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Sample records for reverse polarity capillary

  1. Reversed-polarity capillary zone electrophoretic analysis of usnic acid.

    PubMed

    Kreft, S; Strukelj, B

    2001-08-01

    A capillary zone electrophoretic (CZE) method for the determination of usnic acid is described for the first time. Usnic acid is an antibiotic substance from lichens. Due to its low solubility in water, a high content of methanol in CZE buffer is required. Because of the methanol in the buffer, the electroosmotic flow velocity was lower than the electrophoretic mobility of usnic acid. Accordingly, the use of reversed-polarity (with the anode on the detector side of the capillary) was necessary. The optimal buffer composition was 50 mM NaOH, 20 mM acetic acid and 5% water in methanol. The detection limit of UV detector at 290 nm for usnic acid in the injected extract was 3.5 mg/L and the relative standard deviation of the normalized peak area was 3.3% at 250 mg/L.

  2. Determination of nitrate and nitrite in Hanford defense waste(HDW) by reverse polarity capillary zone electrophoresis (RPCE)method

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalf, S.G.

    1998-06-10

    This paper describes the first application of reverse polarity capillary zone electrophoresis (RPCE) for rapid and accurate determination of nitrate and nitrite in Hanford Defense Waste (HDW). The method development was carried out by using Synthetic Hanford Waste (SHW), followed by the analysis of 4 real HDW samples. Hexamethonium bromide (HMB) was used as electroosmotic flow modifier in borate buffer at pH 9.2 to decrease the electroosmotic flow (EOF) in order to enhance the speed of analysis and the resolution of nitrate and nitrite in high ionic strength HDW samples. The application of this capillary zone electrophoresis method, when compared with ion chromatography for two major components of HDW, nitrate and nitrite slightly reduced analysis time, eliminated most pre-analysis handling of the highly radioactive sample, and cut analysis wastes by more than 2 orders of magnitude. The analysis of real HDW samples that were validated by using sample spikes showed a concentration range of 1.03 to 1.42 M for both nitrate. The migration times of the real HDW and the spiked HDW samples were within a precision of less than 3% relative standard deviation. The selectivity ratio test used for peak confirmation of the spiked samples was within 96% of the real sample. Method reliability was tested by spiking the matrix with 72.4 mM nitrate and nitrite. Recoveries for these spiked samples were 93-103%.

  3. The in-capillary DPPH-capillary electrophoresis-the diode array detector combined with reversed-electrode polarity stacking mode for screening and quantifying major antioxidants in Cuscuta chinensis Lam.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiao; Tian, Ji; Li, Jin; Azietaku, John Teye; Zhang, Bo-Li; Gao, Xiu-Mei; Chang, Yan-Xu

    2016-07-01

    An in-capillary 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH)-CE-the DAD (in-capillary DPPH-CE-DAD) combined with reversed-electrode polarity stacking mode has been developed to screen and quantify the active antioxidant components of Cuscuta chinensis Lam. The operation parameters were optimized with regard to the pH and concentration of buffer solution, SDS, β-CDs, organic modifier, as well as separation voltage and temperature. Six antioxidants including chlorogenic acid, p-coumaric acid, rutin, hyperin, isoquercitrin, and astragalin were screened and the total antioxidant activity of the complex matrix was successfully evaluated based on the decreased peak area of DPPH by the established DPPH-CE-DAD method. Sensitivity was enhanced under reversed-electrode polarity stacking mode and 10- to 31-fold of magnitude improvement in detection sensitivity for each analyte was attained. The results demonstrated that the newly established in-capillary DPPH-CE-DAD method combined with reversed-electrode polarity stacking mode could integrate sample concentration, the oxidizing reaction, separation, and detection into one capillary to fully automate the system. It was considered a suitable technique for the separation, screening, and determination of trace antioxidants in natural products.

  4. Fast and sensitive method to determine parabens by capillary electrophoresis using automatic reverse electrode polarity stacking mode: application to hair samples.

    PubMed

    Sako, Alysson V F; Dolzan, Maressa D; Micke, Gustavo Amadeu

    2015-09-01

    This paper describes a fast and sensitive method for the determination of methyl, ethyl, propyl, and butylparaben in hair samples by capillary electrophoresis using automatic reverse electrode polarity stacking mode. In the proposed method, solutions are injected using the flush command of the analysis software (940 mbar) and the polarity switching is carried out automatically immediately after the sample injection. The advantages compared with conventional stacking methods are the increased analytical frequency, repeatability, and inter-day precision. All analyses were performed in a fused silica capillary (50 cm, 41.5 cm in effective length, 50 μm i.d.), and the background electrolyte was composed of 20 mmol L(-1) sodium tetraborate in 10 % of methanol, pH 9.3. For the reverse polarity, -25 kV/35 s was applied followed by application of +30 kV for the electrophoretic run. Temperature was set at 20 °C, and all analytes were monitored at 297 nm. The method showed acceptable linearity (r (2) > 0.997) in the studied range of 0.1-5.0 mg L(-1), limits of detection below 0.017 mg L(-1), and inter-day, intra-day, and instrumental precision better than 6.2, 3.6, and 4.6 %, respectively. Considering parabens is widely used as a preservative in many products and the reported possibility of damage to the hair and also to human health caused by these compounds, the proposed method was applied to evaluate the adsorption of parabens in hair samples. The results indicate that there is a greater adsorption of methylparaben compared to the other parabens tested and also dyed hairs had a greater adsorption capacity for parabens than natural hairs.

  5. Sequential Polarity-Reversing Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labaw, Clayton C.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed circuit reverses polarity of electric power supplied to bidirectional dc motor, reversible electro-mechanical actuator, or other device operating in direction depending on polarity. Circuit reverses polarity each time power turned on, without need for additional polarity-reversing or direction signals and circuitry to process them.

  6. Optimisation for the separation of the oligosaccharide, sodium Pentosan Polysulfate by reverse polarity capillary zone electrophoresis using a central composite design.

    PubMed

    Prochazka, S; Mulholland, M; Lloyd-Jones, A

    2003-02-01

    The separation by reverse polarity capillary zone electrophoresis of the therapeutically developed sodium salt of Pentosan Polysulfate was optimised through the analysis of response surface methodologies, modeled using a central composite design. The optimisation investigated injection pressure, injection time and voltage and the effect of the conditions on retention times, peak areas, separation efficiency and the method sensitivity. The overall goal was to develop the most sensitive results with no decrease in separation efficiency. The following results were obtained: (1) retention times generally decreased as injection pressure, injection time and voltage increased, injection time having the least effect; (2) as expected peak areas increased as injection pressure and injection time increased but decreased as voltage increased; (3) separation efficiencies generally increased as injection pressure and injection time decreased, with voltage having almost no effect. For the optimum condition, the sample was introduced at the inlet vial at the cathode hydrodynamically, at optimal setting of 44 s at 35 mbar. The optimal voltage was -20 kV. In comparison with other methods, the optimum showed increased sensitivity, resolution and separation efficiency. Repeatability studies were performed on the optimum parameter conditions. Relative standard deviation values obtained were between 0.9 and 5.4%.

  7. Gold-nanoparticle extraction and reversed-electrode-polarity stacking mode combined to enhance capillary electrophoresis sensitivity for conjugated nucleosides and oligonucleotides containing thioether linkers.

    PubMed

    Bosi, Valentina; Sarti, Elena; Navacchia, Maria Luisa; Perrone, Daniela; Pasti, Luisa; Cavazzini, Alberto; Capobianco, Massimo L

    2015-07-01

    We present a capillary electrophoresis method for determining two different C8-conjugated deoxyadenosines, and for oligonucleotides containing them, in which a psoralen or an acridine molecule is bonded to the base via a short alkyl chain containing sulfur ethers at both ends. The sensitivity of the micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) method was increased by using two preconcentration techniques, micro solid-phase extraction (μSPE) followed by reversed-electrode-polarity stacking mode (REPSM). Variables that affect the efficiency of the extraction in μSPE and preconcentration by REPSM, including the type and volume of extraction nanoparticle, concentration, and injection time, were investigated. Under the optimum conditions, enrichment factors obtained were in the range 360-400. The limits of detection (LODs) at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 ranged from 2 to 5 nmol L(-1). The relative recoveries of labelled adenosines from water samples were 95-103%. The proposed method provided high enrichment factors and good precision and accuracy with a short analysis time. On the basis of the advantages of simplicity, high selectivity, high sensitivity, and good reproducibility, the proposed method may have great potential for biochemical applications.

  8. Defining the Polar Field Reversal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upton, Lisa; Hathaway, David H.

    2013-01-01

    The polar fields on the Sun are directly related to solar cycle variability. Recently there has been interest in studying an important characteristic of the polar fields: the timing of the polar field reversals. However this characteristic has been poorly defined, mostly due to the limitations of early observations. In the past, the reversals have been calculated by averaging the flux above some latitude (i.e. 55deg or 75deg). Alternatively, the reversal could be defined by the time in which the previous polarity is completely canceled and replaced by the new polarity at 90de, precisely at the pole. We will use a surface flux transport model to illustrate the differences in the timing of the polar field reversal based on each of these definitions and propose standardization in the definition of the polar field reversal. The ability to predict the timing of the polar field reversal using a surface flux transport model will also be discussed.

  9. Reversed-polarity regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, F.

    1982-01-01

    It is found by a statistical study of 58 reversed-polarity regions (RPRs) covering the 11-year period 1969-1979 that RPRs (1) have a lifespan comparable to normal active regions, (2) do not show a tendency to rotate toward a more normal alignment, and (3) have stable configurations that do not suggest stress due to their anomalous magnetic alignment. As in normal regions, RPR magnetic complexity is found to be the primary factor in flare productivity. Weak-field RPRs produce no flares, and regions with complex spots produce more flares than regions with non-complex spots by a factor of five. The main difference between RPRs and normal regions lies in complex spot frequency, with less that 17% of normal active regions having such spots and fewer than 1.8% having long-lived complex ones, while 41% of RPRs have complex spots and 24% have long-lived complex spots.

  10. Polar Field Reversals and Active Region Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, Gordon; Ettinger, Sophie

    2015-07-01

    We study the relationship between polar field reversals and decayed active region magnetic flux. Photospheric active region flux is dispersed by differential rotation and turbulent diffusion, and is transported poleward by meridional flows and diffusion. We summarize the published evidence from observation and modeling of the influence of meridional flow variations and decaying active region flux's spatial distribution, such as the Joy's law tilt angle. Using NSO Kitt Peak synoptic magnetograms covering cycles 21-24, we investigate in detail the relationship between the transport of decayed active region flux to high latitudes and changes in the polar field strength, including reversals in the magnetic polarity at the poles. By means of stack plots of low- and high-latitude slices of the synoptic magnetograms, the dispersal of flux from low to high latitudes is tracked, and the timing of this dispersal is compared to the polar field changes. In the most abrupt cases of polar field reversal, a few activity complexes (systems of active regions) are identified as the main cause. The poleward transport of large quantities of decayed trailing-polarity flux from these complexes is found to correlate well in time with the abrupt polar field changes. In each case, significant latitudinal displacements were found between the positive and negative flux centroids of the complexes, consistent with Joy's law bipole tilt with trailing-polarity flux located poleward of leading-polarity flux. The activity complexes of the cycle 21 and 22 maxima were larger and longer-lived than those of the cycle 23 and 24 maxima, and the poleward surges were stronger and more unipolar and the polar field changes larger and faster. The cycle 21 and 22 polar reversals were dominated by only a few long-lived complexes whereas the cycle 23 and 24 reversals were the cumulative effects of more numerous, shorter-lived regions. We conclude that sizes and lifetimes of activity complexes are key to

  11. Geomagnetic reversal in brunhes normal polarity epoch.

    PubMed

    Smith, J D; Foster, J H

    1969-02-01

    The magnetic stratigraphly of seven cores of deep-sea sediment established the existence of a short interval of reversed polarity in the upper part of the Brunches epoch of normal polarity. The reversed zone in the cores correlates well with paleontological boundaries and is named the Blake event. Its boundaries are estimated to be 108,000 and 114,000 years ago +/- 10 percent. PMID:17750890

  12. Polar Field Reversals and Active Region Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, Gordon; Ettinger, Sophie

    2015-04-01

    We study the relationship between polar field reversals and decayed active region magnetic flux. Photospheric active region flux is dispersed by differential rotation and turbulent diffusion, and is transported poleward by meridional flows and diffusion. Using NSO Kitt Peak synoptic magnetograms, we investigate in detail the relationship between the transport of decayed active region flux to high latitudes and changes in the polar field strength, including reversals in the magnetic polarity at the poles. By means of stack plots of low- and high-latitude slices of the synoptic magnetograms, the dispersal of flux from low to high latitudes is tracked, and the timing of this dispersal is compared to the polar field changes. In the most abrupt cases of polar field reversal, a few activity complexes (systems of active regions) are identified as the main cause. The poleward transport of large quantities of decayed lagging-polarity flux from these complexes is found to correlate well in time with the abrupt polar field changes. In each case, significant latitudinal displacements were found between the positive and negative flux centroids of the complexes, consistent with Joy's law bipole tilt with lagging-polarity flux located poleward of leading-polarity flux. This work is carried out through the National Solar Observatory Summer Research Assistantship (SRA) Program. The National Solar Observatory is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA) under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  13. Capillary Regeneration in Scleroderma: Stem Cell Therapy Reverses Phenotype?

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Jo N.; Nash, Richard A.; McLeod, D. O.; Fiorentino, David F.; Shulman, Howard M.; Connolly, M. Kari; Molitor, Jerry A.; Henstorf, Gretchen; Lafyatis, Robert; Pritchard, David K.; Adams, Lawrence D.; Furst, Daniel E.; Schwartz, Stephen M.

    2008-01-01

    Background Scleroderma is an autoimmune disease with a characteristic vascular pathology. The vasculopathy associated with scleroderma is one of the major contributors to the clinical manifestations of the disease. Methodology/Principal Findings We used immunohistochemical and mRNA in situ hybridization techniques to characterize this vasculopathy and showed with morphometry that scleroderma has true capillary rarefaction. We compared skin biopsies from 23 scleroderma patients and 24 normal controls and 7 scleroderma patients who had undergone high dose immunosuppressive therapy followed by autologous hematopoietic cell transplant. Along with the loss of capillaries there was a dramatic change in endothelial phenotype in the residual vessels. The molecules defining this phenotype are: vascular endothelial cadherin, a supposedly universal endothelial marker required for tube formation (lost in the scleroderma tissue), antiangiogenic interferon α (overexpressed in the scleroderma dermis) and RGS5, a signaling molecule whose expression coincides with the end of branching morphogenesis during development and tumor angiogenesis (also overexpressed in scleroderma skin. Following high dose immunosuppressive therapy, patients experienced clinical improvement and 5 of the 7 patients with scleroderma had increased capillary counts. It was also observed in the same 5 patients, that the interferon α and vascular endothelial cadherin had returned to normal as other clinical signs in the skin regressed, and in all 7 patients, RGS5 had returned to normal. Conclusion/Significance These data provide the first objective evidence for loss of vessels in scleroderma and show that this phenomenon is reversible. Coordinate changes in expression of three molecules already implicated in angiogenesis or anti-angiogenesis suggest that control of expression of these three molecules may be the underlying mechanism for at least the vascular component of this disease. Since rarefaction has

  14. POLAR FIELD REVERSAL OBSERVATIONS WITH HINODE

    SciTech Connect

    Shiota, D.; Tsuneta, S.; Shimojo, M.; Orozco Suarez, D.; Ishikawa, R.; Sako, N.

    2012-07-10

    We have been monitoring yearly variation in the Sun's polar magnetic fields with the Solar Optical Telescope aboard Hinode to record their evolution and expected reversal near the solar maximum. All magnetic patches in the magnetic flux maps are automatically identified to obtain the number density and magnetic flux density as a function of the total magnetic flux per patch. The detected magnetic flux per patch ranges over four orders of magnitude (10{sup 15}-10{sup 20} Mx). The higher end of the magnetic flux in the polar regions is about one order of magnitude larger than that of the quiet Sun, and nearly that of pores. Almost all large patches ({>=}10{sup 18} Mx) have the same polarity, while smaller patches have a fair balance of both polarities. The polarity of the polar region as a whole is consequently determined only by the large magnetic concentrations. A clear decrease in the net flux of the polar region is detected in the slow rising phase of the current solar cycle. The decrease is more rapid in the north polar region than in the south. The decrease in the net flux is caused by a decrease in the number and size of the large flux concentrations as well as the appearance of patches with opposite polarity at lower latitudes. In contrast, we do not see temporal change in the magnetic flux associated with the smaller patches (<10{sup 18} Mx) and that of the horizontal magnetic fields during the years 2008-2012.

  15. Explaining Polarization Reversals in STEREO Wave Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breneman, A.; Cattell, C.; Wygant, J.; Kersten, K.; Wilson, L, B., III; Dai, L.; Colpitts, C.; Kellogg, P. J.; Goetz, K.; Paradise, A.

    2012-01-01

    Recently Breneman et al. reported observations of large amplitude lightning and transmitter whistler mode waves from two STEREO passes through the inner radiation belt (L<2). Hodograms of the electric field in the plane transverse to the magnetic field showed that the transmitter waves underwent periodic polarization reversals. Specifically, their polarization would cycle through a pattern of right-hand to linear to left-hand polarization at a rate of roughly 200 Hz. The lightning whistlers were observed to be left-hand polarized at frequencies greater than the lower hybrid frequency and less than the transmitter frequency (21.4 kHz) and right-hand polarized otherwise. Only righthand polarized waves in the inner radiation belt should exist in the frequency range of the whistler mode and these reversals were not explained in the previous paper. We show, with a combination of observations and simulated wave superposition, that these polarization reversals are due to the beating of an incident electromagnetic whistler mode wave at 21.4 kHz and linearly polarized, symmetric lower hybrid sidebands Doppler-shifted from the incident wave by +/-200 Hz. The existence of the lower hybrid waves is consistent with the parametric decay mechanism of Lee and Kuo whereby an incident whistler mode wave decays into symmetric, short wavelength lower hybrid waves and a purely growing (zero-frequency) mode. Like the lower hybrid waves, the purely growing mode is Doppler-shifted by 200 Hz as observed on STEREO. This decay mechanism in the upper ionosphere has been previously reported at equatorial latitudes and is thought to have a direct connection with explosive spread F enhancements. As such it may represent another dissipation mechanism of VLF wave energy in the ionosphere and may help to explain a deficit of observed lightning and transmitter energy in the inner radiation belts as reported by Starks et al.

  16. Capillary Ion Concentration Polarization for Power-Free Salt Purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sungmin; Jung, Yeonsu; Cho, Inhee; Kim, Ho-Young; Kim, Sung Jae

    2014-11-01

    In this presentation, we experimentally and theoretically demonstrated the capillary based ion concentration polarization for power-free salt purification system. Traditional ion concentration polarization phenomenon has been studied for a decade for both fundamental nanoscale fluid dynamics and novel engineering applications such as desalination, preconcentration and energy harvesting devices. While the conventional system utilizes an external power source, the system based on capillary ion concentration polarization is capable of perm-selective ion transportation only by capillarity so that the same ion depletion zone can be formed without any external power sources. An ion concentration profile near the nanostructure was tracked using fluorescent probes and analyzed by solving the modified Nernst-Planck equation. As a result, the concentration in the vicinity of the nanostructure was at least 10 times lower than that of bulk electrolyte and thus, the liquid absorbed into the nanostructure had the low concentration. This mechanism can be used for the power free salt purification system which would be significantly useful in underdeveloped and remote area. This work was supported by Samsung Research Funding Center of Samsung Electronics under Project Number SRFC-MA1301-02.

  17. Time reversal invariance in polarized neutron decay

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, E.G.

    1994-03-01

    An experiment to measure the time reversal invariance violating (T-violating) triple correlation (D) in the decay of free polarized neutrons has been developed. The detector design incorporates a detector geometry that provides a significant improvement in the sensitivity over that used in the most sensitive of previous experiments. A prototype detector was tested in measurements with a cold neutron beam. Data resulting from the tests are presented. A detailed calculation of systematic effects has been performed and new diagnostic techniques that allow these effects to be measured have been developed. As the result of this work, a new experiment is under way that will improve the sensitivity to D to 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} or better. With higher neutron flux a statistical sensitivity of the order 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} is ultimately expected. The decay of free polarized neutrons (n {yields} p + e + {bar v}{sub e}) is used to search for T-violation by measuring the triple correlation of the neutron spin polarization, and the electron and proton momenta ({sigma}{sub n} {center_dot} p{sub p} {times} p{sub e}). This correlation changes sign under reversal of the motion. Since final state effects in neutron decay are small, a nonzero coefficient, D, of this correlation indicates the violation of time reversal invariance. D is measured by comparing the numbers of coincidences in electron and proton detectors arranged symmetrically about a longitudinally polarized neutron beam. Particular care must be taken to eliminate residual asymmetries in the detectors or beam as these can lead to significant false effects. The Standard Model predicts negligible T-violating effects in neutron decay. Extensions to the Standard Model include new interactions some of which include CP-violating components. Some of these make first order contributions to D.

  18. Analysis of Polar Reversals of Solar Cycle 22 and 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettinger, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    We study the relationship between polar field reversals and decayed active region magnetic flux. Photospheric active region flux is dispersed by differential rotation and turbulent diffusion, and is transported poleward by meridional flows and diffusion. We investigate in detail the relationship between the transport of decayed active region flux to high latitudes and changes in the polar field strength, including reversals in the magnetic polarity at the poles. By means of stack plots of low- and high-latitude slices of synoptic magnetograms, one to three activity complexes (systems of active regions) were identified in each reversal as the main cause of polar field reversals in each cycle. The poleward transport of large quantities of decayed lagging-polarity flux from these complexes was found to correlate well in time with the polar field changes. In each case significant latitudinal displacements were found between the positive and negative flux centroids of the complexes, consistent with Joy's law bipole tilt with lagging-polarity flux located poleward of leading-polarity flux. This result indicates the importance of the Joy's law tilt and consequent high-latitude polarity bias in polar reversals.This work is carried out through the National Solar Observatory Summer Research Assistantship (SRA) Program. The National Solar Observatory is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA) under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  19. An unusual route to polarization reversal in ferroelectric ultrathin nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Herchig, R.; Chang, Ch.-M.; Mani, B. K.; Ponomareva, I.

    2014-07-07

    Ferroelectric nanowires are promising candidates for miniaturized ferroelectric devices. Some potential nanoscale applications of the nanowires, such as ultra high density ferroelectric memory, utilize their reversible polarization. To meet the ever increasing demand for low energy consumption, it is extremely desirable to reduce the operational fields associated with polarization reversal. In this Letter, we use first-principles-based simulations to explore an unusual route to polarization reversal that utilizes a combination of relatively low bias field and THz pulsed radiation. Such an approach allows for lower operational fields and may lead to other potential applications such as THz radiation sensing and remote switches.

  20. How the geomagnetic field vector reverses polarity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prevot, M.; Mankinen, E.A.; Gromme, C.S.; Coe, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    A highly detailed record of both the direction and intensity of the Earth's magnetic field as it reverses has been obtained from a Miocene volcanic sequence. The transitional field is low in intensity and is typically non-axisymmetric. Geomagnetic impulses corresponding to astonishingly high rates of change of the field sometimes occur, suggesting that liquid velocity within the Earth's core increases during geomagnetic reversals. ?? 1985 Nature Publishing Group.

  1. Magnetic field reversals, polar wander, and core-mantle coupling.

    PubMed

    Courtillot, V; Besse, J

    1987-09-01

    True polar wander, the shifting of the entire mantle relative to the earth's spin axis, has been reanalyzed. Over the last 200 million years, true polar wander has been fast (approximately 5 centimeters per year) most of the time, except for a remarkable standstill from 170 to 110 million years ago. This standstill correlates with a decrease in the reversal frequency of the geomagnetic field and episodes of continental breakup. Conversely, true polar wander is high when reversal frequency increases. It is proposed that intermittent convection modulates the thickness of a thermal boundary layer at the base of the mantle and consequently the core-to-mantle heat flux. Emission of hot thermals from the boundary layer leads to increases in mantle convection and true polar wander. In conjunction, cold thermals released from a boundary layer at the top of the liquid core eventually lead to reversals. Changes in the locations of subduction zones may also affect true polar wander. Exceptional volcanism and mass extinctions at the Cretaceous-Tertiary and Permo-Triassic boundaries may be related to thermals released after two unusually long periods with no magnetic reversals. These environmental catastrophes may therefore be a consequence of thermal and chemical couplings in the earth's multilayer heat engine rather than have an extraterrestrial cause.

  2. Magnetic field reversals, polar wander, and core-mantle coupling.

    PubMed

    Courtillot, V; Besse, J

    1987-09-01

    True polar wander, the shifting of the entire mantle relative to the earth's spin axis, has been reanalyzed. Over the last 200 million years, true polar wander has been fast (approximately 5 centimeters per year) most of the time, except for a remarkable standstill from 170 to 110 million years ago. This standstill correlates with a decrease in the reversal frequency of the geomagnetic field and episodes of continental breakup. Conversely, true polar wander is high when reversal frequency increases. It is proposed that intermittent convection modulates the thickness of a thermal boundary layer at the base of the mantle and consequently the core-to-mantle heat flux. Emission of hot thermals from the boundary layer leads to increases in mantle convection and true polar wander. In conjunction, cold thermals released from a boundary layer at the top of the liquid core eventually lead to reversals. Changes in the locations of subduction zones may also affect true polar wander. Exceptional volcanism and mass extinctions at the Cretaceous-Tertiary and Permo-Triassic boundaries may be related to thermals released after two unusually long periods with no magnetic reversals. These environmental catastrophes may therefore be a consequence of thermal and chemical couplings in the earth's multilayer heat engine rather than have an extraterrestrial cause. PMID:17801638

  3. Reverse capillary flow of condensed water through aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Jongju; Jeon, Wonjae; Alam Khan, Fakhre; Lee, Jinkee; Baik, Seunghyun

    2015-06-01

    Molecular transport through nanopores has recently received considerable attention as a result of advances in nanofabrication and nanomaterial synthesis technologies. Surprisingly, water transport investigations through carbon nanochannels resulted in two contradicting observations: extremely fast transport or rejection of water molecules. In this paper, we elucidate the mechanism of impeded water vapor transport through the interstitial space of aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (aligned-MWCNTs)—capillary condensation, agglomeration, reverse capillary flow, and removal by superhydrophobicity at the tip of the nanotubes. The origin of separation comes from the water’s phase change from gas to liquid, followed by reverse capillary flow. First, the saturation water vapor pressure is decreased in a confined space, which is favorable for the phase change of incoming water vapor into liquid drops. Once continuous water meniscus is formed between the nanotubes by the adsoprtion and agglomeration of water molecules, a high reverse Laplace pressure is induced in the mushroom-shaped liquid meniscus at the entry region of the aligned-MWCNTs. The reverse Laplace pressure can be significantly enhanced by decreasing the pore size. Finally, the droplets pushed backward by the reverse Laplace pressure can be removed by superhydrophobicity at the tip of the aligned-MWCNTs. The analytical analysis was also supported by experiments carried out using 4 mm-long aligned-MWCNTs with different intertube distances. The water rejection rate and the separation factor increased as the intertube distance decreased, resulting in 90% and 10, respectively, at an intertube distance of 4 nm. This mechanism and nanotube membrane may be useful for energy-efficient water vapor separation and dehumidification.

  4. Simulation studies of nucleation of ferroelectric polarization reversal.

    SciTech Connect

    Brennecka, Geoffrey L.; Winchester, Benjamin Michael

    2014-08-01

    Electric field-induced reversal of spontaneous polarization is the defining characteristic of a ferroelectric material, but the process(es) and mechanism(s) associated with the initial nucleation of reverse-polarity domains are poorly understood. This report describes studies carried out using phase field modeling of LiTaO3, a relatively simple prototype ferroelectric material, in order to explore the effects of either mechanical deformation or optically-induced free charges on nucleation and resulting domain configuration during field-induced polarization reversal. Conditions were selected to approximate as closely as feasible those of accompanying experimental work in order to provide not only support for the experimental work but also ensure that additional experimental validation of the simulations could be carried out in the future. Phase field simulations strongly support surface mechanical damage/deformation as effective for dramatically reducing the overall coercive field (Ec) via local field enhancements. Further, optically-nucleated polarization reversal appears to occur via stabilization of latent nuclei via the charge screening effects of free charges.

  5. Two-step polarization reversal in biased ferroelectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, John E. Ukritnukun, Supphatuch; Glaum, Julia; Cozzan, Clayton; Tutuncu, Goknur; Dosch, Chris; Andrieux, Jerome; Jo, Wook; Jones, Jacob L.

    2014-06-14

    Polarization reversal in polycrystalline ferroelectrics is shown to occur via two distinct and sequential domain reorientation steps. This reorientation sequence, which cannot be readily discriminated in the overall sample polarization, is made apparent using time-resolved high-energy x-ray diffraction. Upon application of electric fields opposite to the initial poling direction, two unique and significantly different time constants are observed. The first (faster time constant) is shown to be derived by the release of a residual stress due to initial electrical biasing and the second (slower time constant) due to the redevelopment of residual stress during further domain wall motion. A modified domain reorientation model is given that accurately describes the domain volume fraction evolution during the reversal process.

  6. Two-step polarization reversal in biased ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, John E.; Cozzan, Clayton; Ukritnukun, Supphatuch; Tutuncu, Goknur; Andrieux, Jerome; Glaum, Julia; Dosch, Chris; Jo, Wook; Jones, Jacob L.

    2014-06-01

    Polarization reversal in polycrystalline ferroelectrics is shown to occur via two distinct and sequential domain reorientation steps. This reorientation sequence, which cannot be readily discriminated in the overall sample polarization, is made apparent using time-resolved high-energy x-ray diffraction. Upon application of electric fields opposite to the initial poling direction, two unique and significantly different time constants are observed. The first (faster time constant) is shown to be derived by the release of a residual stress due to initial electrical biasing and the second (slower time constant) due to the redevelopment of residual stress during further domain wall motion. A modified domain reorientation model is given that accurately describes the domain volume fraction evolution during the reversal process.

  7. Critical energy barrier for capillary condensation in mesopores: Hysteresis and reversibility.

    PubMed

    Hiratsuka, Tatsumasa; Tanaka, Hideki; Miyahara, Minoru T

    2016-04-28

    Capillary condensation in the regime of developing hysteresis occurs at a vapor pressure, Pcond, that is less than that of the vapor-like spinodal. This is because the energy barrier for the vapor-liquid transition from a metastable state at Pcond becomes equal to the energy fluctuation of the system; however, a detailed mechanism of the spontaneous transition has not been acquired even through extensive experimental and simulation studies. We therefore construct accurate atomistic silica mesopore models for MCM-41 and perform molecular simulations (gauge cell Monte Carlo and grand canonical Monte Carlo) for argon adsorption on the models at subcritical temperatures. A careful comparison between the simulation and experiment reveals that the energy barrier for the capillary condensation has a critical dimensionless value, Wc (*) = 0.175, which corresponds to the thermal fluctuation of the system and depends neither on the mesopore size nor on the temperature. We show that the critical energy barrier Wc (*) controls the capillary condensation pressure Pcond and also determines a boundary between the reversible condensation/evaporation regime and the developing hysteresis regime.

  8. Critical energy barrier for capillary condensation in mesopores: Hysteresis and reversibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiratsuka, Tatsumasa; Tanaka, Hideki; Miyahara, Minoru T.

    2016-04-01

    Capillary condensation in the regime of developing hysteresis occurs at a vapor pressure, Pcond, that is less than that of the vapor-like spinodal. This is because the energy barrier for the vapor-liquid transition from a metastable state at Pcond becomes equal to the energy fluctuation of the system; however, a detailed mechanism of the spontaneous transition has not been acquired even through extensive experimental and simulation studies. We therefore construct accurate atomistic silica mesopore models for MCM-41 and perform molecular simulations (gauge cell Monte Carlo and grand canonical Monte Carlo) for argon adsorption on the models at subcritical temperatures. A careful comparison between the simulation and experiment reveals that the energy barrier for the capillary condensation has a critical dimensionless value, Wc* = 0.175, which corresponds to the thermal fluctuation of the system and depends neither on the mesopore size nor on the temperature. We show that the critical energy barrier Wc* controls the capillary condensation pressure Pcond and also determines a boundary between the reversible condensation/evaporation regime and the developing hysteresis regime.

  9. Short-term reversibility of ultrastructural changes in pulmonary capillaries caused by stress failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, A. R.; Fu, Z.; Tsukimoto, K.; Prediletto, R.; Mathieu-Costello, O.; West, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    We previously showed that when the pulmonary capillaries in anesthetized rabbits are exposed to a transmural pressure (Ptm) of approximately 40 mmHg, stress failure of the walls occurs with disruption of the capillary endothelium, alveolar epithelium, or sometimes all layers. The present study was designed to determine whether some of the ultrastructural changes are rapidly reversible when the capillary pressure is reduced. To test this, the Ptm was raised to 52.5 cmH2O for 1 min of blood perfusion and then reduced to 12.5 cmH2O for 3 min of saline-dextran perfusion, followed by intravascular fixation at the same pressure. In another group of animals, the pressure was elevated for 1 min of blood and 3 min of saline-dextran before being reduced. The results were compared with previous studies in which the capillary pressures were maintained elevated at 52.5 cmH2O during the entire procedure. Control studies were also done at sustained low pressures. The results showed that the number of endothelial and epithelial breaks per millimeter and the total fraction area of the breaks were reduced when the pressure was lowered. For example, the number of endothelial breaks per millimeter decreased from 7.1 +/- 2.1 to 2.4 +/- 0.7, and the number of epithelial breaks per millimeter fell from 11.4 +/- 3.7 to 3.4 +/- 0.7. There was evidence that the breaks that closed were those that were initially small and were associated with an intact basement membrane. The results suggest that cells can move along their underlying matrix by rapid disengagement and reattachment of cell adhesion molecules, causing breaks to open or close within minutes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  10. Factors regulating capillary remodeling in a reversible model of inflammatory corneal angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mukwaya, Anthony; Peebo, Beatrice; Xeroudaki, Maria; Ali, Zaheer; Lennikov, Anton; Jensen, Lasse; Lagali, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Newly formed microcapillary networks arising in adult organisms by angiogenic and inflammatory stimuli contribute to pathologies such as corneal and retinal blindness, tumor growth, and metastasis. Therapeutic inhibition of pathologic angiogenesis has focused on targeting the VEGF pathway, while comparatively little attention has been given to remodeling of the new microcapillaries into a stabilized, functional, and persistent vascular network. Here, we used a novel reversible model of inflammatory angiogenesis in the rat cornea to investigate endogenous factors rapidly invoked to remodel, normalize and regress microcapillaries as part of the natural response to regain corneal avascularity. Rapid reversal of an inflammatory angiogenic stimulus suppressed granulocytic activity, enhanced recruitment of remodelling macrophages, induced capillary intussusception, and enriched pathways and processes involving immune cells, chemokines, morphogenesis, axonal guidance, and cell motility, adhesion, and cytoskeletal functions. Whole transcriptome gene expression analysis revealed suppression of numerous inflammatory and angiogenic factors and enhancement of endogenous inhibitors. Many of the identified genes function independently of VEGF and represent potentially new targets for molecular control of the critical process of microvascular remodeling and regression in the cornea. PMID:27561355

  11. Factors regulating capillary remodeling in a reversible model of inflammatory corneal angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mukwaya, Anthony; Peebo, Beatrice; Xeroudaki, Maria; Ali, Zaheer; Lennikov, Anton; Jensen, Lasse; Lagali, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Newly formed microcapillary networks arising in adult organisms by angiogenic and inflammatory stimuli contribute to pathologies such as corneal and retinal blindness, tumor growth, and metastasis. Therapeutic inhibition of pathologic angiogenesis has focused on targeting the VEGF pathway, while comparatively little attention has been given to remodeling of the new microcapillaries into a stabilized, functional, and persistent vascular network. Here, we used a novel reversible model of inflammatory angiogenesis in the rat cornea to investigate endogenous factors rapidly invoked to remodel, normalize and regress microcapillaries as part of the natural response to regain corneal avascularity. Rapid reversal of an inflammatory angiogenic stimulus suppressed granulocytic activity, enhanced recruitment of remodelling macrophages, induced capillary intussusception, and enriched pathways and processes involving immune cells, chemokines, morphogenesis, axonal guidance, and cell motility, adhesion, and cytoskeletal functions. Whole transcriptome gene expression analysis revealed suppression of numerous inflammatory and angiogenic factors and enhancement of endogenous inhibitors. Many of the identified genes function independently of VEGF and represent potentially new targets for molecular control of the critical process of microvascular remodeling and regression in the cornea. PMID:27561355

  12. Neutral, Charged and Stratified Polar Monoliths for Hydrophilic Interaction Capillary Electrochromatography

    PubMed Central

    Gunasena, Dilani N.; El Rassi, Ziad

    2013-01-01

    Novel polar monoliths were introduced for hydrophilic interaction capillary electrochromatography (HI-CEC). In one case, a neutral polar monolith resulted from the in situ polymerization of glyceryl methacrylate (GMM) and pentaerythritol triacrylate (PETA) in a ternary porogenic solvent. GMM and PETA possess hydroxyl functional groups, which impart the monolith with hydrophilic interaction sites. This monolith is designated as hydroxy monolith. Although the hydroxy monolith is neutral and void of fixed charges on the surface, a relatively strong cathodal EOF was observed due to the electric double layer formed by the adsorption of ions from the mobile phase, producing a bulk mobile phase flow. The second monolith is charged and referred to as AP-monolith that possesses amine/amide functionalities on its surface, and was prepared by the in situ polymerization of N-(3-aminopropyl) methacrylamide hydrochloride (NAPM) and ethylene dimethacrylate (EDMA) in the presence of cyclohexanol, dodecanol and methanol as porogens. Over the pH range studied a strong anodal EOF was observed. The AP-monolith was further exploited in HI-CEC by modifying its surface with neutral mono- and oligosaccharides to produce a series of the so called sugar modified AP-monoliths (SMAP-monolith), which are considered as stratified hydrophilic monoliths possessing a sub-layer of polar amine/amide groups and a top layer of sugar (a polyhydroxy top layer).The SMAP-monoliths can be viewed as a blend of both the hydroxy monolith and the AP-monolith. The polarity of the various monoliths seems to follow the order: hydroxy monolith < AP-monolith < SMAP-monolith. The novel monoliths were characterized over a wide range of elution conditions with a variety of polar solutes including phenols, substituted phenols, nucleic acid bases, nucleosides and nucleotides PMID:23972465

  13. Apical-basal membrane polarity of membrane phosphatases in isolated capillary endothelium: alteration in ultrastructural localisation under culture conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, R L; Sandra, A

    1993-01-01

    Capillaries from freshly isolated rat epididymal fat were subjected to protocols that allowed ultrastructural localisation of alkaline phosphatase and 5'-nucleotidase. Alkaline phosphatase was almost entirely restricted to the capillary luminal membrane and vesicles associated with this membrane. 5'-nucleotidase was localised on the basal or abluminal membrane and associated vesicles. Arterioles and occasional venules were also present in the cell isolates, and arteriole localisation of 5'-nucleotidase was identical to that in capillaries. In venules, 5'-nucleotidase often failed to exhibit a polarised distribution and was present on both membrane domains. In confluent cultured endothelial cells, 5'-nucleotidase was not expressed in a predominantly polarised arrangement. Alkaline phosphatase was found on apical surfaces and regions of lateral cell contact. The results of these studies show that capillary endothelial cells exhibit enzyme polarity of their surface membranes which is subject to change on introduction of the cells to tissue culture. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8226289

  14. Midlatitude cooling caused by geomagnetic field minimum during polarity reversal.

    PubMed

    Kitaba, Ikuko; Hyodo, Masayuki; Katoh, Shigehiro; Dettman, David L; Sato, Hiroshi

    2013-01-22

    The climatic effects of cloud formation induced by galactic cosmic rays (CRs) has recently become a topic of much discussion. The CR-cloud connection suggests that variations in geomagnetic field intensity could change climate through modulation of CR flux. This hypothesis, however, is not well-tested using robust geological evidence. Here we present paleoclimate and paleoenvironment records of five interglacial periods that include two geomagnetic polarity reversals. Marine oxygen isotope stages 19 and 31 contain both anomalous cooling intervals during the sea-level highstands and the Matuyama-Brunhes and Lower Jaramillo reversals, respectively. This contrasts strongly with the typical interglacial climate that has the temperature maximum at the sea-level peak. The cooling occurred when the field intensity dropped to <40% of its present value, for which we estimate >40% increase in CR flux. The climate warmed rapidly when field intensity recovered. We suggest that geomagnetic field intensity can influence global climate through the modulation of CR flux. PMID:23297205

  15. Midlatitude cooling caused by geomagnetic field minimum during polarity reversal

    PubMed Central

    Kitaba, Ikuko; Hyodo, Masayuki; Katoh, Shigehiro; Dettman, David L.; Sato, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    The climatic effects of cloud formation induced by galactic cosmic rays (CRs) has recently become a topic of much discussion. The CR–cloud connection suggests that variations in geomagnetic field intensity could change climate through modulation of CR flux. This hypothesis, however, is not well-tested using robust geological evidence. Here we present paleoclimate and paleoenvironment records of five interglacial periods that include two geomagnetic polarity reversals. Marine oxygen isotope stages 19 and 31 contain both anomalous cooling intervals during the sea-level highstands and the Matuyama–Brunhes and Lower Jaramillo reversals, respectively. This contrasts strongly with the typical interglacial climate that has the temperature maximum at the sea-level peak. The cooling occurred when the field intensity dropped to <40% of its present value, for which we estimate >40% increase in CR flux. The climate warmed rapidly when field intensity recovered. We suggest that geomagnetic field intensity can influence global climate through the modulation of CR flux. PMID:23297205

  16. Polar organic phase liquid chromatography with packed capillary columns using a vancomycin chiral stationary phase

    PubMed

    Svensson; Donnecke; Karlsson; Karlsson; Vessman

    2000-08-01

    Vancomycin immobilized on silica served as the chiral stationary phase (CSP) in this investigation with polar organic solvents as the mobile phase in liquid chromatography (LC). It was shown that trace amounts of water were beneficial for improving peak shape and efficiency. To regulate the retention and selectivity an acid and/or base were added to the mobile phase where an excess of acid was shown to be preferential for enantioseparation. An unusual increase in selectivity with increasing temperature was shown for the acidic drug, thalidomide. Additionally, nonlinear van't Hoff plots were obtained for metoprolol enantiomers that showed increased retention with increasing temperature. Metoprolol also showed unusual behavior in the polar organic phase when water was added to resemble reversed-phase chromatography, with minimum retention observed at high water or high methanol concentrations. In both instances a high degree of electrostatic interaction between metoprolol and vancomycin was concluded. Metoprolol and ten of its analogs were examined on this CSP to evaluate the enantiorecognition process. A comparison in enantioselectivity for a number of acidic and basic drugs using this CSP was also carried out using the polar organic phase, reversed phase, and normal phase LC which were all compared to the results obtained in supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC). Polar organic phase LC offered a better separation of basic molecules while reversed phase LC was preferred for the resolution of acids. SFC showed the broadest enantioselectivity overall and normal phase LC indicated similar properties, as expected, to SFC but with lower column efficiency. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:10897097

  17. Polarity reversals and tilt of the Earth's magnetic dipole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolginov, A. Z.

    1993-01-01

    There is evidence that the terrestrial magnetic field is connected with the Earth's mantle: (1) there are magnetic anomalies that do not take part in the westward drift of the main field, but are fixed with respect to the mantle; (2) the geomagnetic pole position flips in a particular way by preferred meridional paths during a reversal; and (3) magnetic polarity reversals are correlated with the activations of geological processes. These facts may be explained if we take into account that a significant horizontal temperature gradient can exist in the top levels of the liquid core because of the different thermoconductivity of the different areas of the core-mantle boundary. These temperature inhomogeneities can penetrate the core because fluxes along the core boundary (the thermal wind) can be strongly suppressed by a small redistribution of the chemical composition in the top of the core. The nonparallel gradients of the temperature, density, and composition on the top of the core create a curled electric field that produces a current and a magnetic field. This seed-field can be amplified by motions in the core. The resulting field does not forget the seed-field distribution and in this way the field on the Earth surface (that can be created only in regions with high conductivity, i.e. in the core) is connected with the core-mantle boundary. Contrary to the usual approach to the dynamo problem, we will take into account that the seed field of thermoelectric origin is acting not only at some initial moment of time but permanently.

  18. Electrochemical transformation of trichloroethylene in aqueous solution by electrode polarity reversal

    PubMed Central

    Rajic, Ljiljana; Fallahpour, Noushin; Yuan, Songhu; Alshawabkeh, Akram N.

    2014-01-01

    Electrode polarity reversal is evaluated for electrochemical transformation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in aqueous solution using flow-through reactors with mixed metal oxide electrodes and Pd catalyst. The study tests the hypothesis that optimizing electrode polarity reversal will generate H2O2 in Pd presence in the system. The effect of polarity reversal frequency, duration of the polarity reversal intervals, current intensity and TCE concentration on TCE removal rate and removal mechanism were evaluated. TCE removal efficiencies under 6 cycles h−1 were similar in the presence of Pd catalyst (50.3%) and without Pd catalyst (49.8%), indicating that Pd has limited impact on TCE degradation under these conditions. The overall removal efficacies after 60 min treatment under polarity reversal frequencies of 6, 10, 15, 30 and 90 cycles h−1 were 50.3%, 56.3%, 69.3%, 34.7% and 23.4%, respectively. Increasing the frequency of polarity reversal increases TCE removal as long as sufficient charge is produced during each cycle for the reaction at the electrode. Electrode polarity reversal shifts oxidation/reduction and reduction/oxidation sequences in the system. The optimized polarity reversal frequency (15 cycles h−1 at 60 mA) enables two reaction zones formation where reduction/oxidation occurs at each electrode surface. PMID:25282093

  19. Electrochemical transformation of trichloroethylene in aqueous solution by electrode polarity reversal.

    PubMed

    Rajic, Ljiljana; Fallahpour, Noushin; Yuan, Songhu; Alshawabkeh, Akram N

    2014-12-15

    Electrode polarity reversal is evaluated for electrochemical transformation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in aqueous solution using flow-through reactors with mixed metal oxide electrodes and Pd catalyst. The study tests the hypothesis that optimizing electrode polarity reversal will generate H2O2 in Pd presence in the system. The effect of polarity reversal frequency, duration of the polarity reversal intervals, current intensity and TCE concentration on TCE removal rate and removal mechanism were evaluated. TCE removal efficiencies under 6 cycles h(-1) were similar in the presence of Pd catalyst (50.3%) and without Pd catalyst (49.8%), indicating that Pd has limited impact on TCE degradation under these conditions. The overall removal efficacies after 60 min treatment under polarity reversal frequencies of 6, 10, 15, 30 and 90 cycles h(-1) were 50.3%, 56.3%, 69.3%, 34.7% and 23.4%, respectively. Increasing the frequency of polarity reversal increases TCE removal as long as sufficient charge is produced during each cycle for the reaction at the electrode. Electrode polarity reversal shifts oxidation/reduction and reduction/oxidation sequences in the system. The optimized polarity reversal frequency (15 cycles h(-1) at 60 mA) enables two reaction zones formation where reduction/oxidation occurs at each electrode surface.

  20. 3D Wilson cycle: structural inheritance and subduction polarity reversals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaussier, Stephane; Gerya, Taras; Burg, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Many orogenies display along-strike variations in their orogenic wedge geometry. For instance, the Alps is an example of lateral changes in the subducting lithosphere polarity. High resolution tomography has shown that the southeast dipping European lithosphere is separated from the northeast dipping Adriatic lithosphere by a narrow transition zone at about the "Judicarian" line (Kissling et al. 2006). The formation of such 3D variations remains conjectural. We investigate the conditions that can spontaneously induce such lithospheric structures, and intend to identify the main parameters controlling their formation and geometry. Using the 3D thermo-mechanical code, I3ELVIS (Gerya and Yuen 2007) we modelled a Wilson cycle starting from a continental lithosphere in an extensional setting resulting in continental breakup and oceanic spreading. At a later stage, divergence is gradually reversed to convergence, which induce subduction of the oceanic lithosphere formed during oceanic spreading. In this model, all lateral and longitudinal structures of the lithospheres are generated self-consistently, and are consequences of the initial continental structure, tectono-magmatic inheritance, and material rheology. Our numerical simulations point out the control of rheological parameters defining the brittle/plastic yielding conditions for the lithosphere. Formation of several opposing domains of opposing subduction polarity is facilitated by wide and weak oceanic lithospheres. Furthermore, contrasts of strength between the continental and oceanic lithosphere, as well as the angle between the plate suture and the shortening direction have a second order effect on the lateral geometry of the subduction zone. In our numerical experiments systematic lateral changes in the subduction lithosphere polarity during subduction initiation form spontaneously suggesting intrinsic physical origin of this phenomenon. Further studies are necessary to understand why this feature, observed

  1. Polarization reversal in the tail of Comet Ikeya-Seki /1965 VIII/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, J. L.; Beeson, D. E.

    1976-01-01

    Multicolor observations of brightness and polarization in the continuum throughout the tail of Comet 1965 VIII reveal the presence of positive and negative polarization (polarization reversal) characteristic of slightly absorbing particles. The phase angle of the neutral point is found to vary with color and with time, the latter indicating short-term changes in the properties of the particles after perihelion.

  2. Monolithic metal-organic framework MIL-53(Al)-polymethacrylate composite column for the reversed-phase capillary liquid chromatography separation of small aromatics.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Kareem; Badjah-Hadj-Ahmed, Ahmed Yacine; Aqel, Ahmad; ALOthman, Zeid Abdullah

    2016-03-01

    A monolithic capillary column containing a composite of metal-organic framework MIL-53(Al) incorporated into hexyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate was prepared to enhance the separation of mixtures of small aromatic compounds by using capillary liquid chromatography. The addition of 10 mg/mL MIL-53(Al) microparticles increased the micropore content in the monolithic matrix and increased the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area from 26.92 to 85.12 m(2) /g. The presence of 1,4-benzenedicarboxylate moieties within the structure of MIL-53(Al) as an organic linker greatly influenced the separation of aromatic mixtures through π-π interactions. High-resolution separation was obtained for a series of alkylbenzenes (with resolution factors in the range 0.96-1.75) in less than 8 min, with 14 710 plates/m efficiency for propylbenzene, using a binary polar mobile phase of water/acetonitrile in isocratic mode. A reversed-phase separation mechanism was indicated by the increased retention factor and resolution as the water percentage in the mobile phase increased. A stability study on the composite column showed excellent mechanical stability under various conditions. The higher resolution and faster separation observed at increased temperature indicated an exothermic separation, whereas the negative values for the free energy change of transfer indicated a spontaneous process.

  3. Evidence for a new geomagnetic reversal from lava flows in Idaho: discussion of short polarity reversals in the Brunhes and late Matuyama Polarity Chrons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Champion, D.E.; Lanphere, M.A.; Kuntz, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    K-Ar ages and paleomagnetic data for basalt samples from a new core hole (site E) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) indicate that the age of the reversed polarity event recorded in Snake River Plain lavas is older than 465 ?? 50 ka (1000 years before present) reported previously by Champion et al. (1981). A review of data documenting short reversal records from volcanic and sedimentary rocks shows that there is evidence for eight polarity subchrons in the Brunhes and two besides the Jaramillo in the late Matuyama. These 10 short subchrons begin to indicate the many short events that Cox (1968) hypothesized must exist if polarity interval lengths have a Poisson distribution. The mean sustained polarity interval length since late Matuyama Chron time is 90 000 years. The similarity of this number with the 105-year period of the Earth's orbital eccentricity suggests anew that linkage between geomagnetic, paleoclimatic, and possible underlying Earth orbital parameters should be evaluated. -from Authors

  4. Using Polar Coronal Hole Area Measurements to Determine the Solar Polar Magnetic Field Reversal in Solar Cycle 24

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karna, N.; Webber, S.A. Hess; Pesnell, W.D.

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of solar polar coronal hole (PCH) areas since the launch of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) shows how the polar regions have evolved during Solar Cycle 24. We present PCH areas from mid-2010 through 2013 using data from the Atmospheric Imager Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instruments onboard SDO. Our analysis shows that both the northern and southern PCH areas have decreased significantly in size since 2010. Linear fits to the areas derived from the magnetic-field properties indicate that, although the northern hemisphere went through polar-field reversal and reached solar-maximum conditions in mid-2012, the southern hemisphere had not reached solar-maximum conditions in the polar regions by the end of 2013. Our results show that solar-maximum conditions in each hemisphere, as measured by the area of the polar coronal holes and polar magnetic field, will be offset in time.

  5. Reversible modulation of orbital occupations via an interface-induced polar state in metallic manganites.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hanghui; Qiao, Qiao; Marshall, Matthew S J; Georgescu, Alexandru B; Gulec, Ahmet; Phillips, Patrick J; Klie, Robert F; Walker, Frederick J; Ahn, Charles H; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    2014-09-10

    The breaking of orbital degeneracy on a transition metal cation and the resulting unequal electronic occupations of these orbitals provide a powerful lever over electron density and spin ordering in metal oxides. Here, we use ab initio calculations to show that reversibly modulating the orbital populations on Mn atoms can be achieved at ferroelectric/manganite interfaces by the presence of ferroelectric polarization on the nanoscale. The change in orbital occupation can be as large as 10%, greatly exceeding that of bulk manganites. This reversible orbital splitting is in large part controlled by the propagation of ferroelectric polar displacements into the interfacial region, a structural motif absent in the bulk and unique to the interface. We use epitaxial thin film growth and scanning transmission electron microscopy to verify this key interfacial polar distortion and discuss the potential of reversible control of orbital polarization via nanoscale ferroelectrics.

  6. Newborn Coronal Holes Associated with the Disappearance of Polarity Reversal Boundaries (P46)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelke, R.

    2006-11-01

    rajendra_shelke@yahoo.co.in Coronal holes play an important role in the occurrence of various kinds of solar events. The geomagnetic activity, coronal transients, type II radio bursts, and soft X ray blowouts have shown their strong association with coronal holes (Webb et al., 1978; Shelke and Pande, 1985; Bhatnagar, 1996; Hewish and Bravo, 1986). Recently, Shelke (2006) has linked the onset of interplanetary erupting stream disturbances with the evolutionary changes in the coronal holes. The present study reveals that there exists some physical relationship between the formation of new coronal holes and the disappearance of polarity reversal boundaries with or without the overlying prominences. About 124 new coronal holes are found to emerge at the locations where polarity reversal boundaries existed prior to their disappearance. Among them, nearly 66% and 18% newborn coronal holes have been associated with disappearing prominences and disappearing small unipolar magnetic regions (UMRs) with encircled polarity reversal boundaries respectively. Coronal holes and quiescent prominences are stable solar features that last for many solar rotations. A coronal hole is indicative of a radial magnetic field of a predominant magnetic polarity at the photosphere, whereas solar prominence overlying the polarity reversal boundary straddles both the polarities of a bipolar magnetic region. The new coronal hole emerges on the Sun, owing to the changes in magnetic field configuration leading to the opening of closed magnetic structure into the corona. The mechanism that leads to the eruption of polarity reversal boundaries with or without prominences seems to be interlinked with the mechanism that converts bipolar magnetic regions into unipolar magnetic regions characterizing coronal holes. The fundamental activity for the onset of erupting polarity reversal boundary seems to be the opening of preexisting closed magnetic structures into a new coronal hole, which can support mass

  7. Modeling of concentration polarization in a reverse osmosis channel with parabolic crossflow.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cui; Morse, Audra; Rainwater, Ken; Song, Lianfa

    2014-01-01

    Concentration polarization in narrow reverse osmosis channels with parabolic crossflow was numerically simulated with finite different equations related to permeate velocity, crossflow velocity, average salt concentration, and wall salt concentration. A significant new theoretical development was the determination of two correction functions, F2 and F3, in the governing equation for average salt concentration. Simulations of concentration polarization under various conditions were then presented to describe the features of the new model as well as discussions about the differences of concentration polarizations of the more realistic parabolic flow with those when plug flow or shear flow was assumed. The situations in which the simpler models based on shear or plug flow can be used were indicated. Concentration polarization was also simulated for various conditions to show the applicability of the model and general features of concentration polarization in a narrow, long reverse osmosis channel.

  8. Field-amplified sample stacking and nonaqueous capillary electrophoresis determination of complex mixtures of polar aromatic sulfonates.

    PubMed

    Morales, Sergio; Cela, Rafael

    2002-02-01

    Nonaqueous CE and field-amplified sample stacking have been used in the determination of complex mixtures of polar aromatic sulfonates (AS; mainly benzene- and naphthalenesulfonates) of environmental concern. The analytical procedure consists of an on-column aqueous sample enrichment, followed by the nonaqueous electrophoretic determination of stacked aromatic sulfonates. Various organic solvents were used as separation medium, acetonitrile and N-methylformamide gave the best results. Optimum capillary electrophoresis separation is obtained with ammonium acetate (25 mM) dissolved in N-methylformamide-methanol (90:10) as background electrolyte. This combined method was applied to the analysis of surface water samples spiked with selected aromatic sulfonates derivatives.

  9. Capillary electrochromatography with polyacrylamide monolithic stationary phases having bonded dodecyl ligands and sulfonic acid groups: evaluation of column performance with alkyl phenyl ketones and neutral moderately polar pesticides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, M; El Rassi, Z

    2001-08-01

    In this report, we describe the preparation of porous polyacrylamide-based monolithic columns via vinyl polymerization. These monoliths possess in their structures bonded dodecyl ligands and sulfonic acid groups. While the sulfonic acid groups are meant to support the electroosmotic flow (EOF) necessary for moving the mobile phase through the monolithic capillary, the dodecyl ligands are introduced to provide the nonpolar sites for chromatographic retention. However, incorporating the sulfonic acid groups in the monoliths does not only support the EOF but also exhibit hydrophilic interaction with moderately polar compounds such as urea herbicides and carbamates insecticides. Consequently, mixed-mode (reversed-phase/normal phase) retention behavior is observed with neutral and moderately polar pesticides. The amount of sulfonic acid group in the monolith can be conveniently adjusted by changing the amount of vinylsulfonic acid added to the polymerization reaction. Optimum EOF velocity and adequate chromatographic retention are obtained when 15% vinylsulfonic acid is added to the reaction mixture. Under these conditions, rapid separation and high plate counts reaching greater than 400000 plates/m are readily obtained.

  10. ON POLAR MAGNETIC FIELD REVERSAL AND SURFACE FLUX TRANSPORT DURING SOLAR CYCLE 24

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xudong; Todd Hoeksema, J.; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Junwei

    2015-01-10

    As each solar cycle progresses, remnant magnetic flux from active regions (ARs) migrates poleward to cancel the old-cycle polar field. We describe this polarity reversal process during Cycle 24 using four years (2010.33-2014.33) of line-of-sight magnetic field measurements from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. The total flux associated with ARs reached maximum in the north in 2011, more than two years earlier than the south; the maximum is significantly weaker than Cycle 23. The process of polar field reversal is relatively slow, north-south asymmetric, and episodic. We estimate that the global axial dipole changed sign in 2013 October; the northern and southern polar fields (mean above 60° latitude) reversed in 2012 November and 2014 March, respectively, about 16 months apart. Notably, the poleward surges of flux in each hemisphere alternated in polarity, giving rise to multiple reversals in the north. We show that the surges of the trailing sunspot polarity tend to correspond to normal mean AR tilt, higher total AR flux, or slower mid-latitude near-surface meridional flow, while exceptions occur during low magnetic activity. In particular, the AR flux and the mid-latitude poleward flow speed exhibit a clear anti-correlation. We discuss how these features can be explained in a surface flux transport process that includes a field-dependent converging flow toward the ARs, a characteristic that may contribute to solar cycle variability.

  11. Reverse polarity shoulder replacement: Current concepts and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ling Hong; Desai, Aravind

    2014-01-01

    Shoulder replacement in cuff tear arthropathy (CTA) is an unsolved challenge. CTA poses a soft tissue deficiency in an arthritic glenohumeral joint which the anatomical total shoulder replacement and hemiarthroplasty cannot reliably provide stability, range of movement, function or satisfactory long term outcome. In the past two decades since the introduction of the reverse shoulder replacement, the prosthesis has evolved and has shown promising results. It is a partially constraint joint by virtue of its design features. The reversal of the concavity and convexity of the joint to the proximal humerus and the glenoid, respectively, also shifts and improves its center of rotation onto the osseous surface of the glenoid with less exposure to shear stress. It is a successful pain relieving procedure, offering good outcome in patients with irreparable massive rotator cuff tear with or without osteoarthritis. Consequently, this has led to wider use and expansion of its indication to include more complex elective and trauma cases. Whereas originally used in the more elderly patients, there is increasingly more demand in the younger patients. It is important to have good quality long term data to support these increasing indications. Therefore, we review the literature on the concepts of reverse shoulder replacement and the contemporary evidence. PMID:25035828

  12. Anisotropy as cause for polarity reversals of D" reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Christine; Wookey, James

    2013-04-01

    Seismic reflections from structures in the D" region - the lowest 200-400 km of the Earth's mantle - can provide information on the velocity contrast of this region. Using the waveforms and polarities of the D" reflections in P and S-waves we can distinguish between different possibilities that may cause the observed structures, such as phase transitions, aligned material or thermal anomalies. Here we use recordings of seismic events that reflect beneath the Caribbean and Eurasia. Both P and S reflected waves are used where possible. The source-receiver combinations provide reflections off D" in two fast velocity regions. Under Eurasia three crossing paths are used. The polarities of reflections in both regions differ and can therefore help to further discriminate the cause for the observed reflections. In one region, we find apparent positive S-velocity contrasts but negative P-wave velocity contrasts for the D" reflector. In the second fast velocity region we detect positive P- and S-wave velocity contrasts in two orthogonal paths crossing in the lowermost mantle indicating a different scenario for the structures in D". A third intersecting path shows negative polarities of the reflected P wave. One possible explanation to reconcile observations in both regions is a phase transition from perovskite to post-perovskite with 12 percent of alignment in the post-perovskite phase. Depending on the travel direction of the waves with respect to the flow direction in the lower mantle, apparent positive or negative velocity jumps (reflectivity) can be expected. Other isotropic and anisotropic models are tested but cannot fully explain the range of observations we find in the data.

  13. Probing Yeast Polarity with Acute, Reversible, Optogenetic Inhibition of Protein Function.

    PubMed

    Jost, Anna Payne-Tobin; Weiner, Orion D

    2015-10-16

    We recently developed a technique for rapidly and reversibly inhibiting protein function through light-inducible sequestration of proteins away from their normal sites of action. Here, we adapt this method for inducible inactivation of Bem1, a scaffold protein involved in budding yeast polarity. We find that acute inhibition of Bem1 produces profound defects in cell polarization and cell viability that are not observed in bem1Δ. By disrupting Bem1 activity at specific points in the cell cycle, we demonstrate that Bem1 is essential for the establishment of polarity and bud emergence but is dispensable for the growth of an emerged bud. By taking advantage of the reversibility of Bem1 inactivation, we show that pole size scales with cell size, and that this scaling is dependent on the actin cytoskeleton. Our experiments reveal how rapid reversible inactivation of protein function complements traditional genetic approaches. This strategy should be widely applicable to other biological contexts.

  14. Preparation and evaluation of o-phenanthroline immobilized on a hybrid silica monolith modified with ionic liquids for reversed-phase pressurized capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wenfei; Lü, Haixia; Xie, Zenghong

    2014-12-01

    A novel o-phenanthroline-immobilized ionic-liquid-modified hybrid monolith for capillary electrochromatography was synthesized based on chloropropyl-silica, which was prepared by the in situ polymerization of tetramethoxysilane and 3-chloropropyltrimethoxysilane via a sol-gel process. The morphology of the hybrid monolith was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, and relatively stable anodic electroosmotic flow was observed under a broad pH ranged from pH 3.0 to 9.0. The separation mechanism was investigated by separating four neutral molecules (toluene, dimethylformamide, formamide, and thiourea). The obtained hybrid monolith possessed an obviously reversed-phase retention mechanism, but when the acetonitrile content in the mobile phase was >90% v/v, a weak hydrophilic mechanism was observed on the resultant o-phenanthroline-modified chloropropyl-silica hybrid monolith. The reproducibility of the column was also investigated by measuring relative standard deviations of the migration time for four neutral molecules. Relative standard deviations of run to run (n = 3), day to day (n = 3), and column to column (n = 3) were in the range of 0.4-0.7, 0.9-2.1, and 1.4-3.3%, respectively. Basic separations of various polar analytes including phenols and aromatic amines were successfully achieved.

