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Sample records for reveals unexpected complexity

  1. Comparative analyses of developmental transcription factor repertoires in sponges reveal unexpected complexity of the earliest animals.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, Sofia A V; Adamski, Marcin; Adamska, Maja

    2015-12-01

    Developmental transcription factors (DTFs) control development of animals by affecting expression of target genes, some of which are transcription factors themselves. In bilaterians and cnidarians, conserved DTFs are involved in homologous processes such as gastrulation or specification of neurons. The genome of Amphimedon queenslandica, the first sponge to be sequenced, revealed that only a fraction of these conserved DTF families are present in demosponges. This finding was in line with the view that morphological complexity in the animal lineage correlates with developmental toolkit complexity. However, as the phylum Porifera is very diverse, Amphimedon's genome may not be representative of all sponges. The recently sequenced genomes of calcareous sponges Sycon ciliatum and Leucosolenia complicata allowed investigations of DTFs in a sponge lineage evolutionarily distant from demosponges. Surprisingly, the phylogenetic analyses of identified DTFs revealed striking differences between the calcareous sponges and Amphimedon. As these differences appear to be a result of independent gene loss events in the two sponge lineages, the last common ancestor of sponges had to possess a much more diverse repertoire of DTFs than extant sponges. Developmental expression of sponge homologs of genes involved in specification of the Bilaterian endomesoderm and the neurosensory cells suggests that roles of many DTFs date back to the last common ancestor of all animals. Strikingly, even DTFs displaying apparent pan-metazoan conservation of sequence and function are not immune to being lost from individual species genomes. The quest for a comprehensive picture of the developmental toolkit in the last common metazoan ancestor is thus greatly benefitting from the increasing accessibility of sequencing, allowing comparisons of multiple genomes within each phylum.

  2. Expression of secreted Wnt pathway components reveals unexpected complexity of the planarian amputation response

    PubMed Central

    Gurley, Kyle A.; Elliott, Sarah A.; Simakov, Oleg; Schmidt, Heiko A.; Holstein, Thomas W.; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2010-01-01

    Regeneration is widespread throughout the animal kingdom, but our molecular understanding of this process in adult animals remains poorly understood. Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays crucial roles throughout animal life from early development to adulthood. In intact and regenerating planarians, the regulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling functions to maintain and specify anterior/posterior (A/P) identity. Here, we explore the expression kinetics and RNAi phenotypes for secreted members of the Wnt signaling pathway in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. Smed-wnt and sFRP expression during regeneration is surprisingly dynamic and reveals fundamental aspects of planarian biology that have been previously unappreciated. We show that after amputation, a wounding response precedes rapid reorganization of the A/P axis. Furthermore, cells throughout the body plan can mount this response and reassess their new A/P location in the complete absence of stem cells. While initial stages of the amputation response are stem cell independent, tissue remodeling and the integration of new A/P address with anatomy are stem cell dependent. We also show that WNT5 functions in a reciprocal manner with SLIT to pattern the planarian mediolateral axis, while WNT11-2 patterns the posterior midline. Moreover, we perform an extensive phylogenetic analysis on the Smed-wnt genes using a method that combines and integrates both sequence and structural alignments, enabling us to place all nine genes into Wnt subfamilies for the first time. PMID:20707997

  3. Rethinking the longitudinal stream temperature paradigm: region-wide comparison of thermal infrared imagery reveals unexpected complexity of river temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fullerton, Aimee H.; Torgersen, Christian; Lawler, Joshua J.; Faux, Russell N.; Steel, E. Ashley; Beechie, Timothy J.; Ebersole, Joseph L.; Leibowitz, Scott J.

    2015-01-01

    Prevailing theory suggests that stream temperature warms asymptotically in a downstream direction, beginning at the temperature of the source in the headwaters and leveling off downstream as it converges to match meteorological conditions. However, there have been few empirical examples of longitudinal patterns of temperature in large rivers due to a paucity of data. We constructed longitudinal thermal profiles (temperature versus distance) for 53 rivers in the Pacific Northwest (USA) using an extensive dataset of remotely sensed summertime river temperatures and classified each profile into one of five patterns of downstream warming: asymptotic (increasing then flattening), linear (increasing steadily), uniform (not changing), parabolic (increasing then decreasing), or complex (not fitting other classes). We evaluated (1) how frequently profiles warmed asymptotically downstream as expected, and (2) whether relationships between river temperature and common hydroclimatic variables differed by profile class. We found considerable diversity in profile shape, with 47% of rivers warming asymptotically, and 53% having alternative profile shapes. Water temperature did not warm substantially over the course of the river for coastal parabolic and uniform profiles, and for some linear and complex profiles. Profile classes showed no clear geographical trends. The degree of correlation between river temperature and hydroclimatic variables differed among profile classes, but there was overlap among classes. Water temperature in rivers with asymptotic or parabolic profiles was positively correlated with August air temperature, tributary temperature and velocity, and negatively correlated with elevation, August precipitation, gradient, and distance upstream. Conversely, associations were less apparent in rivers with linear, uniform, or complex profiles. Factors contributing to the unique shape of parabolic profiles differed for coastal and inland rivers, where downstream cooling

  4. Dissecting tRNA-derived fragment complexities using personalized transcriptomes reveals novel fragment classes and unexpected dependencies

    PubMed Central

    Telonis, Aristeidis G.; Loher, Phillipe; Honda, Shozo; Jing, Yi; Palazzo, Juan; Kirino, Yohei; Rigoutsos, Isidore

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed transcriptomic data from 452 healthy men and women representing five different human populations and two races, and, 311 breast cancer samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Our studies revealed numerous constitutive, distinct fragments with overlapping sequences and quantized lengths that persist across dozens of individuals and arise from the genomic loci of all nuclear and mitochondrial human transfer RNAs (tRNAs). Surprisingly, we discovered that the tRNA fragments' length, starting and ending points, and relative abundance depend on gender, population, race and also on amino acid identity, anticodon, genomic locus, tissue, disease, and disease subtype. Moreover, the length distribution of mitochondrially-encoded tRNAs differs from that of nuclearly-encoded tRNAs, and the specifics of these distributions depend on tissue. Notably, tRNA fragments from the same anticodon do not have correlated abundances. We also report on a novel category of tRNA fragments that significantly contribute to the differences we observe across tissues, genders, populations, and races: these fragments, referred to as i-tRFs, are abundant in human tissues, wholly internal to the respective mature tRNA, and can straddle the anticodon. HITS-CLIP data analysis revealed that tRNA fragments are loaded on Argonaute in a cell-dependent manner, suggesting cell-dependent functional roles through the RNA interference pathway. We validated experimentally two i-tRF molecules: the first was found in 21 of 22 tested breast tumor and adjacent normal samples and was differentially abundant between health and disease whereas the second was found in all eight tested breast cancer cell lines. PMID:26325506

  5. Mitochondrial genome of the homoscleromorph Oscarella carmela (Porifera, Demospongiae) reveals unexpected complexity in the common ancestor of sponges and other animals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiujuan; Lavrov, Dennis V

    2007-02-01

    Homoscleromorpha is a small group in the phylum Porifera (Sponges) characterized by several morphological features (basement membrane, acrosomes in spermatozoa, and cross-striated rootlets of the flagellar basal apparatus) shared with eumetazoan animals but not found in most other sponges. To clarify the phylogenetic position of this group, we determined and analyzed the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence of the homoscleromorph sponge Oscarella carmela (Porifera, Demospongiae). O. carmela mtDNA is 20,327 bp and contains the largest complement of genes reported for animal mtDNA, including a putative gene for the C subunit of the twin-arginine translocase (tatC) that has never been found in animal mtDNA. The genes in O. carmela mtDNA are arranged in 2 clusters with opposite transcriptional orientations, a gene arrangement reminiscent of those in several cnidarian mtDNAs but unlike those reported in sponges. At the same time, phylogenetic analyses based on concatenated amino acid sequences from 12 mitochondrial (mt) protein genes strongly support the phylogenetic affinity between the Homoscleromorpha and other demosponges. Altogether, our data suggest that homoscleromorphs are demosponges that have retained ancestral features in both mt genome and morphological organization lost in other taxa and that the most recent common ancestor of sponges and other animals was morphologically and genetically more complex than previously thought.

  6. Complex and unexpected dynamics in simple genetic regulatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borg, Yanika; Ullner, Ekkehard; Alagha, Afnan; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Nesbeth, Darren; Zaikin, Alexey

    2014-03-01

    One aim of synthetic biology is to construct increasingly complex genetic networks from interconnected simpler ones to address challenges in medicine and biotechnology. However, as systems increase in size and complexity, emergent properties lead to unexpected and complex dynamics due to nonlinear and nonequilibrium properties from component interactions. We focus on four different studies of biological systems which exhibit complex and unexpected dynamics. Using simple synthetic genetic networks, small and large populations of phase-coupled quorum sensing repressilators, Goodwin oscillators, and bistable switches, we review how coupled and stochastic components can result in clustering, chaos, noise-induced coherence and speed-dependent decision making. A system of repressilators exhibits oscillations, limit cycles, steady states or chaos depending on the nature and strength of the coupling mechanism. In large repressilator networks, rich dynamics can also be exhibited, such as clustering and chaos. In populations of Goodwin oscillators, noise can induce coherent oscillations. In bistable systems, the speed with which incoming external signals reach steady state can bias the network towards particular attractors. These studies showcase the range of dynamical behavior that simple synthetic genetic networks can exhibit. In addition, they demonstrate the ability of mathematical modeling to analyze nonlinearity and inhomogeneity within these systems.

  7. Carney complex--an unexpected finding during puerperium.

    PubMed

    Schulz, S; Redlich, A; Köppe, I; Reschke, K; Weise, W

    2001-01-01

    Carney complex is an extremely rare, autosomal dominant, multi-system disorder characterized by multiple neoplasias and lentiginosis. The genetic defect responsible for this complex has been localized to the short arm of chromosome 2 (2p16). The most prevalent clinical manifestations in patients with Carney complex are spotty skin pigmentation, skin and cardiac myxomas, Cushing's syndrome and acromegaly. Here we report the case of a 31-year-old woman with a spontaneous pregnancy. At 32 weeks of gestation, she was admitted to our Department of Obstetrics with hypertension and severe back pain. In addition, she had unusual pigmentation and typical cushingoid features. One day after admission, the pregnancy was terminated by emergency cesarian section because of preeclampsia and pathological CTG. During the postoperative period the severe back pain persisted, and radiographic evaluation revealed a collapse of L(2)/L(3) with severe osteopenia. A CT scan showed a mass in the right suprarenal area. Histopathological examination revealed a primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease. After biochemical confirmation of the diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome, it was recognized that the patient met the diagnostic criteria for Carney complex. PMID:11306912

  8. The Crystal Structures of EAP Domains from Staphylococcus aureus Reveal an Unexpected Homology to Bacterial Superantigens

    SciTech Connect

    Geisbrecht, B V; Hamaoka, B Y; Perman, B; Zemla, A; Leahy, D J

    2005-10-14

    The Eap (extracellular adherence protein) of Staphylococcus aureus functions as a secreted virulence factor by mediating interactions between the bacterial cell surface and several extracellular host proteins. Eap proteins from different Staphylococcal strains consist of four to six tandem repeats of a structurally uncharacterized domain (EAP domain). We have determined the three-dimensional structures of three different EAP domains to 1.8, 2.2, and 1.35 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. These structures reveal a core fold that is comprised of an {alpha}-helix lying diagonally across a five-stranded, mixed {beta}-sheet. Comparison of EAP domains with known structures reveals an unexpected homology with the C-terminal domain of bacterial superantigens. Examination of the structure of the superantigen SEC2 bound to the {beta}-chain of a T-cell receptor suggests a possible ligand-binding site within the EAP domain (Fields, B. A., Malchiodi, E. L., Li, H., Ysern, X., Stauffacher, C. V., Schlievert, P. M., Karjalainen, K., and Mariuzza, R. (1996) Nature 384, 188-192). These results provide the first structural characterization of EAP domains, relate EAP domains to a large class of bacterial toxins, and will guide the design of future experiments to analyze EAP domain structure/function relationships.

  9. Kinase inhibitor profiling reveals unexpected opportunities to inhibit disease-associated mutant kinases

    PubMed Central

    Duong-Ly, Krisna C.; Devarajan, Karthik; Liang, Shuguang; Horiuchi, Kurumi Y.; Wang, Yuren; Ma, Haiching; Peterson, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Small-molecule kinase inhibitors have typically been designed to inhibit wild-type kinases rather than the mutant forms that frequently arise in diseases such as cancer. Mutations can have serious clinical implications by increasing kinase catalytic activity or conferring therapeutic resistance. To identify opportunities to repurpose inhibitors against disease-associated mutant kinases, we conducted a large-scale functional screen of 183 known kinase inhibitors against 76 recombinant, mutant kinases. The results revealed lead compounds with activity against clinically important mutant kinases including ALK, LRRK2, RET, and EGFR as well as unexpected opportunities for repurposing FDA-approved kinase inhibitors as leads for additional indications. Furthermore, using T674I PDGFRα as an example, we show how single-dose screening data can provide predictive structure-activity data to guide subsequent inhibitor optimization. This study provides a resource for the development of inhibitors against numerous disease-associated mutant kinases and illustrates the potential of unbiased profiling as an approach to compound-centric inhibitor development. PMID:26776524

  10. Metatranscriptome Analysis of Aquifer Samples Reveals Unexpected Metabolic Lifestyles Relevant to Active Biogeochemical Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beller, H. R.; Jewell, T. N. M.; Karaoz, U.; Banfield, J. F.; Brodie, E.; Williams, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    Modern molecular ecology techniques are revealing the metabolic potential of uncultivated microorganisms, but there is still much to be learned about the actual biogeochemical roles of microbes that have cultivated relatives. Here, we present metatranscriptomic and metagenomic data from a field study that provides evidence of coupled redox processes that have not been documented in cultivated relatives and, indeed, represent strains with metabolic traits that are novel with respect to closely related isolates. The data come from omics analysis of groundwater samples collected during an experiment in which nitrate (a native electron acceptor) was injected into a perennially suboxic aquifer in Rifle (CO). Transcriptional data indicated that just two groups of chemolithoautotrophic bacteria accounted for a very large portion (~80%) of overall community gene expression: (1) members of the Fe(II)-oxidizing Gallionellaceae family and (2) strains of the S-oxidizing species, Sulfurimonas denitrificans. Metabolic lifestyles for Gallionellaceae strains that were novel compared to cultivated representatives included nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation and S oxidation. Evidence for these metabolisms included highly correlated temporal expression in binned data of nitrate reductase (e.g., narGHI) genes (which have never been reported in Gallionellaceae genomes) and Fe(II) oxidation genes (e.g., mtoA) or S oxidation genes (e.g., dsrE, aprA). Of the two most active strains of S. denitrificans, only one showed strong expression of S oxidation genes, whereas the other was apparently using an unexpected (as-yet unidentified) primary electron donor. Transcriptional data added considerable interpretive value to this study, as (1) metagenomic data would not have highlighted these organisms, which had a disproportionately large role in community metabolism relative to their populations, and (2) co-expression of coupled pathway genes could not be predicted based solely on metagenomic data.

  11. An Unexpected Gas-Phase Binding Motif for Metal Dication Complexation with Peptides: Irmpd Spectroscopic Structure Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, Robert C.; Steill, Jeffrey; Polfer, Nicolas; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos

    2011-06-01

    The favorable orientation of the amide linkage and the aromatic side chain of N-terminal Phe or Trp leads to several favorable motifs for metal ion binding to dipeptides, having distinct characteristics in the IR spectrum. Infrared multiple photon photodissociation spectroscopy using the FELIX free electron laser has enabled clear resolution of these isomeric forms. The spectral patterns of complexes of small dications (Mg2+, Ni2+ and Co2+) reveal an unexpected new isomeric form, in which the metal ion displaces the amide hydrogen, forming a metal-nitrogen bond with covalent character which is unprecedented in such gas-phase complexes. Spectra of the ions were acquired by irradiating the cell of the Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer with infrared light from the FELIX laser at wavelengths in the approximate range 500 to 1900 Cm-1.

  12. High-throughput sequencing-based analysis of endogenetic fungal communities inhabiting the Chinese Cordyceps reveals unexpectedly high fungal diversity

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Fei; Chen, Xin; Guo, Meng-Yuan; Bai, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Yan; Shen, Guang-Rong; Li, Yu-Ling; Lin, Juan; Zhou, Xuan-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Chinese Cordyceps, known in Chinese as “DongChong XiaCao”, is a parasitic complex of a fungus (Ophiocordyceps sinensis) and a caterpillar. The current study explored the endogenetic fungal communities inhabiting Chinese Cordyceps. Samples were collected from five different geographical regions of Qinghai and Tibet, and the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer-1 sequences from each sample were obtained using Illumina high-throughput sequencing. The results showed that Ascomycota was the dominant fungal phylum in Chinese Cordyceps and its soil microhabitat from different sampling regions. Among the Ascomycota, 65 genera were identified, and the abundant operational taxonomic units showed the strongest sequence similarity to Ophiocordyceps, Verticillium, Pseudallescheria, Candida and Ilyonectria Not surprisingly, the genus Ophiocordyceps was the largest among the fungal communities identified in the fruiting bodies and external mycelial cortices of Chinese Cordyceps. In addition, fungal communities in the soil microhabitats were clustered separately from the external mycelial cortices and fruiting bodies of Chinese Cordyceps from different sampling regions. There was no significant structural difference in the fungal communities between the fruiting bodies and external mycelial cortices of Chinese Cordyceps. This study revealed an unexpectedly high diversity of fungal communities inhabiting the Chinese Cordyceps and its microhabitats. PMID:27625176

  13. High-throughput sequencing-based analysis of endogenetic fungal communities inhabiting the Chinese Cordyceps reveals unexpectedly high fungal diversity.

    PubMed

    Xia, Fei; Chen, Xin; Guo, Meng-Yuan; Bai, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Yan; Shen, Guang-Rong; Li, Yu-Ling; Lin, Juan; Zhou, Xuan-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Chinese Cordyceps, known in Chinese as "DongChong XiaCao", is a parasitic complex of a fungus (Ophiocordyceps sinensis) and a caterpillar. The current study explored the endogenetic fungal communities inhabiting Chinese Cordyceps. Samples were collected from five different geographical regions of Qinghai and Tibet, and the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer-1 sequences from each sample were obtained using Illumina high-throughput sequencing. The results showed that Ascomycota was the dominant fungal phylum in Chinese Cordyceps and its soil microhabitat from different sampling regions. Among the Ascomycota, 65 genera were identified, and the abundant operational taxonomic units showed the strongest sequence similarity to Ophiocordyceps, Verticillium, Pseudallescheria, Candida and Ilyonectria Not surprisingly, the genus Ophiocordyceps was the largest among the fungal communities identified in the fruiting bodies and external mycelial cortices of Chinese Cordyceps. In addition, fungal communities in the soil microhabitats were clustered separately from the external mycelial cortices and fruiting bodies of Chinese Cordyceps from different sampling regions. There was no significant structural difference in the fungal communities between the fruiting bodies and external mycelial cortices of Chinese Cordyceps. This study revealed an unexpectedly high diversity of fungal communities inhabiting the Chinese Cordyceps and its microhabitats. PMID:27625176

  14. Unexpected Changes in the Population of Coordination Isomers for the Lanthanide Ion Complexes of DOTMA-Tetraglycinate.

    PubMed

    Kumas, Cemile; Fernando, W Shirangi; Zhao, Piyu; Regueiro-Figueroa, Martín; Kiefer, Garry E; Martins, André F; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Sherry, A Dean

    2016-09-19

    Lanthanide complexes with DOTA-tetraglycinate (DOTA-(gly)4) heavily favor the square antiprismatic (SAP) coordination isomer in aqueous solution, a structural feature that has made them useful as water-based paraCEST agents. In an effort to create amide-based paraCEST agents with rapid water exchange rates, we prepared the analogous tetraglycinate complexes with DOTMA, a ligand known to favor the twisted square antiprismatic (TSAP) coordination structures. Unexpectedly, NMR investigations show that the LnDOTMA-(gly)4 complexes, like the LnDOTA-(gly)4 complexes, also favor the SAP isomers in solution. This observation led to density functional theory (DFT) calculations in order to identify the energy terms that favor the SAP structures in lanthanide complexes formed with macrocyclic DOTA- and DOTMA-tetraamide ligands. The DFT calculations revealed that, regardless the nature of the ligand, the TSAP isomers present more negative hydration energies than the SAP counterparts. The extent to which the TSAP isomer is stabilized varies, however, depending on the ligand structure, resulting in different isomeric populations in solution. PMID:27603690

  15. Metagenomic investigation of the geologically unique Hellenic Volcanic Arc reveals a distinctive ecosystem with unexpected physiology.

    PubMed

    Oulas, Anastasis; Polymenakou, Paraskevi N; Seshadri, Rekha; Tripp, H James; Mandalakis, Manolis; Paez-Espino, A David; Pati, Amrita; Chain, Patrick; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Carey, Steven; Kilias, Stephanos; Christakis, Christos; Kotoulas, Georgios; Magoulas, Antonios; Ivanova, Natalia N; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2016-04-01

    Hydrothermal vents represent a deep, hot, aphotic biosphere where chemosynthetic primary producers, fuelled by chemicals from Earth's subsurface, form the basis of life. In this study, we examined microbial mats from two distinct volcanic sites within the Hellenic Volcanic Arc (HVA). The HVA is geologically and ecologically unique, with reported emissions of CO2 -saturated fluids at temperatures up to 220°C and a notable absence of macrofauna. Metagenomic data reveals highly complex prokaryotic communities composed of chemolithoautotrophs, some methanotrophs, and to our surprise, heterotrophs capable of anaerobic degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons. Our data suggest that aromatic hydrocarbons may indeed be a significant source of carbon in these sites, and instigate additional research into the nature and origin of these compounds in the HVA. Novel physiology was assigned to several uncultured prokaryotic lineages; most notably, a SAR406 representative is attributed with a role in anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation. This dataset, the largest to date from submarine volcanic ecosystems, constitutes a significant resource of novel genes and pathways with potential biotechnological applications. PMID:26487573

  16. Metagenomic investigation of the geologically unique Hellenic Volcanic Arc reveals a distinctive ecosystem with unexpected physiology.

    PubMed

    Oulas, Anastasis; Polymenakou, Paraskevi N; Seshadri, Rekha; Tripp, H James; Mandalakis, Manolis; Paez-Espino, A David; Pati, Amrita; Chain, Patrick; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Carey, Steven; Kilias, Stephanos; Christakis, Christos; Kotoulas, Georgios; Magoulas, Antonios; Ivanova, Natalia N; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2016-04-01

    Hydrothermal vents represent a deep, hot, aphotic biosphere where chemosynthetic primary producers, fuelled by chemicals from Earth's subsurface, form the basis of life. In this study, we examined microbial mats from two distinct volcanic sites within the Hellenic Volcanic Arc (HVA). The HVA is geologically and ecologically unique, with reported emissions of CO2 -saturated fluids at temperatures up to 220°C and a notable absence of macrofauna. Metagenomic data reveals highly complex prokaryotic communities composed of chemolithoautotrophs, some methanotrophs, and to our surprise, heterotrophs capable of anaerobic degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons. Our data suggest that aromatic hydrocarbons may indeed be a significant source of carbon in these sites, and instigate additional research into the nature and origin of these compounds in the HVA. Novel physiology was assigned to several uncultured prokaryotic lineages; most notably, a SAR406 representative is attributed with a role in anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation. This dataset, the largest to date from submarine volcanic ecosystems, constitutes a significant resource of novel genes and pathways with potential biotechnological applications.

  17. In situ TEM straining of nanograined free-standing thin films reveals various unexpected deformation mechanisms.

    SciTech Connect

    Follstaedt, David Martin; Knapp, James Arthur; Clark, Blythe G.; Hattar, Khalid M.; Robertson, Ian M.

    2010-04-01

    In-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) straining experiments provide direct detailed observation of the deformation and failure mechanisms active at a length scale relevant to nanomaterials. This presentation will detail continued investigations into the active mechanisms governing high purity nanograined pulsed-laser deposited (PLD) nickel, as well as recent work into dislocation-particle interactions in nanostructured PLD aluminum-alumina alloys. Straining experiments performed on nanograined PLD free-standing nanograined Ni films with an engineered grain size distribution revealed that the addition of ductility with limited decrease in strength, reported in such metals, can be attributed to the simultaneous activity of three deformation mechanisms in front of the crack tip. At the crack tip, a grain agglomeration mechanism occurs where several nanograins appear to rotate, resulting in a very thin, larger grain immediately prior to failure. In the classical plastic zone in front of the crack tip, a multitude of mechanisms were found to operate in the larger grains including: dislocation pile-up, twinning, and stress-assisted grain growth. The region outside of the plastic zone showed signs of elasticity with limited indications of dislocation activity. The insight gained from in-situ TEM straining experiments of nanograined PLD Ni provides feedback for models of the deformation and failure in nanograined FCC metals, and suggests a greater complexity in the active mechanisms. The investigation into the deformation and failure mechanisms of FCC metals via in-situ TEM straining experiments has been expanded to the effect of hard particles on the active mechanisms in nanograined aluminum with alumina particles. The microstructures investigated were developed with varying composition, grain size, and particle distribution via tailoring of the PLD conditions and subsequent annealing. In order to develop microstructures suitable for in-situ deformation testing

  18. The Crystal Structure of Cancer Osaka Thyroid Kinase Reveals an Unexpected Kinase Domain Fold*

    PubMed Central

    Gutmann, Sascha; Hinniger, Alexandra; Fendrich, Gabriele; Drückes, Peter; Antz, Sylvie; Mattes, Henri; Möbitz, Henrik; Ofner, Silvio; Schmiedeberg, Niko; Stojanovic, Aleksandar; Rieffel, Sebastien; Strauss, André; Troxler, Thomas; Glatthar, Ralf; Sparrer, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are important cellular effectors in innate immune responses and play a major role in autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Cancer Osaka thyroid (COT) kinase, also known as mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 8 (MAP3K8) and tumor progression locus 2 (Tpl-2), is a serine-threonine (ST) kinase and is a key regulator in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in macrophages. Due to its pivotal role in immune biology, COT kinase has been identified as an attractive target for pharmaceutical research that is directed at the discovery of orally available, selective, and potent inhibitors for the treatment of autoimmune disorders and cancer. The production of monomeric, recombinant COT kinase has proven to be very difficult, and issues with solubility and stability of the enzyme have hampered the discovery and optimization of potent and selective inhibitors. We developed a protocol for the production of recombinant human COT kinase that yields pure and highly active enzyme in sufficient yields for biochemical and structural studies. The quality of the enzyme allowed us to establish a robust in vitro phosphorylation assay for the efficient biochemical characterization of COT kinase inhibitors and to determine the x-ray co-crystal structures of the COT kinase domain in complex with two ATP-binding site inhibitors. The structures presented in this study reveal two distinct ligand binding modes and a unique kinase domain architecture that has not been observed previously. The structurally versatile active site significantly impacts the design of potent, low molecular weight COT kinase inhibitors. PMID:25918157

  19. The Crystal Structure of Cancer Osaka Thyroid Kinase Reveals an Unexpected Kinase Domain Fold.

    PubMed

    Gutmann, Sascha; Hinniger, Alexandra; Fendrich, Gabriele; Drückes, Peter; Antz, Sylvie; Mattes, Henri; Möbitz, Henrik; Ofner, Silvio; Schmiedeberg, Niko; Stojanovic, Aleksandar; Rieffel, Sebastien; Strauss, André; Troxler, Thomas; Glatthar, Ralf; Sparrer, Helmut

    2015-06-12

    Macrophages are important cellular effectors in innate immune responses and play a major role in autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Cancer Osaka thyroid (COT) kinase, also known as mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 8 (MAP3K8) and tumor progression locus 2 (Tpl-2), is a serine-threonine (ST) kinase and is a key regulator in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in macrophages. Due to its pivotal role in immune biology, COT kinase has been identified as an attractive target for pharmaceutical research that is directed at the discovery of orally available, selective, and potent inhibitors for the treatment of autoimmune disorders and cancer. The production of monomeric, recombinant COT kinase has proven to be very difficult, and issues with solubility and stability of the enzyme have hampered the discovery and optimization of potent and selective inhibitors. We developed a protocol for the production of recombinant human COT kinase that yields pure and highly active enzyme in sufficient yields for biochemical and structural studies. The quality of the enzyme allowed us to establish a robust in vitro phosphorylation assay for the efficient biochemical characterization of COT kinase inhibitors and to determine the x-ray co-crystal structures of the COT kinase domain in complex with two ATP-binding site inhibitors. The structures presented in this study reveal two distinct ligand binding modes and a unique kinase domain architecture that has not been observed previously. The structurally versatile active site significantly impacts the design of potent, low molecular weight COT kinase inhibitors.

  20. Comparative transcriptomics of two environmentally relevant cyanobacteria reveals unexpected transcriptome diversity

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Karsten; Sharma, Cynthia M; Mitschke, Jan; Joke Lambrecht, S; Voß, Björn; Hess, Wolfgang R; Steglich, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Prochlorococcus is a genus of abundant and ecologically important marine cyanobacteria. Here, we present a comprehensive comparison of the structure and composition of the transcriptomes of two Prochlorococcus strains, which, despite their similarities, have adapted their gene pool to specific environmental constraints. We present genome-wide maps of transcriptional start sites (TSS) for both organisms, which are representatives of the two most diverse clades within the two major ecotypes adapted to high- and low-light conditions, respectively. Our data suggest antisense transcription for three-quarters of all genes, which is substantially more than that observed in other bacteria. We discovered hundreds of TSS within genes, most notably within 16 of the 29 prochlorosin genes, in strain MIT9313. A direct comparison revealed very little conservation in the location of TSS and the nature of non-coding transcripts between both strains. We detected extremely short 5′ untranslated regions with a median length of only 27 and 29 nt for MED4 and MIT9313, respectively, and for 8% of all protein-coding genes the median distance to the start codon is only 10 nt or even shorter. These findings and the absence of an obvious Shine–Dalgarno motif suggest that leaderless translation and ribosomal protein S1-dependent translation constitute alternative mechanisms for translation initiation in Prochlorococcus. We conclude that genome-wide antisense transcription is a major component of the transcriptional output from these relatively small genomes and that a hitherto unrecognized high degree of complexity and variability of gene expression exists in their transcriptional architecture. PMID:24739626

  1. Unexpected structural complexity of supernumerary marker chromosomes characterized by microarray comparative genomic hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Karen D; Opheim, Kent E; Hannibal, Mark C; Hing, Anne V; Glass, Ian A; Raff, Michael L; Norwood, Thomas; Torchia, Beth A

    2008-01-01

    Background Supernumerary marker chromosomes (SMCs) are structurally abnormal extra chromosomes that cannot be unambiguously identified by conventional banding techniques. In the past, SMCs have been characterized using a variety of different molecular cytogenetic techniques. Although these techniques can sometimes identify the chromosome of origin of SMCs, they are cumbersome to perform and are not available in many clinical cytogenetic laboratories. Furthermore, they cannot precisely determine the region or breakpoints of the chromosome(s) involved. In this study, we describe four patients who possess one or more SMCs (a total of eight SMCs in all four patients) that were characterized by microarray comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH). Results In at least one SMC from all four patients, array CGH uncovered unexpected complexity, in the form of complex rearrangements, that could have gone undetected using other molecular cytogenetic techniques. Although array CGH accurately defined the chromosome content of all but two minute SMCs, fluorescence in situ hybridization was necessary to determine the structure of the markers. Conclusion The increasing use of array CGH in clinical cytogenetic laboratories will provide an efficient method for more comprehensive characterization of SMCs. Improved SMC characterization, facilitated by array CGH, will allow for more accurate SMC/phenotype correlation. PMID:18471320

  2. Unexpected divergence and lack of divergence revealed in continental Asian Cyornis flycatchers (Aves: Muscicapidae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Xiaoyang; Huang, Yuan; Olsson, Urban; Martinez, Jonathan; Alström, Per; Lei, Fumin

    2016-01-01

    The flycatcher genus Cyornis (Aves: Muscicapidae) comprises 25 species with Oriental distributions. Their relationships are poorly known. We analyzed the phylogenetic relationships of 70 individuals from 12 species and several subspecies of Cyornis based on three mitochondrial genes and five nuclear introns, with special focus on Chinese and Vietnamese populations of the monotypic C. hainanus and polytypic C. rubeculoides. We found no support for inclusion of C. concretus in Cyornis. Deep divergences were observed among different subspecies of C. banyumas and C. rubeculoides. C. rubeculoides glaucicomans was also shown to have a highly distinctive song, and we propose that it is treated as a distinctive Chinese endemic species, C. glaucicomans. In contrast, the south Vietnamese C. rubeculoides klossi, which has a disjunct distribution from the other subspecies of C. rubeculoides, along with a recently discovered population in Guangdong Province (China) with several plumage features reminiscent of C. r. klossi, were indistinguishable in all loci analyzed from the phenotypically markedly different C. hainanus. More research is needed to elucidate the reasons for this unexpected pattern.

  3. The Structure of the Scaffold Nucleoporin Nup120 Reveals a New and Unexpected Domain Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Leksa, Nina C.; Brohawn, Stephen G.; Schwartz, Thomas U.; MIT

    2009-09-25

    Nucleocytoplasmic transport is mediated by nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), enormous protein assemblies residing in circular openings in the nuclear envelope. The NPC is modular, with transient and stable components. The stable core is essentially built from two multiprotein complexes, the Y-shaped heptameric Nup84 complex and the Nic96 complex, arranged around an eightfold axis. We present the crystal structure of Nup120{sup 1-757}, one of the two short arms of the Y-shaped Nup84 complex. The protein adopts a compact oval shape built around a novel bipartite {alpha}-helical domain intimately integrated with a {beta}-propeller domain. The domain arrangement is substantially different from the Nup85 {center_dot} Seh1 complex, which forms the other short arm of the Y. With the data presented here, we establish that all three branches of the Y-shaped Nup84 complex are tightly connected by helical interactions and that the {beta}-propellers likely form interaction site(s) to neighboring complexes.

  4. Citizen Science Reveals Unexpected Continental-Scale Evolutionary Change in a Model Organism

    PubMed Central

    Silvertown, Jonathan; Cook, Laurence; Cameron, Robert; Dodd, Mike; McConway, Kevin; Worthington, Jenny; Skelton, Peter; Anton, Christian; Bossdorf, Oliver; Baur, Bruno; Schilthuizen, Menno; Fontaine, Benoît; Sattmann, Helmut; Bertorelle, Giorgio; Correia, Maria; Oliveira, Cristina; Pokryszko, Beata; Ożgo, Małgorzata; Stalažs, Arturs; Gill, Eoin; Rammul, Üllar; Sólymos, Péter; Féher, Zoltan; Juan, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Organisms provide some of the most sensitive indicators of climate change and evolutionary responses are becoming apparent in species with short generation times. Large datasets on genetic polymorphism that can provide an historical benchmark against which to test for recent evolutionary responses are very rare, but an exception is found in the brown-lipped banded snail (Cepaea nemoralis). This species is sensitive to its thermal environment and exhibits several polymorphisms of shell colour and banding pattern affecting shell albedo in the majority of populations within its native range in Europe. We tested for evolutionary changes in shell albedo that might have been driven by the warming of the climate in Europe over the last half century by compiling an historical dataset for 6,515 native populations of C. nemoralis and comparing this with new data on nearly 3,000 populations. The new data were sampled mainly in 2009 through the Evolution MegaLab, a citizen science project that engaged thousands of volunteers in 15 countries throughout Europe in the biggest such exercise ever undertaken. A known geographic cline in the frequency of the colour phenotype with the highest albedo (yellow) was shown to have persisted and a difference in colour frequency between woodland and more open habitats was confirmed, but there was no general increase in the frequency of yellow shells. This may have been because snails adapted to a warming climate through behavioural thermoregulation. By contrast, we detected an unexpected decrease in the frequency of Unbanded shells and an increase in the Mid-banded morph. Neither of these evolutionary changes appears to be a direct response to climate change, indicating that the influence of other selective agents, possibly related to changing predation pressure and habitat change with effects on micro-climate. PMID:21556137

  5. Citizen science reveals unexpected continental-scale evolutionary change in a model organism.

    PubMed

    Silvertown, Jonathan; Cook, Laurence; Cameron, Robert; Dodd, Mike; McConway, Kevin; Worthington, Jenny; Skelton, Peter; Anton, Christian; Bossdorf, Oliver; Baur, Bruno; Schilthuizen, Menno; Fontaine, Benoît; Sattmann, Helmut; Bertorelle, Giorgio; Correia, Maria; Oliveira, Cristina; Pokryszko, Beata; Ożgo, Małgorzata; Stalažs, Arturs; Gill, Eoin; Rammul, Üllar; Sólymos, Péter; Féher, Zoltan; Juan, Xavier

    2011-04-27

    Organisms provide some of the most sensitive indicators of climate change and evolutionary responses are becoming apparent in species with short generation times. Large datasets on genetic polymorphism that can provide an historical benchmark against which to test for recent evolutionary responses are very rare, but an exception is found in the brown-lipped banded snail (Cepaea nemoralis). This species is sensitive to its thermal environment and exhibits several polymorphisms of shell colour and banding pattern affecting shell albedo in the majority of populations within its native range in Europe. We tested for evolutionary changes in shell albedo that might have been driven by the warming of the climate in Europe over the last half century by compiling an historical dataset for 6,515 native populations of C. nemoralis and comparing this with new data on nearly 3,000 populations. The new data were sampled mainly in 2009 through the Evolution MegaLab, a citizen science project that engaged thousands of volunteers in 15 countries throughout Europe in the biggest such exercise ever undertaken. A known geographic cline in the frequency of the colour phenotype with the highest albedo (yellow) was shown to have persisted and a difference in colour frequency between woodland and more open habitats was confirmed, but there was no general increase in the frequency of yellow shells. This may have been because snails adapted to a warming climate through behavioural thermoregulation. By contrast, we detected an unexpected decrease in the frequency of Unbanded shells and an increase in the Mid-banded morph. Neither of these evolutionary changes appears to be a direct response to climate change, indicating that the influence of other selective agents, possibly related to changing predation pressure and habitat change with effects on micro-climate.

  6. Unexpected Regularity in Swimming Behavior of Clausocalanus furcatus Revealed by a Telecentric 3D Computer Vision System

    PubMed Central

    Bianco, Giuseppe; Botte, Vincenzo; Dubroca, Laurent; Ribera d’Alcalà, Maurizio; Mazzocchi, Maria Grazia

    2013-01-01

    Planktonic copepods display a large repertoire of motion behaviors in a three-dimensional environment. Two-dimensional video observations demonstrated that the small copepod Clausocalanus furcatus, one the most widely distributed calanoids at low to medium latitudes, presented a unique swimming behavior that was continuous and fast and followed notably convoluted trajectories. Furthermore, previous observations indicated that the motion of C. furcatus resembled a random process. We characterized the swimming behavior of this species in three-dimensional space using a video system equipped with telecentric lenses, which allow tracking of zooplankton without the distortion errors inherent in common lenses. Our observations revealed unexpected regularities in the behavior of C. furcatus that appear primarily in the horizontal plane and could not have been identified in previous observations based on lateral views. Our results indicate that the swimming behavior of C. furcatus is based on a limited repertoire of basic kinematic modules but exhibits greater plasticity than previously thought. PMID:23826331

  7. Deep phenotyping of 89 xeroderma pigmentosum patients reveals unexpected heterogeneity dependent on the precise molecular defect.

    PubMed

    Fassihi, Hiva; Sethi, Mieran; Fawcett, Heather; Wing, Jonathan; Chandler, Natalie; Mohammed, Shehla; Craythorne, Emma; Morley, Ana M S; Lim, Rongxuan; Turner, Sally; Henshaw, Tanya; Garrood, Isabel; Giunti, Paola; Hedderly, Tammy; Abiona, Adesoji; Naik, Harsha; Harrop, Gemma; McGibbon, David; Jaspers, Nicolaas G J; Botta, Elena; Nardo, Tiziana; Stefanini, Miria; Young, Antony R; Sarkany, Robert P E; Lehmann, Alan R

    2016-03-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare DNA repair disorder characterized by increased susceptibility to UV radiation (UVR)-induced skin pigmentation, skin cancers, ocular surface disease, and, in some patients, sunburn and neurological degeneration. Genetically, it is assigned to eight complementation groups (XP-A to -G and variant). For the last 5 y, the UK national multidisciplinary XP service has provided follow-up for 89 XP patients, representing most of the XP patients in the United Kingdom. Causative mutations, DNA repair levels, and more than 60 clinical variables relating to dermatology, ophthalmology, and neurology have been measured, using scoring systems to categorize disease severity. This deep phenotyping has revealed unanticipated heterogeneity of clinical features, between and within complementation groups. Skin cancer is most common in XP-C, XP-E, and XP-V patients, previously considered to be the milder groups based on cellular analyses. These patients have normal sunburn reactions and are therefore diagnosed later and are less likely to adhere to UVR protection. XP-C patients are specifically hypersensitive to ocular damage, and XP-F and XP-G patients appear to be much less susceptible to skin cancer than other XP groups. Within XP groups, different mutations confer susceptibility or resistance to neurological damage. Our findings on this large cohort of XP patients under long-term follow-up reveal that XP is more heterogeneous than has previously been appreciated. Our data now enable provision of personalized prognostic information and management advice for each XP patient, as well as providing new insights into the functions of the XP proteins. PMID:26884178

  8. Deep phenotyping of 89 xeroderma pigmentosum patients reveals unexpected heterogeneity dependent on the precise molecular defect

    PubMed Central

    Fassihi, Hiva; Sethi, Mieran; Fawcett, Heather; Wing, Jonathan; Chandler, Natalie; Mohammed, Shehla; Craythorne, Emma; Morley, Ana M. S.; Lim, Rongxuan; Turner, Sally; Henshaw, Tanya; Garrood, Isabel; Giunti, Paola; Hedderly, Tammy; Abiona, Adesoji; Naik, Harsha; Harrop, Gemma; McGibbon, David; Jaspers, Nicolaas G. J.; Botta, Elena; Nardo, Tiziana; Stefanini, Miria; Young, Antony R.; Sarkany, Robert P. E.; Lehmann, Alan R.

    2016-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare DNA repair disorder characterized by increased susceptibility to UV radiation (UVR)-induced skin pigmentation, skin cancers, ocular surface disease, and, in some patients, sunburn and neurological degeneration. Genetically, it is assigned to eight complementation groups (XP-A to -G and variant). For the last 5 y, the UK national multidisciplinary XP service has provided follow-up for 89 XP patients, representing most of the XP patients in the United Kingdom. Causative mutations, DNA repair levels, and more than 60 clinical variables relating to dermatology, ophthalmology, and neurology have been measured, using scoring systems to categorize disease severity. This deep phenotyping has revealed unanticipated heterogeneity of clinical features, between and within complementation groups. Skin cancer is most common in XP-C, XP-E, and XP-V patients, previously considered to be the milder groups based on cellular analyses. These patients have normal sunburn reactions and are therefore diagnosed later and are less likely to adhere to UVR protection. XP-C patients are specifically hypersensitive to ocular damage, and XP-F and XP-G patients appear to be much less susceptible to skin cancer than other XP groups. Within XP groups, different mutations confer susceptibility or resistance to neurological damage. Our findings on this large cohort of XP patients under long-term follow-up reveal that XP is more heterogeneous than has previously been appreciated. Our data now enable provision of personalized prognostic information and management advice for each XP patient, as well as providing new insights into the functions of the XP proteins. PMID:26884178

  9. Deep phenotyping of 89 xeroderma pigmentosum patients reveals unexpected heterogeneity dependent on the precise molecular defect.

    PubMed

    Fassihi, Hiva; Sethi, Mieran; Fawcett, Heather; Wing, Jonathan; Chandler, Natalie; Mohammed, Shehla; Craythorne, Emma; Morley, Ana M S; Lim, Rongxuan; Turner, Sally; Henshaw, Tanya; Garrood, Isabel; Giunti, Paola; Hedderly, Tammy; Abiona, Adesoji; Naik, Harsha; Harrop, Gemma; McGibbon, David; Jaspers, Nicolaas G J; Botta, Elena; Nardo, Tiziana; Stefanini, Miria; Young, Antony R; Sarkany, Robert P E; Lehmann, Alan R

    2016-03-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare DNA repair disorder characterized by increased susceptibility to UV radiation (UVR)-induced skin pigmentation, skin cancers, ocular surface disease, and, in some patients, sunburn and neurological degeneration. Genetically, it is assigned to eight complementation groups (XP-A to -G and variant). For the last 5 y, the UK national multidisciplinary XP service has provided follow-up for 89 XP patients, representing most of the XP patients in the United Kingdom. Causative mutations, DNA repair levels, and more than 60 clinical variables relating to dermatology, ophthalmology, and neurology have been measured, using scoring systems to categorize disease severity. This deep phenotyping has revealed unanticipated heterogeneity of clinical features, between and within complementation groups. Skin cancer is most common in XP-C, XP-E, and XP-V patients, previously considered to be the milder groups based on cellular analyses. These patients have normal sunburn reactions and are therefore diagnosed later and are less likely to adhere to UVR protection. XP-C patients are specifically hypersensitive to ocular damage, and XP-F and XP-G patients appear to be much less susceptible to skin cancer than other XP groups. Within XP groups, different mutations confer susceptibility or resistance to neurological damage. Our findings on this large cohort of XP patients under long-term follow-up reveal that XP is more heterogeneous than has previously been appreciated. Our data now enable provision of personalized prognostic information and management advice for each XP patient, as well as providing new insights into the functions of the XP proteins.

  10. Uranus' Southern Circulation Revealed by Voyager-2 Images: Asymmetric, Unique, Unexpected

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karkoschka, Erich

    2014-11-01

    The southern half of Uranus' southern hemisphere of Uranus has been exceptionally bland. Only a single discrete feature was detected in Voyager-2 images, and none has been seen in thousands of HST and ground-based images since. All other observed regions on Uranus and jovian planets have many features that defined circulation patterns of the jovian planets, but the circulation of Uranus south of -45 deg latitude has been unknown.We performed a reanalysis of Voyager images of Uranus that revealed dozens of discrete features instead of the single feature known before. We improved flatfielding, pad-pixel treatment, and nonlinearity correction. We greatly decreased noise by averaging up to 1600 images. The result is a rotational profile without major gaps.Uranus' high southern latitudes are exceptional in several aspects: 1) The rotational profile has sharp kinks while it is smooth elsewhere on the ice giants. This puts current ideas of a simple Hadley cell on each hemisphere into question. 2) The rotational profile has a large north-south asymmetry, an order of magnitude larger than elsewhere on the jovian planets. 3) Between -68 and -59 deg latitude, the rotational shear is some 30 times lower than at other latitudes. Here, winds speeds around 200 m/s are regular to the 0.1 m/s level. 4) The South Pole had a spot off center rotating 5 h faster than the interior, which has not been observed elsewhere on jovian planets. 5) Uranus revealed spirals winding around the whole planet more than once that indicate very regular meridional motions, to the 2 cm/s level. 6) The latitude at -84 deg was featureless even at a signal-to-noise ratio of 55,000, one of the blandest zones in nature.Some features show significant evolution within the 5-week observing period providing constraints on dynamics. Features also show distinct spectral characteristics in the 8-filter data set providing constraints on the physical nature of features and their altitude. We have the data to

  11. Multi-tissue coexpression networks reveal unexpected subnetworks associated with disease

    PubMed Central

    Dobrin, Radu; Zhu, Jun; Molony, Cliona; Argman, Carmen; Parrish, Mark L; Carlson, Sonia; Allan, Mark F; Pomp, Daniel; Schadt, Eric E

    2009-01-01

    Background Obesity is a particularly complex disease that at least partially involves genetic and environmental perturbations to gene-networks connecting the hypothalamus and several metabolic tissues, resulting in an energy imbalance at the systems level. Results To provide an inter-tissue view of obesity with respect to molecular states that are associated with physiological states, we developed a framework for constructing tissue-to-tissue coexpression networks between genes in the hypothalamus, liver or adipose tissue. These networks have a scale-free architecture and are strikingly independent of gene-gene coexpression networks that are constructed from more standard analyses of single tissues. This is the first systematic effort to study inter-tissue relationships and highlights genes in the hypothalamus that act as information relays in the control of peripheral tissues in obese mice. The subnetworks identified as specific to tissue-to-tissue interactions are enriched in genes that have obesity-relevant biological functions such as circadian rhythm, energy balance, stress response, or immune response. Conclusions Tissue-to-tissue networks enable the identification of disease-specific genes that respond to changes induced by different tissues and they also provide unique details regarding candidate genes for obesity that are identified in genome-wide association studies. Identifying such genes from single tissue analyses would be difficult or impossible. PMID:19463160

  12. The transcriptome of Euglena gracilis reveals unexpected metabolic capabilities for carbohydrate and natural product biochemistry.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Ellis C; Trick, Martin; Hill, Lionel; Rejzek, Martin; Dusi, Renata G; Hamilton, Chris J; Zimba, Paul V; Henrissat, Bernard; Field, Robert A

    2015-10-01

    Euglena gracilis is a highly complex alga belonging to the green plant line that shows characteristics of both plants and animals, while in evolutionary terms it is most closely related to the protozoan parasites Trypanosoma and Leishmania. This well-studied organism has long been known as a rich source of vitamins A, C and E, as well as amino acids that are essential for the human diet. Here we present de novo transcriptome sequencing and preliminary analysis, providing a basis for the molecular and functional genomics studies that will be required to direct metabolic engineering efforts aimed at enhancing the quality and quantity of high value products from E. gracilis. The transcriptome contains over 30,000 protein-encoding genes, supporting metabolic pathways for lipids, amino acids, carbohydrates and vitamins, along with capabilities for polyketide and non-ribosomal peptide biosynthesis. The metabolic and environmental robustness of Euglena is supported by a substantial capacity for responding to biotic and abiotic stress: it has the capacity to deploy three separate pathways for vitamin C (ascorbate) production, as well as producing vitamin E (α-tocopherol) and, in addition to glutathione, the redox-active thiols nor-trypanothione and ovothiol.

  13. The structure of sperm Izumo1 reveals unexpected similarities with Plasmodium invasion proteins.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Kaoru; Han, Ling; Bianchi, Enrica; Wright, Gavin J; de Sanctis, Daniele; Jovine, Luca

    2016-07-25

    Fertilization, the culminating event in sexual reproduction, occurs when haploid sperm and egg recognize each other and fuse to form a diploid zygote. In mammals this process critically depends on the interaction between Izumo1, a protein exposed on the equatorial segment of acrosome-reacted sperm, and the egg plasma-membrane-anchored receptor Juno [1,2]. The molecular mechanism triggering gamete fusion is unresolved because both Izumo1 and Juno lack sequence similarity to known membrane fusogens. Here we report the crystal structure of Izumo1, which reveals a membrane distal region composed of a four-helix bundle connected to a carboxy-terminal immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domain through a β-hairpin stabilized by disulfide bonds. Remarkably, different regions of Izumo1 display significant structural similarities to two proteins expressed by the invasive sporozoite stage of Plasmodium parasites: SPECT1, which is essential for host cell traversal and hepatocyte invasion [3]; and TRAP, which is necessary for gliding motility and invasion [4]. These observations suggest a link between the molecular mechanisms underlying host cell invasion by the malaria parasite and gamete membrane fusion at fertilization.

  14. Integrated analyses resolve conflicts over squamate reptile phylogeny and reveal unexpected placements for fossil taxa.

    PubMed

    Reeder, Tod W; Townsend, Ted M; Mulcahy, Daniel G; Noonan, Brice P; Wood, Perry L; Sites, Jack W; Wiens, John J

    2015-01-01

    Squamate reptiles (lizards and snakes) are a pivotal group whose relationships have become increasingly controversial. Squamates include >9000 species, making them the second largest group of terrestrial vertebrates. They are important medicinally and as model systems for ecological and evolutionary research. However, studies of squamate biology are hindered by uncertainty over their relationships, and some consider squamate phylogeny unresolved, given recent conflicts between molecular and morphological results. To resolve these conflicts, we expand existing morphological and molecular datasets for squamates (691 morphological characters and 46 genes, for 161 living and 49 fossil taxa, including a new set of 81 morphological characters and adding two genes from published studies) and perform integrated analyses. Our results resolve higher-level relationships as indicated by molecular analyses, and reveal hidden morphological support for the molecular hypothesis (but not vice-versa). Furthermore, we find that integrating molecular, morphological, and paleontological data leads to surprising placements for two major fossil clades (Mosasauria and Polyglyphanodontia). These results further demonstrate the importance of combining fossil and molecular information, and the potential problems of estimating the placement of fossil taxa from morphological data alone. Thus, our results caution against estimating fossil relationships without considering relevant molecular data, and against placing fossils into molecular trees (e.g. for dating analyses) without considering the possible impact of molecular data on their placement.

  15. Morphology and Molecules Reveal Unexpected Cryptic Diversity in the Enigmatic Genus Sinobirma Bryk, 1944 (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae)

    PubMed Central

    Rougerie, Rodolphe; Naumann, Stefan; Nässig, Wolfgang A.

    2012-01-01

    The wild silkmoth genus Sinobirma Bryk, 1944 is a poorly known monotypic taxon from the eastern end of the Himalaya Range. It was convincingly proposed to be closely related to some members of an exclusively Afro-tropical group of Saturniidae, but its biogeographical and evolutionary history remains enigmatic. After examining recently collected material from Tibet, northern India, and northeastern Myanmar, we realized that this unique species, S. malaisei Bryk, 1944 only known so far from a few specimens and from a very restricted area near the border between north-eastern Myanmar and the Yunnan province of China, may in fact belong to a group of closely related cryptic species. In this work, we combined morphological comparative study, DNA barcoding, and the sequences of a nuclear marker (D2 expansion segment of the 28S rRNA gene) to unequivocally delimit three distinct species in the genus Sinobirma, of which two are described as new to science: S. myanmarensis sp. n. and S. bouyeri sp. n. An informative DNA barcode sequence was obtained from the female holotype of S. malaisei—collected in 1934—ensuring the proper assignation of this name to the newly collected and studied specimens. Our findings represent another example of the potential of coupling traditional taxonomy and DNA barcoding for revealing and solving difficult cases of cryptic diversity. This approach is now being generalized to the world fauna of Saturniidae, with the participation of most of the taxonomists studying these moths. PMID:23028478

  16. Common and unexpected findings in mummies from ancient Egypt and South America as revealed by CT.

    PubMed

    Jackowski, Christian; Bolliger, Stephan; Thali, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has proved to be a valuable investigative tool for mummy research and is the method of choice for examining mummies. It allows for noninvasive insight, especially with virtual endoscopy, which reveals detailed information about the mummy's sex, age, constitution, injuries, health, and mummification techniques used. CT also supplies three-dimensional information about the scanned object. Mummification processes can be summarized as "artificial," when the procedure was performed on a body with the aim of preservation, or as "natural," when the body's natural environment resulted in preservation. The purpose of artificial mummification was to preserve that person's morphologic features by delaying or arresting the decay of the body. The ancient Egyptians are most famous for this. Their use of evisceration followed by desiccation with natron (a compound of sodium salts) to halt putrefaction and prevent rehydration was so effective that their embalmed bodies have survived for nearly 4500 years. First, the body was cleaned with a natron solution; then internal organs were removed through the cribriform plate and abdomen. The most important, and probably the most lengthy, phase was desiccation. After the body was dehydrated, the body cavities were rinsed and packed to restore the body's former shape. Finally, the body was wrapped. Animals were also mummified to provide food for the deceased, to accompany the deceased as pets, because they were seen as corporal manifestations of deities, and as votive offerings. Artificial mummification was performed on every continent, especially in South and Central America.

  17. Proteomic Investigation of Aphid Honeydew Reveals an Unexpected Diversity of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Haubruge, Eric; Hance, Thierry; Thonart, Philippe; De Pauw, Edwin; Francis, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Aphids feed on the phloem sap of plants, and are the most common honeydew-producing insects. While aphid honeydew is primarily considered to comprise sugars and amino acids, its protein diversity has yet to be documented. Here, we report on the investigation of the honeydew proteome from the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum. Using a two-Dimensional Differential in-Gel Electrophoresis (2D-Dige) approach, more than 140 spots were isolated, demonstrating that aphid honeydew also represents a diverse source of proteins. About 66% of the isolated spots were identified through mass spectrometry analysis, revealing that the protein diversity of aphid honeydew originates from several organisms (i.e. the host aphid and its microbiota, including endosymbiotic bacteria and gut flora). Interestingly, our experiments also allowed to identify some proteins like chaperonin, GroEL and Dnak chaperones, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), and flagellin that might act as mediators in the plant-aphid interaction. In addition to providing the first aphid honeydew proteome analysis, we propose to reconsider the importance of this substance, mainly acknowledged to be a waste product, from the aphid ecology perspective. PMID:24086359

  18. Integrated Analyses Resolve Conflicts over Squamate Reptile Phylogeny and Reveal Unexpected Placements for Fossil Taxa

    PubMed Central

    Reeder, Tod W.; Townsend, Ted M.; Mulcahy, Daniel G.; Noonan, Brice P.; Wood, Perry L.; Sites, Jack W.; Wiens, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Squamate reptiles (lizards and snakes) are a pivotal group whose relationships have become increasingly controversial. Squamates include >9000 species, making them the second largest group of terrestrial vertebrates. They are important medicinally and as model systems for ecological and evolutionary research. However, studies of squamate biology are hindered by uncertainty over their relationships, and some consider squamate phylogeny unresolved, given recent conflicts between molecular and morphological results. To resolve these conflicts, we expand existing morphological and molecular datasets for squamates (691 morphological characters and 46 genes, for 161 living and 49 fossil taxa, including a new set of 81 morphological characters and adding two genes from published studies) and perform integrated analyses. Our results resolve higher-level relationships as indicated by molecular analyses, and reveal hidden morphological support for the molecular hypothesis (but not vice-versa). Furthermore, we find that integrating molecular, morphological, and paleontological data leads to surprising placements for two major fossil clades (Mosasauria and Polyglyphanodontia). These results further demonstrate the importance of combining fossil and molecular information, and the potential problems of estimating the placement of fossil taxa from morphological data alone. Thus, our results caution against estimating fossil relationships without considering relevant molecular data, and against placing fossils into molecular trees (e.g. for dating analyses) without considering the possible impact of molecular data on their placement. PMID:25803280

  19. The structure of sperm Izumo1 reveals unexpected similarities with Plasmodium invasion proteins.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Kaoru; Han, Ling; Bianchi, Enrica; Wright, Gavin J; de Sanctis, Daniele; Jovine, Luca

    2016-07-25

    Fertilization, the culminating event in sexual reproduction, occurs when haploid sperm and egg recognize each other and fuse to form a diploid zygote. In mammals this process critically depends on the interaction between Izumo1, a protein exposed on the equatorial segment of acrosome-reacted sperm, and the egg plasma-membrane-anchored receptor Juno [1,2]. The molecular mechanism triggering gamete fusion is unresolved because both Izumo1 and Juno lack sequence similarity to known membrane fusogens. Here we report the crystal structure of Izumo1, which reveals a membrane distal region composed of a four-helix bundle connected to a carboxy-terminal immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domain through a β-hairpin stabilized by disulfide bonds. Remarkably, different regions of Izumo1 display significant structural similarities to two proteins expressed by the invasive sporozoite stage of Plasmodium parasites: SPECT1, which is essential for host cell traversal and hepatocyte invasion [3]; and TRAP, which is necessary for gliding motility and invasion [4]. These observations suggest a link between the molecular mechanisms underlying host cell invasion by the malaria parasite and gamete membrane fusion at fertilization. PMID:27374339

  20. Kinetic Analysis as a Tool to Distinguish Pathway Complexity in Molecular Assembly: An Unexpected Outcome of Structures in Competition.

    PubMed

    van der Zwaag, Daan; Pieters, Pascal A; Korevaar, Peter A; Markvoort, Albert J; Spiering, A J H; de Greef, Tom F A; Meijer, E W

    2015-10-01

    While the sensitive dependence of the functional characteristics of self-assembled nanofibers on the molecular structure of their building blocks is well-known, the crucial influence of the dynamics of the assembly process is often overlooked. For natural protein-based fibrils, various aggregation mechanisms have been demonstrated, from simple primary nucleation to secondary nucleation and off-pathway aggregation. Similar pathway complexity has recently been described in synthetic supramolecular polymers and has been shown to be intimately linked to their morphology. We outline a general method to investigate the consequences of the presence of multiple assembly pathways, and show how kinetic analysis can be used to distinguish different assembly mechanisms. We illustrate our combined experimental and theoretical approach by studying the aggregation of chiral bipyridine-extended 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxamides (BiPy-1) in n-butanol as a model system. Our workflow consists of nonlinear least-squares analysis of steady-state spectroscopic measurements, which cannot provide conclusive mechanistic information but yields the equilibrium constants of the self-assembly process as constraints for subsequent kinetic analysis. Furthermore, kinetic nucleation-elongation models based on one and two competing pathways are used to interpret time-dependent spectroscopic measurements acquired using stop-flow and temperature-jump methods. Thus, we reveal that the sharp transition observed in the aggregation process of BiPy-1 cannot be explained by a single cooperative pathway, but can be described by a competitive two-pathway mechanism. This work provides a general tool for analyzing supramolecular polymerizations and establishing energetic landscapes, leading to mechanistic insights that at first sight may seem unexpected and counterintuitive. PMID:26354151

  1. Post-genomic analyses of fungal lignocellulosic biomass degradation reveal the unexpected potential of the plant pathogen Ustilago maydis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Filamentous fungi are potent biomass degraders due to their ability to thrive in ligno(hemi)cellulose-rich environments. During the last decade, fungal genome sequencing initiatives have yielded abundant information on the genes that are putatively involved in lignocellulose degradation. At present, additional experimental studies are essential to provide insights into the fungal secreted enzymatic pools involved in lignocellulose degradation. Results In this study, we performed a wide analysis of 20 filamentous fungi for which genomic data are available to investigate their biomass-hydrolysis potential. A comparison of fungal genomes and secretomes using enzyme activity profiling revealed discrepancies in carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes) sets dedicated to plant cell wall. Investigation of the contribution made by each secretome to the saccharification of wheat straw demonstrated that most of them individually supplemented the industrial Trichoderma reesei CL847 enzymatic cocktail. Unexpectedly, the most striking effect was obtained with the phytopathogen Ustilago maydis that improved the release of total sugars by 57% and of glucose by 22%. Proteomic analyses of the best-performing secretomes indicated a specific enzymatic mechanism of U. maydis that is likely to involve oxido-reductases and hemicellulases. Conclusion This study provides insight into the lignocellulose-degradation mechanisms by filamentous fungi and allows for the identification of a number of enzymes that are potentially useful to further improve the industrial lignocellulose bioconversion process. PMID:22300648

  2. Unexpected Genetic Diversity among and within Populations of the Toxic Dinoflagellate Alexandrium catenella as Revealed by Nuclear Microsatellite Markers▿

    PubMed Central

    Masseret, Estelle; Grzebyk, Daniel; Nagai, Satoshi; Genovesi, Benjamin; Lasserre, Bernard; Laabir, Mohamed; Collos, Yves; Vaquer, André; Berrebi, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Since 1998, blooms of Alexandrium catenella associated with paralytic shellfish poisoning have been repeatedly reported for Thau Lagoon (French Mediterranean coast). Based on data obtained for rRNA gene markers, it has been suggested that the strains involved could be closely related to the Japanese temperate Asian ribotype of the temperate Asian clade. In order to gain more insight into the origin of these organisms, we carried out a genetic analysis of 61 Mediterranean and 23 Japanese strains using both ribosomal and microsatellite markers. Whereas the phylogeny based on ribosomal markers tended to confirm the previous findings, the analysis of microsatellite sequences revealed an unexpected distinction between the French and Japanese populations. This analysis also highlighted great intraspecific diversity that was not detected with the classical rRNA gene markers. The Japanese strains are divided into two differentiated A. catenella lineages: the Sea of Japan lineage and the east coast lineage, which includes populations from the Inland Sea and the Pacific Ocean. A. catenella strains isolated from Thau Lagoon belong to another lineage. These findings indicate that microsatellite markers are probably better suited to investigations of the population genetics of this species that is distributed worldwide. Finally, application of the population genetics concepts available for macroorganisms could support new paradigms for speciation and migration in phytoplankton assemblages. PMID:19201972

  3. Zirconium and hafnium complexes containing N-alkyl-substituted amine biphenolate ligands: unexpected ligand degradation and divergent complex constitutions governed by N-alkyls.

    PubMed

    Liang, Lan-Chang; Chien, Chia-Cheng; Chen, Ming-Tsz; Lin, Sheng-Ta

    2013-07-01

    The reactivity and thermal stability of zirconium and hafnium complexes containing the N-alkyl-substituted amine biphenolate ligands of the type [RN(CH2-2-O-3,5-C6H2(tBu)2)2](2-) ([R-ONO](2-); R = tBu (1a), iPr (1b), or nPr (1c)) were investigated. The reactions of either [1a]M(OiPr)2 (M = Zr or Hf) with equimolar H2[1a] or M(OiPr)4(HOiPr) (M = Zr or Hf) with 2 equiv of H2[1a] at 25 °C in diethyl ether or 80 °C in toluene afford moderate yields of colorless crystals of M[1a](OiPr)(iPrOCH2-2-O-3,5-C6H2(tBu)2) (M = Zr (4a) or Hf (5a)). Controlled experiments revealed that the production of 4a and 5a proceeds via unexpected thermal degradation of H2[1a] that produces a highly reactive, transient ortho-quinone methide intermediate. Similar reactions employing H2[1b] and H2[1c], however, led to the formation of homoleptic bis-ligand complexes Zr[1b]2 (8b) and M[1c]2 (M = Zr (8c) or Hf (9c)) as colorless crystals. Decisive factors governing these divergent reaction pathways and complex constitutions are discussed. The X-ray structures of 4a, 5a, 8b, 8c, and 9c are presented.

  4. Directed Evolution Reveals Unexpected Epistatic Interactions That Alter Metabolic Regulation and Enable Anaerobic Xylose Use by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Tremaine, Mary; Hebert, Alexander S.; Myers, Kevin S.; Sardi, Maria; Dickinson, Quinn; Reed, Jennifer L.; Zhang, Yaoping; Coon, Joshua J.; Hittinger, Chris Todd; Gasch, Audrey P.; Landick, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The inability of native Saccharomyces cerevisiae to convert xylose from plant biomass into biofuels remains a major challenge for the production of renewable bioenergy. Despite extensive knowledge of the regulatory networks controlling carbon metabolism in yeast, little is known about how to reprogram S. cerevisiae to ferment xylose at rates comparable to glucose. Here we combined genome sequencing, proteomic profiling, and metabolomic analyses to identify and characterize the responsible mutations in a series of evolved strains capable of metabolizing xylose aerobically or anaerobically. We report that rapid xylose conversion by engineered and evolved S. cerevisiae strains depends upon epistatic interactions among genes encoding a xylose reductase (GRE3), a component of MAP Kinase (MAPK) signaling (HOG1), a regulator of Protein Kinase A (PKA) signaling (IRA2), and a scaffolding protein for mitochondrial iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biogenesis (ISU1). Interestingly, the mutation in IRA2 only impacted anaerobic xylose consumption and required the loss of ISU1 function, indicating a previously unknown connection between PKA signaling, Fe-S cluster biogenesis, and anaerobiosis. Proteomic and metabolomic comparisons revealed that the xylose-metabolizing mutant strains exhibit altered metabolic pathways relative to the parental strain when grown in xylose. Further analyses revealed that interacting mutations in HOG1 and ISU1 unexpectedly elevated mitochondrial respiratory proteins and enabled rapid aerobic respiration of xylose and other non-fermentable carbon substrates. Our findings suggest a surprising connection between Fe-S cluster biogenesis and signaling that facilitates aerobic respiration and anaerobic fermentation of xylose, underscoring how much remains unknown about the eukaryotic signaling systems that regulate carbon metabolism. PMID:27741250

  5. Novel and Unexpected Microbial Diversity in Acid Mine Drainage in Svalbard (78° N), Revealed by Culture-Independent Approaches

    PubMed Central

    García-Moyano, Antonio; Austnes, Andreas Erling; Lanzén, Anders; González-Toril, Elena; Aguilera, Ángeles; Øvreås, Lise

    2015-01-01

    Svalbard, situated in the high Arctic, is an important past and present coal mining area. Dozens of abandoned waste rock piles can be found in the proximity of Longyearbyen. This environment offers a unique opportunity for studying the biological control over the weathering of sulphide rocks at low temperatures. Although the extension and impact of acid mine drainage (AMD) in this area is known, the native microbial communities involved in this process are still scarcely studied and uncharacterized. Several abandoned mining areas were explored in the search for active AMD and a culture-independent approach was applied with samples from two different runoffs for the identification and quantification of the native microbial communities. The results obtained revealed two distinct microbial communities. One of the runoffs was more extreme with regards to pH and higher concentration of soluble iron and heavy metals. These conditions favored the development of algal-dominated microbial mats. Typical AMD microorganisms related to known iron-oxidizing bacteria (Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans, Acidobacteria and Actinobacteria) dominated the bacterial community although some unexpected populations related to Chloroflexi were also significant. No microbial mats were found in the second area. The geochemistry here showed less extreme drainage, most likely in direct contact with the ore under the waste pile. Large deposits of secondary minerals were found and the presence of iron stalks was revealed by microscopy analysis. Although typical AMD microorganisms were also detected here, the microbial community was dominated by other populations, some of them new to this type of system (Saccharibacteria, Gallionellaceae). These were absent or lowered in numbers the farther from the spring source and they could represent native populations involved in the oxidation of sulphide rocks within the waste rock pile. This environment appears thus as a highly interesting field of potential

  6. Novel and Unexpected Microbial Diversity in Acid Mine Drainage in Svalbard (78° N), Revealed by Culture-Independent Approaches

    PubMed Central

    García-Moyano, Antonio; Austnes, Andreas Erling; Lanzén, Anders; González-Toril, Elena; Aguilera, Ángeles; Øvreås, Lise

    2015-01-01

    Svalbard, situated in the high Arctic, is an important past and present coal mining area. Dozens of abandoned waste rock piles can be found in the proximity of Longyearbyen. This environment offers a unique opportunity for studying the biological control over the weathering of sulphide rocks at low temperatures. Although the extension and impact of acid mine drainage (AMD) in this area is known, the native microbial communities involved in this process are still scarcely studied and uncharacterized. Several abandoned mining areas were explored in the search for active AMD and a culture-independent approach was applied with samples from two different runoffs for the identification and quantification of the native microbial communities. The results obtained revealed two distinct microbial communities. One of the runoffs was more extreme with regards to pH and higher concentration of soluble iron and heavy metals. These conditions favored the development of algal-dominated microbial mats. Typical AMD microorganisms related to known iron-oxidizing bacteria (Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans, Acidobacteria and Actinobacteria) dominated the bacterial community although some unexpected populations related to Chloroflexi were also significant. No microbial mats were found in the second area. The geochemistry here showed less extreme drainage, most likely in direct contact with the ore under the waste pile. Large deposits of secondary minerals were found and the presence of iron stalks was revealed by microscopy analysis. Although typical AMD microorganisms were also detected here, the microbial community was dominated by other populations, some of them new to this type of system (Saccharibacteria, Gallionellaceae). These were absent or lowered in numbers the farther from the spring source and they could represent native populations involved in the oxidation of sulphide rocks within the waste rock pile. This environment appears thus as a highly interesting field of potential

  7. Novel and Unexpected Microbial Diversity in Acid Mine Drainage in Svalbard (78° N), Revealed by Culture-Independent Approaches.

    PubMed

    García-Moyano, Antonio; Austnes, Andreas Erling; Lanzén, Anders; González-Toril, Elena; Aguilera, Ángeles; Øvreås, Lise

    2015-10-13

    Svalbard, situated in the high Arctic, is an important past and present coal mining area. Dozens of abandoned waste rock piles can be found in the proximity of Longyearbyen. This environment offers a unique opportunity for studying the biological control over the weathering of sulphide rocks at low temperatures. Although the extension and impact of acid mine drainage (AMD) in this area is known, the native microbial communities involved in this process are still scarcely studied and uncharacterized. Several abandoned mining areas were explored in the search for active AMD and a culture-independent approach was applied with samples from two different runoffs for the identification and quantification of the native microbial communities. The results obtained revealed two distinct microbial communities. One of the runoffs was more extreme with regards to pH and higher concentration of soluble iron and heavy metals. These conditions favored the development of algal-dominated microbial mats. Typical AMD microorganisms related to known iron-oxidizing bacteria (Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans, Acidobacteria and Actinobacteria) dominated the bacterial community although some unexpected populations related to Chloroflexi were also significant. No microbial mats were found in the second area. The geochemistry here showed less extreme drainage, most likely in direct contact with the ore under the waste pile. Large deposits of secondary minerals were found and the presence of iron stalks was revealed by microscopy analysis. Although typical AMD microorganisms were also detected here, the microbial community was dominated by other populations, some of them new to this type of system (Saccharibacteria, Gallionellaceae). These were absent or lowered in numbers the farther from the spring source and they could represent native populations involved in the oxidation of sulphide rocks within the waste rock pile. This environment appears thus as a highly interesting field of potential

  8. Metatranscriptomic analysis of a high-sulfide aquatic spring reveals insights into sulfur cycling and unexpected aerobic metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Elshahed, Mostafa S.; Najar, Fares Z.; Krumholz, Lee R.

    2015-01-01

    Zodletone spring is a sulfide-rich spring in southwestern Oklahoma characterized by shallow, microoxic, light-exposed spring water overlaying anoxic sediments. Previously, culture-independent 16S rRNA gene based diversity surveys have revealed that Zodletone spring source sediments harbor a highly diverse microbial community, with multiple lineages putatively involved in various sulfur-cycling processes. Here, we conducted a metatranscriptomic survey of microbial populations in Zodletone spring source sediments to characterize the relative prevalence and importance of putative phototrophic, chemolithotrophic, and heterotrophic microorganisms in the sulfur cycle, the identity of lineages actively involved in various sulfur cycling processes, and the interaction between sulfur cycling and other geochemical processes at the spring source. Sediment samples at the spring’s source were taken at three different times within a 24-h period for geochemical analyses and RNA sequencing. In depth mining of datasets for sulfur cycling transcripts revealed major sulfur cycling pathways and taxa involved, including an unexpected potential role of Actinobacteria in sulfide oxidation and thiosulfate transformation. Surprisingly, transcripts coding for the cyanobacterial Photosystem II D1 protein, methane monooxygenase, and terminal cytochrome oxidases were encountered, indicating that genes for oxygen production and aerobic modes of metabolism are actively being transcribed, despite below-detectable levels (<1 µM) of oxygen in source sediment. Results highlight transcripts involved in sulfur, methane, and oxygen cycles, propose that oxygenic photosynthesis could support aerobic methane and sulfide oxidation in anoxic sediments exposed to sunlight, and provide a viewpoint of microbial metabolic lifestyles under conditions similar to those seen during late Archaean and Proterozoic eons. PMID:26417542

  9. Metatranscriptomic analysis of a high-sulfide aquatic spring reveals insights into sulfur cycling and unexpected aerobic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Spain, Anne M; Elshahed, Mostafa S; Najar, Fares Z; Krumholz, Lee R

    2015-01-01

    Zodletone spring is a sulfide-rich spring in southwestern Oklahoma characterized by shallow, microoxic, light-exposed spring water overlaying anoxic sediments. Previously, culture-independent 16S rRNA gene based diversity surveys have revealed that Zodletone spring source sediments harbor a highly diverse microbial community, with multiple lineages putatively involved in various sulfur-cycling processes. Here, we conducted a metatranscriptomic survey of microbial populations in Zodletone spring source sediments to characterize the relative prevalence and importance of putative phototrophic, chemolithotrophic, and heterotrophic microorganisms in the sulfur cycle, the identity of lineages actively involved in various sulfur cycling processes, and the interaction between sulfur cycling and other geochemical processes at the spring source. Sediment samples at the spring's source were taken at three different times within a 24-h period for geochemical analyses and RNA sequencing. In depth mining of datasets for sulfur cycling transcripts revealed major sulfur cycling pathways and taxa involved, including an unexpected potential role of Actinobacteria in sulfide oxidation and thiosulfate transformation. Surprisingly, transcripts coding for the cyanobacterial Photosystem II D1 protein, methane monooxygenase, and terminal cytochrome oxidases were encountered, indicating that genes for oxygen production and aerobic modes of metabolism are actively being transcribed, despite below-detectable levels (<1 µM) of oxygen in source sediment. Results highlight transcripts involved in sulfur, methane, and oxygen cycles, propose that oxygenic photosynthesis could support aerobic methane and sulfide oxidation in anoxic sediments exposed to sunlight, and provide a viewpoint of microbial metabolic lifestyles under conditions similar to those seen during late Archaean and Proterozoic eons. PMID:26417542

  10. Self-assembly of a M4L6 complex with unexpected S4 symmetry.

    PubMed

    Giri, Chandan; Topić, Filip; Mal, Prasenjit; Rissanen, Kari

    2014-12-28

    Using 1,4-diaminobenzene and 2-formylpyridine as simple building blocks results in a 1D ligand (rod, L2) to 2D (M4L4 grid, C1) to 3D (S4 symmetrical M4L6, C2) complexes upon sequential addition of Cu(I) and Fe(II) ions. The complex C2 can be seen as the smallest possible pseudo-tetrahedron with S4 symmetry.

  11. The synthesis and unexpected solution chemistry of thermochromic carborane-containing osmium half-sandwich complexes.

    PubMed

    Pitto-Barry, Anaïs; South, Amy; Rodger, Alison; Barry, Nicolas P E

    2016-01-28

    The functionalisation of the 16-electron complex [Os(η(6)-p-cymene)(1,2-dicarba-closo-dodecarborane-1,2-dithiolato)] (1) with a series of Lewis bases to give the 18-electron complexes of general formula [Os(η(6)-p-cymene)(1,2-dicarba-closo-dodecarborane-1,2-dithiolato)(L)] (L = pyridine (2), 4-dimethylaminopyridine (3), 4-cyanopyridine (4), 4-methoxypyridine (5), pyrazine (6), pyridazine (7), 4,4'-bipyridine (8) and triphenylphosphine (9)) is reported. All 18-electron complexes are in equilibrium in solution with the 16-electron precursor, and thermochromic properties are observed in some cases (2, 3, 5, 8, and 9). The binding constants and Gibbs free energies of the equilibria are determined using UV-visible titrations and their stabilities investigated. Synthetic routes for forcing the formation of the 18-electron species are proposed, and analytical methods to characterise the equilibria are described. PMID:26700880

  12. Expression profiling reveals an unexpected growth-stimulating effect of surplus iron on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Du, Yang; Cheng, Wang; Li, Wei-Fang

    2012-08-01

    Iron homeostasis plays a crucial role in growth and division of cells in all kingdoms of life. Although yeast iron metabolism has been extensively studied, little is known about the molecular mechanism of response to surplus iron. In this study, expression profiling of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the presence of surplus iron revealed a dual effect at 1 and 4 h. A cluster of stress-responsive genes was upregulated via activation of the stress-resistance transcription factor Msn4, which indicated the stress effect of surplus iron on yeast metabolism. Genes involved in aerobic metabolism and several anabolic pathways are also upregulated in iron-surplus conditions, which could significantly accelerate yeast growth. This dual effect suggested that surplus iron might participate in a more complex metabolic network, in addition to serving as a stress inducer. These findings contribute to our understanding of the global response of yeast to the fluctuating availability of iron in the environment.

  13. Van der Waals complexes of polar aromatic molecules: unexpected structures for dimers of azulene.

    PubMed

    Piacenza, Manuel; Grimme, Stefan

    2005-10-26

    Full geometry optimizations at the dispersion corrected DFT-BLYP/TZV2P level of theory have been performed for dimers of azulene that may serve as a model system for the van der Waals complexes of polar pi systems. The structures and binding energies for 11 dimers are investigated in detail. The DFT-D interaction energies have been successfully checked against results from the accurate SCS-MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ approach. Out of the nine investigated stacked complexes, eight have binding energies larger than 7.4 kcal/mol (SCS-MP2) that exceed the value of 7.1 kcal/mol for the best naphthalene dimer. T-shaped arrangements (CH...pi) are significantly less stable. Two out of the three best structures have an antiparallel alignment of the monomer dipole moments in the complex, although the best ones with a parallel orientation are only about 0.5 kcal/mol less strongly bound which points to a minor importance of dipole-dipole interactions to binding. Quite surprisingly, the energetically lowest structure (DeltaE = -9.2 kcal/mol) corresponds to a situation where the two seven-membered rings are located almost on top of each other (7-7) and the long molecular axes are rotated against each other by 130 degrees. The 7-7 structural motif is found also in other energetically low-lying structures, and the expected 5-7 (two-side) arrangement is less strongly bound by about 2 kcal/mol. This can be explained by the electrostatic potential of azulene that only partially reflects the charge separation according to the common 4n + 2 pi electron rule. General rules for predicting stable van der Waals complexes of polar pi systems are discussed.

