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Sample records for reverts niemann-pick disease-associated

  1. Niemann-Pick disease

    MedlinePlus

    NPD; Sphingomyelinase deficiency; Lipid storage disorder - Niemann-Pick disease; Lysosomal storage disease - Niemann-Pick ... cannot properly break down cholesterol and other fats (lipids). This leads to too much cholesterol in the ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Niemann-Pick disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... progressive loss of mental abilities and movement (psychomotor regression). Children with Niemann-Pick disease type A also ... with these types may survive into adulthood. Related Information What does it mean if a disorder seems ...

  3. Teaching Children with Niemann-Pick Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gartin, Barbara C.; Murdick, Nikki L.; Cooley, Jennifer; Barnett, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Niemann-Pick Disease (NPD) is a group of rare inherited disorders that are both systemic and degenerative. Knowledge of the disease, its characteristics, and its progression are essential for the teacher and related service personnel to provide an appropriate educational experience for the student. For the teacher who has a student with NPC in…

  4. Stem Cells and Niemann Pick Disease

    PubMed Central

    Andolina, Marino

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Niemann Pick A disease causes a progressive accumulation of sphyngomyelin in several organs and the survival of the patients is usually limited to three years. We describe the outcome of a patient suffering from Niemann Pick A disease, who first underwent an haploidentical bone marrow transplantation, and then intrathecal and I.V injections of mesenchymal cells. Methods and Results: While the outcome of bone marrow transplantation was a complete failure, one month after the treatment with the mesenchymal cells the patient improved from the psychomotor and the parenchymal storage perspective. When hypersplenism was solved platelets rose quickly from 20,000 to 120,000/microliter. Conclusions: Therefore cellular therapy should be considered as a possible choice of treatment of NPA disease. PMID:24921025

  5. Niemann-Pick disease type A presenting as unilateral tremors.

    PubMed

    Vykuntaraju, K N; Lokanatha, Hemalatha; Shivananda

    2012-11-01

    Niemann-Pick group of diseases are rare lysosomal storage disorders. The clinical phenotype is variable. We report a child who first time presented with tremors of tongue and tremors of one side of the body. On examination child had hemiparesis and hepatosplenomegaly. Bone marrow examination shows storage cells suggestive of Niemann-Pick cells and enzyme assay confirmed the diagnosis.

  6. Niemann-Pick type B in adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Simões, Rita Gonçalves; Maia, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Niemann-Pick disease (NPD) is a rare group of autosomal recessive disorders associated with intracellular deposition of sphingomyelin. NPD type B is a milder form, generally later in onset, with a good prognosis for survival into adulthood and usually with no neurological abnormalities. The authors describe the case of a 52-year-old man who presented with unexplained pancytopenia and splenomegaly. He was admitted to emergency splenectomy due to pathological splenic rupture. The histological findings showed diffuse histiocytosis, suggesting lysosomal storage disease. The NPD was confirmed when residual activity of acid sphingomyelinase in peripheral blood leucocytes and cultured skin fibroblasts was detected. Besides lipid abnormalities, the patient also had lipid interstitial pneumonia. There is no treatment for NPD. Management is based on surveillance and supportive care. The patient has reached the sixth decade of life with no symptoms and, despite the pneumonia and splenectomy, he still has a fairly healthy life. PMID:25657196

  7. Niemann-Pick disease type C.

    PubMed

    Vanier, Marie T

    2010-06-03

    Niemann-Pick C disease (NP-C) is a neurovisceral atypical lysosomal lipid storage disorder with an estimated minimal incidence of 1/120,000 live births. The broad clinical spectrum ranges from a neonatal rapidly fatal disorder to an adult-onset chronic neurodegenerative disease. The neurological involvement defines the disease severity in most patients but is typically preceded by systemic signs (cholestatic jaundice in the neonatal period or isolated spleno- or hepatosplenomegaly in infancy or childhood). The first neurological symptoms vary with age of onset: delay in developmental motor milestones (early infantile period), gait problems, falls, clumsiness, cataplexy, school problems (late infantile and juvenile period), and ataxia not unfrequently following initial psychiatric disturbances (adult form). The most characteristic sign is vertical supranuclear gaze palsy. The neurological disorder consists mainly of cerebellar ataxia, dysarthria, dysphagia, and progressive dementia. Cataplexy, seizures and dystonia are other common features. NP-C is transmitted in an autosomal recessive manner and is caused by mutations of either the NPC1 (95% of families) or the NPC2 genes. The exact functions of the NPC1 and NPC2 proteins are still unclear. NP-C is currently described as a cellular cholesterol trafficking defect but in the brain, the prominently stored lipids are gangliosides. Clinical examination should include comprehensive neurological and ophthalmological evaluations. The primary laboratory diagnosis requires living skin fibroblasts to demonstrate accumulation of unesterified cholesterol in perinuclear vesicles (lysosomes) after staining with filipin. Pronounced abnormalities are observed in about 80% of the cases, mild to moderate alterations in the remainder ("variant" biochemical phenotype). Genotyping of patients is useful to confirm the diagnosis in the latter patients and essential for future prenatal diagnosis. The differential diagnosis may include

  8. [Therapies in the Niemann-Pick type C disease].

    PubMed

    Chabrol, B

    2010-06-01

    Niemann-Pick type C disease is a lysosomal storage disease affecting intracellular cholesterol trafficking. Several clinical forms have been described, with a possible onset at all ages of life from the neonatal period to adulthood. The therapeutic approach was symptomatic only until recently, depending on the disability presented by the patient. A global management is essential and often required, taking into account all the problems observed, and includes nutrition care, speech therapy, physiotherapy, psychological support, or psychiatric cares. Improved knowledge on the pathophysiology of Niemann-Pick type C disease has to consider specific therapeutic strategies, the therapeutic target is represented by the progressive brain damage characteristic of this disease. Recently, the use of miglustat allows a number of cases of disease stabilization. The onset of treatment and monitoring will be the best in a reference center expert in the disease.

  9. [Niemann-Pick type C disease: pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Ohno, Kousaku

    2016-03-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder which is caused in 95% by a mutation in the NPC1 gene on chromosome 18 or by NPC2 mutation, encoding for 2 different lysosomal lipid transport proteins. The impaired protein function leads to systemic intralysosomal accumulation of free cholesterol and shingolipids particularly in the CNS. In Japan, currently 34 living NPC patients are known as of December 2015. Considering the prevalence of the disease in the Western countries, the real number of NPC patients is most likely to be five-folds higher. For NPC, treatment methods are established and an approved disease-specific medications are available. It is important that patients early in their disease are referred to expert centers, in order to ensure timely initiation of treatment and to delay the progression of neurological symptoms as a goal.

  10. Hepatic Primary and Secondary Cholesterol Deposition and Damage in Niemann-Pick Disease.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Marta; Fajardo, Alba; Alcalá-Vida, Rafael; Fernández-Vidal, Andrea; Tebar, Francesc; Enrich, Carlos; Cardellach, Francesc; Pérez-Navarro, Esther; Pol, Albert

    2016-03-01

    Niemann-Pick C disease is a neurovisceral disorder caused by mutations in the NPC gene that result in systemic accumulation of intracellular cholesterol. Although neurodegeneration defines the disease's severity, in most patients it is preceded by hepatic complications such as cholestatic jaundice or hepatomegaly. To analyze the contribution of the hepatic disease in Niemann-Pick C disease progression and to evaluate the degree of primary and secondary hepatic damage, we generated a transgenic mouse with liver-selective expression of NPC1 from embryonic stages. Hepatic NPC1 re-expression did not ameliorate the onset and progression of neurodegeneration of the NPC1-null animal. However, the mice showed reduced hepatomegalia and dramatic, although not complete, reduction of hepatic cholesterol and serum bile salts, bilirubin, and transaminase levels. Therefore, hepatic primary and secondary cholesterol deposition and damage occur simultaneously during Niemann-Pick C disease progression.

  11. Niemann-Pick type C disease: molecular mechanisms and potential therapeutic approaches

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, Anton I.; Maxfield, Frederick R.

    2010-01-01

    Cholesterol is an important lipid of mammalian cells. Its unique physicochemical properties modulate membrane behavior and it serves as the precursor for steroid hormones, oxysterols and vitamin D. Cholesterol is effluxed from the late endosomes/lysosomes via the concerted action of at least two distinct proteins: Niemann-Pick C1 and Niemann-Pick C2. Mutations in these two proteins manifest as Niemann-Pick type C disease – a very rare, usually fatal, autosomal, recessive, neurovisceral, lysosomal storage disorder. In this review we discuss the possible mechanisms of action for NPC1 and NPC2 in mediating cholesterol efflux, as well as the different therapeutic approaches being pursued for the treatment of this lipid storage disorder. PMID:20807315

  12. [Clinical and genetic special features of Niemann-Pick disease, type C].

    PubMed

    Zakharova, E Iu; Mikhaĭlova, S V; Proshliakova, T Iu; Rudenskaia, G E

    2012-01-01

    Niemann-Pick disease, type C is a rare hereditary disorder of the group of lisosomal storage diseases, caused by mutations in the genes NPC1 or NPC2. Depending on the onset age, several clinical forms of this disease, which differs by manifestation age, main clinical signs and clinical course, are distinguished. Niemann-Pick disease type C can imitate other hereditary and acquired diseases, which complicates its early diagnostics. Clinical and genetic diversity of this disorder, considered on the clinical cases diagnosed at the FSI "RCMG" of RAMS, are discussed in this review.

  13. Exosome Secretion Ameliorates Lysosomal Storage of Cholesterol in Niemann-Pick Type C Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Katrin; Goebel, Cornelia; Runz, Heiko; Möbius, Wiebke; Weiss, Sievert; Feussner, Ivo; Simons, Mikael; Schneider, Anja

    2010-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C1 disease is an autosomal-recessive lysosomal storage disorder. Loss of function of the npc1 gene leads to abnormal accumulation of free cholesterol and sphingolipids within the late endosomal and lysosomal compartments resulting in progressive neurodegeneration and dysmyelination. Here, we show that oligodendroglial cells secrete cholesterol by exosomes when challenged with cholesterol or U18666A, which induces late endosomal cholesterol accumulation. Up-regulation of exosomal cholesterol release was also observed after siRNA-mediated knockdown of NPC1 and in fibroblasts derived from NPC1 patients and could be reversed by expression of wild-type NPC1. We provide evidence that exosomal cholesterol secretion depends on the presence of flotillin. Our findings indicate that exosomal release of cholesterol may serve as a cellular mechanism to partially bypass the traffic block that results in the toxic lysosomal cholesterol accumulation in Niemann-Pick type C1 disease. Furthermore, we suggest that secretion of cholesterol by exosomes contributes to maintain cellular cholesterol homeostasis. PMID:20554533

  14. Defective Autophagy, Mitochondrial Clearance and Lipophagy in Niemann-Pick Type B Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Salucci, Sara; Luchetti, Francesca; Falcieri, Elisabetta; Di Sario, Gianna; Palma, Fulvio; Papa, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type A (NP-A) and type B (NP-B) are lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) caused by sphingomyelin accumulation in lysosomes relying on reduced or absent acid sphingomyelinase. A considerable body of evidence suggests that lysosomal storage in many LSD impairs autophagy, resulting in the accumulation of poly-ubiquitinated proteins and dysfunctional mitochondria, ultimately leading to cell death. Here we test this hypothesis in a cellular model of Niemann-Pick disease type B, in which autophagy has never been studied. The basal autophagic pathway was first examined in order to evaluate its functionality using several autophagy-modulating substances such as rapamycin and nocodazole. We found that human NP-B B lymphocytes display considerable alteration in their autophagic vacuole accumulation and mitochondrial fragmentation, as well as mitophagy induction (for damaged mitochondria clearance). Furthermore, lipid traceability of intra and extra-cellular environments shows lipid accumulation in NP-B B lymphocytes and also reveals their peculiar trafficking/management, culminating in lipid microparticle extrusion (by lysosomal exocytosis mechanisms) or lipophagy. All of these features point to the presence of a deep autophagy/mitophagy alteration revealing autophagic stress and defective mitochondrial clearance. Hence, rapamycin might be used to regulate autophagy/mitophagy (at least in part) and to contribute to the clearance of lysosomal aberrant lipid storage. PMID:27798705

  15. Multiple Cationic Amphiphiles Induce a Niemann-Pick C Phenotype and Inhibit Ebola Virus Entry and Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-18

    manipulate the intracellular localization of drugs in resistant cancer cells. Biochemistry 44: 15743–15749. 45. Sokol J, Blanchette-Mackie J, Kruth HS, Dwyer...pathogenesis and treatment of acid sphingomye- linase-deficient Niemann-Pick disease. J Inherit Metab Dis 30: 654–663. 63. Devlin C, Pipalia NH, Liao X

  16. CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Generation of Niemann-Pick C1 Knockout Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Du, Ximing; Lukmantara, Ivan; Yang, Hongyuan

    2017-01-01

    Generating a cholesterol storage phenotype of Niemann-Pick Type C (NPC) disease is important for investigating the mechanisms of intracellular cholesterol trafficking, as well as screening drugs for potential treatment of NPC disease. The use of the CRISPR/Cas9 technology to knockout specific genes within the genome of mammals has become routine in the past few years. Here, we describe a protocol for producing a cellular NPC cholesterol storage phenotype in HeLa cells using the CRISPR-Cas9 system to disrupt the NPC1 gene. The protocol details the steps for single guide RNA oligo cloning, cell colony selection, and cell line verification by filipin staining and immunoblotting.

  17. The Pathobiochemistry of Gastrointestinal Symptoms in a Patient with Niemann-Pick Type C Disease.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Mahdi; Kuech, Eva-Maria; Shammas, Hadeel; Wetzel, Gabi; Naim, Hassan Y

    2016-01-01

    The molecular basis of gastrointestinal intolerances in a severe case of Niemann-Pick type C disease was analyzed in an intestinal biopsy specimen. The enzyme activities of intestinal sucrase-isomaltase and maltase-glucoamylase are reduced in the patient, while that of lactase is comparable to the control. The association of SI with lipid rafts is reduced in the patient's biopsy as a consequence of altered composition of membrane microdomains. As association with lipid rafts influences the intracellular transport and the enzyme activities of sucrase-isomaltase and maltase-glucoamylase, these data explain reduced carbohydrate digestion in the intestinal lumen and delineate the effect of deficient cholesterol and sphingolipid homeostasis in development of gastrointestinal symptoms in NPC patients.

  18. Sphingomyelin lipidosis (Niemann-Pick disease) in a juvenile raccoon (Procyon lotor).

    PubMed

    Vapniarsky, N; Wenger, D A; Scheenstra, D; Mete, A

    2013-01-01

    A wild caught juvenile male raccoon with neurological disease was humanely destroyed due to poor prognosis. Necropsy examination revealed hepatomegaly, splenomegaly and multicentric lymphadenomegaly with diffuse hepatic pallor and pulmonary consolidation with pinpoint pale subpleural foci. Microscopically, there was marked pale cytoplasmic swelling of the central and peripheral neurons as well as the glial cells in the brain, accompanied by multiorgan infiltration by abundant foamy macrophages. Ultrastructural investigation revealed accumulation of concentrically arranged lamellar material within lysosomes of the affected neurons, macrophages and endothelial cells. Biochemical enzymatic analysis detected sphingomyelinase deficiency and lysosomal storage disease consistent with sphingomyelin lipidosis (Niemann-Pick disease [NPD]) was diagnosed. This is the first report of NPD in a raccoon.

