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Sample records for reverse polarity capillary

  1. Reverse polarity capillary zone electrophoresis analysis of nitrate and nitrite in natural water samples

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalf, S.G.

    1998-06-11

    This paper describes the application of reverse polarity capillary zone electrophoresis (RPCE) for rapid and accurate determination of nitrate and nitrite in natural water samples. Using hexamethonium bromide (HMB) as an electroosmotic flow modifier in a borate buffer at pH 9.2, the resolution of nitrate and nitrite was accomplished in less than 3 minutes. RPCE was compared with ion chromatographic (IC) and cadmium reduction flow injection analysis (Cd-FIA) methods which are the two most commonly used standard methods for the analysis of natural water samples for nitrate and nitrite. When compared with the ion chromatographic method for the determination of nitrate and nitrite, RPCE reduced analysis time, decreased detection limits by a factor of 10, cut laboratory wastes by more than two orders of magnitude, and eliminated interferences commonly associated with IC. When compared with the cadmium reduction method, RPCE had the advantage of simultaneous determination of nitrate and nitrite, could be used in the presence of various metallic ions that normally interfere in cadmium reduction, and decreased detection limits by a factor of 10.

  2. The in-capillary DPPH-capillary electrophoresis-the diode array detector combined with reversed-electrode polarity stacking mode for screening and quantifying major antioxidants in Cuscuta chinensis Lam.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiao; Tian, Ji; Li, Jin; Azietaku, John Teye; Zhang, Bo-Li; Gao, Xiu-Mei; Chang, Yan-Xu

    2016-07-01

    An in-capillary 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH)-CE-the DAD (in-capillary DPPH-CE-DAD) combined with reversed-electrode polarity stacking mode has been developed to screen and quantify the active antioxidant components of Cuscuta chinensis Lam. The operation parameters were optimized with regard to the pH and concentration of buffer solution, SDS, β-CDs, organic modifier, as well as separation voltage and temperature. Six antioxidants including chlorogenic acid, p-coumaric acid, rutin, hyperin, isoquercitrin, and astragalin were screened and the total antioxidant activity of the complex matrix was successfully evaluated based on the decreased peak area of DPPH by the established DPPH-CE-DAD method. Sensitivity was enhanced under reversed-electrode polarity stacking mode and 10- to 31-fold of magnitude improvement in detection sensitivity for each analyte was attained. The results demonstrated that the newly established in-capillary DPPH-CE-DAD method combined with reversed-electrode polarity stacking mode could integrate sample concentration, the oxidizing reaction, separation, and detection into one capillary to fully automate the system. It was considered a suitable technique for the separation, screening, and determination of trace antioxidants in natural products.

  3. Fast and sensitive method to determine parabens by capillary electrophoresis using automatic reverse electrode polarity stacking mode: application to hair samples.

    PubMed

    Sako, Alysson V F; Dolzan, Maressa D; Micke, Gustavo Amadeu

    2015-09-01

    This paper describes a fast and sensitive method for the determination of methyl, ethyl, propyl, and butylparaben in hair samples by capillary electrophoresis using automatic reverse electrode polarity stacking mode. In the proposed method, solutions are injected using the flush command of the analysis software (940 mbar) and the polarity switching is carried out automatically immediately after the sample injection. The advantages compared with conventional stacking methods are the increased analytical frequency, repeatability, and inter-day precision. All analyses were performed in a fused silica capillary (50 cm, 41.5 cm in effective length, 50 μm i.d.), and the background electrolyte was composed of 20 mmol L(-1) sodium tetraborate in 10 % of methanol, pH 9.3. For the reverse polarity, -25 kV/35 s was applied followed by application of +30 kV for the electrophoretic run. Temperature was set at 20 °C, and all analytes were monitored at 297 nm. The method showed acceptable linearity (r (2) > 0.997) in the studied range of 0.1-5.0 mg L(-1), limits of detection below 0.017 mg L(-1), and inter-day, intra-day, and instrumental precision better than 6.2, 3.6, and 4.6 %, respectively. Considering parabens is widely used as a preservative in many products and the reported possibility of damage to the hair and also to human health caused by these compounds, the proposed method was applied to evaluate the adsorption of parabens in hair samples. The results indicate that there is a greater adsorption of methylparaben compared to the other parabens tested and also dyed hairs had a greater adsorption capacity for parabens than natural hairs.

  4. Sequential Polarity-Reversing Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labaw, Clayton C.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed circuit reverses polarity of electric power supplied to bidirectional dc motor, reversible electro-mechanical actuator, or other device operating in direction depending on polarity. Circuit reverses polarity each time power turned on, without need for additional polarity-reversing or direction signals and circuitry to process them.

  5. Reversed-polarity regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, F.

    1982-01-01

    It is found by a statistical study of 58 reversed-polarity regions (RPRs) covering the 11-year period 1969-1979 that RPRs (1) have a lifespan comparable to normal active regions, (2) do not show a tendency to rotate toward a more normal alignment, and (3) have stable configurations that do not suggest stress due to their anomalous magnetic alignment. As in normal regions, RPR magnetic complexity is found to be the primary factor in flare productivity. Weak-field RPRs produce no flares, and regions with complex spots produce more flares than regions with non-complex spots by a factor of five. The main difference between RPRs and normal regions lies in complex spot frequency, with less that 17% of normal active regions having such spots and fewer than 1.8% having long-lived complex ones, while 41% of RPRs have complex spots and 24% have long-lived complex spots.

  6. Reverse polarization in conjugated heterocycle polythiophene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lu-Xia; Liu, De-Sheng; Zhang, Da-Cheng; Xie, Shi-Jie; Han, Sheng-Hao; Mei, Liang-Mo

    2005-01-01

    Reverse polarization in polythiophene under an applied electric field has been studied in the framework of the tight-binding model. It is found that the applied electronic field has a great influence on the excited states of polythiophene. The effect of the heteroatoms on the polarization has been calculated and analysed carefully. It is indicated that a reverse polarization of biexcitons in polythiophene will be observed more easily. The heteroatoms increase this reversed polarization strength apparently.

  7. Coronal Polarization of Pseudostreamers and the Solar Polar Field Reversal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rachmeler, L. A.; Guennou, C.; Seaton, D. B.; Gibson, S. E.; Auchere, F.

    2016-01-01

    The reversal of the solar polar magnetic field is notoriously hard to pin down due to the extreme viewing angle of the pole. In Cycle 24, the southern polar field reversal can be pinpointed with high accuracy due to a large-scale pseudostreamer that formed over the pole and persisted for approximately a year. We tracked the size and shape of this structure with multiple observations and analysis techniques including PROBA2/SWAP EUV images, AIA EUV images, CoMP polarization data, and 3D tomographic reconstructions. We find that the heliospheric field reversed polarity in February 2014, whereas in the photosphere, the last vestiges of the previous polar field polarity remained until March 2015. We present here the evolution of the structure and describe its identification in the Fe XII 1074nm coronal emission line, sensitive to the Hanle effect in the corona.

  8. Polar Field Reversals and Active Region Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, Gordon; Ettinger, Sophie

    2015-07-01

    We study the relationship between polar field reversals and decayed active region magnetic flux. Photospheric active region flux is dispersed by differential rotation and turbulent diffusion, and is transported poleward by meridional flows and diffusion. We summarize the published evidence from observation and modeling of the influence of meridional flow variations and decaying active region flux's spatial distribution, such as the Joy's law tilt angle. Using NSO Kitt Peak synoptic magnetograms covering cycles 21-24, we investigate in detail the relationship between the transport of decayed active region flux to high latitudes and changes in the polar field strength, including reversals in the magnetic polarity at the poles. By means of stack plots of low- and high-latitude slices of the synoptic magnetograms, the dispersal of flux from low to high latitudes is tracked, and the timing of this dispersal is compared to the polar field changes. In the most abrupt cases of polar field reversal, a few activity complexes (systems of active regions) are identified as the main cause. The poleward transport of large quantities of decayed trailing-polarity flux from these complexes is found to correlate well in time with the abrupt polar field changes. In each case, significant latitudinal displacements were found between the positive and negative flux centroids of the complexes, consistent with Joy's law bipole tilt with trailing-polarity flux located poleward of leading-polarity flux. The activity complexes of the cycle 21 and 22 maxima were larger and longer-lived than those of the cycle 23 and 24 maxima, and the poleward surges were stronger and more unipolar and the polar field changes larger and faster. The cycle 21 and 22 polar reversals were dominated by only a few long-lived complexes whereas the cycle 23 and 24 reversals were the cumulative effects of more numerous, shorter-lived regions. We conclude that sizes and lifetimes of activity complexes are key to

  9. Polar Solvents Trigger Formation of Reverse Micelles.

    PubMed

    Khoshnood, Atefeh; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2015-06-09

    We use molecular dynamics simulations and molecular thermodynamics to investigate the formation of reverse micelles in a system of surfactants and nonpolar solvents. Since the early observation of reverse micelles, the question has been whether the existence of polar solvent molecules such as water is the driving force for the formation of reverse micelles in nonpolar solvents. In this work, we use a simple coarse-grained model of surfactants and solvents to show that a small number of polar solvent molecules triggers the formation of large permanent aggregates. In the absence of polar molecules, both the thermodynamic model and molecular simulations show that small aggregates are more populated in the solution and larger ones are less frequent as the system evolves over time. The size and shape of reverse micelles depend on the size of the polar core: the shape is spherical for a large core and ellipsoidal for a smaller one. Using the coarse-grained model, we also investigate the effect of temperature and surfactant tail length. Our results reveal that the number of surfactant molecules in the micelle decreases as the temperature increases, but the average diameter does not change because the size of the polar core remains invariant. A reverse micelle with small polar core attracts fewer surfactants when the tail is long. The uptake of solvent particles by a micelle of longer surfactant tail is less than shorter ones when the polar solvent particles are initially distributed randomly.

  10. Time reversal tests in polarized neutron reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Asahi, Koichiro; Bowman, J.D.; Crawford, B.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). In recent years the nuclear weak interaction has been studied in the compound nucleus via parity violation. The observed parity-violating effects are strongly enhanced by nuclear structure. The predictions are that the interaction of polarized neutrons with polarized nuclear targets could be also used to perform sensitive tests of time-reversal-violation because of the nuclear enhancements. The author has designed experiments to search for time-reversal violation in neutron-nucleus interactions. He has also developed techniques to polarize neutrons with laser-polarized {sup 3}He gas targets. Using the polarized {sup 3}He neutron spin filter, he has performed two experiments at LANSCE: an absolute neutron beam polarization measurement with an accuracy of 0.2--0.3% and a neutron spin-rotation measurement on a {sup 139}La sample.

  11. Polar Field Reversals and Active Region Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, Gordon; Ettinger, Sophie

    2015-04-01

    We study the relationship between polar field reversals and decayed active region magnetic flux. Photospheric active region flux is dispersed by differential rotation and turbulent diffusion, and is transported poleward by meridional flows and diffusion. Using NSO Kitt Peak synoptic magnetograms, we investigate in detail the relationship between the transport of decayed active region flux to high latitudes and changes in the polar field strength, including reversals in the magnetic polarity at the poles. By means of stack plots of low- and high-latitude slices of the synoptic magnetograms, the dispersal of flux from low to high latitudes is tracked, and the timing of this dispersal is compared to the polar field changes. In the most abrupt cases of polar field reversal, a few activity complexes (systems of active regions) are identified as the main cause. The poleward transport of large quantities of decayed lagging-polarity flux from these complexes is found to correlate well in time with the abrupt polar field changes. In each case, significant latitudinal displacements were found between the positive and negative flux centroids of the complexes, consistent with Joy's law bipole tilt with lagging-polarity flux located poleward of leading-polarity flux. This work is carried out through the National Solar Observatory Summer Research Assistantship (SRA) Program. The National Solar Observatory is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA) under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  12. POLAR FIELD REVERSAL OBSERVATIONS WITH HINODE

    SciTech Connect

    Shiota, D.; Tsuneta, S.; Shimojo, M.; Orozco Suarez, D.; Ishikawa, R.; Sako, N.

    2012-07-10

    We have been monitoring yearly variation in the Sun's polar magnetic fields with the Solar Optical Telescope aboard Hinode to record their evolution and expected reversal near the solar maximum. All magnetic patches in the magnetic flux maps are automatically identified to obtain the number density and magnetic flux density as a function of the total magnetic flux per patch. The detected magnetic flux per patch ranges over four orders of magnitude (10{sup 15}-10{sup 20} Mx). The higher end of the magnetic flux in the polar regions is about one order of magnitude larger than that of the quiet Sun, and nearly that of pores. Almost all large patches ({>=}10{sup 18} Mx) have the same polarity, while smaller patches have a fair balance of both polarities. The polarity of the polar region as a whole is consequently determined only by the large magnetic concentrations. A clear decrease in the net flux of the polar region is detected in the slow rising phase of the current solar cycle. The decrease is more rapid in the north polar region than in the south. The decrease in the net flux is caused by a decrease in the number and size of the large flux concentrations as well as the appearance of patches with opposite polarity at lower latitudes. In contrast, we do not see temporal change in the magnetic flux associated with the smaller patches (<10{sup 18} Mx) and that of the horizontal magnetic fields during the years 2008-2012.

  13. Explaining Polarization Reversals in STEREO Wave Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breneman, A.; Cattell, C.; Wygant, J.; Kersten, K.; Wilson, L, B., III; Dai, L.; Colpitts, C.; Kellogg, P. J.; Goetz, K.; Paradise, A.

    2012-01-01

    Recently Breneman et al. reported observations of large amplitude lightning and transmitter whistler mode waves from two STEREO passes through the inner radiation belt (L<2). Hodograms of the electric field in the plane transverse to the magnetic field showed that the transmitter waves underwent periodic polarization reversals. Specifically, their polarization would cycle through a pattern of right-hand to linear to left-hand polarization at a rate of roughly 200 Hz. The lightning whistlers were observed to be left-hand polarized at frequencies greater than the lower hybrid frequency and less than the transmitter frequency (21.4 kHz) and right-hand polarized otherwise. Only righthand polarized waves in the inner radiation belt should exist in the frequency range of the whistler mode and these reversals were not explained in the previous paper. We show, with a combination of observations and simulated wave superposition, that these polarization reversals are due to the beating of an incident electromagnetic whistler mode wave at 21.4 kHz and linearly polarized, symmetric lower hybrid sidebands Doppler-shifted from the incident wave by +/-200 Hz. The existence of the lower hybrid waves is consistent with the parametric decay mechanism of Lee and Kuo whereby an incident whistler mode wave decays into symmetric, short wavelength lower hybrid waves and a purely growing (zero-frequency) mode. Like the lower hybrid waves, the purely growing mode is Doppler-shifted by 200 Hz as observed on STEREO. This decay mechanism in the upper ionosphere has been previously reported at equatorial latitudes and is thought to have a direct connection with explosive spread F enhancements. As such it may represent another dissipation mechanism of VLF wave energy in the ionosphere and may help to explain a deficit of observed lightning and transmitter energy in the inner radiation belts as reported by Starks et al.

  14. Capillary Ion Concentration Polarization for Power-Free Salt Purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sungmin; Jung, Yeonsu; Cho, Inhee; Kim, Ho-Young; Kim, Sung Jae

    2014-11-01

    In this presentation, we experimentally and theoretically demonstrated the capillary based ion concentration polarization for power-free salt purification system. Traditional ion concentration polarization phenomenon has been studied for a decade for both fundamental nanoscale fluid dynamics and novel engineering applications such as desalination, preconcentration and energy harvesting devices. While the conventional system utilizes an external power source, the system based on capillary ion concentration polarization is capable of perm-selective ion transportation only by capillarity so that the same ion depletion zone can be formed without any external power sources. An ion concentration profile near the nanostructure was tracked using fluorescent probes and analyzed by solving the modified Nernst-Planck equation. As a result, the concentration in the vicinity of the nanostructure was at least 10 times lower than that of bulk electrolyte and thus, the liquid absorbed into the nanostructure had the low concentration. This mechanism can be used for the power free salt purification system which would be significantly useful in underdeveloped and remote area. This work was supported by Samsung Research Funding Center of Samsung Electronics under Project Number SRFC-MA1301-02.

  15. Time reversal invariance in polarized neutron decay

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, E.G.

    1994-03-01

    An experiment to measure the time reversal invariance violating (T-violating) triple correlation (D) in the decay of free polarized neutrons has been developed. The detector design incorporates a detector geometry that provides a significant improvement in the sensitivity over that used in the most sensitive of previous experiments. A prototype detector was tested in measurements with a cold neutron beam. Data resulting from the tests are presented. A detailed calculation of systematic effects has been performed and new diagnostic techniques that allow these effects to be measured have been developed. As the result of this work, a new experiment is under way that will improve the sensitivity to D to 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} or better. With higher neutron flux a statistical sensitivity of the order 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} is ultimately expected. The decay of free polarized neutrons (n {yields} p + e + {bar v}{sub e}) is used to search for T-violation by measuring the triple correlation of the neutron spin polarization, and the electron and proton momenta ({sigma}{sub n} {center_dot} p{sub p} {times} p{sub e}). This correlation changes sign under reversal of the motion. Since final state effects in neutron decay are small, a nonzero coefficient, D, of this correlation indicates the violation of time reversal invariance. D is measured by comparing the numbers of coincidences in electron and proton detectors arranged symmetrically about a longitudinally polarized neutron beam. Particular care must be taken to eliminate residual asymmetries in the detectors or beam as these can lead to significant false effects. The Standard Model predicts negligible T-violating effects in neutron decay. Extensions to the Standard Model include new interactions some of which include CP-violating components. Some of these make first order contributions to D.

  16. Stochastic resonance in geomagnetic polarity reversals.

    PubMed

    Consolini, Giuseppe; De Michelis, Paola

    2003-02-07

    Among noise-induced cooperative phenomena a peculiar relevance is played by stochastic resonance. In this paper we offer evidence that geomagnetic polarity reversals may be due to a stochastic resonance process. In detail, analyzing the distribution function P(tau) of polarity residence times (chrons), we found the evidence of a stochastic synchronization process, i.e., a series of peaks in the P(tau) at T(n) approximately (2n+1)T(Omega)/2 with n=0,1,...,j and T(omega) approximately 0.1 Myr. This result is discussed in connection with both the typical time scale of Earth's orbit eccentricity variation and the recent results on the typical time scale of climatic long-term variation.

  17. Reversible macroscopic dynamics of polar nematic liquid crystals: Reversible currents and their experimental consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Helmut R.; Cladis, P. E.; Pleiner, Harald

    2009-03-01

    Polar liquid crystalline phases are relevant for fluid liquid crystal phases observed in banana liquid crystals as well as for a class of polymeric liquid crystalline materials investigated recently. In this Brief Report we present the reversible dynamics for polar nematic liquid crystals with C∞v symmetry, where the macroscopic polarization representing polar order acts as an independent macroscopic variable. We find reversible coupling terms, for example, between flow and temperature and concentration gradients specific for the existence of a polar preferred direction. We suggest concrete experiments to check the importance of the reversible dynamic cross-coupling terms presented here.

  18. Analysis of Polar Reversals of Solar Cycle 22 and 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettinger, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    We study the relationship between polar field reversals and decayed active region magnetic flux. Photospheric active region flux is dispersed by differential rotation and turbulent diffusion, and is transported poleward by meridional flows and diffusion. We investigate in detail the relationship between the transport of decayed active region flux to high latitudes and changes in the polar field strength, including reversals in the magnetic polarity at the poles. By means of stack plots of low- and high-latitude slices of synoptic magnetograms, one to three activity complexes (systems of active regions) were identified in each reversal as the main cause of polar field reversals in each cycle. The poleward transport of large quantities of decayed lagging-polarity flux from these complexes was found to correlate well in time with the polar field changes. In each case significant latitudinal displacements were found between the positive and negative flux centroids of the complexes, consistent with Joy's law bipole tilt with lagging-polarity flux located poleward of leading-polarity flux. This result indicates the importance of the Joy's law tilt and consequent high-latitude polarity bias in polar reversals.This work is carried out through the National Solar Observatory Summer Research Assistantship (SRA) Program. The National Solar Observatory is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA) under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  19. Quantitative capillary reversed passive latex agglutination test for C-reactive protein (CRP) in the dog.

    PubMed

    Tagata, K; Yokoyama, S; Ginbo, T; Honda, M; Okimura, T; Odakura, M; Nomura, M; Yamamoto, S

    1996-01-01

    A capillary reversed passive latex agglutination test (capillary RPLA) was developed which allows quantification of serum C-reactive protein (CRP) within approximately 15 min. The logarithmic regression line (calibration curve) obtained after measuring each CRP concentration three times in twofold dilutions of a standard canine serum containing 222 micrograms/ml of CRP was y = 6.394 + 0.030x (r = 0.995). Capillary RPLA permitted quantification of CRP in the range 6.9-222 micrograms/ml. The coefficients of variation ranged from 10.28% to 12.40%. The recovery rates (percentage recovery) of CRP by capillary RPLA were within the range 87% to 106%. On measuring the CRP concentrations in sera from 78 dogs by capillary RPLA, single radial immunodiffusion (SRID) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), close correlations were demonstrated between SRID and capillary RPLA (y = 7.250 + 1.109x, r = 0.978), between SRID and ELISA (y = 3.042 + 1.059x, r = 0.967), and between capillary RPLA and ELISA (y = 1.778 + 0.929x, r = 0.962). Capillary RPLA may be considered useful as a routine biochemical technique for measurement of serum CRP concentration in the dog.

  20. How the geomagnetic field vector reverses polarity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prevot, M.; Mankinen, E.A.; Gromme, C.S.; Coe, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    A highly detailed record of both the direction and intensity of the Earth's magnetic field as it reverses has been obtained from a Miocene volcanic sequence. The transitional field is low in intensity and is typically non-axisymmetric. Geomagnetic impulses corresponding to astonishingly high rates of change of the field sometimes occur, suggesting that liquid velocity within the Earth's core increases during geomagnetic reversals. ?? 1985 Nature Publishing Group.

  1. Flexocoupling impact on the kinetics of polarization reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorotiahin, Ivan S.; Morozovska, Anna N.; Eliseev, Eugene A.; Genenko, Yuri A.

    2017-01-01

    The impact of flexoelectric coupling on polarization reversal and space-charge variation in thin films of ferroelectric semiconductors has been studied theoretically. The relaxation-type Landau-Khalatnikov equation together with the Poisson equation and the theory of elasticity equations have been used to calculate in a self-consistent way the spatial-temporal development of ferroelectric polarization, electric potential, space charge, elastic stresses and strains. The analysis of the obtained results reveals a moderate increase in the flexocoupling influence on the polarization, elastic strain, electric potential, and space-charge development with a decrease in the ferroelectric film thickness. In contrast, the dependence of polarization switching time on the applied electric field is remarkably affected by the flexocoupling strength. The polarization reversal process consists typically of two stages; the first stage has no characteristic time, whereas the second one exhibits a switching time strongly dependent on the applied electric field.

  2. Sun's Polar Magnetic Field Reversals in Solar Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pishkalo, M. I.; Leiko, U. M.

    It is known that polar magnetic field of the Sun changes its sign at the maximum of solar cycle. These changes were called as polar field reversals. We investigated dynamics of high-latitude solar magnetic fields separately in northern and southern hemispheres. Solar polar field strength measurements from the Wilcox Solar Observatory and low-resolution synoptic magnetic maps from the SOLIS project and from Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard Solar Dynamics Observatory were used. We analyzed total magnetic flux at near-polar zones, starting from 55, 60, 65, 70, 75, 80 and 85 degrees of latitude, and found time points when the total magnetic flux changed its sign. It was concluded that total magnetic flux changed its sign at first at lower latitudes and finally near the poles. Single polar magnetic field reversal was found in the southern hemisphere. The northern hemisphere was characterized by three-fold magnetic field reversal. Polar magnetic field reversals finished in northern and southern hemispheres by CR 2150 and CR 2162, respectively.

  3. Magnetic field reversals, polar wander, and core-mantle coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Courtillot, V.; Besse, J.

    1987-09-04

    True polar wander, the shifting of the entire mantle relative to the earth's spin axis, has been reanalyzed. Over the last 200 million years, true polar wander has been fast (approximately 5 centimeters per year) most of the time, except for a remarkable standstill from 170 to 110 million years ago. This standstill correlates with a decrease in the reversal frequency of the geomagnetic field and episodes of continental breakup. Conversely, true polar wander is high when reversal frequency increases. It is proposed that intermittent convection modulates the thickness of a thermal boundary layer at the base of the mantle and consequently the core-to-mantle heat flux. Emission of hot thermals from the boundary layer leads to increases in mantle convection and true polar wander. In conjunction, cold thermals released from a boundary layer at the top of the liquid core eventually lead to reversals. Changes in the locations of subduction zones may also affect true polar wander. Exceptional volcanism and mass extinctions at the Cretaceous-Tertiary and Permo-Triassic boundaries may be related to thermals released after two unusually long periods with no magnetic reversals. These environmental catastrophes may therefore be a consequence of thermal and chemical coupling in the earth's multilayer heat engine rather than have an extraterrestrial cause.

  4. Polymethacrylate monolithic and hybrid particle-monolithic columns for reversed-phase and hydrophilic interaction capillary liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Jandera, Pavel; Urban, Jirí; Skeríková, Veronika; Langmaier, Pavel; Kubícková, Romana; Planeta, Josef

    2010-01-01

    We prepared hybrid particle-monolithic polymethacrylate columns for micro-HPLC by in situ polymerization in fused silica capillaries pre-packed with 3-5microm C(18) and aminopropyl silica bonded particles, using polymerization mixtures based on laurylmethacrylate-ethylene dimethacrylate (co)polymers for the reversed-phase (RP) mode and [2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl]-dimethyl-(3-sulfopropyl) zwitterionic (co)polymers for the hydrophilic interaction (HILIC) mode. The hybrid particle-monolithic columns showed reduced porosity and hold-up volumes, approximately 2-2.5 times lower in comparison to the pure monolithic columns prepared in the whole volume of empty capillaries. The elution volumes of sample compounds are also generally lower in comparison to packed or pure monolithic columns. The efficiency and permeability of the hybrid columns are intermediate in between the properties of the reference pure monolithic and particle-packed columns. The chemistries of the embedded solid particles and of the interparticle monolithic moiety in the hybrid capillary columns contribute to the retention to various degrees, affecting the selectivity of separation. Some hybrid columns provided improved separations of proteins in comparison to the reference particle-packed columns in the reversed-phase mode. Zwitterionic hybrid particle-monolithic columns show dual mode retention HILIC/RP behaviour depending on the composition of the mobile phase and allow separations of polar compounds such as phenolic acids in the HILIC mode at lower concentrations of acetonitrile and, often in shorter analysis time in comparison to particle-packed and full-volume monolithic columns.

  5. Simulation studies of nucleation of ferroelectric polarization reversal.

    SciTech Connect

    Brennecka, Geoffrey L.; Winchester, Benjamin Michael

    2014-08-01

    Electric field-induced reversal of spontaneous polarization is the defining characteristic of a ferroelectric material, but the process(es) and mechanism(s) associated with the initial nucleation of reverse-polarity domains are poorly understood. This report describes studies carried out using phase field modeling of LiTaO3, a relatively simple prototype ferroelectric material, in order to explore the effects of either mechanical deformation or optically-induced free charges on nucleation and resulting domain configuration during field-induced polarization reversal. Conditions were selected to approximate as closely as feasible those of accompanying experimental work in order to provide not only support for the experimental work but also ensure that additional experimental validation of the simulations could be carried out in the future. Phase field simulations strongly support surface mechanical damage/deformation as effective for dramatically reducing the overall coercive field (Ec) via local field enhancements. Further, optically-nucleated polarization reversal appears to occur via stabilization of latent nuclei via the charge screening effects of free charges.

  6. The Liverpool Geomagnetic Polarity Reversal : New evidences for a complex magnetic field behavior during reversals.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camps, P.; Perrin, M.; Hoffman, K. A.; Singer, B. S.

    2009-04-01

    We carried out a detailed and continuous paleomagnetic re-sampling of the reversed-to-normal Eocene -36 Ma- geomagnetic transition recorded in the Liverpool (NSW, Australia) volcanic range [Hoffman, 1986]. Our main objective was to obtain a precise description of the variation in the paleofield vector (direction and absolute intensity) as the geomagnetic field reverses. With more than 30 transitional directions documented, the Liverpool reversal is, along with the Miocene record -16.2 Ma- of the Steens Mountain (Oregon, USA) [Mankinen et al., 1985] and the Matuyama-Brunhes -780 Ka- record of Hawaii [Coe et al, 2004], among the best example of a transition record from a volcanic sequence. The Liverpool polarity reversal shows a complex path of the Virtual Geomagnetic poles between the initial (reverse) and final (normal) polarities. Two loops in the trajectory of VGPs before the actual polarity switch are documented [Hoffman, 1986]. Such swings preceding the reversal seems to be a common characteristic of reversal since similar features are described on the Steens Mountain [Jarboe et al., 2007] and a long period of instability, estimated to 18 ka, is now well established prior to the Matuyama-Brunhes reversal [Singer et al., 2005]. In the present study, we found an additional swing through the reversed polarity yielding a complex R-T-R-T-R-T-R-T-N path for VGPs to achieve the reversal process. During the sampling campaign, we did not find evidence for significant hiatus in the eruptive activity such as soil horizons or sediments. We do not believe either that some part of the volcanic sequence be duplicate by the presence of tectonic faults. Hence, we think that the three excursions and the actual reversal belong to a single phenomenon. In order to strengthen this conclusion, precise Ar/ Ar will be performed. Twelve flows (5 of transitional and 7 of reversed polarity, respectively) all located in the lower half part of the Liverpool record, yielded paleointensity

  7. An innovative approach to molecularly imprinted capillaries for polar templates by grafting polymerization.

    PubMed

    Giovannoli, Cristina; Passini, Cinzia; Baravalle, Patrizia; Anfossi, Laura; Giraudi, Gianfranco; Baggiani, Claudio

    2012-06-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers have been successfully used as selective stationary phases in capillary electrophoresis. Notwithstanding, this technique suffers from several drawbacks as the loss of molecular recognition properties in aqueous media and the lack of feasibility for imprinted systems directed towards highly polar templates soluble in aqueous environments only. Thus, the preparation of imprinted polymers for highly polar, water-soluble analytes, represents a challenge. In this work, we present an innovative approach to overcome these drawbacks. It is based on a surface molecular imprinting technique that uses preformed macromonomers as both functional recognition elements and cross-linking agents. A poly-2-hydroxyethyl-co-methacrylic acid linear polymer was grafted from the surface of silica capillaries. The grafted polymer was exhaustively esterified with methacrylic anhydride to obtain polyethylendimethacrylate-co-methacrylic acid linear chains. Then, as a proof of concept, an adequate amount of a very polar template like penicillin V was added in a hydro-organic mixture, and a thin layer of imprinted polymer was obtained by cross-linking the polymer linear chains. The binding behaviour of the imprinted and non-imprinted capillaries was evaluated in different separation conditions in order to assess the presence of template selectivity and molecular recognition effects. The experimental results clearly show that this innovative kind of imprinted material can be easily obtained in very polar polymerization environments and that it is characterized by enhanced molecular recognition properties in aqueous buffers and good selectivity towards the template and strictly related molecules.

  8. Two-step polarization reversal in biased ferroelectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, John E. Ukritnukun, Supphatuch; Glaum, Julia; Cozzan, Clayton; Tutuncu, Goknur; Dosch, Chris; Andrieux, Jerome; Jo, Wook; Jones, Jacob L.

    2014-06-14

    Polarization reversal in polycrystalline ferroelectrics is shown to occur via two distinct and sequential domain reorientation steps. This reorientation sequence, which cannot be readily discriminated in the overall sample polarization, is made apparent using time-resolved high-energy x-ray diffraction. Upon application of electric fields opposite to the initial poling direction, two unique and significantly different time constants are observed. The first (faster time constant) is shown to be derived by the release of a residual stress due to initial electrical biasing and the second (slower time constant) due to the redevelopment of residual stress during further domain wall motion. A modified domain reorientation model is given that accurately describes the domain volume fraction evolution during the reversal process.

  9. Capillary condensation and orientational ordering of confined polar fluids.

    PubMed

    Gramzow, Matthias; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2007-01-01

    The phase behavior and the orientational structure of polar model fluids confined to slit pores is investigated by means of density functional theory in a modified mean-field approximation. We focus on fluid states and further assume a uniform number density throughout the pore. Our results for spherical dipolar particles with additional van der Waals-like interactions (Stockmayer fluids) reveal complex fluid-fluid phase behavior involving condensation and first- and second-order isotropic-to-ferroelectric phase transitions, where the ferroelectric ordering occurs parallel to the confining walls. The relative importance of these phase transitions depends on two "tuning" parameters, that is the strength of the dipolar interactions (relative to the isotropic attractive ones) between fluid particles, and on the pore width. In particular, in narrow pores the condensation transition seen in bulk Stockmayer fluids is entirely suppressed. For dipolar hard spheres, on the other hand, the impact of confinement consists in a decrease of the isotropic-to-ferroelectric transition temperatures. We also demonstrate that the local orientational structure is inhomogeneous and anisotropic even in globally isotropic systems, in agreement with computer simulation results.

  10. Wavefield separation and polarity reversal correction in elastic reverse time migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiyuan; Ma, Xiaona; Fu, Chao; Liang, Guanghe

    2016-04-01

    In elastic reverse time migration (RTM), one of the problems that are often encountered is the cross-talk between P- and S-wavefields. A useful processing technique to reduce the cross-talk is separating the P- and S-wavefields by using divergence and curl operators before applying an elastic imaging condition. However, the separated wavefields lose their physical meaning because their phase and amplitude are changed. In this paper, we modify the divergence and curl operators to give the separated wavefields a clear physical meaning: the separated wavefield is the first derivative of the input wavefield with respect to time. Another problem often encountered is polarity reversals in PS and SP images, which can cause destructive interference in the final stacked image and thus destroy the migrated events. In this paper we also develop a procedure for polarity reversal correction based on the polarization vectors of the P- and S-wavefields in the common-shot domain. The correction factor is first calculated at every imaging point during the wavefield reconstruction and is then multiplied by the PS and SP images at each time step when an elastic imaging condition is applied. Numerical examples with synthetic data have shown that the modified wavefield separation method is correct, and the procedure of polarity reversal correction is effective for a complex model.

  11. Critical energy barrier for capillary condensation in mesopores: Hysteresis and reversibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiratsuka, Tatsumasa; Tanaka, Hideki; Miyahara, Minoru T.

    2016-04-01

    Capillary condensation in the regime of developing hysteresis occurs at a vapor pressure, Pcond, that is less than that of the vapor-like spinodal. This is because the energy barrier for the vapor-liquid transition from a metastable state at Pcond becomes equal to the energy fluctuation of the system; however, a detailed mechanism of the spontaneous transition has not been acquired even through extensive experimental and simulation studies. We therefore construct accurate atomistic silica mesopore models for MCM-41 and perform molecular simulations (gauge cell Monte Carlo and grand canonical Monte Carlo) for argon adsorption on the models at subcritical temperatures. A careful comparison between the simulation and experiment reveals that the energy barrier for the capillary condensation has a critical dimensionless value, Wc* = 0.175, which corresponds to the thermal fluctuation of the system and depends neither on the mesopore size nor on the temperature. We show that the critical energy barrier Wc* controls the capillary condensation pressure Pcond and also determines a boundary between the reversible condensation/evaporation regime and the developing hysteresis regime.

  12. Critical energy barrier for capillary condensation in mesopores: Hysteresis and reversibility.

    PubMed

    Hiratsuka, Tatsumasa; Tanaka, Hideki; Miyahara, Minoru T

    2016-04-28

    Capillary condensation in the regime of developing hysteresis occurs at a vapor pressure, Pcond, that is less than that of the vapor-like spinodal. This is because the energy barrier for the vapor-liquid transition from a metastable state at Pcond becomes equal to the energy fluctuation of the system; however, a detailed mechanism of the spontaneous transition has not been acquired even through extensive experimental and simulation studies. We therefore construct accurate atomistic silica mesopore models for MCM-41 and perform molecular simulations (gauge cell Monte Carlo and grand canonical Monte Carlo) for argon adsorption on the models at subcritical temperatures. A careful comparison between the simulation and experiment reveals that the energy barrier for the capillary condensation has a critical dimensionless value, Wc (*) = 0.175, which corresponds to the thermal fluctuation of the system and depends neither on the mesopore size nor on the temperature. We show that the critical energy barrier Wc (*) controls the capillary condensation pressure Pcond and also determines a boundary between the reversible condensation/evaporation regime and the developing hysteresis regime.

  13. Short-term reversibility of ultrastructural changes in pulmonary capillaries caused by stress failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, A. R.; Fu, Z.; Tsukimoto, K.; Prediletto, R.; Mathieu-Costello, O.; West, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    We previously showed that when the pulmonary capillaries in anesthetized rabbits are exposed to a transmural pressure (Ptm) of approximately 40 mmHg, stress failure of the walls occurs with disruption of the capillary endothelium, alveolar epithelium, or sometimes all layers. The present study was designed to determine whether some of the ultrastructural changes are rapidly reversible when the capillary pressure is reduced. To test this, the Ptm was raised to 52.5 cmH2O for 1 min of blood perfusion and then reduced to 12.5 cmH2O for 3 min of saline-dextran perfusion, followed by intravascular fixation at the same pressure. In another group of animals, the pressure was elevated for 1 min of blood and 3 min of saline-dextran before being reduced. The results were compared with previous studies in which the capillary pressures were maintained elevated at 52.5 cmH2O during the entire procedure. Control studies were also done at sustained low pressures. The results showed that the number of endothelial and epithelial breaks per millimeter and the total fraction area of the breaks were reduced when the pressure was lowered. For example, the number of endothelial breaks per millimeter decreased from 7.1 +/- 2.1 to 2.4 +/- 0.7, and the number of epithelial breaks per millimeter fell from 11.4 +/- 3.7 to 3.4 +/- 0.7. There was evidence that the breaks that closed were those that were initially small and were associated with an intact basement membrane. The results suggest that cells can move along their underlying matrix by rapid disengagement and reattachment of cell adhesion molecules, causing breaks to open or close within minutes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  14. Electric-Assisted Capillary Rise Adsorption of Polar and Nonpolar Solvents by Cellulose and Chitosan.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qi; Wang, Min-Yan; Wu, Yu-Hang; Jiang, Lin-Hai; Shen, Qing

    2016-02-18

    Electric-assisted capillary rise adsorption of polar and nonpolar solvents by cellulose and chitosan was studied by employing an electrostatic generator to assist a common capillary rise wetting by taking the anode and cathode electrodes respectively linked to a metal tube charged with samples and the probe solvent. To vary the voltage at 0, 100, 200, and 300 V, respectively, the recorded dynamic adsorption results showed that the cellulose and chitosan both kept a stable adsorption of the nonpolar hexane and diiodomethane, obviously ignoring the voltage increase. Moreover, the hexane amount adsorbed by cellulose and chitosan is similar, while the diiodomethane amount was adsorbed to a greater amount by cellulose as compared with the chitosan corresponding to these two biomaterials-based nonpolar components, for example, greater for cellulose and smaller for chitosan. Results also showed that the adsorption of polar water and formamide was gradually increased with the voltage increase, especially for chitosan, to correspond to the polar component of these materials, for example, greater for chitosan and smaller for cellulose. These adsorption behaviors suggested that the application of an extra electric field can only enhance the adsorption of polar solvent, and the molecular structure, for exmaple, the β-(1-4)-linked d-glucosamine units of chitosan, has sensitive electric field responses in polar solvent adsorption as compared with those of the β(1-4)-linked d-glucose units of cellulose. The reason for the electric adsorption behaviors was known due to the presence of an extra electric-field-induced reduction of the total surface tension of solvent and mainly the polar component.

  15. Midlatitude cooling caused by geomagnetic field minimum during polarity reversal.

    PubMed

    Kitaba, Ikuko; Hyodo, Masayuki; Katoh, Shigehiro; Dettman, David L; Sato, Hiroshi

    2013-01-22

    The climatic effects of cloud formation induced by galactic cosmic rays (CRs) has recently become a topic of much discussion. The CR-cloud connection suggests that variations in geomagnetic field intensity could change climate through modulation of CR flux. This hypothesis, however, is not well-tested using robust geological evidence. Here we present paleoclimate and paleoenvironment records of five interglacial periods that include two geomagnetic polarity reversals. Marine oxygen isotope stages 19 and 31 contain both anomalous cooling intervals during the sea-level highstands and the Matuyama-Brunhes and Lower Jaramillo reversals, respectively. This contrasts strongly with the typical interglacial climate that has the temperature maximum at the sea-level peak. The cooling occurred when the field intensity dropped to <40% of its present value, for which we estimate >40% increase in CR flux. The climate warmed rapidly when field intensity recovered. We suggest that geomagnetic field intensity can influence global climate through the modulation of CR flux.

  16. Towards an Integrated Geomagnetic Polarity Reversal Timescale for the Pleistocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, T. A.; Storey, M.; Kuiper, K.; Palike, H.

    2011-12-01

    The development of the geomagnetic polarity timescale (GPTS) in the mid 20th century led to the greater understanding of seafloor spreading and plate tectonics (Heirtzler et al., 1968). Over 40 years later, the GPTS continues to be refined, particularly in terms of integrating multiple dating techniques to improve precision of such events, or to resolve the duration of geomagnetic transitions. Recent advancements in integrating astronomical and 40Ar/39Ar dating techniques, and improving upon the precision of neutron fluence monitors, necessitate re-evaluation of the accuracy and precision of various geologic events. Here, we review the ages of three Pleistocene geomagnetic polarity reversals: the Matuyama-Brunhes (ca. 0.78 Ma), the Cobb Mountain (ca. 1.2 Ma), and the Reunion (ca. 2.1 Ma) events. High-precision astronomically calibrated 40Ar/39Ar ages have been obtained via a Noblesse multi-collector noble gas mass spectrometer on volcanic and other datable materials related to each event. The ages were derived by single- or multi-crystal total fusion and/or step heating experiments, using the astronomically calibrated Fish Canyon sanidine and/or the astronomically tuned A1 sanidine as monitor minerals. Each of these ages is then compared to independent astronomical ages for the events in order to define tie-points for constructing a Pleistocene a multi-chronometer GPTS. Although only three reversals are addressed here, the methodology applied shows promise to refining short-lived excursions to enable further understanding of the wavering magnetic field. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme [FP7/2007-2013] under grant agreement no. 215458.

  17. Factors regulating capillary remodeling in a reversible model of inflammatory corneal angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mukwaya, Anthony; Peebo, Beatrice; Xeroudaki, Maria; Ali, Zaheer; Lennikov, Anton; Jensen, Lasse; Lagali, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Newly formed microcapillary networks arising in adult organisms by angiogenic and inflammatory stimuli contribute to pathologies such as corneal and retinal blindness, tumor growth, and metastasis. Therapeutic inhibition of pathologic angiogenesis has focused on targeting the VEGF pathway, while comparatively little attention has been given to remodeling of the new microcapillaries into a stabilized, functional, and persistent vascular network. Here, we used a novel reversible model of inflammatory angiogenesis in the rat cornea to investigate endogenous factors rapidly invoked to remodel, normalize and regress microcapillaries as part of the natural response to regain corneal avascularity. Rapid reversal of an inflammatory angiogenic stimulus suppressed granulocytic activity, enhanced recruitment of remodelling macrophages, induced capillary intussusception, and enriched pathways and processes involving immune cells, chemokines, morphogenesis, axonal guidance, and cell motility, adhesion, and cytoskeletal functions. Whole transcriptome gene expression analysis revealed suppression of numerous inflammatory and angiogenic factors and enhancement of endogenous inhibitors. Many of the identified genes function independently of VEGF and represent potentially new targets for molecular control of the critical process of microvascular remodeling and regression in the cornea. PMID:27561355

  18. Midlatitude cooling caused by geomagnetic field minimum during polarity reversal

    PubMed Central

    Kitaba, Ikuko; Hyodo, Masayuki; Katoh, Shigehiro; Dettman, David L.; Sato, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    The climatic effects of cloud formation induced by galactic cosmic rays (CRs) has recently become a topic of much discussion. The CR–cloud connection suggests that variations in geomagnetic field intensity could change climate through modulation of CR flux. This hypothesis, however, is not well-tested using robust geological evidence. Here we present paleoclimate and paleoenvironment records of five interglacial periods that include two geomagnetic polarity reversals. Marine oxygen isotope stages 19 and 31 contain both anomalous cooling intervals during the sea-level highstands and the Matuyama–Brunhes and Lower Jaramillo reversals, respectively. This contrasts strongly with the typical interglacial climate that has the temperature maximum at the sea-level peak. The cooling occurred when the field intensity dropped to <40% of its present value, for which we estimate >40% increase in CR flux. The climate warmed rapidly when field intensity recovered. We suggest that geomagnetic field intensity can influence global climate through the modulation of CR flux. PMID:23297205

  19. Polarity reversals and tilt of the Earth's magnetic dipole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolginov, A. Z.

    1993-01-01

    There is evidence that the terrestrial magnetic field is connected with the Earth's mantle: (1) there are magnetic anomalies that do not take part in the westward drift of the main field, but are fixed with respect to the mantle; (2) the geomagnetic pole position flips in a particular way by preferred meridional paths during a reversal; and (3) magnetic polarity reversals are correlated with the activations of geological processes. These facts may be explained if we take into account that a significant horizontal temperature gradient can exist in the top levels of the liquid core because of the different thermoconductivity of the different areas of the core-mantle boundary. These temperature inhomogeneities can penetrate the core because fluxes along the core boundary (the thermal wind) can be strongly suppressed by a small redistribution of the chemical composition in the top of the core. The nonparallel gradients of the temperature, density, and composition on the top of the core create a curled electric field that produces a current and a magnetic field. This seed-field can be amplified by motions in the core. The resulting field does not forget the seed-field distribution and in this way the field on the Earth surface (that can be created only in regions with high conductivity, i.e. in the core) is connected with the core-mantle boundary. Contrary to the usual approach to the dynamo problem, we will take into account that the seed field of thermoelectric origin is acting not only at some initial moment of time but permanently.

  20. 3D Wilson cycle: structural inheritance and subduction polarity reversals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaussier, Stephane; Gerya, Taras; Burg, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Many orogenies display along-strike variations in their orogenic wedge geometry. For instance, the Alps is an example of lateral changes in the subducting lithosphere polarity. High resolution tomography has shown that the southeast dipping European lithosphere is separated from the northeast dipping Adriatic lithosphere by a narrow transition zone at about the "Judicarian" line (Kissling et al. 2006). The formation of such 3D variations remains conjectural. We investigate the conditions that can spontaneously induce such lithospheric structures, and intend to identify the main parameters controlling their formation and geometry. Using the 3D thermo-mechanical code, I3ELVIS (Gerya and Yuen 2007) we modelled a Wilson cycle starting from a continental lithosphere in an extensional setting resulting in continental breakup and oceanic spreading. At a later stage, divergence is gradually reversed to convergence, which induce subduction of the oceanic lithosphere formed during oceanic spreading. In this model, all lateral and longitudinal structures of the lithospheres are generated self-consistently, and are consequences of the initial continental structure, tectono-magmatic inheritance, and material rheology. Our numerical simulations point out the control of rheological parameters defining the brittle/plastic yielding conditions for the lithosphere. Formation of several opposing domains of opposing subduction polarity is facilitated by wide and weak oceanic lithospheres. Furthermore, contrasts of strength between the continental and oceanic lithosphere, as well as the angle between the plate suture and the shortening direction have a second order effect on the lateral geometry of the subduction zone. In our numerical experiments systematic lateral changes in the subduction lithosphere polarity during subduction initiation form spontaneously suggesting intrinsic physical origin of this phenomenon. Further studies are necessary to understand why this feature, observed

  1. Electrochemical transformation of trichloroethylene in aqueous solution by electrode polarity reversal

    PubMed Central

    Rajic, Ljiljana; Fallahpour, Noushin; Yuan, Songhu; Alshawabkeh, Akram N.

    2014-01-01

    Electrode polarity reversal is evaluated for electrochemical transformation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in aqueous solution using flow-through reactors with mixed metal oxide electrodes and Pd catalyst. The study tests the hypothesis that optimizing electrode polarity reversal will generate H2O2 in Pd presence in the system. The effect of polarity reversal frequency, duration of the polarity reversal intervals, current intensity and TCE concentration on TCE removal rate and removal mechanism were evaluated. TCE removal efficiencies under 6 cycles h−1 were similar in the presence of Pd catalyst (50.3%) and without Pd catalyst (49.8%), indicating that Pd has limited impact on TCE degradation under these conditions. The overall removal efficacies after 60 min treatment under polarity reversal frequencies of 6, 10, 15, 30 and 90 cycles h−1 were 50.3%, 56.3%, 69.3%, 34.7% and 23.4%, respectively. Increasing the frequency of polarity reversal increases TCE removal as long as sufficient charge is produced during each cycle for the reaction at the electrode. Electrode polarity reversal shifts oxidation/reduction and reduction/oxidation sequences in the system. The optimized polarity reversal frequency (15 cycles h−1 at 60 mA) enables two reaction zones formation where reduction/oxidation occurs at each electrode surface. PMID:25282093

  2. Electrochemical transformation of trichloroethylene in aqueous solution by electrode polarity reversal.

    PubMed

    Rajic, Ljiljana; Fallahpour, Noushin; Yuan, Songhu; Alshawabkeh, Akram N

    2014-12-15

    Electrode polarity reversal is evaluated for electrochemical transformation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in aqueous solution using flow-through reactors with mixed metal oxide electrodes and Pd catalyst. The study tests the hypothesis that optimizing electrode polarity reversal will generate H2O2 in Pd presence in the system. The effect of polarity reversal frequency, duration of the polarity reversal intervals, current intensity and TCE concentration on TCE removal rate and removal mechanism were evaluated. TCE removal efficiencies under 6 cycles h(-1) were similar in the presence of Pd catalyst (50.3%) and without Pd catalyst (49.8%), indicating that Pd has limited impact on TCE degradation under these conditions. The overall removal efficacies after 60 min treatment under polarity reversal frequencies of 6, 10, 15, 30 and 90 cycles h(-1) were 50.3%, 56.3%, 69.3%, 34.7% and 23.4%, respectively. Increasing the frequency of polarity reversal increases TCE removal as long as sufficient charge is produced during each cycle for the reaction at the electrode. Electrode polarity reversal shifts oxidation/reduction and reduction/oxidation sequences in the system. The optimized polarity reversal frequency (15 cycles h(-1) at 60 mA) enables two reaction zones formation where reduction/oxidation occurs at each electrode surface.

  3. Separation of chemical warfare agent degradation products by the reversal of electroosmotic flow in capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Nassar, A E; Lucas, S V; Jones, W R; Hoffland, L D

    1998-03-15

    We report the development of analyses for nerve agent degradation products or related species by the reversal of electroosmotic flow in capillary electrophoresis (CE). The developed methods were used in this laboratory for analysis of samples in the second and third official proficiency tests (International Round-Robins) for the Provisional Technical Secretariat/Preparatory Commission for the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, and those results are reported here. Analytes studied include methylphosphonic acid (a dibasic acid), the monoisopropyl ester of ethylphosphonic acid, and the monoalkyl esters of methylphosphonic acid (R = ethyl, isopropyl, isobutyl, pinacolyl (3,3-dimethyl-2-butyl), cyclohexyl, and 2-ethylhexyl). The cationic surfactants used here for the reversal of electroosmotic flow are didodecyldimethylammonium hydroxide and cetyltrimethylammonium hydroxide. CE methods using conductivity or indirect UV detection provide a good separation efficiency and very high sensitivity for the analysis of such compounds. The detection limits for these species were about 75 micrograms/L when using conductivity detection and about 100 micrograms/L when using indirect UV detection. Because pH plays an important role in the CE separation of the alkylphosphonic acids and their monoesters, the influence of pH on these separation systems was investigated. Electrolytes were stable for at least 3 months. Excellent separation efficiency and freedom from interference due to common anions were obtained in the developed methods which typically achieved complete separations in less than 3 min. The method was applied to aqueous leachates of soil, wipes of surfaces, and vegetation sampled from a field site known to have been exposed to nerve agents and subsequently cleaned up. The data from these environmental samples indicated that the method can be expected to be useful for environmental monitoring.

  4. Resolution of diacylglycerol moieties of natural glycerophospholipids by gas-liquid chromatography on polar capillary columns.

    PubMed

    Myher, J J; Kuksis, A

    1982-06-01

    A rapid and practical method has been developed for the gas-liquid chromatographic determination of the sn-1,2-diacylglycerol moieties of natural glycerophospholipids using polar wall-coated open tubular columns. The method gives complete resolution and quantitative estimates for all species according to molecular weight and degree of unsaturation, including stearoyl docosahexaenoylglycerol and related polyunsaturates. For this purpose the sn-1,2-diacylglycerols are obtained from the glycerophospholipids by hydrolysis with phospholipase C and are converted into the trimethylsilyl or tertiary-butyldimethylsilyl ethers. The silyl ethers are separated by gas-liquid chromatography on the capillary glass columns coated with a polar cyanopropylsiloxane polymer, in the temperature range 175-250 degrees C, using hydrogen as the carrier gas. Practical applications of the method are illustrated by analyses of the sn-1,2-diacylglycerol moieties of the phosphatidylcholines of soybean phosphatides, egg yolk, and rat liver. The method of analysis is applicable to other classes of glycerophospholipids and the total time requirements for the analysis of any one phospholipid class are comparable to those for a fatty acid analysis.

  5. Evidence for a new geomagnetic reversal from lava flows in Idaho: discussion of short polarity reversals in the Brunhes and late Matuyama Polarity Chrons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Champion, D.E.; Lanphere, M.A.; Kuntz, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    K-Ar ages and paleomagnetic data for basalt samples from a new core hole (site E) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) indicate that the age of the reversed polarity event recorded in Snake River Plain lavas is older than 465 ?? 50 ka (1000 years before present) reported previously by Champion et al. (1981). A review of data documenting short reversal records from volcanic and sedimentary rocks shows that there is evidence for eight polarity subchrons in the Brunhes and two besides the Jaramillo in the late Matuyama. These 10 short subchrons begin to indicate the many short events that Cox (1968) hypothesized must exist if polarity interval lengths have a Poisson distribution. The mean sustained polarity interval length since late Matuyama Chron time is 90 000 years. The similarity of this number with the 105-year period of the Earth's orbital eccentricity suggests anew that linkage between geomagnetic, paleoclimatic, and possible underlying Earth orbital parameters should be evaluated. -from Authors

  6. Using Polar Coronal Hole Area Measurements to Determine the Solar Polar Magnetic Field Reversal in Solar Cycle 24

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karna, N.; Webber, S.A. Hess; Pesnell, W.D.

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of solar polar coronal hole (PCH) areas since the launch of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) shows how the polar regions have evolved during Solar Cycle 24. We present PCH areas from mid-2010 through 2013 using data from the Atmospheric Imager Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instruments onboard SDO. Our analysis shows that both the northern and southern PCH areas have decreased significantly in size since 2010. Linear fits to the areas derived from the magnetic-field properties indicate that, although the northern hemisphere went through polar-field reversal and reached solar-maximum conditions in mid-2012, the southern hemisphere had not reached solar-maximum conditions in the polar regions by the end of 2013. Our results show that solar-maximum conditions in each hemisphere, as measured by the area of the polar coronal holes and polar magnetic field, will be offset in time.

  7. Tracking a large pseudostreamer to pinpoint the southern polar magnetic field reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachmeler, Laurel; Guennou, Chloé; Seaton, Daniel B.; Gibson, Sarah; Auchère, Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    The reversal of the solar polar magnetic field is notoriously hard to pin down due to the extreme viewing angle of the pole. In Cycle 24, the southern polar field reversal can be pinpointed with high accuracy due to a large-scale pseudostreamer that formed over the pole and persisted for approximately a year. We tracked the size and shape of this structure with multiple observations and analysis techniques including PROBA2/SWAP EUV images, AIA EUV images, CoMP data, and 3D tomographic reconstructions. We find that the heliospheric field reversed polarity in February 2014, whereas in the photosphere the last vestiges of the previous polar field polarity remained until March 2015.

  8. Preparation and evaluation of a lysine-bonded silica monolith as polar stationary phase for hydrophilic interaction pressurized capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guihua; Lian, Qiuyan; Zeng, Wencan; Xie, Zenghong

    2008-09-01

    A silica-based monolith as polar stationary phase was described for hydrophilic interaction pressurized capillary electrochromatography (HI-pCEC). The polar monolithic column was prepared by on-column reaction of lysine with epoxy groups on a gamma-glycidoxypropyltrimethosysilane-modified silica monolith. The stationary phase yielded strong hydrophilic interaction due to the slightly polar hydroxyl groups, and the strong polar lysine ligand with amino groups and carboxylic groups contained on the surface of the monolith. In order to evaluate the hydrophilic character of lysine ligand, the chromatographic behaviors of epoxy monolith (before lysine bonded) and diol monolith (hydroxyl groups contained) were also investigated. Two groups of comparative experiment were developed in terms of the separation of typical neutral non-polar and polar compounds performed in a mobile phase of aqueous-acetonitrile solution. Results showed that the lysine monolith was much more hydrophilic than the diol monolith, which presented less hydrophobic than the epoxy monolith. For further study on its hydrophilic character, the lysine monolith was demonstrated in the HI-pCEC mode for the separations of various polar compounds such as phenols, nucleic acid bases and nucleosides.

  9. Observation of in plane magnetization reversal using polarization dependent magneto-optic Kerr effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohldag, H.; Weber, N. B.; Hillebrecht, F. U.; Kisker, E.

    2002-02-01

    We present an experimental setup for in plane two axis magnetometry using the polarization dependent magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE). A conventional setup to measure longitudinal MOKE with crossed polarizers is extended by a Faraday cell to compensate for the rotation of the polarization vector caused by a magnetized sample. The shape of the hysteresis loops measured on thin FeNi alloy films depends strongly on the angle between the optical axis of the analyzer and the plane of incidence. We derive expressions for the compensation angle which allow for extraction of vectorial magnetic information from loops detected with oblique polarization. For a small deviation from pure s or p polarization the transverse magnetization is found to be proportional to the difference between the loop obtained with oblique polarization and the one obtained with pure s or p polarization. Thus the complete in plane reversal process split up into longitudinal and transverse components can be observed.

  10. On Polar Magnetic Field Reversal and Surface Flux Transport During Solar Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xudong; Hoeksema, J. Todd; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Junwei

    2015-01-01

    As each solar cycle progresses, remnant magnetic flux from active regions (ARs) migrates poleward to cancel the old-cycle polar field. We describe this polarity reversal process during Cycle 24 using four years (2010.33-2014.33) of line-of-sight magnetic field measurements from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. The total flux associated with ARs reached maximum in the north in 2011, more than two years earlier than the south; the maximum is significantly weaker than Cycle 23. The process of polar field reversal is relatively slow, north-south asymmetric, and episodic. We estimate that the global axial dipole changed sign in 2013 October; the northern and southern polar fields (mean above 60° latitude) reversed in 2012 November and 2014 March, respectively, about 16 months apart. Notably, the poleward surges of flux in each hemisphere alternated in polarity, giving rise to multiple reversals in the north. We show that the surges of the trailing sunspot polarity tend to correspond to normal mean AR tilt, higher total AR flux, or slower mid-latitude near-surface meridional flow, while exceptions occur during low magnetic activity. In particular, the AR flux and the mid-latitude poleward flow speed exhibit a clear anti-correlation. We discuss how these features can be explained in a surface flux transport process that includes a field-dependent converging flow toward the ARs, a characteristic that may contribute to solar cycle variability.

  11. ON POLAR MAGNETIC FIELD REVERSAL AND SURFACE FLUX TRANSPORT DURING SOLAR CYCLE 24

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xudong; Todd Hoeksema, J.; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Junwei

    2015-01-10

    As each solar cycle progresses, remnant magnetic flux from active regions (ARs) migrates poleward to cancel the old-cycle polar field. We describe this polarity reversal process during Cycle 24 using four years (2010.33-2014.33) of line-of-sight magnetic field measurements from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. The total flux associated with ARs reached maximum in the north in 2011, more than two years earlier than the south; the maximum is significantly weaker than Cycle 23. The process of polar field reversal is relatively slow, north-south asymmetric, and episodic. We estimate that the global axial dipole changed sign in 2013 October; the northern and southern polar fields (mean above 60° latitude) reversed in 2012 November and 2014 March, respectively, about 16 months apart. Notably, the poleward surges of flux in each hemisphere alternated in polarity, giving rise to multiple reversals in the north. We show that the surges of the trailing sunspot polarity tend to correspond to normal mean AR tilt, higher total AR flux, or slower mid-latitude near-surface meridional flow, while exceptions occur during low magnetic activity. In particular, the AR flux and the mid-latitude poleward flow speed exhibit a clear anti-correlation. We discuss how these features can be explained in a surface flux transport process that includes a field-dependent converging flow toward the ARs, a characteristic that may contribute to solar cycle variability.

  12. Reverse polarity shoulder replacement: Current concepts and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ling Hong; Desai, Aravind

    2014-01-01

    Shoulder replacement in cuff tear arthropathy (CTA) is an unsolved challenge. CTA poses a soft tissue deficiency in an arthritic glenohumeral joint which the anatomical total shoulder replacement and hemiarthroplasty cannot reliably provide stability, range of movement, function or satisfactory long term outcome. In the past two decades since the introduction of the reverse shoulder replacement, the prosthesis has evolved and has shown promising results. It is a partially constraint joint by virtue of its design features. The reversal of the concavity and convexity of the joint to the proximal humerus and the glenoid, respectively, also shifts and improves its center of rotation onto the osseous surface of the glenoid with less exposure to shear stress. It is a successful pain relieving procedure, offering good outcome in patients with irreparable massive rotator cuff tear with or without osteoarthritis. Consequently, this has led to wider use and expansion of its indication to include more complex elective and trauma cases. Whereas originally used in the more elderly patients, there is increasingly more demand in the younger patients. It is important to have good quality long term data to support these increasing indications. Therefore, we review the literature on the concepts of reverse shoulder replacement and the contemporary evidence. PMID:25035828

  13. Magnetic-field-induced ferroelectric polarization reversal in magnetoelectric composites revealed by piezoresponse force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Miao, Hongchen; Zhou, Xilong; Dong, Shuxiang; Luo, Haosu; Li, Faxin

    2014-08-07

    Controlling electric polarization (or magnetization) in multiferroic materials with external magnetic fields (or electric fields) is very important for fundamental physics and spintronic devices. Although there has been some progress on magnetic-field-induced polarization reversal in single-phase multiferroics, such behavior has so far never been realized in composites. Here we show that it is possible to reverse ferroelectric polarization using magnetic fields in a bilayer Terfenol-D/PMN-33%PT composite. We realized this by ferroelectric domain imaging using piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) under applied magnetic field loading. The internal electric field caused by the magnetoelectric (ME) effect in the PMN-PT crystal is considered as the driving force for the 180° polarization switching, and its existence is verified by switching spectroscopy PFM testing under a series of external magnetic fields. A quantitative method is further suggested to estimate the local ME coefficient based on the switching spectroscopy PFM testing results.

  14. Sample stacking microemulsion electrokinetic capillary chromatography induced by reverse migrating pseudostationary phase for the quantification of phenobarbital and its p-hydroxyphenobarbital metabolite in rat urine.

    PubMed

    Kadi, Adnan; Hefnawy, Mohamed; Julkhuf, Saeed; Abounassif, Mohammed; Mostafa, Gamal; Kassem, Mohamed G; Attia, Sabry; Al-Ghamdi, Ali

    2011-07-07

    For the first time, a capillary electrophoretic (CE) method with sample stacking induced by a reverse migrating pseudostationary phase (SRMP) technique has been developed and validated for sensitive determination of phenobarbital (PB) and its p-hydroxyphenobarbital (PHPB) metabolite in rat urine samples. Separation and determination were optimized on a fused-silica capillary with a total length of 50 cm (effective length 40 cm) and 75 μm ID. The microemulsion background electrolyte consisted of 0.8% (v/v) ethyl acetate, 6.6% (v/v) butan-2-ol, 1.0% (v/v) acetonitrile, 2.0% (w/v) sodium n-dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and 89.6% (v/v) of 7.5 mM ammonium formate at pH 8. When this preconcentration technique was used, the sample stacking and the separation processes took place successively with changing the voltage with an intermediate polarity switching step. For practical application, a solid-phase extraction (SPE), C(18) sorbent with n-hexane/ethyl acetate (1 : 1%, v/v) as the elution solvent was used for sample purification and concentration. The SPE method gave good extraction yields for all the analytes, with absolute recovery values of 96.9% and 99.1% for PB and PHPB, respectively. The regression equations for PB and PHPB showed excellent linearity over a concentration range of 55-1386 ng mL(-1) for PB and PHPB (r = 0.998). The developed microemulsion electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MEEKC) method for separation of the studied compounds with SRMP as the electrophoretic preconcentration technique allowed detection limits in urine samples at 16.8 ng mL(-1) for PB and PHPB which are 15-fold lower than the reported CE method in the literature. The precision results, expressed by the intra-day and inter-day relative standard deviation (RSD) values range from 3.6 to 7.1% (repeatability) and from 3.2 to 7.2% (intermediate precision) for PB and PHPB, respectively, which were in line with Food and Drug Administration (FDA) criteria.

  15. Preparation and evaluation of o-phenanthroline immobilized on a hybrid silica monolith modified with ionic liquids for reversed-phase pressurized capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wenfei; Lü, Haixia; Xie, Zenghong

    2014-12-01

    A novel o-phenanthroline-immobilized ionic-liquid-modified hybrid monolith for capillary electrochromatography was synthesized based on chloropropyl-silica, which was prepared by the in situ polymerization of tetramethoxysilane and 3-chloropropyltrimethoxysilane via a sol-gel process. The morphology of the hybrid monolith was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, and relatively stable anodic electroosmotic flow was observed under a broad pH ranged from pH 3.0 to 9.0. The separation mechanism was investigated by separating four neutral molecules (toluene, dimethylformamide, formamide, and thiourea). The obtained hybrid monolith possessed an obviously reversed-phase retention mechanism, but when the acetonitrile content in the mobile phase was >90% v/v, a weak hydrophilic mechanism was observed on the resultant o-phenanthroline-modified chloropropyl-silica hybrid monolith. The reproducibility of the column was also investigated by measuring relative standard deviations of the migration time for four neutral molecules. Relative standard deviations of run to run (n = 3), day to day (n = 3), and column to column (n = 3) were in the range of 0.4-0.7, 0.9-2.1, and 1.4-3.3%, respectively. Basic separations of various polar analytes including phenols and aromatic amines were successfully achieved.

