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Sample records for reveals target site

  1. Whole Genome Resequencing Reveals Natural Target Site Preferences of Transposable Elements in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Linheiro, Raquel S.; Bergman, Casey M.

    2012-01-01

    Transposable elements are mobile DNA sequences that integrate into host genomes using diverse mechanisms with varying degrees of target site specificity. While the target site preferences of some engineered transposable elements are well studied, the natural target preferences of most transposable elements are poorly characterized. Using population genomic resequencing data from 166 strains of Drosophila melanogaster, we identified over 8,000 new insertion sites not present in the reference genome sequence that we used to decode the natural target preferences of 22 families of transposable element in this species. We found that terminal inverted repeat transposon and long terminal repeat retrotransposon families present clade-specific target site duplications and target site sequence motifs. Additionally, we found that the sequence motifs at transposable element target sites are always palindromes that extend beyond the target site duplication. Our results demonstrate the utility of population genomics data for high-throughput inference of transposable element targeting preferences in the wild and establish general rules for terminal inverted repeat transposon and long terminal repeat retrotransposon target site selection in eukaryotic genomes. PMID:22347367

  2. A comprehensive immunoinformatics and target site study revealed the corner-stone toward Chikungunya virus treatment.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Md Anayet; Khan, Md Arif; Datta, Amit; Mazumder, Md Habibul Hasan; Hossain, Mohammad Uzzal

    2015-05-01

    Recent concerning facts of Chikungunya virus (CHIKV); a Togaviridae family alphavirus has proved this as a worldwide emerging threat which causes Chikungunya fever and devitalizing arthritis. Despite severe outbreaks and lack of antiviral drug, a mere progress has been made regarding to an epitope-based vaccine designed for CHIKV. In this study, we aimed to design an epitope-based vaccine that can trigger a significant immune response as well as to prognosticate inhibitor that can bind with potential drug target sites by using various immunoinformatics and docking simulation tools. Initially, whole proteome of CHIKV was retrieved from database and perused to identify the most immunogenic protein. Structural properties of the selected protein were analyzed. The capacity to induce both humoral and cell-mediated immunity by T cell and B cell were checked for the selected protein. The peptide region spanning 9 amino acids from 397 to 405 and the sequence YYYELYPTM were found as the most potential B cell and T cell epitopes respectively. This peptide could interact with as many as 19 HLAs and showed high population coverage ranging from 69.50% to 84.94%. By using in silico docking techniques the epitope was further assessed for binding against HLA molecules to verify the binding cleft interaction. In addition with this, the allergenicity of the epitopes was also evaluated. In the post therapeutic strategy, three dimensional structure was predicted along with validation and verification that resulted in molecular docking study to identify the potential drug binding sites and suitable therapeutic inhibitor against targeted protein. Finally, pharmacophore study was also performed in quest of seeing potent drug activity. However, this computational epitope-based peptide vaccine designing and target site prediction against CHIKV opens up a new horizon which may be the prospective way in Chikungunya virus research; the results require validation by in vitro and in vivo

  3. Site directed mutagenesis of StSUT1 reveals target amino acids of regulation and stability.

    PubMed

    Krügel, Undine; Wiederhold, Elena; Pustogowa, Jelena; Hackel, Aleksandra; Grimm, Bernhard; Kühn, Christina

    2013-11-01

    Plant sucrose transporters (SUTs) are functional as sucrose-proton-cotransporters with an optimal transport activity in the acidic pH range. Recently, the pH optimum of the Solanum tuberosum sucrose transporter StSUT1 was experimentally determined to range at an unexpectedly low pH of 3 or even below. Various research groups have confirmed these surprising findings independently and in different organisms. Here we provide further experimental evidence for a pH optimum at physiological extrema. Site directed mutagenesis provides information about functional amino acids, which are highly conserved and responsible for this extraordinary increase in transport capacity under extreme pH conditions. Redox-dependent dimerization of the StSUT1 protein was described earlier. Here the ability of StSUT1 to form homodimers was demonstrated by heterologous expression in Lactococcus lactis and Xenopus leavis using Western blots, and in plants by bimolecular fluorescence complementation. Mutagenesis of highly conserved cysteine residues revealed their importance in protein stability. The accessibility of regulatory amino acid residues in the light of StSUT1's compartmentalization in membrane microdomains is discussed.

  4. Targeting extracellular domains D4 and D7 of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 reveals allosteric receptor regulatory sites.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Caroline A C; Giese, Alexandra; Stuttfeld, Edward; Abram Saliba, Johan; Villemagne, Denis; Schleier, Thomas; Binz, H Kaspar; Ballmer-Hofer, Kurt

    2012-10-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) activate three receptor tyrosine kinases, VEGFR-1, -2, and -3, which regulate angiogenic and lymphangiogenic signaling. VEGFR-2 is the most prominent receptor in angiogenic signaling by VEGF ligands. The extracellular part of VEGF receptors consists of seven immunoglobulin homology domains (Ig domains). Earlier studies showed that domains 2 and 3 (D23) mediate ligand binding, while structural analysis of dimeric ligand/receptor complexes by electron microscopy and small-angle solution scattering revealed additional homotypic contacts in membrane-proximal Ig domains D4 and D7. Here we show that D4 and D7 are indispensable for receptor signaling. To confirm the essential role of these domains in signaling, we isolated VEGFR-2-inhibitory "designed ankyrin repeat proteins" (DARPins) that interact with D23, D4, or D7. DARPins that interact with D23 inhibited ligand binding, receptor dimerization, and receptor kinase activation, while DARPins specific for D4 or D7 did not prevent ligand binding or receptor dimerization but effectively blocked receptor signaling and functional output. These data show that D4 and D7 allosterically regulate VEGFR-2 activity. We propose that these extracellular-domain-specific DARPins represent a novel generation of receptor-inhibitory drugs for in vivo applications such as targeting of VEGFRs in medical diagnostics and for treating vascular pathologies.

  5. Targeting Extracellular Domains D4 and D7 of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2 Reveals Allosteric Receptor Regulatory Sites

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, Caroline A. C.; Giese, Alexandra; Stuttfeld, Edward; Abram Saliba, Johan; Villemagne, Denis; Schleier, Thomas; Binz, H. Kaspar

    2012-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) activate three receptor tyrosine kinases, VEGFR-1, -2, and -3, which regulate angiogenic and lymphangiogenic signaling. VEGFR-2 is the most prominent receptor in angiogenic signaling by VEGF ligands. The extracellular part of VEGF receptors consists of seven immunoglobulin homology domains (Ig domains). Earlier studies showed that domains 2 and 3 (D23) mediate ligand binding, while structural analysis of dimeric ligand/receptor complexes by electron microscopy and small-angle solution scattering revealed additional homotypic contacts in membrane-proximal Ig domains D4 and D7. Here we show that D4 and D7 are indispensable for receptor signaling. To confirm the essential role of these domains in signaling, we isolated VEGFR-2-inhibitory “designed ankyrin repeat proteins” (DARPins) that interact with D23, D4, or D7. DARPins that interact with D23 inhibited ligand binding, receptor dimerization, and receptor kinase activation, while DARPins specific for D4 or D7 did not prevent ligand binding or receptor dimerization but effectively blocked receptor signaling and functional output. These data show that D4 and D7 allosterically regulate VEGFR-2 activity. We propose that these extracellular-domain-specific DARPins represent a novel generation of receptor-inhibitory drugs for in vivo applications such as targeting of VEGFRs in medical diagnostics and for treating vascular pathologies. PMID:22801374

  6. Genome-wide analysis of MEF2 transcriptional program reveals synaptic target genes and neuronal activity-dependent polyadenylation site selection

    PubMed Central

    Flavell, Steven W.; Kim, Tae-Kyung; Gray, Jesse M.; Harmin, David A.; Hemberg, Martin; Hong, Elizabeth J.; Markenscoff-Papadimitriou, Eirene; Bear, Daniel M.; Greenberg, Michael E.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Although many transcription factors are known to control important aspects of neural development, the genome-wide programs that are directly regulated by these factors are not known. We have characterized the genetic program that is activated by MEF2, a key regulator of activity-dependent synapse development. These MEF2 target genes have diverse functions at synapses, revealing a broad role for MEF2 in synapse development. Several of the MEF2 targets are mutated in human neurological disorders including epilepsy and autism-spectrum disorders, suggesting that these disorders may be caused by disruption of an activity-dependent gene program that controls synapse development. Our analyses also reveal that neuronal activity promotes alternative polyadenylation site usage at many of the MEF2 target genes, leading to the production of truncated mRNAs that may have different functions than their full-length counterparts. Taken together, these analyses suggest that the ubiquitously expressed transcription factor MEF2 regulates an intricate transcriptional program in neurons that controls synapse development. PMID:19109909

  7. Quantitative Persulfide Site Identification (qPerS-SID) Reveals Protein Targets of H2S Releasing Donors in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Longen, Sebastian; Richter, Florian; Köhler, Yvette; Wittig, Ilka; Beck, Karl-Friedrich; Pfeilschifter, Josef

    2016-01-01

    H2S is an important signalling molecule involved in diverse biological processes. It mediates the formation of cysteine persulfides (R-S-SH), which affect the activity of target proteins. Like thiols, persulfides show reactivity towards electrophiles and behave similarly to other cysteine modifications in a biotin switch assay. In this manuscript, we report on qPerS-SID a mass spectrometry-based method allowing the isolation of persulfide containing peptides in the mammalian proteome. With this method, we demonstrated that H2S donors differ in their efficacy to induce persulfides in HEK293 cells. Furthermore, data analysis revealed that persulfide formation affects all subcellular compartments and various cellular processes. Negatively charged amino acids appeared more frequently adjacent to cysteines forming persulfides. We confirmed our proteomic data using pyruvate kinase M2 as a model protein and showed that several cysteine residues are prone to persulfide formation finally leading to its inactivation. Taken together, the site-specific identification of persulfides on a proteome scale can help to identify target proteins involved in H2S signalling and enlightens the biology of H2S and its releasing agents. PMID:27411966

  8. Comparative analysis of the Dicer-like gene family reveals loss of miR162 target site in SmDCL1 from Salvia miltiorrhiza

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Fenjuan; Qiu, Deyou; Lu, Shanfa

    2015-01-01

    DCL1, the core component for miRNA biogenesis, is itself regulated by miR162 in Arabidopsis. MiRNA-mediated feedback regulation of AtDCL1 is important to maintain the proper level of DCL1 transcripts. However, it is unknown whether the miRNA-mediated regulation of DCL1 is conserved among plants. We analyzed the SmDCL gene family in Salvia miltiorrhiza, an emerging model plant for Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) studies, using a comprehensive approach integrating genome-wide prediction, molecular cloning, gene expression profiling, and posttranscriptional regulation analysis. A total of five SmDCLs were identified. Comparative analysis of SmDCLs and AtDCLs showed an apparent enlargement of SmDCL introns in S. miltiorrhiza. The absence of miR162 in S. miltiorrhiza and the loss of miR162 target site in SmDCL1 were unexpectedly found. Further analysis showed that the miR162 target site was not present in DCL1 from ancient plants and was gained during plant evolution. The gained miR162 target site might be lost in a few modern plants through nucleotide mutations. Our results provide evidence for the gain and loss of miR162 and its target sites in Dicer-like genes during evolution. The data is useful for understanding the evolution of miRNA-mediated feedback regulation of DCLs in plants. PMID:25970825

  9. Target-cell-dependent plasticity within the mossy fibre-CA3 circuit reveals compartmentalized regulation of presynaptic function at divergent release sites.

    PubMed

    Pelkey, Kenneth A; McBain, Chris J

    2008-03-15

    Individual axons of central neurons innervate a large number of distinct postsynaptic targets belonging to divergent functional categories such as glutamatergic principal cells and inhibitory interneurons. While each bouton along a common axon should experience the same activity pattern in response to action potential firing within the parent presynaptic neuron, accumulating evidence suggests that neighbouring boutons contacting functionally distinct postsynaptic targets regulate their release properties independently, despite being separated by only a few microns. This target-cell-specific autonomy of presynaptic function can greatly expand the computational prowess of central axons to allow for precise coordination of large neuronal ensembles within a given circuit. An excellent example of target-cell-specific presynaptic mechanisms occurs in the CA3 hippocampus where mossy fibre (MF) axons of dentate gyrus granule cells target both principal cells and local circuit inhibitory interneurons via both anatomically and functionally specialized terminals. Of particular interest, mechanisms of both short- and long-term plasticity remain autonomous at these divergent release sites due to an anatomical and biochemical segregation of discrete molecular signalling cascades. Here we review roughly a decades worth of research on the MF-CA3 pathway to showcase the target-cell dependence of presynaptically expressed NMDA receptor-independent synaptic plasticity.

  10. Synthetic inositol phosphate analogs reveal that PPIP5K2 has a surface-mounted substrate capture site that is a target for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huanchen; Godage, Himali Y; Riley, Andrew M; Weaver, Jeremy D; Shears, Stephen B; Potter, Barry V L

    2014-05-22

    Diphosphoinositol pentakisphosphate kinase 2 (PPIP5K2) is one of the mammalian PPIP5K isoforms responsible for synthesis of diphosphoinositol polyphosphates (inositol pyrophosphates; PP-InsPs), regulatory molecules that function at the interface of cell signaling and organismic homeostasis. The development of drugs that inhibit PPIP5K2 could have both experimental and therapeutic applications. Here, we describe a synthetic strategy for producing naturally occurring 5-PP-InsP4, as well as several inositol polyphosphate analogs, and we study their interactions with PPIP5K2 using biochemical and structural approaches. These experiments uncover an additional ligand-binding site on the surface of PPIP5K2, adjacent to the catalytic pocket. This site facilitates substrate capture from the bulk phase, prior to transfer into the catalytic pocket. In addition to demonstrating a "catch-and-pass" reaction mechanism in a small molecule kinase, we demonstrate that binding of our analogs to the substrate capture site inhibits PPIP5K2. This work suggests that the substrate-binding site offers new opportunities for targeted drug design.

  11. Molecular architecture of leishmania EF-1alpha reveals a novel site that may modulate protein translation: a possible target for drug development.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Martin; Cherkasov, Artem; Nandan, Devki

    2007-05-18

    Elongation factor-1alpha plays an essential role in eukaryotic protein biosynthesis. Recently, we have shown by protein structure modeling the presence of a hairpin-loop of 12 amino acids in mammalian EF-1alpha that is absent in the leishmania homologue [D. Nandan, A. Cherkasov, R. Sabouti, T. Yi, N.E. Reiner, Molecular cloning, biochemical and structural analysis of elongation factor-1 alpha from Leishmania donovani: comparison with the mammalian homologue, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 302 (2003) 646-652]. As a consequence of this deletion, an exposed region is available on the main body of leishmania EF-1alpha. Here we report the generation of an anti-EF-1alpha antibody (DN-3) which bound selectively to the exposed region of leishmania EF-1alpha, with no reactivity with human EF-1alpha. In a leishmania cell-free protein translation system, DN-3 substantially inhibited protein translation. A similar inhibitory effect was observed when a specific peptide based on the exposed region was used in the cell-free protein translation assay. The application of structure-based in silico methods to identify potential ligands to target the exposed region identified a small molecule that selectively attenuated in vitro translation using leishmania extracts. Moreover, this small molecule showed selective suppressive effect on multiplication of leishmania in culture. Taken together, these findings identify a novel, exposed region in leishmania EF-1alpha that may be involved in protein synthesis and a potential site for drug targeting.

  12. Targeted induction of meiotic double-strand breaks reveals chromosomal domain-dependent regulation of Spo11 and interactions among potential sites of meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Tomoyuki; Kugou, Kazuto; Sasanuma, Hiroyuki; Shibata, Takehiko; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2008-02-01

    Meiotic recombination is initiated by programmed DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation mediated by Spo11. DSBs occur with frequency in chromosomal regions called hot domains but are seldom seen in cold domains. To obtain insights into the determinants of the distribution of meiotic DSBs, we examined the effects of inducing targeted DSBs during yeast meiosis using a UAS-directed form of Spo11 (Gal4BD-Spo11) and a meiosis-specific endonuclease, VDE (PI-SceI). Gal4BD-Spo11 cleaved its target sequence (UAS) integrated in hot domains but rarely in cold domains. However, Gal4BD-Spo11 did bind to UAS and VDE efficiently cleaved its recognition sequence in either context, suggesting that a cold domain is not a region of inaccessible or uncleavable chromosome structure. Importantly, self-association of Spo11 occurred at UAS in a hot domain but not in a cold domain, raising the possibility that Spo11 remains in an inactive intermediate state in cold domains. Integration of UAS adjacent to known DSB hotspots allowed us to detect competitive interactions among hotspots for activation. Moreover, the presence of VDE-introduced DSB repressed proximal hotspot activity, implicating DSBs themselves in interactions among hotspots. Thus, potential sites for Spo11-mediated DSB are subject to domain-specific and local competitive regulations during and after DSB formation.

  13. NSAIDs: Old Drugs Reveal New Anticancer Targets.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Gary A; Keeton, Adam B; Tinsley, Heather N; Whitt, Jason D; Gary, Bernard D; Mathew, Bini; Singh, Raj; Grizzle, William E; Reynolds, Robert C

    2010-05-25

    There is compelling evidence that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitors have antineoplastic activity, but toxicity from cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition and the suppression of physiologically important prostaglandins limits their use for cancer chemoprevention. Previous studies as reviewed here suggest that the mechanism for their anticancer properties does not require COX inhibition, but instead involves an off-target effect. In support of this possibility, recent molecular modeling studies have shown that the NSAID sulindac can be chemically modified to selectively design out its COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitory activity. Unexpectedly, certain derivatives that were synthesized based on in silico modeling displayed increased potency to inhibit tumor cell growth. Other experiments have shown that sulindac can inhibit phosphodiesterase to increase intracellular cyclic GMP levels and that this activity is closely associated with its ability to selectively induce apoptosis of tumor cells. Together, these studies suggest that COX-independent mechanisms can be targeted to develop safer and more efficacious drugs for cancer chemoprevention.

  14. Transcriptome-wide analysis of UTRs in non-small cell lung cancer reveals cancer-related genes with SNV-induced changes on RNA secondary structure and miRNA target sites.

    PubMed

    Sabarinathan, Radhakrishnan; Wenzel, Anne; Novotny, Peter; Tang, Xiaojia; Kalari, Krishna R; Gorodkin, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Traditional mutation assessment methods generally focus on predicting disruptive changes in protein-coding regions rather than non-coding regulatory regions like untranslated regions (UTRs) of mRNAs. The UTRs, however, are known to have many sequence and structural motifs that can regulate translational and transcriptional efficiency and stability of mRNAs through interaction with RNA-binding proteins and other non-coding RNAs like microRNAs (miRNAs). In a recent study, transcriptomes of tumor cells harboring mutant and wild-type KRAS (V-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog) genes in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have been sequenced to identify single nucleotide variations (SNVs). About 40% of the total SNVs (73,717) identified were mapped to UTRs, but omitted in the previous analysis. To meet this obvious demand for analysis of the UTRs, we designed a comprehensive pipeline to predict the effect of SNVs on two major regulatory elements, secondary structure and miRNA target sites. Out of 29,290 SNVs in 6462 genes, we predict 472 SNVs (in 408 genes) affecting local RNA secondary structure, 490 SNVs (in 447 genes) affecting miRNA target sites and 48 that do both. Together these disruptive SNVs were present in 803 different genes, out of which 188 (23.4%) were previously known to be cancer-associated. Notably, this ratio is significantly higher (one-sided Fisher's exact test p-value = 0.032) than the ratio (20.8%) of known cancer-associated genes (n = 1347) in our initial data set (n = 6462). Network analysis shows that the genes harboring disruptive SNVs were involved in molecular mechanisms of cancer, and the signaling pathways of LPS-stimulated MAPK, IL-6, iNOS, EIF2 and mTOR. In conclusion, we have found hundreds of SNVs which are highly disruptive with respect to changes in the secondary structure and miRNA target sites within UTRs. These changes hold the potential to alter the expression of known cancer genes or genes

  15. General view of the archaeological site showing excavation and revealing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of the archaeological site showing excavation and revealing the steps leading down into the eighteenth-century burial vault - Harry Buck House, North of Main Street (14800 Governor Oden Bowie Drive), Upper Marlboro, Prince George's County, MD

  16. Integrin‐Targeting Fluorescent Proteins: Exploration of RGD Insertion Sites

    PubMed Central

    Sonntag, Michael H.; Schill, Jurgen

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The potential of the fluorescent protein scaffold to control peptide sequence functionality is illustrated by an exploration of fluorescent proteins as novel probes for targeting integrins. A library of fluorescent mCitrine proteins with RGD motifs incorporated at several positions in loops within the protein main chain was generated and characterized. Amino acid mutations to RGD as well as RGD insertions were evaluated: both led to constructs with typical mCitrine fluorescent properties. Screening experiments against four human integrin receptors revealed two strong‐binding constructs and two selective integrin binders. The effect of the site of RGD incorporation illustrates the importance of the protein scaffold on RGD sequence functionality, leading to fluorescent protein constructs with the potential for selective integrin targeting. PMID:28004511

  17. Characteristics of Food Industry Web Sites and "Advergames" Targeting Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culp, Jennifer; Bell, Robert A.; Cassady, Diana

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the content of food industry Web sites targeting children by describing strategies used to prolong their visits and foster brand loyalty; and to document health-promoting messages on these Web sites. Design: A content analysis was conducted of Web sites advertised on 2 children's networks, Cartoon Network and Nickelodeon. A…

  18. Target-site resistance to neonicotinoids.

    PubMed

    Crossthwaite, Andrew J; Rendine, Stefano; Stenta, Marco; Slater, Russell

    2014-10-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides selectively target the invertebrate nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and disrupt excitatory cholinergic neurotransmission. First launched over 20 years ago, their broad pest spectrum, variety of application methods and relatively low risk to nontarget organisms have resulted in this class dominating the insecticide market with global annual sales in excess of $3.5 bn. This remarkable commercial success brings with it conditions in the field that favour selection of resistant phenotypes. A number of important pest species have been identified with mutations at the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor associated with insensitivity to neonicotinoids. The detailed characterization of these mutations has facilitated a greater understanding of the invertebrate nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

  19. SSFinder: high throughput CRISPR-Cas target sites prediction tool.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Santosh Kumar; Sharma, Shailesh

    2014-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) system facilitates targeted genome editing in organisms. Despite high demand of this system, finding a reliable tool for the determination of specific target sites in large genomic data remained challenging. Here, we report SSFinder, a python script to perform high throughput detection of specific target sites in large nucleotide datasets. The SSFinder is a user-friendly tool, compatible with Windows, Mac OS, and Linux operating systems, and freely available online.

  20. Radiation inactivation reveals discrete cation binding sites that modulate dihydropyridine binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Bolger, G.T.; Skolnick, P.; Kempner, E.S. )

    1989-08-01

    In low ionic strength buffer (5 mM Tris.HCl), the binding of (3H) nitrendipine to dihydropyridine calcium antagonist binding sites of mouse forebrain membranes is increased by both Na{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+}. Radiation inactivation was used to determine the target size of ({sup 3}H)nitrendipine binding sites in 5 mM Tris.HCl buffer, in the presence and absence of these cations. After irradiation, ({sup 3}H) nitrendipine binding in buffer with or without Na+ was diminished, due to a loss of binding sites and also to an increase in Kd. After accounting for radiation effects on the dissociation constant, the target size for the nitrendipine binding site in buffer was 160-170 kDa and was 170-180 kDa in the presence of sodium. In the presence of calcium ions, ({sup 3}H)nitrendipine binding showed no radiation effects on Kd and yielded a target size of 150-170 kDa. These findings suggest, as in the case of opioid receptors, the presence of high molecular weight membrane components that modulate cation-induced alterations in radioligand binding to dihydropyridine binding sites.

  1. The structure of ribosome-lankacidin complex reveals ribosomal sites for synergistic antibiotics

    SciTech Connect

    Auerbach, Tamar; Mermershtain, Inbal; Davidovich, Chen; Bashan, Anat; Belousoff, Matthew; Wekselman, Itai; Zimmerman, Ella; Xiong, Liqun; Klepacki, Dorota; Arakawa, Kenji; Kinashi, Haruyasu; Mankin, Alexander S.; Yonath, Ada

    2010-04-26

    Crystallographic analysis revealed that the 17-member polyketide antibiotic lankacidin produced by Streptomyces rochei binds at the peptidyl transferase center of the eubacterial large ribosomal subunit. Biochemical and functional studies verified this finding and showed interference with peptide bond formation. Chemical probing indicated that the macrolide lankamycin, a second antibiotic produced by the same species, binds at a neighboring site, at the ribosome exit tunnel. These two antibiotics can bind to the ribosome simultaneously and display synergy in inhibiting bacterial growth. The binding site of lankacidin and lankamycin partially overlap with the binding site of another pair of synergistic antibiotics, the streptogramins. Thus, at least two pairs of structurally dissimilar compounds have been selected in the course of evolution to act synergistically by targeting neighboring sites in the ribosome. These results underscore the importance of the corresponding ribosomal sites for development of clinically relevant synergistic antibiotics and demonstrate the utility of structural analysis for providing new directions for drug discovery.

  2. Targeting sites of inflammation: intercellular adhesion molecule-1 as a target for novel inflammatory therapies

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery to sites of inflammation will provide effective, precise, and safe therapeutic interventions for treatment of diverse disease conditions, by limiting toxic side effects and/or increasing drug action. Disease-site targeting is believed to play a major role in the enhanced efficacy observed for a variety of drugs when formulated inside lipid vesicles. This article will focus on the factors and mechanisms involved in drug targeting to sites of inflammation and the importance of cell adhesion molecules, in particular intercellular adhesion molecule-1, in this process. PMID:24109453

  3. Targeted deletion of Wwox reveals a tumor suppressor function.

    PubMed

    Aqeilan, Rami I; Trapasso, Francesco; Hussain, Sadiq; Costinean, Stefan; Marshall, Dean; Pekarsky, Yuri; Hagan, John P; Zanesi, Nicola; Kaou, Mohamed; Stein, Gary S; Lian, Jane B; Croce, Carlo M

    2007-03-06

    The WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) spans the second most common fragile site of the human genome, FRA16D, located at 16q23, and its expression is altered in several types of human cancer. We have previously shown that restoration of WWOX expression in cancer cells suppresses tumorigenicity. To investigate WWOX tumor suppressor function in vivo, we generated mice carrying a targeted deletion of the Wwox gene and monitored incidence of tumor formation. Osteosarcomas in juvenile Wwox(-/-) and lung papillary carcinoma in adult Wwox(+/-) mice occurred spontaneously. In addition, Wwox(+/-) mice develop significantly more ethyl nitrosourea-induced lung tumors and lymphomas in comparison to wild-type littermate mice. Intriguingly, these tumors still express Wwox protein, suggesting haploinsuffiency of WWOX itself is cancer predisposing. These results indicate that WWOX is a bona fide tumor suppressor.

  4. Thermodynamics of DNA target site recognition by homing endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Eastberg, Jennifer H.; Smith, Audrey McConnell; Zhao, Lei; Ashworth, Justin; Shen, Betty W.; Stoddard, Barry L.

    2007-01-01

    The thermodynamic profiles of target site recognition have been surveyed for homing endonucleases from various structural families. Similar to DNA-binding proteins that recognize shorter target sites, homing endonucleases display a narrow range of binding free energies and affinities, mediated by structural interactions that balance the magnitude of enthalpic and entropic forces. While the balance of ΔH and TΔS are not strongly correlated with the overall extent of DNA bending, unfavorable ΔHbinding is associated with unstacking of individual base steps in the target site. The effects of deleterious basepair substitutions in the optimal target sites of two LAGLIDADG homing endonucleases, and the subsequent effect of redesigning one of those endonucleases to accommodate that DNA sequence change, were also measured. The substitution of base-specific hydrogen bonds in a wild-type endonuclease/DNA complex with hydrophobic van der Waals contacts in a redesigned complex reduced the ability to discriminate between sites, due to nonspecific ΔSbinding. PMID:17947319

  5. Photoaffinity labeling in target- and binding-site identification

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ewan; Collins, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Photoaffinity labeling (PAL) using a chemical probe to covalently bind its target in response to activation by light has become a frequently used tool in drug discovery for identifying new drug targets and molecular interactions, and for probing the location and structure of binding sites. Methods to identify the specific target proteins of hit molecules from phenotypic screens are highly valuable in early drug discovery. In this review, we summarize the principles of PAL including probe design and experimental techniques for in vitro and live cell investigations. We emphasize the need to optimize and validate probes and highlight examples of the successful application of PAL across multiple disease areas. PMID:25686004

  6. A selection system for identifying accessible sites in target RNAs.

    PubMed

    Pan, W H; Devlin, H F; Kelley, C; Isom, H C; Clawson, G A

    2001-04-01

    Although ribozymes offer tremendous potential for posttranscriptionally controlling expression of targeted genes, their utility is often limited by the accessibility of the targeted regions within the RNA transcripts. Here we describe a method that identifies RNA regions that are accessible to oligonucleotides. Based on this selection protocol, we show that construction of hammerhead ribozymes targeted to the identified regions results in catalytic activities that are consistently and substantially greater than those of ribozymes designed on the basis of computer modeling. Identification of accessible sites should also be widely applicable to design of antisense oligonucleotides and DNAzymes.

  7. Marine viruses, a genetic reservoir revealed by targeted viromics

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Joaquín Martínez; Swan, Brandon K; Wilson, William H

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomics has opened new windows on investigating viral diversity and functions. Viromic studies typically require large sample volumes and filtration through 0.2 μm pore-size filters, consequently excluding or under-sampling tailed and very large viruses. We have optimized a targeted viromic approach that employs fluorescence-activated sorting and whole genome amplification to produce dsDNA-enriched libraries from discrete viral populations from a 1-ml water sample. Using this approach on an environmental sample from the Patagonian Shelf, we produced three distinct libraries. One of the virus libraries was dominated (79.65% of sequences with known viral homology) by giant viruses from the Mimiviridae and Phycodnaviridae families, while the two other viromes were dominated by smaller phycodnaviruses, cyanophages and other bacteriophages. The estimated genotypic richness and diversity in our sorted viromes, with 52–163 estimated genotypes, was much lower than in previous virome reports. Fragment recruitment of metagenome reads to selected reference viral genomes yields high genome coverage, suggesting little amplification and sequencing bias against some genomic regions. These results underscore the value of our approach as an effective way to target and investigate specific virus groups. In particular, it will help reveal the diversity and abundance of giant viruses in marine ecosystems. PMID:24304671

  8. Marine viruses, a genetic reservoir revealed by targeted viromics.

    PubMed

    Martínez Martínez, Joaquín; Swan, Brandon K; Wilson, William H

    2014-05-01

    Metagenomics has opened new windows on investigating viral diversity and functions. Viromic studies typically require large sample volumes and filtration through 0.2 μm pore-size filters, consequently excluding or under-sampling tailed and very large viruses. We have optimized a targeted viromic approach that employs fluorescence-activated sorting and whole genome amplification to produce dsDNA-enriched libraries from discrete viral populations from a 1-ml water sample. Using this approach on an environmental sample from the Patagonian Shelf, we produced three distinct libraries. One of the virus libraries was dominated (79.65% of sequences with known viral homology) by giant viruses from the Mimiviridae and Phycodnaviridae families, while the two other viromes were dominated by smaller phycodnaviruses, cyanophages and other bacteriophages. The estimated genotypic richness and diversity in our sorted viromes, with 52-163 estimated genotypes, was much lower than in previous virome reports. Fragment recruitment of metagenome reads to selected reference viral genomes yields high genome coverage, suggesting little amplification and sequencing bias against some genomic regions. These results underscore the value of our approach as an effective way to target and investigate specific virus groups. In particular, it will help reveal the diversity and abundance of giant viruses in marine ecosystems.

  9. An Extensive Survey of Tyrosine Phosphorylation Revealing New Sites in Human Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Heibeck, Tyler H.; Ding, Shi-Jian; Opresko, Lee K.; Zhao, Rui; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Yang, Feng; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Wiley, H. Steven; Qian, Wei-Jun

    2010-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation represents a central regulatory mechanism in cell signaling. Here we present an extensive survey of tyrosine phosphorylation sites in a normal-derived human mammary epithelial cell line by applying anti-phosphotyrosine peptide immunoaffinity purification coupled with high sensitivity capillary liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 481 tyrosine phosphorylation sites (covered by 716 unique peptides) from 285 proteins were confidently identified in HMEC following the analysis of both the basal condition and acute stimulation with epidermal growth factor (EGF). The estimated false discovery rate was 1.0% as determined by searching against a scrambled database. Comparison of these data with existing literature showed significant agreement for previously reported sites. However, we observed 281 sites that were not previously reported for HMEC cultures and 29 of which have not been reported for any human cell or tissue system. The analysis showed that the majority of highly phosphorylated proteins were relatively low-abundance. Large differences in phosphorylation stoichiometry for sites within the same protein were also observed, raising the possibility of more important functional roles for such highly phosphorylated pTyr sites. By mapping to major signaling networks, such as the EGF receptor and insulin growth factor-1 receptor signaling pathways, many known proteins involved in these pathways were revealed to be tyrosine phosphorylated, which provides interesting targets for future hypothesis-driven and targeted quantitative studies involving tyrosine phosphorylation in HMEC or other human systems. PMID:19534553

  10. Cyp1a reporter zebrafish reveals target tissues for dioxin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kun-Hee; Park, Hye-Jeong; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Suhyun; Williams, Darren R; Kim, Myeong-Kyu; Jung, Young Do; Teraoka, Hiroki; Park, Hae-Chul; Choy, Hyon E; Shin, Boo Ahn; Choi, Seok-Yong

    2013-06-15

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is the unintentional byproduct of various industrial processes, is classified as human carcinogen and could disrupt reproductive, developmental and endocrine systems. Induction of cyp1a1 is used as an indicator of TCDD exposure. We sought to determine tissues that are vulnerable to TCDD toxicity using a transgenic zebrafish (Danio rerio) model. We inserted a nuclear enhanced green fluorescent protein gene (EGFP) into the start codon of a zebrafish cyp1a gene in a fosmid clone using DNA recombineering. The resulting recombineered fosmid was then used to generate cyp1a reporter zebrafish, embryos of which were exposed to TCDD. Expression pattern of EGFP in the reporter zebrafish mirrored that of endogenous cyp1a mRNA. In addition, exposure of the embryos to TCDD at as low as 10 pM for 72 h, which does not elicit morphological abnormalities of embryos, markedly increased GFP expression. Furthermore, the reporter embryos responded to other AhR ligands as well. Exposure of the embryos to TCDD revealed previously reported (the cardiovascular system, liver, pancreas, kidney, swim bladder and skin) and unreported target tissues (retinal bipolar cells, otic vesicle, lateral line, cloaca and pectoral fin bud) for TCDD. Transgenic cyp1a reporter zebrafish we have developed can further understanding of ecotoxicological relevance and human health risks by TCDD. In addition, they could be used to identify agonists of AhR and antidotes to TCDD toxicity.

  11. Spontaneous access to DNA target sites in folded chromatin fibers.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Michael G; Bussiek, Malte; Langowski, Jörg; Widom, Jonathan

    2008-06-13

    DNA wrapped in nucleosomes is sterically occluded from many protein complexes that must act on it; how such complexes gain access to nucleosomal DNA is not known. In vitro studies on isolated nucleosomes show that they undergo spontaneous partial unwrapping conformational transitions, which make the wrapped nucleosomal DNA transiently accessible. Thus, site exposure might provide a general mechanism allowing access of protein complexes to nucleosomal DNA. However, existing quantitative analyses of site exposure focused on single nucleosomes, while the presence of neighbor nucleosomes and concomitant chromatin folding might significantly influence site exposure. In this work, we carried out quantitative studies on the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA in homogeneous nucleosome arrays. Two striking findings emerged. Organization into chromatin fibers changes the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA only modestly, from approximately 3-fold decreases to approximately 8-fold increases in accessibility. This means that nucleosome arrays are intrinsically dynamic and accessible even when they are visibly condensed. In contrast, chromatin folding decreases the accessibility of linker DNA by as much as approximately 50-fold. Thus, nucleosome positioning dramatically influences the accessibility of target sites located inside nucleosomes, while chromatin folding dramatically regulates access to target sites in linker DNA.

  12. Functional microRNAs and target sites are created by lineage-specific transposition

    PubMed Central

    Spengler, Ryan M.; Oakley, Clayton K.; Davidson, Beverly L.

    2014-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) account for nearly one-half of the sequence content in the human genome, and de novo germline transposition into regulatory or coding sequences of protein-coding genes can cause heritable disorders. TEs are prevalent in and around protein-coding genes, providing an opportunity to impart regulation. Computational studies reveal that microRNA (miRNA) genes and miRNA target sites reside within TE sequences, but there is little experimental evidence supporting a role for TEs in the birth of miRNAs, or as platform for gene regulation by miRNAs. In this work, we validate miRNAs and target sites derived from TE families prevalent in the human genome, including the ancient long interspersed nuclear element 2 (LINE2/L2), mammalian-wide interspersed repeat (MIR) retrotransposons and the primate-specific Alu family. We show that genes with 3′ untranslated region (3′ UTR) MIR elements are enriched for let-7 targets and that these sites are conserved and responsive to let-7 expression. We also demonstrate that 3′ UTR-embedded Alus are a source of miR-24 and miR-122 target sites and that a subset of active genomic Alus provide for de novo target site creation. Finally, we report that although the creation of miRNA genes by Alu elements is relatively uncommon relative to their overall genomic abundance, Alu-derived miR-1285-1 is efficiently processed from its genomic locus and regulates genes with target sites contained within homologous elements. Taken together, our data provide additional evidence for TEs as a source for miRNAs and miRNA target sites, with instances of conservation through the course of mammalian evolution. PMID:24234653

  13. Functional microRNAs and target sites are created by lineage-specific transposition.

    PubMed

    Spengler, Ryan M; Oakley, Clayton K; Davidson, Beverly L

    2014-04-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) account for nearly one-half of the sequence content in the human genome, and de novo germline transposition into regulatory or coding sequences of protein-coding genes can cause heritable disorders. TEs are prevalent in and around protein-coding genes, providing an opportunity to impart regulation. Computational studies reveal that microRNA (miRNA) genes and miRNA target sites reside within TE sequences, but there is little experimental evidence supporting a role for TEs in the birth of miRNAs, or as platform for gene regulation by miRNAs. In this work, we validate miRNAs and target sites derived from TE families prevalent in the human genome, including the ancient long interspersed nuclear element 2 (LINE2/L2), mammalian-wide interspersed repeat (MIR) retrotransposons and the primate-specific Alu family. We show that genes with 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) MIR elements are enriched for let-7 targets and that these sites are conserved and responsive to let-7 expression. We also demonstrate that 3' UTR-embedded Alus are a source of miR-24 and miR-122 target sites and that a subset of active genomic Alus provide for de novo target site creation. Finally, we report that although the creation of miRNA genes by Alu elements is relatively uncommon relative to their overall genomic abundance, Alu-derived miR-1285-1 is efficiently processed from its genomic locus and regulates genes with target sites contained within homologous elements. Taken together, our data provide additional evidence for TEs as a source for miRNAs and miRNA target sites, with instances of conservation through the course of mammalian evolution.

  14. Bisphosphonates target multiple sites in both cis- and trans-prenyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Guo, Rey-Ting; Cao, Rong; Liang, Po-Huang; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Chang, Tao-Hsin; Hudock, Michael P; Jeng, Wen-Yih; Chen, Cammy K-M; Zhang, Yonghui; Song, Yongcheng; Kuo, Chih-Jung; Yin, Fenglin; Oldfield, Eric; Wang, Andrew H-J

    2007-06-12

    Bisphosphonate drugs (e.g., Fosamax and Zometa) are thought to act primarily by inhibiting farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPPS), resulting in decreased prenylation of small GTPases. Here, we show that some bisphosphonates can also inhibit geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase (GGPPS), as well as undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase (UPPS), a cis-prenyltransferase of interest as a target for antibacterial therapy. Our results on GGPPS (10 structures) show that there are three bisphosphonate-binding sites, consisting of FPP or isopentenyl diphosphate substrate-binding sites together with a GGPP product- or inhibitor-binding site. In UPPS, there are a total of four binding sites (in five structures). These results are of general interest because they provide the first structures of GGPPS- and UPPS-inhibitor complexes, potentially important drug targets, in addition to revealing a remarkably broad spectrum of binding modes not seen in FPPS inhibition.

  15. Nuclease Target Site Selection for Maximizing On-target Activity and Minimizing Off-target Effects in Genome Editing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ciaran M; Cradick, Thomas J; Fine, Eli J; Bao, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The rapid advancement in targeted genome editing using engineered nucleases such as ZFNs, TALENs, and CRISPR/Cas9 systems has resulted in a suite of powerful methods that allows researchers to target any genomic locus of interest. A complementary set of design tools has been developed to aid researchers with nuclease design, target site selection, and experimental validation. Here, we review the various tools available for target selection in designing engineered nucleases, and for quantifying nuclease activity and specificity, including web-based search tools and experimental methods. We also elucidate challenges in target selection, especially in predicting off-target effects, and discuss future directions in precision genome editing and its applications. PMID:26750397

  16. Target-classification approach applied to active UXO sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubitidze, F.; Fernández, J. P.; Shamatava, Irma; Barrowes, B. E.; O'Neill, K.

    2013-06-01

    This study is designed to illustrate the discrimination performance at two UXO active sites (Oklahoma's Fort Sill and the Massachusetts Military Reservation) of a set of advanced electromagnetic induction (EMI) inversion/discrimination models which include the orthonormalized volume magnetic source (ONVMS), joint diagonalization (JD), and differential evolution (DE) approaches and whose power and flexibility greatly exceed those of the simple dipole model. The Fort Sill site is highly contaminated by a mix of the following types of munitions: 37-mm target practice tracers, 60-mm illumination mortars, 75-mm and 4.5'' projectiles, 3.5'', 2.36'', and LAAW rockets, antitank mine fuzes with and without hex nuts, practice MK2 and M67 grenades, 2.5'' ballistic windshields, M2A1-mines with/without bases, M19-14 time fuzes, and 40-mm practice grenades with/without cartridges. The site at the MMR site contains targets of yet different sizes. In this work we apply our models to EMI data collected using the MetalMapper (MM) and 2 × 2 TEMTADS sensors. The data for each anomaly are inverted to extract estimates of the extrinsic and intrinsic parameters associated with each buried target. (The latter include the total volume magnetic source or NVMS, which relates to size, shape, and material properties; the former includes location, depth, and orientation). The estimated intrinsic parameters are then used for classification performed via library matching and the use of statistical classification algorithms; this process yielded prioritized dig-lists that were submitted to the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA) for independent scoring. The models' classification performance is illustrated and assessed based on these independent evaluations.

  17. Revealing the macromolecular targets of complex natural products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reker, Daniel; Perna, Anna M.; Rodrigues, Tiago; Schneider, Petra; Reutlinger, Michael; Mönch, Bettina; Koeberle, Andreas; Lamers, Christina; Gabler, Matthias; Steinmetz, Heinrich; Müller, Rolf; Schubert-Zsilavecz, Manfred; Werz, Oliver; Schneider, Gisbert

    2014-12-01

    Natural products have long been a source of useful biological activity for the development of new drugs. Their macromolecular targets are, however, largely unknown, which hampers rational drug design and optimization. Here we present the development and experimental validation of a computational method for the discovery of such targets. The technique does not require three-dimensional target models and may be applied to structurally complex natural products. The algorithm dissects the natural products into fragments and infers potential pharmacological targets by comparing the fragments to synthetic reference drugs with known targets. We demonstrate that this approach results in confident predictions. In a prospective validation, we show that fragments of the potent antitumour agent archazolid A, a macrolide from the myxobacterium Archangium gephyra, contain relevant information regarding its polypharmacology. Biochemical and biophysical evaluation confirmed the predictions. The results obtained corroborate the practical applicability of the computational approach to natural product ‘de-orphaning’.

  18. Directing cell therapy to anatomic target sites in vivo with magnetic resonance targeting

    PubMed Central

    Muthana, Munitta; Kennerley, Aneurin J.; Hughes, Russell; Fagnano, Ester; Richardson, Jay; Paul, Melanie; Murdoch, Craig; Wright, Fiona; Payne, Christopher; Lythgoe, Mark F.; Farrow, Neil; Dobson, Jon; Conner, Joe; Wild, Jim M.; Lewis, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based therapy exploits modified human cells to treat diseases but its targeted application in specific tissues, particularly those lying deep in the body where direct injection is not possible, has been problematic. Here we use a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system to direct macrophages carrying an oncolytic virus, Seprehvir, into primary and metastatic tumour sites in mice. To achieve this, we magnetically label macrophages with super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and apply pulsed magnetic field gradients in the direction of the tumour sites. Magnetic resonance targeting guides macrophages from the bloodstream into tumours, resulting in increased tumour macrophage infiltration and reduction in tumour burden and metastasis. Our study indicates that clinical MRI scanners can not only track the location of magnetically labelled cells but also have the potential to steer them into one or more target tissues. PMID:26284300

  19. Site-specific tumor-targeted fluorescent contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achilefu, Samuel I.; Bugaj, Joseph E.; Dorshow, Richard B.; Jimenez, Hermo N.; Rajagopalan, Raghavan; Wilhelm, R. Randy; Webb, Elizabeth G.; Erion, Jack L.

    2001-01-01

    Site-specific delivery of drugs and contrast agents to tumors protects normal tissues from the cytotoxic effect of drugs, and enhances the contrast between normal and diseased tissues. In optical medicine, biocompatible dyes can be used as photo therapeutics or as contrast agents. Previous studies have shown that the use of covalent or non-covalent dye conjugates of carries such as antibodies, liposomes, and polysaccharides improves the delivery of such molecules to tumors. However, large biomolecules can elicit adverse immunogenic reactions and also result in prolonged blood circulation times, delaying visualization of target tissues. A viable alternative to this strategy is to use small bioactive molecule-dye conjugates. These molecules have several advantages over large biomolecules, including ease of synthesis of a variety of high purity compounds for combinatorial screening of new targets, enhanced diffusivity to solid tumors, and the ability to affect the pharmocokinetics of the conjugates by minor structural changes. Thus, we conjugated a near IR light absorbing dye to bioactive peptides that specifically target over expressed tumor receptors in established rat tumor lines. High tumor uptake of the conjugates was obtained without loss of either the peptide receptor affinity or the dye fluorescence. These findings demonstrate the efficacy of a small peptide-dye conjugate strategy for in vivo tumor imaging. Site-specific delivery of photodynamic therapy agents may also benefit form this approach.

  20. TCGA Bladder Cancer Study Reveals Potential Drug Targets - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators with the TCGA Research Network have identified new potential therapeutic targets for a major form of bladder cancer, including important genes and pathways that are disrupted in the disease.

  1. TCGA bladder cancer study reveals potential drug targets

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators with TCGA have identified new potential therapeutic targets for a major form of bladder cancer, including important genes and pathways that are disrupted in the disease. They also discovered that, at the molecular level, some subtypes of bla

  2. Crystal structure of an avian influenza polymerase PA[subscript N] reveals an endonuclease active site

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Puwei; Bartlam, Mark; Lou, Zhiyong; Chen, Shoudeng; Zhou, Jie; He, Xiaojing; Lv, Zongyang; Ge, Ruowen; Li, Xuemei; Deng, Tao; Fodor, Ervin; Rao, Zihe; Liu, Yingfang

    2009-11-10

    The heterotrimeric influenza virus polymerase, containing the PA, PB1 and PB2 proteins, catalyses viral RNA replication and transcription in the nucleus of infected cells. PB1 holds the polymerase active site and reportedly harbours endonuclease activity, whereas PB2 is responsible for cap binding. The PA amino terminus is understood to be the major functional part of the PA protein and has been implicated in several roles, including endonuclease and protease activities as well as viral RNA/complementary RNA promoter binding. Here we report the 2.2 angstrom (A) crystal structure of the N-terminal 197 residues of PA, termed PA(N), from an avian influenza H5N1 virus. The PA(N) structure has an alpha/beta architecture and reveals a bound magnesium ion coordinated by a motif similar to the (P)DX(N)(D/E)XK motif characteristic of many endonucleases. Structural comparisons and mutagenesis analysis of the motif identified in PA(N) provide further evidence that PA(N) holds an endonuclease active site. Furthermore, functional analysis with in vivo ribonucleoprotein reconstitution and direct in vitro endonuclease assays strongly suggest that PA(N) holds the endonuclease active site and has critical roles in endonuclease activity of the influenza virus polymerase, rather than PB1. The high conservation of this endonuclease active site among influenza strains indicates that PA(N) is an important target for the design of new anti-influenza therapeutics.

  3. Proteogenomic integration reveals therapeutic targets in breast cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kuan-lin; Li, Shunqiang; Mertins, Philipp; Cao, Song; Gunawardena, Harsha P.; Ruggles, Kelly V.; Mani, D. R.; Clauser, Karl R.; Tanioka, Maki; Usary, Jerry; Kavuri, Shyam M.; Xie, Ling; Yoon, Christopher; Qiao, Jana W; Wrobel, John; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A.; Erdmann-Gilmore, Petra; Snider, Jacqueline E.; Hoog, Jeremy; Singh, Purba; Niu, Beifung; Guo, Zhanfang; Sun, Sam Qiancheng; Sanati, Souzan; Kawaler, Emily; Wang, Xuya; Scott, Adam; Ye, Kai; McLellan, Michael D.; Wendl, Michael C.; Malovannaya, Anna; Held, Jason M.; Gillette, Michael A.; Fenyö, David; Kinsinger, Christopher R.; Mesri, Mehdi; Rodriguez, Henry; Davies, Sherri R.; Perou, Charles M.; Ma, Cynthia; Reid Townsend, R.; Chen, Xian; Carr, Steven A.; Ellis, Matthew J.; Ding, Li

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in mass spectrometry (MS) have enabled extensive analysis of cancer proteomes. Here, we employed quantitative proteomics to profile protein expression across 24 breast cancer patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models. Integrated proteogenomic analysis shows positive correlation between expression measurements from transcriptomic and proteomic analyses; further, gene expression-based intrinsic subtypes are largely re-capitulated using non-stromal protein markers. Proteogenomic analysis also validates a number of predicted genomic targets in multiple receptor tyrosine kinases. However, several protein/phosphoprotein events such as overexpression of AKT proteins and ARAF, BRAF, HSP90AB1 phosphosites are not readily explainable by genomic analysis, suggesting that druggable translational and/or post-translational regulatory events may be uniquely diagnosed by MS. Drug treatment experiments targeting HER2 and components of the PI3K pathway supported proteogenomic response predictions in seven xenograft models. Our study demonstrates that MS-based proteomics can identify therapeutic targets and highlights the potential of PDX drug response evaluation to annotate MS-based pathway activities. PMID:28348404

  4. Integrated genomics of Mucorales reveals novel therapeutic targets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mucormycosis is a life-threatening infection caused by Mucorales fungi. We sequenced 30 fungal genomes and performed transcriptomics with three representative Rhizopus and Mucor strains with human airway epithelial cells during fungal invasion to reveal key host and fungal determinants contributing ...

  5. Deciphering the Code for Retroviral Integration Target Site Selection

    PubMed Central

    Santoni, Federico Andrea; Hartley, Oliver; Luban, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Upon cell invasion, retroviruses generate a DNA copy of their RNA genome and integrate retroviral cDNA within host chromosomal DNA. Integration occurs throughout the host cell genome, but target site selection is not random. Each subgroup of retrovirus is distinguished from the others by attraction to particular features on chromosomes. Despite extensive efforts to identify host factors that interact with retrovirion components or chromosome features predictive of integration, little is known about how integration sites are selected. We attempted to identify markers predictive of retroviral integration by exploiting Precision-Recall methods for extracting information from highly skewed datasets to derive robust and discriminating measures of association. ChIPSeq datasets for more than 60 factors were compared with 14 retroviral integration datasets. When compared with MLV, PERV or XMRV integration sites, strong association was observed with STAT1, acetylation of H3 and H4 at several positions, and methylation of H2AZ, H3K4, and K9. By combining peaks from ChIPSeq datasets, a supermarker was identified that localized within 2 kB of 75% of MLV proviruses and detected differences in integration preferences among different cell types. The supermarker predicted the likelihood of integration within specific chromosomal regions in a cell-type specific manner, yielding probabilities for integration into proto-oncogene LMO2 identical to experimentally determined values. The supermarker thus identifies chromosomal features highly favored for retroviral integration, provides clues to the mechanism by which retrovirus integration sites are selected, and offers a tool for predicting cell-type specific proto-oncogene activation by retroviruses. PMID:21124862

  6. Salivary epithelial cells: an unassuming target site for gene therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Paola; Rowzee, Anne M.; Zheng, Changyu; Adriaansen, Janik; Baum, Bruce J.

    2010-01-01

    Salivary glands are classical exocrine glands whose external secretions result in the production of saliva. However, in addition to the secretion of exocrine proteins, salivary epithelial cells are also capable of secreting proteins internally, into the bloodstream. This brief review examines the potential for using salivary epithelial cells as a target site for in situ gene transfer, with an ultimate goal of producing therapeutic proteins for treating both systemic and upper gastrointestinal tract disorders. The review discusses the protein secretory pathways reported to be present in salivary epithelial cells, the viral gene transfer vectors shown useful for transducing these cells, model transgenic secretory proteins examined, and some clinical conditions that might benefit from such salivary gland gene transfer. PMID:20219693

  7. Novel acetylcholinesterase target site for malaria mosquito control.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yuan-Ping

    2006-12-20

    Current anticholinesterase pesticides were developed during World War II and are toxic to mammals because they target a catalytic serine residue of acetylcholinesterases (AChEs) in insects and in mammals. A sequence analysis of AChEs from 73 species and a three-dimensional model of a malaria-carrying mosquito (Anopheles gambiae) AChE (AgAChE) reported here show that C286 and R339 of AgAChE are conserved at the opening of the active site of AChEs in 17 invertebrate and four insect species, respectively. Both residues are absent in the active site of AChEs of human, monkey, dog, cat, cattle, rabbit, rat, and mouse. The 17 invertebrates include house mosquito, Japanese encephalitis mosquito, African malaria mosquito, German cockroach, Florida lancelet, rice leaf beetle, African bollworm, beet armyworm, codling moth, diamondback moth, domestic silkworm, honey bee, oat or wheat aphid, the greenbug, melon or cotton aphid, green peach aphid, and English grain aphid. The four insects are house mosquito, Japanese encephalitis mosquito, African malaria mosquito, and German cockroach. The discovery of the two invertebrate-specific residues enables the development of effective and safer pesticides that target the residues present only in mosquito AChEs rather than the ubiquitous serine residue, thus potentially offering an effective control of mosquito-borne malaria. Anti-AgAChE pesticides can be designed to interact with R339 and subsequently covalently bond to C286. Such pesticides would be toxic to mosquitoes but not to mammals.

  8. Structural signatures of DRD4 mutants revealed using molecular dynamics simulations: Implications for drug targeting.

    PubMed

    Jatana, Nidhi; Thukral, Lipi; Latha, N

    2016-01-01

    Human Dopamine Receptor D4 (DRD4) orchestrates several neurological functions and represents a target for many psychological disorders. Here, we examined two rare variants in DRD4; V194G and R237L, which elicit functional alterations leading to disruption of ligand binding and G protein coupling, respectively. Using atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we provide in-depth analysis to reveal structural signatures of wild and mutant complexes with their bound agonist and antagonist ligands. We constructed intra-protein network graphs to discriminate the global conformational changes induced by mutations. The simulations also allowed us to elucidate the local side-chain dynamical variations in ligand-bound mutant receptors. The data suggest that the mutation in transmembrane V (V194G) drastically disrupts the organization of ligand binding site and causes disorder in the native helical arrangement. Interestingly, the R237L mutation leads to significant rewiring of side-chain contacts in the intracellular loop 3 (site of mutation) and also affects the distant transmembrane topology. Additionally, these mutations lead to compact ICL3 region compared to the wild type, indicating that the receptor would be inaccessible for G protein coupling. Our findings thus reveal unreported structural determinants of the mutated DRD4 receptor and provide a robust framework for design of effective novel drugs.

  9. Phosphorylation site mapping of soluble proteins: bioinformatical filtering reveals potential plastidic phosphoproteins in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Lohrig, Katharina; Müller, Bernd; Davydova, Joulia; Leister, Dario; Wolters, Dirk Andreas

    2009-04-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a major mode of regulation of metabolism, gene expression, and cell architecture. A combination of phosphopeptide enrichment strategies based on TiO(2) and IMAC in addition to our MudPIT strategy revealed the detection of 181 phosphorylation sites which are located on 125 potentially plastidic proteins predicted by GoMiner, TargetP/Predotar in Arabidopsis thaliana. In our study phosphorylation on serine is favored over threonine and this in turn over phosphorylation on tyrosine residues, showing a percentage of 67.4% to 24.3% to 8.3% for pS:pT:pY. Four phosphorylated residues (S208, Y239, T246 and T330), identified by our approach have been fitted to the structure of the activated form of spinach RuBisCO, which are located in close proximity to the substrate binding site for ribulosebisphosphate. Potentially, these phosphorylation sites exert a direct influence on the catalytic activity of the enzyme. Such examples show nicely the value of the presented mass spectrometric dataset for further biochemical applications, since alternative mutation analysis often turns out to be unsuccessful, caused by mutations in essential proteins which result in lethal phenotypes.

  10. Bioimage analysis of Shigella infection reveals targeting of colonic crypts.

    PubMed

    Arena, Ellen T; Campbell-Valois, Francois-Xavier; Tinevez, Jean-Yves; Nigro, Giulia; Sachse, Martin; Moya-Nilges, Maryse; Nothelfer, Katharina; Marteyn, Benoit; Shorte, Spencer L; Sansonetti, Philippe J

    2015-06-23

    Few studies within the pathogenic field have used advanced imaging and analytical tools to quantitatively measure pathogenicity in vivo. In this work, we present a novel approach for the investigation of host-pathogen processes based on medium-throughput 3D fluorescence imaging. The guinea pig model for Shigella flexneri invasion of the colonic mucosa was used to monitor the infectious process over time with GFP-expressing S. flexneri. A precise quantitative imaging protocol was devised to follow individual S. flexneri in a large tissue volume. An extensive dataset of confocal images was obtained and processed to extract specific quantitative information regarding the progression of S. flexneri infection in an unbiased and exhaustive manner. Specific parameters included the analysis of S. flexneri positions relative to the epithelial surface, S. flexneri density within the tissue, and volume of tissue destruction. In particular, at early time points, there was a clear association of S. flexneri with crypts, key morphological features of the colonic mucosa. Numerical simulations based on random bacterial entry confirmed the bias of experimentally measured S. flexneri for early crypt targeting. The application of a correlative light and electron microscopy technique adapted for thick tissue samples further confirmed the location of S. flexneri within colonocytes at the mouth of crypts. This quantitative imaging approach is a novel means to examine host-pathogen systems in a tailored and robust manner, inclusive of the infectious agent.

  11. Initial basalt target site selection evaluation for the Mars penetrator drop test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunch, T. E.; Quaide, W. L.; Polkowski, G.

    1976-01-01

    Potential basalt target sites for an air drop penetrator test were described and the criteria involved in site selection were discussed. A summary of the background field geology and recommendations for optimum sites are also presented.

  12. Spy: a new group of eukaryotic DNA transposons without target site duplications.

    PubMed

    Han, Min-Jin; Xu, Hong-En; Zhang, Hua-Hao; Feschotte, Cédric; Zhang, Ze

    2014-06-24

    Class 2 or DNA transposons populate the genomes of most eukaryotes and like other mobile genetic elements have a profound impact on genome evolution. Most DNA transposons belong to the cut-and-paste types, which are relatively simple elements characterized by terminal-inverted repeats (TIRs) flanking a single gene encoding a transposase. All eukaryotic cut-and-paste transposons so far described are also characterized by target site duplications (TSDs) of host DNA generated upon chromosomal insertion. Here, we report a new group of evolutionarily related DNA transposons called Spy, which also include TIRs and DDE motif-containing transposase but surprisingly do not create TSDs upon insertion. Instead, Spy transposons appear to transpose precisely between 5'-AAA and TTT-3' host nucleotides, without duplication or modification of the AAATTT target sites. Spy transposons were identified in the genomes of diverse invertebrate species based on transposase homology searches and structure-based approaches. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that Spy transposases are distantly related to IS5, ISL2EU, and PIF/Harbinger transposases. However, Spy transposons are distinct from these and other DNA transposon superfamilies by their lack of TSD and their target site preference. Our findings expand the known diversity of DNA transposons and reveal a new group of eukaryotic DDE transposases with unusual catalytic properties.

  13. Triaziflam and Diaminotriazine derivatives affect enantioselectively multiple herbicide target sites.

    PubMed

    Grossmann, K; Tresch, S; Plath, P

    2001-01-01

    Enantiomers of triaziflam and structurally related diaminotriazines were synthesized and their herbicidal mode of action was investigated. The compounds caused light and dark-dependent effects in multiple test systems including heterotrophic cleaver and photoautotrophic algal cell suspensions, the Hill reaction of isolated thylakoids and germinating cress seeds. Dose-response experiments revealed that the (S)-enantiomers of the compounds preferentially inhibited photosystem II electron transport (PET) and algae growth with efficacies similar to that of the herbicide atrazine. In contrast, the (R)-enantiomers of the diaminotriazines were up to 100 times more potent inhibitors of growth in cleaver cell suspensions and cress seedlings in the dark than the (S)-enantiomers. The most active compound, the (R)-enantiomer of triaziflam, inhibited shoot and root elongation of cress and maize seedlings at concentrations below 1 microM. The meristematic root tips swelled into a club shape which is typical for the action of mitotic disrupter herbicides and cellulose biosynthesis inhibitors. Microscopic examination using histochemical techniques revealed that triaziflam (R)-enantiomer blocks cell division in maize root tips 4 h after treatment. The chromosomes proceeded to a condensed state of prometaphase but were unable to progress further in the mitotic cycle. Disruption of mitosis was accompanied by a loss of spindle and phragmoplast micotubule arrays. Concomitantly, cortical microtubules decreased which could lead to isodiametric cell growth and consequently to root swelling. In addition, a decline in cellulose deposition in cell walls was found 24 h after treatment. Compared to the (R)-form, triaziflam (S)-enantiomer was clearly less active. The results suggest that triaziflam and related diaminotriazines affect enantioselectively multiple sites of action which include PET inhibitory activity, mitotic disruption by inhibiting microtubule formation and inhibition of

  14. Simulations reveal the power and peril of artificial breeding sites for monitoring and managing animals.

    PubMed

    McClure, Christopher J W; Pauli, Benjamin P; Heath, Julie A

    2017-01-24

    Despite common use, the efficacy of artificial breeding sites (e.g., nest boxes, bat houses, artificial burrows) as tools for monitoring and managing animals depends on the demography of target populations and availability of natural sites. Yet, the conditions enabling artificial breeding sites to be useful or informative have yet to be articulated. We use a stochastic simulation model to determine situations where artificial breeding sites are either useful or disadvantageous for monitoring and managing animals. Artificial breeding sites are a convenient tool for monitoring animals and therefore occupancy of artificial breeding sites is often used as an index of population levels. However, systematic changes in availability of sites that are not monitored might induce trends in occupancy of monitored sites-a situation rarely considered by monitoring programs. We therefore examine how systematic changes in unmonitored sites could bias inference from trends in the occupancy of monitored sites. Our model also allows us to examine effects on population levels if artificial breeding sites either increase or decrease population vital rates (survival and fecundity). We demonstrate that trends in occupancy of monitored sites are misleading if the number of unmonitored sites changes over time. Further, breeding site fidelity can cause an initial lag in occupancy of newly installed sites that could be misinterpreted as an increasing population, even when the population has been continuously declining. Importantly, provisioning of artificial breeding sites only benefits populations if breeding sites are limiting or if artificial sites increase vital rates. There are many situations where installation of artificial breeding sites, and their use in monitoring, can have unintended consequences. Managers should therefore not assume that provision of artificial breeding sites will necessarily benefit populations. Further, trends in occupancy of artificial breeding sites should be

  15. In silico Analysis of Combinatorial microRNA Activity Reveals Target Genes and Pathways Associated with Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Dombkowski, Alan A.; Sultana, Zakia; Craig, Douglas B.; Jamil, Hasan

    2011-01-01

    This is an open access article. Unrestricted non-commercial use is permitted provided the original work is properly cited. Aberrant microRNA activity has been reported in many diseases, and studies often find numerous microRNAs concurrently dysregulated. Most target genes have binding sites for multiple microRNAs, and mounting evidence indicates that it is important to consider their combinatorial effect on target gene repression. A recent study associated the coincident loss of expression of six microRNAs with metastatic potential in breast cancer. Here, we used a new computational method, miR-AT!, to investigate combinatorial activity among this group of microRNAs. We found that the set of transcripts having multiple target sites for these microRNAs was significantly enriched with genes involved in cellular processes commonly perturbed in metastatic tumors: cell cycle regulation, cytoskeleton organization, and cell adhesion. Network analysis revealed numerous target genes upstream of cyclin D1 and c-Myc, indicating that the collective loss of the six microRNAs may have a focal effect on these two key regulatory nodes. A number of genes previously implicated in cancer metastasis are among the predicted combinatorial targets, including TGFB1, ARPC3, and RANKL. In summary, our analysis reveals extensive combinatorial interactions that have notable implications for their potential role in breast cancer metastasis and in therapeutic development. PMID:21552493

  16. Structures of Cryptococcus neoformans protein farnesyltransferase reveal strategies for developing inhibitors that target fungal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Hast, Michael A; Nichols, Connie B; Armstrong, Stephanie M; Kelly, Shannon M; Hellinga, Homme W; Alspaugh, J Andrew; Beese, Lorena S

    2011-10-07

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a fungal pathogen that causes life-threatening infections in immunocompromised individuals, including AIDS patients and transplant recipients. Few antifungals can treat C. neoformans infections, and drug resistance is increasing. Protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) catalyzes post-translational lipidation of key signal transduction proteins and is essential in C. neoformans. We present a multidisciplinary study validating C. neoformans FTase (CnFTase) as a drug target, showing that several anticancer FTase inhibitors with disparate scaffolds can inhibit C. neoformans and suggesting structure-based strategies for further optimization of these leads. Structural studies are an essential element for species-specific inhibitor development strategies by revealing similarities and differences between pathogen and host orthologs that can be exploited. We, therefore, present eight crystal structures of CnFTase that define the enzymatic reaction cycle, basis of ligand selection, and structurally divergent regions of the active site. Crystal structures of clinically important anticancer FTase inhibitors in complex with CnFTase reveal opportunities for optimization of selectivity for the fungal enzyme by modifying functional groups that interact with structurally diverse regions. A substrate-induced conformational change in CnFTase is observed as part of the reaction cycle, a feature that is mechanistically distinct from human FTase. Our combined structural and functional studies provide a framework for developing FTase inhibitors to treat invasive fungal infections.

  17. Structures of Cryptococcus neoformans Protein Farnesyltransferase Reveal Strategies for Developing Inhibitors That Target Fungal Pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    Hast, Michael A.; Nichols, Connie B.; Armstrong, Stephanie M.; Kelly, Shannon M.; Hellinga, Homme W.; Alspaugh, J. Andrew; Beese, Lorena S.

    2012-09-17

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a fungal pathogen that causes life-threatening infections in immunocompromised individuals, including AIDS patients and transplant recipients. Few antifungals can treat C. neoformans infections, and drug resistance is increasing. Protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) catalyzes post-translational lipidation of key signal transduction proteins and is essential in C. neoformans. We present a multidisciplinary study validating C. neoformans FTase (CnFTase) as a drug target, showing that several anticancer FTase inhibitors with disparate scaffolds can inhibit C. neoformans and suggesting structure-based strategies for further optimization of these leads. Structural studies are an essential element for species-specific inhibitor development strategies by revealing similarities and differences between pathogen and host orthologs that can be exploited. We, therefore, present eight crystal structures of CnFTase that define the enzymatic reaction cycle, basis of ligand selection, and structurally divergent regions of the active site. Crystal structures of clinically important anticancer FTase inhibitors in complex with CnFTase reveal opportunities for optimization of selectivity for the fungal enzyme by modifying functional groups that interact with structurally diverse regions. A substrate-induced conformational change in CnFTase is observed as part of the reaction cycle, a feature that is mechanistically distinct from human FTase. Our combined structural and functional studies provide a framework for developing FTase inhibitors to treat invasive fungal infections.

  18. The Streptococcus pneumoniae cia regulon: CiaR target sites and transcription profile analysis.

    PubMed

    Mascher, Thorsten; Zähner, Dorothea; Merai, Michelle; Balmelle, Nadège; de Saizieu, Antoine B; Hakenbeck, Regine

    2003-01-01

    The ciaR-ciaH system is one of 13 two-component signal-transducing systems of the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. Mutations in the histidine protein kinase CiaH confer increased resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics and interfere with the development of genetic competence. In order to identify the genes controlled by the cia system, the cia regulon, DNA fragments targeted by the response regulator CiaR were isolated from restricted chromosomal DNA using the solid-phase DNA binding assay and analyzed by hybridization to an oligonucleotide microarray representing the S. pneumoniae genome. A set of 18 chromosomal regions containing 26 CiaR target sites were detected and proposed to represent the minimal cia regulon. The putative CiaR target loci included genes important for the synthesis and modification of cell wall polymers, peptide pheromone and bacteriocin production, and the htrA-spo0J region. In addition, the transcription profile of cia loss-of-function mutants and those with an apparent activated cia system representing the off and on states of the regulatory system were analyzed. The transcript analysis confirmed the cia-dependent expression of seven putative target loci and revealed three additional cia-regulated loci. Five putative target regions were silent under all conditions, and for the remaining three regions, no cia-dependent expression could be detected. Furthermore, the competence regulon, including the comCDE operon required for induction of competence, was completely repressed by the cia system.

  19. Identification of ligands that target the HCV-E2 binding site on CD81

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olaby, Reem Al; Azzazy, Hassan M.; Harris, Rodney; Chromy, Brett; Vielmetter, Jost; Balhorn, Rod

    2013-04-01

    Hepatitis C is a global health problem. While many drug companies have active R&D efforts to develop new drugs for treating Hepatitis C virus (HCV), most target the viral enzymes. The HCV glycoprotein E2 has been shown to play an essential role in hepatocyte invasion by binding to CD81 and other cell surface receptors. This paper describes the use of AutoDock to identify ligand binding sites on the large extracellular loop of the open conformation of CD81 and to perform virtual screening runs to identify sets of small molecule ligands predicted to bind to two of these sites. The best sites selected by AutoLigand were located in regions identified by mutational studies to be the site of E2 binding. Thirty-six ligands predicted by AutoDock to bind to these sites were subsequently tested experimentally to determine if they bound to CD81-LEL. Binding assays conducted using surface Plasmon resonance revealed that 26 out of 36 (72 %) of the ligands bound in vitro to the recombinant CD81-LEL protein. Competition experiments performed using dual polarization interferometry showed that one of the ligands predicted to bind to the large cleft between the C and D helices was also effective in blocking E2 binding to CD81-LEL.

  20. Metabolic and target-site mechanisms combine to confer strong DDT resistance in Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Sara N; Rigden, Daniel J; Dowd, Andrew J; Lu, Fang; Wilding, Craig S; Weetman, David; Dadzie, Samuel; Jenkins, Adam M; Regna, Kimberly; Boko, Pelagie; Djogbenou, Luc; Muskavitch, Marc A T; Ranson, Hilary; Paine, Mark J I; Mayans, Olga; Donnelly, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    The development of resistance to insecticides has become a classic exemplar of evolution occurring within human time scales. In this study we demonstrate how resistance to DDT in the major African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae is a result of both target-site resistance mechanisms that have introgressed between incipient species (the M- and S-molecular forms) and allelic variants in a DDT-detoxifying enzyme. Sequencing of the detoxification enzyme, Gste2, from DDT resistant and susceptible strains of An. gambiae, revealed a non-synonymous polymorphism (I114T), proximal to the DDT binding domain, which segregated with strain phenotype. Recombinant protein expression and DDT metabolism analysis revealed that the proteins from the susceptible strain lost activity at higher DDT concentrations, characteristic of substrate inhibition. The effect of I114T on GSTE2 protein structure was explored through X-ray crystallography. The amino acid exchange in the DDT-resistant strain introduced a hydroxyl group nearby the hydrophobic DDT-binding region. The exchange does not result in structural alterations but is predicted to facilitate local dynamics and enzyme activity. Expression of both wild-type and 114T alleles the allele in Drosophila conferred an increase in DDT tolerance. The 114T mutation was significantly associated with DDT resistance in wild caught M-form populations and acts in concert with target-site mutations in the voltage gated sodium channel (Vgsc-1575Y and Vgsc-1014F) to confer extreme levels of DDT resistance in wild caught An. gambiae.

  1. Evolutionary patterns of metazoan microRNAs reveal targeting principles in the let-7 and miR-10 families

    PubMed Central

    Le, Hoai Huang Thi; Linse, Alexander; Godlove, Victoria A.; Nguyen, Thuy-Duyen; Kotagama, Kasuen; Lynch, Alissa; Rawls, Alan

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene output by targeting degenerate elements in mRNAs and have undergone drastic expansions in higher metazoan genomes. The evolutionary advantage of maintaining copies of highly similar miRNAs is not well understood, nor is it clear what unique functions, if any, miRNA family members possess. Here, we study evolutionary patterns of metazoan miRNAs, focusing on the targeting preferences of the let-7 and miR-10 families. These studies reveal hotspots for sequence evolution with implications for targeting and secondary structure. High-throughput screening for functional targets reveals that each miRNA represses sites with distinct features and regulates a large number of genes with cooperative function in regulatory networks. Unexpectedly, given the high degree of similarity, single-nucleotide changes grant miRNA family members with distinct targeting preferences. Together, our data suggest complex functional relationships among miRNA duplications, novel expression patterns, sequence change, and the acquisition of new targets. PMID:27927717

  2. Anesthetics Target Interfacial Transmembrane Sites in Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Forman, Stuart A.; Chiara, David C.; Miller, Keith W.

    2014-01-01

    General anesthetics are a heterogeneous group of small amphiphilic ligands that interact weakly at multiple allosteric sites on many pentameric ligand gated ion channels (pLGICs), resulting in either inhibition, potentiation of channel activity, or both. Allosteric principles imply that modulator sites must change configuration and ligand affinity during receptor state transitions. Thus, general anesthetics and related compounds are useful both as state-dependent probes of receptor structure and as potentially selective modulators of pLGIC functions. This review focuses on general anesthetic sites in nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, which were among the first anesthetic-sensitive pLGIC experimental models studied, with particular focus on sites formed by transmembrane domain elements. Structural models place many of these sites at interfaces between two or more pLGIC transmembrane helices both within subunits and between adjacent subunits, and between transmembrane helices and either lipids (the lipid-protein interface) or water (i.e. the ion channel). A single general anesthetic may bind at multiple allosteric sites in pLGICs, producing a net effect of either inhibition (e.g. blocking the ion channel) or enhanced channel gating (e.g. inter-subunit sites). Other general anesthetic sites identified by photolabeling or crystallography are tentatively linked to functional effects, including intra-subunit helix bundle sites and the lipid-protein interface. PMID:25316107

  3. Integrative Analysis of CRISPR/Cas9 Target Sites in the Human HBB Gene.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yumei; Zhu, Detu; Zhang, Zhizhuo; Chen, Yaoyong; Sun, Xiaofang

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system has emerged as a powerful customizable artificial nuclease to facilitate precise genetic correction for tissue regeneration and isogenic disease modeling. However, previous studies reported substantial off-target activities of CRISPR system in human cells, and the enormous putative off-target sites are labor-intensive to be validated experimentally, thus motivating bioinformatics methods for rational design of CRISPR system and prediction of its potential off-target effects. Here, we describe an integrative analytical process to identify specific CRISPR target sites in the human β-globin gene (HBB) and predict their off-target effects. Our method includes off-target analysis in both coding and noncoding regions, which was neglected by previous studies. It was found that the CRISPR target sites in the introns have fewer off-target sites in the coding regions than those in the exons. Remarkably, target sites containing certain transcriptional factor motif have enriched binding sites of relevant transcriptional factor in their off-target sets. We also found that the intron sites have fewer SNPs, which leads to less variation of CRISPR efficiency in different individuals during clinical applications. Our studies provide a standard analytical procedure to select specific CRISPR targets for genetic correction.

