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Sample records for reversed electroosmotic flow

  1. Separation of chemical warfare agent degradation products by the reversal of electroosmotic flow in capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Nassar, A E; Lucas, S V; Jones, W R; Hoffland, L D

    1998-03-15

    We report the development of analyses for nerve agent degradation products or related species by the reversal of electroosmotic flow in capillary electrophoresis (CE). The developed methods were used in this laboratory for analysis of samples in the second and third official proficiency tests (International Round-Robins) for the Provisional Technical Secretariat/Preparatory Commission for the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, and those results are reported here. Analytes studied include methylphosphonic acid (a dibasic acid), the monoisopropyl ester of ethylphosphonic acid, and the monoalkyl esters of methylphosphonic acid (R = ethyl, isopropyl, isobutyl, pinacolyl (3,3-dimethyl-2-butyl), cyclohexyl, and 2-ethylhexyl). The cationic surfactants used here for the reversal of electroosmotic flow are didodecyldimethylammonium hydroxide and cetyltrimethylammonium hydroxide. CE methods using conductivity or indirect UV detection provide a good separation efficiency and very high sensitivity for the analysis of such compounds. The detection limits for these species were about 75 micrograms/L when using conductivity detection and about 100 micrograms/L when using indirect UV detection. Because pH plays an important role in the CE separation of the alkylphosphonic acids and their monoesters, the influence of pH on these separation systems was investigated. Electrolytes were stable for at least 3 months. Excellent separation efficiency and freedom from interference due to common anions were obtained in the developed methods which typically achieved complete separations in less than 3 min. The method was applied to aqueous leachates of soil, wipes of surfaces, and vegetation sampled from a field site known to have been exposed to nerve agents and subsequently cleaned up. The data from these environmental samples indicated that the method can be expected to be useful for environmental monitoring.

  2. Microfluidic point-of-care blood panel based on a novel technique: Reversible electroosmotic flow.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Mahdi; Madadi, Hojjat; Casals-Terré, Jasmina

    2015-09-01

    A wide range of diseases and conditions are monitored or diagnosed from blood plasma, but the ability to analyze a whole blood sample with the requirements for a point-of-care device, such as robustness, user-friendliness, and simple handling, remains unmet. Microfluidics technology offers the possibility not only to work fresh thumb-pricked whole blood but also to maximize the amount of the obtained plasma from the initial sample and therefore the possibility to implement multiple tests in a single cartridge. The microfluidic design presented in this paper is a combination of cross-flow filtration with a reversible electroosmotic flow that prevents clogging at the filter entrance and maximizes the amount of separated plasma. The main advantage of this design is its efficiency, since from a small amount of sample (a single droplet [Formula: see text]10 μl) almost 10% of this (approx 1 μl) is extracted and collected with high purity (more than 99%) in a reasonable time (5-8 min). To validate the quality and quantity of the separated plasma and to show its potential as a clinical tool, the microfluidic chip has been combined with lateral flow immunochromatography technology to perform a qualitative detection of the thyroid-stimulating hormone and a blood panel for measuring cardiac Troponin and Creatine Kinase MB. The results from the microfluidic system are comparable to previous commercial lateral flow assays that required more sample for implementing fewer tests.

  3. Microfluidic point-of-care blood panel based on a novel technique: Reversible electroosmotic flow

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Mahdi; Madadi, Hojjat; Casals-Terré, Jasmina

    2015-01-01

    A wide range of diseases and conditions are monitored or diagnosed from blood plasma, but the ability to analyze a whole blood sample with the requirements for a point-of-care device, such as robustness, user-friendliness, and simple handling, remains unmet. Microfluidics technology offers the possibility not only to work fresh thumb-pricked whole blood but also to maximize the amount of the obtained plasma from the initial sample and therefore the possibility to implement multiple tests in a single cartridge. The microfluidic design presented in this paper is a combination of cross-flow filtration with a reversible electroosmotic flow that prevents clogging at the filter entrance and maximizes the amount of separated plasma. The main advantage of this design is its efficiency, since from a small amount of sample (a single droplet ∼10 μl) almost 10% of this (approx 1 μl) is extracted and collected with high purity (more than 99%) in a reasonable time (5–8 min). To validate the quality and quantity of the separated plasma and to show its potential as a clinical tool, the microfluidic chip has been combined with lateral flow immunochromatography technology to perform a qualitative detection of the thyroid-stimulating hormone and a blood panel for measuring cardiac Troponin and Creatine Kinase MB. The results from the microfluidic system are comparable to previous commercial lateral flow assays that required more sample for implementing fewer tests. PMID:26396660

  4. Electroosmotic shear flow in microchannels.

    PubMed

    Mampallil, Dileep; van den Ende, Dirk

    2013-01-15

    We generate and study electroosmotic shear flow in microchannels. By chemically or electrically modifying the surface potential of the channel walls a shear flow component with controllable velocity gradient can be added to the electroosmotic flow caused by double layer effects at the channel walls. Chemical modification is obtained by treating the channel wall with a cationic polymer. In case of electric modification, we used gate electrodes embedded in the channel wall. By applying a voltage to the gate electrode, the zeta potential can be varied and a controllable, uniform shear stress can be applied to the liquid in the channel. The strength of the shear stress depends on both the gate voltage and the applied field which drives the electroosmotic shear flow. Although the stress range is still limited, such a microchannel device can be used in principle as an in situ micro-rheometer for lab on a chip purposes.

  5. Joule heating effects on electroosmotic entry flow.

    PubMed

    Prabhakaran, Rama Aravind; Zhou, Yilong; Patel, Saurin; Kale, Akshay; Song, Yongxin; Hu, Guoqing; Xuan, Xiangchun

    2017-03-01

    Electroosmotic flow is the transport method of choice in microfluidic devices over traditional pressure-driven flow. To date, however, studies on electroosmotic flow have been almost entirely limited to inside microchannels. This work presents the first experimental study of Joule heating effects on electroosmotic fluid entry from the inlet reservoir (i.e., the well that supplies fluids and samples) to the microchannel in a polymer-based microfluidic chip. Electrothermal fluid circulations are observed at the reservoir-microchannel junction, which grow in size and strength with the increasing alternating current to direct current voltage ratio. Moreover, a 2D depth-averaged numerical model is developed to understand the effects of Joule heating on fluid temperature and flow fields in electrokinetic microfluidic chips. This model overcomes the problems encountered in previous unrealistic 2D and costly 3D models, and is able to predict the observed electroosmotic entry flow patterns with a good agreement.

  6. Ionic Origin of Electro-osmotic Flow Hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Chun Yee; Lim, An Eng; Lam, Yee Cheong

    2016-02-01

    Electro-osmotic flow, the driving of fluid at nano- or micro- scales with electric field, has found numerous applications, ranging from pumping to chemical and biomedical analyses in micro-devices. Electro-osmotic flow exhibits a puzzling hysteretic behavior when two fluids with different concentrations displace one another. The flow rate is faster when a higher concentration solution displaces a lower concentration one as compared to the flow in the reverse direction. Although electro-osmotic flow is a surface phenomenon, rather counter intuitively we demonstrate that electro-osmotic flow hysteresis originates from the accumulation or depletion of pH-governing minority ions in the bulk of the fluid, due to the imbalance of electric-field-induced ion flux. The pH and flow velocity are changed, depending on the flow direction. The understanding of electro-osmotic flow hysteresis is critical for accurate fluid flow control in microfluidic devices, and maintaining of constant pH in chemical and biological systems under an electric field.

  7. Ionic Origin of Electro-osmotic Flow Hysteresis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chun Yee; Lim, An Eng; Lam, Yee Cheong

    2016-01-01

    Electro-osmotic flow, the driving of fluid at nano- or micro- scales with electric field, has found numerous applications, ranging from pumping to chemical and biomedical analyses in micro-devices. Electro-osmotic flow exhibits a puzzling hysteretic behavior when two fluids with different concentrations displace one another. The flow rate is faster when a higher concentration solution displaces a lower concentration one as compared to the flow in the reverse direction. Although electro-osmotic flow is a surface phenomenon, rather counter intuitively we demonstrate that electro-osmotic flow hysteresis originates from the accumulation or depletion of pH-governing minority ions in the bulk of the fluid, due to the imbalance of electric-field-induced ion flux. The pH and flow velocity are changed, depending on the flow direction. The understanding of electro-osmotic flow hysteresis is critical for accurate fluid flow control in microfluidic devices, and maintaining of constant pH in chemical and biological systems under an electric field. PMID:26923197

  8. Electroosmotic Flow in Nanofluidic Channels

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report the measurement of electroosmotic mobilities in nanofluidic channels with rectangular cross sections and compare our results with theory. Nanofluidic channels were milled directly into borosilicate glass between two closely spaced microchannels with a focused ion beam instrument, and the nanochannels had half-depths (h) of 27, 54, and 108 nm and the same half-width of 265 nm. We measured electroosmotic mobilities in NaCl solutions from 0.1 to 500 mM that have Debye lengths (κ–1) from 30 to 0.4 nm, respectively. The experimental electroosmotic mobilities compare quantitatively to mobilities calculated from a nonlinear solution of the Poisson–Boltzmann equation for channels with a parallel-plate geometry. For the calculations, ζ-potentials measured in a microchannel with a half-depth of 2.5 μm are used and range from −6 to −73 mV for 500 to 0.1 mM NaCl, respectively. For κh > 50, the Smoluchowski equation accurately predicts electroosmotic mobilities in the nanochannels. However, for κh < 10, the electrical double layer extends into the nanochannels, and due to confinement within the channels, the average electroosmotic mobilities decrease. At κh ≈ 4, the electroosmotic mobilities in the 27, 54, and 108 nm channels exhibit maxima, and at 0.1 mM NaCl, the electroosmotic mobility in the 27 nm channel (κh = 1) is 5-fold lower than the electroosmotic mobility in the 2.5 μm channel (κh = 100). PMID:25365680

  9. Electroosmotic Entry Flow with Joule Heating Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakaran, Rama; Kale, Akshay; Xuan, Xiangchun

    Electrokinetic flow, which transports liquids by electroosmosis and samples by electrophoresis, is the transport method of choice in microfluidic chips over traditional pressure-driven flows. Studies on electrokinetic flows have so far been almost entirely limited to inside microchannels. Very little work has been done on the electroosmotic fluid entry from a reservoir to a microchannel, which is the origin of all fluid and sample motions in microchips. We demonstrate in this talk that strong vortices of opposite circulating directions can be generated in electroosmotic entry flows. We also develop a two-dimensional depth-averaged numerical model of the entire microchip to predict and understand the fluid temperature and flow fields at the reservoir-microchannel junction.

  10. Electroosmotic flow hysteresis for dissimilar ionic solutions

    PubMed Central

    Lim, An Eng; Lam, Yee Cheong

    2015-01-01

    Electroosmotic flow (EOF) with two or more fluids is commonly encountered in various microfluidics applications. However, no investigation has hitherto been conducted to investigate the hysteretic or flow direction-dependent behavior during the displacement flow of solutions with dissimilar ionic species. In this investigation, electroosmotic displacement flow involving dissimilar ionic solutions was studied experimentally through a current monitoring method and numerically through finite element simulations. The flow hysteresis can be characterized by the turning and displacement times; turning time refers to the abrupt gradient change of current-time curve while displacement time is the time for one solution to completely displace the other solution. Both experimental and simulation results illustrate that the turning and displacement times for a particular solution pair can be directional-dependent, indicating that the flow conditions in the microchannel are not the same in the two different flow directions. The mechanics of EOF hysteresis was elucidated through the theoretical model which includes the ionic mobility of each species, a major governing parameter. Two distinct mechanics have been identified as the causes for the EOF hysteresis involving dissimilar ionic solutions: the widening/sharpening effect of interfacial region between the two solutions and the difference in ion concentration distributions (and thus average zeta potentials) in different flow directions. The outcome of this investigation contributes to the fundamental understanding of flow behavior in microfluidic systems involving solution pair with dissimilar ionic species. PMID:25945139

  11. Electro-osmotic flow in polygonal ducts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chang-Yi; Chang, Chien-Cheng

    2011-06-01

    The paper presents semi-analytical solutions to electro-osmotic (EO) flow through polygonal ducts under the Debye-Hückel approximation. Analytical series solutions assisted with numerical collocations are found to yield very fast convergence. The solutions have practical applications as the pores of EO membranes are mostly hexagonal, stacked densely in a beehive-like matrix. In addition, we develop simple asymptotic approximations that would be applicable to all EO tube flows of small as well as large dimensionless electrokinetic width. This facilitates investigation of analytical structures of general EO flows in all shapes of tubes, including the present geometries. In particular, for thick electrical double layers, the flow rate of EO is related to the corresponding viscous Poiseuille flow rate, while for thin electrical double layers, the flow rate is shown to be characterized by the cross-sectional area and the perimeter length of the tubes.

  12. Electro-osmotic flow in bicomponent fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazarenko, Andrei; Sega, Marcello

    The electroosmotic flow (EOF) is a widely used technique that uses the action of external electric fields on solvated ions to move fluids around in microfluidics devices. For homogeneous fluids, the characteristics of the flow can be well approximated by simple analytical models, but in multicomponent systems such as oil-in-water droplets one has to rely to numerical simulations. The purpose of this study is to investigate physical properties of the EOF in a bicomponent fluid by solving the coupled equations of motions of explicit ions in interaction with a continuous model of the flow. To do so we couple the hydrodynamics equations as solved by a Shan-Chen Lattice-Boltzmann method to the molecular dynamics of the ions. The presence of explicit ions allows us to go beyond the simple Poisson-Boltzmann approximations, and investigate a variety of EOF regimes. ETN-COLLDENSE (H2020-MCSA-ITN-2014, Grant No. 642774).

  13. Electroosmotic flow rectification in pyramidal-pore mica membranes.

    PubMed

    Jin, Pu; Mukaibo, Hitomi; Horne, Lloyd P; Bishop, Gregory W; Martin, Charles R

    2010-02-24

    We demonstrate here a new electrokinetic phenomenon, Electroosmotic flow (EOF) rectification, in synthetic membranes containing asymmetric pores. Mica membranes with pyramidally shaped pores prepared by the track-etch method were used. EOF was driven through these membranes by using an electrode in solutions on either side to pass a constant ionic current through the pores. The velocity of EOF depends on the polarity of the current. A high EOF velocity is obtained when the polarity is such that EOF is driven from the larger base opening to the smaller tip opening of the pore. A smaller EOF velocity is obtained when the polarity is reversed such that EOF goes from tip to base. We show that this rectified EOF phenomenon is the result of ion current-rectification observed in such asymmetric-pore membranes.

  14. Electroosmotic Flow Rectification in Pyramidal-Pore Mica Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, P.; Mukaibo, H.; Horne, L.; Bishop, G.; Martin, C. R.

    2010-02-01

    We demonstrate here a new electrokinetic phenomenon, Electroosmotic flow (EOF) rectification, in synthetic membranes containing asymmetric pores. Mica membranes with pyramidally shaped pores prepared by the track-etch method were used. EOF was driven through these membranes by using an electrode in solutions on either side to pass a constant ionic current through the pores. The velocity of EOF depends on the polarity of the current. A high EOF velocity is obtained when the polarity is such that EOF is driven from the larger base opening to the smaller tip opening of the pore. A smaller EOF velocity is obtained when the polarity is reversed such that EOF goes from tip to base. We show that this rectified EOF phenomenon is the result of ion current-rectification observed in such asymmetric-pore membranes.

  15. Highly efficient electroosmotic flow through functionalized carbon nanotube membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ji; Gerstandt, Karen; Majumder, Mainak; Zhan, Xin; Hinds, Bruce J.

    2011-08-01

    Carbon nanotube membranes with inner diameter ranging from 1.5-7 nm were examined for enhanced electroosmotic flow. After functionalization via electrochemical diazonium grafting and carbodiimide coupling reaction, it was found that neutral caffeine molecules can be efficiently pumped via electroosmosis. An electroosmotic velocity as high as 0.16 cm s-1 V-1 has been observed. Power efficiencies were 25-110 fold improved compared to related nanoporous materials, which has important applications in chemical separations and compact medical devices. Nearly ideal electroosmotic flow was seen in the case where the mobile cation diameter nearly matched the inner diameter of the single-walled carbon nanotube resulting in a condition of using one ion is to pump one neutral molecule at equivalent concentrations.

  16. Electro-osmotic flow through a two-dimensional screen-pump filter.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying-Hong; Kuo, Chih-Yu; Chang, Chien C; Wang, Chang-Yi

    2011-09-01

    The electro-osmotic flow driven by a screen pump, composed of a line array of evenly spaced identical rectangular solid blocks, is investigated under the Debye-Hückel approximation. The geometry of the screen pump is determined by the spacing and aspect ratio of the solid blocks. A constant surface zeta potential is assumed on the block surface. The method of eigenfunction series expansion is applied to solve analytically for the applied electric field, electric charge potential in the fluid, and flow field. Because of the low Reynolds number, Stokes equations are applied for the flow. The analytic result is first confirmed by comparing with the exact solution of the electro-osmotic flow in an infinite channel. Then different geometries of the screen pump and the effect of the electrokinetic width are computed for their influence on the flow rate. Recirculating eddies and reversing flow are found even though the applied electric driving field is unidirectional.

  17. Helmholtz-Smoluchowski velocity for viscoelastic electroosmotic flows.

    PubMed

    Park, H M; Lee, W M

    2008-01-15

    Many biofluids such as blood and DNA solutions are viscoelastic and exhibit extraordinary flow behaviors, not existing in Newtonian fluids. Adopting appropriate constitutive equations these exotic flow behaviors can be modeled and predicted reasonably using various numerical methods. However, the governing equations for viscoelastic flows are not easily solvable, especially for electroosmotic flows where the streamwise velocity varies rapidly from zero at the wall to a nearly uniform velocity at the outside of the very thin electric double layer. In the present investigation, we have devised a simple method to find the volumetric flow rate of viscoelastic electroosmotic flows through microchannels. It is based on the concept of the Helmholtz-Smoluchowski velocity which is widely adopted in the electroosmotic flows of Newtonian fluids. It is shown that the Helmholtz-Smoluchowski velocity for viscoelastic fluids can be found by solving a simple cubic algebraic equation. The volumetric flow rate obtained using this Helmholtz-Smoluchowski velocity is found to be almost the same as that obtained by solving the governing partial differential equations for various viscoelastic fluids.

  18. Numerical analysis of mixing enhancement for micro-electroosmotic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, G. H.; He, Y. L.; Tao, W. Q.

    2010-05-01

    Micro-electroosmotic flow is usually slow with negligible inertial effects and diffusion-based mixing can be problematic. To gain an improved understanding of electroosmotic mixing in microchannels, a numerical study has been carried out for channels patterned with wall blocks, and channels patterned with heterogeneous surfaces. The lattice Boltzmann method has been employed to obtain the external electric field, electric potential distribution in the electrolyte, the flow field, and the species concentration distribution within the same framework. The simulation results show that wall blocks and heterogeneous surfaces can significantly disturb the streamlines by fluid folding and stretching leading to apparently substantial improvements in mixing. However, the results show that the introduction of such features can substantially reduce the mass flow rate and thus effectively prolongs the available mixing time when the flow passes through the channel. This is a non-negligible factor on the effectiveness of the observed improvements in mixing efficiency. Compared with the heterogeneous surface distribution, the wall block cases can achieve more effective enhancement in the same mixing time. In addition, the field synergy theory is extended to analyze the mixing enhancement in electroosmotic flow. The distribution of the local synergy angle in the channel aids to evaluate the effectiveness of enhancement method.

  19. Controlling electroosmotic flows by polymer coatings: A joint experimental-theoretical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteferrante, Michele; Sola, Laura; Cretich, Marina; Chiari, Marcella; Marini Bettolo Marconi, Umberto; Melchionna, Simone

    2015-11-01

    We analyze the electroosmotic flow (EOF) of an electrolytic solution in a polymer coated capillary electrophoresis tube. The polymeric density, charge, thickness, and the capillary tube charge vary as a function of pH and produce a non-trivial modulation of the EOF, including a flow reversal at acid pH conditions. By means of a theoretical argument and numerical simulations, we recover the experimental curve for the EOF, providing a firm approach for predictive analysis of electroosmosis under different polymeric coating conditions. A proposed application of the approach is to determine the near-wall charge of the coating to be used for further quantitative analysis of the electroosmotic flow and mobility.

  20. Electro-osmotic flow over a charged superhydrophobic surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hui

    2010-06-01

    Bubbles can be trapped inside textured structures such as grooves, forming a superhydrophobic surface. A superhydrophobic surface has a large effective hydrodynamic slip length compared to a smooth hydrophobic surface and holds the promise of enhancing electrokinetic flows that find many interesting applications in microfluidics. However, recent theoretical studies suggested that electro-osmotic flows over a weakly charged superhydrophobic surface [the zeta potential of the surface is smaller than the thermal potential (25 mV)] can only be enhanced when liquid-gas interfaces are charged [T. M. Squires, Phys. Fluids 20, 092105 (2008); Bahga , J. Fluid Mech. 644, 245 (2010)]. So far there is little work reported when the zeta potential of the surface is comparable or even larger than the thermal potential. In this paper we numerically investigate electro-osmotic flows over a periodically striped slip-stick surface by solving the standard Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations. Our results indicate that at large zeta potentials, even if liquid-gas interfaces are charged, the nonuniform surface conduction due to the mismatch between surface conductions over no-shear and no-slip regions leads to electric field lines penetrating the double layer and thus the nonuniform surface conduction weakens the tangential component of the electric field which primarily drives electro-osmotic flows. Our results imply that, in the presence of strong nonuniform surface conduction, enhanced electro-osmotic flows over a superhydrophobic surface are possible only in certain conditions. In particular, the enhancement due to the slip can potentially be lost at large zeta potentials. Similar loss of the enhancement of a charged particle’s electrophoretic mobility due to the slip was reported by Khair and Squires [Phys. Fluids 21, 042001 (2009)].

  1. Electro-osmotic flow of a model electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Singer, Sherwin J; Zheng, Zhi; Conlisk, A T

    2005-04-01

    Electro-osmotic flow is studied by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations in a model system chosen to elucidate various factors affecting the velocity profile and facilitate comparison with existing continuum theories. The model system consists of spherical ions and solvent, with stationary, uniformly charged walls that make a channel with a height of 20 particle diameters. We find that hydrodynamic theory adequately describes simple pressure-driven (Poiseuille) flow in this model. However, Poisson-Boltzmann theory fails to describe the ion distribution in important situations, and therefore continuum fluid dynamics based on the Poisson-Boltzmann ion distribution disagrees with simulation results in those situations. The failure of Poisson-Boltzmann theory is traced to the exclusion of ions near the channel walls resulting from reduced solvation of the ions in that region. When a corrected ion distribution is used as input for hydrodynamic theory, agreement with numerical simulations is restored. An analytic theory is presented that demonstrates that repulsion of the ions from the channel walls increases the flow rate, and attraction to the walls has the opposite effect. A recent numerical study of electro-osmotic flow is reanalyzed in the light of our findings, and the results conform well to our conclusions for the model system.

  2. Measurement of electroosmotic flow in capillary and microchip electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Zhou, Fang; Zhao, Liang; Zhang, Jian-Rong; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2007-11-02

    Microfluidics is the science and technology of systems that process or manipulate small amounts of fluids, using channels with dimensions of tens of micrometers. Electroosmotic flow (EOF) is an important characteristic of fluids in microchannels. In this paper, EOF generation, effects on separation and definition of EOF are introduced. And EOF measurement methods on capillary electrophoresis (CE) and microchip CE are systematically reviewed based on detection principle, hallmarks of EOF measurement methods are presented, the devices and signals are also schematically described. This paper offers researchers a guidance to obtain an estimate of EOF mobility in capillary and microchip electrophoresis.

  3. Analyses of gibberellins in coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) water by partial filling-micellar electrokinetic chromatography-mass spectrometry with reversal of electroosmotic flow.

    PubMed

    Ge, Liya; Yong, Jean Wan Hong; Tan, Swee Ngin; Hua, Lin; Ong, Eng Shi

    2008-05-01

    In this paper, we present the results of simultaneous screening of eight gibberellins (GAs) in coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) water by MEKC directly coupled to ESI-MS detection. During the development of MEKC-MS, partial filling (PF) was used to prevent the micelles from reaching the mass spectrometer as this is detrimental to the MS signal, and a cationic surfactant, cetyltrimethylammonium hydroxide, was added to the electrolyte to reverse the EOF. On the basis of the resolution of the neighboring peaks, different parameters (i.e., the pH and concentration of buffer, surfactant concentrations, length of the injected micellar plug, organic modifier, and applied separation voltage) were optimized to achieve a satisfactory PF-MEKC separation of eight GA standards. Under optimum conditions, a baseline separation of GA standards, including GA1, GA3, GA5, GA6, GA7, GA9, GA12, and GA13, was accomplished within 25 min. Satisfactory results were obtained in terms of precision (RSD of migration time below 0.9%), sensitivity (LODs in the range of 0.8-1.9 microM) and linearity (R2 between 0.981 and 0.997). MS/MS with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) detection was carried out to obtain sufficient selectivity. PF-MEKC-MS/MS allowed the direct identification and confirmation of the GAs presented in coconut water (CW) sample after SPE, while, the quantitative analysis of GAs was performed by PF-MEKC-MS approach. GA1 and GA3 were successfully detected and quantified in CW. It is anticipated that the current PF-MEKC-MS method can be applicable to analyze GAs in a wide range of biological samples.

  4. Multi-scale simulation method for electroosmotic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lin; Chen, Shiyi; Robbins, Mark O.

    2016-10-01

    Electroosmotic transport in micro-and nano- channels has important applications in biological and engineering systems but is difficult to model because nanoscale structure near surfaces impacts flow throughout the channel. We develop an efficient multi-scale simulation method that treats near-wall and bulk subdomains with different physical descriptions and couples them through a finite overlap region. Molecular dynamics is used in the near-wall subdomain where the ion density is inconsistent with continuum models and the discrete structure of solvent molecules is important. In the bulk region the solvent is treated as a continuum fluid described by the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with thermal fluctuations. A discrete description of ions is retained because of the low density of ions and the long range of electrostatic interactions. A stochastic Euler-Lagrangian method is used to simulate the dynamics of these ions in the implicit continuum solvent. The overlap region allows free exchange of solvent and ions between the two subdomains. The hybrid approach is validated against full molecular dynamics simulations for different geometries and types of flows.

  5. A handy liquid metal based electroosmotic flow pump.

    PubMed

    Gao, Meng; Gui, Lin

    2014-06-07

    A room temperature liquid metal based electroosmotic flow (EOF) pump has been proposed in this work. This low-cost EOF pump is convenient for both fabrication and integration. It utilizes polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannels filled with the liquid-metal as non-contact pump electrodes. The electrode channels are fabricated symmetrically to both sides of the pumping channel, having no contact with the pumping channel. To test the pumping performance of the EOF pump, the mean flow velocities of the fluid (DI water) in the EOF pumps were experimentally measured by tracing the fluorescent microparticles in the flow. To provide guidance for designing a low voltage EOF pump, parametric studies on dimensions of the electrode and pumping channels were performed in this work. According to the experimental results, the pumping speed can reach 5.93 μm s(-1) at a driving voltage of only 1.6 V, when the gap between the electrode and the pumping channel is 20 μm. Injecting a room temperature liquid metal into microchannels can provide a simple, rapid, low-cost but accurately self-aligned way to fabricate microelectrodes for EOF pumps, which is a promising method to achieve the miniaturization and integration of the EOF pump in microfluidic systems. The non-contact liquid electrodes have no influence on the fluid in the pumping channel when pumping, reducing Joule heat generation and preventing gas bubble formation at the surface of electrodes. The pump has great potential to drive a wide range of fluids, such as drug reagents, cell suspensions and biological macromolecule solutions.

  6. Analytical and numerical study of the electro-osmotic annular flow of viscoelastic fluids.

    PubMed

    Ferrás, L L; Afonso, A M; Alves, M A; Nóbrega, J M; Pinho, F T

    2014-04-15

    In this work we present semi-analytical solutions for the electro-osmotic annular flow of viscoelastic fluids modeled by the Linear and Exponential PTT models. The viscoelastic fluid flows in the axial direction between two concentric cylinders under the combined influences of electrokinetic and pressure forcings. The analysis invokes the Debye-Hückel approximation and includes the limit case of pure electro-osmotic flow. The solution is valid for both no slip and slip velocity at the walls and the chosen slip boundary condition is the linear Navier slip velocity model. The combined effects of fluid rheology, electro-osmotic and pressure gradient forcings on the fluid velocity distribution are also discussed.

  7. Development of polymeric coatings for control of electro-osmotic flow in ASTP MA-011 electrophoresis technology experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, W. J.

    1976-01-01

    The development of a methyl cellulose based coating system for control of electro-osmotic flow at the walls of electrophoresis cells is described. Flight electrophoresis columns were coated with this system, resulting in a flight set of six columns. In flight photography of MA-011 electrophoretic separations verified control of electro-osmotic flow.

  8. Effect of heat transfer on rotating electroosmotic flow through a micro-vessel: haemodynamical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, A.; Mondal, A.; Shit, G. C.; Kundu, P. K.

    2016-08-01

    This paper theoretically analyzes the heat transfer characteristics associated with electroosmotic flow of blood through a micro-vessel having permeable walls. The analysis is based on the Debye-Hückel approximation for charge distributions and the Navier-Stokes equations are assumed to represent the flow field in a rotating system. The velocity slip condition at the vessel walls is taken into account. The essential features of the rotating electroosmotic flow of blood and associated heat transfer characteristics through a micro-vessel are clearly highlighted by the variation in the non-dimensional flow velocity, volumetric flow rate and non-dimensional temperature profiles. Moreover, the effect of Joule heating parameter and Prandtl number on the thermal transport characteristics are discussed thoroughly. The study reveals that the flow of blood is appreciably influenced by the elctroosmotic parameter as well as rotating Reynolds number.

  9. Analysis of electroosmotic flow of power-law fluids in a slit microchannel.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Cunlu; Zholkovskij, Emilijk; Masliyah, Jacob H; Yang, Chun

    2008-10-15

    Electroosmotic flow of power-law fluids in a slit channel is analyzed. The governing equations including the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation, the Cauchy momentum equation, and the continuity equation are solved to seek analytical expressions for the shear stress, dynamic viscosity, and velocity distribution. Specifically, exact solutions of the velocity distributions are explicitly found for several special values of the flow behavior index. Furthermore, with the implementation of an approximate scheme for the hyperbolic cosine function, approximate solutions of the velocity distributions are obtained. In addition, a generalized Smoluchowski velocity is introduced by taking into account contributions due to the finite thickness of the electric double layer and the flow behavior index of power-law fluids. Calculations are performed to examine the effects of kappaH, flow behavior index, double layer thickness, and applied electric field on the shear stress, dynamic viscosity, velocity distribution, and average velocity/flow rate of the electroosmotic flow of power-law fluids.

  10. Electroosmotic flow and Joule heating in preparative continuous annular electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Laskowski, René; Bart, Hans-Jörg

    2015-09-01

    An openFOAM "computational fluid dynamic" simulation model was developed for the description of local interaction of hydrodynamics and Joule heating in annular electrochromatography. A local decline of electrical conductivity of the background eluent is caused by an electrokinetic migration of ions resulting in higher Joule heat generation. The model equations consider the Navier-Stokes equation for incompressible fluids, the energy equation for stationary temperature fields, and the mass transfer equation for the electrokinetic flow. The simulations were embedded in commercial ANSYS Fluent software and in open-source environment openFOAM. The annular gap (1 mm width) contained an inorganic C8 reverse-phase monolith as stationary phase prepared by an in situ sol-gel process. The process temperature generated by Joule heating was determined by thermal camera system. The local hydrodynamics in the prototype was detected by a gravimetric contact-free measurement method and experimental and simulated values matched quite well.

  11. Analytical solution of two-fluid electro-osmotic flows of viscoelastic fluids.

    PubMed

    Afonso, A M; Alves, M A; Pinho, F T

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents an analytical model that describes a two-fluid electro-osmotic flow of stratified fluids with Newtonian or viscoelastic rheological behavior. This is the principle of operation of an electro-osmotic two-fluid pump as proposed by Brask et al. [Tech. Proc. Nanotech., 1, 190-193, 2003], in which an electrically non-conducting fluid is transported by the interfacial dragging viscous force of a conducting fluid that is driven by electro-osmosis. The electric potential in the conducting fluid and the analytical steady flow solution of the two-fluid electro-osmotic stratified flow in a planar microchannel are presented by assuming a planar interface between the two immiscible fluids with Newtonian or viscoelastic rheological behavior. The effects of fluid rheology, shear viscosity ratio, holdup and interfacial zeta potential are analyzed to show the viability of this technique, where an enhancement of the flow rate is observed as the shear-thinning effects are increased.

  12. Joule heating effects on electroosmotic flow in insulator-based dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Sriram; Zhu, Junjie; Hu, Guoqing; Xuan, Xiangchun

    2011-09-01

    Insulator-based dielectrophoresis (iDEP) is an emerging technology that has been successfully used to manipulate a variety of particles in microfluidic devices. However, due to the locally amplified electric field around the in-channel insulator, Joule heating often becomes an unavoidable issue that may disturb the electroosmotic flow and affect the particle motion. This work presents the first experimental study of Joule heating effects on electroosmotic flow in a typical iDEP device, e.g., a constriction microchannel, under DC-biased AC voltages. A numerical model is also developed to simulate the observed flow pattern by solving the coupled electric, energy, and fluid equations in a simplified two-dimensional geometry. It is observed that depending on the magnitude of the DC voltage, a pair of counter-rotating fluid circulations can occur at either the downstream end alone or each end of the channel constriction. Moreover, the pair at the downstream end appears larger in size than that at the upstream end due to DC electroosmotic flow. These fluid circulations, which are reasonably simulated by the numerical model, form as a result of the action of the electric field on Joule heating-induced fluid inhomogeneities in the constriction region.

  13. Induced-charge electroosmotic flow around dielectric particles in uniform electric field.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Li, Dongqing

    2013-11-15

    The current research of induced-charge electroosmotic flow (ICEOF) is mostly confined to systems with ideally or fully polarizable surfaces (e.g., metal). However, most materials in nature have various degrees of polarizability, which directly affects the induced charges and subsequently the induced-charge electroosmotic flow. This paper studied the effect of the polarizability of the materials on the ICEOF. An analytical expression of the induced potential on the surface of a dielectric particle in a uniform electrical field was derived. Three-dimensional transient numerical simulations of the ICEOF and the motion of dielectric particles were performed to study the effect of the polarizability. Simulation results show that the transportation of the dielectric particle in a microchannel is not affected by the polarizability of the particle; however, the interaction of two dielectric particles is sensitive to the polarizability of the particles.

  14. Influence of moderate Joule heating on electroosmotic flow velocity, retention, and efficiency in capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guofang; Tallarek, Ulrich; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas; Zhang, Yukui

    2004-07-30

    The influence of Joule heating on electroosmotic flow velocity, the retention factor of neutral analytes, and separation efficiency in capillary electrochromatography was investigated theoretically and experimentally. A plot of electrical current against the applied electrical field strength was used to evaluate the Joule heating effect. When the mobile phase concentration of Tris buffer exceeded 5.0 mM in the studied capillary electrochromatography systems using particulate and monolithic columns (with an accompanying power level of heat dissipation higher than 0.35 W/m), the Joule heating effect became clearly noticeable. Theoretical models for describing the variation of electroosmotic flow velocity with increasing applied field strength and the change of retention factors for neutral analytes with electrical field strength at higher Tris buffer concentrations were analyzed to explain consequences of Joule heating in capillary electrochromatography. Qualitative agreement between experimental data and implications of the theoretical model analysis was observed. The decrease of separation efficiency in capillary electrochromatography with macroporous octadecylsilica particles at high buffer concentration can be also attributed to Joule heating mainly via the increased axial diffusion of the analyte molecules and dispersion of solute bands by a nonuniform electroosmotic flow profile over the column cross-section. However, within a moderate temperature range, the contribution of the macroscopic velocity profile in the column arising from radial temperature gradients is insignificant.

  15. Nonuniform electro-osmotic flow on charged strips and its use in particle trapping.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shui-Jin; Hwang, Shyh-Hong; Wei, Hsien-Hung

    2008-12-02

    In this article, we investigate theoretically electro-osmotic flow set up by charged strips on an otherwise uncharged surface. Starting with a single-strip problem we demonstrate that for simple polynomial surface charge distributions several basic solutions can be derived in closed forms constituted by the analogous idea-flow solutions, which provide a more lucid way of revealing the flow features. These solutions reveal two types of flow topology: simple draining-in/pumping-out streaming and a pair of microvortices for symmetric and antisymmetric surface charge distributions, respectively. For an arbitrary surface charge distribution, more complicated flow structures can be found by the superposition of these basic solutions. We further extend the analysis to two uniformly charged strips and show how the flow characteristics vary with the strips' dimensions and surface zeta potentials. The far-field velocity behavior is also asymptotically identified and indicates that the hydrodynamic nature of the flow is typically long-range. An application to particle trapping with electro-osmotic vortices is also investigated theoretically for the first time. We show that in collaboration with short-range attraction effects the trapping can be facilitated by symmetric vortices with a converging stagnation point, but not by asymmetric vortices.

  16. Electroosmotic flow measurements in a freely suspended liquid film: Experiments and numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Hussein Sheik, Abdulkadir; Bandulasena, H C Hemaka; Starov, Victor; Trybala, Anna

    2017-03-17

    Fluid flow profiles in free liquid films stabilised by anionic and cationic surfactants under an external electric field were investigated. Depthwise velocity fields were measured at the mid region of the free liquid film by confocal μ-PIV and corresponding numerical simulations were performed using Finite Element Method (FEM) to model the system. Depthwise change in velocity profiles was observed with electroosmotic flow dominating in the vicinity of the gas-liquid and solid-liquid interfaces while backpressure drives fluid in the opposite direction at the core of the film. It was also found that the direction of the flow at various sections of the films depends on the type of surfactant used, but flow features remained the same. Numerical simulations predicted the flow profiles with reasonable accuracy; however, asymmetry of the actual film geometry caused deviations at the top half of the computational domain. Overall, electroosmotic flow profiles within a free liquid film is similar to that of the closed-end solid microchannel. However, the flow direction and features of the velocity profiles can be changed by selecting various types of surfactants. The free liquid films thickness was selected to match dimensions of foam Plateau border. Hence these findings will be useful in developing a separation system based on foam electrokinetics. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of non-Newtonian power law rheology on mass transport of a neutral solute for electro-osmotic flow in a porous microtube

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Sourav; De, Sirshendu

    2013-01-01

    Mass transport of a neutral solute for a power law fluid in a porous microtube under electro-osmotic flow regime is characterized in this study. Combined electro-osmotic and pressure driven flow is conducted herein. An analytical solution of concentration profile within mass transfer boundary layer is derived from the first principle. The solute transport through the porous wall is also coupled with the electro-osmotic flow to predict the solute concentration in the permeate stream. The effects of non-Newtonian rheology and the operating conditions on the permeation rate and permeate solute concentration are analyzed in detail. Both cases of assisting (electro-osmotic and poiseulle flow are in same direction) and opposing flow (the individual flows are in opposite direction) cases are taken care of. Enhancement of Sherwood due to electro-osmotic flow for a non-porous conduit is also quantified. Effects if non-Newtonian rheology on Sherwood number enhancement are observed. PMID:24404046

  18. Solute-solvent interactions in micellar electrokinetic chromatography: IV. Characterization of electroosmotic flow and micellar markers.

    PubMed

    Fuguet, Elisabet; Ràfols, Clara; Bosch, Elisabeth; Rosés, Martí

    2002-01-01

    A wide study of the compounds and procedures mostly used to determine the electroosmotic flow (EOF) and micelle elution times has been done in seven different micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) systems. These systems are formed from mixtures of an aqueous buffer with the surfactants sodium dodecyl sulfate, lithium dodecyl sulfate, lithium perfluorooctane sulfonate, sodium cholate, sodium deoxycholate, tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide and hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide. The solvation parameter model has been used to evaluate the usefulness of the compounds studied as EOF or micellar markers in each of the seven MEKC systems. It is demonstrated that methanol, acetonitrile and formamide are the best EOF markers, and that dodecanophenone is the best micellar marker.

  19. Fluid mechanics of electroosmotic flow and its effect on band broadening in capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Ghosal, Sandip

    2004-01-01

    Electroosmotic flow (EOF) usually accompanies electrophoretic migration of charged species in capillary electrophoresis unless special precautions are taken to suppress it. The presence of the EOF provides certain advantages in separations. It is an alternative to mechanical pumps, which are inefficient and difficult to build at small scales, for transporting reagents and analytes on microfluidic chips. The downside is that any imperfection that distorts the EOF profile reduces the separation efficiency. In this paper, the basic facts about EOF are reviewed from the perspective of fluid mechanics and its effect on separations in free solution capillary zone electrophoresis is discussed in the light of recent advances.

  20. Experimental Verification of Overlimiting Current by Surface Conduction and Electro-Osmotic Flow in Microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Sungmin; Cho, Inhee; Heo, Joonseong; Lim, Geunbae; Bazant, Martin Z.; Moon, Dustin Jaesuk; Sung, Gun Yong; Kim, Sung Jae

    2015-03-01

    Direct evidence is provided for the transition from surface conduction (SC) to electro-osmotic flow (EOF) above a critical channel depth (d ) of a nanofluidic device. The dependence of the overlimiting conductance (OLC) on d is consistent with theoretical predictions, scaling as d-1 for SC and d4 /5 for EOF with a minimum around d =8 μ m . The propagation of transient deionization shocks is also visualized, revealing complex patterns of EOF vortices and unstable convection with increasing d . This unified picture of surface-driven OLC can guide further advances in electrokinetic theory, as well as engineering applications of ion concentration polarization in microfluidics and porous media.

  1. A Portable Liquid Chromatograph with a Battery-operated Compact Electroosmotic Pump and a Microfluidic Chip Device with a Reversed Phase Packed Column.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Akihiko; Fujii, Mitsutaka; Fujimoto, Takehiro; Sasaki, Shunsuke; Yanagisawa, Ichiro; Tani, Hirofumi; Tokeshi, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    A compact and lightweight liquid chromatography system is presented with overall dimensions of 26 cm width × 18 cm length × 21 cm height and weight of 2 kg. This system comprises a battery-operated compact electroosmotic pump, a manual injector, a microfluidic chip device containing a packed column and an electrochemical detector, and a USB bus-powered potentiostat. The pumping system was designed for microfluidic-based reversed-phase liquid chromatography in which an electroosmotically generated water stream pushes the mobile phase via a diaphragm for the output. The flow rate ranged from 0 to 10 μL/min and had a high degree of precision. The pumping system operated continuously for over 24 h with dry batteries. The column formed in the microfluidic device was packed with 3-μm ODS particles with a length of 30 mm and a diameter of 0.8 mm. The results presented herein demonstrate the performance of the pumping system and the column using alkylphenols, catecholamine, catechin, and amino acids.

  2. Visualizing the transient electroosmotic flow and measuring the zeta potential of microchannels with a micro-PIV technique.

    PubMed

    Yan, Deguang; Nguyen, Nam-Trung; Yang, Chun; Huang, Xiaoyang

    2006-01-14

    We have demonstrated a transient micro particle image velocimetry (micro-PIV) technique to measure the temporal development of electroosmotic flow in microchannels. Synchronization of different trigger signals for the laser, the CCD camera, and the high-voltage switch makes this measurement possible with a conventional micro-PIV setup. Using the transient micro-PIV technique, we have further proposed a method on the basis of inertial decoupling between the particle electrophoretic motion and the fluid electroosmotic flow to determine the electrophoretic component in the particle velocity and the zeta potential of the channel wall. It is shown that using the measured zeta potentials, the theoretical predictions agree well with the transient response of the electroosmotic velocities measured in this work.

  3. Influence of varying electroosmotic flow on the effective diffusion in electric field gradient separations.

    PubMed

    Maynes, Daniel; Tenny, Joseph; Webbd, Brent W; Lee, Milton L

    2008-02-01

    Recently the use electric field gradient focusing (EFGF) to enhance focusing of proteins has been proposed and explored to provide significant improvement in separation resolution. The objective of EFGF is to focus proteins of specific electrophoretic mobilities at distinct stationary locations in a column or channel. This can be accomplished in a capillary by allowing the electric potential to vary in the streamwise direction. Because the electric field is varying, so also is the electrokinetic force exerted on the proteins and the electroosmotic velocity of the buffer solution. Due to the varying electric field, the Taylor diffusion characteristics will also vary along the column, causing a degradation of peak widths of some proteins, dependent on their equilibrium positions and local velocity distributions. The focus of this paper is an analysis that allows characterization of the local Taylor diffusion and resulting protein band peak width as a function of the local magnitude of the EOF relative to the average fluid velocity for both cylindrical and rectangular channels. In general the analysis shows that as the ratio of the local electroosmotic velocity to the average velocity deviates from unity, the effective diffusion increases significantly. The effectiveness of EFGF devices over a range of protein diffusivities, capillary diameters, flow velocities, and electric field gradient is discussed.

  4. A glass fiber sheet-based electroosmotic lateral flow immunoassay for point-of-care testing.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Yuriko; Osaki, Toshihisa; Kamiya, Koki; Kawano, Ryuji; Honjoh, Tsutomu; Shibata, Haruki; Ide, Toru; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2012-12-21

    We have developed a quantitative immunoassay chip targeting point-of-care testing. To implement a lateral flow immunoassay, a glass fiber sheet was chosen as the material for the microfluidic channel in which the negative charge on the fiber surfaces efficiently generates the electroosmotic flow (EOF). The EOF, in turn, allows controllable bound/free separation of antigen/antibody interactions on the chip and enables precise determination of the antigen concentration. In addition, the defined size of the porous matrix was suitable for the filtration of undesired large particles. We confirmed the linear relationship between the concentration of analyte and the resulting fluorescence intensity from the immunoassay of two model analytes, C-reactive protein (CRP) and insulin, demonstrating that analyte concentration was quantitatively determined within the developed chip in 20 min. The limits of detection were 8.5 ng mL(-1) and 17 ng mL(-1) for CRP and insulin, respectively.

  5. Exact solution of an electroosmotic flow for generalized Burgers fluid in cylindrical domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Masood; Farooq, Asma; Khan, Waqar Azeem; Hussain, Mazhar

    The present paper reports a theoretical study of the dynamics of an electroosmotic flow (EOF) in cylindrical domain. The Cauchy momentum equation is first simplified by incorporating the electrostatic body force in the electric double layer and the generalized Burgers fluid constitutive model. The electric potential distribution is given by the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation. After solving the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation, the Cauchy momentum equation with electrostatic body force is solved analytically by using the temporal Fourier and finite Hankel transforms. The effects of important involved parameters are examined and presented graphically. The results obtained reveal that the magnitude of velocity increases with increase of the Debye-Huckel and electrokinetic parameters. Further, it is shown that the results presented for generalized Burgers fluid are quite general so that results for the Burgers, Oldroyd-B, Maxwell and Newtonian fluids can be obtained as limiting cases.

  6. Experimental verification of overlimiting current by surface conduction and electro-osmotic flow in microchannels.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sungmin; Cho, Inhee; Heo, Joonseong; Lim, Geunbae; Bazant, Martin Z; Moon, Dustin Jaesuk; Sung, Gun Yong; Kim, Sung Jae

    2015-03-20

    Direct evidence is provided for the transition from surface conduction (SC) to electro-osmotic flow (EOF) above a critical channel depth (d) of a nanofluidic device. The dependence of the overlimiting conductance (OLC) on d is consistent with theoretical predictions, scaling as d(-1) for SC and d(4/5) for EOF with a minimum around d=8  μm. The propagation of transient deionization shocks is also visualized, revealing complex patterns of EOF vortices and unstable convection with increasing d. This unified picture of surface-driven OLC can guide further advances in electrokinetic theory, as well as engineering applications of ion concentration polarization in microfluidics and porous media.

  7. Bi-directional flow induced by an AC electroosmotic micropump with DC voltage bias.

    PubMed

    Islam, Nazmul; Reyna, Jairo

    2012-04-01

    This paper discusses the principle of biased alternating current electroosmosis (ACEO) and its application to move the bulk fluid in a microchannel, as an alternative to mechanical pumping methods. Previous EO-driven flow research has looked at the effect of electrode asymmetry and transverse traveling wave forms on the performance of electroosmotic pumps. This paper presents an analysis that was conducted to assess the effect of combining an AC signal with a DC (direct current) bias when generating the electric field needed to impart electroosmosis (EO) within a microchannel. The results presented here are numerical and experimental. The numerical results were generated through simulations performed using COMSOL 3.5a. Currently available theoretical models for EO flows were embedded in the software and solved numerically to evaluate the effects of channel geometry, frequency of excitation, electrode array geometry, and AC signal with a DC bias on the flow imparted on an electrically conducting fluid. Simulations of the ACEO flow driven by a constant magnitude of AC voltage over symmetric electrodes did not indicate relevant net flows. However, superimposing a DC signal over the AC signal on the same symmetric electrode array leads to a noticeable net forward flow. Moreover, changing the polarity of electrical signal creates a bi-directional flow on symmetrical electrode array. Experimental flow measurements were performed on several electrode array configurations. The mismatch between the numerical and experimental results revealed the limitations of the currently available models for the biased EO. However, they confirm that using a symmetric electrode array excited by an AC signal with a DC bias leads to a significant improvement in flow rates in comparison to the flow rates obtained in an asymmetric electrode array configuration excited just with an AC signal.

  8. Thermal transport characteristics of combined electroosmotic and pressure driven flow in soft nanofluidics.

    PubMed

    Matin, M H; Ohshima, H

    2016-08-15

    The present study deals with thermal transport characteristics of an electrolyte solution flowing through a slit nanochannel with polyelectrolyte walls, known as soft nanochannel. The sources of the fluid flow are the pressure gradient along the channel axis and the electrokinetic effects that trigger an electroosmotic flow under the impact of a uniformly applied electric field. The polyelectrolyte layer (PEL) is denoted as a fixed charge layer (FCL) and the electrolyte ions can be present both inside and outside the PEL. Therefore, the PEL-electrolyte interface acts as a semi-penetrable membrane. To the best of our knowledge, the thermal analysis of mixed electrokinetically and pressure driven flow in such soft nanochannels has never been addressed. The Poisson-Boltzmann equation is solved assuming the Debye-Huckel linearization for the low electric potential to provide us with analytical closed form solutions for the conservation equations. The conservation equations are solved to obtain the electric potential; velocity and temperature distributions in terms of governing dimensionless parameters. Also results for the Nusselt number are presented and discussed in detail.

  9. Scaling Law for Cross-stream Diffusion in Microchannels under Combined Electroosmotic and Pressure Driven Flow.

    PubMed

    Song, Hongjun; Wang, Yi; Pant, Kapil

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical study of the cross-stream diffusion of an analyte in a rectangular microchannel under combined electroosmotic flow (EOF) and pressure driven flow to investigate the heterogeneous transport behavior and spatially-dependent diffusion scaling law. An analytical model capable of accurately describing 3D steady-state convection-diffusion in microchannels with arbitrary aspect ratios is developed based on the assumption of the thin Electric Double Layer (EDL). The model is verified against high-fidelity numerical simulation in terms of flow velocity and analyte concentration profiles with excellent agreement (<0.5% relative error). An extensive parametric analysis is then undertaken to interrogate the effect of the combined flow velocity field on the transport behavior in both the positive pressure gradient (PPG) and negative pressure gradient (NPG) cases. For the first time, the evolution from the spindle-shaped concentration profile in the PPG case, via the stripe-shaped profile (pure EOF), and finally to the butterfly-shaped profile in the PPG case is obtained using the analytical model along with a quantitative depiction of the spatially-dependent diffusion layer thickness and scaling law across a wide range of the parameter space.

  10. Thermal characteristics of time-periodic electroosmotic flow in a circular microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, Ali Jabari

    2015-10-01

    A theoretical analysis is performed to explore the thermal characteristics of electroosmotic flow in a circular microchannel under an alternating electric field. An analytical approach is presented to solve energy equation, and then, the exact solution of temperature profiles is obtained by using the Green's function method. This study reveals that the temperature field repeats itself for each half-period. Frequency has a strong influence on the thermal behavior of the flow field. For small values of the dimensionless frequency (small channel size, large kinematic viscosity, or small frequency), the advection mechanism is dominant in the whole domain and the resultant heating (Joule heating and wall heat flux) can be transferred by the complete flow field in the axial direction; while, the middle portion of the flow field at high dimensionless frequencies does not have sufficient time to transfer heat by advection, and the bulk fluid temperature, especially in heating, may consequently become greater than the wall temperature. In a particular instance of cooling mode, a constant surface temperature case is temporarily occurred in which the axial temperature gradient will be zero. For relatively high frequencies, the unsteady bulk fluid temperature in some radial positions at some moments may be equal to the wall temperature; hence instantaneous cylindrical surfaces with zero radial heat flux may occur over a period of time. Depending on the value and sign of the thermal scale ratio, the quasi-steady-state Nusselt number (time-averaged at one period) approaches a specific value as the electrokinetic radius becomes infinity.

  11. Surface instability of a thin electrolyte film undergoing coupled electroosmotic and electrophoretic flows in a microfluidic channel.

    PubMed

    Ray, Bahni; Reddy, Puchalapalli Dinesh Sankar; Bandyopadhyay, Dipankar; Joo, Sang W; Sharma, Ashutosh; Qian, Shizhi; Biswas, Gautam

    2011-11-01

    We consider the stability of a thin liquid film with a free charged surface resting on a solid charged substrate by performing a general Orr-Sommerfeld (O-S) analysis complemented by a long-wave (LW) analysis. An externally applied field generates an electroosmotic flow (EOF) near the solid substrate and an electrophoretic flow (EPF) at the free surface. The EPF retards the EOF when both the surfaces have the same sign of the potential and can even lead to the flow reversal in a part of the film. In conjunction with the hydrodynamic stress, the Maxwell stress is also considered in the problem formulation. The electrokinetic potential at the liquid-air and solid-liquid interfaces is modelled by the Poisson-Boltzmann equation with the Debye-Hückel approximation. The O-S analysis shows a finite-wavenumber shear mode of instability when the inertial forces are strong and an LW interfacial mode of instability in the regime where the viscous force dominates. Interestingly, both the modes are found to form beyond a critical flow rate. The shear (interfacial) mode is found to be dominant when the film is thick (thin), the electric field applied is strong (weak), and the zeta-potentials on the liquid-air and solid-liquid interfaces are high (small). The LW analysis predicts the presence of the interfacial mode, but fails to capture the shear mode. The change in the propagation direction of the interfacial mode with the zeta-potential is predicted by both O-S and LW analyses. The parametric range in which the LW analysis is valid is thus demonstrated.

  12. Electro-osmotically driven MHD flow and heat transfer in micro-channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shit, G. C.; Mondal, A.; Sinha, A.; Kundu, P. K.

    2016-05-01

    A theoretical analysis is presented for electro-osmotic flow (EOF) of blood in a hydrophobic micro-channel with externally applied magnetic field. The lumen of micro-channels is assumed to be porous medium in addition to the consideration of permeability of the channel walls. The effects of slip velocity and thermal-slip are taken into consideration. The governing equations in the electrical double layer (EDL) together with the Poisson-Boltzmann equation and the body force exerted by the applied potential are furthermore considered. The flow is governed by the non-Newtonian viscoelastic fluid model. These equations along with the thermal energy equation are approximated by assuming that the channel height is much greater than the thickness of electrical double layer consisting the stern and diffusive layers. The problem is solved analytically and the computed results have presented graphically for various values of the dimensionless parameters. The results presented here have significant impact on the therapeutic treatment in hyperthermia as well as in controlling blood flow and heat transfer in micro-channels.

  13. Non-isothermal electro-osmotic flow in a microchannel with charge-modulated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bautista, Oscar; Sanchez, Salvador; Mendez, Federico

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we present an theoretical analysis of a nonisothermal electro-osmotic flow of a Newtonian fluid over charge-modulated surfaces in a microchannel. Here, the heating in the microchannel is due to the Joule effect caused by the imposition of an external electric field. The study is conducted through the use of perturbation techniques and is validated by means of numerical simulations. We consider that both, viscosity and electrical conductivity of the fluid are temperature-dependent; therefore, in order to determine the heat transfer process and the corresponding effects on the flow field, the governing equations of continuity, momentum, energy and electric potential have to be solved in a coupled manner. The principal obtained results evidence that the flow patterns are perturbed in a noticeable manner in comparison with the isothernal case. Our results may be used for increasing microfluidics mixing by conjugating thermal effects with the use of charge-modulated surfaces. This work has been supported by the research grants no. 220900 of Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACYT) and 20150919 of SIP-IPN at Mexico. F. Méndez acknowledges also the economical support of PAPIIT-UNAM under contract number IN112215.

  14. An analysis of steady/unsteady electroosmotic flows through charged cylindrical nano-channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, A. K.

    2013-11-01

    The steady/unsteady electroosmotic flow in an infinitely extended cylindrical channel with diameters ranging from 10 to 100 nm has been investigated. A mixture of (NaCl + H2O) is considered for the numerical calculation of the mass, potential, velocity, and mixing efficiency. Results are obtained for the channel diameters are small, equal, or greater than the electric double layer (EDL) both for steady and unsteady cases. In the present discussion, a symmetrical distribution of mole fractions is considered at the wall interface. Hence, the velocity and potential are symmetrical in nature toward the centerline of the channel, and also identical in nature at maximum and minimum time levels (i.e., at π/2 and 3 π/2 for a periodic function) in the transient case. In case of steady flows, the velocity and potential satisfy the chemical equilibrium condition at the centerline. It is observed that the electric double layer reaches a local equilibrium in the presence of electroosmosis when the channel length is long compared to the characteristic hydraulic diameter and the flow is essentially one-dimensional, which depends only on channel diameter. Comparisons of NP (Nernst Plank) model with PB (Poisson-Boltzmann) model are achieved out for different published results at larger channel diameters.

  15. Hydrodynamic dispersion of a neutral non-reacting solute in electroosmotic flow

    SciTech Connect

    S. K. Griffiths; R. H. Nilson

    1999-06-01

    Analytical methods are employed to determine the axial dispersion of a neutral non-reacting solute in an incompressible electroosmotic flow. In contrast to previous approaches, the dispersion is obtained here by solving the time-dependent diffusion-advection equation in transformed spatial and temporal coordinates to obtain the two-dimensional late-time concentration field. The coefficient of dispersion arises as a separation eigenvalue, and its value is obtained as a necessary condition for satisfying all of the required boundary conditions. Solutions based on the Debye-Huckel approximation are presented for both a circular tube and a channel of infinite width. These results recover the well-known solutions for dispersion in pressure-driven flows when the Debye length is very large. In this limit, the axial dispersion is proportional to the square of the Peclet number based on the characteristic transverse dimension of the tube or channel. In the tilt of very small Debye lengths, the authors find that the dispersion varies as the square of the Peclet number based on the Debye length. Simple approximations to the coefficient of dispersion as a function of the Debye length and Peclet number are also presented.

  16. Deformations of a pre-stretched elastic membrane driven by non-uniform electroosmotic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercovici, Moran; Boyko, Evgeniy; Gat, Amir

    2016-11-01

    We study viscous-elastic dynamics of fluid confined between a rigid plate and a pre-stretched elastic membrane subjected to non-uniform electroosmotic flow, and focus on the case of a finite-size membrane clamped at its boundaries. Considering small deformations of a strongly pre-stretched membrane, and applying the lubrication approximation for the flow, we derive a linearized leading-order non-homogenous 4th order diffusion equation governing the deformation and pressure fields. We derive a time-dependent Green's function for a rectangular domain, and use it to obtain several basic solutions for the cases of constant and time varying electric fields. In addition, defining an asymptotic expansion where the small parameter is the ratio of the induced to prescribed tension, we obtain a set of four one-way coupled equations providing a first order correction for the deformation field. Funded by the European Research Council (ERC) under the Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Programme, Grant agreement No. 678734 (MetamorphChip).

  17. Capillary electrophoresis: Imaging of electroosmotic and pressure driven flow profiles in fused silica capillaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, George O., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    This study is a continuation of the summer of 1994 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program. This effort is a portion of the ongoing work by the Biophysics Branch of the Marshall Space Flight Center. The work has focused recently on the separation of macromolecules using capillary electrophoresis (CE). Two primary goals were established for the effort this summer. First, we wanted to use capillary electrophoresis to study the electrohydrodynamics of a sample stream. Secondly, there was a need to develop a methodology for using CE for separation of DNA molecules of various sizes. In order to achieve these goals we needed to establish a procedure for detection of a sample plug under the influence of an electric field Detection of the sample with the microscope and image analysis system would be helpful in studying the electrohydrodynamics of this stream under load. Videotaping this process under the influence of an electric field in real time would also be useful. Imaging and photography of the sample/background electrolyte interface would be vital to this study. Finally, detection and imaging of electroosmotic flow and pressure driven flow must be accomplished.

  18. Rotating electro-osmotic flow over a plate or between two plates.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chien-Cheng; Wang, Chang-Yi

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate rotating electro-osmotic (EO) flow over an infinite plate or in a channel formed by two parallel plates. The analysis is based on the Debye-Hückel approximation for charge distributions and the Navier-Stokes equation for a transport electrolyte in the rotating frame. It is shown that, for the single plate, the nondimensional speed of system rotation ω is the singly most important parameter, while for the channel, in addition to ω, the nondimensional electrokinetic width K also plays an important role. However, the parameter ω≡η(2) has different natural appearances in the respective cases of a single plate (SP) and two plates (TPs). More precisely, η(SP) measures the ratio λ(D)/L(K) of the Debye length to the Ekman depth, while η(TP) measures the ratio L/L(K) of the channel width to the Ekman depth. The effect of rotation is always to reduce the axial flow rate along the direction of the applied electric field, accompanied by a (secondary) transverse flow. In the SP case, the plot on the velocity plane for each ω shows an interesting closed EO Ekman spiral. The size of the spiral shrinks with increasing ω. The transverse flow is so significant that the volume transport associated with the EO Ekman spiral turns clockwise 45° to the applied field near ω=0 and gradually turns at a right angle to the applied field as ω is increased. In contrast, in the TP case, the transverse flow rate is smaller than the axial flow rate when ω is small. The transverse flow rates at all K are observed to reach their maxima at ω of order 1. The volume transport is nearly at a zero angle to the applied field near ω=0 and gradually turns to 45° to the applied field as ω is increased. In the limit of ω→∞, for both SP and TP cases, the entire system forms a rigid body rotation-there is neither axial nor transverse flow.

  19. Surface Charge, Electroosmotic Flow and DNA Extension in Chemically Modified Thermoplastic Nanoslits and Nanochannels

    PubMed Central

    Uba, Franklin I.; Pullagurla, Swathi R.; Sirasunthorn, Nichanun; Wu, Jiahao; Park, Sunggook; Chantiwas, Rattikan; Cho, Yoonkyoung; Shin, Heungjoo; Soper, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Thermoplastics have become attractive alternatives to glass/quartz for microfluidics, but the realization of thermoplastic nanofluidic devices has been slow in spite of the rather simple fabrication techniques that can be used to produce these devices. This slow transition has in part been attributed to insufficient understanding of surface charge effects on the transport properties of single molecules through thermoplastic nanochannels. We report the surface modification of thermoplastic nanochannels and an assessment of the associated surface charge density, zeta potential and electroosmotic flow (EOF). Mixed-scale fluidic networks were fabricated in poly(methylmethacrylate), PMMA. Oxygen plasma was used to generate surface-confined carboxylic acids with devices assembled using low temperature fusion bonding. Amination of the carboxylated surfaces using ethylenediamine (EDA) was accomplished via EDC coupling. XPS and ATR-FTIR revealed the presence of carboxyl and amine groups on the appropriately prepared surfaces. A modified conductance equation for nanochannels was developed to determine their surface conductance and was found to be in good agreement with our experimental results. The measured surface charge density and zeta potential of these devices were lower than glass nanofluidic devices and dependent on the surface modification adopted, as well as the size of the channel. This property, coupled to an apparent increase in fluid viscosity due to nanoconfinement, contributed to the suppression of the EOF in PMMA nanofluidic devices by an order of magnitude compared to the micro-scale devices. Carboxylated PMMA nanochannels were efficient for the transport and elongation of λ-DNA while these same DNA molecules were unable to translocate through aminated nanochannels. PMID:25369728

  20. Suppression of ion conductance by electro-osmotic flow in nano-channels with weakly overlapping electrical double layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Guo, Lingzi; Zhu, Xin; Ran, Qiushi; Dutton, Robert

    2016-08-01

    This theoretical study investigates the nonlinear ionic current-voltage characteristics of nano-channels that have weakly overlapping electrical double layers. Numerical simulations as well as a 1-D mathematical model are developed to reveal that the electro-osmotic flow (EOF) interplays with the concentration-polarization process and depletes the ion concentration inside the channels, thus significantly suppressing the channel conductance. The conductance may be restored at high electrical biases in the presence of recirculating vortices within the channels. As a result of the EOF-driven ion depletion, a limiting-conductance behavior is identified, which is intrinsically different from the classical limiting-current behavior.

