3 and pancreatic BxPC-3 cancer cells, through the generation of ROS. MCF10A breast epithelial cells refractory to the cytotoxic property of these compounds become sensitized to treatment against gossypol, as well as apogossypolone, when pre-incubated with copper. Our present results confirm our earlier findings and strengthen our hypothesis that plant-derived antioxidants mobilize intracellular copper instigating ROS-mediated cellular DNA breakage. As cancer cells exist under significant oxidative stress, this increase in ROS-stress to cytotoxic levels could be a successful anticancer approach.

  4. G-quadruplex prediction in E. coli genome reveals a conserved putative G-quadruplex-Hairpin-Duplex switch

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Oktay I.; Berber, Burak; Hekim, Nezih; Doluca, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Many studies show that short non-coding sequences are widely conserved among regulatory elements. More and more conserved sequences are being discovered since the development of next generation sequencing technology. A common approach to identify conserved sequences with regulatory roles relies on topological changes such as hairpin formation at the DNA or RNA level. G-quadruplexes, non-canonical nucleic acid topologies with little established biological roles, are increasingly considered for conserved regulatory element discovery. Since the tertiary structure of G-quadruplexes is strongly dependent on the loop sequence which is disregarded by the generally accepted algorithm, we hypothesized that G-quadruplexes with similar topology and, indirectly, similar interaction patterns, can be determined using phylogenetic clustering based on differences in the loop sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of 52 G-quadruplex forming sequences in the Escherichia coli genome revealed two conserved G-quadruplex motifs with a potential regulatory role. Further analysis revealed that both motifs tend to form hairpins and G quadruplexes, as supported by circular dichroism studies. The phylogenetic analysis as described in this work can greatly improve the discovery of functional G-quadruplex structures and may explain unknown regulatory patterns. PMID:27596596

  5. The crystal structure of human protein α1M reveals a chromophore-binding site and two putative protein–protein interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yangli; Gao, Zengqiang; Guo, Zhen; Zhang, Hongpeng; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Luo, Miao; Hou, Haifeng; Huang, Ailong; Dong, Yuhui; Wang, Deqiang

    2013-09-27

    Highlights: •We determined the first structure of human α1M with heavy electron density of the chromophore. •We proposed a new structural model of the chromophore. •We first revealed that the two conserved surface regions of α1M are proposed as putative protein–protein interface sites. -- Abstract: Lipocalin α1-microglobulin (α1M) is a conserved glycoprotein present in plasma and in the interstitial fluids of all tissues. α1M is linked to a heterogeneous yellow–brown chromophore of unknown structure, and interacts with several target proteins, including α1-inhibitor-3, fibronectin, prothrombin and albumin. To date, there is little knowledge about the interaction sites between α1M and its partners. Here, we report the crystal structure of the human α1M. Due to the crystallization occurring in a low ionic strength solution, the unidentified chromophore with heavy electron density is observed at a hydrophobic inner tube of α1M. In addition, two conserved surface regions of α1M are proposed as putative protein–protein interface sites. Further study is needed to unravel the detailed information about the interaction between α1M and its partners.

  6. Large number of putative chemoreception and pheromone biosynthesis genes revealed by analyzing transcriptome from ovipositor-pheromone glands of Chilo suppressalis.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yi-Han; Zhang, Ya-Nan; Hou, Xiao-Qing; Li, Fei; Dong, Shuang-Lin

    2015-01-20

    The chemoreception role of moth ovipositor has long been suggested, but its molecular mechanism is mostly unknown. By transcriptomic analysis of the female ovipositor-pheromone glands (OV-PG) of Chilo suppressalis, we obtained 31 putative chemoreception genes (9 OBPs, 10 CSPs, 2 ORs, 1 SNMP, 8 CXEs and 1 AOX), in addition to 32 genes related to sex pheromone biosynthesis (1 FAS, 6 Dess, 10 FARs, 2 ACOs, 1 ACC, 4 FATPs, 3 ACBPs and 5 ELOs). Tissue expression profiles further revealed that CsupCSP2 and CsupCSP10 were OV-PG biased, while most chemoreception genes were highly and preferably expressed in antennae. This suggests that OV-PG employs mostly the same chemoreception proteins as in antennae, although the physiological roles of these proteins might be different in OV-PG. Of the 32 pheromone biosynthesis related genes, CsupDes4, CsupDes5 and CsupFAR2 are strongly OV-PG biased, and clustered with functionally validated genes from other moths, strongly indicating their involvement in specific step of the pheromone biosynthesis. Our study for the first time identified a large number of putative chemoreception genes, and provided an important basis for exploring the chemoreception mechanisms of OV-PG in C. suppressalis, as well as other moth species.

  7. Comparison of 454-ESTs from Huperzia serrata and Phlegmariurus carinatus reveals putative genes involved in lycopodium alkaloid biosynthesis and developmental regulation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hongmei; Li, Ying; Sun, Chao; Wu, Qiong; Song, Jingyuan; Sun, Yongzhen; Steinmetz, André; Chen, Shilin

    2010-09-21

    Plants of the Huperziaceae family, which comprise the two genera Huperzia and Phlegmariurus, produce various types of lycopodium alkaloids that are used to treat a number of human ailments, such as contusions, swellings and strains. Huperzine A, which belongs to the lycodine type of lycopodium alkaloids, has been used as an anti-Alzheimer's disease drug candidate. Despite their medical importance, little genomic or transcriptomic data are available for the members of this family. We used massive parallel pyrosequencing on the Roche 454-GS FLX Titanium platform to generate a substantial EST dataset for Huperzia serrata (H. serrata) and Phlegmariurus carinatus (P. carinatus) as representative members of the Huperzia and Phlegmariurus genera, respectively. H. serrata and P. carinatus are important plants for research on the biosynthesis of lycopodium alkaloids. We focused on gene discovery in the areas of bioactive compound biosynthesis and transcriptional regulation as well as genetic marker detection in these species. For H. serrata, 36,763 unique putative transcripts were generated from 140,930 reads totaling over 57,028,559 base pairs; for P. carinatus, 31,812 unique putative transcripts were generated from 79,920 reads totaling over 30,498,684 base pairs. Using BLASTX searches of public databases, 16,274 (44.3%) unique putative transcripts from H. serrata and 14,070 (44.2%) from P. carinatus were assigned to at least one protein. Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) orthology annotations revealed that the functions of the unique putative transcripts from these two species cover a similarly broad set of molecular functions, biological processes and biochemical pathways.In particular, a total of 20 H. serrata candidate cytochrome P450 genes, which are more abundant in leaves than in roots and might be involved in lycopodium alkaloid biosynthesis, were found based on the comparison of H. serrata and P. carinatus 454-ESTs and real

  8. Comparison of 454-ESTs from Huperzia serrata and Phlegmariurus carinatus reveals putative genes involved in lycopodium alkaloid biosynthesis and developmental regulation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plants of the Huperziaceae family, which comprise the two genera Huperzia and Phlegmariurus, produce various types of lycopodium alkaloids that are used to treat a number of human ailments, such as contusions, swellings and strains. Huperzine A, which belongs to the lycodine type of lycopodium alkaloids, has been used as an anti-Alzheimer's disease drug candidate. Despite their medical importance, little genomic or transcriptomic data are available for the members of this family. We used massive parallel pyrosequencing on the Roche 454-GS FLX Titanium platform to generate a substantial EST dataset for Huperzia serrata (H. serrata) and Phlegmariurus carinatus (P. carinatus) as representative members of the Huperzia and Phlegmariurus genera, respectively. H. serrata and P. carinatus are important plants for research on the biosynthesis of lycopodium alkaloids. We focused on gene discovery in the areas of bioactive compound biosynthesis and transcriptional regulation as well as genetic marker detection in these species. Results For H. serrata, 36,763 unique putative transcripts were generated from 140,930 reads totaling over 57,028,559 base pairs; for P. carinatus, 31,812 unique putative transcripts were generated from 79,920 reads totaling over 30,498,684 base pairs. Using BLASTX searches of public databases, 16,274 (44.3%) unique putative transcripts from H. serrata and 14,070 (44.2%) from P. carinatus were assigned to at least one protein. Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) orthology annotations revealed that the functions of the unique putative transcripts from these two species cover a similarly broad set of molecular functions, biological processes and biochemical pathways. In particular, a total of 20 H. serrata candidate cytochrome P450 genes, which are more abundant in leaves than in roots and might be involved in lycopodium alkaloid biosynthesis, were found based on the comparison of H. serrata and P. carinatus

  9. Proteomic analysis of ACTN4-interacting proteins reveals it's a putative involvement in mRNA metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Khotin, Mikhail; Turoverova, Lidia; Aksenova, Vasilisa; Borutinskaite, Veronika Viktorija; Vener, Alexander; Bajenova, Olga; Pinaev, George P.; Tentler, Dmitri

    2010-06-25

    Alpha-actinin 4 (ACTN4) is an actin-binding protein. In the cytoplasm, ACTN4 participates in structural organisation of the cytoskeleton via cross-linking of actin filaments. Nuclear localisation of ACTN4 has also been reported, but no clear role in the nucleus has been established. In this report, we describe the identification of proteins associated with ACTN4 in the nucleus. A combination of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-GE) and MALDI-TOF mass-spectrometry revealed a large number of ACTN4-bound proteins that are involved in various aspects of mRNA processing and transport. The association of ACTN4 with different ribonucleoproteins suggests that a major function of nuclear ACTN4 may be regulation of mRNA metabolism and signaling.

  10. Multiple Sex-Associated Regions and a Putative Sex Chromosome in Zebrafish Revealed by RAD Mapping and Population Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jennifer L.; Rodríguez Marí, Adriana; Braasch, Ingo; Amores, Angel; Hohenlohe, Paul; Batzel, Peter; Postlethwait, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Within vertebrates, major sex determining genes can differ among taxa and even within species. In zebrafish (Danio rerio), neither heteromorphic sex chromosomes nor single sex determination genes of large effect, like Sry in mammals, have yet been identified. Furthermore, environmental factors can influence zebrafish sex determination. Although progress has been made in understanding zebrafish gonad differentiation (e.g. the influence of germ cells on gonad fate), the primary genetic basis of zebrafish sex determination remains poorly understood. To identify genetic loci associated with sex, we analyzed F2 offspring of reciprocal crosses between Oregon *AB and Nadia (NA) wild-type zebrafish stocks. Genome-wide linkage analysis, using more than 5,000 sequence-based polymorphic restriction site associated (RAD-tag) markers and population genomic analysis of more than 30,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms in our *ABxNA crosses revealed a sex-associated locus on the end of the long arm of chr-4 for both cross families, and an additional locus in the middle of chr-3 in one cross family. Additional sequencing showed that two SNPs in dmrt1 previously suggested to be functional candidates for sex determination in a cross of ABxIndia wild-type zebrafish, are not associated with sex in our AB fish. Our data show that sex determination in zebrafish is polygenic and that different genes may influence sex determination in different strains or that different genes become more important under different environmental conditions. The association of the end of chr-4 with sex is remarkable because, unique in the karyotype, this chromosome arm shares features with known sex chromosomes: it is highly heterochromatic, repetitive, late replicating, and has reduced recombination. Our results reveal that chr-4 has functional and structural properties expected of a sex chromosome. PMID:22792396

  11. Genome sequencing and comparative genomics reveal a repertoire of putative pathogenicity genes in chilli anthracnose fungus Colletotrichum truncatum.

    PubMed

    Rao, Soumya; Nandineni, Madhusudan R

    2017-01-01

    Colletotrichum truncatum, a major fungal phytopathogen, causes the anthracnose disease on an economically important spice crop chilli (Capsicum annuum), resulting in huge economic losses in tropical and sub-tropical countries. It follows a subcuticular intramural infection strategy on chilli with a short, asymptomatic, endophytic phase, which contrasts with the intracellular hemibiotrophic lifestyle adopted by most of the Colletotrichum species. However, little is known about the molecular determinants and the mechanism of pathogenicity in this fungus. A high quality whole genome sequence and gene annotation based on transcriptome data of an Indian isolate of C. truncatum from chilli has been obtained. Analysis of the genome sequence revealed a rich repertoire of pathogenicity genes in C. truncatum encoding secreted proteins, effectors, plant cell wall degrading enzymes, secondary metabolism associated proteins, with potential roles in the host-specific infection strategy, placing it next only to the Fusarium species. The size of genome assembly, number of predicted genes and some of the functional categories were similar to other sequenced Colletotrichum species. The comparative genomic analyses with other species and related fungi identified some unique genes and certain highly expanded gene families of CAZymes, proteases and secondary metabolism associated genes in the genome of C. truncatum. The draft genome assembly and functional annotation of potential pathogenicity genes of C. truncatum provide an important genomic resource for understanding the biology and lifestyle of this important phytopathogen and will pave the way for designing efficient disease control regimens.

  12. Genome sequencing and comparative genomics reveal a repertoire of putative pathogenicity genes in chilli anthracnose fungus Colletotrichum truncatum

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Soumya

    2017-01-01

    Colletotrichum truncatum, a major fungal phytopathogen, causes the anthracnose disease on an economically important spice crop chilli (Capsicum annuum), resulting in huge economic losses in tropical and sub-tropical countries. It follows a subcuticular intramural infection strategy on chilli with a short, asymptomatic, endophytic phase, which contrasts with the intracellular hemibiotrophic lifestyle adopted by most of the Colletotrichum species. However, little is known about the molecular determinants and the mechanism of pathogenicity in this fungus. A high quality whole genome sequence and gene annotation based on transcriptome data of an Indian isolate of C. truncatum from chilli has been obtained. Analysis of the genome sequence revealed a rich repertoire of pathogenicity genes in C. truncatum encoding secreted proteins, effectors, plant cell wall degrading enzymes, secondary metabolism associated proteins, with potential roles in the host-specific infection strategy, placing it next only to the Fusarium species. The size of genome assembly, number of predicted genes and some of the functional categories were similar to other sequenced Colletotrichum species. The comparative genomic analyses with other species and related fungi identified some unique genes and certain highly expanded gene families of CAZymes, proteases and secondary metabolism associated genes in the genome of C. truncatum. The draft genome assembly and functional annotation of potential pathogenicity genes of C. truncatum provide an important genomic resource for understanding the biology and lifestyle of this important phytopathogen and will pave the way for designing efficient disease control regimens. PMID:28846714

  13. Genomic Comparison of Indigenous African and Northern European Chickens Reveals Putative Mechanisms of Stress Tolerance Related to Environmental Selection Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Damarius S.; Weigend, Steffen; Simianer, Henner; Weigend, Annett; Rothschild, Max; Schmidt, Carl; Ashwell, Chris; Persia, Mike; Reecy, James; Lamont, Susan J.

    2017-01-01

    Global climate change is increasing the magnitude of environmental stressors, such as temperature, pathogens, and drought, that limit the survivability and sustainability of livestock production. Poultry production and its expansion is dependent upon robust animals that are able to cope with stressors in multiple environments. Understanding the genetic strategies that indigenous, noncommercial breeds have evolved to survive in their environment could help to elucidate molecular mechanisms underlying biological traits of environmental adaptation. We examined poultry from diverse breeds and climates of Africa and Northern Europe for selection signatures that have allowed them to adapt to their indigenous environments. Selection signatures were studied using a combination of population genomic methods that employed FST, integrated haplotype score (iHS), and runs of homozygosity (ROH) procedures. All the analyses indicated differences in environment as a driver of selective pressure in both groups of populations. The analyses revealed unique differences in the genomic regions under selection pressure from the environment for each population. The African chickens showed stronger selection toward stress signaling and angiogenesis, while the Northern European chickens showed more selection pressure toward processes related to energy homeostasis. The results suggest that chromosomes 2 and 27 are the most diverged between populations and the most selected upon within the African (chromosome 27) and Northern European (chromosome 2) birds. Examination of the divergent populations has provided new insight into genes under possible selection related to tolerance of a population’s indigenous environment that may be baselines for examining the genomic contribution to tolerance adaptions. PMID:28341699

  14. Genomic Comparison of Indigenous African and Northern European Chickens Reveals Putative Mechanisms of Stress Tolerance Related to Environmental Selection Pressure.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Damarius S; Weigend, Steffen; Simianer, Henner; Weigend, Annett; Rothschild, Max; Schmidt, Carl; Ashwell, Chris; Persia, Mike; Reecy, James; Lamont, Susan J

    2017-05-05

    Global climate change is increasing the magnitude of environmental stressors, such as temperature, pathogens, and drought, that limit the survivability and sustainability of livestock production. Poultry production and its expansion is dependent upon robust animals that are able to cope with stressors in multiple environments. Understanding the genetic strategies that indigenous, noncommercial breeds have evolved to survive in their environment could help to elucidate molecular mechanisms underlying biological traits of environmental adaptation. We examined poultry from diverse breeds and climates of Africa and Northern Europe for selection signatures that have allowed them to adapt to their indigenous environments. Selection signatures were studied using a combination of population genomic methods that employed FST , integrated haplotype score (iHS), and runs of homozygosity (ROH) procedures. All the analyses indicated differences in environment as a driver of selective pressure in both groups of populations. The analyses revealed unique differences in the genomic regions under selection pressure from the environment for each population. The African chickens showed stronger selection toward stress signaling and angiogenesis, while the Northern European chickens showed more selection pressure toward processes related to energy homeostasis. The results suggest that chromosomes 2 and 27 are the most diverged between populations and the most selected upon within the African (chromosome 27) and Northern European (chromosome 2) birds. Examination of the divergent populations has provided new insight into genes under possible selection related to tolerance of a population's indigenous environment that may be baselines for examining the genomic contribution to tolerance adaptions. Copyright © 2017 Fleming et al.

  15. Ligand induced structural isomerism in phosphine coordinated gold clusters revealed by ion mobility mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ligare, Marshall R.; Baker, Erin S.; Laskin, Julia; Johnson, Grant E.

    2017-01-01

    Structural isomerism in ligated gold clusters is revealed using electrospray ionization ion mobility spectrometry mass spectrometry. Phosphine ligated Au8 clusters are shown to adopt more “extended” type structures with increasing exchange of methyldiphenylphosphine (MePPh2) for triphenylphosphine (PPh3). These ligand-dependant structure-property relationships are critical to applications of clusters in catalysis.

  16. The Mobile Base System, part of the Canadian arm, is revealed inside the container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    With the lid removed, the wrapped Mobile Base System (MBS) is revealed inside its transport container. The MBS is part of the Canadian Space Agency's Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS), which is part of the payload on mission STS-100 to the International Space Station.

  17. The Mobile Base System, part of the Canadian arm, is revealed inside the container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    With the lid removed, the wrapped Mobile Base System (MBS) is revealed inside its transport container. The MBS is part of the Canadian Space Agency's Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS), which is part of the payload on mission STS-100 to the International Space Station.

  18. Assessment of snake DNA barcodes based on mitochondrial COI and Cytb genes revealed multiple putative cryptic species in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Laopichienpong, Nararat; Muangmai, Narongrit; Supikamolseni, Arrjaree; Twilprawat, Panupon; Chanhome, Lawan; Suntrarachun, Sunutcha; Peyachoknagul, Surin; Srikulnath, Kornsorn

    2016-12-15

    DNA barcodes of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I (COI), cytochrome b (Cytb) genes, and their combined data sets were constructed from 35 snake species in Thailand. No barcoding gap was detected in either of the two genes from the observed intra- and interspecific sequence divergences. Intra- and interspecific sequence divergences of the COI gene differed 14 times, with barcode cut-off scores ranging over 2%-4% for threshold values differentiated among most of the different species; the Cytb gene differed 6 times with cut-off scores ranging over 2%-6%. Thirty-five specific nucleotide mutations were also found at interspecific level in the COI gene, identifying 18 snake species, but no specific nucleotide mutation was observed for Cytb in any single species. This suggests that COI barcoding was a better marker than Cytb. Phylogenetic clustering analysis indicated that most species were represented by monophyletic clusters, suggesting that these snake species could be clearly differentiated using COI barcodes. However, the two-marker combination of both COI and Cytb was more effective, differentiating snake species by over 2%-4%, and reducing species numbers in the overlap value between intra- and interspecific divergences. Three species delimitation algorithms (general mixed Yule-coalescent, automatic barcoding gap detection, and statistical parsimony network analysis) were extensively applied to a wide range of snakes based on both barcodes. This revealed cryptic diversity for eleven snake species in Thailand. In addition, eleven accessions from the database previously grouped under the same species were represented at different species level, suggesting either high genetic diversity, or the misidentification of these sequences in the database as a consequence of cryptic species.

  19. Analysis of Two Putative Candida albicans Phosphopantothenoylcysteine Decarboxylase / Protein Phosphatase Z Regulatory Subunits Reveals an Unexpected Distribution of Functional Roles

    PubMed Central

    Petrényi, Katalin; Molero, Cristina; Kónya, Zoltán; Erdődi, Ferenc; Ariño, Joaquin; Dombrádi, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphatase Z (Ppz) is a fungus specific enzyme that regulates cell wall integrity, cation homeostasis and oxidative stress response. Work on Saccharomyces cerevisiae has shown that the enzyme is inhibited by Hal3/Vhs3 moonlighting proteins that together with Cab3 constitute the essential phosphopantothenoylcysteine decarboxylase (PPCDC) enzyme. In Candida albicans CaPpz1 is also involved in the morphological changes and infectiveness of this opportunistic human pathogen. To reveal the CaPpz1 regulatory context we searched the C. albicans database and identified two genes that, based on the structure of their S. cerevisiae counterparts, were termed CaHal3 and CaCab3. By pull down analysis and phosphatase assays we demonstrated that both of the bacterially expressed recombinant proteins were able to bind and inhibit CaPpz1 as well as its C-terminal catalytic domain (CaPpz1-Cter) with comparable efficiency. The binding and inhibition were always more pronounced with CaPpz1-Cter, indicating a protective effect against inhibition by the N-terminal domain in the full length protein. The functions of the C. albicans proteins were tested by their overexpression in S. cerevisiae. Contrary to expectations we found that only CaCab3 and not CaHal3 rescued the phenotypic traits that are related to phosphatase inhibition by ScHal3, such as tolerance to LiCl or hygromycin B, requirement for external K+ concentrations, or growth in a MAP kinase deficient slt2 background. On the other hand, both of the Candida proteins turned out to be essential PPCDC components and behaved as their S. cerevisiae counterparts: expression of CaCab3 and CaHal3 rescued the cab3 and hal3 vhs3 S. cerevisiae mutations, respectively. Thus, both CaHal3 and CaCab3 retained the PPCDC related functions and have the potential for CaPpz1 inhibition in vitro. The fact that only CaCab3 exhibits its phosphatase regulatory potential in vivo suggests that in C. albicans CaCab3, but not CaHal3, acts as a

  20. Novel circular single-stranded DNA viruses identified in marine invertebrates reveal high sequence diversity and consistent predicted intrinsic disorder patterns within putative structural proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rosario, Karyna; Schenck, Ryan O.; Harbeitner, Rachel C.; Lawler, Stephanie N.; Breitbart, Mya

    2015-01-01

    Viral metagenomics has recently revealed the ubiquitous and diverse nature of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) viruses that encode a conserved replication initiator protein (Rep) in the marine environment. Although eukaryotic circular Rep-encoding ssDNA (CRESS-DNA) viruses were originally thought to only infect plants and vertebrates, recent studies have identified these viruses in a number of invertebrates. To further explore CRESS-DNA viruses in the marine environment, this study surveyed CRESS-DNA viruses in various marine invertebrate species. A total of 27 novel CRESS-DNA genomes, with Reps that share less than 60.1% identity with previously reported viruses, were recovered from 21 invertebrate species, mainly crustaceans. Phylogenetic analysis based on the Rep revealed a novel clade of CRESS-DNA viruses that included approximately one third of the marine invertebrate associated viruses identified here and whose members may represent a novel family. Investigation of putative capsid proteins (Cap) encoded within the eukaryotic CRESS-DNA viral genomes from this study and those in GenBank demonstrated conserved patterns of predicted intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs), which can be used to complement similarity-based searches to identify divergent structural proteins within novel genomes. Overall, this study expands our knowledge of CRESS-DNA viruses associated with invertebrates and explores a new tool to evaluate divergent structural proteins encoded by these viruses. PMID:26217327

  1. Novel circular single-stranded DNA viruses identified in marine invertebrates reveal high sequence diversity and consistent predicted intrinsic disorder patterns within putative structural proteins.

    PubMed

    Rosario, Karyna; Schenck, Ryan O; Harbeitner, Rachel C; Lawler, Stephanie N; Breitbart, Mya

    2015-01-01

    Viral metagenomics has recently revealed the ubiquitous and diverse nature of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) viruses that encode a conserved replication initiator protein (Rep) in the marine environment. Although eukaryotic circular Rep-encoding ssDNA (CRESS-DNA) viruses were originally thought to only infect plants and vertebrates, recent studies have identified these viruses in a number of invertebrates. To further explore CRESS-DNA viruses in the marine environment, this study surveyed CRESS-DNA viruses in various marine invertebrate species. A total of 27 novel CRESS-DNA genomes, with Reps that share less than 60.1% identity with previously reported viruses, were recovered from 21 invertebrate species, mainly crustaceans. Phylogenetic analysis based on the Rep revealed a novel clade of CRESS-DNA viruses that included approximately one third of the marine invertebrate associated viruses identified here and whose members may represent a novel family. Investigation of putative capsid proteins (Cap) encoded within the eukaryotic CRESS-DNA viral genomes from this study and those in GenBank demonstrated conserved patterns of predicted intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs), which can be used to complement similarity-based searches to identify divergent structural proteins within novel genomes. Overall, this study expands our knowledge of CRESS-DNA viruses associated with invertebrates and explores a new tool to evaluate divergent structural proteins encoded by these viruses.

  2. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli pathotypes investigation revealed atypical enteropathogenic E. coli as putative emerging diarrheal agents in children living in Botucatu, São Paulo State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dias, Regiane C B; Dos Santos, Bruna C; Dos Santos, Luis F; Vieira, Melissa A; Yamatogi, Ricardo S; Mondelli, Alessandro L; Sadatsune, Terue; Sforcin, José M; Gomes, Tânia A T; Hernandes, Rodrigo T

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) pathotypes, a leading cause of diarrhea worldwide, among diarrheal and healthy children, up to 5 years of age, living in the city of Botucatu, São Paulo, Brazil. DEC, investigated by PCR detection of virulence factor-encoding genes associated with the distinct pathotypes, was isolated from 18.0% of the patients, and 19.0% of the controls, with enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), the most frequent pathotype, being detected in equal proportion between patients and controls (10.0%). Among the enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) isolates, only one isolate was able to produce the localized adherence pattern to HeLa cells, being thus the only typical EPEC identified. All the remaining EPEC were classified as atypical (aEPEC), and detected in 8.0% and 8.5% of the patients and controls, respectively. Regarding the serotypes, 26.5% of the analyzed EPEC isolates belonged to classical EPEC-serogroups, and the only two STEC found were serotyped as O26:H11 (patient) and O119:H7 (control). Antimicrobial susceptibility tests revealed that 43.6%, 29.5% and 2.6% of the DEC isolates were resistant to ampicillin, cotrimoxazole and gentamicin, respectively. Our data indicate that EAEC remains prevalent among children living in Botucatu, and revealed atypical EPEC as emerging putative diarrheal agents in this geographical region. © 2016 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. 29 Mammalian Genomes Reveal Novel Exaptations of Mobile Elements for Likely Regulatory Functions in the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Craig B.; Haussler, David

    2012-01-01

    Recent research supports the view that changes in gene regulation, as opposed to changes in the genes themselves, play a significant role in morphological evolution. Gene regulation is largely dependent on transcription factor binding sites. Researchers are now able to use the available 29 mammalian genomes to measure selective constraint at the level of binding sites. This detailed map of constraint suggests that mammalian genomes co-opt fragments of mobile elements to act as gene regulatory sequence on a large scale. In the human genome we detect over 280,000 putative regulatory elements, totaling approximately 7 Mb of sequence, that originated as mobile element insertions. These putative regulatory regions are conserved non-exonic elements (CNEEs), which show considerable cross-species constraint and signatures of continued negative selection in humans, yet do not appear in a known mature transcript. These putative regulatory elements were co-opted from SINE, LINE, LTR and DNA transposon insertions. We demonstrate that at least 11%, and an estimated 20%, of gene regulatory sequence in the human genome showing cross-species conservation was co-opted from mobile elements. The location in the genome of CNEEs co-opted from mobile elements closely resembles that of CNEEs in general, except in the centers of the largest gene deserts where recognizable co-option events are relatively rare. We find that regions of certain mobile element insertions are more likely to be held under purifying selection than others. In particular, we show 6 examples where paralogous instances of an often co-opted mobile element region define a sequence motif that closely matches a transcription factor’s binding profile. PMID:22952639

  4. A transcriptomic analysis of the effect of genistein on Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 reveals novel rhizobial genes putatively involved in symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Montaño, F.; Jiménez-Guerrero, I.; Acosta-Jurado, S.; Navarro-Gómez, P.; Ollero, F. J.; Ruiz-Sainz, J. E.; López-Baena, F. J.; Vinardell, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 is a rhizobial soybean symbiont that exhibits an extremely broad host-range. Flavonoids exuded by legume roots induce the expression of rhizobial symbiotic genes and activate the bacterial protein NodD, which binds to regulatory DNA sequences called nod boxes (NB). NB drive the expression of genes involved in the production of molecular signals (Nod factors) as well as the transcription of ttsI, whose encoded product binds to tts boxes (TB), inducing the secretion of proteins (effectors) through the type 3 secretion system (T3SS). In this work, a S. fredii HH103 global gene expression analysis in the presence of the flavonoid genistein was carried out, revealing a complex regulatory network. Three groups of genes differentially expressed were identified: i) genes controlled by NB, ii) genes regulated by TB, and iii) genes not preceded by a NB or a TB. Interestingly, we have found differentially expressed genes not previously studied in rhizobia, being some of them not related to Nod factors or the T3SS. Future characterization of these putative symbiotic-related genes could shed light on the understanding of the complex molecular dialogue established between rhizobia and legumes. PMID:27539649

  5. Molecular characterization of the alpha-glucosidase activity in Enterobacter sakazakii reveals the presence of a putative gene cluster for palatinose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lehner, Angelika; Riedel, Kathrin; Rattei, Thomas; Ruepp, Andreas; Frishman, Dimitrij; Breeuwer, Pieter; Diep, Benjamin; Eberl, Leo; Stephan, Roger

    2006-12-01

    Enterobacter sakazakii is considered an opportunistic pathogen for premature infants and neonates. Although E. sakazakii has been isolated from various types of food, recontaminated dried infant formula has been epidemiologically identified as the major source of infection. Amongst others, alpha-glucosidase activity is one of the most important biochemical features, which differentiates E. sakazakii from other species in the family Enterobacteriaceae and has therefore been used as a selective marker in the development of differential media. However, it has been shown, that methods based on this biochemical feature are prone to producing false-positive results for presumptive E. sakazakii colonies due to the presence of this enzymatic activity in other species of the Enterobacteriaceae. Therefore, elucidation of the molecular basis responsible for the biochemical feature in E. sakazakii would provide novel targets suitable for the development of more specific and direct identification systems for this organism. By applying the bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) approach, along with heterologous gene expression in Escherichia coli, the molecular basis of the alpha-glucosidase activity in E. sakazakii was characterized. Here we report the identification of two different alpha-glucosidase encoding genes. Homology searches of the deduced amino acid sequences revealed that the proteins belong to a cluster of gene products putatively responsible for the metabolism of isomaltulose (palatinose; 6-O-alpha-d-glucopyranosyl-d-fructose). The glycosyl-hydrolyzing activity of each protein was demonstrated by subcloning the respective open reading frames and screening of E. coli transformants for their ability to hydrolyze 4-methyl-umbelliferyl-alpha-d-glucoside. Analysis at the protein level revealed that both enzymes belong to the intracellular fraction of cell proteins. The presence of the postulated palatinose metabolism was proven by growth experiments using this sugar as

  6. Dynamic habitat suitability modelling reveals rapid poleward distribution shift in a mobile apex predator.

    PubMed

    Hill, Nicholas J; Tobin, Andrew J; Reside, April E; Pepperell, Julian G; Bridge, Tom C L

    2016-03-01

    Many taxa are undergoing distribution shifts in response to anthropogenic climate change. However, detecting a climate signal in mobile species is difficult due to their wide-ranging, patchy distributions, often driven by natural climate variability. For example, difficulties associated with assessing pelagic fish distributions have rendered fisheries management ill-equipped to adapt to the challenges posed by climate change, leaving pelagic species and ecosystems vulnerable. Here, we demonstrate the value of citizen science data for modelling the dynamic habitat suitability of a mobile pelagic predator (black marlin, Istiompax indica) within the south-west Pacific Ocean. The extensive spatial and temporal coverage of our occurrence data set (n = 18 717), collected at high resolution (~1.85 km(2) ), enabled identification of suitable habitat at monthly time steps over a 16-year period (1998-2013). We identified considerable monthly, seasonal and interannual variability in the extent and distribution of suitable habitat, predominately driven by chlorophyll a and sea surface height. Interannual variability correlated with El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events, with suitable habitat extending up to ~300 km further south during La Nina events. Despite the strong influence of ENSO, our model revealed a rapid poleward shift in the geometric mean of black marlin habitat, occurring at 88.2 km decade(-1) . By incorporating multiple environmental factors at monthly time steps, we were able to demonstrate a rapid distribution shift in a mobile pelagic species. Our findings suggest that the rapid velocity of climate change in the south-west Pacific Ocean is likely affecting mobile pelagic species, indicating that they may be more vulnerable to climate change than previously thought. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. First proteome study of sporadic flowering in bamboo species (Bambusa vulgaris and Dendrocalamus manipureanus) reveal the boom is associated with stress and mobile genetic elements.

    PubMed

    Louis, Bengyella; Waikhom, Sayanika Devi; Goyari, Sailendra; Jose, Robinson C; Roy, Pranab; Talukdar, Narayan Chandra

    2015-12-15

    Bamboo species are the fastest-growing plants having a long vegetative cycle. Abrupt switching from the vegetative phase to the reproductive phase via sporadic flowering boom, occasionally leads to death of bamboo clumps, and threatens the existence of many bamboo species. To apprehend the molecular mechanism driving sporadic flowering, proteome changes in the initial and advanced floral buds of two edible bamboo species (Bambusa vulgaris and Dendrocalamus manipureanus) was dissected by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). A total of 39 differentially expressed peptide spots were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-TOF/MS). In both B. vulgaris and D. manipureanus, identified proteins were categorized as transposon-related, defence and stress-related, cell cycle related, metabolism related, signal transduction related, and some lacked known putative domains. Proteins such as SEPALLATA3, ubiquitin, histone 3, thaumatin-like protein, putative tethering factor, SF-assemblin, polyubiquitin, mitochondrial carrier-like protein and RPT2-like protein were significantly expressed. Differences in D. manipureanus and B. vulgaris suggested that bamboo species have diverse 'drivers' or 'passengers' genes that govern natural sporadic flowering boom. This first floral proteomics analysis of bamboos revealed that sporadic boom is a highly energetic process, associated with stress elements, mobile genetic elements and signal transduction cross-talk elements.

  8. Revealing Surface States in In-Doped SnTe Nanoplates with Low Bulk Mobility.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jie; Xie, Yujun; Cha, Judy J

    2015-06-10

    Indium (In) doping in topological crystalline insulator SnTe induces superconductivity, making In-doped SnTe a candidate for a topological superconductor. SnTe nanostructures offer well-defined nanoscale morphology and high surface-to-volume ratios to enhance surface effects. Here, we study In-doped SnTe nanoplates, In(x)Sn(1-x)Te, with x ranging from 0 to 0.1 and show they superconduct. More importantly, we show that In doping reduces the bulk mobility of In(x)Sn(1-x)Te such that the surface states are revealed in magnetotransport despite the high bulk carrier density. This is manifested by two-dimensional linear magnetoresistance in high magnetic fields, which is independent of temperature up to 10 K. Aging experiments show that the linear magnetoresistance is sensitive to ambient conditions, further confirming its surface origin. We also show that the weak antilocalization observed in In(x)Sn(1-x)Te nanoplates is a bulk effect. Thus, we show that nanostructures and reducing the bulk mobility are effective strategies to reveal the surface states and test for topological superconductors.

  9. Interaction of a putative BH3 domain of clusterin with anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins as revealed by NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dong-Hwa; Ha, Ji-Hyang; Kim, Yul; Bae, Kwang-Hee; Park, Jae-Yong; Choi, Wan Sung; Yoon, Ho Sup; Park, Sung Goo; Park, Byoung Chul; Yi, Gwan-Su; Chi, Seung-Wook

    2011-05-20

    Highlights: {yields} Identification of a conserved BH3 motif in C-terminal coiled coil region of nCLU. {yields} The nCLU BH3 domain binds to BH3 peptide-binding grooves in both Bcl-X{sub L} and Bcl-2. {yields} A conserved binding mechanism of nCLU BH3 and the other pro-apoptotic BH3 peptides with Bcl-X{sub L}. {yields} The absolutely conserved Leu323 and Asp328 of nCLU BH3 domain are critical for binding to Bcl-X{sub L.} {yields} Molecular understanding of the pro-apoptotic function of nCLU as a novel BH3-only protein. -- Abstract: Clusterin (CLU) is a multifunctional glycoprotein that is overexpressed in prostate and breast cancers. Although CLU is known to be involved in the regulation of apoptosis and cell survival, the precise molecular mechanism underlying the pro-apoptotic function of nuclear CLU (nCLU) remains unclear. In this study, we identified a conserved BH3 motif in C-terminal coiled coil (CC2) region of nCLU by sequence analysis and characterized the molecular interaction of the putative nCLU BH3 domain with anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The chemical shift perturbation data demonstrated that the nCLU BH3 domain binds to pro-apoptotic BH3 peptide-binding grooves in both Bcl-X{sub L} and Bcl-2. A structural model of the Bcl-X{sub L}/nCLU BH3 peptide complex reveals that the binding mode is remarkably similar to those of other Bcl-X{sub L}/BH3 peptide complexes. In addition, mutational analysis confirmed that Leu323 and Asp328 of nCLU BH3 domain, absolutely conserved in the BH3 motifs of BH3-only protein family, are critical for binding to Bcl-X{sub L}. Taken altogether, our results suggest a molecular basis for the pro-apoptotic function of nCLU by elucidating the residue specific interactions of the BH3 motif in nCLU with anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins.

  10. Phylogenetic and comparative gene expression analysis of barley (Hordeum vulgare) WRKY transcription factor family reveals putatively retained functions between monocots and dicots.

    PubMed

    Mangelsen, Elke; Kilian, Joachim; Berendzen, Kenneth W; Kolukisaoglu, Uner H; Harter, Klaus; Jansson, Christer; Wanke, Dierk

    2008-04-28

    WRKY proteins belong to the WRKY-GCM1 superfamily of zinc finger transcription factors that have been subject to a large plant-specific diversification. For the cereal crop barley (Hordeum vulgare), three different WRKY proteins have been characterized so far as regulators in sucrose signaling, pathogen defense, and in response to cold and drought. However, their phylogenetic relationship remained unresolved. In this study, we used available sequence information to identify a minimum number of 45 barley WRKY transcription factor (HvWRKY) genes. According to their structural features, the HvWRKY factors were classified into the previously defined polyphyletic WRKY subgroups 1 to 3. Furthermore, we could assign putative orthologs of the HvWRKY proteins in Arabidopsis and rice. While in most cases clades of orthologous proteins were formed within each group or subgroup, other clades were composed of paralogous proteins for the grasses and Arabidopsis only, which is indicative of specific gene radiation events. To gain insight into their putative functions, we examined expression profiles of WRKY genes from publicly available microarray data resources and found group specific expression patterns. While putative orthologs of the HvWRKY transcription factors have been inferred from phylogenetic sequence analysis, we performed a comparative expression analysis of WRKY genes in Arabidopsis and barley. Indeed, highly correlative expression profiles were found between some of the putative orthologs. HvWRKY genes have not only undergone radiation in monocot or dicot species, but exhibit evolutionary traits specific to grasses. HvWRKY proteins exhibited not only sequence similarities between orthologs with Arabidopsis, but also relatedness in their expression patterns. This correlative expression is indicative for a putative conserved function of related WRKY proteins in monocot and dicot species.

  11. Phylogenetic and comparative gene expression analysis of barley (Hordeum vulgare)WRKY transcription factor family reveals putatively retained functions betweenmonocots and dicots

    SciTech Connect

    Mangelsen, Elke; Kilian, Joachim; Berendzen, Kenneth W.; Kolukisaoglu, Uner; Harter, Klaus; Jansson, Christer; Wanke, Dierk

    2008-02-01

    WRKY proteins belong to the WRKY-GCM1 superfamily of zinc finger transcription factors that have been subject to a large plant-specific diversification. For the cereal crop barley (Hordeum vulgare), three different WRKY proteins have been characterized so far, as regulators in sucrose signaling, in pathogen defense, and in response to cold and drought, respectively. However, their phylogenetic relationship remained unresolved. In this study, we used the available sequence information to identify a minimum number of 45 barley WRKY transcription factor (HvWRKY) genes. According to their structural features the HvWRKY factors were classified into the previously defined polyphyletic WRKY subgroups 1 to 3. Furthermore, we could assign putative orthologs of the HvWRKY proteins in Arabidopsis and rice. While in most cases clades of orthologous proteins were formed within each group or subgroup, other clades were composed of paralogous proteins for the grasses and Arabidopsis only, which is indicative of specific gene radiation events. To gain insight into their putative functions, we examined expression profiles of WRKY genes from publicly available microarray data resources and found group specific expression patterns. While putative orthologs of the HvWRKY transcription factors have been inferred from phylogenetic sequence analysis, we performed a comparative expression analysis of WRKY genes in Arabidopsis and barley. Indeed, highly correlative expression profiles were found between some of the putative orthologs. HvWRKY genes have not only undergone radiation in monocot or dicot species, but exhibit evolutionary traits specific to grasses. HvWRKY proteins exhibited not only sequence similarities between orthologs with Arabidopsis, but also relatedness in their expression patterns. This correlative expression is indicative for a putative conserved function of related WRKY proteins in mono- and dicot species.

  12. Mobile eye tracking reveals little evidence for age differences in attentional selection for mood regulation.

    PubMed

    Isaacowitz, Derek M; Livingstone, Kimberly M; Harris, Julia A; Marcotte, Stacy L

    2015-04-01

    Two studies are reported representing the first use of mobile eye tracking to study emotion regulation across adulthood. Past research on age differences in attentional deployment using stationary eye tracking has revealed older adults show relatively more positive looking and seem to benefit more moodwise from this looking pattern, compared with younger adults. However, these past studies have greatly constrained the stimuli participants can look at, despite real-world settings providing numerous possibilities for what we choose to look at. The authors therefore used mobile eye tracking to study age differences in attentional selection, as indicated by fixation patterns to stimuli of different valence freely chosen by the participant. In contrast to stationary eye-tracking studies of attentional deployment, Study 1 showed that younger and older individuals generally selected similar proportions of valenced stimuli, and attentional selection had similar effects on mood across age groups. Study 2 replicated this pattern with an adult life span sample including middle-aged individuals. Emotion regulation-relevant attention may thus differ depending on whether stimuli are freely chosen or not. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Phosphoproteomic profiling of mouse primary HSPCs reveals new regulators of HSPC mobilization

    PubMed Central

    Ficarro, Scott B.; Hutchinson, John N.; Csepanyi-Komi, Roland; Nguyen, Phi T.; Wisniewski, Eva; Sullivan, Jessica; Hofmann, Oliver; Ligeti, Erzsebet; Marto, Jarrod A.; Wagers, Amy J.

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a central mechanism of signal transduction that both positively and negatively regulates protein function. Large-scale studies of the dynamic phosphorylation states of cell signaling systems have been applied extensively in cell lines and whole tissues to reveal critical regulatory networks, and candidate-based evaluations of phosphorylation in rare cell populations have also been informative. However, application of comprehensive profiling technologies to adult stem cell and progenitor populations has been challenging, due in large part to the scarcity of such cells in adult tissues. Here, we combine multicolor flow cytometry with highly efficient 3-dimensional high performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry to enable quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis from 200 000 highly purified primary mouse hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). Using this platform, we identify ARHGAP25 as a novel regulator of HSPC mobilization and demonstrate that ARHGAP25 phosphorylation at serine 363 is an important modulator of its function. Our approach provides a robust platform for large-scale phosphoproteomic analyses performed with limited numbers of rare progenitor cells. Data from our study comprises a new resource for understanding the molecular signaling networks that underlie hematopoietic stem cell mobilization. PMID:27365422

  14. Gel mobility shift scanning of pectin-inducible promoter from Penicillium griseoroseum reveals the involvement of a CCAAT element in the expression of a polygalacturonase gene

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Previous reports have described pgg2, a polygalacturonase-encoding gene of Penicillium griseoroseum, as an attractive model for transcriptional regulation studies, due to its high expression throughout several in vitro growth conditions, even in the presence of non-inducing sugars such as sucrose. A search for regulatory motifs in the 5' upstream regulatory sequence of pgg2 identified a putative CCAAT box that could justify this expression profile. This element, located 270 bp upstream of the translational start codon, was tested as binding target for regulatory proteins. Analysis of a 170 bp promoter fragment by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) with nuclear extracts prepared from mycelia grown in pectin-containing culture medium revealed a high mobility complex that was subsequently confirmed by analyzing it with a double-stranded oligonucleotide spanning the CCAAT motif. A substitution in the core sequence for GTAGG partially abolished the formation of specific complexes, showing the involvement of the CCAAT box in the regulation of the polygalacturonase gene studied. PMID:21637657

  15. Natural Leishmania (Viannia) spp. infections in phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) from the Brazilian Amazon region reveal new putative transmission cycles of American cutaneous leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Adelson Alcimar Almeida; dos Santos, Thiago Vasconcelos; Jennings, Yara Lúcia Lins; Ishikawa, Edna Aoba Yassui; Barata, Iorlando da Rocha; Silva, Maria das Graças Soares; Lima, José Aprígio Nunes; Shaw, Jeffrey; Lainson, Ralph; Silveira, Fernando Tobias

    2016-01-01

    In Amazonian Brazil the etiological agents of American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL) belong to at least seven Leishmania species but little is known about the putative phlebotomine sand fly vectors in different biomes. In 2002–2003 a survey of the phlebotomine fauna was undertaken in the “Floresta Nacional do Tapajós”, Belterra municipality, in the lower Amazon region, western Pará State, Brazil, where we recently confirmed the presence of a putative hybrid parasite, L. (V.) guyanensis × L. (V.) shawi shawi. Sand flies were collected from Centers for Disease Control (CDC) light traps, Shannon traps and by aspiration on tree bases. Females were dissected and attempts to isolate any flagellate infections were made by inoculating homogenized midguts into Difco B45 medium. Isolates were characterized by monoclonal antibodies and isoenzyme electrophoresis. A total of 9,704 sand flies, belonging to 68 species or subspecies, were collected. Infections were found in the following sand flies: L. (V.) naiffi with Psychodopygus hirsutus hirsutus (1) and Ps. davisi (2); and L. (V.) shawi shawi with Nyssomyia whitmani (3) and Lutzomyia gomezi (1). These results provide strong evidence of new putative transmission cycles for L. (V.) naiffi and L. (V.) s. shawi. PMID:27235194

  16. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry reveals conformational flexibility in the deubiquitinating enzyme USP5.

    PubMed

    Scott, Daniel; Layfield, Robert; Oldham, Neil J

    2015-08-01

    Many proteins exhibit conformation flexibility as part of their biological function, whether through the presence of a series of well-defined states or by the existence of intrinsic disorder. Ion mobility spectrometry, in combination with MS (IM-MS), offers a rapid and sensitive means of probing ensembles of protein structures through measurement of gas-phase collisional cross sections. We have applied IM-MS analysis to the multidomain deubiquitinating enzyme ubiquitin specific protease 5 (USP5), which is believed to exhibit significant conformational flexibility. Native ESI-MS measurement of the 94-kDa USP5 revealed two distinct charge-state distributions: [M + 17H](+) to [M + 21H](+) and [M + 24H](+) to [M + 29H](+). The collisional cross sections of these ions revealed clear groupings of 52 ± 4 nm(2) for the lower charges and 66 ± 6 nm(2) for the higher charges. Molecular dynamics simulation of a compact form of USP5, based on a crystal structure, produced structures of 53-54 nm(2) following 2 ns in the gas phase, while simulation of an extended form (based on small-angle X-ray scattering data) led to structures of 64 nm(2). These data demonstrate that IM-MS is a valuable tool in studying proteins with different discrete conformational states.

  17. Conformational preferences of linear beta-defensins are revealed by ion mobility-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    De Cecco, Martin; Seo, Emily S; Clarke, David J; McCullough, Bryan J; Taylor, Karen; Macmillan, Derek; Dorin, Julia R; Campopiano, Dominic J; Barran, Perdita E

    2010-02-18

    In recent times there has been an enormous rise in resistance to synthetic antibiotics as well as an increase in the virulence of bacteria, the so-called "superbugs". This problem has catalyzed a search for novel molecules to fight bacteria, which in turn relies on a better understanding of the molecular basis of the immune response. Beta-defensins are a class of small, cationic, cysteine-rich antimicrobial peptides expressed by humans and other animals to act against incoming pathogens. As well as their antimicrobial properties, beta-defensins also act as chemokines, recruiting cells to the sites of infection. Here the relationship between the tertiary structures of beta-defensin analogs and their chemotactic activities has been investigated using ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) and biochemical assays. A panel of derivatives of the murine beta-defensin Defb14 has been formed and the ability of these peptides to chemoattract the receptor CCR6 has been assessed in vitro. The derivatives can be divided into two groups, those with chemotactic activity equal to that of the unmodified parent peptide, and those whose chemotactic activity has been lost upon modification. Analysis by ion mobility-mass spectrometry reveals the conformational preferences of these peptides upon ionization from different solvents. Under denaturing conditions, the chemotactic peptides adopt more compact conformations in the gas-phase at higher charge states than those which are inactive. While the conditions of these experiments are not akin to the environment around the receptor in vivo, this technique provides an in vacuo method for distinguishing between the different chemotactic activities of beta-defensin derivatives.

  18. Patient-derived C-terminal mutation of FANCI causes protein mislocalization and reveals putative EDGE motif function in DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Colnaghi, Luca; Jones, Mathew J K; Cotto-Rios, Xiomaris M; Schindler, Detlev; Hanenberg, Helmut; Huang, Tony T

    2011-02-17

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare familial genome instability syndrome caused by mutations in FA genes that results in defective DNA crosslink repair. Activation of the FA pathway requires the FA core ubiquitin ligase complex-dependent monoubiquitination of 2 interacting FA proteins, FANCI and FANCD2. Although loss of either FANCI or FANCD2 is known to prevent monoubiquitination of its respective partner, it is unclear whether FANCI has any additional domains that may be important in promoting DNA repair, independent of its monoubiquitination. Here, we focus on an FA-I patient-derived FANCI mutant protein, R1299X (deletion of 30 residues from its C-terminus), to characterize important structural region(s) in FANCI that is required to activate the FA pathway. We show that, within this short 30 amino acid stretch contains 2 separable functional signatures, a nuclear localization signal and a putative EDGE motif, that is critical for the ability of FANCI to properly monoubiquitinate FANCD2 and promote DNA crosslink resistance. Our study enable us to conclude that, although proper nuclear localization of FANCI is crucial for robust FANCD2 monoubiquitination, the putative FANCI EDGE motif is important for DNA crosslink repair.

  19. Comparative transcriptome analysis of obligately asexual and cyclically sexual rotifers reveals genes with putative functions in sexual reproduction, dormancy, and asexual egg production.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Sara J; Stelzer, Claus-Peter; Welch, David B Mark; Logsdon, John M

    2013-06-19

    Sexual reproduction is a widely studied biological process because it is critically important to the genetics, evolution, and ecology of eukaryotes. Despite decades of study on this topic, no comprehensive explanation has been accepted that explains the evolutionary forces underlying its prevalence and persistence in nature. Monogonont rotifers offer a useful system for experimental studies relating to the evolution of sexual reproduction due to their rapid reproductive rate and close relationship to the putatively ancient asexual bdelloid rotifers. However, little is known about the molecular underpinnings of sex in any rotifer species. We generated mRNA-seq libraries for obligate parthenogenetic (OP) and cyclical parthenogenetic (CP) strains of the monogonont rotifer, Brachionus calyciflorus, to identify genes specific to both modes of reproduction. Our differential expression analysis identified receptors with putative roles in signaling pathways responsible for the transition from asexual to sexual reproduction. Differential expression of a specific copy of the duplicated cell cycle regulatory gene CDC20 and specific copies of histone H2A suggest that such duplications may underlie the phenotypic plasticity required for reproductive mode switch in monogononts. We further identified differential expression of genes involved in the formation of resting eggs, a process linked exclusively to sex in this species. Finally, we identified transcripts from the bdelloid rotifer Adineta ricciae that have significant sequence similarity to genes with higher expression in CP strains of B. calyciflorus. Our analysis of global gene expression differences between facultatively sexual and exclusively asexual populations of B. calyciflorus provides insights into the molecular nature of sexual reproduction in rotifers. Furthermore, our results offer insight into the evolution of obligate asexuality in bdelloid rotifers and provide indicators important for the use of monogononts

  20. Comparative transcriptome analysis of obligately asexual and cyclically sexual rotifers reveals genes with putative functions in sexual reproduction, dormancy, and asexual egg production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sexual reproduction is a widely studied biological process because it is critically important to the genetics, evolution, and ecology of eukaryotes. Despite decades of study on this topic, no comprehensive explanation has been accepted that explains the evolutionary forces underlying its prevalence and persistence in nature. Monogonont rotifers offer a useful system for experimental studies relating to the evolution of sexual reproduction due to their rapid reproductive rate and close relationship to the putatively ancient asexual bdelloid rotifers. However, little is known about the molecular underpinnings of sex in any rotifer species. Results We generated mRNA-seq libraries for obligate parthenogenetic (OP) and cyclical parthenogenetic (CP) strains of the monogonont rotifer, Brachionus calyciflorus, to identify genes specific to both modes of reproduction. Our differential expression analysis identified receptors with putative roles in signaling pathways responsible for the transition from asexual to sexual reproduction. Differential expression of a specific copy of the duplicated cell cycle regulatory gene CDC20 and specific copies of histone H2A suggest that such duplications may underlie the phenotypic plasticity required for reproductive mode switch in monogononts. We further identified differential expression of genes involved in the formation of resting eggs, a process linked exclusively to sex in this species. Finally, we identified transcripts from the bdelloid rotifer Adineta ricciae that have significant sequence similarity to genes with higher expression in CP strains of B. calyciflorus. Conclusions Our analysis of global gene expression differences between facultatively sexual and exclusively asexual populations of B. calyciflorus provides insights into the molecular nature of sexual reproduction in rotifers. Furthermore, our results offer insight into the evolution of obligate asexuality in bdelloid rotifers and provide indicators

  1. First-principles calculations reveal controlling principles for carrier mobilities in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yu-Ning; Zhang, X.-G.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2016-11-01

    Carrier mobilities remain a key qualifying factor for materials competing for next-generation electronics. It has long been believed that carrier mobilities can be calculated using the Born approximation. Here, we introduce a parameter-free, first-principles approach based on complex-wavevector energy bands which does not invoke the Born expansion. We demonstrate that phonon-limited mobility is controlled by low-resistivity percolation paths, which arise from fluctuations that are beyond the Born approximation. We further demonstrate that, in ionized-impurity scattering, one must account for the effect of the screening charge, which cancels most of the Coulomb tail. Calculated electron mobilities in silicon are in agreement with experimental data. The method is easy to use and can provide guidance in the search for high-mobility device designs.

  2. A Systems Biology Approach to Reveal Putative Host-Derived Biomarkers of Periodontitis by Network Topology Characterization of MMP-REDOX/NO and Apoptosis Integrated Pathways.

    PubMed

    Zeidán-Chuliá, Fares; Gürsoy, Mervi; Neves de Oliveira, Ben-Hur; Özdemir, Vural; Könönen, Eija; Gürsoy, Ulvi K

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis, a formidable global health burden, is a common chronic disease that destroys tooth-supporting tissues. Biomarkers of the early phase of this progressive disease are of utmost importance for global health. In this context, saliva represents a non-invasive biosample. By using systems biology tools, we aimed to (1) identify an integrated interactome between matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-REDOX/nitric oxide (NO) and apoptosis upstream pathways of periodontal inflammation, and (2) characterize the attendant topological network properties to uncover putative biomarkers to be tested in saliva from patients with periodontitis. Hence, we first generated a protein-protein network model of interactions ("BIOMARK" interactome) by using the STRING 10 database, a search tool for the retrieval of interacting genes/proteins, with "Experiments" and "Databases" as input options and a confidence score of 0.400. Second, we determined the centrality values (closeness, stress, degree or connectivity, and betweenness) for the "BIOMARK" members by using the Cytoscape software. We found Ubiquitin C (UBC), Jun proto-oncogene (JUN), and matrix metalloproteinase-14 (MMP14) as the most central hub- and non-hub-bottlenecks among the 211 genes/proteins of the whole interactome. We conclude that UBC, JUN, and MMP14 are likely an optimal candidate group of host-derived biomarkers, in combination with oral pathogenic bacteria-derived proteins, for detecting periodontitis at its early phase by using salivary samples from patients. These findings therefore have broader relevance for systems medicine in global health as well.

  3. Three-dimensional reconstruction of human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel revealed an ellipsoidal structure with orifices beneath the putative transmembrane domain.

    PubMed

    Mio, Kazuhiro; Ogura, Toshihiko; Mio, Muneyo; Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang; Sato, Chikara; Sohma, Yoshiro

    2008-10-31

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is a membrane-integral protein that belongs to an ATP-binding cassette superfamily. Mutations in the CFTR gene cause cystic fibrosis in which salt, water, and protein transports are defective in various tissues. Here we expressed wild-type human CFTR as a FLAG-fused protein in HEK293 cells heterologously and purified it in three steps: anti-FLAG and wheat germ agglutinin affinity chromatographies and size exclusion chromatography. The stoichiometry of the protein was analyzed using various biochemical approaches, including chemical cross-linking, blue-native PAGE, size exclusion chromatography, and electron microscopy (EM) observation of antibody-decorated CFTR. All these data support a dimeric assembly of CFTR. Using 5,039 automatically selected particles from negatively stained EM images, the three-dimensional structure of CFTR was reconstructed at 2-nm resolution assuming a 2-fold symmetry. CFTR, presumably in a closed state, was shown to be an ellipsoidal particle with dimensions of 120 x 106 x 162 A. It comprises a small dome-shaped extracellular and membrane-spanning domain and a large cytoplasmic domain with orifices beneath the putative transmembrane domain. EM observation of CFTR.anti-regulatory domain antibody complex confirmed that two regulatory domains are located around the bottom end of the larger oval cytoplasmic domain.

  4. Comparative proteomics of cerebrospinal fluid reveals a predictive model for differential diagnosis of pneumococcal, meningococcal, and enteroviral meningitis, and novel putative therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Meningitis is the inflammation of the meninges in response to infection or chemical agents. While aseptic meningitis, most frequently caused by enteroviruses, is usually benign with a self-limiting course, bacterial meningitis remains associated with high morbidity and mortality rates, despite advances in antimicrobial therapy and intensive care. Fast and accurate differential diagnosis is crucial for assertive choice of the appropriate therapeutic approach for each form of meningitis. Methods We used 2D-PAGE and mass spectrometry to identify the cerebrospinal fluid proteome specifically related to the host response to pneumococcal, meningococcal, and enteroviral meningitis. The disease-specific proteome signatures were inspected by pathway analysis. Results Unique cerebrospinal fluid proteome signatures were found to the three aetiological forms of meningitis investigated, and a qualitative predictive model with four protein markers was developed for the differential diagnosis of these diseases. Nevertheless, pathway analysis of the disease-specific proteomes unveiled that Kallikrein-kinin system may play a crucial role in the pathophysiological mechanisms leading to brain damage in bacterial meningitis. Proteins taking part in this cellular process are proposed as putative targets to novel adjunctive therapies. Conclusions Comparative proteomics of cerebrospinal fluid disclosed candidate biomarkers, which were combined in a qualitative and sequential predictive model with potential to improve the differential diagnosis of pneumococcal, meningococcal and enteroviral meningitis. Moreover, we present the first evidence of the possible implication of Kallikrein-kinin system in the pathophysiology of bacterial meningitis. PMID:26040285

  5. Functional MRI of the Reserpine-Induced Putative Rat Model of Fibromyalgia Reveals Discriminatory Patterns of Functional Augmentation to Acute Nociceptive Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Jack A.; Shibata, Sayaka; Fujikawa, Akihiko; Takahashi, Masayasu; Saga, Tsuneo; Aoki, Ichio

    2017-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging, applied to pre-clinical models of chronic pain, offers unique advantages in the drive to discover new treatments for this prevalent and oppressive condition. The high spatial and temporal resolution of fMRI affords detailed mapping of regional pharmacodynamics that underlie mechanisms of pain suppression by new analgesics. Despite evidence supporting the translational relevance of this approach, relatively few studies have investigated fMRI abnormalities in rodent models of chronic pain. In this study, we used fMRI to map the BOLD response in a recently developed putative rat model of fibromyalgia to innocuous and acute nociceptive stimuli by applying a step-wise graded electrical forepaw stimulation paradigm, with comparison to healthy controls. We observed discriminatory functional signatures (p < 0.001) to 2 mA electrical forepaw stimulation, found to be innocuous in the control group. As such, this translational approach provides sensitive and quantitative neural correlates of the underlying chronic disease. The regional patterns of functional augmentation were found to be concordant with previous studies of nociception in the anaesthetised rat brain, supporting the specificity of this approach in the study of altered central pain processing in reserpine induced myalgia. The methodology introduced in this work represents a novel platform for emerging treatment evaluation in highly experimentally controlled conditions. PMID:28079057

  6. Transposon-mediated enhancer detection reveals the location, morphology and development of the cupular organs, which are putative hydrodynamic sensors, in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Naoyuki; Horie, Takeo; Satoh, Nori; Sasakura, Yasunori

    2010-11-01

    The adult of the ascidian Ciona intestinalis has cupular organs, i.e., putative hydrodynamic sensors, at the atrial epithelium. The cupular organ consists of support cells and sensory neurons, and it extends a gelatinous matrix, known as a cupula, toward the atrial cavity. These characteristics are shared with sensory hair cells in the vertebrate inner ear and lateral line neuromasts in fish and amphibians, which suggests an evolutionary link between the cupular organ and these vertebrate hydrodynamic sensors. In the present study, we have isolated and investigated two transposon-mediated enhancer detection lines that showed GFP expression in support cells of the cupular organs. Using the enhancer detection lines and neuron marker transgenic lines, we describe the position, morphology, and development of the cupular organs. Cupular organs were found at the atrial epithelium, but not in the branchial epithelium. We found that cupular organs are also present along the dorsal fold and the gonoducts. The cells lining the pre-atrial opening in juveniles are presumably precursor cells of the cupular organ. To our knowledge, the present study is the first precise description of the ascidian cupular organ, providing evidence that may help to resolve discrepancies among previous studies on the organ.

  7. First-principles calculations reveal controlling principles for carrier mobilities in semiconductors

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Yu -Ning; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Pantelides, Sokrates T.; ...

    2016-10-11

    It has long been believed that carrier mobilities in semiconductors can be calculated by Fermi s golden rule (Born approximation). Phenomenological models for scattering amplitudes are typically used for engineering- level device modeling. Here we introduce a parameter-free, first-principles approach based on complex- wavevector energy bands that does not invoke the Born approximation. We show that phonon-limited mobility is controlled by low-resistivity percolation paths and that in ionized-impurity scattering one must account for the effect of the screening charge, which cancels most of the Coulomb tail.Finally, calculated electron mobilities in silicon are in agreement with experimental data.