  15. Green chemistry: reversible nonpolar-to-polar solvent.

    PubMed

    Jessop, Philip G; Heldebrant, David J; Li, Xiaowang; Eckert, Charles A; Liotta, Charles L

    2005-08-25

    Imagine a smart solvent that can be switched reversibly from a liquid with one set of properties to another that has very different properties, upon command. Here we create such a system, in which a non-ionic liquid (an alcohol and an amine base) converts to an ionic liquid (a salt in liquid form) upon exposure to an atmosphere of carbon dioxide, and then reverts back to its non-ionic form when exposed to nitrogen or argon gas. Such switchable solvents should facilitate organic syntheses and separations by eliminating the need to remove and replace solvents after each reaction step. PMID:16121169

  16. Green chemistry: Reversible nonpolar-to-polar solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessop, Philip G.; Heldebrant, David J.; Li, Xiaowang; Eckert, Charles A.; Liotta, Charles L.

    2005-08-01

    Imagine a smart solvent that can be switched reversibly from a liquid with one set of properties to another that has very different properties, upon command. Here we create such a system, in which a non-ionic liquid (an alcohol and an amine base) converts to an ionic liquid (a salt in liquid form) upon exposure to an atmosphere of carbon dioxide, and then reverts back to its non-ionic form when exposed to nitrogen or argon gas. Such switchable solvents should facilitate organic syntheses and separations by eliminating the need to remove and replace solvents after each reaction step.

  17. Magnetic-field-induced ferroelectric polarization reversal in magnetoelectric composites revealed by piezoresponse force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Hongchen; Zhou, Xilong; Dong, Shuxiang; Luo, Haosu; Li, Faxin

    2014-07-01

    Controlling electric polarization (or magnetization) in multiferroic materials with external magnetic fields (or electric fields) is very important for fundamental physics and spintronic devices. Although there has been some progress on magnetic-field-induced polarization reversal in single-phase multiferroics, such behavior has so far never been realized in composites. Here we show that it is possible to reverse ferroelectric polarization using magnetic fields in a bilayer Terfenol-D/PMN-33%PT composite. We realized this by ferroelectric domain imaging using piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) under applied magnetic field loading. The internal electric field caused by the magnetoelectric (ME) effect in the PMN-PT crystal is considered as the driving force for the 180° polarization switching, and its existence is verified by switching spectroscopy PFM testing under a series of external magnetic fields. A quantitative method is further suggested to estimate the local ME coefficient based on the switching spectroscopy PFM testing results.

  18. Magnetic-field-induced ferroelectric polarization reversal in magnetoelectric composites revealed by piezoresponse force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Miao, Hongchen; Zhou, Xilong; Dong, Shuxiang; Luo, Haosu; Li, Faxin

    2014-08-01

    Controlling electric polarization (or magnetization) in multiferroic materials with external magnetic fields (or electric fields) is very important for fundamental physics and spintronic devices. Although there has been some progress on magnetic-field-induced polarization reversal in single-phase multiferroics, such behavior has so far never been realized in composites. Here we show that it is possible to reverse ferroelectric polarization using magnetic fields in a bilayer Terfenol-D/PMN-33%PT composite. We realized this by ferroelectric domain imaging using piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) under applied magnetic field loading. The internal electric field caused by the magnetoelectric (ME) effect in the PMN-PT crystal is considered as the driving force for the 180° polarization switching, and its existence is verified by switching spectroscopy PFM testing under a series of external magnetic fields. A quantitative method is further suggested to estimate the local ME coefficient based on the switching spectroscopy PFM testing results. PMID:24953042

  19. All-optical magnetization reversal by circularly polarized laser pulses: Experiment and multiscale modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahaplar, K.; Kalashnikova, A. M.; Kimel, A. V.; Gerlach, S.; Hinzke, D.; Nowak, U.; Chantrell, R.; Tsukamoto, A.; Itoh, A.; Kirilyuk, A.; Rasing, Th.

    2012-03-01

    We present results of detailed experimental and theoretical studies of all-optical magnetization reversal by single circularly-polarized laser pulses in ferrimagnetic rare earth—transition metal (RE-TM) alloys GdxFe90-xCo10 (20%reversal process. This reversal does not involve precessional motion of magnetization but is governed by the longitudinal relaxation and thus has a linear character. We demonstrate that this all-optically driven linear reversal can be modeled as a result of a two-fold impact of the laser pulse on the medium. First, due to absorption of the light and ultrafast laser-induced heating, the medium is brought to a highly nonequilibrium state. Simultaneously, due to the ultrafast inverse Faraday effect the circularly polarized laser pulse acts as an effective magnetic field of the amplitude up to ˜20 T. We show that the polarization-dependent reversal triggered by the circularly polarized light is feasible only in a narrow range (below 10%) of laser fluences. The duration of the laser pulse required for the reversal can be varied from ˜40 fs up to at least ˜1700 fs. We also investigate experimentally the role of the ferrimagnetic properties of GdFeCo in the all-optical reversal. In particular, the optimal conditions for the all-optical reversal are achieved just below the ferrimagnetic compensation temperature, where the magnetic information can be all-optically written by a laser pulse of minimal fluence and read out within just 30 ps. We argue that this is the fastest write-read event demonstrated for magnetic recording so far.

  20. First-order reversal curve probing of spatially resolved polarization switching dynamics in ferroelectric nanocapacitors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yunseok; Kumar, Amit; Ovchinnikov, Oleg; Jesse, Stephen; Han, Hee; Pantel, Daniel; Vrejoiu, Ionela; Lee, Woo; Hesse, Dietrich; Alexe, Marin; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2012-01-24

    Spatially resolved polarization switching in ferroelectric nanocapacitors was studied on the sub-25 nm scale using the first-order reversal curve (FORC) method. The chosen capacitor geometry allows both high-veracity observation of the domain structure and mapping of polarization switching in a uniform field, synergistically combining microstructural observations and probing of uniform-field polarization responses as relevant to device operation. A classical Kolmogorov-Avrami-Ishibashi model has been adapted to the voltage domain, and the individual switching dynamics of the FORC response curves are well approximated by the adapted model. The comparison with microstructures suggests a strong spatial variability of the switching dynamics inside the nanocapacitors.

  1. Microtubule polarity and the direction of pigment transport reverse simultaneously in surgically severed melanophore arms.

    PubMed

    McNiven, M A; Wang, M; Porter, K R

    1984-07-01

    The transport of pigment through the long cytoplasmic extensions (arms) of teleost melanophores is a microtubule-dependent event. We have severed the arms from melanophores to test whether microtubules isolated from the centrosome maintain their original polarity and disposition. In addition, we have tested whether arms containing microtubules of mixed polarities alter the direction of pigment transport. We find that microtubules within severed arms eventually change their polarity and reorganize from the arm center as if to form a new minicell. Concomitant with this change is a reversal in the direction of pigment transport.

  2. An Introductory-Geology Exercise on the Polar-Reversal Time Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, James Herbert

    1986-01-01

    Presents a three-part exercise which provides undergraduates with opportunities to work with data related to the earth's magnetic field. Includes student materials for activities in determining the history of the earth's magnetic field, in finding the general pattern of declination, and for looking for a polar reversal history. (ML)

  3. Reverse micelles as a platform for dynamic nuclear polarization in solution NMR of proteins.

    PubMed

    Valentine, Kathleen G; Mathies, Guinevere; Bédard, Sabrina; Nucci, Nathaniel V; Dodevski, Igor; Stetz, Matthew A; Can, Thach V; Griffin, Robert G; Wand, A Joshua

    2014-02-19

    Despite tremendous advances in recent years, solution NMR remains fundamentally restricted due to its inherent insensitivity. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) potentially offers significant improvements in this respect. The basic DNP strategy is to irradiate the EPR transitions of a stable radical and transfer this nonequilibrium polarization to the hydrogen spins of water, which will in turn transfer polarization to the hydrogens of the macromolecule. Unfortunately, these EPR transitions lie in the microwave range of the electromagnetic spectrum where bulk water absorbs strongly, often resulting in catastrophic heating. Furthermore, the residence times of water on the surface of the protein in bulk solution are generally too short for efficient transfer of polarization. Here we take advantage of the properties of solutions of encapsulated proteins dissolved in low viscosity solvents to implement DNP in liquids. Such samples are largely transparent to the microwave frequencies required and thereby avoid significant heating. Nitroxide radicals are introduced into the reverse micelle system in three ways: attached to the protein, embedded in the reverse micelle shell, and free in the aqueous core. Significant enhancements of the water resonance ranging up to ∼-93 at 0.35 T were observed. We also find that the hydration properties of encapsulated proteins allow for efficient polarization transfer from water to the protein. These and other observations suggest that merging reverse micelle encapsulation technology with DNP offers a route to a significant increase in the sensitivity of solution NMR spectroscopy of proteins and other biomolecules.

  4. Reverse Micelles As a Platform for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization in Solution NMR of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Despite tremendous advances in recent years, solution NMR remains fundamentally restricted due to its inherent insensitivity. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) potentially offers significant improvements in this respect. The basic DNP strategy is to irradiate the EPR transitions of a stable radical and transfer this nonequilibrium polarization to the hydrogen spins of water, which will in turn transfer polarization to the hydrogens of the macromolecule. Unfortunately, these EPR transitions lie in the microwave range of the electromagnetic spectrum where bulk water absorbs strongly, often resulting in catastrophic heating. Furthermore, the residence times of water on the surface of the protein in bulk solution are generally too short for efficient transfer of polarization. Here we take advantage of the properties of solutions of encapsulated proteins dissolved in low viscosity solvents to implement DNP in liquids. Such samples are largely transparent to the microwave frequencies required and thereby avoid significant heating. Nitroxide radicals are introduced into the reverse micelle system in three ways: attached to the protein, embedded in the reverse micelle shell, and free in the aqueous core. Significant enhancements of the water resonance ranging up to ∼−93 at 0.35 T were observed. We also find that the hydration properties of encapsulated proteins allow for efficient polarization transfer from water to the protein. These and other observations suggest that merging reverse micelle encapsulation technology with DNP offers a route to a significant increase in the sensitivity of solution NMR spectroscopy of proteins and other biomolecules. PMID:24456213

  5. Dependence of the duration of geomagnetic polarity reversals on site latitude.

    PubMed

    Clement, Bradford M

    2004-04-01

    An important constraint on the processes governing the geodynamo--the flow in the outer core responsible for generating Earth's magnetic field--is the duration of geomagnetic polarity reversals; that is, how long it takes for Earth's magnetic field to reverse. It is generally accepted that Earth's magnetic field strength drops to low levels during polarity reversals, and the field direction progresses through a 180 degrees change while the field is weak. The time it takes for this process to happen, however, remains uncertain, with estimates ranging from a few thousand up to 28,000 years. Here I present an analysis of the available sediment records of the four most recent polarity reversals. These records yield an average estimate of about 7,000 years for the time it takes for the directional change to occur. The variation about this mean duration is not random, but instead varies with site latitude, with shorter durations observed at low-latitude sites, and longer durations observed at mid- to high-latitude sites. Such variation of duration with site latitude is predicted by simple geometrical reversal models, in which non-dipole fields are allowed to persist while the axial dipole decays through zero and then builds in the opposite direction, and provides a constraint on numerical dynamo models. PMID:15071591

  6. Quantification of Viscosity and Capillary Pressure Anomalies for Polar Liquids in 2D Hydrophilic Nano-Confinements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, S. A.; Torres-Verdin, C.; Balhoff, M.

    2014-12-01

    Interest in liquid and interfacial behavior within nano-confinements spans many disciplines. Geophysical interest originates from a desire to understand flow mechanisms through hydrocarbon-rich nano-porous shale media, especially communication between fractures and the adjacent nano-porous matrix (imbibition). This work investigates the extent of boundary layer nucleation during polar liquid flows in hydrophilic nano-confinements via discrepancies seen in viscosity and capillary pressure from their bulk values. We perform our experiments in two-dimensional nanochannels of varying size and as small as 30 nm x 60 nm in cross section and still obtain visual data with reflected differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. The simple geometry of the nanochannels enables the comparison against analytical transport solutions. By designing a nanochannel experiment that allows us to monitor the rate of fluid imbibition and volume loss of a trapped air pocket the liquid is imbibing into, we are able to decouple capillary pressure and viscosity from imbibition data, as well as gain information about gas partitioning at the meniscus interface. Our current experiments are performed with organic solvents within siliceous nanochannels and the results of the decoupling scheme indicate that for rectangular nanochannels with heights of 60 nm and varying widths, effective viscosity is consistently between 4-12 times higher than the bulk value and capillary pressure is around 50% less than the macroscopic Young-Laplace equation prediction. These results equate to the nucleation of wall boundary layers on the order of tens of molecular layers thick. Structured boundary layers have an inherently increased viscosity compared to the liquid bulk value, resulting in a significant reduction in imbibition efficacy. This presence of approximately 15 nm boundary layers in on the threshold of two different theories - thin bimolecular boundary layers and exclusion zones (thick boundary

  7. Non-particulate (continuous bed or monolithic) restricted-access reversed-phase media for sample clean-up and separation by capillary-format liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Jarmalaviciene, Reda; Kornysova, Olga; Westerlund, Douglas; Maruska, Audrius

    2003-11-01

    Restricted-access reversed-phase non-particulate (continuous bed or monolithic) stationary phases of different hydrophobicity synthesized in 100 microm i.d. fused silica capillaries have been evaluated. A specific property of restricted-access media (RAM) is that they interact with small analytes and exclude big molecules, e.g. proteins, from access to the active sites and adsorption on the surface. This dual property facilitates direct injection of biological fluids for drug or drug-metabolite analysis. Different RAM and RAM-precursor capillary columns were tested to assess the influence of chromatographic bed morphology on loadability. Inverse size-exclusion chromatography was used for investigation of pore structural properties of the capillary-format continuous beds. The data obtained were used to discuss the mechanism of separation of the biological samples using capillary columns and to propose a model for the topochemical architecture of the RAM investigated. Different morphology of the non-particulate reversed-phase precursors resulted in two types of RAM material shielded with hydrophilic polymer, classified as homogeneous or heterogeneous topochemistry stationary phases. Capillary columns were applied for chromatography of biological fluids. High resolution was obtained, without the need for column switching, when capillary columns operated in gradient conditions. Extensive evaluation of the chromatographic properties (hydrophobicity, efficiency, separation impedance, and loadability) of the non-particulate reversed-phase materials was performed before and after shielding with hydrophilic polymer to generate restricted-access properties. Minor changes of hydrophobicity, efficiency, or separation impedance were observed after the shielding. PMID:14513200

  8. Development and localization of reverse-polarity mechanotransducer channels in cochlear hair cells.

    PubMed

    Beurg, Maryline; Goldring, Adam C; Ricci, Anthony J; Fettiplace, Robert

    2016-06-14

    Cochlear hair cells normally detect positive deflections of their hair bundles, rotating toward their tallest edge, which opens mechanotransducer (MT) channels by increased tension in interciliary tip links. After tip-link destruction, the normal polarity of MT current is replaced by a mechanically sensitive current evoked by negative bundle deflections. The "reverse-polarity" current was investigated in cochlear hair cells after tip-link destruction with BAPTA, in transmembrane channel-like protein isoforms 1/2 (Tmc1:Tmc2) double mutants, and during perinatal development. This current is a natural adjunct of embryonic development, present in all wild-type hair cells but declining after birth with emergence of the normal-polarity current. Evidence indicated the reverse-polarity current seen developmentally was a manifestation of the same ion channel as that evident under abnormal conditions in Tmc mutants or after tip-link destruction. In all cases, sinusoidal fluid-jet stimuli from different orientations suggested the underlying channels were opened not directly by deflections of the hair bundle but by deformation of the apical plasma membrane. Cell-attached patch recording on the hair-cell apical membrane revealed, after BAPTA treatment or during perinatal development, 90-pS stretch-activated cation channels that could be blocked by Ca(2+) and by FM1-43. High-speed Ca(2+) imaging, using swept-field confocal microscopy, showed the Ca(2+) influx through the reverse-polarity channels was not localized to the hair bundle, but distributed across the apical plasma membrane. These reverse-polarity channels, which we propose to be renamed "unconventional" mechanically sensitive channels, have some properties similar to the normal MT channels, but the relationship between the two types is still not well defined.

  9. On the global polarity reversal of the induced magnetosphere of Venus: a statistical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vech, Daniel; Stenberg, Gabriella; Nilsson, Hans; Edberg, Niklas; Opitz, Andrea; Szego, Karoly; Zhang, Tielong; Futaana, Yoshifumi

    2016-04-01

    In this study we present the first statistical analysis on the effects of Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) sector boundary crossings on the induced magnetosphere of Venus. These events are of particular interest because they lead to the reconfiguration of the induced magnetosphere with opposite polarity. IMF sector boundary crossings can occur after Heliospheric Current Sheet (HCS) crossings and often after the passages of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICME) and Corotating Interaction Regions (CIR). The results show that the HCS crossings cause significant erosion of the dayside ionosphere and in this region the average heavy ion flux was reduced by a factor of 0.63 compared to the undisturbed cases. The heavy ion flux on the nightside changed by a factor of 0.81. On the nightside ion heating was observed and the average heavy ion temperature increased by the factor of 1.63 compared to the undisturbed cases. The ICME/CIR events were sorted into two groups depending on the polarity reversal of the induced magnetosphere. We found significant differences between them: the cases with polarity reversal showed significant ion heating and increased heavy ion flux upon arrival of the ICME/CIR event. We conclude that the observations are similar to the previous comet studies and the polarity reversal of the induced magnetosphere might be accompanied with dayside reconnection.

  10. An omnipotent Li-ion battery charger with multimode control and polarity reversible techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiann-Jong; Ku, Yi-Tsen; Yang, Hong-Yi; Hwang, Yuh-Shyan; Yu, Cheng-Chieh

    2016-07-01

    The omnipotent Li-ion battery charger with multimode control and polarity reversible techniques is presented in this article. The proposed chip is fabricated with TSMC 0.35μm 2P4M complementary metal-oxide- semiconductor processes, and the chip area including pads is 1.5 × 1.5 mm2. The structure of the omnipotent charger combines three charging modes and polarity reversible techniques, which adapt to any Li-ion batteries. The three reversible Li-ion battery charging modes, including trickle-current charging, large-current charging and constant-voltage charging, can charge in matching polarities or opposite polarities. The proposed circuit has a maximum charging current of 300 mA and the input voltage of the proposed circuit is set to 4.5 V. The maximum efficiency of the proposed charger is about 91% and its average efficiency is 74.8%. The omnipotent charger can precisely provide the charging current to the battery.

  11. Development and localization of reverse-polarity mechanotransducer channels in cochlear hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Beurg, Maryline; Goldring, Adam C.; Ricci, Anthony J.; Fettiplace, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Cochlear hair cells normally detect positive deflections of their hair bundles, rotating toward their tallest edge, which opens mechanotransducer (MT) channels by increased tension in interciliary tip links. After tip-link destruction, the normal polarity of MT current is replaced by a mechanically sensitive current evoked by negative bundle deflections. The “reverse-polarity” current was investigated in cochlear hair cells after tip-link destruction with BAPTA, in transmembrane channel-like protein isoforms 1/2 (Tmc1:Tmc2) double mutants, and during perinatal development. This current is a natural adjunct of embryonic development, present in all wild-type hair cells but declining after birth with emergence of the normal-polarity current. Evidence indicated the reverse-polarity current seen developmentally was a manifestation of the same ion channel as that evident under abnormal conditions in Tmc mutants or after tip-link destruction. In all cases, sinusoidal fluid-jet stimuli from different orientations suggested the underlying channels were opened not directly by deflections of the hair bundle but by deformation of the apical plasma membrane. Cell-attached patch recording on the hair-cell apical membrane revealed, after BAPTA treatment or during perinatal development, 90-pS stretch-activated cation channels that could be blocked by Ca2+ and by FM1-43. High-speed Ca2+ imaging, using swept-field confocal microscopy, showed the Ca2+ influx through the reverse-polarity channels was not localized to the hair bundle, but distributed across the apical plasma membrane. These reverse-polarity channels, which we propose to be renamed “unconventional” mechanically sensitive channels, have some properties similar to the normal MT channels, but the relationship between the two types is still not well defined. PMID:27162344

  12. Kinetic efficiency of polar monolithic capillary columns in high-pressure gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kurganov, A A; Korolev, A A; Shiryaeva, V E; Popova, T P; Kanateva, A Yu

    2013-11-01

    Poppe plots were used for analysis of kinetic efficiency of monolithic sorbents synthesized in quartz capillaries for utilization in high-pressure gas chromatography. Values of theoretical plate time and maximum number of theoretical plates occurred to depend significantly on synthetic parameters such as relative amount of monomer in the initial polymerization mixture, temperature and polymerization time. Poppe plots let one to find synthesis conditions suitable either for high-speed separations or for maximal efficiency. It is shown that construction of kinetic Poppe curves using potential Van Deemter data demands compressibility of mobile phase to be taken into consideration in the case of gas chromatography. Model mixture of light hydrocarbons C1 to C4 was then used for investigation of influence of carrier gas nature on kinetic efficiency of polymeric monolithic columns. Minimal values of theoretical plate times were found for CO2 and N2O carrier gases.

  13. Losartan modulates muscular capillary density and reverses thiazide diuretic-exacerbated insulin resistance in fructose-fed rats

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qi; Mori, Takefumi; Jiang, Yue; Hu, Chunyan; Ohsaki, Yusuke; Yoneki, Yoshimi; Nakamichi, Takashi; Ogawa, Susumu; Sato, Hiroshi; Ito, Sadayoshi

    2012-01-01

    The renin–angiotensin system (RAS) is involved in the pathogenesis of insulin sensitivity (IS). The role of RAS in insulin resistance and muscular circulation has yet to be elucidated. Therefore, this study sought to determine the mechanisms of angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) and/or diuretics on IS and capillary density (CD) in fructose-fed rats (FFRs). Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either normal chow (control group) or fructose-rich chow for 8 weeks. For the last 4 weeks, FFRs were allocated to four groups: an FFR group and groups treated with the thiazide diuretic hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ), with the ARB losartan, or both. IS was evaluated by the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic glucose clamp technique at week 8. In addition, CD in the extensor digitorum longus muscle was evaluated. Blood pressure was significantly higher in the FFRs than in the controls. HCTZ, losartan and their combination significantly lowered blood pressure. IS was significantly lower in the FFR group than in the controls and was even lower in the HCTZ group. Losartan alone or combined with HCTZ significantly increased IS. In all cases, IS was associated with muscular CD, but not with plasma adiponectin or lipids. These results indicate that losartan reverses HCTZ-exacerbated insulin resistance, which can be mediated through the modulation of muscular circulation in rats with impaired glucose metabolism. PMID:21900942

  14. The facile fabrication of a wire-grid polarizer by reversal rigiflex printing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-il; Seo, Soon-min

    2009-04-01

    Wire-grid polarizers (WGPs) can be fabricated easily by reversal rigiflex printing. Metal films with gratings were fabricated on a transparent glass substrate by transfer printing with a metal coated rigiflex mold, and the transferred metal gratings were then etched slightly to eliminate the residual layer. As a result, aligned metal wires (70 nm line/space width, 120 nm height) occupying an area of 3.0 cm x 2.5 cm were obtained. The maximum and minimum transmittances of a WGP replicated from a commercial Moxtek polarizer at 800 nm were 85% and 27%, respectively.

  15. The facile fabrication of a wire-grid polarizer by reversal rigiflex printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae-il; Seo, Soon-min

    2009-04-01

    Wire-grid polarizers (WGPs) can be fabricated easily by reversal rigiflex printing. Metal films with gratings were fabricated on a transparent glass substrate by transfer printing with a metal coated rigiflex mold, and the transferred metal gratings were then etched slightly to eliminate the residual layer. As a result, aligned metal wires (70 nm line/space width, 120 nm height) occupying an area of 3.0 cm × 2.5 cm were obtained. The maximum and minimum transmittances of a WGP replicated from a commercial Moxtek polarizer at 800 nm were 85% and 27%, respectively.

  16. The use of polarity switching for the sensitive determination of nitrate in human cerebrospinal fluid by capillary electrophoresis with contactless conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    Tůma, Petr

    2016-05-20

    A new electrophoretic stacking method has been developed for the sensitive determination of nitrates in cerebrospinal fluid. 2M acetic acid was used as the BGE; inorganic anions were detected using a contactless conductivity detector and separation was carried out in an INST-coated capillary with inner diameter of 25μm. The sample of cerebrospinal fluid was injected in a large volume into the short end of the separation capillary (15cm) and separation first occurred in the isotachophoretic mode, where a long zone of the majority chloride migrates in the capillary and is followed by a concentrated zone of the unseparated nitrates. The sample zone passes to the end of the capillary where more than 99% of the chlorides are let out. Then the polarity of the voltage is switched and separation occurs in the zone electrophoresis mode, in which the nitrates are separated from the zone of chlorides. The time of switching the polarity is determined by the decrease in the electrophoretic current. Up to 99.95% of the original amount of chlorides present in the cerebrospinal fluid could be let out of the capillary by this technique, thus increasing the signal/noise ratio by up to 60-fold compared to classical electrophoretic separation.

  17. Method of electric field flow fractionation wherein the polarity of the electric field is periodically reversed

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Fred J.

    1992-01-01

    A novel method of electric field flow fractionation for separating solute molecules from a carrier solution is disclosed. The method of the invention utilizes an electric field that is periodically reversed in polarity, in a time-dependent, wave-like manner. The parameters of the waveform, including amplitude, frequency and wave shape may be varied to optimize separation of solute species. The waveform may further include discontinuities to enhance separation.

  18. Comparison of capillary electrophoresis and reversed-phase liquid chromatography methodologies for determination of diazepam in pharmaceutical tablets.

    PubMed

    Aurora Prado, María S; Steppe, Martin; Tavares, Marina F M; Kedor-Hackmann, Erika R M; Santoro, Maria Inês R M

    2005-02-23

    Two novel analytical methodologies using capillary electrophoresis (CE) and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) for the determination of diazepam in commercial and simulated tablet formulations were developed and compared. The CE analysis was carried out in a bare fused-silica capillary with 75 microm i.d. and total length of 50 cm (28 cm to the detector) with a buffer solution containing 20 mmol L(-1) sodium tetraborate and 20 mmolL(-1) sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS), pH 9.23. The applied voltage was 20 kV and bromazepam was used as internal standard (IS). The RP-HPLC analysis was carried out in a LiChrospher((R)) 100 RP-18 (5 microm) column with a mobile phase constituted of methanol, acetonitrile and water (45:25:30) with a flow rate of 0.8 mL/min, using acetaminophen as IS. In both cases, detection was carried out by ultraviolet (UV) absorption at 242 nm. Under the optimized conditions, the CE retention times for the standard diazepam and bromazepam (IS) were 4.08 and 3.43 min, respectively, and the retention times of the RP-HPLC analysis for the standard diazepam and acetaminophen (IS) were 4.86 and 1.58 min, respectively. The resolution and efficiency for CE were 7.4 and 1.18 x 10(5)plates/m and for RP-HPLC, 7.5 and 1.76 x 10(4) plates/m. Analytical curves of peak area versus concentration presented correlation coefficients of 0.9996 for CE and 0.9994 for RP-HPLC. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantitation (LOQ) were 4.24 and 12.85 microg/mL for CE and 1.44 and 4.36 microg/mL for RP-HPLC. Relative standard deviations (R.S.D.) were 1.62 and 0.98% for CE and RP-HPLC, respectively. The percentage recovery determined with CE was 100.27+/-1.25 and with RP-HPLC was 101.12+/-2.48. Although both methodologies were shown to be suitable for the determination of diazepam in tablets, performing in a similar manner with regards to several aspects (linearity, recovery and specificity), CE provided a faster analysis and column efficiency whereas

  19. Palmitoleate Reverses High Fat-induced Proinflammatory Macrophage Polarization via AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK)*

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kenny L.; Pillon, Nicolas J.; Sivaloganathan, Darshan M.; Costford, Sheila R.; Liu, Zhi; Théret, Marine; Chazaud, Benedicte; Klip, Amira

    2015-01-01

    A rise in tissue-embedded macrophages displaying “M1-like” proinflammatory polarization is a hallmark of metabolic inflammation during a high fat diet or obesity. Here we show that bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) from high fat-fed mice retain a memory of their dietary environment in vivo (displaying the elevated proinflammatory genes Cxcl1, Il6, Tnf, Nos2) despite 7-day differentiation and proliferation ex vivo. Notably, 6-h incubation with palmitoleate (PO) reversed the proinflammatory gene expression and cytokine secretion seen in BMDM from high fat-fed mice. BMDM from low fat-fed mice exposed to palmitate (PA) for 18 h ex vivo also showed elevated expression of proinflammatory genes (Cxcl1, Il6, Tnf, Nos2, and Il12b) associated with M1 polarization. Conversely, PO treatment increased anti-inflammatory genes (Mrc1, Tgfb1, Il10, Mgl2) and oxidative metabolism, characteristic of M2 macrophages. Therefore, saturated and unsaturated fatty acids bring about opposite macrophage polarization states. Coincubation of BMDM with both fatty acids counteracted the PA-induced Nos2 expression in a PO dose-dependent fashion. PO also prevented PA-induced IκBα degradation, RelA nuclear translocation, NO production, and cytokine secretion. Mechanistically, PO exerted its anti-inflammatory function through AMP-activated protein kinase as AMP kinase knockout or inhibition by Compound C offset the PO-dependent prevention of PA-induced inflammation. These results demonstrate a nutritional memory of BMDM ex vivo, highlight the plasticity of BMDM polarization in response to saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, and identify the potential to reverse diet- and saturated fat-induced M1-like polarization by administering palmitoleate. These findings could have applicability to reverse obesity-linked inflammation in metabolically relevant tissues. PMID:25987561

  20. Palmitoleate Reverses High Fat-induced Proinflammatory Macrophage Polarization via AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK).

    PubMed

    Chan, Kenny L; Pillon, Nicolas J; Sivaloganathan, Darshan M; Costford, Sheila R; Liu, Zhi; Théret, Marine; Chazaud, Benedicte; Klip, Amira

    2015-07-01

    A rise in tissue-embedded macrophages displaying "M1-like" proinflammatory polarization is a hallmark of metabolic inflammation during a high fat diet or obesity. Here we show that bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) from high fat-fed mice retain a memory of their dietary environment in vivo (displaying the elevated proinflammatory genes Cxcl1, Il6, Tnf, Nos2) despite 7-day differentiation and proliferation ex vivo. Notably, 6-h incubation with palmitoleate (PO) reversed the proinflammatory gene expression and cytokine secretion seen in BMDM from high fat-fed mice. BMDM from low fat-fed mice exposed to palmitate (PA) for 18 h ex vivo also showed elevated expression of proinflammatory genes (Cxcl1, Il6, Tnf, Nos2, and Il12b) associated with M1 polarization. Conversely, PO treatment increased anti-inflammatory genes (Mrc1, Tgfb1, Il10, Mgl2) and oxidative metabolism, characteristic of M2 macrophages. Therefore, saturated and unsaturated fatty acids bring about opposite macrophage polarization states. Coincubation of BMDM with both fatty acids counteracted the PA-induced Nos2 expression in a PO dose-dependent fashion. PO also prevented PA-induced IκBα degradation, RelA nuclear translocation, NO production, and cytokine secretion. Mechanistically, PO exerted its anti-inflammatory function through AMP-activated protein kinase as AMP kinase knockout or inhibition by Compound C offset the PO-dependent prevention of PA-induced inflammation. These results demonstrate a nutritional memory of BMDM ex vivo, highlight the plasticity of BMDM polarization in response to saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, and identify the potential to reverse diet- and saturated fat-induced M1-like polarization by administering palmitoleate. These findings could have applicability to reverse obesity-linked inflammation in metabolically relevant tissues.

  1. The MTV experiment: a test of time reversal symmetry using polarized 8Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, J.; Baba, H.; Behr, J. A.; Hirayama, Y.; Iguri, T.; Ikeda, M.; Kato, T.; Kawamura, H.; Kishi, R.; Levy, C. D. P.; Nakaya, Y.; Ninomiya, K.; Ogawa, N.; Onishi, J.; Openshaw, R.; Pearson, M.; Seitaibashi, E.; Tanaka, S.; Tanuma, R.; Totsuka, Y.; Toyoda, T.

    2014-01-01

    The MTV ( Mott Polarimetry for T- Violation Experiment) experiment at TRIUMF-ISAC ( Isotope Separator and ACcelerator), which aims to achieve the highest precision test of time reversal symmetry in polarized nuclear beta decay by measuring a triple correlation ( R-correlation), is motivated by the search for a new physics beyond the Standard Model. In this experiment, the existence of non-zero transverse electron polarization is examined utilizing the analyzing power of Mott scattering from a thin metal foil. Backward scattering electron tracks are measured using a multi-wire drift chamber for the first time. The MTV experiment was commissioned at ISAC in 2009 using an 80 % polarized 8Li beam at 107 pps, resulting in 0.1 % statistical precision on the R-parameter in the first physics run performed in 2010. Next generation cylindrical drift chamber (CDC) is now being installed for the future run.

  2. Double-Polarized pd Scattering and Test of Time-reversal Invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzikov, Yuriy

    2016-02-01

    The integrated proton-deuteron cross section σ˜ for the case of transversal polarization ppy of the proton and tensor polarization Pxz of the deuteron provides a null test signal for time-reversal invariance violating but P-parity conserving effects. The corresponding experiment is planned at COSY to measure the observable σ˜. Here we consider in general case the status of the null-test observable in pd scattering, calculate σ˜ within the Glauber theory of the double-polarized pd scattering at 100 - 1000 MeV and study the contribution of the deuteron S- and D-waves for several type of the T-odd NN interactions.

  3. Electrically controllable sudden reversals in spin and valley polarization in silicene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingtian; Chan, K S; Li, Jingbo

    2016-01-01

    We study the spin and valley dependent transport in a silicene superlattice under the influence of a magnetic exchange field, a perpendicular electric field and a voltage potential. It is found that a gate-voltage-controllable fully spin and valley polarized current can be obtained in the proposed device, and the spin and valley polarizations are sensitive oscillatory functions of the voltage potential. In properly designed superlattice structure, the spin and valley polarizations can be reversed from -100% to 100% by a slight change in the external voltage potential. The energy dispersion relations of the superlattice structure are also investigated, which helps us to understand the effects of the superlattice structure. The switching of the spin direction and the valley of the tunneling electrons by a gate voltage enables new possibilities for spin or valley control in silicene-based spintronics and valleytronics. PMID:27647320

  4. Electrically controllable sudden reversals in spin and valley polarization in silicene

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qingtian; Chan, K. S.; Li, Jingbo

    2016-01-01

    We study the spin and valley dependent transport in a silicene superlattice under the influence of a magnetic exchange field, a perpendicular electric field and a voltage potential. It is found that a gate-voltage-controllable fully spin and valley polarized current can be obtained in the proposed device, and the spin and valley polarizations are sensitive oscillatory functions of the voltage potential. In properly designed superlattice structure, the spin and valley polarizations can be reversed from −100% to 100% by a slight change in the external voltage potential. The energy dispersion relations of the superlattice structure are also investigated, which helps us to understand the effects of the superlattice structure. The switching of the spin direction and the valley of the tunneling electrons by a gate voltage enables new possibilities for spin or valley control in silicene-based spintronics and valleytronics. PMID:27647320

  5. Electrically controllable sudden reversals in spin and valley polarization in silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qingtian; Chan, K. S.; Li, Jingbo

    2016-09-01

    We study the spin and valley dependent transport in a silicene superlattice under the influence of a magnetic exchange field, a perpendicular electric field and a voltage potential. It is found that a gate-voltage-controllable fully spin and valley polarized current can be obtained in the proposed device, and the spin and valley polarizations are sensitive oscillatory functions of the voltage potential. In properly designed superlattice structure, the spin and valley polarizations can be reversed from ‑100% to 100% by a slight change in the external voltage potential. The energy dispersion relations of the superlattice structure are also investigated, which helps us to understand the effects of the superlattice structure. The switching of the spin direction and the valley of the tunneling electrons by a gate voltage enables new possibilities for spin or valley control in silicene-based spintronics and valleytronics.

  6. Polarity reversal of a magnetic vortex core by a unipolar, non-resonant in-plane pulsed magnetic field.

    SciTech Connect

    Keavney, D. J.; Cheng, X. M.; Buchanan, K. S.

    2009-06-24

    We report the polarity reversal of a magnetic vortex core using a nonresonant in-plane pulsed magnetic field of arbitrary waveform studied using time-resolved x-ray photoemission electron microscopy and micromagnetic simulations. The imaging and simulations show that a 5 mT pulse, higher than the critical field for nonlinear effects, effectively leads to the randomization of the vortex core polarity. The micromagnetic simulations further show that the onset of stochastic core polarity randomization does not necessarily coincide with the critical reversal field, leading to a field window for predictable core reversal.

  7. Use of vancomycin silica stationary phase in packed capillary electrochromatography: III. enantiomeric separation of basic compounds with the polar organic mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Fanali, Salvatore; Catarcini, Paolo; Quaglia, Maria Giovanna

    2002-02-01

    The separation of basic compounds into their enantiomers was achieved using capillary electrochromatography in 50 or 75 microm inner diameter (ID) fused-silica capillaries packed with silica a stationary phase derivatized with vancomycin and mobile phases composed of mixtures of polar organic solvents containing 13 mM ammonium acetate. Enantiomer resolution, electroosmotic flow, and the number of theoretical plates were strongly influenced by the type and concentration of the organic solvent. Mobile phases composed of 13 mM ammonium acetate dissolved in mixtures of acetonitrile/methanol, ethanol, n-propanol, or isopropanol were tested and the highest enantioresolutions were achieved using the first mobile phase, allowing the separation of almost all investigated enantiomers (9 from 11 basic compounds). The use of capillaries with different ID (50 and 75 microm ID) packed with the same chiral stationary phase revealed that a higher number of theoretical plates and higher enantioresolution was achieved with the tube with lowest ID.

  8. Superchrons and Reversal Behavior from Phanerozoic and Precambrian Polarity Ratios (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, P. E.; Evans, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    We compile paleomagnetic polarity ratios from the Phanerozoic and from Precambrian time (900-2200 Ma), with the goal to assess whether superchrons can be identified. We compute polarity ratio from a Phanerozoic compilation of paleopoles and identify the best smoothing timescale for distinguishing the three proposed superchrons during this period. We find for a smoothing of 20 Myr that the Cretaceous Normal Superchron (CNS), the Kiaman Reverse Superchron, and Moyero Superchron are discernible in the polarity ratio series. We also compile Precambrian paleopole data from the global paleomagnetic database with strict quality criteria so that all the polarity ratio data included have at least 9 site means and age precision within +/-15 Myr (a nominal superchron duration). We find that the Precambrian polarity ratio series contains several periods that resemble the Phanerozoic superchrons. To test whether it is possible for superchrons to be identified in the Phanerozoic set with the much lower sampling frequency of the Precambrian data set we subsample the Phanerozoic record with a random set of Precambrian sample age spacings. This procedure is then reproduced in a bootstrap, producing an average superchron identification success rate. If the success rate is high then we expect it to be possible to identify superchron-like behavior in the Precambrian, and whether such behavior is quasi-periodic like the ~200 Myr period between the three known Phanerozoic superchrons. Names are proposed for the Precambrian superchrons identified based on their main geological unit.

  9. Polarization control in X-ray FELs by reverse undulator tapering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneidmiller, E. A.; Yurkov, M. V.

    2015-05-01

    Baseline design of a typical X-ray FEL undulator assumes a planar configuration which results in a linear polarization of the FEL radiation. However, many experiments at X-ray FEL user facilities would profit from using a circularly polarized radiation. As a cheap upgrade one can consider an installation of a short helical (or cross-planar) afterburner, but then one should have an efficient method to suppress powerful linearly polarized background from the main undulator. In this paper we propose a new method for such a suppression: an application of the reverse taper in the main undulator. We discover that in a certain range of the taper strength, the density modulation (bunching) at saturation is practically the same as in the case of non-tapered undulator while the power of linearly polarized radiation is suppressed by orders of magnitude. Then strongly modulated electron beam radiates at full power in the afterburner. Considering SASE3 undulator of the European XFEL as a practical example, we demonstrate that soft X-ray radiation pulses with peak power in excess of 100 GW and an ultimately high degree of circular polarization can be produced. The proposed method is rather universal, i.e. it can be used at SASE FELs and seeded (self-seeded) FELs, with any wavelength of interest, in a wide range of electron beam parameters, and with any repetition rate.

  10. Polarity Reversal of the Solar Photospheric Magnetic Field During Activity Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xudong; Hoeksema, Jon Todd; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Junwei

    2014-06-01

    The large-scale solar magnetic field reverses its polarity during the maximum phase of each activity cycle. As observed on the photosphere, active region (AR) magnetic flux migrates poleward in narrow, sheared streams resulted from large-scale flows and diffusion. A small net flux of the trailing sunspot polarity eventually aggregates at high latitudes, manifesting the poloidal field of the next cycle. We characterize this process for the ongoing cycle 24 based on four years' line-of-sight magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). The axial dipole component reversed sign in early 2012, but the poleward flux migration was grossly out of phase in the two hemispheres. As a proxy, the northern polar field (taken as mean above 70 degrees latitude) switched from negative to positive in late 2012, whereas the southern remained positive as of March 2014. Three factors that are in line with the surface flux transport model may have contributed. First, AR emergence started and peaked earlier in the north. Second, several ARs with small or inverse tilt angles (w.r.t. the Joy's law) emerged in the south in late 2010. Third, meridional flow speed inferred from helioseismology varied greatly prior to 2013; slower streams (compared to a three-year mean at the same latitude) appeared earlier in the north. We correlate HMI with the long-running Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO) dataset, and compare the current cycle with the previous three.

  11. Polarization Reversal Over Flooded Regions and Applications to Large-Scale Flood Mapping with Spaceborne Scatterometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, Son V.; Liu, W. Timothy; Xie, Xiao-Su

    1999-01-01

    We present the polarization reversal in backscatter over flooded land regions, and demonstrate for the first time the utility of spaceborne Ku-band scatterometer for large-scale flood mapping. Scatterometer data were collected over the globe by the NASA Scatterometer (NSCAT) operated at 14 GHz on the Japanese ADEOS spacecraft from September 1996 to June 1997. During this time span, several severe floods occurred. Over most land surface, vertical polarization backscatter (Sigma(sub upsilon(upsilon)) is larger than horizontal polarization backscatter (sigma(sub hh)). Such polarization characteristics is reversed and sigma(sub upsilon(upsilon)) is smaller than sigma(sub hh) over flooded regions, except under a dense forest canopy. The total backscatter from the flooded landscape consists of direct backscatter and boundary-interaction backscatter. The direct term is contributed by direct backscattering from objects protruding above the water surface, and by backscattering from waves on the water surface. The boundary-interaction term is contributed by the forward scattering from the protruding objects and then reflected from the water surface, and also by the forward scattering from these objects after the water-surface reflection. Over flooded regions, the boundary-interaction term is dominant at large incidence angles and the strong water-surface reflection is much larger for horizontal polarization than the vertical one due to the Brewster effect in transverse-magnetic waves. These scattering mechanisms cause the polarization reversal over flooded regions. An example obtained with the Analytic Wave Theory is used to illustrate the scattering mechanisms leading to the polarization reversal. We then demonstrate the utility of spaceborne Ku-band scatterometer for large-scale flood mapping. We process NSCAT data to obtain the polarization ratio sigma(sub hh)/sigma(sub upsilon(upsilon)) with colocated data at incidence angles larger than 40 deg. The results over Asian

  12. Significance of the basin wide reverse polarity reflector in the Offshore Sydney Basin, East Australian Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman Talukder, Asrarur; Nadri, Dariush; Rajput, Sanjeev; Clennell, Ben; Griffiths, Cedric; Breeze, David

    2010-05-01

    The Offshore Sydney Basin is located between latitudes 32°30'S and 34°30'S between the coastal cities of Newcastle in the north and Wollongong in the south, covering a total area of ~15,000 squire km. The structural framework of the offshore portion of the basin comprises five principal elements: the Offshore Syncline, an extension of the New England Fold Belt, an offshore extension of the Newcastle Syncline, the Offshore Uplift and the Outer Continental Shelf. The present easterly extent of the basin is the result of Cretaceous rifting and commencement of seafloor spreading in the adjacent Tasman Sea. The continental shelf is approximately 50 km wide offshore Sydney and is edged by relatively steep continental slope. This study has been carried out with 2D multichannel seismic data covering the northern half of the offshore basin. The Cenozoic sedimentary cover of the basin is characterized by two regional unconformities: one at the base of Cenozoic and another intra-Cenozoic. The unconformity at the base of Cenozoic is known as the Top Sydney Basin unconformity. In places the surface is displaced by faults and also characterized by possible mounds producing an overall highly irregular topography. Though most of the faults remained buried beneath the surface some continued up to seafloor. They seem to have NW-SE direction with significant lateral extension. The intra-Cenozoic unconformity forms a prominent reflector at about 80 to 200 msbs (TWT). It is characterized by an angular unconformity with the reflectors terminating onto it from beneath. It is also associated with prograding sequences beneath, terminating with toplap geometry, suggesting that it forms the boundary between a transgressive and regressive phase. This is interpreted as a prograding carbonate dominated shelf-edge. The most interesting aspect of this seismic reflector is that the major part of it presents reverse polarity with respect to the seafloor reflection. The amplitude of the reflector

  13. Reversible conversion of dominant polarity in ambipolar polymer/graphene oxide hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Ye; Han, Su -Ting; Sonar, Prashant; Ma, Xinlei; Chen, Jihua; Zheng, Zijian; Roy, V. A. L.

    2015-03-24

    The possibility to selectively modulate the charge carrier transport in semiconducting materials is extremely challenging for the development of high performance and low-power consuming logic circuits. Systematical control over the polarity (electrons and holes) in transistor based on solution processed layer by layer polymer/graphene oxide hybrid system has been demonstrated. The conversion degree of the polarity is well controlled and reversible by trapping the opposite carriers. Basically, an electron device is switched to be a hole only device or vice versa. Finally, a hybrid layer ambipolar inverter is demonstrated in which almost no leakage of opposite carrier is found. We conclude that this hybrid material has wide range of applications in planar p-n junctions and logic circuits for high-throughput manufacturing of printed electronic circuits.

  14. Reversible conversion of dominant polarity in ambipolar polymer/graphene oxide hybrids

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhou, Ye; Han, Su -Ting; Sonar, Prashant; Ma, Xinlei; Chen, Jihua; Zheng, Zijian; Roy, V. A. L.

    2015-03-24

    The possibility to selectively modulate the charge carrier transport in semiconducting materials is extremely challenging for the development of high performance and low-power consuming logic circuits. Systematical control over the polarity (electrons and holes) in transistor based on solution processed layer by layer polymer/graphene oxide hybrid system has been demonstrated. The conversion degree of the polarity is well controlled and reversible by trapping the opposite carriers. Basically, an electron device is switched to be a hole only device or vice versa. Finally, a hybrid layer ambipolar inverter is demonstrated in which almost no leakage of opposite carrier is found. Wemore » conclude that this hybrid material has wide range of applications in planar p-n junctions and logic circuits for high-throughput manufacturing of printed electronic circuits.« less

  15. Polarized proton-deuteron scattering as a test of time-reversal invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzikov, Yu. N.; Haidenbauer, J.

    2016-09-01

    Scattering of protons with transversal polarization pyp on deuterons with tensor polarization Px z provides a null-test signal for time-reversal (T) invariance violating but parity (P) conserving effects. We calculate the corresponding null-test observable at beam energies 100 -1000 MeV within the spin-dependent Glauber theory considering T-violating P-conserving nucleon-nucleon interactions. The S -wave component of the deuteron wave function as well as the D wave are taken into account and the latter is found to play an important role for the magnitude and the energy dependence of the observable in question. Specifically, with inclusion of the D wave the maximum of the obtained signal is shifted to higher beam energies, i.e., to 700 -800 MeV.

  16. Reversible conversion of dominant polarity in ambipolar polymer/graphene oxide hybrids.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ye; Han, Su-Ting; Sonar, Prashant; Ma, Xinlei; Chen, Jihua; Zheng, Zijian; Roy, V A L

    2015-01-01

    The possibility to selectively modulate the charge carrier transport in semiconducting materials is extremely challenging for the development of high performance and low-power consuming logic circuits. Systematical control over the polarity (electrons and holes) in transistor based on solution processed layer by layer polymer/graphene oxide hybrid system has been demonstrated. The conversion degree of the polarity is well controlled and reversible by trapping the opposite carriers. Basically, an electron device is switched to be a hole only device or vice versa. Finally, a hybrid layer ambipolar inverter is demonstrated in which almost no leakage of opposite carrier is found. This hybrid material has wide range of applications in planar p-n junctions and logic circuits for high-throughput manufacturing of printed electronic circuits.

  17. Reversible Conversion of Dominant Polarity in Ambipolar Polymer/Graphene Oxide Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ye; Han, Su-Ting; Sonar, Prashant; Ma, Xinlei; Chen, Jihua; Zheng, Zijian; Roy, V. A. L.

    2015-01-01

    The possibility to selectively modulate the charge carrier transport in semiconducting materials is extremely challenging for the development of high performance and low-power consuming logic circuits. Systematical control over the polarity (electrons and holes) in transistor based on solution processed layer by layer polymer/graphene oxide hybrid system has been demonstrated. The conversion degree of the polarity is well controlled and reversible by trapping the opposite carriers. Basically, an electron device is switched to be a hole only device or vice versa. Finally, a hybrid layer ambipolar inverter is demonstrated in which almost no leakage of opposite carrier is found. This hybrid material has wide range of applications in planar p-n junctions and logic circuits for high-throughput manufacturing of printed electronic circuits. PMID:25801827

  18. Polarization reversal and domain kinetics in magnesium doped stoichiometric lithium tantalate

    SciTech Connect

    Shur, V. Ya. Akhmatkhanov, A. R.; Baturin, I. S.; Chuvakova, M. A.

    2014-10-13

    The polarization reversal process has been studied in 1 mol. % MgO doped stoichiometric lithium tantalate (LT) single crystal. The revealed stages of domain structure evolution represent (1) continuous nucleation and growth of isolated hexagonal domains with walls oriented along Y directions and (2) continuous motion of the plane domain walls stimulated by merging with isolated domains. The activation field dependence of the switching time has been revealed. The coercive field for quasi-static switching is about 150 V/mm. The bulk screening process has been analyzed. The main parameters of the switching process have been compared with other representatives of LT family.

  19. Brunhes-Matuyama Magnetic Polarity Reversal Tracing using Chinese loess10Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, W.; Beck, W.; Kong, X.; An, Z.; Qiang, X.; Wu, Z.; Xian, F.; Ao, H.

    2014-12-01

    The geomagnetic polarity reversal is generally considered to occur synchronously around the world, and is commonly used as a time marker. However, in the case of the most recent reversal, the Brunhes-Matuyama (B-M) reversal (~780 ka), comparison of paleomagnetic studies in Chinese loess-paleosol sequences versus marine sediments revealed a marked discrepancy in timing of this event (Tauxe et al., 1996; Zhou and Shackleton, 1999), leading to the debate on uncertainties of paleoclimatic correlation between the Chinese loess-paleosol sequences and marine sediments (Wang et al., 2006; Liu et al., 2008; Jin and Liu, 2011). Based on this issue, here we propose to use the cosmogenic 10Be to address this conundrum. 10Be is a long-lived radionuclide produced in the atmosphere by cosmic ray spallation reactions and carried to the ground attached to aerosols. Its atmospheric production rate is inversely proportional to the geomagnetic field intensity (Masarik and Beer, 1999). This allows us to reconstruct past geomagnetic field intensity variations using 10Be concentrations recorded in different sedimentary archives. We carried out the 10Be studies in Luochuan and Xifeng sections in Chinese Loess Plateau, both loess profiles show that 10Be production rate was at a maximum-an indication of the dipole field reversal-at ca. 780 ± 3 ka BP., in paleosol unit S7corresponding to MIS 19. These results have proven that the timing of B-M reversal recorded in Chinese loess is synchronous with that seen in marine records (Tauxe et al., 1996) and reaffirmed the conventional paleoclimatic correlation of loess-paleosol sequences with marine isotope stages and the standard loess timescale as correct. However, it is ~25 ka younger than the age (depth) of the magnetic polarity reversal recorded in these same Chinese loess-paleosol sequences, demonstrating that loess magnetic overprinting has occurred. 1.Jin, C.S.,et al., 2011,PALAEOGEOGR PALAEOCL, 299, 309-3172.Liu, Q.S., et al., 2008, EARTH

  20. Evidence from lava flows for complex polarity transitions: the new composite Steens Mountain reversal record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarboe, Nicholas A.; Coe, Robert S.; Glen, Jonathan M. G.

    2011-08-01

    Geomagnetic polarity transitions may be significantly more complex than are currently depicted in many sedimentary and lava-flow records. By splicing together paleomagnetic results from earlier studies at Steens Mountain with those from three newly studied sections of Oregon Plateau flood basalts at Catlow Peak and Poker Jim Ridge 70-90 km to the southeast and west, respectively, we provide support for this interpretation with the most detailed account of a magnetic field reversal yet observed in volcanic rocks. Forty-five new distinguishable transitional (T) directions together with 30 earlier ones reveal a much more complex and detailed record of the 16.7 Ma reversed (R)-to-normal (N) polarity transition that marks the end of Chron C5Cr. Compared to the earlier R-T-N-T-N reversal record, the new record can be described as R-T-N-T-N-T-R-T-N. The composite record confirms earlier features, adds new west and up directions and an entire large N-T-R-T segment to the path, and fills in directions on the path between earlier directional jumps. Persistent virtual geomagnetic pole (VGP) clusters and separate VGPs have a preference for previously described longitudinal bands from transition study compilations, which suggests the presence of features at the core-mantle boundary that influence the flow of core fluid and distribution of magnetic flux. Overall the record is consistent with the generalization that VGP paths vary greatly from reversal to reversal and depend on the location of the observer. Rates of secular variation confirm that the flows comprising these sections were erupted rapidly, with maximum rates estimated to be 85-120 m ka-1 at Catlow and 130-195 m ka-1 at Poker Jim South. Paleomagnetic poles from other studies are combined with 32 non-transitional poles found here to give a clockwise rotation of the Oregon Plateau of 11.4°± 5.6° with respect to the younger Columbia River Basalt Group flows to the north and 14.5°± 4.6° with respect to cratonic

  1. When and why sediments fail to record the geomagnetic field during polarity reversals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valet, Jean-Pierre; Meynadier, Laure; Simon, Quentin; Thouveny, Nicolas

    2016-11-01

    We present four new records of the Matuyama-Brunhes (M-B) reversal from sediments of the Equatorial Indian Ocean, West Equatorial Pacific and North Atlantic Oceans with deposition rates between 2 cm/kyr and 4.5 cm/kyr. The magnetic measurements were performed using 8 cc cubic samples and provided well-defined reverse and normal polarity directions prior and after the last reversal. In three records stepwise demagnetization of the transitional samples revealed a succession of scattered directions instead of a well-defined characteristic component of magnetization. There is no relationship with changes in magnetic mineralogy, magnetic concentration and magnetic grain sizes. This behavior could be caused by weakly magnetized sediment. However the transitional samples of two cores have almost three orders of magnitude stronger magnetizations than the non-transitional samples that yielded unambiguous primary directions in the other two cores. Moreover a similar proportion of magnetic grains was aligned in all records. Therefore, the large amount of magnetic grains oriented by the weak transitional field did not contribute to improve the definition of the characteristic component. We infer that the weakness of the field might not be only responsible. Assuming that the transitional period is dominated by a multipolar field, it is likely that the rapidly moving non-dipole components generated different directions that were recorded over the 2 cm stratigraphic thickness of each sample. These components are carried by grains with similar magnetic properties yielding scattered directions during demagnetization. In contrast, the strongly magnetized sediments of the fourth core from the West Equatorial Pacific Ocean were exempt of problems during demagnetization. The declinations rotate smoothly between the two polarities while the inclinations remain close to zero. This scenario results from post-depositional realignment that integrated various amounts of pre- and post

  2. Evidence from lava flows for complex polarity transitions: The new composite Steens Mountain reversal record

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jarboe, N.A.; Coe, R.S.; Glen, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Geomagnetic polarity transitions may be significantly more complex than are currently depicted in many sedimentary and lava-flow records. By splicing together paleomagnetic results from earlier studies at Steens Mountain with those from three newly studied sections of Oregon Plateau flood basalts at Catlow Peak and Poker Jim Ridge 70-90 km to the southeast and west, respectively, we provide support for this interpretation with the most detailed account of a magnetic field reversal yet observed in volcanic rocks. Forty-five new distinguishable transitional (T) directions together with 30 earlier ones reveal a much more complex and detailed record of the 16.7 Ma reversed (R)-to-normal (N) polarity transition that marks the end of Chron C5Cr. Compared to the earlier R-T-N-T-N reversal record, the new record can be described as R-T-N-T-N-T-R-T-N. The composite record confirms earlier features, adds new west and up directions and an entire large N-T-R-T segment to the path, and fills in directions on the path between earlier directional jumps. Persistent virtual geomagnetic pole (VGP) clusters and separate VGPs have a preference for previously described longitudinal bands from transition study compilations, which suggests the presence of features at the core-mantle boundary that influence the flow of core fluid and distribution of magnetic flux. Overall the record is consistent with the generalization that VGP paths vary greatly from reversal to reversal and depend on the location of the observer. Rates of secular variation confirm that the flows comprising these sections were erupted rapidly, with maximum rates estimated to be 85-120 m ka-1 at Catlow and 130-195 m ka-1 at Poker Jim South. Paleomagnetic poles from other studies are combined with 32 non-transitional poles found here to give a clockwise rotation of the Oregon Plateau of 11.4???? 5.6?? with respect to the younger Columbia River Basalt Group flows to the north and 14.5???? 4.6?? with respect to cratonic

  3. [Preparation of a reversed-phase capillary monolithic column and its application in the separation of polypeptide mixtures].

    PubMed

    Xie, Jingxin; Bi, Kaishun; Qian, Xiaohong; Zuang, Yangiun

    2009-03-01

    Capillary monolithic columns (75 microm i.d.) were prepared by the copolymerization of lauryl methacrylate as the basic monomer, ethylene dimethacrylate as the cross-linking agent and 1-dodecyl alcohol, 1,4-butanediol and dimethyl sulfoxide as the porogenic mixture. The synthetic stationary phases had better mechanical properties and chemical stabilities. A series of characterization and evaluations were performed on the capillary monolithic columns including the scanning electron microscope (SEM) images, the influences of pressure and the effects on the separation of peptide mixtures by changing the proportions of the porogen solution and cross-linking agent. The final prescription ciontained 15% (w/w) monomer, 15% (w/ w) cross-linking agent, and 70% (w/w) porogenic agent. Then the solution was heated at 70 1C for 24 h. The test of relationship between column length and back pressure showed that the capillary monolithic columns prepared have superior permeability, so a longer column can be used to improve the effects of separation. The prepared capillary monolithic columns are fitted on the nano-scale high performance liquid chromatography for the separation of tryptic digests of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human plasma samples, and better results have been obtained.

  4. Reverse polarity magnetized melt rocks from the Chicxulub impact structure, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urrutia-Fucugauchi, Jaime; Marin, Luis E.; Sharpton, Virgil L.; Quezada, Juan Manuel

    1993-01-01

    Further paleomagnetic data for core samples of melt rock recovered in the Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) exploratory wells within the Chicxulub structure, northern Yucatan peninsula, Mexico are reported. A previous report by Sharpton showed that the rocks studied contain high iridium levels and shocked breccia clasts, and an Ar-40/Ar-39 age of 65.2 plus or minus 0.4 Ma. The geomagnetic polarity determined for two samples is reverse (R) and was correlated with chron 29R that includes the K/T boundary. Our present analysis is based on two samples from each of three clasts of the melt rock from PEMEX well Y6-N17 (1295 to 1299 m b.s.l.). This study concentrates on the vectorial nature and stability of the remanence (NRM), the magnetic mineralogy and remanence carriers (i.e., the reliability and origin of the record), and on the implications (correlation with expected paleolatitude and polarity). The relative orientation of the drill core samples with respect to the horizontal is known. Samples were stable under alternating field (AF) and thermal treatments, and after removal of a small component they exhibited single-vectorial behavior. The characteristic remanence inclinations show small dispersion and a mean value (-43 deg) in close agreement with the expected inclination and paleolatitude (derived from the North American apparent polar wander path). Isothermal remenence (IRM) acquisition experiments, Lowrie-Fuller tests, coercivity and unblocking temperature spectra of NRM and saturation IRM, susceptibility and Q-coefficient analyses, and the single-component nature indicate a dominant mineralogy of iron-rich titanomagnetites with single or pseduo-single domain states. The stable characteristic magnetization may be interpreted as a result of shock heating of the rock at the time of formation of the inpact structure and its polarity, age, and paleolatitude are consistent with a time about the K/T boundary.

  5. Comprehensive two-dimensional separation system by coupling capillary reverse-phase liquid chromatography to capillary isoelectric focusing for peptide and protein mapping with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yu; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2003-09-01

    A comprehensive two-dimensional (2-D) separation system, coupling capillary reverse-phase liquid chromatography (cRPLC) to capillary isoelectric focusing (CIEF), is described for protein and peptide mapping. cRPLC, the first dimension, provided high-resolution separations for salt-free proteins. CIEF, the second dimension with an orthogonal mechanism to cRPLC afforded excellent resolution capability for proteins with efficient protein enrichment. Since all sample fractions in cRPLC effluents could be transferred to the CIEF dimensions, the combination of the two high-efficiency separations resulted in maximal separation capabilities of each dimension. Separation effectiveness of this approach was demonstrated using complex protein/peptide samples, such as yeast cytosol and a BSA tryptic digest. A peak capacity of more than 10 000 had been achieved. A laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detector, developed for this system, allowed for high-sensitive detection, with a fmol level of peptide detection for the BSA digest. FITC and BODIPY maleimide were used to tag the proteins, and the latter was found better both for separation and detection in our 2-D system.

  6. Supersymmetric analogue of BCN type rational integrable models with polarized spin reversal operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, P.; Basu-Mallick, B.; Bondyopadhaya, N.; Datta, C.

    2016-03-01

    We derive the exact spectra as well as partition functions for a class of BCN type of spin Calogero models, whose Hamiltonians are constructed by using supersymmetric analogues of polarized spin reversal operators (SAPSRO). The strong coupling limit of these spin Calogero models yields BCN type of Polychronakos-Frahm (PF) spin chains with SAPSRO. By applying the freezing trick, we obtain an exact expression for the partition functions of such PF spin chains. We also derive a formula which expresses the partition function of any BCN type of PF spin chain with SAPSRO in terms of partition functions of several AK types of supersymmetric PF spin chains, where K ⩽ N - 1. Subsequently we show that an extended boson-fermion duality relation is obeyed by the partition functions of the BCN type of PF chains with SAPSRO. Some spectral properties of these spin chains, like level density distribution and nearest neighbor spacing distribution, are also studied.

  7. Spherical plasma oscillations in a reversed-polarity inertial-electrostatic confinement device

    SciTech Connect

    Tuft, C.; Khachan, J.

    2010-11-15

    A pulsed reversed-polarity inertial-electrostatic confinement device has been investigated experimentally using voltage and spectroscopic diagnostics. Large-amplitude oscillations were observed in the floating potential of the plasma immediately following the initiation of the discharge. It is postulated that the observations were the result of coherent ion oscillations within a harmonic potential well formed by a uniform electron density in the center of the device. A simple model of the system predicts the depth of this transient potential well to be approximately 100 V. Observations of the relative occupation of the third and fourth energy levels of hydrogen in the plasma indicated the formation of a Maxwellian electron energy distribution after 20 {mu}s. The results suggest a promising avenue toward a net fusion power gain by utilizing these oscillations to periodically compress and heat the plasma to thermonuclear densities and energies.

  8. The rich phase behavior of the thermopolarization of water: from a reversal in the polarization, to enhancement near criticality conditions.

    PubMed

    Iriarte-Carretero, Irene; Gonzalez, Miguel A; Armstrong, Jeff; Fernandez-Alonso, Felix; Bresme, Fernando

    2016-07-20

    We investigate using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations the polarization of water induced by thermal gradients using the accurate TIP4P/2005 water model. The full dependence of the polarization covering a wide range of thermodynamic states, from near supercritical to ambient conditions, is reported. Our results show a strong dependence of the thermo-polarization field with the thermodynamic state. The field features a strong enhancement near the critical point, which can be rationalized in terms of the large increase and ultimately the divergence of the thermal expansion of the fluid at the critical temperature. We also show that the TIP4P/2005 model features a reversal in the sign of the thermal polarization at densities ∼1 g cm(-3). The latter result is consistent with the recent observation of this reversal phenomenon in SPC/E water and points the existence of this general physical phenomenon in water. PMID:27397622

  9. Capillary Hemangioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Why do capillary hemangiomas on the eyelids cause vision problems? Capillary Hemangiomas of the eyelid can cause ... a capillary hemangioma in the eye socket cause vision problems? A capillary hemangioma in the eye socket ( ...

