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Sample records for reversibly bound analogues

  1. Fluoride complexes of aluminium or beryllium act on G-proteins as reversibly bound analogues of the gamma phosphate of GTP.

    PubMed Central

    Bigay, J; Deterre, P; Pfister, C; Chabre, M

    1987-01-01

    Fluoride activation of G proteins requires the presence of aluminium or beryllium and it has been suggested that AIF4- acts as an analogue of the gamma-phosphate of GTP in the nucleotide site. We have investigated the action of AIF4- or of BeF3- on transducin (T), the G protein of the retinal rods, either indirectly through the activation of cGMP phosphodiesterase, or more directly through their effects on the conformation of transducin itself. In the presence of AIF4- or BeF3-, purified T alpha subunit of transducin activates purified cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) in the absence of photoactivated rhodopsin. Activation is totally reversed by elution of fluoride or partially reversed by addition of excess T beta gamma. Activation requires that GDP or a suitable analogue be bound to T alpha: T alpha-GDP and T alpha-GDP alpha S are activable by fluorides, but not T alpha-GDP beta S, nor T alpha that has released its nucleotide upon binding to photoexcited rhodopsin. Analysis of previous works on other G proteins and with other nucleotide analogues confirm that in all cases fluoride activation requires that a GDP unsubstituted at its beta phosphate be bound in T alpha. By contrast with alumino-fluoride complexes, which can adopt various coordination geometries, all beryllium fluoride complexes are tetracoordinated, with a Be-F bond length of 1.55 A, and strictly isomorphous to a phosphate group. Our study confirms that fluoride activation of transducin results from a reversible binding of the metal-fluoride complex in the nucleotide site of T alpha, next to the beta phosphate of GDP, as an analogue of the gamma phosphate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:2826123

  2. Butterfly velocity bound and reverse isoperimetric inequality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xing-Hui; Lü, H.

    2017-03-01

    We study the butterfly effect of the AdS planar black holes in the framework of Einstein's general relativity. We find that the butterfly velocities can be expressed by a universal formula vB2=T S /(2 VthP ). In doing so, we come upon a near-horizon geometrical formula for the thermodynamical volume Vth . We verify the volume formula by examining a variety of AdS black holes. We also show that the volume formula implies that the conjectured reverse isoperimetric inequality follows straightforwardly from the null-energy condition, for static AdS black holes. The inequality is thus related to an upper bound of the butterfly velocities.

  3. Structural basis for activation of α-boranophosphate nucleotide analogues targeting drug-resistant reverse transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Philippe; Schneider, Benoît; Sarfati, Simon; Deville-Bonne, Dominique; Guerreiro, Catherine; Boretto, Joëlle; Janin, Joël; Véron, Michel; Canard, Bruno

    2000-01-01

    AIDS chemotherapy is limited by inadequate intracellular concentrations of the active triphosphate form of nucleoside analogues, leading to incomplete inhibition of viral replication and the appearance of drug-resistant virus. Drug activation by nucleoside diphosphate kinase and inhibition of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase were studied comparatively. We synthesized analogues with a borano (BH3–) group on the α-phosphate, and found that they are substrates for both enzymes. X-ray structures of complexes with nucleotide diphosphate kinase provided a structural basis for their activation. The complex with d4T triphosphate displayed an intramolecular CH…O bond contributing to catalysis, and the Rp diastereoisomer of thymidine α-boranotriphosphate bound like a normal substrate. Using α-(Rp)-boranophosphate derivatives of the clinically relevant compounds AZT and d4T, the presence of the α-borano group improved both phosphorylation by nucleotide diphosphate kinase and inhibition of reverse transcription. Moreover, repair of blocked DNA chains by pyrophosphorolysis was reduced significantly in variant reverse transcriptases bearing substitutions found in drug-resistant viruses. Thus, the α-borano modification of analogues targeting reverse transcriptase may be of generic value in fighting viral drug resistance. PMID:10899107

  4. Structural basis for activation of alpha-boranophosphate nucleotide analogues targeting drug-resistant reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Meyer, P; Schneider, B; Sarfati, S; Deville-Bonne, D; Guerreiro, C; Boretto, J; Janin, J; Véron, M; Canard, B

    2000-07-17

    AIDS chemotherapy is limited by inadequate intracellular concentrations of the active triphosphate form of nucleoside analogues, leading to incomplete inhibition of viral replication and the appearance of drug-resistant virus. Drug activation by nucleoside diphosphate kinase and inhibition of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase were studied comparatively. We synthesized analogues with a borano (BH(3)(-)) group on the alpha-phosphate, and found that they are substrates for both enzymes. X-ray structures of complexes with nucleotide diphosphate kinase provided a structural basis for their activation. The complex with d4T triphosphate displayed an intramolecular CH.O bond contributing to catalysis, and the R(p) diastereoisomer of thymidine alpha-boranotriphosphate bound like a normal substrate. Using alpha-(R(p))-boranophosphate derivatives of the clinically relevant compounds AZT and d4T, the presence of the alpha-borano group improved both phosphorylation by nucleotide diphosphate kinase and inhibition of reverse transcription. Moreover, repair of blocked DNA chains by pyrophosphorolysis was reduced significantly in variant reverse transcriptases bearing substitutions found in drug-resistant viruses. Thus, the alpha-borano modification of analogues targeting reverse transcriptase may be of generic value in fighting viral drug resistance.

  5. Design and synthesis of biotin analogues reversibly binding with streptavidin.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tomohiro; Aoki, Kiyoshi; Sugiyama, Akira; Doi, Hirofumi; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Shimizu, Yohei; Kanai, Motomu

    2015-04-01

    Two new biotin analogues, biotin carbonate 5 and biotin carbamate 6, have been synthesized. These molecules were designed to reversibly bind with streptavidin by replacing the hydrogen-bond donor NH group(s) of biotin's cyclic urea moiety with oxygen. Biotin carbonate 5 was synthesized from L-arabinose (7), which furnishes the desired stereochemistry at the 3,4-cis-dihydroxy groups, in 11% overall yield (over 10 steps). Synthesis of biotin carbamate 6 was accomplished from L-cysteine-derived chiral aldehyde 33 in 11% overall yield (over 7 steps). Surface plasmon resonance analysis of water-soluble biotin carbonate analogue 46 and biotin carbamate analogue 47 revealed that KD values of these compounds for binding to streptavidin were 6.7×10(-6)  M and 1.7×10(-10)  M, respectively. These values were remarkably greater than that of biotin (KD =10(-15)  M), and thus indicate the importance of the nitrogen atoms for the strong binding between biotin and streptavidin.

  6. L-Enantiomers of Transition State Analogue Inhibitors Bound to Human Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase

    SciTech Connect

    Rinaldo-Matthis,A.; Murkin, A.; Ramagopal, U.; Clinch, K.; Mee, S.; Evans, G.; Tyler, P.; Furneaux, R.; Almo, S.; Schramm, v.

    2008-01-01

    Human purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) was crystallized with transition-state analogue inhibitors Immucillin-H and DADMe-Immucillin-H synthesized with ribosyl mimics of l-stereochemistry. The inhibitors demonstrate that major driving forces for tight binding of these analogues are the leaving group interaction and the cationic mimicry of the transition state, even though large geometric changes occur with d-Immucillins and l-Immucillins bound to human PNP.

  7. The nature of reversible and not readily reversible bovine corpus luteum plasma membranes bound human chorionic gonadotropin.

    PubMed

    Rao, C V; Carman, F R

    1986-10-01

    125I-human chorionic gonadotropin (125I-hCG) bound to plasma membranes of bovine corpora lutea consisted of reversible and not readily reversible fractions. The not readily reversible fraction progressively increased as the length and the temperature of preincubation were increased. The not readily reversible fraction was, however, completely eluted after any time or temperature of preincubation. Although the not readily reversible and reversible bound 125I-hCG were precipitated equally well with 10% trichloroacetic acid, the not readily reversible bound 125I-hCG was able to rebind much higher to fresh plasma membranes compared to reversible bound 125I-hCG. These findings suggest that while not readily reversible bound 125I-hCG was intact, the reversible bound 125I-hCG was somewhat altered during the binding reaction.

  8. The Analogue of the Aharonov-Bohm Effect for Bound States for Neutral Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakke, Knut; Furtado, C.

    We study the analogue of the Aharonov-Bohm effect for bound states for a neutral particle with a permanent magnetic dipole moment interacting with an external field. We consider a neutral particle confined to moving between two coaxial cylinders and show the dependence of the energy levels on the Aharonov-Casher quantum flux. Moreover, we show that the same flux dependence of the bound states can be found when the neutral particle is confined to a one-dimensional quantum ring and a quantum dot, and we also calculate the persistent currents in each case.

  9. Structure of Mandelate Racemase with Bound Intermediate Analogues Benzohydroxamate and Cupferron

    SciTech Connect

    Lietzan, Adam D.; Nagar, Mitesh; Pellmann, Elise A.; Bourque, Jennifer R.; Bearne, Stephen L.; Maurice, Martin St.

    2012-05-09

    Mandelate racemase (MR, EC 5.1.2.2) from Pseudomonas putida catalyzes the Mg{sup 2+}-dependent interconversion of the enantiomers of mandelate, stabilizing the altered substrate in the transition state by 26 kcal/mol relative to the substrate in the ground state. To understand the origins of this binding discrimination, we determined the X-ray crystal structures of wild-type MR complexed with two analogues of the putative aci-carboxylate intermediate, benzohydroxamate and Cupferron, to 2.2-{angstrom} resolution. Benzohydroxamate is shown to be a reasonable mimic of the transition state and/or intermediate because its binding affinity for 21 MR variants correlates well with changes in the free energy of transition state stabilization afforded by these variants. Both benzohydroxamate and Cupferron chelate the active site divalent metal ion and are bound in a conformation with the phenyl ring coplanar with the hydroxamate and diazeniumdiolate moieties, respectively. Structural overlays of MR complexed with benzohydroxamate, Cupferron, and the ground state analogue (S)-atrolactate reveal that the para carbon of the substrate phenyl ring moves by 0.8-1.2 {angstrom} between the ground state and intermediate state, consistent with the proposal that the phenyl ring moves during MR catalysis while the polar groups remain relatively fixed. Although the overall protein structure of MR with bound intermediate analogues is very similar to that of MR with bound (S)-atrolactate, the intermediate-Mg{sup 2+} distance becomes shorter, suggesting a tighter complex with the catalytic Mg{sup 2+}. In addition, Tyr 54 moves closer to the phenyl ring of the bound intermediate analogues, contributing to an overall constriction of the active site cavity. However, site-directed mutagenesis experiments revealed that the role of Tyr 54 in MR catalysis is relatively minor, suggesting that alterations in enzyme structure that contribute to discrimination between the altered substrate in the

  10. Structures of mithramycin analogues bound to DNA and implications for targeting transcription factor FLI1

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Caixia; Weidenbach, Stevi; Cano, Kristin E.; Wang, Zhonghua; Mitra, Prithiba; Ivanov, Dmitri N.; Rohr, Jürgen; Tsodikov, Oleg V.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors have been considered undruggable, but this paradigm has been recently challenged. DNA binding natural product mithramycin (MTM) is a potent antagonist of oncogenic transcription factor EWS–FLI1. Structural details of MTM recognition of DNA, including the FLI1 binding sequence GGA(A/T), are needed to understand how MTM interferes with EWS–FLI1. We report a crystal structure of an MTM analogue MTM SA–Trp bound to a DNA oligomer containing a site GGCC, and two structures of a novel analogue MTM SA–Phe in complex with DNA. MTM SA–Phe is bound to sites AGGG and GGGT on one DNA, and to AGGG and GGGA(T) (a FLI1 binding site) on the other, revealing how MTM recognizes different DNA sequences. Unexpectedly, at sub-micromolar concentrations MTMs stabilize FLI1–DNA complex on GGAA repeats, which are critical for the oncogenic function of EWS–FLI1. We also directly demonstrate by nuclear magnetic resonance formation of a ternary FLI1–DNA–MTM complex on a single GGAA FLI1/MTM binding site. These biochemical and structural data and a new FLI1–DNA structure suggest that MTM binds the minor groove and perturbs FLI1 bound nearby in the major groove. This ternary complex model may lead to development of novel MTM analogues that selectively target EWS–FLI1 or other oncogenic transcription factors, as anti-cancer therapeutics. PMID:27587584

  11. Structures of mithramycin analogues bound to DNA and implications for targeting transcription factor FLI1.

    PubMed

    Hou, Caixia; Weidenbach, Stevi; Cano, Kristin E; Wang, Zhonghua; Mitra, Prithiba; Ivanov, Dmitri N; Rohr, Jürgen; Tsodikov, Oleg V

    2016-10-14

    Transcription factors have been considered undruggable, but this paradigm has been recently challenged. DNA binding natural product mithramycin (MTM) is a potent antagonist of oncogenic transcription factor EWS-FLI1. Structural details of MTM recognition of DNA, including the FLI1 binding sequence GGA(A/T), are needed to understand how MTM interferes with EWS-FLI1. We report a crystal structure of an MTM analogue MTM SA-Trp bound to a DNA oligomer containing a site GGCC, and two structures of a novel analogue MTM SA-Phe in complex with DNA. MTM SA-Phe is bound to sites AGGG and GGGT on one DNA, and to AGGG and GGGA(T) (a FLI1 binding site) on the other, revealing how MTM recognizes different DNA sequences. Unexpectedly, at sub-micromolar concentrations MTMs stabilize FLI1-DNA complex on GGAA repeats, which are critical for the oncogenic function of EWS-FLI1. We also directly demonstrate by nuclear magnetic resonance formation of a ternary FLI1-DNA-MTM complex on a single GGAA FLI1/MTM binding site. These biochemical and structural data and a new FLI1-DNA structure suggest that MTM binds the minor groove and perturbs FLI1 bound nearby in the major groove. This ternary complex model may lead to development of novel MTM analogues that selectively target EWS-FLI1 or other oncogenic transcription factors, as anti-cancer therapeutics. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Reverse signaling through membrane-bound interleukin-15.

    PubMed

    Budagian, Vadim; Bulanova, Elena; Orinska, Zane; Pohl, Thomas; Borden, Ernest C; Silverman, Robert; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2004-10-01

    The results from this study implicate membrane-anchored interleukin (IL)-15 constitutively expressed on the cell surface of PC-3 human prostate carcinoma cells and interferon-gamma-activated human monocytes in reverse signaling upon stimulation with soluble IL-15 receptor-alpha or anti-IL-15 antibodies, mediating the outside-to-inside signal transduction that involves the activation of members of the MAPK family (ERK and p38) and focal adhesion kinase. The presence of membrane-bound IL-15 was not dependent on the expression of the trimeric IL-15 receptor complex by these cells and resisted treatment with acidic buffer or trypsin. Reverse signaling through membrane-bound IL-15 considerably increased the production of several pro-inflammatory cytokines by monocytes, such as IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, thereby indicating the relevance of this process to the complex immunomodulatory function of these cells. Furthermore, stimulation of transmembrane IL-15 also enhanced the transcription of IL-6 and IL-8 in the PC-3 cell line and promoted migration of PC-3 cells as well as LNCaP human prostate carcinoma cells stably expressing IL-15 on the cell surface. Thus, IL-15 can exist as a biologically active transmembrane molecule that possesses dual ligand-receptor qualities with a potential to induce bidirectional signaling. This fact highlights a new level of complexity in the biology of IL-15 and offers novel important insights into our understanding of the cellular responses modulated by this pleiotropic cytokine.

  13. Design and synthesis of novel distamycin-modified nucleoside analogues as HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Ma, Chunying; Zhang, Jin; Qian, Ning; Ding, Jingjing; Qiao, Renzhong; Zhao, Yufen

    2014-02-01

    Design and synthesis of nucleoside analogues have persistently attracted extensive interest because of their potential application in the field of antiviral therapy, and its study also receives additional impetus for improvement in the ProTide technology. Previous studies have made great strides in the design and discovery of monophosphorylated nucleoside analogues as potential kinase-independent antiretrovirals. In this work, a series of nucleoside phosphoramidates modified by distamycin analogues was synthesized and evaluated as nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) in HIV-1-infected MT-4 and CEM cells, including variations in nucleoside, alkyl moiety, and the structure of distamycin analogues. These compounds exhibited modest potency with the EC50 value in the range of 1.3- to 6.5-fold lower than their corresponding parent drugs in MT-4 cells, which may be attributed to increasing intracellular availability due to the existence of distamycin analogue with favorable hydrophilic-lipophilic equilibrium. Meanwhile, the length of distamycin analogue was considered and assessed as an important factor that could affect antiviral activity and cytotoxicity. Enzymatic and metabolic stability studies have been performed in order to better understand the antiviral behavior of these compounds. The present work revealed the compounds to have a favorable and selective anti-HIV-1 activity in MT-4 and CEM cells, and helped to develop strategies for design and synthesis of effective monophosphorylated nucleoside analogues, which may be applied to antiretroviral research as NRTIs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Specificity of neomycin analogues bound to the packaging region of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA.

    PubMed

    McPike, Mark P; Goodisman, Jerry; Dabrowiak, James C

    2004-04-15

    -neo must be directed away from the binding pocket when these analogues are bivalently bound to RNA. This study showed how variations in the structure of aminoglycosides lead to different binding specificity to part of the packaging region of HIV-1. Such knowledge will be important in design of drugs to target this region.

  15. Transferred nuclear Overhauser effect analyses of membrane-bound enkephalin analogues by sup 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance: Correlation between activities and membrane-bound conformations

    SciTech Connect

    Milon, Alain; Miyazawa, Tatsuo; Higashijima, Tsutomu )

    1990-01-09

    Leu-enkephalin, (D-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalin, and (D-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalinamide (agonists) and (L-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalin (inactive analogue) bind to lipid bilayer consisting of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine. The conformations that these compounds assume, once bound to perdeuterated phospholipid bilayer, have been shown to be unique, as shown by the transferred nuclear Overhauser effect (TRNOE) of {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy. In addition, their location in the bilayer was analyzed by TRNOE in the presence of spin-labeled phospholipids. These analyses showed a clear relationship between the activity and the peptide-membrane interaction. The three active peptides, when bound to membranes, adopt the same conformation, characterized by a type II{prime} {beta}-turn around Gly{sup 3}-Phe and a {gamma}-turn around Gly{sup 2} (or D-Ala{sup 2}). The inactive analogue, (L-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalin, displayed a completely different TRNOE pattern corresponding to a different conformation in the membrane-bound state. The tyrosine residue of the active compounds is not inserted into the interior of membrane, but it is inserted into the bilayer for the L-Ala{sup 2} analogue. According to these results, (L-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalin may be explained to be inactive because the mode of binding to the membranes is different from that of active compounds.

  16. Capacity bounds and constructions for reversible data-hiding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalker, Ton; Willems, Frans M. J.

    2003-06-01

    An undesirable side effect of many watermarking and data-hiding schemes is that the host signal into which auxiliary data is embedded is distorted. Finding an optimal balance between the amount of information embedded and the induced distortion is therefore an active field of research. In recent years, with the rediscovery of Costa's seminal paper Writing on Dirty Paper, there has been considerable progress in understanding the fundamental limits of the capacity versus distortion of watermarking and data-hiding schemes. For some applications, however, no distortion resulting from auxiliary data, however small, is allowed. In these cases the use of reversible data-hiding methods provide a way out. A reversible data-hiding scheme is defined as a scheme that allows complete and blind restoration (i.e. without additional signaling) of the original host data. Practical reversible data-hiding schemes have been proposed by Fridrich et al., but little attention has been paid to the theoretical limits. Some first results on the capacity of reversible watermarking schemes have been derived. The reversible schemes considered in most previous papers have a highly fragile nature: in those schemes, changing a single bit in the watermarked data would prohibit recovery of both the original host signal as well as the embedded auxiliary data. It is the purpose of this paper to repair this situation and to provide some first results on the limits of robust reversible data-hiding. Admittedly, the examples provided in this paper are toy examples, but they are indicative of more practical schemes that will be presented in subsequent papers.

  17. Two active site divalent ions in the crystal structure of the hammerhead ribozyme bound to a transition state analogue

    DOE PAGES

    Mir, Aamir; Golden, Barbara L.

    2015-11-09

    The crystal structure of the hammerhead ribozyme bound to the pentavalent transition state analogue vanadate reveals significant rearrangements relative to the previously determined structures. The active site contracts, bringing G10.1 closer to the cleavage site and repositioning a divalent metal ion such that it could, ultimately, interact directly with the scissile phosphate. This ion could also position a water molecule to serve as a general acid in the cleavage reaction. A second divalent ion is observed coordinated to O6 of G12. This metal ion is well-placed to help tune the pKA of G12. Finally, on the basis of this crystalmore » structure as well as a wealth of biochemical studies, in this paper we propose a mechanism in which G12 serves as the general base and a magnesium-bound water serves as a general acid.« less

  18. Two active site divalent ions in the crystal structure of the hammerhead ribozyme bound to a transition state analogue

    SciTech Connect

    Mir, Aamir; Golden, Barbara L.

    2015-11-09

    The crystal structure of the hammerhead ribozyme bound to the pentavalent transition state analogue vanadate reveals significant rearrangements relative to the previously determined structures. The active site contracts, bringing G10.1 closer to the cleavage site and repositioning a divalent metal ion such that it could, ultimately, interact directly with the scissile phosphate. This ion could also position a water molecule to serve as a general acid in the cleavage reaction. A second divalent ion is observed coordinated to O6 of G12. This metal ion is well-placed to help tune the pKA of G12. Finally, on the basis of this crystal structure as well as a wealth of biochemical studies, in this paper we propose a mechanism in which G12 serves as the general base and a magnesium-bound water serves as a general acid.

  19. OSI-930 analogues as novel reversal agents for ABCG2-mediated multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Ye-Hong; Patel, Jay P; Sodani, Kamlesh; Wu, Chung-Pu; Liao, Li-Qiu; Patel, Atish; Tiwari, Amit K; Dai, Chun-Ling; Chen, Xiang; Fu, Li-Wu; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Korlipara, Vijaya L; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2012-09-15

    OSI-930, a dual c-Kit and KDR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is reported to have undergone a Phase I dose escalation study in patients with advanced solid tumors. A series of fifteen pyridyl and phenyl analogues of OSI-930 were designed and synthesized. Extensive screening of these compounds led to the discovery that nitropyridyl and ortho-nitrophenyl analogues, VKJP1 and VKJP3, were effective in reversing ABC subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) transporter-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR). VKJP1 and VKJP3 significantly sensitized ABCG2-expressing cells to established substrates of ABCG2 including mitoxantrone, SN-38, and doxorubicin in a concentration-dependent manner, but not to the non-ABCG2 substrate cisplatin. However, they were unable to reverse ABCB1- or ABCC1-mediated MDR indicating their selectivity for ABCG2. Western blotting analysis was performed to evaluate ABCG2 expression and it was found that neither VKJP1 nor VKJP3 significantly altered ABCG2 protein expression for up to 72 h. [(3)H]-mitoxantrone accumulation study demonstrated that VKJP1 and VKJP3 increased the intracellular accumulation of [(3)H]-mitoxantrone, a substrate of ABCG2. VKJP1 and VKJP3 also remarkably inhibited the transport of [(3)H]-methotrexate by ABCG2 membrane vesicles. Importantly, both VKJP1 and VKJP3 were efficacious in stimulating the activity of ATPase of ABCG2 and inhibited the photoaffinity labeling of this transporter by its substrate [(125)I]-iodoarylazidoprazosin. The results suggested that VKJP1 and VKJP3, specifically inhibit the function of ABCG2 through direct interaction with its substrate binding site(s). Thus VKJP1 and VKJP3 represent a new class of drugs for reducing MDR in ABCG2 over-expressing tumors.

  20. Semi-synthetic ocotillol analogues as selective ABCB1-mediated drug resistance reversal agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guan-Nan; Wang, Yi-Jun; Kathawala, Rishil J.; Si, Rui; Patel, Bhargav A.; Xu, Jinyi; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of ATP-Binding Cassette transporters leads to multidrug resistance in cancer cells and results in the failure of chemotherapy. In this in-vitro study, we investigated whether or not (20S, 24R/S)-epoxy-12β, 25-dihydroxy-dommarane-3β-amine (ORA and OSA), a pair of semi-synthetic ocotillol analogue epimers, could inhibit the ABCB1 transporter. ORA (1 μM and 3 μM) significantly reversed the resistance to paclitaxel and vincristine in ABCB1-overexpressing SW620/Ad300 and HEK/ABCB1 cells, whereas OSA had no significant effects. In addition, ORA (3 μM) significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of [3H]-paclitaxel by suppressing the efflux function of ABCB1. Meanwhile, both ORA (3 μM) and OSA (3 μM) did not significantly alter the expression level or the subcellular location of ABCB1 protein. Moreover, the ABCB1 ATPase study suggested that ORA had a stronger stimulatory effect on the ATPase activity than OSA. ORA also exhibited a higher docking score as compared with OSA inside transmembrane domain of ABCB1. Overall, we concluded that ORA reverse ABCB1-mediated MDR by competitively inhibiting the ABCB1 drug efflux function. PMID:26296969

  1. Intracellular Metabolism of Nucleoside/Nucleotide Analogues: a Bottleneck to Reach Active Drugs on HIV Reverse Transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Varga, Andrea; Lionne, Corinne; Roy, Béatrice

    2016-01-01

    To date, the most effective way to treat HIV is to use a highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) that combines three or more different drugs. The usual regimen consists of two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and either a protease inhibitor, a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, or an integrase strand transfer inhibitor. Due to the emerging resistance against the nucleoside analogues in use, there is a continuous need for the development of such therapeutic molecules with different structural features. In this review, we would like to summarize the state of knowledge of the antiretroviral nucleoside analogues intracellular metabolism. Indeed, these molecules have to be phosphorylated in the cell, a process that is often a bottleneck, to produce their pharmacologically active triphosphorylated forms. These forms can be used by the HIV reverse transcriptase. Because they lack a 3'-hydroxyl group, they block further extension of the viral DNA, and finally lead to early chain termination. Several kinases can act on the phosphorylation of these drugs; most of them have low nucleoside/nucleotide specificity. On the other hand, there are also nucleotidases in the cell, which can reverse the phosphorylation process, thus shifting the equilibrium from the active triphosphorylated state to the non-active (not-, mono- or di-phosphorylated) states of these analogues. Here, we would like to bring to the attention of the medicinal chemists that they have to take into account the limitation of the intracellular phosphorylation machinery when designing new nucleoside analogue drugs.

  2. Toward a biorelevant structure of protein kinase C bound modulators: design, synthesis, and evaluation of labeled bryostatin analogues for analysis with rotational echo double resonance NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Loy, Brian A; Lesser, Adam B; Staveness, Daryl; Billingsley, Kelvin L; Cegelski, Lynette; Wender, Paul A

    2015-03-18

    Protein kinase C (PKC) modulators are currently of great importance in preclinical and clinical studies directed at cancer, immunotherapy, HIV eradication, and Alzheimer's disease. However, the bound conformation of PKC modulators in a membrane environment is not known. Rotational echo double resonance (REDOR) NMR spectroscopy could uniquely address this challenge. However, REDOR NMR requires strategically labeled, high affinity ligands to determine interlabel distances from which the conformation of the bound ligand in the PKC-ligand complex could be identified. Here we report the first computer-guided design and syntheses of three bryostatin analogues strategically labeled for REDOR NMR analysis. Extensive computer analyses of energetically accessible analogue conformations suggested preferred labeling sites for the identification of the PKC-bound conformers. Significantly, three labeled analogues were synthesized, and, as required for REDOR analysis, all proved highly potent with PKC affinities (∼1 nM) on par with bryostatin. These potent and strategically labeled bryostatin analogues are new structural leads and provide the necessary starting point for projected efforts to determine the PKC-bound conformation of such analogues in a membrane environment, as needed to design new PKC modulators and understand PKC-ligand-membrane structure and dynamics.

  3. Steady-state kinetics of horse-liver alcohol dehydrogenase with a covalently bound coenzyme analogue.

    PubMed

    Kovár, J; Simek, K; Kucera, I; Matyska, L

    1984-03-15

    The steady-state kinetics of the enzyme modified by affinity labelling with NAD analogue, nicotinamide-N6-[N-(6-aminohexyl)carbamoylmethyl]-adenine dinucleotide, has been investigated using a recycling reaction with p-nitrosodimethylaniline and n-butanol as substrates and compared to the kinetics of native alcohol dehydrogenase. The modified enzyme obeys a ping-pong mechanism involving two inactive enzyme forms (enzyme-NAD and enzyme-NADH complexes in the 'open' conformations, the nicotinamide moieties of the coenzymes being out of the active center). The rate of p-nitrosodimethylaniline reduction in the reaction catalyzed by the modified enzyme is comparable to that observed in the presence of the native enzyme. On the other hand, the oxidation of butanol by the modified enzyme is essentially slower under our experimental conditions (pH 8.5). The measurements in the presence of specific alcohol dehydrogenase inhibitors competing with substrates and coenzymes (isobutyramide, pyrazole and AMP) revealed that the relative portion of the inactive 'open' form of the enzyme-NADH complex is negligible, whereas the 'open' form of the enzyme-NAD complex seems to represent a more significant portion (about 30%) under the conditions used.

  4. Characterization of the Pseudocapacitive Nature of Surface Bound Prussian Blue Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Daniel; Hampton, Jennifer

    With the increased use of intermittent renewable energy sources, more efficient methods of energy storage must be explored. Electrochemical capacitors provide a larger volumetric charge density than physical capacitors while maintaining fast charge and discharge rates. Prussian Blue analogues (nickel and cobalt hexacyanoferrate) are ideal pseudocapacitors for frequent charge and discharge cycles since the crystalline structure does not physically change during switching, causing less stress on the film. This project examines the charge transfer and diffusion coefficients for nickel and nickel-cobalt thin films modified with potassium hexacyanoferrate. The films were examined using a scanning electron microscope, an atomic force microscope and an electrochemical workstation to determine their composition, topography and psuedocapacitive nature. Preliminary data suggest that nickel-cobalt films have a larger quantity of charge and have a lower diffusion coefficient per charge than nickel films. This work is supported by the Hope College Nyenhuis Faculty Development Fund, the Hope College Department of Physics Guess Research Fund, and the National Science Foundation under Grants RUI-DMR-1104725, MRI-CHE-0959282, and MRI-CHE-1126462.

  5. Insights into the electronic structure of Cu(II) bound to an imidazole analogue of westiellamide.

    PubMed

    Comba, Peter; Dovalil, Nina; Hanson, Graeme R; Harmer, Jeffrey R; Noble, Christopher J; Riley, Mark J; Seibold, Bjoern

    2014-12-01

    Three synthetic analogues of westiallamide, H3L(wa), have previously been synthesized (H3L(1-3)) that have a common backbone (derived from l-valine) with H3L(wa) but differ in their heterocyclic rings (imidazole, oxazole, thiazole, and oxazoline). Herein we explore in detail through high-resolution pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectroscopy in conjunction with density functional theory (DFT) the geometric and electronic structures of the mono- and dinuclear Cu(II) complexes of these cyclic pseudo hexapeptides. Orientation-selective hyperfine sublevel correlation, electron nuclear double resonance, and three-pulse electron spin echo envelope modulation spectroscopy of [Cu(II)(H2L(1))(MeOH)2](+) reveal delocalization of the unpaired electron spin onto the ligating and distal nitrogens of the coordinated heterocyclic rings and that they are magnetically inequivalent. DFT calculations confirm this and show similar spin densities on the distal heteroatoms in the heterocyclic rings coordinated to the Cu(II) ion in the other cyclic pseudo hexapeptide [Cu(II)(H2L(2,3,wa))(MeOH)2](+) complexes. The magnetic inequivalencies in [Cu(II)(H2L(1))(MeOH)2](+) arise from different orientations of the heterocyclic rings coordinated to the Cu(II) ion, and the delocalization of the unpaired electron onto the distal heteroatoms within these N-methylimidazole rings depends upon their location with respect to the Cu(II) d(x(2)-y(2)) orbital. A systematic study of DFT functionals and basis sets was undertaken to examine the ability to reproduce the experimentally determined spin Hamiltonian parameters. Inclusion of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) using MAG-ReSpect or ORCA with a BHLYP/IGLO-II Wachters setup with SOC corrections and ∼38% Hartree-Fock exchange gave the best predictions of the g and A((63)Cu) matrices. DFT calculations of the (14)N hyperfine and quadrupole parameters for the distal nitrogens of the coordinated heterocyclic

  6. Reverse fault growth and fault interaction with frictional interfaces: insights from analogue models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanno, Emanuele; Bonini, Lorenzo; Basili, Roberto; Toscani, Giovanni; Seno, Silvio

    2017-04-01

    The association of faulting and folding is a common feature in mountain chains, fold-and-thrust belts, and accretionary wedges. Kinematic models are developed and widely used to explain a range of relationships between faulting and folding. However, these models may result not to be completely appropriate to explain shortening in mechanically heterogeneous rock bodies. Weak layers, bedding surfaces, or pre-existing faults placed ahead of a propagating fault tip may influence the fault propagation rate itself and the associated fold shape. In this work, we employed clay analogue models to investigate how mechanical discontinuities affect the propagation rate and the associated fold shape during the growth of reverse master faults. The simulated master faults dip at 30° and 45°, recalling the range of the most frequent dip angles for active reverse faults that occurs in nature. The mechanical discontinuities are simulated by pre-cutting the clay pack. For both experimental setups (30° and 45° dipping faults) we analyzed three different configurations: 1) isotropic, i.e. without precuts; 2) with one precut in the middle of the clay pack; and 3) with two evenly-spaced precuts. To test the repeatability of the processes and to have a statistically valid dataset we replicate each configuration three times. The experiments were monitored by collecting successive snapshots with a high-resolution camera pointing at the side of the model. The pictures were then processed using the Digital Image Correlation method (D.I.C.), in order to extract the displacement and shear-rate fields. These two quantities effectively show both the on-fault and off-fault deformation, indicating the activity along the newly-formed faults and whether and at what stage the discontinuities (precuts) are reactivated. To study the fault propagation and fold shape variability we marked the position of the fault tips and the fold profiles for every successive step of deformation. Then we compared

  7. Reversal-bounded multipushdown machines. [Turing acceptors for context free languages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, B. S.; Book, R. V.

    1974-01-01

    Several representations of the recursively enumerable (r.e.) sets are presented. The first states that every r.e. set is the homomorphic image of the intersection of two linear context-free languages. The second states that every r.e. set is accepted by an on-line Turing acceptor with two pushdown stores such that in every computation, each pushdown store can make at most one reversal (that is, one change from 'pushing' to 'popping'). It is shown that this automata theoretic representation cannot be strengthened by restricting the acceptors to be deterministic multitape, nondeterministic one-tape, or nondeterministic multicounter acceptors. This provides evidence that reversal bounds are not a natural measure of computational complexity for multitape Turing acceptors.

  8. Treatment-limiting toxicities associated withnucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitor therapy: A prospective, observational study**

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, Rosario; Santos, Jesús; Camino, Xavier; Arazo, Piedad; Torres Perea, Rafael; Echevarrfa, Santiago; Ribera, Esteban; Sánchez de la Rosa, Rainel; Moreno Guillen, Santiago

    2005-01-01

    Background: The Recover Study is an ongoing, prospective study designed 10 to assess toxicity associated with the use of nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) (stavudine, zidovudine, lamivudine, didanosine, abacavir) in HIV-1-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in routine clinical practice. This project is being conducted at 120 HIV units at teaching hospitals across Spain. Objective: The aim of this study was to identify the most common treatment-limiting 10 moderate to severe clinical and laboratory adverse effects (AEs), and the individual NRTIs involved in the development of these effects, in HIV-1-infected patients receiving HAART who discontinued use of an NRTI in the Recover Study. Methods: Patients eligible for participation in the Recover Study are aged10 ≥18 years; have virologically documented HIV-1 infection; have sustained viral suppression (viral load <200 cells/mL or stable, heavily experienced [ie, have received ≥3 antiretroviral regimens] patients with viral load <5000 cells/mL) for ≥6 months; are receiving HAART; are undergoing active follow-up; and have developed 2:1 NRTI-associated AE that, in the opinion of a study investigator and under the conditions of routine clinical practice, justified discontinuation of treatment with the offending drug (principal AE/offending NRTI). The present study included patients recruited for the Recover Study between September 2002 and May 2003. Results: A total of 1391 patients were enrolled (966 men, 425 women; mean 1 age, 42 years [range, 18–67 years]). Five hundred six patients (36.4%) had been diagnosed with AIDS. The mean duration of treatment with the offending NRTI was 74 months (range, 6–156 months). Seven hundred nine patients (51.0%) were receiving fourth-line (or more) therapy. Eight hundred twenty-one patients (59.0%) were receiving nonnucleoside analogues, and 552 patients (39.7%), protease inhibitors, as components of their HAART

  9. Reversal of methylcholanthrene-induced changes in mouse prostates in vitro by retinoic acid and its analogues.

    PubMed Central

    Lasnitzki, I.

    1976-01-01

    The influence of vitamin A-related compounds on hyperplasia and metaplasia induced by methylcholanthrene was studied in mouse prostate glands in organ culture. Methylcholanthrene was found to cause extensive hyperplasia and squamous metaplasia of the prostatic epithelium which persisted after withdrawal of the carcinogen. The retinoids included retinoic acid and 6 of its structural analogues synthesized in an attempt to enhance the anticarcinogenic action and reduce the toxicity of the parent compound. These where the cyclopentenyl analogus 7699, A2-retinoic acid, 13-cis-alpha-retinoic acid and 3 aromatic analogues. Administration of the compounds following the carcinogen reduced the extent and incidence of hyperplasia significantly and with the exception of one compound reversed the squamous metaplasia. Two of the aromatic analogues, one with a terminal ethylamide group (1430), and the other with a terminal ethylester group (9369), proved to be the most potent inhibitors, followed by compound 7699 and (9369), proved to be the most potent inhibitors, followed by compound 7699 and retinoic acid. A2-retinoic acid and 13-cis-alpha-retinoic acid showed the lowest activity. The inhibition of hyperplasia appeared to be mediated via a reduction of DNA synthesis. It seemed unrelated to either the biological growth-promoting activity of the compounds or their surface-active properties. It is tentatively suggested that vitamin A and its analogues may act as hormones. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:987794

  10. Design and synthesis of α-carboxy nucleoside phosphonate analogues and evaluation as HIV-1 reverse transcriptase-targeting agents.

    PubMed

    Keane, Sarah J; Ford, Alan; Mullins, Nicholas D; Maguire, Nuala M; Legigan, Thibaut; Balzarini, Jan; Maguire, Anita R

    2015-03-06

    The synthesis of the first series of a new class of nucleoside phosphonate analogues is described. Addition of a carboxyl group at the α position of carbocyclic nucleoside phosphonate analogues leads to a novel class of potent HIV reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors, α-carboxy nucleoside phosphonates (α-CNPs). Key steps in the synthesis of the compounds are Rh-catalyzed O-H insertion and Pd-catalyzed allylation reactions. In cell-free assays, the final products are markedly inhibitory against HIV RT and do not require phosphorylation to exhibit anti-RT activity, which indicates that the α-carboxyphosphonate function is efficiently recognized by HIV RT as a triphosphate entity, an unprecedented property of nucleoside monophosph(on)ates.

  11. Reversible inhibition of central precocious puberty with a long acting GnRH analogue.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, P S; Ward, I; McNinch, A W; Savage, D C

    1985-01-01

    A 7 year old girl with precocious puberty was treated with buserelin, a long acting analogue of gonadotrophin releasing hormone. Spontaneous and stimulated gonadotrophin secretion became prepubertal but returned to pubertal values when buserelin was withdrawn, suggesting that normal sexual maturation should follow cessation of treatment. PMID:3931565

  12. Snapshot of the equilibrium dynamics of a drug bound to HIV-1 reverse transcriptase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Daniel G.; Bauman, Joseph D.; Challa, J. Reddy; Patel, Disha; Troxler, Thomas; Das, Kalyan; Arnold, Eddy; Hochstrasser, Robin M.

    2013-03-01

    The anti-AIDS drug rilpivirine undergoes conformational changes to bind HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT), which is an essential enzyme for the replication of HIV. These changes allow it to retain potency against mutations that otherwise would render the enzyme resistant. Here we report that water molecules play an essential role in this binding process. Femtosecond experiments and theory expose the molecular level dynamics of rilpivirine bound to HIV-1 RT. Two nitrile substituents, one on each arm of the drug, are used as vibrational probes of the structural dynamics within the binding pocket. Two-dimensional vibrational echo spectroscopy reveals that one nitrile group is unexpectedly hydrogen-bonded to a mobile water molecule, not identified in previous X-ray structures. Ultrafast nitrile-water dynamics are confirmed by simulations. A higher (1.51 Å) resolution X-ray structure also reveals a water-drug interaction network. Maintenance of a crucial anchoring hydrogen bond may help retain the potency of rilpivirine against pocket mutations despite the structural variations they cause.

  13. Reversible and efficient inhibition of UDP-galactopyranose mutase by electrophilic, constrained and unsaturated UDP-galactitol analogues.

    PubMed

    Ansiaux, Christophe; N'Go, Inès; Vincent, Stéphane P

    2012-11-12

    A series of UDP-galactitols were designed as analogues of high-energy intermediates of the UDP-galactopyranose mutase (UGM) catalyzed furanose/pyranose interconversion, an essential step of Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall biosynthesis. The final compounds structurally share the UDP and the galactitol substructures that were connected by four distinct electrophilic connections (epoxide, lactone and Michael acceptors). All molecules were synthesized from a common perbenzylated acyclic galactose precursor that was derivatized by alkenylation, alkynylation and cyclopropanation. The inhibition study against UGM could clearly show that slight changes in the relative orientation of the UDP and the galactitol moieties resulted in dramatic variations of binding properties. Compared to known inhibitors, the epoxide derivative displayed a very tight, reversible, inhibition profile. Moreover, a time-dependent inactivation study showed that none of these electrophilic structures could react with UGM, or its FAD cofactor, the catalytic nucleophile of this still intriguing reaction.

  14. The glucagon-like peptide-1 analogue exendin-4 reverses impaired intracellular Ca(2+) signalling in steatotic hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ali, Eunüs S; Hua, Jin; Wilson, Claire H; Tallis, George A; Zhou, Fiona H; Rychkov, Grigori Y; Barritt, Greg J

    2016-09-01

    The release of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and subsequent replenishment of ER Ca(2+) by Ca(2+) entry through store-operated Ca(2+) channels (SOCE) play critical roles in the regulation of liver metabolism by adrenaline, glucagon and other hormones. Both ER Ca(2+) release and Ca(2+) entry are severely inhibited in steatotic hepatocytes. Exendin-4, a slowly-metabolised glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogue, is known to reduce liver glucose output and liver lipid, but the mechanisms involved are not well understood. The aim of this study was to determine whether exendin-4 alters intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis in steatotic hepatocytes, and to evaluate the mechanisms involved. Exendin-4 completely reversed lipid-induced inhibition of SOCE in steatotic liver cells, but did not reverse lipid-induced inhibition of ER Ca(2+) release. The action of exendin-4 on Ca(2+) entry was rapid in onset and was mimicked by GLP-1 or dibutyryl cyclic AMP. In steatotic liver cells, exendin-4 caused a rapid decrease in lipid (half time 6.5min), inhibited the accumulation of lipid in liver cells incubated in the presence of palmitate plus the SOCE inhibitor BTP-2, and enhanced the formation of cyclic AMP. Hormone-stimulated accumulation of extracellular glucose in glycogen replete steatotic liver cells was inhibited compared to that in non-steatotic cells, and this effect of lipid was reversed by exendin-4. It is concluded that, in steatotic hepatocytes, exendin-4 reverses the lipid-induced inhibition of SOCE leading to restoration of hormone-regulated cytoplasmic Ca(2+) signalling. The mechanism may involve GLP-1 receptors, cyclic AMP, lipolysis, decreased diacylglycerol and decreased activity of protein kinase C. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Probing a water channel near the A-ring of receptor-bound 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 with selected 2 alpha-substituted analogues.

    PubMed

    Hourai, Shinji; Fujishima, Toshie; Kittaka, Atsushi; Suhara, Yoshitomo; Takayama, Hiroaki; Rochel, Natacha; Moras, Dino

    2006-08-24

    The crystal structure of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) in complex with 1 alpha,25(OH)2D3 revealed the presence of several water molecules near the A-ring linking the ligand C-2 position to the protein surface. Here, we report the crystal structures of the human VDR ligand binding domain bound to selected C-2 alpha substituted analogues, namely, methyl, propyl, propoxy, hydroxypropyl, and hydroxypropoxy. These specific replacements do not modify the structure of the protein or the ligand, but with the exception of the methyl substituent, all analogues affect the presence and/or the location of the above water molecules. The integrity of the channel interactions and specific C-2 alpha analogue directed additional interactions correlate with the binding affinity of the ligands. In contrast, the resulting loss or gain of H-bonds does not reflect the magnitude of HL60 cell differentiation. Our overall findings highlight a rational approach to the design of more potent ligands by building in features revealed in the crystal structures.

  16. Reversible and formaldehyde-mediated covalent binding of a bis-amino mitoxantrone analogue to DNA.

    PubMed

    Konda, Shyam K; Kelso, Celine; Pumuye, Paul P; Medan, Jelena; Sleebs, Brad E; Cutts, Suzanne M; Phillips, Don R; Collins, J Grant

    2016-05-18

    The ability of a bis-amino mitoxantrone anticancer drug (named WEHI-150) to form covalent adducts with DNA, after activation by formaldehyde, has been studied by electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry and HPLC. Mass spectrometry results showed that WEHI-150 could form covalent adducts with d(ACGCGCGT)2 that contained one, two or three covalent links to the octanucleotide, whereas the control drugs (daunorubicin and the anthracenediones mitoxantrone and pixantrone) only formed adducts with one covalent link to the octanucleotide. HPLC was used to examine the extent of covalent bond formation of WEHI-150 with d(CGCGCG)2 and d(CG(5Me)CGCG)2. Incubation of WEHI-150 with d(CG(5Me)CGCG)2 in the presence of formaldehyde resulted in the formation of significantly greater amounts of covalent adducts than was observed with d(CGCGCG)2. In order to understand the observed increase of covalent adducts with d(CG(5Me)CGCG)2, an NMR study of the reversible interaction of WEHI-150 at both CpG and (5Me)CpG sites was undertaken. Intermolecular NOEs were observed in the NOESY spectra of d(ACGGCCGT)2 with added WEHI-150 that indicated that the drug selectively intercalated at the CpG sites and from the major groove. In particular, NOEs were observed from the WEHI-150 H2,3 protons to the H1' protons of G3 and G7 and from the H6,7 protons to the H5 protons of C2 and C6. By contrast, intermolecular NOEs were observed between the WEHI-150 H2,3 protons to the H2'' proton of the (5Me)C3 in d(CG(5Me)CGCG)2, and between the drug aliphatic protons and the H1' proton of G4. This demonstrated that WEHI-150 preferentially intercalates at (5Me)CpG sites, compared to CpG sequences, and predominantly via the minor groove at the (5Me)CpG site. The results of this study demonstrate that WEHI-150 is likely to form interstrand DNA cross-links, upon activation by formaldehyde, and consequently exhibit greater cytotoxicity than other current anthracenedione drugs.

  17. Albumin-bound basal insulin analogues (insulin detemir and NN344): comparable time-action profiles but less variability than insulin glargine in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Klein, O; Lynge, J; Endahl, L; Damholt, B; Nosek, L; Heise, T

    2007-05-01

    This study compared the time-action profiles of the novel albumin-bound basal insulin analogue NN344 with those of insulin detemir and insulin glargine in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Twenty-seven insulin-treated men with type 2 diabetes [body mass index 30.8 +/- 2.6 kg/m(2) (mean +/- s.d.), haemoglobin A(1c) 7.6 +/- 1.1%] were enrolled in this randomized, double-blind trial and participated in six euglycaemic glucose clamp experiments [target blood glucose (BG) 5 mmol/l] each. Participants received NN344 in three experiments at a dose of 0.8, 1.6 and 2.8 dosing units (DU) (1 DU corresponds to 6 nmol NN344) per kilogram of body weight. In the other three experiments, the participants received 0.4, 0.8 and 1.4 U/kg of either insulin detemir or insulin glargine. The insulin preparations were characterized with regards to their effects on glucose infusion rates (GIRs) (in particular duration of action and within-subject and between-subject variabilities), BG, C-peptide, free fatty acids (FFA), endogenous glucose production (EGP) and peripheral glucose uptake (PGU) over 24 h post-dose. The mean GIR profiles for all three preparations were similar in shape/flatness and showed increasing effect (area under the curve for GIR: AUC-GIR(total)) with increasing dose [low dose: 647 +/- 580, 882 +/- 634, 571 +/- 647 mg/kg (insulin detemir vs. NN344 vs. insulin glargine]; medium dose: 1203 +/- 816, 1720 +/- 1109, 1393 +/- 1203 mg/kg and high dose: 2171 +/- 1344, 3119 +/- 1549, 2952 +/- 2028 mg/kg; p = 0.48]. The duration of action increased with rising doses of all insulin preparations, without major differences between treatments. BG remained below 7 mmol/l in nearly all the experiments. Within-subject variability was lower for the albumin-bound insulin analogues, insulin detemir and NN344, than for insulin glargine (p < 0.0001). Between-subject variability did not differ between treatments, nor did the effects on BG, C-peptide, FFA, EGP or PGU. In individuals with type 2

  18. Efficiency Statistics and Bounds for Systems with Broken Time-Reversal Symmetry.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jian-Hua; Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar; Segal, Dvira

    2015-07-24

    Universal properties of the statistics of stochastic efficiency for mesoscopic time-reversal symmetry broken energy transducers are revealed in the Gaussian approximation. We also discuss how the second law of thermodynamics restricts the statistics of stochastic efficiency. The tight-coupling limit becomes unfavorable, characterized by an infinitely broad distribution of efficiency at all times, when time-reversal symmetry breaking leads to an asymmetric Onsager response matrix. The underlying physics is demonstrated through the quantum Hall effect and further elaborated in a triple-quantum-dot three-terminal thermoelectric engine.

  19. Crystal structure of the Lactococcus lactis formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase bound to an abasic site analogue-containing DNA

    PubMed Central

    Serre, Laurence; Pereira de Jésus, Karine; Boiteux, Serge; Zelwer, Charles; Castaing, Bertrand

    2002-01-01

    The formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg, MutM) is a bifunctional base excision repair enzyme (DNA glycosylase/AP lyase) that removes a wide range of oxidized purines, such as 8-oxoguanine and imidazole ring-opened purines, from oxidatively damaged DNA. The structure of a non-covalent complex between the Lactoccocus lactis Fpg and a 1,3-propanediol (Pr) abasic site analogue-containing DNA has been solved. Through an asymmetric interaction along the damaged strand and the intercalation of the triad (M75/R109/F111), Fpg pushes out the Pr site from the DNA double helix, recognizing the cytosine opposite the lesion and inducing a 60° bend of the DNA. The specific recognition of this cytosine provides some structural basis for understanding the divergence between Fpg and its structural homologue endo nuclease VIII towards their substrate specificities. In addition, the modelling of the 8-oxoguanine residue allows us to define an enzyme pocket that may accommodate the extrahelical oxidized base. PMID:12065399

  20. A comparison of the ability of rilpivirine (TMC278) and selected analogues to inhibit clinically relevant HIV-1 reverse transcriptase mutants

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The recently approved anti-AIDS drug rilpivirine (TMC278, Edurant) is a nonnucleoside inhibitor (NNRTI) that binds to reverse transcriptase (RT) and allosterically blocks the chemical step of DNA synthesis. In contrast to earlier NNRTIs, rilpivirine retains potency against well-characterized, clinically relevant RT mutants. Many structural analogues of rilpivirine are described in the patent literature, but detailed analyses of their antiviral activities have not been published. This work addresses the ability of several of these analogues to inhibit the replication of wild-type (WT) and drug-resistant HIV-1. Results We used a combination of structure activity relationships and X-ray crystallography to examine NNRTIs that are structurally related to rilpivirine to determine their ability to inhibit WT RT and several clinically relevant RT mutants. Several analogues showed broad activity with only modest losses of potency when challenged with drug-resistant viruses. Structural analyses (crystallography or modeling) of several analogues whose potencies were reduced by RT mutations provide insight into why these compounds were less effective. Conclusions Subtle variations between compounds can lead to profound differences in their activities and resistance profiles. Compounds with larger substitutions replacing the pyrimidine and benzonitrile groups of rilpivirine, which reorient pocket residues, tend to lose more activity against the mutants we tested. These results provide a deeper understanding of how rilpivirine and related compounds interact with the NNRTI binding pocket and should facilitate development of novel inhibitors. PMID:23217210

  1. Reversal of arsenic-induced hepatic apoptosis with combined administration of DMSA and its analogues in guinea pigs: role of glutathione and linked enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Deepshikha; Mehta, Ashish; Flora, Swaran J S

    2008-02-01

    Arsenicosis, due to contaminated drinking water in the Indo-Bangladesh region, is a serious health hazard in terms of morbidity and mortality. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated due to arsenic toxicity have been attributed as one of the initial signals that impart cellular toxicity, which is controlled by the internal antioxidant glutathione (GSH). In the present study, we investigated (i) the role of GSH and its linked enzymes, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase, in reversing chronic arsenic toxicity using a thiol chelating agent, meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), or one of its analogues individually or in combination; (ii) if alterations in the carbon side chain of DMSA increased efficacy; and (iii) whether the combination therapy enhance arsenic removal from hepatic tissue and prevent hepatic apoptosis. Results indicated that chronic arsenic exposure led to a ROS-mediated, mitochondrial-driven, caspase-dependent apoptosis in hepatic cells with a significant increase in glutathione disulfide (GSSG) levels and decreased glutathione reductase levels. Monotherapy with DMSA and its analogues did show minimal recovery postchelation. However, the combination of DMSA with long carbon chain analogues like monoisoamyl DMSA (MiADMSA) or monocyclohexyl DMSA (MchDMSA) showed a better efficacy in terms of reducing the arsenic burden as well as reversing altered biochemical variables indicative of oxidative stress and apoptosis. We also observed that GSH and its linked enzymes, especially glutathione reductase, play a vital role in scavenging ROS, maintaining GSH pools, and providing clinical recoveries. On the basis of the above observations, we recommend that combinational therapy of DMSA and its long carbon chain analogues MiADMSA or MchDMSA would be more effective in arsenic toxicity.

  2. Structure of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase with the Inhibitor β-thujaplicinol Bound at the RNase H Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Himmel, Daniel M.; Maegley, Karen A.; Pauly, Tom A.; Bauman, Joseph D.; Das, Kalyan; Dharia, Chhaya; Clark, Arthur D.; Ryan, Kevin; Hickey, Michael J.; Love, Robert A.; Hughes, Stephen H.; Bergqvist, Simon; Arnold, Eddy

    2012-01-01

    Summary Novel inhibitors are needed to counteract the rapid emergence of drug-resistant HIV variants. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) has both DNA polymerase and RNase H (RNH) enzymatic activities, but approved drugs that inhibit RT target the polymerase. Inhibitors that act against new targets, like RNH, would be effective against all of the current drug-resistant variants. Here, we present 2.80 Å and 2.04 Å resolution crystal structures of an RNH inhibitor, β-thujaplicinol, bound at the RNH active site of both HIV-1 RT and an isolated RNH domain. β-thujaplicinol chelates two divalent metal ions at the RNH active site. We provide biochemical evidence that β-thujaplicinol is a slow-binding RNH inhibitor with non-competitive kinetics and suggest that it forms a tropylium ion that interacts favorably with RT and the RNA:DNA substrate. PMID:20004166

  3. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography of non-transferrin-bound iron and some hydroxypyridone and hydroxypyrone chelators.

    PubMed

    el-Jammal, A; Templeton, D M

    1994-08-05

    The pursuit of orally available Fe(III) chelating agents has resulted in several clinical trials of 1,2-dimethyl-3-hydroxypyrid-4-one (CP20). Chromatography of this and related Fe chelators on silica-based columns has proven difficult due to unwanted interactions with the stationary phase, including with contaminating Fe bound to silanol groups. By addition of Fe3+ (50 microM ferric ammonium citrate) to an acidified aqueous mobile phase, we have successfully separated a series of hydroxypyridones-including CP20-and the related pyrones maltol and ethylmaltol by HPLC on microBondapak C18. Complexation occurs with these agents even at low pH, and they elute in an order consistent with the partition coefficients of their Fe(III) complexes. By the reverse strategy of adding ethylmaltol to the mobile phase, chelatable Fe was chromatographed and the peak response at 500 nm was linear down to a detection limit below 0.5 microM. This method was applied to pooled serum and to serum spiked with Fe after filtration at 10 kDa cut-off. The direct determination of non-transferrin-bound Fe at micromolar concentrations in serum is possible with this approach.

  4. Majorana bound states in two-channel time-reversal-symmetric nanowire systems.

    PubMed

    Gaidamauskas, Erikas; Paaske, Jens; Flensberg, Karsten

    2014-03-28

    We consider time-reversal-symmetric two-channel semiconducting quantum wires proximity coupled to a conventional s-wave superconductor. We analyze the requirements for a nontrivial topological phase and find that the necessary conditions are (1) the determinant of the pairing matrix in channel space must be negative, (2) inversion symmetry must be broken, and (3) the two channels must have different spin-orbit couplings. The first condition can be implemented in semiconducting nanowire systems where interactions suppress intra-channel pairing, while the inversion symmetry can be broken by tuning the chemical potentials of the channels. For the case of collinear spin-orbit directions, we find a general expression for the topological invariant by block diagonalization into two blocks with chiral symmetry only. By projection to the low-energy sector, we solve for the zero modes explicitly and study the details of the gap closing, which in the general case happens at finite momenta.

  5. Rhenium analogues of promising renal imaging agents with a [99mTc(CO)3]+ core bound to cysteine-derived dipeptides, including lanthionine.

    PubMed

    He, Haiyang; Lipowska, Malgorzata; Xu, Xiaolong; Taylor, Andrew T; Marzilli, Luigi G

    2007-04-16

    The coordination chemistry of lanthionine (LANH2) and cystathionine (CSTH2) dipeptides, which respectively consist of two cysteines and one cysteine and one homocysteine linked by a thioether bridge, is almost unstudied. Recently for fac-[99mTc(CO)3(LAN)]- isomers, the first small 99mTc(CO)3 agents evaluated in humans were found to give excellent renal images and to have a high specificity for renal excretion. Herein we report the synthesis and characterization of Re complexes useful for interpreting the nature of tracer 99mTc radiopharmaceuticals. Treatment of [Re(CO)3(H2O)3]OTf with commercially available LANH2 (a mixture of meso (d,l) and chiral (dd,ll) isomers) gave three HPLC peaks, 1A, 1B, and 1C, but treatment with CSTH2 (l,l isomer) gave one major product, Re(CO)3(CSTH) (2). Crystalline Re(CO)3(LANH) products were best obtained with synthetic LANH2, richer in meso or chiral isomers. X-ray crystallography showed that these dipeptides coordinate as tridentate N2S-bound ligands with two dangling carboxyls. The LANH ligand is meso in 1A and 1C and chiral in 1B. While 1A (kinetically favored) is stable at ambient temperature for days, it converted into 1C (thermodynamically favored) at 100 degrees C; after 6 h, equilibrium was reached at a 1A:1C ratio of 1:2 at pH 8. The structures provide a rationale for this behavior and for the fact that 1A and 1C have simple NMR spectra. This simplicity results from fluxional interchange between an enantiomer with both chelate rings having the same delta pucker and an enantiomer with both chelate rings having the same lambda pucker. Agents with the [99mTc(CO)3]+ core and N2S ligands show promise of becoming an important class of 99mTc radiopharmaceuticals. The chemistry of Re analogues with these ligands, such as the LAN2- complexes reported here, provides a useful background for designing new small agents and also tagged large agents because two uncoordinated carboxyl groups are available for conjugation with biological

  6. Platinum(IV) complexes conjugated with phenstatin analogue as inhibitors of microtubule polymerization and reverser of multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaochao; Huang, Rizhen; Gou, Shaohua; Wang, Zhimei; Liao, Zhixin; Wang, Hengshan

    2017-09-01

    Pt(IV) complexes comprising a phenstatin analogue, as dual-targeting Pt(IV) prodrug, were designed and synthesized. They were found not only to carry the DNA binding platinum warhead into the tumor cells, but also to have a small molecular unit to inhibit tubulin polymerization. In vitro evaluation results revealed that Pt(IV) complexes showed better and more potent activity against the test human cancer cells including cisplatin resistant cell lines than their corresponding Pt(II) counterparts. In addition, the Pt(IV) derivative of cisplatin, complex 10, exhibited highly selective inhibition in human cancer cells and displayed no obvious toxicity to two human normal cell lines, respectively. Mechanism study suggested that complex 10 induced cell-cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and caused apoptotic cell death of human lung cancer NCI-H460 cells through the mitochondrial mediated pathway. Moreover, complex 10 effectively inhibited the tumor growth in the NCI-H460 xenograft model. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Reversals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Educational Media and Materials for the Handicapped, Columbus, OH.

    Selected from the National Instructional Materials Information System (NIMIS)--a computer based on-line interactive retrieval system on special education materials--the bibliography covers nine materials for remediating reversals in handicapped students at the early childhood and elementary levels. Entries are presented in order of NIMIS accession…

  8. Mutation V111I in HIV-2 Reverse Transcriptase Increases the Fitness of the Nucleoside Analogue-Resistant K65R and Q151M Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Deuzing, Ilona P.; Charpentier, Charlotte; Wright, David W.; Matheron, Sophie; Paton, Jack; Frentz, Dineke; van de Vijver, David A.; Coveney, Peter V.; Descamps, Diane; Boucher, Charles A. B.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Infection with HIV-2 can ultimately lead to AIDS, although disease progression is much slower than with HIV-1. HIV-2 patients are mostly treated with a combination of nucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NRTIs) and protease inhibitors designed for HIV-1. Many studies have described the development of HIV-1 resistance to NRTIs and identified mutations in the polymerase domain of RT. Recent studies have shown that mutations in the connection and RNase H domains of HIV-1 RT may also contribute to resistance. However, only limited information exists regarding the resistance of HIV-2 to NRTIs. In this study, therefore, we analyzed the polymerase, connection, and RNase H domains of RT in HIV-2 patients failing NRTI-containing therapies. Besides the key resistance mutations K65R, Q151M, and M184V, we identified a novel mutation, V111I, in the polymerase domain. This mutation was significantly associated with mutations K65R and Q151M. Sequencing of the connection and RNase H domains of the HIV-2 patients did not reveal any of the mutations that were reported to contribute to NRTI resistance in HIV-1. We show that V111I does not strongly affect drug susceptibility but increases the replication capacity of the K65R and Q151M viruses. Biochemical assays demonstrate that V111I restores the polymerization defects of the K65R and Q151M viruses but negatively affects the fidelity of the HIV-2 RT enzyme. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to analyze the structural changes mediated by V111I. This showed that V111I changed the flexibility of the 110-to-115 loop region, which may affect deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) binding and polymerase activity. IMPORTANCE Mutation V111I in the HIV-2 reverse transcriptase enzyme was identified in patients failing therapies containing nucleoside analogues. We show that the V111I change does not strongly affect the sensitivity of HIV-2 to nucleoside analogues but increases the fitness of viruses with drug

  9. Reversibly Bound Chloride in the Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Receptor Hormone Binding Domain: Possible Allosteric Regulation and a Conserved Structural Motif for the Chloride-binding Site

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, H.; Qiu, Y; Philo, J; Arakawa, T; Ogata, C; Misono, K

    2010-01-01

    The binding of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) to its receptor requires chloride, and it is chloride concentration dependent. The extracellular domain (ECD) of the ANP receptor (ANPR) contains a chloride near the ANP-binding site, suggesting a possible regulatory role. The bound chloride, however, is completely buried in the polypeptide fold, and its functional role has remained unclear. Here, we have confirmed that chloride is necessary for ANP binding to the recombinant ECD or the full-length ANPR expressed in CHO cells. ECD without chloride (ECD(-)) did not bind ANP. Its binding activity was fully restored by bromide or chloride addition. A new X-ray structure of the bromide-bound ECD is essentially identical to that of the chloride-bound ECD. Furthermore, bromide atoms are localized at the same positions as chloride atoms both in the apo and in the ANP-bound structures, indicating exchangeable and reversible halide binding. Far-UV CD and thermal unfolding data show that ECD(-) largely retains the native structure. Sedimentation equilibrium in the absence of chloride shows that ECD(-) forms a strongly associated dimer, possibly preventing the structural rearrangement of the two monomers that is necessary for ANP binding. The primary and tertiary structures of the chloride-binding site in ANPR are highly conserved among receptor-guanylate cyclases and metabotropic glutamate receptors. The chloride-dependent ANP binding, reversible chloride binding, and the highly conserved chloride-binding site motif suggest a regulatory role for the receptor bound chloride. Chloride-dependent regulation of ANPR may operate in the kidney, modulating ANP-induced natriuresis.