  8. The origin of molecular mobility during biomass pyrolysis as revealed by in situ (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dufour, Anthony; Castro-Diaz, Miguel; Brosse, Nicolas; Bouroukba, Mohamed; Snape, Colin

    2012-07-01

    The thermochemical conversion of lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks offers an important potential route for the production of biofuels and value-added green chemicals. Pyrolysis is the first phenomenon involved in all biomass thermochemical processes and it controls to a major extent the product composition. The composition of pyrolysis products can be affected markedly by the extent of softening that occurs. In spite of extensive work on biomass pyrolysis, the development of fluidity during the pyrolysis of biomass has not been quantified. This paper provides the first experimental investigation of proton mobility during biomass pyrolysis by in situ (1)H NMR spectroscopy. The origin of mobility is discussed for cellulose, lignin and xylan. The effect of minerals on cellulose mobility is also investigated. Interactions between polymers in the native biomass network are revealed by in situ (1)H NMR analysis. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Differential microRNA Analysis of Glandular Trichomes and Young Leaves in Xanthium strumarium L. Reveals Their Putative Roles in Regulating Terpenoid Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Rongyan; Li, Yuanjun; Li, Changfu; Zhang, Yansheng

    2015-01-01

    The medicinal plant Xanthium strumarium L. (X. strumarium) is covered with glandular trichomes, which are the sites for synthesizing pharmacologically active terpenoids such as xanthatin. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of 21-24 nucleotide (nt) non-coding RNAs, most of which are identified as regulators of plant growth development. Identification of miRNAs involved in the biosynthesis of plant secondary metabolites remains limited. In this study, high-throughput Illumina sequencing, combined with target gene prediction, was performed to discover novel and conserved miRNAs with potential roles in regulating terpenoid biosynthesis in X. strumarium glandular trichomes. Two small RNA libraries from leaves and glandular trichomes of X. strumarium were established. In total, 1,185 conserved miRNAs and 37 novel miRNAs were identified, with 494 conserved miRNAs and 18 novel miRNAs being differentially expressed between the two tissue sources. Based on the X. strumarium transcriptome data that we recently constructed, 3,307 annotated mRNA transcripts were identified as putative targets of the differentially expressed miRNAs. KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) pathway analysis suggested that some of the differentially expressed miRNAs, including miR6435, miR5021 and miR1134, might be involved in terpenoid biosynthesis in the X. strumarium glandular trichomes. This study provides the first comprehensive analysis of miRNAs in X. strumarium, which forms the basis for further understanding of miRNA-based regulation on terpenoid biosynthesis.

  10. Copy number variations and genome-wide associations reveal putative genes and metabolic pathways involved with the feed conversion ratio in beef cattle.

    PubMed

    de Almeida Santana, Miguel Henrique; Junior, Gerson Antônio Oliveira; Cesar, Aline Silva Mello; Freua, Mateus Castelani; da Costa Gomes, Rodrigo; da Luz E Silva, Saulo; Leme, Paulo Roberto; Fukumasu, Heidge; Carvalho, Minos Esperândio; Ventura, Ricardo Vieira; Coutinho, Luiz Lehmann; Kadarmideen, Haja N; Ferraz, José Bento Sterman

    2016-11-01

    The use of genome-wide association results combined with other genomic approaches may uncover genes and metabolic pathways related to complex traits. In this study, the phenotypic and genotypic data of 1475 Nellore (Bos indicus) cattle and 941,033 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were used for genome-wide association study (GWAS) and copy number variations (CNVs) analysis in order to identify candidate genes and putative pathways involved with the feed conversion ratio (FCR). The GWAS was based on the Bayes B approach analyzing genomic windows with multiple regression models to estimate the proportion of genetic variance explained by each window. The CNVs were detected with PennCNV software using the log R ratio and B allele frequency data. CNV regions (CNVRs) were identified with CNVRuler and a linear regression was used to associate CNVRs and the FCR. Functional annotation of associated genomic regions was performed with the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) and the metabolic pathways were obtained from the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG). We showed five genomic windows distributed over chromosomes 4, 6, 7, 8, and 24 that explain 12 % of the total genetic variance for FCR, and detected 12 CNVRs (chromosomes 1, 5, 7, 10, and 12) significantly associated [false discovery rate (FDR) < 0.05] with the FCR. Significant genomic regions (GWAS and CNV) harbor candidate genes involved in pathways related to energetic, lipid, and protein metabolism. The metabolic pathways found in this study are related to processes directly connected to feed efficiency in beef cattle. It was observed that, even though different genomic regions and genes were found between the two approaches (GWAS and CNV), the metabolic processes covered were related to each other. Therefore, a combination of the approaches complement each other and lead to a better understanding of the FCR.

  11. A Systems Biology Approach to Reveal Putative Host-Derived Biomarkers of Periodontitis by Network Topology Characterization of MMP-REDOX/NO and Apoptosis Integrated Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zeidán-Chuliá, Fares; Gürsoy, Mervi; Neves de Oliveira, Ben-Hur; Özdemir, Vural; Könönen, Eija; Gürsoy, Ulvi K.

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis, a formidable global health burden, is a common chronic disease that destroys tooth-supporting tissues. Biomarkers of the early phase of this progressive disease are of utmost importance for global health. In this context, saliva represents a non-invasive biosample. By using systems biology tools, we aimed to (1) identify an integrated interactome between matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-REDOX/nitric oxide (NO) and apoptosis upstream pathways of periodontal inflammation, and (2) characterize the attendant topological network properties to uncover putative biomarkers to be tested in saliva from patients with periodontitis. Hence, we first generated a protein-protein network model of interactions (“BIOMARK” interactome) by using the STRING 10 database, a search tool for the retrieval of interacting genes/proteins, with “Experiments” and “Databases” as input options and a confidence score of 0.400. Second, we determined the centrality values (closeness, stress, degree or connectivity, and betweenness) for the “BIOMARK” members by using the Cytoscape software. We found Ubiquitin C (UBC), Jun proto-oncogene (JUN), and matrix metalloproteinase-14 (MMP14) as the most central hub- and non-hub-bottlenecks among the 211 genes/proteins of the whole interactome. We conclude that UBC, JUN, and MMP14 are likely an optimal candidate group of host-derived biomarkers, in combination with oral pathogenic bacteria-derived proteins, for detecting periodontitis at its early phase by using salivary samples from patients. These findings therefore have broader relevance for systems medicine in global health as well. PMID:26793622

  12. Molecular profile and functional characterization of the ferritin H subunit from rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus), revealing its putative role in host antioxidant and immune defense.

    PubMed

    Elvitigala, Don Anushka Sandaruwan; Priyathilaka, Thanthrige Thiunuwan; Lim, Bong-Soo; Whang, Ilson; Yeo, Sang-Yeob; Choi, Cheol Young; Lee, Jehee

    2014-11-01

    Ferritins are iron binding proteins made out of 24 subunits, involved in iron homeostasis and metabolism in cellular environments. Here, we sought to identify and functionally characterize a one type of subunits of ferritin (ferritin H-like subunit) from rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus; RbFerH). The complete coding sequence of RbFerH was 531 bp in length, encoding a 177-amino acid protein with a predicted molecular mass of 20.8 kDa. The deduced protein structure possessed the domain architecture characteristic of known ferritin H subunits, including metal ligands for iron binding, a ferroxidase center, and two iron-binding region signatures. As expected, the 5' untranslated region of the RbFerH cDNA sequence contained a putative iron response element region, a characteristic regulatory element involved in its translation. The RbFerH gene comprised 5 exons and 4 introns spanning a 4195 bp region. Overexpressed recombinant RbFerH protein demonstrated prominent Fe(II) ion depriving activity, bacteriostatic properties, and protective effects against oxidative double-stranded DNA damage. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), we found that RbFerH was expressed ubiquitously in the majority of physiologically important tissues in rock bream. A greater abundance of the mRNA transcripts were detected in blood and liver tissues. Upon administering different microbial pathogens and pathogen-derived mitogens, RbFerH transcription was markedly elevated in the blood of rock bream. Taken together, our findings suggest that RbFerH acts as a potent iron sequestrator in rock bream and may actively participate in antimicrobial as well as antioxidative defense. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Spatiotemporal analysis of putative notochordal cell markers reveals CD24 and keratins 8, 18, and 19 as notochord‐specific markers during early human intervertebral disc development

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues‐Pinto, Ricardo; Berry, Andrew; Piper‐Hanley, Karen; Hanley, Neil; Richardson, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In humans, the nucleus pulposus (NP) is composed of large vacuolated notochordal cells in the fetus but, soon after birth, becomes populated by smaller, chondrocyte‐like cells. Although animal studies indicate that notochord‐derived cells persist in the adult NP, the ontogeny of the adult human NP cell population is still unclear. As such, identification of unique notochordal markers is required. This study was conducted to determine the spatiotemporal expression of putative human notochordal markers to aid in the elucidation of the ontogeny of adult human NP cells. Human embryos and fetuses (3.5–18 weeks post‐conception (WPC)) were microdissected to isolate the spine anlagens (notochord and somites/sclerotome). Morphology of the developing IVD was assessed using hematoxylin and eosin. Expression of keratin (KRT) 8, KRT18, KRT19, CD24, GAL3, CD55, BASP1, CTGF, T, CD90, Tie2, and E‐cadherin was assessed using immunohistochemistry. KRT8, KRT18, KRT19 were uniquely expressed by notochordal cells at all spine levels at all stages studied; CD24 was expressed at all stages except 3.5 WPC. While GAL3, CD55, BASP1, CTGF, and T were expressed by notochordal cells at specific stages, they were also co‐expressed by sclerotomal cells. CD90, Tie2, and E‐cadherin expression was not detectable in developing human spine cells at any stage. This study has identified, for the first time, the consistent expression of KRT8, KRT18, KRT19, and CD24 as human notochord‐specific markers during early IVD development. Thus, we propose that these markers can be used to help ascertain the ontogeny of adult human NP cells. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1327–1340, 2016. PMID:26910849

  14. Differential microRNA Analysis of Glandular Trichomes and Young Leaves in Xanthium strumarium L. Reveals Their Putative Roles in Regulating Terpenoid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Rongyan; Li, Yuanjun; Li, Changfu; Zhang, Yansheng

    2015-01-01

    The medicinal plant Xanthium strumarium L. (X. strumarium) is covered with glandular trichomes, which are the sites for synthesizing pharmacologically active terpenoids such as xanthatin. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of 21–24 nucleotide (nt) non-coding RNAs, most of which are identified as regulators of plant growth development. Identification of miRNAs involved in the biosynthesis of plant secondary metabolites remains limited. In this study, high-throughput Illumina sequencing, combined with target gene prediction, was performed to discover novel and conserved miRNAs with potential roles in regulating terpenoid biosynthesis in X. strumarium glandular trichomes. Two small RNA libraries from leaves and glandular trichomes of X. strumarium were established. In total, 1,185 conserved miRNAs and 37 novel miRNAs were identified, with 494 conserved miRNAs and 18 novel miRNAs being differentially expressed between the two tissue sources. Based on the X. strumarium transcriptome data that we recently constructed, 3,307 annotated mRNA transcripts were identified as putative targets of the differentially expressed miRNAs. KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) pathway analysis suggested that some of the differentially expressed miRNAs, including miR6435, miR5021 and miR1134, might be involved in terpenoid biosynthesis in the X. strumarium glandular trichomes. This study provides the first comprehensive analysis of miRNAs in X. strumarium, which forms the basis for further understanding of miRNA-based regulation on terpenoid biosynthesis. PMID:26406988

  15. Physiological responses of emerald ash borer larvae to feeding on different ash species reveal putative resistance mechanisms and insect counter-adaptations.

    PubMed

    Rigsby, C M; Showalter, D N; Herms, D A; Koch, J L; Bonello, P; Cipollini, D

    2015-07-01

    Emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, an Asian wood-boring beetle, has devastated ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees in North American forests and landscapes since its discovery there in 2002. In this study, we collected living larvae from EAB-resistant Manchurian ash (Fraxinus mandschurica), and susceptible white (Fraxinus americana) and green (Fraxinus pennsylvanica) ash hosts, and quantified the activity and production of selected detoxification, digestive, and antioxidant enzymes. We hypothesized that differences in larval physiology could be used to infer resistance mechanisms of ash. We found no differences in cytochrome P450, glutathione-S-transferase, carboxylesterase, sulfotransferase, and tryptic BApNAase activities between larvae feeding on different hosts. Despite this, Manchurian ash-fed larvae produced a single isozyme of low electrophoretic mobility that was not produced in white or green ash-fed larvae. Additionally, larvae feeding on white and green ash produced two serine protease isozymes of high electrophoretic mobility that were not observed in Manchurian ash-fed larvae. We also found lower activity of β-glucosidase and higher activities of monoamine oxidase, ortho-quinone reductase, catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione reductase in Manchurian ash-fed larvae compared to larvae that had fed on susceptible ash. A single isozyme was detected for both catalase and superoxide dismutase in all larval groups. The activities of the quinone-protective and antioxidant enzymes are consistent with the resistance phenotype of the host species, with the highest activities measured in larvae feeding on resistant Manchurian ash. We conclude that larvae feeding on Manchurian ash could be under quinone and oxidative stress, suggesting these may be potential mechanisms of resistance of Manchurian ash to EAB larvae, and that quinone-protective and antioxidant enzymes are important counter-adaptations of larvae for dealing with these resistance

  16. A new centrifuge microscope reveals that mobile plastids trigger gravity sensing in Arabidopsis inflorescence stems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyota, Masatsugu; Tasaka, Masao; Morita, Miyo T.; Gilroy, Simon

    2012-07-01

    The starch-statolith hypothesis is the most widely accepted model for plant gravity sensing and proposes that the sedimentation of high-density starch-filled plastids (amyloplasts) in shoot endodermal cells and root columella cells is important for gravity sensing of each organ. However, starch-deficient phosphoglucomutase (pgm-1) mutants sense gravity and show gravitropism in inflorescence stems, even though most starchless amyloplasts in this mutant fail to sediment toward the gravity vector. These results raise the questions about the role of starch in gravity sensing and the features of statolith/statocyte essential for shoot gravity sensing. To address these questions, we developed a new centrifuge microscope and analyzed two gravitropic mutants, i.e., pgm-1 and endodermal-amyloplast less 1 (eal1). All optical devices (e.g., objective lens, light source and CCD camera) and specimens were rotated on a direct-drive motor, and acquired images were wirelessly transmitted during centrifugation. Live-cell imaging during centrifugation revealed that the starchless amyloplasts sedimented to the hypergravity vector (10 and 30 g) in endodermal cells of pgm-1 stems, indicating that the density of the starchless amyloplasts is higher than that of cytoplasm. Electron micrographs of shoot endodermal cells in pgm-1 mutants suggested that the starchless amyloplast contains an organized thylakoid membrane but not starch granules, which morphologically resembles chloroplasts in the adjacent cortical cells. Therefore, the shoot amyloplasts without starch are possibly as dense as chloroplasts. We examined eal1 mutants, an allele of shoot gravitropism (sgr) 7/short-root (shr), which also have starchless amyloplasts due to abnormal differentiation of amyloplasts and show no gravitropic response at 1 g. Hypergravity up to 30 g induced little gravitropism in eal1 stems and the starchless amyloplasts failed to sediment under 30 g conditions. However, the eal1 mutants treated with

  17. Mobilization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    istic and romantic emotionalism that typifies this genre. Longino, James C., et al. “A Study of World War Procurement and Industrial Mobilization...States. Harrisburg, PA: Military Service Publishing Co., 1941. CARL 355.22 J72b. Written in rough prose , this World War II era document explains the

  18. Deep sequencing of Myxilla (Ectyomyxilla) methanophila, an epibiotic sponge on cold-seep tubeworms, reveals methylotrophic, thiotrophic, and putative hydrocarbon-degrading microbial associations.

    PubMed

    Arellano, Shawn M; Lee, On On; Lafi, Feras F; Yang, Jiangke; Wang, Yong; Young, Craig M; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2013-02-01

    The encrusting sponge Myxilla (Ectyomyxilla) methanophila (Poecilosclerida: Myxillidae) is an epibiont on vestimentiferan tubeworms at hydrocarbon seeps on the upper Louisiana slope of the Gulf of Mexico. It has long been suggested that this sponge harbors methylotrophic bacteria due to its low δ(13)C value and high methanol dehydrogenase activity, yet the full community of microbial associations in M. methanophila remained uncharacterized. In this study, we sequenced 16S rRNA genes representing the microbial community in M. methanophila collected from two hydrocarbon-seep sites (GC234 and Bush Hill) using both Sanger sequencing and next-generation 454 pyrosequencing technologies. Additionally, we compared the microbial community in M. methanophila to that of the biofilm collected from the associated tubeworm. Our results revealed that the microbial diversity in the sponges from both sites was low but the community structure was largely similar, showing a high proportion of methylotrophic bacteria of the genus Methylohalomonas and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading bacteria of the genera Cycloclasticus and Neptunomonas. Furthermore, the sponge microbial clone library revealed the dominance of thioautotrophic gammaproteobacterial symbionts in M. methanophila. In contrast, the biofilm communities on the tubeworms were more diverse and dominated by the chemoorganotrophic Moritella at GC234 and methylotrophic Methylomonas and Methylohalomonas at Bush Hill. Overall, our study provides evidence to support previous suggestion that M. methanophila harbors methylotrophic symbionts and also reveals the association of PAH-degrading and thioautotrophic microbes in the sponge.

  19. TRE5-A retrotransposition profiling reveals putative RNA polymerase III transcription complex binding sites on the Dictyostelium extrachromosomal rDNA element.

    PubMed

    Spaller, Thomas; Groth, Marco; Glöckner, Gernot; Winckler, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum has a haploid genome in which two thirds of the DNA encodes proteins. Consequently, the space available for selfish mobile elements to expand without excess damage to the host genome is limited. The non-long terminal repeat retrotransposon TRE5-A maintains an active population in the D. discoideum genome and apparently adapted to this gene-dense environment by targeting positions ~47 bp upstream of tRNA genes that are devoid of protein-coding regions. Because only ~24% of tRNA genes are associated with a TRE5-A element in the reference genome, we evaluated whether TRE5-A retrotransposition is limited to this subset of tRNA genes. We determined that a tagged TRE5-A element (TRE5-Absr) integrated at 384 of 405 tRNA genes, suggesting that expansion of the current natural TRE5-A population is not limited by the availability of targets. We further observed that TRE5-Absr targets the ribosomal 5S gene on the multicopy extrachromosomal DNA element that carries the ribosomal RNA genes, indicating that TRE5-A integration may extend to the entire RNA polymerase III (Pol III) transcriptome. We determined that both natural TRE5-A and cloned TRE5-Absr retrotranspose to locations on the extrachromosomal rDNA element that contain tRNA gene-typical A/B box promoter motifs without displaying any other tRNA gene context. Based on previous data suggesting that TRE5-A targets tRNA genes by locating Pol III transcription complexes, we propose that A/B box loci reflect Pol III transcription complex assembly sites that possess a function in the biology of the extrachromosomal rDNA element.

  20. Nanoscale histone localization in live cells reveals reduced chromatin mobility in response to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Vidi, Pierre-Alexandre; Lelièvre, Sophie A.; Irudayaraj, Joseph M. K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nuclear functions including gene expression, DNA replication and genome maintenance intimately rely on dynamic changes in chromatin organization. The movements of chromatin fibers might play important roles in the regulation of these fundamental processes, yet the mechanisms controlling chromatin mobility are poorly understood owing to methodological limitations for the assessment of chromatin movements. Here, we present a facile and quantitative technique that relies on photoactivation of GFP-tagged histones and paired-particle tracking to measure chromatin mobility in live cells. We validate the method by comparing live cells to ATP-depleted cells and show that chromatin movements in mammalian cells are predominantly energy dependent. We also find that chromatin diffusion decreases in response to DNA breaks induced by a genotoxic drug or by the ISceI meganuclease. Timecourse analysis after cell exposure to ionizing radiation indicates that the decrease in chromatin mobility is transient and precedes subsequent increased mobility. Future applications of the method in the DNA repair field and beyond are discussed. PMID:25501817

  1. Small-RNA deep sequencing reveals Arctium tomentosum as a natural host of Alstroemeria virus X and a new putative Emaravirus.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yaqi; Tugume, Arthur K; Valkonen, Jari P T

    2012-01-01

    Arctium species (Asteraceae) are distributed worldwide and are used as food and rich sources of secondary metabolites for the pharmaceutical industry, e.g., against avian influenza virus. RNA silencing is an antiviral defense mechanism that detects and destroys virus-derived double-stranded RNA, resulting in accumulation of virus-derived small RNAs (21-24 nucleotides) that can be used for generic detection of viruses by small-RNA deep sequencing (SRDS). SRDS was used to detect viruses in the biennial wild plant species Arctium tomentosum (woolly burdock; family Asteraceae) displaying virus-like symptoms of vein yellowing and leaf mosaic in southern Finland. Assembly of the small-RNA reads resulted in contigs homologous to Alstroemeria virus X (AlsVX), a positive/single-stranded RNA virus of genus Potexvirus (family Alphaflexiviridae), or related to negative/single-stranded RNA viruses of the genus Emaravirus. The coat protein gene of AlsVX was 81% and 89% identical to the two AlsVX isolates from Japan and Norway, respectively. The deduced, partial nucleocapsid protein amino acid sequence of the emara-like virus was only 78% or less identical to reported emaraviruses and showed no variability among the virus isolates characterized. This virus--tentatively named as Woolly burdock yellow vein virus--was exclusively associated with yellow vein and leaf mosaic symptoms in woolly burdock, whereas AlsVX was detected in only one of the 52 plants tested. These results provide novel information about natural virus infections in Acrtium species and reveal woolly burdock as the first natural host of AlsVX besides Alstroemeria (family Alstroemeriaceae). Results also revealed a new virus related to the recently emerged Emaravirus genus and demonstrated applicability of SRDS to detect negative-strand RNA viruses. SRDS potentiates virus surveys of wild plants, a research area underrepresented in plant virology, and helps reveal natural reservoirs of viruses that cause yield losses

  2. Activity and coexpression of Drosophila black with ebony in fly optic lobes reveals putative cooperative tasks in vision that evade electroretinographic detection.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Anna B; Brüsselbach, Florian; Hovemann, Bernhard T

    2013-04-15

    Drosophila mutants black and ebony show pigmentation defects in the adult cuticle, which disclose their cooperative activity in β-alanyl-dopamine formation. In visual signal transduction, Ebony conjugates β-alanine to histamine, forming β-alanyl-histamine or carcinine. Mutation of ebony disrupts signal transduction and reveals an electroretinogram (ERG) phenotype. In contrast to the corresponding cuticle phenotype of black and ebony, there is no ERG phenotype observed when black expression is disrupted. This discrepancy calls into question the longstanding assumption of Black and Ebony interaction. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of Black and Ebony in fly optic lobes. We excluded a presynaptic histamine uptake pathway and confirmed histamine recycling via carcinine formation in glia. β-Alanine supply for this pathway is independent of enzymatic synthesis by Black and β-alanine synthase Pyd3. Two versions of Black are expressed in vivo. Black is a specific aspartate decarboxylase with no activity on glutamate. RNA in situ hybridization and anti-Black antisera localized Black expression in the head. Immunolabeling revealed expression in lamina glia, in large medulla glia, in glia of the ocellar ganglion, and in astrocyte-like glia below the ocellar ganglion. In these glia types, Black expression is strictly accompanied by Ebony expression. Activity, localization, and strict coexpression with Ebony strongly indicate a specific mode of functional interaction that, however, evades ERG detection.

  3. Negative differential mobility for negative carriers as revealed by space charge measurements on crosslinked polyethylene insulated model cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teyssedre, G.; Vu, T. T. N.; Laurent, C.

    2015-12-01

    Among features observed in polyethylene materials under relatively high field, space charge packets, consisting in a pulse of net charge that remains in the form of a pulse as it crosses the insulation, are repeatedly observed but without complete theory explaining their formation and propagation. Positive charge packets are more often reported, and the models based on negative differential mobility(NDM) for the transport of holes could account for some charge packets phenomenology. Conversely, NDM for electrons transport has never been reported so far. The present contribution reports space charge measurements by pulsed electroacoustic method on miniature cables that are model of HVDC cables. The measurements were realized at room temperature or with a temperature gradient of 10 °C through the insulation under DC fields on the order 30-60 kV/mm. Space charge results reveal systematic occurrence of a negative front of charges generated at the inner electrode that moves toward the outer electrode at the beginning of the polarization step. It is observed that the transit time of the front of negative charge increases, and therefore the mobility decreases, with the applied voltage. Further, the estimated mobility, in the range 10-14-10-13 m2 V-1 s-1 for the present results, increases when the temperature increases for the same condition of applied voltage. The features substantiate the hypothesis of negative differential mobility used for modelling space charge packets.

  4. Small-RNA Deep Sequencing Reveals Arctium tomentosum as a Natural Host of Alstroemeria virus X and a New Putative Emaravirus

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Yaqi; Tugume, Arthur K.; Valkonen, Jari P. T.

    2012-01-01

    Background Arctium species (Asteraceae) are distributed worldwide and are used as food and rich sources of secondary metabolites for the pharmaceutical industry, e.g., against avian influenza virus. RNA silencing is an antiviral defense mechanism that detects and destroys virus-derived double-stranded RNA, resulting in accumulation of virus-derived small RNAs (21–24 nucleotides) that can be used for generic detection of viruses by small-RNA deep sequencing (SRDS). Methodology/Principal Findings SRDS was used to detect viruses in the biennial wild plant species Arctium tomentosum (woolly burdock; family Asteraceae) displaying virus-like symptoms of vein yellowing and leaf mosaic in southern Finland. Assembly of the small-RNA reads resulted in contigs homologous to Alstroemeria virus X (AlsVX), a positive/single-stranded RNA virus of genus Potexvirus (family Alphaflexiviridae), or related to negative/single-stranded RNA viruses of the genus Emaravirus. The coat protein gene of AlsVX was 81% and 89% identical to the two AlsVX isolates from Japan and Norway, respectively. The deduced, partial nucleocapsid protein amino acid sequence of the emara-like virus was only 78% or less identical to reported emaraviruses and showed no variability among the virus isolates characterized. This virus—tentatively named as Woolly burdock yellow vein virus—was exclusively associated with yellow vein and leaf mosaic symptoms in woolly burdock, whereas AlsVX was detected in only one of the 52 plants tested. Conclusions/Significance These results provide novel information about natural virus infections in Acrtium species and reveal woolly burdock as the first natural host of AlsVX besides Alstroemeria (family Alstroemeriaceae). Results also revealed a new virus related to the recently emerged Emaravirus genus and demonstrated applicability of SRDS to detect negative-strand RNA viruses. SRDS potentiates virus surveys of wild plants, a research area underrepresented in plant virology

  5. Integrated genome-wide genotyping and gene expression profiling reveals BCL11B as a putative oncogene in acute myeloid leukemia with 14q32 aberrations.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Saman; Sanders, Mathijs A; Zeilemaker, Annelieke; Geertsma-Kleinekoort, Wendy M C; Koenders, Jasper E; Kavelaars, Francois G; Abbas, Zabiollah G; Mahamoud, Souad; Chu, Isabel W T; Hoogenboezem, Remco; Peeters, Justine K; van Drunen, Ellen; van Galen, Janneke; Beverloo, H Berna; Löwenberg, Bob; Valk, Peter J M

    2014-05-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is a neoplasm characterized by recurrent molecular aberrations traditionally demonstrated by cytogenetic analyses. We used high density genome-wide genotyping and gene expression profiling to reveal acquired cryptic abnormalities in acute myeloid leukemia. By genome-wide genotyping of 137 cases of primary acute myeloid leukemia, we disclosed a recurrent focal amplification on chromosome 14q32, which included the genes BCL11B, CCNK, C14orf177 and SETD3, in two cases. In the affected cases, the BCL11B gene showed consistently high mRNA expression, whereas the expression of the other genes was unperturbed. Fluorescence in situ hybridization on 40 cases of acute myeloid leukemia with high BCL11B mRNA expression [2.5-fold above median; 40 out of 530 cases (7.5%)] revealed 14q32 abnormalities in two additional cases. In the four BCL11B-rearranged cases the 14q32 locus was fused to different partner chromosomes. In fact, in two cases, we demonstrated that the focal 14q32 amplifications were integrated into transcriptionally active loci. The translocations involving BCL11B result in increased expression of full-length BCL11B protein. The BCL11B-rearranged acute myeloid leukemias expressed both myeloid and T-cell markers. These biphenotypic acute leukemias all carried FLT3 internal tandem duplications, a characteristic marker of acute myeloid leukemia. BCL11B mRNA expression in acute myeloid leukemia appeared to be strongly associated with expression of other T-cell-specific genes. Myeloid 32D(GCSF-R) cells ectopically expressing Bcl11b showed decreased proliferation rate and less maturation. In conclusion, by an integrated approach involving high-throughput genome-wide genotyping and gene expression profiling we identified BCL11B as a candidate oncogene in acute myeloid leukemia.

  6. Integrated genome-wide genotyping and gene expression profiling reveals BCL11B as a putative oncogene in acute myeloid leukemia with 14q32 aberrations

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Saman; Sanders, Mathijs A.; Zeilemaker, Annelieke; Geertsma-Kleinekoort, Wendy M.C.; Koenders, Jasper E.; Kavelaars, Francois G.; Abbas, Zabiollah G.; Mahamoud, Souad; Chu, Isabel W.T.; Hoogenboezem, Remco; Peeters, Justine K.; van Drunen, Ellen; van Galen, Janneke; Beverloo, H. Berna; Löwenberg, Bob; Valk, Peter J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is a neoplasm characterized by recurrent molecular aberrations traditionally demonstrated by cytogenetic analyses. We used high density genome-wide genotyping and gene expression profiling to reveal acquired cryptic abnormalities in acute myeloid leukemia. By genome-wide genotyping of 137 cases of primary acute myeloid leukemia, we disclosed a recurrent focal amplification on chromosome 14q32, which included the genes BCL11B, CCNK, C14orf177 and SETD3, in two cases. In the affected cases, the BCL11B gene showed consistently high mRNA expression, whereas the expression of the other genes was unperturbed. Fluorescence in situ hybridization on 40 cases of acute myeloid leukemia with high BCL11B mRNA expression [2.5-fold above median; 40 out of 530 cases (7.5%)] revealed 14q32 abnormalities in two additional cases. In the four BCL11B-rearranged cases the 14q32 locus was fused to different partner chromosomes. In fact, in two cases, we demonstrated that the focal 14q32 amplifications were integrated into transcriptionally active loci. The translocations involving BCL11B result in increased expression of full-length BCL11B protein. The BCL11B-rearranged acute myeloid leukemias expressed both myeloid and T-cell markers. These biphenotypic acute leukemias all carried FLT3 internal tandem duplications, a characteristic marker of acute myeloid leukemia. BCL11B mRNA expression in acute myeloid leukemia appeared to be strongly associated with expression of other T-cell-specific genes. Myeloid 32D(GCSF-R) cells ectopically expressing Bcl11b showed decreased proliferation rate and less maturation. In conclusion, by an integrated approach involving high-throughput genome-wide genotyping and gene expression profiling we identified BCL11B as a candidate oncogene in acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:24441149

  7. Co-immunoprecipitation with Tau Isoform-specific Antibodies Reveals Distinct Protein Interactions and Highlights a Putative Role for 2N Tau in Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang; Song, Xiaomin; Nisbet, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing generates multiple isoforms of the microtubule-associated protein Tau, but little is known about their specific function. In the adult mouse brain, three Tau isoforms are expressed that contain either 0, 1, or 2 N-terminal inserts (0N, 1N, and 2N). We generated Tau isoform-specific antibodies and performed co-immunoprecipitations followed by tandem mass tag multiplexed quantitative mass spectrometry. We identified novel Tau-interacting proteins of which one-half comprised membrane-bound proteins, localized to the plasma membrane, mitochondria, and other organelles. Tau was also found to interact with proteins involved in presynaptic signal transduction. MetaCore analysis revealed one major Tau interaction cluster that contained 33 Tau pulldown proteins. To explore the pathways in which these proteins are involved, we conducted an ingenuity pathway analysis that revealed two significant overlapping pathways, “cell-to-cell signaling and interaction” and “neurological disease.” The functional enrichment tool DAVID showed that in particular the 2N Tau-interacting proteins were specifically associated with neurological disease. Finally, for a subset of Tau interactions (apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1), apoE, mitochondrial creatine kinase U-type, β-synuclein, synaptogyrin-3, synaptophysin, syntaxin 1B, synaptotagmin, and synapsin 1), we performed reverse co-immunoprecipitations, confirming the preferential interaction of specific isoforms. For example, apoA1 displayed a 5-fold preference for the interaction with 2N, whereas β-synuclein showed preference for 0N. Remarkably, a reverse immunoprecipitation with apoA1 detected only the 2N isoform. This highlights distinct protein interactions of the different Tau isoforms, suggesting that they execute different functions in brain tissue. PMID:26861879

  8. Smartphones reveal angler behavior: A case study of a popular mobile fishing application in Alberta, Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Papenfuss, Jason T.; Phelps, Nicholas; Fulton, David C.; Venturelli, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Successfully managing fisheries and controlling the spread of invasive species depends on the ability to describe and predict angler behavior. However, finite resources restrict conventional survey approaches and tend to produce retrospective data that are limited in time or space and rely on intentions or attitudes rather than actual behavior. In this study, we used three years of angler data from a popular mobile fishing application in Alberta, Canada, to determine province-wide, seasonal patterns of (1) lake popularity that were consistent with conventional data and (2) anthropogenic lake connectivity that has not been widely described in North America. Our proof-of-concept analyses showed that mobile apps can be an inexpensive source of high-resolution, real-time data for managing fisheries and invasive species. We also identified key challenges that underscore the need for further research and development in this new frontier that combines big data with increased stakeholder interaction and cooperation.

  9. Molecular shape and binding force of Mycoplasma mobile's leg protein Gli349 revealed by an AFM study

    SciTech Connect

    Lesoil, Charles; Nonaka, Takahiro; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Osada, Toshiya; Miyata, Makoto; Afrin, Rehana; Ikai, Atsushi

    2010-01-15

    Recent studies of the gliding bacteria Mycoplasma mobile have identified a family of proteins called the Gli family which was considered to be involved in this novel and yet fairly unknown motility system. The 349 kDa protein called Gli349 was successfully isolated and purified from the bacteria, and electron microscopy imaging and antibody experiments led to the hypothesis that it acts as the 'leg' of M. mobile, responsible for attachment to the substrate as well as for gliding motility. However, more precise evidence of the molecular shape and function of this protein was required to asses this theory any further. In this study, an atomic force microscope (AFM) was used both as an imaging and a force measurement device to provide new information about Gli349 and its role in gliding motility. AFM images of the protein were obtained revealing a complex structure with both rigid and flexible parts, consistent with previous electron micrographs of the protein. Single-molecular force spectroscopy experiments were also performed, revealing that Gli349 is able to specifically bind to sialyllactose molecules and withstand unbinding forces around 70 pN. These findings strongly support the idea that Gli349 is the 'leg' protein of M. mobile, responsible for binding and also most probably force generation during gliding motility.

  10. Molecular shape and binding force of Mycoplasma mobile's leg protein Gli349 revealed by an AFM study.

    PubMed

    Lesoil, Charles; Nonaka, Takahiro; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Osada, Toshiya; Miyata, Makoto; Afrin, Rehana; Ikai, Atsushi

    2010-01-15

    Recent studies of the gliding bacteria Mycoplasma mobile have identified a family of proteins called the Gli family which was considered to be involved in this novel and yet fairly unknown motility system. The 349kDa protein called Gli349 was successfully isolated and purified from the bacteria, and electron microscopy imaging and antibody experiments led to the hypothesis that it acts as the "leg" of M. mobile, responsible for attachment to the substrate as well as for gliding motility. However, more precise evidence of the molecular shape and function of this protein was required to asses this theory any further. In this study, an atomic force microscope (AFM) was used both as an imaging and a force measurement device to provide new information about Gli349 and its role in gliding motility. AFM images of the protein were obtained revealing a complex structure with both rigid and flexible parts, consistent with previous electron micrographs of the protein. Single-molecular force spectroscopy experiments were also performed, revealing that Gli349 is able to specifically bind to sialyllactose molecules and withstand unbinding forces around 70pN. These findings strongly support the idea that Gli349 is the "leg" protein of M. mobile, responsible for binding and also most probably force generation during gliding motility. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A discussion on mobile satellite system and the myths of CDMA and diversity revealed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Nicholas; Goerke, Thomas; Jahn, Axel

    1995-01-01

    The paper explores the myths and facts surrounding: link margins and constellation designs; the use of satellite diversity in a mobile satellite channel; trade-offs in multiple access technique. Different satellite constellations are presented, which are comparable with those used by the big LEO proponents, with the associated trade-offs in the system design. Propagation data and results from various narrowband and wideband measurement campaigns are used to illustrate the expected differences in service performance.

  12. Some Properties of the Chloroplast Envelope as Revealed by Electrophoretic Mobility Studies of Intact Chloroplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Stocking, C. Ralph; Franceschi, Vincent R.

    1982-01-01

    The electrophoretic mobility of mature spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. var. Americana) chloroplasts sampled over a 7-month period was between −2.03 and −2.45 micrometers per second per volt per centimeter when suspended in a solution containing 1 millimolar CaCl2. The surface charge density of EDTA-treated chloroplasts was calculated to be −7,400 electrostatic units per square centimeter representing, on the average, one electronic charge per 645 square Angstroms. Electrophoretic mobility increases during plastid maturation. Calcium, but not magnesium, generally stabilized the envelope of isolated plastids against small increases in surface charge that occur with time in the absence of calcium. Pronase caused a sharp, but temporary, decrease in the electrophoretic mobility of chloroplasts. This was interpreted as representing a transient binding of pronase to the envelope surface during proteolysis. No −SH groups were detected on the surface of the plastid envelope. Inasmuch as the isoelectric point of intact chloroplasts was found to be at pH 4.5, it is likely that the major part of the total surface charge results from the presence of exposed carboxyl groups of intrinsic envelope proteins that are not readily hydrolyzed by mild pronase treatment. PMID:16662663

  13. The 1.6-Å crystal structure of the class of chaperones represented by Escherichia coli Hsp31 reveals a putative catalytic triad

    SciTech Connect

    Quigley, Paulene M.; Korotkov, Konstantin; Baneyx, François; Hol, Wim G.J.

    2010-11-10

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) play essential protective roles under stress conditions by preventing the formation of protein aggregates and degrading misfolded proteins. EcHsp31, the yedU (hchA) gene product, is a representative member of a family of chaperones that alleviates protein misfolding by interacting with early unfolding intermediates. The 1.6-{angstrom} crystal structure of the EcHsp31 dimer reveals a system of hydrophobic patches, canyons, and grooves, which may stabilize partially unfolded substrate. The presence of a well conserved, yet buried, triad in each two-domain subunit suggests a still unproven hydrolytic function of the protein. A flexible extended linker between the A and P domains may play a role in conformational flexibility and substrate binding. The {alpha}-{beta} sandwich of the EcHsp31 monomer shows structural similarity to PhPI, a protease belonging to the DJ-1 superfamily. The structure-guided sequence alignment indicates that Hsp31 homologs can be divided in three classes based on variations in the P domain that dramatically affect both oligomerization and catalytic triad formation.

  14. Expression Analyses Revealed Thymic Stromal Co-Transporter/Slc46A2 Is in Stem Cell Populations and Is a Putative Tumor Suppressor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Yeon; Lee, Gwanghee; Yoon, Minsang; Cho, Eun Hye; Park, Chan-Sik; Kim, Moon Gyo

    2015-01-01

    By combining conventional single cell analysis with flow cytometry and public database searches with bioinformatics tools, we extended the expression profiling of thymic stromal cotransporter (TSCOT), Slc46A2/Ly110, that was shown to be expressed in bipotent precursor and cortical thymic epithelial cells. Genome scale analysis verified TSCOT expression in thymic tissue- and cell type- specific fashion and is also expressed in some other epithelial tissues including skin and lung. Coexpression profiling with genes, Foxn1 and Hoxa3, revealed the role of TSCOT during the organogenesis. TSCOT expression was detected in all thymic epithelial cells (TECs), but not in the CD31+ endothelial cell lineage in fetal thymus. In addition, ABC transporter-dependent side population and Sca-1+ fetal TEC populations both contain TSCOT-expressing cells, indicating TEC stem cells express TSCOT. TSCOT expression was identified as early as in differentiating embryonic stem cells. TSCOT expression is not under the control of Foxn1 since TSCOT is present in the thymic rudiment of nude mice. By searching variations in the expression levels, TSCOT is positively associated with Grhl3 and Irf6. Cytokines such as IL1b, IL22 and IL24 are the potential regulators of the TSCOT expression. Surprisingly, we found TSCOT expression in the lung is diminished in lung cancers, suggesting TSCOT may be involved in the suppression of lung tumor development. Based on these results, a model for TEC differentiation from the stem cells was proposed in context of multiple epithelial organ formation. PMID:26013383

  15. Comparative genomic analysis of SET domain family reveals the origin, expansion, and putative function of the arthropod-specific SmydA genes as histone modifiers in insects

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Feng; Liu, Qing; Wang, Yanli; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Huimin; Song, Tianqi; Yang, Meiling

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The SET domain is an evolutionarily conserved motif present in histone lysine methyltransferases, which are important in the regulation of chromatin and gene expression in animals. In this study, we searched for SET domain–containing genes (SET genes) in all of the 147 arthropod genomes sequenced at the time of carrying out this experiment to understand the evolutionary history by which SET domains have evolved in insects. Phylogenetic and ancestral state reconstruction analysis revealed an arthropod-specific SET gene family, named SmydA, that is ancestral to arthropod animals and specifically diversified during insect evolution. Considering that pseudogenization is the most probable fate of the new emerging gene copies, we provided experimental and evolutionary evidence to demonstrate their essential functions. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis and in vitro methyltransferase activity assays showed that the SmydA-2 gene was transcriptionally active and retained the original histone methylation activity. Expression knockdown by RNA interference significantly increased mortality, implying that the SmydA genes may be essential for insect survival. We further showed predominantly strong purifying selection on the SmydA gene family and a potential association between the regulation of gene expression and insect phenotypic plasticity by transcriptome analysis. Overall, these data suggest that the SmydA gene family retains essential functions that may possibly define novel regulatory pathways in insects. This work provides insights into the roles of lineage-specific domain duplication in insect evolution. PMID:28444351

  16. Expression Analyses Revealed Thymic Stromal Co-Transporter/Slc46A2 Is in Stem Cell Populations and Is a Putative Tumor Suppressor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Yeon; Lee, Gwanghee; Yoon, Minsang; Cho, Eun Hye; Park, Chan-Sik; Kim, Moon Gyo

    2015-06-01

    By combining conventional single cell analysis with flow cytometry and public database searches with bioinformatics tools, we extended the expression profiling of thymic stromal cotransporter (TSCOT), Slc46A2/Ly110, that was shown to be expressed in bipotent precursor and cortical thymic epithelial cells. Genome scale analysis verified TSCOT expression in thymic tissue- and cell type- specific fashion and is also expressed in some other epithelial tissues including skin and lung. Coexpression profiling with genes, Foxn1 and Hoxa3, revealed the role of TSCOT during the organogenesis. TSCOT expression was detected in all thymic epithelial cells (TECs), but not in the CD31(+) endothelial cell lineage in fetal thymus. In addition, ABC transporter-dependent side population and Sca-1(+) fetal TEC populations both contain TSCOT-expressing cells, indicating TEC stem cells express TSCOT. TSCOT expression was identified as early as in differentiating embryonic stem cells. TSCOT expression is not under the control of Foxn1 since TSCOT is present in the thymic rudiment of nude mice. By searching variations in the expression levels, TSCOT is positively associated with Grhl3 and Irf6. Cytokines such as IL1b, IL22 and IL24 are the potential regulators of the TSCOT expression. Surprisingly, we found TSCOT expression in the lung is diminished in lung cancers, suggesting TSCOT may be involved in the suppression of lung tumor development. Based on these results, a model for TEC differentiation from the stem cells was proposed in context of multiple epithelial organ formation.

  17. High-resolution analysis of four efficient yeast replication origins reveals new insights into the ORC and putative MCM binding elements.

    PubMed

    Chang, Fujung; May, Caitlin D; Hoggard, Timothy; Miller, Jeremy; Fox, Catherine A; Weinreich, Michael

    2011-08-01

    In budding yeast, the eukaryotic initiator protein ORC (origin recognition complex) binds to a bipartite sequence consisting of an 11 bp ACS element and an adjacent B1 element. However, the genome contains many more matches to this consensus than actually bind ORC or function as origins in vivo. Although ORC-dependent loading of the replicative MCM helicase at origins is enhanced by a distal B2 element, less is known about this element. Here, we analyzed four highly active origins (ARS309, ARS319, ARS606 and ARS607) by linker scanning mutagenesis and found that sequences adjacent to the ACS contributed substantially to origin activity and ORC binding. Using the sequences of four additional B2 elements we generated a B2 multiple sequence alignment and identified a shared, degenerate 8 bp sequence that was enriched within 228 known origins. In addition, our high-resolution analysis revealed that not all origins exist within nucleosome free regions: a class of Sir2-regulated origins has a stably positioned nucleosome overlapping or near B2. This study illustrates the conserved yet flexible nature of yeast origin architecture to promote ORC binding and origin activity, and helps explain why a strong match to the ORC binding site is insufficient to identify origins within the genome.

  18. Comparative genomic analysis of SET domain family reveals the origin, expansion, and putative function of the arthropod-specific SmydA genes as histone modifiers in insects.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Feng; Liu, Qing; Wang, Yanli; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Huimin; Song, Tianqi; Yang, Meiling; Wang, Xianhui; Kang, Le

    2017-06-01

    The SET domain is an evolutionarily conserved motif present in histone lysine methyltransferases, which are important in the regulation of chromatin and gene expression in animals. In this study, we searched for SET domain-containing genes (SET genes) in all of the 147 arthropod genomes sequenced at the time of carrying out this experiment to understand the evolutionary history by which SET domains have evolved in insects. Phylogenetic and ancestral state reconstruction analysis revealed an arthropod-specific SET gene family, named SmydA, that is ancestral to arthropod animals and specifically diversified during insect evolution. Considering that pseudogenization is the most probable fate of the new emerging gene copies, we provided experimental and evolutionary evidence to demonstrate their essential functions. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis and in vitro methyltransferase activity assays showed that the SmydA-2 gene was transcriptionally active and retained the original histone methylation activity. Expression knockdown by RNA interference significantly increased mortality, implying that the SmydA genes may be essential for insect survival. We further showed predominantly strong purifying selection on the SmydA gene family and a potential association between the regulation of gene expression and insect phenotypic plasticity by transcriptome analysis. Overall, these data suggest that the SmydA gene family retains essential functions that may possibly define novel regulatory pathways in insects. This work provides insights into the roles of lineage-specific domain duplication in insect evolution. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  19. Structural Context of Disease-Associated Mutations and Putative Mechanism of Autoinhibition Revealed by X-Ray Crystallographic Analysis of the EZH2-SET Domain

    PubMed Central

    Antonysamy, Stephen; Condon, Bradley; Druzina, Zhanna; Bonanno, Jeffrey B.; Gheyi, Tarun; Zhang, Feiyu; MacEwan, Iain; Zhang, Aiping; Ashok, Sheela; Rodgers, Logan; Russell, Marijane; Gately Luz, John

    2013-01-01

    The enhancer-of-zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) gene product is an 87 kDa polycomb group (PcG) protein containing a C-terminal methyltransferase SET domain. EZH2, along with binding partners, i.e., EED and SUZ12, upon which it is dependent for activity forms the core of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2). PRC2 regulates gene silencing by catalyzing the methylation of histone H3 at lysine 27. Both overexpression and mutation of EZH2 are associated with the incidence and aggressiveness of various cancers. The novel crystal structure of the SET domain was determined in order to understand disease-associated EZH2 mutations and derive an explanation for its inactivity independent of complex formation. The 2.00 Å crystal structure reveals that, in its uncomplexed form, the EZH2 C-terminus folds back into the active site blocking engagement with substrate. Furthermore, the S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) binding pocket observed in the crystal structure of homologous SET domains is notably absent. This suggests that a conformational change in the EZH2 SET domain, dependent upon complex formation, must take place for cofactor and substrate binding activities to be recapitulated. In addition, the data provide a structural context for clinically significant mutations found in the EZH2 SET domain. PMID:24367637

  20. The 1.6-Å crystal structure of the class of chaperones represented by Escherichia coli Hsp31 reveals a putative catalytic triad

    PubMed Central

    Quigley, Paulene M.; Korotkov, Konstantin; Baneyx, François; Hol, Wim G. J.

    2003-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) play essential protective roles under stress conditions by preventing the formation of protein aggregates and degrading misfolded proteins. EcHsp31, the yedU (hchA) gene product, is a representative member of a family of chaperones that alleviates protein misfolding by interacting with early unfolding intermediates. The 1.6-Å crystal structure of the EcHsp31 dimer reveals a system of hydrophobic patches, canyons, and grooves, which may stabilize partially unfolded substrate. The presence of a well conserved, yet buried, triad in each two-domain subunit suggests a still unproven hydrolytic function of the protein. A flexible extended linker between the A and P domains may play a role in conformational flexibility and substrate binding. The α-β sandwich of the EcHsp31 monomer shows structural similarity to PhPI, a protease belonging to the DJ-1 superfamily. The structure-guided sequence alignment indicates that Hsp31 homologs can be divided in three classes based on variations in the P domain that dramatically affect both oligomerization and catalytic triad formation. PMID:12621151

  1. Hen uterine gene expression profiling during eggshell formation reveals putative proteins involved in the supply of minerals or in the shell mineralization process

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The chicken eggshell is a natural mechanical barrier to protect egg components from physical damage and microbial penetration. Its integrity and strength is critical for the development of the embryo or to ensure for consumers a table egg free of pathogens. This study compared global gene expression in laying hen uterus in the presence or absence of shell calcification in order to characterize gene products involved in the supply of minerals and / or the shell biomineralization process. Results Microarrays were used to identify a repertoire of 302 over-expressed genes during shell calcification. GO terms enrichment was performed to provide a global interpretation of the functions of the over-expressed genes, and revealed that the most over-represented proteins are related to reproductive functions. Our analysis identified 16 gene products encoding proteins involved in mineral supply, and allowed updating of the general model describing uterine ion transporters during eggshell calcification. A list of 57 proteins potentially secreted into the uterine fluid to be active in the mineralization process was also established. They were classified according to their potential functions (biomineralization, proteoglycans, molecular chaperone, antimicrobials and proteases/antiproteases). Conclusions Our study provides detailed descriptions of genes and corresponding proteins over-expressed when the shell is mineralizing. Some of these proteins involved in the supply of minerals and influencing the shell fabric to protect the egg contents are potentially useful biological markers for the genetic improvement of eggshell quality. PMID:24649854

  2. Molecular evidence for the coordination of nitrogen and carbon metabolisms, revealed by a study on the transcriptional regulation of the agl3EFG operon that encodes a putative carbohydrate transporter in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed

    Cen, Xu-Feng; Wang, Jing-Zhi; Zhao, Guo-Ping; Wang, Ying; Wang, Jin

    2016-03-18

    In the agl3EFGXYZ operon (SCO7167-SCO7162, abbreviated as agl3 operon) of Streptomyces coelicolor M145, agl3EFG genes encode a putative ABC-type carbohydrate transporter. The transcription of this operon has been proved to be repressed by Agl3R (SCO7168), a neighboring GntR-family regulator, and this repression can be released by growth on poor carbon sources. Here in this study, we prove that the transcription of agl3 operon is also directly repressed by GlnR, a central regulator governing the nitrogen metabolism in S. coelicolor. The electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) employing the agl3 promoter and mixtures of purified recombinant GlnR and Agl3R indicates that GlnR and Agl3R bind to different DNA sequences within the promoter region of agl3 operon, which is further confirmed by the DNase I footprinting assay. As Agl3R and GlnR have been demonstrated to sense the extracellular carbon and nitrogen supplies, respectively, it is hypothesized that the transcription of agl3 operon is stringently governed by the availabilities of extracellular carbon and nitrogen sources. Consistent with the hypothesis, the agl3 operon is further found to be derepressed only under the condition of poor carbon and rich nitrogen supplies, when both regulators are inactivated. It is believed that activation of the expression of agl3 operon may facilitate the absorption of extracellular carbohydrates to balance the ratio of intracellular carbon to nitrogen.

  3. Novel proteins, putative membrane transporters, and an integrated metabolic network are revealed by quantitative proteomic analysis of Arabidopsis cell culture peroxisomes.

    PubMed

    Eubel, Holger; Meyer, Etienne H; Taylor, Nicolas L; Bussell, John D; O'Toole, Nicholas; Heazlewood, Joshua L; Castleden, Ian; Small, Ian D; Smith, Steven M; Millar, A Harvey

    2008-12-01

    Peroxisomes play key roles in energy metabolism, cell signaling, and plant development. A better understanding of these important functions will be achieved with a more complete definition of the peroxisome proteome. The isolation of peroxisomes and their separation from mitochondria and other major membrane systems have been significant challenges in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) model system. In this study, we present new data on the Arabidopsis peroxisome proteome obtained using two new technical advances that have not previously been applied to studies of plant peroxisomes. First, we followed density gradient centrifugation with free-flow electrophoresis to improve the separation of peroxisomes from mitochondria. Second, we used quantitative proteomics to identify proteins enriched in the peroxisome fractions relative to mitochondrial fractions. We provide evidence for peroxisomal localization of 89 proteins, 36 of which have not previously been identified in other analyses of Arabidopsis peroxisomes. Chimeric green fluorescent protein constructs of 35 proteins have been used to confirm their localization in peroxisomes or to identify endoplasmic reticulum contaminants. The distribution of many of these peroxisomal proteins between soluble, membrane-associated, and integral membrane locations has also been determined. This core peroxisomal proteome from nonphotosynthetic cultured cells contains a proportion of proteins that cannot be predicted to be peroxisomal due to the lack of recognizable peroxisomal targeting sequence 1 (PTS1) or PTS2 signals. Proteins identified are likely to be components in peroxisome biogenesis, beta-oxidation for fatty acid degradation and hormone biosynthesis, photorespiration, and metabolite transport. A considerable number of the proteins found in peroxisomes have no known function, and potential roles of these proteins in peroxisomal metabolism are discussed. This is aided by a metabolic network analysis that reveals a

  4. A gene-rich linkage map in the dioecious species Actinidia chinensis (kiwifruit) reveals putative X/Y sex-determining chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Lena G; Tsang, Gianna K; Datson, Paul M; De Silva, H Nihal; Harvey, Catherine F; Gill, Geoffrey P; Crowhurst, Ross N; McNeilage, Mark A

    2009-03-10

    The genus Actinidia (kiwifruit) consists of woody, scrambling vines, native to China, and only recently propagated as a commercial crop. All species described are dioecious, but the genetic mechanism for sex-determination is unknown, as is the genetic basis for many of the cluster of characteristics making up the unique fruit. It is, however, an important crop in the New Zealand economy, and a classical breeding program would benefit greatly by knowledge of the trait alleles carried by both female and male parents. The application of marker assisted selection (MAS) in seedling populations would also aid the accurate and efficient development of novel fruit types for the market. Gene-rich female, male and consensus linkage maps of the diploid species A. chinensis have been constructed with 644 microsatellite markers. The maps consist of twenty-nine linkage groups corresponding to the haploid number n = 29. We found that sex-linked sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers and the 'Flower-sex' phenotype consistently mapped to a single linkage group, in a subtelomeric region, in a section of inconsistent marker order. The region also contained markers of expressed genes, some of unknown function. Recombination, assessed by allelic distribution and marker order stability, was, in the remainder of the linkage group, in accordance with other linkage groups. Fully informative markers to other genes in this linkage group identified the comparative linkage group in the female map, where recombination ratios determining marker order were similar to the autosomes. We have created genetic linkage maps that define the 29 linkage groups of the haploid genome, and have revealed the position and extent of the sex-determining locus in A. chinensis. As all Actinidia species are dioecious, we suggest that the sex-determining loci of other Actinidia species will be similar to that region defined in our maps. As the extent of the non-recombining region is limited, our

  5. A gene-rich linkage map in the dioecious species Actinidia chinensis (kiwifruit) reveals putative X/Y sex-determining chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Lena G; Tsang, Gianna K; Datson, Paul M; De Silva, H Nihal; Harvey, Catherine F; Gill, Geoffrey P; Crowhurst, Ross N; McNeilage, Mark A

    2009-01-01

    Background The genus Actinidia (kiwifruit) consists of woody, scrambling vines, native to China, and only recently propagated as a commercial crop. All species described are dioecious, but the genetic mechanism for sex-determination is unknown, as is the genetic basis for many of the cluster of characteristics making up the unique fruit. It is, however, an important crop in the New Zealand economy, and a classical breeding program would benefit greatly by knowledge of the trait alleles carried by both female and male parents. The application of marker assisted selection (MAS) in seedling populations would also aid the accurate and efficient development of novel fruit types for the market. Results Gene-rich female, male and consensus linkage maps of the diploid species A. chinensis have been constructed with 644 microsatellite markers. The maps consist of twenty-nine linkage groups corresponding to the haploid number n = 29. We found that sex-linked sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers and the 'Flower-sex' phenotype consistently mapped to a single linkage group, in a subtelomeric region, in a section of inconsistent marker order. The region also contained markers of expressed genes, some of unknown function. Recombination, assessed by allelic distribution and marker order stability, was, in the remainder of the linkage group, in accordance with other linkage groups. Fully informative markers to other genes in this linkage group identified the comparative linkage group in the female map, where recombination ratios determining marker order were similar to the autosomes. Conclusion We have created genetic linkage maps that define the 29 linkage groups of the haploid genome, and have revealed the position and extent of the sex-determining locus in A. chinensis. As all Actinidia species are dioecious, we suggest that the sex-determining loci of other Actinidia species will be similar to that region defined in our maps. As the extent of the non

  6. The First New Zealanders: Patterns of Diet and Mobility Revealed through Isotope Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kinaston, Rebecca L.; Walter, Richard K.; Jacomb, Chris; Brooks, Emma; Tayles, Nancy; Halcrow, Sian E.; Stirling, Claudine; Reid, Malcolm; Gray, Andrew R.; Spinks, Jean; Shaw, Ben; Fyfe, Roger; Buckley, Hallie R.

    2013-01-01

    Direct evidence of the environmental impact of human colonization and subsequent human adaptational responses to new environments is extremely rare anywhere in the world. New Zealand was the last Polynesian island group to be settled by humans, who arrived around the end of the 13th century AD. Little is known about the nature of human adaptation and mobility during the initial phase of colonization. We report the results of the isotopic analysis (carbon, nitrogen and strontium) of the oldest prehistoric skeletons discovered in New Zealand to assess diet and migration patterns. The isotope data show that the culturally distinctive burials, Group 1, had similar diets and childhood origins, supporting the assertion that this group was distinct from Group 2/3 and may have been part of the initial colonizing population at the site. The Group 2/3 individuals displayed highly variable diets and likely lived in different regions of the country before their burial at Wairau Bar, supporting the archaeological evidence that people were highly mobile in New Zealand since the initial phase of human settlement. PMID:23691250

  7. The first New Zealanders: patterns of diet and mobility revealed through isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Kinaston, Rebecca L; Walter, Richard K; Jacomb, Chris; Brooks, Emma; Tayles, Nancy; Halcrow, Sian E; Stirling, Claudine; Reid, Malcolm; Gray, Andrew R; Spinks, Jean; Shaw, Ben; Fyfe, Roger; Buckley, Hallie R

    2013-01-01

    Direct evidence of the environmental impact of human colonization and subsequent human adaptational responses to new environments is extremely rare anywhere in the world. New Zealand was the last Polynesian island group to be settled by humans, who arrived around the end of the 13th century AD. Little is known about the nature of human adaptation and mobility during the initial phase of colonization. We report the results of the isotopic analysis (carbon, nitrogen and strontium) of the oldest prehistoric skeletons discovered in New Zealand to assess diet and migration patterns. The isotope data show that the culturally distinctive burials, Group 1, had similar diets and childhood origins, supporting the assertion that this group was distinct from Group 2/3 and may have been part of the initial colonizing population at the site. The Group 2/3 individuals displayed highly variable diets and likely lived in different regions of the country before their burial at Wairau Bar, supporting the archaeological evidence that people were highly mobile in New Zealand since the initial phase of human settlement.

  8. Phenotypic characterization of Leishmania spp. causing cutaneous leishmaniasis in the lower Amazon region, western Pará state, Brazil, reveals a putative hybrid parasite, Leishmania (Viannia) guyanensis × Leishmania (Viannia) shawi shawi

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Yara Lins; de Souza, Adelson Alcimar Almeida; Ishikawa, Edna Aoba; Shaw, Jeffrey; Lainson, Ralph; Silveira, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    We phenotypically characterized 43 leishmanial parasites from cutaneous leishmaniasis by isoenzyme electrophoresis and the indirect immunofluorescence antibody test (23 McAbs). Identifications revealed 11 (25.6%) strains of Leishmania (V.) braziliensis, 4 (9.3%) of L. (V.) shawi shawi, 7 (16.3%) of L. (V.) shawi santarensis, 6 (13.9%) of L. (V.) guyanensis and L. (V.) lainsoni, 2 (4.7%) of L. (L.) amazonensis, and 7 (16.3%) of a putative hybrid parasite, L. (V.) guyanensis/L. (V.) shawi shawi. McAbs detected three different serodemes of L. (V.) braziliensis: I-7, II-1, and III-3 strains. Among the strains of L. (V.) shawi we identified two populations: one (7 strains) expressing the B19 epitope that was previously considered to be species-specific for L. (V.) guyanensis. We have given this population sub-specific rank, naming it L. (V.) s. santarensis. The other one (4 strains) did not express the B19 epitope like the L. (V.) shawi reference strain, which we now designate as L. (V.) s. shawi. For the first time in the eastern Brazilian Amazon we register a putative hybrid parasite (7 strains), L. (V.) guyanensis/L. (V.) s. shawi, characterized by a new 6PGDH three-band profile at the level of L. (V.) guyanensis. Its PGM profile, however, was very similar to that of L. (V.) s. shawi. These results suggest that the lower Amazon region – western Pará state, Brazil, represents a biome where L. (V.) guyanensis and L. (V.) s. shawi exchange genetic information. PMID:25083790

  9. Advances in ion mobility spectrometry–mass spectrometry reveal key insights into amyloid assembly☆

    PubMed Central

    Woods, L.A.; Radford, S.E.; Ashcroft, A.E.

    2013-01-01

    Interfacing ion mobility spectrometry to mass spectrometry (IMS–MS) has enabled mass spectrometric analyses to extend into an extra dimension, providing unrivalled separation and structural characterization of lowly populated species in heterogeneous mixtures. One biological system that has benefitted significantly from such advances is that of amyloid formation. Using IMS–MS, progress has been made into identifying transiently populated monomeric and oligomeric species for a number of different amyloid systems and has led to an enhanced understanding of the mechanism by which small molecules modulate amyloid formation. This review highlights recent advances in this field, which have been accelerated by the commercial availability of IMS–MS instruments. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mass spectrometry in structural biology. PMID:23063533

  10. BIOCHEMISTRY OF MOBILE ZINC AND NITRIC OXIDE REVEALED BY FLUORESCENT SENSORS

    PubMed Central

    Pluth, Michael D.; Tomat, Elisa; Lippard, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Biologically mobile zinc and nitric oxide (NO) are two prominent examples of inorganic compounds involved in numerous signaling pathways in living systems. In the past decade, a synergy of regulation, signaling, and translocation of these two species has emerged in several areas of human physiology, providing additional incentive for developing adequate detection systems for Zn(II) ions and NO in biological specimens. Fluorescent probes for both of these bioinorganic analytes provide excellent tools for their detection, with high spatial and temporal resolution. We review the most widely used fluorescent sensors for biological zinc and nitric oxide, together with promising new developments and unmet needs of contemporary Zn(II) and NO biological imaging. The interplay between zinc and nitric oxide in the nervous, cardiovascular, and immune systems is highlighted to illustrate the contributions of selective fluorescent probes to the study of these two important bioinorganic analytes. PMID:21675918

  11. The viscoelastic properties of chromatin and the nucleoplasm revealed by scale-dependent protein mobility.

    PubMed

    Erdel, Fabian; Baum, Michael; Rippe, Karsten

    2015-02-18

    The eukaryotic cell nucleus harbours the DNA genome that is organized in a dynamic chromatin network and embedded in a viscous crowded fluid. This environment directly affects enzymatic reactions and target search processes that access the DNA sequence information. However, its physical properties as a reaction medium are poorly understood. Here, we exploit mobility measurements of differently sized inert green fluorescent tracer proteins to characterize the viscoelastic properties of the nuclear interior of a living human cell. We find that it resembles a viscous fluid on small and large scales but appears viscoelastic on intermediate scales that change with protein size. Our results are consistent with simulations of diffusion through polymers and suggest that chromatin forms a random obstacle network rather than a self-similar structure with fixed fractal dimensions. By calculating how long molecules remember their previous position in dependence on their size, we evaluate how the nuclear environment affects search processes of chromatin targets.

