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Sample records for reverses swallowing disability

  1. Swallowing

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... of swallowing include the tongue, teeth, epiglottis, and esophagus. The teeth are used to grind and chop ... the wrong way. In the final stage, the esophagus contracts and moves food toward the stomach.

  2. Development of the Nutrition and Swallowing Checklist, a Screening Tool for Nutrition Risk and Swallowing Risk in People with Intellectual Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Lyn

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses nutrition problems in people with intellectual disabilities, the need for nutrition risk screening, and the development of the Nutrition and Swallowing Checklist in New South Wales. The checklist ensures carer involvement in identifying risks and an interdisciplinary approach to the assessment and management of nutrition and…

  3. Development of the Nutrition and Swallowing Checklist, a Screening Tool for Nutrition Risk and Swallowing Risk in People with Intellectual Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Lyn

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses nutrition problems in people with intellectual disabilities, the need for nutrition risk screening, and the development of the Nutrition and Swallowing Checklist in New South Wales. The checklist ensures carer involvement in identifying risks and an interdisciplinary approach to the assessment and management of nutrition and…

  4. Transcranial direct current stimulation reverses neurophysiological and behavioural effects of focal inhibition of human pharyngeal motor cortex on swallowing.

    PubMed

    Vasant, Dipesh H; Mistry, Satish; Michou, Emilia; Jefferson, Samantha; Rothwell, John C; Hamdy, Shaheen

    2014-02-15

    The human cortical swallowing system exhibits bilateral but functionally asymmetric representation in health and disease as evidenced by both focal cortical inhibition (pre-conditioning with 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation; rTMS) and unilateral stroke, where disruption of the stronger (dominant) pharyngeal projection alters swallowing neurophysiology and behaviour. Moreover, excitatory neurostimulation protocols capable of reversing the disruptive effects of focal cortical inhibition have demonstrated therapeutic promise in post-stroke dysphagia when applied contralaterally. In healthy participants (n = 15, 8 males, mean age (±SEM) 35 ± 9 years), optimal parameters of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) (anodal, 1.5 mA, 10 min) were applied contralaterally after 1 Hz rTMS pre-conditioning to the strongest pharyngeal projection. Swallowing neurophysiology was assessed in both hemispheres by intraluminal recordings of pharyngeal motor-evoked responses (PMEPs) to single-pulse TMS as a measure of cortical excitability. Swallowing behaviour was examined using a pressure-based reaction time protocol. Measurements were made before and for up to 60 min post intervention. Subjects were randomised to active or sham tDCS after 1 Hz rTMS on separate days and data were compared using repeated measures ANOVA. Active tDCS increased PMEPs bilaterally (F1,14 = 7.4, P = 0.017) reversing the inhibitory effects of 1 Hz rTMS in the pre-conditioned hemisphere (F1,14 = 10.1, P = 0.007). Active tDCS also enhanced swallowing behaviour, increasing the number of correctly timed challenge swallows compared to sham (F1,14 = 6.3, P = 0.025). Thus, tDCS to the contralateral pharyngeal motor cortex reverses the neurophysiological and behavioural effects of focal cortical inhibition on swallowing in healthy individuals and has therapeutic potential for dysphagia rehabilitation.

  5. Can the subaltern speak? Visibility of international migrants with communication and swallowing disabilities in the World Report on Disability.

    PubMed

    Pillay, Mershen

    2013-02-01

    Wylie, McAllister, Davidson, and Marshal (2013) argued that the speech-language pathology profession must be encouraged to consider novel ways to deliver equitable services to people with communication disorders. People with communication disorders include the world's 215 million international migrants who deserve unique commentary when considering disability in the world. Hence, this paper focuses on invisibility of international migrants with communication or swallowing disorders in the World Report on Disability. The analysis of people with disabilities is biased towards citizenship. What of those who are non-citizens? Three issues are highlighted: (a) the demographic construction of migrants; (b) management of communication disability within the migrant patient-speech language pathologist dyad; and (c) strategic re-prioritization of dysphagia as a disability. While relevant to all people, re-prioritization of dysphagia as an impairment (of eating or drinking) resulting in restricted mealtime participation is especially relevant to the healthcare of international migrants. This issue is discussed in terms of how safe or adequate eating and drinking ought to constitute essential discharge criteria in medical settings where discharge (often resulting in deportation) may be decided on one's ability to walk or talk.

  6. Transcranial direct current stimulation reverses neurophysiological and behavioural effects of focal inhibition of human pharyngeal motor cortex on swallowing

    PubMed Central

    Vasant, Dipesh H; Mistry, Satish; Michou, Emilia; Jefferson, Samantha; Rothwell, John C; Hamdy, Shaheen

    2014-01-01

    The human cortical swallowing system exhibits bilateral but functionally asymmetric representation in health and disease as evidenced by both focal cortical inhibition (pre-conditioning with 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation; rTMS) and unilateral stroke, where disruption of the stronger (dominant) pharyngeal projection alters swallowing neurophysiology and behaviour. Moreover, excitatory neurostimulation protocols capable of reversing the disruptive effects of focal cortical inhibition have demonstrated therapeutic promise in post-stroke dysphagia when applied contralaterally. In healthy participants (n = 15, 8 males, mean age (±SEM) 35 ± 9 years), optimal parameters of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) (anodal, 1.5 mA, 10 min) were applied contralaterally after 1 Hz rTMS pre-conditioning to the strongest pharyngeal projection. Swallowing neurophysiology was assessed in both hemispheres by intraluminal recordings of pharyngeal motor-evoked responses (PMEPs) to single-pulse TMS as a measure of cortical excitability. Swallowing behaviour was examined using a pressure-based reaction time protocol. Measurements were made before and for up to 60 min post intervention. Subjects were randomised to active or sham tDCS after 1 Hz rTMS on separate days and data were compared using repeated measures ANOVA. Active tDCS increased PMEPs bilaterally (F1,14 = 7.4, P = 0.017) reversing the inhibitory effects of 1 Hz rTMS in the pre-conditioned hemisphere (F1,14 = 10.1, P = 0.007). Active tDCS also enhanced swallowing behaviour, increasing the number of correctly timed challenge swallows compared to sham (F1,14 = 6.3, P = 0.025). Thus, tDCS to the contralateral pharyngeal motor cortex reverses the neurophysiological and behavioural effects of focal cortical inhibition on swallowing in healthy individuals and has therapeutic potential for dysphagia rehabilitation. PMID:24247983

  7. Reversible autism and intellectual disability in children.

    PubMed

    Zappella, Michele

    2012-05-15

    Studies on young children with reversible autism and intellectual disability are discussed. Present evidence suggests a clear cause in a minority of cases including early institutionalization, Landau and Kleffner syndrome, and other early onset epilepsies, intrauterine rubella, and blindness. The majority of cases have normal laboratory results and some have early onset Tourette syndrome. Preliminary data of a follow-up study of this last group are reported in 15 patients suggesting the possibility of two subgroups, one represented by early onset Tourette syndrome phenotype, characterized by a positive family history, and by its appearance at the same time as regression and persistence into adolescence while the other of a different nature. Genetic studies could be of help to clarify this issue and support a diagnosis of favorable outcome in young children. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Fractional photothermolysis treatment of digital cutis laxa reverses hand disability.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jack J; Hsiao, Wendy C; Worswick, Scott D

    2015-01-01

    In this case study, we present a safe and novel treatment for a patient with soft tissue hand disability caused by severe and chronic lupus and cutis laxa (CL). This patient was a woman in her 50s with a 20-year history of systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) and multiple sclerosis who developed hand disability because of the drastic loss of firmness in her soft tissue, extending from the dermis down to the ligaments. The likely cause was CL with SLE synovitis, exacerbated by corticosteroid tapering. Fractional photothermolysis (FP) LASER (Fraxel DUAL 1550/1927; Solta Medical) therapy profoundly alleviated her joint locking in addition to improving the firmness of the overlying skin to reverse her hand disability. This case illustrates a novel approach to CL hand treatment and the profound impact the treatment had on the patient's disabled hand. FP therapy is quick and safe, and its medical application to skin and joints should be further explored. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Swallowing Trouble

    MedlinePlus

    ... larynx (voice box). These procedures are called FEES (Fiber optic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing) or FEESST (Flexible Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing with Sensory Testing). If necessary, an examination of the esophagus, ...

  10. Shampoo - swallowing

    MedlinePlus

    ... The time it was swallowed The amount swallowed Poison Control Your local poison center can be reached directly by calling the national toll-free Poison Help hotline (1-800-222-1222) from anywhere ...

  11. Swallowing soap

    MedlinePlus

    ... if known) Time it was swallowed Amount swallowed Poison Control Your local poison center can be reached directly by calling the national toll-free Poison Help hotline (1-800-222-1222) from anywhere ...

  12. Dirt - swallowing

    MedlinePlus

    ... About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Dirt - swallowing URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002840.htm Dirt - swallowing ...

  13. Painful swallowing

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ulcer in the esophagus, especially due to the antibiotic doxycycline Other causes of swallowing problems include: Mouth or throat ulcers Something stuck in the throat (for example, fish or chicken bones) Tooth infection or abscess

  14. Swallowing sunscreen

    MedlinePlus

    ... a cream or lotion used to protect the skin from sunburn. Sunscreen poisoning occurs when someone swallows sunscreen. This can be by accident or on purpose. This article is for information only. DO NOT ...

  15. Interrelationship of oral health status, swallowing function, nutritional status, and cognitive ability with activities of daily living in Japanese elderly people receiving home care services due to physical disabilities.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Michiko; Komiya-Nonaka, Manae; Akifusa, Sumio; Shimazaki, Yoshihiro; Adachi, Munehisa; Kinoshita, Toshinori; Kikutani, Takeshi; Yamashita, Yoshihisa

    2013-04-01

    Malnutrition and cognitive impairment lead to declines in activities of daily living (ADL). Nutritional status and cognitive ability have been shown to correlate with oral health status and swallowing function. However, the complex relationship among the factors that affect decline in ADL is not understood. We examined direct and indirect relationships among oral health status, swallowing function, nutritional status, cognitive ability, and ADL in Japanese elderly people living at home and receiving home care services because of physical disabilities. Participants were 286 subjects aged 60 years and older (mean age, 84.5±7.9 years) living at home and receiving home care services. Oral health status (the number of teeth and wearing dentures) was assessed, and swallowing function was examined using cervical auscultation. Additionally, ADL, cognitive ability, and nutritional status were assessed using the Barthel Index, the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale, and the Mini Nutritional Assessment-Short Form, respectively. Path analysis was used to test pathways from these factors to ADL. The mean number of teeth present in the participants was 8.6±9.9 (edentates, 40.6%). Dysphagia, malnutrition, and severe cognitive impairment were found in 31.1%, 14.0%, and 21.3% of the participants, respectively. Path analysis indicated that poor oral health status and cognitive impairment had a direct effect on denture wearing, and the consequent dysphagia, in addition to cognitive impairment, was positively associated with malnutrition. Malnutrition as well as dysphagia and cognitive impairment directly limited ADL. A lower number of teeth are positively related to swallowing dysfunction, whereas denture wearing contributes to recovery of swallowing function. Dysphagia, cognitive impairment, and malnutrition directly and indirectly decreased ADL in elderly people living at home and receiving home nursing care. The findings suggest that preventing tooth loss and encouraging denture

  16. "What's the difference?" women's wheelchair basketball, reverse integration, and the question(ing) of disability.

    PubMed

    Spencer-Cavaliere, Nancy; Peers, Danielle

    2011-10-01

    The inclusion of able-bodied athletes within disability sport, a phenomenon known as reverse integration, has sparked significant debate within adapted physical activity. Although researchers and practitioners have taken up positions for or against reverse integration, there is a lack of supporting research on the experiences of athletes who already play in such settings. In this study, we explore how competitive female athletes who have a disability experience reverse integration in Canadian wheelchair basketball. Athletic identity was used as the initial conceptual framework to guide semistructured interviews with nine participants. The results suggest that participation in this context contributed to positive athletic identities. Interviews also pointed to the unexpected theme of "what's the difference?" that this sporting context provided a space for the questioning and creative negotiation of the categories of disability and able-bodiedness. Methodologically, this paper also explores the possibilities and challenges of inter- worldview and insider-outsider research collaboration.

  17. Enhancing Services for Toddlers with Disabilities: A Reverse Mainstreaming Inclusion Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cormany, Ernestine E.

    This practicum designed and developed a program to implement a reverse mainstreaming model of inclusion for 7 toddlers (ages 1 to 3) with disabilities (Down syndrome, profound mental retardation, cerebral palsy, neurofibromatosis, stroke, and hearing impairment) and 3 of their typically developing peers. Emphasis was on the provision of…

  18. Swallowing disorders following skull base surgery.

    PubMed

    Levine, T M

    1988-11-01

    The modern otolaryngologist-head and neck surgeon has the technical ability to perform a wide range of surgical procedures at the skull base. Associated with some of these operations are swallowing deficits secondary to cranial nerve paralyses or anatomic disturbances. The skull base surgeon must physically and emotionally prepare patients preoperatively for these functional disabilities.

  19. Neurophysiology of swallowing

    PubMed Central

    Humbert, Ianessa A.; Fitzgerald, Michelle E.; McLaren, Donald G.; Johnson, Sterling; Porcaro, Eva; Kosmatka, Kris; Hind, Jacqueline; Robbins, JoAnne

    2009-01-01

    This study examined age-related changes in swallowing from an integrated biomechanical and functional imaging perspective in order to more comprehensively characterize changes in swallowing associated with age. We examined swallowing-related fMRI brain activity and videoflouroscopic biomechanics of three bolus types (saliva, water and barium) in 12 young and 11 older adults. We found that age-related neurophysiological changes in swallowing are evident. The group of older adults recruited more cortical regions than young adults, including the pericentral gyri and inferior frontal gyrus pars opercularis and pars triangularis (primarily right-sided). Saliva swallows elicited significantly higher BOLD responses in regions important for swallowing compared to water and barium. In separate videofluoroscopy sessions, we obtained durational measures of supine swallowing. The older cohort had significantly longer delays before the onset of the pharyngeal swallow response and increased residue of ingested material in the pharynx. These findings suggest that older adults without neurological insult elicit more cortical involvement to complete the same swallowing tasks as younger adults. PMID:19010424

  20. Self-Triggered Functional Electrical Stimulation During Swallowing

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, Theresa A.; Mann, Eric A.; Stoklosa, Joseph B.; Ludlow, Christy L.

    2006-01-01

    Hyolaryngeal elevation is essential for airway protection during swallowing and is mainly a reflexive response to oropharyngeal sensory stimulation. Targeted intramuscular electrical stimulation can elevate the resting larynx and, if applied during swallowing, may improve airway protection in dysphagic patients with inadequate hyolaryngeal motion. To be beneficial, patients must synchronize functional electrical stimulation (FES) with their reflexive swallowing and not adapt to FES by reducing the amplitude or duration of their own muscle activity. We evaluated the ability of nine healthy adults to manually synchronize FES with hyolaryngeal muscle activity during discrete swallows, and tested for motor adaptation. Hooked-wire electrodes were placed into the mylo- and thyrohyoid muscles to record electromyographic activity from one side of the neck and deliver monopolar FES for hyolaryngeal elevation to the other side. After performing baseline swallows, volunteers were instructed to trigger FES with a thumb switch in synchrony with their swallows for a series of trials. An experimenter surreptitiously disabled the thumb switch during the final attempt, creating a foil. From the outset, volunteers synchronized FES with the onset of swallow-related thyrohyoid activity (~225 ms after mylohyoid activity onset), preserving the normal sequence of muscle activation. A comparison between average baseline and foil swallows failed to show significant adaptive changes in the amplitude, duration, or relative timing of activity for either muscle, indicating that the central pattern generator for hyolaryngeal elevation is immutable with short term stimulation that augments laryngeal elevation during the reflexive, pharyngeal phase of swallowing. PMID:16107520

  1. [Dysphagia and swallowing rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Shigematsu, Takashi; Fujishima, Ichiro

    2015-02-01

    Dysphagia is a life-threatening disorder caused by many medical conditions such as stroke, neurological disorders, tumors, etc. The symptoms of dysphagia are quite variable and diagnosed by observation or through screening involving instrumental swallowing examinations such as video-fluoroscopy and video-endoscopy, to determine functional severity and treatment-prognosis. Direct- and indirect-therapy is used with and without food, respectively. Swallowing rehabilitation is very effective, and could be used in conjunction with compensatory techniques. Here we present an overview of dysphagia and swallowing rehabilitation.

  2. The Videofluorographic Swallowing Study

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Harris, Bonnie; Jones, Bronwyn

    2008-01-01

    SYNOPSIS The evidence for the physiologic foundation and interpretation of the videofluorographic swallowing study (VFSS) is described. The purpose and clinical utility of VFSS are explained. Standardization of the VFSS procedure, protocol, interpretation and reporting is highlighted as a critical step in future clinical practice and in clinical research. Individualized, evidenced –based rehabilitation strategies are presented as key components that are systematically applied during the VFSS procedure and integrated into the swallowing management plan. A new tool that has been developed and tested for the quantification of swallowing impairment is introduced. PMID:18940640

  3. Dysphagia (Difficulty Swallowing)

    MedlinePlus

    ... your breathing tube. A visual examination of your esophagus (endoscopy). A thin, flexible lighted instrument (endoscope) is passed down your throat so your doctor can see your esophagus. Fiber-optic endoscopic swallowing evaluation (FEES). Your may ...

  4. Jordan-3: measuring visual reversals in children as symptoms of learning disability and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Brian T; Martin, Nancy; Austin, J Sue

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this research was to establish new norms for the Jordan-3 for children ages 5 to 18 years. The research also investigated the frequency of visual reversals in children previously identified as having reading disability, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and broader learning disabilities. Participants were regular education students, ages 5 through 18 years, and special education students previously diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, reading disability, or broader learning disability. Jordan-3 Accuracy and Error raw scores were compared to assess if there was a significant difference between the two groups. Mean Accuracy and Error scores were compared for males and females. Children with learning disability and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder had higher reversals when compared to regular education children, which lends continued support to the Jordan-3 as a valid and reliable measure of visual reversals in children and adolescents. This study illustrates the utility of the Jordan-3 when assessing children who may require remediation to reach their academic potential.

  5. [Arrhythmias from swallowing].

    PubMed

    Palazzuoli, V; Mondillo, S; Faglia, S; D'Aprile, N; De Luca, G; Kristodhullu, A; Corba, E

    1992-01-01

    We describe the case of a 51-year old, non cardiopathic patient, with recurrent attacks of supraventricular tachycardia induced by swallowing. In the existing literature we found several descriptions of hypokinetic arrhythmias, easily explained by a mechanism of vagal inhibition. The cases of predominantly hyperkinetic arrhythmias, however, are much less common. In these patients the origin of the disease seems to be due to sympathetic oesophageal fibers and superior and medium cardiac nerves. In the present case, as in the others reported in the literature, the drug of choice seems to be Amiodarone which appears to be the most effective in preventing tachyarrhythmias caused by swallowing.

  6. Swallowed partial dentures

    PubMed Central

    Hashmi, Syed; Walter, John; Smith, Wendy; Latis, Sergios

    2004-01-01

    Swallowed or inhaled partial dentures can present a diagnostic challenge. Three new cases are described, one of them near-fatal because of vascular erosion and haemorrhage. The published work points to the importance of good design and proper maintenance. The key to early recognition is awareness of the hazard by denture-wearers, carers and clinicians. PMID:14749401

  7. Overdrinking, swallowing inhibition, and regional brain responses prior to swallowing

    PubMed Central

    Saker, Pascal; Egan, Gary F.; McKinley, Michael J.; Denton, Derek A.

    2016-01-01

    In humans, drinking replenishes fluid loss and satiates the sensation of thirst that accompanies dehydration. Typically, the volume of water drunk in response to thirst matches the deficit. Exactly how this accurate metering is achieved is unknown; recent evidence implicates swallowing inhibition as a potential factor. Using fMRI, this study investigated whether swallowing inhibition is present after more water has been drunk than is necessary to restore fluid balance within the body. This proposal was tested using ratings of swallowing effort and measuring regional brain responses as participants prepared to swallow small volumes of liquid while they were thirsty and after they had overdrunk. Effort ratings provided unequivocal support for swallowing inhibition, with a threefold increase in effort after overdrinking, whereas addition of 8% (wt/vol) sucrose to water had minimal effect on effort before or after overdrinking. Regional brain responses when participants prepared to swallow showed increases in the motor cortex, prefrontal cortices, posterior parietal cortex, striatum, and thalamus after overdrinking, relative to thirst. Ratings of swallowing effort were correlated with activity in the right prefrontal cortex and pontine regions in the brainstem; no brain regions showed correlated activity with pleasantness ratings. These findings are all consistent with the presence of swallowing inhibition after excess water has been drunk. We conclude that swallowing inhibition is an important mechanism in the overall regulation of fluid intake in humans. PMID:27791015

  8. Swallowing Dysfunction After Critical Illness

    PubMed Central

    White, S. David; Moss, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Critical care practitioners must frequently make decisions about their patients’ ability to swallow food, liquids, and pills. These decisions can be particularly difficult given the incompletely defined epidemiology, diagnostic criteria, and prognostic features of swallowing disorders in critically ill patients. Furthermore, the consequences of improper decisions—namely, aspiration, malnutrition, hunger, and thirst—can be devastating to patients and their families. This review outlines the problem of swallowing dysfunction in critically ill patients and then addresses the most clinically relevant questions that critical care practitioners face today. First, we review the epidemiology of swallowing dysfunction in critically ill patients. Next, we describe the different diagnostic tests for swallowing dysfunction and describe a general approach to the initial assessment for swallowing disorders. Finally, we explore the existing treatments for swallowing dysfunction. Given the burden of swallowing dysfunction in patients recovering from critical illness, enabling critical care practitioners to manage these disorders, while stimulating new investigation into their pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management, will enhance our care of critically ill patients. PMID:25451355

  9. Reversals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Educational Media and Materials for the Handicapped, Columbus, OH.

    Selected from the National Instructional Materials Information System (NIMIS)--a computer based on-line interactive retrieval system on special education materials--the bibliography covers nine materials for remediating reversals in handicapped students at the early childhood and elementary levels. Entries are presented in order of NIMIS accession…

  10. Swallowing disorders in paralysis of the lower cranial nerves: a functional analysis.

    PubMed

    Périé, S; Coiffier, L; Laccourreye, L; Hazebroucq, V; Chaussade, S; St Guily, J L

    1999-06-01

    Deficits of the lower cranial nerves (nerves IX, X, XI, and XII) occurring after treatment of skull base tumors may cause disabling swallowing disorders. To assess the mechanisms of swallowing disorders involved in such cases, we performed functional examinations: a videoendoscopic swallowing study and simultaneous manometry and videofluoroscopy in 7 patients. This study shows that the main mechanism of the swallowing disorders was a disturbance of the pharyngeal stage, including a decrease of pharyngeal propulsion, reduced laryngeal closure, and cricopharyngeal dysfunction, which led to aspiration. Decreased pharyngeal propulsion was found in 6 patients, with a very high correlation between fiberoscopy and simultaneous manometry-fluoroscopy. The responsibility of the upper esophageal sphincter in swallowing disorders was more difficult to assess. The role of the upper esophageal sphincter and pharyngeal propulsion in the onset of the problem is discussed in regard to the cricopharyngeal myotomy.

  11. Swallowing Disorders: What Families Should Know.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rader, Tom; Rende, Barbara

    Swallowing problems can result from a catastrophic illness or injury, and the family's role is very important in implementing the swallowing precautions recommended by the rehabilitation team. Explained in this pamphlet are the stages of the normal swallowing sequence, symptoms of a swallowing disorder, medical conditions associated with…

  12. Reversing the Export of People with Learning Disabilities and Complex Health Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, Andrew; Roy, Ashok

    2006-01-01

    Background: There is an increase in people with learning disabilities with offending and other disturbed behaviour who are placed in the local community and out of their area of origin. Aims: To compare clients placed locally and out of area. Method: All authorities in an English region were surveyed and interviewed about their clients placed…

  13. Disabilities

    MedlinePlus

    ... it isn't a sickness. Most people with disabilities can - and do - work, play, learn, and enjoy full, healthy lives. Mobility aids and assistive devices can make daily tasks easier. About one in every five people in the United States has a disability. Some people are born with one. Others have ...

  14. Inappropriate Timing of Swallow in the Respiratory Cycle Causes Breathing–Swallowing Discoordination

    PubMed Central

    Yagi, Naomi; Oku, Yoshitaka; Nagami, Shinsuke; Yamagata, Yoshie; Kayashita, Jun; Ishikawa, Akira; Domen, Kazuhisa; Takahashi, Ryosuke

    2017-01-01

    Rationale: Swallowing during inspiration and swallowing immediately followed by inspiration increase the chances of aspiration and may cause disease exacerbation. However, the mechanisms by which such breathing–swallowing discoordination occurs are not well-understood. Objectives: We hypothesized that breathing–swallowing discoordination occurs when the timing of the swallow in the respiratory cycle is inappropriate. To test this hypothesis, we monitored respiration and swallowing activity in healthy subjects and in patients with dysphagia using a non-invasive swallowing monitoring system. Measurements and Main Results: The parameters measured included the timing of swallow in the respiratory cycle, swallowing latency (interval between the onset of respiratory pause and the onset of swallow), pause duration (duration of respiratory pause for swallowing), and the breathing–swallowing coordination pattern. We classified swallows that closely follow inspiration (I) as I-SW, whereas those that precede I as SW-I pattern. Patients with dysphagia had prolonged swallowing latency and pause duration, and tended to have I-SW or SW-I patterns reflecting breathing–swallows discoordination. Conclusions: We conclude that swallows at inappropriate timing in the respiratory cycle cause breathing–swallowing discoordination, and the prolongation of swallowing latency leads to delayed timing of the swallow, and results in an increase in the SW-I pattern in patients with dysphagia.

  15. Acoustical modeling of swallowing mechanism.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, Samaneh Sarraf; Moussavi, Zahra M K

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a mathematical modeling of the swallowing sound generation is presented. To evaluate the model, its application on swallowing disorder (dysphagia) diagnosis is discussed. As a starting point, a simple linear time invariant model is assumed to represent the pharyngeal wall and tissue excited by a train of impulses. The modeling is approached by two different assumptions. In one approach, it is assumed that the impulse train, representing the neural activities to trigger swallow, is the same for both groups of control and dysphagic, and it is the pharyngeal model that accounts for the difference between the two groups. On the other hand, in the second approach, it is assumed that the pharyngeal response is the same for both groups, but the neural activities to initiate the swallow are different between the two groups. The results show that the second approach complies better with the physiological characteristics of swallowing mechanism as it provides a much better discrimination between the swallowing sounds of control and dysphagic groups of this study. Though, it should be noted that our dysphagic group subjects were cerebral palsy and stroke patients. Hence, the model accounting for initiation of neural activities is reasonable to show better results.

  16. Swallowing dysfunction following endotracheal intubation

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Min-Hsuan; Ku, Shih-Chi; Wang, Tyng-Guey; Hsiao, Tzu-Yu; Lee, Jang-Jaer; Chan, Ding-Cheng; Huang, Guan-Hua; Chen, Cheryl Chia-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate postextubation swallowing dysfunction (PSD) 21 days after endotracheal extubation and to examine whether PSD is time-limited and whether age matters. For this prospective cohort study, we evaluated 151 adult critical care patients (≥20 years) who were intubated for at least 48 hours and had no pre-existing neuromuscular disease or swallowing dysfunction. Participants were assessed for time (days) to pass bedside swallow evaluations (swallow 50 mL of water without difficulty) and to resume total oral intake. Outcomes were compared between younger (20–64 years) and older participants (≥65 years). PSD, defined as inability to swallow 50 mL of water within 48 hours after extubation, affected 92 participants (61.7% of our sample). At 21 days postextubation, 17 participants (15.5%) still failed to resume total oral intake and were feeding-tube dependent. We found that older participants had higher PSD rates at 7, 14, and 21 days postextubation, and took significantly longer to pass the bedside swallow evaluations (5.0 vs 3.0 days; P = 0.006) and to resume total oral intake (5.0 vs 3.0 days; P = 0.003) than their younger counterparts. Older participants also had significantly higher rates of subsequent feeding-tube dependence than younger patients (24.1 vs 5.8%; P = 0.008). Excluding patients with pre-existing neuromuscular dysfunction, PSD is common and prolonged. Age matters in the time needed to recover. Swallowing and oral intake should be monitored and interventions made, if needed, in the first 7 to 14 days postextubation, particularly for older patients. PMID:27310972

  17. [Relationship between abnormal swallowing and mouth breathing].

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng-wu; Li, Hong-fa; Wang, Qiu-rui; Xu, Hao; He, Jing-nan

    2013-12-01

    To investigate the relationship between abnormal swallowing and mouth breathing. Thirty-eight patients with abnormal swallowing and 38 patients with normal swallowing were selected. All patients presented with no airway constriction. The age range of the patients was 11-14 years old. The number of patients with mouth breathing was calculated. Statistical analysis (χ(2) test) was performed. The number of patients with mouth breathing in the abnormal swallowing group (17, 45%) was significantly higher than that in the normal swallowing group (5, 13%) (χ(2) = 9.212, P = 0.002). Abnormal swallowing was related to mouth breathing.

  18. Understanding differences between healthy swallows and penetration-aspiration swallows via compressive sensing of tri-axial swallowing accelerometry signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sejdić, Ervin; Dudik, Joshua M.; Kurosu, Atsuko; Jestrović, Iva; Coyle, James L.

    2014-05-01

    Swallowing accelerometry is a promising tool for non-invasive assessment of swallowing difficulties. A recent contribution showed that swallowing accelerometry signals for healthy swallows and swallows indicating laryn- geal penetration or tracheal aspiration have different time-frequency structures, which may be problematic for compressive sensing schemes based on time-frequency dictionaries. In this paper, we examined the effects of dif- ferent swallows on the accuracy of a compressive sensing scheme based on modulated discrete prolate spheroidal sequences. We utilized tri-axial swallowing accelerometry signals recorded from four patients during routinely schedule videofluoroscopy exams. In particular, we considered 77 swallows approximately equally distributed between healthy swallows and swallows presenting with some penetration/aspiration. Our results indicated that the swallow type does not affect the accuracy of a considered compressive sensing scheme. Also, the results con- firmed previous findings that each individual axis contributes different information. Our findings are important for further developments of a device which is to be used for long-term monitoring of swallowing difficulties.

  19. Swallowing disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Mamolar Andrés, Sandra; Santamarina Rabanal, María Liliana; Granda Membiela, Carla María; Fernández Gutiérrez, María José; Sirgo Rodríguez, Paloma; Álvarez Marcos, César

    Parkinson's disease is a type of chronic neurodegenerative pathology with a typical movement pattern, as well as different, less studied symptoms such as dysphagia. Disease-related disorders in efficacy or safety in the process of swallowing usually lead to malnutrition, dehydration or pneumonias. The aim of this study was identifying and analyzing swallowing disorders in Parkinson's disease. The initial sample consisted of 52 subjects with Parkinson's disease to whom the specific test for dysphagia SDQ was applied. Nineteen participants (36.5%) with some degree of dysphagia in the SDQ test were selected to be evaluated by volume-viscosity clinical exploration method and fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing. Disorders in swallowing efficiency and safety were detected in 94.7% of the selected sample. With regards to efficiency, disorders were found in food transport (89.5%), insufficient labial closing (68.4%) and oral residues (47.4%), relating to duration of ingestion. Alterations in security were also observed: pharynx residues (52.7%), coughing (47.4%), penetration (31.64%), aspiration and decrease of SaO2 (5.3%), relating to the diagnosis of respiratory pathology in the previous year. The SDQ test detected swallowing disorders in 36.5% of the subjects with Parkinson's disease. Disorders in swallowing efficiency and safety were demonstrated in 94.7% of this subset. Disorders of efficiency were more frequent than those of safety, establishing a relationship with greater time in ingestion and the appearance of respiratory pathology and pneumonias. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  20. Feeding and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia) in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Speech-Language Pathologists in Swallowing and Feeding Disorders: Technical Report Knowledge and Skills Needed by Speech-Language Pathologists ... Interpretation of Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing: Position Statement Technical Report Guidelines The Preferred Practice Patterns for the Profession ...

  1. Temporal Sequence of Swallow Events during the Oropharyngeal Swallow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendell, Dorie A.; Logemann, Jeri A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To (a) identify and characterize the temporal relation of selected structural movements during the oropharyngeal swallow across participants, (b) determine whether patterns of movement could be identified, and (c) determine whether the temporal relations were affected by aging and bolus characteristics. Method: Retrospective analysis of…

  2. Does Barium Influence Tongue Behaviors during Swallowing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Catriona M.; van Lieshout, Pascal H. H. M.

    2005-01-01

    The validity of videofluoroscopic swallowing assessments rests on the understanding that thin, nectar-, honey-, and spoon-thick radiopaque liquids resemble nonopaque liquids, both in their consistency and in the variations in swallowing that they elicit. Tongue movements during sequential swallows of opaque and nonopaque liquids were studied in 8…

  3. Does Barium Influence Tongue Behaviors during Swallowing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Catriona M.; van Lieshout, Pascal H. H. M.

    2005-01-01

    The validity of videofluoroscopic swallowing assessments rests on the understanding that thin, nectar-, honey-, and spoon-thick radiopaque liquids resemble nonopaque liquids, both in their consistency and in the variations in swallowing that they elicit. Tongue movements during sequential swallows of opaque and nonopaque liquids were studied in 8…

  4. Teledynamic Evaluation of Oropharyngeal Swallowing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malandraki, Georgia A.; McCullough, Gary; He, Xuming; McWeeny, Elizabeth; Perlman, Adrienne L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of the present investigation was to test the feasibility and clinical utility of a real-time Internet-based protocol for remote, telefluoroscopic evaluation of oropharyngeal swallowing. Method: In this prospective cohort study, the authors evaluated 32 patients with a primary diagnosis of stroke or head/neck cancer. All…

  5. Teledynamic Evaluation of Oropharyngeal Swallowing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malandraki, Georgia A.; McCullough, Gary; He, Xuming; McWeeny, Elizabeth; Perlman, Adrienne L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of the present investigation was to test the feasibility and clinical utility of a real-time Internet-based protocol for remote, telefluoroscopic evaluation of oropharyngeal swallowing. Method: In this prospective cohort study, the authors evaluated 32 patients with a primary diagnosis of stroke or head/neck cancer. All…

  6. Congenital feeding and swallowing disorders.

    PubMed

    Abadie, Véronique; Couly, Gérard

    2013-01-01

    Although poorly recognized and studied, congenital sucking, swallowing, and/or feeding disorders are common. They can be the symptoms that reveal a neuromuscular disease, or that complicate a neuromuscular disease. It is essential to know feeding physiology during fetal and infant development in order to understand the variety of its disorders and to direct correctly diagnostic and therapeutic processes. A good semiological analysis will identify the symptoms. Several investigations help to determine the mechanism of the trouble (fiber endoscopy, videofluoroscopy, facial and swallowing electromyography, esophageal manometry, etc.). Other investigations, in addition to clinical assessments, help to identify the cause of the whole picture (peripheral electromyography, brain MRI, genetic or metabolic investigations, etc.). The main causes of sucking, swallowing, and feeding disorders are lesions of the brainstem (malformations of the posterior fossa, neonatal brainstem tumors, agenesis of cranial nerves, clastic lesion of the posterior brain, craniovertebral anomalies, syndromes that involve the rhombencephalic development such as Pierre Robin sequence, CHARGE syndrome, etc.). Suprabulbar lesions, neuromuscular disorders, peripheral esophageal, digestive, and laryngeal anomalies and dysfunctions can also be involved. The main principles of the management of congenital sucking, swallowing, and feeding disorders are the following: cure the cause if possible, facilitate the sucking reflex, preventing deleterious consequences of aspiration, preventing malnutrition, and preventing posttraumatic anorexia. Advice can be given to caregivers and physiotherapists who take charge of these children. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. How to swallow an elephant

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, K.B.

    1995-03-01

    There is an old East Indian fable of a young man who went to see a wise man. The young man had a question - {open_quotes}How can I become rich and powerful?{close_quotes} The wise man paused for a moment then asked a question in return - {open_quotes}How can you swallow an elephant?{close_quotes} The young man was astounded, {open_quotes}There is no way a man can swallow an elephant!{close_quotes} {open_quotes}Yes, there is,{close_quotes} replied the wise man, {open_quotes}You just have to do it one bite at a time.{close_quotes} Many large problems can only be handled the same way that an elephant is swallowed, one bite at a time. Global warming and other environmental problems are obviously of elephant-swallowing scale. Some have set a goal for our society of reducing atmospheric greenhouse gases, particularly carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), by 20%. The cost to accomplish this has been estimated to be about five trillion dollars! As big as this elephant is, I suspect that its size is understated, if all the factors involved are included. The proponents of the plan tell us that it is well worth the cost to save the world. Therein lies another elephant-style problem.

  8. Additive Role of a Potentially Reversible Cognitive Frailty Model and Inflammatory State on the Risk of Disability: The Italian Longitudinal Study on Aging.

    PubMed

    Solfrizzi, Vincenzo; Scafato, Emanuele; Lozupone, Madia; Seripa, Davide; Giannini, Michele; Sardone, Rodolfo; Bonfiglio, Caterina; Abbrescia, Daniela I; Galluzzo, Lucia; Gandin, Claudia; Baldereschi, Marzia; Di Carlo, Antonio; Inzitari, Domenico; Daniele, Antonio; Sabbà, Carlo; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Panza, Francesco

    2017-07-06

    Cognitive frailty is a condition recently defined by operationalized criteria describing the simultaneous presence of physical frailty and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Two subtypes for this clinical construct have been proposed: "potentially reversible" cognitive frailty (physical frailty plus MCI) and "reversible" cognitive frailty (physical frailty plus pre-MCI subjective cognitive decline). Here the prevalence of a potentially reversible cognitive frailty model was estimated. It was also evaluated if introducing a diagnosis of MCI in older subjects with physical frailty could have an additive role on the risk of dementia, disability, and all-cause mortality in comparison with frailty state or MCI condition alone, with analyses separately performed for inflammatory state. In 2,373 individuals from the population-based Italian Longitudinal Study on Aging with a 3.5-year-follow-up, we operationally categorized older individuals without dementia into four groups: non-frail/non-MCI, non-frail/MCI, frail/non-MCI, and frail/MCI. The prevalence of potentially reversible cognitive frailty was 1%, increasing with age and more represented in women than in men, and all groups were associated with significant increased incident rate ratios of dementia, disability, and mortality. A significant difference in rates of disability has been found between the MCI and non-MCI groups (contrasts of adjusted predictions: 0.461; 95% confidence interval: 0.187-0.735) in frail individuals with high inflammatory states (fibrinogen >339 mg/dL). In older individuals without dementia and with elevated inflammation, a potentially reversible cognitive frailty model could have a significant additional predictive effect on the risk of disability than the single conditions of frailty or MCI. Copyright © 2017 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Coordination of Mastication, Swallowing and Breathing

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Koichiro; Palmer, Jeffrey B.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The pathways for air and food cross in the pharynx. In breathing, air may flow through either the nose or the mouth, it always flows through the pharynx. During swallowing, the pharynx changes from an airway to a food channel. The pharynx is isolated from the nasal cavity and lower airway by velopharyngeal and laryngeal closure during the pharyngeal swallow. During mastication, the food bolus accumulates in the pharynx prior to swallow initiation. The structures in the oral cavity, pharynx and larynx serve multiple functions in breathing, speaking, mastication and swallowing. Thus, the fine temporal coordination of feeding among breathing, mastication and swallowing is essential to provide proper food nutrition and to prevent pulmonary aspiration. This review paper will review the temporo-spatial coordination of the movements of oral, pharyngeal, and laryngeal structures during mastication and swallowing, and temporal coordination between breathing, mastication, and swallowing. PMID:20161022

  10. A case of swallow syncope.

    PubMed

    Moore, Peter K; Lee, Jenny K; Garcia, Joel A; Krantz, Mori J

    2013-01-01

    Swallow syncope, also called deglutition syncope, is a rare disorder triggered by oral intake. Patients often have underlying esophageal or structural heart disease. In some cases, the condition can be treated conservatively by eliminating predisposing factors. We describe the case of a 65-year-old woman without cardiovascular or esophageal disease who presented after a motor vehicle accident that was attributed to syncope while driving and eating. In the hospital, the patient suddenly lost consciousness while eating solid food; complete heart block without ventricular escape was documented on continuous electrocardiographic monitoring. A dual-chamber permanent pacemaker was placed and completely resolved the symptoms. This case illustrates a high-risk manifestation of swallow syncope: asystole resulting from an exaggerated vago-glossopharyngeal reflex.

  11. Pharyngeal Swallowing Mechanics Secondary to Hemispheric Stroke.

    PubMed

    May, Nelson H; Pisegna, Jessica M; Marchina, Sarah; Langmore, Susan E; Kumar, Sandeep; Pearson, William G

    2017-05-01

    Computational analysis of swallowing mechanics (CASM) is a method that utilizes multivariate shape change analysis to uncover covariant elements of pharyngeal swallowing mechanics associated with impairment using videofluoroscopic swallowing studies. The goals of this preliminary study were to (1) characterize swallowing mechanics underlying stroke-related dysphagia, (2) decipher the impact of left and right hemispheric strokes on pharyngeal swallowing mechanics, and (3) determine pharyngeal swallowing mechanics associated with penetration-aspiration status. Videofluoroscopic swallowing studies of 18 dysphagic patients with hemispheric infarcts and age- and gender-matched controls were selected from well-controlled data sets. Patient data including laterality and penetration-aspiration status were collected. Coordinates mapping muscle group action during swallowing were collected from videos. Multivariate morphometric analyses of coordinates associated with stroke, affected hemisphere, and penetration-aspiration status were performed. Pharyngeal swallowing mechanics differed significantly in the following comparisons: stroke versus controls (D = 2.19, P < .0001), right hemispheric stroke versus controls (D = 3.64, P < .0001), left hemispheric stroke versus controls (D = 2.06, P < .0001), right hemispheric stroke versus left hemispheric stroke (D = 2.89, P < .0001), and penetration-aspiration versus within normal limits (D = 2.25, P < .0001). Differences in pharyngeal swallowing mechanics associated with each comparison were visualized using eigenvectors. Whereas current literature focuses on timing changes in stroke-related dysphagia, these data suggest that mechanical changes are also functionally important. Pharyngeal swallowing mechanics differed by the affected hemisphere and the penetration-aspiration status. CASM can be used to identify patient-specific swallowing impairment associated with stroke injury that could help

  12. Vibration over the larynx increases swallowing and cortical activation for swallowing.

    PubMed

    Mulheren, Rachel W; Ludlow, Christy L

    2017-09-01

    Sensory input can alter swallowing control in both the cortex and brainstem. Electrical stimulation of superior laryngeal nerve afferents increases reflexive swallowing in animals, with different frequencies optimally effective across species. Here we determined 1) if neck vibration overlying the larynx affected the fundamental frequency of the voice demonstrating penetration of vibration into the laryngeal tissues, and 2) if vibration, in comparison with sham, increased spontaneous swallowing and enhanced cortical hemodynamic responses to swallows in the swallowing network. A device with two motors, one over each thyroid lamina, delivered intermittent 10-s epochs of vibration. We recorded swallows and event-related changes in blood oxygenation level to swallows over the motor and sensory swallowing cortexes bilaterally using functional near infrared spectroscopy. Ten healthy participants completed eight 20-min conditions in counterbalanced order with either epochs of continuous vibration at 30, 70, 110, 150, and 70 + 110 Hz combined, 4-Hz pulsed vibration at 70 + 110 Hz, or two sham conditions without stimulation. Stimulation epochs were separated by interstimulus intervals varying between 30 and 45 s in duration. Vibration significantly reduced the fundamental frequency of the voice compared with no stimulation demonstrating that vibration penetrated laryngeal tissues. Vibration at 70 and at 150 Hz increased spontaneous swallowing compared with sham. Hemodynamic responses to swallows in the motor cortex were enhanced during conditions containing stimulation compared with sham. As vibratory stimulation on the neck increased spontaneous swallowing and enhanced cortical activation for swallows in healthy participants, it may be useful for enhancing swallowing in patients with dysphagia.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Vibratory stimulation at 70 and 150 Hz on the neck overlying the larynx increased the frequency of spontaneous swallowing. Simultaneously vibration also enhanced

  13. Two Techniques to Make Swallowing Pills Easier

    PubMed Central

    Schiele, Julia T.; Schneider, Hendrik; Quinzler, Renate; Reich, Gabriele; Haefeli, Walter E.

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate whether 2 techniques (the pop-bottle method for tablets and the lean-forward technique for capsules) ease swallowing of tablets and capsules, we conducted a cross-sectional study including 151 adults of the general German population. Participants swallowed 16 differently shaped placebos, rated their ease of swallowing on an 8-point Likert scale, and swallowed the 2 dosage forms that they had rated most difficult again using the appropriate technique. The pop-bottle method substantially improved swallowing of tablets in 59.7% (169/283) and the lean-forward technique for capsules in 88.6% (31/35). Both techniques were remarkably effective in participants with and without reported difficulties swallowing pills and should be recommended regularly. PMID:25384817

  14. Two techniques to make swallowing pills easier.

    PubMed

    Schiele, Julia T; Schneider, Hendrik; Quinzler, Renate; Reich, Gabriele; Haefeli, Walter E

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate whether 2 techniques (the pop-bottle method for tablets and the lean-forward technique for capsules) ease swallowing of tablets and capsules, we conducted a cross-sectional study including 151 adults of the general German population. Participants swallowed 16 differently shaped placebos, rated their ease of swallowing on an 8-point Likert scale, and swallowed the 2 dosage forms that they had rated most difficult again using the appropriate technique. The pop-bottle method substantially improved swallowing of tablets in 59.7% (169/283) and the lean-forward technique for capsules in 88.6% (31/35). Both techniques were remarkably effective in participants with and without reported difficulties swallowing pills and should be recommended regularly.

  15. Ovine fetal swallowing responses to polyhydramnios

    PubMed Central

    Brace, Robert A.; Anderson, Debra F.; Cheung, Cecilia Y.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Swallowing of amniotic fluid by late gestation fetuses increases when amniotic fluid volume (AFV) is elevated. Our objectives were to quantitatively characterize fetal swallowing when AFV is elevated above normal to polyhydramniotic levels and to explore the mechanisms that mediate these changes. Late gestation fetal sheep were studied under basal conditions and during intra‐amniotic infusion of lactated Ringer's solution. Control AFV averaged 631 ± 214 mL (SE, n = 6), swallowed volume was 299 ± 94 mL/day, and there were 5.7 ± 1.8 bouts/day of rapid swallowing. During intra‐amniotic infusion, AFV (3065 ± 894 mL) and daily swallowed volume (699 ± 148 mL/day) increased (P < 0.05) and the number of bouts reached a maximum of 13.7 ± 2.0 bouts/day when AFV exceeded 1500 mL. Unexpectedly, the volume swallowed per bout (57.3 ± 5.8 mL, n = 102) did not vary with AFV (r = 0.023, P = 0.81). Neither the number of swallows/day nor the volume/swallow changed consistently with elevated AFV. Daily swallowed volume increases and reaches a maximum of twice normal as AFV approaches polyhydramniotic levels. Mechanistically, the increase in swallowing was achieved primarily by an increase in the number of bouts of swallowing per day rather than the expected passive increase in volume per bout. This implies changes in fetal behavior as AFV was elevated. Furthermore, swallowed volume was four times more sensitive to increases in AFV than reported previously. PMID:24760530

  16. Surface Electromyographic Assessment of Swallowing Function

    PubMed Central

    Poorjavad, Marziyeh; Talebian, Saeed; Ansari, Noureddin Nakhostin; Soleymani, Zahra

    2017-01-01

    The reliability of surface electromyographic (sEMG) variables during swallowing determines the potential usefulness of these measures in swallowing assessment and treatment. This study aimed to establish the reliability of the sEMG measures of the swallowing function of muscles during different swallowing conditions in healthy young and old volunteers. Two groups of volunteers (24 older adults, 10 younger adults) participated in this cross-sectional study during 2014. The activity of masseter, submental, and infrahyoid groups were measured using sEMG during three repetitions of different swallowing tasks. Both the relative and absolute reliability (characterized respectively by ICC, SEM%, and SRD%) were calculated for the sEMG indices of muscle activity during swallowing events. Statistical analyses were performed by the SPSS 19.0 and Microsoft Excel 2007 software packages. Statistical significance was set at P≤0.05. The relative reliability calculations showed significant agreements between repetitions for the mean and peak amplitude and the average of median frequency (MDF) of the studied muscles function during most swallowing types in both groups. However, the duration and particularly the time to peak of muscle activity showed significant agreements during fewer swallowing conditions. Excluding MDF, we found high SEM% and SRD% for the studied measures (particularly timing measures) of muscles function during most swallowing types in both groups. The reliability of sEMG measures was influenced by the age and swallowing types. Our findings suggest that the MDF of muscle function during almost all studied swallowing types can be a reliable measure for the sEMG assessment of swallowing function in both younger and older adults. PMID:28360446

  17. Surface Electromyographic Assessment of Swallowing Function.

    PubMed

    Poorjavad, Marziyeh; Talebian, Saeed; Ansari, Noureddin Nakhostin; Soleymani, Zahra

    2017-03-01

    The reliability of surface electromyographic (sEMG) variables during swallowing determines the potential usefulness of these measures in swallowing assessment and treatment. This study aimed to establish the reliability of the sEMG measures of the swallowing function of muscles during different swallowing conditions in healthy young and old volunteers. Two groups of volunteers (24 older adults, 10 younger adults) participated in this cross-sectional study during 2014. The activity of masseter, submental, and infrahyoid groups were measured using sEMG during three repetitions of different swallowing tasks. Both the relative and absolute reliability (characterized respectively by ICC, SEM%, and SRD%) were calculated for the sEMG indices of muscle activity during swallowing events. Statistical analyses were performed by the SPSS 19.0 and Microsoft Excel 2007 software packages. Statistical significance was set at P≤0.05. The relative reliability calculations showed significant agreements between repetitions for the mean and peak amplitude and the average of median frequency (MDF) of the studied muscles function during most swallowing types in both groups. However, the duration and particularly the time to peak of muscle activity showed significant agreements during fewer swallowing conditions. Excluding MDF, we found high SEM% and SRD% for the studied measures (particularly timing measures) of muscles function during most swallowing types in both groups. The reliability of sEMG measures was influenced by the age and swallowing types. Our findings suggest that the MDF of muscle function during almost all studied swallowing types can be a reliable measure for the sEMG assessment of swallowing function in both younger and older adults.

  18. Difficulties in swallowing oral medications in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Tahaineh, Linda; Wazaify, Mayyada

    2017-04-01

    Background Difficulties swallowing oral medications can affect patient compliance and consequently can compromise patient health. Objective To investigate the prevalence of difficulties in swallowing oral medications among a sample of the Jordanian population and the techniques used to overcome such difficulties. Setting The study was carried out in outpatient pharmacies in the north of Jordan. Method Adult patients who were taking at least one solid oral dosage form for at least 1 month were interviewed using a questionnaire. The questionnaire included demographic details, current medication use, questions about swallowing difficulties, and patient strategies to overcome such difficulties. Main outcome measure The study measured the number of patients reporting difficulties in swallowing oral medications and the techniques used to overcome swallowing difficulties. Results In this study 1250 patients were interviewed and 130 patients reported that they experienced or were currently experiencing difficulties in swallowing oral medications (10.4%). In order to overcome swallowing difficulties, 112 patients (86.2%) stated that they drink more water while 22 patients (16.9%) stated that they cut or crush their solid dosage forms, and 13 patients stated that they open their capsules. Forty-five patients (34.6%) stated that they sometimes skip their doses due to swallowing difficulties. The majority of participants with swallowing difficulties did not discuss their difficulties with their physicians or pharmacists (85.4%). Conclusion Difficulties in swallowing oral medications is a problem that is encountered in Jordan. Techniques used to overcome swallowing difficulties such as crushing or opening capsules can compromise medication efficacy and negatively impact patient health outcomes. Non-compliance due to swallowing difficulties raises a major concern.

  19. Delayed Initiation of the Pharyngeal Swallow: Normal Variability in Adult Swallows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin-Harris, Bonnie; Brodsky, Martin B.; Michel, Yvonne; Lee, Fu-Shing; Walters, Bobby

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to determine bolus head timing and location relations with the onset of hyoid movement at the initiation of the pharyngeal swallow and at the onset of swallow-related apnea. Method: Bolus head timing and location and the timing of swallow-related apnea were recorded from frame-by-frame analyses of…

  20. Videomanometric analysis of supraglottic swallow, effortful swallow, and chin tuck in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Bülow, M; Olsson, R; Ekberg, O

    1999-01-01

    Simultaneous videoradiography and solid-state manometry (videomanometry) was applied in eight healthy volunteers (four women, four men; age range 25-64 years, mean age 41 years) without swallowing problems. Three different swallowing techniques were tested; supraglottic swallow, effortful swallow, and chin tuck. Seven videoradiographic variables and six manometric variables were analyzed. The supraglottic swallowing technique did not differ significantly from that of the control swallows. The effortful swallow had a significantly (p = 0.0001) reduced hyoid-mandibular distance preswallow due to an elevation of the hyoid and the larynx, which caused a significantly (p = 0.007) reduced maximal hyoid movement and a significantly (p = 0.009) reduced laryngeal elevation during swallow. The chin tuck swallow had a significantly (p = 0. 001) reduced laryngohyoid distance and also a significantly (p = 0. 004) reduced hyoid-mandibular distance. The chin tuck swallow also displayed significantly (p = 0.003) weaker pharyngeal contractions. Videomanometry allows for analysis of bolus transport, movement of anatomical structures, and measurement of intraluminal pressures. These variables are important when evaluating swallowing techniques. In the present study, we made a few observations that never have been reported before. When healthy volunteers performed supraglottic swallow, they performed the technique somewhat differently. Therefore, we assume dysphagic patients would need a substantial period of training to perform a technique efficiently. Chin tuck could impair protection of the airways in dysphagic patients with weak pharyngeal constrictor muscles.

  1. Lung Volume during Swallowing: Single Bolus Swallows in Healthy Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hegland, Karen M. Wheeler; Huber, Jessica E.; Pitts, Teresa; Sapienza, Christine M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the relationship between swallowing and lung volume initiation in healthy adults during single swallows of boluses differing in volume and consistency. Differences in lung volume according to respiratory phase surrounding the swallow were also assessed. Method: Nine men and 11 women between the ages of 19 and 28 years…

  2. Lung Volume during Swallowing: Single Bolus Swallows in Healthy Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hegland, Karen M. Wheeler; Huber, Jessica E.; Pitts, Teresa; Sapienza, Christine M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the relationship between swallowing and lung volume initiation in healthy adults during single swallows of boluses differing in volume and consistency. Differences in lung volume according to respiratory phase surrounding the swallow were also assessed. Method: Nine men and 11 women between the ages of 19 and 28 years…

  3. Surface electromyography pattern of human swallowing

    PubMed Central

    Monaco, Annalisa; Cattaneo, Ruggero; Spadaro, Alessandro; Giannoni, Mario

    2008-01-01

    Background The physiology of swallowing is characterized by a complex and coordinated activation of many stomatognathic, pharyngeal, and laryngeal muscles. Kinetics and electromyographic studies have widely investigated the pharyngeal and laryngeal pattern of deglutition in order to point out the differences between normal and dysphagic people. In the dental field, muscular activation during swallowing is believed to be the cause of malocclusion. Despite the clinical importance given to spontaneous swallowing, few physiologic works have studied stomatognathic muscular activation and mandibular movement during spontaneous saliva swallowing. The aim of our study was to investigate the activity patterns of the mandibular elevator muscles (masseter and anterior temporalis muscles), the submental muscles, and the neck muscles (sternocleidomastoid muscles) in healthy people during spontaneous swallowing of saliva and to relate the muscular activities to mandibular movement. Methods The spontaneous swallowing of saliva of 111 healthy individuals was analyzed using surface electromyography (SEMG) and a computerized kinesiography of mandibular movement. Results Fifty-seven of 111 patients swallowed without occlusal contact (SNOC) and 54 individuals had occlusal contact (SOC). The sternocleidomastoid muscles showed a slight, but constant activation during swallowing. The SEMG of the submental and sternocleidomastoid muscles showed no differences between the two groups. The SEMG of the anterior temporalis and masseter muscles showed significant differences (p < 0.0001). The duration of swallowing was significantly higher in the SNOC subjects. Gender and age were not related to electromyographic activation. Healthy SOC and SNOC behaved in different ways. Conclusion The data suggest that there is not a single "normal" or "typical" pattern for spontaneous saliva swallowing. The polygraph seemed a valuable, simple, non-invasive and reliable tool to study the physiology of

  4. Surface electromyography pattern of human swallowing.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Annalisa; Cattaneo, Ruggero; Spadaro, Alessandro; Giannoni, Mario

    2008-03-26

    The physiology of swallowing is characterized by a complex and coordinated activation of many stomatognathic, pharyngeal, and laryngeal muscles. Kinetics and electromyographic studies have widely investigated the pharyngeal and laryngeal pattern of deglutition in order to point out the differences between normal and dysphagic people. In the dental field, muscular activation during swallowing is believed to be the cause of malocclusion.Despite the clinical importance given to spontaneous swallowing, few physiologic works have studied stomatognathic muscular activation and mandibular movement during spontaneous saliva swallowing.The aim of our study was to investigate the activity patterns of the mandibular elevator muscles (masseter and anterior temporalis muscles), the submental muscles, and the neck muscles (sternocleidomastoid muscles) in healthy people during spontaneous swallowing of saliva and to relate the muscular activities to mandibular movement. The spontaneous swallowing of saliva of 111 healthy individuals was analyzed using surface electromyography (SEMG) and a computerized kinesiography of mandibular movement. Fifty-seven of 111 patients swallowed without occlusal contact (SNOC) and 54 individuals had occlusal contact (SOC). The sternocleidomastoid muscles showed a slight, but constant activation during swallowing. The SEMG of the submental and sternocleidomastoid muscles showed no differences between the two groups. The SEMG of the anterior temporalis and masseter muscles showed significant differences (p < 0.0001). The duration of swallowing was significantly higher in the SNOC subjects. Gender and age were not related to electromyographic activation. Healthy SOC and SNOC behaved in different ways. The data suggest that there is not a single "normal" or "typical" pattern for spontaneous saliva swallowing. The polygraph seemed a valuable, simple, non-invasive and reliable tool to study the physiology of swallowing.

  5. Swallowing: A Professional and Parental Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roche, William J.; Petronchak, JoAnn; Eicher, Peggy S.

    2008-01-01

    For humans, successful drinking is a necessity early in life. In fact, swallowing can be observed with ultrasound at approximately the 16th week of pregnancy. The fetus "drinks" amniotic fluid as a way to filter fetal debris and to help maintain the amniotic fluid level for its mother. All this "swallowing practice" in utero enables the fetus to…

  6. Swallowing: A Professional and Parental Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roche, William J.; Petronchak, JoAnn; Eicher, Peggy S.

    2008-01-01

    For humans, successful drinking is a necessity early in life. In fact, swallowing can be observed with ultrasound at approximately the 16th week of pregnancy. The fetus "drinks" amniotic fluid as a way to filter fetal debris and to help maintain the amniotic fluid level for its mother. All this "swallowing practice" in utero enables the fetus to…

  7. Cortical input in control of swallowing.

    PubMed

    Michou, Emilia; Hamdy, Shaheen

    2009-06-01

    This review presents a current synopsis of newer research in cortical control of swallowing and its relationship to advancing knowledge in the field of human swallowing neurophysiology. The intent is to highlight recent findings and to stimulate potential research questions not yet investigated. Advances in human brain imaging have led to a wealth of newer insights into the cortical and subcortical control of human swallowing. This includes a better understanding of the hemispheric contributions to swallowing control and the mechanisms that underlie recovery or compensation after neurological injury. Through advances in imaging and neuroimaging techniques, our knowledge of the neuroanatomy and physiology of swallowing has increased dramatically over the last decade. Integration and interconnection of the diverse swallowing cortical network and how sensory input influences swallowing cortical activation has started to provide a better understanding of the physiological mechanisms that underpin this exquisite yet fundamental sensorimotor function. Experimental paradigms for swallowing neural reorganization have begun to provide evidence for their translation into clinical practice for dysphagia rehabilitation.

  8. How do tablet properties influence swallowing behaviours?

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shinya; Taniguchi, Hiroshige; Hayashi, Hirokazu; Hori, Kazuhiro; Tsujimura, Takanori; Nakamura, Yuki; Sato, Hideaki; Inoue, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Behavioural performance of tablet swallowing was evaluated with different tablet conditions in terms of size, number and surface coating. Four different types of tablets were prepared: small or large, and with or without a surface coating. Fourteen normal male adults were instructed to swallow the prepared tablets with 15 ml of water. The number of tablets in one trial was changed from one to three. To evaluate swallowing and tablet transport, electromyographic activity was recorded in the left suprahyoid muscles, and videofluorographic images were examined. All tablet conditions (size, number and surface coating) affected the swallowing performance in terms of total number of swallows, electromyographic burst patterns and location of remaining tablets. Increases in the size and number of tablets increased the number of swallows and electromyographic burst area and duration. In addition, all of these parameters increased while swallowing tablets without a coating compared with tablets with a coating. Location of the remaining tablets was mainly within the mouth. This study only clarified the normal pattern of tablet swallowing under several conditions in healthy subjects, but the results may facilitate comprehensive evaluation and treatment planning in terms of administering medication to dysphagic patients. © 2013 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  9. Pill swallowing by adults with dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Carnaby-Mann, Giselle; Crary, Michael

    2005-11-01

    To evaluate differences in swallowing physiology and safety in patients with dysphagia between conventional tablets and a new method of tablet transportation, orally disintegrating technology (ODT) (RapiTab; Schwarz Pharma Inc, Milwaukee, Wis). The study observed a single group, crossover design. Outpatient clinic within an academic teaching hospital. A total of 36 adult dysphagic patients referred to the clinic. All subjects underwent simultaneous nasopharyngeal endoscopic evaluation, surface electromyographic (sEMG) measurement, and respiratory monitoring during swallowing. Subjects were evaluated swallowing the ODT and a conventional tablet formulation. Tablets were randomly and blindly presented to each subject. Subjects completed a preference survey subsequent to swallowing both tablets. Significant differences included greater sEMG amplitude and longer apneic duration when swallowing a conventional tablet compared with the ODT (P<.001). Patients with dysphagia demonstrated significantly longer total swallow durations (P<.001), a higher number of swallows per tablet (P<.002), and the need for fluid to assist in the clearance of the conventional tablet (P<.001). No significant difference was noted between the 2 tablet preparations in amount of residue or airway compromise during or following the swallow. On a postevaluation survey, patients reported that they preferred the ODT preparation for most of the parameters assessed. Patients with dysphagia frequently complain of trouble swallowing medication. In this study, an ODT formulation provided a method of delivery that required less effort to swallow, did not result in increased levels of airway compromise, and was preferred by dysphagic patients. The ODT medication delivery technology may provide benefit to adults with dysphagia in convenience, compliance, and accuracy of dosing.

  10. Quantitative classification of pediatric swallowing through accelerometry.

    PubMed

    Merey, Celeste; Kushki, Azadeh; Sejdić, Ervin; Berall, Glenn; Chau, Tom

    2012-06-09

    Dysphagia or swallowing disorder negatively impacts a child's health and development. The gold standard of dysphagia detection is videofluoroscopy which exposes the child to ionizing radiation, and requires specialized clinical expertise and expensive institutionally-based equipment, precluding day-to-day and repeated assessment of fluctuating swallowing function. Swallowing accelerometry is the non-invasive measurement of cervical vibrations during swallowing and may provide a portable and cost-effective bedside alternative. In particular, dual-axis swallowing accelerometry has demonstrated screening potential in older persons with neurogenic dysphagia, but the technique has not been evaluated in the pediatric population. In this study, dual-axis accelerometric signals were collected simultaneous to videofluoroscopic records from 29 pediatric participants (age 6.8 ± 4.8 years; 20 males) previously diagnosed with neurogenic dysphagia. Participants swallowed 3-5 sips of barium-coated boluses of different consistencies (normally, from thick puree to thin liquid) by spoon or bottle. Videofluoroscopic records were reviewed retrospectively by a clinical expert to extract swallow timings and ratings. The dual-axis acceleration signals corresponding to each identified swallow were pre-processed, segmented and trimmed prior to feature extraction from time, frequency, time-frequency and information theoretic domains. Feature space dimensionality was reduced via principal components. Using 8-fold cross-validation, 16-17 dimensions and a support vector machine classifier with an RBF kernel, an adjusted accuracy of 89.6% ± 0.9 was achieved for the discrimination between swallows with and with out airway entry. Our results suggest that dual-axis accelerometry has merit in the non-invasive detection of unsafe swallows in children and deserves further consideration as a pediatric medical device.

  11. Endoscopic characteristics and levodopa responsiveness of swallowing function in progressive supranuclear palsy.

    PubMed

    Warnecke, Tobias; Oelenberg, Stephan; Teismann, Inga; Hamacher, Christina; Lohmann, Hubertus; Ringelstein, Erich Bernd; Dziewas, Rainer

    2010-07-15

    Dysphagia is a frequent and early symptom in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) predisposing patients to aspiration pneumonia. Fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) has emerged as a valuable apparative tool for objective evaluation of neurogenic dysphagia. This is the first study using FEES to investigate the nature of swallowing impairment in PSP. Eighteen consecutive PSP patients (mean age 69.7 +/- 9.0 years) were included. The salient findings of FEES in PSP patients were compared with those of 15 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). In 7 PSP patients, a standardized FEES protocol was performed to explore levodopa (L-dopa) responsiveness of dysphagia. Most frequent abnormalities detected by FEES were bolus leakage, delayed swallowing reflex, and residues in valleculae and piriformes. Aspiration events with at least one food consistency occurred in nearly 30% of PSP patients. Significant pharyngeal saliva pooling was observed in 4 PSP patients. We found no difference of salient endoscopic findings between PSP and PD patients. Endoscopic dysphagia severity in PSP correlated positively with disease duration, clinical disability, and cognitive impairment. No correlation was found with dysarthria severity. In early PSP patients, swallowing dysfunction was solely characterized by liquid leakage with the risk of predeglutitive aspiration during the oral phase of swallowing. Two PSP patients showed relevant improvement of swallowing function after L-dopa challenge. Chin tuck-maneuver, hard swallow, and modification of food consistency were identified as the most effective therapeutic interventions. In conclusion, FEES assessment can deliver important findings for the diagnosis and refined therapy of dysphagia in PSP patients.