  10. Magnetic polarity stratigraphy of the Permian and Carboniferous: The extension of the magnetic reversal record into the Paleozoic

    SciTech Connect

    Opdyke, N.D. )

    1991-03-01

    Magnetic polarity stratigraphy has revolutionized stratigraphic studies in Jurassic to Pleistocene sediments. These studies have been greatly facilitated by the reversal record that is recorded in rocks of the ocean floor. For times prior to the Jurassic, the reversal history of the magnetic field must be determined and eventually related through the type section concept. The magnetic reversal history of the late Paleozoic is dominated by the Permo-Carboniferous reversed superchron (PCRS), which extends from the late Permian to the Carboniferous (Westphalian). Recent studies by the author and his students in Middle Carboniferous sediments of eastern Canada, Pennsylvania, Arizona, and Nevada reveal that the magnetic field has reversed frequently in late Mississippian and early Pennsylvanian times (Meramecian through late Morrowan). The polarity of the magnetic field over this interval is approximately 50% normal and 50% reversed. The frequency of reversal appears to be about one reversal per m.y. The possibility, therefore, exists that this pattern may be used for continental and intercontinental correlation. Attempts are currently underway to correlate this magnetic stratigraphy to fossiliferous marine sections. The base of the PCRS is probably of Atokan age.

  11. Reversing ferroelectric polarization in multiferroic DyMn2O5 by nonmagnetic Al substitution of Mn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Z. Y.; Liu, M. F.; Li, X.; Wang, J. X.; Yan, Z. B.; Wang, K. F.; Liu, J.-M.

    2014-08-01

    The multiferroic RMn2O5 family, where R is rare-earth ion or Y, exhibits rich physics of multiferroicity which has not yet well understood. DyMn2O5 is a representative member of this family. The ferroelectric polarization of DyMn2O5 is claimed to be magnetically relevant and have more than one component. Therefore, the polarization reversal upon the sequent magnetic transitions is expected. We investigate the evolution of the ferroelectric polarization upon a partial substitution of Mn3+ by nonmagnetic Al3+ in order to tailor the Mn3+-Mn4+ interactions and then to modulate the polarization in DyMn2-x/2Alx/2O5. It is revealed that the polarization can be successfully reversed by Al-substitution via substantially suppressing the Mn3+-Mn4+ interactions, while the Dy3+-Mn4+ interactions can sustain against the substitution until a level as high as x = 0.2. In addition, the independent Dy spin ordering is shifted remarkably down to an extremely low temperature due to the Al3+ substitution. The present work unveils the possibility of tailoring the Mn3+-Mn4+ and Dy3+-Mn4+ interactions independently, and thus reversing the ferroelectric polarization.

  12. Reverse Polarity Magnetized Melt Rocks from the Cretaceous/Tertiary Chicxulub Structure, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Marin, Luis; Sharpton, Virgil L.

    1994-01-01

    We report paleomagnetic results for core samples of the breccia and andesitic rocks recovered from the Yucatan-6 Petrolcos Mexicanos exploratory well within the Chicxulub structure (about 60 km SSW from its center), northern Yucatan, Mexico. A previous study has shown that the rocks studied contain high iridium levels and shocked breccia clasts and an Ar/Ar date of 65.2 +/- 0.4 Ma. Andesitic rocks are characterized by stable single-component magnetizations with a mean inclination of -42.6 deg +/- 2.4 deg. Breccias present a complex paleomagnetic record characterized by multivectorial magnetizations with widely different initial NRM inclinations. However, after alternating field demagnetization, well defined characteristic components with upward inclinations are defined. IRM acquisition experiments, comparison of IRM and NRM coercivity spectra and the single component magnetization of the andesitic rocks indicate the occurrence of iron-rich titanomagnetites of single or pseudo-single domain states as the dominant magnetic carriers. Mean inclinations from the andesitic rocks and most of the breccia samples give a mean inclination of about -40 deg to -45 deg, indicating a reverse polarity for the characteristic magnetization that is consistent with geomagnetic chron 29R, which spans the Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/T) boundary. The inclination is also consistent with the expected value (and corresponding paleolatitude) for the site estimated from the reference polar wander curve for North America. We suggest that the characteristic magnetizations for the andesitic and breccia rocks are the result of shock heating at the time of formation of the impact structure and that the age, polarity and pateolatitude are consistent with a time at the K/T boundary.

  13. Loess 10Be evidence for an asynchronous Brunhes-Matuyama magnetic polarity reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weijian; Beck, J. Warren; Kong, Xianghui; An, Zhisheng; Qiang, Xiaoke; Wu, Zhenkun; Xian, Feng; Ao, Hong

    2015-04-01

    magnetic overprinting has occurred. References: 1. Jin, C.S., and Liu, Q.S., 2011, Revisiting the stratigraphic position of the Matuyama-Brunhes geomagnetic polarity boundary in Chinese loess: Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, v. 299, p. 309-317. 2. Liu, Q.S., Roberts, A.P., Rohling, E.J., Zhu, R.X., and Sun, Y.B., 2008, Post-depositional remanent magnetization lock-in and the location of the Matuyama-Brunhes geomagnetic reversal boundary in marine and Chinese loess sequences: Earth and Planetary Science Letters, v. 275, no. 1-2, p. 102-110. 3. Masarik, J., and Beer, J., 1999, Simulation of particle fluxes and cosmogenic nuclide production in the Earth's atmosphere: Jounal of Geophysical Research, v. 104, p. 12099-12111. 4. Tauxe, L., Herbert, T., Shackleton, N.J., and Kok, Y.S., 1996, Astronomical calibration of the Matuyama-Brunhes boundary: Consequences for magnetic remanence acquisition in marine carbonates and the Asian loess sequences: Earth and Planetary Science Letters, v. 140, p. 133-146. 5. Wang, X.S., Yang, Z.Y., Løvlie, R., Sun, Z.M., and Pei, J.L., 2006, A magnetostratigraphic reassessment of correlation between Chinese loess and marine oxygen isotope records over the last 1.1Ma: Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, v. 159, p. 109-117. 6. Zhou, L.P., and Shackleton, N.J., 1999, Misleading positions of geomagnetic reversal boundaries in Eurasian loess and implications for correlation between continental and marine sedimentary sequences: Earth and Planetary Science Letters, v. 168, p. 117-130.

  14. Preparation and evaluation of packed capillary columns for the separation of nucleic acids by ion-pair reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Oberacher, H; Krajete, A; Parson, W; Huber, C G

    2000-09-29

    Oligonucleotides and double stranded DNA fragments were separated in 200 microm I.D. capillary columns packed with micropellicular, octadecylated, 2.1 microm poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) particles by ion-pair reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (IP-RP-HPLC). Both the length and the diameter of the connecting capillaries (150 x 0.020 mm I.D.) as well as the detection volume (3 nl) had to be kept to a minimum in order to maintain the high efficiency of this chromatographic separation system with peak widths at half height in the range of a few seconds. Three different types of frits, namely sintered silica particles, sintered octadecylsilica particles, and monolithic poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) (PS-DVB) frits were evaluated with respect to their influence on chromatographic performance. Best performance for the separation of oligonucleotides and long DNA fragments was observed with the PS-DVB frits, whereas the short DNA fragments were optimally resolved in columns terminated by octadecylsilica frits. The maximum loading capacity of 60 x 0.20 mm I.D. columns ranged from 20 fmol (7.7 ng) for a 587 base pair DNA fragment to 500 fmol (2.4 ng) for a 16-mer oligonucleotide. Lower mass- and concentration detection limits in the low femtomol and low nanomol per liter range, respectively, make capillary IP-RP-HPLC with UV absorbance detection highly attractive for the separation and characterization of minute amounts of synthetic oligonucleotides, DNA restriction fragments, and short tandem repeat sequences amplified by polymerase chain reaction.

  15. Direct observation of the recovery of an antiferroelectric phase during polarization reversal of an induced ferroelectric phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hanzheng; Tan, Xiaoli

    2015-04-01

    Electric fields are generally known to favor the ferroelectric polar state over the antiferroelectric nonpolar state for their Coulomb interactions with dipoles in the crystal. In this paper, we directly image an electric-field-assisted ferroelectric-to-antiferroelectric phase transition during polarization reversal of the ferroelectric phase in polycrystalline P b0.99{N b0.02[(Zr0.57Sn0.43) 0.92T i0.08] 0.98}O3 . With the electric-field in situ transmission electron microscopy technique, such an unlikely phenomenon is verified to occur by both domain morphology change and electron-diffraction analysis. The slower kinetics of the phase transition, compared with ferroelectric polarization reversal, is suggested to contribute to this unusual behavior.

  16. Application of gas-liquid chromatography to the analysis of essential oils. Part XVII. Fingerprinting of essential oils by temperature-programmed gas-liquid chromatography using capillary columns with non-polar stationary phases. Analytical methods committee.

    PubMed

    1997-10-01

    Problems in obtaining reproducible results when 'fingerprinting' essential oils by temperature-programmed gas-liquid chromatography have been reported on in Parts VII and VIII of this series. Those reports were concerned with the general problems and the use of packed columns. This report is concerned with the use of capillary columns and non-polar stationary phases. A collaborative study using capillary columns with non-polar stationary phases has resulted in a method which specifies the 'g-pack value' of a column and gives reproducible relative retention indices for the test compounds limonene, acetophenone, linalol, naphthalene, linalyl acetate and cinnamyl alcohol. The method has been applied successfully to the examination of oil of rosemary. A recommended method is given for the reproducible temperature-programmed gas-liquid chromatographic fingerprinting of essential oils using capillary columns with non-polar stationary phases. PMID:9463975

  17. Age calibration of geomagnetic polarity reversals around the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprain, C. J.; Renne, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Testing different Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary (KPB) extinction hypotheses is inhibited by insufficient geochronology, exemplified in the geomagnetic polarity time scale (GPTS). The GPTS is used for age control in studies lacking means for high-precision age determination, ranging from studies on climate change to the evolution of life across the KPB. If well-calibrated, the GPTS would provide a powerful tool for probing deeper into the events around the KPB extinctions. Current calibration of the GPTS (GTS2012; Ogg, 2012) across circum KPB chrons (C30n-C28n) draws heavily on the age results of Swisher et al. (1993) for the KPB, which has been shown to be ~ 200 ka too old per reanalysis by Renne et al. (2013). Further, GPTS estimations rely heavily on astronomical tuning of ODP cores and land-based records (Zumaia) (Husson et al., 2011; Thibault et al., 2012; Kuiper et al., 2008; Westerhold et al., 2008), which fail to account for possible biasing effects of climate signals other than those due to orbital forcing, such as those associated with the KPB events. Moreover, complex sedimentation in marine sections following the mass extinction can obscure orbital signals and complicate cyclostratigraphic interpretation (Westerhold et al., 2008). Terrestrial deposits in the Hell Creek region of NE Montana (USA) provide an opportunity to refine the ages of polarity reversals near the KPB (C30n-C28n), and test the accuracy of orbitally tuned chronologies e.g. (Ogg, 2012). These strata are interbedded with abundant sanidine-bearing ashes, which have yielded 40Ar/39Ar ages with resolution as good as ± 11 ka and absolute accuracy in the range of ± 40 ka (Renne et al, 2013; Sprain et al., 2014). Further, these sections have relatively uniform sediment accumulation rates, which support the use of interpolation to calculate reversal ages from bounding tephra layers (Sprain et al., 2014). Preliminary results using new 40Ar/39Ar ages and magnetostratigraphic data suggests a

  18. Separation of natural antioxidants using PDMS electrophoresis microchips coupled with amperometric detection and reverse polarity.

    PubMed

    Lucca, Bruno Gabriel; Lunte, Susan Marie; Tomazelli Coltro, Wendell Karlos; Ferreira, Valdir Souza

    2014-12-01

    This report describes the use of PDMS ME coupled with amperometric detection for rapid separation of ascorbic, gallic , ferulic, p-coumaric acids using reverse polarity. ME devices were fabricated in PDMS by soft lithography and detection was accomplished using an integrated carbon fiber working electrode aligned in the end-channel configuration. Separation and detection parameters were investigated and the best conditions were obtained using a run buffer consisting of 5 mM phosphate buffer (pH 6.9) and a detection voltage of 1.0 V versus Ag/AgCl reference electrode. All compounds were separated within 70 s using gated injection mode with baseline resolution and separation efficiencies between 1200 and 9000 plates. Calibration curves exhibited good linearity and the LODs achieved ranged from 1.7 to 9.7 μM. The precision for migration time and peak height provided maximum values of 4% for the intrachip studies. Lastly, the analytical method was successfully applied for the analysis of ascorbic and gallic acids in commercial beverage samples. The results achieved using ME coupled with amperometric detection were in good agreement with the values provided by the supplier. Based on the data reported here, the proposed method shows suitability to be applied for the routine analysis of beverage samples.

  19. Misaligned and Polarity-Reversed Faces Determine Face-specific Capacity Limits

    PubMed Central

    Thoma, Volker; Ward, Neil; de Fockert, Jan W.

    2016-01-01

    Previous research using flanker paradigms suggests that peripheral distracter faces are automatically processed when participants have to classify a single central familiar target face. These distracter interference effects disappear when the central task contains additional anonymous (non-target) faces that load the search for the face target, but not when the central task contains additional non-face stimuli, suggesting there are face-specific capacity limits in visual processing. Here we tested whether manipulating the format of non-target faces in the search task affected face-specific capacity limits. Experiment 1 replicated earlier findings that a distracter face is processed even in high load conditions when participants looked for a target name of a famous person among additional names (non-targets) in a central search array. Two further experiments show that when targets and non-targets were faces (instead of names), however, distracter interference was eliminated under high load—adding non-target faces to the search array exhausted processing capacity for peripheral faces. The novel finding was that replacing non-target faces with images that consisted of two horizontally misaligned face-parts reduced distracter processing. Similar results were found when the polarity of a non-target face image was reversed. These results indicate that face-specific capacity limits are not determined by the configural properties of face processing, but by face parts. PMID:27729889

  20. Separation of natural antioxidants using PDMS electrophoresis microchips coupled with amperometric detection and reverse polarity.

    PubMed

    Lucca, Bruno Gabriel; Lunte, Susan Marie; Tomazelli Coltro, Wendell Karlos; Ferreira, Valdir Souza

    2014-12-01

    This report describes the use of PDMS ME coupled with amperometric detection for rapid separation of ascorbic, gallic , ferulic, p-coumaric acids using reverse polarity. ME devices were fabricated in PDMS by soft lithography and detection was accomplished using an integrated carbon fiber working electrode aligned in the end-channel configuration. Separation and detection parameters were investigated and the best conditions were obtained using a run buffer consisting of 5 mM phosphate buffer (pH 6.9) and a detection voltage of 1.0 V versus Ag/AgCl reference electrode. All compounds were separated within 70 s using gated injection mode with baseline resolution and separation efficiencies between 1200 and 9000 plates. Calibration curves exhibited good linearity and the LODs achieved ranged from 1.7 to 9.7 μM. The precision for migration time and peak height provided maximum values of 4% for the intrachip studies. Lastly, the analytical method was successfully applied for the analysis of ascorbic and gallic acids in commercial beverage samples. The results achieved using ME coupled with amperometric detection were in good agreement with the values provided by the supplier. Based on the data reported here, the proposed method shows suitability to be applied for the routine analysis of beverage samples. PMID:25224541

  1. Capillary sample

    MedlinePlus

    ... using capillary blood sampling. Disadvantages to capillary blood sampling include: Only a limited amount of blood can be drawn using this method. The procedure has some risks (see below). Capillary ...

  2. Reversing ferroelectric polarization in multiferroic DyMn{sub 2}O{sub 5} by nonmagnetic Al substitution of Mn

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Z. Y.; Liu, M. F.; Li, X.; Wang, J. X.; Yan, Z. B.; Wang, K. F.; Liu, J.-M.

    2014-08-07

    The multiferroic RMn{sub 2}O{sub 5} family, where R is rare-earth ion or Y, exhibits rich physics of multiferroicity which has not yet well understood. DyMn{sub 2}O{sub 5} is a representative member of this family. The ferroelectric polarization of DyMn{sub 2}O{sub 5} is claimed to be magnetically relevant and have more than one component. Therefore, the polarization reversal upon the sequent magnetic transitions is expected. We investigate the evolution of the ferroelectric polarization upon a partial substitution of Mn{sup 3+} by nonmagnetic Al{sup 3+} in order to tailor the Mn{sup 3+}-Mn{sup 4+} interactions and then to modulate the polarization in DyMn{sub 2−x/2}Al{sub x/2}O{sub 5}. It is revealed that the polarization can be successfully reversed by Al-substitution via substantially suppressing the Mn{sup 3+}-Mn{sup 4+} interactions, while the Dy{sup 3+}-Mn{sup 4+} interactions can sustain against the substitution until a level as high as x = 0.2. In addition, the independent Dy spin ordering is shifted remarkably down to an extremely low temperature due to the Al{sup 3+} substitution. The present work unveils the possibility of tailoring the Mn{sup 3+}-Mn{sup 4+} and Dy{sup 3+}-Mn{sup 4+} interactions independently, and thus reversing the ferroelectric polarization.

  3. Analysis of nucleic acids by capillary ion-pair reversed-phase HPLC coupled to negative-ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huber, C G; Krajete, A

    1999-09-01

    Ion-pair reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography was successfully coupled to negative-ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry by using 60 × 0.20 mm i.d. capillary columns packed with 2.3-μm micropellicular, octadecylated poly(styrene/divinylbenzene) particles as stationary phase and gradients of acetonitrile in 50 mM aqueous triethylammonium bicarbonate as mobile phase. Systematic variation of the eluent composition, such as concentration of ion-pair reagent, anion in the ion-pair reagent, solution pH, and acetonitrile concentration led to the conclusion that most parameters have opposite effects on chromatographic and mass spectrometric performances. The use of acetonitrile as sheath liquid enabled the rapid and highly efficient separation and detection of phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated oligonucleotides ranging in size from 8 to 40 nucleotides. High-quality full-scan mass spectra showing little cation adduction were acquired from which the molecular masses of the separated oligonucleotides were calculated with an accuracy of 0.011%. With calibration curves being linear over at least 2 orders of magnitude, the lower limits of detection for a oligodeoxythymidine 16-mer were 104 fmol with full scan and 710 amol with selected-ion-monitoring data acquisition. The potential of ion-pair reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry was demonstrated for mixed-sequence oligomers by the characterization of a reaction mixture from solid-phase synthesis of a 40-mer oligonucleotide.

  4. Chromatographic selectivity of poly(alkyl methacrylate-co-divinylbenzene) monolithic columns for polar aromatic compounds by pressure-driven capillary liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shu-Ling; Wang, Chih-Chieh; Fuh, Ming-Ren

    2016-10-01

    In this study, divinylbenzene (DVB) was used as the cross-linker to prepare alkyl methacrylate (AlMA) monoliths for incorporating π-π interactions between the aromatic analytes and AlMA-DVB monolithic stationary phases in capillary LC analysis. Various AlMA/DVB ratios were investigated to prepare a series of 30% AlMA-DVB monolithic stationary phases in fused-silica capillaries (250-μm i.d.). The physical properties (such as porosity, permeability, and column efficiency) of the synthesized AlMA-DVB monolithic columns were investigated for characterization. Isocratic elution of phenol derivatives was first employed to evaluate the suitability of the prepared AlMA-DVB columns for small molecule separation. The run-to-run (0.16-1.20%, RSD; n = 3) and column-to-column (0.26-2.95%, RSD; n = 3) repeatabilities on retention times were also examined using the selected AlMA-DVB monolithic columns. The π-π interactions between the aromatic ring and the DVB-based stationary phase offered better recognition on polar analytes with aromatic moieties, which resulted in better separation resolution of aromatic analytes on the AlMA-DVB monolithic columns. In order to demonstrate the capability of potential environmental and/or food safety applications, eight phenylurea herbicides with single benzene ring and seven sulfonamide antibiotics with polyaromatic moieties were analyzed using the selected AlMA-DVB monolithic columns.

  5. Chromatographic selectivity of poly(alkyl methacrylate-co-divinylbenzene) monolithic columns for polar aromatic compounds by pressure-driven capillary liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shu-Ling; Wang, Chih-Chieh; Fuh, Ming-Ren

    2016-10-01

    In this study, divinylbenzene (DVB) was used as the cross-linker to prepare alkyl methacrylate (AlMA) monoliths for incorporating π-π interactions between the aromatic analytes and AlMA-DVB monolithic stationary phases in capillary LC analysis. Various AlMA/DVB ratios were investigated to prepare a series of 30% AlMA-DVB monolithic stationary phases in fused-silica capillaries (250-μm i.d.). The physical properties (such as porosity, permeability, and column efficiency) of the synthesized AlMA-DVB monolithic columns were investigated for characterization. Isocratic elution of phenol derivatives was first employed to evaluate the suitability of the prepared AlMA-DVB columns for small molecule separation. The run-to-run (0.16-1.20%, RSD; n = 3) and column-to-column (0.26-2.95%, RSD; n = 3) repeatabilities on retention times were also examined using the selected AlMA-DVB monolithic columns. The π-π interactions between the aromatic ring and the DVB-based stationary phase offered better recognition on polar analytes with aromatic moieties, which resulted in better separation resolution of aromatic analytes on the AlMA-DVB monolithic columns. In order to demonstrate the capability of potential environmental and/or food safety applications, eight phenylurea herbicides with single benzene ring and seven sulfonamide antibiotics with polyaromatic moieties were analyzed using the selected AlMA-DVB monolithic columns. PMID:27639150

  6. Cancellation of cellular responses to nanoelectroporation by reversing the stimulus polarity

    PubMed Central

    Semenov, Iurii; Xiao, Shu; Pakhomova, Olga N.; Gregory, Betsy; Schoenbach, Karl H.; Ullery, Jody C.; Beier, Hope T.; Rajulapati, Sambasiva R.; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2014-01-01

    Nanoelectroporation of biomembranes is an effect of high-voltage, nanosecond-duration electric pulses (nsEP). It occurs both in the plasma membrane and inside the cell, and nanoporated membranes are distinguished by ion-selective and potential-sensitive permeability. Here we report a novel phenomenon of bioeffects cancellation that puts nsEP cardinally apart from the conventional electroporation and electrostimulation by milli- and microsecond pulses. We compared the effects of 60- and 300-ns monopolar, nearly rectangular nsEP on intracellular Ca2+ mobilization and cell survival with those of bipolar 60 + 60 and 300 + 300 ns pulses. For diverse endpoints, exposure conditions, pulse numbers (1–60), and amplitudes (15–60 kV/cm), the addition of the second phase cancelled the effects of the first phase. The overall effect of bipolar pulses was profoundly reduced, despite delivering twofold more energy. Cancellation also took place when two phases were separated into two independent nsEP of opposite polarities; it gradually tapered out as the interval between two nsEP increased, but was still present even at a 10-μs interval. The phenomenon of cancellation is unique for nsEP and has not been predicted by the equivalent circuit, transport lattice, and molecular dynamics models of electroporation. The existing paradigms of membrane permeabilization by nsEP will need to be modified. Here we discuss the possible involvement of the assisted membrane discharge, two-step oxidation of membrane phospholipids, and reverse transmembrane ion transport mechanisms. Cancellation impacts nsEP applications in cancer therapy, electrostimulation, and biotechnology, and provides new insights into effects of more complex waveforms, including pulsed electromagnetic emissions. PMID:24748074

  7. Cancellation of cellular responses to nanoelectroporation by reversing the stimulus polarity.

    PubMed

    Pakhomov, Andrei G; Semenov, Iurii; Xiao, Shu; Pakhomova, Olga N; Gregory, Betsy; Schoenbach, Karl H; Ullery, Jody C; Beier, Hope T; Rajulapati, Sambasiva R; Ibey, Bennett L

    2014-11-01

    Nanoelectroporation of biomembranes is an effect of high-voltage, nanosecond-duration electric pulses (nsEP). It occurs both in the plasma membrane and inside the cell, and nanoporated membranes are distinguished by ion-selective and potential-sensitive permeability. Here we report a novel phenomenon of bioeffects cancellation that puts nsEP cardinally apart from the conventional electroporation and electrostimulation by milli- and microsecond pulses. We compared the effects of 60- and 300-ns monopolar, nearly rectangular nsEP on intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization and cell survival with those of bipolar 60 + 60 and 300 + 300 ns pulses. For diverse endpoints, exposure conditions, pulse numbers (1-60), and amplitudes (15-60 kV/cm), the addition of the second phase cancelled the effects of the first phase. The overall effect of bipolar pulses was profoundly reduced, despite delivering twofold more energy. Cancellation also took place when two phases were separated into two independent nsEP of opposite polarities; it gradually tapered out as the interval between two nsEP increased, but was still present even at a 10-µs interval. The phenomenon of cancellation is unique for nsEP and has not been predicted by the equivalent circuit, transport lattice, and molecular dynamics models of electroporation. The existing paradigms of membrane permeabilization by nsEP will need to be modified. Here we discuss the possible involvement of the assisted membrane discharge, two-step oxidation of membrane phospholipids, and reverse transmembrane ion transport mechanisms. Cancellation impacts nsEP applications in cancer therapy, electrostimulation, and biotechnology, and provides new insights into effects of more complex waveforms, including pulsed electromagnetic emissions.

  8. Statistical features of the global polarity reversal of the Venusian induced magnetosphere in response to the polarity change in interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vech, Daniel; Stenberg, Gabriella; Nilsson, Hans; Edberg, Niklas J. T.; Opitz, Andrea; Szegő, Károly; Zhang, Tielong; Futaana, Yoshifumi

    2016-05-01

    In this study we present the first statistical analysis on the effects of heliospheric current sheet crossings on the induced magnetosphere of Venus. These events are of particular interest because they lead to the reconfiguration of the induced magnetosphere with opposite polarity. We use a statistical approach based on 117 orbit pairs, and we study the spatial distribution of the heavy ion flux measurements in the plasma environment of Venus. The average and median heavy ion flux measurements are compared before and after the polarity reversal events. The results show that after the events the average and median heavy ion fluxes in the magnetotail are reduced by the factors of 0.75 ± 0.09 and 0.52, respectively. We find that even if a passage of a current sheet is a short time scale event lasting about 10 min, its effect on the near-Venus plasma environment lasts for a few hours. We conclude that the observations show similarities to the previous comet studies and the polarity reversal of the induced magnetosphere might be accompanied with dayside reconnection and magnetic disconnection of the plasma tail from the planetary ionosphere.

  9. Geomagnetic polarity reversals, Earth's core evolution, and conditions for dynamo action in the cores of terrestrial exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, Peter E.

    Planetary dynamos are responsible for the generation of large-scale magnetic fields and are ubiquitous in the solar system. Magnetic fields generated by dynamo action in a planetary core offer unique insight into the internal structure, composition, and energetics of the planet. This dissertation consists of two main parts, the first focuses on long period fluctuations in Earth's magnetic field and the second explores conditions for dynamo action in the cores of terrestrial exoplanets. The first part consists of three projects using first-principle numerical magnetohydrodynamic models of the geodynamo to investigate the relationship between two fundamental, but poorly understood, aspects of the geomagnetic field: magnetic polarity reversals and the influence of core evolution. The first project explores the dependence of various dynamo properties on the relative strengths of buoyancy and rotation, and identifies several dynamical regimes whose magnetic field fluctuations over time are consistent with the paleomagnetic field. We find that normal evolution of buoyancy production in the core and planetary rotation rate over 100 Myr produce a negligible change in dynamo polarity reversal rate and field intensity, implying that the observed fluctuations in the geomagnetic reversal rate requires either anomalous core evolution or a rough dynamo regime boundary. The second project models the long time-scale evolution of the Earth's core using time-dependent control parameters, which are constrained by the secular cooling of the core and tidal deceleration. We find that fluctuations in the geodynamo are closely coupled to the evolution of the core, which implies a connection between the long time-scale trends in the seafloor geomagnetic polarity reversal rate and the rate of core evolution over the last 100 Myr. In the third project we investigate the hypothesis that the long period (˜200 Myr) oscillation in paleomagnetic reversal frequency is controlled by the heat flow

  10. Origin of the magnetic-field controlled polarization reversal in multiferroic TbMn2 O 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leo, N.; Meier, D.; Pisarev, R. V.; Park, S.; Cheong, S.-W.; Fiebig, M.

    2011-03-01

    The interplay of multi-dimensional complex magnetic order parameters leads to interesting effects like magnetically induced ferroelectricity. A particular interesting example is TbMn 2 O5 because of the associated magnetic-field controllable electric polarization. By optical second harmonic generation we show that the gigantic magnetoelectric effect originates in three independent ferroelectric contributions. Two of these are manganese-generated. The third contribution is related to the magnetism of the Tb 3+ sublattice and has not been identified so far. It mediates the remarkable magnetic-field induced polarization reversal. This model is verified by experiments on the isostructural YMn 2 O5 where Y3+ ions are nonmagnetic and only two polarization contributions are present and no magnetoelectric coupling is observed. These results underline the importance of the 3 d - 4 f -interaction for the intricate magnetoelectric coupling in the class of isostructural RMn 2 O5 compounds. This work was supported by the DFG through SFB 608.

  11. THE MAGNETIZATION DEGREE OF THE OUTFLOW POWERING THE HIGHLY POLARIZED REVERSE-SHOCK EMISSION OF GRB 120308A

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shuai; Jin, Zhi-Ping; Wei, Da-Ming E-mail: dmwei@pmo.ac.cn

    2015-01-01

    GRB 120308A, a long duration γ-ray burst (GRB) detected by Swift, was distinguished by a highly polarized early optical afterglow emission that strongly suggests an ordered magnetic field component in the emitting region. In this work, we model the optical and X-ray emission in the reverse and forward shock scenario and show that the strength of the magnetic field in the reverse-shock region is ∼10 times stronger than that in the forward shock region. Consequently, the outflow powering the highly polarized reverse-shock optical emission was mildly magnetized at a degree of σ ∼ a few percent. Considering the plausible magnetic energy dissipation in both the acceleration and prompt emission phases of the GRB outflow, the afterglow data of GRB 120308A provides us with compelling evidence that, at least for some GRBs, a nonignorable fraction of the energy was released in the form of Poynting flux, confirming the finding first made in the reverse-forward shock emission modeling of the optical afterglow of GRB 990123 by Fan et al. in 2002 and Zhang et al. in 2003.

  12. The effect of contrast polarity reversal on face detection: evidence of perceptual asymmetry from sweep VEP.

    PubMed

    Liu-Shuang, Joan; Ales, Justin M; Rossion, Bruno; Norcia, Anthony M

    2015-03-01

    Contrast polarity inversion (i.e., turning dark regions light and vice versa) impairs face perception. We investigated the perceptual asymmetry between positive and negative polarity faces (matched for overall luminance) using a sweep VEP approach in the context of face detection (Journal of Vision 12 (2012) 1-18). Phase-scrambled face stimuli alternated at a rate of 3 Hz (6 images/s). The phase coherence of every other stimulus was parametrically increased so that a face gradually emerged over a 20-s stimulation sequence, leading to a 3 Hz response reflecting face detection. Contrary to the 6 Hz response, reflecting low-level visual processing, this 3 Hz response was larger and emerged earlier over right occipito-temporal channels for positive than negative polarity faces. Moreover, the 3 Hz response emerged abruptly to positive polarity faces, whereas it increased linearly for negative polarity faces. In another condition, alternating between a positive and a negative polarity face also elicited a strong 3 Hz response, indicating an asymmetrical representation of positive and negative polarity faces even at supra-threshold levels (i.e., when both stimuli were perceived as faces). Overall, these findings demonstrate distinct perceptual representations of positive and negative polarity faces, independently of low-level cues, and suggest qualitatively different detection processes (template-based matching for positive polarity faces vs. linear accumulation of evidence for negative polarity faces).

  13. Electrostatically Reversible Polarity of Ambipolar α-MoTe2 Transistors.

    PubMed

    Nakaharai, Shu; Yamamoto, Mahito; Ueno, Keiji; Lin, Yen-Fu; Li, Song-Lin; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito

    2015-06-23

    A doping-free transistor made of ambipolar α-phase molybdenum ditelluride (α-MoTe2) is proposed in which the transistor polarity (p-type and n-type) is electrostatically controlled by dual top gates. The voltage signal in one of the gates determines the transistor polarity, while the other gate modulates the drain current. We demonstrate the transistor operation experimentally, with electrostatically controlled polarity of both p- and n-type in a single transistor. PMID:25988597

  14. Reversals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Educational Media and Materials for the Handicapped, Columbus, OH.

    Selected from the National Instructional Materials Information System (NIMIS)--a computer based on-line interactive retrieval system on special education materials--the bibliography covers nine materials for remediating reversals in handicapped students at the early childhood and elementary levels. Entries are presented in order of NIMIS accession…

  15. Geomagnetic Polarity Reversal Model of Deeptow Magnetic Survey in the Southwest Subbasin of South China Sea Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, N.; Sun, Z.; Lin, J.; Li, C. F.; Xu, X.

    2014-12-01

    South China Sea basin, which evolved from Cenozoic continental margin rifting and subsequent seafloor spreading, is a classic example of a marginal sea in Western Pacific. Since the early 1980's, several models have been proposed for the formation of this sea basin. The previous studies were based mainly on the distribution of magnetic anomaly lineation obtained from aerial and shipboard measurements. However, large water depth (over 4.5km) and thick sediment cover (up to 1km or more) make the magnetic anoamaly information not so well displayed in aerial and shipboard data. To better understand the evolution of the sea basin, we increased anomaly amplitudes by collecting magnetic data along deep-tow profiles over the magnetic lineations in the South China Sea oceanic area. The one across the southwest subsea basin was analyzed first. The total field magnetic measurements were processed through filtering, resampling, diurnal variation removal, continuation to a level datum, regional field correction, projection to a common azimuth, and deskewing. A magnetic polarity reversal timescale was constructed by matching deep-tow anomalies with a simple, rectangular block magnetization model with the expansion rate for oceanic crust. We analyzed the spreading duration, rate, asymmetry, and reversal events of Southwest subbasin, in reference to the recent GTS2012 geomagnetic polarity representative data and concluded that the Southwest subbasin opened from around 21.767 Ma and stopped around C5C at about 15.974Ma. The full spreading rate varied from 8 to 40 cm/yr. Spreading is usually asymmetric by showing alternate faster spreading rate in one slab than the other in different time periods. From the comparison, several small reversal were revealed in addition to the standard geomagnetic polarity. These findings helped to understand the evolution of the Southwest subbasin of South China Sea and will also help to establish new reversal discrimination.

  16. Influence of mobile phase composition on electroosmotic flow velocity, solute retention and column efficiency in open-tubular reversed-phase capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Crego, A L; Martínez, J; Marina, M L

    2000-02-11

    The effects of some experimental parameters, such as the volume fraction and type of organic modifier in the mobile phase, and the concentration, type and pH of the buffer on the electroosmotic flow velocity, the retention behavior of test solutes, and the column efficiency have been investigated in capillary electrochromatography (CEC) using an open-tubular column of 9.60 microm I.D. with a porous silica layer chemically modified with C18 as stationary phase. The retention of a group of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) used as a test mixture varied significantly by changing the organic modifier content in the hydroorganic mobile phase according to the reversed-phase-like selectivity of the stationary phase. In addition, an increase in the percentage of organic modifier resulted in a slight increase in the linear velocity of the EOF. On the other hand, when the phosphate buffer concentration was increased over the range 1-50 mM, the electroosmotic mobility fell dramatically, the retention of the solutes decreased steadily, and the plate height showed a significant increase. The results obtained with phosphate, trishydroxymethylaminomethane or 2-morpholinoethanesulfonic acid as buffers were similar when pH remained constant. Optimization in CEC was essential to achieve further enhancement of separation performance, because the analysis time and separation resolution are essentially affected when varying operating parameters. Separations of seven PAHs with more than 100000 plates are presented within 4 min analysis time.

  17. V1 is not uniquely identified by polarity reversals of responses to upper and lower visual field stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Ales, Justin M.; Yates, Jacob L.; Norcia, Anthony M.

    2010-01-01

    The cruciform hypothesis states that if a visual evoked potential component originates in V1, then stimuli placed in the upper versus lower visual fields will generate responses with opposite polarity at the scalp. This diagnostic has been used by many studies as a definitive marker of V1 sources. To provide an empirical test of the validity of the cruciform hypothesis, we generated forward models of cortical areas V1, V2 and V3 that were based on realistic estimates of the 3-D shape of these areas and the shape and conductivity of the brain, skull and scalp. Functional MRI was used to identify the location of early visual areas and anatomical MRI data was used construct detailed cortical surface reconstructions and to generate boundary element method forward models of the electrical conductivity of each participant’s head. These two data sets for each subject were used to generate simulated scalp activity from the dorsal and ventral subdivisions of each visual area that correspond to the lower and upper visual field representations, respectively. The predicted topographies show that sources in V1 do not fully conform to the cruciform sign-reversal. Moreover, contrary to the model, retinotopic visual areas V2 and V3 show polarity reversals for upper and lower field stimuli. The presence of a response polarity inversion for upper versus lower field stimuli is therefore an insufficient criterion for identifying responses as having originated in V1. PMID:20488247

  18. Numerical analysis of a hollow electrode plasma torch with a reversed polarity discharge for radioactive waste treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seung-Chul; Kim, Dong-Uk; Kim, Min-Ho; Seo, Jun-Ho; Yang, O.-Bong

    2013-11-01

    In this study, a numerical analysis is carried out in order to investigate the effects of the electrode configuration and the operation conditions on the arc flow structure and the performance of a hollow electrode plasma torch with a reversed polarity discharge. From the numerical results, a swirl injection of plasma gas and a hollowed cathode with a convergent entrance are found to help control the recirculation directions of backflows and the attachment position of the anode spot in the rear electrode. For example, the anode spot is observed to be moved to the central point of the blocked side in the rear electrode (the anode) when the plasma-forming gases are injected with a swirl. This attachment point is predicted to act as a stable anode spot for the transferred operation of the hollow electrode plasma torch with a reversed polarity discharge. In addition, the torch performance is analyzed for operation variables, such as the arc current and the gas flow rates. Similar to that of a conventional hollow electrode plasma torch, the scale-up of input power is accompanied by increases in the arc current and the gas flow rate while increasing the arc current brings about a deterioration in the torch efficiency, which is defined as the ratio of the exit enthalpy to the input power. On the other hand, the temperature profiles at the torch's exit plane show relatively negligible differences for various arc currents and gas flow rates due to the cathode spot being close to the torch exit. Based on these features, we expect the hollow electrode plasma torch with a reversed polarity discharge to be a promising tool for treating radioactive wastes in a single step, both as a non-transferred-type plasma incinerator for combustibles and as a transferred-type arc-melter for non-combustibles.

  19. Reversal of spin polarization in Fe/GaAs (001) driven by resonant surface states: first-principles calculations.

    PubMed

    Chantis, Athanasios N; Belashchenko, Kirill D; Smith, Darryl L; Tsymbal, Evgeny Y; van Schilfgaarde, Mark; Albers, Robert C

    2007-11-01

    A minority-spin resonant state at the Fe/GaAs(001) interface is predicted to reverse the spin polarization with the voltage bias of electrons transmitted across this interface. Using a Green's function approach within the local spin-density approximation, we calculate the spin-dependent current in a Fe/GaAs/Cu tunnel junction as a function of the applied bias voltage. We find a change in sign of the spin polarization of tunneling electrons with bias voltage due to the interface minority-spin resonance. This result explains recent experimental data on spin injection in Fe/GaAs contacts and on tunneling magnetoresistance in Fe/GaAs/Fe magnetic tunnel junctions. PMID:18233099

  20. Scanning capacitance microscopy investigation on InGaAs/InP avalanche photodiode structures: Light-induced polarity reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Hao; Li, Tianxin; Wang, Wenjuan; Hu, Weida; Lin, Le; Lu, Wei

    2009-08-01

    Cross-sectional scanning capacitance microscopy is applied to study the carrier distribution as well as its variation under irradiation in an InGaAs/InP avalanche photodiode. The photocarriers excited by the stray light of atomic force microscope laser beam lead to a dramatic deviation of the dC /dV profile in the unintended-doped absorption layer, and even cause the reversal of signal polarity. The existence of surface potential and its impact on the spreading of photocarriers near the cleaved face are demonstrated as the main origins of the light-induced dC /dV reversal. The effect provides experimental information on the distribution property of photoelectric process in devices.

  1. Direct imaging of the magnetic polarity and reversal mechanism in individual Fe(3-x)O4 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Moya, Carlos; Iglesias-Freire, Óscar; Pérez, Nicolás; Batlle, Xavier; Labarta, Amilcar; Asenjo, Agustina

    2015-05-01

    This work reports on the experimental characterization of the magnetic domain configurations in cubic, isolated Fe3-xO4 nanoparticles with a lateral size of 25-30 nm. The magnetic polarity at remanence of single domain ferrimagnetic Fe3-xO4 nanoparticles deposited onto a carbon-silicon wafer is observed by magnetic force microscopy. The orientations of these domains provide a direct observation of the magneto-crystalline easy axes in each individual nanoparticle. Furthermore, the change in the domain orientation with an external magnetic field gives evidence of particle magnetization reversal mediated by a coherent rotation process that is also theoretically predicted by micromagnetic calculations.

  2. The Steens Basalt of the Oregon Plateau: A geomagnetic polarity reversal and the age of the Columbia River basalt group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarboe, Nicholas A.

    The Steens Basalt of the Oregon Plateau covers about 53,000 km2 of southeastern Oregon and northwestern Nevada. Three localities where volcanic sections contain transitional lavas of the Steens reversal have been studied. At Steens Mountain, previous studies showed a complex reversal path consisting of 30 transitional directional groups. At the three new localities, forty-five new transitional directional groups are discovered, show an increase in the complexity of the reversal path, and reinforce the clumping of some directions. Fifteen 40Ar/39Ar ages were determined from lavas on or near the Oregon Plateau. The lavas are shown to have erupted before, after, or during the Steens reversal in the R0, N 0, or N1 of the CRBG. Using a Bayesian statistical analysis of the mean age of the Steens reversal lavas and three other ages at the Catlow section, the best and preferred age of the Steens reversal is 16.73 +0.13/-0.08 Ma (95% confidence). Correlation of this age to a sea floor spreading time scale allows the floating magnetostratigraphy of the CRBG to be placed into the geomagnetic polarity time scale and shows that the R0 corresponds to the C5Cr chron with the Steens reversal at the top of the C5Cr chron. Twenty six paleomagnetic poles from Steens Mountain are combined with 108 non-transitional poles found in this thesis to give a clockwise rotation of the Oregon Plateau of 11.4° +/- 5.6° with respect to the younger CRBG flows to the north and 14.5° +/- 4.6° with respect to cratonic North America. Using secular variation considerations, eruption rates can be calculated at two of the sections which contain the Steens reversal: 85--120 m/ka at Catlow and 130--195 m/ka at Poker Jim South. Similarly, durations of eruptions have been determined at the four sections that do not contain the Steens reversal: ˜2.5 ka for 260 m at the Pueblo Mountains, 0.5 to 1.5 ka for 190 m at Summit Springs, 1--3 ka for 170 m at North Mickey, and ˜3 ka for 160 m at Guano Rim.

  3. Magnetization reversal of ferromagnetic nanoparticles induced by a stream of polarized electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozhushner, M. A.; Gatin, A. K.; Grishin, M. V.; Shub, B. R.; Kim, V. P.; Khomutov, G. B.; Ilegbusi, O. J.; Trakhtenberg, L. I.

    2016-09-01

    The remagnetization of ferromagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles of several thousand cubic nanometers by spin-polarized current is investigated. For this purpose, magnetite nanoparticles are synthesized and deposited on a conductive nonmagnetic substrate. The remagnetization is conducted in high-vacuum scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The STM tip from magnetized iron wire constitutes one electrode while the ferromagnetic nanoparticle on the graphite surface represents the second electrode. The measured threshold value of remagnetization current (Ithresh=9 nA) is the lowest value of current at which remagnetization occurs. The change in nanoparticle magnetization is detected by the effect of giant magnetic resistance, specifically, the dependence of the weak polarized current (Ipolarized current on magnetic moment of small ferromagnetic nanoclusters. The peculiarities of size dependence of the observed effects are explained.

  4. Polarity Reversal in Homologous Series of Surfactant-Free Janus Nanoparticles: Toward the Next Generation of Amphiphiles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dalin; Chew, Jia Wei; Honciuc, Andrei

    2016-06-28

    The ability to finely tune the amphiphilic balance of Janus nanoparticles (JNPs) could represent a step forward toward creating the next generation of solid-state amphiphiles with significant potential for applications. The inherent amphiphilicity of JNPs stemming from an intrinsic polarity contrast between two surface regions is well-acknowledged, but remained difficult to demonstrate experimentally in the absence of surfactants and stabilizers. We have designed two homologous series of surfactant-free polymeric JNPs starting from polystyrene (PS) seed nanoparticles (NPs) on which we grew Janus lobes of different sizes via seed polymerization and phase separation of the 3-(triethoxysilyl)propyl-methacrylate (3-TSPM) monomer. The two series differ only by the radical initiator used in the seed polymerization: polar ionic ammonium persulfate (APS) vs nonpolar oil-soluble 2,2'-azobis(2-methylpropionitrile) (AIBN). To compare the two series, we employed them in the emulsification of water with heptane or molten paraffin wax. A polarity reversal of the JNPs within AIBN-JNP series could be observed from the catastrophic and transitional emulsion phase inversions and occurred when the more polar lobe was larger than the nonpolar seed PS lobe. Furthermore, the AIBN-JNPs appeared to be amphiphilic and adopt preferred orientation within the monolayer at the oil/water interface. We therefore demonstrated that in the absence of surfactants the amphiphilicity of the JNPs depends not only on the relative size of the lobes, but also on the surface polarity contrast, which can be tuned by changing the nature of radical initiator. PMID:27283348

  5. Unveiling characteristics of a bioelectrochemical system with polarity reversion for simultaneous azo dye treatment and bioelectricity generation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jian; Zhang, Yaping; Liu, Guoguang; Ning, Xunan; Wang, Yujie; Liu, Jingyong

    2015-09-01

    A novel bioelectrochemical system (BES) operated with polarity reversion was explored for simultaneous anaerobic/aerobic treatment of azo dye and production of bioelectricity under extremely low buffer. The Congo red was first decolorized in anode, with completed color removal in 35 h. The resultant decolorization intermediates were then mineralized after the anode reversed to aerobic biocathode, evidenced by 55 % chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal in 200 h. The mineralization efficiency was further increased to 70 % when the period of the half-cycle was prolonged to 375 h. Meanwhile, the BES produced a continuous stable positive/negative alternate voltage output under 5 mM phosphate buffer because of the self-neutralization of the accumulated protons and hydroxyl ions in electrolyte. The electrode performance was significantly improved, which was indicated by alleviated electrode polarization, due to in situ use of accumulated protons and hydroxyl ions and enhanced electron transfer in the presence of Congo red and its degradation intermediates, which resulted in 1.05-fold increases in maximum power density (67.5 vs. 32.9 mW/m(2)). An analysis of the microbial diversity in the biofilm revealed that the biofilm was dominated by facultative bacteria with functional roles in contaminant degradation and electricity generation. PMID:25957151

  6. A critical note on the IAGA-endorsed Polar Cap index procedure: effects of solar wind sector structure and reverse polar convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauning, P.

    2015-11-01

    The International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) has recently endorsed a new Polar Cap (PC) index version to supersede the previous seven different versions of the PCN (North) index and the five different PCS (South) index versions. However, the new PC index has some adverse features which should be known and taken into account by users of the index. It uses in its derivation procedure an "effective" quiet day level (QDC) composed of a "basic" QDC and an added solar wind sector term related to the azimuthal component (By) of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The added IMF By-related terms may introduce unjustified contributions to the PC index of more than 2 index units (mV m-1). Furthermore, cases of reverse convection during strong northward IMF Bz (NBZ) conditions included in the database for calculation of index coefficients can cause unjustified index enhancements of 0.5-1 mV m-1 during calm conditions, reduction of index values by more than 20 % during disturbed conditions, and inconsistencies between index coefficients and index values for the northern and southern polar caps. The aim here is to specify these adverse features and quantify their effects, and to suggest alternative steps for future modifications of the index procedure.

  7. Simultaneous Determination of Essential Oil Components and Fatty Acids in Fennel using Gas Chromatography with a Polar Capillary Column.

    PubMed

    Najdoska-Bogdanov, Menče; Bogdanov, Jane B; Stefova, Marina

    2015-09-01

    Cultivated and wild growing samples of fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill., Apiaceae) from R. Macedonia were studied for their volatiles and fatty acid composition. The main essential oil components isolated via hydrodistillation were: trans-anethole (>80%), estragole (< 6%), limonene (< 6%), anisaldehyde (< 1%) and 0.5 % fenchone. An alternative method for characterization of both the non-polar volatile and non volatile fractions was developed using n-hexane and dichloromethane (3:1, v/v) in a Soxhlet extraction followed by transesterification. The obtained extracts were then characterized and the dominant fatty acid was 18:1 (petroselinic and oleic acid) 75.0-82.8%, followed by 18:2 (linoleic acid) 10.8-16.2% and other fatty acids: palmitic (4.3-6.9%), stearic (1.2-1.7%) and myristic (0-2.9%). The results for the volatile fraction after Soxhlet extraction and transesterification did not significantly differ from results obtained after hydrodistillation, especially for the main components (trans-anethole, estragole, fenchone and limonene), implying that the developed method can be used for simultaneous determination of volatiles and fatty acids.

  8. Simultaneous Determination of Essential Oil Components and Fatty Acids in Fennel using Gas Chromatography with a Polar Capillary Column.

    PubMed

    Najdoska-Bogdanov, Menče; Bogdanov, Jane B; Stefova, Marina

    2015-09-01

    Cultivated and wild growing samples of fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill., Apiaceae) from R. Macedonia were studied for their volatiles and fatty acid composition. The main essential oil components isolated via hydrodistillation were: trans-anethole (>80%), estragole (< 6%), limonene (< 6%), anisaldehyde (< 1%) and 0.5 % fenchone. An alternative method for characterization of both the non-polar volatile and non volatile fractions was developed using n-hexane and dichloromethane (3:1, v/v) in a Soxhlet extraction followed by transesterification. The obtained extracts were then characterized and the dominant fatty acid was 18:1 (petroselinic and oleic acid) 75.0-82.8%, followed by 18:2 (linoleic acid) 10.8-16.2% and other fatty acids: palmitic (4.3-6.9%), stearic (1.2-1.7%) and myristic (0-2.9%). The results for the volatile fraction after Soxhlet extraction and transesterification did not significantly differ from results obtained after hydrodistillation, especially for the main components (trans-anethole, estragole, fenchone and limonene), implying that the developed method can be used for simultaneous determination of volatiles and fatty acids. PMID:26594773

  9. Paleointensity determinations during the Akaroa polarity reversal, New Zealand: New input from the multispecimen parallel differential pTRM method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camps, P.; Fanjat, G.; Poidras, T.; Hoffman, K. A.; Carvallo, C.; kennedy, B.

    2011-12-01

    We resampled two polarity reversals of late Miocene age (~ 9 Ma) recorded successively in the Akaroa volcano (Hoffman, 1986, Nature). Our main objective was to check old paleointensity determinations (Sherwood & Shaw, 1986, J. Geomag. Geoelec.) that yielded stronger values during the transitional period than during stable periods that preceded and followed the reversals. This observation is opposite to what is generally observed. An increase in intensity during the reversal would provide an extreme example of increasing secular variation. However, the experimental method used for determining the paleointensity, method of Shaw, is strongly questioned by the scientific community. A check of these data by the conventional Thellier method was required. Unfortunately, among the 72 sampled flows, only 4 yielded rock magnetic properties well suited for Thellier determinations. In most of the flows, the presence of large Multi-Domain grains of Ti-magnetite, which are frequently associated with Ti-maghemite, precludes any Thellier paleointensity determinations. We implement the domain-state independent paleointensity method (the multispecimen parallel differential pTRM, Dekkers & Bohnel, 2006, EPSL; Fabian & Leonhardt, 2010, EPSL) for 16 lava flows in which the MD Ti-magnetite are not oxidized. Thellier paleointensities obtained do not confirm the Sherwood results but show more scattered values of the intensity even during the stable periods of the field. To complete the data, multispecimen mesearements are being to be done.

  10. Open tubular capillary column for the separation of cytochrome C tryptic digest in capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Ali, Faiz; Cheong, Won Jo

    2015-10-01

    A silica capillary of 50 μm internal diameter and 500 mm length (416 mm effective length) was chemically modified with 4-(trifluoromethoxy) phenyl isocyanate in the presence of dibutyl tin dichloride as catalyst. Sodium diethyl dithiocarbamate was reacted with the terminal halogen of the bound ligand to incorporate the initiator moiety, and in situ polymerization was performed using a monomer mixture of styrene, N-phenylacrylamide, and methacrylic acid. The resultant open tubular capillary column immobilized with the copolymer layer was used for the separation of tryptic digest of cytochrome C in capillary electrochromatography. The sample was well eluted and separated into many components. The elution patterns of tryptic digest of cytochrome C were studied with respect to pH and water content in the mobile phase. This preliminary study demonstrates that open tubular capillary electrochromatography columns with a modified copolymer layer composed of proper nonpolar and polar units fabricated by reversible addition-fragmentation transfer polymerization can be useful as separation media for proteomic analysis. PMID:26289407

  11. Loess 10Be evidence for an asynchronous Brunhes-Matuyama magnetic polarity reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, W.; Beck, W.; Kong, X.; An, Z.; Qiang, X.; Wu, Z.; Xian, F.; Ao, H.

    2015-12-01

    In Chinese loess the Brunhes-Matuyama (B-M) geomagnetic reversal appears to occur about 25 ka prior to the established axial dipole reversal age found in many marine sediments, i.e., in Chinese loess this magnetic reversal boundary is found in glacial loess unit L8 which is thought to be correlated with Marine Isotope Stage 20 (MIS 20), in marine sediment records, however, this boundary is commonly found in interglacial period of MIS 19[1-2], leading to the debate on uncertainties of paleoclimatic correlation between the Chinese loess-paleosol sequences and marine sediments[3-5]. Based on this issue, here we propose to use the cosmogenic 10Be to address this conundrum. 10Be is a long-lived radionuclide produced in the atmosphere by cosmic ray spallation reactions and carried to the ground attached to aerosols. Its atmospheric production rate is inversely proportional to the geomagnetic field intensity [6]. This allows us to reconstruct past geomagnetic field intensity variations using 10Be concentrations recorded in different sedimentary archives. We carried out both the 10Be studies and paleogeomagnetic measurements in Luochuan and Xifeng sections in Chinese Loess Plateau. Both loess profiles show that 10Be production rate was at a maximum-an indication of the dipole field reversal-at ca. 780 ± 3 ka BP., in paleosol unit S7 corresponding to MIS 19, proving that the timing of B-M reversal recorded in Chinese loess is synchronous with that seen in marine records [1]. These results reaffirmed the conventional paleoclimatic correlation of loess-paleosol sequences with marine isotope stages and the standard loess timescale as correct. However, it is ~25 ka younger than the age (depth) of the paleogeomagnetic measurements, which show that the B-M boundary is in L8 in these two Chinese loess-paleosol sequences, demonstrating that loess magnetic overprinting has occurred. 1.Tauxe, L., et al., 1996, EARTH PLANET SC LETT, 140, 133-1462.Zhou, L.P., and Shackleton, 1999

  12. Ground- and excited-state proton transfers in reversed micelles. Polarity restrictions and isotope effects

    SciTech Connect

    Politi, M.J.; Brandt, O.; Fendler, J.H.

    1985-05-23

    Ground- and excited-state proton transfers have been investigated with 8-hydroxy-1,3,6-pyrenetrisulfonate, POH, in sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate, AOT, reversed micelle solubilized water pools in isooctane. Since POH is a much stronger acid in the singlet excited state, (POH)*, than in the ground state (pK/sub a/ = 7.2, pK/sub a/* = 0.5), excitation of POH by 1-5-mJ, 8-ns, 353-nm laser pulses, at pH values such that pK/sub a/* < pH < pK/sub a/, results in the dissociation of POH, governed by k/sub off/*. PO/sup -/ reprotonation rate, K/sub on/ values, have been determined by laser flash photolysis. In reversed micelles k/sub on/ values were found to depend on the water-to-AOT ratio(w values). Deuterium solvent isotope effects of 1.3 and 2.2 have been determined for k/sub on//k/sub on/(D/sub 2/O) in w = 33 and 12 AOT solubilized reversed micelles in isooctane. Combining these values with pK/sub a/ of POH led to isotope effects of 7.8 and 8.4 on k/sub off/ in the corresponding solutions. Steady-state and subnanosecond time-resolved fluorescence measurements have been utilized for assessing POH excited-state deprotonation, governed by k/sub off/*(D/sub 2/O), and reprotonation, governed by k/sub on/*(D/sub 2/O), in pure D/sub 2/O and in AOT entrapped water and AOT-d entrapped D/sub 2/O pools in isooctane. 51 references, 10 figures, 6 tables.

  13. Microchip capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence combined with one-step duplex reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction for the rapid detection of Enterovirus 71 and Coxsackievirus A16 in throat swab specimens.

    PubMed

    Jia, Ruan; Chengjun, Sun; Heng, Chen; Chen, Zhou; Yuanqian, Li; Yongxin, Li

    2015-07-01

    Enterovirus 71 and Coxsackievirus A16 are the main pathogens causing hand-foot-mouth disease. In this paper, microchip capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence combined with one-step duplex reverse transcript-polymerase chain reaction has been developed for the detection of Enterovirus 71 and Coxsackievirus A16 in throat swab specimens. The specific reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction amplicons labeled with SYBR Orange were separated by microchip capillary electrophoresis and detected by laser induced fluorescence detector within 7 min. The intraday and interday relative standard deviation of migration time for DNA Marker was in the range of 1.36-2.94 and 2.78-3.96%, respectively. The detection limits were as low as 2.06 × 10(3) copies/mL for Enterovirus 71 and 5 × 10(3) copies/mL for Coxsackievirus A16. No cross-reactivity was observed with rotavirus, astrovirus, norovirus, and adenovirus, which showed good specificity of the method. This assay was validated using 100 throat swab specimens that were detected by real-time reverse-transcript polymerase chain reaction in parallel and the two methods produced the same results. This study provided a rapid, sensitive and specific method for the detection of Enterovirus 71 and Coxsackievirus A16, which make a contribution to significant time and cost saving for the identification and treatment of patients. PMID:25953405

  14. Microchip capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence combined with one-step duplex reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction for the rapid detection of Enterovirus 71 and Coxsackievirus A16 in throat swab specimens.

    PubMed

    Jia, Ruan; Chengjun, Sun; Heng, Chen; Chen, Zhou; Yuanqian, Li; Yongxin, Li

    2015-07-01

    Enterovirus 71 and Coxsackievirus A16 are the main pathogens causing hand-foot-mouth disease. In this paper, microchip capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence combined with one-step duplex reverse transcript-polymerase chain reaction has been developed for the detection of Enterovirus 71 and Coxsackievirus A16 in throat swab specimens. The specific reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction amplicons labeled with SYBR Orange were separated by microchip capillary electrophoresis and detected by laser induced fluorescence detector within 7 min. The intraday and interday relative standard deviation of migration time for DNA Marker was in the range of 1.36-2.94 and 2.78-3.96%, respectively. The detection limits were as low as 2.06 × 10(3) copies/mL for Enterovirus 71 and 5 × 10(3) copies/mL for Coxsackievirus A16. No cross-reactivity was observed with rotavirus, astrovirus, norovirus, and adenovirus, which showed good specificity of the method. This assay was validated using 100 throat swab specimens that were detected by real-time reverse-transcript polymerase chain reaction in parallel and the two methods produced the same results. This study provided a rapid, sensitive and specific method for the detection of Enterovirus 71 and Coxsackievirus A16, which make a contribution to significant time and cost saving for the identification and treatment of patients.

  15. The dynamics of the solar magnetic field: polarity reversals, butterfly diagram and quasi-biennial oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecchio, A.; Laurenza, M.; Meduri, D.; Carbone, V.; Storini, M.

    2010-12-01

    The spatio-temporal dynamics of the solar magnetic field has been investigated by using NSO/Kitt Peak synoptic magnetic maps covering the period August 1976-September 2003. For each heliographic latitude the field has been decomposed in intrinsic mode functions through the Empirical Mode Decomposition, in order to investigate the time evolution of the various characteristic oscillating frequencies at different latitudes. The quasi biennial oscillations are identified as the fundamental periodicity of the magnetic field and linked to dynamo waves which transport magnetic flux both polewards and equatorwards from latitudes of about 35°. On the other hand, the usual pattern of the Sporer law is associated with periodicities related to the high frequency fluctuating part of the magnetic field. Finally the usual ~22 yr cycle, related to the polarity inversions of the large-scale dipolar field, are consistent with alpha-omega dynamo models including meridional circulation.

  16. Effect of electric field on the performance of soil electro-bioremediation with a periodic polarity reversal strategy.

    PubMed

    Mena, E; Villaseñor, J; Cañizares, P; Rodrigo, M A

    2016-03-01

    In this work, it is studied the effect of the electric fields (within the range 0.0-1.5 V cm(-1)) on the performance of electrobioremediation with polarity reversal, using a bench scale plant with diesel-spiked kaolinite with 14-d long tests. Results obtained show that the periodic changes in the polarity of the electric field results in a more efficient treatment as compared with the single electro-bioremediation process, and it does not require the addition of a buffer to keep the pH within a suitable range. The soil heating was not very important and it did not cause a change in the temperature of the soil up to values incompatible with the life of microorganisms. Low values of water transported by the electro-osmosis process were attained with this strategy. After only 14 d of treatment, by using the highest electric field studied in this work (1.5 V cm(-1)), up to 35.40% of the diesel added at the beginning of the test was removed, value much higher than the 10.5% obtained by the single bioremediation technology in the same period. PMID:26735730

  17. Effect of electric field on the performance of soil electro-bioremediation with a periodic polarity reversal strategy.

    PubMed

    Mena, E; Villaseñor, J; Cañizares, P; Rodrigo, M A

    2016-03-01

    In this work, it is studied the effect of the electric fields (within the range 0.0-1.5 V cm(-1)) on the performance of electrobioremediation with polarity reversal, using a bench scale plant with diesel-spiked kaolinite with 14-d long tests. Results obtained show that the periodic changes in the polarity of the electric field results in a more efficient treatment as compared with the single electro-bioremediation process, and it does not require the addition of a buffer to keep the pH within a suitable range. The soil heating was not very important and it did not cause a change in the temperature of the soil up to values incompatible with the life of microorganisms. Low values of water transported by the electro-osmosis process were attained with this strategy. After only 14 d of treatment, by using the highest electric field studied in this work (1.5 V cm(-1)), up to 35.40% of the diesel added at the beginning of the test was removed, value much higher than the 10.5% obtained by the single bioremediation technology in the same period.

  18. Sample stacking for the analysis of eight penicillin antibiotics by micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography.

    PubMed

    Puig, Patricia; Borrull, Francesc; Calull, Marta; Aguilar, Carme

    2005-02-01

    We studied the use of micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography for separating eight penicillins. The method consists of (i) an electrophoretic separation based on micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography, which uses sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as surfactant; (ii) a sample stacking technique called reverse electrode polarity stacking mode (REPSM); and (iii) direct UV detection. The background electrolyte that gave complete separation contained 20 mM sodium borate buffer and 60 mM SDS. The sensitivity of the method was improved by an enrichment step that used on-column stacking. The limits of detection were at the microg.L(-1) level for the penicillins and did not detract from the peak resolution.

  19. Observations of reverse polarity flux transfer events at the earth's dayside magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rijnbeek, R. P.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Southwood, D. J.; Russell, C. T.

    1982-01-01

    High resolution plasma and magnetic field measurements made by the ISEE 1 and 2 spacecraft have provided the first definitive observations of magnetic reconnection at the dayside boundary, occurring either as a large-scale, quasisteady process enduring on time scales of at least tens of minutes or as a transient process localized in both temporal and spatial extent. Observations of flux transfer events (FTEs) at the earth's dayside magnetopause are presented which have plasma and magnetic field signatures reversed in sign from those previously reported. These FTEs are interpreted in terms of localized and transitory reconnection with the spacecraft located south of the reconnection site. They are associated with a previously reported interval of quasisteady reconnection which is similarly located, indicating that a close physical connection exists between the two processes.

  20. Velocity of domain-wall motion during polarization reversal in ferroelectric thin films: Beyond Merz's Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qingping; Han, Myung-Geun; Tao, Jing; Xu, Guangyong; Welch, David O.; Zhu, Yimei

    2015-02-01

    The motion of domain walls (DWs) is critical to switching kinetics in ferroelectric (FE) materials. Merz's law, dependent only on the applied electric field, cannot explain recent experimental observations in FE thin films because these experiments showed that the DW velocity depends not only on the strength of the applied electric field but also on size of the reversal domain. In this paper, we derive a model to understand the dominant factors controlling the velocity of FE DWs. Our calculations reveal that the DW velocities are not only a function of the strength of the electric field but also decay exponentially with the increasing characteristic time of the measurement or the size of the growing domain. Our observations can naturally explain the gigantic variation reported in the literature, over 15 orders of magnitude, in the experimentally measured DW velocities and the formation of the stripe shape of FE domains.