  16. An Introductory-Geology Exercise on the Polar-Reversal Time Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, James Herbert

    1986-01-01

    Presents a three-part exercise which provides undergraduates with opportunities to work with data related to the earth's magnetic field. Includes student materials for activities in determining the history of the earth's magnetic field, in finding the general pattern of declination, and for looking for a polar reversal history. (ML)

  17. The reversal of the solar polar magnetic fields. IV - The polar fields near sunspot maximum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, N.; Wilson, P. R.

    1992-01-01

    The evolution of solar polar magnetic fields between Carrington rotations 1815 and 1834 is described using magnetic data from the Mount Wilson Observatory and the National Solar Observatory. The observations are compared with simulations using the flux transport equation. It is shown that the evolution of the polar field cannot be reproduced accurately by simulations of the diffusion and poleward drift of the emerging active regions at sunspot latitudes. Histograms of the distribution of the field intensities derived from daily magnetograms are presented which indicate that flux emerges at high latitudes and contributes to the evolution of the magnetic patterns.

  18. Dependence of the duration of geomagnetic polarity reversals on site latitude.

    PubMed

    Clement, Bradford M

    2004-04-08

    An important constraint on the processes governing the geodynamo--the flow in the outer core responsible for generating Earth's magnetic field--is the duration of geomagnetic polarity reversals; that is, how long it takes for Earth's magnetic field to reverse. It is generally accepted that Earth's magnetic field strength drops to low levels during polarity reversals, and the field direction progresses through a 180 degrees change while the field is weak. The time it takes for this process to happen, however, remains uncertain, with estimates ranging from a few thousand up to 28,000 years. Here I present an analysis of the available sediment records of the four most recent polarity reversals. These records yield an average estimate of about 7,000 years for the time it takes for the directional change to occur. The variation about this mean duration is not random, but instead varies with site latitude, with shorter durations observed at low-latitude sites, and longer durations observed at mid- to high-latitude sites. Such variation of duration with site latitude is predicted by simple geometrical reversal models, in which non-dipole fields are allowed to persist while the axial dipole decays through zero and then builds in the opposite direction, and provides a constraint on numerical dynamo models.

  19. Polarity-Reversed Allylations of Aldehydes, Ketones, and Imines Enabled by Hantzsch Ester in Photoredox Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Qi, Li; Chen, Yiyun

    2016-10-10

    The polarity reversal (umpolung) reaction is an invaluable tool for reversing the chemical reactivity of carbonyl and iminyl groups, which subsequent cross-coupling reactions to form C-C bonds offers a unique perspective in synthetic planning and implementation. Reported herein is the first visible-light-induced polarity-reversed allylation and intermolecular Michael addition reaction of aldehydes, ketones, and imines. This chemoselective reaction has broad substrate scope and the engagement of alkyl imines is reported for the first time. The mechanistic investigations indicate the formation of ketyl (or α-aminoalkyl) radicals from single-electron reduction, where the Hantzsch ester is crucial as the electron/proton donor and the activator.

  20. In vitro and in vivo reversal of thyroid epithelial polarity: its relevance for autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed Central

    Hanafusa, T; Pujol-Borrell, R; Chiovato, L; Doniach, D; Bottazzo, G F

    1984-01-01

    A method is described for culturing intact human thyroid follicles, based on the study of 40 thyroidectomy specimens from normal (n = 18) and diseased glands (n = 22). Reversal of the normal polarity of thyrocytes, whereby the microvilli move from the colloid edge to the vascular pole of the cells, occurs gradually when the amount of fetal calf serum (FCS) is changed from 0.5% to 10%. The translocation of thyroid 'microvillar' antigens, (surface expression of 'microsomal' and a separate surface antigen) from the follicular to the vascular pole of thyrocytes was assessed by indirect immunofluorescence with human sera containing microsomal antibodies, as well as by electron microscopy. In normal and diseased thyroid glands up to 80% of follicles became reversed after 5-10 days in high FCS and the microsomal/microvillar antigen persisted for about twice as long as in monolayer cultures. Spontaneous reversal of polarity was observed in six of eight glands from patients with Graves' thyrotoxicosis or toxic nodular goitre in freshly dispersed tissues or after 2 days in 0.5% FCS, unlike normal tissues where only a trace of reversal appeared after 7 days of culture under these conditions. It is postulated that polarity reversal may play a role in human thyroid autoimmunity as the normally secluded 'microvillar' antigens becomes transposed to the vascular pole of thyroid follicles where they are in direct contact with cytotoxic antibodies or sensitized immunocytes. This could initiate lesions in intact follicles. Inappropriate HLA-DR expression on thyrocytes, either stimulated by phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) or appearing spontaneously as an early marker of thyroiditis, did not correlate with reversal of polarity. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:6380840

  1. Quantification of Viscosity and Capillary Pressure Anomalies for Polar Liquids in 2D Hydrophilic Nano-Confinements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, S. A.; Torres-Verdin, C.; Balhoff, M.

    2014-12-01

    Interest in liquid and interfacial behavior within nano-confinements spans many disciplines. Geophysical interest originates from a desire to understand flow mechanisms through hydrocarbon-rich nano-porous shale media, especially communication between fractures and the adjacent nano-porous matrix (imbibition). This work investigates the extent of boundary layer nucleation during polar liquid flows in hydrophilic nano-confinements via discrepancies seen in viscosity and capillary pressure from their bulk values. We perform our experiments in two-dimensional nanochannels of varying size and as small as 30 nm x 60 nm in cross section and still obtain visual data with reflected differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. The simple geometry of the nanochannels enables the comparison against analytical transport solutions. By designing a nanochannel experiment that allows us to monitor the rate of fluid imbibition and volume loss of a trapped air pocket the liquid is imbibing into, we are able to decouple capillary pressure and viscosity from imbibition data, as well as gain information about gas partitioning at the meniscus interface. Our current experiments are performed with organic solvents within siliceous nanochannels and the results of the decoupling scheme indicate that for rectangular nanochannels with heights of 60 nm and varying widths, effective viscosity is consistently between 4-12 times higher than the bulk value and capillary pressure is around 50% less than the macroscopic Young-Laplace equation prediction. These results equate to the nucleation of wall boundary layers on the order of tens of molecular layers thick. Structured boundary layers have an inherently increased viscosity compared to the liquid bulk value, resulting in a significant reduction in imbibition efficacy. This presence of approximately 15 nm boundary layers in on the threshold of two different theories - thin bimolecular boundary layers and exclusion zones (thick boundary

  2. An omnipotent Li-ion battery charger with multimode control and polarity reversible techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiann-Jong; Ku, Yi-Tsen; Yang, Hong-Yi; Hwang, Yuh-Shyan; Yu, Cheng-Chieh

    2016-07-01

    The omnipotent Li-ion battery charger with multimode control and polarity reversible techniques is presented in this article. The proposed chip is fabricated with TSMC 0.35μm 2P4M complementary metal-oxide- semiconductor processes, and the chip area including pads is 1.5 × 1.5 mm2. The structure of the omnipotent charger combines three charging modes and polarity reversible techniques, which adapt to any Li-ion batteries. The three reversible Li-ion battery charging modes, including trickle-current charging, large-current charging and constant-voltage charging, can charge in matching polarities or opposite polarities. The proposed circuit has a maximum charging current of 300 mA and the input voltage of the proposed circuit is set to 4.5 V. The maximum efficiency of the proposed charger is about 91% and its average efficiency is 74.8%. The omnipotent charger can precisely provide the charging current to the battery.

  3. Development and localization of reverse-polarity mechanotransducer channels in cochlear hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Beurg, Maryline; Goldring, Adam C.; Ricci, Anthony J.; Fettiplace, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Cochlear hair cells normally detect positive deflections of their hair bundles, rotating toward their tallest edge, which opens mechanotransducer (MT) channels by increased tension in interciliary tip links. After tip-link destruction, the normal polarity of MT current is replaced by a mechanically sensitive current evoked by negative bundle deflections. The “reverse-polarity” current was investigated in cochlear hair cells after tip-link destruction with BAPTA, in transmembrane channel-like protein isoforms 1/2 (Tmc1:Tmc2) double mutants, and during perinatal development. This current is a natural adjunct of embryonic development, present in all wild-type hair cells but declining after birth with emergence of the normal-polarity current. Evidence indicated the reverse-polarity current seen developmentally was a manifestation of the same ion channel as that evident under abnormal conditions in Tmc mutants or after tip-link destruction. In all cases, sinusoidal fluid-jet stimuli from different orientations suggested the underlying channels were opened not directly by deflections of the hair bundle but by deformation of the apical plasma membrane. Cell-attached patch recording on the hair-cell apical membrane revealed, after BAPTA treatment or during perinatal development, 90-pS stretch-activated cation channels that could be blocked by Ca2+ and by FM1-43. High-speed Ca2+ imaging, using swept-field confocal microscopy, showed the Ca2+ influx through the reverse-polarity channels was not localized to the hair bundle, but distributed across the apical plasma membrane. These reverse-polarity channels, which we propose to be renamed “unconventional” mechanically sensitive channels, have some properties similar to the normal MT channels, but the relationship between the two types is still not well defined. PMID:27162344

  4. Study on the time difference of solar polar field reversal between the north and south hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukuya, D.; Kusano, K.

    2013-12-01

    Dynamo is a mechanism whereby the kinetic energy of plasma is converted to the magnetic energy. This mechanism works to generate and maintain the solar and stellar magnetic field. Since the sun is only a star whose magnetic field can be directly observed, the understanding of solar dynamo can provide clues to clarify dynamo mechanisms. On the other hand, because solar activities, which are caused by solar dynamo, can influence the Earth's climate, solar variability is an important issue also to understand long-term evolution of the Earth's climate. It is widely known that the polarity of the solar magnetic fields on the north and south poles periodically reverses at every sunspot maxima. It is also known that the reversal at one pole is followed by that on the other pole. The time difference of magnetic field reversal between the poles was first noted by Babcock (1959) from the very first observation of polar field. Recently, it was confirmed by detailed observations with the HINODE satellite (Shiota et al. 2012). Svalgaard and Kamide (2013) indicated that there is a relationship between the time difference of the polarity reversal and the hemispheric asymmetry of the sunspot activity. However, the mechanisms for the hemispheric asymmetry are still open to be revealed. In this paper, we study the asymmetric feature of the solar dynamo based on the flux transport dynamo model (Chatterjee et al. 2004) to explain the time difference of magnetic polarity reversal between the north and south poles. In order to calculate long-term variations of solar activities, we use the mean field kinematic dynamo model, which is derived from magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equation through the mean field and other approximations. We carried out the mean field dynamo simulations using the updated SURYA code which was developed originally by Choudhuri and his collaborators (2004). We decomposed the symmetric and asymmetric components of magnetic field, which correspond respectively to the

  5. Simulations of a quasi-Taylor state geomagnetic field including polarity reversals on the Earth Simulator.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Futoshi; Matsushima, Masaki; Honkura, Yoshimori

    2005-07-15

    High-resolution, low-viscosity geodynamo simulations have been carried out on the Earth Simulator, one of the fastest supercomputers, in a dynamic regime similar to that of Earth's core, that is, in a quasi-Taylor state. Our dynamo models exhibit features of the geodynamo not only in spatial and temporal characteristics but also in dynamics. Polarity reversals occurred when magnetic flux patches at high latitudes moved poleward and disappeared; patches with reversed field at low and mid-latitudes then moved poleward.

  6. Polar Kerr effect studies of time reversal symmetry breaking states in heavy fermion superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schemm, E. R.; Levenson-Falk, E. M.; Kapitulnik, A.

    2017-04-01

    The connection between chiral superconductivity and topological order has emerged as an active direction in research as more instances of both have been identified in condensed matter systems. With the notable exception of 3He-B, all of the known or suspected chiral - that is to say time-reversal symmetry-breaking (TRSB) - superfluids arise in heavy fermion superconductors, although the vast majority of heavy fermion superconductors preserve time-reversal symmetry. Here we review recent experimental efforts to identify TRSB states in heavy fermion systems via measurement of polar Kerr effect, which is a direct consequence of TRSB.

  7. Reversible Control of Interfacial Magnetism through Ionic-Liquid-Assisted Polarization Switching

    DOE PAGES

    Herklotz, Andreas; Guo, Er-Jia; Wong, Anthony T.; ...

    2017-02-06

    The ability to control magnetism of materials via electric field enables a myriad of technological innovations in information storage, sensing, and computing. In this paper, we use ionic-liquid-assisted ferroelectric switching to demonstrate reversible modulation of interfacial magnetism in a multiferroic heterostructure composed of ferromagnetic (FM) La0.8Sr0.2MnO3 and ferroelectric (FE) PbZr0.2Ti0.8O3. It is shown that ionic liquids can be used to persistently and reversibly switch a large area of a FE film. Finally, this is a prerequisite for polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR) studies that are conducted to directly probe magnetoelectric coupling of the FE polarization to the interfacial magnetization.

  8. Ensuring Safety of Implanted Devices under MRI using Reversed RF Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Overall, William R.; Pauly, John M.; Stang, Pascal P.; Scott, Greig C.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with long-wire medical implants are currently prevented from undergoing MRI scans due to the risk of RF heating. We have developed a simple technique for determining the heating potential for these implants using reversed RF polarization. This technique could be used on a patient-to-patient basis as a part of the standard pre-scan procedure to ensure that the subject’s device does not pose a heating risk. By using reversed quadrature polarization, the MR scan can be sensitized exclusively to the potentially dangerous currents in the device. Here, we derive the physical principles governing the technique and explore the primary sources of inaccuracy. These principles are verified through finite-difference simulations and through phantom scans of implant leads. These studies demonstrate the potential of the technique for sensitively detecting potentially dangerous coupling conditions before they can do harm. PMID:20593374

  9. Reversible Control of Interfacial Magnetism through Ionic-Liquid-Assisted Polarization Switching.

    PubMed

    Herklotz, Andreas; Guo, Er-Jia; Wong, Anthony T; Meyer, Tricia L; Dai, Sheng; Ward, T Zac; Lee, Ho Nyung; Fitzsimmons, Michael R

    2017-03-08

    The ability to control magnetism of materials via electric field enables a myriad of technological innovations in information storage, sensing, and computing. We use ionic-liquid-assisted ferroelectric switching to demonstrate reversible modulation of interfacial magnetism in a multiferroic heterostructure composed of ferromagnetic (FM) La0.8Sr0.2MnO3 and ferroelectric (FE) PbZr0.2Ti0.8O3. It is shown that ionic liquids can be used to persistently and reversibly switch a large area of a FE film. This is a prerequisite for polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR) studies that are conducted to directly probe magnetoelectric coupling of the FE polarization to the interfacial magnetization.

  10. Chemical Synthesis of O-Glycosylated Human Interleukin-2 by the Reverse Polarity Protection Strategy.

    PubMed

    Asahina, Yuya; Komiya, Shinobu; Ohagi, Ami; Fujimoto, Rina; Tamagaki, Hiroko; Nakagawa, Katsuhiro; Sato, Takashi; Akira, Shizuo; Takao, Toshifumi; Ishii, Akira; Nakahara, Yoshiaki; Hojo, Hironobu

    2015-07-06

    The chemical synthesis of human interleukin-2 (IL-2) , having a core 1 sugar, by a ligation method is reported. Although IL-2 is a globular glycoprotein, its C-terminal region, in particular (99-133), is extremely insoluble when synthesized by solid-phase method. To overcome this problem, the side-chain carboxylic acid of the Glu residues was protected by a picolyl ester, thus reversing its polarity from negative to positive. This reverse polarity protection significantly increased the isoelectric point of the peptide segment and made it positive under acidic conditions and facilitated the purification. An efficient method to prepare the prolyl peptide thioester required for the synthesis of the (28-65) segment was also developed. These efforts resulted in the total synthesis of the glycosylated IL-2 having full biological activity.

  11. Method of electric field flow fractionation wherein the polarity of the electric field is periodically reversed

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Fred J.

    1992-01-01

    A novel method of electric field flow fractionation for separating solute molecules from a carrier solution is disclosed. The method of the invention utilizes an electric field that is periodically reversed in polarity, in a time-dependent, wave-like manner. The parameters of the waveform, including amplitude, frequency and wave shape may be varied to optimize separation of solute species. The waveform may further include discontinuities to enhance separation.

  12. Molecular-level comparison of alkylsilane and polar-embedded reversed-phase liquid chromatography systems.

    PubMed

    Rafferty, Jake L; Siepmann, J Ilja; Schure, Mark R

    2008-08-15

    Stationary phases with embedded polar groups possess several advantages over conventional alkylsilane phases, such as reduced peak tailing, enhanced selectivity for specific functional groups, and the ability to use a highly aqueous mobile phase. To gain a deeper understanding of the retentive properties of these reversed-phase packings, molecular simulations were carried out for three different stationary phases in contact with mobile phases of various water/methanol ratios. Two polar-embedded phases were modeled, namely, amide and ether containing, and compared to a conventional octadecylsilane phase. The simulations show that, due to specific hydrogen bond interactions, the polar-embedded phases take up significantly more solvent and are more ordered than their alkyl counterparts. Alkane and alcohol probe solutes indicate that the polar-embedded phases are less retentive than alkyl phases for nonpolar species, whereas polar species are more retained by them due to hydrogen bonding with the embedded groups and the increased amount of solvent within the stationary phase. This leads to a significant reduction of the free-energy barrier for the transfer of polar species from the mobile phase to residual silanols, and this reduced barrier provides a possible explanation for reduced peak tailing.

  13. Kinetic efficiency of polar monolithic capillary columns in high-pressure gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kurganov, A A; Korolev, A A; Shiryaeva, V E; Popova, T P; Kanateva, A Yu

    2013-11-08

    Poppe plots were used for analysis of kinetic efficiency of monolithic sorbents synthesized in quartz capillaries for utilization in high-pressure gas chromatography. Values of theoretical plate time and maximum number of theoretical plates occurred to depend significantly on synthetic parameters such as relative amount of monomer in the initial polymerization mixture, temperature and polymerization time. Poppe plots let one to find synthesis conditions suitable either for high-speed separations or for maximal efficiency. It is shown that construction of kinetic Poppe curves using potential Van Deemter data demands compressibility of mobile phase to be taken into consideration in the case of gas chromatography. Model mixture of light hydrocarbons C1 to C4 was then used for investigation of influence of carrier gas nature on kinetic efficiency of polymeric monolithic columns. Minimal values of theoretical plate times were found for CO2 and N2O carrier gases.

  14. Electrically controllable sudden reversals in spin and valley polarization in silicene

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qingtian; Chan, K. S.; Li, Jingbo

    2016-01-01

    We study the spin and valley dependent transport in a silicene superlattice under the influence of a magnetic exchange field, a perpendicular electric field and a voltage potential. It is found that a gate-voltage-controllable fully spin and valley polarized current can be obtained in the proposed device, and the spin and valley polarizations are sensitive oscillatory functions of the voltage potential. In properly designed superlattice structure, the spin and valley polarizations can be reversed from −100% to 100% by a slight change in the external voltage potential. The energy dispersion relations of the superlattice structure are also investigated, which helps us to understand the effects of the superlattice structure. The switching of the spin direction and the valley of the tunneling electrons by a gate voltage enables new possibilities for spin or valley control in silicene-based spintronics and valleytronics. PMID:27647320

  15. The MTV experiment: a test of time reversal symmetry using polarized 8Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, J.; Baba, H.; Behr, J. A.; Hirayama, Y.; Iguri, T.; Ikeda, M.; Kato, T.; Kawamura, H.; Kishi, R.; Levy, C. D. P.; Nakaya, Y.; Ninomiya, K.; Ogawa, N.; Onishi, J.; Openshaw, R.; Pearson, M.; Seitaibashi, E.; Tanaka, S.; Tanuma, R.; Totsuka, Y.; Toyoda, T.

    2014-01-01

    The MTV ( Mott Polarimetry for T- Violation Experiment) experiment at TRIUMF-ISAC ( Isotope Separator and ACcelerator), which aims to achieve the highest precision test of time reversal symmetry in polarized nuclear beta decay by measuring a triple correlation ( R-correlation), is motivated by the search for a new physics beyond the Standard Model. In this experiment, the existence of non-zero transverse electron polarization is examined utilizing the analyzing power of Mott scattering from a thin metal foil. Backward scattering electron tracks are measured using a multi-wire drift chamber for the first time. The MTV experiment was commissioned at ISAC in 2009 using an 80 % polarized 8Li beam at 107 pps, resulting in 0.1 % statistical precision on the R-parameter in the first physics run performed in 2010. Next generation cylindrical drift chamber (CDC) is now being installed for the future run.

  16. Electrically controllable sudden reversals in spin and valley polarization in silicene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingtian; Chan, K S; Li, Jingbo

    2016-09-20

    We study the spin and valley dependent transport in a silicene superlattice under the influence of a magnetic exchange field, a perpendicular electric field and a voltage potential. It is found that a gate-voltage-controllable fully spin and valley polarized current can be obtained in the proposed device, and the spin and valley polarizations are sensitive oscillatory functions of the voltage potential. In properly designed superlattice structure, the spin and valley polarizations can be reversed from -100% to 100% by a slight change in the external voltage potential. The energy dispersion relations of the superlattice structure are also investigated, which helps us to understand the effects of the superlattice structure. The switching of the spin direction and the valley of the tunneling electrons by a gate voltage enables new possibilities for spin or valley control in silicene-based spintronics and valleytronics.

  17. Reversing the polarity of a cochlear implant magnet after magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Ju Hyun; Bae, Mi Ran; Chang, Jae Won; Choi, Jae Young

    2012-08-01

    The number of patients with cochlear implant (CI) has been rapidly increasing in recent years, and these patients show a growing need of examination by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, the use of MRI on patients with CI is restricted by the internal magnet of the CI. Many studies have investigated the safety of performing 1.5T MRI on patients with CI, which is now being practiced in a clinical setting. We experienced a case in which the polarity of the cochlear implant magnet was reversed after the patient was examined using 1.5T MRI. The external device was attached to the internal device oppositely. We could not find displacement of the internal device, magnet, or electrode upon radiological evaluation. We came up with two possible mechanisms by which the polarity of the magnet reversed. The first possibility was that the magnetic field of MRI reversed the polarity of the magnet. The second was that the internal magnet was physically realigned while interacting with the MRI. We believe the second hypothesis to be more reliable. A removable magnet and a loose magnet boundary of a CI device may have allowed for physical reorientation of the internal magnet. Therefore, in order to avoid these complications, first, the internal magnet must not be aligned anti-parallel with the magnetic polarity of MRI. In the Siemens MRI, the vector of the magnetic field is downward, so implant site should be placed in facing upwards to minimize demagnetization. In the GE Medical Systems MRI, the vector of the magnetic field is upward, so the implant site should be placed facing downwards. Second, wearing of a commercial mold which is fixed to the internal device before performing MRI can be helpful. In addition, any removable internal magnets in a CI device should be removed before MRI, especially in the trunk. However, to ultimately solve this problem, the pocket of the internal magnet should be redesigned for safety.

  18. Polarization control in X-ray FELs by reverse undulator tapering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneidmiller, E. A.; Yurkov, M. V.

    2015-05-01

    Baseline design of a typical X-ray FEL undulator assumes a planar configuration which results in a linear polarization of the FEL radiation. However, many experiments at X-ray FEL user facilities would profit from using a circularly polarized radiation. As a cheap upgrade one can consider an installation of a short helical (or cross-planar) afterburner, but then one should have an efficient method to suppress powerful linearly polarized background from the main undulator. In this paper we propose a new method for such a suppression: an application of the reverse taper in the main undulator. We discover that in a certain range of the taper strength, the density modulation (bunching) at saturation is practically the same as in the case of non-tapered undulator while the power of linearly polarized radiation is suppressed by orders of magnitude. Then strongly modulated electron beam radiates at full power in the afterburner. Considering SASE3 undulator of the European XFEL as a practical example, we demonstrate that soft X-ray radiation pulses with peak power in excess of 100 GW and an ultimately high degree of circular polarization can be produced. The proposed method is rather universal, i.e. it can be used at SASE FELs and seeded (self-seeded) FELs, with any wavelength of interest, in a wide range of electron beam parameters, and with any repetition rate.

  19. Polarity Reversal of the Solar Photospheric Magnetic Field During Activity Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xudong; Hoeksema, Jon Todd; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Junwei

    2014-06-01

    The large-scale solar magnetic field reverses its polarity during the maximum phase of each activity cycle. As observed on the photosphere, active region (AR) magnetic flux migrates poleward in narrow, sheared streams resulted from large-scale flows and diffusion. A small net flux of the trailing sunspot polarity eventually aggregates at high latitudes, manifesting the poloidal field of the next cycle. We characterize this process for the ongoing cycle 24 based on four years' line-of-sight magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). The axial dipole component reversed sign in early 2012, but the poleward flux migration was grossly out of phase in the two hemispheres. As a proxy, the northern polar field (taken as mean above 70 degrees latitude) switched from negative to positive in late 2012, whereas the southern remained positive as of March 2014. Three factors that are in line with the surface flux transport model may have contributed. First, AR emergence started and peaked earlier in the north. Second, several ARs with small or inverse tilt angles (w.r.t. the Joy's law) emerged in the south in late 2010. Third, meridional flow speed inferred from helioseismology varied greatly prior to 2013; slower streams (compared to a three-year mean at the same latitude) appeared earlier in the north. We correlate HMI with the long-running Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO) dataset, and compare the current cycle with the previous three.

  20. Use of vancomycin silica stationary phase in packed capillary electrochromatography: III. enantiomeric separation of basic compounds with the polar organic mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Fanali, Salvatore; Catarcini, Paolo; Quaglia, Maria Giovanna

    2002-02-01

    The separation of basic compounds into their enantiomers was achieved using capillary electrochromatography in 50 or 75 microm inner diameter (ID) fused-silica capillaries packed with silica a stationary phase derivatized with vancomycin and mobile phases composed of mixtures of polar organic solvents containing 13 mM ammonium acetate. Enantiomer resolution, electroosmotic flow, and the number of theoretical plates were strongly influenced by the type and concentration of the organic solvent. Mobile phases composed of 13 mM ammonium acetate dissolved in mixtures of acetonitrile/methanol, ethanol, n-propanol, or isopropanol were tested and the highest enantioresolutions were achieved using the first mobile phase, allowing the separation of almost all investigated enantiomers (9 from 11 basic compounds). The use of capillaries with different ID (50 and 75 microm ID) packed with the same chiral stationary phase revealed that a higher number of theoretical plates and higher enantioresolution was achieved with the tube with lowest ID.

  1. A High Voltage Power Supply That Mitigates Current Reversals in Capillary Zone Electrophoresis-Electrospray Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaherty, Ryan J.; Sarver, Scott A.; Sun, Liangliang; Brownell, Greg A.; Go, David B.; Dovichi, Norman J.

    2017-02-01

    Capillary electrophoresis coupled with electrospray ionization typically employs two power supplies, one at each end of the capillary. One power supply is located at the proximal (injection) end of the capillary. The power supply located at the distal (detector) end of the capillary drives the electrospray. Electrophoresis is driven by the difference in potential between these power supplies. Separations that employ large capillary inner diameter, high conductivity background electrolyte, and high separation potentials generate higher current than that produced by the electrospray. Excess current flows through the electrospray power supply. Most power supplies are not designed to sink current, and the excess current will cause the electrospray voltage to deviate from its set point. We report a simple circuit to handle this excess current, allowing separations under a wide range of electrophoretic conditions.

  2. Quantitative analysis of gene expression by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Richards, Mark P; Poch, Stephen M

    2002-05-01

    There has been a dramatic expansion of DNA sequence information compiled over the past several years for a variety of eukaryotic and prokaryotic genomes. Accompanying this increase in knowledge of genomic structure and organization has been a growing interest in studying the function of individual genes including regulation of their expression. A number of methods such as Northern blotting, ribonuclease protection assay, and hybridization arrays have been developed to analyze gene expression at the transcriptional (mRNA) level. Although quantitative estimates of mRNA transcripts can be obtained from each of these methods, oftentimes they lack sufficient sensitivity or the methodology is too costly or too labor-intensive to be applied to the analysis of a large number of samples. The most sensitive method for analyzing gene expression at the mRNA level involves the combination of reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). However, in order to provide accurate quantitative estimates of gene expression, a rapid and efficient method is required for separation and detection of the double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) products of RT-PCR. Recent advances in capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (CE/LIF) have made this method suitable for the automated analysis of large numbers of RT-PCR samples. An overview of the application of CE/LIF to quantitative analysis of gene expression by RT-PCR is presented along with selected protocols and examples. Both relative-quantitative (RQ) and quantitative-competitive (QC) approaches to RT-PCR are discussed in conjunction with the use of CE/LIF for rapid and accurate quantitative analysis of PCR products.

  3. Significance of the basin wide reverse polarity reflector in the Offshore Sydney Basin, East Australian Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman Talukder, Asrarur; Nadri, Dariush; Rajput, Sanjeev; Clennell, Ben; Griffiths, Cedric; Breeze, David

    2010-05-01

    The Offshore Sydney Basin is located between latitudes 32°30'S and 34°30'S between the coastal cities of Newcastle in the north and Wollongong in the south, covering a total area of ~15,000 squire km. The structural framework of the offshore portion of the basin comprises five principal elements: the Offshore Syncline, an extension of the New England Fold Belt, an offshore extension of the Newcastle Syncline, the Offshore Uplift and the Outer Continental Shelf. The present easterly extent of the basin is the result of Cretaceous rifting and commencement of seafloor spreading in the adjacent Tasman Sea. The continental shelf is approximately 50 km wide offshore Sydney and is edged by relatively steep continental slope. This study has been carried out with 2D multichannel seismic data covering the northern half of the offshore basin. The Cenozoic sedimentary cover of the basin is characterized by two regional unconformities: one at the base of Cenozoic and another intra-Cenozoic. The unconformity at the base of Cenozoic is known as the Top Sydney Basin unconformity. In places the surface is displaced by faults and also characterized by possible mounds producing an overall highly irregular topography. Though most of the faults remained buried beneath the surface some continued up to seafloor. They seem to have NW-SE direction with significant lateral extension. The intra-Cenozoic unconformity forms a prominent reflector at about 80 to 200 msbs (TWT). It is characterized by an angular unconformity with the reflectors terminating onto it from beneath. It is also associated with prograding sequences beneath, terminating with toplap geometry, suggesting that it forms the boundary between a transgressive and regressive phase. This is interpreted as a prograding carbonate dominated shelf-edge. The most interesting aspect of this seismic reflector is that the major part of it presents reverse polarity with respect to the seafloor reflection. The amplitude of the reflector

  4. Reversible conversion of dominant polarity in ambipolar polymer/graphene oxide hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Ye; Han, Su -Ting; Sonar, Prashant; Ma, Xinlei; Chen, Jihua; Zheng, Zijian; Roy, V. A. L.

    2015-03-24

    The possibility to selectively modulate the charge carrier transport in semiconducting materials is extremely challenging for the development of high performance and low-power consuming logic circuits. Systematical control over the polarity (electrons and holes) in transistor based on solution processed layer by layer polymer/graphene oxide hybrid system has been demonstrated. The conversion degree of the polarity is well controlled and reversible by trapping the opposite carriers. Basically, an electron device is switched to be a hole only device or vice versa. Finally, a hybrid layer ambipolar inverter is demonstrated in which almost no leakage of opposite carrier is found. We conclude that this hybrid material has wide range of applications in planar p-n junctions and logic circuits for high-throughput manufacturing of printed electronic circuits.

  5. Reversible conversion of dominant polarity in ambipolar polymer/graphene oxide hybrids

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Ye; Han, Su -Ting; Sonar, Prashant; ...

    2015-03-24

    The possibility to selectively modulate the charge carrier transport in semiconducting materials is extremely challenging for the development of high performance and low-power consuming logic circuits. Systematical control over the polarity (electrons and holes) in transistor based on solution processed layer by layer polymer/graphene oxide hybrid system has been demonstrated. The conversion degree of the polarity is well controlled and reversible by trapping the opposite carriers. Basically, an electron device is switched to be a hole only device or vice versa. Finally, a hybrid layer ambipolar inverter is demonstrated in which almost no leakage of opposite carrier is found. Wemore » conclude that this hybrid material has wide range of applications in planar p-n junctions and logic circuits for high-throughput manufacturing of printed electronic circuits.« less

  6. ON THE ENHANCED CORONAL MASS EJECTION DETECTION RATE SINCE THE SOLAR CYCLE 23 POLAR FIELD REVERSAL

    SciTech Connect

    Petrie, G. J. D.

    2015-10-10

    Compared to cycle 23, coronal mass ejections (CMEs) with angular widths >30° have been observed to occur at a higher rate during solar cycle 24, per sunspot number. This result is supported by data from three independent databases constructed using Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph Experiment coronagraph images, two employing automated detection techniques and one compiled manually by human observers. According to the two databases that cover a larger field of view, the enhanced CME rate actually began shortly after the cycle 23 polar field reversal, in 2004, when the polar fields returned with a 40% reduction in strength and the interplanetary radial magnetic field became ≈30% weaker. This result is consistent with the link between anomalous CME expansion and the heliospheric total pressure decrease recently reported by Gopalswamy et al.

  7. Reversible Conversion of Dominant Polarity in Ambipolar Polymer/Graphene Oxide Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ye; Han, Su-Ting; Sonar, Prashant; Ma, Xinlei; Chen, Jihua; Zheng, Zijian; Roy, V. A. L.

    2015-01-01

    The possibility to selectively modulate the charge carrier transport in semiconducting materials is extremely challenging for the development of high performance and low-power consuming logic circuits. Systematical control over the polarity (electrons and holes) in transistor based on solution processed layer by layer polymer/graphene oxide hybrid system has been demonstrated. The conversion degree of the polarity is well controlled and reversible by trapping the opposite carriers. Basically, an electron device is switched to be a hole only device or vice versa. Finally, a hybrid layer ambipolar inverter is demonstrated in which almost no leakage of opposite carrier is found. This hybrid material has wide range of applications in planar p-n junctions and logic circuits for high-throughput manufacturing of printed electronic circuits. PMID:25801827

  8. Brunhes-Matuyama Magnetic Polarity Reversal Tracing using Chinese loess10Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, W.; Beck, W.; Kong, X.; An, Z.; Qiang, X.; Wu, Z.; Xian, F.; Ao, H.

    2014-12-01

    The geomagnetic polarity reversal is generally considered to occur synchronously around the world, and is commonly used as a time marker. However, in the case of the most recent reversal, the Brunhes-Matuyama (B-M) reversal (~780 ka), comparison of paleomagnetic studies in Chinese loess-paleosol sequences versus marine sediments revealed a marked discrepancy in timing of this event (Tauxe et al., 1996; Zhou and Shackleton, 1999), leading to the debate on uncertainties of paleoclimatic correlation between the Chinese loess-paleosol sequences and marine sediments (Wang et al., 2006; Liu et al., 2008; Jin and Liu, 2011). Based on this issue, here we propose to use the cosmogenic 10Be to address this conundrum. 10Be is a long-lived radionuclide produced in the atmosphere by cosmic ray spallation reactions and carried to the ground attached to aerosols. Its atmospheric production rate is inversely proportional to the geomagnetic field intensity (Masarik and Beer, 1999). This allows us to reconstruct past geomagnetic field intensity variations using 10Be concentrations recorded in different sedimentary archives. We carried out the 10Be studies in Luochuan and Xifeng sections in Chinese Loess Plateau, both loess profiles show that 10Be production rate was at a maximum-an indication of the dipole field reversal-at ca. 780 ± 3 ka BP., in paleosol unit S7corresponding to MIS 19. These results have proven that the timing of B-M reversal recorded in Chinese loess is synchronous with that seen in marine records (Tauxe et al., 1996) and reaffirmed the conventional paleoclimatic correlation of loess-paleosol sequences with marine isotope stages and the standard loess timescale as correct. However, it is ~25 ka younger than the age (depth) of the magnetic polarity reversal recorded in these same Chinese loess-paleosol sequences, demonstrating that loess magnetic overprinting has occurred. 1.Jin, C.S.,et al., 2011,PALAEOGEOGR PALAEOCL, 299, 309-3172.Liu, Q.S., et al., 2008, EARTH

  9. Investigations & Analysis of Reverse Polarity Repeating Earthquakes at intermediate-depth in the Bucaramanga nest, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, S. A.; Prieto, G. A.

    2014-12-01

    We examine the clustering failure of Bucaramanga nest seismicity in both space and time, at tectonic and small sequence scales. The Bucaramanga nest is the densest concentration of intermediate-depth seismicity in the world - which we observe using the regional network of Colombia (RSNC). The Bucaramanga nest exhibits both traditional repeating earthquakes as well as reverse polarity repeating earthquakes. These two populations of events, each with highly correlating waveforms (repeating events) and with reverse polarity to the other group, are defined using a divisive clustering algorithm based on waveform similarity. Using a feature extraction relocation process, we observe the two groups tightly clustered in regions of both space and time. We show two large features, each corresponding to a group of seismicity, and inspect sequences at a localized scale. Some events in a sequence are separated by as few as ~12 seconds in time and ~100s meters in space. A pattern of cascading failure provides further evidence for a thermal-shear failure mechanism of intermediate-depth earthquakes.

  10. Polarity-reversed robust carrier mobility in monolayer MoS₂ nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yongqing; Zhang, Gang; Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2014-04-30

    Using first-principles calculations and deformation potential theory, we investigate the intrinsic carrier mobility (μ) of monolayer MoS2 sheet and nanoribbons. In contrast to the dramatic deterioration of μ in graphene upon forming nanoribbons, the magnitude of μ in armchair MoS2 nanoribbons is comparable to its sheet counterpart, albeit oscillating with ribbon width. Surprisingly, a room-temperature transport polarity reversal is observed with μ of hole (h) and electron (e) being 200.52 (h) and 72.16 (e) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) in sheet, and 49.72 (h) and 190.89 (e) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) in 4 nm nanoribbon. The high and robust μ and its polarity reversal are attributable to the different characteristics of edge states inherent in MoS2 nanoribbons. Our study suggests that width reduction together with edge engineering provide a promising route for improving the transport properties of MoS2 nanostructures.

  11. Evidence from lava flows for complex polarity transitions: The new composite Steens Mountain reversal record

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jarboe, N.A.; Coe, R.S.; Glen, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Geomagnetic polarity transitions may be significantly more complex than are currently depicted in many sedimentary and lava-flow records. By splicing together paleomagnetic results from earlier studies at Steens Mountain with those from three newly studied sections of Oregon Plateau flood basalts at Catlow Peak and Poker Jim Ridge 70-90 km to the southeast and west, respectively, we provide support for this interpretation with the most detailed account of a magnetic field reversal yet observed in volcanic rocks. Forty-five new distinguishable transitional (T) directions together with 30 earlier ones reveal a much more complex and detailed record of the 16.7 Ma reversed (R)-to-normal (N) polarity transition that marks the end of Chron C5Cr. Compared to the earlier R-T-N-T-N reversal record, the new record can be described as R-T-N-T-N-T-R-T-N. The composite record confirms earlier features, adds new west and up directions and an entire large N-T-R-T segment to the path, and fills in directions on the path between earlier directional jumps. Persistent virtual geomagnetic pole (VGP) clusters and separate VGPs have a preference for previously described longitudinal bands from transition study compilations, which suggests the presence of features at the core-mantle boundary that influence the flow of core fluid and distribution of magnetic flux. Overall the record is consistent with the generalization that VGP paths vary greatly from reversal to reversal and depend on the location of the observer. Rates of secular variation confirm that the flows comprising these sections were erupted rapidly, with maximum rates estimated to be 85-120 m ka-1 at Catlow and 130-195 m ka-1 at Poker Jim South. Paleomagnetic poles from other studies are combined with 32 non-transitional poles found here to give a clockwise rotation of the Oregon Plateau of 11.4???? 5.6?? with respect to the younger Columbia River Basalt Group flows to the north and 14.5???? 4.6?? with respect to cratonic

  12. When and why sediments fail to record the geomagnetic field during polarity reversals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valet, Jean-Pierre; Meynadier, Laure; Simon, Quentin; Thouveny, Nicolas

    2016-11-01

    We present four new records of the Matuyama-Brunhes (M-B) reversal from sediments of the Equatorial Indian Ocean, West Equatorial Pacific and North Atlantic Oceans with deposition rates between 2 cm/kyr and 4.5 cm/kyr. The magnetic measurements were performed using 8 cc cubic samples and provided well-defined reverse and normal polarity directions prior and after the last reversal. In three records stepwise demagnetization of the transitional samples revealed a succession of scattered directions instead of a well-defined characteristic component of magnetization. There is no relationship with changes in magnetic mineralogy, magnetic concentration and magnetic grain sizes. This behavior could be caused by weakly magnetized sediment. However the transitional samples of two cores have almost three orders of magnitude stronger magnetizations than the non-transitional samples that yielded unambiguous primary directions in the other two cores. Moreover a similar proportion of magnetic grains was aligned in all records. Therefore, the large amount of magnetic grains oriented by the weak transitional field did not contribute to improve the definition of the characteristic component. We infer that the weakness of the field might not be only responsible. Assuming that the transitional period is dominated by a multipolar field, it is likely that the rapidly moving non-dipole components generated different directions that were recorded over the 2 cm stratigraphic thickness of each sample. These components are carried by grains with similar magnetic properties yielding scattered directions during demagnetization. In contrast, the strongly magnetized sediments of the fourth core from the West Equatorial Pacific Ocean were exempt of problems during demagnetization. The declinations rotate smoothly between the two polarities while the inclinations remain close to zero. This scenario results from post-depositional realignment that integrated various amounts of pre- and post

  13. The impact of structural relaxation on spin polarization and magnetization reversal of individual nano structures studied by spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sander, Dirk; Phark, Soo-Hyon; Corbetta, Marco; Fischer, Jeison A; Oka, Hirofumi; Kirschner, Jürgen

    2014-10-01

    The application of low temperature spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy in magnetic fields for the quantitative characterization of spin polarization, magnetization reversal and magnetic anisotropy of individual nano structures is reviewed. We find that structural relaxation, spin polarization and magnetic anisotropy vary on the nm scale near the border of a bilayer Co island on Cu(1 1 1). This relaxation is lifted by perimetric decoration with Fe. We discuss the role of spatial variations of the spin-dependent electronic properties within and at the edge of a single nano structure for its magnetic properties.

  14. Global up-regulation of microtubule dynamics and polarity reversal during regeneration of an axon from a dendrite.

    PubMed

    Stone, Michelle C; Nguyen, Michelle M; Tao, Juan; Allender, Dana L; Rolls, Melissa M

    2010-03-01

    Axon regeneration is crucial for recovery after trauma to the nervous system. For neurons to recover from complete axon removal they must respecify a dendrite as an axon: a complete reversal of polarity. We show that Drosophila neurons in vivo can convert a dendrite to a regenerating axon and that this process involves rebuilding the entire neuronal microtubule cytoskeleton. Two major microtubule rearrangements are specifically induced by axon and not dendrite removal: 1) 10-fold up-regulation of the number of growing microtubules and 2) microtubule polarity reversal. After one dendrite reverses its microtubules, it initiates tip growth and takes on morphological and molecular characteristics of an axon. Only neurons with a single dendrite that reverses polarity are able to initiate tip growth, and normal microtubule plus-end dynamics are required to initiate this growth. In addition, we find that JNK signaling is required for both the up-regulation of microtubule dynamics and microtubule polarity reversal initiated by axon injury. We conclude that regulation of microtubule dynamics and polarity in response to JNK signaling is key to initiating regeneration of an axon from a dendrite.

  15. Global Up-Regulation of Microtubule Dynamics and Polarity Reversal during Regeneration of an Axon from a Dendrite

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Michelle C.; Nguyen, Michelle M.; Tao, Juan; Allender, Dana L.

    2010-01-01

    Axon regeneration is crucial for recovery after trauma to the nervous system. For neurons to recover from complete axon removal they must respecify a dendrite as an axon: a complete reversal of polarity. We show that Drosophila neurons in vivo can convert a dendrite to a regenerating axon and that this process involves rebuilding the entire neuronal microtubule cytoskeleton. Two major microtubule rearrangements are specifically induced by axon and not dendrite removal: 1) 10-fold up-regulation of the number of growing microtubules and 2) microtubule polarity reversal. After one dendrite reverses its microtubules, it initiates tip growth and takes on morphological and molecular characteristics of an axon. Only neurons with a single dendrite that reverses polarity are able to initiate tip growth, and normal microtubule plus-end dynamics are required to initiate this growth. In addition, we find that JNK signaling is required for both the up-regulation of microtubule dynamics and microtubule polarity reversal initiated by axon injury. We conclude that regulation of microtubule dynamics and polarity in response to JNK signaling is key to initiating regeneration of an axon from a dendrite. PMID:20053676

  16. Reverse polarity magnetized melt rocks from the Chicxulub impact structure, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia-Fucugauchi, Jaime; Marin, Luis E.; Sharpton, Virgil L.; Quezada, Juan Manuel

    1993-03-01

    Further paleomagnetic data for core samples of melt rock recovered in the Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) exploratory wells within the Chicxulub structure, northern Yucatan peninsula, Mexico are reported. A previous report by Sharpton showed that the rocks studied contain high iridium levels and shocked breccia clasts, and an Ar-40/Ar-39 age of 65.2 plus or minus 0.4 Ma. The geomagnetic polarity determined for two samples is reverse (R) and was correlated with chron 29R that includes the K/T boundary. Our present analysis is based on two samples from each of three clasts of the melt rock from PEMEX well Y6-N17 (1295 to 1299 m b.s.l.). This study concentrates on the vectorial nature and stability of the remanence (NRM), the magnetic mineralogy and remanence carriers (i.e., the reliability and origin of the record), and on the implications (correlation with expected paleolatitude and polarity). The relative orientation of the drill core samples with respect to the horizontal is known. Samples were stable under alternating field (AF) and thermal treatments, and after removal of a small component they exhibited single-vectorial behavior. The characteristic remanence inclinations show small dispersion and a mean value (-43 deg) in close agreement with the expected inclination and paleolatitude (derived from the North American apparent polar wander path). Isothermal remenence (IRM) acquisition experiments, Lowrie-Fuller tests, coercivity and unblocking temperature spectra of NRM and saturation IRM, susceptibility and Q-coefficient analyses, and the single-component nature indicate a dominant mineralogy of iron-rich titanomagnetites with single or pseduo-single domain states. The stable characteristic magnetization may be interpreted as a result of shock heating of the rock at the time of formation of the inpact structure and its polarity, age, and paleolatitude are consistent with a time about the K/T boundary.

  17. Reverse polarity magnetized melt rocks from the Chicxulub impact structure, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urrutia-Fucugauchi, Jaime; Marin, Luis E.; Sharpton, Virgil L.; Quezada, Juan Manuel

    1993-01-01

    Further paleomagnetic data for core samples of melt rock recovered in the Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) exploratory wells within the Chicxulub structure, northern Yucatan peninsula, Mexico are reported. A previous report by Sharpton showed that the rocks studied contain high iridium levels and shocked breccia clasts, and an Ar-40/Ar-39 age of 65.2 plus or minus 0.4 Ma. The geomagnetic polarity determined for two samples is reverse (R) and was correlated with chron 29R that includes the K/T boundary. Our present analysis is based on two samples from each of three clasts of the melt rock from PEMEX well Y6-N17 (1295 to 1299 m b.s.l.). This study concentrates on the vectorial nature and stability of the remanence (NRM), the magnetic mineralogy and remanence carriers (i.e., the reliability and origin of the record), and on the implications (correlation with expected paleolatitude and polarity). The relative orientation of the drill core samples with respect to the horizontal is known. Samples were stable under alternating field (AF) and thermal treatments, and after removal of a small component they exhibited single-vectorial behavior. The characteristic remanence inclinations show small dispersion and a mean value (-43 deg) in close agreement with the expected inclination and paleolatitude (derived from the North American apparent polar wander path). Isothermal remenence (IRM) acquisition experiments, Lowrie-Fuller tests, coercivity and unblocking temperature spectra of NRM and saturation IRM, susceptibility and Q-coefficient analyses, and the single-component nature indicate a dominant mineralogy of iron-rich titanomagnetites with single or pseduo-single domain states. The stable characteristic magnetization may be interpreted as a result of shock heating of the rock at the time of formation of the inpact structure and its polarity, age, and paleolatitude are consistent with a time about the K/T boundary.

  18. Effect of the polarity reversal frequency in the electrokinetic-biological remediation of oxyfluorfen polluted soil.

    PubMed

    Barba, Silvia; Villaseñor, José; Rodrigo, Manuel A; Cañizares, Pablo

    2017-03-03

    This work studies the feasibility of the periodic polarity reversal strategy (PRS) in a combined electrokinetic-biological process for the remediation of clayey soil polluted with a herbicide. Five two-weeks duration electrobioremediation batch experiments were performed in a bench scale set-up using spiked clay soil polluted with oxyfluorfen (20 mg kg(-1)) under potentiostatic conditions applying an electric field between the electrodes of 1.0 V cm(-1) (20.0 V) and using PRS with five frequencies (f) ranging from 0 to 6 d(-1). Additionally, two complementary reference tests were done: single bioremediation and single electrokinetic. The microbial consortium used was obtained from an oil refinery wastewater treatment plant and acclimated to oxyfluorfen degradation. Main soil conditions (temperature, pH, moisture and conductivity) were correctly controlled using PRS. On the contrary, the electroosmotic flow clearly decreased as f increased. The uniform soil microbial distribution at the end of the experiments indicated that the microbial activity remained in every parts of the soil after two weeks when applying PRS. Despite the adapted microbial culture was capable of degrade 100% of oxyfluorfen in water, the remediation efficiency in soil in a reference test, without the application of electric current, was negligible. However, under the low voltage gradients and polarity reversal, removal efficiencies between 5% and 15% were obtained, and it suggested that oxyfluorfen had difficulties to interact with the microbial culture or nutrients and that PRS promoted transport of species, which caused a positive influence on remediation. An optimal f value was observed between 2 and 3 d(-1).

  19. [Polarization reversal in the development of Brazilian metropolises? An analysis based on demographic indicators, using the example of Sao Paulo].

    PubMed

    Bahr, J; Wehrhahn, R

    1995-01-01

    "Using the example of Sao Paulo, this paper addresses itself to the question of how far the decrease in growth rates one observes in large Brazilian metropolises can be interpreted as a process of polarization reversal. The analysis is carried out on the basis of demographic data from small area units, which include the results from the most recent 1991 census. Although it had already been possible in the 1970s to discern first indications of such a process setting in, in the decade 1981-91 indicators of population growth and migration balances agree in pointing to a polarization reversal." (SUMMARY IN ENG)

  20. Magnetic polarity stratigraphy of the Permian and Carboniferous: The extension of the magnetic reversal record into the Paleozoic

    SciTech Connect

    Opdyke, N.D. )

    1991-03-01

    Magnetic polarity stratigraphy has revolutionized stratigraphic studies in Jurassic to Pleistocene sediments. These studies have been greatly facilitated by the reversal record that is recorded in rocks of the ocean floor. For times prior to the Jurassic, the reversal history of the magnetic field must be determined and eventually related through the type section concept. The magnetic reversal history of the late Paleozoic is dominated by the Permo-Carboniferous reversed superchron (PCRS), which extends from the late Permian to the Carboniferous (Westphalian). Recent studies by the author and his students in Middle Carboniferous sediments of eastern Canada, Pennsylvania, Arizona, and Nevada reveal that the magnetic field has reversed frequently in late Mississippian and early Pennsylvanian times (Meramecian through late Morrowan). The polarity of the magnetic field over this interval is approximately 50% normal and 50% reversed. The frequency of reversal appears to be about one reversal per m.y. The possibility, therefore, exists that this pattern may be used for continental and intercontinental correlation. Attempts are currently underway to correlate this magnetic stratigraphy to fossiliferous marine sections. The base of the PCRS is probably of Atokan age.

  1. Reverse Polarity Magnetized Melt Rocks from the Cretaceous/Tertiary Chicxulub Structure, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Marin, Luis; Sharpton, Virgil L.

    1994-01-01

    We report paleomagnetic results for core samples of the breccia and andesitic rocks recovered from the Yucatan-6 Petrolcos Mexicanos exploratory well within the Chicxulub structure (about 60 km SSW from its center), northern Yucatan, Mexico. A previous study has shown that the rocks studied contain high iridium levels and shocked breccia clasts and an Ar/Ar date of 65.2 +/- 0.4 Ma. Andesitic rocks are characterized by stable single-component magnetizations with a mean inclination of -42.6 deg +/- 2.4 deg. Breccias present a complex paleomagnetic record characterized by multivectorial magnetizations with widely different initial NRM inclinations. However, after alternating field demagnetization, well defined characteristic components with upward inclinations are defined. IRM acquisition experiments, comparison of IRM and NRM coercivity spectra and the single component magnetization of the andesitic rocks indicate the occurrence of iron-rich titanomagnetites of single or pseudo-single domain states as the dominant magnetic carriers. Mean inclinations from the andesitic rocks and most of the breccia samples give a mean inclination of about -40 deg to -45 deg, indicating a reverse polarity for the characteristic magnetization that is consistent with geomagnetic chron 29R, which spans the Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/T) boundary. The inclination is also consistent with the expected value (and corresponding paleolatitude) for the site estimated from the reference polar wander curve for North America. We suggest that the characteristic magnetizations for the andesitic and breccia rocks are the result of shock heating at the time of formation of the impact structure and that the age, polarity and pateolatitude are consistent with a time at the K/T boundary.

  2. Direction reversal of the optical spin torque on a Rayleigh absorptive sphere in vector Bessel polarized beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ruiping; Li, Renxian; Qin, Shitong; Ding, Chunying; Mitri, F. G.

    2017-02-01

    The effect of polarization on the optical spin torque (OST) exerted on an absorptive Rayleigh dielectric sphere by a vector Bessel beam is investigated using the dipole approximation method, with particular emphasis on the polarization of the plane wave component forming the beam. On the basis of the mathematical descriptions for the electric fields, which are derived using the angular spectrum decomposition method in plane waves, analytical formulas of the OST are established. The OSTs are numerically calculated, and the effects of polarization, beam-order, and half-cone angle are discussed in detail. Numerical results show that by choosing an appropriate polarization, order and half-cone angle, the transverse OST will manifest vortex-like behaviors, and the sphere will experience negative axial OSTs, i.e. OST sign reversal. Important applications in particle manipulation, rotation and handling using optical Bessel polarized beams would benefit from the results of the present investigation.

  3. Loess 10Be evidence for an asynchronous Brunhes-Matuyama magnetic polarity reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weijian; Beck, J. Warren; Kong, Xianghui; An, Zhisheng; Qiang, Xiaoke; Wu, Zhenkun; Xian, Feng; Ao, Hong

    2015-04-01

    magnetic overprinting has occurred. References: 1. Jin, C.S., and Liu, Q.S., 2011, Revisiting the stratigraphic position of the Matuyama-Brunhes geomagnetic polarity boundary in Chinese loess: Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, v. 299, p. 309-317. 2. Liu, Q.S., Roberts, A.P., Rohling, E.J., Zhu, R.X., and Sun, Y.B., 2008, Post-depositional remanent magnetization lock-in and the location of the Matuyama-Brunhes geomagnetic reversal boundary in marine and Chinese loess sequences: Earth and Planetary Science Letters, v. 275, no. 1-2, p. 102-110. 3. Masarik, J., and Beer, J., 1999, Simulation of particle fluxes and cosmogenic nuclide production in the Earth's atmosphere: Jounal of Geophysical Research, v. 104, p. 12099-12111. 4. Tauxe, L., Herbert, T., Shackleton, N.J., and Kok, Y.S., 1996, Astronomical calibration of the Matuyama-Brunhes boundary: Consequences for magnetic remanence acquisition in marine carbonates and the Asian loess sequences: Earth and Planetary Science Letters, v. 140, p. 133-146. 5. Wang, X.S., Yang, Z.Y., Løvlie, R., Sun, Z.M., and Pei, J.L., 2006, A magnetostratigraphic reassessment of correlation between Chinese loess and marine oxygen isotope records over the last 1.1Ma: Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, v. 159, p. 109-117. 6. Zhou, L.P., and Shackleton, N.J., 1999, Misleading positions of geomagnetic reversal boundaries in Eurasian loess and implications for correlation between continental and marine sedimentary sequences: Earth and Planetary Science Letters, v. 168, p. 117-130.

  4. A simple method for the synthesis of a polar-embedded and polar-endcapped reversed-phase chromatographic packing with low activity of residue silanols.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-yan; Li, Zhi-yong; Liu, Dan; Xue, Ying-wen; Shi, Zhi-guo

    2016-04-22

    Octadecyl bonded silica (ODS) is the most popular packing for reversed-phase chromatography. However, it generally demonstrates bad resolution for polar analytes because of the residue silanols and its poor stability in aqueous mobile phase. To address the problem, a new reversed-phase packing containing both polar-embedded and polar-endcapped moieties was proposed. It was prepared by a very simple method, in which the epoxide addition reaction of 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane with 1-octadecanethiol proceeded simultaneously with the reaction of silane coupling onto silica particles. By controlling the molecular ratio of 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane to 1-octadecanethiol higher than 1.0 (1.56 for the present study), both polar-embedded and polar-endcapped moieties were achieved onto the packing. The performance of the packing was evaluated in detail. The results demonstrated that neutral, acidic and basic analytes were well separated on the packing. The column efficiency for phenanthrene was 34,200 theoretical plates per meter. In addition, four nucleotides can be separated in 100% phosphate buffered saline solution with good reproducibility, which indicates the packing has good stability in aqueous mobile phase. Amitriptyline, a typical basic analytes, was eluted out with relatively symmetric peak shape (asymmetry factor of 1.36), which implies that the packing has not suffered from the negative effect of residue silanols significantly. Good stability in buffer solution of pH ranging from 2.0 to 10.0 was also documented for the packing.

  5. Methacrylate-based diol monolithic stationary phase for the separation of polar and non-polar compounds in capillary liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Linda, Roza; Lim, Lee Wah; Takeuchi, Toyohide

    2013-01-01

    A monolithic capillary column prepared with glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) and poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate (PEGDMA) was investigated and used in capillary liquid chromatography. The polymer monolith was synthesized in the presence of methanol and decanol as the biporogenic solvents by in situ polymerization of GMA and PEGDMA, and the optimum composition of monomer and porogen was investigated. After polymerization, glycidyl groups were hydrolyzed with sulfuric acid to produce diol groups at the surface of the porous monolith via epoxy-ring-opening. The GMA content in the polymerization mixture affected the hydrophilicity of the monolith. The separation capability was evaluated by separation of phenol compounds, phthalic acids, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The poly(GMA-PEGDMA) monolithic capillary column exhibited satisfactory stability.

  6. Capillary Hemangioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Why do capillary hemangiomas on the eyelids cause vision problems? Capillary Hemangiomas of the eyelid can cause ... a capillary hemangioma in the eye socket cause vision problems? A capillary hemangioma in the eye socket ( ...

  7. Helicity reversion in high-order-harmonic generation driven by bichromatic counter-rotating circularly polarized laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaofan; Li, Liang; Zhu, Xiaosong; Liu, Xi; Zhang, Qingbin; Lan, Pengfei; Lu, Peixiang

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the polarization properties of high harmonics generated with the bichromatic counter-rotating circularly polarized (BCCP) laser fields by numerically solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE). It is found that the helicity of the elliptically polarized harmonic emission is reversed at particular harmonic orders. Based on the time-frequency analysis and the classical three-step model, the correspondence between the positions of helicity reversions and the classical trajectories of continuum electrons is established. It is shown that the electrons ionized at one lobe of laser field can be divided into different groups based on the different lobes they recombine at, and the harmonics generated by adjacent groups have opposite helicities. Our study performs a detailed analysis of high harmonics in terms of electron trajectories and depicts a clear and intuitive physical picture of the HHG process in BCCP laser fields.

  8. Separation of natural antioxidants using PDMS electrophoresis microchips coupled with amperometric detection and reverse polarity.

    PubMed

    Lucca, Bruno Gabriel; Lunte, Susan Marie; Tomazelli Coltro, Wendell Karlos; Ferreira, Valdir Souza

    2014-12-01

    This report describes the use of PDMS ME coupled with amperometric detection for rapid separation of ascorbic, gallic , ferulic, p-coumaric acids using reverse polarity. ME devices were fabricated in PDMS by soft lithography and detection was accomplished using an integrated carbon fiber working electrode aligned in the end-channel configuration. Separation and detection parameters were investigated and the best conditions were obtained using a run buffer consisting of 5 mM phosphate buffer (pH 6.9) and a detection voltage of 1.0 V versus Ag/AgCl reference electrode. All compounds were separated within 70 s using gated injection mode with baseline resolution and separation efficiencies between 1200 and 9000 plates. Calibration curves exhibited good linearity and the LODs achieved ranged from 1.7 to 9.7 μM. The precision for migration time and peak height provided maximum values of 4% for the intrachip studies. Lastly, the analytical method was successfully applied for the analysis of ascorbic and gallic acids in commercial beverage samples. The results achieved using ME coupled with amperometric detection were in good agreement with the values provided by the supplier. Based on the data reported here, the proposed method shows suitability to be applied for the routine analysis of beverage samples.

  9. Misaligned and Polarity-Reversed Faces Determine Face-specific Capacity Limits

    PubMed Central

    Thoma, Volker; Ward, Neil; de Fockert, Jan W.

    2016-01-01

    Previous research using flanker paradigms suggests that peripheral distracter faces are automatically processed when participants have to classify a single central familiar target face. These distracter interference effects disappear when the central task contains additional anonymous (non-target) faces that load the search for the face target, but not when the central task contains additional non-face stimuli, suggesting there are face-specific capacity limits in visual processing. Here we tested whether manipulating the format of non-target faces in the search task affected face-specific capacity limits. Experiment 1 replicated earlier findings that a distracter face is processed even in high load conditions when participants looked for a target name of a famous person among additional names (non-targets) in a central search array. Two further experiments show that when targets and non-targets were faces (instead of names), however, distracter interference was eliminated under high load—adding non-target faces to the search array exhausted processing capacity for peripheral faces. The novel finding was that replacing non-target faces with images that consisted of two horizontally misaligned face-parts reduced distracter processing. Similar results were found when the polarity of a non-target face image was reversed. These results indicate that face-specific capacity limits are not determined by the configural properties of face processing, but by face parts. PMID:27729889

  10. Reverse polarity optical-OFDM (RPO-OFDM): dimming compatible OFDM for gigabit VLC links.

    PubMed

    Elgala, Hany; Little, Thomas D C

    2013-10-07

    Visible light communications (VLC) technology permits the exploitation of light-emitting diode (LED) luminaries for simultaneous illumination and broadband wireless communication. Optical orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (O-OFDM) is a promising modulation technique for VLC systems, in which the real-valued O-OFDM baseband signal is used to modulate the instantaneous power of the optical carrier to achieve gigabit data rates. However, a major design challenge that limits the commercialization of VLC is how to incorporate the industry-preferred pulse-width modulation (PWM) light dimming technique while maintaining a broadband and reliable communication link. In this work, a novel signal format, reverse polarity O-OFDM (RPO-OFDM), is proposed to combine the fast O-OFDM communication signal with the relatively slow PWM dimming signal, where both signals contribute to the effective LED brightness. The advantages of using RPO-OFDM include, (1) the data rate is not limited by the frequency of the PWM signal, (2) the LED dynamic range is fully utilized to minimize the nonlinear distortion of the O-OFDM communication signal, and (3) the bit-error performance is sustained over a large fraction of the luminaire dimming range. In addition, RPO-OFDM offers a practical approach to utilize off-the-shelf LED drivers. We show results of numerical simulations to study the trade-offs between the PWM duty cycle, average electrical O-OFDM signal power, radiated optical flux as well as human perceived light.

  11. Pressure-induced Polarization Reversal in Z-type Hexaferrite Single Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Byung-Gu; Chun, Sae Hwan; Kim, Kee Hoon

    2012-02-01

    Multiferroic materials with a gigantic magnetoelectric (ME) coupling at room temperature have been searched for applications to novel devices. Recently, large direct and converse ME effects were realized at room temperature in the so-called Z-type hexaferrite (Ba,Sr)3Co2Fe24O41 single crystals [1,2]. To obtain a new control parameter for realizing a sensitive ME tuning, we studied ME properties of the crystals under uniaxial pressure. Upon applying a tiny uniaxial pressure of about 0.6 GPa, magnetic field-driven electric polarization reversal and anomaly in a M-H loop start to appear at 10 K and gradually disappear at higher temperature above 130 K. By comparing those results with longitudinal magnetostriction at ambient pressure, we propose the pressure-dependent variations of transverse conical spin configuration as well as its domain structure under small magnetic field bias, and point out the possibility of having two different physical origins of the ME coupling in this system. [1] Y. Kitagawa et al., Nat. Mater. 9, 797 (2010) [2] S. H. Chun et al., submitted.

  12. Reversing ferroelectric polarization in multiferroic DyMn{sub 2}O{sub 5} by nonmagnetic Al substitution of Mn

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Z. Y.; Liu, M. F.; Li, X.; Wang, J. X.; Yan, Z. B.; Wang, K. F.; Liu, J.-M.

    2014-08-07

    The multiferroic RMn{sub 2}O{sub 5} family, where R is rare-earth ion or Y, exhibits rich physics of multiferroicity which has not yet well understood. DyMn{sub 2}O{sub 5} is a representative member of this family. The ferroelectric polarization of DyMn{sub 2}O{sub 5} is claimed to be magnetically relevant and have more than one component. Therefore, the polarization reversal upon the sequent magnetic transitions is expected. We investigate the evolution of the ferroelectric polarization upon a partial substitution of Mn{sup 3+} by nonmagnetic Al{sup 3+} in order to tailor the Mn{sup 3+}-Mn{sup 4+} interactions and then to modulate the polarization in DyMn{sub 2−x/2}Al{sub x/2}O{sub 5}. It is revealed that the polarization can be successfully reversed by Al-substitution via substantially suppressing the Mn{sup 3+}-Mn{sup 4+} interactions, while the Dy{sup 3+}-Mn{sup 4+} interactions can sustain against the substitution until a level as high as x = 0.2. In addition, the independent Dy spin ordering is shifted remarkably down to an extremely low temperature due to the Al{sup 3+} substitution. The present work unveils the possibility of tailoring the Mn{sup 3+}-Mn{sup 4+} and Dy{sup 3+}-Mn{sup 4+} interactions independently, and thus reversing the ferroelectric polarization.