  10. Probing the catalytic mechanism of Escherichia coli amine oxidase using mutational variants and a reversible inhibitor as a substrate analogue.

    PubMed

    Saysell, Colin G; Tambyrajah, Winston S; Murray, Jeremy M; Wilmot, Carrie M; Phillips, Simon E V; McPherson, Michael J; Knowles, Peter F

    2002-08-01

    Copper amine oxidases are homodimeric enzymes containing one Cu(2+) ion and one 2,4,5-trihydroxyphenylalanine quinone (TPQ) per monomer. Previous studies with the copper amine oxidase from Escherichia coli (ECAO) have elucidated the structure of the active site and established the importance in catalysis of an active-site base, Asp-383. To explore the early interactions of substrate with enzyme, we have used tranylcypromine (TCP), a fully reversible competitive inhibitor, with wild-type ECAO and with the active-site base variants D383E and D383N. The formation of an adduct, analogous to the substrate Schiff base, between TCP and the TPQ cofactor in the active site of wild-type ECAO and in the D383E and D383N variants has been investigated over the pH range 5.5-9.4. For the wild-type enzyme, the plot of the binding constant for adduct formation (K(b)) against pH is bell-shaped, indicating two pK(a)s of 5.8 and approximately 8, consistent with the preferred reaction partners being the unprotonated active-site base and the protonated TCP. For the D383N variant, the reaction pathway involving unprotonated base and protonated TCP cannot occur, and binding must follow a less favoured pathway with unprotonated TCP as reactant. Surprisingly, for the D383E variant, the K(b) versus pH behaviour is qualitatively similar to that of D383N, supporting a reaction pathway involving unprotonated TCP. The TCP binding data are consistent with substrate binding data for the wild type and the D383E variant using steady-state kinetics. The results provide strong support for a protonated amine being the preferred substrate for the wild-type enzyme, and emphasize the importance of the active-site base, Asp-383, in the primary binding event.

  11. CORCEMA refinement of the bound ligand conformation within the protein binding pocket in reversibly forming weak complexes using STD-NMR intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayalakshmi, V.; Rama Krishna, N.

    2004-05-01

    We describe an intensity-restrained optimization procedure for refining approximate structures of ligands within the protein binding pockets using STD-NMR intensity data on reversibly forming weak complexes. In this approach, the global minimum for the bound-ligand conformation is obtained by a hybrid structure refinement method involving CORCEMA calculation of intensities and simulated annealing optimization of torsion angles of the bound ligand using STD-NMR intensities as experimental constraints and the NOE R-factor as the pseudo-energy function to be minimized. This method is illustrated using simulated STD data sets for typical carbohydrate and peptide ligands. Our procedure also allows for the optimization of side chain torsion angles of protein residues within the binding pocket. This procedure is useful in refining and improving initial models based on crystallography or computer docking or other algorithms to generate models for the bound ligand (e.g., a lead compound) within the protein binding pocket compatible with solution STD-NMR data. This method may facilitate structure-based drug design efforts.

  12. Monocyte surface-bound IL-15 can function as an activating receptor and participate in reverse signaling.

    PubMed

    Neely, Graham G; Epelman, Slava; Ma, Ling Ling; Colarusso, Pina; Howlett, Christopher J; Amankwah, Ernest K; McIntyre, Amanda C; Robbins, Stephen M; Mody, Christopher H

    2004-04-01

    IL-15 is a short chain, four-alpha helix cytokine that shares some biological function with IL-2. One striking difference between IL-2 and IL-15 is the ability of monocytes to express IL-15 on their cell surface after activation. In the current study we have investigated the ability of human monocyte cell surface IL-15 to participate in reverse signaling. Cross-linking anti-IL-15 Abs were used as a surrogate ligand for surface IL-15 engagement. Ligation of cell surface-expressed IL-15 induced monocyte adhesion that required the activity of small m.w. GTPases. Reverse signals through surface IL-15 activated the Rho-GTPase Rac3. In addition, engagement of cell surface IL-15 was found to activate a number of signaling pathways, including both extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38, and resulted in the secretion of IL-8. IL-8 production required mitogen-activated protein kinase activity. Thus, the current study has established that cell surface IL-15 is more than just a ligand; it can function as a receptor and participate in reverse signaling that results in cellular adhesion and production of inflammatory cytokines.

  13. Characterization of cell-surface prion protein relative to its recombinant analogue: insights from molecular dynamics simulations of diglycosylated, membrane-bound human prion protein.

    PubMed

    DeMarco, Mari L; Daggett, Valerie

    2009-04-01

    The prion protein (PrP) is responsible for several fatal neurodegenerative diseases via conversion from its normal to disease-related isoform. The recombinant form of the protein is typically studied to investigate the conversion process. This constructs lacks the co- and post-translational modifications present in vivo, there the protein has two N-linked glycans and is bound to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor. The inherent flexibility and heterogeneity of the glycans, the plasticity of the GPI anchor, and the localization of the protein in a membrane make experimental structural characterization of biological constructs of cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) challenging. Yet this characterization is central in determining not only the suitability of recombinant (rec)-PrP(C) as a model for biological forms of the protein but also the potential role of co- and post-translational modifications on the disease process. Here, we present molecular dynamics simulations of three human prion protein constructs: (i) a protein-only construct modeling the recombinant form, (ii) a diglycosylated and soluble construct, and (iii) a diglycosylated and GPI-anchored construct bound to a lipid bilayer. We found that glycosylation and membrane anchoring do not significantly alter the structure or dynamics of PrP(C), but they do appreciably modify the accessibility of the polypeptide surface PrP(C). In addition, the simulations of membrane-bound PrP(C) revealed likely recognition domains for the disease-initiating PrP(C):PrP(Sc) (infectious and/or misfolded form of the prion protein) binding event and a potential mechanism for the observed inefficiency of conversion associated with differentially glycosylated PrP species.

  14. Pentamethylcyclopentadienyl-rhodium and iridium complexes containing (N^N and N^O) bound chloroquine analogue ligands: synthesis, characterization and antimalarial properties.

    PubMed

    Ekengard, Erik; Kumar, Kamlesh; Fogeron, Thibault; de Kock, Carmen; Smith, Peter J; Haukka, Matti; Monari, Magda; Nordlander, Ebbe

    2016-03-07

    The synthesis and characterization of twenty new pentamethylcyclopentadienyl-rhodium and iridium complexes containing N^N and N^O-chelating chloroquine analogue ligands are described. The in vitro antimalarial activity of the new ligands as well as the complexes was evaluated against the chloroquine sensitive (CQS) NF54 and the chloroquine resistant (CQR) Dd2 strains of Plasmodium falciparum. The antimalarial activity was found to be good to moderate; although all complexes are less active than artesunate, some of the ligands and complexes showed better activity than chloroquine (CQ). In particular, rhodium complexes were found to be considerably more active than iridium complexes against the CQS NF54 strain. Salicylaldimine Schiff base ligands having electron-withdrawing groups (F, Cl, Br, I and NO2) in para position of the salicyl moiety and their rhodium complexes showed good antiplasmodial activity against both the CQS-NF54 and the CQR-Dd2 strains. The crystal structures of (η(5)-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl){N(1)-(7-chloroquinolin-4-yl)-N(2)-(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine)} chlororhodium(III) chloride and (η(5)-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl){(4-chloro-2-(((2-((7-chloroquinolin-4-yl)amino)ethyl)imino)methyl)phenolate)}chlororhodium(III) chloride are reported. The crystallization of the amino-pyridyl complex (η(5)-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl){(N(1)-(7-chloroquinolin-4-yl)-N(2)-(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine)}chloroiridium(III) chloride in acetone resulted in the formation of the imino-pyridyl derivative (η(5)-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl){(N1-(7-chloroquinolin-4-yl)-N2-(pyridin-2-ylmethylene)ethane-1,2-diamine)}chloroiridium(III) chloride, the crystal structure of which is also reported.

  15. Detection and Time Course of Formation of Major Thiamin Diphosphate-Bound Covalent Intermediates Derived from a Chromophoric Substrate Analogue on Benzoylformate Decarboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Sumit; Nemeria, Natalia S.; Balakrishnan, Anand; Brandt, Gabriel S.; Kneen, Malea M.; Yep, Alejandra; McLeish, Michael J.; Kenyon, George L.; Petsko, Gregory A.; Ringe, Dagmar; Jordan, Frank

    2009-04-02

    The mechanism of the enzyme benzoylformate decarboxylase (BFDC), which carries out a typical thiamin diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent nonoxidative decarboxylation reaction, was studied with the chromophoric alternate substrate (E)-2-oxo-4(pyridin-3-yl)-3-butenoic acid (3-PKB). Addition of 3-PKB resulted in the appearance of two transient intermediates formed consecutively, the first one to be formed a predecarboxylation ThDP-bound intermediate with {lambda}{sub max} at 477 nm, and the second one corresponding to the first postdecarboxylation intermediate the enamine with {lambda}{sub max} at 437 nm. The time course of formation/depletion of the PKB-ThDP covalent complex and of the enamine showed that decarboxylation was slower than formation of the PKB-ThDP covalent adduct. When the product of decarboxylation 3-(pyridin-3-yl)acrylaldehyde (PAA) was added to BFDC, again an absorbance with {lambda}{sub max} at 473 nm was formed, corresponding to the tetrahedral adduct of PAA with ThDP. Addition of well-formed crystals of BFDC to a solution of PAA resulted in a high resolution (1.34 {angstrom}) structure of the BFDC-bound adduct of ThDP with PAA confirming the tetrahedral nature at the C2{alpha} atom, rather than of the enamine, and supporting the assignment of the {lambda}{sub max} at 473 nm to the PAA-ThDP adduct. The structure of the PAA-ThDP covalent complex is the first example of a product-ThDP adduct on BFDC. Similar studies with 3-PKB indicated that decarboxylation had taken place. Evidence was also obtained for the slow formation of the enamine intermediate when BFDC was incubated with benzaldehyde, the product of the decarboxylation reaction thus confirming its presence on the reaction pathway.

  16. Combined administration of oxalic acid, succimer and its analogue for the reversal of gallium arsenide-induced oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Flora, Swaran J S; Kannan, Gurusamy M; Pant, Bhagwat P; Jaiswal, Devendra K

    2002-06-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs), a group III-VA intermetallic semiconductor, possesses superior electronic and optical properties and has a wide application in the electronics industry. Exposure to GaAs in the semiconductor industry is a potential occupational hazard because cleaning and slicing GaAs ingots to yield the desired wafer could generate GaAs particles. The ability of GaAs to induce oxidative stress has not yet been reported. The present study reports the role of oxidative stress in GaAs-induced haematological and liver disorders and its possible reversal overturn by administration of meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) and one of its analogue, monoisoamyl DMSA (MiADMSA), either individually or in combination with oxalic acid. While DMSA and MiADMSA are potential arsenic chelators, oxalic acid is reported to be an effective gallium chelator. Male rats were exposed to 10 mg/kg GaAs orally, 5 days a week for 8 weeks. GaAs exposure was then stopped and rats were given a 0.5 mmol/kg dose of succimers (DMSA or MiADMSA), oxalic acid or a combination of the two, intraperitoneally once daily for 5 consecutive days. We found a significant fall in blood delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) activity and blood glutathione (GSH) level, and an increased urinary excretion of delta-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and an increased malondialdehyde (MDA) level in erythrocytes of rats exposed to GaAs. Hepatic GSH levels decreased, whereas there was an increase in GSSG and MDA levels. The results suggest a role of oxidative stress in GaAs-induced haematological and hepatic damage. Administration of DMSA and MiADMSA produced effective recovery in most of the above variables. However, a greater effectiveness of the chelation treatment (i.e. removal of both gallium and arsenic from body organs) could be achieved by combined administration of succimer (DMSA) with oxalic acid since, after MiADMSA administration, a marked loss of essential metals (copper and zinc) is of concern.

  17. Relation between the catalytic efficiency of the synthetic analogues of catechol oxidase with their electrochemical property in the free state and substrate-bound state.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Prateeti; Adhikary, Jaydeep; Ghosh, Bipinbihari; Sanyal, Ria; Chattopadhyay, Shyamal Kumar; Bauzá, Antonio; Frontera, Antonio; Zangrando, Ennio; Das, Debasis

    2014-08-18

    A library of 15 dicopper complexes as synthetic analogues of catechol oxidase has been synthesized with the aim to determine the relationship between the electrochemical behavior of the dicopper(II) species in the absence as well as in the presence of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol (3,5-DTBC) as model substrate and the catalytic activity, kcat, in DMSO medium. The complexes have been characterized by routine physicochemical techniques as well as by X-ray single-crystal structure analysis in some cases. Fifteen "end-off" compartmental ligands have been designed as 1 + 2 Schiff-base condensation product of 2,6-diformyl-4-R-phenol (R = Me, (t)Bu, and Cl) and five different amines, N-(2-aminoethyl)piperazine, N-(2-aminoethyl)pyrrolidine, N-(2-aminoethyl)morpholine, N-(3-aminopropyl)morpholine, and N-(2-aminoethyl)piperidine. Interestingly, in case of the combination of 2,6-diformyl-4-methylphenol and N-(2-aminoethyl)morpholine/N-(3-aminopropyl)morpholine/N-(2-aminoethyl)piperidine 1 + 1 condensation becomes the reality and the ligands are denoted as L2(1-3). On reaction of copper(II) nitrate with L2(1-3) in situ complexes 3, 12, and 13 are formed having general formula Cu2(L2(1-3))2(NO3)2. The remaining 12 ligands obtained as 1 + 2 condensation products are denoted as L1(1-12), which produce complexes having general formula Cu2(L1(1-12))(NO3)2. Catecholase activity of all 15 complexes has been investigated in DMSO medium using 3,5-DTBC as model substrate. Treatment on the basis of Michaelis-Menten model has been applied for kinetic study, and thereby turnover number, kcat, values have been evaluated. Cyclic voltametric (CV) and differential pulse voltametric (DPV) studies of the complexes in the presence as well as in the absence of 3,5-DTBC have been thoroughly investigated in DMSO medium. From those studies it is evident that oxidation of 3,5-DTBC catalyzed by dicopper(II) complexes proceed via two steps: first, semibenzoquinone followed by benzoquinone with concomitant

  18. Structure of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase bound to a novel 38-mer hairpin template-primer DNA aptamer.

    PubMed

    Miller, Matthew T; Tuske, Steve; Das, Kalyan; DeStefano, Jeffrey J; Arnold, Eddy

    2016-01-01

    The development of a modified DNA aptamer that binds HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) with ultra-high affinity has enabled the X-ray structure determination of an HIV-1 RT-DNA complex to 2.3 Å resolution without the need for an antibody Fab fragment or RT-DNA cross-linking. The 38-mer hairpin-DNA aptamer has a 15 base-pair duplex, a three-deoxythymidine hairpin loop, and a five-nucleotide 5'-overhang. The aptamer binds RT in a template-primer configuration with the 3'-end positioned at the polymerase active site and has 2'-O-methyl modifications at the second and fourth duplex template nucleotides that interact with the p66 fingers and palm subdomains. This structure represents the highest resolution RT-nucleic acid structure to date. The RT-aptamer complex is catalytically active and can serve as a platform for studying fundamental RT mechanisms and for development of anti-HIV inhibitors through fragment screening and other approaches. Additionally, the structure allows for a detailed look at a unique aptamer design and provides the molecular basis for its remarkably high affinity for RT. © 2015 The Protein Society.

  19. HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Structure with RNase H Inhibitor dihydroxy benzoyl naphthyl Hydrazone Bound at a Novel Site

    SciTech Connect

    Himmel,D.; Sarafianos, S.; Dharmasena, S.; Hossain, M.; McCoy-Simandle, K.; Ilina, T.; Clark, A.; Knight, J.; Julias, J.; et al.

    2007-01-01

    The rapid emergence of drug-resistant variants of human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1), has limited the efficacy of anti-acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) treatments, and new lead compounds that target novel binding sites are needed. We have determined the 3.15 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) complexed with dihydroxy benzoyl naphthyl hydrazone (DHBNH), an HIV-1 RT RNase H (RNH) inhibitor (RNHI). DHBNH is effective against a variety of drug-resistant HIV-1 RT mutants. While DHBNH has little effect on most aspects of RT-catalyzed DNA synthesis, at relatively high concentrations it does inhibit the initiation of RNA-primed DNA synthesis. Although primarily an RNHI, DHBNH binds >50 {angstrom} away from the RNH active site, at a novel site near both the polymerase active site and the non-nucleoside RT inhibitor (NNRTI) binding pocket. When DHBNH binds, both Tyr181 and Tyr188 remain in the conformations seen in unliganded HIV-1 RT. DHBNH interacts with conserved residues (Asp186, Trp229) and has substantial interactions with the backbones of several less well-conserved residues. On the basis of this structure, we designed substituted DHBNH derivatives that interact with the NNRTI-binding pocket. These compounds inhibit both the polymerase and RNH activities of RT.

  20. Analogue Gravity.

    PubMed

    Barceló, Carlos; Liberati, Stefano; Visser, Matt

    2011-01-01

    Analogue gravity is a research programme which investigates analogues of general relativistic gravitational fields within other physical systems, typically but not exclusively condensed matter systems, with the aim of gaining new insights into their corresponding problems. Analogue models of (and for) gravity have a long and distinguished history dating back to the earliest years of general relativity. In this review article we will discuss the history, aims, results, and future prospects for the various analogue models. We start the discussion by presenting a particularly simple example of an analogue model, before exploring the rich history and complex tapestry of models discussed in the literature. The last decade in particular has seen a remarkable and sustained development of analogue gravity ideas, leading to some hundreds of published articles, a workshop, two books, and this review article. Future prospects for the analogue gravity programme also look promising, both on the experimental front (where technology is rapidly advancing) and on the theoretical front (where variants of analogue models can be used as a springboard for radical attacks on the problem of quantum gravity).

  1. The 2.5 Å Crystal Structure of the SIRT1 Catalytic Domain Bound to Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide (NAD + ) and an Indole (EX527 Analogue) Reveals a Novel Mechanism of Histone Deacetylase Inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xun; Allison, Dagart; Condon, Bradley; Zhang, Feiyu; Gheyi, Tarun; Zhang, Aiping; Ashok, Sheela; Russell, Marijane; MacEwan, Iain; Qian, Yuewei; Jamison, James A.; Luz, John Gately

    2013-02-14

    The sirtuin SIRT1 is a NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase, a Sir2 family member, and one of seven human sirtuins. Sirtuins are conserved from archaea to mammals and regulate transcription, genome stability, longevity, and metabolism. SIRT1 regulates transcription via deacetylation of transcription factors such as PPARγ, NFκB, and the tumor suppressor protein p53. EX527 (27) is a nanomolar SIRT1 inhibitor and a micromolar SIRT2 inhibitor. To elucidate the mechanism of SIRT inhibition by 27, we determined the 2.5 Å crystal structure of the SIRT1 catalytic domain (residues 241–516) bound to NAD+ and the 27 analogue compound 35. 35 binds deep in the catalytic cleft, displacing the NAD+ nicotinamide and forcing the cofactor into an extended conformation. The extended NAD+ conformation sterically prevents substrate binding. The SIRT1/NAD+/35 crystal structure defines a novel mechanism of histone deacetylase inhibition and provides a basis for understanding, and rationally improving, inhibition of this therapeutically important target by drug-like molecules.

  2. Fractional diffusion on bounded domains

    DOE PAGES

    Defterli, Ozlem; D'Elia, Marta; Du, Qiang; ...

    2015-03-13

    We found that the mathematically correct specification of a fractional differential equation on a bounded domain requires specification of appropriate boundary conditions, or their fractional analogue. In this paper we discuss the application of nonlocal diffusion theory to specify well-posed fractional diffusion equations on bounded domains.

  3. Fractional diffusion on bounded domains

    SciTech Connect

    Defterli, Ozlem; D'Elia, Marta; Du, Qiang; Gunzburger, Max Donald; Lehoucq, Richard B.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2015-03-13

    We found that the mathematically correct specification of a fractional differential equation on a bounded domain requires specification of appropriate boundary conditions, or their fractional analogue. In this paper we discuss the application of nonlocal diffusion theory to specify well-posed fractional diffusion equations on bounded domains.

  4. Reversibility of lipoatrophy in HIV-infected patients 2 years after switching from a thymidine analogue to abacavir: the MITOX Extension Study.

    PubMed

    Martin, Allison; Smith, Don E; Carr, Andrew; Ringland, Clare; Amin, Janaki; Emery, Sean; Hoy, Jennifer; Workman, Cassy; Doong, Nicholas; Freund, Judith; Cooper, David A

    2004-04-30

    To determine if long-term improvement in HIV lipoatrophy can be attained by substitution of thymidine analogues zidovudine (ZDV) or stavudine (d4T) with abacavir (ABC). Long-term follow-up (104 weeks) of a randomized, open-label study. Seventeen ambulatory HIV clinics in Australia and London. Patients with HIV lipodystrophy were randomized to switch from a thymidine analogue to ABC, while continuing all other antiretroviral therapy (ABC arm) (n = 42) or continue current therapy (ZDV/d4T arm) (n = 43). At week 24, all control patients could switch to ABC. Of the original 111 patients randomized, 85 had long-term follow-up data, with 77 having imaging data available at 104 weeks. The primary endpoint was time-weighted change in limb fat mass, measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). At week 104, the mean increase in limb fat for the ABC and ZDV/d4T group was 1.26 +/- 2.02 kg and 0.49 +/- 1.38 kg, respectively. The time-weighted change for limb fat was significantly different between the two arms (0.43 kg; P = 0.008). On-treatment analysis demonstrated a trend for increased limb fat in patients in the ABC arm. Visceral fat accumulation, buffalo hump, self-assessed lipodystrophy or the lipodystrophy case definition score (LCDS) did not improve. In patients with moderate-to-severe lipodystrophy, significant improvements in subcutaneous fat continued over 104 weeks after switching from a thymidine analogue to ABC. Nevertheless, the lipodystrophy syndrome was still evident, indicating additional strategies need evaluating.

  5. 2D, 3D-QSAR and docking studies of 1,2,3-thiadiazole thioacetanilides analogues as potent HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The discovery of clinically relevant inhibitors of HIV-RT for antiviral therapy has proven to be a challenging task. To identify novel and potent HIV-RT inhibitors, the quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) approach became very useful and largely widespread technique forligand-based drug design. Methods We perform the two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) QSAR studies of a series of 1,2,3-thiadiazole thioacetanilides analogues to elucidate the structural properties required for HIV-RT inhibitory activity. Results The 2D-QSAR studies were performed using multiple linear regression method, giving r2 = 0.97 and q2 = 0.94. The 3D-QSAR studies were performed using the stepwise variable selection k-nearest neighbor molecular field analysis approach; a leave-one-out cross-validated correlation coefficient q2 = 0.89 and a non-cross-validated correlation coefficient r2 = 0.97 were obtained. Docking analysis suggests that the new series have comparable binding affinity with the standard compounds. Conclusions This approach showed that hydrophobic and electrostatic effects dominantly determine binding affinities which will further useful for development of new NNRTIs. PMID:22691718

  6. Diverse combinatorial design, synthesis and in vitro evaluation of new HEPT analogues as potential non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcription inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Puig-de-la-Bellacasa, Raimon; Giménez, Laura; Pettersson, Sofia; Pascual, Rosalia; Gonzalo, Encarna; Esté, José A; Clotet, Bonaventura; Borrell, José I; Teixidó, Jordi

    2012-08-01

    New analogues of 1-[(2-hydroxyethoxy)methyl]-6-(phenylthio)thymine (HEPT) were synthesized and evaluated for their in vitro activities against HIV-1 in MT-4 cell cultures. Chemical diversity was introduced in 4 of the six positions of the core and the influence of each substituent was studied. This library was built on the basis of a rational diversity analysis with the objective of maximizing diversity and thus, the activity range with a minimum number of synthesized compounds. Among them, 2{1,2,3,1} and 2{1,2,3,4} exhibited the most potent anti-HIV-1 activities (EC(50)=0.015 μg/mL; 0.046 μM, SI >1667) and (EC(50)=0.025 μg/mL; 0.086 μM, SI >1000), respectively, which were about 71-fold and 38-fold more active than the reference compound HEPT (EC(50)=1.01 μg/mL; 3.27 μM, SI >25).

  7. Antinociceptive activity of glycosidic enkephalin analogues.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, R E; Rodríguez, F D; Sacristán, M P; Torres, J L; Reig, F; García Antón, J M; Valencia, G

    1990-01-01

    The antinociceptive activity of two new enkephalin analogues: N1.5-(beta-D-glucopyranosyl)[D-Met2, Pro5]enkephalinamide and N1.5-(beta-D-galactopyranosyl)[D-Met2, Pro5]enkephalinamide was assessed using the tail immersion and paw pressure behavioural tests. Both enkephalin analogues appear to be more active than morphine when injected either into the fourth ventricle or intrathecally; the galactose analogue is more than 5000 times more active than morphine when injected into the fourth ventricle. The analgesic effects produced by the analogues are partially reversed by SC naloxone (0.1 mg/kg) and totally reversed when the dose of naloxone used was 1 mg/kg, suggesting that the analogues act upon more than one type of opiate receptor (mu/delta).

  8. Synthesis, biological evaluation and molecular modeling of 2-Hydroxyisoquinoline-1,3-dione analogues as inhibitors of HIV reverse transcriptase associated ribonuclease H and polymerase.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jing; Vernekar, Sanjeev Kumar V; Chen, Yue-Lei; Miller, Lena; Huber, Andrew D; Myshakina, Nataliya; Sarafianos, Stefan G; Parniak, Michael A; Wang, Zhengqiang

    2017-06-16

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) reverse transcriptase (RT) associated ribonuclease H (RNase H) remains the only virally encoded enzymatic function not clinically validated as an antiviral target. 2-Hydroxyisoquinoline-1,3-dione (HID) is known to confer active site directed inhibition of divalent metal-dependent enzymatic functions, such as HIV RNase H, integrase (IN) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5B polymerase. We report herein the synthesis and biochemical evaluation of a few C-5, C-6 or C-7 substituted HID subtypes as HIV RNase H inhibitors. Our data indicate that while some of these subtypes inhibited both the RNase H and polymerase (pol) functions of RT, potent and selective RNase H inhibition was achieved with subtypes 8-9 as exemplified with compounds 8c and 9c. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Superior bactericidal activity of N-bromine compounds compared to their N-chlorine analogues can be reversed under protein load.

    PubMed

    Gottardi, W; Klotz, S; Nagl, M

    2014-06-01

    To investigate and compare the bactericidal activity (BA) of active bromine and chlorine compounds in the absence and presence of protein load. Quantitative killing tests against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus were performed both in the absence and in the presence of peptone with pairs of isosteric active chlorine and bromine compounds: hypochlorous and hypobromous acid (HOCl and HOBr), dichloro- and dibromoisocyanuric acid, chlorantine and bromantine (1,3-dibromo- and 1,3 dichloro-5,5-dimethylhydantoine), chloramine T and bromamine T (N-chloro- and N-bromo-4-methylbenzenesulphonamide sodium), and N-chloro- and N-bromotaurine sodium. To classify the bactericidal activities on a quantitative basis, an empirical coefficient named specific bactericidal activity (SBA), founded on the parameters of killing curves, was defined: SBA= mean log reductions/(mean exposure times x concentration) [mmol 1(-1) min (-1)]. In the absence of peptone, tests with washed micro-organisms revealed a throughout higher BA of bromine compounds with only slight differences between single substances. This was in contrast to chlorine compounds, whose killing times differed by a factor of more than four decimal powers. As a consequence, also the isosteric pairs showed according differences. In the presence of peptone, however, bromine compounds showed an increased loss of BA, which partly caused a reversal of efficacy within isosteric pairs. In medical practice, weakly oxidizing active chlorine compounds like chloramines have the highest potential as topical anti-infectives in the presence of proteinaceous material (mucous membranes, open wounds). Active bromine compounds, on the other hand, have their chance at insensitive body regions with low organic matter, for example skin surfaces. The expected protein load is one of the most important parameters for selection of a suited active halogen compound. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. Forward and reverse (retro) iron(III) or gallium(III) desferrioxamine E and ring-expanded analogues prepared using metal-templated synthesis from endo-hydroxamic acid monomers.

    PubMed

    Lifa, Tulip; Tieu, William; Hocking, Rosalie K; Codd, Rachel

    2015-04-06

    A metal-templated synthesis (MTS) approach was used to preorganize the forward endo-hydroxamic acid monomer 4-[(5-aminopentyl)(hydroxy)amino]-4-oxobutanoic acid (for-PBH) about iron(III) in a 1:3 metal/ligand ratio to furnish the iron(III) siderophore for-[Fe(DFOE)] (ferrioxamine E) following peptide coupling. Substitution of for-PBH with the reverse (retro) hydroxamic acid analogue 3-(6-amino-N-hydroxyhexanamido)propanoic acid (ret-PBH) furnished ret-[Fe(DFOE)] (ret-ferrioxamine E). As isomers, for-[Fe(DFOE)] and ret-[Fe(DFOE)] gave identical mass spectrometry signals ([M + H(+)](+), m/zcalc 654.3, m/zobs 654.3), yet for-[Fe(DFOE)] eluted in a more polar window (tR = 23.44 min) than ret-[Fe(DFOE)] (tR = 28.13 min) on a C18 reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) column. for-[Ga(DFOE)] (tR = 22.99 min) and ret-[Ga(DFOE)] (tR = 28.11 min) were prepared using gallium(III) as the metal-ion template and showed the same trend for the retention time. Ring-expanded analogues of for-[Fe(DFOE)] and ret-[Fe(DFOE)] were prepared from endo-hydroxamic acid monomers with one additional methylene unit in the amine-containing region, 4-[(6-aminohexyl)(hydroxy)amino]-4-oxobutanoic acid (for-HBH) or 3-(7-amino-N-hydroxyheptanamido)propanoic acid (ret-HBH), to give the corresponding tris(homoferrioxamine E) macrocycles, for-[Fe(HHDFOE)] or ret-[Fe(HHDFOE)] ([M + H(+)](+), m/zcalc 696.3, m/zobs 696.4). The MTS reaction using a constitutional isomer of for-HBH that transposed the methylene unit to the carboxylic acid containing region, 5-[(5-aminopentyl)(hydroxy)amino]-5-oxopentanoic acid (for-PPH), gave the macrocycle for-[Fe(HPDFOE)] in a yield significantly less than that for for-[Fe(HHDFOE)], with the gallium(III) analogue for-[Ga(HPDFOE)] unable to be detected. The work demonstrates the utility and limits of MTS for the assembly of macrocyclic siderophores from endo-hydroxamic acid monomers. Indirect measures (RP-HPLC order of elution, c log P values

  11. Causality and Tsirelson's bounds

    SciTech Connect

    Buhrman, H.; Massar, S.

    2005-11-15

    We study the properties of no-signaling correlations that cannot be reproduced by local measurements on entangled quantum states. We say that such correlations violate Tsirelson bounds. We show that if these correlations are obtained by some reversible unitary quantum evolution U, then U cannot be written in the product form U{sub A}xU{sub B}. This implies that U can be used for signaling and for entanglement generation. This result is completely general and in fact can be viewed as a characterization of Tsirelson bounds. We then show how this result can be used as a tool to study Tsirelson bounds and we illustrate this by rederiving the Tsirelson bound of 2{radical}(2) for the Clauser-Horn-Shimony-Holt inequality, and by deriving a new Tsirelson bound for qutrits.

  12. Epinephrine analogues.

    PubMed

    Sneader, W

    2001-11-01

    Tyramine was the first epinephrine analogue to be introduced into medicine, in the early 1900s. It was followed by ephedrine and pseudoephedrine in the 1920s and by the amfetamines a decade later. The popularity of the amfetamines grew throughout the 1930s and 1940s; after that, there was a slowly dawning realization that they were being widely abused. Isoprenaline, introduced in the 1950s, was soon recognized as superior to epinephrine when used as an inhaler by asthmatics, and it remained the drug of choice for the relief of bronchospasm until around 1970. Orciprenaline, which featured an orcinol system, had a long duration of action and was active by mouth; Boehringer marketed it both as an inhaler and as a syrup for the prophylaxis of bronchospasm. The greatly superior bronchodilators salbutamol and terbutaline, launched in 1968 and 1970, respectively, incorporate further variation on the molecular theme that had led to the development of orciprenaline. (c) 2001 Prous Science. All rights reserved.

  13. Clinical, virological and biochemical evidence supporting the association of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase polymorphism R284K and thymidine analogue resistance mutations M41L, L210W and T215Y in patients failing tenofovir/emtricitabine therapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Thymidine analogue resistance mutations (TAMs) selected under treatment with nucleoside analogues generate two distinct genotypic profiles in the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT): (i) TAM1: M41L, L210W and T215Y, and (ii) TAM2: D67N, K70R and K219E/Q, and sometimes T215F. Secondary mutations, including thumb subdomain polymorphisms (e.g. R284K) have been identified in association with TAMs. We have identified mutational clusters associated with virological failure during salvage therapy with tenofovir/emtricitabine-based regimens. In this context, we have studied the role of R284K as a secondary mutation associated with mutations of the TAM1 complex. Results The cross-sectional study carried out with >200 HIV-1 genotypes showed that virological failure to tenofovir/emtricitabine was strongly associated with the presence of M184V (P < 10-10) and TAMs (P < 10-3), while K65R was relatively uncommon in previously-treated patients failing antiretroviral therapy. Clusters of mutations were identified, and among them, the TAM1 complex showed the highest correlation coefficients. Covariation of TAM1 mutations and V118I, V179I, M184V and R284K was observed. Virological studies showed that the combination of R284K with TAM1 mutations confers a fitness advantage in the presence of zidovudine or tenofovir. Studies with recombinant HIV-1 RTs showed that when associated with TAM1 mutations, R284K had a minimal impact on zidovudine or tenofovir inhibition, and in their ability to excise the inhibitors from blocked DNA primers. However, the mutant RT M41L/L210W/T215Y/R284K showed an increased catalytic rate for nucleotide incorporation and a higher RNase H activity in comparison with WT and mutant M41L/L210W/T215Y RTs. These effects were consistent with its enhanced chain-terminated primer rescue on DNA/DNA template-primers, but not on RNA/DNA complexes, and can explain the higher fitness of HIV-1 having TAM1/R284K mutations. Conclusions Our study shows the association

  14. Molecular basis of the association of H208Y and thymidine analogue resistance mutations M41L, L210W and T215Y in the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase of treated patients.

    PubMed

    Betancor, Gilberto; Nevot, María; Mendieta, Jesús; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Martínez, Miguel A; Menéndez-Arias, Luis

    2014-06-01

    Thymidine analogue resistance mutations (TAMs) in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) associate in two clusters: (i) TAM1 (M41L, L210W and T215Y) and TAM2 (D67N, K70R, K219E/Q, and sometimes T215F). The amino acid substitution H208Y shows increased prevalence in patients treated with nucleoside analogues and is frequently associated with TAM1 mutations. We studied the molecular mechanism favoring the selection of H208Y in the presence of zidovudine, tenofovir and other nucleoside RT inhibitors (NRTIs). NRTI susceptibility was not affected by the addition of H208Y in phenotypic assays carried out in MT-4 cells using recombinant HIV-1 containing wild-type (subtype B, BH10), H208Y, M41L/L210W/T215Y or M41L/H208Y/L210W/T215Y RTs. However, enzymatic studies carried out with purified RTs revealed that in the presence of M41L/L210W/T215Y, H208Y increases the RT's ability to unblock and extend primers terminated with zidovudine, tenofovir and in a lesser extent, stavudine. These effects were observed with DNA/DNA complexes (but not with RNA/DNA) and resulted from the higher ATP-dependent excision activity of the M41L/H208Y/L210W/T215Y RT compared with the M41L/L210W/T215Y mutant. The increased rescue efficiency of the M41L/H208Y/L210W/T215Y RT was observed in the presence of ATP but not with GTP or ITP. Molecular dynamics studies predict an alteration of the stacking interactions between Tyr(215) and the adenine ring of ATP due to long-distance effects caused by tighter packaging of Tyr(208) and Trp(212). These studies provide a mechanistic explanation for the association of TAM-1 and H208Y mutations in viral isolates from patients treated with NRTIs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Facile polymerization of dNTPs bearing unnatural base analogues by DNA polymerase alpha and Klenow fragment (DNA polymerase I).

    PubMed

    Chiaramonte, Molly; Moore, Chad L; Kincaid, Kristi; Kuchta, Robert D

    2003-09-09

    The high fidelity of DNA replication is largely dependent upon accurate incorporation of dNTPs by DNA polymerases. To study the mechanism underlying nucleotide selection, we synthesized four nucleotide analogues bearing the unnatural bases benzimidazole, 5-nitrobenzimidazole, 6-nitrobenzimidazole, and 5-nitroindole and analyzed their incorporation by three DNA polymerases. We have found that human DNA polymerase alpha (pol alpha) and the Klenow fragment of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I (KF) incorporate all four nucleotide analogues opposite all four canonical bases up to 4000-fold more efficiently than an incorrect natural dNTP (i.e., rates that approach those of a correct, natural dNTP), even though the shape of any base pair formed between the analogue and the template likely does not resemble a normal base pair. While pol alpha preferentially incorporated the analogues opposite template pyrimidines, KF surprisingly preferred to polymerize them opposite template purines. Although neither pol alpha nor KF readily polymerized a natural dNTP opposite either 5- or 6-nitrobenzimidazole in the template strand, the enzymes did incorporate the analogues to generate novel base pairs. Both pol alpha and KF polymerized the analogues up to 140-fold more efficiently than dATP both across from abasic sites and as 3'-overhangs on blunt-ended templates. Although Maloney murine leukemia virus reverse transcriptase did not measurably incorporate the analogues, this enzyme bound the analogues with K(I)'s only slightly higher than the K(m) for polymerization of the normal dNTP. The implications of these results with respect to how polymerases discriminate between correct and incorrect dNTPs are discussed.

  16. Bound Rationality and Organizational Learning.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-23

    8217 . 90 0 8 0.. O 4 BOUNDED RATIONALITY AND ORGANIZATIONAL LEARNING Technical Report AlP - 107 Herbert A. Simon Department of Psychology Carnegie Mellon...ACCESSION No N/A N/A N/A N/A 1 1 TITLE (include Security Classificarnon) Bounded rationality and organizational learning 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) HretA io 13a...organizations organizational psychology organizational learning bounded rationality cognitive psychology 𔄃 ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary

  17. Dihydrogen catalysis of the reversible formation and cleavage of C-H and N-H bonds of aminopyridinate ligands bound to (η(5) -C5 Me5 )Ir(III.).

    PubMed

    Zamorano, Ana; Rendón, Nuria; López-Serrano, Joaquín; Valpuesta, José E V; Álvarez, Eleuterio; Carmona, Ernesto

    2015-02-02

    This study focuses on a series of cationic complexes of iridium that contain aminopyridinate (Ap) ligands bound to an (η(5) -C5 Me5 )Ir(III) fragment. The new complexes have the chemical composition [Ir(Ap)(η(5) -C5 Me5 )](+) , exist in the form of two isomers (1(+) and 2(+) ) and were isolated as salts of the BArF (-) anion (BArF =B[3,5-(CF3 )2 C6 H3 ]4 ). Four Ap ligands that differ in the nature of their bulky aryl substituents at the amido nitrogen atom and pyridinic ring were employed. In the presence of H2 , the electrophilicity of the Ir(III) centre of these complexes allows for a reversible prototropic rearrangement that changes the nature and coordination mode of the aminopyridinate ligand between the well-known κ(2) -N,N'-bidentate binding in 1(+) and the unprecedented κ-N,η(3) -pseudo-allyl-coordination mode in isomers 2(+) through activation of a benzylic C-H bond and formal proton transfer to the amido nitrogen atom. Experimental and computational studies evidence that the overall rearrangement, which entails reversible formation and cleavage of H-H, C-H and N-H bonds, is catalysed by dihydrogen under homogeneous conditions. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Outward Bound.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Outward Bound, Inc., Andover, MA.

    The Outward Bound concept was developed in Germany and Great Britain with the saving of human life as the ultimate goal. Courses are designed to help students discover their true physical and mental limits through development of skills including emergency medical aid, firefighting, search and rescue, mountaineering, and sailing. Five Outward Bound…

  19. Structural requirements for human inducible nitric oxide synthase substrates and substrate analogue inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Grant, S K; Green, B G; Stiffey-Wilusz, J; Durette, P L; Shah, S K; Kozarich, J W

    1998-03-24

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS; EC 1.14.13.39) catalyzes the NADPH-dependent oxidation of one of the free guanidino nitrogens of L-Arg to form nitric oxide and L-citrulline. Analogues of L-Arg and the inhibitor, L-N6-(1-iminoethyl)lysine, were used to define structural elements required for the binding and catalysis of compounds. L-Arg analogues with sequentially shorter methylene spacing between the guanidino group and the amino acid portion of the molecule were not iNOS substrates but were reversible inhibitors. L-Arg analogues such as agmatine with a hydroxyl substitution at the 2-amino position were substrates. Desaminoarginine was not a substrate but a reversible inhibitor. Desaminoarginine, agmatine, and argininic acid bound to the enzyme to give type I difference spectra similar to that of L-Arg. The amidino compounds L-N6-(1-iminoethyl)lysine, L-N5-(1-iminoethyl)ornithine, and N5-(1-iminoethyl)cadaverdine, but not N6-(1-iminoethyl)-6-aminocaproic acid, were NADPH-dependent, irreversible inactivators of iNOS. For both the L-Arg and L-N6-(1-iminoethyl)lysine analogues, the 2-amino group appeared to play an important role in catalytic events leading to either substrate turnover or mechanism-based inactivation. Inactivation of iNOS by L-N6-(1-iminoethyl)lysine was NADPH- and dioxygen-dependent, but low incorporation of radiolabel with DL--4, 5-3H]-N6-(1-iminoethyl)lysine indicates that the mechanism of enzyme inactivation is not covalent modification of the protein.

  20. Quantum reverse hypercontractivity

    SciTech Connect

    Cubitt, Toby; Kastoryano, Michael; Montanaro, Ashley; Temme, Kristan

    2015-10-15

    We develop reverse versions of hypercontractive inequalities for quantum channels. By generalizing classical techniques, we prove a reverse hypercontractive inequality for tensor products of qubit depolarizing channels. We apply this to obtain a rapid mixing result for depolarizing noise applied to large subspaces and to prove bounds on a quantum generalization of non-interactive correlation distillation.

  1. Coulomb bound states of strongly interacting photons

    SciTech Connect

    Maghrebi, M. F.; Choi, S.; Martin, I.; Firstenberg, O.; Lukin, M. D.; Büchler, H. P.; Gorshkov, A. V.

    2015-09-16

    We show that two photons coupled to Rydberg states via electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) can interact via an effective Coulomb potential. The interaction then gives rise to a continuum of two-body bound states. Within the continuum, metastable bound states are distinguished in analogy with quasi-bound states tunneling through a potential barrier. We find multiple branches of metastable bound states whose energy spectrum is governed by the Coulomb problem, thus obtaining a photonic analogue of the hydrogen atom. These states propagate with a negative group velocity in the medium, which allows for a simple preparation and detection scheme, before they slowly decay to pairs of bound Rydberg atoms. As a result, we verify the metastability and backward propagation of these Coulomb bound states with exact numerical simulations.

  2. Coulomb bound states of strongly interacting photons

    DOE PAGES

    Maghrebi, M. F.; Gullans, Michael J.; Bienias, P.; ...

    2015-09-16

    We show that two photons coupled to Rydberg states via electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) can interact via an effective Coulomb potential. The interaction then gives rise to a continuum of two-body bound states. Within the continuum, metastable bound states are distinguished in analogy with quasi-bound states tunneling through a potential barrier. We find multiple branches of metastable bound states whose energy spectrum is governed by the Coulomb problem, thus obtaining a photonic analogue of the hydrogen atom. These states propagate with a negative group velocity in the medium, which allows for a simple preparation and detection scheme, before they slowlymore » decay to pairs of bound Rydberg atoms. As a result, we verify the metastability and backward propagation of these Coulomb bound states with exact numerical simulations.« less

  3. Survey of Analogue Spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, Matt

    Analogue spacetimes (and more boldly, analogue models both of and for gravity), have attracted significant and increasing attention over the last decade and a half. Perhaps the most straightforward physical example, which serves as a template for most of the others, is Bill Unruh's model for a dumb hole,(mute black hole, acoustic black hole), wherein sound is dragged along by a moving fluid—and can even be trapped behind an acoustic horizon. This and related analogue models for curved spacetimes are useful in many ways: analogue spacetimes provide general relativists with extremely concrete physical models to help focus their thinking, and conversely the techniques of curved spacetime can sometimes help improve our understanding of condensed matter and/or optical systems by providing an unexpected and countervailing viewpoint. In this chapter, I shall provide a few simple examples of analogue spacetimes as general background for the rest of the contributions.

  4. Positive Root Bounds and Root Separation Bounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Aaron Paul

    In this thesis, we study two classes of bounds on the roots of a polynomial (or polynomial system). A positive root bound of a polynomial is an upper bound on the largest positive root. A root separation bound of a polynomial is a lower bound on the distance between the roots. Both classes of bounds are fundamental tools in computer algebra and computational real algebraic geometry, with numerous applications. In the first part of the thesis, we study the quality of positive root bounds. Higher quality means that the relative over-estimation (the ratio of the bound and the largest positive root) is smaller. We find that all known positive root bounds can be arbitrarily bad. We then show that a particular positive root bound is tight for certain important classes of polynomials. In the remainder of the thesis, we turn to root separation bounds. We observe that known root separation bounds are usually very pessimistic. To our surprise, we also find that known root separation bounds are not compatible with the geometry of the roots (unlike positive root bounds). This motivates us to derive new root separation bounds. In the second part of this thesis, we derive a new root separation for univariate polynomials by transforming a known bound into a new improved bound. In the third part of this thesis, we use a similar strategy to derive a new improved root separation bound for polynomial systems.

  5. Understanding temperature and magnetic-field actuated magnetization polarity reversal in the Prussian blue analogue Cu0.73Mn0.77[Fe(CN)6].zH2O, using XMCD

    SciTech Connect

    Lahiri, Debdutta; Choi, Yongseong; Kumar, Amit; Ramanan, Nitya; Chattopadhyay, Soma; Sharma, Surinder; Haskel, Daniel; Yusuf, S. M.

    2016-03-01

    We have investigated the microscopic origin of temperature and magnetic-field actuated magnetization reversal in Cu0.73Mn0.77[Fe(CN)(6)]center dot zH(2)O, using XMCD. Our results show a fair deviation from the mean-field-theory in the form of different ordering temperatures of Fe and Mn sublattices. A preferential sign reversal of Mn spin under magnetic field and different spin cant angles for the two sublattices have also been observed. An antiferromagnetic coupling between the Fe and Mn sublattices along with different ordering temperatures (sublattice decoupling) for these sublattices explain the temperature-dependent magnetization reversal. Whereas, Mn spin reversal alone (under external magnetic field) is responsible for the observed field-dependent magnetization reversal. The dissimilar magnetic behavior of Fe and Mn sublattices in this cubic 3d-orbital system has been understood by invoking disparity and competition among inter-sublattice magnetic control parameters, viz. magnetic Zeeman energy, exchange coupling constant and magnetic anisotropy constant. Our results have significant design implications for future magnetic switches, by optimizing the competition among these magnetic control parameters.

  6. Anomalous Andreev bound state in noncentrosymmetric superconductors.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yukio; Mizuno, Yoshihiro; Yokoyama, Takehito; Yada, Keiji; Sato, Masatoshi

    2010-08-27

    We study edge states of noncentrosymmetric superconductors where spin-singlet d-wave pairing mixes with spin-triplet p (or f)-wave one by spin-orbit coupling. For d(xy)-wave pairing, the obtained Andreev bound state has an anomalous dispersion as compared to conventional helical edge modes. A unique topologically protected time-reversal invariant Majorana bound state appears at the edge. The charge conductance in the noncentrosymmetric superconductor junctions reflects the anomalous structures of the dispersions, particularly the time-reversal invariant Majorana bound state is manifested as a zero bias conductance peak.

  7. Coulomb Bound States of Strongly Interacting Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghrebi, M. F.; Gullans, M. J.; Bienias, P.; Choi, S.; Martin, I.; Firstenberg, O.; Lukin, M. D.; Büchler, H. P.; Gorshkov, A. V.

    2015-09-01

    We show that two photons coupled to Rydberg states via electromagnetically induced transparency can interact via an effective Coulomb potential. This interaction gives rise to a continuum of two-body bound states. Within the continuum, metastable bound states are distinguished in analogy with quasibound states tunneling through a potential barrier. We find multiple branches of metastable bound states whose energy spectrum is governed by the Coulomb potential, thus obtaining a photonic analogue of the hydrogen atom. Under certain conditions, the wave function resembles that of a diatomic molecule in which the two polaritons are separated by a finite "bond length." These states propagate with a negative group velocity in the medium, allowing for a simple preparation and detection scheme, before they slowly decay to pairs of bound Rydberg atoms.

  8. Fluoride-mediated capture of a noncovalent bound state of a reversible covalent enzyme inhibitor: X-ray crystallographic analysis of an exceptionally potent α-ketoheterocycle inhibitor of fatty acid amide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Mileni, Mauro; Garfunkle, Joie; Ezzili, Cyrine; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Stevens, Raymond C; Boger, Dale L

    2011-03-23

    Two cocrystal X-ray structures of the exceptionally potent α-ketoheterocycle inhibitor 1 (K(i) = 290 pM) bound to a humanized variant of rat fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) are disclosed, representing noncovalently and covalently bound states of the same inhibitor with the enzyme. Key to securing the structure of the noncovalently bound state of the inhibitor was the inclusion of fluoride ion in the crystallization conditions that is proposed to bind the oxyanion hole precluding inhibitor covalent adduct formation with stabilization of the tetrahedral hemiketal. This permitted the opportunity to detect important noncovalent interactions stabilizing the binding of the inhibitor within the FAAH active site independent of the covalent reaction. Remarkably, noncovalently bound 1 in the presence of fluoride appears to capture the active site in the same "in action" state with the three catalytic residues Ser241-Ser217-Lys142 occupying essentially identical positions observed in the covalently bound structure of 1, suggesting that this technique of introducing fluoride may have important applications in structural studies beyond inhibiting substrate or inhibitor oxyanion hole binding. Key insights to emerge from the studies include the observations that noncovalently bound 1 binds in its ketone (not gem diol) form, that the terminal phenyl group in the acyl side chain of the inhibitor serves as the key anchoring interaction overriding the intricate polar interactions in the cytosolic port, and that the role of the central activating heterocycle is dominated by its intrinsic electron-withdrawing properties. These two structures are also briefly compared with five X-ray structures of α-ketoheterocycle-based inhibitors bound to FAAH recently disclosed.

  9. Fluoride-Mediated Capture of a Noncovalent Bound State of a Reversible Covalent Enzyme Inhibitor: X-ray Crystallographic Analysis of an Exceptionally Potent [alpha]-Ketoheterocycle Inhibitor of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Mileni, Mauro; Garfunkle, Joie; Ezzili, Cyrine; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Boger, Dale L.

    2011-11-02

    Two cocrystal X-ray structures of the exceptionally potent {alpha}-ketoheterocycle inhibitor 1 (K{sub i} = 290 pM) bound to a humanized variant of rat fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) are disclosed, representing noncovalently and covalently bound states of the same inhibitor with the enzyme. Key to securing the structure of the noncovalently bound state of the inhibitor was the inclusion of fluoride ion in the crystallization conditions that is proposed to bind the oxyanion hole precluding inhibitor covalent adduct formation with stabilization of the tetrahedral hemiketal. This permitted the opportunity to detect important noncovalent interactions stabilizing the binding of the inhibitor within the FAAH active site independent of the covalent reaction. Remarkably, noncovalently bound 1 in the presence of fluoride appears to capture the active site in the same 'in action' state with the three catalytic residues Ser241-Ser217-Lys142 occupying essentially identical positions observed in the covalently bound structure of 1, suggesting that this technique of introducing fluoride may have important applications in structural studies beyond inhibiting substrate or inhibitor oxyanion hole binding. Key insights to emerge from the studies include the observations that noncovalently bound 1 binds in its ketone (not gem diol) form, that the terminal phenyl group in the acyl side chain of the inhibitor serves as the key anchoring interaction overriding the intricate polar interactions in the cytosolic port, and that the role of the central activating heterocycle is dominated by its intrinsic electron-withdrawing properties. These two structures are also briefly compared with five X-ray structures of {alpha}-ketoheterocycle-based inhibitors bound to FAAH recently disclosed.

  10. Fluoride-Mediated Capture of a Noncovalent Bound State of a Reversible Covalent Enzyme Inhibitor: X-ray Crystallographic Analysis of an Exceptionally Potent α-Ketoheterocycle Inhibitor of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Mileni, Mauro; Garfunkle, Joie; Ezzili, Cyrine; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Boger, Dale L.

    2011-01-01

    Two cocrystal X-ray structures of the exceptionally potent α-ketoheterocycle inhibitor 1 (Ki = 290 pM) bound to a humanized variant of rat fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) are disclosed, representing noncovalently and covalently bound states of the same inhibitor with the enzyme. Key to securing the structure of the noncovalently bound state of the inhibitor was the inclusion of fluoride ion in the crystallization conditions that is proposed to bind the oxyanion hole precluding inhibitor covalent adduct formation with stabilization of the tetrahedral hemiketal. This permitted the opportunity to detect important noncovalent interactions stabilizing the binding of the inhibitor within the FAAH active site independent of the covalent reaction. Remarkably, noncovalently bound 1 in the presence of fluoride appears to capture the active site in the same “in action” state with the three catalytic residues Ser241–Ser217–Lys142 occupying essentially identical positions observed in the covalently bound structure of 1, suggesting that this technique of introducing fluoride may have important applications in structural studies beyond inhibiting substrate or inhibitor oxyanion hole binding. Key insights to emerge from the studies include the observations that noncovalently bound 1 binds in its ketone (not gem diol) form, that the terminal phenyl group in the acyl side chain of the inhibitor serves as the key anchoring interaction overriding the intricate polar interactions in the cytosolic port, and that the role of the central activating heterocycle is dominated by its intrinsic electron-withdrawing properties. These two structures are also briefly compared with five X-ray structures of α-ketoheterocycle-based inhibitors bound to FAAH recently disclosed. PMID:21355555

  11. Natural Analogue Synthesis Report

    SciTech Connect

    A. M. Simmons

    2002-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to present analogue studies and literature reviews designed to provide qualitative and quantitative information to test and provide added confidence in process models abstracted for performance assessment (PA) and model predictions pertinent to PA. This report provides updates to studies presented in the ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' (CRWMS M and O 2000 [151945], Section 13) and new examples gleaned from the literature, along with results of quantitative studies conducted specifically for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). The intent of the natural analogue studies was to collect corroborative evidence from analogues to demonstrate additional understanding of processes expected to occur during postclosure at a potential Yucca Mountain repository. The report focuses on key processes by providing observations and analyses of natural and anthropogenic (human-induced) systems to improve understanding and confidence in the operation of these processes under conditions similar to those that could occur in a nuclear waste repository. The process models include those that represent both engineered and natural barrier processes. A second purpose of this report is to document the various applications of natural analogues to geologic repository programs, focusing primarily on the way analogues have been used by the YMP. This report is limited to providing support for PA in a confirmatory manner and to providing corroborative inputs for process modeling activities. Section 1.7 discusses additional limitations of this report. Key topics for this report are analogues to emplacement drift degradation, waste form degradation, waste package degradation, degradation of other materials proposed for the engineered barrier, seepage into drifts, radionuclide flow and transport in the unsaturated zone (UZ), analogues to coupled thermal-hydrologic-mechanical-chemical processes, saturated zone (SZ) transport, impact of radionuclide

  12. Prevalence of transmitted nucleoside analogue-resistant HIV-1 strains and pre-existing mutations in pol reverse transcriptase and protease region: outcome after treatment in recently infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Balotta, C; Berlusconi, A; Pan, A; Violin, M; Riva, C; Colombo, M C; Gori, A; Papagno, L; Corvasce, S; Mazzucchelli, R; Facchi, G; Velleca, R; Saporetti, G; Galli, M; Rusconi, S; Moroni, M

    2000-03-01

    We retrospectively studied 38 Italian recently HIV-1-infected subjects who seroconverted from 1994 to 1997 to investigate: (i) the prevalence of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI)-related mutations at primary infection; (ii) the proportion of naturally occurring mutations in reverse transcriptase (RT) and protease regions of patients naive for non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs) and protease inhibitors (PIs); (iii) the drug-susceptibility to NRTIs and PIs in subjects with NRTI- and/or PI-related mutations; and (iv) the outcome of seroconverters treated with various NRTIs or NRTI/PI regimens. Baseline HIV-1 plasma viraemia and absolute CD4 count at baseline could not be used to distinguish patients with NRTI- and/or PI-related pre-existing mutations from those with wild-type virus (P = 0.693 and P = 0.542, respectively). The frequency of zidovudine-related mutations was 21% in the study period. The response to treatment was not significantly different in subjects with or without genotypic zidovudine-related mutations at primary infection (P = 0.744 for HIV-1 RNA and P = 0.102 for CD4 cells). Some natural variation (2.6%) was present within regions 98-108 and 179-190 of RT involved in NNRTI resistance. The high natural polymorphism in the protease region present in our patients was similar to that reported by others. In our study some PI-associated substitutions, thought to be compensatory in protease enzymatic function, could confer intermediate to high PI-resistance. As discrepancies between genotypic and phenotypic results may exist in recent seroconverters, our data suggest that the role of transmitted NRTI- and PI-resistant variants remain to be fully elucidated in vivo.

  13. Carbocyclic nucleoside analogues: classification, target enzymes, mechanisms of action and synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matyugina, E. S.; Khandazhinskaya, A. P.; Kochetkov, Sergei N.

    2012-08-01

    Key biological targets (S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase, telomerase, human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase, herpes virus DNA polymerase and hepatitis B virus DNA polymerase) and the mechanisms of action of carbocyclic nucleoside analogues are considered. Structural types of analogues are discussed. Methods of synthesis for the most promising compounds and the spectrum of their biological activities are described. The bibliography includes 126 references.

  14. Aspartame and Its Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlova, L. A.; Komarova, T. V.; Davidovich, Yurii A.; Rogozhin, S. V.

    1981-04-01

    The results of studies on the biochemistry of the sweet taste are briefly reviewed. The methods of synthesis of "aspartame" — a sweet dipeptide — are considered, its structural analogues are described, and quantitative estimates are made of the degree of sweetness relative to sucrose. Attention is concentrated mainly on problems of the relation between the structure of the substance and its taste in the series of aspartyl derivatives. The bibliography includes 118 references.

  15. Germananes: Germanium Graphane Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberger, Joshua

    2014-03-01

    Graphene's success has shown that it is not only possible to create stable, single-atom thick sheets from a crystalline solid, but that these materials have fundamentally different properties than the parent material. Our interest focuses on the synthesis and properties of Group IV graphane analogues. We have synthesized for the first time, mm-scale crystals of a hydrogen-terminated germanium multilayered graphane analogue (germanane, GeH) from the topochemical deintercalation of CaGe2. This layered van der Waals solid is analogous to multilayered graphane. The surface layer of GeH only slowly oxidizes in air over the span of five months, while the underlying layers are resilient to oxidation. We demonstrate that it is possible to covalently terminate the external surface with organic substituents to tune the electronic structure, and enhance the stability. These materials represent a new class of covalently terminated graphane analogues having great potential for a wide range of optoelectronic and sensing applications, especially since theory predicts a direct band gap of 1.53 eV and an electron mobility of 18,000 cm2/Vs which is five times higher than that of bulk Ge.

  16. Quantum analogue computing.

    PubMed

    Kendon, Vivien M; Nemoto, Kae; Munro, William J

    2010-08-13

    We briefly review what a quantum computer is, what it promises to do for us and why it is so hard to build one. Among the first applications anticipated to bear fruit is the quantum simulation of quantum systems. While most quantum computation is an extension of classical digital computation, quantum simulation differs fundamentally in how the data are encoded in the quantum computer. To perform a quantum simulation, the Hilbert space of the system to be simulated is mapped directly onto the Hilbert space of the (logical) qubits in the quantum computer. This type of direct correspondence is how data are encoded in a classical analogue computer. There is no binary encoding, and increasing precision becomes exponentially costly: an extra bit of precision doubles the size of the computer. This has important consequences for both the precision and error-correction requirements of quantum simulation, and significant open questions remain about its practicality. It also means that the quantum version of analogue computers, continuous-variable quantum computers, becomes an equally efficient architecture for quantum simulation. Lessons from past use of classical analogue computers can help us to build better quantum simulators in future.

  17. Entropy Bounds and Entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Zachary

    The generalized covariant entropy bound, or Bousso bound, is a holographic bound on the entropy of a region of space in a gravitational theory. It bounds the entropy passing through certain null surfaces. The bound remains non-trivial in the weak-gravity limit, and provides non-trivial constraints on the entropy of ordinary quantum states even in a regime where gravity is negligible. In the first half of this thesis, we present a proof of the Bousso bound in the weak-gravity regime within the framework of quantum field theory. The bound uses techniques from quantum information theory which relate the energy and entropy of quantum states. We present two proofs of the bound in free and interacting field theory. In the second half, we present a generalization of the Bousso bound called the quantum focussing conjecture. Our conjecture is a bound on the rate of entropy generation in a quantum field theory coupled semiclassically to gravity. The conjecture unifies and generalizes several ideas in holography. In particular, the quantum focussing conjecture implies a bound on entropies which is similar to, but subtly different from, the Bousso bound proven in the first half. The quantum focussing conjecture implies a novel non-gravitational energy condition, the quantum null energy condition, which gives a point-wise lower bound on the null-null component of the stress tensor of quantum matter. We give a proof of this bound in the context of free and superrenormalizable bosonic quantum field theory.

  18. Viscosity bound versus the universal relaxation bound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hod, Shahar

    2017-10-01

    For gauge theories with an Einstein gravity dual, the AdS/CFT correspondence predicts a universal value for the ratio of the shear viscosity to the entropy density, η / s = 1 / 4 π. The holographic calculations have motivated the formulation of the celebrated KSS conjecture, according to which all fluids conform to the lower bound η / s ≥ 1 / 4 π. The bound on η / s may be regarded as a lower bound on the relaxation properties of perturbed fluids and it has been the focus of much recent attention. In particular, it was argued that for a class of field theories with Gauss-Bonnet gravity dual, the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio, η / s, could violate the conjectured KSS bound. In the present paper we argue that the proposed violations of the KSS bound are strongly constrained by Bekenstein's generalized second law (GSL) of thermodynamics. In particular, it is shown that physical consistency of the Gauss-Bonnet theory with the GSL requires its coupling constant to be bounded by λGB ≲ 0 . 063. We further argue that the genuine physical bound on the relaxation properties of physically consistent fluids is ℑω(k > 2 πT) > πT, where ω and k are respectively the proper frequency and the wavenumber of a perturbation mode in the fluid.