  19. Niemann-Pick disease treatment: a systematic review of clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Villamandos García, Diana; Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Fiuza-Luces, Carmen; Pareja-Galeano, Helios; Garatachea, Nuria; Nogales Gadea, Gisela; Lucia, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to analyse all the published clinical trials assessing treatments for Niemann-Pick (NP) disease. At present there are only trials investigating the treatment of NP disease type C. Furthermore, there is no uniformity among studies in treatment outcomes or in data analysis and presentation of results. Miglustat is able to delay neurodegeneration, with greater benefits in patients with a late onset of the disease and β-cyclodextrin-hydroxypropyl (HBP-CD) can attenuate clinical symptoms. As for cholesterol-lowering drugs, the combination of lovastatin, cholestyramine and nicotinic acid is the most effective one for lowering cholesterolemia. Further research is much needed, and ongoing trials using enzyme replacement therapy might hopefully show promising results in the foreseeable future. PMID:26807415

  20. Niemann-Pick C1 functions independently of Niemann-Pick C2 in the initial stage of retrograde transport of membrane-impermeable lysosomal cargo.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Stephen D B; Krise, Jeffrey P

    2010-02-12

    The rare neurodegenerative disease Niemann-Pick Type C (NPC) results from mutations in either NPC1 or NPC2, which are membrane-bound and soluble lysosomal proteins, respectively. Previous studies have shown that mutations in either protein result in biochemically indistinguishable phenotypes, most notably the hyper-accumulation of cholesterol and other cargo in lysosomes. We comparatively evaluated the kinetics of [(3)H]dextran release from lysosomes of wild type, NPC1, NPC2, and NPC1/NPC2 pseudo-double mutant cells and found significant differences between all cell types examined. Specifically, NPC1 or NPC2 mutant fibroblasts treated with NPC1 or NPC2 siRNA (to create NPC1/NPC2 pseudo-double mutants) secreted dextran less efficiently than did either NPC1 or NPC2 single mutant cell lines, suggesting that the two proteins may work independently of one another in the egress of membrane-impermeable lysosomal cargo. To investigate the basis for these differences, we examined the role of NPC1 and NPC2 in the retrograde fusion of lysosomes with late endosomes to create so-called hybrid organelles, which is believed to be the initial step in the egress of cargo from lysosomes. We show here that cells with mutated NPC1 have significantly reduced rates of late endosome/lysosome fusion relative to wild type cells, whereas cells with mutations in NPC2 have rates that are similar to those observed in wild type cells. Instead of being involved in hybrid organelle formation, we show that NPC2 is required for efficient membrane fission events from nascent hybrid organelles, which is thought to be required for the reformation of lysosomes and the release of lysosomal cargo-containing membrane vesicles. Collectively, these results suggest that NPC1 and NPC2 can function independently of one another in the egress of certain membrane-impermeable lysosomal cargo.

  1. Effects of miglustat on stabilization of neurological disorder in niemann-pick disease type C: Iranian pediatric case series.

    PubMed

    Karimzadeh, Parvaneh; Tonekaboni, Seyed Hassan; Ashrafi, Mahmoud Reza; Shafeghati, Yousef; Rezayi, Alireza; Salehpour, Shadab; Ghofrani, Mohammad; Taghdiri, Mohammad Mehdi; Rahmanifar, Ali; Zaman, Talieh; Aryani, Omid; Shoar, Babak Najaf; Shiva, Farideh; Tavasoli, Alireza; Houshmand, Massoud

    2013-12-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C is a rare neurodegenerative disorder with autosomal recessive inheritance that can be broadly categorized into different forms dependent on age at disease onset: pre-/perinatal, early infantile, late infantile, juvenile, and adolescent/adult. This study was conducted to define the age at onset, clinical manifestations, neuroimaging findings and response to treatment in 21 patients diagnosed with Niemann-Pick disease type C and managed in the neurology departments of hospitals in Tehran, Iran. The effects of miglustat on patient ambulation, fine and gross motor function, swallowing, hearing, speech, seizures, psychomotor development, and ocular movements were evaluated for up to 26 months of treatment. Ambulation, fine and gross motor movements, swallowing, speech, and supranuclear gaze palsy were generally stabilized during therapy, and psychomotor delay appeared to be improved in early- and late-infantile onset patients. However, miglustat had no effect on organomegaly or other systemic manifestations of the disease. Miglustat was well tolerated.

  2. Small molecule inhibitors reveal Niemann-Pick C1 is essential for ebolavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Côté, Marceline; Misasi, John; Ren, Tao; Bruchez, Anna; Lee, Kyungae; Filone, Claire Marie; Hensley, Lisa; Li, Qi; Ory, Daniel; Chandran, Kartik; Cunningham, James

    2011-01-01

    Summary Ebolavirus (EboV) is a highly pathogenic enveloped virus that causes outbreaks of zoonotic infection in Africa. The clinical symptoms are manifestations of the massive production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in response to infection1 and in many outbreaks, mortality exceeds 75%. The unpredictable onset, ease of transmission, rapid progression of disease, high mortality and lack of effective vaccine or therapy have created a high level of public concern about EboV2. Here we report the identification of a novel benzylpiperazine adamantane diamide-derived compound that inhibits EboV infection. Using mutant cell lines and informative derivatives of the lead compound, we show that the target of the inhibitor is the endosomal membrane protein Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1). We find that NPC1 is essential for infection, that it binds to the virus glycoprotein (GP), and that the anti-viral compounds interfere with GP binding to NPC1. Combined with the results of previous studies of GP structure and function, our findings support a model of EboV infection in which cleavage of the GP1 subunit by endosomal cathepsin proteases removes heavily glycosylated domains to expose the N-terminal domain3–7, which is a ligand for NPC1 and regulates membrane fusion by the GP2 subunit8. Thus, NPC1 is essential for EboV entry and a target for anti-viral therapy. PMID:21866101

  3. Intrathecal 2-Hydroxypropyl-Beta-Cyclodextrin in a Single Patient with Niemann-Pick C1

    PubMed Central

    Maarup, Timothy J.; Chen, Agnes H.; Porter, Forbes D.; Farhat, Nicole Y.; Ory, Daniel S.; Sidhu, Rohini; Jiang, Xuntian; Dickson, Patricia I.

    2015-01-01

    Niemann-Pick C, Type 1 (NPC1) is a progressive autosomal recessive neurologic disease caused by defective intracellular cholesterol and lipid trafficking. There are currently no United States Food and Drug Administration approved treatments for NPC1. We undertook a study evaluating the safety, efficacy, and biomarker response of intrathecal 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) in a 12-year old subject with mildly symptomatic NPC. The subject received 200mg intrathecal HP-β-CD administered biweekly via lumbar puncture. To date the subject has received 27 intrathecal HP-β-CD injections. Intrathecal HP-β-CD has been generally safe and well tolerated in this subject. There has been improvement in vertical gaze. The subject has developed subclinical hearing loss at high frequency that is likely HP-β-CD related. Plasma 24-(S)-hydroxycholesterol, a pharmacodynamic biomarker for cholesterol redistribution in the central nervous system, was significantly increased in response to each of the first 5 drug administrations. Further dosing as well as dose escalations are needed to more completely ascertain the safety and efficacy of intrathecal HP-β-CD. PMID:26189084

  4. Psychosis in an adolescent girl: a common manifestation in Niemann-Pick Type C disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NP-C) is a rare autosomal-recessively inherited lysosomal storage disorder. It is caused by mutations in the NPC1 (95%) or NPC2 gene. It is a progressive and highly heterogeneous disease, characterized by the presentation of visceral, neurological, and psychiatric symptoms. Apart from the patients that die early from organic failure, most of the patients with juvenile and adolescent/adult onset of the disease, develop neurological and psychiatric symptoms. In some cases psychiatric signs, mostly psychosis, can be the first sign of the disease. A delay in diagnosis is often seen. By describing the case of a 16-year old girl, we would like to highlight current opinion about NP-C disease and resume recent findings on the clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment. We focus on the psychiatric signs, and most important the specific combinations that are typical for the disease. There is no curative treatment for NP-C. Miglustat is used to modify neurological signs in NP-C. PMID:25071864

  5. Diagnostic workup and management of patients with suspected Niemann-Pick type C disease

    PubMed Central

    Papandreou, Apostolos; Gissen, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NP-C) disease is a neurovisceral disorder caused by mutations in the NPC1 and NPC2 genes. It is characterized by lysosomal storage of a broad range of lipids as a result of abnormal intracellular lipid trafficking. Typically patients develop neurodegeneration; however, the speed of disease progression is variable. The exact functions of NPC1 and NPC2 proteins have not been determined and therefore the molecular pathophysiology of NP-C is still not clearly understood. Due to the disease’s rarity and clinical heterogeneity, delays from symptom onset to diagnosis and treatment initiation are common. Current therapeutic approaches focus on multidisciplinary symptom control and deceleration (rather than reversal) of disease progression. Thus identification of cases at early stages of disease is particularly important. Recent advances in genetic and biochemical testing have resulted in the generation of relatively non-invasive, quick and cost-effective laboratory assays that are highly sensitive and specific and have the capacity to enhance the clinicians’ ability to reach a diagnosis earlier. Miglustat is a compound recently licensed in many countries for the treatment of NP-C that has been shown to decelerate neurological regression, whereas many other promising drugs are currently being trialled in preclinical models or human studies. This review summarizes key clinical, genetic and biochemical features of NP-C, suggests a simple diagnostic investigation strategy and gives an overview of available therapeutic options as well as potential novel treatments currently under development. PMID:27134677

  6. Reducing GBA2 Activity Ameliorates Neuropathology in Niemann-Pick Type C Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ottenhoff, Roelof; van Roomen, Cindy P. A. A.; Herrera Moro, Daniela; Claessen, Nike; Vinueza Veloz, María Fernanda; Zhou, Kuikui; Lin, Zhanmin; Mirzaian, Mina; Boot, Rolf G.; De Zeeuw, Chris I.; Overkleeft, Herman S.; Yildiz, Yildiz; Aerts, Johannes M. F. G.

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GBA) hydrolyses glucosylceramide (GlcCer) in lysosomes. Markedly reduced GBA activity is associated with severe manifestations of Gaucher disease including neurological involvement. Mutations in the GBA gene have recently also been identified as major genetic risk factor for Parkinsonism. Disturbed metabolism of GlcCer may therefore play a role in neuropathology. Besides lysosomal GBA, cells also contain a non-lysosomal glucosylceramidase (GBA2). Given that the two β-glucosidases share substrates, we speculated that over-activity of GBA2 during severe GBA impairment might influence neuropathology. This hypothesis was studied in Niemann-Pick type C (Npc1-/-) mice showing secondary deficiency in GBA in various tissues. Here we report that GBA2 activity is indeed increased in the brain of Npc1-/- mice. We found that GBA2 is particularly abundant in Purkinje cells (PCs), one of the most affected neuronal populations in NPC disease. Inhibiting GBA2 in Npc1-/- mice with a brain-permeable low nanomolar inhibitor significantly improved motor coordination and extended lifespan in the absence of correction in cholesterol and ganglioside abnormalities. This trend was recapitulated, although not to full extent, by introducing a genetic loss of GBA2 in Npc1-/- mice. Our findings point to GBA2 activity as therapeutic target in NPC. PMID:26275242

  7. Respiratory disease in Niemann-Pick type C2 is caused by pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Griese, M; Brasch, F; Aldana, V R; Cabrera, M M; Goelnitz, U; Ikonen, E; Karam, B J; Liebisch, G; Linder, M D; Lohse, P; Meyer, W; Schmitz, G; Pamir, A; Ripper, J; Rolfs, A; Schams, A; Lezana, F J

    2010-02-01

    Niemann-Pick diseases are hereditary neurovisceral lysosomal lipid storage disorders, of which the rare type C2 almost uniformly presents with respiratory distress in early infancy. In the patient presented here, the NPC2 exon 4 frameshift mutation c.408_409delAA caused reduced NPC2 protein levels in serum and lung lavage fluid and the synthesis of an aberrant, larger sized protein of around 28 kDa. Protein expression was strongly reduced also in alveolar macrophages. The infant developed failure to thrive and tachypnea. Lung lavage, computer tomography, and histology showed typical signs of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis with an abnormal intraalveolar accumulation of surfactant as well as macrophages. An NPC2-hypomorph animal model also showed pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and accumulation of macrophages in the lung, liver, and spleen long before the mice died. Due to the elevation of cholesterol, the surfactant had an abnormal composition and function. Despite the removal of large amounts of surfactant from the lungs by therapeutic lung lavages, this treatment was only temporarily successful and the infant died of respiratory failure. Our data indicate that respiratory distress in NPC2 disease is associated with a loss of normal NPC2 protein expression in alveolar macrophages and the accumulation of functionally inactive surfactant rich in cholesterol.

  8. Are Niemann-Pick type C proteins key players in cnidarian-dinoflagellate endosymbioses?

    PubMed

    Dani, Vincent; Ganot, Philippe; Priouzeau, Fabrice; Furla, Paola; Sabourault, Cecile

    2014-09-01

    The symbiotic interaction between cnidarians, such as corals and sea anemones, and the unicellular algae Symbiodinium is regulated by yet poorly understood cellular mechanisms, despite the ecological importance of coral reefs. These mechanisms, including host-symbiont recognition and metabolic exchange, control symbiosis stability under normal conditions, but also lead to symbiosis breakdown (bleaching) during stress. This study describes the repertoire of the sterol-trafficking proteins Niemann-Pick type C (NPC1 and NPC2) in the symbiotic sea anemone Anemonia viridis. We found one NPC1 gene in contrast to the two genes (NPC1 and NPC1L1) present in vertebrate genomes. While only one NPC2 gene is present in many metazoans, this gene has been duplicated in cnidarians, and we detected four NPC2 genes in A. viridis. However, only one gene (AvNPC2-d) was upregulated in symbiotic relative to aposymbiotic sea anemones and displayed higher expression in the gastrodermis (symbiont-containing tissue) than in the epidermis. We performed immunolabelling experiments on tentacle cross sections and demonstrated that the AvNPC2-d protein was closely associated with symbiosomes. In addition, AvNPC1 and AvNPC2-d gene expression was strongly downregulated during stress. These data suggest that AvNPC2-d is involved in both the stability and dysfunction of cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbioses.

  9. Identification of seven novel SMPD1 mutations causing Niemann-Pick disease types A and B.

    PubMed

    Irun, P; Mallén, M; Dominguez, C; Rodriguez-Sureda, V; Alvarez-Sala, L A; Arslan, N; Bermejo, N; Guerrero, C; Perez de Soto, I; Villalón, L; Giraldo, P; Pocovi, M

    2013-10-01

    Niemann-Pick disease (NPD) types A and B are autosomal, recessively inherited, lysosomal storage disorders caused by deficient activity of acid sphingomyelinase (E.C. 3.1.4.12) because of mutations in the sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase-1 (SMPD1) gene. Here, we present the molecular analysis and clinical characteristics of 15 NPD type A and B patients. Sequencing the SMDP1 gene revealed eight previously described mutations and seven novel mutations including four missense [c.682T>C (p.Cys228Arg), c.1159T>C (p.Cys387Arg), c.1474G>A (p.Gly492Ser), and c.1795C>T (p.Leu599Phe)], one frameshift [c.169delG (p.Ala57Leufs*20)] and two splicing (c.316+1G>T and c.1341delG). The most frequent mutations were p.Arg610del (21%) and p.Gly247Ser (12%). Two patients homozygous for p.Arg610del and initially classified as phenotype B showed different clinical manifestations. Patients homozygous for p.Leu599Phe had phenotype B, and those homozygous for c.1341delG or c.316+1G>T presented phenotype A. The present results provide new insight into genotype/phenotype correlations in NPD and emphasize the difficulty of classifying patients into types A and B, supporting the idea of a continuum between these two classic phenotypes.