  12. The viscoelastic properties of chromatin and the nucleoplasm revealed by scale-dependent protein mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdel, Fabian; Baum, Michael; Rippe, Karsten

    2015-02-01

    The eukaryotic cell nucleus harbours the DNA genome that is organized in a dynamic chromatin network and embedded in a viscous crowded fluid. This environment directly affects enzymatic reactions and target search processes that access the DNA sequence information. However, its physical properties as a reaction medium are poorly understood. Here, we exploit mobility measurements of differently sized inert green fluorescent tracer proteins to characterize the viscoelastic properties of the nuclear interior of a living human cell. We find that it resembles a viscous fluid on small and large scales but appears viscoelastic on intermediate scales that change with protein size. Our results are consistent with simulations of diffusion through polymers and suggest that chromatin forms a random obstacle network rather than a self-similar structure with fixed fractal dimensions. By calculating how long molecules remember their previous position in dependence on their size, we evaluate how the nuclear environment affects search processes of chromatin targets.

  13. Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Reveals the Energetics of Intermediates that Guide Polyproline Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Liuqing; Holliday, Alison E.; Glover, Matthew S.; Ewing, Michael A.; Russell, David H.; Clemmer, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Proline favors trans-configured peptide bonds in native proteins. Although cis/ trans configurations vary for non-native and unstructured states, solvent also influences these preferences. Water induces the all- cis right-handed polyproline-I (PPI) helix of polyproline to fold into the all- trans left-handed polyproline-II (PPII) helix. Our recent work has shown that this occurs via a sequential mechanism involving six resolved intermediates [Shi, L., Holliday, A.E., Shi, H., Zhu, F., Ewing, M.A., Russell, D.H., Clemmer, D.E.: Characterizing intermediates along the transition from PPI to PPII using ion mobility-mass spectrometry. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 136, 12702-12711 (2014)]. Here, we use ion mobility-mass spectrometry to make the first detailed thermodynamic measurements of the folding intermediates, which inform us about how and why this transition occurs. It appears that early intermediates are energetically favorable because of the hydration of the peptide backbone, whereas late intermediates are enthalpically unfavorable. However, folding continues, as the entropy of the system increases upon successive formation of each new structure. When PPII is immersed in 1-propanol, the PPII→PPI transition occurs, but this reaction occurs through a very different mechanism. Early on, the PPII population splits onto multiple pathways that eventually converge through a late intermediate that continues on to the folded PPI helix. Nearly every step is endothermic. Folding results from a stepwise increase in the disorder of the system, allowing a wide-scale search for a critical late intermediate. Overall, the data presented here allow us to establish the first experimentally determined energy surface for biopolymer folding as a function of solution environment.

  14. Negative differential mobility for negative carriers as revealed by space charge measurements on crosslinked polyethylene insulated model cables

    SciTech Connect

    Teyssedre, G. Laurent, C.; Vu, T. T. N.

    2015-12-21

    Among features observed in polyethylene materials under relatively high field, space charge packets, consisting in a pulse of net charge that remains in the form of a pulse as it crosses the insulation, are repeatedly observed but without complete theory explaining their formation and propagation. Positive charge packets are more often reported, and the models based on negative differential mobility(NDM) for the transport of holes could account for some charge packets phenomenology. Conversely, NDM for electrons transport has never been reported so far. The present contribution reports space charge measurements by pulsed electroacoustic method on miniature cables that are model of HVDC cables. The measurements were realized at room temperature or with a temperature gradient of 10 °C through the insulation under DC fields on the order 30–60 kV/mm. Space charge results reveal systematic occurrence of a negative front of charges generated at the inner electrode that moves toward the outer electrode at the beginning of the polarization step. It is observed that the transit time of the front of negative charge increases, and therefore the mobility decreases, with the applied voltage. Further, the estimated mobility, in the range 10{sup −14}–10{sup −13} m{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} for the present results, increases when the temperature increases for the same condition of applied voltage. The features substantiate the hypothesis of negative differential mobility used for modelling space charge packets.

  15. Novel insights into protein misfolding diseases revealed by ion mobility-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Williams, Danielle M; Pukala, Tara L

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid disorders incorporate a wide range of human diseases arising from the failure of a specific peptide or protein to adopt, or remain in, its native functional conformational state. These pathological conditions, such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease are highly debilitating, exact enormous costs on both individuals and society, and are predicted to increase in prevalence. Consequently, they form the focus of a topical and rich area of current scientific research. A major goal in attempts to understand and treat protein misfolding diseases is to define the structures and interactions of protein species intermediate between fully folded and aggregated, and extract a description of the aggregation process. This has proven a difficult task due to the inability of traditional structural biology approaches to analyze structurally heterogeneous systems. Continued developments in instrumentation and analytical approaches have seen ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) emerge as a complementary approach for protein structure determination, and in some cases, a structural biology tool in its own right. IM-MS is well suited to the study of protein misfolding, and has already yielded significant structural information for selected amyloidogenic systems during the aggregation process. This review describes IM-MS for protein structure investigation, and provides a summary of current research highlighting how this methodology has unequivocally and unprecedentedly provided structural and mechanistic detail pertaining to the oligomerization of a variety of disease related proteins. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. HAB1–SWI3B Interaction Reveals a Link between Abscisic Acid Signaling and Putative SWI/SNF Chromatin-Remodeling Complexes in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Saez, Angela; Rodrigues, Americo; Santiago, Julia; Rubio, Silvia; Rodriguez, Pedro L.

    2008-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) has an important role for plant growth, development, and stress adaptation. HYPERSENSITIVE TO ABA1 (HAB1) is a protein phosphatase type 2C that plays a key role as a negative regulator of ABA signaling; however, the molecular details of HAB1 action in this process are not known. A two-hybrid screen revealed that SWI3B, an Arabidopsis thaliana homolog of the yeast SWI3 subunit of SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complexes, is a prevalent interacting partner of HAB1. The interaction mapped to the N-terminal half of SWI3B and required an intact protein phosphatase catalytic domain. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and coimmunoprecipitation assays confirmed the interaction of HAB1 and SWI3B in the nucleus of plant cells. swi3b mutants showed a reduced sensitivity to ABA-mediated inhibition of seed germination and growth and reduced expression of the ABA-responsive genes RAB18 and RD29B. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments showed that the presence of HAB1 in the vicinity of RD29B and RAB18 promoters was abolished by ABA, which suggests a direct involvement of HAB1 in the regulation of ABA-induced transcription. Additionally, our results uncover SWI3B as a novel positive regulator of ABA signaling and suggest that HAB1 modulates ABA response through the regulation of a putative SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex. PMID:19033529

  17. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry of a rotary ATPase reveals ATP-induced reduction in conformational flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Min; Politis, Argyris; Davies, Roberta B.; Liko, Idlir; Wu, Kuan-Jung; Stewart, Alastair G.; Stock, Daniela; Robinson, Carol V.

    2014-03-01

    Rotary ATPases play fundamental roles in energy conversion as their catalytic rotation is associated with interdomain fluctuations and heterogeneity of conformational states. Using ion mobility mass spectrometry we compared the conformational dynamics of the intact ATPase from Thermus thermophilus with those of its membrane and soluble subcomplexes. Our results define regions with enhanced flexibility assigned to distinct subunits within the overall assembly. To provide a structural context for our experimental data we performed molecular dynamics simulations and observed conformational changes of the peripheral stalks that reflect their intrinsic flexibility. By isolating complexes at different phases of cell growth and manipulating nucleotides, metal ions and pH during isolation, we reveal differences that can be related to conformational changes in the Vo complex triggered by ATP binding. Together these results implicate nucleotides in modulating flexibility of the stator components and uncover mechanistic detail that underlies operation and regulation in the context of the holoenzyme.

  18. Stable Isotope Metabolic Labeling-based Quantitative Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Arabidopsis Mutants Reveals Ethylene-regulated Time-dependent Phosphoproteins and Putative Substrates of Constitutive Triple Response 1 Kinase*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhu; Guo, Guangyu; Zhang, Manyu; Liu, Claire Y.; Hu, Qin; Lam, Henry; Cheng, Han; Xue, Yu; Li, Jiayang; Li, Ning

    2013-01-01

    Ethylene is an important plant hormone that regulates numerous cellular processes and stress responses. The mode of action of ethylene is both dose- and time-dependent. Protein phosphorylation plays a key role in ethylene signaling, which is mediated by the activities of ethylene receptors, constitutive triple response 1 (CTR1) kinase, and phosphatase. To address how ethylene alters the cellular protein phosphorylation profile in a time-dependent manner, differential and quantitative phosphoproteomics based on 15N stable isotope labeling in Arabidopsis was performed on both one-minute ethylene-treated Arabidopsis ethylene-overly-sensitive loss-of-function mutant rcn1-1, deficient in PP2A phosphatase activity, and a pair of long-term ethylene-treated wild-type and loss-of-function ethylene signaling ctr1-1 mutants, deficient in mitogen-activated kinase kinase kinase activity. In total, 1079 phosphopeptides were identified, among which 44 were novel. Several one-minute ethylene-regulated phosphoproteins were found from the rcn1-1. Bioinformatic analysis of the rcn1-1 phosphoproteome predicted nine phosphoproteins as the putative substrates for PP2A phosphatase. In addition, from CTR1 kinase-enhanced phosphosites, we also found putative CTR1 kinase substrates including plastid transcriptionally active protein and calcium-sensing receptor. These regulatory proteins are phosphorylated in the presence of ethylene. Analysis of ethylene-regulated phosphosites using the group-based prediction system with a protein–protein interaction filter revealed a total of 14 kinase–substrate relationships that may function in both CTR1 kinase- and PP2A phosphatase-mediated phosphor-relay pathways. Finally, several ethylene-regulated post-translational modification network models have been built using molecular systems biology tools. It is proposed that ethylene regulates the phosphorylation of arginine/serine-rich splicing factor 41, plasma membrane intrinsic protein 2A, light

  19. Study of nsLTPs in Lotus japonicus genome reveal a specific epidermal cell member (LjLTP10) regulated by drought stress in aerial organs with a putative role in cutin formation.

    PubMed

    Tapia, G; Morales-Quintana, L; Parra, C; Berbel, A; Alcorta, M

    2013-07-01

    The cuticle is the first defense against pathogens and the second way water is lost in plants. Hydrophobic layers covering aerial plant organs from primary stages of development form cuticle, including major classes of aliphatic wax components and cutin. Extensive research has been conducted to understand cuticle formation mechanisms in plants. However, many questions remain unresolved in the transport of lipid components to form cuticle. Database studies of the Lotus japonicus genome have revealed the presence of 24 sequences classified as putative non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs), which were classified in seven groups; four groups were selected because of their expression in aerial organs. LjLTP8 forms a cluster with DIR1 in Arabidopsis thaliana while LjLTP6, LjLTP9, and LjLTP10 were grouped as type I LTPs. In silico studies showed a high level of structural conservation, and substrate affinity studies revealed palmitoyl-CoA as the most likely ligand for these LTPs, although the Lyso-Myristoyl Phosphatidyl Choline, Lyso-myristoyl phosphatidyl glycerol, and Lyso-stearyl phosphatidyl choline ligands also showed a high affinity with the proteins. The LjLTP6 and LjLTP10 genes were expressed in both the stems and the leaves under normal conditions and were highly induced during drought stress. LjLTP10 was the most induced gene in shoots during drought. The gene was only expressed in the epidermal cells of stems, primordial leaves, and young leaflets. LjLTP10 was positively regulated by MeJA but repressed by abscisic acid (ABA), ethylene, and H2O2, while LjLTP6 was weakly induced by MeJA, repressed by H2O2, and not affected by ABA and ethylene. We suggest that LjLTP10 is involved in plant development of stem and leaf cuticle, but also in acclimation to tolerate drought stress in L. japonicus.

  20. Mobility and age of black carbon in two temperate grassland soils revealed by differential scanning calorimetry and radiocarbon dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leifeld, Jens; Feng, Xiaojuan; Eglinton, Timothy; Wacker, Lukas

    2015-04-01

    Black carbon (BC) is a natural component of soil organic matter (SOM) and abundant in many ecosystems. Its stability, due to its relative resistance to microbial decomposition, means it plays an important role in soil C sequestration. A recent review suggests that BC may be mobile in soil; hence, its contribution to a stable SOM pool may change over time due to its lateral or vertical reallocation (Rumpel et al. 2014). However, direct evidence of the mobility of BC, particularly with reference to its vertical mobility, is scarce. We studied the amount of BC in two temperate grassland fields (eutric clayey Camibsol,) that were established in 2001 on former cropland. Volumetric soil samples (0-50 cm, 5 cm increments) were taken at 10 spots in each field in 2001, 2006 and 2011. One of the fields was ploughed in 2007 and the sward was re-sown. BC content was measured by differential scanning calorimetry for a total number of c. 500 samples. The mean BC/OC ratio was 0.10 (±0.05) and reached 0.25 in some samples. Radiocarbon measurements from 24 bulk soil samples revealed relatively small 14C contents in 2001 (92±2.7 pMC) which increased over time (2006: 99.0±1.1 pMC; 2011: 99.1±1.1 pMC). Thermal fractionation of BC by DSC revealed calibrated BC ages of 400 to 1000 years (pMC 87-94), suggesting that BC originates from medieval and post-medieval fire clearings. The change in soil signature may have been caused by a preferential transport of old BC down the soil profile, leading to a selective enrichment of younger soil C over time. In line with this interpretation the DSC measurements suggest that in both fields, BC concentrations significantly decreased for most layers between 2001 and 2006. However, between 2006 and 2011, no further vertical reallocation was observed in the continuous grassland, whereas BC contents of the field ploughed in 2007 significantly increased in the top layers. Together, these data suggest that ploughing in 2001 triggered subsequent

  1. Revealing the hidden networks of interaction in mobile animal groups allows prediction of complex behavioral contagion

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Sara Brin; Twomey, Colin R.; Hartnett, Andrew T.; Wu, Hai Shan; Couzin, Iain D.

    2015-01-01

    Coordination among social animals requires rapid and efficient transfer of information among individuals, which may depend crucially on the underlying structure of the communication network. Establishing the decision-making circuits and networks that give rise to individual behavior has been a central goal of neuroscience. However, the analogous problem of determining the structure of the communication network among organisms that gives rise to coordinated collective behavior, such as is exhibited by schooling fish and flocking birds, has remained almost entirely neglected. Here, we study collective evasion maneuvers, manifested through rapid waves, or cascades, of behavioral change (a ubiquitous behavior among taxa) in schooling fish (Notemigonus crysoleucas). We automatically track the positions and body postures, calculate visual fields of all individuals in schools of ∼150 fish, and determine the functional mapping between socially generated sensory input and motor response during collective evasion. We find that individuals use simple, robust measures to assess behavioral changes in neighbors, and that the resulting networks by which behavior propagates throughout groups are complex, being weighted, directed, and heterogeneous. By studying these interaction networks, we reveal the (complex, fractional) nature of social contagion and establish that individuals with relatively few, but strongly connected, neighbors are both most socially influential and most susceptible to social influence. Furthermore, we demonstrate that we can predict complex cascades of behavioral change at their moment of initiation, before they actually occur. Consequently, despite the intrinsic stochasticity of individual behavior, establishing the hidden communication networks in large self-organized groups facilitates a quantitative understanding of behavioral contagion. PMID:25825752

  2. Revealing the hidden networks of interaction in mobile animal groups allows prediction of complex behavioral contagion.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Sara Brin; Twomey, Colin R; Hartnett, Andrew T; Wu, Hai Shan; Couzin, Iain D

    2015-04-14

    Coordination among social animals requires rapid and efficient transfer of information among individuals, which may depend crucially on the underlying structure of the communication network. Establishing the decision-making circuits and networks that give rise to individual behavior has been a central goal of neuroscience. However, the analogous problem of determining the structure of the communication network among organisms that gives rise to coordinated collective behavior, such as is exhibited by schooling fish and flocking birds, has remained almost entirely neglected. Here, we study collective evasion maneuvers, manifested through rapid waves, or cascades, of behavioral change (a ubiquitous behavior among taxa) in schooling fish (Notemigonus crysoleucas). We automatically track the positions and body postures, calculate visual fields of all individuals in schools of ∼150 fish, and determine the functional mapping between socially generated sensory input and motor response during collective evasion. We find that individuals use simple, robust measures to assess behavioral changes in neighbors, and that the resulting networks by which behavior propagates throughout groups are complex, being weighted, directed, and heterogeneous. By studying these interaction networks, we reveal the (complex, fractional) nature of social contagion and establish that individuals with relatively few, but strongly connected, neighbors are both most socially influential and most susceptible to social influence. Furthermore, we demonstrate that we can predict complex cascades of behavioral change at their moment of initiation, before they actually occur. Consequently, despite the intrinsic stochasticity of individual behavior, establishing the hidden communication networks in large self-organized groups facilitates a quantitative understanding of behavioral contagion.

  3. A combined metabolomic and phylogenetic study reveals putatively prebiotic effects of high molecular weight arabino-oligosaccharides when assessed by in vitro fermentation in bacterial communities derived from humans.

    PubMed

    Sulek, Karolina; Vigsnaes, Louise Kristine; Schmidt, Line Rieck; Holck, Jesper; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz; Smedsgaard, Jørn; Skov, Thomas Hjort; Meyer, Anne S; Licht, Tine Rask

    2014-08-01

    Prebiotic oligosaccharides are defined by their selective stimulation of growth and/or activity of bacteria in the digestive system in ways claimed to be beneficial for health. However, apart from the short chain fatty acids, little is known about bacterial metabolites created by fermentation of prebiotics, and the significance of the size of the oligosaccharides remains largely unstudied. By in vitro fermentations in human fecal microbial communities (derived from six different individuals), we studied the effects of high-mass (HA, >1 kDa), low-mass (LA, <1 kDa) and mixed (BA) sugar beet arabino-oligosaccharides (AOS) as carbohydrate sources. Fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) were included as reference. The changes in bacterial communities and the metabolites produced in response to incubation with the different carbohydrates were analyzed by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS), respectively. All tested carbohydrate sources resulted in a significant increase of Bifidobacterium spp. between 1.79 fold (HA) and 1.64 fold (FOS) in the microbial populations after fermentation, and LC-MS analysis suggested that the bifidobacteria contributed to decomposition of the arabino-oligosaccharide structures, most pronounced in the HA fraction, resulting in release of the essential amino acid phenylalanine. Abundance of Lactobacillus spp. correlated with the presence of a compound, most likely a flavonoid, indicating that lactobacilli contribute to release of such health-promoting substances from plant structures. Additionally, the combination of qPCR and LC-MS revealed a number of other putative interactions between intestinal microbes and the oligosaccharides, which contributes to the understanding of the mechanisms behind prebiotic impact on human health.

  4. Depletion of human micro-RNA miR-125b reveals that it is critical for the proliferation of differentiated cells but not for the down-regulation of putative targets during differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Sun; Kim, Hak Kyun; Chung, Sangmi; Kim, Kwang-Soo; Dutta, Anindya

    2005-04-29

    Micro-RNAs are small non-coding RNAs that regulate target gene expression post-transcriptionally through base pairing with the target messenger RNA. Functional characterization of micro-RNAs awaits robust experimental methods to knock-down a micro-RNA as well as to assay its function in vivo. In addition to the recently developed method to sequester micro-RNA with 2'-O-methyl antisense oligonucleotide, we report that small interfering RNA against the loop region of a micro-RNA precursor can be used to deplete the micro-RNA. The depletion of miR-125b by this method had a profound effect on the proliferation of adult differentiated cancer cells, and this proliferation defect was rescued by co-transfected mature micro-RNA. This technique has unique advantages over the 2'-O-methyl antisense oligonucleotide and can be used to determine micro-RNA function, assay micro-RNAs in vivo, and identify the contribution of a predicted micro-RNA precursor to the pool of mature micro-RNA in a given cell. miR-125b and let-7 micro-RNAs are induced, whereas their putative targets, lin-28 and lin-41, are decreased during in vitro differentiation of Tera-2 or embryonic stem cells. Experimental increase or decrease of micro-RNA concentrations did not, however, affect the levels of the targets, a finding that is explained by the fact that the down-regulation of the targets appears to be mostly at the transcriptional level in these in vitro differentiation systems. Collectively these results reveal the importance of micro-RNA depletion strategies for directly determining micro-RNA function in vivo.

  5. Analysis of CD34+ cell collection using two mobilization regimens for newly diagnosed multiple myeloma patients reveals the separate impact of mobilization and collection variables.

    PubMed

    Abuabdou, Ahmed; Rosenbaum, Eric R; Usmani, Saad Zafar; Barlogie, Bart; Cottler-Fox, Michele

    2014-10-01

    Mobilization regimens for CD34+ cells have generally been judged successful based on the number of cells collected without evaluating mobilization separately from collection. Using retrospective data for patients who collected CD34+ cells on Total Therapy protocols 3a/3b (VTD-PACE) and Total Therapy 4/5 using a novel regimen that added low dose melphalan to VTD-PACE (MVTD-PACE), we analyzed mobilization and collection variables separately. A significant difference favoring MVDT-PACE was found in mean CD34+ cells/µL on day 2 of collection and in mean ratio of CD34+ cells/µL on day 2 to day 1. However, because apheresis variables and growth factor dose during collection were manipulated to optimize individual collections, the two regimens were not significantly different when the mean total CD34+ cells ×10(6) /kg collected was compared. Thus, when evaluating a chemotherapy regimen or new growth factor for mobilization, it is important to realize that total CD34+ cells collected is dependent on both mobilization and collection variables.

  6. Hindered submicron mobility and long-term storage of presynaptic dense-core granules revealed by single-particle tracking.

    PubMed

    Scalettar, B A; Jacobs, C; Fulwiler, A; Prahl, L; Simon, A; Hilken, L; Lochner, J E

    2012-09-01

    Dense-core granules (DCGs) are organelles found in neuroendocrine cells and neurons that house, transport, and release a number of important peptides and proteins. In neurons, DCG cargo can include the secreted neuromodulatory proteins tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and/or brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which play a key role in modulating synaptic efficacy in the hippocampus. This function has spurred interest in DCGs that localize to synaptic contacts between hippocampal neurons, and several studies recently have established that DCGs localize to, and undergo regulated exocytosis from, postsynaptic sites. To complement this work, we have studied presynaptically localized DCGs in hippocampal neurons, which are much more poorly understood than their postsynaptic analogs. Moreover, to enhance relevance, we visualized DCGs via fluorescence labeling of exogenous and endogenous tPA and BDNF. Using single-particle tracking, we determined trajectories of more than 150 presynaptically localized DCGs. These trajectories reveal that mobility of DCGs in presynaptic boutons is highly hindered and that storage is long-lived. We also computed mean-squared displacement curves, which can be used to elucidate mechanisms of transport. Over shorter time windows, most curves are linear, demonstrating that DCG transport in boutons is driven predominantly by diffusion. The remaining curves plateau with time, consistent with motion constrained by a submicron-sized corral. These results have relevance to recent models of presynaptic organization and to recent hypotheses about DCG cargo function. The results also provide estimates for transit times to the presynaptic plasma membrane that are consistent with measured times for onset of neurotrophin release from synaptically localized DCGs. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Hindered submicron mobility and long-term storage of presynaptic dense-core granules revealed by single-particle tracking

    PubMed Central

    Scalettar, B. A.; Jacobs, C.; Fulwiler, A.; Prahl, L.; Simon, A.; Hilken, L.; Lochner, J. E.

    2012-01-01

    Dense-core granules (DCGs) are organelles found in neuroendocrine cells and neurons that house, transport, and release a number of important peptides and proteins. In neurons, DCG cargo can include the secreted neuromodulatory proteins tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and/or brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which play a key role in modulating synaptic efficacy in the hippocampus. This function has spurred interest in DCGs that localize to synaptic contacts between hippocampal neurons, and several studies recently have established that DCGs localize to, and undergo regulated exocytosis from, postsynaptic sites. To complement this work, we have studied presynaptically-localized DCGs in hippocampal neurons, which are much more poorly understood than their postsynaptic analogs. Moreover, to enhance relevance, we visualized DCGs via fluorescence labeling of exogenous and endogenous tPA and BDNF. Using single-particle tracking, we determined trajectories of more than 150 presynaptically-localized DCGs. These trajectories reveal that mobility of DCGs in presynaptic boutons is highly hindered and that storage is long-lived. We also computed mean-squared displacement curves, which can be used to elucidate mechanisms of transport. Over shorter time windows, most curves are linear, demonstrating that DCG transport in boutons is driven predominantly by diffusion. The remaining curves plateau with time, consistent with motion constrained by a submicron-sized corral. These results have relevance to recent models of presynaptic organization and to recent hypotheses about DCG cargo function. The results also provide estimates for transit times to the presynaptic plasma membrane that are consistent with measured times for onset of neurotrophin release from synaptically-localized DCGs. PMID:21976424

  8. Comparative Analysis of the Peanut Witches'-Broom Phytoplasma Genome Reveals Horizontal Transfer of Potential Mobile Units and Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Wen-Sui; Lin, Chan-Pin; Kuo, Chih-Horng

    2013-01-01

    Phytoplasmas are a group of bacteria that are associated with hundreds of plant diseases. Due to their economical importance and the difficulties involved in the experimental study of these obligate pathogens, genome sequencing and comparative analysis have been utilized as powerful tools to understand phytoplasma biology. To date four complete phytoplasma genome sequences have been published. However, these four strains represent limited phylogenetic diversity. In this study, we report the shotgun sequencing and evolutionary analysis of a peanut witches'-broom (PnWB) phytoplasma genome. The availability of this genome provides the first representative of the 16SrII group and substantially improves the taxon sampling to investigate genome evolution. The draft genome assembly contains 13 chromosomal contigs with a total size of 562,473 bp, covering ∼90% of the chromosome. Additionally, a complete plasmid sequence is included. Comparisons among the five available phytoplasma genomes reveal the differentiations in gene content and metabolic capacity. Notably, phylogenetic inferences of the potential mobile units (PMUs) in these genomes indicate that horizontal transfer may have occurred between divergent phytoplasma lineages. Because many effectors are associated with PMUs, the horizontal transfer of these transposon-like elements can contribute to the adaptation and diversification of these pathogens. In summary, the findings from this study highlight the importance of improving taxon sampling when investigating genome evolution. Moreover, the currently available sequences are inadequate to fully characterize the pan-genome of phytoplasmas. Future genome sequencing efforts to expand phylogenetic diversity are essential in improving our understanding of phytoplasma evolution. PMID:23626855

  9. Comparative analysis of the peanut witches'-broom phytoplasma genome reveals horizontal transfer of potential mobile units and effectors.

    PubMed

    Chung, Wan-Chia; Chen, Ling-Ling; Lo, Wen-Sui; Lin, Chan-Pin; Kuo, Chih-Horng

    2013-01-01

    Phytoplasmas are a group of bacteria that are associated with hundreds of plant diseases. Due to their economical importance and the difficulties involved in the experimental study of these obligate pathogens, genome sequencing and comparative analysis have been utilized as powerful tools to understand phytoplasma biology. To date four complete phytoplasma genome sequences have been published. However, these four strains represent limited phylogenetic diversity. In this study, we report the shotgun sequencing and evolutionary analysis of a peanut witches'-broom (PnWB) phytoplasma genome. The availability of this genome provides the first representative of the 16SrII group and substantially improves the taxon sampling to investigate genome evolution. The draft genome assembly contains 13 chromosomal contigs with a total size of 562,473 bp, covering ∼90% of the chromosome. Additionally, a complete plasmid sequence is included. Comparisons among the five available phytoplasma genomes reveal the differentiations in gene content and metabolic capacity. Notably, phylogenetic inferences of the potential mobile units (PMUs) in these genomes indicate that horizontal transfer may have occurred between divergent phytoplasma lineages. Because many effectors are associated with PMUs, the horizontal transfer of these transposon-like elements can contribute to the adaptation and diversification of these pathogens. In summary, the findings from this study highlight the importance of improving taxon sampling when investigating genome evolution. Moreover, the currently available sequences are inadequate to fully characterize the pan-genome of phytoplasmas. Future genome sequencing efforts to expand phylogenetic diversity are essential in improving our understanding of phytoplasma evolution.

  10. Sub-terahertz frequency-domain spectroscopy reveals single-grain mobility and scatter influence of large-area graphene.

    PubMed

    Cervetti, Christian; Heintze, Eric; Gorshunov, Boris; Zhukova, Elena; Lobanov, Svyatoslav; Hoyer, Alexander; Burghard, Marko; Kern, Klaus; Dressel, Martin; Bogani, Lapo

    2015-04-24

    The response of individual domains in wafer-sized chemical vapor deposition graphene is measured by contactless sub-terahertz interferometry, observing the intrinsic optical conductance and reaching very high mobility values. It is shown that charged scatterers limit the mobility, validating previous theoretical predictions, and sub-terahertz quality assessment is demonstrated, as necessary for large-scale applications in touchscreens, as well as wearable and optoelectronic devices.

  11. Revealing high room and low temperatures mobilities of 2D holes in a strained Ge quantum well heterostructures grown on a standard Si(0 0 1) substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myronov, Maksym; Morrison, Christopher; Halpin, John; Rhead, Stephen; Foronda, Jamie; Leadley, David

    2015-08-01

    Carrier mobility is one of the most important parameters of any semiconductor material, determining its suitability for applications in a large variety of electronic devices including field effect transistors (FETs). Today the capabilities of modern planar Si FET devices are almost exhausted and researchers are seeking either new device architectures or new materials. Here we report an extremely high room temperature (at 293 K) 2D hole gas (2DHG) drift mobility of 4500 cm2 V-1 s-1 at a carrier density of 1.2 × 1011 cm-2 obtained in a compressively strained Ge quantum well (QW) heterostructure, grown by an industrial type chemical vapor deposition system on a standard Si(0 0 1) substrate. The low-temperature Hall mobility and carrier density of this structure, measured at 333 mK, are 777,000 cm2 V-1 s-1 and 1.9 × 1011 cm-2, respectively. These hole mobilities are the highest not only among the group-IV Si and Ge based semiconductors, but also among p-type III-V and II-VI materials. The obtained room temperature mobility is substantially higher than those reported so far in strained Ge QW heterostructures and reveals a huge potential for further applications of this material in a wide variety of electronic devices.

  12. Comparative genomics of the type VI secretion systems of Pantoea and Erwinia species reveals the presence of putative effector islands that may be translocated by the VgrG and Hcp proteins

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Type VI secretion apparatus is assembled by a conserved set of proteins encoded within a distinct locus. The putative effector proteins Hcp and VgrG are also encoded within these loci. We have identified numerous distinct Type VI secretion system (T6SS) loci in the genomes of several ecologically diverse Pantoea and Erwinia species and detected the presence of putative effector islands associated with the hcp and vgrG genes. Results Between two and four T6SS loci occur among the Pantoea and Erwinia species. While two of the loci (T6SS-1 and T6SS-2) are well conserved among the various strains, the third (T6SS-3) locus is not universally distributed. Additional orthologous loci are present in Pantoea sp. aB-valens and Erwinia billingiae Eb661. Comparative analysis of the T6SS-1 and T6SS-3 loci showed non-conserved islands associated with the vgrG and hcp, and vgrG genes, respectively. These regions had a G+C content far lower than the conserved portions of the loci. Many of the proteins encoded within the hcp and vgrG islands carry conserved domains, which suggests they may serve as effector proteins for the T6SS. A number of the proteins also show homology to the C-terminal extensions of evolved VgrG proteins. Conclusions Extensive diversity was observed in the number and content of the T6SS loci among the Pantoea and Erwinia species. Genomic islands could be observed within some of T6SS loci, which are associated with the hcp and vgrG proteins and carry putative effector domain proteins. We propose new hypotheses concerning a role for these islands in the acquisition of T6SS effectors and the development of novel evolved VgrG and Hcp proteins. PMID:22115407

  13. Comparative genomics of the Type VI secretion systems of Pantoea and Erwinia species reveals the presence of putative effector islands that may be translocated by the VgrG and Hcp proteins.

    PubMed

    De Maayer, Pieter; Venter, Stephanus N; Kamber, Tim; Duffy, Brion; Coutinho, Teresa A; Smits, Theo H M

    2011-11-24

    The Type VI secretion apparatus is assembled by a conserved set of proteins encoded within a distinct locus. The putative effector proteins Hcp and VgrG are also encoded within these loci. We have identified numerous distinct Type VI secretion system (T6SS) loci in the genomes of several ecologically diverse Pantoea and Erwinia species and detected the presence of putative effector islands associated with the hcp and vgrG genes. Between two and four T6SS loci occur among the Pantoea and Erwinia species. While two of the loci (T6SS-1 and T6SS-2) are well conserved among the various strains, the third (T6SS-3) locus is not universally distributed. Additional orthologous loci are present in Pantoea sp. aB-valens and Erwinia billingiae Eb661. Comparative analysis of the T6SS-1 and T6SS-3 loci showed non-conserved islands associated with the vgrG and hcp, and vgrG genes, respectively. These regions had a G+C content far lower than the conserved portions of the loci. Many of the proteins encoded within the hcp and vgrG islands carry conserved domains, which suggests they may serve as effector proteins for the T6SS. A number of the proteins also show homology to the C-terminal extensions of evolved VgrG proteins. Extensive diversity was observed in the number and content of the T6SS loci among the Pantoea and Erwinia species. Genomic islands could be observed within some of T6SS loci, which are associated with the hcp and vgrG proteins and carry putative effector domain proteins. We propose new hypotheses concerning a role for these islands in the acquisition of T6SS effectors and the development of novel evolved VgrG and Hcp proteins.

  14. Acclimatization of a mixed-animal manure inoculum to the anaerobic digestion of Axonopus compressus reveals the putative importance of Mesotoga infera and Methanosaeta concilii as elucidated by DGGE and Illumina MiSeq.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonathan T E; He, Jianzhong; Tong, Yen Wah

    2017-08-28

    In this study, a multifarious microbial mix from different sources is acclimatized over a period of three months to digesting cowgrass, and the changes in the community structure are examined with both a traditional denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis method as well as a next generation sequencing MiSeq method. It is shown that the much more in depth analysis by Illumina gives more information about the relative abundance and thus putative importance of the role of various microbes, in particular the bacterium Mesotoga infera and the archaeon Methanosaeta concilii. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The crystal structure of Rv1347c, a putative antibiotic resistance protein from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, reveals a GCN5-related fold and suggests an alternative function in siderophore biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Card, G L; Peterson, N A; Smith, C A; Rupp, B; Schick, B M; Baker, E N

    2005-02-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the cause of TB, is a devastating human pathogen. The emergence of multi-drug resistance in recent years has prompted a search for new drug targets and for a better understanding of mechanisms of resistance. Here we focus on the gene product of an open reading frame from M. tuberculosis, Rv1347c, which is annotated as a putative aminoglycoside N-acetyltransferase. The Rv1347c protein does not show this activity, however, and we show from its crystal structure, coupled with functional and bioinformatic data, that its most likely role is in the biosynthesis of mycobactin, the M. tuberculosis siderophore. The crystal structure of Rv1347c was determined by MAD phasing from selenomethionine-substituted protein and refined at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution (R = 0.227, R{sub free} = 0.257). The protein is monomeric, with a fold that places it in the GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase (GNAT) family of acyltransferases. Features of the structure are an acylCoA binding site that is shared with other GNAT family members, and an adjacent hydrophobic channel leading to the surface that could accommodate long-chain acyl groups. Modeling the postulated substrate, the N{sup {var_epsilon}}-hydroxylysine side chain of mycobactin, into the acceptor substrate binding groove identifies two residues at the active site, His130 and Asp168, that have putative roles in substrate binding and catalysis.

  16. Single Molecule Analysis of Serotonin Transporter Regulation Using Antagonist-Conjugated Quantum Dots Reveals Restricted, p38 MAPK-Dependent Mobilization Underlying Uptake Activation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jerry C.; Tomlinson, Ian D.; Warnement, Michael R.; Ustione, Alessandro; Carneiro, Ana M. D.; Piston, David W.; Blakely, Randy D.; Rosenthal, Sandra J.

    2012-01-01

    The presynaptic serotonin (5-HT) transporter (SERT) is targeted by widely prescribed antidepressant medications. Altered SERT expression or regulation has been implicated in multiple neuropsychiatric disorders, including anxiety, depression and autism. Here, we implement a generalizable strategy that exploits antagonist-conjugated quantum dots (Qdots) to monitor, for the first time, single SERT proteins on the surface of serotonergic cells. We document two pools of SERT proteins defined by lateral mobility, one that exhibits relatively free diffusion, and a second, localized to cholesterol and GM1 ganglioside-enriched microdomains, that displays restricted mobility. Receptor-linked signalling pathways that enhance SERT activity mobilize transporters that, nonetheless, remain confined to membrane microdomains. Mobilization of transporters arise from a p38 MAPK-dependent untethering of the SERT C-terminus from the juxtamembrane actin cytoskeleton. Our studies establish the utility of ligand-conjugated Qdots for analysis of the behaviour of single membrane proteins and reveal a physical basis for signaling-mediated SERT regulation. PMID:22745492

  17. Single molecule analysis of serotonin transporter regulation using antagonist-conjugated quantum dots reveals restricted, p38 MAPK-dependent mobilization underlying uptake activation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jerry C; Tomlinson, Ian D; Warnement, Michael R; Ustione, Alessandro; Carneiro, Ana M D; Piston, David W; Blakely, Randy D; Rosenthal, Sandra J

    2012-06-27

    The presynaptic serotonin (5-HT) transporter (SERT) is targeted by widely prescribed antidepressant medications. Altered SERT expression or regulation has been implicated in multiple neuropsychiatric disorders, including anxiety, depression and autism. Here, we implement a generalizable strategy that exploits antagonist-conjugated quantum dots (Qdots) to monitor, for the first time, single SERT proteins on the surface of serotonergic cells. We document two pools of SERT proteins defined by lateral mobility, one that exhibits relatively free diffusion, and a second, localized to cholesterol and GM1 ganglioside-enriched microdomains, that displays restricted mobility. Receptor-linked signaling pathways that enhance SERT activity mobilize transporters that, nonetheless, remain confined to membrane microdomains. Mobilization of transporters arises from a p38 MAPK-dependent untethering of the SERT C terminus from the juxtamembrane actin cytoskeleton. Our studies establish the utility of ligand-conjugated Qdots for analysis of the behavior of single membrane proteins and reveal a physical basis for signaling-mediated SERT regulation.

  18. The intraspecific variability of mitochondrial genes of Agaricus bisporus reveals an extensive group I intron mobility combined with low nucleotide substitution rates.

    PubMed

    Jalalzadeh, Banafsheh; Saré, Idy Carras; Férandon, Cyril; Callac, Philippe; Farsi, Mohammad; Savoie, Jean-Michel; Barroso, Gérard

    2015-02-01

    Intraspecific mitochondrial variability was studied in ten strains of A. bisporus var. bisporus, in a strain representative of A. bisporus var. eurotetrasporus and in a strain of the closely related species Agaricus devoniensis. In A. bisporus, the cox1 gene is the richest in group I introns harboring homing endonuclease genes (heg). This study led to identify group I introns as the main source of cox1 gene polymorphism. Among the studied introns, two groups were distinguished according to the heg they contained. One group harbored heg maintained putatively functional. The other group was composed of eroded heg sequences that appeared to evolve toward their elimination. Low nucleotide substitution rates were found in both types of intronic sequences. This feature was also shared by all types of studied mitochondrial sequences, not only intronic but also genic and intergenic ones, when compared with nuclear sequences. Hence, the intraspecific evolution of A. bisporus mitochondrial genome appears characterized by both an important mobility (presence/absence) of large group I introns and by low nt substitution rates. This stringent conservation of mitochondrial sequences, when compared with their nuclear counterparts, appears irrespective of their apparent functionality and contrasts to what is widely accepted in fungal sequence evolution. This strengthens the usefulness of mtDNA sequences to get clues on intraspecific evolution.

  19. The crystal structure of the Rv0301-Rv0300 VapBC-3 toxin-antitoxin complex from M. tuberculosis reveals a Mg2+ ion in the active site and a putative RNA-binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Andrew B; Miallau, Linda; Sawaya, Michael R; Habel, Jeff; Cascio, Duilio; Eisenberg, David

    2013-01-10

    VapBC pairs account for 45 out of 88 identified toxin-antitoxin (TA) pairs in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) H37Rv genome. A working model suggests that under times of stress, antitoxin molecules are degraded, releasing the toxins to slow the metabolism of the cell, which in the case of VapC toxins is via their RNase activity. Otherwise the TA pairs remain bound to their promoters, autoinhibiting transcription. The crystal structure of Rv0301-Rv0300, an Mtb VapBC TA complex determined at 1.49 Å resolution, suggests a mechanism for these three functions: RNase activity, its inhibition by antitoxin, and its ability to bind promoter DNA. The Rv0301 toxin consists of a core of five parallel beta strands flanked by alpha helices. Three proximal aspartates coordinate a Mg2+ ion forming the putative RNase active site. The Rv0300 antitoxin monomer is extended in structure, consisting of an N-terminal beta strand followed by four helices. The last two helices wrap around the toxin and terminate near the putative RNase active site, but with different conformations. In one conformation, the C-terminal arginine interferes with Mg2+ ion coordination, suggesting a mechanism by which the antitoxin can inhibit toxin activity. At the N-terminus of the antitoxin, two pairs of Ribbon-Helix-Helix (RHH) motifs are related by crystallographic twofold symmetry. The resulting hetero-octameric complex is similar to the FitAB system, but the two RHH motifs are about 30 Å closer together in the Rv0301-Rv0300 complex, suggesting either a different span of the DNA recognition sequence or a conformational change.

  20. Multi-isotopic analysis reveals individual mobility and diet at the Early Iron Age monumental tumulus of Magdalenenberg, Germany.

    PubMed

    Oelze, Vicky M; Koch, Julia K; Kupke, Katharina; Nehlich, Olaf; Zäuner, Steve; Wahl, Joachim; Weise, Stephan M; Rieckhoff, Sabine; Richards, Michael P

    2012-07-01

    For the Early Iron Age western Hallstatt culture, which includes the site of Magdalenenberg in southwest Germany, it has been proposed that people were mobile and maintained far reaching social and trading networks throughout Europe. We tested this hypothesis by analyzing multiple isotopes (strontium, oxygen, sulfur, carbon, and nitrogen) of the preserved skeletons from the Magdalenenberg elite cemetery to determine diets and to look for evidence of mobility. The analysis of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur isotope ratios in collagen of humans (n = 50) and associated domestic fauna (n = 10) indicates a terrestrial-based diet. There was a heterogeneous range of isotope values in both strontium (0.70725 to 0.71923, n = 76) and oxygen (13.4‰ to 18.5‰, n = 78) measured in tooth enamel. Although many of the individuals had values consistent with being from Hallstatt culture sites within southwest Germany, some individuals likely originated from further afield. Possible areas include the Alps of Switzerland and Austria or even locations in Italy. Our study strongly supports the assumption of far reaching social and economic networks in the western Hallstatt culture.

  1. Compact non-rock-salt structures in sodium fluoride cluster ions at specific sizes revealed by ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ohshimo, Keijiro; Takahashi, Tohru; Moriyama, Ryoichi; Misaizu, Fuminori

    2014-10-30

    Structures of small sodium fluoride cluster cations, Na(n)F(n-1)(+), have been determined for n = 5-23 by ion mobility mass spectrometry. In the mass spectrum of Na(n)F(n-1)(+) cluster ions measured after collisions in the ion-drift cell, cuboid ions with near-regular hexahedron such as n = 14 (3 × 3 × 3), 23 (3 × 3 × 5), 38 (3 × 5 × 5), 63 (5 × 5 × 5), and 88 (5 × 5 × 7) were predominantly observed as magic numbers. By comparison of the collision cross sections obtained from the ion mobility measurements with theoretical ones, we have experimentally shown that the ions of n = 7 and 10 have stable non-rock-salt type structures in which one sodium atom is encapsulated into the sodium fluoride cuboid lattice. The collision cross sections of n = 12 and 13 are almost equal to that of the n = 14 cuboid. A similar feature was also observed in collision cross sections of n = 21 and 22, which are equal to that of the n = 23 cuboid. These features indicate that the cluster ions of n = 12, 13, 21, and 22 have near-cuboid structures with some surface defects.

  2. Sediment mobilization deposits from episodic subsurface fluid flow - A new tool to reveal long-term earthquake records?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reusch, Anna; Moernaut, Jasper; Anselmetti, Flavio S.; Strasser, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Subsurface fluid flow can be affected by earthquakes: increased spring activity, mud volcano eruptions, groundwater fluctuations, changes in geyser frequency and other forms of altered subsurface fluid flow have been documented during, after, or even prior to earthquakes. Recently discovered giant pockmarks on the bottom of Lake Neuchâtel, Switzerland, are the lake-floor expression of subsurface fluid flow. They discharge karstic groundwater from the Jura Mountains and experience episodically increased subsurface fluid flow documented by subsurface sediment mobilization deposits at the levees of the pockmarks. In this study, we present the spatio-temporal distribution of event deposits from phases of sediment expulsion and their time correlative multiple mass-transport deposits. We report striking evidence for five events of concurrent multiple subsurface sediment deposits and multiple mass-transport deposits since Late Glacial times, for which we propose past earthquakes as trigger. Comparison of this new event catalogue with historic earthquakes and other independent paleoseismic records suggests that initiation of sediment expulsion requires a minimum macroseismic intensity of VII. Thus, our study presents for the first time sedimentary deposits resulting from increased subsurface fluid flow as new paleoseismic proxy. Comparable processes must also be relevant for other mountain front ranges and coastal mountain ranges, where groundwater flow triggers subsurface sediment mobilization and discharges into lacustrine and marine settings.

  3. Revealing Patterns and Trends of Mass Mobility Through Spatial and Temporal Abstraction of Origin-Destination Movement Data.

    PubMed

    Andrienko, Gennady; Andrienko, Natalia; Fuchs, Georg; Wood, Jo

    2017-09-01

    Origin-destination (OD) movement data describe moves or trips between spatial locations by specifying the origins, destinations, start, and end times, but not the routes travelled. For studying the spatio-temporal patterns and trends of mass mobility, individual OD moves of many people are aggregated into flows (collective moves) by time intervals. Time-variant flow data pose two difficult challenges for visualization and analysis. First, flows may connect arbitrary locations (not only neighbors), thus making a graph with numerous edge intersections, which is hard to visualize in a comprehensible way. Even a single spatial situation consisting of flows in one time step is hard to explore. The second challenge is the need to analyze long time series consisting of numerous spatial situations. We present an approach facilitating exploration of long-term flow data by means of spatial and temporal abstraction. It involves a special way of data aggregation, which allows representing spatial situations by diagram maps instead of flow maps, thus reducing the intersections and occlusions pertaining to flow maps. The aggregated data are used for clustering of time intervals by similarity of the spatial situations. Temporal and spatial displays of the clustering results facilitate the discovery of periodic patterns and longer-term trends in the mass mobility behavior.

  4. Exploration of Bivalent Ligands Targeting Putative Mu Opioid Receptor and Chemokine Receptor CCR5 Dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Arnatt, Christopher K.; Falls, Bethany A.; Yuan, Yunyun; Raborg, Thomas J.; Masvekar, Ruturaj R.; El-Hage, Nazira; Selley, Dana E.; Nicola, Anthony V.; Knapp, Pamela E.; Hauser, Kurt F.; Zhang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Modern antiretroviral therapies have provided HIV-1 infected patients longer lifespans and better quality of life. However, several neurological complications are now being seen in these patients due to HIV-1 associated injury of neurons by infected microglia and astrocytes. In addition, these effects can be further exacerbated with opiate use and abuse. One possible mechanism for such potentiation effects of opiates is the interaction of the mu opioid receptor (MOR) with the chemokine receptor CCR5 (CCR5), a known HIV-1 co-receptor, to form MOR-CCR5 heterodimer. In an attempt to understand this putative interaction and its relevance to neuroAIDS, we designed and synthesized a series of bivalent ligands targeting the putative CCR5-MOR heterodimer. To understand how these bivalent ligands may interact with the heterodimer, biological studies including calcium mobilization inhibition, binding affinity, HIV-1 invasion, and cell fusion assays were applied. In particular, HIV-1 infection assays using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, macrophages, and astrocytes revealed a notable synergy in activity for one particular bivalent ligand. Further, a molecular model of the putative CCR5-MOR heterodimer was constructed, docked with the bivalent ligand, and molecular dynamics simulations of the complex was performed in a membrane-water system to help understand the biological observation. PMID:27720326

  5. Putative archaeal viruses from the mesopelagic ocean.

    PubMed

    Vik, Dean R; Roux, Simon; Brum, Jennifer R; Bolduc, Ben; Emerson, Joanne B; Padilla, Cory C; Stewart, Frank J; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2017-01-01

    Oceanic viruses that infect bacteria, or phages, are known to modulate host diversity, metabolisms, and biogeochemical cycling, while the viruses that infect marine Archaea remain understudied despite the critical ecosystem roles played by their hosts. Here we introduce "MArVD", for Metagenomic Archaeal Virus Detector, an annotation tool designed to identify putative archaeal virus contigs in metagenomic datasets. MArVD is made publicly available through the online iVirus analytical platform. Benchmarking analysis of MArVD showed it to be >99% accurate and 100% sensitive in identifying the 127 known archaeal viruses among the 12,499 viruses in the VirSorter curated dataset. Application of MArVD to 10 viral metagenomes from two depth profiles in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific (ETNP) oxygen minimum zone revealed 43 new putative archaeal virus genomes and large genome fragments ranging in size from 10 to 31 kb. Network-based classifications, which were consistent with marker gene phylogenies where available, suggested that these putative archaeal virus contigs represented six novel candidate genera. Ecological analyses, via fragment recruitment and ordination, revealed that the diversity and relative abundances of these putative archaeal viruses were correlated with oxygen concentration and temperature along two OMZ-spanning depth profiles, presumably due to structuring of the host Archaea community. Peak viral diversity and abundances were found in surface waters, where Thermoplasmata 16S rRNA genes are prevalent, suggesting these archaea as hosts in the surface habitats. Together these findings provide a baseline for identifying archaeal viruses in sequence datasets, and an initial picture of the ecology of such viruses in non-extreme environments.

  6. Putative archaeal viruses from the mesopelagic ocean

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Simon; Brum, Jennifer R.; Bolduc, Ben; Emerson, Joanne B.; Padilla, Cory C.; Stewart, Frank J.; Sullivan, Matthew B.

    2017-01-01

    Oceanic viruses that infect bacteria, or phages, are known to modulate host diversity, metabolisms, and biogeochemical cycling, while the viruses that infect marine Archaea remain understudied despite the critical ecosystem roles played by their hosts. Here we introduce “MArVD”, for Metagenomic Archaeal Virus Detector, an annotation tool designed to identify putative archaeal virus contigs in metagenomic datasets. MArVD is made publicly available through the online iVirus analytical platform. Benchmarking analysis of MArVD showed it to be >99% accurate and 100% sensitive in identifying the 127 known archaeal viruses among the 12,499 viruses in the VirSorter curated dataset. Application of MArVD to 10 viral metagenomes from two depth profiles in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific (ETNP) oxygen minimum zone revealed 43 new putative archaeal virus genomes and large genome fragments ranging in size from 10 to 31 kb. Network-based classifications, which were consistent with marker gene phylogenies where available, suggested that these putative archaeal virus contigs represented six novel candidate genera. Ecological analyses, via fragment recruitment and ordination, revealed that the diversity and relative abundances of these putative archaeal viruses were correlated with oxygen concentration and temperature along two OMZ-spanning depth profiles, presumably due to structuring of the host Archaea community. Peak viral diversity and abundances were found in surface waters, where Thermoplasmata 16S rRNA genes are prevalent, suggesting these archaea as hosts in the surface habitats. Together these findings provide a baseline for identifying archaeal viruses in sequence datasets, and an initial picture of the ecology of such viruses in non-extreme environments. PMID:28630803

  7. Size dependence of the folding of multiply charged sodium cationized polylactides revealed by ion mobility mass spectrometry and molecular modelling.

    PubMed

    De Winter, Julien; Lemaur, Vincent; Ballivian, Renaud; Chirot, Fabien; Coulembier, Olivier; Antoine, Rodolphe; Lemoine, Jérôme; Cornil, Jérôme; Dubois, Philippe; Dugourd, Philippe; Gerbaux, Pascal

    2011-08-22

    Ion mobility spectrometry coupled with mass spectrometry was used to experimentally determine the three-dimensional structure of multiply charged sodium cationized polylactides (PLA). In particular, the experiments were conducted to evaluate the influence of the charge state and the size on the gas-phase conformation of cationized PLA. The measured collision cross sections were then compared to calculated values obtained by computational chemistry methods. The most striking feature was the experimental and theoretical observation of a breaking point in the quasilinear relationship between the average collision cross sections and the number of monomer units for the triply charged cations. This breaking point was theoretically demonstrated, for the doubly and triply charged cations, to be associated with a significant folding of the polymer chains around the cationizing agents. The occurrence of such breaking points could be exploited to correlate the charge state of the most intense ion series observed upon electrospray ionization with the number-average molecular mass of a polymer.

  8. Transcriptome Analysis of the Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems of the Spider Cupiennius salei Reveals Multiple Putative Cys-Loop Ligand Gated Ion Channel Subunits and an Acetylcholine Binding Protein.

    PubMed

    Torkkeli, Päivi H; Liu, Hongxia; French, Andrew S

    2015-01-01

    Invertebrates possess a diverse collection of pentameric Cys-loop ligand gated ion channel (LGIC) receptors whose molecular structures, evolution and relationships to mammalian counterparts have been intensely investigated in several clinically and agriculturally important species. These receptors are targets for a variety of control agents that may also harm beneficial species. However, little is known about Cys-loop receptors in spiders, which are important natural predators of insects. We assembled de novo transcriptomes from the central and peripheral nervous systems of the Central American wandering spider Cupiennius salei, a model species for neurophysiological, behavioral and developmental studies. We found 15 Cys-loop receptor subunits that are expected to form anion or cation permeable channels, plus a putative acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP) that has only previously been reported in molluscs and one annelid. We used phylogenetic and sequence analysis to compare the spider subunits to homologous receptors in other species and predicted the 3D structures of each protein using the I-Tasser server. The quality of homology models improved with increasing sequence identity to the available high-resolution templates. We found that C. salei has orthologous γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), GluCl, pHCl, HisCl and nAChα LGIC subunits to other arthropods, but some subgroups are specific to arachnids, or only to spiders. C. salei sequences were phylogenetically closest to gene fragments from the social spider, Stegodyphus mimosarum, indicating high conservation within the Araneomorphae suborder of spiders. C. salei sequences had similar ligand binding and transmembrane regions to other invertebrate and vertebrate LGICs. They also had motifs associated with high sensitivity to insecticides and antiparasitic agents such as fipronil, dieldrin and ivermectin. Development of truly selective control agents for pest species will require information about the molecular

  9. Complete Genome Sequence and Comparative Genomic Analysis of Mycobacterium massiliense JCM 15300 in the Mycobacterium abscessus Group Reveal a Conserved Genomic Island MmGI-1 Related to Putative Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Nakanaga, Kazue; Nakata, Noboru; Kazumi, Yuko; Maeda, Shinji; Makino, Masahiko; Hoshino, Yoshihiko; Kuroda, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus group subsp., such as M. massiliense, M. abscessus sensu stricto and M. bolletii, are an environmental organism found in soil, water and other ecological niches, and have been isolated from respiratory tract infection, skin and soft tissue infection, postoperative infection of cosmetic surgery. To determine the unique genetic feature of M. massiliense, we sequenced the complete genome of M. massiliense type strain JCM 15300 (corresponding to CCUG 48898). Comparative genomic analysis was performed among Mycobacterium spp. and among M. abscessus group subspp., showing that additional ß-oxidation-related genes and, notably, the mammalian cell entry (mce) operon were located on a genomic island, M. massiliense Genomic Island 1 (MmGI-1), in M. massiliense. In addition, putative anaerobic respiration system-related genes and additional mycolic acid cyclopropane synthetase-related genes were found uniquely in M. massiliense. Japanese isolates of M. massiliense also frequently possess the MmGI-1 (14/44, approximately 32%) and three unique conserved regions (26/44; approximately 60%, 34/44; approximately 77% and 40/44; approximately 91%), as well as isolates of other countries (Malaysia, France, United Kingdom and United States). The well-conserved genomic island MmGI-1 may play an important role in high growth potential with additional lipid metabolism, extra factors for survival in the environment or synthesis of complex membrane-associated lipids. ORFs on MmGI-1 showed similarities to ORFs of phylogenetically distant M. avium complex (MAC), suggesting that horizontal gene transfer or genetic recombination events might have occurred within MmGI-1 among M. massiliense and MAC. PMID:25503461

  10. Transcriptome Analysis of the Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems of the Spider Cupiennius salei Reveals Multiple Putative Cys-Loop Ligand Gated Ion Channel Subunits and an Acetylcholine Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Torkkeli, Päivi H.; Liu, Hongxia; French, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    Invertebrates possess a diverse collection of pentameric Cys-loop ligand gated ion channel (LGIC) receptors whose molecular structures, evolution and relationships to mammalian counterparts have been intensely investigated in several clinically and agriculturally important species. These receptors are targets for a variety of control agents that may also harm beneficial species. However, little is known about Cys-loop receptors in spiders, which are important natural predators of insects. We assembled de novo transcriptomes from the central and peripheral nervous systems of the Central American wandering spider Cupiennius salei, a model species for neurophysiological, behavioral and developmental studies. We found 15 Cys-loop receptor subunits that are expected to form anion or cation permeable channels, plus a putative acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP) that has only previously been reported in molluscs and one annelid. We used phylogenetic and sequence analysis to compare the spider subunits to homologous receptors in other species and predicted the 3D structures of each protein using the I-Tasser server. The quality of homology models improved with increasing sequence identity to the available high-resolution templates. We found that C. salei has orthologous γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), GluCl, pHCl, HisCl and nAChα LGIC subunits to other arthropods, but some subgroups are specific to arachnids, or only to spiders. C. salei sequences were phylogenetically closest to gene fragments from the social spider, Stegodyphus mimosarum, indicating high conservation within the Araneomorphae suborder of spiders. C. salei sequences had similar ligand binding and transmembrane regions to other invertebrate and vertebrate LGICs. They also had motifs associated with high sensitivity to insecticides and antiparasitic agents such as fipronil, dieldrin and ivermectin. Development of truly selective control agents for pest species will require information about the molecular

  11. Virus-Induced Gene Silencing-Based Functional Analyses Revealed the Involvement of Several Putative Trehalose-6-Phosphate Synthase/Phosphatase Genes in Disease Resistance against Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 in Tomato.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huijuan; Hong, Yongbo; Huang, Lei; Liu, Shixia; Tian, Limei; Dai, Yi; Cao, Zhongye; Huang, Lihong; Li, Dayong; Song, Fengming

    2016-01-01

    Trehalose and its metabolism have been demonstrated to play important roles in control of plant growth, development, and stress responses. However, direct genetic evidence supporting the functions of trehalose and its metabolism in defense response against pathogens is lacking. In the present study, genome-wide characterization of putative trehalose-related genes identified 11 SlTPSs for trehalose-6-phosphate synthase, 8 SlTPPs for trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase and one SlTRE1 for trehalase in tomato genome. Nine SlTPSs, 4 SlTPPs, and SlTRE1 were selected for functional analyses to explore their involvement in tomato disease resistance. Some selected SlTPSs, SlTPPs, and SlTRE1 responded with distinct expression induction patterns to Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 as well as to defense signaling hormones (e.g., salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, and a precursor of ethylene). Virus-induced gene silencing-mediated silencing of SlTPS3, SlTPS4, or SlTPS7 led to deregulation of ROS accumulation and attenuated the expression of defense-related genes upon pathogen infection and thus deteriorated the resistance against B. cinerea or Pst DC3000. By contrast, silencing of SlTPS5 or SlTPP2 led to an increased expression of the defense-related genes upon pathogen infection and conferred an increased resistance against Pst DC3000. Silencing of SlTPS3, SlTPS4, SlTPS5, SlTPS7, or SlTPP2 affected trehalose level in tomato plants with or without infection of B. cinerea or Pst DC3000. These results demonstrate that SlTPS3, SlTPS4, SlTPS5, SlTPS7, and SlTPP2 play roles in resistance against B. cinerea and Pst DC3000, implying the importance of trehalose and tis metabolism in regulation of defense response against pathogens in tomato.

  12. Virus-Induced Gene Silencing-Based Functional Analyses Revealed the Involvement of Several Putative Trehalose-6-Phosphate Synthase/Phosphatase Genes in Disease Resistance against Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 in Tomato

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huijuan; Hong, Yongbo; Huang, Lei; Liu, Shixia; Tian, Limei; Dai, Yi; Cao, Zhongye; Huang, Lihong; Li, Dayong; Song, Fengming

    2016-01-01

    Trehalose and its metabolism have been demonstrated to play important roles in control of plant growth, development, and stress responses. However, direct genetic evidence supporting the functions of trehalose and its metabolism in defense response against pathogens is lacking. In the present study, genome-wide characterization of putative trehalose-related genes identified 11 SlTPSs for trehalose-6-phosphate synthase, 8 SlTPPs for trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase and one SlTRE1 for trehalase in tomato genome. Nine SlTPSs, 4 SlTPPs, and SlTRE1 were selected for functional analyses to explore their involvement in tomato disease resistance. Some selected SlTPSs, SlTPPs, and SlTRE1 responded with distinct expression induction patterns to Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 as well as to defense signaling hormones (e.g., salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, and a precursor of ethylene). Virus-induced gene silencing-mediated silencing of SlTPS3, SlTPS4, or SlTPS7 led to deregulation of ROS accumulation and attenuated the expression of defense-related genes upon pathogen infection and thus deteriorated the resistance against B. cinerea or Pst DC3000. By contrast, silencing of SlTPS5 or SlTPP2 led to an increased expression of the defense-related genes upon pathogen infection and conferred an increased resistance against Pst DC3000. Silencing of SlTPS3, SlTPS4, SlTPS5, SlTPS7, or SlTPP2 affected trehalose level in tomato plants with or without infection of B. cinerea or Pst DC3000. These results demonstrate that SlTPS3, SlTPS4, SlTPS5, SlTPS7, and SlTPP2 play roles in resistance against B. cinerea and Pst DC3000, implying the importance of trehalose and tis metabolism in regulation of defense response against pathogens in tomato. PMID:27540389

  13. A conserved fold for fimbrial components revealed by the crystal structure of a putative fimbrial assembly protein (BT1062) from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron at 2.2 Å resolution

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingping; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Cai, Xiaohui; Carlton, Dennis; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Chiu, Michelle; Clayton, Thomas; Das, Debanu; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Ellrott, Kyle; Farr, Carol L.; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Anna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S. Sri; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Miller, Mitchell D.; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Wooten, Tiffany; Yeh, Andrew; Zhou, Jiadong; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-Andre; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    BT1062 from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron is a homolog of Mfa2 (PGN0288 or PG0179), which is a component of the minor fimbriae in Porphyromonas gingivalis. The crystal structure of BT1062 revealed a conserved fold that is widely adopted by fimbrial components. PMID:20944223

  14. Rock-avalanche dynamics revealed by large-scale field mapping and seismic signals at a highly mobile avalanche in the West Salt Creek valley, western Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coe, Jeffrey A.; Baum, Rex L.; Allstadt, Kate; Kochevar, Bernard; Schmitt, Robert G.; Morgan, Matthew L.; White, Jonathan L.; Stratton, Benjamin T.; Hayashi, Timothy A.; Kean, Jason W.