  19. Effects of inorganic phosphate analogues on stiffness and unloaded shortening of skinned muscle fibres from rabbit.

    PubMed

    Chase, P B; Martyn, D A; Kushmerick, M J; Gordon, A M

    1993-01-01

    1. We examined the effects of aluminofluoride (AlFx) and orthovanadate (Vi), tightly binding analogues of orthophosphate (Pi), on the mechanical properties of glycerinated fibres from rabbit psoas muscle. Maximum Ca(2+)-activated force, stiffness, and unloaded shortening velocity (Vus) were measured under conditions of steady-state inhibition (up to 1 mM of inhibitor) and during the recovery from inhibition. 2. Stiffness was measured using either step or sinusoidal (1 kHz) changes in fibre length. Sarcomere length was monitored continuously by helium-neon laser diffraction during maximum Ca2+ activation. Stiffness was determined from the changes in sarcomere length and the corresponding changes in force. Vus was measured using the slack test method. 3. AlF chi and Vi each reversibly inhibited force, stiffness and Vus. Actively cycling cross-bridges were required for reversal of these inhibitory effects. Recovery from inhibition by AlF chi was 3- to 4-fold slower than that following removal of V1. 4. At various degrees of inhibition, AlF chi and Vi both inhibited steady-state isometric force more than either Vus or stiffness. For both AlF chi and Vi, the relatively greater inhibition of force over stiffness persisted during recovery from steady-state inhibition. We interpret these results to indicate that the cross-bridges with AlF chi or Vi bound are analogous to those which occur early in the cross-bridge cycle.

  20. Effects of inorganic phosphate analogues on stiffness and unloaded shortening of skinned muscle fibres from rabbit.

    PubMed Central

    Chase, P B; Martyn, D A; Kushmerick, M J; Gordon, A M

    1993-01-01

    1. We examined the effects of aluminofluoride (AlFx) and orthovanadate (Vi), tightly binding analogues of orthophosphate (Pi), on the mechanical properties of glycerinated fibres from rabbit psoas muscle. Maximum Ca(2+)-activated force, stiffness, and unloaded shortening velocity (Vus) were measured under conditions of steady-state inhibition (up to 1 mM of inhibitor) and during the recovery from inhibition. 2. Stiffness was measured using either step or sinusoidal (1 kHz) changes in fibre length. Sarcomere length was monitored continuously by helium-neon laser diffraction during maximum Ca2+ activation. Stiffness was determined from the changes in sarcomere length and the corresponding changes in force. Vus was measured using the slack test method. 3. AlF chi and Vi each reversibly inhibited force, stiffness and Vus. Actively cycling cross-bridges were required for reversal of these inhibitory effects. Recovery from inhibition by AlF chi was 3- to 4-fold slower than that following removal of V1. 4. At various degrees of inhibition, AlF chi and Vi both inhibited steady-state isometric force more than either Vus or stiffness. For both AlF chi and Vi, the relatively greater inhibition of force over stiffness persisted during recovery from steady-state inhibition. We interpret these results to indicate that the cross-bridges with AlF chi or Vi bound are analogous to those which occur early in the cross-bridge cycle. PMID:8487194

  1. Analogue-to-Digital and Digital-to-Analogue Conversion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Martin

    1997-01-01

    Discusses circuits for three-bit and four-bit analogue digital converters and digital analogue converters. These circuits feature slow operating speeds that enable the circuitry to be used to demonstrate the mode of operation using oscilloscopes and signal generators. (DDR)

  2. Bound states and the Bekenstein bound

    SciTech Connect

    Bousso, Raphael

    2003-10-16

    We explore the validity of the generalized Bekenstein bound, S<= pi M a. We define the entropy S as the logarithm of the number of states which have energy eigenvalue below M and are localized to a flat space region of width alpha. If boundary conditions that localize field modes are imposed by fiat, then the bound encounters well-known difficulties with negative Casimir energy and large species number, as well as novel problems arising only in the generalized form. In realistic systems, however, finite-size effects contribute additional energy. We study two different models for estimating such contributions. Our analysis suggests that the bound is both valid and nontrivial if interactions are properly included, so that the entropy S counts the bound states of interacting fields.

  3. Mammary Analogue Secretory Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Todd M; Parekh, Vishwas

    2016-09-01

    Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma (MASC) is a recently described salivary gland tumor that shares the same histologic appearance and ETV6 gene (12p13) rearrangement as secretory carcinoma of the breast. Prior to its recognition, MASC cases were commonly labeled acinic cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, not otherwise specified. Despite distinctive histologic features, MASC may be difficult to distinguish from other salivary gland tumors, in particular zymogen-poor acinic cell carcinoma and low-grade salivary duct carcinoma. Although characteristic morphologic and immunohistochemical features form the basis of a diagnosis of MASC, the presence of an ETV6-NTRK3 gene fusion is confirmatory. Given its recent recognition the true prognostic import of MASC is not yet clearly defined.

  4. Fluorescent analogues of methotrexate: characterization and interaction with dihydrofolate reductase.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A A; Kempton, R J; Anstead, G M; Freisheim, J H

    1983-01-18

    The dansylated derivatives of lysine and ornithine analogues of methotrexate exhibit fluorescence properties characteristic of the dansyl moiety with an excitation at 328 nm and an emission maximum at 580 nm in aqueous media. As in the case of dansyl amino acids, the fluorescence emission is dependent upon the polarity of the medium. In solvents of low dielectric constant there is an enhancement of the dansyl fluorescence intensity as well as a shift to shorter wavelengths. The dansylated analogues show a reduction in the quantum yields as compared to N epsilon-dansyl-L-lysine and 5-(N,N-dimethylamino)-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid. The absorption spectra of the two dansyl analogues are similar to the spectra of the parent basic amino acid precursors but with reduced molar extinction values. The two fluorescent analogues of methotrexate were found to be potent inhibitors of purified dihydrofolate reductases from Lactobacillus casei and from chicken liver. The binding of these fluorescent analogues to either dihydrofolate reductase resulted in 10-15-nm blue shift of the ligand emission maxima and a 2-5-fold enhancement of the emission. These fluorescent properties of the bound ligands indicate a possible interaction of the dansyl moiety with a region on the enzyme molecule which is more hydrophobic relative to the surrounding solvent.

  5. Analogue modelling of syntectonic leucosomes in migmatitic schists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druguet, Elena; Carreras, Jordi

    2006-10-01

    Migmatites from the Cap de Creus tectonometamorphic belt display a wide variety of structures, from those formed when the leucosomes were melt-bearing, to those developed during solid-state deformation. The observed field structures have been modelled by means of analogue experiments. The materials used in the models are layered plasticine as a schist analogue, and chocolate as analogue of the crystallizing leucosome. A model for the development of syntectonic migmatites is proposed in which initial melt-bearing patches, preferentially formed within fertile pelitic layers, progressively evolve towards lens-shaped veins. Furthermore, heterogeneous deformation of anisotropic metasediments facilitates formation of extensional sites for further melt accumulation and transport. Melt crystallization implies a rapid increase in effective viscosity of leucosomes producing a reversal in competence contrast with respect to the enclosing schists. During the whole process, deformation localizes around crystallizing veins, giving rise to different and contrasting structures for melt-bearing and for solid-state stages.

  6. Impact of indentor geometry on lithosphere deformation - insights from analogue vice models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schemmann, K.; Boutelier, D.; Cruden, A. R.; Oncken, O.

    2006-12-01

    Vice models incorporate a weak lithospheric unit that is compressed between two stronger blocks (vices) analogous to settings with thickened or juvenile crust and high surface heat flow surrounded by colder and stronger continental lithosphere (e.g. plateau orogens). We report the results of laboratory vice models that examine the effect of the geometry of bounding indentor blocks (curvature, size, symmetry) on deformation within the intervening weak orogen. We also analyse the influence of the indentor geometry in combination with different degrees of buoyancy (buoyant and non-buoyant) of the weak lower crust. The upper crust of both the vice blocks and the weak orogen consists of sand; the ductile lower crust and mantle lithosphere layers are composed of mixtures of silicone polymers and plasticene. The model lithosphere floats isostatically on an asthenosphere of water. Surface deformation in the experiments is monitored by a digital stereoscopic camera system and particle imaging velocimetry. This allows high spatial and temporal resolution of the strain evolution in the upper crust, the development of topographic relief, and velocity fields (analogue to GPS data). After each experimental run, the sand cover of the upper crust is removed to examine lower crustal structures. Cross sections cut perpendicular to the orogen record the finite deformation of the lower crust and the mantle lithosphere. The structural inventory developed in the experiments includes thrust faults of variable vergence and reverse faults bounding pop-up structures within the upper crust; and cusp-shape folds bounding deep synclines within the lower crust. The plate geometry is reflected in the initial outline of topography, but the overall geometry of the fault pattern does not show any recurrent shape of the vice blocks. We conclude that plate or indentor geometry does not have a first order, but only a second order influence on structural evolution in the models, as different vice

  7. NASA/ESMD Analogue Mission Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation exploring Earth and its analogues is shown. The topics include: 1) ESMD Goals for the Use of Earth Analogues; 2) Stakeholders Summary; 3) Issues with Current Analogue Situation; 4) Current state of Analogues; 5) External Implementation Plan (Second Step); 6) Recent Progress in Utilizing Analogues; 7) Website Layout Example-Home Page; 8) Website Layout Example-Analogue Site; 9) Website Layout Example-Analogue Mission; 10) Objectives of ARDIG Analog Initiatives; 11) Future Plans; 12) Example: Cold-Trap Sample Return; 13) Example: Site Characterization Matrix; 14) Integrated Analogue Studies-Prerequisites for Human Exploration; and 15) Rating Scale Definitions.

  8. Reversible sideroblastic anemia associated with the tetracycline analogue COL-3.

    PubMed

    Rudek, M A; Horne, M; Figg, W D; Dahut, W; Dyer, V; Pluda, J M; Reed, E

    2001-05-01

    Eight of 35 patients with cancer receiving COL-3, a tetracycline derivative with antiangiogenic properties, developed anemia while on treatment. All of these patients were enrolled on an approved Phase I clinical trial at the National Cancer Institute. Three of these patients had bone marrow examinations that revealed ringed sideroblasts. This paper describes these cases. Am. J. Hematol. 67:51-53, 2001. Published 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Molecular Biodynamers: Dynamic Covalent Analogues of Biopolymers

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Conspectus Constitutional dynamic chemistry (CDC) features the use of reversible linkages at both molecular and supramolecular levels, including reversible covalent bonds (dynamic covalent chemistry, DCC) and noncovalent interactions (dynamic noncovalent chemistry, DNCC). Due to its inherent reversibility and stimuli-responsiveness, CDC has been widely utilized as a powerful tool for the screening of bioactive compounds, the exploitation of receptors or substrates driven by molecular recognition, and the fabrication of constitutionally dynamic materials. Implementation of CDC in biopolymer science leads to the generation of constitutionally dynamic analogues of biopolymers, biodynamers, at the molecular level (molecular biodynamers) through DCC or at the supramolecular level (supramolecular biodynamers) via DNCC. Therefore, biodynamers are prepared by reversible covalent polymerization or noncovalent polyassociation of biorelevant monomers. In particular, molecular biodynamers, biodynamers of the covalent type whose monomeric units are connected by reversible covalent bonds, are generated by reversible polymerization of bio-based monomers and can be seen as a combination of biopolymers with DCC. Owing to the reversible covalent bonds used in DCC, molecular biodynamers can undergo continuous and spontaneous constitutional modifications via incorporation/decorporation and exchange of biorelevant monomers in response to internal or external stimuli. As a result, they behave as adaptive materials with novel properties, such as self-healing, stimuli-responsiveness, and tunable mechanical and optical character. More specifically, molecular biodynamers combine the biorelevant characters (e.g., biocompatibility, biodegradability, biofunctionality) of bioactive monomers with the dynamic features of reversible covalent bonds (e.g., changeable, tunable, controllable, self-healing, and stimuli-responsive capacities), to realize synergistic properties in one system. In addition

  10. Molecular Biodynamers: Dynamic Covalent Analogues of Biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Lehn, Jean-Marie; Hirsch, Anna K H

    2017-02-21

    Constitutional dynamic chemistry (CDC) features the use of reversible linkages at both molecular and supramolecular levels, including reversible covalent bonds (dynamic covalent chemistry, DCC) and noncovalent interactions (dynamic noncovalent chemistry, DNCC). Due to its inherent reversibility and stimuli-responsiveness, CDC has been widely utilized as a powerful tool for the screening of bioactive compounds, the exploitation of receptors or substrates driven by molecular recognition, and the fabrication of constitutionally dynamic materials. Implementation of CDC in biopolymer science leads to the generation of constitutionally dynamic analogues of biopolymers, biodynamers, at the molecular level (molecular biodynamers) through DCC or at the supramolecular level (supramolecular biodynamers) via DNCC. Therefore, biodynamers are prepared by reversible covalent polymerization or noncovalent polyassociation of biorelevant monomers. In particular, molecular biodynamers, biodynamers of the covalent type whose monomeric units are connected by reversible covalent bonds, are generated by reversible polymerization of bio-based monomers and can be seen as a combination of biopolymers with DCC. Owing to the reversible covalent bonds used in DCC, molecular biodynamers can undergo continuous and spontaneous constitutional modifications via incorporation/decorporation and exchange of biorelevant monomers in response to internal or external stimuli. As a result, they behave as adaptive materials with novel properties, such as self-healing, stimuli-responsiveness, and tunable mechanical and optical character. More specifically, molecular biodynamers combine the biorelevant characters (e.g., biocompatibility, biodegradability, biofunctionality) of bioactive monomers with the dynamic features of reversible covalent bonds (e.g., changeable, tunable, controllable, self-healing, and stimuli-responsive capacities), to realize synergistic properties in one system. In addition, molecular

  11. Physical Uncertainty Bounds (PUB)

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, Diane Elizabeth; Preston, Dean L.

    2015-03-19

    This paper introduces and motivates the need for a new methodology for determining upper bounds on the uncertainties in simulations of engineered systems due to limited fidelity in the composite continuum-level physics models needed to simulate the systems. We show that traditional uncertainty quantification methods provide, at best, a lower bound on this uncertainty. We propose to obtain bounds on the simulation uncertainties by first determining bounds on the physical quantities or processes relevant to system performance. By bounding these physics processes, as opposed to carrying out statistical analyses of the parameter sets of specific physics models or simply switching out the available physics models, one can obtain upper bounds on the uncertainties in simulated quantities of interest.

  12. Cardiac specific effects of thyroid hormone analogues.

    PubMed

    Danzi, S; Klein, I

    2011-10-01

    There is significant interest in development of thyroid hormone analogues to harness specific properties as therapeutic agents for a variety of clinical indications including obesity, hypercholesterolemia, heart failure, and thyrotoxicosis. To date, most analogues have been designed to target liver specific effects, which can promote weight loss and lipid lowering through either tissue specific uptake or thyroid hormone receptor (TR) β isoform selectivity at the same time minimizing the unwanted cardiac and bone effects. We have developed a molecular biomarker assay to study the induction of the transcription of the cardiac specific α-myosin heavy chain (MHC) gene as a more sensitive and specific measure of thyroid hormone action on cardiac myocytes. We tested 5 TRβ and 1 TRα selective agonists as well as 2 putative TR antagonists in our α-MHC hnRNA assay. Using reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction, we measured the induction of the α-MHC primary transcript in response to administration of drug. The TRα and only 2 of the TRβ agonists were highly active, when compared to the effect of T3, at the level of the cardiac myocyte. In addition, our data suggests that the reason that the antagonist NH-3 is not able to block the T3-mediated induction of α-MHC is that it does not get transported into the cardiac myocyte. Our data suggest that this assay will be useful in preclinical studies of the potential cardiac specific effects of thyroid hormone analogues and that predictions of function based on structure are not necessarily accurate or complete. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Use of surface plasmon resonance in the binding study of vitamin D, metabolites and analogues with vitamin D binding protein.

    PubMed

    Canoa, Pilar; Rivadulla, Marcos L; Popplewell, Jonathan; van Oosten, René; Gómez, Generosa; Fall, Yagamare

    2017-04-01

    Vitamin D3 and its metabolites are lipophilic molecules with low aqueous solubility and must be transported bound to plasma carrier proteins, primarily to vitamin D binding protein (DBP). The biological functions of vitamin D3 metabolites are intimately dependent on the protein, hence the importance of determining their affinity for DBP. In this study, we developed a novel procedure for measuring the kinetic and equilibrium constants of human-DBP with vitamin D3 and three metabolites: 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3], 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25OHD3) and 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [24,25(OH)2D3] by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). At the same time, five different analogues, synthetized in our laboratory, were evaluated in order to compare the affinity values with the metabolites. Real-time SPR measurements showed that 25OHD3 and 24,25(OH)2D3 had higher affinity (0.3 μM) than 1,25(OH)2D3 (5 μM), with the higher affinity of 25OHD3 and 24,25(OH)2D3 due to dissociation constants 1 order of magnitude slower. In the case of the analogues, the affinity values were lower, with 1-hydroxy-25-nitro-vitamin D3 (NO2-446), structurally closer to 1,25(OH)2D3, showing the highest value with a K D of 50 μM. (24R)-1,25-dihydroxyvitamin-24-buthyl-28-norvitamin D2 (Bu-471) and (24R)-1,25-dihydroxyvitamin-24-phenyl-28-norvitamin D2 (Ph-491), structurally similar, had affinities of 180 and 170 μM, respectively. (22R,23E)-1-hydroxy-22-ethenyl-25-methoxy-23-dehydrovitamin D3 (MeO-455) and 1-hydroxy-20(R)-[5(S)-(2,2-dimethyltetrahydropyran-5-yl)]-22,23-dinor vitamin D3 (Oxan-429) had affinities of 310 and 100 μM, respectively. The binding of the metabolites and analogues was reversible allowing the rapid capture of data for replicates. The kinetic and equilibrium data for both the metabolites and the analogues fitted to the Langmuir model describing a 1:1 interaction. Graphical Abstract Label-free, real time binding study between vitamin D binding protein immmobilized on the

  14. Glucagonlike Peptide 2 Analogue Teduglutide

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Lakshmi S.; Basson, Marc D.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Short bowel syndrome occurs when a shortened intestine cannot absorb sufficient nutrients or fluids. Teduglutide is a recombinant analogue of human glucagonlike peptide 2 that reduces dependence on parenteral nutrition in patients with short bowel syndrome by promoting enterocytic proliferation, increasing the absorptive surface area. However, enterocyte function depends not only on the number of cells that are present but also on differentiated features that facilitate nutrient absorption and digestion. OBJECTIVE To test the hypothesis that teduglutide impairs human intestinal epithelial differentiation. DESIGN AND SETTING We investigated the effects of teduglutide in the modulation of proliferation and differentiation in human Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells at a basic science laboratory. This was an in vitro study using Caco-2 cells, a human-derived intestinal epithelial cell line commonly used to model enterocytic biology. EXPOSURE Cells were exposed to teduglutide or vehicle control. MAINOUTCOMESAND MEASURES We analyzed the cell cycle by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation or propidium iodide staining and flow cytometry and measured cell proliferation by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS) assay. We used quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction to assay the expression of the enterocytic differentiation markers villin, sucrase-isomaltase, glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2), and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4), as well as that of the putative differentiation signals schlafen 12 (SLFN12) and caudal-related homeobox intestine-specific transcription factor (Cdx2). Villin promoter activity was measured by a luciferase-based assay. RESULTS The MTS assay demonstrated that teduglutide increased cell numbers by a mean (SD) of 10% (2%) over untreated controls at a maximal 500nM (n = 6, P < .05). Teduglutide increased bromodeoxyuridine-positive cells vs untreated controls by a mean (SD

  15. Bounding Species Distribution Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Jarnevich, Cahterine S.; Morisette, Jeffrey T.; Esaias, Wayne E.

    2011-01-01

    Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS) might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for "clamping" model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART) and maximum entropy (Maxent) models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used [Current Zoology 57 (5): 642-647, 2011].

  16. Bounding species distribution models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stohlgren, T.J.; Jarnevich, C.S.; Esaias, W.E.; Morisette, J.T.

    2011-01-01

    Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS) might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for "clamping" model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART) and maximum entropy (Maxent) models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used. ?? 2011 Current Zoology.

  17. Bounding Species Distribution Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Jarnevich, Cahterine S.; Morisette, Jeffrey T.; Esaias, Wayne E.

    2011-01-01

    Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS) might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for "clamping" model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART) and maximum entropy (Maxent) models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used [Current Zoology 57 (5): 642-647, 2011].

  18. Mammalian folylpoly-. gamma. -glutamate synthetase. 3. Specificity for folate analogues

    SciTech Connect

    George, S.; Cichowicz, D.J.; Shane, B.

    1987-01-27

    A variety of folate analogues were synthesized to explore the specificity of the folate binding site of hog liver folypolyglutamate synthetase and the requirements for catalysis. Modifications of the internal and terminal glutamate moieties of folate cause large drops in on rates and/or affinity for the protein. The only exceptions are glutamine, homocysteate, and ornithine analogues, indicating a less stringent specificity around the delta-carbon of glutamate. It is proposed that initial folate binding to the enzyme involves low-affinity interactions at a pterin and a glutamate site and that the first glutamate bound is the internal residue adjacent to the benzoyl group. Processive movement of the polyglutamate chain through the glutamate site and a possible conformational change in the protein when the terminal residue is bound would result in tight binding and would position the ..gamma..-carboxyl of the terminal glutamate in the correct position for catalysis. The 4-amino substitution of folate increases the on rate for monoglutamate derivatives but severely impairs catalysis with diglutamate derivatives. Pteroylornithine derivatives are the first potent and specific inhibitors of folylpolyglutamate synthetase to be identified and may act as analogues of reaction intermediates. Other folate derivatives with tetrahedral chemistry replacing the peptide bond, such as pteroyl-..gamma..-glutamyl-(psi,CH/sub 2/-NH)-glutamate, retain affinity for the protein but are considerably less effective inhibitors than the ornithine derivatives. Enzyme activity was assayed using (/sup 14/C)glutamate.

  19. Probing the active center of benzaldehyde lyase with substitutions and the pseudosubstrate analogue benzoylphosphonic acid methyl ester.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Gabriel S; Nemeria, Natalia; Chakraborty, Sumit; McLeish, Michael J; Yep, Alejandra; Kenyon, George L; Petsko, Gregory A; Jordan, Frank; Ringe, Dagmar

    2008-07-22

    Benzaldehyde lyase (BAL) catalyzes the reversible cleavage of ( R)-benzoin to benzaldehyde utilizing thiamin diphosphate and Mg (2+) as cofactors. The enzyme is important for the chemoenzymatic synthesis of a wide range of compounds via its carboligation reaction mechanism. In addition to its principal functions, BAL can slowly decarboxylate aromatic amino acids such as benzoylformic acid. It is also intriguing mechanistically due to the paucity of acid-base residues at the active center that can participate in proton transfer steps thought to be necessary for these types of reactions. Here methyl benzoylphosphonate, an excellent electrostatic analogue of benzoylformic acid, is used to probe the mechanism of benzaldehyde lyase. The structure of benzaldehyde lyase in its covalent complex with methyl benzoylphosphonate was determined to 2.49 A (Protein Data Bank entry 3D7K ) and represents the first structure of this enzyme with a compound bound in the active site. No large structural reorganization was detected compared to the complex of the enzyme with thiamin diphosphate. The configuration of the predecarboxylation thiamin-bound intermediate was clarified by the structure. Both spectroscopic and X-ray structural studies are consistent with inhibition resulting from the binding of MBP to the thiamin diphosphate in the active centers. We also delineated the role of His29 (the sole potential acid-base catalyst in the active site other than the highly conserved Glu50) and Trp163 in cofactor activation and catalysis by benzaldehyde lyase.

  20. Probing the Active Center of Benzaldehyde Lyase with Substitutions and the Pseudosubstrate Analogue Benzoylphosphonic Acid Methyl Ester

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Gabriel S.; Nemeria, Natalia; Chakraborty, Sumit; McLeish, Michael J.; Yep, Alejandra; Kenyon, George L.; Petsko, Gregory A.; Jordan, Frank; Ringe, Dagmar

    2008-07-28

    Benzaldehyde lyase (BAL) catalyzes the reversible cleavage of (R)-benzoin to benzaldehyde utilizing thiamin diphosphate and Mg{sup 2+} as cofactors. The enzyme is important for the chemoenzymatic synthesis of a wide range of compounds via its carboligation reaction mechanism. In addition to its principal functions, BAL can slowly decarboxylate aromatic amino acids such as benzoylformic acid. It is also intriguing mechanistically due to the paucity of acid-base residues at the active center that can participate in proton transfer steps thought to be necessary for these types of reactions. Here methyl benzoylphosphonate, an excellent electrostatic analogue of benzoylformic acid, is used to probe the mechanism of benzaldehyde lyase. The structure of benzaldehyde lyase in its covalent complex with methyl benzoylphosphonate was determined to 2.49 {angstrom} (Protein Data Bank entry 3D7K) and represents the first structure of this enzyme with a compound bound in the active site. No large structural reorganization was detected compared to the complex of the enzyme with thiamin diphosphate. The configuration of the predecarboxylation thiamin-bound intermediate was clarified by the structure. Both spectroscopic and X-ray structural studies are consistent with inhibition resulting from the binding of MBP to the thiamin diphosphate in the active centers. We also delineated the role of His29 (the sole potential acid-base catalyst in the active site other than the highly conserved Glu50) and Trp163 in cofactor activation and catalysis by benzaldehyde lyase.

  1. Organically bound tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Diabate, S.; Strack, S. )

    1993-12-01

    Tritium released into the environment may be incorporated into organic matter. Organically bound tritium in that case will show retention times in organisms that are considerably longer than those of tritiated water which has significant consequences on dose estimates. This article reviews the most important processes of organically bound tritium production and transport through food networks. Metabolic reactions in plant and animal organisms with tritiated water as a reaction partner are of great importance in this respect. The most important production process, in quantitative terms, is photosynthesis in green plants. The translocation of organically bound tritium from the leaves to edible parts of crop plants should be considered in models of organically bound tritium behavior. Organically bound tritium enters the human body on several pathways, either from the primary producers (vegetable food) or at a higher tropic level (animal food). Animal experiments have shown that the dose due to ingestion of organically bound tritium can be up to twice as high as a comparable intake of tritiated water in gaseous or liquid form. In the environment, organically bound tritium in plants and animals is often found to have higher specific tritium concentrations than tissue water. This is not due to some tritium enrichment effects but to the fact that no equilibrium conditions are reached under natural conditions. 66 refs.

  2. Trehalose Analogues: Latest Insights in Properties and Biocatalytic Production

    PubMed Central

    Walmagh, Maarten; Zhao, Renfei; Desmet, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Trehalose (α-d-glucopyranosyl α-d-glucopyranoside) is a non-reducing sugar with unique stabilizing properties due to its symmetrical, low energy structure consisting of two 1,1-anomerically bound glucose moieties. Many applications of this beneficial sugar have been reported in the novel food (nutricals), medical, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. Trehalose analogues, like lactotrehalose (α-d-glucopyranosyl α-d-galactopyranoside) or galactotrehalose (α-d-galactopyranosyl α-d-galactopyranoside), offer similar benefits as trehalose, but show additional features such as prebiotic or low-calorie sweetener due to their resistance against hydrolysis during digestion. Unfortunately, large-scale chemical production processes for trehalose analogues are not readily available at the moment due to the lack of efficient synthesis methods. Most of the procedures reported in literature suffer from low yields, elevated costs and are far from environmentally friendly. “Greener” alternatives found in the biocatalysis field, including galactosidases, trehalose phosphorylases and TreT-type trehalose synthases are suggested as primary candidates for trehalose analogue production instead. Significant progress has been made in the last decade to turn these into highly efficient biocatalysts and to broaden the variety of useful donor and acceptor sugars. In this review, we aim to provide an overview of the latest insights and future perspectives in trehalose analogue chemistry, applications and production pathways with emphasis on biocatalysis. PMID:26084050

  3. Interaction of tRNA with antitumor polyamine analogues.

    PubMed

    N'soukpoé-Kossi, C N; Ahmed Ouameur, A; Thomas, T; Thomas, T J; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2009-08-01

    We studied the interaction between tRNA and three polyamine analogues (1,11-diamino-4,8-diazaundecane.4HCl (333), 3,7,11,15-tetrazaheptadecane.4HCl (BE-333), and 3,7,11,15,19-pentazahenicosane.5HCl (BE-3333)) using FTIR, UV-visible, and CD spectroscopic methods. Spectroscopic evidence showed that polyamine analogues bound tRNA via guanine N7, adenine, uracil O2, and the backbone phosphate (PO2-) groups, while the most reactive sites for biogenic polyamines were guanine N7/O6, adenine N7, uracil O2, and sugar 2'-OH groups as well as the backbone phosphate group. The binding constants of polyamine analogue-tRNA recognition were lower than those of the biogenic polyamine-tRNA complexes, with K333 = 2.8 (+/-0.5) x 10(4), K(BE-333) = 3.7 (+/-0.7) x 10(4), K(BE-3333) = 4.0 (+/-0.9) x 10(4), K(spm) = 8.7 (+/-0.9) x 10(5), K(spd) = 6.1 (+/-0.7) x 10(5), and K(put) = 1.0 (+/-0.3) x 10(5) mol/L. tRNA remained in the A-family conformation; however, it aggregated at high polyamine analogue concentrations.

  4. Trehalose Analogues: Latest Insights in Properties and Biocatalytic Production.

    PubMed

    Walmagh, Maarten; Zhao, Renfei; Desmet, Tom

    2015-06-15

    Trehalose (α-D-glucopyranosyl α-D-glucopyranoside) is a non-reducing sugar with unique stabilizing properties due to its symmetrical, low energy structure consisting of two 1,1-anomerically bound glucose moieties. Many applications of this beneficial sugar have been reported in the novel food (nutricals), medical, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. Trehalose analogues, like lactotrehalose (α-D-glucopyranosyl α-D-galactopyranoside) or galactotrehalose (α-D-galactopyranosyl α-D-galactopyranoside), offer similar benefits as trehalose, but show additional features such as prebiotic or low-calorie sweetener due to their resistance against hydrolysis during digestion. Unfortunately, large-scale chemical production processes for trehalose analogues are not readily available at the moment due to the lack of efficient synthesis methods. Most of the procedures reported in literature suffer from low yields, elevated costs and are far from environmentally friendly. "Greener" alternatives found in the biocatalysis field, including galactosidases, trehalose phosphorylases and TreT-type trehalose synthases are suggested as primary candidates for trehalose analogue production instead. Significant progress has been made in the last decade to turn these into highly efficient biocatalysts and to broaden the variety of useful donor and acceptor sugars. In this review, we aim to provide an overview of the latest insights and future perspectives in trehalose analogue chemistry, applications and production pathways with emphasis on biocatalysis.

  5. PTH analogues and osteoporotic fractures.

    PubMed

    Verhaar, Harald J J; Lems, Willem F

    2010-09-01

    At present there are two parathyroid hormone (PTH) analogues (PTH 1 - 34 and PTH 1 - 84) registered for the treatment of established osteoporosis in postmenopausal women (PTH 1 - 34 and PTH 1 - 84) and in men (PTH 1 - 34 only) who are at increased risk of having a fracture. The efficacy and safety of PTH 1 - 34 and PTH 1 - 84 in the management of osteoporosis is evaluated by reviewing published literature and presentations from scientific meetings through to 2010. This review focuses on data on fracture risk reduction and safety endpoints of PTH analogues. The adverse reactions reported most are nausea, pain in the extremities, headache and dizziness. Exogenous PTH analogues, given as daily subcutaneous injections, stimulate bone formation, increase bone mass and bone strength, and improve calcium balance. In postmenopausal women with osteoporosis, PTH analogues reduced the risk of vertebral (PTH 1 - 34 and PTH 1 - 84) and non-vertebral fractures (only PTH 1 - 34). In men and women with glucocorticosteroid-induced osteoporosis, PTH 1 - 34 reduced the risk of vertebral fractures. In general, PTH analogues are well tolerated with an acceptable safety profile: they can be used for the prevention and treatment of fractures in postmenopausal women with severe, established osteoporosis.

  6. Reversible dementias

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Manjari; Vibha, Deepti

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, more attention has been given to the early diagnostic evaluation of patients with dementia which is essential to identify patients with cognitive symptoms who may have treatable conditions. Guidelines suggest that all patients presenting with dementia or cognitive symptoms should be evaluated with a range of laboratory tests, and with structural brain imaging with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). While many of the disorders reported as ‘reversible dementias’ are conditions that may well be associated with cognitive or behavioral symptoms, these symptoms are not always sufficiently severe to fulfill the clinical criteria for dementia. Thus, while the etiology of a condition may be treatable it should not be assumed that the associated dementia is fully reversible. Potentially reversible dementias should be identified and treatment considered, even if the symptoms are not sufficiently severe to meet the clinical criteria for dementia, and even if partial or full reversal of the cognitive symptoms cannot be guaranteed. In the literature, the most frequently observed potentially reversible conditions identified in patients with cognitive impairment or dementia are depression, adverse effects of drugs, drug or alcohol abuse, space-occupying lesions, normal pressure hydrocephalus, and metabolic conditions land endocrinal conditions like hypothyroidism and nutritional conditions like vitamin B-12 deficiency. Depression is by far the most common of the potentially reversible conditions. The review, hence addresses the common causes of reversible dementia and the studies published so far. PMID:21416018

  7. Reversible Sterilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Largey, Gale

    1977-01-01

    Notes that difficult questions arise concerning the use of sterilization for alleged eugenic and euthenic purposes. Thus, how reversible sterilization will be used with relation to the poor, mentally ill, mentally retarded, criminals, and minors, is questioned. (Author/AM)

  8. Reversible Sterilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Largey, Gale

    1977-01-01

    Notes that difficult questions arise concerning the use of sterilization for alleged eugenic and euthenic purposes. Thus, how reversible sterilization will be used with relation to the poor, mentally ill, mentally retarded, criminals, and minors, is questioned. (Author/AM)

  9. Virial Expansion Bounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tate, Stephen James

    2013-10-01

    In the 1960s, the technique of using cluster expansion bounds in order to achieve bounds on the virial expansion was developed by Lebowitz and Penrose (J. Math. Phys. 5:841, 1964) and Ruelle (Statistical Mechanics: Rigorous Results. Benjamin, Elmsford, 1969). This technique is generalised to more recent cluster expansion bounds by Poghosyan and Ueltschi (J. Math. Phys. 50:053509, 2009), which are related to the work of Procacci (J. Stat. Phys. 129:171, 2007) and the tree-graph identity, detailed by Brydges (Phénomènes Critiques, Systèmes Aléatoires, Théories de Jauge. Les Houches 1984, pp. 129-183, 1986). The bounds achieved by Lebowitz and Penrose can also be sharpened by doing the actual optimisation and achieving expressions in terms of the Lambert W-function. The different bound from the cluster expansion shows some improvements for bounds on the convergence of the virial expansion in the case of positive potentials, which are allowed to have a hard core.

  10. Reversible Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Harsh; Madanieh, Raef; Kosmas, Constantine E; Vatti, Satya K; Vittorio, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies (CMs) have many etiological factors that can result in severe structural and functional dysregulation. Fortunately, there are several potentially reversible CMs that are known to improve when the root etiological factor is addressed. In this article, we discuss several of these reversible CMs, including tachycardia-induced, peripartum, inflammatory, hyperthyroidism, Takotsubo, and chronic illness–induced CMs. Our discussion also includes a review on their respective pathophysiology, as well as possible management solutions. PMID:26052233

  11. Pressor effects of tryptamine analogues.

    PubMed Central

    Bosin, T R; Hixson, E J; Maickel, R P

    1976-01-01

    1. Methylation of tryptamine in the 1-position had little effect on the potency of the drug as a pressor agent in the intact anaesthetized rat. 2. In contrast, substitution of a benzo[b]thiophene ring system for the indole ring decreased the pressor activity. 3. Pretreatment of the animals with reserpine reduced the pressor effect of tryptamine and its benzo[b]thiophene analogue while increasing the effect of the 1-methylindole analogue. 4. Pretreatment with phenoxybenzamine reduced the pressor effect of all three compounds. PMID:1252662

  12. Antimycobacterial evaluation of pyrazinoic acid reversible derivatives.

    PubMed

    Dolezal, Martin; Kesetovic, Diana; Zitko, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Design, results of in vitro antimycobacterial evaluation, and study of structure-activity relationships of various pyrazinecarboxylic acid reversible derivatives are presented. This review deals with some pyrazinamide analogues/prodrugs derived from Nphenylpyrazine- 2-carboxamides (1), arylaminopyrazine-2,5-dicarbonitriles (2), aryl/alkylsulphanylpyrazines (3,4), and aroylpyrazines (5) effecting >50% inhibition in the primary antimycobacterial screen. The promising pyrazine candidates for further antimycobacterial evaluation were discovered. Results give good view onto structure-activity relationships of these analogues and promise even better activity of new compounds prepared after some structure optimization experiments.

  13. Validation of EMP bounds

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, L.K.; Merewether, K.O.; Chen, K.C.; Jorgenson, R.E.; Morris, M.E.; Solberg, J.E.; Lewis, J.G.; Derr, W.

    1996-07-01

    Test data on canonical weapon-like fixtures are used to validate previously developed analytical bounding results. The test fixtures were constructed to simulate (but be slightly worse than) weapon ports of entry but have known geometries (and electrical points of contact). The exterior of the test fixtures exhibited exterior resonant enhancement of the incident fields at the ports of entry with magnitudes equal to those of weapon geometries. The interior consisted of loaded transmission lines adjusted to maximize received energy or voltage but incorporating practical weapon geometrical constraints. New analytical results are also presented for bounding the energies associated with multiple bolt joints and for bounding the exterior resonant enhancement of the exciting fields.

  14. A novel NADPH:(bound) NADP+ reductase and NADH:(bound) NADP+ transhydrogenase function in bovine liver catalase

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Many catalases have the shared property of containing bound NADPH and being susceptible to inactivation by their own substrate, H2O2. The presence of additional (unbound) NADPH effectively prevents bovine liver and human erythrocytic catalase from becoming compound II, the reversibly inactivated state of catalase, and NADP+ is known to be generated in the process. The function of the bound NADPH, which is tightly bound in bovine liver catalase, has been unknown. The present study with bovine liver catalase and [14C]NADPH and [14C]NADH revealed that unbound NADPH or NADH are substrates for an internal reductase and transhydrogenase reaction respectively; the unbound NADPH or NADH cause tightly bound NADP+ to become NADPH without becoming tightly bound themselves. This and other results provide insight into the function of tightly bound NADPH. PMID:15456401

  15. Reversible Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    will have been introduced. 9. Reversible celular autemata We shall assume the reader to have some familiarity with the concept of cel- lular...10003 Mr. Kin B. Thcmpson 1 copy Technical Director Information Systems Divisia.i Naval Research Laboratory (OP-91T) Technical Information Division

  16. Reverse mortgages.

    PubMed

    Farnesi, D

    1995-09-01

    Elders and their families are often caught in a financial bind when it comes to paying for much-needed home care services. Reverse mortgages may offer a solution to elderly home care clients who own their homes but have a limited income with which to maintain their independence.

  17. REVERSE OSMOSIS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    acetate membranes. Mechanisms of the process and porous cellulose acetate membrane technology are briefly reviewed. Based on a general capillary...The reverse osmosis process is discussed with particular reference to systems involving aqueous solutions and Loeb-Sourirajan-type porous cellulose

  18. Computing Graphical Confidence Bounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mezzacappa, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    Approximation for graphical confidence bounds is simple enough to run on programmable calculator. Approximation is used in lieu of numerical tables not always available, and exact calculations, which often require rather sizable computer resources. Approximation verified for collection of up to 50 data points. Method used to analyze tile-strength data on Space Shuttle thermal-protection system.

  19. Born Level Bound States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, Paul

    2017-05-01

    Bound state poles in the S-matrix of perturbative QED are generated by the divergence of the expansion in α . The perturbative corrections are necessarily singular when expanding around free, {O}( α ^0 ) in and out states that have no overlap with finite-sized atomic wave functions. Nevertheless, measurables such as binding energies do have well-behaved expansions in powers of α (and log α ). It is desirable to formulate the concept of "lowest order" for gauge theory bound states such that higher order corrections vanish in the α → 0 limit. This may allow to determine a lowest order term for QCD hadrons which incorporates essential features such as confinement and chiral symmetry breaking, and thus can serve as the starting point of a useful perturbative expansion. I discuss a "Born" (no loop, lowest order in \\hbar ) approximation. Born level states are bound by gauge fields which satisfy the classical field equations. Gauss' law determines a distinct field A^0({\\varvec{x}}) for each instantaneous position of the charges. A Poincaré covariant boundary condition for the gluon field leads to a confining potential for q\\bar{q} and qqq states. In frames where the bound state is in motion the classical gauge field is obtained by a Lorentz boost of the rest frame field.

  20. Computing Graphical Confidence Bounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mezzacappa, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    Approximation for graphical confidence bounds is simple enough to run on programmable calculator. Approximation is used in lieu of numerical tables not always available, and exact calculations, which often require rather sizable computer resources. Approximation verified for collection of up to 50 data points. Method used to analyze tile-strength data on Space Shuttle thermal-protection system.

  1. Correlation between myometrial receptor affinity, lipophilicity and antagonistic potency of oxytocin analogues in the rat.

    PubMed

    Atke, A; Vilhardt, H; Melin, P

    1988-08-01

    Purified myometrial plasma membrane fractions were prepared from rats treated with oestradiol to induce oestrus. The binding affinities of 11 antagonistic oxytocin analogues to the oxytocin receptor of the plasma membranes were measured. Furthermore, lipophilicity of the peptides was assessed by reversed-phase high pressure liquid chromatography. No significant correlation was found between lipophilicity of the analogues and values for antagonistic potencies or binding affinities. Also, receptor-binding affinity did not correlate with in-vitro antagonistic activity whereas a significant correlation was obtained between binding affinities and in-vivo antagonistic potency for analogues void of partial agonist properties. It is concluded that neither receptor affinity nor lipophilicity in the analogues can predict the potency of the antagonists in vitro. However, receptor affinity was found to be a relatively good predictor of the in-vivo potency, while the usefulness of measuring antagonistic potency in vitro is questioned.

  2. Iodination and stability of somatostatin analogues: comparison of iodination techniques. A practical overview.

    PubMed

    de Blois, Erik; Chan, Ho Sze; Breeman, Wouter A P

    2012-01-01

    For iodination ((125/127)I) of tyrosine-containing peptides, chloramin-T, Pre-Coated Iodo-Gen(®) tubes and Iodo-Beads(®) (Pierce) are commonly used for in vitro radioligand investigations and there have been reliant vendors hereof for decades. However, commercial availability of these radio-iodinated peptides is decreasing. For continuation of our research in this field we investigated and optimized (radio-)iodination of somatostatin analogues. In literature, radioiodination using here described somatostatin analogues and iodination techniques are described separately. Here we present an overview, including High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) separation and characterisation by mass spectrometry, to obtain mono- and di-iodinated analogues. Reaction kinetics of (125/127)I iodinated somatostatin analogues were investigated as function of reaction time and concentration of reactants, including somatostatin analogues, iodine and oxidizing agent. To our knowledge, for the here described somatostatin analogues, no (127)I iodination and optimization are described. (Radio-)iodinated somatostatin analogues could be preserved with a >90% radiochemical purity for 1 month after reversed phase HPLC-purification.

  3. Neuronal Analogues of Conditioning Paradigms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-24

    Although the mechanisms of interneuronal communication have been well established, the changes underlying most forms of learning have thus far eluded...stimulating electrodes on one of the connectives was adjusted so as to produce a small excitatory postsynaptic potential ( EPSP ) in the impaled cell...two stimuli would constitute a neuronal analogue of conditioning by producing an increased EPSP in response to the test stimulus alone. If so, then

  4. Desferrithiocin Analogue Uranium Decorporation Agents

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, Raymond J.; Wiegand, Jan; Singh, Shailendra

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Previous systematic structure-activity studies of the desferrithiocin (DFT) platform have allowed the design and synthesis of analogues and derivatives of DFT that retain the exceptional iron-clearing activity of the parent, while eliminating its adverse effects. We hypothesized that a similar approach could be adopted to identify DFT-related analogues that could effectively decorporate uranium. Materials and Methods The decorporation properties of nine DFT-related analogues were determined in a bile duct-cannulated rat model. Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) served as a positive control. Selected ligands also underwent multiple and delayed dosing regimens. Uranium excretion in urine and bile or stool was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS); tissue levels of uranium were also assessed. Results The two best clinical candidates are (S)-4,5-dihydro-2-[2-hydroxy-4-(3,6,9-trioxadecyloxy)phenyl]-4-methyl-4-thiazolecarboxylic acid [(S)-4'-(HO)-DADFT-PE (9)], with a 57% reduction in kidney uranium levels on oral (p.o.) administration and (S)-4,5-dihydro-2-[2-hydroxy-3-(3,6,9-trioxadecyloxy)phenyl]-4-methyl-4-thiazolecarboxylic acid [(S)-3'-(HO)-DADFT-PE (10)], with a 62% renal reduction on p.o. administration. The majority of the metal excretion promoted by these analogues is in the bile, thus further reducing kidney actinide exposure. Conclusions While 9 administered p.o. or subcutaneously (s.c.) immediately post-metal is an effective decorporation agent, withholding the dose (s.c.) until 4 h reduced the activity of the compound. Conversion of 9 to its isopropyl ester may circumvent this issue. PMID:19399680

  5. Reversible simulation of irreversible computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Tromp, John; Vitányi, Paul

    1998-09-01

    Computer computations are generally irreversible while the laws of physics are reversible. This mismatch is penalized by among other things generating excess thermic entropy in the computation. Computing performance has improved to the extent that efficiency degrades unless all algorithms are executed reversibly, for example by a universal reversible simulation of irreversible computations. All known reversible simulations are either space hungry or time hungry. The leanest method was proposed by Bennett and can be analyzed using a simple ‘reversible’ pebble game. The reachable reversible simulation instantaneous descriptions (pebble configurations) of such pebble games are characterized completely. As a corollary we obtain the reversible simulation by Bennett and, moreover, show that it is a space-optimal pebble game. We also introduce irreversible steps and give a theorem on the tradeoff between the number of allowed irreversible steps and the memory gain in the pebble game. In this resource-bounded setting the limited erasing needs to be performed at precise instants during the simulation. The reversible simulation can be modified so that it is applicable also when the simulated computation time is unknown.

  6. Substrate analogues for isoprenoid enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Stremler, K.E.

    1987-01-01

    Diphosphonate analogues of geranyl diphosphate, resistant to degradation by phosphatases, were found to be alternate substrates for the reaction with farnesyl diphosphate synthetase isolated from avian liver. The difluoromethane analogue was shown to be the better alternate substrate, in agreement with solvolysis results which indicate that the electronegativity of the difluoromethylene unit more closely approximates that of the normal bridging oxygen. The usefulness of the C/sub 10/ difluoro analogue, for detecting low levels of isoprenoid enzymes in the presence of high levels of phosphatase activity, was demonstrated with a cell-free preparation from lemon peel. A series of C/sub 5/ through C/sub 15/ homoallylic and allylic diphosphonates, as well as two 5'-nucleotide diphosphonates, was prepared in high overall yield using the activation-displacement sequence. Radiolabeled samples of several of the allylic diphosphonates were prepared with tritium located at C1. A series of geraniols, stereospecifically deuterated at C1, was prepared. The enantiomeric purities and absolute configurations were determined by derivatization as the mandelate esters for analysis by /sup 1/H NMR. The stereochemistry of the activation-displacement sequence was examined using C1-deuterated substrates.

  7. NMR studies of multiple conformations in complexes of Lactobacillus casei dihydrofolate reductase with analogues of pyrimethamine

    SciTech Connect

    Birdsall, B.; Tendler, S.J.B.; Feeney, J.; Carr, M.D. ); Arnold, J.R.P.; Thomas, J.A.; Roberts, G.C.K. ); Griffin, R.J.; Stevens, M.F.G. )

    1990-10-01

    {sup 1}H and {sup 19}F NMR signals from bound ligands have been assigned in one- and two-dimensional NMR spectra of complexes of Lactobacillus casei dihydrofolate reductase with various pyrimethamine analogues. The signals were identified mainly by correlating signals from bound and free ligands by using 2D exchange experiments. Analogues with symmetrically substituted phenyl rings give rise to {sup 1}H signals from four nonequivalent aromatic protons, clearly indicating the presence of hindered rotation about the pyrimidine-phenyl bond. Analogues with symmetrically substituted phenyl rings give rise to {sup 1}H signals from four nonequivalent aromatic protons, clearly indicating the presence of hindered rotation about the pyrimidine-phenyl bond. Analogues containing asymmetrically substituted aromatic rings exist as mixtures of two rotational isomers (an enantiomeric pair) because of this hindered rotation and the NMR spectra revealed that both isomers (forms A and B) bind to the enzyme with comparable, though unequal, binding energies. In this case two complete sets of bound proton signals were observed. The relative orientations of the two forms have been determined from NOE through-space connections between protons on the ligand and protein. Ternary complexes with NADP{sup {plus}} were also examined.

  8. Vasectomy reversal.

    PubMed

    Belker, A M

    1987-02-01

    A vasovasostomy may be performed on an outpatient basis with local anesthesia, but also may be performed on an outpatient basis with epidural or general anesthesia. Local anesthesia is preferred by most of my patients, the majority of whom choose this technique. With proper preoperative and intraoperative sedation, patients sleep lightly through most of the procedure. Because of the length of time often required for bilateral microsurgical vasoepididymostomy, epidural or general anesthesia and overnight hospitalization are usually necessary. Factors influencing the preoperative choice for vasovasostomy or vasoepididymostomy in patients undergoing vasectomy reversal are considered. The preoperative planned choice of vasovasostomy or vasoepididymostomy for patients having vasectomy reversal described herein does not have the support of all urologists who regularly perform these procedures. My present approach has evolved as the data reported in Tables 1 and 2 have become available, but it may change as new information is evaluated. However, it offers a logical method for planning choices of anesthesia and inpatient or outpatient status for patients undergoing vasectomy reversal procedures.

  9. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials. PMID:24938656

  10. Universal bounds on current fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietzonka, Patrick; Barato, Andre C.; Seifert, Udo

    2016-05-01

    For current fluctuations in nonequilibrium steady states of Markovian processes, we derive four different universal bounds valid beyond the Gaussian regime. Different variants of these bounds apply to either the entropy change or any individual current, e.g., the rate of substrate consumption in a chemical reaction or the electron current in an electronic device. The bounds vary with respect to their degree of universality and tightness. A universal parabolic bound on the generating function of an arbitrary current depends solely on the average entropy production. A second, stronger bound requires knowledge both of the thermodynamic forces that drive the system and of the topology of the network of states. These two bounds are conjectures based on extensive numerics. An exponential bound that depends only on the average entropy production and the average number of transitions per time is rigorously proved. This bound has no obvious relation to the parabolic bound but it is typically tighter further away from equilibrium. An asymptotic bound that depends on the specific transition rates and becomes tight for large fluctuations is also derived. This bound allows for the prediction of the asymptotic growth of the generating function. Even though our results are restricted to networks with a finite number of states, we show that the parabolic bound is also valid for three paradigmatic examples of driven diffusive systems for which the generating function can be calculated using the additivity principle. Our bounds provide a general class of constraints for nonequilibrium systems.

  11. Reverse preferential spread in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoizumi, Hiroshi; Tani, Seiichi; Miyoshi, Naoto; Okamoto, Yoshio

    2012-08-01

    Large-degree nodes may have a larger influence on the network, but they can be bottlenecks for spreading information since spreading attempts tend to concentrate on these nodes and become redundant. We discuss that the reverse preferential spread (distributing information inversely proportional to the degree of the receiving node) has an advantage over other spread mechanisms. In large uncorrelated networks, we show that the mean number of nodes that receive information under the reverse preferential spread is an upper bound among any other weight-based spread mechanisms, and this upper bound is indeed a logistic growth independent of the degree distribution.

  12. Choline Analogues in Malaria Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Peyrottes, Suzanne; Caldarelli, Sergio; Wein, Sharon; Périgaud, Christian; Pellet, Alain; Vial, Henri

    2012-01-01

    Emerging resistance against well-established anti-malaria drugs warrants the introduction of new therapeutic agents with original mechanisms of action. Inhibition of membrane-based phospholipid biosynthesis, which is crucial for the parasite, has thus been proposed as a novel and promising therapeutic strategy. This review compiles literature concerning the design and study of choline analogues and related cation derivatives as potential anti-malarials. It covers advances achieved over the last two decades and describes: the concept validation, the design and selection of a clinical candidate (Albitiazolium), back-up derivatives while also providing insight into the development of prodrug approaches. PMID:22607139

  13. Ecstasy analogues found in cacti.

    PubMed

    Bruhn, Jan G; El-Seedi, Hesham R; Stephanson, Nikolai; Beck, Olof; Shulgin, Alexander T

    2008-06-01

    Human interest in psychoactive phenethylamines is known from the use of mescaline-containing cacti and designer drugs such as Ecstasy. From the alkaloid composition of cacti we hypothesized that substances resembling Ecstasy might occur naturally. In this article we show that lophophine, homopiperonylamine and lobivine are new minor constituents of two cactus species, Lophophora williamsii (peyote) and Trichocereus pachanoi (San Pedro). This is the first report of putatively psychoactive phenethylamines besides mescaline in these cacti. A search for further biosynthetic analogues may provide new insights into the structure-activity relationships of mescaline. An intriguing question is whether the new natural compounds can be called "designer drugs."

  14. FUNCTION GENERATOR FOR ANALOGUE COMPUTERS

    DOEpatents

    Skramstad, H.K.; Wright, J.H.; Taback, L.

    1961-12-12

    An improved analogue computer is designed which can be used to determine the final ground position of radioactive fallout particles in an atomic cloud. The computer determines the fallout pattern on the basis of known wind velocity and direction at various altitudes, and intensity of radioactivity in the mushroom cloud as a function of particle size and initial height in the cloud. The output is then displayed on a cathode-ray tube so that the average or total luminance of the tube screen at any point represents the intensity of radioactive fallout at the geographical location represented by that point. (AEC)

  15. Template polymerization of nucleotide analogues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orgel, L. E.

    1991-01-01

    Recent work on the template-directed reactions of the natural D-nucleotides has made it clear that l-nucleotides and nucleotide-like derivatives of other sugars would strongly inhibit the formation of long oligonucleotides. Consequently, attention is focusing on molecules simpler than nucleotides that might have acted as monomers of an information transfer system. We have begun a general exploration of the template directed reactions of diverse peptide analogues. I will present work by Dr. Taifeng Wu on oxidative oligomerization of phosphorothioates and of Dr. Mary Tohidi on the cyclic polymerization of nucleoside and related cyclic pyrophosphates.

  16. Bounds on the speedup in quantum signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrighi, Pablo; Nesme, Vincent; Werner, Reinhard F.

    2017-01-01

    Given a classical, reversible dynamics over a line of discrete systems, we can define a quantum evolution, which acts on basis states like the classical one but is linearly extended to allow for quantum superpositions. It is a curious fact that in the quantum regime, the speed of propagation of information can sometimes be much greater than in the classical regime. Here we provide optimal bounds on this quantum speedup. In particular we show that over a run of many steps, the quantum propagation neighborhood can only increase by a constant fringe, so that there is no asymptotic increase in speed.

  17. Evaluation of Anti-HIV-1 Mutagenic Nucleoside Analogues*

    PubMed Central

    Vivet-Boudou, Valérie; Isel, Catherine; El Safadi, Yazan; Smyth, Redmond P.; Laumond, Géraldine; Moog, Christiane; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Marquet, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Because of their high mutation rates, RNA viruses and retroviruses replicate close to the threshold of viability. Their existence as quasi-species has pioneered the concept of “lethal mutagenesis” that prompted us to synthesize pyrimidine nucleoside analogues with antiviral activity in cell culture consistent with an accumulation of deleterious mutations in the HIV-1 genome. However, testing all potentially mutagenic compounds in cell-based assays is tedious and costly. Here, we describe two simple in vitro biophysical/biochemical assays that allow prediction of the mutagenic potential of deoxyribonucleoside analogues. The first assay compares the thermal stabilities of matched and mismatched base pairs in DNA duplexes containing or not the nucleoside analogues as follows. A promising candidate should display a small destabilization of the matched base pair compared with the natural nucleoside and the smallest gap possible between the stabilities of the matched and mismatched base pairs. From this assay, we predicted that two of our compounds, 5-hydroxymethyl-2′-deoxyuridine and 5-hydroxymethyl-2′-deoxycytidine, should be mutagenic. The second in vitro reverse transcription assay assesses DNA synthesis opposite nucleoside analogues inserted into a template strand and subsequent extension of the newly synthesized base pairs. Once again, only 5-hydroxymethyl-2′-deoxyuridine and 5-hydroxymethyl-2′-deoxycytidine are predicted to be efficient mutagens. The predictive potential of our fast and easy first line screens was confirmed by detailed analysis of the mutation spectrum induced by the compounds in cell culture because only compounds 5-hydroxymethyl-2′-deoxyuridine and 5-hydroxymethyl-2′-deoxycytidine were found to increase the mutation frequency by 3.1- and 3.4-fold, respectively. PMID:25398876

  18. The Valles natural analogue project

    SciTech Connect

    Stockman, H.; Krumhansl, J.; Ho, C.; McConnell, V.

    1994-12-01

    The contact between an obsidian flow and a steep-walled tuff canyon was examined as an analogue for a highlevel waste repository. The analogue site is located in the Valles Caldera in New Mexico, where a massive obsidian flow filled a paleocanyon in the Battleship Rock tuff. The obsidian flow provided a heat source, analogous to waste panels or an igneous intrusion in a repository, and caused evaporation and migration of water. The tuff and obsidian samples were analyzed for major and trace elements and mineralogy by INAA, XRF, X-ray diffraction; and scanning electron microscopy and electron microprobe. Samples were also analyzed for D/H and {sup 39}Ar/{sup 4O} isotopic composition. Overall,the effects of the heating event seem to have been slight and limited to the tuff nearest the contact. There is some evidence of devitrification and migration of volatiles in the tuff within 10 meters of the contact, but variations in major and trace element chemistry are small and difficult to distinguish from the natural (pre-heating) variability of the rocks.

  19. Heteroatom-Containing Porphyrin Analogues.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Tamal; Shetti, Vijayendra S; Sharma, Ritambhara; Ravikanth, Mangalampalli

    2017-02-22

    The heteroatom-containing porphyrin analogues or core-modified porphyrins that resulted from the replacement of one or two pyrrole rings with other five-membered heterocycles such as furan, thiophene, selenophene, tellurophene, indene, phosphole, and silole are highly promising macrocycles and exhibit quite different physicochemical properties compared to regular azaporphyrins. The properties of heteroporphyrins depend on the nature and number of different heterocycle(s) present in place of pyrrole ring(s). The heteroporphyrins provide unique and unprecedented coordination environments for metals. Unlike regular porphyrins, the monoheteroporphyrins are known to stabilize metals in unusual oxidation states such as Cu and Ni in +1 oxidation states. The diheteroporphyrins, which are neutral macrocycles without ionizable protons, also showed interesting coordination chemistry. Thus, significant progress has been made in last few decades on core-modified porphyrins in terms of their synthesis, their use in building multiporphyrin arrays for light-harvesting applications, their use as ligands to form interesting metal complexes, and also their use for several other studies. The synthetic methods available in the literature allow one to prepare mono- and diheteroporphyrins and their functionalized derivatives, which were used extensively to prepare several covalent and noncovalent heteroporphyrin-based multiporphyrin arrays. The methods are also developed to synthesize different hetero analogues of porphyrin derivatives such as heterocorroles, heterochlorins, heterocarbaporphyrinoids, heteroatom-substituted confused porphyrins, and so on. This Review summarizes the key developments that have occurred in heteroporphyrin chemistry over the last four decades.

  20. Multifunctions of bounded variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinter, R. B.

    2016-02-01

    Consider control systems described by a differential equation with a control term or, more generally, by a differential inclusion with velocity set F (t , x). Certain properties of state trajectories can be derived when it is assumed that F (t , x) is merely measurable w.r.t. the time variable t. But sometimes a refined analysis requires the imposition of stronger hypotheses regarding the time dependence. Stronger forms of necessary conditions for minimizing state trajectories can be derived, for example, when F (t , x) is Lipschitz continuous w.r.t. time. It has recently become apparent that significant addition properties of state trajectories can still be derived, when the Lipschitz continuity hypothesis is replaced by the weaker requirement that F (t , x) has bounded variation w.r.t. time. This paper introduces a new concept of multifunctions F (t , x) that have bounded variation w.r.t. time near a given state trajectory, of special relevance to control. We provide an application to sensitivity analysis.

  1. Membrane-bound selenoproteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Rozovsky, Sharon

    2015-10-01

    Selenoproteins employ selenium to supplement the chemistry available through the common 20 amino acids. These powerful enzymes are affiliated with redox biology, often in connection with the detection, management, and signaling of oxidative stress. Among them, membrane-bound selenoproteins play prominent roles in signaling pathways, Ca(2+) regulation, membrane complexes integrity, and biosynthesis of lipophilic molecules. The number of selenoproteins whose physiological roles, protein partners, expression, evolution, and biosynthesis are characterized is steadily increasing, thus offering a more nuanced view of this specialized family. This review focuses on human membrane selenoproteins, particularly the five least characterized ones: selenoproteins I, K, N, S, and T. Membrane-bound selenoproteins are the least understood, as it is challenging to provide the membrane-like environment required for their biochemical and biophysical characterization. Hence, their studies rely mostly on biological rather than structural and biochemical assays. Another aspect that has not received much attention is the particular role that their membrane association plays in their physiological function. Findings cited in this review show that it is possible to infer the structure and the membrane-binding mode of these lesser-studied selenoproteins and design experiments to examine the role of the rare amino acid selenocysteine.

  2. SELECTIVE INHIBITION BY TRYPTOPHAN ANALOGUES OF MURINE TOXIN SYNTHESIS IN PASTEURELLA PESTIS

    PubMed Central

    Montie, Thomas C.; Ajl, Samuel J.

    1964-01-01

    Montie, Thomas C. (Albert Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pa.), and Samuel J. Ajl. Selective inhibition by tryptophan analogues of murine toxin synthesis in Pasteurella pestis. J. Bacteriol. 88:1467–1475. 1964.—Washed-cell suspensions of Pasteurella pestis, avirulent strain “Tjiwidej,” exhibited a preferential inhibition of toxin synthesis relative to total protein formation, when grown in the presence of various tryptophan analogues. Growth was partially inhibited in the presence of methyl analogues. High concentrations of 5-fluorotryptophan induced slight growth-inhibitory effects. However, toxin production was more sensitive to these levels of the analogue. Growth inhibition appeared not to relate to toxin inhibition. Inhibition of toxin synthesis by analogues was reversed by l-tryptophan and indole. Shikimic acid but not anthranilic acid antagonized the action of 4-methyltryptophan on selective toxin synthesis. The formation of tryptophanless protein accounted for continued protein synthesis in tryptophan-depleted cells. Protein resolved by acrylamide gel electrophoresis from crude cell extracts exhibited two toxic protein bands. The synthesis of one toxin-protein band, the less-mobile of the two, appeared to be associated with the membrane fraction of the cell, and was selectively blocked in cells grown in the presence of tryptophan analogues. Cellular tryptophan levels may determine the quantity and quality of proteins made. Images PMID:14234807

  3. Inhibition of experimental ascending urinary tract infection by an epithelial cell-surface receptor analogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edén, C. Svanborg; Freter, R.; Hagberg, L.; Hull, R.; Hull, S.; Leffler, H.; Schoolnik, G.

    1982-08-01

    It has been shown that the establishment of urinary tract infection by Escherichia coli is dependent on attachment of the bacteria to epithelial cells1-4. The attachment involves specific epithelial cell receptors, which have been characterized as glycolipids5-10. Reversible binding to cell-surface mannosides may also be important4,11-13. This suggests an approach to the treatment of infections-that of blocking bacterial attachment with cell membrane receptor analogues. Using E. coli mutants lacking one or other of the two binding specificities (glycolipid and mannose), we show here that glycolipid analogues can block in vitro adhesion and in vivo urinary tract infection.