  4. In vivo binding of PRDM9 reveals interactions with noncanonical genomic sites

    PubMed Central

    Grey, Corinne; Clément, Julie A.J.; Buard, Jérôme; Leblanc, Benjamin; Gut, Ivo; Gut, Marta; Duret, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    In mouse and human meiosis, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) initiate homologous recombination and occur at specific sites called hotspots. The localization of these sites is determined by the sequence-specific DNA binding domain of the PRDM9 histone methyl transferase. Here, we performed an extensive analysis of PRDM9 binding in mouse spermatocytes. Unexpectedly, we identified a noncanonical recruitment of PRDM9 to sites that lack recombination activity and the PRDM9 binding consensus motif. These sites include gene promoters, where PRDM9 is recruited in a DSB-dependent manner. Another subset reveals DSB-independent interactions between PRDM9 and genomic sites, such as the binding sites for the insulator protein CTCF. We propose that these DSB-independent sites result from interactions between hotspot-bound PRDM9 and genomic sequences located on the chromosome axis. PMID:28336543

  5. In vivo binding of PRDM9 reveals interactions with noncanonical genomic sites.

    PubMed

    Grey, Corinne; Clément, Julie A J; Buard, Jérôme; Leblanc, Benjamin; Gut, Ivo; Gut, Marta; Duret, Laurent; de Massy, Bernard

    2017-04-01

    In mouse and human meiosis, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) initiate homologous recombination and occur at specific sites called hotspots. The localization of these sites is determined by the sequence-specific DNA binding domain of the PRDM9 histone methyl transferase. Here, we performed an extensive analysis of PRDM9 binding in mouse spermatocytes. Unexpectedly, we identified a noncanonical recruitment of PRDM9 to sites that lack recombination activity and the PRDM9 binding consensus motif. These sites include gene promoters, where PRDM9 is recruited in a DSB-dependent manner. Another subset reveals DSB-independent interactions between PRDM9 and genomic sites, such as the binding sites for the insulator protein CTCF. We propose that these DSB-independent sites result from interactions between hotspot-bound PRDM9 and genomic sequences located on the chromosome axis.

  6. Structural Code for DNA Recognition Revealed in Crystal Structures of Papillomavirus E2-DNA Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenberg, Haim; Rabinovich, Dov; Frolow, Felix; Hegde, Rashmi S.; Shakked, Zippora

    1998-12-01

    Transcriptional regulation in papillomaviruses depends on sequence-specific binding of the regulatory protein E2 to several sites in the viral genome. Crystal structures of bovine papillomavirus E2 DNA targets reveal a conformational variant of B-DNA characterized by a roll-induced writhe and helical repeat of 10.5 bp per turn. A comparison between the free and the protein-bound DNA demonstrates that the intrinsic structure of the DNA regions contacted directly by the protein and the deformability of the DNA region that is not contacted by the protein are critical for sequence-specific protein/DNA recognition and hence for gene-regulatory signals in the viral system. We show that the selection of dinucleotide or longer segments with appropriate conformational characteristics, when positioned at correct intervals along the DNA helix, can constitute a structural code for DNA recognition by regulatory proteins. This structural code facilitates the formation of a complementary protein-DNA interface that can be further specified by hydrogen bonds and nonpolar interactions between the protein amino acids and the DNA bases.

  7. Extensive site-directed mutagenesis reveals interconnected functional units in the alkaline phosphatase active site

    PubMed Central

    Sunden, Fanny; Peck, Ariana; Salzman, Julia; Ressl, Susanne; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes enable life by accelerating reaction rates to biological timescales. Conventional studies have focused on identifying the residues that have a direct involvement in an enzymatic reaction, but these so-called ‘catalytic residues’ are embedded in extensive interaction networks. Although fundamental to our understanding of enzyme function, evolution, and engineering, the properties of these networks have yet to be quantitatively and systematically explored. We dissected an interaction network of five residues in the active site of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase. Analysis of the complex catalytic interdependence of specific residues identified three energetically independent but structurally interconnected functional units with distinct modes of cooperativity. From an evolutionary perspective, this network is orders of magnitude more probable to arise than a fully cooperative network. From a functional perspective, new catalytic insights emerge. Further, such comprehensive energetic characterization will be necessary to benchmark the algorithms required to rationally engineer highly efficient enzymes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06181.001 PMID:25902402

  8. Structural biology. Structures of the CRISPR-Cmr complex reveal mode of RNA target positioning.

    PubMed

    Taylor, David W; Zhu, Yifan; Staals, Raymond H J; Kornfeld, Jack E; Shinkai, Akeo; van der Oost, John; Nogales, Eva; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2015-05-01

    Adaptive immunity in bacteria involves RNA-guided surveillance complexes that use CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-associated (Cas) proteins together with CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) to target invasive nucleic acids for degradation. Whereas type I and type II CRISPR-Cas surveillance complexes target double-stranded DNA, type III complexes target single-stranded RNA. Near-atomic resolution cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of native type III Cmr (CRISPR RAMP module) complexes in the absence and presence of target RNA reveal a helical protein arrangement that positions the crRNA for substrate binding. Thumblike β hairpins intercalate between segments of duplexed crRNA:target RNA to facilitate cleavage of the target at 6-nucleotide intervals. The Cmr complex is architecturally similar to the type I CRISPR-Cascade complex, suggesting divergent evolution of these immune systems from a common ancestor.

  9. Global geno-proteomic analysis reveals cross-continental sequence conservation and druggable sites among influenza virus polymerases.

    PubMed

    Babar, Mustafeez Mujtaba; Zaidi, Najam-us-Sahar Sadaf; Tahir, Muhammad

    2014-12-01

    Influenza virus is one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity associated with respiratory diseases. The high rate of mutation in the viral proteome provides it with the ability to survive in a variety of host species. This property helps it in maintaining and developing its pathogenicity, transmission and drug resistance. Alternate drug targets, particularly the internal proteins, can potentially be exploited for addressing the resistance issues. In the current analysis, the degree of conservation of influenza virus polymerases has been studied as one of the essential elements for establishing its candidature as a potential target of antiviral therapy. We analyzed more than 130,000 nucleotide and amino acid sequences by classifying them on the basis of continental presence of host organisms. Computational analyses including genetic polymorphism study, mutation pattern determination, molecular evolution and geophylogenetic analysis were performed to establish the high degree of conservation among the sequences. These studies lead to establishing the polymerases, in particular PB1, as highly conserved proteins. Moreover, we mapped the conservation percentage on the tertiary structures of proteins to identify the conserved, druggable sites. The research study, hence, revealed that the influenza virus polymerases are highly conserved (95-99%) proteins with a very slow mutation rate. Potential drug binding sites on various polymerases have also been reported. A scheme for drug target candidate development that can be employed to rapidly mutating proteins has been presented. Moreover, the research output can help in designing new therapeutic molecules against the identified targets.

  10. Site-specifically radioiodinated antibody for targeting tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Rea, D.W.; Ultee, M.E.; Belinka, B.A. Jr.; Coughlin, D.J.; Alvarez, V.L. )

    1990-02-01

    Labeling of an antibody site specifically through its carbohydrate regions preserves its antigen-binding activity. Previously site-specific labeling studies have conjugated antibodies with metallic radioisotopes or drugs. We now report site-specific labeling with a new radioiodinated compound, 2-hydroxy-5-iodo-3-methylbenzoyl hydrazide, whose synthesis we described earlier. The compound is reacted with aldehyde groups produced by specific oxidation of the carbohydrate portion of the antibody with sodium m-periodate. Optimized conjugation conditions give good recovery of active antibody containing 10 groups per molecule. The conjugate is stable in solution for at least several weeks at both 4 and -70 degrees C. When injected into nude mice bearing LS174T human cancer xenografts, the conjugate of B72.3 antibody localizes well to tumor tissue, with low uptake by other organs. This biodistribution is similar to that of conjugate prepared by using solid-phase chloramine-T (Iodohead). There are only two significant differences. First, the carbohydrate conjugate is much less susceptible to dehalogenation, and thus shows much less thyroid uptake. Secondly, the biological half-life of the carbohydrate conjugate was about half that of the chloramine-T one. This could be due primarily to lysis of the hydrazine bond through which the antibody is attached to the compound, which would then be excreted rapidly by itself. The new reagent will be especially useful for antibodies which either cannot be labeled by chloramine-T methods, or whose activity is impaired by them.

  11. Novel target sites in bacteria for overcoming antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Black, Michael T; Hodgson, John

    2005-07-29

    Resistance to marketed antibiotics continues to increase. During the last 10 years some 200 bacterial genome sequences have become available, giving rise to expectations that genomics would provide a plethora of novel targets and hence a flood of new therapeutic agents. Contrary to some predictions the genomic effort has yet to yield a substantial number of novel class agents in clinical development. What are the reasons for the differences between expectations and reality? This article reviews what has been achieved in the exploitation of bacterial genomes for the discovery of novel antibacterials.

  12. [Site-specific drug delivery systems. I. Colon targeted delivery].

    PubMed

    Szente, Virág; Zelkó, Romána

    2007-01-01

    Colon specific drug delivery has gained increased importance not just for the delivery of the drugs for the treatment of local diseases associated with the colon like Chron's disease, ulcerative colitis, irritable bowel syndrome, cancer or infections, but also for the potential it holds for the systemic delivery of proteins (e.g. insulin) and therapeutic peptides. These systems enable the protection of healthy tissues from the side effects of drugs and the drug intake of targeted cells, as well. The formulation of colon specific drug delivery systems is of great impact in the case of diseases having circadian rhythm (midnight gerd). Such circadian rhythm release drug delivery systems are designed to provide a plasma concentration--time profile, which varies according to physiological need at different times during the dosing period, i.e., mimicking the circadian rhythm and severity/manifestation of gastric acid secretion (and/or midnight gerd). In general four primary approaches have been proposed for colon targeted delivery namely pH-dependent systems, time dependent systems, colonic microflora activated systems and prodrugs.

  13. Development of a target-site based regional frequency model using historical information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdi, Yasser; Bardet, Lise; Duluc, Claire-Marie; Rebour, Vincent

    2016-04-01

    Nuclear power facilities in France were designed to withstand extreme environmental conditions with a very low probability of failure. Nevertheless, some exceptional surges considered as outliers are not properly addressed by classical frequency analysis models. If available data at the site of interest (target-site) is sufficiently complete on a long period and not characterized by the presence of an outlier, at-site frequency analysis can be used to estimate quantiles with acceptable uncertainties. Otherwise, regional and historical information (HI) may be used to mitigate the lack of data and the influence of the outlier by increasing its representativeness in the sample. several models have been proposed over the last years for regional extreme surges frequency analysis in France to take into account these outliers in the frequency analysis. However, these models do not give a specific weight to the target site and cannot take into account HI. The objective of the present work is to develop a regional frequency model (RFM) centered on a target-site and using HI. The neighborhood between sites is measured by a degree of physical and statistical dependence between observations (with a prior confidence level). Unlike existing models, the obtained region around the target site (and constituting the neighboring sites) is sliding from a target-site to another. In other words, the developed model assigns a region for each target site. The idea behind the construction of a frequency model favoring target sites and the principle of moving regions around these target-sites is the original key point of the developed model. A related issue regards the estimation of missed and/or ungauged surges at target-sites from those of gauged potential neighboring sites, a multiple linear regression (MLR) is used and it can be extended to other reconstitutions models. MLR analysis can be considered conclusive only if available observations at neighboring sites are informative enough

  14. Local site effects in Kumamoto City revealed by the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuno, Seiji; Korenaga, Masahiro; Okamoto, Kyosuke; Yamanaka, Hiroaki; Chimoto, Kosuke; Matsushima, Takeshi

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate local site effects in Kumamoto City, we installed six temporary seismic stations along a 6-km north-south survey line in the city immediately after the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake foreshock (Mj 6.4), which occurred on April 14, 2016. Seismic data from the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake (Mj 7.3), which occurred on April 16, 2016, were successfully recorded at two sites and indicated large amplitudes in the frequency range of 0.5-3 Hz. Site amplifications estimated from weak ground motion data, with a station at Mt. Kinbo used as a reference, are relatively variable along this survey line; however, site amplification factors in the frequency range of 0.5-3 Hz are not large enough to explain the amplitudes produced by the main shock. Nevertheless, site amplifications estimated from strong ground motion data recorded at the two sites during the main shock are large in the frequency range of 1-3 Hz. These findings reveal that the strong ground motions in the frequency range of 1-3 Hz were enhanced by nonlinear behavior of the subsurface soil in Kumamoto City. Moreover, it is observed that the frequency contents of the main shock data in the frequency range of 0.7-3 Hz differ significantly between the two sites, despite the proximity of these sites (600-m interval). Therefore, we also performed single-station microtremor measurements with an interval distance of approximately 100 m between these two sites. We confirmed that the peak frequencies of the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratios of microtremors have trends that are similar to those of the site amplification factors between the two sites. However, these results could not explain the differences in strong ground motions observed at the two sites during the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  15. Stereospecific suppression of active site mutants by methylphosphonate substituted substrates reveals the stereochemical course of site-specific DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Paul A; Kachroo, Aashiq H; Ma, Chien-Hui; Maciaszek, Anna D; Guga, Piotr; Jayaram, Makkuni

    2015-07-13

    Tyrosine site-specific recombinases, which promote one class of biologically important phosphoryl transfer reactions in DNA, exemplify active site mechanisms for stabilizing the phosphate transition state. A highly conserved arginine duo (Arg-I; Arg-II) of the recombinase active site plays a crucial role in this function. Cre and Flp recombinase mutants lacking either arginine can be rescued by compensatory charge neutralization of the scissile phosphate via methylphosphonate (MeP) modification. The chemical chirality of MeP, in conjunction with mutant recombinases, reveals the stereochemical contributions of Arg-I and Arg-II. The SP preference of the native reaction is specified primarily by Arg-I. MeP reaction supported by Arg-II is nearly bias-free or RP-biased, depending on the Arg-I substituent. Positional conservation of the arginines does not translate into strict functional conservation. Charge reversal by glutamic acid substitution at Arg-I or Arg-II has opposite effects on Cre and Flp in MeP reactions. In Flp, the base immediately 5' to the scissile MeP strongly influences the choice between the catalytic tyrosine and water as the nucleophile for strand scission, thus between productive recombination and futile hydrolysis. The recombinase active site embodies the evolutionary optimization of interactions that not only favor the normal reaction but also proscribe antithetical side reactions.

  16. MBSTAR: multiple instance learning for predicting specific functional binding sites in microRNA targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra; Ghosh, Dip; Mitra, Ramkrishna; Zhao, Zhongming

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) regulates gene expression by binding to specific sites in the 3'untranslated regions of its target genes. Machine learning based miRNA target prediction algorithms first extract a set of features from potential binding sites (PBSs) in the mRNA and then train a classifier to distinguish targets from non-targets. However, they do not consider whether the PBSs are functional or not, and consequently result in high false positive rates. This substantially affects the follow up functional validation by experiments. We present a novel machine learning based approach, MBSTAR (Multiple instance learning of Binding Sites of miRNA TARgets), for accurate prediction of true or functional miRNA binding sites. Multiple instance learning framework is adopted to handle the lack of information about the actual binding sites in the target mRNAs. Biologically validated 9531 interacting and 973 non-interacting miRNA-mRNA pairs are identified from Tarbase 6.0 and confirmed with PAR-CLIP dataset. It is found that MBSTAR achieves the highest number of binding sites overlapping with PAR-CLIP with maximum F-Score of 0.337. Compared to the other methods, MBSTAR also predicts target mRNAs with highest accuracy. The tool and genome wide predictions are available at http://www.isical.ac.in/~bioinfo_miu/MBStar30.htm.

  17. Degenerate target sites mediate rapid primed CRISPR adaptation.

    PubMed

    Fineran, Peter C; Gerritzen, Matthias J H; Suárez-Diez, María; Künne, Tim; Boekhorst, Jos; van Hijum, Sacha A F T; Staals, Raymond H J; Brouns, Stan J J

    2014-04-22

    Prokaryotes encode adaptive immune systems, called CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR associated), to provide resistance against mobile invaders, such as viruses and plasmids. Host immunity is based on incorporation of invader DNA sequences in a memory locus (CRISPR), the formation of guide RNAs from this locus, and the degradation of cognate invader DNA (protospacer). Invaders can escape type I-E CRISPR-Cas immunity in Escherichia coli K12 by making point mutations in the seed region of the protospacer or its adjacent motif (PAM), but hosts quickly restore immunity by integrating new spacers in a positive-feedback process termed "priming." Here, by using a randomized protospacer and PAM library and high-throughput plasmid loss assays, we provide a systematic analysis of the constraints of both direct interference and subsequent priming in E. coli. We have defined a high-resolution genetic map of direct interference by Cascade and Cas3, which includes five positions of the protospacer at 6-nt intervals that readily tolerate mutations. Importantly, we show that priming is an extremely robust process capable of using degenerate target regions, with up to 13 mutations throughout the PAM and protospacer region. Priming is influenced by the number of mismatches, their position, and is nucleotide dependent. Our findings imply that even outdated spacers containing many mismatches can induce a rapid primed CRISPR response against diversified or related invaders, giving microbes an advantage in the coevolutionary arms race with their invaders.

  18. Target selectivity of vertebrate notch proteins. Collaboration between discrete domains and CSL-binding site architecture determines activation probability.

    PubMed

    Ong, Chin-Tong; Cheng, Hui-Teng; Chang, Li-Wei; Ohtsuka, Toshiyuki; Kageyama, Ryoichiro; Stormo, Gary D; Kopan, Raphael

    2006-02-24

    All four mammalian Notch proteins interact with a single DNA-binding protein (RBP-jkappa), yet they are not equivalent in activating target genes. Parallel assays of three Notch-responsive promoters in several cell lines revealed that relative activation strength is dependent on protein module and promoter context more than the cellular context. Each Notch protein reads binding site orientation and distribution on the promoter differently; Notch1 performs extremely well on paired sites, and Notch3 prefers single sites in conjunction with a proximal zinc finger transcription factor. Although head-head sites can elicit a Notch response on their own, use of CBS (CSL binding site) in tail-tail orientation is context-dependent. Bias for specific DNA elements is achieved by interplay between the N-terminal RAM (RBP-jkappa-associated molecule/ankyrin region), which interprets CBS proximity and orientation, and the C-terminal transactivation domain that interacts specifically with the transcription machinery or nearby factors. To confirm the prediction that modular design underscores the evolution of functional divergence between Notch proteins, we generated a synthetic Notch protein (Notch1 ankyrin with Notch3 transactivation domain) that displayed superior signaling strength on the hes5 promoter. Consistent with the prediction that "preferred" targets (Hes1) should respond faster and at lower Notch concentration than other targets, we showed that Hes5-GFP was extinguished fast and recovered slowly, whereas Hes1-GFP was inhibited late and recovered quickly after a pulse of DAPT in metanephroi cultures.

  19. Associating transcription factor-binding site motifs with target GO terms and target genes

    PubMed Central

    Bodén, Mikael; Bailey, Timothy L.

    2008-01-01

    The roles and target genes of many transcription factors (TFs) are still unknown. To predict the roles of TFs, we present a computational method for associating Gene Ontology (GO) terms with TF-binding motifs. The method works by ranking all genes as potential targets of the TF, and reporting GO terms that are significantly associated with highly ranked genes. We also present an approach, whereby these predicted GO terms can be used to improve predictions of TF target genes. This uses a novel gene-scoring function that reflects the insight that genes annotated with GO terms predicted to be associated with the TF are more likely to be its targets. We construct validation sets of GO terms highly associated with known targets of various yeast and human TF. On the yeast reference sets, our prediction method identifies at least one correct GO term for 73% of the TF, 49% of the correct GO terms are predicted and almost one-third of the predicted GO terms are correct. Results on human reference sets are similarly encouraging. Validation of our target gene prediction method shows that its accuracy exceeds that of simple motif scanning. PMID:18544606

  20. The structure of the Helicobacter pylori ferric uptake regulator Fur reveals three functional metal binding sites.

    PubMed

    Dian, Cyril; Vitale, Sylvia; Leonard, Gordon A; Bahlawane, Christelle; Fauquant, Caroline; Leduc, Damien; Muller, Cécile; de Reuse, Hilde; Michaud-Soret, Isabelle; Terradot, Laurent

    2011-03-01

    Fur, the ferric uptake regulator, is a transcription factor that controls iron metabolism in bacteria. Binding of ferrous iron to Fur triggers a conformational change that activates the protein for binding to specific DNA sequences named Fur boxes. In Helicobacter pylori, HpFur is involved in acid response and is important for gastric colonization in model animals. Here we present the crystal structure of a functionally active HpFur mutant (HpFur2M; C78S-C150S) bound to zinc. Although its fold is similar to that of other Fur and Fur-like proteins, the crystal structure of HpFur reveals a unique structured N-terminal extension and an unusual C-terminal helix. The structure also shows three metal binding sites: S1 the structural ZnS₄ site previously characterized biochemically in HpFur and the two zinc sites identified in other Fur proteins. Site-directed mutagenesis and spectroscopy analyses of purified wild-type HpFur and various mutants show that the two metal binding sites common to other Fur proteins can be also metallated by cobalt. DNA protection and circular dichroism experiments demonstrate that, while these two sites influence the affinity of HpFur for DNA, only one is absolutely required for DNA binding and could be responsible for the conformational changes of Fur upon metal binding while the other is a secondary site.

  1. Evaluation of sgRNA target sites for CRISPR-mediated repression of TP53.

    PubMed

    Lawhorn, Ingrid E B; Ferreira, Joshua P; Wang, Clifford L

    2014-01-01

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) platform has been developed as a general method to direct proteins of interest to gene targets. While the native CRISPR system delivers a nuclease that cleaves and potentially mutates target genes, researchers have recently employed catalytically inactive CRISPR-associated 9 nuclease (dCas9) in order to target and repress genes without DNA cleavage or mutagenesis. With the intent of improving repression efficiency in mammalian cells, researchers have also fused dCas9 with a KRAB repressor domain. Here, we evaluated different genomic sgRNA targeting sites for repression of TP53. The sites spanned a 200-kb distance, which included the promoter, transcript sequence, and regions flanking the endogenous human TP53 gene. We showed that repression up to 86% can be achieved with dCas9 alone (i.e., without use of the KRAB domain) by targeting the complex to sites near the TP53 transcriptional start site. This work demonstrates that efficient transcriptional repression of endogenous human genes can be achieved by the targeted delivery of dCas9. Yet, the efficiency of repression strongly depends on the choice of the sgRNA target site.

  2. Selective small molecule inhibitor of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis fumarate hydratase reveals an allosteric regulatory site

    PubMed Central

    Kasbekar, Monica; Fischer, Gerhard; Mott, Bryan T.; Yasgar, Adam; Hyvönen, Marko; Boshoff, Helena I. M.; Abell, Chris; Barry, Clifton E.; Thomas, Craig J.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes in essential metabolic pathways are attractive targets for the treatment of bacterial diseases, but in many cases, the presence of homologous human enzymes makes them impractical candidates for drug development. Fumarate hydratase, an essential enzyme in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, has been identified as one such potential therapeutic target in tuberculosis. We report the discovery of the first small molecule inhibitor, to our knowledge, of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis fumarate hydratase. A crystal structure at 2.0-Å resolution of the compound in complex with the protein establishes the existence of a previously unidentified allosteric regulatory site. This allosteric site allows for selective inhibition with respect to the homologous human enzyme. We observe a unique binding mode in which two inhibitor molecules interact within the allosteric site, driving significant conformational changes that preclude simultaneous substrate and inhibitor binding. Our results demonstrate the selective inhibition of a highly conserved metabolic enzyme that contains identical active site residues in both the host and the pathogen. PMID:27325754

  3. ZFNGenome: A comprehensive resource for locating zinc finger nuclease target sites in model organisms

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs) have tremendous potential as tools to facilitate genomic modifications, such as precise gene knockouts or gene replacements by homologous recombination. ZFNs can be used to advance both basic research and clinical applications, including gene therapy. Recently, the ability to engineer ZFNs that target any desired genomic DNA sequence with high fidelity has improved significantly with the introduction of rapid, robust, and publicly available techniques for ZFN design such as the Oligomerized Pool ENgineering (OPEN) method. The motivation for this study is to make resources for genome modifications using OPEN-generated ZFNs more accessible to researchers by creating a user-friendly interface that identifies and provides quality scores for all potential ZFN target sites in the complete genomes of several model organisms. Description ZFNGenome is a GBrowse-based tool for identifying and visualizing potential target sites for OPEN-generated ZFNs. ZFNGenome currently includes a total of more than 11.6 million potential ZFN target sites, mapped within the fully sequenced genomes of seven model organisms; S. cerevisiae, C. reinhardtii, A. thaliana, D. melanogaster, D. rerio, C. elegans, and H. sapiens and can be visualized within the flexible GBrowse environment. Additional model organisms will be included in future updates. ZFNGenome provides information about each potential ZFN target site, including its chromosomal location and position relative to transcription initiation site(s). Users can query ZFNGenome using several different criteria (e.g., gene ID, transcript ID, target site sequence). Tracks in ZFNGenome also provide "uniqueness" and ZiFOpT (Zinc Finger OPEN Targeter) "confidence" scores that estimate the likelihood that a chosen ZFN target site will function in vivo. ZFNGenome is dynamically linked to ZiFDB, allowing users access to all available information about zinc finger reagents, such as the effectiveness of a given

  4. Computational predictions provide insights into the biology of TAL effector target sites.

    PubMed

    Grau, Jan; Wolf, Annett; Reschke, Maik; Bonas, Ulla; Posch, Stefan; Boch, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors are injected into host plant cells by Xanthomonas bacteria to function as transcriptional activators for the benefit of the pathogen. The DNA binding domain of TAL effectors is composed of conserved amino acid repeat structures containing repeat-variable diresidues (RVDs) that determine DNA binding specificity. In this paper, we present TALgetter, a new approach for predicting TAL effector target sites based on a statistical model. In contrast to previous approaches, the parameters of TALgetter are estimated from training data computationally. We demonstrate that TALgetter successfully predicts known TAL effector target sites and often yields a greater number of predictions that are consistent with up-regulation in gene expression microarrays than an existing approach, Target Finder of the TALE-NT suite. We study the binding specificities estimated by TALgetter and approve that different RVDs are differently important for transcriptional activation. In subsequent studies, the predictions of TALgetter indicate a previously unreported positional preference of TAL effector target sites relative to the transcription start site. In addition, several TAL effectors are predicted to bind to the TATA-box, which might constitute one general mode of transcriptional activation by TAL effectors. Scrutinizing the predicted target sites of TALgetter, we propose several novel TAL effector virulence targets in rice and sweet orange. TAL-mediated induction of the candidates is supported by gene expression microarrays. Validity of these targets is also supported by functional analogy to known TAL effector targets, by an over-representation of TAL effector targets with similar function, or by a biological function related to pathogen infection. Hence, these predicted TAL effector virulence targets are promising candidates for studying the virulence function of TAL effectors. TALgetter is implemented as part of the open-source Java library

  5. Dissection of the Process of Brain Metastasis Reveals Targets and Mechanisms for Molecular-based Intervention.

    PubMed

    Weidle, Ulrich H; Birzele, Fabian; Kollmorgen, Gwendlyn; Rüger, Rüdiger

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastases outnumber the incidence of brain tumors by a factor of ten. Patients with brain metastases have a dismal prognosis and current treatment modalities achieve only a modest clinical benefit. We discuss the process of brain metastasis with respect to mechanisms and involved targets to outline options for therapeutic intervention and focus on breast and lung cancer, as well as melanoma. We describe the process of penetration of the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) by disseminated tumor cells, establishment of a metastatic niche, colonization and outgrowth in the brain parenchyma. Furthermore, the role of angiogenesis in colonization of the brain parenchyma, interactions of extravasated tumor cells with microglia and astrocytes, as well as their propensity for neuromimicry, is discussed. We outline targets suitable for prevention of metastasis and summarize targets suitable for treatment of established brain metastases. Finally, we highlight the implications of findings revealing druggable mutations in brain metastases that cannot be identified in matching primary tumors.

  6. Structure–function insights reveal the human ribosome as a cancer target for antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Myasnikov, Alexander G.; Kundhavai Natchiar, S.; Nebout, Marielle; Hazemann, Isabelle; Imbert, Véronique; Khatter, Heena; Peyron, Jean-François; Klaholz, Bruno P.

    2016-01-01

    Many antibiotics in clinical use target the bacterial ribosome by interfering with the protein synthesis machinery. However, targeting the human ribosome in the case of protein synthesis deregulations such as in highly proliferating cancer cells has not been investigated at the molecular level up to now. Here we report the structure of the human 80S ribosome with a eukaryote-specific antibiotic and show its anti-proliferative effect on several cancer cell lines. The structure provides insights into the detailed interactions in a ligand-binding pocket of the human ribosome that are required for structure-assisted drug design. Furthermore, anti-proliferative dose response in leukaemic cells and interference with synthesis of c-myc and mcl-1 short-lived protein markers reveals specificity of a series of eukaryote-specific antibiotics towards cytosolic rather than mitochondrial ribosomes, uncovering the human ribosome as a promising cancer target. PMID:27665925

  7. Targeting Alpha5 Beta1 Integrin to Prevent Metastatic Breast Cancer Cell Invasion: PhScN Target Site Definition and Plasma Stability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    Award Number: TITLE: “Targeting Alpha5 Beta1 Integrin to Prevent Metastatic Breast Cancer Cell Invasion: PhScN Target Site Definition and Plasma...SUBTITLE Targeting Alpha5 Beta1 Integrin to Prevent Metastatic Breast Cancer Cell Invasion: PhScN Target Site Definition and Plasma Stability 5a...desirable target. Our research tested definitively the hypothesis that both PHSCN and PhScN peptides inhibit α5β1 integrin fibronectin receptor

  8. Recovery of perennial vegetation in military target sites in the eastern Mohave Desert, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steiger, John W.; Webb, Robert H.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of the age of geomorphic surfaces on the recovery of desert vegetation in military target sites was studied in the Mohave and Cerbat Mountains of northwestern Arizona. The target sites were cleared of all vegetation during military exercises in 1942-1943 and have not been subsequently disturbed. The degree of recovery was measured by calculating percentage-similarity (PS) and correlation-coefficient indices on the basis of differences in cover, density, and volume of species growing in and out of each target site. PS values, ranging from 22.7 to 95.1 percent (100 percent = identical composition), indicate a wide range of recovery that is partially controlled by the edaphic properties of the geomorphic surfaces. Statistical analyses show a strong pattern that indicates a greater variability in the degree of recovery for sites on older surfaces than on younger surfaces and a weak pattern that indicates an inverse relation between the degree of recovery and geomorphic age. Comparisons of the different effects of target site construction on the edaphic characteristics of each target site provides an explanation for these patterns and suggests the soil properties critical to the recovery process. Statistically significant negative or positive response to disturbance for most species are independent of the age of the geomorphic surfaces; however, there is strong evidence for a shift in response for the common perennial species Acamptopappus sphaerocephalus, and to a lesser extent, Salazaria mexicana, Encelia farinosa, and Coldenia canescens, among different geomorphic surfaces.

  9. Structure-Based Analysis Reveals Cancer Missense Mutations Target Protein Interaction Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Engin, H. Billur; Kreisberg, Jason F.; Carter, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Recently it has been shown that cancer mutations selectively target protein-protein interactions. We hypothesized that mutations affecting distinct protein interactions involving established cancer genes could contribute to tumor heterogeneity, and that novel mechanistic insights might be gained into tumorigenesis by investigating protein interactions under positive selection in cancer. To identify protein interactions under positive selection in cancer, we mapped over 1.2 million nonsynonymous somatic cancer mutations onto 4,896 experimentally determined protein structures and analyzed their spatial distribution. In total, 20% of mutations on the surface of known cancer genes perturbed protein-protein interactions (PPIs), and this enrichment for PPI interfaces was observed for both tumor suppressors (Odds Ratio 1.28, P-value < 10−4) and oncogenes (Odds Ratio 1.17, P-value < 10−3). To study this further, we constructed a bipartite network representing structurally resolved PPIs from all available human complexes in the Protein Data Bank (2,864 proteins, 3,072 PPIs). Analysis of frequently mutated cancer genes within this network revealed that tumor-suppressors, but not oncogenes, are significantly enriched with functional mutations in homo-oligomerization regions (Odds Ratio 3.68, P-Value < 10−8). We present two important examples, TP53 and beta-2-microglobulin, for which the patterns of somatic mutations at interfaces provide insights into specifically perturbed biological circuits. In patients with TP53 mutations, patient survival correlated with the specific interactions that were perturbed. Moreover, we investigated mutations at the interface of protein-nucleotide interactions and observed an unexpected number of missense mutations but not silent mutations occurring within DNA and RNA binding sites. Finally, we provide a resource of 3,072 PPI interfaces ranked according to their mutation rates. Analysis of this list highlights 282 novel candidate cancer

  10. Structure-Based Analysis Reveals Cancer Missense Mutations Target Protein Interaction Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Engin, H Billur; Kreisberg, Jason F; Carter, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Recently it has been shown that cancer mutations selectively target protein-protein interactions. We hypothesized that mutations affecting distinct protein interactions involving established cancer genes could contribute to tumor heterogeneity, and that novel mechanistic insights might be gained into tumorigenesis by investigating protein interactions under positive selection in cancer. To identify protein interactions under positive selection in cancer, we mapped over 1.2 million nonsynonymous somatic cancer mutations onto 4,896 experimentally determined protein structures and analyzed their spatial distribution. In total, 20% of mutations on the surface of known cancer genes perturbed protein-protein interactions (PPIs), and this enrichment for PPI interfaces was observed for both tumor suppressors (Odds Ratio 1.28, P-value < 10(-4)) and oncogenes (Odds Ratio 1.17, P-value < 10(-3)). To study this further, we constructed a bipartite network representing structurally resolved PPIs from all available human complexes in the Protein Data Bank (2,864 proteins, 3,072 PPIs). Analysis of frequently mutated cancer genes within this network revealed that tumor-suppressors, but not oncogenes, are significantly enriched with functional mutations in homo-oligomerization regions (Odds Ratio 3.68, P-Value < 10(-8)). We present two important examples, TP53 and beta-2-microglobulin, for which the patterns of somatic mutations at interfaces provide insights into specifically perturbed biological circuits. In patients with TP53 mutations, patient survival correlated with the specific interactions that were perturbed. Moreover, we investigated mutations at the interface of protein-nucleotide interactions and observed an unexpected number of missense mutations but not silent mutations occurring within DNA and RNA binding sites. Finally, we provide a resource of 3,072 PPI interfaces ranked according to their mutation rates. Analysis of this list highlights 282 novel candidate cancer

  11. Ubiquinone-binding site mutagenesis reveals the role of mitochondrial complex II in cell death initiation.

    PubMed

    Kluckova, K; Sticha, M; Cerny, J; Mracek, T; Dong, L; Drahota, Z; Gottlieb, E; Neuzil, J; Rohlena, J

    2015-05-07

    Respiratory complex II (CII, succinate dehydrogenase, SDH) inhibition can induce cell death, but the mechanistic details need clarification. To elucidate the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation upon the ubiquinone-binding (Qp) site blockade, we substituted CII subunit C (SDHC) residues lining the Qp site by site-directed mutagenesis. Cell lines carrying these mutations were characterized on the bases of CII activity and exposed to Qp site inhibitors MitoVES, thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA) and Atpenin A5. We found that I56F and S68A SDHC variants, which support succinate-mediated respiration and maintain low intracellular succinate, were less efficiently inhibited by MitoVES than the wild-type (WT) variant. Importantly, associated ROS generation and cell death induction was also impaired, and cell death in the WT cells was malonate and catalase sensitive. In contrast, the S68A variant was much more susceptible to TTFA inhibition than the I56F variant or the WT CII, which was again reflected by enhanced ROS formation and increased malonate- and catalase-sensitive cell death induction. The R72C variant that accumulates intracellular succinate due to compromised CII activity was resistant to MitoVES and TTFA treatment and did not increase ROS, even though TTFA efficiently generated ROS at low succinate in mitochondria isolated from R72C cells. Similarly, the high-affinity Qp site inhibitor Atpenin A5 rapidly increased intracellular succinate in WT cells but did not induce ROS or cell death, unlike MitoVES and TTFA that upregulated succinate only moderately. These results demonstrate that cell death initiation upon CII inhibition depends on ROS and that the extent of cell death correlates with the potency of inhibition at the Qp site unless intracellular succinate is high. In addition, this validates the Qp site of CII as a target for cell death induction with relevance to cancer therapy.

  12. Ubiquinone-binding site mutagenesis reveals the role of mitochondrial complex II in cell death initiation

    PubMed Central

    Kluckova, K; Sticha, M; Cerny, J; Mracek, T; Dong, L; Drahota, Z; Gottlieb, E; Neuzil, J; Rohlena, J

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory complex II (CII, succinate dehydrogenase, SDH) inhibition can induce cell death, but the mechanistic details need clarification. To elucidate the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation upon the ubiquinone-binding (Qp) site blockade, we substituted CII subunit C (SDHC) residues lining the Qp site by site-directed mutagenesis. Cell lines carrying these mutations were characterized on the bases of CII activity and exposed to Qp site inhibitors MitoVES, thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA) and Atpenin A5. We found that I56F and S68A SDHC variants, which support succinate-mediated respiration and maintain low intracellular succinate, were less efficiently inhibited by MitoVES than the wild-type (WT) variant. Importantly, associated ROS generation and cell death induction was also impaired, and cell death in the WT cells was malonate and catalase sensitive. In contrast, the S68A variant was much more susceptible to TTFA inhibition than the I56F variant or the WT CII, which was again reflected by enhanced ROS formation and increased malonate- and catalase-sensitive cell death induction. The R72C variant that accumulates intracellular succinate due to compromised CII activity was resistant to MitoVES and TTFA treatment and did not increase ROS, even though TTFA efficiently generated ROS at low succinate in mitochondria isolated from R72C cells. Similarly, the high-affinity Qp site inhibitor Atpenin A5 rapidly increased intracellular succinate in WT cells but did not induce ROS or cell death, unlike MitoVES and TTFA that upregulated succinate only moderately. These results demonstrate that cell death initiation upon CII inhibition depends on ROS and that the extent of cell death correlates with the potency of inhibition at the Qp site unless intracellular succinate is high. In addition, this validates the Qp site of CII as a target for cell death induction with relevance to cancer therapy. PMID:25950479

  13. Relative number and distribution of murine hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin neurons innervating distinct target sites.

    PubMed

    King, Connie M; Hentges, Shane T

    2011-01-01

    Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons send projections widely throughout the brain consistent with their role in regulating numerous homeostatic processes and mediating analgesia and reward. Recent data suggest that POMC neurons located in the rostral and caudal extents of the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus may mediate selective actions, however it is not clear if POMC neurons in these regions of the arcuate nucleus innervate specific target sites. In the present study, fluorescent microspheres and cholera toxin B were used to retrogradely label POMC neurons in POMC-DsRed transgenic mice. The number and location of POMC cells projecting to the supraoptic nucleus, periaqueductal gray, ventral tegmental area, paraventricular nucleus, lateral hypothalamic nucleus, amygdala and the dosal vagal complex was determined. Tracer injected unilaterally labeled POMC neurons in both sides of the arcuate nucleus. While the total number of retrogradely labeled cells in the arcuate nucleus varied by injection site, less than 10% of POMC neurons were labeled with tracer injected into any target area. Limited target sites appear to be preferentially innervated by POMC neurons that reside in the rostral or caudal extremes of the arcuate nucleus, whereas the majority of target sites are innervated by diffusely distributed POMC neurons. The modest number of cells projecting to each target site indicates that relatively few POMC neurons may mediate potent and specific physiologic responses and therefore disturbed signaling in a very few POMC neurons may have significant consequences.

  14. Relative Number and Distribution of Murine Hypothalamic Proopiomelanocortin Neurons Innervating Distinct Target Sites

    PubMed Central

    King, Connie M.; Hentges, Shane T.

    2011-01-01

    Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons send projections widely throughout the brain consistent with their role in regulating numerous homeostatic processes and mediating analgesia and reward. Recent data suggest that POMC neurons located in the rostral and caudal extents of the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus may mediate selective actions, however it is not clear if POMC neurons in these regions of the arcuate nucleus innervate specific target sites. In the present study, fluorescent microspheres and cholera toxin B were used to retrogradely label POMC neurons in POMC-DsRed transgenic mice. The number and location of POMC cells projecting to the supraoptic nucleus, periaqueductal gray, ventral tegmental area, paraventricular nucleus, lateral hypothalamic nucleus, amygdala and the dosal vagal complex was determined. Tracer injected unilaterally labeled POMC neurons in both sides of the arcuate nucleus. While the total number of retrogradely labeled cells in the arcuate nucleus varied by injection site, less than 10% of POMC neurons were labeled with tracer injected into any target area. Limited target sites appear to be preferentially innervated by POMC neurons that reside in the rostral or caudal extremes of the arcuate nucleus, whereas the majority of target sites are innervated by diffusely distributed POMC neurons. The modest number of cells projecting to each target site indicates that relatively few POMC neurons may mediate potent and specific physiologic responses and therefore disturbed signaling in a very few POMC neurons may have significant consequences. PMID:21991375

  15. Casposon integration shows strong target site preference and recapitulates protospacer integration by CRISPR-Cas systems.

    PubMed

    Béguin, Pierre; Charpin, Nicole; Koonin, Eugene V; Forterre, Patrick; Krupovic, Mart

    2016-12-01

    Casposons are a recently discovered group of large DNA transposons present in diverse bacterial and archaeal genomes. For integration into the host chromosome, casposons employ an endonuclease that is homologous to the Cas1 protein involved in protospacer integration by the CRISPR-Cas adaptive immune system. Here we describe the site-preference of integration by the Cas1 integrase (casposase) encoded by the casposon of the archaeon Aciduliprofundum boonei Oligonucleotide duplexes derived from the terminal inverted repeats (TIR) of the A. boonei casposon as well as mini-casposons flanked by the TIR inserted preferentially at a site reconstituting the original A. boonei target site. As in the A. boonei genome, the insertion was accompanied by a 15-bp direct target site duplication (TSD). The minimal functional target consisted of the 15-bp TSD segment and the adjacent 18-bp sequence which comprises the 3' end of the tRNA-Pro gene corresponding to the TΨC loop. The functional casposase target site bears clear resemblance to the leader sequence-repeat junction which is the target for protospacer integration catalyzed by the Cas1-Cas2 adaptation module of CRISPR-Cas. These findings reinforce the mechanistic similarities and evolutionary connection between the casposons and the adaptation module of the prokaryotic adaptive immunity systems.

  16. Casposon integration shows strong target site preference and recapitulates protospacer integration by CRISPR-Cas systems

    PubMed Central

    Béguin, Pierre; Charpin, Nicole; Koonin, Eugene V.; Forterre, Patrick; Krupovic, Mart

    2016-01-01

    Casposons are a recently discovered group of large DNA transposons present in diverse bacterial and archaeal genomes. For integration into the host chromosome, casposons employ an endonuclease that is homologous to the Cas1 protein involved in protospacer integration by the CRISPR-Cas adaptive immune system. Here we describe the site-preference of integration by the Cas1 integrase (casposase) encoded by the casposon of the archaeon Aciduliprofundum boonei. Oligonucleotide duplexes derived from the terminal inverted repeats (TIR) of the A. boonei casposon as well as mini-casposons flanked by the TIR inserted preferentially at a site reconstituting the original A. boonei target site. As in the A. boonei genome, the insertion was accompanied by a 15-bp direct target site duplication (TSD). The minimal functional target consisted of the 15-bp TSD segment and the adjacent 18-bp sequence which comprises the 3′ end of the tRNA-Pro gene corresponding to the TΨC loop. The functional casposase target site bears clear resemblance to the leader sequence-repeat junction which is the target for protospacer integration catalyzed by the Cas1–Cas2 adaptation module of CRISPR-Cas. These findings reinforce the mechanistic similarities and evolutionary connection between the casposons and the adaptation module of the prokaryotic adaptive immunity systems. PMID:27655632

  17. The structure of the Mycobacterium smegmatis trehalose synthase reveals an unusual active site configuration and acarbose-binding mode†

    PubMed Central

    Caner, Sami; Nguyen, Nham; Aguda, Adeleke; Zhang, Ran; Pan, Yuan T; Withers, Stephen G; Brayer, Gary D

    2013-01-01

    Trehalose synthase (TreS) catalyzes the reversible conversion of maltose into trehalose in mycobacteria as one of three biosynthetic pathways to this nonreducing disaccharide. Given the importance of trehalose to survival of mycobacteria, there has been considerable interest in understanding the enzymes involved in its production; indeed the structures of the key enzymes in the other two pathways have already been determined. Herein, we present the first structure of TreS from Mycobacterium smegmatis, thereby providing insights into the catalytic machinery involved in this intriguing intramolecular reaction. This structure, which is of interest both mechanistically and as a potential pharmaceutical target, reveals a narrow and enclosed active site pocket within which intramolecular substrate rearrangements can occur. We also present the structure of a complex of TreS with acarbose, revealing a hitherto unsuspected oligosaccharide-binding site within the C-terminal domain. This may well provide an anchor point for the association of TreS with glycogen, thereby enhancing its role in glycogen biosynthesis and degradation. PMID:23735230

  18. The structure of the Mycobacterium smegmatis trehalose synthase reveals an unusual active site configuration and acarbose-binding mode.

    PubMed

    Caner, Sami; Nguyen, Nham; Aguda, Adeleke; Zhang, Ran; Pan, Yuan T; Withers, Stephen G; Brayer, Gary D

    2013-09-01

    Trehalose synthase (TreS) catalyzes the reversible conversion of maltose into trehalose in mycobacteria as one of three biosynthetic pathways to this nonreducing disaccharide. Given the importance of trehalose to survival of mycobacteria, there has been considerable interest in understanding the enzymes involved in its production; indeed the structures of the key enzymes in the other two pathways have already been determined. Herein, we present the first structure of TreS from Mycobacterium smegmatis, thereby providing insights into the catalytic machinery involved in this intriguing intramolecular reaction. This structure, which is of interest both mechanistically and as a potential pharmaceutical target, reveals a narrow and enclosed active site pocket within which intramolecular substrate rearrangements can occur. We also present the structure of a complex of TreS with acarbose, revealing a hitherto unsuspected oligosaccharide-binding site within the C-terminal domain. This may well provide an anchor point for the association of TreS with glycogen, thereby enhancing its role in glycogen biosynthesis and degradation.

  19. An integrated CRISPR Bombyx mori genome editing system with improved efficiency and expanded target sites.

    PubMed

    Ma, Sanyuan; Liu, Yue; Liu, Yuanyuan; Chang, Jiasong; Zhang, Tong; Wang, Xiaogang; Shi, Run; Lu, Wei; Xia, Xiaojuan; Zhao, Ping; Xia, Qingyou

    2017-02-09

    Genome editing enabled unprecedented new opportunities for targeted genomic engineering of a wide variety of organisms ranging from microbes, plants, animals and even human embryos. The serial establishing and rapid applications of genome editing tools significantly accelerated Bombyx mori (B. mori) research during the past years. However, the only CRISPR system in B. mori was the commonly used SpCas9, which only recognize target sites containing NGG PAM sequence. In the present study, we first improve the efficiency of our previous established SpCas9 system by 3.5 folds. The improved high efficiency was also observed at several loci in both BmNs cells and B. mori embryos. Then to expand the target sites, we showed that two newly discovered CRISPR system, SaCas9 and AsCpf1, could also induce highly efficient site-specific genome editing in BmNs cells, and constructed an integrated CRISPR system. Genome-wide analysis of targetable sites was further conducted and showed that the integrated system cover 69,144,399 sites in B. mori genome, and one site could be found in every 6.5 bp. The efficiency and resolution of this CRISPR platform will probably accelerate both fundamental researches and applicable studies in B. mori, and perhaps other insects.

  20. Integrase residues that determine nucleotide preferences at sites of HIV-1 integration: implications for the mechanism of target DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Serrao, Erik; Krishnan, Lavanya; Shun, Ming-Chieh; Li, Xiang; Cherepanov, Peter; Engelman, Alan; Maertens, Goedele N.

    2014-01-01

    Retroviruses favor target-DNA (tDNA) distortion and particular bases at sites of integration, but the mechanism underlying HIV-1 selectivity is unknown. Crystal structures revealed a network of prototype foamy virus (PFV) integrase residues that distort tDNA: Ala188 and Arg329 interact with tDNA bases, while Arg362 contacts the phosphodiester backbone. HIV-1 integrase residues Ser119, Arg231, and Lys258 were identified here as analogs of PFV integrase residues Ala188, Arg329 and Arg362, respectively. Thirteen integrase mutations were analyzed for effects on integrase activity in vitro and during virus infection, yielding a total of 1610 unique HIV-1 integration sites. Purine (R)/pyrimidine (Y) dinucleotide sequence analysis revealed HIV-1 prefers the tDNA signature (0)RYXRY(4), which accordingly favors overlapping flexible dinucleotides at the center of the integration site. Consistent with roles for Arg231 and Lys258 in sequence specific and non-specific binding, respectively, the R231E mutation altered integration site nucleotide preferences while K258E had no effect. S119A and S119T integrase mutations significantly altered base preferences at positions −3 and 7 from the site of viral DNA joining. The S119A preference moreover mimicked wild-type PFV selectivity at these positions. We conclude that HIV-1 IN residue Ser119 and PFV IN residue Ala188 contact analogous tDNA bases to effect virus integration. PMID:24520116

  1. Mass spectrometric phosphoproteome analysis of HIV-infected brain reveals novel phosphorylation sites and differential phosphorylation patterns

    PubMed Central

    Uzasci, Lerna; Auh, Sungyoung; Cotter, Robert J.; Nath, Avindra

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To map the phosphoproteome and identify changes in the phosphorylation patterns in the HIV-infected and uninfected brain using high-resolution mass spectrometry. Experimental Design Parietal cortex from brain of individuals with and without HIV infection were lysed and trypsinized. The peptides were labeled with iTRAQ reagents, combined, phospho-enriched by titanium dioxide chromatography, and analyzed by LC-MS/MS with high-resolution. Results Our phosphoproteomic workflow resulted in the identification of 112 phosphorylated proteins and 17 novel phosphorylation sites in all the samples that were analyzed. The phosphopeptide sequences were searched for kinase substrate motifs which revealed potential kinases involved in important signaling pathways. The site-specific phosphopeptide quantification showed that peptides from neurofilament medium polypeptide, myelin basic protein, and 2′–3′-cyclic nucleotide-3′ phosphodiesterase have relatively higher phosphorylation levels during HIV infection. Clinical Relevance This study has enriched the global phosphoproteome knowledge of the human brain by detecting novel phosphorylation sites on neuronal proteins and identifying differentially phosphorylated brain proteins during HIV infection. Kinases that lead to unusual phosphorylations could be therapeutic targets for the treatment of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). PMID:26033855

  2. Whole Exome Sequencing Reveals Novel PHEX Splice Site Mutations in Patients with Hypophosphatemic Rickets

    PubMed Central

    Gillies, Christopher; Sampson, Matthew G.; Kher, Vijay; Sethi, Sidharth K.; Otto, Edgar A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hypophosphatemic rickets (HR) is a heterogeneous genetic phosphate wasting disorder. The disease is most commonly caused by mutations in the PHEX gene located on the X-chromosome or by mutations in CLCN5, DMP1, ENPP1, FGF23, and SLC34A3. The aims of this study were to perform molecular diagnostics for four patients with HR of Indian origin (two independent families) and to describe their clinical features. Methods We performed whole exome sequencing (WES) for the affected mother of two boys who also displayed the typical features of HR, including bone malformations and phosphate wasting. B-lymphoblast cell lines were established by EBV transformation and subsequent RT-PCR to investigate an uncommon splice site variant found by WES. An in silico analysis was done to obtain accurate nucleotide frequency occurrences of consensus splice positions other than the canonical sites of all human exons. Additionally, we applied direct Sanger sequencing for all exons and exon/intron boundaries of the PHEX gene for an affected girl from an independent second Indian family. Results WES revealed a novel PHEX splice acceptor mutation in intron 9 (c.1080-3C>A) in a family with 3 affected individuals with HR. The effect on splicing of this mutation was further investigated by RT-PCR using RNA obtained from a patient’s EBV-transformed lymphoblast cell line. RT-PCR revealed an aberrant splice transcript skipping exons 10-14 which was not observed in control samples, confirming the diagnosis of X-linked dominant hypophosphatemia (XLH). The in silico analysis of all human splice sites adjacent to all 327,293 exons across 81,814 transcripts among 20,345 human genes revealed that cytosine is, with 64.3%, the most frequent nucleobase at the minus 3 splice acceptor position, followed by thymidine with 28.7%, adenine with 6.3%, and guanine with 0.8%. We generated frequency tables and pictograms for the extended donor and acceptor splice consensus regions by analyzing all human

  3. Genome-wide target site triplication of Alu elements in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wooseok; Mun, Seyoung; Kang, Keunsoo; Hennighausen, Lothar; Han, Kyudong

    2015-05-01

    Alu elements are the most successful short interspersed elements in primate genomes and their retrotransposition is a major source of genomic expansion. Alu elements integrate into genomic regions through target-site primed reverse transcription, which generates target site duplications (TSDs). Unexpectedly, we have identified target site triplications (TSTs) at some loci, where two Alu elements in tandem share one direct repeat. Thus, the three copies of the repeat are present. We located 212 TST loci in the human genome and examined 25 putative human-specific TST loci using PCR validation. As a result, 12 human-specific TST loci were identified. These findings suggest that unequal homologous recombination between TSDs can lead to TST. Through this mechanism, the copy number of Alu elements could have increased in primate genomes without new Alu retrotransposition events. This study provides new insight into the augmentation of Alu elements in the primate genome.

  4. Topological robustness analysis of protein interaction networks reveals key targets for overcoming chemotherapy resistance in glioma.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Hátylas; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto

    2015-11-19

    Biological networks display high robustness against random failures but are vulnerable to targeted attacks on central nodes. Thus, network topology analysis represents a powerful tool for investigating network susceptibility against targeted node removal. Here, we built protein interaction networks associated with chemoresistance to temozolomide, an alkylating agent used in glioma therapy, and analyzed their modular structure and robustness against intentional attack. These networks showed functional modules related to DNA repair, immunity, apoptosis, cell stress, proliferation and migration. Subsequently, network vulnerability was assessed by means of centrality-based attacks based on the removal of node fractions in descending orders of degree, betweenness, or the product of degree and betweenness. This analysis revealed that removing nodes with high degree and high betweenness was more effective in altering networks' robustness parameters, suggesting that their corresponding proteins may be particularly relevant to target temozolomide resistance. In silico data was used for validation and confirmed that central nodes are more relevant for altering proliferation rates in temozolomide-resistant glioma cell lines and for predicting survival in glioma patients. Altogether, these results demonstrate how the analysis of network vulnerability to topological attack facilitates target prioritization for overcoming cancer chemoresistance.

  5. Topological robustness analysis of protein interaction networks reveals key targets for overcoming chemotherapy resistance in glioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, Hátylas; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto

    2015-11-01

    Biological networks display high robustness against random failures but are vulnerable to targeted attacks on central nodes. Thus, network topology analysis represents a powerful tool for investigating network susceptibility against targeted node removal. Here, we built protein interaction networks associated with chemoresistance to temozolomide, an alkylating agent used in glioma therapy, and analyzed their modular structure and robustness against intentional attack. These networks showed functional modules related to DNA repair, immunity, apoptosis, cell stress, proliferation and migration. Subsequently, network vulnerability was assessed by means of centrality-based attacks based on the removal of node fractions in descending orders of degree, betweenness, or the product of degree and betweenness. This analysis revealed that removing nodes with high degree and high betweenness was more effective in altering networks’ robustness parameters, suggesting that their corresponding proteins may be particularly relevant to target temozolomide resistance. In silico data was used for validation and confirmed that central nodes are more relevant for altering proliferation rates in temozolomide-resistant glioma cell lines and for predicting survival in glioma patients. Altogether, these results demonstrate how the analysis of network vulnerability to topological attack facilitates target prioritization for overcoming cancer chemoresistance.

  6. Maintenance of plastid RNA editing activities independently of their target sites.

    PubMed

    Tillich, Michael; Poltnigg, Peter; Kushnir, Sergei; Schmitz-Linneweber, Christian

    2006-03-01

    RNA editing in plant organelles is mediated by site-specific, nuclear-encoded factors. Previous data suggested that the maintenance of these factors depends on the presence of their rapidly evolving cognate sites. The surprising ability of allotetraploid Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) to edit a foreign site in the chloroplast ndhA messenger RNA was thought to be inherited from its diploid male ancestor, Nicotiana tomentosiformis. Here, we show that the same ndhA editing activity is also present in Nicotiana sylvestris, which is the female diploid progenitor of tobacco and which lacks the ndhA site. Hence, heterologous editing is not simply a result of tobacco's allopolyploid genome organization. Analyses of other editing sites after sexual or somatic transfer between land plants showed that heterologous editing occurs at a surprisingly high frequency. This suggests that the corresponding editing activities are conserved despite the absence of their target sites, potentially because they serve other functions in the plant cell.

  7. Active-Site Monovalent Cations Revealed in a 1.55 Å Resolution Hammerhead Ribozyme Structure

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Michael; Schultz, Eric P.; Martick, Monika; Scott, William G.

    2013-01-01

    We have obtained a 1.55 Å crystal structure of a hammerhead ribozyme derived from Schistosoma mansoni in conditions that permit detailed observations of Na+ ion binding in the ribozyme's active site. At least two such Na+ ions are observed. The first Na+ ion binds to the N7 of G10.1 and the adjacent A9 phosphate in a manner identical to that previously observed for divalent cations. A second Na+ ion binds to the Hoogsteen face of G12, the general base in the hammerhead cleavage reaction, thereby potentially dissipating the negative charge of the catalytically active enolate form of the nucleotide base. A potential but more ambiguous third site bridges the A9 and scissile phosphates in a manner consistent with previous predictions. Hammerhead ribozymes have been observed to be active in the presence of high concentrations of monovalent cations, including Na+, but the mechanism by which monovalent cations substitute for divalent cations in hammerhead catalysis remains unclear. Our results enable us to suggest that Na+ directly and specifically substitutes for divalent cations in the hammerhead active site. The detailed geometry of the pre-catalytic active site complex is also revealed with a new level of precision, thanks to the quality of the electron density maps obtained from what is currently the highest resolution ribozyme structure in the protein data bank. PMID:23711504

  8. What has DNA sequencing revealed about the VSG expression sites of African trypanosomes?

    PubMed

    McCulloch, Richard; Horn, David

    2009-08-01

    Antigenic variation is crucial for the survival of African trypanosomes in mammals and involves switches in expression of variant surface glycoprotein genes, which are co-transcribed with a number of expression-site-associated genes (ESAGs) from loci termed 'bloodstream expression sites' (BESs). Trypanosomes possess multiple BESs, although the reason for this (and why ESAGs are resident in these loci) has remained a subject of debate. The genome sequence of Trypanosoma brucei, released in 2005, did not include the BESs because of their telomeric disposition. This gap in our knowledge has now been bridged by two new studies, which we discuss here, asking what has been revealed about the biological significance of BES multiplicity and ESAG function and evolution.

  9. The X-ray Structure of a BAK Homodimer Reveals an Inhibitory Zinc Binding Site

    SciTech Connect

    Modoveanu,T.; Liu, Q.; Tocilj, A.; Watson, M.; Shore, G.; Gehring, K.

    2006-01-01

    BAK/BAX-mediated mitochondrial outer-membrane permeabilization (MOMP) drives cell death during development and tissue homeostasis from zebrafish to humans. In most cancers, this pathway is inhibited by BCL-2 family antiapoptotic members, which bind and block the action of proapoptotic BCL proteins. We report the 1.5 {angstrom} crystal structure of calpain-proteolysed BAK, cBAK, to reveal a zinc binding site that regulates its activity via homodimerization. cBAK contains an occluded BH3 peptide binding pocket that binds a BID BH3 peptide only weakly . Nonetheless, cBAK requires activation by truncated BID to induce cytochrome c release in mitochondria isolated from bak/bax double-knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts. The BAK-mediated MOMP is inhibited by low micromolar zinc levels. This inhibition is alleviated by mutation of the zinc-coordination site in BAK. Our results link directly the antiapoptotic effects of zinc to BAK.

  10. Comprehensive polyadenylation site maps in yeast and human reveal pervasive alternative polyadenylation.

    PubMed

    Ozsolak, Fatih; Kapranov, Philipp; Foissac, Sylvain; Kim, Sang Woo; Fishilevich, Elane; Monaghan, A Paula; John, Bino; Milos, Patrice M

    2010-12-10

    The emerging discoveries on the link between polyadenylation and disease states underline the need to fully characterize genome-wide polyadenylation states. Here, we report comprehensive maps of global polyadenylation events in human and yeast generated using refinements to the Direct RNA Sequencing technology. This direct approach provides a quantitative view of genome-wide polyadenylation states in a strand-specific manner and requires only attomole RNA quantities. The polyadenylation profiles revealed an abundance of unannotated polyadenylation sites, alternative polyadenylation patterns, and regulatory element-associated poly(A)(+) RNAs. We observed differences in sequence composition surrounding canonical and noncanonical human polyadenylation sites, suggesting novel noncoding RNA-specific polyadenylation mechanisms in humans. Furthermore, we observed the correlation level between sense and antisense transcripts to depend on gene expression levels, supporting the view that overlapping transcription from opposite strands may play a regulatory role. Our data provide a comprehensive view of the polyadenylation state and overlapping transcription.

  11. Crystal Structure of Menin Reveals Binding Site for Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Murai, Marcelo J.; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Reddy, Gireesh; Grembecka, Jolanta; Cierpicki, Tomasz

    2014-10-02

    Menin is a tumor suppressor protein that is encoded by the MEN1 (multiple endocrine neoplasia 1) gene and controls cell growth in endocrine tissues. Importantly, menin also serves as a critical oncogenic cofactor of MLL (mixed lineage leukemia) fusion proteins in acute leukemias. Direct association of menin with MLL fusion proteins is required for MLL fusion protein-mediated leukemogenesis in vivo, and this interaction has been validated as a new potential therapeutic target for development of novel anti-leukemia agents. Here, we report the first crystal structure of menin homolog from Nematostella vectensis. Due to a very high sequence similarity, the Nematostella menin is a close homolog of human menin, and these two proteins likely have very similar structures. Menin is predominantly an {alpha}-helical protein with the protein core comprising three tetratricopeptide motifs that are flanked by two {alpha}-helical bundles and covered by a {beta}-sheet motif. A very interesting feature of menin structure is the presence of a large central cavity that is highly conserved between Nematostella and human menin. By employing site-directed mutagenesis, we have demonstrated that this cavity constitutes the binding site for MLL. Our data provide a structural basis for understanding the role of menin as a tumor suppressor protein and as an oncogenic co-factor of MLL fusion proteins. It also provides essential structural information for development of inhibitors targeting the menin-MLL interaction as a novel therapeutic strategy in MLL-related leukemias.

  12. PAM multiplicity marks genomic target sites as inhibitory to CRISPR-Cas9 editing

    PubMed Central

    Malina, Abba; Cameron, Christopher J. F.; Robert, Francis; Blanchette, Mathieu; Dostie, Josée; Pelletier, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    In CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing, the underlying principles for selecting guide RNA (gRNA) sequences that would ensure for efficient target site modification remain poorly understood. Here we show that target sites harbouring multiple protospacer adjacent motifs (PAMs) are refractory to Cas9-mediated repair in situ. Thus we refine which substrates should be avoided in gRNA design, implicating PAM density as a novel sequence-specific feature that inhibits in vivo Cas9-driven DNA modification. PMID:26644285

  13. Engineering Factor Xa Inhibitor with Multiple Platelet-Binding Sites Facilitates its Platelet Targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yuanjun; Li, Ruyi; Lin, Yuan; Shui, Mengyang; Liu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Huan; Wang, Yinye

    2016-07-01

    Targeted delivery of antithrombotic drugs centralizes the effects in the thrombosis site and reduces the hemorrhage side effects in uninjured vessels. We have recently reported that the platelet-targeting factor Xa (FXa) inhibitors, constructed by engineering one Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif into Ancylostoma caninum anticoagulant peptide 5 (AcAP5), can reduce the risk of systemic bleeding than non-targeted AcAP5 in mouse arterial injury model. Increasing the number of platelet-binding sites of FXa inhibitors may facilitate their adhesion to activated platelets, and further lower the bleeding risks. For this purpose, we introduced three RGD motifs into AcAP5 to generate a variant NR4 containing three platelet-binding sites. NR4 reserved its inherent anti-FXa activity. Protein-protein docking showed that all three RGD motifs were capable of binding to platelet receptor αIIbβ3. Molecular dynamics simulation demonstrated that NR4 has more opportunities to interact with αIIbβ3 than single-RGD-containing NR3. Flow cytometry analysis and rat arterial thrombosis model further confirmed that NR4 possesses enhanced platelet targeting activity. Moreover, NR4-treated mice showed a trend toward less tail bleeding time than NR3-treated mice in carotid artery endothelium injury model. Therefore, our data suggest that engineering multiple binding sites in one recombinant protein is a useful tool to improve its platelet-targeting efficiency.

  14. MicroRNAs Align With Accessible Sites in Target mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Weihua; Xin, Ping; Clawson, Gary A.

    2015-01-01

    The importance of microRNAs (miRs) in control of gene expression is now clearly recognized. While individual microRNAs are thought to target hundreds of disparate mRNAs via imperfect base pairing, little is known about the characteristics of miR target sites. Here we show that the miRs can be aligned with empirically identified accessible sites in a target RNA (Cytokeratin 19, KRT), and that some of the aligned miRs functionally down-regulate KRT expression post-transcriptionally. We employed an RNase-H-based random library selection protocol to identify accessible sites in KRT RNA. We then aligned the Sanger Institute database collection of human miRs to KRT mRNA, and also aligned them using the web-based MicroInspector program. Most miRs aligned with the accessible sites identified empirically; those not aligned with the empirically identified sites also functioned effectively in RNase-H-based assays. Similar results were obtained with a second target RNA (Mammoglobin). Transient transfection assays established that some of the miRs which aligned with KRT significantly down-regulated it at the protein level, with no effect on RNA level. The functionally effective miRs aligned within the coding region of KRT, whereas a number of miRs which aligned with the 3′-untranslated region did not produce down-regulation. PMID:19998415

  15. Live imaging and modeling of inner nuclear membrane targeting reveals its molecular requirements in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Boni, Andrea; Politi, Antonio Z.; Strnad, Petr; Xiang, Wanqing; Hossain, M. Julius

    2015-01-01

    Targeting of inner nuclear membrane (INM) proteins is essential for nuclear architecture and function, yet its mechanism remains poorly understood. Here, we established a new reporter that allows real-time imaging of membrane protein transport from the ER to the INM using Lamin B receptor and Lap2β as model INM proteins. These reporters allowed us to characterize the kinetics of INM targeting and establish a mathematical model of this process and enabled us to probe its molecular requirements in an RNA interference screen of 96 candidate genes. Modeling of the phenotypes of genes involved in transport of these INM proteins predicted that it critically depended on the number and permeability of nuclear pores and the availability of nuclear binding sites, but was unaffected by depletion of most transport receptors. These predictions were confirmed with targeted validation experiments on the functional requirements of nucleoporins and nuclear lamins. Collectively, our data support a diffusion retention model of INM protein transport in mammalian cells. PMID:26056140

  16. Chemical-biological characterization of a cruzain inhibitor reveals a second target and a mammalian off-target.

    PubMed

    Choy, Jonathan W; Bryant, Clifford; Calvet, Claudia M; Doyle, Patricia S; Gunatilleke, Shamila S; Leung, Siegfried S F; Ang, Kenny K H; Chen, Steven; Gut, Jiri; Oses-Prieto, Juan A; Johnston, Jonathan B; Arkin, Michelle R; Burlingame, Alma L; Taunton, Jack; Jacobson, Matthew P; McKerrow, James M; Podust, Larissa M; Renslo, Adam R

    2013-01-01

    Inhibition of the Trypanosoma cruzi cysteine protease cruzain has been proposed as a therapeutic approach for the treatment of Chagas' disease. Among the best-studied cruzain inhibitors to date is the vinylsulfone K777 (1), which has proven effective in animal models of Chagas' disease. Recent structure-activity studies aimed at addressing potential liabilities of 1 have now produced analogues such as N-[(2S)-1-[[(E,3S)-1-(benzenesulfonyl)-5-phenylpent-1-en-3-yl]amino]-3-(4-methylphenyl)-1-oxopropan-2-yl]pyridine-4-carboxamide (4), which is trypanocidal at ten-fold lower concentrations than for 1. We now find that the trypanocidal activity of 4 derives primarily from the inhibition of T. cruzi 14-α-demethylase (TcCYP51), a cytochrome P450 enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of ergosterol in the parasite. Compound 4 also inhibits mammalian CYP isoforms but is trypanocidal at concentrations below those required to significantly inhibit mammalian CYPs in vitro. A chemical-proteomics approach employing an activity-based probe derived from 1 was used to identify mammalian cathepsin B as a potentially important off-target of 1 and 4. Computational docking studies and the evaluation of truncated analogues of 4 reveal structural determinants for TcCYP51 binding, information that will be useful in further optimization of this new class of inhibitors.

  17. A Novel MHC-I Surface Targeted for Binding by the MCMV m06 Immunoevasin Revealed by Solution NMR.

    PubMed

    Sgourakis, Nikolaos G; May, Nathan A; Boyd, Lisa F; Ying, Jinfa; Bax, Ad; Margulies, David H

    2015-11-27

    As part of its strategy to evade detection by the host immune system, murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) encodes three proteins that modulate cell surface expression of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules: the MHC-I homolog m152/gp40 as well as the m02-m16 family members m04/gp34 and m06/gp48. Previous studies of the m04 protein revealed a divergent Ig-like fold that is unique to immunoevasins of the m02-m16 family. Here, we engineer and characterize recombinant m06 and investigate its interactions with full-length and truncated forms of the MHC-I molecule H2-L(d) by several techniques. Furthermore, we employ solution NMR to map the interaction footprint of the m06 protein on MHC-I, taking advantage of a truncated H2-L(d), "mini-H2-L(d)," consisting of only the α1α2 platform domain. Mini-H2-L(d) refolded in vitro with a high affinity peptide yields a molecule that shows outstanding NMR spectral features, permitting complete backbone assignments. These NMR-based studies reveal that m06 binds tightly to a discrete site located under the peptide-binding platform that partially overlaps with the β2-microglobulin interface on the MHC-I heavy chain, consistent with in vitro binding experiments showing significantly reduced complex formation between m06 and β2-microglobulin-associated MHC-I. Moreover, we carry out NMR relaxation experiments to characterize the picosecond-nanosecond dynamics of the free mini-H2-L(d) MHC-I molecule, revealing that the site of interaction is highly ordered. This study provides insight into the mechanism of the interaction of m06 with MHC-I, suggesting a structural manipulation of the target MHC-I molecule at an early stage of the peptide-loading pathway.

  18. Genomewide analysis of Drosophila GAGA factor target genes reveals context-dependent DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    van Steensel, Bas; Delrow, Jeffrey; Bussemaker, Harmen J.

    2003-01-01

    The association of sequence-specific DNA-binding factors with their cognate target sequences in vivo depends on the local molecular context, yet this context is poorly understood. To address this issue, we have performed genomewide mapping of in vivo target genes of Drosophila GAGA factor (GAF). The resulting list of ≈250 target genes indicates that GAF regulates many cellular pathways. We applied unbiased motif-based regression analysis to identify the sequence context that determines GAF binding. Our results confirm that GAF selectively associates with (GA)n repeat elements in vivo. GAF binding occurs in upstream regulatory regions, but less in downstream regions. Surprisingly, GAF binds abundantly to introns but is virtually absent from exons, even though the density of (GA)n is roughly the same. Intron binding occurs equally frequently in last introns compared with first introns, suggesting that GAF may not only regulate transcription initiation, but possibly also elongation. We provide evidence for cooperative binding of GAF to closely spaced (GA)n elements and explain the lack of GAF binding to exons by the absence of such closely spaced GA repeats. Our approach for revealing determinants of context-dependent DNA binding will be applicable to many other transcription factors. PMID:12601174

  19. Revealing potential molecular targets bridging colitis and colorectal cancer based on multidimensional integration strategy

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yongfei; Li, Xiaobo; Wang, Xishan; Fan, Huihui; Wang, Guiyu; Wang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation may play a vital role in the pathogenesis of inflammation-associated tumors. However, the underlying mechanisms bridging ulcerative colitis (UC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) remain unclear. Here, we integrated multidimensional interaction resources, including gene expression profiling, protein-protein interactions (PPIs), transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation data, and virus-host interactions, to tentatively explore potential molecular targets that functionally link UC and CRC at a systematic level. In this work, by deciphering the overlapping genes, crosstalking genes and pivotal regulators of both UC- and CRC-associated functional module pairs, we revealed a variety of genes (including FOS and DUSP1, etc.), transcription factors (including SMAD3 and ETS1, etc.) and miRNAs (including miR-155 and miR-196b, etc.) that may have the potential to complete the connections between UC and CRC. Interestingly, further analyses of the virus-host interaction network demonstrated that several virus proteins (including EBNA-LP of EBV and protein E7 of HPV) frequently inter-connected to UC- and CRC-associated module pairs with their validated targets significantly enriched in both modules of the host. Together, our results suggested that multidimensional integration strategy provides a novel approach to discover potential molecular targets that bridge the connections between UC and CRC, which could also be extensively applied to studies on other inflammation-related cancers. PMID:26461477

  20. CRISPRdirect: software for designing CRISPR/Cas guide RNA with reduced off-target sites

    PubMed Central

    Naito, Yuki; Hino, Kimihiro; Bono, Hidemasa; Ui-Tei, Kumiko

    2015-01-01

    Summary: CRISPRdirect is a simple and functional web server for selecting rational CRISPR/Cas targets from an input sequence. The CRISPR/Cas system is a promising technique for genome engineering which allows target-specific cleavage of genomic DNA guided by Cas9 nuclease in complex with a guide RNA (gRNA), that complementarily binds to a ∼20 nt targeted sequence. The target sequence requirements are twofold. First, the 5′-NGG protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) sequence must be located adjacent to the target sequence. Second, the target sequence should be specific within the entire genome in order to avoid off-target editing. CRISPRdirect enables users to easily select rational target sequences with minimized off-target sites by performing exhaustive searches against genomic sequences. The server currently incorporates the genomic sequences of human, mouse, rat, marmoset, pig, chicken, frog, zebrafish, Ciona, fruit fly, silkworm, Caenorhabditis elegans, Arabidopsis, rice, Sorghum and budding yeast. Availability: Freely available at http://crispr.dbcls.jp/. Contact: y-naito@dbcls.rois.ac.jp Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25414360

  1. Comparison of splice sites reveals that long noncoding RNAs are evolutionarily well conserved

    PubMed Central

    Nitsche, Anne; Rose, Dominic; Fasold, Mario; Reiche, Kristin; Stadler, Peter F.