    2016-01-01

    On 25 May 2014, a rain-on-snow–induced rock avalanche occurred in the West Salt Creek valley on the northern flank of Grand Mesa in western Colorado (United States). The avalanche mobilized from a preexisting rock slide in the Green River Formation and traveled 4.6 km down the confined valley, killing three people. The avalanche was rare for the contiguous United States because of its large size (54.5 Mm3) and high mobility (height/length = 0.14). To understand the avalanche failure sequence, mechanisms, and mobility, we conducted a forensic analysis using large-scale (1:1000) structural mapping and seismic data. We used high-resolution, unmanned aircraft system imagery as a base for field mapping, and analyzed seismic data from 22 broadband stations (distances < 656 km from the rock-slide source area) and one short-period network. We inverted broadband data to derive a time series of forces that the avalanche exerted on the earth and tracked these forces using curves in the avalanche path. Our results revealed that the rock avalanche was a cascade of landslide events, rather than a single massive failure. The sequence began with an early morning landslide/debris flow that started ∼10 h before the main avalanche. The main avalanche lasted ∼3.5 min and traveled at average velocities ranging from 15 to 36 m/s. For at least two hours after the avalanche ceased movement, a central, hummock-rich core continued to move slowly. Since 25 May 2014, numerous shallow landslides, rock slides, and rock falls have created new structures and modified avalanche topography. Mobility of the main avalanche and central core was likely enhanced by valley floor material that liquefied from undrained loading by the overriding avalanche. Although the base was likely at least partially liquefied, our mapping indicates that the overriding avalanche internally deformed predominantly by sliding along discrete shear surfaces in material that was nearly dry and had substantial frictional

  15. Domain regulation of imprinting cluster in Kip2/Lit1 subdomain on mouse chromosome 7F4/F5: large-scale DNA methylation analysis reveals that DMR-Lit1 is a putative imprinting control region.

    PubMed

    Yatsuki, Hitomi; Joh, Keiichiro; Higashimoto, Ken; Soejima, Hidenobu; Arai, Yuji; Wang, Youdong; Hatada, Izuho; Obata, Yayoi; Morisaki, Hiroko; Zhang, Zhongming; Nakagawachi, Tetsuji; Satoh, Yuji; Mukai, Tsunehiro

    2002-12-01

    Mouse chromosome 7F4/F5, where the imprinting domain is located, is syntenic to human 11p15.5, the locus for Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. The domain is thought to consist of the two subdomains Kip2 (p57(kip2))/Lit1 and Igf2/H19. Because DNA methylation is believed to be a key factor in genomic imprinting, we performed large-scale DNA methylation analysis to identify the cis-element crucial for the regulation of the Kip2/Lit1 subdomain. Ten CpG islands (CGIs) were found, and these were located at the promoter sites, upstream of genes, and within intergenic regions. Bisulphite sequencing revealed that CGIs 4, 5, 8, and 10 were differentially methylated regions (DMRs). CGIs 4, 5, and 10 were methylated paternally in somatic tissues but not in germ cells. CGI8 was methylated in oocyte and maternally in somatic tissues during development. Parental-specific DNase I hypersensitive sites (HSSs) were found near CGI8. These data indicate that CGI8, called DMR-Lit1, is not only the region for gametic methylation but might also be the imprinting control region (ICR) of the subdomain.

  16. Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC/MS)-based parallel metabolic profiling of human and mouse model serum reveals putative biomarkers associated with the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Jonathan; Alonso, Cristina; Vázquez-Chantada, Mercedes; Cormenzana, Miriam Pérez-; Mayo, Rebeca; Galán, Asier; Caballería, Juan; Martín-Duce, Antonio; Tran, Albert; Wagner, Conrad; Luka, Zigmund; Lu, Shelly C.; Castro, Azucena; Le Marchand-Brustel, Yannick; Martínez-Chantar, M. Luz; Veyrie, Nicolas; Clément, Karine; Tordjman, Joan; Gual, Philippe; Mato, José M.

    2010-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), is the most common form of chronic liver disease in most western countries. Current NAFLD diagnosis methods (e.g. liver biopsy analysis or imaging techniques) are poorly suited as tests for such a prevalent condition, from both a clinical and financial point of view. The present work aims to demonstrate the potential utility of serum metabolic profiling in defining phenotypic biomarkers that could be useful in NAFLD management. A parallel animal model / human NAFLD exploratory metabolomics approach was employed, using ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC®-MS) to analyze 42 serum samples collected from non-diabetic, morbidly obese, biopsy-proven NAFLD patients, and 17 animals belonging to the glycine N-methyltransferase knockout (GNMT-KO) NAFLD mouse model. Multivariate statistical analysis of the data revealed a series of common biomarkers that were significantly altered in the NAFLD (GNMT-KO) subjects in comparison to their normal liver counterparts (WT). Many of the compounds observed could be associated with biochemical perturbations associated with liver dysfunction (e.g. reduced Creatine) and inflammation (e.g. eicosanoid signaling). This differential metabolic phenotyping approach may have a future role as a supplement for clinical decision making in NAFLD and in the adaption to more individualized treatment protocols. PMID:20684516

  17. The human gut mobile metagenome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Using the culture independent TRACA system in conjunction with a comparative metagenomic approach, we have recently explored the pool of plasmids associated with the human gut mobile metagenome. This revealed that some plasmids or plasmid families are present in the gut microbiomes of geographically isolated human hosts with a broad global distribution (America, Japan and Europe), and are potentially unique to the human gut microbiome. Functions encoded by the most widely distributed plasmid (pTRACA22) were found to be enriched in the human gut microbiome when compared to microbial communities from other environments, and of particular interest was the increased prevalence of a putative RelBE toxin-antitoxin (TA) addiction module. Subsequent analysis revealed that this was most closely related to putative TA modules from gut associated bacteria belonging to the Firmicutes, but homologues of the RelE toxin were associated with all major bacterial divisions comprising the human gut microbiota. In this addendum, functions of the gut mobile metagenome are considered from the perspective of the human host, and within the context of the hologenome theory of human evolution. In doing so, our original analysis is also extended to include the gut metagenomes of a further 124 individuals comprising the METAHIT dataset. Differences in the incidence and relative abundance of pTRACA22 and associated TA modules between healthy individuals and those with inflammatory bowel diseases are explored, and potential functions of pTRACA22 type RelBE modules in the human gut microbiome are discussed. PMID:21468227

  18. EST analysis reveals putative genes involved in glycyrrhizin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Glycyrrhiza uralensis is one of the most popular medicinal plants in the world and is also widely used in the flavoring of food and tobacco. Due to limited genomic and transcriptomic data, the biosynthetic pathway of glycyrrhizin, the major bioactive compound in G. uralensis, is currently unclear. Identification of candidate genes involved in the glycyrrhizin biosynthetic pathway will significantly contribute to the understanding of the biosynthetic and medicinal chemistry of this compound. Results We used the 454 GS FLX platform and Titanium regents to produce a substantial expressed sequence tag (EST) dataset from the vegetative organs of G. uralensis. A total of 59,219 ESTs with an average read length of 409 bp were generated. 454 ESTs were combined with the 50,666 G. uralensis ESTs in GenBank. The combined ESTs were assembled into 27,229 unique sequences (11,694 contigs and 15,535 singletons). A total of 20,437 unique gene elements representing approximately 10,000 independent transcripts were annotated using BLAST searches (e-value ≤ 1e-5) against the SwissProt, KEGG, TAIR, Nr and Nt databases. The assembled sequences were annotated with gene names and Gene Ontology (GO) terms. With respect to the genes related to glycyrrhizin metabolism, genes encoding 16 enzymes of the 18 total steps of the glycyrrhizin skeleton synthesis pathway were found. To identify novel genes that encode cytochrome P450 enzymes and glycosyltransferases, which are related to glycyrrhizin metabolism, a total of 125 and 172 unigenes were found to be homologous to cytochrome P450s and glycosyltransferases, respectively. The cytochrome P450 candidate genes were classified into 32 CYP families, while the glycosyltransferase candidate genes were classified into 45 categories by GO analysis. Finally, 3 cytochrome P450 enzymes and 6 glycosyltransferases were selected as the candidates most likely to be involved in glycyrrhizin biosynthesis through an organ-specific expression pattern analysis based on real-time PCR. Conclusions Using the 454 GS FLX platform and Titanium reagents, our study provides a high-quality EST database for G. uralensis. Based on the EST analysis, novel candidate genes related to the secondary metabolite pathway of glycyrrhizin, including novel genes encoding cytochrome P450s and glycosyltransferases, were found. With the assistance of organ-specific expression pattern analysis, 3 unigenes encoding cytochrome P450s and 6 unigenes encoding glycosyltransferases were selected as the candidates most likely to be involved in glycyrrhizin biosynthesis. PMID:20423525

  19. Pyrosequencing reveals the effect of mobilizing agents and lignocellulosic substrate amendment on microbial community composition in a real industrial PAH-polluted soil.

    PubMed

    Lladó, S; Covino, S; Solanas, A M; Petruccioli, M; D'annibale, A; Viñas, M

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial and fungal biodiversity throughout different biostimulation and bioaugmentation treatments applied to an industrial creosote-polluted soil were analyzed by means of polyphasic approach in order to gain insight into the microbial community structure and dynamics. Pyrosequencing data obtained from initial creosote polluted soil (after a biopiling step) revealed that Alpha and Gammaproteobacteria were the most abundant bacterial groups, whereas Fusarium and Scedosporium were the main fungal genera in the contaminated soil. At the end of 60-days laboratory scale bioremediation assays, pyrosequencing and DGGE data showed that (i) major bacterial community shifts were caused by the type of mobilizing agent added to the soil and, to a lesser extent, by the addition of lignocellulosic substrate; and (ii) the presence of the non-ionic surfactant (Brij 30) hampered the proliferation of Actinobacteria (Mycobacteriaceae) and Bacteroidetes (Chitinophagaceae) and, in the absence of lignocellulosic substrate, also impeded polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) degradation. The results show the importance of implementing bioremediation experiments combined with microbiome assessment to gain insight on the effect of crucial parameters (e.g. use of additives) over the potential functions of complex microbial communities harbored in polluted soils, essential for bioremediation success.

  20. (19) F-NMR Reveals the Role of Mobile Loops in Product and Inhibitor Binding by the São Paulo Metallo-β-Lactamase.

    PubMed

    Abboud, Martine I; Hinchliffe, Philip; Brem, Jürgen; Macsics, Robert; Pfeffer, Inga; Makena, Anne; Umland, Klaus-Daniel; Rydzik, Anna M; Li, Guo-Bo; Spencer, James; Claridge, Timothy D W; Schofield, Christopher J

    2017-03-27

    Resistance to β-lactam antibiotics mediated by metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) is a growing problem. We describe the use of protein-observe (19) F-NMR (PrOF NMR) to study the dynamics of the São Paulo MBL (SPM-1) from β-lactam-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Cysteinyl variants on the α3 and L3 regions, which flank the di-Zn(II) active site, were selectively (19) F-labeled using 3-bromo-1,1,1-trifluoroacetone. The PrOF NMR results reveal roles for the mobile α3 and L3 regions in the binding of both inhibitors and hydrolyzed β-lactam products to SPM-1. These results have implications for the mechanisms and inhibition of MBLs by β-lactams and non-β-lactams and illustrate the utility of PrOF NMR for efficiently analyzing metal chelation, identifying new binding modes, and studying protein binding from a mixture of equilibrating isomers.

  1. The structure of a chromosomal high mobility group protein-DNA complex reveals sequence-neutral mechanisms important for non-sequence-specific DNA recognition.

    PubMed

    Murphy, F V; Sweet, R M; Churchill, M E

    1999-12-01

    The high mobility group (HMG) chromosomal proteins, which are common to all eukaryotes, bind DNA in a non-sequence-specific fashion to promote chromatin function and gene regulation. They interact directly with nucleosomes and are believed to be modulators of chromatin structure. They are also important in V(D)J recombination and in activating a number of regulators of gene expression, including p53, Hox transcription factors and steroid hormone receptors, by increasing their affinity for DNA. The X-ray crystal structure, at 2.2 A resolution, of the HMG domain of the Drosophila melanogaster protein, HMG-D, bound to DNA provides the first detailed view of a chromosomal HMG domain interacting with linear DNA and reveals the molecular basis of non-sequence-specific DNA recognition. Ser10 forms water-mediated hydrogen bonds to DNA bases, and Val32 with Thr33 partially intercalates the DNA. These two 'sequence-neutral' mechanisms of DNA binding substitute for base-specific hydrogen bonds made by equivalent residues of the sequence-specific HMG domain protein, lymphoid enhancer factor-1. The use of multiple intercalations and water-mediated DNA contacts may prove to be generally important mechanisms by which chromosomal proteins bind to DNA in the minor groove.

  2. A putative hybrid swarm within Oonopsis foliosa (Asteraceae: Astereae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hughes, J.F.; Brown, G.K.

    2004-01-01

    Oo??nopsis foliosa var. foliosa and var. monocephala are endemic to short-grass steppe of southeastern Colorado and until recently were considered geographically disjunct. The only known qualitative feature separating these 2 varieties is floral head type; var. foliosa has radiate heads, whereas var. monocephala heads are discoid. Sympatry between these varieties is restricted to a small area in which a range of parental types and intermediate head morphologies is observed. We used distribution mapping, morphometric analyses, chromosome cytology, and pollen stainability to characterize the sympatric zone. Morphometrics confirms that the only discrete difference between var. foliosa and var. monocephala is radiate versus discoid heads, respectively. The outer florets of putative hybrid individuals ranged from conspicuously elongated yet radially symmetric disc-floret corollas, to elongated radially asymmetric bilabiate- or deeply cleft corollas, to stunted ray florets with appendages remnant of corolla lobes. Chromosome cytology of pollen mother cells from both putative parental varieties and a series of intermediate morphological types collected at the sympatric zone reveal evidence of translocation heterozygosity. Pollen stainability shows no significant differences in viability between the parental varieties and putative hybrids. The restricted distribution of putative hybrids to a narrow zone of sympatry between the parental types and the presence of meiotic chromosome-pairing anomalies in these intermediate plants are consistent with a hybrid origin. The high stainability of putative-hybrid pollen adds to a growing body of evidence that hybrids are not universally unfit.

  3. Impaired mobilization of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in C5-deficient mice supports the pivotal involvement of innate immunity in this process and reveals novel promobilization effects of granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, H M; Wu, W; Wysoczynski, M; Liu, R; Zuba-Surma, E K; Kucia, M; Ratajczak, J; Ratajczak, M Z

    2009-11-01

    We reported that complement cascade (CC) becomes activated in bone marrow (BM) during granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilization of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) and showed that, although third CC component (C3)-deficient mice are easy mobilizers, fifth CC component (C5)-deficient mice mobilize very poorly. To explain this, we postulated that activation/cleavage of CC releases C3a and C5a anaphylatoxins that differently regulate mobilization. Accordingly, C3a, by enhancing responsiveness of HSPCs to decreasing concentrations of stromal-derived growth factor-1 (SDF-1) in BM, prevents mobilization and promotes their BM retention. Therefore, in this study, we focused on the mobilization-enhancing role of C5a. We found that C5a receptor (C5aR) is not expressed on the surface of HSPCs, and that C5a-mediated promobilization effects are mediated by stimulation of granulocytes. Overall, our data support the following model. First C5aR(+) granulocytes are chemoattracted by plasma C5 cleavage fragments, being the first wave of cells leaving BM. This facilitates a subsequent egress of HSPCs. In the next step, after leaving BM, granulocytes undergo degranulation in response to plasma C5a and secrete some cationic peptides (cathelicidin, beta-defensin) that, as shown here for the first time, highly enhance the responsiveness of HSPCs to plasma SDF-1 gradient. In conclusion, our data reveal the underappreciated central role of innate immunity in mobilization, in which C5 cleavage fragments through granulocytes orchestrate this process.

  4. Reassessment of the Listeria monocytogenes pan-genome reveals dynamic integration hotspots and mobile genetic elements as major components of the accessory genome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Listeria monocytogenes is an important food-borne pathogen and model organism for host-pathogen interaction, thus representing an invaluable target considering research on the forces governing the evolution of such microbes. The diversity of this species has not been exhaustively explored yet, as previous efforts have focused on analyses of serotypes primarily implicated in human listeriosis. We conducted complete genome sequencing of 11 strains employing 454 GS FLX technology, thereby achieving full coverage of all serotypes including the first complete strains of serotypes 1/2b, 3c, 3b, 4c, 4d, and 4e. These were comparatively analyzed in conjunction with publicly available data and assessed for pathogenicity in the Galleria mellonella insect model. Results The species pan-genome of L. monocytogenes is highly stable but open, suggesting an ability to adapt to new niches by generating or including new genetic information. The majority of gene-scale differences represented by the accessory genome resulted from nine hyper variable hotspots, a similar number of different prophages, three transposons (Tn916, Tn554, IS3-like), and two mobilizable islands. Only a subset of strains showed CRISPR/Cas bacteriophage resistance systems of different subtypes, suggesting a supplementary function in maintenance of chromosomal stability. Multiple phylogenetic branches of the genus Listeria imply long common histories of strains of each lineage as revealed by a SNP-based core genome tree highlighting the impact of small mutations for the evolution of species L. monocytogenes. Frequent loss or truncation of genes described to be vital for virulence or pathogenicity was confirmed as a recurring pattern, especially for strains belonging to lineages III and II. New candidate genes implicated in virulence function were predicted based on functional domains and phylogenetic distribution. A comparative analysis of small regulatory RNA candidates supports observations of a

  5. New insights into trehalose metabolism by Saccharomyces cerevisiae: NTH2 encodes a functional cytosolic trehalase, and deletion of TPS1 reveals Ath1p-dependent trehalose mobilization.

    PubMed

    Jules, Matthieu; Beltran, Gemma; François, Jean; Parrou, Jean Luc

    2008-02-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the synthesis of endogenous trehalose is catalyzed by a trehalose synthase complex, TPS, and its hydrolysis relies on a cytosolic/neutral trehalase encoded by NTH1. In this work, we showed that NTH2, a paralog of NTH1, encodes a functional trehalase that is implicated in trehalose mobilization. Yeast is also endowed with an acid trehalase encoded by ATH1 and an H+/trehalose transporter encoded by AGT1, which can together sustain assimilation of exogenous trehalose. We showed that a tps1 mutant defective in the TPS catalytic subunit cultivated on trehalose, or on a dual source of carbon made of galactose and trehalose, accumulated high levels of intracellular trehalose by its Agt1p-mediated transport. The accumulated disaccharide was mobilized as soon as cells entered the stationary phase by a process requiring a coupling between its export and immediate extracellular hydrolysis by Ath1p. Compared to what is seen for classical growth conditions on glucose, this mobilization was rather unique, since it took place prior to that of glycogen, which was postponed until the late stationary phase. However, when the Ath1p-dependent mobilization of trehalose identified in this study was impaired, glycogen was mobilized earlier and faster, indicating a fine-tuning control in carbon storage management during periods of carbon and energy restriction.

  6. ECG by mobile technologies.

    PubMed

    Guzik, Przemyslaw; Malik, Marek

    Mobile electrocardiographs consist of three components: a mobile device (e.g. a smartphone), an electrocardiographic device or accessory, and a mobile application. Mobile platforms are small computers with sufficient computational power, good quality display, suitable data storage, and several possibilities of data transmission. Electrocardiographic electrodes and sensors for mobile use utilize unconventional materials, e.g. rubber, e-textile, and inkjet-printed nanoparticle electrodes. Mobile devices can be handheld, worn as vests or T-shirts, or attached to patient's skin as biopatches. Mobile electrocardiographic devices and accessories may additionally record other signals including respiratory rate, activity level, and geolocation. Large-scale clinical studies that utilize electrocardiography are easier to conduct using mobile technologies and the collected data are suitable for "big data" processing. This is expected to reveal phenomena so far inaccessible by standard electrocardiographic techniques.

  7. Putative porin of Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus) bacteroids induced by glyphosate.

    PubMed

    de María, Nuria; Guevara, Angeles; Serra, M Teresa; García-Luque, Isabel; González-Sama, Alfonso; García de Lacoba, Mario; de Felipe, M Rosario; Fernández-Pascual, Mercedes

    2007-08-01

    Application of glyphosate (N-[phosphonomethyl] glycine) to Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus)-nodulated lupin plants caused modifications in the protein pattern of bacteroids. The most significant change was the presence of a 44-kDa polypeptide in bacteroids from plants treated with the higher doses of glyphosate employed (5 and 10 mM). The polypeptide has been characterized by the amino acid sequencing of its N terminus and the isolation and nucleic acid sequencing of its encoding gene. It is putatively encoded by a single gene, and the protein has been identified as a putative porin. Protein modeling revealed the existence of several domains sharing similarity to different porins, such as a transmembrane beta-barrel. The protein has been designated BLpp, for Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus) putative porin, and would be the first porin described in Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus). In addition, a putative conserved domain of porins has been identified which consists of 87 amino acids, located in the BLpp sequence 30 amino acids downstream of the N-terminal region. In bacteroids, mRNA of the BLpp gene shows a basal constitutive expression that increases under glyphosate treatment, and the expression of the gene is seemingly regulated at the transcriptional level. By contrast, in free-living bacteria glyphosate treatment leads to an inhibition of BLpp mRNA accumulation, indicating a different effect of glyphosate on BLpp gene expression in bacteroids and free-living bacteria. The possible role of BLpp in a metabolite interchange between Bradyrhizobium and lupin is discussed.

  8. Putative Bronchopulmonary Flagellated Protozoa in Immunosuppressed Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kilimcioglu, Ali Ahmet; Havlucu, Yavuz; Çelik, Pınar; Özbilgin, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Flagellated protozoa that cause bronchopulmonary symptoms in humans are commonly neglected. These protozoal forms which were presumed to be “flagellated protozoa” have been previously identified in immunosuppressed patients in a number of studies, but have not been certainly classified so far. Since no human cases of bronchopulmonary flagellated protozoa were reported from Turkey, we aimed to investigate these putative protozoa in immunosuppressed patients who are particularly at risk of infectious diseases. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples of 110 immunosuppressed adult patients who were admitted to the Department of Chest Diseases, Hafsa Sultan Hospital of Celal Bayar University, Manisa, Turkey, were examined in terms of parasites by light microscopy. Flagellated protozoal forms were detected in nine (8.2%) of 110 cases. Metronidazole (500 mg b.i.d. for 30 days) was given to all positive cases and a second bronchoscopy was performed at the end of the treatment, which revealed no parasites. In conclusion, immunosuppressed patients with bronchopulmonary symptoms should attentively be examined with regard to flagellated protozoa which can easily be misidentified as epithelial cells. PMID:24804259

  9. Putative bronchopulmonary flagellated protozoa in immunosuppressed patients.

    PubMed

    Kilimcioglu, Ali Ahmet; Havlucu, Yavuz; Girginkardesler, Nogay; Celik, Pınar; Yereli, Kor; Özbilgin, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Flagellated protozoa that cause bronchopulmonary symptoms in humans are commonly neglected. These protozoal forms which were presumed to be "flagellated protozoa" have been previously identified in immunosuppressed patients in a number of studies, but have not been certainly classified so far. Since no human cases of bronchopulmonary flagellated protozoa were reported from Turkey, we aimed to investigate these putative protozoa in immunosuppressed patients who are particularly at risk of infectious diseases. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples of 110 immunosuppressed adult patients who were admitted to the Department of Chest Diseases, Hafsa Sultan Hospital of Celal Bayar University, Manisa, Turkey, were examined in terms of parasites by light microscopy. Flagellated protozoal forms were detected in nine (8.2%) of 110 cases. Metronidazole (500 mg b.i.d. for 30 days) was given to all positive cases and a second bronchoscopy was performed at the end of the treatment, which revealed no parasites. In conclusion, immunosuppressed patients with bronchopulmonary symptoms should attentively be examined with regard to flagellated protozoa which can easily be misidentified as epithelial cells.

  10. Arrival time distributions of product ions reveal isomeric ratio of deprotonated molecules in ion mobility-mass spectrometry of hyaluronan-derived oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Hermannová, Martina; Iordache, Andreea-Maria; Slováková, Kristína; Havlíček, Vladimír; Pelantová, Helena; Lemr, Karel

    2015-06-01

    Hyaluronic acid is a naturally occurring linear polysaccharide with substantial medical potential. In this work, discrimination of tyramine-based hyaluronan derivatives was accessed by ion mobility-mass spectrometry of deprotonated molecules and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. As the product ion mass spectra did not allow for direct isomer discrimination in mixture, the reductive labeling of oligosaccharides as well as stable isotope labeling was performed. The ion mobility separation of parent ions together with the characteristic fragmentation for reduced isomers providing unique product ions allowed us to identify isomers present in a mixture and determine their mutual isomeric ratio. The determination used simple recalculation of arrival time distribution areas of unique ions to areas of deprotonated molecules. Mass spectrometry data were confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  11. Revealing hidden spectral information of chlorine and sulfur in data of a mobile Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy system using chemometrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottlieb, C.; Millar, S.; Günther, T.; Wilsch, G.

    2017-06-01

    For the damage assessment of reinforced concrete structures the quantified ingress profiles of harmful species like chlorides, sulfates and alkali need to be determined. In order to provide on-site analysis of concrete a fast and reliable method is necessary. Low transition probabilities as well as the high ionization energies for chlorine and sulfur in the near-infrared range makes the detection of Cl I and S I in low concentrations a difficult task. For the on-site analysis a mobile LIBS-system (λ = 1064 nm, Epulse ≤ 3 mJ, τ = 1.5 ns) with an automated scanner has been developed at BAM. Weak chlorine and sulfur signal intensities do not allow classical univariate analysis for process data derived from the mobile system. In order to improve the analytical performance multivariate analysis like PLS-R will be presented in this work. A comparison to standard univariate analysis will be carried out and results covering important parameters like detection and quantification limits (LOD, LOQ) as well as processing variances will be discussed (Allegrini and Olivieri, 2014 [1]; Ostra et al., 2008 [2]). It will be shown that for the first time a low cost mobile system is capable of providing reproducible chlorine and sulfur analysis on concrete by using a low sensitive system in combination with multivariate evaluation.

  12. Effect of anoxic vs. oxic conditions in soils on composition of mobile OM as revealed from comprehensive fluorescence analysis of soil effluents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzsche, Andreas; Ritschel, Thomas; Totsche, Kai

    2014-05-01

    The fractionation of OM due to sorption of DOM on mineral surfaces has drawn much attention in soil science. This is mainly motivated by the implied stabilization of OM and the disposition of less affine organic molecules as mobile compounds within porous media, both processes significantly affecting the carbon cycling and that of OM-associated elements. In this study, we provide a time-resolved assessment of mobile OM in soil effluents on the basis of fluorescence excitation-emission-matrices (EEM). Our comprehensive fluorescence EEM analysis was based on a supervised parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) that permits the fixing of selected components. We estimated the protein content in soil effluent OM with a reference for microbially produced proteins from Bacillus subtilis. The soil effluent was obtained from soil columns filled with topsoil either from a floodplain site or a maize field. Except for the 1 mM NaCl influent, nothing was added to the soil columns. Under water-saturated conditions, the activity of autochthonous microbial communities induced anoxic conditions within the soil columns resulting in the microbial reduction of pedogenic Fe(III) oxides and subsequent discharge of mobile Fe2+ during percolation. Upon re-aeration of the soil effluent, Fe2+ re-oxidized and precipitated as organo-mineral ferrihydrite in the soil effluent. EEM from consecutively sampled effluent fractions pointed to a mainly invariant soil effluent OM composition, where fulvic acid-like components were predominant. However, the OM, which was associated with the effluent ferrihydrite, was enriched in proteins, which was confirmed by corresponding FTIR spectra. This suggests the preferential association of proteins with in situ-precipitated ferrihydrite, rendering proteins less mobile in soils, where precipitation and immobilization of ferrihydrite occurs. Consequently, one would assume lower protein concentrations in the soil effluent if ferrihydrite precipitation occurs within

  13. Variation in the mobilization of mercury into Black-winged Stilt Himantopus himantopus chicks in coastal saltpans, as revealed by stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavares, P. C.; Kelly, A.; Maia, R.; Lopes, R. J.; Serrão Santos, R.; Pereira, M. E.; Duarte, A. C.; Furness, R. W.

    2008-03-01

    Causes of variation in mobilization of mercury into Black-winged Stilt Himantopus himantopus chicks were studied through analysis of stable isotope ratios of carbon and nitrogen. Blood and breast feathers were collected from chicks in coastal saltpans during successive breeding seasons. Detritus samples and potential prey (macroinvertebrates) were also collected. Total mercury concentrations and stable isotope signatures were measured using atomic absorption spectroscopy and isotope ratio mass spectrometry respectively. Mercury levels in Chironomidae, Corixidae and Hydrophilidae correlated with mercury levels in chick feathers. Differences of δ 15N signatures between macroinvertebrate groups indicated that they belong to different trophic levels. δ 15N signatures of invertebrates correlated with mercury levels in invertebrates and chicks, but not with δ 15N signatures in chicks. Between-group and between-site differences of δ 15N signatures and mercury levels in invertebrates suggested that they contribute differently to mercury mobilization into chicks, and their relative contribution depends on prey availability in each site. Inter-site differences in the biomagnification factor reinforced that idea. δ 13C signatures in invertebrates marked a larger range of carbon sources than just detritus. Variation of water inflow regime and prey availability may cause between-group and between-site differences of δ 13C signatures in prey. Discrepancies between feather and blood for δ 13C signatures in Praias-Sado and Vaia suggested that temporal variation of prey availability may be the main factor affecting mercury mobilization into chicks in both those cases, since their water inflow regimes are the same. The lowest levels of δ 13C signatures in Vau suggested that water inflow regime may be the main factor in this case, since no discrepancy existed in δ 13C signatures between blood and feather.

  14. Quantum model of catalysis based on a mobile proton revealed by subatomic x-ray and neutron diffraction studies of h-aldose reductase.

    PubMed

    Blakeley, Matthew P; Ruiz, Federico; Cachau, Raul; Hazemann, Isabelle; Meilleur, Flora; Mitschler, Andre; Ginell, Stephan; Afonine, Pavel; Ventura, Oscar N; Cousido-Siah, Alexandra; Haertlein, Michael; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Myles, Dean; Podjarny, Alberto

    2008-02-12

    We present results of combined studies of the enzyme human aldose reductase (h-AR, 36 kDa) using single-crystal x-ray data (0.66 A, 100K; 0.80 A, 15K; 1.75 A, 293K), neutron Laue data (2.2 A, 293K), and quantum mechanical modeling. These complementary techniques unveil the internal organization and mobility of the hydrogen bond network that defines the properties of the catalytic engine, explaining how this promiscuous enzyme overcomes the simultaneous requirements of efficiency and promiscuity offering a general mechanistic view for this class of enzymes.

  15. Quantum Model of Catalysis Based on a Mobile Proton Revealed by Subatomic X-ray and Neutron Diffraction Studies of h-aldose Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Blakeley, M. P.; Ruiz, Fredrico; Cachau, Raul; Hazemann, I.; Meilleur, Flora; Mitschler, A.; Ginell, Stephan; Afonine, Pavel; Ventura, Oscar; Cousido-Siah, Alexandra; Haertlein, M.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Myles, Dean A A; Podjarny, A.

    2008-01-01

    We present results of combined studies of the enzyme human aldose reductase (h-AR, 36 kDa) using single-crystal x-ray data (0.66 Angstroms, 100K; 0.80 Angstroms, 15K; 1.75 Angstroms, 293K), neutron Laue data (2.2 Angstroms, 293K), and quantum mechanical modeling. These complementary techniques unveil the internal organization and mobility of the hydrogen bond network that defines the properties of the catalytic engine, explaining how this promiscuous enzyme overcomes the simultaneous requirements of efficiency and promiscuity offering a general mechanistic view for this class of enzymes.

  16. Quantum model of catalysis based on a mobile proton revealed by subatomic x-ray and neutron diffraction studies of h-aldose reductase

    PubMed Central

    Blakeley, Matthew P.; Ruiz, Federico; Cachau, Raul; Hazemann, Isabelle; Meilleur, Flora; Mitschler, Andre; Ginell, Stephan; Afonine, Pavel; Ventura, Oscar N.; Cousido-Siah, Alexandra; Haertlein, Michael; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Myles, Dean; Podjarny, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    We present results of combined studies of the enzyme human aldose reductase (h-AR, 36 kDa) using single-crystal x-ray data (0.66 Å, 100K; 0.80 Å, 15K; 1.75 Å, 293K), neutron Laue data (2.2 Å, 293K), and quantum mechanical modeling. These complementary techniques unveil the internal organization and mobility of the hydrogen bond network that defines the properties of the catalytic engine, explaining how this promiscuous enzyme overcomes the simultaneous requirements of efficiency and promiscuity offering a general mechanistic view for this class of enzymes. PMID:18250329

  17. New mobile genetic elements in Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34, their possible roles and occurrence in other bacteria.

    PubMed

    Van Houdt, Rob; Monchy, Sébastien; Leys, Natalie; Mergeay, Max

    2009-08-01

    Cupriavidus metallidurans strain CH34 is a beta-Proteobacterium that thrives in low concentrations of heavy metals. The genetic determinants of resistance to heavy metals are located on its two chromosomes, and are particularly abundant in the two megaplasmids, pMOL28 and pMOL30. We explored the involvement of mobile genetic elements in acquiring these and others traits that might be advantageous in this strain using genome comparison of Cupriavidus/Ralstonia strains and related beta-Proteobacteria. At least eleven genomic islands were identified on the main replicon, three on pMOL28 and two on pMOL30. Multiple islands contained genes for heavy metal resistance or other genetic determinants putatively responding to harsh environmental conditions. However, cryptic elements also were noted. New mobile genetic elements (or variations of known ones) were identified through synteny analysis, allowing the detection of mobile genetic elements outside the bias of a selectable marker. Tn4371-like conjugative transposons involved in chemolithotrophy and degradation of aromatic compounds were identified in strain CH34, while similar elements involved in heavy metal resistance were found in Delftia acidovorans SPH-1 and Bordetella petrii DSM12804. We defined new transposons, viz., Tn6048 putatively involved in the response to heavy metals and Tn6050 carrying accessory genes not classically associated with transposons. Syntenic analysis also revealed new transposons carrying metal response genes in Burkholderia xenovorans LB400, and other bacteria. Finally, other putative mobile elements, which were previously unnoticed but apparently common in several bacteria, were also revealed. This was the case for triads of tyrosine-based site-specific recombinases and for an int gene paired with a putative repressor and associated with chromate resistance.

  18. Modeling putative therapeutic implications of exosome exchange between tumor and immune cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mingyang; Huang, Bin; Hanash, Samir M; Onuchic, José N; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2014-10-07

    Development of effective strategies to mobilize the immune system as a therapeutic modality in cancer necessitates a better understanding of the contribution of the tumor microenvironment to the complex interplay between cancer cells and the immune response. Recently, effort has been directed at unraveling the functional role of exosomes and their cargo of messengers in this interplay. Exosomes are small vesicles (30-200 nm) that mediate local and long-range communication through the horizontal transfer of information, such as combinations of proteins, mRNAs and microRNAs. Here, we develop a tractable theoretical framework to study the putative role of exosome-mediated cell-cell communication in the cancer-immunity interplay. We reduce the complex interplay into a generic model whose three components are cancer cells, dendritic cells (consisting of precursor, immature, and mature types), and killer cells (consisting of cytotoxic T cells, helper T cells, effector B cells, and natural killer cells). The framework also incorporates the effects of exosome exchange on enhancement/reduction of cell maturation, proliferation, apoptosis, immune recognition, and activation/inhibition. We reveal tristability-possible existence of three cancer states: a low cancer load with intermediate immune level state, an intermediate cancer load with high immune level state, and a high cancer load with low immune-level state, and establish the corresponding effective landscape for the cancer-immunity network. We illustrate how the framework can contribute to the design and assessments of combination therapies.

  19. Modeling putative therapeutic implications of exosome exchange between tumor and immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Mingyang; Huang, Bin; Hanash, Samir M.; Onuchic, José N.; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2014-01-01

    Development of effective strategies to mobilize the immune system as a therapeutic modality in cancer necessitates a better understanding of the contribution of the tumor microenvironment to the complex interplay between cancer cells and the immune response. Recently, effort has been directed at unraveling the functional role of exosomes and their cargo of messengers in this interplay. Exosomes are small vesicles (30–200 nm) that mediate local and long-range communication through the horizontal transfer of information, such as combinations of proteins, mRNAs and microRNAs. Here, we develop a tractable theoretical framework to study the putative role of exosome-mediated cell–cell communication in the cancer–immunity interplay. We reduce the complex interplay into a generic model whose three components are cancer cells, dendritic cells (consisting of precursor, immature, and mature types), and killer cells (consisting of cytotoxic T cells, helper T cells, effector B cells, and natural killer cells). The framework also incorporates the effects of exosome exchange on enhancement/reduction of cell maturation, proliferation, apoptosis, immune recognition, and activation/inhibition. We reveal tristability—possible existence of three cancer states: a low cancer load with intermediate immune level state, an intermediate cancer load with high immune level state, and a high cancer load with low immune-level state, and establish the corresponding effective landscape for the cancer–immunity network. We illustrate how the framework can contribute to the design and assessments of combination therapies. PMID:25246552

  20. Putative Porin of Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus) Bacteroids Induced by Glyphosate▿

    PubMed Central

    de María, Nuria; Guevara, Ángeles; Serra, M. Teresa; García-Luque, Isabel; González-Sama, Alfonso; de Lacoba, Mario García; de Felipe, M. Rosario; Fernández-Pascual, Mercedes

    2007-01-01

    Application of glyphosate (N-[phosphonomethyl] glycine) to Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus)-nodulated lupin plants caused modifications in the protein pattern of bacteroids. The most significant change was the presence of a 44-kDa polypeptide in bacteroids from plants treated with the higher doses of glyphosate employed (5 and 10 mM). The polypeptide has been characterized by the amino acid sequencing of its N terminus and the isolation and nucleic acid sequencing of its encoding gene. It is putatively encoded by a single gene, and the protein has been identified as a putative porin. Protein modeling revealed the existence of several domains sharing similarity to different porins, such as a transmembrane beta-barrel. The protein has been designated BLpp, for Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus) putative porin, and would be the first porin described in Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus). In addition, a putative conserved domain of porins has been identified which consists of 87 amino acids, located in the BLpp sequence 30 amino acids downstream of the N-terminal region. In bacteroids, mRNA of the BLpp gene shows a basal constitutive expression that increases under glyphosate treatment, and the expression of the gene is seemingly regulated at the transcriptional level. By contrast, in free-living bacteria glyphosate treatment leads to an inhibition of BLpp mRNA accumulation, indicating a different effect of glyphosate on BLpp gene expression in bacteroids and free-living bacteria. The possible role of BLpp in a metabolite interchange between Bradyrhizobium and lupin is discussed. PMID:17557843

  1. Mobile Learning Using Mobile Phones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vicente, Paula

    2013-01-01

    The participation in mobile learning programs is conditioned by having/using mobile communication technology. Those who do not have or use such technology cannot participate in mobile learning programs. This study evaluates who are the most likely participants of mobile learning programs by examining the demographic profile and mobile phone usage…

  2. The Putative Son's Attractiveness Alters the Perceived Attractiveness of the Putative Father.

    PubMed

    Prokop, Pavol

    2015-08-01

    A body of literature has investigated female mate choice in the pre-mating context (pre-mating sexual selection). Humans, however, are long-living mammals forming pair-bonds which sequentially produce offspring. Post-mating evaluations of a partner's attractiveness may thus significantly influence the reproductive success of men and women. I tested herein the theory that the attractiveness of putative sons provides extra information about the genetic quality of fathers, thereby influencing fathers' attractiveness across three studies. As predicted, facially attractive boys were more frequently attributed to attractive putative fathers and vice versa (Study 1). Furthermore, priming with an attractive putative son increased the attractiveness of the putative father with the reverse being true for unattractive putative sons. When putative fathers were presented as stepfathers, the effect of the boy's attractiveness on the stepfather's attractiveness was lower and less consistent (Study 2). This suggests that the presence of an attractive boy has the strongest effect on the perceived attractiveness of putative fathers rather than on non-fathers. The generalized effect of priming with beautiful non-human objects also exists, but its effect is much weaker compared with the effects of putative biological sons (Study 3). Overall, this study highlighted the importance of post-mating sexual selection in humans and suggests that the heritable attractive traits of men are also evaluated by females after mating and/or may be used by females in mate poaching.

  3. The perfect ash-storm: large-scale Pyroclastic Density Current experiments reveal highly mobile, self-fluidising and air-cushioned flow transport regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lube, G.; Cronin, S. J.; Breard, E.; Valentine, G.; Bursik, M. I.; Hort, M. K.; Freundt, A.

    2013-12-01

    We report on the first systematic series of large-scale Pyroclastic Density Current (PDC) experiments using the New Zealand PDC Generator, a novel international research facility in Physical Volcanology recently commissioned at Massey University. Repeatable highly energetic and hot PDCs are synthesized by the controlled ';eruption column-collapse' of up to 3500 kg of homogenously aerated Taupo ignimbrite material from a 15 m-elevated hopper onto an instrumented inclined flume. At discharge rates between 250-1300 kg/s and low- to moderate gas injection rates (yielding initial solids concentration of 15-70 vol%) channelized gas-particle mixture flows life-scaled to dense PDCs can be generated. The flow fronts of the currents reach velocities of up to 9.5 m/s over their first 12 m of travel and rapidly develop strong vertical density stratification. The PDCs typically form a highly mobile, <60 cm-thick dense and channel-confined underflow, with an overriding dilute and turbulent ash cloud surge that also laterally escapes the flume boundaries. Depending on the PDC starting conditions underflows with 1-45 vol% solids concentration are formed, while the upper surge contains <<1 vol.% solids. A characteristic feature of the underflow is the occurrence of 'ignitive' front breakouts, producing jetted lobes that accelerate outward from the flow front, initially forming a lobe-cleft structure, followed by segregation downslope into multiple flow pulses. Depending on initial solids concentration and discharge rate, stratified, dune-bedded and inversely graded bedforms are created whose thicknesses are remarkably uniform along the medial to distal runout path characterising highly mobile flow runout. Along with high-speed video footage we present time-series data of basal arrays of load- and gas-pore pressure transducers to characterise the mobile dense underflows. Data shows that the PDCs are comprised of a turbulent coarse-grained and air-ingesting front with particle

  4. Modulating putative endothelial progenitor cells for the treatment of endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular complications in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wils, Julien; Favre, Julie; Bellien, Jérémy

    2017-02-01

    Diabetes induces a decrease in the number and function of different pro-angiogenic cell types generically designated as putative endothelial progenitor cells (EPC), which encompasses cells from myeloid origin that act in a paracrine fashion to promote angiogenesis and putative "true" EPC that contribute to endothelial replacement. This not only compromises neovasculogenesis in ischemic tissues but also impairs, at an early stage, the reendotheliziation process at sites of injury, contributing to the development of endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular complications. Hyperglycemia, insulin resistance and dyslipidemia promote putative EPC dysregulation by affecting the SDF-1/CXCR-4 and NO pathways and the p53/SIRT1/p66Shc axis that contribute to their mobilization, migration, homing and vasculogenic properties. To optimize the clinical management of patients with hypoglycemic agents, statins and renin-angiotensin system inhibitors, which display pleiotropic effects on putative EPC, is a first step to improve their number and angiogenic potential but specific strategies are needed. Among them, mobilizing therapies based on G-CSF, erythropoietin or CXCR-4 antagonism have been developed to increase putative EPC number to treat ischemic diseases with or without prior cell isolation and transplantation. Growth factors, genetic and pharmacological strategies are also evaluated to improve ex vivo cultured EPC function before transplantation. Moreover, pharmacological agents increasing in vivo the bioavailability of NO and other endothelial factors demonstrated beneficial effects on neovascularization in diabetic ischemic models but their effects on endothelial dysfunction remain poorly evaluated. More experiments are warranted to develop orally available drugs and specific agents targeting p66Shc to reverse putative EPC dysfunction in the expected goal of preventing endothelial dysfunction and diabetic cardiovascular complications. Copyright © 2016. Published by

  5. Successful bone marrow transplantation reveals the lack of endothelial progenitor cells mobilization in a patient with critical limb ischemia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cobellis, G; Botti, C; Taddeo, A; Silvestroni, A; Lillo, S; Da Ponte, A; Villa, M L; Sica, V; Della Bella, S

    2010-09-01

    Restoring blood flow to ischemic tissue is a prerequisite for treatment of ischemic diseases. Cell-based therapy based on bone marrow transplantation is a promising option for patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI). The efficacy of cell therapies to augment neovascularization seems to involve endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs); however, the mechanisms underlying the efficacy have not been fully elucidated. Herein we have described the case of a young patient with severe CLI, who experienced a 24-month beneficial clinical response to autologous bone marrow transplantation. The exceptional amelioration enabled him to perform standardized maximal treadmill exercise test that demonstrated lack of exercise-induced EPC mobilization, despite adequate stromal-derived factor 1 and vascular endothelial growth factor responses. Therefore, tissue ischemia is not sufficient to promote the recruitment of EPCs that have been demonstrated to be involved in the recovery from ischemia. The local implantation of marrow-derived elements may provide cells and/or trophic factors, which have the capacity to augment angiogenesis, opening new approaches to the etiopathogenesis of the disease. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Mobility management in mobile IP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medidi, Sirisha; Golshani, Forouzan

    2002-07-01

    There is an emerging interest in integrating mobile wireless communication with the Internet based on the Ipv6 technology. Many issues introduced by the mobility of users arise when such an integration is attempted. This paper addresses the problem of mobility management, i.e., that of tracking the current IP addresses of mobile terminals and sustaining active IP connections as mobiles move. The paper presents some architectural and mobility management options for integrating wireless access to the Internet. We then present performance results for Mobile IPv4, route optimization and Mobile IPv6.

  7. Toddlers' Duration of Attention toward Putative Threat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiel, Elizabeth J.; Buss, Kristin A.

    2011-01-01

    Although individual differences in reactions to novelty in the toddler years have been consistently linked to risk of developing anxious behavior, toddlers' attention toward a novel, putatively threatening stimulus while in the presence of other enjoyable activities has rarely been examined as a precursor to such risk. The current study examined…

  8. Toddlers' Duration of Attention toward Putative Threat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiel, Elizabeth J.; Buss, Kristin A.

    2011-01-01

    Although individual differences in reactions to novelty in the toddler years have been consistently linked to risk of developing anxious behavior, toddlers' attention toward a novel, putatively threatening stimulus while in the presence of other enjoyable activities has rarely been examined as a precursor to such risk. The current study examined…

  9. Visualization of Whole-Night Sleep EEG From 2-Channel Mobile Recording Device Reveals Distinct Deep Sleep Stages with Differential Electrodermal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Onton, Julie A.; Kang, Dae Y.; Coleman, Todd P.

    2016-01-01

    Brain activity during sleep is a powerful marker of overall health, but sleep lab testing is prohibitively expensive and only indicated for major sleep disorders. This report demonstrates that mobile 2-channel in-home electroencephalogram (EEG) recording devices provided sufficient information to detect and visualize sleep EEG. Displaying whole-night sleep EEG in a spectral display allowed for quick assessment of general sleep stability, cycle lengths, stage lengths, dominant frequencies and other indices of sleep quality. By visualizing spectral data down to 0.1 Hz, a differentiation emerged between slow-wave sleep with dominant frequency between 0.1–1 Hz or 1–3 Hz, but rarely both. Thus, we present here the new designations, Hi and Lo Deep sleep, according to the frequency range with dominant power. Simultaneously recorded electrodermal activity (EDA) was primarily associated with Lo Deep and very rarely with Hi Deep or any other stage. Therefore, Hi and Lo Deep sleep appear to be physiologically distinct states that may serve unique functions during sleep. We developed an algorithm to classify five stages (Awake, Light, Hi Deep, Lo Deep and rapid eye movement (REM)) using a Hidden Markov Model (HMM), model fitting with the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm, and estimation of the most likely sleep state sequence by the Viterbi algorithm. The resulting automatically generated sleep hypnogram can help clinicians interpret the spectral display and help researchers computationally quantify sleep stages across participants. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the feasibility of in-home sleep EEG collection, a rapid and informative sleep report format, and novel deep sleep designations accounting for spectral and physiological differences. PMID:27965558

  10. Visualization of Whole-Night Sleep EEG From 2-Channel Mobile Recording Device Reveals Distinct Deep Sleep Stages with Differential Electrodermal Activity.

    PubMed

    Onton, Julie A; Kang, Dae Y; Coleman, Todd P

    2016-01-01

    Brain activity during sleep is a powerful marker of overall health, but sleep lab testing is prohibitively expensive and only indicated for major sleep disorders. This report demonstrates that mobile 2-channel in-home electroencephalogram (EEG) recording devices provided sufficient information to detect and visualize sleep EEG. Displaying whole-night sleep EEG in a spectral display allowed for quick assessment of general sleep stability, cycle lengths, stage lengths, dominant frequencies and other indices of sleep quality. By visualizing spectral data down to 0.1 Hz, a differentiation emerged between slow-wave sleep with dominant frequency between 0.1-1 Hz or 1-3 Hz, but rarely both. Thus, we present here the new designations, Hi and Lo Deep sleep, according to the frequency range with dominant power. Simultaneously recorded electrodermal activity (EDA) was primarily associated with Lo Deep and very rarely with Hi Deep or any other stage. Therefore, Hi and Lo Deep sleep appear to be physiologically distinct states that may serve unique functions during sleep. We developed an algorithm to classify five stages (Awake, Light, Hi Deep, Lo Deep and rapid eye movement (REM)) using a Hidden Markov Model (HMM), model fitting with the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm, and estimation of the most likely sleep state sequence by the Viterbi algorithm. The resulting automatically generated sleep hypnogram can help clinicians interpret the spectral display and help researchers computationally quantify sleep stages across participants. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the feasibility of in-home sleep EEG collection, a rapid and informative sleep report format, and novel deep sleep designations accounting for spectral and physiological differences.

  11. Traveling-wave Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Reveals Additional Mechanistic Details in the Stabilization of Protein Complex Ions through Tuned Salt Additives

    PubMed Central

    Han, Linjie; Ruotolo, Brandon T.

    2013-01-01

    Ion mobility–mass spectrometry is often applied to the structural elucidation of multiprotein assemblies in cases where X-ray crystallography or NMR experiments have proved challenging. Such applications are growing steadily as we continue to probe regions of the proteome that are less-accessible to such high-resolution structural biology tools. Since ion mobility measures protein structure in the absence of bulk solvent, strategies designed to more-broadly stabilize native-like protein structures in the gas-phase would greatly enable the application of such measurements to challenging structural targets. Recently, we have begun investigating the ability of salt-based solution additives that remain bound to protein ions in the gas-phase to stabilize native-like protein structures. These experiments, which utilize collision induced unfolding and collision induced dissociation in a tandem mass spectrometry mode to measure protein stability, seek to develop a rank-order similar to the Hofmeister series that categorizes the general ability of different anions and cations to stabilize gas-phase protein structure. Here, we study magnesium chloride as a potential stabilizing additive for protein structures in vacuo, and find that the addition of this salt to solutions prior to nano-electrospray ionization dramatically enhances multiprotein complex structural stability in the gas-phase. Based on these experiments, we also refine the physical mechanism of cation-based protein complex ion stabilization by tracking the unfolding transitions experienced by cation-bound complexes. Upon comparison with unbound proteins, we find strong evidence that stabilizing cations act to tether protein complex structure. We conclude by putting the results reported here in context, and by projecting the future applications of this method. PMID:23539363

  12. A Glimpse into the World of Integrative and Mobilizable Elements in Streptococci Reveals an Unexpected Diversity and Novel Families of Mobilization Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Coluzzi, Charles; Guédon, Gérard; Devignes, Marie-Dominique; Ambroset, Chloé; Loux, Valentin; Lacroix, Thomas; Payot, Sophie; Leblond-Bourget, Nathalie

    2017-01-01

    Recent analyses of bacterial genomes have shown that integrated elements that transfer by conjugation play an essential role in horizontal gene transfer. Among these elements, the integrative and mobilizable elements (IMEs) are known to encode their own excision and integration machinery, and to carry all the sequences or genes necessary to hijack the mating pore of a conjugative element for their own transfer. However, knowledge of their prevalence and diversity is still severely lacking. In this work, an extensive analysis of 124 genomes from 27 species of Streptococcus reveals 144 IMEs. These IMEs encode either tyrosine or serine integrases. The identification of IME boundaries shows that 141 are specifically integrated in 17 target sites. The IME-encoded relaxases belong to nine superfamilies, among which four are previously unknown in any mobilizable or conjugative element. A total of 118 IMEs are found to encode a non-canonical relaxase related to rolling circle replication initiators (belonging to the four novel families or to MobT). Surprisingly, among these, 83 encode a TcpA protein (i.e., a non-canonical coupling protein (CP) that is more closely related to FtsK than VirD4) that was not previously known to be encoded by mobilizable elements. Phylogenetic analyses reveal not only many integration/excision module replacements but also losses, acquisitions or replacements of TcpA genes between IMEs. This glimpse into the still poorly known world of IMEs reveals that mobilizable elements have a very high prevalence. Their diversity is even greater than expected, with most encoding a CP and/or a non-canonical relaxase. PMID:28373865

  13. A Glimpse into the World of Integrative and Mobilizable Elements in Streptococci Reveals an Unexpected Diversity and Novel Families of Mobilization Proteins.

    PubMed

    Coluzzi, Charles; Guédon, Gérard; Devignes, Marie-Dominique; Ambroset, Chloé; Loux, Valentin; Lacroix, Thomas; Payot, Sophie; Leblond-Bourget, Nathalie

    2017-01-01

    Recent analyses of bacterial genomes have shown that integrated elements that transfer by conjugation play an essential role in horizontal gene transfer. Among these elements, the integrative and mobilizable elements (IMEs) are known to encode their own excision and integration machinery, and to carry all the sequences or genes necessary to hijack the mating pore of a conjugative element for their own transfer. However, knowledge of their prevalence and diversity is still severely lacking. In this work, an extensive analysis of 124 genomes from 27 species of Streptococcus reveals 144 IMEs. These IMEs encode either tyrosine or serine integrases. The identification of IME boundaries shows that 141 are specifically integrated in 17 target sites. The IME-encoded relaxases belong to nine superfamilies, among which four are previously unknown in any mobilizable or conjugative element. A total of 118 IMEs are found to encode a non-canonical relaxase related to rolling circle replication initiators (belonging to the four novel families or to MobT). Surprisingly, among these, 83 encode a TcpA protein (i.e., a non-canonical coupling protein (CP) that is more closely related to FtsK than VirD4) that was not previously known to be encoded by mobilizable elements. Phylogenetic analyses reveal not only many integration/excision module replacements but also losses, acquisitions or replacements of TcpA genes between IMEs. This glimpse into the still poorly known world of IMEs reveals that mobilizable elements have a very high prevalence. Their diversity is even greater than expected, with most encoding a CP and/or a non-canonical relaxase.

  14. Mobile units of DNA in phytoplasma genomes.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Matt

    2010-09-01

    Phytoplasmas are obligate symbionts of plants and insects that are responsible for significant yield losses in diverse crops. Genome sequencing has revealed that many phytoplasma genomes appear to contain repeated genes organized in units of approximately 20 kb. These 'potential mobile units' (PMUs) resemble composite replicative transposons. PMUs contain several genes for recombination and some also contain putative 'virulence genes'. Genome alignments suggest that PMUs are involved in phytoplasma genome instability and recombination. In this edition of Molecular Microbiology, Hogenhout and colleagues report that one PMU from the aster yellows phytoplasma strain Witches' Broom (AY-WB) can exist as both a linear PMU within the chromosome and as an extrachromosomal circular form. The copy number of the circular form is much higher in the insect vector compared with the plant, and expression levels of genes present on the PMU are also higher in the insect. These observations suggest not only that this PMU could be a mobile element, but that it could also be involved in a phase-variation mechanism that allows the phytoplasma to adapt to its different hosts.

  15. Quantitative analysis of the chromatin proteome in disease reveals remodeling principles and identifies high mobility group protein B2 as a regulator of hypertrophic growth.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Sarah; Chen, Haodong; Mitchell-Jordan, Scherise; Ren, Shuxun; Wang, Yibin; Vondriska, Thomas M

    2012-06-01

    A fundamental question in biology is how genome-wide changes in gene expression are enacted in response to a finite stimulus. Recent studies have mapped changes in nucleosome localization, determined the binding preferences for individual transcription factors, and shown that the genome adopts a nonrandom structure in vivo. What remains unclear is how global changes in the proteins bound to DNA alter chromatin structure and gene expression. We have addressed this question in the mouse heart, a system in which global gene expression and massive phenotypic changes occur without cardiac cell division, making the mechanisms of chromatin remodeling centrally important. To determine factors controlling genomic plasticity, we used mass spectrometry to measure chromatin-associated proteins. We have characterized the abundance of 305 chromatin-associated proteins in normal cells and measured changes in 108 proteins that accompany the progression of heart disease. These studies were conducted on a high mass accuracy instrument and confirmed in multiple biological replicates, facilitating statistical analysis and allowing us to interrogate the data bioinformatically for modules of proteins involved in similar processes. Our studies reveal general principles for global shifts in chromatin accessibility: altered linker to core histone ratio; differing abundance of chromatin structural proteins; and reprogrammed histone post-translational modifications. Using small interfering RNA-mediated loss-of-function in isolated cells, we demonstrate that the non-histone chromatin structural protein HMGB2 (but not HMGB1) suppresses pathologic cell growth in vivo and controls a gene expression program responsible for hypertrophic cell growth. Our findings reveal the basis for alterations in chromatin structure necessary for genome-wide changes in gene expression. These studies have fundamental implications for understanding how global chromatin remodeling occurs with specificity and

  16. Structural connectivity patterns associated with the putative visual word form area and children's reading ability.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qiuyun; Anderson, Adam W; Davis, Nicole; Cutting, Laurie E

    2014-10-24

    With the advent of neuroimaging techniques, especially functional MRI (fMRI), studies have mapped brain regions that are associated with good and poor reading, most centrally a region within the left occipito-temporal/fusiform region (L-OT/F) often referred to as the visual word form area (VWFA). Despite an abundance of fMRI studies of the putative VWFA, research about its structural connectivity has just started. Provided that the putative VWFA may be connected to distributed regions in the brain, it remains unclear how this network is engaged in constituting a well-tuned reading circuitry in the brain. Here we used diffusion MRI to study the structural connectivity patterns of the putative VWFA and surrounding areas within the L-OT/F in children with typically developing (TD) reading ability and with word recognition deficits (WRD; sometimes referred to as dyslexia). We found that L-OT/F connectivity varied along a posterior-anterior gradient, with specific structural connectivity patterns related to reading ability in the ROIs centered upon the putative VWFA. Findings suggest that the architecture of the putative VWFA connectivity is fundamentally different between TD and WRD, with TD showing greater connectivity to linguistic regions than WRD, and WRD showing greater connectivity to visual and parahippocampal regions than TD. Findings thus reveal clear structural abnormalities underlying the functional abnormalities in the putative VWFA in WRD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Putative cryptoendolithic life in Devonian pillow basalt, Rheinisches Schiefergebirge, Germany.

    PubMed

    Peckmann, J; Bach, W; Behrens, K; Reitner, J

    2008-03-01

    Middle Devonian (Givetian) pillow basalt and inter-pillow breccia from the Rheinisches Schiefergebirge in Germany were found to contain putative biogenic filaments that indicate that life once proliferated within these volcanic rocks. Mineralized filaments are found in carbonate amygdules (vesicles filled by carbonate cement) in the volcanic rock, where they started to form on the internal surface of the once water-filled vesicles. Biogenicity of the filaments is indicated by (1) their size and shape resembling modern microorganisms including a constant diameter along the length of curved filaments, (2) their independence of crystal faces or cleavage planes, (3) branching patterns reminiscent of modern microorganisms, and (4) their spatial clustering and preferential occurrence close to the margin of pillows and in the inter-pillow breccias. A time lag between the deposition of pillow basalt and the activity of endoliths is revealed by the sequence of carbonate cements filling the amygdules. The putative filamentous microorganisms thrived after the formation of early fibrous rim cement, but before later equant calcite spar filled most of the remaining porosity. Microbial clay authigenesis analogous to the encrustation of prokaryotes in modern iron-rich environments led to the preservation of filaments. The filaments predominantly consist of the clay minerals chamosite and illite. Having dwelled in water-filled vesicles, the Devonian basalt-hosted filaments apparently represent cryptoendoliths. This finding suggests that a previously unrecognized niche for life exists within volcanic rock.

  18. Characterization of a Putative Ancestor of Coxsackievirus B5 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Gullberg, Maria; Tolf, Conny; Jonsson, Nina; Mulders, Mick N.; Savolainen-Kopra, Carita; Hovi, Tapani; Van Ranst, Marc; Lemey, Philippe; Hafenstein, Susan; Lindberg, A. Michael

    2010-01-01

    Like other RNA viruses, coxsackievirus B5 (CVB5) exists as circulating heterogeneous populations of genetic variants. In this study, we present the reconstruction and characterization of a probable ancestral virion of CVB5. Phylogenetic analyses based on capsid protein-encoding regions (the VP1 gene of 41 clinical isolates and the entire P1 region of eight clinical isolates) of CVB5 revealed two major cocirculating lineages. Ancestral capsid sequences were inferred from sequences of these contemporary CVB5 isolates by using maximum likelihood methods. By using Bayesian phylodynamic analysis, the inferred VP1 ancestral sequence dated back to 1854 (1807 to 1898). In order to study the properties of the putative ancestral capsid, the entire ancestral P1 sequence was synthesized de novo and inserted into the replicative backbone of an infectious CVB5 cDNA clone. Characterization of the recombinant virus in cell culture showed that fully functional infectious virus particles were assembled and that these viruses displayed properties similar to those of modern isolates in terms of receptor preferences, plaque phenotypes, growth characteristics, and cell tropism. This is the first report describing the resurrection and characterization of a picornavirus with a putative ancestral capsid. Our approach, including a phylogenetics-based reconstruction of viral predecessors, could serve as a starting point for experimental studies of viral evolution and might also provide an alternative strategy for the development of vaccines. PMID:20631132

  19. Identification of putative active site residues of ACAT enzymes.

    PubMed

    Das, Akash; Davis, Matthew A; Rudel, Lawrence L

    2008-08-01

    In this report, we sought to determine the putative active site residues of ACAT enzymes. For experimental purposes, a particular region of the C-terminal end of the ACAT protein was selected as the putative active site domain due to its high degree of sequence conservation from yeast to humans. Because ACAT enzymes have an intrinsic thioesterase activity, we hypothesized that by analogy with the thioesterase domain of fatty acid synthase, the active site of ACAT enzymes may comprise a catalytic triad of ser-his-asp (S-H-D) amino acid residues. Mutagenesis studies revealed that in ACAT1, S456, H460, and D400 were essential for activity. In ACAT2, H438 was required for enzymatic activity. However, mutation of D378 destabilized the enzyme. Surprisingly, we were unable to identify any S mutations of ACAT2 that abolished catalytic activity. Moreover, ACAT2 was insensitive to serine-modifying reagents, whereas ACAT1 was not. Further studies indicated that tyrosine residues may be important for ACAT activity. Mutational analysis showed that the tyrosine residue of the highly conserved FYXDWWN motif was important for ACAT activity. Furthermore, Y518 was necessary for ACAT1 activity, whereas the analogous residue in ACAT2, Y496, was not. The available data suggest that the amino acid requirement for ACAT activity may be different for the two ACAT isozymes.