  12. Pharyngeal swallowing phase and chronic cough

    PubMed Central

    Drozdz, Daniela Rejane Constantino; Costa, Cintia Conceição; Jesus, Paulo Roberto de Oliveira; Trindade, Mateus Silva; Weiss, Guilherme; Neto, Abdias Baptista M.; da Silva, Ana Maria T.; Mancopes, Renata

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: The act of swallowing depends on a complex and dynamic process which uses common structures to the act of breathing; respiratory problems can cause swallowing difficulties. Aim: To assess the swallowing pharyngeal phase in patients with chronic cough. Method: Retrospective study with 15 patients of both genders, patients with chronic cough and risk factors for aspiration defined by the pneumologic diagnosis. The patients were submitted to anamnesis on complaints related to swallowing, chewing and breathing, or related to food and to videofluoroscopic examination. Results: It was observed that 33.3% had normal and functional swallowing, being the last one of most prevalence. The mild dysphagia was observed in 20% of the patients, the mild to moderate dysphagia in 6.7% of them. In relation to the Rosenbek scale, 73.3% of patients presented degree 1, 6.7% presented degrees 2 and 3, and 13.3% presented degree 8. The most found pathology was the chronic cough with 40%, followed by asthma with 20%; 69.2% of patients presented stasis and of these, five used protection maneuvers, of these, seven were effective and only three were used in the presence of stasis. The most used maneuver was the multiple swallowing, being effective in 100%. Conclusion: There are peculiarities in the patients' swallowing with chronic cough that, although not presenting complaints relating to swallowing, it presents an important aspiration risk due to the presence of changes in breathing pattern that can intervene in the coordination between breathing and swallowing, which is essential to protect the lower airway. PMID:25991980

  13. Electrophysiological association of spontaneous yawning and swallowing.

    PubMed

    Ertekin, Cumhur; Bulbul, Nazlı Gamze; Uludag, Irem Fatma; Tiftikcioglu, Bedile Irem; Arici, Sehnaz; Gurgor, Nevin

    2015-07-01

    Yawning and swallowing are fundamental physiological processes that are present from fetal stages throughout life and that involve sequential motor activities in the oropharyngo-larynx making it likely that they may share neuroanatomical pathways. We postulate that yawning and swallowing are controlled by a distributed network of brainstem regions including the central pattern generator of swallowing, and therefore spontaneous swallowing is frequently associated with spontaneous yawning. In this study, we sought to test this hypothesis by evaluating the elementary features of yawning in the facial, masseter and submental muscles, together with laryngeal movement sensor and respiratory recordings for spontaneous swallowing. We investigated 15 healthy, normal control subjects, 10 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and 10 patients with brainstem stroke (BSS). Apart from four subjects with PD and two with BSS, who had dysphagia, none of the other study subjects were dysphagic by published criteria. Twenty-five subjects (10 control, 10 BSS, 5 PD) were evaluated by 1-h polygraphic recording, and 10 (5 control, 5 PD) underwent whole-night sleep recordings. One hundred thirty-two yawns were collected, 113 of which were associated with spontaneous swallows, a clear excess of what would be considered as coincidence. The yawns related with swallows could be classified into the following three categories. The characteristics or the duration of swallows and yawns were similar between controls and disease subjects, with the exception of increased duration of yawning in subjects with BSS. Our findings support the presence of common neuroanatomico-physiological pathways for spontaneous swallows and yawning.

  14. Usefulness of ice massage in triggering the swallow reflex.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tomoyuki; Fujishima, Ichiro

    2013-05-01

    In Japan, ice massage is widely used as the prefeeding technique to facilitate dry swallowing, to improve swallowing apraxia for initiating the swallowing action, and in daily swallowing training. In a crossover study, we evaluated the usefulness of ice massage for eliciting the swallowing response. The subjects were 24 dysphagic patients with stroke and cerebrovascular disease. We measured the latency between the command of dry swallowing and the triggering of the swallow reflex by videofluoroscopic examination of swallowing, with and without ice massage. When a subject could not swallow all the 4 trials we recorded whether he or she could swallow or not. And we counted how many times he or she could swallow with and without ice massage. Our results suggest that ice massage significantly shortened the latency to triggering of the swallow reflex and often initiated swallowing even in those subjects who could not swallow without the massage. These results demonstrate that ice massage has an immediate effect on triggering of the swallow reflex. The effect of ice massage was especially remarkable in the 15 subjects who had supranuclear lesions compared with the subjects with nuclear lesions. Thus, ice massage could activate the damaged supranuclear tract and/or the normal nucleus and subnuclear tract for swallowing. Ice massage has proven useful in many clinical dysphagia training sessions. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Lung Volume Measured during Sequential Swallowing in Healthy Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hegland, Karen Wheeler; Huber, Jessica E.; Pitts, Teresa; Davenport, Paul W.; Sapienza, Christine M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Outcomes from studying the coordinative relationship between respiratory and swallow subsystems are inconsistent for sequential swallows, and the lung volume at the initiation of sequential swallowing remains undefined. The first goal of this study was to quantify the lung volume at initiation of sequential swallowing ingestion cycles and…

  16. Lung Volume Measured during Sequential Swallowing in Healthy Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hegland, Karen Wheeler; Huber, Jessica E.; Pitts, Teresa; Davenport, Paul W.; Sapienza, Christine M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Outcomes from studying the coordinative relationship between respiratory and swallow subsystems are inconsistent for sequential swallows, and the lung volume at the initiation of sequential swallowing remains undefined. The first goal of this study was to quantify the lung volume at initiation of sequential swallowing ingestion cycles and…

  17. [Videofluoroscopy study of swallowing in neurogenic dysphagia].

    PubMed

    Avdiunina, I A; Popova, L M; Dokuchaeva, N V; Bragina, L K; Dokuchaeva, N F

    2000-01-01

    Videofluoroscopy (VFS) was for the first time used for examining swallowing in 49 patients with nervous diseases. Disturbances in each phase of swallowing act are analyzed with evaluation of the time parameters and defects, causes of aspiration in neurogenic dysphagia are discussed, and cricopharyngeal insufficiency is described. Neurogenic dysphagia is characterized by a combination of disorders which determine the degree of dysphagia. The most severe swallowing disorders were observed in patients with multiple foci in the brain stem and in diphtheritic polyneuropathies. The authors conclude that VFS is the optimal method for the diagnosis of neurogenic dysphagia.

  18. Stuttered swallowing: Electric stimulation of the right insula interferes with water swallowing. A case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Various functional resonance imaging, magnetoencephalographic and lesion studies suggest the involvement of the insular cortex in the control of swallowing. However, the exact location of insular activation during swallowing and its functional significance remain unclear. Case presentation Invasive electroencephalographic monitoring was performed in a 24-year-old man with medically intractable stereotyped nocturnal hypermotor seizures due to a ganglioglioma. During stimulation of the right inferior posterior insular cortex with depth electrodes the patient spontaneously reported a perception of a "stutter in swallowing". Stimulation of the inferior posterior insular cortex at highest intensity (4 mA) was also associated with irregular and delayed swallows. Swallowing was not impaired during stimulation of the superior posterior insular cortex, regardless of stimulation intensity. Conclusions These results indicate that the right inferior posterior insular cortex is involved in the neural circuitry underlying the control of swallowing. PMID:21294905

  19. Respiratory-swallowing coordination in normal subjects: Lung volume at swallowing initiation.

    PubMed

    McFarland, D H; Martin-Harris, B; Fortin, A-J; Humphries, K; Hill, E; Armeson, K

    2016-12-01

    This study was designed to investigate the significance of bolus types and volumes, delivery methods and swallowing instructions on lung volume at swallowing initiation in normal subjects in a single experiment using a multifactorial approach. Our broad range goal was to determine optimal lung volume range associated with swallowing initiation to provide training targets for dysphagic patients with disordered respiratory-swallow coordination. Our hypothesis was that swallows would be initiated within a limited range of quiet breathing lung volumes regardless of bolus volume, consistency or task. Results confirmed this hypothesis and revealed that swallows were initiated at mean lung volume=244ml. Cued swallows were initiated at lower quiet breathing volumes than un-cued swallows (cued=201ml; un-cued=367ml). Water boluses were initiated at slightly higher quiet breathing volumes than solids. Data suggest that swallows occur within a restricted range of lung volumes with variation due to instructions, bolus type and other experimental variables. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. [The physiologic and the pathologic swallowing process].

    PubMed

    Cantemir, S; Laubert, A

    2017-03-01

    It is estimated that 5 million people in Germany currently suffer from swallowing disorders. Due to increasing life expectancy and the good outcome of very premature infants, this number is expected to increase. Swallowing normally occurs in four phases, and for each phase there are diagnostic tools to assess whether the problem is anatomic-organic or functional. A detailed case history is followed by clinical examination of the cranial nerves, the orofacial region, the swallowing reflex, and pharyngeal and esophageal transit. Attention is also paid to age-related changes in the swallowing process, nasal regurgitation, retention at the base of the tongue or in the hypopharynx, and signs of aspiration.

  1. Instrumentation for bedside analysis of swallowing disorders.

    PubMed

    Greco, Catiuscia S S; Nunes, Luiz G Q; Melo, Pedro L

    2010-01-01

    Disordered swallowing, or dysphagia, is a common problem seen in patients undergoing treatment for cancer, stroke and neurodegenerative illnesses. This disease is associated with aspiration-induced chest infections. The methods currently used for diagnosis, however, are qualitative or based on expensive equipment. Swallowing accelerometry is a promising low-cost, quantitative and noninvasive tool for the evaluation of swallowing. This work describes the design and application of a bedside instrument able to evaluate swallowing mechanisms and to identify patients at risk of aspiration. Three-axis swallowing accelerometry was used to measure the neck vibrations associated with deglutition, providing analog signals to a virtual instrument developed in LabVIEW environment. In vivo tests in normal subjects as well as tests with disphagic patients showed that the system was able to easily and non-invasively detect changes in the swallowing acceleration pattern associated with increasing values of water volume (p < 0.02) and disphagia. We concluded that the developed system could be a useful tool for the objective bedside evaluation of patients at risk of aspiration.

  2. Smartphone-Based Real-time Assessment of Swallowing Ability From the Swallowing Sound.

    PubMed

    Jayatilake, Dushyantha; Ueno, Tomoyuki; Teramoto, Yohei; Nakai, Kei; Hidaka, Kikue; Ayuzawa, Satoshi; Eguchi, Kiyoshi; Matsumura, Akira; Suzuki, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Dysphagia can cause serious challenges to both physical and mental health. Aspiration due to dysphagia is a major health risk that could cause pneumonia and even death. The videofluoroscopic swallow study (VFSS), which is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of dysphagia, is not widely available, expensive and causes exposure to radiation. The screening tests used for dysphagia need to be carried out by trained staff, and the evaluations are usually non-quantifiable. This paper investigates the development of the Swallowscope, a smartphone-based device and a feasible real-time swallowing sound-processing algorithm for the automatic screening, quantitative evaluation, and the visualisation of swallowing ability. The device can be used during activities of daily life with minimal intervention, making it potentially more capable of capturing aspirations and risky swallow patterns through the continuous monitoring. It also consists of a cloud-based system for the server-side analyzing and automatic sharing of the swallowing sound. The real-time algorithm we developed for the detection of dry and water swallows is based on a template matching approach. We analyzed the wavelet transformation-based spectral characteristics and the temporal characteristics of simultaneous synchronised VFSS and swallowing sound recordings of 25% barium mixed 3-ml water swallows of 70 subjects and the dry or saliva swallowing sound of 15 healthy subjects to establish the parameters of the template. With this algorithm, we achieved an overall detection accuracy of 79.3% (standard error: 4.2%) for the 92 water swallows; and a precision of 83.7% (range: 66.6%-100%) and a recall of 93.9% (range: 72.7%-100%) for the 71 episodes of dry swallows.

  3. Smartphone-Based Real-time Assessment of Swallowing Ability From the Swallowing Sound

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Tomoyuki; Teramoto, Yohei; Nakai, Kei; Hidaka, Kikue; Ayuzawa, Satoshi; Eguchi, Kiyoshi; Matsumura, Akira; Suzuki, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Dysphagia can cause serious challenges to both physical and mental health. Aspiration due to dysphagia is a major health risk that could cause pneumonia and even death. The videofluoroscopic swallow study (VFSS), which is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of dysphagia, is not widely available, expensive and causes exposure to radiation. The screening tests used for dysphagia need to be carried out by trained staff, and the evaluations are usually non-quantifiable. This paper investigates the development of the Swallowscope, a smartphone-based device and a feasible real-time swallowing sound-processing algorithm for the automatic screening, quantitative evaluation, and the visualisation of swallowing ability. The device can be used during activities of daily life with minimal intervention, making it potentially more capable of capturing aspirations and risky swallow patterns through the continuous monitoring. It also consists of a cloud-based system for the server-side analyzing and automatic sharing of the swallowing sound. The real-time algorithm we developed for the detection of dry and water swallows is based on a template matching approach. We analyzed the wavelet transformation-based spectral characteristics and the temporal characteristics of simultaneous synchronised VFSS and swallowing sound recordings of 25% barium mixed 3-ml water swallows of 70 subjects and the dry or saliva swallowing sound of 15 healthy subjects to establish the parameters of the template. With this algorithm, we achieved an overall detection accuracy of 79.3% (standard error: 4.2%) for the 92 water swallows; and a precision of 83.7% (range: 66.6%–100%) and a recall of 93.9% (range: 72.7%–100%) for the 71 episodes of dry swallows. PMID:27170905

  4. Evaluation of tongue-, jaw-, and swallowing-related muscle coordination during voluntarily triggered swallowing.

    PubMed

    Ono, Takahiro; Iwata, Hisayuki; Hori, Kazuhiro; Tamine, Kenichi; Kondoh, Jugo; Hamanaka, Sato; Maeda, Yoshinobu

    2009-01-01

    The prosthodontic treatment of dysphagic patients may preclude favorable treatment outcomes due to uncoordinated or discordant oral and pharyngeal functions. Since optimal treatment requires a full understanding of the mechanism of oropharyngeal swallowing, this study seeks to describe the normal temporal pattern of tongue-, jaw-, and swallowing-related muscle coordination during voluntarily triggered swallows in healthy patients. Tongue pressure against the hard palate at seven measuring points, swallowing sounds, and surface electromyography (EMG) activity of the masseter, anterior digastric, and infrahyoid muscles during voluntarily triggered swallowing were recorded in seven healthy male volunteers. The order of onset and offset of these parameters was analyzed by repeated-measures two-way analysis of variance. The onset of anterior digastric muscle activity occurred first and was significantly earlier than the onset of the masseter or infrahyoid muscles and tongue pressure. The onset of masseter muscle activity was also significantly earlier than that of the infrahyoid muscle and tongue pressure. Offset of masseter activity was almost simultaneous with the swallowing sound and was significantly earlier than the offset of the anterior digastric and infrahyoid muscles as well as tongue pressure. The EMG burst of the anterior digastric muscle continued until the offset of tongue pressure, and was followed by the offset of infrahyoid muscle activity. The temporal coordination patterns of the tongue, jaw, and oropharyngeal muscles during voluntarily triggered swallowing appear to agree with known safe management of a bolus and offer criteria for evaluating the function of oropharyngeal swallowing.

  5. Swallowing assessment in myotonic dystrophy type 1 using fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES).

    PubMed

    Pilz, Walmari; Baijens, Laura W J; Passos, Valéria Lima; Verdonschot, Rob; Wesseling, Frederik; Roodenburg, Nel; Faber, Catharina G; Kremer, Bernd

    2014-12-01

    This study describes the swallowing function of patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and the effect of bolus consistency on swallowing in this group. The aim of the study is twofold: (a) to identify which (and to what extent) swallowing variables change for DM1 patients relative to healthy control subjects and (b) to examine whether the degree of oropharyngeal dysphagia is associated with disease severity. Forty-five consecutive DM1 patients and ten healthy subjects underwent a swallowing assessment, at Maastricht University medical Center in the Netherlands. The assessment included a standardized fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) protocol using different bolus consistencies. Clinical severity of the disease was assessed using the muscular impairment rating scale (MIRS). Significant differences were found between patients and controls for all FEES variables. The magnitude of these differences depended on the bolus consistency. The odds of a more pathological swallowing outcome increased significantly with higher MIRS levels. In conclusion, swallowing function is found to be significantly altered in DM1 patients. The results emphasize the importance of conducting a detailed swallowing assessment in all patients, even those with mild muscle weakness.

  6. Influences of swallowing volume and viscosity on regulation of levator veli palatini muscle activity during swallowing.

    PubMed

    Okuno, K; Tachimura, T; Sakai, T

    2013-09-01

    This study examined the aspect of the regulation of velum movement in the transition from the oral to pharyngeal phases of swallowing in relation to changes in the swallowing volume and viscosity by means of measurment of levator veli palatini muscle activity. The subjects were nine normal adults, ranging in age from 24 to 30 years. The swallowing volume was set at 1/4, 1/2 and 1 volume of the optimum volume of green tea for swallowing determined in each subject, and the viscosity was adjusted to 0, 2·0 and 4·6 Pa·s by mixing with thickener. Nine test foods were prepared in total. The electromyographic activity of the levator veli palatini muscle was monitored using bipolar hooked wire electrodes. The levator veli palatini muscle activity was defined as the integrated electromyographic wave. The mean in swallowing each test food was determined in each subject. The levator veli palatini muscle activity increased with the swallowing volume for all subjects (P < 0·05) and decreased inversely with the viscosity for six subjects (P < 0·05), but no change with the increase in the viscosity was noted for three subjects. This study clarified the aspect of the regulation of velar movement with regard to the involvement of the levator veli palatini muscle in swallowing activity with changes in the swallowing volume and viscosity.

  7. Evaluation of patients with multiple sclerosis using reverse nutech functional score and expanded disability status scale after human embryonic stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Shroff, Geeta

    2016-12-01

    The expanded disability status scale (EDSS) is a validated and reliable tool to assess the extent of disabilities in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the use of this tool has been found to be limited in assessing various symptoms of MS that are important. Our study aimed at evaluating the efficacy of a new scoring system, reverse nutech functional score (RNFS) as compared to EDSS in assessing patients with MS treated with human embryonic stem cell (hESC) therapy. The MS patients were treated with hESC therapy for one treatment period. All the patients were evaluated with EDSS and RNFS at baseline and after the hESC therapy. The study included a total of 24 MS patients with mean age of 45 year. The patients showed an improvement in parameters (sleeping disorders, paralysis, paraesthesia, myalgia, muscle weakness, memory, language, irritability, eye pain, depression and coordination, communication, breathing pattern, attention and appetite) associated with MS when evaluated with RNFS. This improvement went unnoticed when the patients were assessed with EDSS. RNFS can efficiently assess the effectiveness of hESC therapy in treating patients with MS. It could be a suitable scoring system for patients with MS as it can assess the slightest improvements in the patients. Use in other settings would be helpful in assessing its utility.

  8. Variations in tongue-palate swallowing pressures when swallowing xanthan gum-thickened liquids.

    PubMed

    Steele, Catriona M; Molfenter, Sonja M; Péladeau-Pigeon, Melanie; Polacco, Rebecca C; Yee, Clemence

    2014-12-01

    Thickened liquids are frequently recommended to reduce the risk of aspiration in patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia. Although it has previously been reported that tongue-palate pressures increase when swallowing spoon-thick and semi-solid consistencies compared to thin liquids, relatively little is known about how swallowing behaviors differ when swallowing liquids of nectar- or honey-thick consistency. Furthermore, previous studies have primarily used starch-based thickeners, and little is known about swallowing behaviors with xanthan gum-thickened liquids, which have recently been introduced for dysphagia management. In this study, we measured variations in tongue-palate pressures during the swallowing of liquids thickened to apparent viscosities of 190, 250, and 380 mPa s at 50/s using increasing concentrations of xanthan gum (0.5, 0.63 and 0.87 w/w%). The viscosity differences between these nectar- and honey-thick stimuli were confirmed to exceed sensory perceptual discrimination thresholds. Data were collected from 78 healthy adults in two sex-balanced age-groups (young; mature) and compared to reference values obtained during water swallowing. The results confirm that increased amplitudes of tongue-palate pressure were used when swallowing the thickened liquid stimuli, compared to swallows of water, and for the honey-thick liquid compared to the two nectar-thick liquids. Age-related reductions were seen in tongue strength but not in swallowing pressures, which fell below 40 % of maximum isometric pressure values. Thus, the use of xanthan gum-thickened liquids is unlikely to tax the swallowing system in terms of tongue pressure generation requirements, even in seniors with reduced maximum isometric tongue pressure measures.

  9. Postoperative Swallowing Assessment After Lung Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Brooke; Byers, Sara; Wasserman-Wincko, Tamara; Smith, Libby; Hathaway, Bridget; Bhama, Jay; Shigemura, Norihisa; Hayanga, J W Awori; D'Cunha, Jonathan; Johnson, Jonas T

    2017-07-01

    Dysphagia, aspiration, and potential pneumonia represent a major source of morbidity in patients undergoing lung transplantation. Conditions that potentiate dysphagia and aspiration include frailty and prolonged intubation. Our group of speech-language pathologists has been actively involved in performance of a bedside evaluation of swallowing, and instrumental evaluation of swallowing with modified barium swallow, and postoperative management in patients undergoing lung transplantation. All lung transplant patients from April 2009 to September 2012 were evaluated retrospectively. A clinical bedside examination was performed by the speech-language pathology team, followed by a modified barium swallow or fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing. A total of 321 patients were referred for evaluation. Twenty-four patients were unable to complete the evaluation. Clinical signs of aspiration were apparent in 160 patients (54%). Deep laryngeal penetration or aspiration were identified in 198 (67%) patients during instrumental testing. A group of 81 patients (27%) had an entirely normal clinical examination, but were found to have either deep penetration or aspiration. The majority of patients aspirate after lung transplantation. Clinical bedside examination is not sensitive enough and will fail to identify patients with silent aspiration. A standard of practice following lung transplantation has been established that helps avoid postoperative aspiration associated with complications. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Nonspecific effects of gap paradigm on swallowing.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Masaki; Saitoh, Kazuya

    2017-02-01

    Analogous to the gap paradigm in experiments for saccadic eye movements with very short reaction times, we hypothesized that the initiation of oropharyngeal swallowing movements guided by visual cues are encouraged under experimental conditions using a similar gap paradigm. A red visual cue indicating to hold a bolus in the mouth and a blue one indicating to swallow the bolus were sequentially provided on a computer display to 11 healthy participants. The gap period between these cues varied from 0 to 800ms. Swallowing kinetics and kinematics were recorded using surface electromyography and a laser displacement sensor, respectively. In comparison with the no-gap paradigm, the delay from the onset of muscle activities to initiation of movement significantly decreased with a 100- (p<0.01) and 200-ms (p<0.005) gap period. With other gap periods, no significant change was detected in the delay. Initiation of visually guided swallowing was enhanced by a gap paradigm of 100-200ms. Wrist flexion was boosted in a similar manner. Thus, the gap effect may be a generalized warning effect. Our findings might provide insights into the contribution of the basal ganglia to volitional swallowing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The interaction between breathing and swallowing in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Nazan Simsek; Karaali, Kamil; Ünal, Ali; Kızılay, Ferah; Öğüş, Candan; Uysal, Hilmi

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the study is to determine the association between respiratory swallow patterns in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. Furthermore, it aims to clarify the role of the dysphagia limit in defining the relationship between swallowing disorders and respiratory disorders. Functional rating scales were used to describe swallowing and respiratory function. Swallowing was observed using the dysphagia limit. Dysphagia limit is the volume at which a second or more swallows are required to swallow the whole bolus. Laryngeal and chest movement sensors, pulmonary function tests, submental, and diaphragm electromyography activity were used to evaluate the relationship between swallowing and respiratory phase. Of the 27 patients included in the study, 14 were dysphagic and 13 were non-dysphagic. Tests showed normal respiratory function in 11 of the non-dysphagic patients and 3 of the dysphagic patients. There was a high correlation between the dysphagia limit and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale swallowing parameters. Non-dysphagic patients were able to swallow during inspiration but only six patients in the dysphagic group were able to swallow during inspiration. The occurrence of dysphagia in ALS is related to piecemeal deglutition and respiration consistency during swallowing. Detecting the timing of disturbances in the relationship between swallowing and respiration may be a way of identifying dysphagia. Dysphagia limit may be a useful, complementary test for assessing swallowing disturbances in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  12. Quality of life in swallowing of the elderly patients affected by stroke.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Émerson Soares; Amaral, Ana Karênina de Freitas Jordão do; Rêgo, Flávia Luiza Costa do; Azevedo, Elma Heitmann Mares; Silva, Priscila Oliveira Costa

    2017-01-01

    - The elderly population faces many difficulties as a result of the aging process. Conceptualize and evaluate their life quality is a challenge, being hard to characterize the impact on daily activities and on functional capacity. The stroke is one of the most disabling neurological diseases, becoming a public health problem. As an aggravating result, there is dysphagia, a disorder that compromises the progression of the food from the mouth to the stomach, causing clinical complications to the individual. - Characterize the life quality of the elderly swallowing affected by stroke. - Cross-sectional study conducted at the University Hospital, attended by 35 elderly with stroke, being 19 women and 16 men, with age between 60 and 90 years old, that self-reported satisfactory overall clinical picture. It was applied the Quality of Life Swallowing protocol. The data were statistically analyzed, by means of ANOVA tests, Spearman correlation, t test, with significance level of 5%. - The mean age was 69.5 years; as for the scores obtained by the 35 participants in the 11 domains of the protocol, it was observed a change in score indicating severe to moderate impact in quality of life related to self-reported swallowing (31.8% to 59.5%); the domain that most interfered was the feeding time (31.8%). - Elderly affected by stroke that present dysphagia has low scores in quality of life related to swallowing.

  13. EFFECT OF GUM CHEWING ON AIR SWALLOWING, SALIVA SWALLOWING AND BELCHING.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana Cristina Viana da; Aprile, Lilian Rose Otoboni; Dantas, Roberto Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Eructation is a physiologic event which allows gastric venting of swallowed air and most of the time is not perceived as a symptom. This is called gastric belching. Supragastric belching occurs when swallowed air does not reach the stomach and returns by mouth a short time after swallowing. This situation may cause discomfort, life limitations and problems in daily life. Our objective in this investigation was to evaluate if gum chewing increases the frequency of gastric and/or supragastric belches. Esophageal transit of liquid and gas was evaluated by impedance measurement in 16 patients with complaint of troublesome belching and in 15 controls. The Rome III criteria were used in the diagnosis of troublesome belching. The esophageal transit of liquid and gas was measured at 5 cm, 10 cm, 15 cm and 20 cm from the lower esophageal sphincter. The subjects were evaluated for 1 hour which was divided into three 20-minute periods: (1) while sitting for a 20-minute base period; (2) after the ingestion of yogurt (200 mL, 190 kcal), in which the subjects were evaluated while chewing or not chewing gum; (3) final 20-minute period in which the subjects then inverted the task of chewing or not chewing gum. In gastric belch, the air flowed from the stomach through the esophagus in oral direction and in supragastric belch the air entered the esophagus rapidly from proximal and was expulsed almost immediately in oral direction. Air swallows were characterized by an increase of at least 50% of basal impedance and saliva swallow by a decrease of at least 50% of basal impedance, that progress from proximal to distal esophagus. In base period, air swallowing was more frequent in patients than in controls and saliva swallowing was more frequent in controls than in patients. There was no difference between the medians of controls and patients in the number of gastric belches and supragastric belches. In six patients, supragastric belches were seen at least once during the 20-minute

  14. High resolution manometry of pharyngeal swallow pressure events associated with effortful swallow and the Mendelsohn maneuver

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Matthew R.; Mielens, Jason D.; Ciucci, Michelle R.; Jones, Corinne A.; Jiang, Jack J.; McCulloch, Timothy M.

    2013-01-01

    Effortful swallow and the Mendelsohn maneuver are two common strategies to improve disordered swallowing. We used high-resolution manometry (HRM) to quantify the effects of these maneuvers on pressure and timing characteristics. Fourteen normal subjects swallowed multiple, five ml water boluses using three techniques: normal swallow; effortful swallow; and Mendelsohn maneuver. Maximum pressure, rate, duration, area integral, and line integral were determined for the velopharynx and tongue base. Minimum pressure, duration of pressure-related change, duration of nadir pressure, maximum pre-opening and post-closure pressure, area integral, and line integral were recorded for the upper esophageal sphincter (UES). Area and line integrals of the velopharyngeal pressure curve significantly increased with the Mendelsohn maneuver; the line integral increased with the effortful swallow. Pre-opening UES pressure decreased significantly for the Mendelsohn, while post-closure pressure tended to increase insignificantly for both maneuvers. UES area and line integrals as well as nadir UES pressure duration increased with both maneuvers. Maneuver-dependent changes were observed primarily at the velopharynx and UES. These regions are critical to safe swallowing, as the velopharynx provides positive pressure at the bolus tail while the UES allows a bolus to enter the esophagus without risk of regurgitation. Integrals were more responsive than maximum pressure or duration and should be investigated further. PMID:22215280

  15. Does barium influence tongue behaviors during swallowing?

    PubMed

    Steele, Catriona M; van Lieshout, Pascal H H M

    2005-02-01

    The validity of videofluoroscopic swallowing assessments rests on the understanding that thin, nectar-, honey-, and spoon-thick radiopaque liquids resemble nonopaque liquids, both in their consistency and in the variations in swallowing that they elicit. Tongue movements during sequential swallows of opaque and nonopaque liquids were studied in 8 healthy participants in 2 age groups (<30 years, >50 years) using electromagnetic midsagittal articulography. Differences included smaller sip size, longer oropharyngeal transit times, and greater variability in tongue movement patterns with opaque liquids compared to nonopaque liquids, but effect sizes for these differences were small. Transit times were significantly longer for older participants than younger participants. We recommend matching radiopaque bolus size in videofluoroscopy to the patient's habitually preferred sip mass for comparator nonopaque liquids.

  16. Tongue pressure patterns during water swallowing.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Daniel; Kieser, Jules; Bolter, Chris; Swain, Michael; Singh, Bhavia; Waddell, J Neil

    2010-03-01

    Bolus propulsion during the normal oral phase of swallowing is thought to be characterised by the sequential elevation of the front, middle, and posterior regions of the dorsum of the tongue. However, the coordinated orchestration of lingual movement is still poorly understood. This study examined how pressures generated by the tongue against the hard palate differed between three points along the midline of the tongue. Specifically, we tested three hypotheses: (1) that there are defined individual patterns of pressure change within the mouth during liquid swallowing; (2) that there are significant negative pressures generated at defined moments during normal swallowing; and, (3) that liquid swallowing is governed by the interplay of pressures generated in an anteroposterior direction in the mouth. Using a metal appliance described previously, we measured absolute pressures during water swallows in six healthy volunteers (4 male, 2 female) with an age range of 25-35 years. Participants performed three 10-ml water swallows from a small cup on five separate days, thus providing data for a total of 15 separate water swallows. There was a distinct pattern to the each of the pressure signals, and this pattern was preserved in the mean obtained when the data were pooled. Furthermore, raw signals from the same subjects presented consistent patterns at each of the five testing sessions. In all subjects, pressure at the anterior and hind palate tended to be negative relative to the preswallow value; at mid-palate, however, pressure changes were less consistent between individuals. When the pressure differences between the sites were calculated, we found that during the swallow a net negative pressure difference developed between anterior and mid-palate and a net positive pressure difference developed between mid-palate and hind palate. Large, rapid fluctuations in pressure occurred at all sites and these varied several-fold between subjects. When the brief sharp reduction

  17. Status report: biological control of swallow-worts

    Treesearch

    Aaron S. Weed; Richard A.. Casagrande

    2009-01-01

    Two swallow-worts (Vincetoxicum nigrum and V. rossicum), originating from Europe, have become established in the eastern United States and Canada. Swallow-worts are herbaceous perennials that persist...

  18. Effects of pollution on swallowing: how little we know

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, J.B.; Silver, K.H. )

    1992-06-01

    Swallowing is an essential function of the upper alimentary tract. It is highly complex, requiring precise coordination of numerous nerves and muscles of the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, and esophagus. Swallowing is integrated with other physiologic functions, including mastication and respiration. Impairments of swallowing may result from many different structural or physiologic disorders. Little is currently known about the direct effects of pollution on swallowing. Structures critical to swallowing, however, are vulnerable to damage by environmental hazards such as exposure to ionizing radiation or intake of toxins by ingestion or inhalation. The relationship of swallowing to environmental lung disease is an area of particular interest because impaired swallowing may result in aspiration of food particles into the lung, and because pollutants may hamper airway defense mechanisms. In this article, we discuss the possible impact of selected environmental agents on swallowing and suggest future directions for research.26 references.

  19. Examining the role of carbonation and temperature on water swallowing performance: a swallowing reaction-time study.

    PubMed

    Michou, Emilia; Mastan, Aliya; Ahmed, Saira; Mistry, Satish; Hamdy, Shaheen

    2012-11-01

    Various therapeutic approaches for dysphagia management are based on modifications of bolus properties to change swallowing biomechanics and increase swallowing safety. Limited evidence exists for the effects of carbonation and bolus temperature on swallowing behavior. Here, we investigated the effects of carbonation and temperature on swallowing behavior using a novel automated and complex swallowing reaction time task via pressure signal recordings in the hypopharynx. Healthy participants (n = 39, 27.7±5 years old) were randomized in two different experiments and asked to perform 10 normal-paced swallows, 10 fast-paced swallows, and 10 challenged swallows within a predetermined time-window of carbonated versus still water (experiment 1) and of cold (4 °C) versus hot (45 °C) versus room temperature (21 °C) water (experiment 2). Quantitative measurements of latencies and percentage of successful challenged swallows were collected and analyzed nonparametrically. An increase in successfully performed challenged swallowing task was observed with carbonated water versus still water (P = 0.021), whereas only cold water shortened the latencies of normally paced swallows compared with room (P = 0.001) and hot (P = 0.004) temperatures. Therefore, it appears that chemothermal stimulation with carbonation and cold are most effective at modulating water swallowing, which in part is likely to be driven by central swallowing afferent activity.

  20. Rehabilitation of swallowing and communication following glossectomy.

    PubMed

    LaBlance, G R; Kraus, K; Steckol, K F

    1991-01-01

    Patients who have had surgical removal of part or all of the tongue are left with varying degrees of swallowing and speech deficiencies. The extent of resection, mobility of the residual tongue segment, and adequacy of the remaining structures determine the amount and type of deficiency. While communicative impairment and dysphagia commonly are seen in a rehabilitation setting, the problems of the glossectomy patient often are unique. This article reviews the anatomy and physiology of the oral and pharyngeal musculature, discusses the speech and swallowing of the glossectomy patient, and presents nursing considerations for successful rehabilitation.

  1. Accidental swallowing of orthodontic expansion appliance key.

    PubMed

    Monini, André da Costa; Maia, Luiz Guilherme Martins; Jacob, Helder Baldi; Gandini, Luiz Gonzaga

    2011-08-01

    Ingestion of a foreign object, including a dental object, can lead to a trip to the emergency room. This article describes the accidental swallowing of a key that was used to activate a rapid maxillary expander. An orthodontic patient swallowed the key while trying to activate the appliance at home. The object's trajectory was followed on radiographs until it was eliminated. Possible clinical complications, legal implications of this situation, and practices for prevention are described. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of a swallowing frequency meter using a laryngeal microphone.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, N; Nohara, K; Okuno, K; Kotani, Y; Okazaki, H; Matsumura, M; Sakai, T

    2012-06-01

    Disuse atrophy of swallowing-related organs is suspected when decreased swallowing frequency is seen in the elderly. However, swallowing frequency has not been examined in elderly people during daily life. We developed a swallowing frequency meter containing a laryngeal microphone that does not restrict the subject's ability to perform daily activities. In this study, the utility of the meter was assessed. Experiment 1: The ability of the meter to detect swallowing was examined. The subject was instructed to swallow saliva or foods at a voluntarily pace. During these procedures, swallowing events were simultaneously recorded by the meter, self-enumeration and videofluorography. As a result, all of the swallowing events identified by the meter coincided with the swallowing events identified by self-enumeration and videofluorography. Experiment 2: Swallowing sounds display various patterns both between and within individuals. Therefore, we examined the concordance rate between the number of swallowing events counted by the meter and that counted by self-enumeration in 15 subjects over a longer period than in experiment 1. The concordance rates calculated by two examiners between the meter and self-enumeration were 96·8 ± 4·5% and 98·9 ± 3·3% at rest and 95·2 ± 4·5% and 96·1 ± 4·1% during meals, respectively. Our findings indicate that this meter is useful for measuring the frequency of swallowing during daily situations.

  3. Effects of Verbal Cue on Bolus Flow during Swallowing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Stephanie K.; Schroeder, Mae Fern; DeGeorge, Pamela C.; Corey, David M.; Rosenbek, John C.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the effects of verbal cuing to initiate swallowing on bolus flow measures in healthy adults. Method: Videofluoroscopic examinations were completed in 12 healthy older adults (median age = 69 years) as they swallowed 5 ml of self-administered liquid barium in 2 conditions: verbally cued and noncued swallows. In the cued…

  4. Effects of Verbal Cue on Bolus Flow during Swallowing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Stephanie K.; Schroeder, Mae Fern; DeGeorge, Pamela C.; Corey, David M.; Rosenbek, John C.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the effects of verbal cuing to initiate swallowing on bolus flow measures in healthy adults. Method: Videofluoroscopic examinations were completed in 12 healthy older adults (median age = 69 years) as they swallowed 5 ml of self-administered liquid barium in 2 conditions: verbally cued and noncued swallows. In the cued…

  5. Symptomatic swallowing-induced paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Mirvis, D M; Bandura, J P; Brody, D A

    1977-05-04

    A 55 year old woman with palpitations during ingestion of food or drink was evaluated with surface, esophageal and dynamic electrocardiographic techniques. Recordings documented the consistent induction of supraventricular tachycardia by swallowing; no definable gastrointestinal or other cardiac abnormality was present. Nine previously reported cases are reviewed, with special reference to the role of vagovagal reflexes in the pathogenesis of this unusual clinical syndrome.

  6. Feeding and Swallowing Dysfunction in Genetic Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper-Brown, Linda; Copeland, Sara; Dailey, Scott; Downey, Debora; Petersen, Mario Cesar; Stimson, Cheryl; Van Dyke, Don C.

    2008-01-01

    Children with genetic syndromes frequently have feeding problems and swallowing dysfunction as a result of the complex interactions between anatomical, medical, physiological, and behavioral factors. Feeding problems associated with genetic disorders may also cause feeding to be unpleasant, negative, or even painful because of choking, coughing,…

  7. The Neurobiology of Swallowing and Dysphagia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Arthur J.

    2008-01-01

    The neurobiological study of swallowing and its dysfunction, defined as dysphagia, has evolved over two centuries beginning with electrical stimulation applied directly to the central nervous system, and then followed by systematic investigations that have used lesioning, transmagnetic stimulation, magnetoencephalography, and functional magnetic…

  8. The electrodiagnostic examination of psychogenic swallowing disorders.

    PubMed

    Vaiman, Michael; Shoval, Gal; Gavriel, Haim

    2008-06-01

    The article discusses the usefulness and technique of investigation of suspected psychogenic dysphagia by surface electromyography (sEMG) of deglutition. Thirty-two patients with suspected psychogenic dysphagia (Group 1) and 40 healthy individuals (Group 2) were involved in the study. The timing, amplitude and graphic patterns of activity of the masseter, submental, infrahyoid and trapezius muscles were examined during voluntary single water swallows ("normal"), and continuous drinking of 100 cc of water. The muscle activity in oral, pharyngeal and initial oesophageal stages of swallowing was measured, and graphic records were evaluated in relation to timing and voltage. Globus hystericus was found in only 14 patients of the Group 1 (43.75%). The main sEMG pattern of psychogenic dysphagia is a lack of any pathologic changes of timing, voltage and graphic patterns of deglutition. In 28% of cases tension of skeletal muscles not involved in deglutition was observed during single swallowing (vs. 0% in controls). Psychogenic/hysteria-conversion dysphagia has no pathologic sEMG patterns associated with deglutition. Skeletal muscle tension during deglutition, being observed in some cases has no connection with the act of swallowing itself. Surface EMG, being non-invasive and non-radiographic, can be used for screening purposes for patients with dysphagia thus avoiding expensive and time-consuming investigation.

  9. The Neurobiology of Swallowing and Dysphagia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Arthur J.

    2008-01-01

    The neurobiological study of swallowing and its dysfunction, defined as dysphagia, has evolved over two centuries beginning with electrical stimulation applied directly to the central nervous system, and then followed by systematic investigations that have used lesioning, transmagnetic stimulation, magnetoencephalography, and functional magnetic…

  10. Feeding and Swallowing Dysfunction in Genetic Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper-Brown, Linda; Copeland, Sara; Dailey, Scott; Downey, Debora; Petersen, Mario Cesar; Stimson, Cheryl; Van Dyke, Don C.

    2008-01-01

    Children with genetic syndromes frequently have feeding problems and swallowing dysfunction as a result of the complex interactions between anatomical, medical, physiological, and behavioral factors. Feeding problems associated with genetic disorders may also cause feeding to be unpleasant, negative, or even painful because of choking, coughing,…

  11. Training effects of the effortful swallow under three exercise conditions.

    PubMed

    Clark, Heather M; Shelton, Natalia

    2014-10-01

    The effortful swallow achieves overload through high effort. It was predicted that both immediate effects on biomechanics and long-term neuromuscular adaptations would be facilitated by maximal overload during this exercise. This study examined how high-effort sips from small-diameter straws influenced linguapalatal swallow pressures. Additionally, training effects of effortful swallows preceded by high-effort sips were compared to two other exercise conditions: effortful swallows preceded by maximum effort lingual elevation and effortful swallows performed in isolation. Training outcomes included linguapalatal pressures produced during effortful and noneffortful swallows, and maximum isometric pressure (MIP) produced during tongue elevation and interlabial compression. Forty healthy adults participated in the experiment. Lingual-palatal swallowing pressure during non effortful and effortful swallows and MIPs were measured prior to and after 4 weeks of training. Prior to training, anterior linguapalatal pressures were significantly higher during effortful compared to noneffortful swallows. Anterior linguapalatal pressures did not significantly differ during swallows preceded by sips from high-resistance straws. Weak correlations were observed between tongue MIP and linguapalatal pressures during effortful swallows. After training, anterior linguapalatal pressures significantly increased, with training effects more dramatic for effortful swallows. Anterior tongue MIP also significantly increased. Gains in anterior linguapalatal pressure were not correlated with gains in tongue MIP. Training effects did not vary across exercise condition. The study failed to find a training advantage of pairing the effortful swallow with a precursor movement. The results demonstrated specificity of training, with more dramatic benefits observed for effortful swallows relative to noneffortful swallows. Further investigation is needed to characterize training effects in older adults

  12. The Effects of Removable Denture on Swallowing

    PubMed Central

    Son, Dae-Sik; Seong, Jin Wan; Kim, Younghoon; Chee, Youngjoon

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between removable dentures and swallowing and describe risks. Methods Twenty-four patients with removable dentures who were referred for videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) were enrolled. We evaluated the change of swallowing function using VFSS before and after the removal of the removable denture. The masticatory performance by Kazunori's method, sensation of oral cavity by Christian's method, underlying disease, and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale for level of consciousness were collected. Functional dysphagia scales, including the oral transit time (OTT), pharyngeal transit time (PTT), percentage of oral residue, percentage of pharyngeal residue, oropharyngeal swallow efficiency (OPSE), and presence of aspiration were measured. Results Four patients dropped out and 20 patients were analyzed (stroke, 13 patients; pneumonia, 3 patients; and others, 4 patients). The mean age was 73.3±11.4 years. There were significant differences before and after the removal of the denture for the OTT. OTT was significantly less after the removal of the denture (8.87 vs. 4.38 seconds, p=0.01). OPSE increased remarkably after the removal of the denture, but without significance (18.24%/sec vs. 25.26%/sec, p=0.05). The OTT and OPSE, while donning a removable denture, were correlated with the masticatory performance (OTT, p=0.04; OPSE, p=0.003) and sensation of oral cavity (OTT, p=0.006; OPSE, p=0.007). Conclusion A removable denture may have negative effects on swallowing, especially OTT and OPSE. These affects may be caused by impaired sensation of the oral cavity or masticatory performance induced by the removable denture. PMID:23705121

  13. Senescent Swallowing: Impact, Strategies and Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Ney, Denise; Weiss, Jennifer; Kind, Amy; Robbins, JoAnne

    2010-01-01

    The risk for disordered oropharyngeal swallowing (dysphagia) increases with age. Loss of swallowing function can have devastating health implications including dehydration, malnutrition, and pneumonia, as well as reduced quality of life. Age-related changes place older adults at risk for dysphagia for two major reasons: One is that natural, healthy aging takes its toll on head and neck anatomy and physiologic and neural mechanisms underpinning swallowing function. This progression of change contributes to alterations in the swallowing in healthy older adults and is termed presbyphagia, naturally diminishing functional reserve. Second, disease prevalence increases with age and dysphagia is a co-morbidity of many age-related diseases and/or their treatments. Sensory changes, medication, sarcopenia and age-related diseases are discussed herein. Relatively recent findings that health complications are associated with dysphagia are presented. Nutrient requirements, fluid intake and nutritional assessment for older adults are reviewed relative to their relations to dysphagia. Dysphagia screening and the pros and cons of tube feeding as a solution are discussed. Optimal intervention strategies for elders with dysphagia ranging from compensatory interventions to more rigorous exercise approaches are presented. Compelling evidence of improved functional swallowing and eating outcomes resulting from active rehabilitation focusing on increasing strength of head and neck musculature is provided. In summary, while oropharyngeal dysphagia may be life-threatening, so are some of the traditional alternatives, particularly for frail, elderly patients. While the state of the evidence calls for more research, this review indicates the behavioral, dietary and environmental modifications emerging in this past decade are compassionate, promising and in many cases preferred alternatives to the always present option of tube feeding. PMID:19483069

  14. Swallowing Function and Nutritional Status in Japanese Elderly People Receiving Home-care Services: A 1-year Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Y; Furuta, M; Akifusa, S; Takeuchi, K; Adachi, M; Kinoshita, T; Kikutani, T; Nakamura, S; Yamashita, Y

    2016-01-01

    Malnutrition is a serious health concern for frail elderly people. Poor oral function leading to insufficient food intake can contribute to the development of malnutrition. In the present study, we explored the longitudinal association of malnutrition with oral function, including oral health status and swallowing function, in elderly people receiving home nursing care. Prospective observational cohort study with 1-year follow-up. Two mid-sized cities in Fukuoka, Japan from November 2010 to March 2012. One hundred and ninety-seven individuals, aged ≥ 60 years, living at home and receiving home-care services because of physical disabilities, without malnutrition. Oral health status, swallowing function, taking modified-texture diets such as minced or pureed foods, nutritional status, cognitive function, and activities of daily living were assessed at baseline. The associations between malnutrition at 1-year follow-up and these related factors were analyzed using a logistic regression model. Swallowing disorders [risk ratio (RR): 5.21, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.65-16.43] were associated with malnutrition. On the other hand, oral health status did not have a direct association with malnutrition. Swallowing disorders may be associated with the incidence of malnutrition in elderly people receiving home-care. The findings indicate that maintaining swallowing function may contribute to the prevention of malnutrition in frail elderly people.

  15. Effect of body posture on involuntary swallow in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Shiino, Yoshitaka; Sakai, Shogo; Takeishi, Ryosuke; Hayashi, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Masahiro; Tsujimura, Takanori; Magara, Jin; Ito, Kayoko; Tsukada, Tetsu; Inoue, Makoto

    2016-03-01

    Clinically, reclining posture has been reported to reduce risk of aspiration. However, during involuntary swallow in reclining posture, changes in orofacial and pharyngeal movement before and during pharyngeal swallow should be considered. Further, the mechanisms underlying the effect of body posture on involuntary swallow remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of body posture on activity patterns of the suprahyoid muscles and on patterns of bolus transport during a natural involuntary swallow. Thirteen healthy male adults participated in a water infusion test and a chewing test. In the water infusion test, thickened water was delivered into the pharynx at a very slow rate until the first involuntary swallow was evoked. In the chewing test, subjects were asked to eat 10 g of gruel rice. In both tests, the recording was performed at four body postures between upright and supine positions. Results showed that reclining changed the location of the bolus head at the start of swallow and prolonged onset latency of the swallowing initiation. Muscle burst duration and whiteout time measured by videoendoscopy significantly increased with body reclining and prolongation of the falling time. In the chewing test, reclining changed the location of the bolus head at the start of swallow, and the frequency of bolus residue after the first swallow increased. Duration and area of EMG burst and whiteout time significantly increased with body reclining. These data suggest that body reclining may result in prolongation of pharyngeal swallow during involuntary swallow. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Functional MRI of swallowing: from neurophysiology to neuroplasticity.

    PubMed

    Malandraki, Georgia A; Johnson, Sterling; Robbins, Joanne

    2011-10-01

    Swallowing is a complex neurogenic sensorimotor process involving all levels of the neuraxis and a vast number of muscles and anatomic structures. Disruption of any of these anatomic or functional components can lead to swallowing disorders (also known as dysphagia). Understanding the neural pathways that govern swallowing is necessary in diagnosing and treating patients with dysphagia. Functional MRI (fMRI) is a prevalent and effective neuroimaging method that has been used to study the complex neurophysiologic control of swallowing in vivo. This article presents a summary of the research studies that have used fMRI to study the neural control of swallowing in normal subjects and dysphagic patients, and to investigate the effects of swallowing treatments on neuroplasticity. Methodologic challenges and caveats are discussed, and a case study of a pre-posttreatment paradigm is presented to highlight potential future directions of fMRI applications in swallowing research and clinical practice. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. [Surface electromyographic study on swallowing in normal adults].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Li, Jin-rang; Chen, Dong-lan

    2013-06-01

    To study the characteristics of surface electromyography (sEMG) during swallowing in normal adults. The sEMG during swallowing was carried out in 126 normal adults. There were 66 males and 60 females with their age ranged from 18 to 65 years. The recording electrodes were placed on the skin above the superior thyroid notch and the duration and amplitude of muscle activities during every deglutition were recorded. Swallowing styles were dry swallow, 20 ml water swallow and 40 ml water swallow. The durations of sEMG at dry swallow, 20 ml water swallow and 40 ml water swallow were (1.133 ± 0.209)s (x¯ ± s), (1.097 ± 0.208)s, and (1.510 ± 0.432)s, while the amplitudes were (0.332 ± 0.115)mV, (0.308 ± 0.095)mV, and (0.399 ± 0.139)mV in normal male group. The durations of sEMG at dry swallow, 20 ml water swallow and 40 ml water swallow were (1.118 ± 0.170)s, (1.085 ± 0.209)s, and (1.765 ± 0.463)s, while the amplitudes were (0.292 ± 0.100)mV, (0.261 ± 0.113)mV, and (0.342 ± 0.129)mV in normal female group. The amplitudes of sEMG in male were higher than those in female (P < 0.05) and the durations had no statistically significant difference between male and female (P > 0.05) in all swallow styles except that the duration of 40 ml water swallow in female was longer than that in male (P < 0.05). In all volunteers, the durations of sEMG at 40 ml water swallow were longer than those at dry swallow and 20 ml water swallow, and there was no statistically significant difference between dry swallow and 20 ml water swallow. The amplitude of sEMG at 40 ml water swallow was higher than that at dry swallow. The amplitude of sEMG in dry swallow was higher than that at 20 ml water swallow. There was no statistically significant difference in durations and amplitudes of sEMG among four different age groups of male. In the female groups, there was no statistically significant difference in durations and amplitudes of sEMG among four different age groups except that the

  18. Psychosocial effects of reverse-integrated basketball activity compared to separate and no physical activity in young people with physical disability.

    PubMed

    Hutzler, Yeshayahu; Chacham-Guber, Anat; Reiter, Shunit

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of participation in different sport modalities on quality of life (QOL) and perceived social competence (PSC) in young people with physical disability. Ninety participants (33 females and 57 males) were monitored across four conditions: competitive separate physical activity (COSPA), recreational separate physical activity (RESPA), reverse-integrated basketball activity (RIBA), and no physical activity (NOPA). QOL and PSC questionnaires were administered at the beginning and the end of the study's duration of six months. ANCOVA corrected for functional independence and gender revealed significant group effects for pre to post change values of QOL and PSC, with greater positive change in the RIBA compared to all other groups. In addition, one-way ANOVA on pre to post change values with LSD post hoc revealed significant differences. RIBA change values for QOL with 8.77%, and for PSC with 9.98% change were significantly higher (p<.001) than in all other groups (ranges -0.18 through 1.36% for QOL, and -2.31 through 2.34% for PSC). These outcomes demonstrate a favorable outcome of the RIBA on participants. Low functional ability did not constrain the effects of sport participation.

  19. Transnasal endoscopic evaluation of swallowing: a bedside technique to evaluate ability to swallow pureed diets in elderly patients with dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Torao; Horiuchi, Akira; Nakayama, Yoshiko

    2013-08-01

    Endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (EES) is not commonly used by gastroenterologists to evaluate swallowing in patients with dysphagia. To use transnasal endoscopy to identify factors predicting successful or failed swallowing of pureed foods in elderly patients with dysphagia. EES of pureed foods was performed by a gastroenterologist using a small-calibre transnasal endoscope. Factors related to successful versus unsuccessful swallowing of pureed foods were analyzed with regard to age, comorbid diseases, swallowing activity, saliva pooling, vallecular residues, pharyngeal residues and airway penetration⁄aspiration. Unsuccessful swallowing was defined in patients who could not eat pureed foods at bedside during hospitalization. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent predictors of swallowing of pureed foods. During a six-year period, 458 consecutive patients (mean age 80 years [range 39 to 97 years]) were considered for the study, including 285 (62%) men. Saliva pooling, vallecular residues, pharyngeal residues and penetration⁄aspiration were found in 240 (52%), 73 (16%), 226 (49%) and 232 patients (51%), respectively. Overall, 247 patients (54%) failed to swallow pureed foods. Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the presence of pharyngeal residues (OR 6.0) and saliva pooling (OR 4.6) occurred significantly more frequently in patients who failed to swallow pureed foods. Pharyngeal residues and saliva pooling predicted impaired swallowing of pureed foods. Transnasal EES performed by a gastroenterologist provided a unique bedside method of assessing the ability to swallow pureed foods in elderly patients with dysphagia.

  20. The Effect of the Cervical Orthosis on Swallowing Physiology and Cervical Spine Motion During Swallowing.

    PubMed

    Mekata, Kojiro; Takigawa, Tomoyuki; Matsubayashi, Jun; Toda, Kazukiyo; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Ito, Yasuo

    2016-02-01

    Cervical orthosis is used to immobilize the neck in various disorders such as trauma and post-operation. However, it is still uncertain how cervical orthosis restricts the degree of movement of the cervical spine during swallowing and how they affect swallowing physiology. The purpose of this study was to evaluate these issues using the Philadelphia(®) Collar. We conducted videofluorography of swallowing in 39 healthy subjects (23 men, 16 women; mean age of 34.3 years) with and without cervical orthosis. To compare the two conditions regarding the cervical spine motion, we determined the angular and positional changes of the occipital bone (C0) and each cervical vertebra (C1-C7) from the oral phase to the pharyngeal phase. Similarly, to compare swallowing physiology, we assessed the start and end times and the durations of soft palate elevation, rapid hyoid anterosuperior movement, epiglottis inversion, closure of the laryngeal vestibule, and pharyngoesophageal segment (PES) opening. Finally, we compared the transit times of contrast agent in the two conditions. The respective extensions of C1, C2, and C3 were 0.31°, 0.07°, and 0.05° (mean) with cervical orthosis, and the respective flexions of C1, C2, and C3 were 0.98°, 1.42°, and 0.85° (mean) without. These results suggested that cervical orthosis restricted the flexion of C1-C3. Analysis of swallowing physiology revealed that the average durations of hyoid anterosuperior elevation, epiglottic inversion, and PES opening were prolonged by 0.09, 0.19, and 0.05 s, respectively. In conclusion, the cervical orthosis restricted the movement of the cervical spine during swallowing and changed swallowing physiology.

  1. Towards automated ingestion detection: swallow sounds.

    PubMed

    Walker, William P; Bhatia, Dinesh

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is a worldwide epidemic and is a cause of many major chronic diseases. In most cases, obesity is a result of an imbalance between food intake and calories burned. Steps toward automated ingestion detection are being made. In order to automate the process of capturing ingestion, a method for detecting, analyzing, and recording sounds related to ingestion is being developed. In this paper, preliminary swallow sound analysis is presented and compared with various other noises captured from a throat mounted microphone. Initial frequency analysis indicates a stronger presence at high frequency intervals for swallow sounds in relation to other captured sounds such as voice. Comparisons show that a single high-pass filter can offer similar results as wavelet decomposition. Two simple methods for event detection are given.

  2. Effects of Effortful Swallow on Cardiac Autonomic Regulation.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Lívia M S; Silva, Roberta G; Melo, Monique; Silva, Nayra N; Vanderlei, Franciele M; Garner, David M; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Valenti, Vitor E

    2016-04-01

    Swallowing-induced changes in heart rate have been recently reported. However, it is not apparent the responses of heart rate variability (HRV) elicited by effortful swallow maneuver. We investigated the acute effects of effortful swallowing maneuver on HRV. This study was performed on 34 healthy women between 18 and 35 years old. We assessed heart rate variability in the time (SDNN, RMSSD, and pNN50) and frequency (HF, LF, and LF/HF ratio) domains and, visual analysis through the Poincaré plot. The subjects remained at rest for 5 min during spontaneous swallowing and then performed effortful swallowing for 5 min. HRV was analyzed during spontaneous and effortful swallowing. We found no significant differences for SDNN, pNN50, RMSSD, HF in absolute units (ms(2)). There is a trend for increase of LF in absolute (p = 0.05) and normalized (p = 0.08) units during effortful swallowing. HF in normalized units reduced (p = 0.02) during effortful swallowing and LF/HF ratio (p = 0.03) increased during effortful swallowing. In conclusion effortful swallow maneuver in healthy women increased sympathetic cardiac modulation, indicating a cardiac overload.

  3. Ataxia Telangiectasia in Siblings: Oral Motor and Swallowing Characterization.

    PubMed

    Rondon-Melo, Silmara; de Almeida, Isabel Junqueira; Andrade, Claudia Regina Furquim de; Sassi, Fernanda Chiarion; Molini-Avejonas, Daniela Regina

    2017-07-12

    BACKGROUND The body of literature on oral motor and swallowing disorders in patients with ataxia telangiectasia (AT) is limited. CASE REPORT The purpose of this study was to characterize oral motor and swallowing disorders in two siblings with AT, based on oral motor and swallowing assessments. Specific procedures were applied for oral motor and swallowing assessments and both patients underwent videofluoroscopy (VFS). Case 1 presented vocal instability, change in postural control during feeding; food retention in oral cavity; slower oral transit time; and multiple swallowing (signs for solid and liquid). Case 2 presented parted lips at rest and reduced muscle strength; reduced strength and mobility of the tongue; vocal weakness and instability; reduced speech precision and intelligibility; decreased intonation pattern; food retention in oral cavity during feeding; slower oral transit time; multiple swallowing (signs for solid and liquid); poor bolus ejection; incoordination and difficulty in controlling the sips of water taken from the cup; altered cervical auscultation after swallowing and respiratory distress (liquid and puree). For both patients VFS results revealed laryngeal penetration for liquid. CONCLUSIONS Although the literature describes the occurrence of dysarthria and swallowing disorders in patients with AT, little attention has been given to describing which oral motor deficits are responsible for these disorders. Early identification of swallowing alterations and rehabilitation could decrease the risk of aspiration pneumonia. Future studies are necessary in order to investigate the deterioration process of swallowing in AT and the influence of rehabilitation in maintaining functional health.

  4. Aspirating and Nonaspirating Swallow Sounds in Children: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Frakking, Thuy; Chang, Anne; O'Grady, Kerry; David, Michael; Weir, Kelly

    2016-12-01

    Cervical auscultation (CA) may be used to complement feeding/swallowing evaluations when assessing for aspiration. There are no published pediatric studies that compare the properties of sounds between aspirating and nonaspirating swallows. To establish acoustic and perceptual profiles of aspirating and nonaspirating swallow sounds and determine if a difference exists between these 2 swallowing types. Aspiration sound clips were obtained from recordings using CA simultaneously undertaken with videofluoroscopic swallow study. Aspiration was determined using the Penetration-Aspiration Scale. The presence of perceptual swallow/breath parameters was rated by 2 speech pathologists who were blinded to the type of swallow. Acoustic data between groups were compared using Mann Whitney U-tests, while perceptual differences were determined by a test of 2 proportions. Combinations of perceptual parameters of 50 swallows (27 aspiration, 23 no aspiration) from 47 children (57% male) were statistically analyzed using area under a receiver operating characteristic (aROC), sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values to determine predictors of aspirating swallows. The combination of post-swallow presence of wet breathing and wheeze and absence of GRS and normal breathing was the best predictor of aspiration (aROC = 0.82, 95% CI, 0.70-0.94). There were no significant differences between these 2 swallow types for peak frequency, duration, and peak amplitude. Our pilot study has shown that certain characteristics of swallow obtained using CA may be useful in the prediction of aspiration. However, further research comparing the acoustic swallowing sound profiles of normal children to children with dysphagia (who are aspirating) on a larger scale is required. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Gas swallow during meals in patients with excessive belching.

    PubMed

    Caballero, N; Serra, J

    2017-09-01

    Swallowed gas is an important source of abdominal gas, and aerophagia is often believed as a putative cause of gas-related abdominal symptoms. However, altered gas-swallow during meals has not been demonstrated. Our aim was to characterize the number of gas swallows during meals in patients complaining of excessive belching and gaseousness and a control group without abdominal symptoms during a 24-h period. A 24-h pH-impedance monitoring was performed in 10 patients with excessive belching, and 11 patients without digestive symptoms or reflux in the pH-impedance study. During the study, patients followed their daily routine and customary meals, without any specific limitation. In each patient the number and content of swallows and belches were analyzed. Total meal periods were similar in controls (75±26 min) and patients (79±21 min; P=.339), but the number of gaseous swallows was greater in patients (114±13 swallows) than controls (71±8 swallows; P=.007), due to a greater frequency of gaseous swallows during meals (15±2 swallows/10 min vs 10±1 swallows/10 min, respectively; P=.008). During the 24-h study period, 66±13 belches were recorded in patients, but only 13±3 belches in controls (P<.001), mainly gastric belches (80±4% and 92±2% of belches, patients, and controls, respectively) which showed a good correlation with the number of gaseous swallows performed during meals (r=.756; P=.011). Gas is frequently swallowed during meals. Patients complaining of excessive belching have a different swallow pattern during meals, with an increased ingestion of gas that correlates with increased gastric belching events. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Detection of swallows with silent aspiration using swallowing and breath sound analysis.

    PubMed

    Sarraf Shirazi, Samaneh; Buchel, Caitlin; Daun, Reesa; Lenton, Laura; Moussavi, Zahra

    2012-12-01

    In this study, the feasibility of acoustical analysis for detection of swallowing silent aspiration is investigated. As a pilot study, we analyzed the breath sounds of 21 dysphagic individuals, 11 of which demonstrated aspiration during the fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) or videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS). We found that the low frequency components of the power spectrum of the breath sounds after a swallow show higher magnitude when there is aspiration. Thus, we divided the frequency range below 300 Hz into three sub-bands and calculated the average power of the breath sound signal in each sub-band as the characteristic features for the stage 1 classification into two groups of aspirated and non-aspirated patients. Then, for the aspirated group, the unsupervised fuzzy k-means clustering algorithm was deployed to label the breath sounds immediately after a swallow as aspiration or non-aspiration. The results were compared with the FEES/VFSS assessments provided by the speech language pathologists. The results are encouraging: more than 86 % accuracy in detection of silent aspiration. While the proposed method should be verified on a larger dataset, the results are promising for the use of acoustical analysis as a clinical tool to detect silent aspiration.

  7. Swallowing Disorders - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arabic (العربية) Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) French (français) Hindi (हिन्दी) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) ... 繁體中文 (Chinese - Traditional) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations French (français) Barium Swallow Déglutition barytée - français (French) Bilingual ...

  8. Clinical swallowing assessment in intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Padovani, Aline Rodrigues; Moraes, Danielle Pedroni; Sassi, Fernanda Chiarion; Andrade, Claudia Regina Furquim de

    2013-01-01

    To report the results of the full clinical swallowing assessment in acute-care population in a large Brazilian teaching hospital. A prospective, descriptive clinical study was conducted during three months in a 30-bed adult clinical emergency ICU from a large Brazilian teaching hospital. Thirty-five patients consecutively referred to the Speech-Language Pathology Service according to our standard clinical practice were included. A full clinical swallowing assessment was completed and includes a Preliminary Assessment Protocol (PAP), a Dysphagia Risk Evaluation Protocol (DREP) and an Oral Feeding Transition Protocol (OFTP). In this study, the prevalence of OD in the ICU setting was of 63%, most of which were classified as moderate and moderate-severe (39%). Patients submitted to orotracheal intubation were very frequently referred to swallowing assessment (74%). The results of the statistical analyses revealed clinical indicators that could correctly classify patients as either having or not having OD on clinical tests. These include cough strength, coordination between breathing and speaking, dysphonia severity, and laryngeal elevation. Twenty six patients (74%) completed all protocols. Of these total, 38% were able to eat a regular diet. The practice with standardized protocols adds an important option for the management of oropharyngeal dysphagia in intensive care unit.

  9. Gastrointestinal damage caused by swallowing multiple magnets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shiqi; Li, Jianhui; Lv, Yi

    2012-09-01

    Swallowing multiple magnets is not uncommon worldwide and it frequently leads to serious consequences. However, most patients fail to receive timely and correct diagnosis and treatment. A literature search was performed to establish an algorithm for these accidents by the authors to identify relevant articles published from June 1987 to October 2010 in Google, Medline, ISI Web of Knowledge Ovid, CNKI, Korea Med and library document delivery, using search terms "magnet ingestion, " "fistula," and "perforation." A total of 149 patients with ingestion of magnetic foreign bodies from 20 countries and areas were identified. 22 of them were companioned with neurological and psychiatric disorders. Swallowing magnets occurred throughout childhood and adolescent, mostly ranging 2 to 4 years in age. Various gastrointestinal damages such as necrosis and intestinal perforation or fistula were encountered. Damage from swallowing multiple magnets carries a significant risk of morbidity and even mortality throughout childhood to adolescent worldwide. Older children and adults with neurological and psychiatric problems may be at high risk for such accidents. Early intervention is crucial.

  10. Anatomical Directional Dissimilarities in Tri-axial Swallowing Accelerometry Signals.

    PubMed

    Movahedi, Faezeh; Kurosu, Atsuko; Coyle, James L; Perera, Subashan; Sejdic, Ervin

    2017-05-01

    Swallowing accelerometry is a noninvasive approach currently under consideration as an instrumental screening test for swallowing difficulties, with most current studies focusing on the swallowing vibrations in the anterior-posterior (A-P) and superior-inferior (S-I) directions. However, the displacement of the hyolaryngeal structure during the act of swallowing in patients with dysphagia involves declination of the medial-lateral (M-L), which suggests that the swallowing vibrations in the M-L direction have the ability to reveal additional details about the swallowing function. With this motivation, we performed a broad comparison of the swallowing vibrations in all three anatomical directions. Tri-axial swallowing accelerometry signals were concurrently collected from 72 dysphagic patients undergoing videofluoroscopic evaluation of swallowing (mean age: 63.94 ± 12.58 years period). Participants swallowed one or more thickened liquids with different consistencies including thin-thick liquids, nectar-thick liquids, and pudding-thick liquids with either a comfortable self-selected volume from a cup or a controlled volume by the examiner from a 5-ml spoon. Swallows were grouped based on the viscosity of swallows and the participant's stroke history. Then, a comprehensive set of features was extracted in multiple signal domains from 881 swallows. The results highlighted inter-axis dissimilarities among tri-axial swallowing vibrations including the extent of variability in the amplitude of signals, the degree of predictability of signals, and the extent of disordered behavior of signals in time-frequency domain. First, the upward movement of the hyolaryngeal structure, representing the S-I signals, were actually more variable in amplitude and showed less predictable behavior than the sideways and forward movements, representing the A-P and M-L signals, during swallowing. Second, the S-I signals, which represent the upward movement of the hyolaryngeal structure

  11. Examination of swallowing maneuver training and transfer of practiced behaviors to laryngeal vestibule kinematics in functional swallowing of healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Renata; Azola, Alba; Macrae, Phoebe; Sunday, Kirstyn; Mejia, Veerley; Vose, Alicia; Humbert, Ianessa A

    2017-03-18

    Swallowing maneuvers are routinely trained in dysphagia rehabilitation with the assumption that practiced behaviors transfer to functional swallowing, however transfer is rarely examined in the deglutition literature. The goal of this study was to train the volitional laryngeal vestibule closure (vLVC) maneuver, which is a swallowing maneuver that targets prolonged laryngeal vestibule closure (LVC). In two different training experiments, 69 healthy adults underwent Long-hold (hold vLVC as long as possible) or Short-hold vLVC training (hold vLVC for 2s). Before and after vLVC training, natural swallows (swallowing without a therapeutic technique) were completed. The outcome variables included laryngeal vestibule closure reaction time and the duration of laryngeal vestibule closure. Results indicate that during both Long-hold and Short-hold vLVC trainings, vLVC swallows had faster laryngeal vestibule closure reaction times and longer durations of laryngeal vestibule closure than in pre-training 5ml liquid swallows. However, only faster laryngeal vestibule closure reaction times transferred to post-training 5ml liquid swallows (20-24% faster), but not prolonged durations of laryngeal vestibule closure. Our findings suggest that swallowing maneuver training has the potential to induce transfer of what was practiced to functional swallowing behavior, although not all practiced behaviors may generalize. These findings are significant for bolstering the effectiveness of dysphagia management in medical settings and should be tested in individuals with dysphagia.