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale RNA sequencing has revealed a large number of long mRNA-like transcripts (lncRNAs) that do not code for proteins. The evolutionary history of these lncRNAs has been notoriously hard to study systematically due to their low level of sequence conservation that precludes comprehensive homology-based surveys and makes them nearly impossible to align. An increasing number of special cases, however, has been shown to be at least as old as the vertebrate lineage. Here we use the conservation of splice sites to trace the evolution of lncRNAs. We show that >85% of the human GENCODE lncRNAs were already present at the divergence of placental mammals and many hundreds of these RNAs date back even further. Nevertheless, we observe a fast turnover of intron/exon structures. We conclude that lncRNA genes are evolutionary ancient components of vertebrate genomes that show an unexpected and unprecedented evolutionary plasticity. We offer a public web service (http://splicemap.bioinf.uni-leipzig.de) that allows to retrieve sets of orthologous splice sites and to produce overview maps of evolutionarily conserved splice sites for visualization and further analysis. An electronic supplement containing the ncRNA data sets used in this study is available at http://www.bioinf.uni-leipzig.de/publications/supplements/12-001. PMID:25802408

  2. Transcriptome-Wide Cleavage Site Mapping on Cellular mRNAs Reveals Features Underlying Sequence-Specific Cleavage by the Viral Ribonuclease SOX

    PubMed Central

    Gaglia, Marta Maria; Rycroft, Chris H.; Glaunsinger, Britt A.

    2015-01-01

    Many viruses express factors that reduce host gene expression through widespread degradation of cellular mRNA. An example of this class of proteins is the mRNA-targeting endoribonuclease SOX from the gamma-herpesvirus Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). Previous studies indicated that cleavage of messenger RNAs (mRNA) by SOX occurs at specific locations defined by the sequence of the target RNA, which is at odds with the down-regulation of a large portion of cellular transcripts. In this study, we address this paradox by using high-throughput sequencing of cleavage intermediates combined with a custom bioinformatics-based analysis pipeline to identify SOX cleavage sites across the mRNA transcriptome. These data, coupled with targeted mutagenesis, reveal that while cleavage sites are specific and reproducible, they are defined by a degenerate sequence motif containing a small number of conserved residues rather than a strong consensus sequence. This degenerate element is well represented in both human and KSHV mRNA, and its presence correlates with RNA destabilization by SOX. This represents a new endonuclease targeting strategy, in which use of a degenerate targeting element enables RNA cleavage at specific locations without restricting the range of targets. Furthermore, it shows that strong target selectivity can be achieved without a high degree of sequence specificity. PMID:26646420

  3. Comprehensive molecular characterization of salivary duct carcinoma reveals actionable targets and similarity to apocrine breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dalin, Martin G.; Desrichard, Alexis; Katabi, Nora; Makarov, Vladimir; Walsh, Logan A.; Lee, Ken-Wing; Wang, Qingguo; Armenia, Joshua; West, Lyndsay; Dogan, Snjezana; Wang, Lu; Ramaswami, Deepa; Ho, Alan L.; Ganly, Ian; Solit, David B.; Berger, Michael F.; Schultz, Nikolaus D.; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.; Chan, Timothy A.; Morris, Luc G.T.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Salivary duct carcinoma (SDC) is an aggressive salivary malignancy which is resistant to chemotherapy and has high mortality rates. We investigated the molecular landscape of SDC, focusing on genetic alterations and gene expression profiles. Experimental Design We performed whole-exome sequencing, RNA sequencing and immunohistochemical analyses in 16 SDC tumors, and examined selected alterations via targeted sequencing of 410 genes in a second cohort of 15 SDCs. Results SDCs harbored a higher mutational burden than many other salivary carcinomas (1.7 mutations/megabase). The most frequent genetic alterations were mutations in TP53 (55%), HRAS (23%), PIK3CA (23%), and amplification of ERBB2 (35%). Most (74%) tumors had alterations in either MAP kinase (BRAF/HRAS/NF1) genes or ERBB2. Potentially targetable alterations based on supportive clinical evidence were present in 61% of tumors. Androgen receptor (AR) was overexpressed in 75%; several potential resistance mechanisms to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) were identified, including the AR-V7 splice variant (present in 50%, often at low ratios compared to full length AR) and FOXA1 mutations (10%). Consensus clustering and pathway analyses in transcriptome data revealed striking similarities between SDC and molecular apocrine breast cancer. Conclusions This study illuminates the landscape of genetic alterations and gene expression programs in SDC, identifying numerous molecular targets and potential determinants of response to AR antagonism. This has relevance for emerging clinical studies of ADT and other targeted therapies in SDC. The similarities between SDC and apocrine breast cancer indicate that clinical data in breast cancer may generate useful hypotheses for SDC. PMID:27103403

  4. Glycan Microheterogeneity at the PGT135 Antibody Recognition Site on HIV-1 gp120 Reveals a Molecular Mechanism for Neutralization Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Laura K.; Spencer, Daniel I. R.; Royle, Louise; Vasiljevic, Snezana; Krumm, Stefanie A.; Doores, Katie J.

    2015-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies have been isolated that bind the glycan shield of the HIV-1 envelope spike. One such antibody, PGT135, contacts the intrinsic mannose patch of gp120 at the Asn332, Asn392, and Asn386 glycosylation sites. Here, site-specific glycosylation analysis of recombinant gp120 revealed glycan microheterogeneity sufficient to explain the existence of a minor population of virions resistant to PGT135 neutralization. Target microheterogeneity and antibody glycan specificity are therefore important parameters in HIV-1 vaccine design. PMID:25878100

  5. Natively glycosylated HIV-1 Env structure reveals new mode for antibody recognition of the CD4-binding site

    PubMed Central

    West, Anthony P; Schamber, Michael; Gazumyan, Anna; Golijanin, Jovana; Seaman, Michael S; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Klein, Florian; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Bjorkman, Pamela J

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 vaccine design is informed by structural studies elucidating mechanisms by which broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) recognize and/or accommodate N-glycans on the trimeric envelope glycoprotein (Env). Variability in high-mannose and complex-type Env glycoforms leads to heterogeneity that usually precludes visualization of the native glycan shield. We present 3.5-Å- and 3.9-Å-resolution crystal structures of the HIV-1 Env trimer with fully processed and native glycosylation, revealing a glycan shield of high-mannose and complex-type N-glycans, which we used to define complete epitopes of two bNAbs. Env trimer was complexed with 10-1074 (against the V3-loop) and IOMA, a new CD4-binding site (CD4bs) antibody. Although IOMA derives from VH1-2*02, the germline gene of CD4bs-targeting VRC01-class bNAbs, its light chain lacks the short CDRL3 that defines VRC01-class bNAbs. Thus IOMA resembles 8ANC131-class/VH1-46–derived CD4bs bNAbs, which have normal-length CDRL3s. The existence of bNAbs that combine features of VRC01-class and 8ANC131-class antibodies has implications for immunization strategies targeting VRC01-like bNAbs. PMID:27617431

  6. Evolutionary comparison reveals that diverging CTCF sites are signatures of ancestral topological associating domains borders

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Marín, Carlos; Tena, Juan J.; Acemel, Rafael D.; López-Mayorga, Macarena; Naranjo, Silvia; de la Calle-Mustienes, Elisa; Maeso, Ignacio; Beccari, Leonardo; Aneas, Ivy; Vielmas, Erika; Bovolenta, Paola; Nobrega, Marcelo A.; Carvajal, Jaime; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence in the last years indicates that the vast amount of regulatory information contained in mammalian genomes is organized in precise 3D chromatin structures. However, the impact of this spatial chromatin organization on gene expression and its degree of evolutionary conservation is still poorly understood. The Six homeobox genes are essential developmental regulators organized in gene clusters conserved during evolution. Here, we reveal that the Six clusters share a deeply evolutionarily conserved 3D chromatin organization that predates the Cambrian explosion. This chromatin architecture generates two largely independent regulatory landscapes (RLs) contained in two adjacent topological associating domains (TADs). By disrupting the conserved TAD border in one of the zebrafish Six clusters, we demonstrate that this border is critical for preventing competition between promoters and enhancers located in separated RLs, thereby generating different expression patterns in genes located in close genomic proximity. Moreover, evolutionary comparison of Six-associated TAD borders reveals the presence of CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) sites with diverging orientations in all studied deuterostomes. Genome-wide examination of mammalian HiC data reveals that this conserved CTCF configuration is a general signature of TAD borders, underscoring that common organizational principles underlie TAD compartmentalization in deuterostome evolution. PMID:26034287

  7. In Vivo Activation of Azipropofol Prolongs Anesthesia and Reveals Synaptic Targets*

    PubMed Central

    Weiser, Brian P.; Kelz, Max B.; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.

    2013-01-01

    General anesthetic photolabels have been instrumental in discovering and confirming protein binding partners and binding sites of these promiscuous ligands. We report the in vivo photoactivation of meta-azipropofol, a potent analog of propofol, in Xenopus laevis tadpoles. Covalent adduction of meta-azipropofol in vivo prolongs the primary pharmacologic effect of general anesthetics in a behavioral phenotype we termed “optoanesthesia.” Coupling this behavior with a tritiated probe, we performed unbiased, time-resolved gel proteomics to identify neuronal targets of meta-azipropofol in vivo. We have identified synaptic binding partners, such as synaptosomal-associated protein 25, as well as voltage-dependent anion channels as potential facilitators of the general anesthetic state. Pairing behavioral phenotypes elicited by the activation of efficacious photolabels in vivo with time-resolved proteomics provides a novel approach to investigate molecular mechanisms of general anesthetics. PMID:23184948

  8. Novel and Viable Acetylcholinesterase Target Site for Developing Effective and Environmentally Safe Insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Yuan-Ping; Brimijoin, Stephen; Ragsdale, David W; Zhu, Kun Yan; Suranyi, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Insect pests are responsible for human suffering and financial losses worldwide. New and environmentally safe insecticides are urgently needed to cope with these serious problems. Resistance to current insecticides has resulted in a resurgence of insect pests, and growing concerns about insecticide toxicity to humans discourage the use of insecticides for pest control. The small market for insecticides has hampered insecticide development; however, advances in genomics and structural genomics offer new opportunities to develop insecticides that are less dependent on the insecticide market. This review summarizes the literature data that support the hypothesis that an insect-specific cysteine residue located at the opening of the acetylcholinesterase active site is a promising target site for developing new insecticides with reduced off-target toxicity and low propensity for insect resistance. These data are used to discuss the differences between targeting the insect-specific cysteine residue and targeting the ubiquitous catalytic serine residue of acetylcholinesterase from the perspective of reducing off-target toxicity and insect resistance. Also discussed is the prospect of developing cysteine-targeting anticholinesterases as effective and environmentally safe insecticides for control of disease vectors, crop damage, and residential insect pests within the financial confines of the present insecticide market. PMID:22280344

  9. Outreach for Outreach: Targeting social media audiences to promote a NASA kids’ web site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, C. C.

    2009-12-01

    The Space Place is a successful NASA web site that benefits upper elementary school students and educators by providing games, activities, and resources to stimulate interest in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, as well as to inform the audience of NASA’s contributions. As online social networking grows to be a central component of modern communication, The Space Place has explored the benefits of integrating social networks with the web site to increase awareness of materials the web site offers. This study analyzes the capabilities of social networks, and specifically the demographics of Twitter and Facebook. It then compares these results with the content, audience, and perceived demographics of The Space Place web site. Based upon the demographic results, we identified a target constituency that would benefit from the integration of social networks into The Space Place web site. As a result of this study, a Twitter feed has been established that releases a daily tweet from The Space Place. In addition, a Facebook page has been created to showcase new content and prompt interaction among fans of The Space Place. Currently, plans are under way to populate the Space Place Facebook page. Each social network has been utilized in an effort to spark excitement about the content on The Space Place, as well as to attract followers to the main NASA Space Place web site. To pursue this idea further, a plan has been developed to promote NASA Space Place’s social media tools among the target audience.

  10. Ribosome-messenger recognition: mRNA target sites for ribosomal protein S1.

    PubMed Central

    Boni, I V; Isaeva, D M; Musychenko, M L; Tzareva, N V

    1991-01-01

    Ribosomal protein S1 is known to play an important role in translational initiation, being directly involved in recognition and binding of mRNAs by 30S ribosomal particles. Using a specially developed procedure based on efficient crosslinking of S1 to mRNA induced by UV irradiation, we have identified S1 binding sites on several phage RNAs in preinitiation complexes. Targets for S1 on Q beta and fr RNAs are localized upstream from the coat protein gene and contain oligo(U)-sequences. In the case of Q beta RNA, this S1 binding site overlaps the S-site for Q beta replicase and the site for S1 binding within a binary complex. It is reasonable that similar U-rich sequences represent S1 binding sites on bacterial mRNAs. To test this idea we have used E. coli ssb mRNA prepared in vitro with the T7 promoter/RNA polymerase system. By the methods of toeprinting, enzymatic footprinting, and UV crosslinking we have shown that binding of the ssb mRNA to 30S ribosomes is S1-dependent. The oligo(U)-sequence preceding the SD domain was found to be the target for S1. We propose that S1 binding sites, represented by pyrimidine-rich sequences upstream from the SD region, serve as determinants involved in recognition of mRNA by the ribosome. Images PMID:2011495

  11. Expanded target-chemical analysis reveals extensive mixed-organic-contaminant exposure in USA streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Paul M.; Journey, Celeste; Romanok, Kristin; Barber, Larry B.; Buxton, Herbert T.; Foreman, William; Furlong, Edward T.; Glassmeyer, Susan T.; Hladik, Michelle; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Jones, Daniel K.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.; Loftin, Keith A.; Mills, Marc A.; Meyer, Michael T.; Orlando, James L.; Reilly, Timothy J.; Smalling, Kelly L.; Villeneuve, Daniel L.

    2017-01-01

    Surface water from 38 streams nationwide was assessed using 14 target-organic methods (719 compounds). Designed-bioactive anthropogenic contaminants (biocides, pharmaceuticals) comprised 57% of 406 organics detected at least once. The 10 most-frequently detected anthropogenic-organics included eight pesticides (desulfinylfipronil, AMPA, chlorpyrifos, dieldrin, metolachlor, atrazine, CIAT, glyphosate) and two pharmaceuticals (caffeine, metformin) with detection frequencies ranging 66–84% of all sites. Detected contaminant concentrations varied from less than 1 ng L–1 to greater than 10 μg L–1, with 77 and 278 having median detected concentrations greater than 100 ng L–1 and 10 ng L–1, respectively. Cumulative detections and concentrations ranged 4–161 compounds (median 70) and 8.5–102 847 ng L–1, respectively, and correlated significantly with wastewater discharge, watershed development, and toxic release inventory metrics. Log10 concentrations of widely monitored HHCB, triclosan, and carbamazepine explained 71–82% of the variability in the total number of compounds detected (linear regression; p-values: < 0.001–0.012), providing a statistical inference tool for unmonitored contaminants. Due to multiple modes of action, high bioactivity, biorecalcitrance, and direct environment application (pesticides), designed-bioactive organics (median 41 per site at μg L–1 cumulative concentrations) in developed watersheds present aquatic health concerns, given their acknowledged potential for sublethal effects to sensitive species and lifecycle stages at low ng L–1.

  12. Virtual screening using combinatorial cyclic peptide libraries reveals protein interfaces readily targetable by cyclic peptides.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Fergal J; O'Donovan, Darragh; Devocelle, Marc; Moran, Niamh; O'Connell, David J; Shields, Denis C

    2015-03-23

    Protein-protein and protein-peptide interactions are responsible for the vast majority of biological functions in vivo, but targeting these interactions with small molecules has historically been difficult. What is required are efficient combined computational and experimental screening methods to choose among a number of potential protein interfaces worthy of targeting lead macrocyclic compounds for further investigation. To achieve this, we have generated combinatorial 3D virtual libraries of short disulfide-bonded peptides and compared them to pharmacophore models of important protein-protein and protein-peptide structures, including short linear motifs (SLiMs), protein-binding peptides, and turn structures at protein-protein interfaces, built from 3D models available in the Protein Data Bank. We prepared a total of 372 reference pharmacophores, which were matched against 108,659 multiconformer cyclic peptides. After normalization to exclude nonspecific cyclic peptides, the top hits notably are enriched for mimetics of turn structures, including a turn at the interaction surface of human α thrombin, and also feature several protein-binding peptides. The top cyclic peptide hits also cover the critical "hot spot" interaction sites predicted from the interaction crystal structure. We have validated our method by testing cyclic peptides predicted to inhibit thrombin, a key protein in the blood coagulation pathway of important therapeutic interest, identifying a cyclic peptide inhibitor with lead-like activity. We conclude that protein interfaces most readily targetable by cyclic peptides and related macrocyclic drugs may be identified computationally among a set of candidate interfaces, accelerating the choice of interfaces against which lead compounds may be screened.

  13. Target and Non-target Site Mechanisms Developed by Glyphosate-Resistant Hairy beggarticks (Bidens pilosa L.) Populations from Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Alcántara-de la Cruz, Ricardo; Fernández-Moreno, Pablo T.; Ozuna, Carmen V.; Rojano-Delgado, Antonia M.; Cruz-Hipolito, Hugo E.; Domínguez-Valenzuela, José A.; Barro, Francisco; De Prado, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    In 2014 hairy beggarticks (Bidens pilosa L.) has been identified as being glyphosate-resistant in citrus orchards from Mexico. The target and non-target site mechanisms involved in the response to glyphosate of two resistant populations (R1 and R2) and one susceptible (S) were studied. Experiments of dose-response, shikimic acid accumulation, uptake-translocation, enzyme activity and 5-enolpyruvyl shikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene sequencing were carried out in each population. The R1 and R2 populations were 20.4 and 2.8-fold less glyphosate sensitive, respectively, than the S population. The resistant populations showed a lesser shikimic acid accumulation than the S population. In the latter one, 24.9% of 14C-glyphosate was translocated to the roots at 96 h after treatment; in the R1 and R2 populations only 12.9 and 15.5%, respectively, was translocated. Qualitative results confirmed the reduced 14C-glyphosate translocation in the resistant populations. The EPSPS enzyme activity of the S population was 128.4 and 8.5-fold higher than the R1 and R2 populations of glyphosate-treated plants, respectively. A single (Pro-106-Ser), and a double (Thr-102-Ile followed by Pro-106-Ser) mutations were identified in the EPSPS2 gene conferred high resistance in R1 population. Target-site mutations associated with a reduced translocation were responsible for the higher glyphosate resistance in the R1 population. The low-intermediate resistance of the R2 population was mediated by reduced translocation. This is the first glyphosate resistance case confirmed in hairy beggarticks in the world. PMID:27752259

  14. Target and Non-target Site Mechanisms Developed by Glyphosate-Resistant Hairy beggarticks (Bidens pilosa L.) Populations from Mexico.

    PubMed

    Alcántara-de la Cruz, Ricardo; Fernández-Moreno, Pablo T; Ozuna, Carmen V; Rojano-Delgado, Antonia M; Cruz-Hipolito, Hugo E; Domínguez-Valenzuela, José A; Barro, Francisco; De Prado, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    In 2014 hairy beggarticks (Bidens pilosa L.) has been identified as being glyphosate-resistant in citrus orchards from Mexico. The target and non-target site mechanisms involved in the response to glyphosate of two resistant populations (R1 and R2) and one susceptible (S) were studied. Experiments of dose-response, shikimic acid accumulation, uptake-translocation, enzyme activity and 5-enolpyruvyl shikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene sequencing were carried out in each population. The R1 and R2 populations were 20.4 and 2.8-fold less glyphosate sensitive, respectively, than the S population. The resistant populations showed a lesser shikimic acid accumulation than the S population. In the latter one, 24.9% of (14)C-glyphosate was translocated to the roots at 96 h after treatment; in the R1 and R2 populations only 12.9 and 15.5%, respectively, was translocated. Qualitative results confirmed the reduced (14)C-glyphosate translocation in the resistant populations. The EPSPS enzyme activity of the S population was 128.4 and 8.5-fold higher than the R1 and R2 populations of glyphosate-treated plants, respectively. A single (Pro-106-Ser), and a double (Thr-102-Ile followed by Pro-106-Ser) mutations were identified in the EPSPS2 gene conferred high resistance in R1 population. Target-site mutations associated with a reduced translocation were responsible for the higher glyphosate resistance in the R1 population. The low-intermediate resistance of the R2 population was mediated by reduced translocation. This is the first glyphosate resistance case confirmed in hairy beggarticks in the world.

  15. Potent neutralization of hepatitis A virus reveals a receptor mimic mechanism and the receptor recognition site

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiangxi; Zhu, Ling; Dang, Minghao; Hu, Zhongyu; Gao, Qiang; Yuan, Shuai; Sun, Yao; Zhang, Bo; Ren, Jingshan; Kotecha, Abhay; Walter, Thomas S.; Wang, Junzhi; Fry, Elizabeth E.; Stuart, David I.; Rao, Zihe

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) infects ∼1.4 million people annually and, although there is a vaccine, there are no licensed therapeutic drugs. HAV is unusually stable (making disinfection problematic) and little is known of how it enters cells and releases its RNA. Here we report a potent HAV-specific monoclonal antibody, R10, which neutralizes HAV infection by blocking attachment to the host cell. High-resolution cryo-EM structures of HAV full and empty particles and of the complex of HAV with R10 Fab reveal the atomic details of antibody binding and point to a receptor recognition site at the pentamer interface. These results, together with our observation that the R10 Fab destabilizes the capsid, suggest the use of a receptor mimic mechanism to neutralize virus infection, providing new opportunities for therapeutic intervention. PMID:28074040

  16. Potent neutralization of hepatitis A virus reveals a receptor mimic mechanism and the receptor recognition site.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiangxi; Zhu, Ling; Dang, Minghao; Hu, Zhongyu; Gao, Qiang; Yuan, Shuai; Sun, Yao; Zhang, Bo; Ren, Jingshan; Kotecha, Abhay; Walter, Thomas S; Wang, Junzhi; Fry, Elizabeth E; Stuart, David I; Rao, Zihe

    2017-01-24

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) infects ∼1.4 million people annually and, although there is a vaccine, there are no licensed therapeutic drugs. HAV is unusually stable (making disinfection problematic) and little is known of how it enters cells and releases its RNA. Here we report a potent HAV-specific monoclonal antibody, R10, which neutralizes HAV infection by blocking attachment to the host cell. High-resolution cryo-EM structures of HAV full and empty particles and of the complex of HAV with R10 Fab reveal the atomic details of antibody binding and point to a receptor recognition site at the pentamer interface. These results, together with our observation that the R10 Fab destabilizes the capsid, suggest the use of a receptor mimic mechanism to neutralize virus infection, providing new opportunities for therapeutic intervention.

  17. Weak Palindromic Consensus Sequences Are a Common Feature Found at the Integration Target Sites of Many Retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaolin; Li, Yuan; Crise, Bruce; Burgess, Shawn M.; Munroe, David J.

    2005-01-01

    Integration into the host genome is one of the hallmarks of the retroviral life cycle and is catalyzed by virus-encoded integrases. While integrase has strict sequence requirements for the viral DNA ends, target site sequences have been shown to be very diverse. We carefully examined a large number of integration target site sequences from several retroviruses, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1, simian immunodeficiency virus, murine leukemia virus, and avian sarcoma-leukosis virus, and found that a statistical palindromic consensus, centered on the virus-specific duplicated target site sequence, was a common feature at integration target sites for these retroviruses. PMID:15795304

  18. RNA sequencing analysis of human podocytes reveals glucocorticoid regulated gene networks targeting non-immune pathways

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lulu; Hindmarch, Charles C. T.; Rogers, Mark; Campbell, Colin; Waterfall, Christy; Coghill, Jane; Mathieson, Peter W.; Welsh, Gavin I.

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are steroids that reduce inflammation and are used as immunosuppressive drugs for many diseases. They are also the mainstay for the treatment of minimal change nephropathy (MCN), which is characterised by an absence of inflammation. Their mechanisms of action remain elusive. Evidence suggests that immunomodulatory drugs can directly act on glomerular epithelial cells or ‘podocytes’, the cell type which is the main target of injury in MCN. To understand the nature of glucocorticoid effects on non-immune cell functions, we generated RNA sequencing data from human podocyte cell lines and identified the genes that are significantly regulated in dexamethasone-treated podocytes compared to vehicle-treated cells. The upregulated genes are of functional relevance to cytoskeleton-related processes, whereas the downregulated genes mostly encode pro-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors. We observed a tendency for dexamethasone-upregulated genes to be downregulated in MCN patients. Integrative analysis revealed gene networks composed of critical signaling pathways that are likely targeted by dexamethasone in podocytes. PMID:27774996

  19. Protein sequence conservation and stable molecular evolution reveals influenza virus nucleoprotein as a universal druggable target.

    PubMed

    Babar, Mustafeez Mujtaba; Zaidi, Najam-us-Sahar Sadaf

    2015-08-01

    The high mutation rate in influenza virus genome and appearance of drug resistance calls for a constant effort to identify alternate drug targets and develop new antiviral strategies. The internal proteins of the virus can be exploited as a potential target for therapeutic interventions. Among these, the nucleoprotein (NP) is the most abundant protein that provides structural and functional support to the viral replication machinery. The current study aims at analysis of protein sequence polymorphism patterns, degree of molecular evolution and sequence conservation as a function of potential druggability of nucleoprotein. We analyzed a universal set of amino acid sequences, (n=22,000) and, in order to identify and correlate the functionally conserved, druggable regions across different parameters, classified them on the basis of host organism, strain type and continental region of sample isolation. The results indicated that around 95% of the sequence length was conserved, with at least 7 regions conserved across the protein among various classes. Moreover, the highly variable regions, though very limited in number, were found to be positively selected indicating, thereby, the high degree of protein stability against various hosts and spatio-temporal references. Furthermore, on mapping the conserved regions on the protein, 7 drug binding pockets in the functionally important regions of the protein were revealed. The results, therefore, collectively indicate that nucleoprotein is a highly conserved and stable viral protein that can potentially be exploited for development of broadly effective antiviral strategies.

  20. RNA sequencing analysis of human podocytes reveals glucocorticoid regulated gene networks targeting non-immune pathways.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lulu; Hindmarch, Charles C T; Rogers, Mark; Campbell, Colin; Waterfall, Christy; Coghill, Jane; Mathieson, Peter W; Welsh, Gavin I

    2016-10-24

    Glucocorticoids are steroids that reduce inflammation and are used as immunosuppressive drugs for many diseases. They are also the mainstay for the treatment of minimal change nephropathy (MCN), which is characterised by an absence of inflammation. Their mechanisms of action remain elusive. Evidence suggests that immunomodulatory drugs can directly act on glomerular epithelial cells or 'podocytes', the cell type which is the main target of injury in MCN. To understand the nature of glucocorticoid effects on non-immune cell functions, we generated RNA sequencing data from human podocyte cell lines and identified the genes that are significantly regulated in dexamethasone-treated podocytes compared to vehicle-treated cells. The upregulated genes are of functional relevance to cytoskeleton-related processes, whereas the downregulated genes mostly encode pro-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors. We observed a tendency for dexamethasone-upregulated genes to be downregulated in MCN patients. Integrative analysis revealed gene networks composed of critical signaling pathways that are likely targeted by dexamethasone in podocytes.

  1. The genome of the heartworm, Dirofilaria immitis, reveals drug and vaccine targets

    PubMed Central

    Godel, Christelle; Kumar, Sujai; Koutsovoulos, Georgios; Ludin, Philipp; Nilsson, Daniel; Comandatore, Francesco; Wrobel, Nicola; Thompson, Marian; Schmid, Christoph D.; Goto, Susumu; Bringaud, Frédéric; Wolstenholme, Adrian; Bandi, Claudio; Epe, Christian; Kaminsky, Ronald; Blaxter, Mark; Mäser, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    The heartworm Dirofilaria immitis is an important parasite of dogs. Transmitted by mosquitoes in warmer climatic zones, it is spreading across southern Europe and the Americas at an alarming pace. There is no vaccine, and chemotherapy is prone to complications. To learn more about this parasite, we have sequenced the genomes of D. immitis and its endosymbiont Wolbachia. We predict 10,179 protein coding genes in the 84.2 Mb of the nuclear genome, and 823 genes in the 0.9-Mb Wolbachia genome. The D. immitis genome harbors neither DNA transposons nor active retrotransposons, and there is very little genetic variation between two sequenced isolates from Europe and the United States. The differential presence of anabolic pathways such as heme and nucleotide biosynthesis hints at the intricate metabolic interrelationship between the heartworm and Wolbachia. Comparing the proteome of D. immitis with other nematodes and with mammalian hosts, we identify families of potential drug targets, immune modulators, and vaccine candidates. This genome sequence will support the development of new tools against dirofilariasis and aid efforts to combat related human pathogens, the causative agents of lymphatic filariasis and river blindness.—Godel, C., Kumar, S., Koutsovoulos, G., Ludin, P., Nilsson, D., Comandatore, F., Wrobel, N., Thompson, M., Schmid, C. D., Goto, S., Bringaud, F., Wolstenholme, A., Bandi, C., Epe, C., Kaminsky, R., Blaxter, M., Mäser, P. The genome of the heartworm, Dirofilaria immitis, reveals drug and vaccine targets. PMID:22889830

  2. RNA-Seq Analysis Reveals Candidate Targets for Curcumin against Tetranychus cinnabarinus

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dousheng; Zhang, Yongqiang; Zhou, Hong; Lai, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Tetranychus cinnabarinus is an important agricultural pest with a broad host range. We previously identified curcumin as a promising acaricidal compound against T. cinnabarinus. However, the acaricidal mechanism of curcumin remains unknown. In this study, RNA-seq was employed to analyze the transcriptome changes in T. cinnabarinus treated with curcumin or the solvent. A total of 105,706,297 clean sequence reads were generated by sequencing, with more than 90% of the reads successfully mapped to the reference sequence. The RNA-seq identified 111 and 96 differentially expressed genes between curcumin- and solvent-treated mites at 24 and 48 h after treatment, respectively. GO enrichment analysis of differentially expressed genes showed that the cellular process was the dominant group at both time points. Finally, we screened 23 differentially expressed genes that were functionally identical or similar to the targets of common insecticide/acaricides or genes that were associated with mite detoxification and metabolism. Calmodulin, phospholipase A2, and phospholipase C were activated upon curcumin treatment suggesting that the calcium channel related genes might play important roles in mite's response to curcumin. Overall our results revealed the global transcriptional changes in T. cinnabarinus after curcumin treatment to enable further identification of the targets of curcumin in mites. PMID:27672652

  3. Earthquakes' local site effects in Christchurch revealed by Cosmo-Skymed and Envisat radar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Closson, Damien; Abou Karaki, N.; Pasquali, P.; Holecz, P.; Riccardi, P.; Milisavljevic, N.; Bouaraba, A.

    2012-04-01

    In September 4th, 2010, and February 22nd, 2011, a 7.1 and 6.3 earthquakes have strongly affected the city of Chirstchurch, New Zealand. The hypocenters were located 40 km westwards and 10 km southwards respectively. The shallow depths of the epicenter were estimated to 10 and 5 km. The deformation field associated with the first event was mapped with Envisat data (C band). One month later, the Italian Space Agency started the surveillance of the city of Chirstchurch. Cosmo-Skymed images (X band) in spotlight mode (pixel of about one meter) were collected from November onwards with a minimum of four days between repeated acquisitions. In that framework, it was possible to study with great accuracy and precision the ground deformations caused by the aftershock that took place on February 22nd, 2011. One image was acquired three days before and another scene one day after. Moreover, two days after this event that killed 181 persons; an aerial survey was performed leading to an orthophoto of the city having a pixel size of 20 cm. An interferometric processing was applied to the Cosmo-Skymed scenes. The interferogram revealed the fringes of the major displacement with a precision of 1.5 cm (half of the wavelenght). At closer look, the general dislocation pattern shown numerous irregularities that have been interpreted as local sites effects. One of the most obvious evidence of local site effects can be seen in the kilometric abandoned landfill of Barwood. Field observations and interviews of local people support the observations regarding the limits of specific zones in the urban area. This research is still in progress and comparisons are currently performed with other earthquakes in Chili and Turkey. This work suggests that an independent method could provide new original data in the frame of the mapping of earthquakes local sites effects.

  4. Representing high throughput expression profiles via perturbation barcodes reveals compound targets.

    PubMed

    Filzen, Tracey M; Kutchukian, Peter S; Hermes, Jeffrey D; Li, Jing; Tudor, Matthew

    2017-02-01

    High throughput mRNA expression profiling can be used to characterize the response of cell culture models to perturbations such as pharmacologic modulators and genetic perturbations. As profiling campaigns expand in scope, it is important to homogenize, summarize, and analyze the resulting data in a manner that captures significant biological signals in spite of various noise sources such as batch effects and stochastic variation. We used the L1000 platform for large-scale profiling of 978 representative genes across thousands of compound treatments. Here, a method is described that uses deep learning techniques to convert the expression changes of the landmark genes into a perturbation barcode that reveals important features of the underlying data, performing better than the raw data in revealing important biological insights. The barcode captures compound structure and target information, and predicts a compound's high throughput screening promiscuity, to a higher degree than the original data measurements, indicating that the approach uncovers underlying factors of the expression data that are otherwise entangled or masked by noise. Furthermore, we demonstrate that visualizations derived from the perturbation barcode can be used to more sensitively assign functions to unknown compounds through a guilt-by-association approach, which we use to predict and experimentally validate the activity of compounds on the MAPK pathway. The demonstrated application of deep metric learning to large-scale chemical genetics projects highlights the utility of this and related approaches to the extraction of insights and testable hypotheses from big, sometimes noisy data.

  5. Whole Genome Sequencing Reveals Potential New Targets for Improving Nitrogen Uptake and Utilization in Sorghum bicolor

    PubMed Central

    Massel, Karen; Campbell, Bradley C.; Mace, Emma S.; Tai, Shuaishuai; Tao, Yongfu; Worland, Belinda G.; Jordan, David R.; Botella, Jose R.; Godwin, Ian D.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) fertilizers are a major agricultural input where more than 100 million tons are supplied annually. Cereals are particularly inefficient at soil N uptake, where the unrecovered nitrogen causes serious environmental damage. Sorghum bicolor (sorghum) is an important cereal crop, particularly in resource-poor semi-arid regions, and is known to have a high NUE in comparison to other major cereals under limited N conditions. This study provides the first assessment of genetic diversity and signatures of selection across 230 fully sequenced genes putatively involved in the uptake and utilization of N from a diverse panel of sorghum lines. This comprehensive analysis reveals an overall reduction in diversity as a result of domestication and a total of 128 genes displaying signatures of purifying selection, thereby revealing possible gene targets to improve NUE in sorghum and cereals alike. A number of key genes appear to have been involved in selective sweeps, reducing their sequence diversity. The ammonium transporter (AMT) genes generally had low allelic diversity, whereas a substantial number of nitrate/peptide transporter 1 (NRT1/PTR) genes had higher nucleotide diversity in domesticated germplasm. Interestingly, members of the distinct race Guinea margaritiferum contained a number of unique alleles, and along with the wild sorghum species, represent a rich resource of new variation for plant improvement of NUE in sorghum. PMID:27826302

  6. Representing high throughput expression profiles via perturbation barcodes reveals compound targets

    PubMed Central

    Kutchukian, Peter S.; Li, Jing; Tudor, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    High throughput mRNA expression profiling can be used to characterize the response of cell culture models to perturbations such as pharmacologic modulators and genetic perturbations. As profiling campaigns expand in scope, it is important to homogenize, summarize, and analyze the resulting data in a manner that captures significant biological signals in spite of various noise sources such as batch effects and stochastic variation. We used the L1000 platform for large-scale profiling of 978 representative genes across thousands of compound treatments. Here, a method is described that uses deep learning techniques to convert the expression changes of the landmark genes into a perturbation barcode that reveals important features of the underlying data, performing better than the raw data in revealing important biological insights. The barcode captures compound structure and target information, and predicts a compound’s high throughput screening promiscuity, to a higher degree than the original data measurements, indicating that the approach uncovers underlying factors of the expression data that are otherwise entangled or masked by noise. Furthermore, we demonstrate that visualizations derived from the perturbation barcode can be used to more sensitively assign functions to unknown compounds through a guilt-by-association approach, which we use to predict and experimentally validate the activity of compounds on the MAPK pathway. The demonstrated application of deep metric learning to large-scale chemical genetics projects highlights the utility of this and related approaches to the extraction of insights and testable hypotheses from big, sometimes noisy data. PMID:28182661

  7. Targeted mutagenesis of zebrafish antithrombin III triggers disseminated intravascular coagulation and thrombosis, revealing insight into function

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Kretz, Colin A.; Maeder, Morgan L.; Richter, Catherine E.; Tsao, Philip; Vo, Andy H.; Huarng, Michael C.; Rode, Thomas; Hu, Zhilian; Mehra, Rohit; Olson, Steven T.; Joung, J. Keith

    2014-01-01

    Pathologic blood clotting is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the developed world, underlying deep vein thrombosis, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Genetic predisposition to thrombosis is still poorly understood, and we hypothesize that there are many additional risk alleles and modifying factors remaining to be discovered. Mammalian models have contributed to our understanding of thrombosis, but are low throughput and costly. We have turned to the zebrafish, a tool for high-throughput genetic analysis. Using zinc finger nucleases, we show that disruption of the zebrafish antithrombin III (at3) locus results in spontaneous venous thrombosis in larvae. Although homozygous mutants survive into early adulthood, they eventually succumb to massive intracardiac thrombosis. Characterization of null fish revealed disseminated intravascular coagulation in larvae secondary to unopposed thrombin activity and fibrinogen consumption, which could be rescued by both human and zebrafish at3 complementary DNAs. Mutation of the human AT3-reactive center loop abolished the ability to rescue, but the heparin-binding site was dispensable. These results demonstrate overall conservation of AT3 function in zebrafish, but reveal developmental variances in the ability to tolerate excessive clot formation. The accessibility of early zebrafish development will provide unique methods for dissection of the underlying mechanisms of thrombosis. PMID:24782510

  8. Revealing the nature of the active site on the carbon catalyst for C-H bond activation.

    PubMed

    Sun, XiaoYing; Li, Bo; Su, Dangsheng

    2014-09-28

    A reactivity descriptor for the C-H bond activation on the nanostructured carbon catalyst is proposed. Furthermore the calculations reveal that the single ketone group can be an active site in ODH reaction.

  9. Cross-species transcriptomic approach reveals genes in hamster implantation sites.

    PubMed

    Lei, Wei; Herington, Jennifer; Galindo, Cristi L; Ding, Tianbing; Brown, Naoko; Reese, Jeff; Paria, Bibhash C

    2014-12-01

    The mouse model has greatly contributed to understanding molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of progesterone (P4) plus estrogen (E)-dependent blastocyst implantation process. However, little is known about contributory molecular mechanisms of the P4-only-dependent blastocyst implantation process that occurs in species such as hamsters, guineapigs, rabbits, pigs, rhesus monkeys, and perhaps humans. We used the hamster as a model of P4-only-dependent blastocyst implantation and carried out cross-species microarray (CSM) analyses to reveal differentially expressed genes at the blastocyst implantation site (BIS), in order to advance the understanding of molecular mechanisms of implantation. Upregulation of 112 genes and downregulation of 77 genes at the BIS were identified using a mouse microarray platform, while use of the human microarray revealed 62 up- and 38 down-regulated genes at the BIS. Excitingly, a sizable number of genes (30 up- and 11 down-regulated genes) were identified as a shared pool by both CSMs. Real-time RT-PCR and in situ hybridization validated the expression patterns of several up- and down-regulated genes identified by both CSMs at the hamster and mouse BIS to demonstrate the merit of CSM findings across species, in addition to revealing genes specific to hamsters. Functional annotation analysis found that genes involved in the spliceosome, proteasome, and ubiquination pathways are enriched at the hamster BIS, while genes associated with tight junction, SAPK/JNK signaling, and PPARα/RXRα signalings are repressed at the BIS. Overall, this study provides a pool of genes and evidence of their participation in up- and down-regulated cellular functions/pathways at the hamster BIS.

  10. Recent discoveries of influenza A drug target sites to combat virus replication.

    PubMed

    Patel, Hershna; Kukol, Andreas

    2016-06-15

    Sequence variations in the binding sites of influenza A proteins are known to limit the effectiveness of current antiviral drugs. Clinically, this leads to increased rates of virus transmission and pathogenicity. Potential influenza A inhibitors are continually being discovered as a result of high-throughput cell based screening studies, whereas the application of computational tools to aid drug discovery has further increased the number of predicted inhibitors reported. This review brings together the aspects that relate to the identification of influenza A drug target sites and the findings from recent antiviral drug discovery strategies.

  11. Synthetic lethal screening reveals FGFR as one of the combinatorial targets to overcome resistance to Met-targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, B; Wang, S; Lee, J M; Jeong, Y; Ahn, T; Son, D-S; Park, H W; Yoo, H-s; Song, Y-J; Lee, E; Oh, Y M; Lee, S B; Choi, J; Murray, J C; Zhou, Y; Song, P H; Kim, K-A; Weiner, L M

    2015-02-26

    Met is a receptor tyrosine kinase that promotes cancer progression. In addition, Met has been implicated in resistance of tumors to various targeted therapies such as epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors in lung cancers, and has been prioritized as a key molecular target for cancer therapy. However, the underlying mechanism of resistance to Met-targeting drugs is poorly understood. Here, we describe screening of 1310 genes to search for key regulators related to drug resistance to an anti-Met therapeutic antibody (SAIT301) by using a small interfering RNA-based synthetic lethal screening method. We found that knockdown of 69 genes in Met-amplified MKN45 cells sensitized the antitumor activity of SAIT301. Pathway analysis of these 69 genes implicated fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) as a key regulator for antiproliferative effects of Met-targeting drugs. Inhibition of FGFR3 increased target cell apoptosis through the suppression of Bcl-xL expression, followed by reduced cancer cell growth in the presence of Met-targeting drugs. Treatment of cells with the FGFR inhibitors substantially restored the efficacy of SAIT301 in SAIT301-resistant cells and enhanced the efficacy in SAIT301-sensitive cells. In addition to FGFR3, integrin β3 is another potential target for combination treatment with SAIT301. Suppression of integrin β3 decreased AKT phosphorylation in SAIT301-resistant cells and restored SAIT301 responsiveness in HCC1954 cells, which are resistant to SAIT301. Gene expression analysis using CCLE database shows that cancer cells with high levels of FGFR and integrin β3 are resistant to crizotinib treatment, suggesting that FGFR and integrin β3 could be used as predictive markers for Met-targeted therapy and provide a potential therapeutic option to overcome acquired and innate resistance for the Met-targeting drugs.

  12. COSMID: A Web-based Tool for Identifying and Validating CRISPR/Cas Off-target Sites

    PubMed Central

    Cradick, Thomas J; Qiu, Peng; Lee, Ciaran M; Fine, Eli J; Bao, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Precise genome editing using engineered nucleases can significantly facilitate biological studies and disease treatment. In particular, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) with CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins are a potentially powerful tool for modifying a genome by targeted cleavage of DNA sequences complementary to designed guide strand RNAs. Although CRISPR/Cas systems can have on-target cleavage rates close to the transfection rates, they may also have relatively high off-target cleavage at similar genomic sites that contain one or more base pair mismatches, and insertions or deletions relative to the guide strand. We have developed a bioinformatics-based tool, COSMID (CRISPR Off-target Sites with Mismatches, Insertions, and Deletions) that searches genomes for potential off-target sites (http://crispr.bme.gatech.edu). Based on the user-supplied guide strand and input parameters, COSMID identifies potential off-target sites with the specified number of mismatched bases and insertions or deletions when compared with the guide strand. For each site, amplification primers optimal for the chosen application are also given as output. This ranked-list of potential off-target sites assists the choice and evaluation of intended target sites, thus helping the design of CRISPR/Cas systems with minimal off-target effects, as well as the identification and quantification of CRISPR/Cas induced off-target cleavage in cells. PMID:25462530

  13. Conserved Hydration Sites in Pin1 Reveal a Distinctive Water Recognition Motif in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Barman, Arghya; Smitherman, Crystal; Souffrant, Michael; Gadda, Giovanni; Hamelberg, Donald

    2016-01-25

    Structurally conserved water molecules are important for biomolecular stability, flexibility, and function. X-ray crystallographic studies of Pin1 have resolved a number of water molecules around the enzyme, including two highly conserved water molecules within the protein. The functional role of these localized water molecules remains unknown and unexplored. Pin1 catalyzes cis/trans isomerizations of peptidyl prolyl bonds that are preceded by a phosphorylated serine or threonine residue. Pin1 is involved in many subcellular signaling processes and is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of several life threatening diseases. Here, we investigate the significance of these structurally conserved water molecules in the catalytic domain of Pin1 using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, free energy calculations, analysis of X-ray crystal structures, and circular dichroism (CD) experiments. MD simulations and free energy calculations suggest the tighter binding water molecule plays a crucial role in maintaining the integrity and stability of a critical hydrogen-bonding network in the active site. The second water molecule is exchangeable with bulk solvent and is found in a distinctive helix-turn-coil motif. Structural bioinformatics analysis of nonredundant X-ray crystallographic protein structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) suggest this motif is present in several other proteins and can act as a water site, akin to the calcium EF hand. CD experiments suggest the isolated motif is in a distorted PII conformation and requires the protein environment to fully form the α-helix-turn-coil motif. This study provides valuable insights into the role of hydration in the structural integrity of Pin1 that can be exploited in protein engineering and drug design.

  14. Relative position and pose measurement approach of specific operation site of space non-cooperative target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feng; Zhou, Ying; Li, Ronghua; Huang, Jianming

    2015-12-01

    In order to achieve the rendezvous and capture of the space non-cooperative target, the relative position and pose measurement of non-cooperative target must be resolved. Since the marker is not installed into the non-cooperative target and there is no inter satellite link to transfer the information, so it is very difficult to measure the relative position and pose measurement of non-cooperative target. The solar array connecting frame of non-cooperative targets have their characters and are easy to capture, so the position and pose measurement of specific operation site of non-cooperative target based on stereo vision has been studied in this paper. The method composed of image acquiring, image filtering, edge detection, feature extraction and relative pose measurement. Finally, the relative position and attitude parameters of the solar wing connection were obtained and provided to the control system. The results of simulation and ground verification show that the algorithm is accurate and effective, and can satisfy the technical requirements of the on orbit operation. The measurement approach can be used for engineering implementation.

  15. Targeted Isolation of Antibodies Directed against Major Sites of SIV Env Vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Rosemarie D.; Welles, Hugh C.; Adams, Cameron; Chakrabarti, Bimal K.; Gorman, Jason; Zhou, Tongqing; Nguyen, Richard; O’Dell, Sijy; Lusvarghi, Sabrina; Bewley, Carole A.; Li, Hui; Shaw, George M.; Sheng, Zizhang; Shapiro, Lawrence; Wyatt, Richard; Kwong, Peter D.; Mascola, John R.; Roederer, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) challenge model of lentiviral infection is often used as a model to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) for studying vaccine mediated and immune correlates of protection. However, knowledge of the structure of the SIV envelope (Env) glycoprotein is limited, as is knowledge of binding specificity, function and potential efficacy of SIV antibody responses. In this study we describe the use of a competitive probe binding sort strategy as well as scaffolded probes for targeted isolation of SIV Env-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). We isolated nearly 70 SIV-specific mAbs directed against major sites of SIV Env vulnerability analogous to broadly neutralizing antibody (bnAb) targets of HIV-1, namely, the CD4 binding site (CD4bs), CD4-induced (CD4i)-site, peptide epitopes in variable loops 1, 2 and 3 (V1, V2, V3) and potentially glycan targets of SIV Env. The range of SIV mAbs isolated includes those exhibiting varying degrees of neutralization breadth and potency as well as others that demonstrated binding but not neutralization. Several SIV mAbs displayed broad and potent neutralization of a diverse panel of 20 SIV viral isolates with some also neutralizing HIV-27312A. This extensive panel of SIV mAbs will facilitate more effective use of the SIV non-human primate (NHP) model for understanding the variables in development of a HIV vaccine or immunotherapy. PMID:27064278

  16. 2013 Philip S. Portoghese Medicinal Chemistry Lectureship: drug discovery targeting allosteric sites.

    PubMed

    Lindsley, Craig W

    2014-09-25

    The identification of sites on receptors topographically distinct from the orthosteric sites, so-called allosteric sites, has heralded novel approaches and modes of pharmacology for target modulation. Over the past 20 years, our understanding of allosteric modulation has grown significantly, and numerous advantages, as well as caveats (e.g., flat structure-activity relationships, species differences, "molecular switches"), have been identified. For multiple receptors and proteins, numerous examples have been described where unprecedented levels of selectivity are achieved along with improved physiochemical properties. While not a panacea, these novel approaches represent exciting opportunities for tool compound development to probe the pharmacology and therapeutic potential of discrete molecular targets, as well as new medicines. In this Perspective, in commemoration of the 2013 Philip S. Portoghese Medicinal Chemistry Lectureship ( Lindsley , C. W. Adventures in allosteric drug discovery . Presented at the 246th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, Indianapolis, IN, September 10, 2013 ; The 2013 Portoghese Lectureship ), several vignettes of drug discovery campaigns targeting novel allosteric mechanisms will be recounted, along with lessons learned and guidelines that have emerged for successful lead optimization.

  17. Hypothalamus proteomics from mouse models with obesity and anorexia reveals therapeutic targets of appetite regulation

    PubMed Central

    Manousopoulou, A; Koutmani, Y; Karaliota, S; Woelk, C H; Manolakos, E S; Karalis, K; Garbis, S D

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the proteomic profile of the hypothalamus in mice exposed to a high-fat diet (HFD) or with the anorexia of acute illness. This comparison could provide insight on the effects of these two opposite states of energy balance on appetite regulation. Methods: Four to six-week-old male C56BL/6J mice were fed a normal (control 1 group; n=7) or a HFD (HFD group; n=10) for 8 weeks. The control 2 (n=7) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) groups (n=10) were fed a normal diet for 8 weeks before receiving an injection of saline and LPS, respectively. Hypothalamic regions were analysed using a quantitative proteomics method based on a combination of techniques including iTRAQ stable isotope labeling, orthogonal two-dimensional liquid chromatography hyphenated with nanospray ionization and high-resolution mass spectrometry. Key proteins were validated with quantitative PCR. Results: Quantitative proteomics of the hypothalamous regions profiled a total of 9249 protein groups (q<0.05). Of these, 7718 protein groups were profiled with a minimum of two unique peptides for each. Hierachical clustering of the differentiated proteome revealed distinct proteomic signatures for the hypothalamus under the HFD and LPS nutritional conditions. Literature research with in silico bioinformatics interpretation of the differentiated proteome identified key biological relevant proteins and implicated pathways. Furthermore, the study identified potential pharmacologic targets. In the LPS groups, the anorexigen pro-opiomelanocortin was downregulated. In mice with obesity, nuclear factor-κB, glycine receptor subunit alpha-4 (GlyR) and neuropeptide Y levels were elevated, whereas serotonin receptor 1B levels decreased. Conclusions: High-precision quantitative proteomics revealed that under acute systemic inflammation in the hypothalamus as a response to LPS, homeostatic mechanisms mediating loss of appetite take effect. Conversely, under chronic inflammation in the

  18. Host factors in retroviral integration and the selection of integration target sites

    PubMed Central

    Craigie, Robert; Bushman, Frederic D.

    2015-01-01

    In order to replicate, a retrovirus must integrate a DNA copy of the viral RNA genome into a chromosome of the host cell. The study of retroviral integration has advanced considerably in the last few years. Here we focus on host factor interactions and the linked area of integration targeting. Genome-wide screens for cellular factors affecting HIV replication have identified a series of host cell proteins that may mediate subcellular trafficking of integration complexes, nuclear import, and integration target site selection. The cell transcriptional co-activator protein LEDGF/p75 has been identified as a tethering factor important for HIV integration, and recently, BET proteins (Brd2, 4, and 4) have been identified as tethering factors for the gammaretroviruses. A new class of HIV inhibitors has been developed targeting the HIV-1 IN-LEDGF binding site, though surprisingly these inhibitors appear to block assembly late during replication and do not act at the integration step. Going forward, genome-wide studies of HIV-host interactions offer many new starting points to investigate HIV replication and identify potential new inhibitor targets. PMID:26104434

  19. Targeting Receptors, Transporters and Site of Absorption to Improve Oral Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Hamman, J.H.; Demana, P.H.; Olivier, E.I.

    2007-01-01

    Although the oral route of drug administration is the most acceptable way of self-medication with a high degree of patient compliance, the intestinal absorption of many drugs is severely hampered by different biological barriers. These barriers comprise of biochemical and physical components. The biochemical barrier includes enzymatic degradation in the gastrointestinal lumen, brush border and in the cytoplasm of the epithelial cells as well as efflux transporters that pump drug molecules from inside the epithelial cell back to the gastrointestinal lumen. The physical barrier consists of the epithelial cell membranes, tight junctions and mucus layer. Different strategies have been applied to improve the absorption of drugs after oral administration, which range from chemical modification of drug molecules and formulation technologies to the targeting of receptors, transporters and specialized cells such as the gut-associated lymphoid tissues. This review focuses specifically on the targeting of receptor-mediated endocytosis, transporters and the absorption-site as methods of optimizing intestinal drug absorption. Intestinal epithelial cells express several nutrient transporters that can be targeted by modifying the drug molecule in such a way that it is recognized as a substrate. Receptor-mediated endocytosis is a transport mechanism that can be targeted for instance by linking a receptor substrate to the drug molecule of interest. Many formulation strategies exist for enhancing drug absorption of which one is to deliver drugs at a specific site in the gastrointestinal tract where optimum drug absorption takes place. PMID:21901064

  20. Pharmacoinformatic and molecular docking studies reveal potential novel antidepressants against neurodegenerative disorders by targeting HSPB8

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Sheikh Arslan; Mannan, Shazia; Ali, Sannia

    2016-01-01

    Charcot–Marie–Tooth (CMT) disease is an inherited peripheral neuromuscular disorder characterized by length-dependent and progressive degeneration of peripheral nerves, leading to muscular weakness. Research has shown that mutated HSPB8 may be responsible for depression, neurodegenerative disorders, and improper functioning of peripheral nerves, resulting in neuromuscular disorders like CMT. In the current work, a hybrid approach of virtual screening and molecular docking studies was followed by homology modeling and pharmacophore identification. Detailed screening analyses were carried out by 2-D similarity search against prescribed antidepressant drugs with physicochemical properties. LigandScout was employed to ascertain novel molecules and pharmacophore properties. In this study, we report three novel compounds that showed maximum binding affinity with HSPB8. Docking analysis elucidated that Met37, Ser57, Ser58, Trp60, Thr63, Thr114, Lys115, Asp116, Gly117, Val152, Val154, Leu186, Asp189, Ser190, Gln191, and Glu192 are critical residues for ligand–receptor interactions. Our analyses suggested paroxetine as a potent compound for targeting HSPB8. Selected compounds have more effective energy scores than the selected drug analogs. Additionally, site-directed mutagenesis could be significant for further analysis of the binding pocket. The novel findings based on an in silico approach may be momentous for potent drug design against depression and CMT. PMID:27226709

  1. Targeted CRISPR disruption reveals a role for RNase MRP RNA in human preribosomal RNA processing.

    PubMed

    Goldfarb, Katherine C; Cech, Thomas R

    2017-01-01

    MRP RNA is an abundant, essential noncoding RNA whose functions have been proposed in yeast but are incompletely understood in humans. Mutations in the genomic locus for MRP RNA cause pleiotropic human diseases, including cartilage hair hypoplasia (CHH). Here we applied CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing to disrupt the endogenous human MRP RNA locus, thereby attaining what has eluded RNAi and RNase H experiments: elimination of MRP RNA in the majority of cells. The resulting accumulation of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) precursor-analyzed by RNA fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), Northern blots, and RNA sequencing-implicates MRP RNA in pre-rRNA processing. Amelioration of pre-rRNA imbalance is achieved through rescue of MRP RNA levels by ectopic expression. Furthermore, affinity-purified MRP ribonucleoprotein (RNP) from HeLa cells cleaves the human pre-rRNA in vitro at at least one site used in cells, while RNP isolated from cells with CRISPR-edited MRP loci loses this activity, and ectopic MRP RNA expression restores cleavage activity. Thus, a role for RNase MRP in human pre-rRNA processing is established. As demonstrated here, targeted CRISPR disruption is a valuable tool for functional studies of essential noncoding RNAs that are resistant to RNAi and RNase H-based degradation.

  2. Revealing praziquantel molecular targets using mass spectrometry imaging: an expeditious approach applied to Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Mônica Siqueira; de Oliveira, Rosimeire Nunes; de Oliveira, Diogo Noin; Esteves, Cibele Zanardi; Allegretti, Silmara Marques; Catharino, Rodrigo Ramos

    2015-05-01

    Finding specific molecular targets and the mechanism of action of praziquantel in the treatment of schistosomiasis remains a challenging task. Our efforts were focused on obtaining further information on worm composition before and after exposure to praziquantel in the treatment of schistosomiasis to elucidate the potential sites of action of this drug. Evidence indicates that the lipid bilayer is changed by treatment with praziquantel. Following this rationale, we employed a mass spectrometry imaging-based approach that helped to characterise lipids in specific locations, which are directly involved in the biochemical pathways of the BH strain of Schistosoma mansoni, as well as differentiating the molecular response that each worm sex presents in vivo. Our findings demonstrated significant differences between the chemical markers found in adult worms before and after praziquantel exposure, especially in phospholipids, which were predominantly identified as chemical markers in all samples. Results also indicate that distinct molecular pathways in both male and female worms could be differentially affected by praziquantel treatment. These data shine new light on the mechanism of action of praziquantel, taking a further step towards its full understanding.

  3. Targeted and genome-scale strategies reveal gene-body methylation signatures in human cells.

    PubMed

    Ball, Madeleine P; Li, Jin Billy; Gao, Yuan; Lee, Je-Hyuk; LeProust, Emily M; Park, In-Hyun; Xie, Bin; Daley, George Q; Church, George M

    2009-04-01

    Studies of epigenetic modifications would benefit from improved methods for high-throughput methylation profiling. We introduce two complementary approaches that use next-generation sequencing technology to detect cytosine methylation. In the first method, we designed approximately 10,000 bisulfite padlock probes to profile approximately 7,000 CpG locations distributed over the ENCODE pilot project regions and applied them to human B-lymphocytes, fibroblasts and induced pluripotent stem cells. This unbiased choice of targets takes advantage of existing expression and chromatin immunoprecipitation data and enabled us to observe a pattern of low promoter methylation and high gene-body methylation in highly expressed genes. The second method, methyl-sensitive cut counting, generated nontargeted genome-scale data for approximately 1.4 million HpaII sites in the DNA of B-lymphocytes and confirmed that gene-body methylation in highly expressed genes is a consistent phenomenon throughout the human genome. Our observations highlight the usefulness of techniques that are not inherently or intentionally biased towards particular subsets like CpG islands or promoter regions.

  4. DNA fingerprinting reveals elevated mutation rates in herring gulls inhabiting a genotoxically contaminated site

    SciTech Connect

    Yauk, C.L.; Quinn, J.S.

    1995-12-31

    The authors used multi-locus DNA fingerprinting to examine families of herring gulls (Larus argentatus) from a genotoxically contaminated site (Hamilton Harbour) and from a pristine location (Kent Island, Bay of Fundy) to show significant differences in mutation rates between the locations. Overall the authors identified 17 mutant bands from 15 individuals of the 35 examined from Hamilton Harbour, and 7 mutant fragments from 7 individuals, of the 43 examined from Kent Island; a mutation frequency of 0.429 per nestling for Hamilton Harbour and 0.163 for Kent Island. The total number of individuals with mutant bands was significantly higher at Hamilton Harbour than at Kent Island (X{sup 2}=6.734; df = 1; P < 0.01). Ongoing analysis of other less contaminated sites also reveals lower mutation rates than those seen in Hamilton Harbour. With multi-locus DNA fingerprinting many regions of the genome can be surveyed simultaneously. The tandemly repeated arrays of nucleotides examined with DNA fingerprinting are known to have elevated rates of mutation. Furthermore, the mutations seen with DNA fingerprinting are predominantly heritable. Other biomarkers currently used in situ are not able to monitor direct and heritable DNA mutation, or measure biological endpoints that frequently result in spontaneous abortion creating difficulty in observing significantly elevated levels in viable offspring. The authors suggest that multilocus DNA fingerprinting can be used as a biomarker to identify potentially heritable risks before the onset of other types of ecological damage. This approach provides a direct measure of mutation in situ and in vivo in a vertebrate species under ambient conditions.

  5. Computational approaches to find the active binding sites of biological targets against busulfan.

    PubMed

    Karthick, T; Tandon, Poonam

    2016-06-01

    Determination of electrophilic and nucleophilic sites of a molecule is the primary task to find the active sites of the lead molecule. In the present study, the active sites of busulfan have been predicted by molecular electrostatic potential surface and Fukui function analysis with the help of dispersion corrected density functional theory. Similarly, the identification of active binding sites of the proteins against lead compound plays a vital role in the field of drug discovery. Rigid and flexible molecular docking approaches are used for this purpose. For rigid docking, Hex 8.0.0 software employing fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithm has been used. The partial flexible blind docking simulations have been performed with AutoDock 4.2 software; where a Lamarckian genetic algorithm is employed. The results showed that the most electrophilic atoms of busulfan bind with the targets. It is clear from the docking studies that busulfan has inhibition capability toward the targets 12CA and 1BZM. Graphical Abstract Docking of ligand and protein.

  6. Protecting Important Sites for Biodiversity Contributes to Meeting Global Conservation Targets

    PubMed Central

    Butchart, Stuart H. M.; Scharlemann, Jörn P. W.; Evans, Mike I.; Quader, Suhel; Aricò, Salvatore; Arinaitwe, Julius; Balman, Mark; Bennun, Leon A.; Bertzky, Bastian; Besançon, Charles; Boucher, Timothy M.; Brooks, Thomas M.; Burfield, Ian J.; Burgess, Neil D.; Chan, Simba; Clay, Rob P.; Crosby, Mike J.; Davidson, Nicholas C.; De Silva, Naamal; Devenish, Christian; Dutson, Guy C. L.; Fernández, David F. Día z; Fishpool, Lincoln D. C.; Fitzgerald, Claire; Foster, Matt; Heath, Melanie F.; Hockings, Marc; Hoffmann, Michael; Knox, David; Larsen, Frank W.; Lamoreux, John F.; Loucks, Colby; May, Ian; Millett, James; Molloy, Dominic; Morling, Paul; Parr, Mike; Ricketts, Taylor H.; Seddon, Nathalie; Skolnik, Benjamin; Stuart, Simon N.; Upgren, Amy; Woodley, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Protected areas (PAs) are a cornerstone of conservation efforts and now cover nearly 13% of the world's land surface, with the world's governments committed to expand this to 17%. However, as biodiversity continues to decline, the effectiveness of PAs in reducing the extinction risk of species remains largely untested. We analyzed PA coverage and trends in species' extinction risk at globally significant sites for conserving birds (10,993 Important Bird Areas, IBAs) and highly threatened vertebrates and conifers (588 Alliance for Zero Extinction sites, AZEs) (referred to collectively hereafter as ‘important sites’). Species occurring in important sites with greater PA coverage experienced smaller increases in extinction risk over recent decades: the increase was half as large for bird species with>50% of the IBAs at which they occur completely covered by PAs, and a third lower for birds, mammals and amphibians restricted to protected AZEs (compared with unprotected or partially protected sites). Globally, half of the important sites for biodiversity conservation remain unprotected (49% of IBAs, 51% of AZEs). While PA coverage of important sites has increased over time, the proportion of PA area covering important sites, as opposed to less important land, has declined (by 0.45–1.14% annually since 1950 for IBAs and 0.79–1.49% annually for AZEs). Thus, while appropriately located PAs may slow the rate at which species are driven towards extinction, recent PA network expansion has under-represented important sites. We conclude that better targeted expansion of PA networks would help to improve biodiversity trends. PMID:22457717

  7. Targeted next-generation sequencing reveals multiple deleterious variants in OPLL-associated genes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Guo, Jun; Cai, Tao; Zhang, Fengshan; Pan, Shengfa; Zhang, Li; Wang, Shaobo; Zhou, Feifei; Diao, Yinze; Zhao, Yanbin; Chen, Zhen; Liu, Xiaoguang; Chen, Zhongqiang; Liu, Zhongjun; Sun, Yu; Du, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the spine (OPLL), which is characterized by ectopic bone formation in the spinal ligaments, can cause spinal-cord compression. To date, at least 11 susceptibility genes have been genetically linked to OPLL. In order to identify potential deleterious alleles in these OPLL-associated genes, we designed a capture array encompassing all coding regions of the target genes for next-generation sequencing (NGS) in a cohort of 55 unrelated patients with OPLL. By bioinformatics analyses, we successfully identified three novel and five extremely rare variants (MAF < 0.005). These variants were predicted to be deleterious by commonly used various algorithms, thereby resulting in missense mutations in four OPLL-associated genes (i.e., COL6A1, COL11A2, FGFR1, and BMP2). Furthermore, potential effects of the patient with p.Q89E of BMP2 were confirmed by a markedly increased BMP2 level in peripheral blood samples. Notably, seven of the variants were found to be associated with the patients with continuous subtype changes by cervical spinal radiological analyses. Taken together, our findings revealed for the first time that deleterious coding variants of the four OPLL-associated genes are potentially pathogenic in the patients with OPLL. PMID:27246988

  8. Targeted Resequencing of Deafness Genes Reveals a Founder MYO15A Variant in Northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Manzoli, Gabrielle N; Bademci, Guney; Acosta, Angelina X; Félix, Têmis M; Cengiz, F Basak; Foster, Joseph; Da Silva, Danniel S Dias; Menendez, Ibis; Sanchez-Pena, Isalis; Tekin, Demet; Blanton, Susan H; Abe-Sandes, Kiyoko; Liu, Xue Zhong; Tekin, Mustafa

    2016-11-01

    Identifying the genetic etiology in a person with hearing loss (HL) is challenging due to the extreme genetic heterogeneity in HL and the population-specific variability. In this study, after excluding GJB2 variants, targeted resequencing of 180 deafness-related genes revealed the causative variants in 11 of 19 (58%) Brazilian probands with autosomal recessive HL. Identified pathogenic variants were in MYO15A (10 families) and CLDN14 (one family). Remarkably, the MYO15A p.(Val1400Met) variant was identified in eight families from the city of Monte Santo in the northeast region of Brazil. Haplotype analysis of this variant was consistent with a single founder. No other cases with this variant were detected among 105 simplex cases from other cities of northeastern Brazil, suggesting that this variant is confined to a geographical region. This study suggests that it is feasible to develop population-specific screening for deafness variants once causative variants are identified in different geographical groups.

  9. Targeted capture and resequencing of 1040 genes reveal environmentally driven functional variation in grey wolves.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Rena M; Robinson, Jacqueline; Harrigan, Ryan; Silva, Pedro; Galverni, Marco; Musiani, Marco; Green, Richard E; Novembre, John; Wayne, Robert K

    2016-01-01

    In an era of ever-increasing amounts of whole-genome sequence data for individuals and populations, the utility of traditional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) array-based genome scans is uncertain. We previously performed a SNP array-based genome scan to identify candidate genes under selection in six distinct grey wolf (Canis lupus) ecotypes. Using this information, we designed a targeted capture array for 1040 genes, including all exons and flanking regions, as well as 5000 1-kb nongenic neutral regions, and resequenced these regions in 107 wolves. Selection tests revealed striking patterns of variation within candidate genes relative to noncandidate regions and identified potentially functional variants related to local adaptation. We found 27% and 47% of candidate genes from the previous SNP array study had functional changes that were outliers in sweed and bayenv analyses, respectively. This result verifies the use of genomewide SNP surveys to tag genes that contain functional variants between populations. We highlight nonsynonymous variants in APOB, LIPG and USH2A that occur in functional domains of these proteins, and that demonstrate high correlation with precipitation seasonality and vegetation. We find Arctic and High Arctic wolf ecotypes have higher numbers of genes under selection, which highlight their conservation value and heightened threat due to climate change. This study demonstrates that combining genomewide genotyping arrays with large-scale resequencing and environmental data provides a powerful approach to discern candidate functional variants in natural populations.

  10. Revealing interaction between sulfobutylether-β-cyclodextrin and reserpine by chemiluminescence and site-directed molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xunyu; Wu, Min; Zhao, Xinfeng; Song, Zhenghua

    2014-09-01

    The host-guest interaction between sulfobutylether-β-cyclodextrin (SBE-β-CD) and reserpine (RSP) is described using flow injection-chemiluminescence (FI-CL) and site-directed molecular docking methods. It was found that RSP could inhibit the CL intensity produced by a luminol/SBE-β-CD system. The decrease in CL intensity was logarithmic over an RSP concentration range of 0.03 to 700.0 nM, giving a regression equation of ∆I = 107.1lgCRES  + 186.1 with a detection limit of 10 pM (3σ). The CL assay was successfully applied in the determination of RSP in injection, saliva and urine samples with recoveries in the range 93.5-106.1%. Using the proposed CL model, the binding constant (KCD-R ) and the stoichiometric ratio of SBE-β-CD/RSP were calculated to be 7.4 × 10(6)  M(-1) and 1 : 1, respectively. Using molecular docking, it was confirmed that luminol binds to the small cavity of SBE-β-CD with a nonpolar interaction, while RSP targeted the larger cavity of SBE-β-CD and formed a 1 : 1 complex with hydrogen bonds. The proposed new CL method has the potential to become a powerful tool for revealing the host-guest interaction between CDs and drugs, as well as monitoring drugs with high sensitivity.

  11. Nanoscale electrochemical patterning reveals the active sites for catechol oxidation at graphite surfaces.

    PubMed

    Patel, Anisha N; McKelvey, Kim; Unwin, Patrick R

    2012-12-19

    Graphite-based electrodes (graphite, graphene, and nanotubes) are used widely in electrochemistry, and there is a long-standing view that graphite step edges are needed to catalyze many reactions, with the basal surface considered to be inert. In the present work, this model was tested directly for the first time using scanning electrochemical cell microscopy reactive patterning and shown to be incorrect. For the electro-oxidation of dopamine as a model process, the reaction rate was measured at high spatial resolution across a surface of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. Oxidation products left behind in a pattern defined by the scanned electrochemical cell served as surface-site markers, allowing the electrochemical activity to be correlated directly with the graphite structure on the nanoscale. This process produced tens of thousands of electrochemical measurements at different locations across the basal surface, unambiguously revealing it to be highly electrochemically active, with step edges providing no enhanced activity. This new model of graphite electrodes has significant implications for the design of carbon-based biosensors, and the results are additionally important for understanding electrochemical processes on related sp(2)-hybridized materials such as pristine graphene and nanotubes.

  12. Structure analysis reveals the flexibility of the ADAMTS-5 active site

    SciTech Connect

    Shieh, Huey-Sheng; Tomasselli, Alfredo G.; Mathis, Karl J.; Schnute, Mark E.; Woodard, Scott S.; Caspers, Nicole; Williams, Jennifer M.; Kiefer, James R.; Munie, Grace; Wittwer, Arthur; Malfait, Anne-Marie; Tortorella, Micky D.

    2012-03-02

    A ((1S,2R)-2-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-yl) succinamide derivative (here referred to as Compound 12) shows significant activity toward many matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), including MMP-2, MMP-8, MMP-9, and MMP-13. Modeling studies had predicted that this compound would not bind to ADAMTS-5 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs-5) due to its shallow S1' pocket. However, inhibition analysis revealed it to be a nanomolar inhibitor of both ADAMTS-4 and -5. The observed inconsistency was explained by analysis of crystallographic structures, which showed that Compound 12 in complex with the catalytic domain of ADAMTS-5 (cataTS5) exhibits an unusual conformation in the S1' pocket of the protein. This first demonstration that cataTS5 can undergo an induced conformational change in its active site pocket by a molecule like Compound 12 should enable the design of new aggrecanase inhibitors with better potency and selectivity profiles.

  13. Fitness cost implications of phiC31-mediated site-specific integrations in target-site strains of the Mexican fruit fly, Anastrepha ludens (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Site-specific recombination technologies are powerful new tools for the manipulation of genomic DNA in insects that can improve transgenesis strategies such as targeting transgene insertions, allowing transgene cassette exchange and DNA mobilization for transgene stabilization. However, understandin...

  14. Advances in osteoclast biology reveal potential new drug targets and new roles for osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Brendan F

    2013-04-01

    Osteoclasts are multinucleated myeloid lineage cells formed in response to macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) by fusion of bone marrow-derived precursors that circulate in the blood and are attracted to sites of bone resorption in response to factors, such as sphingosine-1 phosphate signaling. Major advances in understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating osteoclast functions have been made in the past 20 years, mainly from mouse and human genetic studies. These have revealed that osteoclasts express and respond to proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Some of these cytokines activate NF-κB and nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1) signaling to induce osteoclast formation and activity and also regulate communication with neighboring cells through signaling proteins, including ephrins and semaphorins. Osteoclasts also positively and negatively regulate immune responses and osteoblastic bone formation. These advances have led to development of new inhibitors of bone resorption that are in clinical use or in clinical trials; and more should follow, based on these advances. This article reviews current understanding of how bone resorption is regulated both positively and negatively in normal and pathologic states.

  15. Targeting Alpha5 Beta1 Integrin to Prevent Metastatic Breast Cancer Cell Invasion: PhScN Target Site Definition and Plasma Stability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    Definition and Plasma Stability” PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Philip Andrews CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: The Regents of the University of Michigan...Integrin to Prevent Metastatic Breast Cancer Cell Invasion: PhScN Target Site Definition and Plasma Stability 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER...termini, and/or cysteine side chain to determine the initial spatial constraints of the binding pocket of the ligand to its target site. This will

  16. Inacessible Andean sites reveal land-use induced stabilisation of soil organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitkamp, Felix; Maqsood, Shafique; Sylvester, Steven; Kessler, Michael; Jungkunst, Hermann

    2015-04-01

    these findings were a high proportion of complexed SOC in rangeland soils (25 to 36 vs. 59% of SOC were extractable with Na-pyrophosphate in pristine and rangeland soils, respectively). Moreover, less C was associated with the light fraction (< 1.6 g cm-3), but more with the silt fraction (< 1.6 g cm-3 and size between 63 and 2µm). Differences of the δ13C signatures of vegetation and soil (Δδ13C plant-soil) were lower in all density-size fractions and even negative in the light fraction of rangeland soils, meaning that these were more depleted or less enriched with 13C relative to vegetation. This could indicate stabilisation of old C derived from former pristine vegetation (having a lower 13C signature), presence of pyrogenic carbon or specific stabilisation of depleted compounds. Overall, our the approach of using large, inaccessible sites as reference for continuously used sites revealed that grazing management had tremendous effects on the partitioning of SOC among different fractions, but not on the total stocks. Since SOC in rangeland soils was more effectively stabilised, reactions to environmental changes should be slower and SOC in pristine soils is likely to react more sensitive.

  17. Diverse Actions and Target-Site Selectivity of Neonicotinoids: Structural Insights

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Kazuhiko; Kanaoka, Satoshi; Akamatsu, Miki; Sattelle, David B.