  20. Cloning and expression of a gene from Streptomyces scabies encoding a putative pathogenicity factor.

    PubMed Central

    Bukhalid, R A; Loria, R

    1997-01-01

    We cloned a 9.4-kb DNA fragment from Streptomyces scabies ATCC 41973 that allows the nonpathogen Streptomyces lividans 66 TK24 to necrotize and colonize potato tuber slices and produce scab-like symptoms on potato minitubers. Deletion analysis demonstrated that activity was conferred by a 1.6-kb DNA region. Sequence analysis of a 2.4-kb DNA fragment spanning the DNA region necessary for activity revealed three open reading frames (ORFs). The deduced amino acid sequence of ORF1, designated ORFtnp, showed high levels of identity with the first 233 amino acids of the putative transposases of the IS1164 elements from Rhodococcus rhodochrous (71%) and Mycobacterium bovis (68%), members of the Staphylococcus aureus IS256 family of transposases. No significant homologies to ORF2 and ORF3 were found in the nucleic acid and protein databases. ORFtnp is located 5' of ORF3. ORF2 is incomplete and is located 3' of ORF3. Subcloning of the individual ORFs demonstrated that ORF3, designated nec1, is sufficient for necrotizing activity in S. lividans 66 TK24. S. lividans 66 TK24 expressing nec1 does not produce thaxtomin A but produces an unidentified extracellular water-soluble compound that causes necrosis on potato tuber discs. The G+C content of nec1 suggests that it has moved horizontally from another genus. Southern analysis of ORFtnp and nec1 demonstrate that these genes are physically linked in Streptomyces strains, including S. scabies and Streptomyces acidiscabies strains, that are pathogenic on potato and that produce the phytotoxin thaxtomin A. These data suggest that nec1 may have been mobilized into S. scabies through a transposition event mediated by ORFtnp. PMID:9401037

  1. Ten Putative Contributors to the Obesity Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Emily J.; Dhurandhar, Nikhil V.; Keith, Scott W.; Aronne, Louis J.; Barger, Jamie; Baskin, Monica; Benca, Ruth M.; Biggio, Joseph; Boggiano, Mary M.; Eisenmann, Joe C.; Elobeid, Mai; Fontaine, Kevin R.; Gluckman, Peter; Hanlon, Erin C.; Katzmarzyk, Peter; Pietrobelli, Angelo; Redden, David T.; Ruden, Douglas M.; Wang, Chenxi; Waterland, Robert A.; Wright, Suzanne M.; Allison, David B.

    2010-01-01

    The obesity epidemic is a global issue and shows no signs of abating, while the cause of this epidemic remains unclear. Marketing practices of energy-dense foods and institutionally-driven declines in physical activity are the alleged perpetrators for the epidemic, despite a lack of solid evidence to demonstrate their causal role. While both may contribute to obesity, we call attention to their unquestioned dominance in program funding and public efforts to reduce obesity, and propose several alternative putative contributors that would benefit from equal consideration and attention. Evidence for microorganisms, epigenetics, increasing maternal age, greater fecundity among people with higher adiposity, assortative mating, sleep debt, endocrine disruptors, pharmaceutical iatrogenesis, reduction in variability of ambient temperatures, and intrauterine and intergenerational effects, as contributing factors to the obesity epidemic are reviewed herein. While the evidence is strong for some contributors such as pharmaceutical-induced weight gain, it is still emerging for other reviewed factors. Considering the role of such putative etiological factors of obesity may lead to comprehensive, cause specific, and effective strategies for prevention and treatment of this global epidemic. PMID:19960394

  2. Derivation and evaluation of putative adverse outcome ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition is of concern in fish because COX inhibitors (e.g., ibuprofen) are ubiquitous in aquatic systems/fish tissues, and can disrupt synthesis of prostaglandins that modulate a variety of essential biological functions including reproduction. High content (transcriptomic) empirical data and publicly available high throughput toxicity data (actor.epa.gov) were utilized to develop putative adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for molecular initiating event (MIE) of COX inhibition. Effects of a waterborne, 96h exposure to indomethacin (IN; 100 µg/L), ibuprofen (IB; 200 µg/L) and celecoxib (CX; 20 µg/L) on liver metabolome and ovarian gene expression (using oligonucleotide microarrays) in sexually mature fathead minnows (n=8) were examined. Metabolomic profiles of IN, IB and CX were not significantly different from control or one another. Exposure to IB and CX resulted in differential expression of comparable numbers of genes (IB = 433, CX= 545). In contrast, 2558 genes were differentially expressed in IN-treated fish. Functional analyses (canonical pathway and gene set enrichment) indicated extensive effects of IN on prostaglandin synthesis pathway, oocyte meiosis and several other processes consistent with physiological roles of prostaglandins. Transcriptomic data was congruent with apical endpoint data - IN reduced plasma prostaglandin F2 alpha concentrations, and ovarian COX activity, whereas IB and CX did not. Putative AOPs pathways for

  3. Astrocytes in the optic nerve head express putative mechanosensitive channels

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hee Joo; Sun, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To establish whether optic nerve head astrocytes express candidate molecules to sense tissue stretch. Methods We used conventional PCR, quantitative PCR, and single-cell reverse transcription PCR (RT–PCR) to assess the expression of various members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family and of the recently characterized mechanosensitive channels Piezo1 and 2 in optic nerve head tissue and in single, isolated astrocytes. Results Most TRP subfamilies (TRPC, TRPM, TRPV, TRPA, and TRPP) and Piezo1 and 2 were expressed in the optic nerve head of the mouse. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that TRPC1, TRPM7, TRPV2, TRPP2, and Piezo1 are the dominant isoforms in each subfamily. Single-cell RT–PCR revealed that many TRP isoforms, TRPC1–2, TRPC6, TRPV2, TRPV4, TRPM2, TRPM4, TRPM6–7, TRPP1–2, and Piezo1–2, are expressed in astrocytes of the optic nerve head, and that most astrocytes express TRPC1 and TRPP1–2. Comparisons of the TRPP and Piezo expression levels between different tissue regions showed that Piezo2 expression was higher in the optic nerve head and the optic nerve proper than in the brain and the corpus callosum. TRPP2 also showed higher expression in the optic nerve head. Conclusions Astrocytes in the optic nerve head express multiple putative mechanosensitive channels, in particular the recently identified channels Piezo1 and 2. The expression of putative mechanosensitive channels in these cells may contribute to their responsiveness to traumatic or glaucomatous injury. PMID:26236150

  4. Astrocytes in the optic nerve head express putative mechanosensitive channels.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hee Joo; Sun, Daniel; Jakobs, Tatjana C

    2015-01-01

    To establish whether optic nerve head astrocytes express candidate molecules to sense tissue stretch. We used conventional PCR, quantitative PCR, and single-cell reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) to assess the expression of various members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family and of the recently characterized mechanosensitive channels Piezo1 and 2 in optic nerve head tissue and in single, isolated astrocytes. Most TRP subfamilies (TRPC, TRPM, TRPV, TRPA, and TRPP) and Piezo1 and 2 were expressed in the optic nerve head of the mouse. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that TRPC1, TRPM7, TRPV2, TRPP2, and Piezo1 are the dominant isoforms in each subfamily. Single-cell RT-PCR revealed that many TRP isoforms, TRPC1-2, TRPC6, TRPV2, TRPV4, TRPM2, TRPM4, TRPM6-7, TRPP1-2, and Piezo1-2, are expressed in astrocytes of the optic nerve head, and that most astrocytes express TRPC1 and TRPP1-2. Comparisons of the TRPP and Piezo expression levels between different tissue regions showed that Piezo2 expression was higher in the optic nerve head and the optic nerve proper than in the brain and the corpus callosum. TRPP2 also showed higher expression in the optic nerve head. Astrocytes in the optic nerve head express multiple putative mechanosensitive channels, in particular the recently identified channels Piezo1 and 2. The expression of putative mechanosensitive channels in these cells may contribute to their responsiveness to traumatic or glaucomatous injury.

  5. Enhancing Education through Mobile Augmented Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joan, D. R. Robert

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the author has discussed about the Mobile Augmented Reality and enhancing education through it. The aim of the present study was to give some general information about mobile augmented reality which helps to boost education. Purpose of the current study reveals the mobile networks which are used in the institution campus as well…

  6. The Biogeography of Putative Microbial Antibiotic Production

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Jessica A.; Charkoudian, Louise K.; Docherty, Kathryn M.; Jones, Evan; Kembel, Steven W.; Green, Jessica L.; Bohannan, Brendan J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding patterns in the distribution and abundance of functional traits across a landscape is of fundamental importance to ecology. Mapping these distributions is particularly challenging for species-rich groups with sparse trait measurement coverage, such as flowering plants, insects, and microorganisms. Here, we use likelihood-based character reconstruction to infer and analyze the spatial distribution of unmeasured traits. We apply this framework to a microbial dataset comprised of 11,732 ketosynthase alpha gene sequences extracted from 144 soil samples from three continents to document the spatial distribution of putative microbial polyketide antibiotic production. Antibiotic production is a key competitive strategy for soil microbial survival and performance. Additionally, novel antibiotic discovery is highly relevant to human health, making natural antibiotic production by soil microorganisms a major target for bioprospecting. Our comparison of trait-based biogeographical patterns to patterns based on taxonomy and phylogeny is relevant to our basic understanding of microbial biogeography as well as the pressing need for new antibiotics. PMID:26102275

  7. PUTATIVE ADVERSE OUTCOME PATHWAY FOR INHIBITON ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The adverse outcome pathway (AOP) provides a framework for organizing knowledge to define links between a molecular initiating event (MIE) and an adverse outcome (AO) occurring at a higher level of biological organization, such as the individual or population. The AOP framework proceeds from a general (e.g., not chemical specific) molecular mode of action, designated as a MIE, through stepwise changes in biological status, defined as key events (KEs), to a final AO that can be used in risk assessment. Because aromatase-inhibiting pharmaceuticals are widely used to treat breast cancer patients, we explored the unintended consequences that might occur in fish exposed to these chemicals through wastewater discharge into the aquatic environment. Unlike mammals, fish have two isoforms of aromatase, one that predominates in the ovary (cyp19a1a) and a second (cyp19a1b) that prevails in the brain. Aromatase activity in fish brain can be 100 to 1000 times that in mammals and is associated with reproduction. We have developed a putative AOP for inhibition of brain aromatase in fish leading to reproductive dysfunction based on review of relevant literature and reproductive experiments with the marine fish cunner (Tautogolabrus adspersus) exposed to aromatase-inhibiting pharmaceuticals in the laboratory. The first KE in this AOP is a decrease in brain aromatase activity due to exposure to an aromatase inhibitor. KEs then progress through subsequent steps including decreas

  8. Biogenic Origin for Earth's Oldest Putative Microfossils

    SciTech Connect

    De Gregorio, B.; Sharp, T; Flynn, G; Wirick, S; Hervig, R

    2009-01-01

    Carbonaceous microbe-like features preserved within a local chert unit of the 3.5 Ga old Apex Basalt in Western Australia may represent some of the oldest evidence of life on Earth. However, the biogenicity of these putative microfossils has been called into question, primarily because the sample collection locality is a black, carbon-rich, brecciated chert dike representing an Archean submarine hydrothermal spring, suggesting a formation via an abiotic organic synthesis mechanism. Here we describe the macromolecular hydrocarbon structure, carbon bonding, functional group chemistry, and biotic element abundance of carbonaceous matter associated with these filamentous features. These characteristics are similar to those of biogenic kerogen from the ca. 1.9 Ga old Gunflint Formation. Although an abiotic origin cannot be entirely ruled out, it is unlikely that known abiotic synthesis mechanisms could recreate both the structural and compositional complexity of this ancient carbonaceous matter. Thus, we find that a biogenic origin for this material is more likely, implying that the Apex microbe-like features represent authentic biogenic organic matter.

  9. The Biogeography of Putative Microbial Antibiotic Production.

    PubMed

    Morlon, Hélène; O'Connor, Timothy K; Bryant, Jessica A; Charkoudian, Louise K; Docherty, Kathryn M; Jones, Evan; Kembel, Steven W; Green, Jessica L; Bohannan, Brendan J M

    2015-01-01

    Understanding patterns in the distribution and abundance of functional traits across a landscape is of fundamental importance to ecology. Mapping these distributions is particularly challenging for species-rich groups with sparse trait measurement coverage, such as flowering plants, insects, and microorganisms. Here, we use likelihood-based character reconstruction to infer and analyze the spatial distribution of unmeasured traits. We apply this framework to a microbial dataset comprised of 11,732 ketosynthase alpha gene sequences extracted from 144 soil samples from three continents to document the spatial distribution of putative microbial polyketide antibiotic production. Antibiotic production is a key competitive strategy for soil microbial survival and performance. Additionally, novel antibiotic discovery is highly relevant to human health, making natural antibiotic production by soil microorganisms a major target for bioprospecting. Our comparison of trait-based biogeographical patterns to patterns based on taxonomy and phylogeny is relevant to our basic understanding of microbial biogeography as well as the pressing need for new antibiotics.

  10. Mechanosensory neurons, cutaneous mechanoreceptors, and putative mechanoproteins.

    PubMed

    Del Valle, M E; Cobo, T; Cobo, J L; Vega, J A

    2012-08-01

    The mammalian skin has developed sensory structures (mechanoreceptors) that are responsible for different modalities of mechanosensitivity like touch, vibration, and pressure sensation. These specialized sensory organs are anatomically and functionally connected to a special subset of sensory neurons called mechanosensory neurons, which electrophysiologically correspond with Aβ fibers. Although mechanosensory neurons and cutaneous mechanoreceptors are rather well known, the biology of the sense of touch still remains poorly understood. Basically, the process of mechanosensitivity requires the conversion of a mechanical stimulus into an electrical signal through the activation of ion channels that gate in response to mechanical stimuli. These ion channels belong primarily to the family of the degenerin/epithelium sodium channels, especially the subfamily acid-sensing ion channels, and to the family of transient receptor potential channels. This review compiles the current knowledge on the occurrence of putative mechanoproteins in mechanosensory neurons and mechanoreceptors, as well as the involvement of these proteins on the biology of touch. Furthermore, we include a section about what the knock-out mice for mechanoproteins are teaching us. Finally, the possibilities for mechanotransduction in mechanoreceptors, and the common involvement of the ion channels, extracellular membrane, and cytoskeleton, are revisited.

  11. PUTATIVE ADVERSE OUTCOME PATHWAY FOR INHIBITON ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The adverse outcome pathway (AOP) provides a framework for organizing knowledge to define links between a molecular initiating event (MIE) and an adverse outcome (AO) occurring at a higher level of biological organization, such as the individual or population. The AOP framework proceeds from a general (e.g., not chemical specific) molecular mode of action, designated as a MIE, through stepwise changes in biological status, defined as key events (KEs), to a final AO that can be used in risk assessment. Because aromatase-inhibiting pharmaceuticals are widely used to treat breast cancer patients, we explored the unintended consequences that might occur in fish exposed to these chemicals through wastewater discharge into the aquatic environment. Unlike mammals, fish have two isoforms of aromatase, one that predominates in the ovary (cyp19a1a) and a second (cyp19a1b) that prevails in the brain. Aromatase activity in fish brain can be 100 to 1000 times that in mammals and is associated with reproduction. We have developed a putative AOP for inhibition of brain aromatase in fish leading to reproductive dysfunction based on review of relevant literature and reproductive experiments with the marine fish cunner (Tautogolabrus adspersus) exposed to aromatase-inhibiting pharmaceuticals in the laboratory. The first KE in this AOP is a decrease in brain aromatase activity due to exposure to an aromatase inhibitor. KEs then progress through subsequent steps including decreas

  12. PPB1, a putative spliced leader RNA gene transcription factor in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Wen, L M; Xu, P; Benegal, G; Carvalho, M R; Buck, G A

    2000-10-01

    In trypanosomatids, the spliced leader RNA, or SL RNA, donates its 5' 39 nucleotides to mature nuclear mRNAs in a process termed trans-splicing. We have previously characterized the SL RNA gene from Trypanosoma cruzi and identified its transcription promoter, including a 14 nt proximal sequence element, or PSE, that binds a putative transcription factor and activates transcription of the gene. Herein, we describe establishment of a yeast one-hybrid system using the 14 nt PSE as bait, and use this system to select T. cruzi cDNAs encoding a putative transcription factor that activates transcription of the SL RNA gene. The cDNA was selected from a normalized library and encodes an approximately 45 kDa putative PSE promoter-binding protein, PPB1. PPB1 in vitro translated or overexpressed in and isolated from transformed E. coli, showed PSE-specific binding activity by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Finally, overexpression of PPB1 in T. cruzi led to increased expression of the SL RNA gene as well as reporter genes in episomal constructs under the control of the SL RNA gene promoter. These observations suggest that PPB1 is a transcription factor that plays an important role in SL RNA gene expression.

  13. A large, mobile pathogenicity island confers plant pathogenicity on Streptomyces species.

    PubMed

    Kers, Johan A; Cameron, Kimberly D; Joshi, Madhumita V; Bukhalid, Raghida A; Morello, Joanne E; Wach, Michael J; Gibson, Donna M; Loria, Rosemary

    2005-02-01

    Potato scab is a globally important disease caused by polyphyletic plant pathogenic Streptomyces species. Streptomyces acidiscabies, Streptomyces scabies and Streptomyces turgidiscabies possess a conserved biosynthetic pathway for the nitrated dipeptide phytotoxin thaxtomin. These pathogens also possess the nec1 gene which encodes a necrogenic protein that is an independent virulence factor. In this article we describe a large (325-660 kb) pathogenicity island (PAI) conserved among these three plant pathogenic Streptomyces species. A partial DNA sequence of this PAI revealed the thaxtomin biosynthetic pathway, nec1, a putative tomatinase gene, and many mobile genetic elements. In addition, the PAI from S. turgidiscabies contains a plant fasciation (fas) operon homologous to and colinear with the fas operon in the plant pathogen Rhodococcus fascians. The PAI was mobilized during mating from S. turgidiscabies to the non-pathogens Streptomyces coelicolor and Streptomyces diastatochromogenes on a 660 kb DNA element and integrated site-specifically into a putative integral membrane lipid kinase. Acquisition of the PAI conferred a pathogenic phenotype on S. diastatochromogenes but not on S. coelicolor. This PAI is the first to be described in a Gram-positive plant pathogenic bacterium and is responsible for the emergence of new plant pathogenic Streptomyces species in agricultural systems.

  14. Evaluating the function of putative hormone transporters

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Burkhard; Murphy, Angus S

    2009-01-01

    Hormones typically serve as long distance signaling molecules. To reach their site of action, hormones need to be transported from the sites of synthesis. Many plant hormones are mobile, thus requiring specific transport systems for the export from their source cells as well as subsequent import into target cells. Hormone transport in general is still poorly understood. Auxin is probably the most intensively studied plant hormone concerning transport in the moment. To advance our understanding of hormone transport we need two principal data sets: information on the properties of the transport systems including substrate specificity and kinetics, and we need to identify candidate genes for the respective transporters. Physiological transport data can provide an important basis for identifying and characterizing candidate transporters and to define their in vivo role. A recent publication in Plant Physiology highlights how kinetic and specificity studies may help to identify cytokinin transporters.1 PMID:19649195

  15. Evaluating the function of putative hormone transporters.

    PubMed

    Frommer, Wolf B; Schulz, Burkhard; Murphy, Angus S

    2009-02-01

    Hormones typically serve as long distance signaling molecules. To reach their site of action, hormones need to be transported from the sites of synthesis. Many plant hormones are mobile, thus requiring specific transport systems for the export from their source cells as well as subsequent import into target cells. Hormone transport in general is still poorly understood. Auxin is probably the most intensively studied plant hormone concerning transport in the moment. To advance our understanding of hormone transport we need two principal data sets: information on the properties of the transport systems including substrate specificity and kinetics, and we need to identify candidate genes for the respective transporters. Physiological transport data can provide an important basis for identifying and characterizing candidate transporters and to define their in vivo role. A recent publication in Plant Physiology highlights how kinetic and specificity studies may help to identify cytokinin transporters.

  16. Effect of extracellular electron shuttles on arsenic-mobilizing activities in soil microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Shigeki; Sudo, Takayuki; Watanabe, Mirai; Tsuboi, Shun; Soda, Satoshi; Ike, Michihiko; Amachi, Seigo

    2017-09-01

    Microbially mediated arsenate (As(V)) and Fe(III) reduction play important roles in arsenic (As) cycling in nature. Extracellular electron shuttles can impact microbial Fe(III) reduction, yet little is known about their effects on microbial As mobilization in soils. In this study, microcosm experiments consisting of an As-contaminated soil and microbial communities obtained from several pristine soils were conducted, and the effects of electron shuttles on As mobilization were determined. Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) and riboflavin (RF) were chosen as common exogenous and biogenic electron shuttles, respectively, and both compounds significantly enhanced reductive dissolution of As and Fe. Accumulation of Fe(II)-bearing minerals was also observed, which may lead to re-immobilization of As after prolonged incubation. Interestingly, Firmicutes-related bacteria became predominant in all microcosms, but their compositions at the lower taxonomic level were different in each microcosm. Putative respiratory As(V) reductase gene (arrA) analysis revealed that bacteria closely related to a Clostridia group, especially those including the genera Desulfitobacterium and Desulfosporosinus, might play significant roles in As mobilization. These results indicate that the natural soil microbial community can use electron shuttles for enhanced mobilization of As; the use of this type of system is potentially advantageous for bioremediation of As-contaminated soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Diversity of putative archaeal RNA viruses in metagenomic datasets of a yellowstone acidic hot spring.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongming; Yu, Yongxin; Liu, Taigang; Pan, Yingjie; Yan, Shuling; Wang, Yongjie

    2015-01-01

    Two genomic fragments (5,662 and 1,269 nt in size, GenBank accession no. JQ756122 and JQ756123, respectively) of novel, positive-strand RNA viruses that infect archaea were first discovered in an acidic hot spring in Yellowstone National Park (Bolduc et al., 2012). To investigate the diversity of these newly identified putative archaeal RNA viruses, global metagenomic datasets were searched for sequences that were significantly similar to those of the viruses. A total of 3,757 associated reads were retrieved solely from the Yellowstone datasets and were used to assemble the genomes of the putative archaeal RNA viruses. Nine contigs with lengths ranging from 417 to 5,866 nt were obtained, 4 of which were longer than 2,200 nt; one contig was 204 nt longer than JQ756122, representing the longest genomic sequence of the putative archaeal RNA viruses. These contigs revealed more than 50% sequence similarity to JQ756122 or JQ756123 and may be partial or nearly complete genomes of novel genogroups or genotypes of the putative archaeal RNA viruses. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses indicated that the archaeal RNA viruses are genetically diverse, with at least 3 related viral lineages in the Yellowstone acidic hot spring environment.

  18. Characterization of a putative endoxylanase in the migratory plant-parasitic nematode Radopholus similis.

    PubMed

    Haegeman, Annelies; Vanholme, Bartel; Gheysen, Godelieve

    2009-05-01

    Plant-parasitic nematodes have developed an arsenal of enzymes to degrade the rigid plant cell wall. In this article, we report the presence of a putative endoxylanase in the migratory endoparasitic nematode Radopholus similis. This enzyme is thought to facilitate the migration of the nematode, as it breaks down xylan, the major component of hemicellulose. The corresponding gene (Rs-xyl1) was cloned and the sequence revealed three small introns. Interestingly, the position of all three introns was conserved in a putative endoxylanase from Meloidogyne hapla, and the position of one intron was conserved in two endoxylanases from Meloidogyne incognita, which suggests a common ancestral gene. The spatial and temporal expression of the Rs-xyl1 gene was examined by in situ hybridization and semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The putative protein consists of a signal peptide, a catalytic domain and a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM). The catalytic domain showed similarity to both glycosyl hydrolase family 5 (GHF5) and GHF30 enzymes. Using Hidden Markov Model profiles and phylogenetic analysis, we were able to show that Rs-XYL1 and its closest homologues are not members of GHF5, as suggested previously, but rather form a subclass within GHF30. Silencing the putative endoxylanase by double-stranded RNA targeting of the CBM region resulted in an average decrease in infection of 60%, indicating that the gene is important for the nematode to complete its life cycle.

  19. Preinspiratory calcium rise in putative pre-Bötzinger complex astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Yasumasa; Sasaki, Takuya; Oku, Yoshitaka; Takahashi, Naoya; Seki, Megumi; Ujita, Sakiko; Tanaka, Kenji F; Matsuki, Norio; Ikegaya, Yuji

    2012-01-01

    The neural inspiratory activity originates from a ventrolateral medullary region called the pre-Bötzinger complex (preBötC), yet the mechanism underlying respiratory rhythmogenesis is not completely understood. Recently, the role of not only neurons but astrocytes in the central respiratory control has attracted considerable attention. Here we report our discovery that an intracellular calcium rise in a subset of putative astrocytes precedes inspiratory neuronal firing in rhythmically active slices. Functional calcium imaging from hundreds of preBötC cells revealed that a subset of putative astrocytes exhibited rhythmic calcium elevations preceding inspiratory neuronal activity with a time lag of approximately 2 s. These preinspiratory putative astrocytes maintained their rhythmic activities even during the blockade of neuronal activity with tetrodotoxin, whereas the rhythm frequency was lowered and the intercellular phases of these rhythms were decoupled. In addition, optogenetic stimulation of preBötC putative astrocytes induced firing of inspiratory neurons. These findings raise the possibility that astrocytes in the preBötC are actively involved in respiratory rhythm generation in rhythmically active slices. PMID:22777672

  20. The SLC45 gene family of putative sugar transporters.

    PubMed

    Vitavska, Olga; Wieczorek, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    According to the classic point of view, transport of sugars across animal plasma membranes is performed by two families of transporters. Secondary active transport occurs via Na(+) symporters of the SLC5 gene family, while passive transport occurs via facilitative transporters of the SLC2 family. In recent years a new family appeared in the scenery which was called the SLC45 gene family of putative sugar transporters, mainly because of obvious similarities to plant sucrose transporters. The SLC45 family consists of only four members that have been denominated A1-A4. These members apparently have counterparts in all vertebrates. Moreover, their amino acid sequences reveal close homologies also to respective invertebrate proteins such as a recently detected sucrose transporter in Drosophila, and suggest a phylogenetic relationship also to corresponding proteins from plants, fungi and bacteria. This minireview describes the molecular features of its members with a focus on their possible role as sugar transporters. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Mobile healthcare.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Stephen A; Agee, Nancy Howell

    2012-01-01

    Mobile technology's presence in healthcare has exploded over the past five years. The increased use of mobile devices by all segments of the US population has driven healthcare systems, providers, and payers to accept this new form of communication and to develop strategies to implement and leverage the use of mobile healthcare (mHealth) within their organizations and practices. As healthcare systems move toward a more value-driven model of care, patient centeredness and engagement are the keys to success. Mobile healthcare will provide the medium to allow patients to participate more in their care. Financially, mHealth brings to providers the ability to improve efficiency and deliver savings to both them and the healthcare consumer. However, mHealth is not without challenges. Healthcare IT departments have been reluctant to embrace this shift in technology without fully addressing security and privacy concerns. Providers have been hesitant to adopt mHealth as a form of communication with patients because it breaks with traditional models. Our healthcare system has just started the journey toward the development of mHealth. We offer an overview of the mobile healthcare environment and our approach to solving the challenges it brings to healthcare organizations.

  2. On putative periodontal pathogens: an epidemiological perspective

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Rodrigo; Hujoel, Philippe; Belibasakis, Georgios N

    2015-01-01

    The current understanding on the role of microbiology on periodontitis causation is reviewed. An appraisal of the literature reveals several issues that have limited the attempts to investigate candidate periodontal pathogens as causes of periodontitis and confirms that only limited epidemiological evidence is available. Several aspects of the contemporary understanding on causal inference are discussed with examples for periodontitis. PMID:25874553

  3. A Putative Multiple-Demand System in the Macaque Brain

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Andrew H.; Buckley, Mark J.; Mitchell, Anna S.; Sallet, Jerome; Duncan, John

    2016-01-01

    In humans, cognitively demanding tasks of many types recruit common frontoparietal brain areas. Pervasive activation of this “multiple-demand” (MD) network suggests a core function in supporting goal-oriented behavior. A similar network might therefore be predicted in nonhuman primates that readily perform similar tasks after training. However, an MD network in nonhuman primates has not been described. Single-cell recordings from macaque frontal and parietal cortex show some similar properties to human MD fMRI responses (e.g., adaptive coding of task-relevant information). Invasive recordings, however, come from limited prespecified locations, so they do not delineate a macaque homolog of the MD system and their positioning could benefit from knowledge of where MD foci lie. Challenges of scanning behaving animals mean that few macaque fMRI studies specifically contrast levels of cognitive demand, so we sought to identify a macaque counterpart to the human MD system using fMRI connectivity in 35 rhesus macaques. Putative macaque MD regions, mapped from frontoparietal MD regions defined in humans, were found to be functionally connected under anesthesia. To further refine these regions, an iterative process was used to maximize their connectivity cross-validated across animals. Finally, whole-brain connectivity analyses identified voxels that were robustly connected to MD regions, revealing seven clusters across frontoparietal and insular cortex comparable to human MD regions and one unexpected cluster in the lateral fissure. The proposed macaque MD regions can be used to guide future electrophysiological investigation of MD neural coding and in task-based fMRI to test predictions of similar functional properties to human MD cortex. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In humans, a frontoparietal “multiple-demand” (MD) brain network is recruited during a wide range of cognitively demanding tasks. Because this suggests a fundamental function, one might expect a similar

  4. Ion mobility-enhanced MS(E)-based label-free analysis reveals effects of low-dose radiation post contextual fear conditioning training on the mouse hippocampal proteome.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lin; Wickramasekara, Samanthi I; Akinyeke, Tunde; Stewart, Blair S; Jiang, Yuan; Raber, Jacob; Maier, Claudia S

    2016-05-17

    Recent advances in the field of biodosimetry have shown that the response of biological systems to ionizing radiation is complex and depends on the type and dose of radiation, the tissue(s) exposed, and the time lapsed after exposure. The biological effects of low dose radiation on learning and memory are not well understood. An ion mobility-enhanced data-independent acquisition (MS(E)) approach in conjunction with the ISOQuant software tool was utilized for label-free quantification of hippocampal proteins with the goal of determining protein alteration associated with low-dose whole body ionizing radiation (X-rays, 1Gy) of 5.5-month-old male C57BL/6J mice post contextual fear conditioning training. Global proteome analysis revealed deregulation of 73 proteins (out of 399 proteins). Deregulated proteins indicated adverse effects of irradiation on myelination and perturbation of energy metabolism pathways involving a shift from the TCA cycle to glutamate oxidation. Our findings also indicate that proteins associated with synaptic activity, including vesicle recycling and neurotransmission, were altered in the irradiated mice. The elevated LTP and decreased LTD suggest improved synaptic transmission and enhanced efficiency of neurotransmitter release which would be consistent with the observed comparable contextual fear memory performance of the mice following post-training whole body or sham-irradiation. This study is significant because the biological consequences of low dose radiation on learning and memory are complex and not yet well understood. We conducted a IMS-enhanced MS(E)-based label-free quantitative proteomic analysis of hippocampal tissue with the goal of determining protein alteration associated with low-dose whole body ionizing radiation (X-ray, 1Gy) of 5.5-month-old male C57BL/6J mice post contextual fear conditioning training. The IMS-enhanced MS(E) approach in conjunction with ISOQuant software was robust and accurate with low median CV values of

  5. Putative metronidazole neurotoxicosis in a cat.

    PubMed

    Olson, E J; Morales, S C; McVey, A S; Hayden, D W

    2005-09-01

    A presumptive case of metronidazole toxicity in a 3.4-kg adult cat is described. The cat had been treated for suspected inflammatory bowel disease with an anti-inflammatory dose of prednisone and metronidazole (73.5-147 mg/kg PO q24h) for approximately 40 days prior to presentation. Clinical signs were primarily related to the central nervous system, including acute tetraparesis, unresponsiveness, tremors, and vocalization. The patient was euthanatized after 12 days of supportive care. Necropsy revealed no significant macroscopic lesions. Histologic evaluation revealed multifocal, fairly well-demarcated foci of necrosis in the brainstem, extending from the diencephalon to the medulla oblongata. To our knowledge, this is the first report to document histologic lesions associated with metronidazole administration in a cat.

  6. A mobile element in mutS drives hypermutation in a marine Vibrio

    DOE PAGES

    Chu, Nathaniel D.; Clarke, Sean A.; Timberlake, Sonia; ...

    2017-02-07

    Bacteria face a trade-off between genetic fidelity, which reduces deleterious mistakes in the genome, and genetic innovation, which allows organisms to adapt. Evidence suggests that many bacteria balance this trade-off by modulating their mutation rates, but few mechanisms have been described for such modulation. Following experimental evolution and whole-genome resequencing of the marine bacterium Vibrio splendidus 12B01, we discovered one such mechanism, which allows this bacterium to switch to an elevated mutation rate. This switch is driven by the excision of a mobile element residing in mutS, which encodes a DNA mismatch repair protein. When integrated within the bacterial genome,more » the mobile element provides independent promoter and translation start sequences for mutS—different from the bacterium’s original mutS promoter region—which allow the bacterium to make a functional mutS gene product. Excision of this mobile element rejoins the mutS gene with host promoter and translation start sequences but leaves a 2-bp deletion in the mutS sequence, resulting in a frameshift and a hypermutator phenotype. We further identified hundreds of clinical and environmental bacteria across Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria that possess putative mobile elements within the same amino acid motif in mutS. In a subset of these bacteria, we detected excision of the element but not a frameshift mutation; the mobile elements leave an intact mutS coding sequence after excision. Finally, our findings reveal a novel mechanism by which one bacterium alters its mutation rate and hint at a possible evolutionary role for mobile elements within mutS in other bacteria.« less

  7. A Mobile Element in mutS Drives Hypermutation in a Marine Vibrio.

    PubMed

    Chu, Nathaniel D; Clarke, Sean A; Timberlake, Sonia; Polz, Martin F; Grossman, Alan D; Alm, Eric J

    2017-02-07

    Bacteria face a trade-off between genetic fidelity, which reduces deleterious mistakes in the genome, and genetic innovation, which allows organisms to adapt. Evidence suggests that many bacteria balance this trade-off by modulating their mutation rates, but few mechanisms have been described for such modulation. Following experimental evolution and whole-genome resequencing of the marine bacterium Vibrio splendidus 12B01, we discovered one such mechanism, which allows this bacterium to switch to an elevated mutation rate. This switch is driven by the excision of a mobile element residing in mutS, which encodes a DNA mismatch repair protein. When integrated within the bacterial genome, the mobile element provides independent promoter and translation start sequences for mutS-different from the bacterium's original mutS promoter region-which allow the bacterium to make a functional mutS gene product. Excision of this mobile element rejoins the mutS gene with host promoter and translation start sequences but leaves a 2-bp deletion in the mutS sequence, resulting in a frameshift and a hypermutator phenotype. We further identified hundreds of clinical and environmental bacteria across Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria that possess putative mobile elements within the same amino acid motif in mutS In a subset of these bacteria, we detected excision of the element but not a frameshift mutation; the mobile elements leave an intact mutS coding sequence after excision. Our findings reveal a novel mechanism by which one bacterium alters its mutation rate and hint at a possible evolutionary role for mobile elements within mutS in other bacteria.

  8. A Mobile Element in mutS Drives Hypermutation in a Marine Vibrio

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Nathaniel D.; Clarke, Sean A.; Timberlake, Sonia; Polz, Martin F.; Grossman, Alan D.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteria face a trade-off between genetic fidelity, which reduces deleterious mistakes in the genome, and genetic innovation, which allows organisms to adapt. Evidence suggests that many bacteria balance this trade-off by modulating their mutation rates, but few mechanisms have been described for such modulation. Following experimental evolution and whole-genome resequencing of the marine bacterium Vibrio splendidus 12B01, we discovered one such mechanism, which allows this bacterium to switch to an elevated mutation rate. This switch is driven by the excision of a mobile element residing in mutS, which encodes a DNA mismatch repair protein. When integrated within the bacterial genome, the mobile element provides independent promoter and translation start sequences for mutS—different from the bacterium’s original mutS promoter region—which allow the bacterium to make a functional mutS gene product. Excision of this mobile element rejoins the mutS gene with host promoter and translation start sequences but leaves a 2-bp deletion in the mutS sequence, resulting in a frameshift and a hypermutator phenotype. We further identified hundreds of clinical and environmental bacteria across Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria that possess putative mobile elements within the same amino acid motif in mutS. In a subset of these bacteria, we detected excision of the element but not a frameshift mutation; the mobile elements leave an intact mutS coding sequence after excision. Our findings reveal a novel mechanism by which one bacterium alters its mutation rate and hint at a possible evolutionary role for mobile elements within mutS in other bacteria. PMID:28174306

  9. The crystal structure of M. leprae ML2640c defines a large family of putative S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferases in mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Graña, Martin; Haouz, Ahmed; Buschiazzo, Alejandro; Miras, Isabelle; Wehenkel, Annemarie; Bondet, Vincent; Shepard, William; Schaeffer, Francis; Cole, Stewart T.; Alzari, Pedro M.

    2007-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae protein ML2640c belongs to a large family of conserved hypothetical proteins predominantly found in mycobacteria, some of them predicted as putative S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet)-dependent methyltransferases (MTase). As part of a Structural Genomics initiative on conserved hypothetical proteins in pathogenic mycobacteria, we have determined the structure of ML2640c in two distinct crystal forms. As expected, ML2640c has a typical MTase core domain and binds the methyl donor substrate AdoMet in a manner consistent with other known members of this structural family. The putative acceptor substrate-binding site of ML2640c is a large internal cavity, mostly lined by aromatic and aliphatic side-chain residues, suggesting that a lipid-like molecule might be targeted for catalysis. A flap segment (residues 222–256), which isolates the binding site from the bulk solvent and is highly mobile in the crystal structures, could serve as a gateway to allow substrate entry and product release. The multiple sequence alignment of ML2640c-like proteins revealed that the central α/β core and the AdoMet-binding site are very well conserved within the family. However, the amino acid positions defining the binding site for the acceptor substrate display a higher variability, suggestive of distinct acceptor substrate specificities. The ML2640c crystal structures offer the first structural glimpses at this important family of mycobacterial proteins and lend strong support to their functional assignment as AdoMet-dependent methyltransferases. PMID:17660248

  10. Different Attitudes Concerning the Usage of Live Mobile TV and Mobile Video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyauchi, Koji; Sugahara, Taro; Oda, Hiromi

    The usage of live mobile TV and mobile video devices is increasing in Japan as well as in other countries. We conducted a user study in the summer of 2007, in the Tokyo area of Japan, with 11 participants, in order to understand through qualitative interviews when, how, and why people were using such devices. In this chapter, we present several findings from this user study, which reveals the different attitudes concerning the usage of live mobile TV compared with that of mobile video. These findings consider the following points. (1) Usage on commuter buses or trains, (2) usage at home, (3) usage related to experience sharing, and (4) interest of live mobile TV users in mobile video, and interest of mobile video users in live mobile TV. This chapter also proposes some ideas to improve user experience with mobile TV and video, and compares the results of our user study with those conducted in Finland, Korea, the USA, and the UK.

  11. Mobile Customer Relationship Management and Mobile Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanayei, Ali; Mirzaei, Abas

    The purpose of this study is twofold. First, in order to guarantee a coherent discussion about mobile customer relationship management (mCRM), this paper presents a conceptualization of mCRM delineating its unique characteristics because of Among the variety of mobile services, considerable attention has been devoted to mobile marketing and in particular to mobile customer relationship management services. Second, the authors discusses the security risks in mobile computing in different level(user, mobile device, wireless network,...) and finally we focus on enterprise mobile security and it's subgroups with a series of suggestion and solution for improve mobile computing security.

  12. The aerosols' fate in a putative ammonia ocean on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez, S. I.; Coll, P.; Buch, A.; Brassé, C.; Poch, O.; Raulin, F.

    2010-04-01

    A laboratory study on the chemical transformation of Titan's aerosol analogues placed under putative surface conditions of the satellite was performed. The surface of Titan was one of the targets of the Cassini-Huygens mission and of several of the Cassini orbiter instruments, especially ISS, VIMS and Radar. The first images revealed an interesting solid surface with features that suggest aeolian, tectonic, fluvial processes and even an impact structure[1]. Since then, more detailed descriptions of dunes, channels, lakes, impact craters and cryovolcanic structures have been documented[2]. The existence of an internal liquid water ocean, containing a few percent ammonia has been proposed[2, 3]. It has also been proposed that ammonia-water mixtures can erupt from the putative subsurface ocean leading to cryovolcanism[4]. The Cassini Titan Radar Mapper obtained Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images during 2004 and 2005 that revealed a highly complex geology occurring at Titan's surface[5], among which cryovolcanic features play a central role. The composition of the cryomagma is mainly proposed to be a mixture of water ice and ammonia[6, 7, 8], although ammonia has not been directly detected on Titan, but suggested by recent Cassini-VIMS observations[9]. In order to understand the role that ammonia may play on the chemical transformation of atmospheric aerosols once they reach the surface, we designed the following protocol: laboratory analogues of Titan's aerosols were synthesized from a N2:CH4 (98:2) mixture irradiated under a continuous flow regime of 845 sccm inside which, a cold plasma of 180 W was established. The synthesized analogues were recovered and partitioned in several 10.0 mg samples that were placed in 4.0 mL-volume of aqueous ammonia solutions (25.00, 12.50, 6.25 and 3.125%) at different temperatures (298, 277, 253 and 93 K) for 10 weeks. After a derivatization process performed to the aerosols' refractory phase with N

  13. Genome-wide scans between two honeybee populations reveal putative signatures of human-mediated selection.

    PubMed

    Parejo, M; Wragg, D; Henriques, D; Vignal, A; Neuditschko, M

    2017-09-04

    Human-mediated selection has left signatures in the genomes of many domesticated animals, including the European dark honeybee, Apis mellifera mellifera, which has been selected by apiculturists for centuries. Using whole-genome sequence information, we investigated selection signatures in spatially separated honeybee subpopulations (Switzerland, n = 39 and France, n = 17). Three different test statistics were calculated in windows of 2 kb (fixation index, cross-population extended haplotype homozygosity and cross-population composite likelihood ratio) and combined into a recently developed composite selection score. Applying a stringent false discovery rate of 0.01, we identified six significant selective sweeps distributed across five chromosomes covering eight genes. These genes are associated with multiple molecular and biological functions, including regulation of transcription, receptor binding and signal transduction. Of particular interest is a selection signature on chromosome 1, which corresponds to the WNT4 gene, the family of which is conserved across the animal kingdom with a variety of functions. In Drosophila melanogaster, WNT4 alleles have been associated with differential wing, cross vein and abdominal phenotypes. Defining phenotypic characteristics of different Apis mellifera ssp., which are typically used as selection criteria, include colour and wing venation pattern. This signal is therefore likely to be a good candidate for human mediated-selection arising from different applied breeding practices in the two managed populations. © 2017 The Authors. Animal Genetics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  14. Genome-wide association study reveals putative regulators of bioenergy traits in Populus deltoides.

    PubMed

    Fahrenkrog, Annette M; Neves, Leandro G; Resende, Márcio F R; Vazquez, Ana I; de Los Campos, Gustavo; Dervinis, Christopher; Sykes, Robert; Davis, Mark; Davenport, Ruth; Barbazuk, William B; Kirst, Matias

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been used extensively to dissect the genetic regulation of complex traits in plants. These studies have focused largely on the analysis of common genetic variants despite the abundance of rare polymorphisms in several species, and their potential role in trait variation. Here, we conducted the first GWAS in Populus deltoides, a genetically diverse keystone forest species in North America and an important short rotation woody crop for the bioenergy industry. We searched for associations between eight growth and wood composition traits, and common and low-frequency single-nucleotide polymorphisms detected by targeted resequencing of 18 153 genes in a population of 391 unrelated individuals. To increase power to detect associations with low-frequency variants, multiple-marker association tests were used in combination with single-marker association tests. Significant associations were discovered for all phenotypes and are indicative that low-frequency polymorphisms contribute to phenotypic variance of several bioenergy traits. Our results suggest that both common and low-frequency variants need to be considered for a comprehensive understanding of the genetic regulation of complex traits, particularly in species that carry large numbers of rare polymorphisms. These polymorphisms may be critical for the development of specialized plant feedstocks for bioenergy.

  15. The molecular diversity of freshwater picoeukaryotes reveals high occurrence of putative parasitoids in the plankton.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Emilie; Roussel, Balbine; Amblard, Christian; Sime-Ngando, Télesphore

    2008-06-11

    Eukaryotic microorganisms have been undersampled in biodiversity studies in freshwater environments. We present an original 18S rDNA survey of freshwater picoeukaryotes sampled during spring/summer 2005, complementing an earlier study conducted in autumn 2004 in Lake Pavin (France). These studies were designed to detect the small unidentified heterotrophic flagellates (HF, 0.6-5 microm) which are considered the main bacterivores in aquatic systems. Alveolates, Fungi and Stramenopiles represented 65% of the total diversity and differed from the dominant groups known from microscopic studies. Fungi and Telonemia taxa were restricted to the oxic zone which displayed two fold more operational taxonomic units (OTUs) than the oxycline. Temporal forcing also appeared as a driving force in the diversification within targeted organisms. Several sequences were not similar to those in databases and were considered as new or unsampled taxa, some of which may be typical of freshwater environments. Two taxa known from marine systems, the genera Telonema and Amoebophrya, were retrieved for the first time in our freshwater study. The analysis of potential trophic strategies displayed among the targeted HF highlighted the dominance of parasites and saprotrophs, and provided indications that these organisms have probably been wrongfully regarded as bacterivores in previous studies. A theoretical exercise based on a new 'parasite/saprotroph-dominated HF hypothesis' demonstrates that the inclusion of parasites and saprotrophs may increase the functional role of the microbial loop as a link for carbon flows in pelagic ecosystems. New interesting perspectives in aquatic microbial ecology are thus opened.

  16. Comparative Analysis of Latex Transcriptome Reveals Putative Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Super Productivity of Hevea brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Heping; Fan, Yujie; Yang, Jianghua; Qi, Jiyan; Li, Huibo

    2013-01-01

    Increasing demand for natural rubber prompts studies into the mechanisms governing the productivity of rubber tree (Heveabrasiliensis). It is very interesting to notice that a rubber tree of clone PR107 in Yunnan, China is reported to yield more than 20 times higher than the average rubber tree. This super-high-yielding (SHY) rubber tree (designated as SY107), produced 4.12 kg of latex (cytoplasm of rubber producing laticifers, containing about 30% of rubber) per tapping, more than 7-fold higher than that of the control. This rubber tree is therefore a good material to study how the rubber production is regulated at a molecular aspect. A comprehensive cDNA-AFLP transcript profiling was performed on the latex of SY107 and its average counterparts by using the 384 selective primer pairs for two restriction enzyme combinations (ApoI/MseI and TaqI/MseI). A total of 746 differentially expressed (DE) transcript-derived fragments (TDFs) were identified, of which the expression patterns of 453 TDFs were further confirmed by RT-PCR. These RT-PCR confirmed TDFs represented 352 non-redundant genes, of which 215 had known or partially known functions and were grouped into 10 functional categories. The top three largest categories were transcription and protein synthesis (representing 24.7% of the total genes), defense and stress (15.3%), and primary and secondary metabolism (14.0%). Detailed analysis of the DE-genes suggests notable characteristics of SHY phenotype in improved sucrose loading capability, rubber biosynthesis-preferred sugar utilization, enhanced general metabolism and timely stress alleviation. However, the SHY phenotype has little correlation with rubber-biosynthesis pathway genes. PMID:24066172

  17. Comparative analysis of latex transcriptome reveals putative molecular mechanisms underlying super productivity of Hevea brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chaorong; Xiao, Xiaohu; Li, Heping; Fan, Yujie; Yang, Jianghua; Qi, Jiyan; Li, Huibo

    2013-01-01

    Increasing demand for natural rubber prompts studies into the mechanisms governing the productivity of rubber tree (Heveabrasiliensis). It is very interesting to notice that a rubber tree of clone PR107 in Yunnan, China is reported to yield more than 20 times higher than the average rubber tree. This super-high-yielding (SHY) rubber tree (designated as SY107), produced 4.12 kg of latex (cytoplasm of rubber producing laticifers, containing about 30% of rubber) per tapping, more than 7-fold higher than that of the control. This rubber tree is therefore a good material to study how the rubber production is regulated at a molecular aspect. A comprehensive cDNA-AFLP transcript profiling was performed on the latex of SY107 and its average counterparts by using the 384 selective primer pairs for two restriction enzyme combinations (ApoI/MseI and TaqI/MseI). A total of 746 differentially expressed (DE) transcript-derived fragments (TDFs) were identified, of which the expression patterns of 453 TDFs were further confirmed by RT-PCR. These RT-PCR confirmed TDFs represented 352 non-redundant genes, of which 215 had known or partially known functions and were grouped into 10 functional categories. The top three largest categories were transcription and protein synthesis (representing 24.7% of the total genes), defense and stress (15.3%), and primary and secondary metabolism (14.0%). Detailed analysis of the DE-genes suggests notable characteristics of SHY phenotype in improved sucrose loading capability, rubber biosynthesis-preferred sugar utilization, enhanced general metabolism and timely stress alleviation. However, the SHY phenotype has little correlation with rubber-biosynthesis pathway genes.

  18. The Molecular Diversity of Freshwater Picoeukaryotes Reveals High Occurrence of Putative Parasitoids in the Plankton

    PubMed Central

    Lefèvre, Emilie; Roussel, Balbine; Amblard, Christian; Sime-Ngando, Télesphore

    2008-01-01

    Eukaryotic microorganisms have been undersampled in biodiversity studies in freshwater environments. We present an original 18S rDNA survey of freshwater picoeukaryotes sampled during spring/summer 2005, complementing an earlier study conducted in autumn 2004 in Lake Pavin (France). These studies were designed to detect the small unidentified heterotrophic flagellates (HF, 0.6–5 µm) which are considered the main bacterivores in aquatic systems. Alveolates, Fungi and Stramenopiles represented 65% of the total diversity and differed from the dominant groups known from microscopic studies. Fungi and Telonemia taxa were restricted to the oxic zone which displayed two fold more operational taxonomic units (OTUs) than the oxycline. Temporal forcing also appeared as a driving force in the diversification within targeted organisms. Several sequences were not similar to those in databases and were considered as new or unsampled taxa, some of which may be typical of freshwater environments. Two taxa known from marine systems, the genera Telonema and Amoebophrya, were retrieved for the first time in our freshwater study. The analysis of potential trophic strategies displayed among the targeted HF highlighted the dominance of parasites and saprotrophs, and provided indications that these organisms have probably been wrongfully regarded as bacterivores in previous studies. A theoretical exercise based on a new ‘parasite/saprotroph-dominated HF hypothesis’ demonstrates that the inclusion of parasites and saprotrophs may increase the functional role of the microbial loop as a link for carbon flows in pelagic ecosystems. New interesting perspectives in aquatic microbial ecology are thus opened. PMID:18545660

  19. Expression analysis of Arabidopsis vacuolar sorting receptor 3 reveals a putative function in guard cells.

    PubMed

    Avila, Emily L; Brown, Michelle; Pan, Songqin; Desikan, Radhika; Neill, Steven J; Girke, Thomas; Surpin, Marci; Raikhel, Natasha V

    2008-01-01

    Vacuolar sorting receptors (VSRs) are responsible for the proper targeting of soluble cargo proteins to their destination compartments. The Arabidopsis genome encodes seven VSRs. In this work, the spatio-temporal expression of one of the members of this gene family, AtVSR3, was determined by RT-PCR and promoter::reporter gene fusions. AtVSR3 was expressed specifically in guard cells. Consequently, a reverse genetics approach was taken to determine the function of AtVSR3 by using RNA interference (RNAi) technology. Plants expressing little or no AtVSR3 transcript had a compressed life cycle, bolting approximately 1 week earlier and senescing up to 2 weeks earlier than the wild-type parent line. While the development and distribution of stomata in AtVSR3 RNAi plants appeared normal, stomatal function was altered. The guard cells of mutant plants did not close in response to abscisic acid treatment, and the mean leaf temperatures of the RNAi plants were on average 0.8 degrees C lower than both wild type and another vacuolar sorting receptor mutant, atvsr1-1. Furthermore, the loss of AtVSR3 protein caused the accumulation of nitric oxide and hydrogen peroxide, signalling molecules implicated in the regulation of stomatal opening and closing. Finally, proteomics and western blot analyses of cellular proteins isolated from wild-type and AtVSR3 RNAi leaves showed that phospholipase Dgamma, which may play a role in abscisic acid signalling, accumulated to higher levels in AtVSR3 RNAi guard cells. Thus, AtVSR3 may play an important role in responses to plant stress.

  20. Cineradiography of monkey lip-smacking reveals putative precursors of speech dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ghazanfar, Asif A; Takahashi, Daniel Y; Mathur, Neil; Fitch, W Tecumseh

    2012-07-10

    A key feature of speech is its stereotypical 5 Hz rhythm. One theory posits that this rhythm evolved through the modification of rhythmic facial movements in ancestral primates. If the hypothesis has any validity, then a comparative approach may shed some light. We tested this idea by using cineradiography (X-ray movies) to characterize and quantify the internal dynamics of the macaque monkey vocal tract during lip-smacking (a rhythmic facial expression) versus chewing. Previous human studies showed that speech movements are faster than chewing movements, and the functional coordination between vocal tract structures is different between the two behaviors. If rhythmic speech evolved through a rhythmic ancestral facial movement, then one hypothesis is that monkey lip-smacking versus chewing should also exhibit these differences. We found that the lips, tongue, and hyoid move with a speech-like 5 Hz rhythm during lip-smacking, but not during chewing. Most importantly, the functional coordination between these structures was distinct for each behavior. These data provide empirical support for the idea that the human speech rhythm evolved from the rhythmic facial expressions of ancestral primates.

  1. Genome-wide association study reveals putative regulators of bioenergy traits in Populus deltoides

    DOE PAGES

    Fahrenkrog, Annette M.; Neves, Leandro G.; Resende, Jr., Marcio F. R.; ...

    2016-09-06

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been used extensively to dissect the genetic regulation of complex traits in plants. These studies have focused largely on the analysis of common genetic variants despite the abundance of rare polymorphisms in several species, and their potential role in trait variation. Here, we conducted the first GWAS in Populus deltoides, a genetically diverse keystone forest species in North America and an important short rotation woody crop for the bioenergy industry. We searched for associations between eight growth and wood composition traits, and common and low-frequency single-nucleotide polymorphisms detected by targeted resequencing of 18 153 genesmore » in a population of 391 unrelated individuals. To increase power to detect associations with low-frequency variants, multiple-marker association tests were used in combination with single-marker association tests. Significant associations were discovered for all phenotypes and are indicative that low-frequency polymorphisms contribute to phenotypic variance of several bioenergy traits. Our results suggest that both common and low-frequency variants need to be considered for a comprehensive understanding of the genetic regulation of complex traits, particularly in species that carry large numbers of rare polymorphisms. Lastly, these polymorphisms may be critical for the development of specialized plant feedstocks for bioenergy.« less

  2. Tissue factor residues that putatively interact with membrane phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Ke, Ke; Yuan, Jian; Morrissey, James H

    2014-01-01

    Blood clotting is initiated by the two-subunit enzyme consisting of the plasma protease, factor VIIa (the catalytic subunit), bound to the integral membrane protein, tissue factor (the regulatory subunit). Molecular dynamics simulations have predicted that certain residues in the tissue factor ectodomain interact with phosphatidylserine headgroups to ensure optimal positioning of the tissue factor/factor VIIa complex relative to its membrane-bound protein substrates, factors IX and X. In this study, we individually mutated to alanine all the putative phosphatidylserine-interactive residues in the tissue factor ectodomain and measured their effects on tissue factor cofactor function (activation of factors IX and X by tissue factor/factor VIIa, and clotting of plasma). Some tissue factor mutants exhibited decreased activity in all three assays, with the most profound defects observed from mutations in or near the flexible loop from Lys159 to Gly164. The decreased activity of all of these tissue factor mutants could be partially or completely overcome by increasing the phosphatidylserine content of tissue factor-liposomes. Additionally, yeast surface display was used to screen a random library of tissue factor mutants for enhanced factor VIIa binding. Surprisingly, mutations at a single amino acid (Lys165) predominated, with the Lys165→Glu mutant exhibiting a 3-fold enhancement in factor VIIa binding affinity. Our studies reveal the functional contributions of residues in the C-terminal half of the tissue factor ectodomain that are implicated in interacting with phosphatidylserine headgroups to enhance tissue factor cofactor activity, possibly by allosterically modulating the conformation of the adjacent substrate-binding exosite region of tissue factor.

  3. Going mobile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brus, Eric

    1987-12-01

    By 1990, all metropolitan areas in the U.S. and rural areas close to major cities or towns are expected to have cellular telephone service; 22 Canadian cities also feature cellular service. To supply mobile telecommunication services to sparsely-populated rural areas, a mobile satellite service (MSS) is now being developed. In this paper the projected possibilities of the MSS system are discussed, including a possibility that a piggyback-MSS payload be added to the GSTAR-4 satellite which is scheduled for a launch in 1988 or 1989; one in which some of the hardware from aborted direct-broadcast satellites would be used; and the possibility of building a new MSS satellite with large servicing capacity. Canada is planning to launch its own mobile satellite, MSAT, in the early 1990s. The MSS is expected to be 'generic', serving not only people on land but maritime and aeronautical users as well. It will also offer major benefits to truck and automobile drivers, making it possible for them to conduct business or to call for assistance from locations beyond the range of cellular systems.

  4. Ceres' darkest secret and its putative exosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schorghofer, N.; Mazarico, E.; Platz, T.; Schroeder, S.; Byrne, S.; Carsenty, U.; Combe, J. P.; Ermakov, A.; McFadden, L. A.; Prettyman, T. H.; Preusker, F.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2016-12-01

    Craters near Ceres' rotational poles can be shadowed year-round and trap volatiles. The persistently shadowed regions (PSRs) have been mapped in the northern hemisphere in two ways: by illumination modeling based on the topography and by stacking of images acquired near summer solstice. Scattered light reveals bright crater floor deposits (BCFDs) in a few PSRs. The lack of BCFDs in most PSRs can in part be explained by changes in Ceres' obliquity (axis tilt). At least one BCFD is illuminated and spectroscopically identified as H2O ice; this deposit is exceptionally bright and unusual morphologically. The BCFDs are likely water ice, either delivered through the exosphere or exposed ground ice. The remarkably shallow depths at which water ice is encountered on Ceres, on a global scale, imply that only a small amount of H2O was supplied to its water exosphere from this endogenic source. Ice that accumulated in the PSRs is hence easily dominated by other sources. The lack of optically thick ice deposits in most PSRs provides an upper bound on the exogenic delivery of water to Ceres, estimated as <109 kg since the most recent obliquity maximum 14 kyr ago. Water molecules are only barely gravitationally bound to Ceres at thermal speeds, but heavier species can be long-lived in the exosphere due to the low photo-destruction rates. Nevertheless, there is no observational evidence of other exospheric species yet. These results are based on observations by the FC (Framing Camera), VIR (Visible and Infrared Spectrometer), GRaND (Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer), and Gravity Science investigation of the Dawn spacecraft, which continues to advance our understanding not only of Ceres but of processes relevant to other Solar System bodies as well.

  5. ADAM 12: a putative marker of oligodendrogliomas?

    PubMed

    Kanakis, Dimitrios; Lendeckel, Uwe; Theodosiou, Paraskevi; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Mawrin, Christian; Keilhoff, Gerburg; Bukowska, Alicia; Dietzmann, Knut; Bogerts, Bernhard; Bernstein, Hans-Gert

    2013-01-01

    ADAM 12 (meltrin alpha) belongs to a large family of molecules, consisting of members with both disintegrin and metalloproteinase properties. ADAMs have been implicated in several cell physiological processes including cell adhesion, cell fusion, proteolysis and signalling. ADAM 12 is widely expressed, including skeletal muscle, testis, bone, intestine, heart and kidney. In addition, a variety of tumours show elevated expression of ADAM12; among them being breast-, colon-, gastric- and lung-carcinoma. As to the brain, ADAM 12 has been shown previously to be expressed in rat and human oligodendrocytes. However, little is known about the expression of this protease in brain tumours. This study demonstrates the presence of ADAM 12 in non-neoplastic oligodendroglial cells of normal human brain as well as in neoplastic oligodendroglia and minigemistocytes arising from four pure oligodendrogliomas and three mixed oligoastrocytomas. Double stainings revealed a notable preference of ADAM 12 for the oligodendroglial over astroglial components. The results of immunohistochemistry are in accordance with the results obtained from the RT-PCR, which further demonstrated a mild difference concerning the mRNA concentration of ADAM 12 between similar grades of eight astrocytomas and eight oligodendrogliomas (namely four astrocytomas grade II versus four oligodendrogliomas grade II and four astrocytomas grade III versus four oligodendrogliomas grade III). Both cellular immunostaining for ADAM 12 and ADAM 12 mRNA content decrease with higher histologic grade of the tumour. Surprisingly, the latter parameter (ADAM12 mRNA) showed a significant opposite correlation to the degree of histologic tumour malignancy. From our data showing that ADAM 12 is highly expressed in, but not restricted to, oligodendrogliomas, we conclude that ADAM 12 immunohistochemistry may be a helpful tool in the diagnosis of brain tumours.