  1. A polarity reversal in the large-scale magnetic field of the rapidly rotating sun HD 190771

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, P.; Dintrans, B.; Morgenthaler, A.; Van Grootel, V.; Morin, J.; Lanoux, J.; Aurière, M.; Konstantinova-Antova, R.

    2009-12-01

    Aims. We investigate the long-term evolution of the large-scale photospheric magnetic field geometry of the solar-type star HD 190771. With fundamental parameters very close to those of the Sun except for a shorter rotation period of 8.8 d, HD 190771 provides us with a first insight into the specific impact of the rotation rate in the dynamo generation of magnetic fields in 1 M_⊙ stars. Methods: We use circularly polarized, high-resolution spectra obtained with the NARVAL spectropolarimeter (Observatoire du Pic du Midi, France) and compute cross-correlation line profiles with high signal-to-noise ratio to detect polarized Zeeman signatures. From three phase-resolved data sets collected during the summers of 2007, 2008, and 2009, we model the large-scale photospheric magnetic field of the star by means of Zeeman-Doppler imaging and follow its temporal evolution. Results: The comparison of the magnetic maps shows that a polarity reversal of the axisymmetric component of the large-scale magnetic field occurred between 2007 and 2008, this evolution being observed in both the poloidal and toroidal magnetic components. Between 2008 and 2009, another type of global evolution occured, characterized by a sharp decrease of the fraction of magnetic energy stored in the toroidal component. These changes were not accompanied by significant evolution in the total photospheric magnetic energy. Using our spectra to perform radial velocity measurements, we also detect a very low-mass stellar companion to HD 190771. Table 1 is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  2. Inverse Dipolar Magnetic Anomaly Over the Volcanic Cone Linked to Reverse Polarity Magnetizations in Lavas and Tuffs - Implications for the Conduit System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fucugauchi, J. U.; Perez-Cruz, L. L.; Trigo-Huesca, A.

    2012-12-01

    A combined magnetics and paleomagnetic study of Toluquilla monogenetic volcano and associated lavas and tuffs from Valsequillo basin in Central Mexico provides evidence on a magnetic link between lavas, ash tuffs and the underground volcanic conduit system. Paleomagnetic analyses show that lavas and ash tuffs carry reverse polarity magnetizations, which correlate with the inversely polarized dipolar magnetic anomaly over the volcano. The magnetizations in the lava and tuff show similar southward declinations and upward inclinations, supporting petrological inferences that the tuff was emplaced while still hot and indicating a temporal correlation for lava and tuff emplacement. Conduit geometry is one of the important controlling factors in eruptive dynamics of basaltic volcanoes. However volcanic conduits are often not, or only partly, exposed. Modeling of the dipolar anomaly gives a reverse polarity source magnetization associated with a vertical prismatic body with southward declination and upward inclination, which correlates with the reverse polarity magnetizations in the lava and tuff. The study documents a direct correlation of the paleomagnetic records with the underground magmatic conduit system of the monogenetic volcano. Time scale for cooling of the volcanic plumbing system involves a longer period than the one for the tuff and lava, suggesting that magnetization for the source of dipolar anomaly may represent a long time average as compared to the spot readings in the lava and tuff. The reverse polarity magnetizations in lava and tuff and in the underground source body for the magnetic anomaly are interpreted in terms of eruptive activity of Toluquilla volcano at about 1.3 Ma during the Matuyama reverse polarity C1r.2r chron.

  3. Active Upper-atmosphere Chemistry and Dynamics from Polar Circulation Reversal on Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teanby, Nicholas A.; Irwin, Patrick Gerard Joseph; Nixon, Conor A.; DeKok, Remco; Vinatier, Sandrine; Coustenis, Athena; Sefton-Nash, Elliot; Calcutt, Simon B.; Flasar, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    Saturn's moon Titan has a nitrogen atmosphere comparable to Earth's, with a surface pressure of 1.4 bar. Numerical models reproduce the tropospheric conditions very well but have trouble explaining the observed middle-atmosphere temperatures, composition and winds. The top of the middle-atmosphere circulation has been thought to lie at an altitude of 450 to 500 kilometres, where there is a layer of haze that appears to be separated from the main haze deck. This 'detached' haze was previously explained as being due to the colocation of peak haze production and the limit of dynamical transport by the circulation's upper branch. Herewe report a build-up of trace gases over the south pole approximately two years after observing the 2009 post-equinox circulation reversal, from which we conclude that middle-atmosphere circulation must extend to an altitude of at least 600 kilometres. The primary drivers of this circulation are summer-hemisphere heating of haze by absorption of solar radiation and winter-hemisphere cooling due to infrared emission by haze and trace gases; our results therefore imply that these effects are important well into the thermosphere (altitudes higher than 500 kilometres). This requires both active upper-atmosphere chemistry, consistent with the detection of high-complexity molecules and ions at altitudes greater than 950 kilometres, and an alternative explanation for the detached haze, such as a transition in haze particle growth from monomers to fractal structures.

  4. Active upper-atmosphere chemistry and dynamics from polar circulation reversal on Titan.

    PubMed

    Teanby, Nicholas A; Irwin, Patrick G J; Nixon, Conor A; de Kok, Remco; Vinatier, Sandrine; Coustenis, Athena; Sefton-Nash, Elliot; Calcutt, Simon B; Flasar, F Michael

    2012-11-29

    Saturn's moon Titan has a nitrogen atmosphere comparable to Earth's, with a surface pressure of 1.4 bar. Numerical models reproduce the tropospheric conditions very well but have trouble explaining the observed middle-atmosphere temperatures, composition and winds. The top of the middle-atmosphere circulation has been thought to lie at an altitude of 450 to 500 kilometres, where there is a layer of haze that appears to be separated from the main haze deck. This 'detached' haze was previously explained as being due to the co-location of peak haze production and the limit of dynamical transport by the circulation's upper branch. Here we report a build-up of trace gases over the south pole approximately two years after observing the 2009 post-equinox circulation reversal, from which we conclude that middle-atmosphere circulation must extend to an altitude of at least 600 kilometres. The primary drivers of this circulation are summer-hemisphere heating of haze by absorption of solar radiation and winter-hemisphere cooling due to infrared emission by haze and trace gases; our results therefore imply that these effects are important well into the thermosphere (altitudes higher than 500 kilometres). This requires both active upper-atmosphere chemistry, consistent with the detection of high-complexity molecules and ions at altitudes greater than 950 kilometres, and an alternative explanation for the detached haze, such as a transition in haze particle growth from monomers to fractal structures.

  5. Topographic stress perturbations in southern Davis Mountains, west Texas 1. Polarity reversal of principal stresses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, W.Z.; Morin, R.H.

    2002-01-01

    We have applied a previously developed analytical stress model to interpret subsurface stress conditions inferred from acoustic televiewer logs obtained in two municipal water wells located in a valley in the southern Davis Mountains near Alpine, Texas. The appearance of stress-induced breakouts with orientations that shift by 90?? at two different depths in one of the wells is explained by results from exact solutions for the effects of valleys on gravity and tectonically induced subsurface stresses. The theoretical results demonstrate that above a reference depth termed the hinge point, a location that is dependent on Poisson's ratio, valley shape, and magnitude of the maximum horizontal tectonic stress normal to the long axis of the valley, horizontal stresses parallel to the valley axis are greater than those normal to it. At depths below this hinge point the situation reverses and horizontal stresses normal to the valley axis are greater than those parallel to it. Application of the theoretical model at Alpine is accommodated by the fact that nearby earthquake focal mechanisms establish an extensional stress regime with the regional maximum horizontal principal stress aligned perpendicular to the valley axis. We conclude that the localized stress field associated with a valley setting can be highly variable and that breakouts need to be examined in this context when estimating the orientations and magnitudes of regional principal stresses.

  6. THE DYNAMICS OF THE SOLAR MAGNETIC FIELD: POLARITY REVERSALS, BUTTERFLY DIAGRAM, AND QUASI-BIENNIAL OSCILLATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Vecchio, A.; Meduri, D.; Carbone, V.; Laurenza, M.; Storini, M.

    2012-04-10

    The spatio-temporal dynamics of the solar magnetic field has been investigated by using NSO/Kitt Peak magnetic synoptic maps covering the period 1976 August-2003 September. The field radial component, for each heliographic latitude, has been decomposed in intrinsic mode functions through the Empirical Mode Decomposition in order to investigate the time evolution of the various characteristic oscillating modes at different latitudes. The same technique has also been applied on synoptic maps of the meridional and east-west components, which were derived from the observed line-of-sight projection of the field by using the differential rotation. Results obtained for the {approx}22 yr cycle, related to the polarity inversions of the large-scale dipolar field, show an antisymmetric behavior with respect to the equator in all the field components and a marked poleward flux migration in the radial and meridional components (from about -35 Degree-Sign and +35 Degree-Sign in the southern and northern hemispheres, respectively). The quasi-biennial oscillations (QBOs) are also identified as a fundamental timescale of variability of the magnetic field and associated with poleward magnetic flux migration from low latitudes around the maximum and descending phase of the solar cycle. Moreover, signs of an equatorward drift, at a {approx}2 yr rate, seem to appear in the radial and toroidal components. Hence, the QBO patterns suggest a link to a dynamo action. Finally, the high-frequency component of the magnetic field, at timescales less than 1 yr, provides the most energetic contribution and it is associated with the outbreaks of the bipolar regions on the solar surface.

  7. Active upper-atmosphere chemistry and dynamics from polar circulation reversal on Titan.

    PubMed

    Teanby, Nicholas A; Irwin, Patrick G J; Nixon, Conor A; de Kok, Remco; Vinatier, Sandrine; Coustenis, Athena; Sefton-Nash, Elliot; Calcutt, Simon B; Flasar, F Michael

    2012-11-29

    Saturn's moon Titan has a nitrogen atmosphere comparable to Earth's, with a surface pressure of 1.4 bar. Numerical models reproduce the tropospheric conditions very well but have trouble explaining the observed middle-atmosphere temperatures, composition and winds. The top of the middle-atmosphere circulation has been thought to lie at an altitude of 450 to 500 kilometres, where there is a layer of haze that appears to be separated from the main haze deck. This 'detached' haze was previously explained as being due to the co-location of peak haze production and the limit of dynamical transport by the circulation's upper branch. Here we report a build-up of trace gases over the south pole approximately two years after observing the 2009 post-equinox circulation reversal, from which we conclude that middle-atmosphere circulation must extend to an altitude of at least 600 kilometres. The primary drivers of this circulation are summer-hemisphere heating of haze by absorption of solar radiation and winter-hemisphere cooling due to infrared emission by haze and trace gases; our results therefore imply that these effects are important well into the thermosphere (altitudes higher than 500 kilometres). This requires both active upper-atmosphere chemistry, consistent with the detection of high-complexity molecules and ions at altitudes greater than 950 kilometres, and an alternative explanation for the detached haze, such as a transition in haze particle growth from monomers to fractal structures. PMID:23192150

  8. Sensor development for in situ detection of concentration polarization and fouling of reverse osmosis membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detrich, Kahlil T.; Goulbourne, Nakhiah C.

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to evaluate three polymer electroding techniques in developing a novel in situ sensor for an RO system using the electrical response of a thin film composite sensor. Electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to measure the sensor response when exposed to sodium chloride solutions with concentrations from 0.1 M to 0.8 M in both single and double bath configurations. An insulated carbon grease sensor was mechanically stable while a composite Direct Assembly Process (DAP) sensor was fragile upon hydration. Scanning electron microscopy results from an impregnation-reduction technique showed gold nanoparticles were deposited most effectively when presoaked in a potassium hydroxide solution and on an uncoated membrane; surface resistances remained too high for sensor implementation. Through thickness carbon grease sensors showed a transient response to changes in concentration, and no meaningful concentration sensitivity was noted for the time scales over which EIS measurements were taken. Surface carbon grease electrodes attached to the polyamide thin film were not sensitive to concentration. The impedance spectra indicated the carbon grease sensor was unable to detect changes in concentration in double bath experiments when implemented with the polyamide surface exposed to salt solutions. DAP sensors lacked a consistent response to changes in concentration too. A reverse double bath experiment with the polysulfone layer exposed to a constant concentration exhibited a transient impedance response similar to through thickness carbon grease sensors in a single bath at constant concentration. These results suggest that the microporous polysulfone layer is responsible for sensor response to concentration.

  9. Continuous full filling capillary electrochromatography: nanoparticle synthesis and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Spégel, Peter; Viberg, Peter; Carlstedt, Jonas; Petersson, Patrik; Jörntén-Karlsson, Magnus

    2007-06-22

    Reversed phase continuous full filling capillary electrochromatography with electrospray ionisation mass spectrometric detection was performed with highly sulphated poly[styrene-co-(lauryl methacrylate)-co-(divinylbenzene)] nanoparticles. The nanoparticles that contained a hydrophobic core and a hydrophilic surface were prepared in a one step synthesis using soap free emulsion polymerisation. By changing the concentration of monomers, the polymerisation temperature, and the polarity of the dispersive phase, the size of the nanoparticles could be controlled. With the optimised conditions, nanoparticles with an average size of 157 nm were obtained. These nanoparticles were dispersed in the background electrolyte and used for reversed phase continuous full filling. An orthogonal electrospray ionisation interface was used to separate the eluting nanoparticles from the eluting analytes prior to mass spectrometry detection. Compared to previous studies on reversed phase continuous full filling, the retention, the separation efficiency, and the resolution of a homologous series of dialkyl phthalates were greatly improved.

  10. Identification of water-soluble polar organics in air and vehicular emitted particulate matter using ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry and Capillary electrophoresis - mass spectrometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt-Kopplin, P.; Yassine, M.; Gebefugi, I.; Hertkorn, N.; Dabek-Zlotorzynska, E.

    2009-04-01

    The effects of aerosols on human health, atmospheric chemistry, and climate are among the central topics in current environmental health research. Detailed and accurate measurements of the chemical composition of air particulate matter (PM) represent a challenging analytical task. Minute sample amounts are usually composed of several main constituents and hundreds of minor and trace constituents. Moreover, the composition of individual particles can be fairly uniform or very different (internally or externally mixed aerosols), depending on their origin and atmospheric aging processes (coagulation, condensation / evaporation, chemical reaction). The aim of the presentation was the characterization of the organic matter (OM) fraction of environmental aerosols which is not accessible by GC-methods, either because of their high molecular weight, their polarity or due to thermal instability. We also describe the main chemical characteristics of complexe oligomeric organic fraction extracted from different aerosols collected in urban and rural area in Germany and Canada. Mass spectrometry (MS) became an essential tool used by many prominent leaders of the biological research community and the importance of MS to the future of biological research is now clearly evident as in the fields of Proteomics and Metabolomics. Especially Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Mass Spectrometry (ICR-FT/MS) is an ultrahigh resolution MS that allows new approach in the analysis of complex mixtures. The mass resolution (< 200 ppb) allowed assigning the elemental composition (C, H, O, N, S…) to each of the obtained mass peaks and thus already a description of the mixture in terms of molecular composition. This possibility is used by the authors together with a high resolution separation method of charged compounds: capillary electrophoresis. A CE-ESI-MS method using an ammonium acetate based background electrolyte (pH 4.7) was developed for the determination of isomeric benzoic acids in

  11. Reversed-polarity regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, F.

    1980-01-01

    The 58 RPRS studied have a lifespan comparable to normal active regions and have no tendency to rotate toward a more normal alignment. They seem to have stable configurations with no apparent evidence suggesting stress due to their anomalous magnetic alignment. Magnetic complexity in RPRs is the key to flare productivity just as it is in normal regions - weak field RPRs produced no flares and regions with complex spots produced more flares than regions with noncomplex spots by a factor of 5. The RPRs however, differ from normal regions in the frequency of having complex spots, particularly the long lived complex spots, in them. Less than 17 percent of normal ARs have complex spots; less than 1.8 percent have long lived complex spots. In contrast, 41 percent of RPRs have complex spots and 24 percent have long lived complex spots.

  12. Determination of urinary succinylacetone by capillary electrophoresis for the diagnosis of tyrosinemia type I.

    PubMed

    Cansever, M Serif; Erim, F Bedia

    2005-04-25

    The presence of succinylacetone in urine or blood or amniotic fluid is pathognomonic of an inherited metabolic disorder, named tyrosinemia type I. We developed a capillary electrophoretic method for the fast analysis of succinylacetone in urine samples. The separation was performed at reversed polarity mode using either a cationic surfactant as the buffer additive, or a capillary coated with a positively charged polyelectrolyte. Under these conditions, urine samples were directly injected to the capillary without any pretreatment step. The utility of the method was demonstrated by the identification of succinyacetone in urine from patients with hereditary tyrosinemia type I. For all patients, diagnostic peaks at the expected migration times were detected. The developed method is rapid, simple, inexpensive, and suitable for the determination of succinylacetone in clinical urine samples.

  13. Abasic Phosphorothioate Oligomers Inhibit HIV-1 Reverse Transcription and Block Virus Transmission across Polarized Ectocervical Organ Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Fraietta, Joseph A.; Mueller, Yvonne M.; Lozenski, Karissa L.; Ratner, Deena; Boesteanu, Alina C.; Hancock, Aidan S.; Lackman-Smith, Carol; Zentner, Isaac J.; Chaiken, Irwin M.; Chung, Suhman; LeGrice, Stuart F. J.; Snyder, Beth A.; Mankowski, Marie K.; Jones, Natalie M.; Hope, Jennifer L.; Gupta, Phalguni; Anderson, Sharon H.; Wigdahl, Brian

    2014-01-01

    In the absence of universally available antiretroviral (ARV) drugs or a vaccine against HIV-1, microbicides may offer the most immediate hope for controlling the AIDS pandemic. The most advanced and clinically effective microbicides are based on ARV agents that interfere with the earliest stages of HIV-1 replication. Our objective was to identify and characterize novel ARV-like inhibitors, as well as demonstrate their efficacy at blocking HIV-1 transmission. Abasic phosphorothioate 2′ deoxyribose backbone (PDB) oligomers were evaluated in a variety of mechanistic assays and for their ability to inhibit HIV-1 infection and virus transmission through primary human cervical mucosa. Cellular and biochemical assays were used to elucidate the antiviral mechanisms of action of PDB oligomers against both lab-adapted and primary CCR5- and CXCR4-utilizing HIV-1 strains, including a multidrug-resistant isolate. A polarized cervical organ culture was used to test the ability of PDB compounds to block HIV-1 transmission to primary immune cell populations across ectocervical tissue. The antiviral activity and mechanisms of action of PDB-based compounds were dependent on oligomer size, with smaller molecules preventing reverse transcription and larger oligomers blocking viral entry. Importantly, irrespective of molecular size, PDBs potently inhibited virus infection and transmission within genital tissue samples. Furthermore, the PDB inhibitors exhibited excellent toxicity and stability profiles and were found to be safe for vaginal application in vivo. These results, coupled with the previously reported intrinsic anti-inflammatory properties of PDBs, support further investigations in the development of PDB-based topical microbicides for preventing the global spread of HIV-1. PMID:25224013

  14. Investigation of a marine magnetic polarity reversal boundary in cross section at the northern boundary of the Kane Megamullion, Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 23°40'N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Min; Tivey, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    Near-bottom magnetic field measurements made by the submersible Nautile during the 1992 Kanaut Expedition define the cross-sectional geometry of magnetic polarity reversal boundaries and the vertical variation of crustal magnetization in lower oceanic crust exposed along the Kane Transform Fault (TF) at the northern boundary of the Kane Megamullion (KMM). The KMM exposes lower crust and upper mantle rocks on a low-angle normal fault that was active between 3.3 Ma and 2.1 Ma. The geometry of the polarity boundaries is estimated from an inversion of the submarine magnetic data for crustal magnetization. In general, the polarity boundaries dip away from the ridge axis along the Kane TF scarp, with a west dipping angle of ~45° in the shallow (<1 km) crust and <20° in the deeper crust. The existence of the magnetic polarity boundaries (e.g., C2r.2r/C2An.1n, ~2.581 Ma) indicates that the lower crustal gabbros and upper mantle serpentinized peridotites are able to record a coherent magnetic signal. Our results support the conclusion of Williams (2007) that the lower crust cools through the Curie temperature of magnetite to become magnetic, with the polarity boundaries representing both frozen isotherms and isochrons. We also test the effects of the rotation of this isotherm structure and/or footwall rotation and find that the magnetic polarity boundary geometry is not sensitive to these directional changes.

  15. Capillary origami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Py, Charlotte; Doppler, Lionel; Bico, Jose; Roman, Benoit; Reverdy, Paul; Baroud, Charles

    2006-11-01

    The wet fur of a dog coming out of a pond assembles into bunches: this is the most common effect of capillary forces on elasticity structures (the hairs). From a practical point of view, the deformation of flexible elements by surface tension forces dramatically damages mechanical microsystems or lung airways, but also allows the self-organization of nanotube carpets into well defined clump patterns. But capillary forces may generate even more complex structures when flexible sheets are brought to contact with a liquid interface. Here we present experiments where surface tension folds up an elastic sheet around a deposited water droplet, and discuss the different possible shapes obtained. These self-folding origami may be used in microsy stems design as a convenient and robust way to fold two-dimensional planar patterns into 3-dimensional structures, since surface tension effects are enhanced at small scales.

  16. A reversed-phase capillary ultra-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) method for comprehensive top-down/bottom-up lipid profiling

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiaoli; Zhang, Qibin; Meng, Da; Issac, Giorgis; Zhao, Rui; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Chu, Rosey K.; Zhou, Jianying; Tang, Keqi; Hu, Zeping; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.; Katze, Michael G.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2012-01-01

    Lipidomics is a critical part of metabolomics and aims to study all the lipids within a living system. We present here the development and evaluation of a sensitive capillary UPLC-MS method for comprehensive top-down/bottom-up lipid profiling. Three different stationary phases were evaluated in terms of peak capacity, linearity, reproducibility, and limit of quantification (LOQ) using a mixture of lipid standards representative of the lipidome. The relative standard deviations of the retention times and peak abundances of the lipid standards were 0.29% and 7.7%, respectively, when using the optimized method. The linearity was acceptable at >0.99 over 3 orders of magnitude, and the LOQs were sub-fmol. To demonstrate the performance of the method in the analysis of complex samples, we analyzed lipids extracted from a human cell line, rat plasma, and a model human skin tissue, identifying 446, 444, and 370 unique lipids, respectively. Overall, the method provided either higher coverage of the lipidome, greater measurement sensitivity, or both, when compared to other approaches of global, untargeted lipid profiling based on chromatography coupled with MS. PMID:22354571

  17. Sensitive determination of parabens in human urine and serum using methacrylate monoliths and reversed-phase capillary liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Correa, Enrique Javier; Vela-Soria, Fernando; Ballesteros, Oscar; Ramis-Ramos, Guillermo; Herrero-Martínez, José Manuel

    2015-01-30

    A method for the determination of parabens in human urine and serum by capillary liquid chromatography (cLC) with UV-Vis and mass spectrometry (MS) detection using methacrylate ester-based monolithic columns has been developed. The influence of composition of polymerization mixture was studied. The optimum monolith was obtained with butyl methacrylate monomer at 60/40% (wt/wt) butyl methacrylate/ethylene dimethacrylate ratio and 50wt% porogens (composed of 36wt% of 1,4-butanediol, 54wt% 1-propanol and 10wt% water). Baseline resolution of analytes was achieved through a mobile phase of acetonitrile/water in gradient elution mode. Additionally, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) was combined with both cLC-UV-Vis and cLC-MS to achieve the determination of parabens in human urine and serum samples with very low limits of detection. Satisfactory intra- and inter-day repeatabilities were obtained in UV-Vis and MS detection, although the latter provided lower detection limits (up to 300-fold) than the UV-Vis detection. Recoveries for the target analytes from spiked biological samples ranged from 95.2% to 106.7%. The proposed methodology for the ultra-low determination of parabens in human urine and serum samples is simple and fast, the consumption of reagents is very low, and very small samples can be analyzed.

  18. Investigation of a rare event where the polar ionospheric reverse convection potential does not saturate during a period of extreme northward IMF solar wind driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clauer, C. Robert; Xu, Zhonghua; Maimaiti, M.; Ruohoneimi, J. Michael; Scales, Wayne; Hartinger, Michael D.; Nicolls, Michael J.; Kaeppler, Stephen; Wilder, Frederick D.; Lopez, Ramon E.

    2016-06-01

    A variety of statistical studies have shown that the ionospheric polar potential produced by solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling is linear for weak to moderate solar wind driving but becomes nonlinear during periods of very strong driving. It has been shown that this applies to the two-cell convection potential that develops during southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and also to the reverse convection cells that develop during northward IMF. This has been described as polar potential saturation, and it appears to begin when the driving solar wind electric field becomes greater than 3 mV/m. Utilizing measurements from the Resolute Incoherent Scatter Radar (RISR-N), we examine ionospheric data near local noon within the reverse convection cells that developed during a period of very strong northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) on 12 September 2014. During this period we measure the electric field within the throat of the reverse convection cells to be near 150 mV/m at a time when the IMF is nearly 28 nT northward. This is far in excess of the 30-40 mV/m expected for polar potential saturation of the reverse convection cells. In fact, the development of the electric field responds linearly to the IMF Bz component throughout this period of extreme driving. The conditions in the solar wind show the solar wind velocity near 600 km/s, number density near 20 ions/cm3, and the Alfvén velocity about 75 km/s giving an Alfvén Mach number of 8. A search of several years of solar wind data shows that these values occur together 0.035% of the time. These conditions imply a high plasma β in the magnetosheath. We believe that condition of high β along with high mass density and a strong merging electric field in the magnetosheath are the significant parameters that produce the linear driving of the ionospheric electric field during this unusual period of extreme solar wind conditions. A discussion of current theories to account for cross-polar cap

  19. Magnetic Reversal of Electric Polarization with Fixed Chirality of Magnetic Structure in a Chiral-Lattice Helimagnet MnSb_{2}O_{6}.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, M; Seki, S; Sato, T J; Nambu, Y; Hong, T; Matsuda, M; Cao, H B; Ishiwata, S; Tokura, Y

    2016-07-22

    The correlation between magnetic and dielectric properties has been investigated for the single crystal of the chiral triangular-lattice helimagnet MnSb_{2}O_{6}. We found that the spin-spiral plane in the ground state has a considerable tilting from the (110) plane and that the sign of the spin-spiral tilting angle is coupled to the clockwise or counterclockwise manner of spin rotation and accordingly to the sign of magnetically induced electric polarization. This leads to unique magnetoelectric responses such as the magnetic-field-induced selection of a single ferroelectric domain as well as the reversal of electric polarization just by a slight tilting of the magnetic field direction, where the chiral nature of the crystal structure plays a crucial role through the coupling of the chirality between the crystal and magnetic structures. Our results demonstrate that crystallographic chirality can be an abundant source of novel magnetoelectric functions with coupled internal degrees of freedom. PMID:27494497

  20. Magnetic Reversal of Electric Polarization with Fixed Chirality of Magnetic Structure in a Chiral-Lattice Helimagnet MnSb2 O6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, M.; Seki, S.; Sato, T. J.; Nambu, Y.; Hong, T.; Matsuda, M.; Cao, H. B.; Ishiwata, S.; Tokura, Y.

    2016-07-01

    The correlation between magnetic and dielectric properties has been investigated for the single crystal of the chiral triangular-lattice helimagnet MnSb2 O6 . We found that the spin-spiral plane in the ground state has a considerable tilting from the (110) plane and that the sign of the spin-spiral tilting angle is coupled to the clockwise or counterclockwise manner of spin rotation and accordingly to the sign of magnetically induced electric polarization. This leads to unique magnetoelectric responses such as the magnetic-field-induced selection of a single ferroelectric domain as well as the reversal of electric polarization just by a slight tilting of the magnetic field direction, where the chiral nature of the crystal structure plays a crucial role through the coupling of the chirality between the crystal and magnetic structures. Our results demonstrate that crystallographic chirality can be an abundant source of novel magnetoelectric functions with coupled internal degrees of freedom.

  1. High Resolution Polar Kerr Effect Measurements of Sr2RuO4: Evidence for Broken Time Reversal Symmetry in the Superconducting State

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Jing

    2010-04-05

    Polar Kerr effect in the spin-triplet superconductor Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} was measured with high precision using a Sagnac interferometer with a zero-area Sagnac loop. We observed non-zero Kerr rotations as big as 65 nanorad appearing below T{sub c} in large domains. Our results imply a broken time reversal symmetry state in the superconducting state of Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4}, similar to {sup 3}He-A.

  2. Capillary muscle

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Caroline; Mouterde, Timothée; Quéré, David; Clanet, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The contraction of a muscle generates a force that decreases when increasing the contraction velocity. This “hyperbolic” force–velocity relationship has been known since the seminal work of A. V. Hill in 1938 [Hill AV (1938) Proc R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 126(843):136–195]. Hill’s heuristic equation is still used, and the sliding-filament theory for the sarcomere [Huxley H, Hanson J (1954) Nature 173(4412):973–976; Huxley AF, Niedergerke R (1954) Nature 173(4412):971–973] suggested how its different parameters can be related to the molecular origin of the force generator [Huxley AF (1957) Prog Biophys Biophys Chem 7:255–318; Deshcherevskiĭ VI (1968) Biofizika 13(5):928–935]. Here, we develop a capillary analog of the sarcomere obeying Hill’s equation and discuss its analogy with muscles. PMID:25944938

  3. Precise age of C33N-C32R magnetic-polarity reversal, San Juan Basin, New Mexico and Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fassett, James E.; Steiner, Maureen B.

    1997-01-01

    Polarity-chron boundary C33n-C32r has been identified in the Upper Cretaceous continental Farmington Sandstone Member of the Kirtland Shale in Hunter Wash in the southwest part of the San Juan Basin of New Mexico, and in the marine Lewis Shale at Chimney Rock, Colorado, in the northeast part of the basin. Single- and multiple-crystal laser fusion 40Ar/39Ar ages of sanidine crystals from volcanic ash beds bracketing the C33n-C32r polarity reversal at Hunter Wash establish its age as 73.50 ± 0.18 Ma. The reversal apparently occurs within the Baculites compressus Western Interior ammonite zone and within the Edmontonian land-vertebrate faunal zone. An 8 Ma hiatus separates Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks in the southern San Juan Basin. These findings provide a precise new interpolated Late Cretaceous tie point for geologic time scales, provide the basis for the direct correlation of Western Interior ammonite zones to European open-ocean faunal zones, and establish the first direct tie between continental and marine fossil zones within the Western Interior of North America.

  4. Study of some characteristics of large-scale solar magnetic fields during the global field polarity reversal according to observations at the telescope-magnetograph Kislovodsk Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tlatov, A. G.; Dormidontov, D. V.; Kirpichev, R. V.; Pashchenko, M. P.; Shramko, A. D.; Peshcherov, V. S.; Grigoryev, V. M.; Demidov, M. L.; Svidskii, P. M.

    2015-12-01

    The data obtained at the Routine Prediction Solar Telescope (RPST), which was designed and manufactured mainly at ISTP SB RAS and was installed at Kislovodsk MAS MAO RAN. The telescope is used to register weak large-scale fields throughout the solar disk with an angular resolution about 30 arcsec. The means square error of measurements is ~0.44 G in this case. The MAS MAO RPST observations have been compared with the magnetic fields and other solar activity parameters measured at different ground and space observatories. It was shown that the characteristics of the magnetic fields of active regions and largescale magnetic fields are interrelated. The evolution of the polar magnetic field was considered, and it was shown that the polarity in cycle 24 was reversed in June-July 2013 in the Northern Hemisphere and in December 2014-January 2015 in the Southern Hemisphere. At the same time, it has been noted that the magnetic field strength in the Northern Hemisphere at latitudes higher than 50° varied around zero in 2014, which indicates that the global field sign was reversed for a long time in the Northern Hemisphere.

  5. An experimental study on the effect of spacer on concentration polarization in a long channel reverse osmosis membrane cell.

    PubMed

    Mo, H; Ng, H Y

    2010-01-01

    This study was to experimentally investigate the performance and organic fouling behaviour in a 1-m long RO membrane channel with or without spacer for desalting. It was found that local permeate flux distributed heterogeneously along the long membrane channel without a spacer inserted due to exponential growth of concentration polarization, which also resulted in decreasing salt rejection and increasing organic fouling along the membrane channel in the downstream direction. This heterogeneity could be lessened by inserting a spacer into the channel, which mitigated concentration polarization due to the enhanced turbulence caused by a spacer, especially at the downstream portion of the channel. However, in the upstream of the channel, inserting a spacer exerted an additional vertical resistance which might counteract the effect of concentration polarization mitigation by a spacer and caused a lower permeate flux. This suggests that it is necessary to consider the integral effect of spacer for designing an RO membrane module and an overall RO system in order to prevent extra resistance, reduce concentration polarization and membrane fouling. PMID:20389001

  6. Monolithic poly (SPE-co-BVPE) capillary columns as a novel hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography stationary phase for the separation of polar analytes.

    PubMed

    Foo, Hsiao Ching; Heaton, James; Smith, Norman W; Stanley, Shawn

    2012-10-15

    A novel hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) stationary phase was prepared by the co-polymerisation of zwitterionic N,N'-dimethyl-N-methacryloxyethyl-N-(3-sulfopropyl) ammonium betaine (SPE) and the crosslinker 1,2-bis(p-vinylphenyl) ethane (BVPE) in the presence of the porogens, toluene and methanol. Monolithic columns were produced by carrying out the α,α'-azoisobutyronitrile (AIBN) initiated reaction for 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 h inside a 200 μm i.d. fused silica capillary at 75°C (water bath). The optimum polymerisation time was shown to be 2 h, as this resulted in good porosity, due to enlarged flow-channels and the presence of a higher proportion of mesopores provided a relatively larger surface area than the other columns. The chromatographic properties of the optimised poly (SPE-co-BVPE) monolithic column were evaluated with test mixtures containing both basic and neutral compounds in the HILIC gradient separation mode. This produced relatively sharp peaks (average peak width at half height=0.1 min) with average asymmetry factors of 1.4 and baseline resolution was obtained for all the compounds. Using the isocratic separation of the test mixture, the number of theoretical plates (N) per metre calculated was between 26,888 and 35,930 by using average values obtained for triplicate injections of the compounds thiourea, toluene and acrylamide.

  7. Nanoscale mapping of heterogeneity of the polarization reversal in lead-free relaxor-ferroelectric ceramic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobeljic, D.; Shvartsman, V. V.; Belianinov, A.; Okatan, B.; Jesse, S.; Kalinin, S. V.; Groh, C.; Rödel, J.; Lupascu, D. C.

    2016-01-01

    Relaxor/ferroelectric ceramic/ceramic composites have shown to be promising in generating large electromechanical strain at moderate electric fields. Nonetheless, the mechanisms of polarization and strain coupling between grains of different nature in the composites remain unclear. To rationalize the coupling mechanisms we performed advanced piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) studies of 0.92BNT-0.06BT-0.02KNN/0.93BNT-0.07BT (ergodic/non-ergodic relaxor) composites. PFM is able to distinguish grains of different phases by characteristic domain patterns. Polarization switching has been probed locally, on a sub-grain scale. k-Means clustering analysis applied to arrays of local hysteresis loops reveals variations of polarization switching characteristics between the ergodic and non-ergodic relaxor grains. We report a different set of switching parameters for grains in the composites as opposed to the pure phase samples. Our results confirm ceramic/ceramic composites to be a viable approach to tailor the piezoelectric properties and optimize the macroscopic electromechanical characteristics.Relaxor/ferroelectric ceramic/ceramic composites have shown to be promising in generating large electromechanical strain at moderate electric fields. Nonetheless, the mechanisms of polarization and strain coupling between grains of different nature in the composites remain unclear. To rationalize the coupling mechanisms we performed advanced piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) studies of 0.92BNT-0.06BT-0.02KNN/0.93BNT-0.07BT (ergodic/non-ergodic relaxor) composites. PFM is able to distinguish grains of different phases by characteristic domain patterns. Polarization switching has been probed locally, on a sub-grain scale. k-Means clustering analysis applied to arrays of local hysteresis loops reveals variations of polarization switching characteristics between the ergodic and non-ergodic relaxor grains. We report a different set of switching parameters for grains in the

  8. Nanoscale mapping of heterogeneity of the polarization reversal in lead-free relaxor–ferroelectric ceramic composites

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gobeljic, D.; Shvartsman, V. V.; Belianinov, A.; Okatan, B.; Jesse, S.; Kalinin, S. V.; Groh, C.; Rödel, J.; Lupascu, D. C.

    2016-01-05

    Relaxor/ferroelectric ceramic/ceramic composites have shown to be promising in generating large electromechanical strain at moderate electric fields. However, the mechanisms of polarization and strain coupling between grains of different nature in the composites remain unclear. To rationalize the coupling mechanisms we performed advanced piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) studies of 0.92BNT-0.06BT-0.02KNN/0.93BNT-0.07BT (ergodic/non-ergodic relaxor) composites. PFM is able to distinguish grains of different phases by characteristic domain patterns. Polarization switching has been probed locally, on a sub-grain scale. k-Means clustering analysis applied to arrays of local hysteresis loops reveals variations of polarization switching characteristics between the ergodic and non-ergodic relaxor grains. Here,more » we report a different set of switching parameters for grains in the composites as opposed to the pure phase samples. These results confirm ceramic/ceramic composites to be a viable approach to tailor the piezoelectric properties and optimize the macroscopic electromechanical characteristics.« less

  9. Latitudinal gradients of cosmic rays and the polarity reversal of the heliospheric magnetic field: A preliminary evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newkirk, G., Jr.; Lockwood, J. A.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Simpson, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Within the statistical limits imposed by the currently available data and the noise inherent in the determination of the latitudinal gradient, no evidence for the expected change in the latitudinal gradient from pre-1980 to post-1980 epochs can be found. In addition, the rigidity dependence of the gradient appears to be the same in the two epochs. Thus, no evidence is found for a sensitivity of the latitudinal gradient to the polarity of the largescale heliospheric magnetic field such as has been predicted by models incorporating particle drifts.

  10. Characterization of cis- and trans-octadecenoic acid positional isomers in edible fat and oil using gas chromatography-flame ionisation detector equipped with highly polar ionic liquid capillary column.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Kazuaki; Asanuma, Masaharu; Mizobe, Hoyo; Kojima, Koichi; Nagai, Toshiharu; Beppu, Fumiaki; Gotoh, Naohiro

    2014-10-01

    In this study, the characterisation of all cis- and trans-octadecenoic acid (C18:1) positional isomers in partially hydrogenated vegetable oil (PHVO) and milk fat, which contain several cis- and trans-C18:1 positional isomers, was achieved by gas chromatography-flame ionisation detector equipped with a highly polar ionic liquid capillary column (SLB-IL111). Prior to analysis, the cis- and trans-C18:1 fractions in PHVO and milk fat were separated using a silver-ion cartridge. The resolution of all cis-C18:1 positional isomers was successfully accomplished at the optimal isothermal column temperature of 120 °C. Similarly, the positional isomers of trans-C18:1, except for trans-6-C18:1 and trans-7-C18:1, were separated at 120 °C. The resolution of trans-6-C18:1 and trans-7-C18:1 isomers was made possible by increasing the column temperature to 160 °C. This analytical method is suitable for determining the cis- and trans-C18:1 positional isomers in edible fats and oils.

  11. Entry of PIP3-containing polyplexes into MDCK epithelial cells by local apical-basal polarity reversal

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cuifeng; de Jong, Edwin; Sjollema, Klaas A.; Zuhorn, Inge S.

    2016-01-01

    The polarized architecture of epithelium presents a barrier to therapeutic drug/gene carriers, which is mainly due to a limited (apical) internalization of the carrier systems. The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa invades epithelial cells by inducing production of apical phosphatidylinositol-3, 4, 5-triphosphate (PIP3), which results in the recruitment of basolateral receptors to the apical membrane. Since basolateral receptors are known receptors for gene delivery vectors, apical PIP3 may improve the internalization of such vectors into epithelial cells. PIP3 and nucleic acids were complexed by the cationic polymer polyethylenimine (PEI), forming PEI/PIP3 polyplexes. PEI/PIP3 polyplexes showed enhanced internalization compared to PEI polyplexes in polarized MDCK cells, while basolateral receptors were found to redistribute and colocalize with PEI/PIP3 polyplexes at the apical membrane. Following their uptake via endocytosis, PEI/PIP3 polyplexes showed efficient endosomal escape. The effectiveness of the PIP3-containing delivery system to generate a physiological effect was demonstrated by an essentially complete knock down of GFP expression in 30% of GFP-expressing MDCK cells following anti-GFP siRNA delivery. Here, we demonstrate that polyplexes can be successfully modified to mimic epithelial entry mechanisms used by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These findings encourage the development of pathogen-inspired drug delivery systems to improve drug/gene delivery into and across tissue barriers. PMID:26899207

  12. Use of cyclic current reversal polarization voltammetry for investigating the relationship between corrosion resistance and heat-treatment induced variations in microstructures of 400 C martensitic stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrose, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Software for running a cyclic current reversal polarization voltammagram has been developed for use with a EG&G Princeton Applied Research Model 273 potentiostat/galvanostat system. The program, which controls the magnitude, direction and duration of an impressed galvanostatic current, will produce data in ASCII spreadsheets (Lotus, Quattro) for graphical representation of CCRPV voltammograms. The program was used to determine differences in corrosion resistance of 440 C martenstic stainless steel produced as a result of changes in microstructure effected by tempering. It was determined that tempering at all temperatures above 400 F resulted in increased polarizability of the material, with the increased likelihood that pitting would be initiated upon exposure to marine environments. These results will be used in development of remedial procedures for lowering the susceptibility of these alloys toward the stress corrosion cracking experienced in bearings used in high pressure oxygen turbopumps used in the main engines of space shuttle orbiters.

  13. Invasive ductal carcinomas of the breast showing partial reversed cell polarity are associated with lymphatic tumor spread and may represent part of a spectrum of invasive micropapillary carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Acs, Geza; Esposito, Nicole N; Rakosy, Zsuzsa; Laronga, Christine; Zhang, Paul J

    2010-11-01

    Invasive micropapillary carcinomas (IMPC) of the breast are aggressive tumors frequently associated with lymphatic invasion and nodal metastasis even when micropapillary (MP) differentiation is very focal within the tumors. We have noticed that some breast carcinomas showing lymphatic spread but lacking histologic features of IMPC have occasional tumor cell clusters reminiscent of those of IMPC without the characteristic prominent retraction artifact. To study the clinicopathologic significance of such features, we prospectively selected 1323 invasive ductal carcinomas and determined the presence and extent of MP differentiation and retraction artifact in the tumors. One representative tumor block per case was used for immunostaining for epithelial membrane antigen (EMA). Partial reverse cell polarity (PRCP) was defined as prominent linear EMA reactivity on at least part of the periphery of tumor cell clusters usually associated with decreased cytoplasmic staining. The clinicopathologic features of carcinomas with PRCP were compared with IMPC and invasive ductal (no special type) carcinomas without this feature. Of the 1323 cases, 96 (7.3%) and 92 (7.0%) showed MP features and the presence of PRCP, respectively. We found that the presence of both PRCP and MP features were strongly associated with decreased cytoplasmic EMA immunoreactivity and the presence of lymphatic invasion and nodal metastasis, even if such features were present only very focally. Our results suggest that breast carcinomas with PRCP may have the same implication as MP differentiation and these tumors may represent part of a spectrum of IMPC. Complete or partial reversal of cell polarity may play a significant role in lymphatic tumor spread.

  14. Capillary electrophoresis for drug analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lurie, Ira S.

    1999-02-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is a high resolution separation technique which is amenable to a wide variety of solutes, including compounds which are thermally degradable, non-volatile and highly polar, and is therefore well suited for drug analysis. Techniques which have been used in our laboratory include electrokinetic chromatography (ECC), free zone electrophoresis (CZE) and capillary electrochromatography (CEC). ECC, which uses a charged run buffer additive which migrates counter to osmotic flow, is excellent for many applications, including, drug screening and analyses of heroin, cocaine and methamphetamine samples. ECC approaches include the use of micelles and charged cyclodextrins, which allow for the separation of complex mixtures. Simultaneous separation of acidic, neutral and basic solutes and the resolution of optical isomers and positional isomers are possible. CZE has been used for the analysis of small ions (cations and anions) in heroin exhibits. For the ECC and CZE experiments performed in our laboratory, uncoated capillaries were used. In contrast, CEC uses capillaries packed with high performance liquid chromatography stationary phases, and offers both high peak capacities and unique selectivities. Applications include the analysis of cannabinoids and drug screening. Although CE suffers from limited concentration sensitivity, it is still applicable to trace analysis of drug samples, especially when using injection techniques such as stacking, or detection schemes such as laser induced fluorescence and extended pathlength UV.

  15. Evaluation of in-channel amperometric detection using a dual-channel microchip electrophoresis device and a two-electrode potentiostat for reverse polarity separations

    PubMed Central

    Meneses, Diogenes; Gunasekara, Dulan B.; Pichetsurnthorn, Pann; da Silva, José A. F.; de Abreu, Fabiane C.; Lunte, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    In-channel amperometric detection combined with dual-channel microchip electrophoresis is evaluated using a two-electrode isolated potentiostat for reverse polarity separations. The device consists of two separate channels with the working and reference electrodes placed at identical positions relative to the end of the channel, enabling noise subtraction. In previous reports of this configuration, normal polarity and a three-electrode detection system were used. In the two-electrode detection system described here, the electrode in the reference channel acts as both the counter and reference. The effect of electrode placement in the channels on noise and detector response was investigated using nitrite, tyrosine, and hydrogen peroxide as model compounds. The effects of electrode material and size and type of reference electrode on noise and the potential shift of hydrodynamic voltammograms for the model compounds were determined. In addition, the performance of two- and three-electrode configurations using Pt and Ag/AgCl reference electrodes was compared. Although the signal was attenuated with the Pt reference, the noise was also significantly reduced. It was found that lower LOD were obtained for all three compounds with the dual-channel configuration compared to single-channel, in-channel detection. The dual-channel method was then used for the detection of nitrite in a dermal microdialysis sample obtained from a sheep following nitroglycerin administration. PMID:25256669

  16. Why fluorination of the polar heads reverses the positive sign of the dipole potential of Langmuir monolayers: a vibrational sum frequency spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Karageorgiev, Peter; Petrov, Jordan G; Motschmann, Hubert; Moehwald, Helmuth

    2013-04-16

    Natural nonionic amphiphiles forming monolayers, bilayers, micelles, or biomembranes create a positive dipole potential at the boundary with water. In a series of papers we have reported on Langmuir monolayers with CF3 terminals of the polar heads, which show a negative surface dipole potential ΔV (Petrov , J. G.; Andreeva, T. D.; Kurt, D. K.; Möhwald, H. J. Phys. Chem. B 2005, 109, 14102). Here we use vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy (SF) to study the origin of the opposite ΔV signs of Langmuir films of CH3(CH2)20COCH2CH3 (ethyl ether, EE) and CH3(CH2)20COCH2CF3 (fluorinated ethyl ether, FEE). The vibrational sum frequency spectra are recorded at the same film density of the S-phase of the EE and FEE monolayers and analyzed in the spectral regions of OH, COC, CH3, and CF3 stretching vibrations because these functional groups could be responsible for the different dipole potentials. We compare the rearrangement of the pure water surface by EE and FEE monolayers and the conformations of EE and FEE polar heads. The analysis is performed according to the three-capacitor model of the dipole potential of Langmuir monolayers (Demchak, R. T.; Fort, T., Jr. J. Colloid Interface Sci. 1974, 46, 191). The results show that reversal of the ΔV sign caused by fluorination of the polar heads originates from the upward-oriented CF3 terminals of the FEE heads, whose negative normal dipole moment component determines the negative dipole potential of the FEE monolayer.

  17. Gradient elution in capillary electrochromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Anex, D.; Rakestraw, D.J.; Yan, Chao; Dadoo, R.; Zare, R.N.

    1997-08-01

    In analogy to pressure-driven gradient techniques in high-performance liquid chromatography, a system has been developed for delivering electroosmotically-driven solvent gradients for capillary electrochromatography (CEC). Dynamic gradients with sub-mL/min flow rates are generated by merging two electroosmotic flows that are regulated by computer-controlled voltages. These flows are delivered by two fused-silica capillary arms attached to a T-connector, where they mix and then flow into a capillary column that has been electrokinetically packed with 3-mm reversed-phase particles. The inlet of one capillary arm is placed in a solution reservoir containing one mobile phase and the inlet of the other is placed in a second reservoir containing a second mobile phase. Two independent computer-controlled programmable high-voltage power supplies (0-50 kV)--one providing an increasing ramp and the other providing a decreasing ramp--are used to apply variable high-voltage potentials to the mobile phase reservoirs to regulate the electroosmotic flow in each arm. The ratio of the electroosmotic flow rates between the two arms is changed with time according to the computer-controlled voltages to deliver the required gradient profile to the separation column. Experiments were performed to confirm the composition of the mobile phase during a gradient run and to determine the change of the composition in response to the programmed voltage profile. To demonstrate the performance of electroosmotically-driven gradient elution in CEC, a mixture of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was separated in less than 90 minutes. This gradient technique is expected to be well-suited for generating not only solvent gradients in CEC, but also other types of gradients such as pH- and ionic-strength gradients in capillary electrokinetic separations and analyses.

  18. A cooling event during the last geomagnetic polarity reversal: synchronous occurrence with a large decrease in field intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaba, I.; Hyodo, M.; Katoh, S.; Matsushita, M.

    2009-12-01

    The discovery of a correlation between galactic cosmic ray flux and cloud cover suggests that climate change can be caused by variation in cosmic ray flux which is strongly modulated by the geomagnetic field intensity. This study uses a detailed climate record of the Matuyama-Brunhes (MB) magnetic polarity transition to examine a link between geomagnetic field intensity and climate in geologic time. The record is based on palynological data obtained from a sediment core from Osaka Bay with a 200 year resolution. From marine oxygen isotope stage (MIS) 20 to 18, climate variability is well correlated with glacial-interglacial precession cycles, except for a cooling event that occurred at the highest point of the MIS 19 sea-level highstand. In early MIS 19, the proportion of the warm-temperate evergreen broad-leaved taxon Quercus (Cyclobalanopsis) gradually increased as sea level rose, indicating a progressive warming. However, after ~2 kyr of warming a cooling began with an abrupt reduction in Quercus (Cyclobalanopsis) and an increase in Fagus (cool-temperate deciduous broad-leaved taxon). The cooling persisted for about 4 kyr coincident with the sea-level highstand 19.3, and was followed by a rapid warming. A thermal maximum occurred 6 kyr after 19.3 and 11-12 kyr after an insolation peak. These time lags cannot be interpreted as a delayed vegetational response, as this is typically 500 yr or less. After the thermal maximum, Quercus (Cyclobalanopsis) gradually decreased from 19.2 to 19.1, but the temperature estimated from the vegetation was still warmer than at the sea-level highstand 19.3. This observation conflicts with the pattern of sea-level estimated from oxygen isotope values, which indicates that sea level at MIS 19.1 was about 20 m lower than that at 19.3. This cooling event, during the highest sea level highstand contrasts with the climates of MISs 21, 11 and 1 when the thermal maximum coincided with the highest sea-levels. Detailed relative

  19. Reversal asymmetry in Mesoproterozoic overprinting of the 1.88-Ga Gunflint Formation, Ontario, Canada: non-dipole effects or apparent polar wander?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Phillip W.; Williams, George E.

    2003-12-01

    chemical remagnetisation of the Proterozoic country rock in our sampling area. Although others have argued that asymmetry was a feature of the Keweenawan geomagnetic field, the declinations of our Gunflint and Sibley hematite and magnetite components are different, suggesting that the components were acquired at significantly different times. We conclude that the reversal asymmetry shown by our Gunflint and Sibley data may best be ascribed to apparent polar wander during Keweenawan times.

  20. Fine-resolution mapping of spontaneous and double-strand break-induced gene conversion tracts in Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals reversible mitotic conversion polarity.

    PubMed Central

    Sweetser, D B; Hough, H; Whelden, J F; Arbuckle, M; Nickoloff, J A

    1994-01-01

    Spontaneous and double-strand break (DSB)-induced gene conversion was examined in alleles of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ura3 gene containing nine phenotypically silent markers and an HO nuclease recognition site. Conversions of these alleles, carried on ARS1/CEN4 plasmids, involved interactions with heteroalleles on chromosome V and were stimulated by DSBs created at HO sites. Crossovers that integrate plasmids into chromosomes were not detected since the resultant dicentric chromosomes would be lethal. Converted alleles in shuttle plasmids were easily transferred to Escherichia coli and analyzed for marker conversion, facilitating the characterization of more than 400 independent products from five crosses. This analysis revealed several new features of gene conversions. The average length of DSB-induced conversion tracts was 200 to 300 bp, although about 20% were very short (less than 53 bp). About 20% of spontaneous tracts also were also less than 53 bp, but spontaneous tracts were on average about 40% longer than DSB-induced tracts. Most tracts were continuous, but 3% had discontinuous conversion patterns, indicating that extensive heteroduplex DNA is formed during at least this fraction of events. Mismatches in heteroduplex DNA were repaired in both directions, and repair tracts as short as 44 bp were observed. Surprisingly, most DSB-induced gene conversion tracts were unidirectional and exhibited a reversible polarity that depended on the locations of DSBs and frameshift mutations in recipient and donor alleles. Images PMID:8196629

  1. Simultaneous quantification of flavonoids from Achyrocline satureioides by a polar-reversed phase LC method--application to skin permeation/retention studies.

    PubMed

    Bidone, J; Bica, V C; Petrovick, P R; Simoes, C M O; Koester, L S; Bassani, V L; Teixeira, H F

    2014-01-01

    A selective and sensitive polar-reversed phase LC method was validated for simultaneous quantification of the main Achyrocline satureioides flavonoids (quercetin, luteolin, and 3-O-methylquercetin) in skin samples after permeation/retention studies from topical nanoemulsions. The method was linear in a range of 0.25 to 10.0 microg/mL exhibiting a coefficient of determination higher than 0.999 for all flavonoids. No interference of the nanoemulsion excipients or skin components was observed in the retention times of all flavonoids. The R.S.D. values for intra- and inter-day precision experiments were lower than 6.73%. Flavonoids recovery from nanoemulsions and skin matrices was between 90.05 and 109.88%. In a permeation/retention study with porcine ear high amount of 3-O-methylquercetin was found in the skin sample (0.92 +/- 0.22 microg/g) after two hours. The proposed method was suitable to quantify the main flavonoids of A. satureioides in skin permeation/retention studies from topical nanoemulsions.

  2. Evaluation of chromatographic conditions in reversed phase liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry systems for fingerprinting of polar and amphiphilic plant metabolites.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Nikoline J; Tomasi, Giorgio; Christensen, Jan H

    2016-08-01

    Metabolic fingerprinting is a relatively young scientific discipline requiring robust, yet flexible and fit-for-purpose analytical methods. Here, we introduce a simple approach to select reversed phase LC systems with electrospray MS detection for fingerprinting of polar and amphiphilic plant metabolites. The approach does not rely on isotopic labeling or biological origin of sample constituent and can also be used for non-biological matrices (e.g., oil or sewage sludge) or for other optimization purposes (e.g., mass spectrometric source parameterization). The LC systems varied in column chemistry and temperature, mobile phase pH/additive, gradient steepness/eluotropic strength, and electrospray mode of operation. The systems were evaluated based on the number of features detected using the matchedFilter algorithm from XCMS and the repeatability of this detection across analytical replicates. For negative ion mode detection, the best performances were obtained with an HSS T3 column operated at low pH, which produced a 3-fold increase in the number of reliable features extracted compared with the worst system. The best system for positive ion mode (i.e., the BEH C18 column operated at intermediate pH) only produced a 50 % increase in the number of reliable features. The data also indicate that baseline removal is unavoidable for reliable intensity estimations using peak areas, and that peak heights may be a more robust measure of intensity when baselines cannot be completely removed or in case of coelution, fronting or tailing. PMID:27344456

  3. Evaluation of chromatographic conditions in reversed phase liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry systems for fingerprinting of polar and amphiphilic plant metabolites.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Nikoline J; Tomasi, Giorgio; Christensen, Jan H

    2016-08-01

    Metabolic fingerprinting is a relatively young scientific discipline requiring robust, yet flexible and fit-for-purpose analytical methods. Here, we introduce a simple approach to select reversed phase LC systems with electrospray MS detection for fingerprinting of polar and amphiphilic plant metabolites. The approach does not rely on isotopic labeling or biological origin of sample constituent and can also be used for non-biological matrices (e.g., oil or sewage sludge) or for other optimization purposes (e.g., mass spectrometric source parameterization). The LC systems varied in column chemistry and temperature, mobile phase pH/additive, gradient steepness/eluotropic strength, and electrospray mode of operation. The systems were evaluated based on the number of features detected using the matchedFilter algorithm from XCMS and the repeatability of this detection across analytical replicates. For negative ion mode detection, the best performances were obtained with an HSS T3 column operated at low pH, which produced a 3-fold increase in the number of reliable features extracted compared with the worst system. The best system for positive ion mode (i.e., the BEH C18 column operated at intermediate pH) only produced a 50 % increase in the number of reliable features. The data also indicate that baseline removal is unavoidable for reliable intensity estimations using peak areas, and that peak heights may be a more robust measure of intensity when baselines cannot be completely removed or in case of coelution, fronting or tailing.

  4. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Dovichi, Norman J.; Zhang, Jian Z.

    1995-01-01

    A multiple capillary analyzer allows detection of light from multiple capillaries with a reduced number of interfaces through which light must pass in detecting light emitted from a sample being analyzed, using a modified sheath flow cuvette. A linear or rectangular array of capillaries is introduced into a rectangular flow chamber. Sheath fluid draws individual sample streams through the cuvette. The capillaries are closely and evenly spaced and held by a transparent retainer in a fixed position in relation to an optical detection system. Collimated sample excitation radiation is applied simultaneously across the ends of the capillaries in the retainer. Light emitted from the excited sample is detected by the optical detection system. The retainer is provided by a transparent chamber having inward slanting end walls. The capillaries are wedged into the chamber. One sideways dimension of the chamber is equal to the diameter of the capillaries and one end to end dimension varies from, at the top of the chamber, slightly greater than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries to, at the bottom of the chamber, slightly smaller than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries. The optical system utilizes optic fibres to deliver light to individual photodetectors, one for each capillary tube. A filter or wavelength division demultiplexer may be used for isolating fluorescence at particular bands.

  5. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Dovichi, N.J.; Zhang, J.Z.

    1995-08-08

    A multiple capillary analyzer allows detection of light from multiple capillaries with a reduced number of interfaces through which light must pass in detecting light emitted from a sample being analyzed, using a modified sheath flow cuvette. A linear or rectangular array of capillaries is introduced into a rectangular flow chamber. Sheath fluid draws individual sample streams through the cuvette. The capillaries are closely and evenly spaced and held by a transparent retainer in a fixed position in relation to an optical detection system. Collimated sample excitation radiation is applied simultaneously across the ends of the capillaries in the retainer. Light emitted from the excited sample is detected by the optical detection system. The retainer is provided by a transparent chamber having inward slanting end walls. The capillaries are wedged into the chamber. One sideways dimension of the chamber is equal to the diameter of the capillaries and one end to end dimension varies from, at the top of the chamber, slightly greater than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries to, at the bottom of the chamber, slightly smaller than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries. The optical system utilizes optic fibers to deliver light to individual photodetectors, one for each capillary tube. A filter or wavelength division demultiplexer may be used for isolating fluorescence at particular bands. 21 figs.

  6. Intranasal lobular capillary haemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Dipak Ranjan; Bhandarkar, Ajay M; Shivamurthy, Archana; Joy, Jasmi

    2014-01-01

    Lobular capillary haemangioma (LCH) is a benign proliferation of capillaries with a characteristic lobular architecture on microscopy; it has an affinity for mucous membrane and skin of the head and neck. It is extremely rare in the nasal cavity. We present the case of a 45-year-old man who presented with epistaxis without any predisposing factors, which was diagnosed as lobular capillary haemangioma. PMID:25304675

  7. Capillary zone electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgenson, J.W.; Lukacs, K.D.

    1983-10-21

    Zone electrophoresis in capillaries is a technique complementary to electrophoresis in supporting media, and each approach has its own particular advantages. Efficient heat transfer from small-diameter capillaries permits use of unusually high voltages, resulting in both high resolution and rapid analysis. Capillaries also seem well suited for automation. Our present electromigration injection technique is relatively straightforward and should be simple to automate. Capillaries are reusable, which is an advantage over gels. On-line electronic detection permits good quantification, further enhancing possibilities for fully automatic operation. The greatest obstacle to further development and utilization of capillaries is the requirement of extremely sensitive detectors, and more types of detectors with higher sensitivity are greatly needed. A better understanding of capillary surface modification will also be important, both for improved capillary surface deactivation and for better control over electroosmotic flow. Capillaries should provide an ideal system in which to explore nonaqueous separation media. The prospects for nonaqueous media in electrophoresis are similar to those in electrochemistry, and capillaries should prove an excellent system in which to begin their study. 18 refs., 8 figs.

  8. Retention prediction of highly polar ionizable solutes under gradient conditions on a mixed-mode reversed-phase and weak anion-exchange stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Balkatzopoulou, P; Fasoula, S; Gika, H; Nikitas, P; Pappa-Louisi, A

    2015-05-29

    In the present work the retention of three highly polar and ionizable solutes - uric acid, nicotinic acid and ascorbic acid - was investigated on a mixed-mode reversed-phase and weak anion-exchange (RP/WAX) stationary phase in buffered aqueous acetonitrile (ACN) mobile phases. A U-shaped retention behavior was observed for all solutes with respect to the eluent organic modifier content studied in a range of 5-95% (v/v). This retention behavior clearly demonstrates the presence of a HILIC-type retention mechanism at ACN-rich hydro-organic eluents and an RP-like retention at aqueous-rich hydro-organic eluents. Hence, this column should be promising for application under both RP and HILIC gradient elution modes. For this reason, a series of programmed elution runs were carried out with increasing (RP) and decreasing (HILIC) organic solvent concentration in the mobile phase. This dual gradient process was successfully modeled by two retention models exhibiting a quadratic or a cubic dependence of the logarithm of the solute retention factor (lnk) upon the organic modifier volume fraction (φ). It was found that both models produced by gradient retention data allow the prediction of solute retention times for both types of programmed elution on the mixed-mode column. Four, in the case of the quadratic model, or five, in the case of the cubic model, initial HILIC- and RP-type gradient runs gave satisfactory retention predictions of any similar kind elution program, even with different flow rate, with an overall error of only 2.5 or 1.7%, respectively.

  9. Expression and polarity reversal of V-type H+-ATPase during the mineralization-demineralization cycle in Porcellio scaber sternal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Andreas; Weihrauch, Dirk; Hagedorn, Monica; Towle, David W; Bleher, Reiner

    2004-04-01

    The formation and resorption of CaCO(3) by epithelial cell layers require epithelial transport of protons. We used the anterior sternal epithelium of the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber as a model to study the expression pattern and immunolocalization of a V-type H(+)-ATPase during the mineralization and demineralization of intermittent CaCO(3) deposits. Semiquantitative RT-PCR revealed that the expression of the V-type H(+)-ATPase increases from non Ca(2+)-transporting control stages to the stages of CaCO(3) deposit formation and resorption. In the Ca(2+)-transporting stages the expression was larger in the anterior than in the posterior sternal epithelium, which is not involved in deposit formation and transports just moderate amounts of CaCO(3). Immunocytochemistry of the B-subunit of the V-type H(+)-ATPase in the anterior sternal epithelium reveals an increase in the abundance of the protein within the basolateral membrane, from undetectable to strong signals in the control stage to the stages of CaCO(3) deposit formation, respectively. From the stage of CaCO(3) deposit formation to that of CaCO(3) resorption the signal decreased within the basolateral plasma membrane and increased within the apical plasma membrane. For the first time the results indicate a contribution of a V-type H(+)-ATPase to CaCO(3) deposition and a reversal of its polarity from the basolateral to the apical plasma membrane compartment within the same cells.

  10. Crustal Structure of the Caribbean-South American Diffuse Plate Boundary: Subduction Zone Migration and Polarity Reversal Along BOLIVAR Profile 64W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, S. A.; Levander, A.; Magnani, M.; Zelt, C. A.; Sawyer, D. S.; Ave Lallemant, H. G.