  13. Cancellation of cellular responses to nanoelectroporation by reversing the stimulus polarity

    PubMed Central

    Semenov, Iurii; Xiao, Shu; Pakhomova, Olga N.; Gregory, Betsy; Schoenbach, Karl H.; Ullery, Jody C.; Beier, Hope T.; Rajulapati, Sambasiva R.; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2014-01-01

    Nanoelectroporation of biomembranes is an effect of high-voltage, nanosecond-duration electric pulses (nsEP). It occurs both in the plasma membrane and inside the cell, and nanoporated membranes are distinguished by ion-selective and potential-sensitive permeability. Here we report a novel phenomenon of bioeffects cancellation that puts nsEP cardinally apart from the conventional electroporation and electrostimulation by milli- and microsecond pulses. We compared the effects of 60- and 300-ns monopolar, nearly rectangular nsEP on intracellular Ca2+ mobilization and cell survival with those of bipolar 60 + 60 and 300 + 300 ns pulses. For diverse endpoints, exposure conditions, pulse numbers (1–60), and amplitudes (15–60 kV/cm), the addition of the second phase cancelled the effects of the first phase. The overall effect of bipolar pulses was profoundly reduced, despite delivering twofold more energy. Cancellation also took place when two phases were separated into two independent nsEP of opposite polarities; it gradually tapered out as the interval between two nsEP increased, but was still present even at a 10-μs interval. The phenomenon of cancellation is unique for nsEP and has not been predicted by the equivalent circuit, transport lattice, and molecular dynamics models of electroporation. The existing paradigms of membrane permeabilization by nsEP will need to be modified. Here we discuss the possible involvement of the assisted membrane discharge, two-step oxidation of membrane phospholipids, and reverse transmembrane ion transport mechanisms. Cancellation impacts nsEP applications in cancer therapy, electrostimulation, and biotechnology, and provides new insights into effects of more complex waveforms, including pulsed electromagnetic emissions. PMID:24748074

  14. Column selectivity in reversed-phase liquid chromatography. VI. Columns with embedded or end-capping polar groups.

    PubMed

    Wilson, N S; Gilroy, J; Dolan, J W; Snyder, L R

    2004-02-13

    A previous model of column selectivity for reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RP-LC) has been applied to an additional 21 columns with embedded or end-capping polar groups (EPGs). Embedded-polar-group columns exhibit a significantly different selectivity vs. non-EPG, type-B columns, generally showing preferential retention of hydrogen-bond donors, as well as decreased retention for hydrogen-bond acceptors or ionized bases. EPG-columns are also generally less hydrophobic (more polar) than are non-EPG-columns. Interestingly, columns with polar end-capping tend to more closely resemble non-EPG columns, suggesting that the polar group has less effect on column selectivity when used to end-cap the column versus the case of an embedded polar group. Column selectivity data reported here for EPG-columns can be combined with previously reported values for non-EPG columns to provide a database of 154 different columns. This enables a comparison of any two of these columns in terms of selectivity. However, comparisons that involve EPG columns are more approximate.

  15. Preparation of a mixed-mode hydrophilic interaction/anion-exchange polymeric monolithic stationary phase for capillary liquid chromatography of polar analytes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jian; Lin, Jia; Lin, Xucong; Xie, Zenghong

    2009-01-30

    A novel cationic hydrophilic interaction monolithic stationary phase based on the copolymerization of 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyltrimethylammonium methyl sulfate (META) and pentaerythritol triacrylate (PETA) in a binary porogenic solvent consisting of cyclohexanol/ethylene glycol was designed for performing capillary liquid chromatography. While META functioned as both the ion-exchange sites and polar ligand provider, the PETA, a trivinyl monomer, was introduced as cross-linker. The monolithic stationary phases with different properties were easily prepared by adjusting the amount of META in the polymerization solution as well as the composition of the porogenic solvent. The hydrophilicity of the monolith increased with increasing content of META in the polymerization mixture. A typical hydrophilic interaction chromatography mechanism was observed when the content of acetonitrile in the mobile phase was higher than 20%. The poly(META-co-PETA) monolith showed very good selectivity for neutral, basic and acidic polar analytes. For polar-charged analytes, both hydrophilic interaction and electrostatic interaction contributed to their retention. Peak tailing of basic compounds was avoided and the efficient separation of benzoic acid derivatives was obtained.

  16. Electrokinetic capillary chromatography in a polar continuous-phase water-in-oil microemulsion constituted by water, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and n-pentanol.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Carla R B; Bica, Clara I D; Piatnicki, Clarisse M S; Simó-Alfonso, Ernesto F; Ramis-Ramos, Guillermo

    2005-02-01

    A water-in-oil (w/o) microemulsion (ME) constituted by 15% Tris buffer, pH 8.4, in water and 85% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)/n-pentanol 1:4 mixture, capable of dissolving up to 30% vegetable oils and lard, was used as background electrolyte in reverse microemulsion electrokinetic capillary chromatography (RMEEKC). Owing to the free SDS ions in the continuous phase and some degree of percolation, the ME showed a high conductivity (0.65 mS. cm(-1) at 25 degrees C) and sustained a very stable capillary current. Previous rinsing of the capillary with a quaternary ammonium salt for electroosmotic flow (EOF) reduction, a series of nonionic and anionic solutes dissolved either in the ME or in fat samples diluted with the ME (1:4 ratio), were injected. Using -20 kV, fair separations of the solutes in the migration time order singly charged anions < nonionic solutes < doubly charged anions approximately pyromellitate were obtained, salicylate (I) showing by far the shortest migration time, and phthalate (II) and pyromellitate the longest. Separation was attributed to partition between the aqueous droplets, where pyromellitate and II were assumed to be trapped, and the n-pentanol continuous phase, where the mobilitites could be also modified by association of the solutes with SDS ions. Adequate EOF markers were not found, thus the relative mobility of any solute with respect to the mobility of the droplets, mu(r), was expressed as a fraction of the mobility of I with respect to that of the droplets, being mu(r) = (t(II) - t(R)) t(I) / [(t(II) - t(I)) t(R)], where t(R), t(I), and t(II) are the migration times of the solutes I and II, respectively. The application of RMEEKC to the analysis of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic samples, including edible fats, was demonstrated.

  17. Chromatographic selectivity of poly(alkyl methacrylate-co-divinylbenzene) monolithic columns for polar aromatic compounds by pressure-driven capillary liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shu-Ling; Wang, Chih-Chieh; Fuh, Ming-Ren

    2016-10-05

    In this study, divinylbenzene (DVB) was used as the cross-linker to prepare alkyl methacrylate (AlMA) monoliths for incorporating π-π interactions between the aromatic analytes and AlMA-DVB monolithic stationary phases in capillary LC analysis. Various AlMA/DVB ratios were investigated to prepare a series of 30% AlMA-DVB monolithic stationary phases in fused-silica capillaries (250-μm i.d.). The physical properties (such as porosity, permeability, and column efficiency) of the synthesized AlMA-DVB monolithic columns were investigated for characterization. Isocratic elution of phenol derivatives was first employed to evaluate the suitability of the prepared AlMA-DVB columns for small molecule separation. The run-to-run (0.16-1.20%, RSD; n = 3) and column-to-column (0.26-2.95%, RSD; n = 3) repeatabilities on retention times were also examined using the selected AlMA-DVB monolithic columns. The π-π interactions between the aromatic ring and the DVB-based stationary phase offered better recognition on polar analytes with aromatic moieties, which resulted in better separation resolution of aromatic analytes on the AlMA-DVB monolithic columns. In order to demonstrate the capability of potential environmental and/or food safety applications, eight phenylurea herbicides with single benzene ring and seven sulfonamide antibiotics with polyaromatic moieties were analyzed using the selected AlMA-DVB monolithic columns.

  18. Preparation and evaluation of poly(alkyl methacrylate-co-methacrylic acid-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolithic columns for separating polar small molecules by capillary liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shu-Ling; Wu, Yu-Ru; Lin, Tzuen-Yeuan; Fuh, Ming-Ren

    2015-04-29

    In this study, methacrylic acid (MAA) was incorporated with alkyl methacrylates to increase the hydrophilicity of the synthesized ethylene dimethacrylate-based (EDMA-based) monoliths for separating polar small molecules by capillary LC analysis. Different alkyl methacrylate-MAA ratios were investigated to prepare a series of 30% alkyl methacrylate-MAA-EDMA monoliths in fused-silica capillaries (250-μm i.d.). The porosity, permeability, and column efficiency of the synthesized MAA-incorporated monolithic columns were characterized. A mixture of phenol derivatives is employed to evaluate the applicability of using the prepared monolithic columns for separating small molecules. Fast separation of six phenol derivatives was achieved in 5 min with gradient elution using the selected poly(lauryl methacrylate-co-MAA-co-EDMA) monolithic column. In addition, the effect of acetonitrile content in mobile phase on retention factor and plate height as well as the plate height-flow velocity curves were also investigated to further examine the performance of the selected poly(lauryl methacrylate-co-MAA-co-EDMA) monolithic column. Moreover, the applicability of prepared polymer-based monolithic column for potential food safety applications was also demonstrated by analyzing five aflatoxins and three phenicol antibiotics using the selected poly(lauryl methacrylate-co-MAA-co-EDMA) monolithic column.

  19. The effect of contrast polarity reversal on face detection: evidence of perceptual asymmetry from sweep VEP.

    PubMed

    Liu-Shuang, Joan; Ales, Justin M; Rossion, Bruno; Norcia, Anthony M

    2015-03-01

    Contrast polarity inversion (i.e., turning dark regions light and vice versa) impairs face perception. We investigated the perceptual asymmetry between positive and negative polarity faces (matched for overall luminance) using a sweep VEP approach in the context of face detection (Journal of Vision 12 (2012) 1-18). Phase-scrambled face stimuli alternated at a rate of 3 Hz (6 images/s). The phase coherence of every other stimulus was parametrically increased so that a face gradually emerged over a 20-s stimulation sequence, leading to a 3 Hz response reflecting face detection. Contrary to the 6 Hz response, reflecting low-level visual processing, this 3 Hz response was larger and emerged earlier over right occipito-temporal channels for positive than negative polarity faces. Moreover, the 3 Hz response emerged abruptly to positive polarity faces, whereas it increased linearly for negative polarity faces. In another condition, alternating between a positive and a negative polarity face also elicited a strong 3 Hz response, indicating an asymmetrical representation of positive and negative polarity faces even at supra-threshold levels (i.e., when both stimuli were perceived as faces). Overall, these findings demonstrate distinct perceptual representations of positive and negative polarity faces, independently of low-level cues, and suggest qualitatively different detection processes (template-based matching for positive polarity faces vs. linear accumulation of evidence for negative polarity faces).

  20. Stability-indicating capillary zone electrophoresis method for the assessment of recombinant human interleukin-11 and its correlation with reversed-phase liquid chromatography and biossay.

    PubMed

    Souto, Ricardo Bizogne; Stamm, Fernanda Pavani; Schumacher, Jéssica Barbieri; Cardoso, Clovis Dervil Appratto; de Freitas, Guilherme Weber; Perobelli, Rafaela Ferreira; Dalmora, Sérgio Luiz

    2014-06-01

    A stability-indicating capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) method was validated for the analysis of recombinant human interleukin-11(rhIL-11) using rupatadine fumarate, as internal standard (IS). A fused-silica capillary, (50 µm i.d.; effective length, 40 cm) was used at 25°C; the applied voltage was 20 kV. The background electrolyte solution consisted of 50 mmol L(-1) sodium dihydrogen phosphate solution at pH 3.0. Injections were performed using a pressure mode at 50 mbar for 45 s, with detection by photodiode array detector set at 196 nm. Specificity and stability-indicating capability were established in degradation studies, which also showed that there was no interference of the excipients. The method was linear over the concentration range of 1.0-300 µg mL(-1) (r(2)=0.9992) and the limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantitation (LOQ) were 0.2 µg mL(-1) and 1.0 µg mL(-1), respectively. The accuracy was 100.4% with bias lower than 1.1%. Moreover, the in vitro cytotoxicity test of the degraded products showed significant differences (p<0.05). The method was applied for the content/potency assessment of rhIL-11 in biopharmaceutical formulations, and the results were correlated to those of a validated reversed-phase LC method (RP-LC) and an TF-1 cell culture assay, showing non-significant differences (p>0.05). In addition the CZE and RP-LC methods were applied for the analysis of rhIL-11 in human plasma. Therefore, the proposed alternative method can be applied to monitor stability, to assure the batch-to-batch consistency and quality of the bulk and finished biotechnology-derived medicine.

  1. Capillary sample

    MedlinePlus

    ... repeat the test with blood drawn from a vein. Alternative Names Blood sample - capillary; Fingerstick; Heelstick Images Phenylketonuria test Phenylketonuria test Capillary sample References Garza ...

  2. Reversals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Educational Media and Materials for the Handicapped, Columbus, OH.

    Selected from the National Instructional Materials Information System (NIMIS)--a computer based on-line interactive retrieval system on special education materials--the bibliography covers nine materials for remediating reversals in handicapped students at the early childhood and elementary levels. Entries are presented in order of NIMIS accession…

  3. Polarity reversal of the optical rotation signals with change in direction of impulse conduction along the lobster nerve.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, A

    1993-01-01

    1. The optical rotation signal of nerve associated with excitation was recorded from peripheral nerve taken from a walking leg of a spiny lobster and its properties were analysed. 2. The polarity of the optical rotation signal was reversed when the site of stimulation was changed with reference to the site of optical recording, so that the direction of impulse conduction was reversed, in most of the preparations. 3. Apart from the main response, which is associated with the conducted impulse, a pre-response was found to exist, which manifested itself on anodic stimulation, in a tetrodotoxin-treated nerve, or during the refractory period of the nerve, when the site of stimulation was close to the site of optical recording. The polarity of the pre-response was also reversed when the site of stimulation was changed with reference to the site of optical recording. 4. When the nerve was inclined from the horizontal level, so that the angle of incidence of light to the nerve was changed, the main response changed its amplitude and sometimes its polarity, whereas the pre-response remained practically unchanged. Thus the dependence on the angle of incidence was different between the pre-response and the main response. 5. It is suggested that the dependence of amplitude and polarity of the main response on the angle of incidence of light cannot be explained by the change in molecular axes of the membrane macromolecules, but can only be explained by their conformational change; and therefore the main response can be used as a monitor for the molecular conformation. PMID:8410706

  4. Simultaneous determination of nanomolar nitrite and nitrate in seawater using reverse flow injection analysis coupled with a long path length liquid waveguide capillary cell.

    PubMed

    Feng, Sichao; Zhang, Min; Huang, Yongming; Yuan, Dongxing; Zhu, Yong

    2013-12-15

    A reverse flow injection analysis (rFIA) method coupled with 1m liquid waveguide capillary cell and spectrophotometric detection for simultaneous determination of nanomolar nitrite and nitrate in seawater was developed. The design of two analytical channels sharing the same detection system in the proposed method allowed the analysis of both nitrite and nitrate with single sample injection. Different strategies of reagent injection were investigated to obtain a higher sensitivity and a better peak shape. A dual-wavelength detection mode was chosen to eliminate the light source shifting and sample matrix interference. Experimental parameters were optimized based on a univariate experimental design and the matrix effect from seawater was preliminarily investigated. The proposed method had high sensitivity with detection limit of 0.6 nmol L(-1) for both nitrite and nitrate. The linearity was 2-500 nmol L(-1) for both analytes, and the upper limit could be extended by choosing a lower sensitivity detection wavelength. The analytical results of 26 surface seawater samples obtained with the proposed method showed good agreement with those using a reference method operated using an automated segmented flow analyzer. The proposed method could greatly minimize the trouble introduced by bubbles in the segmented flow analyzer. It also had the advantages of high precision and high sample throughput (nitrite and nitrate detected in triplicate; 5 h(-1)). Compared to normal flow injection analysis, the rFIA method is superior due to its lower reagent consumption, less dispersion of sample, as well as higher sensitivity.

  5. Prediction of retention in reversed-phase liquid chromatography by means of the polarity parameter model.

    PubMed

    Lázaro, Elisabet; Izquierdo, Pere; Ràfols, Clara; Rosés, Martí; Bosch, Elisabeth

    2009-07-03

    The polarity parameter model previously developed: log k=(log k)(0) + p(P(m)(N) - P(s)(N)) has been successfully applied to study several chromatographic systems involving new generation RPLC columns (Luna C18, Resolve C18, XTerra MSC18, and XTerra RP18). In this model the retention of the solutes (log k) is related to a solute parameter (p), a mobile phase parameter (P(m)(N)) and two chromatographic system parameters [P(s)(N) and (log k)(0)]. The studied systems have been characterized with different acetonitrile-water and methanol-water mobile phases, using a set of 12 neutral solutes of different chemical nature. The polarity parameter model allows prediction of retention of any solute in any mobile phase composition just using the retention data obtained in one percentage of organic modifier and the polarity parameters established in the characterization of the chromatographic systems. This model also allows the solute polarity data transference between RPLC characterized systems, so it is possible to predict the retention in various RPLC systems working experimentally with just one of them. Moreover, the global solvation parameter model has also been applied to the same chromatographic systems using a wide set of solutes in order to compare its predictive ability with the one of the polarity parameter model. The results clearly show that both models predict retention with very similar accuracy but the polarity parameter model requires much less preliminary experimental measurements to achieve equivalent results than the global solvation approach.

  6. Reversed polarized emission in highly strained a -plane GaN/AlN multiple quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mata, R.; Cros, A.; Budagosky, J. A.; Molina-Sánchez, A.; Garro, N.; García-Cristóbal, A.; Renard, J.; Founta, S.; Gayral, B.; Bellet-Amalric, E.; Bougerol, C.; Daudin, B.

    2010-09-01

    The polarization of the emission from a set of highly strained a -plane GaN/AlN multiple quantum wells of varying well widths has been studied. A single photoluminescence peak is observed that shifts to higher energies as the quantum well thickness decreases due to quantum confinement. The emitted light is linearly polarized. For the thinnest samples the preferential polarization direction is perpendicular to the wurtzite c axis with a degree of polarization that decreases with increasing well width. However, for the thickest well the preferred polarization direction is parallel to the c axis. Raman scattering, x-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy studies have been performed to determine the three components of the strain tensor in the active region. Moreover, the experimental results have been compared with the strain values computed by means of a model based on the elastic continuum theory. A high anisotropic compressive in-plane strain has been found, namely, -0.6% and -2.8% along the in-plane directions [11¯00] and [0001], respectively, for the thickest quantum well. The oscillator strength of the lowest optical transition has been calculated within the framework of a multiband envelope function model for various quantum well widths and strain values. The influence of confinement and strain on the degree of polarization is discussed and compared with experiment considering various sets of material parameters.

  7. First Detection of Sign-reversed Linear Polarization from the Forbidden [O I] 630.03 nm Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Wijn, A. G.; Socas-Navarro, H.; Vitas, N.

    2017-02-01

    We report on the detection of linear polarization of the forbidden [O i] 630.03 nm spectral line. The observations were carried out in the broader context of the determination of the solar oxygen abundance, an important problem in astrophysics that still remains unresolved. We obtained spectro-polarimetric data of the forbidden [O i] line at 630.03 nm as well as other neighboring permitted lines with the Solar Optical Telescope of the Hinode satellite. A novel averaging technique was used, yielding very high signal-to-noise ratios in excess of 105. We confirm that the linear polarization is sign-reversed compared to permitted lines as a result of the line being dominated by a magnetic dipole transition. Our observations open a new window for solar oxygen abundance studies, offering an alternative method to disentangle the Ni i blend from the [O i] line at 630.03 nm that has the advantage of simple LTE formation physics.

  8. First permanent human implant of the Stimulus Router System, a novel neuroprosthesis: preliminary testing of a polarity reversing stimulation technique.

    PubMed

    Gan, Liu Shi; Ravid, Einat N; Kowalczewski, Jan; Gauthier, Michel; Olson, Jaret; Morhart, Michael; Prochazka, Arthur

    2011-01-01

    Neuroprostheses (NPs) are electrical stimulators that help to restore sensory or motor functions lost as a result of neural damage. The Stimulus Router System (SRS) is a new type of NP developed in our laboratory. The system uses fully implanted, passive leads to "capture" and "route" some of the current flowing between pairs of surface electrodes to the vicinity of the target nerves, hence eliminating the need for an implanted stimulator. In June 2008, 3 SRS leads were implanted in a tetraplegic man for restoration of grasp and release. To reduce the size of the external wristlet and thereby optimize usability, we recently implemented a polarity reversing stimulation technique that allowed us to eliminate a reference electrode. Selective activation of three target muscles was achieved by switching the polarities of the stimulus current delivered between pairs of surface electrodes located over the pick-up terminals of the implanted leads and reducing the amplitude of the secondary phases of the stimulus pulses.

  9. DAPNe with micro-capillary separatory chemistry-coupled to MALDI-MS for the analysis of polar and non-polar lipid metabolism in one cell.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Jason S; Aguilar, Roberto; Petros, Robby A; Verbeck, Guido F

    2017-03-01

    The cellular metabolome is considered to be a representation of cellular phenotype and cellular response to changes to internal or external events. Methods to expand the coverage of the expansive physiochemical properties that makeup the metabolome currently utilize multi-step extractions and chromatographic separations prior to chemical detection, leading to lengthy analysis times. In this study, a single-step procedure for the extraction and separation of a sample using a micro-capillary as a separatory funnel to achieve analyte partitioning within an organic/aqueous immiscible solvent system is described. The separated analytes are then spotted for MALDI-MS imaging and distribution ratios are calculated. Initially, the method is applied to standard mixtures for proof of partitioning. The extraction of an individual cell is non-reproducible; therefore, a broad chemical analysis of metabolites is necessary and will be illustrated with the one-cell analysis of a single Snu-5 gastric cancer cell taken from a cellular suspension. The method presented here shows a broad partitioning dynamic range as a single-step method for lipid analysis demonstrating a decrease in ion suppression often present in MALDI analysis of lipids. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  10. Low magnetic field reversal of electric polarization in a Y-type hexaferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fen; Zou, Tao; Yan, Li-Qin; Liu, Yi; Sun, Young

    2012-03-01

    We report on the magnetically tunable ferroelectricity and giant magnetoelectric sensitivity up to 250 K in a Y-type hexaferrite, BaSrCoZnFe11AlO22. Not only the magnitude but also the sign of electric polarization can be effectively controlled by applying low magnetic fields (a few hundreds of Oe) that modifies the spiral magnetic structures. The magnetically induced ferroelectricity is stabilized even in zero magnetic field. Decayless reproducible flipping of electric polarization by oscillating low magnetic fields is shown. The maximum linear magnetoelectric coefficient reaches a high value of ˜3.0 × 103 ps/m at 200 K.

  11. Obtaining high degree of circular polarization at x-ray free electron lasers via a reverse undulator taper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneidmiller, E. A.; Yurkov, M. V.

    2013-11-01

    Baseline design of a typical x-ray free electron laser (FEL) undulator assumes a planar configuration which results in a linear polarization of the FEL radiation. However, many experiments at x-ray FEL user facilities would profit from using a circularly polarized radiation. As a cheap upgrade, one can consider an installation of a short helical (or cross-planar) afterburner, but then one should have an efficient method to suppress the powerful linearly polarized background from the main undulator. In this paper we propose a new method for such a suppression: an application of the reverse taper in the main undulator. We discover that in a certain range of the taper strength, the density modulation (bunching) at saturation is practically the same as in the case of a nontapered undulator while the power of linearly polarized radiation is suppressed by orders of magnitude. Then strongly modulated electron beam radiates at full power in the afterburner. Considering the SASE3 undulator of the European XFEL as a practical example, we demonstrate that soft x-ray radiation pulses with peak power in excess of 100 GW and an ultimately high degree of circular polarization can be produced. The proposed method is rather universal, i.e., it can be used at SASE FELs and seeded (self-seeded) FELs, with any wavelength of interest, in a wide range of electron beam parameters, and with any repetition rate. It can be used at different x-ray FEL facilities, in particular at Linac Coherent Light Source after installation of the helical afterburner in the near future.

  12. Polarity Reversal in Homologous Series of Surfactant-Free Janus Nanoparticles: Toward the Next Generation of Amphiphiles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dalin; Chew, Jia Wei; Honciuc, Andrei

    2016-06-28

    The ability to finely tune the amphiphilic balance of Janus nanoparticles (JNPs) could represent a step forward toward creating the next generation of solid-state amphiphiles with significant potential for applications. The inherent amphiphilicity of JNPs stemming from an intrinsic polarity contrast between two surface regions is well-acknowledged, but remained difficult to demonstrate experimentally in the absence of surfactants and stabilizers. We have designed two homologous series of surfactant-free polymeric JNPs starting from polystyrene (PS) seed nanoparticles (NPs) on which we grew Janus lobes of different sizes via seed polymerization and phase separation of the 3-(triethoxysilyl)propyl-methacrylate (3-TSPM) monomer. The two series differ only by the radical initiator used in the seed polymerization: polar ionic ammonium persulfate (APS) vs nonpolar oil-soluble 2,2'-azobis(2-methylpropionitrile) (AIBN). To compare the two series, we employed them in the emulsification of water with heptane or molten paraffin wax. A polarity reversal of the JNPs within AIBN-JNP series could be observed from the catastrophic and transitional emulsion phase inversions and occurred when the more polar lobe was larger than the nonpolar seed PS lobe. Furthermore, the AIBN-JNPs appeared to be amphiphilic and adopt preferred orientation within the monolayer at the oil/water interface. We therefore demonstrated that in the absence of surfactants the amphiphilicity of the JNPs depends not only on the relative size of the lobes, but also on the surface polarity contrast, which can be tuned by changing the nature of radical initiator.

  13. Unveiling characteristics of a bioelectrochemical system with polarity reversion for simultaneous azo dye treatment and bioelectricity generation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jian; Zhang, Yaping; Liu, Guoguang; Ning, Xunan; Wang, Yujie; Liu, Jingyong

    2015-09-01

    A novel bioelectrochemical system (BES) operated with polarity reversion was explored for simultaneous anaerobic/aerobic treatment of azo dye and production of bioelectricity under extremely low buffer. The Congo red was first decolorized in anode, with completed color removal in 35 h. The resultant decolorization intermediates were then mineralized after the anode reversed to aerobic biocathode, evidenced by 55 % chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal in 200 h. The mineralization efficiency was further increased to 70 % when the period of the half-cycle was prolonged to 375 h. Meanwhile, the BES produced a continuous stable positive/negative alternate voltage output under 5 mM phosphate buffer because of the self-neutralization of the accumulated protons and hydroxyl ions in electrolyte. The electrode performance was significantly improved, which was indicated by alleviated electrode polarization, due to in situ use of accumulated protons and hydroxyl ions and enhanced electron transfer in the presence of Congo red and its degradation intermediates, which resulted in 1.05-fold increases in maximum power density (67.5 vs. 32.9 mW/m(2)). An analysis of the microbial diversity in the biofilm revealed that the biofilm was dominated by facultative bacteria with functional roles in contaminant degradation and electricity generation.

  14. A critical note on the IAGA-endorsed Polar Cap index procedure: effects of solar wind sector structure and reverse polar convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauning, P.

    2015-11-01

    The International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) has recently endorsed a new Polar Cap (PC) index version to supersede the previous seven different versions of the PCN (North) index and the five different PCS (South) index versions. However, the new PC index has some adverse features which should be known and taken into account by users of the index. It uses in its derivation procedure an "effective" quiet day level (QDC) composed of a "basic" QDC and an added solar wind sector term related to the azimuthal component (By) of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The added IMF By-related terms may introduce unjustified contributions to the PC index of more than 2 index units (mV m-1). Furthermore, cases of reverse convection during strong northward IMF Bz (NBZ) conditions included in the database for calculation of index coefficients can cause unjustified index enhancements of 0.5-1 mV m-1 during calm conditions, reduction of index values by more than 20 % during disturbed conditions, and inconsistencies between index coefficients and index values for the northern and southern polar caps. The aim here is to specify these adverse features and quantify their effects, and to suggest alternative steps for future modifications of the index procedure.

  15. The zonal harmonic model of polarity transitions: A test using successive reversals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theyer, F.; Herrero-Bervera, E.; Hsu, V.; Hammond, S. R.

    1985-02-01

    A recently developed zonal model for the last geomagnetic field reversal, which describes time- and latitude-dependent transitional behavior of intensity and inclination in terms of dominance of low-order field harmonics, was tested using a latitudinal and chronological succession of transition records. The primary data were derived from a high-resolution study of five Matuyama to Brunhes deep-sea cores collected along a 40° meridional band in the north-central Pacific. The transitions analyzed were the onsets and terminations of the Olduvai and Jaramaillo events and the Matuyama-Brunhes boundary. Supplementary data, published by previous workers, included a Jaramillo onset record from the southern Indian Ocean and a transition recorded in the Triassic Chugwater Formation of North America. In a general sense, the measured inclination and intensity records indicate the Jaramillo transitions and the last reversal to be remarkably similar to each other and to differ from the Olduvais. Crosscorrelation of the measured data sets with synthetic zonal harmonic records for the core latitudes indicates that the zonal harmonic model does predict the behavior of Matuyama-Brunhes reversal in the northern hemisphere. For the older reversals, however, the present model requires substantial modification. This is particularly so in the case of the Jaramillo onset: although two inclination and intensity records of this transition from northern and southern hemisphere sediments strongly resemble each other, the current model produces a synthetic record for one hemisphere that is incompatible with that hemisphere's measured data. Further, to model zonally the Olduvai reversals (for which a wide latitudinal northern hemisphere sampling was available), a substantially different ratio of low-order multipole components from that of the standard model is required, and the modeled solution was unsatisfactory at very low latitude. A modified zonal harmonic approach, which introduces a

  16. On the characterization of NaDEHP/n-heptane nonaqueous reverse micelles: the effect of the polar solvent.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Silvina S; Dario Falcone, R; Silber, Juana J; Moyano, Fernando; Mariano Correa, N

    2015-03-14

    The behavior of two polar solvents, ethylene glycol (EG) and dimethylformamide (DMF), entrapped in sodium bis-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate (NaDEHP)/n-heptane reverse micelles (RMs) was investigated using dynamic light scattering (DLS), molecular probe absorption and FT-IR spectroscopy. DLS results reveal the formation of RMs containing EG and DMF as a polar component. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report where both polar solvents are entrapped by the NaDEHP surfactant to effectively create RMs. We use the solvatochromism behavior of the molecular probe, 1-methyl-8-oxyquinolinum betaine (QB), and FT-IR spectroscopy to investigate the physicochemical properties of the non-aqueous RMs. Our results demonstrate that the NaDEHP surfactant interacts through hydrogen bonds with EG at the EG/NaDEHP interface and this interaction is responsible for destroying the bulk structure of pure solvent EG when entrapped in NaDEHP RMs. On the other hand, when DMF is incorporated inside the RMs the bulk structure of DMF is destroyed upon encapsulation by the Na-DMF interaction at the DMF/NaDEHP interface. Our results are completely different than the one observed for DMF/n-heptane/AOT. Our results show how the physicochemical properties, such as micropolarity, microviscosity and hydrogen bond interaction, of nonaqueous NaDEHP/n-heptane RMs interfaces can be dramatically changed by simply using different non-aqueous polar solvents. Thus, these results can be very useful to employ these novel RMs as nanoreactors since the dimensions of the RMs are around 10 to 20 nm.

  17. Loess 10Be evidence for an asynchronous Brunhes-Matuyama magnetic polarity reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, W.; Beck, W.; Kong, X.; An, Z.; Qiang, X.; Wu, Z.; Xian, F.; Ao, H.

    2015-12-01

    In Chinese loess the Brunhes-Matuyama (B-M) geomagnetic reversal appears to occur about 25 ka prior to the established axial dipole reversal age found in many marine sediments, i.e., in Chinese loess this magnetic reversal boundary is found in glacial loess unit L8 which is thought to be correlated with Marine Isotope Stage 20 (MIS 20), in marine sediment records, however, this boundary is commonly found in interglacial period of MIS 19[1-2], leading to the debate on uncertainties of paleoclimatic correlation between the Chinese loess-paleosol sequences and marine sediments[3-5]. Based on this issue, here we propose to use the cosmogenic 10Be to address this conundrum. 10Be is a long-lived radionuclide produced in the atmosphere by cosmic ray spallation reactions and carried to the ground attached to aerosols. Its atmospheric production rate is inversely proportional to the geomagnetic field intensity [6]. This allows us to reconstruct past geomagnetic field intensity variations using 10Be concentrations recorded in different sedimentary archives. We carried out both the 10Be studies and paleogeomagnetic measurements in Luochuan and Xifeng sections in Chinese Loess Plateau. Both loess profiles show that 10Be production rate was at a maximum-an indication of the dipole field reversal-at ca. 780 ± 3 ka BP., in paleosol unit S7 corresponding to MIS 19, proving that the timing of B-M reversal recorded in Chinese loess is synchronous with that seen in marine records [1]. These results reaffirmed the conventional paleoclimatic correlation of loess-paleosol sequences with marine isotope stages and the standard loess timescale as correct. However, it is ~25 ka younger than the age (depth) of the paleogeomagnetic measurements, which show that the B-M boundary is in L8 in these two Chinese loess-paleosol sequences, demonstrating that loess magnetic overprinting has occurred. 1.Tauxe, L., et al., 1996, EARTH PLANET SC LETT, 140, 133-1462.Zhou, L.P., and Shackleton, 1999

  18. Simultaneous Determination of Essential Oil Components and Fatty Acids in Fennel using Gas Chromatography with a Polar Capillary Column.

    PubMed

    Najdoska-Bogdanov, Menče; Bogdanov, Jane B; Stefova, Marina

    2015-09-01

    Cultivated and wild growing samples of fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill., Apiaceae) from R. Macedonia were studied for their volatiles and fatty acid composition. The main essential oil components isolated via hydrodistillation were: trans-anethole (>80%), estragole (< 6%), limonene (< 6%), anisaldehyde (< 1%) and 0.5 % fenchone. An alternative method for characterization of both the non-polar volatile and non volatile fractions was developed using n-hexane and dichloromethane (3:1, v/v) in a Soxhlet extraction followed by transesterification. The obtained extracts were then characterized and the dominant fatty acid was 18:1 (petroselinic and oleic acid) 75.0-82.8%, followed by 18:2 (linoleic acid) 10.8-16.2% and other fatty acids: palmitic (4.3-6.9%), stearic (1.2-1.7%) and myristic (0-2.9%). The results for the volatile fraction after Soxhlet extraction and transesterification did not significantly differ from results obtained after hydrodistillation, especially for the main components (trans-anethole, estragole, fenchone and limonene), implying that the developed method can be used for simultaneous determination of volatiles and fatty acids.

  19. Reversal of cell polarity and actin-myosin cytoskeleton reorganization under mechanical and chemical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Dalous, Jérémie; Burghardt, Emmanuel; Müller-Taubenberger, Annette; Bruckert, Franz; Gerisch, Günther; Bretschneider, Till

    2008-02-01

    To study reorganization of the actin system in cells that invert their polarity, we stimulated Dictyostelium cells by mechanical forces from alternating directions. The cells oriented in a fluid flow by establishing a protruding front directed against the flow and a retracting tail. Labels for polymerized actin and filamentous myosin-II marked front and tail. At 2.1 Pa, actin first disassembled at the previous front before it began to polymerize at the newly induced front. In contrast, myosin-II slowly disappeared from the previous tail and continuously redistributed to the new tail. Front specification was myosin-II independent and accumulation of polymerized actin was even more focused in mutants lacking myosin-II heavy chains. We conclude that under mechanical stimulation, the inversion of cell polarity is initiated by a global internal signal that turns down actin polymerization in the entire cell. It is thought to be elicited at the most strongly stimulated site of the cell, the incipient front region, and to be counterbalanced by a slowly generated, short-range signal that locally activates actin polymerization at the front. Similar pattern of front and tail interconversion were observed in cells reorienting in strong gradients of the chemoattractant cyclic AMP.

  20. A study of the possible relation of the cardiac arrhythmias occurrence to the polarity reversal of the solar magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavromichalaki, H.; Preka-Papadema, P.; Theodoropoulou, A.; Paouris, E.; Apostolou, Th.

    2017-01-01

    The biological human system is probably affected by the solar and geomagnetic disturbances as well as the cosmic ray variations. In this work, the relation between the solar activity and cosmic ray variations and the cardiac arrhythmias over the time period 1997-2009 covering the solar cycle 23, is studied. The used medical data set refers to 4741 patients with cardiac arrhythmias and 2548 of whom were diagnosed with atrial fibrillation, obtained from the 2nd Cardiological Clinic of the General Hospital of Nicaea, Piraeus, in Greece. The smoothing method on a 365-day basis and the Pearson r-coefficient were used in order to compare these records with the number of sunspots, flares, solar proton events, coronal mass ejections and cosmic ray intensity. Applying a moving correlation function to ±1500 days, it is suggested that a change of the correlation sign between the medical data and each one of the above parameters occurs during a time interval of about 2-3 years. This interval corresponds to the time span of the polarity reversal of the solar magnetic field of this solar cycle, which always takes place around the solar cycle maximum. After then a correlation analysis was carried out corresponding to the rise (1997-2001) and the decay (2002-2009) phases of the solar cycle 23. It is noticeable that the polarity reversal of the solar magnetic field coincides with the period where the sign of the correlation between the incidence of arrhythmias and the occurrence number of the solar eruptive events and the cosmic ray intensity, changes sign. The results are comparable with those obtained from the previous solar cycle 22 based on medical data from another country.

  1. Possible influence of the polarity reversal of the solar magnetic field on the various types of arrhythmias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannaropoulou, E.; Papailiou, M.; Mavromichalaki, H.; Gigolashvili, M.; Tvildiani, L.; Janashia, K.; Preka-Papadema, P.; Papadima, Th

    2013-02-01

    Over the last few years various researches have reached the conclusion that cosmic ray variations and geomagnetic disturbances are related to the condition of the human physiological state. In this study medical data concerning the number of incidents of different types of cardiac arrhythmias for the time period 1983 - 1992 which refer to 1902 patients in Tbilisi, Georgia were used. The smoothing method and the Pearson r-coefficients were used to examine the possible effect of different solar and geomagnetic activity parameters and cosmic ray intensity variations on the different types of arrhythmias. The time interval under examination was separated into two different time periods which coincided with the polarity reversal of the solar magnetic field that occurred in the years 1989-1990 and as a result a different behavior of all the above mentioned parameters as well as of the different types of arrhythmias was noticed during the two time intervals. In addition, changing of polarity sign of the solar magnetic field was found to affect the sign of correlation between the incidence of arrhythmias and the aforementioned parameters. The primary and secondary maxima observed in the solar parameters during the solar cycle 22, also appeared in several types of arrhythmias with a time lag of about five months.

  2. Effect of electric field on the performance of soil electro-bioremediation with a periodic polarity reversal strategy.

    PubMed

    Mena, E; Villaseñor, J; Cañizares, P; Rodrigo, M A

    2016-03-01

    In this work, it is studied the effect of the electric fields (within the range 0.0-1.5 V cm(-1)) on the performance of electrobioremediation with polarity reversal, using a bench scale plant with diesel-spiked kaolinite with 14-d long tests. Results obtained show that the periodic changes in the polarity of the electric field results in a more efficient treatment as compared with the single electro-bioremediation process, and it does not require the addition of a buffer to keep the pH within a suitable range. The soil heating was not very important and it did not cause a change in the temperature of the soil up to values incompatible with the life of microorganisms. Low values of water transported by the electro-osmosis process were attained with this strategy. After only 14 d of treatment, by using the highest electric field studied in this work (1.5 V cm(-1)), up to 35.40% of the diesel added at the beginning of the test was removed, value much higher than the 10.5% obtained by the single bioremediation technology in the same period.

  3. Reversed cellular polarity in primary cutaneous mucinous carcinoma: A study on tight junction protein expression in sweat gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Yusuke; Ishida-Yamamoto, Akemi

    2017-04-01

    Primary cutaneous mucinous carcinoma (PCMC) is a rare sweat gland tumor characterized by the presence of abundant mucin around the tumor islands, but the molecular mechanisms for this structure are not well elucidated. Because mucin is epithelial in nature, it is likely to be produced by epithelial tumor cells, not by surrounding stromal cells. We hypothesized that the abundant mucin is a result of reversed cellular polarity of the tumor. To test this hypothesis, we conducted an immunohistological study to investigate expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins occludin and ZO-1 in PCMC, as well as in normal sweat glands and other sweat gland tumors. Dot-like or linear expression of TJ proteins was observed at ductal structures of sweat glands, and ductal or cystic structures of related tumors. In PCMC, however, TJ protein expression was clearly visible at the edges of tumor cell islands. This study provides evidence to show that the characteristic histological structure of PCMC is caused by inverse polarization of the tumor cells, and that TJ proteins are useful markers of ductal differentiation in sweat gland tumors.

  4. Observations of reverse polarity flux transfer events at the earth's dayside magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rijnbeek, R. P.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Southwood, D. J.; Russell, C. T.

    1982-01-01

    High resolution plasma and magnetic field measurements made by the ISEE 1 and 2 spacecraft have provided the first definitive observations of magnetic reconnection at the dayside boundary, occurring either as a large-scale, quasisteady process enduring on time scales of at least tens of minutes or as a transient process localized in both temporal and spatial extent. Observations of flux transfer events (FTEs) at the earth's dayside magnetopause are presented which have plasma and magnetic field signatures reversed in sign from those previously reported. These FTEs are interpreted in terms of localized and transitory reconnection with the spacecraft located south of the reconnection site. They are associated with a previously reported interval of quasisteady reconnection which is similarly located, indicating that a close physical connection exists between the two processes.

  5. Microchip capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence combined with one-step duplex reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction for the rapid detection of Enterovirus 71 and Coxsackievirus A16 in throat swab specimens.

    PubMed

    Jia, Ruan; Chengjun, Sun; Heng, Chen; Chen, Zhou; Yuanqian, Li; Yongxin, Li

    2015-07-01

    Enterovirus 71 and Coxsackievirus A16 are the main pathogens causing hand-foot-mouth disease. In this paper, microchip capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence combined with one-step duplex reverse transcript-polymerase chain reaction has been developed for the detection of Enterovirus 71 and Coxsackievirus A16 in throat swab specimens. The specific reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction amplicons labeled with SYBR Orange were separated by microchip capillary electrophoresis and detected by laser induced fluorescence detector within 7 min. The intraday and interday relative standard deviation of migration time for DNA Marker was in the range of 1.36-2.94 and 2.78-3.96%, respectively. The detection limits were as low as 2.06 × 10(3) copies/mL for Enterovirus 71 and 5 × 10(3) copies/mL for Coxsackievirus A16. No cross-reactivity was observed with rotavirus, astrovirus, norovirus, and adenovirus, which showed good specificity of the method. This assay was validated using 100 throat swab specimens that were detected by real-time reverse-transcript polymerase chain reaction in parallel and the two methods produced the same results. This study provided a rapid, sensitive and specific method for the detection of Enterovirus 71 and Coxsackievirus A16, which make a contribution to significant time and cost saving for the identification and treatment of patients.

  6. Delta Reverse Polarity Shoulder Replacement: Single Surgeon Experience with a Minimum 2-Year Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Eltayeb, Magid; Javaid, Mohammad Muddassir Mahmood

    2015-01-01

    Background The delta reverse shoulder replacement system was developed for the treatment of rotator cuff arthropathy so that the deltoid can substitute for the deficient rotator cuff. To evaluate the results of delta reverse shoulder replacement for functional improvement and complications in a consecutive series by a single surgeon over a period of six years with a minimum follow-up of 2 years. Methods The data were collected retrospectively from electronic theatre records. Over a period of 6 years (2006-2012), 46 cases that fulfilled the inclusion criteria were identified. There were 34 females and 12 males. The average age of patients was 76.2 years (range, 58 to 87 years). A single surgeon performed all procedures using the anterosuperior approach. The mean follow-up time was 49 months (range, 24 to 91 months). All cases had preoperative and postoperative Constant scores. We collected the data on indications, hospital stay, and change in the Constant score, complications, and reoperation rates. Results The main indication for surgery was rotator cuff arthropathy (52.2%), followed by massive rotator cuff tear (28.3%), osteoarthritis (8.7%), fractures (6.5%), and rheumatoid arthritis (4.3%). Also, 65.2% of the cases were referred by general practitioners, 26% of the cases were referred by other consultants, and 8.8% of the cases were already under the care of a shoulder surgeon. The average preoperative Constant score was 23.5 (range, 8 to 59). The average Constant score at the final follow-up was 56 (range, 22 to 83). On average, there was an improvement of 33 points in the Constant score. The improvement in the Constant score was significant (p < 0.001). We observed complications in four patients (8.6%). Three of four patients (6.5%) needed reoperation. The first complication was pulmonary embolism in the early postoperative period. The other complications included dissociation of the glenosphere from the metaglene, deltoid detachment, and stitch abscess

  7. Active upper-atmosphere chemistry and dynamics from polar circulation reversal on Titan.

    PubMed

    Teanby, Nicholas A; Irwin, Patrick G J; Nixon, Conor A; de Kok, Remco; Vinatier, Sandrine; Coustenis, Athena; Sefton-Nash, Elliot; Calcutt, Simon B; Flasar, F Michael

    2012-11-29

    Saturn's moon Titan has a nitrogen atmosphere comparable to Earth's, with a surface pressure of 1.4 bar. Numerical models reproduce the tropospheric conditions very well but have trouble explaining the observed middle-atmosphere temperatures, composition and winds. The top of the middle-atmosphere circulation has been thought to lie at an altitude of 450 to 500 kilometres, where there is a layer of haze that appears to be separated from the main haze deck. This 'detached' haze was previously explained as being due to the co-location of peak haze production and the limit of dynamical transport by the circulation's upper branch. Here we report a build-up of trace gases over the south pole approximately two years after observing the 2009 post-equinox circulation reversal, from which we conclude that middle-atmosphere circulation must extend to an altitude of at least 600 kilometres. The primary drivers of this circulation are summer-hemisphere heating of haze by absorption of solar radiation and winter-hemisphere cooling due to infrared emission by haze and trace gases; our results therefore imply that these effects are important well into the thermosphere (altitudes higher than 500 kilometres). This requires both active upper-atmosphere chemistry, consistent with the detection of high-complexity molecules and ions at altitudes greater than 950 kilometres, and an alternative explanation for the detached haze, such as a transition in haze particle growth from monomers to fractal structures.

  8. Active Upper-atmosphere Chemistry and Dynamics from Polar Circulation Reversal on Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teanby, Nicholas A.; Irwin, Patrick Gerard Joseph; Nixon, Conor A.; DeKok, Remco; Vinatier, Sandrine; Coustenis, Athena; Sefton-Nash, Elliot; Calcutt, Simon B.; Flasar, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    Saturn's moon Titan has a nitrogen atmosphere comparable to Earth's, with a surface pressure of 1.4 bar. Numerical models reproduce the tropospheric conditions very well but have trouble explaining the observed middle-atmosphere temperatures, composition and winds. The top of the middle-atmosphere circulation has been thought to lie at an altitude of 450 to 500 kilometres, where there is a layer of haze that appears to be separated from the main haze deck. This 'detached' haze was previously explained as being due to the colocation of peak haze production and the limit of dynamical transport by the circulation's upper branch. Herewe report a build-up of trace gases over the south pole approximately two years after observing the 2009 post-equinox circulation reversal, from which we conclude that middle-atmosphere circulation must extend to an altitude of at least 600 kilometres. The primary drivers of this circulation are summer-hemisphere heating of haze by absorption of solar radiation and winter-hemisphere cooling due to infrared emission by haze and trace gases; our results therefore imply that these effects are important well into the thermosphere (altitudes higher than 500 kilometres). This requires both active upper-atmosphere chemistry, consistent with the detection of high-complexity molecules and ions at altitudes greater than 950 kilometres, and an alternative explanation for the detached haze, such as a transition in haze particle growth from monomers to fractal structures.

  9. Topographic stress perturbations in southern Davis Mountains, west Texas 1. Polarity reversal of principal stresses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, W.Z.; Morin, R.H.

    2002-01-01

    We have applied a previously developed analytical stress model to interpret subsurface stress conditions inferred from acoustic televiewer logs obtained in two municipal water wells located in a valley in the southern Davis Mountains near Alpine, Texas. The appearance of stress-induced breakouts with orientations that shift by 90?? at two different depths in one of the wells is explained by results from exact solutions for the effects of valleys on gravity and tectonically induced subsurface stresses. The theoretical results demonstrate that above a reference depth termed the hinge point, a location that is dependent on Poisson's ratio, valley shape, and magnitude of the maximum horizontal tectonic stress normal to the long axis of the valley, horizontal stresses parallel to the valley axis are greater than those normal to it. At depths below this hinge point the situation reverses and horizontal stresses normal to the valley axis are greater than those parallel to it. Application of the theoretical model at Alpine is accommodated by the fact that nearby earthquake focal mechanisms establish an extensional stress regime with the regional maximum horizontal principal stress aligned perpendicular to the valley axis. We conclude that the localized stress field associated with a valley setting can be highly variable and that breakouts need to be examined in this context when estimating the orientations and magnitudes of regional principal stresses.

  10. THE DYNAMICS OF THE SOLAR MAGNETIC FIELD: POLARITY REVERSALS, BUTTERFLY DIAGRAM, AND QUASI-BIENNIAL OSCILLATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Vecchio, A.; Meduri, D.; Carbone, V.; Laurenza, M.; Storini, M.

    2012-04-10

    The spatio-temporal dynamics of the solar magnetic field has been investigated by using NSO/Kitt Peak magnetic synoptic maps covering the period 1976 August-2003 September. The field radial component, for each heliographic latitude, has been decomposed in intrinsic mode functions through the Empirical Mode Decomposition in order to investigate the time evolution of the various characteristic oscillating modes at different latitudes. The same technique has also been applied on synoptic maps of the meridional and east-west components, which were derived from the observed line-of-sight projection of the field by using the differential rotation. Results obtained for the {approx}22 yr cycle, related to the polarity inversions of the large-scale dipolar field, show an antisymmetric behavior with respect to the equator in all the field components and a marked poleward flux migration in the radial and meridional components (from about -35 Degree-Sign and +35 Degree-Sign in the southern and northern hemispheres, respectively). The quasi-biennial oscillations (QBOs) are also identified as a fundamental timescale of variability of the magnetic field and associated with poleward magnetic flux migration from low latitudes around the maximum and descending phase of the solar cycle. Moreover, signs of an equatorward drift, at a {approx}2 yr rate, seem to appear in the radial and toroidal components. Hence, the QBO patterns suggest a link to a dynamo action. Finally, the high-frequency component of the magnetic field, at timescales less than 1 yr, provides the most energetic contribution and it is associated with the outbreaks of the bipolar regions on the solar surface.

  11. Extremely rapid directional change during Matuyama-Brunhes geomagnetic polarity reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagnotti, Leonardo; Scardia, Giancarlo; Giaccio, Biagio; Liddicoat, Joseph C.; Nomade, Sebastien; Renne, Paul R.; Sprain, Courtney J.

    2014-11-01

    We report a palaeomagnetic investigation of the last full geomagnetic field reversal, the Matuyama-Brunhes (M-B) transition, as preserved in a continuous sequence of exposed lacustrine sediments in the Apennines of Central Italy. The palaeomagnetic record provides the most direct evidence for the tempo of transitional field behaviour yet obtained for the M-B transition. 40Ar/39Ar dating of tephra layers bracketing the M-B transition provides high-accuracy age constraints and indicates a mean sediment accumulation rate of about 0.2 mm yr-1 during the transition. Two relative palaeointensity (RPI) minima are present in the M-B transition. During the terminus of the upper RPI minimum, a directional change of about 180 ° occurred at an extremely fast rate, estimated to be less than 2 ° per year, with no intermediate virtual geomagnetic poles (VGPs) documented during the transit from the southern to northern hemisphere. Thus, the entry into the Brunhes Normal Chron as represented by the palaeomagnetic directions and VGPs developed in a time interval comparable to the duration of an average human life, which is an order of magnitude more rapid than suggested by current models. The reported investigation therefore provides high-resolution integrated palaeomagnetic and radioisotopic data that document the fine details of the anatomy and tempo of the M-B transition in Central Italy that in turn are crucial for a better understanding of Earth's magnetic field, and for the development of more sophisticated models that are able to describe its global structure and behaviour.

  12. Sensor development for in situ detection of concentration polarization and fouling of reverse osmosis membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detrich, Kahlil T.; Goulbourne, Nakhiah C.

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to evaluate three polymer electroding techniques in developing a novel in situ sensor for an RO system using the electrical response of a thin film composite sensor. Electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to measure the sensor response when exposed to sodium chloride solutions with concentrations from 0.1 M to 0.8 M in both single and double bath configurations. An insulated carbon grease sensor was mechanically stable while a composite Direct Assembly Process (DAP) sensor was fragile upon hydration. Scanning electron microscopy results from an impregnation-reduction technique showed gold nanoparticles were deposited most effectively when presoaked in a potassium hydroxide solution and on an uncoated membrane; surface resistances remained too high for sensor implementation. Through thickness carbon grease sensors showed a transient response to changes in concentration, and no meaningful concentration sensitivity was noted for the time scales over which EIS measurements were taken. Surface carbon grease electrodes attached to the polyamide thin film were not sensitive to concentration. The impedance spectra indicated the carbon grease sensor was unable to detect changes in concentration in double bath experiments when implemented with the polyamide surface exposed to salt solutions. DAP sensors lacked a consistent response to changes in concentration too. A reverse double bath experiment with the polysulfone layer exposed to a constant concentration exhibited a transient impedance response similar to through thickness carbon grease sensors in a single bath at constant concentration. These results suggest that the microporous polysulfone layer is responsible for sensor response to concentration.

  13. In-capillary approach to eliminate SDS interferences in antibody analysis by capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Hernández, Laura; Montealegre, Cristina; Kiessig, Steffen; Moritz, Bernd; Neusüß, Christian

    2016-12-23

    Capillary electrophoresis is an important technique for the characterization of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), especially in the pharmaceutical context. However, identification is difficult as upscaling and hyphenation of used methods directly to mass spectrometry is often not possible due to separation medium components that are incompatible with MS detection. Here a CE-MS method for the analysis of mAbs is presented analyzing SDS-complexed samples. To obtain narrow and intensive peaks of SDS-treated antibodies, an in-capillary strategy was developed based on the co-injection of positively charged surfactants and methanol as organic solvent. For samples containing 0.2% (v/v) of SDS, recovered MS peak intensities up to 97 and 95% were achieved using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide or benzalkonium chloride, respectively. Successful removal of SDS was shown in neutral coated capillaries but also in a capillary with a positively charged coating applying reversed polarity. The usefulness of this in-capillary strategy was demonstrated also for other proteins and for antibodies dissolved in up to 10% v/v SDS solution, and in other SDS-containing matrices, including the sieving matrix used in a standard CE-SDS method and gel-buffers applied in SDS-PAGE methods. The developed CE-MS approaches enable fast and reproducible characterization of SDS-complexed antibodies.

  14. On-line two-dimensional capillary strong anion exchange/reversed phase liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for comprehensive lipid analysis.

    PubMed

    Bang, Dae Young; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2013-10-04

    An on-line two-dimensional liquid chromatography method was developed for comprehensive lipid profiling by coupling strong anion exchange (SAX) and nanoflow reversed-phase liquid chromatography (nRPLC) prior to electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (2D-SAX/nRPLC-ESI-MS/MS). Lipids can be classified into four different types according to the electrical propensities of the lipids: anionic, weak anionic, neutral polar, and special lipids. In 2D-SAX/nRPLC, various lipids can be fractionated in the first dimension (SAX: 5 μm to 100 Å, 5.0 cm × 75 μm i.d.) by step elution (methanol and salt solution), followed by the molecular separation of lipids in the second dimension (RP: 3 μm to 100 Å, 7.0 cm × 75 μm i.d.) with binary gradient LC. Since the elution of lipids from SAX can be achieved with a very small volume of eluent delivered from an autosampler, it can be simply implemented with an LC-ESI-MS instrument for full automation, and the salt step elution, including the two-step injection procedure, can be used for the selective analysis of the desired lipid fraction. For nRPLC-ESI-MS/MS run in either positive or negative ion mode, a common ionization modifier (0.05% ammonium hydroxide with 5mM ammonium formate) was introduced into the binary mobile phase solutions so that 2D-LC-MS could be operated in both ion modes without changing the mobile phase solutions. The developed on-line 2D-SAX/nRPLC-ESI-MS/MS was evaluated with 22 different standard lipids for the optimization of the salt step elution and was applied to a healthy human plasma lipid extract, resulting in the identification of a total of 303 plasma lipids, including 14 different classes.

  15. REVERSE OSMOSIS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    acetate membranes. Mechanisms of the process and porous cellulose acetate membrane technology are briefly reviewed. Based on a general capillary...The reverse osmosis process is discussed with particular reference to systems involving aqueous solutions and Loeb-Sourirajan-type porous cellulose

  16. Reversed-phase liquid chromatography coupled on-line to estrogen receptor bioaffinity detection based on fluorescence polarization.

    PubMed

    Reinen, Jelle; Kool, Jeroen; Vermeulen, Nico P E

    2008-04-01

    We describe the development and validation of a high-resolution screening (HRS) platform which couples gradient reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) on-line to estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) affinity detection using fluorescence polarization (FP). FP, which allows detection at high wavelengths, limits the occurrence of interference from the autofluorescence of test compounds in the bioassay. A fluorescein-labeled estradiol derivative (E2-F) was synthesized and a binding assay was optimized in platereader format. After subsequent optimization in flow-injection analysis (FIA) mode, the optimized parameters were translated to the on-line HRS bioassay. Proof of principle was demonstrated by separating a mixture of five compounds known to be estrogenic (17beta-estradiol, 17alpha-ethinylestradiol and the phytoestrogens coumestrol, coumarol and zearalenone), followed by post-column bioaffinity screening of the individual affinities for ERalpha. Using the HRS-based FP setup, we were able to screen affinities of off-line-generated metabolites of zearalenone for ERalpha. It is concluded that the on-line FP-based bioassay can be used to screen for the affinity of compounds without the disturbing occurrence of autofluorescence.

  17. Reversible switching of in-plane polarized ferroelectric domains in BaTiO3(001) with very low energy electrons

    PubMed Central

    Rault, J. E.; Menteş, T. O.; Locatelli, A.; Barrett, N.

    2014-01-01

    The switchable bipolar ground state is at the heart of research into ferroelectrics for future, low-energy electronics. Polarization switching by an applied field is a complex phenomenon which depends on the initial domain ordering, defect concentration, electrical boundary conditions and charge screening. Injected free charge may also to be used to reversibly switch in-plane polarized domains. We show that the interaction between the initial domain order and the bulk screening provided by very low energy electrons switches the polarization without the collateral radiation damage which occurs when employing a beam of high energy electrons. Polarization switching during charge injection adds a new dimension to the multifunctionality of ferroelectric oxides. PMID:25354723

  18. Synthesis of sol-gel silica particles in reverse micelles with mixed-solvent polar cores: tailoring nanoreactor structure and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bürglová, Kristýna; Hlaváč, Jan; Bartlett, John R.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we describe a new approach for producing metal oxide nano- and microparticles via sol-gel processing in confined media (sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate reverse micelles), in which the chemical and physical properties of the polar aqueous core of the reverse micelles are modulated by the inclusion of a second polar co-solvent. The co-solvents were selected for their capacity to solubilise compounds with low water solubility and included dimethylsulfoxide, dimethylformamide, ethylene glycol, n-propanol, dimethylacetamide and N-methylpyrrolidone. A broad range of processing conditions across the sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate/cyclohexane/water phase diagram were identified that are suitable for preparing particles with dimensions <50 to >500 nm. In contrast, only a relatively narrow range of processing conditions were suitable for preparing such particles in the absence of the co-solvents, highlighting the role of the co-solvent in modulating the properties of the polar core of the reverse micelles. A mechanism is proposed that links the interactions between the various reactive sites on the polar head group of the surfactant and the co-solvent to the nucleation and growth of the particles.

  19. Reverse palaeomagnetic polarity recorded in exposed lacustrine sediments dated 34,000-46,000 years B.P. at Searles Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liddicoat, Joseph; Coe, Robert; Knott, Jeffrey

    2010-05-01

    The history of pluvial Searles Lake in the Great Basin of the United States is well known from extensive field work and numerous cores recovered as part of industrial exploration of Searles Valley, in which the lake formed during the Quaternary (Smith et al., 1979; Liddicoat et al., 1980; Smith, 2009). Sediments deposited in Searles Lake (now dry) are exposed throughout Searles Valley, and siltstone and mudstone bracket about 14,000 to 46,000 calendar years B.P (23 AMS 14-Carbon dates on gastropods and mollusks from fine- to medium-grain sand units that are interbedded with the siltstone and mudstone). The siltstone and mudstone of that age record reverse palaeomagnetic polarity following thermal demagnetization to 600 C at two localities three km apart. For three horizons of paired samples at each locality, the combined mean palaeomagnetic directions are I = -37.5, D = 180.2, alpha-95 = 19.5, n =12, and the mean Virtual Geomagnetic Pole (VGP) is 73.6 S, 231.8 E, Alpha-95 = 20.6, n = 12. The reverse polarity is not attributed to the Mono Lake Excursion (Denham and Cox, 1971) that never has a southerly declination or VGP in the Southern Hemisphere (Liddicoat and Coe, 1979; Liddicoat, 1992). Other samples from the two Searles Valley localities do not reach a definite reverse direction but contain a component of magnetization that approaches reverse polarity above 400 C, and higher in the sections full normal polarity is recorded. The remanence in the Searles Lake sediment that records the reverse palaeomagnetic directions is very low, and when examined in polished thin section, the siltstone contains detrital opaque grains that have a diameter of about 0.2 microns.

  20. Reversed-polarity regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, F.

    1980-01-01

    The 58 RPRS studied have a lifespan comparable to normal active regions and have no tendency to rotate toward a more normal alignment. They seem to have stable configurations with no apparent evidence suggesting stress due to their anomalous magnetic alignment. Magnetic complexity in RPRs is the key to flare productivity just as it is in normal regions - weak field RPRs produced no flares and regions with complex spots produced more flares than regions with noncomplex spots by a factor of 5. The RPRs however, differ from normal regions in the frequency of having complex spots, particularly the long lived complex spots, in them. Less than 17 percent of normal ARs have complex spots; less than 1.8 percent have long lived complex spots. In contrast, 41 percent of RPRs have complex spots and 24 percent have long lived complex spots.

  1. Abasic Phosphorothioate Oligomers Inhibit HIV-1 Reverse Transcription and Block Virus Transmission across Polarized Ectocervical Organ Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Fraietta, Joseph A.; Mueller, Yvonne M.; Lozenski, Karissa L.; Ratner, Deena; Boesteanu, Alina C.; Hancock, Aidan S.; Lackman-Smith, Carol; Zentner, Isaac J.; Chaiken, Irwin M.; Chung, Suhman; LeGrice, Stuart F. J.; Snyder, Beth A.; Mankowski, Marie K.; Jones, Natalie M.; Hope, Jennifer L.; Gupta, Phalguni; Anderson, Sharon H.; Wigdahl, Brian

    2014-01-01

    In the absence of universally available antiretroviral (ARV) drugs or a vaccine against HIV-1, microbicides may offer the most immediate hope for controlling the AIDS pandemic. The most advanced and clinically effective microbicides are based on ARV agents that interfere with the earliest stages of HIV-1 replication. Our objective was to identify and characterize novel ARV-like inhibitors, as well as demonstrate their efficacy at blocking HIV-1 transmission. Abasic phosphorothioate 2′ deoxyribose backbone (PDB) oligomers were evaluated in a variety of mechanistic assays and for their ability to inhibit HIV-1 infection and virus transmission through primary human cervical mucosa. Cellular and biochemical assays were used to elucidate the antiviral mechanisms of action of PDB oligomers against both lab-adapted and primary CCR5- and CXCR4-utilizing HIV-1 strains, including a multidrug-resistant isolate. A polarized cervical organ culture was used to test the ability of PDB compounds to block HIV-1 transmission to primary immune cell populations across ectocervical tissue. The antiviral activity and mechanisms of action of PDB-based compounds were dependent on oligomer size, with smaller molecules preventing reverse transcription and larger oligomers blocking viral entry. Importantly, irrespective of molecular size, PDBs potently inhibited virus infection and transmission within genital tissue samples. Furthermore, the PDB inhibitors exhibited excellent toxicity and stability profiles and were found to be safe for vaginal application in vivo. These results, coupled with the previously reported intrinsic anti-inflammatory properties of PDBs, support further investigations in the development of PDB-based topical microbicides for preventing the global spread of HIV-1. PMID:25224013

  2. Reversed polarity of the glandular epithelial cells in micropapillary carcinoma of the large intestine and the EMA/MUC1 immunostain.

    PubMed

    Cserni, Gábor

    2014-10-01

    Micropapillary carcinoma of the colon and rectum is associated with an adverse prognosis. This tumour type displays reverse polarity of the tumour cells and is stated to be characterised by an inside-out epithelial membrane antigen (EMA)/MUC1 staining. Nine cases of primary colorectal carcinoma and one omental metastasis were studied by means of immunohistochemistry, using antibodies to detect EMA, MUC1, MUC2, MUC3, MUC5AC, MUC6, CD10, CA125, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). The inside-out pattern staining with EMA/MUC1 ranged from diffuse circumferential through focal and partial to negative, but in some cases CEA, MUC3 and CD10 also showed this pattern staining, sometimes more clearly than did EMA or MUC1. The reverse polarity of colorectal micropapillary carcinomas is sometimes better visualised by immunostains other than EMA/MUC1.

  3. Identification of water-soluble polar organics in air and vehicular emitted particulate matter using ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry and Capillary electrophoresis - mass spectrometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt-Kopplin, P.; Yassine, M.; Gebefugi, I.; Hertkorn, N.; Dabek-Zlotorzynska, E.