  14. Micro-CT scan reveals an unexpected high-volume and interconnected pore network in a Cretaceous Sanagasta dinosaur eggshell.

    PubMed

    Hechenleitner, E Martín; Grellet-Tinner, Gerald; Foley, Matthew; Fiorelli, Lucas E; Thompson, Michael B

    2016-03-01

    The Cretaceous Sanagasta neosauropod nesting site (La Rioja, Argentina) was the first confirmed instance of extinct dinosaurs using geothermal-generated heat to incubate their eggs. The nesting strategy and hydrothermal activities at this site led to the conclusion that the surprisingly 7 mm thick-shelled eggs were adapted to harsh hydrothermal microenvironments. We used micro-CT scans in this study to obtain the first three-dimensional microcharacterization of these eggshells. Micro-CT-based analyses provide a robust assessment of gas conductance in fossil dinosaur eggshells with complex pore canal systems, allowing calculation, for the first time, of the shell conductance through its thickness. This novel approach suggests that the shell conductance could have risen during incubation to seven times more than previously estimated as the eggshell erodes. In addition, micro-CT observations reveal that the constant widening and branching of pore canals form a complex funnel-like pore canal system. Furthermore, the high density of pore canals and the presence of a lateral canal network in the shell reduce the risks of pore obstruction during the extended incubation of these eggs in a relatively highly humid and muddy nesting environment. PMID:27009182

  15. Bio-mimicking of Proline-Rich Motif Applied to Carbon Nanotube Reveals Unexpected Subtleties Underlying Nanoparticle Functionalization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanzhao; Jimenez-Cruz, Camilo A.; Wang, Jian; Zhou, Bo; Yang, Zaixing; Zhou, Ruhong

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report computational studies of the SH3 protein domain interacting with various single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) either bare or functionalized by mimicking the proline-rich motif (PRM) ligand (PPPVPPRR) and compare it to the SH3-PRM complex binding. With prolines or a single arginine attached, the SWCNT gained slightly on specificity when compared with the bare control, whereas with multi-arginine systems the specificity dropped dramatically to our surprise. Although the electrostatic interaction provided by arginines is crucial in the recognition between PRM and SH3 domain, our results suggest that attaching multiple arginines to the SWCNT has a detrimental effect on the binding affinity. Detailed analysis of the MD trajectories found two main factors that modulate the specificity of the binding: the existence of competing acidic patches at the surface of SH3 that leads to “trapping and clamping” by the arginines, and the rigidity of the SWCNT introducing entropic penalties in the proper binding. Further investigation revealed that the same “clamping” phenomenon exits in the PRM-SH3 system, which has not been reported in previous literature. The competing effects between nanoparticle and its functionalization components revealed by our model system should be of value to current and future nanomedicine designs. PMID:25427563

  16. Unexpected Outcomes of Thai Cassava Trade: A Case of Global Complexity and Local Unsustainability

    PubMed Central

    CURRAN, SARA R.; COOKE, ABIGAIL M.

    2014-01-01

    Tracing the Thai cassava (Manihot esculenta) trade network, between 1960 and 2000, offers a compelling example of global complexity at work. The emergence of Thailand’s dominance of world export markets caught the world by surprise. The opening up of a European market for cassava was supposed to be met by Brazilian and Indonesian producers. Instead, Thailand took over the market by 1975. Several factors facilitated this emergence including: entrepreneurial diasporic networks of Thai-Chinese traders, local political economy conditions in both Europe and Thailand, and ecological conditions in Thailand. These same factors also shaped the subsequent timing of the closing of the European market, the emergence of a new industry association, the creation of new cassava products, and the expansion to other markets. Furthermore, the dynamic nature of cassava market yielded equivocal outcomes for both Europe and Thai farmers. PMID:25328444

  17. Unexpectedly complex gradation of coral population structure in the Nansei Islands, Japan.

    PubMed

    Zayasu, Yuna; Nakajima, Yuichi; Sakai, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Go; Satoh, Noriyuki; Shinzato, Chuya

    2016-08-01

    To establish effective locations and sizes of potential protected areas for reef ecosystems, detailed information about source and sink relationships between populations is critical, especially in archipelagic regions. Therefore, we assessed population structure and genetic diversity of Acropora tenuis, one of the dominant stony coral species in the Pacific, using 13 microsatellite markers to investigate 298 colonies from 15 locations across the Nansei Islands in southwestern Japan. Genetic diversity was not significant among sampling locations, even in possibly peripheral locations. In addition, our results showed that there are at least two populations of A. tenuis in the study area. The level of genetic differentiation between these populations was relatively low, but significant between many pairs of sampling locations. Directions of gene flow, which were estimated using a coalescence-based approach, suggest that gene flow not only occurs from south to north, but also from north to south in various locations. Consequently, the Yaeyama Islands and the Amami Islands are potential northern and southern sources of corals. On the other hand, the Miyako Islands and west central Okinawa Island are potential sink populations. The Kerama Islands and the vicinity of Taketomi Island are potential contact points of genetic subdivision of coral populations in the Nansei Islands. We found that genetic population structure of A. tenuis in the Nansei Islands is more complex than previously thought. These cryptic populations are very important for preserving genetic diversity and should be maintained. PMID:27551399

  18. Complex communities of small protists and unexpected occurrence of typical marine lineages in shallow freshwater systems

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Marianne; Jardillier, Ludwig; Deschamps, Philippe; Moreira, David; Restoux, Gwendal; Bertolino, Paola; López-García, Purificación

    2014-01-01

    Summary Although inland water bodies are more heterogeneous and sensitive to environmental variation than oceans, the diversity of small protists in these ecosystems is much less well-known. Some molecular surveys of lakes exist, but little information is available from smaller, shallower and often ephemeral freshwater systems, despite their global distribution and ecological importance. We carried out a comparative study based on massive pyrosequencing of amplified 18S rRNA gene fragments of protists in the 0.2-5 μm-size range in one brook and four shallow ponds located in the Natural Regional Park of the Chevreuse Valley, France. Our study revealed a wide diversity of small protists, with 812 stringently defined operational taxonomic units (OTUs) belonging to the recognized eukaryotic supergroups (SAR –Stramenopiles, Alveolata, Rhizaria–, Archaeplastida, Excavata, Amoebozoa, Opisthokonta) and to groups of unresolved phylogenetic position (Cryptophyta, Haptophyta, Centrohelida, Katablepharida, Telonemida, Apusozoa). Some OTUs represented deep-branching lineages (Cryptomycota, Aphelida, Colpodellida, Tremulida, clade-10 Cercozoa, HAP-1 Haptophyta). We identified several lineages previously thought to be marine including, in addition to MAST-2 and MAST-12, already detected in freshwater, MAST-3 and possibly MAST-6. Protist community structures were different in the five ecosystems. These differences did not correlate with geographical distances, but seemed to be influenced by environmental parameters. PMID:25115943

  19. Unexpected complexity of the Reef-Building Coral Acropora millepora transcription factor network

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Coral reefs are disturbed on a global scale by environmental changes including rising sea surface temperatures and ocean acidification. Little is known about how corals respond or adapt to these environmental changes especially at the molecular level. This is mostly because of the paucity of genome-wide studies on corals and the application of systems approaches that incorporate the latter. Like in any other organism, the response of corals to stress is tightly controlled by the coordinated interplay of many transcription factors. Results Here, we develop and apply a new system-wide approach in order to infer combinatorial transcription factor networks of the reef-building coral Acropora millepora. By integrating sequencing-derived transcriptome measurements, a network of physically interacting transcription factors, and phylogenetic network footprinting we were able to infer such a network. Analysis of the network across a phylogenetically broad sample of five species, including human, reveals that despite the apparent simplicity of corals, their transcription factors repertoire and interaction networks seem to be largely conserved. In addition, we were able to identify interactions among transcription factors that appear to be species-specific lending strength to the novel concept of "Taxonomically Restricted Interactions". Conclusions This study provides the first look at transcription factor networks in corals. We identified a transcription factor repertoire encoded by the coral genome and found consistencies of the domain architectures of transcription factors and conserved regulatory subnetworks across eumetazoan species, providing insight into how regulatory networks have evolved. PMID:21526989

  20. Complex communities of small protists and unexpected occurrence of typical marine lineages in shallow freshwater systems.

    PubMed

    Simon, Marianne; Jardillier, Ludwig; Deschamps, Philippe; Moreira, David; Restoux, Gwendal; Bertolino, Paola; López-García, Purificación

    2015-10-01

    Although inland water bodies are more heterogeneous and sensitive to environmental variation than oceans, the diversity of small protists in these ecosystems is much less well known. Some molecular surveys of lakes exist, but little information is available from smaller, shallower and often ephemeral freshwater systems, despite their global distribution and ecological importance. We carried out a comparative study based on massive pyrosequencing of amplified 18S rRNA gene fragments of protists in the 0.2-5 μm size range in one brook and four shallow ponds located in the Natural Regional Park of the Chevreuse Valley, France. Our study revealed a wide diversity of small protists, with 812 stringently defined operational taxonomic units (OTUs) belonging to the recognized eukaryotic supergroups (SAR--Stramenopiles, Alveolata, Rhizaria--Archaeplastida, Excavata, Amoebozoa, Opisthokonta) and to groups of unresolved phylogenetic position (Cryptophyta, Haptophyta, Centrohelida, Katablepharida, Telonemida, Apusozoa). Some OTUs represented deep-branching lineages (Cryptomycota, Aphelida, Colpodellida, Tremulida, clade-10 Cercozoa, HAP-1 Haptophyta). We identified several lineages previously thought to be marine including, in addition to MAST-2 and MAST-12, already detected in freshwater, MAST-3 and possibly MAST-6. Protist community structures were different in the five ecosystems. These differences did not correlate with geographical distances, but seemed to be influenced by environmental parameters.

  1. Revealing the hidden language of complex networks.

    PubMed

    Yaveroğlu, Ömer Nebil; Malod-Dognin, Noël; Davis, Darren; Levnajic, Zoran; Janjic, Vuk; Karapandza, Rasa; Stojmirovic, Aleksandar; Pržulj, Nataša

    2014-01-01

    Sophisticated methods for analysing complex networks promise to be of great benefit to almost all scientific disciplines, yet they elude us. In this work, we make fundamental methodological advances to rectify this. We discover that the interaction between a small number of roles, played by nodes in a network, can characterize a network's structure and also provide a clear real-world interpretation. Given this insight, we develop a framework for analysing and comparing networks, which outperforms all existing ones. We demonstrate its strength by uncovering novel relationships between seemingly unrelated networks, such as Facebook, metabolic, and protein structure networks. We also use it to track the dynamics of the world trade network, showing that a country's role of a broker between non-trading countries indicates economic prosperity, whereas peripheral roles are associated with poverty. This result, though intuitive, has escaped all existing frameworks. Finally, our approach translates network topology into everyday language, bringing network analysis closer to domain scientists. PMID:24686408

  2. Revealing the Hidden Language of Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaveroğlu, Ömer Nebil; Malod-Dognin, Noël; Davis, Darren; Levnajic, Zoran; Janjic, Vuk; Karapandza, Rasa; Stojmirovic, Aleksandar; Pržulj, Nataša

    2014-04-01

    Sophisticated methods for analysing complex networks promise to be of great benefit to almost all scientific disciplines, yet they elude us. In this work, we make fundamental methodological advances to rectify this. We discover that the interaction between a small number of roles, played by nodes in a network, can characterize a network's structure and also provide a clear real-world interpretation. Given this insight, we develop a framework for analysing and comparing networks, which outperforms all existing ones. We demonstrate its strength by uncovering novel relationships between seemingly unrelated networks, such as Facebook, metabolic, and protein structure networks. We also use it to track the dynamics of the world trade network, showing that a country's role of a broker between non-trading countries indicates economic prosperity, whereas peripheral roles are associated with poverty. This result, though intuitive, has escaped all existing frameworks. Finally, our approach translates network topology into everyday language, bringing network analysis closer to domain scientists.

  3. Revealing the Hidden Language of Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Yaveroğlu, Ömer Nebil; Malod-Dognin, Noël; Davis, Darren; Levnajic, Zoran; Janjic, Vuk; Karapandza, Rasa; Stojmirovic, Aleksandar; Pržulj, Nataša

    2014-01-01

    Sophisticated methods for analysing complex networks promise to be of great benefit to almost all scientific disciplines, yet they elude us. In this work, we make fundamental methodological advances to rectify this. We discover that the interaction between a small number of roles, played by nodes in a network, can characterize a network's structure and also provide a clear real-world interpretation. Given this insight, we develop a framework for analysing and comparing networks, which outperforms all existing ones. We demonstrate its strength by uncovering novel relationships between seemingly unrelated networks, such as Facebook, metabolic, and protein structure networks. We also use it to track the dynamics of the world trade network, showing that a country's role of a broker between non-trading countries indicates economic prosperity, whereas peripheral roles are associated with poverty. This result, though intuitive, has escaped all existing frameworks. Finally, our approach translates network topology into everyday language, bringing network analysis closer to domain scientists. PMID:24686408

  4. Modeling and experiment reveal an unexpected stereoelectronic effect on conformation and scalar couplings of alpha-aminoorganostannanes, with possible relevance to the tin-lithium exchange reaction.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Marcelina; Low, Eddy; Chambournier, Gilles; Gawley, Robert E

    2003-10-31

    The solution conformation of N-methyl-2-(tributylstannyl)piperidines has been determined through the use of vicinal 119Sn-13C coupling constants, revealing a conformational distortion caused by an unexpected stereoelectronic effect in some cases. Specifically, the "equatorial" conformer is distorted into a half-chair, in which the nitrogen lone pair eclipses the C-Sn bond. This distortion, which "costs" approximately 1 kcal/mol, correlates with a conformational dependence of geminal 119Sn-15N couplings and a possible correlation with reactivity in the tin-lithium exchange reaction. PMID:14575474

  5. Modeling and experiment reveal an unexpected stereoelectronic effect on conformation and scalar couplings of alpha-aminoorganostannanes, with possible relevance to the tin-lithium exchange reaction.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Marcelina; Low, Eddy; Chambournier, Gilles; Gawley, Robert E

    2003-10-31

    The solution conformation of N-methyl-2-(tributylstannyl)piperidines has been determined through the use of vicinal 119Sn-13C coupling constants, revealing a conformational distortion caused by an unexpected stereoelectronic effect in some cases. Specifically, the "equatorial" conformer is distorted into a half-chair, in which the nitrogen lone pair eclipses the C-Sn bond. This distortion, which "costs" approximately 1 kcal/mol, correlates with a conformational dependence of geminal 119Sn-15N couplings and a possible correlation with reactivity in the tin-lithium exchange reaction.

  6. Second generation sequencing and morphological faecal analysis reveal unexpected foraging behaviour by Myotis nattereri (Chiroptera, Vespertilionidae) in winter

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Temperate winters produce extreme energetic challenges for small insectivorous mammals. Some bat species inhabiting locations with mild temperate winters forage during brief inter-torpor normothermic periods of activity. However, the winter diet of bats in mild temperate locations is studied infrequently. Although microscopic analyses of faeces have traditionally been used to characterise bat diet, recently the coupling of PCR with second generation sequencing has offered the potential to further advance our understanding of animal dietary composition and foraging behaviour by allowing identification of a much greater proportion of prey items often with increased taxonomic resolution. We used morphological analysis and Illumina-based second generation sequencing to study the winter diet of Natterer’s bat (Myotis nattereri) and compared the results obtained from these two approaches. For the first time, we demonstrate the applicability of the Illumina MiSeq platform as a data generation source for bat dietary analyses. Results Faecal pellets collected from a hibernation site in southern England during two winters (December-March 2009–10 and 2010–11), indicated that M. nattereri forages throughout winter at least in a location with a mild winter climate. Through morphological analysis, arthropod fragments from seven taxonomic orders were identified. A high proportion of these was non-volant (67.9% of faecal pellets) and unexpectedly included many lepidopteran larvae. Molecular analysis identified 43 prey species from six taxonomic orders and confirmed the frequent presence of lepidopteran species that overwinter as larvae. Conclusions The winter diet of M. nattereri is substantially different from other times of the year confirming that this species has a wide and adaptable dietary niche. Comparison of DNA derived from the prey to an extensive reference dataset of potential prey barcode sequences permitted fine scale taxonomic resolution of prey

  7. Unexpected Generation and Observation of a T-Shaped Complex of H_{2}C_{2}\\cdotsAgCCH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, N. R.; Stephens, S. L.; Mizukami, W.; Tew, D. P.; Legon, A. C.

    2013-06-01

    An experiment to probe species generated within a supersonically-expanding jet consisting of SF_{6}, Ag, C_{2}H_{2} and argon by broadband rotational spectroscopy revealed the existence of a T-shaped complex of hitherto unknown origin. Empirical tests revealed that this complex requires the presence of C_{2}H_{2} and Ag within the gas sample. While the intensity of the associated transitions are enhanced by the presence of SF_{6}, theoretical calculations and empirical tests implied that the identified complex is H_{2}C_{2}\\cdotsAgCCH rather than the original target of the experiment, H_{2}C_{2}\\cdotsAgF. This deduction is now supported by evidence acquired through experiments exploiting ^{13}C-enriched isotopic samples. Transitions have been assigned for the H_{2}^{13}C_{2}\\cdotsAg^{13}C^{13}CH isotopologue. Data acquired from each isotopologue allows determination of the rotational constants (B}_{0}, C}_{0}) and centrifugal distortion constant, Δ_J}. The data are consistent with a T-shaped complex in which the Ag atom of AgCCH binds to electrons within the {π}-orbitals of ethyne. Preliminary determinations of bond lengths will be presented. Experiments are in progress to measure the spectra of deuterated isotopologues.

  8. Culture-independent genome sequencing of clinical samples reveals an unexpected heterogeneity of infections by Chlamydia pecorum.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Nathan L; Sullivan, Mitchell J; Jelocnik, Martina; Myers, Garry S A; Timms, Peter; Polkinghorne, Adam

    2015-05-01

    Chlamydia pecorum is an important global pathogen of livestock, and it is also a significant threat to the long-term survival of Australia's koala populations. This study employed a culture-independent DNA capture approach to sequence C. pecorum genomes directly from clinical swab samples collected from koalas with chlamydial disease as well as from sheep with arthritis and conjunctivitis. Investigations into single-nucleotide polymorphisms within each of the swab samples revealed that a portion of the reads in each sample belonged to separate C. pecorum strains, suggesting that all of the clinical samples analyzed contained mixed populations of genetically distinct C. pecorum isolates. This observation was independent of the anatomical site sampled and the host species. Using the genomes of strains identified in each of these samples, whole-genome phylogenetic analysis revealed that a clade containing a bovine and a koala isolate is distinct from other clades comprised of livestock or koala C. pecorum strains. Providing additional evidence to support exposure of koalas to Australian livestock strains, two minor strains assembled from the koala swab samples clustered with livestock strains rather than koala strains. Culture-independent probe-based genome capture and sequencing of clinical samples provides the strongest evidence yet to suggest that naturally occurring chlamydial infections are comprised of multiple genetically distinct strains. PMID:25740768

  9. Culture-independent genome sequencing of clinical samples reveals an unexpected heterogeneity of infections by Chlamydia pecorum.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Nathan L; Sullivan, Mitchell J; Jelocnik, Martina; Myers, Garry S A; Timms, Peter; Polkinghorne, Adam

    2015-05-01

    Chlamydia pecorum is an important global pathogen of livestock, and it is also a significant threat to the long-term survival of Australia's koala populations. This study employed a culture-independent DNA capture approach to sequence C. pecorum genomes directly from clinical swab samples collected from koalas with chlamydial disease as well as from sheep with arthritis and conjunctivitis. Investigations into single-nucleotide polymorphisms within each of the swab samples revealed that a portion of the reads in each sample belonged to separate C. pecorum strains, suggesting that all of the clinical samples analyzed contained mixed populations of genetically distinct C. pecorum isolates. This observation was independent of the anatomical site sampled and the host species. Using the genomes of strains identified in each of these samples, whole-genome phylogenetic analysis revealed that a clade containing a bovine and a koala isolate is distinct from other clades comprised of livestock or koala C. pecorum strains. Providing additional evidence to support exposure of koalas to Australian livestock strains, two minor strains assembled from the koala swab samples clustered with livestock strains rather than koala strains. Culture-independent probe-based genome capture and sequencing of clinical samples provides the strongest evidence yet to suggest that naturally occurring chlamydial infections are comprised of multiple genetically distinct strains.

  10. An unexpected Schiff base-type Ni(II) complex: synthesis, crystal structures, fluorescence, electrochemical property and SOD-like activities.

    PubMed

    Chai, Lan-Qin; Zhang, Hong-Song; Huang, Jiao-Jiao; Zhang, Yu-Li

    2015-02-25

    An unexpected Schiff base-type Ni(II) complex, [Ni(L(2))2]⋅CH3OH (HL(2) = 1-(2-{[(E)-3, 5-dibromo-2-hydroxybenzylidene]amino}phenyl)ethanone oxime), has been synthesized via complexation of Ni(II) acetate tetrahydrate with HL(1) (2-(3,5-dibromo-2-hydroxyphenyl)-4-methyl-1,2-dihydroquinazoline 3-oxide) originally. HL(1) and its corresponding Ni(II) complex were characterized by IR, (1)H NMR spectra, as well as by elemental analysis, UV-Vis and emission spectroscopy, respectively. Crystal structures of the ligand and complex have been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Each complex links two other molecules into an infinite 1-D chain via intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions. Moreover, the electrochemical property of the nickle complex was studied by cyclic voltammetry. In addition, SOD-like activities of HL(1) and Ni(II) complex were also investigated.

  11. An unexpected Schiff base-type Ni(II) complex: Synthesis, crystal structures, fluorescence, electrochemical property and SOD-like activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Lan-Qin; Zhang, Hong-Song; Huang, Jiao-Jiao; Zhang, Yu-Li

    2015-02-01

    An unexpected Schiff base-type Ni(II) complex, [Ni(L2)2]ṡCH3OH (HL2 = 1-(2-{[(E)-3, 5-dibromo-2-hydroxybenzylidene]amino}phenyl)ethanone oxime), has been synthesized via complexation of Ni(II) acetate tetrahydrate with HL1 (2-(3,5-dibromo-2-hydroxyphenyl)-4-methyl-1,2-dihydroquinazoline 3-oxide) originally. HL1 and its corresponding Ni(II) complex were characterized by IR, 1H NMR spectra, as well as by elemental analysis, UV-Vis and emission spectroscopy, respectively. Crystal structures of the ligand and complex have been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Each complex links two other molecules into an infinite 1-D chain via intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions. Moreover, the electrochemical property of the nickle complex was studied by cyclic voltammetry. In addition, SOD-like activities of HL1 and Ni(II) complex were also investigated.

  12. Detailed monitoring of a small but recovering population reveals sublethal effects of disease and unexpected interactions with supplemental feeding.

    PubMed

    Tollington, Simon; Greenwood, Andrew; Jones, Carl G; Hoeck, Paquita; Chowrimootoo, Aurélie; Smith, Donal; Richards, Heather; Tatayah, Vikash; Groombridge, Jim J

    2015-07-01

    Infectious diseases are widely recognized to have substantial impact on wildlife populations. These impacts are sometimes exacerbated in small endangered populations, and therefore, the success of conservation reintroductions to aid the recovery of such species can be seriously threatened by outbreaks of infectious disease. Intensive management strategies associated with conservation reintroductions can further compound these negative effects in such populations. Exploring the sublethal effects of disease outbreaks among natural populations is challenging and requires longitudinal, individual life-history data on patterns of reproductive success and other indicators of individual fitness. Long-term monitoring data concerning detailed reproductive information of the reintroduced Mauritius parakeet (Psittacula echo) population collected before, during and after a disease outbreak was investigated. Deleterious effects of an outbreak of beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) were revealed on hatch success, but these effects were remarkably short-lived and disproportionately associated with breeding pairs which took supplemental food. Individual BFDV infection status was not predicted by any genetic, environmental or conservation management factors and was not associated with any of our measures of immune function, perhaps suggesting immunological impairment. Experimental immunostimulation using the PHA (phytohaemagglutinin assay) challenge technique did, however, provoke a significant cellular immune response. We illustrate the resilience of this bottlenecked and once critically endangered, island-endemic species to an epidemic outbreak of BFDV and highlight the value of systematic monitoring in revealing inconspicuous but nonetheless substantial ecological interactions. Our study demonstrates that the emergence of such an infectious disease in a population ordinarily associated with increased susceptibility does not necessarily lead to deleterious impacts on population

  13. The Lipopolysaccharide from Capnocytophaga canimorsus Reveals an Unexpected Role of the Core-Oligosaccharide in MD-2 Binding

    PubMed Central

    Ittig, Simon; Lindner, Buko; Stenta, Marco; Manfredi, Pablo; Zdorovenko, Evelina; Knirel, Yuriy A.; dal Peraro, Matteo

    2012-01-01

    Capnocytophaga canimorsus is a usual member of dog's mouths flora that causes rare but dramatic human infections after dog bites. We determined the structure of C. canimorsus lipid A. The main features are that it is penta-acylated and composed of a “hybrid backbone” lacking the 4′ phosphate and having a 1 phosphoethanolamine (P-Etn) at 2-amino-2-deoxy-d-glucose (GlcN). C. canimorsus LPS was 100 fold less endotoxic than Escherichia coli LPS. Surprisingly, C. canimorsus lipid A was 20,000 fold less endotoxic than the C. canimorsus lipid A-core. This represents the first example in which the core-oligosaccharide dramatically increases endotoxicity of a low endotoxic lipid A. The binding to human myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2) was dramatically increased upon presence of the LPS core on the lipid A, explaining the difference in endotoxicity. Interaction of MD-2, cluster of differentiation antigen 14 (CD14) or LPS-binding protein (LBP) with the negative charge in the 3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Kdo) of the core might be needed to form the MD-2 – lipid A complex in case the 4′ phosphate is not present. PMID:22570611

  14. Multilocus phylogenetic analyses reveal unexpected abundant diversity and significant disjunct distribution pattern of the Hedgehog Mushrooms (Hydnum L.).

    PubMed

    Feng, Bang; Wang, Xiang-Hua; Ratkowsky, David; Gates, Genevieve; Lee, Su See; Grebenc, Tine; Yang, Zhu L

    2016-01-01

    Hydnum is a fungal genus proposed by Linnaeus in the early time of modern taxonomy. It contains several ectomycorrhizal species which are commonly consumed worldwide. However, Hydnum is one of the most understudied fungal genera, especially from a molecular phylogenetic view. In this study, we extensively gathered specimens of Hydnum from Asia, Europe, America and Australasia, and analyzed them by using sequences of four gene fragments (ITS, nrLSU, tef1α and rpb1). Our phylogenetic analyses recognized at least 31 phylogenetic species within Hydnum, 15 of which were reported for the first time. Most Australasian species were recognized as strongly divergent old relics, but recent migration between Australasia and the Northern Hemisphere was also detected. Within the Northern Hemisphere, frequent historical biota exchanges between the Old World and the New World via both the North Atlantic Land Bridge and the Bering Land Bridge could be elucidated. Our study also revealed that most Hydnum species found in subalpine areas of the Hengduan Mountains in southwestern China occur in northeastern/northern China and Europe, indicating that the composition of the mycobiota in the Hengduan Mountains reigion is more complicated than what we have known before. PMID:27151256

  15. Multilocus phylogenetic analyses reveal unexpected abundant diversity and significant disjunct distribution pattern of the Hedgehog Mushrooms (Hydnum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Bang; Wang, Xiang-Hua; Ratkowsky, David; Gates, Genevieve; Lee, Su See; Grebenc, Tine; Yang, Zhu L.

    2016-01-01

    Hydnum is a fungal genus proposed by Linnaeus in the early time of modern taxonomy. It contains several ectomycorrhizal species which are commonly consumed worldwide. However, Hydnum is one of the most understudied fungal genera, especially from a molecular phylogenetic view. In this study, we extensively gathered specimens of Hydnum from Asia, Europe, America and Australasia, and analyzed them by using sequences of four gene fragments (ITS, nrLSU, tef1α and rpb1). Our phylogenetic analyses recognized at least 31 phylogenetic species within Hydnum, 15 of which were reported for the first time. Most Australasian species were recognized as strongly divergent old relics, but recent migration between Australasia and the Northern Hemisphere was also detected. Within the Northern Hemisphere, frequent historical biota exchanges between the Old World and the New World via both the North Atlantic Land Bridge and the Bering Land Bridge could be elucidated. Our study also revealed that most Hydnum species found in subalpine areas of the Hengduan Mountains in southwestern China occur in northeastern/northern China and Europe, indicating that the composition of the mycobiota in the Hengduan Mountains reigion is more complicated than what we have known before. PMID:27151256

  16. Analysis of Two Putative Candida albicans Phosphopantothenoylcysteine Decarboxylase / Protein Phosphatase Z Regulatory Subunits Reveals an Unexpected Distribution of Functional Roles

    PubMed Central

    Petrényi, Katalin; Molero, Cristina; Kónya, Zoltán; Erdődi, Ferenc; Ariño, Joaquin; Dombrádi, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphatase Z (Ppz) is a fungus specific enzyme that regulates cell wall integrity, cation homeostasis and oxidative stress response. Work on Saccharomyces cerevisiae has shown that the enzyme is inhibited by Hal3/Vhs3 moonlighting proteins that together with Cab3 constitute the essential phosphopantothenoylcysteine decarboxylase (PPCDC) enzyme. In Candida albicans CaPpz1 is also involved in the morphological changes and infectiveness of this opportunistic human pathogen. To reveal the CaPpz1 regulatory context we searched the C. albicans database and identified two genes that, based on the structure of their S. cerevisiae counterparts, were termed CaHal3 and CaCab3. By pull down analysis and phosphatase assays we demonstrated that both of the bacterially expressed recombinant proteins were able to bind and inhibit CaPpz1 as well as its C-terminal catalytic domain (CaPpz1-Cter) with comparable efficiency. The binding and inhibition were always more pronounced with CaPpz1-Cter, indicating a protective effect against inhibition by the N-terminal domain in the full length protein. The functions of the C. albicans proteins were tested by their overexpression in S. cerevisiae. Contrary to expectations we found that only CaCab3 and not CaHal3 rescued the phenotypic traits that are related to phosphatase inhibition by ScHal3, such as tolerance to LiCl or hygromycin B, requirement for external K+ concentrations, or growth in a MAP kinase deficient slt2 background. On the other hand, both of the Candida proteins turned out to be essential PPCDC components and behaved as their S. cerevisiae counterparts: expression of CaCab3 and CaHal3 rescued the cab3 and hal3 vhs3 S. cerevisiae mutations, respectively. Thus, both CaHal3 and CaCab3 retained the PPCDC related functions and have the potential for CaPpz1 inhibition in vitro. The fact that only CaCab3 exhibits its phosphatase regulatory potential in vivo suggests that in C. albicans CaCab3, but not CaHal3, acts as a

  17. Analysis of Two Putative Candida albicans Phosphopantothenoylcysteine Decarboxylase / Protein Phosphatase Z Regulatory Subunits Reveals an Unexpected Distribution of Functional Roles.

    PubMed

    Petrényi, Katalin; Molero, Cristina; Kónya, Zoltán; Erdődi, Ferenc; Ariño, Joaquin; Dombrádi, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphatase Z (Ppz) is a fungus specific enzyme that regulates cell wall integrity, cation homeostasis and oxidative stress response. Work on Saccharomyces cerevisiae has shown that the enzyme is inhibited by Hal3/Vhs3 moonlighting proteins that together with Cab3 constitute the essential phosphopantothenoylcysteine decarboxylase (PPCDC) enzyme. In Candida albicans CaPpz1 is also involved in the morphological changes and infectiveness of this opportunistic human pathogen. To reveal the CaPpz1 regulatory context we searched the C. albicans database and identified two genes that, based on the structure of their S. cerevisiae counterparts, were termed CaHal3 and CaCab3. By pull down analysis and phosphatase assays we demonstrated that both of the bacterially expressed recombinant proteins were able to bind and inhibit CaPpz1 as well as its C-terminal catalytic domain (CaPpz1-Cter) with comparable efficiency. The binding and inhibition were always more pronounced with CaPpz1-Cter, indicating a protective effect against inhibition by the N-terminal domain in the full length protein. The functions of the C. albicans proteins were tested by their overexpression in S. cerevisiae. Contrary to expectations we found that only CaCab3 and not CaHal3 rescued the phenotypic traits that are related to phosphatase inhibition by ScHal3, such as tolerance to LiCl or hygromycin B, requirement for external K+ concentrations, or growth in a MAP kinase deficient slt2 background. On the other hand, both of the Candida proteins turned out to be essential PPCDC components and behaved as their S. cerevisiae counterparts: expression of CaCab3 and CaHal3 rescued the cab3 and hal3 vhs3 S. cerevisiae mutations, respectively. Thus, both CaHal3 and CaCab3 retained the PPCDC related functions and have the potential for CaPpz1 inhibition in vitro. The fact that only CaCab3 exhibits its phosphatase regulatory potential in vivo suggests that in C. albicans CaCab3, but not CaHal3, acts as a

  18. Unexpected Actinyl Cation-Directed Structural Variation in Neptunyl(VI) A-Type Tri-lacunary Heteropolyoxotungstate Complexes

    DOE PAGES

    Berg, John M.; Gaunt, Andrew J.; May, Iain; Pugmire, Alison L.; Reilly, Sean D.; Scott, Brian L.; Wilkerson, Marianne P.

    2015-04-22

    A-type tri-lacunary heteropolyoxotungstate anions (e.g., [PW9O34]9-, [AsW9O34]9-, [SiW9O34]10- and [GeW9O34]10-) are multi-dentate oxygen donor ligands that readily form sandwich complexes with actinyl cations ({UO2}2+, {NpO2}+, {NpO2}2+ & {PuO2}2+) in near neutral/slightly alkaline aqueous solutions. Two or three actinyl cations are sandwiched between two trilacunary anions, with additional cations (Na+, K+ or NH4 +) also often held within the cluster. Studies thus far have indicated that it is these additional +I cations, rather than the specific actinyl cation, that direct the structural variation in the complexes formed. We now report the structural characterization of the neptunyl (VI) cluster complex (NH4)13 [Na(NpO2)2(A-α-more » PW9O34)2]·12H2O. The anion in this complex, [Na(NpO2)2(PW9O34)2]13-, contains one Na+ cation and two {NpO2}2+ cations held between two [PW9O34]9- anions – with an additional partial occupancy NH4 + or {NpO2}2+ cation also present. In the analogous uranium (VI) system, under similar reaction conditions that includes an excess of NH4Cl in the parent solution, it was previously shown that [(NH4)2(UVIO2)2(A-PW9O34)2]12- is the dominant species in both solution and the crystallized salt. Spectroscopic studies provide further proof of differences in the observed chemistry for the {NpO2}2+/[PW9O34]9- and {UO2}2+/[PW9O34]9- systems, both in solution and in solid state complexes crystallized from comparable salt solutions. The work revealed that varying the actinide element (Np vs. U) can indeed measurably impact structure and complex stability in the cluster chemistry of actinyl (VI) cations with A-type tri-lacunary heteropolyoxotungstate anions.« less

  19. Unexpected Actinyl Cation-Directed Structural Variation in Neptunyl(VI) A-Type Tri-lacunary Heteropolyoxotungstate Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, John M.; Gaunt, Andrew J.; May, Iain; Pugmire, Alison L.; Reilly, Sean D.; Scott, Brian L.; Wilkerson, Marianne P.

    2015-04-22

    >/[PW9O34]9- and {UO2}2+/[PW9O34]9- systems, both in solution and in solid state complexes crystallized from comparable salt solutions. The work revealed that varying the actinide element (Np vs. U) can indeed measurably impact structure and complex stability in the cluster chemistry of actinyl (VI) cations with A-type tri-lacunary heteropolyoxotungstate anions.

  20. Screening of random peptide library of hemagglutinin from pandemic 2009 A(H1N1) influenza virus reveals unexpected antigenically important regions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wanghui; Han, Lu; Lin, Zhanglin

    2011-01-01

    The antigenic structure of the membrane protein hemagglutinin (HA) from the 2009 A(H1N1) influenza virus was dissected with a high-throughput screening method using complex antisera. The approach involves generating yeast cell libraries displaying a pool of random peptides of controllable lengths on the cell surface, followed by one round of fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) against antisera from mouse, goat and human, respectively. The amino acid residue frequency appearing in the antigenic peptides at both the primary sequence and structural level was determined and used to identify "hot spots" or antigenically important regions. Unexpectedly, different antigenic structures were seen for different antisera. Moreover, five antigenic regions were identified, of which all but one are located in the conserved HA stem region that is responsible for membrane fusion. Our findings are corroborated by several recent studies on cross-neutralizing H1 subtype antibodies that recognize the HA stem region. The antigenic peptides identified may provide clues for creating peptide vaccines with better accessibility to memory B cells and better induction of cross-neutralizing antibodies than the whole HA protein. The scheme used in this study enables a direct mapping of the antigenic regions of viral proteins recognized by antisera, and may be useful for dissecting the antigenic structures of other viral proteins. PMID:21437206

  1. Crystal structure of Rab6A'(Q72L) mutant reveals unexpected GDP/Mg²⁺ binding with opened GTP-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Shin, Young-Cheul; Yoon, Jong Hwan; Jang, Tae-Ho; Kim, Seo Yun; Heo, Won Do; So, Insuk; Jeon, Ju-Hong; Park, Hyun Ho

    2012-07-27

    The Ras small G protein-superfamily is a family of GTP hydrolases whose activity is regulated by GTP/GDP binding states. Rab6A, a member of the Ras superfamily, is involved in the regulation of vesicle trafficking, which is critical for endocytosis, biosynthesis, secretion, cell differentiation and cell growth. Rab6A exists in two isoforms, termed RabA and Rab6A'. Substitution of Gln72 to Leu72 (Q72L) at Rab6 family blocks GTP hydrolysis activity and this mutation usually causes the Rab6 protein to be constitutively in an active form. Here, we report the crystal structure of the human Rab6A'(Q72L) mutant form at 1.9Å resolution. Unexpectedly, we found that Rab6A'(Q72L) possesses GDP/Mg(2+) in the GTP binding pockets, which is formed by a flexible switch I and switch II. Large conformational changes were also detected in the switch I and switch II regions. Our structure revealed that the non-hydrolysable, constitutively active form of Rab6A' can accommodate GDP/Mg(2+) in the open conformation.

  2. A study on the biosynthesis of hygrophorone B(12) in the mushroom Hygrophorus abieticola reveals an unexpected labelling pattern in the cyclopentenone moiety.

    PubMed

    Otto, Alexander; Porzel, Andrea; Schmidt, Jürgen; Wessjohann, Ludger; Arnold, Norbert

    2015-10-01

    The hitherto unknown natural formation of hygrophorones, antibacterial and antifungal cyclopentenone derivatives from mushrooms, was investigated for hygrophorone B(12) in Hygrophorus abieticola Krieglst. ex Gröger & Bresinsky by feeding experiments in the field using (13)C labelled samples of D-glucose and sodium acetate. The incorporation of (13)C isotopes was extensively studied using 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy as well as ESI-HRMS analyses. In the experiment with [U-(13)C6]-glucose, six different (13)C2 labelled isotopomers were observed in the 2D INADEQUATE spectrum due to incorporation of [1,2-(13)C2]-acetyl-CoA. This labelling pattern demonstrated that hygrophorone B(12) is derived from a fatty acid-polyketide route instead of a 1,4-α-D-glucan derived anhydrofructose pathway. The experiment with [2-(13)C]-acetate revealed an unexpected incorporation pattern in the cyclopentenone functionality of hygrophorone B(12). Four single-labelled isotopomers, in particular [1-(13)C]-, [2-(13)C]-, [3-(13)C]-, and [4-(13)C]-hygrophorone B(12), were detected that showed only half enrichment in comparison to the respective labelled alkyl side chain carbons. This labelling pattern indicates the formation of a symmetrical intermediate during hygrophorone B(12) biosynthesis. Based on these observations, a biogenetic route via a 4-oxo fatty acid and a chrysotrione B homologue is discussed.

  3. Adaptation to High Ethanol Reveals Complex Evolutionary Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anupam; Espinosa-Cantú, Adriana; De Maeyer, Dries; Arslan, Ahmed; Van Pee, Michiel; van der Zande, Elisa; Meert, Wim; Yang, Yudi; Zhu, Bo; Marchal, Kathleen; DeLuna, Alexander; Van Noort, Vera; Jelier, Rob; Verstrepen, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Tolerance to high levels of ethanol is an ecologically and industrially relevant phenotype of microbes, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this complex trait remain largely unknown. Here, we use long-term experimental evolution of isogenic yeast populations of different initial ploidy to study adaptation to increasing levels of ethanol. Whole-genome sequencing of more than 30 evolved populations and over 100 adapted clones isolated throughout this two-year evolution experiment revealed how a complex interplay of de novo single nucleotide mutations, copy number variation, ploidy changes, mutator phenotypes, and clonal interference led to a significant increase in ethanol tolerance. Although the specific mutations differ between different evolved lineages, application of a novel computational pipeline, PheNetic, revealed that many mutations target functional modules involved in stress response, cell cycle regulation, DNA repair and respiration. Measuring the fitness effects of selected mutations introduced in non-evolved ethanol-sensitive cells revealed several adaptive mutations that had previously not been implicated in ethanol tolerance, including mutations in PRT1, VPS70 and MEX67. Interestingly, variation in VPS70 was recently identified as a QTL for ethanol tolerance in an industrial bio-ethanol strain. Taken together, our results show how, in contrast to adaptation to some other stresses, adaptation to a continuous complex and severe stress involves interplay of different evolutionary mechanisms. In addition, our study reveals functional modules involved in ethanol resistance and identifies several mutations that could help to improve the ethanol tolerance of industrial yeasts. PMID:26545090

  4. Genome-Wide Analysis Reveals a Major Role in Cell Fate Maintenance and an Unexpected Role in Endoreduplication for the Drosophila FoxA Gene Fork Head

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Rika; Grevengoed, Elizabeth; Stempniewicz, Peter; Andrew, Deborah J.

    2011-01-01

    Transcription factors drive organogenesis, from the initiation of cell fate decisions to the maintenance and implementation of these decisions. The Drosophila embryonic salivary gland provides an excellent platform for unraveling the underlying transcriptional networks of organ development because Drosophila is relatively unencumbered by significant genetic redundancy. The highly conserved FoxA family transcription factors are essential for various aspects of organogenesis in all animals that have been studied. Here, we explore the role of the single Drosophila FoxA protein Fork head (Fkh) in salivary gland organogenesis using two genome-wide strategies. A large-scale in situ hybridization analysis reveals a major role for Fkh in maintaining the salivary gland fate decision and controlling salivary gland physiological activity, in addition to its previously known roles in morphogenesis and survival. The majority of salivary gland genes (59%) are affected by fkh loss, mainly at later stages of salivary gland development. We show that global expression of Fkh cannot drive ectopic salivary gland formation. Thus, unlike the worm FoxA protein PHA-4, Fkh does not function to specify cell fate. In addition, Fkh only indirectly regulates many salivary gland genes, which is also distinct from the role of PHA-4 in organogenesis. Our microarray analyses reveal unexpected roles for Fkh in blocking terminal differentiation and in endoreduplication in the salivary gland and in other Fkh-expressing embryonic tissues. Overall, this study demonstrates an important role for Fkh in determining how an organ preserves its identity throughout development and provides an alternative paradigm for how FoxA proteins function in organogenesis. PMID:21698206

  5. A circadian sleep disorder reveals a complex clock.

    PubMed

    Mignot, Emmanuel; Takahashi, Joseph S

    2007-01-12

    Circadian rhythms are established by transcription of clock genes and autoregulatory transcriptional feedback loops. In this issue, Xu et al. (2007) characterize mice expressing a human Per2 mutation identified in patients with familial advanced sleep phase syndrome. Their results reveal that PER2 phosphorylation, by CK1delta and other kinases, is surprisingly complex and has opposite effects on PER2 levels and period length. PMID:17218251

  6. In vitro analysis of phosphorothioate modification of DNA reveals substrate recognition by a multiprotein complex

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Bo; Zheng, Xiaoqing; Cheng, Qiuxiang; Yao, Fen; Zheng, Tao; Ramesh Babu, I.; Zhou, Huchen; Dedon, Peter; You, Delin

    2015-01-01

    A wide variety of prokaryotes possess DNA modifications consisting of sequence-specific phosphorothioates (PT) inserted by members of a five-gene cluster. Recent genome mapping studies revealed two unusual features of PT modifications: short consensus sequences and partial modification of a specific genomic site in a population of bacteria. To better understand the mechanism of target selection of PT modifications that underlies these features, we characterized the substrate recognition of the PT-modifying enzymes termed DptC, D and E in a cell extract system from Salmonella. The results revealed that double-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides underwent de novo PT modification in vitro, with the same modification pattern as in vivo, i. e., GpsAAC/GpsTTC motif. Unexpectedly, in these in vitro analyses we observed no significant effect on PT modification by sequences flanking GAAC/GTTC motif, while PT also occurred in the GAAC/GTTC motif that could not be modified in vivo. Hemi-PT DNA also served as substrate of the PT-modifying enzymes, but not single-stranded DNA. The PT-modifying enzymes were then found to function as a large protein complex, with all of three subunits in tetrameric conformations. This study provided the first demonstration of in vitro DNA PT modification by PT-modifying enzymes that function as a large protein complex. PMID:26213215

  7. An unexpected cobalt(III) complex containing a Schiff base ligand: Synthesis, crystal structure, spectroscopic behavior, electrochemical property and SOD-like activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Lan-Qin; Huang, Jiao-Jiao; Zhang, Hong-Song; Zhang, Yu-Li; Zhang, Jian-Yu; Li, Yao-Xin

    2014-10-01

    An unexpected mononuclear Co(III) complex, [Co(L2)2·(CH3COO)]·CH3OH (HL2 = 1-(2-{[(E)-3,5-dichloro-2-hydroxybenzylidene]amino}phenyl)ethanone oxime), has been synthesized via complexation of Co(II) acetate tetrahydrate with HL1 originally. The plausible reaction mechanism for the formation of quinazoline-type ligand was proposed. HL1 and its corresponding Co(III) complex were characterized by IR, as well as by elemental analysis and UV-vis spectroscopy. The crystal structure of the complex has been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Each complex links two other molecules into an infinite 1-D chain via intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions. Moreover, the electrochemical properties of the cobalt(III) complex were studied by cyclic voltammetry and X-ray photoelectron spectrum (XPS). In addition, superoxide dismutase-like activities of HL1 and Co(III) complex were also investigated.

  8. An unexpected cobalt(III) complex containing a Schiff base ligand: Synthesis, crystal structure, spectroscopic behavior, electrochemical property and SOD-like activity.

    PubMed

    Chai, Lan-Qin; Huang, Jiao-Jiao; Zhang, Hong-Song; Zhang, Yu-Li; Zhang, Jian-Yu; Li, Yao-Xin

    2014-10-15

    An unexpected mononuclear Co(III) complex, [Co(L2)2·(CH3COO)]·CH3OH (HL2=1-(2-{[(E)-3,5-dichloro-2-hydroxybenzylidene]amino}phenyl)ethanone oxime), has been synthesized via complexation of Co(II) acetate tetrahydrate with HL1 originally. The plausible reaction mechanism for the formation of quinazoline-type ligand was proposed. HL1 and its corresponding Co(III) complex were characterized by IR, as well as by elemental analysis and UV-vis spectroscopy. The crystal structure of the complex has been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Each complex links two other molecules into an infinite 1-D chain via intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions. Moreover, the electrochemical properties of the cobalt(III) complex were studied by cyclic voltammetry and X-ray photoelectron spectrum (XPS). In addition, superoxide dismutase-like activities of HL1 and Co(III) complex were also investigated.

  9. Functional analysis of the TFIID-specific yeast TAF4 (yTAF(II)48) reveals an unexpected organization of its histone-fold domain.

    PubMed

    Thuault, Sylvie; Gangloff, Yann-Gaël; Kirchner, Jay; Sanders, Steven; Werten, Sebastiaan; Romier, Christophe; Weil, P Anthony; Davidson, Irwin

    2002-11-22

    Yeast TFIID comprises the TATA binding protein and 14 TBP-associated factors (TAF(II)s), nine of which contain histone-fold domains (HFDs). The C-terminal region of the TFIID-specific yTAF4 (yTAF(II)48) containing the HFD shares strong sequence similarity with Drosophila (d)TAF4 (dTAF(II)110) and human TAF4 (hTAF(II)135). A structure/function analysis of yTAF4 demonstrates that the HFD, a short conserved C-terminal domain (CCTD), and the region separating them are all required for yTAF4 function. Temperature-sensitive mutations in the yTAF4 HFD alpha2 helix or the CCTD can be suppressed upon overexpression of yTAF12 (yTAF(II)68). Moreover, coexpression in Escherichia coli indicates direct yTAF4-yTAF12 heterodimerization optimally requires both the yTAF4 HFD and CCTD. The x-ray crystal structure of the orthologous hTAF4-hTAF12 histone-like heterodimer indicates that the alpha3 region within the predicted TAF4 HFD is unstructured and does not correspond to the bona fide alpha3 helix. Our functional and biochemical analysis of yTAF4, rather provides strong evidence that the HFD alpha3 helix of the TAF4 family lies within the CCTD. These results reveal an unexpected and novel HFD organization in which the alpha3 helix is separated from the alpha2 helix by an extended loop containing a conserved functional domain. PMID:12237303

  10. Complex kinetics of DNA condensation revealed through DNA twist tracing.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Wong, Wei Juan; Lim, Ci Ji; Ju, Hai-Peng; Li, Ming; Yan, Jie; Wang, Peng-Ye

    2015-08-01

    Toroid formation is an important mechanism for DNA condensation in cells. The length change during DNA condensation was investigated in previous single-molecule experiments. However, DNA twist is key to understanding the topological kinetics of DNA condensation. In this study, DNA twist as well as DNA length was traced during the DNA condensation by the freely orbiting magnetic tweezers and the tilted magnetic tweezers combined with Brownian dynamics simulations. The experimental results disclose the complex relationship between DNA extension and backbone rotation. Brownian dynamics simulations show that the toroid formation follows a wiggling pathway which leads to the complex DNA backbone rotation as revealed in our experiments. These findings provide the complete description of multivalent cation-dependent DNA toroid formation under tension.

  11. Structure of the Sulphiredoxin-Peroxiredoxin Complex Reveals an Essential Repair Embrace

    SciTech Connect

    Jonsson,T.; Johnson, L.; Lowther, W.

    2008-01-01

    Typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxins (Prxs) have an important role in regulating hydrogen peroxide-mediated cell signalling1. In this process, Prxs can become inactivated through the hyperoxidation of an active site Cys residue to Cys sulphinic acid. The unique repair of this moiety by sulphiredoxin (Srx) restores peroxidase activity and terminates the signal2. The hyperoxidized form of Prx exists as a stable decameric structure with each active site buried. Therefore, it is unclear how Srx can access the sulphinic acid moiety. Here we present the 2.6 Angstroms crystal structure of the human Srx-PrxI complex. This complex reveals the complete unfolding of the carboxy terminus of Prx, and its unexpected packing onto the backside of Srx away from the Srx active site. Binding studies and activity analyses of site-directed mutants at this interface show that the interaction is required for repair to occur. Moreover, rearrangements in the Prx active site lead to a juxtaposition of the Prx Gly-Gly-Leu-Gly and Srx ATP-binding motifs, providing a structural basis for the first step of the catalytic mechanism. The results also suggest that the observed interactions may represent a common mode for other proteins to bind to Prxs.

  12. Substrate binding and specificity of rhomboid intramembrane protease revealed by substrate–peptide complex structures

    PubMed Central

    Zoll, Sebastian; Stanchev, Stancho; Began, Jakub; Škerle, Jan; Lepšík, Martin; Peclinovská, Lucie; Majer, Pavel; Strisovsky, Kvido

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms of intramembrane proteases are incompletely understood due to the lack of structural data on substrate complexes. To gain insight into substrate binding by rhomboid proteases, we have synthesised a series of novel peptidyl-chloromethylketone (CMK) inhibitors and analysed their interactions with Escherichia coli rhomboid GlpG enzymologically and structurally. We show that peptidyl-CMKs derived from the natural rhomboid substrate TatA from bacterium Providencia stuartii bind GlpG in a substrate-like manner, and their co-crystal structures with GlpG reveal the S1 to S4 subsites of the protease. The S1 subsite is prominent and merges into the ‘water retention site’, suggesting intimate interplay between substrate binding, specificity and catalysis. Unexpectedly, the S4 subsite is plastically formed by residues of the L1 loop, an important but hitherto enigmatic feature of the rhomboid fold. We propose that the homologous region of members of the wider rhomboid-like protein superfamily may have similar substrate or client-protein binding function. Finally, using molecular dynamics, we generate a model of the Michaelis complex of the substrate bound in the active site of GlpG. PMID:25216680

  13. Nuclear and chloroplast DNA phylogeny reveals complex evolutionary history of Elymus pendulinus.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chi; Hu, Qianni; Sun, Genlou

    2014-02-01

    Evidence accumulated over the last decade has shown that allopolyploid genomes may undergo complex reticulate evolution. In this study, 13 accessions of tetraploid Elymus pendulinus were analyzed using two low-copy nuclear genes (RPB2 and PepC) and two regions of chloroplast genome (Rps16 and trnD-trnT). Previous studies suggested that Pseudoroegneria (St) and an unknown diploid (Y) were genome donors to E. pendulinus, and that Pseudoroegneria was the maternal donor. Our results revealed an extreme reticulate pattern, with at least four distinct gene lineages coexisting within this species that might be acquired through a possible combination of allotetraploidization and introgression from both within and outside the tribe Hordeeae. Chloroplast DNA data identified two potential maternal genome donors (Pseudoroegneria and an unknown species outside Hordeeae) to E. pendulinus. Nuclear gene data indicated that both Pseudoroegneria and an unknown Y diploid have contributed to the nuclear genome of E. pendulinus, in agreement with cytogenetic data. However, unexpected contributions from Hordeum and unknown aliens from within or outside Hordeeae to E. pendulinus without genome duplication were observed. Elymus pendulinus provides a remarkable instance of the previously unsuspected chimerical nature of some plant genomes and the resulting phylogenetic complexity produced by multiple historical reticulation events. PMID:24702067

  14. Unexpected tolerance of glycosylation by UDP-GalNAc:polypeptide alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase revealed by electron capture dissociation mass spectrometry: carbohydrate as potential protective groups.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Yayoi; Matsushita, Takahiko; Fujitani, Naoki; Takegawa, Yasuhiro; Fujihira, Haruhiko; Naruchi, Kentarou; Gao, Xiao-Dong; Manri, Naomi; Sakamoto, Takeshi; Kato, Kentaro; Hinou, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro

    2010-07-20

    UDP-GalNAc:polypeptide alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferases (ppGalNAcTs, EC 2.4.1.41), a family of key enzymes that initiate posttranslational modification with O-glycans in mucin synthesis by introduction of alpha-GalNAc residues, are structurally composed of a catalytic domain and a lectin domain. It has been known that multiple Ser/Thr residues are assigned in common mucin glycoproteins as potential O-glycosylation sites and more than 20 distinct isoforms of this enzyme family contribute to produce densely O-glycosylated mucin glycoproteins. However, it seems that the functional role of the lectin domain of ppGalNAcTs remains unclear. We considered that electron capture dissociation mass spectrometry (ECD-MS), a promising method for highly selective fragmentation at peptide linkages of glycopeptides to generate unique c and z series of ions, should allow for precise structural characterization to uncover the mechanism in O-glycosylation of mucin peptides by ppGalNAcTs. In the present study, it was demonstrated that a system composed of an electrospray source, a linear RFQ ion trap that isolates precursor ions, the ECD device, and a TOF mass spectrometer is a nice tool to identify the preferential O-glycosylation sites without any decomposition of the carbohydrate moiety. It should be noted that electrons used for ECD are accelerated within a range from 1.75 to 9.75 eV depending on the structures of glycopeptides of interest. We revealed for the first time that additional installation of a alpha-GalNAc residue at potential glycosylation sites by ppGalNAcT2 proceeds smoothly in various unnatural glycopeptides having alpha-Man, alpha-Fuc, and beta-Gal residues as well as alpha-GalNAc residues. The results may suggest that ppGalNAcT2 did not differentiate totally presubstituted sugar residues in terms of configuration of functional groups, d-, l-configuration, and even alpha-, beta-stereochemistry at an anomeric carbon atom when relatively short synthetic

  15. A complete series of halocarbonyl molybdenum PNP pincer complexesUnexpected differences between NH and NMe spacers

    PubMed Central

    de Aguiar, Sara Raquel M.M.; Stöger, Berthold; Pittenauer, Ernst; Puchberger, Michael; Allmaier, Günter; Veiros, Luis F.; Kirchner, Karl

    2014-01-01

    In the present study a complete series of seven-coordinate neutral halocarbonyl Mo(II) complexes of the type [Mo(PNPMe-Ph)(CO)2X2] (X = I, Br, Cl, F), featuring the new PNP pincer ligand N,N′-bis(diphenylphosphino)-N,N′-methyl-2,6-diaminopyridine (PNPMe-Ph), were prepared and fully characterized. The synthesis of these complexes was accomplished by different methodologies depending on the halide ligands. For X = I and Br, [Mo(PNPMe-Ph)(CO)2I2] and [Mo(PNPMe-Ph)(CO)2Br2] were obtained by reacting [Mo(PNPMe-Ph)(CO)3] with stoichiometric amounts of I2 and Br2, respectively. Alternatively, these complexes were obtained upon treatment of [MoX2(CO)3(CH3CN)2] (X = I, Br) with 1 equiv. of PNPMe-Ph. On the other hand, in the case of X = Cl, [Mo(PNPMe-Ph)(CO)2Cl2] was afforded by the reaction of [Mo(CO)4(μ-Cl)Cl]2 with 1 equiv. of PNPMe-Ph. The equivalent procedure also worked for X = Br. Finally, addition of 1 equiv. of 1-fluoro-2,4,6-trimethylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate to [Mo(PNPMe-Ph)(CO)3] yielded the analogous fluorine complex [Mo(PNPMe-Ph)(CO)2F2]. The modification of the ligand scaffold by introducing a Me group instead of H changed the properties of the PNP-Ph ligand significantly. While in the present case exclusively neutral seven-coordinate complexes of the type [Mo(PNPMe-Ph)(CO)2X2] were obtained, with the parent PNP-Ph ligand, i.e., featuring NH spacers, cationic seven-coordinate complexes of the type [Mo(PNP-Ph)(CO)3X]X were afforded. DFT calculations indicated that the reactions are under thermodynamic control. The structures of representative complexes were determined by X-ray single crystal analyses. PMID:24940004

  16. Graph analysis of cortical networks reveals complex anatomical communication substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora-López, Gorka; Zhou, Changsong; Kurths, Jürgen

    2009-03-01

    Sensory information entering the nervous system follows independent paths of processing such that specific features are individually detected. However, sensory perception, awareness, and cognition emerge from the combination of information. Here we have analyzed the corticocortical network of the cat, looking for the anatomical substrate which permits the simultaneous segregation and integration of information in the brain. We find that cortical communications are mainly governed by three topological factors of the underlying network: (i) a large density of connections, (ii) segregation of cortical areas into clusters, and (iii) the presence of highly connected hubs aiding the multisensory processing and integration. Statistical analysis of the shortest paths reveals that, while information is highly accessible to all cortical areas, the complexity of cortical information processing may arise from the rich and intricate alternative paths in which areas can influence each other.

  17. An Immature Pachyrhinosaurus perotorum (Dinosauria: Ceratopsidae) Nasal Reveals Unexpected Complexity of Craniofacial Ontogeny and Integument in Pachyrhinosaurus

    PubMed Central

    Fiorillo, Anthony R.; Tykoski, Ronald S.

    2013-01-01

    A new specimen attributable to an immature individual of Pachyrhinosaurus perotorum (Dinosauria, Ceratopsidae) from the Kikak-Tegoseak Quarry in northern Alaska preserves a mix of features that provides refinement to the sequence of ontogenetic stages and transformations inferred for the development of the nasal boss in Pachyrhinosaurus. The new specimen consists of an incomplete nasal that includes the posterior part of the nasal horn, the dorsal surface between the horn and the left-side contacts for the prefrontal and frontal, and some of the left side of the rostrum posteroventral to the nasal horn. The combination of morphologies in the new specimen suggests either an additional stage of development should be recognized in the ontogeny of the nasal boss of Pachyrhinosaurus, or that the ontogenetic pathway of nasal boss development in P. perotorum was notably different from that of P. lakustai. Additionally, the presence of a distinct basal sulcus and the lateral palisade texture on the nasal horn of the specimen described here indicate that a thick, cornified horn sheath was present well before the formation of a dorsal cornified pad. A separate rugose patch on the nasal well posterior to the nasal horn is evidence for a cornified integumentary structure, most likely a thick cornified pad, on the posterior part of the nasal separate from the nasal horn prior to the onset of nasal boss formation in P. perotorum. PMID:23840371

  18. Rethinking the longitudinal stream temperature paradigm: region-wide comparison of thermal infrared imagery reveals unexpected complexity of river temperatures

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used an extensive dataset of remotely sensed summertime river temperature to compare longitudinal profiles (temperature versus distance) for 54 rivers in the Pacific Northwest. We evaluated (1) how often profiles fit theoretical expectations of asymptotic downstream warming, a...

  19. The unexpected case of reactions of halogens and interhalogens with halide substituted Pd(ii) σ-butadienyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Scattolin, Thomas; Visentin, Fabiano; Santo, Claudio; Bertolasi, Valerio; Canovese, Luciano

    2016-07-28

    We have experimentally studied and theoretically interpreted the addition under stoichiometric conditions of halogens or interhalogens to σ-butadienyl palladium complexes bearing the heteroditopic thioquinolines as spectator ligands. The observed reactions do not involve the expected extrusion of the butadienyl fragment but rather the unpredictable substitution of the halide coordinated to palladium and in some cases also of that bound to the terminal butadienyl carbon. We have explained this peculiar reactivity with a mechanistic hypothesis based on a sequence of selective processes of oxidative addition and reductive elimination involving Pd(iv) intermediates. PMID:27357221

  20. The unexpected case of reactions of halogens and interhalogens with halide substituted Pd(ii) σ-butadienyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Scattolin, Thomas; Visentin, Fabiano; Santo, Claudio; Bertolasi, Valerio; Canovese, Luciano

    2016-07-28

    We have experimentally studied and theoretically interpreted the addition under stoichiometric conditions of halogens or interhalogens to σ-butadienyl palladium complexes bearing the heteroditopic thioquinolines as spectator ligands. The observed reactions do not involve the expected extrusion of the butadienyl fragment but rather the unpredictable substitution of the halide coordinated to palladium and in some cases also of that bound to the terminal butadienyl carbon. We have explained this peculiar reactivity with a mechanistic hypothesis based on a sequence of selective processes of oxidative addition and reductive elimination involving Pd(iv) intermediates.

  1. Beyond Contagion: Reality Mining Reveals Complex Patterns of Social Influence

    PubMed Central

    Alshamsi, Aamena; Pianesi, Fabio; Lepri, Bruno; Pentland, Alex; Rahwan, Iyad

    2015-01-01

    Contagion, a concept from epidemiology, has long been used to characterize social influence on people’s behavior and affective (emotional) states. While it has revealed many useful insights, it is not clear whether the contagion metaphor is sufficient to fully characterize the complex dynamics of psychological states in a social context. Using wearable sensors that capture daily face-to-face interaction, combined with three daily experience sampling surveys, we collected the most comprehensive data set of personality and emotion dynamics of an entire community of work. From this high-resolution data about actual (rather than self-reported) face-to-face interaction, a complex picture emerges where contagion (that can be seen as adaptation of behavioral responses to the behavior of other people) cannot fully capture the dynamics of transitory states. We found that social influence has two opposing effects on states: adaptation effects that go beyond mere contagion, and complementarity effects whereby individuals’ behaviors tend to complement the behaviors of others. Surprisingly, these effects can exhibit completely different directions depending on the stable personality or emotional dispositions (stable traits) of target individuals. Our findings provide a foundation for richer models of social dynamics, and have implications on organizational engineering and workplace well-being. PMID:26313449

  2. Unexpected carbon-carbon coupling between organic cyanides and isopropyl {beta}-carbon in a hafnium ene diamide complex

    SciTech Connect

    Bol, J.E.; Hessen, B.; Teuben, J.H.; Smeets, W.J.J.; Spek, A.L.

    1992-06-01

    Reaction of the ene diamide complex Cp*Hf({sigma}{sup 2},{pi}-iPr-DAB)Cl (1; Cp* = {eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}, iPr-DAB = 1,4-diisopropyl-1,4-diaza-1,3-butadiene) with organic cyanides was investigated. The crystal structure of the product, Cp*Hf[iPrNCH{double_bond}CHNC(Me){double_bond}CHC(tBu){double_bond}NH]Cl, is reported. The reaction is thought to proceed by two hydrogen transfers and a C-C coupling on the {beta}-carbon of an isopropyl group. NMR was used to identify reaction intermediates in the hydrogen transfer scheme.

  3. Ventricular Tachycardia or not? An Unexpected Reason of Wide QRS Complex Tachycardia in a Young Healthy Man: Sodium Bicarbonate.

    PubMed

    Eyuboglu, Mehmet

    2016-10-01

    Ventricular tachycardia (VT) is life-threatening subgroup of wide QRS complex tachycardia (WCT). VT is usually associated with structural heart diseases, but it can occur in the absence of any cardiovascular diseases. Adverse cardiac effect of sodium bicarbonate in healthy subjects is not well described. A 30-year-old healthy man with excessive intake of sodium bicarbonate-related VT is presented. He was using sodium bicarbonate during last 2 months to lose weight. He has no risk factors and any cardiovascular or systemic diseases. After intravenous administration of amiodarone, tachycardia ended and his rhythm converted to sinus rhythm with normal electrocardiogram. Patient is asymptomatic, and no VT was observed without any medications at 1 year of follow-up.

  4. Dioxygen Activation by a Macrocyclic Copper Complex Leads to a Cu2O2 Core with Unexpected Structure and Reactivity.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Bosch, Isaac; Cowley, Ryan E; Díaz, Daniel E; Siegler, Maxime A; Nam, Wonwoo; Solomon, Edward I; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2016-04-01

    We report the Cu(I)/O2 chemistry of complexes derived from the macrocylic ligands 14-TMC (1,4,8,11-tetramethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane) and 12-TMC (1,4,7,10-tetramethyl-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane). While [(14-TMC)Cu(I)](+) is unreactive towards dioxygen, the smaller analog [(12-TMC)Cu(I)(CH3CN)](+) reacts with O2 to give a side-on bound peroxo-dicopper(II) species ((S)P), confirmed by spectroscopic and computational methods. Intriguingly, 12-TMC as a N4 donor ligand generates (S)P species, thus in contrast with the previous observation that such species are generated by N2 and N3 ligands. In addition, the reactivity of this macrocyclic side-on peroxo-dicopper(II) differs from typical (S)P species, because it reacts only with acid to release H2O2, in contrast with the classic reactivity of Cu2O2 cores. Kinetics and computations are consistent with a protonation mechanism whereby the TMC acts as a hemilabile ligand and shuttles H(+) to an isomerized peroxo core.

  5. Geometric Mechanics Reveals Optimal Complex Terrestrial Undulation Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Chaohui; Astley, Henry; Schiebel, Perrin; Dai, Jin; Travers, Matthew; Goldman, Daniel; Choset, Howie; CMU Team; GT Team

    Geometric mechanics offers useful tools for intuitively analyzing biological and robotic locomotion. However, utility of these tools were previously restricted to systems that have only two internal degrees of freedom and in uniform media. We show kinematics of complex locomotors that make intermittent contacts with substrates can be approximated as a linear combination of two shape bases, and can be represented using two variables. Therefore, the tools of geometric mechanics can be used to analyze motions of locomotors with many degrees of freedom. To demonstrate the proposed technique, we present studies on two different types of snake gaits which utilize combinations of waves in the horizontal and vertical planes: sidewinding (in the sidewinder rattlesnake C. cerastes) and lateral undulation (in the desert specialist snake C. occipitalis). C. cerastes moves by generating posteriorly traveling body waves in the horizontal and vertical directions, with a relative phase offset equal to +/-π/2 while C. occipitalismaintains a π/2 offset of a frequency doubled vertical wave. Geometric analysis reveals these coordination patterns enable optimal movement in the two different styles of undulatory terrestrial locomotion. More broadly, these examples demonstrate the utility of geometric mechanics in analyzing realistic biological and robotic locomotion.

  6. Endoderm Complexity in the Mouse Gastrula Is Revealed Through the Expression of Spink3

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Hwee Ngee; Rathjen, Peter D.; Familari, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Endoderm formation in the mammalian embryo occurs first in the blastocyst, when the primitive endoderm and pluripotent cells resolve into separate lineages, and again during gastrulation, when the definitive endoderm progenitor population emerges from the primitive streak. The formation of the definitive endoderm can be modeled using pluripotent cell differentiation in culture. The differentiation of early primitive ectoderm-like (EPL) cells, a pluripotent cell population formed from embryonic stem (ES) cells, was used to identify and characterize definitive endoderm formation. Expression of serine peptidase inhibitor, Kazal type 3 (Spink3) was detected in EPL cell–derived endoderm, and in a band of endoderm immediately distal to the embryonic–extra-embryonic boundary in pregastrula and gastrulating embryos. Later expression marked a region of endoderm separating the yolk sac from the developing gut. In the embryo, Spink3 expression marked a region of endoderm comprising the distal visceral endoderm, as determined by an endocytosis assay, and the proximal region of the definitive endoderm. This region was distinct from the more distal definitive endoderm population, marked by thyrotropin-releasing hormone (Trh). Endoderm expressing either Spink3 or Trh could be formed during EPL cell differentiation, and the prevalence of these populations could be influenced by culture medium and growth factor addition. Moreover, further differentiation suggested that the potential of these populations differed. These approaches have revealed an unexpected complexity in the definitive endoderm lineage, a complexity that will need to be accommodated in differentiation protocols to ensure the formation of the appropriate definitive endoderm progenitor in the future. PMID:24940561

  7. Natural Product Screening Reveals Naphthoquinone Complex I Bypass Factors.

    PubMed

    Vafai, Scott B; Mevers, Emily; Higgins, Kathleen W; Fomina, Yevgenia; Zhang, Jianming; Mandinova, Anna; Newman, David; Shaw, Stanley Y; Clardy, Jon; Mootha, Vamsi K

    2016-01-01

    Deficiency of mitochondrial complex I is encountered in both rare and common diseases, but we have limited therapeutic options to treat this lesion to the oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS). Idebenone and menadione are redox-active molecules capable of rescuing OXPHOS activity by engaging complex I-independent pathways of entry, often referred to as "complex I bypass." In the present study, we created a cellular model of complex I deficiency by using CRISPR genome editing to knock out Ndufa9 in mouse myoblasts, and utilized this cell line to develop a high-throughput screening platform for novel complex I bypass factors. We screened a library of ~40,000 natural product extracts and performed bioassay-guided fractionation on a subset of the top scoring hits. We isolated four plant-derived 1,4-naphthoquinone complex I bypass factors with structural similarity to menadione: chimaphilin and 3-chloro-chimaphilin from Chimaphila umbellata and dehydro-α-lapachone and dehydroiso-α-lapachone from Stereospermum euphoroides. We also tested a small number of structurally related naphthoquinones from commercial sources and identified two additional compounds with complex I bypass activity: 2-methoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone and 2-methoxy-3-methyl-1,4,-naphthoquinone. The six novel complex I bypass factors reported here expand this class of molecules and will be useful as tool compounds for investigating complex I disease biology. PMID:27622560

  8. Natural Product Screening Reveals Naphthoquinone Complex I Bypass Factors

    PubMed Central

    Mevers, Emily; Higgins, Kathleen W.; Fomina, Yevgenia; Zhang, Jianming; Mandinova, Anna; Newman, David; Shaw, Stanley Y.; Clardy, Jon; Mootha, Vamsi K.

    2016-01-01

    Deficiency of mitochondrial complex I is encountered in both rare and common diseases, but we have limited therapeutic options to treat this lesion to the oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS). Idebenone and menadione are redox-active molecules capable of rescuing OXPHOS activity by engaging complex I-independent pathways of entry, often referred to as “complex I bypass.” In the present study, we created a cellular model of complex I deficiency by using CRISPR genome editing to knock out Ndufa9 in mouse myoblasts, and utilized this cell line to develop a high-throughput screening platform for novel complex I bypass factors. We screened a library of ~40,000 natural product extracts and performed bioassay-guided fractionation on a subset of the top scoring hits. We isolated four plant-derived 1,4-naphthoquinone complex I bypass factors with structural similarity to menadione: chimaphilin and 3-chloro-chimaphilin from Chimaphila umbellata and dehydro-α-lapachone and dehydroiso-α-lapachone from Stereospermum euphoroides. We also tested a small number of structurally related naphthoquinones from commercial sources and identified two additional compounds with complex I bypass activity: 2-methoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone and 2-methoxy-3-methyl-1,4,-naphthoquinone. The six novel complex I bypass factors reported here expand this class of molecules and will be useful as tool compounds for investigating complex I disease biology. PMID:27622560

  9. Principles of assembly reveal a periodic table of protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Ahnert, Sebastian E; Marsh, Joseph A; Hernández, Helena; Robinson, Carol V; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2015-12-11

    Structural insights into protein complexes have had a broad impact on our understanding of biological function and evolution. In this work, we sought a comprehensive understanding of the general principles underlying quaternary structure organization in protein complexes. We first examined the fundamental steps by which protein complexes can assemble, using experimental and structure-based characterization of assembly pathways. Most assembly transitions can be classified into three basic types, which can then be used to exhaustively enumerate a large set of possible quaternary structure topologies. These topologies, which include the vast majority of observed protein complex structures, enable a natural organization of protein complexes into a periodic table. On the basis of this table, we can accurately predict the expected frequencies of quaternary structure topologies, including those not yet observed. These results have important implications for quaternary structure prediction, modeling, and engineering. PMID:26659058

  10. Principles of assembly reveal a periodic table of protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Ahnert, Sebastian E; Marsh, Joseph A; Hernández, Helena; Robinson, Carol V; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2015-12-11

    Structural insights into protein complexes have had a broad impact on our understanding of biological function and evolution. In this work, we sought a comprehensive understanding of the general principles underlying quaternary structure organization in protein complexes. We first examined the fundamental steps by which protein complexes can assemble, using experimental and structure-based characterization of assembly pathways. Most assembly transitions can be classified into three basic types, which can then be used to exhaustively enumerate a large set of possible quaternary structure topologies. These topologies, which include the vast majority of observed protein complex structures, enable a natural organization of protein complexes into a periodic table. On the basis of this table, we can accurately predict the expected frequencies of quaternary structure topologies, including those not yet observed. These results have important implications for quaternary structure prediction, modeling, and engineering.

  11. Structure of a trimeric nucleoporin complex reveals alternate oligomerization states

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, Vivien; Hsia, Kuo-Chiang; Debler, Erik W.; Kampmann, Martin; Davenport, Andrew M.; Blobel, Günter; Hoelz, André

    2010-08-16

    The heptameric Nup84 complex constitutes an evolutionarily conserved building block of the nuclear pore complex. Here, we present the crystal structure of the heterotrimeric Sec13 {center_dot} Nup145C {center_dot} Nup84 complex, the centerpiece of the heptamer, at 3.2-{angstrom} resolution. Nup84 forms a U-shaped {alpha}-helical solenoid domain, topologically similar to two other members of the heptamer, Nup145C and Nup85. The interaction between Nup84 and Nup145C is mediated via a hydrophobic interface located in the kink regions of the two solenoids that is reinforced by additional interactions of two long Nup84 loops. The Nup84 binding site partially overlaps with the homo-dimerization interface of Nup145C, suggesting competing binding events. Fitting of the elongated Z-shaped heterotrimer into electron microscopy (EM) envelopes of the heptamer indicates that structural changes occur at the Nup145C {center_dot} Nup84 interface. Docking the crystal structures of all heptamer components into the EM envelope constitutes a major advance toward the completion of the structural characterization of the Nup84 complex.

  12. Structure of a trimeric nucleoporin complex reveals alternate oligomerization states

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Vivien; Hsia, Kuo-Chiang; Debler, Erik W.; Kampmann, Martin; Davenport, Andrew M.; Blobel, Günter; Hoelz, André

    2009-01-01

    The heptameric Nup84 complex constitutes an evolutionarily conserved building block of the nuclear pore complex. Here, we present the crystal structure of the heterotrimeric Sec13·Nup145C·Nup84 complex, the centerpiece of the heptamer, at 3.2-Å resolution. Nup84 forms a U-shaped α-helical solenoid domain, topologically similar to two other members of the heptamer, Nup145C and Nup85. The interaction between Nup84 and Nup145C is mediated via a hydrophobic interface located in the kink regions of the two solenoids that is reinforced by additional interactions of two long Nup84 loops. The Nup84 binding site partially overlaps with the homo-dimerization interface of Nup145C, suggesting competing binding events. Fitting of the elongated Z-shaped heterotrimer into electron microscopy (EM) envelopes of the heptamer indicates that structural changes occur at the Nup145C·Nup84 interface. Docking the crystal structures of all heptamer components into the EM envelope constitutes a major advance toward the completion of the structural characterization of the Nup84 complex. PMID:19805193

  13. Uncovering Nuclear Pore Complexity with Innovation

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Rebecca L.; Wente, Susan R.

    2013-01-01

    Advances in imaging and reductionist approaches provide a high-resolution understanding of nuclear pore complex structure and transport, revealing unexpected mechanistic complexities based on nucleoporin functions and specialized import and export pathways. PMID:23498931

  14. Quantitative Genome-Wide Genetic Interaction Screens Reveal Global Epistatic Relationships of Protein Complexes in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashwani; Stewart, Geordie; Samanfar, Bahram; Aoki, Hiroyuki; Wagih, Omar; Vlasblom, James; Phanse, Sadhna; Lad, Krunal; Yeou Hsiung Yu, Angela; Graham, Christopher; Jin, Ke; Brown, Eric; Golshani, Ashkan; Kim, Philip; Moreno-Hagelsieb, Gabriel; Greenblatt, Jack; Houry, Walid A.; Parkinson, John; Emili, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale proteomic analyses in Escherichia coli have documented the composition and physical relationships of multiprotein complexes, but not their functional organization into biological pathways and processes. Conversely, genetic interaction (GI) screens can provide insights into the biological role(s) of individual gene and higher order associations. Combining the information from both approaches should elucidate how complexes and pathways intersect functionally at a systems level. However, such integrative analysis has been hindered due to the lack of relevant GI data. Here we present a systematic, unbiased, and quantitative synthetic genetic array screen in E. coli describing the genetic dependencies and functional cross-talk among over 600,000 digenic mutant combinations. Combining this epistasis information with putative functional modules derived from previous proteomic data and genomic context-based methods revealed unexpected associations, including new components required for the biogenesis of iron-sulphur and ribosome integrity, and the interplay between molecular chaperones and proteases. We find that functionally-linked genes co-conserved among γ-proteobacteria are far more likely to have correlated GI profiles than genes with divergent patterns of evolution. Overall, examining bacterial GIs in the context of protein complexes provides avenues for a deeper mechanistic understanding of core microbial systems. PMID:24586182

  15. Hierarchicality of Trade Flow Networks Reveals Complexity of Products

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Peiteng; Zhang, Jiang; Yang, Bo; Luo, Jingfei

    2014-01-01

    With globalization, countries are more connected than before by trading flows, which amounts to at least trillion dollars today. Interestingly, around percents of exports consist of intermediate products in global. Therefore, the trade flow network of particular product with high added values can be regarded as value chains. The problem is weather we can discriminate between these products from their unique flow network structure? This paper applies the flow analysis method developed in ecology to 638 trading flow networks of different products. We claim that the allometric scaling exponent can be used to characterize the degree of hierarchicality of a flow network, i.e., whether the trading products flow on long hierarchical chains. Then, it is pointed out that the flow networks of products with higher added values and complexity like machinary, transport equipment etc. have larger exponents, meaning that their trade flow networks are more hierarchical. As a result, without the extra data like global input-output table, we can identify the product categories with higher complexity, and the relative importance of a country in the global value chain by the trading network solely. PMID:24905753

  16. Hierarchicality of trade flow networks reveals complexity of products.

    PubMed

    Shi, Peiteng; Zhang, Jiang; Yang, Bo; Luo, Jingfei

    2014-01-01

    With globalization, countries are more connected than before by trading flows, which amounts to at least 36 trillion dollars today. Interestingly, around 30-60 percents of exports consist of intermediate products in global. Therefore, the trade flow network of particular product with high added values can be regarded as value chains. The problem is weather we can discriminate between these products from their unique flow network structure? This paper applies the flow analysis method developed in ecology to 638 trading flow networks of different products. We claim that the allometric scaling exponent η can be used to characterize the degree of hierarchicality of a flow network, i.e., whether the trading products flow on long hierarchical chains. Then, it is pointed out that the flow networks of products with higher added values and complexity like machinary, transport equipment etc. have larger exponents, meaning that their trade flow networks are more hierarchical. As a result, without the extra data like global input-output table, we can identify the product categories with higher complexity, and the relative importance of a country in the global value chain by the trading network solely.