    2005-12-01

    The BOLIVAR (Broadband Ocean-Land Investigation of Venezuela and the Antilles arc Region) project is an NSF funded, collaborative seismic experiment in the southeast Caribbean region. The purpose of the project is to understand the diffuse plate boundary created by the oblique collision between the Caribbean and South American plates. Profile 64W of the BOLIVAR experiment, a 450 km-long, N-S transect onshore and offshore Venezuela located at ~64°W longitude, images the deep crustal structures formed by this collision. The active source components of profile 64W include 300 km of MCS reflection data, 33 coincident OBSs, and 344 land seismic stations which recorded 7500 offshore airgun shots and 2 explosive land shots. Results from the reflection and refraction seismic data along 64W show complex crustal structure across the entire span of the diffuse plate boundary. The onshore portion of 64W crosses the fold and thrust belt of the Serrania del Interior, which formed at ~16 Ma by collision of the Caribbean forearc with the northern South American passive margin. Underlying the Serrania del Interior is a south-vergent, remnant Lesser Antillean subduction zone. As this Lesser Antilles subduction impinged on continental crust, it caused a polarity reversal and jump offshore to the north. Convergence was initially localized in the closure and inversion of the Grenada Basin. However, subduction could not develop because of the ~20-km-thick crust of the Aves Ridge; instead, north-vergent subduction initiated further to the north, where ~12-km-thick Caribbean oceanic crust of the Venezuela Basin began to subduct beneath the Aves Ridge in the Pliocene (~4 Ma) and appears to continue subducting today. Between the remnant subduction zone and the modern one, the El Pilar and Coche dextral strike-slip faults accommodate most of the transform motion of the plate boundary. From the Serrania del Interior to the Aves Ridge, ~260 km of accreted orogenic float comprises the diffuse

  11. Benzothiazoles with tunable electron-withdrawing strength and reverse polarity: a route to triphenylamine-based chromophores with enhanced two-photon absorption.

    PubMed

    Hrobárik, Peter; Hrobáriková, Veronika; Sigmundová, Ivica; Zahradník, Pavol; Fakis, Mihalis; Polyzos, Ioannis; Persephonis, Peter

    2011-11-01

    A series of dipolar and octupolar triphenylamine-derived dyes containing a benzothiazole positioned in the matched or mismatched fashion have been designed and synthesized via palladium-catalyzed Sonogashira cross-coupling reactions. Linear and nonlinear optical properties of the designed molecules were tuned by an additional electron-withdrawing group (EWG) and by changing the relative positions of the donor and acceptor substituents on the heterocyclic ring. This allowed us to examine the effect of positional isomerism and extend the structure-property relationships useful in the engineering of novel heteroaromatic-based systems with enhanced two-photon absorption (TPA). The TPA cross-sections (δ(TPA)) in the target compounds dramatically increased with the branching of the triphenylamine core and with the strength of the auxiliary acceptor. In addition, a change from the commonly used polarity in push-pull benzothiazoles to a reverse one has been revealed as a particularly useful strategy (regioisomeric control) for enhancing TPA cross-sections and shifting the absorption and emission maxima to longer wavelengths. The maximum TPA cross-sections of the star-shaped three-branched triphenylamines are ∼500-2300 GM in the near-infrared region (740-810 nm); thereby the molecular weight normalized δ(TPA)/MW values of the best performing dyes within the series (2.0-2.4 GM·g(-1)·mol) are comparable to those of the most efficient TPA chromophores reported to date. The large TPA cross-sections combined with high emission quantum yields and large Stokes shifts make these compounds excellent candidates for various TPA applications, including two-photon fluorescence microscopy.

  12. Capillary micro-switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steen, Paul; Matalanis, Claude; Hirsa, Amir; Cox, Christhopher

    2002-11-01

    A capillary surface is a liquid/liquid or liquid/gas interface whose shape is determined by surface tension. Capillary surfaces occur when the capillary length is large compared to the container scale, as happens for typical liquids against gas on the sub-millimeter scale on Earth and on the meter scale in the micro-gravity environment of space vehicles. Manipulating capillary surfaces has emerged as a leading strategy for moving liquids on the micro-scale [1]. Practitioners have yet to take advantage of capillary instability in their design of devices, though. We illustrate how the response diagram of a single switch (bi-stable device) can be constructed from that of two capillary elements, how that of a system of switches (a pair) can be built from that of a single switch and finally how understanding the response of the system guides us to observations of new behavior in the laboratory. Experiments on capillary surfaces use either a soap-film analog (10 centimeter scale) or a liquid/gas (millimeter scale) apparatus. Progress is reported on the application of an array of micro-switches to make a controllable adhesion device, with the aim of effecting droplet transport. 1. Cho, Fan, Moon and Kim, "Towards digital microfluidic circuits: creating, transporting, cutting and merging liquid droplets by electrowetting-based actuation." Proc. 15th IEEE Int'l Conf. on MEMS, January 2002.

  13. Multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Li, Q.; Lu, X.

    1998-04-21

    The invention provides a side-entry optical excitation geometry for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system. A charge-injection device is optically coupled to capillaries in the array such that the interior of a capillary is imaged onto only one pixel. In Sanger-type 4-label DNA sequencing reactions, nucleotide identification (``base calling``) is improved by using two long-pass filters to split fluorescence emission into two emission channels. A binary poly(ethyleneoxide) matrix is used in the electrophoretic separations. 19 figs.

  14. Multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Chang, H.T.; Fung, E.N.; Li, Q.; Lu, X.

    1996-12-10

    The invention provides a side-entry optical excitation geometry for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system. A charge-injection device is optically coupled to capillaries in the array such that the interior of a capillary is imaged onto only one pixel. In Sanger-type 4-label DNA sequencing reactions, nucleotide identification (``base calling``) is improved by using two long-pass filters to split fluorescence emission into two emission channels. A binary poly(ethyleneoxide) matrix is used in the electrophoretic separations. 19 figs.

  15. Multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Li, Qingbo; Lu, Xiandan

    1998-04-21

    The invention provides a side-entry optical excitation geometry for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system. A charge-injection device is optically coupled to capillaries in the array such that the interior of a capillary is imaged onto only one pixel. In Sanger-type 4-label DNA sequencing reactions, nucleotide identification ("base calling") is improved by using two long-pass filters to split fluorescence emission into two emission channels. A binary poly(ethyleneoxide) matrix is used in the electrophoretic separations.

  16. Multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Chang, Huan-Tsang; Fung, Eliza N.; Li, Qingbo; Lu, Xiandan

    1996-12-10

    The invention provides a side-entry optical excitation geometry for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system. A charge-injection device is optically coupled to capillaries in the array such that the interior of a capillary is imaged onto only one pixel. In Sanger-type 4-label DNA sequencing reactions, nucleotide identification ("base calling") is improved by using two long-pass filters to split fluorescence emission into two emission channels. A binary poly(ethyleneoxide) matrix is used in the electrophoretic separations.

  17. Nasal Lobular Capillary Hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Prashant; Singla, Saurabh; Mane, Ranoji; Jagdeesh, K. S.

    2013-01-01

    Nasal lobular capillary hemangioma is a rare benign tumor of the paranasal sinuses. This lesion is believed to grow rapidly in size over time. The exact etiopathogenesis is still a dilemma. We discuss a case of nasal lobular capillary hemangioma presenting with a history of epistaxis. Contrast enhanced computed tomography of paranasal sinuses revealed an intensely enhancing soft-tissue mass in the left nasal cavity and left middle and inferior meati with no obvious bony remodeling or destruction. We present imaging and pathologic features of nasal lobular capillary hemangioma and differentiate it from other entities like nasal angiofibroma. PMID:24228209

  18. Polarization Reversal and Electromechanical Studies on Ba(NdxTi1-2xNbx)O3 Dielectric Relaxor Ceramics Prepared Through Conventional and Microwave Sintering Route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahboob, Syed; Prasad, G.; Kumar, G. S.

    Polarization and capacitance studies as a function of applied electric field were done on the Nd and Nb-doped polycrystalline ceramic samples. The result indicates that the ceramic samples show low values of remnant polarization. The capacitance value indicates that microwave sintered samples shows higher capacitance tunability when compared to conventional sintered samples. The results obtained from electromechanical studies are also discussed.

  19. Supercritical fluid reverse micelle separation

    DOEpatents

    Fulton, John L.; Smith, Richard D.

    1993-01-01

    A method of separating solute material from a polar fluid in a first polar fluid phase is provided. The method comprises combining a polar fluid, a second fluid that is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and a surfactant. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid to define the first polar fluid phase. The combined polar and second fluids, surfactant, and solute material dissolved in the polar fluid is maintained under near critical or supercritical temperature and pressure conditions such that the density of the second fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. In this way, a reverse micelle system defining a reverse micelle solvent is formed which comprises a continuous phase in the second fluid and a plurality of reverse micelles dispersed in the continuous phase. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid and is in chemical equilibrium with the reverse micelles. The first polar fluid phase and the continuous phase are immiscible. The reverse micelles each comprise a dynamic aggregate of surfactant molecules surrounding a core of the polar fluid. The reverse micelle solvent has a polar fluid-to-surfactant molar ratio W, which can vary over a range having a maximum ratio W.sub.o that determines the maximum size of the reverse micelles. The maximum ratio W.sub.o of the reverse micelle solvent is then varied, and the solute material from the first polar fluid phase is transported into the reverse micelles in the continuous phase at an extraction efficiency determined by the critical or supercritical conditions.

  20. Supercritical fluid reverse micelle separation

    DOEpatents

    Fulton, J.L.; Smith, R.D.

    1993-11-30

    A method of separating solute material from a polar fluid in a first polar fluid phase is provided. The method comprises combining a polar fluid, a second fluid that is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and a surfactant. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid to define the first polar fluid phase. The combined polar and second fluids, surfactant, and solute material dissolved in the polar fluid is maintained under near critical or supercritical temperature and pressure conditions such that the density of the second fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. In this way, a reverse micelle system defining a reverse micelle solvent is formed which comprises a continuous phase in the second fluid and a plurality of reverse micelles dispersed in the continuous phase. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid and is in chemical equilibrium with the reverse micelles. The first polar fluid phase and the continuous phase are immiscible. The reverse micelles each comprise a dynamic aggregate of surfactant molecules surrounding a core of the polar fluid. The reverse micelle solvent has a polar fluid-to-surfactant molar ratio W, which can vary over a range having a maximum ratio W[sub o] that determines the maximum size of the reverse micelles. The maximum ratio W[sub o] of the reverse micelle solvent is then varied, and the solute material from the first polar fluid phase is transported into the reverse micelles in the continuous phase at an extraction efficiency determined by the critical or supercritical conditions. 27 figures.

  1. Capillary rise of superspreaders.

    PubMed

    Radulovic, Jovana; Sefiane, Khellil; Shanahan, Martin E R

    2011-09-15

    Trisiloxane surfactants, known as 'superspreaders', are commonly employed in numerous applications where enhanced wetting is of the utmost importance. The underlying mechanisms of superspreader wetting have been a focus of scientific interest for ca. 2 decades, and a number of mechanisms have been proposed to explain the unique trisiloxane dynamics. We have studied trisiloxane behaviour in thin capillaries to get further insight into their interfacial activity. Additionally, our knowledge of the capillary rise of superspreaders is surprisingly limited, and the effect of this extraordinary group of surfactants on capillary phenomena has been largely overlooked. Diffusion was confirmed to be the limiting factor of trisiloxane behaviour. A tentative theoretical explanation for the phenomenon studied and an appropriate mathematical model are presented. It is concluded that the enhancement of wetting due to surfactant addition is also a function of geometry: the effect is clear for a sessile drop, but more complex and less beneficial in a capillary.

  2. Displaced capillary dies

    DOEpatents

    Kalejs, Juris P.; Chalmers, Bruce; Surek, Thomas

    1984-01-01

    An asymmetrical shaped capillary die made exclusively of graphite is used to grow silicon ribbon which is capable of being made into solar cells that are more efficient than cells produced from ribbon made using a symmetrically shaped die.

  3. Displaced capillary dies

    DOEpatents

    Kalejs, Juris P.; Chalmers, Bruce; Surek, Thomas

    1982-01-01

    An asymmetrical shaped capillary die made exclusively of graphite is used to grow silicon ribbon which is capable of being made into solar cells that are more efficient than cells produced from ribbon made using a symmetrically shaped die.

  4. Separation of flavanone enantiomers and flavanone glucoside diastereomers from Balanophora involucrata Hook. f. by capillary electrophoresis and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography on a C18 column.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jianyu; Zhang, Si; Yan, Liushui; Tai, Jiandong; Xiao, Qiang; Zou, Kun; Zhou, Yuan; Wu, Jun

    2008-03-21

    A pair of flavanone glucoside diastereomers, (2R)- and (2S)-eriodictyol-5-O-beta-d-glucopyranoside (1a, 1b), was successfully separated by RP-C(18) high-performance liquid chromatography from Balanophora involucrata Hook. f. Some other compounds, including a pair of flavanone enantiomers, (2R)- and (2S)-eriodictyol (2a, 2b), and a pair of flavanone glucoside diastereomers, (2R)- and (2S)-eriodictyol-7-O-beta-d-glucopyranoside(3a, 3b), were separated by capillary electrophoresis from the same plant. The absolute configurations at C-2 of 1a and 1b were determined based on their circular dichroism spectra. Enzymatic hydrolysis of 1a and 1b by beta-d-glucosidase afforded (2R)- and (2S)-eriodictyol, respectively, which were used as the authentic standards for co-elution to determine the migration order of the enantiomers, 2a and 2b. We also report the first example of identifying the migration order of 2a and 2b and resolving the separation of 3a and 3b by capillary electrophoresis. In addition, 1a was unambiguously characterized for the first time by NMR spectra.

  5. Capillary discharge source

    DOEpatents

    Bender, III, Howard Albert

    2003-11-25

    Debris generation from an EUV electric discharge plasma source device can be significantly reduced or essentially eliminated by encasing the electrodes with dielectric or electrically insulating material so that the electrodes are shielded from the plasma, and additionally by providing a path for the radiation to exit wherein the electrodes are not exposed to the area where the radiation is collected. The device includes: (a) a body, which is made of an electrically insulating material, that defines a capillary bore that has a proximal end and a distal end and that defines at least one radiation exit; (b) a first electrode that defines a first channel that has a first inlet end that is connected to a source of gas and a first outlet end that is in communication with the capillary bore, wherein the first electrode is positioned at the distal end of the capillary bore; (c) a second electrode that defines a second channel that has a second inlet end that is in communication with the capillary bore and an outlet end, wherein the second electrode is positioned at the proximal end of the capillary bore; and (d) a source of electric potential that is connected across the first and second electrodes, wherein radiation generated within the capillary bore is emitted through the at least one radiation exit and wherein the first electrode and second electrode are shielded from the emitted radiation.

  6. Capillary saturation and desaturation.

    PubMed

    Hilfer, R; Armstrong, R T; Berg, S; Georgiadis, A; Ott, H

    2015-12-01

    Capillary desaturation experiments produce disconnected (trapped) ganglia of mesoscopic sizes intermediate between pore size and system size. Experimental evidence for interactions between these mesoscale clusters during desaturation is analyzed and discussed within the established microscopic and macroscopic laws of Newton, Young-Laplace, and Darcy. A theoretical expression for capillary number correlations is introduced that seems to have remained unnoticed. It expresses capillary desaturation curves in terms of stationary capillary pressures and relative permeabilities. The theoretical expression shows that the plateau saturation in capillary desaturation curves may in general differ from the residual nonwetting saturation defined through the saturation limit of the main hysteresis loop. Hysteresis effects as well as the difference between wetting and nonwetting fluids are introduced into the analysis of capillary desaturation experiments. The article examines experiments with different desaturation protocols and discusses the existence of a mesoscopic length scale intermediate between pore scale and sample scale. The theoretical expression is derived entirely within the existing traditional theory of two-phase flow in porous media and compared to a recent experiment. PMID:26764820

  7. Isolation and recovery of selected polybrominated diphenyl ethers from human serum and sheep serum: coupling reversed-phase solid-phase disk extraction and liquid-liquid extraction techniques with a capillary gas chromatographic electron capture negative ion mass spectrometric determinative technique.

    PubMed

    Loconto, Paul R; Isenga, David; O'Keefe, Michael; Knottnerus, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are isolated and recovered with acceptable percent recoveries from human serum via liquid-liquid extraction and column chromatographic cleanup and fractionation with quantitation using capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with electron capture negative ion and selected ion monitoring. PBDEs are found in unspiked serum. An alternative sample preparation approach is developed using sheep serum that utilizes a formic acid pre-treatment followed by reversed-phase solid-phase disk extraction and normal-phase solid-phase cleanup using acidified silica gel that yields>50% recoveries. When these percent recoveries are combined with a minimized phase ratio for human serum and very low instrument detection limits, method detection limits below 500 parts-per-trillion are realized.

  8. Process of forming compounds using reverse micelle or reverse microemulsion systems

    DOEpatents

    Linehan, John C.; Fulton, John L.; Bean, Roger M.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a process for producing a nanometer-sized metal compound. The process comprises forming a reverse micelle or reverse microemulsion system comprising a polar fluid in a non-polar or low-polarity fluid. A first reactant comprising a multi-component, water-soluble metal compound is introduced into the polar fluid in a non-polar or low-polarity fluid. This first reactant can be introduced into the reverse micelle or reverse microemulsion system during formation thereof or subsequent to the formation of the reverse micelle or microemulsion system. The water-soluble metal compound is then reacted in the reverse micelle or reverse microemulsion system to form the nanometer-sized metal compound. The nanometer-sized metal compound is then precipitated from the reverse micelle or reverse microemulsion system.

  9. Nematic liquid crystalline elastomer grating and microwire fabricated by micro-molding in capillaries.

    PubMed

    Wei, Renbo; He, Yaning; Wang, Xiaogong; Keller, Patrick

    2013-02-25

    A new approach is developed to fabricate highly oriented mono-domain LCE nano/microstructures through micro-molding in capillaries. Gratings and microwires as two typical examples are fabricated and characterized by polarizing optical microscopy, optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The gratings with precisely controlled sizes and smooth surface are obtained by filling the channels with a nematic monomer mixture followed by the photo-crosslinking. After peeling off the gratings from the substrate, the free-standing microwires are obtained. A uniform orientation of the mesogenic units is observed for the molds with channel width less than 20 μm. Reversible thermomechanical effect is demonstrated by using the microwires obtained through this approach.

  10. Analysis of Soft Drinks: UV Spectrophotometry, Liquid Chromatography, and Capillary Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDevitt, Valerie L.; Rodriguez, Alejandra; Williams, Kathryn R.

    1998-05-01

    Instrumental analysis students analyze commercial soft drinks in three successive laboratory experiments. First, UV multicomponent analysis is used to determine caffeine and benzoic acid in Mello YelloTM using the spectrophotometer's software and manually by the simultaneous equations method. The following week, caffeine, benzoic acid and aspartame are determined in a variety of soft drinks by reversed-phase liquid chromatography using 45% methanol/55% aqueous phosphate, pH 3.0, as the mobile phase. In the third experiment, the same samples are analyzed by capillary electrophoresis using a pH 9.4 borate buffer. Students also determine the minimum detection limits for all three compounds by both LC and CE. The experiments demonstrate the analytical use and limitations of the three instruments. The reports and prelab quizzes also stress the importance of the chemistry of the three compounds, especially the relationships of acid/base behavior and polarity to the LC and CE separations.

  11. Determination of aminoglycoside antibiotics in pharmaceuticals by capillary zone electrophoresis with indirect UV detection coupled with micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ackermans, M T; Everaerts, F M; Beckers, J L

    1992-08-14

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics can be determined by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) with indirect UV detection in the anionic mode with a reversed electroosmotic flow (EOF) by addition of FC 135 to the background electrolyte. The effective mobilities of thirteen aminoglycoside antibiotics were determined as a function of pH. Applying CZE with indirect UV detection in the anionic mode and reversed EOF coupled with micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography with the cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, both neutral and charged antibiotics can be determined in combined pharmaceuticals. As an example, neomycin and hydrocortisone were determined in Otosporin eardrops.

  12. Gas-Filled Capillary Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhauer, L. C.; Kimura, W. D.

    2006-11-01

    We have developed a 1-D, quasi-steady-state numerical model for a gas-filled capillary discharge that is designed to aid in selecting the optimum capillary radius in order to guide a laser beam with the required intensity through the capillary. The model also includes the option for an external solenoid B-field around the capillary, which increases the depth of the parabolic density channel in the capillary, thereby allowing for propagation of smaller laser beam waists. The model has been used to select the parameters for gas-filled capillaries to be utilized during the Staged Electron Laser Acceleration — Laser Wakefield (STELLA-LW) experiment.

  13. Derivatization in Capillary Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Marina, M Luisa; Castro-Puyana, María

    2016-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis is a well-established separation technique in analytical research laboratories worldwide. Its interesting advantages make CE an efficient and potent alternative to other chromatographic techniques. However, it is also recognized that its main drawback is the relatively poor sensitivity when using optical detection. One way to overcome this limitation is to perform a derivatization reaction which is intended to provide the analyte more suitable analytical characteristics enabling a high sensitive detection. Based on the analytical step where the CE derivatization takes place, it can be classified as precapillary (before separation), in-capillary (during separation), or postcapillary (after separation). This chapter describes the application of four different derivatization protocols (in-capillary and precapillary modes) to carry out the achiral and chiral analysis of different compounds in food and biological samples with three different detection modes (UV, LIF, and MS). PMID:27645730

  14. Capillary stretching of fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duprat, C.; Protiere, S.

    2015-09-01

    We study the interaction of a finite volume of liquid with two parallel thin flexible fibers. A tension along the fibers is imposed and may be varied. We report two morphologies, i.e. two types of wet adhesion: a weak capillary adhesion, where a liquid drop bridges the fibers, and a strong elastocapillary adhesion where the liquid is spread between two collapsed fibers. We show that geometry, capillarity and stretching are the key parameters at play. We describe the collapse and detachment of the fibers as a function of two nondimensional parameters, arising from the geometry of the system and a balance between capillary and stretching energies. In addition, we show that the morphology, thus the capillary adhesion, can be controlled by changing the tension within the fibers.

  15. Capillary condenser/evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valenzuela, Javier A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A heat transfer device is disclosed for transferring heat to or from a fluid that is undergoing a phase change. The heat transfer device includes a liquid-vapor manifold in fluid communication with a capillary structure thermally connected to a heat transfer interface, all of which are disposed in a housing to contain the vapor. The liquid-vapor manifold transports liquid in a first direction and conducts vapor in a second, opposite direction. The manifold provides a distributed supply of fluid (vapor or liquid) over the surface of the capillary structure. In one embodiment, the manifold has a fractal structure including one or more layers, each layer having one or more conduits for transporting liquid and one or more openings for conducting vapor. Adjacent layers have an increasing number of openings with decreasing area, and an increasing number of conduits with decreasing cross-sectional area, moving in a direction toward the capillary structure.

  16. Separation of Peptides by Capillary Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Scriba, Gerhard K E

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are an important class of analytes in chemistry, biochemistry, food chemistry, as well as medical and pharmaceutical sciences including biomarker analysis in peptidomics and proteomics. As a high-resolution technique, capillary electrophoresis (CE) is well suited for the analysis of polar compounds such as peptides. In addition, CE is orthogonal to high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) as both techniques are based on different physicochemical separation principles. For the successful development of peptide separations by CE, operational parameters including puffer pH, buffer concentration and buffer type, applied voltage, capillary dimensions, as well as background electrolyte additives such as detergents, ion-pairing reagents, cyclodextrins, (poly)amines, and soluble polymers have to be considered and optimized. PMID:27645745

  17. Polarized nuclear target based on parahydrogen induced polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budker, D.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Appelt, S.; Bouchard, L. S.; Wojtsekhowski, B.

    2012-12-01

    We discuss a novel concept of a polarized nuclear target for accelerator fixed-target scattering experiments, which is based on parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP). One may be able to reach a 33% free-proton polarization in the ethane molecule. The potential advantages of such a target include operation at zero magnetic field, fast (˜100 Hz) polarization oscillation (akin to polarization reversal), and operation with large intensity of an electron beam.

  18. Polarized nuclear target based on parahydrogen induced polarization

    SciTech Connect

    D. Budker, M.P. Ledbetter, S. Appelt, L.S. Bouchard, B. Wojtsekhowski

    2012-12-01

    We discuss a novel concept of a polarized nuclear target for accelerator fixed-target scattering experiments, which is based on parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP). One may be able to reach a 33% free-proton polarization in the ethane molecule. The potential advantages of such a target include operation at zero magnetic field, fast ({approx}100 HZ) polarization oscillation (akin to polarization reversal), and operation with large intensity of an electron beam.

  19. High-performance capillary electrophoresis of histones

    SciTech Connect

    Gurley, L.R.; London, J.E.; Valdez, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    A high performance capillary electrophoresis (HPCE) system has been developed for the fractionation of histones. This system involves electroinjection of the sample and electrophoresis in a 0.1M phosphate buffer at pH 2.5 in a 50 {mu}m {times} 35 cm coated capillary. Electrophoresis was accomplished in 9 minutes separating a whole histone preparation into its components in the following order of decreasing mobility; (MHP) H3, H1 (major variant), H1 (minor variant), (LHP) H3, (MHP) H2A (major variant), (LHP) H2A, H4, H2B, (MHP) H2A (minor variant) where MHP is the more hydrophobic component and LHP is the less hydrophobic component. This order of separation is very different from that found in acid-urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and in reversed-phase HPLC and, thus, brings the histone biochemist a new dimension for the qualitative analysis of histone samples. 27 refs., 8 figs.

  20. Capillary action liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Bergström, Edmund T; Goodall, David M; Myers, Peter

    2009-06-01

    Capillary action LC (caLC) is introduced as a technique using capillary action as the driving force to perform LC in capillary columns packed with HPLC type microparticulate materials. A dry packing method with centrifugal force was developed to prepare capillary columns in parallel (10 columns per 3 min) to support their disposable use in caLC. Using a digital microscope for real-time imaging and recording separations of components in a dye mixture, caLC was found to have flow characteristics similar to TLC. Based on the investigation of microparticulate HPLC silica gels of different size (1.5-10 microm) and a typical TLC grade irregular medium, Merck 60G silica, the van Deemter curves suggested molecular diffusion as the major contribution to band broadening in caLC. With Waters Xbridge 2.6 microm silica, plate heights down to 8.8 microm were obtained, comparable to those achievable in HPLC. Assisted by an image-processing method, the visual caLC separation was converted to a classical chromatogram for further data analysis and such a facility confirmed the observation of highly efficient bands.

  1. Gradient elution capillary electrochromatography and hyphenation with nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Gfrörer, P; Schewitz, J; Pusecker, K; Tseng, L H; Albert, K; Bayer, E

    1999-01-01

    Coupling of gradient capillary electrochromatography (gradient CEC) and capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) was performed using a recently developed capillary NMR interface. This technique was applied for the analysis of pharmaceuticals and food. An analgesic was investigated using isocratic and gradient continuous-flow CEC-NMR. Comparison of the results demonstrated the superiority of gradient CEC over isocratic CEC. Aspartame and caffeine, both ingredients of soft beverages, were separated and analyzed by continuous flow CZE-NMR. The order of elution could be reversed by altering the pH. This reversal led to an increased sample concentration in the NMR detection cell, thus allowing the acquisition of a totally correlated spectroscopy (TOCSY) two-dimensional (2-D) spectrum of the synthetic peptide aspartame. PMID:10065951

  2. Gradient elution capillary electrochromatography and hyphenation with nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Gfrörer, P; Schewitz, J; Pusecker, K; Tseng, L H; Albert, K; Bayer, E

    1999-01-01

    Coupling of gradient capillary electrochromatography (gradient CEC) and capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) was performed using a recently developed capillary NMR interface. This technique was applied for the analysis of pharmaceuticals and food. An analgesic was investigated using isocratic and gradient continuous-flow CEC-NMR. Comparison of the results demonstrated the superiority of gradient CEC over isocratic CEC. Aspartame and caffeine, both ingredients of soft beverages, were separated and analyzed by continuous flow CZE-NMR. The order of elution could be reversed by altering the pH. This reversal led to an increased sample concentration in the NMR detection cell, thus allowing the acquisition of a totally correlated spectroscopy (TOCSY) two-dimensional (2-D) spectrum of the synthetic peptide aspartame.

  3. Metabolomic profiling of anionic metabolites in head and neck cancer cells by capillary ion chromatography with Orbitrap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junhua; Christison, Terri T; Misuno, Kaori; Lopez, Linda; Huhmer, Andreas F; Huang, Yingying; Hu, Shen

    2014-05-20

    A highly sensitive platform coupling capillary ion chromatography (Cap IC) with Q Exactive mass spectrometer has been developed for metabolic profiling of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells. The Cap IC allowed an excellent separation of anionic polar metabolites, and the sensitivities increased by up to 100-fold compared to reversed-phase liquid chromatography and hydrophilic interaction chromatography performed at either high- or capillary-flow rates. The detection limits for a panel of standard metabolites were between 0.04 to 0.5 nmol/L (0.2 to 3.4 fmol) at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. This platform was applied to an untargeted metabolomic analysis of head and neck cancer cells and stem-like cancer cells. Differential metabolomics analysis identified significant changes in energy metabolism pathways (e.g., glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid cycle). These experiments demonstrate Cap IC/MS as a powerful metabolomics tool by providing enhanced separation and sensitivity of polar metabolites combined with high resolution and accurate mass measurement (HR/AM) capabilities to differentiate isobaric metabolites.

  4. Noise suppressing capillary separation system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Xue, Yongjun

    1996-07-30

    A noise-suppressing capillary separation system for detecting the real-time presence or concentration of an analyte in a sample is provided. The system contains a capillary separation means through which the analyte is moved, a coherent light source that generates a beam which is split into a reference beam and a sample beam that irradiate the capillary, and a detector for detecting the reference beam and the sample beam light that transmits through the capillary. The laser beam is of a wavelength effective to be absorbed by a chromophore in the capillary. The system includes a noise suppressing system to improve performance and accuracy without signal averaging or multiple scans.

  5. [Venoruton and capillary permeability].

    PubMed

    Cesarone, M R; Laurora, G; Gabini, M; Errichi, B M; Candiani, C; Belcaro, G

    1989-05-01

    A new system to evaluate capillary permeability, the vacuum suction chamber (VSC) device, was used to assess the effects of Venoruton in patients with venous hypertension. A temporary, superficial skin lesion (wheal) was produced with the VSC device by negative pressure (30 mmHg) applied for 10 minutes on the internal, perimalleolar region. Wheals disappear in less than 60 minutes in normals while in patients with venous hypertension the wheal is more persistent, requiring a significantly longer time to disappear. This new technique was used in association with laser-Doppler flowmetry to evaluate the efficacy of Venoruton (1000 mgs t.i.d.) administered for 2 weeks on venous hypertension. Results indicate a positive effect of Venoruton in reducing the abnormally increased capillary permeability in venous hypertension and are proportional to the changes observed in signs and symptoms after treatment.

  6. Enantioseparations by capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Fanali, S; Catarcini, P; Blaschke, G; Chankvetadze, B

    2001-09-01

    The review summarizes recent developments in enantioseparations by capillary electrochromatography (CEC). Selected fundamental aspects of CEC are discussed in order to stress those features which may allow the success of this technique in the competitive field of enantioseparations. In addition, the comparative characteristics of the different modes of chiral CEC and the stationary phases are presented. The effects of the characteristics of the stationary and liquid phases and operational conditions on the separation results are discussed. Finally, some future trends are briefly addressed.

  7. Alternating-Polarity Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Brief reversing polarity of welding current greatly improves quality of welds. NASA technical memorandum recounts progress in art of variable-polarity plasma-arc (VPPA) welding, with emphasis on welding of aluminum-alloy tanks. VPPA welders offer important advantages over conventional single-polarity gas/tungsten arc welders.

  8. Magnetic field reversal of electric polarization and magnetoelectric phase diagram of the hexaferrite Ba{sub 1.3}Sr{sub 0.7}Co{sub 0.9}Zn{sub 1.1}Fe{sub 10.8}Al{sub 1.2}O{sub 22}

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Shipeng; Yan, Liqin; Chai, Yisheng; Cong, Junzhuang; Sun, Young

    2014-01-20

    Low magnetic field reversal of electric polarization has been demonstrated in the multiferroic Y-type hexaferrite Ba{sub 1.3}Sr{sub 0.7}Co{sub 0.9}Zn{sub 1.1}Fe{sub 10.8}Al{sub 1.2}O{sub 22} single crystal. The maximum magnetoelectric coefficient at 200 K reaches 1065 ps/m near zero magnetic field. By a systematic investigation of magnetic field dependence of magnetic and dielectric responses at various temperatures, we obtained the magnetoelectric phase diagram describing the detailed evolution of the spin-induced ferroelectric phases with temperature and magnetic field. Below 225 K, the transverse spin cone can be stabilized at zero magnetic field, which is responsible for the reversal behavior of electric polarization. Our study reveals how to eventually achieve magnetic field reversal of electric polarization in hexaferrites at room temperature.

  9. Automated Parallel Capillary Electrophoretic System

    DOEpatents

    Li, Qingbo; Kane, Thomas E.; Liu, Changsheng; Sonnenschein, Bernard; Sharer, Michael V.; Kernan, John R.

    2000-02-22

    An automated electrophoretic system is disclosed. The system employs a capillary cartridge having a plurality of capillary tubes. The cartridge has a first array of capillary ends projecting from one side of a plate. The first array of capillary ends are spaced apart in substantially the same manner as the wells of a microtitre tray of standard size. This allows one to simultaneously perform capillary electrophoresis on samples present in each of the wells of the tray. The system includes a stacked, dual carousel arrangement to eliminate cross-contamination resulting from reuse of the same buffer tray on consecutive executions from electrophoresis. The system also has a gel delivery module containing a gel syringe/a stepper motor or a high pressure chamber with a pump to quickly and uniformly deliver gel through the capillary tubes. The system further includes a multi-wavelength beam generator to generate a laser beam which produces a beam with a wide range of wavelengths. An off-line capillary reconditioner thoroughly cleans a capillary cartridge to enable simultaneous execution of electrophoresis with another capillary cartridge. The streamlined nature of the off-line capillary reconditioner offers the advantage of increased system throughput with a minimal increase in system cost.

  10. Polarization reversal and electrocaloric measurements for field-enforced transitions in the system lead zirconate-lead titanate-lead oxide: tin oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Tuttle, B.A.

    1982-01-01

    The Pb(Zr, Sn, Ti)O/sub 3/ crystalline solution series (PZST) has several phases of near equal free energy, allowing field-enforceable antiferroelectric (AFE) to ferroelectric (FE) and paraelectric (PE) to ferroelectric (FE) transitions. An understanding of the stability of FE, AFE, and PE phases with respect to chemical composition, electric field and temperature was developed from low frequency polarization vs electric field measurements at different temperatures. All materials studied had a sequence of phase transitions FE-AFE-PE with increasing temperature. The temperature range of AFE phase stability increased with increasing Zr/Ti ratio, while SnO/sub 2/ content increased the stability over a wider compositional range. Thus, through compositional modification, some materials were fabricated that had an AFE temperature range of stability of only 3/sup 0/C, while for others the temperature range of AFE phase stability was in excess of 100/sup 0/C.

  11. Capillary reference half-cell

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Stephen H.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention is a reference half-cell electrode wherein intermingling of test fluid with reference fluid does not affect the performance of the reference half-cell over a long time. This intermingling reference half-cell may be used as a single or double junction submersible or surface reference electrode. The intermingling reference half-cell relies on a capillary tube having a first end open to reference fluid and a second end open to test fluid wherein the small diameter of the capillary tube limits free motion of fluid within the capillary to diffusion. The electrode is placed near the first end of the capillary in contact with the reference fluid. The method of operation of the present invention begins with filling the capillary tube with a reference solution. After closing the first end of the capillary, the capillary tube may be fully submerged or partially submerged with the second open end inserted into test fluid. Since the electrode is placed near the first end of the capillary, and since the test fluid may intermingle with the reference fluid through the second open end only by diffusion, this intermingling capillary reference half-cell provides a stable voltage potential for long time periods.

  12. Capillary reference half-cell

    DOEpatents

    Hall, S.H.

    1996-02-13

    The present invention is a reference half-cell electrode wherein intermingling of test fluid with reference fluid does not affect the performance of the reference half-cell over a long time. This intermingling reference half-cell may be used as a single or double junction submersible or surface reference electrode. The intermingling reference half-cell relies on a capillary tube having a first end open to reference fluid and a second end open to test fluid wherein the small diameter of the capillary tube limits free motion of fluid within the capillary to diffusion. The electrode is placed near the first end of the capillary in contact with the reference fluid. The method of operation of the present invention begins with filling the capillary tube with a reference solution. After closing the first end of the capillary, the capillary tube may be fully submerged or partially submerged with the second open end inserted into test fluid. Since the electrode is placed near the first end of the capillary, and since the test fluid may intermingle with the reference fluid through the second open end only by diffusion, this intermingling capillary reference half-cell provides a stable voltage potential for long time periods. 11 figs.

  13. Stability of Constrained Capillary Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostwick, J. B.; Steen, P. H.

    2015-01-01

    A capillary surface is an interface between two fluids whose shape is determined primarily by surface tension. Sessile drops, liquid bridges, rivulets, and liquid drops on fibers are all examples of capillary shapes influenced by contact with a solid. Capillary shapes can reconfigure spontaneously or exhibit natural oscillations, reflecting static or dynamic instabilities, respectively. Both instabilities are related, and a review of static stability precedes the dynamic case. The focus of the dynamic case here is the hydrodynamic stability of capillary surfaces subject to constraints of (a) volume conservation, (b) contact-line boundary conditions, and (c) the geometry of the supporting surface.

  14. Alveolar Capillary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Stankiewicz, Pawel; Steinhorn, Robin H.

    2011-01-01

    Alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of the pulmonary veins (ACD/MPV) is a rare, fatal developmental lung disorder of neonates and infants. This review aims to address recent findings in the etiology and genetics of ACD/MPV and to raise awareness of this poorly known disease, which may also present as milder, unclassified forms. Successively discussed are what is known about the epidemiology, pathogenesis, pathophysiology, diagnostic indicators and approaches, genetic testing, treatment, and cases of delayed onset. The review concludes with suggestions for future directions to answer the many unknowns about this disorder. PMID:21471096

  15. Adamantyl-group containing mixed-mode acrylamide-based continuous beds for capillary electrochromatography. Part I: study of a synthesis procedure including solubilization of N-adamantyl-acrylamide via complex formation with a water-soluble cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Al-Massaedh, Ayat Allah; Pyell, Ute

    2013-04-19

    A new synthesis procedure for highly crosslinked macroporous amphiphilic N-adamantyl-functionalized mixed-mode acrylamide-based monolithic stationary phases for capillary electrochromatography (CEC) is investigated employing solubilization of the hydrophobic monomer by complexation with a cyclodextrin. N-(1-adamantyl)acrylamide is synthesized and characterized as a hydrophobic monomer forming a water soluble-inclusion complex with statistically methylated-β-cyclodextrin. The stoichiometry, the complex formation constant and the spatial arrangement of the formed complex are determined. Mixed-mode monolithic stationary phases are synthesized by in situ free radical copolymerization of cyclodextrin-solubilized N-adamantyl acrylamide, a water soluble crosslinker (piperazinediacrylamide), a hydrophilic monomer (methacrylamide), and a negatively charged monomer (vinylsulfonic acid) in aqueous medium in bind silane-pretreated fused silica capillaries. The synthesized monolithic stationary phases are amphiphilic and can be employed in the reversed- and in the normal-phase mode (depending on the composition of the mobile phase), which is demonstrated with polar and non-polar analytes. Observations made with polar analytes and polar mobile phase can only be explained by a mixed-mode retention mechanism. The influence of the total monomer concentration (%T) on the chromatographic properties, the electroosmotic mobility, and on the specific permeability is investigated. With a homologues series of alkylphenones it is confirmed that the hydrophobicity (methylene selectivity) of the stationary phase increases with increasing mass fraction of N-(1-adamantyl)acrylamide in the synthesis mixture. PMID:23489493

  16. Geomagnetic Reversals during the Phanerozoic.

    PubMed

    McElhinny, M W

    1971-04-01

    An antalysis of worldwide paleomagnetic measurements suggests a periodicity of 350 x 10(6) years in the polarity of the geomagnetic field. During the Mesozoic it is predominantly normal, whereas during the Upper Paleozoic it is predominantly reversed. Although geomagnetic reversals occur at different rates throughout the Phanerozoic, there appeaars to be no clear correlation between biological evolutionary rates and reversal frequency. PMID:17735224

  17. Capillary suspensions: Particle networks formed through the capillary force

    PubMed Central

    Koos, Erin

    2014-01-01

    The addition of small amounts of a secondary fluid to a suspension can, through the attractive capillary force, lead to particle bridging and network formation. The capillary bridging phenomenon can be used to stabilize particle suspensions and precisely tune their rheological properties. This effect can even occur when the secondary fluid wets the particles less well than the bulk fluid. These materials, so-called capillary suspensions, have been the subject of recent research studying the mechanism for network formation, the properties of these suspensions, and how the material properties can be modified. Recent work in colloidal clusters is summarized and the relationship to capillary suspensions is discussed. Capillary suspensions can also be used as a pathway for new material design and some of these applications are highlighted. Results obtained to date are summarized and central questions that remain to be answered are proposed in this review. PMID:25729316

  18. Preferential polarization and its reversal in polycrystalline BiFeO3/La0.5Sr0.5CoO3 heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy Choudhury, Palash; Parui, Jayanta; Chiniwar, Santosh; Krupanidhi, S. B.

    2015-04-01

    Polycrystalline BiFeO3 thin films were grown on La0.5Sr0.5CoO3 buffered Pt (200)/TiO2/SiO2/Si substrates under different oxygen partial pressures (10, 25, 50 and 100 mTorr) by pulsed laser ablation. Piezoresponse Force Microscopy and Piezo-Force Spectroscopy have shown that all the films are ferroelectric in nature with locally switchable domains. It has also revealed a preferential downward domain orientation in as-grown films grown under lower oxygen partial pressure (10 and 25 mTorr) with a reversal of preferential domain orientation as the oxygen partial pressure is increased to 100 mTorr during laser ablation. Such phenomena are atypical of multi-grained polycrystalline ferroelectric films and have been discussed on the basis of defect formation with changing growth conditions. For the 50 mTorr grown film, asymmetric domain stability and retention during write-read studies has been observed which is attributed to grain-size-related defect concentration, affecting pinning centres that inhibit domain wall motion.

  19. Possibilities and limitations of capillary electropherosis in pharmaceutical analysis.

    PubMed

    Borst, C; Belal, F; Holzgrabe, U

    2013-07-01

    Capillary electropherosis (CE) has been proved to be an important alternative to high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in pharmaceutical analysis. However, when it comes to the analysis of compounds, e.g. impurities or metabolites, of very different polarity and water solubility CE and the related techniques come to its limits. This is demonstrated for the antipsychotic drug quetiapine and its impurities. A nonaqueous capillary electrophoresis (NACE) method was developed using a background electrolyte (BGE) composed of ammonium acetate dissolved in a mixture of acetonitrile and methanol including acetic acid to protonate the substances. The NACE method gave an excellent separation of all components. Since the conductivity of the BGE used in the NACE method is quite low and problems with current occurred, an additional aqueous capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) method was developed for quetiapine and the two water soluble derivatives, using phosphate buffer as BGE. The method was validated with regard to repeatability and limit of detection.

  20. Tapered capillary optics

    DOEpatents

    Hirsch, Gregory

    1998-01-01

    A metal or glass wire is etched with great precision into a very narrowly tapering cone which has the shape of the desired final capillary-optics bore. By controlling the rate of removal of the wire from an etchant bath, a carefully controlled taper is produced. A sensor measures the diameter of the wire as it leaves the surface of the etchant. This signal is used for feedback control of the withdrawal speed. The etched wire undergoes a treatment to produce an extremely low surface-roughness. The etched and smoothed wire is coated with the material of choice for optimizing the reflectivity of the radiation being focused. This could be a vacuum evaporation, sputtering, CVD or aqueous chemical process. The coated wire is either electroplated, built up with electroless plating, or encapsulated in a polymer cylinder such as epoxy to increase the diameter of the wire for easier handling and greater robustness. During this process, the wire is vertically oriented and tensioned to assure that the wire is absolutely straight. The coated and electroformed wire is bonded to a flat, rigid substrate and is then periodically segmented by cutting or etching a series of narrow slits or grooves into the wire. The wire is vertically oriented and tensioned during the bonding process to assure that it is straight. The original wire material is then chemically etched away through the slits or otherwise withdrawn to leave the hollow internal bore of the final tapered-capillary optical element.

  1. Capillary Electrophoresis in Metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Maier, Tanja Verena; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is an analytical toolbox to describe (all) low-molecular-weight compounds in a biological system, as cells, tissues, urine, and feces, as well as in serum and plasma. To analyze such complex biological samples, high requirements on the analytical technique are needed due to the high variation in compound physico-chemistry (cholesterol derivatives, amino acids, fatty acids as SCFA, MCFA, or LCFA, or pathway-related metabolites belonging to each individual organism) and concentration dynamic range. All main separation techniques (LC-MS, GC-MS) are applied in routine to metabolomics hyphenated or not to mass spectrometry, and capillary electrophoresis is a powerful high-resolving technique but still underused in this field of complex samples. Metabolomics can be performed in the non-targeted way to gain an overview on metabolite profiles in biological samples. Targeted metabolomics is applied to analyze quantitatively pre-selected metabolites. This chapter reviews the use of capillary electrophoresis in the field of metabolomics and exemplifies solutions in metabolite profiling and analysis in urine and plasma. PMID:27645748

  2. Capillary-mediated interface perturbations: Deterministic pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glicksman, Martin E.

    2016-09-01

    Leibniz-Reynolds analysis identifies a 4th-order capillary-mediated energy field that is responsible for shape changes observed during melting, and for interface speed perturbations during crystal growth. Field-theoretic principles also show that capillary-mediated energy distributions cancel over large length scales, but modulate the interface shape on smaller mesoscopic scales. Speed perturbations reverse direction at specific locations where they initiate inflection and branching on unstable interfaces, thereby enhancing pattern complexity. Simulations of pattern formation by several independent groups of investigators using a variety of numerical techniques confirm that shape changes during both melting and growth initiate at locations predicted from interface field theory. Finally, limit cycles occur as an interface and its capillary energy field co-evolve, leading to synchronized branching. Synchronous perturbations produce classical dendritic structures, whereas asynchronous perturbations observed in isotropic and weakly anisotropic systems lead to chaotic-looking patterns that remain nevertheless deterministic.

  3. On Capillary Rise and Nucleation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasad, R.

    2008-01-01

    A comparison of capillary rise and nucleation is presented. It is shown that both phenomena result from a balance between two competing energy factors: a volume energy and a surface energy. Such a comparison may help to introduce nucleation with a topic familiar to the students, capillary rise. (Contains 1 table and 3 figures.)

  4. Capillary optics for radiation focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Peurrung, A.J.; Reeder, P.L.; Bliss, M.; Craig, R.A.; Lepel, E.A.; Stromswold, D.C.; Stoffels, J.; Sunberg, D.S.; Tenny, H.

    1996-11-01

    Capillary lens technology may ultimately bring benefits to neutron and x-ray-based science like conventional lenses with visible light. Although the technology is not yet 10 years old, these lenses have already had a significant impact in engineering, science, and medicine. Capillary lenses are advantageous when it is desirable to increase the radiation flux at a location without regard to its angular divergence. PNNL has worked to improve the technology in several ways. A single, optimally tapered capillary was manufactured, which allows intensity gains of a factor of 270 for an initially parallel, incident x-ray beam. Feasibility of constructing neutron lenses using {sup 58}Ni (particularly effective at reflecting neutrons) has been explored. Three applications for capillary optics have been identified and studied: neutron telescope, Gandolphi x-ray diffractometry, and neutron radiotherapy. A brief guide is given for determining which potential applications are likely to be helped by capillary optics.

  5. Biomedical applications of capillary electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartsova, L. A.; Bessonova, E. A.

    2015-08-01

    The review deals with modern analytical approaches used in capillary electrophoresis for solving medical and biological problems: search for biomarkers of various diseases and rapid diagnosis based on characteristic profiles of biologically active compounds by capillary electrophoresis with mass spectrometric detection; monitoring of the residual drugs in biological fluids for evaluating the efficiency of drug therapy; testing of the enantiomeric purity of pharmaceutical products; the use of novel materials as components of stationary and pseudo-stationary phases in capillary electrophoresis and capillary electrochromatography to increase the selectivity of separation of components of complex matrices; and identification of various on-line preconcentration techniques to reduce the detection limits of biologically active analytes. A topical trend in capillary electrophoresis required in clinical practice, viz., the design of microfluidic systems, is discussed. The bibliography includes 173 references.

  6. Noise suppressing capillary separation system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Xue, Y.

    1996-07-30

    A noise-suppressing capillary separation system for detecting the real-time presence or concentration of an analyte in a sample is provided. The system contains a capillary separation means through which the analyte is moved, a coherent light source that generates a beam which is split into a reference beam and a sample beam that irradiate the capillary, and a detector for detecting the reference beam and the sample beam light that transmits through the capillary. The laser beam is of a wavelength effective to be absorbed by a chromophore in the capillary. The system includes a noise suppressing system to improve performance and accuracy without signal averaging or multiple scans. 13 figs.

  7. Interaction between Polymeric Additives and Secondary Fluids in Capillary Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Bitsch, Boris; Braunschweig, Björn; Willenbacher, Norbert

    2016-02-16

    Capillary suspensions are ternary systems including a solid and two liquid phases representing a novel formulation platform for pastes with unique processing and end-use properties. Here we have investigated aqueous suspensions of non-Brownian graphite particles including different polymers commonly used as thickening agents or binders in paste formulations. We have studied the interaction between these additives and organic solvents in order to elucidate its effect on the characteristic formation of a particle network structure in corresponding ternary capillary suspension systems. Organic solvents with different polarity have been employed, and in the presence of nonadsorbing poly(ethylene oxide), all of them, whether they preferentially wet the graphite surface or not, induce the formation of a network structure within the suspension as indicated by a strong change in rheological properties. However, when the adsorbing polymers carboxymethylcellulose and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) are included, the drastic change in rheological behavior occurs only when polar organic solvents are used as secondary liquids. Obviously, these solvents can form pendular bridges, finally resulting in a sample-spanning particle network. Vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy provides evidence that these polar liquids remove the adsorbed polymer from the graphite particles. In contrast, nonpolar and nonwetting solvents do not force polymer desorption. In these cases, the formation of a percolating network structure within the suspensions is presumably prevented by the strong steric repulsion among graphite particles, not allowing for the formation of particle clusters encapsulating the secondary liquid. Accordingly, polymeric additives and secondary fluids have to be carefully selected in capillary suspension formulations, then offering a new pathway to customize paste formulations. The polymer may serve to adjust an appropriate viscosity level, and the capillary bridging induces the

  8. Microfluidic flow counterbalanced capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ling; Dutta, Debashis

    2013-04-01

    Flow counterbalanced capillary electrophoresis (FCCE) offers a powerful approach to realizing difficult charge based separations in compact microchip devices with application of relatively small electrical voltages. The need for dynamically controlling the pressure-gradient in the FCCE column however presents a significant challenge in implementing this technique on the microchip platform. In this article, we report the use of a simple on-chip pumping unit that allows precise introduction of a periodic pressure-driven backflow into a microfluidic separation channel enabling an FCCE analysis. The backflow in our device was produced by fabricating a shallow segment (0.5 μm deep) downstream of the analysis column (5 μm deep) and applying an electric field across it. A mismatch in the electroosmotic transport rate at the interface of this segment was shown to yield a pressure-gradient that could reverse the flow of the analyte bands without inverting the direction of the electric field. Although such a pressure-gradient also led to additional band broadening in the system, overall, the separation resolution of our device was observed to improve with an increasing number of back-and-forth sample passes through the analysis channel. For our current design, the corresponding improvement in the effective separation length was as much as 52% of the actual distance travelled by the chosen FITC-labeled amino acid samples. The reported device is well suited for further miniaturization of the FCCE method to the nanofluidic length scale which likely would improve its performance, and is easily integrable to other analytical procedures on the microchip platform for lab-on-a-chip applications. PMID:23420375

  9. Steady Capillary Driven Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weislogel, Mark M.

    1996-01-01

    A steady capillary driven flow is developed for a liquid index in a circular tube which is partially coated with a surface modifier to produce a discontinuous wetting condition from one side of the tube to the other. The bulk flow is novel in that it is truly steady, and controlled solely by the physics associated with dynamic wetting. The influence of gravity on the flow is minimized through the use of small diameter tubes approximately O(1 mm) tested horizontally in a laboratory and larger tubes approximately O(10 mm) tested in the low gravity environment of a drop tower. Average steady velocities are predicted and compared against a large experimental data set which includes the effects of tube dimensions and fluid properties. The sensitivity of the velocity to surface cleanliness is dramatic and the advantages of experimentation in a microgravity environment are discussed.

  10. Benign sinonasal capillary haemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Stubbs, Darren; Poulios, Aristotelis; Khalil, Hisham

    2014-01-01

    Haemangiomas are benign fibrovascular tumours relatively that are common in the head and neck, where 60% of them occur Among the various categories of haemangiomas, lobular capillary haemangiomas (LCH) occur frequently on the skin, lips, buccal mucosa, tongue and gingiva. However, they are vanishingly rare in the paranasal sinuses. The imaging features of LCH are non-specific. The histological characteristics of LCH can also make diagnosis difficult as sometimes resemble highly vascular malignant tumours. This leads to the false preoperative diagnosis of suspected malignancy in many cases, which places the patient under unnecessary distress and anxiety. We present a case of LCH appearing as a suspicious nasal lesion of the lateral nasal wall with unilateral nasal obstruction, necrotic centre and epistaxis. The tumour was excised endoscopically in one operation including endoscopic medial maxillectomy. Further education about this lesion is deemed important as preoperative embolisation may be needed for a safe operation. PMID:25287393

  11. Capillaries for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Chang, H.T.; Fung, E.N.

    1997-12-09

    The invention provides a side-entry optical excitation geometry for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system. A charge-injection device is optically coupled to capillaries in the array such that the interior of a capillary is imaged onto only one pixel. In Sanger-type 4-label DNA sequencing reactions, nucleotide identification (``base calling``) is improved by using two long-pass filters to split fluorescence emission into two emission channels. A binary poly(ethyleneoxide) matrix is used in the electrophoretic separations. 19 figs.

  12. Capillaries for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Chang, Huan-Tsang; Fung, Eliza N.

    1997-12-09

    The invention provides a side-entry optical excitation geometry for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system. A charge-injection device is optically coupled to capillaries in the array such that the interior of a capillary is imaged onto only one pixel. In Sanger-type 4-label DNA sequencing reactions, nucleotide identification ("base calling") is improved by using two long-pass filters to split fluorescence emission into two emission channels. A binary poly(ethyleneoxide) matrix is used in the electrophoretic separations.

  13. Capillary ratchet: Hydrodynamics of capillary feeding in shorebirds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Manu; Quere, David; Bush, John

    2008-03-01

    Bill morphologies are highly specialized to particular foraging strategies in birds, as is apparent from the large diversity of beak shapes observed in nature. Here we present an experimental and analytical study of capillary feeding in shorebirds. We highlight the critical role of contact angle hysteresis in capillary feeding. Our study provides a simple physical rationalization for the observation of multiple mandibular spreading cycles in feeding, necessary to overcome contact line resistance. We also find a unique geometrical optima in beak opening and closing angles for the most efficient drop transport. This capillary ratchet mechanism may also find applications in micro scale fluid transport, such as valveless pumping of fluid drops.

  14. Applications of capillary optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard

    2006-10-01

    The paper updates and summarizes contemporary applications of capillary optical fibers. Some of these applications are straight consequence of the classical capillary properties and capillary devices like: rheometry, electrophoresis, column chromatography (gas and liquid). Some new applications are tightly connected with co-propagation (or counter-propagation) of micro-mass together with optical wave - evanescent or of considerable intensity. In the first case, the optical wave is propagated in a narrow (more and more frequently single-mode) optical ring core adjacent to the capillary hole. The optical propagation is purely refractive. In the second case, the intensity maximum of optical wave is on the capillary long axis, i.e. in the center of the hole. The optical propagation is purely photonic, i.e. in a Bragg waveguide (one dimensional photonic band-gap). The capillary hole is filled with vacuum or with propagated matter (gas, liquid, single atoms, continuous particle arrangement). Optical capillaries, filamentary and embedded, are turning to a fundamental component of nano- and micro-MOEMS.

  15. Instability of the capillary bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pare, Gounseti; Hoepffner, Jerome

    2014-11-01

    Capillary adhesion is a physical mechanism that maintains two bodies in contact by capillarity through a liquid ligament. The capillary bridge is an idealization of this capillary adhesion. In this study we first focus on the classical case of the stability of the capillary bridge. Secondly we study a slightly more complex configuration, imagining a flow in the capillary bridge as in the case of the dynamics of the neck of a liquid ligament, in its withdrawal under the effect of capillarity. Inspired by the experiments on soap films of Plateau, the configuration analyzed consists of an initially axisymmetric, mass of fluid held by surface tension forces between two parallel, coaxial, solid pipes of the same diameter. The results presented are obtained by numerical simulations using the free software, Gerris Flow Solver. We first focus on the capillary Venturi. In the static configuration the stability diagram of the capillary bridge obtained is in perfect agreement with the results of Lev A. Slobozhanin. In the dynamic case we develop a matlab code based on the one dimensional equations of Eggers and Dupont. The comparison of the bifurcation diagram obtained and the numerical simulations shows a good agreement.

  16. Capillary flow solder wettability test

    SciTech Connect

    Vianco, P.T.; Rejent, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    A test procedure was developed to assess the capillary flow wettability of solders inside of a confined geometry. The test geometry was comprised of two parallel plates with a controlled gap of constant thickness (0.008 cm, 0.018 cm, 0.025 cm, and 0.038 cm). Capillary flow was assessed by: (1) the meniscus or capillary rise of the solder within the gap, (2) the extent of void formation in the gap, and (3) the time-dependence of the risen solder film. Tests were performed with the lead-free solders.

  17. Integrated multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Tan, Hongdong

    2002-05-14

    The present invention provides an integrated multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system for the analysis of sample analytes. The system integrates and automates multiple components, such as chromatographic columns and separation capillaries, and further provides a detector for the detection of analytes eluting from the separation capillaries. The system employs multiplexed freeze/thaw valves to manage fluid flow and sample movement. The system is computer controlled and is capable of processing samples through reaction, purification, denaturation, pre-concentration, injection, separation and detection in parallel fashion. Methods employing the system of the invention are also provided.

  18. Solvent jet desorption capillary photoionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Haapala, Markus; Teppo, Jaakko; Ollikainen, Elisa; Kiiski, Iiro; Vaikkinen, Anu; Kauppila, Tiina J; Kostiainen, Risto

    2015-03-17

    A new ambient mass spectrometry method, solvent jet desorption capillary photoionization (DCPI), is described. The method uses a solvent jet generated by a coaxial nebulizer operated at ambient conditions with nitrogen as nebulizer gas. The solvent jet is directed onto a sample surface, from which analytes are extracted into the solvent and ejected from the surface in secondary droplets formed in collisions between the jet and the sample surface. The secondary droplets are directed into the heated capillary photoionization (CPI) device, where the droplets are vaporized and the gaseous analytes are ionized by 10 eV photons generated by a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) krypton discharge lamp. As the CPI device is directly connected to the extended capillary inlet of the MS, high ion transfer efficiency to the vacuum of MS is achieved. The solvent jet DCPI provides several advantages: high sensitivity for nonpolar and polar compounds with limit of detection down to low fmol levels, capability of analyzing small and large molecules, and good spatial resolution (250 μm). Two ionization mechanisms are involved in DCPI: atmospheric pressure photoionization, capable of ionizing polar and nonpolar compounds, and solvent assisted inlet ionization capable of ionizing larger molecules like peptides. The feasibility of DCPI was successfully tested in the analysis of polar and nonpolar compounds in sage leaves and chili pepper. PMID:25715054

  19. Analysis of Capillary Rise in Asymmetric Branch-Like Capillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Caoxiong; Shen, Yinghao; Ge, Hongkui; Yang, Zhihui; Su, Shuai; Ren, Kai; Huang, Heyu

    2016-05-01

    Transport in porous media is common in nature, attracting many attentions for a long time. Tree-like network model is often used as a simplification for porous space, expressing the complexity of pore spaces instead of capillary bundle. To investigate spontaneous imbibition characteristics in this network, a dynamic asymmetric branch-like capillary model is used to represent basic network structure, using fractal method to represent tortuosity. This work investigates the influence of parameters on imbibition process in the branch-like capillary model. An analytical equation for the imbibition mass versus time is derived. Parameters from capillary structures to liquid properties are taken into account and analyzed based on the numerical solution of the equation. It is found that the imbibition process in asymmetric branch-like capillary model can be recognized by four sections and brunching tubes are positive for imbibition process. Concomitantly, meniscus arrest event is simulated and discussed. Moreover, the influence of parameters on imbibition process is discussed. These parameters can be classified as static and dynamic. Static parameters mainly change the capillary force, which are related to the ultimate imbibition mass or imbibition ability, while dynamic parameters mainly have influence on resistance of flowing fluid, which are related to the imbibition speed in the imbibition process.

  20. Micro-flow separation system using an open capillary tube that works under laminar flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Jinno, Naoya; Hashimoto, Masahiko; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhiko

    2009-02-01

    A micro-flow separation system was developed using an open capillary, fused-silica or polyethylene tube, and an aqueous-organic mixture (water-acetonitrile-ethyl acetate mixture) as a carrier solution. A model analyte solution containing 2,6-naphthalenedisulfonic acid and 1-naphthol was injected into the capillary tube by a gravity method. The analyte solution was subsequently delivered through the capillary tube with the carrier solution by a micro-syringe pump; the system worked under laminar flow conditions. The analytes were separated through the capillary tube and detected on-capillary by an absorption detector. 2,6-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid and 1-naphthol were detected in this order with a carrier solution of water-acetonitrile-ethyl acetate (15:3:2 volume ratio), while they were detected in the reverse order with a carrier solution of water-acetonitrile-ethyl acetate (2:5:9 volume ratio) using a fused-silica capillary tube. Similar separation behavior, i.e., that the elution times of the analytes could be easily reversed by changing the component ratio of the solvents in the carrier solution, was observed with a polyethylene capillary tube.

  1. Reversible pre-capillary pulmonary hypertension due to dasatinib.

    PubMed

    Buchelli Ramirez, Herminia L; Álvarez Álvarez, Celso M; Rodríguez Reguero, José J; García Clemente, Marta M; Casan Clarà, Pere

    2014-05-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension and secondary pleural effusion have been reported in association with long-term therapy with the multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor dasatinib, approved for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia. Here, we present the case of a 50-year-old man, diagnosed with chronic myeloid leukemia in August 2003, who developed pulmonary arterial hypertension after > 4 years of treatment with dasatinib. The complete remission of pulmonary arterial hypertension following dasatinib discontinuation suggests an etiological role of the drug in its development, although the administration of sildenafil may have played a therapeutic role. PMID:24149673

  2. DNA typing by capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, N.

    1997-10-08

    Capillary electrophoresis is becoming more and more important in nucleic acid analysis including DNA sequencing, typing and disease gene measurements. This work summarized the background of DNA typing. The recent development of capillary electrophoresis was also discussed. The second part of the thesis showed the principle of DNA typing based on using the allelic ladder as the absolute standard ladder in capillary electrophoresis system. Future work will be focused on demonstrating DNA typing on multiplex loci and examples of disease diagnosis in the on-line format of PCR-CE. Also capillary array electrophoresis system should allow high throughput, fast speed DNA typing. Only the introduction and conclusions for this report are available here. A reprint was removed for separate processing.

  3. Liposome behavior in capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Roberts, M A; Locascio-Brown, L; Maccrehan, W A; Durst, R A

    1996-10-01

    The behavior of liposomes in capillary electrophoresis is studied for the purpose of developing a potential method for characterizing liposomes prepared for use in industrial and analytical applications. This study characterizes the electrophoretic behavior of liposomes under various conditions to provide information about electrophoretic mobility and liposome-capillary surface interactions. The results of this method are compared with the results obtained using traditional laser light-scattering methods to obtain size information about liposome preparations. Additionally, reactions of liposomes and the surfactant n-octyl-β-d-glucopyranoside are performed off-line in bulk solution experiments and on-line in the capillary. Automated delivery of lysis agents by multiple electrokinetic injections is demonstrated as a general method for inducing on-capillary reactions between liposomes and other reagents. Furthermore, some preliminary evidence on the use of liposomes as a hydrophobic partitioning medium for analytical separations is presented.