  1. A perturbative thermal analysis for an electro-osmotic flow in a slit microchannel based on a Lubrication theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Ali; Mendez, Federico; Bautista, Oscar; Lizardi, José

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we develop a new thermal analysis for an electro-osmotic flow in a rectangular microchannel. The central idea is very simple: the Debye length that defines the length of the electrical double-layer depends on temperature T. Therefore, if exists any reason to include variable temperature effects, the above length should be utilized with caution because it appears in any electro-osmotic mathematical model. For instance, the presence of the Joule effect is a source that can generate important longitudinal temperature gradients along the microchannel and the isothermal hypothesis is no longer valid. In this manner, the Debye length is altered and as a consequence, new longitudinal temperature gradient terms appear into the resulting governing equations. These terms are enough to change the electric potential and the flow field. Taking into account the above comments, in the present study the momentum equations together with the energy, Poisson and Ohmic current conservation equations are solved by using a regular perturbation technique. For this purpose, we introduce a dimensionless parameter α that measures the temperature deviations of a reference temperature.

  2. Study of electro-osmotic flows in microchannels packed with variable porosity media via lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Zhenhua; Guo, Zhaoli; Shi, Baochang

    2007-05-01

    In this article, electro-osmotic flow (EOF) in microchannels packed with a variable porosity medium is studied using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The present lattice Boltzmann model is constructed based on the generalized porous medium equation for EOF and validated by comparing the numerical solution with the approximate analytical solution. A detailed parametric study has been presented for EOF in microchannels filled with a variable porosity medium. It is found that the variations of porosity, particle size, ζ potential, applied electric field strength, and tortuosity significantly affect the flow pattern. Numerical results also indicate that the variation of the porosity near the wall has an important influence on the velocity profile, and should not be neglected in practice.

  3. Speciation of mercury by hydrostatically modified electroosmotic flow capillary electrophoresis coupled with volatile species generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiu-Ping; Yin, Xue-Bo; Jiang, Dong-Qing; He, Xi-Wen

    2003-04-01

    A novel method for speciation analysis of mercury was developed by on-line hyphenating capillary electrophoresis (CE) with atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). The four mercury species of inorganic mercury Hg(II), methymercury MeHg(I), ethylmercury EtHg(I), and phenylmercury PhHg(I) were separated as mercury-cysteine complexes by CE in a 50-cm x 100-microm-i.d. fused-silica capillary at 15 kV and using a mixture of 100 mmol L(-1) of boric acid and 12% v/v methanol (pH 9.1) as electrolyte. A novel technique, hydrostatically modified electroosmotic flow (HSMEOF) in which the electroosmotic flow (EOF) was modified by applying hydrostatical pressure opposite to the direction of EOF was used to improve resolution. A volatile species generation technique was used to convert the mercury species into their respective volatile species. A newly developed CE-AFS interface was employed to provide an electrical connection for stable electrophoretic separations and to allow on-line volatile species formation. The generated volatile species were on-line detected with AFS. The precisions (RSD, n = 5) were in the range of 1.9-2.5% for migration time, 1.8-6.3% for peak area response, and 2.3-6.1% for peak height response for the four mercury species. The detection limits ranged from 6.8 to 16.5 microg L(-1) (as Hg). The recoveries of the four mercury species in the water samples were in the range of 86.6-111%. The developed technique was successfully applied to speciation analysis of mercury in a certified reference material (DORM-2, dogfish muscle).

  4. Transport and reaction of nanoliter samples in a microfluidic reactor using electro-osmotic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arumbuliyur Comandur, Kaushik; Bhagat, Ali Asgar S.; Dasgupta, Subhashish; Papautsky, Ian; Banerjee, Rupak K.

    2010-03-01

    The primary focus of the paper is to establish both numerical and experimental methods to control the concentration of samples in a microreactor well. The concentration of the reacting samples is controlled by varying the initial sample size and electric field. Further, the paper numerically investigates the feasibility of mixing and reacting nanoliter samples with a wide variation in reaction rates in the microreactor driven by electro-osmotic pumping. Two discrete samples are measured and transported to the microreactor simultaneously by electro-osmotic pinching and switching. The transported samples are mixed in the microreactor and floated for 4.5 s for reaction to occur. It is seen that the normalized concentration of the product increases from 0.25 to 0.45 during that period. Also the effects of sample size and applied electric field on sample concentration during the switching process are studied. It is found that the normalized final sample concentration increases from 0.03 to 0.11 with an increase in sample size from 60 to 150 µm, at a constant electric field. Further, by increasing the electric field from 100 to 1000 V cm-1, at a constant sample size, there is a significant decrease in the final concentration of the sample from 0.14 to 0.04. Our studies also show that the normalized product concentration depends on the reaction rate and increases from 0.28 to 0.48 as the reaction rate increases from 10 L mol-1 s-1 to 105 L mol-1 s-1. However, the increase in the reaction rate beyond 105 L mol-1 s-1 does not influence the product concentration for the present design of the microreactor. Our microreactor with improved mixing can be used for assessing reactions of biological samples. The optimized sample size along with a controlled electric field for sample injection forms the basis for developing a prototype of a microreactor device for high throughput drug screening.

  5. Instantaneous velocity measurement of AC electroosmotic flows by laser induced fluorescence photobleaching anemometer with high temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wei; Yang, Fang; Qiao, Rui; Wang, Guiren; Rui Qiao Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the instantaneous response of flows to applied AC electric fields may help understand some unsolved issues in induced-charge electrokinetics and enhance performance of microfluidic devices. Since currently available velocimeters have difficulty in measuring velocity fluctuations with frequency higher than 1 kHz, most experimental studies so far focus only on the average velocity measurement in AC electrokinetic flows. Here, we present measurements of AC electroosmotic flow (AC-EOF) response time in microchannels by a novel velocimeter with submicrometer spatial resolution and microsecond temporal resolution, i.e. laser-induced fluorescence photobleaching anemometer (LIFPA). Several parameters affecting the AC-EOF response time to the applied electric signal were investigated, i.e. channel length, transverse position and solution conductivity. The experimental results show that the EOF response time under a pulsed electric field decreases with the reduction of the microchannel length, distance between the detection position to the wall and the conductivity of the solution. This work could provide a new powerful tool to measure AC electrokinetics and enhance our understanding of AC electrokinetic flows.

  6. Electro-osmotic infusion for joule heating soil remediation techniques

    DOEpatents

    Carrigan, Charles R.; Nitao, John J.

    1999-01-01

    Electro-osmotic infusion of ground water or chemically tailored electrolyte is used to enhance, maintain, or recondition electrical conductivity for the joule heating remediation technique. Induced flows can be used to infuse electrolyte with enhanced ionic conductivity into the vicinity of the electrodes, maintain the local saturation of near-electrode regions and resaturate a partially dried out zone with groundwater. Electro-osmotic infusion can also tailor the conductivity throughout the target layer by infusing chemically modified and/or heated electrolyte to improve conductivity contrast of the interior. Periodic polarity reversals will prevent large pH changes at the electrodes. Electro-osmotic infusion can be used to condition the electrical conductivity of the soil, particularly low permeability soil, before and during the heating operation. Electro-osmotic infusion is carried out by locating one or more electrodes adjacent the heating electrodes and applying a dc potential between two or more electrodes. Depending on the polarities of the electrodes, the induced flow will be toward the heating electrodes or away from the heating electrodes. In addition, electrodes carrying a dc potential may be located throughout the target area to tailor the conductivity of the target area.

  7. Mechanism of porous core electroosmotic pump flow injection system and its application to determination of chromium(VI) in waste-water.

    PubMed

    Gan, W E; Yang, L; He, Y Z; Zeng, R H; Cervera, M L; de la Guardia, M

    2000-04-03

    An electroosmotic pump flow injection system is introduced in this paper. According to electroosmotic theory, the pump's properties were described. A large flow range (mul min(-1)-ml min(-1)), moderate carrier pressure (>0.15 MPa), reduced performance voltage (<500 V) and stable flow rate (RSD<3.0% in 4 h) are the main properties of the pump. NH(4)OH (0.35 mM) was used as carrier for improving the pump's flow stability. The electroosmotic efficiency of the pump's medium, porous core, can be recovered and regenerated. A sandwich zone was used for sample and reagent introduction in order to adapt to the pump performance. Flow injection-spectrophotometry was employed for the determination of Cr(VI) in waste-water, based on the formation of the complex with 1,5-diphenylcarbazide and absorbance measurement at 540 nm. Within the calibration range of 0-7.0 mg l(-1) of Cr(VI), the RSD was 0.4% (n=5). The recovery of 0.70 mg l(-1) Cr(VI) added to the waste-water sample was 94.5+/-2.0% (n=5).

  8. Interfacial phenomena and dynamic contact angle modulation in microcapillary flows subjected to electroosmotic actuation.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Debapriya; Chakraborty, Suman

    2008-09-02

    The dynamic evolution of an incompressible liquid meniscus inside a microcapillary is investigated, under the combined influences of viscous, capillary, intermolecular, pondermotive, and electroosmotic effects. In the limit of small capillary numbers, an advancing meniscus shape is shown to merge smoothly with the precursor film, using matched asymptotic analysis. A scaling relationship is also established for the dynamic contact angle as a nondimensional function of the capillary number and the applied electrical voltage. The analysis is further generalized by invoking a kinetic slip model for overcoming the constraints of meniscus tip singularity. The kinetic slip model is subsequently utilized to analyze the interfacial dynamics from the perspective of the results obtained from the matched asymptotic analysis. A generalization is achieved in this regard, which may provide a sound basis for controlling the topographical features of a dynamically evolving meniscus in a microcapillary subjected to electrokinetic effects. These results are also in excellent agreement with the experimental findings over a wide range of capillary number values.

  9. Stagnation point reverse flow combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinn, Ben T. (Inventor); Neumeier, Yedidia (Inventor); Seitzman, Jerry M. (Inventor); Jagoda, Jechiel (Inventor); Weksler, Yoav (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A method for combusting a combustible fuel includes providing a vessel having an opening near a proximate end and a closed distal end defining a combustion chamber. A combustible reactants mixture is presented into the combustion chamber. The combustible reactants mixture is ignited creating a flame and combustion products. The closed end of the combustion chamber is utilized for directing combustion products toward the opening of the combustion chamber creating a reverse flow of combustion products within the combustion chamber. The reverse flow of combustion products is intermixed with combustible reactants mixture to maintain the flame.

  10. Flow batteries for microfluidic networks: configuring an electroosmotic pump for nonterminal positions.

    PubMed

    He, Chiyang; Lu, Joann J; Jia, Zhijian; Wang, Wei; Wang, Xiayan; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Liu, Shaorong

    2011-04-01

    A micropump provides flow and pressure for a lab-on-chip device, just as a battery supplies current and voltage for an electronic system. Numerous micropumps have been developed, but none is as versatile as a battery. One cannot easily insert a micropump into a nonterminal position of a fluidic line without affecting the rest of the fluidic system, and one cannot simply connect several micropumps in series to enhance the pressure output, etc. In this work we develop a flow battery (or pressure power supply) to address this issue. A flow battery consists of a +EOP (in which the liquid flows in the same direction as the field gradient) and a -EOP (in which the liquid flows opposite to the electric field gradient), and the outlet of the +EOP is directly connected to the inlet of the -EOP. An external high voltage is applied to this outlet-inlet joint via a short gel-filled capillary that allows ions but not bulk liquid flow, while the +EOP's inlet and the -EOP's outlet (the flow battery's inlet and outlet) are grounded. This flow battery can be deployed anywhere in a fluidic network without electrically affecting the rest of the system. Several flow batteries can be connected in series to enhance the pressure output to drive HPLC separations. In a fluidic system powered by flow batteries, a hydraulic equivalent of Ohm's law can be applied to analyze system pressures and flow rates.

  11. Contact line dynamics of electroosmotic flows of incompressible binary fluid system with density and viscosity contrasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Pranab Kumar; DasGupta, Debabrata; Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Ghosh, Uddipta; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-03-01

    We consider electrically driven dynamics of an incompressible binary fluid, with contrasting densities and viscosities of the two phases, flowing through narrow fluidic channel with walls with predefined surface wettabilities. Through phase field formalism, we describe the interfacial kinetics in the presence of electro-hydrodynamic coupling and address the contact line dynamics of the two-fluid system. We unveil the interplay of the substrate wettability and the contrast in the fluid properties culminating in the forms of two distinct regimes—interface breakup regime and a stable interface regime. Through a parametric study, we demarcate the effect of the density and viscosity contrasts along with the electrokinetic parameters such as the surface charge and ionic concentration on the underlying contact-line-dynamics over interfacial scales.

  12. Flow of Power-Law Liquids in a Hele-Shaw Cell Driven by Non-Uniform Electroosmotic Slip in the Case of Strong Depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyko, Evgeniy; Bercovici, Moran; Gat, Amir

    2016-11-01

    We analyze flow of a non-Newtonian fluid in a Hele-Shaw cell, subjected to spatially non-uniform electroosmotic flow. We specifically focus on power-law fluids with wall depletion properties and derive a p-Poisson equation governing the pressure field, as well as a set of linearized equations representing its asymptotic approximation for weakly non-Newtonian behavior. To investigate the effect of non-Newtonian properties on the resulting fluidic pressure and velocity, we consider several configurations in one and two dimensions, and calculate both exact and approximate solutions. We show that the asymptotic approximation is in good agreement with exact solutions even for fluids with significant non-Newtonian behavior. The asymptotic model thus enables prediction of the flow and pressure fields for non-Newtonian fluids, and may be particularly useful for the analysis and design of microfluidic systems involving electro-kinetic transport of such fluids.

  13. Influence of material transition and interfacial area changes on flow and concentration in electro-osmotic flows.

    PubMed

    Rani, Sudheer D; You, Byoung-Hee; Soper, Steve A; Murphy, Michael C; Nikitopoulos, Dimitris E

    2013-04-03

    This paper presents a numerical study to investigate the effect of geometrical and material transition on the flow and progression of a sample plug in electrokinetic flows. Three cases were investigated: (a) effect of sudden cross-sectional area change (geometrical transition or mismatch) at the interface, (b) effect of only material transition (i.e. varying ζ-potential), and (c) effect of combined material transition and cross-sectional area change at the interface. The geometric transition was quantified based on the ratio of reduced flow area A2 at the mismatch plane to the original cross-sectional area A1. Multiple simulations were performed for varying degrees of area reduction i.e. 0-75% reduction in the available flow area, and the effect of dispersion on the sample plug was quantified by standard metrics. Simulations showed that a 13% combined material and geometrical transition can be tolerated without significant loss of sample resolution. A 6.54% reduction in the flow rates was found between 0% and 75% combined material and geometrical transition.

  14. Determination of nerve agent degradation products by capillary electrophoresis using field-amplified sample stacking injection with the electroosmotic flow pump and contactless conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li; Hauser, Peter C; Lee, Hian Kee

    2009-07-31

    In the present study, field-amplified sample stacking injection using the electroosmotic flow pump (FAEP) was developed for the capillary electrophoretic separation of the four nerve agent degradation products methylphosphonic acid (MPA), ethyl methylphosphonic acid (EMPA), isopropyl methylphosphonic acid (IMPA) and cyclohexyl methylphosphonic acid (CMPA). Coupled to contactless conductivity detection, direct quantification of these non-UV active compounds could be achieved. Sensitivity enhancement of up to 500 to 750-fold could be obtained. The newly established approach was applied to the determination of the analytes in river water and aqueous extracts of soil. Detection limits of 0.5, 0.7, 1.4 and 2.7 ng/mL were obtained for MPA, EMPA, IMPA and CMPA, respectively, in river water and 0.09, 0.14, 0.44 and 0.22 microg/g, respectively, in soil.

  15. Effect of interfacial Maxwell stress on time periodic electro-osmotic flow in a thin liquid film with a flat interface.

    PubMed

    Mayur, Manik; Amiroudine, Sakir; Lasseux, Didier; Chakraborty, Suman

    2014-03-01

    Electro-osmotic flows (EOF) have seen remarkable applications in lab-on-a-chip based microdevices owing to their lack of moving components, durability, and nondispersive nature of the flow profiles under specifically designed conditions. However, such flows may typically suffer from classical Faradaic artifacts like electrolysis of the solvent, which affects the flow rate control. Such a problem has been seen to be overcome by employing time periodic EOFs. Electric field induced transport of a conductive liquid is another nontrivial problem that requires careful study of interfacial dynamics in response to such an oscillatory flow actuation. The present study highlights the role of electric field generated Maxwell stress and free surface potential along with the electric double layer thickness and forcing frequency, toward influencing the interfacial transport and fluid flow in free-surface electro-osmosis under a periodically varying external electric field, in a semi-analytical formalism. Our results reveal interesting regimes over which the pertinent interfacial phenomena as well as bulk transport characteristics may be favorably tuned by employing time varying electrical fields.

  16. Effect of surface charge density and electro-osmotic flow on ionic current in a bipolar nanopore fluidic diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal Singh, Kunwar; Kumar, Manoj

    2011-10-01

    We have simulated bipolar nanopore fluidic diodes for different values of surface charge densities, electrolyte concentrations, and thickness of transition zone. Nanopore enrichment leads to increased nanopore conductivity with the surface charge density at low electrolyte concentrations. Potential drop across the nanopore and electric field inside the nanopore decreases. Forward current and ionic current rectification peaks for a specific value of surface charge density. Even though the electro-osmotic current component remains small as compared to other components, its non-inclusion in the modeling leads to serious errors in the solutions. Significant ion current rectification can be obtained even if transition zone between oppositely charged zones is not narrow. The effect of the surface charge is screened by counterions at higher electrolyte concentrations, which leads to reduced electrolyte polarization and a decrease in the ion current rectification.

  17. Streamwise Oscillation of Airfoils into Reverse Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granlund, Kenneth; Jones, Anya; Ol, Michael

    2015-11-01

    An airfoil in freestream is oscillated in streamwise direction to cyclically enter reverse flow. Measured lift is compared to analytical blade element theories. Advance ratio, reduced frequency and angle of attack is varied within those typical for helicopters. Experimental results reveal that lift does not become negative in the flow reversal part, contradicting one theory and supported by another. Flow visualization reveal the leading edge vortex advecting against the freestream to a point in front of the leading edge.

  18. Stable electroosmotically driven actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sritharan, Deepa; Motsebo, Mylene; Tumbic, Julia; Smela, Elisabeth

    2013-04-01

    We have previously presented "nastic" actuators based on electroosmotic (EO) pumping of fluid in microchannels using high electric fields for potential application in soft robotics. In this work we address two challenges facing this technology: applying EO to meso-scale devices and the stability of the pumping fluid. The hydraulic pressure achieved by EO increases with as 1/d2, where d is the depth of the microchannel, but the flow rate (which determines the stroke and the speed) is proportional to nd, where n is the number of channels. Therefore to get high force and high stroke the device requires a large number of narrow channels, which is not readily achievable using standard microfabrication techniques. Furthermore, for soft robotics the structure must be soft. In this work we present a method of fabricating a three-dimensional porous elastomer to serve as the array of channels based on a sacrificial sugar scaffold. We demonstrate the concept by fabricating small pumps. The flexible devices were made from polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and comprise the 3D porous elastomer flanked on either side by reservoirs containing electrodes. The second issue addressed here involves the pumping fluid. Typically, water is used for EO, but water undergoes electrolysis even at low voltages. Since EO takes place at kV, these systems must be open to release the gases. We have recently reported that propylene carbonate (PC) is pumped at a comparable rate as water and is also stable for over 30 min at 8 kV. Here we show that PC is, however, degraded by moisture, so future EO systems must prevent water from reaching the PC.

  19. Electro-osmotic flow of power-law fluid and heat transfer in a micro-channel with effects of Joule heating and thermal radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shit, G. C.; Mondal, A.; Sinha, A.; Kundu, P. K.

    2016-11-01

    A mathematical model has been developed for studying the electro-osmotic flow and heat transfer of bio-fluids in a micro-channel in the presence of Joule heating effects. The flow of bio-fluid is governed by the non-Newtonian power-law fluid model. The effects of thermal radiation and velocity slip condition have been examined in the case of hydrophobic channel. The Poisson-Boltzmann equation governing the electrical double layer field and a body force generated by the applied electric potential field are taken into consideration. The results presented here pertain to the case where the height of the channel is much greater than the thickness of electrical double layer comprising the Stern and diffuse layers. The expressions for flow characteristics such as velocity, temperature, shear stress and Nusselt number have been derived analytically under the purview of the present model. The results estimated on the basis of the data available in the existing scientific literatures are presented graphically. The effects of thermal radiation have an important bearing on the therapeutic procedure of hyperthermia, particularly in understanding the heat transfer in micro-channel in the presence of electric potential. The dimensionless Joule heating parameter has a reducing impact on Nusselt number for both pseudo-plastic and dilatant fluids, nevertheless its impact on Nusselt number is more pronounced for dilatant fluid. Furthermore, the effect of viscous dissipation has a significant role in controlling heat transfer and should not be neglected.

  20. Orthogonal optical force separation simulation of particle and molecular species mixtures under direct current electroosmotic driven flow for applications in biological sample preparation.

    PubMed

    Staton, Sarah J R; Terray, Alex; Collins, Greg E; Hart, Sean J

    2013-04-01

    Presented here are the results from numerical simulations applying optical forces orthogonally to electroosmotically induced flow containing both molecular species and particles. Simulations were conducted using COMSOL v4.2a Multiphysics® software including the particle tracking module. The study addresses the application of optical forces to selectively remove particulates from a mixed sample stream that also includes molecular species in a pinched flow microfluidic device. This study explores the optimization of microfluidic cell geometry, magnitude of the applied direct current electric field, EOF rate, diffusion, and magnitude of the applied optical forces. The optimized equilibrium of these various contributing factors aids in the development of experimental conditions and geometry for future experimentation as well as directing experimental expectations, such as diffusional losses, separation resolution, and percent yield. The result of this work generated an optimized geometry with flow conditions leading to negligible diffusional losses of the molecular species while also being able to produce particle removal at near 100% levels. An analytical device, such as the one described herein with the capability to separate particulate and molecular species in a continuous, high-throughput fashion would be valuable by minimizing sample preparation and integrating gross sample collection seamlessly into traditional analytical detection methods.

  1. Time-reversed, flow-reversed ballistics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zernow, L.; Chapyak, E. J.; Scheffler, D. R.

    2001-01-01

    Two-dimensional simulations of planar sheet jet formation are studied to examine the hydrodynamic issues involved when simulations are carried out in the inverse direction, that is, with reversed time and flow. Both a realistic copper equation of state and a shockless equation of state were used. These studies are an initial step in evaluating this technique as a ballistics design tool.

  2. On the stability of reverse flow vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troshkin, O. V.

    2016-12-01

    The nonlinear stability of vortex zones of reverse flows in a plane-parallel ideal incompressible flow is proved. The zones originate at large values of a dimensionless parameter taken in the inflow part of the boundary, the so-called vorticity level. Positive or negative values of this parameter lead to a left- or right-hand oriented vortex, respectively.

  3. Axial Compressor Reversed Flow Performance.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    change which occurs at the stall limit of the compresor , the time-owaged data indicates that another flow mode change occurs in the neighborhood of the...surging compression system Into a small amplitude oscillation about the nonrecoverable stall point. This forced oscillation can then decay Into a system...were heavily dependent upon the model used for defining compressor post- stall performance, both steady state end transient, especially In the reve a

  4. Concentration Polarization and Nonequilibrium Electro-osmotic Instability at an Ion-Selective Surface Admitting Normal Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khair, Aditya

    2011-11-01

    We revisit and build upon on the prototypical problem of ion transport across a flat ideal ion-selective surface. Specifically, we examine the influence of imposed fluid flows on concentration polarization (CP) and electrokinetic instability at over-limiting currents. We consider an ion-selective surface, or membrane, that admits a uniform flow across itself. The membrane contacts an electrolyte, whose concentration is uniform in a well-mixed region at a prescribed distance from the membrane. A voltage across the system drives an ionic current, leading to CP in the ``unstirred layer'' between the membrane and well-mixed bulk. The CP reflects a balance between advection of ions with the ``normal flow'' and diffusion. A Peclet number, Pe, parameterizes their relative importance; note, Pe is signed, as the flow can be toward or away from the membrane. An asymptotic analysis for thin Debye layers reveals a nonlinear CP profile, in contrast to the familiar linear profile at Pe=0. Next, we consider over-limiting currents, wherein a non-equilibrium space-charge layer emerges near the membrane surface. Finally, we examine the instability of the quiescent concentration polarization due to second-kind electro-osmosis in the space-charge layer. A stability analysis shows that the imposed normal flow can enhance or retard the instability, depending on its direction.

  5. Unsteady Airloads on Airfoils in Reverse Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Andrew; Jones, Anya

    2014-11-01

    This work gives insight into the influence of airfoil characteristics on unsteady airloads for rotor applications where local airfoil sections may operate at high and/or reverse flow angles of attack. Two-dimensional wind tunnel experiments have been performed on four airfoil sections to investigate the effects of thickness, camber, and trailing edge shape on unsteady airloads (lift, pressure drag, and pitching moment). These model rotor blades were tested through 360 deg of incidence for 104 <=Re <=106 . Unsteady pressure transducers were mounted on the airfoil surface to measure the high frequency, dynamic pressure variations. The temporal evolution of chordwise pressure distributions and resulting airloads is quantified for each airfoil in each of the three unsteady wake regimes present in reverse flow. Specifically, the influence of the formation, growth, and shedding of vortices on the surface pressure distribution is quantified and compared between airfoils with a sharp geometric trailing edge and those with a blunt geometric trailing edge. These findings are integral to mitigation of rotor blade vibrations for applications where airfoil sections are subjected to reverse flow, such as high-speed helicopters and tidal turbines.

  6. An AC electroosmotic micropump for circular chromatographic applications.

    PubMed

    Debesset, S; Hayden, C J; Dalton, C; Eijkel, J C T; Manz, A

    2004-08-01

    Flow rates of up to 50 microm s(-1) have been successfully achieved in a closed-loop channel using an AC electroosmotic pump. The AC electroosmotic pump is made of an interdigitated array of unequal width electrodes located at the bottom of a channel, with an AC voltage applied between the small and the large electrodes. The flow rate was found to increase linearly with the applied voltage and to decrease linearly with the applied frequency. The pump is expected to be suitable for circular chromatography for the following reasons: the driving forces are distributed over the channel length and the pumping direction is set by the direction of the interdigitated electrodes. Pumping in a closed-loop channel can be achieved by arranging the electrode pattern in a circle. In addition the inherent working principle of AC electroosmotic pumping enables the independent optimisation of the channel height or the flow velocity.

  7. Electro-osmotically driven liquid delivery method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Rakestraw, D.J.; Anex, D.S.; Yan, C.; Dadoo, R.; Zare, R.N.

    1999-08-24

    Method and apparatus are disclosed for controlling precisely the composition and delivery of liquid at sub-{micro}L/min flow rate. One embodiment of such a delivery system is an electro-osmotically driven gradient flow delivery system that generates dynamic gradient flows with sub-{micro}L/min flow rates by merging a plurality of electro-osmotic flows. These flows are delivered by a plurality of delivery arms attached to a mixing connector, where they mix and then flow into a receiving means, preferably a column. Each inlet of the plurality of delivery arms is placed in a corresponding solution reservoir. A plurality of independent programmable high-voltage power supplies is used to apply a voltage program to each of the plurality of solution reservoirs to regulate the electro-osmotic flow in each delivery arm. The electro-osmotic flow rates in the delivery arms are changed with time according to each voltage program to deliver the required gradient profile to the column. 4 figs.

  8. Electro-osmotically driven liquid delivery method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Rakestraw, David J.; Anex, Deon S.; Yan, Chao; Dadoo, Rajeev; Zare, Richard N.

    1999-01-01

    Method and apparatus for controlling precisely the composition and delivery of liquid at sub-.mu.L/min flow rate. One embodiment of such a delivery system is an electro-osmotically driven gradient flow delivery system that generates dynamic gradient flows with sub-.mu.L/min flow rates by merging a plurality of electro-osmotic flows. These flows are delivered by a plurality of delivery arms attached to a mixing connector, where they mix and then flow into a receiving means, preferably a column. Each inlet of the plurality of delivery arms is placed in a corresponding solution reservoir. A plurality of independent programmable high-voltage power supplies is used to apply a voltage program to each of the plurality of solution reservoirs to regulate the electro-osmotic flow in each delivery arm. The electro-osmotic flow rates in the delivery arms are changed with time according to each voltage program to deliver the required gradient profile to the column.

  9. A facile and versatile approach for controlling electroosmotic flow in capillary electrophoresis via mussel inspired polydopamine/polyethyleneimine co-deposition.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qifeng; Li, Xiuju; Zhang, Qihui; Yang, Fengqing; Wei, Weili; Xia, Zhining

    2015-10-16

    Electroosmotic flow (EOF), which reveals the charge property of capillary inner surface, has an important impact on the separation performance and reproducibility of capillary electrophoresis (CE). In this study, a novel, facile and versatile method to achieve diverse and controllable EOF in CE was reported based on the co-deposition of mussel-inspired polydopamine (PDA) and branched polyethyleneimine (PEI) on the capillary inner surface as the hybrid functional coating. After these PDA/PEI co-deposited columns were reinforced by the post-incubation of FeCl3, various magnitude and direction of EOF in CE could be easily achieved by varying a number of preparation parameters, including the mass ratio of DA/PEI and the molecular weight of PEI (including PEI-600, PEI-1800, PEI-10000 and PEI-70000). The separation effectiveness and stability of the hybrid coated columns were verified by the analysis of aromatic acids and aniline derivatives. The results showed that the controllable and diverse EOF was important in enhancing the separation performance of the analytes. The baseline separation of all the five aromatic acids can be achieved in 7 min with high separation efficiency by using the PDA/PEI-600 co-deposited column with the mass ratio of 6:1. On the other hand, with the PDA/PEI-70000 co-deposited column with the mass ratio of 6:1, the aniline compounds were easily baseline separated within 10 min. By contrast, using the bare and PDA coated columns, the migration of the aromatic acids was very slow and the baseline separation of the aniline compounds cannot be obtained. Moreover, the co-deposited columns showed long lifetime and good stability. The relative standard deviations for intra-day, inter-day and capillary-to-capillary repeatability of the PDA/PEI-600 co-deposited column with the mass ratio of 6:1, which was reinforced by the post-incubation of FeCl3, were all lower than 5%.

  10. Electroosmotic Pumps with Frits Synthesized from Potassium Silicate

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Nathaniel D.

    2015-01-01

    Electroosmotic pumps employing silica frits synthesized from potassium silicate as a stationary phase show strong electroosmotic flow velocity and resistance to pressure-driven flow. We characterize these pumps and measure an electroosmotic mobility of 2.5×10-8 m2/V s and hydrodynamic resistance per unit length of 70 ×1017 Pa s/m4 with a standard deviation of less than 2% even when varying the amount of water used in the potassium silicate mixture. Furthermore, we demonstrate the simple integration of these pumps into a proof-of-concept PDMS lab-on-a-chip device fabricated from a 3D-printed template. PMID:26629907

  11. Electroosmotic Pumps with Frits Synthesized from Potassium Silicate.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Sara; Erlandsson, Per G; Robinson, Nathaniel D

    2015-01-01

    Electroosmotic pumps employing silica frits synthesized from potassium silicate as a stationary phase show strong electroosmotic flow velocity and resistance to pressure-driven flow. We characterize these pumps and measure an electroosmotic mobility of 2.5 × 10(-8) m(2)/V s and hydrodynamic resistance per unit length of 70 × 10(17) Pa s/m(4) with a standard deviation of less than 2% even when varying the amount of water used in the potassium silicate mixture. Furthermore, we demonstrate the simple integration of these pumps into a proof-of-concept PDMS lab-on-a-chip device fabricated from a 3D-printed template.

  12. Two types of flow reversal events observed in magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, I.; Nagai, T.; Fujimoto, M.; Kojima, H.; Zenitani, S.

    2015-12-01

    Geotail survey in magnetotail provides us with about 200 rapid flow reversal events where tailward flow (< -500 km/s) turns to earthward flow (> +300 km/s) within 10 minutes. We selected 46 definite flow reversal events from them in order to study the physics of X-lines, removing events where stationary plasma and/or tail lobe components are observed at the timing of flow reversals. We found that flow reversal events can be classified into two types according to electron heating/acceleration and low frequency wave activity. About 2/3 of the flow reversal events look "active." In these events, strong electron heating/acceleration and existence of ion-electron decoupling region are commonly observed. The intense wave active in the lower-hybrid frequency range is also observed even in high β region around the neutral sheet. These features are consistent with the collisionless reconnection model demonstrated by recent full kinetic numerical simulations. In contrast, other 1/3 of flow reversal events do not present any of them. No visible ion-electron decoupling is found in these "non-active" flow reversal events. This new finding indicates that the strong wave activity in the electric field would be related to the ion-electron decoupling process and that wave activity is a possible indicator for liveliness of reconnection (= evidence of fast electron flow). The fact that the non-active flow reversals tend to be distributed at the outer fringes of the active flow reversal regions implies that they are related to the three-dimensional structure of magnetic reconnection. In this presentation, we will discuss physical meaning of the difference between active and non-active flow reversal events. It is hard to discuss further collectively the nature of the non-active flow reversals only with single spacecraft measurements. This would be a good topic to be explored using multi-spacecraft data.

  13. Induced-charge electroosmotic trapping of particles.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yukun; Liu, Weiyu; Jia, Yankai; Tao, Ye; Shao, Jinyou; Ding, Yucheng; Jiang, Hongyuan

    2015-05-21

    Position-controllable trapping of particles on the surface of a bipolar metal strip by induced-charge electroosmotic (ICEO) flow is presented herein. We demonstrate a nonlinear ICEO slip profile on the electrode surface accounting for stable particle trapping behaviors above the double-layer relaxation frequency, while no trapping occurs in the DC limit as a result of a strong upward fluidic drag induced by a linear ICEO slip profile. By extending an AC-flow field effect transistor from the DC limit to the AC field, we reveal that fixed-potential ICEO exceeding RC charging frequency can adjust the particle trapping position flexibly by generating controllable symmetry breaking in a vortex flow pattern. Our results open up new opportunities to manipulate microscopic objects in modern microfluidic systems by using ICEO.

  14. Fabrication and characterization of a fritless microfabricated electroosmotic pump with reduced pH dependence.

    PubMed

    Razunguzwa, Trust T; Timperman, Aaron T

    2004-03-01

    A fritless electroosmotic pump with reduced pH dependence has been fabricated on a glass microchip and its performance characterized. The chip design consists of two 500-microm channels, one packed with anion exchange beads and the other packed with cation exchange beads, which produce convergent electroosmotic flow streams. The electroosmotically pumped solution flows away from the intersection of the two pumping channels through a field-free channel. This simple design allows for the production of a fritless electroosmotic pump and easy replacement of the ion exchange beads whose charged surfaces generate the flow. The pump was found to produce volumetric flow rates of up to 2 microL/min for an applied voltage of 3 kV at a pH of 6.8. Moreover, the electroosmotic pump can generate high flow rates over an extended pH range of at least 2-12, a significant advantage over previously fabricated electroosmotic pumps, which typically have a more limited range in which they can achieve high flow rates.

  15. Reciprocating pump with partial flow reversal

    SciTech Connect

    Frazier, T.L.; Dozier, J.D.

    1986-01-21

    This patent describes a reciprocating type pump for lifting fluid from wells and for other similar applications where operating conditions make its actions subject to blockage by mobile fines. The pump consists of a number of interactive components. The first component described in the patent is a pump barrel with a standing check valve at the bottom. The next components detailed are a pump plunger with a traveling check valve at the bottom and a mechanism for reciprocating the plunger in the barrel over a predetermined stroke distance with upper and lower limits on the motion. A principal feature of the patent which is discussed at length is the existence of a port in the barrel which is located above the middle of the stroke distance. Similarly, a means associated with the plunger for closing the port during that portion of the stroke distance when the plunger is below the level of the port is elucidated upon. The final component modality which is represented in the patent is a mechanism for biasing the traveling check valve closed against back pressure of less than a predetermined value such that the fluid is pumped back to reverse flow and thus effects the unblocking of the mobile fines during a portion of the stroke distance of each cycle.

  16. High Pressure Reverse Flow APS Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senneff, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    A design and test demonstration effort was undertaken to evaluate the concept of the reverse flow engine for the APS engine application. The 1500 lb (6672 N) thrust engine was designed to operate on gaseous hydrogen and gaseous oxygen propellants at a mixture ratio of 4 and to achieve the objective performance of 435 sec (4266 Nsec/kg) specific impulse. Superimposed durability requirements called for a million-cycle capability with 50 hours duration. The program was undertaken as a series of tasks including the initial preliminary design, design of critical test components and finally, the design and demonstration of an altitude engine which could be used interchangeably to examine operating parameters as well as to demonstrate the capability of the concept. The program results are reported with data to indicate that all of the program objectives were met or exceeded within the course of testing on the program. The analysis effort undertaken is also reported in detail and supplemented with test data in some cases where prior definitions could not be made. The results are contained of these analyses as well as the test results conducted throughout the course of the program. Finally, the test data and analytical results were combined to allow recommendations for a flight weight design. This preliminary design effort is also detailed.

  17. Extensional instability in electro-osmotic microflows of polymer solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryce, R. M.; Freeman, M. R.

    2010-03-01

    Fluid transport in microfluidic systems typically is laminar due to the low Reynolds number characteristic of the flow. The inclusion of suspended polymers imparts elasticity to fluids, allowing instabilities to be excited when substantial polymer stretching occurs. For high molecular weight polymer chains we find that flow velocities achievable by standard electro-osmotic pumping are sufficient to excite extensional instabilities in dilute polymer solutions. We observe a dependence in measured fluctuations on polymer concentration which plateaus at a threshold corresponding to the onset of significant molecular crowding in macromolecular solutions; plateauing occurs well below the overlap concentration. Our results show that electro-osmotic flows of complex fluids are disturbed from the steady regime, suggesting potential for enhanced mixing and requiring care in modeling the flow of complex liquids such as biopolymer suspensions.

  18. Electroosmotic transport in polyelectrolyte-grafted nanochannels with pH-dependent charge density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guang; Das, Siddhartha

    2015-05-01

    "Smart" polyelectrolyte-grafted or "soft" nanochannels with pH-responsiveness have shown great promise for applications like manipulation of ion transport, ion sensing and selection, current rectification, and many more. In this paper, we develop a theory to study the electroosmotic transport in a polyelectrolyte-grafted (or soft) nanochannel with pH-dependent charge density. In one of our recent studies, we have identified that explicit consideration of hydrogen ion concentration is mandatory for appropriately describing the electrostatics of such systems and the resulting monomer concentration must obey a non-unique, cubic distribution. Here, we use this electrostatic calculation to study the corresponding electroosmotic transport. We establish that the effect of pH in the electroosmotic transport in polyelectrolyte-grafted nanochannels introduces two separate issues: first is the consideration of the hydrogen and hydroxyl ion concentrations in describing the electroosmotic body force, and second is the consideration of the appropriate drag force that bears the signature of this cubic monomeric distribution. Our results indicate that the strength of the electroosmotic velocity for the pH-dependent case is always smaller than that for the pH-independent case, with the extent of this difference being a function of the system parameters. Such nature of the electroosmotic transport will be extremely significant in suppressing the electroosmotic flow strength with implications in large number applications such as capillary electrophoresis induced separation, electric field mediated DNA elongation, electrophoretic DNA nanopore sequencing, and many more.

  19. Reversed flow injection spectrophotometric determination of chlorate.

    PubMed

    Chuesaard, Thanyarat; Wonganan, Tharinee; Wongchanapiboon, Teerapol; Liawruangrath, Saisunee

    2009-09-15

    An interfacing has been developed to connect a spectrophotometer with a personal computer and used as a readout system for development of a simple, rapid and sensitive reversed flow injection (rFI) procedure for chlorate determination. The method is based on the oxidation of indigo carmine by chlorate ions in an acidic solution (dil. HCl) leading to the decrease in absorbance at 610 nm. The decrease in absorbance is directly related to the chlorate concentration present in the sample solutions. Optimum conditions for chlorate were examined. A linear calibration graph over the range of 0.1-0.5 mg L(-1) chlorate was established with the regression equation of Y=104.5X+1.0, r(2)=0.9961 (n=6). The detection limit (3 sigma) of 0.03 mg L(-1), the limit of quantitation (10 sigma) of 0.10 mg L(-1) and the RSD of 3.2% for 0.3 mg L(-1) chlorate (n=11) together with a sample throughput of 92 h(-1) were obtained. The recovery of the added chlorate in spiked water samples was 98.5+/-3.1%. Major interferences for chlorate determination were found to be BrO(3)(-), ClO(2)(-), ClO(-) and IO(3)(-) which were overcome by using SO(3)(2-) (as Na(2)SO(3)) as masking agent. The method has been successfully applied for the determination of chlorate in spiked water samples with the minimum reagent consumption of 14.0 mL h(-1). Good agreement between the proposed rFIA and the reference methods was found verified by Student's t-test at 95% confidence level.

  20. Reverse-flow strategy in biofilters treating CS₂ emissions.

    PubMed

    Rojo, Naiara; Gallastegui, Gorka; Gurtubay, Luis; Barona, Astrid; Elías, Ana

    2013-04-01

    The bacteriostatic properties of carbon disulphide (CS₂) hamper its biodegradation in conventional biofilters. The response of four biofilters operating in downflow mode and reverse-flow mode was compared in a laboratory-scale plant treating CS₂ under sudden short-term changes in operating conditions. A process shutdown for 24 h, an inlet concentration increase and an interruption of the inlet air humidification for 48 h at an empty bed residence time (EBRT) of 240 s did not impact significantly on biodegradation performance, regardless of flow mode. Nevertheless, a reduction in the EBRT to 60 s resulted in a significant decrease in removal efficiency in all the biofilters. The CS₂ degradation profile showed that the reverse-flow mode strategy rendered a more homogenous distribution of biomass along the bed height. The benefits of the reverse-flow mode were demonstrated even when the unidirectional flow mode was re-established.

  1. Calculations of unsteady turbulent boundary layers with flow reversal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, J. F.; Patel, V. C.

    1975-01-01

    The results are presented of a series of computational experiments aimed at studying the characteristics of time-dependent turbulent boundary layers with embedded reversed-flow regions. A calculation method developed earlier was extended to boundary layers with reversed flows for this purpose. The calculations were performed for an idealized family of external velocity distributions, and covered a range of degrees of unsteadiness. The results confirmed those of previous studies in demonstrating that the point of flow reversal is nonsingular in a time-dependent boundary layer. A singularity was observed to develop downstream of reversal, under certain conditions, accompanied by the breakdown of the boundary-layer approximations. A tentative hypothesis was advanced in an attempt to predict the appearance of the singularity, and is shown to be consistent with the calculated results.

  2. Reverse Flow Engine Core Having a Ducted Fan with Integrated Secondary Flow Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kisska, Michael K. (Inventor); Princen, Norman H. (Inventor); Kuehn, Mark S. (Inventor); Cosentino, Gary B. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Secondary air flow is provided for a ducted fan having a reverse flow turbine engine core driving a fan blisk. The fan blisk incorporates a set of thrust fan blades extending from an outer hub and a set of integral secondary flow blades extending intermediate an inner hub and the outer hub. A nacelle provides an outer flow duct for the thrust fan blades and a secondary flow duct carries flow from the integral secondary flow blades as cooling air for components of the reverse flow turbine engine.

  3. Flow instability and flow reversal in heated annular multichannels with initial downward flow

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, H.N.; Hart, C.M.

    1992-12-31

    Experimental and theoretical results are presented regarding the stability of initial downward flow of single phase water in parallel annular channels of the Savannah River Site (SRS) fuel assembly. The test was performed on an electrically heated prototypic mockup of a Mark-22 fuel assembly. The test conditions consisted of mass fluxes, from 98--294 kg/m{sup 2}-sec, and inlet water temperatures of 25{degrees}C and 40{degrees}C. With increased power to the heaters, flow instability was detected, characterized by flow fluctuations and flow redistribution among subchannels of the outer flow channel. With increased power, a condition was observed indicating local subchannel flow reversals where certain subchannel fluid temperatures were high at the inlet and low at the exit. With additional power increased, a critical heat flux condition was observed indicating local subchannel flow reversals where certain subchannel fluid temperatures were high at the inlet and low at the exit. With additional power increases, a critical heat flux condition was reached in the outer channel.

  4. Flow instability and flow reversal in heated annular multichannels with initial downward flow

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, H.N.; Hart, C.M.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical results are presented regarding the stability of initial downward flow of single phase water in parallel annular channels of the Savannah River Site (SRS) fuel assembly. The test was performed on an electrically heated prototypic mockup of a Mark-22 fuel assembly. The test conditions consisted of mass fluxes, from 98--294 kg/m[sup 2]-sec, and inlet water temperatures of 25[degrees]C and 40[degrees]C. With increased power to the heaters, flow instability was detected, characterized by flow fluctuations and flow redistribution among subchannels of the outer flow channel. With increased power, a condition was observed indicating local subchannel flow reversals where certain subchannel fluid temperatures were high at the inlet and low at the exit. With additional power increased, a critical heat flux condition was observed indicating local subchannel flow reversals where certain subchannel fluid temperatures were high at the inlet and low at the exit. With additional power increases, a critical heat flux condition was reached in the outer channel.

  5. A dynamic model of the electroosmotic droplet switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barz, Dominik P. J.; Steen, Paul H.

    2013-09-01

    A capillary switch is a bi-stable system of liquid/gas interfaces with a trigger to toggle back and forth between the two stable equilibrium states. We use an electro-osmotic pump as trigger. The pump, consisting of two electrodes and a porous substrate arranged between the droplets, moves volume between the droplets. This bistable system is called an electro-osmotic droplet switch. With the pump off, for low total volumes, the stable states are a pair of identical sub-hemispherical droplets or, for large enough total volumes, a large-small droplet configuration (two mirror-symmetric states). With the pump on, these stationary states are shifted and, if the pump strength is too great, there are no stationary states at all. In this article, we report the pump-on behavior as a modification of the pump-off behavior. To build the dynamic model of the system, we first develop a characterization of the electro-osmotic pump in the spirit of the Blake-Kozeny correlation for viscous flow through a packed bed. The control-volume model is based on center-of-mass motion. Model predictions compare favorably to observation.

  6. Reversal of theta rhythm flow through intact hippocampal circuits.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Jesse; Amilhon, Bénédicte; Goutagny, Romain; Bott, Jean-Bastien; Manseau, Frédéric; Kortleven, Christian; Bressler, Steven L; Williams, Sylvain

    2014-10-01

    Activity flow through the hippocampus is thought to arise exclusively from unidirectional excitatory synaptic signaling from CA3 to CA1 to the subiculum. Theta rhythms are important for hippocampal synchronization during episodic memory processing; thus, it is assumed that theta rhythms follow these excitatory feedforward circuits. To the contrary, we found that theta rhythms generated in the rat subiculum flowed backward to actively modulate spike timing and local network rhythms in CA1 and CA3. This reversed signaling involved GABAergic mechanisms. However, when hippocampal circuits were physically limited to a lamellar slab, CA3 outputs synchronized CA1 and the subiculum using excitatory mechanisms, as predicted by classic hippocampal models. Finally, analysis of in vivo recordings revealed that this reversed theta flow was most prominent during REM sleep. These data demonstrate that communication between CA3, CA1 and the subiculum is not exclusively unidirectional or excitatory and that reversed inhibitory theta signaling also contributes to intrahippocampal synchrony.

  7. Dynamics of poloidal flows in enhanced reverse shear bifurcation

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, R.; Avinash, K.

    2005-07-15

    A simple reduced enhanced reverse shear (RERS) model is constructed to study the dynamics of poloidal flows during the ERS transition. This model predicts that a reversal of poloidal flow shear occurs just prior to the transition, as seen in experiment [R. E. Bell et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 1429 (1998)]. This transition front propagates until the radial location where the safety factor (q) is minimum and becomes locked there due to insufficient input power to overcome the threshold requirement for the bifurcation. This study also reveals that there can be many routes to ERS transition depending upon various tunable parameters.

  8. Hemodynamics and transient flow reversal in real deployed stents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, Ralph; Ionescu, Mircea

    2011-11-01

    Restenosis rates caused by neointimal hyperplasia are relatively high (~ 30 %) after stent implantation in stenosed arteries. The flow around stent struts under steady and unsteady conditions using computational hemodynamics (CHD) was studied to identify contributing factors to the formation of low and oscillating wall shear stress regions that have been shown to promote endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerotic plaque formation in arteries. Datasets of the Neuroform, BxVelocity, and Taxus stents deployed in straight polymer tubes were obtained from high resolution micro computed tomography. Finite volume CHD simulations of steady and unsteady flow with and without flow reversal were performed. Stagnation zones were noticed adjacent to the strut junctions as the flow enters and exits the stent cells. The stagnation zones were larger in the case of the stents with larger strut diameter (BxVelocity, Taxus), wider strut junctions and larger angles between the struts. Unsteady flow simulations showed enhanced flow reversal with thicker struts and large regions of recirculation flow developing inside the stent at Reynolds numbers higher than 200. It was shown that alterations in blood flow due to real stent deployment (strut prolapse, junction misalignment) cannot be captured with computer generated stent models, that stent specific geometry, and time dependent flow effects can locally alter the wall shear stress and stagnation zones.

  9. Turbulence, flow and transport: hints from reversed field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vianello, N.; Antoni, V.; Spada, E.; Spolaore, M.; Serianni, G.; Cavazzana, R.; Bergsåker, H.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.

    2006-04-01

    The interplay between sheared E × B flows and turbulence has been experimentally investigated in the edge region of the Extrap-T2R reversed field pinch experiment. Electrostatic fluctuations are found to rule the momentum balance equation representing the main driving term for sheared flows which counterbalances anomalous viscous damping. The driving role of electrostatic fluctuations is proved by the spatial structure of the Reynolds stress and by the time behaviour of the mean energy production term which supports the existence of an energy exchange from the small scales of turbulence to the larger scales of the mean flow.

  10. In-situ measurement of electroosmotic drag coefficient in Nafion membrane for the PEMFC.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhe; Morin, Arnaud; Huguet, Patrice; Schott, Pascal; Pauchet, Joël

    2011-11-10

    A new method based on hydrogen pump has been developed to measure the electroosmotic drag coefficient in representative PEMFC operating conditions. It allows eliminating the back-flow of water which leads to some errors in the calculation of this coefficient with previously reported electrochemical methods. Measurements have been performed on 50 μm thick Nafion membranes both extruded and recast. Contrary to what has been described in most of previous published works, the electroosmotic drag coefficient decreases as the membrane water content increases. The same trend is observed for temperatures between 25 and 80 °C. For the same membrane water content, the electroosmotic drag coefficient increases with temperature. In the same condition, there is no difference in drag coefficient for extruded Nafion N112 and recast Nafion NRE212. These results are discussed on the basis of the two commonly accepted proton transport mechanisms, namely, Grotthus and vehicular.

  11. Unsteady Aerodynamics of Static Airfoils in Reverse Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Andrew; Jones, Anya

    2013-11-01

    Wind tunnel experiments have been conducted on two-dimensional blunt and sharp trailing edge airfoils held at static angles of attack in reverse flow for three Reynolds numbers. The current work is aimed at advancing the understanding of fully developed reverse flow for high-speed helicopter applications, and evaluates the potential for blunt trailing edge airfoils to mitigate unsteady rotor blade airloads in this flow regime. Time-resolved particle image velocimetry measurements at post-stall angles of attack have revealed the evolution of a trailing edge vortex formed by the roll-up of vorticity generated in a separated shear layer. Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) was applied to the flow field measurements to improve the identification and tracking of dominant flow structures. Unsteady force balance measurements have captured non-structural vibrations with frequency content which correlates well with that of the temporal coefficients for the first two POD spatial modes. These vibrations vary in frequency with angle of attack and are shown to be linked with trailing edge vortex shedding. The findings presented here give fundamental insight towards the development of efficient rotor blades for high-speed helicopters.

  12. Electrolyte management for effective long-term electro-osmotic transport in low-permeability soils.

    PubMed

    Cherepy, Nerine J; Wildenschild, Dorthe

    2003-07-01

    Electro-osmosis, a coupled-flow phenomenon in which an applied electrical potential gradient drives water flow, may be used to induce water flow through fine-grained sediments. Test cell measurements of electro-osmotic transport in clayey cores extracted from the 27-31 m depth range of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory site indicate the importance of pH control within the anode and cathode reservoirs. In our first experiment, pH was not controlled. As a result, carbonate precipitation and metals precipitation occurred near the cathode end of the core, with acidification near the anode. The combination of these acid and base reactions led to the decline of electro-osmotic flow by a factor of 2 in less than one pore volume. In a second experiment, long-term water transport (>21 pore volumes) at stable electro-osmotic conductivity (k(eo) approximately 1 x 10(-9) m2/s-V) was effected with anode reservoir pH > 8, and cathode reservoir pH < 6. Hydraulic conductivity (k(h)) of the same core was 4 x 10(-10) m/s under a 0.07 MPa hydraulic gradient without electro-osmosis. Stable electro-osmotic flow was measured at a velocity of 4 x 10(-7) m/s under a 4 V/cm voltage gradient, and no hydraulic gradient-3 orders of magnitude greater than the hydraulic flow. We also observed chloroform production in the anode reservoir, resulting from electrochemical production of chlorine gas reacting with trace organics. The chloroform was transported electro-osmotically to the cathode, without measurable loss to adsorption, volatilization, or degradation.

  13. Applications of Electro-Osmotic Transport in the Processing of Textiles

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.F.; Krueger, R.; Hopper, R.; Cherepy, N.

    1999-11-29

    We report development of a pilot process for the industrial rinsing of fabrics. This process combines hydraulic (pressure-driven) transport with electro-osmotic transport. It reduces the total amount of water required in certain rinsing operations by a factor of about five. Cotton exhibits an electro-osmotic transport coefficient of about 6 x 10{sup -9} m{sup 2}/s-V resulting from a partial ionization of hydroxyl groups on the cellulose polymer substrate. This process applies a field transverse to the fabric to effect the movement of water in the spaces between the 10 {micro}m cotton fibers which constitute the yam. The field strength is adjusted so that the induced electro-osmotic flux is comparable to a pressure-driven flux, which moves preferentially in the more open channels between the yams. For a fixed current density, solution conductivity and electro-osmotic transport vary inversely. The process is most practical for removal of liquids of relatively low conductivity (<500 {micro}S/cm). For removal of solutions of conductivity greater than 1200 {micro}S/cm, the rate of electro-osmotic flow may be too low to benefit the rinsing process if current densities are restricted to practical levels of about 30 mA/cm{sup 2}. Electra-osmotic transport may have important applications in wet processing of extremely fine textiles, such as micro fiber fabrics. In addition to rinsing, electro-osmotic transport may also be used to speed the penetration of chemicals and dyestuffs that are applied to the surface of wet textiles.

  14. The phase reversal phenomenon at flow separation and reattachment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stack, J. Pete; Mangalam, S. M.; Kalburgi, V.

    1988-01-01

    Tests were conducted on two different airfoils, one of them in a low-turbulence tunnel, to detect laminar separation and turbulent reattachment locations. A 'nonintrusive' multielement sensor consisting of a large number of closely spaced individual nickel films was vacuum deposited on a thin substrate and bonded to the airfoil model surface. Each sensor element was a part of an independent constant temperature anemometer system. Time history as well as spectral analysis of signals from surface film gauges were used to determine the surface shear flow characteristics. A major breakthrough was achieved with the discovery of phase reversal in low-frequency dynamic shear stress signals across regions of flow separation and reattachment.

  15. ac electroosmotic pumping induced by noncontact external electrodes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shau-Chun; Chen, Hsiao-Ping; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2007-09-21

    Electroosmotic (EO) pumps based on dc electroosmosis is plagued by bubble generation and other electrochemical reactions at the electrodes at voltages beyond 1 V for electrolytes. These disadvantages limit their throughput and offset their portability advantage over mechanical syringe or pneumatic pumps. ac electroosmotic pumps at high frequency (>100 kHz) circumvent the bubble problem by inducing polarization and slip velocity on embedded electrodes,1 but they require complex electrode designs to produce a net flow. We report a new high-throughput ac EO pump design based on induced-polarization on the entire channel surface instead of just on the electrodes. Like dc EO pumps, our pump electrodes are outside of the load section and form a cm-long pump unit consisting of three circular reservoirs (3 mm in diameter) connected by a 1x1 mm channel. The field-induced polarization can produce an effective Zeta potential exceeding 1 V and an ac slip velocity estimated as 1 mmsec or higher, both one order of magnitude higher than earlier dc and ac pumps, giving rise to a maximum throughput of 1 mulsec. Polarization over the entire channel surface, quadratic scaling with respect to the field and high voltage at high frequency without electrode bubble generation are the reasons why the current pump is superior to earlier dc and ac EO pumps.

  16. Mirror reading can reverse the flow of time.

    PubMed

    Casasanto, Daniel; Bottini, Roberto

    2014-04-01

    How does culture shape our concepts? Across many cultures, people conceptualize time as if it flows along a horizontal timeline, but the direction of this implicit timeline is culture specific: Later times are on the right in some cultures but on the left in others. Here we investigated whether experience reading can determine the direction and orientation of the mental timeline, independent of other cultural and linguistic factors. Dutch speakers performed space-time congruity tasks with the instructions and stimuli written in either standard, mirror-reversed, or rotated orthography. When participants judged temporal phrases written in standard orthography, their reaction times were consistent with a rightward-directed mental timeline, but after brief exposure to mirror-reversed orthography, their mental timelines were reversed. When standard orthography was rotated 90° clockwise (downward) or counterclockwise (upward), participants' mental timelines were rotated, accordingly. Reading can play a causal role in shaping people's implicit time representations. Exposure to a new orthography can change the direction and orientation of the mental timeline within minutes, even when the new space-time mapping directly contradicts the reader's usual mapping. To account for this representational flexibility, we propose the hierarchical mental metaphors theory, according to which culturally conditioned mappings between space and time are specific instances of a more general mapping, which is conditioned by the relationship between space and time in the physical world. Conceptualizations of time are culture specific at one level of analysis but may be universal at another.

  17. Compliant Metal Enhanced Convection Cooled Reverse-Flow Annular Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paskin, Marc D.; Acosta, Waldo A.

    1994-01-01

    A joint Army/NASA program was conducted to design, fabricate, and test an advanced, reverse-flow, small gas turbine combustor using a compliant metal enhanced (CME) convection wall cooling concept. The objectives of this effort were to develop a design method (basic design data base and analysis) for the CME cooling technique and tben demonstrate its application to an advanced cycle, small, reverse-flow combustor with 3000 F (1922 K) burner outlet temperature (BOT). The CME concept offers significant improvements in wall cooling effectiveness resulting in a large reduction in cooling air requirements. Therefore, more air is available for control of burner outlet temperature pattern in addition to the benefit of improved efficiency, reduced emissions, and smoke levels. Rig test results demonstrated the benefits and viability of the CME concept meeting or exceeding the aerothermal performance and liner wall temperature characteristics of similar lower temperature-rise combustors, achieving 0.15 pattern factor at 3000 F (1922 K) BOT, while utilizing approximately 80 percent less cooling air than conventional, film-cooled combustion systems.

  18. Thermal inertia and reversing buoyancy in flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menand, Thierry; Raw, Alan; Woods, Andrew W.

    2003-03-01

    The displacement of fluids through porous rocks is fundamental for the recharge of geothermal and hydrocarbon reservoirs [Grant et al., 1982; Lake, 1989], for contaminant dispersal through the groundwater [Bear, 1972] and in controlling mineral reactions in permeable rocks [Phillips, 1991]. In many cases, the buoyancy force associated with density differences between the formation fluid and the displacing fluid controls the rate and pattern of flow through the permeable rock [Phillips, 1991; Barenblatt, 1996; Turcotte and Schubert, 2002]. Here, using new laboratory experiments, we establish that a striking range of different flow patterns may develop depending on whether this density contrast is associated with differences in temperature and/or composition between the two fluids. Owing to the effects of thermal inertia in a porous rock, thermal fronts lag behind compositional fronts [Woods and Fitzgerald, 1993; Turcotte and Schubert, 2002], so that two zones of different density develop in the region flooded with injected fluid. This can lead to increasing, decreasing or even reversing buoyancy in the injected liquid; in the latter case it may then form a double-flood front, spreading along both the upper and lower boundary of the rock. Recognition of these different flow regimes is key for predicting sweep efficiency and dispersal patterns in natural and engineered flows, and offers new opportunities for the enhanced recovery of natural resources in porous rocks.

  19. Convective flow reversal in self-powered enzyme micropumps

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Rivera, Isamar; Shum, Henry; Agrawal, Arjun; Sen, Ayusman; Balazs, Anna C.

    2016-01-01

    Surface-bound enzymes can act as pumps that drive large-scale fluid flows in the presence of their substrates or promoters. Thus, enzymatic catalysis can be harnessed for “on demand” pumping in nano- and microfluidic devices powered by an intrinsic energy source. The mechanisms controlling the pumping have not, however, been completely elucidated. Herein, we combine theory and experiments to demonstrate a previously unreported spatiotemporal variation in pumping behavior in urease-based pumps and uncover the mechanisms behind these dynamics. We developed a theoretical model for the transduction of chemical energy into mechanical fluid flow in these systems, capturing buoyancy effects due to the solution containing nonuniform concentrations of substrate and product. We find that the qualitative features of the flow depend on the ratios of diffusivities δ=DP/DS and expansion coefficients β=βP/βS of the reaction substrate (S) and product (P). If δ>1 and δ>β (or if δ<1 and δ<β), an unexpected phenomenon arises: the flow direction reverses with time and distance from the pump. Our experimental results are in qualitative agreement with the model and show that both the speed and direction of fluid pumping (i) depend on the enzyme activity and coverage, (ii) vary with the distance from the pump, and (iii) evolve with time. These findings permit the rational design of enzymatic pumps that accurately control the direction and speed of fluid flow without external power sources, enabling effective, self-powered fluidic devices. PMID:26903618

  20. Measuring microchannel electroosmotic mobility and zeta potential by the current monitoring method.

    PubMed

    Shao, Chenren; Devoe, Don L

    2013-01-01

    Electroosmotic flow (EOF) is an electrokinetic flow control technique widely used in microfluidic systems for applications including direct electrokinetic pumping, hydrodynamic pressure generation, and counterflow for microfluidic separations. During EOF, an electric field is applied along the length of a microchannel containing an electrolyte, with mobile ions near the charged microchannel walls experiencing a Coulomb force due to electrostatic interactions with the applied electric field that leads to bulk solution movement. The goal of this laboratory is to experimentally determine the fixed channel surface charge (zeta potential) and electroosmotic mobility associated with a given microchannel substrate material and buffer solution, using a simple current monitoring method to measure the average flow velocity within the microchannel. It is a straightforward experiment designed to help students understand EOF physics while gaining hands-on experience with basic world-to-chip interfacing. It is well suited to a 90-min laboratory session for up to 12 students with minimal infrastructure requirements.

  1. Ion Exchange Resin Bead Decoupled High-Pressure Electroosmotic Pump

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bingcheng; Zhang, Feifang; Liang, Xinmiao; Dasgupta, Purnendu K.; Liu, Shaorong

    2009-01-01

    We describe an electroosmotic pump (EOP) that utilizes a cation exchange resin bead as the electric field decoupler. The resin bead serves as a electrical grounding joint without fluid leakage, thus eliminating electrolytic gas interference from the flow channels. The arrangement is easy to practice from readily available components, displays a very low electrical resistance, and is capable of bearing high backpressure (at least 3200 psi). We use a silica xerogel column as the EOP element to pump water and demonstrate a complete capillary ion chromatograph (CIC), which uses a similar bead based microelectrodialytic generator (μ-EDG) to generate a KOH eluent from the pumped water. We observed good operational stability of the complete arrangement over long periods. PMID:19449862

  2. Computation of unsteady turbulent boundary layers with flow reversal and evaluation of two separate turbulence models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebeci, T.; Carr, L. W.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure which solves the governing boundary layer equations within Keller's box method was developed for calculating unsteady laminar flows with flow reversal. This method is extended to turbulent boundary layers with flow reversal. Test cases are used to investigate the proposition that unsteady turbulent boundary layers also remain free of singularities. Turbulent flow calculations are performed. The governing equations for both models are solved. As in laminar flows, the unsteady turbulent boundary layers are free from singularities, but there is a clear indication of rapid thickening of the boundary layer with increasing flow reversal. Predictions of both turbulence models are the same for all practical purposes.