  10. Localizing the human Niemann-Pick C gene to 18q11-12

    SciTech Connect

    Carstea, E.D.; Parker, C.C.; Fandino, L.B.

    1994-09-01

    Niemann-Pick C (NPC) is an autosomal recessive neurovisceral lipid storage disorder characterized by abnormal processing and defective intracellular movement of endocytosed cholesterol. Multipoint genetic linkage analysis on 18 NPC families places the NPC locus within a 5 cM interval between loci D18S44 and D18S66, supported by the lod score Z{sub max}=123.61. Pairwise linkage analysis with marker D18S480 resulted in no obligate recombinations between it and the NPC gene in any of the sibling pairs. The resulting two point lod score was Z{sub max}=10.628 at {theta}=0.001. According to the physical map, both D18S44 and D18S480 are located on band 18q11 whereas D18S66 maps to 18q12, and therefore places NPC on the proximal long arm of chromosome 18. A single pedigree, family 19, demonstrated recombinations with markers that both define and flank the proposed NPC interval. In family 19, it was apparent that there was no correlation between the NPC-like phenotype and inheritance of the chromosome 18 region defined by D18S44 and D18S66. Based on heterogeneity testing, family 19 was excluded from linkage analysis. Therefore, in addition to mapping the NPC gene to proximal 18q, the NPC phenotype of family 19 suggests the existence of a separate gene that codes for an additional component required for intracellular movement of cholesterol.

  11. Flotillins play an essential role in Niemann-Pick C1-like 1-mediated cholesterol uptake

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Liang; Qi, Wei; Wang, Li-Juan; Miao, Hong-Hua; Qu, Yu-Xiu; Li, Bo-Liang; Song, Bao-Liang

    2011-01-01

    Dietary absorption is a major way for mammals to obtain cholesterol, which is mediated by Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1) via vesicular endocytosis. One fundamental question in this process is how free cholesterol is efficiently taken up through the internalization of NPC1L1. Using exogenously expressed NPC1L1-EGFP, we show that the lipid raft proteins flotillins associate with NPC1L1 and their localization is regulated by NPC1L1 during intracellular trafficking. Furthermore, flotillins are essential for NPC1L1-mediated cellular cholesterol uptake, biliary cholesterol reabsorption, and the regulation of lipid levels in mice. Together with NPC1L1, they form cholesterol-enriched membrane microdomains, which function as carriers for bulk of cholesterol. The hypocholesterolemic drug ezetimibe disrupts the association between NPC1L1 and flotillins, which blocks the formation of the cholesterol-enriched microdomains. Our findings reveal a functional role of flotillins in NPC1L1-mediated cholesterol uptake and elucidate the formation of NPC1L1–flotillins-postive cholesterol-enriched membrane microdomains as a mechanism for efficient cholesterol absorption. PMID:21187433

  12. Niemann-Pick C1 Is Essential for Ebolavirus Replication and Pathogenesis In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Andrew S.; Davidson, Cristin; Kuehne, Ana I.; Bakken, Russell; Braigen, Stephen Z.; Gunn, Kathryn E.; Whelan, Sean P.; Brummelkamp, Thijn R.; Twenhafel, Nancy A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recent work demonstrated that the Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) protein is an essential entry receptor for filoviruses. While previous studies focused on filovirus entry requirements of NPC1 in vitro, its roles in filovirus replication and pathogenesis in vivo remain unclear. Here, we evaluated the importance of NPC1, and its partner in cholesterol transport, NPC2, by using a mouse model of Ebolavirus (EBOV) disease. We found that, whereas wild-type mice had high viral loads and succumbed to EBOV infection, Npc1−/− mice were entirely free of viral replication and completely protected from EBOV disease. Interestingly, Npc1+/− mice transiently developed high levels of viremia, but were nevertheless substantially protected from EBOV challenge. We also found Npc2−/− mice to be fully susceptible to EBOV infection, while Npc1−/− mice treated to deplete stored lysosomal cholesterol remained completely resistant to EBOV infection. These results provide mechanistic evidence that NPC1 is directly required for EBOV infection in vivo, with little or no role for NPC1/NPC2-dependent cholesterol transport. Finally, we assessed the in vivo antiviral efficacies of three compounds known to inhibit NPC1 function or NPC1-glycoprotein binding in vitro. Two compounds reduced viral titers in vivo and provided a modest, albeit not statistically significant, degree of protection. Taken together, our results show that NPC1 is critical for replication and pathogenesis in animals and is a bona fide target for development of antifilovirus therapeutics. Additionally, our findings with Npc1+/− mice raise the possibility that individuals heterozygous for NPC1 may have a survival advantage in the face of EBOV infection. PMID:26015498

  13. Multiple Surface Regions on the Niemann-Pick C2 Protein Facilitate Intracellular Cholesterol Transport.

    PubMed

    McCauliff, Leslie A; Xu, Zhi; Li, Ran; Kodukula, Sarala; Ko, Dennis C; Scott, Matthew P; Kahn, Peter C; Storch, Judith

    2015-11-06

    The cholesterol storage disorder Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is caused by defects in either of two late endosomal/lysosomal proteins, NPC1 and NPC2. NPC2 is a 16-kDa soluble protein that binds cholesterol in a 1:1 stoichiometry and can transfer cholesterol between membranes by a mechanism that involves protein-membrane interactions. To examine the structural basis of NPC2 function in cholesterol trafficking, a series of point mutations were generated across the surface of the protein. Several NPC2 mutants exhibited deficient sterol transport properties in a set of fluorescence-based assays. Notably, these mutants were also unable to promote egress of accumulated intracellular cholesterol from npc2(-/-) fibroblasts. The mutations mapped to several regions on the protein surface, suggesting that NPC2 can bind to more than one membrane simultaneously. Indeed, we have previously demonstrated that WT NPC2 promotes vesicle-vesicle interactions. These interactions were abrogated, however, by mutations causing defective sterol transfer properties. Molecular modeling shows that NPC2 is highly plastic, with several intense positively charged regions across the surface that could interact favorably with negatively charged membrane phospholipids. The point mutations generated in this study caused changes in NPC2 surface charge distribution with minimal conformational changes. The plasticity, coupled with membrane flexibility, probably allows for multiple cholesterol transfer routes. Thus, we hypothesize that, in part, NPC2 rapidly traffics cholesterol between closely appositioned membranes within the multilamellar interior of late endosomal/lysosomal proteins, ultimately effecting cholesterol egress from this compartment.

  14. Niemann-Pick type C: focus on the adolescent/adult onset form.

    PubMed

    Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Marano, Massimo; Florio, Lucia; De Santis, Stefano

    2016-11-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NP-C) is an inherited sphingolipidosis characterized by progressive neurological deterioration and early mortality. The symptomatology and disease progression of NP-C are markedly affected by the age at onset of neurological manifestations, and categorization into early-infantile, late-infantile, juvenile, adolescent/adult neurological onset forms can aid evaluation of disease course and responses to therapy. Here, we review current information on the detection, diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of NP-C, with a focus on the adolescent/adult-onset form. A recent analysis indicated that the combined incidence of NP-C related to NPC1 gene mutations (NPC1) and NP-C related to NPC2 gene mutations (NPC2) is approximately 1 case in every 89 000 live births. In particular, late-onset phenotypes might well provide a greater contribution to the overall incidence than has previously been reported. Some neuropathological features in NP-C are held in common with other advanced age-onset diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Visceral symptoms such as splenomegaly are frequently asymptomatic in patients with adolescent/adult-onset NP-C, and are only occasionally detected during routine ultrasound assessments. In contrast, most patients with adolescent/adult-onset exhibit some degree of slowly progressive, non-disease-specific movement disorders (e.g. cerebellar ataxia), and/or more pathognomonic neurological signs such as vertical supranuclear gaze palsy. An increasing number of adolescent/adult-onset cases have been reported following initial recognition of cognitive impairment and/or psychiatric signs. The recent development and implementation of new clinical screening tools (e.g. the NP-C suspicion index) and biomarkers (e.g. plasma oxysterols) should help identify patients who warrant further investigation and possible treatment.

  15. Altered transition metal homeostasis in Niemann-Pick disease, Type C1

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ya Hui; Faux, Noel G.; Killilea, David W.; Yanjanin, Nicole; Firnkes, Sally; Volitakis, Irene; Ganio, George; Walterfang, Mark; Hastings, Caroline; Porter, Forbes D.; Ory, Daniel S.; Bush, Ashley I.

    2014-01-01

    The loss of NPC1 protein function is the predominant cause of Niemann-Pick type C1 disease (NP-C1), a systemic and neurodegenerative disorder characterized by late-endosomal/lysosomal accumulation of cholesterol and other lipids. Limited evidence from post-mortem human tissues, an Npc1−/− mouse model, and cell culture studies also suggest failure of metal homeostasis in NP-C1. To investigate these findings, we performed a comprehensive transition metal analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), plasma and tissue samples from human NP-C1 patients and an Npc1−/− mouse model. NPC1 deficiency in the Npc1−/− mouse model resulted in a perturbation of transition metal homeostasis in the plasma and key organs (brain, liver, spleen, heart, lungs, and kidneys). Analysis of human patient CSF, plasma and post-mortem brain tissues also indicated disrupted metal homeostasis. There was a disparity in the direction of metal changes between the human and the Npc1−/− mouse samples, which may reflect species-specific metal metabolism. Nevertheless, common to both species is brain zinc accumulation. Furthermore, treatment with the glucosylceramide synthase inhibitor miglustat, the only drug shown in a controlled clinical trial to have some efficacy for NP-C1, did not correct the alterations in CSF and plasma transition metal and ceruloplasmin (CP) metabolism in NP-C1 patients. These findings highlight the importance of NPC1 function in metal homeostasis, and indicate that metal-targeting therapy may be of value as a treatment for NP-C. PMID:24343124

  16. Pathogenic mycobacteria achieve cellular persistence by inhibiting the Niemann-Pick Type C disease cellular pathway

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. Tuberculosis remains a major global health concern. The ability to prevent phagosome-lysosome fusion is a key mechanism by which intracellular mycobacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, achieve long-term persistence within host cells. The mechanisms underpinning this key intracellular pro-survival strategy remain incompletely understood. Host macrophages infected with persistent mycobacteria share phenotypic similarities with cells taken from patients suffering from Niemann-Pick Disease Type C (NPC), a rare lysosomal storage disease in which endocytic trafficking defects and lipid accumulation within the lysosome lead to cell dysfunction and cell death. We investigated whether these shared phenotypes reflected an underlying mechanistic connection between mycobacterial intracellular persistence and the host cell pathway dysfunctional in NPC. Methods. The induction of NPC phenotypes in macrophages from wild-type mice or obtained from healthy human donors was assessed via infection with mycobacteria and subsequent measurement of lipid levels and intracellular calcium homeostasis. The effect of NPC therapeutics on intracellular mycobacterial load was also assessed. Results. Macrophages infected with persistent intracellular mycobacteria phenocopied NPC cells, exhibiting accumulation of multiple lipid types, reduced lysosomal Ca2+ levels, and defects in intracellular trafficking. These NPC phenotypes could also be induced using only lipids/glycomycolates from the mycobacterial cell wall. These data suggest that persistent intracellular mycobacteria inhibit the NPC pathway, likely via inhibition of the NPC1 protein, and subsequently induce altered acidic store Ca2+ homeostasis. Reduced lysosomal calcium levels may provide a mechanistic explanation for the reduced levels of phagosome-lysosome fusion in mycobacterial infection. Treatments capable of correcting defects in NPC mutant cells via modulation of host cell calcium were of benefit in promoting

  17. Mitochondrial GSH replenishment as a potential therapeutic approach for Niemann Pick type C disease.

    PubMed

    Torres, Sandra; Matías, Nuria; Baulies, Anna; Nuñez, Susana; Alarcon-Vila, Cristina; Martinez, Laura; Nuño, Natalia; Fernandez, Anna; Caballeria, Joan; Levade, Thierry; Gonzalez-Franquesa, Alba; Garcia-Rovés, Pablo; Balboa, Elisa; Zanlungo, Silvana; Fabrías, Gemma; Casas, Josefina; Enrich, Carlos; Garcia-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernández-Checa, José C

    2017-04-01

    Niemann Pick type C (NPC) disease is a progressive lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in genes encoding NPC1/NPC2 proteins, characterized by neurological defects, hepatosplenomegaly and premature death. While the primary biochemical feature of NPC disease is the intracellular accumulation of cholesterol and gangliosides, predominantly in endolysosomes, mitochondrial cholesterol accumulation has also been reported. As accumulation of cholesterol in mitochondria is known to impair the transport of GSH into mitochondria, resulting in mitochondrial GSH (mGSH) depletion, we investigated the impact of mGSH recovery in NPC disease. We show that GSH ethyl ester (GSH-EE), but not N-acetylcysteine (NAC), restored the mGSH pool in liver and brain of Npc1(-/-) mice and in fibroblasts from NPC patients, while both GSH-EE and NAC increased total GSH levels. GSH-EE but not NAC increased the median survival and maximal life span of Npc1(-/-) mice. Moreover, intraperitoneal therapy with GSH-EE protected against oxidative stress and oxidant-induced cell death, restored calbindin levels in cerebellar Purkinje cells and reversed locomotor impairment in Npc1(-/-) mice. High-resolution respirometry analyses revealed that GSH-EE improved oxidative phosphorylation, coupled respiration and maximal electron transfer in cerebellum of Npc1(-/-) mice. Lipidomic analyses showed that GSH-EE treatment had not effect in the profile of most sphingolipids in liver and brain, except for some particular species in brain of Npc1(-/-) mice. These findings indicate that the specific replenishment of mGSH may be a potential promising therapy for NPC disease, worth exploring alone or in combination with other options.

  18. Anatomically defined neuron-based rescue of neurodegenerative Niemann-Pick type C disorder.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Manuel E; Klein, Andres D; Dimbil, Ubah J; Scott, Matthew P

    2011-03-23

    Niemann-Pick type C disease is a fatal lysosomal storage disorder caused by loss of NPC1 function. The disorder severely affects multiple body systems, particularly the nervous system. To test whether rescue of NPC1 activity in neurons, astrocytes, or other cell types can correct the neurological defects, a Tet-inducible Npc1-YFP transgene was introduced into Npc1(-/-) mice for the cell type-specific rescue of NPC1 loss. NPC1-YFP produced in neurons prevented neuron degeneration, slowed reactive glial activity, and ameliorated the disease. NPC1-YFP produced in astrocytes or in cells of visceral tissue did not. These results suggest that loss of NPC1 activity from neurons is the primary cause of the neuropathology and that rescue of NPC1 function in neurons is sufficient to mitigate the disease. The ability of neurons to survive and function in a cell-autonomous fashion allowed the use of this newly engineered rescue system to further define the brain regions or neuron populations required to ameliorate a neurological symptom. NPC1-YFP produced specifically in cerebellar Purkinje neurons reduced ataxia, increased weight, and prolonged life, but it did not prevent the eventual decline and premature death of Npc1(-/-) mice. Significant increase in lifespan correlated with sustained reduction of inflammation in the thalamus. Neuron rescue of other forebrain areas provided little benefit. Future work targeting increasingly discrete neuronal networks should reveal which CNS areas are critical for survival. This work may have broad implications for understanding the anatomical and cellular basis of neurological signs and symptoms of other neurodegenerative and lysosomal disorders.

  19. Defective Cytochrome P450-Catalysed Drug Metabolism in Niemann-Pick Type C Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wassif, Christopher A.; Gray, James; Burkert, Kathryn R.; Smith, David A.; Morris, Lauren; Cologna, Stephanie M.; Peer, Cody J.; Sissung, Tristan M.; Uscatu, Constantin-Daniel; Figg, William D.; Pavan, William J.; Vite, Charles H.; Porter, Forbes D.; Platt, Frances M.