  4. Capillary Electrophoresis in Wine Science.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Christian; Bagala, Franck; Gougeon, Régis D; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis appeared to be a powerful and reliable technique to analyze the diversity of wine compounds. Wine presents a great variety of natural chemicals coming from the grape berry extraction and the fermentation processes. The first and more abundant after water, ethanol has been quantified in wines via capillary electrophoresis. Other families like organic acids, neutral and acid sugars, polyphenols, amines, thiols, vitamins, and soluble proteins are electrophoretically separated from the complex matrix.Here, we will focus on the different methodologies that have been employed to conduct properly capillary electrophoresis in wine analysis.Two examples informing on wine chemistry obtained by capillary electrophoresis will be detailed. They concern polyphenol analysis and protein profiling. The first category is a well-developed quantitative approach important for the quality and the antioxidant properties conferred to wine. The second aspect involves more research aspects dealing with microbiota infections in the vineyard or in the grape as well as enological practices. PMID:27645750

  5. Surface Tension and Capillary Rise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Alan J.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the shortcomings of textbook explanations of surface tension, distinguishing between concepts of tension and capillary rise. The arguments require only a clear understanding of Newtonian mechanics, notably potential energy. (DF)

  6. Capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry interface

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard D.; Severs, Joanne C.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is an interface between a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary end and an electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end, for transporting an anolyte sample from a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary to a electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary. The interface of the present invention has: (a) a charge transfer fitting enclosing both of the capillary electrophoresis capillary end and the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end; (b) a reservoir containing an electrolyte surrounding the charge transfer fitting; and (c) an electrode immersed into the electrolyte, the electrode closing a capillary electrophoresis circuit and providing charge transfer across the charge transfer fitting while avoiding substantial bulk fluid transfer across the charge transfer fitting. Advantages of the present invention have been demonstrated as effective in providing high sensitivity and efficient analyses.

  7. On-line gas-free electrodialytic eluent generator for capillary ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bingcheng; Takeuchi, Masaki; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2008-01-01

    Both low- and high-pressure, gas-free, capillary-scale electrodialytic generators for eluents in ion chromatography are described. While the low-pressure devices rely on planar or tubular membranes, the high-pressure devices rely on ion-exchange beads used both as one-way ionic gates and as ball-on-seat valves to provide sealing. The high-pressure device is easily implemented in the form of a commercial cross fitting and can withstand at least 1400 psi. By design these devices do not produce gas in the eluent channel; hence, it is not necessary to remove gas afterward. With appropriate electrolytes and electrode polarities, such devices can produce either acid or base or salt. In regard to ionic transport, the behavior of these devices fully corresponds to that of a semiconductor diode. To our knowledge, this is the first time such complete equivalence of ion transport through ion-exchange media and with the more familiar example of electron transport through a semiconductor diode under both forward- and reverse-biased conditions have been demonstrated. Reverse bias can be applied to minimize/prevent Donnan-forbidden leakage or ion exchange. Even with 4 M KOH in the electrode compartments and 4 microL/min water flowing through the eluent channel, with a reverse bias of -12 V, the leakage KOH concentration is <30 microM, whereas the KOH concentration with zero voltage applied, herein after termed open circuit penetration (OCP), is 1600 microM. It is suggested that this OCP occurs not as much through Donnan-forbidden leakage but via ion exchange. Chromatograms and reproducibility data are presented for both isocratic and gradient chromatography, using ion-exchange, latex-modified, open tubular and packed monolithic columns.

  8. Portable, Battery Operated Capillary Electrophoresis with Optical Isomer Resolution Integrated with Ionization Source for Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moini, Mehdi; Rollman, Christopher M.

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a battery operated capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization (CE/ESI) source for mass spectrometry with optical isomer separation capability. The source fits in front of low or high resolution mass spectrometers similar to a nanospray source with about the same weight and size. The source has two high voltage power supplies (±25 kV HVPS) capable of operating in forward or reverse polarity modes and powered by a 12 V rechargeable lithium ion battery with operation time of ~10 h. In ultrafast CE mode, in which short narrow capillaries (≤15 μm i.d., 15-25 cm long) and field gradients ≥1000 V/cm are used, peak widths at the base are <1 s wide. Under these conditions, the source provides high resolution separation, including optical isomer resolution in ~1 min. Using a low resolution mass spectrometer (LTQ Velos) with a scan time of 0.07 s/scan, baseline separation of amino acids and their optical isomers were achieved in ~1 min. Moreover, bovine serum albumin (BSA) was analyzed in ~1 min with 56% coverage using the data-dependent MS/MS. Using a high resolution mass spectrometer (Thermo Orbitrap Elite) with 15,000 resolution, the fastest scan time achieved was 0.15 s, which was adequate for CE-MS analysis when optical isomer separation is not required or when the optical isomers were well separated. Figures of merit including a detection limit of 2 fmol and linear dynamic range of two orders of magnitude were achieved for amino acids.

  9. Portable, Battery Operated Capillary Electrophoresis with Optical Isomer Resolution Integrated with Ionization Source for Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Moini, Mehdi; Rollman, Christopher M

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a battery operated capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization (CE/ESI) source for mass spectrometry with optical isomer separation capability. The source fits in front of low or high resolution mass spectrometers similar to a nanospray source with about the same weight and size. The source has two high voltage power supplies (±25 kV HVPS) capable of operating in forward or reverse polarity modes and powered by a 12 V rechargeable lithium ion battery with operation time of ~10 h. In ultrafast CE mode, in which short narrow capillaries (≤15 μm i.d., 15-25 cm long) and field gradients ≥1000 V/cm are used, peak widths at the base are <1 s wide. Under these conditions, the source provides high resolution separation, including optical isomer resolution in ~1 min. Using a low resolution mass spectrometer (LTQ Velos) with a scan time of 0.07 s/scan, baseline separation of amino acids and their optical isomers were achieved in ~1 min. Moreover, bovine serum albumin (BSA) was analyzed in ~1 min with 56% coverage using the data-dependent MS/MS. Using a high resolution mass spectrometer (Thermo Orbitrap Elite) with 15,000 resolution, the fastest scan time achieved was 0.15 s, which was adequate for CE-MS analysis when optical isomer separation is not required or when the optical isomers were well separated. Figures of merit including a detection limit of 2 fmol and linear dynamic range of two orders of magnitude were achieved for amino acids. PMID:26644308

  10. Capillary zone electrophoresis for enumeration of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus in yogurt.

    PubMed

    Lim, Orathai; Suntornsuk, Worapot; Suntornsuk, Leena

    2009-03-15

    Enumeration of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus is a priority due to their importance in yogurt production. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) of both bacteria could be achieved in 7.2 min with a resolution of 3.2 in the background electrolyte (BGE) containing 4.5mM Tris(hydroxymethyl) amminomethane (TRIS)-4.5 mM boric acid-0.1 mM ethylenediamine tetraacetate (EDTA) (TBE) buffer (pH 8.4) and 0.05% (v/v) polyethylene oxide (PEO), using a capillary of 47.5 cm (effective length) x 100 microm i.d., injection of 50 mbar x 3s followed by -5kV x 120s, a voltage and temperature of 20 kV and 25 degrees C, respectively. Appropriate amounts of PEO in the BGE, sample preparation (i.e. vortex) and introduction were key factors for their separation. A short hydrodynamic injection followed by applying reversed polarity voltage could compress the bacteria into narrow zones, which were detected as separated single peaks. Method linearity (r(2)>0.99), precision (%RSDs<9.3%), recovery (%R=91.7-106.7%) and limit of quantitation (1.0 x 10(6) colony forming unit per mL (CFU/mL)) were satisfactory. Results from the CE analysis of both bacteria in yogurt were not statistically different from those of the plate count method (P>0.05). The CE method can be used as an alternative for quantitation of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus in yogurt since it was reliable, simple, cost and labor effective and rapid, allowing the analysis of 3 samples/h (comparing to 2d/sample by plate count method).

  11. Curvature capillary migration of microspheres.

    PubMed

    Sharifi-Mood, Nima; Liu, Iris B; Stebe, Kathleen J

    2015-09-14

    We address the question: how does capillarity propel microspheres along curvature gradients? For a particle on a fluid interface, there are two conditions that can apply at the three phase contact line: either the contact line adopts an equilibrium contact angle, or it can be pinned by kinetic trapping, e.g. at chemical heterogeneities, asperities, or other pinning sites on the particle surface. We formulate the curvature capillary energy for both scenarios for particles smaller than the capillary length and far from any pinning boundaries. The scale and range of the distortion made by the particle are set by the particle radius; we use singular perturbation methods to find the distortions and to rigorously evaluate the associated capillary energies. For particles with equilibrium contact angles, contrary to the literature, we find that the capillary energy is negligible, with the first contribution bounded to fourth order in the product of the particle radius and the deviatoric curvature of the host interface. For pinned contact lines, we find curvature capillary energies that are finite, with a functional form investigated previously by us for disks and microcylinders on curved interfaces. In experiments, we show microspheres migrate along deterministic trajectories toward regions of maximum deviatoric curvature with curvature capillary energies ranging from 6 × 10(3)-5 × 10(4)kBT. These data agree with the curvature capillary energy for the case of pinned contact lines. The underlying physics of this migration is a coupling of the interface deviatoric curvature with the quadrupolar mode of nanometric disturbances in the interface owing to the particle's contact line undulations. This work is an example of the major implications of nanometric roughness and contact line pinning for colloidal dynamics.

  12. Capillary instability of jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Anuj

    This thesis studies the capillary instability of a compound jet. A compound jet comprises an inner core of a primary fluid surrounded by an annulus of an immiscible secondary fluid. The compound jet is unstable due to capillarity. A compound jet finds applications in a variety of fields, such as, ink jet printing, particle sorting, extrusion, molding, particle production etc. In some of these applications such as molding, the disturbances that could cause the jet breakup start as periodic spatial disturbances of Fourier wave number k and grow in time. This is the temporal instability. In some other applications, such as, ink-jet printing, the disturbances initiate at the edge of the nozzle from which the jet issues out. These disturbances grow in space. This is the spatial instability. At small velocities, even if the initial disturbances are periodic in time, they grow exponentially in time. This is the absolute instability. We perform the temporal, spatial and the absolute stability analysis of an inviscid compound jet in a unified framework using the theory of transforms. Further, we solve the temporal instability problem for a viscous jet to understand the effect of viscosity on breakup dynamics. In the temporal analysis, we show that each interface of the compound jet contributes one mode to the instability. The modes contributed by the inner and outer interfaces grow for waves longer than the inner and the outer circumference of the undisturbed jet, respectively. The inner interface mode has a higher growth rate and hence dominates the breakup. The two interfaces grow exactly in phase in this mode and hence it is refereed to as the stretching mode. The other mode is the squeezing mode because the two interfaces grow exactly out of phase. The same two modes are also present in the spatial analysis. At high Weber numbers the predictions of the spatial theory reduce to those of the temporal theory because the waves simply convect with the jet velocity and there

  13. Decay of capillary wave turbulence.

    PubMed

    Deike, Luc; Berhanu, Michael; Falcon, Eric

    2012-06-01

    We report on the observation of freely decaying capillary wave turbulence on the surface of a fluid. The capillary wave turbulence spectrum decay is found to be self-similar in time with the same power law exponent as the one found in the stationary regime, in agreement with weak turbulence predictions. The amplitude of all Fourier modes are found to decrease exponentially with time at the same damping rate. The longest wavelengths involved in the system are shown to be damped by a viscous surface boundary layer. These long waves play the role of an energy source during the decay that sustains nonlinear interactions to keep capillary waves in a wave turbulent state.

  14. Paramecium swimming in capillary tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Saikat; Um, Soong Ho; Jung, Sunghwan

    2012-04-01

    Swimming organisms in their natural habitat need to navigate through a wide range of geometries and chemical environments. Interaction with boundaries in such situations is ubiquitous and can significantly modify the swimming characteristics of the organism when compared to ideal laboratory conditions. We study the different patterns of ciliary locomotion in glass capillaries of varying diameter and characterize the effect of the solid boundaries on the velocities of the organism. Experimental observations show that Paramecium executes helical trajectories that slowly transition to straight lines as the diameter of the capillary tubes decreases. We predict the swimming velocity in capillaries by modeling the system as a confined cylinder propagating longitudinal metachronal waves that create a finite pressure gradient. Comparing with experiments, we find that such pressure gradient considerations are necessary for modeling finite sized ciliary organisms in restrictive geometries.

  15. Reversible dementias

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Manjari; Vibha, Deepti

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, more attention has been given to the early diagnostic evaluation of patients with dementia which is essential to identify patients with cognitive symptoms who may have treatable conditions. Guidelines suggest that all patients presenting with dementia or cognitive symptoms should be evaluated with a range of laboratory tests, and with structural brain imaging with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). While many of the disorders reported as ‘reversible dementias’ are conditions that may well be associated with cognitive or behavioral symptoms, these symptoms are not always sufficiently severe to fulfill the clinical criteria for dementia. Thus, while the etiology of a condition may be treatable it should not be assumed that the associated dementia is fully reversible. Potentially reversible dementias should be identified and treatment considered, even if the symptoms are not sufficiently severe to meet the clinical criteria for dementia, and even if partial or full reversal of the cognitive symptoms cannot be guaranteed. In the literature, the most frequently observed potentially reversible conditions identified in patients with cognitive impairment or dementia are depression, adverse effects of drugs, drug or alcohol abuse, space-occupying lesions, normal pressure hydrocephalus, and metabolic conditions land endocrinal conditions like hypothyroidism and nutritional conditions like vitamin B-12 deficiency. Depression is by far the most common of the potentially reversible conditions. The review, hence addresses the common causes of reversible dementia and the studies published so far. PMID:21416018

  16. Revised Capillary Breakup Rheometer Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Louise; Schultz, William; Solomon, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Rather than integrate the one-dimensional equation of motion for a capillary breakup rheometer, we take the axial derivative of that equation. This avoids the determination of the axial force with all of its complications and correction factors. The resulting evolutionary equation that involves either two or four derivatives of the capillary radius as a function of the axial coordinate determines the ratio of elongational viscosity to surface tension coefficient. We examine several silicone and olive oils to show the accuracy of the method for Newtonian fluids. We will discuss our surface tension measurement techniques and briefly describe measurements of viscoelastic materials, including saliva.

  17. Conformation-sensitive capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Emma Jane

    2011-01-01

    Conformation-sensitive capillary electrophoresis (CSCE) is a rapid, high-throughput screening method that can be applied to any region of a genome for detection of sequence variants. Slab gel-based conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis was first described by Ganguly et al., and the transfer from slab gels to capillaries for higher throughput was reported by Rozycka et al. CSCE is based on the principle that DNA homoduplexes and heteroduplexes migrate at different rates during electrophoresis under mildly denaturing conditions. Fragments showing an altered peak morphology compared to the wild type are then sequenced to determine the precise nature of the sequence variant detected.

  18. Nonsteady Flow in Capillary Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Ayako

    2000-03-01

    Surface phenomena in the field of electron devices and the problem of how long. It takes plants to absorb water during their growth in hydroponic cultivation is attraching the attention of riseachers. However, the related study of non-steady flow in capillary tubes has a number of issues that require investigation. In response to this situation, we made attempted to assess nonsteady fiow in capillary tubes, the liquid rise time and other issues, using a motion equation that takes factors including the friction force of the tube and the surface tension into consideration.

  19. Capillary interactions in Pickering emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzowski, J.; Tasinkevych, M.; Dietrich, S.

    2011-09-01

    The effective capillary interaction potentials for small colloidal particles trapped at the surface of liquid droplets are calculated analytically. Pair potentials between capillary monopoles and dipoles, corresponding to particles floating on a droplet with a fixed center of mass and subjected to external forces and torques, respectively, exhibit a repulsion at large angular separations and an attraction at smaller separations, with the latter resembling the typical behavior for flat interfaces. This change of character is not observed for quadrupoles, corresponding to free particles on a mechanically isolated droplet. The analytical results are compared with the numerical minimization of the surface free energy of the droplet in the presence of spherical or ellipsoidal particles.

  20. Time reversal of water waves.

    PubMed

    Przadka, A; Feat, S; Petitjeans, P; Pagneux, V; Maurel, A; Fink, M

    2012-08-10

    We present time reversal experiments demonstrating refocusing of gravity-capillary waves in a water tank cavity. Owing to the reverberating effect of the cavity, only a few channels are sufficient to reconstruct the surface wave at the point source, even if the absorption is not negligible. Space-time-resolved measurements of the waves during the refocusing allow us to quantitatively demonstrate that the quality of the refocusing increases linearly with the number of reemitting channels. Numerical simulations corresponding to water waves at larger scales, with negligible damping, indicate the possibility of very high quality refocusing.

  1. Reversible Sterilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Largey, Gale

    1977-01-01

    Notes that difficult questions arise concerning the use of sterilization for alleged eugenic and euthenic purposes. Thus, how reversible sterilization will be used with relation to the poor, mentally ill, mentally retarded, criminals, and minors, is questioned. (Author/AM)

  2. A method of test substance removal in agar colony assays using glass capillaries.

    PubMed

    Kastner, M; Maurer, H R

    1984-07-01

    A technique has been developed to remove test substances, after defined incubation periods, from clonogenic in vitro assays using agar-containing glass capillaries. Following removal from the capillaries, the entire agar gels were washed in petri dishes and redrawn into new capillaries. Using 8 radioactive biochemicals of molecular masses ranging from 150 to 1300 dalton the kinetics of diffusion between 1 and 20 min were determined. Using a wash solution-to-assay volume ratio of 20:1, a single washing for 10 min yielded between 90% and 99% removal by diffusion of test substances. By incorporating myelopoietic stem cells it was demonstrated that the cells to be assayed can be quantitatively transferred, without loss or stress, out of and back into capillaries. Thus the reversibility of test substance action can examined under defined conditions avoiding technical problems of previous methods.

  3. Aspects of column fabrication for packed capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Angus, P D; Demarest, C W; Catalano, T; Stobaugh, J F

    2000-07-28

    Various parameters have been evaluated to develop a process for optimization of column manufacture for packed capillary electrochromatography (CEC). Spherisorb ODS-1 was packed into 75 microm I.D. capillaries to establish a standard set of packing conditions to afford high-performance columns free of voids. Numerous silica-based packing materials including porous and non-porous reversed-phase and ion-exchange phases were employed to evaluate the applicability of the standard conditions. Success of column manufacture and performance demonstrate a relationship to the colligative properties of the packing materials under the applied conditions. Frequently encountered difficulties arising from inadequate column conditioning and void formation in the packed bed are identified and discussed.

  4. Tissue proteomics using capillary isoelectric focusing-based multidimensional separations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yueju; Balgley, Brian M; Lee, Cheng S

    2005-10-01

    The capabilities of capillary isoelectric focusing-based multidimensional separations for performing proteome analysis from minute samples create new opportunities in the pursuit of biomarker discovery using enriched and selected cell populations procured from tissue specimens. In this article, recent advances in online integration of capillary isoelectric focusing with nano-reversed phase liquid chromatography for achieving high-resolution peptide and protein separations prior to mass spectrometry analysis are reviewed, along with its potential application to tissue proteomics. These proteome technological advances combined with recently developed tissue microdissection techniques, provide powerful tools for those seeking to gain a greater understanding at the global level of the cellular machinery associated with human diseases such as cancer.

  5. Reversible Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Harsh; Madanieh, Raef; Kosmas, Constantine E; Vatti, Satya K; Vittorio, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies (CMs) have many etiological factors that can result in severe structural and functional dysregulation. Fortunately, there are several potentially reversible CMs that are known to improve when the root etiological factor is addressed. In this article, we discuss several of these reversible CMs, including tachycardia-induced, peripartum, inflammatory, hyperthyroidism, Takotsubo, and chronic illness–induced CMs. Our discussion also includes a review on their respective pathophysiology, as well as possible management solutions. PMID:26052233

  6. Multiplexed fluorescence detector system for capillary electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Taylor, J.A.

    1996-03-12

    A fluorescence detection system for capillary electrophoresis is provided wherein the detection system can simultaneously excite fluorescence and substantially simultaneously monitor separations in multiple capillaries. This multiplexing approach involves laser irradiation of a sample in a plurality of capillaries through optical fibers that are coupled individually with the capillaries. The array is imaged orthogonally through a microscope onto a charge-coupled device camera for signal analysis. 14 figs.

  7. Multiplexed fluorescence detector system for capillary electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Taylor, John A.

    1994-06-28

    A fluorescence detection system for capillary electrophoresis is provided wherein the detection system can simultaneously excite fluorescence and substantially simultaneously monitor separations in multiple capillaries. This multiplexing approach involves laser irradiation of a sample in a plurality of capillaries through optical fibers that are coupled individually with the capillaries. The array is imaged orthogonally through a microscope onto a charge-coupled device camera for signal analysis.

  8. Multiplexed fluorescence detector system for capillary electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Taylor, J.A.

    1994-06-28

    A fluorescence detection system for capillary electrophoresis is provided wherein the detection system can simultaneously excite fluorescence and substantially simultaneously monitor separations in multiple capillaries. This multiplexing approach involves laser irradiation of a sample in a plurality of capillaries through optical fibers that are coupled individually with the capillaries. The array is imaged orthogonally through a microscope onto a charge-coupled device camera for signal analysis. 14 figures.

  9. Multiplexed fluorescence detector system for capillary electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Taylor, John A.

    1996-03-12

    A fluorescence detection system for capillary electrophoresis is provided wherein the detection system can simultaneously excite fluorescence and substantially simultaneously monitor separations in multiple capillaries. This multiplexing approach involves laser irradiation of a sample in a plurality of capillaries through optical fibers that are coupled individually with the capillaries. The array is imaged orthogonally through a microscope onto a charge-coupled device camera for signal analysis.

  10. Tuning capillary surface properties by charged polymeric coatings.

    PubMed

    Sola, Laura; Chiari, Marcella

    2015-10-01

    Separation of proteins in capillary electrophoresis (CE) is often hindered by their interactions with the silanols groups on the inner surface of the fused silica capillary. In particular, the positive charges of alkaline proteins establish electrostatic interactions with the negative charges of the surface, leading to peak broadening and loss of separation efficiency. Moreover, uncontrolled electroosmotic flow (EOF), severely impacts on analyte mobility causing either loss of resolution or loss of efficiency. Among several strategies, coatings are widely employed to mask capillary surface silanols and so to reduce protein adsorption and EOF. Here we report on the synthesis and characterization of a novel family of adsorbed polymeric coatings, which provide improved performance in terms of prevention of protein adsorption and EOF regulation. In particular, we have added to the polymer backbone, made of N, N-dimethylacrylamide, different ionizable monomers (weak acrylamido acids and bases commercially available with the trade name of Immobilines) to confer a net positive or negative charge to the polymer chain depending on the buffer pH. As a consequence, the separation of alkaline protein is drastically improved in different pH conditions, because the interactions with the inner capillary wall were completely prevented by electrostatic repulsion. The content of these ionogenic monomers can be adjusted, permitting a perfect control of the surface charge density, so EOF is finely and precisely regulated. We also investigated the conformational variation of the polymer on the surface by changing buffer pH using Dual Polarization Interferometry (DPI). The coating procedure is very simple and fast as it consists in the adsorption of a diluted aqueous solution of the polymer on the capillary walls. In addition, the coating is very stable under harsh conditions, can be used for several runs without any re-conditioning or re-coating steps and it is compatible with MS

  11. Capillary Rise in a Wedge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piva, M.

    2009-01-01

    In introductory-level physics courses, the concept of surface tension is often illustrated using the example of capillary rise in thin tubes. In this paper the author describes experiments conducted using a planar geometry created with two small plates forming a thin wedge. The distribution of the fluid entering the wedge can be studied as a…

  12. Capillary blood viscosity in microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Cortinovis, A; Crippa, A; Cavalli, R; Corti, M; Cattaneo, L

    2006-01-01

    As known, at the arteriolar level there is the highest resistance to the flow due to the section and to the velocity with an average pressure fall of 50 mmHg (from 85 to 35 mmHg). This resistance is expressed in sec(-1) by the ratio W/2r. This ratio is very high with an average value of 332 sec(-1) and viscosity at this high shear-rate is negligible. At the capillary level the pressure fall is 11.5 mmHg but the vascular resistance W/2r is much lower, on average 32 sec(-1). We can say that if a resistance of 333 sec(-1) corresponds with a pressure fall of 50 mmHg, then a resistance of 32 sec(-1) should correspond with a pressure fall of 4.8 mmHg. The highest pressure fall is due to another kind of resistance which we can define as "Capillary Blood Viscosity" because it depends on the rheological and structural characteristics of the blood. Our instrument reproduces the structure of the capillary district in an experimental model and measures the General Blood Viscosity (GBV) and the Capillary Blood Viscosity (CBV) at the same shear-rate and in particular at the low shear-rate when in non-Newtonian fluids the highest increase in viscosity appears. Consequently, at the capillary, viscosity is dominant with respect to the other geometric and physical resistances. Moreover, the percentage ratio between the GBV and the CBV gives a physical measure of erythrocyte deformability. Knowing viscosity at shear-rate present in the circulatory system, we can obtain the size of RBCs aggregates in the different circulatory districts and their characteristics expressed like "aggregation bond". Changes in CBV are the only possibility in clinical practice to improve the circulatory flow in the capillary district because it is not sure that changes in the arteriolar section can improve the capillary flow or rather open arterio-venous anastomosis. Moreover, in the systemic circulation the aggregate size allows us to point out the phenomenon of cell adhesion because the presence of

  13. Chemical reactions in reverse micelle systems

    DOEpatents

    Matson, Dean W.; Fulton, John L.; Smith, Richard D.; Consani, Keith A.

    1993-08-24

    This invention is directed to conducting chemical reactions in reverse micelle or microemulsion systems comprising a substantially discontinuous phase including a polar fluid, typically an aqueous fluid, and a microemulsion promoter, typically a surfactant, for facilitating the formation of reverse micelles in the system. The system further includes a substantially continuous phase including a non-polar or low-polarity fluid material which is a gas under standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and which is generally a water-insoluble fluid in a near critical or supercritical state. Thus, the microemulsion system is maintained at a pressure and temperature such that the density of the non-polar or low-polarity fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. The method of carrying out chemical reactions generally comprises forming a first reverse micelle system including an aqueous fluid including reverse micelles in a water-insoluble fluid in the supercritical state. Then, a first reactant is introduced into the first reverse micelle system, and a chemical reaction is carried out with the first reactant to form a reaction product. In general, the first reactant can be incorporated into, and the product formed in, the reverse micelles. A second reactant can also be incorporated in the first reverse micelle system which is capable of reacting with the first reactant to form a product.

  14. Ice ages and geomagnetic reversals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Patrick

    1992-01-01

    There have been speculations on the relationship between climatic cooling and polarity reversals of the earth's magnetic field during the Pleistocene. Two of the common criticisms on this relationship have been the reality of these short duration geomagnetic events and the accuracy of their dates. Champion et al. (1988) have reviewed recent progress in this area. They identified a total of 10 short-duration polarity events in the last 1 Ma and 6 of these events have been found in volcanic rocks, which also have K-Ar dates. Supposing that the speculated relationship between climatic cooling and geomagnetic reversals actually exist, two mechanisms that assume climatic cooling causes short period magnetic reversals will be investigated. These two methods are core-mantle boundary topography and transfer of the rotational energy to the core.

  15. Reversible ischemia in severe stress Tc-99m-Sestamibi perfusion defects: Assessment with gated tomographic polar map Fourier amplitude and amplitude/perfusion ratio images and correlation with resting images

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.A.; Taillon, L.A.

    1994-05-01

    Reversible ischemia in myocardial segments with severe hypoperfusion ({le}50% of normal activity) on stress Tc-99m-Sestamibi (MIBI) images was assessed with ECG-gated tomographic (GSPECT) indices of myocardial thickening, as reflected by an increase in regional count density during systole. GSPECT bullseye plots were generated for each of 8 frames acquired after stress MIBI injection in 39 patients with coronary artery disease and at least one severe perfusion defect on summed SPECT images. Using first harmonic Fourier amplitude (AMP) and AMP to perfusion ratio (APR) images, regional myocardial systolic thickening was assessed using a 5-segment model, scored 0 to 3, for absent, minimal, mildly reduced or normal thickening. These data were regionally compared with defect reversibility assessed using a separate-day or a preceding same-day resting MIBI injection images, in which these segments were scored from 0 to 3 for absent, minimal, partial or complete defect reversibility. Of 91 severe stress defects, 16 showed absent, 18 minimal, 43 partial, and 14 complete reversibility on resting images. Both AMP and APR scores were in statistically significant agreement (p=.0218 and .0006) with resting image reversibility grades, with 79% (p=.0324) and 86% (p=.0001) agreement on the presence of reversibility on resting imaging, respectively. AMP correctly identified 89% of the reversibility defects on rest images, while the APR identified 99% (p=.0248 vs. AMP). On analysis of segment scores, the AMP slightly underestimated the degree of rest image reversibility (p=.0235), while APR images indicated more reversibility thin did resting images (p=.0092). In conclusion, GSPECT MIBI bullseye Fourier AMP images correlate well with the pattern of reversibility on resting MIBI in severe stress perfusion defects. When indexed for the degree of hypoperfusion, the Fourier images depict a greater degree of defect reversibility than resting MIBI images.

  16. Observables for polarized neutrons transmitted through polarized targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hnizdo, V. )

    1994-11-01

    A general and concise formalism is presented for the identification and evaluation of observables, including those that would indicate parity-conservation and/or time-reversal violation by the neutron-nucleus interaction, of experiments on the transmission of polarized neutrons through polarized nuclear targets. Statistical tensors are used for the description of the polarization states of the projectile and target, and the neutron-nucleus total cross section is decomposed into partial cross sections so that each corresponds to different ranks of the projectile and target statistical tensors and to a specific transfer of the orbital angular momentum. Each such partial cross section is associated with a correlation factor'' of particular parity-conservation and time-reversal symmetries, and is measurable by polarizing the projectile and target in states in which the statistical tensors have specific geometries, suggested by the simple geometric properties of the correlation factors.

  17. Polar Warming Drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDunn, T. L.; Bougher, S. W.; Mischna, M. A.; Murphy, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    Polar warming is a dynamically induced temperature enhancement over mid-to-high latitudes that results in a reversed (poleward) meridional temperature gradient. This phenomenon was recently characterized over the 40-90 km altitude region [1] based on nearly three martian years of Mars Climate Sounder observations [2, 3]. Here we investigate which forcing mechanisms affect the magnitude and distribution of the observed polar warming by conducting simulations with the Mars Weather Research and Forecasting General Circulation Model [4, 5]. We present simulations confirming the influence topography [6] and dust loading [e.g., 7] have upon polar warming. We then present simulations illustrating the modulating influence gravity wave momentum deposition exerts upon polar warming, consistent with previous modeling studies [e.g., 8]. The results of this investigation suggest the magnitude and distribution of polar warming in the martian middle atmosphere is modified by gravity wave activity and that the characteristics of the gravity waves that most significantly affect polar warming vary with season. References: [1] McDunn, et al., 2012 (JGR), [2]Kleinböhl, et al., 2009 (JGR), [3] Kleinböhl, et al., 2011 (JQSRT), [4] Richardson, et al., 2007 (JGR), [5] Mischna, et al., 2011 (Planet. Space Sci.), [6] Richardson and Wilson, 2002 (Nature), [7] Haberle, et al., 1982 (Icarus), [8] Barnes, 1990 (JGR).

  18. Monolithic capillary columns based on pentaerythritol tetraacrylate for peptide analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucherenko, E. V.; Melnik, D. M.; Korolev, A. A.; Kanateva, A. Yu.; Pirogov, A. V.; Kurganov, A. A.

    2015-09-01

    Monolythic medium-polar capillary columns based on pentaerythritol tetraacrylate were optimized for separation of peptides. The synthesis temperature and time, the fraction of monomer in the initial polymerization mixture, and the nature of alcohol contained in the complex porogen were chosen as optimization parameters. The highest efficiency was attained for columns obtained with 33 and 34% monomer at a polymerization time of 75 min and a temperature of 75°C. The columns with the optimum structure were effective in separation of a model mixture of five peptides. The sensitivity of the method was 200 ng of peptide per column.

  19. Capillary filling dynamics of viscoelastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Ghosh, Uddipta; Chakraborty, Suman

    2014-05-01

    We consider the filling of a capillary by a viscoelastic fluid described by the Phan-Thien-Tanner (PTT) constitutive behavior. By considering both vertical capillary filling and horizontal capillary filling, we demarcate the role played by gravity and fluid rheology towards long-time oscillations in the capillary penetration depth. We also consider the isothermal filling of the capillary for a closed channel and thus bring out the fundamental differences in the nature of capillary filling for PTT and Newtonian fluids for closed channels in comparison to open channels. Through a scaling analysis, we highlight a distinct viscoelastic regime in the horizontal capillary filling which is in contrast to the Washburn scaling seen in the case of Newtonian fluids. Such an analysis with a very general constitutive behavior is therefore expected to shed light on many areas of microfluidics which focus on biofluids that are often well described by the PTT constitutive behavior.

  20. 3D printed metal columns for capillary liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Sandron, S; Heery, B; Gupta, V; Collins, D A; Nesterenko, E P; Nesterenko, P N; Talebi, M; Beirne, S; Thompson, F; Wallace, G G; Brabazon, D; Regan, F; Paull, B

    2014-12-21

    Coiled planar capillary chromatography columns (0.9 mm I.D. × 60 cm L) were 3D printed in stainless steel (316L), and titanium (Ti-6Al-4V) alloys (external dimensions of ~5 × 30 × 58 mm), and either slurry packed with various sized reversed-phase octadecylsilica particles, or filled with an in situ prepared methacrylate based monolith. Coiled printed columns were coupled directly with 30 × 30 mm Peltier thermoelectric direct contact heater/cooler modules. Preliminary results show the potential of using such 3D printed columns in future portable chromatographic devices. PMID:25285334

  1. An insightful approach for understanding solvatochromic reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzoni, Vinicius; Coutinho, Kaline; Canuto, Sylvio

    2016-07-01

    Several studies have shown that organic dyes may show solvatochromic reversal with respect to the solvent polarity. This controversial non-monotonic behavior is still not well understood. This has been analyzed here using the merocyanine of Brooker as the working example. Associating a continuous variable to model the solvent polarity a solvatochromic reversal is obtained with a single solute without aggregation. This reversal is in excellent agreement with the experimental results and is shown to be the outcome of a competition between structural change and intramolecular charge transfer.

  2. A rectangular capillary suction apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.J. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Hsu, Y.H. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-06-01

    Fluid flow and cake formation in a rectangular capillary suction apparatus (RCSA) are investigated experimentally and theoretically. Water, methanol, ethanol, and ethylene glycol are used to study the effects of liquid properties, and CaCO[sub 3], kaolin, and bentonite slurries are employed for studying the effects of cake formation on capillary suction-time (CST). A theory based on a diffusion-like approach is developed. The liquid saturation under the inner cell will approach a constant value when the wet front distance is large. A method based on this experimental finding for estimating the cake specific resistance is proposed. The agreement between experiments and calculations is close. The RCSA is superior to the cylindrical CSA when treating liquids with small diffusivities or slurries with high solid concentration and/or with high averaged specific resistance.

  3. Capillary electrophoresis in food authenticity.

    PubMed

    Kvasnicka, Frantisek

    2005-06-01

    Food authenticity is a term which simply refers to whether the food purchased by the consumer matches its description. False description can occur in many forms, from the undeclared addition of water or other cheaper materials, or the wrong declaration of the amount of a particular ingredient in the product, to making false statements about the source of ingredients i.e., their geographic, plant, or animal origin. The aim of this review is to summarize applications of capillary electrophoresis in food authentication.

  4. Capillary electrophoresis systems and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Dorairaj, Rathissh; Keynton, Robert S.; Roussel, Thomas J.; Crain, Mark M.; Jackson, Douglas J.; Walsh, Kevin M.; Naber, John F.; Baldwin, Richard P.; Franco, Danielle B.

    2011-08-02

    An embodiment of the invention is directed to a capillary electrophoresis apparatus comprising a plurality of separation micro-channels. A sample loading channel communicates with each of the plurality of separation channels. A driver circuit comprising a plurality of electrodes is configured to induce an electric field across each of the plurality of separation channels sufficient to cause analytes in the samples to migrate along each of the channels. The system further comprises a plurality of detectors configured to detect the analytes.

  5. Ionic Liquids in Capillary Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Wahl, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a great interest was drawn toward ionic liquids (ILs) in analytical separation techniques. ILs possess many properties making them excellent additives in capillary electrophoresis (CE) background electrolytes (BGE). The most important property is the charge of the dissolved ions in BGE enabling the cations to interact with deprotonated silanol groups on the capillary surface and thereby modifying the electroosmotic flow (EOF). Ionic and/or proton donor-acceptor interactions between analyte and IL are possible interactions facilitating new kinds of separation mechanisms in CE. Further advantages of ILs are the high conductivity, the environmentally friendliness, and the good solubility for organic and inorganic compounds. The most commonly used ILs in capillary electrophoresis are dialkylimidazolium-based ILs, whereas for enantioseparation a lot of innovative chiral cations and anions were investigated.ILs are reported to be additives to a normal CE background electrolyte or the sole electrolyte in CE, nonaqueous CE (NACE), micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC), and in enantioseparation. An overview of applications and separation mechanisms reported in the literature is given here, in addition to the enantioseparation of pseudoephedrine using tetrabutylammonium chloride (TBAC) as IL additive to an ammonium formate buffer containing β-cyclodextrin (β-CD). PMID:27645735

  6. Capillary Electrophoresis - Optical Detection Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sepaniak, M. J.

    2001-08-06

    Molecular recognition systems are developed via molecular modeling and synthesis to enhance separation performance in capillary electrophoresis and optical detection methods for capillary electrophoresis. The underpinning theme of our work is the rational design and development of molecular recognition systems in chemical separations and analysis. There have been, however, some subtle and exciting shifts in our research paradigm during this period. Specifically, we have moved from mostly separations research to a good balance between separations and spectroscopic detection for separations. This shift is based on our perception that the pressing research challenges and needs in capillary electrophoresis and electrokinetic chromatography relate to the persistent detection and flow rate reproducibility limitations of these techniques (see page 1 of the accompanying Renewal Application for further discussion). In most of our work molecular recognition reagents are employed to provide selectivity and enhance performance. Also, an emerging trend is the use of these reagents with specially-prepared nano-scale materials. Although not part of our DOE BES-supported work, the modeling and synthesis of new receptors has indirectly supported the development of novel microcantilevers-based MEMS for the sensing of vapor and liquid phase analytes. This fortuitous overlap is briefly covered in this report. Several of the more significant publications that have resulted from our work are appended. To facilitate brevity we refer to these publications liberally in this progress report. Reference is also made to very recent work in the Background and Preliminary Studies Section of the Renewal Application.

  7. Treelike networks accelerating capillary flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shou, Dahua; Ye, Lin; Fan, Jintu

    2014-05-01

    Transport in treelike networks has received wide attention in natural systems, oil recovery, microelectronic cooling systems, and textiles. Existing studies are focused on transport behaviors under a constant potential difference (including pressure, temperature, and voltage) in a steady state [B. Yu and B. Li, Phys. Rev. E 73, 066302 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevE.73.066302; J. Chen, B. Yu, P. Xu, and Y. Li, Phys. Rev. E 75, 056301 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevE.75.056301]. However, dynamic (time-dependent) transport in such systems has rarely been concerned. In this work, we theoretically investigate the dynamics of capillary flow in treelike networks and design the distribution of radius and length of local branches for the fastest capillary flow. It is demonstrated that capillary flow in the optimized tree networks is faster than in traditional parallel tube nets under fixed constraints. As well, the flow time of the liquid is found to increase approximately linearly with penetration distance, which differs from Washburn's classic description that flow time increases as the square of penetration distance in a uniform tube.

  8. Capillary-driven automatic packaging.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuzhe; Hong, Lingfei; Nie, Baoqing; Lam, Kit S; Pan, Tingrui

    2011-04-21

    Packaging continues to be one of the most challenging steps in micro-nanofabrication, as many emerging techniques (e.g., soft lithography) are incompatible with the standard high-precision alignment and bonding equipment. In this paper, we present a simple-to-operate, easy-to-adapt packaging strategy, referred to as Capillary-driven Automatic Packaging (CAP), to achieve automatic packaging process, including the desired features of spontaneous alignment and bonding, wide applicability to various materials, potential scalability, and direct incorporation in the layout. Specifically, self-alignment and self-engagement of the CAP process induced by the interfacial capillary interactions between a liquid capillary bridge and the top and bottom substrates have been experimentally characterized and theoretically analyzed with scalable implications. High-precision alignment (of less than 10 µm) and outstanding bonding performance (up to 300 kPa) has been reliably obtained. In addition, a 3D microfluidic network, aligned and bonded by the CAP technique, has been devised to demonstrate the applicability of this facile yet robust packaging technique for emerging microfluidic and bioengineering applications.

  9. Analytical characterization of wine and its precursors by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Federico J V; Monasterio, Romina P; Vargas, Verónica Carolina Soto; Silva, María F

    2012-08-01

    The accurate determination of marker chemical species in grape, musts, and wines presents a unique analytical challenge with high impact on diverse areas of knowledge such as health, plant physiology, and economy. Capillary electromigration techniques have emerged as a powerful tool, allowing the separation and identification of highly polar compounds that cannot be easily separated by traditional HPLC methods, providing complementary information and permitting the simultaneous analysis of analytes with different nature in a single run. The main advantage of CE over traditional methods for wine analysis is that in most cases samples require no treatment other than filtration. The purpose of this article is to present a revision on capillary electromigration methods applied to the analysis of wine and its precursors over the last decade. The current state of the art of the topic is evaluated, with special emphasis on the natural compounds that have allowed wine to be considered as a functional food. The most representative revised compounds are phenolic compounds, amino acids, proteins, elemental species, mycotoxins, and organic acids. Finally, a discussion on future trends of the role of capillary electrophoresis in the field of analytical characterization of wines for routine analysis, wine classification, as well as multidisciplinary aspects of the so-called "from soil to glass" chain is presented.

  10. Chiral structures from achiral liquid crystals in cylindrical capillaries.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Joonwoo; Kang, Louis; Davidson, Zoey S; Collings, Peter J; Lubensky, Tom C; Yodh, A G

    2015-04-14

    We study chiral symmetry-broken configurations of nematic liquid crystals (LCs) confined to cylindrical capillaries with homeotropic anchoring on the cylinder walls (i.e., perpendicular surface alignment). Interestingly, achiral nematic LCs with comparatively small twist elastic moduli relieve bend and splay deformations by introducing twist deformations. In the resulting twisted and escaped radial (TER) configuration, LC directors are parallel to the cylindrical axis near the center, but to attain radial orientation near the capillary wall, they escape along the radius through bend and twist distortions. Chiral symmetry-breaking experiments in polymer-coated capillaries are carried out using Sunset Yellow FCF, a lyotropic chromonic LC with a small twist elastic constant. Its director configurations are investigated by polarized optical microscopy and explained theoretically with numerical calculations. A rich phenomenology of defects also arises from the degenerate bend/twist deformations of the TER configuration, including a nonsingular domain wall separating domains of opposite twist handedness but the same escape direction and singular point defects (hedgehogs) separating domains of opposite escape direction. We show the energetic preference for singular defects separating domains of opposite twist handedness compared with those of the same handedness, and we report remarkable chiral configurations with a double helix of disclination lines along the cylindrical axis. These findings show archetypally how simple boundary conditions and elastic anisotropy of confined materials lead to multiple symmetry breaking and how these broken symmetries combine to create a variety of defects. PMID:25825733

  11. Chiral structures from achiral liquid crystals in cylindrical capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Joonwoo; Kang, Louis; Davidson, Zoey S.; Collings, Peter J.; Lubensky, Tom C.; Yodh, A. G.

    2015-04-01

    We study chiral symmetry-broken configurations of nematic liquid crystals (LCs) confined to cylindrical capillaries with homeotropic anchoring on the cylinder walls (i.e., perpendicular surface alignment). Interestingly, achiral nematic LCs with comparatively small twist elastic moduli relieve bend and splay deformations by introducing twist deformations. In the resulting twisted and escaped radial (TER) configuration, LC directors are parallel to the cylindrical axis near the center, but to attain radial orientation near the capillary wall, they escape along the radius through bend and twist distortions. Chiral symmetry-breaking experiments in polymer-coated capillaries are carried out using Sunset Yellow FCF, a lyotropic chromonic LC with a small twist elastic constant. Its director configurations are investigated by polarized optical microscopy and explained theoretically with numerical calculations. A rich phenomenology of defects also arises from the degenerate bend/twist deformations of the TER configuration, including a nonsingular domain wall separating domains of opposite twist handedness but the same escape direction and singular point defects (hedgehogs) separating domains of opposite escape direction. We show the energetic preference for singular defects separating domains of opposite twist handedness compared with those of the same handedness, and we report remarkable chiral configurations with a double helix of disclination lines along the cylindrical axis. These findings show archetypally how simple boundary conditions and elastic anisotropy of confined materials lead to multiple symmetry breaking and how these broken symmetries combine to create a variety of defects.

  12. Chiral structures from achiral liquid crystals in cylindrical capillaries

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Joonwoo; Kang, Louis; Davidson, Zoey S.; Collings, Peter J.; Lubensky, Tom C.; Yodh, A. G.

    2015-01-01

    We study chiral symmetry-broken configurations of nematic liquid crystals (LCs) confined to cylindrical capillaries with homeotropic anchoring on the cylinder walls (i.e., perpendicular surface alignment). Interestingly, achiral nematic LCs with comparatively small twist elastic moduli relieve bend and splay deformations by introducing twist deformations. In the resulting twisted and escaped radial (TER) configuration, LC directors are parallel to the cylindrical axis near the center, but to attain radial orientation near the capillary wall, they escape along the radius through bend and twist distortions. Chiral symmetry-breaking experiments in polymer-coated capillaries are carried out using Sunset Yellow FCF, a lyotropic chromonic LC with a small twist elastic constant. Its director configurations are investigated by polarized optical microscopy and explained theoretically with numerical calculations. A rich phenomenology of defects also arises from the degenerate bend/twist deformations of the TER configuration, including a nonsingular domain wall separating domains of opposite twist handedness but the same escape direction and singular point defects (hedgehogs) separating domains of opposite escape direction. We show the energetic preference for singular defects separating domains of opposite twist handedness compared with those of the same handedness, and we report remarkable chiral configurations with a double helix of disclination lines along the cylindrical axis. These findings show archetypally how simple boundary conditions and elastic anisotropy of confined materials lead to multiple symmetry breaking and how these broken symmetries combine to create a variety of defects. PMID:25825733

  13. Progression of Diabetic Capillary Occlusion: A Model

    PubMed Central

    Gens, John Scott; Glazier, James A.; Burns, Stephen A.; Gast, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    An explanatory computational model is developed of the contiguous areas of retinal capillary loss which play a large role in diabetic maculapathy and diabetic retinal neovascularization. Strictly random leukocyte mediated capillary occlusion cannot explain the occurrence of large contiguous areas of retinal ischemia. Therefore occlusion of an individual capillary must increase the probability of occlusion of surrounding capillaries. A retinal perifoveal vascular sector as well as a peripheral retinal capillary network and a deleted hexagonal capillary network are modelled using Compucell3D. The perifoveal modelling produces a pattern of spreading capillary loss with associated macular edema. In the peripheral network, spreading ischemia results from the progressive loss of the ladder capillaries which connect peripheral arterioles and venules. System blood flow was elevated in the macular model before a later reduction in flow in cases with progression of capillary occlusions. Simulations differing only in initial vascular network structures but with identical dynamics for oxygen, growth factors and vascular occlusions, replicate key clinical observations of ischemia and macular edema in the posterior pole and ischemia in the retinal periphery. The simulation results also seem consistent with quantitative data on macular blood flow and qualitative data on venous oxygenation. One computational model applied to distinct capillary networks in different retinal regions yielded results comparable to clinical observations in those regions. PMID:27300722

  14. Fluid Delivery System For Capillary Electrophoretic Applications.

    DOEpatents

    Li, Qingbo; Liu, Changsheng; Kane, Thomas E.; Kernan, John R.; Sonnenschein, Bernard; Sharer, Michael V.

    2002-04-23

    An automated electrophoretic system is disclosed. The system employs a capillary cartridge having a plurality of capillary tubes. The cartridge has a first array of capillary ends projecting from one side of a plate. The first array of capillary ends are spaced apart in substantially the same manner as the wells of a microtitre tray of standard size. This allows one to simultaneously perform capillary electrophoresis on samples present in each of the wells of the tray. The system includes a stacked, dual carrousel arrangement to eliminate cross-contamination resulting from reuse of the same buffer tray on consecutive executions from electrophoresis. The system also has a gel delivery module containing a gel syringe/a stepper motor or a high pressure chamber with a pump to quickly and uniformly deliver gel through the capillary tubes. The system further includes a multi-wavelength beam generator to generate a laser beam which produces a beam with a wide range of wavelengths. An off-line capillary reconditioner thoroughly cleans a capillary cartridge to enable simultaneous execution of electrophoresis with another capillary cartridge. The streamlined nature of the off-line capillary reconditioner offers the advantage of increased system throughput with a minimal increase in system cost.

  15. Quantifying the cleanliness of glass capillaries.

    PubMed

    Bowman, C L

    1998-01-01

    I used capillary rise methods to investigate the lumenal surface properties of quartz (fused silica, Amersil T-08), borosilicate (Corning 7800), and high-lead glass (Corning 0010) capillaries commonly used to make patch pipets. I calculated the capillary rise and contact angle for water and methanol from weight measurements. The capillary rise was compared with the theoretical maximum value calculated by assuming each fluid perfectly wetted the lumenal surface of the glass (i.e., zero contact angle, which reflects the absence of surface contamination). For borosilicate, high-lead, and quartz capillaries, the rise for water was substantially less than the theoretical maximum rise. Exposure of the borosilicate, lead, and quartz capillaries to several cleaning methods resulted in substantially better--but not perfect--agreement between the theoretical maximum rise and calculated capillary rise. By contrast, the capillary rise for methanol was almost identical in untreated and cleaned capillaries, but less than its theoretical maximum rise. The residual discrepancy between the observed and theoretical rise for water could not be improved on by trying a variety of cleaning procedures, but some cleaning methods were superior to others. The water solubility of the surface contaminants, deduced from the effectiveness of repeated rinsing, was different for each of the three types of capillaries examined: Corning 7800 > quartz > Corning 0010. A surface film was also detected in quatz tubing with an internal filament. I conclude that these borosilicate, quartz, and high-lead glass capillaries have a film on the lumenal surface, which can be removed using appropriate cleaning methods. The surface contaminants may be unique to each type of capillary and may also be hydrophobic. Two simple methods are presented to quantitate the cleanliness of glass capillary tubing commonly used to make pipets for studies of biological membranes. It is not known if the surface film is of

  16. Deciphering records of geomagnetic reversals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valet, Jean-Pierre; Fournier, Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    Polarity reversals of the geomagnetic field are a major feature of the Earth's dynamo. Questions remain regarding the dynamical processes that give rise to reversals and the properties of the geomagnetic field during a polarity transition. A large number of paleomagnetic reversal records have been acquired during the past 50 years in order to better constrain the structure and geometry of the transitional field. In addition, over the past two decades, numerical dynamo simulations have also provided insights into the reversal mechanism. Yet despite the large paleomagnetic database, controversial interpretations of records of the transitional field persist; they result from two characteristics inherent to all reversals, both of which are detrimental to an ambiguous analysis. On the one hand, the reversal process is rapid and requires adequate temporal resolution. On the other hand, weak field intensities during a reversal can affect the fidelity of magnetic recording in sedimentary records. This paper is aimed at reviewing critically the main reversal features derived from paleomagnetic records and at analyzing some of these features in light of numerical simulations. We discuss in detail the fidelity of the signal extracted from paleomagnetic records and pay special attention to their resolution with respect to the timing and mechanisms involved in the magnetization process. Records from marine sediments dominate the database. They give rise to transitional field models that often lead to overinterpret the data. Consequently, we attempt to separate robust results (and their subsequent interpretations) from those that do not stand on a strong observational footing. Finally, we discuss new avenues that should favor progress to better characterize and understand transitional field behavior.

  17. Polarization developments

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1993-07-01

    Recent developments in laser-driven photoemission sources of polarized electrons have made prospects for highly polarized electron beams in a future linear collider very promising. This talk discusses the experiences with the SLC polarized electron source, the recent progress with research into gallium arsenide and strained gallium arsenide as a photocathode material, and the suitability of these cathode materials for a future linear collider based on the parameters of the several linear collider designs that exist.

  18. Capillary Phenomena at Nanoscales: Electrowetting and Capillary Adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, Mark

    2011-11-01

    Theories of capillary phenomena have traditionally been based on continuum approximations that break down as dimensions shrink to nanometer scales. Molecular simulations are used to test the limits of continuum theory in electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD) and capillary adhesion between solids. In EWOD, a fluid drop is separated from an electrode by a dielectric. Increasing the voltage V between drop and electrode, decreases the contact angle θ, allowing the droplet to be manipulated. Simulations of nanoscale drops show the same behavior as experiments on millimeter drops. The contact angle follows the continuum Young-Lippmann equation (YLE) at low voltages and then saturates. The saturation mechanism has been difficult to identify in experiments. Simulations show that charged molecules are pulled from the drop by large electrostatic forces near the contact line. Saturation can be delayed by increasing molecular binding, lowering temperature or increasing dielectric constant. A local force balance equation is derived that agrees with the YLE below saturation and remains valid after saturation. Simulations of capillary adhesion examined the force between a spherical tip of radius R and a flat substrate. The shape of the meniscus agrees remarkably well with continuum theory down to nanometer separations, as does the adhesive force from interfacial tension. However, the total force may deviate by factors of two or have the opposite sign. While the component of the pressure along the substrate agrees with the Laplace pressure from continuum theory, the out-of âplane component does not. There may also be significant force oscillations associated with layering near the solids. The elastic response of the solid has little affect on adhesive forces. This material is based upon work supported by National Science Foundation Grant No. CMS-0103408.

  19. Vasectomy reversal.

    PubMed

    Belker, A M

    1987-02-01

    A vasovasostomy may be performed on an outpatient basis with local anesthesia, but also may be performed on an outpatient basis with epidural or general anesthesia. Local anesthesia is preferred by most of my patients, the majority of whom choose this technique. With proper preoperative and intraoperative sedation, patients sleep lightly through most of the procedure. Because of the length of time often required for bilateral microsurgical vasoepididymostomy, epidural or general anesthesia and overnight hospitalization are usually necessary. Factors influencing the preoperative choice for vasovasostomy or vasoepididymostomy in patients undergoing vasectomy reversal are considered. The preoperative planned choice of vasovasostomy or vasoepididymostomy for patients having vasectomy reversal described herein does not have the support of all urologists who regularly perform these procedures. My present approach has evolved as the data reported in Tables 1 and 2 have become available, but it may change as new information is evaluated. However, it offers a logical method for planning choices of anesthesia and inpatient or outpatient status for patients undergoing vasectomy reversal procedures. PMID:3811050

  20. Vasectomy reversal.

    PubMed

    Belker, A M

    1987-02-01

    A vasovasostomy may be performed on an outpatient basis with local anesthesia, but also may be performed on an outpatient basis with epidural or general anesthesia. Local anesthesia is preferred by most of my patients, the majority of whom choose this technique. With proper preoperative and intraoperative sedation, patients sleep lightly through most of the procedure. Because of the length of time often required for bilateral microsurgical vasoepididymostomy, epidural or general anesthesia and overnight hospitalization are usually necessary. Factors influencing the preoperative choice for vasovasostomy or vasoepididymostomy in patients undergoing vasectomy reversal are considered. The preoperative planned choice of vasovasostomy or vasoepididymostomy for patients having vasectomy reversal described herein does not have the support of all urologists who regularly perform these procedures. My present approach has evolved as the data reported in Tables 1 and 2 have become available, but it may change as new information is evaluated. However, it offers a logical method for planning choices of anesthesia and inpatient or outpatient status for patients undergoing vasectomy reversal procedures.

  1. Three distinct reversing modes in the geodynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallet, Y.; Pavlov, V. E.

    2016-03-01

    The data that describe the long-term reversing behavior of the geodynamo show strong and sudden changes in magnetic reversal frequency. This concerns both the onset and the end of superchrons and most probably the occurrence of episodes characterized by extreme geomagnetic reversal frequency (>10-15 rev./Myr). To account for the complexity observed in geomagnetic reversal frequency evolution, we propose a simple scenario in which the geodynamo operates in three distinct reversing modes: i—a "normal" reversing mode generating geomagnetic polarity reversals according to a stationary random process, with on average a reversal rate of ˜3 rev./Myr; ii—a non-reversing "superchron" mode characterizing long time intervals without reversal; iii—a hyper-active reversing mode characterized by an extreme geomagnetic reversal frequency. The transitions between the different reversing modes would be sudden, i.e., on the Myr time scale. Following previous studies, we suggest that in the past, the occurrence of these transitions has been modulated by thermal conditions at the core-mantle boundary governed by mantle dynamics. It might also be possible that they were more frequent during the Precambrian, before the nucleation of the inner core, because of a stronger influence on geodynamo activity of the thermal conditions at the core-mantle boundary.

  2. Dynamics and timing of reversals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valet, J.-P.; Fournier, A.

    2012-04-01

    Information provided by records of geomagnetic reversals from lava sequences is constrained by irregular volcanic activity. We show that, despite different resolution, the ten most detailed volcanic records match surprisingly well and display the same dynamical characteristics after tuning to a common eruption rate. We thus infer that the reversal process has remained unchanged over the past 180Ma with the same time constants and duration. The reversing field is characterized by 3 successive episodes, a precursory event, a 180° polarity switch and a rebound. The first and third phases depict a large amplitude directional change which, by comparison with the archeological record, is estimated to last between 2 and 2.5 kyr. The transit between the two polarities does not exceed 1ka and is thus too fast for being properly recorded by most sediments. Similar results are obtained after reducing the directional clusters that are present at different periods in each record. These features and time constants are compatible with models that do not require any mantle control on reversals processes, which is also supported by the absence of preferred longitude of the pole. Lastly, based on the chronology of the successive reversal phases, the eruption rates are found to be at least twice larger for hot spots (<1flow/100yr) than for large flood basaltic provinces.

  3. One step physically adsorbed coating of silica capillary with excellent stability for the separation of basic proteins by capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiao-Feng; Guo, Xiao-Mei; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Hua-Shan

    2015-11-01

    The coating of capillary inner surface is considered to be an effective approach to suppress the adsorption of proteins on capillary inner surface in CE. However, most of coating materials reported are water-soluble, which may dissolve in BGE during the procedure of electrophoresis. In this study, a novel strategy for selection of physically coating materials has been illustrated to get coating layer with excellent stability using materials having poor solubility in commonly used solvents. Taking natural chitin as example (not hydrolyzed water soluble chitosan), a simple one step coating method using chitin solution in hexafluoroisopropanol was adopted within only 21 min with good coating reproducibility (RSDs of EOF for within-batch coated capillaries of 1.55% and between-batch coated capillaries of 2.31%), and a separation of four basic proteins on a chitin coated capillary was performed to evaluate the coating efficacy. Using chitin coating, the adsorption of proteins on capillary inner surface was successfully suppressed with reversed and stable EOF, and four basic proteins including lysozyme, cytochrome c, ribonuclease A and α-chymotrypsinogen A were baseline separated within 16 min with satisfied separation efficiency using 20 mM pH 2.0 H3PO4-Na2HPO4 as back ground electrolyte and 20 kV as separation voltage. What is more important, the chitin coating layer could be stable for more than two months during this study, which demonstrates that chitin is an ideal material for preparing semi-permanent coating on bare fused silica capillary inner wall and has hopeful potential in routine separation of proteins with CE.

  4. One step physically adsorbed coating of silica capillary with excellent stability for the separation of basic proteins by capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiao-Feng; Guo, Xiao-Mei; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Hua-Shan

    2015-11-01

    The coating of capillary inner surface is considered to be an effective approach to suppress the adsorption of proteins on capillary inner surface in CE. However, most of coating materials reported are water-soluble, which may dissolve in BGE during the procedure of electrophoresis. In this study, a novel strategy for selection of physically coating materials has been illustrated to get coating layer with excellent stability using materials having poor solubility in commonly used solvents. Taking natural chitin as example (not hydrolyzed water soluble chitosan), a simple one step coating method using chitin solution in hexafluoroisopropanol was adopted within only 21 min with good coating reproducibility (RSDs of EOF for within-batch coated capillaries of 1.55% and between-batch coated capillaries of 2.31%), and a separation of four basic proteins on a chitin coated capillary was performed to evaluate the coating efficacy. Using chitin coating, the adsorption of proteins on capillary inner surface was successfully suppressed with reversed and stable EOF, and four basic proteins including lysozyme, cytochrome c, ribonuclease A and α-chymotrypsinogen A were baseline separated within 16 min with satisfied separation efficiency using 20 mM pH 2.0 H3PO4-Na2HPO4 as back ground electrolyte and 20 kV as separation voltage. What is more important, the chitin coating layer could be stable for more than two months during this study, which demonstrates that chitin is an ideal material for preparing semi-permanent coating on bare fused silica capillary inner wall and has hopeful potential in routine separation of proteins with CE. PMID:26452799

  5. Neuronal polarization.

    PubMed

    Takano, Tetsuya; Xu, Chundi; Funahashi, Yasuhiro; Namba, Takashi; Kaibuchi, Kozo

    2015-06-15

    Neurons are highly polarized cells with structurally and functionally distinct processes called axons and dendrites. This polarization underlies the directional flow of information in the central nervous system, so the establishment and maintenance of neuronal polarization is crucial for correct development and function. Great progress in our understanding of how neurons establish their polarity has been made through the use of cultured hippocampal neurons, while recent technological advances have enabled in vivo analysis of axon specification and elongation. This short review and accompanying poster highlight recent advances in this fascinating field, with an emphasis on the signaling mechanisms underlying axon and dendrite specification in vitro and in vivo.

  6. Capillary pumped loop body heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Theodore D. (Inventor); Wren, deceased, Paul (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A capillary pumped loop for transferring heat from one body part to another body part, the capillary pumped loop comprising a capillary evaporator for vaporizing a liquid refrigerant by absorbing heat from a warm body part, a condenser for turning a vaporized refrigerant into a liquid by transferring heat from the vaporized liquid to a cool body part, a first tube section connecting an output port of the capillary evaporator to an input of the condenser, and a second tube section connecting an output of the condenser to an input port of the capillary evaporator. A wick may be provided within the condenser. A pump may be provided between the second tube section and the input port of the capillary evaporator. Additionally, an esternal heat source or heat sink may be utilized.

  7. DNA Sequencing Using capillary Electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Barry Karger

    2011-05-09

    The overall goal of this program was to develop capillary electrophoresis as the tool to be used to sequence for the first time the Human Genome. Our program was part of the Human Genome Project. In this work, we were highly successful and the replaceable polymer we developed, linear polyacrylamide, was used by the DOE sequencing lab in California to sequence a significant portion of the human genome using the MegaBase multiple capillary array electrophoresis instrument. In this final report, we summarize our efforts and success. We began our work by separating by capillary electrophoresis double strand oligonucleotides using cross-linked polyacrylamide gels in fused silica capillaries. This work showed the potential of the methodology. However, preparation of such cross-linked gel capillaries was difficult with poor reproducibility, and even more important, the columns were not very stable. We improved stability by using non-cross linked linear polyacrylamide. Here, the entangled linear chains could move when osmotic pressure (e.g. sample injection) was imposed on the polymer matrix. This relaxation of the polymer dissipated the stress in the column. Our next advance was to use significantly lower concentrations of the linear polyacrylamide that the polymer could be automatically blown out after each run and replaced with fresh linear polymer solution. In this way, a new column was available for each analytical run. Finally, while testing many linear polymers, we selected linear polyacrylamide as the best matrix as it was the most hydrophilic polymer available. Under our DOE program, we demonstrated initially the success of the linear polyacrylamide to separate double strand DNA. We note that the method is used even today to assay purity of double stranded DNA fragments. Our focus, of course, was on the separation of single stranded DNA for sequencing purposes. In one paper, we demonstrated the success of our approach in sequencing up to 500 bases. Other

  8. Measurement of Liquid Viscosities in Tapered or Parabolic Capillaries.

    PubMed

    Ershov; Zorin; Starov

    1999-08-01

    The possibility of using tapered or parabolic capillaries for measurement of liquid viscosities is investigated both experimentally and theoretically. It is demonstrated that even small deviations in capillary radius from a constant value may substantially affect measurement results. Equations are derived which allow correct analysis of the measurement results in tapered or parabolic capillaries. The following cases are analyzed: a water imbibition into a tapered or parabolic capillary and displacement of one liquid by another immiscible liquid in tapered or parabolic capillaries. Two possibilities are considered: (a) the narrow end of the capillary as capillary inlet and (b) the wide end of the capillary as capillary inlet. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  9. Transmission of slow highly charged ions through glass capillaries: Role of the capillary shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, C. L.; Simon, M.; Ikeda, T.; Guillous, S.; Iskandar, W.; Méry, A.; Rangama, J.; Lebius, H.; Benyagoub, A.; Grygiel, C.; Müller, A.; Döbeli, M.; Tanis, J. A.; Cassimi, A.