  17. Hierarchicality of trade flow networks reveals complexity of products.

    PubMed

    Shi, Peiteng; Zhang, Jiang; Yang, Bo; Luo, Jingfei

    2014-01-01

    With globalization, countries are more connected than before by trading flows, which amounts to at least 36 trillion dollars today. Interestingly, around 30-60 percents of exports consist of intermediate products in global. Therefore, the trade flow network of particular product with high added values can be regarded as value chains. The problem is weather we can discriminate between these products from their unique flow network structure? This paper applies the flow analysis method developed in ecology to 638 trading flow networks of different products. We claim that the allometric scaling exponent η can be used to characterize the degree of hierarchicality of a flow network, i.e., whether the trading products flow on long hierarchical chains. Then, it is pointed out that the flow networks of products with higher added values and complexity like machinary, transport equipment etc. have larger exponents, meaning that their trade flow networks are more hierarchical. As a result, without the extra data like global input-output table, we can identify the product categories with higher complexity, and the relative importance of a country in the global value chain by the trading network solely. PMID:24905753

  18. The Capsaspora genome reveals a complex unicellular prehistory of animals.

    PubMed

    Suga, Hiroshi; Chen, Zehua; de Mendoza, Alex; Sebé-Pedrós, Arnau; Brown, Matthew W; Kramer, Eric; Carr, Martin; Kerner, Pierre; Vervoort, Michel; Sánchez-Pons, Núria; Torruella, Guifré; Derelle, Romain; Manning, Gerard; Lang, B Franz; Russ, Carsten; Haas, Brian J; Roger, Andrew J; Nusbaum, Chad; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki

    2013-01-01

    To reconstruct the evolutionary origin of multicellular animals from their unicellular ancestors, the genome sequences of diverse unicellular relatives are essential. However, only the genome of the choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis has been reported to date. Here we completely sequence the genome of the filasterean Capsaspora owczarzaki, the closest known unicellular relative of metazoans besides choanoflagellates. Analyses of this genome alter our understanding of the molecular complexity of metazoans' unicellular ancestors showing that they had a richer repertoire of proteins involved in cell adhesion and transcriptional regulation than previously inferred only with the choanoflagellate genome. Some of these proteins were secondarily lost in choanoflagellates. In contrast, most intercellular signalling systems controlling development evolved later concomitant with the emergence of the first metazoans. We propose that the acquisition of these metazoan-specific developmental systems and the co-option of pre-existing genes drove the evolutionary transition from unicellular protists to metazoans. PMID:23942320

  19. The Capsaspora genome reveals a complex unicellular prehistory of animals

    PubMed Central

    Suga, Hiroshi; Chen, Zehua; de Mendoza, Alex; Sebé-Pedrós, Arnau; Brown, Matthew W.; Kramer, Eric; Carr, Martin; Kerner, Pierre; Vervoort, Michel; Sánchez-Pons, Núria; Torruella, Guifré; Derelle, Romain; Manning, Gerard; Lang, B. Franz; Russ, Carsten; Haas, Brian J.; Roger, Andrew J.; Nusbaum, Chad; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki

    2013-01-01

    To reconstruct the evolutionary origin of multicellular animals from their unicellular ancestors, the genome sequences of diverse unicellular relatives are essential. However, only the genome of the choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis has been reported to date. Here we completely sequence the genome of the filasterean Capsaspora owczarzaki, the closest known unicellular relative of metazoans besides choanoflagellates. Analyses of this genome alter our understanding of the molecular complexity of metazoans’ unicellular ancestors showing that they had a richer repertoire of proteins involved in cell adhesion and transcriptional regulation than previously inferred only with the choanoflagellate genome. Some of these proteins were secondarily lost in choanoflagellates. In contrast, most intercellular signalling systems controlling development evolved later concomitant with the emergence of the first metazoans. We propose that the acquisition of these metazoan-specific developmental systems and the co-option of pre-existing genes drove the evolutionary transition from unicellular protists to metazoans. PMID:23942320

  20. Diffraction computed tomography reveals the inner structure of complex biominerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leemreize, Hanna; Birkbak, Mie; Frølich, Simon; Kenesei, Peter; Almer, Jonathan D.; Stock, Stuart R.; Birkedal, Henrik

    2014-09-01

    Biological materials are complex and their investigation demands advanced characterization tools capable of elucidating their structure in three dimensions without the need for complicated sample preparation. Herein, we discuss our implementation of diffraction/scattering computed tomography (DSCT). DSCT is based on the use of diffraction information for tomographic reconstructions rather than linear attenuation as in regular μ-CT. This provides much additional information on the material under investigation. We illustrate the use of DSCT by discussion of data on a biomineralized attachment organ from a marine mussel. DSCT allowed mapping the spatial distribution of calcium carbonate polymorphs aragonite and calcite even though they were indistinguishable in absorption tomography. Detailed analysis of reconstructed diffraction patterns may provide additional insights as exemplified in the present case by mapping of the degree of chemical substitution in calcite.

  1. The Capsaspora genome reveals a complex unicellular prehistory of animals.

    PubMed

    Suga, Hiroshi; Chen, Zehua; de Mendoza, Alex; Sebé-Pedrós, Arnau; Brown, Matthew W; Kramer, Eric; Carr, Martin; Kerner, Pierre; Vervoort, Michel; Sánchez-Pons, Núria; Torruella, Guifré; Derelle, Romain; Manning, Gerard; Lang, B Franz; Russ, Carsten; Haas, Brian J; Roger, Andrew J; Nusbaum, Chad; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki

    2013-01-01

    To reconstruct the evolutionary origin of multicellular animals from their unicellular ancestors, the genome sequences of diverse unicellular relatives are essential. However, only the genome of the choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis has been reported to date. Here we completely sequence the genome of the filasterean Capsaspora owczarzaki, the closest known unicellular relative of metazoans besides choanoflagellates. Analyses of this genome alter our understanding of the molecular complexity of metazoans' unicellular ancestors showing that they had a richer repertoire of proteins involved in cell adhesion and transcriptional regulation than previously inferred only with the choanoflagellate genome. Some of these proteins were secondarily lost in choanoflagellates. In contrast, most intercellular signalling systems controlling development evolved later concomitant with the emergence of the first metazoans. We propose that the acquisition of these metazoan-specific developmental systems and the co-option of pre-existing genes drove the evolutionary transition from unicellular protists to metazoans.

  2. Cauliflower mosaic virus Transcriptome Reveals a Complex Alternative Splicing Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Bouton, Clément; Geldreich, Angèle; Ramel, Laëtitia; Ryabova, Lyubov A.; Dimitrova, Maria; Keller, Mario

    2015-01-01

    The plant pararetrovirus Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) uses alternative splic-ing to generate several isoforms from its polycistronic pregenomic 35S RNA. This pro-cess has been shown to be essential for infectivity. Previous works have identified four splice donor sites and a single splice acceptor site in the 35S RNA 5’ region and sug-gested that the main role of CaMV splicing is to downregulate expression of open read-ing frames (ORFs) I and II. In this study, we show that alternative splicing is a conserved process among CaMV isolates. In Cabb B-JI and Cabb-S isolates, splicing frequently leads to different fusion between ORFs, particularly between ORF I and II. The corresponding P1P2 fusion proteins expressed in E. coli interact with viral proteins P2 and P3 in vitro. However, they are detected neither during infection nor upon transient expression in planta, which suggests rapid degradation after synthesis and no important biological role in the CaMV infectious cycle. To gain a better understanding of the functional relevance of 35S RNA alternative splicing in CaMV infectivity, we inactivated the previously described splice sites. All the splicing mutants were as pathogenic as the corresponding wild-type isolate. Through RT-PCR-based analysis we demonstrate that CaMV 35S RNA exhibits a complex splicing pattern, as we identify new splice donor and acceptor sites whose selection leads to more than thirteen 35S RNA isoforms in infected turnip plants. Inactivating splice donor or acceptor sites is not lethal for the virus, since disrupted sites are systematically rescued by the activation of cryptic and/or seldom used splice sites. Taken together, our data depict a conserved, complex and flexible process, involving multiple sites, that ensures splicing of 35S RNA. PMID:26162084

  3. Cloning of opal suppressor tRNA genes of a filamentous fungus reveals two tRNASerUGA genes with unexpected structural differences.

    PubMed Central

    Debuchy, R; Brygoo, Y

    1985-01-01

    The informational suppressors su4-1 and su8-1 of Podospora anserina were isolated by transformation of Schizosaccharomyces pombe UGA mutants. The DNA sequence revealed that they were opal (UGA) suppressor tRNAs. Wild-type alleles were also isolated by hybridization. The DNA sequence showed that they both encode species of tRNASerUGA. The gene SU8 has an 18-bp intervening sequence and its primary sequence is very different from that of SU4. PMID:3937728

  4. Revealing the complex conduction heat transfer mechanism of nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Sergis, A; Hardalupas, Y

    2015-12-01

    Nanofluids are two-phase mixtures consisting of small percentages of nanoparticles (sub 1-10 %vol) inside a carrier fluid. The typical size of nanoparticles is less than 100 nm. These fluids have been exhibiting experimentally a significant increase of thermal performance compared to the corresponding carrier fluids, which cannot be explained using the classical thermodynamic theory. This study deciphers the thermal heat transfer mechanism for the conductive heat transfer mode via a molecular dynamics simulation code. The current findings are the first of their kind and conflict with the proposed theories for heat transfer propagation through micron-sized slurries and pure matter. The authors provide evidence of a complex new type of heat transfer mechanism, which explains the observed abnormal heat transfer augmentation. The new mechanism appears to unite a number of popular speculations for the thermal heat transfer mechanism employed by nanofluids as predicted by the majority of the researchers of the field into a single one. The constituents of the increased diffusivity of the nanoparticle can be attributed to mismatching of the local temperature profiles between parts of the surface of the solid and the fluid resulting in increased local thermophoretic effects. These effects affect the region surrounding the solid manifesting interfacial layer phenomena (Kapitza resistance). In this region, the activity of the fluid and the interactions between the fluid and the nanoparticle are elevated. Isotropic increased nanoparticle mobility is manifested as enhanced Brownian motion and diffusion effects.

  5. Complex deformation in western Tibet revealed by anisotropic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Heng; Zhao, Junmeng; Zhao, Dapeng; Yu, Chunquan; Liu, Hongbing; Hu, Zhaoguo

    2016-10-01

    The mechanism and pattern of deformation beneath western Tibet are still an issue of debate. In this work we present 3-D P- and S-wave velocity tomography as well as P-wave radial and azimuthal anisotropy along the ANTILOPE-I profile and surrounding areas in western Tibet, which are determined by using a large number of P and S arrival-time data of local earthquakes and teleseismic events. Our results show that low-velocity (low-V) zones exist widely in the middle crust, whereas low-V zones are only visible in the lower crust beneath northwestern Tibet, indicating the existence of significant heterogeneities and complex flow there. In the upper mantle, a distinct low-V gap exists between the Indian and Asian plates. Considering the P- and S-wave tomography and P-wave azimuthal and radial anisotropy results, we interpret the gap to be caused mainly by shear heating. Depth-independent azimuthal anisotropy and high-velocity zones exist beneath the northern part of the study region, suggesting a vertically coherent deformation beneath the Tarim Basin. In contrast, tomographic and anisotropic features change with depth beneath the central and southern parts of the study region, which reflects depth-dependent (or decoupled) deformations there. At the northern edge of the Indian lithospheric mantle (ILM), P-wave azimuthal anisotropy shows a nearly east-west fast-velocity direction, suggesting that the ILM was re-built by mantle materials flowing to the north.

  6. Layered Social Network Analysis Reveals Complex Relationships in Kindergarteners.

    PubMed

    Golemiec, Mireille; Schneider, Jonathan; Boyce, W Thomas; Bush, Nicole R; Adler, Nancy; Levine, Joel D

    2016-01-01

    The interplay between individuals forms building blocks for social structure. Here, we examine the structure of behavioral interactions among kindergarten classroom with a hierarchy-neutral approach to examine all possible underlying patterns in the formation of layered networks of "reciprocal" interactions. To understand how these layers are coordinated, we used a layered motif approach. Our dual layered motif analysis can therefore be thought of as the dynamics of smaller groups that tile to create the group structure, or alternatively they provide information on what the average child would do in a given local social environment. When we examine the regulated motifs in layered networks, we find that transitivity is at least partially involved in the formation of these layered network structures. We also found complex combinations of the expected reciprocal interactions. The mechanisms used to understand social networks of kindergarten children here are also applicable on a more general scale to any group of individuals where interactions and identities can be readily observed and scored. PMID:26973572

  7. Layered Social Network Analysis Reveals Complex Relationships in Kindergarteners

    PubMed Central

    Golemiec, Mireille; Schneider, Jonathan; Boyce, W. Thomas; Bush, Nicole R.; Adler, Nancy; Levine, Joel D.

    2016-01-01

    The interplay between individuals forms building blocks for social structure. Here, we examine the structure of behavioral interactions among kindergarten classroom with a hierarchy-neutral approach to examine all possible underlying patterns in the formation of layered networks of “reciprocal” interactions. To understand how these layers are coordinated, we used a layered motif approach. Our dual layered motif analysis can therefore be thought of as the dynamics of smaller groups that tile to create the group structure, or alternatively they provide information on what the average child would do in a given local social environment. When we examine the regulated motifs in layered networks, we find that transitivity is at least partially involved in the formation of these layered network structures. We also found complex combinations of the expected reciprocal interactions. The mechanisms used to understand social networks of kindergarten children here are also applicable on a more general scale to any group of individuals where interactions and identities can be readily observed and scored. PMID:26973572

  8. Genome-wide expression profiling in the Drosophila eye reveals unexpected repression of Notch signaling by the JAK/STAT pathway

    PubMed Central

    Flaherty, Maria Sol; Zavadil, Jiri; Ekas, Laura A.; Bach, Erika A.

    2010-01-01

    Although the JAK/STAT pathway regulates numerous processes in vertebrates and invertebrates through modulating transcription, its functionally-relevant transcriptional targets remain largely unknown. With one jak and one stat (stat92E), Drosophila provides a powerful system for finding new JAK/STAT target genes. Genome-wide expression profiling on eye discs in which Stat92E is hyperactivated, revealed 584 differentially-regulated genes, including known targets domeless, socs36E and wingless. Other differentially-regulated genes (chinmo, lama, Mo25, Imp-L2, Serrate, Delta) were validated and may represent new Stat92E targets. Genetic experiments revealed that Stat92E cell-autonomously represses Serrate, which encodes a Notch ligand. Loss of Stat92E led to de-repression of Serrate in the dorsal eye, resulting in ectopic Notch signaling and aberrant eye growth there. Thus, our micro-array documents a new Stat92E target gene and a previously-unidentified inhibitory action of Stat92E on Notch signaling. These data suggest that this study will be a useful resource for the identification of additional Stat92E targets. PMID:19504457

  9. Measurement of PIP3 Levels Reveals an Unexpected Role for p110β in Early Adaptive Responses to p110α-Specific Inhibitors in Luminal Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Carlotta; Ebi, Hiromichi; Martini, Miriam; Beausoleil, Sean A.; Faber, Anthony C.; Jakubik, Charles T.; Huang, Alan; Wang, Youzhen; Nishtala, Madhuri; Hall, Ben; Rikova, Klarisa; Zhao, Jean; Hirsch, Emilio; Benes, Cyril H.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY BYL719, which selectively inhibits the alpha isoform of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) catalytic subunit (p110α), is currently in clinical trials for the treatment of solid tumors, especially luminal breast cancers with PIK3CA mutations and/or HER2 amplification. This study reveals that, even among these sensitive cancers, the initial efficacy of p110α inhibition is mitigated by rapid re-accumulation of the PI3K product PIP3 produced by the p110β isoform. Importantly, the reactivation of PI3K mediated by p110β does not invariably restore AKT phosphorylation, demonstrating the limitations of using phospho-AKT as a surrogate to measure PI3K activation. Consistently, we show that the addition of the p110β inhibitor to BYL719 prevents the PIP3 rebound and induces greater antitumor efficacy in HER2-amplified and PIK3CA mutant cancers. PMID:25544637

  10. Severe Left Ventricular Hypertrophy, Small Pericardial Effusion, and Diffuse Late Gadolinium Enhancement by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Suspecting Cardiac Amyloidosis: Endomyocardial Biopsy Reveals an Unexpected Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Nina P.; Giusca, Sorin; Klingel, Karin; Nunninger, Peter; Korosoglou, Grigorios

    2016-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy can be related to a multitude of cardiac disorders, such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), cardiac amyloidosis, and hypertensive heart disease. Although the presence of LV hypertrophy is generally associated with poorer cardiac outcomes, the early differentiation between these pathologies is crucial due to the presence of specific treatment options. The diagnostic process with LV hypertrophy requires the integration of clinical evaluation, electrocardiography (ECG), echocardiography, biochemical markers, and if required CMR and endomyocardial biopsy in order to reach the correct diagnosis. Here, we present a case of a patient with severe LV hypertrophy (septal wall thickness of 23 mm, LV mass of 264 g, and LV mass index of 147 g/m2), severely impaired longitudinal function, and preserved radial contractility (ejection fraction = 55%), accompanied by small pericardial effusion and diffuse late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Due to the imaging findings, an infiltrative cardiomyopathy, such as cardiac amyloidosis, was suspected. However, amyloid accumulation was excluded by endomyocardial biopsy, which revealed the presence of diffuse myocardial fibrosis in an advanced hypertensive heart disease. PMID:27247807

  11. The Structure of the GM-CSF Receptor Complex Reveals a Distinct Mode of Cytokine Receptor Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Guido; Hercus, Timothy R.; McClure, Barbara J.; Stomski, Frank C.; Dottore, Mara; Powell, Jason; Ramshaw, Hayley; Woodcock, Joanna M.; Xu, Yibin; Guthridge, Mark; McKinstry, William J.; Lopez, Angel F.; Parker, Michael W.

    2008-08-11

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that controls the production and function of blood cells, is deregulated in clinical conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and leukemia, yet offers therapeutic value for other diseases. Its receptors are heterodimers consisting of a ligand-specific {alpha} subunit and a {beta}c subunit that is shared with the interleukin (IL)-3 and IL-5 receptors. How signaling is initiated remains an enigma. We report here the crystal structure of the human GM-CSF/GM-CSF receptor ternary complex and its assembly into an unexpected dodecamer or higher-order complex. Importantly, mutagenesis of the GM-CSF receptor at the dodecamer interface and functional studies reveal that dodecamer formation is required for receptor activation and signaling. This unusual form of receptor assembly likely applies also to IL-3 and IL-5 receptors, providing a structural basis for understanding their mechanism of activation and for the development of therapeutics.

  12. Effectiveness of annealing blocking primers versus restriction enzymes for characterization of generalist diets: unexpected prey revealed in the gut contents of two coral reef fish species.

    PubMed

    Leray, Matthieu; Agudelo, Natalia; Mills, Suzanne C; Meyer, Christopher P

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of predator-prey interactions is challenging as researchers have to rely on indirect methods that can be costly, biased and too imprecise to elucidate the complexity of food webs. DNA amplification and sequencing techniques of gut and fecal contents are promising approaches, but their success largely depends on the ability to amplify the taxonomic array of prey consumed and then match prey amplicons with reference sequences. When little a priori information on diet is available or a generalist predator is targeted, versatile primer sets (also referred to as universal or general primers) as opposed to group- or species-specific primer sets are the most powerful to unveil the full range of prey consumed. However, versatile primers are likely to preferentially amplify the predominant, less degraded predator DNA if no manipulation is performed to exclude this confounding DNA template. In this study we compare two approaches that eliminate the confounding predator template: restriction digestion and the use of annealing blocking primers. First, we use a preliminary DNA barcode library provided by the Moorea BIOCODE project to 1) evaluate the cutting frequency of commercially available restriction enzymes and 2) design predator specific annealing blocking primers. We then compare the performance of the two predator removal strategies for the detection of prey templates using two versatile primer sets from the gut contents of two generalist coral reef fish species sampled in Moorea. Our study demonstrates that blocking primers should be preferentially used over restriction digestion for predator DNA removal as they recover greater prey diversity. We also emphasize that a combination of versatile primers may be required to best represent the breadth of a generalist's diet.

  13. In vivo Whole-Cell Recordings Combined with Electron Microscopy Reveal Unexpected Morphological and Physiological Properties in the Lateral Nucleus of the Trapezoid Body in the Auditory Brainstem

    PubMed Central

    Franken, Tom P.; Smith, Philip H.; Joris, Philip X.

    2016-01-01

    The lateral nucleus of the trapezoid body (LNTB) is a prominent nucleus in the superior olivary complex in mammals including humans. Its physiology in vivo is poorly understood due to a paucity of recordings. It is thought to provide a glycinergic projection to the medial superior olive (MSO) with an important role in binaural processing and sound localization. We combined in vivo patch clamp recordings with labeling of individual neurons in the Mongolian gerbil. Labeling of the recorded neurons allowed us to relate physiological properties to anatomy at the light and electron microscopic level. We identified a population of quite dorsally located neurons with surprisingly large dendritic trees on which most of the synaptic input impinges. In most neurons, one or more of these dendrites run through and are then medial to the MSO. These neurons were often binaural and could even show sensitivity to interaural time differences (ITDs) of stimulus fine structure or envelope. Moreover, a subpopulation showed enhanced phase-locking to tones delivered in the tuning curve tail. We propose that these neurons constitute the gerbil main LNTB (mLNTB). In contrast, a smaller sample of neurons was identified that was located more ventrally and that we designate to be in posteroventral LNTB (pvLNTB). These cells receive large somatic excitatory terminals from globular bushy cells. We also identified previously undescribed synaptic inputs from the lateral superior olive. pvLNTB neurons are usually monaural, display a primary-like-with-notch response to ipsilateral short tones at CF and can phase-lock to low frequency tones. We conclude that mLNTB contains a population of neurons with extended dendritic trees where most of the synaptic input is found, that can show enhanced phase-locking and sensitivity to ITD. pvLNTB cells, presumed to provide glycinergic input to the MSO, get large somatic globular bushy synaptic inputs and are typically monaural with short tone responses similar

  14. In vivo Whole-Cell Recordings Combined with Electron Microscopy Reveal Unexpected Morphological and Physiological Properties in the Lateral Nucleus of the Trapezoid Body in the Auditory Brainstem.

    PubMed

    Franken, Tom P; Smith, Philip H; Joris, Philip X

    2016-01-01

    The lateral nucleus of the trapezoid body (LNTB) is a prominent nucleus in the superior olivary complex in mammals including humans. Its physiology in vivo is poorly understood due to a paucity of recordings. It is thought to provide a glycinergic projection to the medial superior olive (MSO) with an important role in binaural processing and sound localization. We combined in vivo patch clamp recordings with labeling of individual neurons in the Mongolian gerbil. Labeling of the recorded neurons allowed us to relate physiological properties to anatomy at the light and electron microscopic level. We identified a population of quite dorsally located neurons with surprisingly large dendritic trees on which most of the synaptic input impinges. In most neurons, one or more of these dendrites run through and are then medial to the MSO. These neurons were often binaural and could even show sensitivity to interaural time differences (ITDs) of stimulus fine structure or envelope. Moreover, a subpopulation showed enhanced phase-locking to tones delivered in the tuning curve tail. We propose that these neurons constitute the gerbil main LNTB (mLNTB). In contrast, a smaller sample of neurons was identified that was located more ventrally and that we designate to be in posteroventral LNTB (pvLNTB). These cells receive large somatic excitatory terminals from globular bushy cells. We also identified previously undescribed synaptic inputs from the lateral superior olive. pvLNTB neurons are usually monaural, display a primary-like-with-notch response to ipsilateral short tones at CF and can phase-lock to low frequency tones. We conclude that mLNTB contains a population of neurons with extended dendritic trees where most of the synaptic input is found, that can show enhanced phase-locking and sensitivity to ITD. pvLNTB cells, presumed to provide glycinergic input to the MSO, get large somatic globular bushy synaptic inputs and are typically monaural with short tone responses similar

  15. In vivo Whole-Cell Recordings Combined with Electron Microscopy Reveal Unexpected Morphological and Physiological Properties in the Lateral Nucleus of the Trapezoid Body in the Auditory Brainstem

    PubMed Central

    Franken, Tom P.; Smith, Philip H.; Joris, Philip X.

    2016-01-01

    The lateral nucleus of the trapezoid body (LNTB) is a prominent nucleus in the superior olivary complex in mammals including humans. Its physiology in vivo is poorly understood due to a paucity of recordings. It is thought to provide a glycinergic projection to the medial superior olive (MSO) with an important role in binaural processing and sound localization. We combined in vivo patch clamp recordings with labeling of individual neurons in the Mongolian gerbil. Labeling of the recorded neurons allowed us to relate physiological properties to anatomy at the light and electron microscopic level. We identified a population of quite dorsally located neurons with surprisingly large dendritic trees on which most of the synaptic input impinges. In most neurons, one or more of these dendrites run through and are then medial to the MSO. These neurons were often binaural and could even show sensitivity to interaural time differences (ITDs) of stimulus fine structure or envelope. Moreover, a subpopulation showed enhanced phase-locking to tones delivered in the tuning curve tail. We propose that these neurons constitute the gerbil main LNTB (mLNTB). In contrast, a smaller sample of neurons was identified that was located more ventrally and that we designate to be in posteroventral LNTB (pvLNTB). These cells receive large somatic excitatory terminals from globular bushy cells. We also identified previously undescribed synaptic inputs from the lateral superior olive. pvLNTB neurons are usually monaural, display a primary-like-with-notch response to ipsilateral short tones at CF and can phase-lock to low frequency tones. We conclude that mLNTB contains a population of neurons with extended dendritic trees where most of the synaptic input is found, that can show enhanced phase-locking and sensitivity to ITD. pvLNTB cells, presumed to provide glycinergic input to the MSO, get large somatic globular bushy synaptic inputs and are typically monaural with short tone responses similar

  16. Unexpected response. Student essay

    SciTech Connect

    White, T.R.

    1985-05-08

    This paper reviews the NATO mission of deterrence and the threat of its use of nuclear weapons. It suggests that the threat is viable until a war starts, but then becomes meaningless because the Federal Republic of Germany would opt for a different course of action - its Unexpected Response. The conclusion is that convential forces are the essential deterrent given strategic parity. Then strategic mobility is addressed as it provides greater conventional reinforcement potential than generally assumed. An Unexpected Response by the Congress which could be counter-productive to the use of our new mobility is then discussed.

  17. A Regression-Based Analysis of Ribosome-Profiling Data Reveals a Conserved Complexity to Mammalian Translation.

    PubMed

    Fields, Alexander P; Rodriguez, Edwin H; Jovanovic, Marko; Stern-Ginossar, Noam; Haas, Brian J; Mertins, Philipp; Raychowdhury, Raktima; Hacohen, Nir; Carr, Steven A; Ingolia, Nicholas T; Regev, Aviv; Weissman, Jonathan S

    2015-12-01

    A fundamental goal of genomics is to identify the complete set of expressed proteins. Automated annotation strategies rely on assumptions about protein-coding sequences (CDSs), e.g., they are conserved, do not overlap, and exceed a minimum length. However, an increasing number of newly discovered proteins violate these rules. Here we present an experimental and analytical framework, based on ribosome profiling and linear regression, for systematic identification and quantification of translation. Application of this approach to lipopolysaccharide-stimulated mouse dendritic cells and HCMV-infected human fibroblasts identifies thousands of novel CDSs, including micropeptides and variants of known proteins, that bear the hallmarks of canonical translation and exhibit translation levels and dynamics comparable to that of annotated CDSs. Remarkably, many translation events are identified in both mouse and human cells even when the peptide sequence is not conserved. Our work thus reveals an unexpected complexity to mammalian translation suited to provide both conserved regulatory or protein-based functions. PMID:26638175

  18. Monophyly, Distance and Character–Based Multigene Barcoding Reveal Extraordinary Cryptic Diversity in Nassarius: A Complex and Dangerous Community

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Shanmei; Li, Qi; Kong, Lingfeng

    2012-01-01

    Background Correct identification and cryptic biodiversity revelation for marine organisms are pressing since the marine life is important in maintaining the balance of ecological system and is facing the problem of biodiversity crisis or food safety. DNA barcoding has been proved successful to provide resolution beyond the boundaries of morphological information. Nassarius, the common mudsnail, plays an important role in marine environment and has problem in food safety, but the classification of it is quite confused because of the complex morphological diversity. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we report a comprehensive barcoding analysis of 22 Nassarius species. We integrated the mitochondrial and nuclear sequences and the morphological characters to determine 13 Nassarius species studied and reveal four cryptic species and one pair synonyms. Distance, monophyly, and character–based barcoding methods were employed. Conclusions/Significance Such successful identification and unexpected cryptic discovery is significant for Nassarius in food safety and species conversation and remind us to pay more attention to the hidden cryptic biodiversity ignored in marine life. Distance, monophyly, and character–based barcoding methods are all very helpful in identification but the character-based method shows some advantages. PMID:23071774

  19. The analysis of eight transcriptomes from all poriferan classes reveals surprising genetic complexity in sponges.

    PubMed

    Riesgo, Ana; Farrar, Nathan; Windsor, Pamela J; Giribet, Gonzalo; Leys, Sally P

    2014-05-01

    Sponges (Porifera) are among the earliest evolving metazoans. Their filter-feeding body plan based on choanocyte chambers organized into a complex aquiferous system is so unique among metazoans that it either reflects an early divergence from other animals prior to the evolution of features such as muscles and nerves, or that sponges lost these characters. Analyses of the Amphimedon and Oscarella genomes support this view of uniqueness-many key metazoan genes are absent in these sponges-but whether this is generally true of other sponges remains unknown. We studied the transcriptomes of eight sponge species in four classes (Hexactinellida, Demospongiae, Homoscleromorpha, and Calcarea) specifically seeking genes and pathways considered to be involved in animal complexity. For reference, we also sought these genes in transcriptomes and genomes of three unicellular opisthokonts, two sponges (A. queenslandica and O. carmela), and two bilaterian taxa. Our analyses showed that all sponge classes share an unexpectedly large complement of genes with other metazoans. Interestingly, hexactinellid, calcareous, and homoscleromorph sponges share more genes with bilaterians than with nonbilaterian metazoans. We were surprised to find representatives of most molecules involved in cell-cell communication, signaling, complex epithelia, immune recognition, and germ-lineage/sex, with only a few, but potentially key, absences. A noteworthy finding was that some important genes were absent from all demosponges (transcriptomes and the Amphimedon genome), which might reflect divergence from main-stem lineages including hexactinellids, calcareous sponges, and homoscleromorphs. Our results suggest that genetic complexity arose early in evolution as shown by the presence of these genes in most of the animal lineages, which suggests sponges either possess cryptic physiological and morphological complexity and/or have lost ancestral cell types or physiological processes.

  20. Structures of the CRISPR-Cmr complex reveal mode of RNA target positioning

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, David W.; Zhu, Yifan; Staals, Raymond H.J.; Kornfeld, Jack E.; Shinkai, Akeo; van der Oost, John; Nogales, Eva; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive immunity in bacteria involves RNA-guided surveillance complexes that use CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-associated (Cas) proteins together with CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) to target invasive nucleic acids for degradation. While Type I and Type II CRISPR-Cas surveillance complexes target double-stranded DNA, Type III complexes target single-stranded RNA. Near-atomic resolution cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) reconstructions of native Type III Cmr (CRISPR RAMP module) complexes in the absence and presence of target RNA reveal a helical protein arrangement that positions the crRNA for substrate binding. Thumb-like β-hairpins intercalate between segments of duplexed crRNA:target RNA to facilitate cleavage of the target at 6-nt intervals. The Cmr complex is architecturally similar to the Type I CRISPR-Cascade complex, suggesting divergent evolution of these immune systems from a common ancestor. PMID:25837515

  1. Conjunctival lymphangioma in a 4-year-old girl revealed tuberous sclerosis complex

    PubMed Central

    Freiberg, Florentina Joyce; Kunstmann, Erdmute; König, Thomas; Matlach, Juliane; Kampik, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background: To present a case of conjunctival lymphangioma in a 4-year-old girl with tuberous sclerosis complex. Methods/results: A 4-year-old girl presented with a relapsing cystic lesion of the bulbar conjunctiva in the right eye with string-of-pearl-like dilation of lymphatic vessels and right-sided facial swelling with mild pain. Best-corrected vision was not impaired. Examination of the skin revealed three hypomelanotic macules and a lumbal Shagreen patch. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings displayed minimal enhancement of buccal fat on the right side. Cranial and orbital MRI showed signal enhancement in the right cortical and subcortical areas. Genetic analysis revealed a heterozygous deletion encompassing exon 1 and 2 of the TSC1 gene (tuberous sclerosis complex 1 gene), confirming the diagnosis of tuberous sclerosis complex. Conclusion: In conjunctival lymphangioma, tuberous sclerosis complex should be considered as the primary disease. PMID:27703871

  2. Unexpected Angiography Findings and Effects on Management

    PubMed Central

    Neill, Matthew; Charles, Hearns W; Gross, Jonathan S; Farquharson, Sean; Deipolyi, Amy R

    2016-01-01

    Despite progress in noninvasive imaging with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, conventional angiography still contributes to the diagnostic workup of oncologic and other diseases. Arteriography can reveal tumors not evident on cross-sectional imaging, in addition to defining aberrant or unexpected arterial supply to targeted lesions. This additional and potentially unanticipated information can alter management decisions during interventional procedures. PMID:27688932

  3. Unexpected Angiography Findings and Effects on Management.

    PubMed

    Neill, Matthew; Charles, Hearns W; Gross, Jonathan S; Farquharson, Sean; Deipolyi, Amy R

    2016-01-01

    Despite progress in noninvasive imaging with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, conventional angiography still contributes to the diagnostic workup of oncologic and other diseases. Arteriography can reveal tumors not evident on cross-sectional imaging, in addition to defining aberrant or unexpected arterial supply to targeted lesions. This additional and potentially unanticipated information can alter management decisions during interventional procedures. PMID:27688932

  4. Unexpected Angiography Findings and Effects on Management

    PubMed Central

    Neill, Matthew; Charles, Hearns W; Gross, Jonathan S; Farquharson, Sean; Deipolyi, Amy R

    2016-01-01

    Despite progress in noninvasive imaging with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, conventional angiography still contributes to the diagnostic workup of oncologic and other diseases. Arteriography can reveal tumors not evident on cross-sectional imaging, in addition to defining aberrant or unexpected arterial supply to targeted lesions. This additional and potentially unanticipated information can alter management decisions during interventional procedures.

  5. Increasing phonological complexity reveals heightened instability in inter-articulatory coordination in adults who stutter

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Anne; Sadagopan, Neeraja; Walsh, Bridget; Weber-Fox, Christine

    2010-01-01

    The potential role of phonological complexity in destabilizing the speech motor systems of adults who stutter was explored by assessing the performance of 17 adults who stutter and 17 matched control participants on a nonword repetition task. The nonwords varied in length and phonological complexity. Behavioral results revealed no differences between the stuttering and normally fluent groups on accuracy of nonword repetition. In contrast, dramatic differences between groups were observed in the kinematic data. Indices of the consistency of inter-articulator coordination revealed that adults who stutter were much less consistent in their coordinative patterns over repeated productions. With increasing length and complexity of the nonwords, between-group differences in coordinative consistency were more pronounced. Coordination consistency measures revealed that adults who stutter (but not normally fluent adults) showed within-session practice effects; their coordinative consistency improved in five later compared to five earlier productions. Adults who stutter produced the nonwords at a slower rate, but both groups showed increased rates of production on the later trials, indicating a practice effect for duration for both groups. We conclude that, though the adults who stutter performed behaviorally with the same accuracy as normally fluent adults, the nonword repetition task reveals remarkable differences in the speech motor dynamics underlying fluent speech production in adults who stutter compared to their normally fluent peers. These results support a multifactorial, dynamic model of stuttering in which linguistic complexity and utterance length are factors that contribute to the probability of breakdown of the speech motor system. PMID:20412979

  6. Unexpected presence of Fagus orientalis complex in Italy as inferred from 45,000-year-old DNA pollen samples from Venice lagoon

    PubMed Central

    Paffetti, Donatella; Vettori, Cristina; Caramelli, David; Vernesi, Cristiano; Lari, Martina; Paganelli, Arturo; Paule, Ladislav; Giannini, Raffaello

    2007-01-01

    Background Phylogeographic analyses on the Western Euroasiatic Fagus taxa (F. orientalis, F. sylvatica, F. taurica and F. moesiaca) is available, however, the subdivision of Fagus spp. is unresolved and there is no consensus on the phylogeny and on the identification (both with morphological than molecular markers) of Fagus Eurasiatic taxa. For the first time molecular analyses of ancient pollen, dated at least 45,000 years ago, were used in combination with the phylogeny analysis on current species, to identify the Fagus spp. present during the Last Interglacial period in Italy. In this work we aim at testing if the trnL-trnF chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) region, that has been previously proved efficient in discriminating different Quercus taxa, can be employed in distinguishing the Fagus species and in identifying the ancient pollen. Results 86 populations from 4 Western Euroasistic taxa were sampled, and sequenced for the trnL-trnF region to verify the efficiency of this cpDNA region in identifying the Fagus spp.. Furthermore, Fagus crenata (2 populations), Fagus grandifolia (2 populations), Fagus japonica, Fagus hayatae, Quercus species and Castanea species were analysed to better resolve the phylogenetic inference. Our results show that this cpDNA region harbour some informative sites that allow to infer relationships among the species within the Fagaceae family. In particular, few specific and fixed mutations were able to discriminate and identify all the different Fagus species. Considering a short fragment of 176 base pairs within the trnL intron, 2 transversions were found able in distinguishing the F. orientalis complex taxa (F. orientalis, F. taurica and F. moesiaca) from the remaining Fagus spp. (F. sylvatica, F. japonica, F. hayataea, F. crenata and F. grandifolia). This permits to analyse this fragment also in ancient samples, where DNA is usually highly degraded. The sequences data indicate that the DNA recovered from ancient pollen belongs to the F

  7. Unexpected high photothemal conversion efficiency of gold nanospheres upon grafting with two-photon luminescent ruthenium(II) complexes: A way towards cancer therapy?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pingyu; Wang, Jinquan; Huang, Huaiyi; Yu, Bole; Qiu, Kangqiang; Huang, Juanjuan; Wang, Shutao; Jiang, Lei; Gasser, Gilles; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2015-09-01

    The design and development of functional hybrid nanomaterials is currently a topic of great interest in biomedicine. Herein we investigated the grafting of Ru(II) polypyridyl complexes onto gold nanospheres (Ru@AuNPs) to improve the particles' near infrared (NIR) absorption, and ultimately allow for application in photothermal cancer therapy. As demonstrated in this article, these ruthenium(II) complexes could indeed significantly enhance gold nanospheres' two-photon luminescence (PTL) intensity and photothermal therapy (PTT) efficiency. The best dual functional nanoparticles of this study were successfully used for real-time luminescent imaging-guided PTT in live cancer cells. Furthermore, in vivo tumor ablation was achieved with excellent treatment efficacy under a diode laser (808 nm) irradiation at the power density of 0.8 W/cm(2) for 5 min. This study demonstrates that the coupling of inert Ru(II) polypyridyl complexes to gold nanospheres allows for the enhancement of two-photon luminescence and for efficient photothermal effect.

  8. Rcf1 mediates cytochrome oxidase assembly and respirasome formation, revealing heterogeneity of the enzyme complex.

    PubMed

    Vukotic, Milena; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Wiese, Sebastian; Vögtle, F Nora; Meisinger, Chris; Meyer, Helmut E; Zieseniss, Anke; Katschinski, Doerthe M; Jans, Daniel C; Jakobs, Stefan; Warscheid, Bettina; Rehling, Peter; Deckers, Markus

    2012-03-01

    The terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, cytochrome oxidase, transfers electrons to molecular oxygen, generating water. Within the inner mitochondrial membrane, cytochrome oxidase assembles into supercomplexes, together with other respiratory chain complexes, forming so-called respirasomes. Little is known about how these higher oligomeric structures are attained. Here we report on Rcf1 and Rcf2 as cytochrome oxidase subunits in S. cerevisiae. While Rcf2 is specific to yeast, Rcf1 is a conserved subunit with two human orthologs, RCF1a and RCF1b. Rcf1 is required for growth in hypoxia and complex assembly of subunits Cox13 and Rcf2, as well as for the oligomerization of a subclass of cytochrome oxidase complexes into respirasomes. Our analyses reveal that the cytochrome oxidase of mitochondria displays intrinsic heterogeneity with regard to its subunit composition and that distinct forms of respirasomes can be formed by complex variants.

  9. Cilium transition zone proteome reveals compartmentalization and differential dynamics of ciliopathy complexes.

    PubMed

    Dean, Samuel; Moreira-Leite, Flavia; Varga, Vladimir; Gull, Keith

    2016-08-30

    The transition zone (TZ) of eukaryotic cilia and flagella is a structural intermediate between the basal body and the axoneme that regulates ciliary traffic. Mutations in genes encoding TZ proteins (TZPs) cause human inherited diseases (ciliopathies). Here, we use the trypanosome to identify TZ components and localize them to TZ subdomains, showing that the Bardet-Biedl syndrome complex (BBSome) is more distal in the TZ than the Meckel syndrome (MKS) complex. Several of the TZPs identified here have human orthologs. Functional analysis shows essential roles for TZPs in motility, in building the axoneme central pair apparatus and in flagellum biogenesis. Analysis using RNAi and HaloTag fusion protein approaches reveals that most TZPs (including the MKS ciliopathy complex) show long-term stable association with the TZ, whereas the BBSome is dynamic. We propose that some Bardet-Biedl syndrome and MKS pleiotropy may be caused by mutations that impact TZP complex dynamics. PMID:27519801

  10. Unexpected formation of a fused double cycle trinuclear gold(i) complex supported by ortho-phenyl metallated aryl-diphosphine ligands and strong aurophilic interactions.

    PubMed

    Jobbágy, Csaba; Baranyai, Péter; Szabó, Pál; Holczbauer, Tamás; Rácz, Barbara; Li, Liang; Naumov, Panče; Deák, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    The first homoleptic trinuclear arylgold(i) complex, [Au3(L')2](NO3) (3), based on an ortho-phenyl metallated aryl-diphosphine ligand (L' = o-C6H4PPh(C15H10O)PPh2), has been obtained through a new thermolytic reaction of the corresponding diauracycle, [Au2(L)2](NO3)2 (L = xantphos). The formation of 3 involves activation of the ortho-phenyl C-H bond of the xantphos ligands. The presence of Au-C bonds in this new gold-diphosphine cluster is not its only remarkable feature, since it also displays two 12-membered rings fused together and a linear {Au3} chain with aurophilic interactions. Complex 3 exhibits strong sky-blue luminescence that can be assigned to a triplet metal-metal ((3)MM) transition partially mixed with a ligand-to-metal-metal charge transfer ((3)LMMCT) transition related to the aurophilic bonding. This [Au3(L')2](+) triauracycle also shows AIEE-activity, and is a selective luminescent chemosensor for metal ions. PMID:27439467

  11. Multilocus phylogeny of the avian family Alaudidae (larks) reveals complex morphological evolution, non-monophyletic genera and hidden species diversity.

    PubMed

    Alström, Per; Barnes, Keith N; Olsson, Urban; Barker, F Keith; Bloomer, Paulette; Khan, Aleem Ahmed; Qureshi, Masood Ahmed; Guillaumet, Alban; Crochet, Pierre-André; Ryan, Peter G

    2013-12-01

    The Alaudidae (larks) is a large family of songbirds in the superfamily Sylvioidea. Larks are cosmopolitan, although species-level diversity is by far largest in Africa, followed by Eurasia, whereas Australasia and the New World have only one species each. The present study is the first comprehensive phylogeny of the Alaudidae. It includes 83.5% of all species and representatives from all recognised genera, and was based on two mitochondrial and three nuclear loci (in total 6.4 kbp, although not all loci were available for all species). In addition, a larger sample, comprising several subspecies of some polytypic species was analysed for one of the mitochondrial loci. There was generally good agreement in trees inferred from different loci, although some strongly supported incongruences were noted. The tree based on the concatenated multilocus data was overall well resolved and well supported by the data. We stress the importance of performing single gene as well as combined data analyses, as the latter may obscure significant incongruence behind strong nodal support values. The multilocus tree revealed many unpredicted relationships, including some non-monophyletic genera (Calandrella, Mirafra, Melanocorypha, Spizocorys). The tree based on the extended mitochondrial data set revealed several unexpected deep divergences between taxa presently treated as conspecific (e.g. within Ammomanes cinctura, Ammomanes deserti, Calandrella brachydactyla, Eremophila alpestris), as well as some shallow splits between currently recognised species (e.g. Certhilauda brevirostris-C. semitorquata-C. curvirostris; Calendulauda barlowi-C. erythrochlamys; Mirafra cantillans-M. javanica). Based on our results, we propose a revised generic classification, and comment on some species limits. We also comment on the extraordinary morphological adaptability in larks, which has resulted in numerous examples of parallel evolution (e.g. in Melanocorypha mongolica and Alauda leucoptera [both

  12. Fluorescence Anisotropy Reveals Order and Disorder of Protein Domains in the Nuclear Pore Complex

    PubMed Central

    Mattheyses, Alexa L.; Kampmann, Martin; Atkinson, Claire E.; Simon, Sanford M.

    2010-01-01

    We present a new approach for studying individual protein domains within the nuclear pore complex (NPC) using fluorescence polarization microscopy. The NPC is a large macromolecular complex, the size and complexity of which presents experimental challenges. Using fluorescence anisotropy and exploiting the symmetry of the NPC and its organization in the nuclear envelope, we have resolved order and disorder of individual protein domains. Fluorescently tagging specific domains of individual nucleoporins revealed both rigid and flexible domains: the tips of the FG domains are disordered, whereas the NPC-anchored domains are ordered. Our technique allows the collection of structural information in vivo, providing the ability to probe the organization of protein domains within the NPC. This has particular relevance for the FG domain nucleoporins, which are crucial for nucleocytoplasmic transport. PMID:20858414

  13. Unexpected Spin-Crossover and a Low-Pressure Phase Change in an Iron(II)/Dipyrazolylpyridine Complex Exhibiting a High-Spin Jahn- Teller Distortion.

    PubMed

    Kershaw Cook, Laurence J; Thorp-Greenwood, Flora L; Comyn, Tim P; Cespedes, Oscar; Chastanet, Guillaume; Halcrow, Malcolm A

    2015-07-01

    The synthesis of 4-methyl-2,6-di(pyrazol-1-yl)pyridine (L) and four salts of [FeL2]X2 (X– = BF(4)(–), 1; X– = ClO(4)(–), 2; X– = PF(6)(–), 3; X– = CF3SO(3)(–), 4) are reported. Powder samples of 1 and 2 both exhibit abrupt, hysteretic spin-state transitions on cooling, with T(1/2)↓ = 204 and T(1/2)↑ = 209 K (1), and T(1/2)↓ = 175 and T(1/2)↑ = 193 K (2). The 18 K thermal hysteresis loop for 2 is unusually wide for a complex of this type. Single crystal structures of 2 show it to exhibit a Jahn–Teller-distorted six-coordinate geometry in its high-spin state, which would normally inhibit spin-crossover. Bulk samples of 1 and 2 are isostructural by X-ray powder diffraction, and undergo a crystallographic phase change during their spin-transitions. At temperatures below T(1/2), exposing both compounds to 10(–5) Torr pressure inside the powder diffractometer causes a reversible transformation back to the high-temperature crystal phase. Consideration of thermodynamic data implies this cannot be accompanied by a low → high spin-state change, however. Both compounds also exhibit the LIESST effect, with 2 exhibiting an unusually high T(LIESST) of 112 K. The salts 3 and 4 are respectively high-spin and low-spin between 3 and 300 K, with crystalline 3 exhibiting a more pronounced version of the same Jahn–Teller distortion. PMID:26351707

  14. Unexpected Spin-Crossover and a Low-Pressure Phase Change in an Iron(II)/Dipyrazolylpyridine Complex Exhibiting a High-Spin Jahn-Teller Distortion.

    PubMed

    Kershaw Cook, Laurence J; Thorp-Greenwood, Flora L; Comyn, Tim P; Cespedes, Oscar; Chastanet, Guillaume; Halcrow, Malcolm A

    2015-07-01

    The synthesis of 4-methyl-2,6-di(pyrazol-1-yl)pyridine (L) and four salts of [FeL2]X2 (X(-) = BF4(-), 1; X(-) = ClO4(-), 2; X(-) = PF6(-), 3; X(-) = CF3SO3(-), 4) are reported. Powder samples of 1 and 2 both exhibit abrupt, hysteretic spin-state transitions on cooling, with T1/2↓ = 204 and T1/2↑ = 209 K (1), and T1/2↓ = 175 and T1/2↑ = 193 K (2). The 18 K thermal hysteresis loop for 2 is unusually wide for a complex of this type. Single crystal structures of 2 show it to exhibit a Jahn-Teller-distorted six-coordinate geometry in its high-spin state, which would normally inhibit spin-crossover. Bulk samples of 1 and 2 are isostructural by X-ray powder diffraction, and undergo a crystallographic phase change during their spin-transitions. At temperatures below T1/2, exposing both compounds to 10(-5) Torr pressure inside the powder diffractometer causes a reversible transformation back to the high-temperature crystal phase. Consideration of thermodynamic data implies this cannot be accompanied by a low → high spin-state change, however. Both compounds also exhibit the LIESST effect, with 2 exhibiting an unusually high T(LIESST) of 112 K. The salts 3 and 4 are respectively high-spin and low-spin between 3 and 300 K, with crystalline 3 exhibiting a more pronounced version of the same Jahn-Teller distortion. PMID:26052980

  15. An unexpected tetanus case.

    PubMed

    Ergonul, Onder; Egeli, Demet; Kahyaoglu, Bulent; Bahar, Mois; Etienne, Mill; Bleck, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    1 million cases of tetanus are estimated to occur worldwide each year, with more than 200 000 deaths. Tetanus is a life-threatening but preventable disease caused by a toxin produced by Clostridium tetani-a Gram-positive bacillus found in high concentrations in soil and animal excrement. Tetanus is almost completely preventable by active immunisation, but very rarely unexpected cases can occur in individuals who have been previously vaccinated. We report a case of generalised tetanus in a 22-year-old woman that arose despite the protective antitoxin antibody in her serum. The patient received all her vaccinations in the USA; her last vaccination was 6 years ago. The case was unusual because the patient had received all standard vaccinations, had no defined port of entry at disease onset, and had symptoms lasting for 6 months. Tetanus can present with unusual clinical forms; therefore, the diagnosis and management of this rare but difficult disease should be updated. In this Grand Round, we review the clinical features, epidemiology, treatment, and prognosis of C tetani infections. PMID:27301930

  16. Optical tweezers reveal a dynamic mechanical response of cationic peptide-DNA complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Amy; Zheng, Tai; Sucayan, Sarah; Chou, Szu-Ting; Tricoli, Lucas; Hustedt, Jason; Kahn, Jason; Mixson, A. James; Seog, Joonil

    2013-03-01

    Nonviral carriers have been developed to deliver nucleic acids by forming nanoscale complexes; however, there has been limited success in achieving high transfection efficiency. Our hypothesis is that a factor affecting gene delivery efficiency is the mechanical response of the condensed complex. To begin to test this hypothesis, we directly measured the mechanical properties of DNA-carrier complexes using optical tweezers. Histidine-lysine (HK) polymer, Asparagine-lysine (NK) polymer and poly-L-lysine were used to form complexes with a single DNA molecule. As carriers were introduced, a sudden decrease in DNA extension occurrs at a force level which is defined as critical force (Fc). Fc is carrier and concentration dependent. Pulling revealed reduction in DNA extension length for HK-DNA complexes. The characteristics of force profiles vary by agent and can be dynamically manipulated by changes in environmental conditions such as ionic strength of the buffer as well as pH. Heparin can remove cationic reagents which are otherwise irreversibly bound to DNA. The implications for optimizing molecular interactions to enhance transfection efficiency will be discussed.

  17. Transcription closed and open complex dynamics studies reveal balance between genetic determinants and co-factors.

    PubMed

    Sala, Adrien; Shoaib, Muhammad; Anufrieva, Olga; Mutharasu, Gnanavel; Jahan Hoque, Rawnak; Yli-Harja, Olli; Kandhavelu, Meenakshisundaram

    2015-05-19

    In E. coli, promoter closed and open complexes are key steps in transcription initiation, where magnesium-dependent RNA polymerase catalyzes RNA synthesis. However, the exact mechanism of initiation remains to be fully elucidated. Here, using single mRNA detection and dual reporter studies, we show that increased intracellular magnesium concentration affects Plac initiation complex formation resulting in a highly dynamic process over the cell growth phases. Mg2+ regulates transcription transition, which modulates bimodality of mRNA distribution in the exponential phase. We reveal that Mg2+ regulates the size and frequency of the mRNA burst by changing the open complex duration. Moreover, increasing magnesium concentration leads to higher intrinsic and extrinsic noise in the exponential phase. RNAP-Mg2+ interaction simulation reveals critical movements creating a shorter contact distance between aspartic acid residues and Nucleotide Triphosphate residues and increasing electrostatic charges in the active site. Our findings provide unique biophysical insights into the balanced mechanism of genetic determinants and magnesium ion in transcription initiation regulation during cell growth.

  18. Transcription closed and open complex dynamics studies reveal balance between genetic determinants and co-factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sala, Adrien; Shoaib, Muhammad; Anufrieva, Olga; Mutharasu, Gnanavel; Jahan Hoque, Rawnak; Yli-Harja, Olli; Kandhavelu, Meenakshisundaram

    2015-05-01

    In E. coli, promoter closed and open complexes are key steps in transcription initiation, where magnesium-dependent RNA polymerase catalyzes RNA synthesis. However, the exact mechanism of initiation remains to be fully elucidated. Here, using single mRNA detection and dual reporter studies, we show that increased intracellular magnesium concentration affects Plac initiation complex formation resulting in a highly dynamic process over the cell growth phases. Mg2+ regulates transcription transition, which modulates bimodality of mRNA distribution in the exponential phase. We reveal that Mg2+ regulates the size and frequency of the mRNA burst by changing the open complex duration. Moreover, increasing magnesium concentration leads to higher intrinsic and extrinsic noise in the exponential phase. RNAP-Mg2+ interaction simulation reveals critical movements creating a shorter contact distance between aspartic acid residues and Nucleotide Triphosphate residues and increasing electrostatic charges in the active site. Our findings provide unique biophysical insights into the balanced mechanism of genetic determinants and magnesium ion in transcription initiation regulation during cell growth.

  19. Unexpected light behaviour in periodic segmented waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschiéri, Pierre; Doya, Valérie

    2011-12-01

    In this article, it is shown that multimode periodic segmented waveguides (PSW) are versatile optical systems in which properties of wave chaos can be highlighted. Numerical wave analysis reveals that structures of quantum phase space of PSW are similar to Poincaré sections which display a mixed phase space where stability islands are surrounded by a chaotic sea. Then, unexpected light behavior can occur such as, input gaussian beams do not diverge during the propagation in a highly multimode waveguide.

  20. Revealing hidden clonal complexity in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection by qualitative and quantitative improvement of sampling.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Lago, L; Palacios, J J; Herranz, M; Ruiz Serrano, M J; Bouza, E; García-de-Viedma, D

    2015-02-01

    The analysis of microevolution events, its functional relevance and impact on molecular epidemiology strategies, constitutes one of the most challenging aspects of the study of clonal complexity in infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In this study, we retrospectively evaluated whether two improved sampling schemes could provide access to the clonal complexity that is undetected by the current standards (analysis of one isolate from one sputum). We evaluated in 48 patients the analysis by mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeat of M. tuberculosis isolates cultured from bronchial aspirate (BAS) or bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and, in another 16 cases, the analysis of a higher number of isolates from independent sputum samples. Analysis of the isolates from BAS/BAL specimens revealed clonal complexity in a very high proportion of cases (5/48); in most of these cases, complexity was not detected when the isolates from sputum samples were analysed. Systematic analysis of isolates from multiple sputum samples also improved the detection of clonal complexity. We found coexisting clonal variants in two of 16 cases that would have gone undetected in the analysis of the isolate from a single sputum specimen. Our results suggest that analysis of isolates from BAS/BAL specimens is highly efficient for recording the true clonal composition of M. tuberculosis in the lungs. When these samples are not available, we recommend increasing the number of isolates from independent sputum specimens, because they might not harbour the same pool of bacteria. Our data suggest that the degree of clonal complexity in tuberculosis has been underestimated because of the deficiencies inherent in a simplified procedure.

  1. The organization of thinking: what functional brain imaging reveals about the neuroarchitecture of complex cognition.

    PubMed

    Just, Marcel Adam; Varma, Sashank

    2007-09-01

    Recent findings in brain imaging, particularly in fMRI, are beginning to reveal some of the fundamental properties of the organization of the cortical systems that underpin complex cognition. We propose an emerging set of operating principles that govern this organization, characterizing the system as a set of collaborating cortical centers that operate as a large-scale cortical network. Two of the network's critical features are that it is resource constrained and dynamically configured, with resource constraints and demands dynamically shaping the network topology. The operating principles are embodied in a cognitive neuroarchitecture, 4CAPS, consisting of a number of interacting computational centers that correspond to activating cortical areas. Each 4CAPS center is a hybrid production system, possessing both symbolic and connectionist attributes. We describe 4CAPS models of sentence comprehension, spatial problem solving, and complex multitasking and compare the accounts of these models with brain activation and behavioral results. Finally, we compare 4CAPS with other proposed neuroarchitectures.

  2. Exome sequencing of ion channel genes reveals complex variant profiles confounding personal risk assessment in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Klassen, Tara; Davis, Caleb; Goldman, Alica; Burgess, Dan; Chen, Tim; Wheeler, David; McPherson, John; Bourquin, Traci; Lewis, Lora; Villasana, Donna; Morgan, Margaret; Muzny, Donna; Gibbs, Richard; Noebels, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Ion channel mutations are an important cause of rare Mendelian disorders affecting brain, heart, and other tissues. We performed parallel exome sequencing of 237 channel genes in a well characterized human sample, comparing variant profiles of unaffected individuals to those with the most common neuronal excitability disorder, sporadic idiopathic epilepsy. Rare missense variation in known Mendelian disease genes is prevalent in both groups at similar complexity, revealing that even deleterious ion channel mutations confer uncertain risk to an individual depending on the other variants with which they are combined. Our findings indicate that variant discovery via large scale sequencing efforts is only a first step in illuminating the complex allelic architecture underlying personal disease risk. We propose that in silico modeling of channel variation in realistic cell and network models will be crucial to future strategies assessing mutation profile pathogenicity and drug response in individuals with a broad spectrum of excitability disorders. PMID:21703448

  3. Proteomic amino-termini profiling reveals targeting information for protein import into complex plastids.

    PubMed

    Huesgen, Pitter F; Alami, Meriem; Lange, Philipp F; Foster, Leonard J; Schröder, Wolfgang P; Overall, Christopher M; Green, Beverley R

    2013-01-01

    In organisms with complex plastids acquired by secondary endosymbiosis from a photosynthetic eukaryote, the majority of plastid proteins are nuclear-encoded, translated on cytoplasmic ribosomes, and guided across four membranes by a bipartite targeting sequence. In-depth understanding of this vital import process has been impeded by a lack of information about the transit peptide part of this sequence, which mediates transport across the inner three membranes. We determined the mature N-termini of hundreds of proteins from the model diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana, revealing extensive N-terminal modification by acetylation and proteolytic processing in both cytosol and plastid. We identified 63 mature N-termini of nucleus-encoded plastid proteins, deduced their complete transit peptide sequences, determined a consensus motif for their cleavage by the stromal processing peptidase, and found evidence for subsequent processing by a plastid methionine aminopeptidase. The cleavage motif differs from that of higher plants, but is shared with other eukaryotes with complex plastids.

  4. Variable and complex food web structures revealed by exploring missing trophic links between birds and biofilm.

    PubMed

    Kuwae, Tomohiro; Miyoshi, Eiichi; Hosokawa, Shinya; Ichimi, Kazuhiko; Hosoya, Jun; Amano, Tatsuya; Moriya, Toshifumi; Kondoh, Michio; Ydenberg, Ronald C; Elner, Robert W

    2012-04-01

    Food webs are comprised of a network of trophic interactions and are essential to elucidating ecosystem processes and functions. However, the presence of unknown, but critical networks hampers understanding of complex and dynamic food webs in nature. Here, we empirically demonstrate a missing link, both critical and variable, by revealing that direct predator-prey relationships between shorebirds and biofilm are widespread and mediated by multiple ecological and evolutionary determinants. Food source mixing models and energy budget estimates indicate that the strength of the missing linkage is dependent on predator traits (body mass and foraging action rate) and the environment that determines food density. Morphological analyses, showing that smaller bodied species possess more developed feeding apparatus to consume biofilm, suggest that the linkage is also phylogenetically dependent and affords a compelling re-interpretation of niche differentiation. We contend that exploring missing links is a necessity for revealing true network structure and dynamics.

  5. A Comprehensive Genomic Analysis Reveals the Genetic Landscape of Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Complex Deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Kohda, Masakazu; Tokuzawa, Yoshimi; Kishita, Yoshihito; Nyuzuki, Hiromi; Moriyama, Yohsuke; Mizuno, Yosuke; Hirata, Tomoko; Yatsuka, Yukiko; Yamashita-Sugahara, Yzumi; Nakachi, Yutaka; Kato, Hidemasa; Okuda, Akihiko; Tamaru, Shunsuke; Borna, Nurun Nahar; Banshoya, Kengo; Aigaki, Toshiro; Sato-Miyata, Yukiko; Ohnuma, Kohei; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Nagao, Asuteka; Maehata, Hazuki; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Higasa, Koichiro; Nagasaki, Masao; Yasuda, Jun; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Fushimi, Takuya; Shimura, Masaru; Kaiho-Ichimoto, Keiko; Harashima, Hiroko; Yamazaki, Taro; Mori, Masato; Murayama, Kei; Ohtake, Akira; Okazaki, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders have the highest incidence among congenital metabolic disorders characterized by biochemical respiratory chain complex deficiencies. It occurs at a rate of 1 in 5,000 births, and has phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity. Mutations in about 1,500 nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins may cause mitochondrial dysfunction of energy production and mitochondrial disorders. More than 250 genes that cause mitochondrial disorders have been reported to date. However exact genetic diagnosis for patients still remained largely unknown. To reveal this heterogeneity, we performed comprehensive genomic analyses for 142 patients with childhood-onset mitochondrial respiratory chain complex deficiencies. The approach includes whole mtDNA and exome analyses using high-throughput sequencing, and chromosomal aberration analyses using high-density oligonucleotide arrays. We identified 37 novel mutations in known mitochondrial disease genes and 3 mitochondria-related genes (MRPS23, QRSL1, and PNPLA4) as novel causative genes. We also identified 2 genes known to cause monogenic diseases (MECP2 and TNNI3) and 3 chromosomal aberrations (6q24.3-q25.1, 17p12, and 22q11.21) as causes in this cohort. Our approaches enhance the ability to identify pathogenic gene mutations in patients with biochemically defined mitochondrial respiratory chain complex deficiencies in clinical settings. They also underscore clinical and genetic heterogeneity and will improve patient care of this complex disorder.

  6. A Comprehensive Genomic Analysis Reveals the Genetic Landscape of Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Complex Deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Kohda, Masakazu; Tokuzawa, Yoshimi; Kishita, Yoshihito; Nyuzuki, Hiromi; Moriyama, Yohsuke; Mizuno, Yosuke; Hirata, Tomoko; Yatsuka, Yukiko; Yamashita-Sugahara, Yzumi; Nakachi, Yutaka; Kato, Hidemasa; Okuda, Akihiko; Tamaru, Shunsuke; Borna, Nurun Nahar; Banshoya, Kengo; Aigaki, Toshiro; Sato-Miyata, Yukiko; Ohnuma, Kohei; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Nagao, Asuteka; Maehata, Hazuki; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Higasa, Koichiro; Nagasaki, Masao; Yasuda, Jun; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Fushimi, Takuya; Shimura, Masaru; Kaiho-Ichimoto, Keiko; Harashima, Hiroko; Yamazaki, Taro; Mori, Masato; Murayama, Kei; Ohtake, Akira; Okazaki, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders have the highest incidence among congenital metabolic disorders characterized by biochemical respiratory chain complex deficiencies. It occurs at a rate of 1 in 5,000 births, and has phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity. Mutations in about 1,500 nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins may cause mitochondrial dysfunction of energy production and mitochondrial disorders. More than 250 genes that cause mitochondrial disorders have been reported to date. However exact genetic diagnosis for patients still remained largely unknown. To reveal this heterogeneity, we performed comprehensive genomic analyses for 142 patients with childhood-onset mitochondrial respiratory chain complex deficiencies. The approach includes whole mtDNA and exome analyses using high-throughput sequencing, and chromosomal aberration analyses using high-density oligonucleotide arrays. We identified 37 novel mutations in known mitochondrial disease genes and 3 mitochondria-related genes (MRPS23, QRSL1, and PNPLA4) as novel causative genes. We also identified 2 genes known to cause monogenic diseases (MECP2 and TNNI3) and 3 chromosomal aberrations (6q24.3-q25.1, 17p12, and 22q11.21) as causes in this cohort. Our approaches enhance the ability to identify pathogenic gene mutations in patients with biochemically defined mitochondrial respiratory chain complex deficiencies in clinical settings. They also underscore clinical and genetic heterogeneity and will improve patient care of this complex disorder. PMID:26741492

  7. Multiple sampling and discriminatory fingerprinting reveals clonally complex and compartmentalized infections by M. bovis in cattle.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Yurena; Romero, Beatriz; Copano, María Francisca; Bouza, Emilio; Domínguez, Lucas; de Juan, Lucía; García-de-Viedma, Darío

    2015-01-30

    The combination of new genotyping tools and a more exhaustive sampling policy in the analysis of infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis has shown that infection by this pathogen is more complex than initially expected. Mixed infections, coexistence of clonal variants from a parental strain, and compartmentalized infections are all different modalities of this clonal complexity. Until recently, genotyping of Mycobacterium bovis in animal populations was based on spoligotyping and analysis of a single isolate per infection; therefore, clonal complexity is probably underdetected. We used multiple sampling combined with highly discriminatory MIRU-VNTR to study compartmentalized infections by M. bovis in a low-tuberculosis prevalence setting. We spoligotyped the M. bovis isolates from two or more anatomic locations sampled from 55 animals on 39 independent farms. Compartmentalized infections, with two different strains infecting independent lymph nodes in the same animal, were found in six cases (10.9%). MIRU-VNTR analysis confirmed that the compartmentalization was strict and that only one strain was present in each infected node. MIRU-VNTR analysis of additional infected animals on one of the farms confirmed that the compartmentalized infection was a consequence of superinfection, since the two strains were independently infecting other animals. This same analysis revealed the emergence of a microevolved clonal variant in one of the lymph nodes of the compartmentalized animal. Clonal complexity must also be taken into consideration in M. bovis infection, even in low-prevalence settings, and analyses must be adapted to detect it and increase the accuracy of molecular epidemiology studies.

  8. A Comprehensive Genomic Analysis Reveals the Genetic Landscape of Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Complex Deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Nyuzuki, Hiromi; Moriyama, Yohsuke; Mizuno, Yosuke; Hirata, Tomoko; Yatsuka, Yukiko; Yamashita-Sugahara, Yzumi; Nakachi, Yutaka; Kato, Hidemasa; Okuda, Akihiko; Tamaru, Shunsuke; Borna, Nurun Nahar; Banshoya, Kengo; Aigaki, Toshiro; Sato-Miyata, Yukiko; Ohnuma, Kohei; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Nagao, Asuteka; Maehata, Hazuki; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Higasa, Koichiro; Nagasaki, Masao; Yasuda, Jun; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Fushimi, Takuya; Shimura, Masaru; Kaiho-Ichimoto, Keiko; Harashima, Hiroko; Yamazaki, Taro; Mori, Masato; Murayama, Kei; Ohtake, Akira; Okazaki, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders have the highest incidence among congenital metabolic disorders characterized by biochemical respiratory chain complex deficiencies. It occurs at a rate of 1 in 5,000 births, and has phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity. Mutations in about 1,500 nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins may cause mitochondrial dysfunction of energy production and mitochondrial disorders. More than 250 genes that cause mitochondrial disorders have been reported to date. However exact genetic diagnosis for patients still remained largely unknown. To reveal this heterogeneity, we performed comprehensive genomic analyses for 142 patients with childhood-onset mitochondrial respiratory chain complex deficiencies. The approach includes whole mtDNA and exome analyses using high-throughput sequencing, and chromosomal aberration analyses using high-density oligonucleotide arrays. We identified 37 novel mutations in known mitochondrial disease genes and 3 mitochondria-related genes (MRPS23, QRSL1, and PNPLA4) as novel causative genes. We also identified 2 genes known to cause monogenic diseases (MECP2 and TNNI3) and 3 chromosomal aberrations (6q24.3-q25.1, 17p12, and 22q11.21) as causes in this cohort. Our approaches enhance the ability to identify pathogenic gene mutations in patients with biochemically defined mitochondrial respiratory chain complex deficiencies in clinical settings. They also underscore clinical and genetic heterogeneity and will improve patient care of this complex disorder. PMID:26741492

  9. COMBINED DELAY AND GRAPH EMBEDDING OF EPILEPTIC DISCHARGES IN EEG REVEALS COMPLEX AND RECURRENT NONLINEAR DYNAMICS

    PubMed Central

    Erem, B.; Hyde, D.E.; Peters, J.M.; Duffy, F.H.; Brooks, D.H.; Warfield, S.K.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamical structure of the brain’s electrical signals contains valuable information about its physiology. Here we combine techniques for nonlinear dynamical analysis and manifold identification to reveal complex and recurrent dynamics in interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs). Our results suggest that recurrent IEDs exhibit some consistent dynamics, which may only last briefly, and so individual IED dynamics may need to be considered in order to understand their genesis. This could potentially serve to constrain the dynamics of the inverse source localization problem. PMID:26366250

  10. Non-nucleolar transcription complexes of rat liver as revealed by spreading isolated nuclei.

    PubMed

    Harper, F; Puvion-Dutilleul, F

    1979-12-01

    Miller's technique was applied to isolated nuclei of rat liver. Both the usual nucleolar and non-nucleolar transcription complexes were visualized. In addition, an unusual type of putative non-ribosomal transcription unit was revealed. It was charcaterized by a high density of the lateral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) fibrils. Although these particular units exhibited a regular increase of fibril lengths, the length of the transcript-covered deoxyribonucleoprotein (DNP) fibres and the morphological aspect of the RNP fibrils distinguished them from the nucleolar 'Christmas-tree'-like figures. The linear and granular configuration of the transcripts and the absence of terminal knobs made them similar to non-nucleolar nascent RNP fibrils.

  11. Complex patterns in fossilized stromatolites revealed by hyperspectral imaging (400-2496 nm).

    PubMed

    Murphy, R J; Van Kranendonk, M J; Kelloway, S J; Wainwright, I E

    2016-09-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (400-2496 nm) was used to quantitatively map surface textures and compositional variations in stromatolites to determine whether complexity of textures could be used as evidence to support biogenicity in the absence of preserved biomarkers. Four samples of 2.72-2.4 Ga stromatolites from a variety of settings, encompassing marine and lacustrine environments, were selected for hyperspectral imaging. Images of the sawn surfaces of samples were processed to identify reflectance and mineral absorption features and quantify their intensity (as an index of mineral abundance) using automated feature extraction. Amounts of ferrous iron were quantified using a ratio of reflectance at 1650 and 1299 nm. Visible near infrared imagery (400-970 nm) did not reveal additional textural patterns to those obtained from visual inspection. Shortwave infrared imagery (1000-2496 nm), however, revealed complex laminar and convoluted patterns, including a distinctive texture of sharp peaks and broad, low troughs in one sample, similar to living tufted microbial mats. Spectral analysis revealed another sample to be composed of dolomite. Two other samples were dominated by calcite or chlorite ± illite. Large variations in amounts of ferrous iron were found, but ferric iron was exclusively located in the oxidation crust. Hyperspectral imaging revealed large differences between parts of a sample of biogenic and non-biogenic origin. The former was characterized by calcite with varying amounts of ferrous iron, distributed in lenticular, convoluted patterns; the latter by Mg-Fe chlorite with large amounts of aluminium silicate, distributed as fine laminar layers. All minerals identified by hyperspectral imaging were confirmed by thin section petrography and XRD analyses. Spatial statistics generated from quantitative minerals maps showed different patterns between these different parts of the sample. Thus, hyperspectral imaging was shown to be a powerful tool for

  12. Complex patterns in fossilized stromatolites revealed by hyperspectral imaging (400-2496 nm).

    PubMed

    Murphy, R J; Van Kranendonk, M J; Kelloway, S J; Wainwright, I E

    2016-09-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (400-2496 nm) was used to quantitatively map surface textures and compositional variations in stromatolites to determine whether complexity of textures could be used as evidence to support biogenicity in the absence of preserved biomarkers. Four samples of 2.72-2.4 Ga stromatolites from a variety of settings, encompassing marine and lacustrine environments, were selected for hyperspectral imaging. Images of the sawn surfaces of samples were processed to identify reflectance and mineral absorption features and quantify their intensity (as an index of mineral abundance) using automated feature extraction. Amounts of ferrous iron were quantified using a ratio of reflectance at 1650 and 1299 nm. Visible near infrared imagery (400-970 nm) did not reveal additional textural patterns to those obtained from visual inspection. Shortwave infrared imagery (1000-2496 nm), however, revealed complex laminar and convoluted patterns, including a distinctive texture of sharp peaks and broad, low troughs in one sample, similar to living tufted microbial mats. Spectral analysis revealed another sample to be composed of dolomite. Two other samples were dominated by calcite or chlorite ± illite. Large variations in amounts of ferrous iron were found, but ferric iron was exclusively located in the oxidation crust. Hyperspectral imaging revealed large differences between parts of a sample of biogenic and non-biogenic origin. The former was characterized by calcite with varying amounts of ferrous iron, distributed in lenticular, convoluted patterns; the latter by Mg-Fe chlorite with large amounts of aluminium silicate, distributed as fine laminar layers. All minerals identified by hyperspectral imaging were confirmed by thin section petrography and XRD analyses. Spatial statistics generated from quantitative minerals maps showed different patterns between these different parts of the sample. Thus, hyperspectral imaging was shown to be a powerful tool for

  13. Subtle spectral effects accompanying the assembly of bacteriochlorophylls into cyclic light harvesting complexes revealed by high-resolution fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rätsep, Margus Pajusalu, Mihkel Linnanto, Juha Matti; Freiberg, Arvi

    2014-10-21

    We have observed that an assembly of the bacteriochloropyll a molecules into B850 and B875 groups of cyclic bacterial light-harvesting complexes LH2 and LH1, respectively, results an almost total loss of the intra-molecular vibronic structure in the fluorescence spectrum, and simultaneously, an essential enhancement of its phonon sideband due to electron-phonon coupling. While the suppression of the vibronic coupling in delocalized (excitonic) molecular systems is predictable, as also confirmed by our model calculations, a boost of the electron-phonon coupling is rather unexpected. The latter phenomenon is explained by exciton self-trapping, promoted by mixing the molecular exciton states with charge transfer states between the adjacent chromophores in the tightly packed B850 and B875 arrangements. Similar, although less dramatic trends were noted for the light-harvesting complexes containing chlorophyll pigments.

  14. Structure of a topoisomerase II-DNA-nucleotide complex reveals a new control mechanism for ATPase activity

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Bryan H.; Osheroff, Neil; Berger, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Type IIA topoisomerases control DNA supercoiling and disentangle chromosomes by a complex, ATP-dependent strand passage mechanism. Although a general framework exists for type IIA topoisomerase function, the architecture of the full-length enzyme has remained undefined. Here we present the first structure of a fully-catalytic Saccharomyces cerevisiae topoisomerase II homodimer, complexed with DNA and a nonhydrolyzable ATP analog. The enzyme adopts a domain-swapped configuration wherein the ATPase domain of one protomer sits atop the nucleolytic region of its partner subunit. This organization produces an unexpected interaction between the bound DNA and a conformational transducing element in the ATPase domain, which we show is critical for both DNA-stimulated ATP hydrolysis and global topoisomerase activity. Our data indicate that the ATPase domains pivot about each other to ensure unidirectional strand passage and that this state senses bound DNA to promote ATP turnover and enzyme reset. PMID:23022727

  15. Subtle spectral effects accompanying the assembly of bacteriochlorophylls into cyclic light harvesting complexes revealed by high-resolution fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rätsep, Margus; Pajusalu, Mihkel; Linnanto, Juha Matti; Freiberg, Arvi

    2014-10-21

    We have observed that an assembly of the bacteriochloropyll a molecules into B850 and B875 groups of cyclic bacterial light-harvesting complexes LH2 and LH1, respectively, results an almost total loss of the intra-molecular vibronic structure in the fluorescence spectrum, and simultaneously, an essential enhancement of its phonon sideband due to electron-phonon coupling. While the suppression of the vibronic coupling in delocalized (excitonic) molecular systems is predictable, as also confirmed by our model calculations, a boost of the electron-phonon coupling is rather unexpected. The latter phenomenon is explained by exciton self-trapping, promoted by mixing the molecular exciton states with charge transfer states between the adjacent chromophores in the tightly packed B850 and B875 arrangements. Similar, although less dramatic trends were noted for the light-harvesting complexes containing chlorophyll pigments.

  16. Crystal structure of barley limit dextrinase-limit dextrinase inhibitor (LD-LDI) complex reveals insights into mechanism and diversity of cereal type inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Møller, Marie S; Vester-Christensen, Malene B; Jensen, Johanne M; Hachem, Maher Abou; Henriksen, Anette; Svensson, Birte

    2015-05-15

    Molecular details underlying regulation of starch mobilization in cereal seed endosperm remain unknown despite the paramount role of this process in plant growth. The structure of the complex between the starch debranching enzyme barley limit dextrinase (LD), hydrolyzing α-1,6-glucosidic linkages, and its endogenous inhibitor (LDI) was solved at 2.7 Å. The structure reveals an entirely new and unexpected binding mode of LDI as compared with previously solved complex structures of related cereal type family inhibitors (CTIs) bound to glycoside hydrolases but is structurally analogous to binding of dual specificity CTIs to proteases. Site-directed mutagenesis establishes that a hydrophobic cluster flanked by ionic interactions in the protein-protein interface is vital for the picomolar affinity of LDI to LD as assessed by analysis of binding by using surface plasmon resonance and also supported by LDI inhibition of the enzyme activity. A phylogenetic analysis identified four LDI-like proteins in cereals among the 45 sequences from monocot databases that could be classified as unique CTI sequences. The unprecedented binding mechanism shown here for LDI has likely evolved in cereals from a need for effective inhibition of debranching enzymes having characteristic open active site architecture. The findings give a mechanistic rationale for the potency of LD activity regulation and provide a molecular understanding of the debranching events associated with optimal starch mobilization and utilization during germination. This study unveils a hitherto not recognized structural basis for the features endowing diversity to CTIs.

  17. Lipid Clustering Correlates with Membrane Curvature as Revealed by Molecular Simulations of Complex Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Koldsø, Heidi; Shorthouse, David; Hélie, Jean; Sansom, Mark S. P.