    2009-01-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are targets for human and veterinary medicines as well as insecticides. Subtype-selectivity among the diverse nAChR family members is important for medicines targeting particular disorders, and pest-insect selectivity is essential for the development of safer, environmentally acceptable insecticides. Neonicotinoid insecticides selectively targeting insect nAChRs have important applications in crop protection and animal health. Members of this class exhibit strikingly diverse actions on their nAChR targets. Here we review the chemistry and diverse actions of neonicotinoids on insect and mammalian nAChRs. Electrophysiological studies on native nAChRs and on wild-type and mutagenized recombinant nAChRs have shown that basic residues particular to loop D of insect nAChRs are likely to interact electrostatically with the nitro group of neonicotinoids. In 2008, the crystal structures were published showing neonicotinoids docking into the acetylcholine binding site of molluscan acetylcholine binding proteins with homology to the ligand binding domain (LBD) of nAChRs. The crystal structures showed that 1) glutamine in loop D, corresponding to the basic residues of insect nAChRs, hydrogen bonds with the NO2 group of imidacloprid and 2) neonicotinoid-unique stacking and CH-π bonds at the LBD. A neonicotinoid-resistant strain obtained by laboratory-screening has been found to result from target site mutations, and possible reasons for this are also suggested by the crystal structures. The prospects of designing neonicotinoids that are safe not only for mammals but also for beneficial insects such as honey bees (Apis mellifera) are discussed in terms of interactions with non-α nAChR subunits. PMID:19321668

  18. Diverse actions and target-site selectivity of neonicotinoids: structural insights.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Kazuhiko; Kanaoka, Satoshi; Akamatsu, Miki; Sattelle, David B

    2009-07-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are targets for human and veterinary medicines as well as insecticides. Subtype-selectivity among the diverse nAChR family members is important for medicines targeting particular disorders, and pest-insect selectivity is essential for the development of safer, environmentally acceptable insecticides. Neonicotinoid insecticides selectively targeting insect nAChRs have important applications in crop protection and animal health. Members of this class exhibit strikingly diverse actions on their nAChR targets. Here we review the chemistry and diverse actions of neonicotinoids on insect and mammalian nAChRs. Electrophysiological studies on native nAChRs and on wild-type and mutagenized recombinant nAChRs have shown that basic residues particular to loop D of insect nAChRs are likely to interact electrostatically with the nitro group of neonicotinoids. In 2008, the crystal structures were published showing neonicotinoids docking into the acetylcholine binding site of molluscan acetylcholine binding proteins with homology to the ligand binding domain (LBD) of nAChRs. The crystal structures showed that 1) glutamine in loop D, corresponding to the basic residues of insect nAChRs, hydrogen bonds with the NO(2) group of imidacloprid and 2) neonicotinoid-unique stacking and CH-pi bonds at the LBD. A neonicotinoid-resistant strain obtained by laboratory-screening has been found to result from target site mutations, and possible reasons for this are also suggested by the crystal structures. The prospects of designing neonicotinoids that are safe not only for mammals but also for beneficial insects such as honey bees (Apis mellifera) are discussed in terms of interactions with non-alpha nAChR subunits.

  19. Difference Between Dormant Conduction Sites Revealed by Adenosine Triphosphate Provocation and Unipolar Pace-Capture Sites Along the Ablation Line After Pulmonary Vein Isolation.

    PubMed

    Kogawa, Rikitake; Okumura, Yasuo; Watanabe, Ichiro; Sonoda, Kazumasa; Sasaki, Naoko; Takahashi, Keiko; Iso, Kazuki; Nagashima, Koichi; Ohkubo, Kimie; Nakai, Toshiko; Kunimoto, Satoshi; Hirayama, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Dormant pulmonary vein (PV) conduction revealed by adenosine/adenosine triphosphate (ATP) provocation test and exit block to the left atrium by pacing from the PV side of the ablation line ("pace and ablate" method) are used to ensure durable pulmonary vein isolation (PVI). However, the mechanistic relation between ATP-provoked PV reconnection and the unexcitable gap along the ablation line is unclear.Forty-five patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) (paroxysmal: 31 patients, persistent: 14 patients; age: 61.1 ± 9.7 years) underwent extensive encircling PVI (EEPVI, 179 PVs). After completion of EEPVI, an ATP provocation test (30 mg, bolus injection) and unipolar pacing (output, 10 mA; pulse width, 2 ms) were performed along the previous EEPVI ablation line to identify excitable gaps. Dormant conduction was revealed in 29 (34 sites) of 179 PVs (16.2%) after EEP-VI (22/45 patients). Pace capture was revealed in 59 (89 sites) of 179 PVs (33.0%) after EEPVI (39/45 patients), and overlapping sites, ie, sites showing both dormant conduction and pace capture, were observed in 22 of 179 (12.3%) PVs (17/45 patients).Some of the ATP-provoked dormant PV reconnection sites were identical to the sites with excitable gaps revealed by pace capture, but most of the PV sites were differently distributed, suggesting that the main underling mechanism differs between these two forms of reconnection. These findings also suggest that performance of the ATP provocation test followed by the "pace and ablate" method can reduce the occurrence of chronic PV reconnections.

  20. Analysis on establishing Chang'E-3 landing site as a reflectance calibration target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Fu, Xiaohui; Zeng, Xingguo; Yao, Meijuan; Zhang, Hongbo; Su, Yan; Zhao, Shu; Xue, Xiping; Li, Chunlai; Zou, Yongliao

    2015-04-01

    Recent lunar orbital observations suggested that the surface reflectance calculated based on the Apollo 16 standard area and Apollo 16 sample laboratory measurement is significantly different from its true value [1-3], one reason is the composition and maturity differences between the 62231 sampling site and the Apollo 16 standard site existed, the other reason is the physical properties of the returned lunar sample, such as porosity, have been changed during the sampling operations. So more new standard targets on the Moon, besides the widely used Apollo 16 area, are needed for imaging spectrometers on lunar missions to improve their reflectance calibration accuracies. The Chang'E-3 VIS/NIR Imaging Spectrometer (VNIS), which is just fixed at the front of the Yutu rover [4], equipped with a white spectralon panel as reflectance calibration standard, can perform in situ multispectral observations around the Chang'E-3 landing site without altering the physical and mineralogical natures of lunar soils. Therefore, it provides an opportunity to establish a new reliable standard target for in-flight reflectance calibration. The reflectance calibration target should be compositional homogeneous, the topography of which must be flat, and the reflectance should be identical with no nearby units of other different materials. As we have known, Chang'e-3 probe landed on the Mare Imbrium basin in the east part of Sinus Iridum, the landing site is relatively flat at a spatial coverage of ~660km2, and this region belongs to Eratosthenian low-Ti/high-Ti mare basalts [5-6]. According to much higher resolution topography data, elemental data and reflectance data of Chang'E-2 and Chang'E-3[7-8], we preliminary analyse the possibility on establishing Chang'E-3 landing site as a reflectance calibration target. Firstly, the overall terrain of the 4 km×4 km area around the landing site is flat, but there are still three bigger craters existed. Secondly, the composition on Chang'E-3

  1. GHB receptor targets in the CNS: focus on high-affinity binding sites.

    PubMed

    Bay, Tina; Eghorn, Laura F; Klein, Anders B; Wellendorph, Petrine

    2014-01-15

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an endogenous compound in the mammalian brain with both low- and high-affinity receptor targets. GHB is used clinically in the treatment of symptoms of narcolepsy and alcoholism, but also illicitly abused as the recreational drug Fantasy. Major pharmacological effects of exogenous GHB are mediated by GABA subtype B (GABAB) receptors that bind GHB with low affinity. The existence of GHB high-affinity binding sites has been known for more than three decades, but the uncovering of their molecular identity has only recently begun. This has been prompted by the generation of molecular tools to selectively study high-affinity sites. These include both genetically modified GABAB knock-out mice and engineered selective GHB ligands. Recently, certain GABA subtype A (GABAA) receptor subtypes emerged as high-affinity GHB binding sites and potential physiological mediators of GHB effects. In this research update, a description of the various reported receptors for GHB is provided, including GABAB receptors, certain GABAA receptor subtypes and other reported GHB receptors. The main focus will thus be on the high-affinity binding targets for GHB and their potential functional roles in the mammalian brain.

  2. Molecular Expression Profile Reveals Potential Biomarkers and Therapeutic Targets in Canine Endometrial Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Voorwald, Fabiana Azevedo; Marchi, Fabio Albuquerque; Villacis, Rolando Andre Rios; Alves, Carlos Eduardo Fonseca; Toniollo, Gilson Hélio; Amorim, Renee Laufer

    2015-01-01

    Cystic endometrial hyperplasia (CEH), mucometra, and pyometra are common uterine diseases in intact dogs, with pyometra being a life threatening disease. This study aimed to determine the gene expression profile of these lesions and potential biomarkers for closed-cervix pyometra, the most severe condition. Total RNA was extracted from 69 fresh endometrium samples collected from 21 healthy female dogs during diestrus, 16 CEH, 15 mucometra and 17 pyometra (eight open and nine closed-cervixes). Global gene expression was detected using the Affymetrix Canine Gene 1.0 ST Array. Unsupervised analysis revealed two clusters, one mainly composed of diestrus and CEH samples and the other by 12/15 mucometra and all pyometra samples. When comparing pyometra with other groups, 189 differentially expressed genes were detected. SLPI, PTGS2/COX2, MMP1, S100A8, S100A9 and IL8 were among the top up-regulated genes detected in pyometra, further confirmed by external expression data. Notably, a particular molecular profile in pyometra from animals previously treated with exogenous progesterone compounds was observed in comparison with pyometra from untreated dogs as well as with other groups irrespective of exogenous hormone treatment status. In addition to S100A8 and S100A9 genes, overexpression of the inflammatory cytokines IL1B, TNF and IL6 as well as LTF were detected in the pyometra from treated animals. Interestingly, closed pyometra was more frequently detected in treated dogs (64% versus 33%), with IL1B, TNF, LBP and CXCL10 among the most relevant overexpressed genes. This molecular signature associated with potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets, such as CXCL10 and COX2, should guide future clinical studies. Based on the gene expression profile we suggested that pyometra from progesterone treated dogs is a distinct molecular entity. PMID:26222498

  3. Substrate Trapping Proteomics Reveals Targets of the βTrCP2/FBXW11 Ubiquitin Ligase

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tai Young; Siesser, Priscila F.; Rossman, Kent L.; Goldfarb, Dennis; Mackinnon, Kathryn; Yan, Feng; Yi, XianHua; MacCoss, Michael J.; Moon, Randall T.; Der, Channing J.

    2014-01-01

    Defining the full complement of substrates for each ubiquitin ligase remains an important challenge. Improvements in mass spectrometry instrumentation and computation and in protein biochemistry methods have resulted in several new methods for ubiquitin ligase substrate identification. Here we used the parallel adapter capture (PAC) proteomics approach to study βTrCP2/FBXW11, a substrate adaptor for the SKP1–CUL1–F-box (SCF) E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. The processivity of the ubiquitylation reaction necessitates transient physical interactions between FBXW11 and its substrates, thus making biochemical purification of FBXW11-bound substrates difficult. Using the PAC-based approach, we inhibited the proteasome to “trap” ubiquitylated substrates on the SCFFBXW11 E3 complex. Comparative mass spectrometry analysis of immunopurified FBXW11 protein complexes before and after proteasome inhibition revealed 21 known and 23 putatively novel substrates. In focused studies, we found that SCFFBXW11 bound, polyubiquitylated, and destabilized RAPGEF2, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor that activates the small GTPase RAP1. High RAPGEF2 protein levels promoted cell-cell fusion and, consequently, multinucleation. Surprisingly, this occurred independently of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) catalytic activity and of the presence of RAP1. Our data establish new functions for RAPGEF2 that may contribute to aneuploidy in cancer. More broadly, this report supports the continued use of substrate trapping proteomics to comprehensively define targets for E3 ubiquitin ligases. All proteomic data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001062. PMID:25332235

  4. Nucleosomes Selectively Inhibit Cas9 Off-target Activity at a Site Located at the Nucleosome Edge.

    PubMed

    Hinz, John M; Laughery, Marian F; Wyrick, John J

    2016-11-25

    Nucleosomes affect Cas9 binding and activity at on-target sites, but their impact at off-target sites is unknown. To investigate how nucleosomes affect Cas9 cleavage at off-target sites in vitro, we used a single guide RNA (sgRNA) that has been previously shown to efficiently direct Cas9 cleavage at the edge of the strongly positioned 601 nucleosome. Our data indicate that single mismatches between the sgRNA and DNA target have relatively little effect on Cas9 cleavage of naked DNA substrates, but strongly inhibit cleavage of nucleosome substrates, particularly when the mismatch is in the sgRNA "seed" region. These findings indicate that nucleosomes may enhance Cas9 specificity by inhibiting cleavage of off-target sites at the nucleosome edge.

  5. Construction of a directed hammerhead ribozyme library: towards the identification of optimal target sites for antisense-mediated gene inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, M L; Ruffner, D E

    1998-01-01

    Antisense-mediated gene inhibition uses short complementary DNA or RNA oligonucleotides to block expression of any mRNA of interest. A key parameter in the success or failure of an antisense therapy is the identification of a suitable target site on the chosen mRNA. Ultimately, the accessibility of the target to the antisense agent determines target suitability. Since accessibility is a function of many complex factors, it is currently beyond our ability to predict. Consequently, identification of the most effective target(s) requires examination of every site. Towards this goal, we describe a method to construct directed ribozyme libraries against any chosen mRNA. The library contains nearly equal amounts of ribozymes targeting every site on the chosen transcript and the library only contains ribozymes capable of binding to that transcript. Expression of the ribozyme library in cultured cells should allow identification of optimal target sites under natural conditions, subject to the complexities of a fully functional cell. Optimal target sites identified in this manner should be the most effective sites for therapeutic intervention. PMID:9801305

  6. The Groucho Co-repressor Is Primarily Recruited to Local Target Sites in Active Chromatin to Attenuate Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Barbara H.

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression is regulated by the complex interaction between transcriptional activators and repressors, which function in part by recruiting histone-modifying enzymes to control accessibility of DNA to RNA polymerase. The evolutionarily conserved family of Groucho/Transducin-Like Enhancer of split (Gro/TLE) proteins act as co-repressors for numerous transcription factors. Gro/TLE proteins act in several key pathways during development (including Notch and Wnt signaling), and are implicated in the pathogenesis of several human cancers. Gro/TLE proteins form oligomers and it has been proposed that their ability to exert long-range repression on target genes involves oligomerization over broad regions of chromatin. However, analysis of an endogenous gro mutation in Drosophila revealed that oligomerization of Gro is not always obligatory for repression in vivo. We have used chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) to profile Gro recruitment in two Drosophila cell lines. We find that Gro predominantly binds at discrete peaks (<1 kilobase). We also demonstrate that blocking Gro oligomerization does not reduce peak width as would be expected if Gro oligomerization induced spreading along the chromatin from the site of recruitment. Gro recruitment is enriched in “active” chromatin containing developmentally regulated genes. However, Gro binding is associated with local regions containing hypoacetylated histones H3 and H4, which is indicative of chromatin that is not fully open for efficient transcription. We also find that peaks of Gro binding frequently overlap the transcription start sites of expressed genes that exhibit strong RNA polymerase pausing and that depletion of Gro leads to release of polymerase pausing and increased transcription at a bona fide target gene. Our results demonstrate that Gro is recruited to local sites by transcription factors to attenuate rather than silence gene expression by promoting histone deacetylation

  7. Rad54B Targeting to DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Sites Requires Complex Formation with S100A11

    PubMed Central

    Murzik, Ulrike; Hemmerich, Peter; Weidtkamp-Peters, Stefanie; Ulbricht, Tobias; Bussen, Wendy; Hentschel, Julia; von Eggeling, Ferdinand

    2008-01-01

    S100A11 is involved in a variety of intracellular activities such as growth regulation and differentiation. To gain more insight into the physiological role of endogenously expressed S100A11, we used a proteomic approach to detect and identify interacting proteins in vivo. Hereby, we were able to detect a specific interaction between S100A11 and Rad54B, which could be confirmed under in vivo conditions. Rad54B, a DNA-dependent ATPase, is described to be involved in recombinational repair of DNA damage, including DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Treatment with bleomycin, which induces DSBs, revealed an increase in the degree of colocalization between S100A11 and Rad54B. Furthermore, S100A11/Rad54B foci are spatially associated with sites of DNA DSB repair. Furthermore, while the expression of p21WAF1/CIP1 was increased in parallel with DNA damage, its protein level was drastically down-regulated in damaged cells after S100A11 knockdown. Down-regulation of S100A11 by RNA interference also abolished Rad54B targeting to DSBs. Additionally, S100A11 down-regulated HaCaT cells showed a restricted proliferation capacity and an increase of the apoptotic cell fraction. These observations suggest that S100A11 targets Rad54B to sites of DNA DSB repair sites and identify a novel function for S100A11 in p21-based regulation of cell cycle. PMID:18463164

  8. Prenatal exposure to methylmercury alters development of adrenergic receptor binding sites in peripheral sympathetic target tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Slotkin, T.A.; Orband, L.; Cowdery, T.; Kavlock, R.J.; Bartolome, J.

    1987-01-01

    In order to assess the impact of prenatal exposure to methylmercury on sympathetic neurotransmission, effects on development of adrenergic receptor binding sites in peripheral tissues was evaluated. In the liver, methylmercury produced a dose-dependent increase in alpha/sub 1/, alpha/sub 2/, and beta-receptor binding of radioliganda throughout the first 5 weeks of postnatal life. Similarly, renal alpha-receptor subtypes showed increased binding capabilities, but binding to alpha-receptor sites was reduced. At least some of the changes in receptors appear to be of functional significance, as physiological reactivity to adrenergic stimulation is altered in the same directions in these two tissues. The actions of methylmercury displayed tissue specificity in that the same receptor populations were largely unaffected in other tissues (lung, heart). These results suggest that methylmercury exposure in utero alters adrenergic responses through targeted effects on postsynaptic receptor populations in specific tissues.

  9. Alkynol natural products target ALDH2 in cancer cells by irreversible binding to the active site.

    PubMed

    Heydenreuter, Wolfgang; Kunold, Elena; Sieber, Stephan A

    2015-11-11

    Falcarinol and stipudiol are natural products with potent anti-cancer activity found in several vegetables. Here, we use a chemical proteomic strategy to identify ALDH2 as a molecular target of falcarinol in cancer cells and confirm enzyme inhibition via covalent alkylation of the active site. Furthermore, the synthesis of stipudiol led to the observation that ALDH2 exhibits preference for alkynol-based binders. Inhibition of ALDH2 impairs detoxification of reactive aldehydes and limits oxidative stress response, two crucial pathways for cellular viability.

  10. Targeting hunter distribution based on host resource selection and kill sites to manage disease risk

    PubMed Central

    Dugal, Cherie J; van Beest, Floris M; Vander Wal, Eric; Brook, Ryan K

    2013-01-01

    Endemic and emerging diseases are rarely uniform in their spatial distribution or prevalence among cohorts of wildlife. Spatial models that quantify risk-driven differences in resource selection and hunter mortality of animals at fine spatial scales can assist disease management by identifying high-risk areas and individuals. We used resource selection functions (RSFs) and selection ratios (SRs) to quantify sex- and age-specific resource selection patterns of collared (n = 67) and hunter-killed (n = 796) nonmigratory elk (Cervus canadensis manitobensis) during the hunting season between 2002 and 2012, in southwestern Manitoba, Canada. Distance to protected area was the most important covariate influencing resource selection and hunter-kill sites of elk (AICw = 1.00). Collared adult males (which are most likely to be infected with bovine tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis) and chronic wasting disease) rarely selected for sites outside of parks during the hunting season in contrast to adult females and juvenile males. The RSFs showed selection by adult females and juvenile males to be negatively associated with landscape-level forest cover, high road density, and water cover, whereas hunter-kill sites of these cohorts were positively associated with landscape-level forest cover and increasing distance to streams and negatively associated with high road density. Local-level forest was positively associated with collared animal locations and hunter-kill sites; however, selection was stronger for collared juvenile males and hunter-killed adult females. In instances where disease infects a metapopulation and eradication is infeasible, a principle goal of management is to limit the spread of disease among infected animals. We map high-risk areas that are regularly used by potentially infectious hosts but currently underrepresented in the distribution of kill sites. We present a novel application of widely available data to target hunter distribution based on host resource

  11. Targeting hunter distribution based on host resource selection and kill sites to manage disease risk.

    PubMed

    Dugal, Cherie J; van Beest, Floris M; Vander Wal, Eric; Brook, Ryan K

    2013-10-01

    Endemic and emerging diseases are rarely uniform in their spatial distribution or prevalence among cohorts of wildlife. Spatial models that quantify risk-driven differences in resource selection and hunter mortality of animals at fine spatial scales can assist disease management by identifying high-risk areas and individuals. We used resource selection functions (RSFs) and selection ratios (SRs) to quantify sex- and age-specific resource selection patterns of collared (n = 67) and hunter-killed (n = 796) nonmigratory elk (Cervus canadensis manitobensis) during the hunting season between 2002 and 2012, in southwestern Manitoba, Canada. Distance to protected area was the most important covariate influencing resource selection and hunter-kill sites of elk (AICw = 1.00). Collared adult males (which are most likely to be infected with bovine tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis) and chronic wasting disease) rarely selected for sites outside of parks during the hunting season in contrast to adult females and juvenile males. The RSFs showed selection by adult females and juvenile males to be negatively associated with landscape-level forest cover, high road density, and water cover, whereas hunter-kill sites of these cohorts were positively associated with landscape-level forest cover and increasing distance to streams and negatively associated with high road density. Local-level forest was positively associated with collared animal locations and hunter-kill sites; however, selection was stronger for collared juvenile males and hunter-killed adult females. In instances where disease infects a metapopulation and eradication is infeasible, a principle goal of management is to limit the spread of disease among infected animals. We map high-risk areas that are regularly used by potentially infectious hosts but currently underrepresented in the distribution of kill sites. We present a novel application of widely available data to target hunter distribution based on host resource

  12. Selective targeting of the conserved active site cysteine of Mycobacterium tuberculosis methionine aminopeptidase with electrophilic reagents.

    PubMed

    Reddi, Ravikumar; Arya, Tarun; Kishor, Chandan; Gumpena, Rajesh; Ganji, Roopa J; Bhukya, Supriya; Addlagatta, Anthony

    2014-09-01

    Methionine aminopeptidases (MetAPs) cleave initiator methionine from ~ 70% of the newly synthesized proteins in every living cell, and specific inhibition or knockdown of this function is detrimental. MetAPs are metalloenzymes, and are broadly classified into two subtypes, type I and type II. Bacteria contain only type I MetAPs, and the active site of these enzymes contains a conserved cysteine. By contrast, in type II enzymes the analogous position is occupied by a conserved glycine. Here, we report the reactivity of the active site cysteine in a type I MetAP, MetAP1c, of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtMetAP1c) towards highly selective cysteine-specific reagents. The authenticity of selective modification of Cys105 of MtMetAP1c was established by using site-directed mutagenesis and crystal structure determination of covalent and noncovalent complexes. On the basis of these observations, we propose that metal ions in the active site assist in the covalent modification of Cys105 by orienting the reagents appropriately for a successful reaction. These studies establish, for the first time, that the conserved cysteine of type I MetAPs can be targeted for selective inhibition, and we believe that this chemistry can be exploited for further drug discovery efforts regarding microbial MetAPs.

  13. Actin filaments target the oligomeric maturation of the dynamin GTPase Drp1 to mitochondrial fission sites.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wei-ke; Hatch, Anna L; Merrill, Ronald A; Strack, Stefan; Higgs, Henry N

    2015-11-26

    While the dynamin GTPase Drp1 plays a critical role during mitochondrial fission, mechanisms controlling its recruitment to fission sites are unclear. A current assumption is that cytosolic Drp1 is recruited directly to fission sites immediately prior to fission. Using live-cell microscopy, we find evidence for a different model, progressive maturation of Drp1 oligomers on mitochondria through incorporation of smaller mitochondrially-bound Drp1 units. Maturation of a stable Drp1 oligomer does not forcibly lead to fission. Drp1 oligomers also translocate directionally along mitochondria. Ionomycin, a calcium ionophore, causes rapid mitochondrial accumulation of actin filaments followed by Drp1 accumulation at the fission site, and increases fission rate. Inhibiting actin polymerization, myosin IIA, or the formin INF2 reduces both un-stimulated and ionomycin-induced Drp1 accumulation and mitochondrial fission. Actin filaments bind purified Drp1 and increase GTPase activity in a manner that is synergistic with the mitochondrial protein Mff, suggesting a role for direct Drp1/actin interaction. We propose that Drp1 is in dynamic equilibrium on mitochondria in a fission-independent manner, and that fission factors such as actin filaments target productive oligomerization to fission sites.

  14. A Genetic Screen Reveals Novel Targets to Render Pseudomonas aeruginosa Sensitive to Lysozyme and Cell Wall-Targeting Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kang-Mu; Lee, Keehoon; Go, Junhyeok; Park, In Ho; Shin, Jeon-Soo; Choi, Jae Young; Kim, Hyun Jik; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of establishing airway infections. Human airway mucus contains a large amount of lysozyme, which hydrolyzes bacterial cell walls. P. aeruginosa, however, is known to be resistant to lysozyme. Here, we performed a genetic screen using a mutant library of PAO1, a prototype P. aeruginosa strain, and identified two mutants (ΔbamB and ΔfabY) that exhibited decrease in survival after lysozyme treatment. The bamB and fabY genes encode an outer membrane assembly protein and a fatty acid synthesis enzyme, respectively. These two mutants displayed retarded growth in the airway mucus secretion (AMS). In addition, these mutants exhibited reduced virulence and compromised survival fitness in two different in vivo infection models. The mutants also showed susceptibility to several antibiotics. Especially, ΔbamB mutant was very sensitive to vancomycin, ampicillin, and ceftazidime that target cell wall synthesis. The ΔfabY displayed compromised membrane integrity. In conclusion, this study uncovered a common aspect of two different P. aeruginosa mutants with pleiotropic phenotypes, and suggests that BamB and FabY could be novel potential drug targets for the treatment of P. aeruginosa infection. PMID:28299285

  15. A Genetic Screen Reveals Novel Targets to Render Pseudomonas aeruginosa Sensitive to Lysozyme and Cell Wall-Targeting Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang-Mu; Lee, Keehoon; Go, Junhyeok; Park, In Ho; Shin, Jeon-Soo; Choi, Jae Young; Kim, Hyun Jik; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of establishing airway infections. Human airway mucus contains a large amount of lysozyme, which hydrolyzes bacterial cell walls. P. aeruginosa, however, is known to be resistant to lysozyme. Here, we performed a genetic screen using a mutant library of PAO1, a prototype P. aeruginosa strain, and identified two mutants (ΔbamB and ΔfabY) that exhibited decrease in survival after lysozyme treatment. The bamB and fabY genes encode an outer membrane assembly protein and a fatty acid synthesis enzyme, respectively. These two mutants displayed retarded growth in the airway mucus secretion (AMS). In addition, these mutants exhibited reduced virulence and compromised survival fitness in two different in vivo infection models. The mutants also showed susceptibility to several antibiotics. Especially, ΔbamB mutant was very sensitive to vancomycin, ampicillin, and ceftazidime that target cell wall synthesis. The ΔfabY displayed compromised membrane integrity. In conclusion, this study uncovered a common aspect of two different P. aeruginosa mutants with pleiotropic phenotypes, and suggests that BamB and FabY could be novel potential drug targets for the treatment of P. aeruginosa infection.

  16. RNA Sequencing Identifies New RNase III Cleavage Sites in Escherichia coli and Reveals Increased Regulation of mRNA.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Gina C; Cameron, Jeffrey C; Pfleger, Brian F

    2017-03-28

    Ribonucleases facilitate rapid turnover of RNA, providing cells with another mechanism to adjust transcript and protein levels in response to environmental conditions. While many examples have been documented, a comprehensive list of RNase targets is not available. To address this knowledge gap, we compared levels of RNA sequencing coverage of Escherichia coli and a corresponding RNase III mutant to expand the list of known RNase III targets. RNase III is a widespread endoribonuclease that binds and cleaves double-stranded RNA in many critical transcripts. RNase III cleavage at novel sites found in aceEF, proP, tnaC, dctA, pheM, sdhC, yhhQ, glpT, aceK, and gluQ accelerated RNA decay, consistent with previously described targets wherein RNase III cleavage initiates rapid degradation of secondary messages by other RNases. In contrast, cleavage at three novel sites in the ahpF, pflB, and yajQ transcripts led to stabilized secondary transcripts. Two other novel sites in hisL and pheM overlapped with transcriptional attenuators that likely serve to ensure turnover of these highly structured RNAs. Many of the new RNase III target sites are located on transcripts encoding metabolic enzymes. For instance, two novel RNase III sites are located within transcripts encoding enzymes near a key metabolic node connecting glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Pyruvate dehydrogenase activity was increased in an rnc deletion mutant compared to the wild-type (WT) strain in early stationary phase, confirming the novel link between RNA turnover and regulation of pathway activity. Identification of these novel sites suggests that mRNA turnover may be an underappreciated mode of regulating metabolism.IMPORTANCE The concerted action and overlapping functions of endoribonucleases, exoribonucleases, and RNA processing enzymes complicate the study of global RNA turnover and recycling of specific transcripts. More information about RNase specificity and activity is needed to make

  17. Crystal structure of human phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase 1 reveals a novel allosteric site.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng; Lu, Yongcheng; Peng, Baozhen; Ding, Jianping

    2007-01-01

    PRPP (phosphoribosylpyrophosphate) is an important metabolite essential for nucleotide synthesis and PRS (PRPP synthetase) catalyses synthesis of PRPP from R5P (ribose 5-phosphate) and ATP. The enzymatic activity of PRS is regulated by phosphate ions, divalent metal cations and ADP. In the present study we report the crystal structures of recombinant human PRS1 in complexes with SO4(2-) ions alone and with ATP, Cd2+ and SO4(2-) ions respectively. The AMP moiety of ATP binds at the ATP-binding site, and a Cd2+ ion binds at the active site and in a position to interact with the beta- and gamma-phosphates of ATP. A SO4(2-) ion, an analogue of the activator phosphate, was found to bind at both the R5P-binding site and the allosteric site defined previously. In addi-tion, an extra SO4(2-) binds at a site at the dimer interface between the ATP-binding site and the allosteric site. Binding of this SO4(2-) stabilizes the conformation of the flexible loop at the active site, leading to the formation of the active, open conformation which is essential for binding of ATP and initiation of the catalytic reaction. This is the first time that structural stabilization at the active site caused by binding of an activator has been observed. Structural and biochemical data show that mutations of some residues at this site influence the binding of SO4(2-) and affect the enzymatic activity. The results in the present paper suggest that this new SO4(2-)-binding site is a second allosteric site to regulate the enzymatic activity which might also exist in other eukaryotic PRSs (except plant PRSs of class II), but not in bacterial PRSs.

  18. Development and characterization of site specific target sensitive liposomes for the delivery of thrombolytic agents.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Bhuvaneshwar; Nayak, Manasa K; Dash, Debabrata; Agrawal, G P; Vyas, Suresh P

    2011-01-17

    In recent times, search for potent and highly selective thrombolytic agents with minimal side effects has become a major area of research. The aim of the present study was to develop and characterize target sensitive (TS) liposomes encapsulating streptokinase, a thrombolytic agent. The developed TS liposomes were composed of dioleylphophatidyl ethanolamine (DOPE) and dipalmityl-c(RGDfK) (10:1mol/mol). Dipalmityl-c(RGDfK) was synthesized using typical carbodiimide chemistry using palmitic acid and c(RGDfK), while lysine was used as a spacer. Liposomes were of 100-120nm size. In vitro drug release study showed that nearly 40% drug of the entrapped drug was released in 12h in the PBS (pH 7.4), however on incubation with activated platelet about 90% of drug was released within 45min. The results suggested target sensitivity of the liposomes. Further, targeting potential was confirmed using fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry. Clot lysis study revealed that TS liposomes could not only reduce the clot lysis time but also increase the extent of clot lysis as compared to non-liposomal streptokinase solution. In conclusion, the present liposomal formulation will target the thrombolytic agent to the activated platelets in the thrombus and hence will improve the therapeutic efficacy of the drug.

  19. Transcriptome Analysis of Targeted Mouse Mutations Reveals the Topography of Local Changes in Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Adkisson, Michael; Nava, A. J.; Kirov, Julia V.; Cipollone, Andreanna; Willis, Brandon; Rapp, Jared; de Jong, Pieter J.; Lloyd, Kent C.

    2016-01-01

    The unintended consequences of gene targeting in mouse models have not been thoroughly studied and a more systematic analysis is needed to understand the frequency and characteristics of off-target effects. Using RNA-seq, we evaluated targeted and neighboring gene expression in tissues from 44 homozygous mutants compared with C57BL/6N control mice. Two allele types were evaluated: 15 targeted trap mutations (TRAP); and 29 deletion alleles (DEL), usually a deletion between the translational start and the 3’ UTR. Both targeting strategies insert a bacterial beta-galactosidase reporter (LacZ) and a neomycin resistance selection cassette. Evaluating transcription of genes in +/- 500 kb of flanking DNA around the targeted gene, we found up-regulated genes more frequently around DEL compared with TRAP alleles, however the frequency of alleles with local down-regulated genes flanking DEL and TRAP targets was similar. Down-regulated genes around both DEL and TRAP targets were found at a higher frequency than expected from a genome-wide survey. However, only around DEL targets were up-regulated genes found with a significantly higher frequency compared with genome-wide sampling. Transcriptome analysis confirms targeting in 97% of DEL alleles, but in only 47% of TRAP alleles probably due to non-functional splice variants, and some splicing around the gene trap. Local effects on gene expression are likely due to a number of factors including compensatory regulation, loss or disruption of intragenic regulatory elements, the exogenous promoter in the neo selection cassette, removal of insulating DNA in the DEL mutants, and local silencing due to disruption of normal chromatin organization or presence of exogenous DNA. An understanding of local position effects is important for understanding and interpreting any phenotype attributed to targeted gene mutations, or to spontaneous indels. PMID:26839965

  20. RNA Sequencing Identifies New RNase III Cleavage Sites in Escherichia coli and Reveals Increased Regulation of mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Gina C.; Cameron, Jeffrey C.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ribonucleases facilitate rapid turnover of RNA, providing cells with another mechanism to adjust transcript and protein levels in response to environmental conditions. While many examples have been documented, a comprehensive list of RNase targets is not available. To address this knowledge gap, we compared levels of RNA sequencing coverage of Escherichia coli and a corresponding RNase III mutant to expand the list of known RNase III targets. RNase III is a widespread endoribonuclease that binds and cleaves double-stranded RNA in many critical transcripts. RNase III cleavage at novel sites found in aceEF, proP, tnaC, dctA, pheM, sdhC, yhhQ, glpT, aceK, and gluQ accelerated RNA decay, consistent with previously described targets wherein RNase III cleavage initiates rapid degradation of secondary messages by other RNases. In contrast, cleavage at three novel sites in the ahpF, pflB, and yajQ transcripts led to stabilized secondary transcripts. Two other novel sites in hisL and pheM overlapped with transcriptional attenuators that likely serve to ensure turnover of these highly structured RNAs. Many of the new RNase III target sites are located on transcripts encoding metabolic enzymes. For instance, two novel RNase III sites are located within transcripts encoding enzymes near a key metabolic node connecting glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Pyruvate dehydrogenase activity was increased in an rnc deletion mutant compared to the wild-type (WT) strain in early stationary phase, confirming the novel link between RNA turnover and regulation of pathway activity. Identification of these novel sites suggests that mRNA turnover may be an underappreciated mode of regulating metabolism. PMID:28351917

  1. Glyphosate-Resistant Parthenium hysterophorus in the Caribbean Islands: Non Target Site Resistance and Target Site Resistance in Relation to Resistance Levels

    PubMed Central

    Bracamonte, Enzo; Fernández-Moreno, Pablo T.; Barro, Francisco; De Prado, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    was found in the EPSPS enzyme activity treated with glyphosate, where a higher enzyme activity inhibition (glyphosate μM) corresponded to greater resistance levels in P. hysterophorus accessions. One amino acid substitution was found at position 106 in EPSPS, consisting of a proline to serine change in Cu-R1, Do-R1 Do-R2. The above-mentioned results indicate that high resistance values are determined by the number of defense mechanisms (target-site and non-target-site resistance) possessed by the different P. hysterophorus accessions, concurrently. PMID:27999586

  2. Glyphosate-Resistant Parthenium hysterophorus in the Caribbean Islands: Non Target Site Resistance and Target Site Resistance in Relation to Resistance Levels.

    PubMed

    Bracamonte, Enzo; Fernández-Moreno, Pablo T; Barro, Francisco; De Prado, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    found in the EPSPS enzyme activity treated with glyphosate, where a higher enzyme activity inhibition (glyphosate μM) corresponded to greater resistance levels in P. hysterophorus accessions. One amino acid substitution was found at position 106 in EPSPS, consisting of a proline to serine change in Cu-R1, Do-R1 Do-R2. The above-mentioned results indicate that high resistance values are determined by the number of defense mechanisms (target-site and non-target-site resistance) possessed by the different P. hysterophorus accessions, concurrently.

  3. Targeted gene disruption identifies three PPR-DYW proteins involved in RNA editing for five editing sites of the moss mitochondrial transcripts.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Shotaro; Ichinose, Mizuho; Tasaki, Eiji; Aoki, Yoshiaki; Komura, Yoshihiro; Sugita, Mamoru

    2010-11-01

    In plant organelles, RNA editing frequently occurs in many transcripts, but little is known about its molecular mechanism. Eleven RNA editing sites are present in the moss Physcomitrella patens mitochondria. Recently PpPPR_71, one member of 10 DYW-subclass pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR-DYW) proteins, has been identified as a site-specific recognition factor for RNA editing in the mitochondrial transcript. In this study, we disrupted three genes encoding a PPR-DYW protein-PpPPR_56, PpPPR_77, and PpPPR_91-to investigate whether they are involved in RNA editing. Transient expression of an N-terminal amino acid sequence fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) suggests that the three PPR-DYW proteins are targeted to mitochondria. Disruption of each gene by homologous recombination revealed that PpPPR_56 was involved in RNA editing at the nad3 and nad4 sites, PpPPR_77 at the cox2 and cox3 sites, and PpPPR_91 at the nad5-2 site in the mitochondrial transcripts. The nucleotide sequences surrounding the two editing sites targeted by a single PPR-DYW protein share 42 to 56% of their identities. Thus, moss PPR-DYW proteins seem to be site-specific factors for RNA editing in mitochondrial transcripts.

  4. Genome-Wide Assessment of Efficiency and Specificity in CRISPR/Cas9 Mediated Multiple Site Targeting in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Brenda A.; Haak, David C.; Nishimura, Marc T.; Teixeira, Paulo J. P. L.; James, Sean R.; Dangl, Jeffery L.; Nimchuk, Zachary L.

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous multiplex mutation of large gene families using Cas9 has the potential to revolutionize agriculture and plant sciences. The targeting of multiple genomic sites at once raises concerns about the efficiency and specificity in targeting. The model Arabidopsis thaliana is widely used in basic plant research. Previous work has suggested that the Cas9 off-target rate in Arabidopsis is undetectable. Here we use deep sequencing on pooled plants simultaneously targeting 14 distinct genomic loci to demonstrate that multiplex targeting in Arabidopsis is highly specific to on-target sites with no detectable off-target events. In addition, chromosomal translocations are extremely rare. The high specificity of Cas9 in Arabidopsis makes this a reliable method for clean mutant generation with no need to enhance specificity or adopt alternate Cas9 variants. PMID:27622539

  5. Data-independent-acquisition mass spectrometry for identification of targeted-peptide site-specific modifications.

    PubMed

    Porter, Caleb J; Bereman, Michael S

    2015-09-01

    We present a novel strategy based on data-independent acquisition coupled to targeted data extraction for the detection and identification of site-specific modifications of targeted peptides in a completely unbiased manner. This method requires prior knowledge of the site of the modification along the peptide backbone from the protein of interest, but not the mass of the modification. The procedure, named multiplex adduct peptide profiling (MAPP), consists of three steps: 1) A fragment-ion tag is extracted from the data, consisting of the b-type and y-type ion series from the N and C-terminus, respectively, up to the amino-acid position that is believed to be modified; 2) MS1 features are matched to the fragment-ion tag in retention-time space, using the isolation window as a pre-filter to enable calculation of the mass of the modification; and 3) modified fragment ions are overlaid with the unmodified fragment ions to verify the mass calculated in step 2. We discuss the development, applications, and limitations of this new method for detection of unknown peptide modifications. We present an application of the method in profiling adducted peptides derived from abundant proteins in biological fluids with the ultimate objective of detecting biomarkers of exposure to reactive species.

  6. Site-directed mutagenesis of a tetrameric dandelion polyphenol oxidase (PPO-6) reveals the site of subunit interaction.

    PubMed

    Dirks-Hofmeister, Mareike E; Inlow, Jennifer K; Moerschbacher, Bruno M

    2012-09-01

    Polyphenol oxidases (PPOs) catalyze the oxidation of ortho-diphenols to the corresponding quinones (EC 1.10.3.1). In plants PPOs appear in gene families, and the corresponding isoenzymes are located to the thylakoid lumen of chloroplasts. Although plant PPOs are often discussed with regard to their role in defense reactions, a common physiological function has not yet been defined. We analyzed a tetrameric PPO isoenzyme (PPO-6) from dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and found it to display cooperativity in catalysis, a phenomenon that has rarely been shown for plant PPOs previously. The identification of a surface-exposed cysteine (197) through molecular modeling followed by site-directed mutagenesis proved this amino acid residue to stabilize the tetramer via a disulfide linkage. The C197S-mutein still forms a tetrameric structure but shows impaired enzymatic efficiency and cooperativity and a reduction in stability. These findings indicate that oligomerization may be a physiological requirement for PPO-6 stability and function in vivo and raise new questions regarding distinct functions for specific PPO isoenzymes in plants.

  7. Gene targeting by the TAL effector PthXo2 reveals cryptic resistance gene for bacterial blight of rice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Junhui; Peng, Zhao; Long, Juying; Sosso, Davide; Liu, Bo; Eom, Joon-Seob; Huang, Sheng; Liu, Sanzhen; Vera Cruz, Casiana; Frommer, Wolf B; White, Frank F; Yang, Bing

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial blight of rice is caused by the γ-proteobacterium Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, which utilizes a group of type III TAL (transcription activator-like) effectors to induce host gene expression and condition host susceptibility. Five SWEET genes are functionally redundant to support bacterial disease, but only two were experimentally proven targets of natural TAL effectors. Here, we report the identification of the sucrose transporter gene OsSWEET13 as the disease-susceptibility gene for PthXo2 and the existence of cryptic recessive resistance to PthXo2-dependent X. oryzae pv. oryzae due to promoter variations of OsSWEET13 in japonica rice. PthXo2-containing strains induce OsSWEET13 in indica rice IR24 due to the presence of an unpredicted and undescribed effector binding site not present in the alleles in japonica rice Nipponbare and Kitaake. The specificity of effector-associated gene induction and disease susceptibility is attributable to a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), which is also found in a polymorphic allele of OsSWEET13 known as the recessive resistance gene xa25 from the rice cultivar Minghui 63. The mutation of OsSWEET13 with CRISPR/Cas9 technology further corroborates the requirement of OsSWEET13 expression for the state of PthXo2-dependent disease susceptibility to X. oryzae pv. oryzae. Gene profiling of a collection of 104 strains revealed OsSWEET13 induction by 42 isolates of X. oryzae pv. oryzae. Heterologous expression of OsSWEET13 in Nicotiana benthamiana leaf cells elevates sucrose concentrations in the apoplasm. The results corroborate a model whereby X. oryzae pv. oryzae enhances the release of sucrose from host cells in order to exploit the host resources.

  8. Contextual Refinement of Regulatory Targets Reveals Effects on Breast Cancer Prognosis of the Regulome

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Erik; Wang, Yue; Xia, Tian; Cheng, Wenqing; Cheng, Chao

    2017-01-01

    Gene expression regulators, such as transcription factors (TFs) and microRNAs (miRNAs), have varying regulatory targets based on the tissue and physiological state (context) within which they are expressed. While the emergence of regulator-characterizing experiments has inferred the target genes of many regulators across many contexts, methods for transferring regulator target genes across contexts are lacking. Further, regulator target gene lists frequently are not curated or have permissive inclusion criteria, impairing their use. Here, we present a method called iterative Contextual Transcriptional Activity Inference of Regulators (icTAIR) to resolve these issues. icTAIR takes a regulator’s previously-identified target gene list and combines it with gene expression data from a context, quantifying that regulator’s activity for that context. It then calculates the correlation between each listed target gene’s expression and the quantitative score of regulatory activity, removes the uncorrelated genes from the list, and iterates the process until it derives a stable list of refined target genes. To validate and demonstrate icTAIR’s power, we use it to refine the MSigDB c3 database of TF, miRNA and unclassified motif target gene lists for breast cancer. We then use its output for survival analysis with clinicopathological multivariable adjustment in 7 independent breast cancer datasets covering 3,430 patients. We uncover many novel prognostic regulators that were obscured prior to refinement, in particular NFY, and offer a detailed look at the composition and relationships among the breast cancer prognostic regulome. We anticipate icTAIR will be of general use in contextually refining regulator target genes for discoveries across many contexts. The icTAIR algorithm can be downloaded from https://github.com/icTAIR. PMID:28103241

  9. Site-targeted acoustic contrast agent detects molecular expression of tissue factor after balloon angioplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Christopher S.; Abendschein, Dana R.; Scherrer, David E.; Scott, Michael J.; Marsh, Jon N.; Wickline, Samuel A.; Lanza, Gregory M.

    2000-04-01

    Complex molecular signaling heralds the early stages of pathologies such as angiogenesis, inflammation, and cellular responses to mechanically damaged coronary arteries after balloon angioplasty. In previous studies, we have demonstrated acoustic enhancement of blood clot morphology with the use of a nongaseous, ligand-targeted acoustic nanoparticle emulsion delivered to areas of thrombosis both in vitro and in vivo. In this paper, we characterize the early expression of tissue factor which contributes to subsequent arterial restenosis. Tissue factor is a 42kd glycoprotein responsible for blood coagulation but also plays a well-described role in cancer metastasis, angiogenesis, and vascular restenosis. This study was designed to determine whether the targeted contrast agent could localize tissue factor expressed within the wall of balloon-injured arteries. Both carotid arteries of five pigs (20 kg) were injured using an 8 X 20 mm angioplasty balloon. The carotids were treated in situ with a perfluorocarbon nanoparticle emulsion covalently complexed to either specific anti-tissue factor polyclonal F(ab) fragments (treatment) or non-specific IgG F(ab) fragments (control). Intravascular ultrasound (30 MHz) images of the arteries were obtained before and after exposure to the emulsions. Tissue- factor targeted ultrasonic contrast agent acoustically enhanced the subintima and media at the site of balloon- induced injury compared with control contrast arteries (p less than 0.05). Immunohistochemical staining confirmed the presence of increased tissue factor at the sites of acoustic enhancement. Binding of the targeted agents was demonstrated in vitro by scanning electron microscope images of cultured smooth muscle cells that constitutively express tissue factor. This study demonstrates the concept of molecular imaging and localization of carotid arteries' tissue factor in vivo using a new, nanoparticulate emulsion. Enhancement of the visualization of the molecular

  10. Computational analysis of miRNA-target community network reveals cross talk among different metabolisms

    PubMed Central

    Nigam, Deepti; Kadimi, Puneet K.; Kumar, Sanjeev; Mishra, Dwijesh Chandra; Rai, Anil

    2015-01-01

    To date, only a few conserved miRNAs have been predicted in hexaploid (AABBDD) bread wheat and till now community behavior among miRNA is still in dark. Analysis of publically available 1287279 ESTs from NCBI resulted 262 putative pre-miRNAs and 39 novel mature miRNAs. A total 22,468 targets were identified on 21 chromosomes. MiRNA target community was identified for genomes with different levels of cross talks. Gene ontology of these community targets suggests their differential involvement in different metabolisms along with common and stringent involvement in nitrogen metabolism. PMID:26484271

  11. Using Carbohydrate Interaction Assays to Reveal Novel Binding Sites in Carbohydrate Active Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Wilkens, Casper; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Lewińska, Anna; Abou Hachem, Maher; Svensson, Birte

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes often contain auxiliary binding sites located either on independent domains termed carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) on the catalytic module at a certain distance from the active site. The SBSs are usually critical for the activity of their cognate enzyme, though they are not readily detected in the sequence of a protein, but normally require a crystal structure of a complex for their identification. A variety of methods, including affinity electrophoresis (AE), insoluble polysaccharide pulldown (IPP) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have been used to study auxiliary binding sites. These techniques are complementary as AE allows monitoring of binding to soluble polysaccharides, IPP to insoluble polysaccharides and SPR to oligosaccharides. Here we show that these methods are useful not only for analyzing known binding sites, but also for identifying new ones, even without structural data available. We further verify the chosen assays discriminate between known SBS/CBM containing enzymes and negative controls. Altogether 35 enzymes are screened for the presence of SBSs or CBMs and several novel binding sites are identified, including the first SBS ever reported in a cellulase. This work demonstrates that combinations of these methods can be used as a part of routine enzyme characterization to identify new binding sites and advance the study of SBSs and CBMs, allowing them to be detected in the absence of structural data. PMID:27504624

  12. Crystal structure of equine serum albumin in complex with cetirizine reveals a novel drug binding site.

    PubMed

    Handing, Katarzyna B; Shabalin, Ivan G; Szlachta, Karol; Majorek, Karolina A; Minor, Wladek

    2016-03-01

    Serum albumin (SA) is the main transporter of drugs in mammalian blood plasma. Here, we report the first crystal structure of equine serum albumin (ESA) in complex with antihistamine drug cetirizine at a resolution of 2.1Å. Cetirizine is bound in two sites--a novel drug binding site (CBS1) and the fatty acid binding site 6 (CBS2). Both sites differ from those that have been proposed in multiple reports based on equilibrium dialysis and fluorescence studies for mammalian albumins as cetirizine binding sites. We show that the residues forming the binding pockets in ESA are highly conserved in human serum albumin (HSA), and suggest that binding of cetirizine to HSA will be similar. In support of that hypothesis, we show that the dissociation constants for cetirizine binding to CBS2 in ESA and HSA are identical using tryptophan fluorescence quenching. Presence of lysine and arginine residues that have been previously reported to undergo nonenzymatic glycosylation in CBS1 and CBS2 suggests that cetirizine transport in patients with diabetes could be altered. A review of all available SA structures from the PDB shows that in addition to the novel drug binding site we present here (CBS1), there are two pockets on SA capable of binding drugs that do not overlap with fatty acid binding sites and have not been discussed in published reviews.

  13. Cannabinoid CB2 receptor ligand profiling reveals biased signalling and off-target activity

    PubMed Central

    Soethoudt, Marjolein; Grether, Uwe; Fingerle, Jürgen; Grim, Travis W.; Fezza, Filomena; de Petrocellis, Luciano; Ullmer, Christoph; Rothenhäusler, Benno; Perret, Camille; van Gils, Noortje; Finlay, David; MacDonald, Christa; Chicca, Andrea; Gens, Marianela Dalghi; Stuart, Jordyn; de Vries, Henk; Mastrangelo, Nicolina; Xia, Lizi; Alachouzos, Georgios; Baggelaar, Marc P.; Martella, Andrea; Mock, Elliot D.; Deng, Hui; Heitman, Laura H.; Connor, Mark; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Gertsch, Jürg; Lichtman, Aron H.; Maccarrone, Mauro; Pacher, Pal; Glass, Michelle; van der Stelt, Mario

    2017-01-01

    The cannabinoid CB2 receptor (CB2R) represents a promising therapeutic target for various forms of tissue injury and inflammatory diseases. Although numerous compounds have been developed and widely used to target CB2R, their selectivity, molecular mode of action and pharmacokinetic properties have been poorly characterized. Here we report the most extensive characterization of the molecular pharmacology of the most widely used CB2R ligands to date. In a collaborative effort between multiple academic and industry laboratories, we identify marked differences in the ability of certain agonists to activate distinct signalling pathways and to cause off-target effects. We reach a consensus that HU910, HU308 and JWH133 are the recommended selective CB2R agonists to study the role of CB2R in biological and disease processes. We believe that our unique approach would be highly suitable for the characterization of other therapeutic targets in drug discovery research. PMID:28045021

  14. Inactivation of Individual SeqA Binding Sites of the E. coli Origin Reveals Robustness of Replication Initiation Synchrony

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Jyoti K.

    2016-01-01

    The Escherichia coli origin of replication, oriC, comprises mostly binding sites of two proteins: DnaA, a positive regulator, and SeqA, a negative regulator. SeqA, although not essential, is required for timely initiation, and during rapid growth, synchronous initiation from multiple origins. Unlike DnaA, details of SeqA binding to oriC are limited. Here we have determined that SeqA binds to all its sites tested (9/11) and with variable efficiency. Titration of DnaA alters SeqA binding to two sites, both of which have overlapping DnaA sites. The altered SeqA binding, however, does not affect initiation synchrony. Synchrony is also unaffected when individual SeqA sites are mutated. An apparent exception was one mutant where the mutation also changed an overlapping DnaA site. In this mutant, the observed asynchrony could be from altered DnaA binding, as selectively mutating this SeqA site did not cause asynchrony. These results reveal robust initiation synchrony against alterations of individual SeqA binding sites. The redundancy apparently ensures SeqA function in controlling replication in E. coli. PMID:27930658

  15. Synthetic heparan sulfate dodecasaccharides reveal single sulfation site interconverts CXCL8 and CXCL12 chemokine biology.

    PubMed

    Jayson, Gordon C; Hansen, Steen U; Miller, Gavin J; Cole, Claire L; Rushton, Graham; Avizienyte, Egle; Gardiner, John M

    2015-09-18

    The multigram-scale synthesis of a sulfation-site programmed heparin-like dodecasaccharide is described. Evaluation alongside dodecasaccharides lacking this single glucosamine O6-sulfation, or having per-O6-sulfation, shows that site-specific modification of the terminal glucosamine dramatically interconverts regulation of in vitro and in vivo biology mediated by the two important chemokines, CXCL12 (SDF1α) or CXCL8 (IL-8).

  16. Cluster Analysis of p53 Binding Site Sequences Reveals Subsets with Different Functions

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ji-Hyun; Latysheva, Natasha S.; Iggo, Richard D.; Barker, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    p53 is an important regulator of cell cycle arrest, senescence, apoptosis and metabolism, and is frequently mutated in tumors. It functions as a tetramer, where each component dimer binds to a decameric DNA region known as a response element. We identify p53 binding site subtypes and examine the functional and evolutionary properties of these subtypes. We start with over 1700 known binding sites and, with no prior labeling, identify two sets of response elements by unsupervised clustering. When combined, they give rise to three types of p53 binding sites. We find that probabilistic and alignment-based assessments of cross-species conservation show no strong evidence of differential conservation between types of binding sites. In contrast, functional analysis of the genes most proximal to the binding sites provides strong bioinformatic evidence of functional differentiation between the three types of binding sites. Our results are consistent with recent structural data identifying two conformations of the L1 loop in the DNA binding domain, suggesting that they reflect biologically meaningful groups imposed by the p53 protein structure. PMID:27812278

  17. Formation of target-specific binding sites in enzymes: solid-phase molecular imprinting of HRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czulak, J.; Guerreiro, A.; Metran, K.; Canfarotta, F.; Goddard, A.; Cowan, R. H.; Trochimczuk, A. W.; Piletsky, S.

    2016-05-01

    Here we introduce a new concept for synthesising molecularly imprinted nanoparticles by using proteins as macro-functional monomers. For a proof-of-concept, a model enzyme (HRP) was cross-linked using glutaraldehyde in the presence of glass beads (solid-phase) bearing immobilized templates such as vancomycin and ampicillin. The cross-linking process links together proteins and protein chains, which in the presence of templates leads to the formation of permanent target-specific recognition sites without adverse effects on the enzymatic activity. Unlike complex protein engineering approaches commonly employed to generate affinity proteins, the method proposed can be used to produce protein-based ligands in a short time period using native protein molecules. These affinity materials are potentially useful tools especially for assays since they combine the catalytic properties of enzymes (for signaling) and molecular recognition properties of antibodies. We demonstrate this concept in an ELISA-format assay where HRP imprinted with vancomycin and ampicillin replaced traditional enzyme-antibody conjugates for selective detection of templates at micromolar concentrations. This approach can potentially provide a fast alternative to raising antibodies for targets that do not require high assay sensitivities; it can also find uses as a biochemical research tool, as a possible replacement for immunoperoxidase-conjugates.Here we introduce a new concept for synthesising molecularly imprinted nanoparticles by using proteins as macro-functional monomers. For a proof-of-concept, a model enzyme (HRP) was cross-linked using glutaraldehyde in the presence of glass beads (solid-phase) bearing immobilized templates such as vancomycin and ampicillin. The cross-linking process links together proteins and protein chains, which in the presence of templates leads to the formation of permanent target-specific recognition sites without adverse effects on the enzymatic activity. Unlike

  18. Fitness Cost Implications of PhiC31-Mediated Site-Specific Integrations in Target-Site Strains of the Mexican Fruit Fly, Anastrepha ludens (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    PubMed Central

    Meza, José S.; Díaz-Fleischer, Francisco; Sánchez-Velásquez, Lázaro R.; Zepeda-Cisneros, Cristina Silvia; Handler, Alfred M.; Schetelig, Marc F.

    2014-01-01

    Site-specific recombination technologies are powerful new tools for the manipulation of genomic DNA in insects that can improve transgenesis strategies such as targeting transgene insertions, allowing transgene cassette exchange and DNA mobilization for transgene stabilization. However, understanding the fitness cost implications of these manipulations for transgenic strain applications is critical. In this study independent piggyBac-mediated attP target-sites marked with DsRed were created in several genomic positions in the Mexican fruit fly, Anastrepha ludens. Two of these strains, one having an autosomal (attP_F7) and the other a Y-linked (attP_2-M6y) integration, exhibited fitness parameters (dynamic demography and sexual competitiveness) similar to wild type flies. These strains were thus selected for targeted insertion using, for the first time in mexfly, the phiC31-integrase recombination system to insert an additional EGFP-marked transgene to determine its effect on host strain fitness. Fitness tests showed that the integration event in the int_2-M6y recombinant strain had no significant effect, while the int_F7 recombinant strain exhibited significantly lower fitness relative to the original attP_F7 target-site host strain. These results indicate that while targeted transgene integrations can be achieved without an additional fitness cost, at some genomic positions insertion of additional DNA into a previously integrated transgene can have a significant negative effect. Thus, for targeted transgene insertions fitness costs must be evaluated both previous to and subsequent to new site-specific insertions in the target-site strain. PMID:25303238

  19. Fitness cost implications of PhiC31-mediated site-specific integrations in target-site strains of the Mexican fruit fly, Anastrepha ludens (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    PubMed

    Meza, José S; Díaz-Fleischer, Francisco; Sánchez-Velásquez, Lázaro R; Zepeda-Cisneros, Cristina Silvia; Handler, Alfred M; Schetelig, Marc F

    2014-01-01

    Site-specific recombination technologies are powerful new tools for the manipulation of genomic DNA in insects that can improve transgenesis strategies such as targeting transgene insertions, allowing transgene cassette exchange and DNA mobilization for transgene stabilization. However, understanding the fitness cost implications of these manipulations for transgenic strain applications is critical. In this study independent piggyBac-mediated attP target-sites marked with DsRed were created in several genomic positions in the Mexican fruit fly, Anastrepha ludens. Two of these strains, one having an autosomal (attP_F7) and the other a Y-linked (attP_2-M6y) integration, exhibited fitness parameters (dynamic demography and sexual competitiveness) similar to wild type flies. These strains were thus selected for targeted insertion using, for the first time in mexfly, the phiC31-integrase recombination system to insert an additional EGFP-marked transgene to determine its effect on host strain fitness. Fitness tests showed that the integration event in the int_2-M6y recombinant strain had no significant effect, while the int_F7 recombinant strain exhibited significantly lower fitness relative to the original attP_F7 target-site host strain. These results indicate that while targeted transgene integrations can be achieved without an additional fitness cost, at some genomic positions insertion of additional DNA into a previously integrated transgene can have a significant negative effect. Thus, for targeted transgene insertions fitness costs must be evaluated both previous to and subsequent to new site-specific insertions in the target-site strain.

  20. Phenotypic screening reveals TNFR2 as a promising target for cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Geoffrey S.; Mistry, Bina; Guillard, Sandrine; Ulrichsen, Jane Coates; Sandercock, Alan M.; Wang, Jun; González-Muñoz, Andrea; Parmentier, Julie; Black, Chelsea; Soden, Jo; Freeth, Jim; Jovanović, Jelena; Leyland, Rebecca; Al-Lamki, Rafia S.; Leishman, Andrew J.; Rust, Steven J.; Stewart, Ross; Jermutus, Lutz; Bradley, John R.; Bedian, Vahe; Valge-Archer, Viia; Minter, Ralph; Wilkinson, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies that target cell-surface molecules on T cells can enhance anti-tumor immune responses, resulting in sustained immune-mediated control of cancer. We set out to find new cancer immunotherapy targets by phenotypic screening on human regulatory T (Treg) cells and report the discovery of novel activators of tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2) and a potential role for this target in immunotherapy. A diverse phage display library was screened to find antibody mimetics with preferential binding to Treg cells, the most Treg-selective of which were all, without exception, found to bind specifically to TNFR2. A subset of these TNFR2 binders were found to agonise the receptor, inducing iκ-B degradation and NF-κB pathway signalling in vitro. TNFR2 was found to be expressed by tumor-infiltrating Treg cells, and to a lesser extent Teff cells, from three lung cancer patients, and a similar pattern was also observed in mice implanted with CT26 syngeneic tumors. In such animals, TNFR2-specific agonists inhibited tumor growth, enhanced tumor infiltration by CD8+ T cells and increased CD8+ T cell IFN-γ synthesis. Together, these data indicate a novel mechanism for TNF-α-independent TNFR2 agonism in cancer immunotherapy, and demonstrate the utility of target-agnostic screening in highlighting important targets during drug discovery. PMID:27626702

  1. Proteomic analysis reveals CCT is a target of Fragile X mental retardation protein regulation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Monzo, Kate; Dowd, Susan R; Minden, Jonathan S; Sisson, John C

    2010-04-15

    Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is an RNA-binding protein that is required for the translational regulation of specific target mRNAs. Loss of FMRP causes Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common form of inherited mental retardation in humans. Understanding the basis for FXS has been limited because few in vivo targets of FMRP have been identified and mechanisms for how FMRP regulates physiological targets are unclear. We have previously demonstrated that Drosophila FMRP (dFMRP) is required in early embryos for cleavage furrow formation. In an effort to identify new targets of dFMRP-dependent regulation and new effectors of cleavage furrow formation, we used two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry to identify proteins that are misexpressed in dfmr1 mutant embryos. Of the 28 proteins identified, we have identified three subunits of the Chaperonin containing TCP-1 (CCT) complex as new direct targets of dFMRP-dependent regulation. Furthermore, we found that the septin Peanut, a known effector of cleavage, is a likely conserved substrate of fly CCT and is mislocalized in both cct and in dfmr1 mutant embryos. Based on these results we propose that dFMRP-dependent regulation of CCT subunits is required for cleavage furrow formation and that at least one of its substrates is affected in dfmr1- embryos suggesting that dFMRP-dependent regulation of CCT contributes to the cleavage furrow formation phenotype.

  2. HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibody precursor B cells revealed by germline-targeting immunogen

    DOE PAGES

    Jardine, Joseph G.; Kulp, Daniel W.; Havenar-Daughton, Colin; ...

    2016-03-25

    Induction of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) is a major HIV vaccine goal. Germline-targeting immunogens aim to initiate bnAb induction by activating bnAb germline precursor B cells. Critical unmet challenges are to determine whether bnAb precursor naïve B cells bind germline-targeting immunogens and occur at sufficient frequency in humans for reliable vaccine responses. We employed deep mutational scanning and multi-target optimization to develop a germline-targeting immunogen (eOD-GT8) for diverse VRC01-class bnAbs. We then used the immunogen to isolate VRC01-class precursor naïve B cells from HIV-uninfected donors. Frequencies of true VRC01-class precursors, their structures, and their eOD-GT8 affinities support this immunogen asmore » a candidate human vaccine prime. Lastly, these methods could be applied to germline targeting for other classes of HIV bnAbs and for Abs to other pathogens.« less

  3. HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibody precursor B cells revealed by germline-targeting immunogen

    SciTech Connect

    Jardine, Joseph G.; Kulp, Daniel W.; Havenar-Daughton, Colin; Sarkar, Anita; Briney, Bryan; Sok, Devin; Sesterhenn, Fabian; Ereno-Orbea, June; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; Deresa, Isaiah; Hu, Xiaozhen; Spencer, Skye; Jones, Meaghan; Georgeson, Erik; Adachi, Yumiko; Kubitz, Michael; deCamp, Allan C.; Julien, Jean -Philippe; Wilson, Ian A.; Burton, Dennis R.; Crotty, Shane; Schief, William R.

    2016-03-25

    Induction of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) is a major HIV vaccine goal. Germline-targeting immunogens aim to initiate bnAb induction by activating bnAb germline precursor B cells. Critical unmet challenges are to determine whether bnAb precursor naïve B cells bind germline-targeting immunogens and occur at sufficient frequency in humans for reliable vaccine responses. We employed deep mutational scanning and multi-target optimization to develop a germline-targeting immunogen (eOD-GT8) for diverse VRC01-class bnAbs. We then used the immunogen to isolate VRC01-class precursor naïve B cells from HIV-uninfected donors. Frequencies of true VRC01-class precursors, their structures, and their eOD-GT8 affinities support this immunogen as a candidate human vaccine prime. Lastly, these methods could be applied to germline targeting for other classes of HIV bnAbs and for Abs to other pathogens.

  4. Site-Specific Targeting of Platelet-Rich Plasma via Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Talaie, Tara; Pratt, Stephen J.P.; Vanegas, Camilo; Xu, Su; Henn, R. Frank; Yarowsky, Paul; Lovering, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Muscle strains are one of the most common injuries treated by physicians. Standard conservative therapy for acute muscle strains usually involves short-term rest, ice, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications, but there is no clear consensus regarding treatments to accelerate recovery. Recently, clinical use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has gained momentum as an option for therapy and is appealing for many reasons, most notably because it provides growth factors in physiological proportions and it is autologous, safe, easily accessible, and potentially beneficial. Local delivery of PRP to injured muscles can hasten recovery of function. However, specific targeting of PRP to sites of tissue damage in vivo is a major challenge that can limit its efficacy. Hypothesis: Location of PRP delivery can be monitored and controlled in vivo with noninvasive tools. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) can be visualized by both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (in vivo) and fluorescence microscopy (after tissue harvesting). PRP was labeled with SPIONs and administered by intramuscular injections of SPION-containing platelets. MRI was used to monitor the ability to manipulate and retain the location of PRP in vivo by placement of an external magnet. Platelets were isolated from whole blood and incubated with SPIONs. Following SPION incubation with PRP, a magnetic field was used to manipulate platelet location in culture dishes. In vivo, the tibialis anterior (TA) muscles of anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with SPION-containing platelets, and MRI was used to track platelet position with and without a magnet worn over the TA muscles for 4 days. Results: The method used to isolate PRP yielded a high concentration (almost 4-fold increase) of platelets. In vitro experiments showed that the platelets successfully took up SPIONs and then rapidly responded to an applied magnetic field

  5. Live Site Demonstrations: Former Pole Mountain Target and Maneuver Area, Laramie, WY. MetalMapper Data Analysis for Pole Mountain Target and Maneuver Area

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-08

    FINAL REPORT Live Site Demonstrations: Former Pole Mountain Target and Maneuver Area, Laramie, WY MetalMapper Data Analysis for Pole...Mountain Target and Maneuver Area ESTCP Project MR-201157 March 2012 John Baptiste Parsons Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8/98) REPORT ...DOCUMENTATION PAGE Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 The public reporting burden for this collection of information is

  6. Effects of functionalization on the targeting site of carbon nanotubes inside cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, A. E.; Bendall, J. S.; Gass, M.; Muller, K.; Skepper, J.; Midgley, P.; Welland, M.

    2010-07-01

    Functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are currently being investigated for a variety of applications, including contrast agents for medical imaging1. However before they can be used commercially it is necessary to assess whether they enter cells, the site they target within the cell and whether they cause any cytotoxicity. Here we characterize uptake of unlabelled, acid-treated, COO- functionalized SWNTs by human monocyte derived macrophage cells using both low-loss and energy loss spectroscopy and compare our findings to previous work on unpurified SWNTs. The acid-treated SWNTs were less aggregated within cells than unpurified SWNTs. Acid treatment was found to affect the distribution of intracellular SWNTs. Bundles, and also individual acid treated SWNTs, were found frequently inside lysosomes, cytoplasm and also inserting into the plasma membrane whereas unpurified non-functionalised SWNTs entered lysosomes and occasionally the nucleus.

  7. Barriers to Liposomal Gene Delivery: from Application Site to the Target

    PubMed Central

    Saffari, Mostafa; Moghimi, Hamid Reza; Dass, Crispin R

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy is a therapeutic approach to deliver genetic material into cells to alter their function in entire organism. One promising form of gene delivery system (DDS) is liposomes. The success of liposome-mediated gene delivery is a multifactorial issue and well-designed liposomal systems might lead to optimized gene transfection particularly in vivo. Liposomal gene delivery systems face different barriers from their site of application to their target, which is inside the cells. These barriers include presystemic obstacles (epithelial barriers), systemic barriers in blood circulation and cellular barriers. Epithelial barriers differ depending on the route of administration. Systemic barriers include enzymatic degradation, binding and opsonisation. Both of these barriers can act as limiting hurdles that genetic material and their vector should overcome before reaching the cells. Finally liposomes should overcome cellular barriers that include cell entrance, endosomal escape and nuclear uptake. These barriers and their impact on liposomal gene delivery will be discussed in this review. PMID:28228799

  8. Archaeology. Sedimentary DNA from a submerged site reveals wheat in the British Isles 8000 years ago.

    PubMed

    Smith, Oliver; Momber, Garry; Bates, Richard; Garwood, Paul; Fitch, Simon; Pallen, Mark; Gaffney, Vincent; Allaby, Robin G

    2015-02-27

    The Mesolithic-to-Neolithic transition marked the time when a hunter-gatherer economy gave way to agriculture, coinciding with rising sea levels. Bouldnor Cliff, is a submarine archaeological site off the Isle of Wight in the United Kingdom that has a well-preserved Mesolithic paleosol dated to 8000 years before the present. We analyzed a core obtained from sealed sediments, combining evidence from microgeomorphology and microfossils with sedimentary ancient DNA (sedaDNA) analyses to reconstruct floral and faunal changes during the occupation of this site, before it was submerged. In agreement with palynological analyses, the sedaDNA sequences suggest a mixed habitat of oak forest and herbaceous plants. However, they also provide evidence of wheat 2000 years earlier than mainland Britain and 400 years earlier than proximate European sites. These results suggest that sophisticated social networks linked the Neolithic front in southern Europe to the Mesolithic peoples of northern Europe.

  9. Does distant homology with Evf reveal a lipid binding site in Bacillus thuringiensis cytolytic toxins?

    PubMed

    Rigden, Daniel J

    2009-05-19

    The Cry and Cyt classes of insecticidal toxins derived from the sporulating bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis are valuable substitutes for synthetic pesticides in agricultural contexts. Crystal structures and many biochemical data have provided insights into their molecular mechanisms, generally thought to involve oligomerization and pore formation, but have not localised the site on Cyt toxins responsible for selective binding of phospholipids containing unsaturated fatty acids. Here, distant homology between the structure of Cyt toxins and Erwinia virulence factor (Evf) is demonstrated which, along with sequence conservation analysis, allows a putative lipid binding site to be localised in the toxins.

  10. Proteome-wide Light/Dark Modulation of Thiol Oxidation in Cyanobacteria Revealed by Quantitative Site-specific Redox Proteomics*

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jia; Nguyen, Amelia Y.; Dai, Ziyu; Su, Dian; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Smith, Richard D.; Koppenaal, David W.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Qian, Wei-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Reversible protein thiol oxidation is an essential regulatory mechanism of photosynthesis, metabolism, and gene expression in photosynthetic organisms. Herein, we present proteome-wide quantitative and site-specific profiling of in vivo thiol oxidation modulated by light/dark in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, an oxygenic photosynthetic prokaryote, using a resin-assisted thiol enrichment approach. Our proteomic approach integrates resin-assisted enrichment with isobaric tandem mass tag labeling to enable site-specific and quantitative measurements of reversibly oxidized thiols. The redox dynamics of ∼2,100 Cys-sites from 1,060 proteins under light, dark, and 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (a photosystem II inhibitor) conditions were quantified. In addition to relative quantification, the stoichiometry or percentage of oxidation (reversibly oxidized/total thiols) for ∼1,350 Cys-sites was also quantified. The overall results revealed broad changes in thiol oxidation in many key biological processes, including photosynthetic electron transport, carbon fixation, and glycolysis. Moreover, the redox sensitivity along with the stoichiometric data enabled prediction of potential functional Cys-sites for proteins of interest. The functional significance of redox-sensitive Cys-sites in NADP-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, peroxiredoxin (AhpC/TSA family protein Sll1621), and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase was further confirmed with site-specific mutagenesis and biochemical studies. Together, our findings provide significant insights into the broad redox regulation of photosynthetic organisms. PMID:25118246

  11. Genome-Wide Characterization of cis-Acting DNA Targets Reveals the Transcriptional Regulatory Framework of Opaque2 in Maize[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chaobin; Qiao, Zhenyi; Qi, Weiwei; Wang, Qian; Yuan, Yue; Yang, Xi; Tang, Yuanping; Mei, Bing; Lv, Yuanda; Zhao, Han; Xiao, Han; Song, Rentao

    2015-01-01

    Opaque2 (O2) is a transcription factor that plays important roles during maize endosperm development. Mutation of the O2 gene improves the nutritional value of maize seeds but also confers pleiotropic effects that result in reduced agronomic quality. To reveal the transcriptional regulatory framework of O2, we studied the transcriptome of o2 mutants using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) and determined O2 DNA binding targets using chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-Seq). The RNA-Seq analysis revealed 1605 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and 383 differentially expressed long, noncoding RNAs. The DEGs cover a wide range of functions related to nutrient reservoir activity, nitrogen metabolism, stress resistance, etc. ChIP-Seq analysis detected 1686 O2 DNA binding sites distributed over 1143 genes. Overlay of the RNA-Seq and ChIP-Seq results revealed 35 O2-modulated target genes. We identified four O2 binding motifs; among them, TGACGTGG appears to be the most conserved and strongest. We confirmed that, except for the 16- and 18-kD zeins, O2 directly regulates expression of all other zeins. O2 directly regulates two transcription factors, genes linked to carbon and amino acid metabolism and abiotic stress resistance. We built a hierarchical regulatory model for O2 that provides an understanding of its pleiotropic biological effects. PMID:25691733

  12. High-throughput profiling of off-target DNA cleavage reveals RNA-programmed Cas9 nuclease specificity.

    PubMed

    Pattanayak, Vikram; Lin, Steven; Guilinger, John P; Ma, Enbo; Doudna, Jennifer A; Liu, David R

    2013-09-01

    The RNA-programmable Cas9 endonuclease cleaves double-stranded DNA at sites complementary to a 20-base-pair guide RNA. The Cas9 system has been used to modify genomes in multiple cells and organisms, demonstrating its potential as a facile genome-engineering tool. We used in vitro selection and high-throughput sequencing to determine the propensity of eight guide-RNA:Cas9 complexes to cleave each of 10(12) potential off-target DNA sequences. The selection results predicted five off-target sites in the human genome that were confirmed to undergo genome cleavage in HEK293T cells upon expression of one of two guide-RNA:Cas9 complexes. In contrast to previous models, our results show that guide-RNA:Cas9 specificity extends past a 7- to 12-base-pair seed sequence. Our results also suggest a tradeoff between activity and specificity both in vitro and in cells as a shorter, less-active guide RNA is more specific than a longer, more-active guide RNA. High concentrations of guide-RNA:Cas9 complexes can cleave off-target sites containing mutations near or within the PAM that are not cleaved when enzyme concentrations are limiting.