    2013-11-01

    Comparison of the transmission of 27-keV Ar9+ ions through insulating funnel- and conical-shaped glass capillaries of outlet diameters of ˜22 μm is reported. Beam intensities of 1, 5, and 10 pA were injected into both capillaries. Transmission at the untilted angle of 0° was measured as well as at a tilt angle of ˜0.5° for the funnel capillary and a tilt angle of ˜1.1° for the conical capillary. For the funnel capillary, blocking of transmission was observed, whereas, the transmission was continuous for the conical capillary. These measurements suggest that conical-shaped capillaries have transport properties that are different than funnel-shaped capillaries for slow highly charged ions.

  10. Separation and on-column preconcentration of some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs by microemulsion electrokinetic capillary chromatography using high-speed separations.

    PubMed

    Macià, Alba; Borrull, Francesc; Calull, Marta; Aguilar, Carme

    2005-02-01

    Various strategies have been investigated for separating a group of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) by microemulsion electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MEEKC) using high-speed separations. The parameters that of affect the separation, such as the nature of the oil droplet and the buffer, and the surfactant concentration have been studied. In addition, several organic solvents were used to decrease the retention of the analytes in the oil droplet phase and to improve the resolution of the NSAIDs. The optimum microemulsion background electrolyte (BGE) solution made of 0.8% w/w ethyl acetate, 6.6% w/w butan-1-ol, 6.0% w/w acetonitrile, 1.0% w/w sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and 85.6% w/w of 10 mM sodium tetraborate at pH 9.2 resolved the drugs within 8 min. The short-end injection procedure is an alternative for reducing the analysis time. When this procedure was used, the microemulsion BGE solution consisted of 0.8% w/w ethyl acetate, 6.6% w/w butan-1-ol, 17.0% w/w methanol, 1.0% w/w SDS, and 74.6% w/w of 10 mM sodium tetraborate, pH 9.2, and the NSAIDs were separated within 3 min. The reversed electrode polarity stacking mode (REPSM) technique was applied to the on-line concentration of the NSAIDs. In this technique, the sample matrix was pumped out of the capillary using a polarity-switching step. When this technique was applied, the sensitivity was enhanced up to 40-fold and the limits of detection (LODs) were in the low microg.L(-1) levels.

  11. Malpighi and the discovery of capillaries.

    PubMed

    Pearce, J M S

    2007-01-01

    Leonardo da Vinci clearly observed and described capillaries. Using the microscope, Marcello Malpighi examined the brain and major organs to demonstrate their finer anatomical features. This led to his discovery in 1661, of capillaries that proved fundamental to our understanding of the vascular system in the brain and cord. He hypothesized that capillaries were the connection between arteries and veins that allowed blood to flow back to the heart in the circulation of the blood, as first asserted by William Harvey.

  12. Analysis of Small Ions with Capillary Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Aulakh, Jatinder Singh; Kaur, Ramandeep; Malik, Ashok Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Small inorganic ions are easily separated through capillary electrophoresis because they have a high charge-to-mass ratio and suffer little from some of the undesired phenomenon affecting higher molecular weight species like adsorption to the capillary wall, decomposition, and precipitation. This chapter is focused on the analysis of small ions other than metal ions using capillary electrophoresis. Methods are described for the determination of ions of nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur, fluorine, chlorine, bromine, and iodine. PMID:27645739

  13. Transient studies of capillary-induced flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reagan, M. K.; Bowman, W. J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the numerical and experimental results of a study performed on the transient rise of fluid in a capillary tube. The capillary tube problem provides an excellent mechanism from which to launch an investigation into the transient flow of a fluid in a porous wick structure where capillary forces must balance both adverse gravitational effects and frictional losses. For the study, a capillary tube, initially charged with a small volume of water, was lowered into a pool of water. The behavior of the column of fluid during the transient that followed as more water entered the tube from the pool was both numerically and experimentally studied.

  14. Capillary-bridge–derived particles with negative Gaussian curvature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liming; McCarthy, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    We report the preparation of millimeter-scale particles by thermal polymerization of liquid monomer capillary bridges to form catenoid-shaped particles that exhibit negative Gaussian curvature. The shape of the capillary bridges and resulting particles can be finely tuned using several addressable parameters: (i) the shape, size, and orientation of lithographic pinning features on the spanned surfaces; (ii) the distance between opposing support surfaces; and (iii) the lateral displacement (shear) of opposing features. The catenoid-shaped particles exhibit controllable optical properties as a result of their concave menisci, the shape of which can be easily manipulated. The particles self assemble in the presence of a condensing liquid (water) to form reversible neck-to-neck pairs and less reversible end-to-end aggregates. We argue that this approach could be scaled down to micrometer dimensions by fabricating an array of micrometer-scale particles. We also argue, with a discussion of dynamic wetting, that these particles will exhibit interesting anisotropic adhesive properties. PMID:25730873

  15. Polar Bear

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amstrup, S.D.; ,; Lentfer, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Polar bears are long-lived, late-maturing carnivores that have relatively low rates of reproduction and natural mortality. Their populations are susceptible to disturbance from human activities, such as the exploration and development of mineral resources or hunting. Polar bear populations have been an important renewable resource available to coastal communities throughout the Arctic for thousands of years.

  16. Enantiomer Separations by Capillary Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Scriba, Gerhard K E; Harnisch, Henrik; Zhu, Qingfu

    2016-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is a versatile and flexible technique for analytical enantioseparations. This is due to the large variety of chiral selectors as well as the different operation modes including electrokinetic chromatography, micellar electrokinetic chromatography, and microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography. The chiral selector, which is added to the background electrolyte, represents a pseudostationary phase with its own electrophoretic mobility allowing a variety of different separation protocols. The present chapter briefly addresses the basic fundamentals of CE enantioseparations as well as the most frequently applied chiral selectors and separation modes. The practical example illustrates the separation of the enantiomers of a positively charged analyte using native and charged cyclodextrin derivatives as chiral selectors. PMID:27645742

  17. Capillary pumped loop application guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullimore, Brent A.

    Capillary pumped loops (CPLs) have undergone extensive development since the late 1970's, and represent a maturing technology that is beginning to appear in spacecraft designs. Perhaps because most CPL literature is intended for CPL and heat pipe dedvelopers, or perhaps because of the myriad of component design and layout options available, many thermal control designers are either unfamiliar with the capabilities offered by CPLs, or are confused about their limitations. This survey paper is targeted toward thermal control designers who must decide when and where to use CPLs, or having chosen a CPL solution, must deal with system-level integration and test issues.

  18. Capillary surfaces in exotic containers

    SciTech Connect

    Concus, P. ); Finn, R. . Dept. of Mathematics)

    1991-07-01

    A survey is presented of results to date for capillary surfaces in exotic'' containers. These containers have the property that each one admits a continuum of distinct equilibrium free surfaces, all bounding with the container walls the same volume of fluid, making the same contact angle at the trip interface curve, and having identical mechanical energies. The containers can be so designed that they are themselves axially symmetric but that the fluid configurations of minimizing energy cannot be axially symmetric. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Capillary rafts and their destabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protiere, Suzie; Abkarian, Manouk; Aristoff, Jeffrey; Stone, Howard

    2010-11-01

    Small objects trapped at an interface are very common in Nature (insects walking on water, ant rafts, bubbles or pollen at the water-air interface, membranes...) and are found in many multiphase industrial processes. The study of such particle-laden interfaces is therefore of practical as well as fundamental importance. Here we report experiments on the self-assembly of spherical particles into capillary rafts at an oil-water interface and elucidate how such rafts sink. We characterize different types of sinking behavior and show that it is possible to obtain "armored droplets," whereby the sinking oil is encapsulated within a shell of particles.

  20. High pressure pulsed capillary viscometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. L.; Walowitt, J. A.; Pan, C. H. T.

    1972-01-01

    An analytical and test program was conducted in order to establish the feasibility of a multichamber pulsed-capillary viscometer. The initial design incorporated a piston, ram, and seals which produced measured pulses up to 30,000 psi in the closed chamber system. Pressure pulses from one to ten milliseconds were investigated in a system volume of 1 cuin. Four test fluids: a MIL-L-7808, a 5P4E polyphenyl ether, a MIL-L-23699A, and a synthetic hydrocarbon were examined in the test pressure assembly. The pressure-viscosity coefficient and viscosity delay time were determined for the MIL-L-7808 lubricant tested.

  1. Capillary electrophoresis in metallodrug development.

    PubMed

    Holtkamp, Hannah; Hartinger, Christian G

    2015-09-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is a separation method based on differential migration of analytes in electric fields. The compatibility with purely aqueous separation media makes it a versatile tool in metallodrug research. Many metallodrugs undergo ligand exchange reactions that can easily be followed with this method and the information gained can even be improved by coupling the CE to advanced detectors, such as mass spectrometers. This gives the method high potential to facilitate the development of metallodrugs, especially when combined with innovative method development and experimental design. PMID:26547417

  2. Pliocene geomagnetic polarity epochs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalrymple, G.B.; Cox, A.; Doell, Richard R.; Gromme, C.S.

    1967-01-01

    A paleomagnetic and K-Ar dating study of 44 upper Miocene and Pliocene volcanic units from the western United States suggests that the frequency of reversals of the earth's magnetic field during Pliocene time may have been comparable with that of the last 3.6 m.y. Although the data are too limited to permit the formal naming of any new polarity epochs or events, four polarity transitions have been identified: the W10 R/N boundary at 3.7 ?? 0.1 m.y., the A12 N/R boundary at 4.9 ?? 0.1 m.y., the W32 N/R boundary at 9.0 ?? 0.2m.y., and the W36 R/N boundary at 10.8 ?? 0.3 - 1.0 m.y. The loss of absolute resolution of K-Ar dating in older rocks indicates that the use of well defined stratigraphic successions to identify and date polarity transitions will be important in the study of Pliocene and older reversals. ?? 1967.

  3. Stabilization of porous glass reverse-osmosis membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballou, E. V.; Leban, M. I.; Wydeven, T.

    1972-01-01

    Application of porous glass in form of capillary tubes for low capacity ion exchange in hyperfiltration experiments is discussed. Efficiency of desalination by process of reverse osmosis is described. Stabilization of porous glass membrane by presence of aluminum chloride is analyzed.

  4. Polarized rainbow.

    PubMed

    Können, G P; de Boer, J H

    1979-06-15

    The Airy theory of the rainbow is extended to polarized light. For both polarization directions a simple analytic expression is obtained for the intensity distribution as a function of the scattering angle in terms of the Airy function and its derivative. This approach is valid at least down to droplet diameters of 0.3 mm in visible light. The degree of polarization of the rainbow is less than expected from geometrical optics; it increases with droplet size. For a droplet diameter >1 mm the locations of the supernumerary rainbows are equal for both polarization directions, but for a diameter <1 mm the supernumerary rainbows of the weaker polarization component are located between those in the strong component. PMID:20212586

  5. Evaluation of capillary reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahill, J. E.; Halase, J. F.; South, W. K.; Stoffer, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    Anti-icing of the inlet of jet engines is generally performed with high pressure heated air that is directed forward from the compressor through a series of pipes to various manifolds located near the structures to be anti-iced. From these manifolds, the air is directed to all flowpath surfaces that may be susceptible to ice formation. There the anti-icing function may be performed by either heat conduction or film heating. Unfortunately, the prospect of utilizing lighweight, high strength composites for inlet structures of jet engines has been frustrated by the low transverse thermal conductivity of such materials. It was the objective of this program to develop an advanced materials and design concept for anti-icing composite structures. The concept that was evaluated used capillary glass tubes embedded on the surface of a composite structure with heated air ducted through the tubes. An analytical computer program was developed to predict the anti-icing performance of such tubes and a test program was conducted to demonstrate actual performance of this system. Test data and analytical code results were in excellent agreement. Both indicate feasibility of using capillary tubes for surface heating as a means for composite engine structures to combat ice accumulation.

  6. Cryogenic Capillary Screen Heat Entrapment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolshinskiy, L.G.; Hastings, L.J.; Stathman, G.

    2007-01-01

    Cryogenic liquid acquisition devices (LADs) for space-based propulsion interface directly with the feed system, which can be a significant heat leak source. Further, the accumulation of thermal energy within LAD channels can lead to the loss of sub-cooled propellant conditions and result in feed system cavitation during propellant outflow. Therefore, the fundamental question addressed by this program was: "To what degree is natural convection in a cryogenic liquid constrained by the capillary screen meshes envisioned for LADs.?"Testing was first conducted with water as the test fluid, followed by LN2 tests. In either case, the basic experimental approach was to heat the bottom of a cylindrical column of test fluid to establish stratification patterns measured by temperature sensors located above and below a horizontal screen barrier position. Experimentation was performed without barriers, with screens, and with a solid barrier. The two screen meshes tested were those typically used by LAD designers, "200x1400" and "325x2300", both with Twill Dutch Weave. Upon consideration of both the water and LN2 data it was concluded that heat transfer across the screen meshes was dependent upon barrier thermal conductivity and that the capillary screen meshes were impervious to natural convection currents.

  7. Nonaqueous Capillary Electrophoresis Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Klampfl, Christian W; Himmelsbach, Markus

    2016-01-01

    The term nonaqueous capillary electrophoresis (NACE) commonly refers to capillary electrophoresis with purely nonaqueous background electrolytes (BGE). Main advantages of NACE are the possibility to analyze substances with very low solubility in aqueous media as well as separation selectivity that can be quite different in organic solvents (compared to water)-a property that can be employed for manipulation of separation selectivities. Mass spectrometry (MS) has become more and more popular as a detector in CE a fact that applies also for NACE. In the present chapter, the development of NACE-MS since 2004 is reviewed. Relevant parameters like composition of BGE and its influence on separation and detection in NACE as well as sheath liquid for NACE-MS are discussed. Finally, an overview of the papers published in the field of NACE-MS between 2004 and 2014 is given. Applications are grouped according to the field (analysis of natural products, biomedical analysis, food analysis, analysis of industrial products, and fundamental investigations). PMID:27645734

  8. Capillary Rise in Porous Media.

    PubMed

    Lago, Marcelo; Araujo, Mariela

    2001-02-01

    Capillary rise experiments were performed in columns filled with glass beads and Berea sandstones, using visual methods to register the advance of the water front. For the glass bead filled columns, early time data are well fitted by the Washburn equation. However, in the experiments, the advancing front exceeded the predicted equilibrium height. For large times, an algebraic behavior of the velocity of the front is observed (T. Delker et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 2902 (1996)). A model for studying the capillary pressure evolution in a regular assembly of spheres is proposed and developed. It is based on a quasi-static advance of the meniscus with a piston-like motion and allows us to estimate the hydraulic equilibrium height, with values very close to those obtained by fitting early time data to a Washburn equation. The change of regime is explained as a transition in the mechanism of advance of the meniscus. On the other hand, only the Washburn regime was observed for the sandstones. The front velocity was fitted to an algebraical form with an exponent close to 0.5, a value expected from the asymptotic limit of the Washburn equation. Copyright 2001 Academic Press. PMID:11161488

  9. Atomic Force Controlled Capillary Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Aaron; Yeshua, Talia; Palchan, Mila; Lovsky, Yulia; Taha, Hesham

    2010-03-01

    Lithography based on scanning probe microscopic techniques has considerable potential for accurate & localized deposition of material on the nanometer scale. Controlled deposition of metallic features with high purity and spatial accuracy is of great interest for circuit edit applications in the semiconductor industry, for plasmonics & nanophotonics and for basic research in surface enhanced Raman scattering & nanobiophysics. Within the context of metal deposition we will review the development of fountain pen nanochemistry and its most recent emulation Atomic Force Controlled Capillary Electrophoresis (ACCE). Using this latter development we will demonstrate achievement of unprecedented control of nanoparticle deposition using a three-electrode geometry. Three electrodes are attached: one on the outside of a metal coated glass probe, one on the inside of a hollow probe in a solution containing Au nanoparticles in the capillary, and a third on the surface where the writing takes place. The three electrodes provide electrical pulses for accurate control of deposition and retraction of the liquid from the surface overcoming the lack of control seen in both dip pen lithography & fountain pen nanochemistry when the tip contacts the surface. With this development, we demonstrate depositing a single 1.3 nm Au nanoparticle onto surfaces such as semiconductors.

  10. Nucleation theory - Is replacement free energy needed?. [error analysis of capillary approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doremus, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    It has been suggested that the classical theory of nucleation of liquid from its vapor as developed by Volmer and Weber (1926) needs modification with a factor referred to as the replacement free energy and that the capillary approximation underlying the classical theory is in error. Here, the classical nucleation equation is derived from fluctuation theory, Gibb's result for the reversible work to form a critical nucleus, and the rate of collision of gas molecules with a surface. The capillary approximation is not used in the derivation. The chemical potential of small drops is then considered, and it is shown that the capillary approximation can be derived from thermodynamic equations. The results show that no corrections to Volmer's equation are needed.

  11. Sheathless interface for coupling capillary electrophoresis with mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chenchen; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-06-17

    A sheathless interface for coupling capillary electrophoresis (CE) with mass spectrometry is disclosed. The sheathless interface includes a separation capillary for performing CE separation and an emitter capillary for electrospray ionization. A portion of the emitter capillary is porous or, alternatively, is coated to form an electrically conductive surface. A section of the emitter capillary is disposed within the separation capillary, forming a joint. A metal tube, containing a conductive liquid, encloses the joint.

  12. Enzymophoresis of nucleic acids by tandem capillary enzyme reactor-capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Nashabeh, W; el Rassi, Z

    1992-04-10

    Enzymophoresis with coupled heterogeneous capillary enzyme reactor-capillary zone electrophoresis was developed and evaluated in the area of nucleic acids. Ribonuclease T1, hexokinase and adenosine deaminase were successfully immobilized on the inner walls of short fused-silica capillaries through glutaraldehyde attachment. These open-tubular capillary enzyme reactors were quite stable for a prolonged period of use under operation conditions normally used in capillary zone electrophoresis. The capillary enzyme reactors coupled in series with capillary zone electrophoresis served as peak locator on the electropherogram, improved the system selectivity, and facilitated the quantitative determination of the analytes with good accuracy. Also, they allowed the on-line digestion and mapping of minute amounts of transfer ribonucleic acids, and the simultaneous synthesis and separation of nanogram quantities of oligonucleotides.

  13. Intracranial capillary hemangioma in an elderly patient

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Ai; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Matsuda, Ryosuke; Nishimura, Fumihiko; Motoyama, Yasushi; Park, Young-Su; Nakamura, Mitsutoshi; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Capillary hemangiomas are neoplasms involving skin and soft tissue in infants. These lesions rarely involved an intracranial space and reported age distribution ranges from infancy to middle age. We report an extremely rare case of rapidly rising intracranial capillary hemangioma in an elderly woman. Case Description: The 82-year-old woman presented with vomiting, reduced level of consciousness, and worsening mental state. Computed tomography showed a contrast-enhanced extra-axial lesion in the left frontal operculum, although no intracranial mass lesion was identifiable from magnetic resonance imaging taken 2 years earlier. Complete surgical excision was performed and histopathological examination diagnosed benign capillary hemangioma consisting of a variety of dilated capillary blood vessels lined by endothelial cells. Conclusion: This is the first description of rapid growth of an intracranial capillary hemangioma in an elderly woman. These lesions are exceedingly rare in the elderly population, but still show the capacity for rapid growth. Complete excision would prevent further recurrence. PMID:26664868

  14. Modeling capillary barriers in unsaturated fractured rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Zhang, W.; Pan, Lehua; Hinds, Jennifer; Bodvarsson, G. S.

    2002-11-01

    This work presents a series of numerical modeling studies that investigate the hydrogeologic conditions required to form capillary barriers and the effect that capillary barriers have on fluid flow and tracer transport processes in the unsaturated fractured rock of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a potential site for storing high-level radioactive waste. The modeling approach is based on a dual-continuum formulation of coupled multiphase fluid and tracer transport through fractured porous rock. The numerical modeling results showed that effective capillary barriers can develop where both matrix and fracture capillary gradients tend to move water upward. Under the current hydrogeologic conceptualization of Yucca Mountain, strong capillary barrier effects exist for diverting a significant amount of moisture flow through the relatively shallow Paintbrush nonwelded unit, with major faults observed at the site serving as major downward pathways for laterally diverted percolation fluxes. In addition, we used observed field liquid saturation and goechemical isotopic data to check model results and found consistent agreement.

  15. Polarizing cues.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Stephen P

    2012-01-01

    People categorize themselves and others, creating ingroup and outgroup distinctions. In American politics, parties constitute the in- and outgroups, and party leaders hold sway in articulating party positions. A party leader's endorsement of a policy can be persuasive, inducing co-partisans to take the same position. In contrast, a party leader's endorsement may polarize opinion, inducing out-party identifiers to take a contrary position. Using survey experiments from the 2008 presidential election, I examine whether in- and out-party candidate cues—John McCain and Barack Obama—affected partisan opinion. The results indicate that in-party leader cues do not persuade but that out-party leader cues polarize. This finding holds in an experiment featuring President Bush in which his endorsement did not persuade Republicans but it polarized Democrats. Lastly, I compare the effect of party leader cues to party label cues. The results suggest that politicians, not parties, function as polarizing cues. PMID:22400143

  16. A capillary valve for microfluidic systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, Eric B.; Kanouff, Michael P.; Rush, Brian M.

    2004-10-01

    Microfluidic systems are becoming increasingly complicated as the number of applications grows. The use of microfluidic systems for chemical and biological agent detection, for example, requires that a given sample be subjected to many process steps, which requires microvalves to control the position and transport of the sample. Each microfluidic application has its own specific valve requirements and this has precipitated the wide variety of valve designs reported in the literature. Each of these valve designs has its strengths and weaknesses. The strength of the valve design proposed here is its simplicity, which makes it easy to fabricate, easy to actuate, and easy to integrate with a microfluidic system. It can be applied to either gas phase or liquid phase systems. This novel design uses a secondary fluid to stop the flow of the primary fluid in the system. The secondary fluid must be chosen based on the type of flow that it must stop. A dielectric fluid must be used for a liquid phase flow driven by electroosmosis, and a liquid with a large surface tension should be used to stop a gas phase flow driven by a weak pressure differential. Experiments were carried out investigating certain critical functions of the design. These experiments verified that the secondary fluid can be reversibly moved between its 'valve opened' and 'valve closed' positions, where the secondary fluid remained as one contiguous piece during this transport process. The experiments also verified that when Fluorinert is used as the secondary fluid, the valve can break an electric circuit. It was found necessary to apply a hydrophobic coating to the microchannels to stop the primary fluid, an aqueous electrolyte, from wicking past the Fluorinert and short-circuiting the valve. A simple model was used to develop valve designs that could be closed using an electrokinetic pump, and re-opened by simply turning the pump off and allowing capillary forces to push the secondary fluid back into its

  17. Copolymers For Capillary Gel Electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Changsheng; Li, Qingbo

    2005-08-09

    This invention relates to an electrophoresis separation medium having a gel matrix of at least one random, linear copolymer comprising a primary comonomer and at least one secondary comonomer, wherein the comonomers are randomly distributed along the copolymer chain. The primary comonomer is an acrylamide or an acrylamide derivative that provides the primary physical, chemical, and sieving properties of the gel matrix. The at least one secondary comonomer imparts an inherent physical, chemical, or sieving property to the copolymer chain. The primary and secondary comonomers are present in a ratio sufficient to induce desired properties that optimize electrophoresis performance. The invention also relates to a method of separating a mixture of biological molecules using this gel matrix, a method of preparing the novel electrophoresis separation medium, and a capillary tube filled with the electrophoresis separation medium.

  18. Optical reversible programmable Boolean logic unit.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Tanay

    2012-07-20

    Computing with reversibility is the only way to avoid dissipation of energy associated with bit erase. So, a reversible microprocessor is required for future computing. In this paper, a design of a simple all-optical reversible programmable processor is proposed using a polarizing beam splitter, liquid crystal-phase spatial light modulators, a half-wave plate, and plane mirrors. This circuit can perform 16 logical operations according to three programming inputs. Also, inputs can be easily recovered from the outputs. It is named the "reversible programmable Boolean logic unit (RPBLU)." The logic unit is the basic building block of many complex computational operations. Hence the design is important in sense. Two orthogonally polarized lights are defined here as two logical states, respectively.

  19. Characterization and quantification in capillary zone electrophoresis using direct and indirect detection

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, Hui-Ti; Church, W.H.

    1995-12-01

    Capillary zone electrophoresis has become a major separation technique for the analysis of small volumes of materials and it is featured with the advantages of high efficiency, simplicity and rapidity. The purpose of this study was to characterize the performance of a capillary electrophoresis system in regards to the separation efficiency and quantitative capacity. Three sample introduction techniques--electromigration, gravity and pressure injection modes--were evaluated utilizing two different sample-buffer systems. Analytes phenol, benzoic acid and 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid were separated underpositive polarity voltage using a borate buffet and monitored with direct UV absorption detection. Mixtures of myo-inositol 2-monophosphate, myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, and myo-inositol hexakisphosphate were separated under negative polarity voltage using a lon Phor Anionic Electrolyte Buffer containing an electroosmotic flow modifier and a background chromophore for indirect detection.

  20. Static magnetic fields affect capillary flow of red blood cells in striated skin muscle.

    PubMed

    Brix, Gunnar; Strieth, Sebastian; Strelczyk, Donata; Dellian, Marc; Griebel, Jürgen; Eichhorn, Martin E; Andrā, Wilfried; Bellemann, Matthias E

    2008-01-01

    Blood flowing in microvessels is one possible site of action of static magnetic fields (SMFs). We evaluated SMF effects on capillary flow of red blood cells (RBCs) in unanesthetized hamsters, using a skinfold chamber technique for intravital fluorescence microscopy. By this approach, capillary RBC velocities (v(RBC)), capillary diameters (D), arteriolar diameters (D(art)), and functional vessel densities (FVD) were measured in striated skin muscle at different magnetic flux densities. Exposure above a threshold level of about 500 mT resulted in a significant (P < 0.001) reduction of v(RBC) in capillaries as compared to the baseline value. At the maximum field strength of 587 mT, v(RBC) was reduced by more than 40%. Flow reduction was reversible when the field strength was decreased below the threshold level. In contrast, mean values determined at different exposure levels for the parameters D, D(art), and FVD did not vary by more than 5%. Blood flow through capillary networks is affected by strong SMFs directed perpendicular to the vessels. Since the influence of SMFs on blood flow in microvessels directed parallel to the field as well as on collateral blood supply could not be studied, our findings should be carefully interpreted with respect to the setting of safety guidelines.

  1. Geomagnetic excursions reflect an aborted polarity state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valet, Jean-Pierre; Plenier, Guillaume; Herrero-Bervera, E.

    2008-10-01

    Geomagnetic excursions represent short episodes of a few thousand years at most during which the field considerably exceeds its normal range of variability during a polarity state. Paleomagnetic records have now been obtained with extremely high temporal resolution which have improved our knowledge of these short events. We have compiled the most detailed records of excursions that had occurred during the Brunhes and Matuyama chrons. We show that virtual geomagnetic poles (VGPs) of at least one record of each event are able to reach the opposite polarity. In the next step, we have computed different simulations of excursions during which the dipole progressively vanishes before growing back without reversing. This scenario produces very few reversed directions which are only visible at some latitudes. We infer that it is impossible to reach the ratio of reversed to intermediate VGPs present in the paleomagnetic records if the excursions were not associated with a short period of reversed dipole field. Therefore, excursions should be regarded as two successive reversals bracketing an aborted polarity interval. We propose that the same underlying mechanisms prevail in both situations (excursions or reversals) and that below a certain strength the field reaches an unstable position which preludes either the achievement of a reversal or its return to the former polarity.

  2. Towards new applications using capillary waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Stasio, Nicolino; Shibukawa, Atsushi; Papadopoulos, Ioannis N.; Farahi, Salma; Simandoux, Olivier; Huignard, Jean-Pierre; Bossy, Emmanuel; Moser, Christophe; Psaltis, Demetri

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the enhancement of the sensing capabilities of glass capillaries. We exploit their properties as optical and acoustic waveguides to transform them potentially into high resolution minimally invasive endoscopic devices. We show two possible applications of silica capillary waveguides demonstrating fluorescence and optical-resolution photoacoustic imaging using a single 330 μm-thick silica capillary. A nanosecond pulsed laser is focused and scanned in front of a capillary by digital phase conjugation through the silica annular ring of the capillary, used as an optical waveguide. We demonstrate optical-resolution photoacoustic images of a 30 μm-thick nylon thread using the water-filled core of the same capillary as an acoustic waveguide, resulting in a fully passive endoscopic device. Moreover, fluorescence images of 1.5 μm beads are obtained collecting the fluorescence signal through the optical waveguide. This kind of silica-capillary waveguide together with wavefront shaping techniques such as digital phase conjugation, paves the way to minimally invasive multi-modal endoscopy. PMID:26713182

  3. Development of and fabrication of high resolution gas chromatographic capillary columns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zlatkis, A.

    1982-01-01

    Gas chromatographic columns which are used in the trace gas analyzer (TGA) for the space shuttle are coated with a polyoxyethylene lauryl ether. This stationary phase is of medium polarity and has a temperature limit of 160 C. A polymer for this application which has an improved thermal stability is investigated. The use of fused silica capillary columns with specially bonded phases as well as an introduction system (on column) was also studied.

  4. Micromechanism linear actuator with capillary force sealing

    DOEpatents

    Sniegowski, Jeffry J.

    1997-01-01

    A class of micromachine linear actuators whose function is based on gas driven pistons in which capillary forces are used to seal the gas behind the piston. The capillary forces also increase the amount of force transmitted from the gas pressure to the piston. In a major subclass of such devices, the gas bubble is produced by thermal vaporization of a working fluid. Because of their dependence on capillary forces for sealing, such devices are only practical on the sub-mm size scale, but in that regime they produce very large force times distance (total work) values.

  5. Properties of water as a novel stationary phase in capillary gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gallant, Jonathan A; Thurbide, Kevin B

    2014-09-12

    A novel method of separation that uses water as a stationary phase in capillary gas chromatography (GC) is presented. Through applying a water phase to the interior walls of a stainless steel capillary, good separations were obtained for a large variety of analytes in this format. It was found that carrier gas humidification and backpressure were key factors in promoting stable operation over time at various temperatures. For example, with these measures in place, the retention time of an acetone test analyte was found to reduce by only 44s after 100min of operation at a column temperature of 100°C. In terms of efficiency, under optimum conditions the method produced about 20,000 plates for an acetone test analyte on a 250μm i.d.×30m column. Overall, retention on the stationary phase generally increased with analyte water solubility and polarity, but was relatively little correlated with analyte volatility. Conversely, non-polar analytes were essentially unretained in the system. These features were applied to the direct analysis of different polar analytes in both aqueous and organic samples. Results suggest that this approach could provide an interesting alternative tool in capillary GC separations.

  6. "Getting the best sensitivity from on-capillary fluorescence detection in capillary electrophoresis" - A tutorial.

    PubMed

    Galievsky, Victor A; Stasheuski, Alexander S; Krylov, Sergey N

    2016-09-01

    Capillary electrophoresis with Laser-Induced Fluorescence (CE-LIF) detection is being applied to new analytical problems which challenge both the power of CE separation and the sensitivity of LIF detection. On-capillary LIF detection is much more practical than post-capillary detection in a sheath-flow cell. Therefore, commercial CE instruments utilize solely on-capillary CE-LIF detection with a Limit of Detection (LOD) in the nM range, while there are multiple applications of CE-LIF that require pM or lower LODs. This tutorial analyzes all aspects of on-capillary LIF detection in CE in an attempt to identify means for improving LOD of CE-LIF with on-capillary detection. We consider principles of signal enhancement and noise reduction, as well as relevant areas of fluorophore photochemistry and fluorescent microscopy. PMID:27543015

  7. Polarization Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waluschka, Eugene

    1998-01-01

    As light passes through a optical system the reflections and refractions will in general change the polarization state of the light. If we assume that all of the materials in the thin film coatings and substrate are isotropic and homogeneous then calculating the amount of "instrumental" polarization is a relatively straight forward task. In the following sections we will present a of the steps required to perform a 'polarization ray trace' calculation for a single ray and monochromatic and hence polarized light. The thin film portion of the calculation is also shown. The reason for explicitly showing the thin film equations is that there are sign conventions imposed on the boundary value equations by the orientation and handedness of the various coordinate frames which are attached to the geometric rays. The attenuation of light through a optical system, is relatively simple, and requires at the very least a lens (average) reflectivity or transmissivity. Determining the polarization sensitivity of a optical system is still relatively straight forward requiring at least a knowledge of the behavior of the "s" and "p" components at each interface for the chief ray. Determining the thin film induced aberrations of a optical system are somewhat more demanding. Questions about the arithmetic sign of the phase factors and how this relates to the overall "OPD" of a ray are ubiquitous. Many rays are required to construct a wavefront. Thin film codes which modify the OPD's of rays are a requirement for this last mentioned computation. This requires a consistent scheme of coordinate frames and sign conventions and is probably the most demanding task of a polarization ray trace. Only the electric field will used in the discussion. This is not a restriction as the Stokes parameters are functions of the electric field. The following does not attempt to explain, but only to present all of the required concepts and formulas.

  8. Amphiphilic silica nanoparticles as pseudostationary phase for capillary electrophoresis separation.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Ding, Guo-Sheng; Chen, Jie; Tang, An-Na

    2010-11-19

    Amphiphilic silica nanoparticles surface-functionalized by 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) and octyltriethoxylsilane (OTES) were successfully prepared and characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR) and thermogravimetry (TG) techniques. The potential use of these bifunctionalized nanoparticles as pseudostationary phases (PSPs) in capillary electrophoresis (CE) for the separation of charged and neutral compounds was evaluated in terms of their suitability. As expected, fast separation of representative aromatic acids was fulfilled with high separation efficiency, because they migrate in the same direction with the electroosmotic flow (EOF) under optimum experimental conditions. Using a buffer solution of 30mmol/L phosphate (pH 3.0) in the presence of 0.5mg/mL of the synthesized bifunctionalized nanoparticles, the investigated basic compounds were baseline-resolved with symmetrical peaks. Due to the existence of amino groups on the surface of nanoparticles, "silanol effect" that occurs between positively charged basic analytes and the silanols on the inner surface of capillary was greatly suppressed. Furthermore, the separation systems also exhibited reversed-phase (RP) behavior when neutral analytes were tested. PMID:20961550

  9. Clusters of circulating tumor cells traverse capillary-sized vessels

    PubMed Central

    Au, Sam H.; Storey, Brian D.; Moore, John C.; Tang, Qin; Chen, Yeng-Long; Javaid, Sarah; Sarioglu, A. Fatih; Sullivan, Ryan; Madden, Marissa W.; O’Keefe, Ryan; Haber, Daniel A.; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Langenau, David M.; Stott, Shannon L.; Toner, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular aggregates of circulating tumor cells (CTC clusters) are potent initiators of distant organ metastasis. However, it is currently assumed that CTC clusters are too large to pass through narrow vessels to reach these organs. Here, we present evidence that challenges this assumption through the use of microfluidic devices designed to mimic human capillary constrictions and CTC clusters obtained from patient and cancer cell origins. Over 90% of clusters containing up to 20 cells successfully traversed 5- to 10-μm constrictions even in whole blood. Clusters rapidly and reversibly reorganized into single-file chain-like geometries that substantially reduced their hydrodynamic resistances. Xenotransplantation of human CTC clusters into zebrafish showed similar reorganization and transit through capillary-sized vessels in vivo. Preliminary experiments demonstrated that clusters could be disrupted during transit using drugs that affected cellular interaction energies. These findings suggest that CTC clusters may contribute a greater role to tumor dissemination than previously believed and may point to strategies for combating CTC cluster-initiated metastasis. PMID:27091969

  10. Multistaged stokes injected Raman capillary waveguide amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Kurnit, Norman A.

    1980-01-01

    A multistaged Stokes injected Raman capillary waveguide amplifier for providing a high gain Stokes output signal. The amplifier uses a plurality of optically coupled capillary waveguide amplifiers and one or more regenerative amplifiers to increase Stokes gain to a level sufficient for power amplification. Power amplification is provided by a multifocused Raman gain cell or a large diameter capillary waveguide. An external source of CO.sub.2 laser radiation can be injected into each of the capillary waveguide amplifier stages to increase Raman gain. Devices for injecting external sources of CO.sub.2 radiation include: dichroic mirrors, prisms, gratings and Ge Brewster plates. Alternatively, the CO.sub.2 input radiation to the first stage can be coupled and amplified between successive stages.

  11. Capillary electrochromatography using fibers as stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Jinno, K; Watanabe, H; Saito, Y; Takeichi, T

    2001-10-01

    Fiber-packed capillary columns have been evaluated in chromatographic performance in capillary electrochromatography (CEC). The change of electroosmotic flow (EOF) velocity and selectivity using different kinds of fiber materials was examined. Although the EOF velocity among the different fiber packed columns was almost the same, retention of parabens was larger on the Kevlar-packed column than on the Zylon-packed one, and was larger on the as-span-type fiber-packed column than on the high-modulus-type packed one. Using 200 microm ID x 5 cm Kevlar packed column combined with a 100 microm ID x 20 cm precolumn capillary and a 530 microm ID x 45 cm postcolumn capillary, the separation of three parabens within 30 s was achieved. Other compounds were also separated in a few minutes by the fiber-packed CEC method.

  12. Capillary electrochromatography using fibers as stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Jinno, K; Watanabe, H; Saito, Y; Takeichi, T

    2001-10-01

    Fiber-packed capillary columns have been evaluated in chromatographic performance in capillary electrochromatography (CEC). The change of electroosmotic flow (EOF) velocity and selectivity using different kinds of fiber materials was examined. Although the EOF velocity among the different fiber packed columns was almost the same, retention of parabens was larger on the Kevlar-packed column than on the Zylon-packed one, and was larger on the as-span-type fiber-packed column than on the high-modulus-type packed one. Using 200 microm ID x 5 cm Kevlar packed column combined with a 100 microm ID x 20 cm precolumn capillary and a 530 microm ID x 45 cm postcolumn capillary, the separation of three parabens within 30 s was achieved. Other compounds were also separated in a few minutes by the fiber-packed CEC method. PMID:11669512

  13. CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORETIC BEHAVIOR OF SEVEN SULFONYLUREAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic behavior of bensulfuron Me, sulfometuron Me, nicosulfuron (Accent), chlorimuron Et, thifensulfuron Me (Harmony), metsulfuron Me, and chlorsulfuron was studied under capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) conditio...

  14. Capillary Flow Resistors: Local and Global Resistors.

    PubMed

    Berthier, Jean; Gosselin, David; Pham, Andrew; Delapierre, Guillaume; Belgacem, Naceur; Chaussy, Didier

    2016-01-26

    The use of capillary systems in space and biotechnology applications requires the regulation of the capillary flow velocity. It has been observed that constricted sections act as flow resistors. In this work, we also show that enlarged sections temporarily reduce the velocity of the flow. In this work, the theory of the dynamics of capillary flows passing through a constricted or an enlarged channel section is presented. It is demonstrated that the physics of a capillary flow in a channel with a constriction or an enlargement is different and that a constriction acts as a global flow resistor and an enlargement as a local flow resistor. The theoretical results are checked against experimental approaches. PMID:26704147

  15. Capillary Optics generate stronger X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA scientist, in the Space Sciences lab at Marshall, works with capillary optics that generate more intense X-rays than conventional sources. This capability is useful in studying the structure of important proteins.

  16. Characterising Microstructured Materials Using a Capillary Rheometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Christopher I.; See, Howard; Arabo, Emad Y. M.

    2008-07-01

    A parallel plate and capillary rheometer have been used to rheologically characterize an Australian hard wheat flour-water dough over an extensive range of shear rates (10-3-104 s-1). Torsional measurements showed that the shear viscosity of dough increased with strain to a maximum value then decreased, suggesting a breakdown of the dough structure. This was consistent with other published data on doughs. Capillary experiments revealed the shear thinning behavior of dough, which was described by a power-law model. The wall slip behavior of dough was examined, revealing a critical shear stress at which slip occurs for a 1 mm diameter capillary. The capillary data was best linked to the torsional data at low strain values (˜0.1) as expected given the nature of sampling in the two rheometers.

  17. ISS Update: Capillary Flow Experiments-2

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Kelly Humphries interviews Dr. Mark Weislogel, Principal Investigator for the Capillary Flow Experiments-2 (CFE), from the Portland State University in Oregon. The CFE i...

  18. RF Liquid Measurement Of Capillary Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poudyal, Bashudev; Mazzeo, Brian; Warnick, Karl

    2009-10-01

    Electromagnetic measurements of capillary tubes containing liquids can reveal solution properties for industrial, biological, and chemical processes. An analytical model was created for a perpendicular arrangement of SMA cables and a capillary tube. Numerical simulations in Ansoft High Frequency Structural Simulator were performed on the simple arrangement. The transmission parameters of the capillary tube were simulated between two lumped ports over a frequency range from 1 GHz to 20 GHz. Sensitivity of the transmission parameters to solution conditions were calculated for DI water and other variations of conductivity and permittivity. Experiments were performed on a capillary tube in a perpendicular arrangement using an HP 8720B Network Analyzer. The transmission parameters were measured and the resulting data was compared with the simulations. This measurement method can be adapted to different tube and solution conditions.

  19. Capillary Movement in Substrates in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bula, R. J.; Duffie, N. A.

    1996-01-01

    A more complete understanding of the dynamics of capillary flow through an unsaturated porous medium would be useful for a number of space and terrestrial applications. Knowledge of capillary migration of liquids in granular beds in microgravity would significantly enhance the development and understanding of how a matrix based nutrient delivery system for the growth of plants would function in a microgravity environment. Thus, such information is of interest from the theoretical as well as practical point of view.

  20. Thin film capillary process and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2003-11-18

    Method and system of forming microfluidic capillaries in a variety of substrate materials. A first layer of a material such as silicon dioxide is applied to a channel etched in substrate. A second, sacrificial layer of a material such as a polymer is deposited on the first layer. A third layer which may be of the same material as the first layer is placed on the second layer. The sacrificial layer is removed to form a smooth walled capillary in the substrate.

  1. Unusual intraosseous capillary hemangioma of the mandible

    PubMed Central

    Dereci, Omur; Acikalin, Mustafa Fuat; Ay, Sinan

    2015-01-01

    Intraosseous hemangioma is a benign vascular neoplasm, which is mostly seen in vertebrae, maxillofacial bones, and long bones. Intraosseous hemangioma is rarely seen on jaw bones compared to other skeletal bones and usually occurs in the cavernous form. Capillary intraosseous hemangioma of jaws is an uncommon form of intraosseous hemangioma and has not been thoroughly described so far. In this study, a case of capillary intraosseous hemangioma of the mandible was presented with relevant literature review. PMID:26430377

  2. Capillary fracture of soft gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostwick, Joshua B.; Daniels, Karen E.

    2013-10-01

    A liquid droplet resting on a soft gel substrate can deform that substrate to the point of material failure, whereby fractures develop on the gel surface that propagate outwards from the contact line in a starburst pattern. In this paper, we characterize (i) the initiation process, in which the number of arms in the starburst is controlled by the ratio of the surface tension contrast to the gel's elastic modulus, and (ii) the propagation dynamics showing that once fractures are initiated they propagate with a universal power law L∝t3/4. We develop a model for crack initiation by treating the gel as a linear elastic solid and computing the deformations within the substrate from the liquid-solid wetting forces. The elastic solution shows that both the location and the magnitude of the wetting forces are critical in providing a quantitative prediction for the number of fractures and, hence, an interpretation of the initiation of capillary fractures. This solution also reveals that the depth of the gel is an important factor in the fracture process, as it can help mitigate large surface tractions; this finding is confirmed with experiments. We then develop a model for crack propagation by considering the transport of an inviscid fluid into the fracture tip of an incompressible material and find that a simple energy-conservation argument can explain the observed material-independent power law. We compare predictions for both linear elastic and neo-Hookean solids, finding that the latter better explains the observed exponent.

  3. OCT methods for capillary velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Vivek J; Radhakrishnan, Harsha; Lo, Eng H; Mandeville, Emiri T; Jiang, James Y; Barry, Scott; Cable, Alex E

    2012-03-01

    TO DATE, TWO MAIN CATEGORIES OF OCT TECHNIQUES HAVE BEEN DESCRIBED FOR IMAGING HEMODYNAMICS: Doppler OCT and OCT angiography. Doppler OCT can measure axial velocity profiles and flow in arteries and veins, while OCT angiography can determine vascular morphology, tone, and presence or absence of red blood cell (RBC) perfusion. However, neither method can quantify RBC velocity in capillaries, where RBC flow is typically transverse to the probe beam and single-file. Here, we describe new methods that potentially address these limitations. Firstly, we describe a complex-valued OCT signal in terms of a static scattering component, dynamic scattering component, and noise. Secondly, we propose that the time scale of random fluctuations in the dynamic scattering component are related to red blood cell velocity. Analysis was performed along the slow axis of repeated B-scans to parallelize measurements. We correlate our purported velocity measurements against two-photon microscopy measurements of RBC velocity, and investigate changes during hypercapnia. Finally, we image the ischemic stroke penumbra during distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (dMCAO), where OCT velocimetry methods provide additional insight that is not afforded by either Doppler OCT or OCT angiography.

  4. Nonlinear waves in capillary electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Ghosal, Sandip; Chen, Zhen

    2011-01-01

    Electrophoretic separation of a mixture of chemical species is a fundamental technique of great usefulness in biology, health care and forensics. In capillary electrophoresis the sample migrates in a microcapillary in the presence of a background electrolyte. When the ionic concentration of the sample is sufficiently high, the signal is known to exhibit features reminiscent of nonlinear waves including sharp concentration ‘shocks’. In this paper we consider a simplified model consisting of a single sample ion and a background electrolyte consisting of a single co-ion and a counterion in the absence of any processes that might change the ionization states of the constituents. If the ionic diffusivities are assumed to be the same for all constituents the concentration of sample ion is shown to obey a one dimensional advection diffusion equation with a concentration dependent advection velocity. If the analyte concentration is sufficiently low in a suitable non-dimensional sense, Burgers’ equation is recovered, and thus, the time dependent problem is exactly solvable with arbitrary initial conditions. In the case of small diffusivity either a leading edge or trailing edge shock is formed depending on the electrophoretic mobility of the sample ion relative to the background ions. Analytical formulas are presented for the shape, width and migration velocity of the sample peak and it is shown that axial dispersion at long times may be characterized by an effective diffusivity that is exactly calculated. These results are consistent with known observations from physical and numerical simulation experiments. PMID:20238181

  5. Observation of polarized gain from aligned colloidal nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yuan; Ta, Van Duong; Zhao, Xin; Wang, Yue; Chen, Rui; Mutlugun, Evren; Fong, Kah Ee; Tan, Swee Tiam; Dang, Cuong; Sun, Xiao Wei; Sun, Handong; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, colloidal semiconductor nanorods have attracted great interest for polarized spontaneous emission. However, their polarized gain has not been possible to achieve so far. In this work we show the highly polarized stimulated emission from the densely packed ensembles of core-seeded nanorods in a cylindrical cavity. Here CdSe/CdS dot-in-rods were coated and aligned on the inner wall of a capillary tube, providing optical feedback for the nanorod gain medium. Results show that the polarized gain originates intrinsically from the aligned nanorods and not from the cavity and that the optical anisotropy of the nanorod ensemble was amplified with the capillary tube, resulting in highly polarized whispering gallery mode lasing. The highly polarized emission and lasing, together with easy fabrication and flexible incorporation, make this microlaser a promising candidate for important color conversion and enrichment applications including liquid crystal display backlighting and laser lighting.In recent years, colloidal semiconductor nanorods have attracted great interest for polarized spontaneous emission. However, their polarized gain has not been possible to achieve so far. In this work we show the highly polarized stimulated emission from the densely packed ensembles of core-seeded nanorods in a cylindrical cavity. Here CdSe/CdS dot-in-rods were coated and aligned on the inner wall of a capillary tube, providing optical feedback for the nanorod gain medium. Results show that the polarized gain originates intrinsically from the aligned nanorods and not from the cavity and that the optical anisotropy of the nanorod ensemble was amplified with the capillary tube, resulting in highly polarized whispering gallery mode lasing. The highly polarized emission and lasing, together with easy fabrication and flexible incorporation, make this microlaser a promising candidate for important color conversion and enrichment applications including liquid crystal display

  6. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer with barrier member

    DOEpatents

    Dovichi, Norman J.; Zhang, Jian Z.

    1996-01-01

    A multiple capillary biochemical analyzer for sequencing DNA and performing other analyses, in which a set of capillaries extends from wells in a microtiter plate into a cuvette. In the cuvette the capillaries are held on fixed closely spaced centers by passing through a sandwich construction having a pair of metal shims which squeeze between them a rubber gasket, forming a leak proof seal for an interior chamber in which the capillary ends are positioned. Sheath fluid enters the chamber and entrains filament sample streams from the capillaries. The filament sample streams, and sheath fluid, flow through aligned holes in a barrier member spaced close to the capillary ends, into a collection chamber having a lower glass window. The filament streams are illuminated above the barrier member by a laser, causing them to fluoresce. The fluorescence is viewed end-on by a CCD camera chip located below the glass window. The arrangement ensures an equal optical path length from all fluorescing spots to the CCD chip and also blocks scattered fluorescence illumination, providing more uniform results and an improved signal to noise ratio.

  7. Capillary pressure experiments under simulated reservoir conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kummerow, J.; Spangenberg, E.

    2012-04-01

    The contribution of residual trapping to a long-term storage of CO2 in saline aquifers mainly depends on the drainage capillary pressure of a reservoir and the hysteresis of the drainage and imbibition branches of the capillary pressure curve. However, the experimental database of capillary pressure measured at relevant pT conditions is still scarce. Here, we present an experimental set-up, which allows for the performance of capillary pressure experiments with a semi-permeable disk (porous plate) at simulated reservoir conditions. In the framework of the EU funded project CO2CARE, drainage and imbibition cycles are performed on Triassic sandstone samples. We use a temperature controlled oil pressure autoclave to apply a maximum confining pressure of 400 bar and a maximum working temperature of 150°C. The fluid displacement, and hence the sample saturation is controlled by a gear pump with a fine resolution of 0.01 ml. Additionally, the capillary pressure experiment is combined with measurements of elastic wave velocities as well as of the electrical resistivity. In this case, P and S wave velocities and the formation resistivity factor are determined as functions of the brine/ CO2 saturation. The experiment provides information about the efficiency of the capillary trapping of the sample and a calibration of the petrophysical properties on saturation.

  8. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer with barrier member

    DOEpatents

    Dovichi, N.J.; Zhang, J.Z.

    1996-10-22

    A multiple capillary biochemical analyzer is disclosed for sequencing DNA and performing other analyses, in which a set of capillaries extends from wells in a microtiter plate into a cuvette. In the cuvette the capillaries are held on fixed closely spaced centers by passing through a sandwich construction having a pair of metal shims which squeeze between them a rubber gasket, forming a leak proof seal for an interior chamber in which the capillary ends are positioned. Sheath fluid enters the chamber and entrains filament sample streams from the capillaries. The filament sample streams, and sheath fluid, flow through aligned holes in a barrier member spaced close to the capillary ends, into a collection chamber having a lower glass window. The filament streams are illuminated above the barrier member by a laser, causing them to fluoresce. The fluorescence is viewed end-on by a CCD camera chip located below the glass window. The arrangement ensures an equal optical path length from all fluorescing spots to the CCD chip and also blocks scattered fluorescence illumination, providing more uniform results and an improved signal-to-noise ratio. 12 figs.

  9. Cell adhesion during bullet motion in capillaries.

    PubMed

    Takeishi, Naoki; Imai, Yohsuke; Ishida, Shunichi; Omori, Toshihiro; Kamm, Roger D; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-08-01

    A numerical analysis is presented of cell adhesion in capillaries whose diameter is comparable to or smaller than that of the cell. In contrast to a large number of previous efforts on leukocyte and tumor cell rolling, much is still unknown about cell motion in capillaries. The solid and fluid mechanics of a cell in flow was coupled with a slip bond model of ligand-receptor interactions. When the size of a capillary was reduced, the cell always transitioned to "bullet-like" motion, with a consequent decrease in the velocity of the cell. A state diagram was obtained for various values of capillary diameter and receptor density. We found that bullet motion enables firm adhesion of a cell to the capillary wall even for a weak ligand-receptor binding. We also quantified effects of various parameters, including the dissociation rate constant, the spring constant, and the reactive compliance on the characteristics of cell motion. Our results suggest that even under the interaction between P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and P-selectin, which is mainly responsible for leukocyte rolling, a cell is able to show firm adhesion in a small capillary. These findings may help in understanding such phenomena as leukocyte plugging and cancer metastasis.

  10. Cell adhesion during bullet motion in capillaries.

    PubMed

    Takeishi, Naoki; Imai, Yohsuke; Ishida, Shunichi; Omori, Toshihiro; Kamm, Roger D; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-08-01

    A numerical analysis is presented of cell adhesion in capillaries whose diameter is comparable to or smaller than that of the cell. In contrast to a large number of previous efforts on leukocyte and tumor cell rolling, much is still unknown about cell motion in capillaries. The solid and fluid mechanics of a cell in flow was coupled with a slip bond model of ligand-receptor interactions. When the size of a capillary was reduced, the cell always transitioned to "bullet-like" motion, with a consequent decrease in the velocity of the cell. A state diagram was obtained for various values of capillary diameter and receptor density. We found that bullet motion enables firm adhesion of a cell to the capillary wall even for a weak ligand-receptor binding. We also quantified effects of various parameters, including the dissociation rate constant, the spring constant, and the reactive compliance on the characteristics of cell motion. Our results suggest that even under the interaction between P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and P-selectin, which is mainly responsible for leukocyte rolling, a cell is able to show firm adhesion in a small capillary. These findings may help in understanding such phenomena as leukocyte plugging and cancer metastasis. PMID:27261363

  11. The polar wind: Recent observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yau, Andrew W.; Abe, Takumi; Peterson, W. K.

    2007-11-01

    The polar wind is an ambipolar outflow of thermal plasma from the high-latitude ionosphere to the magnetosphere, and it primarily consists of H+, He+ and O+ ions and electrons. Statistical and episodic studies based primarily on ion composition observations on the ISIS-2, DE-1, Akebono and Polar satellites over the past four decades have confirmed the existence of the polar wind. These observations spanned the altitude range from 1000 to ˜50,500 km, and revealed several important features in the polar wind that are unexpected from “classical” polar wind theories. These include the day night asymmetry in polar wind velocity, which is 1.5 2.0 times larger on the dayside; appreciable O+ flow at high altitudes, where the velocity at 5000 10,000 km is of 1 4 km/s; and significant electron temperature anisotropy in the sunlit polar wind, in which the upward-to-downward electron temperature ratio is 1.5 2. These features are attributable to a number of “non-classical” polar wind ion acceleration mechanisms resulting from strong ionospheric convection, enhanced electron and ion temperatures, and escaping atmospheric photoelectrons. The observed polar wind has an averaged ion temperature of ˜0.2 0.3 eV, and a rate of ion velocity increase with altitude that correlates strongly with electron temperature and is greatest at low altitudes (<4000 km for H+). The rate of velocity increase below 4000 km is larger at solar minimum than at solar maximum. Above 4000 km, the reverse is the case. This suggests that the dominant polar wind ion acceleration process may be different at low and high altitudes, respectively. At a given altitude, the polar wind velocity is highly variable, and is on average largest for H+ and smallest for O+. Near solar maximum, H+, He+, and O+ ions typically reach a velocity of 1 km/s near 2000, 3000, and 6000 km, respectively, and velocities of 12, 7, and 4 km/s, respectively, at 10,000 km altitude. Near solar minimum, the velocity of all three

  12. Revolving fraction collector for preparative capillary gas chromatography in the 100-μg to 1-ng range.

    PubMed

    Wassgren, A B; Bergström, G

    1984-11-01

    A gas chromatography fraction collector for use with capillary columns, consisting of an all-glass system with a revolving collector housing six capillary tubes, 100 × 1 mm (internal diameter), has been constructed and tested. The collector is cooled with solid CO2 and has a recovering efficiency of 50-75% in the 100-μg to 1-ng range for compounds of different polarities and volatilities, exemplified by mono- and sesquiter-penes and long-chain esters. The technique has been used for fractionating blends of semiochemicals prior to microchemical reactions, spectroscopic analyses, and behavioral experiments. PMID:24318389

  13. Capillary fracture of soft gels.

    PubMed

    Bostwick, Joshua B; Daniels, Karen E

    2013-10-01

    A liquid droplet resting on a soft gel substrate can deform that substrate to the point of material failure, whereby fractures develop on the gel surface that propagate outwards from the contact line in a starburst pattern. In this paper, we characterize (i) the initiation process, in which the number of arms in the starburst is controlled by the ratio of the surface tension contrast to the gel's elastic modulus, and (ii) the propagation dynamics showing that once fractures are initiated they propagate with a universal power law L[proportional]t(3/4). We develop a model for crack initiation by treating the gel as a linear elastic solid and computing the deformations within the substrate from the liquid-solid wetting forces. The elastic solution shows that both the location and the magnitude of the wetting forces are critical in providing a quantitative prediction for the number of fractures and, hence, an interpretation of the initiation of capillary fractures. This solution also reveals that the depth of the gel is an important factor in the fracture process, as it can help mitigate large surface tractions; this finding is confirmed with experiments. We then develop a model for crack propagation by considering the transport of an inviscid fluid into the fracture tip of an incompressible material and find that a simple energy-conservation argument can explain the observed material-independent power law. We compare predictions for both linear elastic and neo-Hookean solids, finding that the latter better explains the observed exponent.

  14. Capillary fracture of soft gels.

    PubMed

    Bostwick, Joshua B; Daniels, Karen E

    2013-10-01

    A liquid droplet resting on a soft gel substrate can deform that substrate to the point of material failure, whereby fractures develop on the gel surface that propagate outwards from the contact line in a starburst pattern. In this paper, we characterize (i) the initiation process, in which the number of arms in the starburst is controlled by the ratio of the surface tension contrast to the gel's elastic modulus, and (ii) the propagation dynamics showing that once fractures are initiated they propagate with a universal power law L[proportional]t(3/4). We develop a model for crack initiation by treating the gel as a linear elastic solid and computing the deformations within the substrate from the liquid-solid wetting forces. The elastic solution shows that both the location and the magnitude of the wetting forces are critical in providing a quantitative prediction for the number of fractures and, hence, an interpretation of the initiation of capillary fractures. This solution also reveals that the depth of the gel is an important factor in the fracture process, as it can help mitigate large surface tractions; this finding is confirmed with experiments. We then develop a model for crack propagation by considering the transport of an inviscid fluid into the fracture tip of an incompressible material and find that a simple energy-conservation argument can explain the observed material-independent power law. We compare predictions for both linear elastic and neo-Hookean solids, finding that the latter better explains the observed exponent. PMID:24229192

  15. Cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    Romereim, Sarah M

    2011-01-01

    Despite extensive genetic analysis of the dynamic multi-phase process that transforms a small population of lateral plate mesoderm into the mature limb skeleton, the mechanisms by which signaling pathways regulate cellular behaviors to generate morphogenetic forces are not known. Recently, a series of papers have offered the intriguing possibility that regulated cell polarity fine-tunes the morphogenetic process via orienting cell axes, division planes and cell movements. Wnt5a-mediated non-canonical signaling, which may include planar cell polarity, has emerged as a common thread in the otherwise distinct signaling networks that regulate morphogenesis in each phase of limb development. These findings position the limb as a key model to elucidate how global tissue patterning pathways direct local differences in cell behavior that, in turn, generate growth and form. PMID:22064549

  16. Polar Diving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    3 July 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layers exposed by erosion in a trough within the north polar residual cap of Mars, diving beneath a younger covering of polar materials. The layers have, since the Mariner 9 mission in 1972, been interpreted to be composed of a combination of dust and ice in unknown proportions. In this scene, a layer of solid carbon dioxide, which was deposited during the previous autumn and winter, blankets the trough as well as the adjacent terrain. Throughout northern spring, the carbon dioxide will be removed; by summer, the layers will be frost-free.

    Location near: 81.4oN, 352.2oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Spring

  17. Polar Summer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    30 December 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows eroding mesas of frozen carbon dioxide in the martian south polar residual cap. During the summer season, the scarps that bound each pit and mesa in the south polar region become dark as carbon dioxide sublimes away. The darkening might result from the roughening of the surfaces from which ice is subliming, or from the concentration of trace amounts of dust on these slopes, or both.

    Location near: 84.7oS, 48.2oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  18. Microdrilling in steel using ultrashort pulsed laser beams with radial and azimuthal polarization.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Martin; Ahmed, Marwan Abdou; Michalowski, Andreas; Voss, Andreas; Weber, Rudolf; Graf, Thomas

    2010-10-11

    A linear to radial and/or azimuthal polarization converter (LRAC) has been inserted into the beam delivery of a micromachining station equipped with a picosecond laser system. Percussion drilling and helical drilling in steel have been performed using radially as well as azimuthally polarized infrared radiation at 1030 nm. The presented machining results are discussed on the basis of numerical simulations of the polarization-dependent beam propagation inside the fabricated capillaries.

  19. Capillary adhesion at the nanometer scale.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shengfeng; Robbins, Mark O

    2014-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the capillary adhesion from a nonvolatile liquid meniscus between a spherical tip and a flat substrate. The atomic structure of the tip, the tip radius, the contact angles of the liquid on the two surfaces, and the volume of the liquid bridge are varied. The capillary force between the tip and substrate is calculated as a function of their separation h. The force agrees with continuum predictions based on macroscopic theory for h down to ∼5 to 10 nm. At smaller h, the force tends to be less attractive than predicted and has strong oscillations. This oscillatory component of the capillary force is completely missed in the macroscopic theory, which only includes contributions from the surface tension around the circumference of the meniscus and the pressure difference over the cross section of the meniscus. The oscillation is found to be due to molecular layering of the liquid confined in the narrow gap between the tip and substrate. This effect is most pronounced for large tip radii and/or smooth surfaces. The other two components considered by the macroscopic theory are also identified. The surface tension term, as well as the meniscus shape, is accurately described by the macroscopic theory for h down to ∼1 nm, but the capillary pressure term is always more positive than the corresponding continuum result. This shift in the capillary pressure reduces the average adhesion by a factor as large as 2 from its continuum value and is found to be due to an anisotropy in the pressure tensor. The component in the plane of the substrate is consistent with the capillary pressure predicted by the macroscopic theory (i.e., the Young-Laplace equation), but the normal pressure that determines the capillary force is always more positive than the continuum counterpart.

  20. Critical Velocities in Open Capillary Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreyer, Michael; Langbein, Dieter; Rath, Hans J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the proposed research program on open capillary flow and the preliminary work performed theoretically and in drop tower experiments. The work focuses on the fundamental physical understanding of the flow through capillary bound geometries, where the circumference of the cross section of the flow path contains free surfaces. Examples for such a flow configuration are capillary vanes in surface tension tanks, flow along edges and corners and flow through liquid bridges. The geometries may be classified by their cross section areas, wetted circumferences and the radii of curvature of the free surfaces. In the streaming float zone the flow path is bound by a free surface only. The ribbon vane is a model for vane types used in surface tension tanks, where a structure in proximity to the tank wall forms a capillary gap. A groove is used in heat pipes for the transportation of the condensed working fluid to the heat source and a wedge may occur in a spaceborne experiment where fluid has to be transported by the means of surface tension. The research objectives are the determination of the maximum volume flux, the observation of the free surfaces and the liquid flow inside the flow path as well as the evaluation of the limiting capillary wave speed. The restriction of the maximum volume flux is due to convective forces (flow velocity exceeding the capillary wave speed) and/or viscous forces, i.e. the viscous head loss along the flow path must be compensated by the capillary pressure due to the curved free surface. Exceeding the maximum volume flux leads to the choking of the flow path, thus the free surface collapses and.gas ingestion occurs at the outlet. The means are ground-based experimental work with plateau tanks and in a drop tower, a sounding rocket flight, and theoretical analysis with integral balances as well as full three dimensional CFD solutions for flow with free surfaces.

  1. Separation of Recombinant Therapeutic Proteins Using Capillary Gel Electrophoresis and Capillary Isoelectric Focusing.

    PubMed

    De Jong, Caitlyn A G; Risley, Jessica; Lee, Alexis K; Zhao, Shuai Sherry; Chen, David D Y

    2016-01-01

    Detailed step-by-step methods for protein separation techniques based on capillary electrophoresis (CE) are described in this chapter. Focus is placed on two techniques, capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE) and capillary isoelectric focusing (cIEF). CGE is essentially gel electrophoresis, performed in a capillary, where a hydrogel is used as a sieving matrix to separate proteins or peptides based on size. cIEF separates proteins or peptides based on their isoelectric point (pI), the pH at which the protein or peptide bears no charges. Detailed protocols and steps (including capillary preparation, sample preparation, CE separation conditions, and detection) for both CGE and cIEF presented so that readers can follow the described methods in their own labs. PMID:27473487

  2. Eddy intrustion of hot plasma into the polar cap and formation of polar-cap arcs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Y. T.; Gorney, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    Under the simple postulate that multiple large scale detachable magnetospheric convection eddies can exist in the vicinity of the convection reversal boundary and in the polar cap, by Kelvin-Helmholtz instability or otherwise, it is shown that a number of seemingly disconnected plasma and electric field observations in the polar cap can be organized into a theory of magnetosheath and plasmasheet plasma intrusion into the polar cap. Current theory of inverted V structures then predicts existence of similar, but weaker, structures at the eddy convection reversal boundaries in the polar cap. A possible consequence is that the polar cap auroras are natural offshoots from discrete oval arcs and evidently are formed by similar processes. The two arc systems can occassionally produce an optical image in the form of the theta aurora.