    2014-01-01

    Cell membranes are complex multicomponent systems, which are highly heterogeneous in the lipid distribution and composition. To date, most molecular simulations have focussed on relatively simple lipid compositions, helping to inform our understanding of in vitro experimental studies. Here we describe on simulations of complex asymmetric plasma membrane model, which contains seven different lipids species including the glycolipid GM3 in the outer leaflet and the anionic lipid, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphophate (PIP2), in the inner leaflet. Plasma membrane models consisting of 1500 lipids and resembling the in vivo composition were constructed and simulations were run for 5 µs. In these simulations the most striking feature was the formation of nano-clusters of GM3 within the outer leaflet. In simulations of protein interactions within a plasma membrane model, GM3, PIP2, and cholesterol all formed favorable interactions with the model α-helical protein. A larger scale simulation of a model plasma membrane containing 6000 lipid molecules revealed correlations between curvature of the bilayer surface and clustering of lipid molecules. In particular, the concave (when viewed from the extracellular side) regions of the bilayer surface were locally enriched in GM3. In summary, these simulations explore the nanoscale dynamics of model bilayers which mimic the in vivo lipid composition of mammalian plasma membranes, revealing emergent nanoscale membrane organization which may be coupled both to fluctuations in local membrane geometry and to interactions with proteins. PMID:25340788

  18. The Glass Bead Game: experimental sintering of rhyolitic ash reveals complex behaviour of irregular multiphase particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Robyn; Tuffen, Hugh; Owen, Jacqueline; James, Mike; Wadsworth, Fabian

    2016-04-01

    Sintering of magmatic particles profoundly influences the permeability, strength and compaction of fragmented magma in conduits and pyroclastic deposits. It involves initial rounding and agglutination of particles, with formation of inter-particle necks, followed by progressive viscous collapse of pores. The sintering behaviour of ash particles within tuffisite veins, which may mediate shallow outgassing in silicic eruptions, is of particular interest. Experimental studies on homogeneous synthetic glasses[1] have shown sintering rates to be time, temperature and grainsize-dependent, reflecting the influence of melt viscosity and pore-melt interfacial tension. A key objective is to reconstruct the temperature-time path of naturally sintered samples, so here we investigate the sintering of natural, angular ash fragments, to explore whether similar simple relationships emerge for more complex particle morphologies and internal textures. A glass-rich ballistic rhyolite bomb from the Cordón Caulle 2011-2012 eruption was ground and sieved to create various grainsizes of angular ash particles. The bomb contains 70 wt.% SiO2, 0.25 wt.% H2O, and ~30 vol.% crystal phases, as phenocrysts and microlites of plagioclase and pyroxenes. Particles were spread thinly over a sapphire surface in an N2-purged heated stage, and heated to 900, 1000 and 1100 °C, corresponding to melt viscosities of 105.4-107.7 Pa.s. Images were collected every 10-600 s during isothermal sintering over tens of minutes to hours. Quantitative image analysis using ImageJ allowed quantification of evolving particle size and shape (diameter and roundness) and inter-particle neck width. The rate of particle rounding was expected to be highest for smallest particles, and to decrease through time, but unlike synthetic glass bead experiments, no simple trends emerged. When the temporal evolution of particle roundness was tracked, some particles showed an unexpected, systematic increase in rounding rate with time

  19. Substrate recognition by complement convertases revealed in the C5–cobra venom factor complex

    PubMed Central

    Laursen, Nick S; Andersen, Kasper R; Braren, Ingke; Spillner, Edzard; Sottrup-Jensen, Lars; Andersen, Gregers R

    2011-01-01

    Complement acts as a danger-sensing system in the innate immune system, and its activation initiates a strong inflammatory response and cleavage of the proteins C3 and C5 by proteolytic enzymes, the convertases. These contain a non-catalytic substrate contacting subunit (C3b or C4b) in complex with a protease subunit (Bb or C2a). We determined the crystal structures of the C3b homologue cobra venom factor (CVF) in complex with C5, and in complex with C5 and the inhibitor SSL7 at 4.3 Å resolution. The structures reveal a parallel two-point attachment between C5 and CVF, where the presence of SSL7 only slightly affects the C5–CVF interface, explaining the IgA dependence for SSL7-mediated inhibition of C5 cleavage. CVF functions as a relatively rigid binding scaffold inducing a conformational change in C5, which positions its cleavage site in proximity to the serine protease Bb. A general model for substrate recognition by the convertases is presented based on the C5–CVF and C3b–Bb–SCIN structures. Prior knowledge concerning interactions between the endogenous convertases and their substrates is rationalized by this model. PMID:21217642

  20. Single-molecule spectroscopy reveals photosynthetic LH2 complexes switch between emissive states

    PubMed Central

    Schlau-Cohen, Gabriela S.; Wang, Quan; Southall, June; Cogdell, Richard J.; Moerner, W. E.

    2013-01-01

    Photosynthetic organisms flourish under low light intensities by converting photoenergy to chemical energy with near unity quantum efficiency and under high light intensities by safely dissipating excess photoenergy and deleterious photoproducts. The molecular mechanisms balancing these two functions remain incompletely described. One critical barrier to characterizing the mechanisms responsible for these processes is that they occur within proteins whose excited-state properties vary drastically among individual proteins and even within a single protein over time. In ensemble measurements, these excited-state properties appear only as the average value. To overcome this averaging, we investigate the purple bacterial antenna protein light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) from Rhodopseudomonas acidophila at the single-protein level. We use a room-temperature, single-molecule technique, the anti-Brownian electrokinetic trap, to study LH2 in a solution-phase (nonperturbative) environment. By performing simultaneous measurements of fluorescence intensity, lifetime, and spectra of single LH2 complexes, we identify three distinct states and observe transitions occurring among them on a timescale of seconds. Our results reveal that LH2 complexes undergo photoactivated switching to a quenched state, likely by a conformational change, and thermally revert to the ground state. This is a previously unobserved, reversible quenching pathway, and is one mechanism through which photosynthetic organisms can adapt to changes in light intensities. PMID:23776245

  1. Single-molecule spectroscopy reveals photosynthetic LH2 complexes switch between emissive states.

    PubMed

    Schlau-Cohen, Gabriela S; Wang, Quan; Southall, June; Cogdell, Richard J; Moerner, W E

    2013-07-01

    Photosynthetic organisms flourish under low light intensities by converting photoenergy to chemical energy with near unity quantum efficiency and under high light intensities by safely dissipating excess photoenergy and deleterious photoproducts. The molecular mechanisms balancing these two functions remain incompletely described. One critical barrier to characterizing the mechanisms responsible for these processes is that they occur within proteins whose excited-state properties vary drastically among individual proteins and even within a single protein over time. In ensemble measurements, these excited-state properties appear only as the average value. To overcome this averaging, we investigate the purple bacterial antenna protein light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) from Rhodopseudomonas acidophila at the single-protein level. We use a room-temperature, single-molecule technique, the anti-Brownian electrokinetic trap, to study LH2 in a solution-phase (nonperturbative) environment. By performing simultaneous measurements of fluorescence intensity, lifetime, and spectra of single LH2 complexes, we identify three distinct states and observe transitions occurring among them on a timescale of seconds. Our results reveal that LH2 complexes undergo photoactivated switching to a quenched state, likely by a conformational change, and thermally revert to the ground state. This is a previously unobserved, reversible quenching pathway, and is one mechanism through which photosynthetic organisms can adapt to changes in light intensities.

  2. Cross-Correlated Fluctuation Analysis Reveals Phosphorylation-Regulated Paxillin-FAK Complexes in Nascent Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Colin K.; Zareno, Jessica; Digman, Michelle A.; Gratton, Enrico; Horwitz, Alan Rick

    2011-01-01

    We used correlation methods to detect and quantify interactions between paxillin and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in migrating cells. Cross-correlation raster-scan image correlation spectroscopy revealed that wild-type paxillin and the phosphorylation-inhibiting paxillin mutant Y31F-Y118F do not interact with FAK in the cytosol but a phosphomimetic mutant of paxillin, Y31E-Y118E, does. By extending cross-correlation number and brightness analysis to the total internal reflection fluorescence modality, we were able to show that tetramers of paxillin and FAK form complexes in nascent adhesions with a 1:1 stoichiometry ratio. The phosphomimetic mutations on paxillin increase the size of the complex and the assembly rate of nascent adhesions, suggesting that the physical molecular aggregation of paxillin and FAK regulates adhesion formation. In contrast, when phosphorylation is inhibited, the interaction decreases and the adhesions tend to elongate rather than turn over. These direct in vivo data show that the phosphorylation of paxillin is specific to adhesions and leads to localized complex formation with FAK to regulate the dynamics of nascent adhesions. PMID:21281572

  3. Unexpected molecular weight effect in polymer nanocomposites

    DOE PAGES

    Cheng, Shiwang; Holt, Adam P.; Wang, Huiqun; Fan, Fei; Bocharova, Vera; Martin, Halie J.; Etampawala, Thusitha N.; White, Benjamin Tyler; Saito, Tomonori; Kang, Nam -Goo; et al

    2016-01-22

    Here, the properties of the interfacial layer between the polymer matrix and nanoparticles largely determine the macroscopic properties of polymer nanocomposites (PNCs). Although the static thickness of the interfacial layer was found to increase with the molecular weight (MW), the influence of MW on segmental relaxation and the glass transition in this layer remains to be explored. In this Letter, we show an unexpected MW dependence of the interfacial properties in PNC with attractive polymer-nanoparticle interactions: the thickness of the interfacial layer with hindered segmental relaxation decreases as MW increases, in sharp constrast to theoretical predictions. Further analyses reveal amore » reduction in mass density of the interfacial layer with increasing MW, which can explain these unexpected dynamic effects. Our observations call for a significant revision of the current understandings of PNCs and suggest interesting ways to tailor their properties.« less

  4. Novel binding motif and new flexibility revealed by structural analyses of a pyruvate dehydrogenase-dihydrolipoyl acetyltransferase subcomplex from the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex.

    PubMed

    Arjunan, Palaniappa; Wang, Junjie; Nemeria, Natalia S; Reynolds, Shelley; Brown, Ian; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Calero, Guillermo; Jordan, Frank; Furey, William

    2014-10-24

    The Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex contains multiple copies of three enzymatic components, E1p, E2p, and E3, that sequentially carry out distinct steps in the overall reaction converting pyruvate to acetyl-CoA. Efficient functioning requires the enzymatic components to assemble into a large complex, the integrity of which is maintained by tethering of the displaced, peripheral E1p and E3 components to the E2p core through non-covalent binding. We here report the crystal structure of a subcomplex between E1p and an E2p didomain containing a hybrid lipoyl domain along with the peripheral subunit-binding domain responsible for tethering to the core. In the structure, a region at the N terminus of each subunit in the E1p homodimer previously unseen due to crystallographic disorder was observed, revealing a new folding motif involved in E1p-E2p didomain interactions, and an additional, unexpected, flexibility was discovered in the E1p-E2p didomain subcomplex, both of which probably have consequences in the overall multienzyme complex assembly. This represents the first structure of an E1p-E2p didomain subcomplex involving a homodimeric E1p, and the results may be applicable to a large range of complexes with homodimeric E1 components. Results of HD exchange mass spectrometric experiments using the intact, wild type 3-lipoyl E2p and E1p are consistent with the crystallographic data obtained from the E1p-E2p didomain subcomplex as well as with other biochemical and NMR data reported from our groups, confirming that our findings are applicable to the entire E1p-E2p assembly. PMID:25210042

  5. Unexpected higher stabilisation of two classical antiaromatic frameworks with a ruthenium fragment compared to the osmium counterpart: origin probed by DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jingjing; Hao, Yulei; An, Ke; Zhu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were carried out to investigate the stability and aromaticity of metallapentalocyclobutadienes. The results reveal unexpected higher stabilisation achieved with a 4d ruthenium fragment compared to the 5d [corrected] osmium counterpart. Moreover, direct 1-3 metal-carbon bonding in the metallabutadiene unit of these two complexes is negligible. PMID:26505956

  6. Genomes of three tomato pathogens within the Ralstonia solanacearum species complex reveal significant evolutionary divergence

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Ralstonia solanacearum species complex includes thousands of strains pathogenic to an unusually wide range of plant species. These globally dispersed and heterogeneous strains cause bacterial wilt diseases, which have major socio-economic impacts. Pathogenicity is an ancestral trait in R. solanacearum and strains with high genetic variation can be subdivided into four phylotypes, correlating to isolates from Asia (phylotype I), the Americas (phylotype IIA and IIB), Africa (phylotype III) and Indonesia (phylotype IV). Comparison of genome sequences strains representative of this phylogenetic diversity can help determine which traits allow this bacterium to be such a pathogen of so many different plant species and how the bacteria survive in many different habitats. Results The genomes of three tomato bacterial wilt pathogens, CFBP2957 (phy. IIA), CMR15 (phy. III) and PSI07 (phy. IV) were sequenced and manually annotated. These genomes were compared with those of three previously sequenced R. solanacearum strains: GMI1000 (tomato, phy. I), IPO1609 (potato, phy. IIB), and Molk2 (banana, phy. IIB). The major genomic features (size, G+C content, number of genes) were conserved across all of the six sequenced strains. Despite relatively high genetic distances (calculated from average nucleotide identity) and many genomic rearrangements, more than 60% of the genes of the megaplasmid and 70% of those on the chromosome are syntenic. The three new genomic sequences revealed the presence of several previously unknown traits, probably acquired by horizontal transfers, within the genomes of R. solanacearum, including a type IV secretion system, a rhi-type anti-mitotic toxin and two small plasmids. Genes involved in virulence appear to be evolving at a faster rate than the genome as a whole. Conclusions Comparative analysis of genome sequences and gene content confirmed the differentiation of R. solanacearum species complex strains into four phylotypes. Genetic

  7. Complex (Nonstandard) Six-Layer Polytypes of Lizardite Revealed from Oblique-Texture Electron Diffraction Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Zhukhlistov, A.P.; Zinchuk, N.N.; Kotel'nikov, D.D.

    2004-11-01

    Association of simple (1T and 3R) and two complex (nonstandard) orthogonal polytypes of the serpentine mineral lizardite from the Catoca kimberlite pipe (West Africa) association is revealed from oblique-texture electron diffraction patterns. A six-layer polytype with an ordered superposition of equally oriented layers (notation 3{sub 2}3{sub 2}3{sub 4}3{sub 4}3{sub 6}3{sub 6} or ++ - -00) belonging to the structural group A and a three-layer (336 or I,I,II) or a six-layer (336366 or I,I,II,I,II,II) polytype with alternating oppositely oriented layers and semi-disordered structure are identified using polytype analysis.

  8. Electron tomography of the nucleoid of Gemmata obscuriglobus reveals complex liquid crystalline cholesteric structure

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Benjamin; Sagulenko, Evgeny; Morgan, Garry P.; Webb, Richard I.; Fuerst, John A.

    2012-01-01

    The nucleoid of the planctomycete Gemmata obscuriglobus is unique within the Bacteria in being both highly condensed and enclosed by a double-membrane nuclear envelope, seemingly analogous to the nucleus of eukaryotes. Here we have applied electron tomography to study high-pressure frozen, cryosubstituted cells of G. obscuriglobus and found multiple nested orders of DNA organization within the condensed nucleoid structure. Detailed examination of the nucleoid revealed a series of nested arcs characteristic of liquid crystalline cholesteric DNA structure. The finest fibers were arranged in parallel concentrically in a double-twist organization. At the highest order of nucleoid organization, several of these structures come together to form the core of the G. obscuriglobus nucleoid. The complex structure of DNA within this nucleoid may have implications for understanding the evolutionary significance of compartmentalized planctomycete cells. PMID:22993511

  9. Crystal Structure of the HP1-EMSY Complex Reveals an Unusual Mode of HP1 Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Huang,Y.; Myers, M.; Xu, R.

    2006-01-01

    Heterochromatin protein-1 (HP1) plays an essential role in both the assembly of higher-order chromatin structure and epigenetic inheritance. The C-terminal chromo shadow domain (CSD) of HP1 is responsible for homodimerization and interaction with a number of chromatin-associated nonhistone proteins, including EMSY, which is a BRCA2-interacting protein that has been implicated in the development of breast and ovarian cancer. We have determined the crystal structure of the HP1{beta} CSD in complex with the N-terminal domain of EMSY at 1.8 Angstroms resolution. Surprisingly, the structure reveals that EMSY is bound by two HP1 CSD homodimers, and the binding sequences differ from the consensus HP1 binding motif PXVXL. This structural information expands our understanding of HP1 binding specificity and provides insights into interactions between HP1 homodimers that are likely to be important for heterochromatin formation.

  10. Multi-frequency ground-penetrating radar method for revealing complex sedimentary facies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Delaney, A.J.; Horsman, J.; Prentice, M.L.; Arcone, S.A.

    2007-01-01

    We attempted to resolve deltaic facies in Taylor Valley, Antarctica by using pulses centered near 120, 300 and 880 MHz, the latter of which has not yet been tried in this setting, The 120 MHz profiles clearly defined gross material changes, while the 300 MHz profiles added significant resolution to the top set, foreset and bottomset beds. The additional, higher frequency provided only about 2.5 m penetration however, the 10-15 cm pulse length revealed and defined multiple, fine-scale features that were not observed with the lower frequencies. The dip of these features is, in some instances, opposite to that of larger features profiled with the lower frequencies. Profiling with 880 MHz not only confirmed the greater complexity of the sedimentary architecture, but also allowed more robust interpretation of depositional processes. Generally, we recommend pulses centered near 300-400 MHz for detailed sedimentary profiling to about 6m depth. ?? 2007 IEEE.

  11. The Integrative Taxonomic Approach Reveals Host Specific Species in an Encyrtid Parasitoid Species Complex

    PubMed Central

    Chesters, Douglas; Wang, Ying; Yu, Fang; Bai, Ming; Zhang, Tong-Xin; Hu, Hao-Yuan; Zhu, Chao-Dong; Li, Cheng-De; Zhang, Yan-Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Integrated taxonomy uses evidence from a number of different character types to delimit species and other natural groupings. While this approach has been advocated recently, and should be of particular utility in the case of diminutive insect parasitoids, there are relatively few examples of its application in these taxa. Here, we use an integrated framework to delimit independent lineages in Encyrtus sasakii (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea: Encyrtidae), a parasitoid morphospecies previously considered a host generalist. Sequence variation at the DNA barcode (cytochrome c oxidase I, COI) and nuclear 28S rDNA loci were compared to morphometric recordings and mating compatibility tests, among samples of this species complex collected from its four scale insect hosts, covering a broad geographic range of northern and central China. Our results reveal that Encyrtus sasakii comprises three lineages that, while sharing a similar morphology, are highly divergent at the molecular level. At the barcode locus, the median K2P molecular distance between individuals from three primary populations was found to be 11.3%, well outside the divergence usually observed between Chalcidoidea conspecifics (0.5%). Corroborative evidence that the genetic lineages represent independent species was found from mating tests, where compatibility was observed only within populations, and morphometric analysis, which found that despite apparent morphological homogeneity, populations clustered according to forewing shape. The independent lineages defined by the integrated analysis correspond to the three scale insect hosts, suggesting the presence of host specific cryptic species. The finding of hidden host specificity in this species complex demonstrates the critical role that DNA barcoding will increasingly play in revealing hidden biodiversity in taxa that present difficulties for traditional taxonomic approaches. PMID:22666375

  12. Revealing the Differences Between Free and Complexed Enzyme Mechanisms and Factors Contributing to Cell Wall Recalcitrance

    SciTech Connect

    Resch, M.

    2014-09-08

    Enzymatic depolymerization of polysaccharides is a key step in the production of fuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass, and discovery of synergistic biomass-degrading enzyme paradigms will enable improved conversion processes. Historically, revealing insights into enzymatic saccharification mechanisms on plant cell walls has been hindered by uncharacterized substrates and low resolution imaging techniques. Also, translating findings between model substrates to intact biomass is critical for evaluating enzyme performance. Here we employ a fungal free enzyme cocktail, a complexed cellulosomal system, and a combination of the two to investigate saccharification mechanisms on cellulose I, II and III along with corn stover from Clean Fractionation (CF), which is an Organosolv pretreatment. The insoluble Cellulose Enriched Fraction (CEF) from CF contains mainly cellulose with minor amounts of residual hemicellulose and lignin, the amount of which depends on the CF pretreatment severity. Enzymatic digestions at both low and high-solids loadings demonstrate that CF reduces the amount of enzyme required to depolymerize polysaccharides relative to deacetylated, dilute acid pretreated corn stover. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy of the biomass provides evidence for the different mechanisms of enzymatic deconstruction between free and complexed enzyme systems, and reveals the basis for the synergistic relationship between the two enzyme paradigms on a process-relevant substrate for the first time. These results also demonstrate that the presence of lignin, rather than cellulose morphology, is more detrimental to cellulosome action than to free cellulases. As enzyme costs are a major economic driver for biorefineries, this study provides key inputs for the evaluation of CF as a pretreatment method for biomass conversion.

  13. Genome sequence of the pattern forming Paenibacillus vortex bacterium reveals potential for thriving in complex environments

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The pattern-forming bacterium Paenibacillus vortex is notable for its advanced social behavior, which is reflected in development of colonies with highly intricate architectures. Prior to this study, only two other Paenibacillus species (Paenibacillus sp. JDR-2 and Paenibacillus larvae) have been sequenced. However, no genomic data is available on the Paenibacillus species with pattern-forming and complex social motility. Here we report the de novo genome sequence of this Gram-positive, soil-dwelling, sporulating bacterium. Results The complete P. vortex genome was sequenced by a hybrid approach using 454 Life Sciences and Illumina, achieving a total of 289× coverage, with 99.8% sequence identity between the two methods. The sequencing results were validated using a custom designed Agilent microarray expression chip which represented the coding and the non-coding regions. Analysis of the P. vortex genome revealed 6,437 open reading frames (ORFs) and 73 non-coding RNA genes. Comparative genomic analysis with 500 complete bacterial genomes revealed exceptionally high number of two-component system (TCS) genes, transcription factors (TFs), transport and defense related genes. Additionally, we have identified genes involved in the production of antimicrobial compounds and extracellular degrading enzymes. Conclusions These findings suggest that P. vortex has advanced faculties to perceive and react to a wide range of signaling molecules and environmental conditions, which could be associated with its ability to reconfigure and replicate complex colony architectures. Additionally, P. vortex is likely to serve as a rich source of genes important for agricultural, medical and industrial applications and it has the potential to advance the study of social microbiology within Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:21167037

  14. Dark States in the Light-Harvesting complex 2 Revealed by Two-dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferretti, Marco; Hendrikx, Ruud; Romero, Elisabet; Southall, June; Cogdell, Richard J.; Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I.; Scholes, Gregory D.; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2016-02-01

    Energy transfer and trapping in the light harvesting antennae of purple photosynthetic bacteria is an ultrafast process, which occurs with a quantum efficiency close to unity. However the mechanisms behind this process have not yet been fully understood. Recently it was proposed that low-lying energy dark states, such as charge transfer states and polaron pairs, play an important role in the dynamics and directionality of energy transfer. However, it is difficult to directly detect those states because of their small transition dipole moment and overlap with the B850/B870 exciton bands. Here we present a new experimental approach, which combines the selectivity of two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with the availability of genetically modified light harvesting complexes, to reveal the presence of those dark states in both the genetically modified and the wild-type light harvesting 2 complexes of Rhodopseudomonas palustris. We suggest that Nature has used the unavoidable charge transfer processes that occur when LH pigments are concentrated to enhance and direct the flow of energy.

  15. Magnetic fabrics and petrology of the Newry Igneous Complex, Northern Ireland reveals a new emplacement model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Paul; Stevenson, Carl; Cooper, Mark; Ellam, Rob; Meighan, Ian; Hurley, Colm; Reavy, John; Inman, James; Condon, Dan; Crowley, Quentin

    2013-04-01

    The Newry Igneous Complex (NIC) is a largely granodioritic intrusion, comprising three plutons together with an intermediate-ultramafic body at its NE end. The recent Tellus survey of Northern Ireland has highlighted several geophysical anomalies within this area, including two previously unrecognised concentric aeromagnetic structures. U-Pb zircon ages and a geochemical study suggest that these features represent magmas intruded at different times, and that each pluton was emplaced through a series of inward-younging, concentric pulses. A combination of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and field relations were used to investigate the emplacement of these pulses. AMS reveals strong, dominantly oblate, concentric fabrics. These suggest forceful emplacement. Field relationships indicate that the complex was intruded as steep, sheet-like pulses. Host rocks show deflection of fabrics around the NIC supporting the forceful emplacemnt model. However the amount of strain recorded in the host rocks does not fully explain the space required for intrusion. The presence of a deeply penetrating tectontic structure offers a way to transport magma and create space through a releasing bend. The releasing bend would have created some of the space for intrusion to take place initially and likely guided the ascent of magma. However, the strong fabrics present within the NIC suggest that most of the space for the intrusion was created in a forceful way. Therefore, the NIC was emplaced as a ballooning type pluton after ascent through a tectonically created conduit along a deeply penetrating fault.

  16. Multilocus sequence analysis reveals high genetic diversity in clinical isolates of Burkholderia cepacia complex from India

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Vikas; Patil, Prashant P.; Kumar, Sunil; Midha, Samriti; Kaur, Mandeep; Kaur, Satinder; Singh, Meenu; Mali, Swapna; Shastri, Jayanthi; Arora, Anita; Ray, Pallab; Patil, Prabhu B.

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) is a complex group of bacteria causing opportunistic infections in immunocompromised and cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Herein, we report multilocus sequence typing and analysis of the 57 clinical isolates of Bcc collected over the period of seven years (2005–2012) from several hospitals across India. A total of 21 sequence types (ST) including two STs from cystic fibrosis patient’s isolates and twelve novel STs were identified in the population reflecting the extent of genetic diversity. Multilocus sequence analysis revealed two lineages in population, a major lineage belonging to B. cenocepacia and a minor lineage belonging to B. cepacia. Split-decomposition analysis suggests absence of interspecies recombination and intraspecies recombination contributed in generating genotypic diversity amongst isolates. Further linkage disequilibrium analysis indicates that recombination takes place at a low frequency, which is not sufficient to break down the clonal relationship. This knowledge of the genetic structure of Bcc population from a rapidly developing country will be invaluable in the epidemiology, surveillance and understanding global diversity of this group of a pathogen. PMID:27767197

  17. Differential Network Analysis Reveals Evolutionary Complexity in Secondary Metabolism of Rauvolfia serpentina over Catharanthus roseus

    PubMed Central

    Pathania, Shivalika; Bagler, Ganesh; Ahuja, Paramvir S.

    2016-01-01

    Comparative co-expression analysis of multiple species using high-throughput data is an integrative approach to determine the uniformity as well as diversification in biological processes. Rauvolfia serpentina and Catharanthus roseus, both members of Apocyanacae family, are reported to have remedial properties against multiple diseases. Despite of sharing upstream of terpenoid indole alkaloid pathway, there is significant diversity in tissue-specific synthesis and accumulation of specialized metabolites in these plants. This led us to implement comparative co-expression network analysis to investigate the modules and genes responsible for differential tissue-specific expression as well as species-specific synthesis of metabolites. Toward these goals differential network analysis was implemented to identify candidate genes responsible for diversification of metabolites profile. Three genes were identified with significant difference in connectivity leading to differential regulatory behavior between these plants. These genes may be responsible for diversification of secondary metabolism, and thereby for species-specific metabolite synthesis. The network robustness of R. serpentina, determined based on topological properties, was also complemented by comparison of gene-metabolite networks of both plants, and may have evolved to have complex metabolic mechanisms as compared to C. roseus under the influence of various stimuli. This study reveals evolution of complexity in secondary metabolism of R. serpentina, and key genes that contribute toward diversification of specific metabolites. PMID:27588023

  18. Brain responses in humans reveal ideal observer-like sensitivity to complex acoustic patterns

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Marcus T.; Griffiths, Timothy D.; Chait, Maria

    2016-01-01

    We use behavioral methods, magnetoencephalography, and functional MRI to investigate how human listeners discover temporal patterns and statistical regularities in complex sound sequences. Sensitivity to patterns is fundamental to sensory processing, in particular in the auditory system, because most auditory signals only have meaning as successions over time. Previous evidence suggests that the brain is tuned to the statistics of sensory stimulation. However, the process through which this arises has been elusive. We demonstrate that listeners are remarkably sensitive to the emergence of complex patterns within rapidly evolving sound sequences, performing on par with an ideal observer model. Brain responses reveal online processes of evidence accumulation—dynamic changes in tonic activity precisely correlate with the expected precision or predictability of ongoing auditory input—both in terms of deterministic (first-order) structure and the entropy of random sequences. Source analysis demonstrates an interaction between primary auditory cortex, hippocampus, and inferior frontal gyrus in the process of discovering the regularity within the ongoing sound sequence. The results are consistent with precision based predictive coding accounts of perceptual inference and provide compelling neurophysiological evidence of the brain's capacity to encode high-order temporal structure in sensory signals. PMID:26787854

  19. Brain responses in humans reveal ideal observer-like sensitivity to complex acoustic patterns.

    PubMed

    Barascud, Nicolas; Pearce, Marcus T; Griffiths, Timothy D; Friston, Karl J; Chait, Maria

    2016-02-01

    We use behavioral methods, magnetoencephalography, and functional MRI to investigate how human listeners discover temporal patterns and statistical regularities in complex sound sequences. Sensitivity to patterns is fundamental to sensory processing, in particular in the auditory system, because most auditory signals only have meaning as successions over time. Previous evidence suggests that the brain is tuned to the statistics of sensory stimulation. However, the process through which this arises has been elusive. We demonstrate that listeners are remarkably sensitive to the emergence of complex patterns within rapidly evolving sound sequences, performing on par with an ideal observer model. Brain responses reveal online processes of evidence accumulation--dynamic changes in tonic activity precisely correlate with the expected precision or predictability of ongoing auditory input--both in terms of deterministic (first-order) structure and the entropy of random sequences. Source analysis demonstrates an interaction between primary auditory cortex, hippocampus, and inferior frontal gyrus in the process of discovering the regularity within the ongoing sound sequence. The results are consistent with precision based predictive coding accounts of perceptual inference and provide compelling neurophysiological evidence of the brain's capacity to encode high-order temporal structure in sensory signals.

  20. Dark States in the Light-Harvesting complex 2 Revealed by Two-dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Marco; Hendrikx, Ruud; Romero, Elisabet; Southall, June; Cogdell, Richard J; Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I; Scholes, Gregory D; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2016-02-09

    Energy transfer and trapping in the light harvesting antennae of purple photosynthetic bacteria is an ultrafast process, which occurs with a quantum efficiency close to unity. However the mechanisms behind this process have not yet been fully understood. Recently it was proposed that low-lying energy dark states, such as charge transfer states and polaron pairs, play an important role in the dynamics and directionality of energy transfer. However, it is difficult to directly detect those states because of their small transition dipole moment and overlap with the B850/B870 exciton bands. Here we present a new experimental approach, which combines the selectivity of two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with the availability of genetically modified light harvesting complexes, to reveal the presence of those dark states in both the genetically modified and the wild-type light harvesting 2 complexes of Rhodopseudomonas palustris. We suggest that Nature has used the unavoidable charge transfer processes that occur when LH pigments are concentrated to enhance and direct the flow of energy.

  1. Dark States in the Light-Harvesting complex 2 Revealed by Two-dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ferretti, Marco; Hendrikx, Ruud; Romero, Elisabet; Southall, June; Cogdell, Richard J.; Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I.; Scholes, Gregory D.; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2016-01-01

    Energy transfer and trapping in the light harvesting antennae of purple photosynthetic bacteria is an ultrafast process, which occurs with a quantum efficiency close to unity. However the mechanisms behind this process have not yet been fully understood. Recently it was proposed that low-lying energy dark states, such as charge transfer states and polaron pairs, play an important role in the dynamics and directionality of energy transfer. However, it is difficult to directly detect those states because of their small transition dipole moment and overlap with the B850/B870 exciton bands. Here we present a new experimental approach, which combines the selectivity of two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with the availability of genetically modified light harvesting complexes, to reveal the presence of those dark states in both the genetically modified and the wild-type light harvesting 2 complexes of Rhodopseudomonas palustris. We suggest that Nature has used the unavoidable charge transfer processes that occur when LH pigments are concentrated to enhance and direct the flow of energy. PMID:26857477

  2. Dark States in the Light-Harvesting complex 2 Revealed by Two-dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Ferretti, Marco; Hendrikx, Ruud; Romero, Elisabet; Southall, June; Cogdell, Richard J.; Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I.; Scholes, Gregory D.; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2016-02-09

    Energy transfer and trapping in the light harvesting antennae of purple photosynthetic bacteria is an ultrafast process, which occurs with a quantum efficiency close to unity. However the mechanisms behind this process have not yet been fully understood. Recently it was proposed that low-lying energy dark states, such as charge transfer states and polaron pairs, play an important role in the dynamics and directionality of energy transfer. However, it is difficult to directly detect those states because of their small transition dipole moment and overlap with the B850/B870 exciton bands. Here we present a new experimental approach, which combines themore » selectivity of two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with the availability of genetically modified light harvesting complexes, to reveal the presence of those dark states in both the genetically modified and the wild-type light harvesting 2 complexes of Rhodopseudomonas palustris. In conclusion, we suggest that Nature has used the unavoidable charge transfer processes that occur when LH pigments are concentrated to enhance and direct the flow of energy.« less

  3. Differential Network Analysis Reveals Evolutionary Complexity in Secondary Metabolism of Rauvolfia serpentina over Catharanthus roseus.

    PubMed

    Pathania, Shivalika; Bagler, Ganesh; Ahuja, Paramvir S

    2016-01-01

    Comparative co-expression analysis of multiple species using high-throughput data is an integrative approach to determine the uniformity as well as diversification in biological processes. Rauvolfia serpentina and Catharanthus roseus, both members of Apocyanacae family, are reported to have remedial properties against multiple diseases. Despite of sharing upstream of terpenoid indole alkaloid pathway, there is significant diversity in tissue-specific synthesis and accumulation of specialized metabolites in these plants. This led us to implement comparative co-expression network analysis to investigate the modules and genes responsible for differential tissue-specific expression as well as species-specific synthesis of metabolites. Toward these goals differential network analysis was implemented to identify candidate genes responsible for diversification of metabolites profile. Three genes were identified with significant difference in connectivity leading to differential regulatory behavior between these plants. These genes may be responsible for diversification of secondary metabolism, and thereby for species-specific metabolite synthesis. The network robustness of R. serpentina, determined based on topological properties, was also complemented by comparison of gene-metabolite networks of both plants, and may have evolved to have complex metabolic mechanisms as compared to C. roseus under the influence of various stimuli. This study reveals evolution of complexity in secondary metabolism of R. serpentina, and key genes that contribute toward diversification of specific metabolites. PMID:27588023

  4. Impaired neurodevelopment by the low complexity domain of CPEB4 reveals a convergent pathway with neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jihae; Salameh, Johnny S.; Richter, Joel D.

    2016-01-01

    CPEB4 is an RNA binding protein expressed in neuronal tissues including brain and spinal cord. CPEB4 has two domains: one that is structured for RNA binding and one that is unstructured and low complexity that has no known function. Unstructured low complexity domains (LCDs) in proteins are often found in RNA-binding proteins and have been implicated in motor neuron degenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, indicating that these regions mediate normal RNA processing as well as pathological events. While CPEB4 null knockout mice are normal, animals expressing only the CPEB4 LCD are neonatal lethal with impaired mobility that display defects in neuronal development such as reduced motor axon branching and abnormal neuromuscular junction formation. Although full-length CPEB4 is nearly exclusively cytoplasmic, the CPEB4 LCD forms nucleolar aggregates and CPEB4 LCD-expressing animals have altered ribosomal RNA biogenesis, ribosomal protein gene expression, and elevated levels of stress response genes such as the actin-bundling protein DRR1, which impedes neurite outgrowth. Some of these features share similarities with other LCD-related neurodegenerative disease. Most strikingly, DRR1 appears to be a common focus of several neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders. Our study reveals a possible molecular convergence between a neurodevelopmental defect and neurodegeneration mediated by LCDs. PMID:27381259

  5. Cryptic biodiversity effects: importance of functional redundancy revealed through addition of food web complexity.

    PubMed

    Philpott, Stacy M; Pardee, Gabriella L; Gonthier, David J

    2012-05-01

    Interactions between predators and the degree of functional redundancy among multiple predator species may determine whether herbivores experience increased or decreased predation risk. Specialist parasites can modify predator behavior, yet rarely have cascading effects on multiple predator species and prey been evaluated. We examined influences of specialist phorid parasites (Pseudacteon spp.) on three predatory ant species and herbivores in a coffee agroecosystem. Specifically, we examined whether changes in ant richness affected fruit damage by the coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei) and whether phorids altered multi-predator effects. Each ant species reduced borer damage, and without phorids, increasing predator richness did not further decrease borer damage. However, with phorids, activity of one ant species was reduced, indicating that the presence of multiple ant species was necessary to limit borer damage. In addition, phorid presence revealed synergistic effects of multiple ant species, not observed without the presence of this parasite. Thus, a trait-mediated cascade resulting from a parasite-induced predator behavioral change revealed the importance of functional redundancy, predator diversity, and food web complexity for control of this important pest.

  6. Revealing the hidden networks of interaction in mobile animal groups allows prediction of complex behavioral contagion.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Sara Brin; Twomey, Colin R; Hartnett, Andrew T; Wu, Hai Shan; Couzin, Iain D

    2015-04-14

    Coordination among social animals requires rapid and efficient transfer of information among individuals, which may depend crucially on the underlying structure of the communication network. Establishing the decision-making circuits and networks that give rise to individual behavior has been a central goal of neuroscience. However, the analogous problem of determining the structure of the communication network among organisms that gives rise to coordinated collective behavior, such as is exhibited by schooling fish and flocking birds, has remained almost entirely neglected. Here, we study collective evasion maneuvers, manifested through rapid waves, or cascades, of behavioral change (a ubiquitous behavior among taxa) in schooling fish (Notemigonus crysoleucas). We automatically track the positions and body postures, calculate visual fields of all individuals in schools of ∼150 fish, and determine the functional mapping between socially generated sensory input and motor response during collective evasion. We find that individuals use simple, robust measures to assess behavioral changes in neighbors, and that the resulting networks by which behavior propagates throughout groups are complex, being weighted, directed, and heterogeneous. By studying these interaction networks, we reveal the (complex, fractional) nature of social contagion and establish that individuals with relatively few, but strongly connected, neighbors are both most socially influential and most susceptible to social influence. Furthermore, we demonstrate that we can predict complex cascades of behavioral change at their moment of initiation, before they actually occur. Consequently, despite the intrinsic stochasticity of individual behavior, establishing the hidden communication networks in large self-organized groups facilitates a quantitative understanding of behavioral contagion. PMID:25825752

  7. Revealing the hidden networks of interaction in mobile animal groups allows prediction of complex behavioral contagion

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Sara Brin; Twomey, Colin R.; Hartnett, Andrew T.; Wu, Hai Shan; Couzin, Iain D.

    2015-01-01

    Coordination among social animals requires rapid and efficient transfer of information among individuals, which may depend crucially on the underlying structure of the communication network. Establishing the decision-making circuits and networks that give rise to individual behavior has been a central goal of neuroscience. However, the analogous problem of determining the structure of the communication network among organisms that gives rise to coordinated collective behavior, such as is exhibited by schooling fish and flocking birds, has remained almost entirely neglected. Here, we study collective evasion maneuvers, manifested through rapid waves, or cascades, of behavioral change (a ubiquitous behavior among taxa) in schooling fish (Notemigonus crysoleucas). We automatically track the positions and body postures, calculate visual fields of all individuals in schools of ∼150 fish, and determine the functional mapping between socially generated sensory input and motor response during collective evasion. We find that individuals use simple, robust measures to assess behavioral changes in neighbors, and that the resulting networks by which behavior propagates throughout groups are complex, being weighted, directed, and heterogeneous. By studying these interaction networks, we reveal the (complex, fractional) nature of social contagion and establish that individuals with relatively few, but strongly connected, neighbors are both most socially influential and most susceptible to social influence. Furthermore, we demonstrate that we can predict complex cascades of behavioral change at their moment of initiation, before they actually occur. Consequently, despite the intrinsic stochasticity of individual behavior, establishing the hidden communication networks in large self-organized groups facilitates a quantitative understanding of behavioral contagion. PMID:25825752

  8. Introgressive hybridization and the evolutionary history of the herring gull complex revealed by mitochondrial and nuclear DNA

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Based on extensive mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence data, we previously showed that the model of speciation among species of herring gull (Larus argentatus) complex was not that of a ring species, but most likely due more complex speciation scenario's. We also found that two species, herring gull and glaucous gull (L. hyperboreus) displayed an unexpected biphyletic distribution of their mtDNA haplotypes. It was evident that mtDNA sequence data alone were far from sufficient to obtain a more accurate and detailed insight into the demographic processes that underlie speciation of this complex, and that extensive autosomal genetic analysis was warranted. Results For this reason, the present study focuses on the reconstruction of the phylogeographic history of a limited number of gull species by means of a combined approach of mtDNA sequence data and 230 autosomal amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) loci. At the species level, the mtDNA and AFLP genetic data were largely congruent. Not only for argentatus and hyperboreus, but also among a third species, great black-backed gull (L. marinus) we observed two distinct groups of mtDNA sequence haplotypes. Based on the AFLP data we were also able to detect distinct genetic subgroups among the various argentatus, hyperboreus, and marinus populations, supporting our initial hypothesis that complex demographic scenario's underlie speciation in the herring gull complex. Conclusions We present evidence that for each of these three biphyletic gull species, extensive mtDNA introgression could have taken place among the various geographically distinct subpopulations, or even among current species. Moreover, based on a large number of autosomal AFLP loci, we found evidence for distinct and complex demographic scenario's for each of the three species we studied. A more refined insight into the exact phylogeographic history within the herring gull complex is still impossible, and requires detailed autosomal

  9. Boomerang Returns Unexpectedly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Martin; Scott, Douglas; Pierpaoli, Elena

    2000-12-01

    Experimental study of the anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is gathering momentum. The eagerly awaited Boomerang results have lived up to expectations. They provide convincing evidence in favor of the standard paradigm: the universe is close to flat and with primordial fluctuations that are redolent of inflation. Further scrutiny reveals something even more exciting, however-two hints that there may be some unforeseen physical effects. First, the primary acoustic peak appears at slightly larger scales than expected. Although this may be explicable through a combination of mundane effects, we suggest that it is also prudent to consider the possibility that the universe might be marginally closed. The other hint is provided by a second peak, which appears less prominent than expected. This may indicate one of a number of possibilities, including increased damping length or tilted initial conditions, but also breaking of coherence or features in the initial power spectrum. Further data should test whether the current concordance model needs only to be tweaked, or to be enhanced in some fundamental way. A paper about a boomerang by an Australian and his mates.

  10. Mistletoe lectin I in complex with galactose and lactose reveals distinct sugar-binding properties

    SciTech Connect

    Mikeska, Ruth; Arni, Raghuvir; Mikhailov, Albert; Gabdoulkhakov, Azat; Voelter, Wolfgang; Betzel, Christian

    2005-01-01

    The structures of mistletoe lectin I in complex with lactose and galactose reveal differences in binding by the two known sites in subdomains α1 and γ2 and suggest the presence of a third low-affinity site in subdomain β1. The structures of mistletoe lectin I (ML-I) from Viscum album complexed with lactose and galactose have been determined at 2.3 Å resolution and refined to R factors of 20.9% (R{sub free} = 23.6%) and 20.9 (R{sub free} = 24.6%), respectively. ML-I is a heterodimer and belongs to the class of ribosome-inactivating proteins of type II, which consist of two chains. The A-chain has rRNA N-glycosidase activity and irreversibly inhibits eukaryotic ribosomes. The B-chain is a lectin and preferentially binds to galactose-terminated glycolipids and glycoproteins on cell membranes. Saccharide binding is performed by two binding sites in subdomains α1 and γ2 of the ML-I B-chain separated by ∼62 Å from each other. The favoured binding of galactose in subdomain α1 is achieved via hydrogen bonds connecting the 4-hydroxyl and 3-hydroxyl groups of the sugar moiety with the side chains of Asp23B, Gln36B and Lys41B and the main chain of 26B. The aromatic ring of Trp38B on top of the preferred binding pocket supports van der Waals packing of the apolar face of galactose and stabilizes the sugar–lectin complex. In the galactose-binding site II of subdomain γ2, Tyr249B provides the hydrophobic stacking and the side chains of Asp235B, Gln238B and Asn256B are hydrogen-bonding partners for galactose. In the case of the galactose-binding site I, the 2-hydroxyl group also stabilizes the sugar–protein complex, an interaction thus far rarely detected in galactose-specific lectins. Finally, a potential third low-affinity galactose-binding site in subunit β1 was identified in the present ML-I structures, in which a glycerol molecule from the cryoprotectant buffer has bound, mimicking the sugar compound.

  11. A detailed analysis of the leaf rolling mutant sll2 reveals complex nature in regulation of bulliform cell development in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, J-J; Wu, S-Y; Jiang, L; Wang, J-L; Zhang, X; Guo, X-P; Wu, C-Y; Wan, J-M

    2015-03-01

    Bulliform cells are large, thin-walled and highly vacuolated cells, and play an important role in controlling leaf rolling in response to drought and high temperature. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating bulliform cell development have not been well documented. Here, we report isolation and characterisation of a rice leaf-rolling mutant, named shallot-like 2 (sll2). The sll2 plants exhibit adaxially rolled leaves, starting from the sixth leaf stage, accompanied by increased photosynthesis and reduced plant height and tiller number. Histological analyses showed shrinkage of bulliform cells, resulting in inward-curved leaves. The mutant is recessive and revertible at a rate of 9%. The leaf rolling is caused by a T-DNA insertion. Cloning of the insertion using TAIL-PCR revealed that the T-DNA was inserted in the promoter region of LOC_Os07 g38664. Unexpectedly, the enhanced expression of LOC_Os07 g38664 by the 35S enhancer in the T-DNA is not responsible for the leaf rolling phenotype. Further, the enhancer also exerted a long-distance effect, including up-regulation of several bulliform cell-related genes. sll2 suppressed the outward leaf rolling of oul1 in the sll2oul1 double mutant. We conclude that leaf rolling in sll2 could be a result of the combined effect of multi-genes, implying a complex network in regulation of bulliform cell development.

  12. An Exquisitely Specific PDZ/Target Recognition Revealed by the Structure of INAD PDZ3 in Complex with TRP Channel Tail.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fei; Liu, Wei; Shang, Yuan; Zhang, Mingjie

    2016-03-01

    The vast majority of PDZ domains are known to bind to a few C-terminal tail residues of target proteins with modest binding affinities and specificities. Such promiscuous PDZ/target interactions are not compatible with highly specific physiological functions of PDZ domain proteins and their targets. Here, we report an unexpected PDZ/target binding occurring between the scaffold protein inactivation no afterpotential D (INAD) and transient receptor potential (TRP) channel in Drosophila photoreceptors. The C-terminal 15 residues of TRP are required for the specific interaction with INAD PDZ3. The INAD PDZ3/TRP peptide complex structure reveals that only the extreme C-terminal Leu of TRP binds to the canonical αB/βB groove of INAD PDZ3. The rest of the TRP peptide, by forming a β hairpin structure, binds to a surface away from the αB/βB groove of PDZ3 and contributes to the majority of the binding energy. Thus, the INAD PDZ3/TRP channel interaction is exquisitely specific and represents a new mode of PDZ/target recognitions.

  13. A detailed analysis of the leaf rolling mutant sll2 reveals complex nature in regulation of bulliform cell development in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, J-J; Wu, S-Y; Jiang, L; Wang, J-L; Zhang, X; Guo, X-P; Wu, C-Y; Wan, J-M

    2015-03-01

    Bulliform cells are large, thin-walled and highly vacuolated cells, and play an important role in controlling leaf rolling in response to drought and high temperature. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating bulliform cell development have not been well documented. Here, we report isolation and characterisation of a rice leaf-rolling mutant, named shallot-like 2 (sll2). The sll2 plants exhibit adaxially rolled leaves, starting from the sixth leaf stage, accompanied by increased photosynthesis and reduced plant height and tiller number. Histological analyses showed shrinkage of bulliform cells, resulting in inward-curved leaves. The mutant is recessive and revertible at a rate of 9%. The leaf rolling is caused by a T-DNA insertion. Cloning of the insertion using TAIL-PCR revealed that the T-DNA was inserted in the promoter region of LOC_Os07 g38664. Unexpectedly, the enhanced expression of LOC_Os07 g38664 by the 35S enhancer in the T-DNA is not responsible for the leaf rolling phenotype. Further, the enhancer also exerted a long-distance effect, including up-regulation of several bulliform cell-related genes. sll2 suppressed the outward leaf rolling of oul1 in the sll2oul1 double mutant. We conclude that leaf rolling in sll2 could be a result of the combined effect of multi-genes, implying a complex network in regulation of bulliform cell development. PMID:25213398

  14. Transcriptome analysis reveals strong and complex antiviral response in a mollusc.

    PubMed

    He, Yan; Jouaux, Aude; Ford, Susan E; Lelong, Christophe; Sourdaine, Pascal; Mathieu, Michel; Guo, Ximing

    2015-09-01

    Viruses are highly abundant in the oceans, and how filter-feeding molluscs without adaptive immunity defend themselves against viruses is not well understood. We studied the response of a mollusc Crassostrea gigas to Ostreid herpesvirus 1 µVar (OsHV-1μVar) infections using transcriptome sequencing. OsHV-1μVar can replicate extremely rapidly after challenge of C. gigas as evidenced by explosive viral transcription and DNA synthesis, which peaked at 24 and 48 h post-inoculation, respectively, accompanied by heavy oyster mortalities. At 120 h post-injection, however, viral gene transcription and DNA load, and oyster mortality, were greatly reduced indicating an end of active infections and effective control of viral replication in surviving oysters. Transcriptome analysis of the host revealed strong and complex responses involving the activation of all major innate immune pathways that are equipped with expanded and often novel receptors and adaptors. Novel Toll-like receptor (TLR) and MyD88-like genes lacking essential domains were highly up-regulated in the oyster, possibly interfering with TLR signal transduction. RIG-1/MDA5 receptors for viral RNA, interferon-regulatory factors, tissue necrosis factors and interleukin-17 were highly activated and likely central to the oyster's antiviral response. Genes related to anti-apoptosis, oxidation, RNA and protein destruction were also highly up-regulated, while genes related to anti-oxidation were down-regulated. The oxidative burst induced by the up-regulation of oxidases and severe down-regulation of anti-oxidant genes may be important for the destruction of viral components, but may also exacerbate oyster mortality. This study provides unprecedented insights into antiviral response in a mollusc. The mobilization and complex regulation of expanded innate immune-gene families highlights the oyster genome's adaptation to a virus-rich marine environment.

  15. Tantalizing Thanatos: unexpected links in death pathways.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Isabelle; Castedo, Maria; Kroemer, Guido

    2002-07-01

    Cell death is most frequently the result of apoptosis, an event that is often controlled by mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (MMP). Recent data reveal unexpected functional links between apoptosis and autophagic cell death, in the sense that MMP can trigger autophagy of damaged mitochondria. Conversely, one of the major signal-transducing molecules involved in the activation of autophagy during apoptosis--the so-called DAP kinase--can induce cell death through MMP. Connections are also emerging between apoptosis, autophagy, replicative senescence and cancer-specific metabolic changes. PMID:12185842

  16. Perched Lava Pond Complex on South Rift of Axial Volcano Revealed in AUV Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paduan, J. B.; Clague, D. A.; Caress, D. W.; Thomas, H. J.

    2013-12-01

    An extraordinary lava pond complex is located on Axial Volcano's distal south rift. It was discovered in EM300 multibeam bathymetry collected in 1998, and explored and sampled with ROVs Tiburon in 2005 and Doc Ricketts in 2013. It was surveyed with the MBARI Mapping AUV D. Allan B. in 2011, in a complicated mission first flying above the levees at constant depth, then skimming ~5 m over the levees at a different constant depth to survey the floors, then twice switching to constant altitude mode to map outside the ponds. The AUV navigation was adjusted using the MB-System tool mbnavadjust so that bathymetric features match in overlapping and crossing swaths. The ~1-m resolution AUV bathymetry reveals extremely rough terrain, where low-resolution EM300 data had averaged acoustic returns and obscured details of walls, floors, a breach and surrounding flows, and gives context to the ROV observations and samples. The 6 x 1.5 km pond complex has 4 large and several smaller drained ponds with rims 67 to 106 m above the floors. The combined volume before draining was 0.56 km3. The ponds overflowed to build lobate-flow levees with elongate pillows draping outer flanks, then drained, leaving lava veneer on vertical inner walls. Levee rim depths vary by only 10 m and are deeper around the southern ponds. Deep collapse-pits in the levees suggest porosity of pond walls. The eastern levee of the northeastern pond breached, draining the interconnected ponds, and fed thick, rapidly-emplaced, sheet-flows along the complex's east side. These flows travelled at least 5.5 km down-rift and have 19-33 m deep drained ponds. They extended up-rift as well, forming a 10 x 2.5 km ponded flow with level 'bathtub rings' as high as 35 m above the floor marking that flow's high-stand. Despite the breach, at least 0.066 km3 of the molten interior of the large ponds also drained back down the eruptive fissures, as the pond floors are deeper than the sill and sea floor outside the complex. Tumulus

  17. Crystal Structures of Cyclohexanone Monooxygenase Reveal Complex Domain Movements and a Sliding Cofactor

    SciTech Connect

    Mirza, I.; Yachnin, B; Wang, S; Grosse, S; Bergeron, H; Imura, A; Iwaki, H; Hasegawa, Y; Lau, P; Berghuis, A

    2009-01-01

    Cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) is a flavoprotein that carries out the archetypical Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of a variety of cyclic ketones into lactones. Using NADPH and O{sub 2} as cosubstrates, the enzyme inserts one atom of oxygen into the substrate in a complex catalytic mechanism that involves the formation of a flavin-peroxide and Criegee intermediate. We present here the atomic structures of CHMO from an environmental Rhodococcus strain bound with FAD and NADP+ in two distinct states, to resolutions of 2.3 and 2.2 {angstrom}. The two conformations reveal domain shifts around multiple linkers and loop movements, involving conserved arginine 329 and tryptophan 492, which effect a translation of the nicotinamide resulting in a sliding cofactor. Consequently, the cofactor is ideally situated and subsequently repositioned during the catalytic cycle to first reduce the flavin and later stabilize formation of the Criegee intermediate. Concurrent movements of a loop adjacent to the active site demonstrate how this protein can effect large changes in the size and shape of the substrate binding pocket to accommodate a diverse range of substrates. Finally, the previously identified BVMO signature sequence is highlighted for its role in coordinating domain movements. Taken together, these structures provide mechanistic insights into CHMO-catalyzed Baeyer-Villiger oxidation.

  18. Structural Studies of a Bacterial Condensin Complex Reveal ATP-Dependent Disruption of Intersubunit Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, J.; Lim, J; Shin, H; Suh, M; Ku, B; Lee, H; Joo, K; Robinson, H; Lee, J; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Condensins are key mediators of chromosome condensation across organisms. Like other condensins, the bacterial MukBEF condensin complex consists of an SMC family protein dimer containing two ATPase head domains, MukB, and two interacting subunits, MukE and MukF. We report complete structural views of the intersubunit interactions of this condensin along with ensuing studies that reveal a role for the ATPase activity of MukB. MukE and MukF together form an elongated dimeric frame, and MukF's C-terminal winged-helix domains (C-WHDs) bind MukB heads to constitute closed ring-like structures. Surprisingly, one of the two bound C-WHDs is forced to detach upon ATP-mediated engagement of MukB heads. This detachment reaction depends on the linker segment preceding the C-WHD, and mutations on the linker restrict cell growth. Thus ATP-dependent transient disruption of the MukB-MukF interaction, which creates openings in condensin ring structures, is likely to be a critical feature of the functional mechanism of condensins.

  19. Microbial dark matter ecogenomics reveals complex synergistic networks in a methanogenic bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Nobu, Masaru K; Narihiro, Takashi; Rinke, Christian; Kamagata, Yoichi; Tringe, Susannah G; Woyke, Tanja; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2015-08-01

    Ecogenomic investigation of a methanogenic bioreactor degrading terephthalate (TA) allowed elucidation of complex synergistic networks of uncultivated microorganisms, including those from candidate phyla with no cultivated representatives. Our previous metagenomic investigation proposed that Pelotomaculum and methanogens may interact with uncultivated organisms to degrade TA; however, many members of the community remained unaddressed because of past technological limitations. In further pursuit, this study employed state-of-the-art omics tools to generate draft genomes and transcriptomes for uncultivated organisms spanning 15 phyla and reports the first genomic insight into candidate phyla Atribacteria, Hydrogenedentes and Marinimicrobia in methanogenic environments. Metabolic reconstruction revealed that these organisms perform fermentative, syntrophic and acetogenic catabolism facilitated by energy conservation revolving around H2 metabolism. Several of these organisms could degrade TA catabolism by-products (acetate, butyrate and H2) and syntrophically support Pelotomaculum. Other taxa could scavenge anabolic products (protein and lipids) presumably derived from detrital biomass produced by the TA-degrading community. The protein scavengers expressed complementary metabolic pathways indicating syntrophic and fermentative step-wise protein degradation through amino acids, branched-chain fatty acids and propionate. Thus, the uncultivated organisms may interact to form an intricate syntrophy-supported food web with Pelotomaculum and methanogens to metabolize catabolic by-products and detritus, whereby facilitating holistic TA mineralization to CO2 and CH4. PMID:25615435

  20. Nanoscale stiffness topography reveals structure and mechanics of the transport barrier in intact nuclear pore complexes

    PubMed Central

    Labokha, Aksana A.; Osmanović, Dino; Liashkovich, Ivan; Orlova, Elena V.; Ford, Ian J.; Charras, Guillaume; Fassati, Ariberto; Hoogenboom, Bart W.

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is the gate for transport between the cell nucleus and the cytoplasm. Small molecules cross the NPC by passive diffusion, but molecules larger than ~5 nm must bind to nuclear transport receptors to overcome a selective barrier within the NPC1. Whilst the structure and shape of the cytoplasmic ring of the NPC are relatively well characterized2-5, the selective barrier is situated deep within the central channel of the NPC and depends critically on unstructured nuclear pore proteins5,6, and is therefore not well understood. Here, we show that stiffness topography7 with sharp atomic force microscopy tips can generate nanoscale cross sections of the NPC. The cross sections reveal two distinct structures, a cytoplasmic ring and a central plug structure, which are consistent with the three-dimensional NPC structure derived from electron microscopy2-5. The central plug persists after reactivation of the transport cycle and resultant cargo release, indicating that the plug is an intrinsic part of the NPC barrier. Added nuclear transport receptors accumulate on the intact transport barrier and lead to a homogenization of the barrier stiffness. The observed nanomechanical properties in the NPC indicate the presence of a cohesive barrier to transport, and are quantitatively consistent with the presence of a central condensate of nuclear pore proteins in the NPC channel. PMID:25420031

  1. Proteomics and metabolomics analyses reveal the cucurbit sieve tube system as a complex metabolic space.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chaoyang; Ham, Byung-Kook; El-Shabrawi, Hattem M; Alexander, Danny; Zhang, Dabing; Ryals, John; Lucas, William J

    2016-09-01

    The plant vascular system, and specifically the phloem, plays a pivotal role in allocation of fixed carbon to developing sink organs. Although the processes involved in loading and unloading of sugars and amino acids are well characterized, little information is available regarding the nature of other metabolites in the sieve tube system (STS) at specific sites along the pathway. Here, we elucidate spatial features of metabolite composition mapped with phloem enzymes along the cucurbit STS. Phloem sap (PS) was collected from the loading (source), unloading (apical sink region) and shoot-root junction regions of cucumber, watermelon and pumpkin. Our PS analyses revealed significant differences in the metabolic and proteomic profiles both along the source-sink pathway and between the STSs of these three cucurbits. In addition, metabolite profiles established for PS and vascular tissue indicated the presence of distinct compositions, consistent with the operation of the STS as a unique symplasmic domain. In this regard, at various locations along the STS we could map metabolites and their related enzymes to specific metabolic pathways. These findings are discussed with regard to the function of the STS as a unique and highly complex metabolic space within the plant vascular system. PMID:27155400

  2. Advances in translational bioinformatics facilitate revealing the landscape of complex disease mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Advances of high-throughput technologies have rapidly produced more and more data from DNAs and RNAs to proteins, especially large volumes of genome-scale data. However, connection of the genomic information to cellular functions and biological behaviours relies on the development of effective approaches at higher systems level. In particular, advances in RNA-Seq technology has helped the studies of transcriptome, RNA expressed from the genome, while systems biology on the other hand provides more comprehensive pictures, from which genes and proteins actively interact to lead to cellular behaviours and physiological phenotypes. As biological interactions mediate many biological processes that are essential for cellular function or disease development, it is important to systematically identify genomic information including genetic mutations from GWAS (genome-wide association study), differentially expressed genes, bidirectional promoters, intrinsic disordered proteins (IDP) and protein interactions to gain deep insights into the underlying mechanisms of gene regulations and networks. Furthermore, bidirectional promoters can co-regulate many biological pathways, where the roles of bidirectional promoters can be studied systematically for identifying co-regulating genes at interactive network level. Combining information from different but related studies can ultimately help revealing the landscape of molecular mechanisms underlying complex diseases such as cancer. PMID:25559210

  3. Dynamic Localization of Electronic Excitation in Photosynthetic Complexes Revealed with Chiral Two-Dimensional Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fidler, Andrew F.; Singh, Ved P.; Long, Phillip D.; Dahlberg, Peter D.; Engel, Gregory S.

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved ultrafast optical probes of chiral dynamics provide a new window allowing us to explore how interactions with such structured environments drive electronic dynamics. Incorporating optical activity into time-resolved spectroscopies has proven challenging due to the small signal and large achiral background. Here, we demonstrate that two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy can be adapted to detect chiral signals and that these signals reveal how excitations delocalize and contract following excitation. We dynamically probe the evolution of chiral electronic structure in the light harvesting complex 2 of purple bacteria following photoexcitation by creating a chiral two-dimensional mapping. The dynamics of the chiral two-dimensional signal directly reports on changes in the degree of delocalization of the excitonic state following photoexcitation. The mechanism of energy transfer in this system may enhance transfer probability due to the coherent coupling among chromophores while suppressing fluorescence that arises from populating delocalized states. This generally applicable spectroscopy will provide an incisive tool to probe ultrafast transient molecular fluctuations that are obscured in non-chiral experiments. PMID:24504144

  4. Mammalian Axoneme Central Pair Complex Proteins: Broader Roles Revealed by Gene Knockout Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Teves, Maria E.; Nagarkatti-Gude, David R.; Zhang, Zhibing; Strauss, Jerome F.

    2016-01-01

    The axoneme genes, their encoded proteins, their functions and the structures they form are largely conserved across species. Much of our knowledge of the function and structure of axoneme proteins in cilia and flagella is derived from studies on model organisms like the green algae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The core structure of cilia and flagella is the axoneme, which in most motile cilia and flagella contains a 9 + 2 configuration of microtubules. The two central microtubules are the scaffold of the central pair complex (CPC). Mutations that disrupt CPC genes in Chlamydomonas and other model organisms result in defects in assembly, stability and function of the axoneme, leading to flagellar motility defects. However, targeted mutations generated in mice in the orthologous CPC genes have revealed significant differences in phenotypes of mutants compared to Chlamydomonas. Here we review observations that support the concept of cell-type specific roles for the CPC genes in mice, and an expanded repertoire of functions for the products of these genes in cilia, including non-motile cilia, and other microtubule-associated cellular functions. PMID:26785425

  5. Proteomics and metabolomics analyses reveal the cucurbit sieve tube system as a complex metabolic space.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chaoyang; Ham, Byung-Kook; El-Shabrawi, Hattem M; Alexander, Danny; Zhang, Dabing; Ryals, John; Lucas, William J

    2016-09-01

    The plant vascular system, and specifically the phloem, plays a pivotal role in allocation of fixed carbon to developing sink organs. Although the processes involved in loading and unloading of sugars and amino acids are well characterized, little information is available regarding the nature of other metabolites in the sieve tube system (STS) at specific sites along the pathway. Here, we elucidate spatial features of metabolite composition mapped with phloem enzymes along the cucurbit STS. Phloem sap (PS) was collected from the loading (source), unloading (apical sink region) and shoot-root junction regions of cucumber, watermelon and pumpkin. Our PS analyses revealed significant differences in the metabolic and proteomic profiles both along the source-sink pathway and between the STSs of these three cucurbits. In addition, metabolite profiles established for PS and vascular tissue indicated the presence of distinct compositions, consistent with the operation of the STS as a unique symplasmic domain. In this regard, at various locations along the STS we could map metabolites and their related enzymes to specific metabolic pathways. These findings are discussed with regard to the function of the STS as a unique and highly complex metabolic space within the plant vascular system.

  6. Gene coexpression analysis reveals complex metabolism of the monoterpene alcohol linalool in Arabidopsis flowers.

    PubMed

    Ginglinger, Jean-François; Boachon, Benoit; Höfer, René; Paetz, Christian; Köllner, Tobias G; Miesch, Laurence; Lugan, Raphael; Baltenweck, Raymonde; Mutterer, Jérôme; Ullmann, Pascaline; Beran, Franziska; Claudel, Patricia; Verstappen, Francel; Fischer, Marc J C; Karst, Francis; Bouwmeester, Harro; Miesch, Michel; Schneider, Bernd; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Ehlting, Jürgen; Werck-Reichhart, Danièle

    2013-11-01

    The cytochrome P450 family encompasses the largest family of enzymes in plant metabolism, and the functions of many of its members in Arabidopsis thaliana are still unknown. Gene coexpression analysis pointed to two P450s that were coexpressed with two monoterpene synthases in flowers and were thus predicted to be involved in monoterpenoid metabolism. We show that all four selected genes, the two terpene synthases (TPS10 and TPS14) and the two cytochrome P450s (CYP71B31 and CYP76C3), are simultaneously expressed at anthesis, mainly in upper anther filaments and in petals. Upon transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana, the TPS enzymes colocalize in vesicular structures associated with the plastid surface, whereas the P450 proteins were detected in the endoplasmic reticulum. Whether they were expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae or in N. benthamiana, the TPS enzymes formed two different enantiomers of linalool: (-)-(R)-linalool for TPS10 and (+)-(S)-linalool for TPS14. Both P450 enzymes metabolize the two linalool enantiomers to form different but overlapping sets of hydroxylated or epoxidized products. These oxygenated products are not emitted into the floral headspace, but accumulate in floral tissues as further converted or conjugated metabolites. This work reveals complex linalool metabolism in Arabidopsis flowers, the ecological role of which remains to be determined.

  7. Dynamic localization of electronic excitation in photosynthetic complexes revealed with chiral two-dimensional spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fidler, Andrew F; Singh, Ved P; Long, Phillip D; Dahlberg, Peter D; Engel, Gregory S

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved ultrafast optical probes of chiral dynamics provide a new window allowing us to explore how interactions with such structured environments drive electronic dynamics. Incorporating optical activity into time-resolved spectroscopies has proven challenging because of the small signal and large achiral background. Here we demonstrate that two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy can be adapted to detect chiral signals and that these signals reveal how excitations delocalize and contract following excitation. We dynamically probe the evolution of chiral electronic structure in the light-harvesting complex 2 of purple bacteria following photoexcitation by creating a chiral two-dimensional mapping. The dynamics of the chiral two-dimensional signal directly reports on changes in the degree of delocalization of the excitonic states following photoexcitation. The mechanism of energy transfer in this system may enhance transfer probability because of the coherent coupling among chromophores while suppressing fluorescence that arises from populating delocalized states. This generally applicable spectroscopy will provide an incisive tool to probe ultrafast transient molecular fluctuations that are obscured in non-chiral experiments. PMID:24504144

  8. Microbial dark matter ecogenomics reveals complex synergistic networks in a methanogenic bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Nobu, Masaru K; Narihiro, Takashi; Rinke, Christian; Kamagata, Yoichi; Tringe, Susannah G; Woyke, Tanja; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2015-08-01

    Ecogenomic investigation of a methanogenic bioreactor degrading terephthalate (TA) allowed elucidation of complex synergistic networks of uncultivated microorganisms, including those from candidate phyla with no cultivated representatives. Our previous metagenomic investigation proposed that Pelotomaculum and methanogens may interact with uncultivated organisms to degrade TA; however, many members of the community remained unaddressed because of past technological limitations. In further pursuit, this study employed state-of-the-art omics tools to generate draft genomes and transcriptomes for uncultivated organisms spanning 15 phyla and reports the first genomic insight into candidate phyla Atribacteria, Hydrogenedentes and Marinimicrobia in methanogenic environments. Metabolic reconstruction revealed that these organisms perform fermentative, syntrophic and acetogenic catabolism facilitated by energy conservation revolving around H2 metabolism. Several of these organisms could degrade TA catabolism by-products (acetate, butyrate and H2) and syntrophically support Pelotomaculum. Other taxa could scavenge anabolic products (protein and lipids) presumably derived from detrital biomass produced by the TA-degrading community. The protein scavengers expressed complementary metabolic pathways indicating syntrophic and fermentative step-wise protein degradation through amino acids, branched-chain fatty acids and propionate. Thus, the uncultivated organisms may interact to form an intricate syntrophy-supported food web with Pelotomaculum and methanogens to metabolize catabolic by-products and detritus, whereby facilitating holistic TA mineralization to CO2 and CH4.

  9. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry reveals the influence of subunit packing and charge on the dissociation of multiprotein complexes.

    PubMed

    Boeri Erba, Elisabetta; Ruotolo, Brandon T; Barsky, Daniel; Robinson, Carol V

    2010-12-01

    The composition, stoichiometry, and organization of protein complexes can be determined by collision-induced dissociation (CID) coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The increased use of this approach in structural biology prompts a better understanding of the dissociation mechanism(s). Here we report a detailed investigation of the CID of two dodecameric, heat-stable and toroidally shaped complexes: heat shock protein 16.9 (HSP16.9) and stable protein 1 (SP-1). While HSP16.9 dissociates by sequential loss of unfolded monomers, SP-1 ejects not only monomers, but also its building blocks (dimers), and multiples thereof (tetramers and hexamers). Unexpectedly, the dissociation of SP-1 is strongly charge-dependent: loss of the building blocks increases with higher charge states of this complex. By combining MS/MS with ion mobility (IM-MS/MS), we have monitored the unfolding and dissociation events for these complexes in the gas phase. For HSP16.9 unfolding occurs at lower energies than the ejection of subunits, whereas for SP-1 unfolding and dissociation take place simultaneously. We consider these results in the light of the structural organization of HSP16.9 and SP-1 and hypothesize that SP-1 is unable to unfold extensively due to its particular quaternary structure and unusually high charge density. This investigation increases our understanding of the factors governing the CID of protein complexes and moves us closer to the goal of obtaining structural information on subunit interactions and packing from gas-phase experiments. PMID:21053918

  10. Wilderness Emergency: Surviving the Unexpected.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fear, Gene

    In any unexpected survival experience, one must accept the situation with just what one has at the moment it happens, where it happens, and how it happens. Problem solving must be based on known body enemies that threaten life, their priority of influence, and their severity of threat to life. Solutions will depend on the body's energy supply,…

  11. Unexpected Outcomes from Teachers' TV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, Ruth

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author explains why she has unexpectedly become a fan of Teacher's TV. It started when she was asked to show some clips from Teachers' TV as part of a workshop she was leading. She dutifully accepted a CD containing three downloaded programmes about using ICT to teach mathematics and put it into her laptop. Within a few…

  12. Simulations reveal that the HIV-1 gp120-CD4 complex dissociates via complex pathways and is a potential target of the polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandy, Bidisha; Bindu, D. Hima; Dixit, Narendra M.; Maiti, Prabal K.

    2013-07-01

    The polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer prevents HIV-1 entry into target cells in vitro. Its mechanism of action, however, remains unclear and precludes the design of potent dendrimers targeting HIV-1 entry. We employed steered molecular dynamics simulations to examine whether the HIV-1 gp120-CD4 complex is a target of PAMAM. Our simulations mimicked single molecule force spectroscopy studies of the unbinding of the gp120-CD4 complex under the influence of a controlled external force. We found that the complex dissociates via complex pathways and defies the standard classification of adhesion molecules as catch and slip bonds. When the force loading rate was large, the complex behaved as a slip bond, weakening gradually. When the loading rate was small, the complex initially strengthened, akin to a catch bond, but eventually dissociated over shorter separations than with large loading rates. PAMAM docked to gp120 and destabilized the gp120-CD4 complex. The rupture force of the complex was lowered by PAMAM. PAMAM disrupted salt bridges and hydrogen bonds across the gp120-CD4 interface and altered the hydration pattern of the hydrophobic cavity in the interface. In addition, intriguingly, PAMAM suppressed the distinction in the dissociation pathways of the complex between the small and large loading rate regimes. Taken together, our simulations reveal that PAMAM targets the gp120-CD4 complex at two levels: it weakens the complex and also alters its dissociation pathway, potentially inhibiting HIV-1 entry.

  13. Of mice and the 'Age of Discovery': the complex history of colonization of the Azorean archipelago by the house mouse (Mus musculus) as revealed by mitochondrial DNA variation.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, S I; Mathias, M L; Searle, J B

    2015-01-01

    Humans have introduced many species onto remote oceanic islands. The house mouse (Mus musculus) is a human commensal and has consequently been transported to oceanic islands around the globe as an accidental stowaway. The history of these introductions can tell us not only about the mice themselves but also about the people that transported them. Following a phylogeographic approach, we used mitochondrial D-loop sequence variation (within an 849- to 864-bp fragment) to study house mouse colonization of the Azores. A total of 239 sequences were obtained from all nine islands, and interpretation was helped by previously published Iberian sequences and 66 newly generated Spanish sequences. A Bayesian analysis revealed presence in the Azores of most of the D-loop clades previously described in the domesticus subspecies of the house mouse, suggesting a complex colonization history of the archipelago as a whole from multiple geographical origins, but much less heterogeneity (often single colonization?) within islands. The expected historical link with mainland Portugal was reflected in the pattern of D-loop variation of some of the islands but not all. A more unexpected association with a distant North European source area was also detected in three islands, possibly reflecting human contact with the Azores prior to the 15th century discovery by Portuguese mariners. Widening the scope to colonization of the Macaronesian islands as a whole, human linkages between the Azores, Madeira, the Canaries, Portugal and Spain were revealed through the sharing of mouse sequences between these areas. From these and other data, we suggest mouse studies may help resolve historical uncertainties relating to the 'Age of Discovery'.

  14. Characterization of purified human Bact spliceosomal complexes reveals compositional and morphological changes during spliceosome activation and first step catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Bessonov, Sergey; Anokhina, Maria; Krasauskas, Andrius; Golas, Monika M.; Sander, Bjoern; Will, Cindy L.; Urlaub, Henning; Stark, Holger; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    To better understand the compositional and structural dynamics of the human spliceosome during its activation, we set out to isolate spliceosomal complexes formed after precatalytic B but prior to catalytically active C complexes. By shortening the polypyrimidine tract of the PM5 pre-mRNA, which lacks a 3′ splice site and 3′ exon, we stalled spliceosome assembly at the activation stage. We subsequently affinity purified human Bact complexes under the same conditions previously used to isolate B and C complexes, and analyzed their protein composition by mass spectrometry. A comparison of the protein composition of these complexes allowed a fine dissection of compositional changes during the B to Bact and Bact to C transitions, and comparisons with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Bact complex revealed that the compositional dynamics of the spliceosome during activation are largely conserved between lower and higher eukaryotes. Human SF3b155 and CDC5L were shown to be phosphorylated specifically during the B to Bact and Bact to C transition, respectively, suggesting these modifications function at these stages of splicing. The two-dimensional structure of the human Bact complex was determined by electron microscopy, and a comparison with the B complex revealed that the morphology of the human spliceosome changes significantly during its activation. The overall architecture of the human and S. cerevisiae Bact complex is similar, suggesting that many of the higher order interactions among spliceosomal components, as well as their dynamics, are also largely conserved. PMID:20980672

  15. Luminescent Re(I) terpyridine complexes for OLEDs: what does the DFT/TD-DFT probe reveal?

    PubMed

    Velmurugan, Gunasekaran; Venuvanalingam, Ponnambalam

    2015-05-14

    The electronic structure and spectroscopic properties of a series of rhenium(I) terpyridine complexes were investigated using density functional theory (DFT) and time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) methods. The influence of different substituent groups on the optical and electronic properties of Re(I) terpyridine complexes has also been explored. The reorganization energy calculations show that the substituted Re(I) terpyridine complexes are better electron transport materials with high quantum efficiency in OLED devices due to their high electron transport mobility and low λ(electron) values, whereas the unsubstituted complex shows relatively balanceable charge transfer abilities with the higher efficiency in organic light emitting devices (OLEDs). An NBO analysis reveals that n→σ* interactions are mainly responsible for the ground state stabilization of all the complexes. QTAIM results show that in all cases, Re-CO bonds are shared type transient interactions as reported in the other metal ligand complexes. The absorption is associated with (1)MLCT/(1)LLCT/(1)ILCT character while the emission transition has (3)MLCT/(3)LLCT/(3)ILCT character as revealed by a natural transition orbital (NTO) analysis. The higher quantum yields reported for the complexes 4-6 are found to be closely related to both its smaller ΔE(S1-T1), higher μ(S1), E(T1) and moderate (3)MLCT character. The calculated results show that Re(I) terpyridine complexes, particularly complexes 4-6, are suitable candidates for OLED materials.

  16. Massively parallel tag sequencing reveals the complexity of anaerobic marine protistan communities

    PubMed Central

    Stoeck, Thorsten; Behnke, Anke; Christen, Richard; Amaral-Zettler, Linda; Rodriguez-Mora, Maria J; Chistoserdov, Andrei; Orsi, William; Edgcomb, Virginia P

    2009-01-01

    Background Recent advances in sequencing strategies make possible unprecedented depth and scale of sampling for molecular detection of microbial diversity. Two major paradigm-shifting discoveries include the detection of bacterial diversity that is one to two orders of magnitude greater than previous estimates, and the discovery of an exciting 'rare biosphere' of molecular signatures ('species') of poorly understood ecological significance. We applied a high-throughput parallel tag sequencing (454 sequencing) protocol adopted for eukaryotes to investigate protistan community complexity in two contrasting anoxic marine ecosystems (Framvaren Fjord, Norway; Cariaco deep-sea basin, Venezuela). Both sampling sites have previously been scrutinized for protistan diversity by traditional clone library construction and Sanger sequencing. By comparing these clone library data with 454 amplicon library data, we assess the efficiency of high-throughput tag sequencing strategies. We here present a novel, highly conservative bioinformatic analysis pipeline for the processing of large tag sequence data sets. Results The analyses of ca. 250,000 sequence reads revealed that the number of detected Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) far exceeded previous richness estimates from the same sites based on clone libraries and Sanger sequencing. More than 90% of this diversity was represented by OTUs with less than 10 sequence tags. We detected a substantial number of taxonomic groups like Apusozoa, Chrysomerophytes, Centroheliozoa, Eustigmatophytes, hyphochytriomycetes, Ichthyosporea, Oikomonads, Phaeothamniophytes, and rhodophytes which remained undetected by previous clone library-based diversity surveys of the sampling sites. The most important innovations in our newly developed bioinformatics pipeline employ (i) BLASTN with query parameters adjusted for highly variable domains and a complete database of public ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences for taxonomic assignments of tags; (ii

  17. Complex patterns of faulting revealed by 3D seismic data at the West Galicia rifted margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reston, Timothy; Cresswell, Derren; Sawyer, Dale; Ranero, Cesar; Shillington, Donna; Morgan, Julia; Lymer, Gael

    2015-04-01

    The west Galicia margin is characterised by crust thinning to less than 3 km, well-defined fault blocks, which overlie a bright reflection (the S reflector) generally interpreted as a tectonic Moho. The margin exhibits neither voluminous magmatism nor thick sediment piles to obscure the structures and the amount of extension. As such is represents an ideal location to study the process of continental breakup both through seismic imaging and potentially through drilling. Prestack depth migration of existing 2D profiles has strongly supported the interpretation of the S reflector as both a detachment and as the crust-mantle boundary; wide-angle seismic has also shown that the mantle beneath S is serpentinised. Despite the quality of the existing 2D seismic images, a number of competing models have been advanced to explain the formation of this margin, including sequential faulting, polyphase faulting, multiple detachments and the gravitational collapse of the margin over exhumed mantle. As these models, all developed for the Galicia margin, have been subsequently applied to other margins, distinguishing between them has implications not only for the structure of the Galicia margin but for the process of rifting through to breakup more generally. To address these issues in summer of 2013 we collected a 3D combined seismic reflection and wide-angle dataset over this margin. Here we present some of the results of ongoing processing of the 3D volume, focussing on the internal structure of some of the fault blocks that overlies the S detachment. 2D processing of the data shows a relatively simple series of tilted fault block, bound by west-dipping faults that detach downwards onto the bright S reflector. However, inspection of the 3D volume produced by 3D pre-stack time migration reveals that the fault blocks contain a complex set of sedimentary packages, with strata tilted to the east, west, north and south, each package bound by faults. Furthermore, the top of crustal

  18. Genome Evolution in the Eremothecium Clade of the Saccharomyces Complex Revealed by Comparative Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Wendland, Jürgen; Walther, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    We used comparative genomics to elucidate the genome evolution within the pre–whole-genome duplication genus Eremothecium. To this end, we sequenced and assembled the complete genome of Eremothecium cymbalariae, a filamentous ascomycete representing the Eremothecium type strain. Genome annotation indicated 4712 gene models and 143 tRNAs. We compared the E. cymbalariae genome with that of its relative, the riboflavin overproducer Ashbya (Eremothecium) gossypii, and the reconstructed yeast ancestor. Decisive changes in the Eremothecium lineage leading to the evolution of the A. gossypii genome include the reduction from eight to seven chromosomes, the downsizing of the genome by removal of 10% or 900 kb of DNA, mostly in intergenic regions, the loss of a TY3-Gypsy–type transposable element, the re-arrangement of mating-type loci, and a massive increase of its GC content. Key species-specific events are the loss of MNN1-family of mannosyltransferases required to add the terminal fourth and fifth α-1,3-linked mannose residue to O-linked glycans and genes of the Ehrlich pathway in E. cymbalariae and the loss of ZMM-family of meiosis-specific proteins and acquisition of riboflavin overproduction in A. gossypii. This reveals that within the Saccharomyces complex genome, evolution is not only based on genome duplication with subsequent gene deletions and chromosomal rearrangements but also on fungi associated with specific environments (e.g. involving fungal-insect interactions as in Eremothecium), which have encountered challenges that may be reflected both in genome streamlining and their biosynthetic potential. PMID:22384365

  19. The Nature of Genetic Variation for Complex Traits Revealed by GWAS and Regional Heritability Mapping Analyses.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Armando; Tenesa, Albert; Keightley, Peter D

    2015-12-01

    We use computer simulations to investigate the amount of genetic variation for complex traits that can be revealed by single-SNP genome-wide association studies (GWAS) or regional heritability mapping (RHM) analyses based on full genome sequence data or SNP chips. We model a large population subject to mutation, recombination, selection, and drift, assuming a pleiotropic model of mutations sampled from a bivariate distribution of effects of mutations on a quantitative trait and fitness. The pleiotropic model investigated, in contrast to previous models, implies that common mutations of large effect are responsible for most of the genetic variation for quantitative traits, except when the trait is fitness itself. We show that GWAS applied to the full sequence increases the number of QTL detected by as much as 50% compared to the number found with SNP chips but only modestly increases the amount of additive genetic variance explained. Even with full sequence data, the total amount of additive variance explained is generally below 50%. Using RHM on the full sequence data, a slightly larger number of QTL are detected than by GWAS if the same probability threshold is assumed, but these QTL explain a slightly smaller amount of genetic variance. Our results also suggest that most of the missing heritability is due to the inability to detect variants of moderate effect (∼0.03-0.3 phenotypic SDs) segregating at substantial frequencies. Very rare variants, which are more difficult to detect by GWAS, are expected to contribute little genetic variation, so their eventual detection is less relevant for resolving the missing heritability problem.