  4. Four Generations of Transition State Analogues for Human Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, M.; Shi, W; Rinaldo-Mathis, A; Tyler, P; Evans, G; Almo, S; Schramm, V

    2010-01-01

    Inhibition of human purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) stops growth of activated T-cells and the formation of 6-oxypurine bases, making it a target for leukemia, autoimmune disorders, and gout. Four generations of ribocation transition-state mimics bound to PNP are structurally characterized. Immucillin-H (K*{sub i} = 58 pM, first-generation) contains an iminoribitol cation with four asymmetric carbons. DADMe-Immucillin-H (K*{sub i} = 9 pM, second-generation), uses a methylene-bridged dihydroxypyrrolidine cation with two asymmetric centers. DATMe-Immucillin-H (K*{sub i} = 9 pM, third-generation) contains an open-chain amino alcohol cation with two asymmetric carbons. SerMe-ImmH (K*{sub i} = 5 pM, fourth-generation) uses achiral dihydroxyaminoalcohol seramide as the ribocation mimic. Crystal structures of PNPs establish features of tight binding to be; (1) ion-pair formation between bound phosphate (or its mimic) and inhibitor cation, (2) leaving-group interactions to N1, O6, and N7 of 9-deazahypoxanthine, (3) interaction between phosphate and inhibitor hydroxyl groups, and (4) His257 interacting with the 5{prime}-hydroxyl group. The first generation analogue is an imperfect fit to the catalytic site with a long ion pair distance between the iminoribitol and bound phosphate and weaker interactions to the leaving group. Increasing the ribocation to leaving-group distance in the second- to fourth-generation analogues provides powerful binding interactions and a facile synthetic route to powerful inhibitors. Despite chemical diversity in the four generations of transition-state analogues, the catalytic site geometry is almost the same for all analogues. Multiple solutions in transition-state analogue design are available to convert the energy of catalytic rate enhancement to binding energy in human PNP.

  5. Culture-bound syndromes.

    PubMed

    Levine, R E; Gaw, A C

    1995-09-01

    Since its inception, scholars have struggled with the concept of CBSs. This struggle is reflected in the continuing use of a term that is confusing and inaccurate. Most authors would agree that the term "culture-bound syndrome" was intended to describe forms of otherwise common mental illness that are rendered unusual because of the pathoplastic influence of culture. It was intended not only to describe specific syndromes, but also meanings of illness and non-Western notions of disease causation. The term has become an anachronism, for the word, "syndrome," implies specific disease entities, not illnesses of attribution of idioms of distress. Furthermore, the word "bound" implies that the entities described are restricted to a single culture. Close examination reveals that many of the so-called "culture-bound" syndromes are found in multiple cultures that have in common only that they are "non-Western." It may be unreasonable to expect one term to describe these different concepts. The most accurate of the designations offered might be "folk diagnostic categories." Perhaps the most difficult question remaining is "How can we understand (and classify) these phenomena in such a way that highlights their uniqueness but does not dismiss them as too rare and exotic to warrant attention?" The first step is to recognize that the CBSs are a heterogeneous group of conditions. We must next acknowledge that the concepts represented may be difficult for the average Western clinician to recognize but, in their respective cultures, are neither rare nor unusual. With 80% of our increasingly shrinking world coming from "non-Western" cultures, a familiarity with non-Western notions of disease causation is particularly important for modern clinicians. Many authors have recommended that those CBSs that are "true" syndromes be classified together with their Western counterparts. In order to do this, the folk labels need to be put aside and the fundamental components of each disorder

  6. Formation of "bound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, K.; Kästner, M.; Miltner, A.

    2009-04-01

    During degradation of organic pollutants in soil, metabolites, microbial biomass, CO2and "bound" residues ("non-extractable" residues in soil organic matter) are formed. Enhanced transformation of these contaminants into "bound" residues has been proposed as an alternative remediation method for polluted soils. However, this kind of residues may pose a potential risk for the environment due to their chemical structure and possible remobilization under different conditions. Therefore particular attention is given actually to "bound" residues. Part of these non-extractable residues may be "biogenic," because microorganisms use the carbon from the pollutant to form their biomass components (fatty acids, amino acids, amino sugars), which subsequently may be incorporated into soil organic matter. Furthermore, the CO2 originating from mineralization of xenobiotics, can be re-assimilated by microorganisms and also incorporated into "biogenic residue". The hazard posed by "bound" residues may be overestimated because they are "biogenic" (contain microbial fatty acids and amino acids). The knowledge about the pathways of "biogenic residue" formation is necessary for a proper assessment of the fate of tested pollutants and their turnover in the soil environment. Moreover, these data are needed to establish the realistic degradation rates of the contaminants in soil. The main objectives of this study are: to quantify the extent of "biogenic residue" (fatty acids, amino acids, amino sugars) formation during the degradation of a model pollutant (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid = 2,4-D) and during CO2 assimilation by microorganisms and to evaluate which components are mainly incorporated into "bound" residues. To investigate the extent of "biogenic residue" formation in soil during the degradation of 2,4-D, experiments with either 14C-U-ring and 13C6-2,4-D or carboxyl-14C 2,4-D were performed. The incubation experiments were performed according to OECD test guideline 307, in the

  7. CO2 Capture with Enzyme Synthetic Analogue

    SciTech Connect

    Cordatos, Harry

    2010-11-08

    Overview of an ongoing, 2 year research project partially funded by APRA-E to create a novel, synthetic analogue of carbonic anhydrase and incorporate it into a membrane for removal of CO2 from flue gas in coal power plants. Mechanism background, preliminary feasibility study results, molecular modeling of analogue-CO2 interaction, and program timeline are provided.

  8. Macrolactam analogues of macrolide natural products.

    PubMed

    Hügel, Helmut M; Smith, Andrew T; Rizzacasa, Mark A

    2016-12-07

    The chemical modification of macrolide natural products into aza- or lactam analogues is a strategy employed to improve their metabolic stability and biological activity. The methods for the synthesis of several lactam analogues of macrolide natural products are highlighted and aspects of their biological properties presented.

  9. Discrete analogue of generalized Hardy spaces and multiplication operators on homogenous trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthukumar, Perumal; Ponnusamy, Saminathan

    2017-09-01

    In this article, we define discrete analogue of generalized Hardy spaces and its separable subspace on a homogenous rooted tree and study some of its properties such as completeness, inclusion relations with other spaces, separability, growth estimate for functions in these spaces and their consequences. Equivalent conditions for multiplication operators to be bounded and compact are also obtained. Furthermore, we discuss about point spectrum, approximate point spectrum and spectrum of multiplication operators and discuss when a multiplication operator is an isometry.

  10. Fully analogue photonic reservoir computer.

    PubMed

    Duport, François; Smerieri, Anteo; Akrout, Akram; Haelterman, Marc; Massar, Serge

    2016-03-03

    Introduced a decade ago, reservoir computing is an efficient approach for signal processing. State of the art capabilities have already been demonstrated with both computer simulations and physical implementations. If photonic reservoir computing appears to be promising a solution for ultrafast nontrivial computing, all the implementations presented up to now require digital pre or post processing, which prevents them from exploiting their full potential, in particular in terms of processing speed. We address here the possibility to get rid simultaneously of both digital pre and post processing. The standalone fully analogue reservoir computer resulting from our endeavour is compared to previous experiments and only exhibits rather limited degradation of performances. Our experiment constitutes a proof of concept for standalone physical reservoir computers.

  11. Fully analogue photonic reservoir computer

    PubMed Central

    Duport, François; Smerieri, Anteo; Akrout, Akram; Haelterman, Marc; Massar, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Introduced a decade ago, reservoir computing is an efficient approach for signal processing. State of the art capabilities have already been demonstrated with both computer simulations and physical implementations. If photonic reservoir computing appears to be promising a solution for ultrafast nontrivial computing, all the implementations presented up to now require digital pre or post processing, which prevents them from exploiting their full potential, in particular in terms of processing speed. We address here the possibility to get rid simultaneously of both digital pre and post processing. The standalone fully analogue reservoir computer resulting from our endeavour is compared to previous experiments and only exhibits rather limited degradation of performances. Our experiment constitutes a proof of concept for standalone physical reservoir computers. PMID:26935166

  12. Continuous analogues of matrix factorizations

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Alex; Trefethen, Lloyd N.

    2015-01-01

    Analogues of singular value decomposition (SVD), QR, LU and Cholesky factorizations are presented for problems in which the usual discrete matrix is replaced by a ‘quasimatrix’, continuous in one dimension, or a ‘cmatrix’, continuous in both dimensions. Two challenges arise: the generalization of the notions of triangular structure and row and column pivoting to continuous variables (required in all cases except the SVD, and far from obvious), and the convergence of the infinite series that define the cmatrix factorizations. Our generalizations of triangularity and pivoting are based on a new notion of a ‘triangular quasimatrix’. Concerning convergence of the series, we prove theorems asserting convergence provided the functions involved are sufficiently smooth. PMID:25568618

  13. Thrust reverser with variable nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Lawrence (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A thrust reverser is provided for both modulating and reversing bypass flow discharged from a fan through a bypass duct of a turbofan gas turbine engine. The reverser includes an aft cowl joined to a forward cowl and having an aft end surrounding a core engine to define a discharge fan nozzle of minimum flow throat area. The aft cowl is axially translatable relative to the forward cowl from a first position fully retracted against the forward cowl, to a second position partially extended from the forward cowl, and to a third position fully extended from the forward cowl. A plurality of cascade turning vanes are disposed between the forward and aft cowls, and a plurality of thrust reversing deflector doors are pivotally mounted to the aft cowl and bound the bypass duct. The deflector doors are selectively deployed from a stowed position corresponding with the first and second positions of the aft cowl for allowing unrestricted flow of the bypass flow through the fan nozzle. The doors also have a deployed position corresponding with the third position of the aft cowl for substantially deflecting the bypass flow from discharging through the fan nozzle to discharging through the cascade vanes for effecting thrust reverse. Axial translation of the aft cowl between the first and second positions varies flow area of the fan nozzle to vary thrust effected by the discharged bypass flow.

  14. The future of somatostatin analogue therapy.

    PubMed

    Stewart, P M; James, R A

    1999-10-01

    Since its discovery almost 30 years ago, the mode of action and therapeutic applications of somatostatin have been defined. In particular the cloning and characterization of somatostatin receptor subtypes has facilitated the development of high affinity analogues. In the context of pituitary disease, long-acting somatostatin analogues (octreotide, lanreotide) have been used to treat a variety of pituitary tumours but are most efficacious for the treatment of GH and TSH-secreting adenomas. In patients with acromegaly, depot preparations of these analogues are administered intramuscularly every 10-28 days and provide consistent suppression of GH levels to < 5 mU/l in approximately 50-65% of all cases. Even more specific somatostatin receptor analogues are under development. Finally, radiolabelled somatostatin analogue scintigraphy and, in larger doses, therapy, are now established tools in the evaluation and treatment of neuroendocrine tumours.

  15. Dicentrine Analogue-Induced G2/M Arrest and Apoptosis through Inhibition of Topoisomerase II Activity in Human Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huei-Fang; Huang, Huey-Lan; Liao, Jyh-Fei; Shen, Chien-Chang; Huang, Ray-Ling

    2015-07-01

    Lindera megaphylla has been traditionally used as an antineoplastic and wound healing remedy. We previously demonstrated the antitumor effects of D-dicentrine, a natural aporphine alkaloid from the root of L. megaphylla. To generate analogues, series of phenanthrene alkaloids from D-dicentrine were synthesized by degradation with ethyl chloroformate in pyridine, base hydrolysis, and N-alkylation. In this study, we demonstrated that one of the synthesized D-dicentrine analogues (here after designated as analogue 1) exhibited more potent cytotoxic effects than D-dicentrine in colon adenocarcinoma, hepatoma, leukemia, and epidermoid carcinoma cells. We performed cell cycle and apoptotic analysis by flow cytometry, an apoptotic DNA detection ELISA assay, and topoisomerase II activity by the kinetoplast DNA concatenation assay for studying their cytotoxic mechanisms. We found that both D-dicentrine and analogue 1 induced apoptosis and G2/M arrest in HL-60 leukemia cells. The percentage of apoptotic cells induced by analogue 1 was 4.5-fold higher than that induced by D-dicentrine as evident from measuring the amount of histone-bound DNA fragments. Moreover, we found that analogue 1 was 28-fold more potent than D-dicentrine for inhibition of topoisomerase II activity by the kinetoplast DNA concatenation assay. Our findings indicate that D-dicentrine analogue 1 is very promising as a potential antitumor agent for future study.

  16. Andreev-Majorana bound states in superfluids

    SciTech Connect

    Silaev, M. A. Volovik, G. E.

    2014-12-15

    We consider Andreev-Majorana (AM) bound states with zero energy on surfaces, interfaces, and vortices in different phases of the p-wave superfluids. We discuss the chiral superfluid {sup 3}He-A and time reversal invariant phases: superfluid {sup 3}He-B, planar and polar phases. The AM zero modes are determined by topology in the bulk and disappear at the quantum phase transition from the topological to nontopological state of the superfluid. The topology demonstrates the interplay of dimensions. In particular, the zero-dimensional Weyl points in chiral superfluids (the Berry phase monopoles in momentum space) give rise to the one-dimensional Fermi arc of AM bound states on the surface and to the one-dimensional flat band of AM modes in the vortex core. The one-dimensional nodal line in the polar phase produces a two-dimensional flat band of AM modes on the surface. The interplay of dimensions also connects the AM states in superfluids with different dimensions. For example, the topological properties of the spectrum of bound states in three-dimensional {sup 3}He-B are connected to the properties of the spectrum in the two-dimensional planar phase (thin film)

  17. The mechanism of tubulin-colchicine recognition--a kinetic study of the binding of a bicyclic colchicine analogue with a minor modification of the A ring.

    PubMed

    Dumortier, C; Potenziano, J L; Bane, S; Engelborghs, Y

    1997-10-01

    2-Methoxy-5-(2',3',4'-trimethoxy)-2,4,6-cycloheptatrien-1-one (MTC) is a colchicine analogue that lacks the B ring. 2-Methoxy-5-(2',4'-dimethoxyphenyl)-2,4,6-cycloheptatrien-1-one (MD) is an A-ring analogue of MTC, in which one methoxy group is replaced by a hydrogen atom. This paper describes the kinetic features of MDC binding to tubulin, and compares its behaviour with MTC to analyse the effect of the A-ring modification on the recognition process by tubulin. Binding is accompanied by a strong enhancement of MDC fluorescence and quenching of protein fluorescence. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters were obtained from fluorescence stopped-flow measurements. The kinetics are described by a single exponential, indicating that this drug does not discriminate between the different tubulin isotypes. The observed pseudo-first-order rate constant of the fluorescence increase upon binding increases in a non-linear way, indicating that this ligand binds with a similar overall mechanism as colchicine and MTC, consisting of a fast initial binding of low affinity followed by a slower isomerisation step leading to full affinity. The K1 and k2 values for MDC at 25 degrees C were 540 +/- 65 M(-1) and 70 +/- 6 s(-1) respectively. From the temperature dependence, a reaction enthalpy change (deltaH(o)1) of the initial binding of 49 +/- 11 kJ/mol(-1) and an activation energy for the second step of 28 +/- 9 kJ/mol(-1) were calculated. Displacement experiments of bound MDC by MTC allowed the determination of a rate constant of reverse isomerisation of 0.60 +/- 0.07 s(-1) at 25 degrees C and the activation energy of 81 +/- 6 kJ/mol(-1). The overall binding constant was (6.3 +/- 0.2) x 10(4) M(-1) at 25 degrees C. Combination of these results with the kinetic parameters for association gives a full characterisation of the enthalpy pathway for the binding of MDC. The pathway of MDC is shown to differ considerably from that of MTC binding. Since its structural difference is located

  18. Work extraction from quantum systems with bounded fluctuations in work

    PubMed Central

    Richens, Jonathan G.; Masanes, Lluis

    2016-01-01

    In the standard framework of thermodynamics, work is a random variable whose average is bounded by the change in free energy of the system. This average work is calculated without regard for the size of its fluctuations. Here we show that for some processes, such as reversible cooling, the fluctuations in work diverge. Realistic thermal machines may be unable to cope with arbitrarily large fluctuations. Hence, it is important to understand how thermodynamic efficiency rates are modified by bounding fluctuations. We quantify the work content and work of formation of arbitrary finite dimensional quantum states when the fluctuations in work are bounded by a given amount c. By varying c we interpolate between the standard and minimum free energies. We derive fundamental trade-offs between the magnitude of work and its fluctuations. As one application of these results, we derive the corrected Carnot efficiency of a qubit heat engine with bounded fluctuations. PMID:27886177

  19. Work extraction from quantum systems with bounded fluctuations in work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richens, Jonathan G.; Masanes, Lluis

    2016-11-01

    In the standard framework of thermodynamics, work is a random variable whose average is bounded by the change in free energy of the system. This average work is calculated without regard for the size of its fluctuations. Here we show that for some processes, such as reversible cooling, the fluctuations in work diverge. Realistic thermal machines may be unable to cope with arbitrarily large fluctuations. Hence, it is important to understand how thermodynamic efficiency rates are modified by bounding fluctuations. We quantify the work content and work of formation of arbitrary finite dimensional quantum states when the fluctuations in work are bounded by a given amount c. By varying c we interpolate between the standard and minimum free energies. We derive fundamental trade-offs between the magnitude of work and its fluctuations. As one application of these results, we derive the corrected Carnot efficiency of a qubit heat engine with bounded fluctuations.

  20. Side-on bound diazene and hydrazine complexes of ruthenium.

    PubMed

    Field, Leslie D; Li, Hsiu L; Dalgarno, Scott J

    2010-07-05

    The reaction of cis-[RuCl(2)(PP)(2)] (PP = depe, dmpe) with hydrazine afforded end-on bound ruthenium(II) hydrazine complexes. Treatment of the hydrazine complexes with strong base afforded the side-on bound ruthenium(0) diazene complexes cis-[Ru(eta(2)-NH=NH)(PP)(2)]. Treatment of cis-[Ru(eta(2)-NH=NH)(depe)(2)] with weak acid under chloride-free conditions afforded the side-on bound hydrazine complex cis-[Ru(eta(2)-N(2)H(4))(depe)(2)](2+). These are the first reported side-on bound diazene and hydrazine complexes of ruthenium, and they have been characterized by NMR spectroscopy ((1)H, (31)P, (15)N) and by X-ray crystallography. The interconversion between the ruthenium diazene and the ruthenium hydrazine by acid-base treatment was reversible.

  1. Work extraction from quantum systems with bounded fluctuations in work.

    PubMed

    Richens, Jonathan G; Masanes, Lluis

    2016-11-25

    In the standard framework of thermodynamics, work is a random variable whose average is bounded by the change in free energy of the system. This average work is calculated without regard for the size of its fluctuations. Here we show that for some processes, such as reversible cooling, the fluctuations in work diverge. Realistic thermal machines may be unable to cope with arbitrarily large fluctuations. Hence, it is important to understand how thermodynamic efficiency rates are modified by bounding fluctuations. We quantify the work content and work of formation of arbitrary finite dimensional quantum states when the fluctuations in work are bounded by a given amount c. By varying c we interpolate between the standard and minimum free energies. We derive fundamental trade-offs between the magnitude of work and its fluctuations. As one application of these results, we derive the corrected Carnot efficiency of a qubit heat engine with bounded fluctuations.

  2. The effect of purine and pyrimidine analogues and virazole on adenovirus replication.

    PubMed

    Scheffler, P; Haghchenas, D; Wigand, R

    1975-04-01

    The multiplication of adenovirus 19 in HeLa cells was inhibited by various purine and pyrimidine analogues and by virazole. The formation of infectious virus and of capsid proteins (haemagglutin, group-specific complement-fixing antigen) was inhibited to the same degree, while the viral cytopathic effect (CPE) was not inhibited. The reversibility of the inhibition after removal of the substances was more complete for purine than for pyrimidine analogues. The inhibition was counteracted by simulataneous addition of the corresponding nucleosides. Adenosine was more effected than guanosine against purine analogues; both were partially effective against virazole, but none of them against arabinofuranosyladenine. The time-dependence of inhibition, the ensuing eclipse period after removal of the inhibitors, and the successive application of two inhibitors led to the conclusion that most of them affect the viral multiplication mainly by inhibition of DNA synthesis. Azacytidine inhibits the synthesis of structural proteins as well.

  3. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of the first podophyllotoxin analogues as potential vascular-disrupting agents.

    PubMed

    Labruère, Raphaël; Gautier, Benoît; Testud, Marlène; Seguin, Johanne; Lenoir, Christine; Desbène-Finck, Stéphanie; Helissey, Philippe; Garbay, Christiane; Chabot, Guy G; Vidal, Michel; Giorgi-Renault, Sylviane

    2010-12-03

    We designed and synthesized two novel series of azapodophyllotoxin analogues as potential antivascular agents. A linker was inserted between the trimethoxyphenyl ring E and the tetracyclic ABCD moiety of the 4-aza-1,2-didehydropodophyllotoxins. In the first series, the linker enables free rotation between the two moieties; in the second series, conformational restriction of the E nucleus was considered. We have identified several new compounds with inhibitory activity toward tubulin polymerization similar to that of CA-4 and colchicine, while displaying low cytotoxic activity against normal and/or cancer cells. An aminologue and a methylenic analogue were shown to disrupt endothelial cell cords on Matrigel at subtoxic concentrations, and an original assay of drug washout allowed us to demonstrate the rapid reversibility of this effect. These two new analogues are promising leads for the development of vascular-disrupting agents in the podophyllotoxin series.

  4. Activation of Elongation Factor G by Phosphate Analogues

    PubMed Central

    Salsi, Enea; Farah, Elie

    2016-01-01

    EF-G is a universally conserved translational GTPase that promotes the translocation of tRNA and mRNA through the ribosome. EF-G binds to the ribosome in a GTP-bound form and subsequently catalyzes GTP hydrolysis. The contribution of the ribosome-stimulated GTP hydrolysis by EF-G to tRNA/mRNA translocation remains debated. Here, we show that while EF-G•GDP does not stably bind to the ribosome and induce translocation, EFG• GDP in complex with phosphate group analogues BeF3− and AlF4− promotes the translocation of tRNA and mRNA. Furthermore, the rates of mRNA translocation induced by EF-G in the presence of GTP and a non-hydrolysable analogue of GTP, GDP•BeF3−are similar. Our results are consistent with the model suggesting that GTP hydrolysis is not directly coupled to mRNA/tRNA translocation. Hence, GTP binding is required to induce the activated, translocation-competent conformation of EF-G while GTP hydrolysis triggers EF-G release from the ribosome. PMID:27063503

  5. NMR studies of multiple conformations in complexes of Lactobacillus casei dihydrofolate reductase with analogues of pyrimethamine.

    PubMed

    Birdsall, B; Tendler, S J; Arnold, J R; Feeney, J; Griffin, R J; Carr, M D; Thomas, J A; Roberts, G C; Stevens, M F

    1990-10-16

    1H and 19F NMR signals from bound ligands have been assigned in one- and two-dimensional NMR spectra of complexes of Lactobacillus casei dihydrofolate reductase with various pyrimethamine analogues (including pyrimethamine [1, 2,4-diamino-5-(4'-chlorophenyl)-6-ethylpyrimidine], fluoropyrimethamine [2, 2,4-diamino-5-(4'-fluorophenyl)-6-ethylpyrimidine], fluoronitropyrimethamine [3, 2,4-diamino-5-(4'-fluoro-3'-nitrophenyl) -6-ethylpyrimidine], and methylbenzoprim [4, 2,4-diamino-5-[4'- (methylbenzylamino)-3'-nitrophenyl]-6-ethylpyrimidine]). The signals were identified mainly by correlating signals from bound and free ligands by using 2D exchange experiments. Analogues (such as 1 and 2) with symmetrically substituted phenyl rings give rise to 1H signals from four nonequivalent aromatic protons, clearly indicating the presence of hindered rotation about the pyrimidine-phenyl bond. Analogues containing asymmetrically substituted aromatic rings (such as 3 and 4) exist as mixtures of two rotational isomers (an enantiomeric pair) because of this hindered rotation and the NMR spectra revealed that both isomers (forms A and B) bind to the enzyme with comparable, though unequal, binding energies. In this case two complete sets of bound proton signals were observed. The phenyl ring protons in each of the two forms experience essentially the same protein environment (same shielding) as that experienced by the corresponding protons in bound pyrimethamine: this confirms that forms A and B correspond to two rotational isomers resulting from approximately 180 degrees rotation about the pyrimidine-phenyl bond, with the 2,4-diaminopyrimidine ring being bound similarly in both forms. The relative orientations of the two forms have been determined from NOE through-space connections between protons on the ligand and protein.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Plant Volatile Analogues Strengthen Attractiveness to Insect

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yufeng; Yu, Hao; Zhou, Jing-Jiang; Pickett, John A.; Wu, Kongming

    2014-01-01

    Green leaf bug Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür) is one of the major pests in agriculture. Management of A. lucorum was largely achieved by using pesticides. However, the increasing population of A. lucorum since growing Bt cotton widely and the increased awareness of ecoenvironment and agricultural product safety makes their population-control very challenging. Therefore this study was conducted to explore a novel ecological approach, synthetic plant volatile analogues, to manage the pest. Here, plant volatile analogues were first designed and synthesized by combining the bioactive components of β-ionone and benzaldehyde. The stabilities of β-ionone, benzaldehyde and analogue 3 g were tested. The electroantennogram (EAG) responses of A. lucorum adult antennae to the analogues were recorded. And the behavior assay and filed experiment were also conducted. In this study, thirteen analogues were acquired. The analogue 3 g was demonstrated to be more stable than β-ionone and benzaldehyde in the environment. Many of the analogues elicited EAG responses, and the EAG response values to 3 g remained unchanged during seven-day period. 3 g was also demonstrated to be attractive to A. lucorum adults in the laboratory behavior experiment and in the field. Its attractiveness persisted longer than β-ionone and benzaldehyde. This indicated that 3 g can strengthen attractiveness to insect and has potential as an attractant. Our results suggest that synthetic plant volatile analogues can strengthen attractiveness to insect. This is the first published study about synthetic plant volatile analogues that have the potential to be used in pest control. Our results will support a new ecological approach to pest control and it will be helpful to ecoenvironment and agricultural product safety. PMID:24911460

  7. Reversibility conditions for quantum channels and their applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shirokov, M E

    2013-08-31

    Conditions for a quantum channel (noncommutative Markov operator) to be reversible with respect to complete families of quantum states with bounded rank are obtained. A description of all quantum channels reversible with respect to a given (orthogonal or nonorthogonal) complete family of pure states is given. Some applications in quantum information theory are considered. Bibliography: 20 titles.

  8. Space analogue studies in Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lugg, D.; Shepanek, M.

    1999-01-01

    Medical research has been carried out on the Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions (ANARE) for 50 years. As an extension of this program collaborative Australian/United States research on immunology, microbiology, psychology and remote medicine has produced important data and insight on how humans adapt to the stress of extreme isolation, confinement and the harsh environment of Antarctica. An outstanding analogue for the isolation and confinement of space missions (especially planetary outposts), ANARE has been used as an international research platform by Australia and the United States since 1993. Collaborative research has demonstrated a lowered responsiveness of the immune system under the isolation and confinement of Antarctic winter-over; a reduction of almost 50% in T cell proliferation to mitogen phytohaemogglutinin, as well as changes in latent herpesvirus states and the expansion of the polyclonal latent Epstein-Barr virus infected B cell populations. Although no clinically significant disease has been found to result from these immune changes, research is currently assessing the effects of psychological factors on the immune system. This and associated research performed to date and its relevance to both organisations is discussed, and comment made on possible extensions to the program in both medical and other fields.

  9. Space analogue studies in Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Lugg, D; Shepanek, M

    1999-01-01

    Medical research has been carried out on the Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions (ANARE) for 50 years. As an extension of this program collaborative Australian/United States research on immunology, microbiology, psychology and remote medicine has produced important data and insight on how humans adapt to the stress of extreme isolation, confinement and the harsh environment of Antarctica. An outstanding analogue for the isolation and confinement of space missions (especially planetary outposts), ANARE has been used as an international research platform by Australia and the United States since 1993. Collaborative research has demonstrated a lowered responsiveness of the immune system under the isolation and confinement of Antarctic winter-over; a reduction of almost 50% in T cell proliferation to mitogen phytohaemogglutinin, as well as changes in latent herpesvirus states and the expansion of the polyclonal latent Epstein-Barr virus infected B cell populations. Although no clinically significant disease has been found to result from these immune changes, research is currently assessing the effects of psychological factors on the immune system. This and associated research performed to date and its relevance to both organisations is discussed, and comment made on possible extensions to the program in both medical and other fields.

  10. Space analogue studies in Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lugg, D.; Shepanek, M.

    1999-01-01

    Medical research has been carried out on the Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions (ANARE) for 50 years. As an extension of this program collaborative Australian/United States research on immunology, microbiology, psychology and remote medicine has produced important data and insight on how humans adapt to the stress of extreme isolation, confinement and the harsh environment of Antarctica. An outstanding analogue for the isolation and confinement of space missions (especially planetary outposts), ANARE has been used as an international research platform by Australia and the United States since 1993. Collaborative research has demonstrated a lowered responsiveness of the immune system under the isolation and confinement of Antarctic winter-over; a reduction of almost 50% in T cell proliferation to mitogen phytohaemogglutinin, as well as changes in latent herpesvirus states and the expansion of the polyclonal latent Epstein-Barr virus infected B cell populations. Although no clinically significant disease has been found to result from these immune changes, research is currently assessing the effects of psychological factors on the immune system. This and associated research performed to date and its relevance to both organisations is discussed, and comment made on possible extensions to the program in both medical and other fields.

  11. Condensed matter analogues of cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibble, Tom; Srivastava, Ajit

    2013-10-01

    It is always exciting when developments in one branch of physics turn out to have relevance in a quite different branch. It would be hard to find two branches farther apart in terms of energy scales than early-universe cosmology and low-temperature condensed matter physics. Nevertheless ideas about the formation of topological defects during rapid phase transitions that originated in the context of the very early universe have proved remarkably fruitful when applied to a variety of condensed matter systems. The mathematical frameworks for describing these systems can be very similar. This interconnection has led to a deeper understanding of the phenomena in condensed matter systems utilizing ideas from cosmology. At the same time, one can view these condensed matter analogues as providing, at least in a limited sense, experimental access to the phenomena of the early universe for which no direct probe is possible. As this special issue well illustrates, this remains a dynamic and exciting field. The basic idea is that when a system goes through a rapid symmetry-breaking phase transition from a symmetric phase into one with spontaneously broken symmetry, the order parameter may make different choices in different regions, creating domains that when they meet can trap defects. The scale of those domains, and hence the density of defects, is constrained by the rate at which the system goes through the transition and the speed with which order parameter information propagates. This is what has come to be known as the Kibble-Zurek mechanism. The resultant scaling laws have now been tested in a considerable variety of different systems. The earliest experiments illustrating the analogy between cosmology and condensed matter were in liquid crystals, in particular on the isotropic-to-nematic transition, primarily because it is very easy to induce the phase transition (typically at room temperature) and to image precisely what is going on. This field remains one of the

  12. Space analogue studies in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugg, D.; Shepanek, M.

    1999-09-01

    Medical research has been carried out on the Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions (ANARE) for 50 years. As an extension of this program collaborative Australian/United States research on immunology, microbiology, psychology and remote medicine has produced important data and insight on how humans adapt to the stress of extreme isolation, confinement and the harsh environment of Antarctica. An outstanding analogue for the isolation and confinement of space missions (especially planetary outposts), ANARE has been used as an international research platform by Australia and the United States since 1993. Collaborative research has demonstrated a lowered responsiveness of the immune system under the isolation and confinement of Antarctic winter-over; a reduction of almost 50% in T cell proliferation to mltogen phytohaemogglutinin, as well as changes in latent herpesvirus states and the expansion of the polyclonal latent Epstein-Barr virus infected B cell populations. Although no clinically significant disease has been found to result from these immune changes, research is currently assessing the effects of psychological factors on the immune system. This and associated research performed to date and its relevance to both organisations is discussed, and comment made on possible extensions to the program in both medical and other fields.

  13. Inhibition of serine and proline racemases by substrate-product analogues.

    PubMed

    Harty, Matthew; Nagar, Mitesh; Atkinson, Logan; Legay, Christina M; Derksen, Darren J; Bearne, Stephen L

    2014-01-01

    d-Amino acids can play important roles as specific biosynthetic building blocks required by organisms or act as regulatory molecules. Consequently, amino acid racemases that catalyze the formation of d-amino acids are potential therapeutic targets. Serine racemase catalyzes the reversible formation of d-serine (a modulator of neurotransmission) from l-serine, while proline racemase (an essential enzymatic and mitogenic protein in trypanosomes) catalyzes the reversible conversion of l-proline to d-proline. We show the substrate-product analogue α-(hydroxymethyl)serine is a modest, linear mixed-type inhibitor of serine racemase from Schizosaccharomyces pombe (Ki=167±21mM, Ki'=661±81mM, cf. Km=19±2mM). The bicyclic substrate-product analogue of proline, 7-azabicyclo[2.2.1]heptan-7-ium-1-carboxylate is a weak inhibitor of proline racemase from Clostridium sticklandii, giving only 29% inhibition at 142.5mM. However, the more flexible bicyclic substrate-product analogue tetrahydro-1H-pyrrolizine-7a(5H)-carboxylate is a noncompetitive inhibitor of proline racemase from C. sticklandii (Ki=111±15mM, cf. Km=5.7±0.5mM). These results suggest that substrate-product analogue inhibitors of racemases may only be effective when the active site is capacious and/or plastic, or when the inhibitor is sufficiently flexible.

  14. Anaphoric Pronouns and Bound Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasow, Thomas

    1975-01-01

    Deals with certain problems inherent in deriving anaphoric pronouns from bound variables. Syntactic rules applied to determine anaphora relations cannot be applied if anaphoric pronouns and their antecedents have identical underlying forms. An approach to anaphora which preserves some advantages of the bound-variable theory without the problems is…

  15. Northwest Outward Bound Instructor's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Outward Bound School, Portland, OR.

    Instructor responsibilities, procedures for completing activities safely, and instructional methods and techniques are outlined to assist instructors in the Northwest Outward Bound School (Portland, Oregon) as they strive for teaching excellence. Information is organized into six chapters addressing: history and philosophy of Outward Bound; course…

  16. Bounds for Asian basket options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deelstra, Griselda; Diallo, Ibrahima; Vanmaele, Michèle

    2008-09-01

    In this paper we propose pricing bounds for European-style discrete arithmetic Asian basket options in a Black and Scholes framework. We start from methods used for basket options and Asian options. First, we use the general approach for deriving upper and lower bounds for stop-loss premia of sums of non-independent random variables as in Kaas et al. [Upper and lower bounds for sums of random variables, Insurance Math. Econom. 27 (2000) 151-168] or Dhaene et al. [The concept of comonotonicity in actuarial science and finance: theory, Insurance Math. Econom. 31(1) (2002) 3-33]. We generalize the methods in Deelstra et al. [Pricing of arithmetic basket options by conditioning, Insurance Math. Econom. 34 (2004) 55-57] and Vanmaele et al. [Bounds for the price of discrete sampled arithmetic Asian options, J. Comput. Appl. Math. 185(1) (2006) 51-90]. Afterwards we show how to derive an analytical closed-form expression for a lower bound in the non-comonotonic case. Finally, we derive upper bounds for Asian basket options by applying techniques as in Thompson [Fast narrow bounds on the value of Asian options, Working Paper, University of Cambridge, 1999] and Lord [Partially exact and bounded approximations for arithmetic Asian options, J. Comput. Finance 10 (2) (2006) 1-52]. Numerical results are included and on the basis of our numerical tests, we explain which method we recommend depending on moneyness and time-to-maturity.

  17. Northwest Outward Bound Instructor's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Outward Bound School, Portland, OR.

    Instructor responsibilities, procedures for completing activities safely, and instructional methods and techniques are outlined to assist instructors in the Northwest Outward Bound School (Portland, Oregon) as they strive for teaching excellence. Information is organized into six chapters addressing: history and philosophy of Outward Bound; course…

  18. Analogue models of obliquely convergent continental plate boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burbidge, David R.; Braun, Jean

    1998-07-01

    Analogue models are used to examine crustal-scale faulting at obliquely convergent continental plate boundaries. A uniform Coulomb material is deformed with basal kinematic boundary conditions to model two obliquely convergent lithospheric plates. The mantle part of one plate is assumed to detach from its overriding crust and then be subducted beneath the other plate. The obliquity of the collision is assumed to remain constant throughout the deformation. Experiments are run with obliquities ranging from pure convergence (low obliquity) to pure strike slip (high obliquity). Reverse faults are observed for all obliquities with a nonzero convergent component. By contrast, only collisions with a large amount of strike slip motion exhibit wrench faulting. In experiments dominated by their convergent component, the strike slip motion is totally accommodated by oblique slip along the reverse faults. Strain partitioning between reverse faults and wrench faults is only observed for experiments run above a certain critical partitioning obliquity. Prom the observed initial faults, we can deduce the change in orientation in the principal stress triad as the obliquity is changed. We propose that the initial direction of maximum compressive stress (σ1) rotates horizontally as the obliquity is changed, which in turn affects the geometry of the initial faults formed in the material. In the case of reverse faults, the rotation increases their dip measured along the direction of pure convergence. The relative magnitude of the minimum horizontal stress and the vertical stress determine whether reverse faults or strike slip faults are the first to form. Although long term deformation is more difficult to analyze, a simple relationship for the angle at which strain partitioning occurs is derived.

  19. Specific, reversible binding of [18F]benperidol to baboon D2 receptors: PET evaluation of an improved 18F-labeled ligand.

    PubMed

    Moerlein, S M; Perlmutter, J S; Welch, M J

    1995-08-01

    [18F]Benperidol ([18F]BP), a positron-emitting analogue of the dopaminergic D2 antagonist benperidol, was evaluated as a radiopharmaceutical for use with positron emission tomography (PET). PET imaging of baboons after i.v. injection of [18F]BP indicated that the radiofluorinated ligand rapidly localized in vivo within dopaminergic receptor-rich cerebral tissues, and that selective disposition was retained for over 2 h. Pretreatment of an animal with unlabeled receptor-specific antagonists prior to injection of [18F]BP confirmed that the radioligand bound specifically to central D2 receptors in vivo, and not to S2 or D1 receptors. [18F]BP bound to D2 receptors in a reversible manner; unlabeled eticlopride displaced D2 receptor-bound [18F]BP in vivo. The radioligand was metabolized in the periphery to polar metabolites which are not expected to cross the blood-brain barrier. [18F]BP has advantages over other tracers as a radiopharmaceutical for PET study of central D2 receptor activity, and can be applied for noninvasive evaluation of the interaction of unlabeled drugs with central D2 receptor sites.

  20. Wind effects on bounding flight.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Gottfried

    2013-01-07

    The effects of the wind on the energy expenditure of bounding flight and on the travelling speed are dealt with. For this purpose, a mathematical model of bounding flight in moving air is developed. Introducing an appropriate non-dimensionalization, results and findings of generally valid nature are derived. It is shown that bounding flight yields a flight mechanical advantage in headwinds when compared with continuous flapping flight. This is because the minimum energy expenditure is lower and the associated travelling speed is higher. The body lift in the bound phase has an advantageous influence. The effects of tailwinds yield less differences between bounding flight and continuous flapping flight. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Metabolism of organically bound tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, C.C.

    1984-01-01

    The classic methodology for estimating dose to man from environmental tritium ignores the fact that organically bound tritium in foodstuffs may be directly assimilated in the bound compartment of tissues without previous oxidation. We propose a four-compartment model consisting of a free body water compartment, two organic compartments, and a small, rapidly metabolizing compartment. The utility of this model lies in the ability to input organically bound tritium in foodstuffs directly into the organic compartments of the model. We found that organically bound tritium in foodstuffs can increase cumulative total body dose by a factor of 1.7 to 4.5 times the free body water dose alone, depending on the bound-to-loose ratio of tritium in the diet. Model predictions are compared with empirical measurements of tritium in human urine and tissue samples, and appear to be in close agreement. 10 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  2. Brief Report: An Experimental Analogue of Consultee "Resistance" Effects on the Consultant's Therapeutic Behavior--A Preliminary Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cautilli, Joseph; Riley-Tillman, T. Chris

    2006-01-01

    This study presents an experimental analogue of resistance in the consultation process. Using an ABAB reversal design, the experimenter measured the ecological effects of teacher resistant behaviors on consultant therapeutic behavior. The study defined therapeutic behaviors as teaching, confronting and problem identification, analysis, and…

  3. [GnRH analogues for the treatment of fibroids].

    PubMed

    Murillo, Ester Ortiz; Cano, Antonio

    2013-07-01

    Uterine fibroids are benign tumors that are very common in women and may present significant symptoms in 20%-50% of cases. When they require action, their traditional management has been surgery (hysterectomy or fibroidectomy); however medical alternatives have been proposed, given that surgery is associated with a certain morbidity and mortality and involves healthcare costs. Within the pharmacological management of uterine fibroids, GnRH analogues are the best known and most commonly used drugs, although their indications are limited by the side effects associated with long-term treatment. Their primary indication is based on preoperative treatment (to hysterectomy or fibroidectomy) and in selected cases of patients close to menopause or who want more conservative management. These analogues are able to significantly reduce the uterine volume, the size of the fibroid and their accompanying symptoms. Their main disadvantage, however, lies in the reversibility of their effect when treatment is discontinued, along with the side effects associated with hypoestrogenism, such as climacteric symptoms and loss of bone mass. "Add-back" therapies, which associate low-dose estrogens to aGnRH, allow for extended use thanks to decreased side effects without affecting the benefits. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  4. Analogue gravity models from conformal rescaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossenfelder, Sabine; Zingg, Tobias

    2017-08-01

    Analogue gravity is based on a mathematical identity between quantum field theory in curved space-time and the propagation of perturbations in certain condensed matter systems. But not every curved space-time can be simulated in such a way. For analogue gravity to work, one needs not only a condensed matter system that generates the desired metric tensor, but this system then also has to obey its own equations of motion. However, the relation to the metric tensor usually overdetermines the equations of the underlying condensed matter system, such that they in general cannot be fulfilled. In this case the desired metric does not have an analogue. Here, we show that the class of metrics that have an analogue is larger than previously thought. The reason is that the analogue metric is only defined up to a choice of parametrization of the perturbation in the underlying condensed matter system. In this way, the class of analogue gravity models can be vastly expanded.

  5. A novel benzonitrile analogue inhibits rhinovirus replication.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Céline; Querol-Audí, Jordi; Roche, Manon; Franco, David; Froeyen, Mathy; Guerra, Pablo; Terme, Thierry; Vanelle, Patrice; Verdaguer, Núria; Neyts, Johan; Leyssen, Pieter

    2014-10-01

    To study the characteristics and the mode of action of the anti-rhinovirus compound 4-[1-hydroxy-2-(4,5-dimethoxy-2-nitrophenyl)ethyl]benzonitrile (LPCRW_0005). The antiviral activity of LPCRW_0005 was evaluated in a cytopathic effect reduction assay against a panel of human rhinovirus (HRV) strains. To unravel its precise molecular mechanism of action, a time-of-drug-addition study, resistance selection and thermostability assays were performed. The crystal structure of the HRV14/LPCRW_0005 complex was elucidated as well. LPCRW_0005 proved to be a selective inhibitor of the replication of HRV14 (EC(50) of 2 ± 1 μM). Time-of-drug-addition studies revealed that LPCRW_0005 interferes with the earliest stages of virus replication. Phenotypic drug-resistant virus variants were obtained (≥30-fold decrease in susceptibility to the inhibitory effect of LPCRW_0005), which carried either an A150T or A150V amino acid substitution in the VP1 capsid protein. The link between the mutant genotype and drug-resistant phenotype was confirmed by reverse genetics. Cross-resistance studies and thermostability assays revealed that LPCRW_0005 has a similar mechanism of action to the capsid binder pleconaril. Elucidation of the crystal structure of the HRV14/LPCRW_0005 complex revealed the existence of multiple hydrophobic and polar interactions between the VP1 pocket and LPCRW_0005. LPCRW_0005 is a novel inhibitor of HRV14 replication that acts as a capsid binder. The compound has a chemical structure that is markedly smaller than that of other capsid binders. Structural studies show that LPCRW_0005, in contrast to pleconaril, leaves the toe end of the pocket in VP1 empty. This suggests that extended analogues of LPCRW_0005 that fill the full cavity could be more potent inhibitors of rhinovirus replication. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e

  6. Synthesis of a dA-dT base pair analogue and its effects on DNA-ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Lan, T; McLaughlin, L W

    2001-08-01

    Two nucleoside derivatives containing the base analogues 3-deazaadenine and 3-methyl-2-pyridone have been prepared as analogues of dA and dT, respectively. After conversion into the appropriately protected phosphoramidites, DNA sequences were prepared with site-specifically placed analogues. When present in a duplex DNA sequence, the analogues result in the deletion of one or both of the hydrogen bonding functional groups (the N3-nitrogen of dA and the O2-carbonyl of dT) present in the minor groove. Binding by two ligands, 4',6-diamidine-2-phenyl indole (DAPI) and Hoechst 33258 in the minor groove has been probed using a variety of DNA sequences. These sequences contain a d(GAATTC)2 core with analogue nucleosides substituted for one or more of the dA and dT residues. DAPI bound strongly to any sequence that contained both O2-carbonyls of the central two dT residues. The presence of a dc3A residue did in some cases enhance binding. With one of the central O2-carbonyls deleted, the binding was noticeably reduced, and with both absent, no significant binding could be detected. Similar although less dramatic results were observed with Hoechst 33258 binding to analogue sequences.

  7. Binding affinities of amino acid analogues at the charged aqueous titania interface: implications for titania-binding peptides.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Anas M; Hughes, Zak E; Walsh, Tiffany R

    2014-11-11

    Despite the extensive utilization of biomolecule-titania interfaces, biomolecular recognition and interactions at the aqueous titania interface remain far from being fully understood. Here, atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, in partnership with metadynamics, are used to calculate the free energy of adsorption of different amino acid side chain analogues at the negatively-charged aqueous rutile TiO2 (110) interface, under conditions corresponding with neutral pH. Our calculations predict that charged amino acid analogues have a relatively high affinity to the titania surface, with the arginine analogue predicted to be the strongest binder. Interactions between uncharged amino acid analogues and titania are found to be repulsive or weak at best. All of the residues that bound to the negatively-charged interface show a relatively stronger adsorption compared with the charge-neutral interface, including the negatively-charged analogue. Of the analogues that are found to bind to the titania surface, the rank ordering of the binding affinities is predicted to be "arginine" > "lysine" ≈ aspartic acid > "serine". This is the same ordering as was found previously for the charge-neutral aqueous titania interface. Our results show very good agreement with available experimental data and can provide a baseline for the interpretation of peptide-TiO2 adsorption data.

  8. Planetary habitability: lessons learned from terrestrial analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, Louisa J.; Dartnell, Lewis R.

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial analogue studies underpin almost all planetary missions and their use is essential in the exploration of our Solar system and in assessing the habitability of other worlds. Their value relies on the similarity of the analogue to its target, either in terms of their mineralogical or geochemical context, or current physical or chemical environmental conditions. Such analogue sites offer critical ground-truthing for astrobiological studies on the habitability of different environmental parameter sets, the biological mechanisms for survival in extreme environments and the preservation potential and detectability of biosignatures. The 33 analogue sites discussed in this review have been selected on the basis of their congruence to particular extraterrestrial locations. Terrestrial field sites that have been used most often in the literature, as well as some lesser known ones which require greater study, are incorporated to inform on the astrobiological potential of Venus, Mars, Europa, Enceladus and Titan. For example, the possibility of an aerial habitable zone on Venus has been hypothesized based on studies of life at high-altitudes in the terrestrial atmosphere. We also demonstrate why many different terrestrial analogue sites are required to satisfactorily assess the habitability of the changing environmental conditions throughout Martian history, and recommend particular sites for different epochs or potential niches. Finally, habitable zones within the aqueous environments of the icy moons of Europa and Enceladus and potentially in the hydrocarbon lakes of Titan are discussed and suitable analogue sites proposed. It is clear from this review that a number of terrestrial analogue sites can be applied to multiple planetary bodies, thereby increasing their value for astrobiological exploration. For each analogue site considered here, we summarize the pertinent physiochemical environmental features they offer and critically assess the fidelity with which

  9. Szilard engine reversibility as quantum gate function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihelic, F. Matthew

    2012-06-01

    A quantum gate is a logically and thermodynamically reversible situation that effects a unitary transformation of qubits of superimposed information, and essentially constitutes a situation for a reversible quantum decision. A quantum decision is a symmetry break, and the effect of the function of a Szilard engine is a symmetry break. A quantum gate is a situation in which a reversible quantum decision can be made, and so if a logically and thermodynamically reversible Szilard engine can be theoretically constructed then it would function as a quantum gate. While the traditionally theorized Szilard engine is not thermodynamically reversible, if one of the bounding walls of a Szilard engine were to be constructed out of the physical information by which it functions in such a manner as to make that information available to both sides of the wall simultaneously, then such a Szilard engine would be both logically and thermodynamically reversible, and thus capable of function as a quantum gate. A theoretical model of the special case of a reversible Szilard engine functioning as a quantum gate is presented and discussed, and since a quantum decision is made when the shutter of a Szilard engine closes, the coherence of linked reversible Szilard engines should be considered as a state during which all of the shutters of linked Szilard engines are open simultaneously.

  10. Mechanism of benzaldehyde lyase studied via thiamin diphosphate-bound intermediates and kinetic isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sumit; Nemeria, Natalia; Yep, Alejandra; McLeish, Michael J; Kenyon, George L; Jordan, Frank

    2008-03-25

    Direct spectroscopic observation of thiamin diphosphate-bound intermediates was achieved on the enzyme benzaldehyde lyase, which carries out reversible and highly enantiospecific conversion of ( R)-benzoin to benzaldehyde. The key enamine intermediate could be observed at lambda max 393 nm in the benzoin breakdown direction and in the decarboxylase reaction starting with benzoylformate. With benzaldehyde as substrate, no intermediates could be detected, only formation of benzoin at 314 nm. To probe the rate-limiting step in the direction of ( R)-benzoin synthesis, the (1)H/ (2)H kinetic isotope effect was determined for benzaldehyde labeled at the aldehyde position and found to be small (1.14 +/- 0.03), indicating that ionization of the C2alphaH from C2alpha-hydroxybenzylthiamin diphosphate is not rate limiting. Use of the alternate substrates benzoylformic and phenylpyruvic acids (motivated by the observation that while a carboligase, benzaldehyde lyase could also catalyze the slow decarboxylation of 2-oxo acids) enabled the observation of the substrate-thiamin covalent intermediate via the 1',4'-iminopyrimidine tautomer, characteristic of all intermediates with a tetrahedral C2 substituent on ThDP. The reaction of benzaldehyde lyase with the chromophoric substrate analogue ( E)-2-oxo-4(pyridin-3-yl)-3-butenoic acid and its decarboxylated product ( E)-3-(pyridine-3-yl)acrylaldehyde enabled the detection of covalent adducts with both. Neither adduct underwent further reaction. An important finding of the studies is that all thiamin-related intermediates are in a chiral environment on benzaldehyde lyase as reflected by their circular dichroism signatures.

  11. Loratadine analogues as MAGL inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jayendra Z; Ahenkorah, Stephen; Vaara, Miia; Staszewski, Marek; Adams, Yahaya; Laitinen, Tuomo; Navia-Paldanius, Dina; Parkkari, Teija; Savinainen, Juha R; Walczyński, Krzysztof; Laitinen, Jarmo T; Nevalainen, Tapio J

    2015-04-01

    Compound 12a (JZP-361) acted as a potent and reversible inhibitor of human recombinant MAGL (hMAGL, IC50=46 nM), and was found to have almost 150-fold higher selectivity over human recombinant fatty acid amide hydrolase (hFAAH, IC50=7.24 μM) and 35-fold higher selectivity over human α/β-hydrolase-6 (hABHD6, IC50=1.79 μM). Additionally, compound 12a retained H1 antagonistic affinity (pA2=6.81) but did not show cannabinoid receptor activity, when tested at concentrations ⩽ 10 μM. Hence, compound 12a represents a novel dual-acting pharmacological tool possessing both MAGL-inhibitory and antihistaminergic activities.

  12. Bound states in string nets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Marc Daniel; Dusuel, Sébastien; Vidal, Julien

    2016-11-01

    We discuss the emergence of bound states in the low-energy spectrum of the string-net Hamiltonian in the presence of a string tension. In the ladder geometry, we show that a single bound state arises either for a finite tension or in the zero-tension limit depending on the theory considered. In the latter case, we perturbatively compute the binding energy as a function of the total quantum dimension. We also address this issue in the honeycomb lattice where the number of bound states in the topological phase depends on the total quantum dimension. Finally, the internal structure of these bound states is analyzed in the zero-tension limit.

  13. Bounds on the information rate of quantum-secret-sharing schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Sarvepalli, Pradeep

    2011-04-15

    An important metric of the performance of a quantum-secret-sharing scheme is its information rate. Beyond the fact that the information rate is upper-bounded by one, very little is known in terms of bounds on the information rate of quantum-secret-sharing schemes. Furthermore, not every scheme can be realized with rate one. In this paper we derive upper bounds for the information rates of quantum-secret-sharing schemes. We show that there exist quantum access structures on n players for which the information rate cannot be better than O((log{sub 2}n)/n). These results are the quantum analogues of the bounds for classical-secret-sharing schemes proved by Csirmaz.

  14. Release of soil bound (nonextractable) residues by various physiological groups of microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, S.U.; Ivarson, K.C.

    1982-01-01

    Soil bound /sup 14/C-labeled residues were released by four different physiological groups of microorganisms from an organic soil treated with /sup 14/C-ring-labeled prometryn (2-(methylthio)-4,6-bis(isopropylamino)-s-triazine). The extent to which the different microbial populations released bound /sup 14/C residues (25-30% of the total bound /sup 14/C) from the gamma-irradiated soil after 28 days incubation did not differ considerably. Analysis of the extractable material from the incubated soil showed the presence of small amounts of the parent compound, and its hydroxy and mono-N-dealkylated analogues. Low level of /sup 14/CO2 (1.5-3.0% of the total bound /sup 14/C) was evolved from the microbial systems indicating ring cleavage of the released material as being a very minor reaction.

  15. Release of soil bound (nonextractable) residues by various physiological groups of microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Khan, S U; Ivarson, K C

    1982-01-01

    Soil bound 14C-labeled residues were released by four different physiological groups of microorganisms from an organic soil treated with 14C-ring-labeled prometryn [2-(methylthio)-4,6-bis(isopropylamino)-s-triazine]. The extent to which the different microbial populations released bound 14C residues (25-30% of the total bound 14C) from the gamma-irradiated soil after 28 days incubation did not differ considerably. Analysis of the extractable material from the incubated soil showed the presence of small amounts of the parent compound, and its hydroxy and mono-N-dealkylated analogues. Low level of 14CO2 (1.5-3.0% of the total bound 14C) was evolved from the microbial systems indicating ring cleavage of the released material as being a very minor reaction.

  16. Inhibition of monoterpene cyclases by inert analogues of geranyl diphosphate and linalyl diphosphate☆

    PubMed Central

    Karp, Frank; Zhao, Yuxin; Santhamma, Bindu; Assink, Bryce; Coates, Robert M.; Croteau, Rodney B.

    2007-01-01

    The tightly coupled nature of the reaction sequence catalyzed by monoterpene synthases has prevented direct observation of the topologically required isomerization step leading from geranyl diphosphate to the enzyme-bound, tertiary allylic intermediate linalyl diphosphate, which then cyclizes to the various monoterpene skeletons. X-ray crystal structures of these enzymes complexed with suitable analogues of the substrate and intermediate could provide a clearer view of this universal, but cryptic, step of monoterpenoid cyclase catalysis. Toward this end, the functionally inert analogues 2-fluorogeranyl diphosphate, (±)-2-fluorolinalyl diphosphate, and (3R)- and (3S)-homolinalyl diphosphates (2,6-dimethyl-2-vinyl-5-heptenyl diphosphates) were prepared, and compared to the previously described substrate analogue 3-azageranyl diphosphate (3-aza-2,3-dihydrogeranyl diphosphate) as inhibitors and potential crystallization aids with two representative monoterpenoid cyclases, (−)-limonene synthase and (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase. Although these enantioselective synthases readily distinguished between (3R)- and (3S)-homolinalyl diphosphates, both of which were more effective inhibitors than was 3-azageranyl diphosphate, the fluorinated analogues proved to be the most potent competitive inhibitors and have recently yielded informative liganded structures with limonene synthase. PMID:17949678

  17. Distribution and characteristics of bound residues of prometryn in an organic soil

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, S.U.

    1982-01-01

    Uniformly /sup 14/C-ring-labeled prometryn (2-(methylthio)-4,6-bis(isopropylamino)-s-triazine) was incubated with an organic soil under laboratory conditions for 1 year. After exhaustive solvent extraction, the soil containing bound (nonextractable) /sup 14/C-labeled residues was fractionated into humic substances by alkali extraction followed by acid precipitation. A considerable proportion of /sup 14/C-labeled residues in humin and humic acid was comprised of the parent herbicide and its mono-N-dealkylated metabolite. However, the soluble fulvic acid fraction contained an appreciable amount of the 2-hydroxy analogue of prometryn. Thermoanalytical methods were used to obtain information on the nature and location of /sup 14/C-labeled bound residues in soil and humic materials. Exhaustive methylation of humin and humic acid released some of the bound /sup 14/C-labeled residues from these fractions. Bound /sup 14/C-labeled residues in aqueous suspensions of humin or humic acid were stable to UV light. However, UV irradiation of the soil suspension resulted in the release of some of the bound /sup 14/C-labeled residues which were subsequently decomposed to hydroxy analogues.

  18. Reduced peptide bond pseudopeptide analogues of neurotensin.

    PubMed

    Doulut, S; Rodriguez, M; Lugrin, D; Vecchini, F; Kitabgi, P; Aumelas, A; Martinez, J

    1992-01-01

    Pseudopeptide analogues of the C-terminal hexapeptide of neurotensin (H-Arg-Arg-Pro-Tyr-Ile-Leu-OH) were obtained by replacing each peptide bond by the reduced peptide bond CH2NH. The resulting analogues were then examined for their ability to inhibit binding of labeled neurotensin to new-born mouse brain membranes and for stimulation of guinea pig ileum contraction. Replacement of the Ile12-Leu13, Tyr11-Ile12, Pro10-Tyr11 and Lys9-Pro10 peptide bonds resulted in about 2000-, 3400-, 200- and 3400-fold losses, respectively, in binding affinity and 400-, 750-, 250- and 300-fold losses, respectively, in biological activity. Replacement of both Arg8 and Arg9 by lysine led to an analogue exhibiting the same pharmacological profile as the C-terminal hexapeptide of neurotensin. Interestingly, replacement of the Lys8-Lys9 peptide bond by the CH2NH bond produced an analogue exhibiting the same affinity for neurotensin receptors, but 10 times more potent in stimulating guinea pig ileum contraction. N-terminal protected analogues (by the Boc group) showed decreased potency as compared with their amino-free corresponding compounds.

  19. Analogue Downscaling of Seasonal Rainfall Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, A. N.; Timbal, B.; Hendon, H.

    2010-12-01

    We have taken an existing statistical downscaling model (SDM), based on meteorological analogues that was developed for downscaling climate change projections (Timbal et al 2009), and applied it in the seasonal forecasting context to produce downscaled rainfall hindcasts from a coupled model seasonal forecast system (POAMA). Downscaling of POAMA forecasts is required to provide seasonal climate information at local scales of interest. Analogue downscaling is a simple technique to generate rainfall forecasts appropriate to the local scale by conditioning on the large scale predicted GCM circulation and the local topography and climate. Analogue methods are flexible and have been shown to produce good results when downscaling 20th century South Eastern Australian rainfall output from climate models. A set of re-forecasts for three month rainfall at 170 observing stations in the South Murray Darling region of Australia were generated using predictors from the POAMA re-forecasts as input for the analogue SDM. The predictors were optimised over a number of different GCMS in previous climate change downscaling studies. Downscaling with the analogue SDM results in predicted rainfall with realistic variance while maintaining the modest predictive skill of the dynamical model. Evaluation of the consistency between the large scale mean of downscaled and direct GCM output precipitation is encouraging.

  20. On the mechanical analogue of DNA.

    PubMed

    Yakushevich, Ludmila

    2017-03-01

    The creation of mechanical analogues of biological systems is known as a useful instrument that helps to understand better the dynamical mechanisms of the functioning of living organisms. Mechanical analogues of biomolecules are usually constructed for imitation of their internal mobility, which is one of the most important properties of the molecules. Among the different types of internal motions, angular oscillations of nitrous bases are of special interest because they make a substantial contribution to the base pairs opening that in turn is an important element of the process of the DNA-protein recognition. In this paper, we investigate the possibility to construct a mechanical analogue for imitation of angular oscillations of nitrous bases in inhomogeneous DNA. It is shown that the analogue has the form of a mechanical chain of non-identical pendulums that oscillate in the gravitational field of the Earth and coupled by identical springs. The masses and lengths of pendulums, as well as the distances between neighboring pendulums and the rigidity of springs are calculated. To illustrate the approach, we present the result of construction of the mechanical analogue of the fragment of the sequence of bacteriophage T7D.

  1. Synthesis, biological activity, and crystal structure of potent nonnucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase that retain activity against mutant forms of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Morningstar, Marshall L; Roth, Thomas; Farnsworth, David W; Smith, Marilyn Kroeger; Watson, Karen; Buckheit, Robert W; Das, Kalyan; Zhang, Wanyi; Arnold, Eddy; Julias, John G; Hughes, Stephen H; Michejda, Christopher J

    2007-08-23

    In an ongoing effort to develop novel and potent nonnucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors that are effective against the wild type (WT) virus and clinically observed mutants, 1,2-bis-substituted benzimidazoles were synthesized and tested. Optimization of the N1 and C2 positions of benzimidazole led to the development of 1-(2,6-difluorobenzyl)-2-(2,6-difluorophenyl)-4-methylbenzimidazole (1) (IC50 = 0.2 microM, EC50 = 0.44 microM, and TC50 >/= 100 against WT). This paper describes how substitution on the benzimidazole ring profoundly affects activity. Substituents at the benzimidazole C4 dramatically enhanced potency, while at C5 or C6 substituents were generally detrimental or neutral to activity, respectively. A 7-methyl analogue did not inhibit HIV-1 RT. Determination of the crystal structure of 1 bound to RT provided the basis for accurate modeling of additional analogues, which were synthesized and tested. Several derivatives were nanomolar inhibitors of wild-type virus and were effective against clinically relevant HIV-1 mutants.

  2. Synthesis, Biological Activity, and Crystal Structure of Potent Nonnucleoside Inhibitors of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase That Retain Activity against Mutant Forms of the Enzyme†

    PubMed Central

    Morningstar, Marshall L.; Roth, Thomas; Farnsworth, David W.; Smith, Marilyn Kroeger; Watson, Karen; Buckheit, Robert W.; Das, Kalyan; Zhang, Wanyi; Arnold, Eddy; Julias, John G.; Hughes, Stephen H.; Michejda, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    In an ongoing effort to develop novel and potent nonnucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors that are effective against the wild type (WT) virus and clinically observed mutants, 1,2-bis-substituted benzimidazoles were synthesized and tested. Optimization of the N1 and C2 positions of benzimidazole led to the development of 1-(2,6-difluorobenzyl)-2-(2,6-difluorophenyl)-4-methylbenzimidazole (1) (IC50 = 0.2 μM, EC50 = 0.44 μM, and TC50 ≥ 100 against WT). This paper describes how substitution on the benzimidazole ring profoundly affects activity. Substituents at the benzimidazole C4 dramatically enhanced potency, while at C5 or C6 substituents were generally detrimental or neutral to activity, respectively. A 7-methyl analogue did not inhibit HIV-1 RT. Determination of the crystal structure of 1 bound to RT provided the basis for accurate modeling of additional analogues, which were synthesized and tested. Several derivatives were nanomolar inhibitors of wild-type virus and were effective against clinically relevant HIV-1 mutants. PMID:17663538

  3. Efficiency of Rectification: Reversible vs. Irreversible Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, I. M.

    2002-11-01

    Both man-made locomotive devices and molecular motors use gears to transform a reciprocating motion into a directed one. One of the most common gears is a rectifier, a mechanically irreversible appliance. The maximal energetic efficiency of an isothermic gear is bounded by unity, as a consequence of the Second Law. However, approaching this ideal efficiency does not imply approaching reversibility. We discuss what properties of a rectifier mostly influence the transduction efficiency and show that an appliance which locks under backward force is just the one which can approach the ideal efficiency either in the reversible or in the irreversible regime.