  12. Functional connectivity patterns of normal human swallowing: difference among various viscosity swallows in normal and chin-tuck head positions.

    PubMed

    Jestrović, Iva; Coyle, James L; Perera, Subashan; Sejdić, Ervin

    2016-12-01

    Consuming thicker fluids and swallowing in the chin-tuck position has been shown to be advantageous for some patients with neurogenic dysphagia who aspirate due to various causes. The anatomical changes caused by these therapeutic techniques are well known, but it is unclear whether these changes alter the cerebral processing of swallow-related sensorimotor activity. We sought to investigate the effect of increased fluid viscosity and chin-down posture during swallowing on brain networks. 55 healthy adults performed water, nectar-thick, and honey thick liquid swallows in the neutral and chin-tuck positions while EEG signals were recorded. After pre-processing of the EEG timeseries, the time-frequency based synchrony measure was used for forming the brain networks to investigate whether there were differences among the brain networks between the swallowing of different fluid viscosities and swallowing in different head positions. We also investigated whether swallowing under various conditions exhibit small-world properties. Results showed that fluid viscosity affects the brain network in the Delta, Theta, Alpha, Beta, and Gamma frequency bands and that swallowing in the chin-tuck head position affects brain networks in the Alpha, Beta, and Gamma frequency bands. In addition, we showed that swallowing in all tested conditions exhibited small-world properties. Therefore, fluid viscosity and head positions should be considered in future swallowing EEG investigations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Diagnosis of spasmodic dysphonia manifested by swallowing difficulty in videofluoroscopic swallowing study.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Han Gyeol; Lee, Seong Jae; Hyun, Jung Keun; Kim, Tae Uk

    2015-04-01

    Spasmodic dysphonia is defined as a focal laryngeal disorder characterized by dystonic spasms of the vocal cord during speech. We described a case of a 22-year-old male patient who presented complaining of idiopathic difficulty swallowing that suddenly developed 6 months ago. The patient also reported pharyngolaryngeal pain, throat discomfort, dyspnea, and voice change. Because laryngoscopy found no specific problems, an electrodiagnostic study and videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) were performed to find the cause of dysphagia. The VFSS revealed continuous twitch-like involuntary movement of the laryngeal muscle around the vocal folds. Then, he was diagnosed with spasmodic dysphonia by VFSS, auditory-perceptual voice analysis, and physical examination. So, we report the first case of spasmodic dysphonia accompanied with difficulty swallowing that was confirmed by VFSS.

  14. Coordinate mapping of hyolaryngeal mechanics in swallowing.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Thomas Z; Obeidin, Farres; Davidoff, Alisa A; Hightower, Cody L; Johnson, Christohper Z; Rice, Sonya L; Sokolove, Rebecca-Lyn; Taylor, Brandon K; Tuck, John M; Pearson, William G

    2014-05-06

    Characterizing hyolaryngeal movement is important to dysphagia research. Prior methods require multiple measurements to obtain one kinematic measurement whereas coordinate mapping of hyolaryngeal mechanics using Modified Barium Swallow (MBS) uses one set of coordinates to calculate multiple variables of interest. For demonstration purposes, ten kinematic measurements were generated from one set of coordinates to determine differences in swallowing two different bolus types. Calculations of hyoid excursion against the vertebrae and mandible are correlated to determine the importance of axes of reference. To demonstrate coordinate mapping methodology, 40 MBS studies were randomly selected from a dataset of healthy normal subjects with no known swallowing impairment. A 5 ml thin-liquid bolus and a 5 ml pudding swallows were measured from each subject. Nine coordinates, mapping the cranial base, mandible, vertebrae and elements of the hyolaryngeal complex, were recorded at the frames of minimum and maximum hyolaryngeal excursion. Coordinates were mathematically converted into ten variables of hyolaryngeal mechanics. Inter-rater reliability was evaluated by Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). Two-tailed t-tests were used to evaluate differences in kinematics by bolus viscosity. Hyoid excursion measurements against different axes of reference were correlated. Inter-rater reliability among six raters for the 18 coordinates ranged from ICC = 0.90 - 0.97. A slate of ten kinematic measurements was compared by subject between the six raters. One outlier was rejected, and the mean of the remaining reliability scores was ICC = 0.91, 0.84 - 0.96, 95% CI. Two-tailed t-tests with Bonferroni corrections comparing ten kinematic variables (5 ml thin-liquid vs. 5 ml pudding swallows) showed statistically significant differences in hyoid excursion, superior laryngeal movement, and pharyngeal shortening (p < 0.005). Pearson correlations of hyoid excursion measurements from two

  15. Coordinate Mapping of Hyolaryngeal Mechanics in Swallowing

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Thomas Z.; Obeidin, Farres; Davidoff, Alisa A.; Hightower, Cody L.; Johnson, Christohper Z.; Rice, Sonya L.; Sokolove, Rebecca-Lyn; Taylor, Brandon K.; Tuck, John M.; Pearson,, William G.

    2014-01-01

    Characterizing hyolaryngeal movement is important to dysphagia research. Prior methods require multiple measurements to obtain one kinematic measurement whereas coordinate mapping of hyolaryngeal mechanics using Modified Barium Swallow (MBS) uses one set of coordinates to calculate multiple variables of interest. For demonstration purposes, ten kinematic measurements were generated from one set of coordinates to determine differences in swallowing two different bolus types. Calculations of hyoid excursion against the vertebrae and mandible are correlated to determine the importance of axes of reference. To demonstrate coordinate mapping methodology, 40 MBS studies were randomly selected from a dataset of healthy normal subjects with no known swallowing impairment. A 5 ml thin-liquid bolus and a 5 ml pudding swallows were measured from each subject. Nine coordinates, mapping the cranial base, mandible, vertebrae and elements of the hyolaryngeal complex, were recorded at the frames of minimum and maximum hyolaryngeal excursion. Coordinates were mathematically converted into ten variables of hyolaryngeal mechanics. Inter-rater reliability was evaluated by Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). Two-tailed t-tests were used to evaluate differences in kinematics by bolus viscosity. Hyoid excursion measurements against different axes of reference were correlated. Inter-rater reliability among six raters for the 18 coordinates ranged from ICC = 0.90 - 0.97. A slate of ten kinematic measurements was compared by subject between the six raters. One outlier was rejected, and the mean of the remaining reliability scores was ICC = 0.91, 0.84 - 0.96, 95% CI. Two-tailed t-tests with Bonferroni corrections comparing ten kinematic variables (5 ml thin-liquid vs. 5 ml pudding swallows) showed statistically significant differences in hyoid excursion, superior laryngeal movement, and pharyngeal shortening (p < 0.005). Pearson correlations of hyoid excursion measurements from two

  16. A systematic review of self-reported swallowing assessments in progressive neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Keage, Megan; Delatycki, Martin; Corben, Louise; Vogel, Adam

    2015-02-01

    Dysphagia experienced as a consequence of neurodegenerative disease can have severe consequences on a patient's health and well-being. Regular assessment of swallowing function can assist to achieve adequate nutrition and hydration. Here we review subjective swallowing assessments currently available are suitable for use in people with neurodegenerative disease. Measurement properties were reviewed for each tool and coverage of the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (WHO ICF) was considered. Assessments were identified following a review of the published literature Instruments were reviewed on the basis of reliability and validity, as well as administrative properties, such an interpretability, acceptability, and feasibility. Tools were also evaluated according to the WHO ICF framework. In total, 19 studies were identified for full-text review from 13,315 abstracts. Nine self-reported dysphagia assessment tools suitable for use in progressive neurological disorders were identified. The Swallowing Quality of Life Questionnaire (SWAL-QOL) yields the strongest combination of reliability (including internal consistency and test-retest reliability) and convergent validity while simultaneously covering all WHO ICF domains. Lengthy administration time was identified as a limitation of the SWAL-QOL. The review highlights a relative lack of well-validated self-report questionnaires in dysphagia for people with progressive neurological disease. Additional validation and evaluation of the clinical utility of the tools currently available is required to further promote an informed selection of available assessments.

  17. Speech Pathology Reliability for Stroke Swallowing Screening Items.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Stephanie K; Pathak, Shweta; Stach, Carol B; Mohr, Tiffany M; Morgan, Robert O; Anderson, Jane A

    2015-10-01

    Swallowing screening is critical in rapid identification of risk of aspiration in patients presenting with acute stroke symptoms. Accuracy in judgments is vital for the success of the screening. This study examined speech-language pathologists' (SLPs) reliability in interpreting screening items. Swallowing screening was completed in 75 individuals admitted with stroke symptoms. Screening items evaluated were lethargy, dysarthria, wet voice unrelated to swallowing, abnormal volitional cough, and cough, throat clear, wet voice after swallowing, and inability to continuously drink with ingestion of 5 and 90 ml water. Two SLPs, each with more than 10 years of experience, made simultaneous independent judgments of the same observations obtained from the screening. Overall, generally high agreement was identified between the SLPs (k[SE] = 0.83[0.03]). Individual kappas ranged from 0.38 (fair) for non-swallowing wet voice to 0.95 (almost perfect) for cough after swallow, with one item omitted due to minimal variation. SLPs demonstrate high reliability in swallowing screening. Results, however, indicate some potential variability. Items associated with trial swallows had the highest reliability, whereas items related to judgments of speech and voice quality had the lowest. Although SLPs have dedicated training and ample opportunity to practice, differences in agreement are evident. Routine practice in hospital departments is recommended to establish and maintain sensitive perceptual discrimination. If other professionals are to provide swallowing screening, knowledge of SLPs' reliability levels must be considered when identifying screening items, creating education modules, and determining acceptable levels of agreement.

  18. Event Sequence Variability in Healthy Swallowing: Building on Previous Findings

    PubMed Central

    Molfenter, Sonja M.; Leigh, Chelsea; Steele, Catriona M.

    2015-01-01

    This study builds on previous work by Kendall, Leonard and McKenzie, which investigated event sequence variability for 12 paired-events during swallowing by healthy volunteers. They identified four event pairs, which always occurred in a stereotyped order as well as a most-common occurring overall order of events during swallowing. In the current study, we investigate overall event sequencing and the same four paired-events in a sample of swallows by healthy, young (under 45 years old) volunteers. Data were collected during a 16-swallow lateral videofluoroscopy protocol, which included manipulations of bolus volume, barium density, bolus viscosity and swallow cueing. Our results agree with previous findings regarding the fact that variable event sequencing is found in healthy swallowing, and regarding the obligatory sequencing of two paired-events: movement of the arytenoids towards the base of the epiglottis begins prior to upper esophageal sphincter (UES) opening; and maximum hyo-laryngeal approximation occurs after UES opening. However, our data failed to replicate the previous finding of obligatory sequencing of maximum pharyngeal constriction after maximal UES distension and UES opening occurring before bolus arrival at the UES. The most-common observed overall event sequence reported by Kendall was observed in only 4/293 swallows in our dataset. Manipulations of bolus volume, bolus viscosity, barium concentration, swallow cueing and swallow repetitions could not completely account for differences observed between the two studies. PMID:24390702

  19. Using Sensory Properties of Food to Trigger Swallowing: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Loret, C.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of food consistency on swallowing function has been widely studied, and it is well recognized that by delaying the flow of the food bolus, thickened liquids can help in the management of swallowing dysfunction. However, fewer studies have been carried out on the impact of food sensory properties and related liking on swallowing function. This paper reviews the role of taste, olfaction, and trigeminal perceptions on swallowing function and highlights the need for a deeper investigation of this aspect of patient diet modification. PMID:24915399

  20. An Audit to Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy of Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy Placement in Patients with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayres, Lachlan; Black, Chris; Scheepers, Mark; Shaw, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy insertion is an effective method of providing enteral nutrition to patients with neurologically unsafe swallowing or failure of feeding. Patients with severe learning disabilities may develop unsafe swallowing and benefit from percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy placement. It is unclear whether this intervention…

  1. An Audit to Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy of Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy Placement in Patients with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayres, Lachlan; Black, Chris; Scheepers, Mark; Shaw, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy insertion is an effective method of providing enteral nutrition to patients with neurologically unsafe swallowing or failure of feeding. Patients with severe learning disabilities may develop unsafe swallowing and benefit from percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy placement. It is unclear whether this intervention…

  2. Relationship between Quantified Instrumental Swallowing Examination and Comprehensive Clinical Swallowing Examination.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jong-Chi; Park, Ji-Hyuk; Jung, Min-Ye; Yoo, Eun-Young; Chang, Ki-Yeon; Lee, Teak-Young

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the correlation between the Mann Assessment of Swallowing Ability (MASA) and the Videofluoroscopic Dysphagia Scale (VDS) to investigate the applicability of the MASA as a follow-up test of swallowing function. Criterion validity was assessed for MASA results versus VDS scores of tests administered to 54 patients who had a stroke and dysphagia. A significant correlation was found between the MASA and the VDS (correlation coefficient = -0.509). In analyses of test-re-test reliability and inter-rater reliability of the scoring scale, intraclass correlation coefficients (2, 1) were high (0.98, 0.99). In conclusion, the results of the present study indicate that the MASA holds adequate clinical test-re-test and inter-rater reliabilities and criterion validity for measuring the swallowing abilities of Korean patients who had a stroke and dysphagia. The MASA could contribute to more systematic management of swallowing problems and efficient therapeutic service. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. The influence of product and oral characteristics on swallowing.

    PubMed

    Engelen, Lina; Fontijn-Tekamp, Anneke; van der Bilt, Andries

    2005-08-01

    The urge to swallow food could be triggered by a threshold level in both food particle size and lubrication of the food bolus. Thus, both oral physiology and product characteristics may influence the swallowing threshold. We quantified the swallowing threshold in a group of 266 healthy adult subjects (age 42 +/- 12 years) by counting the number of chewing cycles needed to prepare food for swallowing. The influence of oral physiology on the swallowing threshold was determined by measuring salivary flow rate, maximum bite force and masticatory performance. We used about 10 cm(3) of bread, toast, melba toast, breakfast cake, peanuts and cheese to determine the influence on the swallowing threshold of various food characteristics, e.g. hardness, moisture and fat. Furthermore, we tested the effect of buttering the bread, toast, melba toast and breakfast cake on the swallowing threshold. Salivary flow rates were significantly and negatively correlated with the number of chewing cycles of melba toast and breakfast cake. Hence, subjects with more saliva needed less chewing cycles for these dry products. Maximum bite force and masticatory performance had an influence on the swallowing threshold for the hard products only (carrot and peanut). Although significant, the correlation coefficients were less than 0.28. Thus, the oral physiology parameters explained less than 10% of the variance in the swallowing threshold. We found significantly different numbers of chewing cycles for the various foods, ranging from 17 for cake to 63 for carrot. Hard and dry products needed more chewing cycles until swallowing. Buttering the food significantly reduced the number of chewing cycles needed before swallowing. This was especially true for the dry products cake, melba toast and toast. Hard and dry products require more chewing cycles and longer time in mouth until swallowing for sufficient breakdown to take place and for enough saliva to be added to form a coherent bolus safe for

  4. Ataxia Telangiectasia in Siblings: Oral Motor and Swallowing Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Rondon-Melo, Silmara; de Almeida, Isabel Junqueira; de Andrade, Claudia Regina Furquim; Sassi, Fernanda Chiarion; Molini-Avejonas, Daniela Regina

    2017-01-01

    Case series Patient: Male, 23 • Female, 20 Final Diagnosis: Ataxia telnagiectasia Symptoms: Gagging • coughing • hoarseness • articulatory inaccuracy Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Oral motor and swallowing assessment Specialty: Neurology Objective: Rare disease Background: The body of literature on oral motor and swallowing disorders in patients with ataxia telangiectasia (AT) is limited. Case Report: The purpose of this study was to characterize oral motor and swallowing disorders in two siblings with AT, based on oral motor and swallowing assessments. Specific procedures were applied for oral motor and swallowing assessments and both patients underwent videofluoroscopy (VFS). Case 1 presented vocal instability, change in postural control during feeding; food retention in oral cavity; slower oral transit time; and multiple swallowing (signs for solid and liquid). Case 2 presented parted lips at rest and reduced muscle strength; reduced strength and mobility of the tongue; vocal weakness and instability; reduced speech precision and intelligibility; decreased intonation pattern; food retention in oral cavity during feeding; slower oral transit time; multiple swallowing (signs for solid and liquid); poor bolus ejection; incoordination and difficulty in controlling the sips of water taken from the cup; altered cervical auscultation after swallowing and respiratory distress (liquid and puree). For both patients VFS results revealed laryngeal penetration for liquid. Conclusions: Although the literature describes the occurrence of dysarthria and swallowing disorders in patients with AT, little attention has been given to describing which oral motor deficits are responsible for these disorders. Early identification of swallowing alterations and rehabilitation could decrease the risk of aspiration pneumonia. Future studies are necessary in order to investigate the deterioration process of swallowing in AT and the influence of rehabilitation in maintaining

  5. Clinical and fiberoptic endoscopic assessment of swallowing in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Macri, Marina Rodrigues Bueno; Marques, Jair Mendes; Santos, Rosane Sampaio; Furkim, Ana Maria; Melek, Irinei; Rispoli, Daniel; de Alencar Nunes, Maria Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is characterized by progressive and partially reversible obstruction of pulmonary airflow. Aim: To characterize swallowing in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and correlate the findings with the degree chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart and respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, and smoking. Method: We conducted a prospective cohort study of 19 patients (12 men and 7 women; age range, 50–85 years) with confirmed medical diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This study was performed in 2 stages (clinical evaluation and functional assessment using nasolaryngofibroscopy) on the same day. During both stages, vital signs were checked by medical personnel. Results: Clinical evaluation of swallowing in all patients showed the clinical signs of cough. The findings of nasolaryngofibroscopy highlighted subsequent intraoral escape in 5 patients (26.5%). No patient had tracheal aspiration. There was no association of subsequent intraoral escape with degree of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart and respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, or smoking. Conclusion: In patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, there was a prevalence of oral dysphagia upon swallowing and nasolaryngofibroscopy highlighted the finding of subsequent intraoral escape. There was no correlation between intraoral escape and the degree of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart and respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, or smoking. PMID:26106452

  6. Multimodal swallowing evaluation with high-resolution manometry reveals subtle swallowing changes in early and mid-stage Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Corinne A; Ciucci, Michelle R

    2015-01-01

    Background Parkinson disease (PD) has detrimental effects on swallowing function. Treatment options are largely behavioral; thus, patients would benefit from an earlier start to therapy. Early swallowing changes in PD are not well-known, so patients do not typically receive swallowing treatment until later in the progression of PD. Objective We used predictive modeling to determine what quantitative swallowing variables best differentiate individuals with early to mid-stage PD from healthy controls. Methods Participants included twenty-six individuals with early to mid-stage PD and 26 healthy, age- and sex-matched controls. Swallowing was evaluated by simultaneous high-resolution manometry and videofluoroscopy as well as the Sydney Swallow Questionnaire (SSQ). Binomial logistic regression was performed on 4 sets of data: 1) high-resolution manometry only; 2) videofluoroscopy only; 3) SSQ only; and 4) all data combined. Results A model from a combined data set had the highest accuracy in differentiating individuals with PD from controls. The model included maximum pressure in the velopharynx (soft palate), pressure variability in the velopharynx, and the SSQ item concerning difficulty with saliva swallowing. No significant models could be generated using the videofluoroscopy data. Conclusions Individuals with PD show quantitative changes in pressure generation and are able to self-assess aspects of swallowing function in the early and mid-stages of PD, even in the absence of swallowing changes seen on videofluoroscopy. A multimodal approach for the assessment of swallowing may be more accurate for determining subtle swallowing changes that occur in the early stages of PD. PMID:26891176

  7. Integrating Academic and Clinical Learning Using a Clinical Swallowing Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Daniel E.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes an experiential learning activity designed to integrate classroom knowledge and a clinical swallowing assessment. Twenty master's-level graduate students in a dysphagia course conducted a clinical swallowing assessment with a resident of an independent retirement community. The exercise was designed to allow students an…

  8. Swallow-tailed kite nesting in Texas: Past and present

    Treesearch

    Raymond E. Brown; J. Howard Williamson; Dan B. Boone

    1997-01-01

    The historical breeding range of the swallow-tailed kite (Elanoides forficatus) in the United States extended from the Carolinas and Tennessee south through Florida, and Wisconsin and Minnesota south through louisiana, and Nebraska to central and southeastern Texas (Cely, 1979; Johnsgard,. 1990). By 1900, the range of the swallow-tailed kite was...

  9. Swallow Characteristics in Patients with Oculopharyngeal Muscular Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Phyllis M.; Neel, Amy T.; Sprouls, Gwyneth; Morrison, Leslie

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This prospective investigation evaluates oral weakness and its impact on swallow function, weight, and quality of life in patients with oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). Method: Intraoral pressure, swallow pressure, and endurance were measured using an Iowa Oral Performance Instrument in participants with OPMD and matched…

  10. Assessment of Infant Oral Sensorimotor and Swallowing Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Brian; Arvedson, Joan

    2005-01-01

    The development of feeding and swallowing is the result of a complex interface between the developing nervous system, various physiological systems, and the environment. The purpose of this article is to review the neurobiology, development, and assessment of feeding and swallowing during early infancy. In recent years, there have been exciting…

  11. Swallow Characteristics in Patients with Oculopharyngeal Muscular Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Phyllis M.; Neel, Amy T.; Sprouls, Gwyneth; Morrison, Leslie

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This prospective investigation evaluates oral weakness and its impact on swallow function, weight, and quality of life in patients with oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). Method: Intraoral pressure, swallow pressure, and endurance were measured using an Iowa Oral Performance Instrument in participants with OPMD and matched…

  12. Mechanisms of Airway Protection during Chin-Down Swallowing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macrae, Phoebe; Anderson, Cheryl; Humbert, Ianessa

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the effects of chin-down swallowing on laryngeal vestibule closure. It also investigated the technique's rehabilitative impact, by assessing the stability of effects across multiple trials and aftereffects in neutral swallows on cessation of the technique. Method: Duration of laryngeal vestibule closure (dLVC) was…

  13. Therapy for Children with Swallowing Disorders in the Educational Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logemann, Jeri A.

    2000-01-01

    This article presents the various types of swallowing therapy available, including postural changes, sensory enhancements, changes in feeding processes, and exercise programs. Other therapy issues discussed include the relationship of the feeding process to swallowing therapy, the schedule of therapy, and maintenance programs as compared to…

  14. Swallow-wort (Vincetoxicum spp.) biological control update

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pale swallow-wort (Vincetoxicum rossicum = Cynanchum rossicum) and black swallow-wort (V. nigrum = C. louiseae) are herbaceous, perennial, viney milkweeds introduced from Europe (Apocynaceae-subfamily Asclepiadoideae). Both species are becoming increasingly invasive in a variety of natural and manag...

  15. Assessment of Infant Oral Sensorimotor and Swallowing Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Brian; Arvedson, Joan

    2005-01-01

    The development of feeding and swallowing is the result of a complex interface between the developing nervous system, various physiological systems, and the environment. The purpose of this article is to review the neurobiology, development, and assessment of feeding and swallowing during early infancy. In recent years, there have been exciting…

  16. Integrating Academic and Clinical Learning Using a Clinical Swallowing Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Daniel E.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes an experiential learning activity designed to integrate classroom knowledge and a clinical swallowing assessment. Twenty master's-level graduate students in a dysphagia course conducted a clinical swallowing assessment with a resident of an independent retirement community. The exercise was designed to allow students an…

  17. Use of Electromagnetic Midsagittal Articulography in the Study of Swallowing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Catriona M.; Van Lieshout, Pascal H.H.M.

    2004-01-01

    The tongue functions as the primary articulator during the oropharyngeal stages of swallowing. However, detailed descriptions of the kinematics and spatiotemporal variability of tongue behaviors during swallowing are limited to a handful of analyses of data from the X-ray microbeam database. In this article, a new technique, electromagnetic…

  18. Mechanisms of Airway Protection during Chin-Down Swallowing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macrae, Phoebe; Anderson, Cheryl; Humbert, Ianessa

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the effects of chin-down swallowing on laryngeal vestibule closure. It also investigated the technique's rehabilitative impact, by assessing the stability of effects across multiple trials and aftereffects in neutral swallows on cessation of the technique. Method: Duration of laryngeal vestibule closure (dLVC) was…

  19. Swallowing disorders in patients with blepharospasm.

    PubMed

    Cersósimo, María G; Juri, Silvia; Suárez de Chandler, Silvia; Clerici, Roxana; Micheli, Federico E

    2005-01-01

    Blepharospasm is a focal dystonia characterized by involuntary eye closure due to abnormal contraction of orbicular eyelid muscles. When blepharospasm is associated to the presence of involuntary oromandibular movements, it is termed Meige syndrome. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of deglutition alterations in patients with concurrent blepharospasm and Meige syndrome. Twenty consecutive patients were studied by video fluoroscopy using a barium technique. The 4 stages of deglutition were investigated. Ninety percent of patients (18 cases) presented deglutition disorders. The more commonly found alterations were premature food drop, 15 cases (83%) and vallecuale residuals, 14 cases (78%). Sixty seven percent of abnormal findings occurred in the third stage of deglutition. Eighty-nine percent of patients (16) presented more than one swallowing alteration. There was a positive and significant correlation between the number of alterations and patient's age or disease duration. Prevalence of swallowing disorders in the healthy elderly population is reported to be 44%. In our series it reached 90%, suggesting that our findings might be related not only with age but also with a more widespread dystonia exceeding the orofacial muscles.

  20. Swallowing markers in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Banno, Haruhiko; Katsuno, Masahisa; Suzuki, Keisuke; Tanaka, Seiya; Suga, Noriaki; Hashizume, Atsushi; Mano, Tomoo; Araki, Amane; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Fujimoto, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Masahiko; Sobue, Gen

    2017-08-01

    We examined the characteristics of dysphagia in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, a hereditary neuromuscular disease causing weakness of limb, facial, and oropharyngeal muscles via a videofluoroscopic swallowing study, and investigated the plausibility of using these outcome measures for quantitative analysis. A videofluoroscopic swallowing study was performed on 111 consecutive patients with genetically confirmed spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy and 53 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Swallowing of 3-mL liquid barium was analyzed by the Logemann's Videofluorographic Examination of Swallowing worksheet. Of more than 40 radiographic findings, the most pertinent abnormal findings in patients with spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, included vallecular residue after swallow (residue just behind the tongue base), nasal penetration, and insufficient tongue movement (P < 0.001 for each) compared with healthy controls. Quantitative analyses showed that pharyngeal residue after initial swallowing, oral residue after initial swallowing, multiple swallowing sessions, and the penetration-aspiration scale were significantly worse in these patients (P ≤ 0.005 for each) than in controls. In patients with spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, laryngeal penetration was observed more frequently in those without subjective dysphagia. Dysphagia of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy was characterized by impaired tongue movement in the oral phase and nasal penetration followed by pharyngeal residues, which resulted in multiple swallowing sessions and laryngeal penetration. Although major limitations of reproducibility and radiation exposure still exist with videofluoroscopy, pharyngeal residue after initial swallowing and the penetration-aspiration scale might serve as potential outcome measures in clinical studies.

  1. Cervical auscultation synchronized with images from endoscopy swallow evaluations.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Paula; Drinnan, Michael J; Zammit-Maempel, Ivan; Coyle, James L; Ford, Gary A; Wilson, Janet A

    2007-10-01

    Cervical auscultation is the use of a listening device, typically a stethoscope in clinical practice, to assess swallow sounds and by some definitions airway sounds. Judgments are then made on the normality or degree of impairment of the sounds. Listeners interpret the sounds and suggest what might be happening with the swallow or causing impairment. A major criticism of cervical auscultation is that there is no evidence on what causes the sounds or whether the sounds correspond to physiologically important, health-threatening events. We sought to determine in healthy volunteers (1) if a definitive set of swallow sounds could be identified, (2) the order in which swallow sounds and physiologic events occur, and (3) if swallow sounds could be matched to the observed physiologic events. Swallow sounds were computer recorded via a Littmann stethoscope from 19 healthy volunteers (8 males, 11 females, age range = 18-73 years) during simultaneous fiberoptic laryngoscopy and respiration monitoring. Six sound components could be distinguished but none of these occurred in all swallows. There was a wide spread and a large degree of overlap of the timings of swallow sounds and physiologic events. No individual sound component was consistently associated with a physiologic event, which is a clinically significant finding. Comparisons of groups of sounds and events suggest associations between the preclick and the onset of apnea; the preclick and the start of epiglottic excursion; the click and the epiglottis returning to rest; the click and the end of the swallow apnea. There is no evidence of a causal link. The absence of a swallow sound in itself is not a definite sign of pathologic swallowing, but a repeated abnormal pattern may indicate impairment. At present there is no robust evidence that cervical auscultation of swallow sounds should be adopted in routine clinical practice. There are no data to support the inclusion of the technique into clinical guidelines or

  2. Oral medication delivery in impaired swallowing: thickening liquid medications for safe swallowing alters dissolution characteristics.

    PubMed

    Manrique, Yady J; Sparkes, Arron M; Cichero, Julie A Y; Stokes, Jason R; Nissen, Lisa M; Steadman, Kathryn J

    2016-09-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is available in a wide range of oral formulations designed to meet the needs of the population across the age-spectrum, but for people with impaired swallowing, i.e. dysphagia, both solid and liquid medications can be difficult to swallow without modification. The effect of a commercial polysaccharide thickener, designed to be added to fluids to promote safe swallowing by dysphagic patients, on rheology and acetaminophen dissolution was tested using crushed immediate-release tablets in water, effervescent tablets in water, elixir and suspension. The inclusion of the thickener, comprised of xanthan gum and maltodextrin, had a considerable impact on dissolution; acetaminophen release from modified medications reached 12-50% in 30 min, which did not reflect the pharmacopeia specification for immediate release preparations. Flow curves reflect the high zero-shear viscosity and the apparent yield stress of the thickened products. The weak gel nature, in combination with high G' values compared to G'' (viscoelasticity) and high apparent yield stress, impact drug release. The restriction on drug release from these formulations is not influenced by the theoretical state of the drug (dissolved or dispersed), and the approach typically used in clinical practice (mixing crushed tablets into pre-prepared thickened fluid) cannot be improved by altering the order of incorporation or mixing method.

  3. Swallowing Function Defined by Videofluoroscopic Swallowing Studies after Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion: a Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated factors related to swallowing dysfunction after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) using videofluoroscopic swallowing studies (VFSS). Preoperative and postoperative VFSSs were done with 5 mL diluted barium. Oral transit time, pharyngeal delay time, pharyngeal response time (PRT), and pharyngeal transit time were measured. Hyoid bone movement and upper esophageal sphincter (UES) diameter were measured serially. Thickness of prevertebral soft tissue was measured from digitized VFSS images. In results, 12 of 20 patients showed abnormal postoperative VFSS findings. PRT decreased significantly after surgery. Hyoid bone movement did not change significantly after surgery. The maximal distance of UES opening decreased significantly after surgery, and the higher the level of surgery (C3 > C4 > C5 > C6), the greater the decrease in maximal distance of the UES opening after surgery. The time to widest opening of the UES was prolonged significantly. At the C3 and C4 levels, the change in prevertebral soft tissue thickness of patients with VFSS abnormalities was significantly greater than those without abnormalities. In conclusion, patients after ADCF with their highest surgery level at C3 and C4 showed more abnormal VFSS findings, significantly increased soft tissue thickness, and decreased maximal distance of UES opening. VFSS provided objective data related with swallowing dysfunction after ACDF. PMID:27822944

  4. Tachyarrhythmias triggered by swallowing and belching

    PubMed Central

    Wilmshurst, P

    1999-01-01

    Three cases with supraventricular tachyarrhythmias related to oesophageal transit are reported. A 61 year old man had episodes of atrial tachycardia on each swallow of food but not liquid; this has been reported only rarely. A 55 year old man had atrial fibrillation initiated by drinking ice cold beverages; this has not been described previously although atrial tachycardia triggered by drinking ice cold beverages has been described once. A 68 year old man had supraventricular tachycardia initiated by belching; this has not been described previously. These cases illustrate the diversity of atrial tachyarrhythmias that can be precipitated by oesophageal stimulation and suggest that what is regarded as a very rare phenomenon may be found more commonly when sought.

 Keywords: atrial tachycardia; atrial fibrillation; deglutition; eructation; arrhythmias PMID:10026360

  5. Interactive image processing in swallowing research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dengel, Gail A.; Robbins, JoAnne; Rosenbek, John C.

    1991-06-01

    Dynamic radiographic imaging of the mouth, larynx, pharynx, and esophagus during swallowing is used commonly in clinical diagnosis, treatment and research. Images are recorded on videotape and interpreted conventionally by visual perceptual methods, limited to specific measures in the time domain and binary decisions about the presence or absence of events. An image processing system using personal computer hardware and original software has been developed to facilitate measurement of temporal, spatial and temporospatial parameters. Digitized image sequences derived from videotape are manipulated and analyzed interactively. Animation is used to preserve context and increase efficiency of measurement. Filtering and enhancement functions heighten image clarity and contrast, improving visibility of details which are not apparent on videotape. Distortion effects and extraneous head and body motions are removed prior to analysis, and spatial scales are controlled to permit comparison among subjects. Effects of image processing on intra- and interjudge reliability and research applications are discussed.

  6. Characteristics of Dry Chin-Tuck Swallowing Vibrations and Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Dudik, Joshua M; Jestrović, Iva; Luan, Bo; Coyle, James L.; Sejdić, Ervin

    2015-01-01

    Objective The effects of the chin-tuck maneuver, a technique commonly employed to compensate for dysphagia, on cervical auscultation are not fully understood. Characterizing a technique that is known to affect swallowing function is an important step on the way to developing a new instrumentation-based swallowing screening tool. Methods In this study, we recorded data from 55 adult participants who each completed five saliva swallows in a chin-tuck position. The resulting data was processed using previously designed filtering and segmentation algorithms. We then calculated 9 time, frequency, and time-frequency domain features for each independent signal. Results We found that multiple frequency and time domain features varied significantly between male and female subjects as well as between swallowing sounds and vibrations. However, our analysis showed that participant age did not play a significant role on the values of the extracted features. Finally, we found that various frequency features corresponding to swallowing vibrations did demonstrate statistically significant variation between the neutral and chin-tuck positions but sounds showed no changes between these two positions. Conclusion The chin-tuck maneuver affects many facets of swallowing vibrations and sounds and its effects can be monitored via cervical auscultation. Significance These results suggest that a subject’s swallowing technique does need to be accounted for when monitoring their performance with cervical auscultation based instrumentation. PMID:25974926

  7. Ultrasound imaging of infant swallowing during breast-feeding.

    PubMed

    Geddes, Donna T; Chadwick, Lynda M; Kent, Jacqueline C; Garbin, Catherine P; Hartmann, Peter E

    2010-09-01

    Coordination of infants' suck-swallow-breathing patterns is integral to safe and efficient feeding. However, assessment of these patterns is difficult and often invasive, particularly in breast-fed infants less than 4 months of age. The aims of this study were to develop an ultrasound approach to visualize swallowing in term breast-feeding infants and to determine the accuracy of ultrasound imaging of swallowing compared to respiratory inductive plethysmography (RIP). On ultrasound, the breast milk bolus was observed as a predominantly echogenic area moving inferiorly. Of the 388 swallows detected with ultrasound, 379 correlated with the swallow apneas detected by RIP (R(2) = 0.98). The mean duration of the swallow was 0.63 +/- 0.06 s. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive accurate method for detection of swallowing by visualization of movement of the milk bolus through the pharyngeal area of a breast-feeding infant. These techniques may potentially provide useful information for infants experiencing breast-feeding difficulties.

  8. Fabrication of Artificial Food Bolus for Evaluation of Swallowing

    PubMed Central

    Hosotsubo, Miyu; Magota, Tetsuro; Egusa, Masahiko; Miyawaki, Takuya; Matsumoto, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    Simple and easy methods to evaluate swallowing are required because of the recently increased need of rehabilitation for dysphagia. "Artificial food bolus", but not "artificial food", would be a valuable tool for swallowing evaluation without considering the mastication effect which is altered according to the individual's oral condition. Thus, this study was carried out to fabricate artificial bolus resembling natural food bolus. The mechanical property and the volume change of food bolus in normal people were firstly investigated. Thirty healthy adults without dysphagia were selected and asked to chew four sample foods (rice cake, peanut, burdock, and gummy candy). The results indicated that Young’s modulus of bolus before swallowing was below 150 kPa. The bolus volume before swallowing was below 400 mm3. In addition, the saliva component ratio of each bolus was approximately 30wt%, and the average saliva viscosity of research participants was approximately 10 mPa•s. Based on the obtained data, artificial food bolus was designed and fabricated by using alginate hydrogel as a visco-elastic material and gelatin solution as a viscotic material with a ratio of 7:3 based on weight. Consequently, the swallowing time of fabricated artificial food bolus was measured among the same participants. The results indicated the participants swallowed fabricated food bolus with similar manner reflecting their mechanical property and volume. Thus, this artificial food bolus would be a promising tool for evaluation of swallowing. PMID:27977775

  9. Fabrication of Artificial Food Bolus for Evaluation of Swallowing.

    PubMed

    Hosotsubo, Miyu; Magota, Tetsuro; Egusa, Masahiko; Miyawaki, Takuya; Matsumoto, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    Simple and easy methods to evaluate swallowing are required because of the recently increased need of rehabilitation for dysphagia. "Artificial food bolus", but not "artificial food", would be a valuable tool for swallowing evaluation without considering the mastication effect which is altered according to the individual's oral condition. Thus, this study was carried out to fabricate artificial bolus resembling natural food bolus. The mechanical property and the volume change of food bolus in normal people were firstly investigated. Thirty healthy adults without dysphagia were selected and asked to chew four sample foods (rice cake, peanut, burdock, and gummy candy). The results indicated that Young's modulus of bolus before swallowing was below 150 kPa. The bolus volume before swallowing was below 400 mm3. In addition, the saliva component ratio of each bolus was approximately 30wt%, and the average saliva viscosity of research participants was approximately 10 mPa•s. Based on the obtained data, artificial food bolus was designed and fabricated by using alginate hydrogel as a visco-elastic material and gelatin solution as a viscotic material with a ratio of 7:3 based on weight. Consequently, the swallowing time of fabricated artificial food bolus was measured among the same participants. The results indicated the participants swallowed fabricated food bolus with similar manner reflecting their mechanical property and volume. Thus, this artificial food bolus would be a promising tool for evaluation of swallowing.

  10. Tactile thermal oral stimulation increases the cortical representation of swallowing

    PubMed Central

    Teismann, Inga K; Steinsträter, Olaf; Warnecke, Tobias; Suntrup, Sonja; Ringelstein, Erich B; Pantev, Christo; Dziewas, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    Background Dysphagia is a leading complication in stroke patients causing aspiration pneumonia, malnutrition and increased mortality. Current strategies of swallowing therapy involve on the one hand modification of eating behaviour or swallowing technique and on the other hand facilitation of swallowing with the use of pharyngeal sensory stimulation. Thermal tactile oral stimulation (TTOS) is an established method to treat patients with neurogenic dysphagia especially if caused by sensory deficits. Little is known about the possible mechanisms by which this interventional therapy may work. We employed whole-head MEG to study changes in cortical activation during self-paced volitional swallowing in fifteen healthy subjects with and without TTOS. Data were analyzed by means of synthetic aperture magnetometry (SAM) and the group analysis of individual SAM data was performed using a permutation test. Results Compared to the normal swallowing task a significantly increased bilateral cortical activation was seen after oropharyngeal stimulation. Analysis of the chronological changes during swallowing suggests facilitation of both the oral and the pharyngeal phase of deglutition. Conclusion In the present study functional cortical changes elicited by oral sensory stimulation could be demonstrated. We suggest that these results reflect short-term cortical plasticity of sensory swallowing areas. These findings facilitate our understanding of the role of cortical reorganization in dysphagia treatment and recovery. PMID:19566955

  11. The effect of taste and palatability on lingual swallowing pressure.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Cathy A; Dhanaraj, Glory E

    2006-04-01

    There is evidence that a strong, unpalatable, sour bolus improves swallowing in neurogenic dysphagia. It is not known whether other tastes may alter swallowing physiology. This study investigated the effect of moderate versus high taste concentrations (sweet, sour, salty, bitter) and barium taste samples on lingual swallowing pressure in ten healthy young adults, using a three-bulb lingual pressure array secured to the hard palate. Palatability of the samples was analyzed using the nine-point hedonic scale. Results showed that moderate sucrose, high salt, and high citric acid elicited significantly higher lingual swallowing pressures compared with the pressures generated by water. Pressures in the anterior bulb were significantly higher than those recorded from the middle or posterior bulb. There was no significant effect of palatability on lingual swallowing pressures. High salt and citric acid are known to elicit chemesthesis mediated by the trigeminal nerve. These results suggest that chemesthesis may play a crucial role in swallowing physiology. If true, dysphagia diet recommendations that include trigeminal irritants such as carbonation may be beneficial to individuals with dysphagia. However, before this recommendation more research is needed to examine how food properties and their perception affect swallowing in individuals with and without dysphagia.

  12. Evolution of swallowing in lateral pharyngoplasty with stylopharyngeal muscle preservation.

    PubMed

    Mesti, Jayson Junior; Cahali, Michel Burihan

    2012-12-01

    Lateral pharyngoplasty manages obstructive sleep apnea through the myotomy and repositioning of the muscles of the lateral pharyngeal wall. Dysphagia after any pharyngeal surgery is influenced by pain, discomfort from the sutures, the healing process and by the adaptation to the changes in pharyngeal structures. Experience with lateral pharyngoplasty has shown that the superior pharyngeal constrictor muscle plays a minor role in swallowing. One of them, the stylopharyngeus muscle, seems to play an important role during swallowing. The aim of this study is to provide a daily analysis of the follow-up of the swallowing function. We have prospectively evaluated the swallowing function in 20 patients, through the daily application of a visual analogue scale from the first post-op until the complete disappearance of dysphagia. Patients have returned to their normal feeding habits in a mean of 10.9 days after the procedures and they presented a completely normal swallowing, on average, 21.6 days after the surgeries. All patients recover normal swallowing after the procedures, with a maximum recovery time of 33 days. In this study, all patients who underwent lateral pharyngoplasty with total preservation of the stylopharyngeus muscle reported complete normalization of swallowing with a recovery time up to 33 days.

  13. Swallowed dentures: Two cases and a review

    PubMed Central

    Gachabayov, Mahir; Isaev, Mubariz; Orujova, Lala; Isaev, Emin; Yaskin, Evgeniy; Neronov, Dmitriy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Denture ingestion or aspiration is a problem requiring awareness of different specialists including dentists, surgeons, otolaryngologists, anesthesiologists etc. in terms of prevention, early diagnosis and adequate treatment. Complications of swallowed dentures include hollow viscus necrosis, perforation, penetration to neighbor organs leading to fistulae, bleeding and obstruction. Presentation of cases First case is a 54-year-old female who accidentally swallowed retractable one-tooth denture during fall about 22 h before admission and clinical manifestation of acute small bowel obstruction developed. The patient underwent laparotomy, enterotomy with retrieval of the foreign body. The second case is a 31-year-old male who accidentally ingested fixed one-tooth prosthesis while eating which impacted in the ileocaecal valve. During the preparation to colonoscopy the denture spontaneously passed out with stools. Discussion Denture ingestion is more common among patients with psychoneurologic deficit, alcohol and drug abusers. Among healthy and younger population denture ingestion is rare. Both reported patients are not elder. Thus dislodgement of removable or fixed dentures is another risk factor of denture ingestion. Most common site of denture impaction is esophagus; small bowel impaction is rare. Moreover, in most reported cases, small bowel impaction of ingested dentures leads to small bowel perforation. In our first case the complication of denture ingestion appeared to be bowel obstruction what is even rarer. Conclusion Fixed dentures can be accidentally ingested as well as removable dentures. Denture loosening leads to accidental denture ingestion. Patients with denture loosening should be recommended to visit dentist as soon as possible. PMID:26635957

  14. Clock gene variation in Tachycineta swallows

    PubMed Central

    Dor, Roi; Cooper, Caren B; Lovette, Irby J; Massoni, Viviana; Bulit, Flor; Liljesthrom, Marcela; Winkler, David W

    2012-01-01

    Many animals use photoperiod cues to synchronize reproduction with environmental conditions and thereby improve their reproductive success. The circadian clock, which creates endogenous behavioral and physiological rhythms typically entrained to photoperiod, is well characterized at the molecular level. Recent work provided evidence for an association between Clock poly-Q length polymorphism and latitude and, within a population, an association with the date of laying and the length of the incubation period. Despite relatively high overall breeding synchrony, the timing of clutch initiation has a large impact on the fitness of swallows in the genus Tachycineta. We compared length polymorphism in the Clock poly-Q region among five populations from five different Tachycineta species that breed across a hemisphere-wide latitudinal gradient (Fig. 1). Clock poly-Q variation was not associated with latitude; however, there was an association between Clock poly-Q allele diversity and the degree of clutch size decline within breeding seasons. We did not find evidence for an association between Clock poly-Q variation and date of clutch initiation in for any of the five Tachycineta species, nor did we found a relationship between incubation duration and Clock genotype. Thus, there is no general association between latitude, breeding phenology, and Clock polymorphism in this clade of closely related birds. Figure 1 Photos of Tachycineta swallows that were used in this study: A) T. bicolor from Ithaca, New York, B) T. leucorrhoa from Chascomús, Argentina, C) T. albilinea from Hill Bank, Belize, D) T. meyeni from Puerto Varas, Chile, and E) T. thalassina from Mono Lake, California, Photographers: B: Valentina Ferretti; A, C-E: David Winkler. PMID:22408729

  15. Electrophysiological evaluation of oropharyngeal swallowing in myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ertekin, C; Yuceyar, N; Aydogdu, I; Karasoy, H

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Oropharyngeal dysphagia is a common feature of patients with myotonic dystrophy and is not usually perceived due to their emotional deficits and lack of interest. The aim was to show the existence and frequency of subclinical electrophysiological abnormalities in oropharyngeal swallowing and to clarify the mechanisms of dysphagia in myotonic dystrophy.
METHODS—Eighteen patients with myotonic dystrophy were examined for oropharyngeal phase of swallowing by clinical and electrophysiological methods. Ten patients had dysphagia whereas 11 patients had signs and symptoms reflecting CNS involvement. Four patients with myotonia congenita and 30 healthy volunteers served as controls. Laryngeal movements were detected by means of a piezoelectric sensor. EMG activities of the submental muscle (SM-EMG) and needle EMG of the cricopharyngeal muscle of the upper eosophageal sphincter (CP-EMG) were also recorded during swallowing.
RESULTS—In about 70% of the patients with myotonic dystrophy, the existence of oropharyngeal dysphagia was indicated objectively by means of the technique of "dysphagia limit" and by clinical evaluation. Duration of the swallowing reflex as defined by the laryngeal relocation time (0-2 time interval) and submental muscle excitation as a part of the swallowing reflex (A-C interval) were significantly prolonged in patients with myotonic dystrophy, especially in dysphagic patients. Triggering time of the swallowing reflex (A-0 interval) also showed significant prolongation, especially in the patients having both dysphagia and CNS involvement. During swallowing, CP muscle activity was abnormal in 40% of the patients with myotonic dystrophy.
CONCLUSION—Both myopathic weakness and myotonia encountered in oropharyngeal muscles play an important part in the oral and the pharyngeal phases of swallowing dysfunction in myotonic dystrophy. It was also suggested that CNS involvement might contribute to the delay of the triggering of the

  16. Characterization of Swallowing Sound: Preliminary Investigation of Normal Subjects.

    PubMed

    Honda, Tsuyoshi; Baba, Takuro; Fujimoto, Keiko; Goto, Takaharu; Nagao, Kan; Harada, Masafumi; Honda, Eiichi; Ichikawa, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the swallowing sound and identify the process of sound generation during swallowing in young healthy adults. Thirty-three healthy volunteers were enrolled and allocated into three experimental groups. In experiment 1, a microphone was attached to one of eight cervical sites in 20 subjects, participants swallowed 5 ml water, and the sound waveform was recorded. In experiment 2, 10 subjects swallowed either 0, 5, 10, or 15 ml water during audio recording. In addition, participants consumed the 5 ml bolus in two different cervical postures. In experiment 3, the sound waveform and videofluoroscopy were simultaneously recorded while the three participants consumed 5 ml iopamidol solution. The duration and peak intensity ratio of the waveform were analyzed in all experimental groups. The acoustic analysis of the waveforms and videofluoroscopy suggested that the swallowing sound could be divided into three periods, each associated with a stage of the swallowing movement: the oral phase comprising posterior tongue and hyoid bone movement; the pharyngeal phase comprising larynx movement, hyoid bone elevation, epiglottis closure, and passage of the bolus through the esophagus orifice; and the repositioning phase comprising the return of the hyoid bone and larynx to their resting positions, and reopening of the epiglottis. Acoustic analysis of swallowing sounds and videofluoroscopy suggests that the swallowing sound could be divided into three periods associated with each process of the swallowing movement: the oral phase comprising the posterior movement of the tongue and hyoid bone; the pharyngeal phase comprising the laryngeal movement, hyoid bone elevation, epiglottis closure, and the bolus passage to the esophagus orifice; and the repositioning phase comprising the repositioning of the hyoid bone and larynx, and reopening of the epiglottis.

  17. Characterization of Swallowing Sound: Preliminary Investigation of Normal Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Tsuyoshi; Baba, Takuro; Fujimoto, Keiko; Goto, Takaharu; Nagao, Kan; Harada, Masafumi; Honda, Eiichi; Ichikawa, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to characterize the swallowing sound and identify the process of sound generation during swallowing in young healthy adults. Methods Thirty-three healthy volunteers were enrolled and allocated into three experimental groups. In experiment 1, a microphone was attached to one of eight cervical sites in 20 subjects, participants swallowed 5 ml water, and the sound waveform was recorded. In experiment 2, 10 subjects swallowed either 0, 5, 10, or 15 ml water during audio recording. In addition, participants consumed the 5 ml bolus in two different cervical postures. In experiment 3, the sound waveform and videofluoroscopy were simultaneously recorded while the three participants consumed 5 ml iopamidol solution. The duration and peak intensity ratio of the waveform were analyzed in all experimental groups. Results The acoustic analysis of the waveforms and videofluoroscopy suggested that the swallowing sound could be divided into three periods, each associated with a stage of the swallowing movement: the oral phase comprising posterior tongue and hyoid bone movement; the pharyngeal phase comprising larynx movement, hyoid bone elevation, epiglottis closure, and passage of the bolus through the esophagus orifice; and the repositioning phase comprising the return of the hyoid bone and larynx to their resting positions, and reopening of the epiglottis. Conclusion Acoustic analysis of swallowing sounds and videofluoroscopy suggests that the swallowing sound could be divided into three periods associated with each process of the swallowing movement: the oral phase comprising the posterior movement of the tongue and hyoid bone; the pharyngeal phase comprising the laryngeal movement, hyoid bone elevation, epiglottis closure, and the bolus passage to the esophagus orifice; and the repositioning phase comprising the repositioning of the hyoid bone and larynx, and reopening of the epiglottis. PMID:27959902

  18. Functional Connectivity of the Cortical Swallowing Network in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Babaei, Arash; Ward, B. Douglas; Siwiec, Robert; Ahmad, Shahryar; Kern, Mark; Nencka, Andrew; Li, Shi-Jiang; Shaker, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Coherent fluctuations of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal have been referred as “functional connectivity” (FC). Our aim was to systematically characterize FC of underlying neural network involved in swallowing, and to evaluate its reproducibility and modulation during rest or task performance. Methods Activated seed regions within known areas of the cortical swallowing network (CSN) were independently identified in 16 healthy volunteers. Subjects swallowed using a paradigm driven protocol, and the data analyzed using an event-related technique. Then, in the same 16 volunteers, resting and active state data were obtained for 540 seconds in three conditions: 1) swallowing task; 2) control visual task; and 3) resting state; all scans were performed twice. Data was preprocessed according to standard FC pipeline. We determined the correlation coefficient values of member regions of the CSN across the three aforementioned conditions and compared between two sessions using linear regression. Average FC matrices across conditions were then compared. Results Swallow activated twenty-two positive BOLD and eighteen negative BOLD regions distributed bilaterally within cingulate, insula, sensorimotor cortex, prefrontal and parietal cortices. We found that: 1) Positive BOLD regions were highly connected to each other during all test conditions while negative BOLD regions were tightly connected amongst themselves; 2) Positive and negative BOLD regions were anti-correlated at rest and during task performance; 3) Across all three test conditions, FC among the regions was reproducible (r > 0.96, p<10-5); and 4) The FC of sensorimotor region to other regions of the CSN increased during swallowing scan. Conclusions 1) Swallow activated cortical substrates maintain a consistent pattern of functional connectivity; 2) FC of sensorimotor region is significantly higher during swallow scan than that observed during a non-swallow visual task or at rest. PMID

  19. Skill training for swallowing rehabilitation in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Athukorala, Ruvini P; Jones, Richard D; Sella, Oshrat; Huckabee, Maggie-Lee

    2014-07-01

    To examine the effects of skill training on swallowing in individuals with dysphagia secondary to Parkinson's disease (PD) and to explore skill retention after treatment termination. Within-subject pilot study with follow-up after 2 weeks of treatment and after a 2-week nontreatment period. Clinic in a research institute. Patients (N=10; mean age, 67.4y) included 3 women (mean Hoehn and Yahr score, 2.6) and 7 men (mean Hoehn and Yahr score, 2.4). Patients underwent 10 daily sessions of skill training therapy focused on increasing precision in muscle contraction during swallowing using visual feedback. Data from the timed water swallow test, Test of Mastication and Swallowing Solids, surface electromyography (sEMG) of submental muscles, and swallowing-related quality of life questionnaire were collected at 2 baseline sessions (conducted 2wk apart) at the end of treatment and after 2 nontreatment weeks to assess skill retention. Immediately after posttreatment, the swallowing rate for liquids (P=.034), sEMG durational parameters of premotor time (P=.003), and preswallow time (P<.001) improved. A functional carryover effect was seen from dry to water swallows (P=.009). Additionally, swallowing-related quality of life improved (P=.018). Reassessment at 2 weeks after treatment termination revealed short-term retention of treatment effects. A skill-based training approach produced functional, biomechanical, and swallowing-related quality of life improvements in this cohort indicating compelling evidence for the effectiveness of this novel approach for dysphagia rehabilitation in PD. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Decoding human swallowing via electroencephalography: a state-of-the-art review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jestrović, Iva; Coyle, James L.; Sejdić, Ervin

    2015-10-01

    Swallowing and swallowing disorders have garnered continuing interest over the past several decades. Electroencephalography (EEG) is an inexpensive and non-invasive procedure with very high temporal resolution which enables analysis of short and fast swallowing events, as well as an analysis of the organizational and behavioral aspects of cortical motor preparation, swallowing execution and swallowing regulation. EEG is a powerful technique which can be used alone or in combination with other techniques for monitoring swallowing, detection of swallowing motor imagery for diagnostic or biofeedback purposes, or to modulate and measure the effects of swallowing rehabilitation. This paper provides a review of the existing literature which has deployed EEG in the investigation of oropharyngeal swallowing, smell, taste and texture related to swallowing, cortical pre-motor activation in swallowing, and swallowing motor imagery detection. Furthermore, this paper provides a brief review of the different modalities of brain imaging techniques used to study swallowing brain activities, as well as the EEG components of interest for studies on swallowing and on swallowing motor imagery. Lastly, this paper provides directions for future swallowing investigations using EEG.

  1. Decoding human swallowing via electroencephalography: a state-of-the-art review

    PubMed Central

    Jestrović, Iva; Coyle, James L.

    2015-01-01

    Swallowing and swallowing disorders have garnered continuing interest over the past several decades. Electroencephalography (EEG) is an inexpensive and non-invasive procedure with very high temporal resolution which enables analysis of short and fast swallowing events, as well as an analysis of the organizational and behavioral aspects of cortical motor preparation, swallowing execution and swallowing regulation. EEG is a powerful technique which can be used alone or in combination with other techniques for monitoring swallowing, detection of swallowing motor imagery for diagnostic or biofeedback purposes, or to modulate and measure the effects of swallowing rehabilitation. This paper provides a review of the existing literature which has deployed EEG in the investigation of oropharyngeal swallowing, smell, taste and texture related to swallowing, cortical pre-motor activation in swallowing, and swallowing motor imagery detection. Furthermore, this paper provides a brief review of the different modalities of brain imaging techniques used to study swallowing brain activities, as well as the EEG components of interest for studies on swallowing and on swallowing motor imagery. Lastly, this paper provides directions for future swallowing investigations using EEG. PMID:26372528

  2. Sensory Input Pathways and Mechanisms in Swallowing: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Arthur J.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, research on the physiology of swallowing has confirmed that the oropharyngeal swallowing process can be modulated, both volitionally and in response to different sensory stimuli. In this review we identify what is known regarding the sensory pathways and mechanisms that are now thought to influence swallowing motor control and evoke its response. By synthesizing the current state of research evidence and knowledge, we identify continuing gaps in our knowledge of these mechanisms and pose questions for future research. PMID:20814803

  3. Mis-swallowing of cleaning naphtha: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Kuo, C Y; Lee, C Y

    1990-01-01

    Cleaning naphtha, a product of Chinese Petroleum Corporation, is a complex hydrocarbon mixture which contains mainly aliphatic hydrocarbons. It is used as a cleaning fluid and solvent. Three toddlers mis-swallowed a mouth of cleaning naphtha accidentally. One developed multiple organ failure before death, another completely recovered without sequelae, and the other died very soon after mis-swallowing. Two fatal cases were both induced vomiting with aspiration immediately after mis-swallowing by their parents. Therefore, inducing vomiting should not be encouraged especially at home, and prevention of aspiration is very important in the management of such cases.

  4. Cervical auscultation as an adjunct to the clinical swallow examination: a comparison with fibre-optic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing.

    PubMed

    Bergström, Liza; Svensson, Per; Hartelius, Lena

    2014-10-01

    This prospective, single-blinded study investigated the validity and reliability of cervical auscultation (CA) under two conditions; (1) CA-only, using isolated swallow-sound clips, and (2) CSE + CA, using extra clinical swallow examination (CSE) information such as patient case history, oromotor assessment, and the same swallow-sound clips as condition one. The two CA conditions were compared against a fibre-optic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) reference test. Each CA condition consisted of 18 swallows samples compiled from 12 adult patients consecutively referred to the FEES clinic. Patients' swallow sounds were simultaneously recorded during FEES via a Littmann E3200 electronic stethoscope. These 18 swallow samples were sent to 13 experienced dysphagia clinicians recruited from the UK and Australia who were blinded to the FEES results. Samples were rated in terms of (1) if dysphagic, (2) if the patient was safe on consistency trialled, and (3) dysphagia severity. Sensitivity measures ranged from 83-95%, specificity measures from 50-92% across the conditions. Intra-rater agreement ranged from 69-97% total agreement. Inter-rater reliability for dysphagia severity showed substantial agreement (rs = 0.68 and 0.74). Results show good rater reliability for CA-trained speech-language pathologists. Sensitivity and specificity for both CA conditions in this study are comparable to and often better than other well-established CSE components.

  5. Using Teacher Prompts and Habit Reversal to Reduce Fingernail Biting in a Student with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and a Mild Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Raymond J.; Kent, Susan; Johnson, Miriam E.

    2007-01-01

    Fingernail biting is a habit that is developed by numerous people, especially children and teenagers. Many clinicians believe that the habit of fingernail biting stems from nervousness or anxiety. Students, especially students with disabilities, can be easily distracted from instruction, can become the target of negative peer attention, and can…

  6. Psychosocial Effects of Reverse-Integrated Basketball Activity Compared to Separate and No Physical Activity in Young People with Physical Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutzler, Yeshayahu; Chacham-Guber, Anat; Reiter, Shunit

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of participation in different sport modalities on quality of life (QOL) and perceived social competence (PSC) in young people with physical disability. Ninety participants (33 females and 57 males) were monitored across four conditions: competitive separate physical activity (COSPA), recreational…

  7. Psychosocial Effects of Reverse-Integrated Basketball Activity Compared to Separate and No Physical Activity in Young People with Physical Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutzler, Yeshayahu; Chacham-Guber, Anat; Reiter, Shunit

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of participation in different sport modalities on quality of life (QOL) and perceived social competence (PSC) in young people with physical disability. Ninety participants (33 females and 57 males) were monitored across four conditions: competitive separate physical activity (COSPA), recreational…

  8. Swallowed magnets and batteries: a dangerous but not unexpected attraction.

    PubMed

    Teague, Warwick Jonathan; Vaughan, Elizabeth Mary; McHoney, Merrill; McCabe, Amanda Jayne

    2013-04-10

    An 18-month-old boy was witnessed swallowing a cluster of five magnetic toy balls. He was coincidentally noted on plain x-rays to have also recently swallowed a watch battery and a small screw. Initial outpatient management with serial review and x-rays was unsuccessful, and delayed inpatient surgical care by 9 days. Although the child never manifested features of systemic or gastrointestinal upset, emergency laparotomy confirmed a resultant jejunocolic fistula. This case demonstrates how clinical assessment of children who have swallowed magnets separately from each other can be falsely reassuring, and highlights the potential dangers of outpatient management. We recommend children who have swallowed separately >1 magnetic objects (or >1 objects capable of magnetic attraction) be managed as inpatients with active observation and timely foreign body removal.

  9. Super Guppy Swallows T-38s; Heads for El Paso

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Two NASA T-38 aircraft were swallowed whole by NASA's Super Guppy recently on Dryden Flight Research Center's back ramp. The Guppy then airlifted the two retired T-38s to El Paso, Texas, where they...

  10. Gelfoam-induced Swallowing Difficulty after Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Joo Chul; Kim, Tae Wan; Park, Kwan Ho

    2013-06-01

    Symptomatic diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) is not common. Gelfoam is one of the most commonly used topical hemostatic agents. But, in the partially moistened state, air retained in its pores may result in excessive expansion on contact with liquid. The onset of swallowing difficulty after anterior cervical spine surgery due to appling gelfoam is a rare complication. A 77-year-old man with swallowing difficulty was admitted to our hospital and we diagnosed him as DISH confirmed by radiological study. After removing the DISH, patient's symptom was relieved gradually. However, on postoperative day (POD) 7, the symptom recurred but lesser than the preoperative state. We confirmed no hematoma and esophageal perforation on the operation site. We observed him closely and controlled the diet. Three months later, he had no symptom of swallowing difficulty, and was able to be back on a regular diet, including solid foods. We present a complication case of swallowing difficulty occurring by gelfoam application.

  11. Swallowed magnets and batteries: a dangerous but not unexpected attraction

    PubMed Central

    Teague, Warwick Jonathan; Vaughan, Elizabeth Mary; McHoney, Merrill; McCabe, Amanda Jayne

    2013-01-01

    An 18-month-old boy was witnessed swallowing a cluster of five magnetic toy balls. He was coincidentally noted on plain x-rays to have also recently swallowed a watch battery and a small screw. Initial outpatient management with serial review and x-rays was unsuccessful, and delayed inpatient surgical care by 9 days. Although the child never manifested features of systemic or gastrointestinal upset, emergency laparotomy confirmed a resultant jejunocolic fistula. This case demonstrates how clinical assessment of children who have swallowed magnets separately from each other can be falsely reassuring, and highlights the potential dangers of outpatient management. We recommend children who have swallowed separately >1 magnetic objects (or >1 objects capable of magnetic attraction) be managed as inpatients with active observation and timely foreign body removal. PMID:23580685

  12. Long-term functional speech and swallowing outcomes following pharyngolaryngectomy with free jejunal flap reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sharp, David A; Theile, David R; Cook, Renee; Coman, William B

    2010-06-01

    Surgery for advanced cancer of the hypopharynx is a complex issue. Surgical intervention needs to take into consideration the resultant quality of life, in particular fundamental functional outcomes such as speech and swallowing. The aim of this study is to look at these long-term functional outcomes, following pharyngolaryngectomy and free jejunal reconstruction. A total of 19 patients, each undergoing a pharyngolaryngectomy with free jejunal graft was included. Each had a primary tracheoesophageal puncture for insertion of an indwelling voice prosthesis for speech. Functional outcomes of speech and swallow were assessed by a qualified speech pathologist. The impact on patients' quality of life was assessed under 4 domains: impairment, disability, handicap, and well being. The mean time period to follow-up was 4 years. Eighteen of the 19 patients were tolerating an oral diet, with one patient reliant on percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeds. Seventeen patients (89%) were assessed as either having either no--or only a mild degree--of dysphagia, with no evidence of aspiration. Of the 19 patients, 15 were utilizing tracheosophageal speech for communication with 11 (73%) having no--or only a mild degree--of dsyphonia. Patients assessed as having no evidence of dysphagia or dysphonia also reported reduced levels of handicap and distress compared with patients experiencing any degree of dysphagia (P = 0.46) or dysphonia (P = 0.01). While rates of pharyngolaryngectomy increase, most patients have a poor long-term prognosis, heightening the significance of postoperative outcomes. The results of this study highlight the importance of speech and swallow outcomes, and demonstrate the direct correlation between these functions and resultant quality of life.

  13. Role of tongue pressure production in oropharyngeal swallow biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Kazuhiro; Taniguchi, Hiroshige; Hayashi, Hirokazu; Magara, Jin; Minagi, Yoshitomo; Li, Qiang; Ono, Takahiro; Inoue, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    The tongue is important for orofacial movements, including swallowing. Although numerous studies have focused on tongue pressure against the palate, its physiological role has not been fully evaluated. The tongue pressure generation may have the temporal coordination with the swallowing relational organs. The aim of this study was to clarify the physiological mechanisms of tongue pressure and to investigate the temporal relationship among tongue pressure, supra-hyoid muscle activity, and videofluorographic (VF) images during swallowing. Fifteen healthy young subjects participated. Tongue pressure measured using a sensor sheet with five channels, electromyographic EMG, and VF was recorded synchronously during 4-ml barium swallowing. Swallowing behavior in VF images with and without the sensor sheet was compared. Furthermore, the temporal relationship between events measured from tongue pressure, EMG, and VF was evaluated. Swallowing behavior on VF images was not affected by placement of the sensor sheet. Tongue pressure at the posterio-lateral point of the hard palate tended to have biphasic peaks. Tongue pressure production with a monophasic pattern appeared during the same period as the second peak in the biphasic pattern. The onset of tongue pressure was later than the start of hyoid movement and onset of EMG, and offset was observed between the hyoid at the up-forward position and reposition. Onset of tongue pressure at the anterior area was correlated with the start of slight hyoid elevation. Offset of tongue pressure at the posterio-lateral points was strongly time locked with the hyoid at the up-forward position. The present results suggested the temporal coordination of tongue pressure generation with the swallowing-related organs. That is, the tongue pressure was produced for bolus propulsion, and was closely related to hyoid movement temporally during swallowing. These results may contribute to clarify the clinical state with the disorder of tongue

  14. Ginger Orally Disintegrating Tablets to Improve Swallowing in Older People.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Ayumu; Funato, Hiroki; Nakai, Megumi; Iizuka, Michiro; Abe, Noriaki; Yagi, Yusuke; Shiraishi, Hisashi; Jobu, Kohei; Yokota, Junko; Hirose, Kahori; Hyodo, Masamitsu; Miyamura, Mitsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    We previously prepared and pharmaceutically evaluated ginger orally disintegrating (OD) tablets, optimized the base formulation, and carried out a clinical trial in healthy adults in their 20 s and 50s to measure their effect on salivary substance P (SP) level and improved swallowing function. In this study, we conducted clinical trials using the ginger OD tablets in older people to clinically evaluate the improvements in swallowing function resulting from the functional components of the tablet. The ginger OD tablets were prepared by mixing the excipients with the same amount of mannitol and sucrose to a concentration of 1% ginger. Eighteen healthy older adult volunteers aged 63 to 90 were included in the swallowing function test. Saliva was collected before and 15 min after administration of the placebo and ginger OD tablets. Swallowing endoscopy was performed by an otolaryngologist before administration and 15 min after administration of the ginger OD tablets. A scoring method was used to evaluate the endoscopic swallowing. Fifteen minutes after taking the ginger OD tablets, the salivary SP amount was significantly higher than prior to ingestion or after taking the placebo (p<0.05). Among 10 subjects, one scored 1-3 using the four evaluation criteria. Overall, no aspiration occurred and a significant improvement in the swallowing function score was observed (p<0.05) after taking the ginger OD tablets. Our findings showed that the ginger OD tablets increased the salivary SP amount and improved swallowing function in older people with appreciably reduced swallowing function.