  6. ADAM 12: A Putative Marker of Oligodendrogliomas?

    PubMed Central

    Kanakis, Dimitrios; Lendeckel, Uwe; Theodosiou, Paraskevi; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Mawrin, Christian; Keilhoff, Gerburg; Bukowska, Alicia; Dietzmann, Knut; Bogerts, Bernhard; Bernstein, Hans-Gert

    2013-01-01

    ADAM 12 (meltrin alpha) belongs to a large family of molecules, consisting of members with both disintegrin and metalloproteinase properties. ADAMs have been implicated in several cell physiological processes including cell adhesion, cell fusion, proteolysis and signalling. ADAM 12 is widely expressed, including skeletal muscle, testis, bone, intestine, heart and kidney. In addition, a variety of tumours show elevated expression of ADAM12; among them being breast-, colon-, gastric- and lung-carcinoma. As to the brain, ADAM 12 has been shown previously to be expressed in rat and human oligodendrocytes. However, little is known about the expression of this protease in brain tumours. This study demonstrates the presence of ADAM 12 in non-neoplastic oligodendroglial cells of normal human brain as well as in neoplastic oligodendroglia and minigemistocytes arising from four pure oligodendrogliomas and three mixed oligoastrocytomas. Double stainings revealed a notable preference of ADAM 12 for the oligodendroglial over astroglial components. The results of immunohistochemistry are in accordance with the results obtained from the RT-PCR, which further demonstrated a mild difference concerning the mRNA concentration of ADAM 12 between similar grades of eight astrocytomas and eight oligodendrogliomas (namely four astrocytomas grade II versus four oligodendrogliomas grade II and four astrocytomas grade III versus four oligodendrogliomas grade III). Both cellular immunostaining for ADAM 12 and ADAM 12 mRNA content decrease with higher histologic grade of the tumour. Surprisingly, the latter parameter (ADAM12 mRNA) showed a significant opposite correlation to the degree of histologic tumour malignancy. From our data showing that ADAM 12 is highly expressed in, but not restricted to, oligodendrogliomas, we conclude that ADAM 12 immunohistochemistry may be a helpful tool in the diagnosis of brain tumours. PMID:23324579

  7. Structure, regulation, and putative function of the arginine deiminase system of Streptococcus suis.

    PubMed

    Gruening, Petra; Fulde, Marcus; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Goethe, Ralph

    2006-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is an important cause of infectious diseases in young pigs. Little is known about the virulence factors or protective antigens of S. suis. Recently, we have identified two proteins of the arginine deiminase system (ADS) of S. suis, which were temperature induced and expressed on the streptococcal surface (N. Winterhoff, R. Goethe, P. Gruening, M. Rohde, H. Kalisz, H. E. Smith, and P. Valentin-Weigand, J. Bacteriol. 184:6768-6776, 2002). In the present study, we analyzed the complete ADS of S. suis. Due to their homologies to the recently published S. gordonii ADS genes, the genes for arginine deiminase, ornithine carbamoyl-transferase, and carbamate kinase, which were previously designated adiS, octS, and ckS, respectively, were renamed arcA, arcB, and arcC, respectively. Our data revealed that arcA, arcB, and arcC of the S. suis ADS are transcribed from an operon (arcABC operon). Additionally, putative ADS-associated genes were cloned and sequenced which, however, did not belong to the arcABC operon. These were the flpS gene upstream of the arcABC operon with homology to the flp transcription regulator of S. gordonii and the arcD, arcT, arcH, and argR genes downstream of the arcABC operon with high homologies to a putative arginine-ornithine antiporter, a putative dipeptidase of S. gordonii, a putative beta-N-acetylhexosaminidase of S. pneumoniae, and a putative arginine repressor of S. gordonii, respectively. The transcriptional start point of the arcABC operon was determined, and promoter analysis provided evidence that multiple factors contribute to the regulation of the ADS. Thus, a putative binding site for a transcription regulator of the Crp/Fnr family, an ArgR-binding site, and two cis-acting catabolite response elements were identified in the promoter-operator region of the operon. Consistent with this, we could demonstrate that the ADS of S. suis is inducible by arginine and reduced O2 tension and subject to carbon catabolite

  8. Structure, Regulation, and Putative Function of the Arginine Deiminase System of Streptococcus suis

    PubMed Central

    Gruening, Petra; Fulde, Marcus; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Goethe, Ralph

    2006-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is an important cause of infectious diseases in young pigs. Little is known about the virulence factors or protective antigens of S. suis. Recently, we have identified two proteins of the arginine deiminase system (ADS) of S. suis, which were temperature induced and expressed on the streptococcal surface (N. Winterhoff, R. Goethe, P. Gruening, M. Rohde, H. Kalisz, H. E. Smith, and P. Valentin-Weigand, J. Bacteriol. 184:6768-6776, 2002). In the present study, we analyzed the complete ADS of S. suis. Due to their homologies to the recently published S. gordonii ADS genes, the genes for arginine deiminase, ornithine carbamoyl-transferase, and carbamate kinase, which were previously designated adiS, octS, and ckS, respectively, were renamed arcA, arcB, and arcC, respectively. Our data revealed that arcA, arcB, and arcC of the S. suis ADS are transcribed from an operon (arcABC operon). Additionally, putative ADS-associated genes were cloned and sequenced which, however, did not belong to the arcABC operon. These were the flpS gene upstream of the arcABC operon with homology to the flp transcription regulator of S. gordonii and the arcD, arcT, arcH, and argR genes downstream of the arcABC operon with high homologies to a putative arginine-ornithine antiporter, a putative dipeptidase of S. gordonii, a putative β-N-acetylhexosaminidase of S. pneumoniae, and a putative arginine repressor of S. gordonii, respectively. The transcriptional start point of the arcABC operon was determined, and promoter analysis provided evidence that multiple factors contribute to the regulation of the ADS. Thus, a putative binding site for a transcription regulator of the Crp/Fnr family, an ArgR-binding site, and two cis-acting catabolite response elements were identified in the promoter-operator region of the operon. Consistent with this, we could demonstrate that the ADS of S. suis is inducible by arginine and reduced O2 tension and subject to carbon catabolite repression

  9. Unprecedented diversity of catalytic domains in the first four modules of the putative pederin polyketide synthase.

    PubMed

    Piel, Jörn; Wen, Gaiping; Platzer, Matthias; Hui, Dequan

    2004-01-03

    Polyketides of the pederin group are highly potent antitumor compounds found in terrestrial beetles and marine sponges. Pederin is used by beetles of the genera Paederus and Paederidus as a chemical defense. We have recently identified a group of putative pederin biosynthesis genes and localized them to the genome of an as yet unculturable Pseudomonas sp. symbiont, the likely true pederin producer. However, this polyketide synthase cluster lacks several genes expected for pederin production. Here we report an additional polyketide synthase encoded on a separate region of the symbiont genome. It contains at least three novel catalytic domains that are predicted to be involved in pederin chain initiation and the formation of an unusual exomethylene bond. The region is bordered by mobility pseudogenes; this suggests that gene transposition led to the disjointed cluster organization. With this work, all putative pederin genes have been identified. Their heterologous expression in a culturable bacterium will provide important insights into how sustainable sources of invertebrate-derived drug candidates can be created.

  10. Computational identification of putative lincRNAs in mouse embryonic stem cell

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Lyu, Jie; Liu, Hongbo; Gao, Yang; Guo, Jing; He, Hongjuan; Han, Zhengbin; Zhang, Yan; Wu, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    As the regulatory factors, lncRNAs play critical roles in embryonic stem cells. And lincRNAs are most widely studied lncRNAs, however, there might still might exist a large member of uncovered lncRNAs. In this study, we constructed the de novo assembly of transcriptome to detect 6,701 putative long intergenic non-coding transcripts (lincRNAs) expressed in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs), which might be incomplete with the lack coverage of 5′ ends assessed by CAGE peaks. Comparing the TSS proximal regions between the known lincRNAs and their closet protein coding transcripts, our results revealed that the lincRNA TSS proximal regions are associated with the characteristic genomic and epigenetic features. Subsequently, 1,293 lincRNAs were corrected at their 5′ ends using the putative lincRNA TSS regions predicted by the TSS proximal region prediction model based on genomic and epigenetic features. Finally, 43 putative lincRNAs were annotated by Gene Ontology terms. In conclusion, this work provides a novel catalog of mouse ESCs-expressed lincRNAs with the relatively complete transcript length, which might be useful for the investigation of transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of lincRNA in mouse ESCs and even mammalian development. PMID:27713513

  11. In silico identification of a putative new paramyxovirus related to the Henipavirus genus.

    PubMed

    Schomacker, Henrick; Collins, Peter L; Schmidt, Alexander C

    2004-12-05

    A database search for genes encoding paramyxoviral proteins revealed sequences that were designated as human but presented strong evidence of being of viral origin. The two cDNA-derived sequences designated AngRem104 and AngRem52 were originally described as human gene products that were upregulated by angiotensin II in primary mesangial kidney cells. However, their high degree of sequence relatedness to known viral proteins suggests that they represent the P/C/V, M, and F genes of a putative new member of family Paramyxoviridae. Comparison of deduced amino acid sequences and nucleotide motifs suggests that this putative virus is a divergent relative of the Hendra and Nipah viruses; hence, we suggest henipa-like virus or HNLV as a provisional name. Compared to Nipah virus, the percentage of identical (similar) amino acids varied from 19% (42%) for the C protein to 51% (75%) for the M protein. The presence and conservation of presumptive viral transcription start and stop signals and an apparent P editing motif also indicate a relationship of this putative virus to the henipaviruses. Given the highly pathogenic nature of the henipaviruses, the origin of these sequences is enigmatic, and attempts to identify and isolate HNLV are warranted.

  12. Genomic identification of a putative circadian system in the cladoceran crustacean Daphnia pulex

    PubMed Central

    Tilden, Andrea R.; McCoole, Matthew D.; Harmon, Sarah M.; Baer, Kevin N.; Christie, Andrew E.

    2011-01-01

    Essentially nothing is known about the molecular underpinnings of crustacean circadian clocks. The genome of Daphnia pulex, the only crustacean genome available for public use, provides a unique resource for identifying putative circadian proteins in this species. Here, the Daphnia genome was mined for putative circadian protein genes using Drosophila melanogaster queries. The sequences of core clock (e.g. CLOCK, CYCLE, PERIOD, TIMELESS and CRYPTOCHROME 2), clock input (CRYPTOCHROME 1) and clock output (PIGMENT DISPERSING HORMONE RECEPTOR) proteins were deduced. Structural analyses and alignment of the Daphnia proteins with their Drosophila counterparts revealed extensive sequence conservation, particularly in functional domains. Comparisons of the Daphnia proteins with other sequences showed that they are, in most cases, more similar to homologs from other species, including vertebrates, than they are to those of Drosophila. The presence of both CRYPTOCHROME 1 and 2 in Daphnia suggests the organization of its clock may be more similar to that of the butterfly Danaus plexippus than to that of Drosophila (which possesses CRYPTOCHROME 1 but not CRYPTOCHROME 2). These data represent the first description of a putative circadian system from any crustacean, and provide a foundation for future molecular, anatomical and physiological investigations of circadian signaling in Daphnia. PMID:21798832

  13. Molecular cloning of a putative divalent-cation transporter gene as a new genetic marker for the identification of Lactobacillus brevis strains capable of growing in beer.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, N; Ito, M; Horiike, S; Taguchi, H

    2001-05-01

    Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) PCR analysis of Lactobacillus brevis isolates from breweries revealed that one of the random primers could distinguish beer-spoilage strains of L. brevis from nonspoilage strains. The 1.1-kb DNA fragment amplified from all beer-spoilers included one open reading frame, termed hitA (hop-inducible cation transporter), which encodes an integral membrane protein with 11 putative trans-membrane domains and a binding protein-dependent transport signature of a non-ATP binding membrane transporter common to several prokaryotic and eukaryotic transporters. The hitA polypeptide is homologous to the natural resistance-associated macrophage protein (Nramp) family characterized as divalent-cation transport proteins in many prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Northern blot analysis indicated that the hitA transcripts are expressed in cells cultivated in MRS broth supplemented with hop bitter compounds, which act as mobile-carrier ionophores, dissipating the trans-membrane pH gradient in bacteria sensitive to the hop bitter compounds by exchanging H+ for cellular divalent cations such as Mn2+. This suggests that the hitA gene products may play an important role in making the bacteria resistant to hop bitter compounds in beer by transporting metal ions such as Mn2+ into cells that no longer maintain the proton gradient.

  14. Social Mobilization.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Todd; Goldstein, Noah J; Fox, Craig R

    2017-09-25

    This article reviews research from several behavioral disciplines to derive strategies for prompting people to perform behaviors that are individually costly and provide negligible individual or social benefits but are meaningful when performed by a large number of individuals. Whereas the term social influence encompasses all the ways in which people influence other people, social mobilization refers specifically to principles that can be used to influence a large number of individuals to participate in an activity. The motivational force of social mobilization is amplified by the fact that others benefit from the encouraged behaviors, and its overall impact is enhanced by the fact that people are embedded within social networks. This article may be useful to those interested in the provision of public goods, collective action, and prosocial behavior, and we give special attention to field experiments on election participation, environmentally sustainable behaviors, and charitable giving. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Psychology Volume 69 is January 4, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  15. Mobile Transporter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Atlantis, STS-110 mission, deployed this railcar, called the Mobile Transporter, and an initial 43-foot section of track, the S0 (S-zero) truss, preparing the International Space Station (ISS) for future spacewalks. The first railroad in space, the Mobile Transporter will allow the Station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for future assembly and maintenance. The 27,000-pound S0 truss is the first of 9 segments that will make up the Station's external framework that will eventually stretch 356 feet (109 meters), or approximately the length of a football field. The completed truss structure will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the Station. The Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, STS-110 mission, was launched April 8, 2002 and returned to Earth April 19, 2002. STS-110's Extravehicular Activity (EVA) marked the first use of the Station's robotic arm to maneuver spacewalkers around the Station.

  16. A specimen of Rhamphorhynchus with soft tissue preservation, stomach contents and a putative coprolite

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Donald M.; Therrien, François; Habib, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Despite being known for nearly two centuries, new specimens of the derived non-pterodactyloid pterosaur Rhamphorhynchus continue to be discovered and reveal new information about their anatomy and palaeobiology. Here we describe a specimen held in the collections of the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, Alberta, Canada that shows both preservation and impressions of soft tissues, and also preserves material interpreted as stomach contents of vertebrate remains and, uniquely, a putative coprolite. The specimen also preserves additional evidence for fibers in the uropatagium. PMID:26312182

  17. A specimen of Rhamphorhynchus with soft tissue preservation, stomach contents and a putative coprolite.

    PubMed

    Hone, David; Henderson, Donald M; Therrien, François; Habib, Michael B

    2015-01-01

    Despite being known for nearly two centuries, new specimens of the derived non-pterodactyloid pterosaur Rhamphorhynchus continue to be discovered and reveal new information about their anatomy and palaeobiology. Here we describe a specimen held in the collections of the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, Alberta, Canada that shows both preservation and impressions of soft tissues, and also preserves material interpreted as stomach contents of vertebrate remains and, uniquely, a putative coprolite. The specimen also preserves additional evidence for fibers in the uropatagium.

  18. Putative cryomagma interaction with aerosols deposit at Titan's surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coll, Patrice; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; Raulin, Francois; Coscia, David; Ramirez, Sandra I.; Buch, Arnaud; Szopa, Cyril; Poch, Olivier; Cabane, Michel; Brassé, Coralie

    The largest moon of Saturn, Titan, is known for its dense, nitrogen-rich atmosphere. The organic aerosols which are produced in Titan’s atmosphere are of great astrobiological interest, particularly because of their potential evolution when they reach the surface and may interact with putative ammonia-water cryomagma [1]. In this context we have followed the evolution of alkaline pH hydrolysis (25wt% ammonia-water) of Titan aerosol analogues, that have been qualified as representative of Titan’s aerosols [2]. Indeed the first results obtained by the ACP experiment onboard Huygens probe revealed that the main products obtained after thermolysis of Titan’s collected aerosols, were ammonia (NH3) and hydrogen cyanide (HCN). Then performing a direct comparison of the volatiles produced after a thermal treatment done in conditions similar to the ones used by the ACP experiment, we may estimate that the tholins we used are relevant to chemical analogues of Titan’s aerosols, and to note free of oxygen. Taking into account recent studies proposing that the subsurface ocean may contain a lower fraction of ammonia (about 5wt% or less [3]), and assuming the presence of specific gas species [4, 5], in particular CO2 and H2S, trapped in likely internal ocean, we determine a new probable composition of the cryomagma which could potentially interact with deposited Titan’s aerosols. We then carried out different hydrolyses, taking into account this composition, and we established the influence of the hydrolysis temperature on the organic molecules production. References: [1] Mitri et al., 2008. Resurfacing of Titan by ammonia-water cryomagma. Icarus. 196, 216-224. [2] Coll et al. 2013, Can laboratory tholins mimic the chemistry producing Titan's aerosols? A review in light of ACP experimental results, Planetary and Space Science 77, 91-103. [3] Tobie et al. 2012. Titan’s Bulk Composition Constrained by Cassini-Huygens: implication for internal outgassing. The

  19. Sulfur Isotope Composition of Putative Primary Troilite in Chondrules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tachibana, Shogo; Huss, Gary R.

    2002-01-01

    Sulfur isotope compositions of putative primary troilites in chondrules from Bishunpur were measured by ion probe. These primary troilites have the same S isotope compositions as matrix troilites and thus appear to be isotopically unfractionated. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  20. Developing putative AOPs from high content dataDeveloping putative AOPs from high content dataDeveloping putative AOPs from high content dataDeveloping putative AOPs from high content data

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developing putative AOPs from high content data Shannon M. Bell1,2, Stephen W. Edwards2 1 Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education 2 Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development,...

  1. Bartonella henselae AS A PUTATIVE CAUSE OF CONGENITAL CHOLESTASIS.

    PubMed

    Velho, Paulo Eduardo Neves Ferreira; Bellomo-Brandão, Maria Ângela; Drummond, Marina Rovani; Magalhães, Renata Ferreira; Hessel, Gabriel; Barjas-Castro, Maria de Lourdes; Escanhoela, Cecília Amélia Fazzio; Del Negro, Gilda Maria Barbaro; Okay, Thelma Suely

    2016-07-11

    Severe anemia and cholestatic hepatitis are associated with bartonella infections. A putative vertical Bartonella henselae infection was defined on the basis of ultrastructural and molecular analyses in a three-year-old child with anemia, jaundice and hepatosplenomegaly since birth. Physicians should consider bartonellosis in patients with anemia and hepatitis of unknown origin.

  2. Spectral Evidence of Aqueous Activity in Two Putative Martian Paleolakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roush, Ted L.; Marzo, Giuseppe A.; Fonti, Sergio; Orofino, Vincenzo; Blanco, Armando

    2010-01-01

    CRISM observations of putative paleolakes in Cankuzo and Luqa craters exhibit spectral features consistent with the activity of water. The spatial distributions suggest different formation scenarios for each site. In Cankuzo the distribution suggests postimpact alteration whereas in Luqa there are hints of possible formation of a layer of phyllosilicate materials.

  3. Sulfur Isotope Composition of Putative Primary Troilite in Chondrules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tachibana, Shogo; Huss, Gary R.

    2002-01-01

    Sulfur isotope compositions of putative primary troilites in chondrules from Bishunpur were measured by ion probe. These primary troilites have the same S isotope compositions as matrix troilites and thus appear to be isotopically unfractionated. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  4. Developing putative AOPs from high content dataDeveloping putative AOPs from high content dataDeveloping putative AOPs from high content dataDeveloping putative AOPs from high content data

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developing putative AOPs from high content data Shannon M. Bell1,2, Stephen W. Edwards2 1 Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education 2 Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development,...

  5. Bartonella henselae AS A PUTATIVE CAUSE OF CONGENITAL CHOLESTASIS

    PubMed Central

    VELHO, Paulo Eduardo Neves Ferreira; BELLOMO-BRANDÃO, Maria Ângela; DRUMMOND, Marina Rovani; MAGALHÃES, Renata Ferreira; HESSEL, Gabriel; BARJAS-CASTRO, Maria de Lourdes; ESCANHOELA, Cecília Amélia Fazzio; NEGRO, Gilda Maria Barbaro DEL; OKAY, Thelma Suely

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Severe anemia and cholestatic hepatitis are associated with bartonella infections. A putative vertical Bartonella henselae infection was defined on the basis of ultrastructural and molecular analyses in a three-year-old child with anemia, jaundice and hepatosplenomegaly since birth. Physicians should consider bartonellosis in patients with anemia and hepatitis of unknown origin. PMID:27410916

  6. Mobility anisotropy of two-dimensional semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Haifeng; Zhang, Shuqing; Liu, Zhirong

    2016-12-01

    The carrier mobility of anisotropic two-dimensional semiconductors under longitudinal acoustic phonon scattering was theoretically studied using deformation potential theory. Based on the Boltzmann equation with the relaxation time approximation, an analytic formula of intrinsic anisotropic mobility was derived, showing that the influence of effective mass on mobility anisotropy is larger than those of deformation potential constant or elastic modulus. Parameters were collected for various anisotropic two-dimensional materials (black phosphorus, Hittorf's phosphorus, BC2N , MXene, TiS3, and GeCH3) to calculate their mobility anisotropy. It was revealed that the anisotropic ratio is overestimated by the previously described method.

  7. Dynamics of putative raft-associated proteins at the cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Kenworthy, Anne K.; Nichols, Benjamin J.; Remmert, Catha L.; Hendrix, Glenn M.; Kumar, Mukesh; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    Lipid rafts are conceptualized as membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol and glycosphingolipid that serve as platforms for protein segregation and signaling. The properties of these domains in vivo are unclear. Here, we use fluorescence recovery after photobleaching to test if raft association affects a protein's ability to laterally diffuse large distances across the cell surface. The diffusion coefficients (D) of several types of putative raft and nonraft proteins were systematically measured under steady-state conditions and in response to raft perturbations. Raft proteins diffused freely over large distances (>4 μm), exhibiting Ds that varied 10-fold. This finding indicates that raft proteins do not undergo long-range diffusion as part of discrete, stable raft domains. Perturbations reported to affect lipid rafts in model membrane systems or by biochemical fractionation (cholesterol depletion, decreased temperature, and cholesterol loading) had similar effects on the diffusional mobility of raft and nonraft proteins. Thus, raft association is not the dominant factor in determining long-range protein mobility at the cell surface. PMID:15173190

  8. Dynamics of putative raft-associated proteins at the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Kenworthy, Anne K; Nichols, Benjamin J; Remmert, Catha L; Hendrix, Glenn M; Kumar, Mukesh; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2004-06-07

    Lipid rafts are conceptualized as membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol and glycosphingolipid that serve as platforms for protein segregation and signaling. The properties of these domains in vivo are unclear. Here, we use fluorescence recovery after photobleaching to test if raft association affects a protein's ability to laterally diffuse large distances across the cell surface. The diffusion coefficients (D) of several types of putative raft and nonraft proteins were systematically measured under steady-state conditions and in response to raft perturbations. Raft proteins diffused freely over large distances (> 4 microm), exhibiting Ds that varied 10-fold. This finding indicates that raft proteins do not undergo long-range diffusion as part of discrete, stable raft domains. Perturbations reported to affect lipid rafts in model membrane systems or by biochemical fractionation (cholesterol depletion, decreased temperature, and cholesterol loading) had similar effects on the diffusional mobility of raft and nonraft proteins. Thus, raft association is not the dominant factor in determining long-range protein mobility at the cell surface.

  9. Isolation and characterization of two mitoviruses and a putative alphapartitivirus from Fusarium spp.

    PubMed

    Osaki, Hideki; Sasaki, Atsuko; Nomiyama, Koji; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Tomioka, Keisuke; Takehara, Toshiaki

    2015-06-01

    The filamentous fungus Fusarium spp. includes several important plant pathogens. We attempted to reveal presence of double-stranded (ds) RNAs in the genus. Thirty-seven Fusarium spp. at the MAFF collection were analyzed. In the strains of Fusarium coeruleum, Fusarium globosum and Fusarium solani f. sp. pisi, single dsRNA bands were detected. The strains of F. coeruleum and F. solani f. sp. pisi cause potato dry rot and mulberry twig blight, respectively. Sequence analyses revealed that dsRNAs in F. coeruleum and F. globosum consisted of 2423 and 2414 bp, respectively. Using the fungal mitochondrial translation table, the positive strands of these cDNAs were found to contain single open reading frames with the potential to encode a protein of putative 757 and 717 amino acids (molecular mass 88.5 and 84.0 kDa, respectively), similar to RNA-dependent RNA polymerases of members of the genus Mitovirus. These dsRNAs in F. coeruleum and F. globosum were assigned to the genus Mitovirus (family Narnaviridae), and these two mitoviruses were designated as Fusarium coeruleum mitovirus 1 and Fusarium globosum mitovirus 1. On the other hand, a positive strand of cDNA (1950 bp) from dsRNA in F. solani f. sp. pisi contained an ORF potentially encoding a putative RdRp of 608 amino acids (72.0 kDa). The putative RdRp was shown to be related to those of members of the genus of Alphapartitivirus (family Partitiviridae). We coined the name Fusarium solani partitivirus 2 for dsRNA in F. solani f. sp. pisi.

  10. The putative drug efflux systems of the Bacillus cereus group

    PubMed Central

    Elbourne, Liam D. H.; Vörös, Aniko; Kroeger, Jasmin K.; Simm, Roger; Tourasse, Nicolas J.; Finke, Sarah; Henderson, Peter J. F.; Økstad, Ole Andreas; Paulsen, Ian T.; Kolstø, Anne-Brit

    2017-01-01

    The Bacillus cereus group of bacteria includes seven closely related species, three of which, B. anthracis, B. cereus and B. thuringiensis, are pathogens of humans, animals and/or insects. Preliminary investigations into the transport capabilities of different bacterial lineages suggested that genes encoding putative efflux systems were unusually abundant in the B. cereus group compared to other bacteria. To explore the drug efflux potential of the B. cereus group all putative efflux systems were identified in the genomes of prototypical strains of B. cereus, B. anthracis and B. thuringiensis using our Transporter Automated Annotation Pipeline. More than 90 putative drug efflux systems were found within each of these strains, accounting for up to 2.7% of their protein coding potential. Comparative analyses demonstrated that the efflux systems are highly conserved between these species; 70–80% of the putative efflux pumps were shared between all three strains studied. Furthermore, 82% of the putative efflux system proteins encoded by the prototypical B. cereus strain ATCC 14579 (type strain) were found to be conserved in at least 80% of 169 B. cereus group strains that have high quality genome sequences available. However, only a handful of these efflux pumps have been functionally characterized. Deletion of individual efflux pump genes from B. cereus typically had little impact to drug resistance phenotypes or the general fitness of the strains, possibly because of the large numbers of alternative efflux systems that may have overlapping substrate specificities. Therefore, to gain insight into the possible transport functions of efflux systems in B. cereus, we undertook large-scale qRT-PCR analyses of efflux pump gene expression following drug shocks and other stress treatments. Clustering of gene expression changes identified several groups of similarly regulated systems that may have overlapping drug resistance functions. In this article we review current

  11. The putative drug efflux systems of the Bacillus cereus group.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Karl A; Fagerlund, Annette; Elbourne, Liam D H; Vörös, Aniko; Kroeger, Jasmin K; Simm, Roger; Tourasse, Nicolas J; Finke, Sarah; Henderson, Peter J F; Økstad, Ole Andreas; Paulsen, Ian T; Kolstø, Anne-Brit

    2017-01-01

    The Bacillus cereus group of bacteria includes seven closely related species, three of which, B. anthracis, B. cereus and B. thuringiensis, are pathogens of humans, animals and/or insects. Preliminary investigations into the transport capabilities of different bacterial lineages suggested that genes encoding putative efflux systems were unusually abundant in the B. cereus group compared to other bacteria. To explore the drug efflux potential of the B. cereus group all putative efflux systems were identified in the genomes of prototypical strains of B. cereus, B. anthracis and B. thuringiensis using our Transporter Automated Annotation Pipeline. More than 90 putative drug efflux systems were found within each of these strains, accounting for up to 2.7% of their protein coding potential. Comparative analyses demonstrated that the efflux systems are highly conserved between these species; 70-80% of the putative efflux pumps were shared between all three strains studied. Furthermore, 82% of the putative efflux system proteins encoded by the prototypical B. cereus strain ATCC 14579 (type strain) were found to be conserved in at least 80% of 169 B. cereus group strains that have high quality genome sequences available. However, only a handful of these efflux pumps have been functionally characterized. Deletion of individual efflux pump genes from B. cereus typically had little impact to drug resistance phenotypes or the general fitness of the strains, possibly because of the large numbers of alternative efflux systems that may have overlapping substrate specificities. Therefore, to gain insight into the possible transport functions of efflux systems in B. cereus, we undertook large-scale qRT-PCR analyses of efflux pump gene expression following drug shocks and other stress treatments. Clustering of gene expression changes identified several groups of similarly regulated systems that may have overlapping drug resistance functions. In this article we review current

  12. Mobile Support For Logistics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    2014, p. 51. .................................................................................9 Figure 3. GCSS-MC Mobile App Architecture...21 Figure 4. GCSS-MC Mobile App Modules...............................................................22...Figure 5. GCSS-MC Mobile App Login Screen .......................................................23 Figure 6. GCSS-MC App Main Screen

  13. Quicklook Air Mobility Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-03-01

    mobility system in AMPCALC. We discussed formulation logic of the mobility cycle. We presented ramp use optimization and tanker optimization...VB)............................................ 10 Visual Basic for Applications ( VBA ...22 The Mobility System In AMPCALC ....................................................................... 22 Tanker Optimization

  14. Volume 4 - Mobile Sources

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Mobile source reference material for activity data collection from the Emissions Inventory Improvement Program (EIIP). Provides complete methods for collecting key inputs to onroad mobile and nonroad mobile emissions models.

  15. Cooperating mobile robots

    DOEpatents

    Harrington, John J.; Eskridge, Steven E.; Hurtado, John E.; Byrne, Raymond H.

    2004-02-03

    A miniature mobile robot provides a relatively inexpensive mobile robot. A mobile robot for searching an area provides a way for multiple mobile robots in cooperating teams. A robotic system with a team of mobile robots communicating information among each other provides a way to locate a source in cooperation. A mobile robot with a sensor, a communication system, and a processor, provides a way to execute a strategy for searching an area.

  16. Structural and functional characterization of a putative polysaccharide deacetylase of the human parasite Encephalitozoon cuniculi.

    PubMed

    Urch, Jonathan E; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon; Brosson, Damien; Liu, Zhanliang; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Texier, Catherine; van Aalten, Daan M F

    2009-06-01

    The microsporidian Encephalitozoon cuniculi is an intracellular eukaryotic parasite considered to be an emerging opportunistic human pathogen. The infectious stage of this parasite is a unicellular spore that is surrounded by a chitin containing endospore layer and an external proteinaceous exospore. A putative chitin deacetylase (ECU11_0510) localizes to the interface between the plasma membrane and the endospore. Chitin deacetylases are family 4 carbohydrate esterases in the CAZY classification, and several bacterial members of this family are involved in evading lysis by host glycosidases, through partial de-N-acetylation of cell wall peptidoglycan. Similarly, ECU11_0510 could be important for E. cuniculi survival in the host, by protecting the chitin layer from hydrolysis by human chitinases. Here, we describe the biochemical, structural, and glycan binding properties of the protein. Enzymatic analyses showed that the putative deacetylase is unable to deacetylate chitooligosaccharides or crystalline beta-chitin. Furthermore, carbohydrate microarray analysis revealed that the protein bound neither chitooligosaccharides nor any of a wide range of other glycans or chitin. The high resolution crystal structure revealed dramatic rearrangements in the positions of catalytic and substrate binding residues, which explain the loss of deacetylase activity, adding to the unusual structural plasticity observed in other members of this esterase family. Thus, it appears that the ECU11_0510 protein is not a carbohydrate deacetylase and may fulfill an as yet undiscovered role in the E. cuniculi parasite.

  17. Mobile Schools for a Mobile World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Overwhelmingly, independent schools are embracing mobile devices--laptops, iPads or other tablets, and smartphones--to enhance teaching and learning. This article describes the results of the "NAIS 2012 Mobile Learning Survey." Among its findings were that 75 percent of NAIS-member schools currently use mobile learning devices in at…

  18. Mobile Schools for a Mobile World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Overwhelmingly, independent schools are embracing mobile devices--laptops, iPads or other tablets, and smartphones--to enhance teaching and learning. This article describes the results of the "NAIS 2012 Mobile Learning Survey." Among its findings were that 75 percent of NAIS-member schools currently use mobile learning devices in at…

  19. Strategies and Resources for Enhancing the Achievement of Mobile Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Titus, Dale N.

    2007-01-01

    Because studies reveal a relationship between high student mobility and low academic achievement, school administrators are faced with the challenge of raising academic achievement in an era of increased student mobility. Wide variations in state requirements create additional difficulties for mobile students, who tend to be disadvantaged in other…

  20. The Use of Mobile Learning in Science: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crompton, Helen; Burke, Diane; Gregory, Kristen H.; Gräbe, Catharina

    2016-01-01

    The use of mobile learning in education is growing at an exponential rate. To best understand how mobile learning is being used, it is crucial to gain a collective understanding of the research that has taken place. This systematic review reveals the trends in mobile learning in science with a comprehensive analysis and synthesis of studies from…

  1. The Use of Mobile Learning in Science: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crompton, Helen; Burke, Diane; Gregory, Kristen H.; Gräbe, Catharina

    2016-01-01

    The use of mobile learning in education is growing at an exponential rate. To best understand how mobile learning is being used, it is crucial to gain a collective understanding of the research that has taken place. This systematic review reveals the trends in mobile learning in science with a comprehensive analysis and synthesis of studies from…

  2. Identification and Characterization of Putative Integron-Like Elements of the Heavy-Metal-Hypertolerant Strains of Pseudomonas spp.

    PubMed

    Ciok, Anna; Adamczuk, Marcin; Bartosik, Dariusz; Dziewit, Lukasz

    2016-11-28

    Pseudomonas strains isolated from the heavily contaminated Lubin copper mine and Zelazny Most post-flotation waste reservoir in Poland were screened for the presence of integrons. This analysis revealed that two strains carried homologous DNA regions composed of a gene encoding a DNA_BRE_C domain-containing tyrosine recombinase (with no significant sequence similarity to other integrases of integrons) plus a three-component array of putative integron gene cassettes. The predicted gene cassettes encode three putative polypeptides with homology to (i) transmembrane proteins, (ii) GCN5 family acetyltransferases, and (iii) hypothetical proteins of unknown function (homologous proteins are encoded by the gene cassettes of several class 1 integrons). Comparative sequence analyses identified three structural variants of these novel integron-like elements within the sequenced bacterial genomes. Analysis of their distribution revealed that they are found exclusively in strains of the genus Pseudomonas.

  3. Identification of a putative tetrasporophyte-specific gene in Gracilaria lemaneiformis (Gracilariales, Rhodophyte)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xueying; Zhang, Xuecheng

    2008-08-01

    A putative tetrasporophyte-specific gene, designated as SSH466 (GenBank accession No. DQ019223), was one of the genes identified in this work using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) method in Gracilaria lemaneiformis. The full length of the gene was obtained using SMART RACE strategy. Sequence analysis revealed that the gene had 1 019 nucleotides, including an open reading frame of 498 nucleotides encoding 166 amino acid residues, 158 nucleotides of 5' untranslated region and 363 nucleotides of 3' non-coding region. Protein motif and secondary structure prediction showed that there existed a transmembrane domain with a unique β-sheet. Thus, SSH466 protein might be a cross-membrane protein. Sequence homology search in the public GenBank databases did not reveal any significant match with SSH466. Virtual Northern blot analysis confirmed that it was a tetrasporophyte-specific gene.

  4. A catalog of putative adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) that ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A number of putative AOPs for several distinct MIEs of thyroid disruption have been formulated for amphibian metamorphosis and fish swim bladder inflation. These have been entered into the AOP knowledgebase on the OECD WIKI. The EDSP has been actively advancing high-throughput screening for chemical activity toward estrogen, androgen and thyroid targets. However, it has been recently identified that coverage for thyroid-related targets is lagging behind estrogen and androgen assay coverage. As thyroid-related medium-high throughput assays are actively being developed for inclusion in the ToxCast chemical screening program, a parallel effort is underway to characterize putative adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) specific to these thyroid-related targets. This effort is intended to provide biological and ecological context that will enhance the utility of ToxCast high throughput screening data for hazard identification.

  5. Membrane vesicles released by Avibacterium paragallinarum contain putative virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Ramón Rocha, Marcela O; García-González, Octavio; Pérez-Méndez, Alma; Ibarra-Caballero, Jorge; Pérez-Márquez, Victor M; Vaca, Sergio; Negrete-Abascal, Erasmo

    2006-04-01

    Avibacterium paragallinarum, the causative agent of infectious coryza, releases extracellular membrane vesicles (MVs), containing immunogenic proteins, proteases, putative RTX proteins, haemagglutinin, and nucleic acids, into the medium. MVs ranging 50-300 nm in diameter were observed by electron microscopy. They contained immunogenic proteins in the range of 20-160 kDa, detected using vaccinated or experimentally infected chicken sera raised against Av. paragallinarum, but not in pooled sera from specific pathogen-free chickens. Proteolytic activity was not detected in MVs through zymograms; however, immune recognition of high molecular mass bands was observed by Western blotting using an antiprotease serum against Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 1 purified protease, suggesting its presence. MVs agglutinated glutaraldehyde-fixed chicken red blood cells indicating the presence of haemagglutinating antigens. Nucleic acids were also detected inside MVs. Avibacterium paragallinarum releases MVs containing putative virulence factors, which could be important in the pathogenesis of infectious coryza.

  6. Putative melatonin receptors in a human biological clock.

    PubMed

    Reppert, S M; Weaver, D R; Rivkees, S A; Stopa, E G

    1988-10-07

    In vitro autoradiography with 125I-labeled melatonin was used to examine melatonin binding sites in human hypothalamus. Specific 125I-labeled melatonin binding was localized to the suprachiasmatic nuclei, the site of a putative biological clock, and was not apparent in other hypothalamic regions. Specific 125I-labeled melatonin binding was consistently found in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of hypothalami from adults and fetuses. Densitometric analysis of competition experiments with varying concentrations of melatonin showed monophasic competition curves, with comparable half-maximal inhibition values for the suprachiasmatic nuclei of adults (150 picomolar) and fetuses (110 picomolar). Micromolar concentrations of the melatonin agonist 6-chloromelatonin completely inhibited specific 125I-labeled melatonin binding, whereas the same concentrations of serotonin and norepinephrine caused only a partial reduction in specific binding. The results suggest that putative melatonin receptors are located in a human biological clock.

  7. Putative melatonin receptors in a human biological clock

    SciTech Connect

    Reppert, S.M.; Weaver, D.R.; Rivkees, S.A.; Stopa, E.G.

    1988-10-07

    In vitro autoradiography with /sup 125/I-labeled melatonin was used to examine melatonin binding sites in human hypothalamus. Specific /sup 125/I-labeled melatonin binding was localized to the suprachiasmatic nuclei, the site of a putative biological clock, and was not apparent in other hypothalamic regions. Specific /sup 125/I-labeled melatonin binding was consistently found in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of hypothalami from adults and fetuses. Densitometric analysis of competition experiments with varying concentrations of melatonin showed monophasic competition curves, with comparable half-maximal inhibition values for the suprachiasmatic nuclei of adults (150 picomolar) and fetuses (110 picomolar). Micromolar concentrations of the melatonin agonist 6-chloromelatonin completely inhibited specific /sup 125/I-labeled melatonin binding, whereas the same concentrations of serotonin and norepinephrine caused only a partial reduction in specific binding. The results suggest that putative melatonin receptors are located in a human biological clock.

  8. Synthesis of the putative structure of 15-oxopuupehenoic acid.

    PubMed

    Boulifa, Ettahir; Fernández, Antonio; Alvarez, Esteban; Alvarez-Manzaneda, Ramón; Mansour, Ahmed I; Chahboun, Rachid; Alvarez-Manzaneda, Enrique

    2014-11-07

    Synthesis of the putative structure of the marine natural 15-oxopuupehenoic acid has been achieved starting from commercial (-)-sclareol. Key steps of the synthetic sequence are the Robinson annulation of a β-ketoester and methyl vinyl ketone and an unprecedented cyclization of the resulting α,β-enone, which is mediated by tin(IV) chloride in the presence of N-phenylselenophthalimide. The physical properties of the synthetic compound are somewhat different from those reported for the natural product.

  9. In vitro activity of rodogyl against putative periodontopathic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Quee, T C; Roussou, T; Chan, E C

    1983-01-01

    The minimal inhibitory concentrations of Rodogyl (composite tablet of metronidazole and spiramycin), metronidazole-spiramycin mixture, spiramycin, metronidazole, and tetracycline were determined for selected putative periodontopathic microorganisms. Rodogyl was active against almost all strains, including Bacteroides species and the anaerobic spirochetes. Synergism of the component drugs in the Rodogyl combination was noted against Propionibacterium species. Spiramycin activity against Actinomyces species was enhanced in the presence of metronidazole. PMID:6639002

  10. Untrapping Kinetically Trapped Ions: The Role of Water Vapor and Ion-Source Activation Conditions on the Gas-Phase Protomer Ratio of Benzocaine Revealed by Ion-Mobility Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xia, Hanxue; Attygalle, Athula B

    2017-09-21

    The role of water vapor in transforming the thermodynamically preferred species of protonated benzocaine to the less favored protomer was investigated using helium-plasma ionization (HePI) in conjunction with ion-mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS). The IM arrival-time distribution (ATD) recorded from a neat benzocaine sample desorbed to the gas phase by a stream of dry nitrogen and ionized by HePI showed essentially one peak for the O-protonated species. However, when water vapor was introduced to the enclosed ion source, within a span of about 150 ms the ATD profile changed completely to one dominated by the N-protonated species. Under spray-based ionization conditions, the nature and composition of the solvents have been postulated to play a decisive role in defining the manifested protomer ratios. In reality, the solvent vapors present in the ion source (particularly the ambient humidity) indirectly dictate the gas-phase ratio of the protomers. Evidently, the gas-phase protomer ratio established at the confinement of the ions is readjusted by the ion-activation that takes place during the transmission of ions to the vacuum. Although it has been repeatedly stated that ions can retain a "memory" of their solution structures because they can be kinetically trapped, and thereby represent their solution-based stabilities, we show that the initial airborne ions can undergo significant transformations in the transit through the intermediate vacuum zones between the ion source and the mass detector. In this context, we demonstrate that the kinetically trapped N-protomer of benzocaine can be untrapped by reducing the humidity of the enclosed ion source. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  11. Interaction of apolipoprotein AII with the putative high-density lipoprotein receptor.

    PubMed

    Vadiveloo, P K; Allan, C M; Murray, B J; Fidge, N H

    1993-09-14

    There is strong evidence to indicate that binding of HDL by cells is due to recognition of apoproteins residing on the surface of the lipoprotein by the putative HDL receptor(s). Although both of the major HDL apoproteins, AI and AII, are recognized by the putative receptor, the nature of the binding interaction and the domains of the apoproteins involved are largely unknown. Previous data from this laboratory led to the proposal of a model to explain how HDL particles containing AII interacted with the HDL receptor in a different manner as compared to HDL particles which contain apoAI but not apoAII [Vadiveloo, P. K., & Fidge, N. H. (1992) Biochem. J. 284, 145-151]. The model predicted that each chain of the apoAII homodimer contained a binding domain capable of interacting with the HDL receptor. This model was tested in the current study by preparing apoAII monomers, complexing them with phospholipid, and determining the ability of these complexes to bind to putative HDL receptors in rat liver plasma membranes (RLPM) and bovine aortic endothelial cell membranes (BAECM) by ligand blotting. The data showed that these complexes were bound by HB1 and HB2 from RLPM, and to the 110-kDa HDL binding protein from BAECM, providing critical evidence to support the model. Further investigation into the binding interaction revealed that apoAII complexed with phospholipid (apoAII-PC) bound more than delipidated apoAII, which bound more than delipidated apoAII monomers. Thus, optimum binding required the presence of lipid.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Further insight into reproductive incompatibility between putative cryptic species of the Bemisia tabaci whitefly complex.

    PubMed

    Qin, Li; Pan, Li-Long; Liu, Shu-Sheng

    2016-04-01

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), with its global distribution and extensive genetic diversity, is now known to be a complex of over 35 cryptic species. However, a satisfactory resolution of the systematics of this species complex is yet to be achieved. Here, we designed experiments to examine reproductive compatibility among species with different levels of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (mtCOI) divergence. The data show that putative species with mtCOI divergence of >8% between them consistently exhibited complete reproductive isolation. However, two of the putative species, Asia II 9 and Asia II 3, with mtCOI divergence of 4.47% between them, exhibited near complete reproductive compatibility in one direction of their cross, and partial reproductive compatibility in the other direction. Together with some recent reports on this topic from the literature, our data indicates that, while divergence in the mtCOI sequences provides a valid molecular marker for species delimitation in most clades, more genetic markers and more sophisticated molecular phylogeny will be required to achieve adequate delimitation of all species in this whitefly complex. While many attempts have been made to examine the reproductive compatibility among genetic groups of the B. tabaci complex, our study represents the first effort to conduct crossing experiments with putative species that were chosen with considerations of their genetic divergence. In light of the new data, we discuss the best strategy and protocols to conduct further molecular phylogenetic analysis and crossing trials, in order to reveal the overall pattern of reproductive incompatibility among species of this whitefly complex. © 2015 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  13. Two putative-aquaporin genes are differentially expressed during arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in Lotus japonicus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM) are widespread symbioses that provide great advantages to the plant, improving its nutritional status and allowing the fungus to complete its life cycle. Nevertheless, molecular mechanisms that lead to the development of AM symbiosis are not yet fully deciphered. Here, we have focused on two putative aquaporin genes, LjNIP1 and LjXIP1, which resulted to be upregulated in a transcriptomic analysis performed on mycorrhizal roots of Lotus japonicus. Results A phylogenetic analysis has shown that the two putative aquaporins belong to different functional families: NIPs and XIPs. Transcriptomic experiments have shown the independence of their expression from their nutritional status but also a close correlation with mycorrhizal and rhizobial interaction. Further transcript quantification has revealed a good correlation between the expression of one of them, LjNIP1, and LjPT4, the phosphate transporter which is considered a marker gene for mycorrhizal functionality. By using laser microdissection, we have demonstrated that one of the two genes, LjNIP1, is expressed exclusively in arbuscule-containing cells. LjNIP1, in agreement with its putative role as an aquaporin, is capable of transferring water when expressed in yeast protoplasts. Confocal analysis have demonstrated that eGFP-LjNIP1, under its endogenous promoter, accumulates in the inner membrane system of arbusculated cells. Conclusions Overall, the results have shown different functionality and expression specificity of two mycorrhiza-inducible aquaporins in L. japonicus. One of them, LjNIP1 can be considered a novel molecular marker of mycorrhizal status at different developmental stages of the arbuscule. At the same time, LjXIP1 results to be the first XIP family aquaporin to be transcriptionally regulated during symbiosis. PMID:23046713

  14. Fuller Revealed

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-03-16

    MESSENGER's low-altitude campaign has enabled imaging of Fuller crater (named after American architect Buckminster Fuller) in greater detail than previously possible. The top left panel shows an image of Fuller, with the crater rim outlined in pink and the edge of a low-altitude broadband MDIS image in green. The large panel applies a different stretch to the same MDIS broadband image in the first panel, revealing details of the shadowed surface inside Fuller! In particular, as highlighted with yellow arrows in the bottom left panel, the image reveals a region inside Fuller that is lower in reflectance. The edge of the low-reflectance region has a sharp and well-defined boundary, even when imaged at 46 m/pixel, suggesting that the low-reflectance material is sufficiently young to have preserved a sharp boundary against lateral mixing by impact cratering. Models for surface and near-surface temperature within Fuller crater predict a region that is sufficiently cold to host long-lived water ice beneath the surface but too hot to support water ice at the surface. The low-reflectance region revealed in the images matches the thermal characteristics expected for a lag deposit of volatile, organic-rich material that overlies the water ice. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19244

  15. Ghana social mobilization analysis.

    PubMed

    Tweneboa-Kodua, A; Obeng-Quaidoo, I; Abu, K

    1991-01-01

    In order to increase communication channels for child survival and development, the government and UNICEF Ghana undertook a "social mobilization analysis." This analysis included three studies that aimed to identify individuals and existing organizations with the potential to serve as health communicators and to determine the type of assistance that they needed to maximize their effectiveness in this role. The first study surveyed governmental institutions, trade unions, revolutionary organizations, traditional leaders, and others and found a largely untapped reservoir of capacities to promote child health, with varying levels of current involvement. The primary need identified was for information and training materials. The second study focused on the mass media and revealed a low coverage of maternal and child health topics and the need for better cooperation between journalists and health professionals. The third study assessed sources of health information for parents and found several sources, such as religious organizations, women's groups, and school teachers that could be mobilized to promote child health. Recommendations are made for the use of the findings.

  16. TiD: Standalone software for mining putative drug targets from bacterial proteome.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Reena; Pradhan, Dibyabhaba; Jain, Arun Kumar; Rai, Chandra Shekhar

    2017-01-01

    TiD is a standalone application, which relies on basic assumption that a protein must be essential for pathogens survival and non-homologous with host to qualify as putative target. With an input bacterial proteome, TiD removes paralogous proteins, picks essential ones, and excludes proteins homologous with host organisms. The targets illustrate non-homology with at least 40 out of 84 gut microbes, considered safe for human. TiD classifies proposed targets as known, novel and virulent. Users can perform pathway analysis, choke point analysis, interactome analysis, subcellular localization and functional annotations through web servers cross-referenced with the application. Drug targets identified by TiD for Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus anthracis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa have revealed significant overlaps with previous studies. TiD takes <2h to scan putative targets from a bacterial proteome with ~5000 proteins; hence, we propose it as a useful tool for rational drug design. TiD is available at http://bmicnip.in/TiD/. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. SP0454, a putative threonine dehydratase, is required for pneumococcal virulence in mice.

    PubMed

    Yan, WenJuan; Wang, Hong; Xu, WenChun; Wu, KaiFeng; Yao, Run; Xu, XiuYu; Dong, Jie; Zhang, YanQing; Zhong, Wen; Zhang, XueMei

    2012-06-01

    Increasing pressure in antibiotic resistance and the requirement for the design of new vaccines are the objectives of clarifying the putative virulence factors in pneumococcal infection. In this study, the putative threonine dehydratase sp0454 was inactivated by erythromycin-resistance cassette replacement in Streptococcus pneumoniae CMCC 31203 strain. The sp0454 mutant was tested for cell growth, adherence, colonization, and virulence in a murine model. The Δsp0454 mutant showed decreased ability for colonization and impaired ability to adhere to A549 cells. However, the SP0454 polypeptide or its antiserum did not affect pneumococcal CMCC 31203 adhesion to A549 cells. The sp0454 deletion mutant was less virulent in a murine intranasal infection model. Real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed significant decrease of the pneumococcal surface antigen A expression in the sp0454 mutant. These results suggest that SP0454 contributes to virulence and colonization, which could be explained in part by modulating the expression of other virulence factors, such as psaA in pneumococcal infection.

  18. Expression of putative virulence factors in the potato pathogen Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus during infection.

    PubMed

    Holtsmark, Ingrid; Takle, Gunnhild W; Brurberg, May Bente

    2008-02-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus is the causal agent of bacterial wilt and ring rot of potato. So far, only two proteins have been shown to be essential for virulence, namely a plasmid-encoded cellulase CelA and a hypersensitive response-inducing protein. We have examined the relative expression of CelA and eight putative virulence factors during infection of potato and in liquid culture, using quantitative real-time PCR. The examined putative virulence genes were celB, a cellulase-encoding gene and genes encoding a pectate lyase, a xylanase and five homologues of the Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis pathogenicity factor Pat-1 thought to encode a serine protease. Six of the nine assayed genes were up-regulated during infection of potato, including celA, celB, the xylanase gene, and two of the pat genes. The pectate lyase gene showed only slightly elevated expression, whereas three of the five examined pat genes were down-regulated during infection in potato. Interestingly, the two up-regulated pat genes showed a noticeable sequence difference compared to the three down-regulated pat genes. These results reveal several new proteins that are likely to be involved in Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus pathogenicity.

  19. Putative Kappa Opioid Heteromers As Targets for Developing Analgesics Free of Adverse Effects

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    It is now generally recognized that upon activation by an agonist, β-arrestin associates with G protein-coupled receptors and acts as a scaffold in creating a diverse signaling network that could lead to adverse effects. As an approach to reducing side effects associated with κ opioid agonists, a series of β-naltrexamides 3–10 was synthesized in an effort to selectively target putative κ opioid heteromers without recruiting β-arrestin upon activation. The most potent derivative 3 (INTA) strongly activated KOR-DOR and KOR-MOR heteromers in HEK293 cells. In vivo studies revealed 3 to produce potent antinociception, which, when taken together with antagonism data, was consistent with the activation of both heteromers. 3 was devoid of tolerance, dependence, and showed no aversive effect in the conditioned place preference assay. As immunofluorescence studies indicated no recruitment of β-arrestin2 to membranes in coexpressed KOR-DOR cells, this study suggests that targeting of specific putative heteromers has the potential to identify leads for analgesics devoid of adverse effects. PMID:24978316

  20. Putative kappa opioid heteromers as targets for developing analgesics free of adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Le Naour, Morgan; Lunzer, Mary M; Powers, Michael D; Kalyuzhny, Alexander E; Benneyworth, Michael A; Thomas, Mark J; Portoghese, Philip S

    2014-08-14

    It is now generally recognized that upon activation by an agonist, β-arrestin associates with G protein-coupled receptors and acts as a scaffold in creating a diverse signaling network that could lead to adverse effects. As an approach to reducing side effects associated with κ opioid agonists, a series of β-naltrexamides 3-10 was synthesized in an effort to selectively target putative κ opioid heteromers without recruiting β-arrestin upon activation. The most potent derivative 3 (INTA) strongly activated KOR-DOR and KOR-MOR heteromers in HEK293 cells. In vivo studies revealed 3 to produce potent antinociception, which, when taken together with antagonism data, was consistent with the activation of both heteromers. 3 was devoid of tolerance, dependence, and showed no aversive effect in the conditioned place preference assay. As immunofluorescence studies indicated no recruitment of β-arrestin2 to membranes in coexpressed KOR-DOR cells, this study suggests that targeting of specific putative heteromers has the potential to identify leads for analgesics devoid of adverse effects.

  1. The dynamics of mobile promoters: Enhanced stability in promoter regions.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, Mahnaz; Wahl, Lindi M

    2016-10-21

    Mobile promoters are emerging as a new class of mobile genetic elements, first identified by examining prokaryote genome sequences, and more recently confirmed by experimental observations in bacteria. Recent datasets have identified over 40,000 putative mobile promoters in sequenced prokaryote genomes, however only one-third of these are in regions of the genome directly upstream from coding sequences, that is, in promoter regions. The presence of many promoter sequences in non-promoter regions is unexplained. Here we develop a general mathematical model for the dynamics of mobile promoters, extending previous work to capture the dynamics both within and outside promoter regions. From this general model, we apply rigorous model selection techniques to identify which parameters are statistically justified in describing the available mobile promoter data, and find best-fit values of these parameters. Our results suggest that high rates of horizontal gene transfer maintain the population of mobile promoters in promoter regions, and that once established at these sites, mobile promoters are rarely lost, but are commonly copied to other genomic regions. In contrast, mobile promoter copies in non-promoter regions are more numerous and more volatile, experiencing substantially higher rates of duplication, loss and diversification.

  2. Putative function of hypothetical proteins expressed by Clostridium perfringens type A strains and their protective efficacy in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Alam, Syed Imteyaz; Dwivedi, Pratistha

    2016-10-01

    The whole genome sequencing and annotation of Clostridium perfringens strains revealed several genes coding for proteins of unknown function with no significant similarities to genes in other organisms. Our previous studies clearly demonstrated that hypothetical proteins CPF_2500, CPF_1441, CPF_0876, CPF_0093, CPF_2002, CPF_2314, CPF_1179, CPF_1132, CPF_2853, CPF_0552, CPF_2032, CPF_0438, CPF_1440, CPF_2918, CPF_0656, and CPF_2364 are genuine proteins of C. perfringens expressed in high abundance. This study explored the putative role of these hypothetical proteins using bioinformatic tools and evaluated their potential as putative candidates for prophylaxis. Apart from a group of eight hypothetical proteins (HPs), a putative function was predicted for the rest of the hypothetical proteins using one or more of the algorithms used. The phylogenetic analysis did not suggest an evidence of a horizontal gene transfer event except for HP CPF_0876. HP CPF_2918 is an abundant extracellular protein, unique to C. perfringens species with maximum strain coverage and did not show any significant match in the database. CPF_2918 was cloned, recombinant protein was purified to near homogeneity, and probing with mouse anti-CPF_2918 serum revealed surface localization of the protein in C. perfringens ATCC13124 cultures. The purified recombinant CPF_2918 protein induced antibody production, a mixed Th1 and Th2 kind of response, and provided partial protection to immunized mice in direct C. perfringens challenge. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The "kynurenate test", a biochemical assay for putative cognition enhancers.

    PubMed

    Pittaluga, A; Vaccari, D; Raiteri, M

    1997-10-01

    Some putative cognition enhancers (oxiracetam, aniracetam and D-cycloserine) were previously shown to prevent the kynurenic acid antagonism of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-evoked norepinephrine (NE) release in rat hippocampal slices. This functional in vitro assay was further characterized in the present work. D-Serine, a glutamate coagonist at the NMDA receptor glycine site, concentration-dependently (EC50 approximately 0.1 microM) prevented the kynurenate (100 microM) block of the NMDA (100 microM)-evoked [3H]NE release. L-Serine was ineffective up to 10 microM. The gamma-aminobutyric acidB (GABA[B]) receptor antagonist CGP 36742, reported to improve cognitive performance, potently prevented the kynurenate antagonism. The activity of CGP 36742 (1 microM) appeared to be unaffected by 10 microM (-)-baclofen, a GABA(B) receptor agonist; furthermore, CGP 52432, a GABA(B) antagonist more potent than CGP 36742, but reportedly devoid of nootropic properties, was inactive in the "kynurenate test." The novel putative cognition enhancer CR2249, but not its enantiomer CR2361, also potently prevented the kynurenate antagonism. In contrast, linopirdine, nicotine and tacrine were inactive. In rat hippocampal synaptosomes glycine and D-cycloserine enhanced the NMDA-evoked [3H]NE release, whereas oxiracetam and CR2249 did not. These four compounds were all similarly effective in preventing kynurenate antagonism, both in slices and in synaptosomes. The NMDA potentiation caused by glycine (0.1-100 microM) was not affected by 100 microM oxiracetam, which suggested that drugs active in the "kynurenate test" may bind to sites different from the glycine site of the NMDA receptor. To conclude, the "kynurenate test" is an in vitro assay useful in the identification and characterization of putative cognition enhancers acting via NMDA receptors.

  4. Glycosyltransferases and oligosaccharyltransferases in Archaea: putative components of the N-glycosylation pathway in the third domain of life.

    PubMed

    Magidovich, Hilla; Eichler, Jerry

    2009-11-01

    The ability of Eukarya, Bacteria and Archaea to perform N-glycosylation underlies the importance and possible antiquity of this post-translational protein modification. However, in contrast to the relatively well-studied eukaryal and bacterial pathways, the archaeal N-glycosylation process is less understood. To remedy this disparity, the following study has examined 56 available archaeal genomes with the aim of identifying glycosyltransferases and oligosaccharyltransferases, including those putatively catalyzing this post-translational processing event. This analysis reveals that while oligosaccharyltransferases, central components of the N-glycosylation pathway, are found across the range of archaeal phenotypes, the N-glycosylation machinery of hyperthermophilic Archaea may well rely on fewer components than do the parallel systems of nonhyperthermophilic Archaea. Moreover, genes encoding predicted glycosyltransferases of hyperthermophilic Archaea tend to be far more scattered within the genome than is the case with nonhyperthermophilic species, where putative glycosyltransferase genes are often clustered around identified oligosaccharyltransferase-encoding sequences.

  5. An ORF from Bacillus licheniformis encodes a putative DNA repressor.

    PubMed

    Naval, J; Aguilar, D; Serra, X; Pérez-Pons, J A; Piñol, J; Lloberas, J; Querol, E

    2000-01-01

    The complete sequence of a reading frame adjacent to the endo-beta-1,3-1,4-D-glucanase gene from Bacillus licheniformis is reported. It encodes a putative 171 amino acid residues protein with either, low significant sequence similarity in data banks or the corresponding orthologue in the recently sequenced Bacillus subtilis genome. Computer analyses predict a canonical Helix-Turn-Helix motif characteristic of bacterial repressors/DNA binding proteins. A maxicells assay shows that the encoded polypeptide is expressed. A DNA-protein binding, assay performed by gel electrophoresis shows that the expressed protein specifically binds to Bacillus licheniformis DNA.

  6. PUTATIVE GENE PROMOTER SEQUENCES IN THE CHLORELLA VIRUSES

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Lisa A.; Boucher, Philip T.; Yanai-Balser, Giane; Suhre, Karsten; Graves, Michael V.; Van Etten, James L.

    2008-01-01

    Three short (7 to 9 nucleotides) highly conserved nucleotide sequences were identified in the putative promoter regions (150 bp upstream and 50 bp downstream of the ATG translation start site) of three members of the genus Chlorovirus, family Phycodnaviridae. Most of these sequences occurred in similar locations within the defined promoter regions. The sequence and location of the motifs were often conserved among homologous ORFs within the Chlorovirus family. One of these conserved sequences (AATGACA) is predominately associated with genes expressed early in virus replication. PMID:18768195

  7. Molecular genetics: DNA analysis of a putative dog clone.

    PubMed

    Parker, Heidi G; Kruglyak, Leonid; Ostrander, Elaine A

    2006-03-09

    In August 2005, Lee et al. reported the first cloning of a domestic dog from adult somatic cells. This putative dog clone was the result of somatic-cell nuclear transfer from a fibroblast cell of a three-year-old male Afghan hound into a donor oocyte provided by a dog of mixed breed. In light of recent concerns regarding the creation of cloned human cell lines from the same institution, we have undertaken an independent test to determine the validity of the claims made by Lee et al..

  8. Mobile Router Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Stewart, David H.; Bell, Terry L.; Kachmar, Brian A.; Shell, Dan; Leung, Kent

    2002-01-01

    Cisco Systems and NASA have been performing joint research on mobile routing technology under a NASA Space Act Agreement. Cisco developed mobile router technology and provided that technology to NASA for applications to aeronautic and space-based missions. NASA has performed stringent performance testing of the mobile router, including the interaction of routing and transport-level protocols. This paper describes mobile routing, the mobile router, and some key configuration parameters. In addition, the paper describes the mobile routing test network and test results documenting the performance of transport protocols in dynamic routing environments.

  9. Exploring the putative self-binding property of the human farnesyltransferase alpha-subunit.

    PubMed

    Hagemann, Anna; Müller, Grit; Manthey, Iris; Bachmann, Hagen Sjard

    2017-09-26

    Farnesylation is an important post-translational protein modification in eukaryotes. Farnesylation is performed by protein farnesyltransferase, a heterodimer composed of an α- (FTα) and a β-subunit. Recently, homo-dimerization of truncated rat and yeast FTα has been detected, suggesting a new role for FTα homodimers in signal transduction. We investigated the putative dimerization behaviour of human and rat FTα. Different in vitro and in vivo approaches revealed no self-dimerization and a presumably artificial formation of homo-trimers and higher homo-oligomers in vitro. Our study contributes to the clarification of the physiological features of FTase in different species and may be important for the ongoing development of FTase inhibitors. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. A putative in vitro organotypic model of molting with human skin explants.

    PubMed

    Peramo, A; Feinberg, S E; Marcelo, C L

    2012-03-01

    We report finding a simple method to partially reproduce the characteristic process of molting that takes place in invertebrates using human skin explants in vitro. In this method, human skin explants discarded from regular plastic surgery procedures were kept, submersed, in regular growth medium for 10 days at 4°C. After that period, the skin explants were cultured at the air-liquid interface for another 10 days. Histological analysis of the skin revealed the formation of one full epidermal structure and an additional intermediate epidermal structure containing a putative stratum corneum, superimposed one of top of the other, in which we consider an equivalent model of "molting" or "ecdysis". Basic analysis of cell proliferation and differentiation of the explants at different stages of the process are briefly presented. We believe this model can be used in the study of certain human skin diseases as well as in comparative animal physiology.

  11. Revealing Rembrandt

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    The power and significance of artwork in shaping human cognition is self-evident. The starting point for our empirical investigations is the view that the task of neuroscience is to integrate itself with other forms of knowledge, rather than to seek to supplant them. In our recent work, we examined a particular aspect of the appreciation of artwork using present-day functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Our results emphasized the continuity between viewing artwork and other human cognitive activities. We also showed that appreciation of a particular aspect of artwork, namely authenticity, depends upon the co-ordinated activity between the brain regions involved in multiple decision making and those responsible for processing visual information. The findings about brain function probably have no specific consequences for understanding how people respond to the art of Rembrandt in comparison with their response to other artworks. However, the use of images of Rembrandt's portraits, his most intimate and personal works, clearly had a significant impact upon our viewers, even though they have been spatially confined to the interior of an MRI scanner at the time of viewing. Neuroscientific studies of humans viewing artwork have the capacity to reveal the diversity of human cognitive responses that may be induced by external advice or context as people view artwork in a variety of frameworks and settings. PMID:24795552

  12. Dynamics of mobile coupled phase oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uriu, Koichiro; Ares, Saúl; Oates, Andrew C.; Morelli, Luis G.

    2013-03-01

    We study the transient synchronization dynamics of locally coupled phase oscillators moving on a one-dimensional lattice. Analysis of spatial phase correlation shows that mobility speeds up relaxation of spatial modes and leads to faster synchronization. We show that when mobility becomes sufficiently high, it does not allow spatial modes to form and the population of oscillators behaves like a mean-field system. Estimating the relaxation timescale of the longest spatial mode and comparing it with systems with long-range coupling, we reveal how mobility effectively extends the interaction range.