  4. Novel configuration of a myosin II transient intermediate analogue revealed by quick-freeze deep-etch replica electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kimori, Yoshitaka; Baba, Norio; Katayama, Eisaku

    2013-02-15

    In the present paper, we described our attempt to characterize the rough three-dimensional features of the structural analogue of the key intermediate of myosin's cross-bridge cycle. Using quick-freeze deep-etch replica electron microscopy, we observed that actin-attached myosin during in vitro sliding was bent superficially as postulated by the conventional hypothesis, but in the opposite direction of the putative pre-power-stroke configuration, as for ADP·Vi (inorganic vanadate)-bound myosin. We searched for the conformational species with a similar appearance and found that SH1-SH2 (thiols 1 and 2)-cross-linked myosin is a good candidate. To characterize such small asymmetric structures, we employed a new pattern-recognition procedure that accommodates the metal-replicated samples. In this method, the best-matched views of the target microscopic images were selected from a comprehensive set of images simulated from known atomic co-ordinates of relevant proteins. Together with effective morphological filtering, we could define the conformational species and the view angles of the catalytic domain and the lever arm cropped from averaged images of disulfide-cross-linked myosin. Whereas the catalytic domain of the new conformer closely resembled the pPDM (N,N'-p-phenylenedimaleimide)-treated, but SH2 Lys705-cross-linked, structure (PDB code 1L2O), a minor product of the same cross-linking reaction, the lever arm projected differently. Using separately determined view angles of the catalytic domain and the lever arm, we built a model of disulfide-cross-linked myosin. Further combination with the 'displacement-mapping' procedure enabled us to reconstruct the global three-dimensional envelope of the unusual structure whose lever arm orientation is compatible with our reports on the actin-sliding cross-bridge structure. Assuming this conformer as the structural analogue of the transient intermediate during actin sliding, the power stroke of the lever arm might

  5. Genetic engineering to produce polyketide analogues.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Christopher D; Rodriguez, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Polyketides are pharmaceutically important and structurally diverse natural products. Creating analogues for drug development can be done with chemistry, but this is generally restricted to a few accessible functional groups. Analogues can also be made by genetic engineering, which is particularly effective for polyketides synthesized by a modular polyketide synthase (PKS). Such a PKS displays colinearity, which means that the structural features along the polyketide chain are determined by the catalytic specificities in corresponding modules along a molecular assembly line. The assembly line can be genetically engineered through addition, deletion, or mutation of catalytic domains or the reorganization of whole modules. Chemically synthesized precursors also can be fed to engineered assembly lines to further expand the repertoire of analogues. These various methods are discussed with an aim of providing a guide to the strategies most likely to succeed in a given circumstance. Recent information that could be relevant to future polyketide engineering projects is also discussed.

  6. Synthesis and anticancer evaluation of spermatinamine analogues.

    PubMed

    Moosa, Basem A; Sagar, Sunil; Li, Song; Esau, Luke; Kaur, Mandeep; Khashab, Niveen M

    2016-03-15

    Spermatinamine was isolated from an Australian marine sponge, Pseudoceratina sp. as an inhibitor of isoprenylcysteine carboxyl methyltransferase (Icmt), an attractive and novel anticancer target. Herein, we report the synthesis of spermatinamine analogues and their cytotoxic evaluation against three human cancer cell lines, that is, cervix adenocarcinoma (HeLa), breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7), and prostate carcinoma (DU145). Analogues 12, 14 and 15 were found to be the most potent against one or more cell lines with the IC50 values in the range of 5-10 μM. The obtained results suggested that longer polyamine linker along with aromatic oxime substitution provided the most potent analogue compounds against cancer cell lines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Antimalarial Properties of Simplified Kalihinol Analogues.

    PubMed

    Daub, Mary Elisabeth; Prudhomme, Jacques; Ben Mamoun, Choukri; Le Roch, Karine G; Vanderwal, Christopher D

    2017-03-09

    Several kalihinol natural products, members of the broader isocyanoterpene family of antimalarial agents, are potent inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum, the agent of the most severe form of human malaria. Our previous total synthesis of kalihinol B provided a blueprint to generate many analogues within this family, some as complex as the natural product and some much simplified and easier to access. Each analogue was tested for blood-stage antimalarial activity using both drug-sensitive and -resistant P. falciparum strains. Many considerably simpler analogues of the kalihinols retained potent activity, as did a compound with a different decalin scaffold made in only three steps from sclareolide. Finally, one representative compound showed reasonable stability toward microsomal metabolism, suggesting that the isonitrile functional group that is critical for activity is not an inherent liability in these compounds.

  8. Covalent binding of an NAD+ analogue to horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase in a ternary complex with pyrazole.

    PubMed

    Goulas, P

    1987-10-15

    Examination of the model of the fixation site of the adenosine phosphate part of NAD+ on horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase led us to synthesize a NAD+ analogue N6-[N-(8-amino-3,6-dioxaoctyl)carbamoylmethyl]-NAD+ in order to alkylate the carboxylic acid group of Asp-273 and to convert the normally dissociable coenzyme into a permanently bound prosthetic group. This NAD+ analogue is coupled to the horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase in the ternary complex formed with pyrazole. In these conditions the degree of fixation varies between 0.4 and 0.58 coenzyme molecule/enzyme subunit molecule. The N6-[N-(8-amino-3,6-dioxaoctyl)carbamoylmethyl]NAD+ acts as a true prosthetic group which can be reduced and reoxidized by a coupled substrate reaction and the internal activity of this holoenzyme corresponds to the amount of analogue incorporated.

  9. Synthesis and κ-Opioid Receptor Activity of Furan-Substituted Salvinorin A Analogues

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The neoclerodane diterpene salvinorin A, found in the leaves of Salvia divinorum, is a potent κ-opioid receptor agonist, making it an attractive scaffold for development into a treatment for substance abuse. Although several successful semisynthetic studies have been performed to elucidate structure–activity relationships, the lack of analogues with substitutions to the furan ring of salvinorin A has prevented a thorough understanding of its role in binding to the κ-opioid receptor. Herein we report the synthesis of several salvinorin A derivatives with modified furan rings. Evaluation of these compounds in a functional assay indicated that sterically less demanding substitutions are preferred, suggesting the furan ring is bound in a congested portion of the binding pocket. The most potent of the analogues successfully reduced drug-seeking behavior in an animal model of drug-relapse without producing the sedation observed with other κ-opioid agonists. PMID:25426797

  10. Synthesis and κ-opioid receptor activity of furan-substituted salvinorin A analogues.

    PubMed

    Riley, Andrew P; Groer, Chad E; Young, David; Ewald, Amy W; Kivell, Bronwyn M; Prisinzano, Thomas E

    2014-12-26

    The neoclerodane diterpene salvinorin A, found in the leaves of Salvia divinorum, is a potent κ-opioid receptor agonist, making it an attractive scaffold for development into a treatment for substance abuse. Although several successful semisynthetic studies have been performed to elucidate structure-activity relationships, the lack of analogues with substitutions to the furan ring of salvinorin A has prevented a thorough understanding of its role in binding to the κ-opioid receptor. Herein we report the synthesis of several salvinorin A derivatives with modified furan rings. Evaluation of these compounds in a functional assay indicated that sterically less demanding substitutions are preferred, suggesting the furan ring is bound in a congested portion of the binding pocket. The most potent of the analogues successfully reduced drug-seeking behavior in an animal model of drug-relapse without producing the sedation observed with other κ-opioid agonists.

  11. GABAA Receptor Modulation by Etomidate Analogues

    PubMed Central

    Pejo, Ervin; Santer, Peter; Wang, Lei; Dershwitz, Philip; Husain, S. Shaukat; Raines, Douglas E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Etomidate is a highly potent anesthetic agent that is believed to produce hypnosis by enhancing γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor function. We characterized the GABAA receptor and hypnotic potencies of etomidate analogues. We then used computational techniques to build statistical and graphical models that relate the potencies of these etomidate analogues to their structures in order to identify the specific molecular determinants of potency. Methods GABAA receptor potencies were defined with voltage-clamp electrophysiology using α1β3γ2 receptors harboring a channel mutation (α1(L264T)) that enhances anesthetic sensitivity (n = 36 – 60 measurements per concentration-response curve). The hypnotic potencies of etomidate analogues were defined using a loss of righting reflexes assay in Sprague Dawley rats (n = 9 – 21 measurements per dose-response curve). Three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships were determined in silico using comparative molecular field analysis. Results The GABAA receptor and hypnotic potencies of etomidate and the etomidate analogues ranged by 91-fold and 53-fold, respectively. These potency measurements were significantly correlated (r2 = 0.72), but neither measurement correlated with drug hydrophobicity (r2 = 0.019 and 0.005, respectively). Statistically significant and predictive comparative molecular field analysis models were generated and a pharmacophore model was built that revealed both the structural elements in etomidate analogues associated with high potency and the interactions that these elements make with the etomidate binding site. Conclusion There are multiple specific structural elements in etomidate and etomidate analogues that mediate GABAA receptor modulation. Modifying any one element can alter receptor potency by an order of magnitude or more. PMID:26691905

  12. Matrix algorithms for solving (in)homogeneous bound state equations.

    PubMed

    Blank, M; Krassnigg, A

    2011-07-01

    In the functional approach to quantum chromodynamics, the properties of hadronic bound states are accessible via covariant integral equations, e.g. the Bethe-Salpeter equation for mesons. In particular, one has to deal with linear, homogeneous integral equations which, in sophisticated model setups, use numerical representations of the solutions of other integral equations as part of their input. Analogously, inhomogeneous equations can be constructed to obtain off-shell information in addition to bound-state masses and other properties obtained from the covariant analogue to a wave function of the bound state. These can be solved very efficiently using well-known matrix algorithms for eigenvalues (in the homogeneous case) and the solution of linear systems (in the inhomogeneous case). We demonstrate this by solving the homogeneous and inhomogeneous Bethe-Salpeter equations and find, e.g. that for the calculation of the mass spectrum it is as efficient or even advantageous to use the inhomogeneous equation as compared to the homogeneous. This is valuable insight, in particular for the study of baryons in a three-quark setup and more involved systems.

  13. Matrix algorithms for solving (in)homogeneous bound state equations

    PubMed Central

    Blank, M.; Krassnigg, A.

    2011-01-01

    In the functional approach to quantum chromodynamics, the properties of hadronic bound states are accessible via covariant integral equations, e.g. the Bethe–Salpeter equation for mesons. In particular, one has to deal with linear, homogeneous integral equations which, in sophisticated model setups, use numerical representations of the solutions of other integral equations as part of their input. Analogously, inhomogeneous equations can be constructed to obtain off-shell information in addition to bound-state masses and other properties obtained from the covariant analogue to a wave function of the bound state. These can be solved very efficiently using well-known matrix algorithms for eigenvalues (in the homogeneous case) and the solution of linear systems (in the inhomogeneous case). We demonstrate this by solving the homogeneous and inhomogeneous Bethe–Salpeter equations and find, e.g. that for the calculation of the mass spectrum it is as efficient or even advantageous to use the inhomogeneous equation as compared to the homogeneous. This is valuable insight, in particular for the study of baryons in a three-quark setup and more involved systems. PMID:21760640

  14. Insulin analogues: action profiles beyond glycaemic control.

    PubMed

    Eckardt, Kristin; Eckel, Jürgen

    2008-02-01

    A variety of studies have documented significant improvements in the treatment of type 1 and 2 diabetes after the introduction of artificial insulins. This review gives an overview of insulin analogues which are currently approved for therapeutical use. Clinical data regarding the efficiency to control blood glucose level as well as improving HbA1c level in comparison to conventional insulin preparations in type 1 and 2 diabetic patients are summarized. Furthermore, special features of insulin analogues regarding their signalling properties are discussed with focus on the proliferative effects of insulin glargine as well as some recent data of insulin detemir.

  15. Classical Simulated Annealing Using Quantum Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Cour, Brian R.; Troupe, James E.; Mark, Hans M.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we consider the use of certain classical analogues to quantum tunneling behavior to improve the performance of simulated annealing on a discrete spin system of the general Ising form. Specifically, we consider the use of multiple simultaneous spin flips at each annealing step as an analogue to quantum spin coherence as well as modifications of the Boltzmann acceptance probability to mimic quantum tunneling. We find that the use of multiple spin flips can indeed be advantageous under certain annealing schedules, but only for long anneal times.

  16. Reversible Thermoset Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor); Hreha, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of a reversible thermoset adhesive formed by incorporating thermally-reversible cross-linking units and a method for making the reversible thermoset adhesive are provided. One approach to formulating reversible thermoset adhesives includes incorporating dienes, such as furans, and dienophiles, such as maleimides, into a polymer network as reversible covalent cross-links using Diels Alder cross-link formation between the diene and dienophile. The chemical components may be selected based on their compatibility with adhesive chemistry as well as their ability to undergo controlled, reversible cross-linking chemistry.

  17. Biological Evaluation of Double Point Modified Analogues of 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D2 as Potential Anti-Leukemic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Corcoran, Aoife; Nadkarni, Sharmin; Yasuda, Kaori; Sakaki, Toshiyuki; Brown, Geoffrey; Kutner, Andrzej; Marcinkowska, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Structurally similar double-point modified analogues of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D2 (1,25D2) were screened in vitro for their pro-differentiating activity against the promyeloid cell line HL60. Their affinities towards human full length vitamin D receptor (VDR) and metabolic stability against human vitamin D 24-hydroxylase (CYP24A1) were also tested. The analogues (PRI-1730, PRI-1731, PRI-1732, PRI-1733 and PRI-1734) contained 5,6-trans modification of the A-ring and of the triene system, additional hydroxyl or unsaturation at C-22 in the side chain and reversed absolute configuration (24-epi) at C-24 of 1,25D2. As presented in this paper, introduction of selected structural modifications simultaneously in two distinct parts of the vitamin D molecule resulted in a divergent group of analogues. Analogues showed lower VDR affinity in comparison to that of the parent hormones, 1,25D2 and 1,25D3, and they caused effective HL60 cell differentiation only at high concentrations of 100 nM and above. Unexpectedly, introducing of a 5,6-trans modification combined with C-22 hydroxyl and 24-epi configuration switched off entirely the cell differentiation activity of the analogue (PRI-1734). However, this analogue remained a moderate substrate for CYP24A1, as it was metabolized at 22%, compared to 35% for 1,25D2. Other analogues from this series were either less (12% for PRI-1731 and PRI-1733) or more (52% for PRI-1732) resistant to the enzymatic deactivation. Although the inactive analogue PRI-1734 failed to show VDR antagonism, when tested in HL60 cells, its structure might be a good starting point for our design of a vitamin D antagonist. PMID:26840307

  18. Biological Evaluation of Double Point Modified Analogues of 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D₂ as Potential Anti-Leukemic Agents.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Aoife; Nadkarni, Sharmin; Yasuda, Kaori; Sakaki, Toshiyuki; Brown, Geoffrey; Kutner, Andrzej; Marcinkowska, Ewa

    2016-02-01

    Structurally similar double-point modified analogues of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D₂ (1,25D₂) were screened in vitro for their pro-differentiating activity against the promyeloid cell line HL60. Their affinities towards human full length vitamin D receptor (VDR) and metabolic stability against human vitamin D 24-hydroxylase (CYP24A1) were also tested. The analogues (PRI-1730, PRI-1731, PRI-1732, PRI-1733 and PRI-1734) contained 5,6-trans modification of the A-ring and of the triene system, additional hydroxyl or unsaturation at C-22 in the side chain and reversed absolute configuration (24-epi) at C-24 of 1,25D₂. As presented in this paper, introduction of selected structural modifications simultaneously in two distinct parts of the vitamin D molecule resulted in a divergent group of analogues. Analogues showed lower VDR affinity in comparison to that of the parent hormones, 1,25D₂ and 1,25D₃, and they caused effective HL60 cell differentiation only at high concentrations of 100 nM and above. Unexpectedly, introducing of a 5,6-trans modification combined with C-22 hydroxyl and 24-epi configuration switched off entirely the cell differentiation activity of the analogue (PRI-1734). However, this analogue remained a moderate substrate for CYP24A1, as it was metabolized at 22%, compared to 35% for 1,25D₂. Other analogues from this series were either less (12% for PRI-1731 and PRI-1733) or more (52% for PRI-1732) resistant to the enzymatic deactivation. Although the inactive analogue PRI-1734 failed to show VDR antagonism, when tested in HL60 cells, its structure might be a good starting point for our design of a vitamin D antagonist.

  19. Emerging role of riboflavin in the treatment of nucleoside analogue-induced type B lactic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Dalton, S D; Rahimi, A R

    2001-12-01

    Type B lactic acidosis is a rare and often fatal complication seen in patients receiving the nucleotide analogues zidovudine, stavudine, didanosine, and lamivudine. We describe a case of a 51-year-old human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive woman receiving three nucleotide analogues. She presented with nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and hepatic steatosis. Signs of mitochondrial toxicity were demonstrated by diffuse myopathy and pancreatitis. Serum riboflavin levels documented a deficiency that was treated with 50 mg of riboflavin daily. Immediately after treatment, serum blood urea nitrogen level, lactic acid levels, and arterial blood pH all returned to normal values. Her signs of mitochondrial toxicity also improved after treatment with riboflavin. Successful reversal of the patient's type B lactic acidosis after riboflavin therapy suggested that riboflavin deficiency plays a direct role in the development of nucleotide analogue-induced lactic acidosis. It is impossible to predict which patients are predisposed to the development of this syndrome. For this reason, it may be important to screen and treat riboflavin deficiency in patients on nucleoside analogues.

  20. Maximum common subgraph: some upper bound and lower bound results

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiuzhen; Lai, Jing; Jennings, Steven F

    2006-01-01

    Background Structure matching plays an important part in understanding the functional role of biological structures. Bioinformatics assists in this effort by reformulating this process into a problem of finding a maximum common subgraph between graphical representations of these structures. Among the many different variants of the maximum common subgraph problem, the maximum common induced subgraph of two graphs is of special interest. Results Based on current research in the area of parameterized computation, we derive a new lower bound for the exact algorithms of the maximum common induced subgraph of two graphs which is the best currently known. Then we investigate the upper bound and design techniques for approaching this problem, specifically, reducing it to one of finding a maximum clique in the product graph of the two given graphs. Considering the upper bound result, the derived lower bound result is asymptotically tight. Conclusion Parameterized computation is a viable approach with great potential for investigating many applications within bioinformatics, such as the maximum common subgraph problem studied in this paper. With an improved hardness result and the proposed approaches in this paper, future research can be focused on further exploration of efficient approaches for different variants of this problem within the constraints imposed by real applications. PMID:17217524

  1. Modeling agreement on bounded scales.

    PubMed

    Vanbelle, Sophie; Lesaffre, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Agreement is an important concept in medical and behavioral sciences, in particular in clinical decision making where disagreements possibly imply a different patient management. The concordance correlation coefficient is an appropriate measure to quantify agreement between two scorers on a quantitative scale. However, this measure is based on the first two moments, which could poorly summarize the shape of the score distribution on bounded scales. Bounded outcome scores are common in medical and behavioral sciences. Typical examples are scores obtained on visual analog scales and scores derived as the number of positive items on a questionnaire. These kinds of scores often show a non-standard distribution, like a J- or U-shape, questioning the usefulness of the concordance correlation coefficient as agreement measure. The logit-normal distribution has shown to be successful in modeling bounded outcome scores of two types: (1) when the bounded score is a coarsened version of a latent score with a logit-normal distribution on the [0,1] interval and (2) when the bounded score is a proportion with the true probability having a logit-normal distribution. In the present work, a model-based approach, based on a bivariate generalization of the logit-normal distribution, is developed in a Bayesian framework to assess the agreement on bounded scales. This method permits to directly study the impact of predictors on the concordance correlation coefficient and can be simply implemented in standard Bayesian softwares, like JAGS and WinBUGS. The performances of the new method are compared to the classical approach using simulations. Finally, the methodology is used in two different medical domains: cardiology and rheumatology.

  2. Holographic bounds and finite inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Daniel; Scacco, Andrew; Albrecht, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    We compare two holographic arguments that impose especially strong bounds on the amount of inflation. One comes from the de Sitter equilibrium cosmology and the other from the work of Banks and Fischler. We find that simple versions of these two approaches yield the same bound on the number of e-foldings. A careful examination reveals that while these pictures are similar in spirit, they are not necessarily identical prescriptions. We apply the two pictures to specific cosmologies which expose potentially important differences and which also demonstrate ways these seemingly simple proposals can be tricky to implement in practice.

  3. Uncertainty bounds using sector theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R.; Schmidt, David K.

    1989-01-01

    An approach based on sector-stability theory can furnish a description of the uncertainty associated with the frequency response of a model, given sector-bounds on the individual parameters of the model. The application of the sector-based approach to the formulation of useful uncertainty descriptions for linear, time-invariant multivariable systems is presently explored, and the approach is applied to two generic forms of parameter uncertainty in order to investigate its advantages and limitations. The results obtained show that sector-uncertainty bounds can be used to evaluate the impact of parameter uncertainties on the frequency response of the design model.

  4. Multiple magma emplacement and its effect on the superficial deformation: hints from analogue models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanari, Domenico; Bonini, Marco; Corti, Giacomo; del Ventisette, Chiara

    2017-04-01

    To test the effect exerted by multiple magma emplacement on the deformation pattern, we have run analogue models with synchronous, as well as diachronous magma injection from different, aligned inlets. The distance between injection points, as well as the activation in time of injection points was varied for each model. Our model results show how the position and activation in time of injection points (which reproduce multiple magma batches in nature) strongly influence model evolution. In the case of synchronous injection at different inlets, the intrusions and associated surface deformation were elongated. Forced folds and annular bounding reverse faults were quite elliptical, and with the main axis of the elongated dome trending sub-parallel to the direction of the magma input points. Model results also indicate that the injection from multiple aligned sources could reproduce the same features of systems associated with planar feeder dikes, thereby suggesting that caution should be taken when trying to infer the feeding areas on the basis of the deformation features observed at the surface or in seismic profiles. Diachronous injection from different injection points showed that the deformation observed at surface does not necessarily reflect the location and/or geometry of their feeders. Most notably, these experiments suggest that coeval magma injection from different sources favor the lateral migration of magma rather than the vertical growth, promoting the development of laterally interconnected intrusions. Recently, some authors (Magee et al., 2014, 2016; Schofield et al., 2015) have suggested that, based on seismic reflection data analysis, interconnected sills and inclined sheets can facilitate the transport of magma over great vertical distances and laterally for large distances. Intrusions and volcanoes fed by sill complexes may thus be laterally offset significantly from the melt source. Our model results strongly support these findings, by reproducing

  5. SAMHD1 enhances nucleoside-analogue efficacy against HIV-1 in myeloid cells

    PubMed Central

    Ordonez, Paula; Kunzelmann, Simone; Groom, Harriet C. T.; Yap, Melvyn W.; Weising, Simon; Meier, Chris; Bishop, Kate N.; Taylor, Ian A.; Stoye, Jonathan P.

    2017-01-01

    SAMHD1 is an intracellular enzyme that specifically degrades deoxynucleoside triphosphates into component nucleoside and inorganic triphosphate. In myeloid-derived dendritic cells and macrophages as well as resting T-cells, SAMHD1 blocks HIV-1 infection through this dNTP triphosphohydrolase activity by reducing the cellular dNTP pool to a level that cannot support productive reverse transcription. We now show that, in addition to this direct effect on virus replication, manipulating cellular SAMHD1 activity can significantly enhance or decrease the anti-HIV-1 efficacy of nucleotide analogue reverse transcription inhibitors presumably as a result of modulating dNTP pools that compete for recruitment by viral polymerases. Further, a variety of other nucleotide-based analogues, not normally considered antiretrovirals, such as the anti-herpes drugs Aciclovir and Ganciclovir and the anti-cancer drug Clofarabine are now revealed as potent anti-HIV-1 agents, under conditions of low dNTPs. This in turn suggests novel uses for nucleotide analogues to inhibit HIV-1 in differentiated cells low in dNTPs. PMID:28220857

  6. Tubal Ligation Reversal

    MedlinePlus

    ... seal off the fallopian tubes, such as the Essure or Adiana systems, generally aren't reversible. In ... electrocautery). Some types of sterilization, such as the Essure system, are not considered reversible. Even if tubal ...

  7. Species-dependent binding of new synthesized bicalutamide analogues to albumin by optical biosensor analysis.

    PubMed

    Fortugno, Cecilia; van der Gronde, Toon; Varchi, Greta; Guerrini, Andrea; Bertucci, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    The binding of some novel bicalutamide analogues to human serum albumin (HSA) and rat serum albumin (RSA) was investigated by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based optical biosensor technique. The serum protein binding of the bicalutamide analogues was determined and compared to that of the parent compound. Furthermore, HSA and RSA were used as target plasma proteins, in order to highlight possible differences among species when performing pharmacokinetic studies. HSA and RSA were covalently immobilized on carboxymethyl dextran matrixes, using an amine coupling procedure. The anchoring method was validated by determining the dissociation constant (KD) of a standard analyte to confirm that the binding properties of the proteins were maintained. The ranking of the bicalutamide analogues for their HSA and RSA bound fractions was used to compare the behaviour of the two albumins. Most of the bicalutamide analogues showed higher binding levels with respect to the lead compound, (R)-bicalutamide. Further, meaningful differences in the binding level to the two serum proteins were obtained. The dissociation constants (KD) of the interaction between the lead compound, (R)-bicalutamide, and the two proteins were calculated. As a result, the KD obtained with HSA was one order of magnitude higher than that obtained with RSA. The observed differences in the HSA and RSA bonding of the bicalutamide analogues increase the knowledge on the possible low reliability in extrapolating the distribution data obtained on animals to humans. This work demonstrates that SPR based optical biosensor technique is well suited for the medium-high throughput screening of compounds' ligand binding to serum albumins.

  8. Fluorescent Risedronate Analogues Reveal Bisphosphonate Uptake by Bone Marrow Monocytes and Localization Around Osteocytes In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Roelofs, Anke J; Coxon, Fraser P; Ebetino, Frank H; Lundy, Mark W; Henneman, Zachary J; Nancollas, George H; Sun, Shuting; Blazewska, Katarzyna M; Bala, Joy Lynn F; Kashemirov, Boris A; Khalid, Aysha B; McKenna, Charles E; Rogers, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are effective antiresorptive agents owing to their bone-targeting property and ability to inhibit osteoclasts. It remains unclear, however, whether any non-osteoclast cells are directly affected by these drugs in vivo. Two fluorescent risedronate analogues, carboxyfluorescein-labeled risedronate (FAM-RIS) and Alexa Fluor 647–labeled risedronate (AF647-RIS), were used to address this question. Twenty-four hours after injection into 3-month-old mice, fluorescent risedronate analogues were bound to bone surfaces. More detailed analysis revealed labeling of vascular channel walls within cortical bone. Furthermore, fluorescent risedronate analogues were present in osteocytic lacunae in close proximity to vascular channels and localized to the lacunae of newly embedded osteocytes close to the bone surface. Following injection into newborn rabbits, intracellular uptake of fluorescently labeled risedronate was detected in osteoclasts, and the active analogue FAM-RIS caused accumulation of unprenylated Rap1A in these cells. In addition, CD14high bone marrow monocytes showed relatively high levels of uptake of fluorescently labeled risedronate, which correlated with selective accumulation of unprenylated Rap1A in CD14+ cells, as well as osteoclasts, following treatment with risedronate in vivo. Similar results were obtained when either rabbit or human bone marrow cells were treated with fluorescent risedronate analogues in vitro. These findings suggest that the capacity of different cell types to endocytose bisphosphonate is a major determinant for the degree of cellular drug uptake in vitro as well as in vivo. In conclusion, this study shows that in addition to bone-resorbing osteoclasts, bisphosphonates may exert direct effects on bone marrow monocytes in vivo. © 2010 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research PMID:20422624

  9. Development of helix-based vasoactive intestinal peptide analogues: identification of residues required for receptor interaction.

    PubMed

    Musso, G F; Patthi, S; Ryskamp, T C; Provow, S; Kaiser, E T; Veliçelebi, G

    1988-10-18

    Several VIP analogues have been designed on the basis of the hypothesis that the region from residue 6 to residue 28 forms a pi-helical structure when bound to membrane receptors. An empirical approach for the design and construction of analogues based upon distribution frequency and structural homology with several sequence-related peptides is presented. Five peptides were designed, synthesized, and analyzed. One analogue, model 5, containing the native hydrophobic and an altered hydrophilic surface, was an effective VIP agonist in both binding to rat lung membrane receptors (KD1 = 11 +/- 8 pM, KD2 = 6.4 +/- 0.2 nM; VIP KD1 = 21 +/- 13 pM, KD2 = 1.8 +/- 0.6 nM) and stimulation of amylase release from guinea pig pancreatic acini (ED50 = 90 pM; VIP ED50 = 27 pM). The four other analogues were considerably less potent than VIP, yet retained full intrinsic activity. Our results showed that the hydrophobic surface of this helical domain (residues 6-28) contains amino acids important for interaction with receptors, whereas amino acid residues on the hydrophilic surface do not seem to participate strongly in receptor binding or signal transduction. Furthermore, on the basis of high-affinity binding, the stimulation of amylase release in pancreatic acini appears to be coupled to the higher affinity receptors. These results suggest that an approach based on the construction of putative pi-helical structures can be applied to the design of biologically active analogues of VIP. Thus, we have identified several residues within the VIP sequence that are critical for receptor binding using this approach.

  10. Dumb holes: analogues for black holes.

    PubMed

    Unruh, W G

    2008-08-28

    The use of sonic analogues to black and white holes, called dumb or deaf holes, to understand the particle production by black holes is reviewed. The results suggest that the black hole particle production is a low-frequency and low-wavenumber process.

  11. Differential Client Attractiveness in a Counseling Analogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Carl S.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Investigated variations in conceptual complexity level of counselor and client on counselor attraction to the client. Counselor trainees rated attractiveness of clients following two counseling analogue tasks in which the client was depicted as exhibiting high or low conceptual level. More complex clients are more attractive across both levels.…

  12. CO2 Capture with Enzyme Synthetic Analogue

    SciTech Connect

    Cordatos, Harry

    2010-03-01

    Project overview provides background on carbonic anhydrase transport mechanism for CO2 in the human body and proposed approach for ARPA-E project to create a synthetic enzyme analogue and utilize it in a membrane for CO2 capture from flue gas.

  13. Solanapyrone analogues from a Hawaiian fungicolous fungus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Four new solanayrone analogues (solanapyrones J-M; 1-4) have been isolated from an unidentified fungicolous fungus collected in Hawaii. The structures and relative configurations of these compounds were determined by analysis of ID NMR, 2D NMR, and MS data. Solanapyrone J(1) showed antifungal acti...

  14. Analoguing Creativity & Culture: A Method for Metaphors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Timothy N.

    Adding to the benefits of using metaphors as tools, "analoguing" (a method of analysis that focuses on metaphors for meanings in use and meanings of metaphors in use) helps avoid excessive categorization and separation by looking for unities and patterns in phenomena rather than for divisions. Six months of observation of patterns of…

  15. Vasectomy and its reversal.

    PubMed

    Belker, A M

    1985-12-01

    Techniques, results, complications, and medicolegal aspects of vasectomy are discussed in this article. Emphasis is placed on techniques that prevent spontaneous recanalization of the ends of the vas deferens after vasectomy. Factors that affect the reversibility of vasectomy are discussed. New microsurgical techniques of vasectomy reversal are described, and results of these new techniques are compared with results of nonmicrosurgical techniques of vasectomy reversal. Indications for bypass vasoepididymostomy during vasectomy reversal procedures, as well as techniques for performing vasoepididymostomy, are discussed.

  16. Fluorescence-based reversible immunosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issachar, David; Rao, Srivasta V.; Ho, Winston; Kempen, Lothar U.; Wang, Allan Z.; Gasca, Rebecca; Lieberman, Robert A.

    1999-02-01

    All immunosensors currently described in literature are irreversible. Intelligent Optical Systems, Inc. has developed a revolutionary method for producing reversible immunosensors. In this method, the antibody and a labeled analog (structurally and functionally similar to the antigen) are coimmobilized on the sensor surface. Under equilibrium conditions, the labeled analog interacts with immobilized antibody to produce a sensor response. However, in the presence of antigen (analyte), the equilibrium is disturbed as the analyte competes for the binding sites of the immobilized antibody. This produces a measurable sensor response. The equilibrium is shifted back by washing the analyte away with a wash buffer, and the bound analog interacts with the immobilized antibody. Polarization and intensity based measurements are used to design the analog. Photoinduced electron transfer is used to create fluorescent analogs that provide enhancements in fluorescence intensity that can be measured. This principle can be extended to the detection of bacteria.

  17. Reverse Correlation in Neurophysiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringach, Dario; Shapley, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a review of reverse correlation in neurophysiology. We discuss the basis of reverse correlation in linear transducers and in spiking neurons. The application of reverse correlation to measure the receptive fields of visual neurons using white noise and m-sequences, and classical findings about spatial and color processing in…

  18. Successfully Serving the College Bound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hands, Africa S.

    2015-01-01

    Whether they are students taking the traditional path of entering college from high school, or adult first-time or re-entry students, navigating the admissions and financial aid process can be overwhelming for the college bound. Public libraries can help provide information and guidance for a successful start, and this book shows how to do it.…

  19. Pieter Paul Rubens, "Prometheus Bound."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoemaker, Marla K.

    1986-01-01

    Provides a full-color reproduction of Pieter Paul Rubens' painting, "Prometheus Bound," and a lesson plan for using it with students in grades 10 through 12. The goal of the lesson is to introduce students to the techniques of design and execution used by Rubens. (JDH)

  20. Wronskian Method for Bound States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Francisco M.

    2011-01-01

    We propose a simple and straightforward method based on Wronskians for the calculation of bound-state energies and wavefunctions of one-dimensional quantum-mechanical problems. We explicitly discuss the asymptotic behaviour of the wavefunction and show that the allowed energies make the divergent part vanish. As illustrative examples we consider…

  1. Wronskian Method for Bound States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Francisco M.

    2011-01-01

    We propose a simple and straightforward method based on Wronskians for the calculation of bound-state energies and wavefunctions of one-dimensional quantum-mechanical problems. We explicitly discuss the asymptotic behaviour of the wavefunction and show that the allowed energies make the divergent part vanish. As illustrative examples we consider…

  2. Teacher Education in Outward Bound.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Richard A.

    A series of Outward Bound programs and experiences was planned for El Paso County, Colorado, school teachers to increase their awareness of their personal characteristics, especially those that might enhance learning on the part of their students. Part of the planning for the program involved a survey of county high school teachers, counselors,…

  3. Variational Bounds for Creeping Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procházka, Petr

    2010-05-01

    In the paper time dependent variational bounds are derived based on Extended Hashin-Shtrikman variational principles. Direct calculation leads to explicit formulas to be presented in the text. For various mechanical properties easy coding in Excel, say, can be used and verification of accuracy for numerical procedures is available using the derived formulas.

  4. Loosely-Bound Diatomic Molecules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balfour, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses concept of covalent bonding as related to homonuclear diatomic molecules. Article draws attention to the existence of bound rare gas and alkaline earth diatomic molecules. Summarizes their molecular parameters and offers spectroscopic data. Strength and variation with distance of interatomic attractive forces is given. (Author/SA)

  5. Pieter Paul Rubens, "Prometheus Bound."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoemaker, Marla K.

    1986-01-01

    Provides a full-color reproduction of Pieter Paul Rubens' painting, "Prometheus Bound," and a lesson plan for using it with students in grades 10 through 12. The goal of the lesson is to introduce students to the techniques of design and execution used by Rubens. (JDH)

  6. Loosely-Bound Diatomic Molecules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balfour, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses concept of covalent bonding as related to homonuclear diatomic molecules. Article draws attention to the existence of bound rare gas and alkaline earth diatomic molecules. Summarizes their molecular parameters and offers spectroscopic data. Strength and variation with distance of interatomic attractive forces is given. (Author/SA)

  7. Teacher Education in Outward Bound.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Richard A.

    A series of Outward Bound programs and experiences was planned for El Paso County, Colorado, school teachers to increase their awareness of their personal characteristics, especially those that might enhance learning on the part of their students. Part of the planning for the program involved a survey of county high school teachers, counselors,…

  8. [Dmt(1)]DALDA analogues modified with tyrosine analogues at position 1.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yunxin; Lu, Dandan; Chen, Zhen; Ding, Yi; Chung, Nga N; Li, Tingyou; Schiller, Peter W

    2016-08-01

    Analogues of [Dmt(1)]DALDA (H-Dmt-d-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH2; Dmt=2',6'-dimethyltyrosine), a potent μ opioid agonist peptide with mitochondria-targeted antioxidant activity were prepared by replacing Dmt with various 2',6'-dialkylated Tyr analogues, including 2',4',6'-trimethyltyrosine (Tmt), 2'-ethyl-6'-methyltyrosine (Emt), 2'-isopropyl-6'-methyltyrosine (Imt) and 2',6'-diethyltyrosine (Det). All compounds were selective μ opioid agonists and the Tmt(1)-, Emt(1) and Det(1)-analogues showed subnanomolar μ opioid receptor binding affinities. The Tmt(1)- and Emt(1)-analogues showed improved antioxidant activity compared to the Dmt(1)-parent peptide in the DPPH radical-scavenging capacity assay, and thus are of interest as drug candidates for neuropathic pain treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Chicoric acid analogues as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Z; Neamati, N; Zhao, H; Kiryu, Y; Turpin, J A; Aberham, C; Strebel, K; Kohn, K; Witvrouw, M; Pannecouque, C; Debyser, Z; De Clercq, E; Rice, W G; Pommier, Y; Burke, T R

    1999-04-22

    The present study was undertaken to examine structural features of L-chicoric acid (3) which are important for potency against purified HIV-1 integrase and for reported cytoprotective effects in cell-based systems. Through a progressive series of analogues, it was shown that enantiomeric D-chicoric acid (4) retains inhibitory potency against purified integrase equal to its L-counterpart and further that removal of either one or both carboxylic functionalities results in essentially no loss of inhibitory potency. Additionally, while two caffeoyl moieties are required, attachment of caffeoyl groups to the central linking structure can be achieved via amide or mixed amide/ester linkages. More remarkable is the finding that blockage of the catechol functionality through conversion to tetraacetate esters results in almost no loss of potency, contingent on the presence of at least one carboxyl group on the central linker. Taken as a whole, the work has resulted in the identification of new integrase inhibitors which may be regarded as bis-caffeoyl derivatives of glycidic acid and amino acids such as serine and beta-aminoalanine. The present study also examined the reported ability of chicoric acid to exert cytoprotective effects in HIV-infected cells. It was demonstrated in target and cell-based assays that the chicoric acids do not significantly inhibit other targets associated with HIV-1 replication, including reverse transcription, protease function, NCp7 zinc finger function, or replication of virus from latently infected cells. In CEM cells, for both the parent chicoric acid and selected analogues, antiviral activity was observable under specific assay conditions and with high dependence on the multiplicity of viral infection. However, against HIV-1- and HIV-2-infected MT-4 cells, the chicoric acids and their tetraacetylated esters exhibited antiviral activity (50% effective concentration (EC50) ranging from 1.7 to 20 microM and 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50

  10. A novel lunar bed rest analogue.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, Peter R; Rice, Andrea J; Licata, Angelo A; Kuklis, Matthew M; Novotny, Sara C; Genc, Kerim O; Englehaupt, Ricki K; Hanson, Andrea M

    2013-11-01

    Humans will eventually return to the Moon and thus there is a need for a ground-based analogue to enable the study of physiological adaptations to lunar gravity. An important unanswered question is whether or not living on the lunar surface will provide adequate loading of the musculoskeletal system to prevent or attenuate the bone loss that is seen in microgravity. Previous simulations have involved tilting subjects to an approximately 9.5 degrees angle to achieve a lunar gravity component parallel to the long-axis of the body. However, subjects in these earlier simulations were not weight-bearing, and thus these protocols did not provide an analogue for load on the musculoskeletal system. We present a novel analogue which includes the capability to simulate standing and sitting in a lunar loading environment. A bed oriented at a 9.5 degrees angle was mounted on six linear bearings and was free to travel with one degree of freedom along rails. This allowed approximately 1/6 body weight loading of the feet during standing. "Lunar" sitting was also successfully simulated. A feasibility study demonstrated that the analogue was tolerated by subjects for 6 d of continuous bed rest and that the reaction forces at the feet during periods of standing were a reasonable simulation of lunar standing. During the 6 d, mean change in the volume of the quadriceps muscles was -1.6% +/- 1.7%. The proposed analogue would appear to be an acceptable simulation of lunar gravity and deserves further exploration in studies of longer duration.

  11. Titania bound sodium titanate ion exchanger

    DOEpatents

    DeFilippi, Irene C. G.; Yates, Stephen Frederic; Shen, Jian-Kun; Gaita, Romulus; Sedath, Robert Henry; Seminara, Gary Joseph; Straszewski, Michael Peter; Anderson, David Joseph

    1999-03-23

    This invention is method for preparing a titania bound ion exchange composition comprising admixing crystalline sodium titanate and a hydrolyzable titanium compound and, thereafter drying the titania bound crystalline sodium titanate and subjecting the dried titania bound ion exchange composition to optional compaction and calcination steps to improve the physical strength of the titania bound composition.

  12. mRNA cap analogues substituted in the tetraphosphate chain with CX2: identification of O-to-CCl2 as the first bridging modification that confers resistance to decapping without impairing translation

    PubMed Central

    Rydzik, Anna M.; Warminski, Marcin; Sikorski, Pawel J.; Baranowski, Marek R.; Walczak, Sylwia; Kowalska, Joanna; Zuberek, Joanna; Lukaszewicz, Maciej; Nowak, Elzbieta; W. Claridge, Timothy D.; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Nowotny, Marcin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Analogues of the mRNA 5′-cap are useful tools for studying mRNA translation and degradation, with emerging potential applications in novel therapeutic interventions including gene therapy. We report the synthesis of novel mono- and dinucleotide cap analogues containing dihalogenmethylenebisphosphonate moiety (i.e. one of the bridging O atom substituted with CCl2 or CF2) and their properties in the context of cellular translational and decapping machineries, compared to phosphate-unmodified and previously reported CH2-substituted caps. The analogues were bound tightly to eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E), with CCl2-substituted analogues having the highest affinity. When incorporated into mRNA, the CCl2-substituted dinucleotide most efficiently promoted cap-dependent translation. Moreover, the CCl2-analogues were potent inhibitors of translation in rabbit reticulocyte lysate. The crystal structure of eIF4E in complex with the CCl2-analogue revealed a significantly different ligand conformation compared to that of the unmodified cap analogue, which likely contributes to the improved binding. Both CCl2- and CF2- analogues showed lower susceptibility to hydrolysis by the decapping scavenger enzyme (DcpS) and, when incorporated into RNA, conferred stability against major cellular decapping enzyme (Dcp2) to transcripts. Furthermore, the use of difluoromethylene cap analogues was exemplified by the development of 19F NMR assays for DcpS activity and eIF4E binding. PMID:28666355

  13. Entropic uncertainty and measurement reversibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berta, Mario; Wehner, Stephanie; Wilde, Mark M.

    2015-11-01

    The entropic uncertainty relation with quantum side information (EUR-QSI) from [Berta et al., Nat. Phys. 6, 659 (2010)] is a unifying principle relating two distinctive features of quantum mechanics: quantum uncertainty due to measurement incompatibility, and entanglement. In these relations, quantum uncertainty takes the form of preparation uncertainty where one of two incompatible measurements is applied. In particular, the "uncertainty witness" lower bound in the EUR-QSI is not a function of a post-measurement state. An insightful proof of the EUR-QSI from [Coles et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 210405 (2012)] makes use of a fundamental mathematical consequence of the postulates of quantum mechanics known as the non-increase of quantum relative entropy under quantum channels. Here, we exploit this perspective to establish a tightening of the EUR-QSI which adds a new state-dependent term in the lower bound, related to how well one can reverse the action of a quantum measurement. As such, this new term is a direct function of the post-measurement state and can be thought of as quantifying how much disturbance a given measurement causes. Our result thus quantitatively unifies this feature of quantum mechanics with the others mentioned above. We have experimentally tested our theoretical predictions on the IBM Quantum Experience and find reasonable agreement between our predictions and experimental outcomes.

  14. Entropic uncertainty and measurement reversibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berta, Mario; Wehner, Stephanie; Wilde, Mark M.

    2016-07-01

    The entropic uncertainty relation with quantum side information (EUR-QSI) from (Berta et al 2010 Nat. Phys. 6 659) is a unifying principle relating two distinctive features of quantum mechanics: quantum uncertainty due to measurement incompatibility, and entanglement. In these relations, quantum uncertainty takes the form of preparation uncertainty where one of two incompatible measurements is applied. In particular, the ‘uncertainty witness’ lower bound in the EUR-QSI is not a function of a post-measurement state. An insightful proof of the EUR-QSI from (Coles et al 2012 Phys. Rev. Lett. 108 210405) makes use of a fundamental mathematical consequence of the postulates of quantum mechanics known as the non-increase of quantum relative entropy under quantum channels. Here, we exploit this perspective to establish a tightening of the EUR-QSI which adds a new state-dependent term in the lower bound, related to how well one can reverse the action of a quantum measurement. As such, this new term is a direct function of the post-measurement state and can be thought of as quantifying how much disturbance a given measurement causes. Our result thus quantitatively unifies this feature of quantum mechanics with the others mentioned above. We have experimentally tested our theoretical predictions on the IBM quantum experience and find reasonable agreement between our predictions and experimental outcomes.

  15. Aluminofluorides and beryllofluorides as inhibitors of sulphatases. Analogues of hydrogen sulphate?

    PubMed Central

    Roy, A B

    1991-01-01

    The inhibition of fluoride of sulphatase A from ox liver and of the sulphatases of Helix pomatia and Aspergillus oryzae is decreased by EDTA and increased by Al3+ or Be2+, implicating aluminofluorides and beryllofluorides in the reaction. The inhibition, which is reversible, takes several minutes to develop fully and, at least for the sulphatase of H. pomatia, is of a non-linear mixed competitive-non-competitive type. It is suggested that the aluminofluorides and beryllofluorides are acting as analogues of HSO4-. If so, then this behaviour must be considered, as well as their role as analogues of phosphate, in interpreting the effects of these compounds in intact cells. PMID:1953634

  16. Analogue of the quantum Hanle effect and polarization conversion in non-Hermitian plasmonic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Ginzburg, Pavel; Rodríguez-Fortuño, Francisco J; Martínez, Alejandro; Zayats, Anatoly V

    2012-12-12

    The Hanle effect, one of the first manifestations of quantum theory introducing the concept of coherent superposition between pure states, plays a key role in numerous aspects of science varying from applicative spectroscopy to fundamental astrophysical investigations. Optical analogues of quantum effects help to achieve deeper understanding of quantum phenomena and, in turn, to develop cross-disciplinary approaches to realizations of new applications in photonics. Here we show that metallic nanostructures can be designed to exhibit a plasmonic analogue of the quantum Hanle effect and the associated polarization rotation. In the original Hanle effect, time-reversal symmetry is broken by a static magnetic field. We achieve this by introducing dissipative level crossing of localized surface plasmons due to nonuniform losses, designed using a non-Hermitian formulation of quantum mechanics. Such artificial plasmonic "atoms" have been shown to exhibit strong circular birefringence and circular dichroism which depends on the value of loss or gain in the metal-dielectric nanostructure.

  17. [Clinical data I. Clinical experience with tenofovir in combination with nonnucleoside analogue transcriptase inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Bernardino de la Serna, J I; Mora Rillo, M; Arribas López, J R

    2008-06-01

    Highly active antirretroviral therapy has transformed the prognosis of patient infected with human immunodeficiency virus. The efficacy of these drugs has shifted the clinicians; attention to other therapeutic aspects like QD regimens, fixed dose combinations and clinical safety. Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate(TDF) is a nucleoside monophosphate (nucleotide) analogue that inhibits reverse trascriptase enzyme. It's administered in a q.d. regimen and it's recommended by most of the clinical guidelines as a start regimen in combination with two other drugs. Currently more than 5 years of clinical experience is accumulated and confirmed that a combination of tenofovir and a nonnucleoside analogue transcriptase inhibitor is a comfortable, safe, highly effective and low pill burden regimen.

  18. Quantum Operation Time Reversal

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, Gavin E.

    2008-03-25

    The dynamics of an open quantum system can be described by a quantum operation: A linear, complete positive map of operators. Here, I exhibit a compact expression for the time reversal of a quantum operation, which is closely analogous to the time reversal of a classical Markov transition matrix. Since open quantum dynamics are stochastic, and not, in general, deterministic, the time reversal is not, in general, an inversion of the dynamics. Rather, the system relaxes toward equilibrium in both the forward and reverse time directions. The probability of a quantum trajectory and the conjugate, time reversed trajectory are related by the heat exchanged with the environment.

  19. Analogue VLSI for probabilistic networks and spike-time computation.

    PubMed

    Murray, A

    2001-02-01

    The history and some of the methods of analogue neural VLSI are described. The strengths of analogue techniques are described, along with residual problems to be solved. The nature of hardware-friendly and hardware-appropriate algorithms is reviewed and suggestions are offered as to where analogue neural VLSI's future lies.

  20. Tryptophan analogues. 1. Synthesis and antihypertensive activity of positional isomers.

    PubMed

    Safdy, M E; Kurchacova, E; Schut, R N; Vidrio, H; Hong, E

    1982-06-01

    A series of tryptophan analogues having the carboxyl function at the beta-position was synthesized and tested for antihypertensive activity. The 5-methoxy analogue 46 exhibited antihypertensive activity in the rat via the oral route and was much more potent than the normal tryptophan analogue. The methyl ester was found to be a critical structural feature for activity.

  1. Transversely bounded DFB lasers. [bounded distributed-feedback lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C.; Evans, G.; Yeh, C.

    1975-01-01

    Bounded distributed-feedback (DFB) lasers are studied in detail. Threshold gain and field distribution for a number of configurations are derived and analyzed. More specifically, the thin-film guide, fiber, diffusion guide, and hollow channel with inhomogeneous-cladding DFB lasers are considered. Optimum points exist and must be used in DFB laser design. Different-modes feedback and the effects of the transverse boundaries are included. A number of applications are also discussed.

  2. Distribution of unselectively bound ligands along DNA.

    PubMed

    Lando, Dmitri Y; Nechipurenko, Yury D

    2008-10-01

    Unselective and reversible adsorption of ligands on DNA for a model of binding proposed by Zasedatelev, Gursky, and Volkenshtein is considered. In this model, the interaction between neighboring ligands located at the distance of i binding centers is characterized by the statistical weight ai. Each ligand covers L binding centers. For this model, expressions for binding averages are represented in a new simple form. This representation is convenient for the calculation of the fraction of inter-ligand distances of i binding centers fd(i) and the fraction of binding centers included in the distances of i binding centers fbc(i) for various types of interaction between bound ligands. It is shown that, for non-cooperative binding, contact cooperativity and long-range cooperativity, the fraction of the zero inter-ligand distance fd(0) is maximal at any relative concentration of bound ligands (r). Calculations demonstrate that, at low r, fd(0) approximately r.ao, and fd(i) approximately r at 11/r-L, then fd(i) rapidly decreases with i at any r for all types of inter-ligand interaction. At high ligand concentration (r is close to rmax=L(-1)), fd(0) is close to unity and fd(i) rapidly decreases with i for any type of inter-ligand interaction. For strong contact cooperativity, fd(0) is close to unity in a much lager r interval ((0.5-1).rmax), and fd(1) approximately ao(-1) at r approximately 0.5.rmax. In the case of long-range interaction between bound ligands, the dependence fd(i) is more complex and has a maximum at i approximately (1/r-L)1/2 for anti-cooperative binding. fbc(i) is maximal at i approximately 1/r-L for all types of binding except the contact cooperativity. A strong asymmetry in the influence of contact cooperativity and

  3. Boundedness of solutions for reversible system via Moser's twist theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, Daxiong; Li, Wenling

    2008-05-01

    In this paper we consider the problem of the boundedness of all solutions for the reversible system It is shown that all the solutions are bounded provided that the ai(t) (0[less-than-or-equals, slant]i[less-than-or-equals, slant][(n-1)/2]) are of bounded variation in [0,1] and the derivatives of bj(t) and ai(t) are Lipschitzian. It is also shown that there exist ai's being discontinuous everywhere such that all solutions of the equation are bounded. This implies that the continuity of ai's is not necessary for the boundedness of solutions of the equation.

  4. Crystal structure of cutinase covalently inhibited by a triglyceride analogue.

    PubMed Central

    Longhi, S.; Mannesse, M.; Verheij, H. M.; De Haas, G. H.; Egmond, M.; Knoops-Mouthuy, E.; Cambillau, C.

    1997-01-01

    Cutinase from Fusarium solani is a lipolytic enzyme that hydrolyses triglycerides efficiently. All the inhibited forms of lipolytic enzymes described so far are based on the use of small organophosphate and organophosphonate inhibitors, which bear little resemblance to a natural triglyceride substrate. In this article we describe the crystal structure of cutinase covalently inhibited by (R)-1,2-dibutyl-carbamoylglycero-3-O-p-nitrophenylbutyl-phos phonate, a triglyceride analogue mimicking the first tetrahedral intermediate along the reaction pathway. The structure, which has been solved at 2.3 A, reveals that in both the protein molecules of the asymmetric unit the inhibitor is almost completely embedded in the active site crevice. The overall shape of the inhibitor is that of a fork: the two dibutyl-carbamoyl chains point towards the surface of the protein, whereas the butyl chain bound to the phosphorous atom is roughly perpendicular to the sn-1 and sn-2 chains. The sn-3 chain is accommodated in a rather small pocket at the bottom of the active site crevice, thus providing a structural explanation for the preference of cutinase for short acyl chain substrates. PMID:9041628

  5. Novel hydrogel actuator inspired by reversible mussel adhesive protein chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bruce P; Konst, Shari

    2014-06-04

    A novel hydrogel actuator that combines ionoprinting techniques with reversible catechol-metal ion coordination chemistry found in mussel adhesive proteins is developed. Deposited metal ions increase the local crosslinking density, which induces sharp bending of the hydrogel. Reversibly bound metal ions can be removed and reintroduced in a different pattern so that the hydrogel can be reprogrammed to transform into a different 3-dimentional shape. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Upper bound for induced gravitation

    SciTech Connect

    Khuri, N.N.

    1982-08-23

    Given the assumption that G/sub ind.//sup ts-1/ from the Adler-Zee formula is positive, an explicit and rigorous upper bound is derived for it. For pure SU(N) gauge theory, (16..pi..G)/sup -1/< or =(25/12..pi../sup 2/)(N/sup 2/-1) ..lambda../sub N//sup ts2/ is obtained, where ..lambda../sub N/ is the mass scale. In general the bound (16..pi..G)/sup -1/< or =25(..pi../sup 2//144)C/sub psi/..lambda../sup 2/ obtained, where C/sub psi/ is the coefficient of the most singular anomaly contribution in x space, a constant easily determined by low-order perturbation theory for any gauge group.

  7. Secure Key from Bound Entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horodecki, Karol; Horodecki, Michał; Horodecki, Paweł; Oppenheim, Jonathan

    2005-04-01

    We characterize the set of shared quantum states which contain a cryptographically private key. This allows us to recast the theory of privacy as a paradigm closely related to that used in entanglement manipulation. It is shown that one can distill an arbitrarily secure key from bound entangled states. There are also states that have less distillable private keys than the entanglement cost of the state. In general, the amount of distillable key is bounded from above by the relative entropy of entanglement. Relationships between distillability and distinguishability are found for a class of states which have Bell states correlated to separable hiding states. We also describe a technique for finding states exhibiting irreversibility in entanglement distillation.

  8. Lower Bounds on Paraclique Density.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Ronald D; Langston, Michael A; Wang, Kai

    2016-05-11

    The scientific literature teems with clique-centric clustering strategies. In this paper we analyze one such method, the paraclique algorithm. Paraclique has found practical utility in a variety of application domains, and has been successfully employed to reduce the effects of noise. Nevertheless, its formal analysis and worst-case guarantees have remained elusive. We address this issue by deriving a series of lower bounds on paraclique densities.

  9. The eyeglass reversal.

    PubMed

    Oh, Songjoo

    2011-07-01

    Some figures, such as the Necker cube, are spontaneously reversible between alternative percepts. Before learning those skilled reversals, how do people achieve reversals for the very first time? It has been known that, in the case of a first reversal, people can be expected to see the reversal when given specific information about how the figures are ambiguous. This point was confirmed by using drawing versions of reversible figures. To demonstrate how intention plays a role in the initial reversal of a real object, a pair of regular eyeglasses, reversible in perspective, were presented to naïve observers in monocular vision. When the eyeglasses were viewed inwardly and the observers were given information that the eyeglasses could be ambiguous, they were able to easily see the reversal. When the eyeglasses were viewed outwardly, observers saw it only after they had been informed of exactly what the two alternative percepts were.Interestingly, many observers often mistakenly saw the inwardly viewed eyeglasses as placed outwardly from the beginning of the observation, while they saw the outwardly viewed eyeglasses correctly. Taking these results together, for the first reversal of a real object, the specificity of intention varies with the ambiguity of the object.

  10. Information bounds for Gaussian copulas

    PubMed Central

    Hoff, Peter D.; Niu, Xiaoyue; Wellner, Jon A.

    2013-01-01

    Often of primary interest in the analysis of multivariate data are the copula parameters describing the dependence among the variables, rather than the univariate marginal distributions. Since the ranks of a multivariate dataset are invariant to changes in the univariate marginal distributions, rank-based estimators are natural candidates for semiparametric copula estimation. Asymptotic information bounds for such estimators can be obtained from an asymptotic analysis of the rank likelihood, i.e. the probability of the multivariate ranks. In this article, we obtain limiting normal distributions of the rank likelihood for Gaussian copula models. Our results cover models with structured correlation matrices, such as exchangeable or circular correlation models, as well as unstructured correlation matrices. For all Gaussian copula models, the limiting distribution of the rank likelihood ratio is shown to be equal to that of a parametric likelihood ratio for an appropriately chosen multivariate normal model. This implies that the semiparametric information bounds for rank-based estimators are the same as the information bounds for estimators based on the full data, and that the multivariate normal distributions are least favorable. PMID:25313292

  11. A Novel α-Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Analogue Protects Against End-Organ Damage in Experimental Hypertension, Cardiac Hypertrophy, and Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Aubdool, Aisah A; Thakore, Pratish; Argunhan, Fulye; Smillie, Sarah-Jane; Schnelle, Moritz; Srivastava, Salil; Alawi, Khadija M; Wilde, Elena; Mitchell, Jennifer; Farrell-Dillon, Keith; Richards, Daniel A; Maltese, Giuseppe; Siow, Richard C; Nandi, Manasi; Clark, James E; Shah, Ajay M; Sams, Anette; Brain, Susan D

    2017-07-25

    Research into the therapeutic potential of α-calcitonin gene-related peptide (α-CGRP) has been limited because of its peptide nature and short half-life. Here, we evaluate whether a novel potent and long-lasting (t½ ≥7 hours) acylated α-CGRP analogueAnalogue) could alleviate and reverse cardiovascular disease in 2 distinct murine models of hypertension and heart failure in vivo. The ability of the αAnalogue to act selectively via the CGRP pathway was shown in skin by using a CGRP receptor antagonist. The effect of the αAnalogue on angiotensin II-induced hypertension was investigated over 14 days. Blood pressure was measured by radiotelemetry. The ability of the αAnalogue to modulate heart failure was studied in an abdominal aortic constriction model of murine cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure over 5 weeks. Extensive ex vivo analysis was performed via RNA analysis, Western blot, and histology. The angiotensin II-induced hypertension was attenuated by cotreatment with the αAnalogue (50 nmol·kg(-1)·d(-1), SC, at a dose selected for lack of long-term hypotensive effects at baseline). The αAnalogue protected against vascular, renal, and cardiac dysfunction, characterized by reduced hypertrophy and biomarkers of fibrosis, remodeling, inflammation, and oxidative stress. In a separate study, the αAnalogue reversed angiotensin II-induced hypertension and associated vascular and cardiac damage. The αAnalogue was effective over 5 weeks in a murine model of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. It preserved heart function, assessed by echocardiography, while protecting against adverse cardiac remodeling and apoptosis. Moreover, treatment with the αAnalogue was well tolerated with neither signs of desensitization nor behavioral changes. These findings, in 2 distinct models, provide the first evidence for the therapeutic potential of a stabilized αAnalogue, by mediating (1) antihypertensive effects, (2) attenuating cardiac remodeling, and (3) increasing

  12. Synthesis and cytotoxicity properties of amiodarone analogues.

    PubMed

    Bigler, Laurent; Spirli, Carlo; Fiorotto, Romina; Pettenazzo, Andrea; Duner, Elena; Baritussio, Aldo; Follath, Ferenc; Ha, Huy Riem

    2007-06-01

    Amiodarone (AMI) is a potent antiarrhythmic agent; however, its clinical use is limited due to numerous side effects. In order to investigate the structure--cytotoxicity relationship, AMI analogues were synthesized, and then, using rabbit alveolar macrophages, were tested for viability and for the ability to interfere with the degradation of surfactant protein A (SP-A) and with the accumulation of an acidotropic dye. Our data revealed that modification of the diethylamino-beta-ethoxy group of the AMI molecule may affect viability, the ability to degrade SP-A and vacuolation differently. In particular, PIPAM (2d), an analogue with a piperidyl moiety, acts toward the cells in a similar manner to AMI, but is less toxic. Thus, it would be possible to reduce the cytotoxicity of AMI by modifying its chemical structure.

  13. Optimization of propafenone analogues as antimalarial leads.

    PubMed

    Lowes, David J; Guiguemde, W Armand; Connelly, Michele C; Zhu, Fangyi; Sigal, Martina S; Clark, Julie A; Lemoff, Andrew S; Derisi, Joseph L; Wilson, Emily B; Guy, R Kiplin

    2011-11-10

    Propafenone, a class Ic antiarrythmic drug, inhibits growth of cultured Plasmodium falciparum. While the drug's potency is significant, further development of propafenone as an antimalarial would require divorcing the antimalarial and cardiac activities as well as improving the pharmacokinetic profile of the drug. A small array of propafenone analogues was designed and synthesized to address the cardiac ion channel and PK liabilities. Testing of this array revealed potent inhibitors of the 3D7 (drug sensitive) and K1 (drug resistant) strains of P. falciparum that possessed significantly reduced ion channel effects and improved metabolic stability. Propafenone analogues are unusual among antimalarial leads in that they are more potent against the multidrug resistant K1 strain of P. falciparum compared to the 3D7 strain.

  14. Antitumoral cyclic peptide analogues of chlamydocin.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, E; Fauchere, J L; Atassi, G; Viallefont, P; Lazaro, R

    1993-01-01

    A series of cyclic tetrapeptides bearing the bioactive alkylating group on an epsilon-amino-lysyl function have been examined for their antitumoral activity on L1210 and P388 murine leukemia cell lines. One analogue belonging to the chlamydocin family and bearing a beta-chloroethylnitrosourea group was found to be potent at inhibiting L1210 cell proliferation and had a higher therapeutic index than the reference compound bis-beta-chloroethylnitrosourea (BCNU) on the in vivo P388-induced leukemia model.

  15. The Brookhaven electron analogue, 1953--1957

    SciTech Connect

    Plotkin, M.

    1991-12-18

    The following topics are discussed on the Brookhaven electron analogue: L.J. Haworth and E.L. VanHorn letters; Original G.K. Green outline for report; General description; Parameter list; Mechanical Assembly; Alignment; Degaussing; Vacuum System; Injection System; The pulsed inflector; RF System; Ferrite Cavity; Pick-up electrodes and preamplifiers; Radio Frequency power amplifier; Lens supply; Controls and Power; and RF acceleration summary.

  16. The Brookhaven electron analogue, 1953--1957

    SciTech Connect

    Plotkin, M.

    1991-12-18

    The following topics are discussed on the Brookhaven electron analogue: L.J. Haworth and E.L. VanHorn letters; Original G.K. Green outline for report; General description; Parameter list; Mechanical Assembly; Alignment; Degaussing; Vacuum System; Injection System; The pulsed inflector; RF System; Ferrite Cavity; Pick-up electrodes and preamplifiers; Radio Frequency power amplifier; Lens supply; Controls and Power; and RF acceleration summary.