  20. Chemical genetics analysis of an aniline mustard anticancer agent reveals complex I of the electron transport chain as a target.

    PubMed

    Fedeles, Bogdan I; Zhu, Angela Y; Young, Kellie S; Hillier, Shawn M; Proffitt, Kyle D; Essigmann, John M; Croy, Robert G

    2011-09-30

    The antitumor agent 11β (CAS 865070-37-7), consisting of a DNA-damaging aniline mustard linked to an androgen receptor (AR) ligand, is known to form covalent DNA adducts and to induce apoptosis potently in AR-positive prostate cancer cells in vitro; it also strongly prevents growth of LNCaP xenografts in mice. The present study describes the unexpectedly strong activity of 11β against the AR-negative HeLa cells, both in cell culture and tumor xenografts, and uncovers a new mechanism of action that likely explains this activity. Cellular fractionation experiments indicated that mitochondria are the major intracellular sink for 11β; flow cytometry studies showed that 11β exposure rapidly induced oxidative stress, mitochondria being an important source of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Additionally, 11β inhibited oxygen consumption both in intact HeLa cells and in isolated mitochondria. Specifically, 11β blocked uncoupled oxygen consumption when mitochondria were incubated with complex I substrates, but it had no effect on oxygen consumption driven by substrates acting downstream of complex I in the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Moreover, 11β enhanced ROS generation in isolated mitochondria, suggesting that complex I inhibition is responsible for ROS production. At the cellular level, the presence of antioxidants (N-acetylcysteine or vitamin E) significantly reduced the toxicity of 11β, implicating ROS production as an important contributor to cytotoxicity. Collectively, our findings establish complex I inhibition and ROS generation as a new mechanism of action for 11β, which supplements conventional DNA adduct formation to promote cancer cell death.

  1. Structure and flexibility of the endosomal Vps34 complex reveals the basis of its function on membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Yohei; Zhang, Lufei; Pardon, Els; Burke, John E.; Masson, Glenn R.; Johnson, Chris; Steyaert, Jan; Ktistakis, Nicholas T.; Williams, Roger L.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase Vps34 complexes regulate intracellular membrane trafficking in endocytic sorting, cytokinesis and autophagy. We present the 4.4 Å crystal structure of the 385 kDa endosomal complex II (PIK3C3-CII), consisting of Vps34, Vps15 (p150), Vps30/Atg6 (Beclin 1) and Vps38 (UVRAG). The subunits form a Y-shaped complex, centered on the Vps34 C2 domain. Vps34 and Vps15 intertwine in one arm where the Vps15 kinase domain engages the Vps34 activation loop to regulate its activity. Vps30 and Vps38 form the other arm that brackets the Vps15/Vps34 heterodimer, suggesting a path for complex assembly. Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry (HDX-MS) revealed conformational changes accompanying membrane binding and identified a Vps30 loop that is critical for the ability of complex II to phosphorylate giant liposomes on which complex I is inactive. PMID:26450213

  2. Molecular dynamics of the P450cam-Pdx complex reveals complex stability and novel interface contacts.

    PubMed

    Hollingsworth, Scott A; Poulos, Thomas L

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450cam catalyzes the stereo and regiospecific hydroxylation of camphor to 5-exo-hydroxylcamphor. The two electrons for the oxidation of camphor are provided by putidaredoxin (Pdx), a Fe2 S2 containing protein. Two recent crystal structures of the P450cam-Pdx complex, one solved with the aid of covalent cross-linking and one without, have provided a structural picture of the redox partner interaction. To study the stability of the complex structure and the minor differences between the recent crystal structures, a 100 nanosecond molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the cross-linked structure, mutated in silico to wild type and the linker molecule removed, was performed. The complex was stable over the course of the simulation though conformational changes including the movement of the C helix of P450cam further toward Pdx allowed for the formation of a number of new contacts at the complex interface that remained stable throughout the simulation. While several minor crystal contacts were lost in the simulation, all major contacts that had been experimentally studied previously were maintained. The equilibrated MD structure contained a mixture of contacts resembling both the cross-linked and noncovalent structures and the newly identified interactions. Finally, the reformation of the P450cam Asp251-Arg186 ion pair in the MD simulation mirrors the ion pair observed in the more promiscuous CYP101D1 and suggests that the Asp251-Arg186 ion pair may be important.

  3. The Structure of the Yeast Plasma Membrane SNARE Complex Reveals Destabilizing Water Filled Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Strop, P.; Kaiser, S.E.; Vrljic, M.; Brunger, A.T.

    2009-05-26

    Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins form a complex that leads to membrane fusion between vesicles, organelles, and plasma membrane in all eukaryotic cells. We report the 1.7{angstrom} resolution structure of the SNARE complex that mediates exocytosis at the plasma membrane in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Similar to its neuronal and endosomal homologues, the S. cerevisiae SNARE complex forms a parallel four-helix bundle in the center of which is an ionic layer. The S. cerevisiae SNARE complex exhibits increased helix bending near the ionic layer, contains water-filled cavities in the complex core, and exhibits reduced thermal stability relative to mammalian SNARE complexes. Mutagenesis experiments suggest that the water-filled cavities contribute to the lower stability of the S. cerevisiae complex.

  4. Crystal structure of a TAF1-TAF7 complex in human transcription factor IID reveals a promoter binding module

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Curran, Elizabeth C; Hinds, Thomas R; Wang, Edith H; Zheng, Ning

    2014-01-01

    The general transcription factor IID (TFIID) initiates RNA polymerase II-mediated eukaryotic transcription by nucleating pre-initiation complex formation at the core promoter of protein-encoding genes. TAF1, the largest integral subunit of TFIID, contains an evolutionarily conserved yet poorly characterized central core domain, whose specific mutation disrupts cell proliferation in the temperature-sensitive mutant hamster cell line ts13. Although the impaired TAF1 function in the ts13 mutant has been associated with defective transcriptional regulation of cell cycle genes, the mechanism by which TAF1 mediates transcription as part of TFIID remains unclear. Here, we present the crystal structure of the human TAF1 central core domain in complex with another conserved TFIID subunit, TAF7, which biochemically solubilizes TAF1. The TAF1-TAF7 complex displays an inter-digitated compact architecture, featuring an unexpected TAF1 winged helix (WH) domain mounted on top of a heterodimeric triple barrel. The single TAF1 residue altered in the ts13 mutant is buried at the junction of these two structural domains. We show that the TAF1 WH domain has intrinsic DNA-binding activity, which depends on characteristic residues that are commonly used by WH fold proteins for interacting with DNA. Importantly, mutations of these residues not only compromise DNA binding by TAF1, but also abrogate its ability to rescue the ts13 mutant phenotype. Together, our results resolve the structural organization of the TAF1-TAF7 module in TFIID and unveil a critical promoter-binding function of TAF1 in transcription regulation. PMID:25412659

  5. Transcriptome Profiling of Taproot Reveals Complex Regulatory Networks during Taproot Thickening in Radish (Raphanus sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Yu, Rugang; Wang, Jing; Xu, Liang; Wang, Yan; Wang, Ronghua; Zhu, Xianwen; Sun, Xiaochuan; Luo, Xiaobo; Xie, Yang; Everlyne, Muleke; Liu, Liwang

    2016-01-01

    Radish (Raphanus sativus L.) is one of the most important vegetable crops worldwide. Taproot thickening represents a critical developmental period that determines yield and quality in radish life cycle. To isolate differentially expressed genes (DGEs) involved in radish taproot thickening process and explore the molecular mechanism underlying taproot development, three cDNA libraries from radish taproot collected at pre-cortex splitting stage (L1), cortex splitting stage (L2), and expanding stage (L3) were constructed and sequenced by RNA-Seq technology. More than seven million clean reads were obtained from the three libraries, from which 4,717,617 (L1, 65.35%), 4,809,588 (L2, 68.24%) and 4,973,745 (L3, 69.45%) reads were matched to the radish reference genes, respectively. A total of 85,939 transcripts were generated from three libraries, from which 10,450, 12,325, and 7392 differentially expressed transcripts (DETs) were detected in L1 vs. L2, L1 vs. L3, and L2 vs. L3 comparisons, respectively. Gene Ontology and pathway analysis showed that many DEGs, including EXPA9, Cyclin, CaM, Syntaxin, MADS-box, SAUR, and CalS were involved in cell events, cell wall modification, regulation of plant hormone levels, signal transduction and metabolisms, which may relate to taproot thickening. Furthermore, the integrated analysis of mRNA-miRNA revealed that 43 miRNAs and 92 genes formed 114 miRNA-target mRNA pairs were co-expressed, and three miRNA-target regulatory networks of taproot were constructed from different libraries. Finally, the expression patterns of 16 selected genes were confirmed using RT-qPCR analysis. A hypothetical model of genetic regulatory network associated with taproot thickening in radish was put forward. The taproot formation of radish is mainly attributed to cell differentiation, division and expansion, which are regulated and promoted by certain specific signal transduction pathways and metabolism processes. These results could provide new insights

  6. Transcriptome Profiling of Taproot Reveals Complex Regulatory Networks during Taproot Thickening in Radish (Raphanus sativus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Rugang; Wang, Jing; Xu, Liang; Wang, Yan; Wang, Ronghua; Zhu, Xianwen; Sun, Xiaochuan; Luo, Xiaobo; Xie, Yang; Everlyne, Muleke; Liu, Liwang

    2016-01-01

    Radish (Raphanus sativus L.) is one of the most important vegetable crops worldwide. Taproot thickening represents a critical developmental period that determines yield and quality in radish life cycle. To isolate differentially expressed genes (DGEs) involved in radish taproot thickening process and explore the molecular mechanism underlying taproot development, three cDNA libraries from radish taproot collected at pre-cortex splitting stage (L1), cortex splitting stage (L2), and expanding stage (L3) were constructed and sequenced by RNA-Seq technology. More than seven million clean reads were obtained from the three libraries, from which 4,717,617 (L1, 65.35%), 4,809,588 (L2, 68.24%) and 4,973,745 (L3, 69.45%) reads were matched to the radish reference genes, respectively. A total of 85,939 transcripts were generated from three libraries, from which 10,450, 12,325, and 7392 differentially expressed transcripts (DETs) were detected in L1 vs. L2, L1 vs. L3, and L2 vs. L3 comparisons, respectively. Gene Ontology and pathway analysis showed that many DEGs, including EXPA9, Cyclin, CaM, Syntaxin, MADS-box, SAUR, and CalS were involved in cell events, cell wall modification, regulation of plant hormone levels, signal transduction and metabolisms, which may relate to taproot thickening. Furthermore, the integrated analysis of mRNA-miRNA revealed that 43 miRNAs and 92 genes formed 114 miRNA-target mRNA pairs were co-expressed, and three miRNA-target regulatory networks of taproot were constructed from different libraries. Finally, the expression patterns of 16 selected genes were confirmed using RT-qPCR analysis. A hypothetical model of genetic regulatory network associated with taproot thickening in radish was put forward. The taproot formation of radish is mainly attributed to cell differentiation, division and expansion, which are regulated and promoted by certain specific signal transduction pathways and metabolism processes. These results could provide new insights

  7. Transcriptome Profiling of Taproot Reveals Complex Regulatory Networks during Taproot Thickening in Radish (Raphanus sativus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Rugang; Wang, Jing; Xu, Liang; Wang, Yan; Wang, Ronghua; Zhu, Xianwen; Sun, Xiaochuan; Luo, Xiaobo; Xie, Yang; Everlyne, Muleke; Liu, Liwang

    2016-01-01

    Radish (Raphanus sativus L.) is one of the most important vegetable crops worldwide. Taproot thickening represents a critical developmental period that determines yield and quality in radish life cycle. To isolate differentially expressed genes (DGEs) involved in radish taproot thickening process and explore the molecular mechanism underlying taproot development, three cDNA libraries from radish taproot collected at pre-cortex splitting stage (L1), cortex splitting stage (L2), and expanding stage (L3) were constructed and sequenced by RNA-Seq technology. More than seven million clean reads were obtained from the three libraries, from which 4,717,617 (L1, 65.35%), 4,809,588 (L2, 68.24%) and 4,973,745 (L3, 69.45%) reads were matched to the radish reference genes, respectively. A total of 85,939 transcripts were generated from three libraries, from which 10,450, 12,325, and 7392 differentially expressed transcripts (DETs) were detected in L1 vs. L2, L1 vs. L3, and L2 vs. L3 comparisons, respectively. Gene Ontology and pathway analysis showed that many DEGs, including EXPA9, Cyclin, CaM, Syntaxin, MADS-box, SAUR, and CalS were involved in cell events, cell wall modification, regulation of plant hormone levels, signal transduction and metabolisms, which may relate to taproot thickening. Furthermore, the integrated analysis of mRNA-miRNA revealed that 43 miRNAs and 92 genes formed 114 miRNA-target mRNA pairs were co-expressed, and three miRNA-target regulatory networks of taproot were constructed from different libraries. Finally, the expression patterns of 16 selected genes were confirmed using RT-qPCR analysis. A hypothetical model of genetic regulatory network associated with taproot thickening in radish was put forward. The taproot formation of radish is mainly attributed to cell differentiation, division and expansion, which are regulated and promoted by certain specific signal transduction pathways and metabolism processes. These results could provide new insights

  8. Transcriptome Profiling of Taproot Reveals Complex Regulatory Networks during Taproot Thickening in Radish (Raphanus sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Yu, Rugang; Wang, Jing; Xu, Liang; Wang, Yan; Wang, Ronghua; Zhu, Xianwen; Sun, Xiaochuan; Luo, Xiaobo; Xie, Yang; Everlyne, Muleke; Liu, Liwang

    2016-01-01

    Radish (Raphanus sativus L.) is one of the most important vegetable crops worldwide. Taproot thickening represents a critical developmental period that determines yield and quality in radish life cycle. To isolate differentially expressed genes (DGEs) involved in radish taproot thickening process and explore the molecular mechanism underlying taproot development, three cDNA libraries from radish taproot collected at pre-cortex splitting stage (L1), cortex splitting stage (L2), and expanding stage (L3) were constructed and sequenced by RNA-Seq technology. More than seven million clean reads were obtained from the three libraries, from which 4,717,617 (L1, 65.35%), 4,809,588 (L2, 68.24%) and 4,973,745 (L3, 69.45%) reads were matched to the radish reference genes, respectively. A total of 85,939 transcripts were generated from three libraries, from which 10,450, 12,325, and 7392 differentially expressed transcripts (DETs) were detected in L1 vs. L2, L1 vs. L3, and L2 vs. L3 comparisons, respectively. Gene Ontology and pathway analysis showed that many DEGs, including EXPA9, Cyclin, CaM, Syntaxin, MADS-box, SAUR, and CalS were involved in cell events, cell wall modification, regulation of plant hormone levels, signal transduction and metabolisms, which may relate to taproot thickening. Furthermore, the integrated analysis of mRNA-miRNA revealed that 43 miRNAs and 92 genes formed 114 miRNA-target mRNA pairs were co-expressed, and three miRNA-target regulatory networks of taproot were constructed from different libraries. Finally, the expression patterns of 16 selected genes were confirmed using RT-qPCR analysis. A hypothetical model of genetic regulatory network associated with taproot thickening in radish was put forward. The taproot formation of radish is mainly attributed to cell differentiation, division and expansion, which are regulated and promoted by certain specific signal transduction pathways and metabolism processes. These results could provide new insights

  9. Comparative genomic analysis reveals 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase complex lipoylation correlation with aerobiosis in archaea.

    PubMed

    Borziak, Kirill; Posner, Mareike G; Upadhyay, Abhishek; Danson, Michael J; Bagby, Stefan; Dorus, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomic analyses have advanced our understanding of ecological microbial diversity, but to what extent can metagenomic data be used to predict the metabolic capacity of difficult-to-study organisms and their abiotic environmental interactions? We tackle this question, using a comparative genomic approach, by considering the molecular basis of aerobiosis within archaea. Lipoylation, the covalent attachment of lipoic acid to 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes (OADHCs), is essential for metabolism in aerobic bacteria and eukarya. Lipoylation is catalysed either by lipoate protein ligase (LplA), which in archaea is typically encoded by two genes (LplA-N and LplA-C), or by a lipoyl(octanoyl) transferase (LipB or LipM) plus a lipoic acid synthetase (LipA). Does the genomic presence of lipoylation and OADHC genes across archaea from diverse habitats correlate with aerobiosis? First, analyses of 11,826 biotin protein ligase (BPL)-LplA-LipB transferase family members and 147 archaeal genomes identified 85 species with lipoylation capabilities and provided support for multiple ancestral acquisitions of lipoylation pathways during archaeal evolution. Second, with the exception of the Sulfolobales order, the majority of species possessing lipoylation systems exclusively retain LplA, or either LipB or LipM, consistent with archaeal genome streamlining. Third, obligate anaerobic archaea display widespread loss of lipoylation and OADHC genes. Conversely, a high level of correspondence is observed between aerobiosis and the presence of LplA/LipB/LipM, LipA and OADHC E2, consistent with the role of lipoylation in aerobic metabolism. This correspondence between OADHC lipoylation capacity and aerobiosis indicates that genomic pathway profiling in archaea is informative and that well characterized pathways may be predictive in relation to abiotic conditions in difficult-to-study extremophiles. Given the highly variable retention of gene repertoires across the archaea

  10. Blue native-PAGE analysis of Trichoderma harzianum secretome reveals cellulases and hemicellulases working as multienzymatic complexes.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Adelson Joel; Gómez-Mendoza, Diana Paola; Junqueira, Magno; Domont, Gilberto Barbosa; Ximenes Ferreira Filho, Edivaldo; de Sousa, Marcelo Valle; Ricart, Carlos André Ornelas

    2012-08-01

    Plant cell wall-degrading enzymes produced by microorganisms possess important biotechnological applications, including biofuel production. Some anaerobic bacteria are able to produce multienzymatic complexes called cellulosomes while filamentous fungi normally secrete individual hydrolytic enzymes that act synergistically for polysaccharide degradation. Here, we present evidence that the fungus Trichoderma harzianum, cultivated in medium containing the agricultural residue sugarcane bagasse, is able to secrete multienzymatic complexes. The T. harzianum secretome was firstly analyzed by 1D-BN (blue native)-PAGE that revealed several putative complexes. The three most intense 1D-BN-PAGE bands, named complexes [I], [II], and [III], were subsequently subjected to tricine SDS-PAGE that demonstrated that they were composed of smaller subunits. Zymographic assays were performed using 1D-BN-PAGE and 2D-BN/BN-PAGE demonstrating that the complexes bore cellulolytic and xylanolytic activities. The complexes [I], [II], and [III] were then trypsin digested and analyzed separately by LC-MS/MS that revealed their protein composition. Since T. harzianum has an unsequenced genome, a homology-driven proteomics approach provided a higher number of identified proteins than a conventional peptide-spectrum matching strategy. The results indicate that the complexes are formed by cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic enzymes and other proteins such as chitinase, cutinase, and swollenin, which may act synergistically to degrade plant cell wall components.

  11. Differences between EcoRI nonspecific and "star" sequence complexes revealed by osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Sidorova, Nina Y; Rau, Donald C

    2004-10-01

    The binding of the restriction endonuclease EcoRI to DNA is exceptionally specific. Even a single basepair change ("star" sequence) from the recognition sequence, GAATTC, decreases the binding free energy of EcoRI to values nearly indistinguishable from nonspecific binding. The difference in the number of waters sequestered by the protein-DNA complexes of the "star" sequences TAATTC and CAATTC and by the specific sequence complex determined from the dependence of binding free energy on water activity is also practically indistinguishable at low osmotic pressures from the 110 water molecules sequestered by nonspecific sequence complexes. Novel measurements of the dissociation rates of noncognate sequence complexes and competition equilibrium show that sequestered water can be removed from "star" sequence complexes by high osmotic pressure, but not from a nonspecific complex. By 5 Osm, the TAATTC "star" sequence complex has lost almost 90 of the approximately 110 waters initially present. It is more difficult to remove water from the CAATTC "star" sequence complex. The sequence dependence of water loss correlates with the known sequence dependence of "star" cleavage activity.

  12. Single molecule microscopy reveals mechanistic insight into RNA polymerase II preinitiation complex assembly and transcriptional activity

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Abigail E.; Kugel, Jennifer F.; Goodrich, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is a complex process that requires general transcription factors and Pol II to assemble on DNA into preinitiation complexes that can begin RNA synthesis upon binding of NTPs (nucleoside triphosphate). The pathways by which preinitiation complexes form, and how this impacts transcriptional activity are not completely clear. To address these issues, we developed a single molecule system using TIRF (total internal reflection fluorescence) microscopy and purified human transcription factors, which allows us to visualize transcriptional activity at individual template molecules. We see that stable interactions between polymerase II (Pol II) and a heteroduplex DNA template do not depend on general transcription factors; however, transcriptional activity is highly dependent upon TATA-binding protein, TFIIB and TFIIF. We also found that subsets of general transcription factors and Pol II can form stable complexes that are precursors for functional transcription complexes upon addition of the remaining factors and DNA. Ultimately we found that Pol II, TATA-binding protein, TFIIB and TFIIF can form a quaternary complex in the absence of promoter DNA, indicating that a stable network of interactions exists between these proteins independent of promoter DNA. Single molecule studies can be used to learn how different modes of preinitiation complex assembly impact transcriptional activity. PMID:27112574

  13. Unexpected bismuth concentration profiles in metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy-grown Ga(As{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x})/GaAs superlattices revealed by Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, A. W.; Babcock, S. E.; Guan, Y.; Forghani, K.; Anand, A.; Kuech, T. F.

    2015-03-01

    A set of GaAs{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x}/GaAs multilayer quantum-well structures was deposited by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy at 390 °C and 420 °C. The precursor fluxes were introduced with the intent of growing discrete and compositionally uniform GaAs{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x} well and GaAs barrier layers in the epitaxial films. High-resolution high-angle annular-dark-field (or “Z-contrast”) scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging revealed concentration profiles that were periodic in the growth direction, but far more complicated in shape than the intended square wave. The observed composition profiles could explain various reports of physical properties measurements that suggest compositional inhomogeneity in GaAs{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x} alloys as they currently are grown.

  14. Survey of large protein complexes D. vulgaris reveals great structural diversity

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B.-G.; Dong, M.; Liu, H.; Camp, L.; Geller, J.; Singer, M.; Hazen, T. C.; Choi, M.; Witkowska, H. E.; Ball, D. A.; Typke, D.; Downing, K. H.; Shatsky, M.; Brenner, S. E.; Chandonia, J.-M.; Biggin, M. D.; Glaeser, R. M.

    2009-08-15

    An unbiased survey has been made of the stable, most abundant multi-protein complexes in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH) that are larger than Mr {approx} 400 k. The quaternary structures for 8 of the 16 complexes purified during this work were determined by single-particle reconstruction of negatively stained specimens, a success rate {approx}10 times greater than that of previous 'proteomic' screens. In addition, the subunit compositions and stoichiometries of the remaining complexes were determined by biochemical methods. Our data show that the structures of only two of these large complexes, out of the 13 in this set that have recognizable functions, can be modeled with confidence based on the structures of known homologs. These results indicate that there is significantly greater variability in the way that homologous prokaryotic macromolecular complexes are assembled than has generally been appreciated. As a consequence, we suggest that relying solely on previously determined quaternary structures for homologous proteins may not be sufficient to properly understand their role in another cell of interest.

  15. The comet-like composition of a protoplanetary disk as revealed by complex cyanides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öberg, Karin I.; Guzmán, Viviana V.; Furuya, Kenji; Qi, Chunhua; Aikawa, Yuri; Andrews, Sean M.; Loomis, Ryan; Wilner, David J.

    2015-04-01

    Observations of comets and asteroids show that the solar nebula that spawned our planetary system was rich in water and organic molecules. Bombardment brought these organics to the young Earth's surface. Unlike asteroids, comets preserve a nearly pristine record of the solar nebula composition. The presence of cyanides in comets, including 0.01 per cent of methyl cyanide (CH3CN) with respect to water, is of special interest because of the importance of C-N bonds for abiotic amino acid synthesis. Comet-like compositions of simple and complex volatiles are found in protostars, and can readily be explained by a combination of gas-phase chemistry (to form, for example, HCN) and an active ice-phase chemistry on grain surfaces that advances complexity. Simple volatiles, including water and HCN, have been detected previously in solar nebula analogues, indicating that they survive disk formation or are re-formed in situ. It has hitherto been unclear whether the same holds for more complex organic molecules outside the solar nebula, given that recent observations show a marked change in the chemistry at the boundary between nascent envelopes and young disks due to accretion shocks. Here we report the detection of the complex cyanides CH3CN and HC3N (and HCN) in the protoplanetary disk around the young star MWC 480. We find that the abundance ratios of these nitrogen-bearing organics in the gas phase are similar to those in comets, which suggests an even higher relative abundance of complex cyanides in the disk ice. This implies that complex organics accompany simpler volatiles in protoplanetary disks, and that the rich organic chemistry of our solar nebula was not unique.

  16. The comet-like composition of a protoplanetary disk as revealed by complex cyanides.

    PubMed

    Öberg, Karin I; Guzmán, Viviana V; Furuya, Kenji; Qi, Chunhua; Aikawa, Yuri; Andrews, Sean M; Loomis, Ryan; Wilner, David J

    2015-04-01

    Observations of comets and asteroids show that the solar nebula that spawned our planetary system was rich in water and organic molecules. Bombardment brought these organics to the young Earth's surface. Unlike asteroids, comets preserve a nearly pristine record of the solar nebula composition. The presence of cyanides in comets, including 0.01 per cent of methyl cyanide (CH3CN) with respect to water, is of special interest because of the importance of C-N bonds for abiotic amino acid synthesis. Comet-like compositions of simple and complex volatiles are found in protostars, and can readily be explained by a combination of gas-phase chemistry (to form, for example, HCN) and an active ice-phase chemistry on grain surfaces that advances complexity. Simple volatiles, including water and HCN, have been detected previously in solar nebula analogues, indicating that they survive disk formation or are re-formed in situ. It has hitherto been unclear whether the same holds for more complex organic molecules outside the solar nebula, given that recent observations show a marked change in the chemistry at the boundary between nascent envelopes and young disks due to accretion shocks. Here we report the detection of the complex cyanides CH3CN and HC3N (and HCN) in the protoplanetary disk around the young star MWC 480. We find that the abundance ratios of these nitrogen-bearing organics in the gas phase are similar to those in comets, which suggests an even higher relative abundance of complex cyanides in the disk ice. This implies that complex organics accompany simpler volatiles in protoplanetary disks, and that the rich organic chemistry of our solar nebula was not unique. PMID:25855455

  17. The comet-like composition of a protoplanetary disk as revealed by complex cyanides.

    PubMed

    Öberg, Karin I; Guzmán, Viviana V; Furuya, Kenji; Qi, Chunhua; Aikawa, Yuri; Andrews, Sean M; Loomis, Ryan; Wilner, David J

    2015-04-01

    Observations of comets and asteroids show that the solar nebula that spawned our planetary system was rich in water and organic molecules. Bombardment brought these organics to the young Earth's surface. Unlike asteroids, comets preserve a nearly pristine record of the solar nebula composition. The presence of cyanides in comets, including 0.01 per cent of methyl cyanide (CH3CN) with respect to water, is of special interest because of the importance of C-N bonds for abiotic amino acid synthesis. Comet-like compositions of simple and complex volatiles are found in protostars, and can readily be explained by a combination of gas-phase chemistry (to form, for example, HCN) and an active ice-phase chemistry on grain surfaces that advances complexity. Simple volatiles, including water and HCN, have been detected previously in solar nebula analogues, indicating that they survive disk formation or are re-formed in situ. It has hitherto been unclear whether the same holds for more complex organic molecules outside the solar nebula, given that recent observations show a marked change in the chemistry at the boundary between nascent envelopes and young disks due to accretion shocks. Here we report the detection of the complex cyanides CH3CN and HC3N (and HCN) in the protoplanetary disk around the young star MWC 480. We find that the abundance ratios of these nitrogen-bearing organics in the gas phase are similar to those in comets, which suggests an even higher relative abundance of complex cyanides in the disk ice. This implies that complex organics accompany simpler volatiles in protoplanetary disks, and that the rich organic chemistry of our solar nebula was not unique.

  18. Proteomics Analysis with a Nano Random Forest Approach Reveals Novel Functional Interactions Regulated by SMC Complexes on Mitotic Chromosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Shinya; Montaño-Gutierrez, Luis F.; de Lima Alves, Flavia; Ogawa, Hiromi; Toramoto, Iyo; Sato, Nobuko; Morrison, Ciaran G.; Takeda, Shunichi; Hudson, Damien F.; Earnshaw, William C.

    2016-01-01

    Packaging of DNA into condensed chromosomes during mitosis is essential for the faithful segregation of the genome into daughter nuclei. Although the structure and composition of mitotic chromosomes have been studied for over 30 years, these aspects are yet to be fully elucidated. Here, we used stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture to compare the proteomes of mitotic chromosomes isolated from cell lines harboring conditional knockouts of members of the condensin (SMC2, CAP-H, CAP-D3), cohesin (Scc1/Rad21), and SMC5/6 (SMC5) complexes. Our analysis revealed that these complexes associate with chromosomes independently of each other, with the SMC5/6 complex showing no significant dependence on any other chromosomal proteins during mitosis. To identify subtle relationships between chromosomal proteins, we employed a nano Random Forest (nanoRF) approach to detect protein complexes and the relationships between them. Our nanoRF results suggested that as few as 113 of 5058 detected chromosomal proteins are functionally linked to chromosome structure and segregation. Furthermore, nanoRF data revealed 23 proteins that were not previously suspected to have functional interactions with complexes playing important roles in mitosis. Subsequent small-interfering-RNA-based validation and localization tracking by green fluorescent protein-tagging highlighted novel candidates that might play significant roles in mitotic progression. PMID:27231315

  19. How Can We Explain Poverty? Case Study of Dee Reveals the Complexities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seccombe, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Many theories have been offered to explain why people are impoverished. This article by Karen Seccombe uses the case study of "Dee," a newly single mother, to explore four of the most common: individualism, social structuralism, the culture of poverty, and fatalism. She concludes that poverty is a highly complex phenomenon, and it is likely that…

  20. Behaviour of Zinc Complexes and Zinc Sulphide Nanoparticles Revealed by Using Screen Printed Electrodes and Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Nejdl, Lukas; Ruttkay-Nedecky, Branislav; Kudr, Jiří; Kremplova, Monika; Cernei, Natalia; Prasek, Jan; Konecna, Marie; Hubalek, Jaromir; Zitka, Ondrej; Kynicky, Jindrich; Kopel, Pavel; Kizek, Rene; Adam, Vojtech

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we focused on microfluidic electrochemical analysis of zinc complexes (Zn(phen)(his)Cl2, Zn(his)Cl2) and ZnS quantum dots (QDs) using printed electrodes. This method was chosen due to the simple (easy to use) instrumentation and variable setting of flows. Reduction signals of zinc under the strictly defined and controlled conditions (pH, temperature, flow rate, accumulation time and applied potential) were studied. We showed that the increasing concentration of the complexes (Zn(phen)(his)Cl2, Zn(his)Cl2) led to a decrease in the electrochemical signal and a significant shift of the potential to more positive values. The most likely explanation of this result is that zinc is strongly bound in the complex and its distribution on the electrode is very limited. Changing the pH from 3.5 to 5.5 resulted in a significant intensification of the Zn(II) reduction signal. The complexes were also characterized by UV/VIS spectrophotometry, chromatography, and ESI-QTOF mass spectrometry. PMID:24233071

  1. Unprecedented staining of polar lipids by a luminescent rhenium complex revealed by FTIR microspectroscopy in adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Bader, C A; Carter, E A; Safitri, A; Simpson, P V; Wright, P; Stagni, S; Massi, M; Lay, P A; Brooks, D A; Plush, S E

    2016-06-21

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy and confocal imaging have been used to demonstrate that the neutral rhenium(i) tricarbonyl 1,10-phenanthroline complex bound to 4-cyanophenyltetrazolate as the ancillary ligand is able to localise in regions with high concentrations of polar lipids such as phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), sphingomyelin, sphingosphine and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) in mammalian adipocytes. PMID:27170554

  2. Revealing the Differences Between Free and Complexed Enzyme Mechanisms and Factors Contributing to Cell Wall Recalcitrance

    SciTech Connect

    Resch, Michael G.; Donohoe, Byron; Ciesielski, Peter; Nill, Jennifer; McKinney, Kellene; Mittal, Ashutosh; Katahira, Rui; Himmel, Michael; Biddy, Mary; Beckham, Gregg; Decker, Steve

    2014-09-08

    Enzymatic depolymerization of polysaccharides is a key step in the production of fuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass, and discovery of synergistic biomass-degrading enzyme paradigms will enable improved conversion processes. Historically, revealing insights into enzymatic saccharification mechanisms on plant cell walls has been hindered by uncharacterized substrates and low resolution.

  3. Complex history of admixture during citrus domestication revealed by genome analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, G. Albert; Prochnik, Simon; Jenkins, Jerry; Salse, Jerome; Hellsten, Uffe; Murat, Florent; Perrier, Xavier; Ruiz, Manuel; Scalabrin, Simone; Terol, Javier; Takita, Marco Auré lio,; Labadie, Karine; Poulain, Julie; Couloux, Arnaud; Jabbari, Kamel; Cattonaro, Federica; Fabbro, Cristian Del; Pinosio, Sara; Zuccolo, Andrea; Chapman, Jarrod; Grimwood, Jane; Tadeo, Francisco; Estornell, Leandro H.; Mu?oz-Sanz, Juan V.; Ibanez, Victoria; Herrero-Ortega, Amparo; Aleza, Pablo; Pé rez, Juliá n Pé rez,; Ramon, Daniel; Brunel, Dominique; Luro, Francois; Chen, Chunxian; Farmerie, William G.; Desany, Brian; Kodira, Chinnappa; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Harkins, Tim; Fredrikson, Karin; Burns, Paul; Lomsadze, Alexandre; Borodovsky, Mark; Reforgiato, Giuseppe; Freitas-Astua, Juliana; Quetier, Francis; Navarro, Luis; Roose, Mikeal; Wincker, Patrick; Schmutz, Jeremy; Morgante, Michele; Machado, Marcos Antonio; Talon, Manuel; Jaillon, Olivier; Ollitrault, Patrick; Gmitter, Frederick; Rokhsar, Daniel

    2014-06-30

    Although Citrus is the most globally significant tree fruit, its domestication history is poorly understood. Cultivated citrus types are believed to comprise selections from and/or hybrids of several wild progenitor species, but the identities of these progenitors, and their contribution to modern cultivars, remain controversial. Here we report the genomes of a collection of mandarins, pummelos, and oranges, including a high quality reference sequence from a haploid Clementine mandarin. By comparative genome analysis we show that these cultivated types can be derived from two progenitor species. Cultivated pummelos represent selections from a single progenitor species C. maxima. Unexpectedly, however, we find that cultivated mandarins are introgressions of C. maxima into a distinct second population that we identify with the ancestral wild mandarin species C. reticulata. Sweet and sour oranges are found to be interspecific hybrids. Sweet orange, the most widely cultivated citrus, arose as the offspring of previously admixed individuals. In contrast, sour (or Seville) orange is an F1 hybrid of pure C. maxima and C. reticulata parents, implying that wild mandarins were part of the early breeding germplasm. Surprisingly, we also find that a wild Chinese mandarin from Mangshan, China shows substantial sequence divergence from C. reticulata and appears to represent a distinct taxon. Understanding the relationships and phylogeny of cultivated citrus through genome analysis will clarify taxonomic relationships and enable previously inconceivable opportunities for sequence-directed genetic improvement. Citrus are widely consumed worldwide as juice or fresh fruit, providing important sources of vitamin C and other health-promoting compounds. Global production in 2012 exceeded 86 million metric tons, with an estimated value of US$9 billion (http://www.fas.usda.gov/psdonline/circulars/citrus.pdf). The very narrow genetic diversity of cultivated citrus makes it highly

  4. Structure of a Holliday junction complex reveals mechanisms governing a highly regulated DNA transaction

    PubMed Central

    Laxmikanthan, Gurunathan; Xu, Chen; Brilot, Axel F; Warren, David; Steele, Lindsay; Seah, Nicole; Tong, Wenjun; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Landy, Arthur; Van Duyne, Gregory D

    2016-01-01

    The molecular machinery responsible for DNA expression, recombination, and compaction has been difficult to visualize as functionally complete entities due to their combinatorial and structural complexity. We report here the structure of the intact functional assembly responsible for regulating and executing a site-specific DNA recombination reaction. The assembly is a 240-bp Holliday junction (HJ) bound specifically by 11 protein subunits. This higher-order complex is a key intermediate in the tightly regulated pathway for the excision of bacteriophage λ viral DNA out of the E. coli host chromosome, an extensively studied paradigmatic model system for the regulated rearrangement of DNA. Our results provide a structural basis for pre-existing data describing the excisive and integrative recombination pathways, and they help explain their regulation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14313.001 PMID:27223329

  5. Complex structural dynamics of nanocatalysts revealed in Operando conditions by correlated imaging and spectroscopy probes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Zakharov, D.; Zhao, S.; Tappero, R.; Jung, U.; Elsen, A.; Baumann, Ph.; Nuzzo, R. G.; Stach, E. A.; Frenkel, A. I.

    2015-06-29

    Understanding how heterogeneous catalysts change size, shape and structure during chemical reactions is limited by the paucity of methods for studying catalytic ensembles in working state, that is, in operando conditions. Here by a correlated use of synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy in operando conditions, we quantitatively describe the complex structural dynamics of supported Pt catalysts exhibited during an exemplary catalytic reaction—ethylene hydrogenation. This work exploits a microfabricated catalytic reactor compatible with both probes. The results demonstrate dynamic transformations of the ensemble of Pt clusters that spans a broad size range throughout changing reaction conditions. Lastly, this method is generalizable to quantitative operando studies of complex systems using a wide variety of X-ray and electron-based experimental probes.

  6. Unusual anal fin in a Devonian jawless vertebrate reveals complex origins of paired appendages.

    PubMed

    Sansom, Robert S; Gabbott, Sarah E; Purnell, M A

    2013-06-23

    Jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes) have undergone radical anatomical and developmental changes in comparison with their jawless cousins (cyclostomes). Key among these is paired appendages (fins, legs and wings), which first evolved at some point on the gnathostome stem. The anatomy of fossil stem gnathostomes is, therefore, fundamental to our understanding of the nature and timing of the origin of this complex innovation. Here, we show that Euphanerops, a fossil jawless fish from the Devonian, possessed paired anal-fin radials, but no pectoral or pelvic fins. This unique condition occurs at an early stage on the stem-gnathostome lineage. This condition, and comparison with the varied condition of paired fins in other ostracoderms, indicates that there was a large amount of developmental plasticity during this episode-rather than a gradual evolution of this complex feature. Apparently, a number of different clades were exploring morphospace or undergoing multiple losses.

  7. Unusual anal fin in a Devonian jawless vertebrate reveals complex origins of paired appendages

    PubMed Central

    Sansom, Robert S.; Gabbott, Sarah E.; Purnell, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes) have undergone radical anatomical and developmental changes in comparison with their jawless cousins (cyclostomes). Key among these is paired appendages (fins, legs and wings), which first evolved at some point on the gnathostome stem. The anatomy of fossil stem gnathostomes is, therefore, fundamental to our understanding of the nature and timing of the origin of this complex innovation. Here, we show that Euphanerops, a fossil jawless fish from the Devonian, possessed paired anal-fin radials, but no pectoral or pelvic fins. This unique condition occurs at an early stage on the stem-gnathostome lineage. This condition, and comparison with the varied condition of paired fins in other ostracoderms, indicates that there was a large amount of developmental plasticity during this episode—rather than a gradual evolution of this complex feature. Apparently, a number of different clades were exploring morphospace or undergoing multiple losses. PMID:23576777

  8. Complex structural dynamics of nanocatalysts revealed in Operando conditions by correlated imaging and spectroscopy probes

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Y.; Zakharov, D.; Zhao, S.; Tappero, R.; Jung, U.; Elsen, A.; Baumann, Ph.; Nuzzo, R. G.; Stach, E. A.; Frenkel, A. I.

    2015-06-29

    Understanding how heterogeneous catalysts change size, shape and structure during chemical reactions is limited by the paucity of methods for studying catalytic ensembles in working state, that is, in operando conditions. Here by a correlated use of synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy in operando conditions, we quantitatively describe the complex structural dynamics of supported Pt catalysts exhibited during an exemplary catalytic reaction—ethylene hydrogenation. This work exploits a microfabricated catalytic reactor compatible with both probes. The results demonstrate dynamic transformations of the ensemble of Pt clusters that spans a broad size range throughout changing reaction conditions. Lastly,more » this method is generalizable to quantitative operando studies of complex systems using a wide variety of X-ray and electron-based experimental probes.« less

  9. Structures of Adnectin/Protein Complexes Reveal an Expanded Binding Footprint

    SciTech Connect

    Ramamurthy, Vidhyashankar; Krystek, Jr., Stanley R.; Bush, Alexander; Wei, Anzhi; Emanuel, Stuart L.; Gupta, Ruchira Das; Janjua, Ahsen; Cheng, Lin; Murdock, Melissa; Abramczyk, Bozena; Cohen, Daniel; Lin, Zheng; Morin, Paul; Davis, Jonathan H.; Dabritz, Michael; McLaughlin, Douglas C.; Russo, Katie A.; Chao, Ginger; Wright, Martin C.; Jenny, Victoria A.; Engle, Linda J.; Furfine, Eric; Sheriff, Steven

    2014-10-02

    Adnectins are targeted biologics derived from the tenth type III domain of human fibronectin ({sup 10}Fn3), a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily. Target-specific binders are selected from libraries generated by diversifying the three {sup 10}Fn3 loops that are analogous to the complementarity determining regions of antibodies. The crystal structures of two Adnectins were determined, each in complex with its therapeutic target, EGFR or IL-23. Both Adnectins bind different epitopes than those bound by known monoclonal antibodies. Molecular modeling suggests that some of these epitopes might not be accessible to antibodies because of the size and concave shape of the antibody combining site. In addition to interactions from the Adnectin diversified loops, residues from the N terminus and/or the {beta} strands interact with the target proteins in both complexes. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis confirmed the calculated binding energies of these {beta} strand interactions, indicating that these nonloop residues can expand the available binding footprint.

  10. Metagenomic signatures of a tropical mining-impacted stream reveal complex microbial and metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Reis, Mariana P; Dias, Marcela F; Costa, Patrícia S; Ávila, Marcelo P; Leite, Laura R; de Araújo, Flávio M G; Salim, Anna C M; Bucciarelli-Rodriguez, Mônica; Oliveira, Guilherme; Chartone-Souza, Edmar; Nascimento, Andréa M A

    2016-10-01

    Bacteria from aquatic ecosystems significantly contribute to biogeochemical cycles, but details of their community structure in tropical mining-impacted environments remain unexplored. In this study, we analyzed a bacterial community from circumneutral-pH tropical stream sediment by 16S rRNA and shotgun deep sequencing. Carrapatos stream sediment, which has been exposed to metal stress due to gold and iron mining (21 [g Fe]/kg), revealed a diverse community, with predominance of Proteobacteria (39.4%), Bacteroidetes (12.2%), and Parcubacteria (11.4%). Among Proteobacteria, the most abundant reads were assigned to neutrophilic iron-oxidizing taxa, such as Gallionella, Sideroxydans, and Mariprofundus, which are involved in Fe cycling and harbor several metal resistance genes. Functional analysis revealed a large number of genes participating in nitrogen and methane metabolic pathways despite the low concentrations of inorganic nitrogen in the Carrapatos stream. Our findings provide important insights into bacterial community interactions in a mining-impacted environment.

  11. A heterotrimer model of the complete Microprocessor complex revealed by single-molecule subunit counting.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Kristina M; Sarkar, Susanta K; Mills, Maria; Delgado De la Herran, Hilda C; Neuman, Keir C; Steitz, Joan A

    2016-02-01

    During microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis, the Microprocessor complex (MC), composed minimally of Drosha, an RNaseIII enzyme, and DGCR8, a double-stranded RNA-binding protein, cleaves the primary-miRNA (pri-miRNA) to release the pre-miRNA stem-loop structure. Size-exclusion chromatography of the MC, isolated from mammalian cells, suggested multiple copies of one or both proteins in the complex. However, the exact stoichiometry was unknown. Initial experiments suggested that DGCR8 bound pri-miRNA substrates specifically, and given that Drosha could not be bound or cross-linked to RNA, a sequential model for binding was established in which DGCR8 bound first and recruited Drosha. Therefore, many laboratories have studied DGCR8 binding to RNA in the absence of Drosha and have shown that deletion constructs of DGCR8 can multimerize in the presence of RNA. More recently, it was demonstrated that Drosha can bind pri-miRNA substrates in the absence of DGCR8, casting doubt on the sequential model of binding. In the same study, using a single-molecule photobleaching assay, fluorescent protein-tagged deletion constructs of DGCR8 and Drosha assembled into a heterotrimeric complex on RNA, comprising two DGCR8 molecules and one Drosha molecule. To determine the stoichiometry of Drosha and DGCR8 within the MC in the absence of added RNA, we also used a single-molecule photobleaching assay and confirmed the heterotrimeric model of the human MC. We demonstrate that a heterotrimeric complex is likely preformed in the absence of RNA and exists even when full-length proteins are expressed and purified from human cells, and when hAGT-derived tags are used rather than fluorescent proteins.

  12. Stoichiometry and assembly of mTOR complexes revealed by single-molecule pulldown.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ankur; Arauz, Edwin; Aggarwal, Vasudha; Ikon, Nikita; Chen, Jie; Ha, Taekjip

    2014-12-16

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase is a master regulator of cellular, developmental, and metabolic processes. Deregulation of mTOR signaling is implicated in numerous human diseases including cancer and diabetes. mTOR functions as part of either of the two multisubunit complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2, but molecular details about the assembly and oligomerization of mTORCs are currently lacking. We use the single-molecule pulldown (SiMPull) assay that combines principles of conventional pulldown assays with single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to investigate the stoichiometry and assembly of mTORCs. After validating our approach with mTORC1, confirming a dimeric assembly as previously reported, we show that all major components of mTORC2 exist in two copies per complex, indicating that mTORC2 assembles as a homodimer. Interestingly, each mTORC component, when free from the complexes, is present as a monomer and no single subunit serves as the dimerizing component. Instead, our data suggest that dimerization of mTORCs is the result of multiple subunits forming a composite surface. SiMPull also allowed us to distinguish complex disassembly from stoichiometry changes. Physiological conditions that abrogate mTOR signaling such as nutrient deprivation or energy stress did not alter the stoichiometry of mTORCs. On the other hand, rapamycin treatment leads to transient appearance of monomeric mTORC1 before complete disruption of the mTOR-raptor interaction, whereas mTORC2 stoichiometry is unaffected. These insights into assembly of mTORCs may guide future mechanistic studies and exploration of therapeutic potential.

  13. Electron Microscopy Analysis of a Disaccharide Analog complex Reveals Receptor Interactions of Adeno-Associated Virus

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Qing; Spilman, Michael; Meyer, Nancy L.; Lerch, Thomas F.; Stagg, Scott M.; Chapman, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanistic studies of macromolecular complexes often feature x-ray structures of complexes with bound ligands. The attachment of Adeno-Associated Virus (AAV) to cell surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) is an example that has not proven amenable to crystallography, because the binding of GAG analogs disrupts lattice contacts. The interactions of AAV with GAGs are of interest in mediating the cell specificity of AAV-based gene therapy vectors. Previous electron microscopy led to differing conclusions on the exact binding site and the existence of large ligand-induced conformational changes in the virus. Conformational changes are expected during cell entry, but it has remained unclear whether the electron microscopy provided evidence of their induction by GAG-binding. Taking advantage of automated data collection, careful processing and new methods of structure refinement, the structure of AAV-DJ complexed with sucrose octasulfate is determined by electron microscopy difference map analysis to 4.8 Å resolution. At this higher resolution, individual sulfate groups are discernible, providing a stereochemical validation of map interpretation, and highlighting interactions with two surface arginines that have been implicated in genetic studies. Conformational changes induced by the SOS are modest and limited to the loop most directly interacting with the ligand. While the resolution attainable will depend on sample order and other factors, there are an increasing number of macromolecular complexes that can be studied by cryo-electron microscopy at resolutions beyond 5 Å, for which the approaches used here could be used to characterize the binding of inhibitors and other small molecule effectors when crystallography is not tractable. PMID:24036405

  14. Two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy reveals the complex behavior of an amyloid fibril inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Chris T.; Marek, Peter; Cao, Ping; Chiu, Chi-cheng; Singh, Sadanand; Woys, Ann Marie; de Pablo, Juan J.; Raleigh, Daniel P.; Zanni, Martin T.

    2012-01-01

    While amyloid formation has been implicated in the pathology of over twenty human diseases, the rational design of amyloid inhibitors is hampered by a lack of structural information about amyloid-inhibitor complexes. We use isotope labeling and two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy to obtain a residue-specific structure for the complex of human amylin, the peptide responsible for islet amyloid formation in type 2 diabetes, with a known inhibitor, rat amylin. Based on its sequence, rat amylin should block formation of the C-terminal β-sheet, but at 8 hours after mixing rat amylin blocks the N-terminal β-sheet instead. At 24 hours after mixing, rat amylin blocks neither β-sheet and forms its own β-sheet most likely on the outside of the human fibrils. This is striking because rat amylin is natively disordered and not previously known to form amyloid β-sheets. The results show that even seemingly intuitive inhibitors may function by unforeseen and complex structural processes. PMID:22522254

  15. Proteomic analyses reveal distinct chromatin-associated and soluble transcription factor complexes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Wang, Wenqi; Wang, Jiadong; Malovannaya, Anna; Xi, Yuanxin; Li, Wei; Guerra, Rudy; Hawke, David H; Qin, Jun; Chen, Junjie

    2015-01-21

    The current knowledge on how transcription factors (TFs), the ultimate targets and executors of cellular signalling pathways, are regulated by protein-protein interactions remains limited. Here, we performed proteomics analyses of soluble and chromatin-associated complexes of 56 TFs, including the targets of many signalling pathways involved in development and cancer, and 37 members of the Forkhead box (FOX) TF family. Using tandem affinity purification followed by mass spectrometry (TAP/MS), we performed 214 purifications and identified 2,156 high-confident protein-protein interactions. We found that most TFs form very distinct protein complexes on and off chromatin. Using this data set, we categorized the transcription-related or unrelated regulators for general or specific TFs. Our study offers a valuable resource of protein-protein interaction networks for a large number of TFs and underscores the general principle that TFs form distinct location-specific protein complexes that are associated with the different regulation and diverse functions of these TFs.

  16. Environmentally induced changes in correlated responses to selection reveal variable pleiotropy across a complex genetic network.

    PubMed

    Sikkink, Kristin L; Reynolds, Rose M; Cresko, William A; Phillips, Patrick C

    2015-05-01

    Selection in novel environments can lead to a coordinated evolutionary response across a suite of characters. Environmental conditions can also potentially induce changes in the genetic architecture of complex traits, which in turn could alter the pattern of the multivariate response to selection. We describe a factorial selection experiment using the nematode Caenorhabditis remanei in which two different stress-related phenotypes (heat and oxidative stress resistance) were selected under three different environmental conditions. The pattern of covariation in the evolutionary response between phenotypes or across environments differed depending on the environment in which selection occurred, including asymmetrical responses to selection in some cases. These results indicate that variation in pleiotropy across the stress response network is highly sensitive to the external environment. Our findings highlight the complexity of the interaction between genes and environment that influences the ability of organisms to acclimate to novel environments. They also make clear the need to identify the underlying genetic basis of genetic correlations in order understand how patterns of pleiotropy are distributed across complex genetic networks.

  17. Complex history of the amphibian-killing chytrid fungus revealed with genome resequencing data.

    PubMed

    Rosenblum, Erica Bree; James, Timothy Y; Zamudio, Kelly R; Poorten, Thomas J; Ilut, Dan; Rodriguez, David; Eastman, Jonathan M; Richards-Hrdlicka, Katy; Joneson, Suzanne; Jenkinson, Thomas S; Longcore, Joyce E; Parra Olea, Gabriela; Toledo, Luís Felipe; Arellano, Maria Luz; Medina, Edgar M; Restrepo, Silvia; Flechas, Sandra Victoria; Berger, Lee; Briggs, Cheryl J; Stajich, Jason E

    2013-06-01

    Understanding the evolutionary history of microbial pathogens is critical for mitigating the impacts of emerging infectious diseases on economically and ecologically important host species. We used a genome resequencing approach to resolve the evolutionary history of an important microbial pathogen, the chytrid Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), which has been implicated in amphibian declines worldwide. We sequenced the genomes of 29 isolates of Bd from around the world, with an emphasis on North, Central, and South America because of the devastating effect that Bd has had on amphibian populations in the New World. We found a substantial amount of evolutionary complexity in Bd with deep phylogenetic diversity that predates observed global amphibian declines. By investigating the entire genome, we found that even the most recently evolved Bd clade (termed the global panzootic lineage) contained more genetic variation than previously reported. We also found dramatic differences among isolates and among genomic regions in chromosomal copy number and patterns of heterozygosity, suggesting complex and heterogeneous genome dynamics. Finally, we report evidence for selection acting on the Bd genome, supporting the hypothesis that protease genes are important in evolutionary transitions in this group. Bd is considered an emerging pathogen because of its recent effects on amphibians, but our data indicate that it has a complex evolutionary history that predates recent disease outbreaks. Therefore, it is important to consider the contemporary effects of Bd in a broader evolutionary context and identify specific mechanisms that may have led to shifts in virulence in this system.

  18. Two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy reveals the complex behaviour of an amyloid fibril inhibitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, Chris T.; Marek, Peter; Cao, Ping; Chiu, Chi-Cheng; Singh, Sadanand; Woys, Ann Marie; de Pablo, Juan J.; Raleigh, Daniel P.; Zanni, Martin T.

    2012-05-01

    Amyloid formation has been implicated in the pathology of over 20 human diseases, but the rational design of amyloid inhibitors is hampered by a lack of structural information about amyloid-inhibitor complexes. We use isotope labelling and two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy to obtain a residue-specific structure for the complex of human amylin (the peptide responsible for islet amyloid formation in type 2 diabetes) with a known inhibitor (rat amylin). Based on its sequence, rat amylin should block formation of the C-terminal β-sheet, but at 8 h after mixing, rat amylin blocks the N-terminal β-sheet instead. At 24 h after mixing, rat amylin blocks neither β-sheet and forms its own β-sheet, most probably on the outside of the human fibrils. This is striking, because rat amylin is natively disordered and not previously known to form amyloid β-sheets. The results show that even seemingly intuitive inhibitors may function by unforeseen and complex structural processes.

  19. Interactome Mapping Reveals the Evolutionary History of the Nuclear Pore Complex

    PubMed Central

    Obado, Samson O.; Brillantes, Marc; Uryu, Kunihiro; Zhang, Wenzhu; Ketaren, Natalia E.; Chait, Brian T.; Field, Mark C.; Rout, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is responsible for nucleocytoplasmic transport and constitutes a hub for control of gene expression. The components of NPCs from several eukaryotic lineages have been determined, but only the yeast and vertebrate NPCs have been extensively characterized at the quaternary level. Significantly, recent evidence indicates that compositional similarity does not necessarily correspond to homologous architecture between NPCs from different taxa. To address this, we describe the interactome of the trypanosome NPC, a representative, highly divergent eukaryote. We identify numerous new NPC components and report an exhaustive interactome, allowing assignment of trypanosome nucleoporins to discrete NPC substructures. Remarkably, despite retaining similar protein composition, there are exceptional architectural dissimilarities between opisthokont (yeast and vertebrates) and excavate (trypanosomes) NPCs. Whilst elements of the inner core are conserved, numerous peripheral structures are highly divergent, perhaps reflecting requirements to interface with divergent nuclear and cytoplasmic functions. Moreover, the trypanosome NPC has almost complete nucleocytoplasmic symmetry, in contrast to the opisthokont NPC; this may reflect divergence in RNA export processes at the NPC cytoplasmic face, as we find evidence supporting Ran-dependent mRNA export in trypanosomes, similar to protein transport. We propose a model of stepwise acquisition of nucleocytoplasmic mechanistic complexity and demonstrate that detailed dissection of macromolecular complexes provides fuller understanding of evolutionary processes. PMID:26891179

  20. The solution structure of a specific GAGA factor-DNA complex reveals a modular binding mode.

    PubMed

    Omichinski, J G; Pedone, P V; Felsenfeld, G; Gronenborn, A M; Clore, G M

    1997-02-01

    The structure of a complex between the DNA binding domain of the GAGA factor (GAGA-DBD) and an oligonucleotide containing its GAGAG consensus binding site has been determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The GAGA-DBD comprises a single classical Cys2-His2 zinc finger core, and an N-terminal extension containing two highly basic regions, BR1 and BR2. The zinc finger core binds in the major groove and recognizes the first three GAG bases of the consensus in a manner similar to that seen in other classical zinc finger-DNA complexes. Unlike the latter, which require tandem zinc finger repeats with a minimum of two units for high affinity binding, the GAGA-DBD makes use of only a single finger complemented by BR1 and BR2. BR2 forms a helix that interacts in the major groove recognizing the last G of the consensus, while BR1 wraps around the DNA in the minor groove and recognizes the A in the fourth position of the consensus. The implications of the structure of the GAGA-DBD-DNA complex for chromatin remodelling are discussed. PMID:9033593

  1. Complex history of the amphibian-killing chytrid fungus revealed with genome resequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblum, Erica Bree; James, Timothy Y.; Zamudio, Kelly R.; Poorten, Thomas J.; Ilut, Dan; Rodriguez, David; Eastman, Jonathan M.; Richards-Hrdlicka, Katy; Joneson, Suzanne; Jenkinson, Thomas S.; Longcore, Joyce E.; Parra Olea, Gabriela; Toledo, Luís Felipe; Arellano, Maria Luz; Medina, Edgar M.; Restrepo, Silvia; Flechas, Sandra Victoria; Berger, Lee; Briggs, Cheryl J.; Stajich, Jason E.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the evolutionary history of microbial pathogens is critical for mitigating the impacts of emerging infectious diseases on economically and ecologically important host species. We used a genome resequencing approach to resolve the evolutionary history of an important microbial pathogen, the chytrid Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), which has been implicated in amphibian declines worldwide. We sequenced the genomes of 29 isolates of Bd from around the world, with an emphasis on North, Central, and South America because of the devastating effect that Bd has had on amphibian populations in the New World. We found a substantial amount of evolutionary complexity in Bd with deep phylogenetic diversity that predates observed global amphibian declines. By investigating the entire genome, we found that even the most recently evolved Bd clade (termed the global panzootic lineage) contained more genetic variation than previously reported. We also found dramatic differences among isolates and among genomic regions in chromosomal copy number and patterns of heterozygosity, suggesting complex and heterogeneous genome dynamics. Finally, we report evidence for selection acting on the Bd genome, supporting the hypothesis that protease genes are important in evolutionary transitions in this group. Bd is considered an emerging pathogen because of its recent effects on amphibians, but our data indicate that it has a complex evolutionary history that predates recent disease outbreaks. Therefore, it is important to consider the contemporary effects of Bd in a broader evolutionary context and identify specific mechanisms that may have led to shifts in virulence in this system. PMID:23650365

  2. Insight into the flagella type III export revealed by the complex structure of the type III ATPase and its regulator.

    PubMed

    Imada, Katsumi; Minamino, Tohru; Uchida, Yumiko; Kinoshita, Miki; Namba, Keiichi

    2016-03-29

    FliI and FliJ form the FliI6FliJ ATPase complex of the bacterial flagellar export apparatus, a member of the type III secretion system. The FliI6FliJ complex is structurally similar to the α3β3γ complex of F1-ATPase. The FliH homodimer binds to FliI to connect the ATPase complex to the flagellar base, but the details are unknown. Here we report the structure of the homodimer of a C-terminal fragment of FliH (FliHC2) in complex with FliI. FliHC2 shows an unusually asymmetric homodimeric structure that markedly resembles the peripheral stalk of the A/V-type ATPases. The FliHC2-FliI hexamer model reveals that the C-terminal domains of the FliI ATPase face the cell membrane in a way similar to the F/A/V-type ATPases. We discuss the mechanism of flagellar ATPase complex formation and a common origin shared by the type III secretion system and the F/A/V-type ATPases. PMID:26984495

  3. The Precambrian Singo Igneous Complex (SIC), Uganda Revealed As a Mineralized Nested Ring Complex Using High Resolution Airborne Radiometric and Magnetic Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atekwana, E. A.; LePera, A.; Abdelsalam, M. G.; Katumwehe, A. B.; Achang, M.

    2014-12-01

    We used high-resolution radiometrics and aeromagnetic data to investigate the Precambrian Singo Igneous Complex (SIC) in Uganda. The SIC covers an area of about 700 km² and is host to hydrothermally formed economic minerals such as Gold and Tungsten. The distribution of the ore deposits is not well known and current mine workings are limited to the western margins of the complex. Our objectives were to (1) provide a detailed geological map of the SIC and surrounding, (2) investigate relationships between preserved intrusive bodies and Precambrian tectonic structures to provide insight into emplacement of the complex, (3) examine links between magma emplacement, discontinuities and hydrothermal alteration (4) generate two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) models of the complex to understand its subsurface geometry, (5) investigate the relationship between the structure of the SIC and mineral occurrences as an aid to future exploration programs. Edge enhancement filters such as the analytical signal, vertical and tilt derivatives were applied to the magnetic data. In addition, 2-D and 3-D models were produced using Geosoft's GM-SYS 2-D and Voxi modules. The filtered data provided unprecedented structural details of the complex and revealed the following: (1) the edge of the SIC is characterized by higher magnetic susceptibility and Thorium content than its interior, (2) the SIC is characterized by eight to nine nested ring complexes with diameters ranging from 2.5 to 14 km, (3) the 3-D inversion suggests near vertical walls for the ring complexes extending to a depth of about 7 km, (4) the SIC was emplaced within a Precambrian folded basement and was traversed by numerous NW-trending dykes and (5) present day mining activities are concentrated within the folded basement units although occurrences of Tungsten and Gold are found associated with the highly magnetized edge of the ring complexes. We interpret the highly magnetized edges of the nested ring

  4. Unexpected development of artistic talents

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, N

    2005-01-01

    The development of exceptional and unexpected artistic skills at any age must be a matter of curiosity. This can occur among young children with severe learning difficulties, especially if they are autistic. Some examples of these so called idiot-savants are given, and the way in which their brains may function. It is also true that elderly people who suffer from frontotemporal dementia can find that they are able to express themselves in remarkable art forms. This can occur in other types of dementia, but then more often it is the changes that result in the paintings of established artists, for example in the paintings of de Kooning. Possible links between these two phenomenon are discussed, and it is suggested that in both instances it may be that if the brain is relieved of a number of functions it can concentrate on the remaining ones. Ways in which this may operate in both groups are reviewed. PMID:16344297

  5. Crystal structures of the CPAP/STIL complex reveal its role in centriole assembly and human microcephaly.

    PubMed

    Cottee, Matthew A; Muschalik, Nadine; Wong, Yao Liang; Johnson, Christopher M; Johnson, Steven; Andreeva, Antonina; Oegema, Karen; Lea, Susan M; Raff, Jordan W; van Breugel, Mark

    2013-09-17

    Centrioles organise centrosomes and template cilia and flagella. Several centriole and centrosome proteins have been linked to microcephaly (MCPH), a neuro-developmental disease associated with small brain size. CPAP (MCPH6) and STIL (MCPH7) are required for centriole assembly, but it is unclear how mutations in them lead to microcephaly. We show that the TCP domain of CPAP constitutes a novel proline recognition domain that forms a 1:1 complex with a short, highly conserved target motif in STIL. Crystal structures of this complex reveal an unusual, all-β structure adopted by the TCP domain and explain how a microcephaly mutation in CPAP compromises complex formation. Through point mutations, we demonstrate that complex formation is essential for centriole duplication in vivo. Our studies provide the first structural insight into how the malfunction of centriole proteins results in human disease and also reveal that the CPAP-STIL interaction constitutes a conserved key step in centriole biogenesis. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01071.001.

  6. Genome-wide RNAi screen reveals a role for the ESCRT complex in rotavirus cell entry.

    PubMed

    Silva-Ayala, Daniela; López, Tomás; Gutiérrez, Michelle; Perrimon, Norbert; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F

    2013-06-18

    Rotavirus (RV) is the major cause of childhood gastroenteritis worldwide. This study presents a functional genome-scale analysis of cellular proteins and pathways relevant for RV infection using RNAi. Among the 522 proteins selected in the screen for their ability to affect viral infectivity, an enriched group that participates in endocytic processes was identified. Within these proteins, subunits of the vacuolar ATPase, small GTPases, actinin 4, and, of special interest, components of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery were found. Here we provide evidence for a role of the ESCRT complex in the entry of simian and human RV strains in both monkey and human epithelial cells. In addition, the ESCRT-associated ATPase VPS4A and phospholipid lysobisphosphatidic acid, both crucial for the formation of intralumenal vesicles in multivesicular bodies, were also found to be required for cell entry. Interestingly, it seems that regardless of the molecules that rhesus RV and human RV strains use for cell-surface attachment and the distinct endocytic pathway used, all these viruses converge in early endosomes and use multivesicular bodies for cell entry. Furthermore, the small GTPases RHOA and CDC42, which regulate different types of clathrin-independent endocytosis, as well as early endosomal antigen 1 (EEA1), were found to be involved in this process. This work reports the direct involvement of the ESCRT machinery in the life cycle of a nonenveloped virus and highlights the complex mechanism that these viruses use to enter cells. It also illustrates the efficiency of high-throughput RNAi screenings as genetic tools for comprehensively studying the interaction between viruses and their host cells.

  7. Diverse Roles and Interactions of the SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodeling Complex Revealed Using Global Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Davidov, Eugene; Gianoulis, Tara A.; Zhong, Guoneng; Rozowsky, Joel; Bhardwaj, Nitin; Gerstein, Mark B.; Snyder, Michael

    2011-01-01

    A systems understanding of nuclear organization and events is critical for determining how cells divide, differentiate, and respond to stimuli and for identifying the causes of diseases. Chromatin remodeling complexes such as SWI/SNF have been implicated in a wide variety of cellular processes including gene expression, nuclear organization, centromere function, and chromosomal stability, and mutations in SWI/SNF components have been linked to several types of cancer. To better understand the biological processes in which chromatin remodeling proteins participate, we globally mapped binding regions for several components of the SWI/SNF complex throughout the human genome using ChIP-Seq. SWI/SNF components were found to lie near regulatory elements integral to transcription (e.g. 5′ ends, RNA Polymerases II and III, and enhancers) as well as regions critical for chromosome organization (e.g. CTCF, lamins, and DNA replication origins). Interestingly we also find that certain configurations of SWI/SNF subunits are associated with transcripts that have higher levels of expression, whereas other configurations of SWI/SNF factors are associated with transcripts that have lower levels of expression. To further elucidate the association of SWI/SNF subunits with each other as well as with other nuclear proteins, we also analyzed SWI/SNF immunoprecipitated complexes by mass spectrometry. Individual SWI/SNF factors are associated with their own family members, as well as with cellular constituents such as nuclear matrix proteins, key transcription factors, and centromere components, implying a ubiquitous role in gene regulation and nuclear function. We find an overrepresentation of both SWI/SNF-associated regions and proteins in cell cycle and chromosome organization. Taken together the results from our ChIP and immunoprecipitation experiments suggest that SWI/SNF facilitates gene regulation and genome function more broadly and through a greater diversity of interactions

  8. Seismic Anisotropy Reveals a Large Magmatic Sill Complex below the Toba Caldera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaxybulatov, K.; Shapiro, N.; Koulakov, I.; Mordret, A.; Landes, M.; Sens-Schoenfelder, C.

    2014-12-01

    An understanding of the formation of large magmatic reservoirs is a key issue for the evaluation of possible strong volcanic eruptions in the future. Many geological observations of exposed past volcanic systems and geodynamic models have indicated that large magmatic reservoirs can build up over long periods of time, with small increments that promote vertical dykes and horizontally oriented sill intrusions. The typical size of such intrusions beneath presently active volcanoes is too small to be imaged with most geophysical methods. Here we show that large layered intrusion complexes at depth can be detected by measurements of the seismic anisotropy caused by the fine-scale layering. We have used data obtained from 42 stations between May and October 2008 on the Toba caldera complex (north Sumatra, Indonesia) to construct a 3D seismic model of the crust with using ambient noise tomography method. Approximately ~500 Rayleigh and Love waves were extracted from cross correlations of continuous records. Their group velocities were measured at periods between 5 and 19 s and, after a 2D regionalization, inverted into local 1D shear velocity profiles (VSH from Love and VSV from Rayleigh waves) using a Monte-Carlo method based on the Neighborhood Algorithm. All 1D profiles were combined into a final 3D model that shows a strong radial anisotropy below the Toba caldera at depths greater than 7 km. A plausible explanation of these observations is the presence of a large magmatic sill complex in the crust below 7 km in depth. Our data support the concept of the long-term incremental building up of magma bodies that leads to the largest volcanic eruptions.

  9. Diverse roles and interactions of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex revealed using global approaches.

    PubMed

    Euskirchen, Ghia M; Auerbach, Raymond K; Davidov, Eugene; Gianoulis, Tara A; Zhong, Guoneng; Rozowsky, Joel; Bhardwaj, Nitin; Gerstein, Mark B; Snyder, Michael

    2011-03-01

    A systems understanding of nuclear organization and events is critical for determining how cells divide, differentiate, and respond to stimuli and for identifying the causes of diseases. Chromatin remodeling complexes such as SWI/SNF have been implicated in a wide variety of cellular processes including gene expression, nuclear organization, centromere function, and chromosomal stability, and mutations in SWI/SNF components have been linked to several types of cancer. To better understand the biological processes in which chromatin remodeling proteins participate, we globally mapped binding regions for several components of the SWI/SNF complex throughout the human genome using ChIP-Seq. SWI/SNF components were found to lie near regulatory elements integral to transcription (e.g. 5' ends, RNA Polymerases II and III, and enhancers) as well as regions critical for chromosome organization (e.g. CTCF, lamins, and DNA replication origins). Interestingly we also find that certain configurations of SWI/SNF subunits are associated with transcripts that have higher levels of expression, whereas other configurations of SWI/SNF factors are associated with transcripts that have lower levels of expression. To further elucidate the association of SWI/SNF subunits with each other as well as with other nuclear proteins, we also analyzed SWI/SNF immunoprecipitated complexes by mass spectrometry. Individual SWI/SNF factors are associated with their own family members, as well as with cellular constituents such as nuclear matrix proteins, key transcription factors, and centromere components, implying a ubiquitous role in gene regulation and nuclear function. We find an overrepresentation of both SWI/SNF-associated regions and proteins in cell cycle and chromosome organization. Taken together the results from our ChIP and immunoprecipitation experiments suggest that SWI/SNF facilitates gene regulation and genome function more broadly and through a greater diversity of interactions than

  10. Gene and Network Analysis of Common Variants Reveals Novel Associations in Multiple Complex Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nakka, Priyanka; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Ramachandran, Sohini

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies typically lack power to detect genotypes significantly associated with complex diseases, where different causal mutations of small effect may be present across cases. A common, tractable approach for identifying genomic elements associated with complex traits is to evaluate combinations of variants in known pathways or gene sets with shared biological function. Such gene-set analyses require the computation of gene-level P-values or gene scores; these gene scores are also useful when generating hypotheses for experimental validation. However, commonly used methods for generating GWA gene scores are computationally inefficient, biased by gene length, imprecise, or have low true positive rate (TPR) at low false positive rates (FPR), leading to erroneous hypotheses for functional validation. Here we introduce a new method, PEGASUS, for analytically calculating gene scores. PEGASUS produces gene scores with as much as 10 orders of magnitude higher numerical precision than competing methods. In simulation, PEGASUS outperforms existing methods, achieving up to 30% higher TPR when the FPR is fixed at 1%. We use gene scores from PEGASUS as input to HotNet2 to identify networks of interacting genes associated with multiple complex diseases and traits; this is the first application of HotNet2 to common variation. In ulcerative colitis and waist–hip ratio, we discover networks that include genes previously associated with these phenotypes, as well as novel candidate genes. In contrast, existing methods fail to identify these networks. We also identify networks for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, in which GWA studies have yet to identify any significant SNPs. PMID:27489002

  11. Complex Networks Reveal Persistent Global / Regional Structure and Predictive Information Content in Climate Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhaeuser, K.; Chawla, N. V.; Ganguly, A. R.

    2010-12-01

    Recent articles have posited that the skills of climate model projections, particularly for variables and scales of interest to decision makers, may need to be significantly improved. Here we hypothesize that there is information content in variables that are projected more reliably, for example, sea surface temperatures, which is relevant for improving predictions of other variables at scales which may be more crucial, for example, regional land temperature and precipitation anomalies. While this hypothesis may be partially supported based on conceptual understanding, a key question to explore is whether the relevant information content can be meaningfully extracted from observations and model simulations. Here we use climate reconstructions from reanalysis datasets to examine the question in detail. Our tool of choice is complex networks, which have provided useful insights in the context of descriptive analysis and change detection for climate in the recent literature. We describe a new adaptation of complex networks based on computational approaches which provide additional descriptive insights at both global and regional scales, specifically sea surface variables, and provide a unified framework for data-guided predictive modeling, specifically for regional temperature and precipitation over land. Complex networks were constructed from historical data to study the properties of the global climate system and characterize behavior at the global scale. Clusters based on community detection, which leverage the network distance, were used to identify regional structures. Persistence and stability of these features over time were evaluated. Predictive information content of ocean indicators with respect to land climate was extracted using a suite of regression models and validated on held-out data. Our results suggest that the new adaptation of complex networks may be well-suited to provide a unified framework for exploring climate teleconnections or long

  12. Essential Role of the Linear Ubiquitin Chain Assembly Complex in Lymphoma Revealed by Rare Germline Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yibin; Schmitz, Roland; Mitala, Joseph; Whiting, Amanda; Xiao, Wenming; Ceribelli, Michele; Wright, George W.; Zhao, Hong; Yang, Yandan; Xu, Weihong; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Connors, Joseph M.; Rimsza, Lisa M.; Campo, Elias; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Delabie, Jan; Smeland, Erlend B.; Braziel, Rita M.; Tubbs, Raymond R.; Cook, James. R.; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Chan, Wing C.; Wiestner, Adrian; Kruhlak, Michael J.; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Bernal, Federico; Staudt, Louis M.

    2014-01-01

    Constitutive activation of NF-κB is a hallmark of the activated B cell-like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), owing to upstream signals from the B cell receptor (BCR) and MyD88 pathways. The linear polyubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC) attaches linear polyubiquitin chains to IκB kinase γ, a necessary event in some pathways that engage NF-κB. Two germ line polymorphisms affecting the LUBAC subunit RNF31 are rare among healthy individuals (~1%) but enriched in ABC DLBCL (7.8%). These polymorphisms alter RNF31 α helices that mediate binding to the LUBAC subunit RBCK1, thereby increasing RNF31-RBCK1 association, LUBAC enzymatic activity, and NF-κB engagement. In the BCR pathway, LUBAC associates with the CARD11/MALT1/BCL10 adapter complex and is required for ABC DLBCL viability. A stapled RNF31 α-helical peptide based on the ABC DLBCL-associated Q622L polymorphism inhibited RFN31-RBCK1 binding, decreased NF-κB and killed ABC DLBCL cells, credentialing this protein-protein interface as a therapeutic target. PMID:24491438

  13. Super-resolution microscopy reveals LINC complex recruitment at nuclear indentation sites.

    PubMed

    Versaevel, Marie; Braquenier, Jean-Baptiste; Riaz, Maryam; Grevesse, Thomas; Lantoine, Joséphine; Gabriele, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidences show that the actin cytoskeleton is a key parameter of the nuclear remodeling process in response to the modifications of cellular morphology. However, detailed information on the interaction between the actin cytoskeleton and the nuclear lamina was still lacking. We addressed this question by constraining endothelial cells on rectangular fibronectin-coated micropatterns and then using Structured Illumination Microscopy (SIM) to observe the interactions between actin stress fibers, nuclear lamina and LINC complexes at a super-resolution scale. Our results show that tension in apical actin stress fibers leads to deep nuclear indentations that significantly deform the nuclear lamina. Interestingly, indented nuclear zones are characterized by a local enrichment of LINC complexes, which anchor apical actin fibers to the nuclear lamina. Moreover, our findings indicate that nuclear indentations induce the formation of segregated domains of condensed chromatin. However, nuclear indentations and condensed chromatin domains are not irreversible processes and both can relax in absence of tension in apical actin stress fibers.

  14. SH3 Domain–Based Phototrapping in Living Cells Reveals Rho Family GAP Signaling Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Hirokazu; Uezu, Akiyoshi; Mason, Frank M.; Soderblom, Erik J.; Moseley, M. Arthur; Soderling, Scott H.

    2012-01-01

    Rho family GAPs [guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) activating proteins] negatively regulate Rho family GTPase activity and therefore modulate signaling events that control cytoskeletal dynamics. The spatial distribution of these GAPs and their specificity toward individual GTPases are controlled by their interactions with various proteins within signaling complexes. These interactions are likely mediated through the Src homology 3 (SH3) domain, which is abundant in the Rho family GAP proteome and exhibits a micromolar binding affinity, enabling the Rho family GAPs to participate in transient interactions with multiple binding partners. To capture these elusive GAP signaling complexes in situ, we developed a domain-based proteomics approach, starting with in vivo phototrapping of SH3 domain– binding proteins and the mass spectrometry identification of associated proteins for nine representative Rho family GAPs. After the selection of candidate binding proteins by cluster analysis, we performed peptide array–based high-throughput in vitro binding assays to confirm the direct interactions and map the SH3 domain–binding sequences. We thereby identified 54 SH3-mediated binding interactions (including 51 previously unidentified ones) for nine Rho family GAPs. We constructed Rho family GAP interactomes that provided insight into the functions of these GAPs. We further characterized one of the predicted functions for the Rac-specific GAP WRP and identified a role for WRP in mediating clustering of the postsynaptic scaffolding protein gephyrin and the GABAA (γ-aminobutyric acid type A) receptor at inhibitory synapses. PMID:22126966

  15. Substrate complexes of human dipeptidyl peptidase III reveal the mechanism of enzyme inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prashant; Reithofer, Viktoria; Reisinger, Manuel; Wallner, Silvia; Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Macheroux, Peter; Gruber, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Human dipeptidyl-peptidase III (hDPP III) is a zinc-dependent hydrolase cleaving dipeptides off the N-termini of various bioactive peptides. Thus, the enzyme is likely involved in a number of physiological processes such as nociception and is also implicated in several forms of cancer. We present high-resolution crystal structures of hDPP III in complex with opioid peptides (Met-and Leu-enkephalin, endomorphin-2) as well as with angiotensin-II and the peptide inhibitor IVYPW. These structures confirm the previously reported large conformational change of the enzyme upon ligand binding and show that the structure of the closed conformation is independent of the nature of the bound peptide. The overall peptide-binding mode is also conserved ensuring the correct positioning of the scissile peptide bond with respect to the catalytic zinc ion. The structure of the angiotensin-II complex shows, how longer peptides are accommodated in the binding cleft of hDPP III. Differences in the binding modes allow a distinction between real substrates and inhibitory peptides or “slow” substrates. The latter displace a zinc bound water molecule necessitating the energetically much less favoured anhydride mechanism as opposed to the favoured promoted-water mechanism. The structural data also form the necessary framework for the design of specific hDPP III inhibitors. PMID:27025154

  16. DNA Barcode Analysis of Thrips (Thysanoptera) Diversity in Pakistan Reveals Cryptic Species Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Iftikhar, Romana; Ashfaq, Muhammad; Rasool, Akhtar; Hebert, Paul D. N.