  3. Electroosmotic dewatering of dredged sediments: bench-scale investigation.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Krishna R; Urbanek, Adam; Khodadoust, Amid P

    2006-01-01

    The Indiana Harbor (Indiana, USA) has not been dredged since 1972 due to lack of a suitable disposal site for dredged sediment. As a result of this, over a million cubic yards of highly contaminated sediment has accumulated in the harbor. Recently, the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has selected a site for the confined disposal facility (CDF) and is in the process of designing it. Although dredging can be accomplished rapidly, the disposal in the CDF has to be done slowly to allow adequate time for consolidation to occur. The sediment possesses very high moisture content and very low hydraulic conductivity, which cause consolidation to occur slowly. Consolidation of the sediment is essential in order to achieve adequate shear strength of sediments and also to provide enough air space to accommodate the large amount of sediment that requires disposal. Currently, it has been estimated that if a one 3-foot (0.9-m) thick layer of sediment was disposed of at the CDF annually, it would take approximately 10 years to dispose of all the sediment that is to be dredged from the Indiana Harbor. This study investigated the feasibility of using an electroosmotic dewatering technology to accelerate dewatering and consolidation of sediment, thereby allowing more rapid disposal of sediment into the CDF. Electroosmotic dewatering essentially involves applying a small electric potential across the sediment layer, thereby inducing rapid flow as a result of physico-chemical and electrochemical processes. A series of bench-scale electrokinetic experiments were conducted on actual dredged sediment samples from the Indiana Harbor to investigate dewatering rates caused by gravity alone, dewatering rates caused by gravity and electric potential, and the effects of the addition of polymer flocculants on dewatering of the sediments. The results showed that electroosmotic dewatering under an applied electric potential of 1.0VDC/cm could increase the rate of dewatering and

  4. Electroosmotic fluid motion and late-time solute transport at non-negligible zeta potentials

    SciTech Connect

    S. K. Griffiths; R. H. Nilson

    1999-12-01

    Analytical and numerical methods are employed to determine the electric potential, fluid velocity and late-time solute distribution for electroosmotic flow in a tube and channel when the zeta potential is not small. The electric potential and fluid velocity are in general obtained by numerical means. In addition, new analytical solutions are presented for the velocity in a tube and channel in the extremes of large and small Debye layer thickness. The electroosmotic fluid velocity is used to analyze late-time transport of a neutral non-reacting solute. Zeroth and first-order solutions describing axial variation of the solute concentration are determined analytically. The resulting expressions contain eigenvalues representing the dispersion and skewness of the axial concentration profiles. These eigenvalues and the functions describing transverse variation of the concentration field are determined numerically using a shooting technique. Results are presented for both tube and channel geometries over a wide range of the normalized Debye layer thickness and zeta potential. Simple analytical approximations to the eigenvalues are also provided for the limiting cases of large and small values of the Debye layer thickness. The methodology developed here for electroosmotic flow is also applied to the Taylor problem of late-time transport and dispersion in pressure-driven flows.

  5. A low-voltage nano-porous electroosmotic pump.

    PubMed

    Ai, Ye; Yalcin, Sinan E; Gu, Diefeng; Baysal, Oktay; Baumgart, Helmut; Qian, Shizhi; Beskok, Ali

    2010-10-15

    A low-voltage electroosmotic (EO) micropump based on an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) nano-porous membrane with platinum electrodes coated on both sides has been designed, fabricated, tested, and analyzed. The maximum flow rate of 0.074 ml min(-1) V(-1) cm(-2) for a membrane with porosity of 0.65 was obtained. A theoretical model, considering the head loss along the entire EO micropump system and the finite electrical double layer (EDL) effect on the flow rate, is developed for the first time to analyze the performance of the EO micropump. The theoretical and experimental results are in good agreement. It is revealed that the major head loss could remarkably decrease the flow rate, which thus should be taken into account for the applications of the EO micropump in various Lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices. However, the effect of the minor head loss on the flow rate is negligible. The resulting flow rate increases with increasing porosity of the porous membrane and kappaa, the ratio of the radius of the nanopore to the Debye length.

  6. Gliding arc in tornado using a reverse vortex flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kalra, Chiranjeev S.; Cho, Young I.; Gutsol, Alexander; Fridman, Alexander; Rufael, Tecle S.

    2005-02-01

    The present article reports a new gliding arc (GA) system using a reverse vortex flow ('tornado') in a cylindrical reactor (gliding arc in tornado, or GAT), as used to preserve the main advantages of traditional GA systems and overcome their main drawbacks. The primary advantages of traditional GA systems retained in the present GAT are the possibility to generate transitional plasma and to avoid considerable electrode erosion. In contrast to a traditional GA, the new GAT system ensures much more uniform gas treatment and has a significantly larger gas residence time in the reactor. The present article also describes the design of the new reactor and its stable operation regime when the variation of GAT current is very small. These features are understood to be very important for most viable applications. Additionally the GAT provides near-perfect thermal insulation from the reactor wall, indicating that the present GAT does not require the reactor wall to be constructed of high-temperature materials. The new GAT system, with its unique properties such as a high level of nonequilibrium and a large residence time, looks very promising for many industrial applications including fuel conversion, carbon dioxide conversion to carbon monoxide and oxygen, surface treatment, waste treatment, flame stabilization, hydrogen sulfide treatment, etc.

  7. Electroosmotically induced hydraulic pumping on microchips: differential ion transport

    PubMed

    Culbertson; Ramsey; Ramsey

    2000-05-15

    The theory behind and operation of an electroosmotically induced hydraulic pump for microfluidic devices is reported. This microchip functional element consists of a tee intersection with one inlet channel and two outlet channels. The inlet channel is maintained at high voltage while one outlet channel is kept at ground and the other channel has no electric potential applied. A pressure-induced flow of buffer is created in both outlet channels of the tee by reducing electroosmosis in the ground channel relative to that of the inlet channel. Spatially selective reduction of electroosmosis is accomplished by coating the walls of the ground channel with a viscous polymer. The pump is shown to differentially transport ions down the two outlet channels. This ion discrimination ability of the pump is examined as a function of an analyte's electrophoretic velocity. In addition, we demonstrate that an anion can be rejected from the ground channel and made to flow only into the field-free channel if the electrophoretic velocity of the anion is greater than the pressure-generated flow in the ground channel. The velocity threshold at which anion rejection occurs can be selectively tuned by changing the flow resistance in the field-free channel relative to the ground channel.

  8. Effect of Trailing Edge Shape on the Unsteady Aerodynamics of Reverse Flow Dynamic Stall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Andrew; Jones, Anya

    2015-11-01

    This work considers dynamic stall in reverse flow, where flow travels over an oscillating airfoil from the geometric trailing edge towards the leading edge. An airfoil with a sharp geometric trailing edge causes early formation of a primary dynamic stall vortex since the sharp edge acts as the aerodynamic leading edge in reverse flow. The present work experimentally examines the potential merits of using an airfoil with a blunt geometric trailing edge to delay flow separation and dynamic stall vortex formation while undergoing oscillations in reverse flow. Time-resolved and phase-averaged flow fields and pressure distributions are compared for airfoils with different trailing edge shapes. Specifically, the evolution of unsteady flow features such as primary, secondary, and trailing edge vortices is examined. The influence of these flow features on the unsteady pressure distributions and integrated unsteady airloads provide insight on the torsional loading of rotor blades as they oscillate in reverse flow. The airfoil with a blunt trailing edge delays reverse flow dynamic stall, but this leads to greater downward-acting lift and pitching moment. These results are fundamental to alleviating vibrations of high-speed helicopters, where much of the rotor operates in reverse flow.

  9. FLUX ENHANCEMENT IN CROSSFLOW MEMBRANE FILTRATION: FOULING AND IT'S MINIMIZATION BY FLOW REVERSAL

    SciTech Connect

    Shamsuddin Ilias

    2005-01-25

    Fouling problems are perhaps the single most important reason for relatively slow acceptance of ultrafiltration in many areas of chemical and biological processing. To overcome the losses in permeate flux associated with concentration polarization and fouling in cross flow membrane filtration, we investigated the concept of flow reversal as a method to enhance membrane flux in ultrafiltration. Conceptually, flow reversal prevents the formation of stable hydrodynamic and concentration boundary layers at or near the membrane surface. Further more, periodic reversal of the flow direction of the feed stream at the membrane surface results in prevention and mitigation of membrane fouling. Consequently, these advantages are expected to enhance membrane flux significantly. A crossflow membrane filtration unit was designed and built to test the concept of periodic flow reversal for flux enhancement. The essential elements of the system include a crossflow hollow fiber membrane module integrated with a two-way valve to direct the feed flow directions. The two-way valve is controlled by a controller-timer for periodic reversal of flow of feed stream. Another important feature of the system is that with changing feed flow direction, the permeate flow direction is also changed to maintain countercurrent feed and permeate flows for enhanced mass transfer driving force (concentration difference). In this report, we report our application of Flow Reversal technique in clarification of apple juice containing pectin. The presence of pectin in apple juice makes the clarification process difficult and is believed to cause membrane fouling. Of all compounds found in apple juice, pectin is most often identified as the major hindrance to filtration performance. Based on our ultrafiltration experiments with apple juice, we conclude that under flow reversal conditions, the permeate flux is significantly enhanced when compared with the conventional unidirectional flow. Thus, flow reversal

  10. Thrust-reverser flow investigation on a twin-engine transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatlin, Gregory M.; Quinto, P. Frank

    1988-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the NASA Langley 14 x 22 foot Subsonic Tunnel to study the effects of engine thrust reversing on an aft-mounted twin-engine transport and to develop effective testing techniques. Testing was done over a fixed and a moving-belt ground plane and over a pressure instrumented ground board. Free-stream dynamic pressure was set at values up to 12.2 psf, which corresponded to a maximum Reynolds number based on the mean aerodynamic chord of 765,000. The thrust reversers examined included cascade, target and four-door configurations. The investigation focused on the range of free-stream velocities and engine thrust-reverser flow rates that would be typical for landing ground-roll conditions. Flow visualization techniques were investigated, and the use of water or smoke injected into the reverser flow proved effective to determine the forward progression of the reversed flow and reingestion limits. When testing over a moving-belt ground plane, as opposed to a fixed ground plane, forward penetration of the reversed flow was reduced. The use of a pressure-instrumented ground board enabled reversed flow ground velocities to be obtained, and it provided a means by which to identify the reversed flow impingement point on the ground.

  11. Static internal performance of a nonaxisymmetric vaned thrust reverser with flow splay capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bangert, Linda S.; Leavitt, Laurence D.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Static Test Facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel on a dual-port, nonaxisymmetric, block-and-turn type thrust reverser model with vane cascades in the reverser ports which turned the flow in the splay direction and aided in turning the flow in the reverse direction. Splaying reverser flow is a method of delaying to lower landing ground roll speeds the reingestion of hot exhaust flow into the inlets. Exhaust flow splay can also help prevent the impingement of hot exhaust gases on the empennage surfaces when the reverser is integrated into an actual airframe. The vane cascades consisted of two sets of perpendicular vanes with a variable number of turning and splay vanes. A skewed vane box was also tested which had only one set of vanes angled to provide both turning and splay. Vane cascades were designed to provide different amounts of flow splay in the top and bottom ports. Inner doors, trim tabs, and an orifice plate all provided means of varying the port area for reverser flow modulation. The outer door position was varied as a means of influencing the flow reverse angle. Nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 1.75 to approximately 6.00.

  12. Electroosmotic properties of microfluidic channels composed of poly(dimethylsiloxane).

    PubMed

    Ren, X; Bachman, M; Sims, C; Li, G P; Allbritton, N

    2001-10-25

    Microfluidic devices fabricated from polymers exhibit great potential in biological analyses. Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) has shown promise as a substrate for rapid prototyping of devices. Despite this, disagreement exists in the literature as to the ability of PDMS to support electroosmotic (EO) flow and the stability of that flow over time. We demonstrate that in low ionic strength solutions near neutral in pH. oxidized PDMS had a four-fold greater EO mobility (mu(eo)) compared to native PDMS. The greater mu(eo) was maintained irrespective of whether glass or PDMS was used as a support forming one side of the channel. This enhanced mu(eo) was preserved as long as the channels were filled with an aqueous solution. Upon exposure of the channels to air, the mobility decreased by a factor of two with a half-life of 9 h. The EO properties of the air-exposed, oxidized PDMS were regenerated by exposure to strong base. High ionic strength, neutral in pH buffers compatible with living eukaryotic cells diminished the EO flow in the oxidized PDMS devices to a much greater extent than in the native PDMS devices. For analyses utilizing intact and living cells, oxidation of PDMS may not be an effective strategy to substantially increase the mu(eo).

  13. Electro-Osmotic Remediation of Fine-Grained Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepy, N.J.; McNab, W.W.; Wildenschild, D.; Ruiz, R.; Elsholz, A.

    1999-11-22

    The coupled-flow phenomenon, electro-osmosis, whereby water flow results from an applied electrical potential gradient, is being used at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to induce water flow through deep (25-40 meters below surface) fine-grained sediments. The scoping work described here lays the groundwork for implementation of this technology to remediate solvent-contaminated clayey zones at the LLNL site. The electro-osmotic conductivity (k{sub e}) measured in-situ between two 37 m deep wells, 3 m apart of 2.3 x 10{sup -9} m{sup 2}/s-V is in good agreement with the value determined from bench-top studies on the core extracted from one of the wells of 0.94 {+-} 0.29 x 10{sup -9} m{sup 2}/s-V. Hydraulic conductivity (k{sub h}) of the same core is measured to be 2.03 {+-} 0.36 x 10{sup -10} m/s. Thus, a voltage gradient of 1 V/cm produces an effective hydraulic conductivity of {approx}1 x 10{sup -7} m/s; an increase in conductivity of nearly three orders of magnitude.

  14. Experimental Investigation of a Yawed Airfoil in Reverse Flow Dynamic Stall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Luke; Lind, Andrew, , Dr.; Jones, Anya, , Dr.

    2016-11-01

    When a rotating blade enters high advance ratio flight, a significant portion of the blade is subject to reverse flow, where flow travels from the blade's geometric trailing edge to the geometric leading edge. The purpose of this work is to determine the influence of spanwise flow on a blade undergoing dynamic stall in reverse flow. Without spanwise flow, an oscillating sharp trailing edge airfoil in reverse flow experiences separation about its sharp aerodynamic leading edge, leading to the formation of a dynamic stall vortex at low angles of attack. With spanwise flow, an airfoil experiences a delay in lift stall, possibly due to the convection of a vortex along the freestream. This work characterizes the three-dimensional flow field of an oscillating airfoil at static yaw angles in reverse flow. Time-resolved velocity fields and chordwise pressure distributions are presented for several span locations, reduced frequencies, and Reynolds numbers. The unsteady velocity fields allow for the identification of dynamic stall vortex locations, and the unsteady pressure distributions allow for the analysis of spanwise variation in aerodynamic forces. By comparing the yawed and un-yawed cases, this work illustrates the relative importance of spanwise flow in reverse flow dynamic stall.

  15. FLUX ENHANCEMENT IN CROSSFLOW MEMBRANE FILTRATION: FOULING AND IT'S MINIMIZATION BY FLOW REVERSAL

    SciTech Connect

    Shamsuddin Ilias

    2004-06-14

    Fouling problems are perhaps the single most important reason for relatively slow acceptance of ultrafiltration in many areas of chemical and biological processing. To overcome the losses in permeate flux associated with concentration polarization and fouling in cross flow membrane filtration, we investigated the concept of flow reversal as a method to enhance membrane flux in ultrafiltration. Conceptually, flow reversal prevents the formation of stable hydrodynamic and concentration boundary layers at or near the membrane surface. Further more, periodic reversal of the flow direction of the feed stream at the membrane surface results in prevention and mitigation of membrane fouling. Consequently, these advantages are expected to enhance membrane flux significantly. A crossflow membrane filtration unit was designed and built to test the concept of periodic flow reversal for flux enhancement. The essential elements of the system include a crossflow hollow fiber membrane module integrated with a two-way valve to direct the feed flow directions. The two-way valve is controlled by a controller-timer for periodic reversal of flow of feed stream. Another important feature of the system is that with changing feed flow direction, the permeate flow direction is also changed to maintain countercurrent feed and permeate flows for enhanced mass transfer driving force (concentration difference). In our previous report, we reported our work on UF of BSA. In this report, we report our continuing application of Flow Reversal technique in clarification of apple juice containing pectin. The presence of pectin in apple juice makes the clarification process difficult and is believed to cause membrane fouling. Of all compounds found in apple juice, pectin is most often identified as the major hindrance to filtration performance. Laboratory-scale tests on a hollow-fiber ultrafiltration membrane module using pectin in apple juice as feed show that under flow reversal conditions, the

  16. Flux Enhancement in Crossflow Membrane Filtration: Fouling and It's Minimization by Flow Reversal

    SciTech Connect

    Shamsuddin Ilias

    2005-08-04

    Fouling problems are perhaps the single most important reason for relatively slow acceptance of ultrafiltration in many areas of chemical and biological processing. To overcome the losses in permeate flux associated with concentration polarization and fouling in cross flow membrane filtration, we investigated the concept of flow reversal as a method to enhance membrane flux in ultrafiltration. Conceptually, flow reversal prevents the formation of stable hydrodynamic and concentration boundary layers at or near the membrane surface. Further more, periodic reversal of the flow direction of the feed stream at the membrane surface results in prevention and mitigation of membrane fouling. Consequently, these advantages are expected to enhance membrane flux significantly. A crossflow membrane filtration unit was designed and built to test the concept of periodic flow reversal for flux enhancement. The essential elements of the system include a crossflow hollow fiber membrane module integrated with a two-way valve to direct the feed flow directions. The two-way valve is controlled by a controller-timer for periodic reversal of flow of feed stream. Another important feature of the system is that with changing feed flow direction, the permeate flow direction is also changed to maintain countercurrent feed and permeate flows for enhanced mass transfer driving force (concentration difference). Three feed solutions (Bovine serum albumin (BSA), apple juice and citrus fruit pectin) were studied in crossflow membrane filtration. These solutes are well-known in membrane filtration for their fouling and concentration polarization potentials. Laboratory-scale tests on a hollow-fiber ultrafiltration membrane module using each of the feed solutes show that under flow reversal conditions, the permeate flux is significantly enhanced when compared with the conventional unidirectional flow. The flux enhancement is dramatic (by an order of magnitude) with increased feed concentration and

  17. Fingerprinting Reverse Proxies Using Timing Analysis of TCP Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    sites can increase their client throughput by utilizing reverse proxy servers that increase their potential for sales or advertising . From a more... advertising . The ability to reliably identify reverse proxies is valuable to better understand a network topology as well as identify possible vector...As the Internet spread globally, privacy and security became more desirable for online communication, banking, e -commerce, and data storage to name a

  18. Magnetic field induced flow pattern reversal in a ferrofluidic Taylor-Couette system

    PubMed Central

    Altmeyer, Sebastian; Do, Younghae; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of ferrofluidic wavy vortex flows in the counter-rotating Taylor-Couette system, with a focus on wavy flows with a mixture of the dominant azimuthal modes. Without external magnetic field flows are stable and pro-grade with respect to the rotation of the inner cylinder. More complex behaviors can arise when an axial or a transverse magnetic field is applied. Depending on the direction and strength of the field, multi-stable wavy states and bifurcations can occur. We uncover the phenomenon of flow pattern reversal as the strength of the magnetic field is increased through a critical value. In between the regimes of pro-grade and retrograde flow rotations, standing waves with zero angular velocities can emerge. A striking finding is that, under a transverse magnetic field, a second reversal in the flow pattern direction can occur, where the flow pattern evolves into pro-grade rotation again from a retrograde state. Flow reversal is relevant to intriguing phenomena in nature such as geomagnetic reversal. Our results suggest that, in ferrofluids, flow pattern reversal can be induced by varying a magnetic field in a controlled manner, which can be realized in laboratory experiments with potential applications in the development of modern fluid devices. PMID:26687638

  19. Analysis of HRCT-derived xylem network reveals reverse flow in some vessels.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eric F; Matthews, Mark A; McElrone, Andrew J; Phillips, Ronald J; Shackel, Kenneth A; Brodersen, Craig R

    2013-09-21

    Long distance water and nutrient transport in plants is dependent on the proper functioning of xylem networks, a series of interconnected pipe-like cells that are vulnerable to hydraulic dysfunction as a result of drought-induced embolism and/or xylem-dwelling pathogens. Here, flow in xylem vessels was modeled to determine the role of vessel connectivity by using three dimensional xylem networks derived from High Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) images of grapevine (Vitis vinifera cv. 'Chardonnay') stems. Flow in 4-27% of the vessel segments (i.e. any section of vessel elements between connection points associated with intervessel pits) was found to be oriented in the direction opposite to the bulk flow under normal transpiration conditions. In order for the flow in a segment to be in the reverse direction, specific requirements were determined for the location of connections, distribution of vessel endings, diameters of the connected vessels, and the conductivity of the connections. Increasing connectivity and decreasing vessel length yielded increasing numbers of reverse flow segments until a maximum value was reached, after which more interconnected networks and smaller average vessel lengths yielded a decrease in the number of reverse flow segments. Xylem vessel relays also encouraged the formation of reverse flow segments. Based on the calculated flow rates in the xylem network, the downward spread of Xylella fastidiosa bacteria in grape stems was modeled, and reverse flow was shown to be an additional mechanism for the movement of bacteria to the trunk of grapevine.

  20. Magnetic field induced flow pattern reversal in a ferrofluidic Taylor-Couette system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altmeyer, Sebastian; Do, Younghae; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the dynamics of ferrofluidic wavy vortex flows in the counter-rotating Taylor-Couette system, with a focus on wavy flows with a mixture of the dominant azimuthal modes. Without external magnetic field flows are stable and pro-grade with respect to the rotation of the inner cylinder. More complex behaviors can arise when an axial or a transverse magnetic field is applied. Depending on the direction and strength of the field, multi-stable wavy states and bifurcations can occur. We uncover the phenomenon of flow pattern reversal as the strength of the magnetic field is increased through a critical value. In between the regimes of pro-grade and retrograde flow rotations, standing waves with zero angular velocities can emerge. A striking finding is that, under a transverse magnetic field, a second reversal in the flow pattern direction can occur, where the flow pattern evolves into pro-grade rotation again from a retrograde state. Flow reversal is relevant to intriguing phenomena in nature such as geomagnetic reversal. Our results suggest that, in ferrofluids, flow pattern reversal can be induced by varying a magnetic field in a controlled manner, which can be realized in laboratory experiments with potential applications in the development of modern fluid devices.

  1. FLUX ENHANCEMENT IN CROSSFLOW MEMBRANE FILTRATION: FOULING AND IT'S MINIMIZATION BY FLOW REVERSAL

    SciTech Connect

    Shamsuddin Ilias

    2002-03-14

    Fouling problems are perhaps the single most important reason for relatively slow acceptance of ultrafiltration in many areas of chemical and biological processing. To overcome the losses in permeate flux associated with concentration polarization and fouling in cross flow membrane filtration, we investigated the concept of flow reversal as a method to enhance membrane flux in ultrafiltration. Conceptually, flow reversal prevents the formation of stable hydrodynamic and concentration boundary layers at or near the membrane surface. Further more, periodic reversal of the flow direction of the feed stream at the membrane surface results in prevention and mitigation of membrane fouling. Consequently, these advantages are expected to enhance membrane flux significantly. A crossflow membrane filtration unit was designed and built to test the concept of periodic flow reversal for flux enhancement. The essential elements of the system include a crossflow hollow fiber membrane module integrated with a two-way valve to direct the feed flow directions. The two-way valve is controlled by a controller-timer for periodic reversal of flow of feed stream. Another important feature of the system is that with changing feed flow direction, the permeate flow direction is also changed to maintain countercurrent feed and permeate flows for enhanced mass transfer driving force (concentration difference). Bovine serum albumin (BSA) is a well-studied model solute in membrane filtration known for its fouling and concentration polarization capabilities. Laboratory-scale tests on a hollow-fiber ultrafiltration membrane module using BSA solution as feed show that under flow reversal conditions, the permeate flux is significantly enhanced when compared with the conventional unidirectional flow. The flux enhancement is dramatic (by an order of magnitude) with increased feed concentration and operating transmembrane pressure.

  2. Computational and experimental investigation of subsonic internal reversing flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, James A.; Esker, Barbara S.; Smith, C. F.

    1992-01-01

    The flow inside a model exhaust configuration was studied using both experimental and computational techniques. The hardware was tested at the NASA Lewis Research Center's Powered Lift Facility at tailpipe total pressure to ambient static pressure ratios ranging from 1.0 to 5.0. The flow simulations were obtained using the two 3-D Navier-Stokes CFD codes run on the Lewis Cray Y-MP computer. Both codes produced oscillatory solutions due to the inflow boundary condition reflecting acoustic waves. The CFD solutions correctly predicted the flow separation along the inside elbow of the takeoff and also along the walls of the ventral duct. Mass flow rates were overpredicted due to underprediction of the turbulent energy dissipation and subsequent total pressure loss.

  3. Asymmetrical reverse vortex flow due to induced-charge electro-osmosis around carbon stacking structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugioka, Hideyuki

    2011-05-01

    Broken symmetry of vortices due to induced-charge electro-osmosis (ICEO) around stacking structures is important for the generation of a large net flow in a microchannel. Following theoretical predictions in our previous study, we herein report experimental observations of asymmetrical reverse vortex flows around stacking structures of carbon posts with a large height (~110 μm) in water, prepared by the pyrolysis of a photoresist film in a reducing gas. Further, by the use of a coupled calculation method that considers boundary effects precisely, the experimental results, except for the problem of anomalous flow reversal, are successfully explained. That is, unlike previous predictions, the precise calculations here show that stacking structures accelerate a reverse flow rather than suppressing it for a microfluidic channel because of the deformation of electric fields near the stacking portions; these structures can also generate a large net flow theoretically in the direction opposite that of a previous prediction for a standard vortex flow. Furthermore, by solving the one-dimensional Poisson-Nernst-Plank (PNP) equations in the presence of ac electric fields, we find that the anomalous flow reversal occurs by the phase retardation between the induced diffuse charge and the tangential electric field. In addition, we successfully explain the nonlinearity of the flow velocity on the applied voltage by the PNP analysis. In the future, we expect to improve the pumping performance significantly by using stacking structures of conductive posts along with a low-cost process.

  4. Avalanches, breathers, and flow reversal in a continuous Lorenz-96 model.

    PubMed

    Blender, R; Wouters, J; Lucarini, V

    2013-07-01

    For the discrete model suggested by Lorenz in 1996, a one-dimensional long-wave approximation with nonlinear excitation and diffusion is derived. The model is energy conserving but non-Hamiltonian. In a low-order truncation, weak external forcing of the zonal mean flow induces avalanchelike breather solutions which cause reversal of the mean flow by a wave-mean flow interaction. The mechanism is an outburst-recharge process similar to avalanches in a sandpile model.

  5. Electro-osmotic mobility of non-Newtonian fluids

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Cunlu; Yang, Chun

    2011-01-01

    Electrokinetically driven microfluidic devices are usually used to analyze and process biofluids which can be classified as non-Newtonian fluids. Conventional electrokinetic theories resulting from Newtonian hydrodynamics then fail to describe the behaviors of these fluids. In this study, a theoretical analysis of electro-osmotic mobility of non-Newtonian fluids is reported. The general Cauchy momentum equation is simplified by incorporation of the Gouy–Chapman solution to the Poisson–Boltzmann equation and the Carreau fluid constitutive model. Then a nonlinear ordinary differential equation governing the electro-osmotic velocity of Carreau fluids is obtained and solved numerically. The effects of the Weissenberg number (Wi), the surface zeta potential (ψ¯s), the power-law exponent(n), and the transitional parameter (β) on electro-osmotic mobility are examined. It is shown that the results presented in this study for the electro-osmotic mobility of Carreau fluids are quite general so that the electro-osmotic mobility for the Newtonian fluids and the power-law fluids can be obtained as two limiting cases. PMID:21503161

  6. Electro-osmotic mobility of non-Newtonian fluids.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Cunlu; Yang, Chun

    2011-03-23

    Electrokinetically driven microfluidic devices are usually used to analyze and process biofluids which can be classified as non-Newtonian fluids. Conventional electrokinetic theories resulting from Newtonian hydrodynamics then fail to describe the behaviors of these fluids. In this study, a theoretical analysis of electro-osmotic mobility of non-Newtonian fluids is reported. The general Cauchy momentum equation is simplified by incorporation of the Gouy-Chapman solution to the Poisson-Boltzmann equation and the Carreau fluid constitutive model. Then a nonlinear ordinary differential equation governing the electro-osmotic velocity of Carreau fluids is obtained and solved numerically. The effects of the Weissenberg number (Wi), the surface zeta potential (ψ¯s), the power-law exponent(n), and the transitional parameter (β) on electro-osmotic mobility are examined. It is shown that the results presented in this study for the electro-osmotic mobility of Carreau fluids are quite general so that the electro-osmotic mobility for the Newtonian fluids and the power-law fluids can be obtained as two limiting cases.

  7. Turbulence Modeling for Thrust Reverser Flow Field Prediction Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    Barata 28 of a normal impinging jet at H/D = 5 and Vj/V_. = 30 indicate that the shear stress in the vortex is roughly an order of magnitude less than...Speed Afterbody Flows," 1. Propulsion and Power, Vol. 7, No. 4, 1991, pp. 607-616 28. Barata , J. M. M., Durao, D. F. G., and Heitor, M. V., "Turbulent

  8. Arterial microanastomoses on the reverse flow of the internal carotid artery reverse flow: an extreme solution in free-flap revascularisation. How we do it.

    PubMed

    Baj, A; Bolzoni, A; Torretta, S; Pignataro, L

    2014-10-01

    Microvascular free tissue transfer in head and neck reconstruction requires suitable recipient vessels, which are frequently compromised by prior surgery, radiotherapy, or size of the tumour. A surgical description of an arterial free flap pedicle anastomosis on the reverse internal carotid arterial flow in a vessel-depleted neck is presented. A 66-year-old male with a relapse of hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma previously treated with both surgical and radiation therapy for carcinoma of the tongue and the larynx was successfully reconstructed using a free forearm flap with reverse internal carotid arterial flow. The involvement of the carotid glomus and prior surgery excluded the other vessels as recipients. The forearm free flap survived without any complications. This procedure can be considered an alternative rescue technique for salvage reconstruction in a vessel-depleted neck.

  9. Multi-scale symbolic time reverse analysis of gas-liquid two-phase flow structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongmei; Zhai, Lusheng; Jin, Ningde; Wang, Youchen

    Gas-liquid two-phase flows are widely encountered in production processes of petroleum and chemical industry. Understanding the dynamic characteristics of multi-scale gas-liquid two-phase flow structures is of great significance for the optimization of production process and the measurement of flow parameters. In this paper, we propose a method of multi-scale symbolic time reverse (MSTR) analysis for gas-liquid two-phase flows. First, through extracting four time reverse asymmetry measures (TRAMs), i.e. Euclidean distance, difference entropy, percentage of constant words and percentage of reversible words, the time reverse asymmetry (TRA) behaviors of typical nonlinear systems are investigated from the perspective of multi-scale analysis, and the results show that the TRAMs are sensitive to the changing of dynamic characteristics underlying the complex nonlinear systems. Then, the MSTR analysis is used to study the conductance signals from gas-liquid two-phase flows. It is found that the multi-scale TRA analysis can effectively reveal the multi-scale structure characteristics and nonlinear evolution properties of the flow structures.

  10. Reversals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Educational Media and Materials for the Handicapped, Columbus, OH.

    Selected from the National Instructional Materials Information System (NIMIS)--a computer based on-line interactive retrieval system on special education materials--the bibliography covers nine materials for remediating reversals in handicapped students at the early childhood and elementary levels. Entries are presented in order of NIMIS accession…

  11. Reversing flow development in a separating turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Leonardo; Lang, Amy; Wahidi, Redha; Bonacci, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    Fast swimming sharks have micro-structures on their skin consisting of bristling scales. These scales are hypothesized to bristle in response to backflow generated from the separated turbulent boundary layer (TBL) in regions of adverse pressure gradient (APG) on the shark body. Vortices are trapped in the cavities between the scales, which induce momentum exchange between the higher momentum fluid in the outer flow and that in the separated region. This momentum exchange causes reattachment of the separated TBL, causing the scales to return to the unbristled location, and the cycle continues. The rows of scales have widths that are comparable to the spanwise length scale of the intermittent backflow patches that appear in the region of incipient detachment of TBLs. In this experimental investigation, correlations between the shark scale's width and the spanwise size of the low backflow streaks are examined, as well as details of the incipient detachment region. The experiments are conducted in a water tunnel facility and the flow field is measured using PIV. Turbulent boundary layers are subjected to an APG via a rotating cylinder. Separated TBLs are investigated on a flat plate. The authors would like to greatfully acknowledge the Army Research Office for funding this project.

  12. On the reverse flow ceiling jet in pool fire-ventilation crossflow interactions in a simulated aircraft cabin interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwack, E. Y.; Bankston, C. P.; Shakkottai, P.; Back, L. H.

    1989-01-01

    The behavior of the reverse flow ceiling jet against the ventilation flow from 0.58 to 0.87 m/s was investigated in a 1/3 scale model of a wide body aircraft interior. For all tests, strong reverse-flow ceiling jets of hot gases were detected well upstream of the fire. Both thicknesses of the reverse-flow ceiling jet and the smoke layer increased with the fire-crossflow parameter. The thickness of the smoke layer where the smoke flows along the main flow below the reverse-flow ceiling jet was almost twice that of the reverse-flow ceiling jet. Detailed spatial and time-varying temperatures of the gas in the test section were measured, and velocity profiles were also measured using a temperature compensated hot film.

  13. Acute increase in reversal blood flow during counterpulsation is associated with vasoconstriction and changes in the aortic mechanics.

    PubMed

    Bia, Daniel; Zócalo, Yanina; Armentano, Ricardo; de Forteza, Eduardo; Cabrera-Fischer, Edmundo

    2007-01-01

    While the effects of increases in forward blood flow on the arterial diameter and elasticity are known, the effects of reversal flow on the arterial properties remain to be characterized. The intra-aortic balloon pumping (IABP), the device most frequently used in circulatory support, acts generating changes in aortic flow (i.e. increasing reversal flow). Recently, in vitro studies showed that flow reversion reduces the endothelial release of relaxing factors. Hence, vascular smooth muscle (VSM) dependent changes in the aortic properties would be expected during IABP. The aim was to analyze the changes in flow during IABP and to characterize the potential effects of reversal blood flow on the aortic biomechanics. Pressure, flow and diameter were measured in sheep, before and during IABP circulatory support. Potential effects of IABP-dependent high reversal flow conditions on viscous and elastic aortic modulus were analyzed, using isobaric analysis. Flow and pressure waveforms were analyzed in the time domain, and the contribution of oscillatory forward and backward waves to the IABP-dependent changes in flow patterns were evaluated. We found that IABP changed mainly diastolic blood flow, with an increase in the reversal flow, secondary to an increase in the oscillatory backward wave amplitude. The acute increase in reversal flow during IABP was associated with vasoconstriction and changes in the aortic mechanics, possibly due to VSM activation.

  14. Electro-osmotic transport in wet processing of textiles

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, J.F.

    1998-09-22

    Electro-osmotic (or electrokinetic) transport is used to efficiently force a solution (or water) through the interior of the fibers or yarns of textile materials for wet processing of textiles. The textile material is passed between electrodes that apply an electric field across the fabric. Used alone or in parallel with conventional hydraulic washing (forced convection), electro-osmotic transport greatly reduces the amount of water used in wet processing. The amount of water required to achieve a fixed level of rinsing of tint can be reduced, for example, to 1--5 lbs water per pound of fabric from an industry benchmark of 20 lbs water/lb fabric. 5 figs.

  15. Electro-osmotic transport in wet processing of textiles

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.

    1998-01-01

    Electro-osmotic (or electrokinetic) transport is used to efficiently force a solution (or water) through the interior of the fibers or yarns of textile materials for wet processing of textiles. The textile material is passed between electrodes that apply an electric field across the fabric. Used alone or in parallel with conventional hydraulic washing (forced convection), electro-osmotic transport greatly reduces the amount of water used in wet processing. The amount of water required to achieve a fixed level of rinsing of tint can be reduced, for example, to 1-5 lbs water per pound of fabric from an industry benchmark of 20 lbs water/lb fabric.

  16. Direct and reverse pollen-mediated gene flow between GM rice and red rice weed

    PubMed Central

    Serrat, X.; Esteban, R.; Peñas, G.; Català, M. M.; Melé, E.; Messeguer, J.

    2013-01-01

    Potential risks of genetically modified (GM) crops must be identified before their commercialization, as happens with all new technologies. One of the major concerns is the proper risk assessment of adventitious presence of transgenic material in rice fields due to cross-pollination. Several studies have been conducted in order to quantify pollen-mediated gene flow from transgenic rice (Oryza sativa) to both conventional rice and red rice weed (O. sativa f. spontanea) under field conditions. Some of these studies reported GM pollen-donor rice transferring GM traits to red rice. However, gene flow also occurs in the opposite direction, in a phenomenon that we have called reverse gene flow, resulting in transgenic seeds that have incorporated the traits of wild red rice. We quantified reverse gene flow using material from two field trials. A molecular analysis based on amplified fragment length polymorphisms was carried out, being complemented with a phenotypic identification of red rice traits. In both field trials, the reverse gene flow detected was greater than the direct gene flow. The rate of direct gene flow varied according to the relative proportions of the donor (GM rice) and receptor (red rice) plants and was influenced by wind direction. The ecological impact of reverse gene flow is limited in comparison with that of direct gene flow because non-shattered and non-dormant seeds would be obtained in the first generation. Hybrid seed would remain in the spike and therefore most of it would be removed during harvesting. Nevertheless, this phenomenon must be considered in fields used for elite seed production and in developing countries where farmers often keep some seed for planting the following year. In these cases, there is a higher risk of GM red rice weed infestation increasing from year to year and therefore a proper monitoring plan needs to be established.

  17. Adaptation of the Leishman-Beddoes Dynamic Stall Model for Reverse Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Andrew; Jones, Anya

    2016-11-01

    The Leishman-Beddoes dynamic stall model has long been used for the prediction of unsteady airloads acting on rotorcraft and wind turbines. However, little work has been completed that attempts to model the unsteady airloads experienced by a blade in the reverse flow region of a high advance ratio rotor. The present work describes modifications to the Leishman-Beddoes model and evaluates its suitability for the prediction of unsteady airloads for a sinusoidally oscillating NACA 0012 in reverse flow. Specifically, the ability of the model to capture early dynamic stall vortex formation (due to the sharp aerodynamic leading edge) and delayed reattachment is assessed. Results from the modified Leishman-Beddoes model are compared to measured unsteady pressure distributions for reduced frequencies up to 0.511 and a maximum pitch angle of 25 degrees. The model is also evaluated against numerical simulations of reverse flow dynamic stall where complete pressures distributions (and thus unsteady airloads) are available. This work is foundational for the development of more complex low-order models of the reverse flow region of a high advance ratio rotor where the time-varying local freestream and spanwise flow are also expected to play an important role.

  18. Structural and temporal requirements for geomagnetic field reversal deduced from lava flows.

    PubMed

    Singer, Brad S; Hoffman, Kenneth A; Coe, Robert S; Brown, Laurie L; Jicha, Brian R; Pringle, Malcolm S; Chauvin, Annick

    2005-03-31

    Reversals of the Earth's magnetic field reflect changes in the geodynamo--flow within the outer core--that generates the field. Constraining core processes or mantle properties that induce or modulate reversals requires knowing the timing and morphology of field changes that precede and accompany these reversals. But the short duration of transitional field states and fragmentary nature of even the best palaeomagnetic records make it difficult to provide a timeline for the reversal process. 40Ar/39Ar dating of lavas on Tahiti, long thought to record the primary part of the most recent 'Matuyama-Brunhes' reversal, gives an age of 795 +/- 7 kyr, indistinguishable from that of lavas in Chile and La Palma that record a transition in the Earth's magnetic field, but older than the accepted age for the reversal. Only the 'transitional' lavas on Maui and one from La Palma (dated at 776 +/- 2 kyr), agree with the astronomical age for the reversal. Here we propose that the older lavas record the onset of a geodynamo process, which only on occasion would result in polarity change. This initial instability, associated with the first of two decreases in field intensity, began approximately 18 kyr before the actual polarity switch. These data support the claim that complete reversals require a significant period for magnetic flux to escape from the solid inner core and sufficiently weaken its stabilizing effect.

  19. Blood-clotting-inspired reversible polymer-colloid composite assembly in flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsieh; Fallah, Mohammad A.; Huck, Volker; Angerer, Jennifer I.; Reininger, Armin J.; Schneider, Stefan W.; Schneider, Matthias F.; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Blood clotting is a process by which a haemostatic plug is assembled at the site of injury. The formation of such a plug, which is essentially a (bio)polymer-colloid composite, is believed to be driven by shear flow in its initial phase, and contrary to our intuition, its assembly is enhanced under stronger flowing conditions. Here, inspired by blood clotting, we show that polymer-colloid composite assembly in shear flow is a universal process that can be tailored to obtain different types of aggregates including loose and dense aggregates, as well as hydrodynamically induced ‘log’-type aggregates. The process is highly controllable and reversible, depending mostly on the shear rate and the strength of the polymer-colloidbinding potential. Our results have important implications for the assembly of polymer-colloid composites, an important challenge of immense technological relevance. Furthermore, flow-driven reversible composite formation represents a new paradigm in non-equilibrium self-assembly.

  20. Flow reversal of fully developed double diffusive mixed convection in a vertical channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhatar, Nur Asiah Mohd; Saleh, Habibis; Hashim, Ishak

    2015-10-01

    The mixed convection flow within a vertical channel having internal heat generation at a rate proportional to a power of the temperature difference is considered. The analysis is concerning the studies of occurrence of flow reversal and the effects of three dimensionless parameters, identified as the internal heat parameter (G), a mixed convection parameter (λ) and the exponent (p) in the local heating term on the fully developed double diffusive mixed convection flow in a vertical channel. The governing equations are solved numerically via MAPLE. It was found that flow reversal occurs with larger values of internal heat parameter and mixed convection parameter, but smaller values of local-heating exponent. They also show that, unlike the internal heat parameter and the local-heating exponent, the mixed convection parameter do not give any significant effect on the temperature.

  1. Reversing Flows and Heat Spike: Caused by Solar g-Modes?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, Hans G.; Wolff, Charles L.

    2003-01-01

    The Quasi Biennial Oscillation in the Earth s upper atmosphere has an analog deep inside the Sun. As on Earth, the flow is east or west, it is at low latitude, and it reverses direction in a roughly periodic manner. The period in the solar case is 1.3 years. It was detected using solar oscillations similar to the way earthquakes are used to study the Earth's interior. But its cause was not known. We showed that global oscillations (g-modes) can supply enough angular momentum to drive zonal flows with the observed reversal period. This required a calculation of wave dissipation rates inside each flow and in the turbulent layer that separates any two flows of opposite sign. Heat that this process leaves behind causes a thermal spike inside the Sun at the same depth. This may explain an anomaly in observed sound speed that has had no sure explanation.

  2. Phase diagram for the onset of rolling waves and flow reversal in inclined falling films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohlfs, Wilko; Scheid, Benoit; Kneer, Reinhold

    2014-11-01

    The onset of rolling waves and the onset of flow reversal in inclined falling films is investigated in dependence of the Reynolds and the inclination number. For this, the weighted integral boundary layer model (WIBL) and direct numerical simulations (DNS) are used. Analytical criteria for the onset of rolling waves and flow reversal based on the wave celerity, the average film thickness and the maxi-mum/minimum film thickness have been approximated using self-similar parabolic velocity profiles. This approximation has been validated by second-order WIBL and DNS simulations. It is shown that the various transitions in the phase diagram for homoclinic solutions (waves of infinite wave length) are strongly dependent on the inclination, but independent on the streamwise viscous dissipation effect. Compared to the onset of flow reversal, the onset of rolling waves occurs for higher Reynolds numbers, resulting in a regime in which flow reversal and non-rolling waves coexist. Furthermore, simulation results for limit cycles (finite wave length) reveal a strong increase of the critical Reynolds number with the excitation frequency. Institute of Heat and Mass Transfer, Augustinerbach 6, 52056 Aachen, Germany.

  3. Correlations of the cycle-averaged Nusselt number in a periodically reversing pipe flow

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaoguo Tang; Cheng, P. )

    1993-03-01

    An experiment has been initiated to study oscillatory heat transfer in a periodically reversing pipe flow. A multivariate statistical analysis was employed to obtain a correlation equation for the cycle-averaged Nusselt number in terms of the three similarity parameters: the Reynolds number, the dynamic Reynolds number, and the dimensionless fluid displacement.

  4. Modeling the Material Flow and Heat Transfer in Reverse Dual-Rotation Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, L.; Wu, C. S.; Liu, H. J.

    2014-08-01

    Reverse dual-rotation friction stir welding (RDR-FSW) is a novel modification of conventional friction stir welding (FSW) process. During the RDR-FSW process, the tool pin and the assisted shoulder are separated and rotate with opposite direction independently, so that there are two material flows with reverse direction. The material flow and heat transfer in RDR-FSW have significant effects on the microstructure and properties of the weld joint. A 3D model is developed to quantitatively analyze the effects of the separated tool pin and the assisted shoulder which rotate in reverse direction on the material flow and heat transfer during RDR-FSW process. Numerical simulation is conducted to predict the temperature profile, material flow field, streamlines, strain rate, and viscosity distributions near the tool. The calculated results show that as the rotation speed of the tool pin increases, the temperature near the tool gets higher, the zone with higher temperature expands, and approximately symmetric temperature distribution is obtained near the tool. Along the workpiece thickness direction, the calculated material flow velocity and its layer thickness near the tool get lowered because the effect of the shoulder is weakened as the distance away from the top surface increases. The model is validated by comparing the predicted values of peak temperature at some typical locations with the experimentally measured ones.

  5. Arteriovenous flow reversal, experimental investigations. I. Complete flow reversal of the small intestine and of the rear extremity of the dog.

    PubMed

    Gottlob, R; Kunlin, J; Lengua, F

    1985-01-01

    Segments of the small intestine and hind extremities of dogs were perfused under the condition of complete arterio-venous flow reversal (AVFR). In the intestinal segments, the peripheral resistance under AVFR conditions was 4.4 times higher than under orthograde perfusion. Petechiae and hemorhagic infarction were observed. The average flow resistance of the hind extremities was 2.4 times higher than the resistance in control extremities. The pO2 and the O2 saturation in the blood, outflowing from the AVFR extremity was lower than in the control extremity, however, the pO2 was higher. The oxygen consumption was somewhat lower than in the control extremity. It is concluded that by complete AVFR an extremity may be supplied sufficiently with oxygen at least temporarily.

  6. Potential reversal and the effects of flow pattern on galvanic corrosion of lead.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Roger B; Edwards, Marc

    2012-10-16

    Simplistic conventional models predict that a greater mass of lead will be released from lead pipes exposed to higher velocity and flow durations. However, if galvanic Pb-Cu connections are present, or if a highly protective Pb(IV) scale can be formed, reduced flow can markedly increase the mass of lead release to water and resultant consumer exposure. Three chemical mechanisms were identified that can reduce lead release at higher flow including (1) formation of Pb(IV), (2) potential reversal of Pb:Cu couples, after which galvanic corrosion sacrifices copper and lead is protected, and (3) reduced formation of corrosive microenvironments at lead surfaces in galvanic couples. Potential reversal occurred only in the presence of free chlorine with continuous flow, and it did not occur with chloramine, with intermittent flow, or if orthophosphate was present. For both disinfectants, electrochemical measurements supported a mass balance of lead release demonstrating that a greater total mass of lead release occurred with intermittent flow than with continuous flow.

  7. An experimental study of static and oscillating rotor blade sections in reverse flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Andrew Hume

    The rotorcraft community has a growing interest in the development of high-speed helicopters to replace outdated fleets. One barrier to the design of such helicopters is the lack of understanding of the aerodynamic behavior of retreating rotor blades in the reverse flow region. This work considers two fundamental models of this complex unsteady flow regime: static and oscillating (i.e., pitching) airfoils in reverse flow. Wind tunnel tests have been performed at the University of Maryland (UMD) and the United States Naval Academy (USNA). Four rotor blade sections are considered: two featuring a sharp geometric trailing edge (NACA 0012 and NACA 0024) and two featuring a blunt geometric trailing edge (ellipse and cambered ellipse). Static airfoil experiments were performed at angles of attack through 180 deg and Reynolds numbers up to one million, representative of the conditions found in the reverse flow region of a full-scale high-speed helicopter. Time-resolved velocity field measurements were used to identify three unsteady flow regimes: slender body vortex shedding, turbulent wake, and deep stall vortex shedding. Unsteady airloads were measured in these three regimes using unsteady pressure transducers. The magnitude of the unsteady airloads is high in the turbulent wake regime when the separated shear layer is close to the airfoil surface and in deep stall due to periodic vortex-induced flow. Oscillating airfoil experiments were performed on a NACA 0012 and cambered ellipse to investigate reverse flow dynamic stall characteristics by modeling cyclic pitching kinematics. The parameter space spanned three Reynolds numbers (165,000; 330,000; and 500,000), five reduced frequencies between 0.100 and 0.511, three mean pitch angles (5,10, and 15 deg), and two pitch amplitudes (5 deg and 10 deg). The sharp aerodynamic leading edge of the NACA 0012 airfoil forces flow separation resulting in deep dynamic stall. The number of associated vortex structures depends strongly

  8. Predicting Flow Reversals in a Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulated Thermosyphon Using Data Assimilation

    PubMed Central

    Reagan, Andrew J.; Dubief, Yves; Dodds, Peter Sheridan; Danforth, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    A thermal convection loop is a annular chamber filled with water, heated on the bottom half and cooled on the top half. With sufficiently large forcing of heat, the direction of fluid flow in the loop oscillates chaotically, dynamics analogous to the Earth’s weather. As is the case for state-of-the-art weather models, we only observe the statistics over a small region of state space, making prediction difficult. To overcome this challenge, data assimilation (DA) methods, and specifically ensemble methods, use the computational model itself to estimate the uncertainty of the model to optimally combine these observations into an initial condition for predicting the future state. Here, we build and verify four distinct DA methods, and then, we perform a twin model experiment with the computational fluid dynamics simulation of the loop using the Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (ETKF) to assimilate observations and predict flow reversals. We show that using adaptively shaped localized covariance outperforms static localized covariance with the ETKF, and allows for the use of less observations in predicting flow reversals. We also show that a Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD) of the temperature and velocity fields recovers the low dimensional system underlying reversals, finding specific modes which together are predictive of reversal direction. PMID:26849061

  9. Predicting Flow Reversals in a Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulated Thermosyphon Using Data Assimilation.

    PubMed

    Reagan, Andrew J; Dubief, Yves; Dodds, Peter Sheridan; Danforth, Christopher M

    2016-01-01

    A thermal convection loop is a annular chamber filled with water, heated on the bottom half and cooled on the top half. With sufficiently large forcing of heat, the direction of fluid flow in the loop oscillates chaotically, dynamics analogous to the Earth's weather. As is the case for state-of-the-art weather models, we only observe the statistics over a small region of state space, making prediction difficult. To overcome this challenge, data assimilation (DA) methods, and specifically ensemble methods, use the computational model itself to estimate the uncertainty of the model to optimally combine these observations into an initial condition for predicting the future state. Here, we build and verify four distinct DA methods, and then, we perform a twin model experiment with the computational fluid dynamics simulation of the loop using the Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (ETKF) to assimilate observations and predict flow reversals. We show that using adaptively shaped localized covariance outperforms static localized covariance with the ETKF, and allows for the use of less observations in predicting flow reversals. We also show that a Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD) of the temperature and velocity fields recovers the low dimensional system underlying reversals, finding specific modes which together are predictive of reversal direction.

  10. Computational fluid dynamics evaluation of flow reversal treatment of giant basilar tip aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Alnæs, Martin Sandve; Mardal, Kent-Andre; Bakke, Søren; Sorteberg, Angelika

    2015-10-01

    Therapeutic parent artery flow reversal is a treatment option for giant, partially thrombosed basilar tip aneurysms. The effectiveness of this treatment has been variable and not yet studied by applying computational fluid dynamics. Computed tomography images and blood flow velocities acquired with transcranial Doppler ultrasonography were obtained prior to and after bilateral endovascular vertebral artery occlusion for a giant basilar tip aneurysm. Patient-specific geometries and velocity waveforms were used in computational fluid dynamics simulations in order to determine the velocity and wall shear stress changes induced by treatment. Therapeutic parent artery flow reversal lead to a dramatic increase in aneurysm inflow and wall shear stress (30 to 170 Pa) resulting in an increase in intra-aneurysmal circulation. The enlargement of the circulated area within the aneurysm led to a re-normalization of the wall shear stress and the aneurysm remained stable for more than 8 years thereafter. Therapeutic parent artery flow reversal can lead to unintended, potentially harmful changes in aneurysm inflow which can be quantified and possibly predicted by applying computational fluid dynamics.

  11. Numerical investigation of enhanced dilution zone mixing in a reverse flow gas turbine combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocker, D. S.; Smith, C. E.

    1995-04-01

    An advanced method for dilution zone mixing in a reverse flow gas turbine combustor was numerically investigated. For long mixing lengths associated with reverse flow combustors (X/H greater than 2.0), pattern factor was found to be mainly driven by nozzle-to-nozzle fuel flow and/or circumferential airflow variations; conventional radially injected dilution jets could not effectively mix out circumferential nonuniformities. To enhance circumferential mixing, dilution jets were angled to produce a high circumferential (swirl) velocity component. The jets on the outer liner were angled in one direction while the jets on the inner liner were angled in the opposite direction, thus enhancing turbulent shear at the expense of jet penetration. Three-dimensional CFD calculations were performed on a three-nozzle (90 deg) sector, with different fuel flow from each nozzle (90, 100, and 110% of design fuel flow). The computations showed that the optimum configuration of angled jets reduced the pattern factor by 60% compared to an existing conventional dilution hole configuration. The radial average temperature profile was adequately controlled by the inner-to-outer liner dilution flow split.

  12. Reynolds stress flow shear and turbulent energy transfer in reversed field pinch configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vianello, Nicola; Spolaore, Monica; Serianni, Gianluigi; Regnoli, Giorgio; Spada, Emanuele; Antoni, Vanni; Bergsåker, Henric; Drake, James R.

    2003-10-01

    The role of Reynolds Stress tensor on flow generation in turbulent fluids and plasmas is still an open question and the comprehension of its behavior may assist the understanding of improved confinement scenario. It is generally believed that shear flow generation may occur by an interaction of the turbulent Reynolds stress with the shear flow. It is also generally believed that this mechanism may influence the generation of zonal flow shears. The evaluation of the complete Reynolds Stress tensor requires contemporary measurements of its electrostatic and magnetic part: this requirement is more restrictive for Reversed Field Pinch configuration where magnetic fluctuations are larger than in tokamak . A new diagnostic system which combines electrostatic and magnetic probes has been installed in the edge region of Extrap-T2R reversed field pinch. With this new probe the Reynolds stress tensor has been deduced and its radial profile has been reconstructed on a shot to shot basis exploring differen plasma conditions. These profiles have been compared with the naturally occurring velocity flow profile, in particular during Pulsed Poloidal Current Drive experiment, where a strong variation of ExB flow radial profile has been registered. The study of the temporal evolution of Reynolds stress reveals the appearance of strong localized bursts: these are considered in relation with global MHD relaxation phenomena, which naturally occur in the core of an RFP plasma sustaining its configuration.

  13. Performance of 1.15-pressure-ratio fan stage at several rotor blade setting angles with reverse flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovich, G.; Moore, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    A 51 cm diameter low pressure ratio fan stage was tested in reverse flow. Survey flow data were taken over the range of rotative speed from 50 percent to 100 percent design speed at several rotor blade setting angles through both flat and feather pitch. Normal flow design values of pressure ratio and weight flow were 1.15 and 29.9 kg/sec with a rotor tip speed of 243.8 m/sec. The maximum thrust in reverse flow was 52.5 percent of design thrust in normal flow.

  14. RELAP5 analyses of two hypothetical flow reversal events for the advanced neutron source reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, N.C.J.; Wendel, M.W.; Yoder, G.L. Jr.

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents RELAP5 results of two hypothetical, low flow transients analyzed as part of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor safety program. The reactor design features four independent coolant loops (three active and one in standby), each containing a main curculation pump (with battery powered pony motor), heat exchanger, an accumulator, and a check valve. The first transient assumes one of these pumps fails, and additionally, that the check valve in that loop remains stuck in the open position. This accident is considered extremely unlikely. Flow reverses in this loop, reducing the core flow because much of the coolant is diverted from the intact loops back through the failed loop. The second transient examines a 102-mm-diam instantaneous pipe break near the core inlet (the worst break location). A break is assumed to occur 90 s after a total loss-of-offsite power. Core flow reversal occurs because accumulator injection overpowers the diminishing pump flow. Safety margins are evaluated against four thermal limits: T{sub wall}=T{sub sat}, incipient boiling, onset of significant void, and critical heat flux. For the first transient, the results show that these limits are not exceeded (at a 95% non-exceedance probability level) if the pony motor battery lasts 30 minutes (the present design value). For the second transient, the results show that the closest approach of the fuel surface temperature to the local saturation temperature during core flow reversal is about 39{degrees}C. Therefore the fuel remains cool during this transient. Although this work is done specifically for the ANSR geometry and operating conditions, the general conclusions may be applicable to other highly subcooled reactor systems.

  15. Reversal of cortical information flow during visual imagery as compared to visual perception

    PubMed Central

    Dentico, Daniela; Cheung, Bing Leung; Chang, Jui-Yang; Guokas, Jeffrey; Boly, Melanie; Tononi, Giulio; Van Veen, Barry

    2014-01-01

    The role of bottom-up and top-down connections during visual perception and the forming of mental images was examined by analyzing high-density EEG recordings of brain activity using two state-of-the-art methods for assessing the directionality of cortical signal flow: state-space Granger causality and dynamic causal modeling. We quantified the directionality of signal flow in an occipito-parieto-frontal cortical network during perception of movie clips versus mental replay of the movies and free visual imagery. Both Granger causality and dynamic causal modeling analyses revealed increased top-down signal flow in parieto-occipital cortices during mental imagery as compared to visual perception. These results are the first direct demonstration of a reversal of the predominant direction of cortical signal flow during mental imagery as compared to perception. PMID:24910071

  16. Bifurcations of limit cycles in open and closed loop reverse flow reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Lucia; Crescitelli, Silvestro; Brasiello, Antonio

    2013-10-01

    The present work analyses the bifurcations of limit cycles in open and loop reverse flow reactors. The open loop system consists of a reactor where the flow direction is periodically forced whereas in the closed loop system, the flow inversion is dictated by a control law which activates when the temperature at the edge of catalytic bed falls below the set-point value. We performed the bifurcation analysis of the open loop system as the switch time is varied and we constructed the solution diagram through the application of continuation technique. Many Naimark-Sacker bifurcations leading to quasi-periodic regimes have been found on the limit cycles branches. Finally, we compared these limit cycles with those of the closed loop system where the flow inversion is dictated by a control system which acts if the temperature measured at the edge of reactor falls below a set-point value.

  17. Reversal of cortical information flow during visual imagery as compared to visual perception.

    PubMed

    Dentico, Daniela; Cheung, Bing Leung; Chang, Jui-Yang; Guokas, Jeffrey; Boly, Melanie; Tononi, Giulio; Van Veen, Barry

    2014-10-15

    The role of bottom-up and top-down connections during visual perception and the formation of mental images was examined by analyzing high-density EEG recordings of brain activity using two state-of-the-art methods for assessing the directionality of cortical signal flow: state-space Granger causality and dynamic causal modeling. We quantified the directionality of signal flow in an occipito-parieto-frontal cortical network during perception of movie clips versus mental replay of the movies and free visual imagery. Both Granger causality and dynamic causal modeling analyses revealed an increased top-down signal flow in parieto-occipital cortices during mental imagery as compared to visual perception. These results are the first direct demonstration of a reversal of the predominant direction of cortical signal flow during mental imagery as compared to perception.

  18. Reverse-flow combustor for small gas turbines with pressure-atomizing fuel injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norgren, C. T.; Mularz, E. J.; Riddlebaugh, S. M.

    1978-01-01

    A reverse flow combustor suitable for a small gas turbine (2 to 3 kg/s mass flow) was used to evalute the effect of pressure atomizing fuel injectors on combustor performance. In these tests an experimental combustor was designed to operate with 18 simplex pressure atomizing fuel injectors at sea level takeoff conditions. To improve performance at low power conditions, fuel was redistributed so that only every other injector was operational. Combustor performance, emissions, and liner temperature were compared over a range of pressure and inlet air temperatures corresponding to simulated idle, cruise, and takeoff conditions typical of a 16 to 1 pressure ratio turbine engine.

  19. Method of electric field flow fractionation wherein the polarity of the electric field is periodically reversed

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Fred J.

    1992-01-01

    A novel method of electric field flow fractionation for separating solute molecules from a carrier solution is disclosed. The method of the invention utilizes an electric field that is periodically reversed in polarity, in a time-dependent, wave-like manner. The parameters of the waveform, including amplitude, frequency and wave shape may be varied to optimize separation of solute species. The waveform may further include discontinuities to enhance separation.

  20. Tidal reversal and flow velocities using temperature and specific conductance in a small wetland creek

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, Timothy T.

    2016-11-01

    Characterizing flow dynamics in very small tidal creeks is complicated and not well suited to methods developed for upland streams or coastal estuaries, due to low flows, bidirectionality and shallow waters. Simple instrumentation enables thermal and salinity signals to be used to observe flow directions and estimate velocities in these settings. Using multiple inexpensive sensors over 500 m along a tidally influenced wetland creek, I demonstrate how advection of temperature and specific conductance pulses reveal flood and ebb tides and the temporary reversal of flow by warmer, estuarine water from the receiving embayment. The sequential rise of temperature upstream was most evident under hot and dry conditions, after daily peak air temperatures of 25 °C or above, and was subdued or disrupted under cooler or rainy conditions in summertime. Changes in specific conductance at successive sites upstream were less susceptible to environmental influences and confirm tidal flood velocity of between 0.07 and 0.37 m/s. The tidally-induced flow reversal suggests that periodic high tide conditions can interfere with rapid dispersal of pollution discharges, such as from the combined sewer overflow (CSO) located upstream of the studied creek reach. This low-cost approach of temperature and specific conductance sensing in vegetated coastal wetlands where access, precise elevation control and creek discharge measurements are difficult, provides a simple way of tracking water masses when sufficient contrast exists between water sources.

  1. First Signs of Flow Reversal Within a Separated Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerton, Jared; Lang, Amy

    2015-11-01

    A shark's skin is covered in millions of microscopic scales that have been shown to be able to bristle in a reversing flow. The motive of this project is to further explore a potential bio-inspired passive separation control mechanism which can reduce drag. To better understand this mechanism, a more complete understanding of flow reversal within the turbulent boundary layer is required. In order to capture this phenomenon, water tunnel testing at The University of Alabama was conducted. Using a long flat plate and a rotating cylinder, a large turbulent boundary layer and adverse pressure gradient were generated. Under our testing conditions the boundary layer had a Reynolds number of 200,000 and a boundary layer height in the testing window of 5.6 cm. The adverse pressure gradient causes the viscous length scale to increase and thus increase the size of the individual components of the turbulent boundary layer. This will make the low speed streaks approximately 1 cm in width and thus large enough to measure. Results will be presented that test our hypothesis that the first signs of flow reversal will occur within the section of lowest momentum located furthest from the wall, or within the low speed streaks. This Project was funded by NSF REU Site Award 1358991.

  2. Flow dynamics and sediment transport over a reversing barchan, Changli, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuxiang, Dong; Hesp, Patrick A.; Dequan, Huang; Namikas, S. L.

    2017-02-01

    The flow and sediment transport over a reversing 6.9 m-high barchan dune is examined on the Changli Gold Coast in Hebei Province, China. Wind velocity profiles are non-logarithmic, exhibit rapid accelerations up slope, and display near-surface jets at the dune crest and downwind lee slope. From the windward lower slope to dune crest, the wind speed at 5 cm height increased by 55%. The windward slope is a slipface and therefore has a significantly greater gradient than most 'normal' windward slopes, and the magnitude of speed-up is significantly greater (speed-up ratio of 5.25). The majority of sediment was transported in the 0-4 cm height above the bed range. Maximum total sediment flux occurred at the dune crest and was greater than the total flux from three other sites combined. The leeward mid-slope sedimentation rate is strongly influenced by the sediment plume streaming upwards and downwind from the actively reversing dune crest. Dunes in the process of reversing display quite different wind flow and sedimentation patterns than when the dune is in 'normal' flow conditions.

  3. Intravesical electro-osmotic administration of mitomycin C.

    PubMed

    Di Stasi, Savino M; Verri, Cristian; Celestino, Francesco; De Carlo, Francesco; Pagliarulo, Vincenzo

    2016-10-04

    Bladder cancer is very common and most cases are diagnosed as nonmuscle invasive disease, which is characterized by its propensity to recur and progress. Intravesical therapy is used to delay recurrence and progression, while cystectomy is reserved for patients who are refractory to transurethral resection and intravesical therapy. There is an increasing interest in methods to enhance the delivery of intravesical chemotherapeutic agents to improve efficacy. In vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that electro-osmosis of mitomycin C (MMC) is more effective in delivering this drug into the urothelium, lamina propria, and superficial muscle layers of the bladder wall than is passive transport. Higher MMC tissue concentrations might have a clinical impact in the treatment of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). In randomized trials, intravesical electro-osmotic MMC was associated with superior response rate in high-risk NMIBC cancer, compared with passive diffusion MMC transport. New strategies such as intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) combined with electro-osmotic MMC as well as intravesical pre-operative electro-osmotic MMC provided promising results in terms of higher remission rates and longer remission times.Device-assisted intravesical chemotherapy may be a useful ancillary procedure in the treatment of NMIBC. Its evaluation must be planned with respect to the technical functioning of equipment and their use for a clear purpose to avoid the financial and human costs associated with incorrect therapies.

  4. Laboratory Investigation of Electro-Osmotic Remediation of Fine-Grained Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepy, N.; Wildenschild, D.; Elsholz, A.