    2009-04-01

    The effects of aerosols on human health, atmospheric chemistry, and climate are among the central topics in current environmental health research. Detailed and accurate measurements of the chemical composition of air particulate matter (PM) represent a challenging analytical task. Minute sample amounts are usually composed of several main constituents and hundreds of minor and trace constituents. Moreover, the composition of individual particles can be fairly uniform or very different (internally or externally mixed aerosols), depending on their origin and atmospheric aging processes (coagulation, condensation / evaporation, chemical reaction). The aim of the presentation was the characterization of the organic matter (OM) fraction of environmental aerosols which is not accessible by GC-methods, either because of their high molecular weight, their polarity or due to thermal instability. We also describe the main chemical characteristics of complexe oligomeric organic fraction extracted from different aerosols collected in urban and rural area in Germany and Canada. Mass spectrometry (MS) became an essential tool used by many prominent leaders of the biological research community and the importance of MS to the future of biological research is now clearly evident as in the fields of Proteomics and Metabolomics. Especially Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Mass Spectrometry (ICR-FT/MS) is an ultrahigh resolution MS that allows new approach in the analysis of complex mixtures. The mass resolution (< 200 ppb) allowed assigning the elemental composition (C, H, O, N, S…) to each of the obtained mass peaks and thus already a description of the mixture in terms of molecular composition. This possibility is used by the authors together with a high resolution separation method of charged compounds: capillary electrophoresis. A CE-ESI-MS method using an ammonium acetate based background electrolyte (pH 4.7) was developed for the determination of isomeric benzoic acids in

  4. Investigation of a marine magnetic polarity reversal boundary in cross section at the northern boundary of the Kane Megamullion, Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 23°40'N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Min; Tivey, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    Near-bottom magnetic field measurements made by the submersible Nautile during the 1992 Kanaut Expedition define the cross-sectional geometry of magnetic polarity reversal boundaries and the vertical variation of crustal magnetization in lower oceanic crust exposed along the Kane Transform Fault (TF) at the northern boundary of the Kane Megamullion (KMM). The KMM exposes lower crust and upper mantle rocks on a low-angle normal fault that was active between 3.3 Ma and 2.1 Ma. The geometry of the polarity boundaries is estimated from an inversion of the submarine magnetic data for crustal magnetization. In general, the polarity boundaries dip away from the ridge axis along the Kane TF scarp, with a west dipping angle of ~45° in the shallow (<1 km) crust and <20° in the deeper crust. The existence of the magnetic polarity boundaries (e.g., C2r.2r/C2An.1n, ~2.581 Ma) indicates that the lower crustal gabbros and upper mantle serpentinized peridotites are able to record a coherent magnetic signal. Our results support the conclusion of Williams (2007) that the lower crust cools through the Curie temperature of magnetite to become magnetic, with the polarity boundaries representing both frozen isotherms and isochrons. We also test the effects of the rotation of this isotherm structure and/or footwall rotation and find that the magnetic polarity boundary geometry is not sensitive to these directional changes.

  5. Capillary isoelectric focusing-tandem mass spectrometry and reversed-phase liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for quantitative proteomic analysis of differentiating PC12 cells by eight-plex isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guijie; Sun, Liangliang; Keithley, Richard B; Dovichi, Norman J

    2013-08-06

    We report the application of capillary isoelectric focusing for quantitative analysis of a complex proteome. Biological duplicates were generated from PC12 cells at days 0, 3, 7, and 12 following treatment with nerve growth factor. These biological duplicates were digested with trypsin, labeled using eight-plex isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) chemistry, and pooled. The pooled peptides were separated into 25 fractions using reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC). Technical duplicates of each fraction were separated by capillary isoelectric focusing (cIEF) using a set of amino acids as ampholytes. The cIEF column was interfaced to an Orbitrap Velos mass spectrometer with an electrokinetically pumped sheath-flow nanospray interface. This HPLC-cIEF-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) approach identified 835 protein groups and produced 2,329 unique peptides IDs. The biological duplicates were analyzed in parallel using conventional strong-cation exchange (SCX)-RPLC-ESI-MS/MS. The iTRAQ peptides were first separated into eight fractions using SCX. Each fraction was then analyzed by RPLC-ESI-MS/MS. The SCX-RPLC approach generated 1,369 protein groups and 3,494 unique peptide IDs. For protein quantitation, 96 and 198 differentially expressed proteins were obtained with RPLC-cIEF and SCX-RPLC, respectively. The combined set identified 231 proteins. Protein expression changes measured by RPLC-cEIF and SCX-RPLC were highly correlated.

  6. Stability-indicating capillary zone electrophoresis method for the assessment of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and its correlation with reversed-phase liquid chromatography method and bioassay.

    PubMed

    Dalmora, Sergio Luiz; Butzge, Cairo dos Santos; Machado, Francine Trevisan; Walter, Maurício Elesbão; Dalmora, Maria Elisabeth de Ávila; Souto, Ricardo Bizogne

    2012-05-30

    A stability-indicating capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) method was validated for the analysis of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) using leuprorelin acetate (LA), as internal standard (IS). A fused-silica capillary (75 μm i.d.; effective length, 72 cm) was used at 25 °C; the applied voltage was 12 kV. The background electrolyte solution consisted of 50mM di-sodium hydrogen phosphate solution at pH 8.8. Injections were performed using a pressure mode at 50 mbar for 9s, with detection by photodiode array detector set at 200 nm. Specificity and stability-indicating capability were established in degradation studies, which also showed that there was no interference of the excipients. The method was linear over the concentration range of 2.5-200 μg mL(-1) (r(2)=0.9995) and the limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantitation (LOQ) were 0.79 μg mL(-1) and 2.5 μg mL(-1), respectively. The accuracy was 99.14% with bias lower than 1.40%. The method was applied to the quantitative analysis of biopharmaceutical formulations, and the results were correlated to those of a validated reversed-phase LC method (RP-LC), and an in vitro bioassay, showing non-significant differences (p>0.05).

  7. Capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Compton, S W; Brownlee, R G

    1988-05-01

    While capillary electrophoresis, or historically related techniques, have been used for over a century, and recognition of the value of this separation methodology has certainly grown rapidly in the past few years, the technique has generally been used by analytical chemists, particularly in Europe and Japan, and small groups of researchers in the United States. Many of the basic instrumentation problems have been solved only relatively recently, and researchers using capillary electrophoresis are now turning their attention to studying specific applications which demonstrate the potential versatility of this electrophoretic technique. The appearance of standardized commercial instrumentation is imminent. With the availability of such technology, capillary electrophoresis will no longer be an academic curiosity, but rather a tool with the potential for routine separations of diverse samples of interest to analyst, researcher, and clinician.

  8. Reverse Paleomagnetic Polarity in Exposed Lacustrine Sediment in Searles Valley, California, Dated 34,000-46,000 Calendar Years B.P.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liddicoat, J. C.; Coe, R. S.; Knott, J. R.

    2008-12-01

    The late Pleistocene history of Searles Lake in the western Great Basin of the U.S. is known in detail from field work and cores recovered during industrial exploration of Searles Valley, in which the lake formed (Smith et al., 1979; Liddicoat et al., 1980). Exposed siltstone assigned the age about 34,000 to 46,000 calendar years B.P. (eight AMS 14-Carbon dates on gastropods and mollusks from fine- to medium-grain sand units that bracket the siltstone) records reverse paleomagnetic polarity following thermal demagnetization to 600°C at two localities 3 km apart. For 12 samples (six pairs from six horizons, three pairs from each locality), the mean paleomagnetic directions are I = -37.5°, D = 180.2°, alpha-95 = 19.5° and the mean Virtual Geomagnetic Pole (VGP) is 73.6° S, 231.8°E, Alpha-95 = 20.6°. The reverse polarity in the 12 samples is not part of the Mono Lake Excursion (Denham and Cox, 1971) that never has a VGP in the Southern Hemisphere (Liddicoat and Coe, 1979). Other samples from the two Searles Valley localities do not reach a definite reverse direction but contain a component of magnetization that approaches reverse polarity above 400°C. The remanence in the Searles Lake siltstone is very low, and when examined in polished thin section, the siltstone contains detrital opaque grains that have a diameter of about 0.2 microns.

  9. Investigation of a rare event where the polar ionospheric reverse convection potential does not saturate during a period of extreme northward IMF solar wind driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clauer, C. Robert; Xu, Zhonghua; Maimaiti, M.; Ruohoneimi, J. Michael; Scales, Wayne; Hartinger, Michael D.; Nicolls, Michael J.; Kaeppler, Stephen; Wilder, Frederick D.; Lopez, Ramon E.

    2016-06-01

    A variety of statistical studies have shown that the ionospheric polar potential produced by solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling is linear for weak to moderate solar wind driving but becomes nonlinear during periods of very strong driving. It has been shown that this applies to the two-cell convection potential that develops during southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and also to the reverse convection cells that develop during northward IMF. This has been described as polar potential saturation, and it appears to begin when the driving solar wind electric field becomes greater than 3 mV/m. Utilizing measurements from the Resolute Incoherent Scatter Radar (RISR-N), we examine ionospheric data near local noon within the reverse convection cells that developed during a period of very strong northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) on 12 September 2014. During this period we measure the electric field within the throat of the reverse convection cells to be near 150 mV/m at a time when the IMF is nearly 28 nT northward. This is far in excess of the 30-40 mV/m expected for polar potential saturation of the reverse convection cells. In fact, the development of the electric field responds linearly to the IMF Bz component throughout this period of extreme driving. The conditions in the solar wind show the solar wind velocity near 600 km/s, number density near 20 ions/cm3, and the Alfvén velocity about 75 km/s giving an Alfvén Mach number of 8. A search of several years of solar wind data shows that these values occur together 0.035% of the time. These conditions imply a high plasma β in the magnetosheath. We believe that condition of high β along with high mass density and a strong merging electric field in the magnetosheath are the significant parameters that produce the linear driving of the ionospheric electric field during this unusual period of extreme solar wind conditions. A discussion of current theories to account for cross-polar cap

  10. Serial coupling of reversed-phase and zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction LC/MS for the analysis of polar and nonpolar phenols in wine.

    PubMed

    Greco, Giorgia; Grosse, Sylvia; Letzel, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    In the present study, an easy and efficient method based on the serial coupling of analytical reversed-phase and zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography was developed for the simultaneous separation of polar and nonpolar phenols occurring in wine. The zwitterionic hydrophilic column was connected in series to the reversed-phase one via a T-piece, with which the ACN content in eluent of the second dimension was increased, in order to cope the solvent strength incompatibility between the two columns. The final mobile phase at low-flow rate (≤0.5 mL/min), high-ACN content (90%), and low-salt concentration was directed to an ESI-TOF-MS , for high accurate mass detections. The developed method was applied for the identification of target phenols in several wines. Retention time and peak width intra- and interday repeatability studies proved the reliability of the method for the simultaneous analysis of all the polar and nonpolar analytes in wine. The serial reversed-phase/zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupling offered the possibility to enlarge the number of identified compounds and it represents a valid approach for nontarget analysis of complex samples by a single injection.

  11. Separation of iron-free and iron-saturated forms of transferrin and lactoferrin via capillary electrophoresis performed in fused-silica and neutral capillaries.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Paweł; Śpiewak, Klaudyna; Brindell, Małgorzata; Woźniakiewicz, Michał; Stochel, Grażyna; Kościelniak, Paweł

    2013-12-20

    A capillary electrophoresis-based method for the cost-effective and high efficient separation of iron-free and iron-saturated forms of two members of transferrin family: transferrin and lactoferrin has been developed. The proposed qualitative method relying on the SDS application allowed us to separate iron-free and iron-saturated forms of these proteins, as well as human serum albumin, used as an internal standard. Owing to the distinct migration times under established conditions, the combination of transferrin and lactoferrin assays within a single analytical procedure was feasible. The performance of the method using a fused-silica capillary has been compared with the results obtained using the same method but performed with the use of a neutral capillary of the same dimensions. Neutral capillary has been used as an alternative, since the comparable resolution has been achieved with a concomitant reduction of the electroosmotic flow. Despite of this fact, the migration of analytes occurred with similar velocity but in opposite order, due to the reverse polarity application. A quantitative method employing fused-silica capillary for iron saturation study has been also developed, to evaluate the iron saturation in commercial preparations of lactoferrin.

  12. Sensitive determination of parabens in human urine and serum using methacrylate monoliths and reversed-phase capillary liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Correa, Enrique Javier; Vela-Soria, Fernando; Ballesteros, Oscar; Ramis-Ramos, Guillermo; Herrero-Martínez, José Manuel

    2015-01-30

    A method for the determination of parabens in human urine and serum by capillary liquid chromatography (cLC) with UV-Vis and mass spectrometry (MS) detection using methacrylate ester-based monolithic columns has been developed. The influence of composition of polymerization mixture was studied. The optimum monolith was obtained with butyl methacrylate monomer at 60/40% (wt/wt) butyl methacrylate/ethylene dimethacrylate ratio and 50wt% porogens (composed of 36wt% of 1,4-butanediol, 54wt% 1-propanol and 10wt% water). Baseline resolution of analytes was achieved through a mobile phase of acetonitrile/water in gradient elution mode. Additionally, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) was combined with both cLC-UV-Vis and cLC-MS to achieve the determination of parabens in human urine and serum samples with very low limits of detection. Satisfactory intra- and inter-day repeatabilities were obtained in UV-Vis and MS detection, although the latter provided lower detection limits (up to 300-fold) than the UV-Vis detection. Recoveries for the target analytes from spiked biological samples ranged from 95.2% to 106.7%. The proposed methodology for the ultra-low determination of parabens in human urine and serum samples is simple and fast, the consumption of reagents is very low, and very small samples can be analyzed.

  13. Sequence-specific nucleic acid mobility using a reversible block copolymer gel matrix and DNA amphiphiles (lipid-DNA) in capillary and microfluidic electrophoretic separations.

    PubMed

    Wagler, Patrick; Minero, Gabriel Antonio S; Tangen, Uwe; de Vries, Jan Willem; Prusty, Deepak; Kwak, Minseok; Herrmann, Andreas; McCaskill, John S

    2015-10-01

    Reversible noncovalent but sequence-dependent attachment of DNA to gels is shown to allow programmable mobility processing of DNA populations. The covalent attachment of DNA oligomers to polyacrylamide gels using acrydite-modified oligonucleotides has enabled sequence-specific mobility assays for DNA in gel electrophoresis: sequences binding to the immobilized DNA are delayed in their migration. Such a system has been used for example to construct complex DNA filters facilitating DNA computations. However, these gels are formed irreversibly and the choice of immobilized sequences is made once off during fabrication. In this work, we demonstrate the reversible self-assembly of gels combined with amphiphilic DNA molecules, which exhibit hydrophobic hydrocarbon chains attached to the nucleobase. This amphiphilic DNA, which we term lipid-DNA, is synthesized in advance and is blended into a block copolymer gel to induce sequence-dependent DNA retention during electrophoresis. Furthermore, we demonstrate and characterize the programmable mobility shift of matching DNA in such reversible gels both in thin films and microchannels using microelectrode arrays. Such sequence selective separation may be employed to select nucleic acid sequences of similar length from a mixture via local electronics, a basic functionality that can be employed in novel electronic chemical cell designs and other DNA information-processing systems.

  14. The antiphase boundary in half-metallic Heusler alloy Co2Fe(Al,Si): atomic structure, spin polarization reversal, and domain wall effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedelkoski, Zlatko; Sanchez, Ana M.; Ghasemi, Arsham; Hamaya, Kohei; Evans, Richard F. L.; Bell, Gavin R.; Hirohata, Atsufumi; Lazarov, Vlado K.

    2016-11-01

    Atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy reveals the presence of an antiphase boundary in the half-metallic Co2Fe(Al,Si) full Heusler alloy. By employing the density functional theory calculations, we show that this defect leads to reversal of the sign of the spin-polarization in the vicinity of the defect. In addition, we show that this defect reduces the strength of the exchange interactions, without changing the ferromagnetic ordering across the boundary. Atomistic spin calculations predict that this effect reduces the width of the magnetic domain wall compared to that in the bulk.

  15. Synthesis of calcium-phosphorous doped TiO2 nanotubes by anodization and reverse polarization: A promising strategy for an efficient biofunctional implant surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Sofia A.; Patel, Sweetu B.; Sukotjo, Cortino; Mathew, Mathew T.; Filho, Paulo N.; Celis, Jean-Pierre; Rocha, Luís A.; Shokuhfar, Tolou

    2017-03-01

    The modification of surface features such as nano-morphology/topography and chemistry have been employed in the attempt to design titanium oxide surfaces able to overcome the current dental implants failures. The main goal of this study is the synthesis of bone-like structured titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes enriched with Calcium (Ca) and Phosphorous (P) able to enhance osteoblastic cell functions and, simultaneously, display an improved corrosion behavior. To achieve the main goal, TiO2 nanotubes were synthetized and doped with Ca and P by means of a novel methodology which relied, firstly, on the synthesis of TiO2 nanotubes by anodization of titanium in an organic electrolyte followed by reverse polarization and/or anodization, in an aqueous electrolyte. Results show that hydrophilic bone-like structured TiO2 nanotubes were successfully synthesized presenting a highly ordered nano-morphology characterized by non-uniform diameters. The chemical analysis of such nanotubes confirmed the presence of CaCO3, Ca3(PO4)2, CaHPO4 and CaO compounds. The nanotube surfaces submitted to reverse polarization, presented an improved cell adhesion and proliferation compared to smooth titanium. Furthermore, these surfaces displayed a significantly lower passive current in artificial saliva, and so, potential to minimize their bio-degradation through corrosion processes. This study addresses a very simple and promising multidisciplinary approach bringing new insights for the development of novel methodologies to improve the outcome of osseointegrated implants.

  16. Precise age of C33N-C32R magnetic-polarity reversal, San Juan Basin, New Mexico and Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fassett, James E.; Steiner, Maureen B.

    1997-01-01

    Polarity-chron boundary C33n-C32r has been identified in the Upper Cretaceous continental Farmington Sandstone Member of the Kirtland Shale in Hunter Wash in the southwest part of the San Juan Basin of New Mexico, and in the marine Lewis Shale at Chimney Rock, Colorado, in the northeast part of the basin. Single- and multiple-crystal laser fusion 40Ar/39Ar ages of sanidine crystals from volcanic ash beds bracketing the C33n-C32r polarity reversal at Hunter Wash establish its age as 73.50 ± 0.18 Ma. The reversal apparently occurs within the Baculites compressus Western Interior ammonite zone and within the Edmontonian land-vertebrate faunal zone. An 8 Ma hiatus separates Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks in the southern San Juan Basin. These findings provide a precise new interpolated Late Cretaceous tie point for geologic time scales, provide the basis for the direct correlation of Western Interior ammonite zones to European open-ocean faunal zones, and establish the first direct tie between continental and marine fossil zones within the Western Interior of North America.

  17. Capillary electrophoresis using core-based hyperbranched polyethyleneimine (CHPEI) static-coated capillaries.

    PubMed

    Boonyakong, Cheerapa; Tucker, Sheryl A

    2009-10-01

    With unique 3-D architecture, the application of core-based hyperbranched polyethyleneimine (CHPEI), as a capillary coating in capillary electrophoresis, is demonstrated by manipulation of the electroosmotic mobility (EOF). CHPEI coatings (CHPEI5, M(w) approximately 5000 and CHPEI25, M(w) approximately 25,000) were physically adsorbed onto the inner surface of bare fused-silica capillary (BFS) via electrostatic interaction of the oppositely charged molecules by rinsing the capillaries with different CHPEI aqueous solutions. The EOF values of the coated capillaries were measured over the pH range of 4.0-9.0. At higher pH (pH >6) the coated capillary surface possesses excess negative charges, which causes the reversal of the EOF. The magnitudes of the EOF obtained from the coated capillaries were three-fold lower than that of BFS capillary. Desirable reproducibility of the EOF with % RSD (n = 5) < or = 2 was obtained. Effect of ionic strength, stability of the coating (% RSD = 0.3) and the dependence of the EOF on pH (% RSD = 0.5) were also investigated. The CHPEI-coated capillaries were successfully utilized to separate phenolic compounds, B vitamins, as well as basic drugs and related compounds with reasonable analysis time (< 20 min) and acceptable migration-time repeatability (< 0.7% RSD for intra-capillary and < 2% RSD for inter-capillary).

  18. Non-Aqueous Capillary Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szumski, Michał; Buszewski, Bogusław

    Non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis and capillary electrochromatography are special variants of these techniques. Here, organic solvents or their mixtures with or without dissolved electrolytes are used as separation buffer or mobile phase, respectively. The most important features of non-aqueous systems are: better solubility of more hydrophobic ionic substances (many natural products) than in water, much less current and Joule heating allows for using highly concentrated buffers and/or larger capillary internal diameters, polar interactions are enhanced in organic solvents which is often highly advantageous in chiral separation systems. This chapter presents most frequently used solvents, their properties, as well as shows pH* scale which is often used in non-aqueous systems.

  19. Effect of Confinement on the Properties of Sequestered Mixed Polar Solvents: Enzymatic Catalysis in Nonaqueous 1,4-Bis-2-ethylhexylsulfosuccinate Reverse Micelles.

    PubMed

    Durantini, Andres M; Falcone, R Dario; Silber, Juana J; Correa, N Mariano

    2016-06-03

    The influence of different glycerol, N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and water mixtures encapsulated in 1,4-bis-2-ethylhexylsulfosuccinate (AOT)/n-heptane reverse micelles (RMs) on the enzymatic hydrolysis of 2-naphthyl acetate by α-chymotrypsin is demonstrated. In the case of the mixtures with DMF and protic solvents it has been previously shown, using absorption, emission and dynamic light-scattering techniques, that solvents are segregated inside the polar core of the RMs. Protic solvents anchor to the AOT, whereas DMF locates to the polar core of the aggregate. Thus, DMF not only helps to solubilize the hydrophobic substrate, increasing its effective concentrations but surprisingly, it does not affect the enzyme activity. The importance of ensuring the presence of RMs, encapsulation of the polar solvents and the corrections by substrate partitioning in order to obtain reliable conclusions is highlighted. Moreover, the effect of a constrained environment on solvent-solvent interactions in homogenous media and its impact on the use of RMs as nanoreactors is stressed.

  20. Telomerase reverse transcriptase acts in a feedback loop with NF-κB pathway to regulate macrophage polarization in alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao-qin; Yang, Yang; Li, Wan-xia; Cheng, Ya-hui; Li, Xiao-feng; Huang, Cheng; Meng, Xiao-ming; Wu, Bao-ming; Liu, Xin-hua; Zhang, Lei; Lv, Xiong-wen; Li, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Activation of Kupffer cells (KCs) plays a central role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). C57BL/6 mice fed EtOH-containing diet showed a mixed induction of hepatic classical (M1) and alternative (M2) macrophage markers. Since telomerase activation occurs at critical stages of myeloid and lymphoid cell activation, we herein investigated the role of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), the determining factor of telomerase, in macrophage activation during ALD. In our study, TERT expression and telomerase activity (TA) were remarkably increased in liver tissue of EtOH-fed mice. Moreover, EtOH significantly up-regulated TERT in isolated KCs and RAW 264.7 cells and LPS induced TERT production in vitro. These data indicate that up-regulation of TERT may play a critical role in macrophages during ALD. Furthermore, loss- and gain-of-function studies suggested that TERT switched macrophages towards M1 phenotype by regulating NF-κB signaling, but had limited effect on M2 macrophages polarization in vitro. Additionally, PDTC, a chemical inhibitor of NF-κB, could dramatically down-regulate TERT expression and the hallmarks of M1 macrophages. Therefore, our study unveils the role of TERT in macrophage polarization and the cross-talk between TERT and p65, which may provide a possible explanation for the ethanol-mediated hepatic proinflammatory response and M1 macrophage polarization. PMID:26725521

  1. Nanoscale mapping of heterogeneity of the polarization reversal in lead-free relaxor-ferroelectric ceramic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobeljic, D.; Shvartsman, V. V.; Belianinov, A.; Okatan, B.; Jesse, S.; Kalinin, S. V.; Groh, C.; Rödel, J.; Lupascu, D. C.

    2016-01-01

    Relaxor/ferroelectric ceramic/ceramic composites have shown to be promising in generating large electromechanical strain at moderate electric fields. Nonetheless, the mechanisms of polarization and strain coupling between grains of different nature in the composites remain unclear. To rationalize the coupling mechanisms we performed advanced piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) studies of 0.92BNT-0.06BT-0.02KNN/0.93BNT-0.07BT (ergodic/non-ergodic relaxor) composites. PFM is able to distinguish grains of different phases by characteristic domain patterns. Polarization switching has been probed locally, on a sub-grain scale. k-Means clustering analysis applied to arrays of local hysteresis loops reveals variations of polarization switching characteristics between the ergodic and non-ergodic relaxor grains. We report a different set of switching parameters for grains in the composites as opposed to the pure phase samples. Our results confirm ceramic/ceramic composites to be a viable approach to tailor the piezoelectric properties and optimize the macroscopic electromechanical characteristics.Relaxor/ferroelectric ceramic/ceramic composites have shown to be promising in generating large electromechanical strain at moderate electric fields. Nonetheless, the mechanisms of polarization and strain coupling between grains of different nature in the composites remain unclear. To rationalize the coupling mechanisms we performed advanced piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) studies of 0.92BNT-0.06BT-0.02KNN/0.93BNT-0.07BT (ergodic/non-ergodic relaxor) composites. PFM is able to distinguish grains of different phases by characteristic domain patterns. Polarization switching has been probed locally, on a sub-grain scale. k-Means clustering analysis applied to arrays of local hysteresis loops reveals variations of polarization switching characteristics between the ergodic and non-ergodic relaxor grains. We report a different set of switching parameters for grains in the

  2. Quantitation of mRNA levels of steroid 5alpha-reductase isozymes: A method that combines one-step reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and separation by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Torres, Jesús M; Ortega, Esperanza

    2004-02-01

    We developed an accurate, rapid, and modestly labor-intensive method to precisely quantitate mRNA species by one-step reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). This approach combines the high specificity of quantitative competitive PCR with the sensitivity of laser-induced fluorescence capillary electrophoresis (LIF-CE). Both cDNA synthesis and PCR amplification are performed with the same enzyme and site-specific primers, improving the efficiency of cDNA synthesis. The specific target mRNA and a mimic DNA fragment, used as a competitive internal standard, were coamplified in a single reaction in which the same primers are used. The 5' forward primers were end-labeled with 6-carboxy-fluorescein (6-FAM). The ratio of fluorescence intensity between amplified products of the target cDNA and the competitive DNA was determined quantitatively after separation by CE and fluorescence analysis. Using this method, we have been able to precisely quantify the mean amount of steroid 5alpha-reductase (5alpha-R) isozyme mRNA levels in ventral prostate of the rat, detecting 10-fold difference for 5alpha-R1 and 50-fold difference for 5alpha-R2, respectively, in comparison with our previously reported two-step method. Because the competitive RT-PCR presented in this paper enables a more efficient quantitative determination of mRNAs, low-level gene expression could be quantified.

  3. Fabrication of internally tapered capillaries for capillary electrochromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jack; Norton, Dean; Shamsi, Shahab A

    2006-02-15

    In this study, we report a novel procedure for fabricating internally tapered capillary columns suitable for the coupling of capillary electrochromatography (CEC) to electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The internal tapers were prepared by slowly heating the capillary end in a methane/O2 flame. Due to continuous self-shrinking of the inner channel of the capillary, the inside diameter of the opening was reduced to 7-10 microm. The procedure is easy to handle, with no requirement for expensive equipment as well as elimination of problematic grinding of the tip. Several advantages of these new internal tapers, as compared to using externally tapered columns, are described. First, the problems of poor durability and tip breakage associated with external tapering were successfully overcome with the internal taper. A comparison of the online CEC/ESI-MS between external versus internal tapers showed that the latter provides enhanced electrospray stability, resulting in significantly lower short-term noise and very short-term noise values. In turn, the more rugged design of internal tapers allows performing CEC/MS utilizing a harsh polar organic mobile phase, which was not previously successful using an external taper due to higher operating current and electrospray arcing. Next, data on the reproducibility of the internally tapered CEC/MS column using warfarin and beta-blockers as model analytes are presented. For example, when comparing the reproducibility for separation of warfarin under reversed-phase conditions, the internal taper demonstrated superior intraday % RSD (1.6-3.4) as compared to the external taper intraday % RSD (5-6). Last, the applicability of performing quantitative CEC/MS with internally tapered capillaries is demonstrated for simultaneous enantioseparation of beta-blockers. Impressive quantitative results include good linearity of calibration curves (e.g., R2 = 0.9940-0.9988) and limit of detection as low as 30 nM. The sensitive detection of a

  4. Nanoscale mapping of heterogeneity of the polarization reversal in lead-free relaxor–ferroelectric ceramic composites

    DOE PAGES

    Gobeljic, D.; Shvartsman, V. V.; Belianinov, A.; ...

    2016-01-05

    Relaxor/ferroelectric ceramic/ceramic composites have shown to be promising in generating large electromechanical strain at moderate electric fields. However, the mechanisms of polarization and strain coupling between grains of different nature in the composites remain unclear. To rationalize the coupling mechanisms we performed advanced piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) studies of 0.92BNT-0.06BT-0.02KNN/0.93BNT-0.07BT (ergodic/non-ergodic relaxor) composites. PFM is able to distinguish grains of different phases by characteristic domain patterns. Polarization switching has been probed locally, on a sub-grain scale. k-Means clustering analysis applied to arrays of local hysteresis loops reveals variations of polarization switching characteristics between the ergodic and non-ergodic relaxor grains. Here,more » we report a different set of switching parameters for grains in the composites as opposed to the pure phase samples. These results confirm ceramic/ceramic composites to be a viable approach to tailor the piezoelectric properties and optimize the macroscopic electromechanical characteristics.« less

  5. Nanoscale mapping of heterogeneity of the polarization reversal in lead-free relaxor–ferroelectric ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Gobeljic, D.; Shvartsman, V. V.; Belianinov, A.; Okatan, B.; Jesse, S.; Kalinin, S. V.; Groh, C.; Rödel, J.; Lupascu, D. C.

    2016-01-05

    Relaxor/ferroelectric ceramic/ceramic composites have shown to be promising in generating large electromechanical strain at moderate electric fields. However, the mechanisms of polarization and strain coupling between grains of different nature in the composites remain unclear. To rationalize the coupling mechanisms we performed advanced piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) studies of 0.92BNT-0.06BT-0.02KNN/0.93BNT-0.07BT (ergodic/non-ergodic relaxor) composites. PFM is able to distinguish grains of different phases by characteristic domain patterns. Polarization switching has been probed locally, on a sub-grain scale. k-Means clustering analysis applied to arrays of local hysteresis loops reveals variations of polarization switching characteristics between the ergodic and non-ergodic relaxor grains. Here, we report a different set of switching parameters for grains in the composites as opposed to the pure phase samples. These results confirm ceramic/ceramic composites to be a viable approach to tailor the piezoelectric properties and optimize the macroscopic electromechanical characteristics.

  6. Enhancing hydrogen production in microbial electrolysis cells by in situ hydrogen oxidation for self-buffering pH through periodic polarity reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuli; Qin, Mohan; Yang, Xiaoli; He, Zhen

    2017-04-01

    Successful pH control plays a key role in hydrogen production in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs). Herein, periodic polarity reversal (PPR) is applied to a dual-cathode MEC and achieves the enhanced hydrogen production. The MEC with PPR produces 1.3 ± 0.1 m3 H2 m-3d-1 with 50-mM NaCl as the catholyte, much higher than 0.9 ± 0.1 m3 H2 m-3d-1 from the MEC with dual-working cathodes or 0.8 ± 0.1 m3 H2 m-3d-1 from the MEC with one working cathode. Such enhancement benefits from a slower increase in the catholyte pH, for example, it takes 15.3 h to increase the 10-mM NaCl pH from 7.00 to 12.00 in the MEC with PPR, 1.7-3.6 times that of the MECs without PPR, which is due to the decrease in the catholyte pH of the reversed cathode during PPR. The potential of the reversed electrode is more positive than the anode, suggesting that the reversed electrode acts as a second anode electrode using residue hydrogen gas as an electron source. Thus, a mechanism of in situ oxidation of hydrogen gas for pH buffering is proposed and discussed. These findings have provided a simple but effective pH control strategy for enhancing hydrogen production in MECs.

  7. Latitudinal gradients of cosmic rays and the polarity reversal of the heliospheric magnetic field: A preliminary evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newkirk, G., Jr.; Lockwood, J. A.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Simpson, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Within the statistical limits imposed by the currently available data and the noise inherent in the determination of the latitudinal gradient, no evidence for the expected change in the latitudinal gradient from pre-1980 to post-1980 epochs can be found. In addition, the rigidity dependence of the gradient appears to be the same in the two epochs. Thus, no evidence is found for a sensitivity of the latitudinal gradient to the polarity of the largescale heliospheric magnetic field such as has been predicted by models incorporating particle drifts.

  8. Free energy gap laws for the pulse-induced and stationary fluorescence quenching by reversible charge transfer in polar solutions.

    PubMed

    Khokhlova, Svetlana S; Burshtein, Anatoly I

    2011-01-21

    The Stern-Volmer constants for either pulse-induced or stationary fluorescence being quenched by a contact charge transfer are calculated and their free energy dependencies (the free energy gap laws) are specified. The reversibility of charge transfer is taken into account as well as spin conversion in radical ion pairs, followed by their recombination in either singlet or triplet neutral products. The natural decay of triplets as well as their impurity quenching by ionization are accounted for when estimating the fluorescence quantum yield and its free energy dependence.

  9. Magnetic field reversal of electric polarization and magnetoelectric phase diagram of the hexaferrite Ba1.3Sr0.7Co0.9Zn1.1Fe10.8Al1.2O22

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Shipeng; Yan, Liqin; Chai, Yisheng; Cong, Junzhuang; Sun, Young

    2014-01-01

    Low magnetic field reversal of electric polarization has been demonstrated in the multiferroic Y-type hexaferrite Ba1.3Sr0.7Co0.9Zn1.1Fe10.8Al1.2O22 single crystal. The maximum magnetoelectric coefficient at 200 K reaches 1065 ps/m near zero magnetic field. By a systematic investigation of magnetic field dependence of magnetic and dielectric responses at various temperatures, we obtained the magnetoelectric phase diagram describing the detailed evolution of the spin-induced ferroelectric phases with temperature and magnetic field. Below 225 K, the transverse spin cone can be stabilized at zero magnetic field, which is responsible for the reversal behavior of electric polarization. Our study reveals how to eventually achieve magnetic field reversal of electric polarization in hexaferrites at room temperature.

  10. Use of cyclic current reversal polarization voltammetry for investigating the relationship between corrosion resistance and heat-treatment induced variations in microstructures of 400 C martensitic stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrose, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Software for running a cyclic current reversal polarization voltammagram has been developed for use with a EG&G Princeton Applied Research Model 273 potentiostat/galvanostat system. The program, which controls the magnitude, direction and duration of an impressed galvanostatic current, will produce data in ASCII spreadsheets (Lotus, Quattro) for graphical representation of CCRPV voltammograms. The program was used to determine differences in corrosion resistance of 440 C martenstic stainless steel produced as a result of changes in microstructure effected by tempering. It was determined that tempering at all temperatures above 400 F resulted in increased polarizability of the material, with the increased likelihood that pitting would be initiated upon exposure to marine environments. These results will be used in development of remedial procedures for lowering the susceptibility of these alloys toward the stress corrosion cracking experienced in bearings used in high pressure oxygen turbopumps used in the main engines of space shuttle orbiters.

  11. Spin-polarized transport and magnetization reversal behavior of transition metal and half-metallic chromium dioxide thin films and multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anguelouch, Alexandre

    In recent years the interest in the properties of sub-micron ferromagnetic systems has been growing due to both their fundamental significance and practical applications in the fields of magnetic random access memory and magnetic sensing. In the thesis we have studied the magnetization reversal and spin-dependent transport behavior in transition-metal ferromagnets and half-metallic chromium dioxide films and heterostructures. In the case of transition-metal ferromagnets we have investigated the contribution that thermal fluctuations make toward the reversal process of sub-micron patterned elements. We establish that the fluctuations are significant and as a result, that the switching is a stochastic process. Our conclusion is that the Neel-Arrhenius theory of thermally activated magnetic transitions adequately describes the observed behavior. Further, we have demonstrated that domain structure can have a drastic effect on critical "astroid" curves of transition metal micron- and sub-micron-size ferromagnetic films. For these studies, we used magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) as a tool for characterization, and we believe that this technique provides a useful method for investigation of the magnetic properties of patterned media. Half-metals are a class of ferromagnets with 100% spin polarization. These materials show great promise for use in magnetoelectronic applications, such as MTJ-based memory and as magnetic sensors. We have perfected a fabrication technique for obtaining single-crystal epitaxial CrO2 films with nearly complete spin polarization. We have analyzed the thickness dependence of electron transport and magnetic properties of CrO2, and have established that the magnetic, transport and structural properties in these films are closely interrelated. We also report the results of our attempts to fabricate CrO2-based MTJs.

  12. Evaluation of in-channel amperometric detection using a dual-channel microchip electrophoresis device and a two-electrode potentiostat for reverse polarity separations

    PubMed Central

    Meneses, Diogenes; Gunasekara, Dulan B.; Pichetsurnthorn, Pann; da Silva, José A. F.; de Abreu, Fabiane C.; Lunte, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    In-channel amperometric detection combined with dual-channel microchip electrophoresis is evaluated using a two-electrode isolated potentiostat for reverse polarity separations. The device consists of two separate channels with the working and reference electrodes placed at identical positions relative to the end of the channel, enabling noise subtraction. In previous reports of this configuration, normal polarity and a three-electrode detection system were used. In the two-electrode detection system described here, the electrode in the reference channel acts as both the counter and reference. The effect of electrode placement in the channels on noise and detector response was investigated using nitrite, tyrosine, and hydrogen peroxide as model compounds. The effects of electrode material and size and type of reference electrode on noise and the potential shift of hydrodynamic voltammograms for the model compounds were determined. In addition, the performance of two- and three-electrode configurations using Pt and Ag/AgCl reference electrodes was compared. Although the signal was attenuated with the Pt reference, the noise was also significantly reduced. It was found that lower LOD were obtained for all three compounds with the dual-channel configuration compared to single-channel, in-channel detection. The dual-channel method was then used for the detection of nitrite in a dermal microdialysis sample obtained from a sheep following nitroglycerin administration. PMID:25256669

  13. Evaluation of in-channel amperometric detection using a dual-channel microchip electrophoresis device and a two-electrode potentiostat for reverse polarity separations.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Diogenes; Gunasekara, Dulan B; Pichetsurnthorn, Pann; da Silva, José A F; de Abreu, Fabiane C; Lunte, Susan M

    2015-02-01

    In-channel amperometric detection combined with dual-channel microchip electrophoresis is evaluated using a two-electrode isolated potentiostat for reverse polarity separations. The device consists of two separate channels with the working and reference electrodes placed at identical positions relative to the end of the channel, enabling noise subtraction. In previous reports of this configuration, normal polarity and a three-electrode detection system were used. In the two-electrode detection system described here, the electrode in the reference channel acts as both the counter and reference. The effect of electrode placement in the channels on noise and detector response was investigated using nitrite, tyrosine, and hydrogen peroxide as model compounds. The effects of electrode material and size and type of reference electrode on noise and the potential shift of hydrodynamic voltammograms for the model compounds were determined. In addition, the performance of two- and three-electrode configurations using Pt and Ag/AgCl reference electrodes was compared. Although the signal was attenuated with the Pt reference, the noise was also significantly reduced. It was found that lower LOD were obtained for all three compounds with the dual-channel configuration compared to single-channel, in-channel detection. The dual-channel method was then used for the detection of nitrite in a dermal microdialysis sample obtained from a sheep following nitroglycerin administration.

  14. Direct high-performance liquid chromatography enantioseparation of terazosin on an immobilised polysaccharide-based chiral stationary phase under polar organic and reversed-phase conditions.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Rosella; Gallinella, Bruno; La Torre, Francesco; Zanitti, Leo; Turchetto, Luciana; Mosca, Antonina; Cirilli, Roberto

    2009-07-10

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) enantioseparation of terazosin (TER) was accomplished on the immobilised-type Chiralpak IC chiral stationary phase (CSP) under both polar organic and reversed-phase modes. A simple analytical method was validated using a mixture of methanol-water-DEA 95:5:0.1 (v/v/v) as a mobile phase. Under reversed-phase conditions good linearities were obtained over the concentration range 8.76-26.28 microg mL(-1) for both enantiomers. The limits of detection and quantification were 10 and 30 ng mL(-1), respectively. The intra- and inter-day assay precision was less than 1.66% (RSD%). The optimised conditions also allowed to resolve chiral and achiral impurities from the enantiomers of TER. The proposed HPLC method supports pharmacological studies on the biological effects of the both forms of TER and analytical investigations of potential drug formulations based on a single enantiomer. At the semipreparative scale, 5.3 mg of racemic sample were resolved with elution times less than 12 min using a mobile phase consisting of methanol-DEA 100:0.1 (v/v) and both enantiomers were isolated with a purity of > or = 99% enantiomeric excess (ee). The absolute configuration of TER enantiomers was assigned by comparison of the measured specific rotations with those reported in the literature.

  15. Effect of the addition of a nonaqueous polar solvent (glycerol) on enzymatic catalysis in reverse micelles. Hydrolysis of 2-naphthyl acetate by alpha-chymotrypsin.

    PubMed

    Falcone, R Darío; Biasutti, M Alicia; Correa, N Mariano; Silber, Juana J; Lissi, Eduardo; Abuin, Elsa

    2004-07-06

    The kinetics of hydrolysis of 2-naphthyl acetate (2-NA) catalyzed by alpha-chymotrypsin (alpha-CT), in reverse micellar solutions formed by glycerol (GY)-water (38% v/v) mixture/sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT)/n-heptane has been determined by spectroscopic measurements. To compare the efficiency of this reaction with that observed in micelles with water in the core, as well as in the corresponding homogeneous media, the reaction was also studied in water/AOT/n-heptane reverse micellar solutions and in both homogeneous media (water and GY-water, 38% v/v mixture). In every media, alpha-CT was characterized by the absorption and emission spectra, the fluorescence lifetimes, and the fluorescence anisotropy of its tryptophan residues. The effect of AOT concentration on the kinetic parameters obtained in the micellar systems was determined, at a constant molar ratio of the inner polar solvent and surfactant. Moreover, the data obtained allowed the evaluation of the 2-NA partition constant between the organic and the micellar pseudophase. It is shown that the addition of GY to the micelle interior results in an increase in the catalytic properties of alpha-CT. The fluorescence anisotropy studies in the different media show that the addition of GY increases the viscosity as compared with the aqueous systems. It seems that the GY addition to the reverse micellar aggregates results in a decrease of the conformational mobility of alpha-CT, which leads to an increase of the enzyme stability and activity.

  16. Capillary electrophoresis for drug analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lurie, Ira S.

    1999-02-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is a high resolution separation technique which is amenable to a wide variety of solutes, including compounds which are thermally degradable, non-volatile and highly polar, and is therefore well suited for drug analysis. Techniques which have been used in our laboratory include electrokinetic chromatography (ECC), free zone electrophoresis (CZE) and capillary electrochromatography (CEC). ECC, which uses a charged run buffer additive which migrates counter to osmotic flow, is excellent for many applications, including, drug screening and analyses of heroin, cocaine and methamphetamine samples. ECC approaches include the use of micelles and charged cyclodextrins, which allow for the separation of complex mixtures. Simultaneous separation of acidic, neutral and basic solutes and the resolution of optical isomers and positional isomers are possible. CZE has been used for the analysis of small ions (cations and anions) in heroin exhibits. For the ECC and CZE experiments performed in our laboratory, uncoated capillaries were used. In contrast, CEC uses capillaries packed with high performance liquid chromatography stationary phases, and offers both high peak capacities and unique selectivities. Applications include the analysis of cannabinoids and drug screening. Although CE suffers from limited concentration sensitivity, it is still applicable to trace analysis of drug samples, especially when using injection techniques such as stacking, or detection schemes such as laser induced fluorescence and extended pathlength UV.

  17. Comparison of monolithic silica and polymethacrylate capillary columns for LC.

    PubMed

    Moravcová, Dana; Jandera, Pavel; Urban, Jiri; Planeta, Josef

    2004-07-01

    Organic polymer monolithic capillary columns were prepared in fused-silica capillaries by radical co-polymerization of ethylene dimethacrylate and butyl methacrylate monomers with azobisisobutyronitrile as initiator of the polymerization reaction in the presence of various amounts of porogenic solvent mixtures and different concentration ratios of monomers and 1-propanol, 1,4-butanediol, and water. The chromatographic properties of the organic polymer monolithic columns were compared with those of commercial silica-based particulate and monolithic capillary and analytical HPLC columns. The tests included the determination of H-u curves, column permeabilities, pore distribution by inversed-SEC measurements, methylene and polar selectivities, and polar interactions with naphthalenesulphonic acid test samples. Organic polymer monolithic capillary columns show similar retention behaviour to chemically bonded alkyl silica columns for compounds with different polarities characterized by interaction indices, Ix, but have lower methylene selectivities and do not show polar interactions with sulphonic acids. The commercial capillary and analytical silica gel-based monolithic columns showed similar selectivities and provided symmetrical peaks, indicating no significant surface heterogeneities. To allow accurate characterization of the properties of capillary monolithic columns, the experimental data should be corrected for extra-column contributions. With 0.3 mm ID capillary columns, corrections for extra-column volume contributions are sufficient, but to obtain true information on the efficiency of 0.1 mm ID capillary columns, the experimental bandwidths should be corrected for extra-column contributions to peak broadening.

  18. A cooling event during the last geomagnetic polarity reversal: synchronous occurrence with a large decrease in field intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaba, I.; Hyodo, M.; Katoh, S.; Matsushita, M.

    2009-12-01

    The discovery of a correlation between galactic cosmic ray flux and cloud cover suggests that climate change can be caused by variation in cosmic ray flux which is strongly modulated by the geomagnetic field intensity. This study uses a detailed climate record of the Matuyama-Brunhes (MB) magnetic polarity transition to examine a link between geomagnetic field intensity and climate in geologic time. The record is based on palynological data obtained from a sediment core from Osaka Bay with a 200 year resolution. From marine oxygen isotope stage (MIS) 20 to 18, climate variability is well correlated with glacial-interglacial precession cycles, except for a cooling event that occurred at the highest point of the MIS 19 sea-level highstand. In early MIS 19, the proportion of the warm-temperate evergreen broad-leaved taxon Quercus (Cyclobalanopsis) gradually increased as sea level rose, indicating a progressive warming. However, after ~2 kyr of warming a cooling began with an abrupt reduction in Quercus (Cyclobalanopsis) and an increase in Fagus (cool-temperate deciduous broad-leaved taxon). The cooling persisted for about 4 kyr coincident with the sea-level highstand 19.3, and was followed by a rapid warming. A thermal maximum occurred 6 kyr after 19.3 and 11-12 kyr after an insolation peak. These time lags cannot be interpreted as a delayed vegetational response, as this is typically 500 yr or less. After the thermal maximum, Quercus (Cyclobalanopsis) gradually decreased from 19.2 to 19.1, but the temperature estimated from the vegetation was still warmer than at the sea-level highstand 19.3. This observation conflicts with the pattern of sea-level estimated from oxygen isotope values, which indicates that sea level at MIS 19.1 was about 20 m lower than that at 19.3. This cooling event, during the highest sea level highstand contrasts with the climates of MISs 21, 11 and 1 when the thermal maximum coincided with the highest sea-levels. Detailed relative

  19. Fine-resolution mapping of spontaneous and double-strand break-induced gene conversion tracts in Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals reversible mitotic conversion polarity.

    PubMed Central

    Sweetser, D B; Hough, H; Whelden, J F; Arbuckle, M; Nickoloff, J A

    1994-01-01

    Spontaneous and double-strand break (DSB)-induced gene conversion was examined in alleles of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ura3 gene containing nine phenotypically silent markers and an HO nuclease recognition site. Conversions of these alleles, carried on ARS1/CEN4 plasmids, involved interactions with heteroalleles on chromosome V and were stimulated by DSBs created at HO sites. Crossovers that integrate plasmids into chromosomes were not detected since the resultant dicentric chromosomes would be lethal. Converted alleles in shuttle plasmids were easily transferred to Escherichia coli and analyzed for marker conversion, facilitating the characterization of more than 400 independent products from five crosses. This analysis revealed several new features of gene conversions. The average length of DSB-induced conversion tracts was 200 to 300 bp, although about 20% were very short (less than 53 bp). About 20% of spontaneous tracts also were also less than 53 bp, but spontaneous tracts were on average about 40% longer than DSB-induced tracts. Most tracts were continuous, but 3% had discontinuous conversion patterns, indicating that extensive heteroduplex DNA is formed during at least this fraction of events. Mismatches in heteroduplex DNA were repaired in both directions, and repair tracts as short as 44 bp were observed. Surprisingly, most DSB-induced gene conversion tracts were unidirectional and exhibited a reversible polarity that depended on the locations of DSBs and frameshift mutations in recipient and donor alleles. Images PMID:8196629

  20. Sample cleanup and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis of polar aromatic compounds in groundwater samples from a former gas plant.

    PubMed

    Müller, M B; Zwiener, C; Frimmel, F H

    1999-11-12

    A method for the analysis of the polar aromatic compounds 1H-quinolin-4-one (Q), 10H-acridin-9-one (A), 5H-phenanthridin-6-one (P) and 9H-fluoren-9-one (F) in aqueous solutions has been developed. The method comprises steps for sample preparation (solid-phase extraction, cleanup) and analytical determination by means of reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). For the cleanup step the suitability of two different sorbents (alternative A: silica gel, alternative B: LiChrolut EN) was investigated. Alternative B depicted several advantages, in particular higher sorbent capacity, faster and less complicated handling, higher recovery and better reproducibility. For Q, A and P, reproducibility of all method steps is better than 13%, with recovery rates ranging from 76% to 105% (n=3). Alternative B was applied to groundwater samples from a former gas plant. The analytes A and P could be detected at concentrations in the micro/l range.

  1. Determination of organophosphorus pesticides using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with reversed electrode polarity stacking mode-micellar electrokinetic chromatography.

    PubMed

    Soisungnoen, Phimpha; Burakham, Rodjana; Srijaranai, Supalax

    2012-08-30

    A rapid and sensitive method using two preconcentration techniques, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) followed by reversed electrode polarity stacking mode (REPSM) was developed for the analysis of five organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) by micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC). Parameters that affect the efficiency of the extraction in DLLME and preconcentration by REPSM, such as the kind and volume of the extraction and disperser solvents, salt addition, sample matrix and injection time were investigated and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the enrichment factors were obtained in the range from 477 to 635. The linearity of the method for parathion, azinphos and fenitrithion was in the range of 20-1000 ng mL(-1), and for malathion and diazinon in the range of 50-1000 ng mL(-1), with correlation coefficients (r(2)) ranging from 0.9931 to 0.9992. The limits of detecton (LODs) at a signal-to-noice ratio of 3 ranged from 3 to 15 ng mL(-1). The relative recoveries of five OPPs from water samples at spiking levels of 20 and 200 ng mL(-1) for parathion, azinphos and fenitrithion, and 50 and 500 ng mL(-1) for malathion and diazinon, were 69.5-103%. The proposed method provided high enrichment factors, good precision and accuracy with a short analysis time.

  2. Design of strategies to study the metabolic profile of highly polar compounds in plasma by reversed-phase liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-López, Elena; Crego, Antonio L; Marina, María Luisa

    2017-03-24

    Amino acids and related compounds are paramount analytes which are involved in numerous metabolic pathways. Most of these compounds are unable to be retained on Liquid Chromatography with Reversed-Phase stationary phases due to their high hydrophilic character. An interesting strategy is to reduce their polarity through their derivatization with a labelling reagent, such as the commercially available 9-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl (FMOC) which forms stable complexes with primary and secondary amine moieties rapidly. Although some derivatization reagents have been employed in the study of metabolic profiles, as far as we know, FMOC has never been employed for this purpose. In this work, it is demonstrated that the use of RP-LCMS(TOF) using a C18 column and FMOC as labelling agent enables the determination of a larger number of hydrophilic compounds (proteinogenic amino acids, non-proteinogenic amino acids, and biogenic amines) when compared to the use of a fully-wettable pentafluorophenyl column in fully-aqueous conditions (gradient starting in 0% of organic solvent) and HILIC column, both without using compound derivatization. Different strategies for plasma protein elimination were also carefully evaluated. Results revealed that ultrafiltration (UF) offered a lower variability from sample to sample when compared to the protein precipitation (PP) method (from 2 to 12 times lower variability found in UF). Additionally, UF preserved a larger number of possible compounds when compared to the PP approach: 4631 unique molecular features with UF, 666 unique molecular features with PP.

  3. Evaluation and comparison of n-alkyl chain and polar ligand bonded stationary phases for protein separation in reversed-phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ling; Guo, Zhimou; Xiao, Yuansheng; Xue, Xingya; Zhang, Xiuli; Liang, Xinmiao

    2014-09-01

    Protein retention is very sensitive to the change of solvent composition in reversed-phase liquid chromatography for so called "on-off" mechanism, leading to difficulty in mobile phase optimization. In this study, a novel 3-chloropropyl trichlorosilane ligand bonded column was prepared for protein separation. The differences in retention characteristics between the 3-chloropropyl trichlorosilane ligand bonded column and n-alkyl chain modified (C2, C4, C8) stationary phases were elucidated by the retention equation l nk=a+cC(B). Retention parameters (a and c) of nine standard proteins with different molecular weights were calculated by using homemade software. Results showed that retention times of nine proteins were similar on four columns, but the 3-chloropropyl trichlorosilane ligand bonded column obtained the lowest retention parameter values of larger proteins. It meant that their retention behavior affected by acetonitrile concentration would be different due to lower |c| values. More specifically, protein elution windows were broader, and retentions were less sensitive to the change of acetonitrile concentration on the 3-chloropropyl trichlorosilane ligand bonded column than that on other columns. Meanwhile, the 3-chloropropyl trichlorosilane ligand bonded column displayed distinctive selectivity for some proteins. Our results indicated that stationary phase with polar ligand provided potential solutions to the "on-off" problem and optimization in protein separation.

  4. Physiological capillary regression is not dependent on reducing VEGF expression

    PubMed Central

    Olfert, I. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Investigations into physiologically-controlled capillary regression report the provocative finding that microvessel regression occurs in the face of persistent elevation of skeletal muscle vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF) expression. Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), a negative angiogenic regulator, is increasingly being observed to temporally correlate with capillary regression, suggesting that increased TSP-1 (and not reduction in VEGF per se) is needed to initiate, and likely regulate, capillary regression. Based on evidence being gleaned from physiologically-mediated regression of capillaries, it needs to be recognized that capillary regression (and perhaps capillary rarefaction with disease) is not simply the reversal of factors used to stimulate angiogenesis. Rather, the conceptual understanding that angiogenesis and capillary regression each have specific and unique requirements that are biologically constrained to opposite sides of the balance between positive and negative angioregulatory factors may shed light on why anti-VEGF therapies have not lived up to the promise in reversing angiogenesis and providing the cure that many had hoped toward fighting cancer. Emerging evidence from physiological controlled angiogenesis suggest that cases involving excessive or uncontrolled capillary expansion may be best treated by therapies designed to increase expression of negative angiogenic regulators, whereas those involving capillary rarefaction may benefit from inhibiting negative regulators (like TSP-1). PMID:26660949

  5. Crustal Structure of the Caribbean-South American Diffuse Plate Boundary: Subduction Zone Migration and Polarity Reversal Along BOLIVAR Profile 64W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, S. A.; Levander, A.; Magnani, M.; Zelt, C. A.; Sawyer, D. S.; Ave Lallemant, H. G.

    2005-12-01

    The BOLIVAR (Broadband Ocean-Land Investigation of Venezuela and the Antilles arc Region) project is an NSF funded, collaborative seismic experiment in the southeast Caribbean region. The purpose of the project is to understand the diffuse plate boundary created by the oblique collision between the Caribbean and South American plates. Profile 64W of the BOLIVAR experiment, a 450 km-long, N-S transect onshore and offshore Venezuela located at ~64°W longitude, images the deep crustal structures formed by this collision. The active source components of profile 64W include 300 km of MCS reflection data, 33 coincident OBSs, and 344 land seismic stations which recorded 7500 offshore airgun shots and 2 explosive land shots. Results from the reflection and refraction seismic data along 64W show complex crustal structure across the entire span of the diffuse plate boundary. The onshore portion of 64W crosses the fold and thrust belt of the Serrania del Interior, which formed at ~16 Ma by collision of the Caribbean forearc with the northern South American passive margin. Underlying the Serrania del Interior is a south-vergent, remnant Lesser Antillean subduction zone. As this Lesser Antilles subduction impinged on continental crust, it caused a polarity reversal and jump offshore to the north. Convergence was initially localized in the closure and inversion of the Grenada Basin. However, subduction could not develop because of the ~20-km-thick crust of the Aves Ridge; instead, north-vergent subduction initiated further to the north, where ~12-km-thick Caribbean oceanic crust of the Venezuela Basin began to subduct beneath the Aves Ridge in the Pliocene (~4 Ma) and appears to continue subducting today. Between the remnant subduction zone and the modern one, the El Pilar and Coche dextral strike-slip faults accommodate most of the transform motion of the plate boundary. From the Serrania del Interior to the Aves Ridge, ~260 km of accreted orogenic float comprises the diffuse

  6. Benzothiazoles with tunable electron-withdrawing strength and reverse polarity: a route to triphenylamine-based chromophores with enhanced two-photon absorption.

    PubMed

    Hrobárik, Peter; Hrobáriková, Veronika; Sigmundová, Ivica; Zahradník, Pavol; Fakis, Mihalis; Polyzos, Ioannis; Persephonis, Peter

    2011-11-04

    A series of dipolar and octupolar triphenylamine-derived dyes containing a benzothiazole positioned in the matched or mismatched fashion have been designed and synthesized via palladium-catalyzed Sonogashira cross-coupling reactions. Linear and nonlinear optical properties of the designed molecules were tuned by an additional electron-withdrawing group (EWG) and by changing the relative positions of the donor and acceptor substituents on the heterocyclic ring. This allowed us to examine the effect of positional isomerism and extend the structure-property relationships useful in the engineering of novel heteroaromatic-based systems with enhanced two-photon absorption (TPA). The TPA cross-sections (δ(TPA)) in the target compounds dramatically increased with the branching of the triphenylamine core and with the strength of the auxiliary acceptor. In addition, a change from the commonly used polarity in push-pull benzothiazoles to a reverse one has been revealed as a particularly useful strategy (regioisomeric control) for enhancing TPA cross-sections and shifting the absorption and emission maxima to longer wavelengths. The maximum TPA cross-sections of the star-shaped three-branched triphenylamines are ∼500-2300 GM in the near-infrared region (740-810 nm); thereby the molecular weight normalized δ(TPA)/MW values of the best performing dyes within the series (2.0-2.4 GM·g(-1)·mol) are comparable to those of the most efficient TPA chromophores reported to date. The large TPA cross-sections combined with high emission quantum yields and large Stokes shifts make these compounds excellent candidates for various TPA applications, including two-photon fluorescence microscopy.

  7. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Dovichi, Norman J.; Zhang, Jian Z.

    1995-01-01

    A multiple capillary analyzer allows detection of light from multiple capillaries with a reduced number of interfaces through which light must pass in detecting light emitted from a sample being analyzed, using a modified sheath flow cuvette. A linear or rectangular array of capillaries is introduced into a rectangular flow chamber. Sheath fluid draws individual sample streams through the cuvette. The capillaries are closely and evenly spaced and held by a transparent retainer in a fixed position in relation to an optical detection system. Collimated sample excitation radiation is applied simultaneously across the ends of the capillaries in the retainer. Light emitted from the excited sample is detected by the optical detection system. The retainer is provided by a transparent chamber having inward slanting end walls. The capillaries are wedged into the chamber. One sideways dimension of the chamber is equal to the diameter of the capillaries and one end to end dimension varies from, at the top of the chamber, slightly greater than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries to, at the bottom of the chamber, slightly smaller than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries. The optical system utilizes optic fibres to deliver light to individual photodetectors, one for each capillary tube. A filter or wavelength division demultiplexer may be used for isolating fluorescence at particular bands.

  8. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Dovichi, N.J.; Zhang, J.Z.

    1995-08-08

    A multiple capillary analyzer allows detection of light from multiple capillaries with a reduced number of interfaces through which light must pass in detecting light emitted from a sample being analyzed, using a modified sheath flow cuvette. A linear or rectangular array of capillaries is introduced into a rectangular flow chamber. Sheath fluid draws individual sample streams through the cuvette. The capillaries are closely and evenly spaced and held by a transparent retainer in a fixed position in relation to an optical detection system. Collimated sample excitation radiation is applied simultaneously across the ends of the capillaries in the retainer. Light emitted from the excited sample is detected by the optical detection system. The retainer is provided by a transparent chamber having inward slanting end walls. The capillaries are wedged into the chamber. One sideways dimension of the chamber is equal to the diameter of the capillaries and one end to end dimension varies from, at the top of the chamber, slightly greater than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries to, at the bottom of the chamber, slightly smaller than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries. The optical system utilizes optic fibers to deliver light to individual photodetectors, one for each capillary tube. A filter or wavelength division demultiplexer may be used for isolating fluorescence at particular bands. 21 figs.

  9. Intranasal lobular capillary haemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Dipak Ranjan; Bhandarkar, Ajay M; Shivamurthy, Archana; Joy, Jasmi

    2014-01-01

    Lobular capillary haemangioma (LCH) is a benign proliferation of capillaries with a characteristic lobular architecture on microscopy; it has an affinity for mucous membrane and skin of the head and neck. It is extremely rare in the nasal cavity. We present the case of a 45-year-old man who presented with epistaxis without any predisposing factors, which was diagnosed as lobular capillary haemangioma. PMID:25304675

  10. Capillary rheometry for thermosets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malguarnera, S. C.; Carroll, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    Capillary rheometry is effectively used with thermosets. Most important is providing a uniform temperature in the barrel. This was successfully accomplished by using a circulating hot oil system. Standard capillary rheometry methods provide the dependence of thermoset apparent viscosity on shear rate, temperature and time. Such information is very useful in evaluating resin processability and in setting preliminary fabrication conditions.

  11. Femtosecond Laser Micro- and Nanopatterning of the Fused Silica Tube to Enhance Capillary Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngseop; Sohn, Ik-Bu; Noh, Young-Chul

    2012-10-01

    Femtosecond lasers have considerable advantages over conventional lasers for micromachining of transparent materials, and here we use these advantages to fabricate a new type of glass capillary tube with micro- and nanopatterns on the inner surface of the tube. In terms of femtosecond laser patterning, we focused on the polarization state of the femtosecond laser and found that the variation of polarization affected the performance of capillary tubes, especially capillary rise and contact angle. We subsequently confirmed that the number of micropatterns and the direction of nanoripples most greatly affected the capillary rise.

  12. Supercritical fluid reverse micelle separation

    DOEpatents

    Fulton, J.L.; Smith, R.D.

    1993-11-30

    A method of separating solute material from a polar fluid in a first polar fluid phase is provided. The method comprises combining a polar fluid, a second fluid that is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and a surfactant. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid to define the first polar fluid phase. The combined polar and second fluids, surfactant, and solute material dissolved in the polar fluid is maintained under near critical or supercritical temperature and pressure conditions such that the density of the second fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. In this way, a reverse micelle system defining a reverse micelle solvent is formed which comprises a continuous phase in the second fluid and a plurality of reverse micelles dispersed in the continuous phase. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid and is in chemical equilibrium with the reverse micelles. The first polar fluid phase and the continuous phase are immiscible. The reverse micelles each comprise a dynamic aggregate of surfactant molecules surrounding a core of the polar fluid. The reverse micelle solvent has a polar fluid-to-surfactant molar ratio W, which can vary over a range having a maximum ratio W[sub o] that determines the maximum size of the reverse micelles. The maximum ratio W[sub o] of the reverse micelle solvent is then varied, and the solute material from the first polar fluid phase is transported into the reverse micelles in the continuous phase at an extraction efficiency determined by the critical or supercritical conditions. 27 figures.

  13. Supercritical fluid reverse micelle separation

    DOEpatents

    Fulton, John L.; Smith, Richard D.

    1993-01-01

    A method of separating solute material from a polar fluid in a first polar fluid phase is provided. The method comprises combining a polar fluid, a second fluid that is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and a surfactant. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid to define the first polar fluid phase. The combined polar and second fluids, surfactant, and solute material dissolved in the polar fluid is maintained under near critical or supercritical temperature and pressure conditions such that the density of the second fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. In this way, a reverse micelle system defining a reverse micelle solvent is formed which comprises a continuous phase in the second fluid and a plurality of reverse micelles dispersed in the continuous phase. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid and is in chemical equilibrium with the reverse micelles. The first polar fluid phase and the continuous phase are immiscible. The reverse micelles each comprise a dynamic aggregate of surfactant molecules surrounding a core of the polar fluid. The reverse micelle solvent has a polar fluid-to-surfactant molar ratio W, which can vary over a range having a maximum ratio W.sub.o that determines the maximum size of the reverse micelles. The maximum ratio W.sub.o of the reverse micelle solvent is then varied, and the solute material from the first polar fluid phase is transported into the reverse micelles in the continuous phase at an extraction efficiency determined by the critical or supercritical conditions.

  14. Evaluation of migration behaviour of therapeutic peptide hormones in capillary electrophoresis using polybrene-coated capillaries.

    PubMed

    Aptisa, Ghiulendan; Benavente, Fernando; Sanz-Nebot, Victoria; Chirila, Elisabeta; Barbosa, José

    2010-02-01

    Modelling electrophoretic mobility as a function of pH can be simultaneously used for determination of ionization constants and for rapid selection of the optimum pH for separation of mixtures of the modelled compounds. In this work, equations describing the effect of pH on electrophoretic behaviour were used to investigate migration of a series of polyprotic amphoteric peptide hormones between pH 2 and 12 in polybrene-coated capillaries. Polybrene (hexadimethrin bromide) is a polymer composed of quaternary amines that is strongly adsorbed by the fused-silica inner surface, preventing undesired interactions between the peptides and the inner capillary wall. In polybrene-coated capillaries the separation voltage must be reversed, because of the anodic electroosmotic flow promoted by the polycationic polymer attached to the inner capillary wall. The possibility of using polybrene-coated capillaries for determination of accurate ionization constants has been evaluated and the optimum pH for separation of a mixture of the peptide hormones studied has been selected. Advantages and disadvantages of using bare fused-silica and polybrene-coated capillaries for these purposes are discussed.