    2016-01-01

    Although thrips are globally important crop pests and vectors of viral disease, species identifications are difficult because of their small size and inconspicuous morphological differences. Sequence variation in the mitochondrial COI-5ʹ (DNA barcode) region has proven effective for the identification of species in many groups of insect pests. We analyzed barcode sequence variation among 471 thrips from various plant hosts in north-central Pakistan. The Barcode Index Number (BIN) system assigned these sequences to 55 BINs, while the Automatic Barcode Gap Discovery detected 56 partitions, a count that coincided with the number of monophyletic lineages recognized by Neighbor-Joining analysis and Bayesian inference. Congeneric species showed an average of 19% sequence divergence (range = 5.6% - 27%) at COI, while intraspecific distances averaged 0.6% (range = 0.0% - 7.6%). BIN analysis suggested that all intraspecific divergence >3.0% actually involved a species complex. In fact, sequences for three major pest species (Haplothrips reuteri, Thrips palmi, Thrips tabaci), and one predatory thrips (Aeolothrips intermedius) showed deep intraspecific divergences, providing evidence that each is a cryptic species complex. The study compiles the first barcode reference library for the thrips of Pakistan, and examines global haplotype diversity in four important pest thrips. PMID:26741134

  17. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase complex with DNA and nevirapine reveals nonnucleoside inhibition mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Das, Kalyan; Martinez, Sergio E.; Bauman, Joseph D.; Arnold, Eddy

    2012-01-01

    Combinations of nucleoside and nonnucleoside inhibitors (NNRTIs) of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) are widely used in anti-AIDS therapies. Five NNRTIs including nevirapine are clinical drugs; however, the molecular mechanism of inhibition by NNRTIs is not clear. We determined the crystal structures of RT–DNA–nevirapine, RT–DNA, and RT–DNA–AZT-triphosphate complexes at 2.85, 2.70, and 2.80 Å, respectively. The RT–DNA complex in the crystal could bind nevirapine or AZT-triphosphate; however, not both. Binding of nevirapine led to opening of the NNRTI-binding pocket. The pocket formation caused shifting of the 3’-end of DNA primer by ~5.5 Å away from its polymerase active site position. Nucleic acid interactions with fingers and palm subdomains were reduced, the dNTP-binding pocket was distorted, and the thumb opened up. The structures elucidate complementary roles of nucleoside and nonnucleoside inhibitors in inhibiting RT. PMID:22266819

  18. Polycomb repressive complex 2 structure with inhibitor reveals a mechanism of activation and drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Brooun, Alexei; Gajiwala, Ketan S.; Deng, Ya-Li; Liu, Wei; Bolaños, Ben; Bingham, Patrick; He, You-Ai; Diehl, Wade; Grable, Nicole; Kung, Pei-Pei; Sutton, Scott; Maegley, Karen A.; Yu, Xiu; Stewart, Al E.

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) mediates gene silencing through chromatin reorganization by methylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27). Overexpression of the complex and point mutations in the individual subunits of PRC2 have been shown to contribute to tumorigenesis. Several inhibitors of the PRC2 activity have shown efficacy in EZH2-mutated lymphomas and are currently in clinical development, although the molecular basis of inhibitor recognition remains unknown. Here we report the crystal structures of the inhibitor-bound wild-type and Y641N PRC2. The structures illuminate an important role played by a stretch of 17 residues in the N-terminal region of EZH2, we call the activation loop, in the stimulation of the enzyme activity, inhibitor recognition and the potential development of the mutation-mediated drug resistance. The work presented here provides new avenues for the design and development of next-generation PRC2 inhibitors through establishment of a structure-based drug design platform. PMID:27122193

  19. Comparative analysis of carbohydrate active enzymes in Clostridium termitidis CT1112 reveals complex carbohydrate degradation ability.

    PubMed

    Munir, Riffat I; Schellenberg, John; Henrissat, Bernard; Verbeke, Tobin J; Sparling, Richard; Levin, David B

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium termitidis strain CT1112 is an anaerobic, gram positive, mesophilic, cellulolytic bacillus isolated from the gut of the wood-feeding termite, Nasutitermes lujae. It produces biofuels such as hydrogen and ethanol from cellulose, cellobiose, xylan, xylose, glucose, and other sugars, and therefore could be used for biofuel production from biomass through consolidated bioprocessing. The first step in the production of biofuel from biomass by microorganisms is the hydrolysis of complex carbohydrates present in biomass. This is achieved through the presence of a repertoire of secreted or complexed carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes), sometimes organized in an extracellular organelle called cellulosome. To assess the ability and understand the mechanism of polysaccharide hydrolysis in C. termitidis, the recently sequenced strain CT1112 of C. termitidis was analyzed for both CAZymes and cellulosomal components, and compared to other cellulolytic bacteria. A total of 355 CAZyme sequences were identified in C. termitidis, significantly higher than other Clostridial species. Of these, high numbers of glycoside hydrolases (199) and carbohydrate binding modules (95) were identified. The presence of a variety of CAZymes involved with polysaccharide utilization/degradation ability suggests hydrolysis potential for a wide range of polysaccharides. In addition, dockerin-bearing enzymes, cohesion domains and a cellulosomal gene cluster were identified, indicating the presence of potential cellulosome assembly.

  20. Complex mode of inheritance in holoprosencephaly revealed by whole exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Mouden, C; Dubourg, C; Carré, W; Rose, S; Quelin, C; Akloul, L; Hamdi-Rozé, H; Viot, G; Salhi, H; Darnault, P; Odent, S; Dupé, V; David, V

    2016-06-01

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is the most common congenital cerebral malformation, characterized by impaired forebrain cleavage and midline facial anomalies. Heterozygous mutations in 14 genes have been associated with HPE and are often inherited from an unaffected parent, underlying complex genetic bases. It is now emerging that HPE may result from a combination of multiple genetic events, rather than from a single heterozygous mutation. To explore this hypothesis, we undertook whole exome sequencing and targeted high-throughput sequencing approaches to identify mutations in HPE subjects. Here, we report two HPE families in which two mutations are implicated in the disease. In the first family presenting two foetuses with alobar and semi-lobar HPE, we found mutations in two genes involved in HPE, SHH and DISP1, inherited respectively from the father and the mother. The second reported case is a family with a 9-year-old girl presenting lobar HPE, harbouring two compound heterozygous mutations in DISP1. Together, these cases of digenic inheritance and autosomal recessive HPE suggest that in some families, several genetic events are necessary to cause HPE. This study highlights the complexity of HPE inheritance and has to be taken into account by clinicians to improve HPE genetic counselling. PMID:26748417

  1. Complex mode of inheritance in holoprosencephaly revealed by whole exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Mouden, C; Dubourg, C; Carré, W; Rose, S; Quelin, C; Akloul, L; Hamdi-Rozé, H; Viot, G; Salhi, H; Darnault, P; Odent, S; Dupé, V; David, V

    2016-06-01

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is the most common congenital cerebral malformation, characterized by impaired forebrain cleavage and midline facial anomalies. Heterozygous mutations in 14 genes have been associated with HPE and are often inherited from an unaffected parent, underlying complex genetic bases. It is now emerging that HPE may result from a combination of multiple genetic events, rather than from a single heterozygous mutation. To explore this hypothesis, we undertook whole exome sequencing and targeted high-throughput sequencing approaches to identify mutations in HPE subjects. Here, we report two HPE families in which two mutations are implicated in the disease. In the first family presenting two foetuses with alobar and semi-lobar HPE, we found mutations in two genes involved in HPE, SHH and DISP1, inherited respectively from the father and the mother. The second reported case is a family with a 9-year-old girl presenting lobar HPE, harbouring two compound heterozygous mutations in DISP1. Together, these cases of digenic inheritance and autosomal recessive HPE suggest that in some families, several genetic events are necessary to cause HPE. This study highlights the complexity of HPE inheritance and has to be taken into account by clinicians to improve HPE genetic counselling.

  2. Global patterns of large copy number variations in the human genome reveal complexity in chromosome organization.

    PubMed

    Veerappa, Avinash M; Suresh, Raviraj V; Vishweswaraiah, Sangeetha; Lingaiah, Kusuma; Murthy, Megha; Manjegowda, Dinesh S; Padakannaya, Prakash; Ramachandra, Nallur B

    2015-01-01

    Global patterns of copy number variations (CNVs) in chromosomes are required to understand the dynamics of genome organization and complexity. For this study, analysis was performed using the Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0 chip and CytoScan High-Density arrays. We identified a total of 44 109 CNVs from 1715 genomes with a mean of 25 CNVs in an individual, which established the first drafts of population-specific CNV maps providing a rationale for prioritizing chromosomal regions. About 19 905 ancient CNVs were identified across all chromosomes and populations at varying frequencies. CNV count, and sometimes CNV size, contributed to the bulk CNV size of the chromosome. Population specific lengthening and shortening of chromosomal length was observed. Sex bias for CNV presence was largely dependent on ethnicity. Lower CNV inheritance rate was observed for India, compared to YRI and CEU. A total of 33 candidate CNV hotspots from 5382 copy number (CN) variable region (CNVR) clusters were identified. Population specific CNV distribution patterns in p and q arms disturbed the assumption that CNV counts in the p arm are less common compared to long arms, and the CNV occurrence and distribution in chromosomes is length independent. This study unraveled the force of independent evolutionary dynamics on genome organization and complexity across chromosomes and populations. PMID:26390810

  3. Adaptive and selective seed abortion reveals complex conditional decision making in plants.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Katrin M; Soldaat, Leo L; Auge, Harald; Thulke, Hans-Hermann

    2014-03-01

    Behavior is traditionally attributed to animals only. Recently, evidence for plant behavior is accumulating, mostly from plant physiological studies. Here, we provide ecological evidence for complex plant behavior in the form of seed abortion decisions conditional on internal and external cues. We analyzed seed abortion patterns of barberry plants exposed to seed parasitism and different environmental conditions. Without abortion, parasite infestation of seeds can lead to loss of all seeds in a fruit. We statistically tested a series of null models with Monte Carlo simulations to establish selectivity and adaptiveness of the observed seed abortion patterns. Seed abortion was more frequent in parasitized fruits and fruits from dry habitats. Surprisingly, seed abortion occurred with significantly greater probability if there was a second intact seed in the fruit. This strategy provides a fitness benefit if abortion can prevent a sibling seed from coinfestation and if nonabortion of an infested but surviving single seed saves resources invested in the fruit coat. Ecological evidence for complex decision making in plants thus includes a structural memory (the second seed), simple reasoning (integration of inner and outer conditions), conditional behavior (abortion), and anticipation of future risks (seed predation). PMID:24561600

  4. Eigencentrality based on dissimilarity measures reveals central nodes in complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Socorro, A. J.; Herrera-Almarza, G. C.; González-Díaz, L. A.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important problems in complex network’s theory is the location of the entities that are essential or have a main role within the network. For this purpose, the use of dissimilarity measures (specific to theory of classification and data mining) to enrich the centrality measures in complex networks is proposed. The centrality method used is the eigencentrality which is based on the heuristic that the centrality of a node depends on how central are the nodes in the immediate neighbourhood (like rich get richer phenomenon). This can be described by an eigenvalues problem, however the information of the neighbourhood and the connections between neighbours is not taken in account, neglecting their relevance when is one evaluates the centrality/importance/influence of a node. The contribution calculated by the dissimilarity measure is parameter independent, making the proposed method is also parameter independent. Finally, we perform a comparative study of our method versus other methods reported in the literature, obtaining more accurate and less expensive computational results in most cases. PMID:26603652

  5. ANALYSIS OF ALEXANDRIUM TAMARENSE (DINOPHYCEAE) GENES REVEALS THE COMPLEX EVOLUTIONARY HISTORY OF A MICROBIAL EUKARYOTE().

    PubMed

    Chan, Cheong Xin; Soares, Marcelo B; Bonaldo, Maria F; Wisecaver, Jennifer H; Hackett, Jeremiah D; Anderson, Donald M; Erdner, Deana L; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2012-10-01

    Microbial eukaryotes may extinguish much of their nuclear phylogenetic history due to endosymbiotic/horizontal gene transfer (E/HGT). We studied E/HGT in 32,110 contigs of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from the dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense (Dinophyceae) using a conservative phylogenomic approach. The vast majority of predicted proteins (86.4%) in this alga are novel or dinoflagellate-specific. We searched for putative homologs of these predicted proteins against a taxonomically broadly sampled protein database that includes all currently available data from algae and protists and reconstructed a phylogeny from each of the putative homologous protein sets. Of the 2,523 resulting phylogenies, 14-17% are potentially impacted by E/HGT involving both prokaryote and eukaryote lineages, with 2-4% showing clear evidence of reticulate evolution. The complex evolutionary histories of the remaining proteins, many of which may also have been affected by E/HGT, cannot be interpreted using our approach with currently available gene data. We present empirical evidence of reticulate genome evolution that combined with inadequate or highly complex phylogenetic signal in many proteins may impede genome-wide approaches to infer the tree of microbial eukaryotes.

  6. Cellulosome assembly revealed by the crystal structure of the cohesin–dockerin complex

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Ana L.; Dias, Fernando M. V.; Prates, José A. M.; Nagy, Tibor; Gilbert, Harry J.; Davies, Gideon J.; Ferreira, Luís M. A.; Romão, Maria J.; Fontes, Carlos M. G. A.

    2003-01-01

    The utilization of organized supramolecular assemblies to exploit the synergistic interactions afforded by close proximity, both for enzymatic synthesis and for the degradation of recalcitrant substrates, is an emerging theme in cellular biology. Anaerobic bacteria harness a multiprotein complex, termed the “cellulosome,” for efficient degradation of the plant cell wall. This megadalton catalytic machine organizes an enzymatic consortium on a multifaceted molecular scaffold whose “cohesin” domains interact with corresponding “dockerin” domains of the enzymes. Here we report the structure of the cohesin–dockerin complex from Clostridium thermocellum at 2.2-Å resolution. The data show that the β-sheet cohesin domain interacts predominantly with one of the helices of the dockerin. Whereas the structure of the cohesin remains essentially unchanged, the loop–helix–helix–loop–helix motif of the dockerin undergoes conformational change and ordering compared with its solution structure, although the classical 12-residue EF-hand coordination to two calcium ions is maintained. Significantly, internal sequence duplication within the dockerin is manifested in near-perfect internal twofold symmetry, suggesting that both “halves” of the dockerin may interact with cohesins in a similar manner, thus providing a higher level of structure to the cellulosome and possibly explaining the presence of “polycellulosomes.” The structure provides an explanation for the lack of cross-species recognition between cohesin–dockerin pairs and thus provides a blueprint for the rational design, construction, and exploitation of these catalytic assemblies. PMID:14623971

  7. Metagenomic signatures of a tropical mining-impacted stream reveal complex microbial and metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Reis, Mariana P; Dias, Marcela F; Costa, Patrícia S; Ávila, Marcelo P; Leite, Laura R; de Araújo, Flávio M G; Salim, Anna C M; Bucciarelli-Rodriguez, Mônica; Oliveira, Guilherme; Chartone-Souza, Edmar; Nascimento, Andréa M A

    2016-10-01

    Bacteria from aquatic ecosystems significantly contribute to biogeochemical cycles, but details of their community structure in tropical mining-impacted environments remain unexplored. In this study, we analyzed a bacterial community from circumneutral-pH tropical stream sediment by 16S rRNA and shotgun deep sequencing. Carrapatos stream sediment, which has been exposed to metal stress due to gold and iron mining (21 [g Fe]/kg), revealed a diverse community, with predominance of Proteobacteria (39.4%), Bacteroidetes (12.2%), and Parcubacteria (11.4%). Among Proteobacteria, the most abundant reads were assigned to neutrophilic iron-oxidizing taxa, such as Gallionella, Sideroxydans, and Mariprofundus, which are involved in Fe cycling and harbor several metal resistance genes. Functional analysis revealed a large number of genes participating in nitrogen and methane metabolic pathways despite the low concentrations of inorganic nitrogen in the Carrapatos stream. Our findings provide important insights into bacterial community interactions in a mining-impacted environment. PMID:27441985

  8. Water in stars: expected and unexpected

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, T.; Aoki, W.; Ohnaka, K.

    1999-03-01

    We have confirmed the presence of water in the early M giant α Cet (M1.5III) and supergiant KK Per (M2Iab) by the highest resolution grating mode of SWS, but this result is quite unexpected from present model atmospheres. In late M giant and supergiant stars, water observed originates partly in the photosphere as expected by the model atmospheres, but ISO SWS has revealed that the 2.7 mic\\ absorption bands appear to be somewhat stronger than predicted while 6.5 mic\\ bands weaker, indicating the contamination by an emission component. In the mid-infrared region extending to 45 mic, pure rotation lines of hho\\ appear as distinct emission on the high resolution SWS spectra of 30g Her (M7III) and S Per (M4-7Ia), along with the dust emission at 10, 13, 20 mic\\ and a new unidentified feature at 30 mic. Thus, together with the dust, water contributes to the thermal balance of the outer atmosphere already in the mid-infrared. The excitation temperature of hho\\ gas is estimated to be 500 - 1000 K. In view of this result for late M (super)giants, unexpected water observed in early M (super)giants should also be of non-photospheric in origin. Thus, ISO has finally established the presence of a new component of the outer atmosphere - a warm molecular envelope - in red giant and supergiant stars from early to late types. Such a rather warm molecular envelope will be a site of various activities such as chemical reactions, dust formation, mass-outflow etc.

  9. Single muscle fiber proteomics reveals unexpected mitochondrial specialization

    PubMed Central

    Murgia, Marta; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Deshmukh, Atul S; Zeiler, Marlis; Cancellara, Pasqua; Moretti, Irene; Reggiani, Carlo; Schiaffino, Stefano; Mann, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian skeletal muscles are composed of multinucleated cells termed slow or fast fibers according to their contractile and metabolic properties. Here, we developed a high-sensitivity workflow to characterize the proteome of single fibers. Analysis of segments of the same fiber by traditional and unbiased proteomics methods yielded the same subtype assignment. We discovered novel subtype-specific features, most prominently mitochondrial specialization of fiber types in substrate utilization. The fiber type-resolved proteomes can be applied to a variety of physiological and pathological conditions and illustrate the utility of single cell type analysis for dissecting proteomic heterogeneity. PMID:25643707

  10. Dynamics of ribosome scanning and recycling revealed by translation complex profiling.

    PubMed

    Archer, Stuart K; Shirokikh, Nikolay E; Beilharz, Traude H; Preiss, Thomas

    2016-07-28

    Regulation of messenger RNA translation is central to eukaryotic gene expression control. Regulatory inputs are specified by them RNA untranslated regions (UTRs) and often target translation initiation. Initiation involves binding of the 40S ribosomal small subunit (SSU) and associated eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs)near the mRNA 5′ cap; the SSU then scans in the 3′ direction until it detects the start codon and is joined by the 60S ribosomal large subunit (LSU) to form the 80S ribosome. Scanning and other dynamic aspects of the initiation model have remained as conjectures because methods to trap early intermediates were lacking. Here we uncover the dynamics of the complete translation cycle in live yeast cells using translation complex profile sequencing (TCP-seq), a method developed from the ribosome profiling approach. We document scanning by observing SSU footprints along 5′ UTRs. Scanning SSU have 5′-extended footprints (up to~75 nucleotides), indicative of additional interactions with mRNA emerging from the exit channel, promoting forward movement. We visualized changes in initiation complex conformation as SSU footprints coalesced into three major sizes at start codons (19, 29 and 37 nucleotides). These share the same 5′ start site but differ at the 3′ end, reflecting successive changes at the entry channel from an open to a closed state following start codon recognition. We also observe SSU 'lingering' at stop codons after LSU departure. Our results underpin mechanistic models of translation initiation and termination, built on decades of biochemical and structural investigation, with direct genome-wide in vivo evidence. Our approach captures ribosomal complexes at all phases of translation and will aid in studying translation dynamics in diverse cellular contexts. Dysregulation of translation is common in disease and, for example, SSU scanning is a target of anti-cancer drug development. TCP-seq will prove useful in discerning differences

  11. Chemical Complexity in the Shocked Outflow L1157 Revealed by CARMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dollhopf, Niklaus M.; McGuire, Brett A.; Carroll, P. Brandon; Remijan, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Amino acids, the complex organic molecules which are the building blocks of life, have been found in meteoritic samples and, most recently, in samples from Comet Wild-2. Yet, no amino acids have been detected in the gas-phase in the interstellar medium, which seeds and enriches these meteorites and comets. Glycine, the simplest amino acid, has been shown to form in the laboratory through the reaction of hydroxylamine (NH2OH) with acetic acid (CH3COOH), a known interstellar molecule. This has prompted a move to search for NH2OH as a proxy of identifying regions where subsequent searches for glycine may prove the most fruitful.A search for NH2OH was conducted in seven diverse, molecule-rich sources and resulted in non-detections for all seven (Pulliam, et al. 2012). Theoretical work suggested the temperature of the sources was perhaps too low for NH2OH to thermally-desorb into the gas phase. Searches in shocked molecular regions, however, may overcome this barrier, as complex molecules are non-thermally liberated into the gas-phase by these shocks.Here, we present results from a targeted search toward the prototypical shocked outflow L1157. L1157-B0, -B1, and -B2 are shocked regions within the outflow from the infrared source L1157-mm. Using observations from the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA), we have mapped a variety of molecular tracers in the region and conducted an interferometric search for NH2OH with typical spatial resolutions of ~3'. We find that the prototypical complex molecule methanol (CH3OH) peaks in B2, the newer shock. We compare this with the distributions of HCN and HCO+ and discuss the implications for chemical evolution within the region. HCN, used as a density tracer, also peaks in B2 while HCO+ is shown as diffuse throughout B0. We also present the first maps of isocyanic acid (HNCO) in L1157. HNCO is found to peak in B2, cospatial with CH3OH and HCN. Finally, we report a non-detection of three NH2OH transitions

  12. Gene-Disease Network Analysis Reveals Functional Modules in Mendelian, Complex and Environmental Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bauer-Mehren, Anna; Bundschus, Markus; Rautschka, Michael; Mayer, Miguel A.; Sanz, Ferran; Furlong, Laura I.

    2011-01-01

    Background Scientists have been trying to understand the molecular mechanisms of diseases to design preventive and therapeutic strategies for a long time. For some diseases, it has become evident that it is not enough to obtain a catalogue of the disease-related genes but to uncover how disruptions of molecular networks in the cell give rise to disease phenotypes. Moreover, with the unprecedented wealth of information available, even obtaining such catalogue is extremely difficult. Principal Findings We developed a comprehensive gene-disease association database by integrating associations from several sources that cover different biomedical aspects of diseases. In particular, we focus on the current knowledge of human genetic diseases including mendelian, complex and environmental diseases. To assess the concept of modularity of human diseases, we performed a systematic study of the emergent properties of human gene-disease networks by means of network topology and functional annotation analysis. The results indicate a highly shared genetic origin of human diseases and show that for most diseases, including mendelian, complex and environmental diseases, functional modules exist. Moreover, a core set of biological pathways is found to be associated with most human diseases. We obtained similar results when studying clusters of diseases, suggesting that related diseases might arise due to dysfunction of common biological processes in the cell. Conclusions For the first time, we include mendelian, complex and environmental diseases in an integrated gene-disease association database and show that the concept of modularity applies for all of them. We furthermore provide a functional analysis of disease-related modules providing important new biological insights, which might not be discovered when considering each of the gene-disease association repositories independently. Hence, we present a suitable framework for the study of how genetic and environmental factors

  13. RNA-Seq reveals complex genetic response to deepwater horizon oil release in Fundulus grandis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The release of oil resulting from the blowout of the Deepwater Horizon (DH) drilling platform was one of the largest in history discharging more than 189 million gallons of oil and subject to widespread application of oil dispersants. This event impacted a wide range of ecological habitats with a complex mix of pollutants whose biological impact is still not yet fully understood. To better understand the effects on a vertebrate genome, we studied gene expression in the salt marsh minnow Fundulus grandis, which is local to the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico and is a sister species of the ecotoxicological model Fundulus heteroclitus. To assess genomic changes, we quantified mRNA expression using high throughput sequencing technologies (RNA-Seq) in F. grandis populations in the marshes and estuaries impacted by DH oil release. This application of RNA-Seq to a non-model, wild, and ecologically significant organism is an important evaluation of the technology to quickly assess similar events in the future. Results Our de novo assembly of RNA-Seq data produced a large set of sequences which included many duplicates and fragments. In many cases several of these could be associated with a common reference sequence using blast to query a reference database. This reduced the set of significant genes to 1,070 down-regulated and 1,251 up-regulated genes. These genes indicate a broad and complex genomic response to DH oil exposure including the expected AHR-mediated response and CYP genes. In addition a response to hypoxic conditions and an immune response are also indicated. Several genes in the choriogenin family were down-regulated in the exposed group; a response that is consistent with AH exposure. These analyses are in agreement with oligonucleotide-based microarray analyses, and describe only a subset of significant genes with aberrant regulation in the exposed set. Conclusion RNA-Seq may be successfully applied to feral and extremely polymorphic

  14. Genome-wide association mapping reveals a rich genetic architecture of complex traits in Oryza sativa

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Keyan; Tung, Chih-Wei; Eizenga, Georgia C.; Wright, Mark H.; Ali, M. Liakat; Price, Adam H.; Norton, Gareth J.; Islam, M. Rafiqul; Reynolds, Andy; Mezey, Jason; McClung, Anna M.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; McCouch, Susan R.

    2011-01-01

    Asian rice, Oryza sativa is a cultivated, inbreeding species that feeds over half of the world's population. Understanding the genetic basis of diverse physiological, developmental, and morphological traits provides the basis for improving yield, quality and sustainability of rice. Here we show the results of a genome-wide association study based on genotyping 44,100 SNP variants across 413 diverse accessions of O. sativa collected from 82 countries that were systematically phenotyped for 34 traits. Using cross-population-based mapping strategies, we identified dozens of common variants influencing numerous complex traits. Significant heterogeneity was observed in the genetic architecture associated with subpopulation structure and response to environment. This work establishes an open-source translational research platform for genome-wide association studies in rice that directly links molecular variation in genes and metabolic pathways with the germplasm resources needed to accelerate varietal development and crop improvement. PMID:21915109

  15. A Native Ternary Complex Trapped in a Crystal Reveals the Catalytic Mechanism of a Retaining Glycosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Albesa-Jové, David; Mendoza, Fernanda; Rodrigo-Unzueta, Ane; Gomollón-Bel, Fernando; Cifuente, Javier O; Urresti, Saioa; Comino, Natalia; Gómez, Hansel; Romero-García, Javier; Lluch, José M; Sancho-Vaello, Enea; Biarnés, Xevi; Planas, Antoni; Merino, Pedro; Masgrau, Laura; Guerin, Marcelo E

    2015-08-17

    Glycosyltransferases (GTs) comprise a prominent family of enzymes that play critical roles in a variety of cellular processes, including cell signaling, cell development, and host-pathogen interactions. Glycosyl transfer can proceed with either inversion or retention of the anomeric configuration with respect to the reaction substrates and products. The elucidation of the catalytic mechanism of retaining GTs remains a major challenge. A native ternary complex of a GT in a productive mode for catalysis is reported, that of the retaining glucosyl-3-phosphoglycerate synthase GpgS from M. tuberculosis in the presence of the sugar donor UDP-Glc, the acceptor substrate phosphoglycerate, and the divalent cation cofactor. Through a combination of structural, chemical, enzymatic, molecular dynamics, and quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics (QM/MM) calculations, the catalytic mechanism was unraveled, thereby providing a strong experimental support for a front-side substrate-assisted SN i-type reaction.

  16. Protein Configuration Landscape Fluctuations Revealed by Exciton Transition Polarizations in Single Light Harvesting Complexes.

    PubMed

    Tubasum, Sumera; Torbjörnsson, Magne; Yadav, Dheerendra; Camacho, Rafael; Söderlind, Gustaf; Scheblykin, Ivan G; Pullerits, Tõnu

    2016-02-01

    Protein is a flexible material with broad distribution of conformations forming an energy landscape of quasi-stationary states. Disentangling the system dynamics along this landscape is the key for understanding the functioning of the protein. Here we studied a photosynthetic antenna pigment-protein complex LH2 with single molecule two-dimensional polarization imaging. Modeling based on the Redfield relaxation theory well describes the observed polarization properties of LH2 fluorescence and fluorescence excitation, strongly suggesting that at 77 K the conformational subspace of the LH2 is limited to about three configurations with relatively frequent switching among each other. At room temperature the next level of fluctuations determines the conformational dynamics. The results support the multitier model of the energy landscape of proteins and demonstrate the potential of the method for the studies of structural dynamics in proteins.

  17. A high-quality human reference panel reveals the complexity and distribution of genomic structural variants

    PubMed Central

    Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y.; Marschall, Tobias; Kloosterman, Wigard P.; Francioli, Laurent C.; Baaijens, Jasmijn A.; Dijkstra, Louis J.; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Koval, Vyacheslav; Thung, Djie Tjwan; Wardenaar, René; Renkens, Ivo; Coe, Bradley P.; Deelen, Patrick; de Ligt, Joep; Lameijer, Eric-Wubbo; van Dijk, Freerk; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Bovenberg, Jasper A.; de Craen, Anton J. M.; Beekman, Marian; Hofman, Albert; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce; Platteel, Mathieu; Du, Yuanping; Chen, Ruoyan; Cao, Hongzhi; Cao, Rui; Sun, Yushen; Cao, Jeremy Sujie; Neerincx, Pieter B. T.; Dijkstra, Martijn; Byelas, George; Kanterakis, Alexandros; Bot, Jan; Vermaat, Martijn; Laros, Jeroen F. J.; den Dunnen, Johan T.; de Knijff, Peter; Karssen, Lennart C.; van Leeuwen, Elisa M.; Amin, Najaf; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Estrada, Karol; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Kattenberg, V. Mathijs; van Enckevort, David; Mei, Hailiang; Santcroos, Mark; van Schaik, Barbera D. C.; Handsaker, Robert E.; McCarroll, Steven A.; Ko, Arthur; Sudmant, Peter; Nijman, Isaac J.; Uitterlinden, André G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Eichler, Evan E.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Swertz, Morris A.; Wijmenga, Cisca; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B.; Slagboom, P. Eline; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Schönhuth, Alexander; Ye, Kai; Guryev, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Structural variation (SV) represents a major source of differences between individual human genomes and has been linked to disease phenotypes. However, the majority of studies provide neither a global view of the full spectrum of these variants nor integrate them into reference panels of genetic variation. Here, we analyse whole genome sequencing data of 769 individuals from 250 Dutch families, and provide a haplotype-resolved map of 1.9 million genome variants across 9 different variant classes, including novel forms of complex indels, and retrotransposition-mediated insertions of mobile elements and processed RNAs. A large proportion are previously under reported variants sized between 21 and 100 bp. We detect 4 megabases of novel sequence, encoding 11 new transcripts. Finally, we show 191 known, trait-associated SNPs to be in strong linkage disequilibrium with SVs and demonstrate that our panel facilitates accurate imputation of SVs in unrelated individuals. PMID:27708267

  18. Tissue-specific regulatory circuits reveal variable modular perturbations across complex diseases

    PubMed Central

    Marbach, Daniel; Lamparter, David; Quon, Gerald; Kellis, Manolis; Kutalik, Zoltán; Bergmann, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Mapping the molecular circuits that are perturbed by genetic variants underlying complex traits and diseases remains a great challenge. We present a comprehensive resource of 394 cell type and tissue-specific gene regulatory networks for human, each specifying the genome-wide connectivity between transcription factors, enhancers, promoters and genes. Integration with 37 genome-wide association studies (GWASs) shows that disease-associated genetic variants — including variants that do not reach genome-wide significance — often perturb regulatory modules that are highly specific to disease-relevant cell types or tissues. Our resource opens the door to systematic analysis of regulatory programs across hundreds of human cell types and tissues. PMID:26950747

  19. Molecular data reveal complex hybridization and a cryptic species of neotropical wild cat.

    PubMed

    Trigo, Tatiane C; Schneider, Alexsandra; de Oliveira, Tadeu G; Lehugeur, Livia M; Silveira, Leandro; Freitas, Thales R O; Eizirik, Eduardo

    2013-12-16

    Hybridization among animal species has recently become more recognized as an important phenomenon, especially in the context of recent radiations. Here we show that complex hybridization has led to contrasting patterns of genomic composition among closely related species of the Neotropical cat genus Leopardus. We show strong evidence of ancient hybridization and introgression between the pampas cat (L. colocolo) and northeastern populations of tigrina (L. tigrinus), leading to remarkable cytonuclear discordance in the latter. In contrast, southern tigrina populations show recent and continuing hybridization with Geoffroy's cat (L. geoffroyi), leading to extreme levels of interspecific admixture at their contact zone. Finally, we demonstrate that two seemingly continuous Brazilian tigrina populations show no evidence of ongoing gene flow between them, leading us to support their formal recognition as distinct species, namely L. tigrinus in the northeast and L. guttulus in the south. PMID:24291091

  20. Molecular data reveal complex hybridization and a cryptic species of neotropical wild cat.

    PubMed

    Trigo, Tatiane C; Schneider, Alexsandra; de Oliveira, Tadeu G; Lehugeur, Livia M; Silveira, Leandro; Freitas, Thales R O; Eizirik, Eduardo

    2013-12-16

    Hybridization among animal species has recently become more recognized as an important phenomenon, especially in the context of recent radiations. Here we show that complex hybridization has led to contrasting patterns of genomic composition among closely related species of the Neotropical cat genus Leopardus. We show strong evidence of ancient hybridization and introgression between the pampas cat (L. colocolo) and northeastern populations of tigrina (L. tigrinus), leading to remarkable cytonuclear discordance in the latter. In contrast, southern tigrina populations show recent and continuing hybridization with Geoffroy's cat (L. geoffroyi), leading to extreme levels of interspecific admixture at their contact zone. Finally, we demonstrate that two seemingly continuous Brazilian tigrina populations show no evidence of ongoing gene flow between them, leading us to support their formal recognition as distinct species, namely L. tigrinus in the northeast and L. guttulus in the south.

  1. Two Allergen Model Reveals Complex Relationship Between IgE Cross-Linking and Degranulation

    PubMed Central

    Handlogten, Michael W.; Deak, Peter E.; Bilgicer, Basar

    2014-01-01

    Summary Allergy is an immune response to complex mixtures of multiple allergens yet current models use a single synthetic allergen. Multiple allergens were modeled using two well-defined tetravalent allergens each specific for a distinct IgE thus enabling a systematic approach to evaluate the effect of each allergen and percent of allergen specific IgE on mast cell degranulation. We found the overall degranulation response caused by two allergens is additive for low allergen concentrations or low percent specific IgE, does not change for moderate allergen concentrations with moderate to high percent specific IgE, and is reduced for high allergen concentrations with moderate to high percent specific IgE. These results provide further evidence that supra-optimal IgE cross-linking decreases the degranulation response and establishes the two allergen model as a relevant experimental system to elucidate mast cell degranulation mechanisms. PMID:25308278

  2. Antidiabetic phospholipid-nuclear receptor complex reveals the mechanism for phospholipid-driven gene regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Musille, Paul M; Pathak, Manish C; Lauer, Janelle L; Hudson, William H; Griffin, Patrick R; Ortlund, Eric A

    2013-01-31

    The human nuclear receptor liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1) has an important role in controlling lipid and cholesterol homeostasis and is a potential target for the treatment of diabetes and hepatic diseases. LRH-1 is known to bind phospholipids, but the role of phospholipids in controlling LRH-1 activation remains highly debated. Here we describe the structure of both apo LRH-1 and LRH-1 in complex with the antidiabetic phospholipid dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC). Together with hydrogen-deuterium exchange MS and functional data, our studies show that DLPC binding is a dynamic process that alters co-regulator selectivity. We show that the lipid-free receptor undergoes previously unrecognized structural fluctuations, allowing it to interact with widely expressed co-repressors. These observations enhance our understanding of LRH-1 regulation and highlight its importance as a new therapeutic target for controlling diabetes.

  3. Photobleaching reveals complex effects of inhibitors on transcribing RNA polymerase II in living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fromaget, Maud; Cook, Peter R. . E-mail: peter.cook@path.ox.ac.uk

    2007-08-15

    RNA polymerase II transcribes most eukaryotic genes. Photobleaching studies have revealed that living Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing the catalytic subunit of the polymerase tagged with the green fluorescent protein contain a large rapidly exchanging pool of enzyme, plus a smaller engaged fraction; genetic complementation shows this tagged polymerase to be fully functional. We investigated how transcriptional inhibitors - some of which are used therapeutically - affect the engaged fraction in living cells using fluorescence loss in photobleaching; all were used at concentrations that have reversible effects. Various kinase inhibitors (roscovitine, DRB, KM05283, alsterpaullone, isoquinolinesulfonamide derivatives H-7, H-8, H-89, H-9), proteasomal inhibitors (lactacystin, MG132), and an anti-tumour agent (cisplatin) all reduced the engaged fraction; an intercalator (actinomycin D), two histone deacetylase inhibitors (trichostatin A, sodium butyrate), and irradiation with ultra-violet light all increased it. The polymerase proves to be both a sensitive sensor and effector of the response to these inhibitors.

  4. The structure of ribosome-lankacidin complex reveals ribosomal sites for synergistic antibiotics

    SciTech Connect

    Auerbach, Tamar; Mermershtain, Inbal; Davidovich, Chen; Bashan, Anat; Belousoff, Matthew; Wekselman, Itai; Zimmerman, Ella; Xiong, Liqun; Klepacki, Dorota; Arakawa, Kenji; Kinashi, Haruyasu; Mankin, Alexander S.; Yonath, Ada

    2010-04-26

    Crystallographic analysis revealed that the 17-member polyketide antibiotic lankacidin produced by Streptomyces rochei binds at the peptidyl transferase center of the eubacterial large ribosomal subunit. Biochemical and functional studies verified this finding and showed interference with peptide bond formation. Chemical probing indicated that the macrolide lankamycin, a second antibiotic produced by the same species, binds at a neighboring site, at the ribosome exit tunnel. These two antibiotics can bind to the ribosome simultaneously and display synergy in inhibiting bacterial growth. The binding site of lankacidin and lankamycin partially overlap with the binding site of another pair of synergistic antibiotics, the streptogramins. Thus, at least two pairs of structurally dissimilar compounds have been selected in the course of evolution to act synergistically by targeting neighboring sites in the ribosome. These results underscore the importance of the corresponding ribosomal sites for development of clinically relevant synergistic antibiotics and demonstrate the utility of structural analysis for providing new directions for drug discovery.

  5. Ancient mitochondrial DNA analysis reveals complexity of indigenous North American turkey domestication

    PubMed Central

    Speller, Camilla F.; Kemp, Brian M.; Wyatt, Scott D.; Monroe, Cara; Lipe, William D.; Arndt, Ursula M.; Yang, Dongya Y.

    2010-01-01

    Although the cultural and nutritive importance of the turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) to precontact Native Americans and contemporary people worldwide is clear, little is known about the domestication of this bird compared to other domesticates. Mitochondrial DNA analysis of 149 turkey bones and 29 coprolites from 38 archaeological sites (200 BC–AD 1800) reveals a unique domesticated breed in the precontact Southwestern United States. Phylogeographic analyses indicate that this domestic breed originated from outside the region, but rules out the South Mexican domestic turkey (Meleagris gallopavo gallopavo) as a progenitor. A strong genetic bottleneck within the Southwest turkeys also reflects intensive human selection and breeding. This study points to at least two occurrences of turkey domestication in precontact North America and illuminates the intensity and sophistication of New World animal breeding practices. PMID:20133614

  6. Ribonomic analysis of human DZIP1 reveals its involvement in ribonucleoprotein complexes and stress granules

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background DZIP1 (DAZ-interacting protein 1) has been described as a component of the Hh signaling pathway with a putative regulatory role in ciliogenesis. DZIP1 interacts with DAZ RNA binding proteins in embryonic stem cells and human germ cells suggesting a role in mRNA regulation. Results We investigated DZIP1 function in HeLa cells and its involvement in ribonucleoprotein complexes. DZIP1 was predominantly located in granules in the cytoplasm. Under oxidative stress conditions, DZIP1 re-localized to stress granules. DZIP appears to be important for the formation of stress granules during the stress response. We used immunoprecipitation assays with antibodies against DZIP1 and microarray hybridization to identify mRNAs associated with DZIP1. The genetic networks formed by the DZIP1-associated mRNAs were involved in cell cycle and gene expression regulation. DZIP1 is involved in the Hedgehog signaling pathway. We used cyclopamine, a specific inhibitor of this pathway, to analyze the expression of DZIP1 and its associated mRNAs. The abundance of DZIP1-associated mRNAs increased with treatment; however, the silencing or overexpression of DZIP1 in HeLa cells had no effect on the accumulation of the associated mRNAs. Polysomal profile analysis by sucrose gradient centrifugation demonstrated the presence of DZIP1 in the polysomal fraction. Conclusions Our results suggest that DZIP1 is part of an RNP complex that occupies various subcellular locations. The diversity of the mRNAs associated with DZIP1 suggests that this protein is a component of different RNPs associated with translating polysomes and with RNA granules. PMID:24993635

  7. A Polychaete's powerful punch: venom gland transcriptomics of Glycera reveals a complex cocktail of toxin homologs.

    PubMed

    von Reumont, Björn M; Campbell, Lahcen I; Richter, Sandy; Hering, Lars; Sykes, Dan; Hetmank, Jörg; Jenner, Ronald A; Bleidorn, Christoph

    2014-09-01

    Glycerids are marine annelids commonly known as bloodworms. Bloodworms have an eversible proboscis adorned with jaws connected to venom glands. Bloodworms prey on invertebrates, and it is known that the venom glands produce compounds that can induce toxic effects in animals. Yet, none of these putative toxins has been characterized on a molecular basis. Here we present the transcriptomic profiles of the venom glands of three species of bloodworm, Glycera dibranchiata, Glycera fallax and Glycera tridactyla, as well as the body tissue of G. tridactyla. The venom glands express a complex mixture of transcripts coding for putative toxin precursors. These transcripts represent 20 known toxin classes that have been convergently recruited into animal venoms, as well as transcripts potentially coding for Glycera-specific toxins. The toxins represent five functional categories: Pore-forming and membrane-disrupting toxins, neurotoxins, protease inhibitors, other enzymes, and CAP domain toxins. Many of the transcripts coding for putative Glycera toxins belong to classes that have been widely recruited into venoms, but some are homologs of toxins previously only known from the venoms of scorpaeniform fish and monotremes (stonustoxin-like toxin), turrid gastropods (turripeptide-like peptides), and sea anemones (gigantoxin I-like neurotoxin). This complex mixture of toxin homologs suggests that bloodworms employ venom while predating on macroscopic prey, casting doubt on the previously widespread opinion that G. dibranchiata is a detritivore. Our results further show that researchers should be aware that different assembly methods, as well as different methods of homology prediction, can influence the transcriptomic profiling of venom glands. PMID:25193302

  8. Copper Complexation Screen Reveals Compounds with Potent Antibiotic Properties against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Haeili, Mehri; Moore, Casey; Davis, Christopher J. C.; Cochran, James B.; Shah, Santosh; Shrestha, Tej B.; Zhang, Yaofang; Bossmann, Stefan H.; Benjamin, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages take advantage of the antibacterial properties of copper ions in the killing of bacterial intruders. However, despite the importance of copper for innate immune functions, coordinated efforts to exploit copper ions for therapeutic interventions against bacterial infections are not yet in place. Here we report a novel high-throughput screening platform specifically developed for the discovery and characterization of compounds with copper-dependent antibacterial properties toward methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). We detail how one of the identified compounds, glyoxal-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (GTSM), exerts its potent strictly copper-dependent antibacterial properties on MRSA. Our data indicate that the activity of the GTSM-copper complex goes beyond the general antibacterial effects of accumulated copper ions and suggest that, in contrast to prevailing opinion, copper complexes can indeed exhibit species- and target-specific activities. Based on experimental evidence, we propose that copper ions impose structural changes upon binding to the otherwise inactive GTSM ligand and transfer antibacterial properties to the chelate. In turn, GTSM determines target specificity and utilizes a redox-sensitive release mechanism through which copper ions are deployed at or in close proximity to a putative target. According to our proof-of-concept screen, copper activation is not a rare event and even extends to already established drugs. Thus, copper-activated compounds could define a novel class of anti-MRSA agents that amplify copper-dependent innate immune functions of the host. To this end, we provide a blueprint for a high-throughput drug screening campaign which considers the antibacterial properties of copper ions at the host-pathogen interface. PMID:24752262

  9. Analysis of the Mitochondrial Genome in Hypomyces aurantius Reveals a Novel Twintron Complex in Fungi.

    PubMed

    Deng, Youjin; Zhang, Qihui; Ming, Ray; Lin, Longji; Lin, Xiangzhi; Lin, Yiying; Li, Xiao; Xie, Baogui; Wen, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Hypomyces aurantius is a mycoparasite that causes cobweb disease, a most serious disease of cultivated mushrooms. Intra-species identification is vital for disease control, however the lack of genomic data makes development of molecular markers challenging. Small size, high copy number, and high mutation rate of fungal mitochondrial genome makes it a good candidate for intra and inter species differentiation. In this study, the mitochondrial genome of H. H.a0001 was determined from genomic DNA using Illumina sequencing. The roughly 72 kb genome shows all major features found in other Hypocreales: 14 common protein genes, large and small subunit rRNAs genes and 27 tRNAs genes. Gene arrangement comparison showed conserved gene orders in Hypocreales mitochondria are relatively conserved, with the exception of Acremonium chrysogenum and Acremonium implicatum. Mitochondrial genome comparison also revealed that intron length primarily contributes to mitogenome size variation. Seventeen introns were detected in six conserved genes: five in cox1, four in rnl, three in cob, two each in atp6 and cox3, and one in cox2. Four introns were found to contain two introns or open reading frames: cox3-i2 is a twintron containing two group IA type introns; cox2-i1 is a group IB intron encoding two homing endonucleases; and cox1-i4 and cox1-i3 both contain two open reading frame (ORFs). Analyses combining secondary intronic structures, insertion sites, and similarities of homing endonuclease genes reveal two group IA introns arranged side by side within cox3-i2. Mitochondrial data for H. aurantius provides the basis for further studies relating to population genetics and species identification. PMID:27376282

  10. Analysis of the Mitochondrial Genome in Hypomyces aurantius Reveals a Novel Twintron Complex in Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Youjin; Zhang, Qihui; Ming, Ray; Lin, Longji; Lin, Xiangzhi; Lin, Yiying; Li, Xiao; Xie, Baogui; Wen, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Hypomyces aurantius is a mycoparasite that causes cobweb disease, a most serious disease of cultivated mushrooms. Intra-species identification is vital for disease control, however the lack of genomic data makes development of molecular markers challenging. Small size, high copy number, and high mutation rate of fungal mitochondrial genome makes it a good candidate for intra and inter species differentiation. In this study, the mitochondrial genome of H. H.a0001 was determined from genomic DNA using Illumina sequencing. The roughly 72 kb genome shows all major features found in other Hypocreales: 14 common protein genes, large and small subunit rRNAs genes and 27 tRNAs genes. Gene arrangement comparison showed conserved gene orders in Hypocreales mitochondria are relatively conserved, with the exception of Acremonium chrysogenum and Acremonium implicatum. Mitochondrial genome comparison also revealed that intron length primarily contributes to mitogenome size variation. Seventeen introns were detected in six conserved genes: five in cox1, four in rnl, three in cob, two each in atp6 and cox3, and one in cox2. Four introns were found to contain two introns or open reading frames: cox3-i2 is a twintron containing two group IA type introns; cox2-i1 is a group IB intron encoding two homing endonucleases; and cox1-i4 and cox1-i3 both contain two open reading frame (ORFs). Analyses combining secondary intronic structures, insertion sites, and similarities of homing endonuclease genes reveal two group IA introns arranged side by side within cox3-i2. Mitochondrial data for H. aurantius provides the basis for further studies relating to population genetics and species identification. PMID:27376282

  11. mRNA deep sequencing reveals 75 new genes and a complex transcriptional landscape in Mimivirus.

    PubMed

    Legendre, Matthieu; Audic, Stéphane; Poirot, Olivier; Hingamp, Pascal; Seltzer, Virginie; Byrne, Deborah; Lartigue, Audrey; Lescot, Magali; Bernadac, Alain; Poulain, Julie; Abergel, Chantal; Claverie, Jean-Michel

    2010-05-01

    Mimivirus, a virus infecting Acanthamoeba, is the prototype of the Mimiviridae, the latest addition to the nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses. The Mimivirus genome encodes close to 1000 proteins, many of them never before encountered in a virus, such as four amino-acyl tRNA synthetases. To explore the physiology of this exceptional virus and identify the genes involved in the building of its characteristic intracytoplasmic "virion factory," we coupled electron microscopy observations with the massively parallel pyrosequencing of the polyadenylated RNA fractions of Acanthamoeba castellanii cells at various time post-infection. We generated 633,346 reads, of which 322,904 correspond to Mimivirus transcripts. This first application of deep mRNA sequencing (454 Life Sciences [Roche] FLX) to a large DNA virus allowed the precise delineation of the 5' and 3' extremities of Mimivirus mRNAs and revealed 75 new transcripts including several noncoding RNAs. Mimivirus genes are expressed across a wide dynamic range, in a finely regulated manner broadly described by three main temporal classes: early, intermediate, and late. This RNA-seq study confirmed the AAAATTGA sequence as an early promoter element, as well as the presence of palindromes at most of the polyadenylation sites. It also revealed a new promoter element correlating with late gene expression, which is also prominent in Sputnik, the recently described Mimivirus "virophage." These results-validated genome-wide by the hybridization of total RNA extracted from infected Acanthamoeba cells on a tiling array (Agilent)--will constitute the foundation on which to build subsequent functional studies of the Mimivirus/Acanthamoeba system. PMID:20360389

  12. mRNA deep sequencing reveals 75 new genes and a complex transcriptional landscape in Mimivirus

    PubMed Central

    Legendre, Matthieu; Audic, Stéphane; Poirot, Olivier; Hingamp, Pascal; Seltzer, Virginie; Byrne, Deborah; Lartigue, Audrey; Lescot, Magali; Bernadac, Alain; Poulain, Julie; Abergel, Chantal; Claverie, Jean-Michel

    2010-01-01

    Mimivirus, a virus infecting Acanthamoeba, is the prototype of the Mimiviridae, the latest addition to the nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses. The Mimivirus genome encodes close to 1000 proteins, many of them never before encountered in a virus, such as four amino-acyl tRNA synthetases. To explore the physiology of this exceptional virus and identify the genes involved in the building of its characteristic intracytoplasmic “virion factory,” we coupled electron microscopy observations with the massively parallel pyrosequencing of the polyadenylated RNA fractions of Acanthamoeba castellanii cells at various time post-infection. We generated 633,346 reads, of which 322,904 correspond to Mimivirus transcripts. This first application of deep mRNA sequencing (454 Life Sciences [Roche] FLX) to a large DNA virus allowed the precise delineation of the 5′ and 3′ extremities of Mimivirus mRNAs and revealed 75 new transcripts including several noncoding RNAs. Mimivirus genes are expressed across a wide dynamic range, in a finely regulated manner broadly described by three main temporal classes: early, intermediate, and late. This RNA-seq study confirmed the AAAATTGA sequence as an early promoter element, as well as the presence of palindromes at most of the polyadenylation sites. It also revealed a new promoter element correlating with late gene expression, which is also prominent in Sputnik, the recently described Mimivirus “virophage.” These results—validated genome-wide by the hybridization of total RNA extracted from infected Acanthamoeba cells on a tiling array (Agilent)—will constitute the foundation on which to build subsequent functional studies of the Mimivirus/Acanthamoeba system. PMID:20360389

  13. Structural Identification of the Vps18 β-Propeller Reveals a Critical Role in the HOPS Complex Stability and Function*

    PubMed Central

    Behrmann, Heide; Lürick, Anna; Kuhlee, Anne; Balderhaar, Henning Kleine; Bröcker, Cornelia; Kümmel, Daniel; Engelbrecht-Vandré, Siegfried; Gohlke, Ulrich; Raunser, Stefan; Heinemann, Udo; Ungermann, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Membrane fusion at the vacuole, the lysosome equivalent in yeast, requires the HOPS tethering complex, which is recruited by the Rab7 GTPase Ypt7. HOPS provides a template for the assembly of SNAREs and thus likely confers fusion at a distinct position on vacuoles. Five of the six subunits in HOPS have a similar domain prediction with strong similarity to COPII subunits and nuclear porins. Here, we show that Vps18 indeed has a seven-bladed β-propeller as its N-terminal domain by revealing its structure at 2.14 Å. The Vps18 N-terminal domain can interact with the N-terminal part of Vps11 and also binds to lipids. Although deletion of the Vps18 N-terminal domain does not preclude HOPS assembly, as revealed by negative stain electron microscopy, the complex is instable and cannot support membrane fusion in vitro. We thus conclude that the β-propeller of Vps18 is required for HOPS stability and function and that it can serve as a starting point for further structural analyses of the HOPS tethering complex. PMID:25324549

  14. Proteome-wide analysis reveals widespread lysine acetylation of major protein complexes in the malaria parasite

    PubMed Central

    Cobbold, Simon A.; Santos, Joana M.; Ochoa, Alejandro; Perlman, David H.; Llinás, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a ubiquitous post-translational modification in many organisms including the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, yet the full extent of acetylation across the parasite proteome remains unresolved. Moreover, the functional significance of acetylation or how specific acetyl-lysine sites are regulated is largely unknown. Here we report a seven-fold expansion of the known parasite ‘acetylome’, characterizing 2,876 acetylation sites on 1,146 proteins. We observe that lysine acetylation targets a diverse range of protein complexes and is particularly enriched within the Apicomplexan AP2 (ApiAP2) DNA-binding protein family. Using quantitative proteomics we determined that artificial perturbation of the acetate/acetyl-CoA balance alters the acetyl-lysine occupancy of several ApiAP2 DNA-binding proteins and related transcriptional proteins. This metabolic signaling could mediate significant downstream transcriptional responses, as we show that acetylation of an ApiAP2 DNA-binding domain ablates its DNA-binding propensity. Lastly, we investigated the acetyl-lysine targets of each class of lysine deacetylase in order to begin to explore how each class of enzyme contributes to regulating the P. falciparum acetylome. PMID:26813983

  15. Revealing complex function, process and pathway interactions with high-throughput expression and biological annotation data.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nitesh Kumar; Ernst, Mathias; Liebscher, Volkmar; Fuellen, Georg; Taher, Leila

    2016-10-20

    The biological relationships both between and within the functions, processes and pathways that operate within complex biological systems are only poorly characterized, making the interpretation of large scale gene expression datasets extremely challenging. Here, we present an approach that integrates gene expression and biological annotation data to identify and describe the interactions between biological functions, processes and pathways that govern a phenotype of interest. The product is a global, interconnected network, not of genes but of functions, processes and pathways, that represents the biological relationships within the system. We validated our approach on two high-throughput expression datasets describing organismal and organ development. Our findings are well supported by the available literature, confirming that developmental processes and apoptosis play key roles in cell differentiation. Furthermore, our results suggest that processes related to pluripotency and lineage commitment, which are known to be critical for development, interact mainly indirectly, through genes implicated in more general biological processes. Moreover, we provide evidence that supports the relevance of cell spatial organization in the developing liver for proper liver function. Our strategy can be viewed as an abstraction that is useful to interpret high-throughput data and devise further experiments.

  16. Global mapping of herpesvirus-host protein complexes reveals a novel transcription strategy for late genes

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Zoe H.; Verschueren, Erik; Jang, Gwendolyn M.; Kleffman, Kevin; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Park, Jimin; Von Dollen, John; Maher, M. Cyrus; Johnson, Tasha; Newton, William; Jäger, Stefanie; Shales, Michael; Horner, Julie; Hernandez, Ryan D.; Krogan, Nevan J.; Glaunsinger, Britt A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Mapping host-pathogen interactions has proven instrumental for understanding how viruses manipulate host machinery and how numerous cellular processes are regulated. DNA viruses such as herpesviruses have relatively large coding capacity and thus can target an extensive network of cellular proteins. To identify the host proteins hijacked by this pathogen, we systematically affinity tagged and purified all 89 proteins of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) from human cells. Mass spectrometry of this material identified over 500 virus-host interactions. KSHV causes AIDS-associated cancers and its interaction network is enriched for proteins linked to cancer and overlaps with proteins that are also targeted by HIV-1. We found that the conserved KSHV protein ORF24 binds to RNA polymerase II and brings it to viral late promoters by mimicking and replacing cellular TATA-box-binding protein (TBP). This is required for herpesviral late gene expression, a complex and poorly understood phase of the viral lifecycle. PMID:25544563

  17. Crystal structure of equine serum albumin in complex with cetirizine reveals a novel drug binding site.

    PubMed

    Handing, Katarzyna B; Shabalin, Ivan G; Szlachta, Karol; Majorek, Karolina A; Minor, Wladek

    2016-03-01

    Serum albumin (SA) is the main transporter of drugs in mammalian blood plasma. Here, we report the first crystal structure of equine serum albumin (ESA) in complex with antihistamine drug cetirizine at a resolution of 2.1Å. Cetirizine is bound in two sites--a novel drug binding site (CBS1) and the fatty acid binding site 6 (CBS2). Both sites differ from those that have been proposed in multiple reports based on equilibrium dialysis and fluorescence studies for mammalian albumins as cetirizine binding sites. We show that the residues forming the binding pockets in ESA are highly conserved in human serum albumin (HSA), and suggest that binding of cetirizine to HSA will be similar. In support of that hypothesis, we show that the dissociation constants for cetirizine binding to CBS2 in ESA and HSA are identical using tryptophan fluorescence quenching. Presence of lysine and arginine residues that have been previously reported to undergo nonenzymatic glycosylation in CBS1 and CBS2 suggests that cetirizine transport in patients with diabetes could be altered. A review of all available SA structures from the PDB shows that in addition to the novel drug binding site we present here (CBS1), there are two pockets on SA capable of binding drugs that do not overlap with fatty acid binding sites and have not been discussed in published reviews. PMID:26896718

  18. Dynamics of the striped bass (Morone saxatilis) ovary proteome reveal a complex network of the translasome.

    PubMed

    Reading, Benjamin J; Williams, Valerie N; Chapman, Robert W; Williams, Taufika Islam; Sullivan, Craig V

    2013-04-01

    We evaluated changes in the striped bass (Morone saxatilis) ovary proteome during the annual reproductive cycle using label-free quantitative mass spectrometry and a novel machine learning analysis based on K-means clustering and support vector machines. Modulated modularity clustering was used to group co-variable proteins into expression modules and Gene Ontology (GO) biological process and KEGG pathway enrichment analyses were conducted for proteins within those modules. We discovered that components of the ribosome along with translation initiation and elongation factors generally decrease as the annual ovarian cycle progresses toward ovulation, concomitant with a slight increase in components of the 26S-proteasome. Co-variation within more than one expression module of components from these two multi-protein complexes suggests that they are not only co-regulated, but that co-regulation occurs through more than one sub-network. These components also co-vary with subunits of the TCP-1 chaperonin system and enzymes of intermediary metabolic pathways, suggesting that protein folding and cellular bioenergetic state play important roles in protein synthesis and degradation. We provide further evidence to suggest that protein synthesis and degradation are intimately linked, and our results support function of a proteasome-ribosome supercomplex known as the translasome. PMID:23414552

  19. Constitutive auxin response in Physcomitrella reveals complex interactions between Aux/IAA and ARF proteins.

    PubMed

    Lavy, Meirav; Prigge, Michael J; Tao, Sibo; Shain, Stephanie; Kuo, April; Kirchsteiger, Kerstin; Estelle, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The coordinated action of the auxin-sensitive Aux/IAA transcriptional repressors and ARF transcription factors produces complex gene-regulatory networks in plants. Despite their importance, our knowledge of these two protein families is largely based on analysis of stabilized forms of the Aux/IAAs, and studies of a subgroup of ARFs that function as transcriptional activators. To understand how auxin regulates gene expression we generated a Physcomitrella patens line that completely lacks Aux/IAAs. Loss of the repressors causes massive changes in transcription with misregulation of over a third of the annotated genes. Further, we find that the aux/iaa mutant is blind to auxin indicating that auxin regulation of transcription occurs exclusively through Aux/IAA function. We used the aux/iaa mutant as a simplified platform for studies of ARF function and demonstrate that repressing ARFs regulate auxin-induced genes and fine-tune their expression. Further the repressing ARFs coordinate gene induction jointly with activating ARFs and the Aux/IAAs. PMID:27247276

  20. SerRS-tRNASec complex structures reveal mechanism of the first step in selenocysteine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Caiyan; Guo, Yu; Tian, Qingnan; Jia, Qian; Gao, Yuanzhu; Zhang, Qinfen; Zhou, Chun; Xie, Wei

    2015-12-01

    Selenocysteine (Sec) is found in the catalytic centers of many selenoproteins and plays important roles in living organisms. Malfunctions of selenoproteins lead to various human disorders including cancer. Known as the 21st amino acid, the biosynthesis of Sec involves unusual pathways consisting of several stages. While the later stages of the pathways are well elucidated, the molecular basis of the first stage-the serylation of Sec-specific tRNA (tRNA(Sec)) catalyzed by seryl-tRNA synthetase (SerRS)-is unclear. Here we present two cocrystal structures of human SerRS bound with tRNA(Sec) in different stoichiometry and confirm the formation of both complexes in solution by various characterization techniques. We discovered that the enzyme mainly recognizes the backbone of the long variable arm of tRNA(Sec) with few base-specific contacts. The N-terminal coiled-coil region works like a long-range lever to precisely direct tRNA 3' end to the other protein subunit for aminoacylation in a conformation-dependent manner. Restraints of the flexibility of the coiled-coil greatly reduce serylation efficiencies. Lastly, modeling studies suggest that the local differences present in the D- and T-regions as well as the characteristic U20:G19:C56 base triple in tRNA(Sec) may allow SerRS to distinguish tRNA(Sec) from closely related tRNA(Ser) substrate. PMID:26433229

  1. Dynamic Modelling Reveals ‘Hotspots’ on the Pathway to Enzyme-Substrate Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Shane E.; Weber, Daniel K.; Downton, Matthew T.; Wagner, John; Perugini, Matthew A.

    2016-01-01

    Dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS) catalyzes the first committed step in the diaminopimelate pathway of bacteria, yielding amino acids required for cell wall and protein biosyntheses. The essentiality of the enzyme to bacteria, coupled with its absence in humans, validates DHDPS as an antibacterial drug target. Conventional drug design efforts have thus far been unsuccessful in identifying potent DHDPS inhibitors. Here, we make use of contemporary molecular dynamics simulation and Markov state models to explore the interactions between DHDPS from the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus and its cognate substrate, pyruvate. Our simulations recover the crystallographic DHDPS-pyruvate complex without a priori knowledge of the final bound structure. The highly conserved residue Arg140 was found to have a pivotal role in coordinating the entry of pyruvate into the active site from bulk solvent, consistent with previous kinetic reports, indicating an indirect role for the residue in DHDPS catalysis. A metastable binding intermediate characterized by multiple points of intermolecular interaction between pyruvate and key DHDPS residue Arg140 was found to be a highly conserved feature of the binding trajectory when comparing alternative binding pathways. By means of umbrella sampling we show that these binding intermediates are thermodynamically metastable, consistent with both the available experimental data and the substrate binding model presented in this study. Our results provide insight into an important enzyme-substrate interaction in atomistic detail that offers the potential to be exploited for the discovery of more effective DHDPS inhibitors and, in a broader sense, dynamic protein-drug interactions. PMID:26967332

  2. Dynamics of the striped bass (Morone saxatilis) ovary proteome reveal a complex network of the translasome.

    PubMed

    Reading, Benjamin J; Williams, Valerie N; Chapman, Robert W; Williams, Taufika Islam; Sullivan, Craig V

    2013-04-01

    We evaluated changes in the striped bass (Morone saxatilis) ovary proteome during the annual reproductive cycle using label-free quantitative mass spectrometry and a novel machine learning analysis based on K-means clustering and support vector machines. Modulated modularity clustering was used to group co-variable proteins into expression modules and Gene Ontology (GO) biological process and KEGG pathway enrichment analyses were conducted for proteins within those modules. We discovered that components of the ribosome along with translation initiation and elongation factors generally decrease as the annual ovarian cycle progresses toward ovulation, concomitant with a slight increase in components of the 26S-proteasome. Co-variation within more than one expression module of components from these two multi-protein complexes suggests that they are not only co-regulated, but that co-regulation occurs through more than one sub-network. These components also co-vary with subunits of the TCP-1 chaperonin system and enzymes of intermediary metabolic pathways, suggesting that protein folding and cellular bioenergetic state play important roles in protein synthesis and degradation. We provide further evidence to suggest that protein synthesis and degradation are intimately linked, and our results support function of a proteasome-ribosome supercomplex known as the translasome.

  3. Physical Conditions of Eta Car Complex Environment Revealed From Photoionization Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verner, E. M.; Bruhweiler, F.; Nielsen, K. E.; Gull, T.; Kober, G. Vieira; Corcoran, M.

    2006-01-01

    The very massive star, Eta Carinae, is enshrouded in an unusual complex environment of nebulosities and structures. The circumstellar gas gives rise to distinct absorption and emission components at different velocities and distances from the central source(s). Through photoionization modeling, we find that the radiation field from the more massive B-star companion supports the low ionization structure throughout the 5.54 year period. The radiation field of an evolved O-star is required to produce the higher ionization . emission seen across the broad maximum. Our studies utilize the HST/STIS data and model calculations of various regimes from doubly ionized species (T= 10,000K) to the low temperature (T = 760 K) conditions conductive to molecule formation (CH and OH). Overall analysis suggests the high depletion in C and O and the enrichment in He and N. The sharp molecular and ionic absorptions in this extensively CNO - processed material offers a unique environment for studying the chemistry, dust formation processes, and nucleosynthesis in the ejected layers of a highly evolved massive star.

  4. A Quantitative Characterization of Nucleoplasmin/Histone Complexes Reveals Chaperone Versatility

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Rivero, Noelia; Franco, Aitor; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrian; Alonso, Edurne; Muga, Arturo; Prado, Adelina

    2016-01-01

    Nucleoplasmin (NP) is an abundant histone chaperone in vertebrate oocytes and embryos involved in storing and releasing maternal histones to establish and maintain the zygotic epigenome. NP has been considered a H2A–H2B histone chaperone, and recently it has been shown that it can also interact with H3-H4. However, its interaction with different types of histones has not been quantitatively studied so far. We show here that NP binds H2A–H2B, H3-H4 and linker histones with Kd values in the subnanomolar range, forming different complexes. Post-translational modifications of NP regulate exposure of the polyGlu tract at the disordered distal face of the protein and induce an increase in chaperone affinity for all histones. The relative affinity of NP for H2A–H2B and linker histones and the fact that they interact with the distal face of the chaperone could explain their competition for chaperone binding, a relevant process in NP-mediated sperm chromatin remodelling during fertilization. Our data show that NP binds H3-H4 tetramers in a nucleosomal conformation and dimers, transferring them to DNA to form disomes and tetrasomes. This finding might be relevant to elucidate the role of NP in chromatin disassembly and assembly during replication and transcription. PMID:27558753

  5. Statistical inference on genetic data reveals the complex demographic history of human populations in central Asia.

    PubMed

    Palstra, Friso P; Heyer, Evelyne; Austerlitz, Frédéric

    2015-06-01

    The demographic history of modern humans constitutes a combination of expansions, colonizations, contractions, and remigrations. The advent of large scale genetic data combined with statistically refined methods facilitates inference of this complex history. Here we study the demographic history of two genetically admixed ethnic groups in Central Asia, an area characterized by high levels of genetic diversity and a history of recurrent immigration. Using Approximate Bayesian Computation, we infer that the timing of admixture markedly differs between the two groups. Admixture in the traditionally agricultural Tajiks could be dated back to the onset of the Neolithic transition in the region, whereas admixture in Kyrgyz is more recent, and may have involved the westward movement of Turkic peoples. These results are confirmed by a coalescent method that fits an isolation-with-migration model to the genetic data, with both Central Asian groups having received gene flow from the extremities of Eurasia. Interestingly, our analyses also uncover signatures of gene flow from Eastern to Western Eurasia during Paleolithic times. In conclusion, the high genetic diversity currently observed in these two Central Asian peoples most likely reflects the effects of recurrent immigration that likely started before historical times. Conversely, conquests during historical times may have had a relatively limited genetic impact. These results emphasize the need for a better understanding of the genetic consequences of transmission of culture and technological innovations, as well as those of invasions and conquests.

  6. Widespread Environmental Contamination with Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Revealed by a Molecular Detection Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Nuno; Santos, Catarina; Valente, Teresa; Gortázar, Christian; Almeida, Virgílio; Correia-Neves, Margarida

    2015-01-01

    Environmental contamination with Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) has been considered crucial for bovine tuberculosis persistence in multi-host-pathogen systems. However, MTC contamination has been difficult to detect due to methodological issues. In an attempt to overcome this limitation we developed an improved protocol for the detection of MTC DNA. MTC DNA concentration was estimated by the Most Probable Number (MPN) method. Making use of this protocol we showed that MTC contamination is widespread in different types of environmental samples from the Iberian Peninsula, which supports indirect transmission as a contributing mechanism for the maintenance of bovine tuberculosis in this multi-host-pathogen system. The proportion of MTC DNA positive samples was higher in the bovine tuberculosis-infected than in presumed negative area (0.32 and 0.18, respectively). Detection varied with the type of environmental sample and was more frequent in sediment from dams and less frequent in water also from dams (0.22 and 0.05, respectively). The proportion of MTC-positive samples was significantly higher in spring (p<0.001), but MTC DNA concentration per sample was higher in autumn and lower in summer. The average MTC DNA concentration in positive samples was 0.82 MPN/g (CI95 0.70–0.98 MPN/g). We were further able to amplify a DNA sequence specific of Mycobacterium bovis/caprae in 4 environmental samples from the bTB-infected area. PMID:26561038

  7. Complex patterns of mitochondrial dynamics in human pancreatic cells revealed by fluorescent confocal imaging.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Andrey V; Hermann, Martin; Troppmair, Jakob; Margreiter, Raimund; Hengster, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial morphology and intracellular organization are tightly controlled by the processes of mitochondrial fission-fusion. Moreover, mitochondrial movement and redistribution provide a local ATP supply at cellular sites of particular demands. Here we analysed mitochondrial dynamics in isolated primary human pancreatic cells. Using real time confocal microscopy and mitochondria-specific fluorescent probes tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester and MitoTracker Green we documented complex and novel patterns of spatial and temporal organization of mitochondria, mitochondrial morphology and motility. The most commonly observed types of mitochondrial dynamics were (i) fast fission and fusion; (ii) small oscillating movements of the mitochondrial network; (iii) larger movements, including filament extension, retraction, fast (0.1-0.3 mum/sec.) and frequent oscillating (back and forth) branching in the mitochondrial network; (iv) as well as combinations of these actions and (v) long-distance intracellular translocation of single spherical mitochondria or separated mitochondrial filaments with velocity up to 0.5 mum/sec. Moreover, we show here for the first time, a formation of unusual mitochondrial shapes like rings, loops, and astonishingly even knots created from one or more mitochondrial filaments. These data demonstrate the presence of extensive heterogeneity in mitochondrial morphology and dynamics in living cells under primary culture conditions. In summary, this study reports new patterns of morphological changes and dynamic motion of mitochondria in human pancreatic cells, suggesting an important role of integrations of mitochondria with other intracellular structures and systems. PMID:19382913

  8. Regional patterns of genetic diversity in Pinus flexilis (Pinaceae) reveal complex species history.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Stacy; Hamrick, J L; Wells, P V

    2002-05-01

    Pinus flexilis (limber pine) is patchily distributed within its large geographic range; it is mainly restricted to high elevations in the Rocky Mountains and the Basin and Range region of western North America. We examined patterns of allozyme diversity in 30 populations from throughout the species' range. Overall genetic diversity (H(e) = 0.186) was high compared with that of most other pine species but was similar to that of other pines widespread in western North America. The proportion of genetic diversity occurring among populations (G(ST) = 0.101) was also high relative to that for other pines. Observed heterozygosity was less than expected in 28 of the 30 populations. When populations were grouped by region, there were notable differences. Those in the Basin and Range region had more genetic diversity within populations, a higher proportion of genetic diversity among populations, and higher levels of inbreeding within populations than populations from either the Northern or Utah Rocky Mountain regions. Patterns of genetic diversity in P. flexilis have likely resulted from a complex distribution of Pleistocene populations and subsequent gene flow via pollen and seed dispersal. PMID:21665679

  9. A Hidden State in Light-Harvesting Complex II Revealed By Multipulse Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) is pivotal both for collecting solar radiation for photosynthesis, and for protection against photodamage under high light intensities (via a process called nonphotochemical quenching, NPQ). Aggregation of LHCII is associated with fluorescence quenching, and is used as an in vitro model system of NPQ. However, there is no agreement on the nature of the quencher and on the validity of aggregation as a model system. Here, we use ultrafast multipulse spectroscopy to populate a quenched state in unquenched (unaggregated) LHCII. The state shows characteristic features of lutein and chlorophyll, suggesting that it is an excitonically coupled state between these two compounds. This state decays in approximately 10 ps, making it a strong competitor for photodamage and photochemical quenching. It is observed in trimeric and monomeric LHCII, upon re-excitation with pulses of different wavelengths and duration. We propose that this state is always present, but is scarcely populated under low light intensities. Under high light intensities it may become more accessible, e.g. by conformational changes, and then form a quenching channel. The same state may be the cause of fluorescence blinking observed in single-molecule spectroscopy of LHCII trimers, where a small subpopulation is in an energetically higher state where the pathway to the quencher opens up. PMID:25815531

  10. Widespread Environmental Contamination with Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Revealed by a Molecular Detection Protocol.

    PubMed

    Santos, Nuno; Santos, Catarina; Valente, Teresa; Gortázar, Christian; Almeida, Virgílio; Correia-Neves, Margarida

    2015-01-01

    Environmental contamination with Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) has been considered crucial for bovine tuberculosis persistence in multi-host-pathogen systems. However, MTC contamination has been difficult to detect due to methodological issues. In an attempt to overcome this limitation we developed an improved protocol for the detection of MTC DNA. MTC DNA concentration was estimated by the Most Probable Number (MPN) method. Making use of this protocol we showed that MTC contamination is widespread in different types of environmental samples from the Iberian Peninsula, which supports indirect transmission as a contributing mechanism for the maintenance of bovine tuberculosis in this multi-host-pathogen system. The proportion of MTC DNA positive samples was higher in the bovine tuberculosis-infected than in presumed negative area (0.32 and 0.18, respectively). Detection varied with the type of environmental sample and was more frequent in sediment from dams and less frequent in water also from dams (0.22 and 0.05, respectively). The proportion of MTC-positive samples was significantly higher in spring (p<0.001), but MTC DNA concentration per sample was higher in autumn and lower in summer. The average MTC DNA concentration in positive samples was 0.82 MPN/g (CI95 0.70-0.98 MPN/g). We were further able to amplify a DNA sequence specific of Mycobacterium bovis/caprae in 4 environmental samples from the bTB-infected area. PMID:26561038

  11. Transcriptome and Secretome Analyses of Phanerochaete chrysosporium Reveal Complex Patterns of Gene Expression▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Vanden Wymelenberg, Amber; Gaskell, Jill; Mozuch, Mike; Kersten, Phil; Sabat, Grzegorz; Martinez, Diego; Cullen, Dan

    2009-01-01

    The wood decay basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium was grown under standard ligninolytic or cellulolytic conditions and subjected to whole-genome expression microarray analysis and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry of extracellular proteins. A total of 545 genes were flagged on the basis of significant changes in transcript accumulation and/or peptide sequences of the secreted proteins. Under nitrogen or carbon limitation, lignin and manganese peroxidase expression increased relative to nutrient replete medium. Various extracellular oxidases were also secreted in these media, supporting a physiological connection based on peroxide generation. Numerous genes presumed to be involved in mobilizing and recycling nitrogen were expressed under nitrogen limitation, and among these were several secreted glutamic acid proteases not previously observed. In medium containing microcrystalline cellulose as the sole carbon source, numerous genes encoding carbohydrate-active enzymes were upregulated. Among these were six members of the glycoside hydrolase family 61, as well as several polysaccharide lyases and carbohydrate esterases. Presenting a daunting challenge for future research, more than 190 upregulated genes are predicted to encode proteins of unknown function. Of these hypothetical proteins, approximately one-third featured predicted secretion signals, and 54 encoded proteins detected in extracellular filtrates. Our results affirm the importance of certain oxidative enzymes and, underscoring the complexity of lignocellulose degradation, also support an important role for many new proteins of unknown function. PMID:19376920

  12. Widespread Environmental Contamination with Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Revealed by a Molecular Detection Protocol.

    PubMed

    Santos, Nuno; Santos, Catarina; Valente, Teresa; Gortázar, Christian; Almeida, Virgílio; Correia-Neves, Margarida

    2015-01-01

    Environmental contamination with Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) has been considered crucial for bovine tuberculosis persistence in multi-host-pathogen systems. However, MTC contamination has been difficult to detect due to methodological issues. In an attempt to overcome this limitation we developed an improved protocol for the detection of MTC DNA. MTC DNA concentration was estimated by the Most Probable Number (MPN) method. Making use of this protocol we showed that MTC contamination is widespread in different types of environmental samples from the Iberian Peninsula, which supports indirect transmission as a contributing mechanism for the maintenance of bovine tuberculosis in this multi-host-pathogen system. The proportion of MTC DNA positive samples was higher in the bovine tuberculosis-infected than in presumed negative area (0.32 and 0.18, respectively). Detection varied with the type of environmental sample and was more frequent in sediment from dams and less frequent in water also from dams (0.22 and 0.05, respectively). The proportion of MTC-positive samples was significantly higher in spring (p<0.001), but MTC DNA concentration per sample was higher in autumn and lower in summer. The average MTC DNA concentration in positive samples was 0.82 MPN/g (CI95 0.70-0.98 MPN/g). We were further able to amplify a DNA sequence specific of Mycobacterium bovis/caprae in 4 environmental samples from the bTB-infected area.

  13. Eye movements reveal the time-course of anticipating behaviour based on complex, conflicting desires.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Heather J; Breheny, Richard

    2011-05-01

    The time-course of representing others' perspectives is inconclusive across the currently available models of ToM processing. We report two visual-world studies investigating how knowledge about a character's basic preferences (e.g. Tom's favourite colour is pink) and higher-order desires (his wish to keep this preference secret) compete to influence online expectations about subsequent behaviour. Participants' eye movements around a visual scene were tracked while they listened to auditory narratives. While clear differences in anticipatory visual biases emerged between conditions in Experiment 1, post-hoc analyses testing the strength of the relevant biases suggested a discrepancy in the time-course of predicting appropriate referents within the different contexts. Specifically, predictions to the target emerged very early when there was no conflict between the character's basic preferences and higher-order desires, but appeared to be relatively delayed when comprehenders were provided with conflicting information about that character's desire to keep a secret. However, a second experiment demonstrated that this apparent 'cognitive cost' in inferring behaviour based on higher-order desires was in fact driven by low-level features between the context sentence and visual scene. Taken together, these results suggest that healthy adults are able to make complex higher-order ToM inferences without the need to call on costly cognitive processes. Results are discussed relative to previous accounts of ToM and language processing.