    2000-02-23

    Electro-osmosis, a coupled-flow phenomenon in which an applied electrical potential gradient drives water flow, may be used to induce water flow through fine-grained sediments. We plan to use this technology to remediate chlorinated solvent-contaminated clayey zones at the LLNL site. The electro-osmotic conductivity (k{sub e}) determined from bench-top studies for a core extracted from a sediment zone 36.4-36.6 m below surface was initially 7.37 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 2}/s-V, decreasing to 3.44 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 2}/s-V, after electro-osmotically transporting 0.70 pore volumes of water through it (195 ml). Hydraulic conductivity (k{sub h}) of the same core was initially measured to be 5.00 x 10{sup -10} m/s, decreasing to 4.08 x 10{sup -10} m/s at the end of processing. This decline in permeability is likely due to formation of a chemical precipitation zone within the core. Water splitting products and ions electromigrate and precipitate within the core; H{sup +} and metal cations migrate toward the cathode, and OH{sup -} from the cathode moves toward the anode. We are now exploring how to minimize this effect using pH control. The significance of this technology is that for this core, a 3 V/cm voltage gradient produced an initial effective hydraulic conductivity of 2.21 x 10{sup -7} m/s, >400x greater than the initial hydraulic conductivity.

  5. Reversible logic gates based on enzyme-biocatalyzed reactions and realized in flow cells: a modular approach.

    PubMed

    Fratto, Brian E; Katz, Evgeny

    2015-05-18

    Reversible logic gates, such as the double Feynman gate, Toffoli gate and Peres gate, with 3-input/3-output channels are realized using reactions biocatalyzed with enzymes and performed in flow systems. The flow devices are constructed using a modular approach, where each flow cell is modified with one enzyme that biocatalyzes one chemical reaction. The multi-step processes mimicking the reversible logic gates are organized by combining the biocatalytic cells in different networks. This work emphasizes logical but not physical reversibility of the constructed systems. Their advantages and disadvantages are discussed and potential use in biosensing systems, rather than in computing devices, is suggested.

  6. Method and apparatus for cold gas reinjection in through-flow and reverse-flow wave rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalim, M. Razi (Inventor); Paxson, Daniel E. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for cold gas reinjection in through-flow and reverse-flow wave rotors having a plurality of channels formed around a periphery thereof. A first port injects a supply of cool air into the channels. A second port allows the supply of cool air to exit the channels and flow to a combustor. A third port injects a supply of hot gas from the combustor into the channels. A fourth port allows the supply of hot gas to exit the channels and flow to a turbine. A diverting port and a reinjection port are connected to the second and third ports, respectively. The diverting port diverts a portion of the cool air exiting through the second port as reinjection air. The diverting port is fluidly connected to the reinjection port which reinjects the reinjection air back into the channels. The reinjection air evacuates the channels of the hot gas resident therein and cools the channel walls, a pair of end walls of the rotor, ducts communicating with the rotor and subsequent downstream components. In a second embodiment, the second port receives all of the cool air exiting the channels and the diverting port diverts a portion of the cool air just prior to the cool air flowing to the combustor.

  7. Flow reversal in traveling-wave electrokinetics: an analysis of forces due to ionic concentration gradients.

    PubMed

    García-Sánchez, P; Ramos, A; González, A; Green, N G; Morgan, H

    2009-05-05

    Pumping of electrolytes using ac electric fields from arrays of microelectrodes is a subject of current research. The behavior of fluids at low signal amplitudes (<2-3 V(pp)) is in qualitative agreement with the prediction of the ac electroosmosis theory. At higher voltages, this theory cannot account for the experimental observations. In some cases, net pumping is generated in the direction opposite to that predicted by the theory (flow reversal). In this work, we use fluorescent dyes to study the effect of ionic concentration gradients generated by Faradaic currents. We also evaluate the influence of factors such as the channel height and microelectrode array shape in the pumping of electrolytes with traveling-wave potentials. Induced charge beyond the Debye length is postulated to be responsible for the forces generating the observed flows at higher voltages. Numerical calculations are performed in order to illustrate the mechanisms that might be responsible for generating the flow.

  8. Dilution jet configurations in a reverse flow combustor. M.S. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zizelman, J.

    1985-01-01

    Results of measurements of both temperature and velocity fields within a reverse flow combustor are presented. Flow within the combustor is acted upon by perpendicularly injected cooling jets introduced at three different locations along the inner and outer walls of the combustor. Each experiment is typified by a group of parameters: density ratio, momentum ratio, spacing ratio, and confinement parameter. Measurements of both temperature and velocity are presented in terms of normalized profiles at azimuthal positions through the turn section of the combustion chamber. Jet trajectories defined by minimum temperature and maximum velocity give a qualitative indication of the location of the jet within the cross flow. Results of a model from a previous temperature study are presented in some of the plots of data from this work.

  9. Network modeling for reverse flows of end-of-life vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Ene, Seval; Öztürk, Nursel

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • We developed a network model for reverse flows of end-of-life vehicles. • The model considers all recovery operations for end-of-life vehicles. • A scenario-based model is used for uncertainty to improve real case applications. • The model is adequate to real case applications for end-of-life vehicles recovery. • Considerable insights are gained from the model by sensitivity analyses. - Abstract: Product recovery operations are of critical importance for the automotive industry in complying with environmental regulations concerning end-of-life products management. Manufacturers must take responsibility for their products over the entire life cycle. In this context, there is a need for network design methods for effectively managing recovery operations and waste. The purpose of this study is to develop a mathematical programming model for managing reverse flows in end-of-life vehicles’ recovery network. A reverse flow is the collection of used products from consumers and the transportation of these products for the purpose of recycling, reuse or disposal. The proposed model includes all operations in a product recovery and waste management network for used vehicles and reuse for vehicle parts such as collection, disassembly, refurbishing, processing (shredding), recycling, disposal and reuse of vehicle parts. The scope of the network model is to determine the numbers and locations of facilities in the network and the material flows between these facilities. The results show the performance of the model and its applicability for use in the planning of recovery operations in the automotive industry. The main objective of recovery and waste management is to maximize revenue and minimize pollution in end-of-life product operations. This study shows that with an accurate model, these activities may provide economic benefits and incentives in addition to protecting the environment.

  10. Development of stable low-electroosmotic mobility coatings. [for use in electrophoresis systems in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderhoff, J. W.; Micale, F. J.

    1979-01-01

    Long-time rinsings of the Z6040-methlycellulose coating used successfully on the ASTP MA=011 experiment indicate the permanency of this coating is inadequate for continuous flowing systems. Two approaches are described for developing coatings which are stable under continuous fluid movement and which exhibit finite and predictable electroosmotic mobility values while being effective on different types of surfaces, such as glass, plastics, and ceramic alumina, such as is currently used as the electrophoresis channel in the GE-SPAR-CPE apparatus. The surface charge modification of polystyrene latex, especially by protein absorption, to be used as model materials for ground-based electrophoresis experiments, and the preliminary work directed towards the seeded polymerization of large-particle-size monodisperse latexes in a microgravity environment are discussed.

  11. Aortic Blood Flow Reversal Determines Renal Function: Potential Explanation for Renal Dysfunction Caused by Aortic Stiffening in Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Junichiro; Ito, Sadayoshi

    2015-07-01

    Aortic stiffness determines the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and predicts the progressive decline of the GFR. However, the underlying pathophysiological mechanism remains obscure. Recent evidence has shown a close link between aortic stiffness and the bidirectional (systolic forward and early diastolic reverse) flow characteristics. We hypothesized that the aortic stiffening-induced renal dysfunction is attributable to altered central flow dynamics. In 222 patients with hypertension, Doppler velocity waveforms were recorded at the proximal descending aorta to calculate the reverse/forward flow ratio. Tonometric waveforms were recorded to measure the carotid-femoral (aortic) and carotid-radial (peripheral) pulse wave velocities, to estimate the aortic pressure from the radial waveforms, and to compute the aortic characteristic impedance. In addition, renal hemodynamics was evaluated by duplex ultrasound. The estimated GFR was inversely correlated with the aortic pulse wave velocity, reverse/forward flow ratio, pulse pressure, and characteristic impedance, whereas it was not correlated with the peripheral pulse wave velocity or mean arterial pressure. The association between aortic pulse wave velocity and estimated GFR was independent of age, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, and antihypertensive medication. However, further adjustment for the aortic reverse/forward flow ratio and pulse pressure substantially weakened this association, and instead, the reverse/forward flow ratio emerged as the strongest determinant of estimated GFR (P=0.001). A higher aortic reverse/forward flow ratio was also associated with lower intrarenal forward flow velocities. These results suggest that an increase in aortic flow reversal (ie, retrograde flow from the descending thoracic aorta toward the aortic arch), caused by aortic stiffening and impedance mismatch, reduces antegrade flow into the kidney and thereby deteriorates renal function.

  12. Evidence from lava flows for complex polarity transitions: The new composite Steens Mountain reversal record

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jarboe, N.A.; Coe, R.S.; Glen, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Geomagnetic polarity transitions may be significantly more complex than are currently depicted in many sedimentary and lava-flow records. By splicing together paleomagnetic results from earlier studies at Steens Mountain with those from three newly studied sections of Oregon Plateau flood basalts at Catlow Peak and Poker Jim Ridge 70-90 km to the southeast and west, respectively, we provide support for this interpretation with the most detailed account of a magnetic field reversal yet observed in volcanic rocks. Forty-five new distinguishable transitional (T) directions together with 30 earlier ones reveal a much more complex and detailed record of the 16.7 Ma reversed (R)-to-normal (N) polarity transition that marks the end of Chron C5Cr. Compared to the earlier R-T-N-T-N reversal record, the new record can be described as R-T-N-T-N-T-R-T-N. The composite record confirms earlier features, adds new west and up directions and an entire large N-T-R-T segment to the path, and fills in directions on the path between earlier directional jumps. Persistent virtual geomagnetic pole (VGP) clusters and separate VGPs have a preference for previously described longitudinal bands from transition study compilations, which suggests the presence of features at the core-mantle boundary that influence the flow of core fluid and distribution of magnetic flux. Overall the record is consistent with the generalization that VGP paths vary greatly from reversal to reversal and depend on the location of the observer. Rates of secular variation confirm that the flows comprising these sections were erupted rapidly, with maximum rates estimated to be 85-120 m ka-1 at Catlow and 130-195 m ka-1 at Poker Jim South. Paleomagnetic poles from other studies are combined with 32 non-transitional poles found here to give a clockwise rotation of the Oregon Plateau of 11.4???? 5.6?? with respect to the younger Columbia River Basalt Group flows to the north and 14.5???? 4.6?? with respect to cratonic

  13. Aortic stiffness determines diastolic blood flow reversal in the descending thoracic aorta: potential implication for retrograde embolic stroke in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Junichiro; Ito, Sadayoshi

    2013-09-01

    Aortic stiffening often precedes cardiovascular diseases, including stroke, but the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms remain obscure. We hypothesized that such abnormalities could be attributable to altered central blood flow dynamics. In 296 patients with uncomplicated hypertension, Doppler velocity pulse waveforms were recorded at the proximal descending aorta and carotid artery to calculate the reverse/forward flow ratio and diastolic/systolic flow index, respectively. Tonometric waveforms were recorded on the radial artery to estimate aortic pressure and characteristic impedance (Z0) and to determine carotid-femoral (aortic) and carotid-radial (peripheral) pulse wave velocities. In all subjects, the aortic flow waveform was bidirectional, comprising systolic forward and diastolic reverse flows. The aortic reverse/forward flow ratio (35 ± 10%) was positively associated with parameters of aortic stiffness (including pulse wave velocity, Z0, and aortic/peripheral pulse wave velocity ratio), independent of age, body mass index, aortic diameter, and aortic pressure. The carotid flow waveform was unidirectional and bimodal with systolic and diastolic maximal peaks. There was a positive relationship between the carotid diastolic/systolic flow index (28 ± 9%) and aortic reverse/forward flow ratio, which remained significant after adjustment for aortic stiffness and other related parameters. The Bland-Altman plots showed a close time correspondence between aortic reverse and carotid diastolic flow peaks. In conclusion, aortic stiffness determines the extent of flow reversal from the descending aorta to the aortic arch, which contributes to the diastolic antegrade flow into the carotid artery. This hemodynamic relationship constitutes a potential mechanism linking increased aortic stiffness, altered flow dynamics, and increased stroke risk in hypertension.

  14. Flow behaviour analysis of reversible pump-turbine in "S" characteristic operating zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. Q.; Shi, Q. H.; Zhang, K. W.

    2012-11-01

    The pumped storage plant undertakes the task for peak regulation, frequency modulation, phase modulation and accident standby in the electric grid system. Since the design consideration of a pumped storage plant is different from the conventional hydropower plant, the "S" shaped characteristic of pump-turbine will appear in four quadrants characteristic curves, and this characteristic will lead to a series of instabilities while the pump-turbine start at low water head. This paper presents the CFD simulation results of a pump-turbine model with the full flow passage which are compared with model test results. Based on the comparison, the hydraulic reason of the "S" shaped characteristic is discussed and a new concept of partial reverse pump is put forward, i.e. the reverse flow at inlet of runner is the real hydraulic cause of "S" shaped characteristic of a pump-turbine when the unit discharge descends to a certain degree. With the decrease of unit discharge, the effect of partial reverse pump becomes more and more obvious, which leads to an increase of head and finally results the "S" shaped characteristic of a pump-turbine.

  15. Reducing Electroosmotic Flow Enables DNA Separations in Ultrathin Channels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-08-01

    systems with on-column detection. B. Schematic diagram of EOF in traditional CE systems . ...23 Figure 2-2: Schematic diagram of EOF in CE systems ...of the CE/ultrathin channel system for characterization studies. B. Schematic diagram of the CE/ultrathin channel system for separation studies 49...Development of an Integrated DNA Separation System ; Hietpas, P. B., Ed.; The Pennsylvannia State University: University Park, PA, 1997, pp 1-168. 19

  16. Spectroscopic Measurement of Ion Flow During Merging Start-up of Field-Reversed Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Hirotaka; Inomoto, Michiaki; Tanabe, Hiroshi; Annoura, Masanobu; Ono, Yasushi; Nemoto, Koshichi

    2012-10-01

    The counter-helicity merging method [1] of field-reversed configuration (FRC) formation involves generation of bidirectional toroidal flow, known as a ``sling-shot.'' In two fluids regime, reconnection process is strongly affected by the Hall effect [2]. In this study, we have investigated the behavior of toroidal bidirectional flow generated by the counter-helicity merging in two-fluids regime. We use 2D Ion Doppler Spectroscopy to mesure toroidal ion flow during merging start-up of FRC from Ar gas. We defined two cases: one case with a radially pushed-in X line (case I) and the other case with a radially pushed-out X line(case O). The flow during the plasma merging shows radial asymmetry, as expected from the magnetic measurement, but finally relaxes to a unidirectional flow in plasma current direction in both cases. We observed larger toroidal flow in the plasma current direction in case I after FRC is formed, though the FRC in case O has larger magnetic flux. These results suggest that more ions are lost during merging start-up in case I. This selective ion loss might account for stability and confinement of FRCs probably maintained by high energy ions.[4pt] [1] Y. Ono, et al., Nucl. Fusion 39, pp. 2001-2008 (1999).[0pt] [2] M. Inomoto, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 97, 135002, (2006)

  17. Bilateral nasal ala reconstruction of the cocaine-injured nose with 2 free reverse-flow helical rim flaps.

    PubMed

    Castello, Jose R; Taglialatela Scafati, Salvatore; Sánchez, Olaya

    2014-09-01

    Cocaine abuse can lead to nasal deformity because of local ischemia and subsequent fibrosis. Reconstruction can be challenging. We present a case of bilateral microsurgical nasal ala reconstruction with 2 reverse-flow helical rim flap.

  18. Network modeling for reverse flows of end-of-life vehicles.

    PubMed

    Ene, Seval; Öztürk, Nursel

    2015-04-01

    Product recovery operations are of critical importance for the automotive industry in complying with environmental regulations concerning end-of-life products management. Manufacturers must take responsibility for their products over the entire life cycle. In this context, there is a need for network design methods for effectively managing recovery operations and waste. The purpose of this study is to develop a mathematical programming model for managing reverse flows in end-of-life vehicles' recovery network. A reverse flow is the collection of used products from consumers and the transportation of these products for the purpose of recycling, reuse or disposal. The proposed model includes all operations in a product recovery and waste management network for used vehicles and reuse for vehicle parts such as collection, disassembly, refurbishing, processing (shredding), recycling, disposal and reuse of vehicle parts. The scope of the network model is to determine the numbers and locations of facilities in the network and the material flows between these facilities. The results show the performance of the model and its applicability for use in the planning of recovery operations in the automotive industry. The main objective of recovery and waste management is to maximize revenue and minimize pollution in end-of-life product operations. This study shows that with an accurate model, these activities may provide economic benefits and incentives in addition to protecting the environment.

  19. Reverse flow injection spectrophotometric determination of iodate and iodide in table salt.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhihai; Zhao, Jingchan

    2004-05-28

    A very simple and sensitive reverse flow injection method is described for the determination of iodate and iodide. The iodate reacts with excess iodide in acidic medium to form tri-iodide, which can be spectrophotometrically monitored at 351nm, and the absorbance is directly related to the concentration of iodate in the sample. The determination of iodide is based on oxidizing iodide to iodate. The calibration curve is linear in the range of 0.02-3.0mugml(-1) I with r(2)=0.9998, and the limit of detection is 0.008mugml(-1) I. The chemical and flow injection variables were studied and optimized to make the procedure suitable for quantitating iodate and iodide in table salts. It is shown that the reverse flow injection analysis could greatly improve the sensitivity and precision for determination of iodate with a relative standard deviation of 0.9%. A complete analysis, including sampling and washing, could be performed in 35s. The procedure was applied successfully to the determination of iodate and iodide in table salts, and the results were statistically compared with results determined by standard iodometry method.

  20. Effect of the Reversal of Air Flow upon the Discharge Coefficient of Durley Orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ware, Marsden

    1921-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to obtain information on the relationship between the coefficients for flow in two directions through thin plate orifices at low velocities. The results indicate that the ratio of the orifice discharge coefficient from standard orifice C(sub s)(sup 1) to the discharge coefficient from the reverse flow C(sub s) is always less than unity with increasing ratio of box area to orifice area. Even for areas as low as twenty, the ratios of the coefficients are not much less than unity. It is probable, however, that when the ratio of box area is less than twenty, the ratio of discharge coefficients would be greatly reduced. Specific results are given for the case of an apparatus for the laboratory testing of superchargers.

  1. Effect of fuel injector type on performance and emissions of reverse-flow combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norgren, C. T.; Riddlebaugh, S. M.

    1981-01-01

    The combustion process in a reverse-flow combustor suitable for a small gas turbine engine was investigated to evaluate the effect of fuel injector type on performance and emissions. Fuel injector configurations using pressure-atomizing, spill-flow, air blast, and air-assist techniques were compared and evaluated on the basis of performance obtained in a full-scale experimental combustor operated at inlet conditions corresponding to takeoff, cruise, low power, and idle and typical of a 16:1-pressure-ratio turbine engine. Major differences in combustor performance and emissions characteristics were experienced with each injector type even though the aerodynamic configuration was common to most combustor models. Performance characteristics obtained with the various fuel injector types could not have been predicted from bench-test injector spray characteristics. The effect of the number of operating fuel injectors on performance and emissions is also presented.

  2. Effect of broad properties fuel on injector performance in a reverse flow combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raddlebaugh, S. M.; Norgren, C. T.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of fuel type on the performance of various fuel injectors was investigated in a reverse flow combustor. Combustor performance and emissions are documented for simplex pressure atomizing, spill flow, and airblast fuel injectors using a broad properties fuel and compared with performance using Jet A fuel. Test conditions simulated a range of flight conditions including sea level take off, low and high altitude cruise, as well as a parametric evaluation of the effect of increased combustor loading. The baseline simplex injector produced higher emission levels with corresponding lower combustion efficiency with the broad properties fuel. There was little or not loss in performance by the two advanced concept injectors with the broad properties fuel. The airblast injector proved to be especially insensitive to fuel type.

  3. Sheared E×B flow and plasma turbulence viscosity in a Reversed Field Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vianello, N.; Antoni, V.; Spada, E.; Spolaore, M.; Serianni, G.; Regnoli, G.; Zuin, M.; Cavazzana, R.; Bergsåker, H.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.

    2004-11-01

    The relationship between electromagnetic turbulence and sheared plasma flow in Reversed Field Pinch configuration is addressed. The momentum balance equation for a compressible plasma is considered and the terms involved are measured in the outer region of Extrap-T2R RFP device. It results that electrostatic fluctuations determine the plasma flow through the electrostatic component of Reynolds Stress tensor. This term involves spatial and temporal scales comparable to those of MHD activity. The derived experimental perpendicular viscosity is consistent with anomalous diffusion, the latter being discussed in terms of electrostatic turbulence background and coherent structures emerging from fluctuations. The results indicate a dynamical interplay between turbulence, anomalous transport and mean E×B profiles. The momentum balance has been studied also in non-stationary condition during the application of Pulsed Poloidal Current Drive, which is known to reduce the amplitude of MHD modes.

  4. Absent or reversed end diastolic flow velocity in the umbilical artery and necrotising enterocolitis.

    PubMed Central

    Malcolm, G; Ellwood, D; Devonald, K; Beilby, R; Henderson-Smart, D

    1991-01-01

    Absent or reversed end diastolic flow (AREDF) velocities in the umbilical artery were identified in 25 high risk pregnancies. In six pregnancies the fetus was abnormal and all but one of these ended in perinatal death. Of the 19 morphologically normal fetuses, three died in utero and there were four neonatal or infant deaths. The mortality rate was 48% for all pregnancies and 37% for those with morphologically normal fetuses. There was a highly significant increased risk for the development of necrotising enterocolitis in these morphologically normal fetuses with AREDF (53%) compared with controls (6%) who did have umbilical artery end diastolic flow velocities in fetal life. There were no significant differences between the matched pairs for parameters of neonatal outcome chosen to reflect neonatal morbidity. These findings demonstrate the close association between AREDF and necrotising enterocolitis that appears to be independent of other variables such as degree of growth retardation, prematurity, and perinatal asphyxia. PMID:1863128

  5. Reverse flow first dorsal metacarpal artery flap for covering the defect of distal thumb.

    PubMed

    Checcucci, Giuseppe; Galeano, Mariarosaria; Zucchini, Maura; Zampetti, Pier Giuseppe; Ceruso, Massimo

    2014-05-01

    Reconstruction of distal thumb injuries still remains a challenge for hand surgeons. Surgical treatment includes the use of local, regional, and free flaps. The purpose of this report is to present the results of the use of a sensitive reverse flow first dorsal metacarpal artery (FDMA) flap. The skin flap was designed on the radial side of the proximal phalanx of the index finger based on the ulnar and radial branch of the FDMA and a sensory branch of the superficial radial nerve. This neurovascular flap was used in five patients to cover distal soft-tissue thumb defects. All flaps achieved primary healing except for one patient in whom superficial partial necrosis of the flap occurred, and the defect healed by second intention. All patients maintained the thumb original length and were able to return to their previous daily activities. The reverse flow FDMA flap is a reliable option to cover immediate and delayed defects of distal thumb, offering acceptable functional and cosmetic outcomes in respect to sensibility, durability, and skin-match.

  6. Axial flow reversal and its significance in air-sparged hydrocyclone (ASH) flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.D.; Das, A.; Yin, D.

    1995-12-31

    In recent years the potential of air-sparged hydrocyclone (ASH) flotation for fine coal cleaning has been demonstrated both in pilot plant testing and in a plant-site demonstration program. Further improvements in the ASH technology will depend, to some extent, on improved understanding of the complex multiphase fluid flow. Froth transport plays a very important role in determining the efficiency of fine coal cleaning by ASH flotation. It should be noted that the surface of zero axial velocity is of particular significance in froth transport because the location of this surface actually accounts for the amount of froth being transported to the overflow. In this regard, the axial flow reversal has been examined based on specially designed tracer experiments. On the basis of these experimental results, modeling efforts were made to characterize the flow pattern in the ASH. The theoretical predictions based on turbulent fluid dynamic considerations were found to describe experimental observations regarding the surface of zero axial velocity. These results that define the surface of zero axial velocity together with froth phase features established from X-ray CT measurements provide an excellent description of the flow characteristics in ASH flotation and explain the effect of various process variables, such as dimensionless area (A*), dimensionless flowrate (Q*), inlet pressure, percent solids, etc., on flotation recovery. On this basis it is expected that further advances in the design and operation of the ASH system can be made, leading to more efficient use of the ASH technology for fine coal cleaning.

  7. Curvature-induced secondary microflow motion in steady electro-osmotic transport with hydrodynamic slippage effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jin-Myoung; Chun, Myung-Suk

    2011-10-01

    In order to exactly understand the curvature-induced secondary flow motion, the steady electro-osmotic flow (EOF) is investigated by applying the full Poisson-Boltzmann/Navier-Stokes equations in a whole domain of the rectangular microchannel. The momentum equation is solved with the continuity equation as the pressure-velocity coupling achieves convergence by employing the advanced algorithm, and generalized Navier's slip boundary conditions are applied at the hydrophobic curved surface. Two kinds of channels widely used for lab-on-chips are explored with the glass channel and the heterogeneous channel consisting of glass and hydrophobic polydimethylsiloxane, spanning thin to thick electric double layer (EDL) problem. According to a sufficiently low Dean number, an inward skewness in the streamwise velocity profile is observed at the turn. With increasing EDL thickness, the electrokinetic effect gets higher contribution in the velocity profile. Simulation results regarding the variations of streamwise velocity depending on the electrokinetic parameters and hydrodynamic fluid slippage are qualitatively consistent with the predictions documented in the literature. Secondary flows arise due to a mismatch of streamline velocity between fluid in the channel center and near-wall regions. Strengthened secondary flow results from increasing the EDL thickness and the contribution of fluid inertia (i.e., electric field and channel curvature), providing a scaling relation with the same slope. Comparing with and between the cases enables us to identify the optimum selection in applications of curved channel for enhanced EOF and stronger secondary motion relevant to the mixing effect.

  8. Analysis of the flow field generated near an aircraft engine operating in reverse thrust. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledwith, W. A., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A computer solution is developed to the exhaust gas reingestion problem for aircraft operating in the reverse thrust mode on a crosswind-free runway. The computer program determines the location of the inlet flow pattern, whether the exhaust efflux lies within the inlet flow pattern or not, and if so, the approximate time before the reversed flow reaches the engine inlet. The program is written so that the user is free to select discrete runway speeds or to study the entire aircraft deceleration process for both the far field and cross-ingestion problems. While developed with STOL applications in mind, the solution is equally applicable to conventional designs. The inlet and reversed jet flow fields involved in the problem are assumed to be noninteracting. The nacelle model used in determining the inlet flow field is generated using an iterative solution to the Neuman problem from potential flow theory while the reversed jet flow field is adapted using an empirical correlation from the literature. Sample results obtained using the program are included.

  9. Microfluidic system with integrated electroosmotic pumps, concentration gradient generator and fish cell line (RTgill-W1)--towards water toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Glawdel, Tomasz; Elbuken, Caglar; Lee, Lucy E J; Ren, Carolyn L

    2009-11-21

    This study presents a microfluidic system that incorporates electroosmotic pumps, a concentration gradient generator and a fish cell line (rainbow trout gill) to perform toxicity testing on fish cells seeded in the system. The system consists of three mechanical components: (1) a toxicity testing chip containing a microfluidic gradient generator which creates a linear concentration distribution of toxicant in a cell test chamber, (2) an electroosmotic (EO) pump chip that controls the flow rate and operation of the toxicity chip, and (3) indirect reservoirs that connect the two chips allowing for the toxicant solution to be pumped separately from the electroosmotic pump solution. The flow rate and stability of the EO pumps was measured and tested by monitoring the gradient generator using fluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, a lethality test was performed with this system setup using a rainbow trout gill cell line (RTgill-W1) as the test cells and sodium dodecyl sulfate as a model toxicant. A gradient of sodium dodecyl sulfate, from 0 to 50 microg mL(-1), was applied for 1 hr to the attached cells, and the results were quantified using a Live/Dead cell assay. This work is a preliminary study on the application of EO pumps in a living cell assay, with the potential to use the pumps in portable water quality testing devices with RTgill-W1 cells as the biosensors.

  10. Reverse flow events and small-scale effects in the cusp ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spicher, A.; Ilyasov, A. A.; Miloch, W. J.; Chernyshov, A. A.; Clausen, L. B. N.; Moen, J. I.; Abe, T.; Saito, Y.

    2016-10-01

    We report in situ measurements of plasma irregularities associated with a reverse flow event (RFE) in the cusp F region ionosphere. The Investigation of Cusp Irregularities 3 (ICI-3) sounding rocket, while flying through a RFE, encountered several regions with density irregularities down to meter scales. We address in detail the region with the most intense small-scale fluctuations in both the density and in the AC electric field, which were observed on the equatorward edge of a flow shear, and coincided with a double-humped jet of fast flow. Due to its long-wavelength and low-frequency character, the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) alone cannot be the source of the observed irregularities. Using ICI-3 data as inputs, we perform a numerical stability analysis of the inhomogeneous energy-density-driven instability (IEDDI) and demonstrate that it can excite electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in a wide range of wave numbers and frequencies for the electric field configuration observed in that region, which can give rise to the observed small-scale turbulence. The IEDDI can seed as a secondary process on steepened vortices created by a primary KHI. Such an interplay between macroprocesses and microprocesses could be an important mechanism for ion heating in relation to RFEs.

  11. Embolisation of the Gastroduodenal Artery is Not Necessary in the Presence of Reversed Flow Before Yttrium-90 Radioembolisation

    SciTech Connect

    Daghir, Ahmed A.; Gungor, Hatice; Haydar, Ali A.; Wasan, Harpreet S.; Tait, Nicholas P.

    2012-08-15

    Introduction: The gastroduodenal artery (GDA) is usually embolised to avoid nontarget dispersal before yttrium-90 (Y{sup 90}) radioembolisation to treat liver metastases. In a minority of patients, there is retrograde flow in the GDA. The purpose of this study was to determine if there is any increased risk from maintaining a patent GDA in patients with reversed flow. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review was performed of all patients undergoing Y{sup 90} radioembolisation at our institution. The incidence of toxicities arising from nontarget radioembolisation by way of the GDA (gastric/duodenal ulceration, gastric/duodenal bleeding, and pancreatitis) and death occurring within 2 months of treatment were compared between the reversed and the antegrade GDA groups. Results: Ninety-two patients underwent preliminary angiography. Reversed GDA flow was found on angiography in 14.1% of cases; the GDA was not embolised in these patients. The GDA was coiled in 55.7% of patients with antegrade GDA flow to prevent inadvertent dispersal of radioembolic material. There was no increased toxicity related to nontarget dispersal by way of the GDA, or increased early mortality, in patients with reversed GDA flow (P > 0.05). Conclusion: In patients with reversed GDA flow, maintenance of a patent GDA before administration of Y{sup 90} radioembolisation does not increase the risk of toxicity from nontarget dispersal. Therapeutic injection, with careful monitoring to identify early vascular stasis, may be safely performed beyond the origin of the patent GDA. A patent GDA with reversed flow provides forward drive for infused particles and may allow alternative access to the hepatic circulation.

  12. Statistical theory of reversals in two-dimensional confined turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Vishwanath; Fauve, Stephan; Brachet, Marc

    2016-12-01

    It is shown that the truncated Euler equation (TEE), i.e., a finite set of ordinary differential equations for the amplitude of the large-scale modes, can correctly describe the complex transitional dynamics that occur within the turbulent regime of a confined two-dimensional flow obeying Navier-Stokes equation (NSE) with bottom friction and a spatially periodic forcing. The random reversals of the NSE large-scale circulation on the turbulent background involve bifurcations of the probability distribution function of the large-scale circulation. We demonstrate that these NSE bifurcations are described by the related TEE microcanonical distribution which displays transitions from Gaussian to bimodal and broken ergodicity. A minimal 13-mode model reproduces these results.

  13. Post-emplacement melt-flow as a feasible mechanism for reversed differentiation in tholeiitic sills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarnes, I.; Podladchikov, Y. Y.; Neumann, E.-R.; Galerne, C.

    2009-04-01

    This study provides a new explanation model for differentiation in sills, using a combination of geochemical data and field observations, numerical modeling and dimensional analysis. Geochemical data from a saucer-shaped dolerite sill intruded into the Karoo basin, South Africa reveal a process which causes reversed differentiation. The differentiation process is identified by D-shaped geochemical profiles. The notation is based on the vertical expression of whole-rock Mg-number (Mg# = 100*Mg/(Mg+Fetotal)) with the most primitive composition (i.e. high Mg#) in its center, and progressively more evolved composition (i.e. low Mg#) towards the upper and lower margins. Normal differentiation by fractional crystallization is known to produce C-shaped profiles (in terms of Mg# variations), as for example in the Skaergaard Intrusion. From a detailed field study of a saucer-shaped sill complex in the Karoo Basin, South Africa, we observe several different shapes (e.g. S, D and I) occurring within one sill. However, the C-shape is practically absent and hence fractional crystallization with double layer diffusion cannot be the main mechanism for differentiation in sheet intrusions. Several models have been proposed for the formation of D-shaped profiles, such as crystal settling and convection, multiple injections, flow differentiation, compositional convection, or Soret fractionation in combination with in situ crystallization. There is however no general agreement of one particular model, as they pose difficulties explaining all occurrences of D-shaped profiles. Based on numerical modeling we introduce post-emplacement flow as a feasible mechanism to explain the D-shaped profiles. A melt-flow can cause magmatic differentiation in the sill by transporting incompatible and less compatible elements associated with the melt phase (e.g. Zr and Fe) in an advective process through a stationary crystal network. Crystal networks of considerable strength are known to form in the

  14. Steady shear rheometry of dissipative particle dynamics models of polymer fluids in reverse Poiseuille flow.

    PubMed

    Fedosov, Dmitry A; Karniadakis, George Em; Caswell, Bruce

    2010-04-14

    Polymer fluids are modeled with dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) as undiluted bead-spring chains and their solutions. The models are assessed by investigating their steady shear-rate properties. Non-Newtonian viscosity and normal stress coefficients, for shear rates from the lower to the upper Newtonian regimes, are calculated from both plane Couette and plane Poiseuille flows. The latter is realized as reverse Poiseuille flow (RPF) generated from two Poiseuille flows driven by uniform body forces in opposite directions along two-halves of a computational domain. Periodic boundary conditions ensure the RPF wall velocity to be zero without density fluctuations. In overlapping shear-rate regimes the RPF properties are confirmed to be in good agreement with those calculated from plane Couette flow with Lees-Edwards periodic boundary conditions (LECs), the standard virtual rheometer for steady shear-rate properties. The concentration and the temperature dependence of the properties of the model fluids are shown to satisfy the principles of concentration and temperature superposition commonly employed in the empirical correlation of real polymer-fluid properties. The thermodynamic validity of the equation of state is found to be a crucial factor for the achievement of time-temperature superposition. With these models, RPF is demonstrated to be an accurate and convenient virtual rheometer for the acquisition of steady shear-rate rheological properties. It complements, confirms, and extends the results obtained with the standard LEC configuration, and it can be used with the output from other particle-based methods, including molecular dynamics, Brownian dynamics, smooth particle hydrodynamics, and the lattice Boltzmann method.

  15. Electro-osmotic drag coefficient of water and methanol in polymer electrolytes at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, D.; Wainright, J.S.; Landau, U.; Savinell, R.F.

    1996-04-01

    The electro-osmotic drag coefficient of water in two polymer electrolytes was experimentally determined as a function of water activity and current density for temperatures up to 200 C. The results show that the electro-osmotic drag coefficient varies from 0.2 to 0.6 in Nafion{reg_sign}/H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} membrane electrolyte, but is essentially zero in phosphoric acid-doped PBI (polybenzimidazole) membrane electrolyte over the range of water activity considered. The near-zero electro-osmotic drag coefficient found in PBI indicates that this electrolyte should lessen the problems associated with water redistribution in proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

  16. Flow and heat transfer of plane surfaces moving in parallel and reversely to the free stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hsiao-Tsung; Huang, Shih-Feng

    1994-01-01

    Two types of classical forced convection problems have been extensively studied for the past years. They are the Blasius problem of a steady flow over a stationary flat plate; and the Sakiadis problem of a plate moving continuously in a quiescent ambient fluid. In this paper, we study the general forced convection problem of surface moving continuously in a flowing stream by using a quite different transformation to obtain similarity solutions. The present solutions are very accurate for any relative speed of the surface and the free stream over a wide range of Prandtl number between 0.01 and 10 000. We study not only the case of a plane surface moving in parallel to the free stream but also the case of a surface moving reversely. The latter case has not been studied previously. For application convenience, very accurate correlation equations are proposed for predicting the wall friction and heat transfer for any velocity ratio of the surface and the free stream.

  17. A rapid and reversible skull optical clearing method for monitoring cortical blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Zhao, Yanjie; Shi, Rui; Zhu, Dan

    2016-03-01

    In vivo cortex optical imaging is of great important for revealing both structural and functional architecture of brain with high temporal-spatial resolution. To reduce the limitation of turbid skull, researchers had to establish various skull windows or directly expose cortex through craniotomy. Here we developed a skull optical clearing method to make skull transparent. Laser speckle contrast imaging technique was used to monitor the cortical blood flow after topical treatment with the optical clearing agents. The results indicated that the image contrast increased gradually, and then maintained at a high level after 15 min for adult mice, which made the image quality and resolution of micro-vessels nearly approximate to those of exposed cortex. Both the cortical blood flow velocity almost kept constant after skull became transparent. Besides, the treatment of physiological saline on the skull could make skull return to the initial state again and the skull could become transparent again when SOCS retreated it. Thus, we could conclude that the skull optical clearing method was rapid, valid, reversible and safe, which provided us available approach for performing the cortical structural and functional imaging at high temporal-spatial resolution.

  18. High-pressure open-channel on-chip electroosmotic pump for nanoflow high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Gu, Congying; Lynch, Kyle B; Lu, Joann J; Zhang, Zhengyu; Pu, Qiaosheng; Liu, Shaorong

    2014-02-18

    Here, we construct an open-channel on-chip electroosmotic pump capable of generating pressures up to ∼170 bar and flow rates up to ∼500 nL/min, adequate for high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) separations. A great feature of this pump is that a number of its basic pump units can be connected in series to enhance its pumping power; the output pressure is directly proportional to the number of pump units connected. This additive nature is excellent and useful, and no other pumps can work in this fashion. We demonstrate the feasibility of using this pump to perform nanoflow HPLC separations; tryptic digests of bovine serum albumin (BSA), transferrin factor (TF), and human immunoglobulins (IgG) are utilized as exemplary samples. We also compare the performance of our electroosmotic (EO)-driven HPLC with Agilent 1200 HPLC; comparable efficiencies, resolutions, and peak capacities are obtained. Since the pump is based on electroosmosis, it has no moving parts. The common material and process also allow this pump to be integrated with other microfabricated functional components. Development of this high-pressure on-chip pump will have a profound impact on the advancement of lab-on-a-chip devices.

  19. Electrostatic interactions and electro-osmotic properties of semipermeable surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maduar, Salim R.; Vinogradova, Olga I.

    2016-10-01

    We consider two charged semipermeable membranes which bound bulk electrolyte solutions and are separated by a thin film of salt-free liquid. Small ions permeate into the gap, which leads to a steric charge separation in the system. To quantify the problem, we define an effective surface charge density of an imaginary impermeable surface, which mimics an actual semipermeable membrane and greatly simplifies the analysis. The effective charge depends on separation, generally differs from the real one, and could even be of the opposite sign. From the exact and asymptotic solutions of the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation, we obtain the distribution of the potential and of ions in the system. We then derive explicit formulae for the disjoining pressure in the gap and electro-osmotic velocity and show that both are controlled by the effective surface charge.

  20. Electroosmotic sampling. Application to determination of ectopeptidase activity in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongjuan; Guy, Yifat; Hamsher, Amy; Shi, Guoyue; Sandberg, Mats; Weber, Stephen G

    2010-08-01

    We hypothesize that peptide-containing solutions pulled through tissue should reveal the presence and activity of peptidases in the tissue. Using the natural zeta-potential in the organotypic hippocampal slice culture (OHSC), physiological fluids can be pulled through the tissue with an electric field. The hydrolysis of the peptides present in the fluid drawn through the tissue can be determined using capillary HPLC with electrochemical detection of the biuret complexes of the peptides following a postcolumn reaction. We have characterized this new sampling method by measuring the flow rate, examining the use of internal standards, and examining cell death caused by sampling. The sampling flow rate ranges from 60 to 150 nL/min with a 150 microm (ID) sampling capillary with an electric field (at the tip of the capillary) from 30 to 60 V/cm. Cell death can be negligible with controlled sampling conditions. Using this sampling approach, we have electroosmotically pulled Leu-enkephalin through OHSCs to identify ectopeptidase activity in the CA3 region. These studies show that a bestatin-sensitive aminopeptidase may be critical for the hydrolysis of exogenous Leu-enkephalin, a neuropeptide present in the CA3 region of OHSCs.

  1. Electroosmotic Sampling. Application to Determination of Ectopeptidase Activity in Organotypic Hippocampal Slice Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hongjuan; Guy, Yifat; Hamsher, Amy; Shi, Guoyue; Sandberg, Mats; Weber, Stephen G.

    2010-01-01

    We hypothesize that peptide-containing solutions pulled through tissue should reveal the presence and activity of peptidases in the tissue. Using the natural ζ-potential in the organotypic hippocampal slice culture (OHSC), physiological fluids can be pulled through the tissue with an electric field. The hydrolysis of the peptides present in the fluid drawn through the tissue can be determined using capillary HPLC with electrochemical detection of the biuret complexes of the peptides following a postcolumn reaction. We have characterized this new sampling method by measuring the flow rate, examining the use of internal standards, and examining cell death caused by sampling. The sampling flow rate ranges from 60 to 150 nL/min with a 150 μm (ID) sampling capillary with an electric field (at the tip of the capillary) from 30 to 60 V/cm. Cell death can be negligible with controlled sampling conditions. Using this sampling approach, we have electroosmotically pulled Leu-enkephalin through OHSCs to identify ectopeptidase activity in the CA3 region. These studies show that a bestatin-sensitive aminopeptidase may be critical for the hydrolysis of exogenous Leu-enkephalin, a neuropeptide present in the CA3 region of OHSCs. PMID:20669992

  2. Reversed flow of Atlantic deep water during the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Negre, César; Zahn, Rainer; Thomas, Alexander L; Masqué, Pere; Henderson, Gideon M; Martínez-Méndez, Gema; Hall, Ian R; Mas, José L

    2010-11-04

    The meridional overturning circulation (MOC) of the Atlantic Ocean is considered to be one of the most important components of the climate system. This is because its warm surface currents, such as the Gulf Stream, redistribute huge amounts of energy from tropical to high latitudes and influence regional weather and climate patterns, whereas its lower limb ventilates the deep ocean and affects the storage of carbon in the abyss, away from the atmosphere. Despite its significance for future climate, the operation of the MOC under contrasting climates of the past remains controversial. Nutrient-based proxies and recent model simulations indicate that during the Last Glacial Maximum the convective activity in the North Atlantic Ocean was much weaker than at present. In contrast, rate-sensitive radiogenic (231)Pa/(230)Th isotope ratios from the North Atlantic have been interpreted to indicate only minor changes in MOC strength. Here we show that the basin-scale abyssal circulation of the Atlantic Ocean was probably reversed during the Last Glacial Maximum and was dominated by northward water flow from the Southern Ocean. These conclusions are based on new high-resolution data from the South Atlantic Ocean that establish the basin-scale north to south gradient in (231)Pa/(230)Th, and thus the direction of the deep ocean circulation. Our findings are consistent with nutrient-based proxies and argue that further analysis of (231)Pa/(230)Th outside the North Atlantic basin will enhance our understanding of past ocean circulation, provided that spatial gradients are carefully considered. This broader perspective suggests that the modern pattern of the Atlantic MOC-with a prominent southerly flow of deep waters originating in the North Atlantic-arose only during the Holocene epoch.

  3. Reversible Information Flow across the Medial Temporal Lobe: The Hippocampus Links Cortical Modules during Memory Retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Elisa; Henson, Richard N.

    2013-01-01

    A simple cue can be sufficient to elicit vivid recollection of a past episode. Theoretical models suggest that upon perceiving such a cue, disparate episodic elements held in neocortex are retrieved through hippocampal pattern completion. We tested this fundamental assumption by applying functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while objects or scenes were used to cue participants' recall of previously paired scenes or objects, respectively. We first demonstrate functional segregation within the medial temporal lobe (MTL), showing domain specificity in perirhinal and parahippocampal cortices (for object-processing vs scene-processing, respectively), but domain generality in the hippocampus (retrieval of both stimulus types). Critically, using fMRI latency analysis and dynamic causal modeling, we go on to demonstrate functional integration between these MTL regions during successful memory retrieval, with reversible signal flow from the cue region to the target region via the hippocampus. This supports the claim that the human hippocampus provides the vital associative link that integrates information held in different parts of cortex. PMID:23986252

  4. Use of horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands to treat reverse osmosis concentrate of rolling wastewater.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingcheng; Zhao, Gang; Huang, Xiangfeng; Guo, Haobo; Liu, Wei

    2017-03-04

    According to the characteristics of the reverse osmosis concentrate (ROC) generated from iron and steel company, we used three sets of parallel horizontal subsurface flow (HSF) constructed wetlands (CWs) with different plants and substrate layouts to treat the high-salinity wastewater. The plant growth and removal efficiencies under saline condition were evaluated. The evaluation was based entirely on routinely collected water quality data and the physical and chemical characteristics of the plants (Phragmites australis, Typha latifolia, Iris wilsonii, and Scirpus planiculmis). The principal parameters of concern in the effluent were chemical oxygen demand (COD), total nitrogen (TN), and total phosphorus (TP). The results showed that the CWs were able to remove COD, TN, and TP from ROC. S. planiculmis was not suitable for the treatment of high-saline wastewater. The sequence of metals accumulated in CW plants was K>Ca>Na>Mg>Zn>Cu. More than 70% of metals were accumulated in the aboveground of P. australis. The CW filled with gravel and manganese ore and planted with P. australis and T. latifolia had the best performance of pollutant removal, with average removal of 49.96%, 39.45%, and 72.01% for COD, TN, and TP, respectively. The effluent water quality met the regulation in China. These results suggested that HSF CW planted with P. australis and T. latifolia can be applied for ROC pollutants removal.

  5. Reversible chemical delithiation/lithiation of LiFePO4: towards a redox flow lithium-ion battery.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qizhao; Li, Hong; Grätzel, Michael; Wang, Qing

    2013-02-14

    Reversible chemical delithiation/lithiation of LiFePO(4) was successfully demonstrated using ferrocene derivatives, based on which a novel energy storage system--the redox flow lithium-ion battery (RFLB), was devised by integrating the operation flexibility of a redox flow battery and high energy density of a lithium-ion battery. Distinct from the recent semi-solid lithium rechargeable flow battery, the energy storage materials of RFLB stored in separate energy tanks remain stationary upon operation, giving us a fresh perspective on building large-scale energy storage systems with higher energy density and improved safety.

  6. Flow structure in continuous flow electrophoresis chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deiber, J. A.; Saville, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    There are at least two ways that hydrodynamic processes can limit continiuous flow electrophoresis. One arises from the sensitivity of the flow to small temerature gradients, especially at low flow rates and power levels. This sensitivity can be suppressed, at least in principle, by providing a carefully tailored, stabilizing temperature gradient in the cooling system that surrounds the flow channel. At higher power levels another limitation arises due to a restructuring of the main flow. This restructuring is caused by buoyancy, which is in turn affected by the electro-osmotic crossflow. Approximate solutions to appropriate partial differential equations have been computed by finite difference methods. One set of results is described here to illustrate the strong coupling between the structure of the main (axial) flow and the electro-osmotic flow.

  7. Experimental and numerical study of mixed convection with flow reversal in coaxial double-duct heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Mare, Thierry; Voicu, Ionut; Miriel, Jacques; Galanis, Nicolas; Sow, Ousmane

    2008-04-15

    Velocity vectors in a vertical coaxial double-duct heat exchanger for parallel ascending flow of water under conditions of laminar mixed convection have been determined experimentally using the particle image velocimetry technique. The measured velocity distributions for large annular flow rates, resulting in an essentially isothermal environment for the stream in the inner tube, are in very good agreement with corresponding numerical predictions. For flow rates of the same order of magnitude in the inner tube and the annulus, and corresponding temperature differences of about 20 C, experimental observations show that flow reversal occurs simultaneously in both streams over large axial distances for both heating and cooling of the flow in the inner tube. (author)

  8. A computational study of the plasma-flow interplay in a reverse vortex microwave discharge for CO2 conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeiren, Vincent; Bogaerts, Annemie; Plasmant University Of Antwerp Team

    2016-09-01

    The problem of global warming due to greenhouse gas emission is one of the most prominent and urgent problems of the 21st century. Recently, surface wave produced plasmas, created by a microwave discharge, have shown to be very efficient in the conversion of the main emitted greenhouse gas, namely CO2. This is the result of a high thermodynamic inequilibrium in which the CO2 is efficiently dissociated through vibrational excitation. Very promising results have been obtained in experiments using a reverse vortex gas flow. Although it is known that reverse vortex gas flows tend to create a pressure and temperature drop in the center, it is unclear which effect the flow and the plasma have on each other. In this study we model this interplay between the reverse vortex gas flow and the plasma, to get a deeper understanding of the underlying processes. As a first step, Argon gas is used due to its simpler chemistry, limiting the computational costs. In a next step, a reduced chemistry set of CO2 will be implemented.

  9. Optimization of multiple turbine arrays in a channel with tidally reversing flow by numerical modelling with adaptive mesh.

    PubMed

    Divett, T; Vennell, R; Stevens, C

    2013-02-28

    At tidal energy sites, large arrays of hundreds of turbines will be required to generate economically significant amounts of energy. Owing to wake effects within the array, the placement of turbines within will be vital to capturing the maximum energy from the resource. This study presents preliminary results using Gerris, an adaptive mesh flow solver, to investigate the flow through four different arrays of 15 turbines each. The goal is to optimize the position of turbines within an array in an idealized channel. The turbines are represented as areas of increased bottom friction in an adaptive mesh model so that the flow and power capture in tidally reversing flow through large arrays can be studied. The effect of oscillating tides is studied, with interesting dynamics generated as the tidal current reverses direction, forcing turbulent flow through the array. The energy removed from the flow by each of the four arrays is compared over a tidal cycle. A staggered array is found to extract 54 per cent more energy than a non-staggered array. Furthermore, an array positioned to one side of the channel is found to remove a similar amount of energy compared with an array in the centre of the channel.

  10. [Evaporating Droplet and Imaging Slip Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, R. G.

    2002-01-01

    In this report, we summarize work on Evaporating Droplet and Imaging Slip Flows. The work was primarily performed by post-doc Hue Hu, and partially by grad students Lei Li and Danish Chopra. The work includes studies on droplet evaporation and its effects on temperature and velocity fields in an evaporating droplet, new 3-D microscopic particle image velocimetry and direct visualization on wall slip in a surfactant solution. With the exception of the slip measurements, these projects were those proposed in the grant application. Instead of slip flow, the original grant proposed imaging electro-osmotic flows. However, shortly after the grant was issued, the PI became aware of work on electro-osmotic flows by the group of Saville in Princeton that was similar to that proposed, and we therefore elected to carry out work on imaging slip flows rather than electro-osmotic flows.

  11. Effects of discrete-electrode arrangement on traveling-wave electroosmotic pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weiyu; Shao, Jinyou; Ren, Yukun; Wu, Yupan; Wang, Chunhui; Ding, Haitao; Jiang, Hongyuan; Ding, Yucheng

    2016-09-01

    Traveling-wave electroosmotic (TWEO) pumping arises from the action of an imposed traveling-wave (TW) electric field on its own induced charge in the diffuse double layer, which is formed on top of an electrode array immersed in electrolyte solutions. Such a traveling field can be merely realized in practice by a discrete electrode array upon which the corresponding voltages of correct phase are imposed. By employing the theory of linear and weakly nonlinear double-layer charging dynamics, a physical model incorporating both the nonlinear surface capacitance of diffuse layer and Faradaic current injection is developed herein in order to quantify the changes in TWEO pumping performance from a single-mode TW to discrete electrode configuration. Benefiting from the linear analysis, we investigate the influence of using discrete electrode array to create the TW signal on the resulting fluid motion, and several approaches are suggested to improve the pumping performance. In the nonlinear regime, our full numerical analysis considering the intervening isolation spacing indicates that a practical four-phase discrete electrode configuration of equal electrode and gap width exhibits stronger nonlinearity than expected from the idealized pump applied with a single-mode TW in terms of voltage-dependence of the ideal pumping frequency and peak flow rate, though it has a much lower pumping performance. For model validation, pumping of electrolytes by TWEO is achieved over a confocal spiral four-phase electrode array covered by an insulating microchannel; measurement of flow velocity indicates the modified nonlinear theory considering moderate Faradaic conductance is indeed a more accurate physical description of TWEO. These results offer useful guidelines for designing high-performance TWEO microfluidic pumps with discrete electrode array.

  12. In-situ monitoring the realkalisation process by neutron diffraction: Electroosmotic flux and portlandite formation

    SciTech Connect

    Castellote, Marta . E-mail: martaca@ietcc.csic.es; Llorente, Irene; Andrade, Carmen; Turrillas, Xavier; Alonso, Cruz; Campo, Javier

    2006-05-15

    Even though the electroosmotic flux through hardened cementitious materials during laboratory realkalisation trials had been previously noticed, it has never been in-situ monitored, analysing at the same time the establishment of the electroosmotic flux and the microstructure changes in the surroundings of the rebar. In this paper, two series of cement pastes, cast with CEM I and CEM I substituted in a 35% by fly ash, previously carbonated at 100% CO{sub 2}, were submitted to realkalisation treatments followed on line by simultaneous acquisition of neutron diffraction data. As a result, it has been possible to confirm the electroosmosis as the driving force of carbonates towards the rebar and to determine the range of pH in the anolyte in which most of the relevant electroosmotic phenomena takes place. On the other hand, the behaviour of the main crystalline phases involved in the process has been monitored during the treatment, with the precipitation of portlandite as main result.

  13. The electroosmotic droplet switch: countering capillarity with electrokinetics.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Michael J; Ehrhard, Peter; Steen, Paul H

    2005-08-23

    Electroosmosis, originating in the double-layer of a small liquid-filled pore (size R) and driven by a voltage V, is shown to be effective in pumping against the capillary pressure of a larger liquid droplet (size B) provided the dimensionless parameter sigmaR(2)/epsilon|zeta|VB is small enough. Here sigma is surface tension of the droplet liquid/gas interface, epsilon is the liquid dielectric constant, and zeta is the zeta potential of the solid/liquid pair. As droplet size diminishes, the voltage required to pump electroosmotically scales as V approximately R(2)/B. Accordingly, the voltage needed to pump against smaller higher-pressure droplets can actually decrease provided the pump poresize scales down with droplet size appropriately. The technological implication of this favorable scaling is that electromechanical transducers made of moving droplets, so-called "droplet transducers," become feasible. To illustrate, we demonstrate a switch whose bistable energy landscape derives from the surface energy of a droplet-droplet system and whose triggering derives from the electroosmosis effect. The switch is an electromechanical transducer characterized by individual addressability, fast switching time with low voltage, and no moving solid parts. We report experimental results for millimeter-scale droplets to verify key predictions of a mathematical model of the switch. With millimeter-size water droplets and micrometer-size pores, 5 V can yield switching times of 1 s. Switching time scales as B(3)/VR(2). Two possible "grab-and-release" applications of arrays of switches are described. One mimics the controlled adhesion of an insect, the palm beetle; the other uses wettability to move a particle along a trajectory.

  14. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, John M.

    2015-03-01

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a 'special divergence-free' property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. We also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Ref. [11], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Ref. [35], appears to work very well.

  15. Analysis of HRCT-derived xylem network reveals reverse flow in some vessels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flow in xylem vessels is modeled based on constructions of three dimensional xylem networks derived from High Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) images of grapevine (Vitis vinifera) stems. Flow in 6-14% of the vessels was found to be oriented in the opposite direction to the bulk flow under norma...

  16. Graphitic carbon coupled poly(anthraquinone) for proton shuttle flow-in-a-cell application.

    PubMed

    Mathi, Selvam; Kumar, Rudra; Nagarale, Rajaram K; Sharma, Ashutosh

    2017-03-13

    Coupled electron and proton transport are an integral part of non-gassing electro-osmotic pumps (EOP). The kinetics of the electrode limits the kinetics of the electron transfer and hence the flow. This is observed in the present study with newly synthesized graphitic carbon covalently coupled to poly(anthraquinone) (PAQ). When EOP with identical electrodes were assembled, proton shuttle maintained the reversible flow, which was linearly dependent on the ks values. A Laviron plot was used to calculate the electron-transfer rate constant ks and transfer coefficient α, and their linear dependency on content of graphitic carbon was observed. The best ks value obtained was 0.67 s(-1) for 15PAQ. The sandwich-type flow-in-a-cell showed the best result of ∼40 μL min(-1) cm(-1) V(-1) electro-osmotic flux for 15PAQ. It reveals that a balanced combination of graphitic carbon and PAQ is the prime requirement for high-performance electrode materials to be used in microfluidic devices and energy applications.

  17. Fouling and its reversibility in relation to flow properties and module design in aerated hollow fibre modules for membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Pollet, S; Guigui, C; Cabassud, C

    2008-01-01

    Nowadays, most membrane bioreactors are using membranes submerged in the biomass and aeration in the concentrate compartment to limit or to control fouling. An important issue for the design of modules or membrane bundles in MBRs is to understand how the air/liquid flow is behaving and influencing fouling and its reversibility in relationship to the module properties. This paper focuses on an innovative and very specific process, in which HF membranes are put in a cartridge outside the activated sludge tank and a recycling loop is associated to the cartridge in order to decrease concentration of foulant species at the membrane surface and mass transfer resistance. Recycling operates with a very low liquid velocity in the module (a few cm.s(-1)) which constitutes a specificity of this process in terms of filtration operation. The aim of this study is to characterise two-phase flow and its effects on fouling and fouling reversibility at the scale of a semi-industrial bundle of outside/in hollow fibres, and as a function of bundle properties (packing density, fibre diameter), using specific methods to characterise the flow and fouling effects. Two modules were used showing a different packing density. Filtration was operated at constant permeate flux with clay suspension at 0.65 g.l(-1) in the same hydrodynamic conditions. Fouling kinetics and irreversibility were characterised by an adapted step method, and gas and liquid flows were characterised at global scale by residence time distribution analyses and gas hold-up. Fouling velocities are clearly influenced by gas velocity. The proportion of dead to total volume in the module is mainly affected by the liquid flow velocity and module design. The module with the higher fibre diameter and the lower packing density showed better performances in terms of fouling which was correlated with better flow properties.

  18. Time-domain delay-and-sum beamforming for time-reversal detection of intermittent acoustic sources in flows.

    PubMed

    Rakotoarisoa, Ifanila; Fischer, Jeoffrey; Valeau, Vincent; Marx, David; Prax, Christian; Brizzi, Laurent-Emmanuel

    2014-11-01

    This study focuses on the identification of intermittent aeroacoustic sources in flows by using the time-domain beamforming technique. It is first shown that this technique can be seen as a time-reversal (TR) technique, working with approximate Green functions in the case of a shear flow. Some numerical experiments investigate the case of an array measurement of a generic acoustic pulse emitted in a wind-tunnel flow, with a realistic multi-arm spiral array. The results of the time-domain beamforming successfully match those given by a numerical TR technique over a wide range of flow speeds (reaching the transonic regime). It is shown how the results should be analyzed in a focusing plane parallel to the microphone array in order to estimate the location and emission time of the pulse source. An experimental application dealing with the aeroacoustic radiation of a bluff body in a wind-tunnel flow is also considered, and shows that some intermittent events can be clearly identified in the noise radiation. Time-domain beamforming is then an efficient tool for analyzing intermittent acoustic sources in flows, and is a computationally cheaper alternative to the numerical TR technique, which should be used for complex configurations where the Green function is not available.

  19. Local measurements of tearing mode flows and the magnetohydrodynamic dynamo in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Ennis, D. A.; Gangadhara, S.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Ebrahimi, F.; Fiksel, G.; Prager, S. C.; Craig, D.; Anderson, J. K.

    2010-08-15

    The first localized measurements of tearing mode flows in the core of a hot plasma are presented using nonperturbing measurements of the impurity ion flow. Emission from charge exchange recombination is collected by a novel high optical throughput duo spectrometer providing localized ({+-}1 cm) measurements of C{sup +6} impurity ion velocities resolved to <500 m/s with high bandwidth (100 kHz). Poloidal tearing mode flows in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch are observed to be localized to the mode resonant surface with a radial extent much broader than predicted by linear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory but comparable to the magnetic island width. The relative poloidal flow amplitudes among the dominant core modes do not reflect the proportions of the magnetic amplitudes. The largest correlated flows are associated with modes having smaller magnetic amplitudes resonant near the midradius. The MHD dynamo due to these flows on the magnetic axis is measured to be adequate to balance the mean Ohm's law during reduced tearing activity and is significant but does not exclude other dynamo mechanisms from contributing during a surge in reconnection activity.

  20. Particle Deformation and Concentration Polarization in Electroosmotic Transport of Hydrogels through Pores

    SciTech Connect

    Vlassiouk, Ivan V

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we report detection of deformable, hydrogel particles by the resistive-pulse technique using single pores in a polymer film. The hydrogels pass through the pores by electroosmosis and cause formation of a characteristic shape of resistive pulses indicating the particles underwent dehydration and deformation. These effects were explained via a non-homogeneous pressure distribution along the pore axis modeled by the coupled Poisson-Nernst-Planck and Navier Stokes equations. The local pressure drops are induced by the electroosmotic fluid flow. Our experiments also revealed the importance of concentration polarization in the detection of hydrogels. Due to the negative charges as well as branched, low density structure of the hydrogel particles, concentration of ions in the particles is significantly higher than in the bulk. As a result, when electric field is applied across the membrane, a depletion zone can be created in the vicinity of the particle observed as a transient drop of the current. Our experiments using pores with openings between 200 and 1600 nm indicated the concentration polarization dominated the hydrogels detection for pores wider than 450 nm. The results are of importance for all studies that involve transport of molecules, particles and cells through pores with charged walls. The developed inhomogeneous pressure distribution can potentially influence the shape of the transported species. The concentration polarization changes the interpretation of the resistive pulses; the observed current change does not necessarily reflect only the particle size but also the size of the depletion zone that is formed in the particle vicinity.

  1. Removal of volatile organic compounds from air streams by making use of a microwave plasma burner with reverse vortex flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ji H.; Ma, Suk H.; Cho, Chang H.; Hong, Yong C.; Ahn, Jae Y.

    2014-01-01

    We developed an atmospheric-pressure microwave plasma burner for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from polluted air streams. This study focused on the destruction of the VOCs in the high flow rate polluted streams required for industrial use. Plasma flames were sustained by injecting liquefied natural gas (LNG), which is composed of CH4, into the microwave plasma torch. With its high temperature and high density of atomic oxygen, the microwave torch attained nearly complete combustion of LNG, thereby providing a large-volume, high-temperature plasma flame. The plasma flame was applied to reactors in which the polluted streams were in one of two vortex flows: a conventional vortex reactor (CVR) or a reverse vortex reactor (RVR). The RVR, using a plasma power of 2 kW and an LNG flow of 20 liters per minute achieved a destruction removal efficiency (DRE) of 98% for an air flow rate of 5 Nm3/min polluted with 550 pm of VOCs.. For the same experimental parameters, the CVR provided a DRE of 90.2%. We expect that this decontamination system will prove effective in purifying contaminated air at high flow rates.

  2. Hydrogen production from continuous flow, microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cells treating fermentation wastewater.

    PubMed

    Watson, Valerie J; Hatzell, Marta; Logan, Bruce E

    2015-11-01

    A microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cell (MREC) was used to produce hydrogen gas from fermentation wastewater without the need for additional electrical energy. Increasing the number of cell pairs in the reverse electrodialysis stack from 5 to 10 doubled the maximum current produced from 60 A/m(3) to 120 A/m(3) using acetate. However, more rapid COD removal required a decrease in the anolyte hydraulic retention time (HRT) from 24 to 12 h to stabilize anode potentials. Hydrogen production using a fermentation wastewater (10 cell pairs, HRT=8 h) reached 0.9±0.1 L H2/Lreactor/d (1.1±0.1 L H2/g-COD), with 58±5% COD removal and a coulombic efficiency of 74±5%. These results demonstrated that consistent rates of hydrogen gas production could be achieved using an MREC if effluent anolyte COD concentrations are sufficient to produce stable anode potentials.

  3. A modified DRIL procedure by flow reversal of an aborted distal cephalic vein for critical hand ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Danzer, D; Czerny, M; Widmer, M K

    2011-09-01

    Treatment of dialysis access-related hand ischaemia with preservation of the access remains an issue. We report the case of a patient presenting critical hand ischaemia 2 years after proximalisation of a distal radio-cephalic fistula with preservation of the original access. After valvulotomy, the distal cephalic vein was used as in situ bypass and directly anastomosed to the distal brachial artery, providing a direct flow to the hand. This procedure relieved the hand ischaemia without sacrificing the functioning fistula. Six months later, the fistula and bypass were still patent, showing that flow reversal of a previous fistula can be an efficient strategy to correct dialysis access-related hand ischaemia in selected cases.