  17. Benchmarking analogue models of brittle thrust wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreurs, Guido; Buiter, Susanne J. H.; Boutelier, Jennifer; Burberry, Caroline; Callot, Jean-Paul; Cavozzi, Cristian; Cerca, Mariano; Chen, Jian-Hong; Cristallini, Ernesto; Cruden, Alexander R.; Cruz, Leonardo; Daniel, Jean-Marc; Da Poian, Gabriela; Garcia, Victor H.; Gomes, Caroline J. S.; Grall, Céline; Guillot, Yannick; Guzmán, Cecilia; Hidayah, Triyani Nur; Hilley, George; Klinkmüller, Matthias; Koyi, Hemin A.; Lu, Chia-Yu; Maillot, Bertrand; Meriaux, Catherine; Nilfouroushan, Faramarz; Pan, Chang-Chih; Pillot, Daniel; Portillo, Rodrigo; Rosenau, Matthias; Schellart, Wouter P.; Schlische, Roy W.; Take, Andy; Vendeville, Bruno; Vergnaud, Marine; Vettori, Matteo; Wang, Shih-Hsien; Withjack, Martha O.; Yagupsky, Daniel; Yamada, Yasuhiro

    2016-11-01

    We performed a quantitative comparison of brittle thrust wedge experiments to evaluate the variability among analogue models and to appraise the reproducibility and limits of model interpretation. Fifteen analogue modeling laboratories participated in this benchmark initiative. Each laboratory received a shipment of the same type of quartz and corundum sand and all laboratories adhered to a stringent model building protocol and used the same type of foil to cover base and sidewalls of the sandbox. Sieve structure, sifting height, filling rate, and details on off-scraping of excess sand followed prescribed procedures. Our analogue benchmark shows that even for simple plane-strain experiments with prescribed stringent model construction techniques, quantitative model results show variability, most notably for surface slope, thrust spacing and number of forward and backthrusts. One of the sources of the variability in model results is related to slight variations in how sand is deposited in the sandbox. Small changes in sifting height, sifting rate, and scraping will result in slightly heterogeneous material bulk densities, which will affect the mechanical properties of the sand, and will result in lateral and vertical differences in peak and boundary friction angles, as well as cohesion values once the model is constructed. Initial variations in basal friction are inferred to play the most important role in causing model variability. Our comparison shows that the human factor plays a decisive role, and even when one modeler repeats the same experiment, quantitative model results still show variability. Our observations highlight the limits of up-scaling quantitative analogue model results to nature or for making comparisons with numerical models. The frictional behavior of sand is highly sensitive to small variations in material state or experimental set-up, and hence, it will remain difficult to scale quantitative results such as number of thrusts, thrust spacing

  18. Synthesis of constrained analogues of tryptophan

    PubMed Central

    Negrato, Marco; Abbiati, Giorgio; Dell’Acqua, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Summary A Lewis acid-catalysed diastereoselective [4 + 2] cycloaddition of vinylindoles and methyl 2-acetamidoacrylate, leading to methyl 3-acetamido-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrocarbazole-3-carboxylate derivatives, is described. Treatment of the obtained cycloadducts under hydrolytic conditions results in the preparation of a small library of compounds bearing the free amino acid function at C-3 and pertaining to the class of constrained tryptophan analogues. PMID:26664620

  19. Polyamine analogues targeting epigenetic gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi; Marton, Laurence J; Woster, Patrick M; Casero, Robert A

    2009-11-04

    Over the past three decades the metabolism and functions of the polyamines have been actively pursued as targets for antineoplastic therapy. Interactions between cationic polyamines and negatively charged nucleic acids play a pivotal role in DNA stabilization and RNA processing that may affect gene expression, translation and protein activity. Our growing understanding of the unique roles that the polyamines play in chromatin regulation, and the discovery of novel proteins homologous with specific regulatory enzymes in polyamine metabolism, have led to our interest in exploring chromatin remodelling enzymes as potential therapeutic targets for specific polyamine analogues. One of our initial efforts focused on utilizing the strong affinity that the polyamines have for chromatin to create a backbone structure, which could be combined with active-site-directed inhibitor moieties of HDACs (histone deacetylases). Specific PAHAs (polyaminohydroxamic acids) and PABAs (polyaminobenzamides) polyamine analogues have demonstrated potent inhibition of the HDACs, re-expression of p21 and significant inhibition of tumour growth. A second means of targeting the chromatin-remodelling enzymes with polyamine analogues was facilitated by the recent identification of flavin-dependent LSD1 (lysine-specific demethylase 1). The existence of this enzyme demonstrated that histone lysine methylation is a dynamic process similar to other histone post-translational modifications. LSD1 specifically catalyses demethylation of mono- and di-methyl Lys4 of histone 3, key positive chromatin marks associated with transcriptional activation. Structural and catalytic similarities between LSD1 and polyamine oxidases facilitated the identification of biguanide, bisguanidine and oligoamine polyamine analogues that are potent inhibitors of LSD1. Cellular inhibition of LSD1 by these unique compounds led to the re-activation of multiple epigenetically silenced genes important in tumorigenesis. The use of

  20. Transversion-specific purine analogue mutagens and the mechanism of hydroxylaminopurine mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Murray, V

    1987-04-01

    The tryptophan synthetase gene A series of mutants in E. coli has been used to examine the mutational specificity of over 80 purine base analogues. 4 purine analogues have been discovered that solely cause transversions. Evidence is presented that hydroxylaminopurine mutagenesis is caused by a covalent reaction of these compounds with DNA. The transversion-causing purine analogues are derivatives of 2-aminopurine (2AP) and 2,6-diaminopurine (2,6DAP). They stimulate the full reversion frequency of those trp A which can revert through an AT----CG transversion. 8 purine base analogues have been found that induce the AT----CG transversion at the trp A88 site; and 2-amino-6-methylaminopurine (2A6MAP) stimulates by 124-fold, 2-amino-6-ethylaminopurine by 20-fold, 2-methylaminopurine (2MAP) by 9.4-fold, 2,6-bismethylaminopurine by 25-fold, 2AP by 230-fold, 2,6DAP by 15-fold, 2.6-diaminopurine riboside by 5-fold, and 2-hydroxylaminopurine by 11-fold. The last 4 analogues also cause transitions. 2A6MAP, 2-amino-6-ethylaminopurine and 2,6-bismethylaminopurine stimulate only the AT----CG transversion while 2MAP additionally gives rise to AT----TA transversions. By testing other negative 2AP derivatives, the structural requirements necessary for AT----CG transversion mutagenesis have been determined. All 12 hydroxylaminopurine base analogues tested, 2,6-dimethoxyaminopurine and 2-hydrazinopurine were found to cause transition mutations. All of the compounds stimulated the AT----GC transition (by up to 1000-fold) and 11 of the 14 base analogues raised the GT----AT transition (by up to 450-fold). On increasing the hydroxylaminopurine concentration, the mutation frequency also increased concomitantly. Since 6-hydroxylamino-9-methylpurine and 6-methylhydroxylaminopurine cause transitions, the mechanism of hydroxylaminopurine mutagenesis cannot be entirely due to an alteration in tautomeric equilibria or "wobble" type base mispairing. It is proposed that a major mechanism for

  1. Blood Loss Estimation Using Gauze Visual Analogue

    PubMed Central

    Ali Algadiem, Emran; Aleisa, Abdulmohsen Ali; Alsubaie, Huda Ibrahim; Buhlaiqah, Noora Radhi; Algadeeb, Jihad Bagir; Alsneini, Hussain Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background Estimating intraoperative blood loss can be a difficult task, especially when blood is mostly absorbed by gauze. In this study, we have provided an improved method for estimating blood absorbed by gauze. Objectives To develop a guide to estimate blood absorbed by surgical gauze. Materials and Methods A clinical experiment was conducted using aspirated blood and common surgical gauze to create a realistic amount of absorbed blood in the gauze. Different percentages of staining were photographed to create an analogue for the amount of blood absorbed by the gauze. Results A visual analogue scale was created to aid the estimation of blood absorbed by the gauze. The absorptive capacity of different gauze sizes was determined when the gauze was dripping with blood. The amount of reduction in absorption was also determined when the gauze was wetted with normal saline before use. Conclusions The use of a visual analogue may increase the accuracy of blood loss estimation and decrease the consequences related to over or underestimation of blood loss. PMID:27626017

  2. Thymidine analogues for tracking DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, Brenton L; Walker, Tom; Norazit, Anwar; Meedeniya, Adrian C B

    2011-09-15

    Replicating cells undergo DNA synthesis in the highly regulated, S-phase of the cell cycle. Analogues of the pyrimidine deoxynucleoside thymidine may be inserted into replicating DNA, effectively tagging dividing cells allowing their characterisation. Tritiated thymidine, targeted using autoradiography was technically demanding and superseded by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and related halogenated analogues, detected using antibodies. Their detection required the denaturation of DNA, often constraining the outcome of investigations. Despite these limitations BrdU alone has been used to target newly synthesised DNA in over 20,000 reviewed biomedical studies. A recent breakthrough in "tagging DNA synthesis" is the thymidine analogue 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU). The alkyne group in EdU is readily detected using a fluorescent azide probe and copper catalysis using 'Huisgen's reaction' (1,3-dipolar cycloaddition or 'click chemistry'). This rapid, two-step biolabelling approach allows the tagging and imaging of DNA within cells whilst preserving the structural and molecular integrity of the cells. The bio-orthogonal detection of EdU allows its application in more experimental assays than previously possible with other "unnatural bases". These include physiological, anatomical and molecular biological experimentation in multiple fields including, stem cell research, cancer biology, and parasitology. The full potential of EdU and related molecules in biomedical research remains to be explored.

  3. Reversible logic for supercomputing.

    SciTech Connect

    DeBenedictis, Erik P.

    2005-05-01

    This paper is about making reversible logic a reality for supercomputing. Reversible logic offers a way to exceed certain basic limits on the performance of computers, yet a powerful case will have to be made to justify its substantial development expense. This paper explores the limits of current, irreversible logic for supercomputers, thus forming a threshold above which reversible logic is the only solution. Problems above this threshold are discussed, with the science and mitigation of global warming being discussed in detail. To further develop the idea of using reversible logic in supercomputing, a design for a 1 Zettaflops supercomputer as required for addressing global climate warming is presented. However, to create such a design requires deviations from the mainstream of both the software for climate simulation and research directions of reversible logic. These deviations provide direction on how to make reversible logic practical.

  4. Perspective: reverse evolution.

    PubMed

    Teotónio, H; Rose, M R

    2001-04-01

    For some time, the reversibility of evolution was primarily discussed in terms of comparative patterns. Only recently has this problem been studied using experimental evolution over shorter evolutionary time frames. This has raised questions of definition, experimental procedure, and the hypotheses being tested. Experimental evolution has provided evidence for multiple population genetic mechanisms in reverse evolution, including pleiotropy and mutation accumulation. It has also pointed to genetic factors that might prevent reverse evolution, such as a lack of genetic variability, epistasis, and differential genotype-by-environment interactions. The main focus of this perspective is on laboratory studies and their relevance to the genetics of reverse evolution. We discuss reverse evolution experiments with Drosophila, bacterial, and viral populations. Field studies of the reverse evolution of melanism in the peppered moth are also reviewed.

  5. HIV-1 Reverse Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei-Shau; Hughes, Stephen H.

    2012-01-01

    Reverse transcription and integration are the defining features of the Retroviridae; the common name “retrovirus” derives from the fact that these viruses use a virally encoded enzyme, reverse transcriptase (RT), to convert their RNA genomes into DNA. Reverse transcription is an essential step in retroviral replication. This article presents an overview of reverse transcription, briefly describes the structure and function of RT, provides an introduction to some of the cellular and viral factors that can affect reverse transcription, and discusses fidelity and recombination, two processes in which reverse transcription plays an important role. In keeping with the theme of the collection, the emphasis is on HIV-1 and HIV-1 RT. PMID:23028129

  6. Lower bound for quantum phase estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Bessen, Arvid J.

    2005-04-01

    We obtain a query lower bound for quantum algorithms solving the phase estimation problem. Our analysis generalizes existing lower-bound approaches to the case where the oracle Q is given by controlled powers Q{sup p} of Q, as it is, for example, in Shor's order-finding algorithm. In this setting we will prove a {omega}(log 1/{epsilon}) lower bound for the number of applications of Q{sup p{sub 1}}, Q{sup p{sub 2}},.... This bound is tight due to a matching upper bound. We obtain the lower bound using a technique based on frequency analysis.

  7. Lower bounds for randomized Exclusive Write PRAMs

    SciTech Connect

    MacKenzie, P.D.

    1995-05-02

    In this paper we study the question: How useful is randomization in speeding up Exclusive Write PRAM computations? Our results give further evidence that randomization is of limited use in these types of computations. First we examine a compaction problem on both the CREW and EREW PRAM models, and we present randomized lower bounds which match the best deterministic lower bounds known. (For the CREW PRAM model, the lower bound is asymptotically optimal.) These are the first non-trivial randomized lower bounds known for the compaction problem on these models. We show that our lower bounds also apply to the problem of approximate compaction. Next we examine the problem of computing boolean functions on the CREW PRAM model, and we present a randomized lower bound, which improves on the previous best randomized lower bound for many boolean functions, including the OR function. (The previous lower bounds for these functions were asymptotically optimal, but we improve the constant multiplicative factor.) We also give an alternate proof for the randomized lower bound on PARITY, which was already optimal to within a constant additive factor. Lastly, we give a randomized lower bound for integer merging on an EREW PRAM which matches the best deterministic lower bound known. In all our proofs, we use the Random Adversary method, which has previously only been used for proving lower bounds on models with Concurrent Write capabilities. Thus this paper also serves to illustrate the power and generality of this method for proving parallel randomized lower bounds.

  8. Reverse Core Engine with Thrust Reverser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suciu, Gabriel L. (Inventor); Chandler, Jesse M. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An engine system has a gas generator, a bi-fi wall surrounding at least a portion of the gas generator, a casing surrounding a fan, and the casing having first and second thrust reverser doors which in a deployed position abut each other and the bi-fi wall.

  9. Nontoxic piperamides and their synthetic analogues as novel antifouling reagents.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiang-Zhong; Xu, Ying; Zhang, Yi-Fan; Zhang, Yu; Wong, Yue Him; Han, Zhuang; Yin, Yan; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Bioassay-guided isolation of an acetone extract from a terrestrial plant Piper betle produced four known piperamides with potent antifouling (AF) activities, as evidenced by inhibition of settlement of barnacle cypris larvae. The AF activities of the four piperamides and 15 synthesized analogues were compared and their structure-activity relationships were probed. Among the compounds, piperoleine B and 1-[1-oxo-7-(3',4'-methylenedioxyphenyl)-6E-heptenyl]-piperidine (MPHP) showed strong activity against settlement of cyprids of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite, having EC50 values of 1.1 ± 0.3 and 0.5 ± 0.2 μg ml(-1), respectively. No toxicity against zebra fish was observed following incubation with these two compounds. Besides being non-toxic, 91% of piperoleine B-treated cyprids and 84% of MPHP-treated cyprids at a concentration of 100 μM completed normal metamorphosis in recovery bioassays, indicating that the anti-settlement effect of these two compounds was reversible. Hydrolysis and photolysis experiments indicated that MPHP could be decomposed in the marine environment. It is concluded that piperamides are promising compounds for use in marine AF coatings.

  10. Muscarinic receptor subtype selectivity of novel heterocyclic QNB analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgold, J.; Cohen, V.I.; Paek, R.; Reba, R.C. )

    1991-01-01

    In an effort at synthesizing centrally-active subtype-selective antimuscarinic agents, the authors derivatized QNB (quinuclidinyl benzilate), a potent muscarinic antagonist, by replacing one of the phenyl groups with less lipophilic heterocyclic moieties. The displacement of ({sup 3}H)-N-methyl scopolamine binding by these novel compounds to membranes from cells expressing ml - m4 receptor subtypes was determined. Most of the novel 4-bromo-QNB analogues were potent and slightly selective for ml receptors. The 2-thienyl derivative was the most potent, exhibiting a 2-fold greater potency than BrQNB at ml receptors, and a 4-fold greater potency than BrQNB at ml receptors, and a 4-fold greater potency at m2 receptors. This compound was also considerably less lipophilic than BrQNB as determined from its retention time on C18 reverse phase HPLC. This compound may therefore be useful both for pharmacological studies and as a candidate for a radioiodinated SPECT imaging agent for ml muscarinic receptors in human brain.

  11. Hydrogen adsorption in thin films of Prussian blue analogue

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Dali; Ding, Vivian; Luo, Junhua; Currier, Robert P; Obrey, Steve; Zhao, Yusheng

    2008-01-01

    Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) measurement was used to investigate the kinetics of the molecular hydrogen adsorption into thin films of prussian blue analogues - Cu{sub 3}[Co(CN){sub 6}]{sub 2} at ambient conditions. Although the equilibrium adsorption seems to be independent of the thickness, the adsorption rate substantially decreases with the thickness of the films. In addition, the reversibility of H{sub 2} adsorption into the Cu{sub 3}[Co(CN){sub 6}]{sub 2} films was investigated. The results indicate that the Cu{sub 3}[Co(CN){sub 6}]{sub 2} maily interacts with H{sub 2} molecules physically. The highest H{sub 2} uptake by the Cu{sub 3}[Co(CN){sub 6}]{sub 2} films is obtained when the gas phase is stagnant inside the testing cell. However, the unusual high H{sub 2} uptake obtained from the QCM-D measurement makes us question how reliable this analytic methodology is.

  12. Stabilised 111In-labelled DTPA- and DOTA-conjugated neurotensin analogues for imaging and therapy of exocrine pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    de Visser, M; Janssen, P J J M; Srinivasan, A; Reubi, J C; Waser, B; Erion, J L; Schmidt, M A; Krenning, E P; de Jong, M

    2003-08-01

    Neurotensin (NT) receptors are overexpressed in exocrine pancreatic cancer and Ewing's sarcoma. The potential utility of native NT in cancer diagnosis and therapy is, however, limited by its rapid degradation in vivo. Therefore, NT analogues were synthesised with modified lysine and arginine derivatives to enhance stability and coupled either to DTPA, to enable high specific activity labelling with indium-111 for imaging, or to DOTA, to enable high specific activity labelling with beta-emitting radionuclides, such as lutetium-177 and yttrium-90. Based on serum stability (4 h incubation at 37 degrees C in human serum) and receptor binding affinity, the five most promising analogues were selected and further evaluated in in vitro internalisation studies in human colorectal adenocarcinoma HT29 cells, which overexpress NT receptors. All five NT analogues bound with high affinity to NT receptors on human exocrine pancreatic tumour sections. The analogues could be labelled with (111)In to a high specific activity. The (111)In-labelled compounds were found to be very stable in serum. Incubation of HT29 cells with the (111)In-labelled analogues at 37 degrees C showed rapid receptor-mediated uptake and internalisation. The most promising analogue, peptide 2530 [DTPA-(Pip)Gly-Pro-(PipAm)Gly-Arg-Pro-Tyr-tBuGly-Leu-OH] was further tested in vivo in a biodistribution study using HT29 tumour-bearing nude mice. The results of this study showed low percentages of injected dose per gram tissue of this (111)In-labelled 2530 analogue in receptor-negative organs like blood, spleen, pancreas, liver, muscle and femur. Good uptake was found in the receptor-positive HT29 tumour and high uptake was present in the kidneys. Co-injection of excess unlabelled NT significantly reduced tumour uptake, showing that tumour uptake is a receptor-mediated process. With their enhanced stability, maintained high receptor affinity and rapid receptor-mediated internalisation, the (111)In-labelled DTPA

  13. Climatic Forecasting of Net Infiltration at Yucca Montain Using Analogue Meteororological Data

    SciTech Connect

    B. Faybishenko

    2006-09-11

    At Yucca Mountain, Nevada, future changes in climatic conditions will most likely alter net infiltration, or the drainage below the bottom of the evapotranspiration zone within the soil profile or flow across the interface between soil and the densely welded part of the Tiva Canyon Tuff. The objectives of this paper are to: (a) develop a semi-empirical model and forecast average net infiltration rates, using the limited meteorological data from analogue meteorological stations, for interglacial (present day), and future monsoon, glacial transition, and glacial climates over the Yucca Mountain region, and (b) corroborate the computed net-infiltration rates by comparing them with the empirically and numerically determined groundwater recharge and percolation rates through the unsaturated zone from published data. In this paper, the author presents an approach for calculations of net infiltration, aridity, and precipitation-effectiveness indices, using a modified Budyko's water-balance model, with reference-surface potential evapotranspiration determined from the radiation-based Penman (1948) formula. Results of calculations show that net infiltration rates are expected to generally increase from the present-day climate to monsoon climate, to glacial transition climate, and then to the glacial climate. The forecasting results indicate the overlap between the ranges of net infiltration for different climates. For example, the mean glacial net-infiltration rate corresponds to the upper-bound glacial transition net infiltration, and the lower-bound glacial net infiltration corresponds to the glacial transition mean net infiltration. Forecasting of net infiltration for different climate states is subject to numerous uncertainties-associated with selecting climate analogue sites, using relatively short analogue meteorological records, neglecting the effects of vegetation and surface runoff and runon on a local scale, as well as possible anthropogenic climate changes.

  14. Synthesis and biological assay of erlotinib analogues and BSA-conjugated erlotinib analogue.

    PubMed

    Boobalan, Ramalingam; Liu, Kuang-Kai; Chao, Jui-I; Chen, Chinpiao

    2017-04-15

    A series of erlotinib analogues that have structural modification at 6,7-alkoxyl positions is efficiently synthesized. The in vitro anti-tumor activity of synthesized compounds is studied in two non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines (A549 and H1975). Among the synthesized compounds, the iodo compound 6 (ETN-6) exhibits higher anti-cancer activity compared to erlotinib. An efficient method is developed for the conjugation of erlotinib analogue-4, alcohol compound, with protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA), via succinic acid linker. The in vitro anti-tumor activity of the protein attached erlotinib analogue, 8 (ETN-4-Suc-BSA), showed stronger inhibitory activity in both A549 and H1975 NSCLC cell lines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Dissipation Bound for Thermodynamic Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machta, Benjamin B.

    2015-12-01

    Biological and engineered systems operate by coupling function to the transfer of heat and/or particles down a thermal or chemical gradient. In idealized deterministically driven systems, thermodynamic control can be exerted reversibly, with no entropy production, as long as the rate of the protocol is made slow compared to the equilibration time of the system. Here we consider fully realizable, entropically driven systems where the control parameters themselves obey rules that are reversible and that acquire directionality in time solely through dissipation. We show that when such a system moves in a directed way through thermodynamic space, it must produce entropy that is on average larger than its generalized displacement as measured by the Fisher information metric. This distance measure is subextensive but cannot be made small by slowing the rate of the protocol.

  16. A new upper bound of geometric constant [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    Li, Jin Huan; Ling, Bo; Liu, San Yang

    2017-01-01

    A new constant [Formula: see text] is introduced into any real [Formula: see text]-dimensional symmetric normed space X. By virtue of this constant, an upper bound of the geometric constant [Formula: see text], which is used to measure the difference between Birkhoff orthogonality and isosceles orthogonality, is obtained and further extended to an arbitrary m-dimensional symmetric normed linear space ([Formula: see text]). As an application, the result is used to prove a special case for the reverse Hölder inequality.

  17. Bound Anionic States of Aadenine

    SciTech Connect

    Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S.; Li, Xiang; Bowen, Kit H.

    2007-03-20

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Anionic states of nucleic acid bases are involved in DNA damage by low-energy electrons and in charge transfer through DNA. Previous gas phase studies of free, unsolvated nucleic acid base parent anions probed only dipole-bound states, which are not present in condensed phase environments, but did not observe valence anionic states, which for purine bases are thought to be adiabatically unbound. Contrary to this expectation,wehave demonstrated that some thus far ignored tautomers of adenine, which result from enamine-imine transformations, support valence anionic states with electron vertical detachment energies as large as 2.2 eV, and at least one of these anionic tautomers is adiabatically bound. Moreover, we predict that the new anionic tautomers should also dominate in solutions and should be characterized by larger values of electron vertical detachment energy than the canonical valence anion. All of the newfound anionic tautomers might be formed in the course of dissociative electron attachment followed by a hydrogen atom attachment to a carbon atom, and they might affect the structure and properties of DNA and RNA exposed to low-energy electrons. The new valence states observed here, unlike the dipole-bound state, could exist in condensed phases and might be relevant to radiobiological damage. The discovery of these valence anionic states of adenine was facilitated by the development of (i) an experimental method for preparing parent anions of nucleic acid bases for photoelectron experiments, and (ii) a combinatorial/quantum chemical approach for identification of the most stable tautomers of organic molecules.

  18. Bound Anionic States of Adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S.; Li, Xiang; Bowen, Kit H.

    2007-03-20

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Anionic states of nucleic acid bases are involved in DNA damage by low-energy electrons and in charge transfer through DNA. Previous gas phase studies of free, unsolvated nucleic acid base parent anions probed only dipole-bound states, which are not present in condensed phase environments, but did not observe valence anionic states, which for purine bases are thought to be adiabatically unbound. Contrary to this expectation, we have demonstrated that some thus far ignored tautomers of adenine, which result from enamine-imine transformations, support valence anionic states with electron vertical detachment energies as large as 2.2 eV, and at least one of these anionic tautomers is adiabatically bound. Moreover, we predict that the new anionic tautomers should also dominate in solutions and should be characterized by larger values of electron vertical detachment energy than the canonical valence anion. All of the newfound anionic tautomers might be formed in the course of dissociative electron attachment followed by a hydrogen atom attachment to a carbon atom, and they might affect the structure and properties of DNA and RNA exposed to low-energy electrons. The new valence states observed here, unlike the dipole-bound state, could exist in condensed phases and might be relevant to radiobiological damage. The discovery of these valence anionic states of adenine was facilitated by the development of (i) an experimental method for preparing parent anions of nucleic acid bases for photoelectron experiments, and (it) a combinatorial/quantum chemical approach for identification of the most stable tautomers of organic molecules.

  19. Error bounds in cascading regressions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karlinger, M.R.; Troutman, B.M.

    1985-01-01

    Cascading regressions is a technique for predicting a value of a dependent variable when no paired measurements exist to perform a standard regression analysis. Biases in coefficients of a cascaded-regression line as well as error variance of points about the line are functions of the correlation coefficient between dependent and independent variables. Although this correlation cannot be computed because of the lack of paired data, bounds can be placed on errors through the required properties of the correlation coefficient. The potential meansquared error of a cascaded-regression prediction can be large, as illustrated through an example using geomorphologic data. ?? 1985 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

  20. Voronoi Diagrams Without Bounding Boxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, E. T. K.

    2015-10-01

    We present a technique for presenting geographic data in Voronoi diagrams without having to specify a bounding box. The method restricts Voronoi cells to points within a user-defined distance of the data points. The mathematical foundation of the approach is presented as well. The cell clipping method is particularly useful for presenting geographic data that is spread in an irregular way over a map, as for example the Dutch dialect data displayed in Figure 2. The automatic generation of reasonable cell boundaries also makes redundant a frequently used solution to this problem that requires data owners to specify region boundaries, as in Goebl (2010) and Nerbonne et al (2011).

  1. Quantum secret sharing schemes and reversibility of quantum operations

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Akira; Iwamoto, Mitsugu; Yamamoto, Hirosuke

    2005-09-15

    Quantum secret sharing schemes encrypting a quantum state into a multipartite entangled state are treated. The lower bound on the dimension of each share given by Gottesman [Phys. Rev. A 61, 042311 (2000)] is revisited based on a relation between the reversibility of quantum operations and the Holevo information. We also propose a threshold ramp quantum secret sharing scheme and evaluate its coding efficiency.

  2. Bounds on multipartite concurrence and tangle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Li, Ming; Li, Hongfang; Fei, Shao-Ming; Li-Jost, Xianqing

    2016-10-01

    We present an analytical lower bound of multipartite concurrence based on the generalized Bloch representations of density matrices. It is shown that the lower bound can be used as an effective entanglement witness of genuine multipartite entanglement. Tight lower and upper bounds for multipartite tangles are also derived. Since the lower bounds depend on just part of the correlation tensors, the result is experimentally feasible.

  3. Finite Element Output Bounds for Hyperbolic Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Machiels, L.

    2000-03-27

    We propose a Neumann-subproblem a posteriori finite element error bound technique for linear stationary scalar advection problems. The method is similar in many respects to the previous output bound technique developed for elliptic problems. In the new approach, however, the primal residual is enhanced with a streamline diffusion term. We first formulate the bound algorithm, with particular emphasis on the proof of the bounding properties; then, we provide numerical results for an illustrative example.

  4. Characterizing analogue caldera collapse with computerized X-ray micro-tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppe, Sam; Holohan, Eoghan; Boone, Matthieu; Pauwels, Elin; Cnudde, Veerle; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2013-04-01

    Analogue models in the past mainly explored caldera collapse structures by documenting 2D model cross-sections. Kinematic aspects and 3D structures of caldera collapse are less well understood, although they are essential to interpret recent field and monitoring data. We applied high resolution radiography and computerized X-ray micro-tomography (µCT) to image the deformation during analogue fluid withdrawal in small-scale caldera collapse models. The models test and highlight the possibilities and limitations of µCT-scanning to qualitatively image and quantitatively analyse deformation of analogue volcano-tectonic experiments. High resolution interval radiography sequences document '2.5D' surface and internal model geometry, and subsidence kinematics of a collapsing caldera block into an emptying fluid body in an unprecedented way. During the whole drainage process, all subsidence was bound by caldera ring faults. Subsidence was associated with dilatation of the analogue granular material within the collapsing column. The temporal subsidence rate pattern within the subsiding volume comprised three phases: 1) Upward ring fault propagation, 2) Rapid subsidence with the highest subsidence rates within the uppermost subsiding volume, 3) Relatively slower subsidence rates over the whole column with intermittent subsidence rate acceleration. Such acceleration did almost never affect the whole column. By using radiography sequences it is possible in a non-destructive manner to obtain a continuous observation of fault propagation, down sag mechanisms and the subsequent development of collapse structures. Multi-angle µCT scans of the collapse result allow for a full virtual 3D reconstruction of the model. This leads to an unprecedented 3D view on fault geometries. The developed method is a step towards the quantitative documentation of volcano-tectonic models that would render data interpretations immediately comparable to monitoring data available from recent

  5. Methanocarba Analogues of Purine Nucleosides as Potent and Selective Adenosine Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Ji, Xiao-duo; Li, An-Hu; Melman, Neli; Siddiqui, Maqbool A.; Shin, Kye-Jung; Marquez, Victor E.; Ravi, R. Gnana

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine receptor agonists have cardioprotective, cerebroprotective, and antiinflammatory properties. We report that a carbocyclic modification of the ribose moiety incorporating ring constraints is a general approach for the design of A1 and A3 receptor agonists having favorable pharmacodynamic properties. While simple carbocyclic substitution of adenosine agonists greatly diminishes potency, methanocarba-adenosine analogues have now defined the role of sugar puckering in stabilizing the active adenosine receptor-bound conformation and thereby have allowed identification of a favored isomer. In such analogues a fused cyclopropane moiety constrains the pseudosugar ring of the nucleoside to either a Northern (N) or Southern (S) conformation, as defined in the pseudorotational cycle. In binding assays at A1, A2A, and A3 receptors, (N)-methanocarba-adenosine was of higher affinity than the (S)-analogue, particularly at the human A3 receptor (N/S affinity ratio of 150). (N)-Methanocarba analogues of various N6-substituted adenosine derivatives, including cyclopentyl and 3-iodobenzyl, in which the parent compounds are potent agonists at either A1 or A3 receptors, respectively, were synthesized. The N6-cyclopentyl derivatives were A1 receptor-selective and maintained high efficacy at recombinant human but not rat brain A1 receptors, as indicated by stimulation of binding of [35S]GTP-γ-S. The (N)-methanocarba-N6-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine and its 2-chloro derivative had Ki values of 4.1 and 2.2 nM at A3 receptors, respectively, and were highly selective partial agonists. Partial agonism combined with high functional potency at A3 receptors (EC50 < 1 nM) may produce tissue selectivity. In conclusion, as for P2Y1 receptors, at least three adenosine receptors favor the ribose (N)-conformation. PMID:10841798

  6. Behavior of a fluorescent analogue of calmodulin in living 3T3 cells

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    interacts with intracellular components with a range of affinities. The mobility of LRB-CM in the cytoplasm was sensitive to treatment of the cells with trifluoperazine, which suggests that at least some of the intracellular binding sites are specific for calmodulin in the calcium-bound form. FRAP of LRB-CM in the nuclei of living 3T3 cells indicated that the analogue was highly mobile within the nucleus but entered the nucleus from the cytoplasm much more slowly than fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran of comparable molecular size and much more slowly than predicted from its mobility in cytoplasm. PMID:4044638

  7. Clocked Thrust Reversers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suciu, Gabriel L. (Inventor); Chandler, Jesse M. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An aircraft includes a fuselage including a propulsion system supported within an aft portion. A thrust reverser is mounted proximate to the propulsion system for directing thrust in a direction to slow the aircraft. The thrust reverser directs thrust at an angle relative to a vertical plane to reduce interference on control surfaces and reduce generation of underbody lift.

  8. Reverse Transfer Student Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slark, Julie

    After a preliminary study revealed that 21% of all credit students at Santa Ana College (SAC) had previously attended a four-year institution, a further study was conducted to determine the educational interests and matriculation patterns of these reverse transfer students. A sample of 360 reverse transfer students was selected for interviews,…

  9. Ultrasonic Time Reversal Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Mathias; Montaldo, Gabriel; Tanter, Mickael

    2004-11-01

    For more than ten years, time reversal techniques have been developed in many different fields of applications including detection of defects in solids, underwater acoustics, room acoustics and also ultrasound medical imaging and therapy. The essential property that makes time reversed acoustics possible is that the underlying physical process of wave propagation would be unchanged if time were reversed. In a non dissipative medium, the equations governing the waves guarantee that for every burst of sound that diverges from a source there exists in theory a set of waves that would precisely retrace the path of the sound back to the source. If the source is pointlike, this allows focusing back on the source whatever the medium complexity. For this reason, time reversal represents a very powerful adaptive focusing technique for complex media. The generation of this reconverging wave can be achieved by using Time Reversal Mirrors (TRM). It is made of arrays of ultrasonic reversible piezoelectric transducers that can record the wavefield coming from the sources and send back its time-reversed version in the medium. It relies on the use of fully programmable multi-channel electronics. In this paper we present some applications of iterative time reversal mirrors to target detection in medical applications.

  10. Reversibility and energy dissipation in adiabatic superconductor logic.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Naoki; Yamanashi, Yuki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2017-03-06

    Reversible computing is considered to be a key technology to achieve an extremely high energy efficiency in future computers. In this study, we investigated the relationship between reversibility and energy dissipation in adiabatic superconductor logic. We analyzed the evolution of phase differences of Josephson junctions in the reversible quantum-flux-parametron (RQFP) gate and confirmed that the phase differences can change time reversibly, which indicates that the RQFP gate is physically, as well as logically, reversible. We calculated energy dissipation required for the RQFP gate to perform a logic operation and numerically demonstrated that the energy dissipation can fall below the thermal limit, or the Landauer bound, by lowering operation frequencies. We also investigated the 1-bit-erasure gate as a logically irreversible gate and the quasi-RQFP gate as a physically irreversible gate. We calculated the energy dissipation of these irreversible gates and showed that the energy dissipation of these gate is dominated by non-adiabatic state changes, which are induced by unwanted interactions between gates due to logical or physical irreversibility. Our results show that, in reversible computing using adiabatic superconductor logic, logical and physical reversibility are required to achieve energy dissipation smaller than the Landauer bound without non-adiabatic processes caused by gate interactions.

  11. Some Educational Implications & Contributions of Outward Bound.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Outward Bound School, Sydney.

    The development of Outward Bound, from the early beginnings in Britain through expansion in over 30 locations throughout the world, is outlined, and Outward Bound educational aspects are analyzed in terms of the Australian Outward Bound School. The concepts of experiential education, lifelong education, and the broader Australian educational scene…

  12. Determining Normal-Distribution Tolerance Bounds Graphically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mezzacappa, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    Graphical method requires calculations and table lookup. Distribution established from only three points: mean upper and lower confidence bounds and lower confidence bound of standard deviation. Method requires only few calculations with simple equations. Graphical procedure establishes best-fit line for measured data and bounds for selected confidence level and any distribution percentile.

  13. The Acquisition of Bound and Free Anaphora.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koster, Jan; Koster, Charlotte

    Most linguists assume that bound anaphors such as "himself" are connected with their antecedents in a different way from free anaphors such as "him." Bound anaphora resolution is deterministic, based on Principle A of Chomsky's binding theory. Free anaphors, pronominals, cannot be bound in the domain of reflexives (principle…

  14. Consistent Tolerance Bounds for Statistical Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mezzacappa, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    Assumption that sample comes from population with particular distribution is made with confidence C if data lie between certain bounds. These "confidence bounds" depend on C and assumption about distribution of sampling errors around regression line. Graphical test criteria using tolerance bounds are applied in industry where statistical analysis influences product development and use. Applied to evaluate equipment life.

  15. Quantum correlations beyond Tsirelson's bound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Dominic; Ringbauer, Martin; Fedrizzi, Alessandro; White, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Violations of Bell inequalities show that there are correlations that cannot explained by any classical theory. Further violation, beyond Tsirelson's bound, shows that there are correlations that are not explained by quantum mechanics. Such super-quantum correlations would enable violation of information causality, where communication of one bit provides more than one bit of information [Nature 461, 1101 (2009)]. An unavoidable feature of all realistic Bell inequality experiments is loss. If one postselects on successful measurements, unentangled states can violate Bell inequalities. On the other hand, loss can be used to enhance the violation of Bell inequalities for entangled states. This can improve the ability to distinguish between entangled and unentangled states, despite loss. Here we report an optical experiment providing maximal violation of the CHSH-Bell inequality with entangled states. Due to loss and postselection, Tsirelson's bound is also violated. This enables us to more easily distinguish between entangled and unentangled states. In addition, it provides violation of information causality for the postselected data.

  16. Endurance bounds of aerial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Aaron M.; Kroninger, Christopher M.

    2014-06-01

    Within the past few years micro aerial vehicles (MAVs) have received much more attention and are starting to proliferate into military as well as civilian roles. However, one of the major drawbacks for this technology currently, has been their poor endurance, usually below 10 minutes. This is a direct result of the inefficiencies inherent in their design. Often times, designers do not consider the various components in the vehicle design and match their performance to the desired mission for the vehicle. These vehicles lack a prescribed set of design guidelines or empirically derived design equations which often limits their design to selection of commercial off-the-shelf components without proper consideration of their affect on vehicle performance. In the current study, the design space for different vehicle configurations has been examined including insect flapping, avian flapping, rotary wing, and fixed wing, and their performance bounds are established. The propulsion system typical of a rotary wing vehicle is analyzed to establish current baselines for efficiency of vehicles at this scale. The power draw from communications is analyzed to determine its impact on vehicle performance. Finally, a representative fixed wing MAV is examined and the effects of adaptive structures as a means for increasing vehicle endurance and range are examined. This paper seeks to establish the performance bounds for micro air vehicles and establish a path forward for future designs so that efficiency may be maximized.

  17. Asymmetric dark matter bound state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Xiao-Jun; Kang, Zhaofeng; Ko, P.; Li, Jinmian; Li, Tianjun

    2017-02-01

    We propose an interesting framework for asymmetric scalar dark matter (ADM), which has novel collider phenomenology in terms of an unstable ADM bound state (ADMonium) produced via Higgs portals. ADMonium is a natural consequence of the basic features of ADM: the (complex scalar) ADM is charged under a dark local U (1 )d symmetry which is broken at a low scale and provides a light gauge boson X . The dark gauge coupling is strong and then ADM can annihilate away into X -pair effectively. Therefore, the ADM can form a bound state due to its large self-interaction via X mediation. To explore the collider signature of ADMonium, we propose that ADM has a two-Higgs doublet portal. The ADMonium can have a sizable mixing with the heavier Higgs boson, which admits a large cross section of ADMonium production associated with b b ¯. The resulting signature at the LHC depends on the decays of X . In this paper we consider a case of particular interest: p p →b b ¯ +ADMonium followed by ADMonium→2 X →2 e+e- where the electrons are identified as (un)converted photons. It may provide a competitive explanation to heavy di-photon resonance searches at the LHC.

  18. Reversible Thermal-Stiffening in Polymer Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senses, Erkan; Akcora, Pinar

    2015-03-01

    Silica nanoparticles adsorbed with a high glass-transition temperature polymer, PMMA (Tg: 130 °C) are shown to uniformly disperse in a low-Tg polymer matrix, PEO (Tg: -60 °C). These nanocomposites exhibit an unusual reversible liquid-to-solid transition at temperatures above Tg's of both polymers. Mechanical adaptivity of PEO nanocomposites to temperatures underlies the existence of dynamically asymmetric bound layers on particles, and more importantly their impact on mechanical behavior, which sets these materials apart from conventional polymer composites that soften upon heating. Moreover, the growth rate of elastic moduli at temperatures above Tg of PMMA presents an Arrhenius-type relaxation with activation energy well-matching with the α- β merging region of PMMA. These results suggest that the mobility of the surface-bound polymer is essential for reinforcement contrary to commonly accepted glassy-layer hypothesis.

  19. The carbonate analogues of 5'-halogenated resiniferatoxin as TRPV1 ligands.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kwang Su; Lee, Hobin; Kim, Sung Eun; Ha, Tae-Hwan; Ann, Jihyae; Son, Karam; Choi, Sun; Sun, Wei; Pearce, Larry V; DeAndrea-Lazarus, Ian A; Blumberg, Peter M; Lee, Jeewoo

    2013-10-01

    A series of carbonate analogues of 5'-halogenated RTX have been investigated in order to examine the effect of the carbonate group as a linker and the role of halogens in the reversal of activity from agonism to antagonism for rat and human TRPV1 heterologously expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The carbonate analogues showed similar activities to the corresponding RTX derivatives in rat TRPV1 but lower potency in human TRPV1. 5-Halogenation converted the agonists to partial agonists or full antagonists and the extent of antagonism reflected the order of I>Br>Cl>F, with a somewhat greater extent of antagonism for the derivatives of the 4-amino RTX surrogates compared to the corresponding derivatives of RTX itself. The carbonate analogues of I-RTX (60) and 5-bromo-4-amino-RTX (66) were potent and full antagonists with Ki(ant)=2.23 and 2.46 nM, respectively, for rat TRPV1, which were ca. 5-fold more potent than I-RTX (2) under our conditions. The conformational analysis of the I-RTX-carbonate (60) indicated that its bent conformation was similar to that of I-RTX, consistent with compound 60 and I-RTX showing comparable potent antagonism.

  20. Aniline mustard analogues of the DNA-intercalating agent amsacrine: DNA interaction and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Fan, J Y; Valu, K K; Woodgate, P D; Baguley, B C; Denny, W A

    1997-04-01

    Two series of analogues of the clinical antileukemic drug and DNA-intercalating ligand amsacrine have been prepared, containing aniline mustard sidechains of varying reactivity, linked either at the 4-position of the intercalating acridine chromophore (type A) or at the 1'-position of the 9-anilino group (type B). DNase I footprinting assays showed that compounds of type B had stronger reversible binding to DNA than did compounds of type A. Compounds of each type showed similar patterns of alkylation-induced cleavage of DNA, and alkylate at the N7 of guanines in runs of guanines (similar to the pattern for untargeted mustards) as well as some adenines. Both classes of compounds crosslinked DNA, although those bearing relatively inactive mustards did so only at high drug/base pair ratios. However, while the patterns of DNA alkylation were broadly similar, the compounds were considerably more cytotoxic than analogous untargeted mustards. Comparison of their cytotoxicities in wild-type and DNA repair-deficient lines indicated this toxicity was due to DNA crosslinks (except for the least reactive SO2-linked mustards). The 4-linked analogues showed slightly higher in vivo antileukemic activity than the corresponding 1'-linked analogues.

  1. Structural analyses of covalent enzyme-substrate analogue complexes reveal strengths and limitations of de novo enzyme design

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Althoff, Eric A.; Bolduc, Jill; Jiang, Lin; Moody, James; Lassila, Jonathan K.; Giger, Lars; Hilvert, Donald; Stoddard, Barry; Baker, David

    2012-01-01

    We report the cocrystal structures of a computationally designed and experimentally optimized retro-aldol enzyme with covalently bound substrate analogs. The structure with covalently bound substrate analog is similar but not identical to the design model, with an RMSD over the active site residues and equivalent substrate atoms of 1.4Å. As in the design model, the binding pocket orients the substrate through hydrophobic interactions with the naphthyl moiety such that the oxygen atoms analogous to the carbinolamine and β-hydroxyl oxygens are positioned near a network of bound waters. However, there are differences between the design model and the structure: the orientation of the naphthyl group and the conformation of the catalytic lysine are slightly different; the bound water network appears to be more extensive; and the bound substrate analog exhibits more conformational heterogeneity than in typical native enzyme-inhibitor complexes. Alanine scanning of the active site residues shows that both the catalytic lysine and the residues around the binding pocket for the substrate naphthyl group make critical contributions to catalysis. Mutating the set of water-coordinating residues also significantly reduces catalytic activity. The crystal structure of the enzyme with a smaller substrate analogue that lacks the naphthyl rings shows the catalytic lysine to be more flexible than in the naphthyl substrate complex; increased preorganization of the active site would likely improve catalysis. The covalently bound complex structures and mutagenesis data highlight strengths and weaknesses of the de novo enzyme design strategy. PMID:22075445

  2. Polyamine analogues bind human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Beauchemin, R; N'soukpoé-Kossi, C N; Thomas, T J; Thomas, T; Carpentier, R; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2007-10-01

    Polyamine analogues show antitumor activity in experimental models, and their ability to alter activity of cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents in breast cancer is well documented. Association of polyamines with nucleic acids and protein is included in their mechanism of action. The aim of this study was to examine the interaction of human serum albumin (HSA) with several polyamine analogues, such as 1,11-diamino-4,8-diazaundecane (333), 3,7,11,15-tetrazaheptadecane.4HCl (BE-333), and 3,7,11,15,19-pentazahenicosane.5HCl (BE-3333), in aqueous solution at physiological conditions using a constant protein concentration and various polyamine contents (microM to mM). FTIR, UV-visible, and CD spectroscopic methods were used to determine the polyamine binding mode and the effects of polyamine complexation on protein stability and secondary structure. Structural analysis showed that polyamines bind nonspecifically (H-bonding) via polypeptide polar groups with binding constants of K333 = 9.30 x 10(3) M(-1), KBE-333 = 5.63 x 10(2) M(-1), and KBE-3333 = 3.66 x 10(2) M(-1). The protein secondary structure showed major alterations with a reduction of alpha-helix from 55% (free protein) to 43-50% and an increase of beta-sheet from 17% (free protein) to 29-36% in the 333, BE-333, and BE-3333 complexes, indicating partial protein unfolding upon polyamine interaction. HSA structure was less perturbed by polyamine analogues compared to those of the biogenic polyamines.

  3. "Reverse fleximers": introduction of a series of 5-substituted carbocyclic uridine analogues.

    PubMed

    Sadler, Joshua M; Ojewoye, Olubukola; Seley-Radtke, Katherine L

    2008-01-01

    Nucleosides are ubiquitous in biological systems and as such, have been a focus of medicinal chemistry research in the search for new and potent therapeutic compounds. There are a number of modified nucleosides on the market, however increasing reports of resistance by mutation of either the enzyme binding site or the pathway that they are designed to interrupt are surfacing. As shown in recent reports, a candidate that can change conformation and still maintain recognition by the target enzyme would be highly desirable, and it is for this reason that flexible substrates have recently been sought as potential therapeutics. With this goal in mind, we have begun investigation into novel flexible scaffolds capable of overcoming viral resistance mechanisms resulting from binding site mutations.

  4. Reverse Fleximers”: Introduction of a series of 5-substituted carbocyclic uridine analogues

    PubMed Central

    Sadler, Joshua M.; Ojewoye, Olubukola; Seley-Radtke, Katherine L.

    2009-01-01

    Nucleosides are ubiquitous in biological systems and as such, have been a focus of medicinal chemistry research in the search for new and potent therapeutic compounds. There are a number of modified nucleosides on the market, however increasing reports of resistance by mutation of either the enzyme binding site or the pathway that they are designed to interrupt are surfacing. As shown in recent reports, a candidate that can change conformation and still maintain recognition by the target enzyme would be highly desirable, and it is for this reason that flexible substrates have recently been sought as potential therapeutics. With this goal in mind, we have begun investigation into novel flexible scaffolds capable of overcoming viral resistance mechanisms resulting from binding site mutations. PMID:18776508

  5. Residual psychomotor effects following reversal of midazolam sedation with flumazenil.

    PubMed

    Short, T G; Galletly, D C

    1989-08-01

    The ability of flumazenil to reverse the effects of midazolam sedation was examined in a randomised, crossover, placebo controlled study in six male volunteers. Subjects received intravenous injections of either (a) midazolam 10 mg followed 10 minutes later by flumazenil 1.0 mg or (b) midazolam 10 mg followed after 10 minutes by flumazenil 4 mg or (c) placebo followed after 10 minutes by placebo. Post reversal drug effects were examined using a psychomotor battery (critical flicker fusion, digit symbol substitution, tapping test, ball-bearing test, number recall, reflex time) and linear analogue mood scales. It was found that a residual psychomotor deficit was present following flumazenil and that this persisted for up to 125 minutes after the 1.0 mg dose and 65 minutes following 4 mg. A small deterioration in performance was apparent after initial reversal with 1.0 mg, the peak deterioration occurring at 35 minutes.

  6. The Lehmer Matrix and Its Recursive Analogue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number . 1. REPORT DATE 2010 2. REPORT...TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Lehmer matrix and its recursive analogue 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND

  7. New synthetic approaches towards analogues of bedaquiline.

    PubMed

    Priebbenow, Daniel L; Barbaro, Lisa; Baell, Jonathan B

    2016-10-12

    Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is of growing global concern and threatens to undermine increasing efforts to control the worldwide spread of tuberculosis (TB). Bedaquiline has recently emerged as a new drug developed to specifically treat MDR-TB. Despite being highly effective as a result of its unique mode of action, bedaquiline has been associated with significant toxicities and as such, safety concerns are limiting its clinical use. In order to access pharmaceutical agents that exhibit an improved safety profile for the treatment of MDR-TB, new synthetic pathways to facilitate the preparation of bedaquiline and analogues thereof have been discovered.

  8. Conformationally constrained analogues of L-prolyl-l-leucylglycinamide

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, K.L.

    1986-01-01

    The tripeptide, L-prolyl-L-leucylglycinamide (PLG), has been shown to modulate the pharmacological response of the neurotransmitter, dopamine, in the central nervous system. Many physical studies have suggested that PLG can exist in a type II ..beta..-bend conformation. In this study several types of conformationally constrained analogues capable of mimicking different types of conformations of PLG have been designed to answer two questions: (1) Is the type II ..beta..-bend the bioactive conformation of PLG. (2) Does the Leu-Gly amide bond of PLG need to be in a cis or trans configuration in order for it to bind to its receptor. The analogues of PLG that have been synthesized include the following: (1) Lactam analogues, (2) Cyclic peptides, (3) Olefinic analogue, and (4) Tetazole analogues. The analogues synthesized were tested in a (/sup 3/H)-ADTN binding assay to determine their ability to enhance the binding of this dopamine agonist to dopamine receptors.

  9. Creating multiphoton-polarization bound entangled states

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Tzu-Chieh; Lavoie, Jonathan; Kaltenbaek, Rainer

    2011-03-15

    Bound entangled states are the exotic objects in the entangled world. They require entanglement to create them, but once they are formed, it is not possible to locally distill any free entanglement from them. It is only until recently that a few bound entangled states were realized in the laboratory. Motivated by these experiments, we propose schemes for creating various classes of bound entangled states with photon polarization. These include Acin-Bruss-Lewenstein-Sanpara states, Duer's states, Lee-Lee-Kim bound entangled states, and an unextendible-product-basis bound entangled state.

  10. Novel incretin analogues improve autophagy and protect from mitochondrial stress induced by rotenone in SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Jalewa, Jaishree; Sharma, Mohit Kumar; Hölscher, Christian

    2016-10-01

    Currently, there is no viable treatment available for Parkinson's disease (PD) that stops or reverses disease progression. Interestingly, studies testing the glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) mimetic Exendin-4 have shown neuroprotective/neurorestorative properties in pre-clinical tests and in a pilot clinical study of PD. Incretin analogues were originally developed to treat type 2 diabetes and several are currently on the market. In this study, we tested novel incretin analogues on the dopaminergic SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells against a toxic mitochondrial complex I inhibitor, Rotenone. Here, we investigate for the first time the effects of six different incretin receptor agonists - Liraglutide, D-Ser2-Oxyntomodulin, a GLP-1/GIP Dual receptor agonist, dAla(2)-GIP-GluPal, Val(8)GLP-1-GluPal and exendin-4. Post-treatment with doses of 1, 10 or 100 nM of incretin analogues for 12 h increased the survival of SH-SY5Y cells treated with 1 μM Rotenone for 12 h. Furthermore, we studied the post-treatment effect of 100 nM incretin analogues against 1 μM Rotenone stress on apoptosis, mitochondrial stress and autophagy markers. We found significant protective effects of the analogues against Rotenone stress on cell survival and on mitochondrial and autophagy-associated markers. The novel GLP-1/GIP Dual receptor agonist was superior and effective at a tenfold lower concentration compared to the other analogues. Using the Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, LY294002, we further show that the neuroprotective effects are partially PI3K-independent. Our data suggest that the neuroprotective properties exhibited by incretin analogues against Rotenone stress involve enhanced autophagy, increased Akt-mediated cell survival and amelioration of mitochondrial dysfunction. These mechanisms can explain the neuroprotective effects of incretin analogues reported in clinical trials. GLP-1, GIP and dual incretin receptor agonists showed protective effects in SH-SY5Y cells

  11. Encapsulation of flavodoxin in reverse micelles.

    PubMed

    Andrade, S; Kamenskaya, E O; Levashov, A V; Moura, J J

    1997-05-29

    The regulation of the properties of Desulfovibrio gigas flavodoxin in AOT/water/iso-octane micellar system was studied. UV-visible spectroscopic studies have shown that photoreduction of flavodoxin in the presence of EDTA leads to hydroquinone formation through the intermediate semiquinone. The [free FMN] - [bound to flavodoxin FMN] equilibrium (and hence, the amount of apoprotein) depends on redox state of FMN and on hydration degree which controls the micellar size. Thus, a new method of reversible cofactor removing under mild conditions (at low hydration degree of micelles) is suggested, accompained by isolation of apo-form of the protein.

  12. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission natural analogue research program

    SciTech Connect

    Kovach, L.A.; Ott, W.R.

    1995-09-01

    This article describes the natural analogue research program of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC). It contains information on the regulatory context and organizational structure of the high-level radioactive waste research program plan. It also includes information on the conditions and processes constraining selection of natural analogues, describes initiatives of the US NRC, and describes the role of analogues in the licensing process.

  13. CO2 Removal using a Synthetic Analogue of Carbonic Anhydrase

    SciTech Connect

    Cordatos, Harry

    2010-09-14

    Project attempts to develop a synthetic analogue for carbonic anhydrase and incorporate it in a membrane for separation of CO2 from coal power plant flue gas. Conference poster presents result of first 9 months of project progress including concept, basic system architecture and membrane properties target, results of molecular modeling for analogue - CO2 interaction, and next steps of testing analogue resistance to flue gas contaminants.

  14. Bound states in the continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chia Wei; Zhen, Bo; Stone, A. Douglas; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin

    2016-09-01

    Bound states in the continuum (BICs) are waves that remain localized even though they coexist with a continuous spectrum of radiating waves that can carry energy away. Their very existence defies conventional wisdom. Although BICs were first proposed in quantum mechanics, they are a general wave phenomenon and have since been identified in electromagnetic waves, acoustic waves in air, water waves and elastic waves in solids. These states have been studied in a wide range of material systems, such as piezoelectric materials, dielectric photonic crystals, optical waveguides and fibres, quantum dots, graphene and topological insulators. In this Review, we describe recent developments in this field with an emphasis on the physical mechanisms that lead to BICs across seemingly very different materials and types of waves. We also discuss experimental realizations, existing applications and directions for future work.

  15. Synthesis of a cyanopeptide-analogue with trypsin activating properties.

    PubMed

    Radau, G; Rauh, D

    2000-04-17

    An efficient synthesis of a peptidic analogue of cyanobacterial metabolites with proposed serine protease inhibitory activity has been developed. Surprisingly, one trypsin activating compound was obtained.

  16. Self-Powered Analogue Smart Skin.

    PubMed

    Shi, Mayue; Zhang, Jinxin; Chen, Haotian; Han, Mengdi; Shankaregowda, Smitha A; Su, Zongming; Meng, Bo; Cheng, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Haixia

    2016-04-26

    The progress of smart skin technology presents unprecedented opportunities for artificial intelligence. Resolution enhancement and energy conservation are critical to improve the perception and standby time of robots. Here, we present a self-powered analogue smart skin for detecting contact location and velocity of the object, based on a single-electrode contact electrification effect and planar electrostatic induction. Using an analogue localizing method, the resolution of this two-dimensional smart skin can be achieved at 1.9 mm with only four terminals, which notably decreases the terminal number of smart skins. The sensitivity of this smart skin is remarkable, which can even perceive the perturbation of a honey bee. Meanwhile, benefiting from the triboelectric mechanism, extra power supply is unnecessary for this smart skin. Therefore, it solves the problems of batteries and connecting wires for smart skins. With microstructured poly(dimethylsiloxane) films and silver nanowire electrodes, it can be covered on the skin with transparency, flexibility, and high sensitivity.

  17. Enzymatic synthesis of lipid II and analogues.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lin-Ya; Huang, Shih-Hsien; Chang, Ya-Chih; Cheng, Wei-Chieh; Cheng, Ting-Jen R; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2014-07-28

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance has prompted active research in the development of antibiotics with new modes of action. Among all essential bacterial proteins, transglycosylase polymerizes lipid II into peptidoglycan and is one of the most favorable targets because of its vital role in peptidoglycan synthesis. Described in this study is a practical enzymatic method for the synthesis of lipid II, coupled with cofactor regeneration, to give the product in a 50-70% yield. This development depends on two key steps: the overexpression of MraY for the synthesis of lipid I and the use of undecaprenol kinase for the preparation of polyprenol phosphates. This method was further applied to the synthesis of lipid II analogues. It was found that MraY and undecaprenol kinase can accept a wide range of lipids containing various lengths and configurations. The activity of lipid II analogues for bacterial transglycolase was also evaluated. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Long-term predictions using natural analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, R.C.

    1995-09-01

    One of the unique and scientifically most challenging aspects of nuclear waste isolation is the extrapolation of short-term laboratory data (hours to years) to the long time periods (10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} years) required by regulatory agencies for performance assessment. The direct validation of these extrapolations is not possible, but methods must be developed to demonstrate compliance with government regulations and to satisfy the lay public that there is a demonstrable and reasonable basis for accepting the long-term extrapolations. Natural systems (e.g., {open_quotes}natural analogues{close_quotes}) provide perhaps the only means of partial {open_quotes}validation,{close_quotes} as well as data that may be used directly in the models that are used in the extrapolation. Natural systems provide data on very large spatial (nm to km) and temporal (10{sup 3}-10{sup 8} years) scales and in highly complex terranes in which unknown synergisms may affect radionuclide migration. This paper reviews the application (and most importantly, the limitations) of data from natural analogue systems to the {open_quotes}validation{close_quotes} of performance assessments.

  19. An algebra of reversible computation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    We design an axiomatization for reversible computation called reversible ACP (RACP). It has four extendible modules: basic reversible processes algebra, algebra of reversible communicating processes, recursion and abstraction. Just like process algebra ACP in classical computing, RACP can be treated as an axiomatization foundation for reversible computation.

  20. Inhibition of ADH-stimulated water flow by stable prostaglandin endoperoxide analogues.

    PubMed

    Ludens, J H; Taylor, C J

    1982-02-01

    The synthetic prostaglandin endoperoxide analogues 15-hydroxy-9,11-(epoxymethano)prosta-5,13-dien-1-oic acid (EPA-I) and 15-hydroxy-11,9-(epoxymethano)prosta-5,13-dien-1-oic acid (EPA-II) inhibited ADH-induced water flow in the isolated urinary bladder of the toad. In certain other biologic systems, EPA-I appeared to possess "thromboxane-like" activity. Thromboxanes, therefore, as well as the classical E prostaglandins may be modulators of the ADH response. To further characterize the effect of EPA-I on ADH, interaction studies were conducted with a related endoperoxide analogue found to be devoid of anti-ADH activity, 9,11-(epoxymethano)prostan-1-oic acid (EPA-III), and a prostanoid found to be a PGE antagonist in isolated toad bladder, 7-oxa-13-prostynoic acid. EPA-III reversed the anti-ADH activity of EPA-I but not that of PGE2. In contrast, 7-oxa-13-prostynoic acid reversed the anti-ADH activity of PGE2 but not that of an equieffective concentration of EPA-I. These findings suggest that the anti-ADH activity of EPA-I, and by inference thromboxane A2, may be mediated via a different receptor and/or pathway than that of the E prostaglandins.

  1. Reversible shape memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheiko, Sergei; Zhou, Jing; White, Sarah; Ashby, Valerie

    2012-02-01

    An ``Achilles' heel'' of shape memory materials is that shape transformations triggered by an external stimulus are usually irreversible. Here we present a new concept of reversible transitions between two well-defined shapes by controlling hierarchic crystallization of a dual-network elastomer. The reversibility was demonstrated for different types of shape transformations including rod bending, winding of a helical coil, and widening an aperture. The distinct feature of the reversible shape alterations is that both counter-shapes are infinitely stable at a temperature of exploitation. Shape reversibility is highly desirable property in many practical applications such as non-surgical removal of a previously inserted catheter and handfree wrapping up of an earlier unraveled solar sail on a space shuttle.

  2. Reversing the arms race

    SciTech Connect

    von Hippel, F. ); Sagdeev, R.Z. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper contains proceedings of Reversing The Arms Race. Topics covered include: Verifying Reductions of Nuclear Warheads; Verifying Limits on Nuclear-Armed Cruise Missiles; and The Technical Basis for Warhead Detection.

  3. Mechanism of muscarinic receptor-induced K+ channel activation as revealed by hydrolysis-resistant GTP analogues

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The role of a guanine nucleotide-binding protein (Gk) in the coupling between muscarinic receptor activation and opening of an inwardly rectifying K+ channel [IK(M)] was examined in cardiac atrial myocytes, using hydrolysis-resistant GTP analogues. In the absence of muscarinic agonist, GTP analogues produced a membrane current characteristic of IK(M). The initial rate of appearance of this receptor-independent IK(M) was measured for the various analogues in order to explore the kinetic properties of IK(M) activation. We found that IK(M) activation is controlled solely by the intracellular analogue/GTP ratio and not by the absolute concentrations of the nucleotides. Analogues competed with GTP for binding to Gk with the following relative affinities: GTP gamma S greater than GTP greater than GppNHp greater than GppCH2p. At sufficiently high intracellular concentrations, however, all GTP analogues produced the same rate of IK(M) activation. This analogue- independent limiting rate is likely to correspond to the rate of GDP release from inactive, GDP-bound Gk. Muscarinic receptor stimulation by nanomolar concentrations of acetylcholine (ACh), which do not elicit IK(M) under control conditions, catalyzed IK(M) activation in the presence of GTP analogues. The rate of Gk activation by ACh (kACh) was found to be described by the simple relationship kACh = 8.4 X 10(8) min- 1 M-1.[ACh] + 0.44 min-1, the first term of which presumably reflects the agonist-catalyzed rate of GDP release from the Gk.GDP complex, while the second term corresponds to the basal rate of receptor- independent GDP release. Combined with the estimated K0.5 of the IK(M)- [ACh] dose-effect relationship, 160 nM, this result also allowed us to estimate the rate of Gk.GTP hydrolysis, kcat, to be near 135 min-1. These results provide, for the first time, a quantitative description of the salient features of G-protein function in vivo. PMID:2455765

  4. Using tolerance bounds in scientific investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Wendelberger, J.R.

    1996-07-01

    Assessment of the variability in population values plays an important role in the analysis of scientific data. Analysis of scientific data often involves developing a bound on a proportion of a population. Sometimes simple probability bounds are obtained using formulas involving known mean and variance parameters and replacing the parameters by sample estimates. The resulting bounds are only approximate and fail to account for the variability in the estimated parameters. Tolerance bounds provide bounds on population proportions which account for the variation resulting from the estimated mean and variance parameters. A beta content, gamma confidence tolerance interval is constructed so that a proportion beta of the population lies within the region bounded by the interval with confidence gamma. An application involving corrosion measurements is used to illustrate the use of tolerance bounds for different situations. Extensions of standard tolerance intervals are applied to generate regression tolerance bounds, tolerance bounds for more general models of measurements collected over time, and tolerance intervals for varying precision data. Tolerance bounds also provide useful information for designing the collection of future data.