  13. HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibody precursor B cells revealed by germline-targeting immunogen.

    PubMed

    Jardine, Joseph G; Kulp, Daniel W; Havenar-Daughton, Colin; Sarkar, Anita; Briney, Bryan; Sok, Devin; Sesterhenn, Fabian; Ereño-Orbea, June; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; Deresa, Isaiah; Hu, Xiaozhen; Spencer, Skye; Jones, Meaghan; Georgeson, Erik; Adachi, Yumiko; Kubitz, Michael; deCamp, Allan C; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Wilson, Ian A; Burton, Dennis R; Crotty, Shane; Schief, William R

    2016-03-25

    Induction of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) is a major HIV vaccine goal. Germline-targeting immunogens aim to initiate bnAb induction by activating bnAb germline precursor B cells. Critical unmet challenges are to determine whether bnAb precursor naïve B cells bind germline-targeting immunogens and occur at sufficient frequency in humans for reliable vaccine responses. Using deep mutational scanning and multitarget optimization, we developed a germline-targeting immunogen (eOD-GT8) for diverse VRC01-class bnAbs. We then used the immunogen to isolate VRC01-class precursor naïve B cells from HIV-uninfected donors. Frequencies of true VRC01-class precursors, their structures, and their eOD-GT8 affinities support this immunogen as a candidate human vaccine prime. These methods could be applied to germline targeting for other classes of HIV bnAbs and for Abs to other pathogens.

  14. Conceptual processing in music as revealed by N400 effects on words and musical targets.

    PubMed

    Daltrozzo, Jérôme; Schön, Daniele

    2009-10-01

    The cognitive processing of concepts, that is, abstract general ideas, has been mostly studied with language. However, other domains, such as music, can also convey concepts. Koelsch et al. [Koelsch, S., Kasper, E., Sammler, D., Schulze, K., Gunter, T., & Friederici, A. D. Music, language and meaning: Brain signatures of semantic processing. Nature Neuroscience, 7, 302-307, 2004] showed that 10 sec of music can influence the semantic processing of words. However, the length of the musical excerpts did not allow the authors to study the effect of words on musical targets. In this study, we decided to replicate Koelsch et al. findings using 1-sec musical excerpts (Experiment 1). This allowed us to study the reverse influence, namely, of a linguistic context on conceptual processing of musical excerpts (Experiment 2). In both experiments, we recorded behavioral and electrophysiological responses while participants were presented 50 related and 50 unrelated pairs (context/target). Experiments 1 and 2 showed a larger N400 component of the event-related brain potentials to targets following a conceptually unrelated compared to a related context. The presence of an N400 effect with musical targets suggests that music may convey concepts. The relevance of these results for the comprehension of music as a structured set of conceptual units and for the domain specificity of the mechanisms underlying N400 effects are discussed.

  15. In Search of a Cure for Proteostasis-Addicted Cancer: A AAA Target Revealed.

    PubMed

    Xia, Di; Ye, Yihong

    2015-11-09

    Tumorigenesis is often associated with an unbalanced protein homeostasis (proteostasis) network, which sensitizes cancer cells to drugs targeting protein quality control (PQC) regulators. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Anderson and colleagues investigated the anti-cancer activity of a new class of inhibitor against a multi-functional ATPase essential for proteostasis maintenance.

  16. Quantitative analysis of competition in posttranscriptional regulation reveals a novel signature in target expression variation.

    PubMed

    Klironomos, Filippos D; Berg, Johannes

    2013-02-19

    When small RNAs are loaded onto Argonaute proteins they can form the RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISCs), which mediate RNA interference (RNAi). RISC-formation is dependent on a shared pool of Argonaute proteins and RISC-loading factors, and is susceptible to competition among small RNAs. We present a mathematical model that aims to understand how small RNA competition for RISC-formation affects target gene repression. We discuss that small RNA activity is limited by RISC-formation, RISC-degradation, and the availability of Argonautes. We show that different competition conditions for RISC-loading result in different signatures of RNAi determined also by the amount of RISC-recycling taking place. In particular, we find that the small RNAs, although less efficient at RISC-formation, can perform in the low RISC-recycling range as well as their more effective counterparts. Additionally, we predict that under conditions of low RISC-loading efficiency and high RISC-recycling, the variation in target levels increases linearly with the target transcription rate. Furthermore, we show that RISC-recycling determines the effect that Argonaute scarcity conditions have on target expression variation. Our observations, taken together, offer a framework of predictions that can be used to infer from data the particular characteristics of underlying RNAi activity.

  17. Formation of target-specific binding sites in enzymes: solid-phase molecular imprinting of HRP.

    PubMed

    Czulak, J; Guerreiro, A; Metran, K; Canfarotta, F; Goddard, A; Cowan, R H; Trochimczuk, A W; Piletsky, S

    2016-06-07

    Here we introduce a new concept for synthesising molecularly imprinted nanoparticles by using proteins as macro-functional monomers. For a proof-of-concept, a model enzyme (HRP) was cross-linked using glutaraldehyde in the presence of glass beads (solid-phase) bearing immobilized templates such as vancomycin and ampicillin. The cross-linking process links together proteins and protein chains, which in the presence of templates leads to the formation of permanent target-specific recognition sites without adverse effects on the enzymatic activity. Unlike complex protein engineering approaches commonly employed to generate affinity proteins, the method proposed can be used to produce protein-based ligands in a short time period using native protein molecules. These affinity materials are potentially useful tools especially for assays since they combine the catalytic properties of enzymes (for signaling) and molecular recognition properties of antibodies. We demonstrate this concept in an ELISA-format assay where HRP imprinted with vancomycin and ampicillin replaced traditional enzyme-antibody conjugates for selective detection of templates at micromolar concentrations. This approach can potentially provide a fast alternative to raising antibodies for targets that do not require high assay sensitivities; it can also find uses as a biochemical research tool, as a possible replacement for immunoperoxidase-conjugates.

  18. Characterization of EPPIN's Semenogelin I Binding Site: A Contraceptive Drug Target1

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Erick J.R.; Hamil, Katherine G.; Richardson, Richard T.; O'Rand, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epididymal protease inhibitor (EPPIN) is found on the surface of spermatozoa and works as a central hub for a sperm surface protein complex (EPPIN protein complex [EPC]) that inhibits sperm motility on the binding of semenogelin I (SEMG1) during ejaculation. Here, we identify EPPIN's amino acids involved in the interactions within the EPC and demonstrate that EPPIN's sequence C102-P133 contains the major binding site for SEMG1. Within the same region, the sequence F117-P133 binds the EPC-associated protein lactotransferrin (LTF). We show that residues Cys102, Tyr107, and Phe117 in the EPPIN C-terminus are required for SEMG1 binding. Additionally, residues Tyr107 and Phe117 are critically involved in the interaction between EPPIN and LTF. Our findings demonstrate that EPPIN is a key player in the protein-protein interactions within the EPC. Target identification is an important step toward the development of a novel male contraceptive, and the functionality of EPPIN's residues Cys102, Tyr107, and Phe117 offers novel opportunities for contraceptive compounds that inhibit sperm motility by targeting this region of the molecule. PMID:22699487

  19. An efficient targeted nuclease strategy for high-resolution mapping of DNA binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Skene, Peter J; Henikoff, Steven

    2017-01-01

    We describe Cleavage Under Targets and Release Using Nuclease (CUT&RUN), a chromatin profiling strategy in which antibody-targeted controlled cleavage by micrococcal nuclease releases specific protein-DNA complexes into the supernatant for paired-end DNA sequencing. Unlike Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP), which fragments and solubilizes total chromatin, CUT&RUN is performed in situ, allowing for both quantitative high-resolution chromatin mapping and probing of the local chromatin environment. When applied to yeast and human nuclei, CUT&RUN yielded precise transcription factor profiles while avoiding crosslinking and solubilization issues. CUT&RUN is simple to perform and is inherently robust, with extremely low backgrounds requiring only ~1/10th the sequencing depth as ChIP, making CUT&RUN especially cost-effective for transcription factor and chromatin profiling. When used in conjunction with native ChIP-seq and applied to human CTCF, CUT&RUN mapped directional long range contact sites at high resolution. We conclude that in situ mapping of protein-DNA interactions by CUT&RUN is an attractive alternative to ChIP-seq. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21856.001 PMID:28079019

  20. Gene duplication in the major insecticide target site, Rdl, in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Remnant, Emily J; Good, Robert T; Schmidt, Joshua M; Lumb, Christopher; Robin, Charles; Daborn, Phillip J; Batterham, Philip

    2013-09-03

    The Resistance to Dieldrin gene, Rdl, encodes a GABA-gated chloride channel subunit that is targeted by cyclodiene and phenylpyrazole insecticides. The gene was first characterized in Drosophila melanogaster by genetic mapping of resistance to the cyclodiene dieldrin. The 4,000-fold resistance observed was due to a single amino acid replacement, Ala(301) to Ser. The equivalent change was subsequently identified in Rdl orthologs of a large range of resistant insect species. Here, we report identification of a duplication at the Rdl locus in D. melanogaster. The 113-kb duplication contains one WT copy of Rdl and a second copy with two point mutations: an Ala(301) to Ser resistance mutation and Met(360) to Ile replacement. Individuals with this duplication exhibit intermediate dieldrin resistance compared with single copy Ser(301) homozygotes, reduced temperature sensitivity, and altered RNA editing associated with the resistant allele. Ectopic recombination between Roo transposable elements is involved in generating this genomic rearrangement. The duplication phenotypes were confirmed by construction of a transgenic, artificial duplication integrating the 55.7-kb Rdl locus with a Ser(301) change into an Ala(301) background. Gene duplications can contribute significantly to the evolution of insecticide resistance, most commonly by increasing the amount of gene product produced. Here however, duplication of the Rdl target site creates permanent heterozygosity, providing unique potential for adaptive mutations to accrue in one copy, without abolishing the endogenous role of an essential gene.

  1. Radiation inactivation analysis of influenza virus reveals different target sizes for fusion, leakage, and neuraminidase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, S.; Jung, C.Y.; Takahashi, M.; Lenard, J.

    1986-10-07

    The size of the functional units responsible for several activities carried out by the influenza virus envelope glycoproteins was determined by radiation inactivation analysis. Neuraminidase activity, which resides in the glycoprotein NA, was inactivated exponentially with an increasing radiation dose, yielding a target size of 94 +/- 5 kilodaltons (kDa), in reasonable agreement with that of the disulfide-bonded dimer (120 kDa). All the other activities studied are properties of the HA glycoprotein and were normalized to the known molecular weight of the neuraminidase dimer. Virus-induced fusion activity was measured by two phospholipid dilution assays: relief of energy transfer between N-(7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl)dipalmitoyl-L-alpha- phosphatidylethanolamine (N-NBD-PE) and N-(lissamine rhodamine B sulfonyl)-dioleoyl-L-alpha-phosphatidylethanolamine (N-Rh-PE) in target liposomes and relief of self-quenching of N-Rh-PE in target liposomes. Radiation inactivation of fusion activity proceeded exponentially with radiation dose, yielding normalized target sizes of 68 +/- 6 kDa by assay i and 70 +/- 4 kDa by assay ii. These values are close to the molecular weight of a single disulfide-bonded (HA1 + HA2) unit (75 kDa), the monomer of the HA trimer. A single monomer is thus inactivated by each radiation event, and each monomer (or some part of it) constitutes a minimal functional unit capable of mediating fusion. Virus-induced leakage of calcein from target liposomes and virus-induced leakage of hemoglobin from erythrocytes (hemolysis) both showed more complex inactivation behavior: a pronounced shoulder was present in both inactivation curves, followed by a steep drop in activity at higher radiation levels.

  2. CDDO-Me reveals USP7 as a novel target in ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Haiyan; Tang, Caixia; Wu, Yunzhao; Wang, Yingying; Jin, Jin; Xiao, Weilie; Wang, Tongdan; Ma, Chunmin; Xu, Hanzhang; Zhang, Jinfu; Gao, Fenghou; Wu, Ying-Li

    2016-01-01

    Deubiquitinating enzyme USP7 has been involved in the pathogenesis and progression of several cancers. Targeting USP7 is becoming an attractive strategy for cancer therapy. In this study, we identified synthetic triterpenoid C-28 methyl ester of 2-cyano-3, 12-dioxoolen-1, 9-dien-28-oic acid (CDDO-Me) as a novel inhibitor of USP7 but not of other cysteine proteases such as cathepsin B and cathepsin D. CDDO-Me inhibits USP7 activity via a mechanism that is independent of the presence of α, β-unsaturated ketones. Molecular docking studies showed that CDDO-Me fits well in the ubiquitin carboxyl terminus-binding pocket on USP7. Given that CDDO-Me is known to be effective against ovarian cancer cells, we speculated that CDDO-Me may target USP7 in ovarian cancer cells. We demonstrated that ovarian cancer cells have higher USP7 expression than their normal counterparts. Knockdown of USP7 inhibits the proliferation of ovarian cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. Using the cellular thermal shift assay and the drug affinity responsive target stability assay, we further demonstrated that CDDO-Me directly binds to USP7 in cells, which leads to the decrease of its substrates such as MDM2, MDMX and UHRF1. CDDO-Me suppresses ovarian cancer tumor growth in an xenograft model. In conclusion, we demonstrate that USP7 is a novel target of ovarian cancer cells; targeting USP7 may contribute to the anti-cancer effect of CDDO-Me. The development of novel USP7 selective compounds based on the CDDO-Me-scaffold warrants further investigation. PMID:27780924

  3. Site-Selective Passivation of Defects in NiO Solar Photocathodes by Targeted Atomic Deposition.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Cory J; McCullough, Shannon M; Oh, EunBi; Li, Lesheng; Mercado, Candy C; Farnum, Byron H; Li, Wentao; Donley, Carrie L; You, Wei; Nozik, Arthur J; McBride, James R; Meyer, Thomas J; Kanai, Yosuke; Cahoon, James F

    2016-02-01

    For nanomaterials, surface chemistry can dictate fundamental material properties, including charge-carrier lifetimes, doping levels, and electrical mobilities. In devices, surface defects are usually the key limiting factor for performance, particularly in solar-energy applications. Here, we develop a strategy to uniformly and selectively passivate defect sites in semiconductor nanomaterials using a vapor-phase process termed targeted atomic deposition (TAD). Because defects often consist of atomic vacancies and dangling bonds with heightened reactivity, we observe-for the widely used p-type cathode nickel oxide-that a volatile precursor such as trimethylaluminum can undergo a kinetically limited selective reaction with these sites. The TAD process eliminates all measurable defects in NiO, leading to a nearly 3-fold improvement in the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells. Our results suggest that TAD could be implemented with a range of vapor-phase precursors and be developed into a general strategy to passivate defects in zero-, one-, and two-dimensional nanomaterials.

  4. Prediction of TF target sites based on atomistic models of protein-DNA complexes

    PubMed Central

    Angarica, Vladimir Espinosa; Pérez, Abel González; Vasconcelos, Ana T; Collado-Vides, Julio; Contreras-Moreira, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    Background The specific recognition of genomic cis-regulatory elements by transcription factors (TFs) plays an essential role in the regulation of coordinated gene expression. Studying the mechanisms determining binding specificity in protein-DNA interactions is thus an important goal. Most current approaches for modeling TF specific recognition rely on the knowledge of large sets of cognate target sites and consider only the information contained in their primary sequence. Results Here we describe a structure-based methodology for predicting sequence motifs starting from the coordinates of a TF-DNA complex. Our algorithm combines information regarding the direct and indirect readout of DNA into an atomistic statistical model, which is used to estimate the interaction potential. We first measure the ability of our method to correctly estimate the binding specificities of eight prokaryotic and eukaryotic TFs that belong to different structural superfamilies. Secondly, the method is applied to two homology models, finding that sampling of interface side-chain rotamers remarkably improves the results. Thirdly, the algorithm is compared with a reference structural method based on contact counts, obtaining comparable predictions for the experimental complexes and more accurate sequence motifs for the homology models. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that atomic-detail structural information can be feasibly used to predict TF binding sites. The computational method presented here is universal and might be applied to other systems involving protein-DNA recognition. PMID:18922190

  5. Pannexin1 channels contain a glycosylation site that targets the hexamer to the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Boassa, Daniela; Ambrosi, Cinzia; Qiu, Feng; Dahl, Gerhard; Gaietta, Guido; Sosinsky, Gina

    2007-10-26

    Pannexins are newly discovered channel proteins expressed in many different tissues and abundantly in the vertebrate central nervous system. Based on membrane topology, folding and secondary structure prediction, pannexins are proposed to form gap junction-like structures. We show here that Pannexin1 forms a hexameric channel and reaches the cell surface but, unlike connexins, is N-glycosylated. Using site-directed mutagenesis we analyzed three putative N-linked glycosylation sites and examined the effects of each mutation on channel expression. We show for the first time that Pannexin1 is glycosylated at Asn-254 and that this residue is important for plasma membrane targeting. The glycosylation of Pannexin1 at its extracellular surface makes it unlikely that two oligomers could dock to form an intercellular channel. Ultrastructural analysis by electron microscopy confirmed that Pannexin1 junctional areas do not appear as canonical gap junctions. Rather, Pannexin1 channels are distributed throughout the plasma membrane. We propose that N-glycosylation of Pannexin1 could be a significant mechanism for regulating the trafficking of these membrane proteins to the cell surface in different tissues.

  6. Decaleside: a new class of natural insecticide targeting tarsal gustatory sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajashekar, Yallappa; Rao, Lingamallu J. M.; Shivanandappa, Thimmappa

    2012-10-01

    Natural sources for novel insecticide molecules hold promise in view of their eco-friendly nature, selectivity, and mammalian safety. Recent progress in understanding the biology of insect olfaction and taste offers new strategies for developing selective pest control agents. We have isolated two natural insecticidal molecules from edible roots of Decalepis hamiltonii named Decalesides I and II, which are novel trisaccharides, highly toxic to household insect pests and stored-product insects. We have experimentally shown that insecticidal activity requires contact with tarsi on the legs but is not toxic orally. The insecticidal activity of molecules is lost by hydrolysis, and various sugars modify toxic response, showing that the insecticidal activity is via gustatory sites on the tarsi. Selective toxicity to insects by virtue of their gustatory site of action and the mammalian safety of the new insecticides is inherent in their chemical structure with 1-4 or 1-1 α linkage that is easily hydrolyzed by digestive enzymes of mammals. Decalesides represent a new chemical class of natural insecticides with a unique mode of action targeting tarsal chemosensory/gustatory system of insects.

  7. Decaleside: a new class of natural insecticide targeting tarsal gustatory sites.

    PubMed

    Rajashekar, Yallappa; Rao, Lingamallu J M; Shivanandappa, Thimmappa

    2012-10-01

    Natural sources for novel insecticide molecules hold promise in view of their eco-friendly nature, selectivity, and mammalian safety. Recent progress in understanding the biology of insect olfaction and taste offers new strategies for developing selective pest control agents. We have isolated two natural insecticidal molecules from edible roots of Decalepis hamiltonii named Decalesides I and II, which are novel trisaccharides, highly toxic to household insect pests and stored-product insects. We have experimentally shown that insecticidal activity requires contact with tarsi on the legs but is not toxic orally. The insecticidal activity of molecules is lost by hydrolysis, and various sugars modify toxic response, showing that the insecticidal activity is via gustatory sites on the tarsi. Selective toxicity to insects by virtue of their gustatory site of action and the mammalian safety of the new insecticides is inherent in their chemical structure with 1-4 or 1-1 α linkage that is easily hydrolyzed by digestive enzymes of mammals. Decalesides represent a new chemical class of natural insecticides with a unique mode of action targeting tarsal chemosensory/gustatory system of insects.

  8. Site-specific modification of ED-B-targeting antibody using intein-fusion technology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A promising new approach in cancer therapy is the use of tumor specific antibodies coupled to cytotoxic agents. Currently these immunoconjugates are prepared by rather unspecific coupling chemistries, resulting in heterogeneous products. As the drug load is a key parameter for the antitumor activity, site-specific strategies are desired. Expressed protein ligation (EPL) and protein trans-splicing (PTS) are methods for the specific C-terminal modification of a target protein. Both include the expression as an intein fusion protein, followed by the exchange of the intein for a functionalized moiety. Results A full-length IgG specific for fibronectin ED-B was expressed as fusion protein with an intein (Mxe GyrA or Npu DnaE) attached to each heavy chain. In vitro protocols were established to site-specifically modify the antibodies in high yields by EPL or PTS, respectively. Although reducing conditions had to be employed during the process, the integrity or affinity of the antibody was not affected. The protocols were used to prepare immunoconjugates containing two biotin molecules per antibody, attached to the C-termini of the heavy chains. Conclusion Full-length antibodies can be efficiently and site-specifically modified at the C-termini of their heavy chains by intein-fusion technologies. The described protocols can be used to prepare immunoconjugates of high homogeneity and with a defined drug load of two. The attachment to the C-termini is expected to retain the affinity and effector functions of the antibodies. PMID:21777442

  9. MitoFates: improved prediction of mitochondrial targeting sequences and their cleavage sites.

    PubMed

    Fukasawa, Yoshinori; Tsuji, Junko; Fu, Szu-Chin; Tomii, Kentaro; Horton, Paul; Imai, Kenichiro

    2015-04-01

    Mitochondria provide numerous essential functions for cells and their dysfunction leads to a variety of diseases. Thus, obtaining a complete mitochondrial proteome should be a crucial step toward understanding the roles of mitochondria. Many mitochondrial proteins have been identified experimentally but a complete list is not yet available. To fill this gap, methods to computationally predict mitochondrial proteins from amino acid sequence have been developed and are widely used, but unfortunately, their accuracy is far from perfect. Here we describe MitoFates, an improved prediction method for cleavable N-terminal mitochondrial targeting signals (presequences) and their cleavage sites. MitoFates introduces novel sequence features including positively charged amphiphilicity, presequence motifs, and position weight matrices modeling the presequence cleavage sites. These features are combined with classical ones such as amino acid composition and physico-chemical properties as input to a standard support vector machine classifier. On independent test data, MitoFates attains better performance than existing predictors in both detection of presequences and in predicting their cleavage sites. We used MitoFates to look for undiscovered mitochondrial proteins from 42,217 human proteins (including isoforms such as alternative splicing or translation initiation variants). MitoFates predicts 1167 genes to have at least one isoform with a presequence. Five-hundred and eighty of these genes were not annotated as mitochondrial in either UniProt or Gene Ontology. Interestingly, these include candidate regulators of parkin translocation to damaged mitochondria, and also many genes with known disease mutations, suggesting that careful investigation of MitoFates predictions may be helpful in elucidating the role of mitochondria in health and disease. MitoFates is open source with a convenient web server publicly available.

  10. The genetic regulatory network centered on Pto-Wuschela and its targets involved in wood formation revealed by association studies

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaohui; Wei, Zunzheng; Du, Qingzhang; Chen, Jinhui; Wang, Qingshi; Quan, Mingyang; Song, Yuepeng; Xie, Jianbo; Zhang, Deqiang

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) regulate gene expression and can strongly affect phenotypes. However, few studies have examined TF variants and TF interactions with their targets in plants. Here, we used genetic association in 435 unrelated individuals of Populus tomentosa to explore the variants in Pto-Wuschela and its targets to decipher the genetic regulatory network of Pto-Wuschela. Our bioinformatics and co-expression analysis identified 53 genes with the motif TCACGTGA as putative targets of Pto-Wuschela. Single-marker association analysis showed that Pto-Wuschela was associated with wood properties, which is in agreement with the observation that it has higher expression in stem vascular tissues in Populus. Also, SNPs in the 53 targets were associated with growth or wood properties under additive or dominance effects, suggesting these genes and Pto-Wuschela may act in the same genetic pathways that affect variation in these quantitative traits. Epistasis analysis indicated that 75.5% of these genes directly or indirectly interacted Pto-Wuschela, revealing the coordinated genetic regulatory network formed by Pto-Wuschela and its targets. Thus, our study provides an alternative method for dissection of the interactions between a TF and its targets, which will strength our understanding of the regulatory roles of TFs in complex traits in plants. PMID:26549216

  11. Catalytic site-specific cleavage of a DNA-target by an oligonucleotide carrying bleomycin A5.

    PubMed Central

    Sergeyev, D S; Godovikova, T S; Zarytova, V F

    1995-01-01

    Oligonucleotide reagents have been created which are capable of catalytic site-specific cleavage of DNA-targets. The oligonucleotide reagent Blm-R-pd(CCAAACA) bearing the bleomycin A5 (Blm-RH) residue was used to degrade the DNA-target pd(TGTTTGGCGAAGGA). It has been shown that at equimolar reagent: target concentration the bleomycin oligonucleotide derivative can repeatedly cleave the target at G9, G7, T5, T4 and T3 in site-specific manner. This paper demonstrates that with a 10-fold excess of the DNA-target relative to the reagent 30% degradation of the target was observed primarily at a single position G7. The paper also shows that one reagent molecule containing bleomycin A5 residue was capable to degrade three molecules of the DNA-target. The catalytic activity of Blm-R-pd(CCAAACA) was the highest in the temperature range close to the melting temperature of the reagent-target complex, that is under conditions where the oligonucleotide reagent can form a complementary complex and easily dissociate to interact with the next molecule of the target. The number of target molecules degraded by the bleomycin reagent is limited by the degradation of the antibiotic residue itself. Images PMID:7501462

  12. Combining Natural Sequence Variation with High Throughput Mutational Data to Reveal Protein Interaction Sites

    PubMed Central

    Melamed, Daniel; Young, David L.; Miller, Christina R.; Fields, Stanley

    2015-01-01

    Many protein interactions are conserved among organisms despite changes in the amino acid sequences that comprise their contact sites, a property that has been used to infer the location of these sites from protein homology. In an inter-species complementation experiment, a sequence present in a homologue is substituted into a protein and tested for its ability to support function. Therefore, substitutions that inhibit function can identify interaction sites that changed over evolution. However, most of the sequence differences within a protein family remain unexplored because of the small-scale nature of these complementation approaches. Here we use existing high throughput mutational data on the in vivo function of the RRM2 domain of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae poly(A)-binding protein, Pab1, to analyze its sites of interaction. Of 197 single amino acid differences in 52 Pab1 homologues, 17 reduce the function of Pab1 when substituted into the yeast protein. The majority of these deleterious mutations interfere with the binding of the RRM2 domain to eIF4G1 and eIF4G2, isoforms of a translation initiation factor. A large-scale mutational analysis of the RRM2 domain in a two-hybrid assay for eIF4G1 binding supports these findings and identifies peripheral residues that make a smaller contribution to eIF4G1 binding. Three single amino acid substitutions in yeast Pab1 corresponding to residues from the human orthologue are deleterious and eliminate binding to the yeast eIF4G isoforms. We create a triple mutant that carries these substitutions and other humanizing substitutions that collectively support a switch in binding specificity of RRM2 from the yeast eIF4G1 to its human orthologue. Finally, we map other deleterious substitutions in Pab1 to inter-domain (RRM2–RRM1) or protein-RNA (RRM2–poly(A)) interaction sites. Thus, the combined approach of large-scale mutational data and evolutionary conservation can be used to characterize interaction sites at single

  13. Insights into protein interaction networks reveal non-receptor kinases as significant druggable targets for psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Sundarrajan, Sudharsana; Lulu, Sajitha; Arumugam, Mohanapriya

    2015-07-25

    Psoriasis is a chronic disease of the skin characterized by hyper proliferation and inflammation of the epidermis and dermal components of the skin. T-cell-dependent inflammatory process in skin governs the pathogenesis of psoriasis. An in-silico search strategy was utilized to identify psoriatic therapeutic drug targets. The gene expression profiling of psoriatic skin identified a total of 427 differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Gene ontology investigation of DEGs identified genes involved in calcium binding, apoptosis, keratinisation, lipid transportation and homeostasis apart from immune mediated processes. The protein interaction networks identified proteins involved in various signaling mechanisms with high degree of interconnections. The gene modules derived from the main network were enriched with rich kinome. These sub-networks were dominated by the presence of non-receptor kinase family members which are major signal transmitters in immune response. The computational approach has aided in the identification of non-receptor kinases as potential targets for psoriasis drug development.

  14. Functional chromatography reveals three natural products that target the same protein with distinct mechanisms of action

    PubMed Central

    Kang, MinJin; Wu, Tongde; Wijeratne, E. M. Kithsiri; Lau, Eric C.; Mason, Damian J.; Mesa, Celestina; Tillotson, Joseph; Zhang, Donna D.; Gunatilaka, A. A. Leslie; La Clair, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Access to lead compounds with defined molecular targets continues to be a barrier to the translation of natural product resources. As a solution, we have developed a system that uses discreet, recombinant proteins as the vehicles for natural product isolation. Here, we describe the use of this functional chromatographic method to identify natural products that bind to the AAA+ chaperone, p97, a promising cancer target. Application of this method to a panel of fungal and plant extracts identified rheoemodin, 1-hydroxydehydroherbarin and phomapyrrolidone A as distinct p97 modulators. Excitingly, each of these molecules displayed a unique mechanism of p97 modulation. This discovery provides strong support for the application of functional chromatography to the discovery of protein modulators that would likely escape traditional high-throughput or phenotypic screening platforms. PMID:25125376

  15. High-resolution crystal structure reveals molecular details of target recognition by bacitracin

    PubMed Central

    Economou, Nicoleta J.; Cocklin, Simon; Loll, Patrick J.

    2013-01-01

    Bacitracin is a metalloantibiotic agent that is widely used as a medicine and feed additive. It interferes with bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis by binding undecaprenyl-pyrophosphate, a lipid carrier that serves as a critical intermediate in cell wall production. Despite bacitracin’s broad use, the molecular details of its target recognition have not been elucidated. Here we report a crystal structure for the ternary complex of bacitracin A, zinc, and a geranyl-pyrophosphate ligand at a resolution of 1.1 Å. The antibiotic forms a compact structure that completely envelopes the ligand’s pyrophosphate group, together with flanking zinc and sodium ions. The complex adopts a highly amphipathic conformation that offers clues to antibiotic function in the context of bacterial membranes. Bacitracin’s efficient sequestration of its target represents a previously unseen mode for the recognition of lipid pyrophosphates, and suggests new directions for the design of next-generation antimicrobial agents. PMID:23940351

  16. Big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) reveal diverse strategies for sonar target tracking in clutter.

    PubMed

    Mao, Beatrice; Aytekin, Murat; Wilkinson, Gerald S; Moss, Cynthia F

    2016-09-01

    Bats actively adjust the acoustic features of their sonar calls to control echo information specific to a given task and environment. A previous study investigated how bats adapted their echolocation behavior when tracking a moving target in the presence of a stationary distracter at different distances and angular offsets. The use of only one distracter, however, left open the possibility that a bat could reduce the interference of the distracter by turning its head. Here, bats tracked a moving target in the presence of one or two symmetrically placed distracters to investigate adaptive echolocation behavior in a situation where vocalizing off-axis would result in increased interference from distracter echoes. Both bats reduced bandwidth and duration but increased sweep rate in more challenging distracter conditions, and surprisingly, made more head turns in the two-distracter condition compared to one, but only when distracters were placed at large angular offsets. However, for most variables examined, subjects showed distinct strategies to reduce clutter interference, either by (1) changing spectral or temporal features of their calls, or (2) producing large numbers of sonar sound groups and consistent head-turning behavior. The results suggest that individual bats can use different strategies for target tracking in cluttered environments.

  17. Antigen targeting reveals splenic CD169+ macrophages as promoters of germinal center B‐cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Veninga, Henrike; Borg, Ellen G. F.; Vreeman, Kyle; Taylor, Philip R.; Kalay, Hakan; van Kooyk, Yvette; Kraal, Georg; Martinez‐Pomares, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Ag delivery to specific APCs is an attractive approach in developing strategies for vaccination. CD169+ macrophages in the marginal zone of the spleen represent a suitable target for delivery of Ag because of their strategic location, which is optimal for the capture of blood‐borne Ag and their close proximity to B cells and T cells in the white pulp. Here we show that Ag targeting to CD169+ macrophages in mice resulted in strong, isotype‐switched, high‐affinity Ab production and the preferential induction and long‐term persistence of Ag‐specific GC B cells and follicular Th cells. In agreement with these observations, CD169+ macrophages retained intact Ag, induced cognate activation of B cells, and increased expression of costimulatory molecules upon activation. In addition, macrophages were required for the production of cytokines that promote B‐cell responses. Our results identify CD169+ macrophages as promoters of high‐affinity humoral immune responses and emphasize the value of CD169 as target for Ag delivery to improve vaccine responses. PMID:25487358

  18. Integrated analysis of ischemic stroke datasets revealed sex and age difference in anti-stroke targets.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Xing; Dai, Shao-Xing; Wang, Qian; Guo, Yi-Cheng; Hong, Yi; Zheng, Jun-Juan; Liu, Jia-Qian; Liu, Dahai; Li, Gong-Hua; Huang, Jing-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is a common neurological disorder and the burden in the world is growing. This study aims to explore the effect of sex and age difference on ischemic stroke using integrated microarray datasets. The results showed a dramatic difference in whole gene expression profiles and influenced pathways between males and females, and also in the old and young individuals. Furthermore, compared with old males, old female patients showed more serious biological function damage. However, females showed less affected pathways than males in young subjects. Functional interaction networks showed these differential expression genes were mostly related to immune and inflammation-related functions. In addition, we found ARG1 and MMP9 were up-regulated in total and all subgroups. Importantly, IL1A, ILAB, IL6 and TNF and other anti-stroke target genes were up-regulated in males. However, these anti-stroke target genes showed low expression in females. This study found huge sex and age differences in ischemic stroke especially the opposite expression of anti-stroke target genes. Future studies are needed to uncover these pathological mechanisms, and to take appropriate pre-prevention, treatment and rehabilitation measures.

  19. Zinc-induced oligomerization of zinc α2 glycoprotein reveals multiple fatty acid-binding sites.

    PubMed

    Zahid, Henna; Miah, Layeque; Lau, Andy M; Brochard, Lea; Hati, Debolina; Bui, Tam T T; Drake, Alex F; Gor, Jayesh; Perkins, Stephen J; McDermott, Lindsay C

    2016-01-01

    Zinc α2 glycoprotein (ZAG) is an adipokine with a class I MHC protein fold and is associated with obesity and diabetes. Although its intrinsic ligand remains unknown, ZAG binds the dansylated C11 fatty acid 11-(dansylamino)undecanoic acid (DAUDA) in the groove between the α1 and α2 domains. The surface of ZAG has approximately 15 weak zinc-binding sites deemed responsible for precipitation from human plasma. In the present study the functional significance of these metal sites was investigated. Analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) and CD showed that zinc, but not other divalent metals, causes ZAG to oligomerize in solution. Thus ZAG dimers and trimers were observed in the presence of 1 and 2 mM zinc. Molecular modelling of X-ray scattering curves and sedimentation coefficients indicated a progressive stacking of ZAG monomers, suggesting that the ZAG groove may be occluded in these. Using fluorescence-detected sedimentation velocity, these ZAG-zinc oligomers were again observed in the presence of the fluorescent boron dipyrromethene fatty acid C16-BODIPY (4,4-difluoro-5,7-dimethyl-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene-3-hexadecanoic acid). Fluorescence spectroscopy confirmed that ZAG binds C16-BODIPY. ZAG binding to C16-BODIPY, but not to DAUDA, was reduced by increased zinc concentrations. We conclude that the lipid-binding groove in ZAG contains at least two distinct fatty acid-binding sites for DAUDA and C16-BODIPY, similar to the multiple lipid binding seen in the structurally related immune protein CD1c. In addition, because high concentrations of zinc occur in the pancreas, the perturbation of these multiple lipid-binding sites by zinc may be significant in Type 2 diabetes where dysregulation of ZAG and zinc homoeostasis occurs.

  20. Structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rtr1 reveals an active site for an atypical phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Irani, Seema; Yogesha, S D; Mayfield, Joshua; Zhang, Mengmeng; Zhang, Yong; Matthews, Wendy L; Nie, Grace; Prescott, Nicholas A; Zhang, Yan Jessie

    2016-03-01

    Changes in the phosphorylation status of the carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) correlate with the process of eukaryotic transcription. The yeast protein regulator of transcription 1 (Rtr1) and the human homolog RNAPII-associated protein 2 (RPAP2) may function as CTD phosphatases; however, crystal structures of Kluyveromyces lactis Rtr1 lack a consensus active site. We identified a phosphoryl transfer domain in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rtr1 by obtaining and characterizing a 2.6 Å resolution crystal structure. We identified a putative substrate-binding pocket in a deep groove between the zinc finger domain and a pair of helices that contained a trapped sulfate ion. Because sulfate mimics the chemistry of a phosphate group, this structural data suggested that this groove represents the phosphoryl transfer active site. Mutagenesis of the residues lining this groove disrupted catalytic activity of the enzyme assayed in vitro with a fluorescent chemical substrate, and expression of the mutated Rtr1 failed to rescue growth of yeast lacking Rtr1. Characterization of the phosphatase activity of RPAP2 and a mutant of the conserved putative catalytic site in the same chemical assay indicated a conserved reaction mechanism. Our data indicated that the structure of the phosphoryl transfer domain and reaction mechanism for the phosphoryl transfer activity of Rtr1 is distinct from those of other phosphatase families.

  1. How Force Might Activate Talin's Vinculin Binding Sites: SMD Reveals a Structural Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Hytönen, Vesa P; Vogel, Viola

    2008-01-01

    Upon cell adhesion, talin physically couples the cytoskeleton via integrins to the extracellular matrix, and subsequent vinculin recruitment is enhanced by locally applied tensile force. Since the vinculin binding (VB) sites are buried in the talin rod under equilibrium conditions, the structural mechanism of how vinculin binding to talin is force-activated remains unknown. Taken together with experimental data, a biphasic vinculin binding model, as derived from steered molecular dynamics, provides high resolution structural insights how tensile mechanical force applied to the talin rod fragment (residues 486–889 constituting helices H1–H12) might activate the VB sites. Fragmentation of the rod into three helix subbundles is prerequisite to the sequential exposure of VB helices to water. Finally, unfolding of a VB helix into a completely stretched polypeptide might inhibit further binding of vinculin. The first events in fracturing the H1–H12 rods of talin1 and talin2 in subbundles are similar. The proposed force-activated α-helix swapping mechanism by which vinculin binding sites in talin rods are exposed works distinctly different from that of other force-activated bonds, including catch bonds. PMID:18282082

  2. Substrate-binding specificity of chitinase and chitosanase as revealed by active-site architecture analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shijia; Shao, Shangjin; Li, Linlin; Cheng, Zhi; Tian, Li; Gao, Peiji; Wang, Lushan

    2015-12-11

    Chitinases and chitosanases, referred to as chitinolytic enzymes, are two important categories of glycoside hydrolases (GH) that play a key role in degrading chitin and chitosan, two naturally abundant polysaccharides. Here, we investigate the active site architecture of the major chitosanase (GH8, GH46) and chitinase families (GH18, GH19). Both charged (Glu, His, Arg, Asp) and aromatic amino acids (Tyr, Trp, Phe) are observed with higher frequency within chitinolytic active sites as compared to elsewhere in the enzyme structure, indicating significant roles related to enzyme function. Hydrogen bonds between chitinolytic enzymes and the substrate C2 functional groups, i.e. amino groups and N-acetyl groups, drive substrate recognition, while non-specific CH-π interactions between aromatic residues and substrate mainly contribute to tighter binding and enhanced processivity evident in GH8 and GH18 enzymes. For different families of chitinolytic enzymes, the number, type, and position of substrate atoms bound in the active site vary, resulting in different substrate-binding specificities. The data presented here explain the synergistic action of multiple enzyme families at a molecular level and provide a more reasonable method for functional annotation, which can be further applied toward the practical engineering of chitinases and chitosanases.

  3. Structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rtr1 reveals an active site for an atypical phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Mayfield, Joshua; Zhang, Mengmeng; Zhang, Yong; Matthews, Wendy L.; Nie, Grace; Prescott, Nicholas A.; Zhang, Yan Jessie

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the phosphorylation status of the carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) correlate with the process of eukaryotic transcription. The yeast protein regulator of transcription 1 (Rtr1) and the human homolog RNAPII-associated protein 2 (RPAP2) may function as CTD phosphatases; however, crystal structures of Kluyveromyces lactis Rtr1 lack a consensus active site. We identified a phosphoryl transfer domain in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rtr1 by obtaining and characterizing a 2.6 Å resolution crystal structure. We identified a putative substrate-binding pocket in a deep groove between the zinc finger domain and a pair of helices that contained a trapped sulfate ion. Because sulfate mimics the chemistry of a phosphate group, this structural data suggested that this groove represents the phosphoryl transfer active site. Mutagenesis of the residues lining this groove disrupted catalytic activity of the enzyme assayed in vitro with a fluorescent chemical substrate, and expression of the mutated Rtr1 failed to rescue growth of yeast lacking Rtr1. Characterization of the phosphatase activity of RPAP2 and a mutant of the conserved putative catalytic site in the same chemical assay indicated a conserved reaction mechanism. Our data indicated that the structure of the phosphoryl transfer domain and reaction mechanism for the phosphoryl transfer activity of Rtr1 is distinct from those of other phosphatase families. PMID:26933063

  4. Sequencing human-gibbon breakpoints of synteny reveals mosaic new insertions at rearrangement sites.

    PubMed

    Girirajan, Santhosh; Chen, Lin; Graves, Tina; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Ventura, Mario; Fronick, Catrina; Fulton, Lucinda; Rocchi, Mariano; Fulton, Robert S; Wilson, Richard K; Mardis, Elaine R; Eichler, Evan E

    2009-02-01

    The gibbon genome exhibits extensive karyotypic diversity with an increased rate of chromosomal rearrangements during evolution. In an effort to understand the mechanistic origin and implications of these rearrangement events, we sequenced 24 synteny breakpoint regions in the white-cheeked gibbon (Nomascus leucogenys, NLE) in the form of high-quality BAC insert sequences (4.2 Mbp). While there is a significant deficit of breakpoints in genes, we identified seven human gene structures involved in signaling pathways (DEPDC4, GNG10), phospholipid metabolism (ENPP5, PLSCR2), beta-oxidation (ECH1), cellular structure and transport (HEATR4), and transcription (ZNF461), that have been disrupted in the NLE gibbon lineage. Notably, only three of these genes show the expected evolutionary signatures of pseudogenization. Sequence analysis of the breakpoints suggested both nonclassical nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) and replication-based mechanisms of rearrangement. A substantial number (11/24) of human-NLE gibbon breakpoints showed new insertions of gibbon-specific repeats and mosaic structures formed from disparate sequences including segmental duplications, LINE, SINE, and LTR elements. Analysis of these sites provides a model for a replication-dependent repair mechanism for double-strand breaks (DSBs) at rearrangement sites and insights into the structure and formation of primate segmental duplications at sites of genomic rearrangements during evolution.

  5. Identification of a Campylobacter coli methyltransferase targeting adenines at GATC sites.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Vikrant; Altermann, Eric; Crespo, Maria D; Olson, Jonathan W; Siletzky, Robin M; Kathariou, Sophia

    2016-12-02

    Campylobacter coli can infect humans and colonize multiple other animals but its host-associated genes or adaptations are poorly understood. Adenine methylation at GATC sites, resulting in MboI resistance of genomic DNA, was earlier frequently detected among C. coli from swine but not among turkey-derived isolates. The underlying genetic basis has remained unknown. Comparative genome sequence analyses of C. coli 6461, a swine-derived strain with MboI-resistant DNA, revealed two chromosomal ORFs, 0059 and 0060, encoding a putative DNA methyltransferase and a conserved hypothetical protein, respectively, which were lacking from the genome of the turkey-derived C. coli strain 11601, which had MboI-susceptible DNA. To determine whether the ORF0059 mediated MboI resistance and hence encoded a putative N6-adenine DNA methyltransferase, the gene was cloned immediately upstream of a chloramphenicol resistance cassette (cat) and a PCR fragment harboring ORF0059-cat was transformed into C. coli 11601. The transformants had MboI-resistant DNA, suggesting a direct role of this gene in methylation of adenines at GATC sites. In-silico analyses suggested that the ORF0059-ORF0060 cassette was more frequent among C. coli from swine than certain other sources (e.g. cattle, humans). Potential impacts of ORF0059-mediated methylation on C. coli host preference and other adaptations remain to be elucidated.

  6. Mechanism of intermediate filament recognition by plakin repeat domains revealed by envoplakin targeting of vimentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogl, Claudia; Mohammed, Fiyaz; Al-Jassar, Caezar; Jeeves, Mark; Knowles, Timothy J.; Rodriguez-Zamora, Penelope; White, Scott A.; Odintsova, Elena; Overduin, Michael; Chidgey, Martyn

    2016-03-01

    Plakin proteins form critical connections between cell junctions and the cytoskeleton; their disruption within epithelial and cardiac muscle cells cause skin-blistering diseases and cardiomyopathies. Envoplakin has a single plakin repeat domain (PRD) which recognizes intermediate filaments through an unresolved mechanism. Herein we report the crystal structure of envoplakin's complete PRD fold, revealing binding determinants within its electropositive binding groove. Four of its five internal repeats recognize negatively charged patches within vimentin via five basic determinants that are identified by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Mutations of the Lys1901 or Arg1914 binding determinants delocalize heterodimeric envoplakin from intracellular vimentin and keratin filaments in cultured cells. Recognition of vimentin is abolished when its residues Asp112 or Asp119 are mutated. The latter slot intermediate filament rods into basic PRD domain grooves through electrosteric complementarity in a widely applicable mechanism. Together this reveals how plakin family members form dynamic linkages with cytoskeletal frameworks.

  7. Mechanism of intermediate filament recognition by plakin repeat domains revealed by envoplakin targeting of vimentin

    PubMed Central

    Fogl, Claudia; Mohammed, Fiyaz; Al-Jassar, Caezar; Jeeves, Mark; Knowles, Timothy J.; Rodriguez-Zamora, Penelope; White, Scott A.; Odintsova, Elena; Overduin, Michael; Chidgey, Martyn

    2016-01-01

    Plakin proteins form critical connections between cell junctions and the cytoskeleton; their disruption within epithelial and cardiac muscle cells cause skin-blistering diseases and cardiomyopathies. Envoplakin has a single plakin repeat domain (PRD) which recognizes intermediate filaments through an unresolved mechanism. Herein we report the crystal structure of envoplakin's complete PRD fold, revealing binding determinants within its electropositive binding groove. Four of its five internal repeats recognize negatively charged patches within vimentin via five basic determinants that are identified by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Mutations of the Lys1901 or Arg1914 binding determinants delocalize heterodimeric envoplakin from intracellular vimentin and keratin filaments in cultured cells. Recognition of vimentin is abolished when its residues Asp112 or Asp119 are mutated. The latter slot intermediate filament rods into basic PRD domain grooves through electrosteric complementarity in a widely applicable mechanism. Together this reveals how plakin family members form dynamic linkages with cytoskeletal frameworks. PMID:26935805

  8. Molecular Subtyping of Primary Prostate Cancer Reveals Specific and Shared Target Genes of Different ETS Rearrangements12

    PubMed Central

    Paulo, Paula; Ribeiro, Franclim R; Santos, Joana; Mesquita, Diana; Almeida, Mafalda; Barros-Silva, João D; Itkonen, Harri; Henrique, Rui; Jerónimo, Carmen; Sveen, Anita; Mills, Ian G; Skotheim, Rolf I; Lothe, Ragnhild A; Teixeira, Manuel R

    2012-01-01

    This work aimed to evaluate whether ETS transcription factors frequently involved in rearrangements in prostate carcinomas (PCa), namely ERG and ETV1, regulate specific or shared target genes. We performed differential expression analysis on nine normal prostate tissues and 50 PCa enriched for different ETS rearrangements using exon-level expression microarrays, followed by in vitro validation using cell line models. We found specific deregulation of 57 genes in ERG-positive PCa and 15 genes in ETV1-positive PCa, whereas deregulation of 27 genes was shared in both tumor subtypes. We further showed that the expression of seven tumor-associated ERG target genes (PLA1A, CACNA1D, ATP8A2, HLA-DMB, PDE3B, TDRD1, and TMBIM1) and two tumor-associated ETV1 target genes (FKBP10 and GLYATL2) was significantly affected by specific ETS silencing in VCaP and LNCaP cell line models, respectively, whereas the expression of three candidate ERG and ETV1 shared targets (GRPR, KCNH8, and TMEM45B) was significantly affected by silencing of either ETS. Interestingly, we demonstrate that the expression of TDRD1, the topmost overexpressed gene of our list of ERG-specific candidate targets, is inversely correlated with the methylation levels of a CpG island found at -66 bp of the transcription start site in PCa and that TDRD1 expression is regulated by direct binding of ERG to the CpG island in VCaP cells. We conclude that ETS transcription factors regulate specific and shared target genes and that TDRD1, FKBP10, and GRPR are promising therapeutic targets and can serve as diagnostic markers for molecular subtypes of PCa harboring specific fusion gene rearrangements. PMID:22904677

  9. Targeted exome sequencing reveals distinct pathogenic variants in Iranians with colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ashktorab, Hassan; Mokarram, Pooneh; Azimi, Hamed; Olumi, Hasti; Varma, Sudhir; Nickerson, Michael L.; Brim, Hassan

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) is currently used to establish mutational profiles in many multigene diseases such as colorectal cancer (CRC), which is on the rise in many parts of the developing World including, Iran. Little is known about its genetic hallmarks in these populations. AIM To identify variants in 15 CRC-associated genes in patients of Iranian descent. RESULTS There were 51 validated variants distributed on 12 genes: 22% MSH3 (n = 11/51), 10% MSH6 (n = 5/51), 8% AMER1 (n = 4/51), 20% APC (n = 10/51), 2% BRAF (n = 1/51), 2% KRAS (n = 1/51), 12% PIK3CA (n = 6/51), 8% TGFβR2A (n = 4/51), 2% SMAD4 (n = 1/51), 4% SOX9 (n = 2/51), 6% TCF7L2 (n = 3/51), and 6% TP53 (n = 3/51). Most known and distinct variants were in mismatch repair genes (MMR, 32%) and APC (20%). Among oncogenes, PIK3CA was the top target (12%). MATERIALS AND METHODS CRC specimens from 63 Shirazi patients were used to establish the variant' profile on an Ion Torrent platform by targeted exome sequencing. To rule-out technical artifacts, the variants were validated in 13 of these samples using an Illumina NGS platform. Validated variants were annotated and compared to variants from publically available databases. An in-silico functional analysis was performed. MSI status of the analyzed samples was established. CONCLUSION These results illustrate for the first time CRC mutational profile in Iranian patients. MSH3, MSH6, APC and PIK3CA genes seem to play a bigger role in the path to cancer in this population. These findings will potentially lead to informed genetic diagnosis protocol and targeted therapeutic strategies. PMID:28002797

  10. Reprofiling using a zebrafish melanoma model reveals drugs cooperating with targeted therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    del Ama, Laura Fernandez; Jones, Mary; Walker, Paul; Chapman, Anna; Braun, Julia A.; Mohr, Jasmine; Hurlstone, Adam F. L.

    2016-01-01

    Phenotype-guided re-profiling of approved drug molecules presents an accelerated route to developing anticancer therapeutics by bypassing the target-identification bottleneck of target-based approaches and by sampling drugs already in the clinic. Further, combinations incorporating targeted therapies can be screened for both efficacy and toxicity. Previously we have developed an oncogenic-RAS-driven zebrafish melanoma model that we now describe display melanocyte hyperplasia while still embryos. Having devised a rapid method for quantifying melanocyte burden, we show that this phenotype can be chemically suppressed by incubating V12RAS transgenic embryos with potent and selective small molecule inhibitors of either MEK or PI3K/mTOR. Moreover, we demonstrate that combining MEK inhibitors (MEKi) with dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitors (PI3K/mTORi) resulted in a super-additive suppression of melanocyte hyperplasia. The robustness and simplicity of our novel screening assay inspired us to perform a modest screen of FDA approved compounds for their ability to potentiate MEKi PD184352 or PI3K/mTORi NVPBEZ235 suppression of V12RAS-driven melanocyte hyperplasia. Through this route, we confirmed Rapamycin as a compound that could synergize with MEKi and even more so with PI3K/mTORi to suppress melanoma development, including suppressing the growth of cultured human melanoma cells. Further, we discovered two additional compounds—Disulfiram and Tanshinone—that also co-operate with MEKi to suppress the growth of transformed zebrafish melanocytes and showed activity toward cultured human melanoma cells. In conclusion, we provide proof-of-concept that our phenotype-guided screen could be used to identify compounds that affect melanoma development and prompt further evaluation of Disulfiram and Tanshinone as possible partners for combination therapy. PMID:27248171

  11. Genome-wide identification of palmitate-regulated immediate early genes and target genes in pancreatic beta-cells reveals a central role of NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyung Jin; Hwang, Seungwoo; Lee, Se-Hee; Lee, You Ri; Shin, Jiyon; Park, Kyong Soo; Cho, Young Min

    2012-06-01

    Free fatty acid-induced pancreatic β-cell dysfunction plays a key role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. We conducted gene expression microarray analysis to comprehensively investigate the transcription machinery of palmitate-regulated genes in pancreatic β-cells in vitro. In particular, mouse pancreatic βTC3 cells were treated with palmitate in the presence or absence of cycloheximide (CHX), which blocks protein synthesis and thereby allows us to distinguish immediate early genes (IEGs) from their target genes. The microarray experiments identified 34 palmitate-regulated IEGs and 74 palmitate-regulated target genes. In silico promoter analysis revealed that transcription factor binding sites for NF-κB were over-represented, regulating approximately one-third of the palmitate-regulated target genes. In cells treated with CHX, nfkb1 showed an up-regulation by palmitate, suggesting that NF-κB could be an IEG. Functional enrichment analysis of 27 palmitate-regulated genes with NF-κB binding sites showed an over-representation of genes involved in immune response, inflammatory response, defense response, taxis, regulation of cell proliferation, and regulation of cell death pathways. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that palmitate stimulates NF-κB activity both in the presence and absence of CHX. In conclusion, by identifying IEGs and target genes, the present study depicted a comprehensive view of transcription machinery underlying palmitate-induced inflammation and cell proliferation/death in pancreatic β-cells and our data demonstrated the central role of NF-κB.

  12. Comprehensive molecular pathology analysis of small bowel adenocarcinoma reveals novel targets with potential for clinical utility

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Paul; Fuchs, Marc-Aurel; Alderdice, Matthew; McCabe, Clare M.; Bingham, Victoria; McGready, Claire; Tripathi, Shailesh; Emmert-Streib, Frank; Loughrey, Maurice B.; McQuaid, Stephen; Maxwell, Perry; Hamilton, Peter W.; Turkington, Richard; James, Jacqueline A.; Wilson, Richard H.; Salto-Tellez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Small bowel accounts for only 0.5% of cancer cases in the US but incidence rates have been rising at 2.4% per year over the past decade. One-third of these are adenocarcinomas but little is known about their molecular pathology and no molecular markers are available for clinical use. Using a retrospective 28 patient matched normal-tumor cohort, next-generation sequencing, gene expression arrays and CpG methylation arrays were used for molecular profiling. Next-generation sequencing identified novel mutations in IDH1, CDH1, KIT, FGFR2, FLT3, NPM1, PTEN, MET, AKT1, RET, NOTCH1 and ERBB4. Array data revealed 17% of CpGs and 5% of RNA transcripts assayed to be differentially methylated and expressed respectively (p < 0.01). Merging gene expression and DNA methylation data revealed CHN2 as consistently hypermethylated and downregulated in this disease (Spearman −0.71, p < 0.001). Mutations in TP53 which were found in more than half of the cohort (15/28) and Kazald1 hypomethylation were both were indicative of poor survival (p = 0.03, HR = 3.2 and p = 0.01, HR = 4.9 respectively). By integrating high-throughput mutational, gene expression and DNA methylation data, this study reveals for the first time the distinct molecular profile of small bowel adenocarcinoma and highlights potential clinically exploitable markers. PMID:26315110

  13. Comprehensive molecular pathology analysis of small bowel adenocarcinoma reveals novel targets with potential for clinical utility.

    PubMed

    Alvi, Muhammad A; McArt, Darragh G; Kelly, Paul; Fuchs, Marc-Aurel; Alderdice, Matthew; McCabe, Clare M; Bingham, Victoria; McGready, Claire; Tripathi, Shailesh; Emmert-Streib, Frank; Loughrey, Maurice B; McQuaid, Stephen; Maxwell, Perry; Hamilton, Peter W; Turkington, Richard; James, Jacqueline A; Wilson, Richard H; Salto-Tellez, Manuel

    2015-08-28

    Small bowel accounts for only 0.5% of cancer cases in the US but incidence rates have been rising at 2.4% per year over the past decade. One-third of these are adenocarcinomas but little is known about their molecular pathology and no molecular markers are available for clinical use. Using a retrospective 28 patient matched normal-tumor cohort, next-generation sequencing, gene expression arrays and CpG methylation arrays were used for molecular profiling. Next-generation sequencing identified novel mutations in IDH1, CDH1, KIT, FGFR2, FLT3, NPM1, PTEN, MET, AKT1, RET, NOTCH1 and ERBB4. Array data revealed 17% of CpGs and 5% of RNA transcripts assayed to be differentially methylated and expressed respectively (p < 0.01). Merging gene expression and DNA methylation data revealed CHN2 as consistently hypermethylated and downregulated in this disease (Spearman -0.71, p < 0.001). Mutations in TP53 which were found in more than half of the cohort (15/28) and Kazald1 hypomethylation were both were indicative of poor survival (p = 0.03, HR = 3.2 and p = 0.01, HR = 4.9 respectively). By integrating high-throughput mutational, gene expression and DNA methylation data, this study reveals for the first time the distinct molecular profile of small bowel adenocarcinoma and highlights potential clinically exploitable markers.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Revealed Splenic Targeting of Canine Parvovirus Capsid Protein VP2.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yufei; Wang, Haiming; Yan, Dan; Wei, Yanquan; Cao, Yuhua; Yi, Peiwei; Zhang, Hailu; Deng, Zongwu; Dai, Jianwu; Liu, Xiangtao; Luo, Jianxun; Zhang, Zhijun; Sun, Shiqi; Guo, Huichen

    2016-03-21

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) is a highly contagious infectious virus, whose infectious mechanism remains unclear because of acute gastroenteritis and the lack of an efficient tool to visualize the virus in real time during virology research. In this study, we developed an iron oxide nanoparticle supported by graphene quantum dots (GQD), namely, FeGQD. In this composite material, GQD acts as a stabilizer; thus, vacancies are retained on the surface for further physical adsorption of the CPV VP2 protein. The FeGQD@VP2 nanocomposite product showed largely enhanced colloidal stability in comparison with bare FeGQD, as well as negligible toxicity both in vitro and in vivo. The composite displayed high uptake into transferrin receptor (TfR) positive cells, which are distinguishable from FeGQD or TfR negative cells. In addition, the composite developed a significant accumulation in spleen rather than in liver, where bare FeGQD or most iron oxide nanoparticles gather. As these evident targeting abilities of FeGQD@VP2 strongly suggested, the biological activity of CPV VP2 was retained in our study, and its biological functions might correspond to CPV when the rare splenic targeting ability is considered. This approach can be applied to numerous other biomedical studies that require a simple yet efficient approach to track proteins in vivo while retaining biological function and may facilitate virus-related research.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Revealed Splenic Targeting of Canine Parvovirus Capsid Protein VP2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yufei; Wang, Haiming; Yan, Dan; Wei, Yanquan; Cao, Yuhua; Yi, Peiwei; Zhang, Hailu; Deng, Zongwu; Dai, Jianwu; Liu, Xiangtao; Luo, Jianxun; Zhang, Zhijun; Sun, Shiqi; Guo, Huichen

    2016-03-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) is a highly contagious infectious virus, whose infectious mechanism remains unclear because of acute gastroenteritis and the lack of an efficient tool to visualize the virus in real time during virology research. In this study, we developed an iron oxide nanoparticle supported by graphene quantum dots (GQD), namely, FeGQD. In this composite material, GQD acts as a stabilizer; thus, vacancies are retained on the surface for further physical adsorption of the CPV VP2 protein. The FeGQD@VP2 nanocomposite product showed largely enhanced colloidal stability in comparison with bare FeGQD, as well as negligible toxicity both in vitro and in vivo. The composite displayed high uptake into transferrin receptor (TfR) positive cells, which are distinguishable from FeGQD or TfR negative cells. In addition, the composite developed a significant accumulation in spleen rather than in liver, where bare FeGQD or most iron oxide nanoparticles gather. As these evident targeting abilities of FeGQD@VP2 strongly suggested, the biological activity of CPV VP2 was retained in our study, and its biological functions might correspond to CPV when the rare splenic targeting ability is considered. This approach can be applied to numerous other biomedical studies that require a simple yet efficient approach to track proteins in vivo while retaining biological function and may facilitate virus-related research.

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Revealed Splenic Targeting of Canine Parvovirus Capsid Protein VP2

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yufei; Wang, Haiming; Yan, Dan; Wei, Yanquan; Cao, Yuhua; Yi, Peiwei; Zhang, Hailu; Deng, Zongwu; Dai, Jianwu; Liu, Xiangtao; Luo, Jianxun; Zhang, Zhijun; Sun, Shiqi; Guo, Huichen

    2016-01-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) is a highly contagious infectious virus, whose infectious mechanism remains unclear because of acute gastroenteritis and the lack of an efficient tool to visualize the virus in real time during virology research. In this study, we developed an iron oxide nanoparticle supported by graphene quantum dots (GQD), namely, FeGQD. In this composite material, GQD acts as a stabilizer; thus, vacancies are retained on the surface for further physical adsorption of the CPV VP2 protein. The FeGQD@VP2 nanocomposite product showed largely enhanced colloidal stability in comparison with bare FeGQD, as well as negligible toxicity both in vitro and in vivo. The composite displayed high uptake into transferrin receptor (TfR) positive cells, which are distinguishable from FeGQD or TfR negative cells. In addition, the composite developed a significant accumulation in spleen rather than in liver, where bare FeGQD or most iron oxide nanoparticles gather. As these evident targeting abilities of FeGQD@VP2 strongly suggested, the biological activity of CPV VP2 was retained in our study, and its biological functions might correspond to CPV when the rare splenic targeting ability is considered. This approach can be applied to numerous other biomedical studies that require a simple yet efficient approach to track proteins in vivo while retaining biological function and may facilitate virus-related research. PMID:26996514

  17. Targeted deep sequencing of flowering regulators in Brassica napus reveals extensive copy number variation

    PubMed Central

    Schiessl, Sarah; Huettel, Bruno; Kuehn, Diana; Reinhardt, Richard; Snowdon, Rod J.

    2017-01-01

    Gene copy number variation (CNV) is increasingly implicated in control of complex trait networks, particularly in polyploid plants like rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) with an evolutionary history of genome restructuring. Here we performed sequence capture to assay nucleotide variation and CNV in a panel of central flowering time regulatory genes across a species-wide diversity set of 280 B. napus accessions. The genes were chosen based on prior knowledge from Arabidopsis thaliana and related Brassica species. Target enrichment was performed using the Agilent SureSelect technology, followed by Illumina sequencing. A bait (probe) pool was developed based on results of a preliminary experiment with representatives from different B. napus morphotypes. A very high mean target coverage of ~670x allowed reliable calling of CNV, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and insertion-deletion (InDel) polymorphisms. No accession exhibited no CNV, and at least one homolog of every gene we investigated showed CNV in some accessions. Some CNV appear more often in specific morphotypes, indicating a role in diversification. PMID:28291231

  18. Next-generation sequencing of adrenocortical carcinoma reveals new routes to targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Ross, J S; Wang, K; Rand, J V; Gay, L; Presta, M J; Sheehan, C E; Ali, S M; Elvin, J A; Labrecque, E; Hiemstra, C; Buell, J; Otto, G A; Yelensky, R; Lipson, D; Morosini, D; Chmielecki, J; Miller, V A; Stephens, P J

    2014-01-01

    Aims Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) carries a poor prognosis and current systemic cytotoxic therapies result in only modest improvement in overall survival. In this retrospective study, we performed a comprehensive genomic profiling of 29 consecutive ACC samples to identify potential targets of therapy not currently searched for in routine clinical practice. Methods DNA from 29 ACC was sequenced to high, uniform coverage (Illumina HiSeq) and analysed for genomic alterations (GAs). Results At least one GA was found in 22 (76%) ACC (mean 2.6 alterations per ACC). The most frequent GAs were in TP53 (34%), NF1 (14%), CDKN2A (14%), MEN1 (14%), CTNNB1 (10%) and ATM (10%). APC, CCND2, CDK4, DAXX, DNMT3A, KDM5C, LRP1B, MSH2 and RB1 were each altered in two cases (7%) and EGFR, ERBB4, KRAS, MDM2, NRAS, PDGFRB, PIK3CA, PTEN and PTCH1 were each altered in a single case (3%). In 17 (59%) of ACC, at least one GA was associated with an available therapeutic or a mechanism-based clinical trial. Conclusions Next-generation sequencing can discover targets of therapy for relapsed and metastatic ACC and shows promise to improve outcomes for this aggressive form of cancer. PMID:25078331

  19. Structures of lipoyl synthase reveal a compact active site for controlling sequential sulfur insertion reactions.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Jenny E; Hiscox, Martyn J; Dinis, Pedro C; Fox, Stephen J; Iliopoulos, Andreas; Hussey, James E; Sandy, James; Van Beek, Florian T; Essex, Jonathan W; Roach, Peter L

    2014-11-15

    Lipoyl cofactors are essential for living organisms and are produced by the insertion of two sulfur atoms into the relatively unreactive C-H bonds of an octanoyl substrate. This reaction requires lipoyl synthase, a member of the radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzyme superfamily. In the present study, we solved crystal structures of lipoyl synthase with two [4Fe-4S] clusters bound at opposite ends of the TIM barrel, the usual fold of the radical SAM superfamily. The cluster required for reductive SAM cleavage conserves the features of the radical SAM superfamily, but the auxiliary cluster is bound by a CX4CX5C motif unique to lipoyl synthase. The fourth ligand to the auxiliary cluster is an extremely unusual serine residue. Site-directed mutants show this conserved serine ligand is essential for the sulfur insertion steps. One crystallized lipoyl synthase (LipA) complex contains 5'-methylthioadenosine (MTA), a breakdown product of SAM, bound in the likely SAM-binding site. Modelling has identified an 18 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) deep channel, well-proportioned to accommodate an octanoyl substrate. These results suggest that the auxiliary cluster is the likely sulfur donor, but access to a sulfide ion for the second sulfur insertion reaction requires the loss of an iron atom from the auxiliary cluster, which the serine ligand may enable.

  20. Revealing the function of a novel splice-site mutation of CHD7 in CHARGE syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byeonghyeon; Duz, Mehmet Bugrahan; Sagong, Borum; Koparir, Asuman; Lee, Kyu-Yup; Choi, Jae Young; Seven, Mehmet; Yuksel, Adnan; Kim, Un-Kyung; Ozen, Mustafa

    2016-02-01

    Most cases of CHARGE syndrome are sporadic and autosomal dominant. CHD7 is a major causative gene of CHARGE syndrome. In this study, we screened CHD7 in two Turkish patients demonstrating symptoms of CHARGE syndrome such as coloboma, heart defect, choanal atresia, retarded growth, genital abnomalities and ear anomalies. Two mutations of CHD7 were identified including a novel splice-site mutation (c.2443-2A>G) and a previously known frameshift mutation (c.2504_2508delATCTT). We performed exon trapping analysis to determine the effect of the c.2443-2A>G mutation at the transcriptional level, and found that it caused a complete skip of exon 7 and splicing at a cryptic splice acceptor site. Our current study is the second study demonstrating an exon 7 deficit in CHD7. Results of previous studies suggest that the c.2443-2A>G mutation affects the formation of nasal tissues and the neural retina during early development, resulting in choanal atresia and coloboma, respectively. The findings of the present study will improve our understanding of the genetic causes of CHARGE syndrome.

  1. Genomic characterization of brain metastases reveals branched evolution and potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Santagata, Sandro; Cahill, Daniel P.; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Jones, Robert T.; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Lawrence, Michael S.; Horowitz, Peleg M.; Cibulskis, Kristian; Ligon, Keith L.; Tabernero, Josep; Seoane, Joan; Martinez-Saez, Elena; Curry, William T.; Dunn, Ian F.; Paek, Sun Ha; Park, Sung-Hye; McKenna, Aaron; Chevalier, Aaron; Rosenberg, Mara; Barker, Frederick G.; Gill, Corey M.; Van Hummelen, Paul; Thorner, Aaron R.; Johnson, Bruce E.; Hoang, Mai P.; Choueiri, Toni K.; Signoretti, Sabina; Sougnez, Carrie; Rabin, Michael S.; Lin, Nancy U.; Winer, Eric P.; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat; Meyerson, Matthew; Garraway, Levi; Gabriel, Stacey; Lander, Eric S.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Batchelor, Tracy T.; Baselga, Jose; Louis, David N.

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastases are associated with a dismal prognosis. Whether brain metastases harbor distinct genetic alterations beyond those observed in primary tumors is unknown. We performed whole-exome sequencing of 86 matched brain metastases, primary tumors and normal tissue. In all clonally related cancer samples, we observed branched evolution, where all metastatic and primary sites shared a common ancestor yet continued to evolve independently. In 53% of cases, we found potentially clinically informative alterations in the brain metastases not detected in the matched primary-tumor sample. In contrast, spatially and temporally separated brain metastasis sites were genetically homogenous. Distal extracranial and regional lymph node metastases were highly divergent from brain metastases. We detected alterations associated with sensitivity to PI3K/AKT/mTOR, CDK, and HER2/EGFR inhibitors in the brain metastases. Genomic analysis of brain metastases provides an opportunity to identify potentially clinically informative alterations not detected in clinically sampled primary tumors, regional lymph nodes, or extracranial metastases. PMID:26410082

  2. Low Herbivory among Targeted Reforestation Sites in the Andean Highlands of Southern Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Adams, Marc-Oliver; Fiedler, Konrad

    2016-01-01

    Insect herbivory constitutes an important constraint in the viability and management of targeted reforestation sites. Focusing on young experimental stands at about 2000 m elevation in southern Ecuador, we examined foliar damage over one season as a function of tree species and habitat. Native tree species (Successional hardwood: Cedrela montana and Tabebuia chrysantha; fast-growing pioneer: Heliocarpus americanus) have been planted among prevailing local landcover types (abandoned pasture, secondary shrub vegetation, and a Pinus patula plantation) in 2003/4. Plantation trees were compared to conspecifics in the spontaneous undergrowth of adjacent undisturbed rainforest matched for height and foliar volume. Specifically, we tested the hypotheses that H. americanus as a pioneer species suffers more herbivory compared to the two successional tree species, and that damage is inversely related to habitat complexity. Overall leaf damage caused by folivorous insects (excluding leafcutter ants) was low. Average leaf loss was highest among T. chrysantha (7.50% ± 0.19 SE of leaf area), followed by H. americanus (4.67% ± 0.18 SE) and C. montana (3.18% ± 0.15 SE). Contrary to expectations, leaf area loss was highest among trees in closed-canopy natural rainforest, followed by pine plantation, pasture, and secondary shrub sites. Harvesting activity of leafcutter ants (Acromyrmex sp.) was strongly biased towards T. chrysantha growing in open habitat (mean pasture: 2.5%; shrub: 10.5%) where it could result in considerable damage (> 90.0%). Insect folivory is unlikely to pose a barrier for reforestation in the tropical Andean mountain forest zone at present, but leafcutter ants may become problematic if local temperatures increase in the wake of global warming.

  3. Inhibitory effects and oxidative target site of dibutyl phthalate on Karenia brevis.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng-min; Wu, Miao; Yao, Yuan; Zheng, Xiang; Zhao, Jian; Wang, Zhen-yu; Xing, Bao-shan

    2015-08-01

    The inhibitory action and possible damage mechanism of dibutyl phthalate (DBP) on the red tide algae Karenia brevis were investigated. The results showed that the algae experienced oxidative stress after exposure to 5mgL(-1) DBP. Malondialdehyde (MDA) peaked after 72h, with a value approximately 2.3 times higher than that observed for untreated cells. The superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities significantly increased as an adaptive reaction after 48h. DBP induced the overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the OH concentration showed a peak of 33UmL(-1) at 48h, and the highest H2O2 content was approximately 250nmol/10(7) cells at 72h; these latter two values were 2.5 and 4.4 times higher than observed for the control, respectively. TEM images showed that a number of small vacuoles or apical tubers were commonly found around the cell membrane, and the membrane structure was ultimately disintegrated. Further experiments were carried out to locate the original ROS production sites following DBP exposure. The activity of CuZn-SOD (a mainly cytosolic isoform, with some also found in chloroplasts) under DBP exposure was approximately 2.5 times higher than the control, whereas the Mn-SOD (mitochondrial isoform) activity was significantly inhibited. No significant difference was observed in the activity of Fe-SOD (chloroplastic isoform). In addition, dicumarol (an inhibitor of the electron transport chain in the plasma membrane) stimulated DBP-induced ROS production, whereas rotenone (an inhibitor of the mitochondria electron transport chain complex I) decreased DBP-induced ROS production. These results suggested that mitochondria could be the main target sites for DBP attack.