  4. X-ray Diffraction Studies of Forward and Reverse Plastic Flow in Nanoscale Layers during Thermal Cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Gram, Michael D; Carpenter, John S; Payzant, E Andrew; Misra, Amit; Anderson, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    The biaxial stress-strain response of layers within Cu/Ni nanolaminates is determined from in-plane x-ray diffraction spectra during heating/cooling. Thinner (11 nm) Cu and Ni layers with coherent, cube-on-cube interfaces reach ~1.8 GPa (Cu) and ~2.9 GPa (Ni) without yielding. Thicker (21 nm) layers with semi-coherent interfaces exhibit unusual plastic phenomena, including extraordinary plastic work hardening rates, and forward vs. reverse plastic flow with small (~10%) changes in stress, and evidence that threshold plastic stress in Ni layers is altered by preceding plastic flow in Cu layers. Line energy, pinning strength, net interfacial dislocation density and hardness are provided.

  5. The gelatinous extracellular matrix facilitates transport studies in kelp: visualization of pressure-induced flow reversal across sieve plates

    PubMed Central

    Knoblauch, Jan; Peters, Winfried S.; Knoblauch, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims In vascular plants, important questions regarding phloem function remain unanswered due to problems with invasive experimental procedures in this highly sensitive tissue. Certain brown algae (kelps; Laminariales) also possess sieve tubes for photoassimilate transport, but these are embedded in large volumes of a gelatinous extracellular matrix which isolates them from neighbouring cells. Therefore, we hypothesized that kelp sieve tubes might tolerate invasive experimentation better than their analogues in higher plants, and sought to establish Nereocystis luetkeana as an experimental system. Methods The predominant localization of cellulose and the gelatinous extracellular matrix in N. luetkeana was verified using specific fluorescent markers and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Sieve tubes in intact specimens were loaded with fluorescent dyes, either passively (carboxyfluorescein diacetate; CFDA) or by microinjection (rhodamine B), and the movement of the dyes was monitored by fluorescence microscopy. Key Results Application of CFDA demonstrated source to sink bulk flow in N. luetkeana sieve tubes, and revealed the complexity of sieve tube structure, with branches, junctions and lateral connections. Microinjection into sieve elements proved comparatively easy. Pulsed rhodamine B injection enabled the determination of flow velocity in individual sieve elements, and the direct visualization of pressure-induced reversals of flow direction across sieve plates. Conclusions The reversal of flow direction across sieve plates by pressurizing the downstream sieve element conclusively demonstrates that a critical requirement of the Münch theory is satisfied in kelp; no such evidence exists for tracheophytes. Because of the high tolerance of its sieve elements to experimental manipulation, N. luetkeana is a promising alternative to vascular plants for studying the fluid mechanics of sieve tube networks. PMID:26929203

  6. Recovery of rectified signals from hot-wire/film anemometers due to flow reversal in oscillating flows.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yingchen; Jones, Douglas L; Liu, Chang

    2010-01-01

    Hot-wire/film anemometers have been broadly used in experimental studies in fluid mechanics, acoustics, and ocean engineering. Yet, it is well known that hot-wire/film anemometers rectify the signal outputs due to the lack of sensitivity to flow direction. This main drawback, in turn, makes them less useful for diverse fluctuating flow measurements. To solve this issue, a rectification recovery method has been developed based on reconstruction of the Fourier series expansion in conjunction with signal-squaring approach. This signal recovery method was experimentally examined and proven to be successful for both conventional and microfabricated hot-wire/film anemometers. The method was further applied to dipole field measurements, with data from recovered signals perfectly matching the analytical model of the dipole field.

  7. Internal reversing flow in a tailpipe offtake configuration for SSTOVL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcardle, Jack G.; Esker, Barbara S.; Rhodes, James A.

    1992-01-01

    A generic one-third scale model of a tailpipe offtake system for a supersonic short takeoff vertical landing (SSTOVL) aircraft was tested at LeRC Powered Lift Facility. The model consisted of a tailpipe with twin elbows, offtake ducts, and flow control nozzles, plus a small ventral nozzle and a blind flange to simulate a blocked cruise nozzle. The offtake flow turned through a total angle of 177 degrees relative to the tailpipe inlet axis. The flow split was 45 percent to each offtake and 10 percent to the ventral nozzle. The main test objective was to collect data for comparison to the performance of the same configuration predicted by a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Only the experimental results are given - the analytical results are published in a separate paper. Performance tests were made with unheated air at tailpipe-to-ambient pressure ratios up to 5. The total pressure loss through the offtakes was as high as 15.5 percent. All test results are shown as graphs, contour plots, and wall pressure distributions. The complex flow patterns in the tailpipe and elbows at the offtake openings are described with traversing flow angle probe and paint streak flow visualization data.

  8. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, John M.

    2015-03-01

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a "special divergence-free" (SDF) property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. We also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Feng and Shang [Numer. Math. 71, 451 (1995)], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Richardson and Finn [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 014004 (2012

  9. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    DOE PAGES

    Finn, John M.

    2015-03-01

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a 'special divergence-free' property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. Wemore » also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Ref. [11], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Ref. [35], appears to work very well.« less

  10. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, John M.

    2015-03-15

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a “special divergence-free” (SDF) property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. We also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Feng and Shang [Numer. Math. 71, 451 (1995)], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Richardson and Finn [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 014004 (2012

  11. The Number of Perforators Included in Reversed Flow Posterior Interosseous Artery Flap: Does It Affect the Incidence of Venous Congestion?

    PubMed Central

    Shaker, Ayman A.; Elbarbary, Amir S.; Sayed, Mohamed A.; Elghareeb, Mohamed A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study is to decrease the incidence of venous congestion occurring in the reversed flow posterior interosseous artery flap used for coverage of hand defects. Methods: This may be achieved by studying the incidence of venous congestion in flaps including only 1 perforator and comparing the results with others including more than 1 perforator both in small and large sized flaps. Results: This study showed that inclusion of only 1 perforator in the flap decreased the incidence of venous congestion with complete flap loss in flaps to 5%. Also, it decreased the incidence of venous congestion with partial flap loss in flaps to 10%. Conclusions: The small sized reversed flow posterior interosseous artery flap should be less than 40 cm2 and should include only 1 perforator to decrease the incidence of venous congestion with partial and complete loss of the flap. The level of evidence for this study is the type II prospective comparative study. PMID:28293513

  12. Integrating Reverse-Electrodialysis Stacks with Flow Batteries for Improved Energy Recovery from Salinity Gradients and Energy Storage.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiuping; Kim, Taeyoung; Rahimi, Mohammad; Gorski, Christopher A; Logan, Bruce E

    2017-02-22

    Salinity gradient energy can be directly converted into electrical power by using reverse electrodialysis (RED) and other technologies, but reported power densities have been too low for practical applications. Herein, the RED stack performance was improved by using 2,6-dihydroxyanthraquinone and ferrocyanide as redox couples. These electrolytes were then used in a flow battery to produce an integrated RED stack and flow battery (RED-FB) system capable of capturing, storing, and discharging salinity gradient energy. Energy captured from the RED stack was discharged in the flow battery at a maximum power density of 3.0 kW m(-2) -anode, which was similar to the flow batteries charged by electrical power and could be used for practical applications. Salinity gradient energy captured from the RED stack was recovered from the electrolytes as electricity with 30 % efficiency, and the maximum energy density of the system was 2.4 kWh m(-3) -anolyte. The combined RED-FB system overcomes many limitations of previous approaches to capture, store, and use salinity gradient energy from natural or engineered sources.

  13. The formation of reverse shocks in magnetized high energy density supersonic plasma flows

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, S. V. E-mail: l.suttle10@imperial.ac.uk; Suttle, L.; Swadling, G. F.; Bennett, M.; Bland, S. N.; Burdiak, G. C.; Chittenden, J. P.; Grouchy, P. de; Hall, G. N.; Hare, J. D.; Kalmoni, N.; Niasse, N.; Patankar, S.; Smith, R. A.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Burgess, D.; Clemens, A.; Ciardi, A.; Sheng, L.; Yuan, J.; and others

    2014-05-15

    A new experimental platform was developed, based on the use of supersonic plasma flow from the ablation stage of an inverse wire array z-pinch, for studies of shocks in magnetized high energy density physics plasmas in a well-defined and diagnosable 1-D interaction geometry. The mechanism of flow generation ensures that the plasma flow (Re{sub M} ∼ 50, M{sub S} ∼ 5, M{sub A} ∼ 8, V{sub flow} ≈ 100 km/s) has a frozen-in magnetic field at a level sufficient to affect shocks formed by its interaction with obstacles. It is found that in addition to the expected accumulation of stagnated plasma in a thin layer at the surface of a planar obstacle, the presence of the magnetic field leads to the formation of an additional detached density jump in the upstream plasma, at a distance of ∼c/ω{sub pi} from the obstacle. Analysis of the data obtained with Thomson scattering, interferometry, and local magnetic probes suggests that the sub-shock develops due to the pile-up of the magnetic flux advected by the plasma flow.

  14. Is Gene Flow Promoting the Reversal of Pleistocene Divergence in the Mountain Chickadee (Poecile gambeli)?

    PubMed Central

    Manthey, Joseph D.; Klicka, John; Spellman, Garth M.

    2012-01-01

    The Pleistocene glacial cycles left a genetic legacy on taxa throughout the world; however, the persistence of genetic lineages that diverged during these cycles is dependent upon levels of gene flow and introgression. The consequences of secondary contact among taxa may reveal new insights into the history of the Pleistocene’s genetic legacy. Here, we use phylogeographic methods, using 20 nuclear loci from regional populations, to infer the consequences of secondary contact following divergence in the Mountain Chickadee (Poecile gambeli). Analysis of nuclear data identified two geographically-structured genetic groups, largely concordant with results from a previous mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) study. Additionally, the estimated multilocus divergence times indicate a Pleistocene divergence, and are highly concordant with mtDNA. The previous mtDNA study showed a paucity of sympatry between clades, while nuclear patterns of gene flow show highly varied patterns between populations. The observed pattern of gene flow, from coalescent-based analyses, indicates southern populations in both clades exhibit little gene flow within or between clades, while northern populations are experiencing higher gene flow within and between clades. If this pattern were to persist, it is possible the historical legacy of Pleistocene divergence may be preserved in the southern populations only, and the northern populations would become a genetically diverse hybrid species. PMID:23152877

  15. Reversal and amplification of zonal flows by boundary enforced thermal wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, W.; Gastine, T.; Wicht, J.

    2017-01-01

    Zonal flows in rapidly-rotating celestial objects such as the Sun, gas or ice giants form in a variety of surface patterns and amplitudes. Whereas the differential rotation on the Sun, Jupiter and Saturn features a super-rotating equatorial region, the ice giants, Neptune and Uranus harbour an equatorial jet slower than the planetary rotation. Global numerical models covering the optically thick, deep-reaching and rapidly rotating convective envelopes of gas giants reproduce successfully the prograde jet at the equator. In such models, convective columns shaped by the dominant Coriolis force typically exhibit a consistent prograde tilt. Hence angular momentum is pumped away from the rotation axis via Reynolds stresses. Those models are found to be strongly geostrophic, hence a modulation of the zonal flow structure along the axis of rotation, e.g. introduced by persistent latitudinal temperature gradients, seems of minor importance. Within our study we stimulate these thermal gradients and the resulting ageostrophic flows by applying an axisymmetric and equatorially symmetric outer boundary heat flux anomaly (Y20) with variable amplitude and sign. Such a forcing pattern mimics the thermal effect of intense solar or stellar irradiation. Our results suggest that the ageostrophic flows are linearly amplified with the forcing amplitude q⋆ leading to a more pronounced dimple of the equatorial jet (alike Jupiter). The geostrophic flow contributions, however, are suppressed for weak q⋆, but inverted and re-amplified once q⋆ exceeds a critical value. The inverse geostrophic differential rotation is consistently maintained by now also inversely tilted columns and reminiscent of zonal flow profiles observed for the ice giants. Analysis of the main force balance and parameter studies further foster these results.

  16. Electro-osmotic drag effect on the methanol permeation for sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) and nafion 117 membranes.

    PubMed

    Chi, Nguyen Thi Que; Bae, Byungchan; Kim, Dukjoon

    2013-11-01

    Electro-osmotic drag effect on the methanol permeation was investigated for sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (sPEEK) membrane, and its result was compared with that of Nafion 117 membrane. The electro-osmotic drag coefficient was determined from the limiting current density measured at different temperature. The methanol permeability of sPEEK membrane increased with temperature but its temperature dependence was not as strong as that of Nafion 117 membrane. The methanol permeability or the total methanol flux of Nafion 117 membrane was at least twice higher than that of sPEEK70 membrane (sPEEK membrane with 70% sulfonation degree), as the methanol permeation was highly contributed by the electro-osmotic drag effect. This higher electro-osmotic drag of Nafion 117 membrane is attributed to the bigger ion cluster and waster channel in nanophase and thus more free water absorption than sPEEK membrane.

  17. Experimental Observations About The Behavior of The Sheet Flow On Sand Bed Streams and The Reversal Gradation Effect.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateman, A.; Aguilar, C.; Roquer, R.; Andreatta, A.; Velasco, D.

    In our land, Catalonia, exists a lot of torrential ephemeral streams. Which are char- acterized by a great floods during typical convective storms. Sediment transport rates are very important in this gravel/sand torrent. Usually, near the cities, they show a 2- 3% slope bed profile. Engineering works or actuations have to deal with this kind of dynamic systems. The stabilization of this torrents is one of the aim of our research at the Polytechnic University of Catalonia (Hydraulic, Marine and environmental De- partment). Typical experiments in a hydraulic flume was normally used to observe the behavior of stabilization structures. The first step in the research is to know the general evolution of the bed profile. Agradation and degradation experiments in a laboratory flume of 20 m length was car- ried out to study the behavior of the steady and unsteady flow with sediment transport. The hydraulic regime of the experiments was set to be supercritical flat bed; sand flow rates about 300gr/s which gives near a 2% equilibrium slope. The most interesting results of those experiments was the reversal gradation of the sand sizes measured along the flume in the final steady state. This kind of effect was reported by Luca Solari and Gary Parker 2000. A 1-D numerical model to solve the Exner and Saint_Venant implicit system of equation were used to compare the evolu- tion of the different experiments. The sheet sand flow produces a great resistance to flow, the experiments shows the influence exhorted by the sand discharge in the flow resistance factor.

  18. One- and two-dimensional Stirling machine simulation using experimentally generated reversing flow turbuulence models

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, L.F.

    1990-08-01

    The activities described in this report do not constitute a continuum but rather a series of linked smaller investigations in the general area of one- and two-dimensional Stirling machine simulation. The initial impetus for these investigations was the development and construction of the Mechanical Engineering Test Rig (METR) under a grant awarded by NASA to Dr. Terry Simon at the Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota. The purpose of the METR is to provide experimental data on oscillating turbulent flows in Stirling machine working fluid flow path components (heater, cooler, regenerator, etc.) with particular emphasis on laminar/turbulent flow transitions. Hence, the initial goals for the grant awarded by NASA were, broadly, to provide computer simulation backup for the design of the METR and to analyze the results produced. This was envisaged in two phases: First, to apply an existing one-dimensional Stirling machine simulation code to the METR and second, to adapt a two-dimensional fluid mechanics code which had been developed for simulating high Rayleigh number buoyant cavity flows to the METR. The key aspect of this latter component was the development of an appropriate turbulence model suitable for generalized application to Stirling simulation. A final-step was then to apply the two-dimensional code to an existing Stirling machine for which adequate experimental data exist. The work described herein was carried out over a period of three years on a part-time basis. Forty percent of the first year`s funding was provided as a match to the NASA funds by the Underground Space Center, University of Minnesota, which also made its computing facilities available to the project at no charge.

  19. Analysis of Transient and Steady State Neutral Flows in a Field Reversed Configuration Thruster

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-03

    stagnation temperature of 300 K. The carrier gas was molecular nitrogen in a ll cases except for one where neon was used. Transient evolution of gas flow...Navier-Stokes equations is CFD++ 8 developed by Metacomp Technologies, Inc. CFD++ is a flexible computational fluid dynamics software suite for the...intermolecular potential was assumed to be a variable hard sphere. Energy redistribution in molecular colli- sions between the internal and translational modes

  20. An in situ measurement of extracellular cysteamine, homocysteine, and cysteine concentrations in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures by integration of electroosmotic sampling and microfluidic analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Juanfang; Xu, Kerui; Landers, James P; Weber, Stephen G

    2013-03-19

    We demonstrate an all-electric sampling/derivatization/separation/detection system for the quantitation of thiols in tissue cultures. Extracellular fluid collected from rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs) by electroosmotic flow through an 11 cm (length) × 50 μm (i.d.) sampling capillary is introduced to a simple microfluidic chip for derivatization, continuous flow-gated injection, separation, and detection. With the help of a fluorogenic, thiol-specific reagent, ThioGlo-1, we have successfully separated and detected the extracellular levels of free reduced cysteamine, homocysteine, and cysteine from OHSCs within 25 s in a 23 mm separation channel with a confocal laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detector. Attention to the conductivities of the fluids being transported is required for successful flow-gated injections. When the sample conductivity is much higher than the run buffer conductivities, the electroosmotic velocities are such that there is less fluid coming by electroosmosis into the cross from the sample/reagent channel than is leaving by electroosmosis into the separation and waste channels. The resulting decrease in the internal fluid pressure in the injection cross pulls flow from the gated channel. This process may completely shut down the gated injection. Using a glycylglycine buffer with physiological osmolarity but only 62% of physiological conductivity and augmenting the conductivity of the run buffers solved this problem. Quantitation is by standard additions. Concentrations of cysteamine, homocysteine, and cysteine in the extracellular space of OHSCs are 10.6 ± 1.0 nM (n = 70), 0.18 ± 0.01 μM (n = 53), and 11.1 ± 1.2 μM (n = 70), respectively. This is the first in situ quantitative estimation of endogenous cysteamine in brain tissue. Extracellular levels of homocysteine and cysteine are comparable with other reported values.

  1. Electromagnetic treatment to old Alzheimer's mice reverses β-amyloid deposition, modifies cerebral blood flow, and provides selected cognitive benefit.

    PubMed

    Arendash, Gary W; Mori, Takashi; Dorsey, Maggie; Gonzalez, Rich; Tajiri, Naoki; Borlongan, Cesar

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have investigated physiologic and cognitive effects of "long-term" electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure in humans or animals. Our recent studies have provided initial insight into the long-term impact of adulthood EMF exposure (GSM, pulsed/modulated, 918 MHz, 0.25-1.05 W/kg) by showing 6+ months of daily EMF treatment protects against or reverses cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's transgenic (Tg) mice, while even having cognitive benefit to normal mice. Mechanistically, EMF-induced cognitive benefits involve suppression of brain β-amyloid (Aβ) aggregation/deposition in Tg mice and brain mitochondrial enhancement in both Tg and normal mice. The present study extends this work by showing that daily EMF treatment given to very old (21-27 month) Tg mice over a 2-month period reverses their very advanced brain Aβ aggregation/deposition. These very old Tg mice and their normal littermates together showed an increase in general memory function in the Y-maze task, although not in more complex tasks. Measurement of both body and brain temperature at intervals during the 2-month EMF treatment, as well as in a separate group of Tg mice during a 12-day treatment period, revealed no appreciable increases in brain temperature (and no/slight increases in body temperature) during EMF "ON" periods. Thus, the neuropathologic/cognitive benefits of EMF treatment occur without brain hyperthermia. Finally, regional cerebral blood flow in cerebral cortex was determined to be reduced in both Tg and normal mice after 2 months of EMF treatment, most probably through cerebrovascular constriction induced by freed/disaggregated Aβ (Tg mice) and slight body hyperthermia during "ON" periods. These results demonstrate that long-term EMF treatment can provide general cognitive benefit to very old Alzheimer's Tg mice and normal mice, as well as reversal of advanced Aβ neuropathology in Tg mice without brain heating. Results further underscore the potential for EMF treatment

  2. Reverse roll-coating flow: a computational investigation towards high-speed defect free coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belblidia, F.; Tamaddon-Jahromi, H. R.; Echendu, S. O. S.; Webster, M. F.

    2013-11-01

    A finite element Taylor-Galerkin pressure-correction algorithm is employed to simulate a high-speed defect-free roll-coating flow, which substantiates a coating process with a free meniscus surface. Findings are applicable across a wide range of coating sectors in optimisation of coating performance, which targets adaptive and intelligent process control. Industrially, there is a major drive towards using new material products and raising coating line-speeds, to address increased efficiency and productivity. This study has sought to attack these issues by developing an effective predictive toolset for high-speed defect-free coatings. Here, time-stepping/finite element methods are deployed to model this free-surface problem that involves the transfer of a coating fluid from a roller to a substrate (of prescribed wet-film thickness). This procedure is used in conjunction with a set of constitutive equations capable of describing the relevant fluid-film rheology in appropriate detail. Quantities of pressure, lift and drag have been calculated streamwise across the flow domain, and streamline patterns reveal a large recirculating vortex around the meniscus region. Such pressure distributions across the domain display a positive peak which decreases as nip-gap size increases. Further analysis has been conducted, mimicking the presence of a wetting line, whilst varying boundary conditions at the nip. Observation has shown that such inclusion would serve as a relief mechanism to the positive peak pressures generated around the nip zone. Here, through an elasto-hydrodynamic formulation, the elastic deformation of a rubber roll cover (elastomer) has also been introduced, which offers fresh insight into the process with respect to nip-flow behaviour, and allows for the analysis of both positive and negative nip-gaps.

  3. Reverse-flow anterolateral thigh perforator: an ad hoc flap for severe post-burn knee contracture.

    PubMed

    Ismail, H A; El-Bassiony, L E

    2016-03-31

    We evaluate function outcomes of the reverse-flow ALT perforator flap to reconstruct severe post-burn knee contracture. Between October 2012 and December 2014, 10 patients with severe post-burn knee contracture were subjected to reconstruction with 10 ipsilateral reversed-flow ALT perforator flaps. All the patients were male. Ages ranged from 15 to 47 years (mean = 32 years). Time from burn injury to patient presentation ranged from 2-8 months. All patients demonstrated post-burn flexion contracture of the knee joint, ranging from 35 to 75 degrees. Flap sizes ranged from 8×16 to 12×26 cm. The flaps and skin grafts were carried out without major complications. Only minor complications occurred, such as transient, mild congestion immediately after inset in two flaps. Two flaps developed superficial necrosis at the distal edge. One case sustained partial skin graft loss due to haematoma. One case complained of skin hyperpigmentation and hypertrophic scars around the graft. Secondary debulking procedures were required in two cases. The entire donor sites were closed by partial thickness skin graft with acceptable appearance, except one case that was closed primarily. Eight out of ten patients (80%) demonstrated gradual improvement in range of knee motion after a specialized rehabilitation program. Two patients (20%) did not get back full range of motion. RALT perforator flap is the cornerstone for the reconstruction of soft-tissue defects around the knee with acceptable aesthetic and functional results provided that the following items are fulfilled: inclusion of muscle cuff around the pedicle, the pivot point, prevention of pedicle compression after transfer and early surgical intervention on the post-burn knee contracture.

  4. Anatomical consideration of reverse-flow island flap transfers from the midpalm for finger reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Omokawa, S; Tanaka, Y; Ryu, J; Clovis, N

    2001-12-01

    Primary soft-tissue coverage for large palmar defects of the fingers is a difficult problem for cases in which homodigital or heterodigital flaps cannot be used. The aim of this study was to explore the vascular and neural anatomy of the midpalmar area to assess the possibility of reverse island flaps from this area. In 24 cadaver hands perfused with a silicone compound, the arterial pattern of the superficial palmar arch and common palmar digital artery was examined. The cutaneous perforating arteries and nerve branches supplying the midpalmar area were dissected, and the number, location, and arterial diameter of these branches were measured. In six other specimens, the common palmar digital artery was injected to determine the skin territory supplied by the artery. The superficial palmar arch contained the three common palmar digital arteries and its terminal branch coursed along the radial margin of the index metacarpus. This terminal branch had three to six cutaneous perforators (diameter range, 0.1 to 0.5 mm) and supplied the radial aspect of the midpalmar area located over the ulnar half of the adductor pollicis muscles. The midpalmar area was divided into two regions-the proximal and distal-according to the vascular distributions. The proximal region contained dense aponeurosis and thin subcutaneous tissue, and the cutaneous perforators were rather sparse (between three and nine) and had a small diameter (0.1 to 0.3 mm). The distal region, which had loose aponeurosis and abundant subcutaneous tissue, had a rich vascular supply from the common and proper digital artery. Perforating arteries of this region coursed frequently in an oblique fashion and the number of perforators (between eight and 15) and their arterial diameters (diameter range, 0.1 to 0.5 mm) were higher than those of the proximal region. The area of skin perfused by the common palmar digital artery was 5 x 3 cm at the distal midpalmar region. There were three to five cutaneous nerve branches

  5. Electrode kinetic and electro-kinetic effects in electroosmotic dewatering of clay suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Vijh, A.K.

    1997-05-01

    Lockhart`s remarks on the author`s previous interpretation of the electrochemical aspects of the electroosmotic dewatering (EOD) of clay suspensions are analyzed to provide some further clarification. Based on Lockhart`s excellent work, the authors put forward here novel electrochemical interpretations of some features of the following experimental observations: (1) Galvani dewatering; (2) the dewatering efficiency; and (3) high voltage needed for dewatering Al-kaolinite and aluminum electrode effect.

  6. Analysis of dynamic stall using unsteady boundary-layer theory. [effect of pitch rate on the delay in forward movement of the rear flow reversal point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scruggs, R. M.; Nash, J. F.; Singleton, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The unsteady turbulent boundary layer and potential flow about a pitching airfoil are analyzed using numerical methods to determine the effect of pitch rate on the delay in forward movement of the rear flow reversal point. An explicit finite difference scheme is used to integrate the unsteady boundary layer equations, which are coupled at each instant of time to a fully unsteady and nonlinear potential flow analysis. A substantial delay in forward movement of the reversal point is demonstrated with increasing pitch rate, and it is shown that the delay results partly from the alleviation of the gradients in the potential flow, and partly from the effects of unsteadiness in the boundary layer itself. The predicted delay in flow-reversal onset, and its variation with pitch rate, are shown to be in reasonable agreement with experimental data relating to the delay in dynamic stall. From the comparisons it can be concluded (a) that the effects of time-dependence are sufficient to explain the failure of the boundary layer to separate during the dynamic overshoot, and (b) that there may be some link between forward movement of the reversal point and dynamic stall.

  7. Applying solubilization treatment to reverse clogging in laboratory-scale vertical flow constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Guofen, Hua; Wei, Zhu; Lianfang, Zhao; Yunhui, Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Substrate clogging is characterized as a frequently occurring operational problem for subsurface-flow constructed wetlands. The application of solubilization treatment to reduce clogging was tested in lab-scaled setups to provide a promising solution. The performance of solubilization treatment on reducing clogging and the related effects on plants and biofilms in the wetland system were investigated in this paper. The results showed that the infiltration rate and available porosity of wetland substrate increased as a function of increased dosage of NaOH, HCl, NaClO, and detergent, respectively. Among the four solvents, it appeared that NaClO had the most obvious effects on reducing clogging and the infiltration rate and effective porosity recovered to 69% of the original condition. The two possible reasons for solubilization were the flocculents' structure of the clogs was broken up or parts of the organic clogs were dissolved. The function of adding NaOH and NaClO was to dissolve the protein and polysaccharides of the organic clogs; the function of adding HCl was to release the anaerobic gas wrapped in the organic clogs. Furthermore, experiments results also showed that the solubilized solvents did not demonstrate a long-term negative effect on plants and biofilms.

  8. Electro-osmotic pumping and ionic conductance measurements in porous membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajandar, Saumitra K.

    Electro-osmotic (EO) pumps directly convert electrical energy into fluids' kinetic energy, which have many advantages such as a simple and compact structure, no mechanical moving parts, and easy integration. In general, it is easy for EO pumps to generate enough pressure but it has been a challenge for EO pumps to produce a high flowrate. EO pumps have found applications in various micro-/nano-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS) and have the potential to impact a variety of engineering fields including microelectronics cooling and bio-analytical systems. This dissertation focuses on the design, fabrication and characterization of EO pumps based on two novel porous membrane materials: SiO2-coated anodic porous alumina and SiNx-coated porous silicon. High quality porous alumina membranes of controllable pore diameters in the range of 30-100 nm and pore lengths of 60-100 mum were fabricated by electrochemical anodization. The pores are straight, uniform and hexagonally close-packed with a high porosity of up to 50%. The inner surface of the pore was coated with a thin layer (˜5 nm) of SiO2 conformally to achieve a high zeta potential. The EO pumping flowrate of the fabricated anodic alumina membranes, coated and uncoated, was experimentally measured. Results indicate that the high zeta potential of the SiO2 coating increases the pumping flowrate even though the coating reduces the porosity of the membrane. The nanostructured SiO2-coated porous anodic alumina membranes can provide a normalized flowrate of 0.125 ml/min/V/cm2 under a low effective applied voltage of 3 V, which sets a record high normalized flowrate under low applied voltage. To realize field effect control of EO pumping, we designed and fabricated SiNx-coated porous silicon membranes with the silicon core as the electrode to apply a transverse gate potential. The gate potential will modulate the zeta potential of the pore wall and thereby provide control over the EO flowrate. The membranes were

  9. Temperature evolution on Rh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst during partial oxidation of methane in a reverse flow reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Simeone, M.; Menna, L.; Salemme, L.; Allouis, C.

    2010-04-15

    Catalytic partial oxidation of methane was investigated in a reverse flow reactor with commercial Rh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst in pellets. The process is carried out in a catalytic fixed bed reactor and switching of feed flow direction is obtained through four electrovalves synchronized in pairs. Temperature profile along the catalyst bed was measured by fast IR thermography and product composition was measured with a continuous gas analyzer. Feed direction switching time, water to methane ratio and inert section length were investigated as process parameters. Data of catalyst bed temperature evolution during the flow cycle are presented, discussed and related to reactor performance as a function of reverse flow switching period. The effect of water addition to the reacting mixture on the dynamics of catalyst bed temperature evolution is also presented. (author)

  10. An Investigation of Physics and Control of Flow Passing a NACA 0015 in Fully-Reversed Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifford, Christopher J.

    Flow control experiments were performed on a NACA 0015 airfoil in fully-reversed condition, which is anticipated to occur on the retreating blade side of advanced helicopters such as slowed-rotor compound rotorcraft. Control was achieved using nanosecond dielectric barrier discharge (NS-DBD) plasma actuators. The Reynolds number based on a chord length of 203 mm was fixed at 5.0 · 105, corresponding to a freestream velocity of ˜38 m/s. Two angles of attack were considered: α = 0° and 15°, each of which is relevant to a particular implementation of slowed-rotor technology. At α = 0°, the flow resembles that of a flow behind a cylinder. A von Karman vortex street formed in the wake where alternating vortex shedding occurred at a Strouhal number of 0.12. Excitation was performed using an NS-DBD on one side of the airfoil, with plasma formation just upstream of the separation line. However, there was no discernible influence upon the baseline behavior. At α = 15°, fully separated flow on the suction side extended well beyond the airfoil with naturally shed vortices at a Strouhal number of 0.19. Plasma actuation was evaluated at both the aerodynamic leading-edge (ALE) and aerodynamic trailing-edge (ATE) of the airfoil. The flow responded to the plasma actuation at the ALE by generating organized coherent structures in the shear layer over the separated region. Moderate excitation around the natural shedding Strouhal number had the most significant effects: synchronizing the shedding from the ALE and ATE, creating moderately sized structures that convected far downstream, greatly reducing the separation area, increasing lift, and decreasing drag. Excitation at much higher Strouhal numbers resulted in the flow returning to its natural shedding state, but with less coherent structures that diffused in the wake. This reduced the separation area and significantly reduced drag. Plasma actuation at the ATE caused a reduction in the magnitude of the fundamental and

  11. Kinetics of HIV-1 Latency Reversal Quantified on the Single-Cell Level Using a Novel Flow-Based Technique

    PubMed Central

    Martrus, G.; Niehrs, A.; Cornelis, R.; Rechtien, A.; García-Beltran, W.; Lütgehetmann, M.; Hoffmann, C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 establishes a pool of latently infected cells early following infection. New therapeutic approaches aiming at diminishing this persisting reservoir by reactivation of latently infected cells are currently being developed and tested. However, the reactivation kinetics of viral mRNA and viral protein production, and their respective consequences for phenotypical changes in infected cells that might enable immune recognition, remain poorly understood. We adapted a novel approach to assess the dynamics of HIV-1 mRNA and protein expression in latently and newly infected cells on the single-cell level by flow cytometry. This technique allowed the simultaneous detection of gagpol mRNA, intracellular p24 Gag protein, and cell surface markers. Following stimulation of latently HIV-1-infected J89 cells with human tumor necrosis factor alpha (hTNF-α)/romidepsin (RMD) or HIV-1 infection of primary CD4+ T cells, four cell populations were detected according to their expression levels of viral mRNA and protein. gagpol mRNA in J89 cells was quantifiable for the first time 3 h after stimulation with hTNF-α and 12 h after stimulation with RMD, while p24 Gag protein was detected for the first time after 18 h poststimulation. HIV-1-infected primary CD4+ T cells downregulated CD4, BST-2, and HLA class I expression at early stages of infection, proceeding Gag protein detection. In conclusion, here we describe a novel approach allowing quantification of the kinetics of HIV-1 mRNA and protein synthesis on the single-cell level and phenotypic characterization of HIV-1-infected cells at different stages of the viral life cycle. IMPORTANCE Early after infection, HIV-1 establishes a pool of latently infected cells, which hide from the immune system. Latency reversal and immune-mediated elimination of these latently infected cells are some of the goals of current HIV-1 cure approaches; however, little is known about the HIV-1 reactivation kinetics following stimulation with

  12. Evidence for a new geomagnetic reversal from lava flows in Idaho: discussion of short polarity reversals in the Brunhes and late Matuyama Polarity Chrons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Champion, D.E.; Lanphere, M.A.; Kuntz, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    K-Ar ages and paleomagnetic data for basalt samples from a new core hole (site E) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) indicate that the age of the reversed polarity event recorded in Snake River Plain lavas is older than 465 ?? 50 ka (1000 years before present) reported previously by Champion et al. (1981). A review of data documenting short reversal records from volcanic and sedimentary rocks shows that there is evidence for eight polarity subchrons in the Brunhes and two besides the Jaramillo in the late Matuyama. These 10 short subchrons begin to indicate the many short events that Cox (1968) hypothesized must exist if polarity interval lengths have a Poisson distribution. The mean sustained polarity interval length since late Matuyama Chron time is 90 000 years. The similarity of this number with the 105-year period of the Earth's orbital eccentricity suggests anew that linkage between geomagnetic, paleoclimatic, and possible underlying Earth orbital parameters should be evaluated. -from Authors

  13. Sequential determination of multi-nutrient elements in natural water samples with a reverse flow injection system.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kunning; Ma, Jian; Yuan, Dongxing; Feng, Sichao; Su, Haitao; Huang, Yongming; Shangguan, Qipei

    2017-05-15

    An integrated system was developed for automatic and sequential determination of NO2(-), NO3(-), PO4(3-), Fe(2+), Fe(3+) and Mn(2+) in natural waters based on reverse flow injection analysis combined with spectrophotometric detection. The system operation was controlled by a single chip microcomputer and laboratory-programmed software written in LabVIEW. The experimental parameters for each nutrient element analysis were optimized based on a univariate experimental design, and interferences from common ions were evaluated. The upper limits of the linear range (along with detection limit, µmolL(-1)) of the proposed method was 20 (0.03), 200 (0.7), 12 (0.3), 5 (0.03), 5 (0.03), 9 (0.2) µmolL(-1), for NO2(-), NO3(-), PO4(3-), Fe(2+), Fe(3+) and Mn(2+), respectively. The relative standard deviations were below 5% (n=9-13) and the recoveries varied from 88.0±1.0% to 104.5±1.0% for spiked water samples. The sample throughput was about 20h(-1). This system has been successfully applied for the determination of multi-nutrient elements in different kinds of water samples and showed good agreement with reference methods (slope 1.0260±0.0043, R(2)=0.9991, n=50).

  14. Anthocyanin and flavonoid production from Perilla frutescens: pilot plant scale processing including cross-flow microfiltration and reverse osmosis.

    PubMed

    Meng, Linghua; Lozano, Yves; Bombarda, Isabelle; Gaydou, Emile; Li, Bin

    2006-06-14

    Extraction and concentration at a pilot plant scale of anthocyanins and flavonoids from Perilla frutescens var. frutescens harvested in the Guangzhou area of China were investigated. The study of extraction efficiency using mineral acids and organic acids showed that 0.01 mol/L nitric acid was the most suitable to extract flavonoids from this slightly red leaf cultivar. The red extract contained 12 mg/L (as cyanidin equivalent) anthocyanins and other flavones. The multistep process included cross-flow microfiltration (CFM) with a ceramic type membrane, reverse osmosis (RO), and rotating evaporation (RE). The filtration fluxes were high and constant for CFM (150 L/h/m2 at 0.6 b) and for RO (22 L/h/m2 at 40 b). The red extract was concentrated 9.4 times by RO and then 5.4 times by RE. It contained 422 mg/L anthocyanins, representing 77% of the total extracted anthocyanin. The proportion of flavonoids was found unchanged during processing. The concentrated extract showed a pH of 2.7, and its free acidity was found to be 46% of the acidity added for extraction, because of the buffering capacity of the extract. At the concentration level reached, a crystallized deposit occurred and was identified as tartrate.

  15. The Reverse-Flow Facial Artery Buccinator Flap for Skull Base Reconstruction: Key Anatomical and Technical Considerations.

    PubMed

    Farzal, Zainab; Lemos-Rodriguez, Ana M; Rawal, Rounak B; Overton, Lewis J; Sreenath, Satyan B; Patel, Mihir R; Zanation, Adam M

    2015-12-01

    Objective To highlight key anatomical and technical considerations for facial artery identification, and harvest and transposition of the facial artery buccinator (FAB) flap to facilitate its future use in anterior skull base reconstruction. Only a few studies have evaluated the reverse-flow FAB flap for skull base defects. Design Eight FAB flaps were raised in four cadaveric heads and divided into thirds; the facial artery's course at the superior and inferior borders of the flap was measured noting in which incisional third of the flap it laid. The flap's reach to the anterior cranial fossa, sella turcica, clival recess, and contralateral cribriform plate were studied. A clinical case and operative video are also presented. Results The facial artery had a near vertical course and stayed with the middle (⅝) or posterior third (⅜) of the flap in the inferior and superior incisions. Seven of eight flaps covered the sellar/planar regions. Only four of eight flaps covered the contralateral cribriform region. Lastly, none reached the middle third of the clivus. Conclusions The FAB flap requires an understanding of the facial artery's course, generally seen in the middle third of the flap, and is an appropriate alternative for sellar/planar and ipsilateral cribriform defects.

  16. Rapid detection of measles virus using reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification coupled with a disposable lateral flow device.

    PubMed

    Xu, Changping; Feng, Yan; Chen, Yin; Gao, Jian; Lu, Yiyu

    2016-06-01

    The measles virus (MeV) causes a highly contagious disease and efforts to reduce its spread are critical. A reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay coupled with a disposable lateral flow device (RT-LAMP-LFD) was developed for the rapid detection of MeV. The assay was performed in 40 min at an optimal temperature of 58 °C, with endpoint results visualized directly. A probe that was complementary to the RT-LAMP amplicon was designed to enhance assay specificity. Detection limit of the assay was 8.8 copies/μL synthetic RNA, which equals the sensitivity of real-time RT-PCR. Clinical specimens were used to validate the RT-LAMP-LFD in provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (n = 245) and six municipal CDCs (n = 249). The results obtained using RT-LAMP-LFD and real-time RT-PCR were highly concordant. The RT-LAMP-LFD is rapid, stable, and does not require expensive equipment, which can be used for routine MeV monitoring in CDC laboratories.

  17. Label-free viscosity measurement of complex fluids using reversal flow switching manipulation in a microfluidic channel

    PubMed Central

    Jun Kang, Yang; Ryu, Jeongeun; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2013-01-01

    The accurate viscosity measurement of complex fluids is essential for characterizing fluidic behaviors in blood vessels and in microfluidic channels of lab-on-a-chip devices. A microfluidic platform that accurately identifies biophysical properties of blood can be used as a promising tool for the early detections of cardiovascular and microcirculation diseases. In this study, a flow-switching phenomenon depending on hydrodynamic balancing in a microfluidic channel was adopted to conduct viscosity measurement of complex fluids with label-free operation. A microfluidic device for demonstrating this proposed method was designed to have two inlets for supplying the test and reference fluids, two side channels in parallel, and a junction channel connected to the midpoint of the two side channels. According to this proposed method, viscosities of various fluids with different phases (aqueous, oil, and blood) in relation to that of reference fluid were accurately determined by measuring the switching flow-rate ratio between the test and reference fluids, when a reverse flow of the test or reference fluid occurs in the junction channel. An analytical viscosity formula was derived to measure the viscosity of a test fluid in relation to that of the corresponding reference fluid using a discrete circuit model for the microfluidic device. The experimental analysis for evaluating the effects of various parameters on the performance of the proposed method revealed that the fluidic resistance ratio (RJL/RL, fluidic resistance in the junction channel (RJL) to fluidic resistance in the side channel (RL)) strongly affects the measurement accuracy. The microfluidic device with smaller RJL/RL values is helpful to measure accurately the viscosity of the test fluid. The proposed method accurately measured the viscosities of various fluids, including single-phase (Glycerin and plasma) and oil-water phase (oil vs. deionized water) fluids, compared with conventional methods. The proposed

  18. Label-free viscosity measurement of complex fluids using reversal flow switching manipulation in a microfluidic channel.

    PubMed

    Jun Kang, Yang; Ryu, Jeongeun; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2013-01-01

    The accurate viscosity measurement of complex fluids is essential for characterizing fluidic behaviors in blood vessels and in microfluidic channels of lab-on-a-chip devices. A microfluidic platform that accurately identifies biophysical properties of blood can be used as a promising tool for the early detections of cardiovascular and microcirculation diseases. In this study, a flow-switching phenomenon depending on hydrodynamic balancing in a microfluidic channel was adopted to conduct viscosity measurement of complex fluids with label-free operation. A microfluidic device for demonstrating this proposed method was designed to have two inlets for supplying the test and reference fluids, two side channels in parallel, and a junction channel connected to the midpoint of the two side channels. According to this proposed method, viscosities of various fluids with different phases (aqueous, oil, and blood) in relation to that of reference fluid were accurately determined by measuring the switching flow-rate ratio between the test and reference fluids, when a reverse flow of the test or reference fluid occurs in the junction channel. An analytical viscosity formula was derived to measure the viscosity of a test fluid in relation to that of the corresponding reference fluid using a discrete circuit model for the microfluidic device. The experimental analysis for evaluating the effects of various parameters on the performance of the proposed method revealed that the fluidic resistance ratio ( R J L / R L , fluidic resistance in the junction channel ( R J L ) to fluidic resistance in the side channel ( R L )) strongly affects the measurement accuracy. The microfluidic device with smaller R J L / R L values is helpful to measure accurately the viscosity of the test fluid. The proposed method accurately measured the viscosities of various fluids, including single-phase (Glycerin and plasma) and oil-water phase (oil vs. deionized water) fluids, compared with conventional

  19. Low-Power, Low-Voltage Electroosmotic Actuator for an Implantable Micropumping System Intended for Drug Delivery Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getpreecharsawas, Jirachai

    An electroosmotic (EO) actuator offers a low-power, low-voltage alternative in a diaphragm-based periodic displacement micropump intended for an implantable drug delivery system. The actuator utilizes an electroosmosis mechanism to transport liquid across a membrane to deflect the pumping diaphragms in a reciprocating manner. In the study, the membrane made of porous nanocrystalline silicon (pnc-Si) tens of nanometers in thickness was used as the promising EO generator with low power consumption and small package size. This ultrathin membrane provides the opportunity for electrode integration such that the very high electric field can be generated across the membrane with the applied potential under 1 volt for low flow rate applications like drug delivery. Due to such a low applied voltage, the challenge, however, imposes on the capability of generating the pumping pressure high enough to deflect the pumping diaphragms and overcome the back pressure normally encountered in the biological tissue and organ. This research identified the cause of weak pumping pressure that the electric field inside the orifice-like nanopores of the ultrathin membrane is weaker than conventional theory would predict. It no longer scales uniformly with the thickness of membrane, but with the pore length-to-diameter aspect ratio for each nanopore. To enhance the pumping performance, the pnc-Si membrane was coated with an ultrathin Nafion film. As a result, the induced concentration difference across the Nafion film generates the osmotic pressure against the back pressure allowing the EO actuator to maintain the target pumping flow rate under 1 volt.

  20. Impact of higher alginate expression on deposition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in radial stagnation point flow and reverse osmosis systems.

    PubMed

    Herzberg, Moshe; Rezene, Tesfalem Zere; Ziemba, Christopher; Gillor, Osnat; Mathee, Kalai

    2009-10-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) have major impact on biofouling of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes. On one hand, EPS can reduce membrane permeability and on the other, EPS production by the primary colonizers may influence their deposition and attachment rate and subsequently affect the biofouling propensity of the membrane. The role of bacterial exopolysaccharides in bacterial deposition followed by the biofouling potential of an RO membrane was evaluated using an alginate overproducing (mucoid) Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The mucoid P. aeruginosa PAOmucA22 was compared with its isogenic nonmucoid prototypic parent PAO1 microscopically in a radial stagnation point flow (RSPF) system for their bacterial deposition characteristics. Then, biofouling potential of PAO1 and PAOmucA22 was determined in a crossflow rectangular plate-and-frame membrane cell, in which the strains were cultivated on a thin-film composite, polyamide, flat RO membrane coupon (LFC-1) under laminar flow conditions. In the RSPF system, the observed deposition rate of the mucoid strain was between 5- and 10-fold lower than of the wild type using either synthetic wastewater medium (with ionic strength of 14.7 mM and pH 7.4) or 15 mM KCl solution (pH of 6.2). The slower deposition rate of the mucoid strain is explained by 5- to 25-fold increased hydrophilicity of the mucoid strain as compared to the isogenic wild type, PAO1. Corroborating with these results, a significant delay in the onset of biofouling of the RO membrane was observed when the mucoid strain was used as the membrane colonizer, in which the observed time for the induced permeate flux decline was delayed (ca. 2-fold). In conclusion, the lower initial cell attachment of the mucoid strain decelerated biofouling of the RO membrane. Bacterial deposition and attachment is a critical step in biofilm formation and governed by intimate interactions between outer membrane proteins of the bacteria and the surface. Shielding these

  1. Rotation profile flattening and toroidal flow shear reversal due to the coupling of magnetic islands in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Tobias, B.; Chen, M.; Classen, I. G. J.; Domier, C. W.; Fitzpatrick, R.; Grierson, B. A.; Luhmann, N. C.; Muscatello, C. M.; Okabayashi, M.; Olofsson, K. E. J.; Paz-Soldan, C.

    2016-04-15

    The electromagnetic coupling of helical modes, including those having different toroidal mode numbers, modifies the distribution of toroidal angular momentum in tokamak discharges. This can have deleterious effects on other transport channels as well as on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability and disruptivity. At low levels of externally injected momentum, the coupling of core-localized modes initiates a chain of events, whereby flattening of the core rotation profile inside successive rational surfaces leads to the onset of a large m/n = 2/1 tearing mode and locked-mode disruption. Furthermore, with increased torque from neutral beam injection, neoclassical tearing modes in the core may phase-lock to each other without locking to external fields or structures that are stationary in the laboratory frame. The dynamic processes observed in these cases are in general agreement with theory, and detailed diagnosis allows for momentum transport analysis to be performed, revealing a significant torque density that peaks near the 2/1 rational surface. However, as the coupled rational surfaces are brought closer together by reducing q95, additional momentum transport in excess of that required to attain a phase-locked state is sometimes observed. Rather than maintaining zero differential rotation (as is predicted to be dynamically stable by single-fluid, resistive MHD theory), these discharges develop hollow toroidal plasma fluid rotation profiles with reversed plasma flow shear in the region between the m/n = 3/2 and 2/1 islands. Additional forces expressed in this state are not readily accounted for, and therefore, analysis of these data highlights the impact of mode coupling on torque balance and the challenges associated with predicting the rotation dynamics of a fusion reactor-a key issue for ITER. Published by AIP Publishing.

  2. Rotation profile flattening and toroidal flow shear reversal due to the coupling of magnetic islands in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobias, B.; Chen, M.; Classen, I. G. J.; Domier, C. W.; Fitzpatrick, R.; Grierson, B. A.; Luhmann, N. C.; Muscatello, C. M.; Okabayashi, M.; Olofsson, K. E. J.; Paz-Soldan, C.

    2016-05-01

    The electromagnetic coupling of helical modes, even those having different toroidal mode numbers, modifies the distribution of toroidal angular momentum in tokamak discharges. This can have deleterious effects on other transport channels as well as on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability and disruptivity. At low levels of externally injected momentum, the coupling of core-localized modes initiates a chain of events, whereby flattening of the core rotation profile inside successive rational surfaces leads to the onset of a large m/n = 2/1 tearing mode and locked-mode disruption. With increased torque from neutral beam injection, neoclassical tearing modes in the core may phase-lock to each other without locking to external fields or structures that are stationary in the laboratory frame. The dynamic processes observed in these cases are in general agreement with theory, and detailed diagnosis allows for momentum transport analysis to be performed, revealing a significant torque density that peaks near the 2/1 rational surface. However, as the coupled rational surfaces are brought closer together by reducing q95, additional momentum transport in excess of that required to attain a phase-locked state is sometimes observed. Rather than maintaining zero differential rotation (as is predicted to be dynamically stable by single-fluid, resistive MHD theory), these discharges develop hollow toroidal plasma fluid rotation profiles with reversed plasma flow shear in the region between the m/n = 3/2 and 2/1 islands. The additional forces expressed in this state are not readily accounted for, and therefore, analysis of these data highlights the impact of mode coupling on torque balance and the challenges associated with predicting the rotation dynamics of a fusion reactor—a key issue for ITER.

  3. Rotation profile flattening and toroidal flow shear reversal due to the coupling of magnetic islands in tokamaks

    DOE PAGES

    Tobias, B.; Chen, M.; Classen, I. G. J.; ...

    2016-04-15

    The electromagnetic coupling of helical modes, including those having different toroidal mode numbers, modifies the distribution of toroidal angular momentum in tokamak discharges. This can have deleterious effects on other transport channels as well as on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability and disruptivity. At low levels of externally injected momentum, the coupling of core-localized modes initiates a chain of events, whereby flattening of the core rotation profile inside successive rational surfaces leads to the onset of a large m/n = 2/1 tearing mode and locked-mode disruption. Furthermore, with increased torque from neutral beam injection, neoclassical tearing modes in the core may phase-lockmore » to each other without locking to external fields or structures that are stationary in the laboratory frame. The dynamic processes observed in these cases are in general agreement with theory, and detailed diagnosis allows for momentum transport analysis to be performed, revealing a significant torque density that peaks near the 2/1 rational surface. However, as the coupled rational surfaces are brought closer together by reducing q95, additional momentum transport in excess of that required to attain a phase-locked state is sometimes observed. Rather than maintaining zero differential rotation (as is predicted to be dynamically stable by single-fluid, resistive MHD theory), these discharges develop hollow toroidal plasma fluid rotation profiles with reversed plasma flow shear in the region between the m/n = 3/2 and 2/1 islands. Additional forces expressed in this state are not readily accounted for, and therefore, analysis of these data highlights the impact of mode coupling on torque balance and the challenges associated with predicting the rotation dynamics of a fusion reactor-a key issue for ITER. Published by AIP Publishing.« less

  4. High-precision 40Ar/^{39}Ar Ages for the Matuyama-Brunhes Reversal and the Big Lost Subchron from Lava Flows on La Palma, Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Relle, M.; Singer, B.; Hoffman, K.; Battle, A.; Laj, C.; Carracedo, J.; Guillou, H.

    2001-05-01

    The timing of geomagnetic reversals, excursions or events is crucial to understanding the frequency of geomagnetic field instability. A detailed study of 36 lava flows comprising two stratigraphic sequences on the island of La Palma, Canary Islands revealed a complex record of 3 distinct geomagnetic events. The Matuyama-Brunhes (M-B) reversal is recorded in 5 transitionally magnetized lava flows from the north side of the Barranco de Los Tilos. The isochron ages for 3 of these lavas are defined by 11 incremental heating experiments and yielded a weighted mean age* of 796.3\\pm9.0 ka (2\\sigma). On the basis of paleomagnetic results and 2 imprecise K-Ar ages (Abdel-Monem et al., 1972), lavas in the south side of Los Tilos Barranco were previously thought to record the M-B reversal. The lowermost lavas have a weak remanence that may suggest transitioning field behavior. 40Ar/^{39}Ar isochrons from 4 of these flows were defined by 11 separate incremental-heating experiments, and gave a weighted mean age of 823.2\\pm8.6 ka. This anomalous, but not fully transitional, field behavior, 27\\pm17 ka prior to the M-B reversal, may evince a precursor to the M-B reversal as suggested in some marine sediment records. Further up section are two normal polarity flows that gave 40Ar/^{39}Ar isochrons of 751.9\\pm8.1 ka and 675.0\\pm15.7 ka, confirming the highly episodic nature of volcanism that preserves this geomagnetic record. Directly above these normal flows are nine transitionally magnetized lavas with VGPs over India and the section is capped by one normal polarity flow. The 40Ar/^{39}Ar isochrons of 5 lavas, including the uppermost normal flow, were defined by 14 separate experiments and gave a weighted mean age of 578.6\\pm7.8 ka. From these same transitional lavas, Quidelleur et al. (1999, EPSL) reported 3 unspiked K-Ar ages with a weighted mean of 602\\pm24 ka (2\\sigma) and proposed a new event called the "La Palma" excursion. The 40Ar/^{39}Ar age presented here is a

  5. Reverse polarity capillary zone electrophoresis analysis of nitrate and nitrite in natural water samples

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalf, S.G.

    1998-06-11

    This paper describes the application of reverse polarity capillary zone electrophoresis (RPCE) for rapid and accurate determination of nitrate and nitrite in natural water samples. Using hexamethonium bromide (HMB) as an electroosmotic flow modifier in a borate buffer at pH 9.2, the resolution of nitrate and nitrite was accomplished in less than 3 minutes. RPCE was compared with ion chromatographic (IC) and cadmium reduction flow injection analysis (Cd-FIA) methods which are the two most commonly used standard methods for the analysis of natural water samples for nitrate and nitrite. When compared with the ion chromatographic method for the determination of nitrate and nitrite, RPCE reduced analysis time, decreased detection limits by a factor of 10, cut laboratory wastes by more than two orders of magnitude, and eliminated interferences commonly associated with IC. When compared with the cadmium reduction method, RPCE had the advantage of simultaneous determination of nitrate and nitrite, could be used in the presence of various metallic ions that normally interfere in cadmium reduction, and decreased detection limits by a factor of 10.

  6. Free-Flow Open-Chamber Electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharnez, Rizwan; Sammons, David W.

    1994-01-01

    Free-flow open-chamber electrophoresis variant of free-flow electrophoresis performed in chamber with open ends and in which velocity of electro-osmotic flow adjusted equal to and opposite mean electrophoretic velocity of sample. Particles having electrophoretic mobilities greater than mean mobility of sample particles move toward cathode, those with mobilities less move toward anode. Technique applied to separation of components of mixtures of biologically important substances. Sensitivity enhanced by use of tapered chamber.

  7. Fabrication and study of AC electro-osmotic micropumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xin

    In this thesis, microelectrode arrays of micropumps have been designed, fabricated and characterized for transporting microfluid by AC electro-osmosis (ACEO). In particular, the 3D stepped electrode design which shows superior performance to others in literature is adopted for making micropumps, and the performance of such devices has been studied and explored. A novel fabrication process has also been developed in the work, realizing 3D stepped electrodes on a flexible substrate, which is suitable for biomedical use, for example glaucoma implant. There are three major contributions to ACEO pumping in the work. First, a novel design of 3D "T-shaped" discrete electrode arrays was made using PolyMUMPsRTM process. The breakthrough of this work was discretizing the continuous 3D stepped electrodes which were commonly seen in the past research. The "T-shaped" electrodes did not only create ACEO flows on the top surfaces of electrodes but also along the side walls between separated electrodes. Secondly, four 3D stepped electrode arrays were designed, fabricated and tested. It was found from the experiment that PolyMUMPsRTM ACEO electrodes usually required a higher driving voltage than gold electrodes for operation. It was also noticed that a simulation based on the modified model taking into account the surface oxide of electrodes showed a better agreement with the experimental results. It thus demonstrated the possibility that the surface oxide of electrodes had impact on fluidic pumping. This methodology could also be applied to metal electrodes with a native oxide layer such as titanium and aluminum. Thirdly, a prototype of the ACEO pump with 3D stepped electrode arrays was first time realized on a flexible substrate using Kapton polyimide sheets and packaged with PDMS encapsulants. Comprehensive experimental testing was also conducted to evaluate the mechanical properties as well as the pumping performance. The experimental findings indicated that this fabrication

  8. Design of a pulsed-mode fluidic pump using a venturi-like reverse flow diverter. [With no packing glands, mechanical seals or moving parts

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.V.; Lewis, B.E.

    1987-02-01

    This report presents a design procedure for pulsed-mode, venturi-like reverse flow diverter (RFD) pumping systems. Design techniques are presented for systems in which the output line area is allowed to vary proportionally with the throat area of the RFD as well as situations in which the output line area is held constant. The results show that for cases in which the output line area is allowed to vary, an optimum RFD throat area exists for a given input pressure. For situations in which the output line area is held constant, the average output flow decreases in almost a linear fashion with increasing RFD throat area. 6 refs., 8 figs.

  9. Reactive oxygen species are generated by the respiratory complex II--evidence for lack of contribution of the reverse electron flow in complex I.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Hernández-Esquivel, Luz; Rivero-Segura, Nadia A; Marín-Hernández, Alvaro; Neuzil, Jiri; Ralph, Stephen J; Rodríguez-Enríquez, Sara

    2013-02-01

    Succinate-driven oxidation via complex II (CII) may have a significant contribution towards the high rates of production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by mitochondria. Here, we show that the CII Q site inhibitor thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA) blocks succinate + rotenone-driven ROS production, whereas the complex III (CIII) Qo inhibitor stigmatellin has no effect, indicating that CII, not CIII, is the ROS-producing site. The complex I (CI) inhibitor rotenone partially reduces the ROS production driven by high succinate levels (5 mm), which is commonly interpreted as being due to inhibition of a reverse electron flow from CII to CI. However, experimental evidence presented here contradicts the model of reverse electron flow. First, ROS levels produced using succinate + rotenone were significantly higher than those produced using glutamate + malate + rotenone. Second, in tumor mitochondria, succinate-driven ROS production was significantly increased (not decreased) by rotenone. Third, in liver mitochondria, rotenone had no effects on succinate-driven ROS production. Fourth, using isolated heart or hepatoma (AS-30D) mitochondria, the CII Qp anti-cancer drug mitochondrially targeted vitamin E succinate (MitoVES) induced elevated ROS production in the presence of low levels of succinate(0.5 mm), but rotenone had no effect. Using sub-mitochondrial particles, the Cu-based anti-cancer drug Casiopeina II-gly enhanced succinate-driven ROS production. Thus, the present results are inconsistent with and question the interpretation of reverse electron flow from CII to CI and the rotenone effect on ROS production supported by succinate oxidation. Instead, a thermodynamically more favorable explanation is that, in the absence of CIII or complex IV (CIV) inhibitors (which, when added, facilitate reverse electron flow by inducing accumulation of ubiquinol, the CI product), the CII redox centers are the major source of succinate-driven ROS production.

  10. Epithelial fluid transport: protruding macromolecules and space charges can bring about electro-osmotic coupling at the tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Rubashkin, A; Iserovich, P; Hernández, J A; Fischbarg, J

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of the present work is to investigate whether the idea of epithelial fluid transport based on electro-osmotic coupling at the level of the leaky tight junction (TJ) can be further supported by a plausible theoretical model. We develop a model for fluid transport across epithelial layers based on electro-osmotic coupling at leaky tight junctions (TJ) possessing protruding macromolecules and fixed electrical charges. The model embodies systems of electro-hydrodynamic equations for the intercellular pathway, namely the Brinkman and the Poisson-Boltzmann differential equations applied to the TJ. We obtain analytical solutions for a system of these two equations, and are able to derive expressions for the fluid velocity profile and the electrostatic potential. We illustrate the model by employing geometrical parameters and experimental data from the corneal endothelium, for which we have previously reported evidence for a central role for electro-osmosis in translayer fluid transport. Our results suggest that electro-osmotic coupling at the TJ can account for fluid transport by the corneal endothelium. We conclude that electro-osmotic coupling at the tight junctions could represent one of the basic mechanisms driving fluid transport across some leaky epithelia, a process that remains unexplained.

  11. [Prognostic factors of perinatal short-term outcome in severe placental insufficiency using Doppler sonography to assess end-diastolic absent and reverse blood flow in umbilical arteries].

    PubMed

    Frauenschuh, I; Wirbelauer, J; Karl, S; Girschick, G; Rehn, M; Zollner, U; Frambach, T; Dietl, J; Müller, T

    2015-02-01

    Significant placental insufficiency, indicated by Doppler ultrasound findings of absent or reverse end-diastolic flow velocities (AREDV), is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Analysis of blood flow in the ductus venosus should assist in early intrauterine recognition of threatened foetuses. 58 high-risk pregnancies with umbilical AREDV were repeatedly examined (n=364). Doppler findings were correlated with neonatal signs of deterioration (ratio of normoblasts to leukocytes, pH, base excess, Apgar score), as well as short-term morbidity [need for intubation, duration of assisted respiration, evidence of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), necrotising enterocolitis (NEC), intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH grade III+IV)] against the analysis of the blood flow findings (normal or increased pulsitility, absence or reverse end-diastolic flow) in the umbilical arteries (AU), the middle cerebral arteries (ACM) and ductus venosus (DV) relating these to birth weight and the duration of the pregnancy. The median period of observation was 12.8 days, 48% of the foetuses showed an abnormal ductus venosus flow and 26% an absent venous or reverse end-diastolic flow. The median date of delivery was 30 weeks, with a mean birth weight of 816 g. 93% were live births with 12% dying postnatally. Although the criteria for postnatal morbidity (BPD, NEC, IVH III+IV) and mortality did not correlate with changes in arterial and venous Doppler parameters in our group, there was a significant relationship between the normoblast count, known to be a marker of chronic hypoxia. The Apgar 10 minte score, umbilical arterial pH and base excess were correlated with changes in the DV flow curves. Healthy survival started, irrespective of arterial or venous blood flow criteria, from 27+0 weeks of pregnancy. If born between 27.0 and 30+6 weeks, the infants were more likely to be healthy the less the blood flow had been compromised. A birth weight

  12. Influence of pH*-value of methanolic electrolytes on electroosmotic flow in hydrophilic coated capillaries.

    PubMed

    Belder, D; Elke, K; Husmann, H

    2000-01-28

    The dependency of EOF on the H+-concentration and the related so called pH* value of methanolic electrolytes has been examined with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and uncoated capillaries. These results were compared with the pH dependency of EOF of these capillaries using aqueous buffers. In uncoated capillaries the dependency of EOF on the pH(*)-value is very similar for aqueous and methanolic electrolytes. The EOF increases with increasing H+-concentration and pH-hysteresis is observed. In PVA coated capillaries the EOF is strongly reduced over wide pH* or pH ranges for both methanolic electrolytes and aqueous buffers. The EOF in PEG coated capillaries is surprisingly directed to the anode with methanolic electrolytes whereas a reduced cathodic EOF is observed in aqueous electrolytes. The anodic EOF of PEG-coated capillaries in methanolic electrolytes is independent of the pH*-value. The usefulness of PEG- and PVA-coated capillaries for adjusting the EOF in non-aqueous electrolytes for the analysis of isomeric organic acids was demonstrated.

  13. Experimental localization of an acoustic sound source in a wind-tunnel flow by using a numerical time-reversal technique.

    PubMed

    Padois, Thomas; Prax, Christian; Valeau, Vincent; Marx, David

    2012-10-01

    The possibility of using the time-reversal technique to localize acoustic sources in a wind-tunnel flow is investigated. While the technique is widespread, it has scarcely been used in aeroacoustics up to now. The proposed method consists of two steps: in a first experimental step, the acoustic pressure fluctuations are recorded over a linear array of microphones; in a second numerical step, the experimental data are time-reversed and used as input data for a numerical code solving the linearized Euler equations. The simulation achieves the back-propagation of the waves from the array to the source and takes into account the effect of the mean flow on sound propagation. The ability of the method to localize a sound source in a typical wind-tunnel flow is first demonstrated using simulated data. A generic experiment is then set up in an anechoic wind tunnel to validate the proposed method with a flow at Mach number 0.11. Monopolar sources are first considered that are either monochromatic or have a narrow or wide-band frequency content. The source position estimation is well-achieved with an error inferior to the wavelength. An application to a dipolar sound source shows that this type of source is also very satisfactorily characterized.