  15. Parameters of Instrumental Swallowing Evaluations: Describing a Diagnostic Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Pisegna, Jessica M; Langmore, Susan E

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare selected parameters of two swallow evaluations: fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) and the modified barium swallow (MBS) study. This was a cross-sectional, descriptive study. Fifty-five clinicians were asked to watch video recordings of swallow evaluations of 2 patients that were done using fluoroscopy and endoscopy simultaneously. In a randomized order, clinicians viewed 4 edited videos from simultaneous evaluations: the FEES and MBS videos of patient 1 and 2 each taking one swallow of 5 mL applesauce. Clinicians filled out a questionnaire that asked (1) which anatomical sites they could visualize on each video, (2) where they saw pharyngeal residue after a swallow, (3) their overall clinical impression of the pharyngeal residue, and (4) their opinions of the evaluation styles. Clinicians reported a significant difference in the visualization of anatomical sites, 11 of the 15 sites were reported as better-visualized on the FEES than on the MBS video (p < 0.05). Clinicians also rated residue to be present in more locations on the FEES than on the MBS. Clinicians' overall impressions of the severity of residue on the same exact swallow were significantly different depending on the evaluation type (FEES vs. MBS for patient 1 χ(2) = 20.05, p < 0.0001; patient 2 χ(2) = 7.52, p = 0.006), with FEES videos rated more severely. FEES advantages were: more visualization of pharyngeal and laryngeal swallowing anatomy and residue. However, as a result, clinicians provided more severe impressions of residue amount on FEES. On one hand, this suggests that FEES is a more sensitive tool than MBS studies, but on the other hand, clinicians might provide more severe interpretations on FEES.

  16. A swallowed fishbone penetrating the oesophagus into the sternomastoid muscle.

    PubMed

    Al-Shukry, Sabah M

    2003-08-01

    A 40-year-old woman presented with the history of swallowing a fishbone one hour earlier. Since the patient was swallowing normally and the X-ray results were negative, she was reassured and sent home. Twenty days later, when the patient again presented with pain and tenderness in her neck, the fishbone was detected in the left sternomastoid muscle, and removed under local anaesthesia.

  17. Occurrences of yawn and swallow are temporally related.

    PubMed

    Abe, Kimiko; Weisz, Sarah E M; Dunn, Rachelle L; DiGioacchino, Martina C; Nyentap, Jennifer A; Stanbouly, Seta; Theurer, Julie A; Bureau, Yves; Affoo, Rebecca H; Martin, Ruth E

    2015-02-01

    Yawning is a stereotyped motor behavior characterized by deep inhalation and associated dilation of the respiratory tract, pronounced jaw opening, and facial grimacing. The frequency of spontaneous yawning varies over the diurnal cycle, peaking after waking and before sleep. Yawning can also be elicited by seeing or hearing another yawn, or by thinking about yawning, a phenomenon known as "contagious yawning". Yawning is mediated by a distributed network of brainstem and supratentorial brain regions, the components of which are shared with other airway behaviors including respiration, swallowing, and mastication. Nevertheless, the possibility of behavioral coordination between yawning and other brainstem-mediated functions has not been examined. Here we show, with a double-blind methodology, a greater-than-fivefold increase in rest (saliva) swallowing rate during the 10-s period immediately following contagious yawning elicited in 14 adult humans through the viewing of videotaped yawn stimuli. Sixty-five percent of yawns were followed by a swallow within 10 s and swallows accounted for 26 % of all behaviors produced during this post-yawn period. This novel finding of a tight temporal coupling between yawning and swallowing provides preliminary evidence that yawning and swallowing are physiologically related, thus extending current models of upper airway physiology and neurophysiology. Moreover, our finding suggests the possibility that yawning plays a role in eliciting rest swallowing, a view not considered in previous theories of yawning. As such, the present demonstration of a temporal association between yawning and swallowing motivates a re-examination of the longstanding question, "Why do we yawn?".

  18. A Targeted Swallow Screen for the Detection of Postoperative Dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Gee, Erica; Lancaster, Elizabeth; Meltzer, Jospeh; Mendelsohn, Abie H; Benharash, Peyman

    2015-10-01

    Postoperative dysphagia leads to aspiration pneumonia, prolonged hospital stay, and is associated with increased mortality. A simple and sensitive screening test to identify patients requiring objective dysphagia evaluation is presently lacking. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of a novel targeted swallow screen evaluation. This was a prospective trial involving all adult patients who underwent elective cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass at our institution over an 8-week period. Within 24 hours of extubation and before the initiation of oral intake, all postsurgical patients were evaluated using the targeted swallow screen. A fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing was requested for failed screenings. During the study, 50 postcardiac surgery patients were screened. Fifteen (30%) failed the targeted swallow screen, and ten of the fifteen (66%) failed the subsequent fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing exam and were confirmed to have dysphagia. The screening test had 100 per cent sensitivity for detecting dysphagia in our patient population, and a specificity of 87.5 per cent. The overall incidence of dysphagia was 20 per cent. We have shown that a targeted swallow evaluation can efficiently screen patients during the postcardiac surgery period. Furthermore, we have shown that the true incidence of dysphagia after cardiac surgery is significantly higher than previously recognized in literature.

  19. Human hyolaryngeal movements show adaptive motor learning during swallowing.

    PubMed

    Humbert, Ianessa A; Christopherson, Heather; Lokhande, Akshay; German, Rebecca; Gonzalez-Fernandez, Marlis; Celnik, Pablo

    2013-06-01

    The hyoid bone and larynx elevate to protect the airway during swallowing. However, it is unknown whether hyolaryngeal movements during swallowing can adjust and adapt to predict the presence of a persistent perturbation in a feed-forward manner (adaptive motor learning). We investigated adaptive motor learning in nine healthy adults. Electrical stimulation was administered to the anterior neck to reduce hyolaryngeal elevation, requiring more strength to swallow during the perturbation period of this study. We assessed peak hyoid bone and laryngeal movements using videofluoroscopy across thirty-five 5-ml water swallows. Evidence of adaptive motor learning of hyolaryngeal movements was found when (1) participants showed systematic gradual increases in elevation against the force of electrical stimulation and (2) hyolaryngeal elevation overshot the baseline (preperturbation) range of motion, showing behavioral aftereffects, when the perturbation was unexpectedly removed. Hyolaryngeal kinematics demonstrates adaptive, error-reducing movements in the presence of changing and unexpected demands. This is significant because individuals with dysphagia often aspirate due to disordered hyolaryngeal movements. Thus, if rapid motor learning is accessible during swallowing in healthy adults, patients may be taught to predict the presence of perturbations and reduce errors in swallowing before they occur.

  20. Silent aspiration detection by breath and swallowing sound analysis.

    PubMed

    Sarraf Shirazi, Samaneh; Moussavi, Zahra

    2012-01-01

    Detecting aspiration after swallows (the entry of bolus into trachea) is often a difficult task particularly when the patient does not cough; those are called silent aspiration. In this study, the application of acoustical analysis in detecting silent aspiration is investigated. We recorded the swallowing and the breath sounds of 10 individuals with swallowing disorders, who demonstrated silent aspiration during the fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) assessment. We analyzed the power spectral density (PSD) of the breath sound signals following each swallow; the PSD showed higher magnitude at low frequencies for the breath sounds following an aspiration. Therefore, we divided the frequency range below 300 Hz into 3 sub-bands, over which we calculated the average power as the characteristic features for the classification purpose. Then, the fuzzy k-means unsupervised classification method was deployed to find the two clusters in the data set: the aspirated and non-aspirated groups. The results were evaluated using the FEES assessments provided by the speech language pathologists. The results show 82.3% accuracy in detecting swallows with silent aspiration. Although the proposed method should be verified on a larger dataset, the results are promising for the use of acoustical analysis as a clinical tool to detect silent aspiration.

  1. Head and neck cancer patients' perceptions of swallowing following chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Joanne M; McColl, Elaine; Wilson, Janet; Carding, Paul; Rapley, Tim

    2015-12-01

    The study aims to describe patients' experiences of swallowing difficulties following (chemo)radiotherapy for head and neck cancer and to explore any changes over time. A purposive sample of patients with swallowing difficulties was selected at a range of time points, from 3 to 18 months following treatment. Ethnographic observations of 12 patients were conducted in their own homes, over a mealtime situation. Nine new patients were interviewed about changes to their eating and drinking from pre- to post-treatment. Thematic analysis was used to code and analyse the data. Patients' reports of swallowing function were divided into four time zones: pre-treatment, during radiotherapy, early (0-3 months) and late (6-18 months) time points following treatment. The majority reported minimal problems at diagnosis, but marked impairment during and after radiotherapy, without a return to pre-treatment functioning. The focus was on severe physical side effects and changes to food preparation during radiotherapy and in the early phase of recovery. By 6 months, side effects began to subside, but swallowing was still difficult, leading to major changes to family life, socialisation and lifestyle. Swallowing problems after (chemo)radiotherapy are multi-faceted and highly individualised and restrict lives in the long term. Swallowing ability may improve in time, but does not appear to return to pre-treatment function. Further work is required to find ways of being able to best support patients living with this long-term condition.

  2. [Effect of subglottic air insufflation on subglottic pressure during swallowing].

    PubMed

    Clarett, M; Andreu, M F; Salvati, I G; Donnianni, M C; Montes, G S; Rodríguez, M G

    2014-04-01

    To determine whether there are differences between subglottic pressure during swallowing with and without air insufflation via a subglottic catheter in tracheostomized patients. A prospective, randomized cross-over study was made. Adult Intensive Care Units. Patients requiring mechanical ventilation and tracheostomy with a subglottic catheter, and with tolerance to deflation of the balloon and a speaking valve placed over the opening of the tracheostomy tube. Subglottic pressure was measured during swallowing of a thickened solution with and without the delivery of airflow through the subglottic catheter. Subglottic pressure during swallowing. Twelve out of 14 patients showed higher subglottic pressure values during swallowing with air insufflation. Two patients showed no differences between both conditions. Median (Med) values of subglottic pressure for the first, second and third swallow were 5, 4 and 4.5 cmH2O (Med 4.5 cmH2O) without air insufflation, and 8, 5.5 and 7.5 cmH2O (Med 5.5 cmH2O) with air insufflation, respectively (Wilcoxon, Z=-3.078; p=.002). In a group of tracheostomized patients, air insufflation via a subglottic catheter increased subglottic pressure levels measured during swallowing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  3. Quality of life related to swallowing in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Danielle; das Graças Wanderley de Sales Coriolano, Maria; Belo, Luciana Rodrigues; de Marcos Rabelo, Aneide Rocha; Asano, Amdore Guescel; Lins, Otávio Gomes

    2014-10-01

    Swallowing difficulties in Parkinson's disease can result in decreased quality of life. The swallowing quality of life questionnaire (SWAL-QOL) is an instrument for specifically assessing quality of life with respect to swallowing, which has been little explored in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). The goal of this study was to evaluate the quality of life with respect to swallowing in persons with PD compared to controls and at several stages of the disease using the SWAL-QOL. The experimental group was composed of 62 persons with PD at stages 1-4. Forty-one age-matched healthy subjects constituted the control group. The SWAL-QOL scores were significantly lower for the patients with PD than for the controls in all SWAL-QOL domains. Eating duration had the largest difference in score between persons with PD and the controls and the lowest mean score, followed by communication, fatigue, fear, sleep, and food selection. The scores of most domains were lower at later stages of the disease. The scores for eating duration, symptom frequency, and sleep were significantly lower at stage 4 than stages 1 and 2. In conclusion, patients with PD have significantly lower scores in all domains of the SWAL-QOL than normal controls. This means swallowing difficulties occurring in patients with PD negatively affect their QOL. Progression of the disease worsens swallowing QOL, more specifically in the domains of eating duration, symptom frequency, and sleep. This occurs mostly at later stages of the disease.

  4. Acoustic analysis of oropharyngeal swallowing using Sonar Doppler.

    PubMed

    Soria, Franciele Savaris; Silva, Roberta Gonçalves da; Furkim, Ana Maria

    2016-01-01

    During the aging process, one of the functions that changes is swallowing. These alterations in oropharyngeal swallowing may be diagnosed by methods that allow both the diagnosis and biofeedback monitoring by the patient. One of the methods recently described in the literature for the evaluation of swallowing is the Sonar Doppler. To compare the acoustic parameters of oropharyngeal swallowing between different age groups. This was a field, quantitative, study. Examination with Sonar Doppler was performed in 75 elderly and 72 non-elderly adult subjects. The following acoustic parameters were established: initial frequency, first peak frequency, second peak frequency; initial intensity, final intensity; and time for the swallowing of saliva, liquid, nectar, honey, and pudding, with 5- and 10-mL free drinks. Objective, measurable data were obtained; most acoustic parameters studied between adult and elderly groups with respect to consistency and volume were significant. When comparing elderly with non-elderly adult subjects, there is a modification of the acoustic pattern of swallowing, regarding both consistency and food bolus volume. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Swallowing Quality of Life After Zona Incerta Deep Brain Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Sundstedt, Stina; Nordh, Erik; Linder, Jan; Hedström, Johanna; Finizia, Caterina; Olofsson, Katarina

    2017-02-01

    The management of Parkinson's disease (PD) has been improved, but management of signs like swallowing problems is still challenging. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) alleviates the cardinal motor symptoms and improves quality of life, but its effect on swallowing is not fully explored. The purpose of this study was to examine self-reported swallowing-specific quality of life before and after caudal zona incerta DBS (cZI DBS) in comparison with a control group. Nine PD patients (2 women and 7 men) completed the self-report Swallowing Quality of Life questionnaire (SWAL-QOL) before and 12 months after cZI DBS surgery. The postoperative data were compared to 9 controls. Median ages were 53 years (range, 40-70 years) for patients and 54 years (range, 42-72 years) for controls. No significant differences were found between the pre- or postoperative scores. The SWAL-QOL total scores did not differ significantly between PD patients and controls. The PD patients reported significantly lower scores in the burden subscale and the symptom scale. Patients with PD selected for cZI DBS showed good self-reported swallowing-specific quality of life, in many aspects equal to controls. The cZI DBS did not negatively affect swallowing-specific quality of life in this study.

  6. Oral Care for Developmentally Disabled Children: The Primary Dentition Stage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, David J.; Judd, Peter L.

    1988-01-01

    Developmental disabilities and chronic illness can impact the oral health of children in the preeruptive and primary dentition stages. The article covers prevention and management of dental caries; gingival changes; trauma to the primary dentition; sucking, swallowing, and mastication; extraorally fed patients; and factitial injuries. Home-care…

  7. Oral Care for Developmentally Disabled Children: The Primary Dentition Stage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, David J.; Judd, Peter L.

    1988-01-01

    Developmental disabilities and chronic illness can impact the oral health of children in the preeruptive and primary dentition stages. The article covers prevention and management of dental caries; gingival changes; trauma to the primary dentition; sucking, swallowing, and mastication; extraorally fed patients; and factitial injuries. Home-care…

  8. Interdisciplinary evaluation of dysphagia: clinical swallowing evaluation and videoendoscopy of swallowing.

    PubMed

    Sordi, Marina de; Mourão, Lucia Figueiredo; Silva, Ariovaldo Armando da; Flosi, Luciana Claudia Leite

    2009-01-01

    Patients with dysphagia have impairments in many aspects, and an interdisciplinary approach is fundamental to define diagnosis and treatment. A joint approach in the clinical and videoendoscopy evaluation is paramount. To study the correlation between the clinical assessment (ACD) and the videoendoscopic (VED) assessment of swallowing by classifying the degree of severity and the qualitative/descriptive analyses of the procedures. cross-sectional, descriptive and comparative. held from March to December of 2006, at the Otolaryngology/Dysphagia ward of a hospital in the country side of São Paulo. 30 dysphagic patients with different disorders were assessed by ACD and VED. The data was classified by means of severity scales and qualitative/ descriptive analysis. the correlation between severity ACD and VED scales pointed to a statistically significant low agreement (KAPA = 0.4) (p=0,006). The correlation between the qualitative/descriptive analysis pointed to an excellent and statistically significant agreement (KAPA=0.962) (p<0.001) concerning the entire sample. the low agreement between the severity scales point to a need to perform both procedures, reinforcing VED as a doable procedure. The descriptive qualitative analysis pointed to an excellent agreement, and such data reinforces our need to understand swallowing as a process.

  9. Sensory stimulation activates both motor and sensory components of the swallowing system

    PubMed Central

    Lowell, Soren Y.; Poletto, Christopher J.; Knorr-Chung, Bethany R.; Reynolds, Richard C.; Simonyan, Kristina; Ludlow, Christy L.

    2008-01-01

    Volitional swallowing in humans involves the coordination of both brainstem and cerebral swallowing control regions. Peripheral sensory inputs are necessary for safe and efficient swallowing, and their importance to the patterned components of swallowing has been demonstrated. However, the role of sensory inputs to the cerebral system during volitional swallowing is less clear. We used four conditions applied during functional magnetic resonance imaging to differentiate between sensory, motor planning, and motor execution components for cerebral control of swallowing. Oral air pulse stimulation was used to examine the effect of sensory input, covert swallowing was used to engage motor planning for swallowing, and overt swallowing was used to activate the volitional swallowing system. Breath-holding was also included to determine whether its effects could account for the activation seen during overt swallowing. Oral air pulse stimulation, covert swallowing and overt swallowing all produced activation in the primary motor cortex, cingulate cortex, putamen and insula. Additional regions of the swallowing cerebral system that were activated by the oral air pulse stimulation condition included the primary and secondary somatosensory cortex and thalamus. Although air pulse stimulation was on the right side only, bilateral cerebral activation occurred. On the other hand, covert swallowing minimally activated sensory regions, but did activate the supplementary motor area and other motor regions. Breath-holding did not account for the activation during overt swallowing. The effectiveness of oral-sensory stimulation for engaging both sensory and motor components of the cerebral swallowing system demonstrates the importance of sensory input in cerebral swallowing control. PMID:18515150

  10. The Relationship Between Pharyngeal Constriction and Post-swallow Residue.

    PubMed

    Stokely, Shauna L; Peladeau-Pigeon, Melanie; Leigh, Chelsea; Molfenter, Sonja M; Steele, Catriona M

    2015-06-01

    Pharyngeal constriction has been proposed as a parameter that may distinguish functional from impaired swallows. We employed anatomically normalized pixel-based measures of pharyngeal area at maximum constriction, and the ratio of this measure to area at rest, and explored the association between these measures and post-swallow residue using the normalized residue ratio scale (NRRS). Videofluoroscopy data for 5 ml boluses of 22 % (w/v) liquid barium were analyzed from 20 healthy young adults and 40 patients with suspected neurogenic dysphagia. The frames of maximum pharyngeal constriction and post-swallow hyoid rest were extracted. Pixel-based measures of pharyngeal area were made using ImageJ and size-normalized using the squared C2-C4 vertebral distance as a reference scalar. Post-swallow residue and the areas of the vallecular and pyriform sinus spaces were measured on the hyoid rest frame to calculate the NRRSv and NRRSp. The dataset was divided into swallows with residue within or exceeding the upper confidence interval boundary seen in the healthy participants. Mixed model repeated measures ANOVAs were used to compare pharyngeal area (rest, constriction) and the pharyngeal constriction ratio, between individuals with and without residue. Measures of pharyngeal area at maximum constriction were significantly larger (i.e., less constricted, p = 0.000) in individuals with post-swallow residue in either the valleculae or the pyriform sinus. These results support the idea that interventions targeted toward improving pharyngeal constriction have the potential to be effective in reducing post-swallow residue.

  11. Quantitative representation of Eustachian tube component movements during swallowing.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Selma; Teixeira, Miriam S; Alper, Cuneyt M

    2017-02-18

    Describes a method of dynamic video-endoscopy of the Eustachian tube (ET) orifice at the nasopharynx to quantitatively represent ET component movements during swallowing using a graphic function and analyze their importance to its opening mechanics. This was a pilot study of relational event capture using a polar coordinate system applied to trans-nasal video-endoscopic recordings of the ET during 3 swallows in 5 adults. After topical anesthesia of the nose, a 45° telescope was introduced unilaterally and focused on the ipsilateral ET orifice. For each recording, consecutive still-frame images were analyzed by identifying 4 fixed-point locators; the luminal apex, lateral and medial walls and the torus. A frame-normal, horizontal line was constructed through the apex and, then, the medial angles defined at the intersection of the horizontal line and the lines from apex to each point locator were measured. The magnitudes of these angles were plotted as a function of time (i.e. successive frames) for each swallow. The resulting graphs captured the "in plane" relational movements for the locator points during a swallow. Complex interactions among the ET components were resolvable and the patterns were reproducible across swallows. Individual peculiarities observable on review of the corresponding "movies" such as double-swallows, delayed swallows and ET luminal constriction were easily identified in the graphic representation. This methodology is potentially useful for summary presentations of the ET mechanics of individual patients and for quantifying differences in those mechanics between groups defined by their history of middle-ear disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Does Learning Disabled Equal Language Disabled?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haber, Lyn

    Twenty-nine learning disabled (LD) students in grades 1-4 were compared with non-LD students on comprehension of relative clauses. Ss were given baseline, 2-way, and 3-way reversible sentences to test comprehension and examine strategy differences. Results showed that LD students performed more poorly than non-LD students for all sentence types at…

  13. Sensorimotor modulation of human cortical swallowing pathways.

    PubMed

    Hamdy, S; Aziz, Q; Rothwell, J C; Hobson, A; Thompson, D G

    1998-02-01

    1. Transcranial magnetic stimulation over motor areas of cerebral cortex in man can activate short latency bilateral cortical projections to the pharynx and oesophagus. In the present paper we investigate the interaction between pathways from each hemisphere and explore how activity in these pathways is modulated by afferent feedback from the face, pharynx and oesophagus. 2. Comparison of unilateral and bilateral stimulation (using interstimulus intervals (ISIs) of 1, 5 or 10 ms between shocks) showed spatial summation of responses from each hemisphere at an ISI of 1 ms, indicating that cortical efferents project onto a shared population of target neurones. Such summation was not evident at ISIs of 5 or 10 ms. There was little evidence for transcallosal inhibition of responses from each hemisphere, as described for limb muscles. 3. Single stimuli applied to the vagus nerve in the neck or the supraorbital nerve, which alone produce intermediate (onset 20-30 ms) and long (50-70 ms) latency reflex responses in the pharynx and oesophagus, were used to condition the cortical responses. Compared with rest, responses evoked by cortical stimulation were facilitated when they were timed to coincide with the late part of the reflex. The onset latency was reduced during both parts of the reflex response. No facilitation was observed with subthreshold reflex stimuli. 4. Single electrical stimuli applied to the pharynx or oesophagus had no effect on the response to cortical stimulation. However, trains of stimuli at frequencies varying from 0.2 to 10 Hz decreased the latency of the cortically evoked responses without consistently influencing their amplitudes. The effect was site specific: pharyngeal stimulation shortened both pharyngeal and oesophageal response latencies, whereas oesophageal stimulation shortened only the oesophageal response latencies. 5. Cortical swallowing motor pathways from each hemisphere interact and their excitability is modulated in a site

  14. Sensorimotor modulation of human cortical swallowing pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hamdy, Shaheen; Aziz, Qasim; Rothwell, John C; Hobson, Anthony; Thompson, David G

    1998-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation over motor areas of cerebral cortex in man can activate short latency bilateral cortical projections to the pharynx and oesophagus. In the present paper we investigate the interaction between pathways from each hemisphere and explore how activity in these pathways is modulated by afferent feedback from the face, pharynx and oesophagus.Comparison of unilateral and bilateral stimulation (using interstimulus intervals (ISIs) of 1, 5 or 10 ms between shocks) showed spatial summation of responses from each hemisphere at an ISI of 1 ms, indicating that cortical efferents project onto a shared population of target neurones. Such summation was not evident at ISIs of 5 or 10 ms. There was little evidence for transcallosal inhibition of responses from each hemisphere, as described for limb muscles.Single stimuli applied to the vagus nerve in the neck or the supraorbital nerve, which alone produce intermediate (onset 20-30 ms) and long (50-70 ms) latency reflex responses in the pharynx and oesophagus, were used to condition the cortical responses. Compared with rest, responses evoked by cortical stimulation were facilitated when they were timed to coincide with the late part of the reflex. The onset latency was reduced during both parts of the reflex response. No facilitation was observed with subthreshold reflex stimuli.Single electrical stimuli applied to the pharynx or oesophagus had no effect on the response to cortical stimulation. However, trains of stimuli at frequencies varying from 0.2 to 10 Hz decreased the latency of the cortically evoked responses without consistently influencing their amplitudes. The effect was site specific: pharyngeal stimulation shortened both pharyngeal and oesophageal response latencies, whereas oesophageal stimulation shortened only the oesophageal response latencies.Cortical swallowing motor pathways from each hemisphere interact and their excitability is modulated in a site-specific manner by sensory

  15. Intellectual Disability

    MedlinePlus

    ... Knows What? (log-in required) Select Page Intellectual Disability Jun 16, 2010 NICHCY Disability Fact Sheet 8 ... ready! Back to top What is an Intellectual Disability? Intellectual disability is a term used when a ...

  16. Intellectual Disability

    MedlinePlus

    ... Who Knows What? Survey Item Bank Search for: Intellectual Disability NICHCY Disability Fact Sheet 8 January 2011 Links ... getting ready! Back to top What is an Intellectual Disability? Intellectual disability is a term used when a ...

  17. The generation of pharyngeal phase of swallow and its coordination with breathing: interaction between the swallow and respiratory central pattern generators.

    PubMed

    Bautista, Tara G; Sun, Qi-Jian; Pilowsky, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    Swallowing and breathing utilize common muscles and an anatomical passage: the pharynx. The risk of aspiration of ingested material is minimized not only by the laryngeal adduction of the vocal folds and laryngeal elevation but also by the precise coordination of swallows with breathing. Namely, swallows: (1) are preferentially initiated in the postinspiratory/expiratory phase, (2) are accompanied by a brief apnea, and (3) are often followed by an expiration and delay of the next breath. This review summarizes the expiratory evidence on the brainstem regions comprising the central pattern generator (CPG) that produces the pharyngeal stage of swallow, how the motor acts of swallowing and breathing are coordinated, and lastly, brainstem regions where the swallowing and respiratory CPGs may interact in order to ensure "safe" swallows.

  18. Swallowing in patients with Parkinson's disease: a surface electromyography study.

    PubMed

    Ws Coriolano, Maria das Graças; R Belo, Luciana; Carneiro, Danielle; G Asano, Amdore; Al Oliveira, Paulo José; da Silva, Douglas Monteiro; G Lins, Otávio

    2012-12-01

    Our goal was to study deglutition of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and normal controls (NC) using surface electromyography (sEMG). The study included 15 patients with idiopathic PD and 15 age-matched normal controls. Surface electromyography was collected over the suprahyoid muscle group. Conditions were the following: swallow at once 10 and 20 ml of water and 5 and 10 ml of yogurt of firm consistency, and freely drink 100 ml of water. During swallowing, durations of sEMG were significantly longer in PD patients than in normal controls but no significant differences of amplitudes were found. Eighty percent of the PD patients and 20 % of the NC needed more than one swallow to consume 20 ml of water, while 70 % of the PD patients and none of the NC needed more than one swallow to consume 5 ml of yogurt. PD patients took significantly more time and needed significantly more swallows to drink 100 ml of water than normal controls. We conclude that sEMG might be a simple and useful tool to study and monitor deglutition in PD patients.

  19. Hard to Swallow: Developmental Biological Insights into Pediatric Dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    LaMantia, Anthony-Samuel; Moody, Sally A.; Maynard, Thomas M.; Karpinski, Beverly A.; Zohn, Irene E.; Mendelowitz, David; Lee, Norman H.; Popratiloff, Anastas

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric dysphagia—feeding and swallowing difficulties that begin at birth, last throughout childhood, and continue into maturity—is one of the most common, least understood complications in children with developmental disorders. We argue that a major cause of pediatric dysphagia is altered hindbrain patterning during pre-natal development. Such changes can compromise craniofacial structures including oropharyngeal muscles and skeletal elements as well as motor and sensory circuits necessary for normal feeding and swallowing. Animal models of developmental disorders that include pediatric dysphagia in their phenotypic spectrum can provide mechanistic insight into pathogenesis of feeding and swallowing difficulties. A fairly common human genetic developmental disorder, DiGeorge/22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11DS) includes a substantial incidence of pediatric dysphagia in its phenotypic spectrum. Infant mice carrying a parallel deletion to 22q11DS patients have feeding and swallowing difficulties. Altered hindbrain patterning, neural crest migration, craniofacial malformations, and changes in cranial nerve growth prefigure these difficulties. Thus, in addition to craniofacial and pharyngeal anomalies that arise independently of altered neural development, pediatric dysphagia may reflect disrupted hindbrain patterning and its impact on neural circuit development critical for feeding and swallowing. The mechanisms that disrupt hindbrain patterning and circuitry may provide a foundation to develop novel therapeutic approaches for improved clinical management of pediatric dysphagia. PMID:26554723

  20. Swallowing problems in the nursing home: a novel training response.

    PubMed

    O'Loughlin, G; Shanley, C

    1998-01-01

    Various studies suggest that between 50% and 75% of nursing home residents have some difficulty in swallowing. Some of these residents are assessed and treated by speech pathologists, but many are managed by nursing staff without specialist input. A training program called Swallowing ... on a Plate (SOAP) has been developed by the Centre for Education and Research on Ageing and the Inner West Geriatrics and Rehabilitation Service to help address swallowing-related problems in local nursing homes (Inner West of Sydney, Australia). The training program teaches nursing staff how to identify, assess, and manage swallowing problems, including making appropriate referrals. Several new instruments were developed specifically for this program including two assessment checklists, a set of management guidelines, and a swallowing care plan. Evaluation of the program--including 3 months follow-up--showed it to be highly successful. A stand-alone training resource has been produced for wide distribution to help staff implement the program as a permanent aspect of their nursing care. This paper describes the development, content, presentation, resource, and evaluation of the above program.

  1. Hard to swallow: Developmental biological insights into pediatric dysphagia.

    PubMed

    LaMantia, Anthony-Samuel; Moody, Sally A; Maynard, Thomas M; Karpinski, Beverly A; Zohn, Irene E; Mendelowitz, David; Lee, Norman H; Popratiloff, Anastas

    2016-01-15

    Pediatric dysphagia-feeding and swallowing difficulties that begin at birth, last throughout childhood, and continue into maturity--is one of the most common, least understood complications in children with developmental disorders. We argue that a major cause of pediatric dysphagia is altered hindbrain patterning during pre-natal development. Such changes can compromise craniofacial structures including oropharyngeal muscles and skeletal elements as well as motor and sensory circuits necessary for normal feeding and swallowing. Animal models of developmental disorders that include pediatric dysphagia in their phenotypic spectrum can provide mechanistic insight into pathogenesis of feeding and swallowing difficulties. A fairly common human genetic developmental disorder, DiGeorge/22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11DS) includes a substantial incidence of pediatric dysphagia in its phenotypic spectrum. Infant mice carrying a parallel deletion to 22q11DS patients have feeding and swallowing difficulties that approximate those seen in pediatric dysphagia. Altered hindbrain patterning, craniofacial malformations, and changes in cranial nerve growth prefigure these difficulties. Thus, in addition to craniofacial and pharyngeal anomalies that arise independently of altered neural development, pediatric dysphagia may result from disrupted hindbrain patterning and its impact on peripheral and central neural circuit development critical for feeding and swallowing. The mechanisms that disrupt hindbrain patterning and circuitry may provide a foundation to develop novel therapeutic approaches for improved clinical management of pediatric dysphagia. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Surgical rehabilitation of voice and swallowing after jugular foramen surgery.

    PubMed

    Oestreicher-Kedem, Yael; Agrawal, Sumit; Jackler, Robert K; Damrose, Edward J

    2010-03-01

    We sought to determine the patient population that will benefit from surgical rehabilitation of voice and swallowing after jugular foramen tumor (JFT) resection. We performed a retrospective case study of patients with a history of JFT resection. The patients' files were reviewed for data on preoperative and postoperative function of cranial nerves VII and IX through XII, voice and swallowing function, and surgical procedures for voice and swallowing rehabilitation and their timing. Twenty-one patients underwent JFT resection. Thirty-eight percent presented with deficits of cranial nerves VII and IX through XII, and 61% developed new postoperative deficits. Three patients recovered glossopharyngeal nerve function, 2 recovered vagus nerve function, and 1 recovered facial nerve function. Surgical rehabilitation procedures were undertaken in 8 patients. Patients who eventually underwent surgical rehabilitation procedures for voice and swallowing tended to have larger tumors, tumors within the nerve bundle in the jugular foramen, and multiple nerve deficits. Most patients with multiple deficits of cranial nerves VII and IX through XII after JFT resection are unlikely to regain spontaneous nerve function, will experience long-term dysphonia and dysphagia, and will elect to undergo corrective surgery to improve voice and swallowing. Preoperative evaluation and close postoperative follow-up can identify patients who would benefit from early surgical rehabilitation.

  3. Central Nervous System Control of Voice and Swallowing

    PubMed Central

    Ludlow, Christy L.

    2015-01-01

    This review of the central nervous control systems for voice and swallowing has suggested that the traditional concepts of a separation between cortical and limbic and brain stem control should be refined and more integrative. For voice production, a separation of the non-human vocalization system from the human learned voice production system has been posited based primarily on studies of non-human primates. However, recent humans studies of emotionally based vocalizations and human volitional voice production has shown more integration between these two systems than previously proposed. Recent human studies have shown that reflexive vocalization as well as learned voice production not involving speech, involve a common integrative system. On the other hand, recent studies of non-human primates have provided evidence of some cortical activity during vocalization and cortical changes with training during vocal behavior. For swallowing, evidence from the macaque and functional brain imaging in humans indicates that the control for the pharyngeal phase of swallowing is not primarily under brain stem mechanisms as previously proposed. Studies suggest that the initiation and patterning of swallowing for the pharyngeal phase is also under active cortical control for both spontaneous as well as volitional swallowing in awake humans and non-human primates. PMID:26241238

  4. Application of Kinesio Taping method for newborn swallowing difficultly

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chien-Lin; Wu, Wei-Ting; Chang, Ke-Vin; Lin, Hong-Yi; Chou, Li-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Preterm infants are at an increased risk of sucking problems, swallowing difficulty, and poor nourishment. During the neonatal period, the neurobehavioral organization of a preterm baby is poor compared with that of appropriate gestational age infants. Kinesio Taping has been widely used for edema control, joint protection, and proprioception training. With the help of augmentation of the sensory input for muscle facilitation and inhibition through tapping, the coordination of the target muscle groups can be improved. Until now, no research is available on the use of Kinesio Taping for the swallowing difficulty of infant. Methods: We reported a preterm infant suffering from brain edema at birth and swallowing difficultly until 40 weeks. The swallowing reflex was delayed. Moreover, lip closure and rooting reflex combined with the dysfunction grade of jaw movement were poor. We performed KT methods on the baby under the theory of the direction of the tape for facilitate or inhibit the muscle. Result: After the Kinesio Taping treatment, the sucking function was improved with good lip closure.One week later, the baby was discharged without the use of an oral gastric tube. Conclusion: Kinesio Taping contributed significantly to the improvement of impaired sucking and swallowing and could be implemented as a regular rehabilitative approach for infants suffering from these difficulties. PMID:27495080

  5. Effect of carbonated beverages on pharyngeal swallowing in young individuals and elderly inpatients.

    PubMed

    Morishita, Motoyoshi; Mori, Sanae; Yamagami, Shota; Mizutani, Masatoshi

    2014-04-01

    Gustatory and chemical stimulations of the oral cavity and pharyngeal mucosa by carbonated water improve pharyngeal swallowing. We compared changes in pharyngeal swallowing and sensory aspects induced by a carbonated beverage preferred by Japanese with those induced by carbonated water, a sports drink, and tap water in healthy young subjects and elderly inpatients with no swallowing problems. The duration of laryngeal elevation (DOLE) for swallowing the carbonated beverage and water in the second session was shorter compared to that for water in the first session in the elderly subjects. The DOLE and the duration of suprahyoid muscle activity for swallowing were longer in the elderly subjects than in the young subjects for all beverages. Beverages that the subjects subjectively felt were easy to swallow were the sports drink and carbonated beverage, whereas they stated that carbonated water was less easy to swallow. In the elderly subjects, swallowing ability latently decreased, even though they had no problem swallowing in their daily lives, and it was assumed that the carbonated beverage improved pharyngeal swallowing. In addition, the carbonated beverage also influenced the subsequent swallowing of water, showing a persistent effect. It was suggested that carbonated beverages are easy to swallow and effective for improving pharyngeal swallowing.

  6. Prevalence of swallowing dysfunction screened in Swedish cohort of COPD patients.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez Lindh, Margareta; Blom Johansson, Monica; Jennische, Margareta; Koyi, Hirsh

    2017-01-01

    COPD is a common problem associated with morbidity and mortality. COPD may also affect the dynamics and coordination of functions such as swallowing. A misdirected swallow may, in turn, result in the bolus entering the airway. A growing body of evidence suggests that a subgroup of people with COPD is prone to oropharyngeal dysphagia. The aim of this study was to evaluate swallowing dysfunction in patients with stable COPD and to determine the relation between signs and symptoms of swallowing dysfunction and lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second percent predicted). Fifty-one patients with COPD in a stable phase participated in a questionnaire survey, swallowing tests, and spirometry. A post-bronchodilator ratio of the forced expiratory volume in 1 second/best of forced vital capacity and vital capacity <0.7 was used to define COPD. Swallowing function was assessed by a questionnaire and two swallowing tests (water and cookie swallow tests). Sixty-five percent of the patients reported subjective signs and symptoms of swallowing dysfunction in the questionnaire and 49% showed measurable ones in the swallowing tests. For the combined subjective and objective findings, 78% had a coexisting swallowing dysfunction. No significant difference was found between male and female patients. Swallowing function is affected in COPD patients with moderate to severe airflow limitation, and the signs and symptoms of this swallowing dysfunction were subjective, objective, or both.

  7. Validation and demonstration of an isolated acoustic recording technique to estimate spontaneous swallow frequency.

    PubMed

    Crary, Michael A; Sura, Livia; Carnaby, Giselle

    2013-03-01

    Spontaneous swallowing is considered a reflexive, pharyngeal clearance mechanism. Reductions in spontaneous swallow frequency may be a sensitive index for dysphagia and related morbidities. This study evaluated an acoustic recording technique as a measure to estimate spontaneous swallow frequency. Initially, a multichannel physiologic (surface electromyography, swallow apnea, cervical auscultation) recording technique was validated and subsequently compared to an isolated acoustic (microphone) recording technique on a sample of younger (25 ± 2.8 years) and older (68 ± 5.3 years) healthy adult participants. Sensitivity (94 %), specificity (99 %), and classification accuracy (98 %) were high for swallow identification from the multichannel physiologic recording technique. Interjudge reliability was high (k = 0.94, 95 % CI = 0.92-0.96). No significant differences in spontaneous swallow frequency were observed between the multichannel physiologic recordings and the acoustic recordings (0.85 vs. 0.81 swallows per minute). Furthermore, these two techniques were highly correlated (r = 0.95). Interjudge reliability for swallow identification via acoustic recordings was high (k = 0.96, 95 % CI = 0.94-0.99). Preliminary evaluation of the temporal stability of spontaneous swallow frequency measured from acoustic recordings indicated that time samples as short as 5 min produce viable results. Age differences were identified in spontaneous swallow frequency rates, with older participants swallowing less frequently than younger participants (0.47 vs. 1.02 swallows per minute). Collectively, these results indicate that an isolated acoustic recording technique is a valid approach to estimate spontaneous swallow frequency.

  8. Prevalence of swallowing dysfunction screened in Swedish cohort of COPD patients

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez Lindh, Margareta; Blom Johansson, Monica; Jennische, Margareta; Koyi, Hirsh

    2017-01-01

    Background COPD is a common problem associated with morbidity and mortality. COPD may also affect the dynamics and coordination of functions such as swallowing. A misdirected swallow may, in turn, result in the bolus entering the airway. A growing body of evidence suggests that a subgroup of people with COPD is prone to oropharyngeal dysphagia. The aim of this study was to evaluate swallowing dysfunction in patients with stable COPD and to determine the relation between signs and symptoms of swallowing dysfunction and lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second percent predicted). Methods Fifty-one patients with COPD in a stable phase participated in a questionnaire survey, swallowing tests, and spirometry. A post-bronchodilator ratio of the forced expiratory volume in 1 second/best of forced vital capacity and vital capacity <0.7 was used to define COPD. Swallowing function was assessed by a questionnaire and two swallowing tests (water and cookie swallow tests). Results Sixty-five percent of the patients reported subjective signs and symptoms of swallowing dysfunction in the questionnaire and 49% showed measurable ones in the swallowing tests. For the combined subjective and objective findings, 78% had a coexisting swallowing dysfunction. No significant difference was found between male and female patients. Conclusion Swallowing function is affected in COPD patients with moderate to severe airflow limitation, and the signs and symptoms of this swallowing dysfunction were subjective, objective, or both. PMID:28176891

  9. Pharyngeal swallowing and oesophageal motility during a solid meal test: a prospective study in healthy volunteers and patients with major motility disorders.

    PubMed

    Hollenstein, Michael; Thwaites, Philip; Bütikofer, Simon; Heinrich, Henriette; Sauter, Matthias; Ulmer, Irina; Pohl, Daniel; Ang, Daphne; Eberli, Daniel; Schwizer, Werner; Fried, Michael; Distler, Oliver; Fox, Mark; Misselwitz, Benjamin

    2017-09-01

    time between swallows was accompanied by more effective oesophageal contractions (in healthy volunteers, 20/389 [5%] effective swallows at <4 s between swallows vs 586/900 [65%] effective swallows at >11 s between swallows, p<0·0001). Obstructive, spastic, or hypercontractile swallows were rare in healthy volunteers (total <1%). Patients with motility disorders ate slower than healthy volunteers (14·95 g [IQR 11-25] per min vs 32·9 g [25-40] per min, p<0·0001) and pathological oesophageal motility were reproduced when patients consumed the STM. In healthy volunteers, eating speed was associated only with frequency of swallows (slope 2·5 g per min per pharyngeal swallow per min [95% CI 1·1-4·0], p=0·0009), whereas in patients with dysphagia, it was correlated with frequency of effective oesophageal contractions (6·4 g per min per effective contraction per min [4·3-8·5], p<0·0001). Diagnostic agreement was good between the HRM with SWS and rice STM (intra-class correlation coefficient r=0·81, 95% CI 0·74-0·87, p<0·0001). Our results show normative values for pharyngeal swallowing and oesophageal motility in healthy volunteers. Detailed analysis of HRM data acquired during an STM shows that the rate-limiting factor for intake of solids in health is the frequency of pharyngeal swallowing and not oesophageal contractility. The reverse is true in patients with oesophageal motility disorders, in whom the frequency of effective oesophageal contractions determines eating speed. University Hospital Zurich. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of swallowing by Sydney Swallow Questionnaire (SSQ) in oral and oropharyngeal cancer patients treated with primary surgery.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Raghav C; St Rose, Suzanne; Chisholm, Edward J; Georgalas, Christos; Bisase, Brian; Amen, Furrat; Kerawala, Cyrus J; Clarke, Peter M; Nutting, Christopher M; Rhys-Evans, Peter H; Harrington, Kevin J; Kazi, Rehan

    2012-12-01

    This work aimed at evaluating patients' swallowing functions by a newly validated swallow-specific questionnaire, the Sydney Swallow Questionnaire (SSQ), in a cohort of oral and oropharyngeal cancer patients. Mean/median SSQ scores were calculated and compared with study variables using the Mann-Whitney U test and Kruskal-Wallis test. The mean composite SSQ scores (SD) for the base of tongue, oral tongue, and tonsillar cancer patients were 663.8 (382.8), 456.2 (407.6), and 283.0 (243.1), respectively (p = 0.005); for advanced vs. early T stage disease they were 918.1 (319.5) vs. 344.8 (292.1) (p ≤ 0.001); for patients <60 years vs. ≥60 years they were 549.3 (415.1) vs. 314.0 (247.3) (p = 0.02); and for patients with reconstruction vs. without reconstruction they were 676.5 (410.5) vs. 331.9 (286.5) (p = 0.002). SSQ is a useful tool for evaluation of swallowing in head and neck cancer patients. Site of cancer, T stage, patient's age, and reconstruction directly affect post-treatment swallow outcome.

  11. Analysis of pressure generation and bolus transit during pharyngeal swallowing.

    PubMed

    McConnel, F M

    1988-01-01

    Current pharyngeal deglutition theory has stressed the role of the pharyngeal constrictors as producing a peristaltic wave responsible for bolus propulsion through the pharynx. This thesis presents data obtained using manofluorography which supports the significance of tongue and laryngeal motion in swallowing. The usage of the term peristalsis to describe the constrictor contraction is challenged. The results of this quantitative study of swallowing in normal subjects, laryngectomized patients, and patients with restricted tongue motion show that tongue driving pressure and the negative pressure developed in the pharyngeal esophageal segment appear more important than the peristaltic-like pressure of the constrictors. Bolus transit is really dependent upon these two pressures. This model for analysis has clinical significance because it permits quantification of the pharyngeal swallowing mechanism.

  12. Swallow Syncope: Clinical Presentation, Diagnostic Criteria, and Therapeutic Options

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Shashank; Girotra, Mohit; Glasser, Stephen; Dutta, Sudhir K.

    2014-01-01

    We recently encountered three patients with episodes of syncope associated with food ingestion. A 31-year-old woman had an episode of syncope in the hospital while drinking soda. Transient asystole was noted on the telemonitor, confirming the diagnosis of swallow syncope. The other two patients were 78- and 80 year old gentlemen, respectively, who presented with recurrent and transient episodes of dizziness during deglutition. Extensive work-up of syncope was negative in both cases and a diagnosis of swallow syncope was made by clinical criteria. These cases illustrate the challenging problem of swallow syncope. The diagnosis can be suspected on the basis of clinical presentation and confirmed with the demonstration of transient brady-arrhythmia during deglutition. Medical management includes avoiding trigger foods, use of anticholinergics, and/or placement of a permanent cardiac pacemaker. PMID:25038205

  13. Tracking the hyoid bone in videofluoroscopic swallowing studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellen, Patrick M.; Becker, Darci; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; van Daele, Douglas

    2008-03-01

    Difficulty swallowing, or dysphagia, has become a growing problem. Swallowing complications can lead to malnutrition, dehydration, respiratory infection, and even death. The current gold standard for analyzing and diagnosing dysphagia is the videofluoroscopic barium swallow study. In these studies, a fluoroscope is used to image the patient ingesting barium solutions of different volumes and viscosities. The hyoid bone anchors many key muscles involved in swallowing and plays a key role in the process. Abnormal hyoid bone motion during a swallow can indicate swallowing dysfunction. Currently in clinical settings, hyoid bone motion is assessed qualitatively, which can be subject to intra-rater and inter-rater bias. This paper presents a semi-automatic method for tracking the hyoid bone that makes quantitative analysis feasible. The user defines a template of the hyoid on one frame, and this template is tracked across subsequent frames. The matching phase is optimized by predicting the position of the template based on kinematics. An expert speech pathologist marked the position of the hyoid on each frame of ten studies to serve as the gold standard. Results from performing Bland-Altman analysis at a 95% confidence interval showed a bias of 0.0+/-0.08 pixels in x and -0.08+/-0.09 pixels in y between the manually-defined gold standard and the proposed method. The average Pearson's correlation between the gold standard and the proposed method was 0.987 in x and 0.980 in y. This paper also presents a method for automatically establishing a patient-centric coordinate system for the interpretation of hyoid motion. This coordinate system corrects for upper body patient motion during the study and identifies superior-inferior and anterior-posterior motion components. These tools make the use of quantitative hyoid motion analysis feasible in clinical and research settings.

  14. Cortical recovery of swallowing function in wound botulism

    PubMed Central

    Teismann, Inga K; Steinstraeter, Olaf; Warnecke, Tobias; Zimmermann, Julian; Ringelstein, Erich B; Pantev, Christo; Dziewas, Rainer

    2008-01-01

    Background Botulism is a rare disease caused by intoxication leading to muscle weakness and rapidly progressive dysphagia. With adequate therapy signs of recovery can be observed within several days. In the last few years, brain imaging studies carried out in healthy subjects showed activation of the sensorimotor cortex and the insula during volitional swallowing. However, little is known about cortical changes and compensation mechanisms accompanying swallowing pathology. Methods In this study, we applied whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) in order to study changes in cortical activation in a 27-year-old patient suffering from wound botulism during recovery from dysphagia. An age-matched group of healthy subjects served as control group. A self-paced swallowing paradigm was performed and data were analyzed using synthetic aperture magnetometry (SAM). Results The first MEG measurement, carried out when the patient still demonstrated severe dysphagia, revealed strongly decreased activation of the somatosensory cortex but a strong activation of the right insula and marked recruitment of the left posterior parietal cortex (PPC). In the second measurement performed five days later after clinical recovery from dysphagia we found a decreased activation in these two areas and a bilateral cortical activation of the primary and secondary sensorimotor cortex comparable to the results seen in a healthy control group. Conclusion These findings indicate parallel development to normalization of swallowing related cortical activation and clinical recovery from dysphagia and highlight the importance of the insula and the PPC for the central coordination of swallowing. The results suggest that MEG examination of swallowing can reflect short-term changes in patients suffering from neurogenic dysphagia. PMID:18462489

  15. Cortical recovery of swallowing function in wound botulism.

    PubMed

    Teismann, Inga K; Steinstraeter, Olaf; Warnecke, Tobias; Zimmermann, Julian; Ringelstein, Erich B; Pantev, Christo; Dziewas, Rainer

    2008-05-07

    Botulism is a rare disease caused by intoxication leading to muscle weakness and rapidly progressive dysphagia. With adequate therapy signs of recovery can be observed within several days. In the last few years, brain imaging studies carried out in healthy subjects showed activation of the sensorimotor cortex and the insula during volitional swallowing. However, little is known about cortical changes and compensation mechanisms accompanying swallowing pathology. In this study, we applied whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) in order to study changes in cortical activation in a 27-year-old patient suffering from wound botulism during recovery from dysphagia. An age-matched group of healthy subjects served as control group. A self-paced swallowing paradigm was performed and data were analyzed using synthetic aperture magnetometry (SAM). The first MEG measurement, carried out when the patient still demonstrated severe dysphagia, revealed strongly decreased activation of the somatosensory cortex but a strong activation of the right insula and marked recruitment of the left posterior parietal cortex (PPC). In the second measurement performed five days later after clinical recovery from dysphagia we found a decreased activation in these two areas and a bilateral cortical activation of the primary and secondary sensorimotor cortex comparable to the results seen in a healthy control group. These findings indicate parallel development to normalization of swallowing related cortical activation and clinical recovery from dysphagia and highlight the importance of the insula and the PPC for the central coordination of swallowing. The results suggest that MEG examination of swallowing can reflect short-term changes in patients suffering from neurogenic dysphagia.

  16. Swallow-related cerebral cortical activity maps are not specific to deglutition.

    PubMed

    Kern, M; Birn, R; Jaradeh, S; Jesmanowicz, A; Cox, R; Hyde, J; Shaker, R

    2001-04-01

    Cortical representation of swallow-related motor tasks has not been systematically investigated. In this study, we elucidated and compared these cortical representations to those of volitional swallow using block-trial and single-trial methods. Fourteen volunteers were studied by functional magnetic resonance imaging. Cortical activation during both swallowing and swallow-related motor tasks that can be performed independent of swallowing, such as jaw clenching, lip pursing, and tongue rolling, was found in four general areas: the anterior cingulate, motor/premotor cortex, insula, and occipital/parietal region corresponding to Brodmann's areas 7, 19, and 31. Regions of activity, volume of activated voxels, and increases in signal intensity were found to be similar between volitional swallow and swallow-related motor tasks. These findings, using both block-trial and single-trial techniques, suggest that cerebral cortical regions activated during swallowing may not be specific to deglutitive function.

  17. Respiratory phase resetting and airflow changes induced by swallowing in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Paydarfar, D; Gilbert, R J; Poppel, C S; Nassab, P F

    1995-01-01

    1. Relationships between the timing of respiration and deglutition were studied in thirty awake healthy subjects at rest. Deglutition was monitored by submental electromyography, pharyngeal manometry and videofluoroscopy. Respiration was recorded by measurement of oronasal airflow and chest wall movement. Three types of deglutition were studied: injected bolus swallows, spontaneous swallows, and visually cued swallows of boluses previously placed in the mouth. 2. The effect of each swallow on respiratory rhythm was characterized by measurement of cophase, defined as the interval between the onset of deglutitive submental EMG activity to the onset of subsequent rescheduled inspirations. Cophase was determined for swallows initiated at different phases of the respiratory cycle. In all subjects deglutition caused phase resetting of respiratory rhythm. Cophase was largest for swallows initiated near the the inspiratory-expiratory (E-I) transition and smallest for swallows initiated near the expiratory-inspiratory (E-I) transition. The pattern of respiratory resetting by deglutition was topologically classified as type 0. This pattern was shown for swallows induced by bolus injection or visual cue, and for spontaneous swallows. 3. The incidence of spontaneous deglutition was influenced by the position of the swallow in the respiratory cycle. Few spontaneous swallows were initiated near the E-I transition whereas most occurred from late inspiration to mid-expiration. 4. Deglutition caused an abrupt decrease in airflow leading to an interval of apnoea, followed by a period of expiration. The duration of deglutition apnoea for spontaneous swallows was shorter than that for 5 ml bolus swallows, and was unaffected by the respiratory phase of swallow initiation. The period of expiration after swallowing was longest for swallows initiated at the I-E transition, and shortest for E-I swallows. 5. The intervals between bolus injection and the onset of deglutition apnoea, and the

  18. Cardiac tamponade caused by migration of a swallowed sewing needle.

    PubMed

    Vesna, Djokić; Tatjana, Atanasijević; Slobodan, Savić; Slobodan, Nikolić

    2004-01-28

    The case of a 20-year-old female prisoner who died due to cardiac tamponade caused by a swallowed sewing needle migration is reported. According to the autopsy report and complete analysis of medical records, the migration of the swallowed needle was reconstructed: from esophagus and stomach, through diaphragm and pericardium up to the left heart ventricle, where the needle was found at the autopsy. The case is very interesting and unique: there has been no similar case described in medical literature so far.

  19. Segmentation of dual-axis swallowing accelerometry signals in healthy subjects with analysis of anthropometric effects on duration of swallowing activities.

    PubMed

    Sejdić, Ervin; Steele, Catriona M; Chau, Tom

    2009-04-01

    Dysphagia (swallowing difficulty) is a serious and debilitating condition that often accompanies stroke, acquired brain injury, and neurodegenerative illnesses. Individuals with dysphagia are prone to aspiration (the entry of foreign material into the airway), which directly increases the risk of serious respiratory consequences such as pneumonia. Swallowing accelerometry is a promising noninvasive tool for the detection of aspiration and the evaluation of swallowing. In this paper, dual-axis accelerometry was implemented since the motion of the hyolaryngeal complex occurs in both anterior-posterior and superior-inferior directions during swallowing. Dual-axis cervical accelerometry signals were acquired from 408 healthy subjects during dry, wet, and wet chin tuck swallowing tasks. The proposed segmentation algorithm is based on the idea of sequential fuzzy partitioning of the signal and is well suited for long signals with nonstationary variance. The algorithm was validated with simulated signals with known swallowing locations and a subset of 295 real swallows manually segmented by an experienced speech language pathologist. In both cases, the algorithm extracted individual swallows with over 90% accuracy. The time duration analysis was carried out with respect to gender, body mass index (BMI), and age. Demographic and anthropometric variables influenced the duration of these segmented signals. Male participants exhibited longer swallows than female participants (p=0.05). Older participants and participants with higher BMIs exhibited swallows with significantly longer (p=0.05) duration than younger participants and those with lower BMIs, respectively.

  20. Patterns and causes of change in a cliff swallow colony during a 17-year period

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krapu, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    The number of cliff swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonata) nests at a farmstead in southeastern North Dakota increased at an average annual rate of 87% with house sparrow (Passer domesticus) removal during 1957-60 and 1970-72. Harassment of nesting cliff swallows by house sparrows, adult swallow mortality from cold weather in late May, and collapse of nests were the principal observed factors limiting swallow population growth during a 17-year period.

  1. Use of a metal detector in the location of a swallowed razor blade in the oesophagus.

    PubMed

    Kessler, A; Yellin, A; Kessler, A; Kronenberg, J

    1990-05-01

    A case describing the use of a metal detector to locate a metallic foreign body swallowed by a prisoner. Initial work up included plain thoracic X-rays and a gastrografin swallow which were negative. A metal detector was used to confirm the presence of a metal body in the oesophagus which was verified by a barium swallow.

  2. Does soil pH influence swallow-wort distribution in its current range?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The perennial non-native vines, pale swallow-wort (Cynanchum rossicum [Kleopow] Borhidi) and black swallow-wort (Cynanchum louiseae [L.] Kartesz & Gandhi), are established invaders in the northeastern United States and southeastern Canada, and are spreading westward. The swallow-worts typically colo...

  3. Tongue Movements during Water Swallowing in Healthy Young and Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Catriona M.; Van Lieshout, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the nature and extent of variability in tongue movement during healthy swallowing as a function of aging and gender. In addition, changes were quantified in healthy tongue movements in response to specific differences in the nature of the swallowing task (discrete vs. sequential swallows). Method:…

  4. Acoustic analysis of swallowing sounds: a new technique for assessing dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Santamato, Andrea; Panza, Francesco; Solfrizzi, Vincenzo; Russo, Anna; Frisardi, Vincenza; Megna, Marisa; Ranieri, Maurizio; Fiore, Pietro

    2009-07-01

    To perform acoustic analysis of swallowing sounds, using a microphone and a notebook computer system, in healthy subjects and patients with dysphagia affected by neurological diseases, testing the positive/negative predictive value of a pathological pattern of swallowing sounds for penetration/aspiration. Diagnostic test study, prospective, not blinded, with the penetration/aspiration evaluated by fibreoptic endoscopy of swallowing as criterion standard. Data from a previously recorded database of normal swallowing sounds for 60 healthy subjects according to gender, age, and bolus consistency was compared with those of 15 patients with dysphagia from a university hospital referral centre who were affected by various neurological diseases. Mean duration of the swallowing sounds and post-swallowing apnoea were recorded. Penetration/aspiration was verified by fibreoptic endoscopy of swallowing in all patients with dysphagia. The mean duration of swallowing sounds for a liquid bolus of 10 ml water was significantly different between patients with dysphagia and healthy patients. We also described patterns of swallowing sounds and tested the negative/positive predictive values of post-swallowing apnoea for penetration/aspiration verified by fibreoptic endoscopy of swallowing (sensitivity 0.67 (95% confidence interval 0.24-0.94); specificity 1.00 (95% confidence interval 0.56-1.00)). The proposed technique for recording and measuring swallowing sounds could be incorporated into the bedside evaluation, but it should not replace the use of more diagnostic and valuable measures.

  5. Effects of predation and competitor interference on nesting success of house wrens and tree swallows

    Treesearch

    Deborah M. Finch

    1990-01-01

    I examined the relationships among brood survival in House Wrens (Troglodytes aedon) and Tree Swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) and rates of nest-box use, species interference, and nest predation. Tree Swallows nested in boxes in one of three woodlands occupied by House Wrens. Over a 4-year period, clutch mortality rates in swallows were significantly higher than those in...

  6. Treatment of post-stroke dysphagia by vitalstim therapy coupled with conventional swallowing training.

    PubMed

    Xia, Wenguang; Zheng, Chanjuan; Lei, Qingtao; Tang, Zhouping; Hua, Qiang; Zhang, Yangpu; Zhu, Suiqiang

    2011-02-01

    To investigate the effects of VitalStim therapy coupled with conventional swallowing training on recovery of post-stroke dysphagia, a total of 120 patients with post-stroke dysphagia were randomly and evenly divided into three groups: conventional swallowing therapy group, VitalStim therapy group, and VitalStim therapy plus conventional swallowing therapy group. Prior to and after the treatment, signals of surface electromyography (sEMG) of swallowing muscles were detected, swallowing function was evaluated by using the Standardized Swallowing Assessment (SSA) and Videofluoroscopic Swallowing Study (VFSS) tests, and swallowing-related quality of life (SWAL-QOL) was evaluated using the SWAL-QOL questionnaire. There were significant differences in sEMG value, SSA, VFSS, and SWAL-QOL scores in each group between prior to and after treatment. After 4-week treatment, sEMG value, SSA, VFSS and SWAL-QOL scores were significantly greater in the VitalStim therapy plus conventional swallowing training group than in the conventional swallowing training group and VitalStim therapy group, but no significant difference existed between conventional swallowing therapy group and VitalStim therapy group. It was concluded that VitalStim therapy coupled with conventional swallowing training was conducive to recovery of post-stroke dysphagia.

  7. Tongue Movements during Water Swallowing in Healthy Young and Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Catriona M.; Van Lieshout, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the nature and extent of variability in tongue movement during healthy swallowing as a function of aging and gender. In addition, changes were quantified in healthy tongue movements in response to specific differences in the nature of the swallowing task (discrete vs. sequential swallows). Method:…

  8. Statistical Learning, Letter Reversals, and Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treiman, Rebecca; Gordon, Jessica; Boada, Richard; Peterson, Robin L.; Pennington, Bruce F.

    2014-01-01

    Reversal errors play a prominent role in theories of reading disability. We examined reversal errors in the writing of letters by 5- to 6-year-old children. Of the 130 children, 92 had a history of difficulty in producing speech sounds, a risk factor for reading problems. Children were more likely to reverse letter forms that face left, such as…

  9. [Characteristics and limitation of portable bedside swallowing test in elderly with dementia: comparison between the repetitive saliva swallowing test and the simple swallowing provocation test].

    PubMed

    Baba, Yuki; Teramoto, Shinji; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Machida, Ayako; Akishita, Masahiro; Toba, Kenji

    2005-05-01

    Several bedside portable swallowing tests have been advocated for screening for dysphagia. However, the clinical usefulness and limitation of these tests have not been examined in elderly patients with dementia. We performed the repetitive saliva swallowing test (RSST) and the simple swallowing provocation test (SSPT) in 37 elderly inpatients (81.8 +/- 1.2 years old). Simultaneously, cognitive and verbal communication ability were assessed by the Hasegawa Dementia Scale revised version (HDSR) and the Mini-Communication Test (MCT). RSST was completed only in 22 patients (59%), whereas SSPT was successfully completed in all cases. Scores of HDSR and MCT were significantly lower in patients who were unable to cooperate with RSST compared to successful examinees (HDSR: 7 +/- 1 vs 15 +/- 3, p < 0.0; MCT: 47 +/- 8 vs 81 +/- 5, p < 0.01). Dysphagia was detected in 14 patients (64%) by RSST and 5 (14%) by SSPT. Patients with dysphagia showed significantly lower cognitive function (p < 0.05) and verbal communication ability (p < 0.05). In conclusion, RSST is more sensitive to detect dysphagia in elderly patients; however, compliance with RSST is strongly influenced by the patient's cognitive function and verbal communication ability. Comprehensive geriatric assessment will help to choose an alternative test for dysphagia such as SSPT which is more specific test for aspiration pneumonia.

  10. Effects of Lingual Effort on Swallow Pressures Following Radiation Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenius, Kerry; Stierwalt, Julie; LaPointe, Leonard L.; Bourgeois, Michelle; Carnaby, Giselle; Crary, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This article investigated the effects of increased oral lingual pressure on pharyngeal pressures during swallowing in patients who have undergone radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. It was hypothesized that increased oral lingual pressure would result in increased pharyngeal pressures. Method: A within-subject experimental design was…

  11. Evaluation of Swallowing in Infants with Congenital Heart Defect

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Karine da Rosa; Firpo, Cora; Gasparin, Marisa; Teixeira, Adriane Ribeiro; Dornelles, Silvia; Bacaltchuk, Tzvi; Levy, Deborah Salle

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Surgical repair of congenital heart disease in the first years of life compromises the coordination of the suction, breathing, and swallowing functions. Objective To describe the alterations in swallowing found in infants with congenital heart defect during their hospitalization. Methods Prospective, cross-sectional study in a reference hospital for heart disease. The sample consisted of 19 postsurgical patients who underwent an evaluation of swallowing. The infants included were younger than 7 months and had a diagnosis of congenital heart defect and suspected swallowing difficulties. Results Of the 19 infants with congenital heart defect, the median age was 3.2 months. A significant association was found between suction rhythm and dysphagia (p = 0.036) and between oral-motor oral feeding readiness and dysphagia (p = 0.014). Conclusions The data suggest that dysphagia often occurs after surgery in infants with congenital heart defect. Infants with congenital heart defect had very similar behavior to preterm infants in terms of oral feeding readiness. PMID:25992152

  12. [A case of swallowing a lower partial denture].

    PubMed

    Carbery, A; Provençal, M

    1993-10-01

    This paper reports on the case of an elderly person who accidentally swallowed his partial denture. The ingestion did not result in any signs or symptoms and the denture was found totally by chance. A major surgical procedure was required to remove the prosthesis.

  13. Differences in swallowing between high and low concentration taste stimuli.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Ahmed; Steele, Catriona M; Pelletier, Cathy A

    2014-01-01

    Taste is a property that is thought to potentially modulate swallowing behavior. Whether such effects depend on taste, intensity remains unclear. This study explored differences in the amplitudes of tongue-palate pressures in swallowing as a function of taste stimulus concentration. Tongue-palate pressures were collected in 80 healthy women, in two age groups (under 40, over 60), stratified by genetic taste status (nontasters, supertasters). Liquids with different taste qualities (sweet, sour, salty, and bitter) were presented in high and low concentrations. General labeled magnitude scale ratings captured perceived taste intensity and liking/disliking of the test liquids. Path analysis explored whether factors of taste, concentration, age group, and/or genetic taste status impacted: (1) perceived intensity; (2) palatability; and (3) swallowing pressures. Higher ratings of perceived intensity were found in supertasters and with higher concentrations, which were more liked/disliked than lower concentrations. Sweet stimuli were more palatable than sour, salty, or bitter stimuli. Higher concentrations elicited stronger tongue-palate pressures independently and in association with intensity ratings. The perceived intensity of a taste stimulus varies as a function of stimulus concentration, taste quality, participant age, and genetic taste status and influences swallowing pressure amplitudes. High-concentration salty and sour stimuli elicit the greatest tongue-palate pressures.

  14. Feasibility of flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing in healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Marks, Stanley L; Douthitt, Katie L; Belafsky, Peter C

    2016-03-01

    To assess feasibility of flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) in awake dogs, determine whether specific variables associated with the oropharyngeal phase of swallowing can be recognized, and evaluate the safety and tolerability of FEES. 6 healthy client-owned large- and giant-breed adult dogs. A topical anesthetic was applied to the nasal passage of each dog, and a fiberoptic endoscope was passed transnasally until the tip of the scope was positioned in the oropharynx. All dogs voluntarily drank colored water followed by consumption of a commercial canned diet and then a kibble diet mixed with food color. During each swallow, laryngeal and pharyngeal anatomic structures were evaluated and depth of bolus flow prior to the pharyngeal phase of swallowing was assessed. Evidence of bolus retention in the vallecula or pyriform sinuses and laryngeal penetration of the bolus were recorded. FEES was completed without major adverse events and was tolerated well by all 6 dogs. Mild, self-limiting epistaxis was noted for 2 dogs. The nasopharynx, oropharynx, and hypopharynx were observed in all dogs; movement of food boluses through the esophagus was observed in 2 dogs, and food boluses in the stomach were visible in 1 dog. Pharyngeal and laryngeal function was considered physiologically normal in all dogs. FEES appeared to be a feasible diagnostic tool for use in large- and giant-breed dogs. Studies are warranted in dogs with oropharyngeal dysphagia to determine whether FEES can be tolerated and whether it can augment videofluoroscopy findings.