    2016-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is a neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in either the NPC1 or NPC2 gene. NPC is characterised by storage of multiple lipids in the late endosomal/lysosomal compartment, resulting in cellular and organ system dysfunction. The underlying molecular mechanisms that lead to the range of clinical presentations in NPC are not fully understood. While evaluating potential small molecule therapies in Npc1-/- mice, we observed a consistent pattern of toxicity associated with drugs metabolised by the cytochrome P450 system, suggesting a potential drug metabolism defect in NPC1 disease. Investigation of the P450 system in the context of NPC1 dysfunction revealed significant changes in the gene expression of many P450 associated genes across the full lifespan of Npc1-/- mice, decreased activity of cytochrome P450 reductase, and a global decrease of multiple cytochrome P450 catalysed dealkylation reactions. In vivo drug metabolism studies using a prototypic P450 metabolised drug, midazolam, confirmed dysfunction in drug clearance in the Npc1-/- mouse. Expression of the Phase II enzyme uridinediphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) was also significantly reduced in Npc1-/- mice. Interestingly, reduced activity within the P450 system was also observed in heterozygous Npc1+/- mice. The reduced activity of P450 enzymes may be the result of bile acid deficiency/imbalance in Npc1-/- mice, as bile acid treatment significantly rescued P450 enzyme activity in Npc1-/- mice and has the potential to be an adjunctive therapy for NPC disease patients. The dysfunction in the cytochrome P450 system were recapitulated in the NPC1 feline model. Additionally, we present the first evidence that there are alterations in the P450 system in NPC1 patients. PMID:27019000

  20. Case Report: Genetic analysis and anesthetic management of a child with Niemann-Pick disease Type A

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Priti G.; Coleman, Melissa; Horst, Meagan; Rocourt, Dorothy; Ladda, Roger L.; Janicki, Piotr K.

    2015-01-01

    A 14-month-old child, recently diagnosed with Niemann-Pick disease type A, presented for a laparoscopic placement of a gastrostomy tube under general anesthesia. The disease was confirmed and further characterized by genetic testing, which revealed evidence of the presence of two known pathogenic mutations in the SMPD1 gene, and enzyme studies showed a corresponding very low level of enzymatic activity of acidic sphingomyelinase. The anesthetic management involved strategies to manage an anticipated difficult intubation and avoid post-operative ventilation. PMID:26913189

  1. Stimulation of adenosine A2A receptors reduces intracellular cholesterol accumulation and rescues mitochondrial abnormalities in human neural cell models of Niemann-Pick C1.

    PubMed

    Ferrante, A; De Nuccio, C; Pepponi, R; Visentin, S; Martire, A; Bernardo, A; Minghetti, L; Popoli, P

    2016-04-01

    Niemann Pick C 1 (NPC1) disease is an incurable, devastating lysosomal-lipid storage disorder characterized by hepatosplenomegaly, progressive neurological impairment and early death. Current treatments are very limited and the research of new therapeutic targets is thus mandatory. We recently showed that the stimulation of adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) rescues the abnormal phenotype of fibroblasts from NPC1 patients suggesting that A2AR agonists could represent a therapeutic option for this disease. However, since all NPC1 patients develop severe neurological symptoms which can be ascribed to the complex pathology occurring in both neurons and oligodendrocytes, in the present paper we tested the effects of the A2AR agonist CGS21680 in human neuronal and oligodendroglial NPC1 cell lines (i.e. neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y and oligodendroglial MO3.13 transiently transfected with NPC1 small interfering RNA). The down-regulation of the NPC1 protein effectively resulted in intracellular cholesterol accumulation and altered mitochondrial membrane potential. Both effects were significantly attenuated by CGS21680 (500 nM). The protective effects of CGS were prevented by the selective A2AR antagonist ZM241385 (500 nM). The involvement of calcium modulation was demonstrated by the ability of Bapta-AM (5-7 μM) in reverting the effect of CGS. The A2A-dependent activity was prevented by the PKA-inhibitor KT5720, thus showing the involvement of the cAMP/PKA signaling. These findings provide a clear in vitro proof of concept that A2AR agonists are promising potential drugs for NPC disease.

  2. Niemann-Pick disease type C symptomatology: an expert-based clinical description

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NP-C) is a rare, progressive, irreversible disease leading to disabling neurological manifestations and premature death. The estimated disease incidence is 1:120,000 live births, but this likely represents an underestimate, as the disease may be under-diagnosed due to its highly heterogeneous presentation. NP-C is characterised by visceral, neurological and psychiatric manifestations that are not specific to the disease and that can be found in other conditions. The aim of this review is to provide non-specialists with an expert-based, detailed description of NP-C signs and symptoms, including how they present in patients and how they can be assessed. Early disease detection should rely on seeking a combination of signs and symptoms, rather than isolated findings. Examples of combinations which are strongly suggestive of NP-C include: splenomegaly and vertical supranuclear gaze palsy (VSGP); splenomegaly and clumsiness; splenomegaly and schizophrenia-like psychosis; psychotic symptoms and cognitive decline; and ataxia with dystonia, dysarthria/dysphagia and cognitive decline. VSGP is a hallmark of NP-C and becomes highly specific of the disease when it occurs in combination with other manifestations (e.g. splenomegaly, ataxia). In young infants (<2 years), abnormal saccades may first manifest as slowing and shortening of upward saccades, long before gaze palsy onset. While visceral manifestations tend to predominate during the perinatal and infantile period (2 months–6 years of age), neurological and psychiatric involvement is more prominent during the juvenile/adult period (>6 years of age). Psychosis in NP-C is atypical and variably responsive to treatment. Progressive cognitive decline, which always occurs in patients with NP-C, manifests as memory and executive impairment in juvenile/adult patients. Disease prognosis mainly correlates with the age at onset of the neurological signs, with early-onset forms progressing faster

  3. Identifying Niemann-Pick type C in early-onset ataxia: two quick clinical screening tools.

    PubMed

    Synofzik, Matthis; Fleszar, Zofia; Schöls, Ludger; Just, Jennifer; Bauer, Peter; Torres Martin, Juan V; Kolb, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NP-C) is a rare multisystemic lysosomal disorder which, albeit treatable, is still starkly underdiagnosed. As NP-C features early onset ataxia (EOA) in 85-90 % of cases, EOA presents a promising target group for undiagnosed NP-C patients. Here, we assessed the ability of the previously established NP-C suspicion index (SI) and a novel abbreviated '2/3 SI' tool for rapid appraisal of suspected NP-C in unexplained EOA. This was a retrospective observational study comparing 'NP-C EOA' cases (EOA patients with confirmed NP-C) with non-NP-C EOA controls (EOA patients negative for NP-C gene mutations). NP-C risk prediction scores (RPS) from both the original and 2/3 SIs were calculated and their discriminatory performance evaluated. Among 133 patients (47 NP-C EOA cases; 86 non-NP-C EOA controls), moderate (40-69 points) and high (≥70 points) RPS were common based on original SI assessments in non-NP-C EOA controls [16 (19 %) and 8 (9 %), respectively], but scores ≥70 points were far more frequent [46 (98 %)] among NP-C EOA cases. RPS cut-off values provided 98 % sensitivity and 91 % specificity for NP-C at 70-point cut-off, and ROC analysis revealed an AUC of 0.982. Using the 2/3 SI, 90 % of NP-C EOA cases had scores of 2 or 3, and RPS analysis showed an AUC of 0.961. In conclusion, the NP-C SI and the new, quick-to-apply 2/3 SI distinguished well between NP-C and non-NP-C patients, even in EOA populations with high background levels of broadly NPC-compatible multisystemic disease features. While the original SI showed the greatest sensitivity, both tools reliably aided identification of patients with unexplained EOA who warranted further investigation for NP-C.

  4. Correction of Apolipoprotein A-I-mediated Lipid Efflux and High Density Lipoprotein Particle Formation in Human Niemann-Pick Type C Disease Fibroblasts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Impaired cell cholesterol trafficking in Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease results in the first known instance of impaired regulation of the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), a lipid transporter mediating the rate-limiting step in high density lipoprotein (HDL) formation, as a cause of lo...

  5. Intestinal and hepatic Niemann-Pick C1L1 proteins: future therapeutic targets for cholesterol gallstones disease?

    PubMed

    Castro-Torres, Ibrahim Guillermo; De la O-Arciniega, Minarda; Bravo-Duarte, Gustavo Adolfo; Gallegos-Estudillo, Janeth; Domínguez-Ortíz, Miguel Ángel; Martínez-Vázquez, Mariano

    2014-04-05

    The formation of cholesterol gallstones is a very complex and polygenic disorder that involves an alteration of the secretion of bile lipids, cholesterol crystallization, important immunological reactions in the gallbladder tissue, formation of biliary sludge composed of mucin, and inadequate gallbladder motility. The search for a therapeutic target is oriented towards decreasing bile secretion and intestinal absorption of cholesterol, in which Niemann-Pick C1L1 (NPC1L1) proteins play an important role. In basic and clinical studies, regulating the expression of these proteins can reduce intestinal, liver, plasma and bile cholesterol levels, a therapeutic effect that would be useful not only for treating the disease, but to prevent it, given the large quantity of risk factors. We discuss these effects in this review and propose NPC1L1 proteins as future therapeutic targets of cholesterol gallstones disease.

  6. Circadian profiling in two mouse models of lysosomal storage disorders; Niemann Pick type-C and Sandhoff disease

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Katie; Livieratos, Achilleas; Dumbill, Richard; Hughes, Steven; Ang, Gauri; Smith, David A.; Morris, Lauren; Brown, Laurence A.; Peirson, Stuart N.; Platt, Frances M.; Davies, Kay E.; Oliver, Peter L.

    2016-01-01

    Sleep and circadian rhythm disruption is frequently associated with neurodegenerative disease, yet it is unclear how the specific pathology in these disorders leads to abnormal rest/activity profiles. To investigate whether the pathological features of lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) influence the core molecular clock or the circadian behavioural abnormalities reported in some patients, we examined mouse models of Niemann-Pick Type-C (Npc1 mutant, Npc1nih) and Sandhoff (Hexb knockout, Hexb−/−) disease using wheel-running activity measurement, neuropathology and clock gene expression analysis. Both mutants exhibited regular, entrained rest/activity patterns under light:dark (LD) conditions despite the onset of their respective neurodegenerative phenotypes. A slightly shortened free-running period and changes in Per1 gene expression were observed in Hexb−/− mice under constant dark conditions (DD); however, no overt neuropathology was detected in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Conversely, despite extensive cholesterol accumulation in the SCN of Npc1nih mutants, no circadian disruption was observed under constant conditions. Our results indicate the accumulation of specific metabolites in LSDs may differentially contribute to circadian deregulation at the molecular and behavioural level. PMID:26467605

  7. Orlistat limits cholesterol intestinal absorption by Niemann-pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1) inhibition.

    PubMed

    Alqahtani, Saeed; Qosa, Hisham; Primeaux, Brian; Kaddoumi, Amal

    2015-09-05

    The known mechanism by which orlistat decreases the absorption of dietary cholesterol is by inhibition of intestinal lipases. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of orlistat to limit cholesterol absorption by inhibition of the cholesterol transport protein Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1) as another mechanism of action. In situ rat intestinal perfusion studies were conducted to study the effect of orlistat on jejunal cholesterol absorption. Inhibition kinetic parameters were calculated from in vitro inhibition studies using Caco2 and NPC1L1 transfected cell lines. The in situ studies demonstrated that intestinal perfusion of orlistat (100µM) was able to reduce cholesterol absorption by three-fold when compared to control (i.e. in the absence of orlistat, P<0.01). In vitro studies using Caco2 cells demonstrated orlistat to reduce the cellular uptake of cholesterol by 30%. Additionally, orlistat reduced the cellular uptake of cholesterol in dose dependent manner in NPC1L1 transfected cell line with an IC50=1.2µM. Lineweaver-Burk plot indicated a noncompetitive inhibition of NPC1L1 by orlistat. Beside the already established mechanism by which orlistat reduces the absorption of cholesterol, we demonstrated for the first time that orlistat limits cholesterol absorption by the inhibition of NPC1L1 transport protein.

  8. Pharmacological reversion of sphingomyelin-induced dendritic spine anomalies in a Niemann Pick disease type A mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo, Ana I; Camoletto, Paola G; Morando, Laura; Sassoe-Pognetto, Marco; Giustetto, Maurizio; Van Veldhoven, Paul P; Schuchman, Edward H; Ledesma, Maria D

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the role of lipids in synapses and the aberrant molecular mechanisms causing the cognitive deficits that characterize most lipidosis is necessary to develop therapies for these diseases. Here we describe sphingomyelin (SM) as a key modulator of the dendritic spine actin cytoskeleton. We show that increased SM levels in neurons of acid sphingomyelinase knock out mice (ASMko), which mimic Niemann Pick disease type A (NPA), result in reduced spine number and size and low levels of filamentous actin. Mechanistically, SM accumulation decreases the levels of metabotropic glutamate receptors type I (mGluR1/5) at the synaptic membrane impairing membrane attachment and activity of RhoA and its effectors ROCK and ProfilinIIa. Pharmacological enhancement of the neutral sphingomyelinase rescues the aberrant molecular and morphological phenotypes in vitro and in vivo and improves motor and memory deficits in ASMko mice. Altogether, these data demonstrate the influence of SM and its catabolic enzymes in dendritic spine physiology and contribute to our understanding of the cognitive deficits of NPA patients, opening new perspectives for therapeutic interventions. Subject Categories Genetics, Gene Therapy & Genetic Disease; Neuroscience PMID:24448491

  9. Combination brain and systemic injections of AAV provide maximal functional and survival benefits in the Niemann-Pick mouse

    PubMed Central

    Passini, Marco A.; Bu, Jie; Fidler, Jonathan A.; Ziegler, Robin J.; Foley, Joseph W.; Dodge, James C.; Yang, Wendy W.; Clarke, Jennifer; Taksir, Tatyana V.; Griffiths, Denise A.; Zhao, Michael A.; O'Riordan, Catherine R.; Schuchman, Edward H.; Shihabuddin, Lamya S.; Cheng, Seng H.