  14. Constitutive auxin response in Physcomitrella reveals complex interactions between Aux/IAA and ARF proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lavy, Meirav; Prigge, Michael J; Tao, Sibo; Shain, Stephanie; Kuo, April; Kirchsteiger, Kerstin; Estelle, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The coordinated action of the auxin-sensitive Aux/IAA transcriptional repressors and ARF transcription factors produces complex gene-regulatory networks in plants. Despite their importance, our knowledge of these two protein families is largely based on analysis of stabilized forms of the Aux/IAAs, and studies of a subgroup of ARFs that function as transcriptional activators. To understand how auxin regulates gene expression we generated a Physcomitrella patens line that completely lacks Aux/IAAs. Loss of the repressors causes massive changes in transcription with misregulation of over a third of the annotated genes. Further, we find that the aux/iaa mutant is blind to auxin indicating that auxin regulation of transcription occurs exclusively through Aux/IAA function. We used the aux/iaa mutant as a simplified platform for studies of ARF function and demonstrate that repressing ARFs regulate auxin-induced genes and fine-tune their expression. Further the repressing ARFs coordinate gene induction jointly with activating ARFs and the Aux/IAAs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13325.001 PMID:27247276

  15. Environmental Interactions and Epistasis Are Revealed in the Proteomic Responses to Complex Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Samir, Parimal; Rahul; Slaughter, James C; Link, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Ultimately, the genotype of a cell and its interaction with the environment determine the cell's biochemical state. While the cell's response to a single stimulus has been studied extensively, a conceptual framework to model the effect of multiple environmental stimuli applied concurrently is not as well developed. In this study, we developed the concepts of environmental interactions and epistasis to explain the responses of the S. cerevisiae proteome to simultaneous environmental stimuli. We hypothesize that, as an abstraction, environmental stimuli can be treated as analogous to genetic elements. This would allow modeling of the effects of multiple stimuli using the concepts and tools developed for studying gene interactions. Mirroring gene interactions, our results show that environmental interactions play a critical role in determining the state of the proteome. We show that individual and complex environmental stimuli behave similarly to genetic elements in regulating the cellular responses to stimuli, including the phenomena of dominance and suppression. Interestingly, we observed that the effect of a stimulus on a protein is dominant over other stimuli if the response to the stimulus involves the protein. Using publicly available transcriptomic data, we find that environmental interactions and epistasis regulate transcriptomic responses as well. PMID:26247773

  16. Quantification of social behavior in D. discoideum reveals complex fixed and facultative strategies.

    PubMed

    Buttery, Neil J; Rozen, Daniel E; Wolf, Jason B; Thompson, Christopher R L

    2009-08-25

    Understanding the maintenance of cooperation requires an understanding of the nature of cheaters and the strategies used to mitigate their effects. However, it is often difficult to determine how cheating or differential social success has arisen. For example, cheaters may employ different strategies (e.g., fixed and facultative), whereas other causes of unequal fitness in social situations can result in winners and losers without cheating. To address these problems, we quantified the social success of naturally occurring genotypes of Dictyostelium discoideum during the formation of chimeric fruiting bodies, consisting of dead stalk cells and viable spores. We demonstrate that an apparent competitive dominance hierarchy of spore formation in chimera is partly due to a fixed strategy where genotypes exhibit dramatically different spore allocations. However, we also find complex, variable facultative strategies, where genotypes change their allocation in chimera. By determining the magnitude and direction of these changes, we partition facultative cheating into two forms: (1) promotion of individual fitness through selfish behaviour ("self-promotion") and (2) coercion of other genotypes to act cooperatively. Our results demonstrate and define social interactions between D. discoideum isolates, thus providing a conceptual framework for the study of the genetic mechanisms that underpin social evolution.

  17. New Levels of Language Processing Complexity and Organization Revealed by Granger Causation

    PubMed Central

    Gow, David W.; Caplan, David N.

    2012-01-01

    Granger causation analysis of high spatiotemporal resolution reconstructions of brain activation offers a new window on the dynamic interactions between brain areas that support language processing. Premised on the observation that causes both precede and uniquely predict their effects, this approach provides an intuitive, model-free means of identifying directed causal interactions in the brain. It requires the analysis of all non-redundant potentially interacting signals, and has shown that even “early” processes such as speech perception involve interactions of many areas in a strikingly large network that extends well beyond traditional left hemisphere perisylvian cortex that play out over hundreds of milliseconds. In this paper we describe this technique and review several general findings that reframe the way we think about language processing and brain function in general. These include the extent and complexity of language processing networks, the central role of interactive processing dynamics, the role of processing hubs where the input from many distinct brain regions are integrated, and the degree to which task requirements and stimulus properties influence processing dynamics and inform our understanding of “language-specific” localized processes. PMID:23293611

  18. BstYI bound to noncognate DNA reveals a "hemispecific" complex: implications for DNA scanning.

    PubMed

    Townson, Sharon A; Samuelson, James C; Bao, Yongming; Xu, Shuang-Yong; Aggarwal, Aneel K

    2007-04-01

    DNA recognition by proteins is essential for specific expression of genes in a living organism. En route to a target DNA site, a protein will often sample noncognate DNA sites through nonspecific protein-DNA interactions, resulting in a variety of conformationally different binding states. We present here the crystal structure of endonuclease BstYI bound to a noncognate DNA. Surprisingly, the structure reveals the enzyme in a "hemispecific" binding state on the pathway between nonspecific and specific recognition. A single base pair change in the DNA abolishes binding of only one monomer, with the second monomer bound specifically. We show that the enzyme binds essentially as a rigid body, and that one end of the DNA is accommodated loosely in the binding cleft while the other end is held tightly. Another intriguing feature of the structure is Ser172, which has a dual role in establishing nonspecific and specific contacts. Taken together, the structure provides a snapshot of an enzyme in a "paused" intermediate state that may be part of a more general mechanism of scanning DNA. PMID:17437717

  19. Phospho-proteomic analyses of B-Raf protein complexes reveal new regulatory principles

    PubMed Central

    Eisenhardt, Anja E.; Sprenger, Adrian; Röring, Michael; Herr, Ricarda; Weinberg, Florian; Köhler, Martin; Braun, Sandra; Orth, Joachim; Diedrich, Britta; Lanner, Ulrike; Tscherwinski, Natalja; Schuster, Simon; Dumaz, Nicolas; Schmidt, Enrico; Baumeister, Ralf; Schlosser, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    B-Raf represents a critical physiological regulator of the Ras/RAF/MEK/ERK-pathway and a pharmacological target of growing clinical relevance, in particular in oncology. To understand how B-Raf itself is regulated, we combined mass spectrometry with genetic approaches to map its interactome in MCF-10A cells as well as in B-Raf deficient murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and B-Raf/Raf-1 double deficient DT40 lymphoma cells complemented with wildtype or mutant B-Raf expression vectors. Using a multi-protease digestion approach, we identified a novel ubiquitination site and provide a detailed B-Raf phospho-map. Importantly, we identify two evolutionary conserved phosphorylation clusters around T401 and S419 in the B-Raf hinge region. SILAC labelling and genetic/biochemical follow-up revealed that these clusters are phosphorylated in the contexts of oncogenic Ras, sorafenib induced Raf dimerization and in the background of the V600E mutation. We further show that the vemurafenib sensitive phosphorylation of the T401 cluster occurs in trans within a Raf dimer. Substitution of the Ser/Thr-residues of this cluster by alanine residues enhances the transforming potential of B-Raf, indicating that these phosphorylation sites suppress its signaling output. Moreover, several B-Raf phosphorylation sites, including T401 and S419, are somatically mutated in tumors, further illustrating the importance of phosphorylation for the regulation of this kinase. PMID:27034005

  20. BstYI bound to noncognate DNA reveals a "hemispecific" complex: implications for DNA scanning.

    PubMed

    Townson, Sharon A; Samuelson, James C; Bao, Yongming; Xu, Shuang-Yong; Aggarwal, Aneel K

    2007-04-01

    DNA recognition by proteins is essential for specific expression of genes in a living organism. En route to a target DNA site, a protein will often sample noncognate DNA sites through nonspecific protein-DNA interactions, resulting in a variety of conformationally different binding states. We present here the crystal structure of endonuclease BstYI bound to a noncognate DNA. Surprisingly, the structure reveals the enzyme in a "hemispecific" binding state on the pathway between nonspecific and specific recognition. A single base pair change in the DNA abolishes binding of only one monomer, with the second monomer bound specifically. We show that the enzyme binds essentially as a rigid body, and that one end of the DNA is accommodated loosely in the binding cleft while the other end is held tightly. Another intriguing feature of the structure is Ser172, which has a dual role in establishing nonspecific and specific contacts. Taken together, the structure provides a snapshot of an enzyme in a "paused" intermediate state that may be part of a more general mechanism of scanning DNA.

  1. First DNA sequences from Asian cave bear fossils reveal deep divergences and complex phylogeographic patterns.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Michael; Rohland, Nadin; Weinstock, Jacobo; Baryshnikov, Gennady; Sher, Andrei; Nagel, Doris; Rabeder, Gernot; Pinhasi, Ron; Schmidt, Heiko A; Hofreiter, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Until recently, cave bears were believed to have only inhabited Europe. However, recent morphological evidence suggests that cave bears' geographic range extended as far east as Transbaikalia, Eastern Siberia. These Asian cave bears were morphologically distinct from European cave bears. However, how they related to European lineages remains unclear, stressing the need to assess the phylogenetic and phylogeographic relationship between Asian cave bears and their European relatives. In this work, we address this issue using a 227 base-pair fragment of the mitochondrial control region obtained from nine fossil bone samples from eight sites from the Urals, Caucasus, Altai Mountains, Ukraine and Yana River region in Eastern Siberia. Results of the phylogenetic analyses indicate that (i) the cave bear from the Yana River is most closely related to cave bears from the Caucasus region; (ii) the Caucasus/Yana group of bears is genetically very distinct from both European cave bears and brown bears, suggesting that these bears could represent an independent species; and (iii) the Western European cave bear lineage reached at least temporarily to the Altai Mountains, 7000 km east of their known centre of distribution. These results suggest that the diversity of cave bears was greater than previously believed, and that they could survive in a much wider range of ecological conditions than previously assumed. They also agree with recent studies on other extinct and extant species, such as wolves, hyenas and steppe bison, which have also revealed higher genetic and ecological diversity in Pleistocene populations than previously known. PMID:19226321

  2. Genome sequencing reveals complex secondary metabolome in the marine actinomycete Salinispora tropica

    PubMed Central

    Udwary, Daniel W.; Zeigler, Lisa; Asolkar, Ratnakar N.; Singan, Vasanth; Lapidus, Alla; Fenical, William; Jensen, Paul R.; Moore, Bradley S.

    2007-01-01

    Recent fermentation studies have identified actinomycetes of the marine-dwelling genus Salinispora as prolific natural product producers. To further evaluate their biosynthetic potential, we sequenced the 5,183,331-bp S. tropica CNB-440 circular genome and analyzed all identifiable secondary natural product gene clusters. Our analysis shows that S. tropica dedicates a large percentage of its genome (≈9.9%) to natural product assembly, which is greater than previous Streptomyces genome sequences as well as other natural product-producing actinomycetes. The S. tropica genome features polyketide synthase systems of every known formally classified family, nonribosomal peptide synthetases, and several hybrid clusters. Although a few clusters appear to encode molecules previously identified in Streptomyces species, the majority of the 17 biosynthetic loci are novel. Specific chemical information about putative and observed natural product molecules is presented and discussed. In addition, our bioinformatic analysis not only was critical for the structure elucidation of the polyene macrolactam salinilactam A, but its structural analysis aided the genome assembly of the highly repetitive slm loci. This study firmly establishes the genus Salinispora as a rich source of drug-like molecules and importantly reveals the powerful interplay between genomic analysis and traditional natural product isolation studies. PMID:17563368

  3. Ethiopian genetic diversity reveals linguistic stratification and complex influences on the Ethiopian gene pool.

    PubMed

    Pagani, Luca; Kivisild, Toomas; Tarekegn, Ayele; Ekong, Rosemary; Plaster, Chris; Gallego Romero, Irene; Ayub, Qasim; Mehdi, S Qasim; Thomas, Mark G; Luiselli, Donata; Bekele, Endashaw; Bradman, Neil; Balding, David J; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2012-07-13

    Humans and their ancestors have traversed the Ethiopian landscape for millions of years, and present-day Ethiopians show great cultural, linguistic, and historical diversity, which makes them essential for understanding African variability and human origins. We genotyped 235 individuals from ten Ethiopian and two neighboring (South Sudanese and Somali) populations on an Illumina Omni 1M chip. Genotypes were compared with published data from several African and non-African populations. Principal-component and STRUCTURE-like analyses confirmed substantial genetic diversity both within and between populations, and revealed a match between genetic data and linguistic affiliation. Using comparisons with African and non-African reference samples in 40-SNP genomic windows, we identified "African" and "non-African" haplotypic components for each Ethiopian individual. The non-African component, which includes the SLC24A5 allele associated with light skin pigmentation in Europeans, may represent gene flow into Africa, which we estimate to have occurred ~3 thousand years ago (kya). The non-African component was found to be more similar to populations inhabiting the Levant rather than the Arabian Peninsula, but the principal route for the expansion out of Africa ~60 kya remains unresolved. Linkage-disequilibrium decay with genomic distance was less rapid in both the whole genome and the African component than in southern African samples, suggesting a less ancient history for Ethiopian populations.

  4. Ethiopian Genetic Diversity Reveals Linguistic Stratification and Complex Influences on the Ethiopian Gene Pool

    PubMed Central

    Pagani, Luca; Kivisild, Toomas; Tarekegn, Ayele; Ekong, Rosemary; Plaster, Chris; Gallego Romero, Irene; Ayub, Qasim; Mehdi, S. Qasim; Thomas, Mark G.; Luiselli, Donata; Bekele, Endashaw; Bradman, Neil; Balding, David J.; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Humans and their ancestors have traversed the Ethiopian landscape for millions of years, and present-day Ethiopians show great cultural, linguistic, and historical diversity, which makes them essential for understanding African variability and human origins. We genotyped 235 individuals from ten Ethiopian and two neighboring (South Sudanese and Somali) populations on an Illumina Omni 1M chip. Genotypes were compared with published data from several African and non-African populations. Principal-component and STRUCTURE-like analyses confirmed substantial genetic diversity both within and between populations, and revealed a match between genetic data and linguistic affiliation. Using comparisons with African and non-African reference samples in 40-SNP genomic windows, we identified “African” and “non-African” haplotypic components for each Ethiopian individual. The non-African component, which includes the SLC24A5 allele associated with light skin pigmentation in Europeans, may represent gene flow into Africa, which we estimate to have occurred ∼3 thousand years ago (kya). The non-African component was found to be more similar to populations inhabiting the Levant rather than the Arabian Peninsula, but the principal route for the expansion out of Africa ∼60 kya remains unresolved. Linkage-disequilibrium decay with genomic distance was less rapid in both the whole genome and the African component than in southern African samples, suggesting a less ancient history for Ethiopian populations. PMID:22726845

  5. Barcoding reveals complex clonal dynamics of de novo transformed human mammary cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Long V; Pellacani, Davide; Lefort, Sylvain; Kannan, Nagarajan; Osako, Tomo; Makarem, Maisam; Cox, Claire L; Kennedy, William; Beer, Philip; Carles, Annaick; Moksa, Michelle; Bilenky, Misha; Balani, Sneha; Babovic, Sonja; Sun, Ivan; Rosin, Miriam; Aparicio, Samuel; Hirst, Martin; Eaves, Connie J

    2015-12-10

    Most human breast cancers have diversified genomically and biologically by the time they become clinically evident. Early events involved in their genesis and the cellular context in which these events occur have thus been difficult to characterize. Here we present the first formal evidence of the shared and independent ability of basal cells and luminal progenitors, isolated from normal human mammary tissue and transduced with a single oncogene (KRAS(G12D)), to produce serially transplantable, polyclonal, invasive ductal carcinomas within 8 weeks of being introduced either subrenally or subcutaneously into immunodeficient mice. DNA barcoding of the initial cells revealed a dramatic change in the numbers and sizes of clones generated from them within 2 weeks, and the first appearance of many 'new' clones in tumours passaged into secondary recipients. Both primary and secondary tumours were phenotypically heterogeneous and primary tumours were categorized transcriptionally as 'normal-like'. This system challenges previous concepts that carcinogenesis in normal human epithelia is necessarily a slow process requiring the acquisition of multiple driver mutations. It also presents the first description of initial events that accompany the genesis and evolution of malignant human mammary cell populations, thereby contributing new understanding of the rapidity with which heterogeneity in their properties can develop. PMID:26633636

  6. Analysis of putative nonulosonic acid biosynthesis pathways in Archaea reveals a complex evolutionary history.

    PubMed

    Kandiba, Lina; Eichler, Jerry

    2013-08-01

    Sialic acids and the other nonulosonic acid sugars, legionaminic acid and pseudaminic acid, are nine carbon-containing sugars that can be detected as components of the glycans decorating proteins and other molecules in Eukarya and Bacteria. Yet, despite the prevalence of N-glycosylation in Archaea and the variety of sugars recruited for the archaeal version of this post-translational modification, only a single report of a nonulosonic acid sugar in an archaeal N-linked glycan has appeared. Hence, to obtain a clearer picture of nonulosonic acid sugar biosynthesis capability in Archaea, 122 sequenced genomes were scanned for the presence of genes involved in the biogenesis of these sugars. The results reveal that while Archaea and Bacteria share a common route of sialic acid biosynthesis, numerous archaeal nonulosonic acid sugar biosynthesis pathway components were acquired from elsewhere via various routes. Still, the limited number of Archaea encoding components involved in the synthesis of nonulosonic acid sugars implies that such saccharides are not major components of glycans in this domain.

  7. Single-Molecule FRET Reveals Hidden Complexity in a Protein Energy Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Tsytlonok, Maksym; Ibrahim, Shehu M.; Rowling, Pamela J.E.; Xu, Wenshu; Ruedas-Rama, Maria J.; Orte, Angel; Klenerman, David; Itzhaki, Laura S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Here, using single-molecule FRET, we reveal previously hidden conformations of the ankyrin-repeat domain of AnkyrinR, a giant adaptor molecule that anchors integral membrane proteins to the spectrin-actin cytoskeleton through simultaneous binding of multiple partner proteins. We show that the ankyrin repeats switch between high-FRET and low-FRET states, controlled by an unstructured “safety pin” or “staple” from the adjacent domain of AnkyrinR. Opening of the safety pin leads to unravelling of the ankyrin repeat stack, a process that will dramatically affect the relative orientations of AnkyrinR binding partners and, hence, the anchoring of the spectrin-actin cytoskeleton to the membrane. Ankyrin repeats are one of the most ubiquitous molecular recognition platforms in nature, and it is therefore important to understand how their structures are adapted for function. Our results point to a striking mechanism by which the order-disorder transition and, thereby, the activity of repeat proteins can be regulated. PMID:25565106

  8. Unexpected Results are Usually Wrong, but Often Interesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, M.

    2014-12-01

    In climate modeling, an unexpected result is usually wrong, arising from some sort of mistake. Despite the fact that we all bemoan uncertainty in climate, the field is underlain by a robust, successful body of theory and any properly conducted modeling experiment is posed and conducted within that context. Consequently, if results from a complex climate model disagree with theory or from expectations from simpler models, much skepticism is in order. But, this exposes the fundamental tension of using complex, sophisticated models. If simple models and theory were perfect there would be no reason for complex models--the entire point of sophisticated models is to see if unexpected phenomena arise as emergent properties of the system. In this talk, I will step through some paleoclimate examples, drawn from my own work, of unexpected results that emerge from complex climate models arising from mistakes of two kinds. The first kind of mistake, is what I call a 'smart mistake'; it is an intentional incorporation of assumptions, boundary conditions, or physics that is in violation of theoretical or observational constraints. The second mistake, a 'dumb mistake', is just that, an unintentional violation. Analysis of such mistaken simulations provides some potentially novel and certainly interesting insights into what is possible and right in paleoclimate modeling by forcing the reexamination of well-held assumptions and theories.

  9. Ubiquinone-binding site mutagenesis reveals the role of mitochondrial complex II in cell death initiation.

    PubMed

    Kluckova, K; Sticha, M; Cerny, J; Mracek, T; Dong, L; Drahota, Z; Gottlieb, E; Neuzil, J; Rohlena, J

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory complex II (CII, succinate dehydrogenase, SDH) inhibition can induce cell death, but the mechanistic details need clarification. To elucidate the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation upon the ubiquinone-binding (Qp) site blockade, we substituted CII subunit C (SDHC) residues lining the Qp site by site-directed mutagenesis. Cell lines carrying these mutations were characterized on the bases of CII activity and exposed to Qp site inhibitors MitoVES, thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA) and Atpenin A5. We found that I56F and S68A SDHC variants, which support succinate-mediated respiration and maintain low intracellular succinate, were less efficiently inhibited by MitoVES than the wild-type (WT) variant. Importantly, associated ROS generation and cell death induction was also impaired, and cell death in the WT cells was malonate and catalase sensitive. In contrast, the S68A variant was much more susceptible to TTFA inhibition than the I56F variant or the WT CII, which was again reflected by enhanced ROS formation and increased malonate- and catalase-sensitive cell death induction. The R72C variant that accumulates intracellular succinate due to compromised CII activity was resistant to MitoVES and TTFA treatment and did not increase ROS, even though TTFA efficiently generated ROS at low succinate in mitochondria isolated from R72C cells. Similarly, the high-affinity Qp site inhibitor Atpenin A5 rapidly increased intracellular succinate in WT cells but did not induce ROS or cell death, unlike MitoVES and TTFA that upregulated succinate only moderately. These results demonstrate that cell death initiation upon CII inhibition depends on ROS and that the extent of cell death correlates with the potency of inhibition at the Qp site unless intracellular succinate is high. In addition, this validates the Qp site of CII as a target for cell death induction with relevance to cancer therapy. PMID:25950479

  10. Ubiquinone-binding site mutagenesis reveals the role of mitochondrial complex II in cell death initiation

    PubMed Central

    Kluckova, K; Sticha, M; Cerny, J; Mracek, T; Dong, L; Drahota, Z; Gottlieb, E; Neuzil, J; Rohlena, J

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory complex II (CII, succinate dehydrogenase, SDH) inhibition can induce cell death, but the mechanistic details need clarification. To elucidate the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation upon the ubiquinone-binding (Qp) site blockade, we substituted CII subunit C (SDHC) residues lining the Qp site by site-directed mutagenesis. Cell lines carrying these mutations were characterized on the bases of CII activity and exposed to Qp site inhibitors MitoVES, thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA) and Atpenin A5. We found that I56F and S68A SDHC variants, which support succinate-mediated respiration and maintain low intracellular succinate, were less efficiently inhibited by MitoVES than the wild-type (WT) variant. Importantly, associated ROS generation and cell death induction was also impaired, and cell death in the WT cells was malonate and catalase sensitive. In contrast, the S68A variant was much more susceptible to TTFA inhibition than the I56F variant or the WT CII, which was again reflected by enhanced ROS formation and increased malonate- and catalase-sensitive cell death induction. The R72C variant that accumulates intracellular succinate due to compromised CII activity was resistant to MitoVES and TTFA treatment and did not increase ROS, even though TTFA efficiently generated ROS at low succinate in mitochondria isolated from R72C cells. Similarly, the high-affinity Qp site inhibitor Atpenin A5 rapidly increased intracellular succinate in WT cells but did not induce ROS or cell death, unlike MitoVES and TTFA that upregulated succinate only moderately. These results demonstrate that cell death initiation upon CII inhibition depends on ROS and that the extent of cell death correlates with the potency of inhibition at the Qp site unless intracellular succinate is high. In addition, this validates the Qp site of CII as a target for cell death induction with relevance to cancer therapy. PMID:25950479

  11. Rare Inherited and De Novo CNVs Reveal Complex Contributions to ASD Risk in Multiplex Families.

    PubMed

    Leppa, Virpi M; Kravitz, Stephanie N; Martin, Christa Lese; Andrieux, Joris; Le Caignec, Cedric; Martin-Coignard, Dominique; DyBuncio, Christina; Sanders, Stephan J; Lowe, Jennifer K; Cantor, Rita M; Geschwind, Daniel H

    2016-09-01

    Rare mutations, including copy-number variants (CNVs), contribute significantly to autism spectrum disorder (ASD) risk. Although their importance has been established in families with only one affected child (simplex families), the contribution of both de novo and inherited CNVs to ASD in families with multiple affected individuals (multiplex families) is less well understood. We analyzed 1,532 families from the Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE) to assess the impact of de novo and rare CNVs on ASD risk in multiplex families. We observed a higher burden of large, rare CNVs, including inherited events, in individuals with ASD than in their unaffected siblings (odds ratio [OR] = 1.7), but the rate of de novo events was significantly lower than in simplex families. In previously characterized ASD risk loci, we identified 49 CNVs, comprising 24 inherited events, 19 de novo events, and 6 events of unknown inheritance, a significant enrichment in affected versus control individuals (OR = 3.3). In 21 of the 30 families (71%) in whom at least one affected sibling harbored an established ASD major risk CNV, including five families harboring inherited CNVs, the CNV was not shared by all affected siblings, indicating that other risk factors are contributing. We also identified a rare risk locus for ASD and language delay at chromosomal region 2q24 (implicating NR4A2) and another lower-penetrance locus involving inherited deletions and duplications of WWOX. The genetic architecture in multiplex families differs from that in simplex families and is complex, warranting more complete genetic characterization of larger multiplex ASD cohorts. PMID:27569545

  12. Rare Inherited and De Novo CNVs Reveal Complex Contributions to ASD Risk in Multiplex Families.

    PubMed

    Leppa, Virpi M; Kravitz, Stephanie N; Martin, Christa Lese; Andrieux, Joris; Le Caignec, Cedric; Martin-Coignard, Dominique; DyBuncio, Christina; Sanders, Stephan J; Lowe, Jennifer K; Cantor, Rita M; Geschwind, Daniel H

    2016-09-01

    Rare mutations, including copy-number variants (CNVs), contribute significantly to autism spectrum disorder (ASD) risk. Although their importance has been established in families with only one affected child (simplex families), the contribution of both de novo and inherited CNVs to ASD in families with multiple affected individuals (multiplex families) is less well understood. We analyzed 1,532 families from the Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE) to assess the impact of de novo and rare CNVs on ASD risk in multiplex families. We observed a higher burden of large, rare CNVs, including inherited events, in individuals with ASD than in their unaffected siblings (odds ratio [OR] = 1.7), but the rate of de novo events was significantly lower than in simplex families. In previously characterized ASD risk loci, we identified 49 CNVs, comprising 24 inherited events, 19 de novo events, and 6 events of unknown inheritance, a significant enrichment in affected versus control individuals (OR = 3.3). In 21 of the 30 families (71%) in whom at least one affected sibling harbored an established ASD major risk CNV, including five families harboring inherited CNVs, the CNV was not shared by all affected siblings, indicating that other risk factors are contributing. We also identified a rare risk locus for ASD and language delay at chromosomal region 2q24 (implicating NR4A2) and another lower-penetrance locus involving inherited deletions and duplications of WWOX. The genetic architecture in multiplex families differs from that in simplex families and is complex, warranting more complete genetic characterization of larger multiplex ASD cohorts.

  13. Complex Regulation Pattern of IRF3 Activation Revealed by a Novel Dimerization Reporter System.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zining; Ji, Jingyun; Peng, Di; Ma, Feng; Cheng, Genhong; Qin, F Xiao-Feng

    2016-05-15

    Induction of type I IFN (IFN-I) is essential for host antiviral immune responses. However, IFN-I also plays divergent roles in antibacterial immunity, persistent viral infections, autoimmune diseases, and tumorigenesis. IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) is the master transcription factor that controls IFN-I production via phosphorylation-dependent dimerization in most cell types in response to viral infections and various innate stimuli by pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). To monitor the dynamic process of IRF3 activation, we developed a novel IRF3 dimerization reporter based on bimolecular luminescence complementation (BiLC) techniques, termed the IRF3-BiLC reporter. Robust induction of luciferase activity of the IRF3-BiLC reporter was observed upon viral infection and PAMP stimulation with a broad dynamic range. Knockout of TANK-binding kinase 1, the critical upstream kinase of IRF3, as well as the mutation of serine 386, the essential phosphorylation site of IRF3, completely abolished the luciferase activity of IRF3-BiLC reporter, confirming the authenticity of IRF3 activation. Taken together, these results demonstrated that the IRF3-BiLC reporter is a highly specific, reliable, and sensitive system to measure IRF3 activity. Using this reporter system, we further observed that the temporal pattern and magnitude of IRF3 activation induced by various PAMPs are highly complex with distinct cell type-specific characteristics, and IRF3 dimerization is a direct regulatory node for IFN-α/β receptor-mediated feed-forward regulation and crosstalk with other pathways. Therefore, the IRF3-BiLC reporter has multiple potential applications, including mechanistic studies as well as the identification of novel compounds that can modulate IRF3 activation. PMID:27045107

  14. Nutrient export from catchments on forested landscapes reveals complex nonstationary and stationary climate signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengistu, Samson G.; Quick, Christopher G.; Creed, Irena F.

    2013-06-01

    Headwater catchment hydrology and biogeochemistry are influenced by climate, including linear trends (nonstationary signals) and climate oscillations (stationary signals). We used an analytical framework to detect nonstationary and stationary signals in yearly time series of nutrient export [dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), nitrate (NO3--N), and total dissolved phosphorus (TDP)] in forested headwater catchments with differential water loading and water storage potential at the Turkey Lakes Watershed in Ontario, Canada. We tested the hypotheses that (1) climate has nonstationary and stationary effects on nutrient export, the combination of which explains most of the variation in nutrient export; (2) more metabolically active nutrients (e.g., DON, NO3--N, and TDP) are more sensitive to these signals; and (3) catchments with relatively low water loading and water storage capacity are more sensitive to these signals. Both nonstationary and stationary signals were identified, and the combination of both explained the majority of the variation in nutrient export data. More variation was explained in more labile nutrients (DON, NO3--N, and TDP), which were also more sensitive to climate signals. The catchment with low-water storage potential and low water loading was most sensitive to nonstationary and stationary climatic oscillations, suggesting that these hydrologic features are characteristic of the most effective sentinels of climate change. The observed complex links between climate change, climatic oscillations, and water nutrient fluxes in headwater catchments suggest that climate may have considerable influence on the productivity and biodiversity of surface waters, in addition to other drivers such as atmospheric pollution.

  15. Mechanics of severing for large microtubule complexes revealed by coarse-grained simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theisen, Kelly E.; Desai, Neha J.; Volski, Allison M.; Dima, Ruxandra I.

    2013-09-01

    We investigate the mechanical behavior of microtubule (MT) protofilaments under the action of bending forces, ramped up linearly in time, to provide insight into the severing of MTs by microtubule associated proteins (MAPs). We used the self-organized polymer model which employs a coarse-grained description of the protein chain and ran Brownian dynamics simulations accelerated on graphics processing units that allow us to follow the dynamics of a MT system on experimental timescales. Our study focused on the role played in the MT depolymerization dynamics by the inter-tubulin contacts a protofilament experiences when embedded in the MT lattice, and the number of binding sites of MAPs on MTs. We found that proteins inducing breaking of MTs must have at least three attachment points on any tubulin dimer from an isolated protofilament. In contrast, two points of contact would suffice when dimers are located in an intact MT lattice, in accord with experimental findings on MT severing proteins. Our results show that confinement of a protofilament in the MT lattice leads to a drastic reduction in the energy required for the removal of tubulin dimers, due to the drastic reduction in entropy. We further showed that there are differences in the energetic requirements based on the location of the dimer to be removed by severing. Comparing the energy of tubulin dimers removal revealed by our simulations with the amount of energy resulting from one ATP hydrolysis, which is the source of energy for all MAPs, we provided strong evidence for the experimental finding that severing proteins do not bind uniformly along the MT wall.

  16. Identifying habitats at risk: simple models can reveal complex ecosystem dynamics.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Paul S; Pitt, Kylie A; Olds, Andrew D; Rissik, David; Connolly, Rod M

    2015-03-01

    The relationship between ecological impact and ecosystem structure is often strongly nonlinear, so that small increases in impact levels can cause a disproportionately large response in ecosystem structure. Nonlinear ecosystem responses can be difficult to predict because locally relevant data sets can be difficult or impossible to obtain. Bayesian networks (BN) are an emerging tool that can help managers to define ecosystem relationships using a range of data types from comprehensive quantitative data sets to expert opinion. We show how a simple BN can reveal nonlinear dynamics in seagrass ecosystems using ecological relationships sourced from the literature. We first developed a conceptual diagram by cataloguing the ecological responses of seagrasses to a range of drivers and impacts. We used the conceptual diagram to develop a BN populated with values sourced from published studies. We then applied the BN to show that the amount of initial seagrass biomass has a mitigating effect on the level of impact a meadow can withstand without loss, and that meadow recovery can often require disproportionately large improvements in impact levels. This mitigating effect resulted in the middle ranges of impact levels having a wide likelihood of seagrass presence, a situation known as bistability. Finally, we applied the model in a case study to identify the risk of loss and the likelihood of recovery for the conservation and management of seagrass meadows in Moreton Bay, Queensland, Australia. We used the model to predict the likelihood of bistability in 23 locations in the Bay. The model predicted bistability in seven locations, most of which have experienced seagrass loss at some stage in the past 25 years providing essential information for potential future restoration efforts. Our results demonstrate the capacity of simple, flexible modeling tools to facilitate collation and synthesis of disparate information. This approach can be adopted in the initial stages of

  17. Spatial patterns of African ungulate aggregation reveal complex but limited risk effects from reintroduced carnivores.

    PubMed

    Moll, Remington J; Killion, Alexander K; Montgomery, Robert A; Tambling, Craig J; Hayward, Matt W

    2016-05-01

    The "landscape of fear" model, recently advanced in research on the non-lethal effects of carnivores on ungulates, predicts that prey will exhibit detectable antipredator behavior not only during risky times (i.e., predators in close proximity) but also in risky places (i.e., habitat where predators kill prey or tend to occur). Aggregation is an important antipredator response in numerous ungulate species, making it a useful metric to evaluate the strength and scope of the landscape of fear in a multi-carnivore, multi-ungulate system. We conducted ungulate surveys over a 2-year period in South Africa to test the influence of three broad-scale sources of variation in the landscape on spatial patterns in aggregation: (1) habitat structure, (2) where carnivores tended to occur (i.e., population-level utilization distributions), and (3) where carnivores tended to kill ungulate prey (i.e., probabilistic kill site maps). We analyzed spatial variation in aggregation for six ungulate species exposed to predation from recently reintroduced lion (Panthera leo) and spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta). Although we did detect larger aggregations of ungulates in "risky places," these effects existed primarily for smaller-bodied (<150 kg) ungulates and were relatively moderate (change of 4 individuals across all habitats). In comparison, ungulate aggregations tended to increase at a slightly lower rate in habitat that was more open. The lion, an ambush (stalking) carnivore, had stronger influence on ungulate aggregation than the hyena, an active (coursing) carnivore. In addition, places where lions tended to kill prey had a greater effect on ungulate aggregation than places where lions tended to occur, but an opposing pattern existed for hyena. Our study reveals heterogeneity in the landscape of fear and suggests broad-scale risk effects following carnivore reintroduction only moderately influence ungulate aggregation size and vary considerably by predator hunting mode, type of

  18. Spatial patterns of African ungulate aggregation reveal complex but limited risk effects from reintroduced carnivores.

    PubMed

    Moll, Remington J; Killion, Alexander K; Montgomery, Robert A; Tambling, Craig J; Hayward, Matt W

    2016-05-01

    The "landscape of fear" model, recently advanced in research on the non-lethal effects of carnivores on ungulates, predicts that prey will exhibit detectable antipredator behavior not only during risky times (i.e., predators in close proximity) but also in risky places (i.e., habitat where predators kill prey or tend to occur). Aggregation is an important antipredator response in numerous ungulate species, making it a useful metric to evaluate the strength and scope of the landscape of fear in a multi-carnivore, multi-ungulate system. We conducted ungulate surveys over a 2-year period in South Africa to test the influence of three broad-scale sources of variation in the landscape on spatial patterns in aggregation: (1) habitat structure, (2) where carnivores tended to occur (i.e., population-level utilization distributions), and (3) where carnivores tended to kill ungulate prey (i.e., probabilistic kill site maps). We analyzed spatial variation in aggregation for six ungulate species exposed to predation from recently reintroduced lion (Panthera leo) and spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta). Although we did detect larger aggregations of ungulates in "risky places," these effects existed primarily for smaller-bodied (<150 kg) ungulates and were relatively moderate (change of 4 individuals across all habitats). In comparison, ungulate aggregations tended to increase at a slightly lower rate in habitat that was more open. The lion, an ambush (stalking) carnivore, had stronger influence on ungulate aggregation than the hyena, an active (coursing) carnivore. In addition, places where lions tended to kill prey had a greater effect on ungulate aggregation than places where lions tended to occur, but an opposing pattern existed for hyena. Our study reveals heterogeneity in the landscape of fear and suggests broad-scale risk effects following carnivore reintroduction only moderately influence ungulate aggregation size and vary considerably by predator hunting mode, type of

  19. Age-related structural abnormalities in the human retina-choroid complex revealed by two-photon excited autofluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Han, Meng; Giese, Guenter; Schmitz-Valckenberg, Steffen; Bindewald-Wittich, Almut; Holz, Frank G; Yu, Jiayi; Bille, Josef F; Niemz, Markolf H

    2007-01-01

    The intensive metabolism of photoreceptors is delicately maintained by the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and the choroid. Dysfunction of either the RPE or choroid may lead to severe damage to the retina. Two-photon excited autofluorescence (TPEF) from endogenous fluorophores in the human retina provides a novel opportunity to reveal age-related structural abnormalities in the retina-choroid complex prior to apparent pathological manifestations of age-related retinal diseases. In the photoreceptor layer, the regularity of the macular photoreceptor mosaic is preserved during aging. In the RPE, enlarged lipofuscin granules demonstrate significantly blue-shifted autofluorescence, which coincides with the depletion of melanin pigments. Prominent fibrillar structures in elderly Bruch's membrane and choriocapillaries represent choroidal structure and permeability alterations. Requiring neither slicing nor labeling, TPEF imaging is an elegant and highly efficient tool to delineate the thick, fragile, and opaque retina-choroid complex, and may provide clues to the trigger events of age-related macular degeneration.

  20. Complex frictional behaviour of clay-bearing carbonate faults revealed by integrated field and experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, R. J.; De Paola, N.; Holdsworth, R.

    2013-12-01

    Seismicity in the Northern Apennines of Italy nucleates in and propagates through a complex carbonate multilayer sequence, comprising limestones with regular marl interbeds. Observations from the Gubbio fault (1984, Ms = 5.2) indicate that earthquake displacement is localized within narrow principal slip zones, <1.5 mm wide, characterized by cataclasites, gouges and calcite veins, and containing up to 50% phyllosilicate. Due to their predominantly velocity-strengthening nature, phyllosilicates are often considered to promote aseismic behaviour during the inter-seismic and post-seismic (afterslip) periods, and may act as barriers to rupture propagation in the upper crust. To assess the effect of clay content on the frictional behaviour and microstructural evolution of carbonate faults during earthquake propagation, we performed high-velocity friction (HVF) experiments, using a rotary-shear apparatus, on end-member gouges of calcite (Cal), montmorillonite (Mont) and mixed-layer illite-smectite (I/S), and on 50:50 and 80:20 mixtures of Cal+Mont and Cal+I/S. Experiments were conducted at room temperature, 1.3 m/s slip rate and 9 MPa normal load. Each sample was run under dry and water-saturated conditions, and experiments terminated both at peak friction (μp) and steady-state friction (μss) for comparison of microstructures at contrasting strength stages. Results for the dry gouges are in-line with previous HVF experiments: all samples attain a peak in friction at the onset of slip, ranging from 0.59 (Mont) to 0.72 (Cal), followed by a dramatic decrease in strength within the first ~0.5 m, after which friction maintains a constant μss value, ranging from 0.15 (Cal) to 0.22 (Mont). Frictional behaviour of the wet gouges is very different: clay-bearing samples typically do not exhibit a peak in friction; steady-state behaviour is attained immediately at the onset of sliding with friction coefficient values as low as 0.05. In summary, when dry, calcite controls the

  1. Temporal trends in mammal responses to fire reveals the complex effects of fire regime attributes.

    PubMed

    Lindenmayer, David B; Blanchard, Wade; MacGregor, Christopher; Barton, Philip; Banks, Sam C; Crane, Mason; Michael, Damian; Okada, Sachiko; Berry, Laurence; Florance, Daniel; Gill, Malcolm

    2016-03-01

    guide management of when and where (prescribed) fire or, conversely, long-unburned vegetation is needed. The complexity of observed responses highlights the need for large reserves in which patterns of heterogeneity in fire regimes can be sustained in space and over time.

  2. The Complex History of Alarcon Rise Mid-Ocean Ridge Rhyolite Revealed through Mineral Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, B. M.; Portner, R. A.; Clague, D. A.; Daczko, N. R.; Castillo, P.; Bindeman, I. N.

    2014-12-01

    A suite of basalts to rhyolites recovered from the Alarcon Rise, the northern extension of the intermediate spreading-rate East Pacific Rise, provides an unparalleled test of established mechanisms for high-Si lava formation at ridges. Rhyolites are ≤35% phyric and poorly vesicular. Mafic xenoclasts are common, and plagioclase is the dominant phase. Olivine and clinopyroxene are also common, and orthopyroxene, FeTi-oxides, zircon, and rare pyrite blebs are present. Major and trace element glass data are consistent with MELTS models of fractional crystallization from a parental melt, but a diverse mineral population records added complexity. Olivine and plagioclase compositions are broadly consistent with models, with the exception of more variable Fo52-77 and An87-28 in a basaltic andesitic composition where pigeonite is predicted to replace olivine in the crystallizing assemblage between ~1085-1015°C; pigeonites analyzed in an andesite have lower Ca and Fe than predicted. Clinopyroxene variability generally increases with host melt SiO2, from Mg# 86-84 in basalts to Mg# 80-21 in rhyolites, and zoning is common with higher-MgO anhedral cores mantled by lower-MgO euhedral rims. Cooler magmas aided the preservation of disequilibrium and are supported by ~715-835°C Ti-in-zircon and ilmenite-magnetite thermometry in rhyolites. Despite a well-predicted liquid line of decent, multiple signals of chemical disequilibrium in intermediate to silicic melts support mixing of magmatic batches and/or assimilation of partially hydrous crust. Assimilation is permissible given δ18O values that are lower than expected solely from fractional crystallization (i.e., <6.3‰ at 77% SiO2), but assimilation extent is limited on the basis of δD ~82±8 and Pacific MORB-like 87Sr/86Sr. Zircon Hf-isotopes and trace element patterns support a juvenile oceanic crustal source. Whereas depleted Pacific MORB mantle source reservoir is supported by whole rock Sr-Nd isotopes, slight

  3. Comprehensive analysis of RNA-seq data reveals the complexity of the transcriptome in Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    complement to the B. rapa genome sequence, which will advance our understanding of the dynamics and complexity of the B. rapa transcriptome. The atlas of gene expression in different tissues will be useful for accelerating research on functional genomics and genome evolution in Brassica species. PMID:24098974

  4. Complex Crustal Structure Beneath Western Turkey Revealed by 3D Seismic Full Waveform Inversion (FWI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubuk-Sabuncu, Yesim; Taymaz, Tuncay; Fichtner, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    We present a 3D radially anisotropic velocity model of the crust and uppermost mantle structure beneath the Sea of Marmara and surroundings based on the full waveform inversion method. The intense seismic activity and crustal deformation are observed in the Northwest Turkey due to transition tectonics between the strike-slip North Anatolian Fault (NAF) and the extensional Aegean region. We have selected and simulated complete waveforms of 62 earthquakes (Mw > 4.0) occurred during 2007-2015, and recorded at (Δ < 10°) distances. Three component earthquake data is obtained from broadband seismic stations of Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Center (KOERI, Turkey), Hellenic Unified Seismic Network (HUSN, Greece) and Earthquake Research Center of Turkey (AFAD-DAD). The spectral-element solver of the wave equation, SES3D algorithm, is used to simulate seismic wave propagation in 3D spherical coordinates (Fichtner, 2009). The Large Scale Seismic Inversion Framework (LASIF) workflow tool is also used to perform full seismic waveform inversion (Krischer et al., 2015). The initial 3D Earth model is implemented from the multi-scale seismic tomography study of Fichtner et al. (2013). Discrepancies between the observed and simulated synthetic waveforms are determined using the time-frequency misfits which allows a separation between phase and amplitude information (Fichtner et al., 2008). The conjugate gradient optimization method is used to iteratively update the initial Earth model when minimizing the misfit. The inversion is terminated after 19 iterations since no further advances are observed in updated models. Our analysis revealed shear wave velocity variations of the shallow and deeper crustal structure beneath western Turkey down to depths of ~35-40 km. Low shear wave velocity anomalies are observed in the upper and mid crustal depths beneath major fault zones located in the study region. Low velocity zones also tend to mark the outline of young volcanic

  5. Integrative genetic, epigenetic and pathological analysis of paraganglioma reveals complex dysregulation of NOTCH signaling.

    PubMed

    Cama, Alessandro; Verginelli, Fabio; Lotti, Lavinia Vittoria; Napolitano, Francesco; Morgano, Annalisa; D'Orazio, Andria; Vacca, Michele; Perconti, Silvia; Pepe, Felice; Romani, Federico; Vitullo, Francesca; di Lella, Filippo; Visone, Rosa; Mannelli, Massimo; Neumann, Hartmut P H; Raiconi, Giancarlo; Paties, Carlo; Moschetta, Antonio; Tagliaferri, Roberto; Veronese, Angelo; Sanna, Mario; Mariani-Costantini, Renato

    2013-10-01

    reveal an essential role of NOTCH pathway deregulation in this tumor type. PMID:23955600

  6. Multiple mating reveals complex patterns of assortative mating by personality and body size.

    PubMed

    Montiglio, Pierre-Olivier; Wey, Tina W; Chang, Ann T; Fogarty, Sean; Sih, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Understanding patterns of non-random mating is central to predicting the consequences of sexual selection. Most studies quantifying assortative mating focus on testing for correlations among partners' phenotypes in mated pairs. Few studies have distinguished between assortative mating arising from preferences for similar partners (expressed by all or a subset of the population) vs. from phenotypic segregation in the environment. Also, few studies have assessed the robustness of assortative mating against temporal changes in social conditions. We tracked multiple matings by stream water striders (Aquarius remigis) across variable social conditions to investigate mating patterns by both body size and behavioural type (personality). We documented temporal changes in partner availability and used a mixed model approach to analyse individual behaviours and changes in mating status recorded on an hourly basis. We assessed whether all or only a subset of individuals in the population expressed a tendency to mate with similar phenotypes. Our analyses took into account variation in the level of competition and in the phenotypes of available partners. Males and females exhibited significant assortative mating by body size: the largest males and females, and the smallest males and females mated together more often than random. However, individuals of intermediate size were equally likely to mate with small, intermediate or large partners. Individuals also displayed two contrasting patterns of assortative mating by personality (activity level). Individuals generally mated preferentially with partners of similar activity level. However, beyond that general trend, individuals with more extreme personalities tended to exhibit disassortative mating: the most active males mated disproportionately with less active females and the least active males tended to mate with more active females. Our analyses thus revealed multiple, distinct patterns of nonrandom mating. These mating

  7. Multiple mating reveals complex patterns of assortative mating by personality and body size.

    PubMed

    Montiglio, Pierre-Olivier; Wey, Tina W; Chang, Ann T; Fogarty, Sean; Sih, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Understanding patterns of non-random mating is central to predicting the consequences of sexual selection. Most studies quantifying assortative mating focus on testing for correlations among partners' phenotypes in mated pairs. Few studies have distinguished between assortative mating arising from preferences for similar partners (expressed by all or a subset of the population) vs. from phenotypic segregation in the environment. Also, few studies have assessed the robustness of assortative mating against temporal changes in social conditions. We tracked multiple matings by stream water striders (Aquarius remigis) across variable social conditions to investigate mating patterns by both body size and behavioural type (personality). We documented temporal changes in partner availability and used a mixed model approach to analyse individual behaviours and changes in mating status recorded on an hourly basis. We assessed whether all or only a subset of individuals in the population expressed a tendency to mate with similar phenotypes. Our analyses took into account variation in the level of competition and in the phenotypes of available partners. Males and females exhibited significant assortative mating by body size: the largest males and females, and the smallest males and females mated together more often than random. However, individuals of intermediate size were equally likely to mate with small, intermediate or large partners. Individuals also displayed two contrasting patterns of assortative mating by personality (activity level). Individuals generally mated preferentially with partners of similar activity level. However, beyond that general trend, individuals with more extreme personalities tended to exhibit disassortative mating: the most active males mated disproportionately with less active females and the least active males tended to mate with more active females. Our analyses thus revealed multiple, distinct patterns of nonrandom mating. These mating

  8. Structure of Crumbs tail in complex with the PALS1 PDZ-SH3-GK tandem reveals a highly specific assembly mechanism for the apical Crumbs complex.

    PubMed

    Li, Youjun; Wei, Zhiyi; Yan, Yan; Wan, Qingwen; Du, Quansheng; Zhang, Mingjie

    2014-12-01

    The Crumbs (Crb) complex, formed by Crb, PALS1, and PATJ, is evolutionarily conserved in metazoans and acts as a master cell-growth and -polarity regulator at the apical membranes in polarized epithelia. Crb intracellular functions, including its direct binding to PALS1, are mediated by Crb's highly conserved 37-residue cytoplasmic tail. However, the mechanistic basis governing the highly specific Crb-PALS1 complex formation is unclear, as reported interaction between the Crb tail (Crb-CT) and PALS1 PSD-95/DLG/ZO-1 (PDZ) domain is weak and promiscuous. Here we have discovered that the PDZ-Src homolgy 3 (SH3)-Guanylate kinase (GK) tandem of PALS1 binds to Crb-CT with a dissociation constant of 70 nM, which is ∼ 100-fold stronger than the PALS1 PDZ-Crb-CT interaction. The crystal structure of the PALS1 PDZ-SH3-GK-Crb-CT complex reveals that PDZ-SH3-GK forms a structural supramodule with all three domains contributing to the tight binding to Crb. Mutations disrupting the tertiary interactions of the PDZ-SH3-GK supramodule weaken the PALS1-Crb interaction and compromise PALS1-mediated polarity establishment in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cysts. We further show that specific target binding of other members of membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUKs) (e.g., CASK binding to neurexin) also requires the presence of their PDZ-SH3-GK tandems.

  9. Binding of an organo-osmium(II) anticancer complex to guanine and cytosine on DNA revealed by electron-based dissociations in high resolution Top-Down FT-ICR mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wootton, Christopher A; Sanchez-Cano, Carlos; Liu, Hong-Ke; Barrow, Mark P; Sadler, Peter J; O'Connor, Peter B

    2015-02-28

    The Os(II) arene anticancer complex [(η(6)-bip)Os(en)Cl](+) (Os1-Cl; where bip = biphenyl, and en = ethylenediamine) binds strongly to DNA. Here we investigate reactions between Os1-Cl and the self-complementary 12-mer oligonucleotide 5'-TAGTAATTACTA-3' (DNA12) using ultra high resolution Fourier Transform-Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR MS). Identification of the specific sites of DNA osmiation with {(η(6)-bip)Os(en)}(2+) was made possible by the use of Electron Detachment Dissociation (EDD) which produced a wide range of assignable osmiated MS/MS fragments. In contrast, the more commonly used CAD and IRMPD techniques produced fragments which lose the bound osmium. These studies reveal that not only is guanine G3 a strong binding site for {(η(6)-bip)Os(en)}(2+) but, unexpectedly, so too is cytosine C10. Interestingly, the G3/C10 di-osmiated adduct of DNA12 also formed readily but did not undergo such facile fragmentation by EDD, perhaps due to folding induced by van der Waal's interactions of the bound osmium arene species. These new insights into osmium arene DNA adducts should prove valuable for the design of new organometallic drugs and contribute to understanding the lack of cross resistance of this organometallic anticancer complex with cisplatin.

  10. Comparative Genomic Analyses of the Human NPHP1 Locus Reveal Complex Genomic Architecture and Its Regional Evolution in Primates

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Bo; Liu, Pengfei; Gupta, Aditya; Beck, Christine R.; Tejomurtula, Anusha; Campbell, Ian M.; Gambin, Tomasz; Simmons, Alexandra D.; Withers, Marjorie A.; Harris, R. Alan; Rogers, Jeffrey; Schwartz, David C.; Lupski, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Many loci in the human genome harbor complex genomic structures that can result in susceptibility to genomic rearrangements leading to various genomic disorders. Nephronophthisis 1 (NPHP1, MIM# 256100) is an autosomal recessive disorder that can be caused by defects of NPHP1; the gene maps within the human 2q13 region where low copy repeats (LCRs) are abundant. Loss of function of NPHP1 is responsible for approximately 85% of the NPHP1 cases—about 80% of such individuals carry a large recurrent homozygous NPHP1 deletion that occurs via nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR) between two flanking directly oriented ~45 kb LCRs. Published data revealed a non-pathogenic inversion polymorphism involving the NPHP1 gene flanked by two inverted ~358 kb LCRs. Using optical mapping and array-comparative genomic hybridization, we identified three potential novel structural variant (SV) haplotypes at the NPHP1 locus that may protect a haploid genome from the NPHP1 deletion. Inter-species comparative genomic analyses among primate genomes revealed massive genomic changes during evolution. The aggregated data suggest that dynamic genomic rearrangements occurred historically within the NPHP1 locus and generated SV haplotypes observed in the human population today, which may confer differential susceptibility to genomic instability and the NPHP1 deletion within a personal genome. Our study documents diverse SV haplotypes at a complex LCR-laden human genomic region. Comparative analyses provide a model for how this complex region arose during primate evolution, and studies among humans suggest that intra-species polymorphism may potentially modulate an individual’s susceptibility to acquiring disease-associated alleles. PMID:26641089

  11. The structure of the BfrB-Bfd complex reveals protein-protein interactions enabling iron release from bacterioferritin

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Huili; Wang, Yan; Lovell, Scott; Kumar, Ritesh; Ruvinsky, Anatoly M.; Battaile, Kevin P.; Vakser, Ilya A.; Rivera, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Ferritin-like molecules are unique to cellular iron homeostasis because they can store iron at concentrations much higher than those dictated by the solubility of Fe3+. Very little is known about the protein interactions that deliver iron for storage, or promote the mobilization of stored iron from ferritin-like molecules. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterioferritin (Pa-BfrB) in complex with bacterioferritin-associated ferredoxin (Pa-Bfd) at 2.0 Å resolution. As the first example of a ferritin-like molecule in complex with a cognate partner, the structure provides unprecedented insight into the complementary interface that enables the [2Fe-2S] cluster of Pa-Bfd to promote heme-mediated electron transfer through the BfrB protein dielectric (~18 Å), a process that is necessary to reduce the core ferric mineral and facilitate mobilization of Fe2+. The Pa-BfrB-Bfd complex also revealed the first structure of a Bfd, thus providing a first view to what appears to be a versatile metal binding domain ubiquitous to the large Fer2_BFD family of proteins and enzymes with diverse functions. Residues at the Pa-BfrB-Bfd interface are highly conserved in Bfr and Bfd sequences from a number of pathogenic bacteria, suggesting that the specific recognition between Pa-BfrB and Pa-Bfd is of widespread significance to the understanding of bacterial iron homeostasis. PMID:22812654

  12. The Structure of the BfrB-Bfd Complex Reveals Protein-Protein Interactions Enabling Iron Release from Bacterioferritin

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Huili; Wang, Yan; Lovell, Scott; Kumar, Ritesh; Ruvinsky, Anatoly M; Battaile, Kevin P; Vakser, Ilya A; Rivera, Mario

    2012-09-11

    Ferritin-like molecules are unique to cellular iron homeostasis because they can store iron at concentrations much higher than those dictated by the solubility of Fe3+. Very little is known about the protein interactions that deliver iron for storage or promote the mobilization of stored iron from ferritin-like molecules. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterioferritin (Pa-BfrB) in complex with bacterioferritin-associated ferredoxin (Pa-Bfd) at 2.0 Å resolution. As the first example of a ferritin-like molecule in complex with a cognate partner, the structure provides unprecedented insight into the complementary interface that enables the [2Fe-2S] cluster of Pa-Bfd to promote heme-mediated electron transfer through the BfrB protein dielectric (~18 Å), a process that is necessary to reduce the core ferric mineral and facilitate mobilization of Fe2+. The Pa-BfrB-Bfd complex also revealed the first structure of a Bfd, thus providing a first view to what appears to be a versatile metal binding domain ubiquitous to the large Fer2_BFD family of proteins and enzymes with diverse functions. Residues at the Pa-BfrB-Bfd interface are highly conserved in Bfr and Bfd sequences from a number of pathogenic bacteria, suggesting that the specific recognition between Pa-BfrB and Pa-Bfd is of widespread significance to the understanding of bacterial iron homeostasis.

  13. Mechanism of Bacterial Cell-Surface Attachment Revealed by the Structure of Cellulosomal Type II Cohesin-dockerin Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Adams,J.; Pal, G.; Jia, Z.; Smith, S.

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial cell-surface attachment of macromolecular complexes maintains the microorganism in close proximity to extracellular substrates and allows for optimal uptake of hydrolytic byproducts. The cellulosome is a large multienzyme complex used by many anaerobic bacteria for the efficient degradation of plant cell-wall polysaccharides. The mechanism of cellulosome retention to the bacterial cell surface involves a calcium-mediated protein-protein interaction between the dockerin (Doc) module from the cellulosomal scaffold and a cohesin (Coh) module of cell-surface proteins located within the proteoglycan layer. Here, we report the structure of an ultra-high-affinity (K{sub a} = 1.44 x 10{sup 10} M{sup 1-}) complex between type II Doc, together with its neighboring X module from the cellulosome scaffold of Clostridium thermocellum, and a type II Coh module associated with the bacterial cell surface. Identification of X module-Doc and X module-Coh contacts reveal roles for the X module in Doc stability and enhanced Coh recognition. This extremely tight interaction involves one face of the Coh and both helices of the Doc and comprises significant hydrophobic character and a complementary extensive hydrogen-bond network. This structure represents a unique mechanism for cell-surface attachment in anaerobic bacteria and provides a rationale for discriminating between type I and type II Coh modules.

  14. Identification of ORC1/CDC6-interacting factors in Trypanosoma brucei reveals critical features of origin recognition complex architecture.

    PubMed

    Tiengwe, Calvin; Marcello, Lucio; Farr, Helen; Gadelha, Catarina; Burchmore, Richard; Barry, J David; Bell, Stephen D; McCulloch, Richard

    2012-01-01

    DNA replication initiates by formation of a pre-replication complex on sequences termed origins. In eukaryotes, the pre-replication complex is composed of the Origin Recognition Complex (ORC), Cdc6 and the MCM replicative helicase in conjunction with Cdt1. Eukaryotic ORC is considered to be composed of six subunits, named Orc1-6, and monomeric Cdc6 is closely related in sequence to Orc1. However, ORC has been little explored in protists, and only a single ORC protein, related to both Orc1 and Cdc6, has been shown to act in DNA replication in Trypanosoma brucei. Here we identify three highly diverged putative T. brucei ORC components that interact with ORC1/CDC6 and contribute to cell division. Two of these factors are so diverged that we cannot determine if they are eukaryotic ORC subunit orthologues, or are parasite-specific replication factors. The other we show to be a highly diverged Orc4 orthologue, demonstrating that this is one of the most widely conserved ORC subunits in protists and revealing it to be a key element of eukaryotic ORC architecture. Additionally, we have examined interactions amongst the T. brucei MCM subunits and show that this has the conventional eukaryotic heterohexameric structure, suggesting that divergence in the T. brucei replication machinery is limited to the earliest steps in origin licensing.

  15. Unexpected elastic softening in δ -plutonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliori, A.; Ledbetter, H.; Lawson, A. C.; Ramirez, A. P.; Miller, D. A.; Betts, J. B.; Ramos, M.; Lashley, J. C.

    2006-02-01

    Elastic-constant measurements on a Pu-2.4at.% Ga quasiisotropic polycrystal reveal remarkable elastic softening as temperature increases from ambient to 500K . Unexpected softening appears in both the bulk modulus B and the shear modulus G , thus in all quasiisotropic elastic stiffnesses such as the Young modulus and the Lamé constants. The dB/dT slope gives a (lattice) Grüneisen parameter γ=3.7 , much higher than a typical fcc-metallic-element value of 2.4±0.5 . Especially, this high γ from dB/dT measurements disagrees strongly with the γ=-0.26±0.5 from volume measurements. The dB/dT slope exceeds that measured previously at lower temperatures. Also, it exceeds that expected from high-temperature Debye-Waller-factor measurements. A two-level model used successfully previously to interpret this alloy’s unusually low thermal expansion also describes the large dB/dT . We comment on possible explanations for plutonium’s odd anharmonic behavior. These concepts include magnetism, 5f -electron localization-delocalization, and vibrational entropy. Our measurements on the Pu-Ga polycrystal agree remarkably well with a Kröner-theory average of previous measurements on a same-composition monocrystal.

  16. Rapid Response: Unexpected Jupiter Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon-Miller, Amy

    2009-07-01

    On 3 June 2010, amateur astronomers A. Wesley and C. Go independently captured observations of an impact on Jupiter: the bright flash of an impact itself, not the dark aftermath as seen in 2009. This event was completely unexpected given the recent impact in 2009, and contradicts recently revised predictions of jovian impact rates. Three circumstances make this 2009 event unique: first, the event was captured on video; second, it was on the jovian day-side and hence fully visible from Earth; and third, it was at low latitude {i.e., favorably placed on the planet}. These factors will permit a lightcurve to be extracted, which is critical for determining the energy of the explosion and hence the size of the impacting body {not available for the 2009 event and available for only a few 1994 events by Galileo}. As of this writing, no dark impact site has been detected with telescopes of any aperture, including the Gemini North telescope. Hubble may be the only facility with high enough spatial resolution to detect the 2010 impact site. If Hubble images show a site, then the body's trajectory might be obtainable. If no site is detected, then Hubble will confirm that this is the first observation of a meteor on another atmosphere-bearing planet. If an event of this size occurred on Earth, it would be likely be termed a Type 1 Low-Altitude Airburst, like Tunguska or larger. Thus, this new event could become the best-observed analogue of a terrestrial airburst of the size that dominates the impact threat to humans. The observations we propose should provide independent constraints on penetration depth and atmospheric effects. This data will strongly inform our understanding of terrestrial airbursts and allow better quantification of the associated threat. We request a single orbit to image the impact latitude on the planet's central meridian. Of critical importance are Hubble's unique UV sensitivity {critical for assessing aspects of the 2009 impact, and not obtainable from

  17. DNA Barcoding of Bemisia tabaci Complex (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) Reveals Southerly Expansion of the Dominant Whitefly Species on Cotton in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Ashfaq, Muhammad; Hebert, Paul D. N.; Mirza, M. Sajjad; Khan, Arif M.; Mansoor, Shahid; Shah, Ghulam S.; Zafar, Yusuf

    2014-01-01

    Background Although whiteflies (Bemisia tabaci complex) are an important pest of cotton in Pakistan, its taxonomic diversity is poorly understood. As DNA barcoding is an effective tool for resolving species complexes and analyzing species distributions, we used this approach to analyze genetic diversity in the B. tabaci complex and map the distribution of B. tabaci lineages in cotton growing areas of Pakistan. Methods/Principal Findings Sequence diversity in the DNA barcode region (mtCOI-5′) was examined in 593 whiteflies from Pakistan to determine the number of whitefly species and their distributions in the cotton-growing areas of Punjab and Sindh provinces. These new records were integrated with another 173 barcode sequences for B. tabaci, most from India, to better understand regional whitefly diversity. The Barcode Index Number (BIN) System assigned the 766 sequences to 15 BINs, including nine from Pakistan. Representative specimens of each Pakistan BIN were analyzed for mtCOI-3′ to allow their assignment to one of the putative species in the B. tabaci complex recognized on the basis of sequence variation in this gene region. This analysis revealed the presence of Asia II 1, Middle East-Asia Minor 1, Asia 1, Asia II 5, Asia II 7, and a new lineage “Pakistan”. The first two taxa were found in both Punjab and Sindh, but Asia 1 was only detected in Sindh, while Asia II 5, Asia II 7 and “Pakistan” were only present in Punjab. The haplotype networks showed that most haplotypes of Asia II 1, a species implicated in transmission of the cotton leaf curl virus, occurred in both India and Pakistan. Conclusions DNA barcodes successfully discriminated cryptic species in B. tabaci complex. The dominant haplotypes in the B. tabaci complex were shared by India and Pakistan. Asia II 1 was previously restricted to Punjab, but is now the dominant lineage in southern Sindh; its southward spread may have serious implications for cotton plantations in this region. PMID

  18. Structure, mechanics, and binding mode heterogeneity of LEDGF/p75-DNA nucleoprotein complexes revealed by scanning force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderlinden, Willem; Lipfert, Jan; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Debyser, Zeger; de Feyter, Steven

    2014-04-01

    LEDGF/p75 is a transcriptional coactivator implicated in the pathogenesis of AIDS and leukemia. In these contexts, LEDGF/p75 acts as a cofactor by tethering protein cargo to transcriptionally active regions in the human genome. Our study - based on scanning force microscopy (SFM) imaging - is the first to provide structural information on the interaction of LEDGF/p75 with DNA. Two novel approaches that allow obtaining insights into the DNA conformation inside nucleoprotein complexes revealed (1) that LEDGF/p75 can bind at least in three different binding modes, (2) how DNA topology and protein dimerization affect these binding modes, and (3) geometrical and mechanical aspects of the nucleoprotein complexes. These structural and mechanical details will help us to better understand the cellular mechanisms of LEDGF/p75 as a transcriptional coactivator and as a cofactor in disease.LEDGF/p75 is a transcriptional coactivator implicated in the pathogenesis of AIDS and leukemia. In these contexts, LEDGF/p75 acts as a cofactor by tethering protein cargo to transcriptionally active regions in the human genome. Our study - based on scanning force microscopy (SFM) imaging - is the first to provide structural information on the interaction of LEDGF/p75 with DNA. Two novel approaches that allow obtaining insights into the DNA conformation inside nucleoprotein complexes revealed (1) that LEDGF/p75 can bind at least in three different binding modes, (2) how DNA topology and protein dimerization affect these binding modes, and (3) geometrical and mechanical aspects of the nucleoprotein complexes. These structural and mechanical details will help us to better understand the cellular mechanisms of LEDGF/p75 as a transcriptional coactivator and as a cofactor in disease. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: SFM topographs of phage lambda DNA in situ, in the absence and presence of LEDGF/p75; model-independent tests for DNA chain equilibration in 2D; SFM topographs of

  19. Structure of the Human FANCL RING-Ube2T Complex Reveals Determinants of Cognate E3-E2 Selection

    PubMed Central

    Hodson, Charlotte; Purkiss, Andrew; Miles, Jennifer Anne; Walden, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Summary The combination of an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme with an E3 ubiquitin-ligase is essential for ubiquitin modification of a substrate. Moreover, the pairing dictates both the substrate choice and the modification type. The molecular details of generic E3-E2 interactions are well established. Nevertheless, the determinants of selective, specific E3-E2 recognition are not understood. There are ∼40 E2s and ∼600 E3s giving rise to a possible ∼24,000 E3-E2 pairs. Using the Fanconi Anemia pathway exclusive E3-E2 pair, FANCL-Ube2T, we report the atomic structure of the FANCL RING-Ube2T complex, revealing a specific and extensive network of additional electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. Furthermore, we show that these specific interactions are required for selection of Ube2T over other E2s by FANCL. PMID:24389026

  20. Saami and Berbers--an unexpected mitochondrial DNA link.

    PubMed

    Achilli, Alessandro; Rengo, Chiara; Battaglia, Vincenza; Pala, Maria; Olivieri, Anna; Fornarino, Simona; Magri, Chiara; Scozzari, Rosaria; Babudri, Nora; Santachiara-Benerecetti, A Silvana; Bandelt, Hans-Jürgen; Semino, Ornella; Torroni, Antonio

    2005-05-01

    The sequencing of entire human mitochondrial DNAs belonging to haplogroup U reveals that this clade arose shortly after the "out of Africa" exit and rapidly radiated into numerous regionally distinct subclades. Intriguingly, the Saami of Scandinavia and the Berbers of North Africa were found to share an extremely young branch, aged merely approximately 9,000 years. This unexpected finding not only confirms that the Franco-Cantabrian refuge area of southwestern Europe was the source of late-glacial expansions of hunter-gatherers that repopulated northern Europe after the Last Glacial Maximum but also reveals a direct maternal link between those European hunter-gatherer populations and the Berbers.

  1. Amish Lifestyle Brings Unexpected Benefit: Less Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... 160228.html Amish Lifestyle Brings Unexpected Benefit: Less Asthma Finding suggests exposing kids to lots of allergens, ... rest of the population -- much lower rates of asthma. "We found Amish children had extremely low levels ...

  2. The Paleoproterozoic Singo granite in south-central Uganda revealed as a nested igneous ring complex using geophysical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelsalam, Mohamed G.; Katumwehe, Andrew B.; Atekwana, Estella A.; Le Pera, Alan K.; Achang, Mercy

    2016-04-01

    We used high-resolution airborne magnetic and radiometric data and satellite gravity data to investigate the form of occurrence of the Paleoproterozoic Singo granite in west-central Uganda. This granitic body covers an area of ∼700 km2, intrudes Paleoproterozoic crystalline rocks and overlain by Paleoproterozoic-Mesoproterozoic sedimentary rocks, both of which belong to the Rwenzori terrane, and it is host to hydrothermally-formed economic minerals such as gold and tungsten. Our analysis provided unprecedented geometrical details of the granitic body and revealed the following: (1) the margins of the Singo granite are characterized by a higher magnetic signature compared to the interior of the granitic body as well as the surroundings. These anomalies are apparent in both the total magnetic field and horizontal derivative images and define eight overlapping ring features. (2) the depth continuation of these magnetic anomalies define outward but steeply-dipping features as indicated by the tilt images extracted from the airborne magnetic data. This is further supported by forward modeling of the magnetic and gravity data. (3) the Singo granite is characterized by relatively high and evenly-distributed equivalent concentration of Uranium (eU) and Thorium (eTh) compared to the surroundings and this is apparent in the Potassium (K)-eTh-eU radiometric ternary image. (4) the granitic body is defined by a gravity low anomaly that persisted to a depth of three km as shown by the Bouguer anomaly image and its five km upward continuation. We used these observations to identify this granitic body as a nested igneous ring complex and we refer to it as the Singo Igneous Ring Complex (SIRC). We further interpreted the eight ring structures as individual igneous ring complexes aligned in an E-W and NE-SW direction and these were developed due to repeated calderas collapse. Additionally, we interpreted the ring-shaped magnetic anomalies as due to hydrothermally-altered margins

  3. Missed appendicitis: did unexpected intraluminal densities play a role?

    PubMed

    Harper, Rachel; Friedman, Benjamin T; Strote, Jared

    2016-01-01

    A healthy 19-year-old boy presented to our emergency department with abdominal pain. His history, examination and laboratory evaluation raised concern for appendicitis. A CT study of the abdomen and pelvis was carried out by the radiologist and emergency physician and was notable only for a large amount of unexpected high-attenuation intraluminal material. With further history, this was thought to be most likely retained bismuth from over-the-counter medicine ingestion. The patient was discharged home without a diagnosis. Further review of the CT scan by a second radiologist revealed a concern for appendiceal enlargement and associated free fluid. The patient was called back for further evaluation and treatment and ultimately an appendectomy was performed. Physicians should be aware of the causes and impact of unexpected radiopaque intraluminal contents on radiological studies. Most commonly from ingested medicine, such findings can obscure mucosal details, mimic active bleeding or create a distraction from other abnormalities. PMID:27605197

  4. RAG2 and XLF/Cernunnos interplay reveals a novel role for the RAG complex in DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Lescale, Chloé; Abramowski, Vincent; Bedora-Faure, Marie; Murigneux, Valentine; Vera, Gabriella; Roth, David B.; Revy, Patrick; de Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Deriano, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    XRCC4-like factor (XLF) functions in classical non-homologous end-joining (cNHEJ) but is dispensable for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) generated during V(D)J recombination. A long-standing hypothesis proposes that, in addition to its canonical nuclease activity, the RAG1/2 proteins participate in the DNA repair phase of V(D)J recombination. Here we show that in the context of RAG2 lacking the C-terminus domain (Rag2c/c mice), XLF deficiency leads to a profound lymphopenia associated with a severe defect in V(D)J recombination and, in the absence of p53, increased genomic instability at V(D)J sites. In addition, Rag2c/c XLF−/− p53−/− mice develop aggressive pro-B cell lymphomas bearing complex chromosomal translocations and gene amplifications involving Igh and c-myc/pvt1 loci. Our results reveal an unanticipated functional interplay between the RAG complex and XLF in repairing RAG-induced DSBs and maintaining genome integrity during antigen receptor gene assembly. PMID:26833222

  5. Rapid dynamics of general transcription factor TFIIB binding during preinitiation complex assembly revealed by single-molecule analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhengjian; English, Brian P.; Grimm, Jonathan B.; Kazane, Stephanie A.; Hu, Wenxin; Tsai, Albert; Inouye, Carla; You, Changjiang; Piehler, Jacob; Schultz, Peter G.; Lavis, Luke D.; Revyakin, Andrey; Tjian, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Transcription of protein-encoding genes in eukaryotic cells requires the coordinated action of multiple general transcription factors (GTFs) and RNA polymerase II (Pol II). A “step-wise” preinitiation complex (PIC) assembly model has been suggested based on conventional ensemble biochemical measurements, in which protein factors bind stably to the promoter DNA sequentially to build a functional PIC. However, recent dynamic measurements in live cells suggest that transcription factors mostly interact with chromatin DNA rather transiently. To gain a clearer dynamic picture of PIC assembly, we established an integrated in vitro single-molecule transcription platform reconstituted from highly purified human transcription factors and complemented it by live-cell imaging. Here we performed real-time measurements of the hierarchal promoter-specific binding of TFIID, TFIIA, and TFIIB. Surprisingly, we found that while promoter binding of TFIID and TFIIA is stable, promoter binding by TFIIB is highly transient and dynamic (with an average residence time of 1.5 sec). Stable TFIIB–promoter association and progression beyond this apparent PIC assembly checkpoint control occurs only in the presence of Pol II–TFIIF. This transient-to-stable transition of TFIIB-binding dynamics has gone undetected previously and underscores the advantages of single-molecule assays for revealing the dynamic nature of complex biological reactions. PMID:27798851

  6. Genetic relationship of 32 cell lines of Euplotes octocarinatus species complex revealed by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Möllenbeck, M

    1999-12-01

    Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting was used in this study to determine the genetic relationship of different cell lines of the hypotrichous ciliate Euplotes octocarinatus. Stocks isolated from different habitats in the USA, and from a group of genetically recombined laboratory strains, were characterized. Band-sharing indices (D) for all possible pairwise comparisons revealed a remarkable genetic diversity between the different cell lines. Investigation of the genetic structure in natural populations found diversity--although to a different extent--in all populations investigated. No clonal structure could be observed, as proposed for several protozoa and recently shown for E. daidaleos. These findings suggest frequent conjugation in the population of E. octocarinatus. No correlation between the genetic relationship of cell lines from different habitats and the distance between the corresponding sampling locations was found. Once separated geographically, the exchange of genetic material between populations appears to be nearly impossible. Therefore, these groups tend to separate into sibling species. The data generally support the occurrence of different syngens in the E. octocarinatus species complex. This finding is in accordance with our observation that the morphological 'species' of E. octocarinatus consists of several syngens or sibling species, similar to findings for the Paramecium aurelia-, Tetrahymena pyriformis- and E. vannus- species complexes. PMID:10722304

  7. Structure of a PE–PPE–EspG complex from Mycobacterium tuberculosis reveals molecular specificity of ESX protein secretion

    PubMed Central

    Ekiert, Damian C.; Cox, Jeffery S.

    2014-01-01

    Nearly 10% of the coding capacity of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome is devoted to two highly expanded and enigmatic protein families called PE and PPE, some of which are important virulence/immunogenicity factors and are secreted during infection via a unique alternative secretory system termed “type VII.” How PE-PPE proteins function during infection and how they are translocated to the bacterial surface through the five distinct type VII secretion systems [ESAT-6 secretion system (ESX)] of M. tuberculosis is poorly understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of a PE-PPE heterodimer bound to ESX secretion-associated protein G (EspG), which adopts a novel fold. This PE-PPE-EspG complex, along with structures of two additional EspGs, suggests that EspG acts as an adaptor that recognizes specific PE–PPE protein complexes via extensive interactions with PPE domains, and delivers them to ESX machinery for secretion. Surprisingly, secretion of most PE-PPE proteins in M. tuberculosis is likely mediated by EspG from the ESX-5 system, underscoring the importance of ESX-5 in mycobacterial pathogenesis. Moreover, our results indicate that PE-PPE domains function as cis-acting targeting sequences that are read out by EspGs, revealing the molecular specificity for secretion through distinct ESX pathways. PMID:25275011

  8. ARM-Seq: AlkB-facilitated RNA methylation sequencing reveals a complex landscape of modified tRNA fragments

    PubMed Central

    Cozen, Aaron E.; Quartley, Erin; Holmes, Andrew D.; Robinson, Eva H.; Phizicky, Eric M.; Lowe, Todd M.

    2015-01-01

    High throughput RNA sequencing has accelerated discovery of the complex regulatory roles of small RNAs, but RNAs containing modified nucleosides may escape detection when those modifications interfere with reverse transcription during RNA-seq library preparation. Here we describe AlkB-facilitated RNA Methylation sequencing (ARM-Seq) which uses pre-treatment with Escherichia coli AlkB to demethylate 1-methyladenosine, 3-methylcytidine, and 1-methylguanosine, all commonly found in transfer RNAs. Comparative methylation analysis using ARM-Seq provides the first detailed, transcriptome-scale map of these modifications, and reveals an abundance of previously undetected, methylated small RNAs derived from tRNAs. ARM-Seq demonstrates that tRNA-derived small RNAs accurately recapitulate the m1A modification state for well-characterized yeast tRNAs, and generates new predictions for a large number of human tRNAs, including tRNA precursors and mitochondrial tRNAs. Thus, ARM-Seq provides broad utility for identifying previously overlooked methyl-modified RNAs, can efficiently monitor methylation state, and may reveal new roles for tRNA-derived RNAs as biomarkers or signaling molecules. PMID:26237225

  9. Crystal Structure of the FGFR4/LY2874455 Complex Reveals Insights into the Pan-FGFR Selectivity of LY2874455

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Daichao; Guo, Ming; Philips, Michael A.; Qu, Lingzhi; Jiang, Longying; Li, Jun; Chen, Xiaojuan; Chen, Zhuchu; Chen, Lin; Chen, Yongheng

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant FGFR4 signaling has been documented abundantly in various human cancers. The majority of FGFR inhibitors display significantly reduced potency toward FGFR4 compared to FGFR1-3. However, LY2874455 has similar inhibition potency for FGFR1-4 with IC50 less than 6.4 nM. To date, there is no published crystal structure of LY2874455 in complex with any kinase. To better understand the pan-FGFR selectivity of LY2874455, we have determined the crystal structure of the FGFR4 kinase domain bound to LY2874455 at a resolution of 2.35 Å. LY2874455, a type I inhibitor for FGFR4, binds to the ATP-binding pocket of FGFR4 in a DFG-in active conformation with three hydrogen bonds and a number of van der Waals contacts. After alignment of the kinase domain sequence of 4 FGFRs, and superposition of the ATP binding pocket of 4 FGFRs, our structural analyses reveal that the interactions of LY2874455 to FGFR4 are largely conserved in 4 FGFRs, explaining at least partly, the broad inhibitory activity of LY2874455 toward 4 FGFRs. Consequently, our studies reveal new insights into the pan-FGFR selectivity of LY2874455 and provide a structural basis for developing novel FGFR inhibitors that target FGFR1-4 broadly. PMID:27618313

  10. Crystal Structure of the FGFR4/LY2874455 Complex Reveals Insights into the Pan-FGFR Selectivity of LY2874455.

    PubMed

    Wu, Daichao; Guo, Ming; Philips, Michael A; Qu, Lingzhi; Jiang, Longying; Li, Jun; Chen, Xiaojuan; Chen, Zhuchu; Chen, Lin; Chen, Yongheng

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant FGFR4 signaling has been documented abundantly in various human cancers. The majority of FGFR inhibitors display significantly reduced potency toward FGFR4 compared to FGFR1-3. However, LY2874455 has similar inhibition potency for FGFR1-4 with IC50 less than 6.4 nM. To date, there is no published crystal structure of LY2874455 in complex with any kinase. To better understand the pan-FGFR selectivity of LY2874455, we have determined the crystal structure of the FGFR4 kinase domain bound to LY2874455 at a resolution of 2.35 Å. LY2874455, a type I inhibitor for FGFR4, binds to the ATP-binding pocket of FGFR4 in a DFG-in active conformation with three hydrogen bonds and a number of van der Waals contacts. After alignment of the kinase domain sequence of 4 FGFRs, and superposition of the ATP binding pocket of 4 FGFRs, our structural analyses reveal that the interactions of LY2874455 to FGFR4 are largely conserved in 4 FGFRs, explaining at least partly, the broad inhibitory activity of LY2874455 toward 4 FGFRs. Consequently, our studies reveal new insights into the pan-FGFR selectivity of LY2874455 and provide a structural basis for developing novel FGFR inhibitors that target FGFR1-4 broadly. PMID:27618313

  11. Structure of a HOIP/E2~ubiquitin complex reveals RBR E3 ligase mechanism and regulation.

    PubMed

    Lechtenberg, Bernhard C; Rajput, Akhil; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Dobaczewska, Małgorzata K; Ware, Carl F; Mace, Peter D; Riedl, Stefan J

    2016-01-28

    Ubiquitination is a central process affecting all facets of cellular signalling and function. A critical step in ubiquitination is the transfer of ubiquitin from an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme to a substrate or a growing ubiquitin chain, which is mediated by E3 ubiquitin ligases. RING-type E3 ligases typically facilitate the transfer of ubiquitin from the E2 directly to the substrate. The RING-between-RING (RBR) family of RING-type E3 ligases, however, breaks this paradigm by forming a covalent intermediate with ubiquitin similarly to HECT-type E3 ligases. The RBR family includes Parkin and HOIP, the central catalytic factor of the LUBAC (linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex). While structural insights into the RBR E3 ligases Parkin and HHARI in their overall auto-inhibited forms are available, no structures exist of intact fully active RBR E3 ligases or any of their complexes. Thus, the RBR mechanism of action has remained largely unknown. Here we present the first structure, to our knowledge, of the fully active human HOIP RBR in its transfer complex with an E2~ubiquitin conjugate, which elucidates the intricate nature of RBR E3 ligases. The active HOIP RBR adopts a conformation markedly different from that of auto-inhibited RBRs. HOIP RBR binds the E2~ubiquitin conjugate in an elongated fashion, with the E2 and E3 catalytic centres ideally aligned for ubiquitin transfer, which structurally both requires and enables a HECT-like mechanism. In addition, three distinct helix-IBR-fold motifs inherent to RBRs form ubiquitin-binding regions that engage the activated ubiquitin of the E2~ubiquitin conjugate and, surprisingly, an additional regulatory ubiquitin molecule. The features uncovered reveal critical states of the HOIP RBR E3 ligase cycle, and comparison with Parkin and HHARI suggests a general mechanism for RBR E3 ligases. PMID:26789245

  12. Structure of a HOIP/E2~ubiquitin complex reveals RBR E3 ligase mechanism and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lechtenberg, Bernhard C.; Rajput, Akhil; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Dobaczewska, Małgorzata K.; Ware, Carl F.; Mace, Peter D.; Riedl, Stefan J.