  14. Comparison of the performance of forward fill/flush and reverse fill/flush flow modulation in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Krupčík, Jan; Gorovenko, Roman; Špánik, Ivan; Sandra, Pat; Giardina, Matthew

    2016-09-30

    The performances of forward flow fill and flush (FFF) and of reverse flow fill and flush (RFF) in flow modulated comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) using the same volume of the sampling channel have been studied and compared. Sample models include a reference mixture of hydrocarbons at low concentration, a petroleum reformate product and the essential oil of Rosa damascena Miller. The latter samples contain solutes in different concentrations but some up to 30% allowing to study overloading phenomena in detail. For solutes injected at low quantity, the performance of FFF and RFF is similar. For solutes present in a sample at high quantity, RFF guarantees less broadening and spreading resulting in better quantitation.

  15. Amazon river flow regime and flood recessional agriculture: Flood stage reversals and risk of annual crop loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coomes, Oliver T.; Lapointe, Michel; Templeton, Michael; List, Geneva

    2016-08-01

    The annual flood cycle is an important driver of ecosystem structure and function in large tropical rivers such as the Amazon. Riparian peasant communities rely on river fishing and annual floodplain agriculture, closely adapted to the recession phase of the flood pulse. This article reports on a poorly documented but important challenge facing farmers practicing flood recessional agriculture along the Amazon river: frequent, unpredictable stage reversals (repiquetes) which threaten to ruin crops growing on channel bars. We assess the severity of stage reversals for rice production on exposed river mud bars (barreales) near Iquitos, Peru. Crop loss risk is estimated based on a quantitative analysis of 45 years of daily Amazon stage data and field data from floodplain communities nearby in the Muyuy archipelago, upstream of Iquitos. Rice varieties selected, elevations of silt rich bars where rice is sown, as well as planting and harvest dates are analyzed in the light of the timing, frequencies and amplitudes of observed stage reversals that have the potential to destroy growing rice. We find that unpredictable stage reversals can produce substantial crop losses and shorten significantly the length of average growing seasons on lower elevation river bars. The data reveal that local famers extend planting down to lower bar elevations where the mean probabilities of re-submergence before rice maturity (due to reversals) approach 50%, below which they implicitly consider that the risk of crop loss outweighs the potential reward of planting.

  16. Analysis of traveling-wave electro-osmotic pumping with double-sided electrode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Hung-Chun; Yang, Ruey-Jen; Luo, Win-Jet

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, a series of numerical simulations was performed to investigate the pumping performance of electro-osmotic micropumps containing electrode arrays patterned on the upper and lower sides of a microchannel. The simulations have been analyzed with a linear electro-osmotic model based upon the Debye-Hückel theory of the double layer. The potential drop across the diffuse layer is assumed to be less than 25 mV (kBT/e), and there is a linear response between the surface charge and the voltage drop across the double layer. The double layer is not resolved but is lumped into effective parameters that are imported from the Debye-Hückel and Stern layers. We examined the effects of the relative positioning of the electrodes in the opposing arrays (i.e., symmetrical or staggered), and the phase lag and the angular frequency of the alternating current (ac) signals applied to the electrodes within the two arrays. A critical height of the microchannel was observed, below which the interactions of the applied electrical potentials on the walls became significant. The optimum pumping effect was obtained when the electrode arrays were symmetrical to one another around the centerline of the channel and were activated by ac potentials with a 0° phase shift. The corresponding angular frequency of the maximum pumping velocity for different phase shifts of the applied ac signals was also determined. Overall, the simulation results presented in this paper provide a useful insight into the optimal design parameters and operating conditions for micropumps containing two arrays of microelectrodes on the microchannel walls.

  17. Analysis of traveling-wave electro-osmotic pumping with double-sided electrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Hung-Chun; Yang, Ruey-Jen; Luo, Win-Jet

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, a series of numerical simulations was performed to investigate the pumping performance of electro-osmotic micropumps containing electrode arrays patterned on the upper and lower sides of a microchannel. The simulations have been analyzed with a linear electro-osmotic model based upon the Debye-Hückel theory of the double layer. The potential drop across the diffuse layer is assumed to be less than 25 mV (k(B)T/e), and there is a linear response between the surface charge and the voltage drop across the double layer. The double layer is not resolved but is lumped into effective parameters that are imported from the Debye-Hückel and Stern layers. We examined the effects of the relative positioning of the electrodes in the opposing arrays (i.e., symmetrical or staggered), and the phase lag and the angular frequency of the alternating current (ac) signals applied to the electrodes within the two arrays. A critical height of the microchannel was observed, below which the interactions of the applied electrical potentials on the walls became significant. The optimum pumping effect was obtained when the electrode arrays were symmetrical to one another around the centerline of the channel and were activated by ac potentials with a 0° phase shift. The corresponding angular frequency of the maximum pumping velocity for different phase shifts of the applied ac signals was also determined. Overall, the simulation results presented in this paper provide a useful insight into the optimal design parameters and operating conditions for micropumps containing two arrays of microelectrodes on the microchannel walls.

  18. Scanning electrochemical microscopy of membrane transport in the reverse imaging mode.

    PubMed

    Uitto, O D; White, H S

    2001-02-01

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM), operated in reverse imaging mode (RIM), has been used to visualize the steady-state transport of molecules entering into porous membranes. RIM imaging is advantageous for investigating transport across biological membranes in situations where the SECM tip can access only the exterior membrane surface. Examples of RIM images of a synthetic membrane (mica with pores filled with the ion-selective polymer Nafion) and a biological membrane (hairless mouse skin) recorded during diffusive and iontophoretic transport, are reported. RIM imaging during diffusive transport allows visualization of the depletion of solute molecules in the solution adjacent to the pore openings. However, an accumulation of solute molecules above the pore opening is observed during iontophoresis, which is a consequence of the separation of the solute from the solvent (i.e., ultrafiltration). The separation results from differences in the rates of molecule transfer across the pore/solution interface when electroosmotic flow is operative. The results suggest that RIM imaging may be useful for measuring the kinetics of interfacial molecule transfer at biological membranes.

  19. Corona anemometry for qualitative measurement of reversing surface flow with application to separation control by external excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durbin, P. A.; Mckinzie, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    An corona anemometer which detects gas flow by the displacement of an ion beam is described, and experiments are performed using the anemometer to investigate the active control of diffusor separation by periodic forcing. The apparatus is applied to the separated flow over a rearward facing ramp. An oscillating vane is attached to the surface near the separation point. It is suggested that the enhancement in turbulent energy produced by the oscillating vane is due to drastic modification of the wake shear flow, and not to vane-produced turbulence.

  20. Microfluidic flow counterbalanced capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ling; Dutta, Debashis

    2013-04-07

    Flow counterbalanced capillary electrophoresis (FCCE) offers a powerful approach to realizing difficult charge based separations in compact microchip devices with application of relatively small electrical voltages. The need for dynamically controlling the pressure-gradient in the FCCE column however presents a significant challenge in implementing this technique on the microchip platform. In this article, we report the use of a simple on-chip pumping unit that allows precise introduction of a periodic pressure-driven backflow into a microfluidic separation channel enabling an FCCE analysis. The backflow in our device was produced by fabricating a shallow segment (0.5 μm deep) downstream of the analysis column (5 μm deep) and applying an electric field across it. A mismatch in the electroosmotic transport rate at the interface of this segment was shown to yield a pressure-gradient that could reverse the flow of the analyte bands without inverting the direction of the electric field. Although such a pressure-gradient also led to additional band broadening in the system, overall, the separation resolution of our device was observed to improve with an increasing number of back-and-forth sample passes through the analysis channel. For our current design, the corresponding improvement in the effective separation length was as much as 52% of the actual distance travelled by the chosen FITC-labeled amino acid samples. The reported device is well suited for further miniaturization of the FCCE method to the nanofluidic length scale which likely would improve its performance, and is easily integrable to other analytical procedures on the microchip platform for lab-on-a-chip applications.

  1. Simultaneous determination of nanomolar nitrite and nitrate in seawater using reverse flow injection analysis coupled with a long path length liquid waveguide capillary cell.

    PubMed

    Feng, Sichao; Zhang, Min; Huang, Yongming; Yuan, Dongxing; Zhu, Yong

    2013-12-15

    A reverse flow injection analysis (rFIA) method coupled with 1m liquid waveguide capillary cell and spectrophotometric detection for simultaneous determination of nanomolar nitrite and nitrate in seawater was developed. The design of two analytical channels sharing the same detection system in the proposed method allowed the analysis of both nitrite and nitrate with single sample injection. Different strategies of reagent injection were investigated to obtain a higher sensitivity and a better peak shape. A dual-wavelength detection mode was chosen to eliminate the light source shifting and sample matrix interference. Experimental parameters were optimized based on a univariate experimental design and the matrix effect from seawater was preliminarily investigated. The proposed method had high sensitivity with detection limit of 0.6 nmol L(-1) for both nitrite and nitrate. The linearity was 2-500 nmol L(-1) for both analytes, and the upper limit could be extended by choosing a lower sensitivity detection wavelength. The analytical results of 26 surface seawater samples obtained with the proposed method showed good agreement with those using a reference method operated using an automated segmented flow analyzer. The proposed method could greatly minimize the trouble introduced by bubbles in the segmented flow analyzer. It also had the advantages of high precision and high sample throughput (nitrite and nitrate detected in triplicate; 5 h(-1)). Compared to normal flow injection analysis, the rFIA method is superior due to its lower reagent consumption, less dispersion of sample, as well as higher sensitivity.

  2. Long-term successful outcome of severe hand ischemia using arterialization with reversal of venous flow: case report.

    PubMed

    Chloros, George D; Li, Zhongyu; Koman, L Andrew

    2008-09-01

    The management of unreconstructible vascular lesions in the hand is a challenge with limited options for treatment. After 22 years of hand ischemia, involving management with reverse interpositional vein grafting, periarterial sympathectomy, and partial finger amputations, a 62-year-old man underwent arterialization of the venous system of the hand for unreconstructible distal vascular lesions as a salvage procedure. At 7-year follow-up, the patient is pain-free with good functional and health-related quality of life outcomes and no further amputations. This procedure may be considered as a salvage alternative to prevent additional amputation in selected patients.

  3. Stacking open-capillary electroosmotic pumps in series to boost the pumping pressure to drive high-performance liquid chromatographic separations.

    PubMed

    He, Chiyang; Zhu, Zaifang; Gu, Congying; Lu, Joann; Liu, Shaorong

    2012-03-02

    Numerous micropumps have been developed, but few of them can produce adequate flow rate and pressure for high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) applications. We have recently developed an innovative hybrid electroosmotic pump (EOP) to solve this problem. The basic unit of a hybrid pump consists of a +EOP (the pumping element is positively charged) and a -EOP (the pumping element is negatively charged). The outlet of the +EOP is then joined with the inlet of the -EOP, forming a basic pump unit, while the anode of a positive high voltage (HV) power supply is placed at the joint. The inlet and outlet of this pump unit are electrically grounded. With this configuration, we can stack many of such pump units in series to boost the pumping power. In this work, we describe in details how an open-capillary hybrid EOP is constructed and characterize this pump systematically. We also show that a hybrid EOP with ten serially stacked pump units can deliver a maximum pressure of 21.5 MPa (∼3100 psi). We further demonstrate the feasibility of using this hybrid EOP to drive eluents for HPLC separations of proteins and peptides.

  4. Stacking open-capillary electroosmotic pumps in series to boost the pumping pressure to drive high-performance liquid chromatographic separations

    DOE PAGES

    He, Chiyang; Zhu, Zaifang; Gu, Congying; ...

    2012-01-09

    Numerous micropumps have been developed, but few of them can produce adequate flow rate and pressure for high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) applications. We have recently developed an innovative hybrid electroosmotic pump (EOP) to solve this problem. The basic unit of a hybrid pump consists of a +EOP (the pumping element is positively charged) and a -EOP (the pumping element is negatively charged). The outlet of the +EOP is then joined with the inlet of the -EOP, forming a basic pump unit, while the anode of a positive high voltage (HV) power supply is placed at the joint. The inlet andmore » outlet of this pump unit are electrically grounded. With this configuration, we can stack many of such pump units in series to boost the pumping power. In this work, we describe in details how an open-capillary hybrid EOP is constructed and characterize this pump systematically. We also show that a hybrid EOP with ten serially stacked pump units can deliver a maximum pressure of 21.5 MPa (~3100 psi). Here, we further demonstrate the feasibility of using this hybrid EOP to drive eluents for HPLC separations of proteins and peptides.« less

  5. Stacking open-capillary electroosmotic pumps in series to boost the pumping pressure to drive high-performance liquid chromatographic separations

    SciTech Connect

    He, Chiyang; Zhu, Zaifang; Gu, Congying; Lu, Joann; Liu, Shaorong

    2012-01-09

    Numerous micropumps have been developed, but few of them can produce adequate flow rate and pressure for high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) applications. We have recently developed an innovative hybrid electroosmotic pump (EOP) to solve this problem. The basic unit of a hybrid pump consists of a +EOP (the pumping element is positively charged) and a -EOP (the pumping element is negatively charged). The outlet of the +EOP is then joined with the inlet of the -EOP, forming a basic pump unit, while the anode of a positive high voltage (HV) power supply is placed at the joint. The inlet and outlet of this pump unit are electrically grounded. With this configuration, we can stack many of such pump units in series to boost the pumping power. In this work, we describe in details how an open-capillary hybrid EOP is constructed and characterize this pump systematically. We also show that a hybrid EOP with ten serially stacked pump units can deliver a maximum pressure of 21.5 MPa (~3100 psi). Here, we further demonstrate the feasibility of using this hybrid EOP to drive eluents for HPLC separations of proteins and peptides.

  6. Modeling the Effects of Changing Seasonal River Flow Rates on the Mixing of Reverse Osmosis Plant Effluent into the Pasquotank River in North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, K. M.; Hankinson, S. D.

    2004-12-01

    The goal of this research, begun Fall 2004, is to assess the seasonal impact of effluent from a reverse osmosis (RO) plant on the water of the Pasquotank River, a trunk river of Albemarle Sound in northeast North Carolina. Currently, the plant discharges about 103,000 gallons of high salinity (16 ppt) processed groundwater into Chantilly Bay in the Pasquotank River (0-3 ppt, depending on season) over an eight-hour operational day. The impact of the RO effluent on water chemistry and physical properties along the river bottom depends on the flow rate of the river. The Pasquotank is slower flowing (anecdotally, reverse flowing at times) during the generally dry summer season and faster flowing during the rainy winter season. This varying river flow rate may result in various effluent zones: a pool of effluent on the riverbed, a plume of effluent dissipating with downstream distance, or a minimal effluent signal near the outlet manifold. Modeling of seasonal data for the current rate of effluent discharge allows prediction of the effects of tripling the daily volume of RO plant discharge through round-the-clock plant operation, an outcome that seems likely in the near future due to residential growth in the county served by the plant. Data from fall and early winter 2004 will be presented. Water parameters (salinity/conductivity, temperature, pH, turbidity, Secchi depth, dissolved oxygen content, and dissolved major cation concentrations) are measured biweekly at nine surface stations (three water depths at each station) in the general vicinity of the effluent discharge outlet. Similar parameters are measured biweekly for Pasquotank River water at two stations upstream and two stations downstream of the outlet. River flow rates and discharge rates are measured weekly. The results of modeling using a two-end member mixing model and a normative analysis treatment will be presented. Additionally, modeling results for various possible changes (relocation of discharge

  7. Experimental validation benchmark data for CFD of transient convection from forced to natural with flow reversal on a vertical flat plate

    SciTech Connect

    Lance, Blake W.; Smith, Barton L.

    2016-06-23

    Transient convection has been investigated experimentally for the purpose of providing Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) validation benchmark data. A specialized facility for validation benchmark experiments called the Rotatable Buoyancy Tunnel was used to acquire thermal and velocity measurements of flow over a smooth, vertical heated plate. The initial condition was forced convection downward with subsequent transition to mixed convection, ending with natural convection upward after a flow reversal. Data acquisition through the transient was repeated for ensemble-averaged results. With simple flow geometry, validation data were acquired at the benchmark level. All boundary conditions (BCs) were measured and their uncertainties quantified. Temperature profiles on all four walls and the inlet were measured, as well as as-built test section geometry. Inlet velocity profiles and turbulence levels were quantified using Particle Image Velocimetry. System Response Quantities (SRQs) were measured for comparison with CFD outputs and include velocity profiles, wall heat flux, and wall shear stress. Extra effort was invested in documenting and preserving the validation data. Details about the experimental facility, instrumentation, experimental procedure, materials, BCs, and SRQs are made available through this paper. As a result, the latter two are available for download and the other details are included in this work.

  8. Experimental validation benchmark data for CFD of transient convection from forced to natural with flow reversal on a vertical flat plate

    DOE PAGES

    Lance, Blake W.; Smith, Barton L.

    2016-06-23

    Transient convection has been investigated experimentally for the purpose of providing Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) validation benchmark data. A specialized facility for validation benchmark experiments called the Rotatable Buoyancy Tunnel was used to acquire thermal and velocity measurements of flow over a smooth, vertical heated plate. The initial condition was forced convection downward with subsequent transition to mixed convection, ending with natural convection upward after a flow reversal. Data acquisition through the transient was repeated for ensemble-averaged results. With simple flow geometry, validation data were acquired at the benchmark level. All boundary conditions (BCs) were measured and their uncertainties quantified.more » Temperature profiles on all four walls and the inlet were measured, as well as as-built test section geometry. Inlet velocity profiles and turbulence levels were quantified using Particle Image Velocimetry. System Response Quantities (SRQs) were measured for comparison with CFD outputs and include velocity profiles, wall heat flux, and wall shear stress. Extra effort was invested in documenting and preserving the validation data. Details about the experimental facility, instrumentation, experimental procedure, materials, BCs, and SRQs are made available through this paper. As a result, the latter two are available for download and the other details are included in this work.« less

  9. AC electro-osmotic mixing induced by non-contact external electrodes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shau-Chun; Chen, Hsiao-Ping; Lee, Chia-Yu; Yu, Chun-Ching; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2006-10-15

    We demonstrate efficient mixing in a micro-fluidic reservoir smaller than 10 microL using ac electro-osmosis driven by field-induced polarization. Our mixing device, of that electrodes are outside of the mixing unit, consists of three circular reservoirs (3mm in diameter) connected by a 1 mm x 1 mm channel. Unlike dc electro-osmosis, whose polarization is from charged substrate functional groups, this new mechanism uses the external field to capacitively charge the surface and the surface capacitance becomes the key factor in the electrokinetic mobility. The charging and mixing are enhanced at tailor-designed channel corners by exploiting the high normal fields at geometric singularities. The induced surface dielectric polarization and the resulting electric counter-ion double layer produce an effective Zeta potential in excess of 1 V, over one order of magnitude larger than the channel Zeta potential. The resulting ac electro-osmotic slip velocity scales quadratically with respect to the applied field, in contrast to the linear scaling of dc electro-osmosis and at 1cm/s and larger, exceeds the classical dc values by two orders of magnitude. The polarization is non-uniform at the corners due to field leakage to the dielectric substrate and the inhomogeneous slip velocity produces intense mixing vortices that effectively homogenize solutes in 30s in a 3mm reservoir, in contrast to hour-long mixing by pure diffusion.

  10. Band spreading in two-dimensional microchannel turns for electrophoretic or electroosmotic species transport

    SciTech Connect

    S. K. Griffiths; R. H. Nilson

    2000-03-01

    Analytical and numerical methods are employed to investigate species transport by electrophoretic or electroosmotic motion in the curved geometry of a two-dimensional turn. Closed-form analytical solutions describing the turn-induced diffusive and dispersive spreading of a species band are presented for both the low and high Peclet number limits. The authors find that the spreading due to dispersion is proportional to the product of the turn included angle and the Peclet number at low Peclet numbers. It is proportional to the square of the included angle and independent of the Peclet number when the Peclet number is large. A composite solution applicable to all Peclet numbers is constructed from these limiting behaviors. Numerical solutions for species transport in a turn are also presented over a wide range of the included angle and the mean turn radius. Based on comparisons between the analytical and numerical results, the authors find that the analytical solutions provide very good estimates of both dispersive and diffusive spreading provided that the mean turn radius exceeds the channel width. These new solutions also agree well with data from a previous study. Optimum conditions minimizing total spreading in a turn are presented and discussed.

  11. Binary electroosmotic-pump nanoflow gradient generator for miniaturized high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lei; Lu, Joann Juan; Gu, Congying; Liu, Shaorong

    2014-12-16

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) plays an important role in biotechnology, and a majority of chromatographic separations use gradient elution. While gradient generators can be built in different formats, binary pumps or quaternary pumps are most frequently used for gradient generator constructions. We have recently developed a high-pressure electroosmotic pump (EOP); the pump can be manufactured at a cost of a few hundred dollars. However, it is challenging to use this pump to deliver a gradient eluent directly. In this study, we first improve the monolith preparation by applying a pressure to the monomer solution during polymerization. We assemble a binary EOP gradient generator and discuss the relationship between the gradient profile and voltage applied to the EOP. We demonstrate the feasibility of the binary EOP gradient generator for generating a smooth and reproducible nanoflow gradient. After integration of the gradient generator into a miniaturized HPLC system, we use the HPLC system for separating peptide mixtures from trypsin-digested proteins. The performance comparison between the above miniaturized HPLC system and an Agilent 1200 HPLC system exhibits comparable efficiencies, resolutions, and peak capacities.

  12. Drumlins in reverse gear: observations against the relationship between drumlin stoss and lee asymmetry and flow direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnolo, M.; Clark, C. D.; Hughes, A. L.; Jordan, C.

    2008-12-01

    A well-known characteristic of drumlins is their longitudinal asymmetry in morphology with steep upstream slope angles (stoss) and more gentle downstream tails (lee). This characteristic is the main cue for deducing flow direction from drumlin fields. However, and although commonly accepted, few studies have actually quantified this drumlin property. How many drumlins in a field show this asymmetric form? Does it match with flow direction? Here we analyse drumlins from our mapping program of Great Britain, based on a high resolution DTM (5 m horizontal resolution, 0.7-1 m vertical accuracy) and yielding a GIS database of over 25,000 drumlins recorded as polygons, defined by their perimeter break-of-slope. Using GIS techniques we analysed long-profile asymmetry and compared this with the flow direction as derived from other information such as moraines, eskers, and spatial context within the ice sheet. Because drumlins may lie on a non- horizontal surface (i.e. hillslope), the first stage of analysis was to 'terrain correct' them. With all their bases adjusted to a horizontal plane, the highest point now also approximates the thickest part of the drumlin. We then computed a simple measure of asymmetry (Harry and Trenhaile, 1987) as the ratio of distances AB/(AB+BC), where A and C are the most upstream and downstream points respectively and B is the summit. In this paper we present the statistics of this analysis applied to the large sample of drumlins. The surprising result is that British drumlins are far from being "classically" asymmetrical. This is discussed in comparison to previous work and for its implication on drumlin formation theories.

  13. Control of ion gyroscale fluctuations via electrostatic biasing and sheared E×B flow in the C-2 field reversed configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, L.; Ruskov, E.; Deng, B. H.; Binderbauer, M.; Tajima, T.; Gota, H.; Tuszewski, M.

    2016-03-01

    Control of radial particle and thermal transport is instrumental for achieving and sustaining well-confined high-β plasma in a Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC). Radial profiles of low frequency ion gyro-scale density fluctuations (0.5≤kρs≤40), consistent with drift- or drift-interchange modes, have been measured in the scrape-off layer (SOL) and core of the C-2 Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC), together with the toroidal E×B velocity. It is shown here that axial electrostatic SOL biasing controls and reduces gyro-scale density fluctuations, resulting in very low FRC core fluctuation levels. When the radial E×B flow shearing rate decreases below the turbulence decorrelation rate, fluctuation levels increase substantially, concomitantly with onset of the n=2 instability and rapid loss of diamagnetism. Low turbulence levels, improved energy/particle confinement and substantially increased FRC life times are achieved when E×B shear near the separatrix is maintained via axial SOL biasing using an annular washer gun.

  14. Stress-sensitive nutrient consumption via steady and non-reversing dynamic shear in continuous-flow rotational bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Belfiore, Laurence A; Bonani, Walter; Leoni, Matteo; Belfiore, Carol J

    2009-05-01

    Stress-sensitive biological response is simulated in a modified parallel-disk viscometer that implements steady and unidirectional dynamic shear under physiological conditions. Anchorage-dependent mammalian cells adhere to a protein coating on the surface of the rotating plate, receiving nutrients and oxygen from an aqueous medium that flows radially and tangentially, accompanied by transverse diffusion in the z-direction toward the active surface. This process is modeled as radial convection and axial diffusion with angular symmetry in cylindrical coordinates. The reaction/diffusion boundary condition on the surface of the rotating plate includes position-dependent stress-sensitive nutrient consumption via the zr- and zTheta-elements of the velocity gradient tensor at the cell/aqueous-medium interface. Linear transport laws in chemically reactive systems that obey Curie's theorem predict the existence of cross-phenomena between scalar reaction rates and the magnitude of the second-rank velocity gradient tensor, selecting only those elements of nabla v experienced by anchorage-dependent cells that are bound to protein-active sites. Stress sensitivity via the formalism of irreversible thermodynamics introduces a zeroth-order contribution to heterogeneous reaction rates that must be quenched when nutrients, oxygen, chemically anchored cells, or vacant active protein sites are not present on the surface of the rotating plate. Computer simulations of nutrient consumption profiles via simple nth-order kinetics (i.e., n=1,2) suggest that rotational bioreactor designs should consider stress-sensitivity when the shear-rate-based Damköhler number (i.e., ratio of the stress-dependent zeroth-order rate of nutrient consumption relative to the rate of nutrient diffusion toward active cells adhered to the rotating plate) is greater than approximately 25% of the stress-free Damköhler number. Rotational bioreactor simulations are presented for simple 1st-order, simple 2nd

  15. In situ microscopy reveals reversible cell wall swelling in kelp sieve tubes: one mechanism for turgor generation and flow control?

    PubMed

    Knoblauch, Jan; Tepler Drobnitch, Sarah; Peters, Winfried S; Knoblauch, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Kelps, brown algae (Phaeophyceae) of the order Laminariales, possess sieve tubes for the symplasmic long-distance transport of photoassimilates that are evolutionarily unrelated but structurally similar to the tubes in the phloem of vascular plants. We visualized sieve tube structure and wound responses in fully functional, intact Bull Kelp (Nereocystis luetkeana [K. Mertens] Postels & Ruprecht 1840). In injured tubes, apparent slime plugs formed but were unlikely to cause sieve tube occlusion as they assembled at the downstream side of sieve plates. Cell walls expanded massively in the radial direction, reducing the volume of the wounded sieve elements by up to 90%. Ultrastructural examination showed that a layer of the immediate cell wall characterized by circumferential cellulose fibrils was responsible for swelling and suggested that alginates, abundant gelatinous polymers of the cell wall matrix, were involved. Wall swelling was rapid, reversible and depended on intracellular pressure, as demonstrated by pressure-injection of silicon oil. Our results revive the concept of turgor generation and buffering by swelling cell walls, which had fallen into oblivion over the last century. Because sieve tube transport is pressure-driven and controlled physically by tube diameter, a regulatory role of wall swelling in photoassimilate distribution is implied in kelps.

  16. Effect of the polarity reversal frequency in the electrokinetic-biological remediation of oxyfluorfen polluted soil.

    PubMed

    Barba, Silvia; Villaseñor, José; Rodrigo, Manuel A; Cañizares, Pablo

    2017-03-03

    This work studies the feasibility of the periodic polarity reversal strategy (PRS) in a combined electrokinetic-biological process for the remediation of clayey soil polluted with a herbicide. Five two-weeks duration electrobioremediation batch experiments were performed in a bench scale set-up using spiked clay soil polluted with oxyfluorfen (20 mg kg(-1)) under potentiostatic conditions applying an electric field between the electrodes of 1.0 V cm(-1) (20.0 V) and using PRS with five frequencies (f) ranging from 0 to 6 d(-1). Additionally, two complementary reference tests were done: single bioremediation and single electrokinetic. The microbial consortium used was obtained from an oil refinery wastewater treatment plant and acclimated to oxyfluorfen degradation. Main soil conditions (temperature, pH, moisture and conductivity) were correctly controlled using PRS. On the contrary, the electroosmotic flow clearly decreased as f increased. The uniform soil microbial distribution at the end of the experiments indicated that the microbial activity remained in every parts of the soil after two weeks when applying PRS. Despite the adapted microbial culture was capable of degrade 100% of oxyfluorfen in water, the remediation efficiency in soil in a reference test, without the application of electric current, was negligible. However, under the low voltage gradients and polarity reversal, removal efficiencies between 5% and 15% were obtained, and it suggested that oxyfluorfen had difficulties to interact with the microbial culture or nutrients and that PRS promoted transport of species, which caused a positive influence on remediation. An optimal f value was observed between 2 and 3 d(-1).

  17. Potential of the reversed-inject differential flow modulator for comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography in the quantitative profiling and fingerprinting of essential oils of different complexity.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Chiara; Rubiolo, Patrizia; Cobelli, Luigi; Stani, Gianluca; Miliazza, Armando; Giardina, Matthew; Firor, Roger; Bicchi, Carlo

    2015-10-23

    In this study, the first capillary flow technology reverse-inject differential flow modulator was implemented with different column configurations (lengths, diameters and stationary phase coupling) and detector combinations (mass spectrometry--MS and flame ionization detection--FID) to evaluate its potential in the quantitative profiling and fingerprinting of medium-to-highly complex essential oils. In particular, a parallel dual-secondary column dual-detection configuration that has shown to improve the information potential also with thermally modulated GC × GC platforms (MS identification reliability and accurate FID quantitation), was tested. Several system performance parameters (separation measure SGC × GC, modulation ratio MR, separation space used and peak symmetry) were evaluated by analyzing a mixture of volatiles of interest in the flavor and fragrance field. The systems demonstrating the best chromatographic performance were selected for quantitative profiling of lavender and mint essential oils and fingerprinting of vetiver essential oil. Experimental results demonstrate that careful tuning of column dimensions and system configurations yields improved: (a) selectivity; (b) operable carrier gas linear velocities at close-to-optimal values; (c) (2)D separation power by extending the modulation period and (d) handling of overloaded peaks without dramatic losses in resolution and quantitative accuracy.

  18. Fit-to-Flow (F2F) interconnects: universal reversible adhesive-free microfluidic adaptors for lab-on-a-chip systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Arnold; Pan, Tingrui

    2011-02-21

    World-to-chip (macro-to-micro) interface continues to be one of the most complicated, ineffective, and unreliable components in the development of emerging lab-on-a-chip systems involving integrated microfluidic operations. A number of irreversible (e.g., adhesive gluing) and reversible techniques (e.g., press fitting) have attempted to provide dedicated fluidic passage from standard tubing to miniature on-chip devices, none of which completely addresses the above concerns. In this paper, we present standardized adhesive-free microfluidic adaptors, referred to as Fit-to-Flow (F2F) Interconnects, to achieve reliable hermetic seal, high-density tube packing, self-aligned plug-in, reworkable connectivity, straightforward scalability and expandability, and applicability to broad lab-on-a-chip platforms; analogous to the modular plug-and-play USB architecture employed in modern electronics. Specifically, two distinct physical packaging mechanisms are applied, with one utilizing induced tensile stress in elastomeric socket to establish reversible seal and the other using negative pressure to provide on demand vacuum shield, both of which can be adapted to a variety of experimental configurations. The non-leaking performance (up to 336 kPa) along with high tube-packing density (of 1 tube/mm(2)) and accurate self-guided alignment (of 10 μm) have been characterized. In addition, a 3D microfluidic mixer and a 6-level chemical gradient generator paired with the corresponding F2F Interconnects have been devised to illustrate the applicability of the universal fluidic connections to classic lab-on-a-chip operations.

  19. Tuning the Stability of Organic Active Materials for Nonaqueous Redox Flow Batteries via Reversible, Electrochemically Mediated Li + Coordination

    SciTech Connect

    Carino, Emily V.; Staszak-Jirkovsky, Jakub; Assary, Rajeev S.; Curtiss, Larry A.; Markovic, Nenad M.; Brushett, Fikile R.

    2016-03-24

    We describe an electrochemically mediated interaction between Li+ and a promising active material for nonaqueous redox flow batteries (RFBs), 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-6,7-dimethoxy-1,1,4,4-tetramethylnaphthalene (TDT), and the impact of this structural interaction on material stability during voltammetric cycling. TDT could be an advantageous organic positive electrolyte material for nonaqueous RFBs due to its high oxidation potential, 4.21 V vs Li/Li+, and solubility of at least 1.0 M in select electrolytes. Although results from voltammetry suggest TDT displays Nernstian reversibility in many nonaqueous electrolyte solutions, bulk electrolysis reveals significant degradation in all electrolytes studied, the extent of which depends on the electrolyte solution composition. Results of subtractively normalized in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (SNIFTIRS) confirm that TDT undergoes reversible structural changes during cyclic voltammetry in propylene carbonate and 1,2-dimethoxyethane solutions containing Li+ electrolytes, but irreversible degradation occurs when tetrabutylammonium (TBA+) replaces Li+ as the electrolyte cation in these solutions. By combining the results from SNIFTIRS experiments with calculations from density functional theory, solution-phase active species structure and potential-dependent interactions can be determined. We find that Li+ coordinates to the Lewis basic methoxy groups of neutral TDT and, upon electrochemical oxidation, this complex dissociates into the radical cation TDT•+ and Li+. The improved cycling stability in the presence of Li+ relative to TBA+ suggests that the structural interaction reported herein may be advantageous to the design of energy storage materials based on organic molecules.

  20. Comparison of cryogenic and differential flow (forward and reverse fill/flush) modulators and applications to the analysis of heavy petroleum cuts by high-temperature comprehensive gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Duhamel, Chloé; Cardinael, Pascal; Peulon-Agasse, Valérie; Firor, Roger; Pascaud, Laurent; Semard-Jousset, Gaëlle; Giusti, Pierre; Livadaris, Vincent

    2015-03-27

    The development of new efficient conversion processes to transform heavy petroleum fractions into valuable products, such as diesel, requires improved chemical knowledge of the latter. High-temperature comprehensive gas chromatography (HT-GC × GC) has proven to be a powerful technique for characterizing such complex samples. This paper reports on an evaluation of the performances of four different differential flow modulators, including two original ones that have not been previously described in the literature, in terms of dispersion, peak intensity, peak capacity and overloading. These modulators, all of which are based on Agilent capillary flow technology (CFT), are forward fill/flush (FFF) differential flow modulators with an integrated collection channel or an adjustable channel (new) and reverse fill/flush (RFF) differential flow modulators with an integrated collection channel (new) or an adjustable channel. First, the optimization of the collection channel dimensions is described. Second, an RFF and an FFF differential flow modulator possessing the same collection channel were compared. The reverse differential flow modulation significantly reduced band broadening compared to forward differential flow modulation, and the peak intensity doubled for every modulated peak when an RFF differential flow modulator was used. Then, an RFF differential flow modulator and CO2 dual-jet modulator were compared. Whereas the percentages of separation space used were similar (61% with the HT-GC × GC method using a cryogenic modulator and 59% with the method using an RFF differential flow modulator), the peak capacities were at least three times more important with differential flow modulation due to the greater length of the column used in the second dimension. The results demonstrate that the RFF differential flow modulator is an excellent tool for studying heavy petroleum cuts. It demonstrates the best performances and it is the most versatile modulator. In its two

  1. Impact of leakage current and electrolysis on FET flow control and pH changes in nanofluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Oh, Youn-Jin; Bottenus, Danny; Ivory, Cornelius F; Han, Sang M

    2009-06-07

    We have fabricated multiple-internal-reflection Si infrared waveguides integrated with an array of nanochannels sealed with an optically transparent top cover. The channel walls consist of a thin layer of SiO2 for electrical insulation, and gate electrodes surround the channel sidewalls and bottom to manipulate their surface charge and zeta-potential in a fluidic field effect transistor (FET) configuration. This nanofluidic device is used to probe the transport of charged molecules (Alexa 488) and to measure the pH shift in nanochannels in response to an electrical potential applied to the gate. During gate biasing for FET operation, laser-scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy (LS-CFM) is used to visualize the flow of fluorescent dye molecules (Alexa 488), and multiple internal reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (MIR-FTIRS) is used to probe the characteristic vibrational modes of fluorescein pH indicator and measure the pH shift. The electroosmotic flow of Alexa 488 is accelerated in response to a negative gate bias, whereas its flow direction is reversed in response to a positive gate bias. We also measure that the pH of buffered electrolyte solutions shifts by as much as a pH unit upon applying the gate bias. With prolonged application of gate bias, however, we observe that the initial response in flow speed and direction as well as pH shift becomes reversed. We attribute these anomalous flow and pH shift characteristics to a leakage current that flows from the Si gate through the thermally grown SiO2 to the electrolyte solution.

  2. Field Effect Flow Control in a Polymer T-Intersection Microfluidic Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sniadecki, Nathan J.; Chang, Richard; Beamesderfer, Mike; Lee, Cheng S.; DeVoe, Don L.

    2003-01-01

    We present a study of induced pressure pumping in a polymer microchannel due to differential electroosmotic flow @OF) rates via field-effect flow control (FEFC). The experimental results demonstrate that the induced pressure pumping is dependent on the distance of the FEFC gate from the cathodic gate. A proposed flow model based on a linearly-decaying zeta potential profile is found to successfully predict experimental trends.

  3. The global monsoon definition using the difference of local minimum and maximum pentad precipitation rates associated with cross-equatorial flow reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Weihong; Jiang, Ning

    2016-05-01

    Since most previous attempts to establish monsoon indices have been limited to specific regions, they have lacked the applicability to universally describe the global monsoon domain. In this paper, we first review the history of global monsoon study and then identify the climatology of global precipitation associated with major systems of the atmospheric general circulation. A new index, based on the annual and semiannual harmonic precipitation rate difference between two local calendar maximal and minimal precipitation pentads, is used to identify the global monsoon domain focusing on where experienced and what caused the climatic dry-wet alteration. The global monsoon domain is defined by the regions where two pentad-mean precipitation difference exceeds 4 mm ṡday-1, which is also influenced by the low-level prevailing wind reversal associated with the cross-equatorial flow. This definition not only confirmed previous results of the classical global monsoon domain from the tropical Africa to Asia-Australia and non-classical monsoon region in the tropical America but also solved an issue of missing local summer monsoon spots.

  4. Visual Detection of West Nile Virus Using Reverse Transcription Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Combined with a Vertical Flow Visualization Strip.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zengguo; Wang, Hualei; Wang, Lina; Li, Ling; Jin, Hongli; Xu, Changping; Feng, Na; Wang, Jianzhong; Li, Qian; Zhao, Yongkun; Wang, Tiecheng; Gao, Yuwei; Lu, Yiyu; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) causes a severe zoonosis, which can lead to a large number of casualties and considerable economic losses. A rapid and accurate identification method for WNV for use in field laboratories is urgently needed. Here, a method utilizing reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification combined with a vertical flow visualization strip (RT-LAMP-VF) was developed to detect the envelope (E) gene of WNV. The RT-LAMP-VF assay could detect 10(2) copies/μl of an WNV RNA standard using a 40 min amplification reaction followed by a 2 min incubation of the amplification product on the visualization strip, and no cross-reaction with other closely related members of the Flavivirus genus was observed. The assay was further evaluated using cells and mouse brain tissues infected with a recombinant rabies virus expressing the E protein of WNV. The assay produced sensitivities of 10(1.5) TCID50/ml and 10(1.33) TCID50/ml for detection of the recombinant virus in the cells and brain tissues, respectively. Overall, the RT-LAMP-VF assay developed in this study is rapid, simple and effective, and it is therefore suitable for clinical application in the field.

  5. Reversed phase liquid chromatography hyphenated to continuous flow-extractive desorption electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry for analysis and charge state manipulation of undigested proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Yang, Samuel H; Vidova, Veronika; Rice, Elisa M; Wijeratne, Aruna B; Havlíček, Vladimír; Schug, Kevin A

    2015-01-01

    The application of continuous flow-extractive desorption electrospray ionization (CF-EDESI), an ambient ionization source demonstrated previously for use with intact protein analysis, is expanded here for the coupling of reversed phase protein separations to mass spectrometry. This configuration allows the introduction of charging additives to enhance detection without affecting the chromatographic separation mechanism. Two demonstrations of the advantages of CF-EDESI are presented in this work. First, a proof-of- principle is presented to demonstrate the applicability of hyphenation of liquid chromatography (LC) to CF- EDESI. LC-CF-EDESI-MS has good sensitivity compared to LC-electrospray ionization (ESI)-mass spectrometry. Second, the supercharging mechanism investigated in CF-EDESI provides an insight into a highly debated supercharging process in ESI. The results indicate that the mechanism of protein charging seen in HPLC-CF-EDESI is different from supercharging phenomena in conventional ESI. The surface tension mechanism and binding mechanism may both contribute to protein supercharging in ESI.

  6. EFFECT OF AQUEOUS PHASE PROPERTIES ON CLAY PARTICLE ZETA POTENTIAL AND ELECTRO-OSMOTIC PERMEABILITY: IMPLICATIONS FOR ELECTRO-KINETIC SOIL REMEDIATION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The influence of aqueous phase properties (pH, ionic strength and divalent metal ion concentration) on clay particle zeta potential and packed-bed electro-osmotic permeability was quantified. Although pH strongly altered the zeta potential of a Georgia kaolinite, it did not signi...

  7. Preparation and evaluation of o-phenanthroline immobilized on a hybrid silica monolith modified with ionic liquids for reversed-phase pressurized capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wenfei; Lü, Haixia; Xie, Zenghong

    2014-12-01

    A novel o-phenanthroline-immobilized ionic-liquid-modified hybrid monolith for capillary electrochromatography was synthesized based on chloropropyl-silica, which was prepared by the in situ polymerization of tetramethoxysilane and 3-chloropropyltrimethoxysilane via a sol-gel process. The morphology of the hybrid monolith was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, and relatively stable anodic electroosmotic flow was observed under a broad pH ranged from pH 3.0 to 9.0. The separation mechanism was investigated by separating four neutral molecules (toluene, dimethylformamide, formamide, and thiourea). The obtained hybrid monolith possessed an obviously reversed-phase retention mechanism, but when the acetonitrile content in the mobile phase was >90% v/v, a weak hydrophilic mechanism was observed on the resultant o-phenanthroline-modified chloropropyl-silica hybrid monolith. The reproducibility of the column was also investigated by measuring relative standard deviations of the migration time for four neutral molecules. Relative standard deviations of run to run (n = 3), day to day (n = 3), and column to column (n = 3) were in the range of 0.4-0.7, 0.9-2.1, and 1.4-3.3%, respectively. Basic separations of various polar analytes including phenols and aromatic amines were successfully achieved.

  8. A flux monitoring method for easy and accurate flow rate measurement in pressure-driven flows.

    PubMed

    Siria, Alessandro; Biance, Anne-Laure; Ybert, Christophe; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2012-03-07

    We propose a low-cost and versatile method to measure flow rate in microfluidic channels under pressure-driven flows, thereby providing a simple characterization of the hydrodynamic permeability of the system. The technique is inspired by the current monitoring method usually employed to characterize electro-osmotic flows, and makes use of the measurement of the time-dependent electric resistance inside the channel associated with a moving salt front. We have successfully tested the method in a micrometer-size channel, as well as in a complex microfluidic channel with a varying cross-section, demonstrating its ability in detecting internal shape variations.

  9. Melatonin reverses flow shear stress-induced injury in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells via activation of AMP-activated protein kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Fan, Chongxi; Deng, Chao; Zhao, Lin; Hu, Wei; Di, Shouyin; Ma, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Yu; Qin, Zhigang; Jin, Zhenxiao; Yan, Xiaolong; Jiang, Shuai; Sun, Yang; Yi, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Tissue-engineered heart valves (TEHVs) are a promising treatment for valvular heart disease, although their application is limited by high flow shear stress (FSS). Melatonin has a wide range of physiological functions and is currently under clinical investigation for expanded applications; moreover, extensive protective effects on the cardiovascular system have been reported. In this study, we investigated the protection conferred by melatonin supplementation against FSS-induced injury in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) and elucidated the potential mechanism in this process. Melatonin markedly reduced BMSC apoptotic death in a concentration-dependent manner while increasing the levels of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl2), and decreasing those of Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax), p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA), and caspase 3. Notably, melatonin exerted its protective effects by upregulating the phosphorylation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which promotes acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) phosphorylation. Further molecular experiments revealed that luzindole, a nonselective antagonist of melatonin receptors, blocked the anti-FSS injury (anti-FSSI) effects of melatonin. Inhibition of AMPK by Compound C also counteracted the protective effects of melatonin, suggesting that melatonin reverses FSSI in BMSCs through the AMPK-dependent pathway. Overall, our findings indicate that melatonin contributes to the amelioration of FSS-induced BMSC injury by activating melatonin receptors and AMPK/ACC signaling. Our findings may provide a basis for the design of more effective strategies that promote the use of TEHCs in patients.

  10. Particle tracking techniques for electrokinetic microchannel flows.

    PubMed

    Devasenathipathy, Shankar; Santiago, Juan G; Takehara, Kohsei

    2002-08-01

    We have applied particle tracking techniques to obtain spatially resolved velocity measurements in electrokinetic flow devices. Both micrometer-resolution particle image velocimetry (micro-PMV) and particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) techniques have been used to quantify and study flow phenomena in electrokinetic systems applicable to microfluidic bioanalytical devices. To make the flow measurements quantitative, we performed a series of seed particle calibration experiments. First, we measure the electroosmotic wall mobility of a borosilicate rectangular capillary (40 by 400 microm) using current monitoring. In addition to this wall mobility characterization, we apply PTV to determine the electrophoretic mobilities of more than 1,000 fluorescent microsphere particles in aqueous buffer solutions. Particles from this calibrated particle/ buffer mixture are then introduced into two electrokinetic flow systems for particle tracking flow experiments. In these experiments, we use micro-PIV, together with an electric field prediction, to obtain electroosmotic flow bulk fluid velocity measurements. The first example flow system is a microchannel intersection where we demonstrate a detailed documentation of the similitude between the electrical fields and the velocity fields in an electrokinetic system with uniform zeta potential, zeta. In the second system, we apply micro-PIV to a microchannel system with nonuniform zeta. The latter experiment provides a simultaneous measurement of two distinct wall mobilities within the microchannel.

  11. Numerical analysis of the zeta potential regarding the characteristics of a ring-type electro-osmotic mixer.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hyeon-Seok; Kim, Tae-An; Kim, Youn-Jea

    2011-07-01

    The micromixer that is applied for the electro-osmotic effect in this study, which is a passive type, takes two fluids from different inlets and combines them into a single channel. The fluids then enter the mixing chamber with different inner and outer radii. Four microelectrodes are positioned on the outer wall of the mixing chamber. The electric potentials on the four microelectrodes are sinusoidal for certain values of the time, voltage, zeta potential, and frequency. In order to check the validity of the two-dimensional numerical analysis that already has been performed, we performed a three-dimensional numerical analysis using a commercial code, COMSOL. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equation is solved in this model, with a slip boundary condition on the inner and outer walls of the mixing chamber. The results of two- and three-dimensional models are graphically depicted and compared from the viewpoint of streamlines and concentration.

  12. Sampling strategies for capillary isoelectric focusing with electroosmotic zone mobilization assessed by high-resolution dynamic computer simulation.

    PubMed

    Takácsi-Nagy, Anna; Kilár, Ferenc; Páger, Csilla; Mosher, Richard A; Thormann, Wolfgang

    2012-03-01

    The impact of initial sample distribution on separation and focusing of analytes in a pH 3–11 gradient formed by 101 biprotic carrier ampholytes under concomitant electroosmotic displacement was studied by dynamic high-resolution computer simulation. Data obtained with application of the analytes mixed with the carrier ampholytes (as is customarily done), as a short zone within the initial carrier ampholyte zone, sandwiched between zones of carrier ampholytes, or introduced before or after the initial carrier ampholyte zone were compared. With sampling as a short zone within or adjacent to the carrier ampholytes, separation and focusing of analytes is shown to proceed as a cationic, anionic, or mixed process and separation of the analytes is predicted to be much faster than the separation of the carrier components. Thus, after the initial separation, analytes continue to separate and eventually reach their focusing locations. This is different to the double-peak approach to equilibrium that takes place when analytes and carrier ampholytes are applied as a homogenous mixture. Simulation data reveal that sample application between two zones of carrier ampholytes results in the formation of a pH gradient disturbance as the concentration of the carrier ampholytes within the fluid element initially occupied by the sample will be lower compared to the other parts of the gradient. As a consequence thereof, the properties of this region are sample matrix dependent, the pH gradient is flatter, and the region is likely to represent a conductance gap (hot spot). Simulation data suggest that sample placed at the anodic side or at the anodic end of the initial carrier ampholyte zone are the favorable configurations for capillary isoelectric focusing with electroosmotic zone mobilization.

  13. Mechanistic Study of Electroosmotic Transport Across Hydrated Nail Plates: Effects of pH and Ionic Strength

    PubMed Central

    HAO, JINSONG; LI, S. KEVIN

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of pH and ionic strength on electroosmotic transport in transungual iontophoresis. Transungual iontophoretic transport of model neutral permeants mannitol (MA) and urea (UR) across fully hydrated human nail plates in phosphate-buffered saline of different pH and ionic strengths were investigated in vitro. Two protocols were involved in the transport experiments with each protocol divided into stages including passive and iontophoresis transport at 0.1 and/or 0.3 mA. Nail plate electrical resistance and water uptake of nail clippings were measured at various pH and ionic strengths. In the pH study, electroosmosis enhanced the anodal transport of MA at pH 9 and cathodal transport at pH 3. The Peclet numbers of MA were more than two times higher than those of UR under these conditions. No significant electroosmosis enhancement was observed for MA and UR at pH 5. In the ionic strength study, a decrease in solution ionic strength from 0.7 to 0.04 M enhanced electroosmotic transport. Nail electrical resistance increased with decreasing the ionic strength of the equilibrating solution, but reached a plateau when the ionic strength was less than approximately 0.07 M. Solution pH and ionic strength had no significant effect on nail hydration. Under the studied pH and ionic strength conditions, the effects of electroosmosis were small compared to the direct-field effects in transungual iontophoretic transport of small to moderate size permeants. PMID:18386836

  14. Reversible Sterilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Largey, Gale

    1977-01-01

    Notes that difficult questions arise concerning the use of sterilization for alleged eugenic and euthenic purposes. Thus, how reversible sterilization will be used with relation to the poor, mentally ill, mentally retarded, criminals, and minors, is questioned. (Author/AM)

  15. Reversible Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Harsh; Madanieh, Raef; Kosmas, Constantine E; Vatti, Satya K; Vittorio, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies (CMs) have many etiological factors that can result in severe structural and functional dysregulation. Fortunately, there are several potentially reversible CMs that are known to improve when the root etiological factor is addressed. In this article, we discuss several of these reversible CMs, including tachycardia-induced, peripartum, inflammatory, hyperthyroidism, Takotsubo, and chronic illness–induced CMs. Our discussion also includes a review on their respective pathophysiology, as well as possible management solutions. PMID:26052233

  16. Moving wall, continuous flow electronphoresis apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Percy H. (Inventor); Snyder, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    This invention relates generally to electrophoresis devices and more particularly to a moving wall, continuous flow device in which an electrophoresis chamber is angularly positionable with respect to the direction of moving belt walls. A frame with an electrophoresis chamber is rotatably supported between two synchronously driven belt walls. This allows the chamber to be angularly positionable with respect to the direction of belt travel, which compensates for electroosmotic flow within the electrophoresis chamber. Injection of a buffer solution via an opening and a homogenous sample stream via another opening is performed at the end of a chamber, and collection of buffer and the fractionated species particles is done by a conventional collection array at an opposite end of the chamber. Belts are driven at a rate which exactly matches the flow of buffer and sample through the chamber, which entrains the buffer to behave as a rigid electrophoretic medium, eliminating flow distortions (Poiseuille effect). Additionally, belt material for each belt is stored at one end of the device and is taken up by drive wheels at an opposite end. The novelty of this invention particularly lies in the electrophoresis chamber being angularly positionable between two moving belt walls in order to compensate for electroosmotic flow. Additionally, new belt material is continuously exposed within the chamber, minimizing flow distortion due to contamination of the belt material by the sample.

  17. Assessment of Joule heating and its effects on electroosmotic flow and electrophoretic transport of solutes in microfluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Tang, Gongyue; Yan, Deguang; Yang, Chun; Gong, Haiqing; Chai, John Chee; Lam, Yee Cheong

    2006-02-01

    Joule heating is inevitable when an electric field is applied across a conducting medium. It would impose limitations on the performance of electrokinetic microfluidic devices. This article presents a 3-D mathematical model for Joule heating and its effects on the EOF and electrophoretic transport of solutes in microfluidic channels. The governing equations were numerically solved using the finite-volume method. Experiments were carried out to investigate the Joule heating associated phenomena and to verify the numerical models. A rhodamine B-based thermometry technique was employed to measure the solution temperature distributions in microfluidic channels. The microparticle image velocimetry technique was used to measure the velocity profiles of EOF under the influence of Joule heating. The numerical solutions were compared with experimental results, and reasonable agreement was found. It is found that with the presence of Joule heating, the EOF velocity deviates from its normal "plug-like" profile. The numerical simulations show that Joule heating not only accelerates the sample transport but also distorts the shape of the sample band.

  18. Dielectrophoresis of reverse phase emulsions.

    PubMed

    Flores-Rodriguez, N; Bryning, Z; Markx, G H

    2005-08-01

    Reverse miniemulsions, emulsions of droplets of size 200 nm-1 microm of a polar liquid dispersed in an apolar continuous liquid phase, exhibit strong electrokinetic responses in low-frequency electric fields. The electrokinetic behaviour of a reverse miniemulsion, previously developed for use as electronic paper, has been investigated under static and flow conditions, in uniform and non-uniform electric fields. Results reveal that when using frequencies lower than 10 Hz strong aggregation of the droplets occurs. In uniform electric fields, under static conditions, droplets reversibly aggregate into honeycomb-like or irregular aggregates. Under flow conditions, droplets aggregate into approximately equidistant streams. In non-uniform electric fields the droplets reversibly aggregate in high-field regions, and can be guided along regions of high field strength in a flow. The potential of the technique for the formation of structured materials is discussed.

  19. A flow method based on solvent extraction coupled on-line to a reversed micellar mediated chemiluminescence detection for selective determination of gold(III) and gallium(III) in water and industrial samples.

    PubMed

    Hasanin, Tamer H A; Okamoto, Yasuaki; Fujiwara, Terufumi

    2016-02-01

    A rapid and sensitive flow method, based on the combination of on-line solvent extraction with reversed micellar mediated chemiluminescence (CL) detection using rhodamine B (RB), was investigated for the selective determination of Au(III) and Ga(III) in aqueous solutions. 2.0 M HCl was the optimum for extracting Au(III) while a 5.0M HCl solution containing 2.5M LiCl was selected as an optimum acidic medium for extraction of Ga(III). The Au(III) and Ga(III) chloro-complex anions were extracted from the above aqueous acidic solutions into toluene as their ion-pair complexes with the protonated RBH(+) ion followed by membrane phase separation in a flow system. In a flow cell of a detector, the extract was mixed with the reversed micellar solution of cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC) in 1-hexanol-cyclohexane/water (1.0M HCl) containing 0.10 M cerium(IV) and 0.05 M lithium sulfate. Then uptake of the ion-pair by the CTAC reversed micelles and the subsequent CL oxidation of RB with Ce(IV) occurred easily and the CL signals produced were recorded. Using a flow injection system, a detection limit (DL) of 0.4 μM Au(III) and 0.6 μM Ga(III), and linear calibration graphs with dynamic ranges from the respective DLs to 10 μM for Au(III) and Ga(III) were obtained under the optimized experimental conditions. The relative standard deviations (n=6) obtained at 2.0 µM Au(III) and 4.0 µM Ga(III) were 3.0% and 2.4%, respectively. The presented CL methodology has been applied for the determination of Au(III) and Ga(III) in water and industrial samples with satisfactory results.

  20. Methane Screening in JET Reverse Field Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    J.D. Strachan; B. Alper; G. Corrigan; S.K. Erents; C. Giroud; A. Korotkov; H. Leggate; G.F. Mathews; R.A. Pitts; M. Stamp; J. Spence

    2004-05-17

    JET plasmas with reverse magnetic field feature a different SOL flow than those with normal field. The observed carbon fueling efficiency from injecting methane gas was similar in reverse and normal field. EDGE2D modeling used an externally applied force to create the SOL flows, without specifying the origin of the force. The resulting flow agreed reasonably with the experimental values between the separatrix and 4 cm mid-plane depth in the SOL. The effect of the flow on the calculated carbon screening was 5 to 15% higher carbon fueling efficiency for the low flow velocity with reverse field.

  1. Microfluidic device and methods for focusing fluid streams using electroosmotically induced pressures

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Stephen C.; Ramsey, J. Michael

    2010-06-01

    A microfabricated device employing a bridging membrane and methods for electrokinetic transport of a liquid phase biological or chemical material using the same are described. The bridging membrane is deployed in or adjacent to a microchannel and permits either electric current flow or the transport of gas species, while inhibiting the bulk flow of material. The use of bridging membranes in accordance with this invention is applicable to electrokinetically inducing fluid flow to confine a selected material in a region of a microchannel that is not influenced by an electric field. Other structures for inducing fluid flow in accordance with this invention include nanochannel bridging membranes and alternating current fluid pumping devices. Applications of the bridging membranes according to this invention include the separation of species from a sample material, valving of fluids in a microchannel network, mixing of different materials in a microchannel, and the pumping of fluids.

  2. Reversible Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    will have been introduced. 9. Reversible celular autemata We shall assume the reader to have some familiarity with the concept of cel- lular...10003 Mr. Kin B. Thcmpson 1 copy Technical Director Information Systems Divisia.i Naval Research Laboratory (OP-91T) Technical Information Division

  3. REVERSE OSMOSIS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    acetate membranes. Mechanisms of the process and porous cellulose acetate membrane technology are briefly reviewed. Based on a general capillary...The reverse osmosis process is discussed with particular reference to systems involving aqueous solutions and Loeb-Sourirajan-type porous cellulose

  4. Simulation of an ac electro-osmotic pump with step microelectrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byoung Jae; Lee, Seung-Hyun; Rezazadeh, Soghra; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2011-05-01

    Pumps with step microelectrodes subjected to an ac voltage are known to have faster pumping rates than those with planar asymmetric microelectrodes. The driving force for pumping in these systems is ac electro-osmosis. This paper aims to understand the flow behaviors of pumps with step microelectrodes by using a realistic model applicable to high external voltages. This model takes the steric effect due to the finite sizes of ions into account and copes with the exponential sensitivity of the counterion concentration to voltage. The effects on the pumping flow rate of varying the pump parameters were investigated. The geometrical parameters were optimized, and the effects of varying the ac frequency and amplitude were examined. The electrical potential of the fluid and the electrical charge at the electrode surface were solved simultaneously, and the Stokes equation was used to describe the fluid flow.

  5. Reverse Fluid Transport Due to Boundary Pulsations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coloma, Mikhail; Schaffer, David; Chiarot, Paul; Huang, Peter

    2016-11-01

    We investigate a reverse fluid transport mechanism consisting of peristaltic flow and boundary wave reflections. The reverse flow occurs in a rectangular conduit aligned in parallel between two cylindrical channels embedded in an elastic PDMS medium. The pulsating flow in the cylindrical channels, driven by a peristaltic pump, deform the PDMS medium and induce a pulsating flow in the rectangular conduit. Waveforms along the conduit boundaries, and their transmission and reflections, can be controlled by changing the PDMS rigidity. Our results show that while the overall wave propagation direction is in the forward direction, a reverse flow in the rectangular conduit can be preferentially induced by varying the elastic rigidity in one of the cylindrical channels. We study the overall flow velocity and direction under various PDMS rigidities. The identified set of experimental parameters that leads to a reverse flow will provide insights in understanding metabolic waste transport within the arterial walls in the brain.

  6. Remarkable electrokinetic features of charge-stratified soft nanoparticles: mobility reversal in monovalent aqueous electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Moussa, Mariam; Caillet, Céline; Town, Raewyn M; Duval, Jérôme F L

    2015-05-26

    The electrokinetic behavior of G6.5 carboxylate-terminated poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) starburst dendrimers (8 ± 1 nm diameter) is investigated over a broad range of pH values (3-9) and NaNO3 concentrations (c(∞ )= 2-200 mM). The dependence of nanodendrimer electrophoretic mobility μ on pH and c(∞) is marked by an unconventional decrease of the point of zero mobility (PZM) from 5.4 to 5.5 to 3.8 upon increase in salt concentration, with PZM defined as the pH value at which a reversal of the mobility sign is reached. The existence of a common intersection point is further evidenced for series of mobility versus pH curves measured at different NaNO3 concentrations. Using soft particle electrokinetic theory, this remarkable behavior is shown to originate from the zwitterionic functionality of the PAMAM-COOH particles. The dependence of PZM on c(∞) results from the coupling between electroosmotic flow and dendrimeric interphase defined by a nonuniform distribution of amine and carboxylic functional groups. In turn, μ reflects the sign and distribution of particle charges located within an electrokinetically active region, the dimension of which is determined by the Debye length, varied here in the range 0.7-6.8 nm. In agreement with theory, the electrokinetics of smaller G4.5 PAMAM-COOH nanoparticles (5 ± 0.5 nm diameter) further confirms that the PZM is shifted to higher pH with decreasing dendrimer size. Depending on pH, a mobility extremum is obtained under conditions where the Debye length and the particle radius are comparable. This results from changes in particle structure compactness following salt- and pH-mediated modulations of intraparticle Coulombic interactions. The findings solidly evidence the possible occurrence of particle mobility reversal in monovalent salt solution suggested by recent molecular dynamic simulations and anticipated from earlier mean-field electrokinetic theory.

  7. Vasectomy reversal.

    PubMed

    Belker, A M

    1987-02-01

    A vasovasostomy may be performed on an outpatient basis with local anesthesia, but also may be performed on an outpatient basis with epidural or general anesthesia. Local anesthesia is preferred by most of my patients, the majority of whom choose this technique. With proper preoperative and intraoperative sedation, patients sleep lightly through most of the procedure. Because of the length of time often required for bilateral microsurgical vasoepididymostomy, epidural or general anesthesia and overnight hospitalization are usually necessary. Factors influencing the preoperative choice for vasovasostomy or vasoepididymostomy in patients undergoing vasectomy reversal are considered. The preoperative planned choice of vasovasostomy or vasoepididymostomy for patients having vasectomy reversal described herein does not have the support of all urologists who regularly perform these procedures. My present approach has evolved as the data reported in Tables 1 and 2 have become available, but it may change as new information is evaluated. However, it offers a logical method for planning choices of anesthesia and inpatient or outpatient status for patients undergoing vasectomy reversal procedures.

  8. Gridded electron reversal ionizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A gridded electron reversal ionizer forms a three dimensional cloud of zero or near-zero energy electrons in a cavity within a filament structure surrounding a central electrode having holes through which the sample gas, at reduced pressure, enters an elongated reversal volume. The resultant negative ion stream is applied to a mass analyzer. The reduced electron and ion space-charge limitations of this configuration enhances detection sensitivity for material to be detected by electron attachment, such as narcotic and explosive vapors. Positive ions may be generated by generating electrons having a higher energy, sufficient to ionize the target gas and pulsing the grid negative to stop the electron flow and pulsing the extraction aperture positive to draw out the positive ions.

  9. Effect of zeta potential on the performance of a ring-type electroosmotic mixer.

    PubMed

    Kim, T A; Koo, K H; Kim, Y J

    2009-12-01

    In order to achieve faster mixing, a new type of electrokinetic mixer with a T-type channel is introduced. The proposed mixer takes two fluids from different inlets and combines them into a single channel. The fluids then enter a mixing chamber with different inner and outer radii. Four microelectrodes are positioned on the outer wall of the mixing chamber. The electric potentials on the four microelectrodes are sinusoidal with respect to time and have various maximum voltages, zeta potentials and frequency values. The working fluid is water and each inlet has a different initial concentration values. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equation is solved in the channel, with a slip boundary condition on the inner and outer walls of the mixing chamber. The convection-diffusion equation is used to describe the concentration of the dissolved substances in the fluid. The pressure, concentration and flow fields in the channel are calculated and the results are graphically depicted for various flow and electric conditions.