    2007-01-01

    Niemann-Pick disease (NPD) is caused by the loss of acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) activity, which results in widespread accumulation of undegraded lipids in cells of the viscera and CNS. In this study, we tested the effect of combination brain and systemic injections of recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors encoding human ASM (hASM) in a mouse model of NPD. Animals treated by combination therapy exhibited high levels of hASM in the viscera and brain, which resulted in near-complete correction of storage throughout the body. This global reversal of pathology translated to normal weight gain and superior recovery of motor and cognitive functions compared to animals treated by either brain or systemic injection alone. Furthermore, animals in the combination group did not generate antibodies to hASM, demonstrating the first application of systemic-mediated tolerization to improve the efficacy of brain injections. All of the animals treated by combination therapy survived in good health to an investigator-selected 54 weeks, whereas the median lifespans of the systemic-alone, brain-alone, or untreated ASM knockout groups were 47, 48, and 34 weeks, respectively. These data demonstrate that combination therapy is a promising therapeutic modality for treating NPD and suggest a potential strategy for treating disease indications that cause both visceral and CNS pathologies. PMID:17517638

  10. Cell entry by a novel European filovirus requires host endosomal cysteine proteases and Niemann-Pick C1

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Melinda; Ndungo, Esther; Jangra, Rohit K.; Cai, Yingyun; Postnikova, Elena; Radoshitzky, Sheli R.; Dye, John M.; de Arellano, Eva Ramírez; Negredo, Ana; Palacios, Gustavo; Kuhn, Jens H.; Chandran, Kartik

    2014-01-01

    Lloviu virus (LLOV), a phylogenetically divergent filovirus, is the proposed etiologic agent of die-offs of Schreiber’s long-fingered bats (Miniopterus schreibersii) in western Europe. Studies of LLOV remain limited because the infectious agent has not yet been isolated. Here, we generated a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus expressing the LLOV spike glycoprotein (GP) and used it to show that LLOV GP resembles other filovirus GP proteins in structure and function. LLOV GP must be cleaved by endosomal cysteine proteases during entry, but is much more protease-sensitive than EBOV GP. The EBOV/MARV receptor, Niemann Pick C1 (NPC1), is also required for LLOV entry, and its second luminal domain is recognized with high affinity by a cleaved form of LLOV GP, suggesting that receptor binding would not impose a barrier to LLOV infection of humans and non-human primates. The use of NPC1 as an intracellular entry receptor may be a universal property of filoviruses. PMID:25310500

  11. Clinical and Genetic Characteristics of Mexican Patients with Juvenile Presentation of Niemann-Pick Type C Disease

    PubMed Central

    Piña-Aguilar, Raul E.; Vera-Loaiza, Aurea; Chacón-Camacho, Oscar F.; Zenteno, Juan Carlos; Nuñez-Orozco, Lilia; Santillán-Hernández, Yuritzi

    2014-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C disease (NPC) is a rare lysosomal disease with a protean presentation, ranging from a fatal neonatal course with visceromegaly to an adult presentation with only neurological or psychiatric symptomatology. In this report we describe the genetic and clinical characteristics of 3 Mexican patients from different families with juvenile presentation of NPC. Clinical examination, imaging of central nervous and gastrointestinal system, and EEG were performed. Genetic studies include sequencing and deletion/duplication analysis of NPC1 and NPC2 genes. All patients presented with cognitive impairment, ataxia, and supranuclear vertical gaze palsy; one case had gelastic cataplexy. Also they developed epilepsy and cortical atrophy and two patients had thinning of corpus callosum. The 3 patients were compound heterozygotes for NPC1 sequence variants, including 5 missense and 1 nonsense mutations: p.P1007A and p.F1087L in Case 1; p.Q921P and p.G992R in Case 2; and p.R348∗ and p.V1165M in case 3. Mexican patients with juvenile NPC presented with a variable clinical phenotype and compound heterozygosity. This suggests a relative high frequency of mutation carriers as it is reported for European population. Consequently, clinicians should consider NPC as a diagnosis possibility in any adolescent or young adult patient with juvenile dementia and/or ataxia, even in absence of gelastic cataplexy and supranuclear vertical gaze palsy. PMID:25349751

  12. Infrared spectroscopic imaging of the biochemical modifications induced in the cerebellum of the Niemann-Pick type C mouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidder, Linda H.; Colarusso, Pina; Stewart, Sarah A.; Levin, Ira W.; Appel, Nathan M.; Lester, David S.; Pentchev, Peter G.; Lewis, E. N.

    1999-01-01

    WE have applied Fourier transform infrared (IR) spectroscopic imaging to the investigation of the neuropathologic effects of a genetic lipid storage disease, Niemann-Pick type C (NPC). Tissue sections both from the cerebella of a strain of BALB/c mice that demonstrated morphology and pathology of the human disease and from control animals were used. These samples were analyzed by standard histopathological procedures as well as this new IR imaging approach. The IR absorbance images exhibit contrast based on biochemical variations and allow for the identification of the cellular layers within the tissue samples. Furthermore, these images provide a qualitative description of the localized biochemical differences existing between the diseased and control tissue in the absence of histological staining. Statistical analyses of the IR spectra extracted from individual cell layers of the imaging data sets provide concise quantitative descriptions of these biochemical changes. The results indicate that lipid is depleted specifically in the white matter of the NPC mouse in comparison to the control samples. Minor differences were noted for the granular layers, but no significant differences were observed in the molecular layers of the cerebellar tissue. These changes are consistent with significant demyelination within the cerebellum of the NPC mouse.

  13. Changes in Caries Risk and Activity of a 9-Year-Old Patient with Niemann-Pick Disease Type C

    PubMed Central

    Mesquita-Guimarães, Késsia Suênia Fidelis; De Rossi, Andiara; Freitas, Aldevina Campos; Nelson-Filho, Paulo; da Silva, Raquel Assed; de Queiroz, Alexandra Mussolino

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This case report describes the changes in caries risk and activity and dental treatment of a 9-year-old patient who presented with signs and symptoms of Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC). Treatment. The preventive dental treatment included instructions to caregivers for oral hygiene and diet. A calcium hydroxide pulpotomy and restorative dental treatments were performed in a dental office with desensitization techniques and behavioral management. The patient was attended every 3 months for the control of dental plaque biofilm, for topical fluoride application, and for observing the pulpotomized tooth. Results. The bacterial plaque biofilm was being adequately controlled by the caregiver. After 2 years, the clinical and radiographic examination of the pulpotomized tooth showed the absence of internal root resorption and bone rarefaction, and clinical examination showed tooth sensitivity, dental pain, and gingival swelling. Conclusion. The pulpotomy prevented clinical and radiographic success. Dentists must be aware of and be able to identify systemic and local aspects associated with caries risk of children with NPC disease. Furthermore, dentists must employ stringent preventive measures and provide instructions to caregivers to reduce caries risk. PMID:25685563

  14. Saccadic Eye Movement Characteristics in Adult Niemann-Pick Type C Disease: Relationships with Disease Severity and Brain Structural Measures

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Larry A.; Bowman, Elizabeth A.; Velakoulis, Dennis; Fahey, Michael C.; Desmond, Patricia; Macfarlane, Matthew D.; Looi, Jeffrey Chee Leong; Adamson, Christopher L.; Walterfang, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Niemann-Pick Type C disease (NPC) is a rare genetic disorder of lipid metabolism. A parameter related to horizontal saccadic peak velocity was one of the primary outcome measures in the clinical trial assessing miglustat as a treatment for NPC. Neuropathology is widespread in NPC, however, and could be expected to affect other saccadic parameters. We compared horizontal saccadic velocity, latency, gain, antisaccade error percentage and self-paced saccade generation in 9 adult NPC patients to data from 10 age-matched controls. These saccadic measures were correlated with appropriate MRI-derived brain structural measures (e.g., dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, frontal eye fields, supplemental eye fields, parietal eye fields, pons, midbrain and cerebellar vermis) and with measures of disease severity and duration. The best discriminators between groups were reflexive saccade gain and the two volitional saccade measures. Gain was also the strongest correlate with disease severity and duration. Most of the saccadic measures showed strongly significant correlations with neurophysiologically appropriate brain regions. While our patient sample is small, the apparent specificity of these relationships suggests that as new diagnostic methods and treatments become available for NPC, a broader range of saccadic measures may be useful tools for the assessment of disease progression and treatment efficacy. PMID:23226429

  15. Intracisternal Cyclodextrin Prevents Cerebellar Dysfunction and Purkinje Cell Death in Feline Niemann-Pick type C1 disease

    PubMed Central

    Vite, C. H.; Bagel, J. H.; Swain, G. P.; Prociuk, M.; Sikora, T. U.; Stein, V. M.; O’Donnell, P.; Ruane, T.; Ward, S.; Crooks, A.; Li, S.; Mauldin, E.; Stellar, S.; De Meulder, M.; Kao, M. L.; Ory, D. S.; Davidson, C.; Vanier, M. T.; Walkley, S. U.

    2015-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC) disease is a lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in the NPC1 gene, leading to an increase in unesterified cholesterol and several sphingolipids, and resulting in hepatic disease and progressive neurological disease. Whereas subcutaneous administration of the pharmaceutical excipient 2-hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) ameliorated hepatic disease, doses sufficient to reduce neurological disease resulted in pulmonary toxicity. In contrast, direct administration of HPβCD into the cisterna magna of presymptomatic cats with NPC disease prevented the onset of cerebellar dysfunction for greater than a year and resulted in a reduction in Purkinje cell loss and near normal concentrations of cholesterol and sphingolipids. Moreover, administration of intracisternal HPβCD to NPC cats with ongoing cerebellar dysfunction slowed disease progression, increased survival time, and decreased the accumulation of brain gangliosides. An increase in hearing threshold was identified as a potential adverse effect. Together, these studies in the feline animal model have provided critical data on efficacy and safety of drug administration directly into the CNS that will be important for advancing HPβCD into clinical trials. PMID:25717099

  16. Sphingomyelin-induced inhibition of the plasma membrane calcium ATPase causes neurodegeneration in type A Niemann-Pick disease.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Cañamás, A; Benvegnù, S; Rueda, C B; Rábano, A; Satrústegui, J; Ledesma, M D

    2016-09-13

    Niemann-Pick disease type A (NPA) is a rare lysosomal storage disorder characterized by severe neurological alterations that leads to death in childhood. Loss-of-function mutations in the acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) gene cause NPA, and result in the accumulation of sphingomyelin (SM) in lysosomes and plasma membrane of neurons. Using ASM knockout (ASMko) mice as a NPA disease model, we investigated how high SM levels contribute to neural pathology in NPA. We found high levels of oxidative stress both in neurons from these mice and a NPA patient. Impaired activity of the plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) increases intracellular calcium. SM induces PMCA decreased activity, which causes oxidative stress. Incubating ASMko-cultured neurons in the histone deacetylase inhibitor, SAHA, restores PMCA activity and calcium homeostasis and, consequently, reduces the increased levels of oxidative stress. No recovery occurs when PMCA activity is pharmacologically impaired or genetically inhibited in vitro. Oral administration of SAHA prevents oxidative stress and neurodegeneration, and improves behavioral performance in ASMko mice. These results demonstrate a critical role for plasma membrane SM in neuronal calcium regulation. Thus, we identify changes in PMCA-triggered calcium homeostasis as an upstream mediator for NPA pathology. These findings can stimulate new approaches for pharmacological remediation in a disease with no current clinical treatments.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 13 September 2016; doi:10.1038/mp.2016.148.

  17. Structural Insights into the Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1)-Mediated Cholesterol Transfer and Ebola Infection.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xin; Qian, Hongwu; Zhou, Xinhui; Wu, Jianping; Wan, Tao; Cao, Pingping; Huang, Weiyun; Zhao, Xin; Wang, Xudong; Wang, Peiyi; Shi, Yi; Gao, George F; Zhou, Qiang; Yan, Nieng

    2016-06-02

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) is associated with mutations in NPC1 and NPC2, whose gene products are key players in the endosomal/lysosomal egress of low-density lipoprotein-derived cholesterol. NPC1 is also the intracellular receptor for Ebola virus (EBOV). Here, we present a 4.4 Å structure of full-length human NPC1 and a low-resolution reconstruction of NPC1 in complex with the cleaved glycoprotein (GPcl) of EBOV, both determined by single-particle electron cryomicroscopy. NPC1 contains 13 transmembrane segments (TMs) and three distinct lumenal domains A (also designated NTD), C, and I. TMs 2-13 exhibit a typical resistance-nodulation-cell division fold, among which TMs 3-7 constitute the sterol-sensing domain conserved in several proteins involved in cholesterol metabolism and signaling. A trimeric EBOV-GPcl binds to one NPC1 monomer through the domain C. Our structural and biochemical characterizations provide an important framework for mechanistic understanding of NPC1-mediated intracellular cholesterol trafficking and Ebola virus infection.

  18. Altered distribution and function of natural killer cells in murine and human Niemann-Pick disease type C1.

    PubMed

    Speak, Anneliese O; Te Vruchte, Danielle; Davis, Lianne C; Morgan, Anthony J; Smith, David A; Yanjanin, Nicole M; Simmons, Louise; Hartung, Ralf; Runz, Heiko; Mengel, Eugen; Beck, Michael; Imrie, Jackie; Jacklin, Elizabeth; Wraith, James E; Hendriksz, Christian; Lachmann, Robin; Cognet, Celine; Sidhu, Rohini; Fujiwara, Hideji; Ory, Daniel S; Galione, Antony; Porter, Forbes D; Vivier, Eric; Platt, Frances M

    2014-01-02

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) is a neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder caused by defects in the lysosomal proteins NPC1 or NPC2. NPC cells are characterized by reduced lysosomal calcium levels and impaired sphingosine transport from lysosomes. Natural killer (NK) cells kill virally infected/transformed cells via degranulation of lysosome-related organelles. Their trafficking from lymphoid tissues into the circulation is dependent on sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) gradients, sensed by S1P receptor 5 (S1P5). We hypothesized that NK-cell function and trafficking could be affected in NPC disease due to the combined effects of the lysosomal calcium defect and sphingosine storage. In an NPC1 mouse model, we found the frequency of NK cells was altered and phenocopied S1P5-deficient mice, consistent with defects in S1P levels. NK cells from NPC1 mice also had a defect in cytotoxicity due to a failure in degranulation of cytotoxic granules, which was associated with reduced lysosomal calcium levels. Affected NPC1 patients and NPC1 heterozygote carriers had reduced NK-cell numbers in their blood and showed similar phenotypic and developmental changes to those observed in the NPC1 mouse. These findings highlight the effects of lysosomal storage on the peripheral immune system.

  19. Heterogeneity and frequency of movement disorders in juvenile and adult-onset Niemann-Pick C disease.

    PubMed

    Anheim, Mathieu; Lagha-Boukbiza, Ouhaïd; Fleury-Lesaunier, Marie-Céline; Valenti-Hirsch, Maria-Paola; Hirsch, Edouard; Gervais-Bernard, Hélène; Broussolle, Emmanuel; Thobois, Stéphane; Vanier, Marie T; Latour, Philippe; Tranchant, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C disease (NPC) is a recessive neurolipidosis. We report five adolescent and adult NPC cases to underscore the frequency and heterogeneity of movement disorders in NPC. Clinical, morphologic, biochemical and genetic study was performed in the five patients. Disease onset was between 8 and 50 years. Movement disorders were present in all cases, were heterogeneous and often combined [cerebellar ataxia (5/5), myoclonus (3/5), dystonia (2/5), chorea (1/5) and tremor (1/5)] and were the first sign in 4/5. Two patients were reported to have no vertical supranuclear gaze palsy (VSGP) at the first examination. Two patients experienced acute neuropsychiatric signs leading to death in one case due to myoclonic storm. Filipin staining was always positive. Two NPC1 mutations were identified in three patients, only one in two siblings. NPC should be considered in case of unexplained movement disorders, even when VSGP or cataplexy are not reported. Filipin staining remains a strong support for the diagnosis. Treatment with miglustat should be considered which is currently the only approved disease-specific treatment of NPC in children and adults.

  20. Cholesterol accumulation in Niemann Pick type C (NPC) model cells causes a shift in APP localization to lipid rafts

    SciTech Connect

    Kosicek, Marko; Malnar, Martina; Goate, Alison; Hecimovic, Silva

    2010-03-12

    It has been suggested that cholesterol may modulate amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) formation, a causative factor of Alzheimer's disease (AD), by regulating distribution of the three key proteins in the pathogenesis of AD ({beta}-amyloid precursor protein (APP), {beta}-secretase (BACE1) and/or presenilin 1 (PS1)) within lipid rafts. In this work we tested whether cholesterol accumulation upon NPC1 dysfunction, which causes Niemann Pick type C disease (NPC), causes increased partitioning of APP into lipid rafts leading to increased CTF/A{beta} formation in these cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains. To test this we used CHO NPC1{sup -/-} cells (NPC cells) and parental CHOwt cells. By sucrose density gradient centrifugation we observed a shift in fl-APP/CTF compartmentalization into lipid raft fractions upon cholesterol accumulation in NPC vs. wt cells. Furthermore, {gamma}-secretase inhibitor treatment significantly increased fl-APP/CTF distribution in raft fractions in NPC vs. wt cells, suggesting that upon cholesterol accumulation in NPC1-null cells increased formation of APP-CTF and its increased processing towards A{beta} occurs in lipid rafts. Our results support that cholesterol overload, such as in NPC disease, leads to increased partitioning of APP/CTF into lipid rafts resulting in increased amyloidogenic processing of APP in these cholesterol-rich membranes. This work adds to the mechanism of the cholesterol-effect on APP processing and the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and supports the role of lipid rafts in these processes.