  13. Characterisation of putative oxygen chemoreceptors in bowfin (Amia calva).

    PubMed

    Porteus, Cosima S; Wright, Patricia A; Milsom, William K

    2014-04-15

    Serotonin containing neuroepithelial cells (NECs) are putative oxygen sensing cells found in different locations within the gills of fish. In this study we wished to determine the effect of sustained internal (blood) hypoxaemia versus external (aquatic) hypoxia on the size and density of NECs in the first gill arch of bowfin (Amia calva), a facultative air breather. We identified five different populations of serotonergic NECs in this species (Types I-V) based on location, presence of synaptic vesicles (SV) that stain for the antibody SV2, innervation and labelling with the neural crest marker HNK-1. Cell Types I-III were innervated, and these cells, which participate in central O2 chemoreflexes, were studied further. Although there was no change in the density of any cell type in bowfin after exposure to sustained hypoxia (6.0 kPa for 7 days) without access to air, all three of these cell types increased in size. In contrast, only Type II and III cells increased in size in bowfin exposed to sustained hypoxia with access to air. These data support the suggestion that NECs are putative oxygen-sensing cells, that they occur in several locations, and that Type I cells monitor only hypoxaemia, whereas both other cell types monitor hypoxia and hypoxaemia.

  14. Putative golden proportions as predictors of facial esthetics in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kiekens, Rosemie M A; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie; van 't Hof, Martin A; van 't Hof, Bep E; Maltha, Jaap C

    2008-10-01

    In orthodontics, facial esthetics is assumed to be related to golden proportions apparent in the ideal human face. The aim of the study was to analyze the putative relationship between facial esthetics and golden proportions in white adolescents. Seventy-six adult laypeople evaluated sets of photographs of 64 adolescents on a visual analog scale (VAS) from 0 to 100. The facial esthetic value of each subject was calculated as a mean VAS score. Three observers recorded the position of 13 facial landmarks included in 19 putative golden proportions, based on the golden proportions as defined by Ricketts. The proportions and each proportion's deviation from the golden target (1.618) were calculated. This deviation was then related to the VAS scores. Only 4 of the 19 proportions had a significant negative correlation with the VAS scores, indicating that beautiful faces showed less deviation from the golden standard than less beautiful faces. Together, these variables explained only 16% of the variance. Few golden proportions have a significant relationship with facial esthetics in adolescents. The explained variance of these variables is too small to be of clinical importance.

  15. Comparative analyses of a putative Francisella conjugative element.

    PubMed

    Siddaramappa, Shivakumara; Challacombe, Jean F; Petersen, Jeannine M; Pillai, Segaran; Kuske, Cheryl R

    2014-03-01

    A large circular plasmid detected in Francisella novicida-like strain PA10-7858, designated pFNPA10, was sequenced completely and analyzed. This 41,013-bp plasmid showed no homology to any of the previously sequenced Francisella plasmids and was 8-10 times larger in size than them. A total of 57 ORFs were identified within pFNPA10 and at least 9 of them encoded putative proteins with homology to different conjugal transfer proteins. The presence of iteron-like direct repeats and an ORF encoding a putative replication protein within pFNPA10 suggested that it replicated by the theta mode. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that pFNPA10 had no near neighbors in the databases and that it may have originated within an environmental Francisella lineage. Based on its features, pFNPA10 appears to be a novel extra-chromosomal genetic element within the genus Francisella. The suitability of pFNPA10 as a vector for transformation of species of Francisella by conjugation remains to be explored.

  16. CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ANALYSIS OF A PUTATIVE OXIDOREDUCTASE FROM KLEBSIELLA PNEUMONIAE

    SciTech Connect

    Baig, M.; Brown, A.; Eswaramoorthy, S.; Swaminathan, S.

    2009-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae, a gram-negative enteric bacterium, is found in nosocomial infections which are acquired during hospital stays for about 10% of hospital patients in the United States. The crystal structure of a putative oxidoreductase from K. pneumoniae has been determined. The structural information of this K. pneumoniae protein was used to understand its function. Crystals of the putative oxidoreductase enzyme were obtained by the sitting drop vapor diffusion method using Polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3350, Bis-Tris buffer, pH 5.5 as precipitant. These crystals were used to collect X-ray data at beam line X12C of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The crystal structure was determined using the SHELX program and refi ned with CNS 1.1. This protein, which is involved in the catalysis of an oxidation-reduction (redox) reaction, has an alpha/beta structure. It utilizes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) or nicotine adenine dinucleotide (NAD) to perform its function. This structure could be used to determine the active and co-factor binding sites of the protein, information that could help pharmaceutical companies in drug design and in determining the protein’s relationship to disease treatment such as that for pneumonia and other related pathologies.

  17. Identification, purification, and molecular cloning of a putative plastidic glucose translocator.

    PubMed

    Weber, A; Servaites, J C; Geiger, D R; Kofler, H; Hille, D; Gröner, F; Hebbeker, U; Flügge, U I

    2000-05-01

    During photosynthesis, part of the fixed carbon is directed into the synthesis of transitory starch, which serves as an intermediate carbon storage facility in chloroplasts. This transitory starch is mobilized during the night. Increasing evidence indicates that the main route of starch breakdown proceeds by way of hydrolytic enzymes and results in glucose formation. This pathway requires a glucose translocator to mediate the export of glucose from the chloroplasts. We have reexamined the kinetic properties of the plastidic glucose translocator and, using a differential labeling procedure, have identified the glucose translocator as a component of the inner envelope membrane. Peptide sequence information derived from this protein was used to isolate cDNA clones encoding a putative plastidic glucose translocator from spinach, potato, tobacco, Arabidopsis, and maize. We also present the molecular characterization of a candidate for a hexose transporter of the plastid envelope membrane. This transporter, initially characterized more than 20 years ago, is closely related to the mammalian glucose transporter GLUT family and differs from all other plant hexose transporters that have been characterized to date.

  18. Identification of a putative protein profile associated with tamoxifen therapy resistance in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Umar, Arzu; Kang, Hyuk; Timmermans, Annemieke M; Look, Maxime P; Meijer-van Gelder, Marion E; den Bakker, Michael A; Jaitly, Navdeep; Martens, John W M; Luider, Theo M; Foekens, John A; Pasa-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2009-06-01

    Tamoxifen resistance is a major cause of death in patients with recurrent breast cancer. Current clinical factors can correctly predict therapy response in only half of the treated patients. Identification of proteins that are associated with tamoxifen resistance is a first step toward better response prediction and tailored treatment of patients. In the present study we intended to identify putative protein biomarkers indicative of tamoxifen therapy resistance in breast cancer using nano-LC coupled with FTICR MS. Comparative proteome analysis was performed on approximately 5,500 pooled tumor cells (corresponding to approximately 550 ng of protein lysate/analysis) obtained through laser capture microdissection (LCM) from two independently processed data sets (n = 24 and n = 27) containing both tamoxifen therapy-sensitive and therapy-resistant tumors. Peptides and proteins were identified by matching mass and elution time of newly acquired LC-MS features to information in previously generated accurate mass and time tag reference databases. A total of 17,263 unique peptides were identified that corresponded to 2,556 non-redundant proteins identified with > or = 2 peptides. 1,713 overlapping proteins between the two data sets were used for further analysis. Comparative proteome analysis revealed 100 putatively differentially abundant proteins between tamoxifen-sensitive and tamoxifen-resistant tumors. The presence and relative abundance for 47 differentially abundant proteins were verified by targeted nano-LC-MS/MS in a selection of unpooled, non-microdissected discovery set tumor tissue extracts. ENPP1, EIF3E, and GNB4 were significantly associated with progression-free survival upon tamoxifen treatment for recurrent disease. Differential abundance of our top discriminating protein, extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer, was validated by tissue microarray in an independent patient cohort (n = 156). Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer levels were

  19. Identification of a Putative Protein Profile Associated with Tamoxifen Therapy Resistance in Breast Cancer*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Umar, Arzu; Kang, Hyuk; Timmermans, Annemieke M.; Look, Maxime P.; Meijer-van Gelder, Marion E.; den Bakker, Michael A.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Martens, John W. M.; Luider, Theo M.; Foekens, John A.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2009-01-01

    Tamoxifen resistance is a major cause of death in patients with recurrent breast cancer. Current clinical factors can correctly predict therapy response in only half of the treated patients. Identification of proteins that are associated with tamoxifen resistance is a first step toward better response prediction and tailored treatment of patients. In the present study we intended to identify putative protein biomarkers indicative of tamoxifen therapy resistance in breast cancer using nano-LC coupled with FTICR MS. Comparative proteome analysis was performed on ∼5,500 pooled tumor cells (corresponding to ∼550 ng of protein lysate/analysis) obtained through laser capture microdissection (LCM) from two independently processed data sets (n = 24 and n = 27) containing both tamoxifen therapy-sensitive and therapy-resistant tumors. Peptides and proteins were identified by matching mass and elution time of newly acquired LC-MS features to information in previously generated accurate mass and time tag reference databases. A total of 17,263 unique peptides were identified that corresponded to 2,556 non-redundant proteins identified with ≥2 peptides. 1,713 overlapping proteins between the two data sets were used for further analysis. Comparative proteome analysis revealed 100 putatively differentially abundant proteins between tamoxifen-sensitive and tamoxifen-resistant tumors. The presence and relative abundance for 47 differentially abundant proteins were verified by targeted nano-LC-MS/MS in a selection of unpooled, non-microdissected discovery set tumor tissue extracts. ENPP1, EIF3E, and GNB4 were significantly associated with progression-free survival upon tamoxifen treatment for recurrent disease. Differential abundance of our top discriminating protein, extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer, was validated by tissue microarray in an independent patient cohort (n = 156). Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer levels were higher in therapy

  20. Innovative island mobile vet.

    PubMed

    Forster, Dan

    2016-06-11

    One of the UK's first mobile veterinary clinics was recently awarded a Queen's Award for Innovation. Mobile Vet was launched on the Isle of Wight in 2013 by Dan Forster and his wife Kirsty, a veterinary nurse. British Veterinary Association.

  1. Ion mobility sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Jun; Watson, David B.; Whitten, William B.

    2013-01-22

    An ion mobility sensor system including an ion mobility spectrometer and a differential mobility spectrometer coupled to the ion mobility spectrometer. The ion mobility spectrometer has a first chamber having first end and a second end extending along a first direction, and a first electrode system that generates a constant electric field parallel to the first direction. The differential mobility spectrometer includes a second chamber having a third end and a fourth end configured such that a fluid may flow in a second direction from the third end to the fourth end, and a second electrode system that generates an asymmetric electric field within an interior of the second chamber. Additionally, the ion mobility spectrometer and the differential mobility spectrometer form an interface region. Also, the first end and the third end are positioned facing one another so that the constant electric field enters the third end and overlaps the fluid flowing in the second direction.

  2. Tandem mobile robot system

    DOEpatents

    Buttz, James H.; Shirey, David L.; Hayward, David R.

    2003-01-01

    A robotic vehicle system for terrain navigation mobility provides a way to climb stairs, cross crevices, and navigate across difficult terrain by coupling two or more mobile robots with a coupling device and controlling the robots cooperatively in tandem.

  3. Structural and social aspects of human mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagrow, James; Lin, Yu-Ru

    2012-02-01

    Research on human mobility has been revolutionized by cellular phone data, capturing activity patterns across extensive populations. A number of interesting features have been discovered, including the ultra-slow growth of human mobility patterns, which cannot be reproduced by traditional random-walk models. However, the spatiotemporal flows and detailed microstructure of human mobility have not been well studied. Inferring complex mobility networks from country-wide data from mobile phone data, we find that human mobility is dominated by a small group of frequently visited and dynamically close locations, forming a primary ``habitat'' that captures typical behavior, along with subsidiary habitats representing additional travel. These habitats are both well separated and spatially compact. We find that motion within habitats exhibits distinct temporal scaling and that the time delay to enter subsidiary habitats is a primary factor in the spatiotemporal growth of human travel. Mobility is also coupled with social activity. Interestingly, many phone users possess habitats that occupy single temporal and social contexts and display high temporal and social predictability when occupying subsidiary habitats, revealing new connections between human activity and mobility dynamics.

  4. Mobile Student Information System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asif, Muhammad; Krogstie, John

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A mobile student information system (MSIS) based on mobile computing and context-aware application concepts can provide more user-centric information services to students. The purpose of this paper is to describe a system for providing relevant information to students on a mobile platform. Design/methodology/approach: The research…

  5. Mobility and Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard van Leer Foundation Newsletter, 1994

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue deals with the phenomenon of mobility or transience in India, Kenya, Greece, Ireland, Malaysia, Thailand and Israel. The primary focus is on mobility's effect on young children, specifically their health and education; some of the broader concerns also addressed by the newsletter are the causes of mobility and its…

  6. Mobile Student Information System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asif, Muhammad; Krogstie, John

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A mobile student information system (MSIS) based on mobile computing and context-aware application concepts can provide more user-centric information services to students. The purpose of this paper is to describe a system for providing relevant information to students on a mobile platform. Design/methodology/approach: The research…

  7. Deblocking of mobile stereo video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzari, Lucio; Gotchev, Atanas; Egiazarian, Karen

    2012-02-01

    Most of candidate methods for compression of mobile stereo video apply block-transform based compression based on the H-264 standard with quantization of transform coefficients driven by quantization parameter (QP). The compression ratio and the resulting bit rate are directly determined by the QP level and high compression is achieved for the price of visually noticeable blocking artifacts. Previous studies on perceived quality of mobile stereo video have revealed that blocking artifacts are the most annoying and most influential in the acceptance/rejection of mobile stereo video and can even completely cancel the 3D effect and the corresponding quality added value. In this work, we address the problem of deblocking of mobile stereo video. We modify a powerful non-local transform-domain collaborative filtering method originally developed for denoising of images and video. The method employs grouping of similar block patches residing in spatial and temporal vicinity of a reference block in filtering them collaboratively in a suitable transform domain. We study the most suitable way of finding similar patches in both channels of stereo video and suggest a hybrid four-dimensional transform to process the collected synchronized (stereo) volumes of grouped blocks. The results benefit from the additional correlation available between the left and right channel of the stereo video. Furthermore, addition sharpening is applied through an embedded alpha-rooting in transform domain, which improve the visual appearance of the deblocked frames.

  8. Putative bacterial volatile-mediated growth in soybean (Glycine max L. Merrill) and expression of induced proteins under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Vaishnav, A; Kumari, S; Jain, S; Varma, A; Choudhary, D K

    2015-08-01

    Plant root-associated rhizobacteria elicit plant immunity referred to as induced systemic tolerance (IST) against multiple abiotic stresses. Among multibacterial determinants involved in IST, the induction of IST and promotion of growth by putative bacterial volatile compounds (VOCs) is reported in the present study. To characterize plant proteins induced by putative bacterial VOCs, proteomic analysis was performed by MALDI-MS/MS after exposure of soybean seedlings to a new strain of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) Pseudomonas simiae strain AU. Furthermore, expression analysis by Western blotting confirmed that the vegetative storage protein (VSP), gamma-glutamyl hydrolase (GGH) and RuBisCo large chain proteins were significantly up-regulated by the exposure to AU strain and played a major role in IST. VSP has preponderant roles in N accumulation and mobilization, acid phosphatase activity and Na(+) homeostasis to sustain plant growth under stress condition. More interestingly, plant exposure to the bacterial strain significantly reduced Na(+) and enhanced K(+) and P content in root of soybean seedlings under salt stress. In addition, high accumulation of proline and chlorophyll content also provided evidence of protection against osmotic stress during the elicitation of IST by bacterial exposure. The present study reported for the first time that Ps. simiae produces a putative volatile blend that can enhance soybean seedling growth and elicit IST against 100 mmol l(-1) NaCl stress condition. The identification of such differentially expressed proteins provide new targets for future studies that will allow assessment of their physiological roles and significance in the response of glycophytes to stresses. Further work should uncover more about the chemical side of VOC compounds and a detailed study about their molecular mechanism responsible for plant growth. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  9. Mobile Virtual Private Networking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulkkis, Göran; Grahn, Kaj; Mårtens, Mathias; Mattsson, Jonny

    Mobile Virtual Private Networking (VPN) solutions based on the Internet Security Protocol (IPSec), Transport Layer Security/Secure Socket Layer (SSL/TLS), Secure Shell (SSH), 3G/GPRS cellular networks, Mobile IP, and the presently experimental Host Identity Protocol (HIP) are described, compared and evaluated. Mobile VPN solutions based on HIP are recommended for future networking because of superior processing efficiency and network capacity demand features. Mobile VPN implementation issues associated with the IP protocol versions IPv4 and IPv6 are also evaluated. Mobile VPN implementation experiences are presented and discussed.

  10. Residential mobility microsimulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yifei; Wu, Lun

    2010-09-01

    Residential mobility refers to the spatial movement of individuals and households between dwellings within an urban area. This considerable amount of intra-urban movement affects the urban structure and has significant repercussions for urban transportation. In order to understand and project related impacts, a considerable number of residential mobility models has been developed and used in the regional planning process. Within this context, the history and state-of-art residential mobility models are discussed and indicated. Meanwhile, a residential mobility Microsimulation model, called URM-Microsim (Urban Residential Mobility Microsimulation), is introduced and discussed.

  11. Ion mobility sensor

    DOEpatents

    Koo, Jackson C.; Yu, Conrad M.

    2005-08-23

    An ion mobility sensor which can detect both ion and molecules simultaneously. Thus, one can measure the relative arrival times between various ions and molecules. Different ions have different mobility in air, and the ion sensor enables measurement of ion mobility, from which one can identify the various ions and molecules. The ion mobility sensor which utilizes a pair of glow discharge devices may be designed for coupling with an existing gas chromatograph, where various gas molecules are already separated, but numbers of each kind of molecules are relatively small, and in such cases a conventional ion mobility sensor cannot be utilized.

  12. Akt1 as a putative regulator of Hox genes.

    PubMed

    Kong, Kyoung-Ah; Yoon, Heejei; Kim, Myoung Hee

    2013-01-25

    In mammals, precise spatiotemporal expressions of Hox genes control the main body axis during embryogenesis. However, the mechanism by which Hox genes are regulated is poorly understood. To discover the putative regulator of Hox genes, in silico analyses were performed using GEO profiles, and Akt1 emerged as a candidate regulator of Hox genes in E13.5 MEFs. The results of the RT-PCR showed that 5' Hoxc genes, including ncRNA were upregulated in Akt1 null MEF. Combined bisulfite restriction analysis (COBRA) and bisulfite sequencing showed that the CpG island of a 5' Hoxc gene was hypomethylated in Akt1 null cells. These results indicate that Hox expression could be controlled by the function of Akt1 through epigenetic modification such as DNA methylation.

  13. Quartet analysis of putative horizontal gene transfer in Crenarchaeota.

    PubMed

    Ching, Travers H; Yoza, Brandon A; Li, Qing X

    2014-02-01

    Horizontal gene transfers (HGT) between four Crenarchaeota species (Metallosphaera cuprina Ar-4T, Acidianus hospitalis W1T, Vulcanisaeta moutnovskia 768-28T, and Pyrobaculum islandicum DSM 4184T) were investigated with quartet analysis. Strong support was found for individual genes that disagree with the phylogeny of the majority, implying genomic mosaicism. One such gene, a ferredoxin-related gene, was investigated further and incorporated into a larger phylogeny, which provided evidence for HGT of this gene from the Vulcanisaeta lineage to the Acidianus lineage. This is the first application of quartet analysis of HGT for the phylum Crenarchaeota. The results have shown that quartet analysis is a powerful technique to screen homologous sequences for putative HGTs and is useful in visually describing genomic mosaicism and HGT within four taxa.

  14. Disparate subcellular location of putative sortase substrates in Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Peltier, Johann; Shaw, Helen A; Wren, Brendan W; Fairweather, Neil F

    2017-08-23

    Clostridium difficile is a gastrointestinal pathogen but how the bacterium colonises this niche is still little understood. Sortase enzymes covalently attach specific bacterial proteins to the peptidoglycan cell wall and are often involved in colonisation by pathogens. Here we show C. difficile proteins CD2537 and CD3392 are functional substrates of sortase SrtB. Through manipulation of the C-terminal regions of these proteins we show the SPKTG motif is essential for covalent attachment to the cell wall. Two additional putative substrates, CD0183 which contains an SPSTG motif, and CD2768 which contains an SPQTG motif, are not cleaved or anchored to the cell wall by sortase. Finally, using an in vivo asymmetric cleavage assay, we show that despite containing a conserved SPKTG motif, in the absence of SrtB these proteins are localised to disparate cellular compartments.

  15. Identification of Putative Potassium Channel Homologues in Pathogenic Protozoa

    PubMed Central

    Prole, David L.; Marrion, Neil V.

    2012-01-01

    K+ channels play a vital homeostatic role in cells and abnormal activity of these channels can dramatically alter cell function and survival, suggesting that they might be attractive drug targets in pathogenic organisms. Pathogenic protozoa lead to diseases such as malaria, leishmaniasis, trypanosomiasis and dysentery that are responsible for millions of deaths each year worldwide. The genomes of many protozoan parasites have recently been sequenced, allowing rational design of targeted therapies. We analyzed the genomes of pathogenic protozoa and show the existence within them of genes encoding putative homologues of K+ channels. These protozoan K+ channel homologues represent novel targets for anti-parasitic drugs. Differences in the sequences and diversity of human and parasite proteins may allow pathogen-specific targeting of these K+ channel homologues. PMID:22363819

  16. Catalysis-based total synthesis of putative mandelalide A.

    PubMed

    Willwacher, Jens; Fürstner, Alois

    2014-04-14

    A concise synthesis of the putative structure assigned to the highly cytotoxic marine macrolide mandelalide A (1) is disclosed. Specifically, an iridium-catalyzed two-directional Krische allylation and a cobalt-catalyzed carbonylative epoxide opening served as convenient entry points for the preparation of the major building blocks. The final stages feature the first implementation of terminal-acetylene metathesis into natural product synthesis, which is remarkable as this class of substrates was beyond reach until very recently; key to success was the use of the highly selective molybdenum alkylidyne complex 42 as the catalyst. Although the constitution and stereochemistry of the synthetic samples are unambiguous, the spectra of 1 as well as of 11-epi-1 deviate from those of the natural product, which implies a subtle but deep-seated error in the original structure assignment.

  17. Design and synthesis of inositolphosphoglycan putative insulin mediators.

    PubMed

    López-Prados, Javier; Cuevas, Félix; Reichardt, Niels-Christian; de Paz, José-Luis; Morales, Ezequiel Q; Martín-Lomas, Manuel

    2005-03-07

    The binding modes of a series of molecules, containing the glucosamine (1-->6) myo-inositol structural motif, into the ATP binding site of the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) have been analysed using molecular docking. These calculations predict that the presence of a phosphate group at the non-reducing end in pseudodisaccharide and pseudotrisaccharide structures properly orientate the molecule into the binding site and that pseudotrisaccharide structures present the best shape complementarity. Therefore, pseudodisaccharides and pseudotrisaccharides have been synthesised from common intermediates using effective synthetic strategies. On the basis of this synthetic chemistry, the feasibility of constructing small pseudotrisaccharide libraries on solid-phase using the same intermediates has been explored. The results from the biological evaluation of these molecules provide additional support to an insulin-mediated signalling system which involves the intermediacy of inositolphosphoglycans as putative insulin mediators.

  18. Motor abnormalities as a putative endophenotype for Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Gianluca; Paşca, Sergiu P.

    2013-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) represent a complex group of behaviorally defined conditions with core deficits in social communication and the presence of repetitive and restrictive behaviors. To date, neuropathological studies have failed to identify pathognomonic cellular features for ASDs and there remains a fundamental disconnection between the complex clinical aspects of ASDs and the underlying neurobiology. Although not listed among the core diagnostic domains of impairment in ASDs, motor abnormalities have been consistently reported across the spectrum. In this perspective article, we summarize the evidence that supports the use of motor abnormalities as a putative endophenotype for ASDs. We argue that because these motor abnormalities do not directly depend on social or linguistic development, they may serve as an early disease indicator. Furthermore, we propose that stratifying patients based on motor development could be useful not only as an outcome predictor and in identifying more specific treatments for different ASDs categories, but also in exposing neurobiological mechanisms. PMID:23781177

  19. Variation in Arabidopsis flooding responses identifies numerous putative "tolerance genes".

    PubMed

    Vashisht, Divya; van Veen, Hans; Akman, Melis; Sasidharan, Rashmi

    2016-11-01

    Plant survival in flooded environments requires a combinatory response to multiple stress conditions such as limited light availability, reduced gas exchange and nutrient uptake. The ability to fine-tune the molecular response at the transcriptional and/or post-transcriptional level that can eventually lead to metabolic and anatomical adjustments are the underlying requirements to confer tolerance. Previously, we compared the transcriptomic adjustment of submergence tolerant, intolerant accessions and identified a core conserved and genotype-specific response to flooding stress, identifying numerous 'putative' tolerance genes. Here, we performed genome wide association analyses on 81 natural Arabidopsis accessions that identified 30 additional SNP markers associated with flooding tolerance. We argue that, given the many genes associated with flooding tolerance in Arabidopsis, improving resistance to submergence requires numerous genetic changes.

  20. Hypoxia-induced anapyrexia: implications and putative mediators.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Alexandre A; Branco, Luiz G S

    2002-01-01

    Hypoxia elicits an array of compensatory responses in animals ranging from protozoa to mammals. Central among these responses is anapyrexia, the regulated decrease of body temperature. The importance of anapyrexia lies in the fact that it reduces oxygen consumption, increases the affinity of hemoglobin for oxygen, and blunts the energetically costly responses to hypoxia. The mechanisms of anapyrexia are of intense interest to physiologists. Several substances, among them lactate, adenosine, opioids, and nitric oxide, have been suggested as putative mediators of anapyrexia, and most appear to act in the central nervous system. Moreover, there is evidence that the drop in body temperature in response to hypoxia, unlike the ventilatory response to hypoxia, does not depend on the activation of peripheral chemoreceptors. The current knowledge of the mechanisms of hypoxia-induced anapyrexia are reviewed.

  1. Correlation of change in R2* and phase with putative iron content in deep gray matter of healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Haacke, E. Mark; Miao, Yanwei; Liu, Manju; Habib, Charbel A.; Katkuri, Yashwanth; Liu, Ting; Yang, Zhihong; Lang, Zhijin; Hu, Jiani; Wu, Jianlin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To establish a correlation between putative iron content using susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) phase and T2* weighted magnitude values in the basal ganglia as a function of age in healthy human brains. Materials and methods 100 healthy adults (20-69 yr.; mean = 43 yr) were evaluated for this study using a gradient echo sequence. The original magnitude and high pass filtered phase data were analyzed as proxy variables for iron content in the substantia nigra, red nucleus, globus pallidus, putamen, caudate nucleus, thalamus and pulvinar thalamus. Each structure was broken into two parts, a high iron content region and a low iron content region. Results Both magnitude and phase data showed an increase in putative iron content with age. However, the high iron content region revealed two new pieces of information: both the average iron content per pixel and the area of high iron increased with age. Further, significant increase in iron uptake as a function of age was found past the age of 40. Conclusion A two region of interest analysis of iron is a much more sensitive means to evaluate iron content change over time. Contrary to the current belief that iron content increases level off with age, the putative iron deposition in region two is seen to increase with age. PMID:20815053

  2. A novel putative enterococcal pathogenicity island linked to the esp virulence gene of Enterococcus faecium and associated with epidemicity.

    PubMed

    Leavis, Helen; Top, Janetta; Shankar, Nathan; Borgen, Katrine; Bonten, Marc; van Embden, Jan; Willems, Rob J L

    2004-02-01

    Enterococcus faecalis harbors a virulence-associated surface protein encoded by the esp gene. This gene has been shown to be part of a 150-kb putative pathogenicity island. A gene similar to esp has recently been found in Enterococcus faecium isolates recovered from hospitalized patients. In the present study we analyzed the polymorphism in the esp gene of E. faecium, and we investigated the association of esp with neighboring chromosomal genes. The esp gene showed considerable sequence heterogeneity in the regions encoding the nonrepeat N- and C-terminal domains of the Esp protein as well as differences in the number of repeats. DNA sequencing of chromosomal regions flanking the esp gene of E. faecium revealed seven open reading frames, representing putative genes implicated in virulence, regulation of transcription, and antibiotic resistance. These flanking regions were invariably associated with the presence or absence of the esp gene in E. faecium, indicating that esp in E. faecium is part of a distinct genetic element. Because of the presence of virulence genes in this gene cluster, the lower G+C content relative to that of the genome, and the presence of esp in E. faecium isolates associated with nosocomial outbreaks and clinically documented infections, we conclude that this genetic element constitutes a putative pathogenicity island, the first one described in E. faecium. Except for the presence of esp and araC, this pathogenicity island is completely different from the esp-containing pathogenicity island previously disclosed in E. faecalis.

  3. Whole-Genome Survey of the Putative ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter Family Genes in Vitis vinifera

    PubMed Central

    Çakır, Birsen; Kılıçkaya, Ozan

    2013-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein superfamily constitutes one of the largest protein families known in plants. In this report, we performed a complete inventory of ABC protein genes in Vitis vinifera, the whole genome of which has been sequenced. By comparison with ABC protein members of Arabidopsis thaliana, we identified 135 putative ABC proteins with 1 or 2 NBDs in V. vinifera. Of these, 120 encode intrinsic membrane proteins, and 15 encode proteins missing TMDs. V. vinifera ABC proteins can be divided into 13 subfamilies with 79 “full-size,” 41 “half-size,” and 15 “soluble” putative ABC proteins. The main feature of the Vitis ABC superfamily is the presence of 2 large subfamilies, ABCG (pleiotropic drug resistance and white-brown complex homolog) and ABCC (multidrug resistance-associated protein). We identified orthologs of V. vinifera putative ABC transporters in different species. This work represents the first complete inventory of ABC transporters in V. vinifera. The identification of Vitis ABC transporters and their comparative analysis with the Arabidopsis counterparts revealed a strong conservation between the 2 species. This inventory could help elucidate the biological and physiological functions of these transporters in V. vinifera. PMID:24244377

  4. Whole-genome survey of the putative ATP-binding cassette transporter family genes in Vitis vinifera.

    PubMed

    Çakır, Birsen; Kılıçkaya, Ozan

    2013-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein superfamily constitutes one of the largest protein families known in plants. In this report, we performed a complete inventory of ABC protein genes in Vitis vinifera, the whole genome of which has been sequenced. By comparison with ABC protein members of Arabidopsis thaliana, we identified 135 putative ABC proteins with 1 or 2 NBDs in V. vinifera. Of these, 120 encode intrinsic membrane proteins, and 15 encode proteins missing TMDs. V. vinifera ABC proteins can be divided into 13 subfamilies with 79 "full-size," 41 "half-size," and 15 "soluble" putative ABC proteins. The main feature of the Vitis ABC superfamily is the presence of 2 large subfamilies, ABCG (pleiotropic drug resistance and white-brown complex homolog) and ABCC (multidrug resistance-associated protein). We identified orthologs of V. vinifera putative ABC transporters in different species. This work represents the first complete inventory of ABC transporters in V. vinifera. The identification of Vitis ABC transporters and their comparative analysis with the Arabidopsis counterparts revealed a strong conservation between the 2 species. This inventory could help elucidate the biological and physiological functions of these transporters in V. vinifera.

  5. Putative Regulatory Factors Associated with Intramuscular Fat Content

    PubMed Central

    Cesar, Aline S. M.; Regitano, Luciana C. A.; Koltes, James E.; Fritz-Waters, Eric R.; Lanna, Dante P. D.; Gasparin, Gustavo; Mourão, Gerson B.; Oliveira, Priscila S. N.; Reecy, James M.; Coutinho, Luiz L.

    2015-01-01

    Intramuscular fat (IMF) content is related to insulin resistance, which is an important prediction factor for disorders, such as cardiovascular disease, obesity and type 2 diabetes in human. At the same time, it is an economically important trait, which influences the sensorial and nutritional value of meat. The deposition of IMF is influenced by many factors such as sex, age, nutrition, and genetics. In this study Nellore steers (Bos taurus indicus subspecies) were used to better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in IMF content. This was accomplished by identifying differentially expressed genes (DEG), biological pathways and putative regulatory factors. Animals included in this study had extreme genomic estimated breeding value (GEBV) for IMF. RNA-seq analysis, gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) and co-expression network methods, such as partial correlation coefficient with information theory (PCIT), regulatory impact factor (RIF) and phenotypic impact factor (PIF) were utilized to better understand intramuscular adipogenesis. A total of 16,101 genes were analyzed in both groups (high (H) and low (L) GEBV) and 77 DEG (FDR 10%) were identified between the two groups. Pathway Studio software identified 13 significantly over-represented pathways, functional classes and small molecule signaling pathways within the DEG list. PCIT analyses identified genes with a difference in the number of gene-gene correlations between H and L group and detected putative regulatory factors involved in IMF content. Candidate genes identified by PCIT include: ANKRD26, HOXC5 and PPAPDC2. RIF and PIF analyses identified several candidate genes: GLI2 and IGF2 (RIF1), MPC1 and UBL5 (RIF2) and a host of small RNAs, including miR-1281 (PIF). These findings contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie fat content and energy balance in muscle and provide important information for the production of healthier beef for human consumption. PMID:26042666

  6. Rhodiola rosea L. as a putative botanical antidepressant.

    PubMed

    Amsterdam, Jay D; Panossian, Alexander G

    2016-06-15

    Rhodiola rosea (R. rosea) is a botanical adaptogen with putative anti-stress and antidepressant properties. Evidence-based data supporting the effectiveness of R. rosea for depression in adults is limited, and therefore a comprehensive review of available animal and human studies suggesting a putative antidepressant action is warranted. A review of the literature was undertaken to ascertain studies of possible antidepressant mechanisms of action and studies of the safety and effectiveness of R. rosea extracts in animals and adult humans. A search of MEDLINE and the Russian state library database was conducted (up to October 2015) on R. rosea. R. rosea extracts and its purified constituent, salidroside, has been shown to produce a variety of mediator interactions with several molecular networks of neuroendocrine-immune and neurotransmitter receptor systems likely to be involved in the pathophysiology of depression. A wide variety of preclinical in vivo and ex vivo studies with laboratory animals suggests the presence of several biochemical and pharmacological antidepressant-like actions. Clinical assessment of R. rosea L. rhizome extracts in humans with various depressive syndromes is based upon results from two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of 146 subjects with major depressive disorder and seven open-label studies totaling 714 individuals with stress-induced mild depression (diagnosed as asthenic syndrome or psychoneurosis). Overall, results of these studies suggests a possible antidepressant action for R. rosea extract in adult humans. In contrast to most conventional antidepressants, R. rosea extract appears to be well-tolerated in short-term studies with a favorable safety profile. R. rosea demonstrates multi-target effects on various levels of the regulation of cell response to stress, affecting various components of the neuroendocrine, neurotransmitter receptor and molecular networks associated with possible beneficial effects on mood

  7. Cryptic Species in Putative Ancient Asexual Darwinulids (Crustacea, Ostracoda)

    PubMed Central

    Schön, Isa; Pinto, Ricardo L.; Halse, Stuart; Smith, Alison J.; Martens, Koen; Birky, C. William

    2012-01-01

    Background Fully asexually reproducing taxa lack outcrossing. Hence, the classic Biological Species Concept cannot be applied. Methodology/Principal Findings We used DNA sequences from the mitochondrial COI gene and the nuclear ITS2 region to check species boundaries according to the evolutionary genetic (EG) species concept in five morphospecies in the putative ancient asexual ostracod genera, Penthesilenula and Darwinula, from different continents. We applied two methods for detecting cryptic species, namely the K/θ method and the General Mixed Yule Coalescent model (GMYC). We could confirm the existence of species in all five darwinulid morphospecies and additional cryptic diversity in three morphospecies, namely in Penthesilenula brasiliensis, Darwinula stevensoni and in P. aotearoa. The number of cryptic species within one morphospecies varied between seven (P. brasiliensis), five to six (D. stevensoni) and two (P. aotearoa), respectively, depending on the method used. Cryptic species mainly followed continental distributions. We also found evidence for coexistence at the local scale for Brazilian cryptic species of P. brasiliensis and P. aotearoa. Our ITS2 data confirmed that species exist in darwinulids but detected far less EG species, namely two to three cryptic species in P. brasiliensis and no cryptic species at all in the other darwinulid morphospecies. Conclusions/Significance Our results clearly demonstrate that both species and cryptic diversity can be recognized in putative ancient asexual ostracods using the EG species concept, and that COI data are more suitable than ITS2 for this purpose. The discovery of up to eight cryptic species within a single morphospecies will significantly increase estimates of biodiversity in this asexual ostracod group. Which factors, other than long-term geographic isolation, are important for speciation processes in these ancient asexuals remains to be investigated. PMID:22802945

  8. Screening for hydrolytic enzymes reveals Ayr1p as a novel triacylglycerol lipase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ploier, Birgit; Scharwey, Melanie; Koch, Barbara; Schmidt, Claudia; Schatte, Jessica; Rechberger, Gerald; Kollroser, Manfred; Hermetter, Albin; Daum, Günther

    2013-12-13

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as well as other eukaryotes, preserves fatty acids and sterols in a biologically inert form, as triacylglycerols and steryl esters. The major triacylglycerol lipases of the yeast S. cerevisiae identified so far are Tgl3p, Tgl4p, and Tgl5p (Athenstaedt, K., and Daum, G. (2003) YMR313c/TGL3 encodes a novel triacylglycerol lipase located in lipid particles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. J. Biol. Chem. 278, 23317-23323; Athenstaedt, K., and Daum, G. (2005) Tgl4p and Tgl5p, two triacylglycerol lipases of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are localized to lipid particles. J. Biol. Chem. 280, 37301-37309). We observed that upon cultivation on oleic acid, triacylglycerol mobilization did not come to a halt in a yeast strain deficient in all currently known triacylglycerol lipases, indicating the presence of additional not yet characterized lipases/esterases. Functional proteome analysis using lipase and esterase inhibitors revealed a subset of candidate genes for yet unknown hydrolytic enzymes on peroxisomes and lipid droplets. Based on the conserved GXSXG lipase motif, putative functions, and subcellular localizations, a selected number of candidates were characterized by enzyme assays in vitro, gene expression analysis, non-polar lipid analysis, and in vivo triacylglycerol mobilization assays. These investigations led to the identification of Ayr1p as a novel triacylglycerol lipase of yeast lipid droplets and confirmed the hydrolytic potential of the peroxisomal Lpx1p in vivo. Based on these results, we discuss a possible link between lipid storage, lipid mobilization, and peroxisomal utilization of fatty acids as a carbon source.

  9. Screening for Hydrolytic Enzymes Reveals Ayr1p as a Novel Triacylglycerol Lipase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    PubMed Central

    Ploier, Birgit; Scharwey, Melanie; Koch, Barbara; Schmidt, Claudia; Schatte, Jessica; Rechberger, Gerald; Kollroser, Manfred; Hermetter, Albin; Daum, Günther

    2013-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as well as other eukaryotes, preserves fatty acids and sterols in a biologically inert form, as triacylglycerols and steryl esters. The major triacylglycerol lipases of the yeast S. cerevisiae identified so far are Tgl3p, Tgl4p, and Tgl5p (Athenstaedt, K., and Daum, G. (2003) YMR313c/TGL3 encodes a novel triacylglycerol lipase located in lipid particles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. J. Biol. Chem. 278, 23317–23323; Athenstaedt, K., and Daum, G. (2005) Tgl4p and Tgl5p, two triacylglycerol lipases of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are localized to lipid particles. J. Biol. Chem. 280, 37301–37309). We observed that upon cultivation on oleic acid, triacylglycerol mobilization did not come to a halt in a yeast strain deficient in all currently known triacylglycerol lipases, indicating the presence of additional not yet characterized lipases/esterases. Functional proteome analysis using lipase and esterase inhibitors revealed a subset of candidate genes for yet unknown hydrolytic enzymes on peroxisomes and lipid droplets. Based on the conserved GXSXG lipase motif, putative functions, and subcellular localizations, a selected number of candidates were characterized by enzyme assays in vitro, gene expression analysis, non-polar lipid analysis, and in vivo triacylglycerol mobilization assays. These investigations led to the identification of Ayr1p as a novel triacylglycerol lipase of yeast lipid droplets and confirmed the hydrolytic potential of the peroxisomal Lpx1p in vivo. Based on these results, we discuss a possible link between lipid storage, lipid mobilization, and peroxisomal utilization of fatty acids as a carbon source. PMID:24187129

  10. A Large-Scale Functional Analysis of Putative Target Genes of Mating-Type Loci Provides Insight into the Regulation of Sexual Development of the Cereal Pathogen Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-Kyoung; Jo, Seong-Mi; Kim, Gi-Yong; Kim, Da-Woon; Kim, Yeon-Ki; Yun, Sung-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Fusarium graminearum, the causal agent of Fusarium head blight in cereal crops, produces sexual progeny (ascospore) as an important overwintering and dissemination strategy for completing the disease cycle. This homothallic ascomycetous species does not require a partner for sexual mating; instead, it carries two opposite mating-type (MAT) loci in a single nucleus to control sexual development. To gain a comprehensive understanding of the regulation of sexual development in F. graminearum, we used in-depth and high-throughput analyses to examine the target genes controlled transcriptionally by two-linked MAT loci (MAT1-1, MAT1-2). We hybridized a genome-wide microarray with total RNAs from F. graminearum mutants that lacked each MAT locus individually or together, and overexpressed MAT1-2-1, as well as their wild-type progenitor, at an early stage of sexual development. A comparison of the gene expression levels revealed a total of 1,245 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) among all of the mutants examined. Among these, genes involved in metabolism, cell wall organization, cellular response to stimuli, cell adhesion, fertilization, development, chromatin silencing, and signal transduction, were significantly enriched. Protein binding microarray analysis revealed the presence of putative core DNA binding sequences (ATTAAT or ATTGTT) for the HMG (high mobility group)-box motif in the MAT1-2-1 protein. Targeted deletion of 106 DEGs revealed 25 genes that were specifically required for sexual development, most of which were regulated transcriptionally by both the MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 loci. Taken together with the expression patterns of key target genes, we propose a regulatory pathway for MAT-mediated sexual development, in which both MAT loci may be activated by several environmental cues via chromatin remodeling and/or signaling pathways, and then control the expression of at least 1,245 target genes during sexual development via regulatory cascades and/or networks

  11. A Large-Scale Functional Analysis of Putative Target Genes of Mating-Type Loci Provides Insight into the Regulation of Sexual Development of the Cereal Pathogen Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Kyoung; Jo, Seong-Mi; Kim, Gi-Yong; Kim, Da-Woon; Kim, Yeon-Ki; Yun, Sung-Hwan

    2015-09-01

    Fusarium graminearum, the causal agent of Fusarium head blight in cereal crops, produces sexual progeny (ascospore) as an important overwintering and dissemination strategy for completing the disease cycle. This homothallic ascomycetous species does not require a partner for sexual mating; instead, it carries two opposite mating-type (MAT) loci in a single nucleus to control sexual development. To gain a comprehensive understanding of the regulation of sexual development in F. graminearum, we used in-depth and high-throughput analyses to examine the target genes controlled transcriptionally by two-linked MAT loci (MAT1-1, MAT1-2). We hybridized a genome-wide microarray with total RNAs from F. graminearum mutants that lacked each MAT locus individually or together, and overexpressed MAT1-2-1, as well as their wild-type progenitor, at an early stage of sexual development. A comparison of the gene expression levels revealed a total of 1,245 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) among all of the mutants examined. Among these, genes involved in metabolism, cell wall organization, cellular response to stimuli, cell adhesion, fertilization, development, chromatin silencing, and signal transduction, were significantly enriched. Protein binding microarray analysis revealed the presence of putative core DNA binding sequences (ATTAAT or ATTGTT) for the HMG (high mobility group)-box motif in the MAT1-2-1 protein. Targeted deletion of 106 DEGs revealed 25 genes that were specifically required for sexual development, most of which were regulated transcriptionally by both the MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 loci. Taken together with the expression patterns of key target genes, we propose a regulatory pathway for MAT-mediated sexual development, in which both MAT loci may be activated by several environmental cues via chromatin remodeling and/or signaling pathways, and then control the expression of at least 1,245 target genes during sexual development via regulatory cascades and/or networks

  12. The Ecology of Human Mobility.

    PubMed

    Meekan, Mark G; Duarte, Carlos M; Fernández-Gracia, Juan; Thums, Michele; Sequeira, Ana M M; Harcourt, Rob; Eguíluz, Víctor M

    2017-03-01

    Mobile phones and other geolocated devices have produced unprecedented volumes of data on human movement. Analysis of pooled individual human trajectories using big data approaches has revealed a wealth of emergent features that have ecological parallels in animals across a diverse array of phenomena including commuting, epidemics, the spread of innovations and culture, and collective behaviour. Movement ecology, which explores how animals cope with and optimize variability in resources, has the potential to provide a theoretical framework to aid an understanding of human mobility and its impacts on ecosystems. In turn, big data on human movement can be explored in the context of animal movement ecology to provide solutions for urgent conservation problems and management challenges.

  13. Determination and Analysis of the Putative AcaCD-Responsive Promoters of Salmonella Genomic Island 1

    PubMed Central

    Olasz, Ferenc; Kiss, János

    2016-01-01

    The integrative genomic island SGI1 and its variants confer multidrug resistance in numerous Salmonella enterica serovariants and several Proteus mirabilis and Acinetobacter strains. SGI1 is mobilized by the IncA/C family plasmids. The island exploits not only the conjugation apparatus of the plasmid, but also utilizes the plasmid-encoded master regulator AcaCD to induce the excision and formation of its transfer-competent form, which is a key step in the horizontal transfer of SGI1. Triggering of SGI1 excision occurs via the AcaCD-dependent activation of xis gene expression. AcaCD binds in Pxis to an unusually long recognition sequence. Beside the Pxis promoter, upstream regions of four additional SGI1 genes, S004, S005, S012 and S018, also contain putative AcaCD-binding sites. Furthermore, SGI1 also encodes an AcaCD-related activator, FlhDCSGI1, which has no known function. Here, we have analysed the functionality of the putative AcaCD-dependent promoter regions and proved their activation by either AcaCD or FlhDCSGI1. Moreover, we provide evidence that both activators act on the same binding site in Pxis and that FlhDCSGI1 is able to complement the acaCD deletion of the IncA/C family plasmid R16a. We determined the transcription start sites for the AcaCD-responsive promoters and showed that orf S004 is expressed probably from a different start codon than predicted earlier. Additionally, expression of S003 from promoter PS004 was ruled out. Pxis and the four SGI1 promoters examined here also lack obvious -35 promoter box and their promoter profile is consistent with the class II-type activation pathway. Although the role of the four additionally analysed AcaCD/FlhDCSGI1-controlled genes in transfer and/or maintenance of SGI1 is not yet clear, the conservation of the whole region suggests the existence of some selection for their functionality. PMID:27727307

  14. Identification of genomic variants putatively targeted by selection during dog domestication.

    PubMed

    Cagan, Alex; Blass, Torsten

    2016-01-12

    Dogs [Canis lupus familiaris] were the first animal species to be domesticated and continue to occupy an important place in human societies. Recent studies have begun to reveal when and where dog domestication occurred. While much progress has been made in identifying the genetic basis of phenotypic differences between dog breeds we still know relatively little about the genetic changes underlying the phenotypes that differentiate all dogs from their wild progenitors, wolves [Canis lupus]. In particular, dogs generally show reduced aggression and fear towards humans compared to wolves. Therefore, selection for tameness was likely a necessary prerequisite for dog domestication. With the increasing availability of whole-genome sequence data it is possible to try and directly identify the genetic variants contributing to the phenotypic differences between dogs and wolves. We analyse the largest available database of genome-wide polymorphism data in a global sample of dogs 69 and wolves 7. We perform a scan to identify regions of the genome that are highly differentiated between dogs and wolves. We identify putatively functional genomic variants that are segregating or at high frequency [> = 0.75 Fst] for alternative alleles between dogs and wolves. A biological pathways analysis of the genes containing these variants suggests that there has been selection on the 'adrenaline and noradrenaline biosynthesis pathway', well known for its involvement in the fight-or-flight response. We identify 11 genes with putatively functional variants fixed for alternative alleles between dogs and wolves. The segregating variants in these genes are strong candidates for having been targets of selection during early dog domestication. We present the first genome-wide analysis of the different categories of putatively functional variants that are fixed or segregating at high frequency between a global sampling of dogs and wolves. We find evidence that selection has been strongest

  15. Genome-wide analysis of putative peroxiredoxin in unicellular and filamentous cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cyanobacteria are photoautotrophic prokaryotes with wide variations in genome sizes and ecological habitats. Peroxiredoxin (PRX) is an important protein that plays essential roles in protecting own cells against reactive oxygen species (ROS). PRXs have been identified from mammals, fungi and higher plants. However, knowledge on cyanobacterial PRXs still remains obscure. With the availability of 37 sequenced cyanobacterial genomes, we performed a comprehensive comparative analysis of PRXs and explored their diversity, distribution, domain structure and evolution. Results Overall 244 putative prx genes were identified, which were abundant in filamentous diazotrophic cyanobacteria, Acaryochloris marina MBIC 11017, and unicellular cyanobacteria inhabiting freshwater and hot-springs, while poor in all Prochlorococcus and marine Synechococcus strains. Among these putative genes, 25 open reading frames (ORFs) encoding hypothetical proteins were identified as prx gene family members and the others were already annotated as prx genes. All 244 putative PRXs were classified into five major subfamilies (1-Cys, 2-Cys, BCP, PRX5_like, and PRX-like) according to their domain structures. The catalytic motifs of the cyanobacterial PRXs were similar to those of eukaryotic PRXs and highly conserved in all but the PRX-like subfamily. Classical motif (CXXC) of thioredoxin was detected in protein sequences from the PRX-like subfamily. Phylogenetic tree constructed of catalytic domains coincided well with the domain structures of PRXs and the phylogenies based on 16s rRNA. Conclusions The distribution of genes encoding PRXs in different unicellular and filamentous cyanobacteria especially those sub-families like PRX-like or 1-Cys PRX correlate with the genome size, eco-physiology, and physiological properties of the organisms. Cyanobacterial and eukaryotic PRXs share similar conserved motifs, indicating that cyanobacteria adopt similar catalytic mechanisms as eukaryotes. All

  16. Dichotomous Distribution of Putative Cholinergic Interneurons in Mouse Accessory Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Marking, Sarah; Krosnowski, Kurt; Ogura, Tatsuya; Lin, Weihong

    2017-01-01

    express the calcium binding protein, calbindin-D28K. Moreover, exposure to either a male intruder or soiled bedding from a mating cage leads to an increase in the number of c-Fos-expressing MCL GFP+ neurons. Taken together, our data reveal a population of largely unidentified putative cholinergic neurons in the AOB. Their dichotomous distribution in the aAOB and pAOB suggests region-specific cholinergic involvement in olfactory information processing. PMID:28289379

  17. Coral bleaching under thermal stress: putative involvement of host/symbiont recognition mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Vidal-Dupiol, Jeremie; Adjeroud, Mehdi; Roger, Emmanuel; Foure, Laurent; Duval, David; Mone, Yves; Ferrier-Pages, Christine; Tambutte, Eric; Tambutte, Sylvie; Zoccola, Didier; Allemand, Denis; Mitta, Guillaume

    2009-01-01

    Background Coral bleaching can be defined as the loss of symbiotic zooxanthellae and/or their photosynthetic pigments from their cnidarian host. This major disturbance of reef ecosystems is principally induced by increases in water temperature. Since the beginning of the 1980s and the onset of global climate change, this phenomenon has been occurring at increasing rates and scales, and with increasing severity. Several studies have been undertaken in the last few years to better understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms of coral bleaching but the jigsaw puzzle is far from being complete, especially concerning the early events leading to symbiosis breakdown. The aim of the present study was to find molecular actors involved early in the mechanism leading to symbiosis collapse. Results In our experimental procedure, one set of Pocillopora damicornis nubbins was subjected to a gradual increase of water temperature from 28°C to 32°C over 15 days. A second control set kept at constant temperature (28°C). The differentially expressed mRNA between the stressed states (sampled just before the onset of bleaching) and the non stressed states (control) were isolated by Suppression Subtractive Hybridization. Transcription rates of the most interesting genes (considering their putative function) were quantified by Q-RT-PCR, which revealed a significant decrease in transcription of two candidates six days before bleaching. RACE-PCR experiments showed that one of them (PdC-Lectin) contained a C-Type-Lectin domain specific for mannose. Immunolocalisation demonstrated that this host gene mediates molecular interactions between the host and the symbionts suggesting a putative role in zooxanthellae acquisition and/or sequestration. The second gene corresponds to a gene putatively involved in calcification processes (Pdcyst-rich). Its down-regulation could reflect a trade-off mechanism leading to the arrest of the mineralization process under stress. Conclusion Under thermal

  18. Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein Interacts with Cellular Putative RNA Helicase

    PubMed Central

    You, Li-Ru; Chen, Chun-Ming; Yeh, Tien-Shun; Tsai, Tzung-Yuan; Mai, Ru-Tsun; Lin, Chi-Hung; Lee, Yan-Hwa Wu

    1999-01-01

    The nucleocapsid core protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been shown to trans-act on several viral or cellular promoters. To get insight into the trans-action mechanism of HCV core protein, a yeast two-hybrid cloning system was used for identification of core protein-interacting cellular protein. One such cDNA clone encoding the DEAD box family of putative RNA helicase was obtained. This cellular putative RNA helicase, designated CAP-Rf, exhibits more than 95% amino acid sequence identity to other known RNA helicases including human DBX and DBY, mouse mDEAD3, and PL10, a family of proteins generally involved in translation, splicing, development, or cell growth. In vitro binding or in vivo coimmunoprecipitation studies demonstrated the direct interaction of the full-length/matured form and C-terminally truncated variants of HCV core protein with this targeted protein. Additionally, the protein’s interaction domains were delineated at the N-terminal 40-amino-acid segment of the HCV core protein and the C-terminal tail of CAP-Rf, which encompassed its RNA-binding and ATP hydrolysis domains. Immunoblotting or indirect immunofluorescence analysis revealed that the endogenous CAP-Rf was mainly localized in the nucleus and to a lesser extent in the cytoplasm, and when fused with FLAG tag, it colocalized with the HCV core protein either in the cytoplasm or in the nucleus. Similar to other RNA helicases, this cellular RNA helicase has nucleoside triphosphatase-deoxynucleoside triphosphatase activity, but this activity is inhibited by various forms of homopolynucleotides and enhanced by the HCV core protein. Moreover, transient expression of HCV core protein in human hepatoma HuH-7 cells significantly potentiated the trans-activation effect of FLAG-tagged CAP-Rf or untagged CAP-Rf on the luciferase reporter plasmid activity. All together, our results indicate that CAP-Rf is involved in regulation of gene expression and that HCV core protein promotes the trans

  19. Coral bleaching under thermal stress: putative involvement of host/symbiont recognition mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Dupiol, Jeremie; Adjeroud, Mehdi; Roger, Emmanuel; Foure, Laurent; Duval, David; Mone, Yves; Ferrier-Pages, Christine; Tambutte, Eric; Tambutte, Sylvie; Zoccola, Didier; Allemand, Denis; Mitta, Guillaume

    2009-08-04

    Coral bleaching can be defined as the loss of symbiotic zooxanthellae and/or their photosynthetic pigments from their cnidarian host. This major disturbance of reef ecosystems is principally induced by increases in water temperature. Since the beginning of the 1980s and the onset of global climate change, this phenomenon has been occurring at increasing rates and scales, and with increasing severity. Several studies have been undertaken in the last few years to better understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms of coral bleaching but the jigsaw puzzle is far from being complete, especially concerning the early events leading to symbiosis breakdown. The aim of the present study was to find molecular actors involved early in the mechanism leading to symbiosis collapse. In our experimental procedure, one set of Pocillopora damicornis nubbins was subjected to a gradual increase of water temperature from 28 degrees C to 32 degrees C over 15 days. A second control set kept at constant temperature (28 degrees C). The differentially expressed mRNA between the stressed states (sampled just before the onset of bleaching) and the non stressed states (control) were isolated by Suppression Subtractive Hybridization. Transcription rates of the most interesting genes (considering their putative function) were quantified by Q-RT-PCR, which revealed a significant decrease in transcription of two candidates six days before bleaching. RACE-PCR experiments showed that one of them (PdC-Lectin) contained a C-Type-Lectin domain specific for mannose. Immunolocalisation demonstrated that this host gene mediates molecular interactions between the host and the symbionts suggesting a putative role in zooxanthellae acquisition and/or sequestration. The second gene corresponds to a gene putatively involved in calcification processes (Pdcyst-rich). Its down-regulation could reflect a trade-off mechanism leading to the arrest of the mineralization process under stress. Under thermal stress

  20. Understanding seasonal mobilities, health and wellbeing to Sanya, China.

    PubMed

    Kou, Lirong; Xu, Honggang; Hannam, Kevin

    2017-03-01

    Both the ageing of the Chinese population and elderly mobility impact on the Chinese social infrastructure, triggering challenges to maintain elderly wellbeing. This paper reflects on the notion that seasonal mobility promotes wellbeing, and explores how two crucial factors, namely, forced migration and health conditions, influence the relations between seasonal retirement mobility and wellbeing. This study analyses amenity-led seasonal retired mobilities to Sanya as a case study, and adopts and develops a conceptual framework for relations between mobility and wellbeing in terms of daily activity, sociality, and context through seasonal mobility. Qualitative methods including participant observation, non-participant observation, in-depth interviews, and mobile ethnography were used to collect data. This revealed the heterogeneity of health conditions, and the constrained mobilities of seasonal retirees. Health and willingness for mobility are shown as significant factors in influencing the relations between mobility and wellbeing, which are in turn complicated and dynamic. Seasonal mobilities bring about difficulties for retirees particularly in terms of their efforts to reconstruct their previous life and self-continuities. However, it is argued that these retirees can merely maintain temporary and superficial wellbeing due to constant health concerns and uncertainties over potential temporary or permanent return to their places of origin. Those with serious health problems have more limitations, sacrificing other aspects of wellbeing for physical health. Practical implications from state, destination, and individual levels to better facilitate seasonal mobility and promote wellbeing are provided.

  1. The Bacillus anthracis chromosome contains four conserved, excision-proficient, putative prophages

    PubMed Central

    Sozhamannan, Shanmuga; Chute, Michael D; McAfee, Farrell D; Fouts, Derrick E; Akmal, Arya; Galloway, Darrell R; Mateczun, Alfred; Baillie, Leslie W; Read, Timothy D

    2006-01-01

    Background Bacillus anthracis is considered to be a recently emerged clone within the Bacillus cereus sensu lato group. The B. anthracis genome sequence contains four putative lambdoid prophages. We undertook this study in order to understand whether the four prophages are unique to B. anthracis and whether they produce active phages. Results More than 300 geographically and temporally divergent isolates of B. anthracis and its near neighbors were screened by PCR for the presence of specific DNA sequences from each prophage region. Every isolate of B. anthracis screened by PCR was found to produce all four phage-specific amplicons whereas none of the non-B. anthracis isolates, produced more than one phage-specific amplicon. Excision of prophages could be detected by a PCR based assay for attP sites on extra-chromosomal phage circles and for attB sites on phage-excised chromosomes. SYBR-green real-time PCR assays indicated that prophage excision occurs at very low frequencies (2 × 10-5 - 8 × 10-8/cell). Induction with mitomycin C increased the frequency of excision of one of the prophages by approximately 250 fold. All four prophages appear to be defective since, mitomycin C induced culture did not release any viable phage particle or lyse the cells or reveal any phage particle under electron microscopic examination. Conclusion The retention of all four putative prophage regions across all tested strains of B. anthracis is further evidence of the very recent emergence of this lineage and the prophage regions may be useful for differentiating the B. anthracis chromosome from that of its neighbors. All four prophages can excise at low frequencies, but are apparently defective in phage production. PMID:16600039

  2. A Putative Bacterial ABC Transporter Circumvents the Essentiality of Signal Peptidase

    PubMed Central

    Morisaki, J. Hiroshi; Smith, Peter A.; Date, Shailesh V.; Kajihara, Kimberly K.; Truong, Chau Linda; Modrusan, Zora; Yan, Donghong; Kang, Jing; Xu, Min; Shah, Ishita M.; Mintzer, Robert; Kofoed, Eric M.; Cheung, Tommy K.; Arnott, David; Koehler, Michael F. T.; Heise, Christopher E.; Brown, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The type I signal peptidase of Staphylococcus aureus, SpsB, is an attractive antibacterial target because it is essential for viability and extracellularly accessible. We synthesized compound 103, a novel arylomycin-derived inhibitor of SpsB with significant potency against various clinical S. aureus strains (MIC of ~1 µg/ml). The predominant clinical strain USA300 developed spontaneous resistance to compound 103 with high frequency, resulting from single point mutations inside or immediately upstream of cro/cI, a homolog of the lambda phage transcriptional repressor cro. These cro/cI mutations led to marked (>50-fold) overexpression of three genes encoding a putative ABC transporter. Overexpression of this ABC transporter was both necessary and sufficient for resistance and, notably, circumvented the essentiality of SpsB during in vitro culture. Mutation of its predicted ATPase gene abolished resistance, suggesting a possible role for active transport; in these bacteria, resistance to compound 103 occurred with low frequency and through mutations in spsB. Bacteria overexpressing the ABC transporter and lacking SpsB were capable of secreting a subset of proteins that are normally cleaved by SpsB and instead were cleaved at a site distinct from the canonical signal peptide. These bacteria secreted reduced levels of virulence-associated proteins and were unable to establish infection in mice. This study reveals the mechanism of resistance to a novel arylomycin derivative and demonstrates that the nominal essentiality of the S. aureus signal peptidase can be circumvented by the upregulation of a putative ABC transporter in vitro but not in vivo. PMID:27601569

  3. Putative Cross-Contamination Routes of Listeria monocytogenes in a Meat Processing Facility in Romania.

    PubMed

    Bolocan, Andrei Sorin; Oniciuc, Elena Alexandra; Alvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino; Wagner, Martin; Rychli, Kathrin; Jordan, Kieran; Nicolau, Anca Ioana

    2015-09-01

    Putative routes of Listeria monocytogenes contamination, based on the workflow of the employees, were studied in a meat processing facility by investigating 226 samples collected from food contact surfaces, non-food contact surfaces, raw materials, and ready-to-eat meat products on four occasions over a 1-year period. In total, 19.7% of non-food contact surfaces, 22.9% of food contact surfaces, 45% of raw materials, and 20% of ready-to-eat meat products were positive for L. monocytogenes (analyzed by the International Organization for Standardization standard method ISO 11290). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiles were determined for a representative subset of these isolates, and 11 distinct pulsotypes were identified, two of which were frequently isolated (T4 and T8) and considered persistent. Strains from the various pulsotypes were screened for the presence of bcrABC and qacH, the genes responsible for tolerance responses to quaternary ammonium compounds. Two strains harbored bcrABC, and these strains had a higher benzalkonium chloride tolerance; however, they were not considered persistent strains. The frequently isolated PFGE pulsotype T8 strains were highly adhesive to abiotic surfaces at 10 and 20°C; however, the pulsotype T6 strain, which was isolated only at the last sampling time, had the highest adhesion ability, and the pulsotype T4 strain (the second most persistent pulsotype) had only modest adhesion. Four putative cross-contamination routes were confirmed by mapping the persistent and other isolates. This information could allow a food safety manager to adjust the work flow to improve the hygienic conditions in a meat processing facility. This study revealed the prevalence and persistence of L. monocytogenes strains in a meat processing facility and established the importance of developing strategies to avoid cross-contamination, recalls, and outbreaks of listeriosis.