  15. Abundance and genetic damage of barn swallows from Fukushima

    PubMed Central

    Bonisoli-Alquati, A.; Koyama, K.; Tedeschi, D. J.; Kitamura, W.; Sukuzi, H.; Ostermiller, S.; Arai, E.; Møller, A. P.; Mousseau, T. A.

    2015-01-01

    A number of studies have assessed or modeled the distribution of the radionuclides released by the accident at the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP). Few studies however have investigated its consequences for the local biota. We tested whether exposure of barn swallow (Hirundo rustica) nestlings to low dose ionizing radiation increased genetic damage to their peripheral erythrocytes. We estimated external radiation exposure by using thermoluminescent dosimeters, and by measuring radioactivity of the nest material. We then assessed DNA damage by means of the neutral comet assay. In addition, we conducted standard point-count censuses of barn swallows across environmental radiation levels, and estimated their abundance and local age ratio. Radioactivity of nest samples was in the range 479–143,349 Bq kg−1, while external exposure varied between 0.15 and 4.9 mGy. Exposure to radioactive contamination did not correlate with higher genetic damage in nestlings. However, at higher levels of radioactive contamination the number of barn swallows declined and the fraction of juveniles decreased, indicating lower survival and lower reproduction and/or fledging rate. Thus, genetic damage to nestlings does not explain the decline of barn swallows in contaminated areas, and a proximate mechanism for the demographic effects documented here remains to be clarified. PMID:25838205

  16. Effects of Lingual Effort on Swallow Pressures Following Radiation Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenius, Kerry; Stierwalt, Julie; LaPointe, Leonard L.; Bourgeois, Michelle; Carnaby, Giselle; Crary, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This article investigated the effects of increased oral lingual pressure on pharyngeal pressures during swallowing in patients who have undergone radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. It was hypothesized that increased oral lingual pressure would result in increased pharyngeal pressures. Method: A within-subject experimental design was…

  17. Evaluation of Manometric Measures during Tongue-Hold Swallows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doeltgen, Sebastian H.; Witte, Ulrike; Gumbley, Freya; Huckabee, Maggie-Lee

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Based on visual inspection, prior research documented increased movement of the posterior pharyngeal wall in healthy volunteers during tongue-hold swallows. This manometric study investigated the immediate effects of the tongue-hold maneuver on pharyngeal peak pressure generation, duration of pressure generation, and pressure slope…

  18. Persistence of Respiratory-Swallowing Coordination after Laryngectomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charbonneau, Isabelle; Lund, James P.; McFarland, David H.

    2005-01-01

    The present study was designed to provide additional insights into the neural mechanisms underlying respiratory-swallowing coupling by studying potential alterations in movement coordination when upper airway protection is no longer necessary. Twelve laryngectomized participants, all at least 3 years postsurgery, were compared to age- and…

  19. Screening technologies for detection of swallowed packages of narcotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, Lowell J.; Magnuson, Erik E.; Sheldon, Alan G.; Kumar, Sankaran

    1997-01-01

    An increasingly popular method of transporting modest quantities of narcotics across international borders is to employ 'swallowers'. These are people who typically enter the country as international airline passengers after swallowing small, water-tight packages of heroin and/or cocaine. Rapid and accurate identification of swallowers in the airport environment poses difficult technical changes. Commonly used medical inspection technologies fall into one of two categories. Either they are unsuitable for widespread use, or they do not provide adequate information. An example of the former is x-ray scanning, while an example of the latter is ultrasonic imaging. Quantum Magnetics has developed a system to screen selected airline passengers for the presence of swallowed narcotics. The system utilizes magnetic resonance, which provides the physical basis for the magnetic resonance imaging systems widely used in the medical community as an alternative to x-rays. The system is currently operational, and laboratory performance testing is complete. Both the design of the system and its performance will be discussed. This work was sponsored in part by the Office of National Drug Control Policy and the US Customs Service.

  20. Ellen Swallow Richards (1842-1911): Ecological Foremother.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Patricia J.

    Most educated women (in the sciences and other fields) still have a hard time discarding the patriarchal socialization and pressures in their own fields which prevent them from seeing this extraordinary woman as an environmental pioneer and ecological foremother. Ellen Swallow Richards merits attention and respect as a foremother of what would…

  1. Swallowing Disorders in Parkinson's Disease: Impact of Lingual Pumping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Argolo, Natalie; Sampaio, Marília; Pinho, Patrícia; Melo, Ailton; Nóbrega, Ana Caline

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lingual pumping (LP) is a repetitive, involuntary, anteroposterior movement of the tongue on the soft palate that is executed prior to transferring the food bolus to the pharynx, but we also observed LP when multiple swallows were taken. LP may be associated with rigidity and bradykinesia in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). This…

  2. [Age-related changes in swallowing. Physiology and pathophysiology].

    PubMed

    Muhle, P; Wirth, R; Glahn, J; Dziewas, R

    2015-04-01

    The term presbyphagia refers to all changes of swallowing physiology that are manifested with increasing age. Alterations in the pattern of deglutition that are part of healthy aging are called primary presbyphagia. Primary presbyphagia is not an illness in itself but contributes to a more pervasive naturally diminished functional reserve, making older adults more susceptible to dysphagia. If disorders in swallowing occur in the elderly as a comorbidity of a specific disease, for example stroke or neurodegenerative disorders, this is called secondary presbyphagia. Increasing age has an impact on each stage of deglutition. In the oral preparatory phase a diminished input for smell and taste as well as a usually multifactorial cause of dry mouth are the most important influencing factors. Sarcopenia, the degenerative loss of skeletal muscle mass, strength and quality associated with aging, interferes in particular with the oropharyngeal phase. A decreased sensory feedback from the oropharyngeal mucosa leads to a delayed triggering of the swallowing reflex. Finally, a reduction in connective tissue elasticity and changes of the axial skeleton lead to various modifications of the swallowing pattern with advanced age.

  3. Evaluation of Manometric Measures during Tongue-Hold Swallows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doeltgen, Sebastian H.; Witte, Ulrike; Gumbley, Freya; Huckabee, Maggie-Lee

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Based on visual inspection, prior research documented increased movement of the posterior pharyngeal wall in healthy volunteers during tongue-hold swallows. This manometric study investigated the immediate effects of the tongue-hold maneuver on pharyngeal peak pressure generation, duration of pressure generation, and pressure slope…

  4. Swallowing Disorders in Parkinson's Disease: Impact of Lingual Pumping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Argolo, Natalie; Sampaio, Marília; Pinho, Patrícia; Melo, Ailton; Nóbrega, Ana Caline

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lingual pumping (LP) is a repetitive, involuntary, anteroposterior movement of the tongue on the soft palate that is executed prior to transferring the food bolus to the pharynx, but we also observed LP when multiple swallows were taken. LP may be associated with rigidity and bradykinesia in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). This…

  5. Coordination in oro-pharyngeal biomechanics during human swallowing.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Minagi, Yoshitomo; Hori, Kazuhiro; Kondoh, Jugo; Fujiwara, Shigehiro; Tamine, Kenichi; Inoue, Makoto; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Chen, Yongjin; Ono, Takahiro

    2015-08-01

    In swallowing, the tongue contacts against the hard palate to generate pressure for propelling a bolus from the oral cavity into the pharynx. Meanwhile, the hyoid and larynx move upward and forward to facilitate the bolus from the pharynx into the esophagus. It has been well known that sequential coordination between those actions is critical for safety accomplishment of swallowing. However, the absence of noninvasive assessment for it limits the detection to the physiological symptom of dysphagia. We applied a sensor sheet on the hard palate to measure tongue contact pressure and a bend sensor on the frontal neck to monitor the laryngeal movement, which was synchronized with hyoid motion for assessing the coordination between both actions in 14 healthy male subjects when swallowing 5ml of water. The sequential order of tongue pressure and hyoid movement was successfully displayed. Tongue pressure was produced after slight movement of the hyoid and closely to the hyoid elevation, then reached a maximum when the hyoid stabilized in the most anterior-superior position, and ceased concurrently with the onset of hyoid descent. Additionally, the synchronized data from both sensors showed positive correlations between identified time points on the laryngeal signal waveform and onset, peak and offset of tongue pressure. Our sensing system successfully showed the coordination between tongue pressure production and hyoid motion, and could be a simple and noninvasive method for clinicians to evaluate the oral and pharyngeal stages of swallowing.

  6. Persistence of Respiratory-Swallowing Coordination after Laryngectomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charbonneau, Isabelle; Lund, James P.; McFarland, David H.

    2005-01-01

    The present study was designed to provide additional insights into the neural mechanisms underlying respiratory-swallowing coupling by studying potential alterations in movement coordination when upper airway protection is no longer necessary. Twelve laryngectomized participants, all at least 3 years postsurgery, were compared to age- and…

  7. The timing of administration, dose dependence and efficacy of dopa decarboxylase inhibitors on the reversal of motor disability produced by L-DOPA in the MPTP-treated common marmoset.

    PubMed

    Tayarani-Binazir, Kayhan A; Jackson, Michael J; Fisher, Ria; Zoubiane, Ghada; Rose, Sarah; Jenner, Peter

    2010-06-10

    Dopa decarboxylase inhibitors are routinely used to potentiate the effects of L-DOPA in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. However, neither in clinical use nor in experimental models of Parkinson's disease have the timing and dose of dopa decarboxylase inhibitors been thoroughly explored. We now report on the choice of dopa decarboxylase inhibitors, dose and the time of dosing relationships of carbidopa, benserazide and L-alpha-methyl dopa (L-AMD) in potentiating the effects of L-DOPA in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6 tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated common marmoset. Pre-treatment with benserazide for up to 3h did not alter the motor response to L-DOPA compared to simultaneous administration with L-DOPA. There was some evidence of a relationship between carbidopa and benserazide dose and increased locomotor activity and the reversal of motor disability. But in general, commonly used dose levels of dopa decarboxylase inhibitors appeared to produce a maximal motor response to L-DOPA. In contrast, dyskinesia intensity and duration continued to increase with both carbidopa and benserazide dose. The novel dopa decarboxylase inhibitor, L-AMD, increased locomotor activity and improved motor disability to the same extent as carbidopa or benserazide but importantly this was accompanied by significantly less dyskinesia. This study shows that currently, dopa decarboxylase inhibitors may be routinely employed in the MPTP-treated primate at doses which are higher than those necessary to produce a maximal potentiation of the anti-parkinsonian effect of L-DOPA. This may lead to excessive expression of dyskinesia in this model of Parkinson's disease and attention should be given to the dose regimens currently employed.

  8. The effects of increased fluid viscosity on swallowing sounds in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Jestrović, Iva; Dudik, Joshua M; Luan, Bo; Coyle, James L; Sejdić, Ervin

    2013-09-10

    Cervical auscultation (CA) is an affordable, non-invasive technique used to observe sounds occurring during swallowing. CA involves swallowing characterization via stethoscopes or microphones, while accelerometers can detect other vibratory signals. While the effects of fluid viscosity on swallowing accelerometry signals is well understood, there are still open questions about these effects on swallowing sounds. Therefore, this study investigated the influence of fluids with increasing thickness on swallowing sound characteristics. We collected swallowing sounds and swallowing accelerometry signals from 56 healthy participants. Each participant completed five water swallows, five swallows of nectar-thick apple juice, and five swallows of honey-thick apple juice. These swallows were completed in neutral head and chin-tuck head positions. After pre-processing of collected signals, a number of features in time, frequency and time-frequency domains were extracted. Our numerical analysis demonstrated that significant influence of viscosity was found in most of the features. In general, features extracted from swallows in the neutral head position were affected more than swallows from the chin-tuck position. Furthermore, most of the differences were found between water and fluids with higher viscosity. Almost no significant differences were found between swallows involving nectar-thick and honey-thick apple juices. Our results also showed that thicker fluids had higher acoustic regularity and predictability as demonstrated by the information-theoretic features, and a lower frequency content as demonstrated by features in the frequency domain. According to these results, we can conclude that viscosity of fluids should be considered in future investigations involving swallowing sounds.

  9. The relationship between hyoid and laryngeal displacement and swallowing impairment

    PubMed Central

    Steele, Catriona M.; Bailey, Gemma L.; Chau, Tom; Molfenter, Sonja M.; Oshalla, Mohamed; Waito, Ashley A.; Zoratto, Dana C. B. H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Reduced range of hyoid and laryngeal movement is thought to contribute to aspiration risk and pharyngeal residues in dysphagia. Our aim was to determine the extent to which movements of the hyoid and larynx are correlated in the superior and anterior directions in swallowing, and whether movement range is predictive of penetration-aspiration or pharyngeal residue. Design Prospective, single-blind study of penetration-aspiration and pharyngeal residue with objective frame-by-frame measures of hyoid and laryngeal excursion from videofluoroscopy. Setting Tertiary hospital and rehabilitation teaching hospital. Participants 28 participants referred for videofluoroscopy: 13 females, aged 57-77; 15 males aged 54-70. Individuals with known neurodegenerative diseases or prior surgery to the neck were excluded. Each swallowed three boluses of 40% w/v thin liquid barium suspension. Outcomes Two speech-language pathologists independently rated penetration-aspiration, vallecular and pyriform sinus residue. Cervical spine length, hyoid and laryngeal displacement were traced frame-by-frame. Predictive power was calculated. Results Cervical spine length was significantly greater in males. Hyoid displacement ranged from 34-63% of the C2-4 distance. Arytenoid displacement ranged from 18-66%, with significantly smaller anterior displacement in males. Positive hyoid-laryngeal movement correlations in both axes were the most common pattern observed. Participants with reduced displacement ranges (≤ first quartile) and with abnormal correlation patterns were more likely to display penetration-aspiration. Those with reduced anterior hyoid displacement and abnormal correlation patterns had a greater risk of post-swallow pharyngeal residues. Conclusions It is difficult for clinicians to make on-line appraisals of the extent to which hyoid and laryngeal movement may be contributing to functional swallowing consequences during videofluoroscopy. This study suggests that it is most

  10. Swallowing Impairment During Propofol Target-Controlled Infusion.

    PubMed

    Gemma, Marco; Pasin, Laura; Oriani, Alessandro; Agostoni, Massimo; Palonta, Francesca; Ramella, Barbara; Bussi, Mario; Beretta, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Sedatives can impair the swallowing process. We assessed the incidence and severity of swallowing impairment in patients sedated with propofol at clinically relevant doses. We also identified factors that were predictive of swallowing impairment. In 80 patients scheduled to undergo elective gastrointestinal endoscopy under target-controlled infusion (TCI) propofol sedation, swallowing was evaluated by glottis videoendoscopy, using the Dysphagia Severity Score (DSS) and the Penetration and Aspiration Scale (PAS). The level of sedation was assessed with the Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation (OAAS) scale. Evaluations were obtained within each patient at 3 target effect-site propofol concentrations of 2, 3, and 4 μg/mL (Marsh model). At 2 μg/mL TCI, the OAAS score was 2 in 21 (26.25%) patients and 1 in 59 (73.75%). The OAAS score was 1 in all patients at 3 and 4 μg/mL TCI target. At 3 μg/mL TCI target, 19 (24.36%) patients had a DSS = 3 and 18 patients (23.08%) had a PAS = 7-8 (severe swallowing impairment). DSS was associated with increasing age (5-year odds ratio [OR] 1.53 [1.22-1.93]; P < 0.001), body mass index (BMI; OR 1.24 [1.08-1.42]; P = 0.002), and TCI target (OR 15.80 [7.76-32.20]; P < 0.001). In an alternative model incorporating OAAS instead of TCI target, DSS was associated with increasing age (5-year OR 1.13 [1.02-1.24]; P = 0.014) and BMI (OR 1.08 [1.02-1.15]; P = 0.006) and decreasing OAAS (OR 0.05 [0.006-0.36]; P = 0.003). PAS was associated with increasing age (5-year OR 1.09 [1.04-1.15]; P < 0.001), BMI (OR 1.23 [1.07-1.41]; P = 0.003), and TCI target (OR 15.23 [7.45-31.16]; P < 0.001). In an alternative model incorporating OAAS instead of TCI target, PAS was associated with increasing age (5-year OR 1.14 [1.04-1.26]; P = 0.007) and BMI (OR 1.09 [1.02-1.15]; P = 0.006) and decreasing OAAS (OR 0.05 [0.006-0.41]; P = 0.005). Aspiration due to swallowing impairment may occur during deep sedation produced by propofol at commonly used TCI

  11. Teaching children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autistic disorder (AD) how to swallow pills.

    PubMed

    Beck, Melissa H; Cataldo, Marilyn; Slifer, Keith J; Pulbrook, Valerie; Guhman, Jaswinder K

    2005-01-01

    One barrier to medication adherence in pediatric populations is difficulty swallowing pills. Some children may not have prerequisite skills for pill swallowing, while others may have developed conditioned anxiety from repeated negative experiences. Eight children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or autistic disorder participated in behavioral training to increase cooperation with pill swallowing. A pill-swallowing protocol was utilized during practice sessions with placebo "pills" of increasing size to implement systematic desensitization. Seven of the 8 children swallowed medication with a therapist. Six of the 8 children maintained treatment gains over time. Interventions used to succeed with these children are presented along with methods to reduce conditioned behavioral distress.

  12. Effects of tongue pressing effortful swallow in older healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Park, Taeok; Kim, Youngsun

    2016-01-01

    The risk of swallowing disorders is increased for older individuals due to weak tongue and pharyngeal muscle strength. This study was appraised the value of a preventative approach by developing the tongue pressing effortful swallow (TPES) applied using a home-based and self-administered procedure. The TPES was developed by combining two swallowing exercises: tongue strengthening exercise and the effortful swallow. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of the TPES on maximum tongue pressure and peak amplitude of submental muscle activity in older individuals. 27 older individuals (mean 73 years) performed a 4-week TPES. The exercise program was adapted to a home-based and self-administered procedure. The maximum tongue pressure was measured by the Iowa Oral Performance Instrument and peak amplitude of submental muscle activity by surface electromyography (sEMG). Statistical comparisons were made by a matched pairs t-test (p<0.05). The results of this study showed that the TPES had statistically significant and positive effects on increasing maximum tongue pressure, but the peak amplitude of the submental sEMG did not differ between before and after exercises. The TPES had a positive impact in older individuals. The TPES, a combining exercise, was possible because two exercises had common physiological events. The TPES was a more innovative and efficient approach than the tongue strengthening exercise alone. In addition, older individuals were able to perform the swallowing exercise at home and by themselves with little assistance. Future research needs to refine the TPES and apply it to patients with dysphagia. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  13. Disability Identity--Disability Pride

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses a way of thinking about disability which has emerged out of the UK Disabled People's Movement over the last three decades in opposition to the preceding medical model of disability which viewed disability as synonymous with problem. Disabled people are increasingly challenging the notion that their embodiment is inherently…

  14. [The effectiveness of fiberoptic endoscopic swallow study and modified barium swallow study techniques in diagnosis of dysphagia].

    PubMed

    Gerek, Mustafa; Atalay, Altan; Cekin, Engin; Ciyiltepe, Müzeyyen; Ozkaptan, Yalçin

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) and the modified barium swallow test (MBST) in patients with dysphagia. Eighty patients with dysphagia were evaluated in three groups consisting of 27 patients with oral, pharyngeal, or esophageal masses; 26 patients with neurogenic dysphagia; and 27 patients with no distinct pathology. All the patients underwent FEES and MBST to examine elevation of the soft palate, nasal regurgitation, pharyngeal residue, penetration, aspiration, and pooling of secretions in the pyriform sinus and vallecula. In neurogenic dysphagia, MBST was more efficacious in detecting aspiration and pooling in the vallecula (p<0.05). Evaluation of the internal anatomy, visualization of masses, and laryngopharyngeal sensory discrimination were only possible with the FEES. On the other hand, evaluation of the elevation of the larynx and the hyoid, the relaxation of the upper esophageal sphincter, and the oral phase of swallowing, and the detection of esophageal pathologies were only possible with the MBST. The leading advantages of the two evaluation techniques seem to lie in the detection of aspiration for the FEES, and dynamic evaluation of the oral and esophageal phases of swallowing for the MBST.

  15. Soft-robotic esophageal swallowing as a clinically-inspired bolus rheometry technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirven, Steven; Allen, Jacqueline; (Peter Xu, Weiliang; Cheng, Leo K.

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the impact of viscosity and peristaltic transport parameters on manometric pressure signatures, a reproducible swallowing process is required. Due to inter- and intra-subject variability from swallow to swallow, the human body does not represent an optimal mechanism for such an investigation. A smooth and continuous swallowing soft-robot has been developed to produce biomimetic swallowing trajectories, and is proposed to operate as a bench-top bolus rheometric investigation method. The method compares conventional viscometry and pressure signature findings from robotic swallowing experiments. The robotic aspect of experimentation involved 450 biomimetic swallows (10 repetitions of 45 unique experiments). The method examined swallowing transport in three dimensions: bolus formulation, peristaltic wavelength, and peristaltic velocity, each of which are known to contribute to safe and effective swallowing in vivo. It is found that the pressure gradients and magnitudes are commensurate with clinical reports on biological swallowing, on the order of 100 mmHg peak, however, the relationship between viscosity and pressure signatures is less clear. Bolus transport cannot be predicted as a function of bolus viscosity alone. Traditional viscometric data at 50 s-1, as used in clinical practice, may not be a strong indicator of swallow effort, safety, or efficacy in vivo.

  16. Neural network pattern recognition of lingual-palatal pressure for automated detection of swallow.

    PubMed

    Hadley, Aaron J; Krival, Kate R; Ridgel, Angela L; Hahn, Elizabeth C; Tyler, Dustin J

    2015-04-01

    We describe a novel device and method for real-time measurement of lingual-palatal pressure and automatic identification of the oral transfer phase of deglutition. Clinical measurement of the oral transport phase of swallowing is a complicated process requiring either placement of obstructive sensors or sitting within a fluoroscope or articulograph for recording. Existing detection algorithms distinguish oral events with EMG, sound, and pressure signals from the head and neck, but are imprecise and frequently result in false detection. We placed seven pressure sensors on a molded mouthpiece fitting over the upper teeth and hard palate and recorded pressure during a variety of swallow and non-swallow activities. Pressure measures and swallow times from 12 healthy and 7 Parkinson's subjects provided training data for a time-delay artificial neural network to categorize the recordings as swallow or non-swallow events. User-specific neural networks properly categorized 96 % of swallow and non-swallow events, while a generalized population-trained network was able to properly categorize 93 % of swallow and non-swallow events across all recordings. Lingual-palatal pressure signals are sufficient to selectively and specifically recognize the initiation of swallowing in healthy and dysphagic patients.

  17. Differential involvement of two cortical masticatory areas in modulation of the swallowing reflex in rats.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, Takanori; Tsuji, Kojun; Ariyasinghe, Sajjiv; Fukuhara, Takako; Yamada, Aki; Hayashi, Hirokazu; Nakamura, Yuki; Iwata, Koichi; Inoue, Makoto

    2012-10-24

    To clarify the functional role of cortical descending inputs involved in the swallowing reflex, the effect of electrical stimulation of two cortical masticatory areas (CMAs: A- and P-area) on rhythmic jaw movements (RJMs) and superior laryngeal nerve (SLN)-evoked swallows were studied. RJMs and swallowing reflex were elicited by repetitive electrical stimulation of CMAs and the SLN, respectively. The electromyographic activities of jaw-closer (masseter), jaw-opener (digastric), and laryngeal-elevator (thyrohyoid) muscles were recorded to identify the RJMs and swallowing reflex. The number of evoked swallows was significantly lower, and swallowing interval was significantly longer during A-area stimulation compared with those without stimulation. Conversely, these parameters were not significantly altered during P-area stimulation. The inhibition of swallows by A-area stimulation was not affected by an increase in sensory input by wooden stick application between upper and lower teeth, or A-area stimulation preceding SLN stimulation. The present findings suggest that the swallowing reflex is inhibited by activation of the A-area, but not the P-area. Since no changes in swallows were seen after the increase in intraoral sensory input and prior activation of masticatory central pattern generator (CPG), swallowing inhibition may be mediated by direct inputs from the A-area or inputs via the masticatory CPG into the swallowing CPG. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Sensory stimulation to improve swallowing reflex and prevent aspiration pneumonia in elderly dysphagic people.

    PubMed

    Ebihara, Satoru; Kohzuki, Masahiro; Sumi, Yasunori; Ebihara, Takae

    2011-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality from aspiration pneumonia continues to be a major health problem in the elderly. A swallowing disorder, such as a delayed triggering of the swallowing reflex, exists in patients with aspiration pneumonia. We found that the swallowing reflex in elderly people was temperature-sensitive. The swallowing reflex was delayed when the temperature of the food was close to body temperature. The actual swallowing time shortened when the temperature difference increases. The improvement of swallowing reflex by temperature stimuli could be mediated by the temperature-sensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) channel. The administration of a pastille with capsaicin as an agonist stimulus of TRPV1, a warm-temperature receptor, decreased the delay in swallowing reflex. Food with menthol, an agonist of TRPM8, a cold-temperature receptor, also decreased the delay in swallowing reflex. Olfactory stimulation such as black pepper was useful to improve the swallowing reflex for people with low activity of daily living (ADL) levels or with decreased consciousness. Oral care also shortened the latent time of swallowing reflex presumably due to stimulating the nociception of the oral cavity. A combination of these sensory stimuli may improve the swallowing disorders and prevent aspiration pneumonia.

  19. Human swallowing simulation based on videofluorography images using Hamiltonian MPS method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Takahiro; Michiwaki, Yukihiro; Kamiya, Tetsu; Toyama, Yoshio; Tamai, Tasuku; Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2015-09-01

    In developed nations, swallowing disorders and aspiration pneumonia have become serious problems. We developed a method to simulate the behavior of the organs involved in swallowing to clarify the mechanisms of swallowing and aspiration. The shape model is based on anatomically realistic geometry, and the motion model utilizes forced displacements based on realistic dynamic images to reflect the mechanisms of human swallowing. The soft tissue organs are modeled as nonlinear elastic material using the Hamiltonian MPS method. This method allows for stable simulation of the complex swallowing movement. A penalty method using metaballs is employed to simulate contact between organ walls and smooth sliding along the walls. We performed four numerical simulations under different analysis conditions to represent four cases of swallowing, including a healthy volunteer and a patient with a swallowing disorder. The simulation results were compared to examine the epiglottic downfolding mechanism, which strongly influences the risk of aspiration.

  20. Submental sEMG and Hyoid Movement during Mendelsohn Maneuver, Effortful Swallow, and Expiratory Muscle Strength Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler-Hegland, Karen M.; Rosenbek, John C.; Sapienza, Christine M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the concurrent biomechanical and electromyographic properties of 2 swallow-specific tasks (effortful swallow and Mendelsohn maneuver) and 1 swallow-nonspecific (expiratory muscle strength training [EMST]) swallow therapy task in order to examine the differential effects of each on hyoid motion and associated…

  1. Submental sEMG and Hyoid Movement during Mendelsohn Maneuver, Effortful Swallow, and Expiratory Muscle Strength Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler-Hegland, Karen M.; Rosenbek, John C.; Sapienza, Christine M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the concurrent biomechanical and electromyographic properties of 2 swallow-specific tasks (effortful swallow and Mendelsohn maneuver) and 1 swallow-nonspecific (expiratory muscle strength training [EMST]) swallow therapy task in order to examine the differential effects of each on hyoid motion and associated…

  2. [Comparison of swallowing surface electromyography in globus patients and healthy adults].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Li, Jinrang

    2015-02-01

    To study the surface electromyography (sEMG) changes of globus patients during swallowing and to discuss the cause of the globus. The sEMG during swallowing was recorded in 126 healthy volunteers (control group) and 34 globus patients (globus group).Swallow included dry swallow and 20 ml water swallow. The durations and amplitudes of muscle activities during every swallow were recorded. The durations and amplitudes of the sEMG in two groups were compared using t test. The durations of sEMG at dry swallow and 20 ml water swallow were (1.128 ± 0.191)s and (1.091 ± 0.208)s, while the amplitudes were (0.313 ± 0.110) mV and (0.286 ± 0.106) mV in control group. The durations of sEMG at dry swallow and 20 ml water swallow were (1.178 ± 0.252)s and (1.127 ± 0.178)s, while the amplitudes were (0.341 ± 0.116) mV and (0.316 ± 0.094) mV in globus group. There were no significant differences between globus patients and healthy volunteers in the durations and amplitudes of sEMG at dry swallow and 20 ml water swallow (P > 0.05).Furthermore, there were also no significant differences in the durations and amplitudes of the sEMG between the two groups in the same gender (P > 0.05). The results of swallowing sEMG suggested that the swallowing function in globus patients has not been damaged and psychological intervention should be considered in the treatment.

  3. Innate immune response development in nestling tree swallows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stambaugh, T.; Houdek, B.J.; Lombardo, M.P.; Thorpe, P.A.; Caldwell, Hahn D.

    2011-01-01

    We tracked the development of innate immunity in nestling Tree Swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) and compared it to that of adults using blood drawn from nestlings during days 6, 12, and 18 of the ???20-day nestling period and from adults. Innate immunity was characterized using an in vitro assay of the ability of whole blood to kill Escherichia coli. The ability of whole blood to kill E. coli increased as nestlings matured. Neither this component of innate immunity nor right wing chord length on day18 were as developed as in adults indicating that development of the innate immune system and growth both continued after fledging. Narrow sense heritability analyses suggest that females with strong immune responses produced nestlings with strong immune responses. These data suggest nestling Tree Swallows allocated sufficient energy to support rapid growth to enable fledging by day 18, but that further development of innate immunity occurred post-fledging. ?? 2011 by the Wilson Ornithological Society.

  4. Activation of upper airway muscles during breathing and swallowing

    PubMed Central

    Ludlow, Christy L.

    2013-01-01

    The upper airway is a complex muscular tube that is used by the respiratory and digestive systems. The upper airway is invested with several small and anatomically peculiar muscles. The muscle fiber orientations and their nervous innervation are both extremely complex, and how the activity of the muscles is initiated and adjusted during complex behaviors is poorly understood. The bulk of the evidence suggests that the entire assembly of tongue and laryngeal muscles operate together but differently during breathing and swallowing, like a ballet rather than a solo performance. Here we review the functional anatomy of the tongue and laryngeal muscles, and their neural innervation. We also consider how muscular activity is altered as respiratory drive changes, and briefly address upper airway muscle control during swallowing. PMID:24092695

  5. Imaging findings of swallowed dentures: a case series.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Ashish; Bosco, Jerome; Subramanian, Manickam; Chokkapan, Kabilan; Shenoy, Jagadish; Lim, Tze Chwan

    2015-12-01

    Dental prosthesis is an uncommon ingested non-food foreign body in adults. Once swallowed, it can lead to serious complications and morbidity. Hence, early localization of the offending foreign body is crucial for timely management. As the dentures are usually made up of non-metallic material and often impacted at or below the level of C7 vertebra, conventional radiograph has limited role in their evaluation. We describe the clinical history and imaging findings of swallowed partial dentures in four patients who presented to the emergency department. The dentures were localized using unenhanced CT of the neck that showed the characteristic mildly hyperdense curvilinear or irregular appearance of the dentures within the upper esophagus. Multiplanar CT reconstructions provide an orientation of the ingested denture within the esophagus, thus guiding the endoscopist.

  6. Speech and Swallowing in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tjaden, Kris

    2009-01-01

    Dysarthria and dysphagia occur frequently in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Reduced speech intelligibility is a significant functional limitation of dysarthria, and in the case of PD is likely related articulatory and phonatory impairment. Prosodically-based treatments show the most promise for addressing these deficits as well as for maximizing speech intelligibility. Communication-oriented strategies also may help to enhance mutual understanding between a speaker and listener. Dysphagia in PD can result in serious health issues, including aspiration pneumonia, malnutrition, and dehydration. Early identification of swallowing abnormalities is critical so as to minimize the impact of dysphagia on health status and quality of life. Feeding modifications, compensatory strategies, and therapeutic swallowing techniques all have a role in the management of dysphagia in PD. PMID:19946386

  7. Elevated frequency of abnormalities in barn swallows from Chernobyl.

    PubMed

    Møller, A P; Mousseau, T A; de Lope, F; Saino, N

    2007-08-22

    Ever since the Chernobyl accident in 1986, that contaminated vast areas in surrounding countries with radiation, abnormalities and birth defects have been reported in human populations. Recently, several studies suggested that the elevated frequency of such abnormalities can be attributed to poverty and stress in affected human populations. Here, we present long-term results for a free-living population of barn swallows, Hirundo rustica, demonstrating the presence of 11 morphological abnormalities in populations around Chernobyl, but much less frequently in an uncontaminated Ukrainian control population and three more distant control populations. The presence of these abnormalities in barn swallows is associated with reduced viability. These findings demonstrate a link between morphological abnormalities and radiation in an animal population that cannot be attributed to poverty and stress. The most parsimonious hypothesis for abnormalities in animal and human populations alike is that the effects are caused by the same underlying cause, viz. radiation derived from the Chernobyl accident.

  8. Successful endoscopic removal of a swallowed toothbrush: case report.

    PubMed

    Tonkic, Ante; Bogdanovic, Zoran; Grandić, Leo

    2011-04-06

    Most ingested foreign bodies will pass uneventfully through the gastrointestinal tract. Nevertheless, long and rigid foreign bodies are associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal impaction, perforation and bleeding. Moreover, there has been no case of spontaneous passage of a toothbrush reported. Therefore, the prompt removal of such ingested foreign objects is recommended before complications develop. This case report describes a case of an 18-year-old woman who accidentally swallowed her toothbrush. The toothbrush was successfully removed via flexible endoscopy using a polypectomy snare. A swallowed toothbrush is a special clinical challenge. Early endoscopic retrieval of the toothbrush is critical for reducing morbidity and mortality. In cases when endoscopic removal fails, a laparoscopic surgical approach may be an alternative.

  9. Tongue movements during water swallowing in healthy young and older adults.

    PubMed

    Steele, Catriona M; Van Lieshout, Pascal

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the nature and extent of variability in tongue movement during healthy swallowing as a function of aging and gender. In addition, changes were quantified in healthy tongue movements in response to specific differences in the nature of the swallowing task (discrete vs. sequential swallows). Electromagnetic midsagittal articulography (EMMA) was used to study the swallowing-related movements of markers located in midline on the anterior (blade), middle (body), and posterior (dorsum) tongue in a sample of 34 healthy adults in 2 age groups (under vs. over 50 years of age). Participants performed a series of reiterated water swallows, in either a discrete or a sequential manner. This study shows that age-related changes in tongue movements during swallowing are restricted to the domain of movement duration. The authors confirm that different tongue regions can be selectively modulated during swallowing tasks and that both functional and anatomical constraints influence the manner in which tongue movement modulation occurs. Sequential swallowing, in comparison to discrete swallowing, elicits simplification or down-scaling of several kinematic parameters. The data illustrate task-specific stereotyped patterns of tongue movement in swallowing, which are robust to the effects of healthy aging in all aspects other than movement duration.

  10. Validation of the optimal site in the neck region for detecting swallowing sounds.

    PubMed

    Pan, Q; Maeda, N; Manda, Y; Kodama, N; Minagi, S

    2016-11-01

    Recently, the swallowing sound has been used to detect swallowing events non-invasively. A previous study, using an accelerometer, showed that the site over the lateral border of the trachea immediately inferior to the cricoid cartilage was the optimal site for detecting swallowing sounds. However, the optimal site for detection of the swallowing sound using a microphone remains undetermined. To validate the optimal site in the neck region for detecting swallowing sounds. Fourteen healthy subjects (mean age, 27·6 ± 2·2 years; seven male and seven female) participated in this study. Twenty condenser microphones were attached to 20 sites on the left neck surface to detect swallowing sounds. Participants were instructed to swallow five different stimuli three times as follows: Resting saliva, 1 and 5 mL of Japanese tea, and 1 and 5 mL of yoghurt. Mean relative peak intensity was used to indicate the magnitude of the swallowing sound. Sound spectrograms were used to illustrate differences in the properties of swallowing sounds. Mean relative peak intensity number was highest in sites at the inferior border of the mandible just above the sternocleidomastoid muscle (site 11) and sites over the lateral border of the trachea immediately inferior to the cricoid cartilage (site 8). Comparison of spectrograms showed a greater density distribution of higher frequency components at site 11 compared with site 8. These results indicate that the inferior border of the mandible just above the sternocleidomastoid muscle is the optimal site for the detection of swallowing sounds.

  11. Effect of ill-fitting dentures on the swallowing duration in patients using polygraphy.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Annalisa; Cattaneo, Ruggero; Masci, Chiara; Spadaro, Alessandro; Marzo, Giuseppe

    2012-06-01

    Surface electromyography (SEMG) has been widely used in the recent years to study swallowing physiology, offering a valid and reliable tool for identifying normal swallowing. The goal of our study was to assess the contribution of denture fitness in the age-related increase of swallowing duration. Twenty denture wearers and 20 dentate individuals were analysed using SEMG and a computerised kinesiography of mandibular movement. Three spontaneous saliva swallowings were recorded for each patient with both their old and new prostheses. Three spontaneous saliva swallowings were recorded for each dentate person in two different recording sessions. Old prosthesis mean swallowing time was 1.84 (SD ± 0.85) seconds while the new well-fitting prostheses needed a 1.28 (SD ± 0.55) (p = 0.0009) swallowing time. The difference in swallowing time was significant (p = 0.01) between dentate subjects and individuals wearing an old prosthesis. No significant difference was found between dentate subjects and the same prosthesis wearers when a new well-fitting prosthesis was worn. Data presented in this work suggest that part of the increased duration of swallowing showed by elderly and healthy people is because of incorrect an dental prosthesis. Prolongation of swallowing duration in the elderly population could be reconsidered in the light of the quality of dental device worn by the aged population. © 2011 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Swallowing and voice effects of Lee Silverman Voice Treatment (LSVT®): a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    El Sharkawi, A; Ramig, L; Logemann, J; Pauloski, B; Rademaker, A; Smith, C; Pawlas, A; Baum, S; Werner, C

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To define the effects of Lee Silverman Voice Treatment (LSVT® on swallowing and voice in eight patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Methods: Each patient received a modified barium swallow (MBS) in addition to voice recording before and after 1 month of LSVT®. Swallowing motility disorders were defined and temporal measures of the swallow were completed from the MBS. Voice evaluation included measures of vocal intensity, fundamental frequency, and the patient's perception of speech change. Results: before LSVT®, the most prevalent swallowing motility disorders were oral phase problems including reduced tongue control and strength. Reduced tongue base retraction resulting in residue in the vallecula was the most common disorder in the pharyngeal stage of the swallow. Oral transit time (OTT) and pharyngeal transit time (PTT) were prolonged. After LSVT®, there was an overall 51% reduction in the number of swallowing motility disorders. Some temporal measures of swallowing were also significantly reduced as was the approximate amount of oral residue after 3 ml and 5 ml liquid swallows. Voice changes after LSVT® included a significant increase in vocal intensity during sustained vowel phonation as well as during reading. Conclusions: LSVT® seemingly improved neuromuscular control of the entire upper aerodigestive tract, improving oral tongue and tongue base function during the oral and pharyngeal phases of swallowing as well as improving vocal intensity. PMID:11784821

  13. Predation by ants controls swallow bug (Hemiptera: Cimicidae: Oeciacus vicarius) infestations.

    PubMed

    Brown, Charles R; Page, Catherine E; Robison, Grant A; O'Brien, Valerie A; Booth, Warren

    2015-06-01

    The swallow bug (Oeciacus vicarius) is the only known vector for Buggy Creek virus (BCRV), an alphavirus that circulates in cliff swallows (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) and house sparrows (Passer domesticus) in North America. We discovered ants (Crematogaster lineolata and Formica spp.) preying on swallow bugs at cliff swallow colonies in western Nebraska, U.S.A. Ants reduced the numbers of visible bugs on active swallow nests by 74-90%, relative to nests in the same colony without ants. Ant predation on bugs had no effect on the reproductive success of cliff swallows inhabiting the nests where ants foraged. Ants represent an effective and presumably benign way of controlling swallow bugs at nests in some colonies. They may constitute an alternative to insecticide use at sites where ecologists wish to remove the effects of swallow bugs on cliff swallows or house sparrows. By reducing bug numbers, ant presence may also lessen BCRV transmission at the spatial foci (bird colony sites) where epizootics occur. The effect of ants on swallow bugs should be accounted for in studying variation among sites in vector abundance.

  14. Swallowing and voice effects of Lee Silverman Voice Treatment (LSVT): a pilot study.

    PubMed

    El Sharkawi, A; Ramig, L; Logemann, J A; Pauloski, B R; Rademaker, A W; Smith, C H; Pawlas, A; Baum, S; Werner, C

    2002-01-01

    To define the effects of Lee Silverman Voice Treatment (LSVT on swallowing and voice in eight patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Each patient received a modified barium swallow (MBS) in addition to voice recording before and after 1 month of LSVT. Swallowing motility disorders were defined and temporal measures of the swallow were completed from the MBS. Voice evaluation included measures of vocal intensity, fundamental frequency, and the patient's perception of speech change. before LSVT, the most prevalent swallowing motility disorders were oral phase problems including reduced tongue control and strength. Reduced tongue base retraction resulting in residue in the vallecula was the most common disorder in the pharyngeal stage of the swallow. Oral transit time (OTT) and pharyngeal transit time (PTT) were prolonged. After LSVT, there was an overall 51% reduction in the number of swallowing motility disorders. Some temporal measures of swallowing were also significantly reduced as was the approximate amount of oral residue after 3 ml and 5 ml liquid swallows. Voice changes after LSVT included a significant increase in vocal intensity during sustained vowel phonation as well as during reading. LSVT seemingly improved neuromuscular control of the entire upper aerodigestive tract, improving oral tongue and tongue base function during the oral and pharyngeal phases of swallowing as well as improving vocal intensity.

  15. Differential response properties of peripherally and cortically evoked swallows by electrical stimulation in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, Takanori; Tsuji, Kojun; Magara, Jin; Sakai, Shogo; Suzuki, Taku; Nakamura, Yuki; Nozawa-Inoue, Kayoko; Inoue, Makoto

    2016-04-01

    We compared onset latency, motor-response patterns, and the effect of electrical stimulation of the cortical masticatory area between peripherally and cortically evoked swallows by electrical stimulation in anesthetized rats. The number of swallows and the motor patterns were determined using electromyographic recordings from the thyrohyoid, digastric, and masseter muscles. The onset latency of the first swallow evoked by electrical stimulation of the cortical swallowing area (Cx) was significantly longer than that evoked by stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN). The duration of thyrohyoid burst activity associated with SLN-evoked swallows was significantly longer than that associated with either Cx-evoked or spontaneous swallows. Combining Cx with SLN stimulation increased the number of swallows at low levels of SLN stimulation. Finally, A-area (the orofacial motor cortex) stimulation inhibited Cx-evoked swallows significantly more than it inhibited SLN-evoked swallows. These findings suggest that peripherally and cortically evoked swallows have different response properties and are affected differently by the mastication network. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Enhancing effects of flavored nutritive stimuli on cortical swallowing network activity

    PubMed Central

    Babaei, Arash; Kern, Mark; Antonik, Stephen; Mepani, Rachel; Ward, B. Douglas; Li, Shi-Jiang; Hyde, James

    2010-01-01

    A better understanding of the central control of the physiology of deglutition is necessary for devising interventions aimed at correcting pathophysiological conditions of swallowing. Positive modulation of the cortical swallowing network can have clinical ramifications in dysphagia due to central nervous system deficits. Our aim was to determine the effect of nutritive sensory input on the cortical swallowing network. In 14 healthy right-handed volunteers, we utilized a paradigm-driven protocol to quantify the number of activated voxels and their signal intensity within the left hemispheric cortical swallowing network by high-resolution functional MRI (fMRI) during five different swallowing conditions. Swallowing conditions included a dry swallow (saliva) and natural water-, lemon-, popcorn-, and chocolate-flavored liquid swallows. Each flavored liquid was presented simultaneously by its image, scent, and taste in random order and tested over three runs. fMRIs were analyzed in a blinded fashion. Average fMRI blood oxygenation level-dependent signal intensity and number of activated voxels during swallowing concurrent with nutritive gustatory, olfactory, and visual stimulations were significantly increased compared with dry/natural water swallows throughout the cortical swallowing network (P < 0.001 and P < 0.05, respectively). Subregion analysis showed the increased activity for flavored liquids in prefrontal, cingulate gyrus, and sensory/motor cortex, but not in precuneus and insula. Concurrent gustatory, olfactory, and visual nutritive stimulation enhances the activity of the cortical swallowing network. This finding may have clinical implications in management of swallowing disorders due to cortical lesions. PMID:20508154

  17. Swallowing disorders: proposal of a method for forensic medicine assessment

    PubMed Central

    Fattori, B; Ursino, F; Matteucci, F; Mallardi, V; Nacci, A

    2007-01-01

    Summary For a correct classification of dysphagia, morphologic instrumental investigations capable of analysing the anatomical structures of the digestive tract, are undoubtedly essential, but the most important investigations are the functional investigations, such as videofluoroscopy, fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing, oro-pharyngo-oesophageal scintigraphy, manometry and pH-metry. Results of these examinations enable us to identify, in patients with dysphagia, the extent of permanent damage, as a consequence of injury to the structures designated to swallowing, must be such that it at least minimally impairs and decreases the relative function, but to a degree that can be detected and, in some manner, measured. From a legal point of view, alterations in swallowing, caused by damage to structures belonging to the respiratory-digestive tract, can be found in crimes against persons and particularly in those involving body injury. In the case of civil, but also in private or social insurance proceedings, it is necessary to distinguish which parameters are to be used as reference for evaluating and quantifying the injury in terms of reimbursement. With the introduction of complete biological well-being, injury is considered as an impairment of the worth and right to enjoy psychological-physical integrity as a quality of life. The criteria currently used internationally take into account the conception of psychological-physical efficiency; nevertheless, in Italian forensic medicine, there is no table that offers a thorough quantification of swallowing modifications, if one excludes oesophageal disorders. Herewith, an evaluation table, dividing oro-pharyngo-oesophageal dysphagia into five, progressively serious classes, is proposed. PMID:17883190

  18. Using a metal detector to locate a swallowed ring pull.

    PubMed

    Ryan, J; Perez-Avila, C A; Cherukuri, A; Tidey, B

    1995-03-01

    A 48-year-old man accidently swallowed the ring pull from a soft drink can. He complained of pain in his chest. Chest radiographs were normal. A metal detector emitted a strong response when passed across the front of his chest. Oesophagoscopy was carried out and the ring pull was successfully removed. We recommend the wider use of metal detectors by accident and emergency (A&E) department staff particularly when dealing with patients who have ingested metals of low radiodensity.

  19. Trip Report - June 1989 Swallow Float Deployment with RUM

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    spectral plots of Section VII, however, have been corrected for all electronic system gains including the geophone/ hydropone sensitivities and the anti...June, 1989 in the deep northeast Pacific Ocean at 32.4 N, 120.7 W. Representative data collected by the two properly-functioning Swallow floats, one with... system 80 16. Price Code. 17. Se 7ity Classification 18. Security Classification 19. Security Classification 20. Limitation of Abstract. otiepor. of

  20. Tongue-surface movement patterns during speech and swallowing.

    PubMed

    Green, Jordan R; Wang, Yu-Tsai

    2003-05-01

    The tongue has been frequently characterized as being composed of several functionally independent articulators. The question of functional regionality within the tongue was examined by quantifying the strength of coupling among four different tongue locations across a large number of consonantal contexts and participants. Tongue behavior during swallowing was also described. Vertical displacements of pellets affixed to the tongue were extracted from the x-ray microbeam database. Forty-six participants recited 20 vowel-consonant-vowel (VCV) combinations and swallowed 10 ccs of water. Tongue-surface movement patterns were quantitatively described by computing the covariance between the vertical time-histories of all possible pellet pairs. Phonemic differentiation in vertical tongue motions was observed as coupling varied predictably across pellet pairs with place of articulation. Moreover, tongue displacements for speech and swallowing clustered into distinct groups based on their coupling profiles. Functional independence of anterior tongue regions was evidenced by a wide range of movement coupling relations between anterior tongue pellets. The strengths and weaknesses of the covariance-based analysis for characterizing tongue movement are considered.

  1. Cryptococcus neoformans isolation from swallow (Hirundo rustica) excreta in Iran.

    PubMed

    Hedayati, Mohammad T; Mayahi, Sabah; Fakhar, Mahdi; Shokohi, Tahereh; Majidi, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an encapsulated yeast that can cause cryptococcosis, a life-threatening infection that mainly occurs in immunocompromised patients. The major environmental sources of C. neoformans have been shown to be soil contaminated with avian droppings. In the present study, we evaluated the isolation of C. neoformans from swallow (Hirundo rustica) excreta in two northern cities of Iran. Ninety-seven swallow droppings were evaluated and 498 yeast-like colonies were isolated and identified as Rhodotorula spp. (62.8%), Candida spp. (28.5%)and C. neoformans (8.7%). Cryptococcus neoformans was isolated from 5/97 (5.2%) of collected samples. Min-Max colony forming units (CFU) per one gram for the positive samples were 3-10 C. neoformans colonies. The total mean CFU per one gram for the positive samples was 4.8. The results of this study demonstrate that excreta of swallow may harbor different species of potentially pathogenic yeasts, mainly C. neoformans, and may be capable of disseminating these fungi in the environment.

  2. Tongue-surface movement patterns during speech and swallowing

    PubMed Central

    Green, Jordan R.; Wang, Yu-Tsai

    2009-01-01

    The tongue has been frequently characterized as being composed of several functionally independent articulators. The question of functional regionality within the tongue was examined by quantifying the strength of coupling among four different tongue locations across a large number of consonantal contexts and participants. Tongue behavior during swallowing was also described. Vertical displacements of pellets affixed to the tongue were extracted from the x-ray microbeam database. Forty-six participants recited 20 vowel-consonant-vowel (VCV) combinations and swallowed 10 ccs of water. Tongue-surface movement patterns were quantitatively described by computing the covariance between the vertical time-histories of all possible pellet pairs. Phonemic differentiation in vertical tongue motions was observed as coupling varied predictably across pellet pairs with place of articulation. Moreover, tongue displacements for speech and swallowing clustered into distinct groups based on their coupling profiles. Functional independence of anterior tongue regions was evidenced by a wide range of movement coupling relations between anterior tongue pellets. The strengths and weaknesses of the covariance-based analysis for characterizing tongue movement are considered. PMID:12765399

  3. Mastication and swallowing: influence of fluid addition to foods.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Luciano José; Gavião, Maria Beatriz Duarte; Engelen, Lina; Van der Bilt, Andries

    2007-02-01

    The production of sufficient saliva is indispensable for good chewing. Recent research has demonstrated that salivary flow rate has little influence on the swallowing threshold. The hypothesis examined in the present study was that adding fluids to foods will influence chewing physiology. Twenty subjects chewed on melba toast, cake, carrot, peanut and Gouda cheese. They also chewed on these foods after addition of different volumes of water or alpha-amylase solution. Jaw muscle activity, number of chewing cycles until swallowing and chewing cycle duration were measured. Repeated measures analysis of variance was applied to test the null hypothesis that there would be no statistically significant difference among the results obtained for the various food types and fluids. Subsequently, contrasts were determined to study the levels of intra-subjects factors (food type and fluid volume). Linear regression was used to determine the changes in muscle activity and cycle duration as a function of the chewing cycles. Fluid addition significantly decreased muscle activity and swallowing threshold for melba, cake and peanut (p<0.05). The effect of alpha-amylase in the solutions was similar to that of water (p>0.05). Doubling the volume of tap water had a greater effect. Fluid addition facilitated chewing of dry foods (melba, cake), but did not influence the chewing of fatty (cheese) and wet products (carrot). This study is relevant to improve patients' life quality and the management of chewing and feeding disorders caused by hyposalivation.

  4. Swallowing before and after tonsillectomy as evaluated by surface electromyography.

    PubMed

    Vaiman, Michael; Krakovski, Daniel; Gavriel, Haim

    2007-07-01

    Surface electromyography (sEMG) was performed on adult patients (n = 40) following tonsillectomy to evaluate recovery by objective means. Evaluated parameters included timing of swallowing and continuous drinking, electric amplitude and graphic patterns of masseter (MS), and measurement of infrahyoid (INF) and submental (SUB) muscles after tonsillectomy and comparison with normative database. The duration of drinking periods showed significant increase among patients; single-swallow durations remained normal. The electric activity of MS and INF muscles was significantly higher among the patients compared with normative database. It took one month until all the EMG data returned to normal. Tonsillectomy affects muscle activity during swallowing by involving additional muscles in deglutition. EMG is a simple reliable method for postoperative evaluation and might contribute to comparative analysis of different tonsillectomy techniques. EMG can be used during pre- and postoperative stages to monitor recovery and functional improvement of throat muscles and deglutition. The reported sEMG method and obtained data might be further used: 1) As an additional tool for comparison of different methods of tonsillectomy (eg, cold vs hot dissection, laser surgery, etc); 2) For further development of objective postsurgical pain assessment; 3) As an additional tool for assessment and development of less traumatic surgical technique; and 4) For monitoring of recovery in difficult cases.

  5. Epidermal electronics for electromyography: An application to swallowing therapy.

    PubMed

    Constantinescu, Gabriela; Jeong, Jae-Woong; Li, Xinda; Scott, Dylan K; Jang, Kyung-In; Chung, Hyun-Joong; Rogers, John A; Rieger, Jana

    2016-08-01

    Head and neck cancer treatment alters the anatomy and physiology of patients. Resulting swallowing difficulties can lead to serious health concerns. Surface electromyography (sEMG) is used as an adjuvant to swallowing therapy exercises. sEMG signal collected from the area under the chin provides visual biofeedback from muscle contractions and is used to help patients perform exercises correctly. However, conventional sEMG adhesive pads are relatively thick and difficult to effectively adhere to a patient's altered chin anatomy, potentially leading to poor signal acquisition in this population. Here, the emerging technology of epidermal electronics is introduced, where ultra-thin geometry allows for close contouring of the chin. The two objectives of this study were to (1) assess the potential of epidermal electronics technology for use with swallowing therapy and (2) assess the significance of the reference electrode placement. This study showed comparative signals between the new epidermal sEMG patch and the conventional adhesive patches used by clinicians. Furthermore, an integrated reference yielded optimal signal for clinical use; this configuration was more robust to head movements than when an external reference was used. Improvements for future iterations of epidermal sEMG patches specific to day-to-day clinical use are suggested. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Pharyngeal swallowing disorders: selection for and outcome after myotomy.

    PubMed Central

    Mason, R J; Bremner, C G; DeMeester, T R; Crookes, P F; Peters, J H; Hagen, J A; DeMeester, S R

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop selection criteria based on the mechanical properties of pharyngoesophageal swallowing that indicate when patients with pharyngeal dysphagia will benefit from a myotomy. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The pathophysiology of pharyngoesophageal swallowing disorders is complex. The disorder is of interest to several medical specialists (gastroenterologists, otorhinolaryngologists, general and thoracic surgeons), which contributes to confusion about the entity. The management is compounded because it is most frequently seen in the elderly, is often associated with generalized neuromuscular disease, and occurs with a high prevalence of concomitant disease. The selection of patients for myotomy is difficult and of major importance to the quality of life of the affected patients. METHOD: One hundred seven patients without a Zenker diverticulum but with pharyngeal dysphagia underwent a detailed manometric assessment of the upper esophageal sphincter (UES). Cricopharyngeal opening was identified by the presence of a subatmospheric pressure drop before bolus arrival. Impaired pharyngoesophageal segment compliance resulting in a resistance to pharyngoesophageal flow was determined by measuring the intrabolus pressure generated by a 5-ml liquid bolus. RESULTS: Thirty-one of 107 patients underwent a myotomy (29%). Both impaired sphincter opening and increased intrabolus pressure predicted a good outcome. CONCLUSION: Myotomy is beneficial in patients with pharyngeal swallowing disorders and manometric evidence of defective sphincter opening and increased intrabolus pressure. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:9790349

  7. Swallowing and pharyngeal function in postoperative pharyngeal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Martini, D V; Har-El, G; Lucente, F E; Slavit, D H

    1997-07-01

    This study examines the pharyngeal phase of swallowing after the resection of pharyngeal cancer, and focuses on the pharynx as a functional organ. The purpose of the study was to obtain information on both reconstruction and rehabilitation in cases of surgically treated pharyngeal cancer. The records of 21 consecutive patients who underwent surgical treatment of oropharyngeal and hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma between 1990 and 1993 were reviewed. Functional results following surgery were graded on a numerical scale in three categories: pharyngeal swallow, laryngeal and lower airway protection, and oral alimentation. Three treatment groups were observed: group 1 = transoral excision with primary closure (six patients); group 2 = composite resection with primary closure (nine patients); and group 3 = composite resection with deltopectoral or pectoralis major flap closure (six patients). Comparison of pharyngeal swallow and laryngeal protection functions showed no significant difference between the three groups. However, oral alimentation performance in group 1 was significantly better than in group 3, and groups 1 and 2 achieved a similar level. In patients with T3 and T4 tumors postoperative function was poor and no difference in postoperative function was demonstrated between patients undergoing reconstruction with primary closure and patients undergoing reconstruction with deltopectoral or pectoralis major flaps. Patients with T3 and T4 tumors experienced impaired postoperative function regardless of the method of reconstruction used. This is not a condemnation of the surgical treatment of advanced pharyngeal tumors, but rather a suggestion that other reconstruction techniques be considered.

  8. Pathologic Aerophagia: A Rare but Important Medical Condition in People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Wendy; Sajith, Sreedharan Geetha

    2017-01-01

    Background: Pathologic aerophagia (PA) is characterised by excessive swallowing of air resulting in significant abdominal distension or belching. This is a relatively rare condition in general population but has been reported in up to 8.8% of institutionalised patients with intellectual disability. In severe cases, this can cause volvulus and…

  9. Pathologic Aerophagia: A Rare but Important Medical Condition in People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Wendy; Sajith, Sreedharan Geetha

    2017-01-01

    Background: Pathologic aerophagia (PA) is characterised by excessive swallowing of air resulting in significant abdominal distension or belching. This is a relatively rare condition in general population but has been reported in up to 8.8% of institutionalised patients with intellectual disability. In severe cases, this can cause volvulus and…

  10. Kinematic analysis of laryngeal movements in patients with neurogenic dysphagia before and after swallowing rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Prosiegel, M; Heintze, M; Sonntag, E W; Schenk, T; Yassouridis, A

    2000-01-01

    To examine whether kinematic analysis of laryngeal movements (which are closely linked to pharyngeal swallowing) can differentiate between normal and disturbed swallowing, we used a three-dimensional ultrasound movement recording system to measure the movements of the larynx during swallowing in 32 patients with neurogenic dysphagia caused by central nervous system lesions and in 32 age- and sex-matched healthy individuals. At the beginning of an inpatient rehabilitation swallowing program, laryngeal movements in 24 patients were highly disturbed in terms of velocity curve irregularities. After rehabilitation, the majority of patients with hitherto irregular velocity profiles exhibited laryngeal kinematics that were indistinguishable from those of 32 healthy subjects. Kinematic analysis of laryngeal movements, therefore, is suitable for monitoring motor recovery of swallowing disturbances in patients with neurogenic dysphagia while undergoing swallowing rehabilitation.

  11. Maxillofacial prosthetics: history to modern applications. Part 2--Speech and swallow prostheses.

    PubMed

    Paprocki, Gregory J

    2013-10-01

    Speech and swallow difficulties can arise from a variety of causes. Regardless of etiology, many of the problems can be solved by the fabrication of a speech or swallow prosthesis. Considering the relatively large patient population affected by these disorders, there is limited awareness of maxillofacial prosthetic solutions among the general dental and medical communities. A brief history of speech and swallow prostheses is presented along with recommendations for diagnosis and referral.

  12. Late onset tracheo-oesophageal fistula following a swallowed dental plate.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, P B; Goiti, J J

    1993-01-01

    Swallowing dentures and dental plates has been a cause of distress among elderly patients. Tracheo-oesophageal fistula caused by a foreign body is rare and of the cases reported in the literature only one was due to a swallowed denture which resulted in a recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy [4]. We describe a delayed onset tracheo-oesophageal fistula due to a swallowed dental plate in a young patient.

  13. Adaptation of swallowing hyo-laryngeal kinematics is distinct in oral vs. pharyngeal sensory processing

    PubMed Central

    Lokhande, Akshay; Christopherson, Heather; German, Rebecca; Stone, Alice

    2012-01-01

    Before a bolus is pushed into the pharynx, oral sensory processing is critical for planning movements of the subsequent pharyngeal swallow, including hyoid bone and laryngeal (hyo-laryngeal) kinematics. However, oral and pharyngeal sensory processing for hyo-laryngeal kinematics is not fully understood. In 11 healthy adults, we examined changes in kinematics with sensory adaptation, sensitivity shifting, with oropharyngeal swallows vs. pharyngeal swallows (no oral processing), and with various bolus volumes and tastes. Only pharyngeal swallows showed sensory adaptation (gradual changes in kinematics with repeated exposure to the same bolus). Conversely, only oropharyngeal swallows distinguished volume differences, whereas pharyngeal swallows did not. No taste effects were observed for either swallow type. The hyo-laryngeal kinematics were very similar between oropharyngeal swallows and pharyngeal swallows with a comparable bolus. Sensitivity shifting (changing sensory threshold for a small bolus when it immediately follows several very large boluses) was not observed in pharyngeal or oropharyngeal swallowing. These findings indicate that once oral sensory processing has set a motor program for a specific kind of bolus (i.e., 5 ml water), hyo-laryngeal movements are already highly standardized and optimized, showing no shifting or adaptation regardless of repeated exposure (sensory adaptation) or previous sensory experiences (sensitivity shifting). Also, the oral cavity is highly specialized for differentiating certain properties of a bolus (volume) that might require a specific motor plan to ensure swallowing safety, whereas the pharyngeal cavity does not make the same distinctions. Pharyngeal sensory processing might not be able to adjust motor plans created by the oral cavity once the swallow has already been triggered. PMID:22403349

  14. Anesthesia and increased hypercarbic drive impair the coordination between breathing and swallowing

    PubMed Central

    D'Angelo, Olivia M.; Diaz-Gil, Daniel; Nunn, Danuza; Simons, Jeroen C.P.; Gianatasio, Chloe; Mueller, Noomi; Meyer, Matthew J.; Pierce, Eric; Rosow, Carl; Eikermann, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Background Coordination between breathing and swallowing helps prevent aspiration of foreign material into the respiratory tract. We examined the effects of anesthesia, and hypercapnia on swallowing-breathing coordination. Methods In a randomized controlled cross-over study, general anesthesia with propofol or sevoflurane was titrated using an up-down method to identify the threshold for suppression of the motor response to electrical stimulation of the forearm. Additional measurements included bispectral index, genioglossus electromyogram, ventilation (pneumotachometer), and hypopharyngeal pressure. During wakefulness and at each level of anesthetic, carbon dioxide was added to increase its end tidal pressure by 4 and 8 mmHg. A swallow was defined as increased genioglossus activity with deglutition apnea and an increase in hypopharyngeal pressure. Spontaneous swallows were categorized as physiological (during expiration or followed by expiration), or pathological (during inspiration or followed by an inspiration). Results A total of 224 swallows were analyzed. Anesthesia increased the proportion of pathological swallows (25.9% versus 4.9%), and decreased the number of swallows per hour (1.7 ± 3.3 versus 28.0 ± 22.3) compared to wakefulness. During anesthesia, hypercapnia decreased hypopharyngeal pressure during inspiration (-14.1±3.7 versus -8.7±2 mmHg), and increased minute ventilation the proportion of pathological swallows (19.1% versus 12.3%), and the number of swallows per hour (5.5 ±17.0. versus 1.3 ± 5.5). Conclusions Anesthesia impaired the coordination between swallowing and respiration. Mild hypercapnia increased the frequency of swallowing during anesthesia and the likelihood of pathological swallowing. During anesthesia, the risk for aspiration may be further increased when ventilatory drive is stimulated. PMID:25275368

  15. The Sequence of Swallowing Events During the Chin-Down Posture

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jennifer L.; Macrae, Phoebe; Anderson, Cheryl; Taylor-Kamara, Isha

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated the effect of the chin-down posture on the sequence of swallowing events in healthy adults. Method Sixteen healthy participants performed 45 5-ml thin liquid swallows during videofluoroscopy: 5 neutral head position, 30 chin-down posture, and then 10 neutral head position. Eight swallowing events were measured: the time of hyoid burst, bolus head in the pharynx, bolus tail in the pharynx, laryngeal vestibule closure (LVC), upper esophageal sphincter (UES) opening, bolus head in the UES, bolus tail exiting the pharynx, and laryngeal vestibule opening (LVO). Results Our key finding is that LVC was one of the first 3 swallowing events in 69% of neutral swallows and in 78% of chin-down swallows (p = .006). Also, LVO occurred last in 14% of chin-down swallows but never occurred last in the preceding neutral swallows (p ≤ .001). Thus, in chin-down swallows, LVC occurred earlier and LVO occurred later. Conclusions The chin-down posture may be beneficial for individuals with delayed onset of LVC and reduced duration of the LVC. Future studies are needed to examine this effect in individuals with dysphagia. PMID:26225454

  16. Spontaneous Swallowing Frequency [Has Potential to] Identify Dysphagia in Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Carnaby, Giselle D; Sia, Isaac; Khanna, Anna; Waters, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Spontaneous swallowing frequency has been described as an index of dysphagia in various health conditions. This study evaluated the potential of spontaneous swallow frequency analysis as a screening protocol for dysphagia in acute stroke. Methods In a cohort of 63 acute stroke cases swallow frequency rates (swallows per minute: SPM) were compared to stroke and swallow severity indices, age, time from stroke to assessment, and consciousness level. Mean differences in SPM were compared between patients with vs. without clinically significant dysphagia. ROC analysis was used to identify the optimal threshold in SPM which was compared to a validated clinical dysphagia examination for identification of dysphagia cases. Time series analysis was employed to identify the minimally adequate time period to complete spontaneous swallow frequency analysis. Results SPM correlated significantly with stroke and swallow severity indices but not with age, time from stroke onset, or consciousness level. Patients with dysphagia demonstrated significantly lower SPM rates. SPM differed by dysphagia severity. ROC analysis yielded a threshold of SPM ≤ 0.40 which identified dysphagia (per the criterion referent) with 0.96 sensitivity, 0.68 specificity, and 0.96 negative predictive value. Time series analysis indicated that a 5 to 10 minute sampling window was sufficient to calculate spontaneous swallow frequency to identify dysphagia cases in acute stroke. Conclusions Spontaneous swallowing frequency presents high potential to screen for dysphagia in acute stroke without the need for trained, available personnel. PMID:24149008

  17. Spontaneous swallowing frequency has potential to identify dysphagia in acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Crary, Michael A; Carnaby, Giselle D; Sia, Isaac; Khanna, Anna; Waters, Michael F

    2013-12-01

    Spontaneous swallowing frequency has been described as an index of dysphagia in various health conditions. This study evaluated the potential of spontaneous swallow frequency analysis as a screening protocol for dysphagia in acute stroke. In a cohort of 63 acute stroke cases, swallow frequency rates (swallows per minute [SPM]) were compared with stroke and swallow severity indices, age, time from stroke to assessment, and consciousness level. Mean differences in SPM were compared between patients with versus without clinically significant dysphagia. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to identify the optimal threshold in SPM, which was compared with a validated clinical dysphagia examination for identification of dysphagia cases. Time series analysis was used to identify the minimally adequate time period to complete spontaneous swallow frequency analysis. SPM correlated significantly with stroke and swallow severity indices but not with age, time from stroke onset, or consciousness level. Patients with dysphagia demonstrated significantly lower SPM rates. SPM differed by dysphagia severity. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis yielded a threshold of SPM≤0.40 that identified dysphagia (per the criterion referent) with 0.96 sensitivity, 0.68 specificity, and 0.96 negative predictive value. Time series analysis indicated that a 5- to 10-minute sampling window was sufficient to calculate spontaneous swallow frequency to identify dysphagia cases in acute stroke. Spontaneous swallowing frequency presents high potential to screen for dysphagia in acute stroke without the need for trained, available personnel.