  1. Effects of intracerebroventricular administration of 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin in a patient with Niemann-Pick Type C disease.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Muneaki; Shraishi, Koki; Wada, Koki; Ishitsuka, Yoichi; Doi, Hirohito; Maeda, Miyuki; Mizoguchi, Tatsuhiro; Eto, Junya; Mochinaga, Sakiko; Arima, Hidetoshi; Irie, Tetsumi

    2014-01-01

    Niemann-Pick Type C disease (NPC) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder characterized by progressive neurological deterioration. Previously, we reported that intravenous administration of 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPB-CD) in two patients with NPC had only partial and transient beneficial effects on neurological function. The most likely reason for HPB-CD not significantly improving the neurological deficits of NPC is its inability to cross the blood-brain barrier. Herein, we describe the effects of intrathecal HPB-CD in an eight-year-old patient with a perinatal onset of NPC, administered initially at a dose of 10 mg/kg every other week and increased up to 10 mg/kg twice a week. Clinically, the patient maintained residual neurological functions for two years, at which time nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed a decreased choline to creatine ratio and increased N-acetylaspartate to creatine ratio, and positron emission tomography revealed increased standardized uptake values. Total-tau in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was also decreased after two years. No adverse effects were observed over the course of treatment. The CSF concentrations of HPB-CD during the distribution phase after the injections were comparable with those at which HPB-CD could normalize cellular cholesterol abnormality in vitro. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the mechanisms of action of HPB-CD in NPC, and to determine the optimal dose and intervals of HPB-CD injection.

  2. Improvement in Lipid and Protein Trafficking in Niemann-Pick C1 Cells by Correction of a Secondary Enzyme Defect

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, Cecilia; Pipalia, Nina H.; Liao, Xianghai; Schuchman, Edward H.; Maxfield, Frederick R.; Tabas, Ira

    2010-01-01

    Different primary lysosomal trafficking defects lead to common alterations in lipid trafficking, suggesting cooperative interactions among lysosomal lipids. However, cellular analysis of the functional consequences of this phenomenon is lacking. As a test case, we studied cells with defective Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) protein, a cholesterol trafficking protein whose defect gives rise to lysosomal accumulation of cholesterol and other lipids, leading to NPC disease. NPC1 cells also develop a secondary defect in acid sphingomyelinase (SMase) activity despite a normal acid SMase gene (SMPD1). When acid SMase activity was restored to normal levels in NPC1-deficient CHO cells through SMPD1 transfection, there was a dramatic reduction in lysosomal cholesterol. Two other defects, excess lysosomal bis-(monoacylglycerol) phosphate (BMP) and defective transferrin receptor (TfR) recycling, were also markedly improved. To test its relevance in human cells, the acid SMase activity defect in fibroblasts from NPC1 patients was corrected by SMPD1 transfection or acid SMase enzyme replacement. Both treatments resulted in a dramatic reduction in lysosomal cholesterol. These data show that correcting one aspect of a complex lysosomal lipid storage disease can reduce the cellular consequences even if the primary genetic defect is not corrected. PMID:20412078

  3. Invariant natural killer T cells are not affected by lysosomal storage in patients with Niemann-Pick disease type C.

    PubMed

    Speak, Anneliese O; Platt, Nicholas; Salio, Mariolina; te Vruchte, Danielle; Smith, David A; Shepherd, Dawn; Veerapen, Natacha; Besra, Gurdyal S; Yanjanin, Nicole M; Simmons, Louise; Imrie, Jackie; Wraith, James E; Lachmann, Robin H; Hartung, Ralf; Runz, Heiko; Mengel, Eugen; Beck, Michael; Hendriksz, Christian J; Porter, Forbes D; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Platt, Frances M

    2012-07-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are a specialised subset of T cells that are restricted to the MHC class I like molecule, CD1d. The ligands for iNKT cells are lipids, with the canonical superagonist being α-galactosylceramide, a non-mammalian glycosphingolipid. Trafficking of CD1d through the lysosome is required for the development of murine iNKT cells. Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by dysfunction in either of two lysosomal proteins, NPC1 or NPC2, resulting in the storage of multiple lipids, including glycosphingolipids. In the NPC1 mouse model, iNKT cells are virtually undetectable, which is likely due to the inability of CD1d to be loaded with the selecting ligand due to defective lysosomal function and/or CD1d trafficking. However, in this study we have found that in NPC1 patients iNKT cells are present at normal frequencies, with no phenotypic or functional differences. In addi-tion, antigen-presenting cells derived from NPC1 patients are functionally competent to present several different CD1d/iNKT-cell ligands. This further supports the hypothesis that there are different trafficking requirements for the development of murine and human iNKT cells, and a functional lysosomal/late-endosomal compartment is not required for human iNKT-cell development.

  4. Inhibition of GM3 Synthase Attenuates Neuropathology of Niemann-Pick Disease Type C by Affecting Sphingolipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun; Lee, Jong Kil; Bae, Yong Chul; Yang, Song Hyun; Okino, Nozomu; Schuchman, Edward H.; Yamashita, Tadashi; Bae, Jae-sung; Jin, Hee Kyung

    2014-01-01

    In several lysosomal storage disorders, including Niemann-Pick disease Type C (NP-C), sphingolipids, including glycosphingolipids, particularly gangliosides, are the predominant storage materials in the brain, raising the possibility that accumulation of these lipids may be involved in the NP-C neurodegenerative process. However, correlation of these accumulations and NP-C neuropathology has not been fully characterized. Here we derived NP-C mice with complete and partial deletion of the Siat9 (encoding GM3 synthase) gene in order to investigate the role of ganglioside in NP-C pathogenesis. According to our results, NPC mice with homozygotic deletion of GM3 synthase exhibited an enhanced neuropathological phenotype and died significantly earlier than NP-C mice. Notably, in contrast to complete depletion, NP-C mice with partial deletion of the GM3 synthase gene showed ameliorated NP-C neuropathology, including motor disability, demyelination, and abnormal accumulation of cholesterol and sphingolipids. These findings indicate the crucial role of GM3 synthesis in the NP-C phenotype and progression of CNS pathologic abnormality, suggesting that well-controlled inhibition of GM3 synthesis could be used as a therapeutic strategy. PMID:24599001

  5. Mitotic epitopes are incorporated into age-dependent neurofibrillary tangles in Niemann-Pick disease type C.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Wang, Xuezhen; Jiang, Feng; Wang, Wei; Vincent, Inez; Bu, Bitao

    2010-03-01

    The mechanism underlying neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other neurodegenerative disorders remains elusive. Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) is a kind of genetic neurovisceral disorder in which the intracellular sequestration of cholesterol and other lipids in neurons, NFT formation and neuronal degeneration in brain are the neuropathology hallmarks. The age of onset and progression of the disease vary dramatically. We have analyzed the hippocampus from 17 NPC cases, aged from 7 months to 55 years, to depict the temporal characteristics of NFT formation. Unexpectedly, classic NFT was observed in about 4-year-old NPC brain, suggesting that NFT is not aging dependent, and that juvenile brain neurons satisfy the requirements for NFT formation. NFT in the hippocampus of NPC was significantly increased in number with the advance of age. More importantly, multiple mitotic phase markers, which are not usually found in normal mature neurons, were abundant in the affected neurons and incorporated into NFT. The unusual activation of cdc2/cyclin B kinase and downstream mitotic indices are closely associated with the age-dependent NFT formation, signifying the contribution of abortive cell cycle to neurodegeneration. The cdc2 inhibitors may be therapeutically used for early intervention of neurodegeneration and NFT formation in NPC.

  6. Niemann-Pick Type C2 Protein Mediates Hepatic Stellate Cells Activation by Regulating Free Cholesterol Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Twu, Yuh-Ching; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan; Lin, Yun-Lian; Hsu, Shih-Ming; Wang, Yuan-Hsi; Liao, Chia-Yu; Wang, Chung-Kwe; Liang, Yu-Chih; Liao, Yi-Jen

    2016-07-13

    In chronic liver diseases, regardless of their etiology, the development of fibrosis is the first step toward the progression to cirrhosis, portal hypertension, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the main profibrogenic cells that promote the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis, and so it is important to identify the molecules that regulate HSCs activation and liver fibrosis. Niemann-Pick type C2 (NPC2) protein plays an important role in the regulation of intracellular cholesterol homeostasis by directly binding with free cholesterol. However, the roles of NPC2 in HSCs activation and liver fibrosis have not been explored in detail. Since a high-cholesterol diet exacerbates liver fibrosis progression in both rodents and humans, we propose that the expression of NPC2 affects free cholesterol metabolism and regulates HSCs activation. In this study, we found that NPC2 is decreased in both thioacetamide- and carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis tissues. In addition, NPC2 is expressed in quiescent HSCs, but its activation status is down-regulated. Knockdown of NPC2 in HSC-T6 cells resulted in marked increases in transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-induced collagen type 1 α1 (Col1a1), α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression, and Smad2 phosphorylation. In contrast, NPC2 overexpression decreased TGF-β1-induced HSCs activation. We further demonstrated that NPC2 deficiency significantly increased the accumulation of free cholesterol in HSCs, increasing Col1a1 and α-SMA expression and activating Smad2, and leading to sensitization of HSCs to TGF-β1 activation. In contrast, overexpression of NPC2 decreased U18666A-induced free cholesterol accumulation and inhibited the subsequent HSCs activation. In conclusion, our study has demonstrated that NPC2 plays an important role in HSCs activation by regulating the accumulation of free cholesterol. NPC2 overexpression may thus represent a new treatment strategy for liver fibrosis.

  7. Niemann-Pick Type C2 Protein Mediates Hepatic Stellate Cells Activation by Regulating Free Cholesterol Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Twu, Yuh-Ching; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan; Lin, Yun-Lian; Hsu, Shih-Ming; Wang, Yuan-Hsi; Liao, Chia-Yu; Wang, Chung-Kwe; Liang, Yu-Chih; Liao, Yi-Jen

    2016-01-01

    In chronic liver diseases, regardless of their etiology, the development of fibrosis is the first step toward the progression to cirrhosis, portal hypertension, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the main profibrogenic cells that promote the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis, and so it is important to identify the molecules that regulate HSCs activation and liver fibrosis. Niemann-Pick type C2 (NPC2) protein plays an important role in the regulation of intracellular cholesterol homeostasis by directly binding with free cholesterol. However, the roles of NPC2 in HSCs activation and liver fibrosis have not been explored in detail. Since a high-cholesterol diet exacerbates liver fibrosis progression in both rodents and humans, we propose that the expression of NPC2 affects free cholesterol metabolism and regulates HSCs activation. In this study, we found that NPC2 is decreased in both thioacetamide- and carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis tissues. In addition, NPC2 is expressed in quiescent HSCs, but its activation status is down-regulated. Knockdown of NPC2 in HSC-T6 cells resulted in marked increases in transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-induced collagen type 1 α1 (Col1a1), α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression, and Smad2 phosphorylation. In contrast, NPC2 overexpression decreased TGF-β1-induced HSCs activation. We further demonstrated that NPC2 deficiency significantly increased the accumulation of free cholesterol in HSCs, increasing Col1a1 and α-SMA expression and activating Smad2, and leading to sensitization of HSCs to TGF-β1 activation. In contrast, overexpression of NPC2 decreased U18666A-induced free cholesterol accumulation and inhibited the subsequent HSCs activation. In conclusion, our study has demonstrated that NPC2 plays an important role in HSCs activation by regulating the accumulation of free cholesterol. NPC2 overexpression may thus represent a new treatment strategy for liver fibrosis. PMID:27420058

  8. Cerebrospinal Fluid Calbindin D Concentration as a Biomarker of Cerebellar Disease Progression in Niemann-Pick Type C1 Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bagel, Jessica; Sampson, Maureen; Farhat, Nicole; Ding, Wenge; Swain, Gary; Prociuk, Maria; O’Donnell, Patricia; Drobatz, Kenneth; Gurda, Brittney; Wassif, Christopher; Remaley, Alan; Porter, Forbes; Vite, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) 1 disease is a rare, inherited, neurodegenerative disease. Clear evidence of the therapeutic efficacy of 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) in animal models resulted in the initiation of a phase I/IIa clinical trial in 2013 and a phase IIb/III trial in 2015. With clinical trials ongoing, validation of a biomarker to track disease progression and serve as a supporting outcome measure of therapeutic efficacy has become compulsory. In this study, we evaluated calcium-binding protein calbindin D-28K (calbindin) concentrations in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as a biomarker of NPC1 disease. In the naturally occurring feline model, CSF calbindin was significantly elevated at 3 weeks of age, prior to the onset of cerebellar dysfunction, and steadily increased to >10-fold over normal at end-stage disease. Biweekly intrathecal administration of HPβCD initiated prior to the onset of neurologic dysfunction completely normalized CSF calbindin in NPC1 cats at all time points analyzed when followed up to 78 weeks of age. Initiation of HPβCD after the onset of clinical signs (16 weeks of age) resulted in a delayed reduction of calbindin levels in the CSF. Evaluation of CSF from patients with NPC1 revealed that calbindin concentrations were significantly elevated compared with CSF samples collected from unaffected patients. Off-label treatment of patients with NPC1 with miglustat, an inhibitor of glycosphingolipid biosynthesis, significantly decreased CSF calbindin compared with pretreatment concentrations. These data suggest that the CSF calbindin concentration is a sensitive biomarker of NPC1 disease that could be instrumental as an outcome measure of therapeutic efficacy in ongoing clinical trials. PMID:27307499

  9. Structural Basis of Sterol Binding by NPC2, a Lysosomal Protein Deficient in Niemann-Pick Type C2 Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,S.; Benoff, B.; Liou, H.; Lobel, P.; Stock, A.

    2007-01-01

    NPC2 is a small lysosomal glycoprotein that binds cholesterol with submicromolar affinity. Deficiency in NPC2 is the cause of Niemann-Pick type C2 disease, a fatal neurovisceral disorder characterized by accumulation of cholesterol in lysosomes. Here we report the crystal structure of bovine NPC2 bound to cholesterol-3-O-sulfate, an analog that binds with greater apparent affinity than cholesterol. Structures of both apo-bound and sterol-bound NPC2 were observed within the same crystal lattice, with an asymmetric unit containing one molecule of apoNPC2 and two molecules of sterol-bound NPC2. As predicted from a previously determined structure of apoNPC2, the sterol binds in a deep hydrophobic pocket sandwiched between the two {beta}-sheets of NPC2, with only the sulfate substituent of the ligand exposed to solvent. In the two available structures of apoNPC2, the incipient ligand-binding pocket, which ranges from a loosely packed hydrophobic core to a small tunnel, is too small to accommodate cholesterol. In the presence of sterol, the pocket expands, facilitated by a slight separation of the {beta}-strands and substantial reorientation of some side chains, resulting in a perfect molding of the pocket around the hydrocarbon portion of cholesterol. A notable feature is the repositioning of two aromatic residues at the tunnel entrance that are essential for NPC2 function. The NPC2 structures provide evidence of a malleable binding site, consistent with the previously documented broad range of sterol ligand specificity.