  5. Bound anionic states of adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S; Li, Xiang; Bowen, Kit H

    2007-03-20

    Anionic states of nucleic acid bases are involved in DNA damage by low-energy electrons and in charge transfer through DNA. Previous gas phase studies of free, unsolvated nucleic acid base parent anions probed only dipole-bound states, which are not present in condensed phase environments, but did not observe valence anionic states, which for purine bases, are thought to be adiabatically unbound. Contrary to this expectation, we have demonstrated that some thus far ignored tautomers of adenine, which result from enamine-imine transformations, support valence anionic states with electron vertical detachment energies as large as 2.2 eV, and at least one of these anionic tautomers is adiabatically bound. Moreover, we predict that the new anionic tautomers should also dominate in solutions and should be characterized by larger values of electron vertical detachment energy than the canonical valence anion. All of the new-found anionic tautomers might be formed in the course of dissociative electron attachment followed by a hydrogen atom attachment to a carbon atom, and they might affect the structure and properties of DNA and RNA exposed to low-energy electrons. The discovery of these valence anionic states of adenine was facilitated by the development of: (i) a new experimental method for preparing parent anions of nucleic acid bases for photoelectron experiments, and (ii) a new combinatorial/ quantum chemical approach for identification of the most stable tautomers of organic molecules. The computational portion of this work was supported by the: (i) Polish State Committee for Scientific Research (KBN) Grants: DS/8000-4-0140-7 (M.G.) and N204 127 31/2963 (M.H.), (ii) European Social Funds (EFS) ZPORR/2.22/II/2.6/ARP/U/2/05 (M.H.), and (iii) US DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Low Dose Radiation Research Program (M.G.). M.H. holds the Foundation for Polish Science (FNP) award for young scientists. The calculations were performed at the Academic

  6. Simple bounds on fluctuations and uncertainty relations for first-passage times of counting observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrahan, Juan P.

    2017-03-01

    Recent large deviation results have provided general lower bounds for the fluctuations of time-integrated currents in the steady state of stochastic systems. A corollary are so-called thermodynamic uncertainty relations connecting precision of estimation to average dissipation. Here we consider this problem but for counting observables, i.e., trajectory observables which, in contrast to currents, are non-negative and nondecreasing in time (and possibly symmetric under time reversal). In the steady state, their fluctuations to all orders are bound from below by a Conway-Maxwell-Poisson distribution dependent only on the averages of the observable and of the dynamical activity. We show how to obtain the corresponding bounds for first-passage times (times when a certain value of the counting variable is first reached) and their uncertainty relations. Just like entropy production does for currents, dynamical activity controls the bounds on fluctuations of counting observables.

  7. On thermodynamic and microscopic reversibility

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, Gavin E.

    2011-07-12

    The word 'reversible' has two (apparently) distinct applications in statistical thermodynamics. A thermodynamically reversible process indicates an experimental protocol for which the entropy change is zero, whereas the principle of microscopic reversibility asserts that the probability of any trajectory of a system through phase space equals that of the time reversed trajectory. However, these two terms are actually synonymous: a thermodynamically reversible process is microscopically reversible, and vice versa.

  8. Space Analogue Environments: Are the Populations Comparable?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandal, G. M.

    Background: Much of our present understanding about psychology in space is based on studies of groups operating in so-called analogue environments where personnel are exposed to many of the same stressors as those experienced by astronauts in space. One possible problem with extrapolating results is that personnel operating in various hazardous and confined environments might differ in characteristics influencing coping, interaction, and performance. The object of this study was to compare the psychological similarity of these populations in order to get a better understanding of whether this extrapolation is justifiable. The samples investigated include polar crossings (N= 22), personnel on Antarctic research stations (N= 183), several military occupations (N= 187), and participants in space simulation studies (N=20). Methods: Personnel in each of these environments were assessed using the Personality Characteristic Inventory (PCI) and Utrecht Coping List (UCL). The PCI is a multidimensional trait assessment battery that measures various aspects of achievement orientation and social competence. The UCL is a questionnaire designed to assess habitual coping strategies when encountering stressful or demanding situations. Results: Only minor differences in use of habitual coping strategies were evident across the different samples. In relation to personality scores, the military subjects and participants in space simulation studies indicated higher competitiveness and negative instrumentality compared to both the personnel on Antarctic research stations and participants in polar expedition. Among the personnel on Antarctic research stations, significant gender differences were found with women scoring lower on competitiveness, negative instrumentality and impatience/irritability. Compared to the other samples, the participants in polar expeditions were found to be more homogeneous in personality and no significant gender differences were evident on the traits that

  9. Slip dynamics in an analogue faultzone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolf, Michael; Rosenau, Matthias; Oncken, Onno

    2017-04-01

    Elastic stress in the lithosphere releases through slip along pre-existing planes of weakness (fault zones). Slip events may occur on many spatial and temporal scales. They range from short-term localised seismic slip (earthquakes) to aseismic slip transients and long-term distributed slip in cataclastic or ductile shear zones. The interplay of seismic and aseismic fault slip is poorly understood, potentially complex and very costly to model numerically. Therefore, we designed an analogue experiment using a rate-and-state frictional material (fused glass beads), that shows unstable (seismic) and stable (aseismic) slip. This is embedded in an elastic material (ballistic gelatin) that models upper crustal elastic rebound. In the analogue model presented here, we examine the influence of multiple parameters on the slip dynamics and overall statistics of ruptures within a glass bead shear zone. We use a customised rotary shear apparatus (Schulze ring-shear tester) to monitor shear stress during shear. The apparatus allows a direct control of shear rate and normal stress. Its transparent lid enables concurrent monitoring of the frictional contact surface. Digital image correlation is used to measure on-fault deformation. Because of the rate-and-state frictional properties of glass beads (a-b = -0.0138), the used setup produces regular stick-slip events under certain normal loading and strain rate conditions. Preliminary analysis shows the following: The events feature statistics similar to natural slip systems, i.e. a magnitude distribution similar to single faults. Estimated moment magnitudes of the laboratory earthquakes range from MW = -7 to -6. A Gutenberg-Richter like decay up to a certain corner magnitude followed by a characteristic peak is observable. With decreasing loading rate the recurrence time and size of events increase exponentially with exponents similar to natural events. Rupture dynamics are characterised by a transition from two-dimensional crack

  10. A nonlinear dynamic analogue model of substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimas, A. J.; Baker, D. N.; Roberts, D. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Büchner, J.

    Linear prediction filter studies have shown that the magnetospheric response to energy transfer from the solar wind contains both directly driven and unloading components. These studies have also shown that the magnetospheric response is significantly nonlinear and, thus, the linear prediction filtering technique and other correlative techniques which assume a linear magnetospheric response cannot give a complete deacription of that response. Here, the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction is discussed within the framework of deterministic nonlinear dynamics. An earlier dripping faucet mechanical analogue to the magnetosphere is first reviewed and then the plasma physical counterpart to the mechanical model is constructed. A Faraday loop in the magnetotail is considered and the relationship of electric potentials on the loop to changes in the magnetic flux threading the loop is developed. This approach leads to a model of geomagnetic activity which is similar to the earlier mechanical model but described in terms of the geometry and plasma contents of the magnetotail. This Faraday loop response model contains analogues to both the directly driven and the storage-release magnetospheric responses and it includes, in a fundamental way, the inherent nonlinearity of the solar wind-magnetosphere system. It can be chancterized as a nonlinear, damped harmonic oscillator that is driven by the loading-unloading substorm cycle. The model is able to explain many of the features of the linear prediction filter results. In particular, at low geomagnetic activity levels the model exbibits the "regular dripping" response which provides an explanation for the unloading component at 1 hour lag in the linear prediction filters. Further, the model suggests that the disappearance of the unloading component in the linear prediction filters at high geomagnetic activity levels is due to a chaotic transition beyond which the loading-unloading mechanism becomes aperiodic. The model predicts

  11. Nonadditivity of Rains' bound for distillable entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Duan, Runyao

    2017-06-01

    Rains' bound is arguably the best known upper bound of the distillable entanglement by operations completely preserving positivity of partial transpose (PPT) and was conjectured to be additive and coincide with the asymptotic relative entropy of entanglement. We disprove both conjectures by explicitly constructing a special class of mixed two-qubit states. We then introduce an additive semidefinite programming lower bound (EM) for the asymptotic Rains' bound, and it immediately becomes a computable lower bound for entanglement cost of bipartite states. Furthermore, EM is also proved to be the best known upper bound of the PPT-assisted deterministic distillable entanglement and gives the asymptotic rates for all pure states and some class of genuinely mixed states.

  12. Environment-responsive fluorescent nucleoside analogue probe for studying oligonucleotide dynamics in a model cell-like compartment.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Maroti G; Srivatsan, Seergazhi G

    2013-11-21

    The majority of fluorescent nucleoside analogue probes that have been used in the in vitro study of nucleic acids are not suitable for cell-based biophysical assays because they exhibit excitation maxima in the UV region and low quantum yields within oligonucleotides. Therefore, we propose that the photophysical characterization of oligonucleotides labeled with a fluorescent nucleoside analogue in reverse micelles (RM), which are good biological membrane models and UV-transparent, could provide an alternative approach to studying the properties of nucleic acids in a cell-like confined environment. In this context, we describe the photophysical properties of an environment-sensitive fluorescent uridine analogue (1), based on the 5-(benzo[b]thiophen-2-yl)pyrimidine core, in micelles and RM. The emissive nucleoside, which is polarity- and viscosity-sensitive, reports the environment of the surfactant assemblies via changes in its fluorescence properties. The nucleoside analogue, incorporated into an RNA oligonucleotide and hybridized to its complementary DNA and RNA oligonucleotides, exhibits a significantly higher fluorescence intensity, lifetime, and anisotropy in RM than in aqueous buffer, which is consistent with the environment of RM. Collectively, our results demonstrate that nucleoside 1 could be utilized as a fluorescent label to study the function of nucleic acids in a model cellular milieu.

  13. MDMA (3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine) Analogues as Tools to Characterize MDMA-Like Effects: An Approach to Understand Entactogen Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Sáez-Briones, P.; Hernández, A.

    2013-01-01

    Besides stimulants and hallucinogens, whose psychotropic effects are shared by many structurally related molecules exhibiting different efficacies and potencies in humans, the phenylisopropylamine MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, XTC, “Ecstasy”) is the prototypical representative of a separate class of psychotropic substance, able to elicit the so-called entactogenic syndrome in healthy humans. This reversible altered state of consciousness, usually described as an “open mind state”, may have relevant therapeutic applications, both in psychotherapy and as a pharmacological support in many neuropsychiatric disorders with a high rate of treatment failure. Nevertheless, a comprehensive and systematic exploration of the structure-activity relationships associated with entactogenic activity has remained incomplete and controversial, highlighting the possibility that MDMA might represent a pharmacological rarity in the field of psychotropics. As the latter is still an open question, the pharmacological characterization of MDMA analogues remains the logical strategy to attempt the elucidation of the structural requirements needed to elicit typical MDMA-like effects. Intriguingly, almost no experimental evidence supports the existence of actual MDMA analogues that truly resemble the whole pharmacological profile of MDMA, probably due to its complex (and partially not fully understood) mechanism of action that includes a disruption of monoaminergic neurotransmission. The present review presents a brief summary of the pharmacology of MDMA, followed by the evidence accumulated over the years regarding the characterization of classical structurally related MDMA analogues in different models and how this state of the art highlights the need to develop new and better MDMA analogues. PMID:24403876

  14. The structure of locally bounded finite-dimensional representations of connected locally compact groups

    SciTech Connect

    Shtern, A. I.

    2014-04-30

    An analogue of a Lie theorem is obtained for (not necessarily continuous) finite-dimensional representations of soluble finite-dimensional locally compact groups with connected quotient group by the centre. As a corollary, the following automatic continuity proposition is obtained for locally bounded finite-dimensional representations of connected locally compact groups: if G is a connected locally compact group, N is a compact normal subgroup of G such that the quotient group G/N is a Lie group, N{sub 0} is the connected identity component in N, H is the family of elements of G commuting with every element of N{sub 0}, and π is a (not necessarily continuous) locally bounded finite-dimensional representation of G, then π is continuous on the commutator subgroup of H (in the intrinsic topology of the smallest analytic subgroup of G containing this commutator subgroup). Bibliography: 23 titles. (paper)

  15. Stacking of the mutagenic base analogue 5-bromouracil: energy landscapes of pyrimidine dimers in gas phase and water.

    PubMed

    Holroyd, Leo F; van Mourik, Tanja

    2015-11-11

    The potential energy surfaces of stacked base pairs consisting of cytosine (C), thymine (T), uracil (U) and the mutagenic thymine analogue 5-bromouracil (BrU) have been searched to obtain all possible minima. Minima and transition states were optimised at the counterpoise-corrected M06-2X/6-31+G(d) level, both in the gas phase and in water, modelled by the polarizable continuum model. The stacked dimers studied are BrU/BrU, C/BrU, C/C, C/T, C/U, T/BrU and T/U. Both face-to-back and face-to-face structures were considered. Free energies were calculated at 298.15 K. Together with U/U, T/T and BrU/U results from previous work, these results complete the family consisting of every stacked dimer combination consisting of C, T, U and BrU. The results were used to assess the hypothesis suggested in the literature that BrU stacks stronger than T, which could stabilise the mispair formed by BrU and guanine. In the gas phase, structures of C/BrU, T/BrU and U/BrU with greater zero-point-corrected binding energies than C/T, T/T and U/T, respectively, were found, with differences in favour of BrU of 3.1 kcal mol(-1), 1.7 kcal mol(-1) and 0.5 kcal mol(-1), respectively. However, the structure of these dimers differed considerably from anything encountered in DNA. When only the dimers with the most "DNA-like" twist (±36°) were considered, C/BrU and T/BrU were still more strongly bound than C/T and T/T, by 0.5 kcal mol(-1) and 1.7 kcal mol(-1), respectively. However, when enthalpic and/or solvent contributions were taken into account, the stacking advantage of BrU was reversed in the gas phase and mostly nullified in water. Enhanced stacking therefore does not seem a plausible mechanism for the considerably greater ability of BrU-G mispairs over T-G mispairs to escape enzymatic repair.

  16. Lower bound for the multifield bounce action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravind, Aditya; Lorshbough, Dustin; Paban, Sonia

    2014-05-01

    We present a lower bound for the multifield bounce action with a quartic potential with bounded coefficients in the absence of gravity. We find that for a large number of fields the lower bound decreases with the number of fields as N-3. This work clarifies previous statements made in numerical studies which found that the bounce action scales as N-2.66 and discusses some subtleties of studying field space trajectories.

  17. Optimized Live Heap Bound Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    Optimized Live Heap Bound Analysis Leena Unnikrishnan ∗ Scott D. Stoller∗ Yanhong A. Liu∗ Abstract This paper describes a general approach for...insertion sort selection sort merge sort n S B Bopt n S B Bopt n S B Bopt n S B Bopt 101 1.0 m 0 1.0 m 101 1.0 m 1.0 M 9.0 m 101 0 37.3 s 10.0 m 101 2.0 m 0.9...s 0.7 s 102 0.1 s 0.3 s 0.1 s 102 0.1 s 5.1 s 102 0.2 s 5.0 s 102 40.0 m 103 10.7 s 3.5 M 11.9 s 103 12.8 s 1.5 H 103 27.3 s 1.5 H 103 0.7 s binomial

  18. Arenavirus reverse genetics for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Riaño, Emilio; Cheng, Benson Yee Hin; Carlos de la Torre, Juan; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis

    2013-06-01

    Arenaviruses are important human pathogens with no Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-licensed vaccines available and current antiviral therapy being limited to an off-label use of the nucleoside analogue ribavirin of limited prophylactic efficacy. The development of reverse genetics systems represented a major breakthrough in arenavirus research. However, rescue of recombinant arenaviruses using current reverse genetics systems has been restricted to rodent cells. In this study, we describe the rescue of recombinant arenaviruses from human 293T cells and Vero cells, an FDA-approved line for vaccine development. We also describe the generation of novel vectors that mediate synthesis of both negative-sense genome RNA and positive-sense mRNA species of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) directed by the human RNA polymerases I and II, respectively, within the same plasmid. This approach reduces by half the number of vectors required for arenavirus rescue, which could facilitate virus rescue in cell lines approved for human vaccine production but that cannot be transfected at high efficiencies. We have shown the feasibility of this approach by rescuing both the Old World prototypic arenavirus LCMV and the live-attenuated vaccine Candid#1 strain of the New World arenavirus Junín. Moreover, we show the feasibility of using these novel strategies for efficient rescue of recombinant tri-segmented both LCMV and Candid#1.

  19. Analogue Divider by Averaging a Triangular Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvam, Krishnagiri Chinnathambi

    2017-03-01

    A new analogue divider circuit by averaging a triangular wave using operational amplifiers is explained in this paper. The triangle wave averaging analog divider using operational amplifiers is explained here. The reference triangular waveform is shifted from zero voltage level up towards positive power supply voltage level. Its positive portion is obtained by a positive rectifier and its average value is obtained by a low pass filter. The same triangular waveform is shifted from zero voltage level to down towards negative power supply voltage level. Its negative portion is obtained by a negative rectifier and its average value is obtained by another low pass filter. Both the averaged voltages are combined in a summing amplifier and the summed voltage is given to an op-amp as negative input. This op-amp is configured to work in a negative closed environment. The op-amp output is the divider output.

  20. Derivatisable Cyanobactin Analogues: A Semisynthetic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Oueis, Emilia; Adamson, Catherine; Mann, Greg; Ludewig, Hannes; Redpath, Philip; Migaud, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Many natural cyclic peptides have potent and potentially useful biological activities. Their use as therapeutic starting points is often limited by the quantities available, the lack of known biological targets and the practical limits on diversification to fine‐tune their properties. We report the use of enzymes from the cyanobactin family to heterocyclise and macrocyclise chemically synthesised substrates so as to allow larger‐scale syntheses and better control over derivatisation. We have made cyclic peptides containing orthogonal reactive groups, azide or dehydroalanine, that allow chemical diversification, including the use of fluorescent labels that can help in target identification. We show that the enzymes are compatible and efficient with such unnatural substrates. The combination of chemical synthesis and enzymatic transformation could help renew interest in investigating natural cyclic peptides with biological activity, as well as their unnatural analogues, as therapeutics. PMID:26507241

  1. A simple analogue of lung mechanics.

    PubMed

    Sherman, T F

    1993-12-01

    A model of the chest and lungs can be easily constructed from a bottle of water, a balloon, a syringe, a rubber stopper, glass and rubber tubing, and clamps. The model is a more exact analogue of the body than the classic apparatus of Hering in two respects: 1) the pleurae and intrapleural fluid are represented by water rather than air, and 2) the subatmospheric "intrapleural" pressure is created by the elasticity of the "lung" (balloon) rather than by a vacuum pump. With this model, students can readily see how the lung is inflated and deflated by movements of the "diaphragm and chest" (syringe plunger) and how intrapleural pressures change as this is accomplished.

  2. Naturalness in an emergent analogue spacetime.

    PubMed

    Liberati, Stefano; Visser, Matt; Weinfurtner, Silke

    2006-04-21

    Effective field theories (EFTs) have been widely used as a framework in order to place constraints on the Planck suppressed Lorentz violations predicted by various models of quantum gravity. There are, however, technical problems in the EFT framework when it comes to ensuring that small Lorentz violations remain small--this is the essence of the "naturalness" problem. Herein we present an "emergent" spacetime model, based on the "analogue gravity" program, by investigating a specific condensed-matter system. Specifically, we consider the class of two-component BECs subject to laser-induced transitions between the components, and we show that this model is an example for Lorentz invariance violation due to ultraviolet physics. Furthermore, our model explicitly avoids the naturalness problem, and makes specific suggestions regarding how to construct a physically reasonable quantum gravity phenomenology.

  3. Analogue Divider by Averaging a Triangular Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvam, Krishnagiri Chinnathambi

    2017-08-01

    A new analogue divider circuit by averaging a triangular wave using operational amplifiers is explained in this paper. The triangle wave averaging analog divider using operational amplifiers is explained here. The reference triangular waveform is shifted from zero voltage level up towards positive power supply voltage level. Its positive portion is obtained by a positive rectifier and its average value is obtained by a low pass filter. The same triangular waveform is shifted from zero voltage level to down towards negative power supply voltage level. Its negative portion is obtained by a negative rectifier and its average value is obtained by another low pass filter. Both the averaged voltages are combined in a summing amplifier and the summed voltage is given to an op-amp as negative input. This op-amp is configured to work in a negative closed environment. The op-amp output is the divider output.

  4. A hypnotic analogue of clinical confabulation.

    PubMed

    Cox, Rochelle E; Barnier, Amanda J

    2015-01-01

    Confabulation-fabricated or distorted memories about oneself-occurs in many disorders, but there is no reliable technique for investigating it in the laboratory. The authors used hypnosis to model clinical confabulation by giving subjects a suggestion for either (a) amnesia for everything that had happened since they started university, (b) amnesia for university plus an instruction to fill in memory gaps, or (c) confusion about the temporal order of university events. They then indexed different types of memory on a confabulation battery. The amnesia suggestion produced the most confabulation, especially for personal semantic information. Notably, subjects confabulated by making temporal confusions. The authors discuss the theoretical implications of this first attempt to model clinical confabulation and the potential utility of such analogues.

  5. Jupiter analogues and planets of active stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kürster, M.; Zechmeister, M.; Endl, M.; Lo Curto, G.; Hartman, H.; Nilsson, H.; Henning, T.; Hatzes, A. P.; Cochran, W. D.

    2013-04-01

    Combined results are now available from a 15 year long search for Jupiter analogues around solar-type stars using the ESO CAT + CES, ESO 3.6 m + CES, and ESO 3.6 m + HARPS instruments. They comprise planet (co-)discoveries (ι Hor and HR 506) and confirmations (three planets in HR 3259) as well as non-confirmations of planets (HR 4523 and ɛ Eri) announced elsewhere. A long-term trend in ɛ Ind found by our survey is probably attributable to a Jovian planet with a period >30 yr, but we cannot fully exclude stellar activity effects as the cause. A 3.8 year periodic variation in HR 8323 can be attributed to stellar activity.

  6. Sharpening bounds on principal effects with covariates.

    PubMed

    Long, Dustin M; Hudgens, Michael G

    2013-12-01

    Estimation of treatment effects in randomized studies is often hampered by possible selection bias induced by conditioning on or adjusting for a variable measured post-randomization. One approach to obviate such selection bias is to consider inference about treatment effects within principal strata, that is, principal effects. A challenge with this approach is that without strong assumptions principal effects are not identifiable from the observable data. In settings where such assumptions are dubious, identifiable large sample bounds may be the preferred target of inference. In practice these bounds may be wide and not particularly informative. In this work we consider whether bounds on principal effects can be improved by adjusting for a categorical baseline covariate. Adjusted bounds are considered which are shown to never be wider than the unadjusted bounds. Necessary and sufficient conditions are given for which the adjusted bounds will be sharper (i.e., narrower) than the unadjusted bounds. The methods are illustrated using data from a recent, large study of interventions to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV through breastfeeding. Using a baseline covariate indicating low birth weight, the estimated adjusted bounds for the principal effect of interest are 63% narrower than the estimated unadjusted bounds. © 2013, The International Biometric Society.

  7. Terrestrial Analogues for Lunar Impact Melt Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neish, C. D.; Hamilton, C. W.; Hughes, S. S.; Nawotniak, S. Kobs; Garry, W. B.; Skok, J. R.; Elphic, R. C.; Schaefer, E.; Carter, L. M.; Bandfield, J. L.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Lunar impact melt deposits have unique physical properties. They have among the highest observed radar returns at S-Band (12.6 cm wavelength), implying that they are rough at the decimeter scale. However, they are also observed in high-resolution optical imagery to be quite smooth at the meter scale. These characteristics distinguish them from well-studied terrestrial analogues, such as Hawaiian pahoehoe and ?a ?a lava flows. The morphology of impact melt deposits can be related to their emplacement conditions, so understanding the origin of these unique surface properties will help to inform us as to the circumstances under which they were formed. In this work, we seek to find a terrestrial analogue for well-preserved lunar impact melt flows by examining fresh lava flows on Earth. We compare the radar return and high-resolution topographic variations of impact melt flows to terrestrial lava flows with a range of surface textures. The lava flows examined in this work range from smooth Hawaiian pahoehoe to transitional basaltic flows at Craters of the Moon (COTM) National Monument and Preserve in Idaho to rubbly and spiny pahoehoe-like flows at the recent eruption at Holuhraun in Iceland. The physical properties of lunar impact melt flows appear to differ from those of all the terrestrial lava flows studied in this work. This may be due to (a) differences in post-emplacement modification processes or (b) fundamental differences in the surface texture of the melt flows due to the melts' unique emplacement and/or cooling environment. Information about the surface properties of lunar impact melt deposits will be critical for future landed missions that wish to sample these materials.

  8. Current european regulatory perspectives on insulin analogues

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Insulin analogues are increasingly considered as an alternative to human insulin in the therapy of diabetes mellitus. Insulin analogues (IAs) are chemically different from human insulin and may have different pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic properties. The significance of the modifications of the insulin molecule for the safety profile of IAs must be considered. This review describes the regulatory procedure and the expectations for the scientific content of European marketing authorization applications for innovative IAs submitted to the European Medicines Agency. Particular consideration is given to a potential cancer hazard. Specific regulatory guidance on how to address a possible carcinogenic or tumor promoting effect of innovative IAs in non-clinical studies is available. After marketing authorization, the factual access of patients to the new product will be determined to great extent by health technology assessment bodies, reimbursement decisions and the price. Whereas the marketing authorization is a European decision, pricing and reimbursement are national or regional responsibilities. The assessment of benefit and risk by the European Medicines Agency is expected to influence future decisions on price and reimbursement on a national or regional level. Collaborations between regulatory agencies and health technology assessment bodies have been initiated on European and national level to facilitate the use of the European Medicines Agency's benefit risk assessment as basis on which to build the subsequent health technology assessment. The option for combined or joint scientific advice procedures with regulators and health technology assessment bodies on European level or on a national level in several European Member States may help applicants to optimize their development program and dossier preparation in regard of both European marketing authorization application and reimbursement decisions. PMID:21736748

  9. Terrestrial analogues for lunar impact melt flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neish, C. D.; Hamilton, C. W.; Hughes, S. S.; Nawotniak, S. Kobs; Garry, W. B.; Skok, J. R.; Elphic, R. C.; Schaefer, E.; Carter, L. M.; Bandfield, J. L.; Osinski, G. R.; Lim, D.; Heldmann, J. L.

    2017-01-01

    Lunar impact melt deposits have unique physical properties. They have among the highest observed radar returns at S-Band (12.6 cm wavelength), implying that they are rough at the decimeter scale. However, they are also observed in high-resolution optical imagery to be quite smooth at the meter scale. These characteristics distinguish them from well-studied terrestrial analogues, such as Hawaiian pāhoehoe and ´a´ā lava flows. The morphology of impact melt deposits can be related to their emplacement conditions, so understanding the origin of these unique surface properties will help to inform us as to the circumstances under which they were formed. In this work, we seek to find a terrestrial analogue for well-preserved lunar impact melt flows by examining fresh lava flows on Earth. We compare the radar return and high-resolution topographic variations of impact melt flows to terrestrial lava flows with a range of surface textures. The lava flows examined in this work range from smooth Hawaiian pāhoehoe to transitional basaltic flows at Craters of the Moon (COTM) National Monument and Preserve in Idaho to rubbly and spiny pāhoehoe-like flows at the recent eruption at Holuhraun in Iceland. The physical properties of lunar impact melt flows appear to differ from those of all the terrestrial lava flows studied in this work. This may be due to (a) differences in post-emplacement modification processes or (b) fundamental differences in the surface texture of the melt flows due to the melts' unique emplacement and/or cooling environment. Information about the surface properties of lunar impact melt deposits will be critical for future landed missions that wish to sample these materials.

  10. Natural analogues of nuclear waste glass corrosion.

    SciTech Connect

    Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.

    1999-01-06

    This report reviews and summarizes studies performed to characterize the products and processes involved in the corrosion of natural glasses. Studies are also reviewed and evaluated on how well the corrosion of natural glasses in natural environments serves as an analogue for the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses in an engineered geologic disposal system. A wide range of natural and experimental corrosion studies has been performed on three major groups of natural glasses: tektite, obsidian, and basalt. Studies of the corrosion of natural glass attempt to characterize both the nature of alteration products and the reaction kinetics. Information available on natural glass was then compared to corresponding information on the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses, specifically to resolve two key questions: (1) whether one or more natural glasses behave similarly to nuclear waste glasses in laboratory tests, and (2) how these similarities can be used to support projections of the long-term corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion behavior of basaltic glasses was most similar to that of nuclear waste glasses, but the corrosion of tektite and obsidian glasses involves certain processes that also occur during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The reactions and processes that control basalt glass dissolution are similar to those that are important in nuclear waste glass dissolution. The key reaction of the overall corrosion mechanism is network hydrolysis, which eventually breaks down the glass network structure that remains after the initial ion-exchange and diffusion processes. This review also highlights some unresolved issues related to the application of an analogue approach to predicting long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass corrosion, such as discrepancies between experimental and field-based estimates of kinetic parameters for basaltic glasses.

  11. Terrestrial Analogues for Lunar Impact Melt Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neish, C. D.; Hamilton, C. W.; Hughes, S. S.; Nawotniak, S. Kobs; Garry, W. B.; Skok, J. R.; Elphic, R. C.; Schaefer, E.; Carter, L. M.; Bandfield, J. L.; Osinski, G. R.; Lim, D.; Heldmann, J. L.

    2016-01-01

    Lunar impact melt deposits have unique physical properties. They have among the highest observed radar returns at S-Band (12.6 cm wavelength), implying that they are rough at the decimeter scale. However, they are also observed in high-resolution optical imagery to be quite smooth at the meter scale. These characteristics distinguish them from well-studied terrestrial analogues, such as Hawaiian pahoehoe and ?a ?a lava flows. The morphology of impact melt deposits can be related to their emplacement conditions, so understanding the origin of these unique surface properties will help to inform us as to the circumstances under which they were formed. In this work, we seek to find a terrestrial analogue for well-preserved lunar impact melt flows by examining fresh lava flows on Earth. We compare the radar return and high-resolution topographic variations of impact melt flows to terrestrial lava flows with a range of surface textures. The lava flows examined in this work range from smooth Hawaiian pahoehoe to transitional basaltic flows at Craters of the Moon (COTM) National Monument and Preserve in Idaho to rubbly and spiny pahoehoe-like flows at the recent eruption at Holuhraun in Iceland. The physical properties of lunar impact melt flows appear to differ from those of all the terrestrial lava flows studied in this work. This may be due to (a) differences in post-emplacement modification processes or (b) fundamental differences in the surface texture of the melt flows due to the melts' unique emplacement and/or cooling environment. Information about the surface properties of lunar impact melt deposits will be critical for future landed missions that wish to sample these materials.

  12. Induction of abortion by different prostaglandin analogues.

    PubMed

    Bygdeman, M; Wiqvist, N

    1974-01-01

    The clinical advantages and disadvantages of intra amniotic administration of PGF2alpha in comparison with hypertonic saline has recently been summarized by the Prostaglandin Task Force within the World Health Organization Expanded program. The investigation comprised approximately 1,500 patients treated randomly with the two methods. The main advantage of the PG method was a significantly shorter induction-abortion interval and a lesser risk for serious complications and the significant disadvantage a slight increase in the mean frequency of minor complaints in terms of diarrhoea and vomiting. With PGF2alpha it seems difficult to obtain a "one shot" method to terminate second trimester pregnancy even with the intra-amniotic route of administration. The 15-methyl analogues seem more promising in this respect. The uterine response following administration of this compound is characterized by a more gradual initiation of uterine stimulation and a sustained effect, One intraamniotic injection of 2.5 mg 15-methyl-PGF2alpha induced abortion in nearly 100% of the cases and the incidence of side effects was low. Promising results with this compound have also been obtained following a single extra-amniotic instillation or by repeated intramuscular injections. Vaginal administration of 15-methyl PGF2alpha or its methyl ester can also be used for termination of pregnancy. Recently orally active PG analogues have become available for clinical testing. One of these compounds, 16,16-dimethyl-PGE2 may in some cases stimulate uterine contractility sufficiently to induce a second trimester abortion following repeated oral administration.

  13. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol Anchor Analogues Sequester Cholesterol and Reduce Prion Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Bate, Clive; Tayebi, Mourad; Williams, Alun

    2010-01-01

    A hallmark of prion diseases is the conversion of the host-encoded prion protein (PrPC where C is cellular) into an alternatively folded, disease-related isoform (PrPSc, where Sc is scrapie), the accumulation of which is associated with synapse degeneration and ultimately neuronal death. The formation of PrPSc is dependent upon the presence of PrPC in specific, cholesterol-sensitive membrane microdomains, commonly called lipid rafts. PrPC is targeted to these lipid rafts because it is attached to membranes via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor. Here, we show that treatment of prion-infected neuronal cell lines (ScN2a, ScGT1, or SMB cells) with synthetic glycosylphosphatidylinositol analogues, glucosamine-phosphatidylinositol (glucosamine-PI) or glucosamine 2-O-methyl inositol octadecyl phosphate, reduced the PrPSc content of these cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, ScGT1 cells treated with glucosamine-PI did not transmit infection following intracerebral injection to mice. Treatment with glucosamine-PI increased the cholesterol content of ScGT1 cell membranes and reduced activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (PLA2), consistent with the hypothesis that the composition of cell membranes affects key PLA2-dependent signaling pathways involved in PrPSc formation. The effect of glucosamine-PI on PrPSc formation was also reversed by the addition of platelet-activating factor. Glucosamine-PI caused the displacement of PrPC from lipid rafts and reduced expression of PrPC at the cell surface, putative sites for PrPSc formation. We propose that treatment with glucosamine-PI modifies local micro-environments that control PrPC expression and activation of PLA2 and subsequently inhibits PrPSc formation. PMID:20427265

  14. Reverse transcriptase incorporation of 1,5-anhydrohexitol nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Vastmans, Karen; Froeyen, Matheus; Kerremans, Luc; Pochet, Sylvie; Herdewijn, Piet

    2001-01-01

    Several reverse transcriptases were studied for their ability to accept anhydrohexitol triphosphates, having a conformationally restricted six-membered ring, as substrate for template-directed synthesis of HNA. It was found that AMV, M-MLV, M-MLV (H–), RAV2 and HIV-1 reverse transcriptases were able to recognise the anhydrohexitol triphosphate as substrate and to efficiently catalyse the incorporation of one non-natural anhydrohexitol nucleotide opposite a natural complementary nucleotide. However, only the dimeric enzymes, the RAV2 and HIV-1 reverse transcriptases, seemed to be able to further extend the primer with another anhydrohexitol building block. Subsequently, several HIV-1 mutants (4×AZT, 4×AZT/L100I, L74V, M184V and K65A) were likewise analysed, resulting in selection of K65A and, in particular, M184V as the most succesful mutant HIV-1 reverse transcriptases capable of elongating a DNA primer with several 1,5-anhydrohexitol adenines in an efficient way. Results of kinetic experiments in the presence of this enzyme revealed that incorporation of one anhydrohexitol nucleotide of adenine or thymine gave an increased (for 1,5-anhydrohexitol-ATP) and a slightly decreased (for 1,5-anhydrohexitol-TTP) Km value in comparison to that of their natural counterparts. However, no more than four analogues could be inserted under the experimental conditions required for selective incorporation. Investigation of incorporation of the altritol anhydrohexitol nucleotide of adenine in the presence of M184V and Vent (exo–) DNA polymerase proved that an adjacent hydroxyl group on C3 of 1,5-anhydrohexitol-ATP has a detrimental effect on the substrate activity of the six-ring analogue. These results could be rationalised based on the X-ray structure of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. PMID:11470872

  15. Tren-based analogues of bacillibactin: structure and stability.

    PubMed

    Dertz, Emily A; Xu, Jide; Raymond, Kenneth N

    2006-07-10

    Synthetic analogues were designed to highlight the effect of the glycine moiety of bacillibactin on the overall stability of the ferric complex as compared to synthetic analogues of enterobactin. Insertion of a variety of amino acids to catecholamide analogues based on a Tren (tris(2-aminoethyl)amine) backbone increased the overall acidity of the ligands, causing an enhancement of the stability of the resulting ferric complex as compared to TRENCAM. Solution thermodynamic behavior of these siderophores and their synthetic analogues was investigated through potentiometric and spectrophotometric titrations. X-ray crystallography, circular dichroism, and molecular modeling were used to determine the chirality and geometry of the ferric complexes of bacillibactin and its analogues. In contrast to the Tren scaffold, addition of a glycine to the catechol chelating arms causes an inversion of the trilactone backbone, resulting in opposite chiralities of the two siderophores and a destabilization of the ferric complex of bacillibactin compared to ferric enterobactin.

  16. Reversible collisionless magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Ishizawa, A.; Watanabe, T.-H.

    2013-10-15

    Reversible magnetic reconnection is demonstrated for the first time by means of gyrokinetic numerical simulations of a collisionless magnetized plasma. Growth of a current-driven instability in a sheared magnetic field is accompanied by magnetic reconnection due to electron inertia effects. Following the instability growth, the collisionless reconnection is accelerated with development of a cross-shaped structure of current density, and then all field lines are reconnected. The fully reconnected state is followed by the secondary reconnection resulting in a weakly turbulent state. A time-reversed simulation starting from the turbulent state manifests that the collisionless reconnection process proceeds inversely leading to the initial state. During the reversed reconnection, the kinetic energy is reconverted into the original magnetic field energy. In order to understand the stability of reversed process, an external perturbation is added to the fully reconnected state, and it is found that the accelerated reconnection is reversible when the deviation of the E × B streamlines due to the perturbation is comparable with or smaller than a current layer width.

  17. Andreev bound states in topological superconductors (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Yukio; Lu, Bo; Yada, Keiji; Sato, Masatoshi

    2016-10-01

    Andreev bound states in topological superconductors Yukio Tanaka1, Lu Bo1,, K. Yada1, A. Yamakage1, M. Sato2 1Department of Applied Physics, Nagoya University 2Yukawa Institute, Kyoto University e-mail: ytanaka@nuap.nagoya-u.ac.jp It is known that Andreev bound state is an important ingredient to identify unconventional superconductors [1]. Up to now, there have been several types of Andreev bound states stemming from their topological origins [2-3]. It can be classified into i)dispersionless flat band type realized in cuprate, ii)linear dispersion type realized in chiral superconductor like Sr2RuO4, iii)helical dispersion type realized in non-centrosymmetric superconductor and iv)cone type in the surface state on B-phase of superfluid 3He [3]. It has been noted that certain surfaces of Weyl semimetals have bound states forming open Fermi arcs, which are never seen in typical metallic states. We show that the Fermi arcs enable them to support an even more exotic surface state with crossed flat bands in the superconducting state. We clarify the topological origin of the crossed dispersionless flat bands and the relevant symmetry that stabilizes the cross point. Our symmetry analysis are applicable to known candidate materials of time-reversal breaking Weyl semimetals[4]. [1]S. Kashiwaya and Y. Tanaka, Rep. Prog. Phys. 63 1641 (2000). [2]Y. Tanaka, M. Sato, and N. Nagaosa, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 81 011013 (2012). [3] M. Sato, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103 (2009) 020401. [4] B. Lu, K. Yada, M. Sato, and Y. Tanaka, Phys. Rev. Lett. 114 09

  18. Reversal learning enhanced by lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD)

    PubMed Central

    King, A.R.; Martin, I.L.; Arabella Melville, K.

    1974-01-01

    1 Small doses of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) (12.5-50 μg/kg) consistently facilitated learning of a brightness discrimination reversal. 2 2-Bromo-lysergic acid diethylamide (BOL-148), a structural analogue of LSD, with similar peripheral anti-5-hydroxytrypamine activity but no psychotomimetic properties, had no effect in this learning situation at a similar dose (25 μg/kg). 3 LSD, but not BOL-148, caused a small but significant increase in brain 5-hydroxytryptamine levels, but had no effect on the levels of catecholamines in the brain at 25 μg/kg. PMID:4458849

  19. Analogues of uracil nucleosides with intrinsic fluorescence (NIF-analogues): synthesis and photophysical properties.

    PubMed

    Segal, Meirav; Fischer, Bilha

    2012-02-28

    Uridine cannot be utilized as fluorescent probe due to its extremely low quantum yield. For improving the uracil fluorescence characteristics we extended the natural chromophore at the C5 position by coupling substituted aromatic rings directly or via an alkenyl or alkynyl linker to create fluorophores. Extension of the uracil base was achieved by treating 5-I-uridine with the appropriate boronic acid under the Suzuki coupling conditions. Analogues containing an alkynyl linker were obtained from 5-I-uridine and the suitable boronic acid in a Sonogashira coupling reaction. The uracil fluorescent analogues proposed here were designed to satisfy the following requirements: a minimal chemical modification at a position not involved in base-pairing, resulting in relatively long absorption and emission wavelengths and high quantum yield. 5-((4-Methoxy-phenyl)-trans-vinyl)-2'-deoxy-uridine, 6b, was found to be a promising fluorescent probe. Probe 6b exhibits a quantum yield that is 3000-fold larger than that of the natural chromophore (Φ 0.12), maximum emission (478 nm) which is 170 nm red shifted as compared to uridine, and a Stokes shift of 143 nm. In addition, since probe 6b adopts the anti conformation and S sugar puckering favored by B-DNA, it makes a promising nucleoside analogue to be incorporated in an oligonucleotide probe for detection of genetic material.

  20. Reversibility of liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mengxi; Kisseleva, Tatiana

    2015-09-01

    Liver fibrosis is a serious health problem worldwide, which can be induced by a wide spectrum of chronic liver injuries. However, until today, there is no effective therapy available for liver fibrosis except the removal of underlying etiology or liver transplantation. Recent studies indicate that liver fibrosis is reversible when the causative agent(s) is removed. Understanding of mechanisms of liver fibrosis regression will lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets for liver fibrosis. This review summarizes recent research progress on mechanisms of reversibility of liver fibrosis. While most of the research has been focused on HSCs/myofibroblasts and inflammatory pathways, the crosstalk between different organs, various cell types and multiple signaling pathways should not be overlooked. Future studies that lead to fully understanding of the crosstalk between different cell types and the molecular mechanism underlying the reversibility of liver fibrosis will definitely give rise to new therapeutic strategies to treat liver fibrosis.

  1. The feasibility program with security constraints and network rearrangement costs - Application to mixed /analogue and digital/ transmission networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serreault, J.-Y.; Minoux, M.

    1980-02-01

    This paper presents a second version of the 'feasibility program' (SECURAD) developed by the CNET. This program enables the routing at minimal costs of several thousand of requirements (expressed in circuits or groups of circuits) on very large mixed (analogue and digital) transmission networks, while respecting given capacities and taking into account security constraints and network-rearrangement costs. Consideration is given to a procedure for determining lower bounds for the cost of the optimal solution by solving a dual problem, and thus checking the quality of the approximate solutions obtained.

  2. Role of low density lipoprotein-bound cholesterol esters in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cutts, J.L.; Madden, E.A.; Melnykovych, G.

    1986-05-01

    The glucocorticoid sensitive CEM-C7 T-cell line was derived from human acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells by Norman and Thompson. Madden et al. have demonstrated that this growth inhibitory effect is due in part to a glucocorticoid-mediated inhibition of cholesterol synthesis and can be partially reversed by cholesterol dispersions. To further delineate the role of cholesterol in this growth inhibition, they have examined the ability of low density lipoprotein (LDL)-bound (/sup 3/H)cholesterol linoleate to reverse the growth inhibitory effect of 1 ..mu..M dexamethasone (Dex) on the CEM-C7 cells. LDL-bound cholesterol linoleate was unable to reverse the Dex-mediated growth inhibition, although incorporation of (/sup 14/C) acetate into free cholesterol was inhibited by 29%, following the Brown and Goldstein model. The presence of Dex further inhibited acetate incorporation into free cholesterol in the LDL-treated cells. Under all conditions, more than 99% of the acetate incorporated into cholesterol was present as free cholesterol, while over 87% of the LDL-bound cholesterol linoleate taken up remained in the ester compartment. These results indicate that CEM-C7 cells are unable to utilize LDL-bound cholesterol esters as a source of free cholesterol and rely on endogenous synthesis for their free cholesterol requirements.

  3. Dynamics of magnetization reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safonov, Vladimir L.

    2000-03-01

    Advanced magnetic recording systems are designed for extremely high areal densities and data rate. These two aspects require both magnetization reversal at very short times (< 1 ns) and long term ( ~ 5-10 years) stability against thermal fluctuations. There are two basic physics problems associated with these requirements. The first is a characterization of thermal-dynamic reversal over very wide time range. The second is an understanding of the physics of the relaxation mechanisms. Both these subjects will be reviewed in this talk. Thermal dynamic reversal requires solution of the Landau-Lifshitz equation with fluctuations. We have solved this problem in terms of the ``random walk" dynamics of a nonlinear oscillator [1,2]. The expressions for the switching field versus pulse time are analytic and show good agreement with measurements on CrO_2. Our studies of fundamental relaxation mechanisms have involved a two step approach. First the results of computer simulations of magnetization reversal without phenomenological damping will be discussed. In this case coherent rotation of the magnetization excites spin waves during which an excess of Zeeman energy is transformed to anisotropy and exchange energies. However, for fine grains whose size is sufficiently small so that the grain magnetization is virtually uniform, non-linear spin waves cannot assist reversal [3]. A new analytic model of reversal that couples coherent rotation to impurity ions by an anisotropic exchange mechanism will be discussed. These impurity ions are assumed to relax at a very high rate to the lattice. [1] V.L.Safonov, JMMM 195, 523 (1999); J.Appl.Phys. 85, 4370 (1999). [2] V.L.Safonov, H.N.Bertram, MMM'99, CU-09. [3] V.L.Safonov, H.N.Bertram, J.Appl.Phys. 85, 5072 (1999); MMM'99, CD-11.

  4. Reverse shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Jarrett, Claudius D; Brown, Brandon T; Schmidt, Christopher C

    2013-07-01

    The reverse shoulder arthroplasty is considered to be one of the most significant technological advancements in shoulder reconstructive surgery over the past 30 years. It is able to successfully decrease pain and improve function for patients with rotator cuff-deficient shoulders. The glenoid is transformed into a sphere that articulates with a humeral socket. The current reverse prosthesis shifts the center of rotation more medial and distal, improving the deltoid's mechanical advantage. This design has resulted in successful improvement in both active shoulder elevation and in quality of life. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Sequential Polarity-Reversing Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labaw, Clayton C.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed circuit reverses polarity of electric power supplied to bidirectional dc motor, reversible electro-mechanical actuator, or other device operating in direction depending on polarity. Circuit reverses polarity each time power turned on, without need for additional polarity-reversing or direction signals and circuitry to process them.

  6. Sequential Polarity-Reversing Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labaw, Clayton C.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed circuit reverses polarity of electric power supplied to bidirectional dc motor, reversible electro-mechanical actuator, or other device operating in direction depending on polarity. Circuit reverses polarity each time power turned on, without need for additional polarity-reversing or direction signals and circuitry to process them.

  7. Species-dependent binding of tocainide analogues to albumin: affinity chromatography and circular dichroism study.

    PubMed

    Pistolozzi, Marco; Fortugno, Cecilia; Franchini, Carlo; Corbo, Filomena; Muraglia, Marilena; Roy, Myriam; Félix, Guy; Bertucci, Carlo

    2014-10-01

    A series of novel tocainide analogues were characterized for their HSA and RSA binding, by using high-performance liquid affinity chromatography (HPLAC) and circular dichroism (CD). In this HPLAC study, HSA and RSA were covalently immobilized to the silica matrix of HPLC columns, with a procedure that maintained unaltered the binding properties of the proteins. The tocainide analogues were ranked for their affinity to HSA and RSA on the basis of their bound fractions measured by the two albumin-based columns. This technique was also applied to characterize the high affinity binding sites of these tocainide analogues to the protein. For this purpose displacement experiments were carried out by means of increasing concentrations in the mobile phase of competitors known to bind selectively to the main binding sites of HSA. The results obtained with the immobilized proteins were confirmed by investigating the same drug-protein systems in solution by circular dichroism. The comparison of the data collected with both methodologies highlighted the dramatic effect of small differences in the amino acidic sequences of the two proteins. In fact, despite their similar primary and secondary structures, a small difference in the amino acidic sequence leads to significant differences in their three-dimensional structure reflecting their different binding capacity and their stereoselectivity. Therefore, this study confirms how it is crucial to consider the significant differences among the animal models when performing pharmacokinetic studies. It is also clear that the knowledge of serum carrier binding parameters at an early stage of drug discovery represents a great advantage that may help to save time and efforts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Inhibition of Streptococcus mutans adherence and biofilm formation using analogues of the SspB peptide.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Kentaro; Hanada, Nobuhiro; Usui, Yoshie; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Koba, Hidehiko; Nakao, Ryoma; Watanabe, Haruo; Senpuku, Hidenobu

    2010-10-01

    Streptococcus gordonii is a pioneer colonizer of the enamel salivary pellicle that forms biofilm on the tooth surfaces. Recent reports show the surface protein analogue peptide {400 (T) of SspB 390-402 is substituted to K forming SspB (390-T400K-402)} from S. gordonii interacts strongly with salivary receptors to cariogenic bacteria, Streptococcus mutans. To characterize the analogue peptide biological activities, we investigated its binding and inhibiting effects, and the role of its amino acid moities. We measured binding activity of analogue peptides to salivary components using the BIAcore assay; assayed inhibition activities of peptides for bacterial binding and growth on saliva-coated hydroxyapatite beads (s-HA); and describe the peptides interfering with biofilm formation of S. mutans on polystyrene surfaces. The SspB (390-T400K-402 and -401) peptides significantly bound with salivary components and inhibited the binding of S. mutans and S. gordonii to s-HA without bactericidal activity; but did not inhibit binding of Streptococcus mitis, a beneficial commensal. Further, the lack of D and E-L at position 390 and 401-402 in the peptide, and substituted peptide SspB (D390H- or D390K-T400K-402) did not bind to salivary components or inhibit binding of S. mutans. The SspB (390-T400K-402) peptide inhibited biofilm formation on salivary components-coated polystyrene surfaces in absence of conditioned planktonic cells. We found constructing the peptide to include positions 390(D), 400(K) and 401(E), two surface positive and negative connective charges, and at least 12 amino acids are required to bind salivary components and inhibit the binding of S. mutans and S. gordonii. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Synthesis and biochemical characterization of a phosphorylated analogue of the response regulator CheB.

    PubMed

    Saxl, R L; Anand, G S; Stock, A M

    2001-10-30

    CheB is a response regulator protein in the bacterial chemotaxis two-component signal transduction pathway. Methylesterase CheB functions together with methyltransferase CheR to modulate the level of glutamate methylation in transmembrane chemoreceptors in response to environmental stimuli. The level of glutamate methylation in turn indirectly controls the direction of flagellar rotation. Like most two-component response regulators, CheB is activated in vivo by phosphorylation of a single aspartate, Asp 56, in its regulatory domain. Extensive biochemical and crystallographic studies have been completed on the inactive, unphosphorylated form of CheB. Because of the inherent lability of aspartyl phosphate bonds and the intrinsic phosphatase activity of CheB, the activated, phosphorylated form of CheB cannot be isolated for further characterization. We present a synthetic scheme to prepare an analogue of phosphorylated CheB using site-specific mutagenesis and chemical modification strategies. Initially, the two native cysteines found in CheB were substituted by serines and a cysteine was substituted for Asp 56 to yield D56C/C207S/C309S CheB. The unique cysteine in the substituted form of CheB was modified by sodium thiophosphate, Na(3)SPO(3), using two sequential disulfide bond exchange reactions. The analogue, D56C/C207S/C309S CheB-SPO(3), contained a thiophosphate group covalently bonded to the protein through a disulfide linkage at residue 56. Mass spectrometry showed that the protein was singly modified. Reverse phase chromatography showed that greater than 95% of the protein was modified under optimized conditions and that the analogue had a half-life of 28 days. In in vitro methylesterase assays in the presence of Mg(2+), the analogue exhibited activity equivalent to that of fully phosphorylated C207S/C309S CheB. Thus, D56C/C207S/C309S CheB-SPO(3) is a stable analogue that may be useful for characterization of the active form of CheB.

  10. Conductivity bound from dirty black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitaghsir Fadafan, Kazem

    2016-11-01

    We propose a lower bound of the dc electrical conductivity in strongly disordered, strongly interacting quantum field theories using holography. We study linear response of black holes with broken translational symmetry in Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theories of gravity. Using the generalized Stokes equations at the horizon, we derive the lower bound of the electrical conductivity for the dual two dimensional disordered field theory.

  11. THE HOPF BIFURCATION WITH BOUNDED NOISE

    PubMed Central

    Botts, Ryan T.; Homburg, Ale Jan; Young, Todd R.

    2012-01-01

    We study Hopf-Andronov bifurcations in a class of random differential equations (RDEs) with bounded noise. We observe that when an ordinary differential equation that undergoes a Hopf bifurcation is subjected to bounded noise then the bifurcation that occurs involves a discontinuous change in the Minimal Forward Invariant set. PMID:24748762

  12. Outward Bound: an Experience in Human Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danenburg, William; Gaggi, Silvio

    1974-01-01

    Two authors describe how their participation in an outward bound program has helped them develop a greater degree of general self confidence, greater ease in dealing with complex and frustrating problems, and a greater appreciation of man's place in the natural environment. They also describe Outward Bound courses that have been especially…

  13. Outward Bound: An Innovative Patient Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stich, Thomas F.; Gaylor, Michael S.

    A 1975 Dartmouth Outward Bound Mental Health Project, begun with a pilot project for disturbed adolescents, has evolved into an ongoing treatment option in three separate clinical settings for psychiatric patients and recovering alcoholics. Outward Bound consists of a series of prescribed physical and social tasks where the presence of stress,…

  14. Generalized upper bound for inelastic diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troshin, S. M.; Tyurin, N. E.

    2017-01-01

    For inelastic diffraction, we obtain an upper bound valid for the whole range of the elastic scattering amplitude variation allowed by unitarity. We discuss the energy dependence of the inelastic diffractive cross-section on the base of this bound and recent Large Hadron Collider (LHC) data.

  15. Bounding millimagnetically charged particles with magnetars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, Anson; Huang, Junwu

    2017-09-01

    Millimagnetically charged particles generically appear in scenarios with kinetic mixing. We present model independent bounds on these particles coming from magnetars. Schwinger pair production discharges the magnetic field of the magnetar. Thus the existence of large magnetic fields at magnetars place strong bounds on the millimagnetic charge to be smaller than 10-18 over a large mass range.

  16. THE HOPF BIFURCATION WITH BOUNDED NOISE.

    PubMed

    Botts, Ryan T; Homburg, Ale Jan; Young, Todd R

    2012-08-01

    We study Hopf-Andronov bifurcations in a class of random differential equations (RDEs) with bounded noise. We observe that when an ordinary differential equation that undergoes a Hopf bifurcation is subjected to bounded noise then the bifurcation that occurs involves a discontinuous change in the Minimal Forward Invariant set.

  17. Outward Bound: An Innovative Patient Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stich, Thomas F.; Gaylor, Michael S.

    A 1975 Dartmouth Outward Bound Mental Health Project, begun with a pilot project for disturbed adolescents, has evolved into an ongoing treatment option in three separate clinical settings for psychiatric patients and recovering alcoholics. Outward Bound consists of a series of prescribed physical and social tasks where the presence of stress,…

  18. A lower bound for the QRQW PRAM

    SciTech Connect

    MacKenzie, P.D.

    1995-05-02

    The queue-read, queue-write (QRQW) parallel random access machine (PRAM) model is a shared memory model which allows concurrent reading and writing with a time cost proportional to the contention. This is designed to model currently available parallel machines more accurately than either the CRCW PRAM or EREW PRAM models. Many algorithmic results have been developed for the QRQW PRAM. However, the only lower bound results have been fairly simple reductions from lower bounds for other models, such as the EREW PRAM or the ``few-write`` CREW PRAM. Here we present a lower bound specific to the QRQW PRAM. This lower bound is on the problem of Linear Approximate Compaction (LAC), whose input consists of at most m marked items in an array of size n, and whose output consists of the rn marked items in an array of size 0(m). There is an O({radical}log n), expected time randomized algorithm for LAC on the QRQW PRAM. We prove a lower bound of {Omega}(log log log n) expected time for any randomized algorithm for LAC. This bound applies regardless of the number of processors and memory cells of the QRQW PRAM. The previous best lower bound was {Omega}(log* n) time, taken from the known lower bound for LAC on the CRCW PRAM.

  19. Experimental Evidence for Bounds on Quantum Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovino, F. A.; Castagnoli, G.; Degiovanni, I. P.; Castelletto, S.

    2004-02-01

    We implemented the experiment proposed by Cabello in the preceding Letter to test the bounds of quantum correlation. As expected from the theory we found that, for certain choices of local observables, Tsirelson's bound of the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequality (2√(2)) is not reached by any quantum states.

  20. Si:P as a laboratory analogue for hydrogen on high magnetic field white dwarf stars.

    PubMed

    Murdin, B N; Li, Juerong; Pang, M L Y; Bowyer, E T; Litvinenko, K L; Clowes, S K; Engelkamp, H; Pidgeon, C R; Galbraith, I; Abrosimov, N V; Riemann, H; Pavlov, S G; Hübers, H-W; Murdin, P G

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen in a magnetic flux density of 10(5) T (1 gigagauss), the maximum observed on high-field magnetic white dwarfs, is impossible because practically available fields are about a thousand times less. In this regime, the cyclotron and binding energies become equal. Here we demonstrate Lyman series spectra for phosphorus impurities in silicon up to the equivalent field, which is scaled to 32.8 T by the effective mass and dielectric constant. The spectra reproduce the high-field theory for free hydrogen, with quadratic Zeeman splitting and strong mixing of spherical harmonics. They show the way for experiments on He and H(2) analogues, and for investigation of He(2), a bound molecule predicted under extreme field conditions.

  1. Direct observation of the interaction of single fluorescent nucleotide analogue molecules with DNA polymerase I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jing Yong; Yamane, Yuji; Yamauchi, Masayo; Nakatsuka, Hiroki; Ishikawa, Mitsuru

    2000-04-01

    The interaction of a fluorescent nucleotide analogue, 2'- (or-3')- O-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl) adenosine 5'-triphosphate (TNP-ATP), with the Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase I (Pol I) was visualized at a single-molecule level. Upon excitation, individual enzyme-TNP-ATP complexes resulted in bright fluorescent spots owing to the increase of the fluorescence quantum yield of TNP-ATP when it bound to the enzyme molecule, whereas unbound TNP-ATP molecules were not visible in the single molecule detection. Thus, we directly investigated the individual interactions of TNP-ATP with the enzyme using single-molecule fluorescence imaging and time-resolved spectroscopy of single enzyme-TNP-ATP complexes without prior separation of the unbound probe molecules.

  2. Solid-phase synthesis of lidocaine and procainamide analogues using backbone amide linker (BAL) anchoring.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Simon K; Peacock, Mandy J; Kates, Steven A; Barany, George

    2003-01-01

    New solid-phase strategies have been developed for the synthesis of lidocaine (1) and procainamide (2) analogues, using backbone amide linker (BAL) anchoring. Both sets were prepared starting from a common resin-bound intermediate, followed by four general steps: (i) attachment of a primary aliphatic or aromatic amine to the solid support via reductive amination (as monitored by a novel test involving reaction of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine with residual aldehyde groups); (ii) acylation of the resultant secondary amine; (iii) displacement of halide with an amine; and (iv) trifluoroacetic acid-mediated release from the support. A manual parallel strategy was followed to provide 60 novel compounds, of which two dozen have not been previously described. In most cases, initial crude purities were >80%, and overall isolated yields were in the 40-88% range.

  3. Topological modes bound to dislocations in mechanical metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulose, Jayson; Chen, Bryan Gin-Ge; Vitelli, Vincenzo

    2015-02-01

    Mechanical metamaterials are artificial structures with unusual properties, such as negative Poisson ratio, bistability or tunable vibrational properties, that originate in the geometry of their unit cell. Often at the heart of such unusual behaviour is a soft mode: a motion that does not significantly stretch or compress the links between constituent elements. When activated by motors or external fields, soft modes become the building blocks of robots and smart materials. Here, we demonstrate the existence of topological soft modes that can be positioned at desired locations in a metamaterial while being robust against a wide range of structural deformations or changes in material parameters. These protected modes, localized at dislocations in deformed kagome and square lattices, are the mechanical analogue of topological states bound to defects in electronic systems. We create physical realizations of the topological modes in prototypes of kagome lattices built out of rigid triangular plates. We show mathematically that they originate from the interplay between two Berry phases: the Burgers vector of the dislocation and the topological polarization of the lattice. Our work paves the way towards engineering topologically protected nanomechanical structures for molecular robotics or information storage and read-out.

  4. Viral fitness: relation to drug resistance mutations and mechanisms involved: nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutations.

    PubMed

    Weber, Jan; Henry, Kenneth R; Arts, Eric J; Quiñones-Mateu, Miguel E

    2007-03-01

    Nucleoside and nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors constitute the backbone of highly active antiretroviral therapy in the treatment of HIV-1 infection. One of the major obstacles in achieving the long-term efficacy of anti-HIV-1 therapy is the development of resistance. The advent of resistance mutations is usually accompanied by a change in viral replicative fitness. This review focuses on the most common nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-associated mutations and their effects on HIV-1 replicative fitness. Recent studies have explained the two main mechanisms of resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and their role in HIV-1 replicative fitness. The first involves mutations directly interfering with binding or incorporation and seems to impact replicative fitness more adversely than the second mechanism, which involves enhanced excision of the newly incorporated analogue. Further studies have helped explain the antagonistic effects between amino acid substitutions, K65R, L74V, M184V, and thymidine analogue mutations, showing how viral replicative fitness influences the evolution of thymidine analogue resistance pathways. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance mutations impact HIV-1 replicative fitness to a lesser extent than protease resistance mutations. The monitoring of viral replicative fitness may help in the management of HIV-1 infection in highly antiretroviral-experienced individuals.

  5. Fluoride-Cleavable, Fluorescently Labelled Reversible Terminators: Synthesis and Use in Primer Extension

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, Diana C; Serva, Saulius; D'Onofrio, Jennifer; Keller, Angelika; Lubys, Arvydas; Kurg, Ants; Remm, Maido; Engels, Joachim W

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescent 2′-deoxynucleotides containing a protecting group at the 3′-O-position are reversible terminators that enable array-based DNA sequencing-by-synthesis (SBS) approaches. Herein, we describe the synthesis and full characterisation of four reversible terminators bearing a 3′-blocking moiety and a linker-dye system that is removable under the same fluoride-based treatment. Each nucleotide analogue has a different fluorophore attached to the base through a fluoride-cleavable linker and a 2-cyanoethyl moiety as the 3′-blocking group, which can be removed by using a fluoride treatment as well. Furthermore, we identified a DNA polymerase, namely, RevertAid M-MuLV reverse transcriptase, which can incorporate the four modified reversible terminators. The synthesised nucleotides and the optimised DNA polymerase were used on CodeLink slides spotted with hairpin oligonucleotides to demonstrate their potential in a cyclic reversible terminating approach. PMID:21294195

  6. Covariant entropy bound and loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Wilson-Ewing, Edward

    2008-09-15

    We examine Bousso's covariant entropy bound conjecture in the context of radiation filled, spatially flat, Friedmann-Robertson-Walker models. The bound is violated near the big bang. However, the hope has been that quantum gravity effects would intervene and protect it. Loop quantum cosmology provides a near ideal setting for investigating this issue. For, on the one hand, quantum geometry effects resolve the singularity and, on the other hand, the wave function is sharply peaked at a quantum corrected but smooth geometry, which can supply the structure needed to test the bound. We find that the bound is respected. We suggest that the bound need not be an essential ingredient for a quantum gravity theory but may emerge from it under suitable circumstances.