  18. The relationship between limit of Dysphagia and average volume per swallow in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Belo, Luciana Rodrigues; Gomes, Nathália Angelina Costa; Coriolano, Maria das Graças Wanderley de Sales; de Souza, Elizabete Santos; Moura, Danielle Albuquerque Alves; Asano, Amdore Guescel; Lins, Otávio Gomes

    2014-08-01

    The goal of this study was to obtain the limit of dysphagia and the average volume per swallow in patients with mild to moderate Parkinson's disease (PD) but without swallowing complaints and in normal subjects, and to investigate the relationship between them. We hypothesize there is a direct relationship between these two measurements. The study included 10 patients with idiopathic PD and 10 age-matched normal controls. Surface electromyography was recorded over the suprahyoid muscle group. The limit of dysphagia was obtained by offering increasing volumes of water until piecemeal deglutition occurred. The average volume per swallow was calculated by dividing the time taken by the number of swallows used to drink 100 ml of water. The PD group showed a significantly lower dysphagia limit and lower average volume per swallow. There was a significantly moderate direct correlation and association between the two measurements. About half of the PD patients had an abnormally low dysphagia limit and average volume per swallow, although none had spontaneously related swallowing problems. Both measurements may be used as a quick objective screening test for the early identification of swallowing alterations that may lead to dysphagia in PD patients, but the determination of the average volume per swallow is much quicker and simpler.

  19. Central inhibition of initiation of swallowing by systemic administration of diazepam and baclofen in anaesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, Takanori; Sakai, Shogo; Suzuki, Taku; Ujihara, Izumi; Tsuji, Kojun; Magara, Jin; Canning, Brendan J; Inoue, Makoto

    2017-05-01

    Dysphagia is caused not only by neurological and/or structural damage but also by medication. We hypothesized memantine, dextromethorphan, diazepam, and baclofen, all commonly used drugs with central sites of action, may regulate swallowing function. Swallows were evoked by upper airway (UA)/pharyngeal distension, punctate mechanical stimulation using a von Frey filament, capsaicin or distilled water (DW) applied topically to the vocal folds, and electrical stimulation of a superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) in anesthetized rats and were documented by recording electromyographic activation of the suprahyoid and thyrohyoid muscles and by visualizing laryngeal elevation. The effects of intraperitoneal or topical administration of each drug on swallowing function were studied. Systemic administration of diazepam and baclofen, but not memantine or dextromethorphan, inhibited swallowing evoked by mechanical, chemical, and electrical stimulation. Both benzodiazepines and GABAA receptor antagonists diminished the inhibitory effects of diazepam, whereas a GABAB receptor antagonist diminished the effects of baclofen. Topically applied diazepam or baclofen had no effect on swallowing. These data indicate that diazepam and baclofen act centrally to inhibit swallowing in anesthetized rats.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Systemic administration of diazepam and baclofen, but not memantine or dextromethorphan, inhibited swallowing evoked by mechanical, chemical, and electrical stimulation. Both benzodiazepines and GABAA receptor antagonists diminished the inhibitory effects of diazepam, whereas a GABAB receptor antagonist diminished the effects of baclofen. Topical applied diazepam or baclofen was without effect on swallowing. Diazepam and baclofen act centrally to inhibit swallowing in anesthetized rats. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Brain and behavioral effects of swallowing carbonated water on the human pharyngeal motor system.

    PubMed

    Elshukri, Omsaad; Michou, Emilia; Mentz, Hannah; Hamdy, Shaheen

    2016-02-15

    Chemical stimulation of the swallowing network with carbonation and citric acid has been investigated, showing potential benefits on swallowing of dysphagic patients. Despite this, the underlying mechanisms for these effects are not fully understood. Here we investigated the effects of 5 ml liquid bolus swallows of carbonated, citric acid, and still water on a swallowing reaction-time tasks paradigm in 16 healthy adults (8 male, mean age 33 ± 3.7 yr, protocol 1). We then investigated the net effects of "sensory bolus interventions" (40 repeated swallows every 15 s) of the three different liquid boluses on corticobulbar excitability, as examined with single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in 16 participants (8 female, mean age 33 ± 3.7 yr, protocol 2). The findings showed that a larger number of correctly timed swallows (within a predetermined time window) was accomplished mainly with carbonated liquids (z = -2.04, P = 0.04 vs. still water, protocol 1). Both carbonated and citric acid liquid interventions with 40 swallows increased corticobulbar excitability of the stronger pharyngeal projection, suggesting a similar modulatory pathway for the effects on swallowing. However, carbonation showed superiority (P = 0.04, F = 4.75, 2-way ANOVA), with the changes lasting up to 60 min following the intervention. These results hold significance for future further and in-depth physiological investigations of the differences between different stimuli on swallowing neural network. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Pharyngeal swallowing elicited by fluid infusion: role of volition and vallecular containment.

    PubMed

    Pouderoux, P; Logemann, J A; Kahrilas, P J

    1996-02-01

    Nonalimentary swallows minimize aspiration by clearing accumulated fluid from the pharynx. This study aimed to define 1) the pharyngeal sensory field to elicit swallowing and 2) the effect of infusion rate, volition, taste, and temperature on pharyngeal swallows. Test solutions were directed into the valleculae at 6.5, 11.5, and 32 ml/min through a catheter in eight healthy volunteers. Deglutition was signaled with electromyography and electroglottography. Spatial distribution of infusate before swallowing was studied using videofluoroscopy coupled with a video timer. Volitional control was assessed with rapid or restrained swallows. Pharyngeal swallow latency decreased as the instillation rate increased, was potently modified with volition, and was unchanged by infusate taste or temperature. Water infusion into the valleculae did not trigger pharyngeal swallowing until liquids overflowed and reached the aryepiglottic folds or pyriform sinuses. The variation in swallow latency among flow rates was mainly due to the duration of liquid containment within the valleculae. This suggests that the valleculae act to contain pharyngeal secretions and residue and prevent aspiration by diverting their contents around the larynx before swallowing.

  2. The importance of the reproducibility of oropharyngeal swallowing in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. An electrophysiological study.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, G; Alfonsi, E; Mainardi, L; Alvisi, E; Brighina, F; Valentino, F; Fierro, B; Sandrini, G; Bertino, G; Berlangieri, M; De Icco, R; Fresia, M; Moglia, A

    2017-05-01

    To investigate electrophysiologically the reproducibility of oropharyngeal swallowing in patients with ALS. We enrolled 26 ALS patients, both with and without clinical signs of dysphagia, and 30 age-matched controls. The reproducibility of the electrophysiological signals related to the oral phase (electromyographic activity of the submental/suprahyoid muscles) and the pharyngeal phase (laryngeal-pharyngeal mechanogram) of swallowing across repeated swallows was assessed. To do this we computed two similarity indexes (SI) by using previously described mathematical algorithms. The reproducibility of oropharyngeal swallowing was significantly reduced both in patients with and in those without clinical signs of dysphagia, with more marked alterations being detected in the dysphagic group. The SI of both phases of swallowing, oral and pharyngeal, correlated significantly with dysphagia severity and disease severity. In ALS different pathophysiological mechanisms can alter the stereotyped motor behaviors underlying normal swallowing, thus reducing the reproducibility of the swallowing act. A decrease in swallowing reproducibility could be a preclinical sign of dysphagia and, beyond a certain threshold, a pathological hallmark of oropharyngeal dysphagia. Electrophysiological assessment is a simple and useful tool for the early detection of swallowing abnormalities, and for the management of overt dysphagia in ALS. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Surface electromyographic characteristics of swallowing in dysphagia secondary to brainstem stroke.

    PubMed

    Crary, M A; Baldwin, B O

    1997-01-01

    Surface electromyography (SEMG) provides an noninvasive avenue for evaluating swallowing physiology. This report describes SEMG characteristics associated with swallow attempts in 6 dysphagic patients who had suffered brainstem stroke compared with 6 age and gender-matched controls. Results indicated that patients with dysphagia secondary to brainstem stroke differed in both amplitude and timing aspects of swallowing attempts from asymptomatic controls. Specifically, the results indicated that during swallow attempts, dysphagic patients produced more muscle activity over a shorter duration and with less coordination than controls. Potential physiological mechanisms of these results are discussed.

  4. Feeding and Swallowing Disorders in Pediatric Neuromuscular Diseases: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    van den Engel-Hoek, Lenie; de Groot, Imelda J.M.; de Swart, Bert J.M.; Erasmus, Corrie E.

    2015-01-01

    Feeding and swallowing problems in infants and children have a great impact on health and wellbeing. The aim of this study was to provide an overview of recognized feeding and swallowing problems in different groups of children with neuromuscular diseases, based on relevant literature and expert opinion, and to propose recommendations for the assessment and treatment of these problems. Almost all pediatric neuromuscular diseases are accompanied by feeding and swallowing problems during the different phases of deglutition, problems that give rise to a wide variety of signs and symptoms, which emphasizes the importance of a comprehensive feeding and swallowing assessment by a speech and language therapist. PMID:27858755

  5. Effects of liquid stimuli on dual-axis swallowing accelerometry signals in a healthy population

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Dual-axis swallowing accelerometry has recently been proposed as a tool for non-invasive analysis of swallowing function. Although swallowing is known to be physiologically modifiable by the type of food or liquid (i.e., stimuli), the effects of stimuli on dual-axis accelerometry signals have never been thoroughly investigated. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate stimulus effects on dual-axis accelerometry signal characteristics. Signals were acquired from 17 healthy participants while swallowing 4 different stimuli: water, nectar-thick and honey-thick apple juices, and a thin-liquid barium suspension. Two swallowing tasks were examined: discrete and sequential. A variety of features were extracted in the time and time-frequency domains after swallow segmentation and pre-processing. A separate Friedman test was conducted for each feature and for each swallowing task. Results Significant main stimulus effects were found on 6 out of 30 features for the discrete task and on 5 out of 30 features for the sequential task. Analysis of the features with significant stimulus effects suggested that the changes in the signals revealed slower and more pronounced swallowing patterns with increasing bolus viscosity. Conclusions We conclude that stimulus type does affect specific characteristics of dual-axis swallowing accelerometry signals, suggesting that associated clinical screening protocols may need to be stimulus specific. PMID:20128928

  6. Developmental changes in pharyngeal swallowing acoustics: a comparison of adults and children.

    PubMed

    Hennessey, Neville W; Fisher, Gemma; Ciccone, Natalie

    2017-05-19

    This study examined developmental differences in the acoustics of pharyngeal swallowing. Thirty-one young children (M = 4.5 years) and 29 adults (M = 22.5 years) were recorded swallowing thin liquid and puree boluses. In comparison with adults, children showed longer total swallow sound duration and duration to peak intensity, as well as greater variability in the duration to peak intensity and mean of the averaged spectrum in Hz. Thin and puree boluses differed in measures of duration, intensity and frequency of the averaged sound spectrum, although these effects did not interact with age. The increased variability in swallowing observed in children paralleled that found in acoustic measures of vowel formants, although speech and swallowing acoustic measures were uncorrelated. Using Formant 2 frequency as a proxy measure of vocal tract length, the age differences in swallowing acoustics appear to be independent of physical size, although associations between duration to peak intensity and pharyngeal size warrant further investigation. These findings suggest acoustic measures of swallowing are sensitive to developmental status, possibly reflecting ongoing refinement of the pharyngeal swallow across childhood, and support continued research into the use of digital cervical auscultation as a tool to assess the efficiency and stability of the swallowing neuromuscular control system in children and adults.

  7. A comparative analysis of DBSCAN, K-means, and quadratic variation algorithms for automatic identification of swallows from swallowing accelerometry signals.

    PubMed

    Dudik, Joshua M; Kurosu, Atsuko; Coyle, James L; Sejdić, Ervin

    2015-04-01

    Cervical auscultation with high resolution sensors is currently under consideration as a method of automatically screening for specific swallowing abnormalities. To be clinically useful without human involvement, any devices based on cervical auscultation should be able to detect specified swallowing events in an automatic manner. In this paper, we comparatively analyze the density-based spatial clustering of applications with noise algorithm (DBSCAN), a k-means based algorithm, and an algorithm based on quadratic variation as methods of differentiating periods of swallowing activity from periods of time without swallows. These algorithms utilized swallowing vibration data exclusively and compared the results to a gold standard measure of swallowing duration. Data was collected from 23 subjects that were actively suffering from swallowing difficulties. Comparing the performance of the DBSCAN algorithm with a proven segmentation algorithm that utilizes k-means clustering demonstrated that the DBSCAN algorithm had a higher sensitivity and correctly segmented more swallows. Comparing its performance with a threshold-based algorithm that utilized the quadratic variation of the signal showed that the DBSCAN algorithm offered no direct increase in performance. However, it offered several other benefits including a faster run time and more consistent performance between patients. All algorithms showed noticeable differentiation from the endpoints provided by a videofluoroscopy examination as well as reduced sensitivity. In summary, we showed that the DBSCAN algorithm is a viable method for detecting the occurrence of a swallowing event using cervical auscultation signals, but significant work must be done to improve its performance before it can be implemented in an unsupervised manner. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A Comparative Analysis of DBSCAN, K-Means, and Quadratic Variation Algorithms for Automatic Identification of Swallows from Swallowing Accelerometry Signals

    PubMed Central

    Dudik, Joshua M.; Kurosu, Atsuko; Coyle, James L

    2015-01-01

    Background Cervical auscultation with high resolution sensors is currently under consideration as a method of automatically screening for specific swallowing abnormalities. To be clinically useful without human involvement, any devices based on cervical auscultation should be able to detect specified swallowing events in an automatic manner. Methods In this paper, we comparatively analyze the density-based spatial clustering of applications with noise algorithm (DBSCAN), a k-means based algorithm, and an algorithm based on quadratic variation as methods of differentiating periods of swallowing activity from periods of time without swallows. These algorithms utilized swallowing vibration data exclusively and compared the results to a gold standard measure of swallowing duration. Data was collected from 23 subjects that were actively suffering from swallowing difficulties. Results Comparing the performance of the DBSCAN algorithm with a proven segmentation algorithm that utilizes k-means clustering demonstrated that the DBSCAN algorithm had a higher sensitivity and correctly segmented more swallows. Comparing its performance with a threshold-based algorithm that utilized the quadratic variation of the signal showed that the DBSCAN algorithm offered no direct increase in performance. However, it offered several other benefits including a faster run time and more consistent performance between patients. All algorithms showed noticeable differen-tiation from the endpoints provided by a videofluoroscopy examination as well as reduced sensitivity. Conclusions In summary, we showed that the DBSCAN algorithm is a viable method for detecting the occurrence of a swallowing event using cervical auscultation signals, but significant work must be done to improve its performance before it can be implemented in an unsupervised manner. PMID:25658505

  9. Disability retirement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eck, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    Eligibility for disability retirement is discussed. General guidelines and a few standards are given. Usually the same basic medical principles apply to the evaluation of claims for disability retirement as apply to determining medical suitability for initial employment.

  10. Developmental Disabilities

    MedlinePlus

    Developmental disabilities are severe, long-term problems. They may be physical, such as blindness. They may affect mental ability, ... everyday living. There are many causes of developmental disabilities, including Genetic or chromosome abnormalities. These cause conditions ...

  11. Disability retirement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eck, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    Eligibility for disability retirement is discussed. General guidelines and a few standards are given. Usually the same basic medical principles apply to the evaluation of claims for disability retirement as apply to determining medical suitability for initial employment.

  12. Displacement of oropharyngeal structures during suction-swallowing cycles.

    PubMed

    Engelke, W; Glombek, J; Psychogios, M; Schneider, S; Ellenberger, D; Santander, P

    2014-07-01

    Suction ability plays an important role in supporting oral nutrition and needs special care following neurological disorders and tumor-associated defects. However, the details of suction are still poorly understood. The present study evaluates displacement of orofacial structures during suction and deglutition based on manometric controlled MRI. Nine healthy subjects were scanned wearing an intraoral mouthpiece for water intake by suction and subsequent swallowing. Suction-swallowing cycles were identified by intraoral negative pressure. Midsagittal MRI slices (3 T; temporal resolution 0.53 s) were analyzed at rest, suction and pharyngeal swallowing. The mandibular displacement was measured as the distance between the anterior nasal spine and the inferior point of the mandible. Following areas were defined: subpalatal compartment (SCA), retrolingual (RLA), epipharyngeal (EPA) and mouth floor area (MFA). During rest, an average distance of 7 cm was observed between the mandibular measurement points. The measured SCA was 3.67 cm(2), the RLA 6.98 cm(2), the EPA 9.00 cm(2) and the MFA 15.21 cm(2) (average values). At the end of suction, the mandibular distance reduces (to 6.88 cm), the SCA increases significantly (to 5.96 cm(2); p = 0.0002), the RLA decreases (to 6.45 cm(2)), the EPA increases (to 10.59 cm(2)) and the MFA decreases (to 15.02 cm(2)). During deglutition, the mandible lifted significantly (to 6.81 cm; p = 0.0276), the SCA reduced to zero, the RLA was not measurable, the EPA reduces significantly (to 3.01 cm(2); p < 0.0001) and the MFA increases (to 16.36 cm(2)). According to these observations, a combined displacement of the tongue in an anteroposterior direction with active tongue dorsum-velum contact appears to be the predominant activity during suction and responsible for the expansion of the subpalatal area.

  13. Development of Suck and Swallow Mechanisms in Infants.

    PubMed

    Lau, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    Preterm infants' hospital discharge is often delayed due to their inability to feed by mouth safely and competently. No evidence-based supported guidelines are currently available for health-care professionals caring for these infants. Available interventions advocating benefits are not readily acknowledged for lack of rigorous documentation inasmuch as any improvements may ensue from infants' normal maturation. Through research, a growing understanding of the development of nutritive sucking skills has emerged, shedding light on how and why infants may encounter oral feeding difficulties due to the immaturity of specific physiologic functions. Unfortunately, this knowledge has yet to be translated to the clinical practice to improve the diagnoses of oral feeding problems through the development of relevant assessment tools and to enhance infants' oral feeding skills through the development of efficacious preventive and therapeutic interventions. This review focuses on the maturation of the various physiologic functions implicated in the transport of a bolus from the oral cavity to the stomach. Although infants' readiness for oral feeding is deemed attained when suck, swallow, and respiration are coordinated, we do not have a clear definition of what coordination implies. We have learned that each of these functions encompasses a number of elements that mature at different times and rates. Consequently, it would appear that the proper functioning of sucking, the swallow processing, and respiration need to occur at two levels: first, the elements within each function must reach an appropriate functional maturation that can work in synchrony with each other to generate an appropriate suck, swallow process, and respiration; and second, the elements of all these distinct functions, in turn, must be able to do the same at an integrative level to ensure the safe and efficient transport of a bolus from the mouth to the stomach.

  14. Unilateral Superior Laryngeal Nerve Lesion in an Animal Model of Dysphagia and Its Effect on Sucking and Swallowing

    PubMed Central

    Campbell-Malone, Regina; Holman, Shaina D.; Lukasik, Stacey L.; Fukuhara, Takako; Gierbolini-Norat, Estela M.; Thexton, Allan J.; German, Rebecca Z.

    2013-01-01

    We tested two hypotheses relating to the sensory deficit that follows a unilateral superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) lesion in an infant animal model. We hypothesized that it would result in (1) a higher incidence of aspiration and (2) temporal changes in sucking and swallowing. We ligated the right-side SLN in six 2–3-week-old female pigs. Using videofluoroscopy, we recorded swallows in the same pre- and post-lesion infant pigs. We analyzed the incidence of aspiration and the duration and latency of suck and swallow cycles. After unilateral SLN lesioning, the incidence of silent aspiration during swallowing increased from 0.7 to 41.5 %. The durations of the suck containing the swallow, the suck immediately following the swallow, and the swallow itself were significantly longer in the post-lesion swallows, although the suck prior to the swallow was not different. The interval between the start of the suck containing a swallow and the subsequent epiglottal movement was longer in the post-lesion swallows. The number of sucks between swallows was significantly greater in post-lesion swallows compared to pre-lesion swallows. Unilateral SLN lesion increased the incidence of aspiration and changed the temporal relationships between sucking and swallowing. The longer transit time and the temporal coordinative dysfunction between suck and swallow cycles may contribute to aspiration. These results suggest that swallow dysfunction and silent aspiration are common and potentially overlooked sequelae of unilateral SLN injury. This validated animal model of aspiration has the potential for further dysphagia studies. PMID:23417250

  15. The relationship between residue and aspiration on the subsequent swallow: an application of the normalized residue ratio scale.

    PubMed

    Molfenter, Sonja M; Steele, Catriona M

    2013-12-01

    Postswallow residue is widely considered to be a sign of swallowing impairment and is assumed to pose risk for aspiration on subsequent swallows. We undertook a preliminary retrospective study to investigate the link between postswallow residue and penetration-aspiration on the immediately occurring subsequent clearing swallow (i.e., without introduction of a new bolus). Videofluoroscopy clips for 156 thin-liquid single bolus swallows by patients with neurogenic dysphagia were selected for study because they displayed multiple swallows per bolus. Residue for each subswallow (n = 407) was analyzed using the Normalized Residue Ratio Scale for the valleculae (NRRSv) and piriform sinuses. The association between residue presence at the end of a swallow and penetration-aspiration on the next swallow was examined. Postswallow residue in one or both pharyngeal spaces was significantly associated with impaired swallowing safety on the subsequent clearing swallow for the same bolus. However, when analyzed separately by residue location, only vallecular residue was significantly associated with impaired swallowing safety on the next clearing swallow. The distribution of NRRSv scores by swallowing safety demonstrated an NRRSv cut-point of 0.09, above which there was a 2.07 times greater relative risk of penetration-aspiration. Postswallow vallecular residue, measured using the NRRS, is significantly associated with penetration-aspiration on subsequent clearing swallows. A clinically meaningful cut-point of 0.09 on the NRRSv scale demarcates this risk. Further research with different bolus consistencies is needed.

  16. Effects of carbonated liquid on swallowing dysfunction in dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson's disease dementia.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Victoria; Torisson, Gustav; Bülow, Margareta; Londos, Elisabet

    2017-01-01

    Swallowing dysfunction is an increasingly recognized problem in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD), which can result in aspiration pneumonia and death. Few studies have examined potential ways of improving swallowing function in this fragile patient group. The aim of this study was to evaluate swallowing dysfunction and carbonated liquid using videofluoroscopy in DLB and PDD patients. A total of 48 patients with DLB and PDD were referred for a clinical examination with videofluoroscopy. Descriptive overall assessments were provided at the time of the examination regarding swallowing function and the effects of different modifications, including carbonated thin liquid (CTL). Additionally, a repeated measures quantitative retrospective analysis has been performed comparing 1) thin liquids; 2) thickened liquids and 3) CTLs, with regard to the quantitative variables 1) pharyngeal transit time (PTT); 2) pharyngeal retention and 3) tracheal penetration. In all, 40/48 (83%) of the patients had a swallowing dysfunction, which was confirmed on videofluoroscopy, with 34/40 (85%) patients having a pharyngeal-type dysfunction. A total of 14/40 (35%) patients with an objective swallowing impairment did not have any subjective swallowing symptoms. Out of the patients with swallowing dysfunction, 87% had an overall improved swallowing function with carbonated liquid. PTT for carbonated liquid (median 633 ms, interquartile range [IQR] 516-786 ms) was quicker than for thin liquid (760 ms, IQR 613-940 ms, P=0.014) and thickened liquid (880.0 ms, IQR 600-1,500 ms, P<0.001). No significant effect was seen in residue or penetration. The majority of patients with DLB or PDD had a swallowing dysfunction, sometimes without subjective swallowing symptoms, which improved with carbonated liquid. This highlights the importance of investigating patients with videofluoroscopy and to carry out a prospective interventional study to further

  17. Gum chewing improves swallow frequency and latency in Parkinson patients: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    South, Angela R; Somers, Stephanie M; Jog, Mandar S

    2010-04-13

    Reduced swallowing frequency affects secretion management in Parkinson disease (PD). Gum chewing increases saliva flow and swallow frequency. This study uses chewing gum to modify swallow frequency and latency between swallows in patients with PD. 1) Assess the frequency and latency of swallow at baseline (BL), during gum chewing (GC), and post gum chewing (PGC) for participants with PD (stage 2-4) nonsymptomatic for prandial dysphagia; and 2) assess carryover after gum is expectorated. Twenty participants were studied across 3 tasks, each of 5 minutes in duration: BL, GC, and PGC. Respiratory and laryngeal signals were continuously recorded using PowerLab (version 5.5.5; ADI Instruments, Castle Hill, Australia). Frequency and latency of swallow events were calculated. Differences (analysis of variance) are reported for frequency (p < 0.000001) and latency (p < 0.000001). Swallow frequency (mean +/- SD) increased during GC (14.95 +/- 3.02) compared with BL (3.1 +/- 2.85) and PGC (7.0 +/- 2.57). Latency in seconds (mean +/- SD) decreased during GC (24.1 +/- 4.174) and increased with BL (131.8 +/- 59.52) and PGC (mean = 60.74 +/- 25.25). Intertask comparisons (t test) found differences in swallow frequency and latency between tasks: BL vs GC (p < 0.0001, p < 0.0001), BL vs PGC (p < 0.0011, p < 0.0009), and GC vs PGC (p < 0.0001, p < 0.0002), respectively. Post hoc analysis showed carryover to 5.317 minutes. Modifying sensorimotor input by chewing gum alters frequency and latency of swallowing and may be an effective strategy for secretion management in Parkinson disease. This study provides Class III evidence that chewing gum increases swallow frequency and decreases latency of swallowing in an experiment in patients with stage 2 to 4 Parkinson disease who are nonsymptomatic for significant prandial dysphagia.

  18. Identification of swallowing events from sEMG Signals Obtained from Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Crary, Michael A; Carnaby Mann, Giselle D; Groher, Michael E

    2007-04-01

    Surface electromyography (sEMG) is being used with increasing frequency to identify the occurrence of swallowing, to describe swallow physiology, and to treat impaired swallowing function in dysphagic patients. Despite this increased utilization, limited information is available regarding the validity and reliability of investigators and clinicians to interpret sEMG data in reference to swallowing. This study examines the validity and interjudge reliability of swallow identification using sEMG records obtained from healthy adults. Validity and reliability estimates were compared between experienced and naïve judges in the identification of swallows from graphic sEMG records. Multiple validity estimates were high, indicating a strong degree of accuracy in identification of swallows versus nonswallow movements from sEMG traces. Experienced judges were more accurate than naïve judges (classification accuracy: experienced = 90% vs. naïve = 81%; p = 0.006, kappa: experienced = 0.89 vs. naïve 0.62; p = 0.008). Judges in both groups were more likely to classify swallows as nonswallow movements (false negatives) than to classify nonswallow movements as swallows (false positives). Interjudge reliability estimates indicated a high degree of agreement among judges in the identification of swallows versus nonswallow movements from the sEMG signal, with higher agreement among experienced judges (average kappa coefficient: experienced = 0.75 vs. naïve = 0.51). These results suggest that the sEMG graphic record is a valid and reliable tool for identifying normal swallows and that experience with this technique results in better identification and interjudge agreement.

  19. Switching Hemispheres: A New Migration Strategy for the Disjunct Argentinean Breeding Population of Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica)

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Perez, Belen; Hobson, Keith A.; Powell, Rebecca L.; Still, Christopher J.; Huber, Gernot H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Barn Swallows (Hirundo rustica) breed almost exclusively in the Northern Hemisphere. However, since the early 1980's, a small disjunct breeding population has become established in eastern Argentina, presumably by birds previously derived from those breeding in North America. Currently, it is unknown where these individuals go following breeding and how they have adjusted to a reversal in phenology. Their austral wintering period corresponds to the breeding period of the northern ancestral population and so they can potentially return to these more traditional breeding sites or they may occupy other South American wintering regions left vacant by conspecifics returning to the Northern Hemisphere. Principal Findings We used a three-isotope (δ13C, δ15N, δ2H) approach to investigate potential wintering areas in Central and South America of individuals breeding in Argentina. Feather isotope values differed from those expected and measured at local breeding sites in Argentina indicating molt after the austral breeding period and away from the breeding grounds. Potential molting origins were identified applying likelihood-based assignment methods to a δ2H isoscape for South America and dichotomous prior information on the distribution of C3 and C4 vegetation types based on modeled vegetation-δ13C values. Barn Swallows now breeding in Argentina have changed their migratory behavior but presumably use the same cues as those used by the ancestral population, molting their feathers during the austral winter, likely in north-eastern South America. PMID:23383257

  20. Switching hemispheres: a new migration strategy for the disjunct Argentinean breeding population of Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica).

    PubMed

    Garcia-Perez, Belen; Hobson, Keith A; Powell, Rebecca L; Still, Christopher J; Huber, Gernot H

    2013-01-01

    Barn Swallows (Hirundo rustica) breed almost exclusively in the Northern Hemisphere. However, since the early 1980's, a small disjunct breeding population has become established in eastern Argentina, presumably by birds previously derived from those breeding in North America. Currently, it is unknown where these individuals go following breeding and how they have adjusted to a reversal in phenology. Their austral wintering period corresponds to the breeding period of the northern ancestral population and so they can potentially return to these more traditional breeding sites or they may occupy other South American wintering regions left vacant by conspecifics returning to the Northern Hemisphere. We used a three-isotope (δ(13)C, δ(15)N, δ(2)H) approach to investigate potential wintering areas in Central and South America of individuals breeding in Argentina. Feather isotope values differed from those expected and measured at local breeding sites in Argentina indicating molt after the austral breeding period and away from the breeding grounds. Potential molting origins were identified applying likelihood-based assignment methods to a δ(2)H isoscape for South America and dichotomous prior information on the distribution of C3 and C4 vegetation types based on modeled vegetation-δ(13)C values. Barn Swallows now breeding in Argentina have changed their migratory behavior but presumably use the same cues as those used by the ancestral population, molting their feathers during the austral winter, likely in north-eastern South America.

  1. Treatment for dysphagia (swallowing difficulties) in hereditary ataxia.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Adam P; Keage, Megan J; Johansson, Kerstin; Schalling, Ellika

    2015-11-13

    Hereditary ataxias are a heterogeneous group of disorders resulting in progressive inco-ordination. Swallowing impairment, also known as dysphagia, is a common and potentially life threatening sequel of disease progression. The incidence and nature of dysphagia in these conditions is largely unknown. The loss of an effective and safe swallow can dramatically affect the health and well-being of an individual. Remediation of difficulties of eating and drinking is an important goal in the clinical care of people with hereditary ataxia. To assess the effects of interventions for swallowing impairment (dysphagia) in people with hereditary ataxias. We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Specialized Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL Plus, PsycINFO, and the Education Resources Information Center (ERIC) on 14 September 2015. We also searched Linguistics and Language Behavior Abstracts (LLBA), Dissertation Abstracts, and Trials Registries on 24 September 2015. We considered all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs that compared treatments for hereditary ataxia with placebo or no treatment. We only included studies measuring dysphagia. Three review authors (ES, KJ, MK) independently screened all titles and abstracts. In the event of any disagreement or uncertainty over the inclusion of a particular paper, the review authors planned to meet and reach consensus. We identified no RCTs from the 519 titles and abstracts screened. We excluded papers primarily for not including participants with a hereditary ataxia (that is, being focused on other neurological conditions), being theoretical reviews rather than intervention studies, or being neither randomised nor quasi-randomised trials.We identified five papers of various design that described treatment for dysphagia, or improvement to swallow as a by-product of treatment, in people with hereditary ataxia. None of these studies were RCTs or

  2. Fluid mechanics of eating, swallowing and digestion - overview and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Engmann, Jan; Burbidge, Adam S

    2013-02-26

    From a very simplistic viewpoint, the human digestive system can be regarded as a long tube (with dramatic variations in diameter, cross-section, wall properties, pumping mechanisms, regulating valves and in-line sensors). We single out a few fluid mechanical phenomena along the trajectory of a food bolus from the mouth to the small intestine and discuss how they influence sensorial perception, safe transport, and nutrient absorption from a bolus. The focus is on lubrication flows between the tongue and palate, the oropharyngeal stage of swallowing and effects of flow on absorption in the small intestine. Specific challenges and opportunities in this research area are highlighted.

  3. Real time swallowing measurement system by using photometric stereo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujino, Masahiro; Kato, Kunihito; Mura, Emi; Nagai, Hajime

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a measurement system to evaluate the swallowing by estimating the movement of the thyroid cartilage. We developed a measurement system based on the vision sensor in order to achieve the noncontact and non-invasive sensor. The movement of the subject's thyroid cartilage is tracked by the three dimensional information of the surface of the skin measured by the photometric stereo. We constructed a camera system that uses near-IR light sources and three camera sensors. We conformed the effectiveness of the proposed system by experiments.

  4. Disabilities, Benefits, and Disability Benefits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirst, Michael A.

    1986-01-01

    The study attempted to relate patterns of disabilities to amounts of money received in social security benefits. Findings from structured interviews with parents of 248 disabled young adults (ages 18-22) indicated that the United Kingdom social security system gives more recognition to costs arising from physical than from mental disability.…

  5. POLYCHLORINATED BYPHENOLS AND P,P'-DDE IN TREE SWALLOW EGGS AND NESTLINGS FROM A SUPERFUND SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study assessed biologically available contaminant concentrations in tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor) eggs and nestlings from a marine Superfund site. Tree swallows are used widely to assess and monitor aquatic contamination due to their preference for nesting near water an...

  6. POLYCHLORINATED BYPHENOLS AND P,P'-DDE IN TREE SWALLOW EGGS AND NESTLINGS FROM A SUPERFUND SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study assessed biologically available contaminant concentrations in tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor) eggs and nestlings from a marine Superfund site. Tree swallows are used widely to assess and monitor aquatic contamination due to their preference for nesting near water an...

  7. Prevalence and Severity of Voice and Swallowing Difficulties in Mitochondrial Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Read, Jennifer L.; Whittaker, Roger G.; Miller, Nick; Clark, Sue; Taylor, Robert; McFarland, Robert; Turnbull, Douglass

    2012-01-01

    Background: Mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) cause a broad spectrum of clinical phenotypes. Anecdotal evidence suggests that voice and swallow problems are a common feature of these diseases. Aims: To characterize accurately the prevalence and severity of voice and swallow problems in a large cohort of patients with mitochondrial disease.…

  8. Mercury Contamination in Tree Swallows Nesting at Northern Wisconsin Inland Lakes that Differ in Methylation Potential

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) are a useful species to assess the bioavailability and effects of trace elements, including mercury, because they will nest in boxes in relatively close proximity to one another. Because tree swallows feed on the aerial stages of benthic aquat...

  9. Vocal Variability Post Swallowing in Individuals with and without Oropharyngeal Dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Karoline Weber dos; Scheeren, Betina; Maciel, Antonio Carlos; Cassol, Mauriceia

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Voice modification after swallowing may indicate changes in the transit of the bolus. Objective The aim of this study is to verify the use of perceptual voice analysis to detect oropharyngeal dysphagia. Study Design Case series. Methods Twenty-seven patients with dysphagia as diagnosed by videofluoroscopy and 25 without were evaluated. The sustained vowel /a/ was recorded before this exam and after swallowing different consistencies (pasty, liquid and solid). For the voice evaluation, the GRBAS scale (grade, roughness, breathiness, asthenia and strain) and the parameter “wet voice” were used. Three judges blinded to study group and time of emission performed voice analysis. Results Individuals with dysphagia showed significant decrease in grade of voice and asthenia and increase in strain after swallowing pasty substances, differing from individuals without dysphagia who showed no modification of the parameters after swallowing. The wet voice parameter showed no difference after swallowing in both study groups. Conclusion The decrease in grade and asthenia and increased strain are indicative of a swallowing disorder, indicating increased vocal strain to clean the vocal tract of food. The modification of vocal production after swallowing proved to be a trusted resource for detection of swallowing disorders. PMID:25992153

  10. Vocal Variability Post Swallowing in Individuals with and without Oropharyngeal Dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Santos, Karoline Weber Dos; Scheeren, Betina; Maciel, Antonio Carlos; Cassol, Mauriceia

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Voice modification after swallowing may indicate changes in the transit of the bolus. Objective The aim of this study is to verify the use of perceptual voice analysis to detect oropharyngeal dysphagia. Study Design Case series. Methods Twenty-seven patients with dysphagia as diagnosed by videofluoroscopy and 25 without were evaluated. The sustained vowel /a/ was recorded before this exam and after swallowing different consistencies (pasty, liquid and solid). For the voice evaluation, the GRBAS scale (grade, roughness, breathiness, asthenia and strain) and the parameter "wet voice" were used. Three judges blinded to study group and time of emission performed voice analysis. Results Individuals with dysphagia showed significant decrease in grade of voice and asthenia and increase in strain after swallowing pasty substances, differing from individuals without dysphagia who showed no modification of the parameters after swallowing. The wet voice parameter showed no difference after swallowing in both study groups. Conclusion The decrease in grade and asthenia and increased strain are indicative of a swallowing disorder, indicating increased vocal strain to clean the vocal tract of food. The modification of vocal production after swallowing proved to be a trusted resource for detection of swallowing disorders.

  11. Tongue Pressure and Submental Surface Electromyography Measures during Noneffortful and Effortful Saliva Swallows in Healthy Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeates, Erin M.; Steele, Catriona M.; Pelletier, Cathy A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The effortful swallow, a compensatory technique frequently employed by speech-language pathologists for their patients with dysphagia, is still not fully understood in terms of how it modifies the swallow. In particular, although age-related changes are known to reduce maximum isometric tongue pressure, it is not known whether age affects…

  12. Tongue Pressure Modulation during Swallowing: Water versus Nectar-Thick Liquids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Catriona M.; Bailey, Gemma L.; Molfenter, Sonja M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Evidence of tongue-palate pressure modulation during swallowing between thin and nectar-thick liquids stimuli has been equivocal. This mirrors a lack of clear evidence in the literature of tongue and hyoid movement modulation between nectar-thick and thin liquid swallows. In the current investigation, the authors sought to confirm whether…

  13. Mechanism of Sequential Swallowing during Straw Drinking in Healthy Young and Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Stephanie K.; Corey, David M.; Hadskey, Leslie D.; Legendre, Calli; Priestly, Daniel H.; Rosenbek, John C.; Foundas, Anne L.

    2004-01-01

    Recent research has revealed differences between isolated and sequential swallowing in healthy young adults; however, the influence of normal aging on sequential swallowing has not been studied. Thus, the purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of normal aging on deglutition during sequential straw drinking. Videofluoroscopic…

  14. New biological information on the invasive swallow-worts (Vincetoxicum spp.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Vincetoxicum nigrum (L.) Moench [Cynanchum louiseae Kartesz & Gandhi] (black swallow-wort) and V. rossicum (Kleopow) Barbar. [Cynanchum rossicum (Kleopow) Borhidi] (pale swallow-wort) are herbaceous perennial vines in the Apocynaceae native to Europe. Both species are considered invasive in their in...

  15. Leaf anthracnose, a new disease of swallow-worts from Russia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Black swallow-wort Vincetoxicum nigrum (L.) Moench (synonym=Cynanchum louiseae Kartesz & Gandhi) and pale swallow-wort Vincetoxicum rossicum (Kleopow) Borhidi (synonym=Cynanchum rossicum (Kleopow) Borhidi) are invasive plants belonging to the family Apocynaceae and are the targets of biological cont...

  16. Prevalence and Severity of Voice and Swallowing Difficulties in Mitochondrial Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Read, Jennifer L.; Whittaker, Roger G.; Miller, Nick; Clark, Sue; Taylor, Robert; McFarland, Robert; Turnbull, Douglass

    2012-01-01

    Background: Mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) cause a broad spectrum of clinical phenotypes. Anecdotal evidence suggests that voice and swallow problems are a common feature of these diseases. Aims: To characterize accurately the prevalence and severity of voice and swallow problems in a large cohort of patients with mitochondrial disease.…

  17. Immediate effects of acupuncture on tongue pressure including swallowing reflex latency in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Shimpei; Kuriyama, Nagato; Tsuru, Hiroyuki; Egawa, Masato

    2016-02-01

    It is important to evaluate tongue function in terms of its clinical implications for swallowing ability. Motor dysfunction and loss of coordination of the tongue are frequently seen, and this influences the oral and pharyngeal phases of swallowing. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the effect of a single acupuncture treatment for tongue pressure in Parkinson's disease. A total of 13 patients, aged 57- 84 years, were recruited. Tongue pressure was measured using a tongue pressure manometer. Furthermore, swallowing reflex latency was measured in 3 of the 13 patients. Significant changes were seen after acupuncture in mean tongue pressure, which increased from 23.1 to 26.7 kPa (p<0.01). Reductions were seen after acupuncture in mean swallowing reflex latency (from 5.2 to 4.6 s for first saliva swallow; from 19.9 to 15.7 s for second saliva swallow; and from 10.4 to 5.7 s for third saliva swallow(s)). Our study's findings suggest that acupuncture may be useful for improving oral cavity function, but further controlled trials are needed. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  18. The Influence of Stimulus Taste and Chemesthesis on Tongue Movement Timing in Swallowing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Catriona M.; van Lieshout, Pascal H. H. M.; Pelletier, Cathy A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the influence of taste and trigeminal irritation (chemesthesis) on durational aspects of tongue movement in liquid swallowing, controlling for the influence of perceived taste intensity. Method: Electromagnetic midsagittal articulography was used to trace tongue movements during discrete liquid swallowing with 5 liquids: water,…

  19. Development of Swallowing and Feeding: Prenatal through First Year of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaney, Amy L.; Arvedson, Joan C.

    2008-01-01

    The development of feeding and swallowing involves a highly complex set of interactions that begin in embryologic and fetal periods and continue through infancy and early childhood. This article will focus on swallowing and feeding development in infants who are developing normally with a review of some aspects of prenatal development that provide…

  20. Effects of Pacifier and Taste on Swallowing, Esophageal Motility, Transit and Respiratory Rhythm in Human Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Shubert, Theresa R.; Sitaram, Swetha; Jadcherla, Sudarshan R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pacifier use is widely prevalent globally despite hygienic concerns and uncertain mechanistic effects on swallowing or airway safety. Aims The effects of pacifier and taste interventions on pharyngo-esophageal motility, bolus transit and respiratory rhythms were investigated by determining the upper esophageal sphincter (UES), esophageal body, esophagogastric junction (EGJ) motor patterns as well as deglutition apnea, respiratory rhythm disturbances and esophageal bolus clearance. Methods Fifteen infants (6 males; median gestation 31 wks and birth weight 1.4 kg) underwent high resolution impedance manometry at 43 (41-44) weeks post-menstrual age. Manometric, respiratory, and impedance characteristics of spontaneous swallows, pacifier associated dry swallowing and taste (pacifier dipped in 3% sucrose) associated swallowing were analyzed. Linear mixed and generalized estimating equation models were used. Data are presented as mean ± SEM, %, or median (IQR). Key Results Pharyngo-esophageal motility, respiratory, and impedance characteristics of 209 swallows were analyzed (85 spontaneous swallows, 63 pacifier associated dry swallows, 61 taste associated swallows). Basal UES and EGJ pressures decreased upon pacifier (P<0.05) and taste interventions (P<0.05); however, esophageal motility, respiratory rhythm, and impedance transit characteristics were similar with both interventions. Conclusions and Inferences Oral stimulus with pacifier or taste interventions decreases UES and EGJ basal pressure, but has no effects on pharyngo-esophageal motility, airway interactions, or esophageal bolus transit. A decrease in central parasympathetic-cholinergic excitatory drive is likely responsible for the basal effects. PMID:26727930

  1. The Influence of Stimulus Taste and Chemesthesis on Tongue Movement Timing in Swallowing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Catriona M.; van Lieshout, Pascal H. H. M.; Pelletier, Cathy A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the influence of taste and trigeminal irritation (chemesthesis) on durational aspects of tongue movement in liquid swallowing, controlling for the influence of perceived taste intensity. Method: Electromagnetic midsagittal articulography was used to trace tongue movements during discrete liquid swallowing with 5 liquids: water,…

  2. Demography of invasive black and pale swallow-wort populations in New York

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Vincetoxicum nigrum (Black Swallow-wort) and Vincetoxicum rossicum (Pale Swallow-wort) are perennial twining vines introduced from Europe. Both species have become invasive in northeastern North America in a variety of habitats. To develop parameters for a population model for evaluating potential b...

  3. Biomechanical Correlates of Surface Electromyography Signals Obtained during Swallowing by Healthy Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crary, Michael A.; Carnaby (Mann), Giselle D.; Groher, Michael E.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe biomechanical correlates of the surface electromyographic signal obtained during swallowing by healthy adult volunteers. Method: Seventeen healthy adults were evaluated with simultaneous videofluoroscopy and surface electromyography (sEMG) while swallowing 5 mL of liquid barium sulfate. Three…

  4. [Swallowing function after near-total laryngectomy, cricohyoidoepiglottopexy (CHEP), and cricohyoidopexy (CHP)].

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Meijin; Yao, Kazuo; Nishiyama, Kouichirou; Nagai, Hiromi; Ito, Akihiko; Yokobori, Satoru; Okamoto, Makito; Hirose, Hajime

    2002-01-01

    We studied postoperative swallowing in 4 patients undergoing CHEP and 1 undergoing CHP. Swallowing was obtained by intense swallowing rehabilitation since only 1/4 of the larynx remained after near-total laryngectomy. Our swallowing rehabilitation program is detailed in this paper. The improvement of swallowing is classified into 3 stages. In stage I, volus directly intrudes into the trachea. In stage II, volus stagnates between laryngeal inlet and tracheal stoma. In stage III, volus directly flows through the esophageal inlet. Stage III indicates that rehabilitation is almost completed. Stage I is shortest at 2 to 14 days and Stage II longest at 7 to 80 days. The MTF (Method, Time, Food) score described by Fujimoto et al was used to analyze swallowing. Three cases following CHEP showed high scores shortly after the introduction of rehabilitation and reached the maximum score at discharge (15 points = normal swallowing). At present, these 3 patients are satisfied with swallowing and enjoy a good quality of life. In 2 other cases (1 CHEP and 1 CHP), both had a wide laryngeal inlet and still have some difficulty with liquids. Further modification of the surgical technique is needed especially for CHP.

  5. Evidence-Based Systematic Review: Effects of Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation on Swallowing and Neural Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Heather; Lazarus, Cathy; Arvedson, Joan; Schooling, Tracy; Frymark, Tobi

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To systematically review the literature examining the effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) on swallowing and neural activation. The review was conducted as part of a series examining the effects of oral motor exercises (OMEs) on speech, swallowing, and neural activation. Method: A systematic search was conducted to…

  6. Comparison of Clinician Judgments and Measurements of Swallow Response Time: A Preliminary Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karnell, Michael P.; Rogus, Nicole M.

    2005-01-01

    Practicing clinicians frequently offer judgments about aspects of swallowing physiology rather than performing actual measurements. Little is known about the accuracy of those judgments. The purpose of this preliminary study was to explore agreement of clinicians' judgments of pharyngeal swallow response time (PSRT) with temporal measurements of…

  7. Evidence-Based Systematic Review: Effects of Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation on Swallowing and Neural Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Heather; Lazarus, Cathy; Arvedson, Joan; Schooling, Tracy; Frymark, Tobi

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To systematically review the literature examining the effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) on swallowing and neural activation. The review was conducted as part of a series examining the effects of oral motor exercises (OMEs) on speech, swallowing, and neural activation. Method: A systematic search was conducted to…

  8. Optimizing Respiratory-Swallowing Coordination in Patients With Oropharyngeal Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Harris, Bonnie; Garand, Kendrea L. (Focht); McFarland, David

    2017-01-01

    Swallowing impairment (dysphagia) represents the highest functional morbidity in oropharyngeal (OP) head and neck (HNC) treated either with surgical approaches followed by radiation or with more recent organ preservation protocols, including combined chemotherapy and radiation. Despite the promising overall increasing survival rates, swallowing impairments remain chronic, are often resistant to traditional swallowing therapy, and have devastating consequences on health and well-being. The respiratory-swallow cross-system approach presented here extends beyond traditional swallowing interventions that commonly targets muscles and structures alone, and is instead, directed toward the re-establishment of optimal respiratory-swallowing coordination. Results from our work investigating a respiratory-swallow treatment (RST) paradigm is presented, including results from an RST clinical trial in HNC patients, primarily with OP cancers, with chronic and with intractable dysphagia post-cancer and post-traditional swallowing treatment. Future work will investigate the impact of RST on the degree and durability of clinical outcomes, including oral intake and quality of life, while also examining the potential added benefits of a home practice program that uses a commercially available and easy to use recording and analysis hardware and software. PMID:28884146

  9. Optimizing Respiratory-Swallowing Coordination in Patients With Oropharyngeal Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Martin-Harris, Bonnie; Garand, Kendrea L Focht; McFarland, David

    2017-07-01

    Swallowing impairment (dysphagia) represents the highest functional morbidity in oropharyngeal (OP) head and neck (HNC) treated either with surgical approaches followed by radiation or with more recent organ preservation protocols, including combined chemotherapy and radiation. Despite the promising overall increasing survival rates, swallowing impairments remain chronic, are often resistant to traditional swallowing therapy, and have devastating consequences on health and well-being. The respiratory-swallow cross-system approach presented here extends beyond traditional swallowing interventions that commonly targets muscles and structures alone, and is instead, directed toward the re-establishment of optimal respiratory-swallowing coordination. Results from our work investigating a respiratory-swallow treatment (RST) paradigm is presented, including results from an RST clinical trial in HNC patients, primarily with OP cancers, with chronic and with intractable dysphagia post-cancer and post-traditional swallowing treatment. Future work will investigate the impact of RST on the degree and durability of clinical outcomes, including oral intake and quality of life, while also examining the potential added benefits of a home practice program that uses a commercially available and easy to use recording and analysis hardware and software.

  10. Phytophagous arthropods of invasive swallow-wort vines (Vincetoxicum spp.) in New York

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pale swallow-wort (Vincetoxicum rossicum [Kleopow] Barbar.) and black swallow-wort (V. nigrum [L.] Moench), European species of herbaceous, perennial viny milkweeds, have become increasingly invasive in various natural and managed habitats in the northeastern United States and southeastern Canada, i...

  11. Biomechanical Correlates of Surface Electromyography Signals Obtained during Swallowing by Healthy Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crary, Michael A.; Carnaby (Mann), Giselle D.; Groher, Michael E.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe biomechanical correlates of the surface electromyographic signal obtained during swallowing by healthy adult volunteers. Method: Seventeen healthy adults were evaluated with simultaneous videofluoroscopy and surface electromyography (sEMG) while swallowing 5 mL of liquid barium sulfate. Three…

  12. Invasive Swallow-worts: An allelopathic role for -(-) antofine remains unclear

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pale swallow-wort (Vincetoxicum rossicum) and black swallow-wort (V. nigrum) are two invasive plant species in the northeastern United States and eastern Canada that have undergone rapidly expanding ranges over the past 30 years. Both species possess a highly bioactive phytotoxin -(-) antofine in r...

  13. Preliminary studies on seed dispersal of swallow-wort (Vincetoxicum spp.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Vincetoxicum rossicum (pale swallow-wort) and V. nigrum (black swallow-wort) are invasive, perennial vines that have become problematic in natural areas in the northeastern United States and neighboring southeastern Canada. Both species reproduce primarily via wind-dispersed seeds in the form of ac...

  14. Mechanism of Sequential Swallowing during Straw Drinking in Healthy Young and Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Stephanie K.; Corey, David M.; Hadskey, Leslie D.; Legendre, Calli; Priestly, Daniel H.; Rosenbek, John C.; Foundas, Anne L.

    2004-01-01

    Recent research has revealed differences between isolated and sequential swallowing in healthy young adults; however, the influence of normal aging on sequential swallowing has not been studied. Thus, the purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of normal aging on deglutition during sequential straw drinking. Videofluoroscopic…

  15. Relationship between ease of swallowing and deglutition-related muscle activity in various postures.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, T; Kida, I

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the ease of swallowing and the deglutition-related muscle activity in various body and head postures by surface electromyography (EMG). Bipolar surface electrodes were placed on the right suprahyoid and infrahyoid muscles of nine healthy adults (19-28 years) while swallowing jelly. Ten postures per subject were examined: five body angulations (0 degrees [supine], 30 degrees, 60 degrees, 90 degrees [upright] and 120 degrees from the horizontal) and two head positions (chin-up and chin-down). The duration and amplitude of suprahyoid and infrahyoid muscle activity were measured by an electromyograph, and the ease of swallowing was subjectively determined by using a rating scale (0 = difficult to swallow, 10 = easy to swallow). The group-average duration and amplitude of muscle activity and the group-average rating scales mostly showed insignificant changes with the body angulations independent of the head positions. Interestingly, the duration and amplitude of muscle activity during swallowing were negatively correlated with the rating scales, indicating that a shorter duration and smaller activity of muscle activity corresponds to easier swallowing. Consequently, the duration and amplitude of suprahyoid and infrahyoid muscle activity measured by surface EMG would be a useful indicator of the easy-to-swallow performance.

  16. Population Trends and Management of the Bank Swallow (Riparia riparia) on the Sacramento River, California

    Treesearch

    Barrett A. Garrison; Ronald W. Schlorff; Joan M. Humphrey; Stephen A. Laymon; Frank J. Michny

    1989-01-01

    Annual monitoring of Bank Swallows (Riparia riparia) along the Sacramento River, California has been conducted since 1986 to determine population trends, evaluate impacts from bank protection and flood control projects, and implement and monitor mitigation efforts. The population of Bank Swallows in a 50-mile river reach remained static over 3...

  17. Tongue Pressure Modulation during Swallowing: Water versus Nectar-Thick Liquids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Catriona M.; Bailey, Gemma L.; Molfenter, Sonja M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Evidence of tongue-palate pressure modulation during swallowing between thin and nectar-thick liquids stimuli has been equivocal. This mirrors a lack of clear evidence in the literature of tongue and hyoid movement modulation between nectar-thick and thin liquid swallows. In the current investigation, the authors sought to confirm whether…

  18. Prevalence of Auditory Problems in Children with Feeding and Swallowing Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawool, Vishakha Waman

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Although an interdisciplinary approach is recommended for assessment and management of feeding or swallowing difficulties, audiologists are not always included in the interdisciplinary team. The purpose of this study is to report the prevalence of middle ear and hearing problems in children with feeding and swallowing disorders and to…

  19. Functional outcome in acute stroke patients with oropharyngeal Dysphagia after swallowing therapy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kun-Ling; Liu, Ting-Yuan; Huang, Yu-Chi; Leong, Chau-Peng; Lin, Wei-Che; Pong, Ya-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Dysphagia after stroke is associated with mortality and increased pulmonary complications. Swallowing therapies may decrease pulmonary complications and improve patients' quality of life after stroke. This study used clinical swallowing assessments and videofluoroscopy (VFS) to assess the functional recovery of acute stroke patients with dysphagia after different swallowing therapies. We enrolled 29 acute stroke patients with dysphagia and randomly divided them into 3 therapy groups: traditional swallowing (TS), oropharyngeal neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES), and combined NMES/TS. All patients were assessed using the clinical functional oral intake scale (FOIS), 8-point penetration-aspiration scale (PAS), and functional dysphagia scale (FDS) of VFS before and after treatment. There were no differences in the clinical parameters and swallowing results of the FOIS and VFS before swallowing treatment among the 3 groups (P > .05). TS therapy and combined therapy both had significant swallowing improvement after therapy according to the FOIS and 8-point PAS (P < .05). When comparing the results of the VFS among the 3 groups, we found significant improvements in patients eating cookies and thick liquid after combined NMES/TS therapy (P < .05). In acute stroke patients with dysphagia, combined NMES/TS therapy is the most effective swallowing therapy in taking solid diets and thick liquids.

  20. Development of Swallowing and Feeding: Prenatal through First Year of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaney, Amy L.; Arvedson, Joan C.

    2008-01-01

    The development of feeding and swallowing involves a highly complex set of interactions that begin in embryologic and fetal periods and continue through infancy and early childhood. This article will focus on swallowing and feeding development in infants who are developing normally with a review of some aspects of prenatal development that provide…

  1. Mercury Contamination in Tree Swallows Nesting at Northern Wisconsin Inland Lakes that Differ in Methylation Potential

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) are a useful species to assess the bioavailability and effects of trace elements, including mercury, because they will nest in boxes in relatively close proximity to one another. Because tree swallows feed on the aerial stages of benthic aquat...

  2. Identifying Patterns of FEES-Derived Swallowing Trajectories Using Group-Based Trajectory Model.

    PubMed

    Baijens, Laura W J; Pilz, Walmari; Kremer, Bernd; Passos, Valeria Lima

    2015-10-01

    The present study delineates and visualizes swallowing trajectories along seven swallow trials in dysphagic patients using group-based trajectory modeling (GBTM). This model facilitates the recognition of swallowing functional categories, estimates their frequency of occurrence, and enhances the understanding of swallowing dynamics. Two hundred and five dysphagic patients underwent a standardized FEES examination protocol. Five ordinal variables were blindly assessed for each swallow by two observers independently. GBTM analysis was conducted to find and characterize trajectories of FEES responses. For most FEES outcome variables, trajectories were qualitatively distinct in degree and kind (level of impairment and how this changed over the seven swallow trials). Two FEES outcome variables-delayed initiation of the pharyngeal reflex and postswallow pyriform sinus pooling-showed the highest prevalence of severe swallowing impairment. Highly impaired categories were more stable throughout the different swallow trials. Intermediate trajectories, by contrast, were erratic, responding more sensitively to shifts in bolus consistency. GBTM can identify distinct developmental trajectories of measured FEES variables in patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia. In clinical practice, classification into distinct groups would help to identify the subgroup of dysphagic patients who may need specific medical attention.

  3. Pressure profile similarities between tongue resistance training tasks and liquid swallows.

    PubMed

    Steele, Catriona M; Bailey, Gemma L; Molfenter, Sonja M; Yeates, Erin M; Grace-Martin, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Tongue-pressure resistance training is known to increase tongue strength in seniors and individuals with stroke-related dysphagia. However, evidence of associated functional improvements in swallowing is equivocal. We investigated similarities in pressure waveform profiles between swallowing and several tongue-palate pressure tasks to identify tasks that may be best suited for inclusion in tongue-pressure resistance training protocols for patients who are unable to safely perform real bolus swallows in treatment. Tongue-palate pressures were recorded in 20 healthy young adults. Participants performed water and nectar-thick juice swallows, effortful and noneffortful saliva swallows, and "half-maximum" tongue-palate partial-pressure tasks emphasizing either anterior or posterior tongue-palate contact at different speeds. Pressure slopes (amplitude change over time) during the pressure application (rise) and withdrawal (release) phases were analyzed. A subset of four tasks with the greatest similarity in slope characteristics to those seen in bolus swallows was identified: anterior-emphasis half-maximum tongue-palate presses, posterior-emphasis maximum isometric tongue-palate presses, posterior-emphasis half-maximum slow tongue-palate presses, and effortful saliva swallows. We propose that future research should explore the degree to which swallowing improvements are obtained from treatment protocols that emphasize these tasks.

  4. Tongue Pressure and Submental Surface Electromyography Measures during Noneffortful and Effortful Saliva Swallows in Healthy Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeates, Erin M.; Steele, Catriona M.; Pelletier, Cathy A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The effortful swallow, a compensatory technique frequently employed by speech-language pathologists for their patients with dysphagia, is still not fully understood in terms of how it modifies the swallow. In particular, although age-related changes are known to reduce maximum isometric tongue pressure, it is not known whether age affects…

  5. Normal swallowing acoustics across age, gender, bolus viscosity, and bolus volume.

    PubMed

    Youmans, Scott R; Stierwalt, Julie A G

    2011-12-01

    Cervical auscultation has been proposed as an augmentative procedure for the subjective clinical swallowing examination due to the tangible differences between normal and dysphagic swallowing sounds. However, the research is incomplete regarding cervical auscultation and swallowing acoustics in that the differences between the sounds of normal versus dysphagic swallowing have yet to be fully understood or quantified. The swallows of 96 reportedly healthy adults, balanced for gender and divided into younger, middle, and older age groups, were audio-recorded while ingesting several boluses of varying viscosity and volume. The audio signals were then analyzed to determine their temporal and acoustic characteristics. Results indicated increasing pharyngeal swallowing duration with increasing age, bolus viscosity, and bolus volume. In addition, an increased duration to peak intensity with increasing age was found in one of our two analyses, as well as with some of the more viscous versus less viscous boluses. Men and older persons produced higher peak intensities and peak frequencies than women and younger persons. Thin liquids were produced with more intensity than honey or more viscous boluses, and with greater frequency than mechanical soft solids. Larger volumes resulted in greater peak frequency values. Some of the acoustic measurements appear to be more useful than others, including the duration of the acoustic swallowing signal and the within-subjects peak intensity variable. We noted that differences in swallowing acoustics were more related to changes in viscosity rather than volume. Finally, within-participant observations were more useful than between-participant observations.

  6. ACCUMULATION OF PCB CONGENERS IN NESTLING TREE SWALLOWS (TACHYCINETA BICOLOR) ON THE HUDSON RIVER, NEW YORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Together, these two papers establish a quantitative linkage between PCB concentrations in nestling tree swallows and in the insects that they consume. As such, these papers provide strong support for the use of nestling swallows as a biomonitoring species for exposure assessment ...

  7. Reversible dementias

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Manjari; Vibha, Deepti

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, more attention has been given to the early diagnostic evaluation of patients with dementia which is essential to identify patients with cognitive symptoms who may have treatable conditions. Guidelines suggest that all patients presenting with dementia or cognitive symptoms should be evaluated with a range of laboratory tests, and with structural brain imaging with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). While many of the disorders reported as ‘reversible dementias’ are conditions that may well be associated with cognitive or behavioral symptoms, these symptoms are not always sufficiently severe to fulfill the clinical criteria for dementia. Thus, while the etiology of a condition may be treatable it should not be assumed that the associated dementia is fully reversible. Potentially reversible dementias should be identified and treatment considered, even if the symptoms are not sufficiently severe to meet the clinical criteria for dementia, and even if partial or full reversal of the cognitive symptoms cannot be guaranteed. In the literature, the most frequently observed potentially reversible conditions identified in patients with cognitive impairment or dementia are depression, adverse effects of drugs, drug or alcohol abuse, space-occupying lesions, normal pressure hydrocephalus, and metabolic conditions land endocrinal conditions like hypothyroidism and nutritional conditions like vitamin B-12 deficiency. Depression is by far the most common of the potentially reversible conditions. The review, hence addresses the common causes of reversible dementia and the studies published so far. PMID:21416018

  8. Combined neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) with fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) and traditional swallowing rehabilitation in the treatment of stroke-related dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shu-Fen; Hsu, Chien-Wei; Lin, Huey-Shyan; Sun, Hsien-Pin; Chang, Ping-Hsin; Hsieh, Wan-Ling; Wang, Jue-Long

    2013-12-01

    Dysphagia is common after stroke. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) and fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) for the treatment of dysphagia have gained in popularity, but the combined application of these promising modalities has rarely been studied. We aimed to evaluate whether combined NMES, FEES, and traditional swallowing rehabilitation can improve swallowing functions in stroke patients with moderate to severe dysphagia. Thirty-two patients with moderate to severe dysphagia poststroke (≥3 weeks) were recruited. Patients received 12 sessions of NMES for 1 h/day, 5 days/week within a period of 2-3 weeks. FEES was done before and after NMES for evaluation and to guide dysphagic therapy. All patients subsequently received 12 sessions of traditional swallowing rehabilitation (50 min/day, 3 days/week) for 4 weeks. Primary outcome measure was the Functional Oral Intake Scale (FOIS). Secondary outcome measures included clinical degree of dysphagia, the patient's self-perception of swallowing ability, and the patient's global satisfaction with therapy. Patients were assessed at baseline, after NMES, at 6-month follow-up, and at 2-year follow-up. Twenty-nine patients completed the study. FOIS, degree of dysphagia, and patient's self-perception of swallowing improved significantly after NMES, at the 6-month follow-up, and at the 2-year follow-up (p < 0.001, each compared with baseline). Most patients reported considerable satisfaction with no serious adverse events. Twenty-three of the 29 (79.3 %) patients maintained oral diet with no pulmonary complications at 2-year follow-up. This preliminary case series demonstrated that combined NMES, FEES, and traditional swallowing rehabilitation showed promise for improving swallowing functions in stroke patients with moderate-to-severe dysphagia. The benefits were maintained for up to 2 years. The results are promising enough to justify further studies.

  9. Fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES): proposal for informed consent

    PubMed Central

    Nacci, A; Ursino, F; La Vela, R; Matteucci, F; Mallardi, V; Fattori, B

    2008-01-01

    Summary Fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) is now a first choice method for studying swallowing disorders on account of the various advantages it offers: easy to use, very well tolerated, allows bedside examination and is economic. Nevertheless, this diagnostic procedure is not without risks, the most probable consequences of which include discomfort, gagging and/or vomiting, vasovagal syncope, epistaxis, mucosal perforation, adverse reactions to topical anaesthetics and laryngospasm. The risks involved with FEES stress the importance of informing the patient of these; this is an important aspect in medicine that necessarily and immediately implies receiving the patient’s so-called “informed consent”. Informed consent should be obtained not only by means of specific printed forms but also after the patient has had an interview with the physician who will be performing the procedure and who will offer information according to the personal clinical, psychological, cultural and linguistic situation of the patient and in keeping with the type of procedure proposed. In the case of FEES, as with other invasive or non-invasive diagnostic procedures, therefore, routine written and signed consent, together with a patient/physician interview should fulfil what is known as “complete information”. In this report, a specific form for informed consent to FEES procedures, is proposed. PMID:18939710

  10. Safe medication swallowing in Dysphagia: a collaborative improvement project.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Lawrence D; Little, Jane; Kung, Edward; Williams, Evelyn M; Siemiatkowska, Krystyna; Plowman, Suzanne

    2008-01-01

    Episodes of choking during medication administration to patients with dysphagia prompted a chart audit and caregiver interview to identify system problems that allowed inappropriate drug administration to occur. Sixty elderly patients residing on two patient care areas in a 500-bed complex continuing care facility were studied. The audit explored the actual nursing medication administration methods and compared this to the information obtained from various communication tools including instructions that appeared on the medication administration record (MAR), the current diet order, the recommendations of the speech-language pathologist (SLP) and comments on the nursing care plan. The audit yielded a number of discrepancies between nursing actions and the instructions obtain from these sources. We proposed that changes to the process of communicating medication swallowing recommendations among team members would lead to greater patient safety. Major practice changes included the use of standardized language by the SLP when making recommendations, the writing of SLP recommendations in the doctor's orders, the inclusion of SLP recommendations on the MAR and the creation of a "dysphagia alert" on the pharmacy computer system. An educational intervention was conducted to implement process changes. Its effectiveness was evaluated using a pre- and post-test and a participant satisfaction survey. A post-implementation audit showed compliance with the practice change. In summary, process changes were implemented to improve compliance with SLP medication-related swallowing recommendations and to prevent the inadvertent prescribing, dispensing or crushing of sustained-release medications in patients with dysphagia.

  11. Lead concentrations and reproduction in highway-nesting barn swallows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grue, C.E.; O'Shea, T.J.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    Swallows (Hirundo rustica) collected within the right-of-way of a major Maryland highway were greater than those found in Barn Swallows nesting within a rural area. Lead concentrations in the feathers of adults from the highway colony were also greater than Lead concentrations in the carcasses and stomach contents of adult and nestling Barn those of rural adults, but concentrations in the feathers of nestlings from the two locations were similar. Activity of u-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase in red blood cells was lower in highway-nesting adults and their young than in their rural counterparts, although hemoglobin concentrations and hematocrits did not differ. The number of eggs, nestlings, and body weights of the latter at 16-18 days of age were similar in the two colonies, as were body weights of adults from the two areas. These results suggest that contamination of roadside habitats by lead from automotive emissions does not pose a serious hazard to birds that are aerial feeders.