  15. Multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Li, Q.; Lu, X.

    1998-04-21

    The invention provides a side-entry optical excitation geometry for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system. A charge-injection device is optically coupled to capillaries in the array such that the interior of a capillary is imaged onto only one pixel. In Sanger-type 4-label DNA sequencing reactions, nucleotide identification (``base calling``) is improved by using two long-pass filters to split fluorescence emission into two emission channels. A binary poly(ethyleneoxide) matrix is used in the electrophoretic separations. 19 figs.

  16. Multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Chang, H.T.; Fung, E.N.; Li, Q.; Lu, X.

    1996-12-10

    The invention provides a side-entry optical excitation geometry for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system. A charge-injection device is optically coupled to capillaries in the array such that the interior of a capillary is imaged onto only one pixel. In Sanger-type 4-label DNA sequencing reactions, nucleotide identification (``base calling``) is improved by using two long-pass filters to split fluorescence emission into two emission channels. A binary poly(ethyleneoxide) matrix is used in the electrophoretic separations. 19 figs.

  17. Multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Li, Qingbo; Lu, Xiandan

    1998-04-21

    The invention provides a side-entry optical excitation geometry for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system. A charge-injection device is optically coupled to capillaries in the array such that the interior of a capillary is imaged onto only one pixel. In Sanger-type 4-label DNA sequencing reactions, nucleotide identification ("base calling") is improved by using two long-pass filters to split fluorescence emission into two emission channels. A binary poly(ethyleneoxide) matrix is used in the electrophoretic separations.

  18. Multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Chang, Huan-Tsang; Fung, Eliza N.; Li, Qingbo; Lu, Xiandan

    1996-12-10

    The invention provides a side-entry optical excitation geometry for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system. A charge-injection device is optically coupled to capillaries in the array such that the interior of a capillary is imaged onto only one pixel. In Sanger-type 4-label DNA sequencing reactions, nucleotide identification ("base calling") is improved by using two long-pass filters to split fluorescence emission into two emission channels. A binary poly(ethyleneoxide) matrix is used in the electrophoretic separations.

  19. Process of forming compounds using reverse micelle or reverse microemulsion systems

    DOEpatents

    Linehan, John C.; Fulton, John L.; Bean, Roger M.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a process for producing a nanometer-sized metal compound. The process comprises forming a reverse micelle or reverse microemulsion system comprising a polar fluid in a non-polar or low-polarity fluid. A first reactant comprising a multi-component, water-soluble metal compound is introduced into the polar fluid in a non-polar or low-polarity fluid. This first reactant can be introduced into the reverse micelle or reverse microemulsion system during formation thereof or subsequent to the formation of the reverse micelle or microemulsion system. The water-soluble metal compound is then reacted in the reverse micelle or reverse microemulsion system to form the nanometer-sized metal compound. The nanometer-sized metal compound is then precipitated from the reverse micelle or reverse microemulsion system.

  20. Capillary nail refill test

    MedlinePlus

    ... may indicate: Dehydration Shock Peripheral vascular disease (PVD) Hypothermia Alternative Names Nail blanch test; Capillary refill time ... Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 79. Read More Dehydration Hypothermia Peripheral artery disease - legs Shock Review Date 4/ ...

  1. Displaced capillary dies

    DOEpatents

    Kalejs, Juris P.; Chalmers, Bruce; Surek, Thomas

    1984-01-01

    An asymmetrical shaped capillary die made exclusively of graphite is used to grow silicon ribbon which is capable of being made into solar cells that are more efficient than cells produced from ribbon made using a symmetrically shaped die.

  2. Displaced capillary dies

    DOEpatents

    Kalejs, Juris P.; Chalmers, Bruce; Surek, Thomas

    1982-01-01

    An asymmetrical shaped capillary die made exclusively of graphite is used to grow silicon ribbon which is capable of being made into solar cells that are more efficient than cells produced from ribbon made using a symmetrically shaped die.

  3. Capillary rise of superspreaders.

    PubMed

    Radulovic, Jovana; Sefiane, Khellil; Shanahan, Martin E R

    2011-09-15

    Trisiloxane surfactants, known as 'superspreaders', are commonly employed in numerous applications where enhanced wetting is of the utmost importance. The underlying mechanisms of superspreader wetting have been a focus of scientific interest for ca. 2 decades, and a number of mechanisms have been proposed to explain the unique trisiloxane dynamics. We have studied trisiloxane behaviour in thin capillaries to get further insight into their interfacial activity. Additionally, our knowledge of the capillary rise of superspreaders is surprisingly limited, and the effect of this extraordinary group of surfactants on capillary phenomena has been largely overlooked. Diffusion was confirmed to be the limiting factor of trisiloxane behaviour. A tentative theoretical explanation for the phenomenon studied and an appropriate mathematical model are presented. It is concluded that the enhancement of wetting due to surfactant addition is also a function of geometry: the effect is clear for a sessile drop, but more complex and less beneficial in a capillary.

  4. Capillary discharge source

    DOEpatents

    Bender, III, Howard Albert

    2003-11-25

    Debris generation from an EUV electric discharge plasma source device can be significantly reduced or essentially eliminated by encasing the electrodes with dielectric or electrically insulating material so that the electrodes are shielded from the plasma, and additionally by providing a path for the radiation to exit wherein the electrodes are not exposed to the area where the radiation is collected. The device includes: (a) a body, which is made of an electrically insulating material, that defines a capillary bore that has a proximal end and a distal end and that defines at least one radiation exit; (b) a first electrode that defines a first channel that has a first inlet end that is connected to a source of gas and a first outlet end that is in communication with the capillary bore, wherein the first electrode is positioned at the distal end of the capillary bore; (c) a second electrode that defines a second channel that has a second inlet end that is in communication with the capillary bore and an outlet end, wherein the second electrode is positioned at the proximal end of the capillary bore; and (d) a source of electric potential that is connected across the first and second electrodes, wherein radiation generated within the capillary bore is emitted through the at least one radiation exit and wherein the first electrode and second electrode are shielded from the emitted radiation.

  5. Capillary saturation and desaturation.

    PubMed

    Hilfer, R; Armstrong, R T; Berg, S; Georgiadis, A; Ott, H

    2015-12-01

    Capillary desaturation experiments produce disconnected (trapped) ganglia of mesoscopic sizes intermediate between pore size and system size. Experimental evidence for interactions between these mesoscale clusters during desaturation is analyzed and discussed within the established microscopic and macroscopic laws of Newton, Young-Laplace, and Darcy. A theoretical expression for capillary number correlations is introduced that seems to have remained unnoticed. It expresses capillary desaturation curves in terms of stationary capillary pressures and relative permeabilities. The theoretical expression shows that the plateau saturation in capillary desaturation curves may in general differ from the residual nonwetting saturation defined through the saturation limit of the main hysteresis loop. Hysteresis effects as well as the difference between wetting and nonwetting fluids are introduced into the analysis of capillary desaturation experiments. The article examines experiments with different desaturation protocols and discusses the existence of a mesoscopic length scale intermediate between pore scale and sample scale. The theoretical expression is derived entirely within the existing traditional theory of two-phase flow in porous media and compared to a recent experiment.

  6. Capillary saturation and desaturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilfer, R.; Armstrong, R. T.; Berg, S.; Georgiadis, A.; Ott, H.

    2015-12-01

    Capillary desaturation experiments produce disconnected (trapped) ganglia of mesoscopic sizes intermediate between pore size and system size. Experimental evidence for interactions between these mesoscale clusters during desaturation is analyzed and discussed within the established microscopic and macroscopic laws of Newton, Young-Laplace, and Darcy. A theoretical expression for capillary number correlations is introduced that seems to have remained unnoticed. It expresses capillary desaturation curves in terms of stationary capillary pressures and relative permeabilities. The theoretical expression shows that the plateau saturation in capillary desaturation curves may in general differ from the residual nonwetting saturation defined through the saturation limit of the main hysteresis loop. Hysteresis effects as well as the difference between wetting and nonwetting fluids are introduced into the analysis of capillary desaturation experiments. The article examines experiments with different desaturation protocols and discusses the existence of a mesoscopic length scale intermediate between pore scale and sample scale. The theoretical expression is derived entirely within the existing traditional theory of two-phase flow in porous media and compared to a recent experiment.

  7. Analysis of Soft Drinks: UV Spectrophotometry, Liquid Chromatography, and Capillary Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDevitt, Valerie L.; Rodriguez, Alejandra; Williams, Kathryn R.

    1998-05-01

    Instrumental analysis students analyze commercial soft drinks in three successive laboratory experiments. First, UV multicomponent analysis is used to determine caffeine and benzoic acid in Mello YelloTM using the spectrophotometer's software and manually by the simultaneous equations method. The following week, caffeine, benzoic acid and aspartame are determined in a variety of soft drinks by reversed-phase liquid chromatography using 45% methanol/55% aqueous phosphate, pH 3.0, as the mobile phase. In the third experiment, the same samples are analyzed by capillary electrophoresis using a pH 9.4 borate buffer. Students also determine the minimum detection limits for all three compounds by both LC and CE. The experiments demonstrate the analytical use and limitations of the three instruments. The reports and prelab quizzes also stress the importance of the chemistry of the three compounds, especially the relationships of acid/base behavior and polarity to the LC and CE separations.

  8. Field enhancement sample stacking for analysis of organic acids in traditional Chinese medicine by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qianqian; Xu, Xueqin; Huang, Yuanyuan; Xu, Liangjun; Chen, Guonan

    2012-07-13

    A technique known as field enhancement sample stacking (FESS) and capillary electrophoresis (CE) separation has been developed to analyze and detect organic acids in the three traditional Chinese medicines (such as Portulaca oleracea L., Crataegus pinnatifida and Aloe vera L.). In FESS, a reverse electrode polarity-stacking mode (REPSM) was applied as on-line preconcentration strategy. Under the optimized condition, the baseline separation of eight organic acids (linolenic acid, lauric acid, p-coumaric acid, ascorbic acid, benzoic acid, caffeic acid, succinic acid and fumaric acid) could be achieved within 20 min. Validation parameters of this method (such as detection limits, linearity and precision) were also evaluated. The detection limits ranged from 0.4 to 60 ng/mL. The results indicated that the proposed method was effective for the separation of mixtures of organic acids. Satisfactory recoveries were also obtained in the analysis of these organic acids in the above traditional Chinese medicine samples.

  9. Polarized nuclear target based on parahydrogen induced polarization

    SciTech Connect

    D. Budker, M.P. Ledbetter, S. Appelt, L.S. Bouchard, B. Wojtsekhowski

    2012-12-01

    We discuss a novel concept of a polarized nuclear target for accelerator fixed-target scattering experiments, which is based on parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP). One may be able to reach a 33% free-proton polarization in the ethane molecule. The potential advantages of such a target include operation at zero magnetic field, fast ({approx}100 HZ) polarization oscillation (akin to polarization reversal), and operation with large intensity of an electron beam.

  10. Gas-Filled Capillary Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhauer, L. C.; Kimura, W. D.

    2006-11-01

    We have developed a 1-D, quasi-steady-state numerical model for a gas-filled capillary discharge that is designed to aid in selecting the optimum capillary radius in order to guide a laser beam with the required intensity through the capillary. The model also includes the option for an external solenoid B-field around the capillary, which increases the depth of the parabolic density channel in the capillary, thereby allowing for propagation of smaller laser beam waists. The model has been used to select the parameters for gas-filled capillaries to be utilized during the Staged Electron Laser Acceleration — Laser Wakefield (STELLA-LW) experiment.

  11. Optimization of capillary electrophoresis method with contactless conductivity detection for the analysis of tobramycin and its related substances.

    PubMed

    El-Attug, Mohamed Nouri; Hoogmartens, Jos; Adams, Erwin; Van Schepdael, Ann

    2012-01-25

    A method was validated and optimized to determine tobramycin (TOB) and its related substances. TOB is an aminoglycoside antibiotic which lacks a strong UV absorbing chromophore or fluorophore. Due to the physicochemical properties of TOB, capillary electrophoresis (CE) in combination with Capacitively Coupled Contactless Conductivity Detection (C(4)D) was chosen. The optimized separation method uses a background electrolyte (BGE) composed of 25 mM morpholinoethane-sulphonic acid (MES) adjusted to pH 6.4 by L-histidine (l-His). 0.3 mM cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) was added as electroosmotic flow modifier in a concentration below the critical micellar concentration (CMC). Ammonium acetate 50 mg L(-1) was used as internal standard (IS). 30 kV was applied in reverse polarity (cathode at the injection capillary end) on a fused silica capillary (65/43 cm; 75 μm id). The optimized separation was obtained in less than 7 min with good linearity (R(2)=0.9995) for tobramycin. It shows a good precision expressed as RSD on relative peak areas equal to 0.2% and 0.7% for intraday and interday respectively. The LOD and LOQ are 0.4 and 1.3 mg L(-1) corresponding to 9 pg and 31 pg respectively.

  12. Derivatization in Capillary Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Marina, M Luisa; Castro-Puyana, María

    2016-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis is a well-established separation technique in analytical research laboratories worldwide. Its interesting advantages make CE an efficient and potent alternative to other chromatographic techniques. However, it is also recognized that its main drawback is the relatively poor sensitivity when using optical detection. One way to overcome this limitation is to perform a derivatization reaction which is intended to provide the analyte more suitable analytical characteristics enabling a high sensitive detection. Based on the analytical step where the CE derivatization takes place, it can be classified as precapillary (before separation), in-capillary (during separation), or postcapillary (after separation). This chapter describes the application of four different derivatization protocols (in-capillary and precapillary modes) to carry out the achiral and chiral analysis of different compounds in food and biological samples with three different detection modes (UV, LIF, and MS).

  13. Capillary condenser/evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valenzuela, Javier A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A heat transfer device is disclosed for transferring heat to or from a fluid that is undergoing a phase change. The heat transfer device includes a liquid-vapor manifold in fluid communication with a capillary structure thermally connected to a heat transfer interface, all of which are disposed in a housing to contain the vapor. The liquid-vapor manifold transports liquid in a first direction and conducts vapor in a second, opposite direction. The manifold provides a distributed supply of fluid (vapor or liquid) over the surface of the capillary structure. In one embodiment, the manifold has a fractal structure including one or more layers, each layer having one or more conduits for transporting liquid and one or more openings for conducting vapor. Adjacent layers have an increasing number of openings with decreasing area, and an increasing number of conduits with decreasing cross-sectional area, moving in a direction toward the capillary structure.

  14. A strong phase reversal of the Arctic Oscillation in midwinter 2015/2016: Role of the stratospheric polar vortex and tropospheric blocking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Hoffman H. N.; Zhou, Wen; Leung, Marco Y. T.; Shun, C. M.; Lee, S. M.; Tong, H. W.

    2016-11-01

    In January 2016, Asia and North America experienced unusual cold temperatures, although the global average of surface air temperature broke the warmest record during a strong El Niño event. This was closely related to the remarkable phase transition of the Arctic Oscillation (AO), which can be explained by stratosphere-troposphere interactions. First, the quasi-biennial oscillation changed to its westerly phase in summer 2015 and the stratospheric polar vortex was stronger in early to midwinter 2015/2016. As blocking did not occur in December, the associated downward propagation signal resulted in a strongly positive AO in late December 2015. Second, after late December, the positive phase of Pacific-North America pattern became apparent in El Niño event, which strengthened the Aleutian anticyclone in the stratosphere. In addition, an equivalent barotropic ("blocking") anticyclone was established in the troposphere over Asia. The coexistence of blocking over Asia and North America characterized the negative AO and a strong zonal wave number 2 pattern. Due to stronger zonal wave number 2 signals from the troposphere, the stronger stratospheric polar vortex was elongated, with two cyclonic centers over Asia and the North Atlantic in January. The resultant southward displacement of polar vortices was followed by rare snowfall in the subtropical region of East Asia and a heavy snowstorm on the East Coast of the United States.

  15. Method for analysis of polar volatile trace components in aqueous samples by gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, Johan; Roeraade, Johan

    2005-05-15

    A new method has been developed for direct analysis of volatile polar trace compounds in aqueous samples by gas chromatography. Water samples are injected onto a short packed precolumn containing anhydrous lithium chloride. A capillary column is coupled in series with the prefractionation column for final separation of the analytes. The enrichment principle of the salt precolumn is reverse to the principles employed in conventional methods such as SPE or SPME in which a sorbent or adsorbent is utilized to trap or concentrate the analytes. Such methods are not efficient for highly polar compounds. In the LiCl precolumn concept, the water matrix is strongly retained on the hygroscopic salt, whereas polar as well as nonpolar volatile organic compounds show very low retention and are eluted ahead of the water. After transfer of the analytes to the capillary column, the retained bulk water is removed by backflushing the precolumn at elevated temperature. For direct injections of 120 microL of aqueous samples, the combined time for injection and preseparation is only 3.5 min. With this procedure, direct repetitive automated analyses of highly volatile polar compounds such as methanol or tetrahydrofuran can be performed, and a limit of quantification in the low parts-per-billion region utilizing a flame ionization detector is demonstrated.

  16. Double-layer poly(vinyl alcohol)-coated capillary for highly sensitive and stable capillary electrophoresis and capillary electrophoresis with mass spectrometry glycan analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Wei; Zhao, Ming-Zhe; Liu, Jing-Xin; Zhou, Ying-Lin; Zhang, Xin-Xiang

    2015-02-01

    Glycosylation plays an important role in protein conformations and functions as well as many biological activities. Capillary electrophoresis combined with various detection methods provided remarkable developments for high-sensitivity glycan profiling. The coating of the capillary is needed for highly polar molecules from complex biosamples. A poly(vinyl alcohol)-coated capillary is commonly utilized in the capillary electrophoresis separation of saccharides sample due to the high-hydrophilicity properties. A modified facile coating workflow was carried out to acquire a novel multiple-layer poly(vinyl alcohol)-coated capillary for highly sensitive and stable analysis of glycans. The migration time fluctuation was used as index in the optimization of layers and a double layer was finally chosen, considering both the effects and simplicity in fabrication. With migration time relative standard deviation less than 1% and theoretical plates kept stable during 100 consecutive separations, the method was presented to be suitable for the analysis of glycosylation with wide linear dynamic range and good reproducibility. The glycan profiling of enzymatically released N-glycans from human serum was obtained by the presented capillary electrophoresis method combined with mass spectrometry detection with acceptable results.

  17. Facile preparation of a stable and functionalizable hybrid monolith via ring-opening polymerization for capillary liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui; Ou, Junjie; Tang, Shouwan; Zhang, Zhenbin; Dong, Jing; Liu, Zhongshan; Zou, Hanfa

    2013-08-02

    An organic-inorganic hybrid monolith was prepared by a single-step ring-opening polymerization of octaglycidyldimethylsilyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) with poly(ethylenimine) (PEI). The obtained hybrid monoliths possessed high ordered 3D skeletal microstructure with dual retention mechanism that exhibits reversed-phase (RP) mechanism under polar mobile phase and hydrophilic-interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) retention mechanism under less polar mobile phase. The high column efficiencies of 110,000N/m can be achieved for separation of alkylbenzenes in capillary reversed-phase liquid chromatography (cLC). Due to the robust property of hybrid monolith and the rich primary and secondary amino groups on its surface, the resulting hybrid monolith was easily modified with γ-gluconolactone and physically coated with cellulose tris(3,5-dimethylphenylcarbamate) (CDMPC), respectively. The former was successfully applied for HILIC separation of neutral, basic and acidic polar compounds as well as small peptides, and the latter for enantioseparation of racemates in cLC. The high column efficiencies were achieved in all of those separations. These results demonstrated that the hybrid monolith (POSS-PEI) possessed high stability and good surface tailorbility, potentially being applied for other research fields.

  18. Electronic simulation of the supported liquid membrane in electromembrane extraction systems: Improvement of the extraction by precise periodical reversing of the field polarity.

    PubMed

    Moazami, Hamid Reza; Nojavan, Saeed; Zahedi, Pegah; Davarani, Saied Saeed Hosseiny

    2014-09-02

    In order to understand the limitations of electromebrane extraction procedure better, a simple equivalent circuit has been proposed for a supported liquid membrane consisting of a resistor and a low leakage capacitor in series. To verify the equivalent circuit, it was subjected to a simulated periodical polarity changing potential and the resulting time variation of the current was compared with that of a real electromembrane extraction system. The results showed a good agreement between the simulated current patterns and those of the real ones. In order to investigate the impact of various limiting factors, the corresponding values of the equivalent circuit were estimated for a real electromembrane extraction system and were attributed to the physical parameters of the extraction system. A dual charge transfer mechanism was proposed for electromembrane extraction by combining general migration equation and fundamental aspects derived from the simulation. Dual mechanism comprises a current dependent contribution of analyte in total current and could support the possibility of an improvement in performance of an electromembrane extraction by application of an asymmetric polarity changing potential. The optimization of frequency and duty cycle of the asymmetric polarity exchanging potential resulted in a higher recovery (2.17 times greater) in comparison with the conventional electromebrane extraction. The simulation also provided more quantitative approaches toward the investigation of the mechanism of extraction and contribution of different limiting factors in electromembrane extraction. Results showed that the buildup of the double layer is the main limiting factor and the Joule heating has lesser impact on the performance of an electromebrane extraction system.

  19. Capillary action liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Bergström, Edmund T; Goodall, David M; Myers, Peter

    2009-06-01

    Capillary action LC (caLC) is introduced as a technique using capillary action as the driving force to perform LC in capillary columns packed with HPLC type microparticulate materials. A dry packing method with centrifugal force was developed to prepare capillary columns in parallel (10 columns per 3 min) to support their disposable use in caLC. Using a digital microscope for real-time imaging and recording separations of components in a dye mixture, caLC was found to have flow characteristics similar to TLC. Based on the investigation of microparticulate HPLC silica gels of different size (1.5-10 microm) and a typical TLC grade irregular medium, Merck 60G silica, the van Deemter curves suggested molecular diffusion as the major contribution to band broadening in caLC. With Waters Xbridge 2.6 microm silica, plate heights down to 8.8 microm were obtained, comparable to those achievable in HPLC. Assisted by an image-processing method, the visual caLC separation was converted to a classical chromatogram for further data analysis and such a facility confirmed the observation of highly efficient bands.

  20. Alternating-Polarity Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Brief reversing polarity of welding current greatly improves quality of welds. NASA technical memorandum recounts progress in art of variable-polarity plasma-arc (VPPA) welding, with emphasis on welding of aluminum-alloy tanks. VPPA welders offer important advantages over conventional single-polarity gas/tungsten arc welders.

  1. A robust method for iodine status determination in epidemiological studies by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    de Macedo, Adriana Nori; Teo, Koon; Mente, Andrew; McQueen, Matthew J; Zeidler, Johannes; Poirier, Paul; Lear, Scott A; Wielgosz, Andy; Britz-McKibbin, Philip

    2014-10-21

    Iodine deficiency is the most common preventable cause of intellectual disabilities in children. Global health initiatives to ensure optimum nutrition thus require continuous monitoring of population-wide iodine intake as determined by urinary excretion of iodide. Current methods to analyze urinary iodide are limited by complicated sample pretreatment, costly infrastructure, and/or poor selectivity, posing restrictions to large-scale epidemiological studies. We describe a simple yet selective method to analyze iodide in volume-restricted human urine specimens stored in biorepositories by capillary electrophoresis (CE) with UV detection. Excellent selectivity is achieved when using an acidic background electrolyte in conjunction with dynamic complexation via α-cyclodextrin in an unmodified fused-silica capillary under reversed polarity. Sample self-stacking is developed as a novel online sample preconcentration method to boost sensitivity with submicromolar detection limits for iodide (S/N ≈ 3, 0.06 μM) directly in urine. This assay also allows for simultaneous analysis of environmental iodide uptake inhibitors, including thiocyanate and nitrate. Rigorous method validation confirmed good linearity (R(2) = 0.9998), dynamic range (0.20 to 4.0 μM), accuracy (average recovery of 93% at three concentration levels) and precision for reliable iodide determination in pooled urine specimens over 29 days of analysis (RSD = 11%, n = 87).

  2. Magnetic field reversal of electric polarization and magnetoelectric phase diagram of the hexaferrite Ba{sub 1.3}Sr{sub 0.7}Co{sub 0.9}Zn{sub 1.1}Fe{sub 10.8}Al{sub 1.2}O{sub 22}

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Shipeng; Yan, Liqin; Chai, Yisheng; Cong, Junzhuang; Sun, Young

    2014-01-20

    Low magnetic field reversal of electric polarization has been demonstrated in the multiferroic Y-type hexaferrite Ba{sub 1.3}Sr{sub 0.7}Co{sub 0.9}Zn{sub 1.1}Fe{sub 10.8}Al{sub 1.2}O{sub 22} single crystal. The maximum magnetoelectric coefficient at 200 K reaches 1065 ps/m near zero magnetic field. By a systematic investigation of magnetic field dependence of magnetic and dielectric responses at various temperatures, we obtained the magnetoelectric phase diagram describing the detailed evolution of the spin-induced ferroelectric phases with temperature and magnetic field. Below 225 K, the transverse spin cone can be stabilized at zero magnetic field, which is responsible for the reversal behavior of electric polarization. Our study reveals how to eventually achieve magnetic field reversal of electric polarization in hexaferrites at room temperature.

  3. Noise suppressing capillary separation system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Xue, Yongjun

    1996-07-30

    A noise-suppressing capillary separation system for detecting the real-time presence or concentration of an analyte in a sample is provided. The system contains a capillary separation means through which the analyte is moved, a coherent light source that generates a beam which is split into a reference beam and a sample beam that irradiate the capillary, and a detector for detecting the reference beam and the sample beam light that transmits through the capillary. The laser beam is of a wavelength effective to be absorbed by a chromophore in the capillary. The system includes a noise suppressing system to improve performance and accuracy without signal averaging or multiple scans.

  4. Polarization reversal and electrocaloric measurements for field-enforced transitions in the system lead zirconate-lead titanate-lead oxide: tin oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Tuttle, B.A.

    1982-01-01

    The Pb(Zr, Sn, Ti)O/sub 3/ crystalline solution series (PZST) has several phases of near equal free energy, allowing field-enforceable antiferroelectric (AFE) to ferroelectric (FE) and paraelectric (PE) to ferroelectric (FE) transitions. An understanding of the stability of FE, AFE, and PE phases with respect to chemical composition, electric field and temperature was developed from low frequency polarization vs electric field measurements at different temperatures. All materials studied had a sequence of phase transitions FE-AFE-PE with increasing temperature. The temperature range of AFE phase stability increased with increasing Zr/Ti ratio, while SnO/sub 2/ content increased the stability over a wider compositional range. Thus, through compositional modification, some materials were fabricated that had an AFE temperature range of stability of only 3/sup 0/C, while for others the temperature range of AFE phase stability was in excess of 100/sup 0/C.

  5. Tandem mass spectrometry with online high-flow reversed-phase extraction and normal-phase chromatography on silica columns with aqueous-organic mobile phase for quantitation of polar compounds in biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yuzhong; Zhang, Hongwei; Wu, Jing-Tao; Olah, Timothy V

    2005-01-01

    In this work, high-flow online reversed-phase extraction was coupled with normal phase on silica columns with aqueous-organic mobile phase liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) to quantify drug candidates in biological fluids. The orthogonal separation effect obtained from this configuration considerably reduced matrix effects and increased sensitivity for highly polar compounds as detected by selected reaction monitoring. This approach also significantly improved the robustness and limit of detection of the assays. An evaluation of this system was performed using a mixture of albuterol and bamethan in rat plasma. Assay validation demonstrated acceptable accuracy (< 8% difference) and precision (< 6% CV) for these model compounds. The system has been used for the quantitation of polar ionic compounds in biological fluids in support of drug discovery programs. This assay was used to analyze samples for a BMS proprietary compound (A) in a rat pharmacokinetic study and is shown as an example to demonstrate the precision, accuracy, and sufficient sensitivity of this system.

  6. Capillary Isoelectric Focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markuszewski, Michał J.; Bujak, Renata; Daghir, Emilia

    Capillary isoelectric focusing (CIEF) is a widespread technique for the analysis of peptides and proteins in biological samples. CIEF is used to separate mixtures of compounds on the basis of differences in their isoelectric point. Aspects of sample preparation, capillary selection, zone mobilization procedures as well as various detection modes used have been described and discussed. Moreover CIEF, coupled to various types of detection techniques (MALDI or LIF), has increasingly been applied to the analysis of variety different high-molecular compounds. CIEF is considered as a highly specific analytical method which may be routinely used in the separation of rare hemoglobin variants. In addition, the application of CIEF in proteomic field have been discussed on the examples of analyses of glycoproteins and immunoglobins due to the meaning in clinical diagnostic.

  7. Enantioseparations by capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Fanali, S; Catarcini, P; Blaschke, G; Chankvetadze, B

    2001-09-01

    The review summarizes recent developments in enantioseparations by capillary electrochromatography (CEC). Selected fundamental aspects of CEC are discussed in order to stress those features which may allow the success of this technique in the competitive field of enantioseparations. In addition, the comparative characteristics of the different modes of chiral CEC and the stationary phases are presented. The effects of the characteristics of the stationary and liquid phases and operational conditions on the separation results are discussed. Finally, some future trends are briefly addressed.

  8. Automated Parallel Capillary Electrophoretic System

    DOEpatents

    Li, Qingbo; Kane, Thomas E.; Liu, Changsheng; Sonnenschein, Bernard; Sharer, Michael V.; Kernan, John R.

    2000-02-22

    An automated electrophoretic system is disclosed. The system employs a capillary cartridge having a plurality of capillary tubes. The cartridge has a first array of capillary ends projecting from one side of a plate. The first array of capillary ends are spaced apart in substantially the same manner as the wells of a microtitre tray of standard size. This allows one to simultaneously perform capillary electrophoresis on samples present in each of the wells of the tray. The system includes a stacked, dual carousel arrangement to eliminate cross-contamination resulting from reuse of the same buffer tray on consecutive executions from electrophoresis. The system also has a gel delivery module containing a gel syringe/a stepper motor or a high pressure chamber with a pump to quickly and uniformly deliver gel through the capillary tubes. The system further includes a multi-wavelength beam generator to generate a laser beam which produces a beam with a wide range of wavelengths. An off-line capillary reconditioner thoroughly cleans a capillary cartridge to enable simultaneous execution of electrophoresis with another capillary cartridge. The streamlined nature of the off-line capillary reconditioner offers the advantage of increased system throughput with a minimal increase in system cost.

  9. Multimode metal-lined capillaries for Raman collection and sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Buric, Michael P; Chen, Kevin P; Falk, Joel; Woodruff, Steven D

    2010-12-01

    Reflective metal-lined capillary waveguides are useful for laser-power delivery or for collecting scattered light in sensing applications. We theoretically examine the multimode propagation of polarized light in large-diameter, metallized, capillary waveguides using a new perturbation technique valid for all waveguide modes. This modeling permits prediction of the collection efficiency of Raman or fluorescent light produced in the waveguide at all angles. These theoretical results are supported by measuring the intensity and angular distribution of collected scattered gas–Raman Stokes power.

  10. Preferential polarization and its reversal in polycrystalline BiFeO3/La0.5Sr0.5CoO3 heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy Choudhury, Palash; Parui, Jayanta; Chiniwar, Santosh; Krupanidhi, S. B.

    2015-04-01

    Polycrystalline BiFeO3 thin films were grown on La0.5Sr0.5CoO3 buffered Pt (200)/TiO2/SiO2/Si substrates under different oxygen partial pressures (10, 25, 50 and 100 mTorr) by pulsed laser ablation. Piezoresponse Force Microscopy and Piezo-Force Spectroscopy have shown that all the films are ferroelectric in nature with locally switchable domains. It has also revealed a preferential downward domain orientation in as-grown films grown under lower oxygen partial pressure (10 and 25 mTorr) with a reversal of preferential domain orientation as the oxygen partial pressure is increased to 100 mTorr during laser ablation. Such phenomena are atypical of multi-grained polycrystalline ferroelectric films and have been discussed on the basis of defect formation with changing growth conditions. For the 50 mTorr grown film, asymmetric domain stability and retention during write-read studies has been observed which is attributed to grain-size-related defect concentration, affecting pinning centres that inhibit domain wall motion.

  11. Hydrophilic interaction and reversed phase mixed-mode liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution tandem mass spectrometry for polar lipids analysis.

    PubMed

    Granafei, Sara; Azzone, Pietro; Spinelli, Vito Alessandro; Losito, Ilario; Palmisano, Francesco; Cataldi, Tommaso R I

    2016-12-16

    A hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) fused-core column (150×2.1mm ID, 2.7μm particle size) and a short reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) column (20mm×2.1mm ID, 1.9μm) were serially coupled to perform mixed-mode chromatography (MMC) on complex mixtures of phospholipids (PL). Mobile phase composition and gradient elution program were, preliminarily, optimized using a mixture of phosphatidylcholines (PC), phosphatidylethanolamines (PE), their corresponding lyso-forms (LPC and LPE), and sphingomyelins (SM). Thus a mixture of PC extracted from soybean was characterized by MMC coupled to electrospray ionization (ESI) high-resolution Fourier-transform mass spectrometry (FTMS) using an orbital trap analyzer. Several previously undiscovered PC, including positional isomers (i.e. 16:0/19:1 and 19:1/16:0) of PC 35:1 and skeletal isomers (i.e. 18:1/18:2 and 18:0/18:3) of PC 36:3 were identified. Therefore, high-resolution MS/MS spectra unveiled the occurrence of isomers for several overall side chain compositions. The proposed MMC-ESI-FTMS/MS approach revealed an unprecedented capability in disclosing complexity of an actual lipid extract, thus representing a very promising approach to lipidomics.

  12. Prazosin Can Prevent Glucocorticoid Mediated Capillary Rarefaction

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Erin R.; Dunford, Emily C.; Trifonova, Anastassia; Abdifarkosh, Ghoncheh; Teich, Trevor; Riddell, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) elicit skeletal muscle capillary rarefaction, which can subsequently impair blood distribution and muscle function; however, the mechanisms have not been established. We hypothesized that CORT would inhibit endothelial cell survival signals but that treatment with the alpha-1 adrenergic receptor inhibitor prazosin, which leads to angiogenesis in skeletal muscle of healthy rats, would reverse these effects and induce angiogenesis within the skeletal muscle of corticosterone (CORT)-treated rats. Male Sprague Dawley rats were implanted subcutaneously with CORT pellets (400 mg/rat), with or without concurrent prazosin treatment (50mg/L in drinking water), for 1 or 2 weeks. Skeletal muscle capillary rarefaction, as indicated by a significant reduction in capillary-to-fiber ratio (C:F), occurred after 2 weeks of CORT treatment. Concurrent prazosin administration prevented this capillary rarefaction in CORT-treated animals but did not induce angiogenesis or arteriogenesis as was observed with prazosin treatment in control rats. CORT treatment reduced the mRNA level of Angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1), which was partially offset in the muscles of rats that received 2 weeks of co-treatment with prazosin. In 2W CORT animals, prazosin treatment elicited a significant increase in vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) mRNA and protein. Conversely prazosin did not rescue CORT-induced reductions in transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGFβ1 and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) mRNA. To determine if CORT impaired shear stress dependent signaling, cultured rat skeletal muscle endothelial cells were pre-treated with CORT (600nM) for 48 hours, then exposed to 15 dynes/cm2 shear stress or maintained with no flow. CORT blunted the shear stress-induced increase in pSer473 Akt, while pThr308 Akt, ERK1/2 and p38 phosphorylation and nitric oxide (NO) production were unaffected. This study demonstrates that GC-mediated capillary rarefaction is associated with a reduction

  13. Prazosin Can Prevent Glucocorticoid Mediated Capillary Rarefaction.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Erin R; Dunford, Emily C; Trifonova, Anastassia; Abdifarkosh, Ghoncheh; Teich, Trevor; Riddell, Michael C; Haas, Tara L

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) elicit skeletal muscle capillary rarefaction, which can subsequently impair blood distribution and muscle function; however, the mechanisms have not been established. We hypothesized that CORT would inhibit endothelial cell survival signals but that treatment with the alpha-1 adrenergic receptor inhibitor prazosin, which leads to angiogenesis in skeletal muscle of healthy rats, would reverse these effects and induce angiogenesis within the skeletal muscle of corticosterone (CORT)-treated rats. Male Sprague Dawley rats were implanted subcutaneously with CORT pellets (400 mg/rat), with or without concurrent prazosin treatment (50mg/L in drinking water), for 1 or 2 weeks. Skeletal muscle capillary rarefaction, as indicated by a significant reduction in capillary-to-fiber ratio (C:F), occurred after 2 weeks of CORT treatment. Concurrent prazosin administration prevented this capillary rarefaction in CORT-treated animals but did not induce angiogenesis or arteriogenesis as was observed with prazosin treatment in control rats. CORT treatment reduced the mRNA level of Angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1), which was partially offset in the muscles of rats that received 2 weeks of co-treatment with prazosin. In 2W CORT animals, prazosin treatment elicited a significant increase in vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) mRNA and protein. Conversely prazosin did not rescue CORT-induced reductions in transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGFβ1 and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) mRNA. To determine if CORT impaired shear stress dependent signaling, cultured rat skeletal muscle endothelial cells were pre-treated with CORT (600nM) for 48 hours, then exposed to 15 dynes/cm2 shear stress or maintained with no flow. CORT blunted the shear stress-induced increase in pSer473 Akt, while pThr308 Akt, ERK1/2 and p38 phosphorylation and nitric oxide (NO) production were unaffected. This study demonstrates that GC-mediated capillary rarefaction is associated with a reduction

  14. The Matuyama-Brunhes polarity reversal in four Chinese loess records: high-fidelity recording of geomagnetic field behavior or a less than reliable chronostratigraphic marker?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xisheng; Løvlie, Reidar; Chen, Yun; Yang, Zhenyu; Pei, Junling; Tang, Ling

    2014-10-01

    The paleomagnetic recording fidelity of Chinese loess has been a matter of long-term dispute. To help shed light on the acquisition/retention mechanisms of natural remanent magnetization in loess, we report on high-sampling-resolution paleomagnetic constraints on the position of the Matuyama-Brunhes Boundary (MBB) in four typical loess sections in different marginal areas of the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP), each of which has experienced different East Asian winter/summer monsoon strengths and pedogenic intensities. Detailed thermal demagnetization experiments for 1850 specimens reveal that none of the high-accumulation-rate loess with the weakest pedogenesis at Caotan (western CLP), the massive Pedogenesis loess characterized by extensive development of thick calcareous nodule layers at Jixian (SE CLP), and the moderately pedogenized loess at Fanshan (NE CLP) have preserved high-fidelity geomagnetic records across the MBBs. Jiuzhoutai (western CLP), one of the thickest loess profiles in the world, contains the thickest, and hitherto the most complex MBB that is too extensive to be regarded as rapid fluctuations of geomagnetic field during the M/B reversal. At Jixian, a predominance of pedogenesis-induced chemical remanent magnetization overprinting has heavily obscured the original remanence. The significant downward displacement of the MBB at Fanshan and even its total absence at Caotan, together with extensive remagnetization of the coarse-grained ‘upper sandy loess layer’ (L9) in both sections, further suggest that the processes of remanence acquisition/retention of Chinese loess in the marginal areas of the CLP are rather complicated. Thus, interpretations of the fine structure of geomagnetic transitional field behavior and ‘excursions’, especially in the Matuyama Chron, should be regarded with caution.

  15. Capillary reference half-cell

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Stephen H.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention is a reference half-cell electrode wherein intermingling of test fluid with reference fluid does not affect the performance of the reference half-cell over a long time. This intermingling reference half-cell may be used as a single or double junction submersible or surface reference electrode. The intermingling reference half-cell relies on a capillary tube having a first end open to reference fluid and a second end open to test fluid wherein the small diameter of the capillary tube limits free motion of fluid within the capillary to diffusion. The electrode is placed near the first end of the capillary in contact with the reference fluid. The method of operation of the present invention begins with filling the capillary tube with a reference solution. After closing the first end of the capillary, the capillary tube may be fully submerged or partially submerged with the second open end inserted into test fluid. Since the electrode is placed near the first end of the capillary, and since the test fluid may intermingle with the reference fluid through the second open end only by diffusion, this intermingling capillary reference half-cell provides a stable voltage potential for long time periods.

  16. Capillary reference half-cell

    DOEpatents

    Hall, S.H.

    1996-02-13

    The present invention is a reference half-cell electrode wherein intermingling of test fluid with reference fluid does not affect the performance of the reference half-cell over a long time. This intermingling reference half-cell may be used as a single or double junction submersible or surface reference electrode. The intermingling reference half-cell relies on a capillary tube having a first end open to reference fluid and a second end open to test fluid wherein the small diameter of the capillary tube limits free motion of fluid within the capillary to diffusion. The electrode is placed near the first end of the capillary in contact with the reference fluid. The method of operation of the present invention begins with filling the capillary tube with a reference solution. After closing the first end of the capillary, the capillary tube may be fully submerged or partially submerged with the second open end inserted into test fluid. Since the electrode is placed near the first end of the capillary, and since the test fluid may intermingle with the reference fluid through the second open end only by diffusion, this intermingling capillary reference half-cell provides a stable voltage potential for long time periods. 11 figs.

  17. Capillary rogue waves.

    PubMed

    Shats, M; Punzmann, H; Xia, H

    2010-03-12

    We report the first observation of extreme wave events (rogue waves) in parametrically driven capillary waves. Rogue waves are observed above a certain threshold in forcing. Above this threshold, frequency spectra broaden and develop exponential tails. For the first time we present evidence of strong four-wave coupling in nonlinear waves (high tricoherence), which points to modulation instability as the main mechanism in rogue waves. The generation of rogue waves is identified as the onset of a distinct tail in the probability density function of the wave heights. Their probability is higher than expected from the measured wave background.

  18. Development of a lipid profiling system using reverse-phase liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry with rapid polarity switching and an automated lipid identification software.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takayuki; Uchikata, Takato; Sakamoto, Shigeru; Yokoi, Yasuto; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Bamba, Takeshi

    2013-05-31

    Lipidomics requires accurate lipid profiling, which until recently has been challenging at best. In the present study, we developed a practical workflow for high-throughput and exhaustive lipid profiling by combining reverse-phase liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole orbitrap Fourier transform mass spectrometry, with an automated lipid identification software. This validated method enables highly sensitive and simultaneous analysis of lipids with varying polarities such as glycerophospholipids and sphingophospholipids, by switching the acquisition polarities in mass spectrometry. In addition, it facilitates data-dependent MS(2) analysis targeting the lipid molecular species without any influence from other ions by setting the inclusion list, the target m/z list for the product ion scanning. The m/z values of the target lipid molecular species, stored in the database of Lipid Search software, are added to the inclusion list. Moreover, optimizing the identification conditions of the software for the LC/MS system enables high-throughput and accurate identification of lipid molecular species existing in biological samples. Specifically, LC separation is essential for accurate identification of lipid molecular species that possess some fatty acid chains, because it can be difficult to determine fatty acid chain composition of detected molecular species especially in triacylglycerol compounds in direct infusion mass spectrometry. This method has high reproducibility and can be used for structural analysis even for low-abundance compounds. Using this method, over 400 lipid compounds targeted in this research were detected and identified from a sample of mouse plasma. This result indicates that the LC/MS method in the present study enables efficient lipid profiling.

  19. Capillary suspensions: Particle networks formed through the capillary force

    PubMed Central

    Koos, Erin

    2014-01-01

    The addition of small amounts of a secondary fluid to a suspension can, through the attractive capillary force, lead to particle bridging and network formation. The capillary bridging phenomenon can be used to stabilize particle suspensions and precisely tune their rheological properties. This effect can even occur when the secondary fluid wets the particles less well than the bulk fluid. These materials, so-called capillary suspensions, have been the subject of recent research studying the mechanism for network formation, the properties of these suspensions, and how the material properties can be modified. Recent work in colloidal clusters is summarized and the relationship to capillary suspensions is discussed. Capillary suspensions can also be used as a pathway for new material design and some of these applications are highlighted. Results obtained to date are summarized and central questions that remain to be answered are proposed in this review. PMID:25729316

  20. Capillary-mediated interface perturbations: Deterministic pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glicksman, Martin E.

    2016-09-01

    Leibniz-Reynolds analysis identifies a 4th-order capillary-mediated energy field that is responsible for shape changes observed during melting, and for interface speed perturbations during crystal growth. Field-theoretic principles also show that capillary-mediated energy distributions cancel over large length scales, but modulate the interface shape on smaller mesoscopic scales. Speed perturbations reverse direction at specific locations where they initiate inflection and branching on unstable interfaces, thereby enhancing pattern complexity. Simulations of pattern formation by several independent groups of investigators using a variety of numerical techniques confirm that shape changes during both melting and growth initiate at locations predicted from interface field theory. Finally, limit cycles occur as an interface and its capillary energy field co-evolve, leading to synchronized branching. Synchronous perturbations produce classical dendritic structures, whereas asynchronous perturbations observed in isotropic and weakly anisotropic systems lead to chaotic-looking patterns that remain nevertheless deterministic.

  1. Tapered capillary optics

    DOEpatents

    Hirsch, Gregory

    1998-01-01

    A metal or glass wire is etched with great precision into a very narrowly tapering cone which has the shape of the desired final capillary-optics bore. By controlling the rate of removal of the wire from an etchant bath, a carefully controlled taper is produced. A sensor measures the diameter of the wire as it leaves the surface of the etchant. This signal is used for feedback control of the withdrawal speed. The etched wire undergoes a treatment to produce an extremely low surface-roughness. The etched and smoothed wire is coated with the material of choice for optimizing the reflectivity of the radiation being focused. This could be a vacuum evaporation, sputtering, CVD or aqueous chemical process. The coated wire is either electroplated, built up with electroless plating, or encapsulated in a polymer cylinder such as epoxy to increase the diameter of the wire for easier handling and greater robustness. During this process, the wire is vertically oriented and tensioned to assure that the wire is absolutely straight. The coated and electroformed wire is bonded to a flat, rigid substrate and is then periodically segmented by cutting or etching a series of narrow slits or grooves into the wire. The wire is vertically oriented and tensioned during the bonding process to assure that it is straight. The original wire material is then chemically etched away through the slits or otherwise withdrawn to leave the hollow internal bore of the final tapered-capillary optical element.

  2. Interaction between Polymeric Additives and Secondary Fluids in Capillary Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Bitsch, Boris; Braunschweig, Björn; Willenbacher, Norbert

    2016-02-16

    Capillary suspensions are ternary systems including a solid and two liquid phases representing a novel formulation platform for pastes with unique processing and end-use properties. Here we have investigated aqueous suspensions of non-Brownian graphite particles including different polymers commonly used as thickening agents or binders in paste formulations. We have studied the interaction between these additives and organic solvents in order to elucidate its effect on the characteristic formation of a particle network structure in corresponding ternary capillary suspension systems. Organic solvents with different polarity have been employed, and in the presence of nonadsorbing poly(ethylene oxide), all of them, whether they preferentially wet the graphite surface or not, induce the formation of a network structure within the suspension as indicated by a strong change in rheological properties. However, when the adsorbing polymers carboxymethylcellulose and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) are included, the drastic change in rheological behavior occurs only when polar organic solvents are used as secondary liquids. Obviously, these solvents can form pendular bridges, finally resulting in a sample-spanning particle network. Vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy provides evidence that these polar liquids remove the adsorbed polymer from the graphite particles. In contrast, nonpolar and nonwetting solvents do not force polymer desorption. In these cases, the formation of a percolating network structure within the suspensions is presumably prevented by the strong steric repulsion among graphite particles, not allowing for the formation of particle clusters encapsulating the secondary liquid. Accordingly, polymeric additives and secondary fluids have to be carefully selected in capillary suspension formulations, then offering a new pathway to customize paste formulations. The polymer may serve to adjust an appropriate viscosity level, and the capillary bridging induces the

  3. On Capillary Rise and Nucleation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasad, R.

    2008-01-01

    A comparison of capillary rise and nucleation is presented. It is shown that both phenomena result from a balance between two competing energy factors: a volume energy and a surface energy. Such a comparison may help to introduce nucleation with a topic familiar to the students, capillary rise. (Contains 1 table and 3 figures.)

  4. Capillary optics for radiation focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Peurrung, A.J.; Reeder, P.L.; Bliss, M.; Craig, R.A.; Lepel, E.A.; Stromswold, D.C.; Stoffels, J.; Sunberg, D.S.; Tenny, H.

    1996-11-01

    Capillary lens technology may ultimately bring benefits to neutron and x-ray-based science like conventional lenses with visible light. Although the technology is not yet 10 years old, these lenses have already had a significant impact in engineering, science, and medicine. Capillary lenses are advantageous when it is desirable to increase the radiation flux at a location without regard to its angular divergence. PNNL has worked to improve the technology in several ways. A single, optimally tapered capillary was manufactured, which allows intensity gains of a factor of 270 for an initially parallel, incident x-ray beam. Feasibility of constructing neutron lenses using {sup 58}Ni (particularly effective at reflecting neutrons) has been explored. Three applications for capillary optics have been identified and studied: neutron telescope, Gandolphi x-ray diffractometry, and neutron radiotherapy. A brief guide is given for determining which potential applications are likely to be helped by capillary optics.

  5. Noise suppressing capillary separation system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Xue, Y.

    1996-07-30

    A noise-suppressing capillary separation system for detecting the real-time presence or concentration of an analyte in a sample is provided. The system contains a capillary separation means through which the analyte is moved, a coherent light source that generates a beam which is split into a reference beam and a sample beam that irradiate the capillary, and a detector for detecting the reference beam and the sample beam light that transmits through the capillary. The laser beam is of a wavelength effective to be absorbed by a chromophore in the capillary. The system includes a noise suppressing system to improve performance and accuracy without signal averaging or multiple scans. 13 figs.

  6. Geometry-induced capillary emptying.

    PubMed

    Rascón, Carlos; Parry, Andrew O; Aarts, Dirk G A L

    2016-10-24

    When a capillary is half-filled with liquid and turned to the horizontal, the liquid may flow out of the capillary or remain in it. For lack of a better criterion, the standard assumption is that the liquid will remain in a capillary of narrow cross-section, and will flow out otherwise. Here, we present a precise mathematical criterion that determines which of the two outcomes occurs for capillaries of arbitrary cross-sectional shape, and show that the standard assumption fails for certain simple geometries, leading to very rich and counterintuitive behavior. This opens the possibility of creating very sensitive microfluidic devices that respond readily to small physical changes, for instance, by triggering the sudden displacement of fluid along a capillary without the need of any external pumping.

  7. Biomedical applications of capillary electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartsova, L. A.; Bessonova, E. A.

    2015-08-01

    The review deals with modern analytical approaches used in capillary electrophoresis for solving medical and biological problems: search for biomarkers of various diseases and rapid diagnosis based on characteristic profiles of biologically active compounds by capillary electrophoresis with mass spectrometric detection; monitoring of the residual drugs in biological fluids for evaluating the efficiency of drug therapy; testing of the enantiomeric purity of pharmaceutical products; the use of novel materials as components of stationary and pseudo-stationary phases in capillary electrophoresis and capillary electrochromatography to increase the selectivity of separation of components of complex matrices; and identification of various on-line preconcentration techniques to reduce the detection limits of biologically active analytes. A topical trend in capillary electrophoresis required in clinical practice, viz., the design of microfluidic systems, is discussed. The bibliography includes 173 references.

  8. Microfluidic flow counterbalanced capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ling; Dutta, Debashis

    2013-04-07

    Flow counterbalanced capillary electrophoresis (FCCE) offers a powerful approach to realizing difficult charge based separations in compact microchip devices with application of relatively small electrical voltages. The need for dynamically controlling the pressure-gradient in the FCCE column however presents a significant challenge in implementing this technique on the microchip platform. In this article, we report the use of a simple on-chip pumping unit that allows precise introduction of a periodic pressure-driven backflow into a microfluidic separation channel enabling an FCCE analysis. The backflow in our device was produced by fabricating a shallow segment (0.5 μm deep) downstream of the analysis column (5 μm deep) and applying an electric field across it. A mismatch in the electroosmotic transport rate at the interface of this segment was shown to yield a pressure-gradient that could reverse the flow of the analyte bands without inverting the direction of the electric field. Although such a pressure-gradient also led to additional band broadening in the system, overall, the separation resolution of our device was observed to improve with an increasing number of back-and-forth sample passes through the analysis channel. For our current design, the corresponding improvement in the effective separation length was as much as 52% of the actual distance travelled by the chosen FITC-labeled amino acid samples. The reported device is well suited for further miniaturization of the FCCE method to the nanofluidic length scale which likely would improve its performance, and is easily integrable to other analytical procedures on the microchip platform for lab-on-a-chip applications.

  9. Sulfated and sulfonated polysaccharide as chiral stationary phases for capillary electrochromatography and capillary electrochromatography–mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jie; Bragg, William; Hou, Jingguo; Lin, Na; Chandrasekaran, Sekar; Shamsi, Shahab A.

    2009-01-01

    The applications of polysaccharide phenyl carbamate derivatives as chiral stationary phases (CSPs) for capillary electrochromatography (CEC) are often hindered by longer retention times, especially using a normal-phase (NP) eluent due to very low electroosmotic flow (EOF). Therefore, in this study, we propose an approach for the aforementioned problems by introducing two new types of negatively charged sulfate and sulfonated groups for polysaccharide CSPs. These CSPs were utilized to pack CEC columns for enantioseparation with a NP eluent. Compared to conventional cellulose tris(3,5-dimethylphenyl carbamate) or CDMPC CSPs, the sulfated CDMPC CSP (sulfur content 4.25%, w/w) shortened the analysis time up to 50% but with a significant loss of enantiomeric resolution (~60%). On the other hand, the sulfonated CDMPC CSP (sulfur content 1.76%, w/w) not only provided fast throughput but also maintained excellent resolving power. In addition, its synthesis is much more straightforward than the sulfated one. Furthermore, we studied several stationary phase parameters (CSP loading and silica gel pore size) and mobile phase parameters (including type of mobile phase and its composition) to evaluate the throughput and enantioselectivity. Using the optimized conditions, a chiral pool containing 66 analytes was screened to evaluate the enantioselectivity under three different mobile phase modes (i.e., NP, polar organic phase (POP) and reversed-phase (RP) eluents). Among these mobile phase modes, the RP mode showed the highest success rate, whereas some degree of complementary enantioselectivity was observed with NP and POP. Finally, the feasibility of applying this CSP for CEC–MS enantioseparation using internal tapered column was evaluated with NP, POP and RP eluents. In particular, the NP-CEC–MS provided significantly enhanced sensitivity when methanol was replaced with isopropanol in the sheath liquid. Using aminog-lutethimide as model chiral analyte, all three modes of

  10. Quaternary ammonium substituted agarose as surface coating for capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Ullsten, Sara; Söderberg, Lennart; Folestad, Staffan; Markides, Karin E

    2004-05-01

    A novel positively charged polymer of quaternary ammonium substituted agarose (Q-agarose) has been synthesized and explored for use as a coating in capillary electrophoresis. The fast and simple coating procedure is based on a multi-site electrostatic interaction between the polycationic agarose polymer and the negatively charged fused-silica surface. By simply flushing fused-silica capillaries with hot polymer solution a positively charged, hydrophilic deactivation layer is achieved. The polymer surface provides an intermediate electroosmotic flow of reversed direction, over a range of pH 2-11, compared to unmodified fused-silica. The coating procedure was highly reproducible with an RSD of 4%, evaluated as the electroosmotic flow mobility for 30 capillaries prepared at 10 different occasions. The application of Q-agarose coated capillaries in separation science was investigated using a set of basic drugs and model proteins and peptides. Due to the intermediate electroosmotic flow generated, the resolution of basic drugs could be increased, compared to using bare fused-silica capillaries. Moreover, the coating enabled separation of proteins and peptides with efficiencies up to 300.000 plates m(-1).

  11. Capillary ratchet: Hydrodynamics of capillary feeding in shorebirds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Manu; Quere, David; Bush, John

    2008-03-01

    Bill morphologies are highly specialized to particular foraging strategies in birds, as is apparent from the large diversity of beak shapes observed in nature. Here we present an experimental and analytical study of capillary feeding in shorebirds. We highlight the critical role of contact angle hysteresis in capillary feeding. Our study provides a simple physical rationalization for the observation of multiple mandibular spreading cycles in feeding, necessary to overcome contact line resistance. We also find a unique geometrical optima in beak opening and closing angles for the most efficient drop transport. This capillary ratchet mechanism may also find applications in micro scale fluid transport, such as valveless pumping of fluid drops.

  12. Capillaries for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Chang, H.T.; Fung, E.N.

    1997-12-09

    The invention provides a side-entry optical excitation geometry for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system. A charge-injection device is optically coupled to capillaries in the array such that the interior of a capillary is imaged onto only one pixel. In Sanger-type 4-label DNA sequencing reactions, nucleotide identification (``base calling``) is improved by using two long-pass filters to split fluorescence emission into two emission channels. A binary poly(ethyleneoxide) matrix is used in the electrophoretic separations. 19 figs.

  13. Capillaries for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Chang, Huan-Tsang; Fung, Eliza N.

    1997-12-09

    The invention provides a side-entry optical excitation geometry for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system. A charge-injection device is optically coupled to capillaries in the array such that the interior of a capillary is imaged onto only one pixel. In Sanger-type 4-label DNA sequencing reactions, nucleotide identification ("base calling") is improved by using two long-pass filters to split fluorescence emission into two emission channels. A binary poly(ethyleneoxide) matrix is used in the electrophoretic separations.

  14. Steady Capillary Driven Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weislogel, Mark M.

    1996-01-01

    A steady capillary driven flow is developed for a liquid index in a circular tube which is partially coated with a surface modifier to produce a discontinuous wetting condition from one side of the tube to the other. The bulk flow is novel in that it is truly steady, and controlled solely by the physics associated with dynamic wetting. The influence of gravity on the flow is minimized through the use of small diameter tubes approximately O(1 mm) tested horizontally in a laboratory and larger tubes approximately O(10 mm) tested in the low gravity environment of a drop tower. Average steady velocities are predicted and compared against a large experimental data set which includes the effects of tube dimensions and fluid properties. The sensitivity of the velocity to surface cleanliness is dramatic and the advantages of experimentation in a microgravity environment are discussed.

  15. A capillary Archimedes' screw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darbois Texier, Baptiste; Dorbolo, Stephane

    2014-11-01

    As used by Egyptians for irrigation and reported by Archimedes, a screw turning inside a hollow pipe can pull out a fluid againt gravity. At a centimetric scale, an analagous system can be found with a drop pending on a rotating spiral which is tilted toward the horizontal. The ascent of the drop to the top of the spiral is considered and a theoretical model based on geometrical considerations is proposed. The climb of the drop is limited by the fluid deposition on the screw at high capillary number and by a centrifugation phenomenon. We find out the range of fluid proprities and spiral characteristics for which an ascending motion of the drop is possible. Finally we discuss the efficiency of such system to extract a fluid from a bath at a centrimetric scale.

  16. Multidimensional capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Grochocki, Wojciech; Markuszewski, Michał J; Quirino, Joselito P

    2015-01-01

    Multidimensional separation where two or more orthogonal displacement mechanisms are combined is a promising approach to increase peak capacity in CE. The combinations allow dramatic improvement of analytical performance since the total peak capacity is given by a product of the peak capacities of all methods. The initial reports were concentrated on the construction of effective connections between capillaries for 2D analysis. Today, 2D and 3D CE systems are now able to separate real complex biological or environmental mixtures with good repeatability, improved resolution with minimal loss of sample. This review will present the developments in the field of multidimensional CE during the last 15 years. The endeavors in this specific field were on the development of interfaces, interface-free techniques including integrated separations, microdevices, and on-line sample concentration techniques to improve detection sensitivity.

  17. High productivity chromatographic separations on monolithic capillary columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolev, A. A.; Shiryaeva, V. E.; Popova, T. P.; Kurganov, A. A.

    2013-03-01

    The productivity of monolithic capillary columns based on silica gel and polymers of different polarities (divinylbenzene and ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate) is investigated using a model mixture of light hydrocarbons. It is shown that the productivity of a column is noticeably affected by the type of gas carrier. The highest productivity is observed when using carbon dioxide or dinitrogen monoxide as the gas carrier. The lowest productivity is observed when uisng hydrogen or helium.

  18. Polarized cells, polar actions.

    PubMed

    Maddock, J R; Alley, M R; Shapiro, L

    1993-11-01

    The recognition of polar bacterial organization is just emerging. The examples of polar localization given here are from a variety of bacterial species and concern a disparate array of cellular functions. A number of well-characterized instances of polar localization of bacterial proteins, including the chemoreceptor complex in both C. crescentus and E. coli, the maltose-binding protein in E. coli, the B. japonicum surface attachment proteins, and the actin tail of L. monocytogenes within a mammalian cell, involve proteins or protein complexes that facilitate bacterial interaction with the environment, either the extracellular milieux or that within a plant or mammalian host. The significance of this observation remains unclear. Polarity in bacteria poses many problems, including the necessity for a mechanism for asymmetrically distributing proteins as well as a mechanism by which polar localization is maintained. Large structures, such as a flagellum, are anchored at the pole by means of the basal body that traverses the peptidoglycan wall. But for proteins and small complexes, whether in the periplasm or the membrane, one must invoke a mechanism that prevents the diffusion of these proteins away from the cell pole. Perhaps the periplasmic proteins are retained at the pole by the presence of the periseptal annulus (35). The constraining features for membrane components are not known. For large aggregates, such as the clusters of MCP, CheA, and CheW complexes, perhaps the size of the aggregate alone prevents displacement. In most cases of cellular asymmetry, bacteria are able to discriminate between the new pole and the old pole and to utilize this information for localization specificity. The maturation of new pole to old pole appears to be a common theme as well. Given numerous examples reported thus far, we propose that bacterial polarity displays specific rules and is a more general phenomenon than has been previously recognized.

  19. Instability of the capillary bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pare, Gounseti; Hoepffner, Jerome

    2014-11-01

    Capillary adhesion is a physical mechanism that maintains two bodies in contact by capillarity through a liquid ligament. The capillary bridge is an idealization of this capillary adhesion. In this study we first focus on the classical case of the stability of the capillary bridge. Secondly we study a slightly more complex configuration, imagining a flow in the capillary bridge as in the case of the dynamics of the neck of a liquid ligament, in its withdrawal under the effect of capillarity. Inspired by the experiments on soap films of Plateau, the configuration analyzed consists of an initially axisymmetric, mass of fluid held by surface tension forces between two parallel, coaxial, solid pipes of the same diameter. The results presented are obtained by numerical simulations using the free software, Gerris Flow Solver. We first focus on the capillary Venturi. In the static configuration the stability diagram of the capillary bridge obtained is in perfect agreement with the results of Lev A. Slobozhanin. In the dynamic case we develop a matlab code based on the one dimensional equations of Eggers and Dupont. The comparison of the bifurcation diagram obtained and the numerical simulations shows a good agreement.

  20. Inertial Rise in Short Capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shardt, Orest; Waghmare, Prashant; Mitra, Sushanta; Derksen, Jos

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the primarily inertial rise of liquid in vertical glass capillaries that are shorter than the equilibrium rise height (Jurin height). We focus on the behavior of the liquid upon reaching the top of the capillary and use high-speed imaging to observe the motion of the liquid-air interface with high spatial and temporal resolution. We examine the dependence of the interface behavior on the meniscus speed and capillary height and describe a new phenomenon. Upon reaching the upper edge of a sufficiently short capillary, the meniscus inverts, rises upward, and bulges out radially. The bulging liquid then wets the external surface of the capillary and slides down. The meniscus inside the capillary retracts, falling below the upper edge, and then oscillates vertically with decaying amplitude, inverting several times before reaching a steady shape. A theoretical analysis is used to interpret the conditions required for this phenomenon to occur. A key assumption in the analysis is that the transient flow is inertial and therefore the capillary driving force is balanced by the weight and inertia of the rising liquid column while viscous forces are comparatively small. The analysis points to the possibility of obtaining previously-unseen behavior under reduced gravity.

  1. Electrospraying from nanofluidic capillary slot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arscott, Steve; Troadec, David

    2005-09-01

    We present here an original electrospray emitter tip based on a nanofluidic capillary slot. The nanofabrication involves focused ion beam etching to form the slot which has a cross-section of 50×300nm and a length of 4μm. The liquid is deformed into the nanofluidic capillary slot by capillary action; the electrospray is produced by the application of a low voltage. Using a water-methanol-formic acid solution, we have observed an electrospray onset voltage of 125V. At a measured electrospray current of 1nA, the unforced flow-rate is estimated to be 110pLmin-1.

  2. Integrated multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Tan, Hongdong

    2002-05-14

    The present invention provides an integrated multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system for the analysis of sample analytes. The system integrates and automates multiple components, such as chromatographic columns and separation capillaries, and further provides a detector for the detection of analytes eluting from the separation capillaries. The system employs multiplexed freeze/thaw valves to manage fluid flow and sample movement. The system is computer controlled and is capable of processing samples through reaction, purification, denaturation, pre-concentration, injection, separation and detection in parallel fashion. Methods employing the system of the invention are also provided.

  3. Analysis of Capillary Rise in Asymmetric Branch-Like Capillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Caoxiong; Shen, Yinghao; Ge, Hongkui; Yang, Zhihui; Su, Shuai; Ren, Kai; Huang, Heyu

    2016-05-01

    Transport in porous media is common in nature, attracting many attentions for a long time. Tree-like network model is often used as a simplification for porous space, expressing the complexity of pore spaces instead of capillary bundle. To investigate spontaneous imbibition characteristics in this network, a dynamic asymmetric branch-like capillary model is used to represent basic network structure, using fractal method to represent tortuosity. This work investigates the influence of parameters on imbibition process in the branch-like capillary model. An analytical equation for the imbibition mass versus time is derived. Parameters from capillary structures to liquid properties are taken into account and analyzed based on the numerical solution of the equation. It is found that the imbibition process in asymmetric branch-like capillary model can be recognized by four sections and brunching tubes are positive for imbibition process. Concomitantly, meniscus arrest event is simulated and discussed. Moreover, the influence of parameters on imbibition process is discussed. These parameters can be classified as static and dynamic. Static parameters mainly change the capillary force, which are related to the ultimate imbibition mass or imbibition ability, while dynamic parameters mainly have influence on resistance of flowing fluid, which are related to the imbibition speed in the imbibition process.