  4. Low Herbivory among Targeted Reforestation Sites in the Andean Highlands of Southern Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Marc-Oliver; Fiedler, Konrad

    2016-01-01

    Insect herbivory constitutes an important constraint in the viability and management of targeted reforestation sites. Focusing on young experimental stands at about 2000 m elevation in southern Ecuador, we examined foliar damage over one season as a function of tree species and habitat. Native tree species (Successional hardwood: Cedrela montana and Tabebuia chrysantha; fast-growing pioneer: Heliocarpus americanus) have been planted among prevailing local landcover types (abandoned pasture, secondary shrub vegetation, and a Pinus patula plantation) in 2003/4. Plantation trees were compared to conspecifics in the spontaneous undergrowth of adjacent undisturbed rainforest matched for height and foliar volume. Specifically, we tested the hypotheses that H. americanus as a pioneer species suffers more herbivory compared to the two successional tree species, and that damage is inversely related to habitat complexity. Overall leaf damage caused by folivorous insects (excluding leafcutter ants) was low. Average leaf loss was highest among T. chrysantha (7.50% ± 0.19 SE of leaf area), followed by H. americanus (4.67% ± 0.18 SE) and C. montana (3.18% ± 0.15 SE). Contrary to expectations, leaf area loss was highest among trees in closed-canopy natural rainforest, followed by pine plantation, pasture, and secondary shrub sites. Harvesting activity of leafcutter ants (Acromyrmex sp.) was strongly biased towards T. chrysantha growing in open habitat (mean pasture: 2.5%; shrub: 10.5%) where it could result in considerable damage (> 90.0%). Insect folivory is unlikely to pose a barrier for reforestation in the tropical Andean mountain forest zone at present, but leafcutter ants may become problematic if local temperatures increase in the wake of global warming. PMID:26963395

  5. Reverse Chemical Genetics: Comprehensive Fitness Profiling Reveals the Spectrum of Drug Target Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Sunita; Bergeron, Julien R.; Mellor, Joseph C.; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey

    2016-01-01

    The emergence and prevalence of drug resistance demands streamlined strategies to identify drug resistant variants in a fast, systematic and cost-effective way. Methods commonly used to understand and predict drug resistance rely on limited clinical studies from patients who are refractory to drugs or on laborious evolution experiments with poor coverage of the gene variants. Here, we report an integrative functional variomics methodology combining deep sequencing and a Bayesian statistical model to provide a comprehensive list of drug resistance alleles from complex variant populations. Dihydrofolate reductase, the target of methotrexate chemotherapy drug, was used as a model to identify functional mutant alleles correlated with methotrexate resistance. This systematic approach identified previously reported resistance mutations, as well as novel point mutations that were validated in vivo. Use of this systematic strategy as a routine diagnostics tool widens the scope of successful drug research and development. PMID:27588687

  6. A second target of the antimalarial and antibacterial agent fosmidomycin revealed by cellular metabolic profiling†

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Baichen; Watts, Kristin M.; Hodge, Dana; Kemp, Lisa M.; Hunstad, David A.; Hicks, Leslie M.; Odom, Audrey R.

    2011-01-01

    Antimicrobial drug resistance is an urgent problem in control and treatment of many of the world's most serious infections, including Plasmodium falciparum malaria, tuberculosis, and healthcare-associated infections with Gram-negative bacteria. Because the non-mevalonate pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis is essential in eubacteria and P. falciparum, and this pathway is not present in humans, there is great interest in targeting the enzymes of non-mevalonate metabolism for antibacterial and antiparasitic drug development. Fosmidomycin is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent currently in clinical trials of combination therapies to treat malaria. In vitro, fosmidomycin is known to inhibit the deoxyxylulose phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR) enzyme of isoprenoid biosynthesis from multiple pathogenic organisms. To define the in vivo metabolic response to fosmidomycin, we developed a novel mass spectrometry method to quantitate six metabolites of non-mevalonate isoprenoid metabolism from complex biological samples. Using this technique, we validate that the biological effects of fosmidomycin are mediated through blockade of de novo isoprenoid biosynthesis in both P. falciparum malaria parasites and E. coli bacteria: in both organisms, metabolic profiling demonstrated a block in isoprenoid metabolism following fosmidomycin treatment, and growth inhibition due to fosmidomycin was rescued by media supplemented with isoprenoid metabolites. Isoprenoid metabolism proceeded through DXR even in the presence of fosmidomycin, but was inhibited at the level of the downstream enzyme, methylerythritol phosphate cytidyltransferase (IspD). Overexpression of IspD in E. coli conferred fosmidomycin resistance, and fosmidomycin was found to inhibit IspD in vitro. This work has validated fosmidomycin as a biological reagent to block non-mevalonate isoprenoid metabolism, and suggests a second in vivo target for fosmidomycin within isoprenoid biosynthesis, in two evolutionarily diverse

  7. Favipiravir pharmacokinetics in Ebola-Infected patients of the JIKI trial reveals concentrations lower than targeted

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thi Huyen Tram; Anglaret, Xavier; Madelain, Vincent; Taburet, Anne-Marie; Baize, Sylvain; Pastorino, Boris; Rodallec, Anne; Piorkowski, Géraldine; Conde, Mamoudou N.; Bore, Joseph Akoi; Carbonnelle, Caroline; Jacquot, Frédéric; Raoul, Hervé; Malvy, Denis; Mentré, France

    2017-01-01

    Background In 2014–2015, we assessed favipiravir tolerance and efficacy in patients with Ebola virus (EBOV) disease (EVD) in Guinea (JIKI trial). Because the drug had never been used before for this indication and that high concentrations of the drugs were needed to achieve antiviral efficacy against EBOV, a pharmacokinetic model had been used to propose relevant dosing regimen. Here we report the favipiravir plasma concentrations that were achieved in participants in the JIKI trial and put them in perspective with the model-based targeted concentrations. Methods and findings Pre-dose drug concentrations were collected at Day-2 and Day-4 of treatment in 66 patients of the JIKI trial and compared to those predicted by the model taking into account patient’s individual characteristics. At Day-2, the observed concentrations were slightly lower than the model predictions adjusted for patient’s characteristics (median value of 46.1 versus 54.3 μg/mL for observed and predicted concentrations, respectively, p = 0.012). However, the concentrations dropped at Day-4, which was not anticipated by the model (median values of 25.9 and 64.4 μg/mL for observed and predicted concentrations, respectively, p<10−6). There was no significant relationship between favipiravir concentrations and EBOV viral kinetics or mortality. Conclusions Favipiravir plasma concentrations in the JIKI trial failed to achieve the target exposure defined before the trial. Furthermore, the drug concentration experienced an unanticipated drop between Day-2 and Day-4. The origin of this drop could be due to severe sepsis conditions and/or to intrinsic properties of favipiravir metabolism. Dose-ranging studies should be performed in healthy volunteers to assess the concentrations and the tolerance that could be achieved with high doses. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02329054 PMID:28231247

  8. In silico pathway analysis in cervical carcinoma reveals potential new targets for treatment

    PubMed Central

    van Dam, Peter A.; van Dam, Pieter-Jan H. H.; Rolfo, Christian; Giallombardo, Marco; van Berckelaer, Christophe; Trinh, Xuan Bich; Altintas, Sevilay; Huizing, Manon; Papadimitriou, Kostas; Tjalma, Wiebren A. A.; van Laere, Steven

    2016-01-01

    An in silico pathway analysis was performed in order to improve current knowledge on the molecular drivers of cervical cancer and detect potential targets for treatment. Three publicly available Affymetrix gene expression data-sets (GSE5787, GSE7803, GSE9750) were retrieved, vouching for a total of 9 cervical cancer cell lines (CCCLs), 39 normal cervical samples, 7 CIN3 samples and 111 cervical cancer samples (CCSs). Predication analysis of microarrays was performed in the Affymetrix sets to identify cervical cancer biomarkers. To select cancer cell-specific genes the CCSs were compared to the CCCLs. Validated genes were submitted to a gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) and Expression2Kinases (E2K). In the CCSs a total of 1,547 probe sets were identified that were overexpressed (FDR < 0.1). Comparing to CCCLs 560 probe sets (481 unique genes) had a cancer cell-specific expression profile, and 315 of these genes (65%) were validated. GSEA identified 5 cancer hallmarks enriched in CCSs (P < 0.01 and FDR < 0.25) showing that deregulation of the cell cycle is a major component of cervical cancer biology. E2K identified a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network of 162 nodes (including 20 drugable kinases) and 1626 edges. This PPI-network consists of 5 signaling modules associated with MYC signaling (Module 1), cell cycle deregulation (Module 2), TGFβ-signaling (Module 3), MAPK signaling (Module 4) and chromatin modeling (Module 5). Potential targets for treatment which could be identified were CDK1, CDK2, ABL1, ATM, AKT1, MAPK1, MAPK3 among others. The present study identified important driver pathways in cervical carcinogenesis which should be assessed for their potential therapeutic drugability. PMID:26701206

  9. Phytoliths reveal the earliest fine reedy textile in China at the Tianluoshan site

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianping; Lu, Houyuan; Sun, Guoping; Flad, Rowan; Wu, Naiqin; Huan, Xiujia; He, Keyang; Wang, Yonglei

    2016-01-01

    Textiles are among the longest and most widespread technologies in human history, although poor preservation of perishable artifacts in Paleolithic and Neolithic contexts makes them difficult to unearth and has hampered study of their production and use. Here we report evidence of a plain-woven mat from the Tianluoshan site, Zhejiang, Eastern China. Phytolith and AMS dating from the mat and modern reference collections shown that the mat was made of reeds (Phragmites australis (Cav.)) and dated to 6775–6645 cal. yr. BP. This is the earliest directly dated fiber artifact so far known in China, over at least one thousand years earlier than any established dates for woven remains elsewhere. The evidence of the mat and other related remains suggest that textile products might occur earlier than 7000–8000 years ago and are significant for understanding the history of textiles, as well as production and human adaptation in Neolithic China. PMID:26766794

  10. Phytoliths reveal the earliest fine reedy textile in China at the Tianluoshan site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianping; Lu, Houyuan; Sun, Guoping; Flad, Rowan; Wu, Naiqin; Huan, Xiujia; He, Keyang; Wang, Yonglei

    2016-01-01

    Textiles are among the longest and most widespread technologies in human history, although poor preservation of perishable artifacts in Paleolithic and Neolithic contexts makes them difficult to unearth and has hampered study of their production and use. Here we report evidence of a plain-woven mat from the Tianluoshan site, Zhejiang, Eastern China. Phytolith and AMS dating from the mat and modern reference collections shown that the mat was made of reeds (Phragmites australis (Cav.)) and dated to 6775–6645 cal. yr. BP. This is the earliest directly dated fiber artifact so far known in China, over at least one thousand years earlier than any established dates for woven remains elsewhere. The evidence of the mat and other related remains suggest that textile products might occur earlier than 7000–8000 years ago and are significant for understanding the history of textiles, as well as production and human adaptation in Neolithic China.

  11. Phytoliths reveal the earliest fine reedy textile in China at the Tianluoshan site.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianping; Lu, Houyuan; Sun, Guoping; Flad, Rowan; Wu, Naiqin; Huan, Xiujia; He, Keyang; Wang, Yonglei

    2016-01-14

    Textiles are among the longest and most widespread technologies in human history, although poor preservation of perishable artifacts in Paleolithic and Neolithic contexts makes them difficult to unearth and has hampered study of their production and use. Here we report evidence of a plain-woven mat from the Tianluoshan site, Zhejiang, Eastern China. Phytolith and AMS dating from the mat and modern reference collections shown that the mat was made of reeds (Phragmites australis (Cav.)) and dated to 6775-6645 cal. yr. BP. This is the earliest directly dated fiber artifact so far known in China, over at least one thousand years earlier than any established dates for woven remains elsewhere. The evidence of the mat and other related remains suggest that textile products might occur earlier than 7000-8000 years ago and are significant for understanding the history of textiles, as well as production and human adaptation in Neolithic China.

  12. Distribution of ESCRT machinery at HIV assembly sites reveals virus scaffolding of ESCRT subunits.

    PubMed

    Van Engelenburg, Schuyler B; Shtengel, Gleb; Sengupta, Prabuddha; Waki, Kayoko; Jarnik, Michal; Ablan, Sherimay D; Freed, Eric O; Hess, Harald F; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2014-02-07

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) hijacks the endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) to mediate virus release from infected cells. The nanoscale organization of ESCRT machinery necessary for mediating viral abscission is unclear. Here, we applied three-dimensional superresolution microscopy and correlative electron microscopy to delineate the organization of ESCRT components at HIV assembly sites. We observed ESCRT subunits localized within the head of budding virions and released particles, with head-localized levels of CHMP2A decreasing relative to Tsg101 and CHMP4B upon virus abscission. Thus, the driving force for HIV release may derive from initial scaffolding of ESCRT subunits within the viral bud interior followed by plasma membrane association and selective remodeling of ESCRT subunits.

  13. Mixture model of pottery decorations from Lake Chad Basin archaeological sites reveals ancient segregation patterns

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, John D.; Lin, Kathryn; MacEachern, Scott

    2016-01-01

    We present a new statistical approach to analysing an extremely common archaeological data type—potsherds—that infers the structure of cultural relationships across a set of excavation units (EUs). This method, applied to data from a set of complex, culturally heterogeneous sites around the Mandara mountains in the Lake Chad Basin, helps elucidate cultural succession through the Neolithic and Iron Age. We show how the approach can be integrated with radiocarbon dates to provide detailed portraits of cultural dynamics and deposition patterns within single EUs. In this context, the analysis supports ancient cultural segregation analogous to historical ethnolinguistic patterning in the region. We conclude with a discussion of the many possible model extensions using other archaeological data types. PMID:27009217

  14. Mixture model of pottery decorations from Lake Chad Basin archaeological sites reveals ancient segregation patterns.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, John D; Lin, Kathryn; MacEachern, Scott

    2016-03-30

    We present a new statistical approach to analysing an extremely common archaeological data type--potsherds--that infers the structure of cultural relationships across a set of excavation units (EUs). This method, applied to data from a set of complex, culturally heterogeneous sites around the Mandara mountains in the Lake Chad Basin, helps elucidate cultural succession through the Neolithic and Iron Age. We show how the approach can be integrated with radiocarbon dates to provide detailed portraits of cultural dynamics and deposition patterns within single EUs. In this context, the analysis supports ancient cultural segregation analogous to historical ethnolinguistic patterning in the region. We conclude with a discussion of the many possible model extensions using other archaeological data types.

  15. Activation pathway of Src kinase reveals intermediate states as targets for drug design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Diwakar; Meng, Yilin; Roux, Benoît; Pande, Vijay S.

    2014-03-01

    Unregulated activation of Src kinases leads to aberrant signalling, uncontrolled growth and differentiation of cancerous cells. Reaching a complete mechanistic understanding of large-scale conformational transformations underlying the activation of kinases could greatly help in the development of therapeutic drugs for the treatment of these pathologies. In principle, the nature of conformational transition could be modelled in silico via atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, although this is very challenging because of the long activation timescales. Here we employ a computational paradigm that couples transition pathway techniques and Markov state model-based massively distributed simulations for mapping the conformational landscape of c-src tyrosine kinase. The computations provide the thermodynamics and kinetics of kinase activation for the first time, and help identify key structural intermediates. Furthermore, the presence of a novel allosteric site in an intermediate state of c-src that could be potentially used for drug design is predicted.

  16. Target sites for transcallosal fibers in human visual cortex - A combined diffusion and polarized light imaging study.

    PubMed

    Caspers, Svenja; Axer, Markus; Caspers, Julian; Jockwitz, Christiane; Jütten, Kerstin; Reckfort, Julia; Grässel, David; Amunts, Katrin; Zilles, Karl

    2015-11-01

    Transcallosal fibers of the visual system have preferential target sites within the occipital cortex of monkeys. These target sites coincide with vertical meridian representations of the visual field at borders of retinotopically defined visual areas. The existence of preferential target sites of transcallosal fibers in the human brain at the borders of early visual areas was claimed, but controversially discussed. Hence, we studied the distribution of transcallosal fibers in human visual cortex, searching for an organizational principle across early and higher visual areas. In-vivo high angular resolution diffusion imaging data of 28 subjects were used for probabilistic fiber tracking using a constrained spherical deconvolution approach. The fiber architecture within the target sites was analyzed at microscopic resolution using 3D polarized light imaging in a post-mortem human hemisphere. Fibers through a seed in the splenium of the corpus callosum reached the occipital cortex via the forceps major and the tapetum. We found target sites of these transcallosal fibers at borders of cytoarchitectonically defined occipital areas not only between early visual areas V1 and V2, V3d and V3A, and V3v and V4, but also between higher extrastriate areas, namely V4 (ventral) and posterior fusiform area FG1 as well as posterior fusiform area FG2 and lateral occipital cortex. In early visual areas, the target sites coincided with the vertical meridian representations of retinotopic maps. The spatial arrangement of the fibers in the 'border tuft' region at the V1/V2 border was found to be more complex than previously observed in myeloarchitectonic studies. In higher visual areas, our results provided additional evidence for a hemi-field representation in human area V4. The fiber topography in posterior fusiform gyrus indicated that additional retinotopic areas might exist, located between the recently identified retinotopic representations phPITv/phPITd and PHC-1/PHC-2 in lateral

  17. Beyond the binding site: in vivo identification of tbx2, smarca5 and wnt5b as molecular targets of CNBP during embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Armas, Pablo; Margarit, Ezequiel; Mouguelar, Valeria S; Allende, Miguel L; Calcaterra, Nora B

    2013-01-01

    CNBP is a nucleic acid chaperone implicated in vertebrate craniofacial development, as well as in myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) and sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM) human muscle diseases. CNBP is highly conserved among vertebrates and has been implicated in transcriptional regulation; however, its DNA binding sites and molecular targets remain elusive. The main goal of this work was to identify CNBP DNA binding sites that might reveal target genes involved in vertebrate embryonic development. To accomplish this, we used a recently described yeast one-hybrid assay to identify DNA sequences bound in vivo by CNBP. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that these sequences are G-enriched and show high frequency of putative G-quadruplex DNA secondary structure. Moreover, an in silico approach enabled us to establish the CNBP DNA-binding site and to predict CNBP putative targets based on gene ontology terms and synexpression with CNBP. The direct interaction between CNBP and candidate genes was proved by EMSA and ChIP assays. Besides, the role of CNBP upon the identified genes was validated in loss-of-function experiments in developing zebrafish. We successfully confirmed that CNBP up-regulates tbx2b and smarca5, and down-regulates wnt5b gene expression. The highly stringent strategy used in this work allowed us to identify new CNBP target genes functionally important in different contexts of vertebrate embryonic development. Furthermore, it represents a novel approach toward understanding the biological function and regulatory networks involving CNBP in the biology of vertebrates.

  18. A Metabolic Probe-Enabled Strategy Reveals Uptake and Protein Targets of Polyunsaturated Aldehydes in the Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    PubMed Central

    Wolfram, Stefanie; Wielsch, Natalie; Hupfer, Yvonne; Mönch, Bettina; Lu-Walther, Hui-Wen; Heintzmann, Rainer; Werz, Oliver; Svatoš, Aleš; Pohnert, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Diatoms are unicellular algae of crucial importance as they belong to the main primary producers in aquatic ecosystems. Several diatom species produce polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs) that have been made responsible for chemically mediated interactions in the plankton. PUA-effects include chemical defense by reducing the reproductive success of grazing copepods, allelochemical activity by interfering with the growth of competing phytoplankton and cell to cell signaling. We applied a PUA-derived molecular probe, based on the biologically highly active 2,4-decadienal, with the aim to reveal protein targets of PUAs and affected metabolic pathways. By using fluorescence microscopy, we observed a substantial uptake of the PUA probe into cells of the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum in comparison to the uptake of a structurally closely related control probe based on a saturated aldehyde. The specific uptake motivated a chemoproteomic approach to generate a qualitative inventory of proteins covalently targeted by the α,β,γ,δ-unsaturated aldehyde structure element. Activity-based protein profiling revealed selective covalent modification of target proteins by the PUA probe. Analysis of the labeled proteins gave insights into putative affected molecular functions and biological processes such as photosynthesis including ATP generation and catalytic activity in the Calvin cycle or the pentose phosphate pathway. The mechanism of action of PUAs involves covalent reactions with proteins that may result in protein dysfunction and interference of involved pathways. PMID:26496085

  19. Super-resolution microscopy reveals decondensed chromatin structure at transcription sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yejun; Maharana, Shovamayee; Wang, Michelle D.; Shivashankar, G. V.

    2014-03-01

    Remodeling of the local chromatin structure is essential for the regulation of gene expression. While a number of biochemical and bioimaging experiments suggest decondensed chromatin structures are associated with transcription, a direct visualization of DNA and transcriptionally active RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II) at super-resolution is still lacking. Here we investigate the structure of chromatin isolated from HeLa cells using binding activatable localization microscopy (BALM). The sample preparation method preserved the structural integrity of chromatin. Interestingly, BALM imaging of the chromatin spreads revealed the presence of decondensed chromatin as gap structures along the spreads. These gaps were enriched with phosphorylated S5 RNA pol II, and were sensitive to the cellular transcriptional state. Taken together, we could visualize the decondensed chromatin regions together with active RNA pol II for the first time using super-resolution microscopy.

  20. Genome-Wide Targets Regulated by the OsMADS1 Transcription Factor Reveals Its DNA Recognition Properties1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Khanday, Imtiyaz; Das, Sanjukta; Chongloi, Grace L; Vijayraghavan, Usha

    2016-01-01

    OsMADS1 controls rice (Oryza sativa) floral fate and organ development. Yet, its genome-wide targets and the mechanisms underlying its role as a transcription regulator controlling developmental gene expression are unknown. We identify 3112 gene-associated OsMADS1-bound sites in the floret genome. These occur in the vicinity of transcription start sites, within gene bodies, and in intergenic regions. Majority of the bound DNA contained CArG motif variants or, in several cases, only A-tracts. Sequences flanking the binding peak had a higher AT nucleotide content, implying that broader DNA structural features may define in planta binding. Sequences for binding by other transcription factor families like MYC, AP2/ERF, bZIP, etc. are enriched in OsMADS1-bound DNAs. Target genes implicated in transcription, chromatin remodeling, cellular processes, and hormone metabolism were enriched. Combining expression data from OsMADS1 knockdown florets with these DNA binding data, a snapshot of a gene regulatory network was deduced where targets, such as AP2/ERF and bHLH transcription factors and chromatin remodelers form nodes. We show that the expression status of these nodal factors can be altered by inducing the OsMADS1-GR fusion protein and present a model for a regulatory cascade where the direct targets of OsMADS1, OsbHLH108/SPT, OsERF034, and OsHSF24, in turn control genes such as OsMADS32 and OsYABBY5. This cascade, with other similar relationships, cumulatively contributes to floral organ development. Overall, OsMADS1 binds to several regulatory genes and, probably in combination with other factors, controls a gene regulatory network that ensures rice floret development. PMID:27457124

  1. NMR reveals the allosteric opening and closing of Abelson tyrosine kinase by ATP-site and myristoyl pocket inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Skora, Lukasz; Mestan, Jürgen; Fabbro, Doriano; Jahnke, Wolfgang; Grzesiek, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Successful treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia is based on inhibitors binding to the ATP site of the deregulated breakpoint cluster region (Bcr)–Abelson tyrosine kinase (Abl) fusion protein. Recently, a new type of allosteric inhibitors targeting the Abl myristoyl pocket was shown in preclinical studies to overcome ATP-site inhibitor resistance arising in some patients. Using NMR and small-angle X-ray scattering, we have analyzed the solution conformations of apo Abelson tyrosine kinase (c-Abl) and c-Abl complexes with ATP-site and allosteric inhibitors. Binding of the ATP-site inhibitor imatinib leads to an unexpected open conformation of the multidomain SH3-SH2-kinase c-Abl core, whose relevance is confirmed by cellular assays on Bcr-Abl. The combination of imatinib with the allosteric inhibitor GNF-5 restores the closed, inactivated state. Our data provide detailed insights on the poorly understood combined effect of the two inhibitor types, which is able to overcome drug resistance. PMID:24191057

  2. NMR reveals the allosteric opening and closing of Abelson tyrosine kinase by ATP-site and myristoyl pocket inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Skora, Lukasz; Mestan, Jürgen; Fabbro, Doriano; Jahnke, Wolfgang; Grzesiek, Stephan

    2013-11-19

    Successful treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia is based on inhibitors binding to the ATP site of the deregulated breakpoint cluster region (Bcr)-Abelson tyrosine kinase (Abl) fusion protein. Recently, a new type of allosteric inhibitors targeting the Abl myristoyl pocket was shown in preclinical studies to overcome ATP-site inhibitor resistance arising in some patients. Using NMR and small-angle X-ray scattering, we have analyzed the solution conformations of apo Abelson tyrosine kinase (c-Abl) and c-Abl complexes with ATP-site and allosteric inhibitors. Binding of the ATP-site inhibitor imatinib leads to an unexpected open conformation of the multidomain SH3-SH2-kinase c-Abl core, whose relevance is confirmed by cellular assays on Bcr-Abl. The combination of imatinib with the allosteric inhibitor GNF-5 restores the closed, inactivated state. Our data provide detailed insights on the poorly understood combined effect of the two inhibitor types, which is able to overcome drug resistance.

  3. Genome-Wide Mapping of Targets of Maize Histone Deacetylase HDA101 Reveals Its Function and Regulatory Mechanism during Seed Development[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hua; Liu, Xinye; Xin, Mingming; Du, Jinkun; Hu, Zhaorong; Peng, HuiRu; Sun, Qixin; Ni, Zhongfu; Yao, Yingyin

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) regulate histone acetylation levels by removing the acetyl group from lysine residues. The maize (Zea mays) HDAC HDA101 influences several aspects of development, including kernel size; however, the molecular mechanism by which HDA101 affects kernel development remains unknown. In this study, we find that HDA101 regulates the expression of transfer cell-specific genes, suggesting that their misregulation may be associated with the defects in differentiation of endosperm transfer cells and smaller kernels observed in hda101 mutants. To investigate HDA101 function during the early stages of seed development, we performed genome-wide mapping of HDA101 binding sites. We observed that, like mammalian HDACs, HDA101 mainly targets highly and intermediately expressed genes. Although loss of HDA101 can induce histone hyperacetylation of its direct targets, this often does not involve variation in transcript levels. A small subset of inactive genes that must be negatively regulated during kernel development is also targeted by HDA101 and its loss leads to hyperacetylation and increased expression of these inactive genes. Finally, we report that HDA101 interacts with members of different chromatin remodeling complexes, such as NFC103/MSI1 and SNL1/SIN3-like protein corepressors. Taken together, our results reveal a complex genetic network regulated by HDA101 during seed development and provide insight into the different mechanisms of HDA101-mediated regulation of transcriptionally active and inactive genes. PMID:26908760

  4. Metabolic variation between japonica and indica rice cultivars as revealed by non-targeted metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chaoyang; Shi, Jianxin; Quan, Sheng; Cui, Bo; Kleessen, Sabrina; Nikoloski, Zoran; Tohge, Takayuki; Alexander, Danny; Guo, Lining; Lin, Hong; Wang, Jing; Cui, Xiao; Rao, Jun; Luo, Qian; Zhao, Xiangxiang; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Zhang, Dabing

    2014-01-01

    Seed metabolites are critically important both for plant development and human nutrition; however, the natural variation in their levels remains poorly characterized. Here we profiled 121 metabolites in mature seeds of a wide panel Oryza sativa japonica and indica cultivars, revealing correlations between the metabolic phenotype and geographic origin of the rice seeds. Moreover, japonica and indica subspecies differed significantly not only in the relative abundances of metabolites but also in their corresponding metabolic association networks. These findings provide important insights into metabolic adaptation in rice subgroups, bridging the gap between genome and phenome, and facilitating the identification of genetic control of metabolic properties that can serve as a basis for the future improvement of rice quality via metabolic engineering. PMID:24861081

  5. Complete genome-wide screening and subtractive genomic approach revealed new virulence factors, potential drug targets against bio-war pathogen Brucella melitensis 16M

    PubMed Central

    Pradeepkiran, Jangampalli Adi; Sainath, Sri Bhashyam; Kumar, Konidala Kranthi; Bhaskar, Matcha

    2015-01-01

    Brucella melitensis 16M is a Gram-negative coccobacillus that infects both animals and humans. It causes a disease known as brucellosis, which is characterized by acute febrile illness in humans and causes abortions in livestock. To prevent and control brucellosis, identification of putative drug targets is crucial. The present study aimed to identify drug targets in B. melitensis 16M by using a subtractive genomic approach. We used available database repositories (Database of Essential Genes, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Automatic Annotation Server, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) to identify putative genes that are nonhomologous to humans and essential for pathogen B. melitensis 16M. The results revealed that among 3 Mb genome size of pathogen, 53 putative characterized and 13 uncharacterized hypothetical genes were identified; further, from Basic Local Alignment Search Tool protein analysis, one hypothetical protein showed a close resemblance (50%) to Silicibacter pomeroyi DUF1285 family protein (2RE3). A further homology model of the target was constructed using MODELLER 9.12 and optimized through variable target function method by molecular dynamics optimization with simulating annealing. The stereochemical quality of the restrained model was evaluated by PROCHECK, VERIFY-3D, ERRAT, and WHATIF servers. Furthermore, structure-based virtual screening was carried out against the predicted active site of the respective protein using the glycerol structural analogs from the PubChem database. We identified five best inhibitors with strong affinities, stable interactions, and also with reliable drug-like properties. Hence, these leads might be used as the most effective inhibitors of modeled protein. The outcome of the present work of virtual screening of putative gene targets might facilitate design of potential drugs for better treatment against brucellosis. PMID:25834405

  6. Complete genome-wide screening and subtractive genomic approach revealed new virulence factors, potential drug targets against bio-war pathogen Brucella melitensis 16M.

    PubMed

    Pradeepkiran, Jangampalli Adi; Sainath, Sri Bhashyam; Kumar, Konidala Kranthi; Bhaskar, Matcha

    2015-01-01

    Brucella melitensis 16M is a Gram-negative coccobacillus that infects both animals and humans. It causes a disease known as brucellosis, which is characterized by acute febrile illness in humans and causes abortions in livestock. To prevent and control brucellosis, identification of putative drug targets is crucial. The present study aimed to identify drug targets in B. melitensis 16M by using a subtractive genomic approach. We used available database repositories (Database of Essential Genes, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Automatic Annotation Server, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) to identify putative genes that are nonhomologous to humans and essential for pathogen B. melitensis 16M. The results revealed that among 3 Mb genome size of pathogen, 53 putative characterized and 13 uncharacterized hypothetical genes were identified; further, from Basic Local Alignment Search Tool protein analysis, one hypothetical protein showed a close resemblance (50%) to Silicibacter pomeroyi DUF1285 family protein (2RE3). A further homology model of the target was constructed using MODELLER 9.12 and optimized through variable target function method by molecular dynamics optimization with simulating annealing. The stereochemical quality of the restrained model was evaluated by PROCHECK, VERIFY-3D, ERRAT, and WHATIF servers. Furthermore, structure-based virtual screening was carried out against the predicted active site of the respective protein using the glycerol structural analogs from the PubChem database. We identified five best inhibitors with strong affinities, stable interactions, and also with reliable drug-like properties. Hence, these leads might be used as the most effective inhibitors of modeled protein. The outcome of the present work of virtual screening of putative gene targets might facilitate design of potential drugs for better treatment against brucellosis.

  7. Complexity of gastric acid secretion revealed by targeted gene disruption in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Duan; Zhao, Chun-Mei

    2010-01-01

    Physiology of gastric acid secretion is one of the earliest subjects in medical research and education. Gastric acid secretion has been sometimes inadequately expressed as pH value rather than amount of gastric H(+) secreted per unit time. Gastric acid secretion is regulated by endocrine, paracrine and neurocrine signals via at least three messenger pathways: gastrin-histamine, CCK-somatostatin, and neural network. These pathways have been largely validated and further characterized by phenotyping a series of knockout mouse models. The complexity of gastric acid secretion is illustrated by both expected and unexpected phenotypes of altered acid secretion. For examples, in comparison with wild-type mice, gastrin and CCK double knockout and SSTR(2) knockout mice displayed a shift in the regulation of ECL cells from somatostatin-SSTR(2) pathway to galanin-Gal1 receptor pathway; a shift in the regulation of parietal cells from gastrin-histamine pathway to vagal pathway; and a shift in the CCK(2) receptors on parietal cells from functional silence to activation. The biological function of glycine-extended gastrin in synergizing gastrin-17 has been revealed in gastrin knockout mice. The roles of gastric acid secretion in tumorigenesis and ulceration have not been fully understood. Transgenic hypergastrinemic INS-GAS mice developed a spontaneous gastric cancer, which was associated with an impaired acid secretion. Gastrin knockout mice were still able to produce acid in response to vagal stimulation, especially after H. pylori infection. Taken together, phenotyping of a series of genetically engineered mouse models reveals a high degree of complexity of gastric acid secretion in both physiological and pathophysiological conditions.

  8. Microbiome of prebiotic-treated mice reveals novel targets involved in host response during obesity

    PubMed Central

    Everard, Amandine; Lazarevic, Vladimir; Gaïa, Nadia; Johansson, Maria; Ståhlman, Marcus; Backhed, Fredrik; Delzenne, Nathalie M; Schrenzel, Jacques; François, Patrice; Cani, Patrice D

    2014-01-01

    The gut microbiota is involved in metabolic and immune disorders associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes. We previously demonstrated that prebiotic treatment may significantly improve host health by modulating bacterial species related to the improvement of gut endocrine, barrier and immune functions. An analysis of the gut metagenome is needed to determine which bacterial functions and taxa are responsible for beneficial microbiota–host interactions upon nutritional intervention. We subjected mice to prebiotic (Pre) treatment under physiological (control diet: CT) and pathological conditions (high-fat diet: HFD) for 8 weeks and investigated the production of intestinal antimicrobial peptides and the gut microbiome. HFD feeding significantly decreased the expression of regenerating islet-derived 3-gamma (Reg3g) and phospholipase A2 group-II (PLA2g2) in the jejunum. Prebiotic treatment increased Reg3g expression (by ∼50-fold) and improved intestinal homeostasis as suggested by the increase in the expression of intectin, a key protein involved in intestinal epithelial cell turnover. Deep metagenomic sequencing analysis revealed that HFD and prebiotic treatment significantly affected the gut microbiome at different taxonomic levels. Functional analyses based on the occurrence of clusters of orthologous groups (COGs) of proteins also revealed distinct profiles for the HFD, Pre, HFD-Pre and CT groups. Finally, the gut microbiota modulations induced by prebiotics counteracted HFD-induced inflammation and related metabolic disorders. Thus, we identified novel putative taxa and metabolic functions that may contribute to the development of or protection against the metabolic alterations observed during HFD feeding and HFD-Pre feeding. PMID:24694712

  9. The crystal structure of human protein α1M reveals a chromophore-binding site and two putative protein–protein interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yangli; Gao, Zengqiang; Guo, Zhen; Zhang, Hongpeng; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Luo, Miao; Hou, Haifeng; Huang, Ailong; Dong, Yuhui; Wang, Deqiang

    2013-09-27

    Highlights: •We determined the first structure of human α1M with heavy electron density of the chromophore. •We proposed a new structural model of the chromophore. •We first revealed that the two conserved surface regions of α1M are proposed as putative protein–protein interface sites. -- Abstract: Lipocalin α1-microglobulin (α1M) is a conserved glycoprotein present in plasma and in the interstitial fluids of all tissues. α1M is linked to a heterogeneous yellow–brown chromophore of unknown structure, and interacts with several target proteins, including α1-inhibitor-3, fibronectin, prothrombin and albumin. To date, there is little knowledge about the interaction sites between α1M and its partners. Here, we report the crystal structure of the human α1M. Due to the crystallization occurring in a low ionic strength solution, the unidentified chromophore with heavy electron density is observed at a hydrophobic inner tube of α1M. In addition, two conserved surface regions of α1M are proposed as putative protein–protein interface sites. Further study is needed to unravel the detailed information about the interaction between α1M and its partners.

  10. Structure of the Acinetobacter baumannii dithiol oxidase DsbA bound to elongation factor EF-Tu reveals a novel protein interaction site.

    PubMed

    Premkumar, Lakshmanane; Kurth, Fabian; Duprez, Wilko; Grøftehauge, Morten K; King, Gordon J; Halili, Maria A; Heras, Begoña; Martin, Jennifer L

    2014-07-18

    The multidrug resistant bacterium Acinetobacter baumannii is a significant cause of nosocomial infection. Biofilm formation, that requires both disulfide bond forming and chaperone-usher pathways, is a major virulence trait in this bacterium. Our biochemical characterizations show that the periplasmic A. baumannii DsbA (AbDsbA) enzyme has an oxidizing redox potential and dithiol oxidase activity. We found an unexpected non-covalent interaction between AbDsbA and the highly conserved prokaryotic elongation factor, EF-Tu. EF-Tu is a cytoplasmic protein but has been localized extracellularly in many bacterial pathogens. The crystal structure of this complex revealed that the EF-Tu switch I region binds to the non-catalytic surface of AbDsbA. Although the physiological and pathological significance of a DsbA/EF-Tu association is unknown, peptides derived from the EF-Tu switch I region bound to AbDsbA with submicromolar affinity. We also identified a seven-residue DsbB-derived peptide that bound to AbDsbA with low micromolar affinity. Further characterization confirmed that the EF-Tu- and DsbB-derived peptides bind at two distinct sites. These data point to the possibility that the non-catalytic surface of DsbA is a potential substrate or regulatory protein interaction site. The two peptides identified in this work together with the newly characterized interaction site provide a novel starting point for inhibitor design targeting AbDsbA.

  11. Mutational and structural analyses of Caldanaerobius polysaccharolyticus Man5B reveal novel active site residues for family 5 glycoside hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Takuji; Schmitz, George E; Dodd, Dylan; Han, Yejun; Burnett, Alanna; Nagasawa, Naoko; Mackie, Roderick I; Nakamura, Haruki; Morikawa, Kosuke; Cann, Isaac

    2013-01-01

    CpMan5B is a glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 5 enzyme exhibiting both β-1,4-mannosidic and β-1,4-glucosidic cleavage activities. To provide insight into the amino acid residues that contribute to catalysis and substrate specificity, we solved the structure of CpMan5B at 1.6 Å resolution. The structure revealed several active site residues (Y12, N92 and R196) in CpMan5B that are not present in the active sites of other structurally resolved GH5 enzymes. Residue R196 in GH5 enzymes is thought to be strictly conserved as a histidine that participates in an electron relay network with the catalytic glutamates, but we show that an arginine fulfills a functionally equivalent role and is found at this position in every enzyme in subfamily GH5_36, which includes CpMan5B. Residue N92 is required for full enzymatic activity and forms a novel bridge over the active site that is absent in other family 5 structures. Our data also reveal a role of Y12 in establishing the substrate preference for CpMan5B. Using these molecular determinants as a probe allowed us to identify Man5D from Caldicellulosiruptor bescii as a mannanase with minor endo-glucanase activity.

  12. Mutational and Structural Analyses of Caldanaerobius polysaccharolyticus Man5B Reveal Novel Active Site Residues for Family 5 Glycoside Hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yejun; Burnett, Alanna; Nagasawa, Naoko; Mackie, Roderick I.; Nakamura, Haruki; Morikawa, Kosuke; Cann, Isaac

    2013-01-01

    CpMan5B is a glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 5 enzyme exhibiting both β-1,4-mannosidic and β-1,4-glucosidic cleavage activities. To provide insight into the amino acid residues that contribute to catalysis and substrate specificity, we solved the structure of CpMan5B at 1.6 Å resolution. The structure revealed several active site residues (Y12, N92 and R196) in CpMan5B that are not present in the active sites of other structurally resolved GH5 enzymes. Residue R196 in GH5 enzymes is thought to be strictly conserved as a histidine that participates in an electron relay network with the catalytic glutamates, but we show that an arginine fulfills a functionally equivalent role and is found at this position in every enzyme in subfamily GH5_36, which includes CpMan5B. Residue N92 is required for full enzymatic activity and forms a novel bridge over the active site that is absent in other family 5 structures. Our data also reveal a role of Y12 in establishing the substrate preference for CpMan5B. Using these molecular determinants as a probe allowed us to identify Man5D from Caldicellulosiruptor bescii as a mannanase with minor endo-glucanase activity. PMID:24278284

  13. Targeted metabolomics reveals a male pheromone and sex-specific ascaroside biosynthesis in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Izrayelit, Yevgeniy; Srinivasan, Jagan; Campbell, Sydney L.; Jo, Yeara; von Reuss, Stephan H.; Genoff, Margaux C.; Sternberg, Paul W.; Schroeder, Frank C.

    2012-01-01

    In the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans, a class of small molecule signals called ascarosides regulate development, mating and social behaviors. Ascaroside production has been studied in the predominant sex, the hermaphrodite, but not in males, which account for less than 1% of wild-type worms grown under typical laboratory conditions. Using HPLC-MS-based targeted metabolomics, we show that males also produce ascarosides and that their ascaroside profile differs markedly from that of hermaphrodites. Whereas hermaphrodite ascaroside profiles are dominated by ascr#3, containing an α,β-unsaturated fatty acid, males predominantly produce the corresponding dihydro-derivative ascr#10. This small structural modification profoundly affects signaling properties: hermaphrodites are retained by attomole-amounts of male-produced ascr#10, whereas hermaphrodite-produced ascr#3 repels hermaphrodites and attracts males. Male production of ascr#10 is population density-dependent, indicating sensory regulation of ascaroside biosynthesis. Analysis of gene expression data supports a model in which sex-specific regulation of peroxisomal β-oxidation produces functionally different ascaroside profiles. PMID:22662967

  14. Targeted metabolomics reveals a male pheromone and sex-specific ascaroside biosynthesis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Izrayelit, Yevgeniy; Srinivasan, Jagan; Campbell, Sydney L; Jo, Yeara; von Reuss, Stephan H; Genoff, Margaux C; Sternberg, Paul W; Schroeder, Frank C

    2012-08-17

    In the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans, a class of small molecule signals called ascarosides regulate development, mating, and social behaviors. Ascaroside production has been studied in the predominant sex, the hermaphrodite, but not in males, which account for less than 1% of wild-type worms grown under typical laboratory conditions. Using HPLC-MS-based targeted metabolomics, we show that males also produce ascarosides and that their ascaroside profile differs markedly from that of hermaphrodites. Whereas hermaphrodite ascaroside profiles are dominated by ascr#3, containing an α,β-unsaturated fatty acid, males predominantly produce the corresponding dihydro-derivative ascr#10. This small structural modification profoundly affects signaling properties: hermaphrodites are retained by attomole-amounts of male-produced ascr#10, whereas hermaphrodite-produced ascr#3 repels hermaphrodites and attracts males. Male production of ascr#10 is population density-dependent, indicating sensory regulation of ascaroside biosynthesis. Analysis of gene expression data supports a model in which sex-specific regulation of peroxisomal β-oxidation produces functionally different ascaroside profiles.

  15. Cytogenomic profiling of breast cancer brain metastases reveals potential for repurposing targeted therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Bollig-Fischer, Aliccia; Michelhaugh, Sharon K; Wijesinghe, Priyanga; Dyson, Greg; Kruger, Adele; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Choi, Lydia; Alosh, Baraa; Ali-Fehmi, Rouba; Mittal, Sandeep

    2015-06-10

    Breast cancer brain metastases remain a significant clinical problem. Chemotherapy is ineffective and a lack of treatment options result in poor patient outcomes. Targeted therapeutics have proven to be highly effective in primary breast cancer, but lack of molecular genomic characterization of metastatic brain tumors is hindering the development of new treatment regimens. Here we contribute to fill this void by reporting on gene copy number variation (CNV) in 10 breast cancer metastatic brain tumors, assayed by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Results were compared to a list of cancer genes verified by others to influence cancer. Cancer gene aberrations were identified in all specimens and pathway-level analysis was applied to aggregate data, which identified stem cell pluripotency pathway enrichment and highlighted recurring, significant amplification of SOX2, PIK3CA, NTRK1, GNAS, CTNNB1, and FGFR1. For a subset of the metastatic brain tumor samples (n = 4) we compared patient-matched primary breast cancer specimens. The results of our CGH analysis and validation by alternative methods indicate that oncogenic signals driving growth of metastatic tumors exist in the original cancer. This report contributes support for more rapid development of new treatments of metastatic brain tumors, the use of genomic-based diagnostic tools and repurposed drug treatments.

  16. A chemical proteomics approach reveals Hsp27 as a target for proapoptotic clerodane diterpenes.

    PubMed

    Faiella, Laura; Piaz, Fabrizio Dal; Bisio, Angela; Tosco, Alessandra; De Tommasi, Nunziatina

    2012-10-01

    Clerodane diterpenoids are a class of naturally occurring molecules widely distributed in the Lamiaceae family. Neo-clerodane diterpenoids from Salvia ssp were recently described as compounds inhibiting the proliferation of human cancer cell lines. To gain new insights into molecular mechanism(s) underlying the antitumor potential of this class of compounds, we used a chemical proteomics approach to analyse the cellular interactome of hardwickiic acid (HAA) selected as a representative molecule. HAA was linked to an opportune 1,1'-carbonyldiimidazole modified by 1,12-dodecanediamine and then immobilized on a matrix support. The modified beads were then used as bait for fishing the potential partners of HAA in a U937 cell lysate. We identified heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27), an ATP-independent antiapoptotic chaperone characterized for its tumorigenic and metastatic properties and now referenced as a major therapeutic target in many types of cancer, as a major HAA partner. Here, we also report the study of HAA-Hsp27 interaction by means of a panel of chemical and biological approaches, including surface plasmon resonance measurements limited proteolysis, and biochemical assays. Our data suggest that HAA could provide a potential tool to develop strategies for the discovery of Hsp27 chemical inhibitors.

  17. The critical role of tissue angiotensin-converting enzyme as revealed by gene targeting in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Esther, C R; Marino, E M; Howard, T E; Machaud, A; Corvol, P; Capecchi, M R; Bernstein, K E

    1997-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) generates the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II, which plays a critical role in maintenance of blood pressure in mammals. Although significant ACE activity is found in plasma, the majority of the enzyme is bound to tissues such as the vascular endothelium. We used targeted homologous recombination to create mice expressing a form of ACE that lacks the COOH-terminal half of the molecule. This modified ACE protein is catalytically active but entirely secreted from cells. Mice that express only this modified ACE have significant plasma ACE activity but no tissue-bound enzyme. These animals have low blood pressure, renal vascular thickening, and a urine concentrating defect. The phenotype is very similar to that of completely ACE-deficient mice previously reported, except that the renal pathology is less severe. These studies strongly support the concept that the tissue-bound ACE is essential to the control of blood pressure and the structure and function of the kidney. PMID:9153279

  18. Benznidazole Biotransformation and Multiple Targets in Trypanosoma cruzi Revealed by Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Trochine, Andrea; Creek, Darren J.; Faral-Tello, Paula; Barrett, Michael P.; Robello, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Background The first line treatment for Chagas disease, a neglected tropical disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, involves administration of benznidazole (Bzn). Bzn is a 2-nitroimidazole pro-drug which requires nitroreduction to become active, although its mode of action is not fully understood. In the present work we used a non-targeted MS-based metabolomics approach to study the metabolic response of T. cruzi to Bzn. Methodology/Principal findings Parasites treated with Bzn were minimally altered compared to untreated trypanosomes, although the redox active thiols trypanothione, homotrypanothione and cysteine were significantly diminished in abundance post-treatment. In addition, multiple Bzn-derived metabolites were detected after treatment. These metabolites included reduction products, fragments and covalent adducts of reduced Bzn linked to each of the major low molecular weight thiols: trypanothione, glutathione, γ-glutamylcysteine, glutathionylspermidine, cysteine and ovothiol A. Bzn products known to be generated in vitro by the unusual trypanosomal nitroreductase, TcNTRI, were found within the parasites, but low molecular weight adducts of glyoxal, a proposed toxic end-product of NTRI Bzn metabolism, were not detected. Conclusions/significance Our data is indicative of a major role of the thiol binding capacity of Bzn reduction products in the mechanism of Bzn toxicity against T. cruzi. PMID:24853684

  19. Structure of protein O-mannose kinase reveals a unique active site architecture

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qinyu; Venzke, David; Walimbe, Ameya S; Anderson, Mary E; Fu, Qiuyu; Kinch, Lisa N; Wang, Wei; Chen, Xing; Grishin, Nick V; Huang, Niu; Yu, Liping; Dixon, Jack E; Campbell, Kevin P; Xiao, Junyu

    2016-01-01

    The ‘pseudokinase’ SgK196 is a protein O-mannose kinase (POMK) that catalyzes an essential phosphorylation step during biosynthesis of the laminin-binding glycan on α-dystroglycan. However, the catalytic mechanism underlying this activity remains elusive. Here we present the crystal structure of Danio rerio POMK in complex with Mg2+ ions, ADP, aluminum fluoride, and the GalNAc-β3-GlcNAc-β4-Man trisaccharide substrate, thereby providing a snapshot of the catalytic transition state of this unusual kinase. The active site of POMK is established by residues located in non-canonical positions and is stabilized by a disulfide bridge. GalNAc-β3-GlcNAc-β4-Man is recognized by a surface groove, and the GalNAc-β3-GlcNAc moiety mediates the majority of interactions with POMK. Expression of various POMK mutants in POMK knockout cells further validated the functional requirements of critical residues. Our results provide important insights into the ability of POMK to function specifically as a glycan kinase, and highlight the structural diversity of the human kinome. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22238.001 PMID:27879205

  20. Structures of protective antibodies reveal sites of vulnerability on Ebola virus.

    PubMed

    Murin, Charles D; Fusco, Marnie L; Bornholdt, Zachary A; Qiu, Xiangguo; Olinger, Gene G; Zeitlin, Larry; Kobinger, Gary P; Ward, Andrew B; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2014-12-02

    Ebola virus (EBOV) and related filoviruses cause severe hemorrhagic fever, with up to 90% lethality, and no treatments are approved for human use. Multiple recent outbreaks of EBOV and the likelihood of future human exposure highlight the need for pre- and postexposure treatments. Monoclonal antibody (mAb) cocktails are particularly attractive candidates due to their proven postexposure efficacy in nonhuman primate models of EBOV infection. Two candidate cocktails, MB-003 and ZMAb, have been extensively evaluated in both in vitro and in vivo studies. Recently, these two therapeutics have been combined into a new cocktail named ZMapp, which showed increased efficacy and has been given compassionately to some human patients. Epitope information and mechanism of action are currently unknown for most of the component mAbs. Here we provide single-particle EM reconstructions of every mAb in the ZMapp cocktail, as well as additional antibodies from MB-003 and ZMAb. Our results illuminate key and recurring sites of vulnerability on the EBOV glycoprotein and provide a structural rationale for the efficacy of ZMapp. Interestingly, two of its components recognize overlapping epitopes and compete with each other for binding. Going forward, this work now provides a basis for strategic selection of next-generation antibody cocktails against Ebola and related viruses and a model for predicting the impact of ZMapp on potential escape mutations in ongoing or future Ebola outbreaks.

  1. Ligand Promiscuity of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Agonists and Antagonists Revealed by Site-Directed Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Soshilov, Anatoly A.

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that can be activated by structurally diverse chemicals. To examine the mechanisms responsible for the promiscuity in AhR ligand binding, we determined the effects of mutations within the AhR ligand-binding domain (LBD) on the activity of diverse AhR ligands. Site-directed mutagenesis identified Ile319 of the mouse AhR and, to a lesser extent, Phe318 as residues involved in ligand-selective modulation of AhR transformation using a panel of 12 AhR ligands. These ligands could be categorized into four distinct structurally related groups based on their ability to activate AhR mutants at position 319 in vitro. The mutation I319K was selectively activated by FICZ and not by other examined ligands in vitro and in cell culture. F318L and F318A mutations resulted in the conversion of AhR agonists β-naphthoflavone and 3-methylcholanthrene, respectively, into partial agonists/antagonists. Hsp90 binding to the AhR was decreased with several mutations and was inversely correlated with AhR ligand-binding promiscuity. Together, these data define overlapping amino acid residues within the AhR LBD involved in the selectivity of ligand binding, the agonist or antagonist mode of ligand binding, and hsp90 binding and provide insights into the ligand diversity of AhR activators. PMID:24591650

  2. Controllable Microfluidic Synthesis of Multiphase Drug-Carrying Lipospheres for Site-Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hettiarachchi, Kanaka; Feingold, Steven; Zhang, Shirley; Lee, Abraham P.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    We report the production of micrometer-sized gas-filled lipospheres using digital microfluidics technology for chemotherapeutic drug delivery. Advantages of on-chip synthesis include a monodisperse size distribution (polydispersity index (σ) values of <5%) with consistent stability and uniform drug loading. Photolithography techniques are applied to fabricate novel PDMS-based microfluidic devices that feature a combined dual hydrodynamic flow-focusing region and expanding nozzle geometry with a narrow orifice. Spherical vehicles are formed through flow-focusing by the self-assembly of phospholipids to a lipid layer around the gas core, followed by a shear-induced break off at the orifice. The encapsulation of an extra oil layer between the outer lipid shell and inner bubble gaseous core allows the safe transport of highly hydrophobic and toxic drugs at high concentrations. Doxorubicin (Dox) entrapment is estimated at 15 mg mL−1 of particles packed in a single ordered layer. In addition, the attachment of targeting ligands to the lipid shell allows for direct vehicle binding to cancer cells. Preliminary acoustic studies of these monodisperse gas lipospheres reveal a highly uniform echo correlation of greater than 95%. The potential exists for localized drug concentration and release with ultrasound energy. PMID:19455647

  3. A brassinosteroid transcriptional network revealed by genome-wide identification of BESI target genes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaofei; Li, Lei; Zola, Jaroslaw; Aluru, Maneesha; Ye, Huaxun; Foudree, Andrew; Guo, Hongqing; Anderson, Sarah; Aluru, Srinivas; Liu, Peng; Rodermel, Steve; Yin, Yanhai

    2011-02-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are important regulators for plant growth and development. BRs signal to control the activities of the BES1 and BZR1 family transcription factors. The transcriptional network through which BES1 and BZR regulate large number of target genes is mostly unknown. By combining chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with Arabidopsis tiling arrays (ChIP-chip) and gene expression studies, we have identified 1609 putative BES1 target genes, 404 of which are regulated by BRs and/or in gain-of-function bes1-D mutant. BES1 targets contribute to BR responses and interactions with other hormonal or light signaling pathways. Computational modeling of gene expression data using Algorithm for the Reconstruction of Accurate Cellular Networks (ARACNe) reveals that BES1-targeted transcriptional factors form a gene regulatory network (GRN). Mutants of many genes in the network displayed defects in BR responses. Moreover, we found that BES1 functions to inhibit chloroplast development by repressing the expression of GLK1 and GLK2 transcription factors, confirming a hypothesis generated from the GRN. Our results thus provide a global view of BR regulated gene expression and a GRN that guides future studies in understanding BR-regulated plant growth.

  4. Methyl Substitution of a Rexinoid Agonist Improves Potency and Reveals Site of Lipid Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    (2E,4E,6Z,8E)-8-(3′,4′-Dihydro-1′(2′H)-naphthalen-1′-ylidene)-3,7-dimethyl-2,4,6-octatrienoic acid, 9cUAB30, is a selective rexinoid that displays substantial chemopreventive capacity with little toxicity. 4-Methyl-UAB30, an analogue of 9cUAB30, is a potent RXR agonist but caused increased lipid biosynthesis unlike 9cUAB30. To evaluate how methyl substitution influenced potency and lipid biosynthesis, we synthesized four 9cUAB30 homologues with methyl substitutions at the 5-, 6-, 7-, or 8-position of the tetralone ring. The syntheses and biological evaluations of these new analogues are reported here along with the X-ray crystal structures of each homologue bound to the ligand binding domain of hRXRα. We demonstrate that each homologue of 9cUAB30 is a more potent agonist, but only the 7-methyl-9cUAB30 caused severe hyperlipidemia in rats. On the basis of the X-ray crystal structures of these new rexinoids and bexarotene (Targretin) bound to hRXRα-LBD, we reveal that each rexinoid, which induced hyperlipidemia, had methyl groups that interacted with helix 7 residues of the LBD. PMID:24801499

  5. Integrated strategy reveals the protein interface between cancer targets Bcl-2 and NAF-1

    PubMed Central

    Tamir, Sagi; Rotem-Bamberger, Shahar; Katz, Chen; Morcos, Faruck; Hailey, Kendra L.; Zuris, John A.; Wang, Charles; Conlan, Andrea R.; Lipper, Colin H.; Paddock, Mark L.; Mittler, Ron; Onuchic, José N.; Jennings, Patricia A.; Friedler, Assaf; Nechushtai, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    Life requires orchestrated control of cell proliferation, cell maintenance, and cell death. Involved in these decisions are protein complexes that assimilate a variety of inputs that report on the status of the cell and lead to an output response. Among the proteins involved in this response are nutrient-deprivation autophagy factor-1 (NAF-1)- and Bcl-2. NAF-1 is a homodimeric member of the novel Fe-S protein NEET family, which binds two 2Fe-2S clusters. NAF-1 is an important partner for Bcl-2 at the endoplasmic reticulum to functionally antagonize Beclin 1-dependent autophagy [Chang NC, Nguyen M, Germain M, Shore GC (2010) EMBO J 29(3):606–618]. We used an integrated approach involving peptide array, deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (DXMS), and functional studies aided by the power of sufficient constraints from direct coupling analysis (DCA) to determine the dominant docked conformation of the NAF-1–Bcl-2 complex. NAF-1 binds to both the pro- and antiapoptotic regions (BH3 and BH4) of Bcl-2, as demonstrated by a nested protein fragment analysis in a peptide array and DXMS analysis. A combination of the solution studies together with a new application of DCA to the eukaryotic proteins NAF-1 and Bcl-2 provided sufficient constraints at amino acid resolution to predict the interaction surfaces and orientation of the protein–protein interactions involved in the docked structure. The specific integrated approach described in this paper provides the first structural information, to our knowledge, for future targeting of the NAF-1–Bcl-2 complex in the regulation of apoptosis/autophagy in cancer biology. PMID:24706857

  6. Ability of a salivary intrinsically unstructured protein to bind different tannin targets revealed by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Canon, Francis; Giuliani, Alexandre; Paté, Franck; Sarni-Manchado, Pascale

    2010-09-01

    Astringency is thought to result from the interaction between salivary proline-rich proteins (PRP) that belong to the intrinsically unstructured protein group (IUP), and tannins, which are phenolic compounds. IUPs have the ability to bind several and/or different targets. At the same time, tannins have different chemical features reported to contribute to the sensation of astringency. The ability of both electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry to investigate the noncovalent interaction occurring between a human salivary PRP, IB5, and a model tannin, epigallocatechin 3-O-gallate (EgCG), has been reported. Herein, we extend this method to study the effect of tannin chemical features on their interaction with IB5. We used five model tannins, epigallocatechin (EgC), epicatechin 3-O-gallate (ECG), epigallocatechin 3-O-gallate (EgCG), procyanidin dimer B2 and B2 3'-O-gallate, which cover the main tannin chemical features: presence of a gallate moiety (galloylation), the degree of polymerization, and the degree of B ring hydroxylation. We show the ability of IB5 to bind these tannins. We report differences in stoichiometries and in stability of the IB5•1 tannin complexes. These results demonstrate the main role of hydroxyl groups in these interactions and show the involvement of hydrogen bonds. Finally, these results are in line with sensory analysis, by Vidal et al. (J Sci Food Agric 83:564-573, 2003) pointing out that the chain length and the level of galloylation are the main factors affecting astringency perception.

  7. Distinct phytochrome actions in nonvascular plants revealed by targeted inactivation of phytobilin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Rong; Su, Yi-shin; Tu, Shih-Long

    2012-01-01

    The red/far-red light photoreceptor phytochrome mediates photomorphological responses in plants. For light sensing and signaling, phytochromes need to associate with open-chain tetrapyrrole molecules as the chromophore. Biosynthesis of tetrapyrrole chromophores requires members of ferredoxin-dependent bilin reductases (FDBRs). It was shown that LONG HYPOCOTYL 2 (HY2) is the only FDBR in flowering plants producing the phytochromobilin (PΦB) for phytochromes. However, in the moss Physcomitrella patens, we found a second FDBR that catalyzes the formation of phycourobilin (PUB), a tetrapyrrole pigment usually found as the protein-bound form in cyanobacteria and red algae. Thus, we named the enzyme PUB synthase (PUBS). Severe photomorphogenic phenotypes, including the defect of phytochrome-mediated phototropism, were observed in Physcomitrella patens when both HY2 and PUBS were disrupted by gene targeting. This indicates HY2 and PUBS function redundantly in phytochrome-mediated responses of nonvascular plants. Our studies also show that functional PUBS orthologs are found in selected lycopod and chlorophyte genomes. Using mRNA sequencing for transcriptome profiling, we demonstrate that expression of the majority of red-light-responsive genes are misregulated in the pubs hy2 double mutant. These studies showed that moss phytochromes rapidly repress expression of genes involved in cell wall organization, transcription, hormone responses, and protein phosphorylation but activate genes involved in photosynthesis and stress signaling during deetiolation. We propose that, in nonvascular plants, HY2 and PUBS produce structurally different but functionally similar chromophore precursors for phytochromes. Holophytochromes regulate biological processes through light signaling to efficiently reprogram gene expression for vegetative growth in the light. PMID:22566621

  8. Trans genomic capture and sequencing of primate exomes reveals new targets of positive selection.

    PubMed

    George, Renee D; McVicker, Graham; Diederich, Rachel; Ng, Sarah B; MacKenzie, Alexandra P; Swanson, Willie J; Shendure, Jay; Thomas, James H

    2011-10-01

    Comparison of protein-coding DNA sequences from diverse primates can provide insight into these species' evolutionary history and uncover the molecular basis for their phenotypic differences. Currently, the number of available primate reference genomes limits these genome-wide comparisons. Here we use targeted capture methods designed for human to sequence the protein-coding regions, or exomes, of four non-human primate species (three Old World monkeys and one New World monkey). Despite average sequence divergence of up to 4% from the human sequence probes, we are able to capture ~96% of coding sequences. Using a combination of mapping and assembly techniques, we generated high-quality full-length coding sequences for each species. Both the number of nucleotide differences and the distribution of insertion and deletion (indel) lengths indicate that the quality of the assembled sequences is very high and exceeds that of most reference genomes. Using this expanded set of primate coding sequences, we performed a genome-wide scan for genes experiencing positive selection and identified a novel class of adaptively evolving genes involved in the conversion of epithelial cells in skin, hair, and nails to keratin. Interestingly, the genes we identify under positive selection also exhibit significantly increased allele frequency differences among human populations, suggesting that they play a role in both recent and long-term adaptation. We also identify several genes that have been lost on specific primate lineages, which illustrate the broad utility of this data set for other evolutionary analyses. These results demonstrate the power of second-generation sequencing in comparative genomics and greatly expand the repertoire of available primate coding sequences.

  9. Molecular Basis of Acute Cystitis Reveals Susceptibility Genes and Immunotherapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Cafaro, Caterina; Nadeem, Aftab; Butler, Daniel S. C.; Rydström, Gustav; Filenko, Nina A.; Wullt, Björn; Miethke, Thomas; Svanborg, Catharina

    2016-01-01

    Tissue damage is usually regarded as a necessary price to pay for successful elimination of pathogens by the innate immune defense. Yet, it is possible to distinguish protective from destructive effects of innate immune activation and selectively attenuate molecular nodes that create pathology. Here, we identify acute cystitis as an Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β)-driven, hyper-inflammatory condition of the infected urinary bladder and IL-1 receptor blockade as a novel therapeutic strategy. Disease severity was controlled by the mechanism of IL-1β processing and mice with intact inflammasome function developed a moderate, self-limiting form of cystitis. The most severe form of acute cystitis was detected in mice lacking the inflammasome constituents ASC or NLRP-3. IL-1β processing was hyperactive in these mice, due to a new, non-canonical mechanism involving the matrix metalloproteinase 7- (MMP-7). ASC and NLRP-3 served as transcriptional repressors of MMP7 and as a result, Mmp7 was markedly overexpressed in the bladder epithelium of Asc-/- and Nlrp3-/- mice. The resulting IL-1β hyper-activation loop included a large number of IL-1β-dependent pro-inflammatory genes and the IL-1 receptor antagonist Anakinra inhibited their expression and rescued susceptible Asc-/- mice from bladder pathology. An MMP inhibitor had a similar therapeutic effect. Finally, elevated levels of IL-1β and MMP-7 were detected in patients with acute cystitis, suggesting a potential role as biomarkers and immunotherapeutic targets. The results reproduce important aspects of human acute cystitis in the murine model and provide a comprehensive molecular framework for the pathogenesis and immunotherapy of acute cystitis, one of the most common infections in man. Trial Registration The clinical studies were approved by the Human Ethics Committee at Lund University (approval numbers LU106-02, LU236-99 and Clinical Trial Registration RTP-A2003, International Committee of Medical Journal Editors, www

  10. Site-Directed Spin Labeling Reveals Pentameric Ligand-Gated Ion Channel Gating Motions

    PubMed Central

    Dellisanti, Cosma D.; Ghosh, Borna; Hanson, Susan M.; Raspanti, James M.; Grant, Valerie A.; Diarra, Gaoussou M.; Schuh, Abby M.; Satyshur, Kenneth; Klug, Candice S.; Czajkowski, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    Pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) are neurotransmitter-activated receptors that mediate fast synaptic transmission. In pLGICs, binding of agonist to the extracellular domain triggers a structural rearrangement that leads to the opening of an ion-conducting pore in the transmembrane domain and, in the continued presence of neurotransmitter, the channels desensitize (close). The flexible loops in each subunit that connect the extracellular binding domain (loops 2, 7, and 9) to the transmembrane channel domain (M2–M3 loop) are essential for coupling ligand binding to channel gating. Comparing the crystal structures of two bacterial pLGIC homologues, ELIC and the proton-activated GLIC, suggests channel gating is associated with rearrangements in these loops, but whether these motions accurately predict the motions in functional lipid-embedded pLGICs is unknown. Here, using site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and functional GLIC channels reconstituted into liposomes, we examined if, and how far, the loops at the ECD/TMD gating interface move during proton-dependent gating transitions from the resting to desensitized state. Loop 9 moves ∼9 Å inward toward the channel lumen in response to proton-induced desensitization. Loop 9 motions were not observed when GLIC was in detergent micelles, suggesting detergent solubilization traps the protein in a nonactivatable state and lipids are required for functional gating transitions. Proton-induced desensitization immobilizes loop 2 with little change in position. Proton-induced motion of the M2–M3 loop was not observed, suggesting its conformation is nearly identical in closed and desensitized states. Our experimentally derived distance measurements of spin-labeled GLIC suggest ELIC is not a good model for the functional resting state of GLIC, and that the crystal structure of GLIC does not correspond to a desensitized state. These findings advance our

  11. Targeted Deletion of a Plasmodium Site-2 Protease Impairs Life Cycle Progression in the Mammalian Host

    PubMed Central

    Goulielmaki, Evi; Chalari, Anna; Withers-Martinez, Chrislaine; Siden-Kiamos, Inga; Matuschewski, Kai

    2017-01-01

    Site-2 proteases (S2P) belong to the M50 family of metalloproteases, which typically perform essential roles by mediating activation of membrane–bound transcription factors through regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP). Protease-dependent liberation of dormant transcription factors triggers diverse cellular responses, such as sterol regulation, Notch signalling and the unfolded protein response. Plasmodium parasites rely on regulated proteolysis for controlling essential pathways throughout the life cycle. In this study we examine the Plasmodium-encoded S2P in a murine malaria model and show that it is expressed in all stages of Plasmodium development. Localisation studies by endogenous gene tagging revealed that in all invasive stages the protein is in close proximity to the nucleus. Ablation of PbS2P by reverse genetics leads to reduced growth rates during liver and blood infection and, hence, virulence attenuation. Strikingly, absence of PbS2P was compatible with parasite life cycle progression in the mosquito and mammalian hosts under physiological conditions, suggesting redundant or dispensable roles in vivo. PMID:28107409

  12. Targeted Disruption of ALK Reveals a Potential Role in Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Nord, Christoffer; Ahlgren, Ulf; Eriksson, Maria; Vernersson-Lindahl, Emma; Helland, Åslaug; Alexeyev, Oleg A.; Hallberg, Bengt; Palmer, Ruth H.

    2015-01-01

    Mice lacking ALK activity have previously been reported to exhibit subtle behavioral phenotypes. In this study of ALK of loss of function mice we present data supporting a role for ALK in hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in male mice. We observed lower level of serum testosterone at P40 in ALK knock-out males, accompanied by mild disorganization of seminiferous tubules exhibiting decreased numbers of GATA4 expressing cells. These observations highlight a role for ALK in testis function and are further supported by experiments in which chemical inhibition of ALK activity with the ALK TKI crizotinib was employed. Oral administration of crizotinib resulted in a decrease of serum testosterone levels in adult wild type male mice, which reverted to normal levels after cessation of treatment. Analysis of GnRH expression in neurons of the hypothalamus revealed a significant decrease in the number of GnRH positive neurons in ALK knock-out mice at P40 when compared with control littermates. Thus, ALK appears to be involved in hypogonadotropic hypogonadism by regulating the timing of pubertal onset and testis function at the upper levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary gonadal axis. PMID:25955180

  13. Identification of off-target cleavage sites of zinc finger nucleases and TAL effector nucleases using predictive models.

    PubMed

    Fine, Eli J; Cradick, Thomas J; Bao, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Using engineered nucleases, such as Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs) or Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs), to make targeted genomic modifications has become a common technique to create new model organisms and custom cell lines, and has shown great promise for disease treatment. However, these nucleases have the potential for off-target cleavage that could confound interpretation of experimental results and be detrimental for therapeutic use. Here, we describe a method to test for nuclease cleavage at potential off-target sites predicted by bioinformatics models.

  14. Opaque-2 is a transcriptional activator that recognizes a specific target site in 22-kD zein genes.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, R J; Ketudat, M; Aukerman, M J; Hoschek, G

    1992-06-01

    opaque-2 (o2) is a regulatory locus in maize that plays an essential role in controlling the expression of genes encoding the 22-kD zein proteins. Through DNase I footprinting and DNA binding analyses, we have identified the binding site for the O2 protein (O2) in the promoter of 22-kD zein genes. The sequence in the 22-kD zein gene promoter that is recognized by O2 is similar to the target site recognized by other "basic/leucine zipper" (bZIP) proteins in that it contains an ACGT core that is necessary for DNA binding. The site is located in the -300 region relative to the translation start and lies about 20 bp downstream of the highly conserved zein gene sequence motif known as the "prolamin box." Employing gel mobility shift assays, we used O2 antibodies and nuclear extracts from an o2 null mutant to demonstrate that the O2 protein in maize endosperm nuclei recognizes the target site in the zein gene promoter. Mobility shift assays using nuclear proteins from an o2 null mutant indicated that other endosperm proteins in addition to O2 can bind the O2 target site and that O2 may be associated with one of these proteins. We also demonstrated that in yeast cells the O2 protein can activate expression of a lacZ gene containing a multimer of the O2 target sequence as part of its promoter, thus confirming its role as a transcriptional activator. A computer-assisted search indicated that the O2 target site is not present in the promoters of zein genes other than those of the 22-kD class. These data suggest a likely explanation at the molecular level for the differential effect of o2 mutations on expression of certain members of the zein gene family.

  15. Femtosecond near-infrared laser microirradiation reveals a crucial role for PARP signaling on factor assemblies at DNA damage sites

    PubMed Central

    Saquilabon Cruz, Gladys Mae; Kong, Xiangduo; Silva, Bárbara Alcaraz; Khatibzadeh, Nima; Thai, Ryan; Berns, Michael W.; Yokomori, Kyoko

    2016-01-01

    Laser microirradiation is a powerful tool for real-time single-cell analysis of the DNA damage response (DDR). It is often found, however, that factor recruitment or modification profiles vary depending on the laser system employed. This is likely due to an incomplete understanding of how laser conditions/dosages affect the amounts and types of damage and the DDR. We compared different irradiation conditions using a femtosecond near-infrared laser and found distinct damage site recruitment thresholds for 53BP1 and TRF2 correlating with the dose-dependent increase of strand breaks and damage complexity. Low input-power microirradiation that induces relatively simple strand breaks led to robust recruitment of 53BP1 but not TRF2. In contrast, increased strand breaks with complex damage including crosslinking and base damage generated by high input-power microirradiation resulted in TRF2 recruitment to damage sites with no 53BP1 clustering. We found that poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation distinguishes between the two damage states and that PARP activation is essential for rapid TRF2 recruitment while suppressing 53BP1 accumulation at damage sites. Thus, our results reveal that careful titration of laser irradiation conditions allows induction of varying amounts and complexities of DNA damage that are gauged by differential PARP activation regulating protein assembly at the damage site. PMID:26424850

  16. Metaproteomics and metabolomics analyses of chronically petroleum‐polluted sites reveal the importance of general anaerobic processes uncoupled with degradation

    PubMed Central

    Bargiela, Rafael; Herbst, Florian‐Alexander; Martínez‐Martínez, Mónica; Seifert, Jana; Rojo, David; Cappello, Simone; Genovese, María; Crisafi, Francesca; Denaro, Renata; Chernikova, Tatyana N.; Barbas, Coral; von Bergen, Martin; Yakimov, Michail M.; Golyshin, Peter N.

    2015-01-01

    Crude oil is one of the most important natural assets for humankind, yet it is a major environmental pollutant, notably in marine environments. One of the largest crude oil polluted areas in the word is the semi‐enclosed Mediterranean Sea, in which the metabolic potential of indigenous microbial populations towards the large‐scale chronic pollution is yet to be defined, particularly in anaerobic and micro‐aerophilic sites. Here, we provide an insight into the microbial metabolism in sediments from three chronically polluted marine sites along the coastline of Italy: the Priolo oil terminal/refinery site (near Siracuse, Sicily), harbour of Messina (Sicily) and shipwreck of MT Haven (near Genoa). Using shotgun metaproteomics and community metabolomics approaches, the presence of 651 microbial proteins and 4776 metabolite mass features have been detected in these three environments, revealing a high metabolic heterogeneity between the investigated sites. The proteomes displayed the prevalence of anaerobic metabolisms that were not directly related with petroleum biodegradation, indicating that in the absence of oxygen, biodegradation is significantly suppressed. This suppression was also suggested by examining the metabolome patterns. The proteome analysis further highlighted the metabolic coupling between methylotrophs and sulphate reducers in oxygen‐depleted petroleum‐polluted sediments. PMID:26201687

  17. Co-infection with two strains of Brome mosaic bromovirus reveals common RNA recombination sites in different hosts.

    PubMed

    Kolondam, Beivy; Rao, Parth; Sztuba-Solinska, Joanna; Weber, Philipp H; Dzianott, Aleksandra; Johns, Mitrick A; Bujarski, Jozef J

    2015-01-01

    We have previously reported intra-segmental crossovers in Brome mosaic virus (BMV) RNAs. In this work, we studied the homologous recombination of BMV RNA in three different hosts: barley (Hordeum vulgare), Chenopodium quinoa, and Nicotiana benthamiana that were co-infected with two strains of BMV: Russian (R) and Fescue (F). Our work aimed at (1) establishing the frequency of recombination, (2) mapping the recombination hot spots, and (3) addressing host effects. The F and R nucleotide sequences differ from each other at many translationally silent nucleotide substitutions. We exploited this natural variability to track the crossover sites. Sequencing of a large number of cDNA clones revealed multiple homologous crossovers in each BMV RNA segment, in both the whole plants and protoplasts. Some recombination hot spots mapped at similar locations in different hosts, suggesting a role for viral factors, but other sites depended on the host. Our results demonstrate the chimeric ('mosaic') nature of the BMV RNA genome.

  18. High-resolution profiling of Drosophila replication start sites reveals a DNA shape and chromatin signature of metazoan origins.

    PubMed

    Comoglio, Federico; Schlumpf, Tommy; Schmid, Virginia; Rohs, Remo; Beisel, Christian; Paro, Renato

    2015-05-05

    At every cell cycle, faithful inheritance of metazoan genomes requires the concerted activation of thousands of DNA replication origins. However, the genetic and chromatin features defining metazoan replication start sites remain largely unknown. Here, we delineate the origin repertoire of the Drosophila genome at high resolution. We address the role of origin-proximal G-quadruplexes and suggest that they transiently stall replication forks in vivo. We dissect the chromatin configuration of replication origins and identify a rich spatial organization of chromatin features at initiation sites. DNA shape and chromatin configurations, not strict sequence motifs, mark and predict origins in higher eukaryotes. We further examine the link between transcription and origin firing and reveal that modulation of origin activity across cell types is intimately linked to cell-type-specific transcriptional programs. Our study unravels conserved origin features and provides unique insights into the relationship among DNA topology, chromatin, transcription, and replication initiation across metazoa.