  7. Upper bounds on sequential decoding performance parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jelinek, F.

    1974-01-01

    This paper presents the best obtainable random coding and expurgated upper bounds on the probabilities of undetectable error, of t-order failure (advance to depth t into an incorrect subset), and of likelihood rise in the incorrect subset, applicable to sequential decoding when the metric bias G is arbitrary. Upper bounds on the Pareto exponent are also presented. The G-values optimizing each of the parameters of interest are determined, and are shown to lie in intervals that in general have nonzero widths. The G-optimal expurgated bound on undetectable error is shown to agree with that for maximum likelihood decoding of convolutional codes, and that on failure agrees with the block code expurgated bound. Included are curves evaluating the bounds for interesting choices of G and SNR for a binary-input quantized-output Gaussian additive noise channel.

  8. Mutually unbiased bases and bound entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiesmayr, Beatrix C.; Löffler, Wolfgang

    2014-04-01

    In this contribution we relate two different key concepts: mutually unbiased bases (MUBs) and entanglement. We provide a general toolbox for analyzing and comparing entanglement of quantum states for different dimensions and numbers of particles. In particular we focus on bound entanglement, i.e. highly mixed states which cannot be distilled by local operations and classical communications. For a certain class of states—for which the state-space forms a ‘magic’ simplex—we analyze the set of bound entangled states detected by the MUB criterion for different dimensions d and number of particles n. We find that the geometry is similar for different d and n, consequently the MUB criterion opens possibilities to investigate the typicality of positivity under partial transposition (PPT)-bound and multipartite bound entanglement more deeply and provides a simple experimentally feasible tool to detect bound entanglement.

  9. Rigorous bounds for optimal dynamical decoupling

    SciTech Connect

    Uhrig, Goetz S.; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2010-07-15

    We present rigorous performance bounds for the optimal dynamical decoupling pulse sequence protecting a quantum bit (qubit) against pure dephasing. Our bounds apply under the assumption of instantaneous pulses and of bounded perturbing environment and qubit-environment Hamiltonians such as those realized by baths of nuclear spins in quantum dots. We show that if the total sequence time is fixed the optimal sequence can be used to make the distance between the protected and unperturbed qubit states arbitrarily small in the number of applied pulses. If, on the other hand, the minimum pulse interval is fixed and the total sequence time is allowed to scale with the number of pulses, then longer sequences need not always be advantageous. The rigorous bound may serve as a testbed for approximate treatments of optimal decoupling in bounded models of decoherence.

  10. Design, synthesis, evaluation, and structure of vitamin D analogues with furan side chains.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Ramón; Zacconi, Flavia; Sussman, Fredy; Ordóñez-Morán, Paloma; Muñoz, Alberto; Huet, Tiphaine; Molnár, Ferdinand; Moras, Dino; Rochel, Natacha; Maestro, Miguel; Mouriño, Antonio

    2012-01-09

    Based on the crystal structures of human vitamin D receptor (hVDR) bound to 1α,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D(3) (1,25 D) and superagonist ligands, we previously designed new superagonist ligands with a tetrahydrofuran ring at the side chain that optimize the aliphatic side-chain conformation through an entropy benefit. Following a similar strategy, four novel vitamin D analogues with aromatic furan side chains (3a, 3b, 4a, 4b) have now been developed. The triene system has been constructed by an efficient stereoselective intramolecular cyclization of an enol triflate (A-ring precursor) followed by a Suzuki-Miyaura coupling of the resulting intermediate with an alkenyl boronic ester (CD-side chain, upper fragment). The furan side chains have been constructed by gold chemistry. These analogues exhibit significant pro-differentiation effects and transactivation potency. The crystal structure of 3a in a complex with the ligand-binding domain of hVDR revealed that the side-chain furanic ring adopts two conformations.

  11. High resolution structure of an M23 peptidase with a substrate analogue

    PubMed Central

    Grabowska, Maja; Jagielska, Elzbieta; Czapinska, Honorata; Bochtler, Matthias; Sabala, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    LytM is a Staphylococcus aureus autolysin and a homologue of the S. simulans lysostaphin. Both enzymes are members of M23 metallopeptidase family (MEROPS) comprising primarily bacterial peptidoglycan hydrolases. LytM occurs naturally in a latent form, but can be activated by cleavage of an inhibitory N-terminal proregion. Here, we present a 1.45 Å crystal structure of LytM catalytic domain with a transition state analogue, tetraglycine phosphinate, bound in the active site. In the electron density, the active site of the peptidase, the phosphinate and the “diglycine” fragment on the P1′ side of the transition state analogue are very well defined. The density is much poorer or even absent for the P1 side of the ligand. The structure is consistent with the involvement of His260 and/or His291 in the activation of the water nucleophile and suggests a possible catalytic role for Tyr204, which we confirmed by mutagenesis. Possible mechanisms of catalysis and the structural basis of substrate specificity are discussed based on the structure analysis. PMID:26437833

  12. Genuine modern analogues of Precambrian stromatolites from caldera lakes of Niuafo'ou Island, Tonga.

    PubMed

    Kazmierczak, Józef; Kempe, Stephan

    2006-03-01

    Calcareous or dolomitic, often secondarily silicified, laminated microbial structures known as stromatolites are important keys to reconstruct the chemical and biotic evolution of the early ocean. Most authors assume that cyanobacteria-associated microbialitic structures described from Shark Bay, Western Australia, and Exuma Sound, Bahamas, represent modern marine analogues for Precambrian stromatolites. Although they resemble the Precambrian forms macroscopically, their microstructure and mineralogical composition differ from those characterizing their purported ancient counterparts. Most Precambrian stromatolites are composed of presumably in situ precipitated carbonates, while their assumed modern marine analogues are predominantly products of accretion of grains trapped and bound by microbial, predominantly cyanobacterial, benthic mats and biofilms and only occasionally by their physicochemical activity. It has therefore been suggested that the carbonate chemistry of early Precambrian seawater differed significantly from modern seawater, and that some present-day quasi-marine or non-marine environments supporting growth of calcareous microbialites reflect the hydrochemical conditions controlling the calcification potential of Precambrian microbes better than modern seawater. Here we report the discovery of a non-marine environment sustaining growth of calcareous cyanobacterial microbialites showing macroscopic and microscopic features resembling closely those described from many Precambrian stromatolites.

  13. Conformational studies of immunodominant myelin basic protein 1-11 analogues using NMR and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Laimou, Despina; Lazoura, Eliada; Troganis, Anastassios N; Matsoukas, Minos-Timotheos; Deraos, Spyros N; Katsara, Maria; Matsoukas, John; Apostolopoulos, Vasso; Tselios, Theodore V

    2011-11-01

    Τwo dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance studies complimented by molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to investigate the conformation of the immunodominant epitope of acetylated myelin basic protein residues 1-11 (Ac-MBP(1-11)) and its altered peptide ligands, mutated at position 4 to an alanine (Ac-MBP(1-11)[4A]) or a tyrosine residue (Ac-MBP(1-11)[4Y]). Conformational analysis of the three analogues indicated that they adopt an extended conformation in DMSO solution as no long distance NOE connectivities were observed and seem to have a similar conformation when bound to the active site of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC II). The interaction of each peptide with MHC class II I-A(u) was further investigated in order to explore the molecular mechanism of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis induction/inhibition in mice. The present findings indicate that the Gln(3) residue, which serves as a T-cell receptor (TCR) contact site in the TCR/peptide/I-A(u) complex, has a different orientation in the mutated analogues especially in the Ac-MBP(1-11)[4A] peptide. In particular the side chain of Gln(3) is not solvent exposed as for the native Ac-MBP(1-11) and it is not available for interaction with the TCR.

  14. Conformational studies of immunodominant myelin basic protein 1-11 analogues using NMR and molecular modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laimou, Despina; Lazoura, Eliada; Troganis, Anastassios N.; Matsoukas, Minos-Timotheos; Deraos, Spyros N.; Katsara, Maria; Matsoukas, John; Apostolopoulos, Vasso; Tselios, Theodore V.

    2011-11-01

    Τwo dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance studies complimented by molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to investigate the conformation of the immunodominant epitope of acetylated myelin basic protein residues 1-11 (Ac-MBP1-11) and its altered peptide ligands, mutated at position 4 to an alanine (Ac-MBP1-11[4A]) or a tyrosine residue (Ac-MBP1-11[4Y]). Conformational analysis of the three analogues indicated that they adopt an extended conformation in DMSO solution as no long distance NOE connectivities were observed and seem to have a similar conformation when bound to the active site of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC II). The interaction of each peptide with MHC class II I-Au was further investigated in order to explore the molecular mechanism of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis induction/inhibition in mice. The present findings indicate that the Gln3 residue, which serves as a T-cell receptor (TCR) contact site in the TCR/peptide/I-Au complex, has a different orientation in the mutated analogues especially in the Ac-MBP1-11[4A] peptide. In particular the side chain of Gln3 is not solvent exposed as for the native Ac-MBP1-11 and it is not available for interaction with the TCR.

  15. Time reversal communication system

    DOEpatents

    Candy, James V.; Meyer, Alan W.

    2008-12-02

    A system of transmitting a signal through a channel medium comprises digitizing the signal, time-reversing the digitized signal, and transmitting the signal through the channel medium. The channel medium may be air, earth, water, tissue, metal, and/or non-metal.

  16. Reversible Chemochromic Hydrogen Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC), affiliated with the University of Central Florida, has invented a reversible pigment that changes from light beige to blue when exposed to hydrogen and back to light beige when exposed to atmospheric oxygen. In laboratory and environmental studies, the FSEC pigment in its tape form failed to change color adequately when exposed to hydrogen after one day of exposure at Kennedy Space Center's Beach Corrosion Test Facility. The reversible hydrogen-detecting tape also lost its ability to change color after being placed in an environmental chamber at 45 C for one day. The first attempts at extruding the reversible pigment into various polymers were unsuccessful because of the pigment's poor thermal stability. The goal of this project was to formulate a pigment with improved thermal and environmental stability for extrusion into a variety of appropriate polymer matrices. The formulation of the reversible hydrogen-detecting pigment was modified by removing one reagent and chemically modifying the hydrogen sensitive ingredient. This was intended to improve the hydrophobicity of the pigment and alter the thermal degradation mechanism.

  17. Engineering Encounters: Reverse Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGowan, Veronica Cassone; Ventura, Marcia; Bell, Philip

    2017-01-01

    This column presents ideas and techniques to enhance your science teaching. This month's issue shares information on how students' everyday experiences can support science learning through engineering design. In this article, the authors outline a reverse-engineering model of instruction and describe one example of how it looked in our fifth-grade…

  18. Reversing Discrimination: A Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pati, Gopal; Reilly, Charles W.

    1977-01-01

    Examines the debate over affirmative action and reverse discrimination, and discusses how and why the present dilemma has developed. Suggests that organizations can best address the problem through an honest, in-depth analysis of their organizational structure and management practices. (JG)

  19. Reversing Flow Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, P. D.

    1986-04-01

    The Reversing Flow Test Facility (RFTF) is intended for the study of fluid flow and heat transfer under the reversing-flow conditions that occur in Stirling engines. The facility consists of four major parts: (1) Mechanical Drive - two cylinders with cam-driven pistons which generate the reversing gas flow, (2) Test Section - a U-shaped section containing instrumented test pieces, (3) Instruments -l high-speed transducers for measuring gas pressure and temperature, piston positions, and other system parameters, and (4) Data Acquisition System - a computer-based system able to acquire, store, display and analyze the data from the instruments. The RFTF can operate at pressures up to 8.0 MPa, hot-side temperatures to 800 deg. C, and flow-reversal frequencies to 50 Hz. Operation to data has used helium as the working gas at pressures of 3.0 and 6.0 MPa, at ambient temperature, and at frequencies from 1 to 50 Hz. The results show that both frictional and inertial parts of the pressure drop are significant in the heater, coolers and connecting tubes; the inertial part is negligible in the regenerators. In all cases, the frictional part of the pressure drop is nearly in phase with the mass flow.

  20. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, R; Ramadan, H; Bamford, J

    2013-01-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is an underdiagnosed condition which usually presents as severe headache with or without neurological deficit. We report the case of a 55-year-old woman who presented with headache and multifocal intracerebral haemorrhage. We review the literature regarding the presentation, pathophysiology and management of RCVS and discuss how to differentiate it from cerebral vasculitis.

  1. Language Reversion Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Bot, Kees; Clyne, Michael

    1989-01-01

    A longitudinal study on language maintenance and loss among Dutch-English bilinguals in Australia revealed little loss in both languages over the years. This leads to the hypothesis of a "critical threshold" that must be reached to retain the second language. First language reversion appears commonly among immigrants who did not reach this…

  2. Bound-free Spectra for Diatomic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenke, David W.

    2012-01-01

    It is now recognized that prediction of radiative heating of entering space craft requires explicit treatment of the radiation field from the infrared (IR) to the vacuum ultra violet (VUV). While at low temperatures and longer wavelengths, molecular radiation is well described by bound-bound transitions, in the short wavelength, high temperature regime, bound-free transitions can play an important role. In this work we describe first principles calculations we have carried out for bound-bound and bound-free transitions in N2, O2, C2, CO, CN, NO, and N2+. Compared to bound ]bound transitions, bound-free transitions have several particularities that make them different to deal with. These include more complicated line shapes and a dependence of emission intensity on both bound state diatomic and atomic concentrations. These will be discussed in detail below. The general procedure we used was the same for all species. The first step is to generate potential energy curves, transition moments, and coupling matrix elements by carrying out ab initio electronic structure calculations. These calculations are expensive, and thus approximations need to be made in order to make the calculations tractable. The only practical method we have to carry out these calculations is the internally contracted multi-reference configuration interaction (icMRCI) method as implemented in the program suite Molpro. This is a widely used method for these kinds of calculations, and is capable of generating very accurate results. With this method, we must first of choose which electrons to correlate, the one-electron basis to use, and then how to generate the molecular orbitals.

  3. Locating Bound Structures in the Accelerating Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, David; Batuski, D. J.

    2013-01-01

    Given the overwhelming evidence of the universe’s accelerating expansion, the question of what structures are gravitationally bound becomes one of utmost interest. Dunner et al. 2006 (D06) and Busha et al. 2003 (B03) set out to answer this question analytically, and they arrived at fairly different answers owing to the differences in their assumptions of velocities at the present epoch. Applying their criteria to different superclusters, it’s possible to make predictions about what structures may be bound. We apply the criteria of D06 and B03 to the Aquarius, Microscopium, Corona Borealis, and Shapley superclusters to make predictions about what structures might be bound and compare with the results of simple N-body simulations to determine which method is a better predictor and to determine the likelihood that parts or all of the superclusters listed above are bound. We find that D06 tend to predict more structure to be bound than B03, and the results of the N-body simulations usually lie somewhere in between the two sets of predictions. Observational evidence, and simulation data suggests that pairs of clusters in Aquarius and Microscopium are gravitationally bound, and that Shapley contains a large complex of clusters that are bound, along with some additional bound pairs. The likelihood that any of the clusters in Corona Borealis are bound to one another is very small, contrary to the claims of Small et al. 1998, who claimed that the entire supercluster is likely gravitationally bound. Busha M. T., Adams F. C., Wechsler R. H., Evrard A. E., 2003, ApJ, 596, 713 Dunner R., Araya P. A., Meza A., Reisenegger A., 2006, MNRAS, 306, 803 Small T. A., Ma C., Sargent W. L. W., Hamilton D., 1998, ApJ, 492, 45

  4. Functionalized Congener Approach to Muscarinic Antagonists: Analogues of Pirenzepine

    PubMed Central

    Karton, Yishai; Bradbury, Barton J.; Baumgold, Jesse; Paek, Robert; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    The M1-selective muscarinic receptor antagonist pirenzepine (5,11-dihydro-11-[(4-methyl-1-piperazinyl)acetyl]-6H-pyrido[2,3-b] [1,4]benzodiazepin-6-one) was derivatized to explore points of attachment of functionalized side chains for the synthesis of receptor probes and ligands for affinity chromatography. The analogues prepared were evaluated in competitive binding assays versus [3H]-N-methylscopolamine at four muscarinic receptor subtypes (m1AChR-m4AChR) in membranes from rat heart tissue and transfected A9L cells. 9-(Hydroxymethyl)pirenzepine, 8-(methylthio)pirenzepine, and a series of 8-aminosulfonyl derivatives were synthesized. Several 5-substituted analogues of pirenzepine also were prepared. An alternate series of analogues substituted on the 4-position of the piperazine ring was prepared by reaction of 4-desmethylpirenzepine with various electrophiles. An N-chloroethyl analogue of pirenzepine was shown to form a reactive aziridine species in aqueous buffer yet failed to affinity label muscarinic receptors. Within a series of aminoalkyl analogues, the affinity increased as the length of the alkyl chain increased. Shorter chain analogues were generally much less potent than pirenzepine, and longer analogues (7–10 carbons) were roughly as potent as pirenzepine at m1 receptors, but were nonselective. Depending on the methylene chain length, acylation or alkyl substitution of the terminal amine also influenced the affinity at muscarinic receptors. PMID:2066986

  5. Design of multi-epitope, analogue-based cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Fikes, John D; Sette, Alessandro

    2003-09-01

    The current objective of our cancer programme is to develop an effective vaccine based on rationally designed T cell epitope analogues, for use in the adjuvant setting for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and colon cancer. Analogue epitopes, enhanced for either human leukocyte antigen (HLA) binding or T cell receptor (TCR) signalling, have been shown to be more effective at breaking immunological tolerance than cognate wild-type epitopes. Although encouraging early-phase clinical data has been obtained by others using a limited number of HLA-A2-restricted epitope analogues, the clinical benefits and immune correlates for vaccines comprised of multiple epitope analogues restricted by multiple HLA supertypes remains to be investigated. Clinical studies are currently being conducted on EP-2101, a prototype vaccine that delivers multiple HLA-A2-restricted analogue epitopes. In parallel, fixed anchor and heteroclitic analogues restricted by three other commonly expressed HLA supertypes are being identified. These analogues will be incorporated into future vaccines including optimised minigenes (epigenes) and tested in preclinical and clinical studies addressing various different cancer indications.

  6. Analogues of erectile dysfunction drugs: an under-recognised threat.

    PubMed

    Poon, W T; Lam, Y H; Lai, C K; Chan, Albert Y W; Mak, Tony W L

    2007-10-01

    To investigate the problem of drug analogue adulteration in male erectile dysfunction health products. Survey of over-the-counter male erectile dysfunction health products available in convenience stores and pharmacies in Hong Kong. Tertiary referral centre for clinical toxicology analysis in Hong Kong. The pattern and extent of adulteration of male erectile dysfunction health products with sildenafil, tadalafil, and vardenafil as well as their structurally modified analogues. Of 26 products studied, one (4%) was found to contain undeclared sildenafil, while 14 (54%) contained drug analogues of different kinds. The latter included acetildenafil, hydroxyacetildenafil, hydroxyhomosildenafil, and piperidenafil. The first three were analogues of sildenafil and the last was an analogue of vardenafil. One young patient presented with ataxia after taking an acetildenafil-containing product. The positive rate of concealed drug analogues in male erectile dysfunction health products is alarmingly high. Such analogues are difficult to detect by ordinary laboratory methods, and might be used in an attempt to evade regulatory inspection. Without going through the stringent drug testing process, the adverse effects of these chemicals remain largely unknown and unpredictable. Effective surveillance system and control measures are needed urgently. The medical profession and the public should be alerted to this under-recognised threat.

  7. Reverse inequalities in {mu}-deformed Segal-Bargmann analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Angulo Aguila, Carlos; Sontz, Stephen Bruce

    2006-04-15

    We prove reverse hypercontractivity inequalities as well as reverse log-Sobolev inequalities in the context of a space of holomorphic functions, which is called the {mu}-deformed Segal-Bargmann space and arises in the works of Wigner, Rosenblum, and Marron. To achieve this we define {mu}-deformations of energy and entropy. Our principle results generalize earlier works of Carlen and Sontz. We also show that the semigroup of this theory is L{sup p} bounded, and we conjecture that it is L{sup p} contractive and, even more strongly, that it is hypercontractive.

  8. Occult HIV-1 drug resistance to thymidine analogues following failure of first-line tenofovir combined with a cytosine analogue and nevirapine or efavirenz in sub Saharan Africa: a retrospective multi-centre cohort study.

    PubMed

    Gregson, John; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Marconi, Vincent C; van Vuuren, Cloete; Ndembi, Nicaise; Hamers, Raph L; Kanki, Phyllis; Hoffmann, Christopher J; Lockman, Shahin; Pillay, Deenan; de Oliveira, Tulio; Clumeck, Nathan; Hunt, Gillian; Kerschberger, Bernhard; Shafer, Robert W; Yang, Chunfu; Raizes, Elliot; Kantor, Rami; Gupta, Ravindra K

    2017-03-01

    HIV-1 drug resistance to older thymidine analogue nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor drugs has been identified in sub-Saharan Africa in patients with virological failure of first-line combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) containing the modern nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor tenofovir. We aimed to investigate the prevalence and correlates of thymidine analogue mutations (TAM) in patients with virological failure of first-line tenofovir-containing ART. We retrospectively analysed patients from 20 studies within the TenoRes collaboration who had locally defined viral failure on first-line therapy with tenofovir plus a cytosine analogue (lamivudine or emtricitabine) plus a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI; nevirapine or efavirenz) in sub-Saharan Africa. Baseline visits in these studies occurred between 2005 and 2013. To assess between-study and within-study associations, we used meta-regression and meta-analyses to compare patients with and without TAMs for the presence of resistance to tenofovir, cytosine analogue, or NNRTIs. Of 712 individuals with failure of first-line tenofovir-containing regimens, 115 (16%) had at least one TAM. In crude comparisons, patients with TAMs had lower CD4 counts at treatment initiation than did patients without TAMs (60·5 cells per μL [IQR 21·0-128·0] in patients with TAMS vs 95·0 cells per μL [37·0-177·0] in patients without TAMs; p=0·007) and were more likely to have tenofovir resistance (93 [81%] of 115 patients with TAMs vs 352 [59%] of 597 patients without TAMs; p<0·0001), NNRTI resistance (107 [93%] vs 462 [77%]; p<0·0001), and cytosine analogue resistance (100 [87%] vs 378 [63%]; p=0·0002). We detected associations between TAMs and drug resistance mutations both between and within studies; the correlation between the study-level proportion of patients with tenofovir resistance and TAMs was 0·64 (p<0·0001), and the odds ratio for tenofovir resistance comparing patients with

  9. Occult HIV-1 drug resistance to thymidine analogues following failure of first-line tenofovir combined with a cytosine analogue and nevirapine or efavirenz in sub Saharan Africa: a retrospective multi-centre cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Gregson, John; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Marconi, Vincent C; van Vuuren, Cloete; ChB, MB; Ndembi, Nicaise; Hamers, Raph L; Kanki, Phyllis; Hoffmann, Christopher J; Lockman, Shahin; Pillay, Deenan; de Oliveira, Tulio; Clumeck, Nathan; Hunt, Gillian; Kerschberger, Bernhard; Shafer, Robert W; Yang, Chunfu; Raizes, Elliot; Kantor, Rami; Gupta, Ravindra K

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background HIV-1 drug resistance to older thymidine analogue nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor drugs has been identified in sub-Saharan Africa in patients with virological failure of first-line combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) containing the modern nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor tenofovir. We aimed to investigate the prevalence and correlates of thymidine analogue mutations (TAM) in patients with virological failure of first-line tenofovir-containing ART. Methods We retrospectively analysed patients from 20 studies within the TenoRes collaboration who had locally defined viral failure on first-line therapy with tenofovir plus a cytosine analogue (lamivudine or emtricitabine) plus a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI; nevirapine or efavirenz) in sub-Saharan Africa. Baseline visits in these studies occurred between 2005 and 2013. To assess between-study and within-study associations, we used meta-regression and meta-analyses to compare patients with and without TAMs for the presence of resistance to tenofovir, cytosine analogue, or NNRTIs. Findings Of 712 individuals with failure of first-line tenofovir-containing regimens, 115 (16%) had at least one TAM. In crude comparisons, patients with TAMs had lower CD4 counts at treatment initiation than did patients without TAMs (60·5 cells per μL [IQR 21·0–128·0] in patients with TAMS vs 95·0 cells per μL [37·0–177·0] in patients without TAMs; p=0·007) and were more likely to have tenofovir resistance (93 [81%] of 115 patients with TAMs vs 352 [59%] of 597 patients without TAMs; p<0·0001), NNRTI resistance (107 [93%] vs 462 [77%]; p<0·0001), and cytosine analogue resistance (100 [87%] vs 378 [63%]; p=0·0002). We detected associations between TAMs and drug resistance mutations both between and within studies; the correlation between the study-level proportion of patients with tenofovir resistance and TAMs was 0·64 (p<0·0001), and the odds ratio for

  10. Properties of bound trifluoroethanol complexes with horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D C; Dahlquist, F W

    1982-07-20

    The substrate analogue 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) has been used as a 19F NMR probe of the active site of alcohol dehydrogenase from horse liver (LADH). We are able to directly observe a single resonance assigned to TFE in its ternary complex with LADH and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD). The chemical shift of this resonance is independent of pH between values of 6.2 and 8.9, suggesting that bound TFE does not change ionization state in this range. Both by 19F NMR self-exchange measurements and by ligand-displacement studies with pyrazole, we also find that displacement of TFE from its ternary complex with NAD is a linear function of proton concentration over a similar pH range, with more rapid desorption occurring at lower pH values. This suggests that the pK of 6.4 for this process seen previously by Kvassman and Pettersson [Kvassman, J., & Pettersson, G. (1980) Eur. J. Biochem. 103, 557] is not due to the ionization of bound TFE. These studies also show that the bound lifetime of TFE in its ternary complex with LADH and NAD is quite long (400s) at pH 8.7, suggesting the use of TFE as a kinetic trapping reagent in single-turnover stopped-flow experiments. Binding isotherms of NAD to LADH saturated with TFE at pH 8.7 or with pyrazole at pH 7.5 reveal essentially no cooperative behavior. The displacement time courses described above are all adequately fit as first-order processes, thus giving no evidence for site heterogeneity or site-site interaction in the binding of these ligands to dimeric LADH. TFE and pyrazole are used as reagents to further explore the question of site-site interaction from a kinetic point of view in the following paper [Anderson, D. C., & Dahlquist, F.W. (1982) Biochemistry (following paper in this issue)].

  11. Synthesis of pacidamycin analogues via an Ugi-multicomponent reaction.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Kazuya; Sakagami, Masahiro; Feng, Fei; Takahashi, Fumiyo; Uotani, Kouichi; Togame, Hiroko; Takemoto, Hiroshi; Ichikawa, Satoshi; Matsuda, Akira

    2012-07-15

    The second-generation synthesis of 3'-hydroxypacidamycin D (2) has been accomplished via an Ugi-four component reaction at a late stage of the synthesis. This approach provided ready access to a range of analogues including diastereomers of the diaminobutylic acid residue and hybrid-type analogues of mureidomycins. Biological evaluations of these analogues indicated that the stereochemistry at the diaminobutylic acid residue has a crucial impact on both the MraY biochemical inhibition and whole-cell antibacterial activity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Mars on Earth: soil analogues for future Mars missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marlow, Jeffrey J.; Martins, Zita; Sephton, Mark A.

    2008-04-01

    Preparations for missions to Mars are a major concern for scientists. Predicting how equipment and experiments will perform on the planet is difficult because tests are restricted to Earth. Mars soil analogues are being used to solve this problem. These terrestrial materials are chemically and physically similar to martian soils and, because they contain unusual minerals and trace amounts of organic matter, are scientifically interesting in their own right. However, no current analogue is appropriate for all necessary tests. Here we describe Mars soil analogues, identify limitations and suggest the need for new Mars simulants.

  13. Synthesis of chalcone analogues with increased antileishmanial activity.

    PubMed

    Boeck, Paula; Bandeira Falcão, Camila Alves; Leal, Paulo César; Yunes, Rosendo Augusto; Filho, Valdir Cechinel; Torres-Santos, Eduardo Caio; Rossi-Bergmann, Bartira

    2006-03-01

    Eighteen analogues of an active natural chalcone were synthesized using xanthoxyline and some derivatives, and these analogues were tested for selective activity against both promastigotes and intracellular amastigotes of Leishmania amazonensis in vitro. Three analogues (10, 12, and 19) containing nitro, fluorine or bromine groups, respectively, displayed increased selective activity against the parasites as compared with the natural chalcone. The nitrosylated chalcone 10 was also tested intralesionally in infected mice and was found to be as effective as Pentostan reference drug at a dose 100 times higher than that of the chalcone in controlling both the lesion growth and the parasite burden.

  14. A chemoselective and continuous synthesis of m-sulfamoylbenzamide analogues

    PubMed Central

    Verlee, Arno; Heugebaert, Thomas; van der Meer, Tom; Kerchev, Pavel I; Van Breusegem, Frank

    2017-01-01

    For the synthesis of m-sulfamoylbenzamide analogues, small molecules which are known for their bioactivity, a chemoselective procedure has been developed starting from m-(chlorosulfonyl)benzoyl chloride. Although a chemoselective process in batch was already reported, a continuous-flow process reveals an increased selectivity at higher temperatures and without catalysts. In total, 15 analogues were synthesized, using similar conditions, with yields ranging between 65 and 99%. This is the first automated and chemoselective synthesis of m-sulfamoylbenzamide analogues. PMID:28326139

  15. Fluorescent polyene ceramide analogues as membrane probes.

    PubMed

    Nieves, Ingrid; Artetxe, Ibai; Abad, José Luis; Alonso, Alicia; Busto, Jon V; Fajarí, Lluís; Montes, L Ruth; Sot, Jesús; Delgado, Antonio; Goñi, Félix M

    2015-03-03

    Three ceramide analogues have been synthesized, with sphingosine-like chains containing five conjugated double bonds. Pentaene I has an N-palmitoyl acyl chain, while the other two pentaenes contain also a doxyl radical, respectively, at C5 (Penta5dox) and at C16 (Penta16dox) positions of the N-acyl chain. Pentaene I maximum excitation and emission wavelengths in a phospholipid bilayer are 353 and 478 nm, respectively. Pentaene I does not segregate from the other lipids in the way natural ceramide does, but rather mixes with them in a selective way according to the lipid phases involved. Fluorescence confocal microscopy studies show that when lipid domains in different physical states coexist, Pentaene I emission is higher in gel than in fluid domains, and in liquid-ordered than in liquid-disordered areas. Electron paramagnetic resonance of the pentaene doxyl probes confirms that these molecules are sensitive to the physical state of the bilayer. Calorimetric and fluorescence quenching experiments suggest that the lipids under study orient themselves in lipid bilayers with their polar moieties located at the lipid-water interface. The doxyl radical in the N-acyl chain quenches the fluorescence of the pentaene group when in close proximity. Because of this property, Penta16dox can detect gel-fluid transitions in phospholipids. The availability of probes for lipids in the gel phase is important in view of novel evidence for the existence of gel microdomains in cell membranes.

  16. Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma mimicking salivary adenoma.

    PubMed

    Williams, Lindsay; Chiosea, Simion I

    2013-12-01

    Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma (MASC) is a recently described salivary gland tumor characterized by ETV6 translocation. It appears that prior studies have identified MASC by reviewing salivary gland carcinomas, such as acinic cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, not otherwise specified. To address the possibility of MASC mimicking benign salivary neoplasms we reviewed 12 salivary gland (cyst)adenomas diagnosed prior to the discovery of MASC. One encapsulated (cyst)adenoma of the parotid gland demonstrated features of MASC. The diagnosis was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization with an ETV6 break-apart probe. An unusual complex pattern of ETV6 rearrangement with duplication of the telomeric/distal ETV6 probe was identified. This case illustrates that MASC may mimic salivary (cyst)adenomas. To more accurately assess true clinical and morphologic spectrum of MASC, future studies may have to include review of salivary (cyst)adenomas. The differential diagnosis of MASC may have to be expanded to include cases resembling salivary (cyst)adenomas.

  17. X-rays from Green Pea analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brorby, M.; Kaaret, P.

    2017-09-01

    X-ray observations of two metal-deficient luminous compact galaxies (LCG; SHOC 486 and SDSS J084220.94+115000.2) with properties similar to the so-called Green Pea galaxies were obtained using the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Green Pea galaxies are relatively small, compact (a few kpc across) galaxies that get their green colour from strong [O iii] λ5007 Å emission, an indicator of intense, recent star formation. These two galaxies were predicted to have the highest observed count rates, using the X-ray luminosity-star formation rate (LX-SFR) relation for X-ray binaries, from a statistically complete sample drawn from optical criteria. We determine the X-ray luminosity relative to SFR and metallicity for these two galaxies. Neither exhibits any evidence of active galactic nuclei, and we suspect that the X-ray emission originates from unresolved populations of high-mass X-ray binaries. We discuss the LX-SFR-metallicity plane for star-forming galaxies and show that the two LCGs are consistent with the prediction of this relation. This is the first detection of Green Pea analogues in X-rays.

  18. Actions of Thyroid Hormone Analogues on Chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Glinsky, Gennadi V.

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular domain of plasma membrane integrin αvβ3 contains a receptor for thyroid hormone (L-thyroxine, T4; 3,5,3′-triiodo-L-thyronine, T3); this receptor also binds tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac), a derivative of T4. Tetrac inhibits the binding of T4 and T3 to the integrin. Fractalkine (CX3CL1) is a chemokine relevant to inflammatory processes in the CNS that are microglia-dependent but also important to normal brain development. Expression of the CX3CL1 gene is downregulated by tetrac, suggesting that T4 and T3 may stimulate fractalkine expression. Independently of its specific receptor (CX3CR1), fractalkine binds to αvβ3 at a site proximal to the thyroid hormone-tetrac receptor and changes the physical state of the integrin. Tetrac also affects expression of the genes for other CNS-relevant chemokines, including CCL20, CCL26, CXCL2, CXCL3, and CXCL10. The chemokine products of these genes are important to vascularity of the brain, particularly of the choroid plexus, to inflammatory processes in the CNS and, in certain cases, to neuroprotection. Thyroid hormones are known to contribute to regulation of each of these CNS functions. We propose that actions of thyroid hormone and hormone analogues on chemokine gene expression contribute to regulation of inflammatory processes in brain and of brain blood vessel formation and maintenance. PMID:27493972

  19. Isomer-shift analogue in neutron resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, A.; Pabst, D.; Pikelner, L. B.; Seidel, K.

    1981-06-01

    For the first time, the recently predicted chemical shift of neutron resonances, to be regarded as an analogue to the Mössbauer isomer shift, has been experimentally observed studying the 6.67 eV resonance of 238U. The experimental shifts were determined by a chi-square fitting technique from the time-of-flight transmission spectra of metallic uranium and four uranium compounds measured at the Dubna IBR-30 pulsed reactor. A computational method has been applied to estimate, and compensate for, the influence of the crystal-lattice vibrations on the experimental values thus obtained. The electron density differences at the nucleus have been calculated for the various sample pairs using available data on chemical X-ray shifts in uranium compounds, on Mössbauer isomer shifts in isovalent neptunium compounds and on free-ion electron densities. The resonance shift results lead to the conclusion that the mean-square charge radius of 238U diminishes by 1.7 -0.8+1.2 fm 2 upon capturing the resonance neutron.

  20. Extending the structure-activity relationship study of marine natural ningalin B analogues as P-glycoprotein inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Wong, Iris L K; Peng, Kai; Liu, Zhen; Wang, Peng; Jiang, Tingfu; Jiang, Tao; Chow, Larry M C; Wan, Sheng Biao

    2017-01-05

    In the present study, a total of 25 novel ningalin B analogues were synthesized and evaluated for their P-gp modulating activity in a P-gp overexpressed breast cancer cell line LCC6MDR. Preliminary structure-activity study shows that A ring and its two methoxy groups are important pharmacophores for P-gp inhibiting activity. Among all derivatives, 23 is the most potent P-gp modulator with EC50 of 120-165 nM in reversing paclitaxel, DOX, vinblastine and vincristine resistance. It is relatively safe to use with selective index at least greater than 606 compared to verapamil. Mechanistic study demonstrates that compound 23 reverses P-gp mediated drug resistance by inhibiting transport activity of P-gp, thereby restoring intracellular drug accumulation. In summary, our study demonstrates that ningalin B analogue 23 is a non-cytotoxic and effective P-gp chemosensitizer that can be used in the future for reversing P-gp mediated clinical cancer drug resistance.

  1. Match-bounded String Rewriting Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geser, Alfons; Hofbauer, Dieter; Waldmann, Johannes

    2003-01-01

    We introduce a new class of automated proof methods for the termination of rewriting systems on strings. The basis of all these methods is to show that rewriting preserves regular languages. To this end, letters are annotated with natural numbers, called match heights. If the minimal height of all positions in a redex is h+1 then every position in the reduct will get height h+1. In a match-bounded system, match heights are globally bounded. Using recent results on deleting systems, we prove that rewriting by a match-bounded system preserves regular languages. Hence it is decidable whether a given rewriting system has a given match bound. We also provide a sufficient criterion for the abence of a match-bound. The problem of existence of a match-bound is still open. Match-boundedness for all strings can be used as an automated criterion for termination, for match-bounded systems are terminating. This criterion can be strengthened by requiring match-boundedness only for a restricted set of strings, for instance the set of right hand sides of forward closures.

  2. SPAM: A Simple Approach for Profiling Bound Water Molecules.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guanglei; Swails, Jason M; Manas, Eric S

    2013-12-10

    A method that identifies the hydration shell structure of proteins and estimates the relative free energies of water molecules within that hydration shell is described. The method, which we call "SPAM" (maps spelled in reverse), utilizes explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to capture discrete hydration sites at the water-protein interface and computes a local free energy measure from the distribution of interaction energies between water and the environment at a specific site. SPAM is able to provide a qualitative estimate of the thermodynamic profile of bound water molecules that correlates nicely with well-studied structure-activity relationships and observed binding "hot spots". This is demonstrated in retrospective analyses of HIV1 protease and hen egg white lysozyme, where the effects of water displacement and solvent binding have been studied extensively. The simplicity and effectiveness of SPAM allow for prospective application during the drug discovery process.

  3. Operations of Majorana Bound States in Charge-qubit Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Ting; Wang, Zidan

    2014-03-01

    The experimental pursuit of Majorana bound state (MBS) in one-dimensional (1D) solid state systems has been brought into the limelight since the proposal of Kitaev's toy lattice model. Here we use the inductively coupled charge-qubit array to realize a tunable Kitaev model. With the advantages of the superconducting-qubit circuit, we can manipulate the parameters of Kitaev model and change the symmetry class to which the model Hamiltonian belongs from the class D to the class BDI. We also discuss a simple class DIII model constructed by coupling two copies of the class D charge-qubit array. Using the time reversal symmetry and a residual U(1) spin rotation symmetry of the model, we explore the possibility of implementing universal single topological qubit operations.

  4. Sound Velocity Bound and Neutron Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Bedaque, Paulo; Steiner, Andrew W.

    2015-01-21

    A conjecture that the velocity of sound in any medium is smaller than the velocity of light in vacuum divided by sqrt(3). Simple arguments support this bound in nonrelativistic and/or weakly coupled theories. Moreover, the bound has been demonstrated in several classes of strongly coupled theories with gravity duals and is saturated only in conformal theories. Here, we point out that the existence of neutron stars with masses around two solar masses combined with the knowledge of the equation of state of hadronic matter at low densities is in strong tension with this bound.

  5. Bounds on dark matter in solar orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.D.; Lau, E.L.; Taylor, A.H.; Dicus, D.A.; Teplitz, D.C.; Texas Univ., Austin; Maryland Univ., College Park )

    1989-07-01

    The possibility is considered that a spherical distribution of dark matter (DM), matter not visible with current instruments, is trapped in the sun's gravitational field. Bounds are placed from the motion of Uranus and Neptune, on the amount of DM that could be so trapped within the radius of those planets' orbits, as follows: from the Voyager 2, Uranus-flyby data new, more accurate ephemeris values are generated. Trapped DM mass is bounded by noting that such a distribution would increase the effective mass of the sun as seen by the outer planets and by using the new ephemeris values to bound such an increase. 34 refs.

  6. Sound Velocity Bound and Neutron Stars

    DOE PAGES

    Bedaque, Paulo; Steiner, Andrew W.

    2015-01-21

    A conjecture that the velocity of sound in any medium is smaller than the velocity of light in vacuum divided by sqrt(3). Simple arguments support this bound in nonrelativistic and/or weakly coupled theories. Moreover, the bound has been demonstrated in several classes of strongly coupled theories with gravity duals and is saturated only in conformal theories. Here, we point out that the existence of neutron stars with masses around two solar masses combined with the knowledge of the equation of state of hadronic matter at low densities is in strong tension with this bound.

  7. Sound velocity bound and neutron stars.

    PubMed

    Bedaque, Paulo; Steiner, Andrew W

    2015-01-23

    It has been conjectured that the velocity of sound in any medium is smaller than the velocity of light in vacuum divided by sqrt[3]. Simple arguments support this bound in nonrelativistic and/or weakly coupled theories. The bound has been demonstrated in several classes of strongly coupled theories with gravity duals and is saturated only in conformal theories. We point out that the existence of neutron stars with masses around two solar masses combined with the knowledge of the equation of state of hadronic matter at "low" densities is in strong tension with this bound.

  8. Lightweight Distance Bounding Protocol against Relay Attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Seok; Cho, Kookrae; Yum, Dae Hyun; Hong, Sung Je; Lee, Pil Joong

    Traditional authentication protocols are based on cryptographic techniques to achieve identity verification. Distance bounding protocols are an enhanced type of authentication protocol built upon both signal traversal time measurement and cryptographic techniques to accomplish distance verification as well as identity verification. A distance bounding protocol is usually designed to defend against the relay attack and the distance fraud attack. As there are applications to which the distance fraud attack is not a serious threat, we propose a streamlined distance bounding protocol that focuses on the relay attack. The proposed protocol is more efficient than previous protocols and has a low false acceptance rate under the relay attack.

  9. Pattern Search Algorithms for Bound Constrained Minimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Robert Michael; Torczon, Virginia

    1996-01-01

    We present a convergence theory for pattern search methods for solving bound constrained nonlinear programs. The analysis relies on the abstract structure of pattern search methods and an understanding of how the pattern interacts with the bound constraints. This analysis makes it possible to develop pattern search methods for bound constrained problems while only slightly restricting the flexibility present in pattern search methods for unconstrained problems. We prove global convergence despite the fact that pattern search methods do not have explicit information concerning the gradient and its projection onto the feasible region and consequently are unable to enforce explicitly a notion of sufficient feasible decrease.

  10. Paired Magmatic-Metallogenic Belts in Myanmar - an Andean Analogue?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, Nicholas; Robb, Laurence; Searle, Michael; Morley, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    Myanmar (Burma) is richly endowed in precious and base metals, having one of the most diverse collections of natural resources in SE Asia. Its geological history is dominated by the staged closing of Tethys and the suturing of Gondwana-derived continental fragments onto the South China craton during the Mesozoic-Cenozoic. The country is located at a crucial geologic juncture where the main convergent Tethyan collision zone swings south around the Namche Barwa Eastern Himalayan syntaxis. However, despite recent work, the geological and geodynamic history of Myanmar remains enigmatic. Plate margin processes, magmatism, metasomatism and the genesis of mineral deposits are intricately linked, and there has long been recognized a relationship between the distribution of certain mineral deposit types, and the tectonic settings which favour their genesis. A better knowledge of the regional tectonic evolution of a potential exploration jurisdiction is therefore crucial to understanding its minerals prospectivity. This strong association between tectonics and mineralization can equally be applied in reverse. By mapping out the spatial, and temporal, distribution of presumed co-genetic mineral deposits, coupled with an understanding of their collective metallogenetic origin, a better appreciation of the tectonic evolution of a terrane may be elucidated. Identification and categorization of metallotects within a geodynamically-evolving terrane thus provides a complimentary tool to other methodologies (e.g. geochemical, geochronological, structural, geophysical, stratigraphical), for determining the tectonic history and inferred geodynamic setting of that terrane through time. Myanmar is one such study area where this approach can be undertaken. Here are found two near-parallel magmatic belts, which together contain a significant proportion of that country's mineral wealth of tin, tungsten, copper, gold and silver. Although only a few 100 km's apart, these belts exhibit a

  11. Cyclobutanone Analogues of β-Lactam Antibiotics: β-Lactamase Inhibitors with Untapped Potential?

    PubMed

    Devi, Prarthana; Rutledge, Peter J

    2017-02-16

    β-Lactam antibiotics have been used for many years to treat bacterial infections. However the effective treatment of an increasing range of microbial infections is threatened by bacterial resistance to β-lactams: the prolonged, widespread (and at times reckless) use of these drugs has spawned widespread resistance, which renders them ineffective against many bacterial strains. The cyclobutanone ring system is isosteric with β-lactam: in cyclobutanone analogues, the eponymous cyclic amide is replaced with an all-carbon ring, the amide N is substituted by a tertiary C-H α to a ketone. Cyclobutanone analogues of various β-lactam antibiotics have been investigated over the last 35 years, initially as prospective antibiotics in their own right and inhibitors of the β-lactamase enzymes that impart resistance to β-lactams. More recently they have been tested as inhibitors of other serine proteases and as mechanistic probes of β-lactam biosynthesis. Cyclobutanone analogues of the penam ring system are the first reversible inhibitors with moderate activity against all classes of β-lactamase; other compounds from this family inhibit Streptomyces R61 dd-carboxypeptidase/transpeptidase, human neutrophil elastase and porcine pancreatic elastase. But has their potential as enzyme inhibitors been fully exploited? Challenges in synthesising diversely functionalised cyclobutanone derivatives mean that only a limited number have been made (with limited structural diversity) and evaluated. This review surveys the different synthetic approaches that have been taken to these compounds, the investigations made to evaluate their biological activity and prospects for future developments in this area. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Synthesis of C-linked triazole-containing AFGP analogues and their ability to inhibit ice recrystallization.

    PubMed

    Capicciotti, Chantelle J; Trant, John F; Leclère, Mathieu; Ben, Robert N

    2011-04-20

    C-Linked antifreeze glycoprotein (C-AFGP) analogues have been shown to have potent ice recrystallization inhibition (IRI) activity. However, the lengthy synthesis of these compounds is not amenable to large-scale preparation for the many commercial, industrial, and medical applications that exist. This paper describes the synthesis of triazole-containing AFGPs using a convergent solid-phase synthesis (SPS) approach in which multiple carbohydrate derivatives are coupled to a resin-bound synthetic peptide in a single step. Modified "Click" conditions using dry DMF as solvent with catalytic Cu(II), sodium ascorbate, and microwave radiation afforded the synthesis of AFGP analogues 9-12 in 16-54% isolated yield. Compound 9 demonstrated no IRI activity, while compounds 10, 11, and 12 were moderate inhibitors of ice recrystallization. These results suggest that, while the triazole group is a structural mimetic of an amide bond, the amide bond in C-AFGP analogue 3 is an essential structural feature necessary for potent IRI activity.

  13. Design, Synthesis, and Biological Evaluation of Novel Pyridine-Bridged Analogues of Combretastatin-A4 as Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A series of novel pyridine-bridged analogues of combretastatin-A4 (CA-4) were designed and synthesized. As expected, the 4-atom linker configuration retained little cytotoxicities in the compounds 2e, 3e, 3g, and 4i. Activities of the analogues with 3-atom linker varied widely depending on the phenyl ring substitutions, and the 3-atom linker containing nitrogen represents the more favorable linker structure. Among them, three analogues (4h, 4s, and 4t) potently inhibited cell survival and growth, arrested cell cycle, and blocked angiogenesis and vasculature formation in vivo in ways comparable to CA-4. The superposition of 4h and 4s in the colchicine-binding pocket of tubulin shows the binding posture of CA-4, 4h, and 4s are similar, as confirmed by the competitive binding assay where the ability of the ligands to replace tubulin-bound colchicine was measured. The binding data are consistent with the observed biological activities in antiproliferation and suppression of angiogenesis but are not predictive of their antitubulin polymerization activities. PMID:24669888

  14. A reverse transcriptase ribozyme.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Gerald F; Samanta, Biswajit

    2017-09-26

    A highly evolved RNA polymerase ribozyme was found to also be capable of functioning as a reverse transcriptase, an activity that has never been demonstrated before for RNA. This activity is thought to have been crucial for the transition from RNA to DNA genomes during the early history of life on Earth, when it similarly could have arisen as a secondary function of an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. The reverse transcriptase ribozyme can incorporate all four dNTPs and can generate products containing up to 32 deoxynucleotides. It is likely that this activity could be improved through evolution, ultimately enabling the synthesis of complete DNA genomes. DNA is much more stable compared to RNA and thus provides a larger and more secure repository for genetic information.

  15. Gridded electron reversal ionizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A gridded electron reversal ionizer forms a three dimensional cloud of zero or near-zero energy electrons in a cavity within a filament structure surrounding a central electrode having holes through which the sample gas, at reduced pressure, enters an elongated reversal volume. The resultant negative ion stream is applied to a mass analyzer. The reduced electron and ion space-charge limitations of this configuration enhances detection sensitivity for material to be detected by electron attachment, such as narcotic and explosive vapors. Positive ions may be generated by generating electrons having a higher energy, sufficient to ionize the target gas and pulsing the grid negative to stop the electron flow and pulsing the extraction aperture positive to draw out the positive ions.

  16. Reversible Aggregation of Albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colby, Ralph H.; Oates, Katherine M. N.; Krause, Wendy E.; Jones, Ronald L.

    2004-03-01

    We explore the interactions in synovial fluid involving the polyelectrolyte sodium hyaluronate (NaHA) and plasma proteins in their native state (albumin and globulins). Rheological measurements on synovial fluid show it to be highly viscoelastic and also rheopectic (stress increases with time in steady shear). Equilibrium dialysis confirms the findings of Ogston and Dubin that there is no association between NaHA and albumin at physiological pH and salt. What we find instead is a reversible aggregation of albumin, with an association energy of order 3kT and commensurate association lifetime of order microseconds. Certain anti-inflammatory drugs are shown to prevent this reversible aggregation. The implications of these findings for synovial fluid and blood rheology are discussed.

  17. Reversing Glass Wettability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, D. O.; Smith, J. E., Jr.; Kaukler, W. F.

    1985-01-01

    Treatment reverses wettability of glassware: Liquids that normally wet glass no longer do, and those that do not wet glass are made to do so. Useful in research on container effects in nucleation and growth of secondary phase from solution. Treatment consists of spreading 3 percent (by weight) solution of silicone oil in hexane isomers over glass, drying in air, and curing at 300 degrees C in vacuum for one hour.

  18. URCHIN: Reverse ray tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altay, Gabriel; Theuns, Tom

    2014-12-01

    URCHIN is a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) reverse ray tracer (i.e. from particles to sources). It calculates the amount of shielding from a uniform background that each particle experiences. Preservation of the adaptive density field resolution present in many gas dynamics codes and uniform sampling of gas resolution elements with rays are two of the benefits of URCHIN; it also offers preservation of Galilean invariance, high spectral resolution, and preservation of the standard uniform UV background in optically thin gas.

  19. [Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome].

    PubMed

    Laakso, Elina; Pekkola, Johanna; Soinne, Lauri; Putaala, Jukka

    2014-01-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is increasingly recognized. The condition is characterized by multifocal vasoconstriction lesions in cerebral arteries. Headache is the central symptom, with an acute onset and paroxysmal occurrence. Some of the patients develop intracranial hemorrhage, ischemic disturbance of the cerebral circulation, hypertensive encephalopathy (PRES) or epileptic seizures as complications. The disease is most common in middle-aged women. Most patients have an underlying predisposing factor, most commonly vasoactive medications, drugs or puerperium. There is no evidence-based practice.

  20. A Non-Verbal Analogue to the Verbal Transformation Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lass, Norman J.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Investigates the effectiveness of non-speech auditory stimuli in eliciting transformations analogous to those reported for speech stimuli to determine if a non-verbal analogue to the verbal transformation effect exists. (DD)

  1. Trustworthiness and Influence: A Reexamination in an Extended Counseling Analogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothmeier, Rosemarie C.; Dixon, David N.

    1980-01-01

    The study demonstrated that: (1) interviewer trustworthiness can be manipulated in an analogue interview setting; and (2) interviewer trustworthiness is related to interpersonal influence in the interview setting. Findings follow a pattern of outcomes predicted by cognitive dissonance theory. (Author)

  2. Generalised insulin oedema after intensification of treatment with insulin analogues.

    PubMed

    Adamo, Luigi; Thoelke, Mark

    2013-02-20

    We report a case of generalised insulin oedema after intensification of treatment with genetically modified insulin. This is the first case of generalised oedema in response to treatment with insulin analogues in a patient not insulin naive.

  3. From BPA to its analogues: Is it a safe journey?

    PubMed

    Usman, Afia; Ahmad, Masood

    2016-09-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA) is one of the most abundant synthetic chemicals in the world due to its uses in plastics. Its widespread exposure vis-a-vis low dose effects led to a reduction in its safety dose and imposition of ban on its use in infant feeding bottles. This restriction paved the way for the gradual market entry of its analogues. However, their structural similarity to BPA has put them under surveillance for endocrine disrupting potential. The application of these analogues is increasing and so are the studies reporting their toxicity. This review highlights the reasons which led to the ban of BPA and also reports the exposure and toxicological data available on its analogues. Hence, this compilation is expected to answer in a better way whether the replacement of BPA by these analogues is safer or more harmful?

  4. Effect of glutamate analogues on brain tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Campbell, G L; Bartel, R; Freidman, H S; Bigner, D D

    1985-10-01

    Glutamate analogues have been used in many different experimental approaches in neurobiology. A small number of these analogues have been classified as gliotoxic. We have examined the effect of seven glutamate analogues (five gliotoxic and two neurotoxic) on the growth and viability of four human glioma cell lines, one human medulloblastoma cell line, and one human sarcoma cell line. Aminoadipic acid and homocysteic acid predominantly affected the growth of two glioma cell lines in the presence of 4 mM glutamine. Phosphonobutyric acid predominantly affected the other two glioma cell lines and the medulloblastoma cell line in the presence of 4 mM glutamine. In medium containing no glutamine, all three analogues had marked effects on all the cell lines except the sarcoma cell line. These effects were dose dependent. We postulate that these results can in part be explained on the basis of metabolic compartmentalization.

  5. Sulphur Spring: Busy Intersection and Possible Martian Analogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nankivell, A.; Andre, N.; Thomas-Keprta, K.; Allen, C.; McKay, D.

    2000-01-01

    Life in extreme environments exhibiting conditions similar to early Earth and Mars, such as Sulphur Spring, may harbor microbiota serving as both relics from the past as well as present day Martian analogues.

  6. Sulphur Spring: Busy Intersection and Possible Martian Analogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nankivell, A.; Andre, N.; Thomas-Keprta, K.; Allen, C.; McKay, D.

    2000-01-01

    Life in extreme environments exhibiting conditions similar to early Earth and Mars, such as Sulphur Spring, may harbor microbiota serving as both relics from the past as well as present day Martian analogues.

  7. Weather and event generators based on analogues of atmospheric circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiou, Pascal

    2015-04-01

    Analogues of atmospheric circulation have had numerous applications on weather prediction, climate reconstructions and detection/attribution analyses. A stochastic weather generator based on circulation analogues was recently proposed by Yiou (2014) to simulate sequences of European temperatures. One of the features of this weather generator is that it preserves the spatial and temporal structures of the climate variables to be simulated. This method is flexible enough to be combined efficiently with a storm detection algorithm in order to generate large catalogues of high impact extra-tropical storms that hit Europe. I will present the gist of the method of circulation analogues and some performances. Two promising applications for weather generators based on this method (ensemble climate prediction and extra-tropical storms) will be tested. References Yiou, P.: AnaWEGE: a weather generator based on analogues of atmospheric circulation, Geosci. Model Dev., 7, 531-543, doi:10.5194/gmd-7-531-2014, 2014.

  8. Cell-cycle analyses using thymidine analogues in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Anda, Silje; Boye, Erik; Grallert, Beata

    2014-01-01

    Thymidine analogues are powerful tools when studying DNA synthesis including DNA replication, repair and recombination. However, these analogues have been reported to have severe effects on cell-cycle progression and growth, the very processes being investigated in most of these studies. Here, we have analyzed the effects of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) and 5-Chloro-2'-deoxyuridine (CldU) using fission yeast cells and optimized the labelling procedure. We find that both analogues affect the cell cycle, but that the effects can be mitigated by using the appropriate analogue, short pulses of labelling and low concentrations. In addition, we report sequential labelling of two consecutive S phases using EdU and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU). Furthermore, we show that detection of replicative DNA synthesis is much more sensitive than DNA-measurements by flow cytometry.

  9. Analogues for Wild2: Carbonaceous Chondrites Shot into Aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, L. J.; Bridges, J. C.; MacArthur, J. L.; Wickham-Eade, J. E.; Price, M. C.; Burchell, M. J.; Butterworth, A. L.; Baker, S. H.

    2016-08-01

    Comet Wild2 particles show similarities to carbonaceous chondrites. We compare Wild2 grains to analogue shots of CV3 and CR2 powders in aerogel tracks, using the same techniques, to make accurate comparisons.

  10. 49 CFR 230.89 - Reverse gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Reversing Gear § 230.89 Reverse gear. (a) General provisions. Reverse gear, reverse levers, and quadrants shall be maintained in a safe and suitable condition for service. Reverse lever latch shall be so...

  11. 49 CFR 230.89 - Reverse gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Reversing Gear § 230.89 Reverse gear. (a) General provisions. Reverse gear, reverse levers, and quadrants shall be maintained in a safe and suitable condition for service. Reverse lever latch shall be so...

  12. 49 CFR 230.89 - Reverse gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Reversing Gear § 230.89 Reverse gear. (a) General provisions. Reverse gear, reverse levers, and quadrants shall be maintained in a safe and suitable condition for service. Reverse lever latch shall be so...

  13. 49 CFR 230.89 - Reverse gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Reversing Gear § 230.89 Reverse gear. (a) General provisions. Reverse gear, reverse levers, and quadrants shall be maintained in a safe and suitable condition for service. Reverse lever latch shall be so...

  14. 49 CFR 230.89 - Reverse gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Reversing Gear § 230.89 Reverse gear. (a) General provisions. Reverse gear, reverse levers, and quadrants shall be maintained in a safe and suitable condition for service. Reverse lever latch shall be so...

  15. Time reversal interactive objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ing, Ros Ki; Quieffin, Nicolas; Catheline, Stefan; Fink, Mathias

    2001-05-01

    Time reversal has shown to be a fruitful concept in nondestructive testing in underwater acoustic or in ultrasonic imaging. In this paper this technique is adapted in the audible range to transform every day objects into tactile sensitive interfaces. A quick historical background is presented in the ultrasonic field and specially in chaotic cavity. In all time reversal experiments, it is demonstrated that a wave field spatially and temporally recorded is able to back propagate to its source. In other words, the field contains all the information on the location of the source. In the interactive experiments, it is shown that touching an object like a window, a table or a world globe generates an acoustic field easily detectable with one or two acoustic sensors. Using the concept of time reversal, the source location is deduced in real time. Then, touching objects at specific locations (virtual switches) is used to activate devices. Such devices are for example lights, stereo volume, or computer software. From a technical point of view, all these interactive experiments just use some computation easily performed with a standard personnel computer.

  16. Reversible hysteresis loop tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, A.; Binek, Ch.; Margulies, D. T.; Moser, A.; Fullerton, E. E.

    2006-02-01

    We utilize antiferromagnetically coupled bilayer structures to magnetically tune hysteresis loop properties. Key element of this approach is the non-overlapping switching field distribution of the two magnetic layers that make up the system: a hard magnetic CoPtCrB layer (HL) and a soft magnetic CoCr layer (SL). Both layers are coupled antiferromagnetically through an only 0.6-nm-thick Ru interlayer. The non-overlapping switching field distribution allows the measurement of magnetization reversal in the SL at low fields while keeping the magnetization state of the HL unperturbed. Applying an appropriate high field or high field sequence changes the magnetic state of the HL, which then influences the SL magnetization reversal due to the interlayer coupling. In this way, the position and shape of the SL hysteresis loop can be changed or tuned in a fully reversible and highly effective manner. Here, we study specifically how the SL hysteresis loop characteristics change as we move the HL through an entire high field hysteresis loop sequence.

  17. Reverse lectin ELISA for detecting fucosylated forms of α1-acid glycoprotein associated with hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Stål, Per; Zenlander, Robin; Edenvik, Pia; Alexandersson, Catharina; Haglund, Mats; Rydén, Ingvar; Påhlsson, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Altered fucosylation of glycoproteins is associated with development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Lectins have been commonly used to assay changes in fucosylation of plasma glycoproteins. In the present study a recombinantly engineered form of the fucose binding lectin Aleuria aurantia (AAL) consisting of a single binding site for fucose (S2), was used to construct a reverse lectin ELISA method. Microtiter plates coated with the S2 lectin were used to capture glycoproteins from plasma samples followed by antibody detection of S2-bound fucosylated α1-acid glycoprotein (S2-bound AGP). The method was used to compare the level of S2-bound AGP in serum samples from a small cohort of patients with hepatitis, cirrhosis or HCC. Using the reverse S2 lectin ELISA it was shown that the levels of S2-bound AGP was significantly higher in HCC patients compared to non-cancer patients and that there was also a significant elevation of S2-bound AGP in HCC patients compared to cirrhosis patients. There was no correlation between the level of S2-bound AGP and total AGP concentration. The performance of S2-bound AGP in differentiating HCC from cirrhosis samples or hepatitis samples were compared to other markers. A combination of S2-bound AGP, α-fetoprotein and AGP concentration showed performances giving area under receiver operating curves of 0.87 and 0.95 respectively. PMID:28296934

  18. Semisynthesis of salviandulin E analogues and their antitrypanosomal activity.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Yutaka; Fujiwara, Koji; Yamazaki, Akira; Sugawara, Naoko; Yano, Reiko; Fukaya, Haruhiko; Hitotsuyanagi, Yukio; Takeya, Koichi; Ishiyama, Aki; Iwatsuki, Masato; Otoguro, Kazuhiko; Yamada, Haruki; Ōmura, Satoshi

    2014-01-15

    A series of analogues of salviandulin E, a rearranged neoclerodane diterpene originally isolated from Salvia leucantha (Lamiaceae), were prepared and their in vitro activity against Trypanosoma brucei brucei was evaluated with currently used therapeutic drugs as positive controls. One of the 19 compounds prepared and assayed in the present study, butanoyl 3,4-dihydrosalviandulin E analogue was found to be a possible candidate for an antitrypanosomal drug with fairly strong antitrypanosomal activity and lower cytotoxicity.

  19. Carbacaprazamycins: Chemically Stable Analogues of the Caprazamycin Nucleoside Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Mayumi; Hsuan, Lee Shang; Kato, Yuta; Matsuda, Akira

    2015-04-10

    Carbacaprazamycins, which are chemically stable analogues of caprazamycins, were designed and synthesized. These analogues were active against drug-resistant bacterial pathogens such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococci, and their activities were comparable to those of the parent caprazamycins. The effect of treatment with carbacaprazamycin on morphological changes in S. aureus indicated that the mode of action was completely different from those of existing peptidoglycan inhibitors.

  20. Adjuvant properties of a simplified C32 monomycolyl glycerol analogue.

    PubMed

    Bhowruth, Veemal; Minnikin, David E; Agger, Else Marie; Andersen, Peter; Bramwell, Vincent W; Perrie, Yvonne; Besra, Gurdyal S

    2009-04-01

    A simplified C(32) monomycolyl glycerol (MMG) analogue demonstrated enhanced immunostimulatory activity in a dioctadecyl ammonium bromide (DDA)/Ag85B-ESAT-6 formulation. Elevated levels of IFN-gamma and IL-6 were produced in spleen cells from mice immunised with a C(32) MMG analogue comparable activity to the potent Th1 adjuvant, trehalose 6,6'-di-behenate (TDB).