  4. Capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry interface

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard D.; Severs, Joanne C.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is an interface between a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary end and an electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end, for transporting an anolyte sample from a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary to a electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary. The interface of the present invention has: (a) a charge transfer fitting enclosing both of the capillary electrophoresis capillary end and the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end; (b) a reservoir containing an electrolyte surrounding the charge transfer fitting; and (c) an electrode immersed into the electrolyte, the electrode closing a capillary electrophoresis circuit and providing charge transfer across the charge transfer fitting while avoiding substantial bulk fluid transfer across the charge transfer fitting. Advantages of the present invention have been demonstrated as effective in providing high sensitivity and efficient analyses.

  5. Capillary fracturing in granular media.

    PubMed

    Holtzman, Ran; Szulczewski, Michael L; Juanes, Ruben

    2012-06-29

    We study the displacement of immiscible fluids in deformable, noncohesive granular media. Experimentally, we inject air into a thin bed of water-saturated glass beads and observe the invasion morphology. The control parameters are the injection rate, the bead size, and the confining stress. We identify three invasion regimes: capillary fingering, viscous fingering, and "capillary fracturing," where capillary forces overcome frictional resistance and induce the opening of conduits. We derive two dimensionless numbers that govern the transition among the different regimes: a modified capillary number and a fracturing number. The experiments and analysis predict the emergence of fracturing in fine-grained media under low confining stress, a phenomenon that likely plays a fundamental role in many natural processes such as primary oil migration, methane venting from lake sediments, and the formation of desiccation cracks.

  6. Capillary Fracturing in Granular Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtzman, Ran; Szulczewski, Michael L.; Juanes, Ruben

    2012-06-01

    We study the displacement of immiscible fluids in deformable, noncohesive granular media. Experimentally, we inject air into a thin bed of water-saturated glass beads and observe the invasion morphology. The control parameters are the injection rate, the bead size, and the confining stress. We identify three invasion regimes: capillary fingering, viscous fingering, and “capillary fracturing,” where capillary forces overcome frictional resistance and induce the opening of conduits. We derive two dimensionless numbers that govern the transition among the different regimes: a modified capillary number and a fracturing number. The experiments and analysis predict the emergence of fracturing in fine-grained media under low confining stress, a phenomenon that likely plays a fundamental role in many natural processes such as primary oil migration, methane venting from lake sediments, and the formation of desiccation cracks.

  7. DNA typing by capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, N.

    1997-10-08

    Capillary electrophoresis is becoming more and more important in nucleic acid analysis including DNA sequencing, typing and disease gene measurements. This work summarized the background of DNA typing. The recent development of capillary electrophoresis was also discussed. The second part of the thesis showed the principle of DNA typing based on using the allelic ladder as the absolute standard ladder in capillary electrophoresis system. Future work will be focused on demonstrating DNA typing on multiplex loci and examples of disease diagnosis in the on-line format of PCR-CE. Also capillary array electrophoresis system should allow high throughput, fast speed DNA typing. Only the introduction and conclusions for this report are available here. A reprint was removed for separate processing.

  8. Polarization measurement through combination polarizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yunfeng; Li, Linjun; He, Zhelong; Liu, Yanwei; Ma, Cheng; Shi, Guang; Liu, Lu

    2014-02-01

    Polarization measurement approaches only using polarizer and grating is present. The combination polarizers consists of two polarizers: one is γ degree with the X axis; the other is along the Y axis. Binary grating is covered by the combination polarizers, and based on Fraunhofer diffraction, the diffraction intensity formula is deduced. The polarization state of incident light can be gotten by fitting the diffraction pattern with the deduced formula. Compared with the traditional polarization measurement method, this measurement only uses polarizer and grating, therefore, it can be applied to measure a wide wavelength range without replacing device in theory.

  9. Chiral anion exchangers applied to capillary electrochromatography enantioseparation of oppositely charged chiral analytes: investigation of stationary and mobile phase parameters.

    PubMed

    Lämmerhofer, M; Tobler, E; Lindner, W

    2000-07-28

    Weak anion-exchange (WAX) type chiral stationary phases (CSPs) based on tert.-butyl carbamoyl quinine as chiral selector (SO) and different types of silica particles (porous and non-porous) as chromatographic support are evaluated in packed capillary electrochromatography (CEC). Their ability to resolve the enantiomers of negatively charged chiral analytes, e.g., N-derivatized amino acids, in the anion-exchange mode and their electrochromatographic characteristics are described in dependence of several mobile phase parameters (pH, buffer type and concentration, organic modifier type and concentration) and other experimental variables (electric field strength, capillary temperature). The inherent "zwitterionic" surface character of such silica-based WAX type CSPs (positively charged SO and negatively charged residual silanols) allows the reversal of the electroosmotic flow (EOF) towards the anode at pH values below the isoelectric point (pI) of the modified surface, whereas a cathodic EOF results at pH values above the pI. Since for negatively charged analytes also an electrophoretic transport increment has to be considered, which can be either in or against the EOF direction, several distinct modes of elution have been observed under different stationary phase and mobile phase conditions: (i) co-electrophoretic elution of the negatively charged solutes with the anodic EOF in the negative polarity mode, (ii) counter-electrophoretic elution with the cathodic EOF in the positive polarity mode, and (iii) electrophoretically dominated elution in the negative polarity mode with a cathodic EOF directed to the injection end of the capillary. Useful enantioseparations of chiral acids have been obtained with all three modes. Enantioselectivity values as high as under pressure-driven conditions and theoretical plate numbers up to 120000 per meter could be achieved under electrically driven conditions. A repeatability study yielded RSD values below 2% for retention times and

  10. Portable, Battery Operated Capillary Electrophoresis with Optical Isomer Resolution Integrated with Ionization Source for Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moini, Mehdi; Rollman, Christopher M.

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a battery operated capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization (CE/ESI) source for mass spectrometry with optical isomer separation capability. The source fits in front of low or high resolution mass spectrometers similar to a nanospray source with about the same weight and size. The source has two high voltage power supplies (±25 kV HVPS) capable of operating in forward or reverse polarity modes and powered by a 12 V rechargeable lithium ion battery with operation time of ~10 h. In ultrafast CE mode, in which short narrow capillaries (≤15 μm i.d., 15-25 cm long) and field gradients ≥1000 V/cm are used, peak widths at the base are <1 s wide. Under these conditions, the source provides high resolution separation, including optical isomer resolution in ~1 min. Using a low resolution mass spectrometer (LTQ Velos) with a scan time of 0.07 s/scan, baseline separation of amino acids and their optical isomers were achieved in ~1 min. Moreover, bovine serum albumin (BSA) was analyzed in ~1 min with 56% coverage using the data-dependent MS/MS. Using a high resolution mass spectrometer (Thermo Orbitrap Elite) with 15,000 resolution, the fastest scan time achieved was 0.15 s, which was adequate for CE-MS analysis when optical isomer separation is not required or when the optical isomers were well separated. Figures of merit including a detection limit of 2 fmol and linear dynamic range of two orders of magnitude were achieved for amino acids.

  11. Portable, Battery Operated Capillary Electrophoresis with Optical Isomer Resolution Integrated with Ionization Source for Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Moini, Mehdi; Rollman, Christopher M

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a battery operated capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization (CE/ESI) source for mass spectrometry with optical isomer separation capability. The source fits in front of low or high resolution mass spectrometers similar to a nanospray source with about the same weight and size. The source has two high voltage power supplies (±25 kV HVPS) capable of operating in forward or reverse polarity modes and powered by a 12 V rechargeable lithium ion battery with operation time of ~10 h. In ultrafast CE mode, in which short narrow capillaries (≤15 μm i.d., 15-25 cm long) and field gradients ≥1000 V/cm are used, peak widths at the base are <1 s wide. Under these conditions, the source provides high resolution separation, including optical isomer resolution in ~1 min. Using a low resolution mass spectrometer (LTQ Velos) with a scan time of 0.07 s/scan, baseline separation of amino acids and their optical isomers were achieved in ~1 min. Moreover, bovine serum albumin (BSA) was analyzed in ~1 min with 56% coverage using the data-dependent MS/MS. Using a high resolution mass spectrometer (Thermo Orbitrap Elite) with 15,000 resolution, the fastest scan time achieved was 0.15 s, which was adequate for CE-MS analysis when optical isomer separation is not required or when the optical isomers were well separated. Figures of merit including a detection limit of 2 fmol and linear dynamic range of two orders of magnitude were achieved for amino acids.

  12. Capillary zone electrophoresis for enumeration of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus in yogurt.

    PubMed

    Lim, Orathai; Suntornsuk, Worapot; Suntornsuk, Leena

    2009-03-15

    Enumeration of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus is a priority due to their importance in yogurt production. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) of both bacteria could be achieved in 7.2 min with a resolution of 3.2 in the background electrolyte (BGE) containing 4.5mM Tris(hydroxymethyl) amminomethane (TRIS)-4.5 mM boric acid-0.1 mM ethylenediamine tetraacetate (EDTA) (TBE) buffer (pH 8.4) and 0.05% (v/v) polyethylene oxide (PEO), using a capillary of 47.5 cm (effective length) x 100 microm i.d., injection of 50 mbar x 3s followed by -5kV x 120s, a voltage and temperature of 20 kV and 25 degrees C, respectively. Appropriate amounts of PEO in the BGE, sample preparation (i.e. vortex) and introduction were key factors for their separation. A short hydrodynamic injection followed by applying reversed polarity voltage could compress the bacteria into narrow zones, which were detected as separated single peaks. Method linearity (r(2)>0.99), precision (%RSDs<9.3%), recovery (%R=91.7-106.7%) and limit of quantitation (1.0 x 10(6) colony forming unit per mL (CFU/mL)) were satisfactory. Results from the CE analysis of both bacteria in yogurt were not statistically different from those of the plate count method (P>0.05). The CE method can be used as an alternative for quantitation of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus in yogurt since it was reliable, simple, cost and labor effective and rapid, allowing the analysis of 3 samples/h (comparing to 2d/sample by plate count method).

  13. Threshold capillary pressure in capillaries with curved sides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lago, Marcelo; Araujo, Mariela

    2003-03-01

    Modeling of fluid flow through permeable media is of great importance in assessing the performance of both hydrocarbon reservoirs and aquifers. In this process, network models based on cylindrical capillaries with circular cross sections are frequently used. This type of capillaries are not able to reproduce interesting physical phenomena observed in the experiments, for example, situations where there is flow by films with the wetting fluid occupying the crevices and wedges of the structure. We present an analysis of the behavior of the capillary pressure of a droplet of non-wetting fluid with an infinite length, inside objects of cylindrical symmetry with curved sides. The calculation is based on a method proposed by Mayer and Stowe and Princen (MS-P). Different capillary geometries are considered, and the behavior of the capillary pressure and transversal fluid saturation as a function of the shape factor is studied. The results found either analytically or numerically, allow to understand the relation between geometry and flow properties, and helps in the building of more realistic pore network models for flow studies at the pore scale.

  14. Two-dimensional capillary electrophoresis using tangentially connected capillaries.

    PubMed

    Sahlin, Eskil

    2007-06-22

    A novel type of fused silica capillary system is described where channels with circular cross-sections are tangentially in contact with each other and connected through a small opening at the contact area. Since the channels are not crossing each other in the same plane, the capillaries can easily be filled with different solutions, i.e. different solutions will be in contact with each other at the contact point. The system has been used to perform different types of two-dimensional separations and the complete system is fully automated where a high voltage switch is used to control the location of the high voltage in the system. Using two model compounds it is demonstrated that a type of two-dimensional separation can be performed using capillary zone electrophoresis at two different pH values. It is also shown that a compound with acid/base properties can be concentrated using a dynamic pH junction mechanism when transferred from the first separation to the second separation. In addition, the system has been used to perform a comprehensive two-dimensional capillary electrophoresis separation of tryptic digest of bovine serum albumin using capillary zone electrophoresis followed by micellar electrokinetic chromatography.

  15. Reversible Sterilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Largey, Gale

    1977-01-01

    Notes that difficult questions arise concerning the use of sterilization for alleged eugenic and euthenic purposes. Thus, how reversible sterilization will be used with relation to the poor, mentally ill, mentally retarded, criminals, and minors, is questioned. (Author/AM)

  16. Ordered mesoporous silica functionalized with β-cyclodextrin derivative for stereoisomer separation of flavanones and flavanone glycosides by nano-liquid chromatography and capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Silva, Mariana; Pérez-Quintanilla, Damián; Morante-Zarcero, Sonia; Sierra, Isabel; Marina, María Luisa; Aturki, Zeineb; Fanali, Salvatore

    2017-03-24

    In this paper a chiral stationary phase (CSP) was prepared by the immobilization of a β-CD derivative (3,5-dimethylphenylcarbamoylated β-CD) onto the surface of amino-functionalized spherical ordered mesoporous silica (denoted as SM) via a urea linkage using the Staudinger reaction. The CSP was packed into fused silica capillaries 100μm I.D. and evaluated by means of nano-liquid chromatography (nano-LC) and capillary electrochromatography (CEC) using model compounds for the enantio- and the diastereomeric separation. The compounds flavanone, 2'-hydroxyflavanone, 4'-hydroxyflavanone, 6-hydroxyflavanone, 4'-methoxyflavanone, 7-methoxyflavanone, hesperetin, hesperidin, naringenin, and naringin were studied using reversed and polar organic elution modes. Baseline stereoisomer resolution and good results in terms of peak efficiency and short analysis time of all studied flavonoids and flavanones glycosides were achieved in reversed phase mode, using as mobile phase a mixture of MeOH/H2O, 10mM ammonium acetate pH 4.5 at different ratios. For the polar organic mode using 100% of MeOH as mobile phase, the CSP showed better performances and the baseline chiral separation of several studied compounds occurred in an analysis time of less than 10min. Good results were also achieved by CEC employing two different mobile phases. The use of MeOH/H2O, 5mM ammonium acetate buffer pH 6.0 (90/10, v/v) was very effective for the chiral resolution of flavanone and its methoxy and hydroxy derivatives.

  17. Capillary wave measurements on helically-supported capillary channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandurwala, Fahim; Thiessen, David

    2010-10-01

    NASA is considering power generation by the Rankine cycle to save weight on long-duration manned missions to the moon or Mars. Phase separation technology is critical to this process in microgravity. Arrays of capillary channels might be useful for filtering liquid drops from a flowing vapor. The efficiency of droplet capture by a helically-supported capillary channel is being studied. A droplet impinging on the channel launches capillary waves that propagate down the channel helping to dissipate some of the drop's kinetic energy. High-speed video of the channel combined with image processing allows for measurement of the amplitude and speed of the wave packets. Increasing the pitch of the support structure decreases the wave speed. An understanding of the dynamic response of the channel to drop impact is a first step in predicting drop-capture efficiency.

  18. Reversible Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Harsh; Madanieh, Raef; Kosmas, Constantine E; Vatti, Satya K; Vittorio, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies (CMs) have many etiological factors that can result in severe structural and functional dysregulation. Fortunately, there are several potentially reversible CMs that are known to improve when the root etiological factor is addressed. In this article, we discuss several of these reversible CMs, including tachycardia-induced, peripartum, inflammatory, hyperthyroidism, Takotsubo, and chronic illness–induced CMs. Our discussion also includes a review on their respective pathophysiology, as well as possible management solutions. PMID:26052233

  19. Interstitial capillary changes in lithium nephropathy: effects of antihypertensive treatment.

    PubMed

    Skyum, Helle; Marcussen, Niels; Nielsen, Steen Horne; Christensen, Sten

    2004-10-01

    Histopathological changes were investigated in the tubulointerstitium and in the capillaries of male Wistar rats with lithium-induced nephropathy using stereological methods. Two antihypertensive drugs with opposite effects on the renin-angiotensin system, an ACE inhibitor (angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor) and a thiazide diuretic, modified the nephropathy. Generally, there was a significant positive correlation between the reduction in GFR (glomerular filtration rate) and the reduction in the volume of intact tubular structures and interstitial capillaries. A significant negative correlation was seen between the reduction in GFR and the increase in tubulocapillary distance and the absolute volume of interstitial connective tissue, respectively. Treatment with perindopril, and to some extent hydrochlorothiazide, reversed the rise in systolic blood pressure associated with lithium-induced nephropathy but did not affect the progression to terminal uraemia, the structural renal changes or the mortality. In conclusion, severe tubular and capillary changes are seen in this model of chronic renal failure. Tubular atrophy is associated with a decrease in interstitial capillaries and with an increase in the tubulocapillary distance. Systemic hypertension or activation of the renin-angiotensin system may not be important factors for the progression to terminal renal failure.

  20. Capillary imbibition in parallel tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McRae, Oliver; Ramakrishnan, T. S.; Bird, James

    2016-11-01

    In modeling porous media two distinct approaches can be employed; the sample can be examined holistically, using global variables such as porosity, or it can be treated as a network of capillaries connected in series to various intermediate reservoirs. In forced imbibition this series-based description is sufficient to characterize the flow, due to the presence of an externally maintained pressure difference. However, in spontaneous imbibition, flow is driven by an internal capillary pressure, making it unclear whether a series-based model is appropriate. In this talk, we show using numerical simulations the dynamics of spontaneous imbibition in concentrically arranged capillary tubes. This geometry allows both tubes access to a semi-infinite reservoir but with inlets in close enough proximity to allow for interference. We compare and contrast the results of our simulations with theory and previous experiments. Schlumberger-Doll Research.

  1. Decay of capillary wave turbulence.

    PubMed

    Deike, Luc; Berhanu, Michael; Falcon, Eric

    2012-06-01

    We report on the observation of freely decaying capillary wave turbulence on the surface of a fluid. The capillary wave turbulence spectrum decay is found to be self-similar in time with the same power law exponent as the one found in the stationary regime, in agreement with weak turbulence predictions. The amplitude of all Fourier modes are found to decrease exponentially with time at the same damping rate. The longest wavelengths involved in the system are shown to be damped by a viscous surface boundary layer. These long waves play the role of an energy source during the decay that sustains nonlinear interactions to keep capillary waves in a wave turbulent state.

  2. Chemical reactions in reverse micelle systems

    DOEpatents

    Matson, Dean W.; Fulton, John L.; Smith, Richard D.; Consani, Keith A.

    1993-08-24

    This invention is directed to conducting chemical reactions in reverse micelle or microemulsion systems comprising a substantially discontinuous phase including a polar fluid, typically an aqueous fluid, and a microemulsion promoter, typically a surfactant, for facilitating the formation of reverse micelles in the system. The system further includes a substantially continuous phase including a non-polar or low-polarity fluid material which is a gas under standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and which is generally a water-insoluble fluid in a near critical or supercritical state. Thus, the microemulsion system is maintained at a pressure and temperature such that the density of the non-polar or low-polarity fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. The method of carrying out chemical reactions generally comprises forming a first reverse micelle system including an aqueous fluid including reverse micelles in a water-insoluble fluid in the supercritical state. Then, a first reactant is introduced into the first reverse micelle system, and a chemical reaction is carried out with the first reactant to form a reaction product. In general, the first reactant can be incorporated into, and the product formed in, the reverse micelles. A second reactant can also be incorporated in the first reverse micelle system which is capable of reacting with the first reactant to form a product.

  3. Analysis of urinary drugs of abuse by a multianalyte capillary electrophoretic immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Caslavska, J; Allemann, D; Thormann, W

    1999-04-09

    This paper characterizes a novel multianalyte competitive binding, electrokinetic capillary-based immunoassay for urinary methadone, opiates, benzoylecgonine (cocaine metabolite) and amphetamines. After incubation of 25 microliters urine with the reactants for several minutes in the presence of an internal standard, a small aliquot of the mixture is applied onto a fused-silica capillary and the unbound fluorescein labelled drug tracers are monitored by capillary electrophoresis with on-column laser induced fluorescence detection. The multianalyte assay is shown to be rapid, simple, quantitative, capable of recognizing urinary drug concentrations > or = 30 ng/ml and suitable for screening of patient urines. Data are demonstrated to compare well with those obtained by routine screening methods based on enzyme multiplied immunoassay techniques and fluorescence polarization immunoassays. The electrokinetic capillary assay has been validated via analysis of external quality control urines and confirmation analysis of patient urines using GC-MS.

  4. Ice ages and geomagnetic reversals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Patrick

    1992-01-01

    There have been speculations on the relationship between climatic cooling and polarity reversals of the earth's magnetic field during the Pleistocene. Two of the common criticisms on this relationship have been the reality of these short duration geomagnetic events and the accuracy of their dates. Champion et al. (1988) have reviewed recent progress in this area. They identified a total of 10 short-duration polarity events in the last 1 Ma and 6 of these events have been found in volcanic rocks, which also have K-Ar dates. Supposing that the speculated relationship between climatic cooling and geomagnetic reversals actually exist, two mechanisms that assume climatic cooling causes short period magnetic reversals will be investigated. These two methods are core-mantle boundary topography and transfer of the rotational energy to the core.

  5. Capillary interactions in Pickering emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzowski, J.; Tasinkevych, M.; Dietrich, S.

    2011-09-01

    The effective capillary interaction potentials for small colloidal particles trapped at the surface of liquid droplets are calculated analytically. Pair potentials between capillary monopoles and dipoles, corresponding to particles floating on a droplet with a fixed center of mass and subjected to external forces and torques, respectively, exhibit a repulsion at large angular separations and an attraction at smaller separations, with the latter resembling the typical behavior for flat interfaces. This change of character is not observed for quadrupoles, corresponding to free particles on a mechanically isolated droplet. The analytical results are compared with the numerical minimization of the surface free energy of the droplet in the presence of spherical or ellipsoidal particles.

  6. Capillary haemangioma of the testis

    PubMed Central

    Mazal, P; Kratzik, C; Kain, R; Susani, M

    2000-01-01

    A case of testicular capillary haemangioma is reported and the importance of intraoperative examination of this very rare lesion emphasised. Capillary haemangioma of the testis can be similar to malignant testicular tumours on clinical presentation, as well as on ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging, and therefore should be included in the intraoperative differential diagnosis. Because of the benign nature of this lesion, conservative surgical treatment by means of tumour enucleation with preservation of the testis is possible, if intraoperative examination of frozen sections of representative tissue can be performed. Key Words: testis • haemangioma PMID:11002773

  7. Nonsteady Flow in Capillary Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Ayako

    2000-03-01

    Surface phenomena in the field of electron devices and the problem of how long. It takes plants to absorb water during their growth in hydroponic cultivation is attraching the attention of riseachers. However, the related study of non-steady flow in capillary tubes has a number of issues that require investigation. In response to this situation, we made attempted to assess nonsteady fiow in capillary tubes, the liquid rise time and other issues, using a motion equation that takes factors including the friction force of the tube and the surface tension into consideration.

  8. Revised Capillary Breakup Rheometer Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Louise; Schultz, William; Solomon, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Rather than integrate the one-dimensional equation of motion for a capillary breakup rheometer, we take the axial derivative of that equation. This avoids the determination of the axial force with all of its complications and correction factors. The resulting evolutionary equation that involves either two or four derivatives of the capillary radius as a function of the axial coordinate determines the ratio of elongational viscosity to surface tension coefficient. We examine several silicone and olive oils to show the accuracy of the method for Newtonian fluids. We will discuss our surface tension measurement techniques and briefly describe measurements of viscoelastic materials, including saliva.

  9. Reversible ischemia in severe stress Tc-99m-Sestamibi perfusion defects: Assessment with gated tomographic polar map Fourier amplitude and amplitude/perfusion ratio images and correlation with resting images

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.A.; Taillon, L.A.

    1994-05-01

    Reversible ischemia in myocardial segments with severe hypoperfusion ({le}50% of normal activity) on stress Tc-99m-Sestamibi (MIBI) images was assessed with ECG-gated tomographic (GSPECT) indices of myocardial thickening, as reflected by an increase in regional count density during systole. GSPECT bullseye plots were generated for each of 8 frames acquired after stress MIBI injection in 39 patients with coronary artery disease and at least one severe perfusion defect on summed SPECT images. Using first harmonic Fourier amplitude (AMP) and AMP to perfusion ratio (APR) images, regional myocardial systolic thickening was assessed using a 5-segment model, scored 0 to 3, for absent, minimal, mildly reduced or normal thickening. These data were regionally compared with defect reversibility assessed using a separate-day or a preceding same-day resting MIBI injection images, in which these segments were scored from 0 to 3 for absent, minimal, partial or complete defect reversibility. Of 91 severe stress defects, 16 showed absent, 18 minimal, 43 partial, and 14 complete reversibility on resting images. Both AMP and APR scores were in statistically significant agreement (p=.0218 and .0006) with resting image reversibility grades, with 79% (p=.0324) and 86% (p=.0001) agreement on the presence of reversibility on resting imaging, respectively. AMP correctly identified 89% of the reversibility defects on rest images, while the APR identified 99% (p=.0248 vs. AMP). On analysis of segment scores, the AMP slightly underestimated the degree of rest image reversibility (p=.0235), while APR images indicated more reversibility thin did resting images (p=.0092). In conclusion, GSPECT MIBI bullseye Fourier AMP images correlate well with the pattern of reversibility on resting MIBI in severe stress perfusion defects. When indexed for the degree of hypoperfusion, the Fourier images depict a greater degree of defect reversibility than resting MIBI images.

  10. Shielding Electrostatic Fields in Polar Semiconductor Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hönig, G. M. O.; Westerkamp, S.; Hoffmann, A.; Callsen, G.

    2017-02-01

    Polar semiconductor materials enable a variety of classic and quantum-light sources, which are optimized continuously. However, one key problem—the inherent electric crystal polarization of such materials—remains unsolved and deteriorates the radiative exciton decay rate. We suggest a sequence of reverse interfaces to compensate these polarization effects, while the polar, natural crystal growth direction is maintained. Former research approaches, like growth on less-polar crystal planes or even the stabilization of unnatural phases, never reached industrial maturity. In contrast, our concept provides a way for the development of ultrafast devices based on established growth processes for polar materials, while the electric potential landscape becomes adjustable.

  11. Polar Warming Drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDunn, T. L.; Bougher, S. W.; Mischna, M. A.; Murphy, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    Polar warming is a dynamically induced temperature enhancement over mid-to-high latitudes that results in a reversed (poleward) meridional temperature gradient. This phenomenon was recently characterized over the 40-90 km altitude region [1] based on nearly three martian years of Mars Climate Sounder observations [2, 3]. Here we investigate which forcing mechanisms affect the magnitude and distribution of the observed polar warming by conducting simulations with the Mars Weather Research and Forecasting General Circulation Model [4, 5]. We present simulations confirming the influence topography [6] and dust loading [e.g., 7] have upon polar warming. We then present simulations illustrating the modulating influence gravity wave momentum deposition exerts upon polar warming, consistent with previous modeling studies [e.g., 8]. The results of this investigation suggest the magnitude and distribution of polar warming in the martian middle atmosphere is modified by gravity wave activity and that the characteristics of the gravity waves that most significantly affect polar warming vary with season. References: [1] McDunn, et al., 2012 (JGR), [2]Kleinböhl, et al., 2009 (JGR), [3] Kleinböhl, et al., 2011 (JQSRT), [4] Richardson, et al., 2007 (JGR), [5] Mischna, et al., 2011 (Planet. Space Sci.), [6] Richardson and Wilson, 2002 (Nature), [7] Haberle, et al., 1982 (Icarus), [8] Barnes, 1990 (JGR).

  12. Self-assembly of cellulose nanoparticles as electrolyte additive for capillary electrophoresis separation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dihui; Yang, Qin; Jin, Shanxia; Deng, Qianchun; Zhou, Ping

    2014-11-07

    In this work, a new cellulose derivative, octadecyl modified quaternized cellulose (ODMQC), was synthesized and used as additive in the background electrolyte for capillary electrophoresis. The derivative bearing hydrophobic groups and hydrophilic groups can self-assemble into a stable nano-scaled micelle structure in aqueous solution. When ODMQC was added in running buffer, the capillaries were shown to generate applicable anodal EOF over the investigated range of pH 3.0-12.0. Due to the lack of UV active groups, the ODMQC did not disturb the UV detection. It is shown that ODMQC-added capillaries allow the separation of basic proteins by reducing their adsorption onto the capillary wall. Also, the addition of ODMQC provides adequate separation of aromatic acids with low pKa values and improved separation of sulfa drugs. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the addition of ODMQC can incorporate an additional reversed-phase mechanism that improves the separation of neutral analytes.

  13. Observables for polarized neutrons transmitted through polarized targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hnizdo, V. )

    1994-11-01

    A general and concise formalism is presented for the identification and evaluation of observables, including those that would indicate parity-conservation and/or time-reversal violation by the neutron-nucleus interaction, of experiments on the transmission of polarized neutrons through polarized nuclear targets. Statistical tensors are used for the description of the polarization states of the projectile and target, and the neutron-nucleus total cross section is decomposed into partial cross sections so that each corresponds to different ranks of the projectile and target statistical tensors and to a specific transfer of the orbital angular momentum. Each such partial cross section is associated with a correlation factor'' of particular parity-conservation and time-reversal symmetries, and is measurable by polarizing the projectile and target in states in which the statistical tensors have specific geometries, suggested by the simple geometric properties of the correlation factors.

  14. Light-directing omnidirectional circularly polarized reflection from liquid-crystal droplets.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jing; Li, Yannian; Bisoyi, Hari Krishna; Zola, Rafael S; Yang, Deng-Ke; Bunning, Timothy J; Weitz, David A; Li, Quan

    2015-02-09

    Constructing and tuning self-organized three-dimensional (3D) superstructures with tailored functionality is crucial in the nanofabrication of smart molecular devices. Herein we fabricate a self-organized, phototunable 3D photonic superstructure from monodisperse droplets of one-dimensional cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC) containing a photosensitive chiral molecular switch with high helical twisting power. The droplets are obtained by a glass capillary microfluidic technique by dispersing into PVA solution that facilitates planar anchoring of the liquid-crystal molecules at the droplet surface, as confirmed by the observation of normal incidence selective circular polarized reflection in all directions from the core of individual droplet. Photoirradiation of the droplets furnishes dynamic reflection colors without thermal relaxation, whose wavelength can be tuned reversibly by variation of the irradiation time. The results provided clear evidence on the phototunable reflection in all directions.

  15. Aspects of column fabrication for packed capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Angus, P D; Demarest, C W; Catalano, T; Stobaugh, J F

    2000-07-28

    Various parameters have been evaluated to develop a process for optimization of column manufacture for packed capillary electrochromatography (CEC). Spherisorb ODS-1 was packed into 75 microm I.D. capillaries to establish a standard set of packing conditions to afford high-performance columns free of voids. Numerous silica-based packing materials including porous and non-porous reversed-phase and ion-exchange phases were employed to evaluate the applicability of the standard conditions. Success of column manufacture and performance demonstrate a relationship to the colligative properties of the packing materials under the applied conditions. Frequently encountered difficulties arising from inadequate column conditioning and void formation in the packed bed are identified and discussed.

  16. Multiplexed fluorescence detector system for capillary electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Taylor, John A.

    1996-03-12

    A fluorescence detection system for capillary electrophoresis is provided wherein the detection system can simultaneously excite fluorescence and substantially simultaneously monitor separations in multiple capillaries. This multiplexing approach involves laser irradiation of a sample in a plurality of capillaries through optical fibers that are coupled individually with the capillaries. The array is imaged orthogonally through a microscope onto a charge-coupled device camera for signal analysis.

  17. Multiplexed fluorescence detector system for capillary electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Taylor, John A.

    1994-06-28

    A fluorescence detection system for capillary electrophoresis is provided wherein the detection system can simultaneously excite fluorescence and substantially simultaneously monitor separations in multiple capillaries. This multiplexing approach involves laser irradiation of a sample in a plurality of capillaries through optical fibers that are coupled individually with the capillaries. The array is imaged orthogonally through a microscope onto a charge-coupled device camera for signal analysis.

  18. Multiplexed fluorescence detector system for capillary electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Taylor, J.A.

    1994-06-28

    A fluorescence detection system for capillary electrophoresis is provided wherein the detection system can simultaneously excite fluorescence and substantially simultaneously monitor separations in multiple capillaries. This multiplexing approach involves laser irradiation of a sample in a plurality of capillaries through optical fibers that are coupled individually with the capillaries. The array is imaged orthogonally through a microscope onto a charge-coupled device camera for signal analysis. 14 figures.

  19. Multiplexed fluorescence detector system for capillary electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Taylor, J.A.

    1996-03-12

    A fluorescence detection system for capillary electrophoresis is provided wherein the detection system can simultaneously excite fluorescence and substantially simultaneously monitor separations in multiple capillaries. This multiplexing approach involves laser irradiation of a sample in a plurality of capillaries through optical fibers that are coupled individually with the capillaries. The array is imaged orthogonally through a microscope onto a charge-coupled device camera for signal analysis. 14 figs.

  20. Bacterial motion in narrow capillaries

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Liyan; Wasnik, Vaibhav; Emberly, Eldon

    2014-01-01

    Motile bacteria often have to pass through small tortuous pores in soil or tissue of higher organisms. However, their motion in this prevalent type of niche is not fully understood. Here, we modeled it with narrow glass capillaries and identified a critical radius (Rc) for bacterial motion. Near the surface of capillaries narrower than that, the swimming trajectories are helices. In larger capillaries, they swim in distorted circles. Under non-slip condition, the peritrichous Escherichia coli swam in left-handed helices with an Rc of ∼10 μm near glass surface. However, slipping could occur in the fast monotrichous Pseudomonas fluorescens, when a speed threshold was exceeded, and thus both left-handed and right-handed helices were executed in glass capillaries. In the natural non-cylindrical pores, the near-surface trajectories would be spirals and twisted loops. Engaging in such motions reduces the bacterial migration rate. With a given pore size, the run length and the tumbling angle of the bacterium determine the probability and duration of their near-surface motion. Shear flow and chemotaxis potentially enhance it. Based on this observation, the puzzling previous observations on bacterial migration in porous environments can be interpreted. PMID:25764548

  1. Capillary Rise in a Wedge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piva, M.

    2009-01-01

    In introductory-level physics courses, the concept of surface tension is often illustrated using the example of capillary rise in thin tubes. In this paper the author describes experiments conducted using a planar geometry created with two small plates forming a thin wedge. The distribution of the fluid entering the wedge can be studied as a…

  2. Enhancement of capillary electrochromatographic separation performance by conductive polymer in a layer-by-layer fabricated graphene stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juan; Zhang, Wenpeng; Bao, Tao; Chen, Zilin

    2014-04-25

    In this work, we fabricated a novel graphene-based capillary column for open-tubular capillary electrochromatography (OT-CEC) by a layer-by-layer strategy. To immobilize graphene onto the inner surface of silica capillary, a bio-inspired method was first used to functionalize the capillary surface with a layer of polydopamine (PDA). Graphene oxide (GO) was then introduced and can covalently react with polydopamine, realizing immobilization of graphene as a result. To enhance the modification efficiency of polydopamine, a conductive polymer, polyaniline (PANI) was introduced to be a sub-layer; polydopamine was then introduced following with GO, to generate a multilayer GO-PDA-PANI@capillary. Interestingly, separation efficiency of the graphene-based capillary was enhanced significantly by using conductive PANI as a sub-layer. The morphology of different layers modified on the capillary column was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The electroosmotic flow (EOF) characteristics of capillaries modified with different layers were also investigated by varying the pH value of mobile phase. GO-PDA-PANI@capillary showed good separation efficiency towards alkylbenzenes by OT-CEC mode, with theoretic plate numbers up to 133,918 for benzene. The separation was found to follow a reversed-phase chromatographic retention mechanism. Repeatability of the GO-PDA-PANI@capillary was studied, with relative standard deviations for intra-day and inter-day runs less than 2.89%, and column-to-column runs less than 6.17%. The separation performance of GO-PDA-PANI@capillary was also compared with that of the reported graphene modified capillary.

  3. Reversible Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    will have been introduced. 9. Reversible celular autemata We shall assume the reader to have some familiarity with the concept of cel- lular...10003 Mr. Kin B. Thcmpson 1 copy Technical Director Information Systems Divisia.i Naval Research Laboratory (OP-91T) Technical Information Division

  4. Dielectrophoresis of reverse phase emulsions.

    PubMed

    Flores-Rodriguez, N; Bryning, Z; Markx, G H

    2005-08-01

    Reverse miniemulsions, emulsions of droplets of size 200 nm-1 microm of a polar liquid dispersed in an apolar continuous liquid phase, exhibit strong electrokinetic responses in low-frequency electric fields. The electrokinetic behaviour of a reverse miniemulsion, previously developed for use as electronic paper, has been investigated under static and flow conditions, in uniform and non-uniform electric fields. Results reveal that when using frequencies lower than 10 Hz strong aggregation of the droplets occurs. In uniform electric fields, under static conditions, droplets reversibly aggregate into honeycomb-like or irregular aggregates. Under flow conditions, droplets aggregate into approximately equidistant streams. In non-uniform electric fields the droplets reversibly aggregate in high-field regions, and can be guided along regions of high field strength in a flow. The potential of the technique for the formation of structured materials is discussed.

  5. Monolithic capillary columns based on pentaerythritol tetraacrylate for peptide analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucherenko, E. V.; Melnik, D. M.; Korolev, A. A.; Kanateva, A. Yu.; Pirogov, A. V.; Kurganov, A. A.

    2015-09-01

    Monolythic medium-polar capillary columns based on pentaerythritol tetraacrylate were optimized for separation of peptides. The synthesis temperature and time, the fraction of monomer in the initial polymerization mixture, and the nature of alcohol contained in the complex porogen were chosen as optimization parameters. The highest efficiency was attained for columns obtained with 33 and 34% monomer at a polymerization time of 75 min and a temperature of 75°C. The columns with the optimum structure were effective in separation of a model mixture of five peptides. The sensitivity of the method was 200 ng of peptide per column.

  6. Laser induced optically and thermally reversible birefringence in azopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarova, D.; Nedelchev, L.; Ivanov, D.; Blagoeva, B.; Berberova, N.; Stoykova, E.; Mateev, G.; Kostadinova, D.

    2016-01-01

    Azopolymers are well known organic materials for polarization holographic recording due to the induced anisotropy under illumination with polarized light. They possess all the desirable characteristics of the known polarization-sensitive materials, as high sensitivity and reversibility, but excel them substantially in the magnitude of the photoinduced birefringence. This makes possible to record reversible polarization gratings with high diffraction efficiency. In this paper results of experimental investigations on the reversibility properties of birefringence photoinduced in azopolymers are reported, depending on the conditions of subsequent optical and thermal treatment. Thin films of different polymers were prepared in order to examine the kinetics of multiple recording and erasure of birefringence in different types of azopolymers. The reversibility of the polarization recording has been studied using two different method of erasure - by increased temperature and on illumination with circularly polarized light.

  7. Deciphering records of geomagnetic reversals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valet, Jean-Pierre; Fournier, Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    Polarity reversals of the geomagnetic field are a major feature of the Earth's dynamo. Questions remain regarding the dynamical processes that give rise to reversals and the properties of the geomagnetic field during a polarity transition. A large number of paleomagnetic reversal records have been acquired during the past 50 years in order to better constrain the structure and geometry of the transitional field. In addition, over the past two decades, numerical dynamo simulations have also provided insights into the reversal mechanism. Yet despite the large paleomagnetic database, controversial interpretations of records of the transitional field persist; they result from two characteristics inherent to all reversals, both of which are detrimental to an ambiguous analysis. On the one hand, the reversal process is rapid and requires adequate temporal resolution. On the other hand, weak field intensities during a reversal can affect the fidelity of magnetic recording in sedimentary records. This paper is aimed at reviewing critically the main reversal features derived from paleomagnetic records and at analyzing some of these features in light of numerical simulations. We discuss in detail the fidelity of the signal extracted from paleomagnetic records and pay special attention to their resolution with respect to the timing and mechanisms involved in the magnetization process. Records from marine sediments dominate the database. They give rise to transitional field models that often lead to overinterpret the data. Consequently, we attempt to separate robust results (and their subsequent interpretations) from those that do not stand on a strong observational footing. Finally, we discuss new avenues that should favor progress to better characterize and understand transitional field behavior.

  8. Polarization Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, James P., Jr.; Chipman, Russell A.

    1990-01-01

    The analysis of the polarization characteristics displayed by optical systems can be divided into two categories: geometrical and physical. Geometrical analysis calculates the change in polarization of a wavefront between pupils in an optical instrument. Physical analysis propagates the polarized fields wherever the geometrical analysis is not valid, i.e., near the edges of stops, near images, in anisotropic media, etc. Polarization aberration theory provides a starting point for geometrical design and facilitates subsequent optimization. The polarization aberrations described arise from differences in the transmitted (or reflected) amplitudes and phases at interfaces. The polarization aberration matrix (PAM) is calculated for isotropic rotationally symmetric systems through fourth order and includes the interface phase, amplitude, linear diattenuation, and linear retardance aberrations. The exponential form of Jones matrices used are discussed. The PAM in Jones matrix is introduced. The exact calculation of polarization aberrations through polarization ray tracing is described. The report is divided into three sections: I. Rotationally Symmetric Optical Systems; II. Tilted and Decentered Optical Systems; and Polarization Analysis of LIDARs.

  9. Vasectomy reversal.

    PubMed

    Belker, A M

    1987-02-01

    A vasovasostomy may be performed on an outpatient basis with local anesthesia, but also may be performed on an outpatient basis with epidural or general anesthesia. Local anesthesia is preferred by most of my patients, the majority of whom choose this technique. With proper preoperative and intraoperative sedation, patients sleep lightly through most of the procedure. Because of the length of time often required for bilateral microsurgical vasoepididymostomy, epidural or general anesthesia and overnight hospitalization are usually necessary. Factors influencing the preoperative choice for vasovasostomy or vasoepididymostomy in patients undergoing vasectomy reversal are considered. The preoperative planned choice of vasovasostomy or vasoepididymostomy for patients having vasectomy reversal described herein does not have the support of all urologists who regularly perform these procedures. My present approach has evolved as the data reported in Tables 1 and 2 have become available, but it may change as new information is evaluated. However, it offers a logical method for planning choices of anesthesia and inpatient or outpatient status for patients undergoing vasectomy reversal procedures.

  10. Capillary rise in cellulose sponges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungchul; Kim, Ho-Young; Mahadevan, L.

    2011-11-01

    A cellulose sponge, commonly used for clean-up jobs, can absorb and hold a significant amount of water within its pores, whose size ranges from micrometers to millimeters. We investigate the dynamics of capillary rise of water in the sponge using a combination of experiment and theory. We find that the rate of the capillary rise is significantly lower than Washburn's rule that assumes the sponge as a row of adjoined pores and the liquid flow to be driven by the Laplace pressure. We introduce a novel theory to model the flow in the hygroscopic porous media by combining Darcy's law based on the moisture concentration and the modified Young-Laplace equation. The scaling law constructed through this work agrees well with the experimental results.

  11. Chiral structures from achiral liquid crystals in cylindrical capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Joonwoo; Kang, Louis; Davidson, Zoey S.; Collings, Peter J.; Lubensky, Tom C.; Yodh, A. G.

    2015-04-01

    We study chiral symmetry-broken configurations of nematic liquid crystals (LCs) confined to cylindrical capillaries with homeotropic anchoring on the cylinder walls (i.e., perpendicular surface alignment). Interestingly, achiral nematic LCs with comparatively small twist elastic moduli relieve bend and splay deformations by introducing twist deformations. In the resulting twisted and escaped radial (TER) configuration, LC directors are parallel to the cylindrical axis near the center, but to attain radial orientation near the capillary wall, they escape along the radius through bend and twist distortions. Chiral symmetry-breaking experiments in polymer-coated capillaries are carried out using Sunset Yellow FCF, a lyotropic chromonic LC with a small twist elastic constant. Its director configurations are investigated by polarized optical microscopy and explained theoretically with numerical calculations. A rich phenomenology of defects also arises from the degenerate bend/twist deformations of the TER configuration, including a nonsingular domain wall separating domains of opposite twist handedness but the same escape direction and singular point defects (hedgehogs) separating domains of opposite escape direction. We show the energetic preference for singular defects separating domains of opposite twist handedness compared with those of the same handedness, and we report remarkable chiral configurations with a double helix of disclination lines along the cylindrical axis. These findings show archetypally how simple boundary conditions and elastic anisotropy of confined materials lead to multiple symmetry breaking and how these broken symmetries combine to create a variety of defects.

  12. Chiral structures from achiral liquid crystals in cylindrical capillaries

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Joonwoo; Kang, Louis; Davidson, Zoey S.; Collings, Peter J.; Lubensky, Tom C.; Yodh, A. G.

    2015-01-01

    We study chiral symmetry-broken configurations of nematic liquid crystals (LCs) confined to cylindrical capillaries with homeotropic anchoring on the cylinder walls (i.e., perpendicular surface alignment). Interestingly, achiral nematic LCs with comparatively small twist elastic moduli relieve bend and splay deformations by introducing twist deformations. In the resulting twisted and escaped radial (TER) configuration, LC directors are parallel to the cylindrical axis near the center, but to attain radial orientation near the capillary wall, they escape along the radius through bend and twist distortions. Chiral symmetry-breaking experiments in polymer-coated capillaries are carried out using Sunset Yellow FCF, a lyotropic chromonic LC with a small twist elastic constant. Its director configurations are investigated by polarized optical microscopy and explained theoretically with numerical calculations. A rich phenomenology of defects also arises from the degenerate bend/twist deformations of the TER configuration, including a nonsingular domain wall separating domains of opposite twist handedness but the same escape direction and singular point defects (hedgehogs) separating domains of opposite escape direction. We show the energetic preference for singular defects separating domains of opposite twist handedness compared with those of the same handedness, and we report remarkable chiral configurations with a double helix of disclination lines along the cylindrical axis. These findings show archetypally how simple boundary conditions and elastic anisotropy of confined materials lead to multiple symmetry breaking and how these broken symmetries combine to create a variety of defects. PMID:25825733

  13. Step-gradient capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Euerby, M R; Gilligan, D; Johnson, C M; Bartle, K D

    1997-10-01

    The analytical benefits of using a step-gradient in capillary electrochromatography (CEC) are demonstrated. The application of step-gradient CEC to the analysis of six diuretics of widely differing lipophilicities was evaluated and shown to result in a marked reduction in the analysis time and an improvement in the peak shape for later-eluting lipophilic components. When the step-gradient approach was performed in an automated mode, the retention time RSD for repeated injections was below 1%.

  14. Capillary electrophoresis systems and methods

    DOEpatents

    Dorairaj, Rathissh; Keynton, Robert S.; Roussel, Thomas J.; Crain, Mark M.; Jackson, Douglas J.; Walsh, Kevin M.; Naber, John F.; Baldwin, Richard P.; Franco, Danielle B.

    2011-08-02

    An embodiment of the invention is directed to a capillary electrophoresis apparatus comprising a plurality of separation micro-channels. A sample loading channel communicates with each of the plurality of separation channels. A driver circuit comprising a plurality of electrodes is configured to induce an electric field across each of the plurality of separation channels sufficient to cause analytes in the samples to migrate along each of the channels. The system further comprises a plurality of detectors configured to detect the analytes.

  15. Polar Bear

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amstrup, S.D.; ,; Lentfer, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Polar bears are long-lived, late-maturing carnivores that have relatively low rates of reproduction and natural mortality. Their populations are susceptible to disturbance from human activities, such as the exploration and development of mineral resources or hunting. Polar bear populations have been an important renewable resource available to coastal communities throughout the Arctic for thousands of years.

  16. Capillary Electrophoresis - Optical Detection Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sepaniak, M. J.

    2001-08-06

    Molecular recognition systems are developed via molecular modeling and synthesis to enhance separation performance in capillary electrophoresis and optical detection methods for capillary electrophoresis. The underpinning theme of our work is the rational design and development of molecular recognition systems in chemical separations and analysis. There have been, however, some subtle and exciting shifts in our research paradigm during this period. Specifically, we have moved from mostly separations research to a good balance between separations and spectroscopic detection for separations. This shift is based on our perception that the pressing research challenges and needs in capillary electrophoresis and electrokinetic chromatography relate to the persistent detection and flow rate reproducibility limitations of these techniques (see page 1 of the accompanying Renewal Application for further discussion). In most of our work molecular recognition reagents are employed to provide selectivity and enhance performance. Also, an emerging trend is the use of these reagents with specially-prepared nano-scale materials. Although not part of our DOE BES-supported work, the modeling and synthesis of new receptors has indirectly supported the development of novel microcantilevers-based MEMS for the sensing of vapor and liquid phase analytes. This fortuitous overlap is briefly covered in this report. Several of the more significant publications that have resulted from our work are appended. To facilitate brevity we refer to these publications liberally in this progress report. Reference is also made to very recent work in the Background and Preliminary Studies Section of the Renewal Application.

  17. Capillary stretching of elastic fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protiere, Suzie; Stone, Howard A.; Duprat, Camille

    2014-11-01

    Fibrous media consisting of constrained flexible fibers can be found in many engineered systems (membranes in filters, woven textile, matted paper). When such materials interact with a liquid, the presence of liquid/air interfaces induces capillary forces that deform the fibers. To model this interaction we study the behaviour of a finite volume of liquid deposited on two parallel flexible fibers clamped at both ends. A tension along the fibers is imposed and may be varied. We show that the system undergoes various morphological changes as the interfiber distance, the elasticity and the tension of the fibers are varied. For a certain range of parameters, the liquid spreads along the fibers and pulls them together, leading to the ``zipping'' of the fibers. This capillary adhesion can then be enhanced or reduced by changing the tension within the fibers. We will show that balancing stretching and capillary forces allows the prediction of this transition as well as the conditions for which detachment of the fibers occurs. These results may be used to prevent the clogging of fibrous membranes or to optimize the capture of liquids.

  18. Evaporation and instabilities of microscopic capillary bridges

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Nobuo; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Kohonen, Mika M.

    2003-01-01

    The formation and disappearance of liquid bridges between two surfaces can occur either through equilibrium or nonequilibrium processes. In the first instance, the bridge molecules are in thermodynamic equilibrium with the surrounding vapor medium. In the second, chemical potential gradients result in material transfer; mechanical instabilities, because of van der Waals force jumps on approach or a Rayleigh instability on rapid separation, may trigger irreversible film coalescence or bridge snapping. We have studied the growth and disappearance mechanisms of laterally microscopic liquid bridges of three hydrocarbon liquids in slit-like pores. At rapid slit-opening rates, the bridges rupture by means of a mechanical instability described by the Young–Laplace equation. Noncontinuum but apparently reversible behavior is observed when a bridge is held at nanoscopic surface separations H close to the thermodynamic equilibrium Kelvin length, 2rKcosθ, where rK is the Kelvin radius and θ is the contact angle. During the course of slow evaporation (at H > 2rKcosθ) and subsequent regrowth by capillary condensation (at H < 2rKcosθ), the refractive index of the bridge may vary continuously and reversibly between that of the bulk liquid and vapor. The evaporation process becomes irreversible only at the very final stage of evaporation, when the refractive index of the fluid attains virtually that of the vapor. Measured refractive index profiles and the time-dependence of evaporating neck diameters also seem to differ from predictions based on a continuum picture of bridge evaporation far from the critical point. We discuss these findings in terms of the probable density profiles in evolving liquid bridges. PMID:12538868

  19. Macrophage Polarization.

    PubMed

    Murray, Peter J

    2017-02-10

    Macrophage polarization refers to how macrophages have been activated at a given point in space and time. Polarization is not fixed, as macrophages are sufficiently plastic to integrate multiple signals, such as those from microbes, damaged tissues, and the normal tissue environment. Three broad pathways control polarization: epigenetic and cell survival pathways that prolong or shorten macrophage development and viability, the tissue microenvironment, and extrinsic factors, such as microbial products and cytokines released in inflammation. A plethora of advances have provided a framework for rationally purifying, describing, and manipulating macrophage polarization. Here, I assess the current state of knowledge about macrophage polarization and enumerate the major questions about how activated macrophages regulate the physiology of normal and damaged tissues.

  20. Application of capillary nongel sieving electrophoresis for gene analysis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Y; Xu, Q; Han, F; Ding, K; Song, F; Fan, Y; Zhu, N; Wu, G; Lin, B

    1999-07-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) has proved to be a strong tool for DNA analysis and has found abundant applications in the fields of restriction fragment sizing, mutation screening, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product characterizing and forensic identifying. CE may be the main alternative to slab gel electrophoresis. Capillary nongel electrophoresis is the most favorable mode when aiming for this purpose because of its advantages of long lifetime, easy operation, good reproducibility, and low expense. In this paper, a new kind of sieving matrix, with mannitol as the additive for capillary electrophoresis, as well as related methods and their application for gene analysis were reported. Nine DNA fragments amplified by multiplex PCR from a normal dystrophin gene were well separated by this system. Three different deletions were found in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients. Three to four copies of the sex-determination region of the Y chromosome (SRY) gene, as well as the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene, could be detected in mixed samples. The frequencies of short tandem repeats (STR) in PAH genes was analyzed in 61 normal Chinese individuals and 6 phenylketonuria families. One case of prenatal gene diagnosis was performed. By using this matrix, CE coupled with reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR), the analysis of the alternative splicing expression pattern of the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene in adult lung tissue was achieved.

  1. Progression of Diabetic Capillary Occlusion: A Model

    PubMed Central

    Gens, John Scott; Glazier, James A.; Burns, Stephen A.; Gast, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    An explanatory computational model is developed of the contiguous areas of retinal capillary loss which play a large role in diabetic maculapathy and diabetic retinal neovascularization. Strictly random leukocyte mediated capillary occlusion cannot explain the occurrence of large contiguous areas of retinal ischemia. Therefore occlusion of an individual capillary must increase the probability of occlusion of surrounding capillaries. A retinal perifoveal vascular sector as well as a peripheral retinal capillary network and a deleted hexagonal capillary network are modelled using Compucell3D. The perifoveal modelling produces a pattern of spreading capillary loss with associated macular edema. In the peripheral network, spreading ischemia results from the progressive loss of the ladder capillaries which connect peripheral arterioles and venules. System blood flow was elevated in the macular model before a later reduction in flow in cases with progression of capillary occlusions. Simulations differing only in initial vascular network structures but with identical dynamics for oxygen, growth factors and vascular occlusions, replicate key clinical observations of ischemia and macular edema in the posterior pole and ischemia in the retinal periphery. The simulation results also seem consistent with quantitative data on macular blood flow and qualitative data on venous oxygenation. One computational model applied to distinct capillary networks in different retinal regions yielded results comparable to clinical observations in those regions. PMID:27300722

  2. Fluid Delivery System For Capillary Electrophoretic Applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qingbo; Liu, Changsheng; Kane, Thomas E.; Kernan, John R.; Sonnenschein, Bernard; Sharer, Michael V.

    2002-04-23

    An automated electrophoretic system is disclosed. The system employs a capillary cartridge having a plurality of capillary tubes. The cartridge has a first array of capillary ends projecting from one side of a plate. The first array of capillary ends are spaced apart in substantially the same manner as the wells of a microtitre tray of standard size. This allows one to simultaneously perform capillary electrophoresis on samples present in each of the wells of the tray. The system includes a stacked, dual carrousel arrangement to eliminate cross-contamination resulting from reuse of the same buffer tray on consecutive executions from electrophoresis. The system also has a gel delivery module containing a gel syringe/a stepper motor or a high pressure chamber with a pump to quickly and uniformly deliver gel through the capillary tubes. The system further includes a multi-wavelength beam generator to generate a laser beam which produces a beam with a wide range of wavelengths. An off-line capillary reconditioner thoroughly cleans a capillary cartridge to enable simultaneous execution of electrophoresis with another capillary cartridge. The streamlined nature of the off-line capillary reconditioner offers the advantage of increased system throughput with a minimal increase in system cost.

  3. Quantifying the cleanliness of glass capillaries.

    PubMed

    Bowman, C L

    1998-01-01

    I used capillary rise methods to investigate the lumenal surface properties of quartz (fused silica, Amersil T-08), borosilicate (Corning 7800), and high-lead glass (Corning 0010) capillaries commonly used to make patch pipets. I calculated the capillary rise and contact angle for water and methanol from weight measurements. The capillary rise was compared with the theoretical maximum value calculated by assuming each fluid perfectly wetted the lumenal surface of the glass (i.e., zero contact angle, which reflects the absence of surface contamination). For borosilicate, high-lead, and quartz capillaries, the rise for water was substantially less than the theoretical maximum rise. Exposure of the borosilicate, lead, and quartz capillaries to several cleaning methods resulted in substantially better--but not perfect--agreement between the theoretical maximum rise and calculated capillary rise. By contrast, the capillary rise for methanol was almost identical in untreated and cleaned capillaries, but less than its theoretical maximum rise. The residual discrepancy between the observed and theoretical rise for water could not be improved on by trying a variety of cleaning procedures, but some cleaning methods were superior to others. The water solubility of the surface contaminants, deduced from the effectiveness of repeated rinsing, was different for each of the three types of capillaries examined: Corning 7800 > quartz > Corning 0010. A surface film was also detected in quatz tubing with an internal filament. I conclude that these borosilicate, quartz, and high-lead glass capillaries have a film on the lumenal surface, which can be removed using appropriate cleaning methods. The surface contaminants may be unique to each type of capillary and may also be hydrophobic. Two simple methods are presented to quantitate the cleanliness of glass capillary tubing commonly used to make pipets for studies of biological membranes. It is not known if the surface film is of

  4. Hyphenation of capillary HPLC to microcoil (1)H NMR spectroscopy for the determination of tocopherol homologues.

    PubMed

    Krucker, Manfred; Lienau, Annette; Putzbach, Karsten; Grynbaum, Marc David; Schuler, Paul; Albert, Klaus

    2004-05-01

    Highly selective reversed phases (C(30) phases) are self-packed in 250 microm inner diameter fused-silica capillaries and employed for capillary HPLC separation of shape-constrained natural compounds (tocopherol homologues, vitamin E). Miniaturized hyphenated systems such as capillary HPLC-ESI-MS (positive ionization mode) and, with special emphasis, continuous-flow capillary HPLC- NMR are used for structural determination of the separated compounds. Despite the small amount of sample available (1.33 microg of each tocopherol), the authors have been able to monitor the capillary HPLC separation under continuous-flow (1)H NMR conditions, thus allowing an immediate peak identification. Further structural assignment was carried out in the stopped-flow NMR mode as shown, for example, by a 2D (1)H,(1)H COSY NMR spectrum of alpha-tocopherol. We demonstrate in this paper the considerable potential of hyphenated capillary separations coupled to MS and NMR for the investigation of restricted amounts of sample.

  5. Sunward convection in both polar caps

    SciTech Connect

    Reiff, P.H.

    1982-08-01

    The geomagnetic storm of July 29, 1977 has been the object of concentrated study. The latter part of the day (1800--2300 UT) is particularly interesting because it is a period of extremely strong, almost directly northward interplanetary magnetic fields (IMF). Such northward IMF's have been related to periods of reversed (i.e., sunward) convection in the polar cap, and this day is no exception. Zanetti et al. (1981), using Triad magnetometer data, show magnetic perturbations implying reversed convection in the northern polar cap, while the Birkeland currents in the southern polar cap are very weak. They give two possible interpretations: (1) merging occurs preferentially in the northern cusp region, and therefore reversed convection is restricted to the northern polar cap or (2) the currents flow predominantly in the sunlit northern polar cap because its conductivity is higher. This paper shows convection data from both the northern polar cap (S3-3) and the southern polar cap (AE-C). In both cases, regions of reversed convection are seen. Therefore the asymmetry of the Birkeland currents is more likely caused by a conductivity asymmetry than a convection asymmetry. It is likely that the low-energy ions seen deep in the polar cap may be traped on closed field lines after merging on both tail lobe boundaries.

  6. Stabilization of porous glass reverse-osmosis membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballou, E. V.; Leban, M. I.; Wydeven, T.

    1972-01-01

    Application of porous glass in form of capillary tubes for low capacity ion exchange in hyperfiltration experiments is discussed. Efficiency of desalination by process of reverse osmosis is described. Stabilization of porous glass membrane by presence of aluminum chloride is analyzed.

  7. One step physically adsorbed coating of silica capillary with excellent stability for the separation of basic proteins by capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiao-Feng; Guo, Xiao-Mei; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Hua-Shan

    2015-11-01

    The coating of capillary inner surface is considered to be an effective approach to suppress the adsorption of proteins on capillary inner surface in CE. However, most of coating materials reported are water-soluble, which may dissolve in BGE during the procedure of electrophoresis. In this study, a novel strategy for selection of physically coating materials has been illustrated to get coating layer with excellent stability using materials having poor solubility in commonly used solvents. Taking natural chitin as example (not hydrolyzed water soluble chitosan), a simple one step coating method using chitin solution in hexafluoroisopropanol was adopted within only 21 min with good coating reproducibility (RSDs of EOF for within-batch coated capillaries of 1.55% and between-batch coated capillaries of 2.31%), and a separation of four basic proteins on a chitin coated capillary was performed to evaluate the coating efficacy. Using chitin coating, the adsorption of proteins on capillary inner surface was successfully suppressed with reversed and stable EOF, and four basic proteins including lysozyme, cytochrome c, ribonuclease A and α-chymotrypsinogen A were baseline separated within 16 min with satisfied separation efficiency using 20 mM pH 2.0 H3PO4-Na2HPO4 as back ground electrolyte and 20 kV as separation voltage. What is more important, the chitin coating layer could be stable for more than two months during this study, which demonstrates that chitin is an ideal material for preparing semi-permanent coating on bare fused silica capillary inner wall and has hopeful potential in routine separation of proteins with CE.

  8. Polar Glaciology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robin, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    Two fields of research on polar ice sheets are likely to be of dominant interest during the 1990s. These are: the role of polar ice sheets in the hydrological cycle ocean-atmosphere-ice sheets-oceans, especially in relation to climate change; and the study and interpretation of material in deep ice cores to provide improved knowledge of past climates and of the varying levels of atmospheric constituents such as CO2, NOx, SO2, aerosols, etc., over the past 200,000 years. Both topics require a better knowledge of ice dynamics. Many of the studies that should be undertaken in polar regions by Earth Observing System require similar instruments and techniques to those used elsewhere over oceans and inland surfaces. However to study polar regions two special requirements need to be met: Earth Observing System satellite(s) need to be in a sufficiently high inclination orbit to cover most of the polar regions. Instruments must also be adapted, often by relatively limited changes, to give satisfactory data over polar ice. The observational requirements for polar ice sheets in the 1990s are summarized.

  9. On-line sample enrichment for the determination of proteins by capillary zone electrophoresis with poly(vinyl alcohol)-coated bubble cell capillaries.

    PubMed

    Law, Wai S; Zhao, Jian H; Li, Sam F Y

    2005-09-01

    Field-amplified sample stacking (FASS) is used to separate basic proteins in a poly-(vinyl alcohol)-coated bubble cell capillary. To our knowledge, this is the first paper describing the on-column stacking of proteins (as cations) using FASS in bubble cell capillary. The bubble cell capillary is fabricated using a one-step method. Cetyltrimethylammonium chloride is added into the running buffer to reverse the EOF and, thus, to pump the water plug out during the sample stacking step. The effect of the water plug lengths and sample injection durations were investigated and optimized. The results obtained were compared with those for the normal capillary without bubble cell in terms of resolution and sensitivity enhancement. Under the optimal condition, this method can improve the sensitivity of the peak areas ranging from 5000- to 26 000-fold. The RSDs (n = 5) of the migration time and peak area are satisfactory (less than 0.6 and 12%, respectively). Application of the capillary electrophoresis method with bubble cell, FASS, and UV detection thereby leads to the determination of these proteins at concentrations ranging from 3 to 10 ng/mL, based on a signal-to-noise ratio of 3:1.

  10. Joule heating in packed capillaries used in capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Anurag S; Reynolds, Kimberly J; Colón, Luis A

    2002-09-01

    Effective heat dissipation is critical for reproducible and efficient separations in electrically driven separation systems. Flow rate, retention kinetics, and analyte diffusion rates are some of the characteristics that are affected by variation in the temperature of the mobile phase inside the column. In this study, we examine the issue of Joule heating in packed capillary columns used in capillary electrochromatography (CEC). As almost all commonly used CEC packings are poor thermal conductors, it is assumed that the packing particles do not conduct heat and heat transfer is solely through the mobile phase flowing through the system. The electrical conductivity of various mobile phases was measured at different temperatures by a conductivity meter and the temperature coefficient for each mobile phase was calculated. This was followed by measurement of the electrical current at several applied voltages to calculate the conductivity of the solution within the column as a function of the applied voltage. An overall increase in the conductivity is attributed to Joule heating within the column, while a constant conductivity means good heat dissipation. A plot of conductivity versus applied voltage was used as the indicator of poor heat dissipation. Using theories that have been proposed earlier for modeling of Joule heating effects in capillary electrophoresis (CE), we estimated the temperature within CEC columns. Under mobile and stationary phase conditions typically used in CEC, heat dissipation was found to be not always efficient. Elevated temperatures within the columns in excess of 23 degrees C above ambient temperature were calculated for packed columns, and about 35 degrees C for an open column, under a given set of conditions. The results agree with recently published experimental findings with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) thermometry, and Raman spectroscopic measurements.

  11. Microfluidic PMMA interfaces for rectangular glass capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evander, Mikael; Tenje, Maria

    2014-02-01

    We present the design and fabrication of a polymeric capillary fluidic interface fabricated by micro-milling. The design enables the use of glass capillaries with any kind of cross-section in complex microfluidic setups. We demonstrate two different designs of the interface; a double-inlet interface for hydrodynamic focusing and a capillary interface with integrated pneumatic valves. Both capillary interfaces are presented together with examples of practical applications. This communication shows the design optimization and presents details of the fabrication process. The capillary interface opens up for the use of complex microfluidic systems in single-use glass capillaries. They also enable simple fabrication of glass/polymer hybrid devices that can be beneficial in many research fields where a pure polymer chip negatively affects the device's performance, e.g. acoustofluidics.