  10. A periodic array of nano-scale parallel slats for high-efficiency electroosmotic pumping.

    PubMed

    Kung, Chun-Fei; Wang, Chang-Yi; Chang, Chien-Cheng

    2013-12-01

    It is known that the eletroosmotic (EO) flow rate through a nano-scale channel is extremely small. A channel made of a periodic array of slats is proposed to effectively promote the EO pumping, and thus greatly improve the EO flow rate. The geometrically simple array is complicated enough that four length scales are involved: the vertical period 2L, lateral period 2aL, width of the slat 2cL as well as the Debye length λD. The EO pumping rate is determined by the normalized lengths: a, c, or the perforation fraction of slats η=1-(c/a) and the dimensionless electrokinetic width K=L/λD. In a nano-scale channel, K is of order unity or less. EO pumping in both longitudinal and transverse directions (denoted as longitudinal EO pumping (LEOP) and transverse EO pumping (TEOP), respectively) is investigated by solving the Debye-Hückel approximation and viscous electro-kinetic equation. The main findings include that (i) the EO pumping rates of LEOP for small K are remarkably improved (by one order of magnitude) when we have longer slats (a≫1) and a large perforation fraction of slats (η > 0.7); (ii) the EO pumping rates of TEOP for small K can also be much improved but less significantly with longer slats and a large perforation fraction of slats. Nevertheless, it must be noted that in practice K cannot be made arbitrarily small as the criterion of φc≈0 for the reference potential at the channel center put lower bounds on K; in other words, there are geometrical limits for the use of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation.

  11. An investigation of scramming the outer shutdown rods of the ANS with no reversal of flow in the manifold inlet lines

    SciTech Connect

    Morsk, K. )

    1992-10-01

    This report provides calculations and calculation checks on the outer shutdown system, consisting of eight shutdown rods located on the outside of the core. The function of the system is to scram the reactor, or to break the chain reaction of the fission process. The shutdown rods are clad with a neutron-absorbing material (i.e., hafnium) to achieve scram. During normal operation, the outer shutdown rods (Fig. 1) are in a nonscram, withdrawn position. This means that they are not close enough to the core to absorb a significant number of the neutrons that cause the fission process. In the case of a malfunction or an emergency, the outer control rods are moved to a position near the core. The outer shutdown system is operated with the use of springs and hydraulics. During normal operation, a constant flow of heavy water is circulated through the reflector vessel. A part of this flow provides a pressure high enough to keep the rods in their withdrawn or upper position, a nonscram status. If any signs of abnormal operation occur, the valves in the hydraulic system cut off the flow, and the springs push the rods into the scram position, stopping the chain reaction. Once the flow is restarted, the rods can be withdrawn to the nonscram position. Calculations of the mass of the outer control rod, the scram spring data, and the hydraulic pressure to hold the rods in the withdrawn position have been checked. In the case of a malfunction of the flow/pressure relief valves, a calculation was needed to show that the scram time would not exceed the time allowed. The scram time has been determined based on different values of the rod insertion length and the outside radius of the annulus was calculated. The effective force pushing the rod into the scram position, the rate of acceleration, and the actual scram time was then determined.

  12. Capillary filling under electro-osmotic effects in the presence of electromagneto-hydrodynamic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Nikhil; Ghosh, Uddipta; Chakraborty, Suman

    2014-06-01

    We report various regimes of capillary filling dynamics under electromagneto-hydrodynamic interactions, in the presence of electrical double layer effects. Our chosen configuration considers an axial electric field and transverse magnetic field acting on an electrolyte. We demonstrate that for positive interfacial potential, the movement of the capillary front resembles capillary rise in a vertical channel under the action of gravity. We also evaluate the time taken by the capillary front to reach the final equilibrium position for positive interfacial potential and show that the presence of a transverse magnetic field delays the time of travel of the liquid front, thereby sustaining the capillary motion for a longer time. Our scaling estimates reveal that the initial linear regime starts, as well as ends, much earlier in the presence of electrical and magnetic body forces, as compared to the corresponding transients observed under pure surface tension driven flow. We further obtain a long time solution for the capillary imbibition for positive interfacial potential, and derive a scaling estimate of the capillary stopping time as a function of the applied magnetic field and an intrinsic length scale delineating electromechanical influences of the electrical double layer. Our findings are likely to offer alternative strategies of controlling dynamical features of capillary imbibition, by modulating the interplay between electromagnetic interactions, electrical double layer phenomena, and hydrodynamics over interfacial scales.

  13. Capillary filling under electro-osmotic effects in the presence of electromagneto-hydrodynamic effects.

    PubMed

    Desai, Nikhil; Ghosh, Uddipta; Chakraborty, Suman

    2014-06-01

    We report various regimes of capillary filling dynamics under electromagneto-hydrodynamic interactions, in the presence of electrical double layer effects. Our chosen configuration considers an axial electric field and transverse magnetic field acting on an electrolyte. We demonstrate that for positive interfacial potential, the movement of the capillary front resembles capillary rise in a vertical channel under the action of gravity. We also evaluate the time taken by the capillary front to reach the final equilibrium position for positive interfacial potential and show that the presence of a transverse magnetic field delays the time of travel of the liquid front, thereby sustaining the capillary motion for a longer time. Our scaling estimates reveal that the initial linear regime starts, as well as ends, much earlier in the presence of electrical and magnetic body forces, as compared to the corresponding transients observed under pure surface tension driven flow. We further obtain a long time solution for the capillary imbibition for positive interfacial potential, and derive a scaling estimate of the capillary stopping time as a function of the applied magnetic field and an intrinsic length scale delineating electromechanical influences of the electrical double layer. Our findings are likely to offer alternative strategies of controlling dynamical features of capillary imbibition, by modulating the interplay between electromagnetic interactions, electrical double layer phenomena, and hydrodynamics over interfacial scales.

  14. A detailed examination of a X-line region in the distant tail: ISEE-3 observations of jet flow and B(sub z) reversals and a pair of slow shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, C. M.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Smith, E. J.; Feldman, W. C.

    1994-01-01

    We report an observation of Petschek-type magnetic reconnection at a distant neutral line (X = -230 R(sub e)) with a full set of signatures of the magnetic merging process. These features include a reversal of plasma flows from earthward to tailward, a pair of slow shocks and the magnetic field X-type line. These two slow shocks are shown to satisfy the shock criteria used by Feldman et al. (1987). The spacecraft first crosses a slow shock to enter the earthward flowing plasmasheet with velocity of about 440 km/s. The embedded magnetic field has a positive B(sub z) component. The spacecraft next enters a region of tailward plasma flow with speed approximately 670 km/s and an embedded negative B(sub z), indicating entry into the plasmasheet tailward of the X-line. These observed velocities are comparable to calculated velocities based on Rankine-Hugoniot conservation relationships. The spacecraft subsequently returns into the south tail lobe by crossing another slow shock. Coplanarity analyses shows that the two slow shocks have orientations consistent with that predicted by the Petschek reconnection model. We note that this event occurs during northward interplanetary magnetic fields. Thus, a magnetic stress built-up in the distant tail may be responsible for this reconnection process.

  15. Cortisol extraction through human skin by reverse iontophoresis.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Stephanie A; Heikenfeld, Jason; Brooks, Tiffany; Esfandiari, Leyla; Boyce, Steven; Park, Yoonjee; Kasting, Gerald B

    2017-04-01

    Continuous monitoring of cortisol at the surface of the skin would advance the diagnosis and treatment of cortisol-related diseases, or of elevated cortisol levels related to stress in otherwise healthy populations. Reliable and accurate detection of cortisol at the skin surface remains a limiting factor in real-time monitoring of cortisol. To address this limitation, cortisol extraction through excised human skin by reverse iontophoresis was studied in vitro in side-by-side diffusion cells using a radiolabeled probe. The skin was subjected to four direct current regimens (0, 28, 56, 113μAcm(-2)) with the anode in the donor chamber and the cumulative cortisol concentrations recorded in the receiver chamber. The 56 and 113μAcm(-2) regimens significantly increased transport of (3)H-cortisol through the skin, and current density correlated directly with transcutaneous transport of (3)H-cortisol. The threshold of detection of electroosmotic versus passive diffusion of cortisol through the skin was between 28 and 56μAcm(-2). The results of this study are significant in examining how lipophilic analytes found in the bloodstream respond to reverse iontophoresis across the skin. In addition, a device integration technique is presented which illustrates how continuous cortisol extraction and sensing could potentially be achieved in a conventional wearable format.

  16. Time Periodic Electro-Osmotic-Flow of Jeffrey Fluid in a Circular Microtube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Y. J.; Liu, Q. S.; Duan, H. Z.; Chang, L.; Yang, L. G.

    2011-09-01

    Flow behavior of time periodic electro-osmotic flow (EOF) of non-Newtonian (Jeffrey) fluids in a circular microtube is investigated based on a linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation, together with the Cauchy momentum equation and the Jeffrey constitutive equation. Taking near-wall depletion effects of macromolecules into account, we divided the flow region into skimming layer and the bulk. Analytical solutions of EOF velocity distribution are obtained. By numerical computations, the influences of the related parameters on the velocity amplitude are studied.

  17. STOL landing thrust: Reverser jet flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotansky, D. R.; Glaze, L. W.

    1987-01-01

    Analysis tools and modeling concepts for jet flow fields encountered upon use of thrust reversers for high performance military aircraft are described. A semi-empirical model of the reverser ground wall jet interaction with the uniform cross flow due to aircraft forward velocity is described. This ground interaction model is used to demonstrate exhaust gas ingestion conditions. The effects of control of exhaust jet vector angle, lateral splay, and moving versus fixed ground simulation are discussed. The Adler/Baron jet-in-cross flow model is used in conjunction with three dimensional panel methods to investigate the upper surface jet induced flow field.

  18. Multi-reverse flow injection analysis integrated with multi-optical sensor for simultaneous determination of Mn(II), Fe(II), Cu(II) and Fe(III) in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Youngvises, Napaporn; Suwannasaroj, Kittigan; Jakmunee, Jaroon; AlSuhaimi, Awadh

    2017-05-01

    Multi-reverse flow injection analysis (Mr-FIA) integrated with multi-optical sensor was developed and optimized for the simultaneous determination of multi ions; Mn(II), Fe(II), Cu(II) and Fe(III) in water samples. The sample/standard solutions were propelled making use of a four channels peristaltic pump whereas 4 colorimetric reagents specific for the metal ions were separately injected in sample streams using multi-syringe pump. The color zones that formed in the individual mixing coils were then streamed into multi-channels spectrometer, which comprised of four flows through cell and four pairs of light emitting diode and photodiode, whereby signals were measured concurrently. The linearity range (along with detection limit, µgL(-1)) was 0.050-3.0(16), 0.30-2.0 (11), 0.050-1.0(12) and 0.10-1.0(50)mgL(-1), for Mn(II), Fe(II), Cu(II) and Fe(III), respectively. In the interim, the correlation coefficients were 0.9924-0.9942. The percentages relative standard deviation was less than 3. The proposed system was applied successfully to determine targeted metal ions simultaneously in natural water with high sample throughput and low reagent consumption, thus it satisfies the criteria of Green Analytical Chemistry (GAC) and its goals.

  19. Reverse logistics in the Brazilian construction industry.

    PubMed

    Nunes, K R A; Mahler, C F; Valle, R A

    2009-09-01

    In Brazil most Construction and Demolition Waste (C&D waste) is not recycled. This situation is expected to change significantly, since new federal regulations oblige municipalities to create and implement sustainable C&D waste management plans which assign an important role to recycling activities. The recycling organizational network and its flows and components are fundamental to C&D waste recycling feasibility. Organizational networks, flows and components involve reverse logistics. The aim of this work is to introduce the concepts of reverse logistics and reverse distribution channel networks and to study the Brazilian C&D waste case.

  20. Reducing spurious flow in simulations of electrokinetic phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempfer, Georg; Davies, Gary B.; Holm, Christian; de Graaf, Joost

    2016-07-01

    Electrokinetic transport phenomena can strongly influence the behaviour of macromolecules and colloidal particles in solution, with applications in, e.g., DNA translocation through nanopores, electro-osmotic flow in nanocapillaries, and electrophoresis of charged macromolecules. Numerical simulations are an important tool to investigate these electrokinetic phenomena, but are often plagued by spurious fluxes and spurious flows that can easily exceed physical fluxes and flows. Here, we present a method that reduces one of these spurious currents, spurious flow, by several orders of magnitude. We demonstrate the effectiveness and generality of our method for both the electrokinetic lattice-Boltzmann and finite-element-method based algorithms by simulating a charged sphere in an electrolyte solution and flow through a nanopore. We also show that previous attempts to suppress these spurious currents introduce other sources of error.

  1. Study of a new airfoil used in reversible axial fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Chaojun; Wei, Baosuo; Gu, Chuangang

    1991-01-01

    The characteristics of the reverse ventilation of axial flow are analyzed. An s shaped airfoil with a double circular arc was tested in a wind tunnel. The experimental results showed that the characteristics of this new airfoil in reverse ventilation are the same as those in normal ventilation, and that this airfoil is better than the existing airfoils used on reversible axial fans.

  2. Summary of Scale-Model Thrust-Reverser Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povolny, John H; Steffen, Fred W; Mcardle, Jack G

    1957-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to determine the characteristics of several basic types of thrust-reverser. Models of three types, target, tailpipe cascade, and ring cascade, were tested with unheated air. The effects of design variables on reverse-thrust performance, reversed-flow boundaries, and thrust modulation characteristics were determined.

  3. The study of the influence of temperature and initial glucose concentration on the fermentation process in the presence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strain immobilized on starch gels by reversed-flow gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lainioti, G Ch; Kapolos, J; Koliadima, A; Karaiskakis, G

    2012-01-01

    The technique of reversed-flow gas chromatography (RFGC) was employed for the determination of the alcoholic fermentation phases and of kinetic parameters for free and immobilized cell systems, at different initial glucose concentrations and temperature values. In addition to this, due to its considerable advantages over other techniques, RFGC was used for the characterization of a new biocatalyst, yeast cells immobilized on starch gel, and especially wheat starch gel. Immobilization of wine yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae AXAZ-1 was accomplished on wheat and corn starch gels in order to prepare new biocatalysts with great interest for the fermentation industry. The RFGC led with great accuracy, resulting from a literature review, to the determination of reaction rate constants and activation energies at each phase of the fermentation processes. A maximum value of rate constants was observed at initial glucose concentration of 205 g/L, where a higher number of yeast cells was observed. The increase of glucose concentrations had a negative influence on the growth of AXAZ-1 cells and rate constants were decreased. The decrease of fermentation temperature caused a substantial reduction in the viability of immobilized cells as well as in rate constant values. Activation energies of corn starch gel presented lower values than those of wheat starch gel. However, the two supports showed higher catalytic efficiency than free cell systems, proving that starch gels may act as a promoter of the catalytic activity of the yeast cells involved in the fermentation process.

  4. Tandem mass spectrometry with online high-flow reversed-phase extraction and normal-phase chromatography on silica columns with aqueous-organic mobile phase for quantitation of polar compounds in biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yuzhong; Zhang, Hongwei; Wu, Jing-Tao; Olah, Timothy V

    2005-01-01

    In this work, high-flow online reversed-phase extraction was coupled with normal phase on silica columns with aqueous-organic mobile phase liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) to quantify drug candidates in biological fluids. The orthogonal separation effect obtained from this configuration considerably reduced matrix effects and increased sensitivity for highly polar compounds as detected by selected reaction monitoring. This approach also significantly improved the robustness and limit of detection of the assays. An evaluation of this system was performed using a mixture of albuterol and bamethan in rat plasma. Assay validation demonstrated acceptable accuracy (< 8% difference) and precision (< 6% CV) for these model compounds. The system has been used for the quantitation of polar ionic compounds in biological fluids in support of drug discovery programs. This assay was used to analyze samples for a BMS proprietary compound (A) in a rat pharmacokinetic study and is shown as an example to demonstrate the precision, accuracy, and sufficient sensitivity of this system.

  5. Field-effect Flow Control in Polymer Microchannel Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sniadecki, Nathan; Lee, Cheng S.; Beamesderfer, Mike; DeVoe, Don L.

    2003-01-01

    A new Bio-MEMS electroosmotic flow (EOF) modulator for plastic microchannel networks has been developed. The EOF modulator uses field-effect flow control (FEFC) to adjust the zeta potential at the Parylene C microchannel wall. By setting a differential EOF pumping rate in two of the three microchannels at a T-intersection with EOF modulators, the induced pressure at the intersection generated pumping in the third, field-free microchannel. The EOF modulators are able to change the magnitude and direction of the pressure pumping by inducing either a negative or positive pressure at the intersection. The flow velocity is tracked by neutralized fluorescent microbeads in the microchannels. The proof-of-concept of the EOF modulator described here may be applied to complex plastic ,microchannel networks where individual microchannel flow rates are addressable by localized induced-pressure pumping.

  6. Reducing current reversal time in electric motor control

    DOEpatents

    Bredemann, Michael V

    2014-11-04

    The time required to reverse current flow in an electric motor is reduced by exploiting inductive current that persists in the motor when power is temporarily removed. Energy associated with this inductive current is used to initiate reverse current flow in the motor.

  7. Reversed flow fluidized-bed combustion apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Shang, Jer-Yu; Mei, Joseph S.; Wilson, John S.

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a fluidized-bed combustion apparatus provided with a U-shaped combustion zone. A cyclone is disposed in the combustion zone for recycling solid particulate material. The combustion zone configuration and the recycling feature provide relatively long residence times and low freeboard heights to maximize combustion of combustible material, reduce nitrogen oxides, and enhance sulfur oxide reduction.

  8. Reversible Thermoset Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor); Hreha, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of a reversible thermoset adhesive formed by incorporating thermally-reversible cross-linking units and a method for making the reversible thermoset adhesive are provided. One approach to formulating reversible thermoset adhesives includes incorporating dienes, such as furans, and dienophiles, such as maleimides, into a polymer network as reversible covalent cross-links using Diels Alder cross-link formation between the diene and dienophile. The chemical components may be selected based on their compatibility with adhesive chemistry as well as their ability to undergo controlled, reversible cross-linking chemistry.

  9. Reverse thrust performance of the QCSEE variable pitch turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samanich, N. E.; Reemsnyder, D. C.; Bloomer, H. E.

    1980-01-01

    Results of steady-state reverse and forward-to-reverse thrust transient performance tests are presented. The original QCSEE 4-segment variable fan nozzle was retested in reverse and compared with a continuous, 30-deg half-angle conical exlet. Data indicated that the significantly more stable, higher pressure recovery flow with the fixed 30-deg exlet resulted in lower engine vibrations, lower fan blade stress and approximately a 20% improvement in reverse thrust. Objective reverse thrust of 35% of takeoff thrust was reached. Thrust response of less than 1.5 sec was achieved for the approach and the takeoff-to-reverse thrust transients.

  10. Reverse thrust performance of the QCSEE variable pitch turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samanich, N. E.; Reemsnyder, D. C.; Blodmer, H. E.

    1980-01-01

    Results of steady state reverse and forward to reverse thrust transient performance tests are presented. The original quiet, clean, short haul, experimental engine four segment variable fan nozzle was retested in reverse and compared with a continuous, 30 deg half angle conical exlet. Data indicated that the significantly more stable, higher pressure recovery flow with the fixed 30 deg exlet resulted in lower engine vibrations, lower fan blade stress, and approximately a 20 percent improvement in reverse thrust. Objective reverse thrust of 35 percent of takeoff thrust was reached. Thrust response of less than 1.5 sec was achieved for the approach and the takeoff to reverse thrust transients.

  11. Vasectomy and its reversal.

    PubMed

    Belker, A M

    1985-12-01

    Techniques, results, complications, and medicolegal aspects of vasectomy are discussed in this article. Emphasis is placed on techniques that prevent spontaneous recanalization of the ends of the vas deferens after vasectomy. Factors that affect the reversibility of vasectomy are discussed. New microsurgical techniques of vasectomy reversal are described, and results of these new techniques are compared with results of nonmicrosurgical techniques of vasectomy reversal. Indications for bypass vasoepididymostomy during vasectomy reversal procedures, as well as techniques for performing vasoepididymostomy, are discussed.

  12. Coupled lattice Boltzmann method for simulating electrokinetic flows: A localized scheme for the Nernst-Plank model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hiroaki; Kinjo, Tomoyuki; Washizu, Hitoshi

    2014-10-01

    We present a coupled lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) to solve a set of model equations for electrokinetic flows in micro-/nano-channels. The model consists of the Poisson equation for the electrical potential, the Nernst-Planck equation for the ion concentration, and the Navier-Stokes equation for the flows of the electrolyte solution. In the proposed LBM, the electrochemical migration and the convection of the electrolyte solution contributing to the ion flux are incorporated into the collision operator, which maintains the locality of the algorithm inherent to the original LBM. Furthermore, the Neumann-type boundary condition at the solid/liquid interface is then correctly imposed. In order to validate the present LBM, we consider an electro-osmotic flow in a slit between two charged infinite parallel plates, and the results of LBM computation are compared to the analytical solutions. Good agreement is obtained in the parameter range considered herein, including the case in which the nonlinearity of the Poisson equation due to the large potential variation manifests itself. We also apply the method to a two-dimensional problem of a finite-length microchannel with an entry and an exit. The steady state, as well as the transient behavior, of the electro-osmotic flow induced in the microchannel is investigated. It is shown that, although no external pressure difference is imposed, the presence of the entry and exit results in the occurrence of the local pressure gradient that causes a flow resistance reducing the magnitude of the electro-osmotic flow.

  13. Reverse Correlation in Neurophysiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringach, Dario; Shapley, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a review of reverse correlation in neurophysiology. We discuss the basis of reverse correlation in linear transducers and in spiking neurons. The application of reverse correlation to measure the receptive fields of visual neurons using white noise and m-sequences, and classical findings about spatial and color processing in…

  14. The reversed-flow gas chromatography technique as a tool for the study of the evaporation retardation of SO2 and (CH3)2S from water by soluble surfactants.

    PubMed

    Sevastos, D; Kotsalos, E; Koliadima, A

    2017-02-01

    In the present work the evaporation retardation of SO2 and (CH3)2S (=DMS) from water by soluble surfactants was studied by the Reversed-Flow Gas Chromatography (R.F.G.C.) technique. Using suitable mathematical analysis, rate coefficients, kc, for the transfer of SO2 and DMS from pure or artificial sea water to the atmospheric environment were determined in the presence or the absence of surfactants. The efficiency of the three surfactants used (CTAB, TRITON X-100 and SDS) to retard the evaporation rate of SO2 and DMS from water was estimated by the decrease of the kc values in the presence of the three surfactants, compared to those in the absence of surfactants. The more efficient surfactant for the retardation evaporation of SO2 from both the pure and the artificial sea water was found to be the cationic CTAB surfactant, as the maximum decreases of the kc values were found to be 4.61×10(-3)cms(-1) (number of films, n=1) and 3.07×10(-3)cms(-1) (n=3), respectively. On the other hand, more efficient surfactant for the retardation evaporation of DMS from pure water was found to be the non-ionic TRITON X-100, in which the decrease of the kc value was estimated to be 18.20×10(-3)cms(-1) (n=3) and from artificial sea water the cationic CTAB surfactant in which the decrease of the kc value was found to be 8.24×10(-3)cms(-1) (n=3). Finally, the precision of the R.F.G.C. method in studying the retardation effect of various surfactants in the transfer of SO2 and DMS from the water body to the atmosphere is estimated (mean value 96.69%), and the experimental values of kc are compared with those given in the literature.

  15. Relaminarization of fluid flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narasimha, R.; Sreenivasan, K. R.

    1979-01-01

    The mechanisms of the relaminarization of turbulent flows are investigated with a view to establishing any general principles that might govern them. Three basic archetypes of reverting flows are considered: the dissipative type, the absorptive type, and the Richardson type exemplified by a turbulent boundary layer subjected to severe acceleration. A number of other different reverting flows are then considered in the light of the analysis of these archetypes, including radial Poiseuille flow, convex boundary layers, flows reverting by rotation, injection, and suction, as well as heated horizontal and vertical gas flows. Magnetohydrodynamic duct flows are also examined. Applications of flow reversion for turbulence control are discussed.

  16. Modeling Electrokinetic Flows by the Smoothed Profile Method

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xian; Beskok, Ali; Karniadakis, George Em

    2010-01-01

    We propose an efficient modeling method for electrokinetic flows based on the Smoothed Profile Method (SPM) [1–4] and spectral element discretizations. The new method allows for arbitrary differences in the electrical conductivities between the charged surfaces and the the surrounding electrolyte solution. The electrokinetic forces are included into the flow equations so that the Poisson-Boltzmann and electric charge continuity equations are cast into forms suitable for SPM. The method is validated by benchmark problems of electroosmotic flow in straight channels and electrophoresis of charged cylinders. We also present simulation results of electrophoresis of charged microtubules, and show that the simulated electrophoretic mobility and anisotropy agree with the experimental values. PMID:20352076

  17. Quantum Operation Time Reversal

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, Gavin E.

    2008-03-25

    The dynamics of an open quantum system can be described by a quantum operation: A linear, complete positive map of operators. Here, I exhibit a compact expression for the time reversal of a quantum operation, which is closely analogous to the time reversal of a classical Markov transition matrix. Since open quantum dynamics are stochastic, and not, in general, deterministic, the time reversal is not, in general, an inversion of the dynamics. Rather, the system relaxes toward equilibrium in both the forward and reverse time directions. The probability of a quantum trajectory and the conjugate, time reversed trajectory are related by the heat exchanged with the environment.

  18. Reverse osmosis water purification system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahlstrom, H. G.; Hames, P. S.; Menninger, F. J.

    1986-01-01

    A reverse osmosis water purification system, which uses a programmable controller (PC) as the control system, was designed and built to maintain the cleanliness and level of water for various systems of a 64-m antenna. The installation operates with other equipment of the antenna at the Goldstone Deep Space Communication Complex. The reverse osmosis system was designed to be fully automatic; with the PC, many complex sequential and timed logic networks were easily implemented and are modified. The PC monitors water levels, pressures, flows, control panel requests, and set points on analog meters; with this information various processes are initiated, monitored, modified, halted, or eliminated as required by the equipment being supplied pure water.

  19. Magnetic reversals from planetary dynamo waves.

    PubMed

    Sheyko, Andrey; Finlay, Christopher C; Jackson, Andrew

    2016-11-24

    A striking feature of many natural dynamos is their ability to undergo polarity reversals. The best documented example is Earth's magnetic field, which has reversed hundreds of times during its history. The origin of geomagnetic polarity reversals lies in a magnetohydrodynamic process that takes place in Earth's core, but the precise mechanism is debated. The majority of numerical geodynamo simulations that exhibit reversals operate in a regime in which the viscosity of the fluid remains important, and in which the dynamo mechanism primarily involves stretching and twisting of field lines by columnar convection. Here we present an example of another class of reversing-geodynamo model, which operates in a regime of comparatively low viscosity and high magnetic diffusivity. This class does not fit into the paradigm of reversal regimes that are dictated by the value of the local Rossby number (the ratio of advection to Coriolis force). Instead, stretching of the magnetic field by a strong shear in the east-west flow near the imaginary cylinder just touching the inner core and parallel to the axis of rotation is crucial to the reversal mechanism in our models, which involves a process akin to kinematic dynamo waves. Because our results are relevant in a regime of low viscosity and high magnetic diffusivity, and with geophysically appropriate boundary conditions, this form of dynamo wave may also be involved in geomagnetic reversals.

  20. The eyeglass reversal.

    PubMed

    Oh, Songjoo

    2011-07-01

    Some figures, such as the Necker cube, are spontaneously reversible between alternative percepts. Before learning those skilled reversals, how do people achieve reversals for the very first time? It has been known that, in the case of a first reversal, people can be expected to see the reversal when given specific information about how the figures are ambiguous. This point was confirmed by using drawing versions of reversible figures. To demonstrate how intention plays a role in the initial reversal of a real object, a pair of regular eyeglasses, reversible in perspective, were presented to naïve observers in monocular vision. When the eyeglasses were viewed inwardly and the observers were given information that the eyeglasses could be ambiguous, they were able to easily see the reversal. When the eyeglasses were viewed outwardly, observers saw it only after they had been informed of exactly what the two alternative percepts were.Interestingly, many observers often mistakenly saw the inwardly viewed eyeglasses as placed outwardly from the beginning of the observation, while they saw the outwardly viewed eyeglasses correctly. Taking these results together, for the first reversal of a real object, the specificity of intention varies with the ambiguity of the object.

  1. Development of a bi-functional silica monolith for electro-osmotic pumping and DNA clean-up/extraction using gel-supported reagents in a microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Jennifer A; Shaw, Kirsty J; Docker, Peter T; Dyer, Charlotte E; Greenman, John; Greenway, Gillian M; Haswell, Stephen J

    2009-06-07

    A silica monolith used to support both electro-osmotic pumping (EOP) and the extraction/elution of DNA coupled with gel-supported reagents is described. The benefits of the combined EOP extraction/elution system were illustrated by combining DNA extraction and gene amplification using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) process. All the reagents necessary for both processes were supported within pre-loaded gels that allow the reagents to be stored at 4 degrees C for up to four weeks in the microfluidic device. When carrying out an analysis the crude sample only needed to be hydrodynamically introduced into the device which was connected to an external computer controlled power supply via platinum wire electrodes. DNA was extracted with 65% efficiency after loading lysed cells onto a silica monolith. Ethanol contained within an agarose gel matrix was then used to wash unwanted debris away from the sample by EOP (100 V cm(-1) for 5 min). The retained DNA was subsequently eluted from the monolith by water contained in a second agarose gel, again by EOP using an electric field of 100 V cm(-1) for 5 min, and transferred into the PCR reagent containing gel. The eluted DNA in solution was successfully amplified by PCR, confirming that the concept of a complete self-contained microfluidic device could be realised for DNA sample clean up and amplification, using a simple pumping and on-chip reagent storage methodology.

  2. Active water management at the cathode of a planar air-breathing polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell using an electroosmotic pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabian, T.; O'Hayre, R.; Litster, S.; Prinz, F. B.; Santiago, J. G.

    In a typical air-breathing fuel cell design, ambient air is supplied to the cathode by natural convection and dry hydrogen is supplied to a dead-ended anode. While this design is simple and attractive for portable low-power applications, the difficulty in implementing effective and robust water management presents disadvantages. In particular, excessive flooding of the open-cathode during long-term operation can lead to a dramatic reduction of fuel cell power. To overcome this limitation, we report here on a novel air-breathing fuel cell water management design based on a hydrophilic and electrically conductive wick in conjunction with an electroosmotic (EO) pump that actively pumps water out of the wick. Transient experiments demonstrate the ability of the EO-pump to "resuscitate" the fuel cell from catastrophic flooding events, while longer term galvanostatic measurements suggest that the design can completely eliminate cathode flooding using less than 2% of fuel cell power, and lead to stable operation with higher net power performance than a control design without EO-pump. This demonstrates that active EO-pump water management, which has previously only been demonstrated in forced-convection fuel cell systems, can also be applied effectively to miniaturized (<5 W) air-breathing fuel cell systems.

  3. SPECIATION OF ARSENIC COMPOUNDS IN DRINKING WATER BY CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS WITH HYDRODYNAMICALLY MODIFIED ELECTROOSMOTIC FLOW DETECTED THROUGH HYDRIDE GENERATION INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS..

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) was used to speciate four environmentally significant, toxic forms of arsenic: arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid. Hydride generation (HG) was used to convert the species into their respective hydrides. The hydride ...

  4. SPECIATION OF ARSENIC COMPOUNDS IN DRINKING WATER BY CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS WITH HYDRODYNAMICALLY MODIFIED ELECTROOSMOTIC FLOW DETECTED THROUGH HYDRIDE GENERATION INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS...

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) was used to speciate four environmentally significant, toxic forms of arsenic: arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid. Hydride generation (HG) was used to convert the species into their respective hydrides. The hydride s...

  5. Rapid screening of the heterogeneity of DNA methylation by single-strand conformation polymorphism and CE-LIF in the presence of electro-osmotic flow.

    PubMed

    Yu, Meng-Hsuan; Huang, Ya-Chi; Chang, Po-Ling

    2014-08-01

    DNA methylation is a complex event in epigenetic studies because of both the large CpG islands present upstream of the promoter region and the different distribution of DNA methylation despite similar methylation levels. For this reason, we proposed a fast, cost-effective method for the screening of DNA methylation based on SSCP and CE-LIF. In this study, the PCR products that were amplified from bisulfite-treated genomic DNA were denatured at 94°C, followed by immediate chilling in ice water to form the ssDNA. The ssDNA were separated by 1.5% poly(ethylene oxide) (Mavg 8 000 000 Da) in the presence of EOF according to the different conformations represented by their unique methylation states. This result demonstrated that four hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines represented a different heterogeneity of DNA methylation and could be distinguished by SSCP-CE. The results obtained from SSCP-CE also corresponded with those obtained from combined bisulfide restriction analysis and methylation-sensitive high-resolution melting analysis. Therefore, the proposed SSCP-CE method may potentially be used for rapid screening for determination of the heterogeneity of DNA methylation in further epigenetic studies and clinical diagnosis.

  6. Perspective: reverse evolution.

    PubMed

    Teotónio, H; Rose, M R

    2001-04-01

    For some time, the reversibility of evolution was primarily discussed in terms of comparative patterns. Only recently has this problem been studied using experimental evolution over shorter evolutionary time frames. This has raised questions of definition, experimental procedure, and the hypotheses being tested. Experimental evolution has provided evidence for multiple population genetic mechanisms in reverse evolution, including pleiotropy and mutation accumulation. It has also pointed to genetic factors that might prevent reverse evolution, such as a lack of genetic variability, epistasis, and differential genotype-by-environment interactions. The main focus of this perspective is on laboratory studies and their relevance to the genetics of reverse evolution. We discuss reverse evolution experiments with Drosophila, bacterial, and viral populations. Field studies of the reverse evolution of melanism in the peppered moth are also reviewed.

  7. Reversible logic for supercomputing.

    SciTech Connect

    DeBenedictis, Erik P.

    2005-05-01

    This paper is about making reversible logic a reality for supercomputing. Reversible logic offers a way to exceed certain basic limits on the performance of computers, yet a powerful case will have to be made to justify its substantial development expense. This paper explores the limits of current, irreversible logic for supercomputers, thus forming a threshold above which reversible logic is the only solution. Problems above this threshold are discussed, with the science and mitigation of global warming being discussed in detail. To further develop the idea of using reversible logic in supercomputing, a design for a 1 Zettaflops supercomputer as required for addressing global climate warming is presented. However, to create such a design requires deviations from the mainstream of both the software for climate simulation and research directions of reversible logic. These deviations provide direction on how to make reversible logic practical.

  8. Reversible cortical blindness: posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Sabyasachi; Mondal, Kanchan Kumar; Das, Somnath; Gupta, Anindya; Biswas, Jaya; Bhattacharyya, Subir Kumar; Biswas, Gautam

    2010-11-01

    Cortical blindness is defined as visual failure with preserved pupillary reflexes in structurally intact eyes due to bilateral lesions affecting occipital cortex. Bilateral oedema and infarction of the posterior and middle cerebral arterial territory, trauma, glioma and meningioma of the occipital cortex are the main causes of cortical blindness. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) refers to the reversible subtype of cortical blindness and is usually associated with hypertension, diabetes, immunosuppression, puerperium with or without eclampsia. Here, 3 cases of PRES with complete or partial visual recovery following treatment in 6-month follow-up are reported.

  9. Spatially uniform microflows induced by thermoviscous expansion along a traveling temperature wave: Analogies with electro-osmotic transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Debashis; Chakraborty, Suman

    2012-07-01

    We discover that thermoviscous expansion along a traveling wave in a microfluidic channel may be capable of generating a spatially uniform flow profile in a time-averaged sense. We further delineate that the resultant complex flow characteristics, realized by virtue of an intricate interplay between thermal compression-expansion waves and temperature-dependent viscosity variations and controlled by an external heating, may be remarkably characterized by a unique thermal penetration depth scale (analogous to Debye length in electro-osmosis) and a velocity scale (analogous to the Helmholtz Smulochowski velocity in electro-osmosis) that in turn depends on the considerations of “thin” and “thick” microchannel limits, as dictated by the thermal penetration depth as compared to the lateral extent of the microfluidic channel. We show that, when the thermal penetration depth is small as compared to the channel height, a uniform velocity profile is generated in the channel in a time-averaged sense. The velocity scale characterizing this uniform flow may be represented by a function of the thermal diffusivity, volumetric expansion coefficient and thermal viscosity coefficient of the fluid, characteristic amplitude and speed of the thermal wave, as well as the channel height. Results from the present study are expected to provide valuable insights towards arresting hydrodynamic dispersion in microchannels by nonelectrochemical means, following a pH-independent route.

  10. Electrokinetic transport in unsteady flow through peristaltic microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Dharmendra; Mulchandani, Janak; Jhalani, Shubham

    2016-04-01

    We analyze the electrokinetic transport of aqueous electrolyte fluids with Newtonian model in presence of peristalsis through microchannel. Debye-Hückel linearization is employed to simplify the problem. Low Reynolds number and large wavelength approximations are taken into account subjected to microfluidics applications. Electrical double layer (EDL) is considered very thin and electroosmotic slip velocity (i.e. Helmholtz-Smoluchowski velocity) at the wall is subjected to study the effect of applied electrical field. The solutions for axial velocity and pressure difference along the channel length are obtained analytically and the effects of adding and opposing the flow by applied electric field have been discussed. It is revealed that the axial velocity and pressure gradient enhances with adding electric field and an opposite behavior is found in the flow direction on opposing the electric field. These results may also help towards designing organ-on-a-chip like devices for better drug design.

  11. Quantum reverse hypercontractivity

    SciTech Connect

    Cubitt, Toby; Kastoryano, Michael; Montanaro, Ashley; Temme, Kristan

    2015-10-15

    We develop reverse versions of hypercontractive inequalities for quantum channels. By generalizing classical techniques, we prove a reverse hypercontractive inequality for tensor products of qubit depolarizing channels. We apply this to obtain a rapid mixing result for depolarizing noise applied to large subspaces and to prove bounds on a quantum generalization of non-interactive correlation distillation.

  12. Electrokinetic flows through a parallel-plate channel with slipping stripes on walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Chiu-On; Chu, Henry C. W.

    2011-10-01

    Longitudinal and transverse electrohydrodynamic flows through a plane channel, of which the walls are micropatterned with a periodic array of stripes, are considered. One unit of wall pattern consists of a slipping stripe and a non-slipping stripe, each with a distinct zeta potential. The problems are solved by a semi-analytical method, where the basic solutions satisfying the electrohydrodynamic equations are expressed by eigenfunction expansions, and the coefficients are determined numerically by point collocation satisfying the mixed stick-slip boundary conditions. In the regime of linear response, the Onsager relations for the fluid and current fluxes are deduced as linear functions of the hydrodynamic and electric forcings. The phenomenological coefficients are explicitly expressed as functions of the channel height, the Debye parameter, the slipping area fraction of the wall, the intrinsic slip length, and the zeta potentials. Attention is paid to some particular kinds of patterns, with a view to revisit and to generalize the theoretical limits made in previous studies on electrokinetic flow over an inhomogeneously slipping surface. One should be cautious when applying the theoretical limits. We show that when a surface is not 100% uniformly slipping but has a small fraction of area being covered by no-slip slots, the electro-osmotic enhancement can be appreciably reduced. We also show that when the electric double layer is only moderately thin, slipping-uncharged regions on a surface will have finite inhibition effect on the electro-osmotic flow.

  13. Reversible macroscopic dynamics of polar nematic liquid crystals: Reversible currents and their experimental consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Helmut R.; Cladis, P. E.; Pleiner, Harald

    2009-03-01

    Polar liquid crystalline phases are relevant for fluid liquid crystal phases observed in banana liquid crystals as well as for a class of polymeric liquid crystalline materials investigated recently. In this Brief Report we present the reversible dynamics for polar nematic liquid crystals with C∞v symmetry, where the macroscopic polarization representing polar order acts as an independent macroscopic variable. We find reversible coupling terms, for example, between flow and temperature and concentration gradients specific for the existence of a polar preferred direction. We suggest concrete experiments to check the importance of the reversible dynamic cross-coupling terms presented here.

  14. Static Performance of Six Innovative Thrust Reverser Concepts for Subsonic Transport Applications: Summary of the NASA Langley Innovative Thrust Reverser Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Scott C.; Yetter, Jeffrey A.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Langley Configuration Aerodynamics Branch has conducted an experimental investigation to study the static performance of innovative thrust reverser concepts applicable to high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines. Testing was conducted on a conventional separate-flow exhaust system configuration, a conventional cascade thrust reverser configuration, and six innovative thrust reverser configurations. The innovative thrust reverser configurations consisted of a cascade thrust reverser with porous fan-duct blocker, a blockerless thrust reverser, two core-mounted target thrust reversers, a multi-door crocodile thrust reverser, and a wing-mounted thrust reverser. Each of the innovative thrust reverser concepts offer potential weight savings and/or design simplifications over a conventional cascade thrust reverser design. Testing was conducted in the Jet-Exit Test Facility at NASA Langley Research Center using a 7.9%-scale exhaust system model with a fan-to-core bypass ratio of approximately 9.0. All tests were conducted with no external flow and cold, high-pressure air was used to simulate core and fan exhaust flows. Results show that the innovative thrust reverser concepts achieved thrust reverser performance levels which, when taking into account the potential for system simplification and reduced weight, may make them competitive with, or potentially more cost effective than current state-of-the-art thrust reverser systems.

  15. Static Performance of Six Innovative Thrust Reverser Concepts for Subsonic Transport Applications: Summary of the NASA Langley Innovative Thrust Reverser Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Scott C.; Yetter, Jeffrey A.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Langley Configuration Aerodynamics Branch has conducted an experimental investigation to study the static performance of innovative thrust reverser concepts applicable to high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines. Testing was conducted on a conventional separate-flow exhaust system configuration, a conventional cascade thrust reverser configuration, and six innovative thrust reverser configurations. The innovative thrust reverser configurations consisted of a cascade thrust reverser with porous fan-duct blocker, a blockerless thrust reverser, two core-mounted target thrust reversers, a multi-door crocodile thrust reverser, and a wing-mounted thrust reverser. Each of the innovative thrust reverser concepts offer potential weight savings and/or design simplifications over a conventional cascade thrust reverser design. Testing was conducted in the Jet-Exit Test Facility at NASA Langley Research Center using a 7.9%-scale exhaust system model with a fan-to-core bypass ratio of approximately 9.0. All tests were conducted with no external flow and cold, high-pressure air was used to simulate core and fan exhaust flows. Results show that the innovative thrust reverser concepts achieved thrust reverser performance levels which, when taking into account the potential for system simplification and reduced weight, may make them competitive with, or potentially more cost effective than current state-of-the-art thrust reverser systems. All data gathered in this investigation are contained in the CD-ROM.

  16. Field Measurements of Electro-osmotic Transport of Ground Water Contaminants in a Lithologically Heterogeneous Alluvial-Fan Setting

    SciTech Connect

    McNab,W; Karachewski,J; Weismann,G

    2001-07-31

    Remediation of contaminated ground water by pump-and-treat approaches is often problematic because the heterogeneous distributions of lithologies, and hence hydraulic conductivities, characterizing many aquifers result in complex flow paths. Consequently, contaminants are removed readily from the most permeable regions of the subsurface but the less permeable sediments, rich in clay and silt, remain largely undisturbed. These continue to act as diffusion-limited sources for further contamination of the permeable sediments. Under certain circumstances, specialized technologies, such as electrokinetic approaches, may be useful for enhancing the removal of ground water from low-permeability sediments. These circumstances generally include high contaminant concentrations--hence posing a chronic source threat--and a relatively small area requiring treatment. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California, electro-osmosis (EO) is being evaluated as a means for extracting ground water containing trichloroethylene (TCE) and other chlorinated hydrocarbons from fine-grained sediments in a plume source area.

  17. Static Performance of a Wing-Mounted Thrust Reverser Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Scott C.; Yetter, Jeffrey A.

    1998-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in the Jet-Exit Test Facility at NASA Langley Research Center to study the static aerodynamic performance of a wing-mounted thrust reverser concept applicable to subsonic transport aircraft. This innovative engine powered thrust reverser system is designed to utilize wing-mounted flow deflectors to produce aircraft deceleration forces. Testing was conducted using a 7.9%-scale exhaust system model with a fan-to-core bypass ratio of approximately 9.0, a supercritical left-hand wing section attached via a pylon, and wing-mounted flow deflectors attached to the wing section. Geometric variations of key design parameters investigated for the wing-mounted thrust reverser concept included flow deflector angle and chord length, deflector edge fences, and the yaw mount angle of the deflector system (normal to the engine centerline or parallel to the wing trailing edge). All tests were conducted with no external flow and high pressure air was used to simulate core and fan engine exhaust flows. Test results indicate that the wing-mounted thrust reverser concept can achieve overall thrust reverser effectiveness levels competitive with (parallel mount), or better than (normal mount) a conventional cascade thrust reverser system. By removing the thrust reverser system from the nacelle, the wing-mounted concept offers the nacelle designer more options for improving nacelle aero dynamics and propulsion-airframe integration, simplifying nacelle structural designs, reducing nacelle weight, and improving engine maintenance access.

  18. An algebra of reversible computation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    We design an axiomatization for reversible computation called reversible ACP (RACP). It has four extendible modules: basic reversible processes algebra, algebra of reversible communicating processes, recursion and abstraction. Just like process algebra ACP in classical computing, RACP can be treated as an axiomatization foundation for reversible computation.

  19. On thermodynamic and microscopic reversibility

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, Gavin E.

    2011-07-12

    The word 'reversible' has two (apparently) distinct applications in statistical thermodynamics. A thermodynamically reversible process indicates an experimental protocol for which the entropy change is zero, whereas the principle of microscopic reversibility asserts that the probability of any trajectory of a system through phase space equals that of the time reversed trajectory. However, these two terms are actually synonymous: a thermodynamically reversible process is microscopically reversible, and vice versa.

  20. The Liverpool Geomagnetic Polarity Reversal : New evidences for a complex magnetic field behavior during reversals.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camps, P.; Perrin, M.; Hoffman, K. A.; Singer, B. S.

    2009-04-01

    We carried out a detailed and continuous paleomagnetic re-sampling of the reversed-to-normal Eocene -36 Ma- geomagnetic transition recorded in the Liverpool (NSW, Australia) volcanic range [Hoffman, 1986]. Our main objective was to obtain a precise description of the variation in the paleofield vector (direction and absolute intensity) as the geomagnetic field reverses. With more than 30 transitional directions documented, the Liverpool reversal is, along with the Miocene record -16.2 Ma- of the Steens Mountain (Oregon, USA) [Mankinen et al., 1985] and the Matuyama-Brunhes -780 Ka- record of Hawaii [Coe et al, 2004], among the best example of a transition record from a volcanic sequence. The Liverpool polarity reversal shows a complex path of the Virtual Geomagnetic poles between the initial (reverse) and final (normal) polarities. Two loops in the trajectory of VGPs before the actual polarity switch are documented [Hoffman, 1986]. Such swings preceding the reversal seems to be a common characteristic of reversal since similar features are described on the Steens Mountain [Jarboe et al., 2007] and a long period of instability, estimated to 18 ka, is now well established prior to the Matuyama-Brunhes reversal [Singer et al., 2005]. In the present study, we found an additional swing through the reversed polarity yielding a complex R-T-R-T-R-T-R-T-N path for VGPs to achieve the reversal process. During the sampling campaign, we did not find evidence for significant hiatus in the eruptive activity such as soil horizons or sediments. We do not believe either that some part of the volcanic sequence be duplicate by the presence of tectonic faults. Hence, we think that the three excursions and the actual reversal belong to a single phenomenon. In order to strengthen this conclusion, precise Ar/ Ar will be performed. Twelve flows (5 of transitional and 7 of reversed polarity, respectively) all located in the lower half part of the Liverpool record, yielded paleointensity

  1. Three-Dimensional Transport Modeling for Proton Exchange Membrane(PEM) Fuel Cell with Micro Parallel Flow Field

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Pil Hyong; Han, Sang Seok; Hwang, Sang Soon

    2008-01-01

    Modeling and simulation for heat and mass transport in micro channel are being used extensively in researches and industrial applications to gain better understanding of the fundamental processes and to optimize fuel cell designs before building a prototype for engineering application. In this study, we used a single-phase, fully three dimensional simulation model for PEMFC that can deal with both anode and cathode flow field for examining the micro flow channel with electrochemical reaction. The results show that hydrogen and oxygen were solely supplied to the membrane by diffusion mechanism rather than convection transport, and the higher pressure drop at cathode side is thought to be caused by higher flow rate of oxygen at cathode. And it is found that the amount of water in cathode channel was determined by water formation due to electrochemical reaction plus electro-osmotic mass flux directing toward the cathode side. And it is very important to model the back diffusion and electro-osmotic mass flux accurately since the two flux was closely correlated each other and greatly influenced for determination of ionic conductivity of the membrane which directly affects the performance of fuel cell. PMID:27879774

  2. Reversibility of liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mengxi; Kisseleva, Tatiana

    2015-09-01

    Liver fibrosis is a serious health problem worldwide, which can be induced by a wide spectrum of chronic liver injuries. However, until today, there is no effective therapy available for liver fibrosis except the removal of underlying etiology or liver transplantation. Recent studies indicate that liver fibrosis is reversible when the causative agent(s) is removed. Understanding of mechanisms of liver fibrosis regression will lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets for liver fibrosis. This review summarizes recent research progress on mechanisms of reversibility of liver fibrosis. While most of the research has been focused on HSCs/myofibroblasts and inflammatory pathways, the crosstalk between different organs, various cell types and multiple signaling pathways should not be overlooked. Future studies that lead to fully understanding of the crosstalk between different cell types and the molecular mechanism underlying the reversibility of liver fibrosis will definitely give rise to new therapeutic strategies to treat liver fibrosis.

  3. Dynamics of magnetization reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safonov, Vladimir L.

    2000-03-01

    Advanced magnetic recording systems are designed for extremely high areal densities and data rate. These two aspects require both magnetization reversal at very short times (< 1 ns) and long term ( ~ 5-10 years) stability against thermal fluctuations. There are two basic physics problems associated with these requirements. The first is a characterization of thermal-dynamic reversal over very wide time range. The second is an understanding of the physics of the relaxation mechanisms. Both these subjects will be reviewed in this talk. Thermal dynamic reversal requires solution of the Landau-Lifshitz equation with fluctuations. We have solved this problem in terms of the ``random walk" dynamics of a nonlinear oscillator [1,2]. The expressions for the switching field versus pulse time are analytic and show good agreement with measurements on CrO_2. Our studies of fundamental relaxation mechanisms have involved a two step approach. First the results of computer simulations of magnetization reversal without phenomenological damping will be discussed. In this case coherent rotation of the magnetization excites spin waves during which an excess of Zeeman energy is transformed to anisotropy and exchange energies. However, for fine grains whose size is sufficiently small so that the grain magnetization is virtually uniform, non-linear spin waves cannot assist reversal [3]. A new analytic model of reversal that couples coherent rotation to impurity ions by an anisotropic exchange mechanism will be discussed. These impurity ions are assumed to relax at a very high rate to the lattice. [1] V.L.Safonov, JMMM 195, 523 (1999); J.Appl.Phys. 85, 4370 (1999). [2] V.L.Safonov, H.N.Bertram, MMM'99, CU-09. [3] V.L.Safonov, H.N.Bertram, J.Appl.Phys. 85, 5072 (1999); MMM'99, CD-11.

  4. Polar Field Reversals and Active Region Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, Gordon; Ettinger, Sophie

    2015-07-01

    We study the relationship between polar field reversals and decayed active region magnetic flux. Photospheric active region flux is dispersed by differential rotation and turbulent diffusion, and is transported poleward by meridional flows and diffusion. We summarize the published evidence from observation and modeling of the influence of meridional flow variations and decaying active region flux's spatial distribution, such as the Joy's law tilt angle. Using NSO Kitt Peak synoptic magnetograms covering cycles 21-24, we investigate in detail the relationship between the transport of decayed active region flux to high latitudes and changes in the polar field strength, including reversals in the magnetic polarity at the poles. By means of stack plots of low- and high-latitude slices of the synoptic magnetograms, the dispersal of flux from low to high latitudes is tracked, and the timing of this dispersal is compared to the polar field changes. In the most abrupt cases of polar field reversal, a few activity complexes (systems of active regions) are identified as the main cause. The poleward transport of large quantities of decayed trailing-polarity flux from these complexes is found to correlate well in time with the abrupt polar field changes. In each case, significant latitudinal displacements were found between the positive and negative flux centroids of the complexes, consistent with Joy's law bipole tilt with trailing-polarity flux located poleward of leading-polarity flux. The activity complexes of the cycle 21 and 22 maxima were larger and longer-lived than those of the cycle 23 and 24 maxima, and the poleward surges were stronger and more unipolar and the polar field changes larger and faster. The cycle 21 and 22 polar reversals were dominated by only a few long-lived complexes whereas the cycle 23 and 24 reversals were the cumulative effects of more numerous, shorter-lived regions. We conclude that sizes and lifetimes of activity complexes are key to

  5. Sequential Polarity-Reversing Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labaw, Clayton C.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed circuit reverses polarity of electric power supplied to bidirectional dc motor, reversible electro-mechanical actuator, or other device operating in direction depending on polarity. Circuit reverses polarity each time power turned on, without need for additional polarity-reversing or direction signals and circuitry to process them.

  6. Reversible Chemochromic Hydrogen Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC), affiliated with the University of Central Florida, has invented a reversible pigment that changes from light beige to blue when exposed to hydrogen and back to light beige when exposed to atmospheric oxygen. In laboratory and environmental studies, the FSEC pigment in its tape form failed to change color adequately when exposed to hydrogen after one day of exposure at Kennedy Space Center's Beach Corrosion Test Facility. The reversible hydrogen-detecting tape also lost its ability to change color after being placed in an environmental chamber at 45 C for one day. The first attempts at extruding the reversible pigment into various polymers were unsuccessful because of the pigment's poor thermal stability. The goal of this project was to formulate a pigment with improved thermal and environmental stability for extrusion into a variety of appropriate polymer matrices. The formulation of the reversible hydrogen-detecting pigment was modified by removing one reagent and chemically modifying the hydrogen sensitive ingredient. This was intended to improve the hydrophobicity of the pigment and alter the thermal degradation mechanism.

  7. Time reversal communication system

    DOEpatents

    Candy, James V.; Meyer, Alan W.

    2008-12-02

    A system of transmitting a signal through a channel medium comprises digitizing the signal, time-reversing the digitized signal, and transmitting the signal through the channel medium. The channel medium may be air, earth, water, tissue, metal, and/or non-metal.

  8. Tubal Ligation Reversal

    MedlinePlus

    ... depending on a woman's age and other factors. Success rates may be as high as 80 percent or ... details of the procedure Discuss the likelihood of success and your ability to get pregnant after the procedure Discuss other options for pregnancy, such as IVF A tubal ligation reversal can be done as ...

  9. Language Reversion Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Bot, Kees; Clyne, Michael

    1989-01-01

    A longitudinal study on language maintenance and loss among Dutch-English bilinguals in Australia revealed little loss in both languages over the years. This leads to the hypothesis of a "critical threshold" that must be reached to retain the second language. First language reversion appears commonly among immigrants who did not reach this…

  10. Electrokinetic remediation using surfactant-coated ceramic casings

    SciTech Connect

    Mattson, E.D.; Bowman, R.S.; Lindgren, E.R.

    2000-06-01

    Electrokinetic remediation is an emerging technique that can be used to remove metals from saturated or unsaturated soils. In unsaturated soils, control of the medium's water content is essential. Previously used electrode designs have caused detrimental soil wetting due to excess electroosmotic flow out of ceramic-encased anodes. The authors tested a method to reverse the electroosmotic flow at the anode by treating the ceramic casing with the cationic surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA). Laboratory tests showed the untreated ceramic had an electroosmotic permeability of 2.4 x 10{sup {minus}5} cm{sup 2} V{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. Ceramic treated with HDTMA had an electroosmotic permeability of {minus}1.3 x 10{sup {minus}5} cm{sup 2} V{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. Under an applied electric potential, electroosmotic flow was reversed in the HDTMA-treated ceramic, indicating a reversed zeta potential due to formation of an HDTMA bilayer on the ceramic surface. Field tests conducted over a 6-month period showed negligible water loss from HDTMA-treated ceramic compared to untreated ceramics. The results indicated that a surfactant treatment to the anode ceramic casing can greatly improve the application of electrokinetics in unsaturated environments.

  11. URCHIN: Reverse ray tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altay, Gabriel; Theuns, Tom

    2014-12-01

    URCHIN is a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) reverse ray tracer (i.e. from particles to sources). It calculates the amount of shielding from a uniform background that each particle experiences. Preservation of the adaptive density field resolution present in many gas dynamics codes and uniform sampling of gas resolution elements with rays are two of the benefits of URCHIN; it also offers preservation of Galilean invariance, high spectral resolution, and preservation of the standard uniform UV background in optically thin gas.

  12. Reversing Glass Wettability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, D. O.; Smith, J. E., Jr.; Kaukler, W. F.

    1985-01-01

    Treatment reverses wettability of glassware: Liquids that normally wet glass no longer do, and those that do not wet glass are made to do so. Useful in research on container effects in nucleation and growth of secondary phase from solution. Treatment consists of spreading 3 percent (by weight) solution of silicone oil in hexane isomers over glass, drying in air, and curing at 300 degrees C in vacuum for one hour.

  13. The fluid mechanics of continuous flow electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saville, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    The overall objective is to establish theoretically and confirm experimentally the ultimate capabilities of continuous flow electrophoresis chambers operating in an environment essentially free of particle sedimentation and buoyancy. The efforts are devoted to: (1) studying the effects of particle concentration on sample conductivity and dielectric constant. The dielectric constant and conductivity were identified as playing crucial roles in the behavior of the sample and on the resolving power and throughput of continuous flow devices; and (2) improving the extant mathematical models to predict flow fields and particle trajectories in continuous flow electrophoresis. A dielectric spectrometer was designed and built to measure the complex dielectric constant of a colloidal dispersion as a function of frequency between 500 Hz and 200 kHz. The real part of the signal can be related to the sample's conductivity and the imaginary part to its dielectric constant. Measurements of the dielectric constants of several different dispersions disclosed that the dielectric constants of dilute systems of the sort encountered in particle electrophoresis are much larger than would be expected based on the extant theory. Experiments were carried out to show that, in many cases, this behavior is due to the presence of a filamentary structure of small hairs on the particle surface. A technique for producing electrokinetically ideal synthetic latex particles by heat treating was developed. Given the ubiquitous nature of hairy surfaces with both cells and synthetic particles, it was deemed necessary to develop a theory to explain their behavior. A theory for electrophoretic mobility of hairy particles was developed. Finally, the extant computer programs for predicting the structure of electro-osmotically driven flows were extended to encompass flow channels with variable wall mobilities.

  14. Time reversal interactive objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ing, Ros Ki; Quieffin, Nicolas; Catheline, Stefan; Fink, Mathias

    2001-05-01

    Time reversal has shown to be a fruitful concept in nondestructive testing in underwater acoustic or in ultrasonic imaging. In this paper this technique is adapted in the audible range to transform every day objects into tactile sensitive interfaces. A quick historical background is presented in the ultrasonic field and specially in chaotic cavity. In all time reversal experiments, it is demonstrated that a wave field spatially and temporally recorded is able to back propagate to its source. In other words, the field contains all the information on the location of the source. In the interactive experiments, it is shown that touching an object like a window, a table or a world globe generates an acoustic field easily detectable with one or two acoustic sensors. Using the concept of time reversal, the source location is deduced in real time. Then, touching objects at specific locations (virtual switches) is used to activate devices. Such devices are for example lights, stereo volume, or computer software. From a technical point of view, all these interactive experiments just use some computation easily performed with a standard personnel computer.

  15. Full-thickness small intestine necrosis with midgut volvulus, distributed in a patchy fashion, is reversible with moderate blood flow: resumption of normal function to non-viable intestine.

    PubMed

    Amano, Hizuru; Uchida, Hiroo; Kawashima, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Yujiro; Kishimoto, Hiroshi

    2014-08-01

    Midgut volvulus is a highly life-threatening condition that carries a high risk of short gut syndrome. We report a case of catastrophic neonatal midgut volvulus in which second-look laparotomy revealed apparently non-viable remnant small intestine but with a moderate blood supply. Full-thickness small intestine necrosis was distributed in a patchy fashion, with non-viable and necrotic areas distributed so widely that no portion of the intestine could be resected. A section of full-thickness necrotic intestine preserved at surgery was able to regenerate, and normal function was restored over a period of 1 month. This case indicated that intestinal resumption may be dependent on blood flow. Even when intestinal viability is questionable, preservation enables the chance of regeneration if moderate blood flow is present.

  16. Voltage-Rectified Current and Fluid Flow in Conical Nanopores.

    PubMed

    Lan, Wen-Jie; Edwards, Martin A; Luo, Long; Perera, Rukshan T; Wu, Xiaojian; Martin, Charles R; White, Henry S

    2016-11-15

    Ion current rectification (ICR) refers to the asymmetric potential-dependent rate of the passage of solution ions through a nanopore, giving rise to electrical current-voltage characteristics that mimic those of a solid-state electrical diode. Since the discovery of ICR in quartz nanopipettes two decades ago, synthetic nanopores and nanochannels of various geometries, fabricated in membranes and on wafers, have been extensively investigated to understand fundamental aspects of ion transport in highly confined geometries. It is now generally accepted that ICR requires an asymmetric electrical double layer within the nanopore, producing an accumulation or depletion of charge-carrying ions at opposite voltage polarities. Our research groups have recently explored how the voltage-dependent ion distributions and ICR within nanopores can induce novel nanoscale flow phenomena that have applications in understanding ionics in porous materials used in energy storage devices, chemical sensing, and low-cost electrical pumping of fluids. In this Account, we review our most recent investigations on this topic, based on experiments using conical nanopores (10-300 nm tip opening) fabricated in thin glass, mica, and polymer membranes. Measurable fluid flow in nanopores can be induced either using external pressure forces, electrically via electroosmotic forces, or by a combination of these two forces. We demonstrate that pressure-driven flow can greatly alter the electrical properties of nanopores and, vice versa, that the nonlinear electrical properties of conical nanopores can impart novel and useful flow phenomena. Electroosmotic flow (EOF), which depends on the magnitude of the ion fluxes within the double layer of the nanopore, is strongly coupled to the accumulation/depletion of ions. Thus, the same underlying cause of ICR also leads to EOF rectification, i.e., unequal flows occurring for the same voltage but opposite polarities. EOF rectification can be used to electrically

  17. A micro flow-meter for closed-loop management of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Accoto, Dino; Damiani, Francesco; Campisi, Michele; Castrataro, Piero; Campolo, Domenico; Guglielmelli, Eugenio; Dario, Paolo

    2005-01-01

    The closed-loop management of biological samples in μTAS requires proper flow-sensors to be inserted in the hydraulic path. The optimal choice between hybrid mounting and monolithic fabrication depends on several design variables, one of which is the technological compatibility between the sensor and the pumping mechanism. Monolithic integration appears to be the eligible solution if both pumps and sensors can be fabricated with the same technological process. In this paper we show that it is actually possible to fabricate a flow-sensor, based on streaming potential detection, with the same soft-lithographic process used for the fabrication of electroosmotic pumps. The device has been fabricated in PDMS and experimentally tested, showing a good linearity. Finally, its time-varying response, related to the aging of the PDMS surface, is discussed.

  18. Reverse-Tangent Injection in a Centrifugal Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoch, Gary J.

    2007-01-01

    Injection of working fluid into a centrifugal compressor in the reverse tangent direction has been invented as a way of preventing flow instabilities (stall and surge) or restoring stability when stall or surge has already commenced. The invention applies, in particular, to a centrifugal compressor, the diffuser of which contains vanes that divide the flow into channels oriented partly radially and partly tangentially. In reverse-tangent injection, a stream or jet of the working fluid (the fluid that is compressed) is injected into the vaneless annular region between the blades of the impeller and the vanes of the diffuser. As used here, "reverse" signifies that the injected flow opposes (and thereby reduces) the tangential component of the velocity of the impeller discharge. At the same time, the injected jet acts to increase the radial component of the velocity of the impeller discharge.

  19. Reversible brazing process

    DOEpatents

    Pierce, Jim D.; Stephens, John J.; Walker, Charles A.

    1999-01-01

    A method of reversibly brazing surfaces together. An interface is affixed to each surface. The interfaces can be affixed by processes such as mechanical joining, welding, or brazing. The two interfaces are then brazed together using a brazing process that does not defeat the surface to interface joint. Interfaces of materials such as Ni-200 can be affixed to metallic surfaces by welding or by brazing with a first braze alloy. The Ni-200 interfaces can then be brazed together using a second braze alloy. The second braze alloy can be chosen so that it minimally alters the properties of the interfaces to allow multiple braze, heat and disassemble, rebraze cycles.

  20. Reversal bending fatigue testing

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Tan, Ting

    2014-10-21

    Embodiments for apparatuses for testing reversal bending fatigue in an elongated beam are disclosed. Embodiments are configured to be coupled to first and second end portions of the beam and to apply a bending moment to the beam and create a pure bending condition in an intermediate portion of the beam. Embodiments are further configured to cyclically alternate the direction of the bending moment applied to the beam such that the intermediate portion of the beam cyclically bends in opposite directions in a pure bending condition.

  1. The topology of intrasector reversals of the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Crooker, N. U.; Gosling, J. T.