  10. Plasma Lysosphingomyelin Demonstrates Great Potential as a Diagnostic Biomarker for Niemann-Pick Disease Type C in a Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Welford, Richard W. D.; Garzotti, Marco; Marques Lourenço, Charles; Mengel, Eugen; Marquardt, Thorsten; Reunert, Janine; Amraoui, Yasmina; Kolb, Stefan A.; Morand, Olivier; Groenen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NP-C) is a devastating, neurovisceral lysosomal storage disorder which is characterised by variable manifestation of visceral signs, progressive neuropsychiatric deterioration and premature death, caused by mutations in the NPC1 and NPC2 genes. Due to the complexity of diagnosis and the availability of an approved therapy in the EU, improved detection of NP-C may have a huge impact on future disease management. At the cellular level dysfunction or deficiency of either the NPC1 or NPC2 protein leads to a complex intracellular endosomal/lysosomal trafficking defect, and organ specific patterns of sphingolipid accumulation. Lysosphingolipids have been shown to be excellent biomarkers of sphingolipidosis in several enzyme deficient lysosomal storage disorders. Additionally, in a recent study the lysosphingolipids, lysosphingomyelin (SPC) and glucosylsphingosine (GlcSph), appeared to be elevated in the plasma of three adult NP-C patients. In order to investigate the clinical utility of SPC and GlcSph as diagnostic markers, an in-depth fit for purpose biomarker assay validation for measurement of these biomarkers in plasma by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was performed. Plasma SPC and GlcSph are stable and can be measured accurately, precisely and reproducibly. In a retrospective analysis of 57 NP-C patients and 70 control subjects, median plasma SPC and GlcSph were significantly elevated in NP-C by 2.8-fold and 1.4-fold respectively. For miglustat-naïve NP-C patients, aged 2–50 years, the area under the ROC curve was 0.999 for SPC and 0.776 for GlcSph. Plasma GlcSph did not correlate with SPC levels in NP-C patients. The data indicate excellent potential for the use of lysosphingomyelin in NP-C diagnosis, where it could be used to identify NP-C patients for confirmatory genetic testing. PMID:25479233

  11. Collaborative Development of 2-Hydroxypropyl-β-Cyclodextrin for the Treatment of Niemann-Pick Type C1 Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ottinger, Elizabeth A.; Kao, Mark L.; Carrillo-Carrasco, Nuria; Yanjanin, Nicole; Shankar, Roopa Kanakatti; Janssen, Marjo; Brewster, Marcus; Scott, Ilona; Xu, Xin; Cradock, Jim; Terse, Pramod; Dehdashti, Seameen; Marugan, Juan; Zheng, Wei; Portilla, Lili; Hubbs, Alan; Pavan, William J.; Heiss, John; Vite, Charles H.; Walkley, Steven U.; Ory, Daniel S.; Silber, Steven A.; Porter, Forbes D.; Austin, Christopher P.; McKew, John C.

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) established the Therapeutics for Rare and Neglected Diseases (TRND) program within the National Center for Advancing Translational Science (NCATS), which was created to stimulate drug discovery and development for rare and neglected tropical diseases through a collaborative model between the NIH, academic scientists, nonprofit organizations, and pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies. This paper describes one of the first TRND programs, the development of 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) for the treatment of Niemann-Pick disease type C1 (NPC1). NPC is a neurodegenerative, autosomal recessive rare disease caused by a mutation in either the NPC1 (about 95% of cases) or the NPC2 gene (about 5% of cases). These mutations affect the intracellular trafficking of cholesterol and other lipids, which leads to a progressive accumulation of unesterified cholesterol and glycosphingolipids in the CNS and visceral organs. Affected individuals typically exhibit ataxia, swallowing problems, seizures, and progressive impairment of motor and intellectual function in early childhood, and usually die in adolescence. There is no disease modifying therapy currently approved for NPC1 in the US. A collaborative drug development program has been established between TRND, public and private partners that has completed the pre-clinical development of HP-β-CD through IND filing for the current Phase I clinical trial that is underway. Here we discuss how this collaborative effort helped to overcome scientific, clinical and financial challenges facing the development of new drug treatments for rare and neglected diseases, and how it will incentivize the commercialization of HP-β-CD for the benefit of the NPC patient community. PMID:24283970

  12. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography in nodular splenomegaly associated with type B Niemann-Pick disease: an atypical hemangioma enhancement pattern.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, E; Proietti, A; Miccoli, P; Basolo, F; Ciancia, E; Erba, P A; Galimberti, S; Orsitto, E; Petrini, M

    2009-09-01

    Sommario INTRODUZIONE: La malattia di Niemann-Pick (NPD) tipo A e B è una patologia da accumulo di lipidi. Il tipo A è un disordine fatale dell'infanzia. Il tipo B è una forma non-neuronopatica ossevata sia nei bambini che negli adulti con possibile riscontro di epatomegalia e/o splenomegalia (nodulare) durante un esame ecografico. Il tipo C dipende da un difetto nel trasporto del colesterolo. METODI: Una donna di 21 anni si è presentata al Pronto Soccorso con febbre, faringodinia e dolore al quadrante addominale superiore sinistro. Gli esami ematochimici hanno evidenziato anemia, piastrinopenia, aumento delle AST, ALT, GGT, FA, LDH trigliceridi, colesterolo totale, e ridotto HDL. La PCR per CMV ed EBV era negativa. La radiografia del torace era negativa. L'ecografia transaddominale ha rilevato splenomegalia (>22 cm long axis) con una lesione ipoecogena irregolare subcapsulare al polo superiore compatibile con infarto splenico e la presenza di multiple lesioni nodulari iperecogene con diametro da 1 cm fino a 5. RISULTATI: È stata quindi eseguita una ecografia con mezzo di contrasto con SonoVue (Bracco) che ha confermato la presenza di un infarto splenico. Le lesioni nodulari mostravano un enhancement in fase arteriosa con wash out in fase parenchimatosa tardiva. La F-FDG-PET ha mostrato un uptake nodulare splenico. Nel sospetto di un processo linfoproliferativo è stata eseguita una splenectomia. La diagnosi è stata di NPD tipo B con infarto splenico e le lesioni nodulari sono risulate essere emangiomi. DISCUSSIONE: Concludendo, la CEUS ha confermato la diagnosi e l'estenzione dell'infarto splenico, ma l'enhancement nodulare atipico supportato dalle immagini F-FDG-PET è stato fuorviante, suggerendo l'ipotesi di lesioni linfomatose.

  13. Collaborative development of 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin for the treatment of Niemann-Pick type C1 disease.

    PubMed

    Ottinger, Elizabeth A; Kao, Mark L; Carrillo-Carrasco, Nuria; Yanjanin, Nicole; Shankar, Roopa Kanakatti; Janssen, Marjo; Brewster, Marcus; Scott, Ilona; Xu, Xin; Cradock, Jim; Terse, Pramod; Dehdashti, Seameen J; Marugan, Juan; Zheng, Wei; Portilla, Lili; Hubbs, Alan; Pavan, William J; Heiss, John; Vite, Charles H; Walkley, Steven U; Ory, Daniel S; Silber, Steven A; Porter, Forbes D; Austin, Christopher P; McKew, John C

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) established the Therapeutics for Rare and Neglected Diseases (TRND) program within the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), which was created to stimulate drug discovery and development for rare and neglected tropical diseases through a collaborative model between the NIH, academic scientists, nonprofit organizations, and pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies. This paper describes one of the first TRND programs, the development of 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) for the treatment of Niemann-Pick disease type C1 (NPC1). NPC is a neurodegenerative, autosomal recessive rare disease caused by a mutation in either the NPC1 (about 95% of cases) or the NPC2 gene (about 5% of cases). These mutations affect the intracellular trafficking of cholesterol and other lipids, which leads to a progressive accumulation of unesterified cholesterol and glycosphingolipids in the CNS and visceral organs. Affected individuals typically exhibit ataxia, swallowing problems, seizures, and progressive impairment of motor and intellectual function in early childhood, and usually die in adolescence. There is no disease modifying therapy currently approved for NPC1 in the US. A collaborative drug development program has been established between TRND, public and private partners that has completed the pre-clinical development of HP-β-CD through IND filing for the current Phase I clinical trial that is underway. Here we discuss how this collaborative effort helped to overcome scientific, clinical and financial challenges facing the development of new drug treatments for rare and neglected diseases, and how it will incentivize the commercialization of HP-β-CD for the benefit of the NPC patient community.

  14. PEG-lipid micelles enable cholesterol efflux in Niemann-Pick Type C1 disease-based lysosomal storage disorder

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Anna; Patel, Siddharth; Ward, Carl; Lorenz, Anna; Ortiz, Mauren; DuRoss, Allison; Wieghardt, Fabian; Esch, Amanda; Otten, Elsje G.; Heiser, Laura M.; Korolchuk, Viktor I.; Sun, Conroy; Sarkar, Sovan; Sahay, Gaurav

    2016-01-01

    2-Hydroxy-propyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD), a cholesterol scavenger, is currently undergoing Phase 2b/3 clinical trial for treatment of Niemann Pick Type C-1 (NPC1), a fatal neurodegenerative disorder that stems from abnormal cholesterol accumulation in the endo/lysosomes. Unfortunately, the extremely high doses of HPβCD required to prevent progressive neurodegeneration exacerbates ototoxicity, pulmonary toxicity and autophagy-based cellular defects. We present unexpected evidence that a poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG)-lipid conjugate enables cholesterol clearance from endo/lysosomes of Npc1 mutant (Npc1−/−) cells. Herein, we show that distearyl-phosphatidylethanolamine-PEG (DSPE-PEG), which forms 12-nm micelles above the critical micelle concentration, accumulates heavily inside cholesterol-rich late endosomes in Npc1−/− cells. This potentially results in cholesterol solubilization and leakage from lysosomes. High-throughput screening revealed that DSPE-PEG, in combination with HPβCD, acts synergistically to efflux cholesterol without significantly aggravating autophagy defects. These well-known excipients can be used as admixtures to treat NPC1 disorder. Increasing PEG chain lengths from 350 Da-30 kDa in DSPE-PEG micelles, or increasing DSPE-PEG content in an array of liposomes packaged with HPβCD, improved cholesterol egress, while Pluronic block copolymers capable of micelle formation showed slight effects at high concentrations. We postulate that PEG-lipid based nanocarriers can serve as bioactive drug delivery systems for effective treatment of lysosomal storage disorders. PMID:27572704

  15. Alteration of Gene Expression Profile in Niemann-Pick Type C Mice Correlates with Tissue Damage and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez, Mary C.; del Pozo, Talía; Robledo, Fermín A.; Carrasco, Gonzalo; Pavez, Leonardo; Olivares, Felipe; González, Mauricio; Zanlungo, Silvana

    2011-01-01

    Background Niemann-Pick type C disease (NPC) is a neurovisceral lipid storage disorder mainly characterized by unesterified cholesterol accumulation in lysosomal/late endosomal compartments, although there is also an important storage for several other kind of lipids. The main tissues affected by the disease are the liver and the cerebellum. Oxidative stress has been described in various NPC cells and tissues, such as liver and cerebellum. Although considerable alterations occur in the liver, the pathological mechanisms involved in hepatocyte damage and death have not been clearly defined. Here, we assessed hepatic tissue integrity, biochemical and oxidative stress parameters of wild-type control (Npc1+/+; WT) and homozygous-mutant (Npc1−/−; NPC) mice. In addition, the mRNA abundance of genes encoding proteins associated with oxidative stress, copper metabolism, fibrosis, inflammation and cholesterol metabolism were analyzed in livers and cerebella of WT and NPC mice. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed various oxidative stress parameters in the liver and hepatic and cerebellum gene expression in 7-week-old NPC1-deficient mice compared with control animals. We found signs of inflammation and fibrosis in NPC livers upon histological examination. These signs were correlated with increased levels of carbonylated proteins, diminished total glutathione content and significantly increased total copper levels in liver tissue. Finally, we analyzed liver and cerebellum gene expression patterns by qPCR and microarray assays. We found a correlation between fibrotic tissue and differential expression of hepatic as well as cerebellar genes associated with oxidative stress, fibrosis and inflammation in NPC mice. Conclusions/Significance In NPC mice, liver disease is characterized by an increase in fibrosis and in markers associated with oxidative stress. NPC is also correlated with altered gene expression, mainly of genes involved in oxidative stress and fibrosis

  16. Ontogenic changes in lung cholesterol metabolism, lipid content, and histology in mice with Niemann-Pick type C disease.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Charina M; Lopez, Adam M; Le, Lam Q; Posey, Kenneth S; Weinberg, Arthur G; Turley, Stephen D

    2014-01-01

    Niemann-Pick Type C (NPC) disease is caused by a deficiency of either NPC1 or NPC2. Loss of function of either protein results in the progressive accumulation of unesterified cholesterol in every tissue leading to cell death and organ damage. Most literature on NPC disease focuses on neurological and liver manifestations. Pulmonary dysfunction is less well described. The present studies investigated how Npc1 deficiency impacts the absolute weight, lipid composition and histology of the lungs of Npc1(-/-) mice (Npc1(nih)) at different stages of the disease, and also quantitated changes in the rates of cholesterol and fatty acid synthesis in the lung over this same time span (8 to 70days of age). Similar measurements were made in Npc2(-/-) mice at 70days. All mice were of the BALB/c strain and were fed a basal rodent chow diet. Well before weaning, the lung weight, cholesterol and phospholipid (PL) content, and cholesterol synthesis rate were all elevated in the Npc1(-/-) mice and remained so at 70days of age. In contrast, lung triacylglycerol content was reduced while there was no change in lung fatty acid synthesis. Despite the elevated PL content, the composition of PL in the lungs of the Npc1(-/-) mice was unchanged. H&E staining revealed an age-related increase in the presence of lipid-laden macrophages in the alveoli of the lungs of the Npc1(-/-) mice starting as early as 28days. Similar metabolic and histologic changes were evident in the lungs of the Npc2(-/-) mice. Together these findings demonstrate an intrinsic lung pathology in NPC disease that is of early onset and worsens over time.

  17. STRUCTURAL BASIS OF STEROL BINDING BY NPC2, A LYSOSOMAL PROTEIN DEFICIENT IN NIEMANN-PICK TYPE C2 DISEASE*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Sujuan; Benoff, Brian; Liou, Heng-Ling; Lobel, Peter; Stock, Ann M.