  12. Capillary pumped loop body heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Theodore D. (Inventor); Wren, deceased, Paul (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A capillary pumped loop for transferring heat from one body part to another body part, the capillary pumped loop comprising a capillary evaporator for vaporizing a liquid refrigerant by absorbing heat from a warm body part, a condenser for turning a vaporized refrigerant into a liquid by transferring heat from the vaporized liquid to a cool body part, a first tube section connecting an output port of the capillary evaporator to an input of the condenser, and a second tube section connecting an output of the condenser to an input port of the capillary evaporator. A wick may be provided within the condenser. A pump may be provided between the second tube section and the input port of the capillary evaporator. Additionally, an esternal heat source or heat sink may be utilized.

  13. Equilibrium capillary forces with atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sprakel, J; Besseling, N A M; Leermakers, F A M; Cohen Stuart, M A

    2007-09-07

    We present measurements of equilibrium forces resulting from capillary condensation. The results give access to the ultralow interfacial tensions between the capillary bridge and the coexisting bulk phase. We demonstrate this with solutions of associative polymers and an aqueous mixture of gelatin and dextran, with interfacial tensions around 10 microN/m. The equilibrium nature of the capillary forces is attributed to the combination of a low interfacial tension and a microscopic confinement geometry, based on nucleation and growth arguments.

  14. DNA Sequencing Using capillary Electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Barry Karger

    2011-05-09

    The overall goal of this program was to develop capillary electrophoresis as the tool to be used to sequence for the first time the Human Genome. Our program was part of the Human Genome Project. In this work, we were highly successful and the replaceable polymer we developed, linear polyacrylamide, was used by the DOE sequencing lab in California to sequence a significant portion of the human genome using the MegaBase multiple capillary array electrophoresis instrument. In this final report, we summarize our efforts and success. We began our work by separating by capillary electrophoresis double strand oligonucleotides using cross-linked polyacrylamide gels in fused silica capillaries. This work showed the potential of the methodology. However, preparation of such cross-linked gel capillaries was difficult with poor reproducibility, and even more important, the columns were not very stable. We improved stability by using non-cross linked linear polyacrylamide. Here, the entangled linear chains could move when osmotic pressure (e.g. sample injection) was imposed on the polymer matrix. This relaxation of the polymer dissipated the stress in the column. Our next advance was to use significantly lower concentrations of the linear polyacrylamide that the polymer could be automatically blown out after each run and replaced with fresh linear polymer solution. In this way, a new column was available for each analytical run. Finally, while testing many linear polymers, we selected linear polyacrylamide as the best matrix as it was the most hydrophilic polymer available. Under our DOE program, we demonstrated initially the success of the linear polyacrylamide to separate double strand DNA. We note that the method is used even today to assay purity of double stranded DNA fragments. Our focus, of course, was on the separation of single stranded DNA for sequencing purposes. In one paper, we demonstrated the success of our approach in sequencing up to 500 bases. Other

  15. Capillary-bridge–derived particles with negative Gaussian curvature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liming; McCarthy, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    We report the preparation of millimeter-scale particles by thermal polymerization of liquid monomer capillary bridges to form catenoid-shaped particles that exhibit negative Gaussian curvature. The shape of the capillary bridges and resulting particles can be finely tuned using several addressable parameters: (i) the shape, size, and orientation of lithographic pinning features on the spanned surfaces; (ii) the distance between opposing support surfaces; and (iii) the lateral displacement (shear) of opposing features. The catenoid-shaped particles exhibit controllable optical properties as a result of their concave menisci, the shape of which can be easily manipulated. The particles self assemble in the presence of a condensing liquid (water) to form reversible neck-to-neck pairs and less reversible end-to-end aggregates. We argue that this approach could be scaled down to micrometer dimensions by fabricating an array of micrometer-scale particles. We also argue, with a discussion of dynamic wetting, that these particles will exhibit interesting anisotropic adhesive properties. PMID:25730873

  16. Capillaroscopy and the measurement of capillary pressure

    PubMed Central

    Shore, Angela C

    2000-01-01

    Capillaries play a critical role in cardiovascular function as the point of exchange of nutrients and waste products between the tissues and circulation. Studies of capillary function in man are limited by access to the vascular bed. However, skin capillaries can readily be studied by the technique of capillaroscopy which enables the investigator to assess morphology, density and blood flow velocity. It is also possible to estimate capillary pressure by direct cannulation using glass micropipettes. This review will describe the techniques used to make these assessments and will outline some of the changes that are seen in health and disease. PMID:11136289

  17. Polarizing cues.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Stephen P

    2012-01-01

    People categorize themselves and others, creating ingroup and outgroup distinctions. In American politics, parties constitute the in- and outgroups, and party leaders hold sway in articulating party positions. A party leader's endorsement of a policy can be persuasive, inducing co-partisans to take the same position. In contrast, a party leader's endorsement may polarize opinion, inducing out-party identifiers to take a contrary position. Using survey experiments from the 2008 presidential election, I examine whether in- and out-party candidate cues—John McCain and Barack Obama—affected partisan opinion. The results indicate that in-party leader cues do not persuade but that out-party leader cues polarize. This finding holds in an experiment featuring President Bush in which his endorsement did not persuade Republicans but it polarized Democrats. Lastly, I compare the effect of party leader cues to party label cues. The results suggest that politicians, not parties, function as polarizing cues.

  18. Horizontal microscopy in square capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, Pavel E.

    1992-07-01

    Intracellular protoplasmic movements may, due to gravity, have a vertical component greater or different from the horizontal one. This makes horizontal microscopy indispensable in the search for the cellular sensor of gravity. The possibility of the latter being a cell organelle assigns special significance to high-resolution microscopy. A horizontal suction device for picking up a cell and its high-resolution horizontal microscopy in a rectangular capillary may be helpful for detection of gravity-related shifts of cellular organelles in vivo.

  19. Capillary wave spectroscopy on ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patzke, J.; Rathke, B.; Will, S.

    2007-12-01

    We investigate the magnetoviscous effect in ferrofluids by Capillary Wave Spectroscopy (CWS, Surface Light Scattering). This technique probes a specific mode of thermally excited surface waves giving information on surface tension and viscosity. In ferrofluids we detect a transition from propagating surface modes to overdamped ones depending on the particle concentration and strength and the orientation of an externally applied magnetic field. We interprete this effect as caused by an increase of the liquid viscosity with an increasing particle concentration and field-strength. Changing the relative orientation of the scattering vector and magnetic field shows that the viscous properties of ferrofluids in a magnetic field are anisotropic. Figs 8, Refs 12.

  20. High pressure pulsed capillary viscometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. L.; Walowitt, J. A.; Pan, C. H. T.

    1972-01-01

    An analytical and test program was conducted in order to establish the feasibility of a multichamber pulsed-capillary viscometer. The initial design incorporated a piston, ram, and seals which produced measured pulses up to 30,000 psi in the closed chamber system. Pressure pulses from one to ten milliseconds were investigated in a system volume of 1 cuin. Four test fluids: a MIL-L-7808, a 5P4E polyphenyl ether, a MIL-L-23699A, and a synthetic hydrocarbon were examined in the test pressure assembly. The pressure-viscosity coefficient and viscosity delay time were determined for the MIL-L-7808 lubricant tested.

  1. Capillary Bridges between Soft Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wexler, Jason S.; Heard, Tiara M.; Stone, Howard A.

    2014-02-01

    A wetting droplet trapped in the thin gap between two elastic bodies will deflect the bodies towards one another. The deformation increases the total capillary adhesion force by increasing the contact radius and narrowing the gap height. For flat droplets, with a large ratio of radius to gap height, the Laplace pressure causes surface deformations that are orders of magnitude larger than those induced by a sessile droplet of the same radius. We present experiments, scalings, and closed-form solutions that describe the deformation. Using variational techniques, we also show that the problem exhibits a bifurcation, where the gap spontaneously closes due to an incremental increase in drop volume.

  2. Pre-Cretaceous Tectonic Evolution of the Pacific Plate and Extension of the Geomagnetic Polarity Reversal Time Scale with Implications for the Origin of the Jurassic ’Quiet Zone’

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    decreasing geomagnetic field strength with increasing age during this period. The early history of the northern Pacific plate and Pacific- Farallon -lzanagi...scale. A number of the Pacific, Farallon and Izanagi plates (Hilde et workers measured magnetic lineations in the west- al., 1976; Woods and Davies, 1982...formed at a RRR triple junction between the over, many models of the geometry of the polarity Phoenix, Farallon and Izanagi plates at 180 Ma blocks within

  3. Large-volume sample stacking-capillary electrophoresis used for the determination of 3-nitrotyrosine in rat urine.

    PubMed

    Maeso, Nuria; Cifuentes, Alejandro; Barbas, Coral

    2004-09-25

    Large-volume sample stacking using the electroosmotic flow (EOF) pump technique has been investigated for the quantification of 3-nitrotyrosine in urine of diabetic rats. The best separation conditions for these highly complex samples were obtained using capillary electrophoresis (CE) in the reversed polarity mode (i.e., injecting at the cathode and detecting at the anode) using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) in the running buffer. The optimum CE separation conditions were achieved using a phosphate buffer prepared with 0.15M phosphoric acid and 0.5 mM CTAB adjusted to pH 6.4 with sodium hydroxide. In such CE conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) was 1.77 microM for 3-nitrotyrosine with normal injection mode, meanwhile with the large-volume sample stacking technique a more than 20-fold improvement was observed (i.e., LOD = 0.08 microM was obtained) without noticeable loss of resolution. This value allowed the detection of 3-nitrotyrosine in urine from diabetic rats. To our knowledge, this work is one of the few applications showing the great possibilities of these stacking procedures to analyse biological samples by CE.

  4. Analysis of multiple quaternary ammonium compounds in the brain using tandem capillary column separation and high resolution mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Falasca, Sara; Petruzziello, Filomena; Kretz, Robert; Rainer, Gregor; Zhang, Xiaozhe

    2012-06-08

    Endogenous quaternary ammonium compounds are involved in various physiological processes in the central nervous system. In the present study, eleven quaternary ammonium compounds, including acetylcholine, choline, carnitine, acetylcarnitine and seven other acylcarnitines of low polarity, were analyzed from brain extracts using a two dimension capillary liquid chromatography-Fourier transform mass spectrometry method. To deal with their large difference in hydrophobicities, tandem coupling between reversed phase and hydrophilic interaction chromatography columns was used to separate all the targeted quaternary ammonium compounds. Using high accuracy mass spectrometry in selected ion monitoring mode, all the compounds could be detected from each brain sample with high selectivity. The developed method was applied for the relative quantification of these quaternary ammonium compounds in three different brain regions of tree shrews: prefrontal cortex, striatum, and hippocampus. The comparative analysis showed that quaternary ammonium compounds were differentially distributed across the three brain areas. The analytical method proved to be highly sensitive and reliable for simultaneous determination of all the targeted analytes from brain samples.

  5. Hepatocyte Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Treyer, Aleksandr; Müsch, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocytes, like other epithelia, are situated at the interface between the organism’s exterior and the underlying internal milieu and organize the vectorial exchange of macromolecules between these two spaces. To mediate this function, epithelial cells, including hepatocytes, are polarized with distinct luminal domains that are separated by tight junctions from lateral domains engaged in cell-cell adhesion and from basal domains that interact with the underlying extracellular matrix. Despite these universal principles, hepatocytes distinguish themselves from other nonstriated epithelia by their multipolar organization. Each hepatocyte participates in multiple, narrow lumina, the bile canaliculi, and has multiple basal surfaces that face the endothelial lining. Hepatocytes also differ in the mechanism of luminal protein trafficking from other epithelia studied. They lack polarized protein secretion to the luminal domain and target single-spanning and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored bile canalicular membrane proteins via transcytosis from the basolateral domain. We compare this unique hepatic polarity phenotype with that of the more common columnar epithelial organization and review our current knowledge of the signaling mechanisms and the organization of polarized protein trafficking that govern the establishment and maintenance of hepatic polarity. The serine/threonine kinase LKB1, which is activated by the bile acid taurocholate and, in turn, activates adenosine monophosphate kinase-related kinases including AMPK1/2 and Par1 paralogues has emerged as a key determinant of hepatic polarity. We propose that the absence of a hepatocyte basal lamina and differences in cell-cell adhesion signaling that determine the positioning of tight junctions are two crucial determinants for the distinct hepatic and columnar polarity phenotypes. PMID:23720287

  6. Nucleation theory - Is replacement free energy needed?. [error analysis of capillary approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doremus, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    It has been suggested that the classical theory of nucleation of liquid from its vapor as developed by Volmer and Weber (1926) needs modification with a factor referred to as the replacement free energy and that the capillary approximation underlying the classical theory is in error. Here, the classical nucleation equation is derived from fluctuation theory, Gibb's result for the reversible work to form a critical nucleus, and the rate of collision of gas molecules with a surface. The capillary approximation is not used in the derivation. The chemical potential of small drops is then considered, and it is shown that the capillary approximation can be derived from thermodynamic equations. The results show that no corrections to Volmer's equation are needed.

  7. Layer-by-layer assembly of polyelectrolyte and graphene oxide for open-tubular capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Qu, Qishu; Gu, Chenhao; Gu, Zuli; Shen, Yuqi; Wang, Chengyin; Hu, Xiaoya

    2013-03-22

    In this paper, open-tubular capillary column coated with graphene oxide (GO) was prepared through ionic adsorption of negatively charged GO nanosheets onto the capillary wall pre-modified with positively charged poly(diallydimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA). Thus prepared coating was very stable and could endure over 200 separations. The electroosmotic flow (EOF) characteristics of bare fused silica capillary column, PDDA coated column, and GO-PDDA coated column (GO-PDDA@column) were investigated by varying the percentage of methanol in buffer and the buffer pH value. The run-to-run, day-to-day, and column-to-column reproducibilities of EOF on GO-PDDA@column were satisfying with relative standard deviation values of less than 2% in all cases. The stationary phase displays a characteristic reversed-phase behavior. The GO-PDDA@column was also used to separate proteins in egg white. Both basic and acidic proteins were separated in a single run.

  8. Cryogenic Capillary Screen Heat Entrapment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolshinskiy, L.G.; Hastings, L.J.; Stathman, G.

    2007-01-01

    Cryogenic liquid acquisition devices (LADs) for space-based propulsion interface directly with the feed system, which can be a significant heat leak source. Further, the accumulation of thermal energy within LAD channels can lead to the loss of sub-cooled propellant conditions and result in feed system cavitation during propellant outflow. Therefore, the fundamental question addressed by this program was: "To what degree is natural convection in a cryogenic liquid constrained by the capillary screen meshes envisioned for LADs.?"Testing was first conducted with water as the test fluid, followed by LN2 tests. In either case, the basic experimental approach was to heat the bottom of a cylindrical column of test fluid to establish stratification patterns measured by temperature sensors located above and below a horizontal screen barrier position. Experimentation was performed without barriers, with screens, and with a solid barrier. The two screen meshes tested were those typically used by LAD designers, "200x1400" and "325x2300", both with Twill Dutch Weave. Upon consideration of both the water and LN2 data it was concluded that heat transfer across the screen meshes was dependent upon barrier thermal conductivity and that the capillary screen meshes were impervious to natural convection currents.

  9. Atomic Force Controlled Capillary Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Aaron; Yeshua, Talia; Palchan, Mila; Lovsky, Yulia; Taha, Hesham

    2010-03-01

    Lithography based on scanning probe microscopic techniques has considerable potential for accurate & localized deposition of material on the nanometer scale. Controlled deposition of metallic features with high purity and spatial accuracy is of great interest for circuit edit applications in the semiconductor industry, for plasmonics & nanophotonics and for basic research in surface enhanced Raman scattering & nanobiophysics. Within the context of metal deposition we will review the development of fountain pen nanochemistry and its most recent emulation Atomic Force Controlled Capillary Electrophoresis (ACCE). Using this latter development we will demonstrate achievement of unprecedented control of nanoparticle deposition using a three-electrode geometry. Three electrodes are attached: one on the outside of a metal coated glass probe, one on the inside of a hollow probe in a solution containing Au nanoparticles in the capillary, and a third on the surface where the writing takes place. The three electrodes provide electrical pulses for accurate control of deposition and retraction of the liquid from the surface overcoming the lack of control seen in both dip pen lithography & fountain pen nanochemistry when the tip contacts the surface. With this development, we demonstrate depositing a single 1.3 nm Au nanoparticle onto surfaces such as semiconductors.

  10. Evaluation of capillary reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahill, J. E.; Halase, J. F.; South, W. K.; Stoffer, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    Anti-icing of the inlet of jet engines is generally performed with high pressure heated air that is directed forward from the compressor through a series of pipes to various manifolds located near the structures to be anti-iced. From these manifolds, the air is directed to all flowpath surfaces that may be susceptible to ice formation. There the anti-icing function may be performed by either heat conduction or film heating. Unfortunately, the prospect of utilizing lighweight, high strength composites for inlet structures of jet engines has been frustrated by the low transverse thermal conductivity of such materials. It was the objective of this program to develop an advanced materials and design concept for anti-icing composite structures. The concept that was evaluated used capillary glass tubes embedded on the surface of a composite structure with heated air ducted through the tubes. An analytical computer program was developed to predict the anti-icing performance of such tubes and a test program was conducted to demonstrate actual performance of this system. Test data and analytical code results were in excellent agreement. Both indicate feasibility of using capillary tubes for surface heating as a means for composite engine structures to combat ice accumulation.

  11. Capillary Rise in Porous Media.

    PubMed

    Lago, Marcelo; Araujo, Mariela

    2001-02-01

    Capillary rise experiments were performed in columns filled with glass beads and Berea sandstones, using visual methods to register the advance of the water front. For the glass bead filled columns, early time data are well fitted by the Washburn equation. However, in the experiments, the advancing front exceeded the predicted equilibrium height. For large times, an algebraic behavior of the velocity of the front is observed (T. Delker et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 2902 (1996)). A model for studying the capillary pressure evolution in a regular assembly of spheres is proposed and developed. It is based on a quasi-static advance of the meniscus with a piston-like motion and allows us to estimate the hydraulic equilibrium height, with values very close to those obtained by fitting early time data to a Washburn equation. The change of regime is explained as a transition in the mechanism of advance of the meniscus. On the other hand, only the Washburn regime was observed for the sandstones. The front velocity was fitted to an algebraical form with an exponent close to 0.5, a value expected from the asymptotic limit of the Washburn equation. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  12. Geomagnetic excursions reflect an aborted polarity state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valet, Jean-Pierre; Plenier, Guillaume; Herrero-Bervera, E.

    2008-10-01

    Geomagnetic excursions represent short episodes of a few thousand years at most during which the field considerably exceeds its normal range of variability during a polarity state. Paleomagnetic records have now been obtained with extremely high temporal resolution which have improved our knowledge of these short events. We have compiled the most detailed records of excursions that had occurred during the Brunhes and Matuyama chrons. We show that virtual geomagnetic poles (VGPs) of at least one record of each event are able to reach the opposite polarity. In the next step, we have computed different simulations of excursions during which the dipole progressively vanishes before growing back without reversing. This scenario produces very few reversed directions which are only visible at some latitudes. We infer that it is impossible to reach the ratio of reversed to intermediate VGPs present in the paleomagnetic records if the excursions were not associated with a short period of reversed dipole field. Therefore, excursions should be regarded as two successive reversals bracketing an aborted polarity interval. We propose that the same underlying mechanisms prevail in both situations (excursions or reversals) and that below a certain strength the field reaches an unstable position which preludes either the achievement of a reversal or its return to the former polarity.

  13. Magnetic reversals from planetary dynamo waves.

    PubMed

    Sheyko, Andrey; Finlay, Christopher C; Jackson, Andrew

    2016-11-24

    A striking feature of many natural dynamos is their ability to undergo polarity reversals. The best documented example is Earth's magnetic field, which has reversed hundreds of times during its history. The origin of geomagnetic polarity reversals lies in a magnetohydrodynamic process that takes place in Earth's core, but the precise mechanism is debated. The majority of numerical geodynamo simulations that exhibit reversals operate in a regime in which the viscosity of the fluid remains important, and in which the dynamo mechanism primarily involves stretching and twisting of field lines by columnar convection. Here we present an example of another class of reversing-geodynamo model, which operates in a regime of comparatively low viscosity and high magnetic diffusivity. This class does not fit into the paradigm of reversal regimes that are dictated by the value of the local Rossby number (the ratio of advection to Coriolis force). Instead, stretching of the magnetic field by a strong shear in the east-west flow near the imaginary cylinder just touching the inner core and parallel to the axis of rotation is crucial to the reversal mechanism in our models, which involves a process akin to kinematic dynamo waves. Because our results are relevant in a regime of low viscosity and high magnetic diffusivity, and with geophysically appropriate boundary conditions, this form of dynamo wave may also be involved in geomagnetic reversals.

  14. Sheathless interface for coupling capillary electrophoresis with mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Chenchen; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-06-17

    A sheathless interface for coupling capillary electrophoresis (CE) with mass spectrometry is disclosed. The sheathless interface includes a separation capillary for performing CE separation and an emitter capillary for electrospray ionization. A portion of the emitter capillary is porous or, alternatively, is coated to form an electrically conductive surface. A section of the emitter capillary is disposed within the separation capillary, forming a joint. A metal tube, containing a conductive liquid, encloses the joint.

  15. Internal capillary insulation for cryogenic tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgrew, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Capillary-type insulation was devised for installation on inside of liquid methane fuel tanks for future aircraft. Insulation consists of honeycomb core of fiberglass cloth impregnated with polyimide resin which is bonded onto metal tank wall using polyimide adhesive. Capillary holes in each honeycomb cell admit methane which provides static pressure in cell.

  16. Capillary waveguide optrodes for Medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieslinger, Dietmar; Weigl, Bernhard H.; Draxler, Sonja; Lippitsch, Max E.

    1997-01-01

    Glass capillaries with a chemically sensitive coating on the inner surface are used as optical sensors for medical diagnostics. The capillary simultaneously serves as a sample compartment, a sensor element, and an inhomogeneous optical waveguide. Different optical setups have been investigated and compared regarding its waveguiding properties.

  17. Study of Capillary-Based Gaseous Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacobaeus, C.; Francke, T.; Danielsson, M.; Ostling, J.; Peskov, V.

    2004-06-01

    We have studied gain vs. voltage characteristics and position resolutions of multistep capillary plates (two or three capillary plates operating in a cascade), as well as capillary plates operating in a mode when the main amplification occurs between plates or between the capillary plate and the readout plate (parallel plate amplification mode). Results of these studies demonstrated that in the parallel-plate amplification mode one can reach both high gains (>100000) and good position resolutions (~100 micro meter) even with a single step arrangement. It offers a compact amplification structure, which can be used in many applications. For example, in preliminary tests we succeeded to combine it with a photocathode and use it as a position sensitive gaseous photomultiplier. CsI coated capillary plates could also be used as a high position resolution and high rate X-ray converter.

  18. Oximetry of retinal capillaries by multicomponent analysis.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Hiromitsu; Arimoto, Hidenobu; Shirai, Tomohiro; Ooto, Sotaro; Hangai, Masanori; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2012-08-01

    Retinal oximetry of capillaries was performed for early detection of retinal vascular abnormalities, which are caused predominantly by complications of systemic circulatory diseases. As the conventional method for determining absorbance is not applicable to capillaries, multicomponent analysis was used to estimate the absorbance spectra of the retinal blood vessels. In this analysis, the capillary spectrum was classified as intermediate between those of the retinal arteries and veins, enabling relative estimation of oxygen saturation in the capillaries. This method could be useful for early recognition of disturbances in the peripheral circulation. Furthermore, a spectroscopic ophthalmoscope system based on the proposed method was developed to examine the human retina. A clinical trial of this system demonstrated that oximetry of the retinal capillaries may be an improvement over the present diagnosis for patients of malignant hypertension.

  19. The topology of intrasector reversals of the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Crooker, N. U.; Gosling, J. T.

    1996-11-01

    A technique has been developed recently to determine the polarities of interplanetary magnetic fields relative to their origins at the Sun by comparing energetic electron flow directions with local magnetic field directions. Here we use heat flux electrons from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) plasma detector on the ISEE 3 spacecraft to determine the field polarities. We examine periods within well-defined magnetic sectors when the field directions appear to be reversed from the normal spiral direction of the sector. About half of these intrasector field reversals (IFRs) are cases in which the polarities match those of the surrounding sectors, indicating that those fields have been folded back toward the Sun. The more interesting cases are those with polarity reversals. We find no clear cases of isolated reverse polarity fields, which suggests that islands of reverse polarity in the solar source dipole field probably do not exist. The IFRs with polarity reversals are strongly associated with periods of bidirectional electron flows, suggesting that those fields occur only in conjunction with closed fields. We propose that both those IFRs and the bidirectional flows are signatures of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In that case, many interplanetary CMEs are larger and more complex than previously thought, consisting of both open and closed field components.

  20. A capillary valve for microfluidic systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, Eric B.; Kanouff, Michael P.; Rush, Brian M.

    2004-10-01

    Microfluidic systems are becoming increasingly complicated as the number of applications grows. The use of microfluidic systems for chemical and biological agent detection, for example, requires that a given sample be subjected to many process steps, which requires microvalves to control the position and transport of the sample. Each microfluidic application has its own specific valve requirements and this has precipitated the wide variety of valve designs reported in the literature. Each of these valve designs has its strengths and weaknesses. The strength of the valve design proposed here is its simplicity, which makes it easy to fabricate, easy to actuate, and easy to integrate with a microfluidic system. It can be applied to either gas phase or liquid phase systems. This novel design uses a secondary fluid to stop the flow of the primary fluid in the system. The secondary fluid must be chosen based on the type of flow that it must stop. A dielectric fluid must be used for a liquid phase flow driven by electroosmosis, and a liquid with a large surface tension should be used to stop a gas phase flow driven by a weak pressure differential. Experiments were carried out investigating certain critical functions of the design. These experiments verified that the secondary fluid can be reversibly moved between its 'valve opened' and 'valve closed' positions, where the secondary fluid remained as one contiguous piece during this transport process. The experiments also verified that when Fluorinert is used as the secondary fluid, the valve can break an electric circuit. It was found necessary to apply a hydrophobic coating to the microchannels to stop the primary fluid, an aqueous electrolyte, from wicking past the Fluorinert and short-circuiting the valve. A simple model was used to develop valve designs that could be closed using an electrokinetic pump, and re-opened by simply turning the pump off and allowing capillary forces to push the secondary fluid back into its

  1. Two-dimensional capillary origami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brubaker, N. D.; Lega, J.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a global approach to the problem of capillary origami that captures all unfolded equilibrium configurations in the two-dimensional setting where the drop is not required to fully wet the flexible plate. We provide bifurcation diagrams showing the level of encapsulation of each equilibrium configuration as a function of the volume of liquid that it contains, as well as plots representing the energy of each equilibrium branch. These diagrams indicate at what volume level the liquid drop ceases to be attached to the endpoints of the plate, which depends on the value of the contact angle. As in the case of pinned contact points, three different parameter regimes are identified, one of which predicts instantaneous encapsulation for small initial volumes of liquid.

  2. Capillary Separation: Micellar Electrokinetic Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terabe, Shigeru

    2009-07-01

    Micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC), a separation mode of capillary electrophoresis (CE), has enabled the separation of electrically neutral analytes. MEKC can be performed by adding an ionic micelle to the running solution of CE without modifying the instrument. Its separation principle is based on the differential migration of the ionic micelles and the bulk running buffer under electrophoresis conditions and on the interaction between the analyte and the micelle. Hence, MEKC's separation principle is similar to that of chromatography. MEKC is a useful technique particularly for the separation of small molecules, both neutral and charged, and yields high-efficiency separation in a short time with minimum amounts of sample and reagents. To improve the concentration sensitivity of detection, several on-line sample preconcentration techniques such as sweeping have been developed.

  3. Copolymers For Capillary Gel Electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Changsheng; Li, Qingbo

    2005-08-09

    This invention relates to an electrophoresis separation medium having a gel matrix of at least one random, linear copolymer comprising a primary comonomer and at least one secondary comonomer, wherein the comonomers are randomly distributed along the copolymer chain. The primary comonomer is an acrylamide or an acrylamide derivative that provides the primary physical, chemical, and sieving properties of the gel matrix. The at least one secondary comonomer imparts an inherent physical, chemical, or sieving property to the copolymer chain. The primary and secondary comonomers are present in a ratio sufficient to induce desired properties that optimize electrophoresis performance. The invention also relates to a method of separating a mixture of biological molecules using this gel matrix, a method of preparing the novel electrophoresis separation medium, and a capillary tube filled with the electrophoresis separation medium.

  4. Development of and fabrication of high resolution gas chromatographic capillary columns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zlatkis, A.

    1982-01-01

    Gas chromatographic columns which are used in the trace gas analyzer (TGA) for the space shuttle are coated with a polyoxyethylene lauryl ether. This stationary phase is of medium polarity and has a temperature limit of 160 C. A polymer for this application which has an improved thermal stability is investigated. The use of fused silica capillary columns with specially bonded phases as well as an introduction system (on column) was also studied.

  5. Polarized Campuses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parr, Susan Resneck

    1991-01-01

    On college campuses, the climate is polarized because of intolerance and discrimination, censorship, factionalism, and anger among students and faculty. As a result, the campus is in danger of becoming dominated by political issues and discouraging the exchange of ideas characteristic of a true liberal arts education. (MSE)

  6. Capillary Properties of Model Pores.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Tim J.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Liquid menisci in small pores exhibit a curved surface across which there is a significant pressure difference. In the past it has been difficult to calculate the curvatures, of this class of menisci. Some recent studies have shown that a relatively straightforward, but hitherto neglected, method originated by Mayer & Stowe (1965) and Princen (1969a) can be applied to analyse wedging menisci. However, the method has lacked a comprehensive experimental verification. This investigation follows on from the previously limited studies. A standardised method for the application of the analysis is described, the results from which are compared to observations made using modified experimental procedures. The behaviour of the capillary surfaces formed in several model pores are analysed with the method. The model systems studied are rectangular ducts, the pores formed by a rod in an angled corner, by two contacting rods and a plate and the space between a rod and a plate. For the latter two shapes the analysis is extended to include systems of mixed wettability which have a particular bearing on enhanced oil recovery operations. Experiments in which curvatures are inferred from observations of capillary rise, are performed using two comparative techniques. An involved procedure confirms predictions of meniscus curvature to within 0.3%. Use of a more straightforward, through less accurate, technique enables variations of curvature with tube shape or contact angle(s) to be conveniently studied. Results obtained are excellent and confirm the theory within the determined experimental errors. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  7. Screening for urinary amphetamine and analogs by capillary electrophoretic immunoassays and confirmation by capillary electrophoresis with on-column multiwavelength absorbance detection.

    PubMed

    Ramseier, A; Caslavska, J; Thormann, W

    1998-11-01

    This paper characterizes competitive binding, electrokinetic capillary-based immunoassays for screening of urinary amphetamine (A) and analogs using reagents which were commercialized for a fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA). After incubation of 25 microL urine with the reactants, a small aliquot of the mixture is applied onto a fused-silica capillary and unbound fluorescein-labeled tracer compounds are monitored by capillary electrophoresis with on-column laser-induced fluorescence detection. Configurations in presence and absence of micelles were investigated and found to be capable of recognizing urinary D-(+)-amphetamine at concentrations > about 80 ng/mL. Similar responses were obtained for racemic methamphetamine (MA) and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). The electrokinetic immunoassay data suggest that the FPIA reagent kit includes two immunoassay systems (two antibodies and two tracer molecules), one that recognizes MA and MDMA, and one that is geared towards monitoring of A. For confirmation analysis of urinary amphetamines and ephedrines, capillary electrophoresis in a pH 9.2 buffer and multiwavelength UV detection was employed. The suitability of the electrokinetic methods for screening and confirmation is demonstrated via analysis of patient and external quality control urines.

  8. Capillary forces between chemically different substrates.

    PubMed

    De Souza, E J; Brinkmann, M; Mohrdieck, C; Crosby, A; Arzt, E

    2008-09-16

    Motivated by experimental results, we present numerical and analytical calculations of the capillary force exerted by a capillary bridge spanning the gap between two parallel flat plates of asymmetric wettability. Depending on whether the sum of the two contact angles is smaller or larger than 180 degrees, the capillary force is either attractive or repulsive at small separations D between the plates. In either cases the magnitude of the force diverges as D approaches zero. The leading order of this divergence is captured by an analytical expression deduced from the geometry of the meniscus of a flat capillary bridge. The results for substrates with different wettability reveal an interesting behavior: with the sum of the contact angles fixed, the magnitude of the capillary force and the rupture separation decreases as the asymmetry in contact angles is increased. In addition, we present the rupture separation, i.e., the maximal extension of a capillary bridge, as a function of the contact angles. Our results provide an extensive picture of surface wettability effects on capillary adhesion.

  9. Towards new applications using capillary waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Stasio, Nicolino; Shibukawa, Atsushi; Papadopoulos, Ioannis N.; Farahi, Salma; Simandoux, Olivier; Huignard, Jean-Pierre; Bossy, Emmanuel; Moser, Christophe; Psaltis, Demetri

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the enhancement of the sensing capabilities of glass capillaries. We exploit their properties as optical and acoustic waveguides to transform them potentially into high resolution minimally invasive endoscopic devices. We show two possible applications of silica capillary waveguides demonstrating fluorescence and optical-resolution photoacoustic imaging using a single 330 μm-thick silica capillary. A nanosecond pulsed laser is focused and scanned in front of a capillary by digital phase conjugation through the silica annular ring of the capillary, used as an optical waveguide. We demonstrate optical-resolution photoacoustic images of a 30 μm-thick nylon thread using the water-filled core of the same capillary as an acoustic waveguide, resulting in a fully passive endoscopic device. Moreover, fluorescence images of 1.5 μm beads are obtained collecting the fluorescence signal through the optical waveguide. This kind of silica-capillary waveguide together with wavefront shaping techniques such as digital phase conjugation, paves the way to minimally invasive multi-modal endoscopy. PMID:26713182

  10. Analytical performances of two liquid crystals and their mixture as stationary phases in capillary gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Bélaïdi, D; Sebih, S; Boudah, S; Guermouche, M H; Bayle, J P

    2005-09-16

    Comparative gas chromatographic applications of two new liquid crystals called LCa and LCb and their equimolar mixture LC(a+b) were investigated. The thermal properties of LCa, LCb and LC(a+b) were established with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and polarizing microscopy. Differential scanning calorimetry of LC(a+b) showed that the melting or clearing temperature was intermediate between the corresponding temperatures of the pure compounds. Polarizing microscopy showed that the liquid crystal phase of A + B was nematic. The chromatographic separation abilities LCa, LCb and LC(a+b) were studied using fused silica capillary columns. Interesting analytical performances were obtained: isomeric separation of aromatics, polyaromatics, phenols.

  11. Properties of water as a novel stationary phase in capillary gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gallant, Jonathan A; Thurbide, Kevin B

    2014-09-12

    A novel method of separation that uses water as a stationary phase in capillary gas chromatography (GC) is presented. Through applying a water phase to the interior walls of a stainless steel capillary, good separations were obtained for a large variety of analytes in this format. It was found that carrier gas humidification and backpressure were key factors in promoting stable operation over time at various temperatures. For example, with these measures in place, the retention time of an acetone test analyte was found to reduce by only 44s after 100min of operation at a column temperature of 100°C. In terms of efficiency, under optimum conditions the method produced about 20,000 plates for an acetone test analyte on a 250μm i.d.×30m column. Overall, retention on the stationary phase generally increased with analyte water solubility and polarity, but was relatively little correlated with analyte volatility. Conversely, non-polar analytes were essentially unretained in the system. These features were applied to the direct analysis of different polar analytes in both aqueous and organic samples. Results suggest that this approach could provide an interesting alternative tool in capillary GC separations.

  12. Micromechanism linear actuator with capillary force sealing

    DOEpatents

    Sniegowski, Jeffry J.

    1997-01-01

    A class of micromachine linear actuators whose function is based on gas driven pistons in which capillary forces are used to seal the gas behind the piston. The capillary forces also increase the amount of force transmitted from the gas pressure to the piston. In a major subclass of such devices, the gas bubble is produced by thermal vaporization of a working fluid. Because of their dependence on capillary forces for sealing, such devices are only practical on the sub-mm size scale, but in that regime they produce very large force times distance (total work) values.

  13. Capillary electrophoresis with indirect amperometric detection.

    PubMed

    Olefirowicz, T M; Ewing, A G

    1990-01-19

    The use of indirect amperometric detection with capillary electrophoresis is demonstrated. The system consists of a porous glass coupler which allows amperometric detection at a carbon fiber electrode placed in the end of the capillary. 3,4-Dihydroxybenzylamine is added to the buffer system as a continuously eluting electrophore. Indirect amperometric detection in 9-mumol I.D. capillaries provides detection limits as low as 380 attomole for the amino acid arginine. Finally, both direct and indirect amperometric detection can be accomplished simultaneously.

  14. Extensive database of liquid phase diffusion coefficients of some frequently used test molecules in reversed-phase liquid chromatography and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Song, Huiying; Vanderheyden, Yoachim; Adams, Erwin; Desmet, Gert; Cabooter, Deirdre

    2016-07-15

    Diffusion plays an important role in all aspects of band broadening in chromatography. An accurate knowledge of molecular diffusion coefficients in different mobile phases is therefore crucial in fundamental column performance studies. Correlations available in literature, such as the Wilke-Chang equation, can provide good approximations of molecular diffusion under reversed-phase conditions. However, these correlations have been demonstrated to be less accurate for mobile phases containing a large percentage of acetonitrile, as is the case in hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography. A database of experimentally measured molecular diffusion coefficients of some 45 polar and apolar compounds that are frequently used as test molecules under hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography and reversed-phase conditions is therefore presented. Special attention is given to diffusion coefficients of polar compounds obtained in large percentages of acetonitrile (>90%). The effect of the buffer concentration (5-10mM ammonium acetate) on the obtained diffusion coefficients is investigated and is demonstrated to mainly influence the molecular diffusion of charged molecules. Diffusion coefficients are measured using the Taylor-Aris method and hence deduced from the peak broadening of a solute when flowing through a long open tube. The validity of the set-up employed for the measurement of the diffusion coefficients is demonstrated by ruling out the occurrence of longitudinal diffusion, secondary flow interactions and extra-column effects, while it is also shown that radial equilibration in the 15m long capillary is effective.

  15. Analytical potential of enzyme-coated capillary reactors in capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Simonet, Bartolomé M; Ríos, Angel; Valcárcel, Miguel

    2004-01-01

    Enzymes immobilized on the inner surface of an electrophoretic capillary were used to increase sensitivity and resolution in capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). Sensitivity is enhanced by inserting a piece of capillary containing the immobilized enzyme into the main capillary, located before the detector, in order to transform the analyte into a product with a higher absorptivity. This approach was used to determine ethanol. In order to improve resolution, capillary pieces containing immobilized enzymes were inserted at various strategic positions along the electrophoretic capillary. On reaching the enzyme, the analyte was converted into a product with a high electrophoretic mobility, the migration time for which was a function of the position of the enzyme reactor. This approach was applied to the separation and determination of acetaldehyde and pyruvate. Finally, the proposed method was validated with the determination of ethanol, acetaldehyde, and pyruvate in beer and wine samples.

  16. Capillary electrochromatography with monolithic silica column: I. Preparation of silica monoliths having surface-bound octadecyl moieties and their chromatographic characterization and applications to the separation of neutral and charged species.

    PubMed

    Allen, Darin; El Rassi, Ziad

    2003-01-01

    Monolithic silica columns with surface-bound octadecyl (C18) moieties have been prepared by a sol-gel process in 100 microm ID fused-silica capillaries for reversed-phase capillary electrochromatography of neutral and charged species. The reaction conditions for the preparation of the C18-silica monoliths were optimized for maximum surface coverage with octadecyl moieties in order to maximize retention and selectivity toward neutral and charged solutes with a sufficiently strong electroosmotic flow (> 2 mm/s) to yield rapid analysis time. Furthermore, the effect of the pore-tailoring process on the silica monoliths was performed over a wide range of treatment time with 0.010 M ammonium hydroxide solution in order to determine the optimum time and conditions that yield mesopores of narrow pore size distribution that result in high separation efficiency. Under optimum column fabrication conditions and optimum mobile phase composition and flow velocity, the average separation efficiency reached 160 000 plates/m, a value comparable to that obtained on columns packed with 3 microm C18-silica particles with the advantages of high permeability and virtually no bubble formation. The optimized monolithic C18-silica columns were evaluated for their retention properties toward neutral and charged analytes over a wide range of mobile phase compositions. A series of dimensionless retention parameters were evaluated and correlated to solute polarity and electromigration property. A dimensionless mobility modulus was introduced to describe charged solute migration and interaction behavior with the monolithic C18-silica in a counterflow regime during capillary electrochromatography (CEC )separations. The mobility moduli correlated well with the solute hydrophobic character and its charge-to-mass ratio.

  17. Polar Diving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    3 July 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layers exposed by erosion in a trough within the north polar residual cap of Mars, diving beneath a younger covering of polar materials. The layers have, since the Mariner 9 mission in 1972, been interpreted to be composed of a combination of dust and ice in unknown proportions. In this scene, a layer of solid carbon dioxide, which was deposited during the previous autumn and winter, blankets the trough as well as the adjacent terrain. Throughout northern spring, the carbon dioxide will be removed; by summer, the layers will be frost-free.

    Location near: 81.4oN, 352.2oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Spring

  18. Cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    Romereim, Sarah M

    2011-01-01

    Despite extensive genetic analysis of the dynamic multi-phase process that transforms a small population of lateral plate mesoderm into the mature limb skeleton, the mechanisms by which signaling pathways regulate cellular behaviors to generate morphogenetic forces are not known. Recently, a series of papers have offered the intriguing possibility that regulated cell polarity fine-tunes the morphogenetic process via orienting cell axes, division planes and cell movements. Wnt5a-mediated non-canonical signaling, which may include planar cell polarity, has emerged as a common thread in the otherwise distinct signaling networks that regulate morphogenesis in each phase of limb development. These findings position the limb as a key model to elucidate how global tissue patterning pathways direct local differences in cell behavior that, in turn, generate growth and form. PMID:22064549

  19. Clusters of circulating tumor cells traverse capillary-sized vessels

    PubMed Central

    Au, Sam H.; Storey, Brian D.; Moore, John C.; Tang, Qin; Chen, Yeng-Long; Javaid, Sarah; Sarioglu, A. Fatih; Sullivan, Ryan; Madden, Marissa W.; O’Keefe, Ryan; Haber, Daniel A.; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Langenau, David M.; Stott, Shannon L.; Toner, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular aggregates of circulating tumor cells (CTC clusters) are potent initiators of distant organ metastasis. However, it is currently assumed that CTC clusters are too large to pass through narrow vessels to reach these organs. Here, we present evidence that challenges this assumption through the use of microfluidic devices designed to mimic human capillary constrictions and CTC clusters obtained from patient and cancer cell origins. Over 90% of clusters containing up to 20 cells successfully traversed 5- to 10-μm constrictions even in whole blood. Clusters rapidly and reversibly reorganized into single-file chain-like geometries that substantially reduced their hydrodynamic resistances. Xenotransplantation of human CTC clusters into zebrafish showed similar reorganization and transit through capillary-sized vessels in vivo. Preliminary experiments demonstrated that clusters could be disrupted during transit using drugs that affected cellular interaction energies. These findings suggest that CTC clusters may contribute a greater role to tumor dissemination than previously believed and may point to strategies for combating CTC cluster-initiated metastasis. PMID:27091969

  20. Non-capillary binding of colloidal particles to liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaz, David; McGorty, Ryan; Manoharan, Vinothan

    2012-02-01

    We observe colloidal polystyrene particles binding reversibly to an oil-water interface through the combination of a repulsive electrostatic force and an attractive van der Waals force. Previously studied interactions of an aqueous colloidal particle and a liquid interface have generally fallen into two categories: 1) electrostatic repulsion indicated by the dependence on salt and 2) capillary adsorption where surface tension brings the particle in contact with both phases and is indicated by practically irreversible binding. With our technique of pushing individual colloidal particles towards a planar oil-water interface and observing their motion in three-dimensions with holographic microscopy we have observed both interactions. However, our observations indicate that under certain conditions the electrostatic repulsion, which is due to repulsive image charges, is weak enough for a particle to experience a van der Waals attraction while strong enough to prevent a particle from penetrating the interface and becoming bound through capillary action. We observe individual particles transition between repulsive and attractive interactions with the interface suggesting that these colloidal particles have a heterogeneous surface charge.

  1. Clusters of circulating tumor cells traverse capillary-sized vessels.

    PubMed

    Au, Sam H; Storey, Brian D; Moore, John C; Tang, Qin; Chen, Yeng-Long; Javaid, Sarah; Sarioglu, A Fatih; Sullivan, Ryan; Madden, Marissa W; O'Keefe, Ryan; Haber, Daniel A; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Langenau, David M; Stott, Shannon L; Toner, Mehmet

    2016-05-03

    Multicellular aggregates of circulating tumor cells (CTC clusters) are potent initiators of distant organ metastasis. However, it is currently assumed that CTC clusters are too large to pass through narrow vessels to reach these organs. Here, we present evidence that challenges this assumption through the use of microfluidic devices designed to mimic human capillary constrictions and CTC clusters obtained from patient and cancer cell origins. Over 90% of clusters containing up to 20 cells successfully traversed 5- to 10-μm constrictions even in whole blood. Clusters rapidly and reversibly reorganized into single-file chain-like geometries that substantially reduced their hydrodynamic resistances. Xenotransplantation of human CTC clusters into zebrafish showed similar reorganization and transit through capillary-sized vessels in vivo. Preliminary experiments demonstrated that clusters could be disrupted during transit using drugs that affected cellular interaction energies. These findings suggest that CTC clusters may contribute a greater role to tumor dissemination than previously believed and may point to strategies for combating CTC cluster-initiated metastasis.

  2. Ionic liquids monolithic columns for protein separation in capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cui-Cui; Deng, Qi-Liang; Fang, Guo-Zhen; Liu, Hui-Lin; Wu, Jian-Hua; Pan, Ming-Fei; Wang, Shuo

    2013-12-04

    A series of ionic liquids (ILs) monolithic capillary columns based on 1-vinyl-3-octylimidazolium (ViOcIm(+)) were prepared by two approaches ("one-pot" approach and "anion-exchange" approach). The effects of different anions (bromide, Br(-); tetrafluoroborate, BF4(-); hexafluorophosphate, PF6(-); and bis-trifluoromethanesulfonylimide, NTf2(-)) on chromatography performance of all the resulting columns were investigated systematically under capillary electrochromatography (CEC) mode. The results indicated that all these columns could generate a stable reversed electroosmotic flow (EOF) over a wide pH range from 2.0 to 12.0. For the columns prepared by "one-pot" approach, the EOF decreased in the order of ViOcIm(+)Br(-)>ViOcIm(+)BF4(-)>ViOcIm(+)PF6(-)>ViOcIm(+)NTf2(-) under the same CEC conditions; the ViOcIm(+)Br(-) based column exhibited highest column efficiencies for the test small molecules; the ViOcIm(+)NTf2(-) based column possessed the strongest retention for aromatic hydrocarbons; and baseline separation of four standard proteins was achieved on ViOcIm(+)NTf2(-) based column corresponding to the highest column efficiency of 479,000 N m(-1) for cytochrome c (Cyt c). These results indicated that the property of ILs based columns could be tuned successfully by changing anions, which gave these columns potential to separate both small molecules and macro biomolecules.

  3. Applicability of chemically modified capillaries in chiral capillary electrophoresis for methamphetamine profiling.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Yuko T; Mikuma, Toshiyasu; Kuwayama, Kenji; Tsujikawa, Kenji; Miyaguchi, Hajime; Kanamori, Tatsuyuki; Inoue, Hiroyuki

    2013-03-10

    We examined the applicability of chemically modified capillaries on the chiral capillary electrophoresis of essential compounds for methamphetamine (MA) profiling (MA, amphetamine, ephedrine, pseudoephedrine, norephedrine, and norpseudoephedrine) using highly sulfated γ-cyclodextrin as a chiral selector. Four types of chemically modified capillaries, namely, FunCap-CE/Type D (possessing diol groups), Type A (amino groups), Type C (carboxyl groups), and Type S (sulfate groups), were evaluated. Repeatability, speed, and good chiral resolution sufficient for routine MA profiling were achieved with the Type S capillary.

  4. CAPILLARY BARRIERS IN UNSATURATED FRACTURED ROCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Y.S. Wu; W. Zhang; L. Pan; J. Hinds; G. Bodvarsson

    2000-10-01

    This work presents modeling studies investigating the effects of capillary barriers on fluid-flow and tracer-transport processes in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a potential site for storing high-level radioactive waste. These studies are designed to identify factors controlling the formation of capillary barriers and to estimate their effects on the extent of possible large-scale lateral flow in unsaturated fracture rocks. The modeling approach is based on a continuum formulation of coupled multiphase fluid and tracer transport through fractured porous rock. Flow processes in fractured porous rock are described using a dual-continuum concept. In addition, approximate analytical solutions are developed and used for assessing capillary-barrier effects in fractured rocks. This study indicates that under the current hydrogeologic conceptualization of Yucca Mountain, strong capillary-barrier effects exist for significantly diverting moisture flow.

  5. Multistaged stokes injected Raman capillary waveguide amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Kurnit, Norman A.

    1980-01-01

    A multistaged Stokes injected Raman capillary waveguide amplifier for providing a high gain Stokes output signal. The amplifier uses a plurality of optically coupled capillary waveguide amplifiers and one or more regenerative amplifiers to increase Stokes gain to a level sufficient for power amplification. Power amplification is provided by a multifocused Raman gain cell or a large diameter capillary waveguide. An external source of CO.sub.2 laser radiation can be injected into each of the capillary waveguide amplifier stages to increase Raman gain. Devices for injecting external sources of CO.sub.2 radiation include: dichroic mirrors, prisms, gratings and Ge Brewster plates. Alternatively, the CO.sub.2 input radiation to the first stage can be coupled and amplified between successive stages.

  6. CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORETIC BEHAVIOR OF SEVEN SULFONYLUREAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic behavior of bensulfuron Me, sulfometuron Me, nicosulfuron (Accent), chlorimuron Et, thifensulfuron Me (Harmony), metsulfuron Me, and chlorsulfuron was studied under capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) conditio...

  7. Capillary underwater discharges in repetitive pulse regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Baerdemaeker, F.; Monte, M.; Leys, C.

    2004-03-01

    In this study a capillary underwater discharge, that is sustained with AC (50 Hz) voltages up to 7.5 kV, is investigated. In a capillary discharge scheme, the current is, at some point along its path between two submerged electrodes, flowing through a narrow elongated bore in a dielectric material. When the current density is sufficiently high, local boiling and subsequent vapour breakdown results in the formation of a plasma within this capillary. At the same time the capillary emits an intense jet of vapour bubbles. Time-dependent electrical current, voltage and light emission curves are recorded for discharges in solutions of NaCl in distilled water and reveal different discharge regimes, depending on the conductivity and the excitation voltage, ranging from repetitive microsecond discharge pulses to a quasi-continuous discharge with a glow-like voltage-current characteristic.

  8. Characterising Microstructured Materials Using a Capillary Rheometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Christopher I.; See, Howard; Arabo, Emad Y. M.

    2008-07-01

    A parallel plate and capillary rheometer have been used to rheologically characterize an Australian hard wheat flour-water dough over an extensive range of shear rates (10-3-104 s-1). Torsional measurements showed that the shear viscosity of dough increased with strain to a maximum value then decreased, suggesting a breakdown of the dough structure. This was consistent with other published data on doughs. Capillary experiments revealed the shear thinning behavior of dough, which was described by a power-law model. The wall slip behavior of dough was examined, revealing a critical shear stress at which slip occurs for a 1 mm diameter capillary. The capillary data was best linked to the torsional data at low strain values (˜0.1) as expected given the nature of sampling in the two rheometers.

  9. ISS Update: Capillary Flow Experiments-2

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Kelly Humphries interviews Dr. Mark Weislogel, Principal Investigator for the Capillary Flow Experiments-2 (CFE), from the Portland State University in Oregon. The CFE i...

  10. Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin coating for capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Shah, Roopa S; Wang, Qinggang; Lee, Milton L

    2002-04-05

    Coating the interior surface of a fused-silica capillary with a polymeric material has long been used in capillary electrophoresis (CE) to reduce or eliminate electroosmotic flow and suppress adsorption. A cycloaliphatic epoxide-based resin was bonded to silane treated capillaries and crosslinked with a curing agent. The epoxy resin coating significantly reduced electroosmotic flow over a pH range of 3-10. This coating was sufficiently hydrophilic to suppress protein adsorption. The epoxy resin coated capillary was used to separate several acidic and basic proteins and peptides. Separation efficiencies greater than 400,000 theoretical plates were achieved. The relative standard deviations in migration times for proteins were <0.8%. Speed and simplicity are important advantages of the coating procedure compared to other published coating methods.

  11. Capillary electrochromatography using fibers as stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Jinno, K; Watanabe, H; Saito, Y; Takeichi, T

    2001-10-01

    Fiber-packed capillary columns have been evaluated in chromatographic performance in capillary electrochromatography (CEC). The change of electroosmotic flow (EOF) velocity and selectivity using different kinds of fiber materials was examined. Although the EOF velocity among the different fiber packed columns was almost the same, retention of parabens was larger on the Kevlar-packed column than on the Zylon-packed one, and was larger on the as-span-type fiber-packed column than on the high-modulus-type packed one. Using 200 microm ID x 5 cm Kevlar packed column combined with a 100 microm ID x 20 cm precolumn capillary and a 530 microm ID x 45 cm postcolumn capillary, the separation of three parabens within 30 s was achieved. Other compounds were also separated in a few minutes by the fiber-packed CEC method.

  12. Narrative Review: Clarkson Disease-Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Druey, Kirk M.; Greipp, Philip R.

    2010-01-01

    In 1960, Dr. Bayard Clarkson described a patient experiencing sporadic episodes of hypovolemia, hypotension, and edema. Plasma during the acute attack induced a “shock”-like syndrome when given systemically in rats. The unusual and enigmatic “Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome” (SCLS) named for Dr. Clarkson is of unknown etiology and is characterized by transient, severe, reversible hemoconcentration and hypoalbuminemia due to leakage of fluids and macromolecules (up to 900 kDa) into tissues (1). Fewer than 150 cases of SCLS have been reported since 1960, but the nonspecific presenting symptoms and signs and high mortality rate may have resulted in under-recognition of this disorder. Given the substantial overlap of SCLS with other “shock” syndromes, including sepsis, anaphylaxis, and angioedema, clinicians should consider this diagnosis in patients with unexplained edema, increased hematocrit, and hypotension. PMID:20643990

  13. Capillary electrophoresis-based proteomic techniques for biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xueping; Wang, Chenchen; Lee, Cheng S

    2013-01-01

    Besides proteome complexity, the greatest bioanalytical challenge facing comprehensive proteomic analysis, particularly in the identification of low abundance proteins, is related to the large variation of protein relative abundances. In contrast to universally enriching all analytes by a similar degree, the result of the capillary isotachophoresis (CITP) stacking process is that major components may be diluted, but trace compounds are concentrated. Such selective enhancement toward low abundance proteins drastically reduces the range of relative protein abundances within complex proteomes and greatly enhances the resulting proteome coverage. Furthermore, CITP offers seamless combination with nano-reversed phase liquid chromatography (nano-RPLC) as two highly resolving and completely orthogonal separation techniques critically needed for analyzing complex proteomes.

  14. Biomolecule analyses in an open-tubular capillary chromatography using ternary mixed carrier solvents with chemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Naoya; Masuhara, Yuji; Jinno, Naoya; Hashimoto, Masahiko; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhiko

    2012-01-01

    We examined the elution behavior of isoluminol isothiocyanate (ILITC)-labeled biomolecules (α-amino acids, peptides, and proteins) in an open-tubular capillary chromatography system using an untreated fused-silica capillary tube and a water-acetonitrile-ethyl acetate mixture carrier solution. Such an open-tubular capillary chromatography is called "tube radial distribution chromatography (TRDC)" for convenience. A mixture of ILITC and ILITC-labeled biomolecules was analyzed using TRDC with chemiluminescence detection that provided simple instrument without a light source and complex optical devises. The ILITC and the labeled twenty α-amino acids were separated, in this order or the reverse order, or not separated with an organic solvent-rich and water-rich carrier solution. Their elution behavior was considered to be of hydrophilic or hydrophobic nature of ILITC and the labeled α-amino acids. The ILITC and the labeled protein, alcohol dehydrogenase and bovine serum albumin, were separated in this order with an organic solvent-rich carrier solution, while they were eluted in the reverse order with a water-rich carrier solution, based on the TRDC separation performance. The TRDC system worked with the untreated open-tubular capillary tube not using any specific capillary tubes, such as coated, packed, or monolithic.

  15. Unusual intraosseous capillary hemangioma of the mandible.

    PubMed

    Dereci, Omur; Acikalin, Mustafa Fuat; Ay, Sinan

    2015-01-01

    Intraosseous hemangioma is a benign vascular neoplasm, which is mostly seen in vertebrae, maxillofacial bones, and long bones. Intraosseous hemangioma is rarely seen on jaw bones compared to other skeletal bones and usually occurs in the cavernous form. Capillary intraosseous hemangioma of jaws is an uncommon form of intraosseous hemangioma and has not been thoroughly described so far. In this study, a case of capillary intraosseous hemangioma of the mandible was presented with relevant literature review.

  16. Thin film capillary process and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2003-11-18

    Method and system of forming microfluidic capillaries in a variety of substrate materials. A first layer of a material such as silicon dioxide is applied to a channel etched in substrate. A second, sacrificial layer of a material such as a polymer is deposited on the first layer. A third layer which may be of the same material as the first layer is placed on the second layer. The sacrificial layer is removed to form a smooth walled capillary in the substrate.

  17. Bundled capillary electrophoresis using microstructured fibres.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Benjamin; Gibson, Graham T T; Oleschuk, Richard D

    2011-01-01

    Joule heating, arising from the electric current passing through the capillary, causes many undesired effects in CE that ultimately result in band broadening. The use of narrow-bore capillaries helps to solve this problem as smaller cross-sectional area results in decreased Joule heating and the rate of heat dissipation is increased by the larger surface-to-volume ratio. Issues arising from such small capillaries, such as poor detection sensitivity, low loading capacity and high flow-induced backpressure (complicating capillary loading) can be avoided by using a bundle of small capillaries operating simultaneously that share buffer reservoirs. Microstructured fibres, originally designed as waveguides in the telecommunication industry, are essentially a bundle of parallel ∼5 μm id channels that extend the length of a fibre having otherwise similar dimensions to conventional CE capillaries. This work presents the use of microstructured fibres for CZE, taking advantage of their relatively high surface-to-volume ratio and the small individual size of each channel to effect highly efficient separations, particularly for dye-labelled peptides.

  18. [Transvascular fluid exchange disturbed by capillary injuries].

    PubMed

    Lugrin, D; Chave, S; Raucoules, M; Grimaud, D

    1996-01-01

    Fluid exchange disorders due to capillary lesions are numerous and their extent depends on the underlying disease as well as the capillary structure of the affected organ. The inflammatory cascade, triggered by sepsis or reperfusion injury, is mediated by several humoral mediators and activated blood cells. These include pro-inflammatory cytokines, arachidonic acid, proteases, oxygen free radicals, polymorphonuclears, procoagulant, complement and fibrinolytic system. The interaction between these mediators leads to a loss of endothelial integrity, a loss of basment membrane and a disruption of the interstitial matrix, with wasting of the endothelial cytoskeleton. The alteration in permeability induces transcapillary exudation of water and protein in the interstitial space, leading to organ dysfunction, mainly the lungs and splanchnic organs. Nitric oxyde, by modulating the response of the endothelium to the cellular interaction may protect against capillary injury. Capillary "stress lesions" following microvascular hypertension are the physiological basis of neurogenic or high altitude pulmonary oedema, and overinflation injury from mechanical ventilation. The anatomic specific features of the cerebral capillaries resulted in the well known concept of blood brain barrier with it's changeing morphology. Under the effect of humoral mediators and cellular interactions, the endothelial cells are able, via a calcium-mediated mechanism, to contract and to modify capillary permeability, leading to vasogenic oedema.

  19. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer with barrier member

    DOEpatents

    Dovichi, Norman J.; Zhang, Jian Z.

    1996-01-01

    A multiple capillary biochemical analyzer for sequencing DNA and performing other analyses, in which a set of capillaries extends from wells in a microtiter plate into a cuvette. In the cuvette the capillaries are held on fixed closely spaced centers by passing through a sandwich construction having a pair of metal shims which squeeze between them a rubber gasket, forming a leak proof seal for an interior chamber in which the capillary ends are positioned. Sheath fluid enters the chamber and entrains filament sample streams from the capillaries. The filament sample streams, and sheath fluid, flow through aligned holes in a barrier member spaced close to the capillary ends, into a collection chamber having a lower glass window. The filament streams are illuminated above the barrier member by a laser, causing them to fluoresce. The fluorescence is viewed end-on by a CCD camera chip located below the glass window. The arrangement ensures an equal optical path length from all fluorescing spots to the CCD chip and also blocks scattered fluorescence illumination, providing more uniform results and an improved signal to noise ratio.

  20. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer with barrier member

    DOEpatents

    Dovichi, N.J.; Zhang, J.Z.

    1996-10-22

    A multiple capillary biochemical analyzer is disclosed for sequencing DNA and performing other analyses, in which a set of capillaries extends from wells in a microtiter plate into a cuvette. In the cuvette the capillaries are held on fixed closely spaced centers by passing through a sandwich construction having a pair of metal shims which squeeze between them a rubber gasket, forming a leak proof seal for an interior chamber in which the capillary ends are positioned. Sheath fluid enters the chamber and entrains filament sample streams from the capillaries. The filament sample streams, and sheath fluid, flow through aligned holes in a barrier member spaced close to the capillary ends, into a collection chamber having a lower glass window. The filament streams are illuminated above the barrier member by a laser, causing them to fluoresce. The fluorescence is viewed end-on by a CCD camera chip located below the glass window. The arrangement ensures an equal optical path length from all fluorescing spots to the CCD chip and also blocks scattered fluorescence illumination, providing more uniform results and an improved signal-to-noise ratio. 12 figs.

  1. Capillary breakup of fluid threads within confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Guoqing; Xue, Chundong; Chen, Xiaodong

    2016-11-01

    Fluid thread breakup is a widespread phenomenon in nature, industry, and daily life. Driven by surface tension (or capillarity) at low flow-rate condition, the breakup scenario is usually called capillary instability or Plateau-Rayleigh instability. Fluid thread deforms under confinement of ambient fluid to form a fluid neck. Thinning of the neck at low flow-rate condition is quasistatic until the interface becomes unstable and collapses to breakup. Underlying mechanisms and universalities of both the stable and unstable thinning remain, however, unclear and even contradictory. Here we conduct new numerical and experimental studies to show that confined interfaces are not only stabilized but also destabilized by capillarity at low flow-rate condition. Capillary stabilization is attributed to confinement-determined internal pressure that is higher than capillary pressure along the neck. Two origins of capillary destabilization are identified: one is confinement-induced gradient of capillary pressure along the interface; the other is the competition between local capillary pressure and internal pressure. This work was supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11402274, 11272321, and 11572334).

  2. OCT methods for capillary velocimetry

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Radhakrishnan, Harsha; Lo, Eng H.; Mandeville, Emiri T.; Jiang, James Y.; Barry, Scott; Cable, Alex E.

    2012-01-01

    To date, two main categories of OCT techniques have been described for imaging hemodynamics: Doppler OCT and OCT angiography. Doppler OCT can measure axial velocity profiles and flow in arteries and veins, while OCT angiography can determine vascular morphology, tone, and presence or absence of red blood cell (RBC) perfusion. However, neither method can quantify RBC velocity in capillaries, where RBC flow is typically transverse to the probe beam and single-file. Here, we describe new methods that potentially address these limitations. Firstly, we describe a complex-valued OCT signal in terms of a static scattering component, dynamic scattering component, and noise. Secondly, we propose that the time scale of random fluctuations in the dynamic scattering component are related to red blood cell velocity. Analysis was performed along the slow axis of repeated B-scans to parallelize measurements. We correlate our purported velocity measurements against two-photon microscopy measurements of RBC velocity, and investigate changes during hypercapnia. Finally, we image the ischemic stroke penumbra during distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (dMCAO), where OCT velocimetry methods provide additional insight that is not afforded by either Doppler OCT or OCT angiography. PMID:22435106

  3. Eddy intrustion of hot plasma into the polar cap and formation of polar-cap arcs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Y. T.; Gorney, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    Under the simple postulate that multiple large scale detachable magnetospheric convection eddies can exist in the vicinity of the convection reversal boundary and in the polar cap, by Kelvin-Helmholtz instability or otherwise, it is shown that a number of seemingly disconnected plasma and electric field observations in the polar cap can be organized into a theory of magnetosheath and plasmasheet plasma intrusion into the polar cap. Current theory of inverted V structures then predicts existence of similar, but weaker, structures at the eddy convection reversal boundaries in the polar cap. A possible consequence is that the polar cap auroras are natural offshoots from discrete oval arcs and evidently are formed by similar processes. The two arc systems can occassionally produce an optical image in the form of the theta aurora.

  4. Myxobacteria, Polarity, and Multicellular Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Dale; Robinson, Mark; Kroos, Lee

    2010-01-01

    Myxobacteria are renowned for the ability to sporulate within fruiting bodies whose shapes are species-specific. The capacity to build those multicellular structures arises from the ability of M. xanthus to organize high cell-density swarms, in which the cells tend to be aligned with each other while constantly in motion. The intrinsic polarity of rod-shaped cells lays the foundation, and each cell uses two polar engines for gliding on surfaces. It sprouts retractile type IV pili from the leading cell pole and secretes capsular polysaccharide through nozzles from the trailing pole. Regularly periodic reversal of the gliding direction was found to be required for swarming. Those reversals are generated by a G-protein switch which is driven by a sharply tuned oscillator. Starvation induces fruiting body development, and systematic reductions in the reversal frequency are necessary for the cells to aggregate rather than continue to swarm. Developmental gene expression is regulated by a network that is connected to the suppression of reversals. PMID:20610548

  5. Rotating Reverse-Osmosis for Water Purification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueptow, RIchard M.