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitination is a central process affecting all facets of cellular signaling and function1. A critical step in ubiquitination is the transfer of ubiquitin from an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme to a substrate or a growing ubiquitin chain, which is mediated by E3 ubiquitin ligases. RING-type E3 ligases typically facilitate the transfer of ubiquitin from the E2 directly to the substrate2,3. The RBR family of RING-type E3 ligases, however, breaks this paradigm by forming a covalent intermediate with ubiquitin similarly to HECT-type E3 ligases4–6. The RBR family includes Parkin4 and HOIP, the central catalytic factor of the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC)7. While structural insights into the RBR E3 ligases Parkin and HHARI in their overall autoinhibited forms are available8–13, no structures exist of intact fully active RBR E3 ligases or any of their complexes. Thus, the RBR mechanism of action has remained largely enigmatic. Here we present the first structure of the fully active HOIP-RBR in its transfer complex with an E2~ubiquitin conjugate, which elucidates the intricate nature of RBR E3 ligases. The active HOIP-RBR adopts a conformation markedly different from that of autoinhibited RBRs. HOIP-RBR binds the E2~ubiquitin conjugate in an elongated fashion, with the E2 and E3 catalytic centers ideally aligned for ubiquitin transfer, which structurally both requires and enables a HECT-like mechanism. In addition, surprisingly, three distinct helix–IBR-fold motifs inherent to RBRs form ubiquitin-binding regions that engage the activated ubiquitin of the E2~Ub conjugate as well as an additional regulatory ubiquitin molecule. The features uncovered reveal critical states of the HOIP-RBR E3 ligase cycle, and comparison with Parkin and HHARI suggests a general mechanism for RBR E3 ligases. PMID:26789245

  13. Crystal Structure of the Core Region of Hantavirus Nucleocapsid Protein Reveals the Mechanism for Ribonucleoprotein Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yu; Wang, Wenming; Sun, Yuna; Ma, Chao; Wang, Xu; Wang, Xin; Liu, Pi; Shen, Shu; Li, Baobin; Lin, Jianping; Deng, Fei

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hantaviruses, which belong to the genus Hantavirus in the family Bunyaviridae, infect mammals, including humans, causing either hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) or hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) in humans with high mortality. Hantavirus encodes a nucleocapsid protein (NP) to encapsidate the genome and form a ribonucleoprotein complex (RNP) together with viral polymerase. Here, we report the crystal structure of the core domains of NP (NPcore) encoded by Sin Nombre virus (SNV) and Andes virus (ANDV), which are two representative members that cause HCPS in the New World. The constructs of SNV and ANDV NPcore exclude the N- and C-terminal portions of full polypeptide to obtain stable proteins for crystallographic study. The structure features an N lobe and a C lobe to clamp RNA-binding crevice and exhibits two protruding extensions in both lobes. The positively charged residues located in the RNA-binding crevice play a key role in RNA binding and virus replication. We further demonstrated that the C-terminal helix and the linker region connecting the N-terminal coiled-coil domain and NPcore are essential for hantavirus NP oligomerization through contacts made with two adjacent protomers. Moreover, electron microscopy (EM) visualization of native RNPs extracted from the virions revealed that a monomer-sized NP-RNA complex is the building block of viral RNP. This work provides insight into the formation of hantavirus RNP and provides an understanding of the evolutionary connections that exist among bunyaviruses. IMPORTANCE Hantaviruses are distributed across a wide and increasing range of host reservoirs throughout the world. In particular, hantaviruses can be transmitted via aerosols of rodent excreta to humans or from human to human and cause HFRS and HCPS, with mortalities of 15% and 50%, respectively. Hantavirus is therefore listed as a category C pathogen. Hantavirus encodes an NP that plays essential roles both in RNP formation and

  14. SAXS analysis of the tRNA-modifying enzyme complex MnmE/MnmG reveals a novel interaction mode and GTP-induced oligomerization

    PubMed Central

    Fislage, Marcus; Brosens, Elke; Deyaert, Egon; Spilotros, Alessandro; Pardon, Els; Loris, Remy; Steyaert, Jan; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Versées, Wim

    2014-01-01

    Transfer ribonucleic acid (tRNA) modifications, especially at the wobble position, are crucial for proper and efficient protein translation. MnmE and MnmG form a protein complex that is implicated in the carboxymethylaminomethyl modification of wobble uridine (cmnm5U34) of certain tRNAs. MnmE is a G protein activated by dimerization (GAD), and active guanosine-5'-triphosphate (GTP) hydrolysis is required for the tRNA modification to occur. Although crystal structures of MnmE and MnmG are available, the structure of the MnmE/MnmG complex (MnmEG) and the nature of the nucleotide-induced conformational changes and their relevance for the tRNA modification reaction remain unknown. In this study, we mainly used small-angle X-ray scattering to characterize these conformational changes in solution and to unravel the mode of interaction between MnmE, MnmG and tRNA. In the nucleotide-free state MnmE and MnmG form an unanticipated asymmetric α2β2 complex. Unexpectedly, GTP binding promotes further oligomerization of the MnmEG complex leading to an α4β2 complex. The transition from the α2β2 to the α4β2 complex is fast, reversible and coupled to GTP binding and hydrolysis. We propose a model in which the nucleotide-induced changes in conformation and oligomerization of MnmEG form an integral part of the tRNA modification reaction cycle. PMID:24634441

  15. Co-modulation analysis of gene regulation in breast cancer reveals complex interplay between ESR1 and ERBB2 genes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Gene regulation is dynamic across cellular conditions and disease subtypes. From the aspect of regulation under modulation, regulation strength between a pair of genes can be modulated by (dependent on) expression abundance of another gene (modulator gene). Previous studies have demonstrated the involvement of genes modulated by single modulator genes in cancers, including breast cancer. However, analysis of multi-modulator co-modulation that can further delineate the landscape of complex gene regulation is, to our knowledge, unexplored previously. In the present study we aim to explore the joint effects of multiple modulator genes in modulating global gene regulation and dissect the biological functions in breast cancer. Results To carry out the analysis, we proposed the Covariability-based Multiple Regression (CoMRe) method. The method is mainly built on a multiple regression model that takes expression levels of multiple modulators as inputs and regulation strength between genes as output. Pairs of genes were divided into groups based on their co-modulation patterns. Analyzing gene expression profiles from 286 breast cancer patients, CoMRe investigated ten candidate modulator genes that interacted and jointly determined global gene regulation. Among the candidate modulators, ESR1, ERBB2, and ADAM12 were found modulating the most numbers of gene pairs. The largest group of gene pairs was composed of ones that were modulated by merely ESR1. Functional annotation revealed that the group was significantly related to tumorigenesis and estrogen signaling in breast cancer. ESR1−ERBB2 co-modulation was the largest group modulated by more than one modulators. Similarly, the group was functionally associated with hormone stimulus, suggesting that functions of the two modulators are performed, at least partially, through modulation. The findings were validated in majorities of patients (> 99%) of two independent breast cancer datasets. Conclusions We have

  16. Structural Analysis of a Family 101 Glycoside Hydrolase in Complex with Carbohydrates Reveals Insights into Its Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Gregg, Katie J.; Suits, Michael D. L.; Deng, Lehua; Vocadlo, David J.; Boraston, Alisdair B.

    2015-01-01

    O-Linked glycosylation is one of the most abundant post-translational modifications of proteins. Within the secretory pathway of higher eukaryotes, the core of these glycans is frequently an N-acetylgalactosamine residue that is α-linked to serine or threonine residues. Glycoside hydrolases in family 101 are presently the only known enzymes to be able to hydrolyze this glycosidic linkage. Here we determine the high-resolution structures of the catalytic domain comprising a fragment of GH101 from Streptococcus pneumoniae TIGR4, SpGH101, in the absence of carbohydrate, and in complex with reaction products, inhibitor, and substrate analogues. Upon substrate binding, a tryptophan lid (residues 724-WNW-726) closes on the substrate. The closing of this lid fully engages the substrate in the active site with Asp-764 positioned directly beneath C1 of the sugar residue bound within the −1 subsite, consistent with its proposed role as the catalytic nucleophile. In all of the bound forms of the enzyme, however, the proposed catalytic acid/base residue was found to be too distant from the glycosidic oxygen (>4.3 Å) to serve directly as a general catalytic acid/base residue and thereby facilitate cleavage of the glycosidic bond. These same complexes, however, revealed a structurally conserved water molecule positioned between the catalytic acid/base and the glycosidic oxygen. On the basis of these structural observations we propose a new variation of the retaining glycoside hydrolase mechanism wherein the intervening water molecule enables a Grotthuss proton shuttle between Glu-796 and the glycosidic oxygen, permitting this residue to serve as the general acid/base catalytic residue. PMID:26304114

  17. Three-dimensional analysis of a viral RNA replication complex reveals a virus-induced mini-organelle.

    PubMed

    Kopek, Benjamin G; Perkins, Guy; Miller, David J; Ellisman, Mark H; Ahlquist, Paul

    2007-09-01

    Positive-strand RNA viruses are the largest genetic class of viruses and include many serious human pathogens. All positive-strand RNA viruses replicate their genomes in association with intracellular membrane rearrangements such as single- or double-membrane vesicles. However, the exact sites of RNA synthesis and crucial topological relationships between relevant membranes, vesicle interiors, surrounding lumens, and cytoplasm generally are poorly defined. We applied electron microscope tomography and complementary approaches to flock house virus (FHV)-infected Drosophila cells to provide the first 3-D analysis of such replication complexes. The sole FHV RNA replication factor, protein A, and FHV-specific 5-bromouridine 5'-triphosphate incorporation localized between inner and outer mitochondrial membranes inside approximately 50-nm vesicles (spherules), which thus are FHV-induced compartments for viral RNA synthesis. All such FHV spherules were outer mitochondrial membrane invaginations with interiors connected to the cytoplasm by a necked channel of approximately 10-nm diameter, which is sufficient for ribonucleotide import and product RNA export. Tomographic, biochemical, and other results imply that FHV spherules contain, on average, three RNA replication intermediates and an interior shell of approximately 100 membrane-spanning, self-interacting protein As. The results identify spherules as the site of protein A and nascent RNA accumulation and define spherule topology, dimensions, and stoichiometry to reveal the nature and many details of the organization and function of the FHV RNA replication complex. The resulting insights appear relevant to many other positive-strand RNA viruses and support recently proposed structural and likely evolutionary parallels with retrovirus and double-stranded RNA virus virions.

  18. Structural Analysis of a Family 101 Glycoside Hydrolase in Complex with Carbohydrates Reveals Insights into Its Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Katie J; Suits, Michael D L; Deng, Lehua; Vocadlo, David J; Boraston, Alisdair B

    2015-10-16

    O-Linked glycosylation is one of the most abundant post-translational modifications of proteins. Within the secretory pathway of higher eukaryotes, the core of these glycans is frequently an N-acetylgalactosamine residue that is α-linked to serine or threonine residues. Glycoside hydrolases in family 101 are presently the only known enzymes to be able to hydrolyze this glycosidic linkage. Here we determine the high-resolution structures of the catalytic domain comprising a fragment of GH101 from Streptococcus pneumoniae TIGR4, SpGH101, in the absence of carbohydrate, and in complex with reaction products, inhibitor, and substrate analogues. Upon substrate binding, a tryptophan lid (residues 724-WNW-726) closes on the substrate. The closing of this lid fully engages the substrate in the active site with Asp-764 positioned directly beneath C1 of the sugar residue bound within the -1 subsite, consistent with its proposed role as the catalytic nucleophile. In all of the bound forms of the enzyme, however, the proposed catalytic acid/base residue was found to be too distant from the glycosidic oxygen (>4.3 Å) to serve directly as a general catalytic acid/base residue and thereby facilitate cleavage of the glycosidic bond. These same complexes, however, revealed a structurally conserved water molecule positioned between the catalytic acid/base and the glycosidic oxygen. On the basis of these structural observations we propose a new variation of the retaining glycoside hydrolase mechanism wherein the intervening water molecule enables a Grotthuss proton shuttle between Glu-796 and the glycosidic oxygen, permitting this residue to serve as the general acid/base catalytic residue.

  19. Whole Genome Sequencing Reveals Complex Evolution Patterns of Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing Strains in Patients

    PubMed Central

    Merker, Matthias; Kohl, Thomas A.; Roetzer, Andreas; Truebe, Leona; Richter, Elvira; Rüsch-Gerdes, Sabine; Fattorini, Lanfranco; Oggioni, Marco R.; Cox, Helen; Varaine, Francis; Niemann, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) strains represent a major threat for tuberculosis (TB) control. Treatment of MDR-TB patients is long and less effective, resulting in a significant number of treatment failures. The development of further resistances leads to extensively drug-resistant (XDR) variants. However, data on the individual reasons for treatment failure, e.g. an induced mutational burst, and on the evolution of bacteria in the patient are only sparsely available. To address this question, we investigated the intra-patient evolution of serial MTBC isolates obtained from three MDR-TB patients undergoing longitudinal treatment, finally leading to XDR-TB. Sequential isolates displayed identical IS6110 fingerprint patterns, suggesting the absence of exogenous re-infection. We utilized whole genome sequencing (WGS) to screen for variations in three isolates from Patient A and four isolates from Patient B and C, respectively. Acquired polymorphisms were subsequently validated in up to 15 serial isolates by Sanger sequencing. We determined eight (Patient A) and nine (Patient B) polymorphisms, which occurred in a stepwise manner during the course of the therapy and were linked to resistance or a potential compensatory mechanism. For both patients, our analysis revealed the long-term co-existence of clonal subpopulations that displayed different drug resistance allele combinations. Out of these, the most resistant clone was fixed in the population. In contrast, baseline and follow-up isolates of Patient C were distinguished each by eleven unique polymorphisms, indicating an exogenous re-infection with an XDR strain not detected by IS6110 RFLP typing. Our study demonstrates that intra-patient microevolution of MDR-MTBC strains under longitudinal treatment is more complex than previously anticipated. However, a mutator phenotype was not detected. The presence of different subpopulations might confound phenotypic and molecular drug

  20. Transcriptome, carbohydrate, and phytohormone analysis of Petunia hybrida reveals a complex disturbance of plant functional integrity under mild chilling stress.

    PubMed

    Bauerfeind, Martin Andreas; Winkelmann, Traud; Franken, Philipp; Druege, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Cultivation of chilling-tolerant ornamental crops at lower temperature could reduce the energy demands of heated greenhouses. To provide a better understanding of how sub-optimal temperatures (12°C vs. 16°C) affect growth of the sensitive Petunia hybrida cultivar 'SweetSunshine Williams', the transcriptome, carbohydrate metabolism, and phytohormone homeostasis were monitored in aerial plant parts over 4 weeks by use of a microarray, enzymatic assays and GC-MS/MS. The data revealed three consecutive phases of chilling response. The first days were marked by a strong accumulation of sugars, particularly in source leaves, preferential up-regulation of genes in the same tissue and down-regulation of several genes in the shoot apex, especially those involved in the abiotic stress response. The midterm phase featured a partial normalization of carbohydrate levels and gene expression. After 3 weeks of chilling exposure, a new stabilized balance was established. Reduced hexose levels in the shoot apex, reduced ratios of sugar levels between the apex and source leaves and a higher apical sucrose/hexose ratio, associated with decreased activity and expression of cell wall invertase, indicate that prolonged chilling induced sugar accumulation in source leaves at the expense of reduced sugar transport to and reduced sucrose utilization in the shoot. This was associated with reduced levels of indole-3-acetic acid and abscisic acid in the apex and high numbers of differentially, particularly up-regulated genes, especially in the source leaves, including those regulating histones, ethylene action, transcription factors, and a jasmonate-ZIM-domain protein. Transcripts of one Jumonji C domain containing protein and one expansin accumulated in source leaves throughout the chilling period. The results reveal a dynamic and complex disturbance of plant function in response to mild chilling, opening new perspectives for the comparative analysis of differently tolerant cultivars. PMID

  1. Ancient DNA reveals prehistoric gene-flow from siberia in the complex human population history of North East Europe.

    PubMed

    Der Sarkissian, Clio; Balanovsky, Oleg; Brandt, Guido; Khartanovich, Valery; Buzhilova, Alexandra; Koshel, Sergey; Zaporozhchenko, Valery; Gronenborn, Detlef; Moiseyev, Vyacheslav; Kolpakov, Eugen; Shumkin, Vladimir; Alt, Kurt W; Balanovska, Elena; Cooper, Alan; Haak, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    North East Europe harbors a high diversity of cultures and languages, suggesting a complex genetic history. Archaeological, anthropological, and genetic research has revealed a series of influences from Western and Eastern Eurasia in the past. While genetic data from modern-day populations is commonly used to make inferences about their origins and past migrations, ancient DNA provides a powerful test of such hypotheses by giving a snapshot of the past genetic diversity. In order to better understand the dynamics that have shaped the gene pool of North East Europeans, we generated and analyzed 34 mitochondrial genotypes from the skeletal remains of three archaeological sites in northwest Russia. These sites were dated to the Mesolithic and the Early Metal Age (7,500 and 3,500 uncalibrated years Before Present). We applied a suite of population genetic analyses (principal component analysis, genetic distance mapping, haplotype sharing analyses) and compared past demographic models through coalescent simulations using Bayesian Serial SimCoal and Approximate Bayesian Computation. Comparisons of genetic data from ancient and modern-day populations revealed significant changes in the mitochondrial makeup of North East Europeans through time. Mesolithic foragers showed high frequencies and diversity of haplogroups U (U2e, U4, U5a), a pattern observed previously in European hunter-gatherers from Iberia to Scandinavia. In contrast, the presence of mitochondrial DNA haplogroups C, D, and Z in Early Metal Age individuals suggested discontinuity with Mesolithic hunter-gatherers and genetic influx from central/eastern Siberia. We identified remarkable genetic dissimilarities between prehistoric and modern-day North East Europeans/Saami, which suggests an important role of post-Mesolithic migrations from Western Europe and subsequent population replacement/extinctions. This work demonstrates how ancient DNA can improve our understanding of human population movements across

  2. Structures of BmrR-Drug Complexes Reveal a Rigid Multidrug Binding Pocket And Transcription Activation Through Tyrosine Expulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Newberry, K.J.; Huffman, J.L.; Miller, M.C.; Vazquez-Laslop, N.; Neyfakh, A.A.; Brennan, R.G.

    2009-05-22

    BmrR is a member of the MerR family and a multidrug binding transcription factor that up-regulates the expression of the bmr multidrug efflux transporter gene in response to myriad lipophilic cationic compounds. The structural mechanism by which BmrR binds these chemically and structurally different drugs and subsequently activates transcription is poorly understood. Here, we describe the crystal structures of BmrR bound to rhodamine 6G (R6G) or berberine (Ber) and cognate DNA. These structures reveal each drug stacks against multiple aromatic residues with their positive charges most proximal to the carboxylate group of Glu-253 and that, unlike other multidrug binding pockets, that of BmrR is rigid. Substitution of Glu-253 with either alanine (E253A) or glutamine (E253Q) results in unpredictable binding affinities for R6G, Ber, and tetraphenylphosphonium. Moreover, these drug binding studies reveal that the negative charge of Glu-253 is not important for high affinity binding to Ber and tetraphenylphosphonium but plays a more significant, but unpredictable, role in R6G binding. In vitro transcription data show that E253A and E253Q are constitutively active, and structures of the drug-free E253A-DNA and E253Q-DNA complexes support a transcription activation mechanism requiring the expulsion of Tyr-152 from the multidrug binding pocket. In sum, these data delineate the mechanism by which BmrR binds lipophilic, monovalent cationic compounds and suggest the importance of the redundant negative electrostatic nature of this rigid drug binding pocket that can be used to discriminate against molecules that are not substrates of the Bmr multidrug efflux pump.

  3. Ancient DNA Reveals Prehistoric Gene-Flow from Siberia in the Complex Human Population History of North East Europe

    PubMed Central

    Der Sarkissian, Clio; Balanovsky, Oleg; Brandt, Guido; Khartanovich, Valery; Buzhilova, Alexandra; Koshel, Sergey; Zaporozhchenko, Valery; Gronenborn, Detlef; Moiseyev, Vyacheslav; Kolpakov, Eugen; Shumkin, Vladimir; Alt, Kurt W.; Balanovska, Elena; Cooper, Alan; Haak, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    North East Europe harbors a high diversity of cultures and languages, suggesting a complex genetic history. Archaeological, anthropological, and genetic research has revealed a series of influences from Western and Eastern Eurasia in the past. While genetic data from modern-day populations is commonly used to make inferences about their origins and past migrations, ancient DNA provides a powerful test of such hypotheses by giving a snapshot of the past genetic diversity. In order to better understand the dynamics that have shaped the gene pool of North East Europeans, we generated and analyzed 34 mitochondrial genotypes from the skeletal remains of three archaeological sites in northwest Russia. These sites were dated to the Mesolithic and the Early Metal Age (7,500 and 3,500 uncalibrated years Before Present). We applied a suite of population genetic analyses (principal component analysis, genetic distance mapping, haplotype sharing analyses) and compared past demographic models through coalescent simulations using Bayesian Serial SimCoal and Approximate Bayesian Computation. Comparisons of genetic data from ancient and modern-day populations revealed significant changes in the mitochondrial makeup of North East Europeans through time. Mesolithic foragers showed high frequencies and diversity of haplogroups U (U2e, U4, U5a), a pattern observed previously in European hunter-gatherers from Iberia to Scandinavia. In contrast, the presence of mitochondrial DNA haplogroups C, D, and Z in Early Metal Age individuals suggested discontinuity with Mesolithic hunter-gatherers and genetic influx from central/eastern Siberia. We identified remarkable genetic dissimilarities between prehistoric and modern-day North East Europeans/Saami, which suggests an important role of post-Mesolithic migrations from Western Europe and subsequent population replacement/extinctions. This work demonstrates how ancient DNA can improve our understanding of human population movements across

  4. Transcriptome, carbohydrate, and phytohormone analysis of Petunia hybrida reveals a complex disturbance of plant functional integrity under mild chilling stress

    PubMed Central

    Bauerfeind, Martin Andreas; Winkelmann, Traud; Franken, Philipp; Druege, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Cultivation of chilling-tolerant ornamental crops at lower temperature could reduce the energy demands of heated greenhouses. To provide a better understanding of how sub-optimal temperatures (12°C vs. 16°C) affect growth of the sensitive Petunia hybrida cultivar ‘SweetSunshine Williams’, the transcriptome, carbohydrate metabolism, and phytohormone homeostasis were monitored in aerial plant parts over 4 weeks by use of a microarray, enzymatic assays and GC-MS/MS. The data revealed three consecutive phases of chilling response. The first days were marked by a strong accumulation of sugars, particularly in source leaves, preferential up-regulation of genes in the same tissue and down-regulation of several genes in the shoot apex, especially those involved in the abiotic stress response. The midterm phase featured a partial normalization of carbohydrate levels and gene expression. After 3 weeks of chilling exposure, a new stabilized balance was established. Reduced hexose levels in the shoot apex, reduced ratios of sugar levels between the apex and source leaves and a higher apical sucrose/hexose ratio, associated with decreased activity and expression of cell wall invertase, indicate that prolonged chilling induced sugar accumulation in source leaves at the expense of reduced sugar transport to and reduced sucrose utilization in the shoot. This was associated with reduced levels of indole-3-acetic acid and abscisic acid in the apex and high numbers of differentially, particularly up-regulated genes, especially in the source leaves, including those regulating histones, ethylene action, transcription factors, and a jasmonate-ZIM-domain protein. Transcripts of one Jumonji C domain containing protein and one expansin accumulated in source leaves throughout the chilling period. The results reveal a dynamic and complex disturbance of plant function in response to mild chilling, opening new perspectives for the comparative analysis of differently tolerant cultivars

  5. An integrated RNA-Seq and network study reveals a complex regulation process of rice embryo during seed germination.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ting; He, Zilong; Tan, XinYu; Liu, Xue; Yuan, Xiao; Luo, Yingfeng; Hu, Songnian

    2015-08-14

    Seed germination is a crucial stage for plant development and agricultural production. To investigate its complex regulation process, the RNA-Seq study of rice embryo was conducted at three time points of 0, 12 and 48 h post imbibition (HPI). Dynamic transcriptional alterations were observed, especially in the early stage (0-12 HPI). Seed related genes, especially those encoding desiccation inducible proteins and storage reserves in embryo, decreased drastically after imbibition. The expression profiles of phytohormone related genes indicated distinct roles of abscisic acid (ABA), gibberellin (GA) and brassinosteroid (BR) in germination. Moreover, network analysis revealed the importance of protein phosphorylation in phytohormone interactions. Network and gene ontology (GO) analyses suggested that transcription factors (TFs) played a regulatory role in functional transitions during germination, and the enriched TF families at 0 HPI implied a regulation of epigenetic modification in dry seeds. In addition, 35 germination-specific TF genes in embryo were identified and seven genes were verified by qRT-PCR. Besides, enriched TF binding sites (TFBSs) supported physiological changes in germination. Overall, this study expands our comprehensive knowledge of multiple regulation factors underlying rice seed germination.

  6. Crystal structure of PXY-TDIF complex reveals a conserved recognition mechanism among CLE peptide-receptor pairs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Heqiao; Lin, Xiaoya; Han, Zhifu; Qu, Li-Jia; Chai, Jijie

    2016-01-01

    Plants can achieve amazing lifespans because of their continuous and repetitive formation of new organs by stem cells present within meristems. The balance between proliferation and differentiation of meristem cells is largely regulated by the CLAVATA3/ENDOSPERM SURROUNDING REGION (CLE) peptide hormones. One of the well-characterized CLE peptides, CLE41/TDIF (tracheary elements differentiation inhibitory factor), functions to suppress tracheary element differentiation and promote procambial cell proliferation, playing important roles in vascular development and wood formation. The recognition mechanisms of TDIF or other CLE peptides by their respective receptors, however, remain largely elusive. Here we report the crystal structure of TDIF in complex with its receptor PXY, a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase (LRR-RK). Our structure reveals that TDIF mainly adopts an “Ω”-like conformation binding to the inner surface of the LRR domain of PXY. Interaction between TDIF and PXY is predominately mediated by the relatively conserved amino acids of TDIF. Structure-based sequence alignment showed that the TDIF-interacting motifs are also conserved among other known CLE receptors. Our data provide a structural template for understanding the recognition mechanism of CLE peptides by their receptors, offering an opportunity for the identification of receptors of other uncharacterized CLE peptides. PMID:27055373

  7. A Complex Regulatory Network Coordinating Cell Cycles During C. elegans Development Is Revealed by a Genome-Wide RNAi Screen

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sarah H.; Tobin, David V.; Memar, Nadin; Beltz, Eleanor; Holmen, Jenna; Clayton, Joseph E.; Chiu, Daniel J.; Young, Laura D.; Green, Travis H.; Lubin, Isabella; Liu, Yuying; Conradt, Barbara; Saito, R. Mako

    2014-01-01

    The development and homeostasis of multicellular animals requires precise coordination of cell division and differentiation. We performed a genome-wide RNA interference screen in Caenorhabditis elegans to reveal the components of a regulatory network that promotes developmentally programmed cell-cycle quiescence. The 107 identified genes are predicted to constitute regulatory networks that are conserved among higher animals because almost half of the genes are represented by clear human orthologs. Using a series of mutant backgrounds to assess their genetic activities, the RNA interference clones displaying similar properties were clustered to establish potential regulatory relationships within the network. This approach uncovered four distinct genetic pathways controlling cell-cycle entry during intestinal organogenesis. The enhanced phenotypes observed for animals carrying compound mutations attest to the collaboration between distinct mechanisms to ensure strict developmental regulation of cell cycles. Moreover, we characterized ubc-25, a gene encoding an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme whose human ortholog, UBE2Q2, is deregulated in several cancers. Our genetic analyses suggested that ubc-25 acts in a linear pathway with cul-1/Cul1, in parallel to pathways employing cki-1/p27 and lin-35/pRb to promote cell-cycle quiescence. Further investigation of the potential regulatory mechanism demonstrated that ubc-25 activity negatively regulates CYE-1/cyclin E protein abundance in vivo. Together, our results show that the ubc-25-mediated pathway acts within a complex network that integrates the actions of multiple molecular mechanisms to control cell cycles during development. PMID:24584095

  8. Structure of trigger factor binding domain in biologically homologous complex with eubacterial ribosome reveals its chaperone action

    SciTech Connect

    Baram, David; Pyetan, Erez; Sittner, Assa; Auerbach-Nevo, Tamar; Bashan, Anat; Yonath, Ada

    2010-07-13

    Trigger factor (TF), the first chaperone in eubacteria to encounter the emerging nascent chain, binds to the large ribosomal subunit in the vicinity of the protein exit tunnel opening and forms a sheltered folding space. Here, we present the 3.5-{angstrom} crystal structure of the physiological complex of the large ribosomal subunit from the eubacterium Deinococcus radiodurans with the N-terminal domain of TF (TFa) from the same organism. For anchoring, TFa exploits a small ribosomal surface area in the vicinity of proteins L23 and L29, by using its 'signature motif' as well as additional structural elements. The molecular details of TFa interactions reveal that L23 is essential for the association of TF with the ribosome and may serve as a channel of communication with the nascent chain progressing in the tunnel. L29 appears to induce a conformational change in TFa, which results in the exposure of TFa hydrophobic patches to the opening of the ribosomal exit tunnel, thus increasing its affinity for hydrophobic segments of the emerging nascent polypeptide. This observation implies that, in addition to creating a protected folding space for the emerging nascent chain, TF association with the ribosome prevents aggregation by providing a competing hydrophobic environment and may be critical for attaining the functional conformation necessary for chaperone activity.

  9. Complex chemoattractive and chemorepellent Kit signals revealed by direct imaging of murine mast cells in microfluidic gradient chambers†

    PubMed Central

    Shamloo, Amir; Manchandia, Milan; Ferreira, Meghaan; Mani, Maheswaran; Nguyen, Christopher; Jahn, Thomas; Weinberg, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Besides its cooperating effects on stem cell proliferation and survival, Kit ligand (KL) is a potent chemotactic protein. While transwell assays permit studies of the frequency of migrating cells, the lack of direct visualization precludes dynamic chemotaxis studies. In response, we utilize microfluidic chambers that enable direct observation of murine bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMC) within stable KL gradients. Using this system, individual Kit+ BMMC were quantitatively analyzed for migration speed and directionality during KL-induced chemotaxis. Our results indicated a minimum activating threshold of ~3 ng ml−1 for chemoattraction. Analysis of cells at KL concentrations below 3 ng ml−1 revealed a paradoxical chemorepulsion, which has not been described previously. Unlike chemoattraction, which occurred continuously after an initial time lag, chemorepulsion occurred only during the first 90 minutes of observation. Both chemoattraction and chemorepulsion required the action of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR), as treatment with pertussis toxin abrogated directed migration. These results differ from previous studies of GPCR-mediated chemotaxis, where chemorepulsion occurred at high ligand concentrations. These data indicate that Kit-mediated chemotaxis is more complex than previously understood, with the involvement of GPCRs in addition to the Kit receptor tyrosine kinase and the presence of both chemoattractive and chemorepellent phases. PMID:23835699

  10. High-resolution imaging reveals new features of nuclear export of mRNA through the nuclear pore complexes.

    PubMed

    Kelich, Joseph M; Yang, Weidong

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear envelope (NE) of eukaryotic cells provides a physical barrier for messenger RNA (mRNA) and the associated proteins (mRNPs) traveling from sites of transcription in the nucleus to locations of translation processing in the cytoplasm. Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) embedded in the NE serve as a dominant gateway for nuclear export of mRNA. However, the fundamental characterization of export dynamics of mRNPs through the NPC has been hindered by several technical limits. First, the size of NPC that is barely below the diffraction limit of conventional light microscopy requires a super-resolution microscopy imaging approach. Next, the fast transit of mRNPs through the NPC further demands a high temporal resolution by the imaging approach. Finally, the inherent three-dimensional (3D) movements of mRNPs through the NPC demand the method to provide a 3D mapping of both transport kinetics and transport pathways of mRNPs. This review will highlight the recently developed super-resolution imaging techniques advanced from 1D to 3D for nuclear export of mRNPs and summarize the new features in the dynamic nuclear export process of mRNPs revealed from these technical advances. PMID:25141104

  11. Multilocus genealogies reveal multiple cryptic species and biogeographical complexity in the California turret spider Antrodiaetus riversi (Mygalomorphae, Antrodiaetidae).

    PubMed

    Starrett, James; Hedin, Marshal

    2007-02-01

    Antrodiaetus riversi (Araneae, Antrodiaetidae) is a dispersal-limited, habitat specialized mygalomorph spider species endemic to mesic woodlands of northern and central California. This species occupies a disjunct distribution, with populations in the Sierra Nevada and Coast Ranges, separated by the inhospitable Central Valley. Previous studies of morphological and allozyme variation have suggested that these populations may constitute cryptic species. We investigated the phylogeography of A. riversi using both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences, collected for a comprehensive population sample. These data reveal the presence of at least five species in the A. riversi complex - these species are deeply diverged, and genealogically exclusive in both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. Each of these species is characterized by extreme population subdivision and deep phylogeographical structuring, consistent with minimal gene flow across the dissected Californian landscape. Three species are restricted to the Coast Ranges, one to high altitudes of the central Sierran Nevada, and one species is found in both ranges. These species have allopatric distributions, although species parapatry is hypothesized to occur in several areas. Species diversification appears to have pulsed in the Late Miocene/Early Pliocene, a timing consistent with biogeographical reconstructions for many Californian taxa, and a time of turbulent geological activity in the region.

  12. A mitochondrial-focused genetic interaction map reveals a scaffold-like complex required for inner membrane organization in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Hoppins, Suzanne; Collins, Sean R; Cassidy-Stone, Ann; Hummel, Eric; Devay, Rachel M; Lackner, Laura L; Westermann, Benedikt; Schuldiner, Maya; Weissman, Jonathan S; Nunnari, Jodi

    2011-10-17

    To broadly explore mitochondrial structure and function as well as the communication of mitochondria with other cellular pathways, we constructed a quantitative, high-density genetic interaction map (the MITO-MAP) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The MITO-MAP provides a comprehensive view of mitochondrial function including insights into the activity of uncharacterized mitochondrial proteins and the functional connection between mitochondria and the ER. The MITO-MAP also reveals a large inner membrane-associated complex, which we term MitOS for mitochondrial organizing structure, comprised of Fcj1/Mitofilin, a conserved inner membrane protein, and five additional components. MitOS physically and functionally interacts with both outer and inner membrane components and localizes to extended structures that wrap around the inner membrane. We show that MitOS acts in concert with ATP synthase dimers to organize the inner membrane and promote normal mitochondrial morphology. We propose that MitOS acts as a conserved mitochondrial skeletal structure that differentiates regions of the inner membrane to establish the normal internal architecture of mitochondria.

  13. Gene Coexpression Analysis Reveals Complex Metabolism of the Monoterpene Alcohol Linalool in Arabidopsis Flowers[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ginglinger, Jean-François; Boachon, Benoit; Höfer, René; Paetz, Christian; Köllner, Tobias G.; Miesch, Laurence; Lugan, Raphael; Baltenweck, Raymonde; Mutterer, Jérôme; Ullmann, Pascaline; Beran, Franziska; Claudel, Patricia; Verstappen, Francel; Fischer, Marc J.C.; Karst, Francis; Bouwmeester, Harro; Miesch, Michel; Schneider, Bernd; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Ehlting, Jürgen; Werck-Reichhart, Danièle

    2013-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 family encompasses the largest family of enzymes in plant metabolism, and the functions of many of its members in Arabidopsis thaliana are still unknown. Gene coexpression analysis pointed to two P450s that were coexpressed with two monoterpene synthases in flowers and were thus predicted to be involved in monoterpenoid metabolism. We show that all four selected genes, the two terpene synthases (TPS10 and TPS14) and the two cytochrome P450s (CYP71B31 and CYP76C3), are simultaneously expressed at anthesis, mainly in upper anther filaments and in petals. Upon transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana, the TPS enzymes colocalize in vesicular structures associated with the plastid surface, whereas the P450 proteins were detected in the endoplasmic reticulum. Whether they were expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae or in N. benthamiana, the TPS enzymes formed two different enantiomers of linalool: (−)-(R)-linalool for TPS10 and (+)-(S)-linalool for TPS14. Both P450 enzymes metabolize the two linalool enantiomers to form different but overlapping sets of hydroxylated or epoxidized products. These oxygenated products are not emitted into the floral headspace, but accumulate in floral tissues as further converted or conjugated metabolites. This work reveals complex linalool metabolism in Arabidopsis flowers, the ecological role of which remains to be determined. PMID:24285789

  14. Tetrapositive plutonium, neptunium, uranium, and thorium coordination complexes: chemistry revealed by electron transfer and collision induced dissociation.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yu; Tian, Guoxin; Rao, Linfeng; Gibson, John K

    2014-04-17

    The Pu(4+), Np(4+), and U(4+) ions, which have large electron affinities of ∼34.6, ∼33.6, and ∼32.6 eV, respectively, were stabilized from solution to the gas phase upon coordination by three neutral tetramethyl-3-oxa-glutaramide ligands (TMOGA). Both collision induced dissociation (CID) and electron transfer dissociation (ETD) of Pu(TMOGA)3(4+) reveal the propensity for reduction of Pu(IV) to Pu(III), by loss of TMOGA(+) in CID and by simple electron transfer in ETD. The reduction of Pu(IV) is in distinct contrast to retention of Th(IV) in both CID and ETD of Th(TMOGA)3(4+), where only the C-Oether bond cleavage product was observed. U(TMOGA)3(4+) behaves similarly to Th(TMOGA)3(4+) upon CID and ETD, while the fragmentation patterns of Np(TMOGA)3(4+) lie between those of Pu(TMOGA)3(4+) and U(TMOGA)3(4+). It is notable that the gas-phase fragmentation behaviors of these exceptional tetrapositive complexes parallel fundamental differences in condensed phase chemistry within the actinide series, specifically the tendency for reduction from the IV to III oxidation states.

  15. Genome re-sequencing of semi-wild soybean reveals a complex Soja population structure and deep introgression.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jie; Wang, Yu; Wu, Sanling; Wang, Ying-Ying; Ye, Chu-Yu; Bai, Xuefei; Li, Zefeng; Yan, Chenghai; Wang, Weidi; Wang, Ziqiang; Shu, Qingyao; Xie, Jiahua; Lee, Suk-Ha; Fan, Longjiang

    2014-01-01

    Semi-wild soybean is a unique type of soybean that retains both wild and domesticated characteristics, which provides an important intermediate type for understanding the evolution of the subgenus Soja population in the Glycine genus. In this study, a semi-wild soybean line (Maliaodou) and a wild line (Lanxi 1) collected from the lower Yangtze regions were deeply sequenced while nine other semi-wild lines were sequenced to a 3-fold genome coverage. Sequence analysis revealed that (1) no independent phylogenetic branch covering all 10 semi-wild lines was observed in the Soja phylogenetic tree; (2) besides two distinct subpopulations of wild and cultivated soybean in the Soja population structure, all semi-wild lines were mixed with some wild lines into a subpopulation rather than an independent one or an intermediate transition type of soybean domestication; (3) high heterozygous rates (0.19-0.49) were observed in several semi-wild lines; and (4) over 100 putative selective regions were identified by selective sweep analysis, including those related to the development of seed size. Our results suggested a hybridization origin for the semi-wild soybean, which makes a complex Soja population structure. PMID:25265539

  16. Nano positioning system reveals the course of upstream and nontemplate DNA within the RNA polymerase II elongation complex.

    PubMed

    Andrecka, Joanna; Treutlein, Barbara; Arcusa, Maria Angeles Izquierdo; Muschielok, Adam; Lewis, Robert; Cheung, Alan C M; Cramer, Patrick; Michaelis, Jens

    2009-09-01

    Crystallographic studies of the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) elongation complex (EC) revealed the locations of downstream DNA and the DNA-RNA hybrid, but not the course of the nontemplate DNA strand in the transcription bubble and the upstream DNA duplex. Here we used single-molecule Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (smFRET) experiments to locate nontemplate and upstream DNA with our recently developed Nano Positioning System (NPS). In the resulting complete model of the Pol II EC, separation of the nontemplate from the template strand at position +2 involves interaction with fork loop 2. The nontemplate strand passes loop beta10-beta11 on the Pol II lobe, and then turns to the other side of the cleft above the rudder. The upstream DNA duplex exits at an approximately right angle from the incoming downstream DNA, and emanates from the cleft between the protrusion and clamp. Comparison with published data suggests that the architecture of the complete EC is conserved from bacteria to eukaryotes and that upstream DNA is relocated during the initiation-elongation transition.

  17. Prefrontal cortical recordings with biomorphic MEAs reveal complex columnar-laminar microcircuits for BCI/BMI implementation

    PubMed Central

    Opris, Ioan; Fuqua, Joshua L; Gerhardt, Greg A.; Hampson, Robert E.; Deadwyler, Sam A.

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian prefrontal cortex known as the seat of high brain functions uses a six layer distribution of minicolumnar neurons to coordinate the integration of sensory information and the selection of relevant signals for goal driven behavior. To reveal the complex functionality of these columnar microcircuits we employed simultaneous recordings with several configurations of biomorphic microelectrode arrays (MEAs) within cortical layers in adjacent minicolumns, in four nohuman primates (NHPs) performing a delayed match-to-sample (DMS) visual discrimination task. We examined: 1) the functionality of inter-laminar, and inter-columnar interactions between pairs of cells in the same or different minicolumns by use of normalized cross-correlation histograms (CCH), 2) the modulation of Glutamate concentration in layer 2/3, and 3) the potential interactions within these microcircuits. The results demonstrate that neurons in both infra-granular and supra-granular layers interact through inter-laminar loops, as well as through intra-laminar to produce behavioral response signals. These results provide new insights into the manner in which prefrontal cortical microcircuitry integrates sensory stimuli used to provide behaviorally relevant signals that may be implemented in brain computer/machine interfaces (BCI/BMIs) during performance of the task. PMID:24954713

  18. Virtual screening reveals a viral-like polymerase inhibitor that complexes with the DNA polymerase of Moniliophthora perniciosa.

    PubMed

    Andrade, B S; Souza, C S; Santos, G; Góes-Neto, A

    2016-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Moniliophthora perniciosa is a basidiomycota that causes the witches' broom disease in cocoa trees (Theobroma cacao L.). The mitochondrial DNA polymerase of M. perniciosa (MpmitDNApol) is classified within the B family of DNA polymerases, which can be found in viruses and cellular organelles. Using virtual screening processes, accessing KEGG, PubChem, and ZINC databases, we selected the 27 best putative nucleoside viral-like polymerase inhibitors to test against MpmitDNApol. We used Autodock Vina to perform docking simulations of the selected molecules and to return energy values in several ligand conformations. Then, we used Pymol v1.7.4.4 to check the stereochemistry of chiral carbons, hydrogen bonding receptors, absence or presence of hydrogen, sub and superstructure, numbers of rings, rotatable bonds, and donor groups. We selected the Entecavir Hydrate, a drug used to control hepatitis B; subsequently AMBER 14 was used to describe the behavior of polymerase-entecavir complex after setting up 3500 ps of simulation in water at a temperature of 300 K. From the simulation, a graph of Potential Energy was generated revealing that the ligand remains in the catalytic site after 3500 ps with a final energy of -612,587.4214 kcal/mol. PMID:27323084

  19. Structural and computational studies of the Staphylococcus aureus sortase B-substrate complex reveal a substrate-stabilized oxyanion hole.

    PubMed

    Jacobitz, Alex W; Wereszczynski, Jeff; Yi, Sung Wook; Amer, Brendan R; Huang, Grace L; Nguyen, Angelyn V; Sawaya, Michael R; Jung, Michael E; McCammon, J Andrew; Clubb, Robert T

    2014-03-28

    Sortase cysteine transpeptidases covalently attach proteins to the bacterial cell wall or assemble fiber-like pili that promote bacterial adhesion. Members of this enzyme superfamily are widely distributed in Gram-positive bacteria that frequently utilize multiple sortases to elaborate their peptidoglycan. Sortases catalyze transpeptidation using a conserved active site His-Cys-Arg triad that joins a sorting signal located at the C terminus of their protein substrate to an amino nucleophile located on the cell surface. However, despite extensive study, the catalytic mechanism and molecular basis of substrate recognition remains poorly understood. Here we report the crystal structure of the Staphylococcus aureus sortase B enzyme in a covalent complex with an analog of its NPQTN sorting signal substrate, revealing the structural basis through which it displays the IsdC protein involved in heme-iron scavenging from human hemoglobin. The results of computational modeling, molecular dynamics simulations, and targeted amino acid mutagenesis indicate that the backbone amide of Glu(224) and the side chain of Arg(233) form an oxyanion hole in sortase B that stabilizes high energy tetrahedral catalytic intermediates. Surprisingly, a highly conserved threonine residue within the bound sorting signal substrate facilitates construction of the oxyanion hole by stabilizing the position of the active site arginine residue via hydrogen bonding. Molecular dynamics simulations and primary sequence conservation suggest that the sorting signal-stabilized oxyanion hole is a universal feature of enzymes within the sortase superfamily.

  20. Amyloid-β-Anti-Amyloid-β Complex Structure Reveals an Extended Conformation in the Immunodominant B-Cell Epitope

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, Luke A; Wun, Kwok S; Crespi, Gabriela A.N.; Fodero-Tavoletti, Michelle T; Galatis, Denise; Bagley, Christopher J; Beyreuther, Konrad; Masters, Colin L; Cappai, Roberto; McKinstry, William J; Barnham, Kevin J; Parker, Michael W

    2008-04-29

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, generated by proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein, is central to AD pathogenesis. Most pharmaceutical activity in AD research has focused on Aβ, its generation and clearance from the brain. In particular, there is much interest in immunotherapy approaches with a number of anti-Aβ antibodies in clinical trials. We have developed a monoclonal antibody, called WO2, which recognises the Aβ peptide. To this end, we have determined the three-dimensional structure, to near atomic resolution, of both the antibody and the complex with its antigen, the Aβ peptide. The structures reveal the molecular basis for WO2 recognition and binding of Aβ. The Aβ peptide adopts an extended, coil-like conformation across its major immunodominant B-cell epitope between residues 2 and 8. We have also studied the antibody-bound Aβ peptide in the presence of metals known to affect its aggregation state and show that WO2 inhibits these interactions. Thus, antibodies that target the N-terminal region of Aβ, such as WO2, hold promise for therapeutic development.

  1. Amyloid-β-Anti-Amyloid-β Complex Structure Reveals an Extended Conformation in the Immunodominant B-Cell Epitope

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, Luke A; Wun, Kwok S; Crespi, Gabriela A.N.; Fodero-Tavoletti, Michelle T; Galatis, Denise; Bagley, Christopher J; Beyreuther, Konrad; Masters, Colin L; Cappai, Roberto; McKinstry, William J; Barnham, Kevin J; Parker, Michael W

    2012-04-17

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, generated by proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein, is central to AD pathogenesis. Most pharmaceutical activity in AD research has focused on Aβ, its generation and clearance from the brain. In particular, there is much interest in immunotherapy approaches with a number of anti-Aβ antibodies in clinical trials. We have developed a monoclonal antibody, called WO2, which recognises the Aβ peptide. To this end, we have determined the three-dimensional structure, to near atomic resolution, of both the antibody and the complex with its antigen, the Aβ peptide. The structures reveal the molecular basis for WO2 recognition and binding of Aβ. The Aβ peptide adopts an extended, coil-like conformation across its major immunodominant B-cell epitope between residues 2 and 8. We have also studied the antibody-bound Aβ peptide in the presence of metals known to affect its aggregation state and show that WO2 inhibits these interactions. Thus, antibodies that target the N-terminal region of Aβ, such as WO2, hold promise for therapeutic development.

  2. Genome re-sequencing of semi-wild soybean reveals a complex Soja population structure and deep introgression.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jie; Wang, Yu; Wu, Sanling; Wang, Ying-Ying; Ye, Chu-Yu; Bai, Xuefei; Li, Zefeng; Yan, Chenghai; Wang, Weidi; Wang, Ziqiang; Shu, Qingyao; Xie, Jiahua; Lee, Suk-Ha; Fan, Longjiang

    2014-01-01

    Semi-wild soybean is a unique type of soybean that retains both wild and domesticated characteristics, which provides an important intermediate type for understanding the evolution of the subgenus Soja population in the Glycine genus. In this study, a semi-wild soybean line (Maliaodou) and a wild line (Lanxi 1) collected from the lower Yangtze regions were deeply sequenced while nine other semi-wild lines were sequenced to a 3-fold genome coverage. Sequence analysis revealed that (1) no independent phylogenetic branch covering all 10 semi-wild lines was observed in the Soja phylogenetic tree; (2) besides two distinct subpopulations of wild and cultivated soybean in the Soja population structure, all semi-wild lines were mixed with some wild lines into a subpopulation rather than an independent one or an intermediate transition type of soybean domestication; (3) high heterozygous rates (0.19-0.49) were observed in several semi-wild lines; and (4) over 100 putative selective regions were identified by selective sweep analysis, including those related to the development of seed size. Our results suggested a hybridization origin for the semi-wild soybean, which makes a complex Soja population structure.

  3. Small RNA and Degradome Sequencing Reveal Complex Roles of miRNAs and Their Targets in Developing Wheat Grains

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Yuke; Hao, Chenyang; Chen, Xinhong; Zhang, Xueyong

    2015-01-01

    Plant microRNAs (miRNAs) have been shown to play critical roles in plant development. In this study, we employed small RNA combined with degradome sequencing to survey development-related miRNAs and their validated targets during wheat grain development. A total of 186 known miRNAs and 37 novel miRNAs were identified in four small RNA libraries. Moreover, a miRNA-like long hairpin locus was first identified to produce 21~22-nt phased siRNAs that act in trans to cleave target mRNAs. A comparison of the miRNAomes revealed that 55 miRNA families were differentially expressed during the grain development. Predicted and validated targets of these development-related miRNAs are involved in different cellular responses and metabolic processes including cell proliferation, auxin signaling, nutrient metabolism and gene expression. This study provides insight into the complex roles of miRNAs and their targets in regulating wheat grain development. PMID:26426440

  4. High-density PhyloChip profiling of stimulated aquifer microbial communities reveals a complex response to acetate amendment

    SciTech Connect

    Handley, Kim M.; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Piceno, Yvette M.; Andersen, Gary L.; DeSantis, Todd Z.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Wilkins, Michael J.; N'Guessan, A. Lucie; Peacock, Aaron; Bargar, John; Long, Philip E.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2012-04-13

    There is increasing interest in harnessing the functional capacities of indigenous microbial communities to transform and remediate a wide range of environmental contaminants. Information about which community members respond to stimulation can guide the interpretation and development of remediation approaches. To comprehensively determine community membership and abundance patterns among a suite of samples associated with uranium bioremediation experiments we employed a high-density microarray (PhyloChip). Samples were unstimulated, naturally reducing, or collected during Fe(III) (early) and sulfate reduction (late biostimulation) from an acetate re-amended/amended aquifer in Rifle, Colorado, and from laboratory experiments using field-collected materials. Deep community sampling with PhyloChip identified hundreds-to-thousands of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) present during amendment, and revealed close similarity among highly enriched taxa from drill-core and groundwater well-deployed column sediment. Overall, phylogenetic data suggested stimulated community membership was most affected by a carryover effect between annual stimulation events. Nevertheless, OTUs within the Fe(III)- and sulfate-reducing lineages, Desulfuromonadales and Desulfobacterales, were repeatedly stimulated. Less consistent, co-enriched taxa represented additional lineages associated with Fe(III) and sulfate reduction (for example, Desulfovibrionales; Syntrophobacterales; Peptococcaceae) and autotrophic sulfur oxidation (Sulfurovum; Campylobacterales). These data imply complex membership among highly stimulated taxa, and by inference biogeochemical responses to acetate, a non-fermentable substrate.

  5. High-density PhyloChip profiling of stimulated aquifer microbial communities reveals a complex response to acetate amendment.

    PubMed

    Handley, Kim M; Wrighton, Kelly C; Piceno, Yvette M; Andersen, Gary L; DeSantis, Todd Z; Williams, Kenneth H; Wilkins, Michael J; N'Guessan, A Lucie; Peacock, Aaron; Bargar, John; Long, Philip E; Banfield, Jillian F

    2012-07-01

    There is increasing interest in harnessing the functional capacities of indigenous microbial communities to transform and remediate a wide range of environmental contaminants. Information about which community members respond to stimulation can guide the interpretation and development of remediation approaches. To comprehensively determine community membership and abundance patterns among a suite of samples associated with uranium bioremediation experiments, we employed a high-density microarray (PhyloChip). Samples were unstimulated, naturally reducing, or collected during Fe(III) (early) and sulfate reduction (late biostimulation) from an acetate re-amended/amended aquifer in Rifle, Colorado, and from laboratory experiments using field-collected materials. Deep community sampling with PhyloChip identified hundreds-to-thousands of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) present during amendment, and revealed close similarity among highly enriched taxa from drill core and groundwater well-deployed column sediment. Overall, phylogenetic data suggested that stimulated community membership was most affected by a carryover effect between annual stimulation events. Nevertheless, OTUs within the Fe(III)- and sulfate-reducing lineages, Desulfuromonadales and Desulfobacterales, were repeatedly stimulated. Less consistent, co-enriched taxa represented additional lineages associated with Fe(III) and sulfate reduction (e.g. Desulfovibrionales; Syntrophobacterales; Peptococcaceae) and autotrophic sulfur oxidation (Sulfurovum; Campylobacterales). Data implies complex membership among highly stimulated taxa and, by inference, biogeochemical responses to acetate, a nonfermentable substrate.

  6. Relative Orientation of Imidazole Ligands in Cu(II) Model and Abeta peptides Complexes revealed by ESEEM Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Jessica; Sun, Li; Warncke, Kurt

    2009-11-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is associated with the aggregation and fibrillization of the beta-amyloid protein (Abeta). The coordination of Cu(II) by peptide histidine imidazole sidechains is proposed to play an important role in determining the fibrillization ``switch'' [1]. We have developed techniques of X-band electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopy to determine the molecular structure of the Cu(II)-histidine imidazole coordination in cryotrapped soluble and fibrillar forms of Abeta peptides, in order to gain insight into the factors that govern fibrillization. Focusing on the ESEEM double quantum harmonic feature, we use our hybrid optimization-based OPTESIM simulation software [2] to determine the mutual orientation of the imidazole rings in Cu(II)--bis-imidazole complexes that include cis- versus trans- coordination. The technique has been applied to Abeta(13-21) peptide to reveal the Cu(II) coordination mode in fibrils. [1] Dong , J., et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., 2007, 104, 13313. [2] Sun, L., et al., J. Magn. Reson. 2009, 200, 21

  7. Unexpected Advice for Beginning Graduate Students in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.

    2012-08-01

    My experience is that beginning graduate students in astrophysics have unrealistic views of how to negotiate the complexities of graduate school and to prepare themselves for a professional career in astrophysics or some other field. This chapter describes my unexpected advice to students beginning with why they should not plan to write a thesis. Other advice concerns how to find and work with a research supervisor, writing and other skills needed for their research, and the need to be creative and when necessary controversial.

  8. Origin of unexpected magnetism in Cu-doped TIO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Q. K.; Wang, B.; Woo, C. H.; Wang, H.; Zhu, Z. Y.; Wang, R.

    2008-01-01

    Cu-doped TiO2 has recently been found to exhibit unexpected room temperature ferromagnetism. In the present work, possible defect structures and the associated magnetism are calculated within the generalized gradient approximation using the projector augmented wave method (PAW). In particular, structures of the vacancy-Cu impurity complex are studied. Our results show that the magnetism is caused by: 1) the hybridization of p-d orbitals between the Cu and O ions, and 2) the spin polarization of the 3d orbital of Cu and of the 2p orbital of O ions.

  9. Zernike phase contrast cryo-electron microscopy reveals 100 kDa component in a protein complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yi-Min; Wang, Chun-Hsiung; Chang, Jen-wei; Chen, Yi-yun; Miyazaki, Naoyuki; Murata, Kazuyoshi; Nagayama, Kuniaki; Chang, Wei-Hau

    2013-12-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) has become a powerful technique for obtaining near atomic structures for large protein assemblies or large virus particles, but the application to protein particles smaller than 200-300 kDa has been hampered by the feeble phase contrast obtained for such small samples and the limited number of electrons tolerated by them without incurring excessive radiation damage. By implementing a thin-film quarter-wave phase plate to a cryo-EM, Nagayama, one of the present authors, has recently restored the long-lost very low spatial frequencies, generating in-focus phase contrast superior to that of conventional defocusing phase contrast, and successfully applied the so-called Zernike phase-plate cryo-EM to target various biological samples in native state. Nevertheless, the sought-after goal of using enhanced phase contrast to reveal a native protein as small as 100 kDa waits to be realized. Here, we report a study in which 200 kV Zernike phase-plate cryo-EM with a plate cut-on periodicity of 36 nm was applied to visualize 100 kDa components of various protein complexes, including the small domains on the surface of an icosahedral particle of ˜38 nm derived from the dragon grouper nervous necrosis virus (DGNNV) and the labile sub-complex dissociated from yeast RNA polymerase III of 17 nm. In the former case, we observed a phase contrast reversal phenomenon at the centre of the icosahedral particle and traced its root cause to the near matching of the cut-on size and the particle size. In summary, our work has demonstrated that Zernike phase-plate implementation can indeed expand the size range of proteins that can be successfully investigated by cryo-EM, opening the door for countless proteins. Finally, we briefly discuss the possibility of using a transfer lens system to enlarge the cut-on periodicity without further miniaturizing the plate pinhole.

  10. Complex mean circulation over the inner shelf south of Martha's Vineyard revealed by observations and a high-resolution model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ganju, Neil K.; Lentz, Steven J.; Kirincich, Anthony R.; Farrar, J. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Inner-shelf circulation is governed by the interaction between tides, baroclinic forcing, winds, waves, and frictional losses; the mean circulation ultimately governs exchange between the coast and ocean. In some cases, oscillatory tidal currents interact with bathymetric features to generate a tidally rectified flow. Recent observational and modeling efforts in an overlapping domain centered on the Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory (MVCO) provided an opportunity to investigate the spatial and temporal complexity of circulation on the inner shelf. ADCP and surface radar observations revealed a mean circulation pattern that was highly variable in the alongshore and cross-shore directions. Nested modeling incrementally improved representation of the mean circulation as grid resolution increased and indicated tidal rectification as the generation mechanism of a counter-clockwise gyre near the MVCO. The loss of model skill with decreasing resolution is attributed to insufficient representation of the bathymetric gradients (Δh/h), which is important for representing nonlinear interactions between currents and bathymetry. The modeled momentum balance was characterized by large spatial variability of the pressure gradient and horizontal advection terms over short distances, suggesting that observed inner-shelf momentum balances may be confounded. Given the available observational and modeling data, this work defines the spatially variable mean circulation and its formation mechanism—tidal rectification—and illustrates the importance of model resolution for resolving circulation and constituent exchange near the coast. The results of this study have implications for future observational and modeling studies near the MVCO and other inner-shelf locations with alongshore bathymetric variability.

  11. Diffusion Spectrum MRI Tractography Reveals the Presence of a Complex Network of Residual Myofibers in Infarcted Myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Sosnovik, David E.; Wang, Ruopeng; Dai, Guangping; Wang, Teresa; Aikawa, Elena; Novikov, Mikhael; Rosenzweig, Anthony; Gilbert, Richard J.; Wedeen, Van J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Changes in myocardial microstructure are important components of the tissue response to infarction but are difficult to resolve with current imaging techniques. A novel technique, diffusion spectrum MRI tractography (DSI-tractography), was thus used to image myofiber architecture in normal and infarcted myocardium. Unlike diffusion tensor imaging, DSI-tractography resolves multiple myofiber populations per voxel, thus generating accurate 3D tractograms, which we present in the myocardium for the first time. Methods and Results DSI-tractography was performed at 4.7 Tesla in excised rat hearts 3 weeks following left coronary artery ligation (n=4), and in 4 age-matched controls. Fiber architecture in the control hearts varied smoothly from endocardium to epicardium, producing a symmetric array of crossing helical structures in which orthogonal myofibers were separated by fibers with intermediate helix angles. Fiber architecture in the infarcted hearts was severely perturbed. The infarct boundary in all cases was highly irregular and punctuated repeatedly by residual myofibers extending from within the infarct to the border zones. In all infarcts longitudinal myofibers extending towards the basal-anterior wall and transversely oriented myofibers extending towards the septum lay in direct contact with each other, forming nodes of orthogonal myofiber intersection or contact. Conclusions DSI-tractography resolves 3D myofiber architecture and reveals a complex network of orthogonal myofibers within infarcted myocardium. Mesh-like networks of orthogonal myofibers in infarcted myocardium may resist mechanical remodeling, but likely also increase the risk for lethal re-entrant arrhythmias. DSI-tractography thus provides a new and important readout of tissue injury following myocardial infarction. PMID:19808594

  12. Complex interactions of the Eastern and Western Slavic populations with other European groups as revealed by mitochondrial DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Grzybowski, Tomasz; Malyarchuk, Boris A; Derenko, Miroslava V; Perkova, Maria A; Bednarek, Jarosław; Woźniak, Marcin

    2007-06-01

    Mitochondrial DNA sequence variation was examined by the control region sequencing (HVS I and HVS II) and RFLP analysis of haplogroup-diagnostic coding region sites in 570 individuals from four regional populations of Poles and two Russian groups from northwestern part of the country. Additionally, sequences of complete mitochondrial genomes representing K1a1b1a subclade in Polish and Polish Roma populations have been determined. Haplogroup frequency patterns revealed in Poles and Russians are similar to those characteristic of other Europeans. However, there are several features of Slavic mtDNA pools seen on the level of regional populations which are helpful in the understanding of complex interactions of the Eastern and Western Slavic populations with other European groups. One of the most important is the presence of subhaplogroups U5b1b1, D5, Z1 and U8a with simultaneous scarcity of haplogroup K in populations of northwestern Russia suggesting the participation of Finno-Ugrian tribes in the formation of mtDNA pools of Russians from this region. The results of genetic structure analyses suggest that Russians from Velikii Novgorod area (northwestern Russia) and Poles from Suwalszczyzna (northeastern Poland) differ from all remaining Polish and Russian samples. Simultaneously, northwestern Russians and northeastern Poles bear some similarities to Baltic (Latvians) and Finno-Ugrian groups (Estonians) of northeastern Europe, especially on the level of U5 haplogroup frequencies. The occurrence of K1a1b1a subcluster in Poles and Polish Roma is one of the first direct proofs of the presence of Ashkenazi-specific mtDNA lineages in non-Jewish European populations.

  13. Ecomorph or endangered coral? DNA and microstructure reveal hawaiian species complexes: Montipora dilatata/flabellata/turgescens & M. patula/verrilli.

    PubMed

    Forsman, Zac H; Concepcion, Gregory T; Haverkort, Roxanne D; Shaw, Ross W; Maragos, James E; Toonen, Robert J

    2010-01-01

    M. dilatata, M. flabellata, and M. patula and 80 other scleractinian corals were petitioned to be listed under the US Endangered Species Act (ESA), which would have major conservation implications. One of the difficulties with this evaluation is that reproductive boundaries between morphologically defined coral species are often permeable, and morphology can be wildly variable. We examined genetic and morphological variation in Hawaiian Montipora with a suite of molecular markers (mitochondrial: COI, CR, Cyt-B, 16S, ATP6; nuclear: ATPsβ, ITS) and microscopic skeletal measurements. Mitochondrial markers and the ITS region revealed four distinct clades: I) M. patula/M. verrilli, II) M. cf. incrassata, III) M. capitata, IV) M. dilatata/M. flabellata/M. cf. turgescens. These clades are likely to occur outside of Hawai'i according to mitochondrial control region haplotypes from previous studies. The ATPsβ intron data showed a pattern often interpreted as resulting from hybridization and introgression; however, incomplete lineage sorting may be more likely since the multicopy nuclear ITS region was consistent with the mitochondrial data. Furthermore, principal components analysis (PCA) of skeletal microstructure was concordant with the mitochondrial clades, while nominal taxa overlapped. The size and shape of verrucae or papillae contributed most to identifying groups, while colony-level morphology was highly variable. It is not yet clear if these species complexes represent population-level variation or incipient speciation (CA<1MYA), two alternatives that have very different conservation implications. This study highlights the difficulty in understanding the scale of genetic and morphological variation that corresponds to species as opposed to population-level variation, information that is essential for conservation and for understanding coral biodiversity. PMID:21151995

  14. Ecomorph or Endangered Coral? DNA and Microstructure Reveal Hawaiian Species Complexes: Montipora dilatata/flabellata/turgescens & M. patula/verrilli

    PubMed Central

    Forsman, Zac H.; Concepcion, Gregory T.; Haverkort, Roxanne D.; Shaw, Ross W.; Maragos, James E.; Toonen, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    M. dilatata, M. flabellata, and M. patula and 80 other scleractinian corals were petitioned to be listed under the US Endangered Species Act (ESA), which would have major conservation implications. One of the difficulties with this evaluation is that reproductive boundaries between morphologically defined coral species are often permeable, and morphology can be wildly variable. We examined genetic and morphological variation in Hawaiian Montipora with a suite of molecular markers (mitochondrial: COI, CR, Cyt-B, 16S, ATP6; nuclear: ATPsβ, ITS) and microscopic skeletal measurements. Mitochondrial markers and the ITS region revealed four distinct clades: I) M. patula/M. verrilli, II) M. cf. incrassata, III) M. capitata, IV) M. dilatata/M. flabellata/M. cf. turgescens. These clades are likely to occur outside of Hawai'i according to mitochondrial control region haplotypes from previous studies. The ATPsβ intron data showed a pattern often interpreted as resulting from hybridization and introgression; however, incomplete lineage sorting may be more likely since the multicopy nuclear ITS region was consistent with the mitochondrial data. Furthermore, principal components analysis (PCA) of skeletal microstructure was concordant with the mitochondrial clades, while nominal taxa overlapped. The size and shape of verrucae or papillae contributed most to identifying groups, while colony-level morphology was highly variable. It is not yet clear if these species complexes represent population-level variation or incipient speciation (CA<1MYA), two alternatives that have very different conservation implications. This study highlights the difficulty in understanding the scale of genetic and morphological variation that corresponds to species as opposed to population-level variation, information that is essential for conservation and for understanding coral biodiversity. PMID:21151995

  15. Design of in vitro Symmetric Complexes and Analysis by Hybrid Methods Reveal Mechanisms of HIV Capsid Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Yeager, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Unlike the capsids of icosahedral viruses, retroviral capsids are pleomorphic, with variably curved, closed fullerene shells composed of ~250 hexamers and exactly 12 pentamers of the viral CA protein. Structures of CA oligomers have been difficult to obtain because the subunit-subunit interactions are inherently weak, and CA tends to spontaneously assemble into capsid-like particles. Guided by a cryoEM-based model of the hexagonal lattice of HIV-1 CA, we used a two-step biochemical strategy to obtain soluble CA hexamers and pentamers for crystallization. First, each oligomer was stabilized by engineering disulfide cross-links between the N-terminal domains of adjacent subunits. Second, the cross-linked oligomers were prevented from polymerizing into hyperstable, capsid-like structures by mutations that weakened the dimeric association between the C-terminal domains that link adjacent oligomers. The X-ray structures revealed that the oligomers are comprised of a fairly rigid, central symmetric ring of N-terminal domains encircled by mobile C-terminal domains. Assembly of the quasi-equivalent oligomers requires remarkably subtle rearrangements in inter-subunit quaternary bonding interactions, and appears to be controlled by an electrostatic switch that favors hexamers over pentamers. An atomic model of the complete HIV-1 capsid was then built using the fullerene cone as a template. Rigid-body rotations around two assembly interfaces are sufficient to generate the full range of continuously varying lattice curvature in the fullerene cone. The steps in determining this HIV-1 capsid atomic model exemplify how structural biology can be leveraged by the use of hybrid methods, a powerful approach for exploring the structure of pleomorphic macromolecular complexes. PMID:21762799

  16. SSU rRNA reveals a sequential increase in shell complexity among the euglyphid testate amoebae (Rhizaria: Euglyphida).

    PubMed

    Lara, Enrique; Heger, Thierry J; Mitchell, Edward A D; Meisterfeld, Ralf; Ekelund, Flemming

    2007-04-01

    The existing data on the molecular phylogeny of filose testate amoebae from order Euglyphida has revealed contradictions between traditional morphological classification and SSU rRNA phylogeny and, moreover, the position of several important genera remained unknown. We therefore carried out a study aiming to fill several important gaps and better understand the relationships among the main euglyphid testate amoebae and the evolutionary steps that led to the present diversity at a higher level. We obtained new SSU rRNA sequences from five genera and seven species. This new phylogeny obtained shows that (1) the clade formed by species of genera Assulina and Placocista branches unambiguously at the base of the subclade of Euglyphida comprising all members of the family Trinematidae and genus Euglypha, (2) family Trinematidae (Trachelocorythion, Trinema, and Corythion) branches as a sister group to genus Euglypha, (3) three newly sequenced Euglypha species (E. cf. ciliata, E. penardi, and E. compressa) form a new clade within the genus. Since our results show that Assulina and Placocista do not belong to the Euglyphidae (unless the Trinematidae are also included in this family), we propose the creation of a new family named Assulinidae. Consequently, we give a family status to the genera Euglypha and (tentatively) Scutiglypha, which become the new family Euglyphidae. The evolutionary pattern suggested by SSU rRNA phylogeny shows a clear tendency towards increasing morphological complexity of the shell characterised by changes in the symmetry (migration of the aperture to a ventral position and/or compression of the shell) and the appearance of specialised scales at the aperture (in families Trinematidae and Euglyphidae). PMID:17292668

  17. An Unexpected Influence on a Quadratic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Jon D.

    2013-01-01

    Using technology to explore the coefficients of a quadratic equation can lead to an unexpected result. This article describes an investigation that involves sliders and dynamically linked representations. It guides students to notice the effect that the parameter "a" has on the graphical representation of a quadratic function in the form…

  18. Some Unexpected Results Using Computer Algebra Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonso, Felix; Garcia, Alfonsa; Garcia, Francisco; Hoya, Sara; Rodriguez, Gerardo; de la Villa, Agustin

    2001-01-01

    Shows how teachers can often use unexpected outputs from Computer Algebra Systems (CAS) to reinforce concepts and to show students the importance of thinking about how they use the software and reflecting on their results. Presents different examples where DERIVE, MAPLE, or Mathematica does not work as expected and suggests how to use them as a…

  19. Functional Dissection of the NuA4 Histone Acetyltransferase Reveals Its Role as a Genetic Hub and that Eaf1 Is Essential for Complex Integrity▿

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Leslie; Lambert, Jean-Philippe; Gerdes, Maria; Al-Madhoun, Ashraf S.; Skerjanc, Ilona S.; Figeys, Daniel; Baetz, Kristin

    2008-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae NuA4 histone acetyltransferase complex catalyzes the acetylation of histone H4 and the histone variant Htz1 to regulate key cellular events, including transcription, DNA repair, and faithful chromosome segregation. To further investigate the cellular processes impacted by NuA4, we exploited the nonessential subunits of the complex to build an extensive NuA4 genetic-interaction network map. The map reveals that NuA4 is a genetic hub whose function buffers a diverse range of cellular processes, many not previously linked to the complex, including Golgi complex-to-vacuole vesicle-mediated transport. Further, we probe the role that nonessential subunits play in NuA4 complex integrity. We find that most nonessential subunits have little impact on NuA4 complex integrity and display between 12 and 42 genetic interactions. In contrast, the deletion of EAF1 causes the collapse of the NuA4 complex and displays 148 genetic interactions. Our study indicates that Eaf1 plays a crucial function in NuA4 complex integrity. Further, we determine that Eaf5 and Eaf7 form a subcomplex, which reflects their similar genetic interaction profiles and phenotypes. Our integrative study demonstrates that genetic interaction maps are valuable in dissecting complex structure and provides insight into why the human NuA4 complex, Tip60, has been associated with a diverse range of pathologies. PMID:18212056

  20. Analysis of the NuRD subunits reveals a histone deacetylase core complex and a connection with DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Ng, Huck-Hui; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Tempst, Paul; Bird, Adrian; Reinberg, Danny

    1999-01-01

    ATP-dependent nucleosome remodeling and core histone acetylation and deacetylation represent mechanisms to alter nucleosome structure. NuRD is a multisubunit complex containing nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase activities. The histone deacetylases HDAC1 and HDAC2 and the histone binding proteins RbAp48 and RbAp46 form a core complex shared between NuRD and Sin3-histone deacetylase complexes. The histone deacetylase activity of the core complex is severely compromised. A novel polypeptide highly related to the metastasis-associated protein 1, MTA2, and the methyl-CpG-binding domain-containing protein, MBD3, were found to be subunits of the NuRD complex. MTA2 modulates the enzymatic activity of the histone deacetylase core complex. MBD3 mediates the association of MTA2 with the core histone deacetylase complex. MBD3 does not directly bind methylated DNA but is highly related to MBD2, a polypeptide that binds to methylated DNA and has been reported to possess demethylase activity. MBD2 interacts with the NuRD complex and directs the complex to methylated DNA. NuRD may provide a means of gene silencing by DNA methylation. PMID:10444591

  1. Evolutionary history of black grouse major histocompatibility complex class IIB genes revealed through single locus sequence-based genotyping

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gene duplications are frequently observed in the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) of many species, and as a consequence loci belonging to the same MHC class are often too similar to tell apart. In birds, single locus genotyping of MHC genes has proven difficult due to concerted evolution homogenizing sequences at different loci. But studies on evolutionary history, mode of selection and heterozygosity correlations on the MHC cannot be performed before it is possible to analyse duplicated genes separately. In this study we investigate the architecture and evolution of the MHC class IIB genes in black grouse. We developed a sequence-based genotyping method for separate amplification of the two black grouse MHC class IIB genes BLB1 and BLB2. Based on this approach we are able to study differences in structure and selection between the two genes in black grouse and relate these results to the chicken MHC structure and organization. Results Sequences were obtained from 12 individuals and separated into alleles using the software PHASE. We compared nucleotide diversity measures and employed selection tests for BLB1 and BLB2 to explore their modes of selection. Both BLB1 and BLB2 are transcribed and display classic characteristics of balancing selection as predicted for expressed MHC class IIB genes. We found evidence for both intra- and interlocus recombination or gene conversion, as well as indication for positive but differential selection at both loci. Moreover, the two loci appear to be linked. Phylogenetic analyses revealed orthology of the black grouse MHC class IIB genes to the respective BLB loci in chicken. Conclusions The results indicate that the duplication of the BLB gene occurred before the species divergence into black grouse, chicken and pheasant. Further, we conclude that BLB1 and BLB2 in black grouse are subjected to homogenizing concerted evolution due to interlocus genetic exchange after species divergence. The loci are in linkage

  2. Human insulin analogues modified at the B26 site reveal a hormone conformation that is undetected in the receptor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Žáková, Lenka; Kletvíková, Emília; Lepšík, Martin; Collinsová, Michaela; Watson, Christopher J.; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Jiráček, Jiří; Brzozowski, Andrzej M.

    2014-10-01

    [AsnB26]- and [GlyB26]-insulin mutants attain a B26-turn like fold without assistance of chemical modifications. Their structures match the insulin receptor interface and expand the spectrum of insulin conformations. The structural characterization of the insulin–insulin receptor (IR) interaction still lacks the conformation of the crucial B21–B30 insulin region, which must be different from that in its storage forms to ensure effective receptor binding. Here, it is shown that insulin analogues modified by natural amino acids at the TyrB26 site can represent an active form of this hormone. In particular, [AsnB26]-insulin and [GlyB26]-insulin attain a B26-turn-like conformation that differs from that in all known structures of the native hormone. It also matches the receptor interface, avoiding substantial steric clashes. This indicates that insulin may attain a B26-turn-like conformation upon IR binding. Moreover, there is an unexpected, but significant, binding specificity of the AsnB26 mutant for predominantly the metabolic B isoform of the receptor. As it is correlated with the B26 bend of the B-chain of the hormone, the structures of AsnB26 analogues may provide the first structural insight into the structural origins of differential insulin signalling through insulin receptor A and B isoforms.

  3. Structural comparison of the Caenorhabditis elegans and human Ndc80 complexes bound to microtubules reveals distinct binding behavior

    PubMed Central

    Wilson-Kubalek, Elizabeth M.; Cheeseman, Iain M.; Milligan, Ronald A.

    2016-01-01

    During cell division, kinetochores must remain tethered to the plus ends of dynamic microtubule polymers. However, the molecular basis for robust kinetochore–microtubule interactions remains poorly understood. The conserved four-subunit Ndc80 complex plays an essential and direct role in generating dynamic kinetochore–microtubule attachments. Here we compare the binding of the Caenorhabditis elegans and human Ndc80 complexes to microtubules at high resolution using cryo–electron microscopy reconstructions. Despite the conserved roles of the Ndc80 complex in diverse organisms, we find that the attachment mode of these complexes for microtubules is distinct. The human Ndc80 complex binds every tubulin monomer along the microtubule protofilament, whereas the C. elegans Ndc80 complex binds more tightly to β-tubulin. In addition, the C. elegans Ndc80 complex tilts more toward the adjacent protofilament. These structural differences in the Ndc80 complex between different species may play significant roles in the nature of kinetochore–microtubule interactions. PMID:26941333

  4. Regulatory RNAs discovered in unexpected places.

    PubMed

    Pek, Jun Wei; Okamura, Katsutomo

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have discovered both small and long noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) encoded in unexpected places. These ncRNA genes were surprises at the time of their discovery, but many quickly became well-accepted families of functional regulatory RNA species. Even after years of extensive gene annotation studies using high-throughput sequencing technologies, new types of ncRNA genes continue to be discovered in unexpected places. We highlight ncRNAs that have atypical structures and that are encoded in what are generally considered 'junk' sequences, such as spacers and introns. We also discuss current bottlenecks in the approaches for identifying novel ncRNAs and the possibility that many remain to be discovered. PMID:26424536