  12. Energy intake estimation from counts of chews and swallows

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Juan M.; Higgins, Janine A.; Schuckers, Stephanie C.; Bellisle, France; Pan, Zhaoxing; Melanson, Edward L.; Neuman, Michael R.; Sazonov, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Current, validated methods for dietary assessment rely on self-report, which tends to be inaccurate, time-consuming, and burdensome. The objective of this work was to demonstrate the suitability of estimating energy intake using individually-calibrated models based on Counts of Chews and Swallows (CCS models). In a laboratory setting, subjects consumed three identical meals (training meals) and a fourth meal with different content (validation meal). Energy intake was estimated by four different methods: weighed food records (gold standard), diet diaries, photographic food records, and CCS models. Counts of chews and swallows were measured using wearable sensors and video analysis. Results for the training meals demonstrated that CCS models presented the lowest reporting bias and a lower error as compared to diet diaries. For the validation meal, CCS models showed reporting errors that were not different from the diary or the photographic method. The increase in error for the validation meal may be attributed to differences in the physical properties of foods consumed during training and validation meals. However, this may be potentially compensated for by including correction factors into the models. This study suggests that estimation of energy intake from CCS may offer a promising alternative to overcome limitations of self-report. PMID:25447016

  13. Energy intake estimation from counts of chews and swallows.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Juan M; Higgins, Janine A; Schuckers, Stephanie C; Bellisle, France; Pan, Zhaoxing; Melanson, Edward L; Neuman, Michael R; Sazonov, Edward

    2015-02-01

    Current, validated methods for dietary assessment rely on self-report, which tends to be inaccurate, time-consuming, and burdensome. The objective of this work was to demonstrate the suitability of estimating energy intake using individually-calibrated models based on Counts of Chews and Swallows (CCS models). In a laboratory setting, subjects consumed three identical meals (training meals) and a fourth meal with different content (validation meal). Energy intake was estimated by four different methods: weighed food records (gold standard), diet diaries, photographic food records, and CCS models. Counts of chews and swallows were measured using wearable sensors and video analysis. Results for the training meals demonstrated that CCS models presented the lowest reporting bias and a lower error as compared to diet diaries. For the validation meal, CCS models showed reporting errors that were not different from the diary or the photographic method. The increase in error for the validation meal may be attributed to differences in the physical properties of foods consumed during training and validation meals. However, this may be potentially compensated for by including correction factors into the models. This study suggests that estimation of energy intake from CCS may offer a promising alternative to overcome limitations of self-report. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cranial nerve modulation of human cortical swallowing motor pathways.

    PubMed

    Hamdy, S; Aziz, Q; Rothwell, J C; Hobson, A; Barlow, J; Thompson, D G

    1997-04-01

    Animal data indicate that cortical swallowing pathways can be modulated by cranial nerve afferent stimulation. We therefore studied the effects of human trigeminal and vagal nerve excitation on the corticofugal pathways to the oropharynx and esophagus, using electromagnetic stimulation. Unilateral stimulation of either the trigeminal or vagus nerve evoked two distinct reflex electromyographic responses in the pharynx and esophagus, an early response (latency range 19-30 ms) and a late response (latency range 42-72 ms). In the mylohyoid muscles, however, only a single response was seen (latency range 36-64 ms). Cortical stimulation also evoked electromyographic responses in the mylohyoid muscles, pharynx, and esophagus, with latencies of 8.5 +/- 0.3, 9.3 +/- 0.3, and 10.1 +/- 0.4 ms, respectively. When either trigeminal or vagus nerve stimulation preceded cortical stimulation, the cortically evoked responses were facilitated, with maximal effects at interstimulation intervals of 30-200 ms for pharynx and esophagus (P < 0.02) and at interstimulation intervals of 50-100 ms for mylohyoid muscles (P < 0.05). Our results demonstrate that stimulation of human cranial nerve afferent fibers facilitates cortical swallowing motor pathways.

  15. Increased oxidative stress in barn swallows from the Chernobyl region.

    PubMed

    Bonisoli-Alquati, Andrea; Mousseau, Timothy A; Møller, Anders Pape; Caprioli, Manuela; Saino, Nicola

    2010-02-01

    The Chernobyl nuclear accident produced the largest unintended release of radionuclides in history, with dramatic consequences for humans and other organisms. Exposure to ionizing radiation is known to reduce circulating and stored levels of specific antioxidants in birds and humans, thus potentially increasing oxidative stress. However, overall effects of radioactive exposure on oxidative status have never been investigated in any free ranging vertebrate. We measured plasma antioxidant capacity and concentration of reactive oxygen metabolites in adult barn swallows (Hirundo rustica) from colonies with variable background radiation levels in the Chernobyl region in Ukraine and Belarus. We predicted that antioxidants would decrease while reactive oxygen metabolites would increase with exposure to increasing levels of radiation at the breeding sites. Consistent with this expectation, radiation level positively predicted plasma concentration of reactive oxygen metabolites, whereas no significant covariation was found with non-enzymatic plasma antioxidant capacity. An index of oxidative stress was also larger in barn swallows exposed to high contamination levels. Thus, radioactive contamination appeared to be responsible for the increased generation of reactive oxygen metabolites and the imbalance between reactive oxygen metabolites and non-enzymatic plasma antioxidant capacity. 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Neuropharmacologic correlates of deglutition: lessons from fictive swallowing.

    PubMed

    Bieger, D

    1991-01-01

    Pharmacologic investigations into the transmission processes underlying fictive swallowing in the rat have disclosed the potential diversity of chemical signals used in central deglutitive pathways. Monoaminergic mechanisms appear to serve as links between subcortical structures and the medullary pattern generator of swallowing (PGS), and may play a critical role in maintaining internal facilitatory drive, required by the PGS for optimal responsivity to peripheral sensory input. Cholinergic bulbar interneurons form an integral component of the PGS subnetwork controlling esophageal peristalsis. Local GABA neurons exert a tonic inhibition of the buccopharyngeal stage, may regulate buccopharyngeal-esophageal coupling, and may contribute to peristaltic rhythmic generation at both the premotoneuronal and motoneuronal level. Receptor subtypes for excitatory amino acids (glutamate, aspartate) are differentially associated with deglutitive premotoneurons for both the buccopharyngeal and esophageal stage, as well as with ambiguus motoneurons. Preliminary evidence suggests the existence of excitatory peptidergic mechanisms involving thyrotropin-releasing hormone, vasopressin, oxytocin, and somatostatin, a probable candidate for excitatory transmitter in the solitarioambigual internuncial projection to motoneurons innervating esophageal striated musculature. Further validation of this experimental model may ultimately help to establish a framework for the clinical recognition, management, and exploitation of drug actions on central deglutitive neuroeffectors.

  17. Function of upper esophageal sphincter during swallowing: the grabbing effect.

    PubMed

    Pouderoux, P; Kahrilas, P J

    1997-05-01

    This study investigated deglutitive axial force developed within the pharynx, upper esophageal sphincter (UES), and cervical esophagus. Position and deglutitive excursion of the UES were determined using combined manometry and videofluoroscopy in eight healthy volunteers. Deglutitive clearing force was quantified with a force transducer to which nylon balls of 6- or 8-mm diameter were tethered and positioned within the oropharynx, hypopharynx, UES, and cervical esophagus. Axial force recordings were synchronized with videofluoroscopic imaging. Clearing force was dependent on both sphere diameter (P < 0.05) and location, with greater force exhibited in the hypopharynx and UES compared with the oropharynx and esophagus (P < 0.05). Within the UES, the onset of traction force coincided with passage of the pharyngeal clearing wave but persisted well beyond this. On videofluoroscopy, the persistent force was associated with the aboral motion of the ball caught within the UES. Force abated with gradual slippage of the UES around the ball. The force attributable to the combination of UES contraction and laryngeal descent was named the grabbing effect. The grabbing effect functions to transfer luminal contents distal to the laryngeal inlet at the end of the pharyngeal swallow, presumably acting to prevent regurgitation and/or aspiration of swallowed material.

  18. Sexual selection and tail streamers in the barn swallow

    PubMed Central

    ller, A. P. M; Barbosa, A.; Cuervo, J. J.; Lope, F. de; Merino, S.; Saino, N.

    1998-01-01

    The functional significance of elongated, narrow tips of the tail feathers of certain birds, so-called tail streamers, has recently been discussed from an aerodynamic point of view, and the effects of sexual selection on such traits have been questioned. We review our long-term field studies using observational and experimental approaches to investigate natural and sexual selection in the barn swallow, Hirundo rustica, which has sexually size-dimorphic outermost tail feathers. Experimental manipulation of the length of the outermost tail feathers has demonstrated sexual selection advantages of tail elongation and disadvantages of tail shortening, with opposite effects for natural selection in terms of foraging efficiency, haematocrit and survival. These findings are contrary to the prediction of a general deterioration from both shortening and elongation, if the tail trait was determined solely by its effects on aerodynamic efficiency and flight manoeuvrability. Patterns of sexual selection in manipulated birds conform with patterns in unmanipulated birds, and selection differentials for different components of sexual selection in manipulated birds are strongly positively correlated with differentials in unmanipulated birds. Age and sex differences in tail length, and geographical patterns of sexual size dimorphism, are also consistent with sexual selection theory, but inconsistent with a purely natural selection advantage of long outermost tail feathers in male barn swallows.

  19. Incidence of Pneumonia After Videofluoroscopic Swallowing Study and Associated Factors.

    PubMed

    Jo, Hannae; Park, Jung-Gyoo; Min, David; Park, Hee-Won; Kang, Eun Kyoung; Lee, Kun-Jai; Baek, Sora

    2016-02-01

    Pneumonia after videofluoroscopic swallow study (VFSS) is sometimes considered to be caused by aspiration during VFSS; however, to our knowledge, a relationship between these events has not been clearly investigated. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of VFSS-related pneumonia and related factors. Overall, 696 VFSS cases were retrospectively reviewed. Cases in which blood culture was performed within 3 days after VFSS due to newly developed infectious signs were considered as post-VFSS infection cases. Pneumonia was suspected when there was some evidence of respiratory infectious signs in clinical, radiological, and laboratory findings. The underlying disease, clinical signs, and VFSS findings of the pneumonia group were assessed. Among 696 cases, pneumonia was diagnosed in 15 patients. The patients in the pneumonia group tended to be older and had higher aspiration rate on VFSS than those in the non-pneumonia group. In the pneumonia group, 2 patients showed no aspiration during VFSS. In 6 patients, pneumonia developed after massive aspiration of gastric content in 5 patients and inappropriate oral feeding with risk of aspiration before VFSS in 1 patient. Only 7 patients (1.0 %) were finally determined as having VFSS-related pneumonia. In conclusion, the 72-h incidence of VFSS-related pneumonia was 1.0 %. Old age and severity of swallowing difficulty are associated with occurrence of pneumonia.

  20. Surface electromyographic studies of swallowing in normal children, age 4-12 years.

    PubMed

    Vaiman, Michael; Segal, Samuel; Eviatar, Ephraim

    2004-01-01

    Surface electromyographic (sEMG) studies were performed on 100 normal children, age 4-12 years, to establish normative database for duration and amplitude of muscle activity during swallowing and continuous drinking. Prospective observational study of healthy volunteers. Parameters evaluated during swallowing include the timing and amplitude (in microV) of activity of m. orbicularis oris, masseter, submental and infrahyoid (laryngeal strap muscles (LSM)) groups covered by platisma. Four tests were examined: voluntary single swallows of saliva ("dry" swallow), voluntary single water swallows as normal, voluntary single swallows of excessive amount of water (up to 15ml), continuous drinking of 50ml of water (duration and number of swallows). Duration of muscle activity during swallowing (mean plus standard deviation (S.D.)) was measured for two age groups: 4-8 and 9-12 years old. The group of 40 adults, age 18-30 years, was taken as a control group. Normative data for duration and amplitude of muscle activity during single swallowing and continuous drinking are established for healthy children. The duration of muscle activity during swallows and drinking in all tests showed decrease with the age, and this tendency is statistically significant (one-dimensional analysis of variance, SPSS, chi(2) criterion, 95% confidence interval). There was no statistically significant difference in amplitude (range) measurements between children and adults (P=0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between male and female children duration of muscle activity during single swallowing and continuous drinking in all age groups (P>/=0.05). Surface EMG of swallowing is a simple and reliable noninvasive method for screening evaluation of swallowing with low level of discomfort of the examination. The normative timing of events data can be used for evaluation of complaints and symptoms, as well as for comparison purposes in pre- and postoperative stages and in

  1. Soft Electronics Enabled Ergonomic Human-Computer Interaction for Swallowing Training.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yongkuk; Nicholls, Benjamin; Sup Lee, Dong; Chen, Yanfei; Chun, Youngjae; Siang Ang, Chee; Yeo, Woon-Hong

    2017-04-21

    We introduce a skin-friendly electronic system that enables human-computer interaction (HCI) for swallowing training in dysphagia rehabilitation. For an ergonomic HCI, we utilize a soft, highly compliant ("skin-like") electrode, which addresses critical issues of an existing rigid and planar electrode combined with a problematic conductive electrolyte and adhesive pad. The skin-like electrode offers a highly conformal, user-comfortable interaction with the skin for long-term wearable, high-fidelity recording of swallowing electromyograms on the chin. Mechanics modeling and experimental quantification captures the ultra-elastic mechanical characteristics of an open mesh microstructured sensor, conjugated with an elastomeric membrane. Systematic in vivo studies investigate the functionality of the soft electronics for HCI-enabled swallowing training, which includes the application of a biofeedback system to detect swallowing behavior. The collection of results demonstrates clinical feasibility of the ergonomic electronics in HCI-driven rehabilitation for patients with swallowing disorders.

  2. New directions for understanding neural control in swallowing: the potential and promise of motor learning.

    PubMed

    Humbert, Ianessa A; German, Rebecca Z

    2013-03-01

    Oropharyngeal swallowing is a complex sensorimotor phenomenon that has had decades of research dedicated to understanding it more thoroughly. However, the underlying neural mechanisms responsible for normal and disordered swallowing remain very vague. We consider this gap in knowledge the result of swallowing research that has been broad (identifying phenomena) but not deep (identifying what controls the phenomena). The goals of this review are to address the complexity of motor control of oropharyngeal swallowing and to review the principles of motor learning based on limb movements as a model system. We compare this literature on limb motor learning to what is known about oropharyngeal function as a first step toward suggesting the use of motor learning principles in swallowing research.

  3. New Directions for Understanding Neural Control in Swallowing: The Potential and Promise of Motor Learning

    PubMed Central

    Humbert, Ianessa A.

    2013-01-01

    Oropharyngeal swallowing is a complex sensorimotor phenomenon that has had decades of research dedicated to understanding it more thoroughly. However, the underlying neural mechanisms responsible for normal and disordered swallowing remain very vague. We consider this gap in knowledge the result of swallowing research that has been broad (identifying phenomena) but not deep (identifying what controls the phenomena). The goals of this review are to address the complexity of motor control of oropharyngeal swallowing and to review the principles of motor learning based on limb movements as a model system. We compare this literature on limb motor learning to what is known about oropharyngeal function as a first step toward suggesting the use of motor learning principles in swallowing research. PMID:23192633

  4. The effects of compressive sensing on extracted features from tri-axial swallowing accelerometry signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sejdić, Ervin; Movahedi, Faezeh; Zhang, Zhenwei; Kurosu, Atsuko; Coyle, James L.

    2016-05-01

    Acquiring swallowing accelerometry signals using a comprehensive sensing scheme may be a desirable approach for monitoring swallowing safety for longer periods of time. However, it needs to be insured that signal characteristics can be recovered accurately from compressed samples. In this paper, we considered this issue by examining the effects of the number of acquired compressed samples on the calculated swallowing accelerometry signal features. We used tri-axial swallowing accelerometry signals acquired from seventeen stroke patients (106 swallows in total). From acquired signals, we extracted typically considered signal features from time, frequency and time-frequency domains. Next, we compared these features from the original signals (sampled using traditional sampling schemes) and compressively sampled signals. Our results have shown we can obtain accurate estimates of signal features even by using only a third of original samples.

  5. Soft Electronics Enabled Ergonomic Human-Computer Interaction for Swallowing Training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yongkuk; Nicholls, Benjamin; Sup Lee, Dong; Chen, Yanfei; Chun, Youngjae; Siang Ang, Chee; Yeo, Woon-Hong

    2017-04-01

    We introduce a skin-friendly electronic system that enables human-computer interaction (HCI) for swallowing training in dysphagia rehabilitation. For an ergonomic HCI, we utilize a soft, highly compliant (“skin-like”) electrode, which addresses critical issues of an existing rigid and planar electrode combined with a problematic conductive electrolyte and adhesive pad. The skin-like electrode offers a highly conformal, user-comfortable interaction with the skin for long-term wearable, high-fidelity recording of swallowing electromyograms on the chin. Mechanics modeling and experimental quantification captures the ultra-elastic mechanical characteristics of an open mesh microstructured sensor, conjugated with an elastomeric membrane. Systematic in vivo studies investigate the functionality of the soft electronics for HCI-enabled swallowing training, which includes the application of a biofeedback system to detect swallowing behavior. The collection of results demonstrates clinical feasibility of the ergonomic electronics in HCI-driven rehabilitation for patients with swallowing disorders.

  6. The effects of compressive sensing on extracted features from tri-axial swallowing accelerometry signals.

    PubMed

    Sejdić, Ervin; Movahedi, Faezeh; Zhang, Zhenwei; Kurosu, Atsuko; Coyle, James L

    2016-04-17

    Acquiring swallowing accelerometry signals using a comprehensive sensing scheme may be a desirable approach for monitoring swallowing safety for longer periods of time. However, it needs to be insured that signal characteristics can be recovered accurately from compressed samples. In this paper, we considered this issue by examining the effects of the number of acquired compressed samples on the calculated swallowing accelerometry signal features. We used tri-axial swallowing accelerometry signals acquired from seventeen stroke patients (106 swallows in total). From acquired signals, we extracted typically considered signal features from time, frequency and time-frequency domains. Next, we compared these features from the original signals (sampled using traditional sampling schemes) and compressively sampled signals. Our results have shown we can obtain accurate estimates of signal features even by using only a third of original samples.

  7. The influence of tracheotomy tubes on the swallowing frequency in neurogenic dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Seidl, Rainer O; Nusser-Müller-Busch, Ricki; Ernst, Arne

    2005-03-01

    To compare the swallowing frequency in patients with neurogenic dysphagia with or without tracheotomy tubes (TT) to assess the underlying mechanisms of dysphagia to improve rehabilitation strategies. Prospective study, 10 patients (64 +/- 7 years) with neurogenic dysphagia. Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) less than 8 points, tracheotomy due to the dysphagia 2 weeks before the examination. The swallowing frequency (1 or less over 5 min) was assessed over 5 consecutive days with or without TT. The swallowing frequency increased after removal of the TT. These findings did not influence the GCS or the Coma Remission Scale. Over a 5-day period, the frequency of swallowing was increased. TTs decisively influence the swallowing behavior of vegetative patients. This phenomenon could be based on an improved sensitivity under re-established physiological expiration. We strongly favor removing the TT or deflating the cuff of the TT under therapeutic conditions in a rehabilitation therapy setting.

  8. Ultrasound of oral and masticatory muscles: Why every neuromuscular swallow team should have an ultrasound machine.

    PubMed

    Van Den Engel-Hoek, Lenie; Lagarde, Marloes; Van Alfen, Nens

    2017-03-01

    Patients with neuromuscular disorders often present with swallowing difficulties due to oral phase problems and pharyngeal residue after swallow. It is important to assess the underlying pathology and cause of the swallowing disturbance in this patient group, such as dystrophic changes in oral and masticatory muscles. This allows for more patient-tailored recommendations, for example optimal compensation strategies to maintain function for longer. Ultrasound can show structural changes caused by dystrophy or denervation of muscles, detect involuntary movements such as fasciculations, and provide dynamic video images of tongue motion during swallowing attempts. This article, based on the authors' extensive experience with ultrasound in neuromuscular disease, explains the concepts of oral muscle ultrasound and its proven value in assessing neuromuscular mastication and swallowing problems. As a patient-friendly and portable technique, we advocate its use as a standard tool for analyzing neuromuscular dysphagia. Clin. Anat. 30:183-193, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Neural activation of swallowing and swallowing-related tasks in healthy young adults: an attempt to separate the components of deglutition.

    PubMed

    Malandraki, Georgia A; Sutton, Bradley P; Perlman, Adrienne L; Karampinos, Dimitrios C; Conway, Charles

    2009-10-01

    Understanding the underlying neural pathways that govern the highly complex neuromuscular action of swallowing is considered crucial in the process of correctly identifying and treating swallowing disorders. The aim of the present investigation was to identify the neural activations of the different components of deglutition in healthy young adults using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Ten right-handed young healthy individuals were scanned in a 3-Tesla Siemens Allegra MRI scanner. Participants were visually cued for both a "Swallow" task and for component/control tasks ("Prepare to swallow", "Tap your tongue", and "Clear your throat") in a randomized order (event-related design). Behavioral interleaved gradient (BIG) methodology was used to address movement-related artifacts. Areas activated during each of the three component tasks enabled a partial differentiation of the neural localization for various components of the swallow. Areas that were more activated during throat clearing than other components included the posterior insula and small portions of the post- and pre-central gyri bilaterally. Tongue tapping showed higher activation in portions of the primary sensorimotor and premotor cortices and the parietal lobules. Planning did not show any areas that were more activated than in the other component tasks. When swallowing was compared with all other tasks, there was significantly more activation in the cerebellum, thalamus, cingulate gyrus, and all areas of the primary sensorimotor cortex bilaterally.

  10. Managing eating and drinking difficulties (dysphagia) with children who have learning disabilities: What is effective?

    PubMed

    Harding, Celia; Cockerill, Helen

    2015-07-01

    People who work with children who have neurological and learning disabilities frequently need to manage the health and emotional risks associated with eating, drinking and swallowing (dysphagia). Some approaches can support children to develop oral feeding competence or to maximise their ability to maintain some oral intake supplemented with tube feeding. However, some clinicians feel that oral-motor exercises can support eating and drinking skills as well as speech and language development, whereas there is little evidence to support this.The implied "beneficial" association between oral-motor exercises, speech and swallowing skills gives a false impression in terms of future outcomes for parents and carers of children with learning disabilities. This paper considers oral-motor approaches in the remediation of dysphagia and the need for a cultural shift away from this view. Realistic and useful outcomes for people with learning disabilities need to be an essential part of therapeutic intervention.

  11. Reversible Sterilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Largey, Gale

    1977-01-01

    Notes that difficult questions arise concerning the use of sterilization for alleged eugenic and euthenic purposes. Thus, how reversible sterilization will be used with relation to the poor, mentally ill, mentally retarded, criminals, and minors, is questioned. (Author/AM)

  12. Reversible Sterilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Largey, Gale

    1977-01-01

    Notes that difficult questions arise concerning the use of sterilization for alleged eugenic and euthenic purposes. Thus, how reversible sterilization will be used with relation to the poor, mentally ill, mentally retarded, criminals, and minors, is questioned. (Author/AM)

  13. Respiratory-swallow training in patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Martin-Harris, Bonnie; McFarland, David; Hill, Elizabeth G; Strange, Charlton B; Focht, Kendrea L; Wan, Zhuang; Blair, Julie; McGrattan, Katlyn

    2015-05-01

    To test a novel intervention to train swallowing to occur in the midexpiratory to low expiratory phase of quiet breathing to improve swallowing safety and efficiency. Safety and efficacy nonrandomized controlled trial with 1-month follow-up. Ambulatory clinics. Patients (N=30) with head and neck cancer (HNC) and chronic dysphagia completed the intervention. Fifteen of these patients participated in a 1-month follow-up visit. Training protocol based on hierarchy of motor skill acquisition to encourage autonomous and optimal respiratory-swallowing coordination. Visual feedback of respiratory phase and volume for swallowing initiation was provided by nasal airflow and rib cage/abdomen signals. Respiratory-swallow phase pattern, Modified Barium Swallow Impairment Profile (MBSImP) scores, Penetration-Aspiration Scale (PAS) scores, and MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory scores. Using visual feedback, patients were trained to initiate swallows during the midexpiratory phase of quiet breathing and continue to expire after swallowing. This optimal phase patterning increased significantly after treatment (P<.0001). Changes in respiratory-swallowing coordination were associated with improvements in 3 MBSImP component scores: laryngeal vestibular closure (P=.0004), tongue base retraction (P<.0001), and pharyngeal residue (P=.01). Significant improvements were also seen in PAS scores (P<.0001). Relative to pretreatment values, patients participating in 1-month follow-up had increased optimal phase patterning (P<.0001), improved laryngeal vestibular closure (P=.01), tongue base retraction (P=.003), and pharyngeal residue (P=.006) MBSImP scores and improved PAS scores (P<.0001). Improvements in respiratory-swallowing coordination can be trained using a systematic protocol and respiratory phase-lung volume-related biofeedback in patients with HNC and chronic dysphagia, with favorable effects on airway protection and bolus clearance. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of

  14. Respiratory-Swallow Training in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Harris, Bonnie; McFarland, David; Hill, Elizabeth G.; Strange, Charlton B.; Focht, Kendrea L.; Wan, Zhuang; Blair, Julie; McGrattan, Katlyn

    2014-01-01

    Objective To test a novel intervention to train swallowing to occur in the mid-to-low expiratory phase of quiet breathing to improve swallowing safety and efficiency. Design Safety and efficacy non-randomized clinical trial with one-month follow-up. Setting Head and neck cancer (HNC) ambulatory clinics. Participants Thirty patients with HNC and chronic dysphagia completed the intervention. Fifteen of these patients participated in a one-month follow-up visit. Interventions Training protocol based on hierarchy of motor skill acquisition to encourage autonomous and optimal respiratory-swallowing coordination. Visual feedback of respiratory phase and volume for swallowing initiation was provided by nasal airflow and rib cage/abdomen signals. Main Outcome Measures Respiratory-swallow phase pattern, Modified Barium Swallow Impairment Profile™© (MBSImP) scores, Penetration Aspiration Scale (PAS) scores, M.D. Anderson Dysphagia Inventory scores Results Using visual feedback, patients were trained to initiate swallows during the mid-expiratory phase of quiet breathing and to continue to expire after swallowing. This optimal phase patterning increased significantly after treatment (p <0.0001). Changes in respiratory-swallowing coordination were associated with improvements in three MBSImP component scores: laryngeal vestibular closure (p = 0.0004), tongue base retraction (p <0.0001), and pharyngeal residue (p = 0.01). Significant improvements were also seen in PAS scores (p <0.0001). Relative to pre-treatment values, patients participating in one-month follow-up had increased optimal phase patterning (p <0.0001), improved laryngeal vestibular closure (p = 0.01), tongue base retraction (p = 0.003), and pharyngeal residue (p = 0.006) MBSImP scores, and improved PAS scores (p <0.0001). Conclusions Improvements in respiratory-swallowing coordination can be trained using a systematic protocol and respiratory phase-lung volume related biofeedback in patients with HNC and

  15. Visual and auditory stimuli associated with swallowing activate mirror neurons: a magnetoencephalography study.

    PubMed

    Ushioda, Takashi; Watanabe, Yutaka; Sanjo, Yusuke; Yamane, Gen-Yuki; Abe, Shinichi; Tsuji, Yusuke; Ishiyama, Atushi

    2012-12-01

    In the present study, we evaluated activated areas of the cerebral cortex with regard to the mirror neuron system during swallowing. To identify the activated areas, we used magnetoencephalography. Subjects were ten consenting volunteers. Swallowing-related stimuli comprised an animated image of the left profile of a person swallowing water with laryngeal elevation as a visual swallowing trigger stimulus and a swallowing sound as an auditory swallowing trigger stimulus. As control stimuli, a still frame image of the left profile without an additional trigger was shown, and an artificial sound as a false auditory trigger was provided. Triggers were presented at 3,000 ms after the start of image presentation. The stimuli were combined and presented and the areas activated were identified for each stimulus. With animation and still-frame stimuli, the visual association area (Brodmann area (BA) 18) was activated at the start of image presentation, while with the swallowing sound and artificial sound stimuli, the auditory areas BA 41 and BA 42 were activated at the time of trigger presentation. However, with animation stimuli (animation stimulus, animation + swallowing sound stimuli, and animation + artificial sound stimuli), activation in BA 6 and BA 40, corresponding to mirror neurons, was observed between 620 and 720 ms before the trigger. Besides, there were also significant differences in latency time and peak intensity between animation stimulus and animation + swallowing sound stimuli. Our results suggest that mirror neurons are activated by swallowing-related visual and auditory stimuli.

  16. The Effects of Oral-Motor Exercises on Swallowing in Children: An Evidence-Based Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arvedson, Joan; Clark, Heather; Lazarus, Cathy; Schooling, Tracy; Frymark, Tobi

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this unregistered evidence-based systematic review was to determine the state and quality of evidence on the effects of oral motor exercises (OME) on swallowing physiology, pulmonary health, functional swallowing outcomes, and drooling management in children with swallowing disorders. Method: A systematic search of 20 electronic…

  17. The Effects of Oral-Motor Exercises on Swallowing in Children: An Evidence-Based Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arvedson, Joan; Clark, Heather; Lazarus, Cathy; Schooling, Tracy; Frymark, Tobi

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this unregistered evidence-based systematic review was to determine the state and quality of evidence on the effects of oral motor exercises (OME) on swallowing physiology, pulmonary health, functional swallowing outcomes, and drooling management in children with swallowing disorders. Method: A systematic search of 20 electronic…

  18. Reversible Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Harsh; Madanieh, Raef; Kosmas, Constantine E; Vatti, Satya K; Vittorio, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies (CMs) have many etiological factors that can result in severe structural and functional dysregulation. Fortunately, there are several potentially reversible CMs that are known to improve when the root etiological factor is addressed. In this article, we discuss several of these reversible CMs, including tachycardia-induced, peripartum, inflammatory, hyperthyroidism, Takotsubo, and chronic illness–induced CMs. Our discussion also includes a review on their respective pathophysiology, as well as possible management solutions. PMID:26052233

  19. Factors Associated with Swallowing Assessment after Oral Endotracheal Intubation and Mechanical Ventilation for Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Brodsky, Martin B.; González-Fernández, Marlís; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro A.; Shanholtz, Carl; Palmer, Jeffrey B.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Endotracheal intubation is associated with postextubation swallowing dysfunction, but no guidelines exist for postextubation swallowing assessments. Objectives: We evaluated the prevalence, patient demographic and clinical factors, and intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital organizational factors associated with swallowing assessment after oral endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation in patients with acute lung injury (ALI). Methods: We performed a secondary analysis of a prospective cohort study in which investigators evaluated 178 eligible patients with ALI who were mechanically ventilated via oral endotracheal tube. The patients were recruited from 13 ICUs at four teaching hospitals in Baltimore, Maryland. Patient demographic and clinical factors, types of ICU, and hospital study sites were evaluated for their association with completion of a swallowing assessment both in the ICU and after the ICU stay before hospital discharge. Factors significantly associated with a swallow assessment were evaluated in a multivariable logistic regression model. Measurements and Main Results: Before hospital discharge, 79 (44%) patients completed a swallowing assessment, among whom 59 (75%) had their assessments initiated in ICU and 20 (25%) had their assessments initiated on the hospital ward. Female sex (odds ratio [OR] = 2.01; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 1.03–3.97), orotracheal intubation duration (OR = 1.13 per day; 95% CI = 1.05–1.22), and hospital study site (Site 3: OR = 2.41; 95% CI = 1.00–5.78) were independently associated with swallowing assessment. Although Site 3 had a twofold increase in swallowing assessments in the ICU, there was no significant difference between hospitals in the frequency of swallowing assessments completed after ICU discharge (P = 0.287) or in the proportion of patients who failed a swallowing assessment conducted in the ICU (P = 0.468) or on the ward (P = 0

  20. Evaluating Swallowing Muscles Essential for Hyolaryngeal Elevation by Using Muscle Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, William G.; Hindson, David F.; Langmore, Susan E.; Zumwalt, Ann C.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Reduced hyolaryngeal elevation, a critical event in swallowing, is associated with radiation therapy. Two muscle groups that suspend the hyoid, larynx, and pharynx have been proposed to elevate the hyolaryngeal complex: the suprahyoid and longitudinal pharyngeal muscles. Thought to assist both groups is the thyrohyoid, a muscle intrinsic to the hyolaryngeal complex. Intensity modulated radiation therapy guidelines designed to preserve structures important to swallowing currently exclude the suprahyoid and thyrohyoid muscles. This study used muscle functional magnetic resonance imaging (mfMRI) in normal healthy adults to determine whether both muscle groups are active in swallowing and to test therapeutic exercises thought to be specific to hyolaryngeal elevation. Methods and Materials: mfMRI data were acquired from 11 healthy subjects before and after normal swallowing and after swallowing exercise regimens (the Mendelsohn maneuver and effortful pitch glide). Whole-muscle transverse relaxation time (T2 signal, measured in milliseconds) profiles of 7 test muscles were used to evaluate the physiologic response of each muscle to each condition. Changes in effect size (using the Cohen d measure) of whole-muscle T2 profiles were used to determine which muscles underlie swallowing and swallowing exercises. Results: Post-swallowing effect size changes (where a d value of >0.20 indicates significant activity during swallowing) for the T2 signal profile of the thyrohyoid was a d value of 0.09; a d value of 0.40 for the mylohyoid, 0.80 for the geniohyoid, 0.04 for the anterior digastric, and 0.25 for the posterior digastric-stylohyoid in the suprahyoid muscle group; and d values of 0.47 for the palatopharyngeus and 0.28 for the stylopharyngeus muscles in the longitudinal pharyngeal muscle group. The Mendelsohn maneuver and effortful pitch glide swallowing exercises showed significant effect size changes for all muscles tested, except for the thyrohyoid. Conclusions

  1. Factors associated with swallowing assessment after oral endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation for acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Martin B; González-Fernández, Marlís; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro A; Shanholtz, Carl; Palmer, Jeffrey B; Needham, Dale M

    2014-12-01

    Endotracheal intubation is associated with postextubation swallowing dysfunction, but no guidelines exist for postextubation swallowing assessments. We evaluated the prevalence, patient demographic and clinical factors, and intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital organizational factors associated with swallowing assessment after oral endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation in patients with acute lung injury (ALI). We performed a secondary analysis of a prospective cohort study in which investigators evaluated 178 eligible patients with ALI who were mechanically ventilated via oral endotracheal tube. The patients were recruited from 13 ICUs at four teaching hospitals in Baltimore, Maryland. Patient demographic and clinical factors, types of ICU, and hospital study sites were evaluated for their association with completion of a swallowing assessment both in the ICU and after the ICU stay before hospital discharge. Factors significantly associated with a swallow assessment were evaluated in a multivariable logistic regression model. Before hospital discharge, 79 (44%) patients completed a swallowing assessment, among whom 59 (75%) had their assessments initiated in ICU and 20 (25%) had their assessments initiated on the hospital ward. Female sex (odds ratio [OR] = 2.01; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 1.03-3.97), orotracheal intubation duration (OR = 1.13 per day; 95% CI = 1.05-1.22), and hospital study site (Site 3: OR = 2.41; 95% CI = 1.00-5.78) were independently associated with swallowing assessment. Although Site 3 had a twofold increase in swallowing assessments in the ICU, there was no significant difference between hospitals in the frequency of swallowing assessments completed after ICU discharge (P = 0.287) or in the proportion of patients who failed a swallowing assessment conducted in the ICU (P = 0.468) or on the ward (P = 0.746). In this multisite prospective study, female sex, intubation duration, and

  2. Evaluating swallowing muscles essential for hyolaryngeal elevation by using muscle functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Pearson, William G; Hindson, David F; Langmore, Susan E; Zumwalt, Ann C

    2013-03-01

    Reduced hyolaryngeal elevation, a critical event in swallowing, is associated with radiation therapy. Two muscle groups that suspend the hyoid, larynx, and pharynx have been proposed to elevate the hyolaryngeal complex: the suprahyoid and longitudinal pharyngeal muscles. Thought to assist both groups is the thyrohyoid, a muscle intrinsic to the hyolaryngeal complex. Intensity modulated radiation therapy guidelines designed to preserve structures important to swallowing currently exclude the suprahyoid and thyrohyoid muscles. This study used muscle functional magnetic resonance imaging (mfMRI) in normal healthy adults to determine whether both muscle groups are active in swallowing and to test therapeutic exercises thought to be specific to hyolaryngeal elevation. mfMRI data were acquired from 11 healthy subjects before and after normal swallowing and after swallowing exercise regimens (the Mendelsohn maneuver and effortful pitch glide). Whole-muscle transverse relaxation time (T2 signal, measured in milliseconds) profiles of 7 test muscles were used to evaluate the physiologic response of each muscle to each condition. Changes in effect size (using the Cohen d measure) of whole-muscle T2 profiles were used to determine which muscles underlie swallowing and swallowing exercises. Post-swallowing effect size changes (where a d value of >0.20 indicates significant activity during swallowing) for the T2 signal profile of the thyrohyoid was a d value of 0.09; a d value of 0.40 for the mylohyoid, 0.80 for the geniohyoid, 0.04 for the anterior digastric, and 0.25 for the posterior digastric-stylohyoid in the suprahyoid muscle group; and d values of 0.47 for the palatopharyngeus and 0.28 for the stylopharyngeus muscles in the longitudinal pharyngeal muscle group. The Mendelsohn maneuver and effortful pitch glide swallowing exercises showed significant effect size changes for all muscles tested, except for the thyrohyoid. Muscles of both the suprahyoid and the longitudinal

  3. Understanding intellectual disability through RASopathies.

    PubMed

    San Martín, Alvaro; Pagani, Mario Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Intellectual disability, commonly known as mental retardation in the International Classification of Disease from World Health Organization, is the term that describes an intellectual and adaptive cognitive disability that begins in early life during the developmental period. Currently the term intellectual disability is the preferred one. Although our understanding of the physiological basis of learning and learning disability is poor, a general idea is that such condition is quite permanent. However, investigations in animal models suggest that learning disability can be functional in nature and as such reversible through pharmacology or appropriate learning paradigms. A fraction of the cases of intellectual disability is caused by point mutations or deletions in genes that encode for proteins of the RAS/MAP kinase signaling pathway known as RASopathies. Here we examined the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in this group of genetic disorders focusing in studies which provide evidence that intellectual disability is potentially treatable and curable. The evidence presented supports the idea that with the appropriate understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved, intellectual disability could be treated pharmacologically and perhaps through specific mechanistic-based teaching strategies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. People with intellectual disabilities and dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Janet; Chadwick, Darren; Baines, Susannah; Emerson, Eric; Hatton, Chris

    2017-03-12

    Dysphagia (difficulties in eating, drinking or swallowing) is associated with serious health complications and psychosocial sequelae. This review aims to summarise the state of the evidence regarding dysphagia in people with intellectual disabilities (excluding prevalence), identify gaps in the evidence base and highlight future research priorities. Studies published from 1 January 1990 to 19 July 2016 were identified using Medline, Cinahl, PsycINFO, Web of Science, email requests and cross citations. Studies were reviewed narratively in relation to identified themes. A total of 35 studies were included in the review. Themes identified were as follows: health conditions associated with dysphagia; mortality; health service use; practice and knowledge in supporting people with intellectual disabilities and dysphagia; intervention effectiveness and quality of life. Dysphagia is associated with respiratory infections and choking and may be under-recognised. Silent aspiration is common and may go unnoticed. Management practices exist, but there are few intervention studies and no randomised controlled trials (RCTs), and hence, the effectiveness of these is currently unclear. Dysphagia is a key concern in relation to people with intellectual disabilities. There is urgent need for research on the management of dysphagia in people with intellectual disabilities, including mealtime support offered, positioning, dietary modification and impact on wellbeing. Implications for Rehabilitation Dysphagia is common in people with intellectual disabilities, associated with serious health risks and may be under-recognised. Caregivers of people with intellectual disabilities should be educated about dysphagia. There is an urgent need for research on improving the management of dysphagia in people with intellectual disabilities. Improved recognition and management of dysphagia may reduce the occurrence of associated health conditions and reduce hospital admissions and premature death

  5. Swallowing interventions for the treatment of dysphagia after head and neck cancer: a systematic review of behavioural strategies used to promote patient adherence to swallowing exercises.

    PubMed

    Govender, Roganie; Smith, Christina H; Taylor, Stuart A; Barratt, Helen; Gardner, Benjamin

    2017-01-10

    Dysphagia is a significant side-effect following treatment for head and neck cancers, yet poor adherence to swallowing exercises is frequently reported in intervention studies. Behaviour change techniques (BCTs) can be used to improve adherence, but no review to date has described the techniques or indicated which may be more associated with improved swallowing outcomes. A systematic review was conducted to identify behavioural strategies in swallowing interventions, and to explore any relationships between these strategies and intervention effects. Randomised and quasi-randomised studies of head and neck cancer patients were included. Behavioural interventions to improve swallowing were eligible provided a valid measure of swallowing function was reported. A validated and comprehensive list of 93 discrete BCTs was used to code interventions. Analysis was conducted via a structured synthesis approach. Fifteen studies (8 randomised) were included, and 20 different BCTs were each identified in at least one intervention. The BCTs identified in almost all interventions were: instruction on how to perform the behavior, setting behavioural goals and action planning. The BCTs that occurred more frequently in effective interventions, were: practical social support, behavioural practice, self-monitoring of behaviour and credible source for example a skilled clinician delivering the intervention. The presence of identical BCTs in comparator groups may diminish effects. Swallowing interventions feature multiple components that may potentially impact outcomes. This review maps the behavioural components of reported interventions and provides a method to consistently describe these components going forward. Future work may seek to test the most effective BCTs, to inform optimisation of swallowing interventions.

  6. Swallowing performance in patients with vocal fold motion impairment.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J A; Pryde, A; White, A; Maher, L; Maran, A G

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-seven patients with vocal fold motion impairment underwent detailed pharyngoesophagel manometry with a strain gauge assembly linked to a computer recorder. Nine were known to have lesions of the central vagal trunk or nucleus, 9 had recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) palsy, and the remainder were idiopathic. The site of the lesion was a more important determinant of subjective swallowing performance than the position of the involved cord at laryngoscopy. Patients with central lesions had lower tonic and contraction upper esophageal sphincter (UES) pressures than 25 age-matched controls, suggesting that high cervical branches of the lower cranial nerves are important in UES excitatory innervation. RLN palsy patients showed significantly increased pharyngeal contraction amplitude and reduced pharyngoesophageal wave durations. The results suggest that the dysphagia associated with vocal fold motion impairment is not simply due to the disruption of laryngeal deglutitive kinetics, but to independent effects on pharyngeal function.

  7. Serratia marcescens infection in a swallow-tailed hummingbird.

    PubMed

    Saidenberg, André B S; Teixeira, Rodrigo H F; Astolfi-Ferreira, Claudete S; Knöbl, Terezinha; Ferreira, Antonio J Piantino

    2007-01-01

    A swallow-tailed hummingbird (Eupetomena macroura) was presented with a history of prostration and inability to fly. After a 2-day hospitalization, the bird died and necropsy findings included diffuse hyperemia of the small intestine serosal and mucosal surfaces and the presence of a small quantity of clear ascitic fluid in the coelomic cavity. Intestinal contents and cardiac blood were collected for microbiologic exams yielding pure cultures of a pigmented strain of Serratia marcescens. This strain was susceptible to gentamicin, enrofloxacin, streptomycin, trimethoprim, and sulfamethoxazole and had intermediate susceptibility to chloramphenicol and resistance to cephalotin. The source of the infection could not be ascertained, but possible contamination of hummingbird feeders could be involved, because the infection seemed to originate from the digestive tract.

  8. Kinematic and temporal factors associated with penetration-aspiration in swallowing liquids.

    PubMed

    Molfenter, Sonja M; Steele, Catriona M

    2014-04-01

    In this study we undertook careful analysis of 13 quantitative physiological variables related to oropharyngeal swallowing from a sample of 42 subacute patients referred for dysphagia assessment. Each patient underwent a videofluoroscopic swallowing examination in which they swallowed up to five boluses of 22 % w/v ultrathin liquid barium suspension administered by teaspoon. Our goal was to determine whether scores on 13 kinematic or temporal parameters of interest were independently associated with the presence of penetration-aspiration in the final compiled dataset of 178 swallows. Participants were classified as aspirators based on the presence of at least one swallow that demonstrated a Penetration-Aspiration Scale score of ≥3. The parameters of interest included six kinematic parameters for capturing hyoid position, three swallow durations [laryngeal closure duration, hyoid movement duration, and upper esophageal sphincter (UES) opening duration], and four swallow intervals (laryngeal closure to UES opening, bolus dwell time in the pharynx prior to laryngeal closure, stage transition duration, and pharyngeal transit time). Mixed-model repeated-measures ANOVAs were conducted to determine the association between each parameter and aspiration status. Only 1 of the 13 parameters tested distinguished aspirators from nonaspirators: aspirators demonstrated significantly shorter UES opening duration. In addition, a trend toward reduced maximum superior position of the hyoid was seen in aspirators. Limitations and future considerations are discussed.

  9. Kinematic and temporal factors associated with penetration-aspiration in liquid swallowing

    PubMed Central

    Molfenter, Sonja M.; Steele, Catriona M.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we undertook careful analysis of 13 quantitative physiological variables related to oropharyngeal swallowing from a sample of 42 subacute patients referred for dysphagia assessment. Each patient underwent videofluoroscopic swallowing examination in which they swallowed up to 5 boluses of 22% w/v ultra-thin liquid barium suspension administered by teaspoon. Our goal was to determine whether scores on thirteen kinematic or temporal parameters of interest were independently associated with the presence of penetration-aspiration in the final compiled dataset of 178 swallows. Participants were classified as aspirators, based on the presence of at least one swallow demonstrating a penetration-aspiration scale score ≥ 3. The parameters of interest included: six kinematic parameters for capturing hyoid position; three swallow durations (laryngeal closure duration; hyoid movement duration; upper esophageal sphincter (UES) opening duration); and four swallow intervals (laryngeal closure to UES opening; bolus dwell time in the pharynx prior to laryngeal closure; stage transition duration; and pharyngeal transit time). Mixed model repeated measures ANOVAs were conducted to determine the association between each parameter and aspiration status. Only one of the 13 parameters tested distinguished aspirators from non-aspirators: aspirators demonstrated significantly shorter UES opening duration. Additionally, a trend towards reduced maximum superior position of the hyoid was seen in aspirators. Limitations and future considerations are discussed. PMID:24445381

  10. Therapeutic singing as an early intervention for swallowing in persons with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Stegemöller, E L; Hibbing, P; Radig, H; Wingate, J

    2017-04-01

    For persons with Parkinson's disease (PD), secondary motor symptoms such as swallow impairment impact the quality of life and are major contributors to mortality. There is a present need for therapeutic interventions aimed at improving swallow function during the early stages of PD. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the effects of a group therapeutic singing intervention on swallowing in persons with PD with no significant dysphagia symptoms. Cohort study. University in the United States. Twenty-four participants with PD. Eight weeks of group therapeutic singing. Electromyography (EMG) was used to assess muscle activity associated with swallow pre and post the group singing intervention. Swallow quality of life (SWAL-QOL) and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) were also obtained pre- and post-intervention. Participants reported minimal difficulty with swallowing, yet results revealed a significant increase in EMG outcome measures, as well as significant improvement in UPDRS total and UPDRS motor scores. No significant differences were revealed for SWAL-QOL. Increases in EMG timing measures may suggest that group singing results in the prolongation of laryngeal elevation, protecting the airway from foreign material for longer periods of time during swallow. Combined with the improvement in UPDRS clinical measures, therapeutic singing may be an engaging early intervention strategy to address oropharyngeal dysphagia while also benefiting additional clinical symptoms of PD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Behavioural and neurophysiological disruption of corticobulbar motor systems and their effects on sequential pharyngeal swallowing.

    PubMed

    Al-Toubi, Aamir; Daniels, Stephanie K; Huckabee, Maggie-Lee; Corey, David M; Doeltgen, Sebastian H

    2016-10-15

    Primary motor networks are known to be involved in the control of voluntary oral movements as well as the modulation of pharyngeal movements during experimentally controlled single swallows performed on command. The role of these networks in the more typical task of sequential swallowing remains unexplored. This study evaluated the hypothesis that experimental disruption of motor cortical activation would reduce the rate and regularity of repeatedly performed volitional or volitionally initiated motor tasks controlled by corticospinal (finger tapping) and corticobulbar (eyebrow movement, jaw opening, volitional sequential swallowing) motor systems, but would not influence a more reflexive corticobulbar task (reflexive sequential swallowing to pharyngeal water infusion). This premise was investigated in 24 healthy participants using two techniques: a dual task paradigm and a transcranial magnetic stimulation paradigm. Disruption effects were quantified by changes in rate and regularity of performance for each tested motor task. In summary, volitional motor tasks controlled by corticospinal motor networks (finger tapping) are more susceptible to behavioural and neurophysiological disruption than tasks controlled by cortiobulbar motor networks containing a reflexive component (both volitional and experimentally initiated consecutive swallowing). Purely volitional motor tasks controlled by the corticobulbar motor system (eyebrow raising or jaw opening) were affected in similar ways as the volitional corticospinal motor tasks. In summary, tasks involving sequential pharyngeal swallowing - whether volitionally or experimentally initiated - are largely robust against disruption of primary cortical motor networks, supporting a key role of medullary CPGs in the motor control of sequential pharyngeal swallowing.

  12. Swallowing and deep brain stimulation in Parkinson’s disease: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Troche, Michelle S.; Brandimore, Alexandra E.; Foote, Kelly D.; Okun, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to assess the current state of the literature on the topic of deep brain stimulation (DBS) and its effects on swallowing function in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Pubmed, Cochrane review, and web of science searches were completed on all articles addressing DBS that contained a swallowing outcome measure. Outcome measures included the penetration/aspiration scale, pharyngeal transit time, oropharyngeal residue, drooling, aspiration pneumonia, death, hyolaryngeal excursion, epiglottic inversion, UPDRS scores, and presence of coughing/throat clearing during meals. The search identified 13 studies specifically addressing the effects of DBS on swallowing. Critical assessment of the 13 identified peer-reviewed publications revealed nine studies employing an experimental design, (e.g. “on” vs. “off”, pre- vs. post-DBS) and four case reports. None of the nine experimental studies were found to identify clinically significant improvement or decline in swallowing function with DBS. Despite these findings, several common threads were identified across experimental studies and will be examined in this review. Additionally, available data demonstrate that, although subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation has been considered to cause more impairment to swallowing function than globus pallidus internus (GPi) stimulation, there are no experimental studies directly comparing swallowing function in STN vs. GPi. Moreover, there has been no comparison of unilateral vs. bilateral DBS surgery and the coincident effects on swallowing function. This review includes a critical analysis of all experimental studies and discusses methodological issues that should be addressed in future studies. PMID:23726461

  13. Role of peripheral reflexes in the initiation of the esophageal phase of swallowing

    PubMed Central

    Medda, Bidyut K.; Babaei, Arash; Shaker, Reza

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of peripheral reflexes in initiation of the esophageal phase of swallowing. In 10 decerebrate cats, we recorded electromyographic responses from the pharynx, larynx, and esophagus and manometric data from the esophagus. Water (1–5 ml) was injected into the nasopharynx to stimulate swallowing, and the timing of the pharyngeal and esophageal phases of swallowing was quantified. The effects of transection or stimulation of nerves innervating the esophagus on swallowing and esophageal motility were tested. We found that the percent occurrence of the esophageal phase was significantly related to the bolus size. While the time delays between the pharyngeal and esophageal phases of swallowing were not related to the bolus size, they were significantly more variable than the time delays between activation of muscles within the pharyngeal phase. Transection of the sensory innervation of the proximal cervical esophagus blocked or significantly inhibited activation of the esophageal phase in the proximal cervical esophagus. Peripheral electrical stimulation of the pharyngoesophageal nerve activated the proximal cervical esophagus, peripheral electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve activated the distal cervical esophagus, and peripheral electrical stimulation the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) had no effect on the esophagus. Centripetal electrical stimulation of the SLN activated the cervical component of the esophageal phase of swallowing before initiation of the pharyngeal phase. Therefore, we concluded that initiation of the esophageal phase of swallowing depends on feedback from peripheral reflexes acting through the SLN, rather than a central program. PMID:24557762

  14. Role of peripheral reflexes in the initiation of the esophageal phase of swallowing.

    PubMed

    Lang, Ivan M; Medda, Bidyut K; Babaei, Arash; Shaker, Reza

    2014-04-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of peripheral reflexes in initiation of the esophageal phase of swallowing. In 10 decerebrate cats, we recorded electromyographic responses from the pharynx, larynx, and esophagus and manometric data from the esophagus. Water (1-5 ml) was injected into the nasopharynx to stimulate swallowing, and the timing of the pharyngeal and esophageal phases of swallowing was quantified. The effects of transection or stimulation of nerves innervating the esophagus on swallowing and esophageal motility were tested. We found that the percent occurrence of the esophageal phase was significantly related to the bolus size. While the time delays between the pharyngeal and esophageal phases of swallowing were not related to the bolus size, they were significantly more variable than the time delays between activation of muscles within the pharyngeal phase. Transection of the sensory innervation of the proximal cervical esophagus blocked or significantly inhibited activation of the esophageal phase in the proximal cervical esophagus. Peripheral electrical stimulation of the pharyngoesophageal nerve activated the proximal cervical esophagus, peripheral electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve activated the distal cervical esophagus, and peripheral electrical stimulation the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) had no effect on the esophagus. Centripetal electrical stimulation of the SLN activated the cervical component of the esophageal phase of swallowing before initiation of the pharyngeal phase. Therefore, we concluded that initiation of the esophageal phase of swallowing depends on feedback from peripheral reflexes acting through the SLN, rather than a central program.

  15. Swallowing is differentially influenced by retronasal compared with orthonasal stimulation in combination with gustatory stimuli.

    PubMed

    Welge-Lüssen, Antje; Ebnöther, Myriam; Wolfensberger, Markus; Hummel, Thomas

    2009-07-01

    Identical stimuli are processed differently when presented ortho- or retronasally. In contrast to orthonasal olfaction, retronasal odorant perception is strongly associated with flavor and food intake, which is usually followed by swallowing. Along with other stimuli, gustatory stimuli are known to influence the swallowing reflex. It was therefore the aim of present study to examine whether retronasal olfaction, in combination with simultaneous gustatory stimuli, influences swallowing in a manner different from that of orthonasal olfaction. Fifty normosmic and normogeusic subjects took part in the study. A sweet taste (glucose, delivered via an intraoral taste dispenser) was presented simultaneously with vanillin, a food-like odor, either ortho- or retronasally at random using a computer-controlled olfactometer. Ultrasound imaging of the mouth floor was recorded on videotape to continuously monitor swallowing activity. After retronasal stimulation, swallowing occurred significantly faster (7.49 vs. 9.42 s; P < 0.001) and also took place more frequently compared with swallowing after orthonasal stimulation (1.38 times vs. 1.14 times; P < 0.001). These results show that a food-like odorant presented retronasally in combination with a congruent taste stimulus can influence swallowing. Whether these results can be assigned to other, unfamiliar, unpleasant nonfood-like odors has yet to be determined.

  16. The physiologic coupling of sucking and swallowing coordination provides a unique process for neonatal survival

    PubMed Central

    McGrattan, Katlyn E.; Sivalingam, Maneesha; Hasenstab, Kathryn A.; Wei, Lai; Jadcherla, Sudarshan R.

    2016-01-01

    Aim Although the coordination of sucking and swallowing is critical for successful oral intake in neonates, the mechanisms that facilitate this coordination are not well understood. This investigation sought to clarify the mechanisms that facilitate this coordination, by comparing sucks that were coordinated with swallows and sucks that were completed in isolation. Methods Ten neonates with a median gestational age of 28.2 weeks, ranging from 27.0-35.0 weeks, were recruited from the neonatal nurseries at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, USA. They were evaluated while bottle-feeding at term gestation for differences in characteristics between sucks that were coupled and not coupled with swallows. Suction was evaluated using an intraoral pressure transducer and swallows were identified using a micro-manometry pharyngeal catheter. Linear mixed models were applied to distinguish sucking characteristics. Results Suction exhibited an anti-phase relationship with the generation and release of positive pharyngeal pressure during the swallow. Coupled sucks had lower suction generation and release rates (p<0.0001), lower suction amplitude (p=0.004), longer suction duration (p<0.0001) and higher milk ejection pressure (p<0.0001). Conclusion The coordination of unique sucking and swallowing movement patterns may be achieved by the infant adapting to the sucking kinematics around the lingual patterns that facilitate the pharyngeal swallow. PMID:27028793

  17. The mandible advancement may alter the coordination between breathing and the non-nutritive swallowing reflex.

    PubMed

    Ayuse, T; Ayuse, T; Ishitobi, S; Yoshida, H; Nogami, T; Kurata, S; Hoshino, Y; Oi, K

    2010-05-01

    The coordination between nasal breathing and non-nutritive swallowing serves as a protective reflex against potentially asphyxiating material, i.e. saliva and secretions, entering the respiratory tract. Although this protective reflex is influenced by positional changes in the head and body, the effect of mandible position on this reflex is not fully understood. We examined the effect of mandible advancement associated with mouth opening on the coordination between nasal breathing and non-nutritive swallowing induced by continuous infusion of distilled water into the pharyngeal cavity. The combination of mandible advancement and mouth opening increased the duration of swallowing apnoea and submental electromyographic burst duration. When the mandible was advanced with the mouth open, the duration of swallowing apnoea increased significantly compared with the centric position (0.79 +/- 0.23 vs. 0.64 +/- 0.12 s, P < 0.05, n = 12), and the duration of submental electromyographic activity increased significantly (2.11 +/- 0.63 vs. 1.46 +/- 0.25 s, P < 0.05, n = 12). Mandible advancement with mouth opening altered the respiratory phase resetting during swallowing and the timing of swallow in relation to respiratory cycle phase. We conclude that mandible re-positioning may strongly influence the coordination between nasal breathing and non-nutritive swallowing by altering respiratory parameters and by inhibiting movement of the tongue-jaw complex.

  18. Routine Use of Contrast Swallow After Total Gastrectomy and Esophagectomy: Is it Justified?

    PubMed Central

    El-Sourani, Nader; Bruns, Helge; Troja, Achim; Raab, Hans-Rudolf; Antolovic, Dalibor

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background After gastrectomy or esophagectomy, esophagogastrostomy and esophagojejunostomy are commonly used for reconstruction. Water-soluble contrast swallow is often used as a routine screening to exclude anastomotic leakage during the first postoperative week. In this retrospective study, the sensitivity and specificity of oral water-soluble contrast swallow for the detection of anastomotic leakage and its clinical symptoms were analysed. Material/Methods Records of 104 consecutive total gastrectomies and distal esophagectomies were analysed. In all cases, upper gastrointestinal contrast swallow with the use of a water-soluble contrast agent was performed on the 5th postoperative day. Extravasation of the contrast agent was defined as anastomotic leakage. When anastomotic insufficiency was suspected but no extravasation was present, a computed tomography (CT) scan and upper endoscopy were performed. Results Oral contrast swallow detected 7 anastomotic leaks. Based on CT-scans and upper endoscopy, the true number of anastomotic leakage was 15. The findings of the oral contrast swallow were falsely positive in 4 and falsely negative in 12 patients, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the oral contrast swallow was 20% and 96%, respectively. Conclusions Routine radiological contrast swallow following total gastrectomy or distal esophagectomy cannot be recommended. When symptoms of anastomotic leakage are present, a CT-scan and endoscopy are currently the methods of choice.

  19. An evaluation of the University of Washington Quality of Life swallowing domain following oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Thomas, L; Jones, T M; Tandon, S; Katre, C; Lowe, D; Rogers, S N

    2008-07-01

    Oropharyngeal cancer and its treatment have debilitating effect on swallowing function which can impact on quality of life. The aims of this study were to assess swallowing dysfunction in patients treated for oropharyngeal cancer by both patient and observer assessed tools and to assess the suitability of University of Washington Quality of Life (UW-QOL) swallowing domain as a potential screening tool in routine clinic practice. This was a cross-sectional study of disease free survivors following radical treatment for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma at a tertiary care centre between 1999 and May 2005. Evaluation included three questionnaires--the M. D. Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI), the SWALQOL, the University of Washington Quality of Life (UWQOL) and Fibreoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing (FEES). Of 117 patients 77 (66%) participated. On the UW-QOL, 18% could only swallow liquids whilst 11% could not swallow at all. There is a clear demarcation between UW-QOL levels and food consistency and texture as measured by the SWALQOL (r= -0.86, P<0.001). There was a graduation in respect to function with correlations of r=0.61 with overall MDADI and SWALQOL and r= -0.45 for FEES. Patients scoring 70 or better in the UW-QOL were notably better in MDADI and the SWALQOL hence a cut off of below 70 could be regarded as a quick screening tool for swallowing dysfunction.

  20. Effects of topical nasal anesthetic on fiberoptic endoscopic examination of swallowing with sensory testing (FEESST).

    PubMed

    Kamarunas, Erin E; McCullough, Gary H; Guidry, Tiffany J; Mennemeier, Mark; Schluterman, Keith

    2014-02-01

    Objections to the use of topical nasal anesthesia (TNA) during fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) with sensory testing (FEESST) have been raised, primarily because of the possibility of desensitizing the pharyngeal and laryngeal mucosa and affecting both the sensory and motor aspects of the swallow. Furthermore, it has been suggested that TNA is not necessary during FEES as it does not improve patient comfort or make the procedure easier for the endoscopist. The purpose of this double-blind, randomized, controlled, crossover clinical trial was to determine how gel TNA during flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing with sensory testing affects sensation, swallowing, and comfort rating scores in healthy non-dysphagic participants. Laryngopharyngeal sensory thresholds and swallowing durations were compared between two conditions: TNA and sham. Transition duration decreased statistically significantly during the TNA condition compared to the sham for 10 ml only (p < 0.05). All other swallowing measures did not change between the conditions. Laryngopharyngeal sensory thresholds and perceptions did not change between conditions. No change was observed for subject comfort scores, ease of exam, or quality of view. Future studies should evaluate TNA administration variables, including concentration, dosage amount, and method of application, to determine the optimal strategy for providing comfort while avoiding altered swallowing.

  1. Quantitative assessment of swallowing activity by MMG measurement with PVDF film.

    PubMed

    Takuya, Hashimoto; Keita, Tsukagoshi; Takuji, Koike

    2017-07-01

    Difficulty of swallowing, called dysphagia, leads to aspiration pneumonia which is particularly a big health concern in aging societies. Therefore, prevention and treatment of dysphagia would contribute to extending healthy-life and QOL of elderly people and decreasing healthcare cost. Robotics technologies are expected as one of the effective methods to solve the problem in terms of detecting malfunction in swallowing and recovering swallowing function. The aim of this study is to investigate muscle activity during normal swallowing using mechanomyography (MMG) with PolyVinylidene DiFluoride (PVDF) film which is a ferroelectrics polymer. Measurement of MMG signal during voluntary isometric contraction of the biceps brachii muscle was conducted to confirm whether PVDF film can detect MMG signal. In the experiment, surface electromyography (sEMG) was also measured as a reference to estimate muscle activity for comparison. Then, activities of swallowing muscles during normal swallowing with different volume of bolus were measured using MMG signal. As the result, it was confirmed that swallowing activity can be quantified by the detected MMG signal from different region of neck.

  2. The effect of bolus viscosity on swallowing function in neurogenic dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Clavé, P; de Kraa, M; Arreola, V; Girvent, M; Farré, R; Palomera, E; Serra-Prat, M

    2006-11-01

    To assess the pathophysiology and treatment of neurogenic dysphagia. 46 patients with brain damage, 46 with neurodegenerative diseases and eight healthy volunteers were studied by videofluoroscopy while swallowing 3-20 mL liquid (20.4 mPa s), nectar (274.4 mPa s) and pudding (3931.2 mPa s) boluses. Volunteers presented a safe and efficacious swallow, short swallow response (< or =740 ms), fast laryngeal closure (< or =160 ms) and strong bolus propulsion (> or =0.33 mJ). Brain damage patients presented: (i) 21.6% aspiration of liquids, reduced by nectar (10.5%) and pudding (5.3%) viscosity (P < 0.05) and (ii) 39.5% oropharyngeal residue. Neurodegenerative patients presented: (i) 16.2% aspiration of liquids, reduced by nectar (8.3%) and pudding (2.9%) viscosity (P < 0.05) and (ii) 44.4% oropharyngeal residue. Both group of patients presented prolonged swallow response (> or =806 ms) with a delay in laryngeal closure (> or =245 ms), and weak bolus propulsion forces (< or =0.20 mJ). Increasing viscosity did not affect timing of swallow response or bolus kinetic energy. Patients with neurogenic dysphagia presented high prevalence of videofluoroscopic signs of impaired safety and efficacy of swallow, and were at high risk of respiratory and nutritional complications. Impaired safety is associated with slow oropharyngeal reconfiguration and impaired efficacy with low bolus propulsion. Increasing bolus viscosity greatly improves swallowing function in neurological patients.

  3. Tongue pressure and submental surface electromyography measures during noneffortful and effortful saliva swallows in healthy women.

    PubMed

    Yeates, Erin M; Steele, Catriona M; Pelletier, Cathy A

    2010-08-01

    The effortful swallow, a compensatory technique frequently employed by speech-language pathologists for their patients with dysphagia, is still not fully understood in terms of how it modifies the swallow. In particular, although age-related changes are known to reduce maximum isometric tongue pressure, it is not known whether age affects people's ability to perform the effortful swallow. In this study, differences were explored between younger and older healthy women in execution of the effortful swallowing maneuver through a comparative analysis of effortful and noneffortful swallows. Eighty healthy women (40 age 18-35 years and 40 age 60 and older) participated. Peak amplitude measures and the timing of signal onset to peak were measured using concurrent tongue pressure and submental surface electromyography. Result Statistically significant main effects of age group were not observed in the amplitude data, but older participants showed slower rise times to peak anterior tongue-palate pressure. Despite the general age-related deterioration of the swallowing musculature due to the phenomenon of sarcopenia, older women can still produce noneffortful and effortful swallows with lingual pressure and submental surface electromyography amplitudes similar to younger women.

  4. Nursing swallow screens: why is testing water only not enough?

    PubMed

    Ellis, Allison Loftiss; Hannibal, Ruth Renee

    2013-10-01

    The speech-language pathologist (SLP) standardized a Nursing Bedside Swallowing Screen (NBSS) tool for all patients admitted to the hospital. The adults engaged in the NBSS before oral intake (i.e., medication included) as part of the Brain Attack Pathway for patients with neurological symptoms. If the patient failed the NBSS in the emergency department (ED), then the screen was repeated again after the patient had been admitted before the SLP dysphagia evaluation. Fifty-three male and female patients ranging from 34 to 96 years old with an initial diagnosis of stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) admitted during an 8-week time period from April 25, 2010, to June 19, 2010, were included in this study. There were 32 women and 17 men including 27 strokes and 22 TIAs tested. As a whole, the NBSS and SLP dysphagia evaluation results were consistent with each other for 40 of 46 patients (86.96% perfect agreement). The NBSS had 74% of sensitivity (34 of 46) with the nursing and the speech pathologist in agreement with the patients passing the swallow screen. Accurate identification of aspiration with the patients failing the NBSS was evident with the nursing and speech pathology assessment, which resulted in 83% of sensitivity (10 of 12). The positive predictive value with the corresponding identification of aspiration with the staff was 96% (44 of 46). The naturalistic observation of the patients exhibited internal consistency reliability between the two disciplines. Extraneous variables affecting the results included spontaneous resolution of stroke or TIA symptoms or the patient's decline in neurological status. For more insights from the authors, see Supplemental Digital Content 1, at http://links.lww.com/JNN/A9.

  5. Monarch butterfly oviposition on swallow-worts (Vincetoxicum spp.).

    PubMed

    Casagrande, R A; Dacey, J E

    2007-06-01

    As black swallow-wort, Vincetoxicum nigrum L. Moench, and pale swallow-wort, V. rossicum (Kleopow) Barbar., spread throughout the northeastern United States and southern Canada, there is concern about the impact of these invasive plants on populations of the native North American monarch butterfly Danaus plexippus L. Recent laboratory studies in New York and Ontario, Canada, have found little or no oviposition by monarch butterflies on the two Vincetoxicum species. In Rhode Island, we found 10.5-21.7% oviposition on Vincetoxicum species relative to common milkweed Asclepias syriaca L. in choice tests and 11.9-20.3% in no-choice tests in 2 yr of laboratory testing. These results were supported by field cage trials where monarchs given a choice between V. nigrum and A. syriaca laid 24.5% of their eggs on V. nigrum. In surveys of three pasture fields in Rhode Island where relative coverage of A. syriaca exceeded that of V. nigrum by a 0.77:0.23 ratio, 15.4% of monarch eggs were found on V. nigrum plants. In V. nigrum stands with very little A. syriaca (6.25 stems/ha), monarch egg density on V. nigrum was found to be over five times greater than in the three mixed pasture fields. In none of our laboratory or field evaluations was there any survival of monarch larvae on Vincetoxicum species. It seems that in Rhode Island, Vincetoxicum species serve as an oviposition sink for monarch butterflies. These findings suggest that East Coast butterflies may differ in host selection from those in central New York and southern Ontario, Canada.