    2004-01-01

    A new design for a water-filtering device combines rotating filtration with reverse osmosis to create a rotating reverse- osmosis system. Rotating filtration has been used for separating plasma from whole blood, while reverse osmosis has been used in purification of water and in some chemical processes. Reverse- osmosis membranes are vulnerable to concentration polarization a type of fouling in which the chemicals meant not to pass through the reverse-osmosis membranes accumulate very near the surfaces of the membranes. The combination of rotating filtration and reverse osmosis is intended to prevent concentration polarization and thereby increase the desired flux of filtered water while decreasing the likelihood of passage of undesired chemical species through the filter. Devices based on this concept could be useful in a variety of commercial applications, including purification and desalination of drinking water, purification of pharmaceutical process water, treatment of household and industrial wastewater, and treatment of industrial process water. A rotating filter consists of a cylindrical porous microfilter rotating within a stationary concentric cylindrical outer shell (see figure). The aqueous suspension enters one end of the annulus between the inner and outer cylinders. Filtrate passes through the rotating cylindrical microfilter and is removed via a hollow shaft. The concentrated suspension is removed at the end of the annulus opposite the end where the suspension entered.

  6. Constraining the reversing and non-reversing modes of the geodynamo. New insights from magnetostratigraphy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallet, Y.; Pavlov, V.; Shatsillo, A.; Hulot, G.

    2015-12-01

    Constraining the evolution in the geomagnetic reversal frequency over hundreds of million years is not a trivial matter. Beyond the fact that there are long periods without reversals, known as superchrons, and periods with many reversals, the way the reversal frequency changes through time during reversing periods is still debated. A smooth evolution or a succession of stationary segments have both been suggested to account for the geomagnetic polarity time scale since the Middle-Late Jurassic. Sudden changes from a reversing mode to a non-reversing mode of the geodynamo may also well have happened, the switch between the two modes having then possibly been controlled by the thermal conditions at the core-mantle boundary. There is, nevertheless, a growing set of magnetostratigraphic data, which could help decipher a proper interpretation of the reversal history, in particular in the early Paleozoic and even during the Precambrian. Although yielding a fragmentary record, these data reveal the occurrence of both additional superchrons and periods characterized by extremely high, not to say extraordinary, magnetic reversal frequencies. In this talk, we will present a synthesis of these data, mainly obtained from Siberia, and discuss their implication for the magnetic reversal behavior over the past billion years.

  7. Polar Terrains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03577 Polar Terrains

    The region surrounding the South Polar Cap contains many different terrain types. This image shows both etched terrain and a region of 'mounds'.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 75S, Longitude 286.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  8. Polar ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, S.; Grose, W. L.; Jones, R. L.; Mccormick, M. P.; Molina, Mario J.; Oneill, A.; Poole, L. R.; Shine, K. P.; Plumb, R. A.; Pope, V.

    1990-01-01

    The observation and interpretation of a large, unexpected ozone depletion over Antarctica has changed the international scientific view of stratospheric chemistry. The observations which show the veracity, seasonal nature, and vertical structure of the Antarctic ozone hole are presented. Evidence for Arctic and midlatitude ozone loss is also discussed. The chemical theory for Antarctic ozone depletion centers around the occurrence of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in Antarctic winter and spring; the climatology and radiative properties of these clouds are presented. Lab studies of the physical properties of PSCs and the chemical processes that subsequently influence ozone depletion are discussed. Observations and interpretation of the chemical composition of the Antarctic stratosphere are described. It is shown that the observed, greatly enhanced abundances of chlorine monoxide in the lower stratosphere are sufficient to explain much if not all of the ozone decrease. The dynamic meteorology of both polar regions is given, interannual and interhemispheric variations in dynamical processes are outlined, and their likely roles in ozone loss are discussed.

  9. Gold nanoparticle-coated capillaries for protein and peptide analysis on open-tubular capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Hamer, Mariana; Yone, Angel; Rezzano, Irene

    2012-01-01

    We report a new method of immobilization of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on a fused-silica capillary through covalent binding. The resulting modified capillary was applied to electrophoretic systems to improve the efficiency of separation and the selectivity of selected solutes. The immobilization of AuNPs on the capillary wall was performed in a very simple and fast way without requiring heating. The surface features of an AuNP-coated capillary column were determined using the scanning electron microscopy. The chromatographic properties of AuNP-coated capillaries were investigated through variation of the buffer pH and separation voltage. Effective separations of synthetic peptides mixture were obtained on the AuNP-coated capillaries. The method shows a remarkable stability since it was reused about 900 times. The capacity factor was duplicated. Therefore, this modification is stable and can be applied to different separation purposes. A complex mixture of tryptic peptide fragments of HSA was analyzed in both the bare- and the AuNP-coated capillaries. Better electrophoretic peptide profile was observed when using the AuNP-coated capillary.

  10. Capillary electrophoresis in a fused-silica capillary with surface roughness gradient.

    PubMed

    Horká, Marie; Šlais, Karel; Karásek, Pavel; Růžička, Filip; Šalplachta, Jiří; Šesták, Jozef; Kahle, Vladislav; Roth, Michal

    2016-10-01

    The electro-osmotic flow, a significant factor in capillary electrophoretic separations, is very sensitive to small changes in structure and surface roughness of the inner surface of fused silica capillary. Besides a number of negative effects, the electro-osmotic flow can also have a positive effect on the separation. An example could be fused silica capillaries with homogenous surface roughness along their entire separation length as produced by etching with supercritical water. Different strains of methicillin-resistant and methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus were separated on that type of capillaries. In the present study, fused-silica capillaries with a gradient of surface roughness were prepared and their basic behavior was studied in capillary zone electrophoresis with UV-visible detection. First the influence of the electro-osmotic flow on the peak shape of a marker of electro-osmotic flow, thiourea, has been discussed. An antifungal agent, hydrophobic amphotericin B, and a protein marker, albumin, have been used as model analytes. A significant narrowing of the detected zones of the examined analytes was achieved in supercritical-water-treated capillaries as compared to the electrophoretic separation in smooth capillaries. Minimum detectable amounts of 5 ng/mL amphotericin B and 5 μg/mL albumin were reached with this method.

  11. Two-dimensional capillary electrophoresis: capillary isoelectric focusing and capillary zone electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Jane A; Ramsay, Lauren M; Dada, Oluwatosin O; Cermak, Nathan; Dovichi, Norman J

    2010-08-01

    CIEF and CZE are coupled with LIF detection to create an ultrasensitive 2-D separation method for proteins. In this method, two capillaries are joined through a buffer-filled interface. Separate power supplies control the potential at the injection end of the first capillary and at the interface; the detector is held at ground potential. Proteins are labeled with the fluorogenic reagent Chromeo P503, which preserves the isoelectric point of the labeled protein. The labeled proteins were mixed with ampholytes and injected into the first-dimension capillary. A focusing step was performed with the injection end of the capillary at high pH and the interface at low pH. To mobilize components, the interface was filled with a high pH buffer, which was compatible with the second-dimension separation. A fraction was transferred to the second-dimension capillary for separation. The process of fraction transfer and second dimension separation was repeated two dozen times. The separation produced a spot capacity of 125.

  12. Critical Velocities in Open Capillary Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreyer, Michael; Langbein, Dieter; Rath, Hans J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the proposed research program on open capillary flow and the preliminary work performed theoretically and in drop tower experiments. The work focuses on the fundamental physical understanding of the flow through capillary bound geometries, where the circumference of the cross section of the flow path contains free surfaces. Examples for such a flow configuration are capillary vanes in surface tension tanks, flow along edges and corners and flow through liquid bridges. The geometries may be classified by their cross section areas, wetted circumferences and the radii of curvature of the free surfaces. In the streaming float zone the flow path is bound by a free surface only. The ribbon vane is a model for vane types used in surface tension tanks, where a structure in proximity to the tank wall forms a capillary gap. A groove is used in heat pipes for the transportation of the condensed working fluid to the heat source and a wedge may occur in a spaceborne experiment where fluid has to be transported by the means of surface tension. The research objectives are the determination of the maximum volume flux, the observation of the free surfaces and the liquid flow inside the flow path as well as the evaluation of the limiting capillary wave speed. The restriction of the maximum volume flux is due to convective forces (flow velocity exceeding the capillary wave speed) and/or viscous forces, i.e. the viscous head loss along the flow path must be compensated by the capillary pressure due to the curved free surface. Exceeding the maximum volume flux leads to the choking of the flow path, thus the free surface collapses and.gas ingestion occurs at the outlet. The means are ground-based experimental work with plateau tanks and in a drop tower, a sounding rocket flight, and theoretical analysis with integral balances as well as full three dimensional CFD solutions for flow with free surfaces.

  13. Capillary adhesion at the nanometer scale.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shengfeng; Robbins, Mark O

    2014-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the capillary adhesion from a nonvolatile liquid meniscus between a spherical tip and a flat substrate. The atomic structure of the tip, the tip radius, the contact angles of the liquid on the two surfaces, and the volume of the liquid bridge are varied. The capillary force between the tip and substrate is calculated as a function of their separation h. The force agrees with continuum predictions based on macroscopic theory for h down to ∼5 to 10 nm. At smaller h, the force tends to be less attractive than predicted and has strong oscillations. This oscillatory component of the capillary force is completely missed in the macroscopic theory, which only includes contributions from the surface tension around the circumference of the meniscus and the pressure difference over the cross section of the meniscus. The oscillation is found to be due to molecular layering of the liquid confined in the narrow gap between the tip and substrate. This effect is most pronounced for large tip radii and/or smooth surfaces. The other two components considered by the macroscopic theory are also identified. The surface tension term, as well as the meniscus shape, is accurately described by the macroscopic theory for h down to ∼1 nm, but the capillary pressure term is always more positive than the corresponding continuum result. This shift in the capillary pressure reduces the average adhesion by a factor as large as 2 from its continuum value and is found to be due to an anisotropy in the pressure tensor. The component in the plane of the substrate is consistent with the capillary pressure predicted by the macroscopic theory (i.e., the Young-Laplace equation), but the normal pressure that determines the capillary force is always more positive than the continuum counterpart.

  14. Joule heating and determination of temperature in capillary electrophoresis and capillary electrochromatography columns.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Anurag S

    2004-05-28

    This article reviews the progress that has taken place in the past decade on the topic of estimation of Joule heating and temperature inside an open or packed capillary in electro-driven separation techniques of capillary electrophoresis (CE) and capillary electrochromatography (CEC), respectively. Developments in theoretical modeling of the heat transfer in the capillary systems have focused on attempts to apply the existing models on newer techniques such as CEC and chip-based CE. However, the advent of novel analytical tools such as pulsed magnetic field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), NMR thermometry, and Raman spectroscopy, have led to a revolution in the area of experimental estimation of Joule heating and temperature inside the capillary via the various noninvasive techniques. This review attempts to capture the major findings that have been reported in the past decade.

  15. Separation of Recombinant Therapeutic Proteins Using Capillary Gel Electrophoresis and Capillary Isoelectric Focusing.

    PubMed

    De Jong, Caitlyn A G; Risley, Jessica; Lee, Alexis K; Zhao, Shuai Sherry; Chen, David D Y

    2016-01-01

    Detailed step-by-step methods for protein separation techniques based on capillary electrophoresis (CE) are described in this chapter. Focus is placed on two techniques, capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE) and capillary isoelectric focusing (cIEF). CGE is essentially gel electrophoresis, performed in a capillary, where a hydrogel is used as a sieving matrix to separate proteins or peptides based on size. cIEF separates proteins or peptides based on their isoelectric point (pI), the pH at which the protein or peptide bears no charges. Detailed protocols and steps (including capillary preparation, sample preparation, CE separation conditions, and detection) for both CGE and cIEF presented so that readers can follow the described methods in their own labs.

  16. High speed and reproducible analysis of nitrosamines by capillary electrophoresis with a sulfonated capillary.

    PubMed

    Taga, Atsushi; Nishi, Tomoko; Honda, Yoshitaka; Sato, Atsushi; Terashima, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Kentaro; Kodama, Shuji; Boki, Keito

    2007-01-01

    Recently environmental control is regarded as important for good human health conditions, and toxic substances, including carcinogens and endocrine disruptors should be eliminated from our living environment. Hence easy quantitative methods are expected for a high level of environmental control. Our previous paper describes an easy quantitative analysis of nitrosamines (NAs) by capillary electrophoresis with an untreated fused silica capillary installed in an ordinary apparatus. In this paper, utilizing a novel type capillary column having sulfonated inner wall was investigated for improvements of separation performance and reproducibility. A sulfonated capillary causes fast and stabile electroosmotic flow because its inner wall is strongly negative charged. On a performance comparison of a sulfonated capillary with an untreated fused silica, analysis time reduction of c.a. forty percent was achieved, and relative standard deviations of migration times and peak responses were less than one third. In addition sample concentrations giving detection and quantitation limits were also reduced to a half.

  17. Capillary liquid chromatography using laser-based and mass spectrometric detection. [Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE); micellar electrokinetic capillary kchromatography (MECC)

    SciTech Connect

    Sepaniak, M.J.; Cook, K.D.

    1992-01-01

    In the years following the 1986 seminal paper (J. Chromatogr. Sci., 24, 347-352) describing modern capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE), the prominence of capillary electrokinetic separation techniques has grown. A related electrochromatographic technique is micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MECC). This report presents a brief synopsis of research efforts during the current 3-year period. In addition to a description of analytical separations-based research, results of efforts to develop and expand spectrometric detection for the techniques is reviewed. Laser fluorometric detection schemes have been successfully advanced. Mass spectrometric research was less fruitful, largely owing to personnel limitations. A regenerable fiber optic sensor was developed that can be used to remotely monitor chemical carcinogens, etc. (DLC)

  18. Application of the copolymers containing sulfobetaine methacrylate in protein separation by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Fuhu; Tan, Lin; Xiang, Lina; Liu, Songtao; Wang, Yanmei

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the formation of highly efficient antiprotein adsorption random copolymer coating of poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide-co-sulfobetaine methacrylate) (poly(DMA-co-SBMA)) on the fused-silica capillary inner wall. Firstly, the poly(DMA-co-SBMA)s with different feed ratio (SBMA/DMA) were synthesized via the reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. And then, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and water contact angle (CA) were used to investigate the composition and hydrophilicity of poly(DMA-co-SBMA) coating formed on the glass slide surfaces. CA measurements revealed that the poly(DMA-co-SBMA) coating became more hydrophilic with the increment of feed ratio (SBMA/DMA), and at the same time, the XPS results showed that the coating ability was also increased with the increment of feed ratio. Followed, the copolymer was applied to coat the fused-silica capillary inner wall, and the coated capillary was used to separate the mixture of proteins (lysozyme, cytochrome c, ribonuclease A, and α-chymotrypsinogen A) in a pH range from 3.0 to 5.0. Under the optimum conditions, an excellent separation of basic proteins with peak efficiencies ranging from 551,000 to 1509,000 N/m had been accomplished within 10 min. Furthermore, the effect of coating composition on protein separation was also investigated through the comparison of separation efficiency achieved by using bare, PSBMA- and poly(DMA-co-SBMA)-coated capillary, respectively.

  19. An enzyme immobilized microassay in capillary electrophoresis for characterization and inhibition studies of alkaline phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Jamshed

    2011-07-15

    A simple and fast dynamically coated capillary electrophoretic method was developed for the characterization and inhibition studies of alkaline phosphatases(EC 3.1.3.1). An inside capillary enzymatic reaction was performed, and hydrolysis of the substrate 4-nitrophenylphosphate to 4-nitrophenol was measured. Fused-silica capillary surface was dynamically modified with polycationic polybrene coating. By reversal of the electroosmotic flow (EOF), analysis time was reduced up to 3 min as the anionic analytes were migrated in the same direction as the EOF. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the method was increased using electroinjection through high-field amplified injection. The baseline separation of 4-nitrophenylphosphate and 4-nitrophenol was achieved by employing 50 mM sodium phosphate as the running buffer (pH 8.5), 0.0025% polybrene, and a constant voltage of -15 kV, and the products were detected at 322 nm. Under the optimized conditions, a good separation with high efficiency was achieved. The new method was applied to study enzyme kinetics and inhibitor screening. K(m) and K(i) values obtained with the new CE method were compared well with the standard spectrophotometric method. Dynamic coating of fused-silica capillary gave fast and reproducible separation of substrate and product. The method can be easily optimized for inhibition studies of other isozymes.

  20. Separation and characterization of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) hordeins by free zone capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Lookhart, G L; Bean, S R; Jones, B L

    1999-06-01

    Extraction conditions, separation conditions, and capillary rinsing protocols were optimized for the separation of barley hordeins by free zone capillary electrophoresis. Stable hordein extracts were obtained with a single 5 min extraction after the albumins and globulins were removed. Hordeins had to be reduced for optimal resolution. Optimum separation conditions for hordein separations were 100 mM phosphate-glycine buffer containing 20% acetonitrile and 0.05% hydroxypropylmethylcellulose. The addition of zwitterionic sulfobetaine detergents containing hydrocarbon tails of eight and ten carbons slightly improved the resolution of the separations, but not enough to warrant their use on a routine basis. The migration positions of the hordein subclasses were determined by two- dimensional reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography x free zone capillary electrophoresis mapping. The hordein subclasses formed clusters similar to those of wheat gliadins. Separation-to-separation repeatability was good, with migration time relative standard deviations < 1% for a 15-run period. For routine discrimination of cultivars, a 2 min post-separation rinse with 500 mM acetic acid was necessary to prevent protein build-up on the capillary walls. An example of successfully differentiating barley cultivars using this technique is shown.

  1. Laser printing hierarchical structures with the aid of controlled capillary-driven self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yanlei; Lao, Zhaoxin; Cumming, Benjamin P.; Wu, Dong; Li, Jiawen; Liang, Haiyi; Chu, Jiaru; Huang, Wenhao; Gu, Min

    2015-01-01

    Capillary force is often regarded as detrimental because it may cause undesired distortion or even destruction to micro/nanostructures during a fabrication process, and thus many efforts have been made to eliminate its negative effects. From a different perspective, capillary force can be artfully used to construct specific complex architectures. Here, we propose a laser printing capillary-assisted self-assembly strategy for fabricating regular periodic structures. Microscale pillars are first produced by localized femtosecond laser polymerization and are subsequently assembled into periodic hierarchical architectures with the assistance of controlled capillary forces in an evaporating liquid. Spatial arrangements, pillar heights, and evaporation processes are readily tuned to achieve designable ordered assemblies with various geometries. Reversibility of the assembly is also revealed by breaking the balance between the intermolecular force and the elastic standing force. We further demonstrate the functionality of the hierarchical structures as a nontrivial tool for the selective trapping and releasing of microparticles, opening up a potential for the development of in situ transportation systems for microobjects. PMID:26038541

  2. Polar Barchans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    20 July 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows dark, barchan sand dunes of the north polar region of Mars. Barchan dunes are simple, rounded forms with two horns that extend downwind. Inequalities in local wind patterns may result in one horn being extended farther than the other, as is the case for several dunes in this image. The image also shows several barchans may merge to form a long dune ridge. The horns and attendant slip faces on these dunes indicate wind transport of sand from the upper left toward the lower right. The image is located near 77.6oN, 103.6oW. The picture covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide; sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  3. Distillation of binary mixtures with capillary porous plates

    SciTech Connect

    Abu Al-Rub, F.A.; Akili, J.; Datta, R.

    1998-07-01

    Distillation of liquid mixtures using capillary porous plates is a new process which depends upon the use of the intermolecular interactions between solids and liquids to alter the normal vapor-liquid equilibrium of a given mixture. Distillation of different binary mixtures, namely ethanol-water, ethanol-benzene, and acetone-ethanol systems, of different compositions was experimentally studied in a continuous distillation column equipped with four, five, or six porous sintered stainless steel fractionating plates of 13.5 {micro}m pore diameter as well as six normal sieve plates. The results showed that the main factors affecting the separation efficiency in a given porous plate are the polarization of the pure liquids and the polarization difference between the mixture components. For the ethanol-water system, the results showed that while no separation was achieved in a distillation column with conventional stages, the zeotropic point of this system was broken in the distillation column with porous plates. A distillate of about 94 mol% ethanol was obtained for a feed of the zeotropic composition, i.e., 89.7 mol% ethanol. For the ethanol-benzene system, the azeotropic point was shifted from 40 mol% ethanol to about 30 mol% ethanol. For the acetone-ethanol system, there was no significant difference between the results obtained with normal stages and those with the porous plates. These results are in agreement with the developed theory.

  4. Thermal lens detector system for capillary electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Bernd S.; Faubel, Werner N.; Ache, Hans-Joachim

    1997-07-01

    The characteristics and the performance of a thermal lens detector, which uses a double-beam absorption scheme, were studied in a capillary electrophoresis system with various types of toxic pollutants, e.g., pesticides. The setup of the detector system was miniaturized using the smallest diverging path lengths between the cell and the pinhole (4 mm). The probe laser beam (He:Ne laser, 633 nm) and the excitation beam (Ar+ ion laser, 364, 457, 488, and 514 nm) with a crossed setup were directed by mirrors into two microscope objectives that focused the beam to a 5-micrometers waist inside the capillary. The detection volume was on the order of 75 nl when a 75-micrometers capillary was employed. The change in intensity of the probe beam was detected by a photodiode behind a pinhole, which was protected with different band-pass interference filters. The excitation laser can be used in the multiline order. Micellar electrokinetic methods are used for pesticide separation. The performance of the detector in capillary electrophoresis was assessed with various types of capillaries and compared with a conventional absorption detector. The limit of detection is at least one order of magnitude better than it is with the absorption detector.

  5. Synthetic Capillaries to Control Microscopic Blood Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarveswaran, K.; Kurz, V.; Dong, Z.; Tanaka, T.; Penny, S.; Timp, G.

    2016-02-01

    Capillaries pervade human physiology. The mean intercapillary distance is only about 100 μm in human tissue, which indicates the extent of nutrient diffusion. In engineered tissue the lack of capillaries, along with the associated perfusion, is problematic because it leads to hypoxic stress and necrosis. However, a capillary is not easy to engineer due to its complex cytoarchitecture. Here, it is shown that it is possible to create in vitro, in about 30 min, a tubular microenvironment with an elastic modulus and porosity consistent with human tissue that functionally mimicks a bona fide capillary using “live cell lithography”(LCL) to control the type and position of cells on a composite hydrogel scaffold. Furthermore, it is established that these constructs support the forces associated with blood flow, and produce nutrient gradients similar to those measured in vivo. With LCL, capillaries can be constructed with single cell precision—no other method for tissue engineering offers such precision. Since the time required for assembly scales with the number of cells, this method is likely to be adapted first to create minimal functional units of human tissue that constitute organs, consisting of a heterogeneous population of 100–1000 cells, organized hierarchically to express a predictable function.

  6. EUV radiation from nitrogen capillary discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, Oleksandr; Kolacek, Karel; Schmidt, Jiri; Straus, Jaroslav

    2014-08-01

    In the last decade EUV sources attract interest from researchers over the world. One of the main motivations is EUV lithography, which could lead to further miniaturization in electronics. Nitrogen recombination laser at wavelength of 13.4 nm based on capillary discharge Z-pinch configuration could be used in experiments with testing of resolution of photoresist for EUV lithography (close to wavelength of 13.5 nm Si/Mo multilayer mirrors have a high reflectivity at normal incidence angles). In this work, pinching of nitrogen-filled capillary discharge is studied for the development of EUV laser, which is based on recombination pumping scheme. The goal of this study is achieving the required plasma conditions using a capillary discharge Z-pinch apparatus. In experiments with nitrogen, the capillary length was shortened from 232 mm to 90 mm and current quarter-period was changed from 60 ns to 50 ns in contrast with early experiments with Ne-like argon laser. EUV radiation from capillary discharge was registered by X-ray vacuum diode for different pressure, amplitude and duration of pre-pulse and charging voltage of the Marx generator.

  7. Restructuring and aging in a capillary suspension

    PubMed Central

    Koos, Erin; Kannowade, Wolfgang; Willenbacher, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    The rheological properties of capillary suspensions, suspensions with small amounts of an added immiscible fluid, are dramatically altered with the addition of the secondary fluid. We investigate a capillary suspension to determine how the network ages and restructures at rest and under applied external shear deformation. The present work uses calcium carbonate suspended in silicone oil (11 % solids) with added water as a model system. Aging of capillary suspensions and their response to applied oscillatory shear is distinctly different from particulate gels dominated by the van der Waals forces. The suspensions dominated by the capillary force are very sensitive to oscillatory flow, with the linear viscoelastic regime ending at a deformation of only 0.1% and demonstrating power-law aging behavior. This aging persists for long times at low deformations or for shorter times with a sudden decrease in the strength at higher deformations. This aging behavior suggests that the network is able to rearrange and even rupture. This same sensitivity is not demonstrated in shear flow where very high shear rates are required to rupture the agglomerates returning the apparent viscosity of capillary suspensions to the same viscosity as for the pure vdW suspension. A transitional region is also present at intermediate water contents wherein the material response depends very strongly on the type, strength, and duration of the external forcing. PMID:25729113

  8. Synthetic Capillaries to Control Microscopic Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Sarveswaran, K.; Kurz, V.; Dong, Z.; Tanaka, T.; Penny, S.; Timp, G.

    2016-01-01

    Capillaries pervade human physiology. The mean intercapillary distance is only about 100 μm in human tissue, which indicates the extent of nutrient diffusion. In engineered tissue the lack of capillaries, along with the associated perfusion, is problematic because it leads to hypoxic stress and necrosis. However, a capillary is not easy to engineer due to its complex cytoarchitecture. Here, it is shown that it is possible to create in vitro, in about 30 min, a tubular microenvironment with an elastic modulus and porosity consistent with human tissue that functionally mimicks a bona fide capillary using “live cell lithography”(LCL) to control the type and position of cells on a composite hydrogel scaffold. Furthermore, it is established that these constructs support the forces associated with blood flow, and produce nutrient gradients similar to those measured in vivo. With LCL, capillaries can be constructed with single cell precision—no other method for tissue engineering offers such precision. Since the time required for assembly scales with the number of cells, this method is likely to be adapted first to create minimal functional units of human tissue that constitute organs, consisting of a heterogeneous population of 100–1000 cells, organized hierarchically to express a predictable function. PMID:26905751

  9. Micro-injector for capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Sáiz, Jorge; Koenka, Israel Joel; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Müller, Beat; Chwalek, Thomas; Hauser, Peter C

    2015-08-01

    A novel micro-injector for capillary electrophoresis for the handling of samples with volumes down to as little as 300 nL was designed and built in our laboratory for analyses in which the available volume is a limitation. The sample is placed into a small cavity located directly in front of the separation capillary, and the injection is then carried out automatically by controlled pressurization of the chamber with compressed air. The system also allows automated flushing of the injection chamber as well as of the capillary. In a trial with a capillary electrophoresis system with contactless conductivity detector, employing a capillary of 25 μm diameter, the results showed good stability of migration times and peak areas. To illustrate the technique, the fast separation of five inorganic cations (Na(+) , K(+) , NH4 (+) , Ca(2+) , and Mg(2+) ) was set up. This could be achieved in less than 3 min, with good limits of detection (10 μM) and linear ranges (between about 10 and 1000 μM). The system was demonstrated for the determination of the inorganic cations in porewater samples of a lake sediment core.

  10. Restructuring and aging in a capillary suspension.

    PubMed

    Koos, Erin; Kannowade, Wolfgang; Willenbacher, Norbert

    2014-12-01

    The rheological properties of capillary suspensions, suspensions with small amounts of an added immiscible fluid, are dramatically altered with the addition of the secondary fluid. We investigate a capillary suspension to determine how the network ages and restructures at rest and under applied external shear deformation. The present work uses calcium carbonate suspended in silicone oil (11 % solids) with added water as a model system. Aging of capillary suspensions and their response to applied oscillatory shear is distinctly different from particulate gels dominated by the van der Waals forces. The suspensions dominated by the capillary force are very sensitive to oscillatory flow, with the linear viscoelastic regime ending at a deformation of only 0.1% and demonstrating power-law aging behavior. This aging persists for long times at low deformations or for shorter times with a sudden decrease in the strength at higher deformations. This aging behavior suggests that the network is able to rearrange and even rupture. This same sensitivity is not demonstrated in shear flow where very high shear rates are required to rupture the agglomerates returning the apparent viscosity of capillary suspensions to the same viscosity as for the pure vdW suspension. A transitional region is also present at intermediate water contents wherein the material response depends very strongly on the type, strength, and duration of the external forcing.

  11. Enantiomer separation of chiral pharmaceuticals by capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Wistuba, D; Schurig, V

    2000-04-14

    Enantiomer separation of chiral pharmaceuticals by capillary electrochromatography (CEC) is achieved with open-tubular capillaries (o-CEC), with packed capillaries (p-CEC) or with monolithic capillaries. In o-CEC, capillaries are coated with a thin film containing cyclodextrin derivatives, cellulose, proteins, poly-terguride or molecularly imprinted polymers as chiral selectors. In p-CEC, typical chiral HPLC stationary phases such as silica-bonded cyclodextrin or cellulose derivatives, proteins, glycoproteins, macrocyclic antibiotics, quinine-derived and 'Pirkle' selectors, polyacrylamides and molecularly imprinted polymers are used as chiral selectors. Chiral monolithic stationary phases prepared by in situ polymerization into the capillary were also developed for electrochromatographic enantiomer separation.

  12. Reversible Thermoset Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor); Hreha, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of a reversible thermoset adhesive formed by incorporating thermally-reversible cross-linking units and a method for making the reversible thermoset adhesive are provided. One approach to formulating reversible thermoset adhesives includes incorporating dienes, such as furans, and dienophiles, such as maleimides, into a polymer network as reversible covalent cross-links using Diels Alder cross-link formation between the diene and dienophile. The chemical components may be selected based on their compatibility with adhesive chemistry as well as their ability to undergo controlled, reversible cross-linking chemistry.

  13. Polarization conversion cube corner retro-reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crabtree, Karlton

    This document presents the polarization conversion cube-corner retroreflector (PCCCR). The PCCCR is a cube-corner retroreflector which transforms the electric field as follows: the major axis is rotated by 90° and the handedness is reversed. Since the polarization properties of a CCR are dependent on the polarization properties of each surface, exploration of the space of Mueller matrices is organized by surface type. The Mueller matrix of CCR having each of several surface types is calculated, including the traditional hollow metal and solid glass CCR types. PCCCR only occur for non-isotropic surface types. Four particular surface polarization properties are found which produce PCCCR. Three examples of PCCCR are presented using sub-wavelength grating surfaces. Several other interesting CCR are presented, including a 45° polarization rotator.

  14. Capillary and geometrically driven fingering instability in nonflat Hele-Shaw cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandão, Rodolfo; Miranda, José A.

    2017-03-01

    The usual viscous fingering instability arises when a fluid displaces another of higher viscosity in a flat Hele-Shaw cell, under sufficiently large capillary number conditions. In this traditional framing, the reverse flow case (more viscous fluid displacing a less viscous one) and the viscosity-matched situation (fluids of equal viscosities) are stable. We revisit this classical fluid dynamic problem, now considering flow in a nonflat Hele-Shaw cell. For a specific nonflat environment, we show that both the reverse and the viscosity-matched flows can become unstable, even at low capillary number. This peculiar fluid fingering instability is driven by the combined action of capillary effects and geometric properties of the nonflat Hele-Shaw cell. Our theoretical results indicate that the Hele-Shaw cell geometry significantly impacts the linear stability and nonlinear pattern-forming dynamics of the system. This suggests that the geometry of the medium plays an important role in favoring the occurrence of fingering patterns in nonflat, confined fluid flows.

  15. Development and validation of a capillary electrophoresis method with capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (CE-C(4) D) for the analysis of amikacin and its related substances.

    PubMed

    El-Attug, Mohamed Nouri; Adams, Erwin; Van Schepdael, Ann

    2012-09-01

    Amikacin is a semisynthetic aminoglycoside antibiotic derived from kanamycin A that lacks a strong UV absorbing chromophore or fluorophore. Due to the physicochemical properties of amikacin and its related substances, CE in combination with capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (CE-C(4) D) was chosen. The optimized separation method uses a BGE composed of 20 mM MES adjusted to pH 6.6 by l-histidine and 0.3 mM CTAB that was added as flow modifier in a concentration below the CMC. Ammonium acetate 20 mg.L(-1) was used as internal standard. 30 kV was applied in reverse polarity on a fused silica capillary (73/48 cm; 75 μm id). The optimized separation was obtained in less than 6 min with good linearity (R(2) = 0.9996) for amikacin base. It shows a good precision expressed as RSD on relative peak areas equal to 0.1 and 0.7% for intraday and interday, respectively. The LOD and LOQ are 0.5 mg.L(-1) and 1.7 mg.L(-1) , respectively.

  16. SXR optical diagnostics of capillary discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pina, L.; Jancarek, A.; Vrbova, M.; Tamas, M.; Blazej, J.; Havlikova, R.; Vrba, P.; Tomassetti, G.; Ritucci, A.

    2006-08-01

    Pinching capillary discharge in nitrogen is investigated for the purpose of development of laser recombination pumping. An apparatus, previously realized for argon capillary laser pumping, was used to understand details of pinching mechanism and emission characteristics for capillary filled by nitrogen. Time dependences of radiation intensities emitted in the wavelength range 1.9 - 2.5 nm and time integrated in the spectral range 10 - 20 nm were measured under various pressures. A computer model is used to describe the pinch dynamics and to estimate the radiation characteristics. EUV reflection grating spectrometer coupled to BI CCD camera and filtered PIN diode were used for time integrated and time resolved spectral measurements respectively. The measured profiles of radiation intensities are compared with the computer simulations of time dependences of selected energy level populations that correspond to the hydrogen- and helium- like ion line emission in the detected spectral range. Complex method for spectral image restoration was developed.

  17. Capillary movement of liquid in granular beds

    SciTech Connect

    Yendler, B.; Webbon, B.

    1993-12-31

    Knowledge of capillary migration of liquids in granular beds in microgravity is essential for the development of a substrate based nutrient delivery sytem for the growth of plants in space. This problem is also interesting from the theoretical as well as the practical point of view. The purpose of this study was to model capillary water propagation through a granular bed in microgravity. In our ground experiments, water propagation is driven primarily by capillary force. Data for spherical partical sizes in the range from 0.46 to 2 mm have been obtained. It was shown that the velocity of water propagation is very sensitive to particle size. Theoretical consideration is also provided. Actual space flight experiments are planned for the future to confirm our results.

  18. Asymmetric capillary bridges between contacting spheres.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Timothy P; Bird, James C

    2015-09-15

    When a drop of liquid wets two identical solid spheres, the liquid forms a capillary bridge between the spheres to minimize surface energy. In the absence of external forces, these bridges are typically assumed to be axisymmetric, and the shape that minimizes surface energy can be calculated analytically. However under certain conditions, the bridge is axisymmetrically unstable, and migrates to a non-axisymmetric configuration. The goal of this paper is to characterize these non-axisymmetric capillary bridges. Specifically, we numerically calculate the shape of the capillary bridge between two contacting spheres that minimizes the total surface energy for a given volume and contact angle and compare to experiments. When the bridge is asymmetric, finite element calculations demonstrate that the shape of the bridge is spherical. In general, the bridge shape depends on both volume and contact angle, yet we find the degree of asymmetry is controlled by a single parameter.

  19. Novel absorption detection techniques for capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Yongjun

    1994-07-27

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) has emerged as one of the most versatile separation methods. However, efficient separation is not sufficient unless coupled to adequate detection. The narrow inner diameter (I.D.) of the capillary column raises a big challenge to detection methods. For UV-vis absorption detection, the concentration sensitivity is only at the μM level. Most commercial CE instruments are equipped with incoherent UV-vis lamps. Low-brightness, instability and inefficient coupling of the light source with the capillary limit the further improvement of UV-vis absorption detection in CE. The goals of this research have been to show the utility of laser-based absorption detection. The approaches involve: on-column double-beam laser absorption detection and its application to the detection of small ions and proteins, and absorption detection with the bubble-shaped flow cell.

  20. "Reversed" alamethicin conductance in lipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, R J; de Levie, R

    1991-01-01

    Alamethicin at a concentration of 2 micrograms/ml on one side of a lipid bilayer, formed at the tip of a patch clamp pipette from diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol (2:1 mol ratio) in aqueous 0.5 M KCl, 5 mM Hepes, pH 7.0, exhibits an asymmetric current-voltage curve, only yielding alamethicin currents when the side to which the peptide has been added is made positive. Below room temperature, however, single alamethicin channels created in such membranes sometimes survive a sudden reversal of the polarity. These "reversed" channels are distinct from transiently observed states displayed as the channel closes after a polarity reversal. Such "reversed" channels can be monitored for periods up to several minutes, during which time we have observed them to fluctuate through more than 20 discrete conductance states. They are convenient for the study of isolated ion-conducting alamethicin aggregates because, after voltage reversal, no subsequent incorporation of additional ion-conducting aggregates takes place. PMID:1712238

  1. Passive recruitment of circulating leukocytes into capillary sprouts from existing capillaries in a microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Forouzan, Omid; Burns, Jennie M; Robichaux, Jennifer L; Murfee, Walter L; Shevkoplyas, Sergey S

    2011-06-07

    Recent evidence implicating leukocytes in angiogenesis raises the question of whether leukocytes and other cells circulating with the blood in microvascular networks can home to capillary sprouts intraluminally. This study describes an investigation of leukocyte trafficking in sprouting capillaries fabricated using soft lithography. The leukocytes passing with whole blood through existing capillaries were able to enter microfabricated capillary sprouts of variable length and sprouting angle due to the mechanical interaction with red blood cells (RBCs) at the sprouting bifurcation, in spite of the complete absence of blood flow through the blind-ended sprouts or any chemoattractants. The RBCs formed "comet tails" (the densely packed cellular trains forming behind leukocytes as they move through narrow capillaries) and effectively pushed leukocytes into the microfabricated sprouts while bypassing them at the sprouting bifurcation. Individual sprouts filled with several leukocytes, as wells as RBCs and platelets, were observed. The results of this study suggest that (i) blood cells are likely present in capillary sprouts throughout their development, (ii) leukocytes and other circulating cells may use this mechanism to home to capillary sprouts intraluminally for direct engraftment, and (iii) tissues may use this phenomenon as another mechanism for local recruitment of leukocytes from the blood stream.

  2. Photosensitive diazotized poly(ethylene glycol) covalent capillary coatings for analysis of proteins by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bing; Chen, Xin; Cong, Hailin; Shu, Xi; Peng, Qiaohong

    2016-09-01

    A new method for the fabrication of covalently cross-linked capillary coatings of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) is described using diazotized PEG (diazo-PEG) as a new photosensitive coating agent. The film of diazo-PEG depends on ionic bonding and was first prepared on the inner surface of capillary by self-assembly, and ionic bonding was converted into covalent bonding after reaction of ultraviolet light with diazo groups through unique photochemical reaction. The covalently bonded coating impedance adsorption of protein on the central surface of capillary and hence the four proteins ribonuclease A, cytochrome c, bovine serum albumin, and lysosome can be baseline separated by using capillary electrophoresis (CE). The covalently cross-linked diazo-PEG capillary column coatings not only improved the CE separation performance for proteins compared to non-covalently cross-linked coatings or bare capillary but also showed a remarkable chemical solidity and repeatability. Because photosensitive diazo-PEG took the place of the highly noxious and silane moisture-sensitive coating reagents in the fabrication of covalent coating, this technique shows the advantage of being environment-friendly and having a high efficiency for CE to make the covalently bonded capillaries.

  3. Fluorescence-labeled peptides as isoelectric point (pI) markers in capillary isoelectric focusing with fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Shimura, K; Kasai, K

    1995-08-01

    Commercially available peptides, mostly angiotensin derivatives, were labeled at their N-terminal amino group with 5-carboxytetramethylrhodamine succinimidyl ester, to obtain fluorescent pI markers for capillary isoelectric focusing with fluorescence detection. The labeled peptides were purified by reversed-phase chromatography. They were well separated on isoelectric focusing in a polyacrylamide gel slab and their pIs were determined by comigration with protein-pI markers. The fluorescent markers could be detected as sharp peaks in capillary isoelectric focusing with laser-induced fluorescence detection (He-Ne laser, 1 mW, 543.5 nm). The detection limit was found to be around 3 x 10(-12) M (0.8 amol). Tetramethylrhodamine-labeled pea lectin (3 pg) was subjected to capillary isoelectric focusing and the pIs of the fluorescent derivatives of the lectin were determined by using the fluorescence-labeled peptides as pI markers.

  4. Internal electrolyte temperatures for polymer and fused-silica capillaries used in capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Evenhuis, Christopher J; Guijt, Rosanne M; Macka, Miroslav; Marriott, Philip J; Haddad, Paul R

    2005-11-01

    Polymers are important as materials for manufacturing microfluidic devices for electrodriven separations, in which Joule heating is an unavoidable phenomenon. Heating effects were investigated in polymer capillaries using a CE setup. This study is the first step toward the longer-term objective of the study of heating effects occurring in polymeric microfluidic devices. The thermal conductivity of polymers is much smaller than that of fused silica (FS), resulting in less efficient dissipation of heat in polymeric capillaries. This study used conductance measurements as a temperature probe to determine the mean electrolyte temperatures in CE capillaries of different materials. Values for mean electrolyte temperatures in capillaries made of New Generation FluoroPolymer (NGFP), poly-(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA), and poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) capillaries were compared with those obtained for FS capillaries. Extrapolation of plots of conductance versus power per unit length (P/L) to zero power was used to obtain conductance values free of Joule heating effects. The ratio of the measured conductance values at different power levels to the conductance at zero power was used to determine the mean temperature of the electrolyte. For each type of capillary material, it was found that the average increase in the mean temperature of the electrolyte (DeltaT(Mean)) was directly proportional to P/L and inversely proportional to the thermal conductivity (lambda) of the capillary material. At 7.5 W/m, values for DeltaT(Mean) for NGFP, PMMA, and PEEK were determined to be 36.6, 33.8, and 30.7 degrees C, respectively. Under identical conditions, DeltaT(Mean) for FS capillaries was 20.4 degrees C.

  5. Observation of gravity-capillary wave turbulence.

    PubMed

    Falcon, Eric; Laroche, Claude; Fauve, Stéphan

    2007-03-02

    We report the observation of the crossover between gravity and capillary wave turbulence on the surface of mercury. The probability density functions of the turbulent wave height are found to be asymmetric and thus non-Gaussian. The surface wave height displays power-law spectra in both regimes. In the capillary region, the exponent is in fair agreement with weak turbulence theory. In the gravity region, it depends on the forcing parameters. This can be related to the finite size of the container. In addition, the scaling of those spectra with the mean energy flux is found in disagreement with weak turbulence theory for both regimes.

  6. Capillary origami and superhydrophobic membrane surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraldi, N. R.; Ouali, F. F.; Morris, R. H.; McHale, G.; Newton, M. I.

    2013-05-01

    Capillary origami uses surface tension to fold and shape solid films and membranes into three-dimensional structures. It uses the fact that solid surfaces, no matter how hydrophobic, will tend to adhere to and wrap around the surface of a liquid. In this work, we report that a superhydrophobic coating can be created, which can completely suppress wrapping as a contacting water droplet evaporates. We also show that using a wetting azeotropic solution of allyl alcohol, which penetrates the surface features, can enhance liquid adhesion and create more powerful Capillary Origami. These findings create the possibility of selectively shaping membrane substrates.

  7. Use of Plastic Capillaries for Macromolecular Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, Rachel R.; Hong, Young-Soo; Ciszak, Ewa M.

    2003-01-01

    Methods of crystallization of biomolecules in plastic capillaries (Nalgene 870 PFA tubing) are presented. These crystallization methods used batch, free-interface liquid- liquid diffusion alone, or a combination with vapor diffusion. Results demonstrated growth of crystals of test proteins such as thaumatin and glucose isomerase, as well as protein studied in our laboratory such dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase. Once the solutions were loaded in capillaries, they were stored in the tubes in frozen state at cryogenic temperatures until the desired time of activation of crystallization experiments.

  8. Capillary interactions between anisotropic colloidal particles.

    PubMed

    Loudet, J C; Alsayed, A M; Zhang, J; Yodh, A G

    2005-01-14

    We report on the behavior of micron-sized prolate ellipsoids trapped at an oil-water interface. The particles experience strong, anisotropic, and long-ranged attractive capillary interactions which greatly exceed the thermal energy k(B)T. Depending on surface chemistry, the particles aggregate into open structures or chains. Using video microscopy, we extract the pair interaction potential between ellipsoids and show it exhibits a power law behavior over the length scales probed. Our observations can be explained using recent calculations, if we describe the interfacial ellipsoids as capillary quadrupoles.

  9. Laser absorption waves in metallic capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, V. N.; Arutiunian, R. V.; Bol'Shov, L. A.; Kanevskii, M. F.; Kondrashov, V. V.

    1987-07-01

    The propagation of laser absorption waves in metallic capillaries was studied experimentally and numerically during pulsed exposure to CO2 laser radiation. The dependence of the plasma front propagation rate on the initial air pressure in the capillary is determined. In a broad range of parameters, the formation time of the optically opaque plasma layer is governed by the total laser pulse energy from the beginning of the exposure to the instant screening appears, and is weakly dependent on the pulse shape and gas pressure.

  10. Control of electroosmosis in coated quartz capillaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herren, Blair J.; Van Alstine, James; Snyder, Robert S.; Shafer, Steven G.; Harris, J. Milton

    1987-01-01

    The effectiveness of various coatings for controlling the electroosmotic fluid flow that hinders electrophoretic processes is studied using analytical particle microelectrophoresis. The mobilities of 2-micron diameter glass and polystyrene latex spheres (exhibiting both negative and zero effective surface charge) were measured in 2-mm diameter quartz capillaries filled with NaCl solutions within the 3.5-7.8 pH range. It is found that capillary inner surface coatings using 5000 molecular weight (or higher) poly(ethylene glycol): significantly reduced electroosmosis within the selected pH range, were stable for long time periods, and appeared to be more effective than dextran, methylcellulose, or silane coatings.

  11. Vasectomy and its reversal.

    PubMed

    Belker, A M

    1985-12-01

    Techniques, results, complications, and medicolegal aspects of vasectomy are discussed in this article. Emphasis is placed on techniques that prevent spontaneous recanalization of the ends of the vas deferens after vasectomy. Factors that affect the reversibility of vasectomy are discussed. New microsurgical techniques of vasectomy reversal are described, and results of these new techniques are compared with results of nonmicrosurgical techniques of vasectomy reversal. Indications for bypass vasoepididymostomy during vasectomy reversal procedures, as well as techniques for performing vasoepididymostomy, are discussed.

  12. Mathematical Model Of Variable-Polarity Plasma Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    Mathematical model of variable-polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding process developed for use in predicting characteristics of welds and thus serves as guide for selection of process parameters. Parameters include welding electric currents in, and durations of, straight and reverse polarities; rates of flow of plasma and shielding gases; and sizes and relative positions of welding electrode, welding orifice, and workpiece.

  13. Variable-Polarity Plasma Arc Welding Of Alloy 2219

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Daniel W.; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Report presents results of study of variable-polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding of aluminum alloy 2219. Consists of two parts: Examination of effects of microsegregation and transient weld stress on macrosegregation in weld pool and, electrical characterization of straight- and reverse-polarity portions of arc cycle.

  14. Reverse Correlation in Neurophysiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringach, Dario; Shapley, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a review of reverse correlation in neurophysiology. We discuss the basis of reverse correlation in linear transducers and in spiking neurons. The application of reverse correlation to measure the receptive fields of visual neurons using white noise and m-sequences, and classical findings about spatial and color processing in…

  15. Asymmetric transmission of linearly polarized waves in terahertz chiral metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Shenying; Luan, Kang; Ma, Hui Feng; Lv, Wenjin; Li, Yuxiang; Zhu, Zheng; Guan, Chunying; Shi, Jinhui; Cui, Tie Jun

    2017-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the asymmetric transmission of linearly polarized waves in a multilayer chiral metamaterial in the terahertz (THz) regime. The chiral metamaterial is constructed by two stacked orthogonal metallic layers embedded in polyimide dielectric layers. Simulated and measured results show that the proposed multilayer chiral metamaterial can achieve dual-band direction-dependent cross-polarization conversions for both x- and y-polarized THz waves. The polarized wave passing through the metamaterial will be converted into its orthogonal polarization state, while the same polarized wave is blocked along the reversed propagation direction. In addition, the asymmetric transmission band may be effectively engineered to other frequencies by slightly adjusting the gap width. We believe that our findings are beneficial in manipulating the polarization state of THz waves and exploring polarization-sensitive THz devices.

  16. Spectrometer capillary vessel and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Linehan, John C.; Yonker, Clement R.; Zemanian, Thomas S.; Franz, James A.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention is an arrangement of a glass capillary tube for use in spectroscopy. In particular, the invention is a capillary arranged in a manner permitting a plurality or multiplicity of passes of a sample material through a spectroscopic measurement zone. In a preferred embodiment, the multi-pass capillary is insertable within a standard NMR sample tube. The present invention further includes a method of making the multi-pass capillary tube and an apparatus for spinning the tube.

  17. Spectrometer capillary vessel and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Linehan, J.C.; Yonker, C.R.; Zemanian, T.S.; Franz, J.A.

    1995-11-21

    The present invention is an arrangement of a glass capillary tube for use in spectroscopy. In particular, the invention is a capillary arranged in a manner permitting a plurality or multiplicity of passes of a sample material through a spectroscopic measurement zone. In a preferred embodiment, the multi-pass capillary is insertable within a standard NMR sample tube. The present invention further includes a method of making the multi-pass capillary tube and an apparatus for spinning the tube. 13 figs.

  18. The polarization properties of a tilted polarizer.

    PubMed

    Korger, Jan; Kolb, Tobias; Banzer, Peter; Aiello, Andrea; Wittmann, Christoffer; Marquardt, Christoph; Leuchs, Gerd

    2013-11-04

    Polarizers are key components in optical science and technology. Thus, understanding the action of a polarizer beyond oversimplifying approximations is crucial. In this work, we study the interaction of a polarizing interface with an obliquely incident wave experimentally. To this end, a set of Mueller matrices is acquired employing a novel procedure robust against experimental imperfections. We connect our observation to a geometric model, useful to predict the effect of polarizers on complex light fields.

  19. Geomagnetic polarity epochs: a new polarity event and the age of the brunhes-matuyama boundary.

    PubMed

    Doell, R R; Dalrymple, G B

    1966-05-20

    Recent paleomagnetic-radiometric data from six rhyolite domes in the Valles Caldera, New Mexico, indicate that the last change in polarity of the earth's magnetic field from reversed to normal (the Brunhes-Matuyama boundary) occurred at about 0.7 million years ago. A previously undiscovered geomagnetic polarity event, herein named the "Jaramillo normal event," occurred about 0.9 million years ago.

  20. Geomagnetic polarity epochs: A new polarity event and the age of the Brunhes-Matuyama boundary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doell, Richard R.; Dalrymple, G.B.

    1966-01-01

    Recent paleomagnetic-radiometric data from six rhyolite domes in the Valles Caldera, New Mexico, indicate that the last change in polarity of the earth's magnetic field from reversed to normal (the Brunhes-Matuyama boundary) occurred at about 0.7 million years ago. A previously undiscovered geomagnetic polarity event, herein named the "Jaramillo normal event," occurred about 0.9 million years ago.

  1. Electrical detection of microwave assisted magnetization reversal by spin pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Siddharth; Subhra Mukherjee, Sankha; Elyasi, Mehrdad; Singh Bhatia, Charanjit; Yang, Hyunsoo

    2014-03-24

    Microwave assisted magnetization reversal has been investigated in a bilayer system of Pt/ferromagnet by detecting a change in the polarity of the spin pumping signal. The reversal process is studied in two material systems, Pt/CoFeB and Pt/NiFe, for different aspect ratios. The onset of the switching behavior is indicated by a sharp transition in the spin pumping voltage. At a threshold value of the external field, the switching process changes from partial to full reversal with increasing microwave power. The proposed method provides a simple way to detect microwave assisted magnetization reversal.

  2. Dynamics of transitions between capillary stable states under weightlessness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srikanth, Praveen

    The study of two phase systems with one of the phases obstructing the other is of importance in a lot of fields. Liquid droplets in airways and air bubbles in the blood stream both fall under this category of problems. Helium bubbles in hydrazine fuel lines of satellites also have been found to cause frequent thruster shutdown and also seriously affect spacecraft control. Studies have been carried out until now to look at static equilibrium topologies and stability of such two phase systems in straight, bent and laterally compressed capillaries. In this investigation we look at the dynamics of the transitions between the stable topologies identified for a straight cylindrical capillary. The break up of the interface could adversely affect system performance. OpenFOAM is used to compute transitions from a stable droplet to a plug or the reverse by suitably adding or removing the obstructing phase through inlet patches on the wall of the cylinder. The main parameters presented are the non-dimensional energy, non-dimensional transition times, non-dimensional transition volumes and the general dynamics of the transitions itself. Before computing transitions the static equilibrium topologies computed by OpenFOAM are compared with those predicted by Surface Evolver and are found to be within acceptable deviations. The grid dependence of these transitions has also been studied. Transitions are computed for contact angles in the range of 10° to 170°. Different modes of transitions are observed depending on the contact angle of the case for both the types of transitions. The transition volumes are compared to the volume of existence limits for the corresponding initial topology at a particular contact angle for both the transitions.

  3. Polarized internal target apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Holt, R.J.

    1984-10-10

    A polarized internal target apparatus with a polarized gas target of improved polarization and density (achieved by mixing target gas atoms with a small amount of alkali metal gas atoms, and passing a high intensity polarized light source into the mixture to cause the alkali metal gas atoms to become polarized which interact in spin exchange collisions with target gas atoms yielding polarized target gas atoms) is described.

  4. Polarized internal target apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Holt, Roy J.

    1986-01-01

    A polarized internal target apparatus with a polarized gas target of improved polarization and density achieved by mixing target gas atoms with a small amount of alkali metal gas atoms, and passing a high intensity polarized light source into the mixture to cause the alkali metal gas atoms to become polarized which interact in spin exchange collisions with target gas atoms yielding polarized target gas atoms.

  5. Polarization in Scattering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    we refer to the linear polarization as parallel if the polarization vector is in the scattering plane or perpendicular if the polarization vector is...obvious that the different polarization states can all be represented as linear combinations of any of the independent pairs of polarization states...J.C. (1976) “Improvement of underwater visibility by reduction of backscatter with a circular polarization technique, Applied Optics, 6, 321-330

  6. Nitric oxide synthase inhibitors attenuate transforming-growth-factor-beta 1-stimulated capillary organization in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Papapetropoulos, A.; Desai, K. M.; Rudic, R. D.; Mayer, B.; Zhang, R.; Ruiz-Torres, M. P.; García-Cardeña, G.; Madri, J. A.; Sessa, W. C.

    1997-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a complex process involving endothelial cell (EC) proliferation, migration, differentiation, and organization into patent capillary networks. Nitric oxide (NO), an EC mediator, has been reported to be antigenic as well as proangiogenic in different models of in vivo angiogenesis. Our aim was to investigate the role of NO in capillary organization using rat microvascular ECs (RFCs) grown in three-dimensional (3D) collagen gels. RFCs placed in 3D cultures exhibited extensive tube formation in the presence of transforming growth factor-beta 1. Addition of the NO synthase (NOS) inhibitors L-nitro-arginine methylester (L-NAME, 1 mmol/L) or L-monomethyl-nitro-l-arginine (1 mmol/L) inhibited tube formation and the accumulation of nitrite in the media by approximately 50%. Incubation of the 3D cultures with excess L-arginine reversed the inhibitory effect of L-NAME on tube formation. In contrast to the results obtained in 3D cultures, inhibition of NO synthesis by L-NAME did not influence RFC proliferation in two-dimensional (2D) cultures or antagonize the ability of transforming growth factor-beta 1 to suppress EC proliferation in 2D cultures. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction revealed the constitutive expression of all three NOS isoforms, neuronal, inducible, and endothelial NOSs, in 2D and 3D cultures. Moreover, Western blot analysis demonstrated the presence of immunoreactive protein for all NOS isoforms in 3D cultures of RFCs. In addition, in the face of NOS blockade, co-treatment with the NO donor sodium nitroprusside or the stable analog of cGMP, 8-bromo-cGMP, restored capillary tube formation. Thus, the autocrine production of NO and the activation of soluble guanylate cyclase are necessary events in the process of differentiation and in vitro capillary tube organization of RFCs. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9137106

  7. Quantum Operation Time Reversal

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, Gavin E.

    2008-03-25

    The dynamics of an open quantum system can be described by a quantum operation: A linear, complete positive map of operators. Here, I exhibit a compact expression for the time reversal of a quantum operation, which is closely analogous to the time reversal of a classical Markov transition matrix. Since open quantum dynamics are stochastic, and not, in general, deterministic, the time reversal is not, in general, an inversion of the dynamics. Rather, the system relaxes toward equilibrium in both the forward and reverse time directions. The probability of a quantum trajectory and the conjugate, time reversed trajectory are related by the heat exchanged with the environment.

  8. Laser illumination of multiple capillaries that form a waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Dhadwal, Harbans S.; Quesada, Mark A.; Studier, F. William

    1998-08-04

    A system and method are disclosed for efficient laser illumination of the interiors of multiple capillaries simultaneously, and collection of light emitted from them. Capillaries in a parallel array can form an optical waveguide wherein refraction at the cylindrical surfaces confines side-on illuminating light to the core of each successive capillary in the array. Methods are provided for determining conditions where capillaries will form a waveguide and for assessing and minimizing losses due to reflection. Light can be delivered to the arrayed capillaries through an integrated fiber optic transmitter or through a pair of such transmitters aligned coaxially at opposite sides of the array. Light emitted from materials within the capillaries can be carried to a detection system through optical fibers, each of which collects light from a single capillary, with little cross talk between the capillaries. The collection ends of the optical fibers can be in a parallel array with the same spacing as the capillary array, so that the collection fibers can all be aligned to the capillaries simultaneously. Applicability includes improving the efficiency of many analytical methods that use capillaries, including particularly high-throughput DNA sequencing and diagnostic methods based on capillary electrophoresis.

  9. Laser illumination of multiple capillaries that form a waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Dhadwal, H.S.; Quesada, M.A.; Studier, F.W.

    1998-08-04

    A system and method are disclosed for efficient laser illumination of the interiors of multiple capillaries simultaneously, and collection of light emitted from them. Capillaries in a parallel array can form an optical waveguide wherein refraction at the cylindrical surfaces confines side-on illuminating light to the core of each successive capillary in the array. Methods are provided for determining conditions where capillaries will form a waveguide and for assessing and minimizing losses due to reflection. Light can be delivered to the arrayed capillaries through an integrated fiber optic transmitter or through a pair of such transmitters aligned coaxially at opposite sides of the array. Light emitted from materials within the capillaries can be carried to a detection system through optical fibers, each of which collects light from a single capillary, with little cross talk between the capillaries. The collection ends of the optical fibers can be in a parallel array with the same spacing as the capillary array, so that the collection fibers can all be aligned to the capillaries simultaneously. Applicability includes improving the efficiency of many analytical methods that use capillaries, including particularly high-throughput DNA sequencing and diagnostic methods based on capillary electrophoresis. 35 figs.

  10. 21 CFR 864.6150 - Capillary blood collection tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Capillary blood collection tube. 864.6150 Section... blood collection tube. (a) Identification. A capillary blood collection tube is a plain or heparinized glass tube of very small diameter used to collect blood by capillary action. (b) Classification. Class...

  11. 21 CFR 864.6150 - Capillary blood collection tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Capillary blood collection tube. 864.6150 Section... blood collection tube. (a) Identification. A capillary blood collection tube is a plain or heparinized glass tube of very small diameter used to collect blood by capillary action. (b) Classification. Class...

  12. 21 CFR 864.6150 - Capillary blood collection tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Capillary blood collection tube. 864.6150 Section... blood collection tube. (a) Identification. A capillary blood collection tube is a plain or heparinized glass tube of very small diameter used to collect blood by capillary action. (b) Classification. Class...

  13. 21 CFR 864.6150 - Capillary blood collection tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Capillary blood collection tube. 864.6150 Section... blood collection tube. (a) Identification. A capillary blood collection tube is a plain or heparinized glass tube of very small diameter used to collect blood by capillary action. (b) Classification. Class...

  14. 21 CFR 864.6150 - Capillary blood collection tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Capillary blood collection tube. 864.6150 Section... blood collection tube. (a) Identification. A capillary blood collection tube is a plain or heparinized glass tube of very small diameter used to collect blood by capillary action. (b) Classification. Class...

  15. In-capillary detection of fast antibody-peptide binding using fluorescence coupled capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yuqin; Qiu, Lin; Qin, Haifang; Ding, Shumin; Liu, Li; Teng, Yiwan; Chen, Yao; Wang, Cheli; Li, Jinchen; Wang, Jianhao; Jiang, Pengju

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report a technique for detecting the fast binding of antibody-peptide inside a capillary. Anti-HA was mixed and interacted with FAM-labeled HA tag (FAM-E4 ) inside the capillary. Fluorescence coupled capillary electrophoresis (CE-FL) was employed to measure and record the binding process. The efficiency of the antibody-peptide binding on in-capillary assays was found to be affected by the molar ratio. Furthermore, the stability of anti-HA-FAM-E4 complex was investigated as well. The results indicated that E4 YPYDVPDYA (E4) or TAMRA-E4 YPYDVPDYA (TAMRA-E4) had the same binding priorities with anti-HA. The addition of excess E4 or TAMRA-E4 could lead to partial dissociation of the complex and take a two-step mechanism including dissociation and association. This method can be applied to detect a wide range of biomolecular interactions.

  16. Preparation approaches of the coated capillaries with liposomes in capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Mei, Jie; Tian, Yan-Ping; He, Wen; Xiao, Yu-Xiu; Wei, Juan; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2010-10-29

    The use of liposomes as coating materials in capillary electrophoresis has recently emerged as an important and popular research area. There are three preparation methods that are commonly used for coating capillaries with liposomes, namely physical adsorption, avidin-biotin binding and covalent coupling. Herein, the three different coating methods were compared, and the liposome-coated capillaries prepared by these methods were evaluated by studying systematically their EOF characterization and performance (repeatability, reproducibility and lifetime). The amount of immobilized phospholipids and the interactions between liposome or phospholipid membrane and neutral compounds for the liposome-coated capillaries prepared by these methods were also investigated in detail. Finally, the merits and disadvantages for each coating method were reviewed.

  17. Macroscopic theory for capillary-pressure hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Athukorallage, Bhagya; Aulisa, Eugenio; Iyer, Ram; Zhang, Larry

    2015-03-03

    In this article, we present a theory of macroscopic contact angle hysteresis by considering the minimization of the Helmholtz free energy of a solid-liquid-gas system over a convex set, subject to a constant volume constraint. The liquid and solid surfaces in contact are assumed to adhere weakly to each other, causing the interfacial energy to be set-valued. A simple calculus of variations argument for the minimization of the Helmholtz energy leads to the Young-Laplace equation for the drop surface in contact with the gas and a variational inequality that yields contact angle hysteresis for advancing/receding flow. We also show that the Young-Laplace equation with a Dirichlet boundary condition together with the variational inequality yields a basic hysteresis operator that describes the relationship between capillary pressure and volume. We validate the theory using results from the experiment for a sessile macroscopic drop. Although the capillary effect is a complex phenomenon even for a droplet as various points along the contact line might be pinned, the capillary pressure and volume of the drop are scalar variables that encapsulate the global quasistatic energy information for the entire droplet. Studying the capillary pressure versus volume relationship greatly simplifies the understanding and modeling of the phenomenon just as scalar magnetic hysteresis graphs greatly aided the modeling of devices with magnetic materials.

  18. Antibodies to mouse lung capillary endothelium.

    PubMed

    Rorvik, M C; Allison, D P; Hotchkiss, J A; Witschi, H P; Kennel, S J

    1988-07-01

    We are interested in developing monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) that recognize specific cell types in the lung of BALB/c mice. Normal mouse lung homogenate was used to immunize F344 rats and hybridomas were produced by fusion of rat spleen cells with mouse myeloma SP 2/0. Two hybridomas were selected which produced MoAbs active in immunohistochemistry of lung cells. MoAb 273-34A and 411-201B both show extensive peroxidase staining of capillary endothelial cells within alveolar walls of lungs at the light microscopic level. To demonstrate cell specificity, immunoelectron microscopy with gold-labeled antibody was performed. Lightly fixed lungs were frozen and thin-sectioned before staining with MoAb and 5-nm gold particles coupled to secondary antibody. Quantitative analyses of these cryosections show that both antibodies, used at optimal concentrations, are specific for binding to capillary endothelial cells. More than 95% of the gold particles are associated with capillary endothelial cells on the thin side of the alveolar wall. When capillaries adjoined thick septa containing interstitial cells, about two thirds of the gold particles were associated with endothelial cells and about one quarter with interstitial cells. These MoAbs should be useful in studying the role of endothelial cells in toxic lung injury.

  19. Using Capillary Flows to Pattern Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyawahare, Saurabh; Craig, Kate; Scherer, Axel

    2006-03-01

    One can appreciate how capillary forces cause unexpected patterns and shapes by looking at a soap bubble. Pattern formation by surface tension is seen in ring patterns of coffee stains, fingering patterns in Hele-Shaw cells, ordering of two dimensional micro-sphere crystals, combing of DNA and skeleton formation in marine creatures called radiolarians. Though comman, problems involving the understanding and control of the self-assembly mechanism need to be resolved before using capillary forces as a practical lithographic tool. Here, we report capillary flows create line patterns in evaporating liquids between closely spaced parallel plates. The widths of these lines range from a few microns to a few nanometers. Deliberate patterning of such lines requires pinning of the contact line and the presence of foaming surfactants. The position and type of line can be controlled with artificial pinning points and varying solutes respectively, and large-scale photolithography can be used to guide and control the definition of nanostructures. We provide ``proof of principle'' demonstrations of this method's application by creating lines of colloidal quantum dots and micro-spheres. This represents the first step in using capillary phenomena to create controlled, self--assembling, one-dimensional wire-like structures

  20. Design criteria for SW-205 capillary system

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, W.J.

    1989-04-01

    This design criteria covers the converting of the SW-250 Capillary System from fumehood manual operation to sealed glovebox automated operation. The design criteria contains general guidelines and includes drawings reflecting a similar installation at another site. Topics include purpose and physical description, architectural-engineering requirements, reference document, electrical, fire protection, occupational safety and health, quality assurance, and security.