  4. Analysis of and function predictions for previously conserved hypothetical or putative proteins in Blochmannia floridanus

    PubMed Central

    Gaudermann, Peter; Vogl, Ina; Zientz, Evelyn; Silva, Francisco J; Moya, Andres; Gross, Roy; Dandekar, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Background There is an increasing interest to better understand endosymbiont capabilities in insects both from an ecological point of view and for pest control. Blochmannia floridanus provides important nutrients for its host, the ant Camponotus, while the bacterium in return is provided with a niche to proliferate. Blochmannia floridanus proteins and metabolites are difficult to study due to its endosymbiontic life style; however, its complete genome sequence became recently available. Results Improved sequence analysis algorithms, databanks and gene and pathway context methods allowed us to reveal new information on various enzyme and pathways from the Blochmannia floridanus genome sequence [EMBL-ID BX248583]. Furthermore, these predictions are supported and linked to experimental data for instance from structural genomics projects (e.g. Bfl341, Bfl 499) or available biochemical data on proteins from other species which we show here to be related. We were able to assign a confirmed or at least a putative molecular function for 21 from 27 previously conserved hypothetical proteins. For 48 proteins of 66 with a previous putative assignment the function was further clarified. Several of these proteins occur in many proteobacteria and are found to be conserved even in the compact genome of this endosymbiont. To extend and re-test predictions and links to experimentally verified protein functions, functional clusters and interactions were assembled. These included septum initiation and cell division (Bfl165, Bfl303, Bfl248 et al.); translation; transport; the ubiquinone (Bfl547 et al.), the inositol and nitrogen pathways. Conclusion Taken together, our data allow a better and more complete description of the pathway capabilities and life style of this typical endosymbiont. PMID:16401340

  5. Report on the development of putative functional SSR and SNP markers in passion fruits.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Zirlane Portugal; Munhoz, Carla de Freitas; Vieira, Maria Lucia Carneiro

    2017-09-06

    Passionflowers Passiflora edulis and Passiflora alata are diploid, outcrossing and understudied fruit bearing species. In Brazil, passion fruit cultivation began relatively recently and has earned the country an outstanding position as the world's top producer of passion fruit. The fruit's main economic value lies in the production of juice, an essential exotic ingredient in juice blends. Currently, crop improvement strategies, including those for underexploited tropical species, tend to incorporate molecular genetic approaches. In this study, we examined a set of P. edulis transcripts expressed in response to infection by Xanthomonas axonopodis, (the passion fruit's main bacterial pathogen that attacks the vines), aiming at the development of putative functional markers, i.e. SSRs (simple sequence repeats) and SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms). A total of 210 microsatellites were found in 998 sequences, and trinucleotide repeats were found to be the most frequent (31.4%). Of the sequences selected for designing primers, 80.9% could be used to develop SSR markers, and 60.6% SNP markers for P. alata. SNPs were all biallelic and found within 15 gene fragments of P. alata. Overall, gene fragments generated 10,003 bp. SNP frequency was estimated as one SNP every 294 bp. Polymorphism rates revealed by SSR and SNP loci were 29.4 and 53.6%, respectively. Passiflora edulis transcripts were useful for the development of putative functional markers for P. alata, suggesting a certain level of sequence conservation between these cultivated species. The markers developed herein could be used for genetic mapping purposes and also in diversity studies.

  6. The putative serine protease inhibitor Api m 6 from Apis mellifera venom: recombinant and structural evaluation.

    PubMed

    Michel, Y; McIntyre, M; Ginglinger, H; Ollert, M; Cifuentes, L; Blank, S; Spillner, E

    2012-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) E-mediated reactions to honeybee venom can cause severe anaphylaxis, sometimes with fatal consequences. Detailed knowledge of the allergic potential of all venom components is necessary to ensure proper diagnosis and treatment of allergy and to gain a better understanding of the allergological mechanisms of insect venoms. Our objective was to undertake an immunochemical and structural evaluation of the putative low-molecular-weight serine protease inhibitor Api m 6, a component of honeybee venom. We recombinantly produced Api m 6 as a soluble protein in Escherichia coli and in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) insect cells.We also assessed specific IgE reactivity of venom-sensitized patients with 2 prokaryotically produced Api m 6 variants using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Moreover, we built a structural model ofApi m 6 and compared it with other protease inhibitor structures to gain insights into the function of Api m 6. In a population of 31 honeybee venom-allergic patients, 26% showed specific IgE reactivity with prokaryotically produced Api m 6, showing it to be a minor but relevant allergen. Molecular modeling of Api m 6 revealed a typical fold of canonical protease inhibitors, supporting the putative function of this venom allergen. Although Api m 6 has a highly variant surface charge, its epitope distribution appears to be similar to that of related proteins. Api m 6 is a honeybee venom component with IgE-sensitizing potential in a fraction of venom-allergic patients. Recombinant Api m 6 can help elucidate individual component-resolved reactivity profiles and increase our understanding of immune responses to low-molecular-weight allergens

  7. Putative glycoprotein and glycolipid polymorphonuclear leukocyte receptors for the Actinomyces naeslundii WVU45 fimbrial lectin.

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, A L; Ruhl, S; Joralmon, R A; Brennan, M J; Sutphin, M J; Cisar, J O

    1995-01-01

    Recognition of receptors on sialidase-treated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) by the Gal/GalNAc lectin associated with the type 2 fimbriae of certain strains of actinomyces results in activation of the PMNs, phagocytosis, and destruction of the bacteria. In the present study, plant lectins were utilized as probes to identify putative PMN receptors for the actinomyces lectin. The Gal-reactive lectin from Ricinus communis (RCAI), the Gal/GalNAc-reactive lectins from R. communis (RCAII) and Bauhinia purpurea (BPA), as well as the Gal beta 1-3GalNAc-specific lectins from Arachis hypogaea (PNA) and Agaricus bisporus (ABA) inhibited killing of Actinomyces naeslundii WVU45 by sialidase-treated PMNs. These five lectins detected a 130-kDa surface-labeled glycoprotein on nitrocellulose transfers of PMN extracts separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This glycoprotein was revealed only after treatment of the transfers with sialidase, a condition analogous to the sialidase dependence of the lectin-mediated biological responses of the PMNs to the actinomyces. The mannose-reactive lectin concanavalin A did not inhibit killing of the actinomyces and failed to detect the 130-kDa glycoprotein but did block PMN-dependent killing of Escherichia coli B, a bacterium that possesses mannose-sensitive fimbriae. Therefore, the PMN glycoprotein receptor for A. naeslundii is clearly distinct from those recognized by E. coli. Two major putative glycolipid receptors were also identified by actinomyces and RCAI overlays on sialidase-treated thin-layer chromatograms of PMN gangliosides. Thus, both a 130-kDa glycoprotein and certain gangliosides are implicated in the attachment of the actinomyces to PMNs. PMID:7790078

  8. Structural characterization of CalO1: a putative orsellinic acid methyltransferase in the calicheamicin-biosynthetic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Aram; Singh, Shanteri; Bingman, Craig A.; Thorson, Jon S.; Phillips, Jr, George N.

    2011-11-07

    The X-ray structure determination at 2.4 {angstrom} resolution of the putative orsellinic acid C3 O-methyltransferase (CalO1) involved in calicheamicin biosynthesis is reported. Comparison of CalO1 with a homology model of the functionally related calicheamicin orsellinic acid C2 O-methyltransferase (CalO6) implicates several residues that are likely to contribute to the regiospecificity of alkylation. Consistent with the proposed requirement of an acyl-carrier-protein-bound substrate, this structural study also reveals structural determinants within CalO1 that are anticipated to accommodate an association with an acyl carrier protein.

  9. Mobile healthcare informatics.

    PubMed

    Siau, Keng; Shen, Zixing

    2006-06-01

    Advances in wireless technology give pace to the rapid development of mobile applications. The coming mobile revolution will bring dramatic and fundamental changes to our daily life. It will influence the way we live, the way we do things, and the way we take care of our health. For the healthcare industry, mobile applications provide a new frontier in offering better care and services to patients, and a more flexible and mobile way of communicating with suppliers and patients. Mobile applications will provide important real time data for patients, physicians, insurers, and suppliers. In addition, it will revolutionalize the way information is managed in the healthcare industry and redefine the doctor - patient communication. This paper discusses different aspects of mobile healthcare. Specifically, it presents mobile applications in healthcare, and discusses possible challenges facing the development of mobile applications. Obstacles in developing mobile healthcare applications include mobile device limitations, wireless networking problems, infrastructure constraints, security concerns, and user distrust. Research issues in resolving or alleviating these problems are also discussed in the paper.

  10. Coupling human mobility and social ties.

    PubMed

    Toole, Jameson L; Herrera-Yaqüe, Carlos; Schneider, Christian M; González, Marta C

    2015-04-06

    Studies using massive, passively collected data from communication technologies have revealed many ubiquitous aspects of social networks, helping us understand and model social media, information diffusion and organizational dynamics. More recently, these data have come tagged with geographical information, enabling studies of human mobility patterns and the science of cities. We combine these two pursuits and uncover reproducible mobility patterns among social contacts. First, we introduce measures of mobility similarity and predictability and measure them for populations of users in three large urban areas. We find individuals' visitations patterns are far more similar to and predictable by social contacts than strangers and that these measures are positively correlated with tie strength. Unsupervised clustering of hourly variations in mobility similarity identifies three categories of social ties and suggests geography is an important feature to contextualize social relationships. We find that the composition of a user's ego network in terms of the type of contacts they keep is correlated with mobility behaviour. Finally, we extend a popular mobility model to include movement choices based on social contacts and compare its ability to reproduce empirical measurements with two additional models of mobility.

  11. Coupling human mobility and social ties

    PubMed Central

    Toole, Jameson L.; Herrera-Yaqüe, Carlos; Schneider, Christian M.; González, Marta C.

    2015-01-01

    Studies using massive, passively collected data from communication technologies have revealed many ubiquitous aspects of social networks, helping us understand and model social media, information diffusion and organizational dynamics. More recently, these data have come tagged with geographical information, enabling studies of human mobility patterns and the science of cities. We combine these two pursuits and uncover reproducible mobility patterns among social contacts. First, we introduce measures of mobility similarity and predictability and measure them for populations of users in three large urban areas. We find individuals' visitations patterns are far more similar to and predictable by social contacts than strangers and that these measures are positively correlated with tie strength. Unsupervised clustering of hourly variations in mobility similarity identifies three categories of social ties and suggests geography is an important feature to contextualize social relationships. We find that the composition of a user's ego network in terms of the type of contacts they keep is correlated with mobility behaviour. Finally, we extend a popular mobility model to include movement choices based on social contacts and compare its ability to reproduce empirical measurements with two additional models of mobility. PMID:25716185

  12. Comparative Genomics Reveals Mobile Pathogenicity Chromosomes in Fusarium

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium species are among the most important phytopathogenic and toxigenic fungi, having significant impact on crop production and animal health. Distinctively, strains of F. oxysporum exhibit wide host range and are pathogenic to both plant and animal species, reflecting remarkable genetic adapta...

  13. ACTS mobile SATCOM experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbe, Brian S.; Frye, Robert E.; Jedrey, Thomas C.

    1993-01-01

    Over the last decade, the demand for reliable mobile satellite communications (satcom) for voice, data, and video applications has increased dramatically. As consumer demand grows, the current spectrum allocation at L-band could become saturated. For this reason, NASA and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory are developing the Advanced Communications Technology Satellites (ACTS) mobile terminal (AMT) and are evaluating the feasibility of K/Ka-band (20/30 GHz) mobile satcom to meet these growing needs. U.S. industry and government, acting as co-partners, will evaluate K/Ka-band mobile satcom and develop new technologies by conducting a series of applications-oriented experiments. The ACTS and the AMT testbed will be used to conduct these mobile satcom experiments. The goals of the ACTS Mobile Experiments Program and the individual experiment configurations and objectives are further presented.

  14. Isolation and identification of a putative scent-related gene RhMYB1 from rose.

    PubMed

    Yan, Huijun; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Qigang; Jian, Hongying; Qiu, Xianqin; Wang, Jihua; Tang, Kaixue

    2011-10-01

    Rose fragrances play an important role in attracting pollinators and commercial value. However, some genes involved in rose floral scent metabolism are less well understood. Here, wild-type scented rose (WR) and its spontaneous non-scented mutant rose (MR) were analyzed. SPME-GC/MS analysis showed that relative content of 1-ethenyl-4-methoxy-benzene represented was significantly different between WR and MR. We have isolated an EST encoding a MYB family of transcription factor from SSH libraries of the two roses in the previous studies, and designated RhMYB1. In the study, the full-length cDNA of RhMYB1 was identified and characterized by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The RhMYB1 full-length cDNA was 1,125 bp containing an 882 bp open reading frame, which encodes a precursor protein of 294 amino acids. Sequence alignments revealed that RhMYB1 shared high similarity with other plants R-type MYB, and RhMYB1 contained a DNA binding domain. Northern blot analysis revealed that RhMYB1 was expressed specifically in flower petal, moreover, the expression level of RhMYB1 in WR increased along with scent emission, and decreased when the scent emission decreased. It is suggested that RhMYB1 might be a putative identification of gene involved in the biosynthesis of rose scent.

  15. Evidence of a putative deep sea specific microbiome in marine sponges.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Jonathan; Flemer, Burkhardt; Jackson, Stephen A; Morrissey, John P; O'Gara, Fergal; O'Gara, Ferghal; Dobson, Alan D W

    2014-01-01

    The microbiota of four individual deep water sponges, Lissodendoryx diversichela, Poecillastra compressa, Inflatella pellicula, and Stelletta normani, together with surrounding seawater were analysed by pyrosequencing of a region of the 16S rRNA gene common to Bacteria and Archaea. Due to sampling constraints at depths below 700 m duplicate samples were not collected. The microbial communities of L. diversichela, P. compressa and I. pellicula were typical of low microbial abundance (LMA) sponges while S. normani had a community more typical of high microbial abundance (HMA) sponges. Analysis of the deep sea sponge microbiota revealed that the three LMA-like sponges shared a set of abundant OTUs that were distinct from those associated with sponges from shallow waters. Comparison of the pyrosequencing data with that from shallow water sponges revealed that the microbial communities of all sponges analysed have similar archaeal populations but that the bacterial populations of the deep sea sponges were distinct. Further analysis of the common and abundant OTUs from the three LMA-like sponges placed them within the groups of ammonia oxidising Archaea (Thaumarchaeota) and sulphur oxidising γ-Proteobacteria (Chromatiales). Reads from these two groups made up over 70% of all 16S rRNA genes detected from the three LMA-like sponge samples, providing evidence of a putative common microbial assemblage associated with deep sea LMA sponges.

  16. Sequence and expression analysis of putative Arachis hypogaea (peanut) Nod factor perception proteins.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez, Fernando; Angelini, Jorge; Figueredo, María Soledad; Muñoz, Vanina; Tonelli, María Laura; Fabra, Adriana

    2015-07-01

    Peanut, like most legumes, develops a symbiotic relationship with rhizobia to overcome nitrogen limitation. Rhizobial infection of peanut roots occurs through a primitive and poorly characterized intercellular mechanism. Knowledge of the molecular determinants of this symbiotic interaction is scarce, and little is known about the molecules implicated in the recognition of the symbionts. Here, we identify the LysM extracellular domain sequences of two putative peanut Nod factor receptors, named AhNFR1 and AhNFP. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that they correspond to LjNFR1 and LjNFR5 homologs, respectively. Transcriptional analysis revealed that, unlike LjNFR5, AhNFP expression was not induced at 8 h post bradyrhizobial inoculation. Further examination of AhNFP showed that the predicted protein sequence is identical to GmNFR5 in two positions that are crucial for Nod factor perception in other legumes. Analysis of the AhNFP LysM2 tridimensional model revealed that these two amino acids are very close, delimiting a zone of the molecule essential for Nod factor recognition. These data, together with the analysis of the molecular structure of Nod factors of native peanut symbionts previously reported, suggest that peanut and soybean could share some of the determinants involved in the signalling cascade that allows symbiosis establishment.

  17. Genomic localization, sequence analysis, and transcription of the putative human cytomegalovirus DNA polymerase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Heilbronn, R; Jahn, G; Bürkle, A; Freese, U K; Fleckenstein, B; zur Hausen, H

    1987-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-induced DNA polymerase has been well characterized biochemically and functionally, but its genomic location has not yet been assigned. To identify the coding sequence, cross-hybridization with the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) polymerase gene was used, as suggested by the close similarity of the herpes group virus-induced DNA polymerases to the HCMV DNA polymerase. A cosmid and plasmid library of the entire HCMV genome was screened with the BamHI Q fragment of HSV-1 at different stringency conditions. One PstI-HincII restriction fragment of 850 base pairs mapping within the EcoRI M fragment of HCMV cross-hybridized at Tm - 25 degrees C. Sequence analysis revealed one open reading frame spanning the entire sequence. The amino acid sequence showed a highly conserved domain of 133 amino acids shared with the HSV and putative Epstein-Barr virus polymerase sequences. This domain maps within the C-terminal part of the HSV polymerase gene, which has been suggested to contain part of the catalytic center of the enzyme. Transcription analysis revealed one 5.4-kilobase early transcript in the sense orientation with respect to the open reading frame identified. This transcript appears to code for the 140-kilodalton HCMV polymerase protein. Images PMID:3023689

  18. Deduced amino acid sequence of a putative sodium channel from the scyphozoan jellyfish Cyanea capillata.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, P A; Holman, M A; Greenberg, R M

    1993-01-01

    Members of the phylum Cnidaria are the lowest extant organisms to possess a nervous system and are the first that are known to contain cells that produce action potentials carried exclusively by Na+ ions. They thus occupy an important position in the evolution of Na+ channels. A cDNA encoding a 198-kDa protein with high sequence identity to known Na+ channels was isolated from the scyphozoan jellyfish Cyanea capillata. The similarity between this and other Na+ channels is greatest in the transmembrane segments and the putative pore region and less so in the cytoplasmic loops that link the four domains of the protein. Phylogenetic analysis of the deduced protein reveals that it is closely related to known Na+ channels, particularly those of squid and Drosophila, and more distantly separated from Ca2+ channels. Scrutiny of the Cyanea channel in regions corresponding to those purported to form the tetrodotoxin receptor and selectivity filter of Na+ channels in higher animals reveals several anomalies that suggest that current models of the location of the tetrodotoxin binding site and Na+ channel selectivity filter are incomplete. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8394021

  19. Deduced amino acid sequence of a putative sodium channel from the scyphozoan jellyfish Cyanea capillata.

    PubMed

    Anderson, P A; Holman, M A; Greenberg, R M

    1993-08-01

    Members of the phylum Cnidaria are the lowest extant organisms to possess a nervous system and are the first that are known to contain cells that produce action potentials carried exclusively by Na+ ions. They thus occupy an important position in the evolution of Na+ channels. A cDNA encoding a 198-kDa protein with high sequence identity to known Na+ channels was isolated from the scyphozoan jellyfish Cyanea capillata. The similarity between this and other Na+ channels is greatest in the transmembrane segments and the putative pore region and less so in the cytoplasmic loops that link the four domains of the protein. Phylogenetic analysis of the deduced protein reveals that it is closely related to known Na+ channels, particularly those of squid and Drosophila, and more distantly separated from Ca2+ channels. Scrutiny of the Cyanea channel in regions corresponding to those purported to form the tetrodotoxin receptor and selectivity filter of Na+ channels in higher animals reveals several anomalies that suggest that current models of the location of the tetrodotoxin binding site and Na+ channel selectivity filter are incomplete.

  20. Evidence of a Putative Deep Sea Specific Microbiome in Marine Sponges

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Jonathan; Flemer, Burkhardt; Jackson, Stephen A.; Morrissey, John P.; O'Gara, Ferghal; Dobson, Alan D. W.

    2014-01-01

    The microbiota of four individual deep water sponges, Lissodendoryx diversichela, Poecillastra compressa, Inflatella pellicula, and Stelletta normani, together with surrounding seawater were analysed by pyrosequencing of a region of the 16S rRNA gene common to Bacteria and Archaea. Due to sampling constraints at depths below 700 m duplicate samples were not collected. The microbial communities of L. diversichela, P. compressa and I. pellicula were typical of low microbial abundance (LMA) sponges while S. normani had a community more typical of high microbial abundance (HMA) sponges. Analysis of the deep sea sponge microbiota revealed that the three LMA-like sponges shared a set of abundant OTUs that were distinct from those associated with sponges from shallow waters. Comparison of the pyrosequencing data with that from shallow water sponges revealed that the microbial communities of all sponges analysed have similar archaeal populations but that the bacterial populations of the deep sea sponges were distinct. Further analysis of the common and abundant OTUs from the three LMA-like sponges placed them within the groups of ammonia oxidising Archaea (Thaumarchaeota) and sulphur oxidising γ-Proteobacteria (Chromatiales). Reads from these two groups made up over 70% of all 16S rRNA genes detected from the three LMA-like sponge samples, providing evidence of a putative common microbial assemblage associated with deep sea LMA sponges. PMID:24670421

  1. Efficiently prepared ephedrine alkaloids-free Ephedra Herb extract: a putative marker and antiproliferative effects.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Naohiro; Yamashita, Tadatoshi; Hyuga, Sumiko; Hyuga, Masashi; Kamakura, Hiroyuki; Yoshimura, Morio; Maruyama, Takuro; Hakamatsuka, Takashi; Amakura, Yoshiaki; Hanawa, Toshihiko; Goda, Yukihiro

    2016-07-01

    Ephedrine alkaloids (EAs) have been considered the main pharmacologically active substances in Ephedra Herb (, Mao; EH) since they were first identified by Prof. N. Nagai, and are known to induce palpitation, hypertension, insomnia, and dysuria as side effects. Therefore, the administration of drugs containing EH to patients with cardiovascular-related diseases is severely contraindicated. While our previous studies suggest that some of the effects of EH may not be due to EAs, considering their side effects would be expedient to develop a new EAs-free EH extract (EFE). Here, we established a preparation method for EFE and revealed its chemical composition, including the content of herbacetin, a flavonoid aglycon present in EH and a potential putative marker for EFE quality control. In addition, we showed the antiproliferative effects of EFE against the H1975 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell line. EFE was prepared from EH extract using the ion exchange resin SK-1B. LC/Orbitrap MS analysis revealed the removal of EAs, 6-methoxykynurenic acid, and 6-hydroxykynurenic acid from the original extract. Quantitative analysis of herbacetin using LC/MS in acid-hydrolyzed EFE showed that its content was 0.104 %. Although several alkaloidal constituents were removed from EH extract, the antiproliferative effect of EFE against H1975 cells was comparable to that of EH extract. These results indicate that EFE retained the anticancer effect of EH and demonstrated its potential for future development as a new herbal medicine with reduced side effects.

  2. Genomic localization, sequence analysis, and transcription of the putative human cytomegalovirus DNA polymerase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Heilbronn, T.; Jahn, G.; Buerkle, A.; Freese, U.K.; Fleckenstein, B.; Zur Hausen, H.

    1987-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-induced DNA polymerase has been well characterized biochemically and functionally, but its genomic location has not yet been assigned. To identify the coding sequence, cross-hybridization with the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) polymerase gene was used, as suggested by the close similarity of the herpes group virus-induced DNA polymerases to the HCMV DNA polymerase. A cosmid and plasmid library of the entire HCMV genome was screened with the BamHI Q fragment of HSF-1 at different stringency conditions. One PstI-HincII restriction fragment of 850 base pairs mapping within the EcoRI M fragment of HCMV cross-hybridized at T/sub m/ - 25/degrees/C. Sequence analysis revealed one open reading frame spanning the entire sequence. The amino acid sequence showed a highly conserved domain of 133 amino acids shared with the HSV and putative Esptein-Barr virus polymerase sequences. This domain maps within the C-terminal part of the HSV polymerase gene, which has been suggested to contain part of the catalytic center of the enzyme. Transcription analysis revealed one 5.4-kilobase early transcript in the sense orientation with respect to the open reading frame identified. This transcript appears to code for the 140-kilodalton HCMV polymerase protein.

  3. Mobile learning in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serkan Güllüoüǧlu, Sabri

    2013-03-01

    This paper outlines the main infrastructure for implicating mobile learning in medicine and present a sample mobile learning application for medical learning within the framework of mobile learning systems. Mobile technology is developing nowadays. In this case it will be useful to develop different learning environments using these innovations in internet based distance education. M-learning makes the most of being on location, providing immediate access, being connected, and acknowledges learning that occurs beyond formal learning settings, in places such as the workplace, home, and outdoors. Central to m-learning is the principle that it is the learner who is mobile rather than the device used to deliver m learning. The integration of mobile technologies into training has made learning more accessible and portable. Mobile technologies make it possible for a learner to have access to a computer and subsequently learning material and activities; at any time and in any place. Mobile devices can include: mobile phone, personal digital assistants (PDAs), personal digital media players (eg iPods, MP3 players), portable digital media players, portable digital multimedia players. Mobile learning (m-learning) is particularly important in medical education, and the major users of mobile devices are in the field of medicine. The contexts and environment in which learning occurs necessitates m-learning. Medical students are placed in hospital/clinical settings very early in training and require access to course information and to record and reflect on their experiences while on the move. As a result of this paper, this paper strives to compare and contrast mobile learning with normal learning in medicine from various perspectives and give insights and advises into the essential characteristics of both for sustaining medical education.

  4. Mobile computing for radiology.

    PubMed

    Auffermann, William F; Chetlen, Alison L; Sharma, Arjun; Colucci, Andrew T; DeQuesada, Ivan M; Grajo, Joseph R; Kung, Justin W; Loehfelm, Thomas W; Sherry, Steven J

    2013-12-01

    The rapid advances in mobile computing technology have the potential to change the way radiology and medicine as a whole are practiced. Several mobile computing advances have not yet found application to the practice of radiology, while others have already been applied to radiology but are not in widespread clinical use. This review addresses several areas where radiology and medicine in general may benefit from adoption of the latest mobile computing technologies and speculates on potential future applications.

  5. Exploring the mobility of mobile phone users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csáji, Balázs Cs.; Browet, Arnaud; Traag, V. A.; Delvenne, Jean-Charles; Huens, Etienne; Van Dooren, Paul; Smoreda, Zbigniew; Blondel, Vincent D.

    2013-03-01

    Mobile phone datasets allow for the analysis of human behavior on an unprecedented scale. The social network, temporal dynamics and mobile behavior of mobile phone users have often been analyzed independently from each other using mobile phone datasets. In this article, we explore the connections between various features of human behavior extracted from a large mobile phone dataset. Our observations are based on the analysis of communication data of 100,000 anonymized and randomly chosen individuals in a dataset of communications in Portugal. We show that clustering and principal component analysis allow for a significant dimension reduction with limited loss of information. The most important features are related to geographical location. In particular, we observe that most people spend most of their time at only a few locations. With the help of clustering methods, we then robustly identify home and office locations and compare the results with official census data. Finally, we analyze the geographic spread of users’ frequent locations and show that commuting distances can be reasonably well explained by a gravity model.

  6. The Controversy, Challenges, and Potential Benefits of Putative Female Germline Stem Cells Research in Mammals.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zezheng; Sun, Mengli; Liang, Xia; Li, Jia; Zhou, Fangyue; Zhong, Zhisheng; Zheng, Yuehui

    2016-01-01

    The conventional view is that female mammals lose their ability to generate new germ cells after birth. However, in recent years, researchers have successfully isolated and cultured a type of germ cell from postnatal ovaries in a variety of mammalian species that have the abilities of self-proliferation and differentiation into oocytes, and this finding indicates that putative germline stem cells maybe exist in the postnatal mammalian ovaries. Herein, we review the research history and discovery of putative female germline stem cells, the concept that putative germline stem cells exist in the postnatal mammalian ovary, and the research progress, challenge, and application of putative germline stem cells in recent years.

  7. The Controversy, Challenges, and Potential Benefits of Putative Female Germline Stem Cells Research in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Zezheng; Sun, Mengli; Liang, Xia; Li, Jia; Zhou, Fangyue; Zhong, Zhisheng; Zheng, Yuehui

    2016-01-01

    The conventional view is that female mammals lose their ability to generate new germ cells after birth. However, in recent years, researchers have successfully isolated and cultured a type of germ cell from postnatal ovaries in a variety of mammalian species that have the abilities of self-proliferation and differentiation into oocytes, and this finding indicates that putative germline stem cells maybe exist in the postnatal mammalian ovaries. Herein, we review the research history and discovery of putative female germline stem cells, the concept that putative germline stem cells exist in the postnatal mammalian ovary, and the research progress, challenge, and application of putative germline stem cells in recent years. PMID:26788065

  8. Doctors going mobile.

    PubMed

    Romano, Ron; Baum, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Having a Web page and a blog site are the minimum requirements for an Internet presence in the new millennium. However, a Web page that loads on a personal computer or a laptop will be ineffective on a mobile or cellular phone. Today, with more existing and potential patients having access to cellular technology, it is necessary to reconfigure the appearance of your Web site that appears on a mobile phone. This article discusses mobile computing and suggestions for improving the appearance of your Web site on a mobile or cellular phone.

  9. Internationally Mobile Academics: Concept and Findings in Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teichler, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Information on the international mobility of persons in charge of teaching and/or research at institutions of higher education is by no means abundant. Most official statistics provide only information on their current citizenship. A closer look reveals that international mobility can be enormously varied--for example, migration initiated by their…

  10. Internationally Mobile Academics: Concept and Findings in Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teichler, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Information on the international mobility of persons in charge of teaching and/or research at institutions of higher education is by no means abundant. Most official statistics provide only information on their current citizenship. A closer look reveals that international mobility can be enormously varied--for example, migration initiated by their…

  11. Evolutionary genetics: Mobile DNAs as sources of adaptive change?

    PubMed

    Brookfield, John F Y

    2004-05-04

    Mobile DNAs are potent sources of mutation in wild populations, but seem only rarely to have been used in adaptive evolution. A new study has revealed a mobile DNA insertion in Drosophila simulans that is associated with an apparent selective sweep and an elevation in expression level of an adjacent gene which creates insecticide resistance.

  12. Flamingo cadherin: a putative host receptor for Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Blau, Karin; Portnoi, Maxim; Shagan, Marilou; Kaganovich, Antonina; Rom, Slava; Kafka, Daniel; Chalifa Caspi, Vered; Porgador, Angel; Givon-Lavi, Noga; Gershoni, Jonathan M; Dagan, Ron; Mizrachi Nebenzahl, Yaffa

    2007-06-15

    Streptococcus pneumoniae fructose bisphosphate aldolase (FBA) is a cell wall-localized lectin. We demonstrate that recombinant (r) FBA and anti-rFBA antibodies inhibit encapsulated and unencapsulated S. pneumoniae serotype 3 adherence to A549 type II lung carcinoma epithelial cells. A random combinatorial peptide library expressed by filamentous phage was screened with rFBA. Eleven of 30 rFBA-binding phages inhibited 90% of S. pneumoniae adhesion to A549 cells. The insert peptide sequence of 9 of these phages matched the Flamingo cadherin receptor (FCR) when aligned against the human genome. A peptide comprising a putative FBA-binding region of FCR (FCRP) inhibited 2 genetically and capsularly unrelated pairs of encapsulated and unencapsulated S. pneumoniae strains from binding to A549 cells. Moreover, FCRP inhibited S. pneumoniae nasopharyngeal and lung colonization and, possibly, pneumonia development in the mouse intranasal inoculation model system. These data indicate that FBA is an S. pneumoniae adhesin and that FCR is its host receptor.

  13. Formation of putative chloroplast cytochromes in isolated developing pea chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Thaver, S.S.; Bhava, D.; Castelfranco, P.A.

    1986-04-01

    In addition to chlorophyll-protein complexes, other proteins were labeled when isolated developing pea chloroplasts were incubated with (/sup 14/C)-5-aminolevulinic acid (/sup 14/C)-ALA. The major labeled band (M/sub r/ = 43 kDa by LDS-PAGE) was labeled even in the presence of chloramphenicol. Heme-dependent peroxidase activity (as detected by the tetramethyl benzidine-H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ stain) was not visibly associated with this band. The radioactive band was stable to heat, 5% HCl in acetone, and was absent if the incubation with (/sup 14/C)-5-aminolevulinic acid was carried out in the presence of N-methyl protoporphyrin IX dimethyl ester (a specific inhibitor of ferrochelatase). Organic solvent extraction procedures for the enrichment of cytochrome f from chloroplast membranes also extracted this unknown labeled product. It was concluded that this labeled product was probably a c-type cytochrome. The effect of exogenous iron, iron chelators, gabaculine (an inhibitor of ALA synthesis) and other incubation conditions upon the in vitro formation of putative chloroplast cytochromes will be discussed.

  14. Conformational study of a putative HLTV-1 retroviral protease inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Llido, S; d'Estaintot, B L; Dautant, A; Geoffre, S; Picard, P; Precigoux, G

    1993-05-01

    The crystal structure of prolyl-glutaminyl-valyl-statyl-alanyl-leucine (Pro-Gln-Val-Sta-Ala-Leu, C(32)H(57)N(7)0(9).5H(2)0, M(r) = 683.9 + 90.1), a putative HTLV-1 protease inhibitor based on one of the consensus retroviral protease cleavage sequences, and containing the statine residue [(4S,3S)-4-amino-3-hydroxy-6-methylheptanoic acid], has been determined by X-ray diffraction. The same molecule has been modelled in the active site of the HTLV-1 protease and both conformations have been compared. The peptide crystallizes as a pentahydrate in space group P2(1) with a = 10.874(2), b = 9.501(2), c = 21.062(5) A, beta = 103.68 (1) degrees, Z = 2, V= 2114.3 A(3), D(x) = 1.21 g cm(-3), micro = 8.02 cm(-1), T= 293 K, lambda(Cu Kalpha) = 1.5418 A. The structure has been refined to an R value of 0.070 for 2152 observed reflections. The peptide main chain can be described as extended and adopts the usual zigzag conformation from the prolyl to the statyl residue. The main difference in conformation between the individual observed and modelled molecules is located on the Sta, Ala and Leu residues with the main chain of the modelled molecule rotated by about 180 degrees as compared to the observed conformation in the crystal state.

  15. Epigenetic regulation of putative tumor suppressor TGFBI in human leukemias.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hongbo; Liu, Jing; Guo, Dan; Liu, Peixiang; Zhao, Yongliang

    2014-01-01

    Both in vitro and in vivo data have demonstrated the TGFBI gene functions as a putative tumor suppressor and is frequently downregulated in human tumors of different histological types. The hypermethylation of the TGFBI promoter, as one of the main regulatory mechanisms, is associated with TGFBI silencing. In this study, we used a methylation-specific PCR (MSP) method to evaluate the methylation status of the TGFBI promoter in human leukemias. Real-time RT-PCR and methylation-specific PCR approaches were performed to define the TGFBI expression and promoter methylation in human leukemia cell lines and clinical samples. Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells from leukemia patients, bisulfite-converted, and analyzed by the MSP method. Hypermethylation of the TGFBI promoter occurred in leukemia cell lines and demethylation treatment reexpressed TGFBI at a substantially increased level in most of leukemia cell lines tested. Furthermore, a much higher level of CpG island methylation and a significantly lower TGFBI expression were also identified in clinical leukemia samples. The results suggest an important role of promoter methylation in regulating TGFBI expression in leukemia, which provides a useful diagnostic marker for clinical management of human leukemias.

  16. Phytophthora infestans specific phosphorylation patterns and new putative control targets.

    PubMed

    Frades, Itziar; Andreasson, Erik

    2016-04-01

    In this study we applied biomathematical searches of gene regulatory mechanisms to learn more about oomycete biology and to identify new putative targets for pesticides or biological control against Phytophthora infestans. First, oomycete phylum-specific phosphorylation motifs were found by discriminative n-gram analysis. We found 11.600 P. infestans specific n-grams, mapping 642 phosphoproteins. The most abundant group among these related to phosphatidylinositol metabolism. Due to the large number of possible targets found and our hypothesis that multi-level control is a sign of usefulness as targets for intervention, we identified overlapping targets with a second screen. This was performed to identify proteins dually regulated by small RNA and phosphorylation. We found 164 proteins to be regulated by both sRNA and phosphorylation and the dominating functions where phosphatidylinositol signalling/metabolism, endocytosis, and autophagy. Furthermore we performed a similar regulatory study and discriminative n-gram analysis of proteins with no clear orthologs in other species and proteins that are known to be unique to P. infestans such as the RxLR effectors, Crinkler (CRN) proteins and elicitins. We identified CRN proteins with specific phospho-motifs present in all life stages. PITG_12626, PITG_14042 and PITG_23175 are CRN proteins that have species-specific phosphorylation motifs and are subject to dual regulation.

  17. Putative transmembrane transporter modulates higher-level aggression in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Budhaditya; Chan, Yick-Bun; Kravitz, Edward A

    2017-02-28

    By selection of winners of dyadic fights for 35 generations, we have generated a hyperaggressive Bully line of flies that almost always win fights against the parental wild-type Canton-S stock. Maintenance of the Bully phenotype is temperature dependent during development, with the phenotype lost when flies are reared at 19 °C. No similar effect is seen with the parent line. This difference allowed us to carry out RNA-seq experiments and identify a limited number of genes that are differentially expressed by twofold or greater in the Bullies; one of these was a putative transmembrane transporter, CG13646, which showed consistent and reproducible twofold down-regulation in Bullies. We examined the causal effect of this gene on the phenotype with a mutant line for CG13646, and with an RNAi approach. In all cases, reduction in expression of CG13646 by approximately half led to a hyperaggressive phenotype partially resembling that seen in the Bully flies. This gene is a member of a very interesting family of solute carrier proteins (SLCs), some of which have been suggested as being involved in glutamine/glutamate and GABA cycles of metabolism in excitatory and inhibitory nerve terminals in mammalian systems.

  18. A putative corticosteroid hormone in Pacific lamprey, Entosphenus tridentatus.

    PubMed

    Rai, Satbir; Szeitz, András; Roberts, Brent W; Christie, Quill; Didier, Wesley; Eom, Junho; Yun, Sang-Seon; Close, David A

    2015-02-01

    Great efforts have been put forth to elucidate the mechanisms of the stress response in vertebrates and demonstrate the conserved response across different vertebrate groups, ranging from similarities in the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis to the release and role of corticosteroids. There is however, still very little known about stress physiology in the Pacific lamprey (Entosphenus tridentatus), descendants of the earliest vertebrate lineage, the agnathans. In this paper we demonstrate that 11-deoxycortisol, a steroid precursor to cortisol in the steroidogenic pathway, may be a functional corticosteroid in Pacific lamprey. We identified the putative hormone in Pacific lamprey plasma by employing an array of methods such as RIA, HPLC and mass spectrometry analysis. We demonstrated that plasma levels of 11-deoxycortisol significantly increased in Pacific lamprey 0.5 and 1 h after stress exposure and that lamprey corticotropin releasing hormone injections increased circulating levels of 11-deoxycortisol, suggesting that the stress response is under the control of the HPA/I axis as it is in higher vertebrates. A comprehensive understanding of vertebrate stress physiology may help shed light on the evolution of the corticosteroid signaling system within the vertebrate lineage.

  19. Putative role of Tat-Env interaction in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Poon, Selina; Moscoso, Carlos G; Xing, Li; Kan, Elaine; Sun, Yide; Kolatkar, Prasanna R; Vahlne, Anders G; Srivastava, Indresh K; Barnett, Susan W; Cheng, R Holland

    2013-09-24

    To study the complex formed between Tat protein and Env soluble trimeric immunogen, and compare with previously determined structures of Env native trimers and Env-CD4m complexes. The soluble Env trimer was used to mimic the spike glycoprotein on the virus surface for the study. To overcome limitations of other structural determination methods, cryoelectron microscopy was employed to image the complex, and single particle reconstruction was utilized to reconstruct the structure of the complex from collected micrographs. Molecular modeling of gp120-Tat was performed to provide atomic coordinates for docking. Images were preprocessed by multivariate statistical analysis to identify principal components of variation then submitted for reconstruction. Reconstructed structures were docked with modeled gp120-Tat atomic coordinates to study the positions of crucial epitopes. Analysis of the Env-Tat complex demonstrated an intermediate structure between Env native trimers and Env-CD4m structures. Docking results indicate that the CD4-binding site and the V3 loop are exposed in the Env-Tat complex. The integrin-binding sequence in Tat was also exposed in Env-Tat docking. The intermediate structure induced by Tat-interaction with Env could potentially provide an explanation for increased virus infection in the presence of Tat protein. Consequently, exposure of CD4-binding sites and a putative integrin-binding sequence on Tat in the complex may provide a new avenue for rational design of an effective HIV vaccine. © 2013 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

  20. BAT1, a putative acyltransferase, modulates brassinosteroid levels in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sunhwa; Cho, Young-hyun; Kim, Kangmin; Matsui, Minami; Son, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Seong-Ki; Fujioka, Shozo; Hwang, Ildoo

    2013-02-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are essential for various aspects of plant development. Cellular BR homeostasis is critical for proper growth and development of plants; however, its regulatory mechanism remains largely unknown. BAT1 (BR-related acyltransferase 1), a gene encoding a putative acyltransferase, was found to be involved in vascular bundle development in a full-length cDNA over-expressor (FOX) screen. Over-expression of BAT1 resulted in typical BR-deficient phenotypes, which were rescued by exogenously applied castasterone and brassinolide. Analyses of BR profiles demonstrated that BAT1 alters levels of several brassinolide biosynthetic intermediates, including 6-deoxotyphasterol, typhasterol and 6-deoxocastasterone. BAT1 is mainly localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. BAT1 is highly expressed in young tissues and vascular bundles, and its expression is induced by auxin. These data suggest that BAT1 is involved in BR homeostasis, probably by conversion of brassinolide intermediates into acylated BR conjugates. © 2012 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Generating Recombinant Antibodies against Putative Biomarkers of Retinal Injury.

    PubMed

    Kierny, Michael R; Cunningham, Thomas D; Bouhenni, Rachida A; Edward, Deepak P; Kay, Brian K

    2015-01-01

    Candidate biomarkers, indicative of disease or injury, are beginning to overwhelm the process of validation through immunological means. Recombinant antibodies developed through phage-display offer an alternative means of generating monoclonal antibodies faster than traditional immunization of animals. Peptide segments of putative biomarkers of laser induced injury in the rabbit, discovered through mass spectrometry, were used as targets for a selection against a library of phage-displayed human single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies. Highly specific antibodies were isolated to four of these unique peptide sequences. One antibody against the retinal protein, Guanine Nucleotide-Binding Protein Beta 5 (GBB5), had a dissociation constant ~300 nM and recognized the full-length endogenous protein in retinal homogenates of three different animal species by western blot. Alanine scanning of the peptide target identified three charged and one hydrophobic amino acid as the critical binding residues for two different scFvs. To enhance the utility of the reagent, one scFv was dimerized through a Fragment-crystallizable hinge region (i.e., Fc) and expressed in HEK-293 cells. This dimeric reagent yielded a 25-fold lower detection limit in western blots.

  2. Putative BRAF activating fusion in a medullary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Kasaian, Katayoon; Wiseman, Sam M; Walker, Blair A; Schein, Jacqueline E; Hirst, Martin; Moore, Richard A; Mungall, Andrew J; Marra, Marco A; Jones, Steven J M

    2016-03-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is a malignancy of the calcitonin-producing parafollicular cells of the thyroid gland. Surgery is the only curative treatment for this cancer. External beam radiation therapy is reserved for adjuvant treatment of MTC with aggressive features. Targeted therapeutics vandetanib and cabozantinib are approved for the treatment of aggressive and metastatic tumors that are not amenable to surgery. The use of these multikinase inhibitors are supported by the observed overactivation of the RET oncoprotein in a large subpopulation of MTCs. However, not all patients carry oncogenic alterations of this kinase. Hence, there is still a need for comprehensive molecular characterization of MTC utilizing whole-genome and transcriptome-sequencing methodologies with the aim of identifying targetable mutations. Here, we describe the genomic profiles of two medullary thyroid cancers and report the presence of a putative oncogenic BRAF fusion in one. Such alterations, previously observed in other malignancies and known targets of available drugs, can benefit patients who currently have no treatment options.

  3. Putative transmembrane transporter modulates higher-level aggression in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Budhaditya; Chan, Yick-Bun; Kravitz, Edward A.

    2017-01-01

    By selection of winners of dyadic fights for 35 generations, we have generated a hyperaggressive Bully line of flies that almost always win fights against the parental wild-type Canton-S stock. Maintenance of the Bully phenotype is temperature dependent during development, with the phenotype lost when flies are reared at 19 °C. No similar effect is seen with the parent line. This difference allowed us to carry out RNA-seq experiments and identify a limited number of genes that are differentially expressed by twofold or greater in the Bullies; one of these was a putative transmembrane transporter, CG13646, which showed consistent and reproducible twofold down-regulation in Bullies. We examined the causal effect of this gene on the phenotype with a mutant line for CG13646, and with an RNAi approach. In all cases, reduction in expression of CG13646 by approximately half led to a hyperaggressive phenotype partially resembling that seen in the Bully flies. This gene is a member of a very interesting family of solute carrier proteins (SLCs), some of which have been suggested as being involved in glutamine/glutamate and GABA cycles of metabolism in excitatory and inhibitory nerve terminals in mammalian systems. PMID:28193893

  4. Putative uremic encephalopathy in horses: five cases (1978-1998).

    PubMed

    Frye, M A; Johnson, J S; Traub-Dargatz, J L; Savage, C J; Fettman, M J; Gould, D H

    2001-02-15

    To determine historical, physical examination, clinicopathologic, and postmortem findings in horses with putative uremic encephalopathy. Design-Retrospective study. Animals-5 horses with renal failure and neurologic disease not attributable to abnormalities in any other organ system. Medical records from 1978 to 1998 were examined for horses with renal disease and neurologic signs not attributable to primary neurologic, hepatic, or other diseases. Signalment, history, physical examination findings, clinicopathologic data, renal ultrasonographic findings, and postmortem data were reviewed. Of 332 horses with renal disease, 5 met selection criteria. Historical findings, physical examination findings, clinicopathologic data, ultrasonographic data, and postmortem findings were consistent with chronic renal failure. Swollen astrocytes were detected in all 4 horses examined at necropsy. A single criterion was not determined to be pathognomonic for uremic encephalopathy in horses. Uremic encephalopathy should be considered as a differential diagnosis in horses with evidence of chronic renal failure and encephalopathic neurologic sign not attributable to other causes. Astrocyte swelling, which was common to all 4 horses examined at necropsy, may serve as a microscopic indicator of uremic encephalopathy in horses.

  5. The inducible CAM plants in putative lunar lander experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlak, Olexii; Zaetz, Iryna; Soldatkin, Olexii; Rogutskyy, Ivan; Danilchenko, Boris; Mikheev, Olexander; de Vera, Jean-Pierre; Vidmachenko, Anatolii; Foing, Bernard H.; Kozyrovska, Natalia

    Precursory lunar lander experiments on growing plants in locker-based chambers will increase our understanding of effect of lunar conditions on plant physiology. The inducible CAM (Cras-sulacean Acid Metabolism)-plants are reasonable model for a study of relationships between environmental challenges and changes in plant/bacteria gene expression. In inducible CAM-plants the enzymatic machinery for the environmentally activated CAM switches on from a C3-to a full-CAM mode of photosynthesis in response to any stresses (Winter et al., 2008). In our study, Kalanchoe spp. are shown to be promising candidates for putative lunar experiments as resistant to irradiation and desiccation, especially after inoculation with a bacterial consortium (Boorlak et al., 2010). Within frames of the experiment we expect to get information about the functional activity of CAM-plants, in particular, its organogenesis, photosystem, the circadian regulation of plant metabolism on the base of data gaining with instrumental indications from expression of the reporter genes fused to any genes involved in vital functions of the plant (Kozyrovska et al., 2009). References 1. Winter K., Garcia M., Holtum J. (2008) J. Exp. Bot. 59(7):1829-1840 2. Bourlak O., Lar O., Rogutskyy I., Mikheev A., Zaets I., Chervatyuk N., de Vera J.-P., Danilchenko A.B. Foing B.H., zyrovska N. (2010) Space Sci. Technol. 3. Kozyrovska N.O., Vidmachenko A.P., Foing B.H. et al. Exploration/call/estec/ESA. 2009.

  6. Phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase: potential therapeutic target and putative metabolic oncogene.

    PubMed

    Zogg, Cheryl K

    2014-01-01

    Exemplified by cancer cells' preference for glycolysis, for example, the Warburg effect, altered metabolism in tumorigenesis has emerged as an important aspect of cancer in the past 10-20 years. Whether due to changes in regulatory tumor suppressors/oncogenes or by acting as metabolic oncogenes themselves, enzymes involved in the complex network of metabolic pathways are being studied to understand their role and assess their utility as therapeutic targets. Conversion of glycolytic intermediate 3-phosphoglycerate into phosphohydroxypyruvate by the enzyme phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH)-a rate-limiting step in the conversion of 3-phosphoglycerate to serine-represents one such mechanism. Forgotten since classic animal studies in the 1980s, the role of PHGDH as a potential therapeutic target and putative metabolic oncogene has recently reemerged following publication of two prominent papers near-simultaneously in 2011. Since that time, numerous studies and a host of metabolic explanations have been put forward in an attempt to understand the results observed. In this paper, I review the historic progression of our understanding of the role of PHGDH in cancer from the early work by Snell through its reemergence and rise to prominence, culminating in an assessment of subsequent work and what it means for the future of PHGDH.

  7. Rapid Discrimination Among Putative Mechanistic Models of Biochemical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lomnitz, Jason G.; Savageau, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    An overarching goal in molecular biology is to gain an understanding of the mechanistic basis underlying biochemical systems. Success is critical if we are to predict effectively the outcome of drug treatments and the development of abnormal phenotypes. However, data from most experimental studies is typically noisy and sparse. This allows multiple potential mechanisms to account for experimental observations, and often devising experiments to test each is not feasible. Here, we introduce a novel strategy that discriminates among putative models based on their repertoire of qualitatively distinct phenotypes, without relying on knowledge of specific values for rate constants and binding constants. As an illustration, we apply this strategy to two synthetic gene circuits exhibiting anomalous behaviors. Our results show that the conventional models, based on their well-characterized components, cannot account for the experimental observations. We examine a total of 40 alternative hypotheses and show that only 5 have the potential to reproduce the experimental data, and one can do so with biologically relevant parameter values. PMID:27578053

  8. Generating Recombinant Antibodies against Putative Biomarkers of Retinal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kierny, Michael R.; Cunningham, Thomas D.; Bouhenni, Rachida A.; Edward, Deepak P.; Kay, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    Candidate biomarkers, indicative of disease or injury, are beginning to overwhelm the process of validation through immunological means. Recombinant antibodies developed through phage-display offer an alternative means of generating monoclonal antibodies faster than traditional immunization of animals. Peptide segments of putative biomarkers of laser induced injury in the rabbit, discovered through mass spectrometry, were used as targets for a selection against a library of phage-displayed human single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies. Highly specific antibodies were isolated to four of these unique peptide sequences. One antibody against the retinal protein, Guanine Nucleotide-Binding Protein Beta 5 (GBB5), had a dissociation constant ~300 nM and recognized the full-length endogenous protein in retinal homogenates of three different animal species by western blot. Alanine scanning of the peptide target identified three charged and one hydrophobic amino acid as the critical binding residues for two different scFvs. To enhance the utility of the reagent, one scFv was dimerized through a Fragment-crystallizable hinge region (i.e., Fc) and expressed in HEK-293 cells. This dimeric reagent yielded a 25-fold lower detection limit in western blots. PMID:25902199

  9. Putative impact of RNA editing on drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Decher, Niels; Netter, Michael F; Streit, Anne K

    2013-01-01

    Virtually all organisms use RNA editing as a powerful post-transcriptional mechanism to recode genomic information and to increase functional protein diversity. The enzymatic editing of pre-mRNA by ADARs and CDARs is known to change the functional properties of neuronal receptors and ion channels regulating cellular excitability. However, RNA editing is also an important mechanism for genes expressed outside the brain. The fact that RNA editing breaks the 'one gene encodes one protein' hypothesis is daunting for scientists and a probable drawback for drug development, as scientists might search for drugs targeting the 'wrong' protein. This possible difficulty for drug discovery and development became more evident from recent publications, describing that RNA editing events have profound impact on the pharmacology of some common drug targets. These recent studies highlight that RNA editing can cause massive discrepancies between the in vitro and in vivo pharmacology. Here, we review the putative impact of RNA editing on drug discovery, as RNA editing has to be considered before using high-throughput screens, rational drug design or choosing the right model organism for target validation.

  10. General pharmacology of the putative cognition enhancer linopirdine.

    PubMed

    Flagmeyer, I; Gebert, I; van der Staay, F J

    1995-04-01

    The putative cognition enhancer linopirdine (3,3-bis(4-pyrindinylmethyl)-1-phenylindolin-2-one, CAS 105431-72-9) is supposed to act by enhancing the release of neurotransmitters, especially acetylcholine. The present study assessed the effects of a single administration of this compound on the central nervous system in eight different rat and mouse models (CNS general pharmacology). In each test performed, linopirdine was administered subcutaneously in doses of 3, 10, and 30 mg/kg. The compound did not affect traction ability and nociceptive responsiveness nor did it induce catalepsy. Linopirdine impaired motor coordination in the balance rod test. The compound showed a distinct proconvulsive action in the pentylenetetrazole threshold dose test and induced in the highest dose tested (30 mg/kg) lethal seizures in some mice. It increased the duration of hexobarbital-induced anaesthesia in mice. Rats treated with linopirdine showed ptosis, salivation, slight sedation, paw beating and slight hypothermia. These results support the hypothesis that linopirdine acts by elevating the release of different neurotransmitters such as acetylcholine and dopamine. The compound has a low potential to produce side effects at pharmacodynamic active doses.

  11. Inhalation of two putative Gulf War toxins by mice.

    PubMed

    Repine, John E; Wilson, Paul; Elkins, Nancy; Klawitter, Jelena; Christians, Uwe; Peters, Ben; Smith, Dwight M

    2016-01-01

    We employed our inhalation methodology to examine whether biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress would be produced in mice following inhalation of aerosols containing carbonaceous particles or the vapor of pesticides prevalent during the first Gulf War. Exposure to two putative Gulf War Illness toxins, fine airborne particles and the pesticide malathion, increased biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress in Friend virus B (FVB) female mice. Mice inhaling particles 24 h before had increased lung lavage and plasma Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) (a biomarker of inflammation) and PGF2α (a biomarker of oxidative stress) levels, lung lavage protein and lung lavage lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) levels. These changes were a function of particle density and exposure time. Compared to particle inhalation, mice inhaling malathion 24 h before had small increase in plasma LTB4 and PGF2α levels but no increase in lung lavage LTB4, lung lavage protein, lung lavage LDH, and lung lavage alveolar macrophage (AM) levels compared to unexposed control mice. AM from particle-exposed mice contained phagocytosed particles, while AM from malathion-exposed mice showed no abnormalities. Our results indicate that inhaling particles or malathion can alter inflammatory and oxidative biomarkers in mice and raise the possibility that these toxins may have altered inflammation and oxidative stress biomarkers in Gulf War-exposed individuals.

  12. The complete genome, comparative and functional analysis of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia reveals an organism heavily shielded by drug resistance determinants

    PubMed Central

    Crossman, Lisa C; Gould, Virginia C; Dow, J Maxwell; Vernikos, Georgios S; Okazaki, Aki; Sebaihia, Mohammed; Saunders, David; Arrowsmith, Claire; Carver, Tim; Peters, Nicholas; Adlem, Ellen; Kerhornou, Arnaud; Lord, Angela; Murphy, Lee; Seeger, Katharine; Squares, Robert; Rutter, Simon; Quail, Michael A; Rajandream, Mari-Adele; Harris, David; Churcher, Carol; Bentley, Stephen D; Parkhill, Julian; Thomson, Nicholas R; Avison, Matthew B

    2008-01-01

    Background Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is a nosocomial opportunistic pathogen of the Xanthomonadaceae. The organism has been isolated from both clinical and soil environments in addition to the sputum of cystic fibrosis patients and the immunocompromised. Whilst relatively distant phylogenetically, the closest sequenced relatives of S. maltophilia are the plant pathogenic xanthomonads. Results The genome of the bacteremia-associated isolate S. maltophilia K279a is 4,851,126 bp and of high G+C content. The sequence reveals an organism with a remarkable capacity for drug and heavy metal resistance. In addition to a number of genes conferring resistance to antimicrobial drugs of different classes via alternative mechanisms, nine resistance-nodulation-division (RND)-type putative antimicrobial efflux systems are present. Functional genomic analysis confirms a role in drug resistance for several of the novel RND efflux pumps. S. maltophilia possesses potentially mobile regions of DNA and encodes a number of pili and fimbriae likely to be involved in adhesion and biofilm formation that may also contribute to increased antimicrobial drug resistance. Conclusion The panoply of antimicrobial drug resistance genes and mobile genetic elements found suggests that the organism can act as a reservoir of antimicrobial drug resistance determinants in a clinical environment, which is an issue of considerable concern. PMID:18419807

  13. Mental Effort in Mobility Route Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinsen, Harald; Tellevik, Jon Magne; Elmerskog, Bengt; Storlilokken, Magnar

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the mental effort required to monitor landmarks and the effect of the type of route on mobility-route training. The results revealed that the features of landmarks and competence in travel were significantly related, indicating that some environmental factors related to height and width are more easily learned when people can…

  14. Evaluation Framework for Dependable Mobile Learning Scenarios

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bensassi, Manel; Laroussi, Mona

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the dependability analysis is to predict inconsistencies and to reveal ambiguities and incompleteness in the designed learning scenario. Evaluation, in traditional learning design, is generally planned after the execution of the scenario. In mobile learning, this stage becomes too difficult and expensive to apply due to the complexity…

  15. Protein Mobility within Secretory Granules

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Annita Ngatchou; Bittner, Mary A.; Holz, Ronald W.; Axelrod, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the basis for previous observations that fluorescent-labeled neuropeptide Y (NPY) is usually released within 200 ms after fusion, whereas labeled tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is often discharged over many seconds. We found that tPA and NPY are endogenously expressed in small and different subpopulations of bovine chromaffin cells in culture. We measured the mobility of these proteins (tagged with fluorophore) within the lumen of individual secretory granules in living chromaffin cells, and related their mobilities to postfusion release kinetics. A method was developed that is not limited by standard optical resolution, in which a bright flash of strongly decaying evanescent field (∼64 nm exponential decay constant) produced by total internal reflection (TIR) selectively bleaches cerulean-labeled protein proximal to the glass coverslip within individual granules. Fluorescence recovery occurred as unbleached protein from distal regions within the 300 nm granule diffused into the bleached proximal regions. The fractional bleaching of tPA-cerulean (tPA-cer) was greater when subsequently probed with TIR excitation than with epifluorescence, indicating that tPA-cer mobility was low. The almost equal NPY-cer bleaching when probed with TIR and epifluorescence indicated that NPY-cer equilibrated within the 300 ms bleach pulse, and therefore had a greater mobility than tPA-cer. TIR-fluorescence recovery after photobleaching revealed a significant recovery of tPA-cer (but not NPY-cer) fluorescence within several hundred milliseconds after bleaching. Numerical simulations, which take into account bleach duration, granule diameter, and the limited number of fluorophores in a granule, are consistent with tPA-cer being 100% mobile, with a diffusion coefficient of 2 × 10−10 cm2/s (∼1/3000 of that for a protein of similar size in aqueous solution). However, the low diffusive mobility of tPA cannot alone explain its slow postfusion release. In the

  16. CRISPR/cas Loci of Type II Propionibacterium acnes Confer Immunity against Acquisition of Mobile Elements Present in Type I P. acnes

    PubMed Central

    Brüggemann, Holger; Lomholt, Hans B.; Tettelin, Hervé; Kilian, Mogens

    2012-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is a skin commensal that occasionally acts as an opportunistic pathogen. The population structure of this species shows three main lineages (I–III). While type I strains are mainly associated with sebaceous follicles of human skin and inflammatory acne, types II and III strains are more often associated with deep tissue infections. We investigated the occurrence and distribution of the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) in P. acnes, assessed their immunological memory, and addressed the question if such a system could account for type-specific properties of the species. A collection of 108 clinical isolates covering all known phylotypes of P. acnes was screened for the existence of CRISPR/cas loci. We found that CRISPR loci are restricted to type II P. acnes strains. Sequence analyses of the CRISPR spacers revealed that the system confers immunity to P. acnes-specific phages and to two mobile genetic elements. These elements are found almost exclusively in type I P. acnes strains. Genome sequencing of a type I P. acnes isolate revealed that one element, 54 kb in size, encodes a putative secretion/tight adherence (TAD) system. Thus, CRISPR/cas loci in P. acnes recorded the exposure of type II strains to mobile genetic elements of type I strains. The CRISPR/cas locus is deleted in type I strains, which conceivably accounts for their ability to horizontally acquire fitness or virulence traits and might indicate that type I strains constitute a younger subpopulation of P. acnes. PMID:22479553

  17. Evaluating the mobility potential of antibiotic resistance genes in environmental resistomes without metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Pärnänen, Katariina; Karkman, Antti; Tamminen, Manu; Lyra, Christina; Hultman, Jenni; Paulin, Lars; Virta, Marko

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes are ubiquitous in the environment. However, only a fraction of them are mobile and able to spread to pathogenic bacteria. Until now, studying the mobility of antibiotic resistance genes in environmental resistomes has been challenging due to inadequate sensitivity and difficulties in contig assembly of metagenome based methods. We developed a new cost and labor efficient method based on Inverse PCR and long read sequencing for studying mobility potential of environmental resistance genes. We applied Inverse PCR on sediment samples and identified 79 different MGE clusters associated with the studied resistance genes, including novel mobile genetic elements, co-selected resistance genes and a new putative antibiotic resistance gene. The results show that the method can be used in antibiotic resistance early warning systems. In comparison to metagenomics, Inverse PCR was markedly more sensitive and provided more data on resistance gene mobility and co-selected resistances. PMID:27767072

  18. Mobile Apps for Librarians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, June L.

    2013-01-01

    In an increasing mobile environment, library and reading-related activities often take place on a phone or tablet device. Not only does this mean that library Web sites must keep mobile navigability in mind, but also develop and utilize apps that allow patrons to interact with information and with libraries. While apps do not serve every purpose,…

  19. Mobile Apps for Librarians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, June L.

    2013-01-01

    In an increasing mobile environment, library and reading-related activities often take place on a phone or tablet device. Not only does this mean that library Web sites must keep mobile navigability in mind, but also develop and utilize apps that allow patrons to interact with information and with libraries. While apps do not serve every purpose,…

  20. ACTS Mobile Terminals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbe, Brian S.; Agan, Martin J.; Jedrey, Thomas C.

    1997-01-01

    The development of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Mobile Terminal (AMT) and its follow-on, the Broadband Aeronautical Terminal (BAT), have provided an excellent testbed for the evaluation of K- and Ka-band mobile satellite communications systems. An overview of both of these terminals is presented in this paper.

  1. Mastering Mobile Security

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panettieri, Joseph C.

    2007-01-01

    Without proper security, mobile devices are easy targets for worms, viruses, and so-called robot ("bot") networks. Hackers increasingly use bot networks to launch massive attacks against eCommerce websites--potentially targeting one's online tuition payment or fundraising/financial development systems. How can one defend his mobile systems against…

  2. Mobile Christian - shuttle flight

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-04-21

    Erin Whittle, 14, (seated) and Brianna Johnson, 14, look on as Louis Stork, 13, attempts a simulated landing of a space shuttle at StenniSphere. The young people were part of a group from Mobile Christian School in Mobile, Ala., that visited StenniSphere on April 21.

  3. Mastering Mobile Security

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panettieri, Joseph C.

    2007-01-01

    Without proper security, mobile devices are easy targets for worms, viruses, and so-called robot ("bot") networks. Hackers increasingly use bot networks to launch massive attacks against eCommerce websites--potentially targeting one's online tuition payment or fundraising/financial development systems. How can one defend his mobile systems against…

  4. Mobile Learning Anytime, Anywhere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hlodan, Oksana

    2010-01-01

    Some educational institutions are taking the leap to mobile learning (m-learning) by giving out free iPods. For example, Abilene Christian University gave iPods or iPhones to freshman students and developed 15 Web applications specifically for the mobile devices. The iPod is not the only ubiquitous m-learning device. Any technology that connects…