  6. New Swallowing Evaluation Using Piezoelectricity in Normal Individuals.

    PubMed

    Sogawa, Yuichiro; Kimura, Shinji; Harigai, Toru; Sakurai, Naoki; Toyosato, Akira; Nishikawa, Taro; Inoue, Makoto; Murasawa, Akira; Endo, Naoto

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to elucidate the relationship between the piezoelectric waveform latency, hyoid bone movement, surface electromyogram (sEMG), and the pharyngeal transit time (PTT) during swallowing. Forty-one healthy subjects were divided into three age groups: younger (20-39 years, n = 8), middle-aged (40-59 years, n = 9), and older (60-79 years, n = 24). Motion analysis of the hyoid bone using videofluorography (VF), waveform analysis of the front neck using piezoelectric films, and sEMG of the suprahyoid muscle group were performed simultaneously. Latencies of the three movement phases were defined as upward (VFS1), forward (VFS2), and returning to starting position (VFS3). The three phases of the piezoelectric waveform-from wave initiation of the negative wave to the start of the second deep negative wave; from the start of the second deep negative wave to the start of the last positive wave (SLPW); and from the SLPW to the end of the last positive wave-were defined as PS1, PS2, and PS3, respectively. VFS1-3 and PS1-3 were significantly correlated. VFS1 and PS1 latencies were significantly longer with thick liquid than with thin liquid. VFS2, PS1, and PS2 latencies were longer in the older group than in the other two groups. The start of PS1 was nearly equal to those of sEMG and VFS1. Bolus arrival time in the valleculae was statistically equal to the end of the PS1 with both thin and thick liquids. To establish the swallowing screening using Piezoelectric film, further investigation is necessary in the dysphagia patients.

  7. Swallowing problems at the end of the palliative phase: incidence and severity in 164 unsedated patients.

    PubMed

    Bogaardt, Hans; Veerbeek, Laetitia; Kelly, Katherine; van der Heide, Agnes; van Zuylen, Lia; Speyer, Renée

    2015-04-01

    Swallowing problems are reported to be a common finding in patients who receive palliative care. In existing literature, the incidence of swallowing problems is mostly described in small numbers of patients at the start of the palliative phase. As we hypothesized that the incidence of dysphagia might increase as the palliative phase progresses, this study describes the incidence of swallowing problems and related problems in 164 unsedated patients at the end of the palliative phase, defined by the last 72 h before their death. To determine the incidence of swallowing problems and related problems, questionnaires were completed bereaved by relatives and nursing staff. Our data shows that in the palliative phase the incidence of swallowing problems can be as high as 79 %. A significant correlation was found between swallowing problems and reduced psycho-social quality of life as assessed by nursing staff (ρ = -.284). Overall the nursing staff rated the incidence and severity of swallowing problems (and related problems like frequent coughing, loss of appetite, and problems with oral secretions) lower than the relatives. This study suggests that incidence of swallowing problems at the end of the palliative phase is high and that these difficulties may not only result in discomfort for patients, but also can raise concern for caregivers. More information and education on management of swallowing problems in palliative settings might be needed for both relatives and nursing staff. However, the data also suggest that any intervention should be proportional to the level of distress caused by the intervention.

  8. Role of Barium Swallow in Diagnosing Clinically Significant Anastomotic Leak following Esophagectomy

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Simon; Iannettoni, Mark D.; Keech, John C.; Bashir, Mohammad; Gruber, Peter J.; Parekh, Kalpaj R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Barium swallow is performed following esophagectomy to evaluate the anastomosis for detection of leaks and to assess the emptying of the gastric conduit. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of the barium swallow study in diagnosing anastomotic leaks following esophagectomy. Methods Patients who underwent esophagectomy from January 2000 to December 2013 at our institution were investigated. Barium swallow was routinely done between days 5–7 to detect a leak. These results were compared to clinically determined leaks (defined by neck wound infection requiring jejunal feeds and or parenteral nutrition) during the postoperative period. The sensitivity and specificity of barium swallow in diagnosing clinically significant anastomotic leaks was determined. Results A total of 395 esophagectomies were performed (mean age, 62.2 years). The indications for the esophagectomy were as follows: malignancy (n=320), high-grade dysplasia (n=14), perforation (n=27), benign stricture (n=7), achalasia (n=16), and other (n=11). A variety of techniques were used including transhiatal (n=351), McKeown (n=35), and Ivor Lewis (n=9) esophagectomies. Operative mortality was 2.8% (n=11). Three hundred and sixty-eight patients (93%) underwent barium swallow study after esophagectomy. Clinically significant anastomotic leak was identified in 36 patients (9.8%). Barium swallow was able to detect only 13/36 clinically significant leaks. The sensitivity of the swallow in diagnosing a leak was 36% and specificity was 97%. The positive and negative predictive values of barium swallow study in detecting leaks were 59% and 93%, respectively. Conclusion Barium swallow is an insensitive but specific test for detecting leaks at the cervical anastomotic site after esophagectomy. PMID:27066433

  9. Swallowing difficulties with oral drugs among polypharmacy patients attending community pharmacies.

    PubMed

    Marquis, Julien; Schneider, Marie-Paule; Payot, Valérie; Cordonier, Anne-Christine; Bugnon, Olivier; Hersberger, Kurt E; Arnet, Isabelle

    2013-12-01

    Swallowing difficulties are common and can affect patients' ability to take solid oral dosage forms, thus compromising medication adherence. Strategies developed by patients to overcome such difficulties while taking medicines have seldom been described. To determine prevalence and characteristics of swallowing difficulties among primary care patients attending their community pharmacies; to explore strategies developed by patients to overcome their difficulties, and health professionals' awareness of these problems. Prospective study with a semi-structured questionnaire in random community pharmacies located in two Swiss regions. In each pharmacy, an interviewer asked 16 questions to each consecutive patient (18 years and older) with a prescription for at least 3 different solid oral forms. Quantification of number of patients with swallowing difficulties and detailed description of difficulties. Among 122 pharmacies, 59 (48 %) accepted to join the study and 410 patients were enrolled. Thirty-seven patients (9.0 %) reported ongoing swallowing difficulties, while 55 patients (13.4 %) reported past difficulties. For the majority of patients, difficulties occurred at each single dose (83.7 %), with a single medication (59.8 %) and lasted for less than 12 months (53.8 %). Number of tablets was not the main trigger. Swallowing difficulties impaired extremely daily life in 12 % of the patients. Intentional non adherence (23 % of patients) and altering the oral dose formulation were the most common and potentially harmful strategies used by patients to overcome their swallowing difficulties. According to the patients, pharmacists and physicians rarely inquired about their swallowing difficulties. We report a fairly high prevalence of swallowing difficulties in polypharmacy patients attending their community pharmacies. Pharmacists have to interview patients on their swallowing difficulties in a more systematic way, support patients in finding solutions and refer them to

  10. Swallowing function after laryngeal cleft repair: more than just fixing the cleft.

    PubMed

    Osborn, Alexander J; de Alarcon, Alessandro; Tabangin, Meredith E; Miller, Claire K; Cotton, Robin T; Rutter, Michael J

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate and describe the swallowing function in children after laryngeal cleft repair. Ten-year (2002-2012) retrospective chart review. Academic tertiary care pediatric otolaryngology practice. Records of 60 children who had surgical repair of laryngeal cleft (ages 2 weeks-14 years) and postoperative functional endoscopic evaluation of swallowing or videofluoroscopic swallow studies were examined retrospectively. Twenty-nine children had one postoperative swallow evaluation, 19 children had two, 4 children had three, 5 children had four, and 3 children had five. Median time to the first evaluation was 10.8 weeks (interquartile range [IQR]: 36.5, 231). On the final swallow evaluation, 34 (57%) children demonstrated normal swallowing parameters, 12 (20%) children showed penetration, and 14 (23%) children showed aspiration. Forty-three (72%) children were able to take everything by mouth normally or with minor behavioral modifications, 11 (18%) children required thickened fluids, and six (10%) children were kept nil per os (NPO). Mean improvement on the penetration-aspiration (pen-asp) scale was 2.13. On multivariable analysis, neurodevelopmental issues and gastronomy tube use were associated with the need for NPO status. Despite a high rate of surgical success, a substantial minority of children have persistent swallowing dysfunction after laryngeal cleft repair. Swallowing dysfunction after repair is multifactorial and arises from concomitant neurologic, anatomic, or other comorbidities that contribute to oropharyngeal and pharyngeal dysphagia. Based on our results, we recommend a testing schedule for postoperative swallowing evaluations after cleft repair. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  11. Swallowing transit times and valleculae residue in stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Breathing and swallowing are physiologically linked to ensure effortless gas exchange during oronasal breathing and to prevent aspiration during swallowing. Studies have indicated consistent aspiration in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, mainly related to delayed swallowing reflex and problems with lingual propulsion and pharyngeal peristalsis as a result of bilateral weakness and incoordination of the related muscles. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate swallowing transit times and valleculae residue characteristics of stable COPD patients who have no swallowing complaints. Methods Our study population included 20 stable patients with COPD and no swallowing complaints and 20 healthy controls. Swallowing was assessed through videofluoroscopic examination and involved the analysis of the following parameters: (1) pharyngeal stages of deglutition; (2) the duration of bolus movement through the oral cavity and pharynx (i.e. transit times); (3) valleculae residue ratio; (4) penetration/aspiration. Results Participants of the study did not present any signs of penetration-aspiration for any of the tested consistencies. Patients with COPD presented longer pharyngeal transit times during the ingestion of the liquid consistency and during the ingestion of the paste consistency. Regarding the duration of tongue base contact with the posterior pharyngeal wall, COPD patients also presented longer durations for the liquid and paste consistencies. No significant difference was observed for the distribution of individuals among the different valleculae residue severity levels. Conclusions Our study suggests that stable COPD patients may present physiological adaptations as a protective swallowing maneuver to avoid aspiration/penetration of pharyngeal contents. Moreover, valleculae residue cannot be seen as an isolated factor when trying to explain swallowing alterations in this population. PMID:24739506

  12. Dysphagia and swallowing-related quality of life in Friedreich ataxia.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Adam P; Brown, Sophie E; Folker, Joanne E; Corben, Louise A; Delatycki, Martin B

    2014-02-01

    Dysphagia in Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) and its impact on quality of life is not adequately understood. The objective of this study was to characterise dysphagia in FRDA and to determine the impact of swallowing dysfunction on activities, participation, and sense of well-being. Thirty-six individuals with a confirmed diagnosis of FRDA were assessed via a clinical bedside examination (CBE), the Royal Brisbane Hospital outcome measure for swallowing, an oral-motor examination and the Australian therapy outcome measures for speech and swallowing (AusTOMS). Data on swallowing function, diet modification and swallowing strategies were collated. Thirty-three (91.67 %) participants exhibited clinical signs of dysphagia according to the CBE, and all participants received ratings indicating swallowing difficulties on at least one other measure. Dysphagia in FRDA is characterised by oral and pharyngeal stage impairment relating to incoordination, weakness and spasticity. A significant positive correlation was found between the severity of impairment, activity, participation and distress/well-being on the AusTOMS, suggesting that swallowing function decreases with overall reductions in quality of life. A significant correlation was found between activity on the AusTOMS and disease duration (r = -0.283, p = 0.012). No significant correlations were found between dysphagia severity and GAA repeat length, age of onset or disease severity. Participants employing diet modification and swallowing strategies demonstrated higher dysphagia severity, activity limitations and participation restrictions. These data advocate a holistic approach to dysphagia management in FRDA. Early detection of swallowing impairment and consideration of the potential impact dysphagia has on quality of life should be key aspects in disease management.

  13. Submental Muscle Activity is Delayed and Shortened During Swallowing Following Stroke.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Ri; Lee, Seung Ah; Kim, Keewon; Leigh, Ja-Ho; Han, Tai Ryoon; Oh, Byung-Mo

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the activities of the submental muscles using surface electromyography (sEMG) in patients presenting with dysphagia secondary to middle cerebral artery (MCA) infarction, and to compare the results with those in healthy volunteers. Retrospective study design. A dysphagia clinic at a tertiary care university hospital. Twenty-one patients presenting with dysphagia after unilateral MCA infarction were recruited into the study within 2 months of stroke onset. To serve as a control group, 13 healthy volunteers were enrolled. The primary sEMG parameters were swallowing onset, pretrigger duration, swallowing duration, and swallowing amplitude. Swallowing functional outcome was evaluated using the Videofluoroscopic Dysphagia Scale and the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association National Outcome Measurement System. Patients with MCA infarction demonstrated significantly delayed swallowing onset (P < .001) and shorter swallowing duration (P = .003) compared with the controls. Duration from the start of sEMG activity and actual laryngeal elevation also was delayed in the patient group (P = .042). At a cut-off point of 0.13 seconds for swallowing onset, sensitivity was 85.7% and specificity was 69.2%. For swallowing duration, sensitivity was 84.6% and specificity was 66.7% with 1.05 seconds as the cut-off point. Patients with MCA infarction showed not only delayed swallowing onset and pretrigger duration, but also shorter duration of sEMG activity compared with those in healthy volunteers. Our results suggest that dysphagia after stroke might be further compromised by delayed laryngeal response especially after the start of suprahyoid muscle activity, which represents impaired laryngeal protection mechanism. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. 'Pharyngocise': Randomized Controlled Trial of Preventative Exercises to Maintain Muscle Structure and Swallowing Function During Head-and-Neck Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Carnaby-Mann, Giselle; Crary, Michael A.; Schmalfuss, Ilona

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Dysphagia after chemoradiotherapy is common. The present randomized clinical trial studied the effectiveness of preventative behavioral intervention for dysphagia compared with the 'usual care.' Methods and Materials: A total of 58 head-and-neck cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy were randomly assigned to usual care, sham swallowing intervention, or active swallowing exercises (pharyngocise). The intervention arms were treated daily during chemoradiotherapy. The primary outcome measure was muscle size and composition (determined by T{sub 2}-weighted magnetic resonance imaging). The secondary outcomes included functional swallowing ability, dietary intake, chemosensory function, salivation, nutritional status, and the occurrence of dysphagia-related complications. Results: The swallowing musculature (genioglossus, hyoglossuss, and mylohyoid) demonstrated less structural deterioration in the active treatment arm. The functional swallowing, mouth opening, chemosensory acuity, and salivation rate deteriorated less in the pharyngocise group. Conclusion: Patients completing a program of swallowing exercises during cancer treatment demonstrated superior muscle maintenance and functional swallowing ability.

  15. Adherence to Preventive Exercises and Self-Reported Swallowing Outcomes in Post-Radiation Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shinn, Eileen Huh; Basen-Engquist, Karen; Baum, George; Steen, Sven; Bauman, Rachel Freeman; Morrison, William; Garden, Adam Seth; Sheil, Cathleen; Kilgore, Kelly; Hutcheson, Kate; Barringer, Denise; Yuan, Ying; Lewin, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Background To reduce the risk of long-term swallowing complications after radiation, swallowing exercises may be helpful. Both the rate of adherence to swallowing exercises and its impact on future swallowing function is unknown. Methods 109 oropharyngeal cancer patients beginning radiation were tracked for two years to determine adherence to swallowing exercises. Participants completed the M.D. Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI) 1–2 years after treatment to assess self-reported swallowing function. Adherence, demographics, tumor and treatment variables were multivariably regressed onto the MDADI physical subscale score. Results Per speech pathologist documentation, 13% of the participants were fully adherent and 32% were partially adherent. Adherence was associated with the Physical MDADI Subscale score in the multivariate model (p=.01). Conclusions The majority of head and neck cancer patients are nonadherent to swallowing exercise regimens and may benefit from supportive care strategies to optimize their adherence. PMID:24142523

  16. Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sittiprapaporn, Wichian, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Learning disability is a classification that includes several disorders in which a person has difficulty learning in a typical manner. Depending on the type and severity of the disability, interventions may be used to help the individual learn strategies that will foster future success. Some interventions can be quite simplistic, while others are…

  17. Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sittiprapaporn, Wichian, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Learning disability is a classification that includes several disorders in which a person has difficulty learning in a typical manner. Depending on the type and severity of the disability, interventions may be used to help the individual learn strategies that will foster future success. Some interventions can be quite simplistic, while others are…

  18. Electric stimulation approaches to the restoration and rehabilitation of swallowing: a review.

    PubMed

    Steele, Catriona M; Thrasher, Adam T; Popovic, Milos R

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a proliferation of interest in the use of electric stimulation for the treatment of swallowing disorders. This review explores both the rationale and existing evidence for electric stimulation approaches to swallowing rehabilitation. Although this is an exciting area of research which holds promise for future clinically relevant technology and/or therapy, a critical analysis of the existing literature will be presented to support the argument that implementation of electric stimulation in clinical swallowing rehabilitation settings still remains pre-mature.

  19. Interaction between central pattern generators for breathing and swallowing in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Dick, T E; Oku, Y; Romaniuk, J R; Cherniack, N S

    1993-01-01

    1. We examined the interaction between central pattern generators for respiration and deglutition in decerebrate, vagotomized, paralysed and ventilated cats (n = 10), by recording activity from the following nerves: hypoglossal, phrenic, thyroarytenoid and triangularis sterni. Fictive breathing was spontaneous with carbon dioxide above the apnoeic threshold (end-tidal PCO2, 32 +/- 4 mmHg) and fictive swallowing was induced by stimulating the internal branch of the left superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) continuously (0.2 ms pulse duration, 10 Hz). 2. In all ten animals, SLN stimulation evoked short bursts of thyroarytenoid and hypoglossal nerve activity indicative of fictive swallowing. In two of ten animals, respiration was inhibited completely during deglutition. In the other eight animals, fictive breathing and swallowing occurred simultaneously. 3. With SLN stimulation below threshold for eliciting swallowing, the respiratory rhythm decreased, the duration of inspiration did not change but the duration of expiration, especially stage II, increased. Integrated nerve activities indicated that the rate of rise and peak of phrenic nerve activity decreased, stage I expiratory activity of the thyroarytenoid and especially that of the hypoglossal nerve increased and stage II expiratory activity of the triangularis sterni nerve was suppressed completely. However, if inspired carbon dioxide was increased, i.e. hypercapnic ventilation, stage II expiratory activity remained partially during continuous SLN stimulation. 4. Fictive-swallowing bursts occurred only at respiratory phase transitions. At the minimal stimulus intensity that evoked repetitive swallowing bursts, the pattern of interaction between breathing and swallowing central pattern generators was consistent for each animal (n = 7) but was different across animals. In four animals, fictive swallows occurred at the phase transition between stage II expiration and inspiration, at the transition between inspiration and

  20. Radial forearm versus anterolateral thigh flap reconstruction after hemiglossectomy: functional assessment of swallowing and speech.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Hung-Tao; Leu, Yi-Shing; Liu, Chung-Ji; Tung, Kwang-Yi; Lin, Chang-Ching

    2008-02-01

    The authors retrospectively compared the results of postoperative speech and swallowing in patients who had undergone hemiglossectomy for carcinoma of the anterior tongue. Immediate reconstruction in 16 patients was with a free radial forearm flap and in another 16 with an anterolateral thigh flap. Clinical speech pathology evaluation included the Fletcher time-to-time maximum syllable repetition rate, multiple rhyme test, and overall quality and intelligibility of the patients' speech. Evaluation of swallowing included deglutition duration, bolus volume, and ingestion rate. The functional results with both flaps were adequate, and the two groups did not differ significantly between each other for either speech or swallowing.

  1. A Trade-Off between Reproduction and Feather Growth in the Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica)

    PubMed Central

    Saino, Nicola; Romano, Maria; Rubolini, Diego; Ambrosini, Roberto; Romano, Andrea; Caprioli, Manuela; Costanzo, Alessandra; Bazzi, Gaia

    2014-01-01

    Physiological trade-offs mediated by limiting energy, resources or time constrain the simultaneous expression of major functions and can lead to the evolution of temporal separation between demanding activities. In birds, plumage renewal is a demanding activity, which accomplishes fundamental functions, such as allowing thermal insulation, aerodynamics and socio-sexual signaling. Feather renewal is a very expensive and disabling process, and molt is often partitioned from breeding and migration. However, trade-offs between feather renewal and breeding have been only sparsely studied. In barn swallows (Hirundo rustica) breeding in Italy and undergoing molt during wintering in sub-Saharan Africa, we studied this trade-off by removing a tail feather from a large sample of individuals and analyzing growth bar width, reflecting feather growth rate, and length of the growing replacement feather in relation to the stage in the breeding cycle at removal and clutch size. Growth bar width of females and length of the growing replacement feather of both sexes were smaller when the original feather had been removed after clutch initiation. Importantly, in females both growth bar width and replacement feather length were negatively predicted by clutch size, and more strongly so for large clutches and when feather removal occurred immediately after clutch completion. Hence, we found strong, coherent evidence for a trade-off between reproduction, and laying effort in particular, and the ability to generate new feathers. These results support the hypothesis that the derived condition of molting during wintering in long-distance migrants is maintained by the costs of overlapping breeding and molt. PMID:24826890

  2. A trade-off between reproduction and feather growth in the barn swallow (Hirundo rustica).

    PubMed

    Saino, Nicola; Romano, Maria; Rubolini, Diego; Ambrosini, Roberto; Romano, Andrea; Caprioli, Manuela; Costanzo, Alessandra; Bazzi, Gaia

    2014-01-01

    Physiological trade-offs mediated by limiting energy, resources or time constrain the simultaneous expression of major functions and can lead to the evolution of temporal separation between demanding activities. In birds, plumage renewal is a demanding activity, which accomplishes fundamental functions, such as allowing thermal insulation, aerodynamics and socio-sexual signaling. Feather renewal is a very expensive and disabling process, and molt is often partitioned from breeding and migration. However, trade-offs between feather renewal and breeding have been only sparsely studied. In barn swallows (Hirundo rustica) breeding in Italy and undergoing molt during wintering in sub-Saharan Africa, we studied this trade-off by removing a tail feather from a large sample of individuals and analyzing growth bar width, reflecting feather growth rate, and length of the growing replacement feather in relation to the stage in the breeding cycle at removal and clutch size. Growth bar width of females and length of the growing replacement feather of both sexes were smaller when the original feather had been removed after clutch initiation. Importantly, in females both growth bar width and replacement feather length were negatively predicted by clutch size, and more strongly so for large clutches and when feather removal occurred immediately after clutch completion. Hence, we found strong, coherent evidence for a trade-off between reproduction, and laying effort in particular, and the ability to generate new feathers. These results support the hypothesis that the derived condition of molting during wintering in long-distance migrants is maintained by the costs of overlapping breeding and molt.

  3. Learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Lyon, G R

    1996-01-01

    Approximately 5% of all public school students are identified as having a learning disability (LD). LD is not a single disorder, but includes disabilities in any of seven areas related to reading, language, and mathematics. These separate types of learning disabilities frequently co-occur with one another and with social skill deficits and emotional or behavioral disorders. Most of the available information concerning learning disabilities relates to reading disabilities, and the majority of children with learning disabilities have their primary deficits in basic reading skills. An important part of the definition of LD is its exclusions: learning disabilities cannot be attributed primarily to mental retardation, emotional disturbance, cultural difference, or disadvantage. Thus, the concept of LD focuses on the notion of a discrepancy between a child's academic achievement and his or her apparent capacity to learn. Recent research indicates, however, that disability in basic reading skills is primarily caused by deficits in phonological awareness, which is independent of any achievement-capacity discrepancy. Deficits in phonological awareness can be identified in late kindergarten and first grade using inexpensive, straightforward testing protocol. Interventions have varying effectiveness, depending largely on the severity of the individual child's disability. The prevalence of learning disability identification has increased dramatically in the past 20 years. The "real" prevalence of LD is subject to much dispute because of the lack of an agreed-upon definition of LD with objective identification criteria. Some researchers have argued that the currently recognized 5% prevalence rate is inflated; others argue that LD is still underidentified. In fact, it appears that there are both sound and unsound reasons for the increase in identification rates. Sound reasons for the increase include better research, a broader definition of disability in reading, focusing on

  4. Reversible Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    will have been introduced. 9. Reversible celular autemata We shall assume the reader to have some familiarity with the concept of cel- lular...10003 Mr. Kin B. Thcmpson 1 copy Technical Director Information Systems Divisia.i Naval Research Laboratory (OP-91T) Technical Information Division

  5. Reverse mortgages.

    PubMed

    Farnesi, D

    1995-09-01

    Elders and their families are often caught in a financial bind when it comes to paying for much-needed home care services. Reverse mortgages may offer a solution to elderly home care clients who own their homes but have a limited income with which to maintain their independence.

  6. REVERSE OSMOSIS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    acetate membranes. Mechanisms of the process and porous cellulose acetate membrane technology are briefly reviewed. Based on a general capillary...The reverse osmosis process is discussed with particular reference to systems involving aqueous solutions and Loeb-Sourirajan-type porous cellulose

  7. Swallowing Disorders in Sjögren's Syndrome: Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Effects on Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Jenny L; Tanner, Kristine; Merrill, Ray M; Miller, Karla L; Kendall, Katherine A; Roy, Nelson

    2016-02-01

    This epidemiological investigation examined the prevalence, risk factors, and quality-of-life effects of swallowing disorders in Sjögren's syndrome (SS). One hundred and one individuals with primary or secondary SS (94 females, 7 males; mean age 59.4, SD = 14.1) were interviewed regarding the presence, nature, and impact of swallowing disorders and symptoms. Associations among swallowing disorders and symptoms, select medical and social history factors, SS disease severity, and the M.D. Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI) and Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36) were examined. The prevalence of a current self-reported swallowing disorder was 64.4 %. SS disease severity was the strongest predictor of swallowing disorders, including significant associations with the following swallow symptoms: taking smaller bites, thick mucus in the throat, difficulty placing food in the mouth, and wheezing while eating (p < .05). Additional swallowing disorder risk factors included the presence of a self-reported voice disorder, esophageal reflux, current exposure to secondary tobacco smoke, frequent neck or throat tension, frequent throat clearing, chronic post-nasal drip, and stomach or duodenal ulcers. Swallowing disorders did not differ on the basis of primary or secondary SS. Swallowing disorders and specific swallowing symptoms were uniquely associated with reduced quality of life. Among those with swallowing disorders, 42 % sought treatment, with approximately half reporting improvement. Patient-perceived swallowing disorders are relatively common in SS and increase with disease severity. Specific swallowing symptoms uniquely and significantly reduce swallow and health-related quality of life, indicating the need for increased identification and management of dysphagia in this population.

  8. Multiple Disabilities. NICHCY Disability Fact Sheet #10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The term "multiple disabilities" is general and broad. From the term, you cannot tell how many disabilities a child has; which disabilities are involved; or how severe each disability is. Many combinations of disabilities are possible. The different disabilities will also have a combined impact. That is why it is also important to ask:…

  9. Biochemical Reversal of Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, John T. A.

    2006-03-01

    We cite our progress on biochemical reversal of aging. However, it may be circa 2 years before we have necessary substances at low cost. Meanwhile, without them, a number of measures can be adopted providing marked improvement for the problems of aging in modern societies. For example, enzymes are needed to excrete toxins that accelerate aging; Hg is the ultimate toxin that disables all enzymes (including those needed to excrete Hg itself). Low Hg level in the urine, due to loss of excretory ability, causes the diagnosis of Hg toxicity to almost always be missed. Hg sources must be removed from the body! Another example is excess sugar; hyperglycemia decreases intracellular ascorbic acid (AA) by competitively inhibiting the insulin- mediated active transport of AA into cells. Thus, immunity is impaired by low leucocyte AA. AA is needed for new proteins in aging tissues. Humans must supplement AA; their need same as in AA-synthesizing mammals.

  10. Swallows as a sentinel species for contaminant exposure and effect studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, Christine M.; Elliott, John G.; Bishop, Christine Annette; Morrissey, Christy A.

    2011-01-01

    Tree swallows are an important model species to study the effects of contaminants in wild bird populations and have been used extensively in studies across North America. The advantages of swallows compared to other avian species are detailed. Three case histories are provided where swallows have been successfully used in Natural Resource Damage and Ecological Risk Assessments. The final two sections of this chapter are for individuals who want more in-depth information and include a summary of the chemical classes for which there are swallow data, including effect levels when known. Information provided in this section can be used to put exposure to most classes of contaminants into context with other sites across North America. Finally, commonly used endpoints, ranging from population-level down to cellular and genetic endpoints, are discussed including considerations and pitfalls, and when further work is needed to more fully understand the role of environmental and biological variation in interpreting these endpoints.

  11. Limited receptive area neural classifier for recognition of swallowing sounds using continuous wavelet transform.

    PubMed

    Makeyev, Oleksandr; Sazonov, Edward; Schuckers, Stephanie; Lopez-Meyer, Paulo; Melanson, Ed; Neuman, Michael

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we propose a sound recognition technique based on the limited receptive area (LIRA) neural classifier and continuous wavelet transform (CWT). LIRA neural classifier was developed as a multipurpose image recognition system. Previous tests of LIRA demonstrated good results in different image recognition tasks including: handwritten digit recognition, face recognition, metal surface texture recognition, and micro work piece shape recognition. We propose a sound recognition technique where scalograms of sound instances serve as inputs of the LIRA neural classifier. The methodology was tested in recognition of swallowing sounds. Swallowing sound recognition may be employed in systems for automated swallowing assessment and diagnosis of swallowing disorders. The experimental results suggest high efficiency and reliability of the proposed approach.

  12. Effect of citric acid and citric acid-sucrose mixtures on swallowing in neurogenic oropharyngeal dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Cathy A; Lawless, Harry T

    2003-01-01

    The ability of sour and sweet-sour mixtures to improve swallowing in 11 nursing home residents with neurogenic oropharyngeal dysphagia was investigated using fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing. Citric acid (2.7%) significantly reduced aspiration and penetration compared with water. Teaspoon delivery of liquids significantly reduced aspiration and penetration compared with natural cup drinking. Subjects tended to appropriately self-regulate the cup volume they consumed after the first trial. A significant increase in spontaneous dry swallows was observed after both taste stimuli. The mechanisms for improved swallowing due to citric acid are not understood but may be due to increased gustatory and trigeminal stimulation of acid to the brainstem in neurologically impaired subjects.

  13. Vasectomy reversal.

    PubMed

    Belker, A M

    1987-02-01

    A vasovasostomy may be performed on an outpatient basis with local anesthesia, but also may be performed on an outpatient basis with epidural or general anesthesia. Local anesthesia is preferred by most of my patients, the majority of whom choose this technique. With proper preoperative and intraoperative sedation, patients sleep lightly through most of the procedure. Because of the length of time often required for bilateral microsurgical vasoepididymostomy, epidural or general anesthesia and overnight hospitalization are usually necessary. Factors influencing the preoperative choice for vasovasostomy or vasoepididymostomy in patients undergoing vasectomy reversal are considered. The preoperative planned choice of vasovasostomy or vasoepididymostomy for patients having vasectomy reversal described herein does not have the support of all urologists who regularly perform these procedures. My present approach has evolved as the data reported in Tables 1 and 2 have become available, but it may change as new information is evaluated. However, it offers a logical method for planning choices of anesthesia and inpatient or outpatient status for patients undergoing vasectomy reversal procedures.

  14. Both head extension and mouth opening impair the ability to swallow in the supine position.

    PubMed

    Hanamoto, H; Kadono, K; Boku, A; Kudo, C; Morimoto, Y; Sugimura, M; Niwa, H

    2014-08-01

    Head position and mouth opening in the supine position may impair the ability to swallow. If this does occur, it would lead to retention of intra-oral fluids during dental treatment, which would lead to stimulation of the cough reflex. This study was conducted to investigate how head position and mouth opening affect swallowing ability. The water swallowing test was performed in 13 healthy adult subjects in the supine position. The subjects were asked to swallow 10 mL of water that was injected into the mouth in a single attempt. After swallowing, the residual intra-oral water was suctioned and its volume was measured. An electromyogram (EMG) of the suprahyoid (SH) muscles was also recorded during the test. The duration of SH muscle activity and peak amplitude of SH EMG were examined. The water swallowing test was performed under three head positions (neutral, extended and flexed) and four mouth opening patterns (interincisal distances of 0, 20, 30 and 40 mm). The wider the subject opened the mouth, the more the water remained in the mouth after swallowing. The residual volume of water was more in the extended position compared with that in the neutral and flexed positions. Peak amplitude of SH EMG decreased with mouth opening. Duration of SH muscle activity was longer in the extended position than in the neutral and flexed positions. Head extension and mouth opening can induce difficulty in swallowing in the supine position by extending the duration of SH muscle activity while reducing its intensity. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Hot water swallows improve symptoms and accelerate esophageal clearance in esophageal motility disorders.

    PubMed

    Triadafilopoulos, G; Tsang, H P; Segall, G M

    1998-06-01

    Cold liquid ingestion may precipitate episodes of dysphagia and chest pain in patients with spastic esophageal motility disorders. The effect of hot liquids on esophageal symptoms, esophageal peristalsis, and clearance and any potential therapeutic benefit in such patients has not been examined. Using esophageal scintigraphy and manometry, we have investigated the effects of hot water swallows on dysphagia, chest pain, and esophageal motility and clearance in patients with esophageal motility disorders. We studied 48 men and women with intermittent dysphagia to both solids and liquids, chest pain, and/or regurgitation. All patients underwent upper endoscopy, barium swallow, and esophageal manometry using standard techniques. Esophageal scintigraphy assessed esophageal transit time (ETT) and retrograde intraesophageal movement of bolus at baseline (22 degrees C) and after hot (60 degrees C) water swallows. Esophageal manometry assessed the amplitude and duration of esophageal contractions in response to baseline and hot water swallows. Patients were followed clinically for as long as 6 months to assess symptomatic response. We found that baseline esophageal scintigraphy revealed a mean ETT of 48.5 seconds; after hot water swallow, mean ETT was 27.8 seconds (p < 0.001). The number of secondary peaks at baseline was 3.5; after hot water swallow, it was 2.1 (p < 0.001). Baseline esophageal manometry showed a mean esophageal body contraction amplitude of 188 mm Hg (mean duration, 11.8 seconds) in response to wet swallows and 125 mm Hg (mean duration, 5.7 seconds) with hot water swallows (p < 0.001). Clinically, 28 (58%) of 48 patients noted significant (>50%) improvement of their symptoms and have been ingesting hot water or other hot liquids regularly with their meals. We conclude that hot water accelerates esophageal clearance, decreases the amplitude and duration of esophageal body contractions, and improves symptoms in patients with esophageal motility disorders

  16. Characteristics of eating and swallowing problems in patients who have dementia with Lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Shunichiro; Adachi, Hiroyoshi; Toyota, Yasutaka; Mori, Takaaki; Matsumoto, Izumi; Fukuhara, Ryuji; Ikeda, Manabu

    2009-06-01

    Eating problems occur frequently in patients with dementia, and almost half of all patients with Parkinson's disease have such problems. It has therefore been assumed that eating problems are also common in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). However, few systematic studies have investigated eating problems in DLB patients. The aim of this study was to clarify the frequency and characteristics of eating problems in patients with DLB. We examined 29 consecutive patients with DLB and 33 with Alzheimer's disease (AD) in terms of age, sex, education, Mini-mental State Examination, clinical dementia rating (CDR), neuropsychiatric inventory (NPI), Unified Parkinson disease rating scale (UPDRS), fluctuations in cognition, and usage of neuroleptic drugs / antiparkinsonian drugs. We employed a comprehensive questionnaire comprising 40 items and compared the scores between the two groups. DLB patients showed significantly higher scores than AD patients for "difficulty in swallowing foods," "difficulty in swallowing liquids," "coughing or choking when swallowing," "taking a long time to swallow," "suffering from sputum," "loss of appetite," "need watching or help," and "constipation". Only the UPDRS score significantly affected the scores for "difficulty in swallowing foods," "taking a long time to swallow" and "needs watching or help" score, whereas only the NPI score affected the score for "loss of appetite." The scores for UPDRS, NPI and CDR significantly affected the scores for "difficulty in swallowing liquids." No significant independent variables affected the scores for "coughing or choking when swallowing," "suffering from sputum" and "constipation." Although DLB patients show many eating problems, the causes of each problem vary, and the severity of dementia or Parkinsonism is not the only determinant.

  17. Modulation of activity in swallowing motor cortex following esophageal acidification: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Paine, Peter A; Hamdy, Shaheen; Chitnis, Xavier; Gregory, Lloyd J; Giampietro, Vincent; Brammer, Mick; Williams, Steve; Aziz, Qasim

    2008-06-01

    Esophageal acid exposure induces sensory and motility changes in the upper gastrointestinal tract; however, the mechanisms involved and the effects on activity in the brain regions that control swallowing are unknown. The aim of this study was to examine functional changes in the cortical swallowing network as a result of esophageal acidification using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Seven healthy volunteers (3 female, age range=20-30 years) were randomized to receive either a 0.1 M hydrochloric acid or (control) saline infusion for 30 min into the distal esophagus. Postinfusion, subjects underwent four 8 min blocks of fMRI over 1 h. These alternated between 1 min swallowing water boluses and 1 min rest. Three-dimensional cluster analysis for group brain activation during swallowing was performed together with repeated-measures ANOVA for differences between acid and saline. After acid infusion, swallowing-induced activation was seen predominantly in postcentral gyrus (p<0.004). ANOVA comparison of acid with saline showed a significant relative reduction in activation during swallowing of the precentral gyrus (M1) BA 4 (p<0.008) in response to acid infusion. No areas of increased cortical activation were identified with acid vs. saline during swallowing. Esophageal acidification inhibits motor and association cortical areas during a swallowing task, probably via changes in vagal afferent or nociceptive input from the esophagus. This mechanism may play a protective role, facilitating acid clearance by reduced descending central motor inhibition of enteric/spinal reflexes, or by preventing further ingestion of injurious agents.

  18. Using the gugging swallowing screen (GUSS) for dysphagia screening in acute stroke patients.

    PubMed

    John, Jennilee St; Berger, Linley

    2015-03-01

    Aspiration pneumonia from dysphagia following stroke presents significant morbidity and mortality in that population. Dysphagia screening before oral intake has been a standard of care for years, but there is a lack of consensus on the best screening tool. The Gugging Swallowing Screen (GUSS) is presented as a potentially better alternative to other dysphagia screens due to its safer progression of oral intake, more thorough evaluation of swallowing, and ability to enable earlier nutrition.

  19. Endoscopic removal of throat-packing gauze swallowed during general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Toshinori; Goto, Takahisa; Matsui, Yoshiro; Tohnai, Iwai

    2012-09-01

    Throat packing is commonly placed in the pharynx before starting oral and maxillofacial surgery under general anesthesia to protect the airway from aspiration of blood and surgical debris. Complications such as airway obstruction may arise if any of the throat packing is retained after extubation, and less commonly, swallowing of the throat packing has been reported. We report endoscopic removal of throat packing gauze swallowed during general anesthesia.

  20. Accumulation of PCB congeners in nestling tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) on the Hudson River, New York.

    PubMed

    Echols, Kathy R; Tillitt, Donald E; Nichols, John W; Secord, Anne L; McCarty, John P

    2004-12-01

    Tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) were used as a sentinel species to monitor the contamination and bioavailability of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the Hudson River watershed. Several tree swallow nest box colonies around and downstream from Hudson Falls, NY, were studied. Tree swallow eggs, adults, and 5-, 10-, and 15-day-old nestlings were collected and analyzed for 103 PCB congeners. Emergent insects collected by net (primarily Odonata) or as a food bolus (primarily Diptera) taken from the mouths of adult tree swallows returning to the nest were analyzed in the same manner. Total PCB concentrations (wet weight) in eggs from two contaminated sites ranged from 9000 to 25,000 ng/g and accumulated to 32,000 and 96,000 ng/g in 15-day-old nestling at two contaminated sites. The congener patterns of PCBs in eggs, nestlings, and adults were compared to those found in emergent insects (Odonata and Diptera) using principal components analysis. The PCB patterns of the biota differed from that of Aroclor technical mixtures. PCB patterns in adult tree swallows were similar to those in eggs, while the patterns in dietary insects were similar to nestling tree swallows. Uptake rate constants were determined for tree swallow nestlings and compared between the two contaminated sites. The estimated PCB congener uptake rate constants were 0.008-0.02 d(-1) based on uptake in nestlings until day 15 post-hatch. The rate constants were comparable between the two study areas and may be used to predict nestling contamination at other locations. Our studies confirm the utility of nestling tree swallows to evaluate localized PCB contamination.

  1. Effect of an intraoral appliance on tongue pressure measured by force exerted during swallowing.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kaifan; Zeng, Jingjing; Xu, Tianmin

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to modify the transpalatal arch design that is used for vertical control of the molars, based on individual muscle strength and morphology features of the tongue during swallowing. Individual Silastic (Müller-Omicron, Cologne, Germany) swallowing tongue records were created and measured for 32 healthy volunteers. The transpalatal arches were modified by adding acrylic pads, based on the swallowing tongue records. Tongue pressure exerted on the hard palate and the acrylic pads at 3 distances to the palatal mucosa during swallowing was measured by pressure sensors for 18 subjects. The intraclass correlation coefficient of the thickness of swallowing tongue records taken by 2 researchers was 0.977, indicating good consistency between these researchers. A significant negative correlation was found between the thickness of the swallowing tongue records and individual tongue pressure (r = -0.511; P <0.01). Tongue pressure exerted on the fabricated pads consistent with swallowing tongue records was significantly higher than on the hard palate, yet not significantly higher than tongue pressure exerted on the pads positioned 3 mm closer to the palatal mucosa. In contrast, increasing the distance of the pad 3 mm away from the mucosa led to significant augmentation of tongue pressure. Creating patient swallowing tongue records is a repeatable and reliable method to reflect individual differences in morphologic features and muscle strengths of the tongue. Decreasing the distance of the pads to the mucosa is preferable if a high force to intrude molars will not be used. On the premise of a patient's tolerance, increasing the distance of the pads away from the mucosa leads to augmentation of tongue force. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Accumulation of PCB congeners in nestling tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) on the Hudson River, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Echols, Kathy R.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Nichols, John W.; Secord, Anne L.; McCarty, John P.

    2004-01-01

    Tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) were used as a sentinel species to monitor the contamination and bioavailability of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the Hudson River watershed. Several tree swallow nest box colonies around and downstream from Hudson Falls, NY, were studied. Tree swallow eggs, adults, and 5-, 10-, and 15-day-old nestlings were collected and analyzed for 103 PCB congeners. Emergent insects collected by net (primarily Odonata) or as a food bolus (primarily Diptera) taken from the mouths of adult tree swallows returning to the nest were analyzed in the same manner. Total PCB concentrations (wet weight) in eggs from two contaminated sites ranged from 9000 to 25 000 ng/g and accumulated to 32 000 and 96 000 ng/g in 15-day-old nestling at two contaminated sites. The congener patterns of PCBs in eggs, nestlings, and adults were compared to those found in emergent insects (Odonata and Diptera) using principal components analysis. The PCB patterns of the biota differed from that of Aroclor technical mixtures. PCB patterns in adult tree swallows were similar to those in eggs, while the patterns in dietary insects were similar to nestling tree swallows. Uptake rate constants were determined for tree swallow nestlings and compared between the two contaminated sites. The estimated PCB congener uptake rate constants were 0.008-0.02 d-1 based on uptake in nestlings until day 15 post-hatch. The rate constants were comparable between the two study areas and may be used to predict nestling contamination at other locations. Our studies confirm the utility of nestling tree swallows to evaluate localized PCB contamination.

  3. Trace element concentrations and bioindicator responses in tree swallows from northwestern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, Christine M.; Custer, T.W.; Warburton, D.; Hoffman, D.J.; Bickham, J.W.; Matson, C.W.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Extremely high concentrations of cadmium (3.5 ug/g dry wgt.) and elevated concentrations of chromium (>10 ug/g dry wgt.) and mercury (1.6 ug/g dry wgt.) were reported in waterbird tissues at Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge in northwestern Minnesota in 1994. Tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) were studied during 1998-2001 at three drainages into the Refuge, two pools on the Refuge, and at a nearby reference location to document whether high levels of contaminants were still present, and if so to quantify the source and severity of the contamination. Trace elements were measured in tree swallow eggs, livers, and diet. Reproductive success and bioindicator responses were monitored. In 2000, water was drawn down on Agassiz Pool, one of the main pools on the Refuge. This presented an opportunity to evaluate the response of trace element concentrations in the diet and tissues of tree swallows after reflooding. High concentrations of trace elements were not detected in swallow tissues, nor were there differences among locations. Less than 20% of swallow samples had detectable concentrations of cadmium or chromium. Mercury concentrations were low and averaged <0.25 ug/g dry wgt. in swallow tissues. Trace elements, including mercury, did not increase in tree swallows following the 2000 drawdown at Agassiz Pool. Hatching success and survival of nestlings to 12 days-of-age for tree swallows on the Refuge were similar to the national average and consistent with background trace element concentrations. Bioindicator measurements were within the normal ranges as well.

  4. Outcomes and predictors of surgical management in type 1 laryngeal cleft swallowing dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Thottam, Prasad John; Georg, Matthew; Chi, David; Mehta, Deepak K

    2016-12-01

    To examine the effect of and predict the success of type 1 laryngeal cleft (LC-1) augmentation through swallowing evaluations. Retrospective chart analysis. Sixty-eight patients with LC-1s underwent interarytenoid injection laryngoplasty (IL) and were examined. The median age at IL was 9 months. Swallowing evaluations were performed pre- and postoperatively using fiberoptic endoscopic examination of swallowing or modified barium swallow. The presence of aspiration or penetrations at various consistencies was recorded. McNemar's tests were used to detect changes in swallowing pre- and postoperatively. Logistic regression was used to assess factors affecting the odds of postoperative success. Preoperatively, 89.7% of patients demonstrated penetration or aspiration. Post-IL, 69.1% were safe for thins, and 75% showed improvement in swallowing. Postoperatively, there was a significant reduction in patients experiencing problems with thin liquids (P < 0.001) and in those with frank or silent aspiration (P < 0.001). Patients with penetrations on thin liquids had higher likelihood of a successful IL (odds ratio [OR] = 3.68, P = 0.021). The probability of success with silent aspiration at any consistency was significantly decreased (OR = 0.26, P = 0.015). Fifteen patients underwent formal endoscopic surgical repair, and 90.0% were safe with thin consistencies postoperatively. A large proportion of patients with LC-1 and associated swallowing dysfunctions respond favorably to IL and formal repair. Children who demonstrated penetration with thin liquids had a higher rate of swallowing dysfunction resolution post-IL; whereas patients demonstrating silent aspiration had poorer responses to IL. 4. Laryngoscope, 126:2838-2843, 2016. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  5. Sucking and swallowing rates after palatal anesthesia: an electromyographic study in infant pigs.

    PubMed

    Holman, Shaina Devi; Waranch, Danielle R; Campbell-Malone, Regina; Ding, Peng; Gierbolini-Norat, Estela M; Lukasik, Stacey L; German, Rebecca Z

    2013-07-01

    Infant mammalian feeding consists of rhythmic suck cycles and reflexive pharyngeal swallows. Although we know how oropharyngeal sensation influences the initiation and frequency of suck and swallow cycles, the role of palatal sensation is unknown. We implanted EMG electrodes into the mylohyoid muscle, a muscle active during suckling, and the thyrohyoid muscle, a muscle active during swallowing, in eight infant pigs. Pigs were then bottle-fed while lateral videofluoroscopy was simultaneously recorded from the electrodes. Two treatments were administered prior to feeding and compared with control feedings: 1) palatal anesthesia (0.5% bupivacaine hydrochloride), and 2) palatal saline. Using the timing of mylohyoid muscle and thyrohyoid muscle activity, we tested for differences between treatment and control feedings for swallowing frequency and suck cycle duration. Following palatal anesthesia, four pigs could not suck and exhibited excessive jaw movement. We categorized the four pigs that could suck after palatal anesthesia as group A, and those who could not as group B. Group A had no significant change in suck cycle duration and a higher swallowing frequency after palatal saline (P = 0.021). Group B had significantly longer suck cycles after palatal anesthesia (P < 0.001) and a slower swallowing frequency (P < 0.001). Swallowing frequency may be a way to predict group membership, since it was different in control feedings between groups (P < 0.001). The qualitative and bimodal group response to palatal anesthesia may reflect a developmental difference. This study demonstrates that palatal sensation is involved in the initiation and frequency of suck and swallow cycles in infant feeding.

  6. Sucking and swallowing rates after palatal anesthesia: an electromyographic study in infant pigs

    PubMed Central

    Waranch, Danielle R.; Campbell-Malone, Regina; Ding, Peng; Gierbolini-Norat, Estela M.; Lukasik, Stacey L.; German, Rebecca Z.

    2013-01-01

    Infant mammalian feeding consists of rhythmic suck cycles and reflexive pharyngeal swallows. Although we know how oropharyngeal sensation influences the initiation and frequency of suck and swallow cycles, the role of palatal sensation is unknown. We implanted EMG electrodes into the mylohyoid muscle, a muscle active during suckling, and the thyrohyoid muscle, a muscle active during swallowing, in eight infant pigs. Pigs were then bottle-fed while lateral videofluoroscopy was simultaneously recorded from the electrodes. Two treatments were administered prior to feeding and compared with control feedings: 1) palatal anesthesia (0.5% bupivacaine hydrochloride), and 2) palatal saline. Using the timing of mylohyoid muscle and thyrohyoid muscle activity, we tested for differences between treatment and control feedings for swallowing frequency and suck cycle duration. Following palatal anesthesia, four pigs could not suck and exhibited excessive jaw movement. We categorized the four pigs that could suck after palatal anesthesia as group A, and those who could not as group B. Group A had no significant change in suck cycle duration and a higher swallowing frequency after palatal saline (P = 0.021). Group B had significantly longer suck cycles after palatal anesthesia (P < 0.001) and a slower swallowing frequency (P < 0.001). Swallowing frequency may be a way to predict group membership, since it was different in control feedings between groups (P < 0.001). The qualitative and bimodal group response to palatal anesthesia may reflect a developmental difference. This study demonstrates that palatal sensation is involved in the initiation and frequency of suck and swallow cycles in infant feeding. PMID:23636723

  7. Thyroid Resection Improves Perception of Swallowing Function in Patients with Thyroid Disease

    PubMed Central

    Greenblatt, David Yü; Sippel, Rebecca; Leverson, Glen; Frydman, James; Schaefer, Sarah; Chen, Herbert

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients with thyroid disease frequently complain of dysphagia. To date, there have been no prospective studies evaluating swallowing function before and after thyroid surgery. We used the swallowing quality of life (SWAL-QOL) validated outcomes assessment tool to measure changes in swallowing-related quality-of-life in patients undergoing thyroid surgery. Methods Patients undergoing thyroid surgery from May 2002 to December 2004 completed the SWAL-QOL questionnaire before and one year after surgery. Data were collected on demographic and clinicopathologic variables, and comparisons were made to determine the effect of surgery on patients’ perceptions of swallowing function. Results Of 146 eligible patients, 116 (79%) completed the study. The mean patient age was 49 years, and 81% were female. Sixty-four patients (55%) underwent total thyroidectomy and the remainder received thyroid lobectomy. Thirty patients (26%) had thyroid cancer. The most frequent benign thyroid conditions were multinodular goiter (28%) and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (27%). Mean pre-operative SWAL-QOL scores were below 90 for nine of the eleven domains, indicating the perception of impaired swallowing and imperfect quality of life. After surgery, significant improvements were seen in eight SWAL-QOL domains. Recurrent laryngeal nerve injury was associated with dramatic score decreases in multiple domains. Conclusions In patients with thyroid disease, uncomplicated thyroidectomy leads to significant improvements in many aspects of patient-reported swallowing-related quality-of-life measured by the SWAL-QOL instrument. PMID:19034567

  8. Development of a Portable Non-Invasive Swallowing and Respiration Assessment Device †

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, Wann-Yun; Wang, Chin-Man; Chang, Chia-Shuo

    2015-01-01

    Dysphagia is a condition that happens when a person cannot smoothly swallow food from the mouth to the stomach. It causes malnourishment in patients, or can even cause death due to aspiration pneumonia. Recently, more and more researchers have focused their attention on the importance of swallowing and respiration coordination, and the use of non-invasive assessment systems has become a hot research trend. In this study, we aimed to integrate the timing and pattern monitoring of respiration and swallowing by using a portable and non-invasive approach which can be applied at the bedside in hospitals or institutions, or in a home environment. In this approach, we use a force sensing resistor (FSR) to detect the motions of the thyroid cartilage in the pharyngeal phase. We also use the surface electromyography (sEMG) to detect the contraction of the submental muscle in the oral phase, and a nasal cannula to detect nasal airflow for respiration monitoring during the swallowing process. All signals are received and processed for swallowing event recognition. A total of 19 volunteers participated in the testing and over 57 measurements were made. The results show that the proposed approach can effectively distinguish the swallowing function in people of different ages and genders. PMID:26024414

  9. Swallowing disorder and inhibition of cough reflex induced by atropine sulfate in conscious dogs.

    PubMed

    Tsubouchi, Tadashi; Tsujimoto, Shinji; Sugimoto, Shinichi; Katsura, Yasunori; Mino, Terumasa; Seki, Takaki

    2008-03-01

    In this study, the effects of atropine sulfate (atropine) on swallowing and cough reflex were evaluated in the two experimental models in conscious dogs. To evaluate the effects of atropine on swallowing, 1 mL of marker (contrast medium) was injected into the pharynx under X-ray exposure to induce swallowing. Baclofen, used as a positive control, caused marker congestion in the upper esophagus. In our experimental model, atropine (0.02 and 0.1 mg/kg, i.v.) dose-dependently increased not only the number of marker congestions but also that of the swallows. In addition, atropine significantly shortened the onset of first swallowing. In the evaluation of atropine effects on electrically evoked cough reflex induced by two electrodes implanted into the trachea, atropine strongly inhibited the number of coughs at 0.01 or 0.05 mg/kg accompanied with 0.01 or 0.05 mg/kg per hour (i.v.), respectively. These findings indicate that atropine has the potential of causing aspiration pneumonia through induction of swallowing disorder and inhibition of the cough reflex.

  10. Intensive swallowing and orofacial contracture rehabilitation after severe burn: A pilot study and literature review.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Nicola A; Ward, Elizabeth C; Maitz, Peter K

    2017-02-01

    Dysphagia following severe burns can be significant and protracted, yet there is little evidence describing the rehabilitation principles, process or outcomes. Outline current evidence and detail the clinical outcomes of two cases who underwent a multifaceted intensive treatment programme aimed at rehabilitating dysphagia by strengthening swallow function and minimising orofacial contractures after severe head and neck burns. Two men (54 and 18 years) with full-thickness head and neck burns and inhalation injury underwent intensive orofacial scar management and dysphagia rehabilitation. Therapy was prescribed, consisting of scar stretching, splinting and pharyngeal swallow tasks. Horizontal and vertical range of movement (HROM; VROM), physiological swallow features, functional swallowing outcomes and related distress, were collected at baseline and routinely until dysphagia resolution and scar stabilisation. At presentation, both cases demonstrated severely reduced HROM and VROM, profound dysphagia and moderate dysphagia related distress. Therapy adherence was high. Resolution of dysphagia to full oral diet, nil physiological swallowing impairment, and nil dysphagia related distress was achieved by 222 and 77 days post injury respectively. VROM and HROM achieved normal range by 237 and 204 days. Active rehabilitation achieved full functional outcomes for swallowing and orofacial range of movement. A protracted duration of therapy can be anticipated in this complex population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  11. Physiology of oropharyngeal swallow in the cat: a videofluoroscopic and electromyographic study.

    PubMed

    Kobara-Mates, M; Logemann, J A; Larson, C; Kahrilas, P J

    1995-02-01

    The majority of animal studies of deglutition have examined electrically stimulated swallows in sedated animals. This present investigation examined oropharyngeal and cervical esophageal swallow physiology in three awake normal domestic cats using concurrent electromyography (EMG) and videofluorography (VFG). Hooked wire electrodes were surgically implanted into six oropharyngeal muscles in each cat. During collection of VFG and EMG data, each cat ate barium-impregnated cat food while the fluorography tube focused on a lateral view of the oral cavity, pharynx, and cervical esophagus. A number of significant differences in the physiology of swallowing were found between the cat and human adult. The oral stage of swallow is much longer in the cat with bolus accumulation in the valleculae. Duration and components of the pharyngeal stage of swallow are much faster, and the pharyngeal stage occurs earlier in relation to bolus passage through the cricopharyngeus. In addition, the cat exhibits a marked superior constrictor bulge at the onset of the pharyngeal contractile wave and summation of the peristaltic waves in the esophagus, whereas the human adult does not. Feline swallow physiology is more similar to that of the human infant than that of human adults.

  12. Relationships Among Rheological, Sensory Texture, and Swallowing Pressure Measurements of Hydrocolloid-Thickened Fluids.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Z; Damodhar, H; Grummer, C; Mendenhall, H; Banaszynski, K; Hartel, R; Hind, J; Joyce, A; Kaufman, A; Robbins, J

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationships among three categories of measurements (rheological, sensory texture, and swallowing pressure) from fluids thickened to two different viscosities with 15 different hydrocolloids. Fluids at viscosities of 300 and 1500 cP (at 30 s(-1)) were targeted because these are the viscosities corresponding to the barium standards used in radiographic dysphagia diagnosis. Within the low viscosity (nectar) fluids (300 cP), the sensory properties thickness, stickiness, adhesiveness, mouth coating, and number of swallows were highly positively correlated with each other and highly positively correlated with the flow behavior index, n value (an indicator of shear-thinning behavior). Within the higher viscosity (thin honey) fluids (1500 cP), the sensory textures of adhesiveness, stickiness, mouth coating, and number of swallows correlated positively with rheological measures of n value. Swallowing pressures measured in the anterior oral cavity correlated negatively with the consistency coefficient k [shear stress/(shear rate) (n) ]. Samples that were more shear thinning (lower n values, higher k values) were generally perceived as less thick, with less adhesive properties (stickiness, adhesiveness, mouthcoating, and number of swallows). This information can be useful for selecting thickeners for people with dysphagia. A desirable thickener for many dysphagic patients would be one that allowed for a safe swallow by being viscous enough to reduce airway penetration, yet pleasant to drink, having the minimal perceived thickness and mouthcoating associated with greater shear thinning.

  13. Effects of mercury exposure on the reproductive success of tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor).

    PubMed

    Brasso, Rebecka L; Cristol, Daniel A

    2008-02-01

    An experimental tree swallow population was established in the headwaters of the Shenandoah River, Virginia, USA to assess the accumulation and effects of mercury contamination on birds that eat emergent aquatic insects. One tributary, the South River, was contaminated with mercury before 1950. Reproductive success of swallows nesting within 50 m of this river was compared to that of three uncontaminated reference tributaries in 2005 and 2006. Female swallows on the contaminated stretch of river had significantly elevated blood and feather total mercury (blood: 3.56 +/- 2.41 ppm ww vs. 0.17 +/- 0.15 ppm reference; feather: 13.55 +/- 6.94 ppm vs. 2.34 +/- 0.87 ppm reference), possibly the highest ever reported for an insectivorous songbird. Insects collected by the swallows to be fed to nestlings averaged 0.97 +/- 1.11 ppm dw total mercury, significantly higher than on reference sites. Swallows in the contaminated area produced fewer fledglings than those in reference areas. The effect of mercury contamination on productivity was detectable only for young females in the contaminated area that were breeding for the first time in 2006, a segment of the population that may already have been stressed by inexperience. Tree swallows served as practical and effective biomonitors for mercury levels and effects and have great potential as proxy biomonitors for more logistically challenging birds such as loons or eagles.

  14. Targeted exercise therapy for voice and swallow in persons with Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Russell, John A.; Ciucci, Michelle R.; Connor, Nadine P.; Schallert, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    Sensorimotor deficits affecting voice and swallowing ability can have a devastating impact on the quality of life of people with Parkinson disease (PD). Recent scientific findings in animal models of PD pinpoint targeted exercise therapy as a potential treatment to reduce neurochemical loss and decrease parkinsonian symptoms. Although there may be beneficial effects, targeted exercise therapy is not a standard component of therapy for the cranial sensiromotor deficits seen in PD. In this paper we review the scientific evidence for targeted training for voice and swallowing deficits. The literature search revealed 19 publications that included targeted training for voice and only one publication that included targeted training for swallowing. We summarize 3 main findings: 1) targeted training may be associated with lasting changes in voice behavior, 2) targeted training of sensorimotor actions with anatomical or functional overlap with voice and swallowing may improve voice and swallowing to some degree, but it is unknown whether these effects endure over time, and 3) evidence regarding cranial sensorimotor interventions for Parkinson disease is sparse. We concluded that targeted training for voice and swallow is a promising but under-studied intervention for cranial sensorimotor deficits associated with PD and posit that animal models can be useful in designing empirically based studies that further the science on targeted training. PMID:20233583

  15. Brain regions involved in swallowing: Evidence from stroke patients in a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Dehaghani, Shiva Ebrahimian; Yadegari, Fariba; Asgari, Ali; Chitsaz, Ahmad; Karami, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Limited data available about the mechanisms of dysphagia and areas involving swallow after brain damage; accordingly it is hard to predict which cases are more likely to develop swallowing dysfunction based on the neuroimaging. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between brain lesions and dysphagia in a sample of acute conscious stroke patients. Materials and Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 113 acute conscious stroke patients (69 male mean [standard deviation (SD)] age 64.37 [15.1]), participated in this study. Two neurologists and one radiologist localized brain lesions according to neuroimaging of the patients. Swallowing functions were assessed clinically by an expert speech pathologist with the Mann Assessment of Swallowing Ability (MASA). The association of brain region and swallowing problem was statistically evaluated using Chi-square test. Results: Mean (SD) MASA score for the dysphagic patients was 139.61 (29.77). Swallowing problem was significantly more prevalent in the right primary sensory (P = 0.03), right insula (P = 0.005), and right internal capsule (P = 0.05). Conclusion: It may be concluded from these findings that the right hemisphere lesions associated with occurring dysphagia. Further studies using more advanced diagnostic tools on big samples particularly in a perspective structure are needed. PMID:27904591

  16. Effect of aging on cough and swallowing reflexes: implications for preventing aspiration pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Ebihara, Satoru; Ebihara, Takae; Kohzuki, Masahiro

    2012-02-01

    The impairment of airway protective reflexes, i.e., swallowing and cough reflexes, is thought to be one of the major causes for aspiration pneumonia in older people. Restoration of cough and swallowing reflexes in the elderly is key to preventing aspiration pneumonia in the elderly. Although, the medical literature has asserted that cough and swallowing are controlled primarily by the brainstem, recent advances in human brain imaging has provided evidence that cortical and subcortical structures play critical roles in cough and swallowing control. Because of their nature, reflexive cough and swallowing activate both sensory and motor areas in the cortex. In both protective reflexes, the sensory component, including sensory cortex in reflexive circuits, seems to be more vulnerable to aging than the motor component, including the motor cortex. Therefore, the strategy to restore cough and swallowing reflexes should be focused on compensations of sensory components in these reflexive circuits. Remedies to enhance sensory nerve terminals and sensory cortical areas related to these reflexes might be useful to prevent aspiration pneumonia in the elderly.

  17. A model experiment to study swallowing of spherical and elongated particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marconati, Marco; Raut, Sharvari; Charkhi, Farshad; Burbidge, Adam; Engmann, Jan; Ramaioli, Marco

    2017-06-01

    Swallowing disorders are not uncommon among elderly and people affected by neurological diseases. For these patients the ingestion of solid grains, such as pharmaceutical oral solid formulations, could result in choking. This generally results in a low compliance in taking solid medications. The effect of the solid medication size on the real or perceived ease of swallowing is still to be understood from the mechanistic viewpoint. The interplay of the inclusion shape and the rheology of the liquid being swallowed together with the medication is also not fully understood. In this study, a model experiment was developed to study the oropharyngeal phase of swallowing, replicating the dynamics of the bolus flow induced by the tongue (by means of a roller driven by an applied force). Experiments were performed using a wide set of solid inclusions, dispersed in a thick Newtonian liquid. Predictions for a simple theory are compared with experiments. Results show that an increase in the grain size results in a slower dynamics of the swallowing. Furthermore, the experiments demonstrated the paramount role of shape, as flatter and more streamlined inclusions flow faster than spherical. This approach can support the design of new oral solid formulations that can be ingested more easily and effectively also by people with mild swallowing disorders.

  18. The Food Contaminant Mycotoxin Deoxynivalenol Inhibits the Swallowing Reflex in Anaesthetized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Abysique, Anne; Tardivel, Catherine; Troadec, Jean-Denis; Félix, Bernadette

    2015-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), one of the most abundant mycotoxins found on cereals, is known to be implicated in acute and chronic illnesses in both humans and animals. Among the symptoms, anorexia, reduction of weight gain and decreased nutrition efficiency were described, but the mechanisms underlying these effects on feeding behavior are not yet totally understood. Swallowing is a major motor component of ingestive behavior which allows the propulsion of the alimentary bolus from the mouth to the esophagus. To better understand DON effects on ingestive behaviour, we have studied its effects on rhythmic swallowing in the rat, after intravenous and central administration. Repetitive electrical stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve or of the tractus solitarius, induces rhythmic swallowing that can be recorded using electromyographic electrodes inserted in sublingual muscles. Here we provide the first demonstration that, after intravenous and central administration, DON strongly inhibits the swallowing reflex with a short latency and in a dose dependent manner. Moreover, using c-Fos staining, a strong neuronal activation was observed in the solitary tract nucleus which contains the central pattern generator of swallowing and in the area postrema after DON intravenous injection. Our data show that DON modifies swallowing and interferes with central neuronal networks dedicated to food intake regulation. PMID:26192767

  19. Cine MRI of swallowing in patients with advanced oral or oropharyngeal carcinoma: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Kreeft, Anne Marijn; Rasch, Coen R N; Muller, Sara H; Pameijer, Frank A; Hallo, Eeke; Balm, Alfons J M

    2012-06-01

    Treatment of oral and oropharyngeal cancer may cause dysphagia. Purpose is to examine whether cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) yields additional information compared to standard examination in the evaluation of posttreatment dysphagia and mobility of oral and oropharyngeal structures. Thirty-four cine MRIs were made in 23 patients with advanced oral and oropharyngeal cancer, consisting of an MR image every 800 ms during swallowing which is compared to videofluoroscopy and quality of life questionnaires. A scoring system was applied to assess mobility on cine MR and videofluoroscopy leading to a score ranging from 9 to 17. Cine MRI of the swallowing in a midsagittal plane visualized the tumor (if located in the same plane), important anatomic structures and surgical reconstructions. Posttreatment mobility on cine MRI and videofluoroscopy was significantly diminished compared to pretreatment, mean pretreatment cine MRI score was 10.8 and posttreatment 12.4 (p = 0.017). Impaired mobility on cine MRI was significantly correlated to more swallowing problems (Spearman's correlation coefficient 0.73, p = 0.04), on videofluoroscopy not. Cine MRI is a promising new technique as an adjunct to standard examinations for evaluation of swallowing in patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer. Cine MRI directly visualizes the dynamics of swallowing and allows evaluation of pre- and posttreatment differences. Abnormal findings are significantly correlated with subjective swallowing complaints of patients.

  20. Learning about the dynamic swallowing process using an interactive multimedia program.

    PubMed

    Scholten, I; Russell, A

    2000-01-01

    The management of dysphagia is the largest recognized subspecialty in the field of speech-language pathology. Practicing speech-language pathologists require a comprehensive theoretical and functional knowledge base to underpin the safe and effective management of people with dysphagia. Students need to develop an understanding of the normal integrated swallow and how it can be affected to appreciate the assessment or treatment of dysphagia. Although students are well motivated to learn this material, assimilating knowledge of the dynamic nature of the swallow has typically been problematic because of its complex character. The limitations of currently available teaching resources have been addressed by the production of an interactive multimedia program that includes integrated presentation of text, graphics, voice-overs, and video and animation sequences to highlight various aspects of the swallowing process. Students can selectively manipulate parts of this process to understand the normal swallow and to simulate different aspects of dysfunction and the consequent effects on swallow safety and efficiency. Feedback from students, faculty, and experts has demonstrated that The Dynamic Swallow would be a valued tool in the teaching of dysphagia.