    1996-11-01

    A technique has been developed recently to determine the polarities of interplanetary magnetic fields relative to their origins at the Sun by comparing energetic electron flow directions with local magnetic field directions. Here we use heat flux electrons from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) plasma detector on the ISEE 3 spacecraft to determine the field polarities. We examine periods within well-defined magnetic sectors when the field directions appear to be reversed from the normal spiral direction of the sector. About half of these intrasector field reversals (IFRs) are cases in which the polarities match those of the surrounding sectors, indicating that those fields have been folded back toward the Sun. The more interesting cases are those with polarity reversals. We find no clear cases of isolated reverse polarity fields, which suggests that islands of reverse polarity in the solar source dipole field probably do not exist. The IFRs with polarity reversals are strongly associated with periods of bidirectional electron flows, suggesting that those fields occur only in conjunction with closed fields. We propose that both those IFRs and the bidirectional flows are signatures of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In that case, many interplanetary CMEs are larger and more complex than previously thought, consisting of both open and closed field components.

  2. Reversible airfoils for stopped rotors in high speed flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemiec, Robert; Jacobellis, George; Gandhi, Farhan

    2014-10-01

    This study starts with the design of a reversible airfoil rib for stopped-rotor applications, where the sharp trailing-edge morphs into the rounded leading-edge, and vice-versa. A NACA0012 airfoil is approximated in a piecewise linear manner and straight, rigid outer profile links used to define the airfoil contour. The end points of the profile links connect to control links, each set on a central actuation rod via an offset. Chordwise motion of the actuation rod moves the control and the profile links and reverses the airfoil. The paper describes the design methodology and evolution of the final design, based on which two reversible airfoil ribs were fabricated and used to assemble a finite span reversible rotor/wing demonstrator. The profile links were connected by Aluminum strips running in the spanwise direction which provided stiffness as well as support for a pre-tensioned elastomeric skin. An inter-rib connector with a curved-front nose piece supports the leading-edge. The model functioned well and was able to reverse smoothly back-and-forth, on application and reversal of a voltage to the motor. Navier-Stokes CFD simulations (using the TURNS code) show that the drag coefficient of the reversible airfoil (which had a 13% maximum thickness due to the thickness of the profile links) was comparable to that of the NACA0013 airfoil. The drag of a 16% thick elliptical airfoil was, on average, about twice as large, while that of a NACA0012 in reverse flow was 4-5 times as large, even prior to stall. The maximum lift coefficient of the reversible airfoil was lower than the elliptical airfoil, but higher than the NACA0012 in reverse flow operation.

  3. Spurious behavior in volcanic records of geomagnetic field reversals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlut, Julie; Vella, Jerome; Valet, Jean-Pierre; Soler, Vicente; Legoff, Maxime

    2016-04-01

    Very large directional variations of magnetization have been reported in several lava flows recording a geomagnetic reversal. Such behavior could reflect real geomagnetic changes or be caused by artifacts due to post-emplacement alteration and/or non-ideal magnetic behavior. More recently, a high resolution paleomagnetic record from sediments pleads also for an extremely rapid reversal process during the last reversal. Assuming that the geomagnetic field would have moved by tens of degrees during cooling of moderate thickness lava flows implies brief episodes of rapid changes by a few degrees per day that are difficult to reconcile with the rate of liquid motions at the core surface. Systematical mineralogical bias is a most likely explanation to promote such behavior as recently reconsidered by Coe et al., 2014 for the rapid field changes recorded at Steens Mountain. We resampled three lava flows at La Palma island (Canarias) that are sandwiched between reverse polarity and normal polarity flows associated with the last reversal. The results show an evolution of the magnetization direction from top to bottom. Thermal demagnetization experiments were conducted using different heating and cooling rates. Similarly, continuous demagnetization and measurements. In both cases, we did not notice any remagnetization associated with mineralogical transformations during the experiments. Magnetic grain sizes do not show any correlation with the amplitude of the deviations. Microscopic observations indicate poor exsolution, which could suggests post-cooling thermochemical remagnetization processes.

  4. Reverse engineering molecular hypergraphs.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Ahsanur; Poirel, Christopher L; Badger, David J; Estep, Craig; Murali, T M

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of molecular interaction networks is pervasive in systems biology. This research relies almost entirely on graphs for modeling interactions. However, edges in graphs cannot represent multiway interactions among molecules, which occur very often within cells. Hypergraphs may be better representations for networks having such interactions, since hyperedges can naturally represent relationships among multiple molecules. Here, we propose using hypergraphs to capture the uncertainty inherent in reverse engineering gene-gene networks. Some subsets of nodes may induce highly varying subgraphs across an ensemble of networks inferred by a reverse engineering algorithm. We provide a novel formulation of hyperedges to capture this uncertainty in network topology. We propose a clustering-based approach to discover hyperedges. We show that our approach can recover hyperedges planted in synthetic data sets with high precision and recall, even for moderate amount of noise. We apply our techniques to a data set of pathways inferred from genetic interaction data in S. cerevisiae related to the unfolded protein response. Our approach discovers several hyperedges that capture the uncertain connectivity of genes in relevant protein complexes, suggesting that further experiments may be required to precisely discern their interaction patterns. We also show that these complexes are not discovered by an algorithm that computes frequent and dense subgraphs.

  5. Reversal of sterilisation.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, A

    1977-09-03

    It is difficult to know what conclusions one can reach in a study of 103 women who asked for reversal of sterilization (Mr. R.M.L. Winston, July 30, p. 305) when there are no data about the numbers and characteristics of the women who were sterilized and have not asked for reversal. And Mr. Winston's conclusion that it "seems unwise to sterilise women under 30 particularly immediately after pregnancy or if their marriage is in jeopardy" is therefore difficult to justify and has a disconcertingly paternalistic ring. It also implies that the stability or otherwise of a marriage should be a prime concern of obstetricians when women request sterilization. But what distrubed me most about Mr. Winston's article was his statement that "most women in this survey had been told that termination would not be undertaken without sterilisation." I wonder if this form of ultimatum, which Mr. Winston condemns, is likely to increase now that this operation is performed under a fee-for-service system?

  6. Reverse surface-polariton cherenkov radiation

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Jin; Wang, Qi Jie; Zhang, Jingjing; Luo, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The existence of reverse Cherenkov radiation for surface plasmons is demonstrated analytically. It is shown that in a metal-insulator-metal (MIM) waveguide, surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) excited by an electron moving at a speed higher than the phase velocity of SPPs can generate Cherenkov radiation, which can be switched from forward to reverse direction by tuning the core thickness of the waveguide. Calculations are performed in both frequency and time domains, demonstrating that a radiation pattern with a backward-pointing radiation cone can be achieved at small waveguide core widths, with energy flow opposite to the wave vector of SPPs. Our study suggests the feasibility of generating and steering electron radiation in simple plasmonic systems, opening the gate for various applications such as velocity-selective particle detections. PMID:27477061

  7. Reverse photoacoustic standoff spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Van Neste, Charles W.; Senesac, Lawrence R.; Thundat, Thomas G.

    2011-04-12

    A system and method are disclosed for generating a reversed photoacoustic spectrum at a greater distance. A source may emit a beam to a target and a detector measures signals generated as a result of the beam being emitted on the target. By emitting a chopped/pulsed light beam to the target, it may be possible to determine the target's optical absorbance by monitoring the intensity of light collected at the detector at different wavelengths. As the wavelength of light is changed, the target may absorb or reject each optical frequency. Rejection may increase the intensity at the sensing element and absorption may decrease the intensity. Accordingly, an identifying spectrum of the target may be made with the intensity variation of the detector as a function of illuminating wavelength.

  8. Biochemical Reversal of Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, John T. A.

    2006-03-01

    We cite our progress on biochemical reversal of aging. However, it may be circa 2 years before we have necessary substances at low cost. Meanwhile, without them, a number of measures can be adopted providing marked improvement for the problems of aging in modern societies. For example, enzymes are needed to excrete toxins that accelerate aging; Hg is the ultimate toxin that disables all enzymes (including those needed to excrete Hg itself). Low Hg level in the urine, due to loss of excretory ability, causes the diagnosis of Hg toxicity to almost always be missed. Hg sources must be removed from the body! Another example is excess sugar; hyperglycemia decreases intracellular ascorbic acid (AA) by competitively inhibiting the insulin- mediated active transport of AA into cells. Thus, immunity is impaired by low leucocyte AA. AA is needed for new proteins in aging tissues. Humans must supplement AA; their need same as in AA-synthesizing mammals.

  9. Reverse slapper detonator

    DOEpatents

    Weingart, Richard C.

    1990-01-01

    A reverse slapper detonator (70), and methodology related thereto, are provided. The detonator (70) is adapted to be driven by a pulse of electric power from an external source (80). A conductor (20) is disposed along the top (14), side (18), and bottom (16) surfaces of a sheetlike insulator (12). Part of the conductor (20) comprises a bridge (28), and an aperture (30) is positioned within the conductor (20), with the bridge (28) and the aperture (30) located on opposite sides of the insulator (12). A barrel (40) and related explosive charge (50) are positioned adjacent to and in alignment with the aperture (30), and the bridge (28) is buttressed with a backing layer (60). When the electric power pulse vaporizes the bridge (28), a portion of the insulator (12) is propelled through the aperture (30) and barrel (40), and against the explosive charge (50), thereby detonating it.

  10. Reversible fluctuation rectifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, I. M.

    1999-10-01

    The analysis of a Feynman's ratchet system [J. M. R. Parrondo and P. Español, Am. J. Phys. 64, 1125 (1996)] and of its electrical counterpart, a diode engine [I. M. Sokolov, Europhys. Lett. 44, 278 (1998)] has shown that ``fluctuation rectifiers'' consisting of a nonlinear element (ratchet, diode) and a linear element (vane, resistor) kept at different temperatures always show efficiency smaller than the Carnot value, thus indicating the irreversible mode of operation. We show that this irreversibility is not intrinsic for a system in simultaneous contact with two heat baths at different temperatures and that a fluctuation rectifier can work reversibly. This is illustrated by a model with two diodes switched in opposite directions, where the Carnot efficiency is achieved when backward resistivity of the diodes tends to infinity.

  11. Reversed-polarity regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, F.

    1982-01-01

    It is found by a statistical study of 58 reversed-polarity regions (RPRs) covering the 11-year period 1969-1979 that RPRs (1) have a lifespan comparable to normal active regions, (2) do not show a tendency to rotate toward a more normal alignment, and (3) have stable configurations that do not suggest stress due to their anomalous magnetic alignment. As in normal regions, RPR magnetic complexity is found to be the primary factor in flare productivity. Weak-field RPRs produce no flares, and regions with complex spots produce more flares than regions with non-complex spots by a factor of five. The main difference between RPRs and normal regions lies in complex spot frequency, with less that 17% of normal active regions having such spots and fewer than 1.8% having long-lived complex ones, while 41% of RPRs have complex spots and 24% have long-lived complex spots.

  12. Reverse shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Smithers, Christopher J; Young, Allan A; Walch, Gilles

    2011-12-01

    The reverse shoulder arthroplasty emerged as a potential solution for those patients who could not be managed effectively with a conventional total shoulder arthroplasty. Grammont revolutionized the design by medializing and distalizing the center of rotation and utilizing a large convex glenoid surface and concave humeral component with a neck-shaft angle of 155°. This design has been highly successful in cuff deficient shoulders, and indications continue to broaden. Many mid-term studies have improved upon the early encouraging results. Long-term studies are starting to emerge, demonstrating good survivorship, but progressive functional and radiographic deterioration continue to be concerning. Careful patient selection and attention to appropriate technique are required to reduce the current high rate of complications. New prosthesis designs are continuing to develop to address some of these limitations.

  13. Reverse Osmosis Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    McMordie Stoughton, Kate; Duan, Xiaoli; Wendel, Emily M.

    2013-08-26

    This technology evaluation was prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). ¬The technology evaluation assesses techniques for optimizing reverse osmosis (RO) systems to increase RO system performance and water efficiency. This evaluation provides a general description of RO systems, the influence of RO systems on water use, and key areas where RO systems can be optimized to reduce water and energy consumption. The evaluation is intended to help facility managers at Federal sites understand the basic concepts of the RO process and system optimization options, enabling them to make informed decisions during the system design process for either new projects or recommissioning of existing equipment. This evaluation is focused on commercial-sized RO systems generally treating more than 80 gallons per hour.¬

  14. Reverse Osmosis Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    2013-08-01

    This technology evaluation was prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). The technology evaluation assesses techniques for optimizing reverse osmosis (RO) systems to increase RO system performance and water efficiency. This evaluation provides a general description of RO systems, the influence of RO systems on water use, and key areas where RO systems can be optimized to reduce water and energy consumption. The evaluation is intended to help facility managers at Federal sites understand the basic concepts of the RO process and system optimization options, enabling them to make informed decisions during the system design process for either new projects or recommissioning of existing equipment. This evaluation is focused on commercial-sized RO systems generally treating more than 80 gallons per hour.

  15. Multiple stimulus reversible hydrogels

    DOEpatents

    Gutowska, Anna; Krzyminski, Karol J.

    2003-12-09

    A polymeric solution capable of gelling upon exposure to a critical minimum value of a plurality of environmental stimuli is disclosed. The polymeric solution may be an aqueous solution utilized in vivo and capable of having the gelation reversed if at least one of the stimuli fall below, or outside the range of, the critical minimum value. The aqueous polymeric solution can be used either in industrial or pharmaceutical environments. In the medical environment, the aqueous polymeric solution is provided with either a chemical or radioisotopic therapeutic agent for delivery to a specific body part. The primary advantage of the process is that exposure to one environmental stimuli alone will not cause gelation, thereby enabling the therapeutic agent to be conducted through the body for relatively long distances without gelation occurring.

  16. Multiple stimulus reversible hydrogels

    DOEpatents

    Gutowska, Anna; Krzyminski, Karol J.

    2006-04-25

    A polymeric solution capable of gelling upon exposure to a critical minimum value of a plurality of environmental stimuli is disclosed. The polymeric solution may be an aqueous solution utilized in vivo and capable of having the gelation reversed if at least one of the stimuli fall below, or outside the range of, the critical minimum value. The aqueous polymeric solution can be used either in industrial or pharmaceutical environments. In the medical environment, the aqueous polymeric solution is provided with either a chemical or radioisotopic therapeutic agent for delivery to a specific body part. The primary advantage of the process is that exposure to one environmental stimuli alone will not cause gelation, thereby enabling the therapeutic agent to be conducted through the body for relatively long distances without gelation occurring.

  17. Magnetic reversals and mass extinctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raup, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a study of reversals of the earth's magnetic field over the past 165 Myr are presented. A stationary periodicity of 30 Myr emerges which predicts pulses of increased reversal activity centered at 10, 40, 70, . . . Myr before the present. The correlation between the reversal intensity and biological extinctions is examined, and a nontrivial discrepancy is found between the magnetic and extinction periodicity.

  18. 49 CFR 230.89 - Reverse gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Reverse gear. 230.89 Section 230.89 Transportation... Reversing Gear § 230.89 Reverse gear. (a) General provisions. Reverse gear, reverse levers, and quadrants... quadrant. Proper counterbalance shall be provided for the valve gear. (b) Air-operated power reverse...

  19. 49 CFR 230.89 - Reverse gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reverse gear. 230.89 Section 230.89 Transportation... Reversing Gear § 230.89 Reverse gear. (a) General provisions. Reverse gear, reverse levers, and quadrants... quadrant. Proper counterbalance shall be provided for the valve gear. (b) Air-operated power reverse...

  20. 49 CFR 230.89 - Reverse gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Reverse gear. 230.89 Section 230.89 Transportation... Reversing Gear § 230.89 Reverse gear. (a) General provisions. Reverse gear, reverse levers, and quadrants... quadrant. Proper counterbalance shall be provided for the valve gear. (b) Air-operated power reverse...

  1. 49 CFR 230.89 - Reverse gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Reverse gear. 230.89 Section 230.89 Transportation... Reversing Gear § 230.89 Reverse gear. (a) General provisions. Reverse gear, reverse levers, and quadrants... quadrant. Proper counterbalance shall be provided for the valve gear. (b) Air-operated power reverse...

  2. 49 CFR 230.89 - Reverse gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Reverse gear. 230.89 Section 230.89 Transportation... Reversing Gear § 230.89 Reverse gear. (a) General provisions. Reverse gear, reverse levers, and quadrants... quadrant. Proper counterbalance shall be provided for the valve gear. (b) Air-operated power reverse...

  3. Underestimation of access flow by ultrasound dilution flow measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bos, Clemens; Smits, Johannes H. M.; Zijlstra, Jan J.; Blankestijn, Peter J.; Bakker, Chris J. G.; Viergever, Max A.

    2002-02-01

    For hemodialysis access surveillance, flow measurements are increasingly considered important because they identify accesses at risk of thrombosis. Usually these flow measurements are performed with the ultrasound dilution technique. In a previous patient study it was observed that the resulting flow values were systematically low as compared to magnetic resonance flow measurements, but a satisfactory explanation was lacking. In the present study, we will demonstrate by hemodynamic calculations and in vitro experiments that this discrepancy can be explained by a temporary reduction of the access flow rate, caused by the reversed needle configuration during ultrasound dilution flow measurements. In this configuration, blood is injected retrogressively at one needle and flow between the needles is increased, causing an increased dissipation of energy. The proposed explanation is subsequently confirmed in a patient with a loop graft, by measuring the blood velocity by Doppler ultrasound as a function of reversed dialyzer flow rate. Apart from the ultrasound dilution technique, these findings are applicable to other recently proposed methods for measuring access flow that employ the reversed needle configuration.

  4. Time Reversal Violation

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, H; /SLAC

    2009-01-27

    This talk briefly reviews three types of time-asymmetry in physics, which I classify as universal, macroscopic and microscopic. Most of the talk is focused on the latter, namely the violation of T-reversal invariance in particle physics theories. In sum tests of microscopic T-invariance, or observations of its violation, are limited by the fact that, while we can measure many processes, only in very few cases can we construct a matched pair of process and inverse process and observe it with sufficient sensitivity to make a test. In both the cases discussed here we can achieve an observable T violation making use of flavor tagging, and in the second case also using the quantum properties of an antisymmetric coherent state of two B mesons to construct a CP-tag. Both these tagging properties depend only on very general properties of the flavor and/or CP quantum numbers and so provide model independent tests for T-invariance violations. The microscopic laws of physics are very close to T-symmetric. There are small effects that give CP- and T-violating processes in three-generation-probing weak decays. Where a T-violating observable can be constructed we see the relationships between T-violation and CP-violation expected in a CPT conserving theory. These microscopic effects are unrelated to the 'arrow of time' that is defined by increasing entropy, or in the time direction defined by the expansion of our Universe.

  5. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Algahtani, Abdulhadi; Aldarmahi, Ahmad; Hmoud, Mohammed; Marzuk, Yousef; Shirah, Bader

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinicoradiological syndrome characterized by headache, altered mental status, seizures, or loss of vision. In this study, we report the largest series of PRES coming from Saudi Arabia and explore the etiology, clinical presentation, and outcome. We also report new imaging findings associated with this condition. Methods: We performed a retrospective study of all cases of PRES admitted to King Abdulaziz Medical City, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, between the years 2005 and 2015. A neurologist reviewed all charts and analyzed the clinical presentations, etiological factors, and outcomes, and a neuroradiologist reviewed the imaging studies. Only patients with clinical and imaging features consistent with PRES were included in the study. Results: We collected 31 patients who had clinical and radiological features consistent with PRES. Females were more affected than males (18 females and 13 males), and patients’ age ranged from 6 to 95 years, with a mean of 38.3 years. Patients were treated by removing the precipitating causes and treating the underlying conditions. Resolution of neurologic signs occurred within 2 to 3 weeks in all patients. Conclusion: In our opinion, PRES itself is usually a benign condition with complete recovery if the condition is recognized early and managed appropriately. Although clinical signs are nonspecific, the constellation of symptoms including headache, visual problems, seizures, and altered level of consciousness should suggest the possibility of PRES, especially in high-risk group. Abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging are often characteristic and may be the first clue to the diagnosis. PMID:28042366

  6. Reversible micromachining locator

    DOEpatents

    Salzer, Leander J.; Foreman, Larry R.

    1999-01-01

    This invention provides a device which includes a locator, a kinematic mount positioned on a conventional tooling machine, a part carrier disposed on the locator and a retainer ring. The locator has disposed therein a plurality of steel balls, placed in an equidistant position circumferentially around the locator. The kinematic mount includes a plurality of magnets which are in registry with the steel balls on the locator. In operation, a blank part to be machined is placed between a surface of a locator and the retainer ring (fitting within the part carrier). When the locator (with a blank part to be machined) is coupled to the kinematic mount, the part is thus exposed for the desired machining process. Because the locator is removably attachable to the kinematic mount, it can easily be removed from the mount, reversed, and reinserted onto the mount for additional machining. Further, the locator can likewise be removed from the mount and placed onto another tooling machine having a properly aligned kinematic mount. Because of the unique design and use of magnetic forces of the present invention, positioning errors of less than 0.25 micrometer for each machining process can be achieved.

  7. Reversible micromachining locator

    DOEpatents

    Salzer, L.J.; Foreman, L.R.

    1999-08-31

    This invention provides a device which includes a locator, a kinematic mount positioned on a conventional tooling machine, a part carrier disposed on the locator and a retainer ring. The locator has disposed therein a plurality of steel balls, placed in an equidistant position circumferentially around the locator. The kinematic mount includes a plurality of magnets which are in registry with the steel balls on the locator. In operation, a blank part to be machined is placed between a surface of a locator and the retainer ring (fitting within the part carrier). When the locator (with a blank part to be machined) is coupled to the kinematic mount, the part is thus exposed for the desired machining process. Because the locator is removably attachable to the kinematic mount, it can easily be removed from the mount, reversed, and reinserted onto the mount for additional machining. Further, the locator can likewise be removed from the mount and placed onto another tooling machine having a properly aligned kinematic mount. Because of the unique design and use of magnetic forces of the present invention, positioning errors of less than 0.25 micrometer for each machining process can be achieved. 7 figs.

  8. Reversibility in nucleocytoplasmic transport

    PubMed Central

    Kopito, Ronen Benjamine; Elbaum, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic exchange of proteins and RNAs is mediated by receptors that usher their cargo through the nuclear pores. Peptide localization signals on each cargo determine the receptors with which it will interact. Those interactions are normally regulated by the small GTPase Ran. Hydrolysis of GTP provides the chemical energy required to create a bona fide thermodynamic pump that selectively and directionally accumulates its substrates across the nuclear envelope. A common perception is that cargo delivery is irreversible, e.g., a protein imported to the nucleus does not return to the cytoplasm except perhaps via a specific export receptor. Quantitative measurements using cell-free nuclei reconstituted in Xenopus egg extract show that nuclear accumulation follows first-order kinetics and reaches steady state at a level that follows a Michaelis–Menten function of the cytoplasmic cargo concentration. This saturation suggests that receptor-mediated translocation across the nuclear pore occurs bidirectionally. The reversibility of accumulation was demonstrated directly by exchange of the cytosolic medium and by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. Based on our results, we offer a simple biophysical model that predicts the observed behavior. A far-reaching consequence is that the nuclear localization signal dictates the fate of a protein population rather than that of the individual molecules that bear it, which remain free to shuttle back and forth. This implies an open communication between the nucleus and cytoplasm and a ubiquitous mechanism for signaling in both directions. PMID:17646647

  9. Polar Field Reversals and Active Region Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, Gordon; Ettinger, Sophie

    2015-04-01

    We study the relationship between polar field reversals and decayed active region magnetic flux. Photospheric active region flux is dispersed by differential rotation and turbulent diffusion, and is transported poleward by meridional flows and diffusion. Using NSO Kitt Peak synoptic magnetograms, we investigate in detail the relationship between the transport of decayed active region flux to high latitudes and changes in the polar field strength, including reversals in the magnetic polarity at the poles. By means of stack plots of low- and high-latitude slices of the synoptic magnetograms, the dispersal of flux from low to high latitudes is tracked, and the timing of this dispersal is compared to the polar field changes. In the most abrupt cases of polar field reversal, a few activity complexes (systems of active regions) are identified as the main cause. The poleward transport of large quantities of decayed lagging-polarity flux from these complexes is found to correlate well in time with the abrupt polar field changes. In each case, significant latitudinal displacements were found between the positive and negative flux centroids of the complexes, consistent with Joy's law bipole tilt with lagging-polarity flux located poleward of leading-polarity flux. This work is carried out through the National Solar Observatory Summer Research Assistantship (SRA) Program. The National Solar Observatory is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA) under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  10. The Reversal in Migration Patterns -- Some Rural Development Consequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ploch, Louis A.

    The reversal in migration patterns in the 1970's resulting in a net population flow from metropolitan (urban) to nonmetropolitan (rural) areas may have a variety of rural development consequences. Sizeable population increase in rural communities which traditionally have experienced net out-migration or very slow increases is evident in Maine…

  11. Validity of Time Reversal forTesting Granger Causality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Irene; Panknin, Danny; Bartz, Daniel; Muller, Klaus-Robert; Haufe, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    Inferring causal interactions from observed data is a challenging problem, especially in the presence of measurement noise. To alleviate the problem of spurious causality, Haufe et al. (2013) proposed to contrast measures of information flow obtained on the original data against the same measures obtained on time-reversed data. They show that this procedure, time-reversed Granger causality (TRGC), robustly rejects causal interpretations on mixtures of independent signals. While promising results have been achieved in simulations, it was so far unknown whether time reversal leads to valid measures of information flow in the presence of true interaction. Here we prove that, for linear finite-order autoregressive processes with unidirectional information flow, the application of time reversal for testing Granger causality indeed leads to correct estimates of information flow and its directionality. Using simulations, we further show that TRGC is able to infer correct directionality with similar statistical power as the net Granger causality between two variables, while being much more robust to the presence of measurement noise.

  12. Electrophilicity and solvatochromic reversal of pyridinium phenolate betaine dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezende, Marcos Caroli; Aracena, Andrés

    2012-07-01

    The solvatochromic reversal of phenolate betaine dyes may be theoretically rationalized and predicted by determining the flow direction of their internal charge-transfer in media of increasing polarity, with the aid of the electrophilicities of the donor and acceptor moieties, or of the corresponding electrophilic Fukui functions. The protocol was applied to ten examples from the literature.

  13. Reverse genetics of avian metapneumoviruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An overview of avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) infection in turkeys and development of a reverse genetics system for aMPV subgroup C (aMPV-C) virus will be presented. By using reverse genetics technology, we generated recombinant aMPV-C viruses containing a different length of glycoprotein (G) gene or...

  14. Play: The Reversal Theory Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, J. H.

    The intention of this theoretical paper is to present a reversal theory interpretation of play phenomena. Reversal theory, a developing theory in psychology, concerns the complex relationship between experience and motivation. One of the central charactieristics of the theory is that it attempts to understand why so much of human behavior is…

  15. Reverse Transfer Project, Summer 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reis, Elizabeth

    In 1986, a Reverse Transfer Project was initiated at Moraine Valley Community College (MVCC) in order to promote the summer school attendance at MVCC of "reverse transfer" students (i.e., students who attended another institution during the regular academic year). A mailing, containing a cover letter, informational brochure, summer catalog, and…

  16. Preference Reversal in Multiattribute Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsetsos, Konstantinos; Usher, Marius; Chater, Nick

    2010-01-01

    A central puzzle for theories of choice is that people's preferences between options can be reversed by the presence of decoy options (that are not chosen) or by the presence of other irrelevant options added to the choice set. Three types of reversal effect reported in the decision-making literature, the attraction, compromise, and similarity…

  17. A model for 'reverse innovation' in health care.

    PubMed

    Depasse, Jacqueline W; Lee, Patrick T

    2013-08-30

    'Reverse innovation,' a principle well established in the business world, describes the flow of ideas from emerging to more developed economies. There is strong and growing interest in applying this concept to health care, yet there is currently no framework for describing the stages of reverse innovation or identifying opportunities to accelerate the development process. This paper combines the business concept of reverse innovation with diffusion of innovation theory to propose a model for reverse innovation as a way to innovate in health care. Our model includes the following steps: (1) identifying a problem common to lower- and higher-income countries; (2) innovation and spread in the low-income country (LIC); (3) crossover to the higher-income country (HIC); and (4) innovation and spread in the HIC. The crucial populations in this pathway, drawing from diffusion of innovation theory, are LIC innovators, LIC early adopters, and HIC innovators. We illustrate the model with three examples of current reverse innovations. We then propose four sets of specific actions that forward-looking policymakers, entrepreneurs, health system leaders, and researchers may take to accelerate the movement of promising solutions through the reverse innovation pipeline: (1) identify high-priority problems shared by HICs and LICs; (2) create slack for change, especially for LIC innovators, LIC early adopters, and HIC innovators; (3) create spannable social distances between LIC early adopters and HIC innovators; and (4) measure reverse innovation activity globally.

  18. Optimization of zeta potential profile for low-dispersion flows in microchannel turns.

    PubMed

    Park, H M; Hong, S M; Lee, J S

    2007-03-21

    A method is developed to determine the optimal profile of zeta potential around U turns such that the turn-induced spreading of a solute band is minimized. After proposing a velocity profile that eliminates the racetrack effect, a conjugate gradient method is adopted to find the zeta potential profile to induce the required velocity. The optimal profiles of zeta potential seem to be insensitive to the relevant parameters of electroosmotic flows. It is shown that a reduction of variance two orders of magnitude below that of a comparable turn with uniform zeta potential is easily attained by adopting the optimal profile of zeta potential, which can be realized using a UV excimer laser or external voltage control.

  19. Estimation of Joule heating effect on temperature and pressure distribution in electrokinetic-driven microchannel flows.

    PubMed

    Chein, Reiyu; Yang, Yeong Chin; Lin, Yushan

    2006-02-01

    In this study we present simple analytical models that predict the temperature and pressure variations in electrokinetic-driven microchannel flow under the Joule heating effect. For temperature prediction, a simple model shows that the temperature is related to the Joule heating parameter, autothermal Joule heating parameter, external cooling parameter, Peclet number, and the channel length to channel hydraulic diameter ratio. The simple model overpredicted the thermally developed temperature compared with the full numerical simulation, but in good agreement with the experimental measurements. The factors that affect the external cooling parameters, such as the heat transfer coefficient, channel configuration, and channel material are also examined based on this simple model. Based on the mass conservation, a simple model is developed that predicts the pressure variations, including the temperature effect. An adverse pressure gradient is required to satisfy the mass conservation requirement. The temperature effect on the pressure gradient is via the temperature-dependent fluid viscosity and electroosmotic velocity.

  20. Modeling of gaseous flows within proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Weisbrod, K.R.; Vanderborgh, N.E.; Grot, S.A.

    1996-12-31

    Development of a comprehensive mechanistic model has been helpful to understand PEM fuel cell performance. Both through-the-electrode and down-the-channel models have been developed to support our experimental effort to enhance fuel cell design and operation. The through-the-electrode model was described previously. This code describes the known transport properties and dynamic processes that occur within a membrane and electrode assembly. Key parameters include transport through the backing layers, water diffusion and electroosmotic transport in the membrane, and reaction electrochemical kinetics within the cathode catalyst layer. In addition, two geometric regions within the cathode layer are represented, the first region below saturation and second with liquid water present. Although processes at high gas stoichiometry are well represented by more simple codes, moderate stoichiometry processes require a two dimensional representation that include the gaseous composition and temperature along flow channel. Although usually PEM hardware utilizes serpentine flow channels, this code does not include such geometric features and thus the flow can be visualized along a single channel.

  1. Classical Analog to Entanglement Reversibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitambar, Eric; Fortescue, Ben; Hsieh, Min-Hsiu

    2015-08-01

    In this Letter we study the problem of secrecy reversibility. This asks when two honest parties can distill secret bits from some tripartite distribution pX Y Z and transform secret bits back into pX Y Z at equal rates using local operation and public communication. This is the classical analog to the well-studied problem of reversibly concentrating and diluting entanglement in a quantum state. We identify the structure of distributions possessing reversible secrecy when one of the honest parties holds a binary distribution, and it is possible that all reversible distributions have this form. These distributions are more general than what is obtained by simply constructing a classical analog to the family of quantum states known to have reversible entanglement. An indispensable tool used in our analysis is a conditional form of the Gács-Körner common information.

  2. Radiative reverse shock laser experiments relevant to accretion processes in cataclysmic variables

    SciTech Connect

    Krauland, C. M.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.; Sweeney, R.; Grosskopf, M.; Klein, S.; Gillespie, R.; Keiter, P. A.; Loupias, B.; Falize, E.

    2013-05-15

    We discuss the production of radiative reverse shocks in experiments at the Omega-60 laser facility. The ability of this high-intensity laser to impart large energy densities on micron-thin foils makes it feasible to create supersonic plasma flows. Obtaining a radiative reverse shock in the laboratory requires a sufficiently fast flow (∼100 km/s) of a material whose opacity is large enough to produce energetically significant emission from experimentally achievable shocked layers. The reverse shock forms in the flow once it is impeded. This paper presents the first radiographic data of normal incidence, reverse shockwaves. These experiments are primarily motivated by the contribution of radiative reverse shock waves to the evolving dynamics of the cataclysmic variable (CV) system in which they reside. We show similarity properties to suggest that the experimental production of radiative reserve shocks in the laboratory may be scalable to such astrophysical systems.

  3. Reverse osmosis reverses conventional wisdom with Superfund cleanup success

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, M. ); Miller, K. )

    1994-09-01

    Although widely recognized as the most efficient means of water purification, reverse osmosis has not been considered effective for remediating hazardous wastewater. Scaling and fouling, which can cause overruns and downtime, and require membrane replacement, have inhibited success in high-volume wastewater applications. Despite this background, a reverse osmosis technology developed in Europe recently was used successfully to treat large volumes of contaminated water at a major Superfund site in Texas. The technology's success there may increase the chances for reverse osmosis to find wider use in future cleanups and other waste treatment applications.

  4. The Geomagnetic Field During a Reversal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heirtzler, James R.

    2003-01-01

    By modifying the IGRF it is possible to learn what may happen to the geomagnetic field during a geomagnetic reversal. If the entire IGRF reverses then the declination and inclination only reverse when the field strength is zero. If only the dipole component of the IGRF reverses a large geomagnetic field remains when the dipole component is zero and he direction of the field at the end of the reversal is not exactly reversed from the directions at the beginning of the reversal.

  5. Reversible BWR fuel assembly and method of using same

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, T.R.; Wilson, J.F.; Knott, R.P.

    1987-04-07

    A nuclear fuel assembly is described comprising: (a) a flow channel; (b) a lower nozzle assembly structurally attached to the flow channel to form therewith an external envelope; (c) an invertible fuel bundle adapted to be inserted into the envelope, the fuel bundle comprising elongated fuel rods held in a spaced lateral array between top and bottom tie plates. Each of the top and bottom tie plates is substantially identical and has means for supporting the fuel bundle within the envelope in either of two mutually inverted vertical orientations whereby the orientation of the fuel bundle in a flow channel may be reversed during burn-up operation.

  6. Circulation Produced by a Flapping Wing During Stroke Reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burge, Matthew; Ringuette, Matthew

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the circulation behavior of the 3D flow structures formed during the stroke-reversal of a 2-degree-of-freedom flapping wing in hover. Previous work has related circulation peaks to the unsteady wing kinematics and forces. However, information from experiments detailing contributions from the multiple, 3D flow structures is lacking. The objective of this work is to quantitatively study the spanwise circulation as well as the spanwise flow which advects vorticity in the complex loop topology of a flapping wing during stroke reversal. We analyze the flow features of a scaled wing model using multi-plane stereo digital particle image velocimetry in a glycerin-water mixture. Data plane locations along the wing span are inspired by the time-resolved behavior of the 3D vortex structures observed in our earlier flow visualization studies. As with our prior work, we vary dimensionless parameters such as the pitching reduced frequency to understand their effect on the circulation. This research provides insight into the vortex dynamics produced by the coupled rotational and pitching wing motions during stroke reversal, when lift generation is challenging. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation, Award Number 1336548, supervised by Dr. Dimitrios Papavassiliou.

  7. Streaming reversal of energetic particles in the magnetotail during a substorm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lui, A. T. Y.; Williams, D. J.; Eastman, T. E.; Frank, L. A.; Akasofu, S.-I.

    1984-01-01

    A case of reversal in the streaming anisotropy of energetic ions and in the plasma flow observed from the IMP 8 spacecraft during a substorm on February 8, 1978 is studied in detail using measurements of energetic particles, plasma, and magnetic field. Four new features emerge when high time resolution data are examined in detail. The times of streaming reversal of energetic particles in different energy ranges do not coincide with the time of plasma flow reversal. Qualitatively different velocity distributions are observed in earthward and tailward plasma flows during the observed flow reversal intervals. Strong tailward streaming of energetic particles can be detected during northward magnetic field environments and, conversely, earthward streaming in southward field environments. During the period of tailward streaming of energetic particles, earthward streaming fluxes are occasionally detected.

  8. Supercritical fluid reverse micelle separation

    DOEpatents

    Fulton, J.L.; Smith, R.D.

    1993-11-30

    A method of separating solute material from a polar fluid in a first polar fluid phase is provided. The method comprises combining a polar fluid, a second fluid that is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and a surfactant. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid to define the first polar fluid phase. The combined polar and second fluids, surfactant, and solute material dissolved in the polar fluid is maintained under near critical or supercritical temperature and pressure conditions such that the density of the second fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. In this way, a reverse micelle system defining a reverse micelle solvent is formed which comprises a continuous phase in the second fluid and a plurality of reverse micelles dispersed in the continuous phase. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid and is in chemical equilibrium with the reverse micelles. The first polar fluid phase and the continuous phase are immiscible. The reverse micelles each comprise a dynamic aggregate of surfactant molecules surrounding a core of the polar fluid. The reverse micelle solvent has a polar fluid-to-surfactant molar ratio W, which can vary over a range having a maximum ratio W[sub o] that determines the maximum size of the reverse micelles. The maximum ratio W[sub o] of the reverse micelle solvent is then varied, and the solute material from the first polar fluid phase is transported into the reverse micelles in the continuous phase at an extraction efficiency determined by the critical or supercritical conditions. 27 figures.

  9. Supercritical fluid reverse micelle separation

    DOEpatents

    Fulton, John L.; Smith, Richard D.

    1993-01-01

    A method of separating solute material from a polar fluid in a first polar fluid phase is provided. The method comprises combining a polar fluid, a second fluid that is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and a surfactant. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid to define the first polar fluid phase. The combined polar and second fluids, surfactant, and solute material dissolved in the polar fluid is maintained under near critical or supercritical temperature and pressure conditions such that the density of the second fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. In this way, a reverse micelle system defining a reverse micelle solvent is formed which comprises a continuous phase in the second fluid and a plurality of reverse micelles dispersed in the continuous phase. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid and is in chemical equilibrium with the reverse micelles. The first polar fluid phase and the continuous phase are immiscible. The reverse micelles each comprise a dynamic aggregate of surfactant molecules surrounding a core of the polar fluid. The reverse micelle solvent has a polar fluid-to-surfactant molar ratio W, which can vary over a range having a maximum ratio W.sub.o that determines the maximum size of the reverse micelles. The maximum ratio W.sub.o of the reverse micelle solvent is then varied, and the solute material from the first polar fluid phase is transported into the reverse micelles in the continuous phase at an extraction efficiency determined by the critical or supercritical conditions.

  10. Characterization of the fouling phenomenon in reverse osmosis

    SciTech Connect

    Barger, M.

    1989-01-01

    This dissertation explores the application of a bench scale reverse osmosis test cell apparatus as a research tool. This versatile system was used to explore the response of a reverse osmosis membrane to various types of feedwaters. As a result of this research, an easy, accurate experimental method for predicting the rejection in any reverse osmosis system has been developed and demonstrated. The dissertation illustrates a simple procedure to identify if a precipitating feedwater solution will foul a reverse osmosis membrane. The research also presents evidence that suggests that the common practice of increasing feed flow rates to clean a membrane may not always be an acceptable method to revive a system. In addition to this information about the RO systems, the dissertation provides insight into the environment around the membrane surface. Statistically significant information about the nature and behavior of the membrane permeation coefficient is presented. Evidence is provided to demonstrate the negative effects on membrane performance of small amounts of grease contamination from the process equipment. Insight into the resistive nature of membranes, boundary layers, and fouling deposits is also presented. Throughout the course of this research, the relationship between concentration polarization and the permeate flux is illustrated. This is done first in the traditional terms of wall concentration, and later in terms of flow resistance. This dissertation also provides an experimental demonstration of both the detachment of a boundary layer from a membrane and the resistive nature of a precipitated fouling layer in a reverse osmosis system.

  11. Thaw flow control for liquid heat transport systems

    DOEpatents

    Kirpich, Aaron S.

    1989-01-01

    In a liquid metal heat transport system including a source of thaw heat for use in a space reactor power system, the thaw flow throttle or control comprises a fluid passage having forward and reverse flow sections and a partition having a plurality of bleed holes therein to enable fluid flow between the forward and reverse sections. The flow throttle is positioned in the system relatively far from the source of thaw heat.

  12. Sandwich mixer-reactor: influence of the diffusion coefficient and flow rate ratios.

    PubMed

    Abonnenc, Mélanie; Josserand, Jacques; Girault, Hubert H

    2009-02-07

    A sandwich mixer consists of mixing two solutions in a channel, one central laminar flow being sandwiched between two outer flow solutions. The present numerical study considers the convection-diffusion of two reacting species A and B, provided respectively by the two incoming solutions. The simulations show how the diffusion coefficient, flow rate and species concentration ratios influence, via the transversal diffusion length and reaction kinetics, the reaction extent at the end of the sandwich mixer. First, this extent can be enhanced up to 60% if the species with the lowest diffusion coefficient is located in the outer solutions where the flow velocity is small compared to that of the central part (higher residence time). Secondly, decreasing the outer flow rates (to confine the reaction close to the walls) and increasing the local concentration to keep the same flux ratio improve the extent by 300%. Comparison with a bi-lamination passive mixer, with an ideal mixer and an electro-osmotic driven flow mixer is presented. These conclusions are also demonstrated for consecutive reactions, showing an amplification of the effects described above. The results are also presented versus the residence time in the mixer-reactor to show the time window for which the gain is appreciable.

  13. Reverse engineering quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oeckl, Robert

    2012-12-01

    An approach to the foundations of quantum theory is advertised that proceeds by "reverse engineering" quantum field theory. As a concrete instance of this approach, the general boundary formulation of quantum theory is outlined.

  14. Deciphering records of geomagnetic reversals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valet, Jean-Pierre; Fournier, Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    Polarity reversals of the geomagnetic field are a major feature of the Earth's dynamo. Questions remain regarding the dynamical processes that give rise to reversals and the properties of the geomagnetic field during a polarity transition. A large number of paleomagnetic reversal records have been acquired during the past 50 years in order to better constrain the structure and geometry of the transitional field. In addition, over the past two decades, numerical dynamo simulations have also provided insights into the reversal mechanism. Yet despite the large paleomagnetic database, controversial interpretations of records of the transitional field persist; they result from two characteristics inherent to all reversals, both of which are detrimental to an ambiguous analysis. On the one hand, the reversal process is rapid and requires adequate temporal resolution. On the other hand, weak field intensities during a reversal can affect the fidelity of magnetic recording in sedimentary records. This paper is aimed at reviewing critically the main reversal features derived from paleomagnetic records and at analyzing some of these features in light of numerical simulations. We discuss in detail the fidelity of the signal extracted from paleomagnetic records and pay special attention to their resolution with respect to the timing and mechanisms involved in the magnetization process. Records from marine sediments dominate the database. They give rise to transitional field models that often lead to overinterpret the data. Consequently, we attempt to separate robust results (and their subsequent interpretations) from those that do not stand on a strong observational footing. Finally, we discuss new avenues that should favor progress to better characterize and understand transitional field behavior.

  15. Reverse Current in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, J. W., III

    1978-01-01

    An idealized steady state model of a stream of energetic electrons neutralized by a reverse current in the pre-flare solar plasma was developed. These calculations indicate that, in some cases, a significant fraction of the beam energy may be dissipated by the reverse current. Joule heating by the reverse current is a more effective mechanism for heating the plasma than collisional losses from the energetic electrons because the Ohmic losses are caused by thermal electrons in the reverse current which have much shorter mean free paths than the energetic electrons. The heating due to reverse currents is calculated for two injected energetic electron fluxes. For the smaller injected flux, the temperature of the coronal plasma is raised by about a factor of two. The larger flux causes the reverse current drift velocity to exceed the critical velocity for the onset of ion cyclotron turbulence, producing anomalous resistivity and an order of magnitude increase in the temperature. The heating is so rapid that the lack of ionization equilibrium may produce a soft X-ray and EUV pulse from the corona.

  16. Dynamo and anomalous transport in the reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Prager, S.C.

    1998-08-01

    The reversed field pinch is an effective tool to study the macroscopic consequences of magnetic fluctuations, such as the dynamo effect and anomalous transport. Several explanations exist for the dynamo (the self-generation of plasma current)--the MHD dynamo, the kinetic dynamo, and the diamagnetic dynamo. There is some experimental evidence for each, particularly from measurements of ion velocity and electron pressure fluctuations. Magnetic fluctuations are known to produce energy and particle flux in the RFP core. Current profile control is able to decrease fluctuation-induced transport by a factor of five. Improved confinement regimes are also obtained at deep reversal and, possibly, with flow shear.

  17. Buoyancy-driven flow excursions in fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J.E.; Paul, P.K.; Menna, J.D.

    1995-12-31

    A power limit criterion was developed for a postulated Loss of Pumping Accident (LOPA) in one of the recently shut down heavy water production reactors at the Savannah River Site. These reactors were cooled by recirculating moderator downward through channels in cylindrical fuel tubes. Powers were limited to prevent a flow excursion from occurring in one or more of these parallel channels. During full-power operation, limits prevented a boiling flow excursion from taking place. At low flow rates, during the addition of emergency cooling water, buoyant forces reverse the flow in one of the coolant channels before boiling occurs. As power increases beyond the point of flow reversal, the maximum wall temperature approaches the fluid saturation temperature, and a thermal excursion occurs. The power limit criterion for low flow rates was the onset of flow reversal. To determine conditions for flow reversal, tests were performed in a mock-up of a fuel assembly that contained two electrically heated concentric tubes surrounded by three flow channels. These tests were modeled using a finite difference thermal-hydraulic code. According to code calculations, flow reversed in the outer flow channel before the maximum wall temperature reached the local fluid saturation temperature. Thermal excursions occurred when the maximum wall temperature approximately equaled the saturation temperature. For a postulated LOPA, the flow reversal criterion for emergency cooling water addition was more limiting than the boiling excursion criterion for full power operation. This criterion limited powers to 37% of historical levels.

  18. Buoyancy-driven flow excursions in fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J.E.; Paul, P.K.; Menna, J.D.

    1995-09-01

    A power limit criterion was developed for a postulated Loss of Pumping Accident (LOPA) in one of the recently shut down heavy water production reactors at the Savannah River Site. These reactors were cooled by recirculating heavy water moderator downward through channels in cylindrical fuel tubes. Powers were limited to safeguard against a flow excursion in one of more of these parallel channels. During-full-power operation, limits safeguarded against a boiling flow excursion. At low flow rates, during the addition of emergency cooling water, buoyant forces reverse the flow in one of the coolant channels before boiling occurs. As power increased beyond the point of flow reversal, the maximum wall temperature approaches the fluid saturation temperature, and a thermal excursion occurs. The power limit criterion for low flow rates was the onset of flow reversal. To determine conditions for flow reversal, tests were performed in a mock-up of a fuel assembly that contained two electrically heated concentric tubes surrounded by three flow channels. These tests were modeled using a finite difference thermal-hydraulic code. According to code calculations, flow reversed in the outer flow channel before the maximum wall temperature reached the local fluid saturation temperature. Thermal excursions occurred when the maximum wall temperature approximately equaled the saturation temperature. For a postulated LOPA, the flow reversal criterion for emergency cooling water addition was more limiting than the boiling excursion criterion for full power operation. This criterion limited powers to 37% of the limiting power for previous long-term reactor operations.

  19. Flow compensating pressure regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baehr, E. F. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus for regulating pressure of treatment fluid during ophthalmic procedures is described. Flow sensing and pressure regulating diaphragms are used to modulate a flow control valve. The pressure regulating diaphragm is connected to the flow control valve to urge the valve to an open position due to pressure being applied to the diaphragm by bias means such as a spring. The flow sensing diaphragm is mechanically connected to the flow control valve and urges it to an opened position because of the differential pressure on the diaphragm generated by a flow of incoming treatment fluid through an orifice in the diaphragm. A bypass connection with a variable restriction is connected in parallel relationship to the orifice to provide for adjusting the sensitivity of the flow sensing diaphragm. A multiple lever linkage system is utilized between the center of the second diaphragm and the flow control valve to multiply the force applied to the valve by the other diaphragm and reverse the direction of the force.

  20. Compliant Metal Enhanced Convection Cooled Reverse-Flow Annular Combustor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-01

    shock tests were performed to addition, there were 16 static pressure taps assess the durability of the CME combustor . The throughout the combustor rig...Scheme for Small Gas Turbine Combustors ," AIAA Paper No. 7. M.D. Paskin, H.C. Mongia , and W.A. Acosta, 90-2158, July 1990. "An Efficient Liner Cooling...for Combustor Applications," NASA CR-168103, April 1983. 8. M.D. Paskin and H.C. Mongia , "Composite Matrix Experimnental Combustor ," NASA CR- 5. D.B

  1. GORE Flow Reversal System and GORE Embolic Filter Extension Study

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-22

    Carotid Stenosis; Constriction, Pathologic; Carotid Artery Diseases; Cerebrovascular Disorders; Brain Diseases; Central Nervous System Diseases; Nervous System Diseases; Arterial Occlusive Diseases; Vascular Diseases; Cardiovascular Diseases; Pathological Conditions, Anatomical

  2. Blade Sections in Streamwise Oscillations into Reverse Flow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-07

    blade surges into the freestream and dropping to near zero as the blade retreats. At this high angle of attack, however, maxi - mum lift no longer lags...progresses, stronger viscous effects might cause precipitation of deep stall, a weak - ening of bound circulation, and a drop in lift ahead of the drop

  3. High-Flow Asymmetric Reverse-Osmosis Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, M. C.; Wydeven, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    Water-soluble polymer membrane insolubilized by transition-metal salt. Thin layer of lower permeability material joined with thicker layer of highpermeability material. Two layers chemically identical or chemically distinct. They differ in density, compactness or other respects. Used to purify or desalinate seawater, brackish water, or industrial or domestic wastewater.

  4. Stagnation point reverse flow combustor for a combustion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinn, Ben T. (Inventor); Neumeier, Yedidia (Inventor); Seitzman, Jerry M. (Inventor); Jagoda, Jechiel (Inventor); Hashmonay, Ben-Ami (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A combustor assembly includes a combustor vessel having a wall, a proximate end defining an opening and a closed distal end opposite said proximate end. A manifold is carried by the proximate end. The manifold defines a combustion products exit. The combustion products exit being axially aligned with a portion of the closed distal end. A plurality of combustible reactant ports is carried by the manifold for directing combustible reactants into the combustion vessel from the region of the proximate end towards the closed distal end.

  5. Ecological Impacts of Reverse Speciation in Threespine Stickleback.

    PubMed

    Rudman, Seth M; Schluter, Dolph

    2016-02-22

    Young species are highly prone to extinction via increased gene flow after human-caused environmental changes. This mechanism of biodiversity loss, often termed reverse speciation or introgressive extinction, is of exceptional interest because the parent species are typically highly differentiated ecologically. Reverse speciation events are potentially powerful case studies for the role of evolution in driving ecological changes, as the phenotypic shifts associated with introgressive extinction can be large and they occur over particularly short timescales. Furthermore, reverse speciation can lead to novel phenotypes, which may in turn produce novel ecological effects. Here we investigate the ecological shift associated with reverse speciation in threespine stickleback fish using a field study and a replicated experiment. We find that an instance of introgressive extinction had cascading ecological consequences that altered the abundance of both aquatic prey and the pupating aquatic insects that emerged into the terrestrial ecosystem. The community and ecosystem impacts of reverse speciation were novel, and yet they were also predictable based on ecological and morphological considerations. The study suggests that knowledge about the community ecology and changes in functional morphology of a dominant species may lead to some predictive power for the ecological effects of evolutionary change. Moreover, the rapid nature and resultant ecological impacts associated with reverse speciation demonstrates the interplay between biodiversity, evolutionary change, and ecosystem function.

  6. Elastic deformations driven by non-uniform lubrication flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Shimon; Tulchinsky, Arie; Gat, Amir D.; Bercovici, Moran

    2017-02-01

    The ability to create dynamic deformations of micron-sized structures is relevant to a wide variety of applications such as adaptable optics, soft robotics, and reconfigurable microfluidic devices. In this work we examine non-uniform lubrication flow as a mechanism to create complex deformation fields in an elastic plate. We consider a Kirchoff-Love elasticity model for the plate and Hele-Shaw flow in a narrow gap between the plate and a parallel rigid surface. Based on linearization of the Reynolds equation, we obtain a governing equation which relates elastic deformations to gradients in non-homogenous physical properties of the fluid (e.g. body forces, viscosity, and slip velocity). We then focus on a specific case of non-uniform Helmholtz-Smoluchowski electroosmotic slip velocity, and provide a method for determining the zeta-potential distribution necessary to generate arbitrary static and quasi-static deformations of the elastic plate. Extending the problem to time-dependent solutions, we analyze transient effects on asymptotically static solutions, and finally provide a closed form solution for a Green's function for time periodic actuations.

  7. Reversible Rings with Involutions and Some Minimalities

    PubMed Central

    Fakieh, W. M.; Nauman, S. K.

    2013-01-01

    In continuation of the recent developments on extended reversibilities on rings, we initiate here a study on reversible rings with involutions, or, in short, ∗-reversible rings. These rings are symmetric, reversible, reflexive, and semicommutative. In this note we will study some properties and examples of ∗-reversible rings. It is proved here that the polynomial rings of ∗-reversible rings may not be ∗-reversible. A criterion for rings which cannot adhere to any involution is developed and it is observed that a minimal noninvolutary ring is of order 4 and that a minimal noncommutative ∗-reversible ring is of order 16. PMID:24489510

  8. Investigation of a Full-scale, Cascade-type Thrust Reverser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, Robert C; Algranti, Joseph S

    1957-01-01

    A double set of turning vanes was carried inside the jet tailpipe. To produce reverse thrust, the tailpipe opens into two side sections and the turning vanes move outward to form a V-shaped cascade, which deflects the exhaust-gas flow. Forward and reverse net thrust were measured over a range of engine speeds with the airplane stationary. Taxi tests were made to determine the comparative stopping distances using wheel braking and reverse thrust separately, and a combination of both. The effect of turning-vane spacing on thrust-reverser performance was determined by scale-model tests using unheated air.

  9. Sand transportation and reverse patterns over leeward face of sand dune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hong; Dun, Hongchao; Tong, Ding; Huang, Ning

    2017-04-01

    Sand saltation has complex interactions with turbulent flow and dune form. Most models of wind-blown sand consider ideal circumstances such as steady wind velocity and a flat surface, and the bulk of data on wind flow and sand transport over an individual dune has focused mostly on the influence of dune shape or inter-dune space on the wind flow, neglecting the effect of morphology on sand saltation, particularly airflow and sand transportation over the leeward slope. Wind flow structures over the leeward slope of sand dunes have a fundamental influence on the organization of sand dunes. In order to understand sand dune dynamics, lee face airflow and sediment transportation should be paid more attention. Previous field observations could not measure turbulent flow structure well because of the limited observation points and the influence of experiment structure on wind field. In addition, the reverse sand particles over leeward face could not be collected by sand trap in field. Numerous field observations could not measure turbulent flow structure because of the limited observation points and the influence of experimental structures on the wind field. In addition, the reverse transport of sand particles over leeward face could not be collected by sand traps in field. Therefore, this paper aims to investigate the turbulent flow structure and sand transport pattern over the leeward slope. A numerical model of sand saltation over slope terrain is constructed, which also considers the coupling effects between air flow and sand particles. The large eddy simulation method is used to model turbulent flow. Sand transport is simulated by tracking the trajectory of each sand particle. The results show that terrain significantly alters the turbulent air flow structure and wind-blown sand movement, especially over the leeward slope. Here, mass flux increases initially and then decreases with height in the reversed flow region in the direction of wind flow, and the mass flux

  10. Deformation stages of technical aluminum at reverse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaulina, O. Yu; Durnovtseva, A. N.; Shvagrukova, E. V.

    2016-02-01

    Durability and reliability of machines and mechanisms are determined, mainly, by their fatigue resistance as far as, in the most cases, variable load impacts on machine components. Accordingly, the problem of fatigue failure is extremely topical, still. Its complexity is connected with a wide range of factors. First of all, at cyclic load the compatibility relations of a material surface layer, which is loaded over the yield point and the elastic-loaded substrate layer, play a very important role. This fact determines involvement into plastic flow and failure of all the scale hierarchy of deformation structural levels. Reverse loading under the condition of the elastic-loaded substrate layer causes strong localization of plastic deformation in the surface layers. In the deformation localization areas the material reaches its limit state, when fatigue cracks arise and expand. The paper presents the mechanisms of fatigue deformation for technical aluminum at various fatigue stages.

  11. Reversible battery charger for electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tenglong

    Electric power system in today's world is on the verge of significant transformation. For the past few years or so, "Smart grid" has been one of the hottest topics in national news and professional conferences in the electric power industry. The next-generation electricity grid, known as "smart" or "intelligent," is expected to accommodate all generation and storage options, whereupon Vehicle-to-Grid (V2G) technology emerges in Electric and hybrid-electric vehicles and has been a promising technology. This thesis presents a reversible battery charger for electric vehicle with V2G function and associated control strategy for the power flowing between the grid and EV. The reversible battery charger is being proposed to connect the power grid and EV battery group of 12 batteries of 12V in series on an EV of Electric Vehicle Evaluation Lab in University of Massachusetts Lowell. The method uses a matrix converter and bidirectional de-dc converter. The charger was simulated using MATLAB SIMULINK environment. The results are presented to show the charger operation under different mode.

  12. Vasectomy reversal: a clinical update

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Abhishek P; Smith, Ryan P

    2016-01-01

    Vasectomy is a safe and effective method of contraception used by 42–60 million men worldwide. Approximately 3%–6% of men opt for a vasectomy reversal due to the death of a child or divorce and remarriage, change in financial situation, desire for more children within the same marriage, or to alleviate the dreaded postvasectomy pain syndrome. Unlike vasectomy, vasectomy reversal is a much more technically challenging procedure that is performed only by a minority of urologists and places a larger financial strain on the patient since it is usually not covered by insurance. Interest in this procedure has increased since the operating microscope became available in the 1970s, which consequently led to improved patency and pregnancy rates following the procedure. In this clinical update, we discuss patient evaluation, variables that may influence reversal success rates, factors to consider in choosing to perform vasovasostomy versus vasoepididymostomy, and the usefulness of vasectomy reversal to alleviate postvasectomy pain syndrome. We also review the use of robotics for vasectomy reversal and other novel techniques and instrumentation that have emerged in recent years to aid in the success of this surgery. PMID:26975488

  13. Reverse shift mechanism for automotive manual transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Inui, M.; Ogawa, S.

    1987-03-03

    A reverse shift mechanism is described for an automotive manual transmission of a type having a reverse idler gear which is movable to selectively complete a reverse gear train, the reverse shift mechanism comprising: a reverse shift arm having a portion disposed adjacent the reverse idler gear and pivotally carried with respect to a transmission casing so that the portion rocks along a direction of axis of the reverse idler gear in response to shifting operation. The portion of the reverse shift arm is provided with a blind hole which is open at a first end toward the reverse idler gear and is closed at a second end away from the reverse idler gear; and a shift arm shoe carried by the portion of the reverse shift arm adjacent the reverse idler gear for pushing the reverse idler gear. The shift arm shoe has an end adapted to engage with a circumferential groove formed in the reverse idler gear and an opposing end shaped to fit in the blind hole of the reverse shift arm; whereby the shift arm shoe is prevented from coming off during assembly by virtue of a vacuum effect created by air confined in the blind hole by fitting engagement between the opposing end and the blind hole, and is held in place after assembly by being clamped between the groove of the reverse idler gear and the blind hole of the reverse shift arm.

  14. Photosensitized Production of Hydrogen by Hydrogenase in Reversed Micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilhorst, Riet; Laane, Colja; Veeger, Cees

    1982-06-01

    Hydrogenase (hydrogen:ferricytochrome c3 oxidoreductase, EC 1.12.2.1) from Desulfovibrio vulgaris was encapsulated in reversed micelles with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as surfactant and a chloroform/octane mixture as solvent. Reducing equivalents for hydrogenase-catalyzed hydrogen production were provided by vectorial photosensitized electron transfer from a donor (thiophenol) in the organic phase through a surfactant-Ru2+ sensitizer located in the interphase to methyl viologen concentrated in the aqueous core of the reversed micelle. The results show that reversed micelles provide a microenvironment that (i) stabilizes hydrogenase against inactivation and (ii) allows an efficient vectorial photosensitized electron and proton flow from the organic phase to hydrogenase in the aqueous phase.

  15. Ice ages and geomagnetic reversals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Patrick

    1992-01-01

    There have been speculations on the relationship between climatic cooling and polarity reversals of the earth's magnetic field during the Pleistocene. Two of the common criticisms on this relationship have been the reality of these short duration geomagnetic events and the accuracy of their dates. Champion et al. (1988) have reviewed recent progress in this area. They identified a total of 10 short-duration polarity events in the last 1 Ma and 6 of these events have been found in volcanic rocks, which also have K-Ar dates. Supposing that the speculated relationship between climatic cooling and geomagnetic reversals actually exist, two mechanisms that assume climatic cooling causes short period magnetic reversals will be investigated. These two methods are core-mantle boundary topography and transfer of the rotational energy to the core.

  16. Co-electroosmotic capillary electrophoresis of basic proteins with 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ionic liquids as non-covalent coating agents of the fused-silica capillary and additives of the electrolyte solution.

    PubMed

    Corradini, Danilo; Nicoletti, Isabella; Bonn, Günther K

    2009-06-01

    The paper reports the results of a study carried out to evaluate the use of three 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium-based ionic liquids as non-covalent coating agents for bare fused-silica capillaries and additives of the electrolyte solutions (BGE) for CE of basic proteins in the co-EOF separation mode. The three ionic liquids are differentiated from each other by the length of the alkyl group on the imidazolium cation, consisting of either an ethyl, butyl or octyl substituent, whereas tetrafluoroborate is the common anionic component of the ionic liquids. Coating the capillary with the ionic liquid resulted in improved peak shape and protein separation, while the EOF was maintained cathodic. This indicates that each ionic liquid is effective at masking the protein interaction sites on the inner surface of the capillary, also when its adsorption onto the capillary wall has not completely neutralized all the negative charges arising from the ionization of the silanol groups and the ionic liquid is not incorporated into the BGE employed for separation. Using the coated capillaries with BGE containing the ionic liquid employed for the coating, at concentration low enough to maintaining the EOF cathodic, both peak shape and protein separation varied to different extents, based on the particular ionic liquid used and its concentration. Fast and efficient separation of the model basic protein mixture in co-electroosmotic CE is obtained with the 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate coated capillary and 100 mM acetate buffer (pH 4.0) containing 4.4 mM 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate as the BGE.

  17. Reversible Switching of Cooperating Replicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urtel, Georg C.; Rind, Thomas; Braun, Dieter

    2017-02-01

    How can molecules with short lifetimes preserve their information over millions of years? For evolution to occur, information-carrying molecules have to replicate before they degrade. Our experiments reveal a robust, reversible cooperation mechanism in oligonucleotide replication. Two inherently slow replicating hairpin molecules can transfer their information to fast crossbreed replicators that outgrow the hairpins. The reverse is also possible. When one replication initiation site is missing, single hairpins reemerge from the crossbreed. With this mechanism, interacting replicators can switch between the hairpin and crossbreed mode, revealing a flexible adaptation to different boundary conditions.

  18. Marburg Virus Reverse Genetics Systems

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Kristina Maria; Mühlberger, Elke

    2016-01-01

    The highly pathogenic Marburg virus (MARV) is a member of the Filoviridae family and belongs to the group of nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses. Reverse genetics systems established for MARV have been used to study various aspects of the viral replication cycle, analyze host responses, image viral infection, and screen for antivirals. This article provides an overview of the currently established MARV reverse genetic systems based on minigenomes, infectious virus-like particles and full-length clones, and the research that has been conducted using these systems. PMID:27338448

  19. Marburg Virus Reverse Genetics Systems.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Kristina Maria; Mühlberger, Elke

    2016-06-22

    The highly pathogenic Marburg virus (MARV) is a member of the Filoviridae family and belongs to the group of nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses. Reverse genetics systems established for MARV have been used to study various aspects of the viral replication cycle, analyze host responses, image viral infection, and screen for antivirals. This article provides an overview of the currently established MARV reverse genetic systems based on minigenomes, infectious virus-like particles and full-length clones, and the research that has been conducted using these systems.

  20. Long-acting reversible contraception.

    PubMed

    Peck, Susan A

    2013-10-01

    Although short-acting reversible hormonal contraceptives, such as oral contraceptives and the contraceptive patch and vaginal ring, remain the most commonly used contraceptive methods in the United States, they are also associated with the highest failure rates. Long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) methods, such as intrauterine devices and contraceptive implants, offer high continuation rates and very low failure rates, and are safe for use in most women. The provision of LARC methods to adolescent, young adult and nulliparous women is a relatively new concept that offers an innovative option for these populations.