  3. CE-ESI-MS of biological anions in plastic capillaries at high pH.

    PubMed

    Benavente, Fernando; Sanz-Nebot, Victoria; Barbosa, José; van der Heijden, Rob; van der Greef, Jan; Hankemeier, Thomas

    2007-03-01

    In this study, the potential of poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA, Plexiglas) and polyether ether ketone (PEEK) tubing for CE-ESI-MS separations of anions at high pH values was examined. A set of model compounds of biological interest was used to investigate the main operational parameters for CE-ESI-MS, such as the sheath-flow interface design, the polarity of the ionization voltage, the use of ammonia-based separation electrolytes, and the sheath liquid composition. Optimum separations and detection sensitivities in negative ESI mode were obtained using a running electrolyte of 75 mM of ammonia at pH 11 and a sheath liquid of 60:40 v/v or 75:25 v/v isopropanol/water with 0.5% v/v of ammonia. At these experimental conditions, PMMA and PEEK capillaries show good hydrolytic stabilities and lower EOF values than fused-silica columns. Better separation resolutions were obtained with PMMA capillary, but this plastic rapidly swelled and bled because of its limited chemical resistance to the sheath liquid. PMMA columns equipped with a fused-silica tip were used for a safer exposure to the sheath liquid, but the inner surface of the fused-silica tips had limited stability at pH 11. On the other hand, good separations and reproducibility on migration times and peak areas were obtained using PEEK capillaries without capillary column deterioration. PMID:17300131

  4. Capillary liquid chromatography using laser-based and mass spectrometric detection. [Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE); micellar electrokinetic capillary kchromatography (MECC)

    SciTech Connect

    Sepaniak, M.J.; Cook, K.D.

    1992-01-01

    In the years following the 1986 seminal paper (J. Chromatogr. Sci., 24, 347-352) describing modern capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE), the prominence of capillary electrokinetic separation techniques has grown. A related electrochromatographic technique is micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MECC). This report presents a brief synopsis of research efforts during the current 3-year period. In addition to a description of analytical separations-based research, results of efforts to develop and expand spectrometric detection for the techniques is reviewed. Laser fluorometric detection schemes have been successfully advanced. Mass spectrometric research was less fruitful, largely owing to personnel limitations. A regenerable fiber optic sensor was developed that can be used to remotely monitor chemical carcinogens, etc. (DLC)

  5. Geomagnetic polarity epochs: Sierra Nevada II

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cox, A.; Doell, Richard R.; Brent, Dalrymple G.

    1963-01-01

    Ten new determinations on volcanic extrusions in the Sierra Nevada with potassium-argon ages of 3.1 million years or less indicate that the remanent magnetizations fall into two groups, a normal group in which the remanent magnetization is directed downward and to the north, and a reversed group magnetized up and to the south. Thermomagnetic experiments and mineralogic studies fail to provide an explanation of the opposing polarities in terms of mineralogic control, but rather suggest that the remanent magnetization reflects reversals of the main dipole field of the earth. All available radiometric ages are consistent with this field-reversal hypothesis and indicate that the present normal polarity epoch (N1) as well as the previous reversed epoch (R1) are 0.9 to 1.0 million years long, whereas the previous normal epoch (N2) was at least 25 percent longer.

  6. Geomagnetic Polarity Epochs: Sierra Nevada II.

    PubMed

    Cox, A; Doell, R R; Dalrymple, G B

    1963-10-18

    Ten new determinations on volcanic extrusions in the Sierra Nevada with potassium-argon ages of 3.1 million years or less indicate that the remanent magnetizations fall into two groups, a normal group in which the remanent magnetization is directed downward and to the north, and a reversed group magnetized up and to the south. Thermomagnetic experiments and mineralogic studies fail to provide an explanation of the opposing polarities in terms of mineralogic control, but rather suggest that the remanent magnetization reflects reversals of the main dipole field of the earth. All available radiometric ages are consistent with this field-reversal hypothesis and indicate that the present normal polarity epoch (N1) as well as the previous reversed epoch (R1) are 0.9 to 1.0 million years long, whereas the previous normal epoch (N2) was at least 25 percent longer. PMID:17799480

  7. Synthetic Capillaries to Control Microscopic Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Sarveswaran, K.; Kurz, V.; Dong, Z.; Tanaka, T.; Penny, S.; Timp, G.

    2016-01-01

    Capillaries pervade human physiology. The mean intercapillary distance is only about 100 μm in human tissue, which indicates the extent of nutrient diffusion. In engineered tissue the lack of capillaries, along with the associated perfusion, is problematic because it leads to hypoxic stress and necrosis. However, a capillary is not easy to engineer due to its complex cytoarchitecture. Here, it is shown that it is possible to create in vitro, in about 30 min, a tubular microenvironment with an elastic modulus and porosity consistent with human tissue that functionally mimicks a bona fide capillary using “live cell lithography”(LCL) to control the type and position of cells on a composite hydrogel scaffold. Furthermore, it is established that these constructs support the forces associated with blood flow, and produce nutrient gradients similar to those measured in vivo. With LCL, capillaries can be constructed with single cell precision—no other method for tissue engineering offers such precision. Since the time required for assembly scales with the number of cells, this method is likely to be adapted first to create minimal functional units of human tissue that constitute organs, consisting of a heterogeneous population of 100–1000 cells, organized hierarchically to express a predictable function. PMID:26905751

  8. Micro-injector for capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Sáiz, Jorge; Koenka, Israel Joel; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Müller, Beat; Chwalek, Thomas; Hauser, Peter C

    2015-08-01

    A novel micro-injector for capillary electrophoresis for the handling of samples with volumes down to as little as 300 nL was designed and built in our laboratory for analyses in which the available volume is a limitation. The sample is placed into a small cavity located directly in front of the separation capillary, and the injection is then carried out automatically by controlled pressurization of the chamber with compressed air. The system also allows automated flushing of the injection chamber as well as of the capillary. In a trial with a capillary electrophoresis system with contactless conductivity detector, employing a capillary of 25 μm diameter, the results showed good stability of migration times and peak areas. To illustrate the technique, the fast separation of five inorganic cations (Na(+) , K(+) , NH4 (+) , Ca(2+) , and Mg(2+) ) was set up. This could be achieved in less than 3 min, with good limits of detection (10 μM) and linear ranges (between about 10 and 1000 μM). The system was demonstrated for the determination of the inorganic cations in porewater samples of a lake sediment core.

  9. Passive Reactor Cooling Using Capillary Porous Wick

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Christopher G.; Lin, Thomas F.

    2006-07-01

    Long-term reliability of actively pumped cooling systems is a concern in space-based nuclear reactors. Capillary-driven passive cooling systems are being considered as an alternative to gravity-driven systems. The high surface tension of liquid lithium makes it attractive as the coolant in a capillary-driven cooling system. A system has been conceived in which the fuel rod of a reactor is surrounded by a concentric wick through which liquid lithium flows to provide cooling under normal and emergency operating conditions. Unheated wicking experiments at three pressures using four layered screen mesh wicks of different porosities and three relatively high surface tension fluids have been conducted to gain insight into capillary phenomena for such a capillary cooling system. All fluids tested demonstrated wicking ability in each of the wick structures for all pressures, and wicking ability for each fluid increased with decreasing wick pore size. An externally heated wicking experiment with liquid lithium as the wicking fluid was also conducted. In addition to wicking experiments, a heater rod is under development to simulate the fuel rod of a space based nuclear reactor by providing a heat flux of up to 110 kW/m{sup 2}. Testing of this heater rod has shown its ability to undergo repeated cycling from below 533 K to over 1255 K without failure. This heater rod will be integrated into lithium wicking experiments to provide more realistic simulation of the proposed capillary-driven space nuclear reactor cooling system. (authors)

  10. Restructuring and aging in a capillary suspension

    PubMed Central

    Koos, Erin; Kannowade, Wolfgang; Willenbacher, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    The rheological properties of capillary suspensions, suspensions with small amounts of an added immiscible fluid, are dramatically altered with the addition of the secondary fluid. We investigate a capillary suspension to determine how the network ages and restructures at rest and under applied external shear deformation. The present work uses calcium carbonate suspended in silicone oil (11 % solids) with added water as a model system. Aging of capillary suspensions and their response to applied oscillatory shear is distinctly different from particulate gels dominated by the van der Waals forces. The suspensions dominated by the capillary force are very sensitive to oscillatory flow, with the linear viscoelastic regime ending at a deformation of only 0.1% and demonstrating power-law aging behavior. This aging persists for long times at low deformations or for shorter times with a sudden decrease in the strength at higher deformations. This aging behavior suggests that the network is able to rearrange and even rupture. This same sensitivity is not demonstrated in shear flow where very high shear rates are required to rupture the agglomerates returning the apparent viscosity of capillary suspensions to the same viscosity as for the pure vdW suspension. A transitional region is also present at intermediate water contents wherein the material response depends very strongly on the type, strength, and duration of the external forcing. PMID:25729113

  11. Case report of lumbar intradural capillary hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Unnithan, Ajaya Kumar Ayyappan; Joseph, T. P.; Gautam, Amol; Shymole, V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Capillary hemangioma is a rare tumor in spinal intradural location. Despite the rarity, early recognition is important because of the risk of hemorrhage. This is a case report of a woman who had capillary hemangioma of cauda equina. Case Description: A 54 -year-old woman presented with a low backache, radiating to the left leg for 2 months. She had left extensor hallucis weakness, sensory impairment in left L5 dermatome, and mild tenderness in lower lumbar spine. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) LS spine showed L4/5 intradural tumor, completely occluding canal in myelogram, enhancing with contrast, s/o benign nerve sheath tumor. L4 laminectomy was done. Reddish tumor was seen originating from a single root. It was removed preserving the root. Postoperatively, she was relieved of symptoms. MRI showed no residue. Histopathology showed lobular proliferation of capillary-sized blood vessels and elongated spindle cells. Immunohistochemistry showed CD34 positivity in endothelial cell lining of blood vessel and smooth muscle actin positivity in blood vessel muscle cells. HPR-capillary hemangioma. Conclusion: Although rare, capillary hemangioma should be in the differential diagnosis of intradural tumors. It closely mimics nerve sheath tumor. PMID:27069745

  12. Synthetic Capillaries to Control Microscopic Blood Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarveswaran, K.; Kurz, V.; Dong, Z.; Tanaka, T.; Penny, S.; Timp, G.

    2016-02-01

    Capillaries pervade human physiology. The mean intercapillary distance is only about 100 μm in human tissue, which indicates the extent of nutrient diffusion. In engineered tissue the lack of capillaries, along with the associated perfusion, is problematic because it leads to hypoxic stress and necrosis. However, a capillary is not easy to engineer due to its complex cytoarchitecture. Here, it is shown that it is possible to create in vitro, in about 30 min, a tubular microenvironment with an elastic modulus and porosity consistent with human tissue that functionally mimicks a bona fide capillary using “live cell lithography”(LCL) to control the type and position of cells on a composite hydrogel scaffold. Furthermore, it is established that these constructs support the forces associated with blood flow, and produce nutrient gradients similar to those measured in vivo. With LCL, capillaries can be constructed with single cell precision—no other method for tissue engineering offers such precision. Since the time required for assembly scales with the number of cells, this method is likely to be adapted first to create minimal functional units of human tissue that constitute organs, consisting of a heterogeneous population of 100–1000 cells, organized hierarchically to express a predictable function.

  13. Capillary xray compressor: principle versus practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewe, Dale L.; Heald, Steve M.; Barg, Bill; Brown, Frederick C.; Kim, Kyungha H.; Stern, Edward A.

    1995-09-01

    Guiding x rays down the inside of tapered capillaries is a means to increase the flux density of x rays from synchrotron light sources without some of the disadvantages inherent in other techniques. We have demonstrated that a process based on techniques for fabrication of glass fibers may be used to produce tapered capillaries with inlet diameters on the order of 150 micrometers or more, and outlets on the order of 1 micrometer or less. We present a description of the capillary fabrication and results of tests of the performance of several capillaries, along with a comparison with calculations of performance. We also summarize refinements to the fabrication process that will provide additional improvements. The transmission of x rays from linear capillaries with inlet diameters of approximately 150 micrometers and outlet diameters of 1.3 - 1.4 micrometer is on the order of 2%, with corresponding intensity gains of up to 274. Initial results indicate that the capability exists for producing convex profiles necessary for optimal transmission. Calculated and measured transmission efficiencies are in fairly good agreement, leading to the expectation that efficiencies predicted by calculations to be attainable from optimal profiles are a realistic goal, given the ability to manufacture these profiles.

  14. Rotating Reverse-Osmosis for Water Purification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueptow, RIchard M.

    2004-01-01

    A new design for a water-filtering device combines rotating filtration with reverse osmosis to create a rotating reverse- osmosis system. Rotating filtration has been used for separating plasma from whole blood, while reverse osmosis has been used in purification of water and in some chemical processes. Reverse- osmosis membranes are vulnerable to concentration polarization a type of fouling in which the chemicals meant not to pass through the reverse-osmosis membranes accumulate very near the surfaces of the membranes. The combination of rotating filtration and reverse osmosis is intended to prevent concentration polarization and thereby increase the desired flux of filtered water while decreasing the likelihood of passage of undesired chemical species through the filter. Devices based on this concept could be useful in a variety of commercial applications, including purification and desalination of drinking water, purification of pharmaceutical process water, treatment of household and industrial wastewater, and treatment of industrial process water. A rotating filter consists of a cylindrical porous microfilter rotating within a stationary concentric cylindrical outer shell (see figure). The aqueous suspension enters one end of the annulus between the inner and outer cylinders. Filtrate passes through the rotating cylindrical microfilter and is removed via a hollow shaft. The concentrated suspension is removed at the end of the annulus opposite the end where the suspension entered.

  15. Laser printing hierarchical structures with the aid of controlled capillary-driven self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yanlei; Lao, Zhaoxin; Cumming, Benjamin P.; Wu, Dong; Li, Jiawen; Liang, Haiyi; Chu, Jiaru; Huang, Wenhao; Gu, Min

    2015-01-01

    Capillary force is often regarded as detrimental because it may cause undesired distortion or even destruction to micro/nanostructures during a fabrication process, and thus many efforts have been made to eliminate its negative effects. From a different perspective, capillary force can be artfully used to construct specific complex architectures. Here, we propose a laser printing capillary-assisted self-assembly strategy for fabricating regular periodic structures. Microscale pillars are first produced by localized femtosecond laser polymerization and are subsequently assembled into periodic hierarchical architectures with the assistance of controlled capillary forces in an evaporating liquid. Spatial arrangements, pillar heights, and evaporation processes are readily tuned to achieve designable ordered assemblies with various geometries. Reversibility of the assembly is also revealed by breaking the balance between the intermolecular force and the elastic standing force. We further demonstrate the functionality of the hierarchical structures as a nontrivial tool for the selective trapping and releasing of microparticles, opening up a potential for the development of in situ transportation systems for microobjects. PMID:26038541

  16. Constraining the reversing and non-reversing modes of the geodynamo. New insights from magnetostratigraphy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallet, Y.; Pavlov, V.; Shatsillo, A.; Hulot, G.

    2015-12-01

    Constraining the evolution in the geomagnetic reversal frequency over hundreds of million years is not a trivial matter. Beyond the fact that there are long periods without reversals, known as superchrons, and periods with many reversals, the way the reversal frequency changes through time during reversing periods is still debated. A smooth evolution or a succession of stationary segments have both been suggested to account for the geomagnetic polarity time scale since the Middle-Late Jurassic. Sudden changes from a reversing mode to a non-reversing mode of the geodynamo may also well have happened, the switch between the two modes having then possibly been controlled by the thermal conditions at the core-mantle boundary. There is, nevertheless, a growing set of magnetostratigraphic data, which could help decipher a proper interpretation of the reversal history, in particular in the early Paleozoic and even during the Precambrian. Although yielding a fragmentary record, these data reveal the occurrence of both additional superchrons and periods characterized by extremely high, not to say extraordinary, magnetic reversal frequencies. In this talk, we will present a synthesis of these data, mainly obtained from Siberia, and discuss their implication for the magnetic reversal behavior over the past billion years.

  17. Polar Landforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    10 August 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows eroded remnants of carbon dioxide ice in the south polar residual cap of Mars. The scarps that outline each small mesa have retreated about 3 meters (10 feet) per Mars year since MGS began orbiting the red planet in 1997.

    Location near: 87.0oS, 31.9oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  18. Polar Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    12 August 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a slope upon which are exposed some of the layered materials that underlie the south polar cap of Mars. The layers are generally considered to be sediments--perhaps dust--that may have been cemented by water ice.

    Location near: 84.1oS, 343.9oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  19. Novel absorption detection techniques for capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Y.

    1994-07-27

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) has emerged as one of the most versatile separation methods. However, efficient separation is not sufficient unless coupled to adequate detection. The narrow inner diameter (I.D.) of the capillary column raises a big challenge to detection methods. For UV-vis absorption detection, the concentration sensitivity is only at the {mu}M level. Most commercial CE instruments are equipped with incoherent UV-vis lamps. Low-brightness, instability and inefficient coupling of the light source with the capillary limit the further improvement of UV-vis absorption detection in CE. The goals of this research have been to show the utility of laser-based absorption detection. The approaches involve: on-column double-beam laser absorption detection and its application to the detection of small ions and proteins, and absorption detection with the bubble-shaped flow cell.

  20. Capillary breakup of discontinuously rate thickening suspensions.

    PubMed

    Zimoch, Pawel J; McKinley, Gareth H; Hosoi, A E

    2013-07-19

    Using discontinuously rate thickening suspensions (DRTS) as a model system, we show that beads-on-a-string morphologies can arise as a result of external viscous drag acting during capillary-driven breakup of a non-Newtonian fluid. To minimize the perturbative effect of gravity, we developed a new experimental test platform in which the filament is supported in a horizontal position at the surface of an immiscible oil bath. We show that the evolution of thin DRTS filaments during the capillary thinning process is well described by a set of one-dimensional slender filament equations. The strongly rate-dependent rheology of the test fluid and the aspect ratio of the filament couple to control the thinning dynamics and lead to a simple criterion describing the localized arrest of the capillary thinning process and the subsequent formation of complex, high aspect ratio beads-on-a-string structures. PMID:23909338

  1. Photosensitive diazotized poly(ethylene glycol) covalent capillary coatings for analysis of proteins by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bing; Chen, Xin; Cong, Hailin; Shu, Xi; Peng, Qiaohong

    2016-09-01

    A new method for the fabrication of covalently cross-linked capillary coatings of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) is described using diazotized PEG (diazo-PEG) as a new photosensitive coating agent. The film of diazo-PEG depends on ionic bonding and was first prepared on the inner surface of capillary by self-assembly, and ionic bonding was converted into covalent bonding after reaction of ultraviolet light with diazo groups through unique photochemical reaction. The covalently bonded coating impedance adsorption of protein on the central surface of capillary and hence the four proteins ribonuclease A, cytochrome c, bovine serum albumin, and lysosome can be baseline separated by using capillary electrophoresis (CE). The covalently cross-linked diazo-PEG capillary column coatings not only improved the CE separation performance for proteins compared to non-covalently cross-linked coatings or bare capillary but also showed a remarkable chemical solidity and repeatability. Because photosensitive diazo-PEG took the place of the highly noxious and silane moisture-sensitive coating reagents in the fabrication of covalent coating, this technique shows the advantage of being environment-friendly and having a high efficiency for CE to make the covalently bonded capillaries. PMID:27475442

  2. Mach-like capillary-gravity wakes.

    PubMed

    Moisy, Frédéric; Rabaud, Marc

    2014-08-01

    We determine experimentally the angle α of maximum wave amplitude in the far-field wake behind a vertical surface-piercing cylinder translated at constant velocity U for Bond numbers Bo(D)=D/λ(c) ranging between 0.1 and 4.2, where D is the cylinder diameter and λ(c) the capillary length. In all cases the wake angle is found to follow a Mach-like law at large velocity, α∼U(-1), but with different prefactors depending on the value of Bo(D). For small Bo(D) (large capillary effects), the wake angle approximately follows the law α≃c(g,min)/U, where c(g,min) is the minimum group velocity of capillary-gravity waves. For larger Bo(D) (weak capillary effects), we recover a law α∼√[gD]/U similar to that found for ship wakes at large velocity [Rabaud and Moisy, Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 214503 (2013)]. Using the general property of dispersive waves that the characteristic wavelength of the wave packet emitted by a disturbance is of order of the disturbance size, we propose a simple model that describes the transition between these two Mach-like regimes as the Bond number is varied. We show that the new capillary law α≃c(g,min)/U originates from the presence of a capillary cusp angle (distinct from the usual gravity cusp angle), along which the energy radiated by the disturbance accumulates for Bond numbers of order of unity. This model, complemented by numerical simulations of the surface elevation induced by a moving Gaussian pressure disturbance, is in qualitative agreement with experimental measurements.

  3. Mach-like capillary-gravity wakes.

    PubMed

    Moisy, Frédéric; Rabaud, Marc

    2014-08-01

    We determine experimentally the angle α of maximum wave amplitude in the far-field wake behind a vertical surface-piercing cylinder translated at constant velocity U for Bond numbers Bo(D)=D/λ(c) ranging between 0.1 and 4.2, where D is the cylinder diameter and λ(c) the capillary length. In all cases the wake angle is found to follow a Mach-like law at large velocity, α∼U(-1), but with different prefactors depending on the value of Bo(D). For small Bo(D) (large capillary effects), the wake angle approximately follows the law α≃c(g,min)/U, where c(g,min) is the minimum group velocity of capillary-gravity waves. For larger Bo(D) (weak capillary effects), we recover a law α∼√[gD]/U similar to that found for ship wakes at large velocity [Rabaud and Moisy, Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 214503 (2013)]. Using the general property of dispersive waves that the characteristic wavelength of the wave packet emitted by a disturbance is of order of the disturbance size, we propose a simple model that describes the transition between these two Mach-like regimes as the Bond number is varied. We show that the new capillary law α≃c(g,min)/U originates from the presence of a capillary cusp angle (distinct from the usual gravity cusp angle), along which the energy radiated by the disturbance accumulates for Bond numbers of order of unity. This model, complemented by numerical simulations of the surface elevation induced by a moving Gaussian pressure disturbance, is in qualitative agreement with experimental measurements. PMID:25215822

  4. Polar Markings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA02155 Polar Markings

    These bright and dark markings occurred near the end of summer in the south polar region. The dark material is likely dust that has been freed of frost cover.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -76.3N, Longitude 84.9E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  5. Polar Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA02153 Polar Layers

    This image of the south polar region shows layered material. It is not known if the layers are formed yearly or if they form over the period of 10s to 100s of years or more.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -80.3N, Longitude 296.2E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  6. Polar Ridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03662 Polar Ridges

    This ridge system is located in the south polar region.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -81.7N, Longitude 296.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  7. Polar Textures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03638 Polar Textures

    This image illustrates the variety of textures that appear in the south polar region during late summer.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 80.5S, Longitude 57.9E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  8. Polar ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, S.; Grose, W. L.; Jones, R. L.; Mccormick, M. P.; Molina, Mario J.; Oneill, A.; Poole, L. R.; Shine, K. P.; Plumb, R. A.; Pope, V.

    1990-01-01

    The observation and interpretation of a large, unexpected ozone depletion over Antarctica has changed the international scientific view of stratospheric chemistry. The observations which show the veracity, seasonal nature, and vertical structure of the Antarctic ozone hole are presented. Evidence for Arctic and midlatitude ozone loss is also discussed. The chemical theory for Antarctic ozone depletion centers around the occurrence of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in Antarctic winter and spring; the climatology and radiative properties of these clouds are presented. Lab studies of the physical properties of PSCs and the chemical processes that subsequently influence ozone depletion are discussed. Observations and interpretation of the chemical composition of the Antarctic stratosphere are described. It is shown that the observed, greatly enhanced abundances of chlorine monoxide in the lower stratosphere are sufficient to explain much if not all of the ozone decrease. The dynamic meteorology of both polar regions is given, interannual and interhemispheric variations in dynamical processes are outlined, and their likely roles in ozone loss are discussed.

  9. Polar Terrains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03577 Polar Terrains

    The region surrounding the South Polar Cap contains many different terrain types. This image shows both etched terrain and a region of 'mounds'.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 75S, Longitude 286.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  10. Use of Plastic Capillaries for Macromolecular Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, Rachel R.; Hong, Young-Soo; Ciszak, Ewa M.

    2003-01-01

    Methods of crystallization of biomolecules in plastic capillaries (Nalgene 870 PFA tubing) are presented. These crystallization methods used batch, free-interface liquid- liquid diffusion alone, or a combination with vapor diffusion. Results demonstrated growth of crystals of test proteins such as thaumatin and glucose isomerase, as well as protein studied in our laboratory such dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase. Once the solutions were loaded in capillaries, they were stored in the tubes in frozen state at cryogenic temperatures until the desired time of activation of crystallization experiments.

  11. Control of electroosmosis in coated quartz capillaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herren, Blair J.; Van Alstine, James; Snyder, Robert S.; Shafer, Steven G.; Harris, J. Milton

    1987-01-01

    The effectiveness of various coatings for controlling the electroosmotic fluid flow that hinders electrophoretic processes is studied using analytical particle microelectrophoresis. The mobilities of 2-micron diameter glass and polystyrene latex spheres (exhibiting both negative and zero effective surface charge) were measured in 2-mm diameter quartz capillaries filled with NaCl solutions within the 3.5-7.8 pH range. It is found that capillary inner surface coatings using 5000 molecular weight (or higher) poly(ethylene glycol): significantly reduced electroosmosis within the selected pH range, were stable for long time periods, and appeared to be more effective than dextran, methylcellulose, or silane coatings.

  12. A Rare Association of Trigeminal Autonomic Cephalgia: Pontine Capillary Telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Kurt, Erdal; Arslan, Sabina; Unal-Cevik, Isin; Karli Oguz, Kader; Tezer, F Irsel

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a case of pontine capillary telangiectasia in a 43-year-old woman with a clinical diagnosis of trigeminal autonomic cephalgia. The possible association with pontine capillary telangiectasia and trigeminal autonomic cephalgia is discussed. PMID:25963152

  13. The Laschamp and the Other Recent Events - Excursions or Reversals?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valet, J.-P.

    2009-04-01

    The Laschamp event discovered by Norbert Bonhommet in lava flows of Massif Central (France) is the youngest and the most studied field excursion. Its geomagnetic origin has been controversial due to the existence of self-reversal processes. Taking advantage of new dated sites, we have studied 21 units including 12 new localities and found no new site with intermediate or reverse polarity was found. Ten sites have a normal polarity and all sites studied at Olby, Louchadière and Royat display intermediate but scattered directions. We confirm that reverse polarity flows are affected by self-reversals but we found that this is also the case for normal flows. A direct consequence is that self-reversals cannot be taken as responsible for the reverse directions but they likely contribute to generate dispersion. Thus despite complex magnetization, the geomagnetic origin of the Laschamp in the Chaîne des Puys is not questioned. The volcanic pole positions (VGPs) clearly indicate that the Laschamp event is associated with full reversed directions. The compilation of the most detailed records of excursions that occuured during the Brunhes and Matuyama chron shows that this situation is almost systematic. In all cases, at least one virtual geomagnetic pole (VGPs) is able to reach the opposite polarity. In the next step, we have computed different simulations of excursions during which the dipole progressively vanishes before growing back without reversing. This scenario produces very few reversed directions which are only visible at some latitudes. We infer that it is impossible to reach the ratio of reversed to intermediate VGPs present in the paleomagnetic records if the excursions were not associated with a short period of reversed dipole field. Therefore, excursions should be regarded as two successive reversals bracketing an aborted polarity interval. We propose that the same underlying mechanisms prevail in both situations (excursions or reversals) and that below a

  14. Determination of amino acids in fodders and raw materials using capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Komarova, N V; Kamentsev, J S; Solomonova, A P; Anufrieva, R M

    2004-02-01

    Two schemes were offered for analysis of amino acid contents in fodders and raw materials for mixed fodders by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). The first variant provides express analysis of four technologically important amino acids (lysine, methionine, threonine, cystine) in borate buffer on characteristic absorption of aminogroup (190 nm), with limits of quantitation being on average 0.2%. The second scheme includes pre-capillary derivatization of amino acids using phenylisothiocyanate (PITC) and separation of phenylthiocarbamyl (PTC)-derivatives obtained by CZE with a detection on 254 nm, which allows to widen a list of detectable components up to 19 (without tryptophan) and significantly improve detection limits down to 0.01%. Acid hydrolysis was used for a sample preparation. The results of analysis of fodders were compared using such methods, as CZE, ion exchange chromatography (amino acid analyzer) and reversed-phase (RP)-HPLC (with gradient technique of elution). PMID:14698247

  15. Spectrometer capillary vessel and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Linehan, John C.; Yonker, Clement R.; Zemanian, Thomas S.; Franz, James A.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention is an arrangement of a glass capillary tube for use in spectroscopy. In particular, the invention is a capillary arranged in a manner permitting a plurality or multiplicity of passes of a sample material through a spectroscopic measurement zone. In a preferred embodiment, the multi-pass capillary is insertable within a standard NMR sample tube. The present invention further includes a method of making the multi-pass capillary tube and an apparatus for spinning the tube.

  16. Spectrometer capillary vessel and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Linehan, J.C.; Yonker, C.R.; Zemanian, T.S.; Franz, J.A.

    1995-11-21

    The present invention is an arrangement of a glass capillary tube for use in spectroscopy. In particular, the invention is a capillary arranged in a manner permitting a plurality or multiplicity of passes of a sample material through a spectroscopic measurement zone. In a preferred embodiment, the multi-pass capillary is insertable within a standard NMR sample tube. The present invention further includes a method of making the multi-pass capillary tube and an apparatus for spinning the tube. 13 figs.

  17. Capillary zone electrophoresis for U(VI) and short chain carboxylic acid sorption studies on silica and rutile.

    PubMed

    Sladkov, Vladimir; Zhao, Yujia; Mercier-Bion, Florence

    2011-02-15

    Capillary zone electrophoresis was used to study the uranyl and short chain carboxylic acid sorption on silica and rutile. The separation and the simultaneous determination (in a single run) of a number of short chain carboxylic acids (oxalic, formic, acetic and propionic) and U(VI) with direct UV detection is developed for the analysis of solutions after the sorption experiments. The reverse polarity mode is used (the injection is performed at the negative end). The matrix effect of Si(IV) (possible silica dissolution product) and perchlorate (added for constant ionic strength in sorption experiments) on the separation of U(VI) and organic acids is investigated. The influence of methanol addition in carrier electrolyte on the separation selectivity of given analytes is also studied. Under the chosen conditions (carbonate buffer (ionic strength of 0.1M), pH 9.8, 0.15 mM of tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide, 25% (v/v) of methanol) the calibration curves are plotted. They are linear in two ranges of concentration from ∼1×10(-5) to ∼1×10(-3) M for oxalate, acetate, propionate, U(VI) and ∼1×10(-4) to ∼1×10(-3) for formate. The accuracy of the procedure is checked by the "added-found" method in simulation solutions. The relative standard deviations of the concentrations found are within the range of 1-10% and the recovery is in the range of 90-115%. This method is applied for the analysis of aqueous samples issued from sorption experiments on silica and rutile. The obtained results indicate that the given organic acids decrease uranium sorption both on silica and rutile. These experiments demonstrate that short chain carboxylic acids can influence the mobility and the chemistry of U(VI) in the environment.

  18. Reversible Thermoset Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor); Hreha, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of a reversible thermoset adhesive formed by incorporating thermally-reversible cross-linking units and a method for making the reversible thermoset adhesive are provided. One approach to formulating reversible thermoset adhesives includes incorporating dienes, such as furans, and dienophiles, such as maleimides, into a polymer network as reversible covalent cross-links using Diels Alder cross-link formation between the diene and dienophile. The chemical components may be selected based on their compatibility with adhesive chemistry as well as their ability to undergo controlled, reversible cross-linking chemistry.

  19. Polar Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03581 Polar Layers

    This image shows just one example of the bright and dark markings that appear during summer time. The marks are related to the polar layers. If you happen to see a wild-eyed guy sticking his tongue out at you, you'll know why this image qualifies for the old 'art' category of THEMIS releases.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 80.6S, Longitude 34.1E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  20. Network crosstalk dynamically changes during neutrophil polarization.

    PubMed

    Ku, Chin-Jen; Wang, Yanqin; Weiner, Orion D; Altschuler, Steven J; Wu, Lani F

    2012-05-25

    How complex signaling networks shape highly coordinated, multistep cellular responses is poorly understood. Here, we made use of a network-perturbation approach to investigate causal influences, or "crosstalk," among signaling modules involved in the cytoskeletal response of neutrophils to chemoattractant. We quantified the intensity and polarity of cytoskeletal marker proteins over time to characterize stereotyped cellular responses. Analyzing the effects of network disruptions revealed that, not only does crosstalk evolve rapidly during polarization, but also that intensity and polarity responses are influenced by different patterns of crosstalk. Interestingly, persistent crosstalk is arranged in a surprisingly simple circuit: a linear cascade from front to back to microtubules influences intensities, and a feed-forward network in the reverse direction influences polarity. Our approach provided a rational strategy for decomposing a complex, dynamically evolving signaling system and revealed evolving paths of causal influence that shape the neutrophil polarization response.

  1. Laser illumination of multiple capillaries that form a waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Dhadwal, H.S.; Quesada, M.A.; Studier, F.W.

    1998-08-04

    A system and method are disclosed for efficient laser illumination of the interiors of multiple capillaries simultaneously, and collection of light emitted from them. Capillaries in a parallel array can form an optical waveguide wherein refraction at the cylindrical surfaces confines side-on illuminating light to the core of each successive capillary in the array. Methods are provided for determining conditions where capillaries will form a waveguide and for assessing and minimizing losses due to reflection. Light can be delivered to the arrayed capillaries through an integrated fiber optic transmitter or through a pair of such transmitters aligned coaxially at opposite sides of the array. Light emitted from materials within the capillaries can be carried to a detection system through optical fibers, each of which collects light from a single capillary, with little cross talk between the capillaries. The collection ends of the optical fibers can be in a parallel array with the same spacing as the capillary array, so that the collection fibers can all be aligned to the capillaries simultaneously. Applicability includes improving the efficiency of many analytical methods that use capillaries, including particularly high-throughput DNA sequencing and diagnostic methods based on capillary electrophoresis. 35 figs.

  2. Cyclodextrin-Functionalized Monolithic Capillary Columns: Preparation and Chiral Applications.

    PubMed

    Adly, Frady G; Antwi, Nana Yaa; Ghanem, Ashraf

    2016-02-01

    In this review, the recently reported approaches for the preparation of cyclodextrin-functionalized capillary monolithic columns are highlighted, with few applications in chiral separations using capillary liquid chromatography (CLC) and capillary electrochromatography (CEC). Chirality 28:97-109, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Laser illumination of multiple capillaries that form a waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Dhadwal, Harbans S.; Quesada, Mark A.; Studier, F. William

    1998-08-04

    A system and method are disclosed for efficient laser illumination of the interiors of multiple capillaries simultaneously, and collection of light emitted from them. Capillaries in a parallel array can form an optical waveguide wherein refraction at the cylindrical surfaces confines side-on illuminating light to the core of each successive capillary in the array. Methods are provided for determining conditions where capillaries will form a waveguide and for assessing and minimizing losses due to reflection. Light can be delivered to the arrayed capillaries through an integrated fiber optic transmitter or through a pair of such transmitters aligned coaxially at opposite sides of the array. Light emitted from materials within the capillaries can be carried to a detection system through optical fibers, each of which collects light from a single capillary, with little cross talk between the capillaries. The collection ends of the optical fibers can be in a parallel array with the same spacing as the capillary array, so that the collection fibers can all be aligned to the capillaries simultaneously. Applicability includes improving the efficiency of many analytical methods that use capillaries, including particularly high-throughput DNA sequencing and diagnostic methods based on capillary electrophoresis.

  4. Application of CHESS single-bounce capillaries at synchrotron beamlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, R.; Szebenyi, T.; Pfeifer, M.; Woll, A.; Smilgies, D.-M.; Finkelstein, K.; Dale, D.; Wang, Y.; Vila-Comamala, J.; Gillilan, R.; Cook, M.; Bilderback, D. H.

    2014-03-01

    Single-bounce capillaries are achromatic X-ray focusing optics that can provide efficient and high demagnification focusing with large numerical apertures. Capillary fabrication at CHESS can be customized according to specific application requirements. Exemplary applications are reviewed in this paper, as well as recent progress on condensers for high-resolution transmission X-ray microscopy and small focal size capillaries.

  5. 21 CFR 864.6150 - Capillary blood collection tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Capillary blood collection tube. 864.6150 Section... blood collection tube. (a) Identification. A capillary blood collection tube is a plain or heparinized glass tube of very small diameter used to collect blood by capillary action. (b) Classification. Class...

  6. 21 CFR 864.6150 - Capillary blood collection tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Capillary blood collection tube. 864.6150 Section... blood collection tube. (a) Identification. A capillary blood collection tube is a plain or heparinized glass tube of very small diameter used to collect blood by capillary action. (b) Classification. Class...

  7. 21 CFR 864.6150 - Capillary blood collection tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Capillary blood collection tube. 864.6150 Section... blood collection tube. (a) Identification. A capillary blood collection tube is a plain or heparinized glass tube of very small diameter used to collect blood by capillary action. (b) Classification. Class...

  8. 21 CFR 864.6150 - Capillary blood collection tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Capillary blood collection tube. 864.6150 Section... blood collection tube. (a) Identification. A capillary blood collection tube is a plain or heparinized glass tube of very small diameter used to collect blood by capillary action. (b) Classification. Class...

  9. 21 CFR 864.6150 - Capillary blood collection tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Capillary blood collection tube. 864.6150 Section... blood collection tube. (a) Identification. A capillary blood collection tube is a plain or heparinized glass tube of very small diameter used to collect blood by capillary action. (b) Classification. Class...

  10. Macroscopic theory for capillary-pressure hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Athukorallage, Bhagya; Aulisa, Eugenio; Iyer, Ram; Zhang, Larry

    2015-03-01

    In this article, we present a theory of macroscopic contact angle hysteresis by considering the minimization of the Helmholtz free energy of a solid-liquid-gas system over a convex set, subject to a constant volume constraint. The liquid and solid surfaces in contact are assumed to adhere weakly to each other, causing the interfacial energy to be set-valued. A simple calculus of variations argument for the minimization of the Helmholtz energy leads to the Young-Laplace equation for the drop surface in contact with the gas and a variational inequality that yields contact angle hysteresis for advancing/receding flow. We also show that the Young-Laplace equation with a Dirichlet boundary condition together with the variational inequality yields a basic hysteresis operator that describes the relationship between capillary pressure and volume. We validate the theory using results from the experiment for a sessile macroscopic drop. Although the capillary effect is a complex phenomenon even for a droplet as various points along the contact line might be pinned, the capillary pressure and volume of the drop are scalar variables that encapsulate the global quasistatic energy information for the entire droplet. Studying the capillary pressure versus volume relationship greatly simplifies the understanding and modeling of the phenomenon just as scalar magnetic hysteresis graphs greatly aided the modeling of devices with magnetic materials.

  11. Interaction of light particles with capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tőkési, K.; DuBois, R. D.

    2013-04-01

    The possible similarities and differences between the transmission of slow highly charged ions and light particles, like positrons and electrons, through a single cylindrical, tapered glass capillary with large aspect ratio are studied. We address the question whether the guiding-effect is observable for low intensity positron beams.

  12. Using Capillary Flows to Pattern Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyawahare, Saurabh; Craig, Kate; Scherer, Axel

    2006-03-01

    One can appreciate how capillary forces cause unexpected patterns and shapes by looking at a soap bubble. Pattern formation by surface tension is seen in ring patterns of coffee stains, fingering patterns in Hele-Shaw cells, ordering of two dimensional micro-sphere crystals, combing of DNA and skeleton formation in marine creatures called radiolarians. Though comman, problems involving the understanding and control of the self-assembly mechanism need to be resolved before using capillary forces as a practical lithographic tool. Here, we report capillary flows create line patterns in evaporating liquids between closely spaced parallel plates. The widths of these lines range from a few microns to a few nanometers. Deliberate patterning of such lines requires pinning of the contact line and the presence of foaming surfactants. The position and type of line can be controlled with artificial pinning points and varying solutes respectively, and large-scale photolithography can be used to guide and control the definition of nanostructures. We provide ``proof of principle'' demonstrations of this method's application by creating lines of colloidal quantum dots and micro-spheres. This represents the first step in using capillary phenomena to create controlled, self--assembling, one-dimensional wire-like structures

  13. Imbibition of ``Open Capillary'': Fundamentals and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Marie; Kawano, Ryuji; Kamiya, Koki; Okumura, Ko

    2015-11-01

    Control or transportation of small amount of liquid is one of the most important issues in various contexts including medical sciences or pharmaceutical industries to fuel delivery. We studied imbibition of ``open capillary'' both experimentally and theoretically, and found simple scaling laws for both statics and dynamics of the imbibition, similarly as that of imbibition of capillary tubes. Furthermore, we revealed the existence of ``precursor film,'' which developed ahead of the imbibing front, and the dynamics of it is described well by another scaling law for capillary rise in a corner. Then, to show capabilities of open capillaries, we demonstrated two experiments by fabricating micro mixing devices to achieve (1) simultaneous multi-color change of the Bromothymol blue (BTB) solution and (2) expression of the green florescent protein (GFP). This research was partly supported by ImPACT Program of Council for Science, Technology and Innovation (Cabinet Office, Government of Japan). M. T. is supported by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science Research Fellowships for Young Scientists.

  14. Macroscopic theory for capillary-pressure hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Athukorallage, Bhagya; Aulisa, Eugenio; Iyer, Ram; Zhang, Larry

    2015-03-01

    In this article, we present a theory of macroscopic contact angle hysteresis by considering the minimization of the Helmholtz free energy of a solid-liquid-gas system over a convex set, subject to a constant volume constraint. The liquid and solid surfaces in contact are assumed to adhere weakly to each other, causing the interfacial energy to be set-valued. A simple calculus of variations argument for the minimization of the Helmholtz energy leads to the Young-Laplace equation for the drop surface in contact with the gas and a variational inequality that yields contact angle hysteresis for advancing/receding flow. We also show that the Young-Laplace equation with a Dirichlet boundary condition together with the variational inequality yields a basic hysteresis operator that describes the relationship between capillary pressure and volume. We validate the theory using results from the experiment for a sessile macroscopic drop. Although the capillary effect is a complex phenomenon even for a droplet as various points along the contact line might be pinned, the capillary pressure and volume of the drop are scalar variables that encapsulate the global quasistatic energy information for the entire droplet. Studying the capillary pressure versus volume relationship greatly simplifies the understanding and modeling of the phenomenon just as scalar magnetic hysteresis graphs greatly aided the modeling of devices with magnetic materials. PMID:25646688

  15. Analytical biotechnology: Capillary electrophoresis and chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, C.; Nikelly, J.G.

    1990-01-01

    The papers describe the separation, characterization, and equipment required for the electrophoresis or chromatography of cyclic nucleotides, pharmaceuticals, therapeutic proteins, recombinant DNA products, pheromones, peptides, and other biological materials. One paper, On-column radioisotope detection for capillary electrophoresis, has been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  16. Numerical simulations of capillary barrier field tests

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, C.E.; Stormont, J.C.

    1997-12-31

    Numerical simulations of two capillary barrier systems tested in the field were conducted to determine if an unsaturated flow model could accurately represent the observed results. The field data was collected from two 7-m long, 1.2-m thick capillary barriers built on a 10% grade that were being tested to investigate their ability to laterally divert water downslope. One system had a homogeneous fine layer, while the fine soil of the second barrier was layered to increase its ability to laterally divert infiltrating moisture. The barriers were subjected first to constant infiltration while minimizing evaporative losses and then were exposed to ambient conditions. The continuous infiltration period of the field tests for the two barrier systems was modelled to determine the ability of an existing code to accurately represent capillary barrier behavior embodied in these two designs. Differences between the field test and the model data were found, but in general the simulations appeared to adequately reproduce the response of the test systems. Accounting for moisture retention hysteresis in the layered system will potentially lead to more accurate modelling results and is likely to be important when developing reasonable predictions of capillary barrier behavior.

  17. Capillary electrochromatography analysis of hormonal cyclic and linear peptides.

    PubMed

    Walhagen, K; Unger, K K; Hearn, M T

    2001-10-15

    The retention behavior of linear and cyclic peptides has been studied by capillary electrochromatography (CEC) with a variety of different n-alkyl silica reversed-phase sorbents and also with mixed-mode phases containing both strong cation-exchange (sulfonic acid) and n-alkyl groups bonded onto the silica surface, using eluents ranging from pH 2.0 to pH 5.0. Depending upon the amino acid sequence, electrochromatographic retention of the peptides was strongly affected by the composition of the eluent, its pH value, and the choice of sorbent packed into the capillaries. The dominant separation processes operating with these charged analytes could be modulated inter alia by the content of organic modifier, acetonitrile, in the eluent, with peptide resolution predominantly arising from electrophoretic migration processes at high acetonitrile content. As the concentration of acetonitrile was decreased, chromatographic retention processes became more pronounced. With the n-alkyl silica CEC columns used in this study, silanophilic interactions between the sorbents and the charged peptides could be suppressed by increasing the molarity of the buffer and by adjusting the pH of the eluent to lower values. On the other hand, electrostatic interactions between basic peptides and the surface of strong cation-exchanger, mixed-mode materials can be suppressed at low pH values by using higher ionic strength conditions in the eluent. Different selectivity behavior was achieved with desmopressin and the other peptides with Spherisorb C18/SCX and Hypersil mixed-mode materials when an identical eluent composition of 60% (v/v) acetonitrile with 7.6 mM triethylammonium phosphate, pH 3.0, was used. These findings confirm that the surface charge density of the sorbent fulfills an important role in the modulation of peptide selectivity in CEC. These studies also confirm that the dependency of the logarithm of the CEC retention coefficients, i.e., log Kcec, of a peptide separated with n

  18. Recent advances of ionic liquids and polymeric ionic liquids in capillary electrophoresis and capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sheng; Liu, Shujuan; Guo, Yong; Liu, Xia; Jiang, Shengxiang

    2014-08-29

    Ionic liquids (ILs) and polymeric ionic liquids (PILs) with unique and fascinating properties have drawn considerable interest for their use in separation science, especially in chromatographic techniques. In this article, significant contributions of ILs and PILs in the improvement of capillary electrophoresis and capillary electrochromatography are described, and a specific overview of the most relevant examples of their applications in the last five years is also given. Accordingly, some general conclusions and future perspectives in these areas are discussed.

  19. Dynamics of a capillary invasion in a closed-end capillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hosub; Tripathi, Anubhav; Lee, Jinkee

    2014-11-01

    The position of fluid invasion in an open capillary increases as the square root of time and ceases when the capillary and hydrostatic forces are balanced, when viscous and inertia terms are negligible. Although this fluid invasion into open-end capillaries has been well described, detailed studies of fluid invasion in closed-end capillaries have not been explored thoroughly. Thus, we demonstrated, both theoretically and experimentally, a fluid invasion in closed-end capillaries, where the movement of the meniscus and the invasion velocity are accompanied by adiabatic gas compression inside the capillary. Theoretically, we found the fluid oscillations during invasion at short time scales by solving the one dimensional momentum balance. This oscillatory motion is evaluated in order to determine which physical forces dominate the different conditions, and is further described by a damped driven harmonic oscillator model. However, this oscillating motion is not observed in the experiments. This inconsistency is due to the following; first, a continuous decrease in the radius of the curvature caused by decreasing the invasion velocity and increasing pressure inside the close-ended capillary, and second, the shear stress increase in the short time scale by the plug like velocity profile within the entrance length. The viscous term of modified momentum equation can be written as K8/μl rc2dl/dt by using the multiplying factor K, which represents the increase of shear stress. The K is 7.3, 5.1 and 4.8 while capillary aspect ratio χc is 740, 1008 and 1244, respectively.

  20. Development of oxidative stress in the peritubular capillary microenvironment mediates sepsis-induced renal microcirculatory failure and acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Holthoff, Joseph H; Seely, Kathryn A; Pathak, Elina; Spencer, Horace J; Gokden, Neriman; Mayeux, Philip R

    2012-02-01

    Acute kidney injury is a frequent and serious complication of sepsis. To better understand the development of sepsis-induced acute kidney injury, we performed the first time-dependent studies to document changes in renal hemodynamics and oxidant generation in the peritubular microenvironment using the murine cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model of sepsis. CLP caused an increase in renal capillary permeability at 2 hours, followed by decreases in mean arterial pressure, renal blood flow (RBF), and renal capillary perfusion at 4 hours, which were sustained through 18 hours. The decline in hemodynamic parameters was associated with hypoxia and oxidant generation in the peritubular microenvironment and a decrease in glomerular filtration rate. The role of oxidants was assessed using the superoxide dismutase mimetic/peroxynitrite scavenger MnTMPyP [Mn(III)tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin]. At 10 mg/kg administered 6 hours after CLP, MnTMPyP did not alter blood pressure, but blocked superoxide and peroxynitrite generation, reversed the decline in RBF, capillary perfusion, and glomerular filtration rate, preserved tubular architecture, and increased 48-hour survival. However, MnTMPyP administered at CLP did not prevent capillary permeability or the decrease in RBF and capillary perfusion, which suggests that these early events are not mediated by oxidants. These data demonstrate that renal hemodynamic changes occur early after sepsis and that targeting the later oxidant generation can break the cycle of injury and enable the microcirculation and renal function to recover.

  1. A gaussian model for simulated geomagnetic field reversals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicht, Johannes; Meduri, Domenico G.

    2016-10-01

    Field reversals are the most spectacular events in the geomagnetic history but remain little understood. Here we explore the dipole behaviour in particularly long numerical dynamo simulations to reveal statistically significant conditions required for reversals and excursions to happen. We find that changes in the axial dipole moment behaviour are crucial while the equatorial dipole moment plays a negligible role. For small Rayleigh numbers, the axial dipole always remains strong and stable and obeys a clearly Gaussian probability distribution. Only when the Rayleigh number is increased sufficiently the axial dipole can reverse and its distribution becomes decisively non-Gaussian. Increased likelihoods around zero indicate a pronounced lingering in a new low dipole moment state. Reversals and excursions can only happen when axial dipole fluctuations are large enough to drive the system from the high dipole moment state assumed during stable polarity epochs into the low dipole moment state. Since it is just a matter of chance which polarity is amplified during dipole recovery, reversals and grand excursions, i.e. excursions during which the dipole assumes reverse polarity, are equally likely. While the overall reversal behaviour seems Earth-like, a closer comparison to palaeomagnetic findings suggests that the simulated events last too long and that grand excursions are too rare. For a particularly large Ekman number we find a second but less Earth-like type of reversals where the total field decays and recovers after a certain time.

  2. Variable-Polarity Plasma Arc Welding Of Alloy 2219

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Daniel W.; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Report presents results of study of variable-polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding of aluminum alloy 2219. Consists of two parts: Examination of effects of microsegregation and transient weld stress on macrosegregation in weld pool and, electrical characterization of straight- and reverse-polarity portions of arc cycle.

  3. Mathematical Model Of Variable-Polarity Plasma Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    Mathematical model of variable-polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding process developed for use in predicting characteristics of welds and thus serves as guide for selection of process parameters. Parameters include welding electric currents in, and durations of, straight and reverse polarities; rates of flow of plasma and shielding gases; and sizes and relative positions of welding electrode, welding orifice, and workpiece.

  4. Method of making tapered capillary tips with constant inner diameters

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Ryan T.; Page, Jason S.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-02-17

    Methods of forming electrospray ionization emitter tips are disclosed herein. In one embodiment, an end portion of a capillary tube can be immersed into an etchant, wherein the etchant forms a concave meniscus on the outer surface of the capillary. Variable etching rates in the meniscus can cause an external taper to form. While etching the outer surface of the capillary wall, a fluid can be flowed through the interior of the capillary tube. Etching continues until the immersed portion of the capillary tube is completely etched away.

  5. Electrical detection of microwave assisted magnetization reversal by spin pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Siddharth; Subhra Mukherjee, Sankha; Elyasi, Mehrdad; Singh Bhatia, Charanjit; Yang, Hyunsoo

    2014-03-24

    Microwave assisted magnetization reversal has been investigated in a bilayer system of Pt/ferromagnet by detecting a change in the polarity of the spin pumping signal. The reversal process is studied in two material systems, Pt/CoFeB and Pt/NiFe, for different aspect ratios. The onset of the switching behavior is indicated by a sharp transition in the spin pumping voltage. At a threshold value of the external field, the switching process changes from partial to full reversal with increasing microwave power. The proposed method provides a simple way to detect microwave assisted magnetization reversal.

  6. Overcharging in biological systems: reversal of electrophoretic mobility of aqueous polyaspartate by multivalent cations.

    PubMed

    Kubíčková, Anna; Křížek, Tomáš; Coufal, Pavel; Vazdar, Mario; Wernersson, Erik; Heyda, Jan; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2012-05-01

    Charge reversal as an extreme case of charge compensation is directly observed by capillary electrophoresis for a negatively charged peptide in aqueous solutions of trivalent cations. Atomistic and coarse-grained simulations provide molecular interpretation of this effect showing that it is largely of electrostatic origin with a minor contribution of chemical specificity of the salt ions.

  7. Geomagnetic polarity epochs: a new polarity event and the age of the brunhes-matuyama boundary.

    PubMed

    Doell, R R; Dalrymple, G B

    1966-05-20

    Recent paleomagnetic-radiometric data from six rhyolite domes in the Valles Caldera, New Mexico, indicate that the last change in polarity of the earth's magnetic field from reversed to normal (the Brunhes-Matuyama boundary) occurred at about 0.7 million years ago. A previously undiscovered geomagnetic polarity event, herein named the "Jaramillo normal event," occurred about 0.9 million years ago. PMID:17754815

  8. Geomagnetic polarity epochs: a new polarity event and the age of the brunhes-matuyama boundary.

    PubMed

    Doell, R R; Dalrymple, G B

    1966-05-20

    Recent paleomagnetic-radiometric data from six rhyolite domes in the Valles Caldera, New Mexico, indicate that the last change in polarity of the earth's magnetic field from reversed to normal (the Brunhes-Matuyama boundary) occurred at about 0.7 million years ago. A previously undiscovered geomagnetic polarity event, herein named the "Jaramillo normal event," occurred about 0.9 million years ago.

  9. Geomagnetic polarity epochs: A new polarity event and the age of the Brunhes-Matuyama boundary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doell, Richard R.; Dalrymple, G.B.

    1966-01-01

    Recent paleomagnetic-radiometric data from six rhyolite domes in the Valles Caldera, New Mexico, indicate that the last change in polarity of the earth's magnetic field from reversed to normal (the Brunhes-Matuyama boundary) occurred at about 0.7 million years ago. A previously undiscovered geomagnetic polarity event, herein named the "Jaramillo normal event," occurred about 0.9 million years ago.

  10. The unique Polarity Phenotype of Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Müsch, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocytes, the main epithelial cell type of the liver, function like all epithelial cells to mediate the vectorial flow of macromolecules into and out of the organ they encompass. They do so by establishing polarized surface domains and by restricting paracellular flow via their tight junctions and cell-cell adhesion. Yet, the cell and tissue organization of hepatocytes differs profoundly from that of most other epithelia, including those of the digestive and urinary tracts, the lung or the breast. The latter form monolayered tissues in which the apical domains of individual cells align around a central continuous luminal cavity that constitutes the tubules and acini characteristic of these organs. Hepatocytes, by contrast, form capillary-sized lumina with multiple neighbors resulting in a branched, tree-like bile canaliculi network that spreads across the liver parenchyme. I will discuss some of the key molecular features that distinguish the hepatocyte polarity phenotype from that of monopolar, columnar epithelia. PMID:24956563

  11. Selectivity of stationary phases based on pyridinium ionic liquids for capillary gas chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shashkov, M. V.; Sidelnikov, V. N.; Zaikin, P. A.

    2014-04-01

    A number of capillary columns with stationary liquid phases based on mono- and dication pyridinium ionic liquids (ILs) were prepared. Their polarity was evaluated using McReynolds system and the selectivity was estimated from intermolecular interactions. The parameters of intermolecular interactions were obtained from retention data using the (Abraham) model of the linear free energy relationship. The dependences of intermolecular interactions on the structure of the cation in the ILs under study were revealed. The results were compared with the data for the traditional phases (HP-5, ZB-WAX). Examples of separation of mixtures of oxygen-containing compounds on the phases under study are given.

  12. The influence of artificial sealing on the capillary barrier's function.

    PubMed

    Trpkosová, Dagmar; Mls, Jirí

    2010-01-01

    Regulations for the sealing of landfill sites require two independent sealing components. To satisfy this requirement, the combined capillary barrier was developed using impermeable sheeting placed between the capillary layer and the capillary block of the traditional capillary barrier. In this study, a numerical model is introduced based on hydraulic characteristics obtained by means of measurements of samples of capillary barrier materials. To make a comparison possible, samples of a laboratory investigated barrier were measured. Two laboratory experiments with a simple and a combined capillary barrier were repeated using the developed numerical model and good agreement between computed and measured results was found. Subsequently, the model was used for investigating the effect of failure of the artificial sheeting on the capillary barrier's efficiency. The obtained results are presented and discussed. PMID:19853432

  13. Capillary leakage in travelers with dengue infection: implications for pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Meltzer, Eyal; Heyman, Zahava; Bin, Hanna; Schwartz, Eli

    2012-03-01

    Dengue hemorrhagic fever is characterized by the presence of a capillary leak syndrome. Its pathogenesis is presumed to differ from that of classical dengue fever (DF) and to be associated with secondary dengue infection. Returning travelers given a diagnosis of DF were evaluated for capillary leakage with abdominal sonography. Data were compared between travelers with primary/secondary infection defined by epidemiologic and serologic parameters. A total of 12 (34.3%) of 35 patients had sonographic signs of capillary leakage. Most (85%) patients with capillary leakage had classical DF. Capillary leak was diagnosed in 32% of primary dengue cases and in 40% of secondary dengue cases (P = 0.69). The two patients given a diagnosis of dengue hemorrhagic fever had primary infections. The high prevalence of capillary leakage among travelers, most of them with primary exposure to dengue, calls into question the importance of secondary infection in causing capillary leakage in dengue infection.

  14. Quantum Operation Time Reversal

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, Gavin E.

    2008-03-25

    The dynamics of an open quantum system can be described by a quantum operation: A linear, complete positive map of operators. Here, I exhibit a compact expression for the time reversal of a quantum operation, which is closely analogous to the time reversal of a classical Markov transition matrix. Since open quantum dynamics are stochastic, and not, in general, deterministic, the time reversal is not, in general, an inversion of the dynamics. Rather, the system relaxes toward equilibrium in both the forward and reverse time directions. The probability of a quantum trajectory and the conjugate, time reversed trajectory are related by the heat exchanged with the environment.

  15. Capillary Penetration into Inclined Circular Glass Tubes.

    PubMed

    Trabi, Christophe L; Ouali, F Fouzia; McHale, Glen; Javed, Haadi; Morris, Robert H; Newton, Michael I

    2016-02-01

    The spontaneous penetration of a wetting liquid into a vertical tube against the force of gravity and the imbibition of the same liquid into a horizontal tube (or channel) are both driven by capillary forces and described by the same fundamental equations. However, there have been few experimental studies of the transition from one orientation to the other. We report systematic measurements of capillary penetration of polydimethylsiloxane oils of viscosities 9.6, 19.2, and 48.0 mPa·s into glass capillary tubes. We first report the effect of tube radii R between 140 and 675 μm on the dynamics of spontaneous imbibition. We show that the data can be fitted using the exact numerical solution to the governing equations and that these are similar to fits using the analytical viscogravitational approximation. However, larger diameter tubes show a rate of penetration slower than expected using an equilibrium contact angle and the known value of liquid viscosity. To account for the slowness, an increase in viscosity by a factor (η/ρ)(scaling) is needed. We show full agreement with theory requires the ratio R/κ(-1) ∼ 0.1 or less, where κ(-1) is the capillary length. In addition, we propose an experimental method that enables the determination of the dynamic contact angle during imbibition, which gives values that agree with the literature values. We then report measurements of dynamic penetration into the tubes of R = 190 and 650 μm for a range of inclination angles to the horizontal, φ, from 5 to 90°. We show that capillary penetration can still be fitted using the viscogravitational solution, rather than the Bosanquet solution which describes imbibition without gravity, even for inclination angles as low as 10°. Moreover, at these low angles, the effect of the tube radius is found to diminish and this appears to relate to an effective capillary length, κ(-1)(φ) = (γ(LV)/ρg sin φ)(1/2). PMID:26738739

  16. Separation performance of cucurbit[8]uril and its coordination complex with cadmium (II) in capillary gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tao; Ji, Ningning; Qi, Meiling; Tao, Zhu; Fu, Ruonong

    2014-05-23

    Here we report the investigation of using cucurbit[8]uril (CB8) and its coordination complex with cadmium (II) (CB8-Cd) as stationary phases for capillary gas chromatography (GC). The prepared capillary columns of CB8 and CB8-Cd stationary phases achieved column efficiency of 2200plates/m and 1508plates/m, respectively, and showed weak polarity based on the measured McReynolds constants. Their separation performance was investigated by GC separation of mixtures of different types while a commercial column was used for comparison. The CB8 stationary phase achieved high resolution for a wide range of analytes from nonpolar to polar while the CB8-Cd stationary phase exhibited good separation mainly for nonpolar to weak polar analytes. The CB stationary phases differ from the commercial one in terms of retention behaviors and resolving ability due to their different molecular interactions with analytes. Moreover, energy effect on the retention of analytes on CB8 and CB8-Cd stationary phases was examined, showing that retention on CB8 column was determined mainly by enthalpy change for polar analytes and by both enthalpy change and entropy change for weak polar analytes whereas retention on CB8-Cd column was mainly controlled by entropy change. This work demonstrates the great potential of CB8 and CB8-Cd stationary phases as a new type of GC stationary phases in GC analysis.

  17. Polarized internal target apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Holt, Roy J.

    1986-01-01

    A polarized internal target apparatus with a polarized gas target of improved polarization and density achieved by mixing target gas atoms with a small amount of alkali metal gas atoms, and passing a high intensity polarized light source into the mixture to cause the alkali metal gas atoms to become polarized which interact in spin exchange collisions with target gas atoms yielding polarized target gas atoms.

  18. Polarized internal target apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Holt, R.J.

    1984-10-10

    A polarized internal target apparatus with a polarized gas target of improved polarization and density (achieved by mixing target gas atoms with a small amount of alkali metal gas atoms, and passing a high intensity polarized light source into the mixture to cause the alkali metal gas atoms to become polarized which interact in spin exchange collisions with target gas atoms yielding polarized target gas atoms) is described.

  19. [Functional morphology of endonasal blood capillaries].

    PubMed

    Grevers, G

    1989-01-01

    Harvey (1628) was the first to describe the blood circulatory system. 50 years later, the capillary system was discovered by Marcello Malpighi as a link between arteries and veins. Since then, the microvascular network has been examined abundantly by means of various morphological and physiological techniques. During the last decades the development of the technical equipment enabled us to receive detailed informations on the structural and ultrastructural aspects of the vasculature and--particularly--the capillary endothelium. New electron microscopic investigations on the behaviour of this special cell system. In the present study we combined our own morphological results on the endonasal microcirculatory system--using different morphological techniques--to interpret these anatomical finding under functional aspects.

  20. Immunogold-silver staining by capillary action.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R K; Braye, S G; Crouch, R L

    1989-12-01

    The authors have developed an improved method for immunogold-silver staining of paraffin sections. Using a manual capillary action staining system, they were able to simplify the technical aspects of the procedure, permitting rapid processing of large batches of slides with better reproducibility. Background staining was decreased by use of buffers containing a detergent. The use of a light-stable silver reagent permitted greater control of the enhancement stage. The method yielded a high degree of contrast with negligible nonspecific staining. Sensitivity was comparable to that obtained with conventional enzymatic immunostaining. However, the authors noted that trypsinization of sections was rendered unnecessary for those antigens for which such pretreatment was usually required, and the need for special fixatives could be eliminated. The method was also applicable to immunostaining of frozen sections. Immunogold-silver staining by capillary action deserves consideration as an alternative to existing immunohistochemical methods in diagnostic histopathology.