  19. Communication between binding sites is required for YqjI regulation of target promoters within the yqjH-yqjI intergenic region.

    PubMed

    Wang, Suning; Blahut, Matthew; Wu, Yun; Philipkosky, Katherine E; Outten, F Wayne

    2014-09-01

    The nickel-responsive transcription factor YqjI represses its own transcription and transcription of the divergent yqjH gene, which encodes a novel ferric siderophore reductase. The intergenic region between the two promoters is complex, with multiple sequence features that may impact YqjI-dependent regulation of its two target promoters. We utilized mutagenesis and DNase I footprinting to characterize YqjI regulation of the yqjH-yqjI intergenic region. The results show that YqjI binding results in an extended footprint at the yqjI promoter (site II) compared to the yqjH promoter (site I). Mutagenesis of in vivo gene reporter constructs revealed that the two YqjI binding sites, while separated by nearly 200 bp, appear to communicate in order to provide full YqjI-dependent regulation at the two target promoters. Thus, YqjI binding at both promoters is required for full repression of either promoter, suggesting that the two YqjI binding sites cooperate to control transcription from the divergent promoters. Furthermore, internal deletions that shorten the total length of the intergenic region disrupt the ability of YqjI to regulate the yqjH promoter. Finally, mutagenesis of the repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP) elements within the yqjH-yqjI intergenic region shows that these sequences are not required for YqjI regulation. These studies provide a complex picture of novel YqjI transcriptional regulation within the yqjH-yqjI intergenic region and suggest a possible model for communication between the YqjI binding sites at each target promoter.

  20. Structure of a small-molecule inhibitor complexed with GlmU from Haemophilus influenzae reveals an allosteric binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Mochalkin, Igor; Lightle, Sandra; Narasimhan, Lakshmi; Bornemeier, Dirk; Melnick, Michael; VanderRoest, Steven; McDowell, Laura

    2008-04-02

    N-Acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GlmU) is an essential enzyme in aminosugars metabolism and an attractive target for antibiotic drug discovery. GlmU catalyzes the formation of uridine-diphospho-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc), an important precursor in the peptidoglycan and lipopolisaccharide biosynthesis in both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Here we disclose a 1.9 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of a synthetic small-molecule inhibitor of GlmU from Haemophilus influenzae (hiGlmU). The compound was identified through a high-throughput screening (HTS) configured to detect inhibitors that target the uridyltransferase active site of hiGlmU. The original HTS hit exhibited a modest micromolar potency (IC{sub 50} - 18 {mu}M in a racemic mixture) against hiGlmU and no activity against Staphylococcus aureus GlmU (saGlmU). The determined crystal structure indicated that the inhibitor occupies an allosteric site adjacent to the GlcNAc-1-P substrate-binding region. Analysis of the mechanistic model of the uridyltransferase reaction suggests that the binding of this allosteric inhibitor prevents structural rearrangements that are required for the enzymatic reaction, thus providing a basis for structure-guided design of a new class of mechanism-based inhibitors of GlmU.

  1. Polymorphisms in microRNA target sites modulate risk of lymphoblastic and myeloid leukemias and affect microRNA binding

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background MicroRNA dysregulation is a common event in leukemia. Polymorphisms in microRNA-binding sites (miRSNPs) in target genes may alter the strength of microRNA interaction with target transcripts thereby affecting protein levels. In this study we aimed at identifying miRSNPs associated with leukemia risk and assessing impact of these miRSNPs on miRNA binding to target transcripts. Methods We analyzed with specialized algorithms the 3′ untranslated regions of 137 leukemia-associated genes and identified 111 putative miRSNPs, of which 10 were chosen for further investigation. We genotyped patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML, n = 87), chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, n = 140), childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, n = 101) and healthy controls (n = 471). Association between SNPs and leukemia risk was calculated by estimating odds ratios in the multivariate logistic regression analysis. For miRSNPs that were associated with leukemia risk we performed luciferase reporter assays to examine whether they influence miRNA binding. Results Here we show that variant alleles of TLX1_rs2742038 and ETV6_rs1573613 were associated with increased risk of childhood ALL (OR (95% CI) = 3.97 (1.43-11.02) and 1.9 (1.16-3.11), respectively), while PML_rs9479 was associated with decreased ALL risk (OR = 0.55 (0.36-0.86). In adult myeloid leukemias we found significant associations between the variant allele of PML_rs9479 and decreased AML risk (OR = 0.61 (0.38-0.97), and between variant alleles of IRF8_ rs10514611 and ARHGAP26_rs187729 and increased CML risk (OR = 2.4 (1.12-5.15) and 1.63 (1.07-2.47), respectively). Moreover, we observed a significant trend for an increasing ALL and CML risk with the growing number of risk genotypes with OR = 13.91 (4.38-44.11) for carriers of ≥3 risk genotypes in ALL and OR = 4.9 (1.27-18.85) for carriers of 2 risk genotypes in CML. Luciferase reporter assays revealed that the C allele of ARHGAP

  2. Optimized deep-targeted proteotranscriptomic profiling reveals unexplored Conus toxin diversity and novel cysteine frameworks.

    PubMed

    Lavergne, Vincent; Harliwong, Ivon; Jones, Alun; Miller, David; Taft, Ryan J; Alewood, Paul F

    2015-07-21

    Cone snails are predatory marine gastropods characterized by a sophisticated venom apparatus responsible for the biosynthesis and delivery of complex mixtures of cysteine-rich toxin peptides. These conotoxins fold into small highly structured frameworks, allowing them to potently and selectively interact with heterologous ion channels and receptors. Approximately 2,000 toxins from an estimated number of >70,000 bioactive peptides have been identified in the genus Conus to date. Here, we describe a high-resolution interrogation of the transcriptomes (available at www.ddbj.nig.ac.jp) and proteomes of the diverse compartments of the Conus episcopatus venom apparatus. Using biochemical and bioinformatic tools, we found the highest number of conopeptides yet discovered in a single Conus specimen, with 3,305 novel precursor toxin sequences classified into 9 known superfamilies (A, I1, I2, M, O1, O2, S, T, Z), and identified 16 new superfamilies showing unique signal peptide signatures. We were also able to depict the largest population of venom peptides containing the pharmacologically active C-C-CC-C-C inhibitor cystine knot and CC-C-C motifs (168 and 44 toxins, respectively), as well as 208 new conotoxins displaying odd numbers of cysteine residues derived from known conotoxin motifs. Importantly, six novel cysteine-rich frameworks were revealed which may have novel pharmacology. Finally, analyses of codon usage bias and RNA-editing processes of the conotoxin transcripts demonstrate a specific conservation of the cysteine skeleton at the nucleic acid level and provide new insights about the origin of sequence hypervariablity in mature toxin regions.

  3. Functional malignant cell heterogeneity in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors revealed by targeting of PDGF-DD.

    PubMed

    Cortez, Eliane; Gladh, Hanna; Braun, Sebastian; Bocci, Matteo; Cordero, Eugenia; Björkström, Niklas K; Miyazaki, Hideki; Michael, Iacovos P; Eriksson, Ulf; Folestad, Erika; Pietras, Kristian

    2016-02-16

    Intratumoral heterogeneity is an inherent feature of most human cancers and has profound implications for cancer therapy. As a result, there is an emergent need to explore previously unmapped mechanisms regulating distinct subpopulations of tumor cells and to understand their contribution to tumor progression and treatment response. Aberrant platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRβ) signaling in cancer has motivated the development of several antagonists currently in clinical use, including imatinib, sunitinib, and sorafenib. The discovery of a novel ligand for PDGFRβ, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-DD, opened the possibility of a previously unidentified signaling pathway involved in tumor development. However, the precise function of PDGF-DD in tumor growth and invasion remains elusive. Here, making use of a newly generated Pdgfd knockout mouse, we reveal a functionally important malignant cell heterogeneity modulated by PDGF-DD signaling in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNET). Our analyses demonstrate that tumor growth was delayed in the absence of signaling by PDGF-DD. Surprisingly, ablation of PDGF-DD did not affect the vasculature or stroma of PanNET; instead, we found that PDGF-DD stimulated bulk tumor cell proliferation by induction of paracrine mitogenic signaling between heterogeneous malignant cell clones, some of which expressed PDGFRβ. The presence of a subclonal population of tumor cells characterized by PDGFRβ expression was further validated in a cohort of human PanNET. In conclusion, we demonstrate a previously unrecognized heterogeneity in PanNET characterized by signaling through the PDGF-DD/PDGFRβ axis.

  4. Functional malignant cell heterogeneity in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors revealed by targeting of PDGF-DD

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, Eliane; Gladh, Hanna; Braun, Sebastian; Bocci, Matteo; Cordero, Eugenia; Björkström, Niklas K.; Miyazaki, Hideki; Michael, Iacovos P.; Eriksson, Ulf; Folestad, Erika; Pietras, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Intratumoral heterogeneity is an inherent feature of most human cancers and has profound implications for cancer therapy. As a result, there is an emergent need to explore previously unmapped mechanisms regulating distinct subpopulations of tumor cells and to understand their contribution to tumor progression and treatment response. Aberrant platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRβ) signaling in cancer has motivated the development of several antagonists currently in clinical use, including imatinib, sunitinib, and sorafenib. The discovery of a novel ligand for PDGFRβ, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-DD, opened the possibility of a previously unidentified signaling pathway involved in tumor development. However, the precise function of PDGF-DD in tumor growth and invasion remains elusive. Here, making use of a newly generated Pdgfd knockout mouse, we reveal a functionally important malignant cell heterogeneity modulated by PDGF-DD signaling in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNET). Our analyses demonstrate that tumor growth was delayed in the absence of signaling by PDGF-DD. Surprisingly, ablation of PDGF-DD did not affect the vasculature or stroma of PanNET; instead, we found that PDGF-DD stimulated bulk tumor cell proliferation by induction of paracrine mitogenic signaling between heterogeneous malignant cell clones, some of which expressed PDGFRβ. The presence of a subclonal population of tumor cells characterized by PDGFRβ expression was further validated in a cohort of human PanNET. In conclusion, we demonstrate a previously unrecognized heterogeneity in PanNET characterized by signaling through the PDGF-DD/PDGFRβ axis. PMID:26831065

  5. Optimized deep-targeted proteotranscriptomic profiling reveals unexplored Conus toxin diversity and novel cysteine frameworks

    PubMed Central

    Lavergne, Vincent; Harliwong, Ivon; Jones, Alun; Miller, David; Taft, Ryan J.; Alewood, Paul F.

    2015-01-01

    Cone snails are predatory marine gastropods characterized by a sophisticated venom apparatus responsible for the biosynthesis and delivery of complex mixtures of cysteine-rich toxin peptides. These conotoxins fold into small highly structured frameworks, allowing them to potently and selectively interact with heterologous ion channels and receptors. Approximately 2,000 toxins from an estimated number of >70,000 bioactive peptides have been identified in the genus Conus to date. Here, we describe a high-resolution interrogation of the transcriptomes (available at www.ddbj.nig.ac.jp) and proteomes of the diverse compartments of the Conus episcopatus venom apparatus. Using biochemical and bioinformatic tools, we found the highest number of conopeptides yet discovered in a single Conus specimen, with 3,305 novel precursor toxin sequences classified into 9 known superfamilies (A, I1, I2, M, O1, O2, S, T, Z), and identified 16 new superfamilies showing unique signal peptide signatures. We were also able to depict the largest population of venom peptides containing the pharmacologically active C-C-CC-C-C inhibitor cystine knot and CC-C-C motifs (168 and 44 toxins, respectively), as well as 208 new conotoxins displaying odd numbers of cysteine residues derived from known conotoxin motifs. Importantly, six novel cysteine-rich frameworks were revealed which may have novel pharmacology. Finally, analyses of codon usage bias and RNA-editing processes of the conotoxin transcripts demonstrate a specific conservation of the cysteine skeleton at the nucleic acid level and provide new insights about the origin of sequence hypervariablity in mature toxin regions. PMID:26150494

  6. Targeted next-generation sequencing of candidate genes reveals novel mutations in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, YUE; FENG, YUE; ZHANG, YUN-MEI; DING, XIAO-XUE; SONG, YU-ZHU; ZHANG, A-MEI; LIU, LI; ZHANG, HONG; DING, JIA-HUAN; XIA, XUE-SHAN

    2015-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a major cause of sudden cardiac death and heart failure, and it is characterized by genetic and clinical heterogeneity, even for some patients with a very poor clinical prognosis; in the majority of cases, DCM necessitates a heart transplant. Genetic mutations have long been considered to be associated with this disease. At present, mutations in over 50 genes related to DCM have been documented. This study was carried out to elucidate the characteristics of gene mutations in patients with DCM. The candidate genes that may cause DCM include MYBPC3, MYH6, MYH7, LMNA, TNNT2, TNNI3, MYPN, MYL3, TPM1, SCN5A, DES, ACTC1 and RBM20. Using next-generation sequencing (NGS) and subsequent mutation confirmation with traditional capillary Sanger sequencing analysis, possible causative non-synonymous mutations were identified in ~57% (12/21) of patients with DCM. As a result, 7 novel mutations (MYPN, p.E630K; TNNT2, p.G180A; MYH6, p.R1047C; TNNC1, p.D3V; DES, p.R386H; MYBPC3, p.C1124F; and MYL3, p.D126G), 3 variants of uncertain significance (RBM20, p.R1182H; MYH6, p.T1253M; and VCL, p.M209L), and 2 known mutations (MYH7, p.A26V and MYBPC3, p.R160W) were revealed to be associated with DCM. The mutations were most frequently found in the sarcomere (MYH6, MYBPC3, MYH7, TNNC1, TNNT2 and MYL3) and cytoskeletal (MYPN, DES and VCL) genes. As genetic testing is a useful tool in the clinical management of disease, testing for pathogenic mutations is beneficial to the treatment of patients with DCM and may assist in predicting disease risk for their family members before the onset of symptoms. PMID:26458567

  7. Transportation risk assessment for the shipment of irradiated FFTF tritium target assemblies from the Hanford Site to the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, D. L.

    1997-11-19

    A Draft Technical Information Document (HNF-1855) is being prepared to evaluate proposed interim tritium and medical isotope production at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). This report examines the potential health and safety impacts associated with transportation of irradiated tritium targets from FFTF to the Savannah River Site for processing at the Tritium Extraction Facility. Potential risks to workers and members of the public during normal transportation and accident conditions are assessed.

  8. Targeting Alpha5 Beta1 Integrin to Prevent Metastatic Breast Cancer Cell Invasion: PhScN Target Site Definition and Plasma Stability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Study of collision – induced dissociation (CID) fragmentation of Ac-PHSCN-NHs in online LC-LTQ- Orbitrap Ac-PHSCN-NH2 introduced into the mass...binding site for the PHSCN/PhScN sequence on α5β1 integrin using protein crosslinking techniques and subsequent identification of the protein and peptide ...cations or by specific ligands. Our first attempt at crosslinking the peptide to its target protein was to replicate the conditions used for in

  9. The structure of sedoheptulose-7-phosphate isomerase from Burkholderia pseudomallei reveals a zinc binding site at the heart of the active site.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Nicholas J

    2010-07-16

    Heptoses are found in the surface polysaccharides of most bacteria, contributing to structures that are essential for virulence and antibiotic resistance. Consequently, the biosynthetic enzymes for these sugars are attractive targets for novel antibiotics. The best characterized biosynthetic enzyme is GmhA, which catalyzes the conversion of sedoheptulose-7-phosphate into D-glycero-D-manno-heptopyranose-7-phosphate, the first step in the biosynthesis of heptose. Here, the structure of GmhA from Burkholderia pseudomallei is reported. This enzyme contains a zinc ion at the heart of its active site: this ion stabilizes the active, closed form of the enzyme and presents coordinating side chains as a potential acid and base to drive catalysis. A complex with the product demonstrates that the enzyme retains activity in the crystal and thus suggests that the closed conformation is catalytically relevant and is an excellent target for the development of therapeutics. A revised mechanism for the action of GmhA is postulated on the basis of this structure and the activity of B. pseudomallei GmhA mutants.

  10. Crystal Structures of GII.10 and GII.12 Norovirus Protruding Domains in Complex with Histo-Blood Group Antigens Reveal Details for a Potential Site of Vulnerability

    SciTech Connect

    Hansman, Grant S.; Biertümpfel, Christian; Georgiev, Ivelin; McLellan, Jason S.; Chen, Lei; Zhou, Tongqing; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Kwong, Peter D.

    2011-10-10

    Noroviruses are the dominant cause of outbreaks of gastroenteritis worldwide, and interactions with human histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) are thought to play a critical role in their entry mechanism. Structures of noroviruses from genogroups GI and GII in complex with HBGAs, however, reveal different modes of interaction. To gain insight into norovirus recognition of HBGAs, we determined crystal structures of norovirus protruding domains from two rarely detected GII genotypes, GII.10 and GII.12, alone and in complex with a panel of HBGAs, and analyzed structure-function implications related to conservation of the HBGA binding pocket. The GII.10- and GII.12-apo structures as well as the previously solved GII.4-apo structure resembled each other more closely than the GI.1-derived structure, and all three GII structures showed similar modes of HBGA recognition. The primary GII norovirus-HBGA interaction involved six hydrogen bonds between a terminal {alpha}fucose1-2 of the HBGAs and a dimeric capsid interface, which was composed of elements from two protruding subdomains. Norovirus interactions with other saccharide units of the HBGAs were variable and involved fewer hydrogen bonds. Sequence analysis revealed a site of GII norovirus sequence conservation to reside under the critical {alpha}fucose1-2 and to be one of the few patches of conserved residues on the outer virion-capsid surface. The site was smaller than that involved in full HBGA recognition, a consequence of variable recognition of peripheral saccharides. Despite this evasion tactic, the HBGA site of viral vulnerability may provide a viable target for small molecule- and antibody-mediated neutralization of GII norovirus.

  11. Detection of target site resistance to pyrethroids and organophosphates in the horn fly using multiplex polymerase chain reaction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The horn fly, Haematobia irritans L., is an obligate blood-feeding fly and the primary insect pest parasitizing cattle in the United States. Pesticide resistance has become a huge problem for cattle producers and although several mechanisms of resistance are possible, target site resistance is the m...

  12. Integrative genomics analysis of chromosome 5p gain in cervical cancer reveals target over-expressed genes, including Drosha

    PubMed Central

    Scotto, Luigi; Narayan, Gopeshwar; Nandula, Subhadra V; Subramaniyam, Shivakumar; Kaufmann, Andreas M; Wright, Jason D; Pothuri, Bhavana; Mansukhani, Mahesh; Schneider, Achim; Arias-Pulido, Hugo; Murty, Vundavalli V

    2008-01-01

    Background Copy number gains and amplifications are characteristic feature of cervical cancer (CC) genomes for which the underlying mechanisms are unclear. These changes may possess oncogenic properties by deregulating tumor-related genes. Gain of short arm of chromosome 5 (5p) is the most frequent karyotypic change in CC. Methods To examine the role of 5p gain, we performed a combination of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and gene expression analyses on invasive cancer and in various stages of CC progression. Results The SNP and FISH analyses revealed copy number increase (CNI) of 5p in 63% of invasive CC, which arises at later stages of precancerous lesions in CC development. We integrated chromosome 5 genomic copy number and gene expression data to identify key target over expressed genes as a consequence of 5p gain. One of the candidates identified was Drosha (RNASEN), a gene that is required in the first step of microRNA (miRNA) processing in the nucleus. Other 5p genes identified as targets of CNI play a role in DNA repair and cell cycle regulation (BASP1, TARS, PAIP1, BRD9, RAD1, SKP2, and POLS), signal transduction (OSMR), and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (NNT, SDHA, and NDUFS6), suggesting that disruption of pathways involving these genes may contribute to CC progression. Conclusion Taken together, we demonstrate the power of integrating genomics data with expression data in deciphering tumor-related targets of CNI. Identification of 5p gene targets in CC denotes an important step towards biomarker development and forms a framework for testing as molecular therapeutic targets. PMID:18559093

  13. Knockdown of ALR (MLL2) Reveals ALR Target Genes and Leads to Alterations in Cell Adhesion and Growth▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Issaeva, Irina; Zonis, Yulia; Rozovskaia, Tanya; Orlovsky, Kira; Croce, Carlo M.; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Mazo, Alex; Eisenbach, Lea; Canaani, Eli

    2007-01-01

    ALR (MLL2) is a member of the human MLL family, which belongs to a larger SET1 family of histone methyltransferases. We found that ALR is present within a stable multiprotein complex containing a cohort of proteins shared with other SET1 family complexes and several unique components, such as PTIP and the jumonji family member UTX. Like other complexes formed by SET1 family members, the ALR complex exhibited strong H3K4 methyltransferase activity, conferred by the ALR SET domain. By generating ALR knockdown cell lines and comparing their expression profiles to that of control cells, we identified a set of genes whose expression is activated by ALR. Some of these genes were identified by chromatin immunoprecipitation as direct ALR targets. The ALR complex was found to associate in an ALR-dependent fashion with promoters and transcription initiation sites of target genes and to induce H3K4 trimethylation. The most characteristic features of the ALR knockdown cells were changes in the dynamics and mode of cell spreading/polarization, reduced migration capacity, impaired anchorage-dependent and -independent growth, and decreased tumorigenicity in mice. Taken together, our results suggest that ALR is a transcriptional activator that induces the transcription of target genes by covalent histone modification. ALR appears to be involved in the regulation of adhesion-related cytoskeletal events, which might affect cell growth and survival. PMID:17178841

  14. Identification of cytoplasmic capping targets reveals a role for cap homeostasis in translation and mRNA stability

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Chandrama; Patil, Deepak P.; Kennedy, Brian A.; Bakthavachalu, Baskar; Bundschuh, Ralf; Schoenberg, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The notion that decapping leads irreversibly to mRNA decay changed with the identification of capped transcripts missing portions of their 5′ ends and a cytoplasmic complex that can restore the cap on uncapped mRNAs. The current study used accumulation of uncapped transcripts in cells inhibited for cytoplasmic capping to identify the targets of this pathway. Inhibition of cytoplasmic capping resulted in the destabilization of some transcripts and the redistribution of others from polysomes to non-translating mRNPs, where they accumulate in an uncapped state. Only a portion of the mRNA transcriptome is affected by cytoplasmic capping, and its targets encode proteins involved in nucleotide binding, RNA and protein localization and the mitotic cell cycle. The 3′-UTRs of recapping targets are enriched for AU-rich elements and microRNA binding sites, both of which function in cap-dependent mRNA silencing. These findings identify a cyclical process of decapping and recapping we term cap homeostasis. PMID:22921400

  15. Oviposition by African malaria vector mosquitoes. II. Effects of site tone, water type and conspecific immatures on target selection by freshwater Anopheles gambiae Giles, sensu lato.

    PubMed

    McCrae, A W

    1984-06-01

    Females of Anopheles gambiae s. lat., most of which would have been A. gambiae s. str., were collected from houses in coastal Kenya and tested for their oviposition preferences using Petri dishes in large laboratory cages with lighting equivalent to weak moonlight. Significantly more eggs were laid overnight in water over black than over paler tones, and this difference increased as contrast with the surrounding floor was increased. Direct observation revealed that over white targets, females oviposited from a settled posture, whereas over black targets they did so from flight. The influence on this behaviour of target darkness (tone) overrode that of cage size or target size. In tests which yielded markedly fewer eggs in sea water than in tap water, no significant difference was detected when cage floors were either black or white, although a black floor might have resulted in significantly greater discrimination against sea water had more tests been conducted. All further testing was done over black cage floors. Turbid water from a natural development site received more eggs than distilled, tap or swamp water, even though the turbid water appeared paler than the others. The females did not discriminate between rearing water and tap water, or tap water with and without pupae, but the presence of larvae was repellent. Turbid water from a development site thus seemed to possess an arrestant property which overrode selection favouring darker targets, and which was not derived from prior presence of conspecific immatures. It is suggested that for A. gambiae, oviposition from a settled posture is a response to sub-optimal stimuli, possibly indicating conditions under which oviposition would not occur in nature, and hence why cage experiments using white targets have in the past yielded confusing results.

  16. Targeted Mutagenesis, Precise Gene Editing, and Site-Specific Gene Insertion in Maize Using Cas9 and Guide RNA.

    PubMed

    Svitashev, Sergei; Young, Joshua K; Schwartz, Christine; Gao, Huirong; Falco, S Carl; Cigan, A Mark

    2015-10-01

    Targeted mutagenesis, editing of endogenous maize (Zea mays) genes, and site-specific insertion of a trait gene using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated (Cas)-guide RNA technology are reported in maize. DNA vectors expressing maize codon-optimized Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 endonuclease and single guide RNAs were cointroduced with or without DNA repair templates into maize immature embryos by biolistic transformation targeting five different genomic regions: upstream of the liguleless1 (LIG1) gene, male fertility genes (Ms26 and Ms45), and acetolactate synthase (ALS) genes (ALS1 and ALS2). Mutations were subsequently identified at all sites targeted, and plants containing biallelic multiplex mutations at LIG1, Ms26, and Ms45 were recovered. Biolistic delivery of guide RNAs (as RNA molecules) directly into immature embryo cells containing preintegrated Cas9 also resulted in targeted mutations. Editing the ALS2 gene using either single-stranded oligonucleotides or double-stranded DNA vectors as repair templates yielded chlorsulfuron-resistant plants. Double-strand breaks generated by RNA-guided Cas9 endonuclease also stimulated insertion of a trait gene at a site near LIG1 by homology-directed repair. Progeny showed expected Mendelian segregation of mutations, edits, and targeted gene insertions. The examples reported in this study demonstrate the utility of Cas9-guide RNA technology as a plant genome editing tool to enhance plant breeding and crop research needed to meet growing agriculture demands of the future.

  17. Cre/lox-Recombinase-Mediated Cassette Exchange for Reversible Site-Specific Genomic Targeting of the Disease Vector, Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Häcker, Irina; Harrell II, Robert A.; Eichner, Gerrit; Pilitt, Kristina L.; O’Brochta, David A.; Handler, Alfred M.; Schetelig, Marc F.

    2017-01-01

    Site-specific genome modification (SSM) is an important tool for mosquito functional genomics and comparative gene expression studies, which contribute to a better understanding of mosquito biology and are thus a key to finding new strategies to eliminate vector-borne diseases. Moreover, it allows for the creation of advanced transgenic strains for vector control programs. SSM circumvents the drawbacks of transposon-mediated transgenesis, where random transgene integration into the host genome results in insertional mutagenesis and variable position effects. We applied the Cre/lox recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE) system to Aedes aegypti, the vector of dengue, chikungunya, and Zika viruses. In this context we created four target site lines for RMCE and evaluated their fitness costs. Cre-RMCE is functional in a two-step mechanism and with good efficiency in Ae. aegypti. The advantages of Cre-RMCE over existing site-specific modification systems for Ae. aegypti, phiC31-RMCE and CRISPR, originate in the preservation of the recombination sites, which 1) allows successive modifications and rapid expansion or adaptation of existing systems by repeated targeting of the same site; and 2) provides reversibility, thus allowing the excision of undesired sequences. Thereby, Cre-RMCE complements existing genomic modification tools, adding flexibility and versatility to vector genome targeting. PMID:28266580

  18. Cre/lox-Recombinase-Mediated Cassette Exchange for Reversible Site-Specific Genomic Targeting of the Disease Vector, Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Häcker, Irina; Harrell Ii, Robert A; Eichner, Gerrit; Pilitt, Kristina L; O'Brochta, David A; Handler, Alfred M; Schetelig, Marc F

    2017-03-07

    Site-specific genome modification (SSM) is an important tool for mosquito functional genomics and comparative gene expression studies, which contribute to a better understanding of mosquito biology and are thus a key to finding new strategies to eliminate vector-borne diseases. Moreover, it allows for the creation of advanced transgenic strains for vector control programs. SSM circumvents the drawbacks of transposon-mediated transgenesis, where random transgene integration into the host genome results in insertional mutagenesis and variable position effects. We applied the Cre/lox recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE) system to Aedes aegypti, the vector of dengue, chikungunya, and Zika viruses. In this context we created four target site lines for RMCE and evaluated their fitness costs. Cre-RMCE is functional in a two-step mechanism and with good efficiency in Ae. aegypti. The advantages of Cre-RMCE over existing site-specific modification systems for Ae. aegypti, phiC31-RMCE and CRISPR, originate in the preservation of the recombination sites, which 1) allows successive modifications and rapid expansion or adaptation of existing systems by repeated targeting of the same site; and 2) provides reversibility, thus allowing the excision of undesired sequences. Thereby, Cre-RMCE complements existing genomic modification tools, adding flexibility and versatility to vector genome targeting.

  19. A novel molecular mechanism involved in multiple myeloma development revealed by targeting MafB to haematopoietic progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Romero-Camarero, Isabel; González-Herrero, Inés; Alonso-Escudero, Esther; Abollo-Jiménez, Fernando; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Gutierrez, Norma C; Orfao, Alberto; Marín, Nieves; Villar, Luisa María; Criado, Ma Carmen Fernández; Pintado, Belén; Flores, Teresa; Alonso-López, Diego; De Las Rivas, Javier; Jiménez, Rafael; Criado, Francisco Javier García; Cenador, María Begoña García; Lossos, Izidore S; Cobaleda, César; Sánchez-García, Isidro

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the cellular origin of cancer can help to improve disease prevention and therapeutics. Human plasma cell neoplasias are thought to develop from either differentiated B cells or plasma cells. However, when the expression of Maf oncogenes (associated to human plasma cell neoplasias) is targeted to mouse B cells, the resulting animals fail to reproduce the human disease. Here, to explore early cellular changes that might take place in the development of plasma cell neoplasias, we engineered transgenic mice to express MafB in haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HS/PCs). Unexpectedly, we show that plasma cell neoplasias arise in the MafB-transgenic mice. Beyond their clinical resemblance to human disease, these neoplasias highly express genes that are known to be upregulated in human multiple myeloma. Moreover, gene expression profiling revealed that MafB-expressing HS/PCs were more similar to B cells and tumour plasma cells than to any other subset, including wild-type HS/PCs. Consistent with this, genome-scale DNA methylation profiling revealed that MafB imposes an epigenetic program in HS/PCs, and that this program is preserved in mature B cells of MafB-transgenic mice, demonstrating a novel molecular mechanism involved in tumour initiation. Our findings suggest that, mechanistically, the haematopoietic progenitor population can be the target for transformation in MafB-associated plasma cell neoplasias. PMID:22903061

  20. Ligand-incorporation site in 5-methylcytosine-detection probe modulating the site of osmium complexation with the target DNA.

    PubMed

    Sugizaki, Kaori; Nakamura, Akiko; Yanagisawa, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2012-09-01

    ICON Probes, short DNA strands containing an adenine linked to a bipyridine ligand, formed an interstrand cross-link with 5-methylcytosine located opposite the modified adenine in the presence of an osmium oxidant. The location of a bipyridine-tethered adenine in the probes varied the selectivity of the reactive base. An ICON probe where the modified adenine was located at the probe center showed a 5-methylcytosine-selective osmium complexation, whereas an ICON probe with the modified adenine at the strand end exhibited high reactivity towards thymine as well as 5-methylcytosine. The modulation of reactive bases by the incorporation of a bipyridine-tethered adenine site made facilitates design of ICON probes for the fluorometric detection of 5-methylcytosine.

  1. The first crystal structure of human RNase 6 reveals a novel substrate-binding and cleavage site arrangement

    PubMed Central

    Prats-Ejarque, Guillem; Arranz-Trullén, Javier; Blanco, Jose A.; Pulido, David; Nogués, M. Victòria; Moussaoui, Mohammed; Boix, Ester

    2016-01-01

    Human RNase 6 is a cationic secreted protein that belongs to the RNase A superfamily. Its expression is induced in neutrophils and monocytes upon bacterial infection, suggesting a role in host defence. We present here the crystal structure of RNase 6 obtained at 1.72 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) resolution, which is the first report for the protein 3D structure and thereby setting the basis for functional studies. The structure shows an overall kidney-shaped globular fold shared with the other known family members. Three sulfate anions bound to RNase 6 were found, interacting with residues at the main active site (His15, His122 and Gln14) and cationic surface-exposed residues (His36, His39, Arg66 and His67). Kinetic characterization, together with prediction of protein–nucleotide complexes by molecular dynamics, was applied to analyse the RNase 6 substrate nitrogenous base and phosphate selectivity. Our results reveal that, although RNase 6 is a moderate catalyst in comparison with the pancreatic RNase type, its structure includes lineage-specific features that facilitate its activity towards polymeric nucleotide substrates. In particular, enzyme interactions at the substrate 5′ end can provide an endonuclease-type cleavage pattern. Interestingly, the RNase 6 crystal structure revealed a novel secondary active site conformed by the His36–His39 dyad that facilitates the polynucleotide substrate catalysis. PMID:27013146

  2. Stromal transcriptional profiles reveal hierarchies of anatomical site, serum response and disease and identify disease specific pathways.

    PubMed

    Filer, Andrew; Antczak, Philipp; Parsonage, Greg N; Legault, Holly M; O'Toole, Margot; Pearson, Mark J; Thomas, Andrew M; Scheel-Toellner, Dagmar; Raza, Karim; Buckley, Christopher D; Falciani, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Synovial fibroblasts in persistent inflammatory arthritis have been suggested to have parallels with cancer growth and wound healing, both of which involve a stereotypical serum response programme. We tested the hypothesis that a serum response programme can be used to classify diseased tissues, and investigated the serum response programme in fibroblasts from multiple anatomical sites and two diseases. To test our hypothesis we utilized a bioinformatics approach to explore a publicly available microarray dataset including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthritis (OA) and normal synovial tissue, then extended those findings in a new microarray dataset representing matched synovial, bone marrow and skin fibroblasts cultured from RA and OA patients undergoing arthroplasty. The classical fibroblast serum response programme discretely classified RA, OA and normal synovial tissues. Analysis of low and high serum treated fibroblast microarray data revealed a hierarchy of control, with anatomical site the most powerful classifier followed by response to serum and then disease. In contrast to skin and bone marrow fibroblasts, exposure of synovial fibroblasts to serum led to convergence of RA and OA expression profiles. Pathway analysis revealed three inter-linked gene networks characterising OA synovial fibroblasts: Cell remodelling through insulin-like growth factors, differentiation and angiogenesis through _3 integrin, and regulation of apoptosis through CD44. We have demonstrated that Fibroblast serum response signatures define disease at the tissue level, and that an OA specific, serum dependent repression of genes involved in cell adhesion, extracellular matrix remodelling and apoptosis is a critical discriminator between cultured OA and RA synovial fibroblasts.

  3. Site-specific gene targeting using transcription activator-like effector (TALE)-based nuclease in Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zijian; Li, Nianzu; Huang, Guodong; Xu, Junqiang; Pan, Yu; Wang, Zhimin; Tang, Qinglin; Song, Ming; Wang, Xiaojia

    2013-11-01

    Site-specific recognition modules with DNA nuclease have tremendous potential as molecular tools for genome targeting. The type III transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) contain a DNA binding domain consisting of tandem repeats that can be engineered to bind user-defined specific DNA sequences. We demonstrated that customized TALE-based nucleases (TALENs), constructed using a method called "unit assembly", specifically target the endogenous FRIGIDA gene in Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata L. The results indicate that the TALENs bound to the target site and cleaved double-strand DNA in vitro and in vivo, whereas the effector binding elements have a 23 bp spacer. The T7 endonuclease I assay and sequencing data show that TALENs made double-strand breaks, which were repaired by a non-homologous end-joining pathway within the target sequence. These data show the feasibility of applying customized TALENs to target and modify the genome with deletions in those organisms that are still in lacking gene target methods to provide germplasms in breeding improvement.

  4. Transgenic banana plants expressing Xanthomonas wilt resistance genes revealed a stable non-target bacterial colonization structure.

    PubMed

    Nimusiima, Jean; Köberl, Martina; Tumuhairwe, John Baptist; Kubiriba, Jerome; Staver, Charles; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-12-10

    Africa is among the continents where the battle over genetically modified crops is currently being played out. The impact of GM in Africa could potentially be very positive. In Uganda, researchers have developed transgenic banana lines resistant to banana Xanthomonas wilt. The transgenic lines expressing hrap and pflp can provide a timely solution to the pandemic. However, the impact of the transgenes expression on non-target microorganisms has not yet been investigated. To study this effect, transgenic and control lines were grown under field conditions and their associated microbiome was investigated by 16S rRNA gene profiling combining amplicon sequencing and molecular fingerprinting. Three years after sucker planting, no statistically significant differences between transgenic lines and their non-modified predecessors were detected for their associated bacterial communities. The overall gammaproteobacterial rhizosphere microbiome was highly dominated by Xanthomonadales, while Pseudomonadales and Enterobacteriales were accumulated in the pseudostem. Shannon indices revealed much higher diversity in the rhizosphere than in the pseudostem endosphere. However, the expression of the transgenes did not result in changes in the diversity of Gammaproteobacteria, the closest relatives of the target pathogen. In this field experiment, the expression of the resistance genes appears to have no consequences for non-target rhizobacteria and endophytes.

  5. Microarray and Degradome Sequencing Reveal MicroRNA Differential Expression Profiles and Their Targets in Pinellia pedatisecta

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Qiulei; Zhou, Wei; Xu, Shaowei; Xu, Tao

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous small non-coding RNAs which play a critical role in gene regulation in plants. Pinelliapedatisecta is one of the most important herbs in traditional Chinese medicine, but there are no microRNAs of Pinelliapedatisecta were deposited in miRBase and the research of the related miRNA biological functions is still insufficient. To detect Pinelliapedatisecta miRNAs and discover their expression difference with Pinelliaternata, we carried out a microarray profiling. A total of 101 miRNAs belonging to 22 miRNA families were detected both in Pinelliapedatisecta and Pinelliaternata respectively, among them 21 miRNAs showed their differentially expression. GO (gene ontology) term enrichment analysis of the target genes of differential expression miRNAs reveal that these miRNAs mainly affect the reproduction, transcription factor activity and plant developmental process. To elucidate the target function of miRNAs, we constructed a degradome library from Pinellia pedatisecta leaf. The result showed that a total of 18 transcript were identified as targets of miRNAs and further analysis indicated that miR156 and miR529 may function together to repress SPL14. PMID:24086673

  6. Transgenic banana plants expressing Xanthomonas wilt resistance genes revealed a stable non-target bacterial colonization structure

    PubMed Central

    Nimusiima, Jean; Köberl, Martina; Tumuhairwe, John Baptist; Kubiriba, Jerome; Staver, Charles; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Africa is among the continents where the battle over genetically modified crops is currently being played out. The impact of GM in Africa could potentially be very positive. In Uganda, researchers have developed transgenic banana lines resistant to banana Xanthomonas wilt. The transgenic lines expressing hrap and pflp can provide a timely solution to the pandemic. However, the impact of the transgenes expression on non-target microorganisms has not yet been investigated. To study this effect, transgenic and control lines were grown under field conditions and their associated microbiome was investigated by 16S rRNA gene profiling combining amplicon sequencing and molecular fingerprinting. Three years after sucker planting, no statistically significant differences between transgenic lines and their non-modified predecessors were detected for their associated bacterial communities. The overall gammaproteobacterial rhizosphere microbiome was highly dominated by Xanthomonadales, while Pseudomonadales and Enterobacteriales were accumulated in the pseudostem. Shannon indices revealed much higher diversity in the rhizosphere than in the pseudostem endosphere. However, the expression of the transgenes did not result in changes in the diversity of Gammaproteobacteria, the closest relatives of the target pathogen. In this field experiment, the expression of the resistance genes appears to have no consequences for non-target rhizobacteria and endophytes. PMID:26657016

  7. RNA Seq profiling reveals a novel expression pattern of TGF-β target genes in human blood eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhong-Jian; Hu, Jie; Esnault, Stephane; Dozmorov, Igor; Malter, James S

    2015-09-01

    Despite major advances in our understanding of TGF-β signaling in multiple cell types, little is known about the direct target genes of this pathway in human eosinophils. These cells constitute the major inflammatory component present in the sputum and lung of active asthmatics and their numbers correlate well with disease severity. During the transition from acute to chronic asthma, TGF-β levels rise several fold in the lung which drives fibroblasts to produce extracellular matrix (ECM) and participate in airway and parenchymal remodeling. In this report, we use purified blood eosinophils from healthy donors and analyze baseline and TGF-β responsive genes by RNA Seq, and demonstrate that eosinophils (PBE) express 7981 protein-coding genes of which 178 genes are up-regulated and 199 genes are down-regulated by TGF-β. While 18 target genes have been previously associated with asthma and eosinophilic disorders, the vast majority have been implicated in cell death and survival, differentiation, and cellular function. Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed that 126 canonical pathways are activated by TGF-β including iNOS, TREM1, p53, IL-8 and IL-10 signaling. As TGF-β is an important cytokine for eosinophil function and survival, and pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis, our results represent a significant step toward the identification of novel TGF-β responsive genes and provide a potential therapeutic opportunity by selectively targeting relevant genes and pathways.

  8. Direct Imaging of RAB27B-Enriched Secretory Vesicle Biogenesis in Lacrimal Acinar Cells Reveals Origins on a Nascent Vesicle Budding Site

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Lilian; Karvar, Serhan; Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah F.

    2012-01-01

    This study uses YFP-tagged Rab27b expression in rabbit lacrimal gland acinar cells, which are polarized secretory epithelial cells, to characterize early stages of secretory vesicle trafficking. Here we demonstrate the utility of YFP-Rab27b to delineate new perspectives on the mechanisms of early vesicle biogenesis in lacrimal gland acinar cells, where information is significantly limited. Protocols were developed to deplete the mature YFP-Rab27b-enriched secretory vesicle pool in the subapical region of the cell, and confocal fluorescence microscopy was used to track vesicle replenishment. This analysis revealed a basally-localized organelle, which we termed the “nascent vesicle site,” from which nascent vesicles appeared to emerge. Subapical vesicular YFP-Rab27b was co-localized with p150Glued, a component of the dynactin cofactor of cytoplasmic dynein. Treatment with the microtubule-targeted agent, nocodazole, did not affect release of mature secretory vesicles, although during vesicle repletion it significantly altered nascent YFP-Rab27b-enriched secretory vesicle localization. Instead of moving to the subapical region, these vesicles were trapped at the nascent vesicle site which was adjacent to, if not a sub-compartment of, the trans-Golgi network. Finally, YFP-Rab27b-enriched secretory vesicles which reached the subapical cytoplasm appeared to acquire the actin-based motor protein, Myosin 5C. Our findings show that Rab27b enrichment occurs early in secretory vesicle formation, that secretory vesicles bud from a visually discernable nascent vesicle site, and that transport from the nascent vesicle site to the subapical region requires intact microtubules. PMID:22363735

  9. Human Monoclonal Islet Cell Antibodies From a Patient with Insulin- Dependent Diabetes Mellitus Reveal Glutamate Decarboxylase as the Target Antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Wiltrud; Endl, Josef; Eiermann, Thomas H.; Brandt, Michael; Kientsch-Engel, Rosemarie; Thivolet, Charles; Jungfer, Herbert; Scherbaum, Werner A.

    1992-09-01

    The autoimmune phenomena associated with destruction of the β cell in pancreatic islets and development of type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus (IDDM) include circulating islet cell antibodies. We have immortalized peripheral blood lymphocytes from prediabetic individuals and patients with newly diagnosed IDDM by Epstein-Barr virus transformation. IgG-positive cells were selected by anti-human IgG-coupled magnetic beads and expanded in cell culture. Supernatants were screened for cytoplasmic islet cell antibodies using the conventional indirect immunofluorescence test on cryostat sections of human pancreas. Six islet cell-specific B-cell lines, originating from a patient with newly diagnosed IDDM, could be stabilized on a monoclonal level. All six monoclonal islet cell antibodies (MICA 1-6) were of the IgG class. None of the MICA reacted with human thyroid, adrenal gland, anterior pituitary, liver, lung, stomach, and intestine tissues but all six reacted with pancreatic islets of different mammalian species and, in addition, with neurons of rat cerebellar cortex. MICA 1-6 were shown to recognize four distinct antigenic epitopes in islets. Islet cell antibody-positive diabetic sera but not normal human sera blocked the binding of the monoclonal antibodies to their target epitopes. Immunoprecipitation of 35S-labeled human islet cell extracts revealed that a protein of identical size to the enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.15) was a target of all MICA. Furthermore, antigen immunotrapped by the MICA from brain homogenates showed glutamate decarboxylase enzyme activity. MICA 1-6 therefore reveal glutamate decarboxylase as the predominant target antigen of cytoplasmic islet cell autoantibodies in a patient with newly diagnosed IDDM.

  10. Canine epidermal lipid sampling by skin scrub revealed variations between different body sites and normal and atopic dogs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previously, we evaluated a minimally invasive epidermal lipid sampling method called skin scrub, which achieved reproducible and comparable results to skin scraping. The present study aimed at investigating regional variations in canine epidermal lipid composition using the skin scrub technique and its suitability for collecting skin lipids in dogs suffering from certain skin diseases. Eight different body sites (5 highly and 3 lowly predisposed for atopic lesions) were sampled by skin scrub in 8 control dogs with normal skin. Additionally, lesional and non-lesional skin was sampled from 12 atopic dogs and 4 dogs with other skin diseases by skin scrub. Lipid fractions were separated by high performance thin layer chromatography and analysed densitometrically. Results No significant differences in total lipid content were found among the body sites tested in the control dogs. However, the pinna, lip and caudal back contained significantly lower concentrations of ceramides, whereas the palmar metacarpus and the axillary region contained significantly higher amounts of ceramides and cholesterol than most other body sites. The amount of total lipids and ceramides including all ceramide classes were significantly lower in both lesional and non-lesional skin of atopic dogs compared to normal skin, with the reduction being more pronounced in lesional skin. The sampling by skin scrub was relatively painless and caused only slight erythema at the sampled areas but no oedema. Histological examinations of skin biopsies at 2 skin scrubbed areas revealed a potential lipid extraction from the transition zone between stratum corneum and granulosum. Conclusions The present study revealed regional variations in the epidermal lipid and ceramide composition in dogs without skin abnormalities but no connection between lipid composition and predilection sites for canine atopic dermatitis lesions. The skin scrub technique proved to be a practicable sampling method for canine

  11. Structure of Arabidopsis thaliana 5-methylthioribose kinase reveals a more occluded active site than its bacterial homolog

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Shao-Yang; Cornell, Kenneth A; Howell, P Lynne

    2007-01-01

    Background Metabolic variations exist between the methionine salvage pathway of humans and a number of plants and microbial pathogens. 5-Methylthioribose (MTR) kinase is a key enzyme required for methionine salvage in plants and many bacteria. The absence of a mammalian homolog suggests that MTR kinase is a good target for the design of specific herbicides or antibiotics. Results The structure of Arabidopsis thaliana MTR kinase co-crystallized with ATPγS and MTR has been determined at 1.9 Å resolution. The structure is similar to B. subtilis MTR kinase and has the same protein kinase fold observed in other evolutionarily related protein kinase-like phosphotransferases. The active site is comparable between the two enzymes with the DXE-motif coordinating the nucleotide-Mg, the D238 of the HGD catalytic loop polarizing the MTR O1 oxygen, and the RR-motif interacting with the substrate MTR. Unlike its bacterial homolog, however, the Gly-rich loop (G-loop) of A. thaliana MTR kinase has an extended conformation, which shields most of the active site from solvent, a feature that resembles eukaryotic protein kinases more than the bacterial enzyme. The G- and W-loops of A. thaliana and B. subtilis MTR kinase adopt different conformations despite high sequence similarity. The ATPγS analog was hydrolyzed during the co-crystallization procedure, resulting in ADP in the active site. This suggests that the A. thaliana enzyme, like its bacterial homolog, may have significant ATPase activity in the absence of MTR. Conclusion The structure of A. thaliana MTR kinase provides a template for structure-based design of agrochemicals, particularly herbicides whose effectiveness could be regulated by nutrient levels. Features of the MTR binding site offer an opportunity for a simple organic salt of an MTR analog to specifically inhibit MTR kinase. PMID:17961230

  12. Structure of Arabidopsis thaliana 5-methylthioribose Kinase Reveals a More Occluded Active Site Than its Bacterial Homolog

    SciTech Connect

    Ku,S.; Cornell, K.; Howell, P.

    2007-01-01

    Metabolic variations exist between the methionine salvage pathway of humans and a number of plants and microbial pathogens. 5-Methylthioribose (MTR) kinase is a key enzyme required for methionine salvage in plants and many bacteria. The absence of a mammalian homolog suggests that MTR kinase is a good target for the design of specific herbicides or antibiotics. The structure of Arabidopsis thaliana MTR kinase co-crystallized with ATP?S and MTR has been determined at 1.9 Angstroms resolution. The structure is similar to B. subtilis MTR kinase and has the same protein kinase fold observed in other evolutionarily related protein kinase-like phosphotransferases. The active site is comparable between the two enzymes with the DXE-motif coordinating the nucleotide-Mg, the D238 of the HGD catalytic loop polarizing the MTR O1 oxygen, and the RR-motif interacting with the substrate MTR. Unlike its bacterial homolog, however, the Gly-rich loop (G-loop) of A. thaliana MTR kinase has an extended conformation, which shields most of the active site from solvent, a feature that resembles eukaryotic protein kinases more than the bacterial enzyme. The G- and W-loops of A. thaliana and B. subtilis MTR kinase adopt different conformations despite high sequence similarity. The ATP?S analog was hydrolyzed during the co-crystallization procedure, resulting in ADP in the active site. This suggests that the A. thaliana enzyme, like its bacterial homolog, may have significant ATPase activity in the absence of MTR. The structure of A. thaliana MTR kinase provides a template for structure-based design of agrochemicals, particularly herbicides whose effectiveness could be regulated by nutrient levels. Features of the MTR binding site offer an opportunity for a simple organic salt of an MTR analog to specifically inhibit MTR kinase.

  13. Distinct roles of N-glycosylation at different sites of corin in cell membrane targeting and ectodomain shedding.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Zhou, Tiantian; Peng, Jianhao; Xu, Ping; Dong, Ningzheng; Chen, Shenghan; Wu, Qingyu

    2015-01-16

    Corin is a membrane-bound protease essential for activating natriuretic peptides and regulating blood pressure. Human corin has 19 predicted N-glycosylation sites in its extracellular domains. It has been shown that N-glycans are required for corin cell surface expression and zymogen activation. It remains unknown, however, how N-glycans at different sites may regulate corin biosynthesis and processing. In this study, we examined corin mutants, in which each of the 19 predicted N-glycosylation sites was mutated individually. By Western analysis of corin proteins in cell lysate and conditioned medium from transfected HEK293 cells and HL-1 cardiomyocytes, we found that N-glycosylation at Asn-80 inhibited corin shedding in the juxtamembrane domain. Similarly, N-glycosylation at Asn-231 protected corin from autocleavage in the frizzled-1 domain. Moreover, N-glycosylation at Asn-697 in the scavenger receptor domain and at Asn-1022 in the protease domain is important for corin cell surface targeting and zymogen activation. We also found that the location of the N-glycosylation site in the protease domain was not critical. N-Glycosylation at Asn-1022 may be switched to different sites to promote corin zymogen activation. Together, our results show that N-glycans at different sites may play distinct roles in regulating the cell membrane targeting, zymogen activation, and ectodomain shedding of corin.

  14. Imperfect centered miRNA binding sites are common and can mediate repression of target mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) bind to mRNAs and target them for translational inhibition or transcriptional degradation. It is thought that most miRNA-mRNA interactions involve the seed region at the 5′ end of the miRNA. The importance of seed sites is supported by experimental evidence, although there is growing interest in interactions mediated by the central region of the miRNA, termed centered sites. To investigate the prevalence of these interactions, we apply a biotin pull-down method to determine the direct targets of ten human miRNAs, including four isomiRs that share centered sites, but not seeds, with their canonical partner miRNAs. Results We confirm that miRNAs and their isomiRs can interact with hundreds of mRNAs, and that imperfect centered sites are common mediators of miRNA-mRNA interactions. We experimentally demonstrate that these sites can repress mRNA activity, typically through translational repression, and are enriched in regions of the transcriptome bound by AGO. Finally, we show that the identification of imperfect centered sites is unlikely to be an artifact of our protocol caused by the biotinylation of the miRNA. However, the fact that there was a slight bias against seed sites in our protocol may have inflated the apparent prevalence of centered site-mediated interactions. Conclusions Our results suggest that centered site-mediated interactions are much more frequent than previously thought. This may explain the evolutionary conservation of the central region of miRNAs, and has significant implications for decoding miRNA-regulated genetic networks, and for predicting the functional effect of variants that do not alter protein sequence. PMID:24629056

  15. Revealing the Atomic Site-Dependent g Factor within a Single Magnetic Molecule via the Extended Kondo Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Shixuan

    Control over charge and spin states at the single molecule level is crucial not only for a fundamental understanding of charge and spin interactions but also represents a prerequisite for development of molecular electronics and spintronics. In this talk, I will talk about the extended spin distribution in space beyond the central Mn ion, and onto the non-magnetic constituent atoms of the MnPc molecule. This extended spin distribution results in an extended Kondo effect, which can be explained by spin polarization induced by symmetry breaking of the molecular framework, as confirmed by DFT calculations. Measuring the evolution of the Kondo splitting with applied magnetic fields at different atomic sites, we find a spatial variation of the g-factor within a single molecule for the first time. The existence of atomic site-dependent g-factors can be attributed to specific molecular orbitals distributed over the entire molecule. This work not only open up a new opportunity for quantum information recording, but also provide a new route to explore the internal electronic and spin structure of complex molecules, hard to achieve otherwise. (L. W. Liu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 2015, 114, 126601. In collaboration with Liwei Liu, Kai Yang, Yuhang Jiang, Li Gao, Qi Liu, Boqun Song, Wende Xiao, Haitao Zhou, Hongjun Gao in CAS, Min Ouyang in MU, and A.H. Castro Neto in SNU.) Revealing the Atomic Site-Dependent g Factor within a Single Magnetic Molecule via the Extended Kondo Effect.

  16. An anti-hapten camelid antibody reveals a cryptic binding site with significant energetic contributions from a nonhypervariable loop

    SciTech Connect

    Fanning, Sean W.; Horn, James R.

    2014-03-05

    Conventional anti-hapten antibodies typically bind low-molecular weight compounds (haptens) in the crevice between the variable heavy and light chains. Conversely, heavy chain-only camelid antibodies, which lack a light chain, must rely entirely on a single variable domain to recognize haptens. While several anti-hapten VHHs have been generated, little is known regarding the underlying structural and thermodynamic basis for hapten recognition. Here, an anti-methotrexate VHH (anti-MTX VHH) was generated using grafting methods whereby the three complementarity determining regions (CDRs) were inserted onto an existing VHH framework. Thermodynamic analysis of the anti-MTX VHH CDR1-3 Graft revealed a micromolar binding affinity, while the crystal structure of the complex revealed a somewhat surprising noncanonical binding site which involved MTX tunneling under the CDR1 loop. Due to the close proximity of MTX to CDR4, a nonhypervariable loop, the CDR4 loop sequence was subsequently introduced into the CDR1-3 graft, which resulted in a dramatic 1000-fold increase in the binding affinity. Crystal structure analysis of both the free and complex anti-MTX CDR1-4 graft revealed CDR4 plays a significant role in both intermolecular contacts and binding site conformation that appear to contribute toward high affinity binding. Additionally, the anti-MTX VHH possessed relatively high specificity for MTX over closely related compounds aminopterin and folate, demonstrating that VHH domains are capable of binding low-molecular weight ligands with high affinity and specificity, despite their reduced interface.

  17. An anti-hapten camelid antibody reveals a cryptic binding site with significant energetic contributions from a nonhypervariable loop

    PubMed Central

    Fanning, Sean W; Horn, James R

    2011-01-01

    Conventional anti-hapten antibodies typically bind low-molecular weight compounds (haptens) in the crevice between the variable heavy and light chains. Conversely, heavy chain-only camelid antibodies, which lack a light chain, must rely entirely on a single variable domain to recognize haptens. While several anti-hapten VHHs have been generated, little is known regarding the underlying structural and thermodynamic basis for hapten recognition. Here, an anti-methotrexate VHH (anti-MTX VHH) was generated using grafting methods whereby the three complementarity determining regions (CDRs) were inserted onto an existing VHH framework. Thermodynamic analysis of the anti-MTX VHH CDR1-3 Graft revealed a micromolar binding affinity, while the crystal structure of the complex revealed a somewhat surprising noncanonical binding site which involved MTX tunneling under the CDR1 loop. Due to the close proximity of MTX to CDR4, a nonhypervariable loop, the CDR4 loop sequence was subsequently introduced into the CDR1-3 graft, which resulted in a dramatic 1000-fold increase in the binding affinity. Crystal structure analysis of both the free and complex anti-MTX CDR1-4 graft revealed CDR4 plays a significant role in both intermolecular contacts and binding site conformation that appear to contribute toward high affinity binding. Additionally, the anti-MTX VHH possessed relatively high specificity for MTX over closely related compounds aminopterin and folate, demonstrating that VHH domains are capable of binding low-molecular weight ligands with high affinity and specificity, despite their reduced interface. PMID:21557375

  18. Site-directed spectroscopy of cardiac myosin-binding protein C reveals effects of phosphorylation on protein structural dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Colson, Brett A.; Thompson, Andrew R.; Espinoza-Fonseca, L. Michel; Thomas, David D.

    2016-01-01

    We have used the site-directed spectroscopies of time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) and double electron–electron resonance (DEER), combined with complementary molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, to resolve the structure and dynamics of cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C), focusing on the N-terminal region. The results have implications for the role of this protein in myocardial contraction, with particular relevance to β-adrenergic signaling, heart failure, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. N-terminal cMyBP-C domains C0–C2 (C0C2) contain binding regions for potential interactions with both thick and thin filaments. Phosphorylation by PKA in the MyBP-C motif regulates these binding interactions. Our spectroscopic assays detect distances between pairs of site-directed probes on cMyBP-C. We engineered intramolecular pairs of labeling sites within cMyBP-C to measure, with high resolution, the distance and disorder in the protein’s flexible regions using TR-FRET and DEER. Phosphorylation reduced the level of molecular disorder and the distribution of C0C2 intramolecular distances became more compact, with probes flanking either the motif between C1 and C2 or the Pro/Ala-rich linker (PAL) between C0 and C1. Further insight was obtained from microsecond MD simulations, which revealed a large structural change in the disordered motif region in which phosphorylation unmasks the surface of a series of residues on a stable α-helix within the motif with high potential as a protein–protein interaction site. These experimental and computational findings elucidate structural transitions in the flexible and dynamic portions of cMyBP-C, providing previously unidentified molecular insight into the modulatory role of this protein in cardiac muscle contractility. PMID:26908877

  19. Site-directed spectroscopy of cardiac myosin-binding protein C reveals effects of phosphorylation on protein structural dynamics.

    PubMed

    Colson, Brett A; Thompson, Andrew R; Espinoza-Fonseca, L Michel; Thomas, David D

    2016-03-22

    We have used the site-directed spectroscopies of time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) and double electron-electron resonance (DEER), combined with complementary molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, to resolve the structure and dynamics of cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C), focusing on the N-terminal region. The results have implications for the role of this protein in myocardial contraction, with particular relevance to β-adrenergic signaling, heart failure, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. N-terminal cMyBP-C domains C0-C2 (C0C2) contain binding regions for potential interactions with both thick and thin filaments. Phosphorylation by PKA in the MyBP-C motif regulates these binding interactions. Our spectroscopic assays detect distances between pairs of site-directed probes on cMyBP-C. We engineered intramolecular pairs of labeling sites within cMyBP-C to measure, with high resolution, the distance and disorder in the protein's flexible regions using TR-FRET and DEER. Phosphorylation reduced the level of molecular disorder and the distribution of C0C2 intramolecular distances became more compact, with probes flanking either the motif between C1 and C2 or the Pro/Ala-rich linker (PAL) between C0 and C1. Further insight was obtained from microsecond MD simulations, which revealed a large structural change in the disordered motif region in which phosphorylation unmasks the surface of a series of residues on a stable α-helix within the motif with high potential as a protein-protein interaction site. These experimental and computational findings elucidate structural transitions in the flexible and dynamic portions of cMyBP-C, providing previously unidentified molecular insight into the modulatory role of this protein in cardiac muscle contractility.

  20. Examination of CRISPR/Cas9 design tools and the effect of target site accessibility on Cas9 activity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ciaran M; Davis, Timothy H; Bao, Gang

    2017-03-16

    The recent adaptation of the CRISPR/Cas9 system for targeted genome engineering has led to its widespread applications in many fields worldwide. In order to better understand the design rules of CRISPR/Cas9 systems, several groups have carried out large library-based screens leading to some insight into sequence preferences among highly active target sites. To facilitate CRISPR/Cas9 design these studies have spawned a plethora of gRNA design tools with algorithms based solely on direct or indirect sequence features. Here we demonstrate that the predictive power of these tools is poor, suggesting that sequence features alone cannot accurately inform the cutting efficiency of a particular CRISPR/Cas9 gRNA design. Furthermore we demonstrate that DNA target site accessibility influences the activity of CRISPR/Cas9. With further optimisation we hypothesise that it will be possible to increase the predictive power of gRNA design tools by including both sequence and target site accessibility metrics. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Spatial Dynamics and Expanded Vertical Niche of Blue Sharks in Oceanographic Fronts Reveal Habitat Targets for Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Queiroz, Nuno; Humphries, Nicolas E.; Noble, Leslie R.; Santos, António M.; Sims, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Dramatic population declines among species of pelagic shark as a result of overfishing have been reported, with some species now at a fraction of their historical biomass. Advanced telemetry techniques enable tracking of spatial dynamics and behaviour, providing fundamental information on habitat preferences of threatened species to aid conservation. We tracked movements of the highest pelagic fisheries by-catch species, the blue shark Prionace glauca, in the North-east Atlantic using pop-off satellite-linked archival tags to determine the degree of space use linked to habitat and to examine vertical niche. Overall, blue sharks moved south-west of tagging sites (English Channel; southern Portugal), exhibiting pronounced site fidelity correlated with localized productive frontal areas, with estimated space-use patterns being significantly different from that of random walks. Tracked female sharks displayed behavioural variability in diel depth preferences, both within and between individuals. Diel depth use ranged from normal DVM (nDVM; dawn descent, dusk ascent), to reverse DVM (rDVM; dawn ascent, dusk descent), to behavioural patterns where no diel differences were apparent. Results showed that blue sharks occupy some of the most productive marine zones for extended periods and structure diel activity patterns across multiple spatio-temporal scales in response to particular habitat types. In so doing, sharks occupied an extraordinarily broad vertical depth range for their size (1.0–2.0 m fork length), from the surface into the bathypelagic realm (max. dive depth, 1160 m). The space-use patterns of blue sharks indicated they spend much of the time in areas where pelagic longlining activities are often highest, and in depth zones where these fisheries particularly target other species, which could account for the rapid declines recently reported for blue sharks in many parts of the world's oceans. Our results provide habitat targets for blue shark conservation

  2. Spatial dynamics and expanded vertical niche of blue sharks in oceanographic fronts reveal habitat targets for conservation.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Nuno; Humphries, Nicolas E; Noble, Leslie R; Santos, António M; Sims, David W

    2012-01-01

    Dramatic population declines among species of pelagic shark as a result of overfishing have been reported, with some species now at a fraction of their historical biomass. Advanced telemetry techniques enable tracking of spatial dynamics and behaviour, providing fundamental information on habitat preferences of threatened species to aid conservation. We tracked movements of the highest pelagic fisheries by-catch species, the blue shark Prionace glauca, in the North-east Atlantic using pop-off satellite-linked archival tags to determine the degree of space use linked to habitat and to examine vertical niche. Overall, blue sharks moved south-west of tagging sites (English Channel; southern Portugal), exhibiting pronounced site fidelity correlated with localized productive frontal areas, with estimated space-use patterns being significantly different from that of random walks. Tracked female sharks displayed behavioural variability in diel depth preferences, both within and between individuals. Diel depth use ranged from normal DVM (nDVM; dawn descent, dusk ascent), to reverse DVM (rDVM; dawn ascent, dusk descent), to behavioural patterns where no diel differences were apparent. Results showed that blue sharks occupy some of the most productive marine zones for extended periods and structure diel activity patterns across multiple spatio-temporal scales in response to particular habitat types. In so doing, sharks occupied an extraordinarily broad vertical depth range for their size (1.0-2.0 m fork length), from the surface into the bathypelagic realm (max. dive depth, 1160 m). The space-use patterns of blue sharks indicated they spend much of the time in areas where pelagic longlining activities are often highest, and in depth zones where these fisheries particularly target other species, which could account for the rapid declines recently reported for blue sharks in many parts of the world's oceans. Our results provide habitat targets for blue shark conservation that

  3. Contact Bioassays with Phenoxybenzyl and Tetrafluorobenzyl Pyrethroids against Target-Site and Metabolic Resistant Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Horstmann, Sebastian; Sonneck, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Background Mosquito strains that exhibit increased tolerance to the chemical class of compounds with a sodium channel modulator mode of action (pyrethroids and pyrethrins) are typically described as “pyrethroid resistant”. Resistance to pyrethroids is an increasingly important challenge in the control of mosquito-borne diseases, such as malaria or dengue, because one of the main interventions (the distribution of large numbers of long-lasting insecticide-treated bed nets) currently relies entirely on long-lasting pyrethroids. Increasing tolerance of target insects against this class of insecticides lowers their impact in vector control. The current study suggests that the level of metabolic resistance depends on the structure of the molecule and that structurally different compounds may still be effective because detoxifying enzymes are unable to bind to these uncommon structures. Methods Treated surface contact bioassays were performed on susceptible Aedes aegypti, East African knockdown resistance (kdr) Anopheles gambiae (strain RSP-H) and metabolically resistant Anopheles funestus (strain FUMOZ-R) with different pyrethroids, such as cypermethrin, ß-cyfluthrin, deltamethrin, permethrin and transfluthrin (alone and in combination with the synergist piperonyl butoxide). The nonfluorinated form of transfluthrin was also assessed as a single agent and in combination with piperonyl butoxide. Results Although the dosages for pyrethroids containing a phenoxybenzyl moiety have exhibited differences in terms of effectiveness among the three tested mosquito species, the structurally different transfluthrin with a polyfluorobenzyl moiety remained active in mosquitoes with upregulated P450 levels. In trials with transfluthrin mixed with piperonyl butoxide, the added synergist exhibited no efficacy-enhancing effect. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that transfluthrin has the potential to control P450-mediated metabolically resistant mosquitoes because the

  4. Essential Genes for In Vitro Growth of the Endophyte Herbaspirillum seropedicae SmR1 as Revealed by Transposon Insertion Site Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Rosconi, Federico; de Vries, Stefan P W; Baig, Abiyad; Fabiano, Elena; Grant, Andrew J

    2016-11-15

    The interior of plants contains microorganisms (referred to as endophytes) that are distinct from those present at the root surface or in the surrounding soil. Herbaspirillum seropedicae strain SmR1, belonging to the betaproteobacteria, is an endophyte that colonizes crops, including rice, maize, sugarcane, and sorghum. Different approaches have revealed genes and pathways regulated during the interactions of H. seropedicae with its plant hosts. However, functional genomic analysis of transposon (Tn) mutants has been hampered by the lack of genetic tools. Here we successfully employed a combination of in vivo high-density mariner Tn mutagenesis and targeted Tn insertion site sequencing (Tn-seq) in H. seropedicae SmR1. The analysis of multiple gene-saturating Tn libraries revealed that 395 genes are essential for the growth of H. seropedicae SmR1 in tryptone-yeast extract medium. A comparative analysis with the Database of Essential Genes (DEG) showed that 25 genes are uniquely essential in H. seropedicae SmR1. The Tn mutagenesis protocol developed and the gene-saturating Tn libraries generated will facilitate elucidation of the genetic mechanisms of the H. seropedicae endophytic lifestyle.

  5. Interactions of calmodulin with metal ions and with its target proteins revealed by conformation-sensitive monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Wolf, T; Solomon, B; Ivnitski, D; Rishpon, J; Fleminger, G

    1998-01-01

    Two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) raised against bovine calmodulin (CaM), CAM1 and CAM4, enable one to monitor conformational changes that occur in the molecule. The interaction of CAM1 with CaM depends on the Ca2+ occupancy of its Ca(2+)-binding sites. CAM4, in contrast, interacts with CaM in a Ca(2+)-independent manner, interacting with both holoCaM and EGTA-treated CaM to a similar extent. Their interaction with various CaMs, CaM tryptic fragments and chemically modified CaM, as well as molecular graphics, led to identification of the CAM1 and CAM4 epitopes on the C- and N-terminal lobes of CAM respectively. The two mAbs were used as macromolecular probes to detect conformational changes occurring in the CaM molecule upon binding of metal ions and target proteins and peptides. MAb CAM1 successfully detected changes associated with Al3+ binding even in the presence of Ca2+, indicating that Al3+ and Ca2+ ions may bind to the protein simultaneously, leading to a new conformation of the molecule. MAbs CAM1 and CAM4 were used to follow the interactions of CaM with its target peptides and proteins. Complexes with melittin, mastoparan, calcineurin and phosphodiesterase showed different immunological properties on an immuno-enzyme electrode, indicating unique structural properties for each complex.

  6. MiRNA-Target Interaction Reveals Cell-Specific Post-Transcriptional Regulation in Mammalian Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Varun; Naqvi, Afsar Raza; Uttamani, Juhi Raju; Nares, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs are 18–22 nucleotides long, non-coding RNAs that bind transcripts with complementary sequences leading to either mRNA degradation or translational suppression. However, the inherent differences in preferred mode of miRNA regulation among cells of different origin have not been examined. In our previous transcriptome profiling studies, we observed that post-transcriptional regulation can differ substantially depending on the cell in context. Here we examined mechanistic differences in the regulation of a let-7a targeted (wild type) or resistant (mutant) engineered renilla transcript across various mammalian cell lines of diverse origin. Dual luciferase assays show that compared to mutant (mut), the reporter gene containing wild type (wt) let-7a binding sites was efficiently suppressed upon transfection in various cell lines. Importantly, the strength of miRNA regulation varied across the cell lines. Total RNA analysis demonstrates that wt renilla mRNA was expressed to similar or higher levels compared to mut suggesting that translation repression is a predominant mode of miRNA regulation. Nonetheless, transcript degradation was observed in some cell lines. Ago-2 immunoprecipitation show that miRNA repressed renilla mRNA are associated with functional mi-RISC (miRNA-RNA induced silencing complex). Given the immense potential of miRNA as a therapeutic option, these findings highlight the necessity to thoroughly examine the mode of mRNA regulation in order to achieve the beneficial effects in targeting cells. PMID:26761000

  7. Novel structure--function information on biogenic amine transporters revealed by site-directed mutagenesis and alkylation.

    PubMed

    Reith, Maarten E A

    2013-07-01

    The study reported by Wenge and Bönisch in this issue provides critical structural information regarding extracellular loop 2 (EL2) of the human norepinephrine transporter (NET). A systematic search among all 10 cysteine and 13 histidine residues in NET led to His222 in EL2 as the target for N-ethylmaleimide: its alkylation interferes with [(3)H]nisoxetine binding, indicating the part of EL2 containing His 222 reaches back into the protein interior where it prevents access by nisoxetine to its binding site. Thus, EL2 in human NET does much more than conformationally assisting substrate translocation. The present study underscores the importance of site-directed mutagenesis approaches to elucidate structural features that cannot be deduced from crystals of homolog proteins. In the case of NET, the closest crystal structure is that of the homolog LeuT, but EL2 is difficult to align with 22 less loop residues in LeuT than in NET. The present results could only be achieved by the systematic mutagenesis study of all cysteines and all histidines in NET.

  8. New "persona" concept helps site designers cater to target user segments' needs.

    PubMed

    2004-09-01

    Using the relatively new "persona" design concept, Web strategists create a set of archetypical user characters, each one representing one of their site's primary audiences. Then, as their site is constructed or upgraded, they champion the personas, arguing on their behalf and forcing the design team to take each audience's needs and wants into account.

  9. Preparation of recombinant thioredoxin fused N-terminal proCNP: Analysis of enterokinase cleavage products reveals new enterokinase cleavage sites.

    PubMed

    Liew, Oi Wah; Ching Chong, Jenny Pek; Yandle, Tim G; Brennan, Stephen O

    2005-06-01

    C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) acts as a paracrine hormone to dilate blood vessels and is also required for the growth of long bones. In vivo, CNP is produced by cleavage from the C-terminal end of a larger proCNP peptide. The remaining N-terminal proCNP fragment (NT-proCNP) escapes into the circulation where its concentration is much higher than that of CNP due presumably to a lower clearance rate. Our strategy to obtain large quantities of pure NT-proCNP for further physiological investigations was to express it as a fusion protein with His(6)-tagged thioredoxin followed by cleavage using enterokinase to yield NT-proCNP alone. We have successfully designed and artificially synthesized the coding sequence specifying both mouse and human NT-proCNP with built-in codon bias towards Escherichia coli codon preference. An enterokinase recognition sequence was incorporated immediately upstream of the NT-proCNP coding sequence to allow the fusion protein to be cleaved without leaving any extra residues on the NT-proCNP peptide. High levels of fusion proteins were obtained, constituting 50-58% of total bacterial proteins. Greater than 90% of recombinant thioredoxin/NT-proCNP was expressed in the soluble form and purified to near homogeneity in a single chromatographic step using nickel as the metal ion in IMAC. A time course analysis of the products released from enterokinase cleavage of the recombinant proteins by ESI-MS revealed three sensitive secondary cleavage sites: two were located on vector-associated sequences linking the thioredoxin moiety and NT-proCNP, and one at the C-terminal end of NT-proCNP. Clearly, substrate specificity of both the native and recombinant forms of enterokinase for the recognition sequence DDDDK was by no means exclusive. Hydrolysis at the unexpected LKGDR site located towards the carboxyl end on NT-proCNP was significantly more efficient than at the internally sited DDDDK target sequence. However, when this same sequence was sited

  10. Comprehensive profiling of retroviral integration sites using target enrichment methods from historical koala samples without an assembled reference genome.

    PubMed

    Cui, Pin; Löber, Ulrike; Alquezar-Planas, David E; Ishida, Yasuko; Courtiol, Alexandre; Timms, Peter; Johnson, Rebecca N; Lenz, Dorina; Helgen, Kristofer M; Roca, Alfred L; Hartman, Stefanie; Greenwood, Alex D

    2016-01-01

    Background. Retroviral integration into the host germline results in permanent viral colonization of vertebrate genomes. The koala retrovirus (KoRV) is currently invading the germline of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) and provides a unique opportunity for studying retroviral endogenization. Previous analysis of KoRV integration patterns in modern koalas demonstrate that they share integration sites primarily if they are related, indicating that the process is currently driven by vertical transmission rather than infection. However, due to methodological challenges, KoRV integrations have not been comprehensively characterized. Results. To overcome these challenges, we applied and compared three target enrichment techniques coupled with next generation sequencing (NGS) and a newly customized sequence-clustering based computational pipeline to determine the integration sites for 10 museum Queensland and New South Wales (NSW) koala samples collected between the 1870s and late 1980s. A secondary aim of this study sought to identify common integration sites across modern and historical specimens by comparing our dataset to previously published studies. Several million sequences were processed, and the KoRV integration sites in each koala were characterized. Conclusions. Although the three enrichment methods each exhibited bias in integration site retrieval, a combination of two methods, Primer Extension Capture and hybridization capture is recommended for future studies on historical samples. Moreover, identification of integration sites shows that the proportion of integration sites shared between any two koalas is quite small.

  11. Comprehensive profiling of retroviral integration sites using target enrichment methods from historical koala samples without an assembled reference genome

    PubMed Central

    Alquezar-Planas, David E.; Ishida, Yasuko; Courtiol, Alexandre; Timms, Peter; Johnson, Rebecca N.; Lenz, Dorina; Helgen, Kristofer M.; Roca, Alfred L.; Hartman, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    Background. Retroviral integration into the host germline results in permanent viral colonization of vertebrate genomes. The koala retrovirus (KoRV) is currently invading the germline of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) and provides a unique opportunity for studying retroviral endogenization. Previous analysis of KoRV integration patterns in modern koalas demonstrate that they share integration sites primarily if they are related, indicating that the process is currently driven by vertical transmission rather than infection. However, due to methodological challenges, KoRV integrations have not been comprehensively characterized. Results. To overcome these challenges, we applied and compared three target enrichment techniques coupled with next generation sequencing (NGS) and a newly customized sequence-clustering based computational pipeline to determine the integration sites for 10 museum Queensland and New South Wales (NSW) koala samples collected between the 1870s and late 1980s. A secondary aim of this study sought to identify common integration sites across modern and historical specimens by comparing our dataset to previously published studies. Several million sequences were processed, and the KoRV integration sites in each koala were characterized. Conclusions. Although the three enrichment methods each exhibited bias in integration site retrieval, a combination of two methods, Primer Extension Capture and hybridization capture is recommended for future studies on historical samples. Moreover, identification of integration sites shows that the proportion of integration sites shared between any two koalas is quite small. PMID:27069793

  12. Integrated Genomic Characterization Reveals Novel, Therapeutically Relevant Drug Targets in FGFR and EGFR Pathways in Sporadic Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Winnie S.; Fonseca, Rafael; Bryce, Alan H.; McCullough, Ann E.; Barrett, Michael T.; Hunt, Katherine; Patel, Maitray D.; Young, Scott W.; Collins, Joseph M.; Silva, Alvin C.; Condjella, Rachel M.; Block, Matthew; McWilliams, Robert R.; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.; Klee, Eric W.; Bible, Keith C.; Harris, Pamela; Oliver, Gavin R.; Bhavsar, Jaysheel D.; Nair, Asha A.; Middha, Sumit; Asmann, Yan; Kocher, Jean-Pierre; Schahl, Kimberly; Kipp, Benjamin R.; Barr Fritcher, Emily G.; Baker, Angela; Aldrich, Jessica; Kurdoglu, Ahmet; Izatt, Tyler; Christoforides, Alexis; Cherni, Irene; Nasser, Sara; Reiman, Rebecca; Phillips, Lori; McDonald, Jackie; Adkins, Jonathan; Mastrian, Stephen D.; Placek, Pamela; Watanabe, Aprill T.; LoBello, Janine; Han, Haiyong; Von Hoff, Daniel; Craig, David W.; Stewart, A. Keith; Carpten, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Advanced cholangiocarcinoma continues to harbor a difficult prognosis and therapeutic options have been limited. During the course of a clinical trial of whole genomic sequencing seeking druggable targets, we examined six patients with advanced cholangiocarcinoma. Integrated genome-wide and whole transcriptome sequence analyses were performed on tumors from six patients with advanced, sporadic intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (SIC) to identify potential therapeutically actionable events. Among the somatic events captured in our analysis, we uncovered two novel therapeutically relevant genomic contexts that when acted upon, resulted in preliminary evidence of anti-tumor activity. Genome-wide structural analysis of sequence data revealed recurrent translocation events involving the FGFR2 locus in three of six assessed patients. These observations and supporting evidence triggered the use of FGFR inhibitors in these patients. In one example, preliminary anti-tumor activity of pazopanib (in vitro FGFR2 IC50≈350 nM) was noted in a patient with an FGFR2-TACC3 fusion. After progression on pazopanib, the same patient also had stable disease on ponatinib, a pan-FGFR inhibitor (in vitro, FGFR2 IC50≈8 nM). In an independent non-FGFR2 translocation patient, exome and transcriptome analysis revealed an allele specific somatic nonsense mutation (E384X) in ERRFI1, a direct negative regulator of EGFR activation. Rapid and robust disease regression was noted in this ERRFI1 inactivated tumor when treated with erlotinib, an EGFR kinase inhibitor. FGFR2 fusions and ERRFI mutations may represent novel targets in sporadic intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and trials should be characterized in larger cohorts of patients with these aberrations. PMID:24550739

  13. Integrated genomic characterization reveals novel, therapeutically relevant drug targets in FGFR and EGFR pathways in sporadic intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Borad, Mitesh J; Champion, Mia D; Egan, Jan B; Liang, Winnie S; Fonseca, Rafael; Bryce, Alan H; McCullough, Ann E; Barrett, Michael T; Hunt, Katherine; Patel, Maitray D; Young, Scott W; Collins, Joseph M; Silva, Alvin C; Condjella, Rachel M; Block, Matthew; McWilliams, Robert R; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N; Klee, Eric W; Bible, Keith C; Harris, Pamela; Oliver, Gavin R; Bhavsar, Jaysheel D; Nair, Asha A; Middha, Sumit; Asmann, Yan; Kocher, Jean-Pierre; Schahl, Kimberly; Kipp, Benjamin R; Barr Fritcher, Emily G; Baker, Angela; Aldrich, Jessica; Kurdoglu, Ahmet; Izatt, Tyler; Christoforides, Alexis; Cherni, Irene; Nasser, Sara; Reiman, Rebecca; Phillips, Lori; McDonald, Jackie; Adkins, Jonathan; Mastrian, Stephen D; Placek, Pamela; Watanabe, Aprill T; Lobello, Janine; Han, Haiyong; Von Hoff, Daniel; Craig, David W; Stewart, A Keith; Carpten, John D

    2014-02-01

    Advanced cholangiocarcinoma continues to harbor a difficult prognosis and therapeutic options have been limited. During the course of a clinical trial of whole genomic sequencing seeking druggable targets, we examined six patients with advanced cholangiocarcinoma. Integrated genome-wide and whole transcriptome sequence analyses were performed on tumors from six patients with advanced, sporadic intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (SIC) to identify potential therapeutically actionable events. Among the somatic events captured in our analysis, we uncovered two novel therapeutically relevant genomic contexts that when acted upon, resulted in preliminary evidence of anti-tumor activity. Genome-wide structural analysis of sequence data revealed recurrent translocation events involving the FGFR2 locus in three of six assessed patients. These observations and supporting evidence triggered the use of FGFR inhibitors in these patients. In one example, preliminary anti-tumor activity of pazopanib (in vitro FGFR2 IC50≈350 nM) was noted in a patient with an FGFR2-TACC3 fusion. After progression on pazopanib, the same patient also had stable disease on ponatinib, a pan-FGFR inhibitor (in vitro, FGFR2 IC50≈8 nM). In an independent non-FGFR2 translocation patient, exome and transcriptome analysis revealed an allele specific somatic nonsense mutation (E384X) in ERRFI1, a direct negative regulator of EGFR activation. Rapid and robust disease regression was noted in this ERRFI1 inactivated tumor when treated with erlotinib, an EGFR kinase inhibitor. FGFR2 fusions and ERRFI mutations may represent novel targets in sporadic intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and trials should be characterized in larger cohorts of patients with these aberrations.

  14. Striking Plasticity of CRISPR-Cas9 and Key Role of Non-target DNA, as Revealed by Molecular Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-Cas9 system recently emerged as a transformative genome-editing technology that is innovating basic bioscience and applied medicine and biotechnology. The endonuclease Cas9 associates with a guide RNA to match and cleave complementary sequences in double stranded DNA, forming an RNA:DNA hybrid and a displaced non-target DNA strand. Although extensive structural studies are ongoing, the conformational dynamics of Cas9 and its interplay with the nucleic acids during association and DNA cleavage are largely unclear. Here, by employing multi-microsecond time scale molecular dynamics, we reveal the conformational plasticity of Cas9 and identify key determinants that allow its large-scale conformational changes during nucleic acid binding and processing. We show how the “closure” of the protein, which accompanies nucleic acid binding, fundamentally relies on highly coupled and specific motions of the protein domains, collectively initiating the prominent conformational changes needed for nucleic acid association. We further reveal a key role of the non-target DNA during the process of activation of the nuclease HNH domain, showing how the nontarget DNA positioning triggers local conformational changes that favor the formation of a catalytically competent Cas9. Finally, a remarkable conformational plasticity is identified as an intrinsic property of the HNH domain, constituting a necessary element that allows for the HNH repositioning. These novel findings constitute a reference for future experimental studies aimed at a full characterization of the dynamic features of the CRISPR-Cas9 system, and—more importantly—call for novel structure engineering efforts that are of fundamental importance for the rational design of new genome-engineering applications. PMID:27800559

  15. A targetable fluorescent sensor reveals that copper-deficient SCO1 and SCO2 patient cells prioritize mitochondrial copper homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Dodani, Sheel C; Leary, Scot C; Cobine, Paul A; Winge, Dennis R; Chang, Christopher J

    2011-06-08

    We present the design, synthesis, spectroscopy, and biological applications of Mitochondrial Coppersensor-1 (Mito-CS1), a new type of targetable fluorescent sensor for imaging exchangeable mitochondrial copper pools in living cells. Mito-CS1 is a bifunctional reporter that combines a Cu(+)-responsive fluorescent platform with a mitochondrial-targeting triphenylphosphonium moiety for localizing the probe to this organelle. Molecular imaging with Mito-CS1 establishes that this new chemical tool can detect changes in labile mitochondrial Cu(+) in a model HEK 293T cell line as well as in human fibroblasts. Moreover, we utilized Mito-CS1 in a combined imaging and biochemical study in fibroblasts derived from patients with mutations in the two synthesis of cytochrome c oxidase 1 and 2 proteins (SCO1 and SCO2), each of which is required for assembly and metalation of functionally active cytochrome c oxidase (COX). Interestingly, we observe that although defects in these mitochondrial metallochaperones lead to a global copper deficiency at the whole cell level, total copper and exchangeable mitochondrial Cu(+) pools in SCO1 and SCO2 patient fibroblasts are largely unaltered relative to wild-type controls. Our findings reveal that the cell maintains copper homeostasis in mitochondria even in situations of copper deficiency and mitochondrial metallochaperone malfunction, illustrating the importance of regulating copper stores in this energy-producing organelle.

  16. sgRNAcas9: a software package for designing CRISPR sgRNA and evaluating potential off-target cleavage sites.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shengsong; Shen, Bin; Zhang, Chaobao; Huang, Xingxu; Zhang, Yonglian

    2014-01-01

    Although the CRISPR/Cas9/sgRNA system efficiently cleaves intracellular DNA at desired target sites, major concerns remain on potential "off-target" cleavage that may occur throughout the whole genome. In order to improve CRISPR-Cas9 specificity for targeted genome editing and transcriptional control, we describe a bioinformatics tool "sgRNAcas9", which is a software package developed for fast design of CRISPR sgRNA with minimized off-target effects. This package consists of programs to perform a search for CRISPR target sites (protospacers) with user-defined parameters, predict genome-wide Cas9 potential off-target cleavage sites (POT), classify the POT into three categories, batch-design oligonucleotides for constructing 20-nt (nucleotides) or truncated sgRNA expression vectors, extract desired length nucleotide sequences flanking the on- or off-target cleavage sites for designing PCR primer pairs to validate the mutations by T7E1 cleavage assay. Importantly, by identifying potential off-target sites in silico, the sgRNAcas9 allows the selection of more specific target sites and aids the identification of bona fide off-target sites, significantly facilitating the design of sgRNA for genome editing applications. sgRNAcas9 software package is publicly available at BiooTools website (www.biootools.com) under the terms of the GNU General Public License.

  17. Targeted Capture Sequencing in Whitebark Pine Reveals Range-Wide Demographic and Adaptive Patterns Despite Challenges of a Large, Repetitive Genome

    PubMed Central

    Syring, John V.; Tennessen, Jacob A.; Jennings, Tara N.; Wegrzyn, Jill; Scelfo-Dalbey, Camille; Cronn, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) inhabits an expansive range in western North America, and it is a keystone species of subalpine environments. Whitebark is susceptible to multiple threats – climate change, white pine blister rust, mountain pine beetle, and fire exclusion – and it is suffering significant mortality range-wide, prompting the tree to be listed as ‘globally endangered’ by the International Union for Conservation of Nature and ‘endangered’ by the Canadian government. Conservation collections (in situ and ex situ) are being initiated to preserve the genetic legacy of the species. Reliable, transferrable, and highly variable genetic markers are essential for quantifying the genetic profiles of seed collections relative to natural stands, and ensuring the completeness of conservation collections. We evaluated the use of hybridization-based target capture to enrich specific genomic regions from the 27 GB genome of whitebark pine, and to evaluate genetic variation across loci, trees, and geography. Probes were designed to capture 7,849 distinct genes, and screening was performed on 48 trees. Despite the inclusion of repetitive elements in the probe pool, the resulting dataset provided information on 4,452 genes and 32% of targeted positions (528,873 bp), and we were able to identify 12,390 segregating sites from 47 trees. Variations reveal strong geographic trends in heterozygosity and allelic richness, with trees from the southern Cascade and Sierra Range showing the greatest distinctiveness and differentiation. Our results show that even under non-optimal conditions (low enrichment efficiency; inclusion of repetitive elements in baits), targeted enrichment produces high quality, codominant genotypes from large genomes. The resulting data can be readily integrated into management and gene conservation activities for whitebark pine, and have the potential to be applied to other members of 5-needle pine group (Pinus subsect. Quinquefolia) due to

  18. Targeted Capture Sequencing in Whitebark Pine Reveals Range-Wide Demographic and Adaptive Patterns Despite Challenges of a Large, Repetitive Genome.

    PubMed

    Syring, John V; Tennessen, Jacob A; Jennings, Tara N; Wegrzyn, Jill; Scelfo-Dalbey, Camille; Cronn, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) inhabits an expansive range in western North America, and it is a keystone species of subalpine environments. Whitebark is susceptible to multiple threats - climate change, white pine blister rust, mountain pine beetle, and fire exclusion - and it is suffering significant mortality range-wide, prompting the tree to be listed as 'globally endangered' by the International Union for Conservation of Nature and 'endangered' by the Canadian government. Conservation collections (in situ and ex situ) are being initiated to preserve the genetic legacy of the species. Reliable, transferrable, and highly variable genetic markers are essential for quantifying the genetic profiles of seed collections relative to natural stands, and ensuring the completeness of conservation collections. We evaluated the use of hybridization-based target capture to enrich specific genomic regions from the 27 GB genome of whitebark pine, and to evaluate genetic variation across loci, trees, and geography. Probes were designed to capture 7,849 distinct genes, and screening was performed on 48 trees. Despite the inclusion of repetitive elements in the probe pool, the resulting dataset provided information on 4,452 genes and 32% of targeted positions (528,873 bp), and we were able to identify 12,390 segregating sites from 47 trees. Variations reveal strong geographic trends in heterozygosity and allelic richness, with trees from the southern Cascade and Sierra Range showing the greatest distinctiveness and differentiation. Our results show that even under non-optimal conditions (low enrichment efficiency; inclusion of repetitive elements in baits), targeted enrichment produces high quality, codominant genotypes from large genomes. The resulting data can be readily integrated into management and gene conservation activities for whitebark pine, and have the potential to be applied to other members of 5-needle pine group (Pinus subsect. Quinquefolia) due to their

  19. Genome-wide identification of polycomb target genes reveals a functional association of Pho with Scm in Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiqing; Cheng, Daojun; Mon, Hiroaki; Tatsuke, Tsuneyuki; Zhu, Li; Xu, Jian; Lee, Jae Man; Xia, Qingyou; Kusakabe, Takahiro

    2012-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are evolutionarily conserved chromatin modifiers and act together in three multimeric complexes, Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1), Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), and Pleiohomeotic repressive complex (PhoRC), to repress transcription of the target genes. Here, we identified Polycomb target genes in Bombyx mori with holocentric centromere using genome-wide expression screening based on the knockdown of BmSCE, BmESC, BmPHO, or BmSCM gene, which represent the distinct complexes. As a result, the expressions of 29 genes were up-regulated after knocking down 4 PcG genes. Particularly, there is a significant overlap between targets of BmPho (331 out of 524) and BmScm (331 out of 532), and among these, 190 genes function as regulator factors playing important roles in development. We also found that BmPho, as well as BmScm, can interact with other Polycomb components examined in this study. Further detailed analysis revealed that the C-terminus of BmPho containing zinc finger domain is involved in the interaction between BmPho and BmScm. Moreover, the zinc finger domain in BmPho contributes to its inhibitory function and ectopic overexpression of BmScm is able to promote transcriptional repression by Gal4-Pho fusions including BmScm-interacting domain. Loss of BmPho expression causes relocalization of BmScm into the cytoplasm. Collectively, we provide evidence of a functional link between BmPho and BmScm, and propose two Polycomb-related repression mechanisms requiring only BmPho associated with BmScm or a whole set of PcG complexes.

  20. Random Tagging Genotyping by Sequencing (rtGBS), an Unbiased Approach to Locate Restriction Enzyme Sites across the Target Genome

    PubMed Central

    Hilario, Elena; Barron, Lorna; Deng, Cecilia H.; Datson, Paul M.; Davy, Marcus W.; Storey, Roy D.

    2015-01-01

    Genotyping by sequencing (GBS) is a restriction enzyme based targeted approach developed to reduce the genome complexity and discover genetic markers when a priori sequence information is unavailable. Sufficient coverage at each locus is essential to distinguish heterozygous from homozygous sites accurately. The number of GBS samples able to be pooled in one sequencing lane is limited by the number of restriction sites present in the genome and the read depth required at each site per sample for accurate calling of single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Loci bias was observed using a slight modification of the Elshire et al. method: some restriction enzyme sites were represented in higher proportions while others were poorly represented or absent. This bias could be due to the quality of genomic DNA, the endonuclease and ligase reaction efficiency, the distance between restriction sites, the preferential amplification of small library restriction fragments, or bias towards cluster formation of small amplicons during the sequencing process. To overcome these issues, we have developed a GBS method based on randomly tagging genomic DNA (rtGBS). By randomly landing on the genome, we can, with less bias, find restriction sites that are far apart, and undetected by the standard GBS (stdGBS) method. The study comprises two types of biological replicates: six different kiwifruit plants and two independent DNA extractions per plant; and three types of technical replicates: four samples of each DNA extraction, stdGBS vs. rtGBS methods, and two independent library amplifications, each sequenced in separate lanes. A statistically significant unbiased distribution of restriction fragment size by rtGBS showed that this method targeted 49% (39,145) of BamH I sites shared with the reference genome, compared to only 14% (11,513) by stdGBS. PMID:26633193

  1. Structure of the Acinetobacter baumannii Dithiol Oxidase DsbA Bound to Elongation Factor EF-Tu Reveals a Novel Protein Interaction Site

    PubMed Central

    Premkumar, Lakshmanane; Kurth, Fabian; Duprez, Wilko; Grøftehauge, Morten K.; King, Gordon J.; Halili, Maria A.; Heras, Begoña; Martin, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    The multidrug resistant bacterium Acinetobacter baumannii is a significant cause of nosocomial infection. Biofilm formation, that requires both disulfide bond forming and chaperone-usher pathways, is a major virulence trait in this bacterium. Our biochemical characterizations show that the periplasmic A. baumannii DsbA (AbDsbA) enzyme has an oxidizing redox potential and dithiol oxidase activity. We found an unexpected non-covalent interaction between AbDsbA and the highly conserved prokaryotic elongation factor, EF-Tu. EF-Tu is a cytoplasmic protein but has been localized extracellularly in many bacterial pathogens. The crystal structure of this complex revealed that the EF-Tu switch I region binds to the non-catalytic surface of AbDsbA. Although the physiological and pathological significance of a DsbA/EF-Tu association is unknown, peptides derived from the EF-Tu switch I region bound to AbDsbA with submicromolar affinity. We also identified a seven-residue DsbB-derived peptide that bound to AbDsbA with low micromolar affinity. Further characterization confirmed that the EF-Tu- and DsbB-derived peptides bind at two distinct sites. These data point to the possibility that the non-catalytic surface of DsbA is a potential substrate or regulatory protein interaction site. The two peptides identified in this work together with the newly characterized interaction site provide a novel starting point for inhibitor design targeting AbDsbA. PMID:24860094

  2. Ancient DNA analyses of early archaeological sites in New Zealand reveal extreme exploitation of moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes) at all life stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskam, Charlotte L.; Allentoft, Morten E.; Walter, Richard; Scofield, R. Paul; Haile, James; Holdaway, Richard N.; Bunce, Michael; Jacomb, Chris

    2012-10-01

    The human colonisation of New Zealand in the late thirteenth century AD led to catastrophic impacts on the local biota and is among the most compelling examples of human over-exploitation of native fauna, including megafauna. Nearly half of the species in New Zealand' s pre-human avifauna are now extinct, including all nine species of large, flightless moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes). The abundance of moa in early archaeological sites demonstrates the significance of these megaherbivores in the diet of the first New Zealanders. Combining moa assemblage data, based on DNA identification of eggshell and bone, with morphological identification of bone (literature and museum catalogued specimens), we present the most comprehensive audit of moa to date from several significant 13th-15th century AD archaeological deposits across the east coast of the South Island. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was amplified from 251 of 323 (78%) eggshell fragments and 22 of 27 (88%) bone samples, and the analyses revealed the presence of four moa species: Anomalopteryx didiformis; Dinornis robustus; Emeus crassus and Euryapteryx curtus. The mtDNA, along with polymorphic microsatellite markers, enabled an estimate of the minimum number of individual eggs consumed at each site. Remarkably, in one deposit over 50 individual eggs were identified - a number that likely represents a considerable proportion of the total reproductive output of moa in the area and emphasises that human predation of all life stages of moa was intense. Molecular sexing was conducted on bones (n = 11). Contrary to previous ancient DNA studies from natural sites that consistently report an excess of female moa, we observed an excess of males (2.7:1), suggestive that males were preferential targets. This could be related to different behaviour between the two highly size-dimorphic sexes in moa. Lastly, we investigated the moa species from recovered skeletal and eggshell remains from seven Wairau Bar burials, and identified

  3. Identification of Host-Chromosome Binding Sites and Candidate Gene Targets for Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus LANA

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Fang; Tsai, Kevin; Chen, Horng-Shen; Wikramasinghe, Priyankara; Davuluri, Ramana V.; Showe, Louise; Domsic, John; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2012-01-01

    LANA is essential for tethering the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) genome to metaphase chromosomes and for modulating host-cell gene expression, but the binding sites in the host-chromosome remain unknown. Here, we use LANA-specific chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-Seq) to identify LANA binding sites in the viral and host-cell genomes of a latently infected pleural effusion lymphoma cell line BCBL1. LANA bound with high occupancy to the KSHV genome terminal repeats (TR) and to a few minor binding sites in the KSHV genome, including the LANA promoter region. We identified 256 putative LANA binding site peaks with P < 0.01 and overlap in two independent ChIP-Seq experiments. We validated several of the high-occupancy binding sites by conventional ChIP assays and quantitative PCR. Candidate cellular LANA binding motifs were identified and assayed for binding to purified recombinant LANA protein in vitro but bound with low affinity compared to the viral TR binding site. More than half of the LANA binding sites (170/256) could be mapped to within 2.5 kb of a cellular gene transcript. Pathways and Gene Ontogeny (GO) analysis revealed that LANA binds to genes within the p53 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) regulatory network. Further analysis revealed partial overlap of LANA and STAT1 binding sites in several gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-regulated genes. We show that ectopic expression of LANA can downmodulate IFN-γ-mediated activation of a subset of genes, including the TAP1 peptide transporter and proteasome subunit beta type 9 (PSMB9), both of which are required for class I antigen presentation. Our data provide a potential mechanism through which LANA may regulate several host cell pathways by direct binding to gene regulatory elements. PMID:22419807

  4. Variability of ribosomal DNA sites in Festuca pratensis, Lolium perenne, and their intergeneric hybrids, revealed by FISH and GISH.

    PubMed

    Ksiazczyk, T; Taciak, M; Zwierzykowski, Z

    2010-01-01

    This study focuses on the variability of chromosomal location and number of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sites in some diploid and autotetraploid Festuca pratensis and Lolium perenne cultivars, as well as on identification of rDNA-bearing chromosomes in their triploid and tetraploid F. pratensis × L. perenne hybrids. The rDNA loci were mapped using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 5S and 25S rDNA probes, and the origin of parental genomes was verified by genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) with L. perenne genomic DNA as a probe, and F. pratensis genomic DNA as a block. FISH detected variation in the number and chromosomal location of both 5S and 45S rDNA sites. In F. pratensis mostly additional signals of 5S rDNA loci occurred, as compared with standard F. pratensis karyotypes. Losses of 45S rDNA loci were more frequent in L. perenne cultivars and intergeneric hybrids. Comparison of the F. pratensis and L. perenne genomes approved a higher number of rDNA sites as well as variation in chromosomal rDNA location in L. perenne. A greater instability of F. pratensis-genome-like and L. perenne-genome-like chromosomes in tetraploid hybrids was revealed, indicating gains and losses of rDNA loci, respectively. Our data indicate that the rDNA loci physically mapped on chromosomes 2 and 3 in F. pratensis and on chromosome 3 in L. perenne are useful markers for these chromosomes in intergeneric Festuca × Lolium hybrids.

  5. Site-directed spin labeling reveals a conformational switch in the phosphorylation domain of smooth muscle myosin.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Wendy D; Blakely, Sarah E; Nesmelov, Yuri E; Thomas, David D

    2005-03-15

    We have used site-directed spin labeling and EPR spectroscopy to detect structural changes within the regulatory light chain (RLC) of smooth muscle myosin upon phosphorylation. Smooth muscle contraction is activated by phosphorylation of S19 on RLC, but the structural basis of this process is unknown. There is no crystal structure containing a phosphorylated RLC, and there is no crystal structure for the N-terminal region of any RLC. Therefore, we have prepared single-Cys mutations throughout RLC, exchanged each mutant onto smooth muscle heavy meromyosin, verified normal regulatory function, and used EPR to determine dynamics and solvent accessibility at each site. A survey of spin-label sites throughout the RLC revealed that only the N-terminal region (first 24 aa) shows a significant change in dynamics upon phosphorylation, with most of the first 17 residues showing an increase in rotational amplitude. Therefore, we focused on this N-terminal region. Additional structural information was obtained from the pattern of oxygen accessibility along the sequence. In the absence of phosphorylation, little or no periodicity was observed, suggesting a lack of secondary structural order in this region. However, phosphorylation induced a strong helical pattern (3.6-residue periodicity) in the first 17 residues, while increasing accessibility throughout the first 24 residues. We have identified a domain within RLC, the N-terminal phosphorylation domain, in which phosphorylation increases helical order, internal dynamics, and accessibility. These results support a model in which this disorder-to-order transition within the phosphorylation domain results in decreased head-head interactions, activating myosin in smooth muscle.

  6. [Measurement and data analysis of drug concentrations at the target site--potentials, limitations and fields of application].

    PubMed

    Schäftlein, André; el Talia, Maurice; Kloft, Charlotte

    2013-04-01

    Drug measurements in the blood are only surrogates for drug concentrations in peripheral tissues, which often represent the target sites of the drug. Due to drug specific and physiological characteristics, however, blood and target site concentrations may differ. For this reason, methods to measure drug concentrations at the target site have been developed during the last years. During the last decade, microdialysis has become the method of choice for the continuous study of unbound tissue concentrations of drugs. In order to fully exploit these measurements to quantify the concentration-time profile of the investigated drug, different tools of data analysis can be applied. The aim is to contribute to decision-making in selecting the optimal dose 1) for dosing schedules during the development program of new drugs and 2) for therapeutic usage for physicians and pharmacists. For these aims, the so called ,,nonlinear mixed effect (NLME) modelling approach" presents the method of choice as it determines the typical concentration-time profile of a drug as well as the variability within the investigated study population. Additionally, between-patient variability can be explained by patient-specific characteristics e.g. weight enabling dose individualisation within the whole investigated population. A systematic literature research in Pubmed for the use of antiinfectives in humans shows that the preferable methods of measuring concentrations at the target site (microdialysis) and data analysis (NLME) have rarely been used simultaneously. Hence, in future the benefit of linking both methods of choice should be further exploited in order to improve knowledge gain, to optimise antiinfective dosing regimens and to increase medication safety.

  7. Structure of an N276-Dependent HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibody Targeting a Rare V5 Glycan Hole Adjacent to the CD4 Binding Site

    SciTech Connect

    Wibmer, Constantinos Kurt; Gorman, Jason; Anthony, Colin S.; Mkhize, Nonhlanhla N.; Druz, Aliaksandr; York, Talita; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Labuschagne, Phillip; Louder, Mark K.; Bailer, Robert T.; Abdool Karim, Salim S.; Mascola, John R.; Williamson, Carolyn; Moore, Penny L.; Kwong, Peter D.; Morris, Lynn; Kirchhoff, F.

    2016-08-31

    ABSTRACT

    All HIV-1-infected individuals develop strain-specific neutralizing antibodies to their infecting virus, which in some cases mature into broadly neutralizing antibodies. Defining the epitopes of strain-specific antibodies that overlap conserved sites of vulnerability might provide mechanistic insights into how broadly neutralizing antibodies arise. We previously described an HIV-1 clade C-infected donor, CAP257, who developed broadly neutralizing plasma antibodies targeting an N276 glycan-dependent epitope in the CD4 binding site. The initial CD4 binding site response potently neutralized the heterologous tier 2 clade B viral strain RHPA, which was used to design resurfaced gp120 antigens for single-B-cell sorting. Here we report the isolation and structural characterization of CAP257-RH1, an N276 glycan-dependent CD4 binding site antibody representative of the early CD4 binding site plasma response in donor CAP257. The cocrystal structure of CAP257-RH1 bound to RHPA gp120 revealed critical interactions with the N276 glycan, loop D, and V5, but not with aspartic acid 368, similarly to HJ16 and 179NC75. The CAP257-RH1 monoclonal antibody was derived from the immunoglobulin-variable IGHV3-33 and IGLV3-10 genes and neutralized RHPA but not the transmitted/founder virus from donor CAP257. Its narrow neutralization breadth was attributed to a binding angle that was incompatible with glycosylated V5 loops present in almost all HIV-1 strains, including the CAP257 transmitted/founder virus. Deep sequencing of autologous CAP257 viruses, however, revealed minority variants early in infection that lacked V5 glycans. These glycan-free V5 loops are unusual holes in the glycan shield that may have been necessary for initiating this N276 glycan-dependent CD4 binding site B-cell lineage.

    IMPORTANCEThe conserved CD4 binding site on gp120 is a major target for HIV-1 vaccine design, but key events in the elicitation and maturation of

  8. Structure of an N276-Dependent HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibody Targeting a Rare V5 Glycan Hole Adjacent to the CD4 Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Wibmer, Constantinos Kurt; Gorman, Jason; Anthony, Colin S.; Mkhize, Nonhlanhla N.; Druz, Aliaksandr; York, Talita; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Labuschagne, Phillip; Louder, Mark K.; Bailer, Robert T.; Abdool Karim, Salim S.; Mascola, John R.; Williamson, Carolyn; Moore, Penny L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT All HIV-1-infected individuals develop strain-specific neutralizing antibodies to their infecting virus, which in some cases mature into broadly neutralizing antibodies. Defining the epitopes of strain-specific antibodies that overlap conserved sites of vulnerability might provide mechanistic insights into how broadly neutralizing antibodies arise. We previously described an HIV-1 clade C-infected donor, CAP257, who developed broadly neutralizing plasma antibodies targeting an N276 glycan-dependent epitope in the CD4 binding site. The initial CD4 binding site response potently neutralized the heterologous tier 2 clade B viral strain RHPA, which was used to design resurfaced gp120 antigens for single-B-cell sorting. Here we report the isolation and structural characterization of CAP257-RH1, an N276 glycan-dependent CD4 binding site antibody representative of the early CD4 binding site plasma response in donor CAP257. The cocrystal structure of CAP257-RH1 bound to RHPA gp120 revealed critical interactions with the N276 glycan, loop D, and V5, but not with aspartic acid 368, similarly to HJ16 and 179NC75. The CAP257-RH1 monoclonal antibody was derived from the immunoglobulin-variable IGHV3-33 and IGLV3-10 genes and neutralized RHPA but not the transmitted/founder virus from donor CAP257. Its narrow neutralization breadth was attributed to a binding angle that was incompatible with glycosylated V5 loops present in almost all HIV-1 strains, including the CAP257 transmitted/founder virus. Deep sequencing of autologous CAP257 viruses, however, revealed minority variants early in infection that lacked V5 glycans. These glycan-free V5 loops are unusual holes in the glycan shield that may have been necessary for initiating this N276 glycan-dependent CD4 binding site B-cell lineage. IMPORTANCE The conserved CD4 binding site on gp120 is a major target for HIV-1 vaccine design, but key events in the elicitation and maturation of different antibody lineages to this site

  9. Type 2 diabetes mellitus-related genetic polymorphisms in microRNAs and microRNA target sites.

    PubMed

    Gong, Weijing; Xiao, Di; Ming, Guangfeng; Yin, Jiye; Zhou, Honghao; Liu, Zhaoqian

    2014-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important endogenous regulators in eukaryotic gene expression and a broad range of biological processes. MiRNA-related genetic variations have been proved to be associated with human diseases, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Polymorphisms in miRNA genes (primary miRNAs, precursor miRNAs, mature miRNAs, and miRNA regulatory regions) may be involved in the development of T2DM by changing the expression and structure of miRNAs and target gene expression. Genetic polymorphisms of the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) in miRNA target genes may destroy putative miRNA binding sites or create new miRNA binding sites, which affects the binding of UTRs with miRNAs, finally resulting in susceptibility to and development of T2DM. Therefore, focusing on studies into genetic polymorphisms in miRNAs or miRNA binding sites will help our understanding of the pathophysiology of T2DM development and lead to better health management. Herein, we review the association of genetic polymorphisms in miRNA and miRNA targets genes with T2DM development.

  10. Target sites for the design of anti-trypanosomatid drugs based on the structure of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Matheus Pinto; Emery, Flávio da Silva; Nonato, M Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosomatids consist of a large group of flagellated parasitic protozoa, including parasites from the genera Leishmania and Trypanosoma, responsible for causing infections in millions of humans worldwide and for which currently no appropriate therapy is available. The significance of pyrimidines in cellular metabolism makes their de novo and salvage pathways ideal druggable targets for pharmacological intervention and open an opportunity for pharmaceutical innovation. In the current review, we discuss the merits in targeting the enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH), a flavin-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the fourth and only redox step in pyrimidine de novo biosynthesis, as a strategy for the development of efficient therapeutic strategies for trypanosomatid-related diseases.We also describe the advances and perspectives from the structural biology point of view in order to unravel the structure-function relationship of trypanosomatid DHODHs, and to identify and validate target sites for drug development.

  11. Onco-Regulon: an integrated database and software suite for site specific targeting of transcription factors of cancer genes

    PubMed Central

    Tomar, Navneet; Mishra, Akhilesh; Mrinal, Nirotpal; Jayaram, B.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) bind at multiple sites in the genome and regulate expression of many genes. Regulating TF binding in a gene specific manner remains a formidable challenge in drug discovery because the same binding motif may be present at multiple locations in the genome. Here, we present Onco-Regulon (http://www.scfbio-iitd.res.in/software/onco/NavSite/index.htm), an integrated database of regulatory motifs of cancer genes clubbed with Unique Sequence-Predictor (USP) a software suite that identifies unique sequences for each of these regulatory DNA motifs at the specified position in the genome. USP works by extending a given DNA motif, in 5′→3′, 3′ →5′ or both directions by adding one nucleotide at each step, and calculates the frequency of each extended motif in the genome by Frequency Counter programme. This step is iterated till the frequency of the extended motif becomes unity in the genome. Thus, for each given motif, we get three possible unique sequences. Closest Sequence Finder program predicts off-target drug binding in the genome. Inclusion of DNA-Protein structural information further makes Onco-Regulon a highly informative repository for gene specific drug development. We believe that Onco-Regulon will help researchers to design drugs which will bind to an exclusive site in the genome with no off-target effects, theoretically. Database URL: http://www.scfbio-iitd.res.in/software/onco/NavSite/index.htm PMID:27515825

  12. Onco-Regulon: an integrated database and software suite for site specific targeting of transcription factors of cancer genes.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Navneet; Mishra, Akhilesh; Mrinal, Nirotpal; Jayaram, B

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) bind at multiple sites in the genome and regulate expression of many genes. Regulating TF binding in a gene specific manner remains a formidable challenge in drug discovery because the same binding motif may be present at multiple locations in the genome. Here, we present Onco-Regulon (http://www.scfbio-iitd.res.in/software/onco/NavSite/index.htm), an integrated database of regulatory motifs of cancer genes clubbed with Unique Sequence-Predictor (USP) a software suite that identifies unique sequences for each of these regulatory DNA motifs at the specified position in the genome. USP works by extending a given DNA motif, in 5'→3', 3' →5' or both directions by adding one nucleotide at each step, and calculates the frequency of each extended motif in the genome by Frequency Counter programme. This step is iterated till the frequency of the extended motif becomes unity in the genome. Thus, for each given motif, we get three possible unique sequences. Closest Sequence Finder program predicts off-target drug binding in the genome. Inclusion of DNA-Protein structural information further makes Onco-Regulon a highly informative repository for gene specific drug development. We believe that Onco-Regulon will help researchers to design drugs which will bind to an exclusive site in the genome with no off-target effects, theoretically.Database URL: http://www.scfbio-iitd.res.in/software/onco/NavSite/index.htm.

  13. [Personalized optimization of beta-lactam regimens based on studies of the pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics at the target sites].

    PubMed

    Ikawa, Kazuro

    2009-07-01

    Beta-lactam antibiotics are used for the treatment of various infections such as intra-abdominal infections and bacterial meningitis. Beta-lactams act at the infection site and their antibacterial effects relate to the exposure time during which the drug concentrations remain above the minimum inhibitory concentration for bacteria (T>MIC). The penetration into and exposure of beta-lactams at the target sites, such as the abdominal cavity and the cerebrospinal space, are therefore considered to be good indicators of their efficacies. However, earlier clinical research has focused primary on the drug concentrations in plasma. We therefore examined the pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics of beta-lactams at the target sites, and analyzed them using a population pharmacokinetic modeling and statistical technique called Monte Carlo simulation. This review summarizes our recent findings on carbapenem and cephem antibiotics in peritoneal and cerebrospinal fluids, and our new approaches to personalize and optimize beta-lactam dosing regimens based on their site-specific pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic profiles.

  14. A targeted mutation at the known collagenase cleavage site in mouse type I collagen impairs tissue remodeling

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Degradation of type I collagen, the most abundant collagen, is initiated by collagenase cleavage at a highly conserved site between Gly775 and Ile776 of the alpha 1 (I) chain. Mutations at or around this site render type I collagen resistant to collagenase digestion in vitro. We show here that mice carrying a collagenase-resistant mutant Col1a-1 transgene die late in embryo-genesis, ascribable to overexpression of the transgene, since the same mutation introduced into the endogenous Col1a-1 gene by gene targeting permitted normal development of mutant mice to young adulthood. With increasing age, animals carrying the targeted mutation developed marked fibrosis of the dermis similar to that in human scleroderma. Postpartum involution of the uterus in the mutant mice was also impaired, with persistence of collagenous nodules in the uterine wall. Although type I collagen from the homozygous mutant mice was resistant to cleavage by human or rat fibroblast collagenases at the helical site, only the rat collagenase cleaved collagen trimers at an additional, novel site in the nonhelical N-telopeptide domain. Our results suggest that cleavage by murine collagenase at the N-telopeptide site could account for resorption of type I collagen during embryonic and early adult life. During intense collagen resorption, however, such as in the immediate postpartum uterus and in the dermis later in life, cleavage at the helical site is essential for normal collagen turnover. Thus, type I collagen is degraded by at least two differentially controlled mechanisms involving collagenases with distinct, but overlapping, substrate specificities. PMID:7790374

  15. Industrial bottoming-cycle targeting of opportunities at the plant site. Volume I. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, N.L.; Brown, H.L.; Hamel, B.B.; Toy, M.P.; Hedman, B.A.

    1982-09-01

    Bottoming cycle potential in the US industrial marketplace is identified using the General Energy Associates Industrial Plant Energy Profile Data Base. From the data base technology evaluations and economic estimates can be made directly at the plant site level. The top 10,000 plants in the country were individually analyzed for these bottoming cycle applications. Results are summarized as follows: potential number of plant sites and megawatts, potential energy savings, electric production, regional and state profiles, bottoming cycle/working fluid systems, and projection of future bottoming cycle applications.

  16. Polymorphisms in MicroRNA Target Sites of Forkhead Box O Genes Are Associated with Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xiaoyun; Yu, Hongping; Li, Anhua; Bei, Chunhua; Qiu, Xiaoqiang

    2015-01-01

    The forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factors play important roles in various cancer development including Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC). In this study we conducted a hospital-based case control study including 1049 cases (HCC patients) and 1052 controls (non-tumor patients) to examine whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within microRNA (miRNA) target sites of FOXO genes confer HCC susceptibility. A total of three miRNA target site SNPs in the 3’ untranslated regions (UTR) of FOXO1 (rs17592236), FOXO3 (rs4946936) and FOXO4 (rs4503258) were analyzed. No statistically significant differences were found in genotype distribution for rs17592236, rs4946936, and rs4503258 between the HCC patient group and the tumor-free control group using single factor chi-square analysis (P>0.05). However, multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the CT/TT genotype in rs17592236 was significantly associated with decreased risk of HCC development (P = 0.010, OR = 0.699, 95% CI: 0.526–0.927) as compared to the CC genotype in rs17592236. Additionally, a genetic interaction was found between rs17592236 and rs4503258 (P = 0.003, OR = 0.755, 95% CI: 0.628–0.908). Functional dual luciferase reporter assays verified that the rs17592236 SNP was a target site of human miRNA miR-137. Together, these results indicate that the rs17592236 polymorphism is associated with decreasing of HCC hereditary susceptibility likely through modulating the binding affinity of miR-137 to the 3’UTR in FOXO1 messenger RNA (mRNA). Further knowledge obtained from this study may provide important evidence for the prevention and targeted therapy of HCC. PMID:25739100

  17. Genome-wide direct target analysis reveals a role for SHORT-ROOT in root vascular patterning through cytokinin homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hongchang; Hao, Yueling; Kovtun, Mikhail; Stolc, Viktor; Deng, Xing-Wang; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Kojima, Mikiko

    2011-11-01

    SHORT-ROOT (SHR) is a key regulator of root growth and development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Made in the stele, the SHR protein moves into an adjacent cell layer, where it specifies endodermal cell fate; it is also essential for apical meristem maintenance, ground tissue patterning, vascular differentiation, and lateral root formation. Much has been learned about the mechanism by which SHR controls radial patterning, but how it regulates other aspects of root morphogenesis is still unclear. To dissect the SHR developmental pathway, we have determined the genome-wide locations of SHR direct targets using a chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by microarray analysis method. K-means clustering analysis not only identified additional quiescent center-specific SHR targets but also revealed a direct role for SHR in gene regulation in the pericycle and xylem. Using cell type-specific markers, we showed that in shr, the phloem and the phloem-associated pericycle expanded, whereas the xylem and xylem-associated pericycle diminished. Interestingly, we found that cytokinin level was elevated in shr and that exogenous cytokinin conferred a shr-like vascular patterning phenotype in wild-type root. By chromatin immunoprecipitation-polymerase chain reaction and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays, we showed that SHR regulates cytokinin homeostasis by directly controlling the transcription of cytokinin oxidase 3, a cytokinin catabolism enzyme preferentially expressed in the stele. Finally, overexpression of a cytokinin oxidase in shr alleviated its vascular patterning defect. On the basis of these results, we suggest that one mechanism by which SHR controls vascular patterning is the regulation of cytokinin homeostasis.

  18. A novel polyamine allosteric site of SpeG from Vibrio cholerae is revealed by its dodecameric structure

    PubMed Central

    Filippova, Ekaterina V.; Kuhn, Misty L.; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Kiryukhina, Olga; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Ballicora, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Spermidine N-acetyltransferase, encoded by the gene speG, catalyzes the initial step in the degradation of polyamines and is a critical enzyme for determining the polyamine concentrations in bacteria. In Escherichia coli, studies have shown that SpeG is the enzyme responsible for acetylating spermidine under stress conditions and for preventing spermidine toxicity. Not all bacteria contain speG, and many bacterial pathogens have developed strategies to either acquire or silence it for pathogenesis. Here, we present thorough kinetic analyses combined with structural characterization of the VCA0947 SpeG enzyme from the important human pathogen Vibrio cholerae. Our studies revealed the unexpected presence of a previously unknown allosteric site and an unusual dodecameric structure for a member of the Gcn5-related N-acetyltransferase (GNAT) superfamily. We show that SpeG forms dodecamers in solution and in crystals and describe its three-dimensional structure in several ligand-free and liganded structures. Importantly, these structural data define the first view of a polyamine bound in an allosteric site of an N-acetyltransferase. Kinetic characterization of SpeG from V. cholerae showed that it acetylates spermidine and spermine. The behavior of this enzyme is complex and exhibits sigmoidal curves and substrate inhibition. We performed a detailed non-linear regression kinetic analysis to simultaneously fit families of substrate saturation curves to uncover a simple kinetic mechanism that explains the apparent complexity of this enzyme. Our results provide a fundamental understanding of the bacterial SpeG enzyme, which will be key towards understanding the regulation of polyamine levels in bacteria during pathogenesis. PMID:25623305

  19. Circular dichroism and site-directed spin labeling reveal structural and dynamical features of high-pressure states of myoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Lerch, Michael T.; Horwitz, Joseph; McCoy, John; Hubbell, Wayne L.

    2013-01-01

    Excited states of proteins may play important roles in function, yet are difficult to study spectroscopically because of their sparse population. High hydrostatic pressure increases the equilibrium population of excited states, enabling their characterization [Akasaka K (2003) Biochemistry 42:10875–85]. High-pressure site-directed spin-labeling EPR (SDSL-EPR) was developed recently to map the site-specific structure and dynamics of excited states populated by pressure. To monitor global secondary structure content by circular dichroism (CD) at high pressure, a modified optical cell using a custom MgF2 window with a reduced aperture is introduced. Here, a combination of SDSL-EPR and CD is used to map reversible structural transitions in holomyoglobin and apomyoglobin (apoMb) as a function of applied pressure up to 2 kbar. CD shows that the high-pressure excited state of apoMb at pH 6 has helical content identical to that of native apoMb, but reversible changes reflecting the appearance of a conformational ensemble are observed by SDSL-EPR, suggesting a helical topology that fluctuates slowly on the EPR time scale. Although the high-pressure state of apoMb at pH 6 has been referred to as a molten globule, the data presented here reveal significant differences from the well-characterized pH 4.1 molten globule of apoMb. Pressure-populated states of both holomyoglobin and apoMb at pH 4.1 have significantly less helical structure, and for the latter, that may correspond to a transient folding intermediate. PMID:24248390

  20. Metabolomics Reveals Metabolic Targets and Biphasic Responses in Breast Cancer Cells Treated by Curcumin Alone and in Association with Docetaxel

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Curcumin (CUR) has deserved extensive research due to its anti-inflammatory properties, of interest in human diseases including cancer. However, pleiotropic even paradoxical responses of tumor cells have been reported, and the mechanisms of action of CUR remain uncompletely elucidated. Methodology/Principal Findings 1H-NMR spectroscopy-based metabolomics was applied to get novel insight into responses of MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells to CUR alone, and MCF7 cells to CUR in cotreatment with docetaxel (DTX). In both cell types, a major target of CUR was glutathione metabolism. Total glutathione (GSx) increased at low dose CUR (≤ 10 mg.l−1–28 µM-) (up to +121% in MCF7 cells, P<0.01, and +138% in MDA-MB-231 cells, P<0.01), but decreased at high dose (≥ 25 mg.l−1 −70 µM-) (−49%, in MCF7 cells, P<0.02, and −56% in MDA-MB-231 cells, P<0.025). At high dose, in both cell types, GSx-related metabolites decreased, including homocystein, creatine and taurine (−60 to −80%, all, P<0.05). Together with glutathione-S-transferase actvity, data established that GSx biosynthesis was upregulated at low dose, and GSx consumption activated at high dose. Another major target, in both cell types, was lipid metabolism involving, at high doses, accumulation of polyunsaturated and total free fatty acids (between ×4.5 and ×11, P<0.025), and decrease of glycerophospho-ethanolamine and -choline (about −60%, P<0.025). Multivariate statistical analyses showed a metabolic transition, even a biphasic behavior of some metabolites including GSx, between low and high doses. In addition, CUR at 10 mg.l−1 in cotreatment with DTX induced modifications in glutathione metabolism, lipid metabolism, and glucose utilization. Some of these changes were biphasic depending on the duration of exposure to CUR. Conclusions/Significance Metabolomics reveals major metabolic targets of CUR in breast cancer cells, and biphasic responses that challenge the widely accepted

  1. Comparative Genomics of the Zoonotic Pathogen Ehrlichia chaffeensis Reveals Candidate Type IV Effectors and Putative Host Cell Targets

    PubMed Central

    Noroy, Christophe; Meyer, Damien F.

    2017-01-01

    During infection, some intracellular pathogenic bacteria use a dedicated multiprotein complex known as the type IV secretion system to deliver type IV effector (T4E) proteins inside the host cell. These T4Es allow the bacteria to evade host defenses and to subvert host cell processes to their own advantage. Ehrlichia chaffeensis is a tick-transmitted obligate intracellular pathogenic bacterium, which causes human monocytic ehrlichiosis. Using comparative whole genome analysis, we identified the relationship between eight available E. chaffeensis genomes isolated from humans and show that these genomes are highly conserved. We identified the candidate core type IV effectome of E. chaffeensis and some conserved intracellular adaptive strategies. We assigned the West Paces strain to genetic group II and predicted the repertoires of T4Es encoded by E. chaffeensis genomes, as well as some putative host cell targets. We demonstrated that predicted T4Es are preferentially distributed in gene sparse regions of the genome. In addition to the identification of the two known type IV effectors of Anaplasmataceae, we identified two novel candidates T4Es, ECHLIB_RS02720 and ECHLIB_RS04640, which are not present in all E. chaffeensis strains and could explain some variations in inter-strain virulence. We also identified another novel candidate T4E, ECHLIB_RS02720, a hypothetical protein exhibiting EPIYA, and NLS domains as well as a classical type IV secretion signal, suggesting an important role inside the host cell. Overall, our results agree with current knowledge of Ehrlichia molecular pathogenesis, and reveal novel candidate T4Es that require experimental validation. This work demonstrates that comparative effectomics enables identification of important host pathways targeted by the bacterial pathogen. Our study, which focuses on the type IV effector repertoires among several strains of E. chaffeensis species, is an original approach and provides rational putative targets

  2. The Crystal Structure of a Cardiovirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase Reveals an Unusual Conformation of the Polymerase Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Vives-Adrian, Laia; Lujan, Celia; Oliva, Baldo; van der Linden, Lonneke; Selisko, Barbara; Coutard, Bruno; Canard, Bruno; van Kuppeveld, Frank J. M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) is a member of the Cardiovirus genus within the large Picornaviridae family, which includes a number of important human and animal pathogens. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) 3Dpol is a key enzyme for viral genome replication. In this study, we report the X-ray structures of two different crystal forms of the EMCV RdRp determined at 2.8- and 2.15-Å resolution. The in vitro elongation and VPg uridylylation activities of the purified enzyme have also been demonstrated. Although the overall structure of EMCV 3Dpol is shown to be similar to that of the known RdRps of other members of the Picornaviridae family, structural comparisons show a large reorganization of the active-site cavity in one of the crystal forms. The rearrangement affects mainly motif A, where the conserved residue Asp240, involved in ribonucleoside triphosphate (rNTP) selection, and its neighbor residue, Phe239, move about 10 Å from their expected positions within the ribose binding pocket toward the entrance of the rNTP tunnel. This altered conformation of motif A is stabilized by a cation-π interaction established between the aromatic ring of Phe239 and the side chain of Lys56 within the finger domain. Other contacts, involving Phe239 and different residues of motif F, are also observed. The movement of motif A is connected with important conformational changes in the finger region flanked by residues 54 to 63, harboring Lys56, and in the polymerase N terminus. The structures determined in this work provide essential information for studies on the cardiovirus RNA replication process and may have important implications for the development of new antivirals targeting the altered conformation of motif A. IMPORTANCE The Picornaviridae family is one of the largest virus families known, including many important human and animal pathogens. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) 3Dpol is a key enzyme for picornavirus genome replication and a validated

  3. Integrative Multi-omic Analysis of Human Platelet eQTLs Reveals Alternative Start Site in Mitofusin 2

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Lukas M.; Chen, Edward S.; Edelstein, Leonard C.; Kong, Xianguo; Bhatlekar, Seema; Rigoutsos, Isidore; Bray, Paul F.; Shaw, Chad A.

    2016-01-01

    Platelets play a central role in ischemic cardiovascular events. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of death worldwide. Numerous genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified loci associated with CVD risk. However, our understanding of how these variants contribute to disease is limited. Using data from the platelet RNA and expression 1 (PRAX1) study, we analyzed cis expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) in platelets from 154 normal human subjects. We confirmed these results in silico by performing allele-specific expression (ASE) analysis, which demonstrated that the allelic directionality of eQTLs and ASE patterns correlate significantly. Comparison of platelet eQTLs with data from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project revealed that a number of platelet eQTLs are platelet specific and that platelet eQTL peaks localize to the gene body at a higher rate than eQTLs from other tissues. Upon integration with data from previously published GWASs, we found that the trait-associated variant rs1474868 coincides with the eQTL peak for mitofusin 2 (MFN2). Additional experimental and computational analyses revealed that this eQTL is linked to an unannotated alternate MFN2 start site preferentially expressed in platelets. Integration of phenotype data from the PRAX1 study showed that MFN2 expression levels were significantly associated with platelet count. This study links the variant rs1474868 to a platelet-specific regulatory role for MFN2 and demonstrates the utility of integrating multi-omic data with eQTL analysis in disease-relevant tissues for interpreting GWAS results. PMID:27132591

  4. A Conserved Target Site in HIV-1 Gag RNA is Accessible to Inhibition by Both an HDV Ribozyme and a Short Hairpin RNA

    PubMed Central

    Scarborough, Robert J; Lévesque, Michel V; Boudrias-Dalle, Etienne; Chute, Ian C; Daniels, Sylvanne M; Ouellette, Rodney J; Perreault, Jean-Pierre; Gatignol, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Antisense-based molecules targeting HIV-1 RNA have the potential to be used as part of gene or drug therapy to treat HIV-1 infection. In this study, HIV-1 RNA was screened to identify more conserved and accessible target sites for ribozymes based on the hepatitis delta virus motif. Using a quantitative screen for effects on HIV-1 production, we identified a ribozyme targeting a highly conserved site in the Gag coding sequence with improved inhibitory potential compared to our previously described candidates targeting the overlapping Tat/Rev coding sequence. We also demonstrate that this target site is highly accessible to short hairpin directed RNA interference, suggesting that it may be available for the binding of antisense RNAs with different modes of action. We provide evidence that this target site is structurally conserved in diverse viral strains and that it is sufficiently different from the human transcriptome to limit off-target effects from antisense therapies. We also show that the modified hepatitis delta virus ribozyme is more sensitive to a mismatch in its target site compared to the short hairpin RNA. Overall, our results validate the potential of a new target site in HIV-1 RNA to be used for the development of antisense therapies. PMID:25072692

  5. Virus Capsids as Targeted Nanoscale Delivery Vessels of Photoactive Compounds for Site-Specific Photodynamic Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Brian A.

    The research presented in this work details the use of a viral capsid as an addressable delivery vessel of photoactive compounds for use in photodynamic therapy. Photodynamic therapy is a treatment that involves the interaction of light with a photosensitizing molecule to create singlet oxygen, a reactive oxygen species. Overproduction of singlet oxygen in cells can cause oxidative damage leading to cytotoxicity and eventually cell death. Challenges with the current generation of FDA-approved photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy primarily stem from their lack of tissue specificity. This work describes the packaging of photoactive cationic porphyrins inside the MS2 bacteriophage capsid, followed by external modification of the capsid with cancer cell-targeting G-quadruplex DNA aptamers to generate a tumor-specific photosensitizing agent. First, a cationic porphyrin is loaded into the capsids via nucleotide-driven packaging, a process that involves charge interaction between the porphyrin and the RNA inside the capsid. Results show that over 250 porphyrin molecules associate with the RNA within each MS2 capsid. Removal of RNA from the capsid severely inhibits the packaging of the cationic porphyrins. Porphyrin-virus constructs were then shown to photogenerate singlet oxygen, and cytotoxicity in non-targeted photodynamic treatment experiments. Next, each porphyrin-loaded capsid is externally modified with approximately 60 targeting DNA aptamers by employing a heterobifunctional crosslinking agent. The targeting aptamer is known to bind the protein nucleolin, a ubiquitous protein that is overexpressed on the cell surface by many cancer cell types. MCF-7 human breast carcinoma cells and MCF-10A human mammary epithelial cells were selected as an in vitro model for breast cancer and normal tissue, respectively. Fluorescently tagged virus-aptamer constructs are shown to selectively target MCF-7 cells versus MCF-10A cells. Finally, results are shown in which porphyrin

  6. Identification of Thyroid Hormone Receptor Binding Sites and Target Genes Using ChIP-on-Chip in Developing Mouse Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hongyan; Yauk, Carole L.; Rowan-Carroll, Andrea; You, Seo-Hee; Zoeller, R. Thomas; Lambert, Iain; Wade, Michael G.

    2009-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is critical to normal brain development, but the mechanisms operating in this process are poorly understood. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation to enrich regions of DNA bound to thyroid receptor beta (TRβ) of mouse cerebellum sampled on post natal day 15. Enriched target was hybridized to promoter microarrays (ChIP-on-chip) spanning −8 kb to +2 kb of the transcription start site (TSS) of 5000 genes. We identified 91 genes with TR binding sites. Roughly half of the sites were located in introns, while 30% were located within 1 kb upstream (5′) of the TSS. Of these genes, 83 with known function included genes involved in apoptosis, neurodevelopment, metabolism and signal transduction. Two genes, MBP and CD44, are known to contain TREs, providing validation of the system. This is the first report of TR binding for 81 of these genes. ChIP-on-chip results were confirmed for 10 of the 13 binding fragments using ChIP-PCR. The expression of 4 novel TH target genes was found to be correlated with TH levels in hyper/hypothyroid animals providing further support for TR binding. A TRβ binding site upstream of the coding region of myelin associated glycoprotein was demonstrated to be TH-responsive using a luciferase expression system. Motif searches did not identify any classic binding elements, indicating that not all TR binding sites conform to variations of the classic form. These findings provide mechanistic insight into impaired neurodevelopment resulting from TH deficiency and a rich bioinformatics resource for developing a better understanding of TR binding. PMID:19240802

  7. Crystal structure of plant ferritin reveals a novel metal binding site that functions as a transit site for metal transfer in ferritin.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Taro; Goto, Fumiyuki; Yoshihara, Toshihiro; Mikami, Bunzo

    2010-02-05

    Ferritins are important iron storage and detoxification proteins that are widely distributed in living kingdoms. Because plant ferritin possesses both a ferroxidase site and a ferrihydrite nucleation site, it is a suitable model for studying the mechanism of iron storage in ferritin. This article presents for the first time the crystal structure of a plant ferritin from soybean at 1.8-A resolution. The soybean ferritin 4 (SFER4) had a high structural similarity to vertebrate ferritin, except for the N-terminal extension region, the C-terminal short helix E, and the end of the BC-loop. Similar to the crystal structures of other ferritins, metal binding sites were observed in the iron entry channel, ferroxidase center, and nucleation site of SFER4. In addition to these conventional sites, a novel metal binding site was discovered intermediate between the iron entry channel and the ferroxidase site. This site was coordinated by the acidic side chain of Glu(173) and carbonyl oxygen of Thr(168), which correspond, respectively, to Glu(140) and Thr(135) of human H chain ferritin according to their sequences. A comparison of the ferroxidase activities of the native and the E173A mutant of SFER4 clearly showed a delay in the iron oxidation rate of the mutant. This indicated that the glutamate residue functions as a transit site of iron from the 3-fold entry channel to the ferroxidase site, which may be universal among ferritins.

  8. Understanding functional miRNA-target interactions in vivo by site-specific genome engineering.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Andrew R; Azzam, Ghows; Wheatley, Lucy; Tibbit, Charlotte; Rajakumar, Timothy; McGowan, Simon; Stanger, Nathan; Ewels, Philip Andrew; Taylor, Stephen; Ponting, Chris P; Liu, Ji-Long; Sauka-Spengler, Tatjana; Fulga, Tudor A

    2014-08-19

    MicroRNA (miRNA) target recognition is largely dictated by short 'seed' sequences, and single miRNAs therefore have the potential to regulate a large number of genes. Understanding the contribution of specific miRNA-target interactions to the regulation of biological processes in vivo remains challenging. Here we use transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 technologies to interrogate the functional relevance of predicted miRNA response elements (MREs) to post-transcriptional silencing in zebrafish and Drosophila. We also demonstrate an effective strategy that uses CRISPR-mediated homology-directed repair with short oligonucleotide donors for the assessment of MRE activity in human cells. These methods facilitate analysis of the direct phenotypic consequences resulting from blocking specific miRNA-MRE interactions at any point during development.

  9. Gene expression profiles of progressive pancreatic endocrine tumours and their liver metastases reveal potential novel markers and therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Capurso, G; Lattimore, S; Crnogorac-Jurcevic, T; Panzuto, F; Milione, M; Bhakta, V; Campanini, N; Swift, S M; Bordi, C; Delle Fave, G; Lemoine, N R

    2006-06-01

    The intrinsic nature of tumour behaviour (stable vs progressive) and the presence of liver metastases are key factors in determining the outcome of patients with a pancreatic endocrine tumour (PET). Previous expression profile analyses of PETs were limited to non-homogeneous groups or to primary lesions only. The aim of this study was to investigate the gene expression profiles of a more uniform series of sporadic, non-functioning (NF) PETs with progressive disease and, for the first time, their liver metastases, on the Affymetrix human genome U133A and B GeneChip set. Thirteen NF PET samples (eight primaries and five liver metastases) from ten patients with progressive, metastatic disease, three cell lines (BON, QGP and CM) and four purified islet samples were analysed. The same samples were employed for confirmation of candidate gene expression by means of quantitative RT-PCR, while a further 37 PET and 15 carcinoid samples were analysed by immunohistochemistry. Analysis of genes differentially expressed between islets and primaries and metastases revealed 667 up- and 223 down-regulated genes, most of which have not previously been observed in PETs, and whose gene ontology molecular function has been detailed. Overexpression of bridging integrator 1 (BIN1) and protein Z dependent protease inhibitor (SERPINA10) which may represent useful biomarkers, and of lymphocyte specific protein tyrosine kinase (LCK) and bone marrow stromal cell antigen (BST2) which could be used as therapeutic targets, has been validated. When primary tumours were compared with metastatic lesions, no significantly differentially expressed genes were found, in accord with cluster analysis which revealed a striking similarity between primary and metastatic lesions, with the cell lines clustering separately. We have provided a comprehensive list of differentially expressed genes in a uniform set of aggressive NF PETs. A number of dysregulated genes deserve further in-depth study as potentially

  10. Targeting of Magnetic Nanoparticle-coated Microbubbles to the Vascular Wall Empowers Site-specific Lentiviral Gene Delivery in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Heun, Yvonn; Hildebrand, Staffan; Heidsieck, Alexandra; Gleich, Bernhard; Anton, Martina; Pircher, Joachim; Ribeiro, Andrea; Mykhaylyk, Olga; Eberbeck, Dietmar; Wenzel, Daniela; Pfeifer, Alexander; Woernle, Markus; Krötz, Florian; Pohl, Ulrich; Mannell, Hanna

    2017-01-01

    In the field of vascular gene therapy, targeting systems are promising advancements to improve site-specificity of gene delivery. Here, we studied whether incorporation of magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) with different magnetic properties into ultrasound sensitive microbubbles may represent an efficient way to enable gene targeting in the vascular system after systemic application. Thus, we associated novel silicon oxide-coated magnetic nanoparticle containing microbubbles (SO-Mag MMB) with lentiviral particles carrying therapeutic genes and determined their physico-chemical as well as biological properties compared to MMB coated with polyethylenimine-coated magnetic nanoparticles (PEI-Mag MMB). While there were no differences between both MMB types concerning size and lentivirus binding, SO-Mag MMB exhibited superior characteristics regarding magnetic moment, magnetizability as well as transduction efficiency under static and flow conditions in vitro. Focal disruption of lentiviral SO-Mag MMB by ultrasound within isolated vessels exposed to an external magnetic field decisively improved localized VEGF expression in aortic endothelium ex vivo and enhanced the angiogenic response. Using the same system in vivo, we achieved a highly effective, site-specific lentiviral transgene expression in microvessels of the mouse dorsal skin after arterial injection. Thus, we established a novel lentiviral MMB technique, which has great potential towards site-directed vascular gene therapy. PMID:28042335

  11. Targeting of Magnetic Nanoparticle-coated Microbubbles to the Vascular Wall Empowers Site-specific Lentiviral Gene Delivery in vivo.

    PubMed

    Heun, Yvonn; Hildebrand, Staffan; Heidsieck, Alexandra; Gleich, Bernhard; Anton, Martina; Pircher, Joachim; Ribeiro, Andrea; Mykhaylyk, Olga; Eberbeck, Dietmar; Wenzel, Daniela; Pfeifer, Alexander; Woernle, Markus; Krötz, Florian; Pohl, Ulrich; Mannell, Hanna

    2017-01-01

    In the field of vascular gene therapy, targeting systems are promising advancements to improve site-specificity of gene delivery. Here, we studied whether incorporation of magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) with different magnetic properties into ultrasound sensitive microbubbles may represent an efficient way to enable gene targeting in the vascular system after systemic application. Thus, we associated novel silicon oxide-coated magnetic nanoparticle containing microbubbles (SO-Mag MMB) with lentiviral particles carrying therapeutic genes and determined their physico-chemical as well as biological properties compared to MMB coated with polyethylenimine-coated magnetic nanoparticles (PEI-Mag MMB). While there were no differences between both MMB types concerning size and lentivirus binding, SO-Mag MMB exhibited superior characteristics regarding magnetic moment, magnetizability as well as transduction efficiency under static and flow conditions in vitro. Focal disruption of lentiviral SO-Mag MMB by ultrasound within isolated vessels exposed to an external magnetic field decisively improved localized VEGF expression in aortic endothelium ex vivo and enhanced the angiogenic response. Using the same system in vivo, we achieved a highly effective, site-specific lentiviral transgene expression in microvessels of the mouse dorsal skin after arterial injection. Thus, we established a novel lentiviral MMB technique, which has great potential towards site-directed vascular gene therapy.

  12. The targeted synthesis of single site vanadyl species on the surface and in the framework of silicate building block materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ming-Yung; Jiao, Jian; Mayes, Richard T; Hagaman, Edward {Ed} W; Barnes, Craig E.

    2011-01-01

    A new synthetic methodology for the targeted preparation of single site, atomically dispersed vanadyl groups in silicate matrices is described. This methodology requires functionalized silicate building blocks Si{sub 8}O{sub 20}(OSnMe{sub 3}){sub 8} that become linked together through vanadyl ({triple_bond}V-O) groups in the matrix. A sequential addition strategy is illustrated which allows the targeting of specific connectivities for the vanadyl group to the silicate building block matrix (i.e. the number of V-O-Si bonds linking the vanadyl unit). Silicate matrices containing exclusively 3-connected (OV(OSi{sub cube}){sub 3}), 2-connected (OV(OR)(OSi{sub cube}){sub 2}) or 1-connected (OVCl{sub 2}(OSi{sub cube})) vanadyl sites are described and characterized via a wide variety spectroscopic and physical techniques (gravimetric analysis, EXAFS, AA and solid state NMR ({sup 51}V, {sup 29}Si, and {sup 17}O)). We demonstrate how the combination of gravimetric, solid state NMR (SSNMR) and EXAFS data can be used to uniquely define the vanadyl sites in these matrices. Furthermore, the use of {sup 17}O SSNMR (1D and MQMAS) is illustrated as an indirect spectroscopic probe to follow changes in the ligands bound to vanadium atom within the vanadyl groups in these matrices.

  13. The Targeted Synthesis of Single Site Vanadyl Species on the Surface and in the Framework of Silicate Building Block Materials

    SciTech Connect

    M Lee; J Jiao; R Mayes; E Hagaman; C Barnes

    2011-12-31

    A new synthetic methodology for the targeted preparation of single site, atomically dispersed vanadyl groups in silicate matrices is described. This methodology requires functionalized silicate building blocks Si{sub 8}O{sub 20}(OSnMe{sub 3}){sub 8} that become linked together through vanadyl ({triple_bond}V=O) groups in the matrix. A sequential addition strategy is illustrated which allows the targeting of specific connectivities for the vanadyl group to the silicate building block matrix (i.e. the number of V-O-Si bonds linking the vanadyl unit). Silicate matrices containing exclusively 3-connected (OV(OSi{sub cube}){sub 3}), 2-connected (OV(OR)(OSi{sub cube}){sub 2}) or 1-connected (OVCl{sub 2}(OSi{sub cube})) vanadyl sites are described and characterized via a wide variety spectroscopic and physical techniques (gravimetric analysis, EXAFS, AA and solid state NMR ({sup 51}V, {sup 29}Si, and {sup 17}O)). We demonstrate how the combination of gravimetric, solid state NMR (SSNMR) and EXAFS data can be used to uniquely define the vanadyl sites in these matrices. Furthermore, the use of {sup 17}O SSNMR (1D and MQMAS) is illustrated as an indirect spectroscopic probe to follow changes in the ligands bound to vanadium atom within the vanadyl groups in these matrices.

  14. Validation of serine-threonine protein phosphatase as the herbicide target site of endothall

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endothall, an older commercial herbicide, and cantharidin, a natural product from the blister beetle (Epicauta spp.), are close chemical analogues. A comparison of the effect of endothall and cantharidin on plants revealed a similarity in their level of phytotoxicity on both Arabidopsis thaliana an...

  15. Systemic analysis of inducible target of rapamycin mutants reveal a general metabolic switch controlling growth in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Caldana, Camila; Li, Yan; Leisse, Andrea; Zhang, Yi; Bartholomaeus, Lisa; Fernie, Alisdair R; Willmitzer, Lothar; Giavalisco, Patrick

    2013-03-01

    The target of rapamycin (TOR) pathway is a major regulator of growth in all eukaryotes, integrating energy, nutrient and stress signals into molecular decisions. By using large-scale MS-based metabolite profiling of primary, secondary and lipid compounds in combination with array-based transcript profiling, we show that the TOR protein not only regulates growth but also influences nutrient partitioning and central energy metabolism. The study was performed on plants exhibiting conditional down-regulation of AtTOR expression, revealing strong regulation of genes involved in pathways such as the cell cycle, cell-wall modifications and senescence, together with major changes in transcripts and metabolites of the primary and secondary metabolism. In agreement with these results, our morphological and metabolic analyses disclosed major metabolic changes leading to massive accumulations of storage lipids and starch. The implications of these data in the context of the general role of TOR in eukaryotic systems are discussed in parallel with the plant-specific aspects of TOR function. Finally, we propose a role for harnessing the plant TOR pathway by utilizing it as a potent metabolic switch, offering a possible route for biotechnological optimization of plant energy content and carbon partitioning for the production of bioenergy.

  16. Targeted Deletion of Prkar1a Reveals a Role for Protein Kinase A in Mesenchymal-to-Epithelial Transition

    PubMed Central

    Nadella, Kiran S.; Jones, Georgette N.; Trimboli, Anthony; Stratakis, Constantine A.; Leone, Gustavo; Kirschner, Lawrence S.

    2011-01-01

    Dysregulation of protein kinase A (PKA) activity, caused by loss of function mutations in PRKAR1A, is known to induce tumor formation in the inherited tumor syndrome Carney complex (CNC) and is also associated with sporadic tumors of the thyroid and adrenal. We have previously shown that Prkar1a+/− mice develop schwannomas reminiscent of those seen in CNC and that similar tumors are observed in tissue-specific knockouts (KO) of Prkar1a targeted to the neural crest. Within these tumors, we have previously described the presence of epithelial islands, although the nature of these structures was unclear. In this article, we report that these epithelial structures are derived from KO cells originating in the neural crest. Analysis of the mesenchymal marker vimentin revealed that this protein was markedly down-regulated not only from the epithelial islands, but also from the tumor as a whole, consistent with mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET). In vitro, Prkar1a null primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts, which display constitutive PKA signaling, also showed evidence for MET, with a loss of vimentin and up-regulation of the epithelial marker E-cadherin. Reduction of vimentin protein occurred at the posttranslational level and was rescued by proteasomal inhibition. Finally, this down-regulation of vimentin was recapitulated in the adrenal nodules of CNC patients, confirming an unexpected and previously unrecognized role for PKA in MET. PMID:18413734

  17. HDAC2 blockade by nitric oxide and histone deacetylase inhibitors reveals a common target in Duchenne muscular dystrophy treatment

    PubMed Central

    Colussi, Claudia; Mozzetta, Chiara; Gurtner, Aymone; Illi, Barbara; Rosati, Jessica; Straino, Stefania; Ragone, Gianluca; Pescatori, Mario; Zaccagnini, Germana; Antonini, Annalisa; Minetti, Giulia; Martelli, Fabio; Piaggio, Giulia; Gallinari, Paola; Steinkuhler, Christian; Clementi, Emilio; Dell'Aversana, Carmela; Altucci, Lucia; Mai, Antonello; Capogrossi, Maurizio C.; Puri, Pier Lorenzo; Gaetano, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    The overlapping histological and biochemical features underlying the beneficial effect of deacetylase inhibitors and NO donors in dystrophic muscles suggest an unanticipated molecular link among dystrophin, NO signaling, and the histone deacetylases (HDACs). Higher global deacetylase activity and selective increased expression of the class I histone deacetylase HDAC2 were detected in muscles of dystrophin-deficient MDX mice. In vitro and in vivo siRNA-mediated down-regulation of HDAC2 in dystrophic muscles was sufficient to replicate the morphological and functional benefits observed with deacetylase inhibitors and NO donors. We found that restoration of NO signaling in vivo, by adenoviral-mediated expression of a constitutively active endothelial NOS mutant in MDX muscles, and in vitro, by exposing MDX-derived satellite cells to NO donors, resulted in HDAC2 blockade by cysteine S-nitrosylation. These data reveal a special contribution of HDAC2 in the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and indicate that HDAC2 inhibition by NO-dependent S-nitrosylation is important for the therapeutic response to NO donors in MDX mice. They also define a common target for independent pharmacological interventions in the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. PMID:19047631

  18. HDAC2 blockade by nitric oxide and histone deacetylase inhibitors reveals a common target in Duchenne muscular dystrophy treatment.

    PubMed

    Colussi, Claudia; Mozzetta, Chiara; Gurtner, Aymone; Illi, Barbara; Rosati, Jessica; Straino, Stefania; Ragone, Gianluca; Pescatori, Mario; Zaccagnini, Germana; Antonini, Annalisa; Minetti, Giulia; Martelli, Fabio; Piaggio, Giulia; Gallinari, Paola; Steinkuhler