    2013-01-01

    NPC2 is a small lysosomal glycoprotein that binds cholesterol with submicromolar affinity. Deficiency in NPC2 is the cause of Niemann Pick type C2 disease, a fatal neurovisceral disorder characterized by accumulation of cholesterol in lysosomes. Here we report the crystal structure of bovine NPC2 bound to cholesterol-3-O-sulfate, an analog that binds with greater apparent affinity than cholesterol. Structures of both apo- and sterol-bound NPC2 were observed within the same crystal lattice, with an asymmetric unit containing one molecule of apoNPC2 and two molecules of sterol-bound NPC2. As predicted from a previously determined structure of apoNPC2, the sterol binds in a deep hydrophobic pocket sandwiched between the two β sheets of NPC2, with only the sulfate substituent of the ligand exposed to solvent. In the two available structures of apoNPC2, the incipient ligand-binding pocket, which ranges from a loosely packed hydrophobic core to a small tunnel, is too small to accommodate cholesterol. In the presence of sterol, the pocket expands, facilitated by a slight separation of the β strands and substantial reorientation of some side chains, resulting in a perfect molding of the pocket around the hydrocarbon portion of cholesterol. A notable feature is the repositioning of two aromatic residues at the tunnel entrance that are essential for NPC2 function. The NPC2 structures provide evidence of a malleable binding site, consistent with the previously documented broad range of sterol ligand specificity. PMID:17573352

  18. Pharmacologic Treatment Assigned for Niemann Pick Type C1 Disease Partly Changes Behavioral Traits in Wild-Type Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schlegel, Victoria; Thieme, Markus; Holzmann, Carsten; Witt, Martin; Grittner, Ulrike; Rolfs, Arndt; Wree, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Niemann-Pick Type C1 (NPC1) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder characterized by accumulation of cholesterol and glycosphingolipids. Previously, we demonstrated that BALB/c-npc1nihNpc1−/− mice treated with miglustat, cyclodextrin and allopregnanolone generally performed better than untreated Npc1−/− animals. Unexpectedly, they also seemed to accomplish motor tests better than their sham-treated wild-type littermates. However, combination-treated mutant mice displayed worse cognition performance compared to sham-treated ones. To evaluate effects of these drugs in healthy BALB/c mice, we here analyzed pharmacologic effects on motor and cognitive behavior of wild-type mice. For combination treatment mice were injected with allopregnanolone/cyclodextrin weekly, starting at P7. Miglustat injections were performed daily from P10 till P23. Starting at P23, miglustat was embedded in the chow. Other mice were treated with miglustat only, or sham-treated. The battery of behavioral tests consisted of accelerod, Morris water maze, elevated plus maze, open field and hot-plate tests. Motor capabilities and spontaneous motor behavior were unaltered in both drug-treated groups. Miglustat-treated wild-type mice displayed impaired spatial learning compared to sham- and combination-treated mice. Both combination- and miglustat-treated mice showed enhanced anxiety in the elevated plus maze compared to sham-treated mice. Additionally, combination treatment as well as miglustat alone significantly reduced brain weight, whereas only combination treatment reduced body weight significantly. Our results suggest that allopregnanolone/cyclodextrin ameliorate most side effects of miglustat in wild-type mice. PMID:27834854

  19. Molecular analysis of the acid sphingomyelinase deficiency in a family with an intermediate form of Niemann-Pick disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ferlinz, K; Hurwitz, R; Weiler, M; Suzuki, K; Sandhoff, K; Vanier, M T

    1995-01-01

    A novel point mutation in the lysosomal acid sphingomyelinase gene has been identified in the recently reported Serbian family with a clinically and biochemically atypical intermediate form of Niemann-Pick disease. The mutation was a T1171-->G transversion resulting in substitution of glycine for normal tryptophan at amino acid residue 391. The coding sequence was otherwise normal. All of the five affected individuals were almost certainly homoallelic, and both of the two obligate heterozygotes studied also carried the same mutation. This mutation is therefore likely to be directly associated with the atypical phenotype of these patients. Expression in COS-1 cells suggested a higher residual activity than that in cultured fibroblasts. A recently developed high-affinity rabbit antihuman sphingomyelinase antibody allowed us to study for the first time the biosynthesis, processing, and targeting of a mutant sphingomyelinase by metabolic labeling of cultured fibroblasts. The mutant enzyme protein was normally synthesized, processed, and routed to the lysosome but was apparently unstable and degraded rapidly once it reached the lysosome. Together with the finding of the relatively high residual activity in COS-1 cells, we interpret our observations to mean that instability and rapid breakdown of the mature mutant enzyme protein, due to the mutation rather than direct inactivation of the catalytic activity, is the primary mechanism for the deficiency of sphingomyelinase activity in these patients. A high prevalence of this mutation in the Serbian population is likely, since the family pedigree indicates that members from four reportedly unrelated families must have contributed the same mutation. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7762557

  20. PEG-lipid micelles enable cholesterol efflux in Niemann-Pick Type C1 disease-based lysosomal storage disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Anna; Patel, Siddharth; Ward, Carl; Lorenz, Anna; Ortiz, Mauren; Duross, Allison; Wieghardt, Fabian; Esch, Amanda; Otten, Elsje G.; Heiser, Laura M.; Korolchuk, Viktor I.; Sun, Conroy; Sarkar, Sovan; Sahay, Gaurav

    2016-08-01

    2-Hydroxy-propyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD), a cholesterol scavenger, is currently undergoing Phase 2b/3 clinical trial for treatment of Niemann Pick Type C-1 (NPC1), a fatal neurodegenerative disorder that stems from abnormal cholesterol accumulation in the endo/lysosomes. Unfortunately, the extremely high doses of HPβCD required to prevent progressive neurodegeneration exacerbates ototoxicity, pulmonary toxicity and autophagy-based cellular defects. We present unexpected evidence that a poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG)-lipid conjugate enables cholesterol clearance from endo/lysosomes of Npc1 mutant (Npc1‑/‑) cells. Herein, we show that distearyl-phosphatidylethanolamine-PEG (DSPE-PEG), which forms 12-nm micelles above the critical micelle concentration, accumulates heavily inside cholesterol-rich late endosomes in Npc1‑/‑ cells. This potentially results in cholesterol solubilization and leakage from lysosomes. High-throughput screening revealed that DSPE-PEG, in combination with HPβCD, acts synergistically to efflux cholesterol without significantly aggravating autophagy defects. These well-known excipients can be used as admixtures to treat NPC1 disorder. Increasing PEG chain lengths from 350 Da-30 kDa in DSPE-PEG micelles, or increasing DSPE-PEG content in an array of liposomes packaged with HPβCD, improved cholesterol egress, while Pluronic block copolymers capable of micelle formation showed slight effects at high concentrations. We postulate that PEG-lipid based nanocarriers can serve as bioactive drug delivery systems for effective treatment of lysosomal storage disorders.

  1. Alterations in Gene Expression in Mutant Amyloid Precursor Protein Transgenic Mice Lacking Niemann-Pick Type C1 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Maulik, Mahua; Thinakaran, Gopal; Kar, Satyabrata

    2013-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease, a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused mostly by mutation in NPC1 gene, is pathologically characterized by the accumulation of free cholesterol in brain and other tissues. This is accompanied by gliosis and loss of neurons in selected brain regions, including the cerebellum. Recent studies have shown that NPC disease exhibits intriguing parallels with Alzheimer’s disease, including the presence of neurofibrillary tangles and increased levels of amyloid precursor protein (APP)-derived β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides in vulnerable brain neurons. To evaluate the role of Aβ in NPC disease, we determined the gene expression profile in selected brain regions of our recently developed bigenic ANPC mice, generated by crossing APP transgenic (Tg) mice with heterozygous Npc1-deficient mice. The ANPC mice exhibited exacerbated neuronal and glial pathology compared to other genotypes [i.e., APP-Tg, double heterozygous (Dhet), Npc1-null and wild-type mice]. Analysis of expression profiles of 86 selected genes using real-time RT-PCR arrays showed a wide-spectrum of alterations in the four genotypes compared to wild-type controls. The changes observed in APP-Tg and Dhet mice are limited to only few genes involved mostly in the regulation of cholesterol metabolism, whereas Npc1-null and ANPC mice showed alterations in the expression profiles of a number of genes regulating cholesterol homeostasis, APP metabolism, vesicular trafficking and cell death mechanism in both hippocampus and cerebellum compared to wild-type mice. Intriguingly, ANPC and Npc1-null mice, with some exceptions, exhibited similar changes, although more genes were differentially expressed in the affected cerebellum than the relatively spared hippocampus. The altered gene profiles were found to match with the corresponding protein levels. These results suggest that lack of Npc1 protein can alter the expression profile of selected transcripts as well as proteins, and APP

  2. Niemann-Pick type C1 patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells display disease specific hallmarks

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Niemann-Pick type C1 disease (NPC1) is a rare progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the NPC1 gene. In this lysosomal storage disorder the intracellular transport and sequestration of several lipids like cholesterol is severely impaired, resulting in an accumulation of lipids in late endosomes and lysosomes. The neurological manifestation of the disease is caused by dysfunction and cell death in the central nervous system. Several animal models were used to analyze the impaired pathways. However, the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are still not completely understood and the genetic variability in humans cannot be reflected in these models. Therefore, a human model using patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells provides a promising approach. Methods We reprogrammed human fibroblasts from a NPC1 patient and a healthy control by retroviral transduction with Oct4, Klf4, Sox2 and c-Myc. The obtained human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) were characterized by immunocytochemical analyses. Neural progenitor cells were generated and patch clamp recordings were performed for a functional analysis of derived neuronal cells. Filipin stainings and the Amplex Red assay were used to demonstrate and quantify cholesterol accumulation. Results The hiPSCs expressed different stem cell markers, e.g. Nanog, Tra-1-81 and SSEA4. Using the embryoid body assay, the cells were differentiated in cells of all three germ layers and induced teratoma in immunodeficient mice, demonstrating their pluripotency. In addition, neural progenitor cells were derived and differentiated into functional neuronal cells. Patch clamp recordings revealed voltage dependent channels, spontaneous action potentials and postsynaptic currents. The accumulation of cholesterol in different tissues is the main hallmark of NPC1. In this study we found an accumulation of cholesterol in fibroblasts of a NPC1 patient, derived hiPSCs, and neural progenitor cells, but not in

  3. The role of Niemann-Pick C1 - Like 1 (NPC1L1) in intestinal sterol absorption.

    PubMed

    Turley, Stephen D

    2008-04-01

    The absorption of cholesterol by the proximal small intestine represents a major pathway for the entry of cholesterol into the body pools. This cholesterol is derived primarily from the bile and the diet. In adult humans, typically several hundred milligrams of cholesterol reach the liver from the intestine daily, with the potential to impact the plasma low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) concentration. There are three main phases involved in cholesterol absorption. The first occurs intraluminally and culminates in micellar solubilization of unesterified cholesterol which facilitates its movement up to the brush border membrane (BBM) of the enterocyte. The second phase involves the transport of cholesterol across the BBM by Niemann-Pick C1 Like-1 (NPC1L1), while the third phase entails a series of steps within the enterocyte involving the esterification of cholesterol and its incorporation, along with other lipids and apolipoprotein B48 (apo B48), into nascent chylomicrons (CM). The discovery of the role of NPC1L1 in intestinal sterol transport occurred directly as a consequence of efforts to identify the molecular target of ezetimibe, a novel, potent, and specific inhibitor of sterol absorption that is now widely used in combination therapy with statins for the management of hypercholesterolemia in the general population. Some aspects of the role of NPC1L1 in cholesterol absorption nevertheless remain controversial and are the subject of ongoing research. For example, one report suggests that NPC1L1 is located not in the plasma membrane but intracellularly where it is thought to be involved in cytosolic trafficking of cholesterol, while another concludes that a protein other than NPC1L1 is responsible for the high affinity binding of cholesterol on intestinal BBM. However, other new studies which show that the in vivo responsiveness of different species to ezetimibe correlates with NPC1L1 binding affinity further support the widely held belief that NPC1L1

  4. Niemann-Pick Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... C who share a common ancestral background in Nova Scotia were previously referred to as Type D. × ... C who share a common ancestral background in Nova Scotia were previously referred to as Type D. ...

  5. FTY720/fingolimod increases NPC1 and NPC2 expression and reduces cholesterol and sphingolipid accumulation in Niemann-Pick type C mutant fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Newton, Jason; Hait, Nitai C; Maceyka, Michael; Colaco, Alexandria; Maczis, Melissa; Wassif, Christopher A; Cougnoux, Antony; Porter, Forbes D; Milstien, Sheldon; Platt, Nicholas; Platt, Frances M; Spiegel, Sarah

    2017-04-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in NPC1 or NPC2 with decreased functions leading to lysosomal accumulation of cholesterol and sphingolipids. FTY720/fingolimod, used for treatment of multiple sclerosis, is phosphorylated by nuclear sphingosine kinase 2, and its active phosphorylated form (FTY720-P) is an inhibitor of class I histone deacetylases. In this study, administration of clinically relevant doses of FTY720 to mice increased expression of NPC1 and -2 in brain and liver and decreased cholesterol in an SphK2-dependent manner. FTY720 greatly increased expression of NPC1 and -2 in human NPC1 mutant fibroblasts that correlated with formation of FTY720-P and significantly reduced the accumulation of cholesterol and glycosphingolipids. In agreement with this finding, FTY720 pretreatment of human NPC1 mutant fibroblasts restored transport of the cholera toxin B subunit, which binds ganglioside GM1, to the Golgi apparatus. Together, these findings suggest that FTY720 administration can ameliorate cholesterol and sphingolipid storage and trafficking defects in NPC1 mutant fibroblasts. Because neurodegeneration is the main clinical feature of NPC disease, and FTY720 accumulates in the CNS and has several advantages over available histone deacetylase inhibitors now in clinical trials, our work provides a potential opportunity for treatment of this incurable disease.-Newton, J., Hait, N. C., Maceyka, M., Colaco, A., Maczis, M., Wassif, C. A., Cougnoux, A., Porter, F. D., Milstien, S., Platt, N., Platt, F. M., Spiegel, S. FTY720/fingolimod increases NPC1 and NPC2 expression and reduces cholesterol and sphingolipid accumulation in Niemann-Pick type C mutant fibroblasts.

  6. Heat Shock Protein Beta-1 Modifies Anterior to Posterior Purkinje Cell Vulnerability in a Mouse Model of Niemann-Pick Type C Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dell’Orco, James M.; Qin, Zhaohui S.; Kalyana-Sundaram, Shanker; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Shakkottai, Vikram G.; Lieberman, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Selective neuronal vulnerability is characteristic of most degenerative disorders of the CNS, yet mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain poorly characterized. Many forms of cerebellar degeneration exhibit an anterior-to-posterior gradient of Purkinje cell loss including Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC) disease, a lysosomal storage disorder characterized by progressive neurological deficits that often begin in childhood. Here, we sought to identify candidate genes underlying vulnerability of Purkinje cells in anterior cerebellar lobules using data freely available in the Allen Brain Atlas. This approach led to the identification of 16 candidate neuroprotective or susceptibility genes. We demonstrate that one candidate gene, heat shock protein beta-1 (HSPB1), promoted neuronal survival in cellular models of NPC disease through a mechanism that involved inhibition of apoptosis. Additionally, we show that over-expression of wild type HSPB1 or a phosphomimetic mutant in NPC mice slowed the progression of motor impairment and diminished cerebellar Purkinje cell loss. We confirmed the modulatory effect of Hspb1 on Purkinje cell degeneration in vivo, as knockdown by Hspb1 shRNA significantly enhanced neuron loss. These results suggest that strategies to promote HSPB1 activity may slow the rate of cerebellar degeneration in NPC disease and highlight the use of bioinformatics tools to uncover pathways leading to neuronal protection in neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:27152617

  7. The cross-talk of LDL-cholesterol with cell motility: Insights from the Niemann Pick Type C1 mutation and altered integrin trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Hoque, Monira; Rentero, Carles; Conway, James R; Murray, Rachael Z; Timpson, Paul; Enrich, Carlos; Grewal, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol is considered indispensible for the recruitment and functioning of integrins in focal adhesions for cell migration. However, the physiological cholesterol pools that control integrin trafficking and focal adhesion assembly remain unclear. Using Niemann Pick Type C1 (NPC) mutant cells, which accumulate Low Density lipoprotein (LDL)-derived cholesterol in late endosomes (LE), several recent studies indicate that LDL-cholesterol has multiple roles in regulating focal adhesion dynamics. Firstly, targeting of endocytosed LDL-cholesterol from LE to focal adhesions controls their formation at the leading edge of migrating cells. Other newly emerging literature suggests that this may be coupled to vesicular transport of integrins, Src kinase and metalloproteases from the LE compartment to focal adhesions. Secondly, our recent work identified LDL-cholesterol as a key factor that determines the distribution and ability of several Soluble NSF Attachment Protein (SNAP) Receptor (SNARE) proteins, key players in vesicle transport, to control integrin trafficking to the cell surface and extracellular matrix (ECM) secretion. Collectively, dietary, genetic and pathological changes in cholesterol metabolism may link with efficiency and speed of integrin and ECM cell surface delivery in metastatic cancer cells. This commentary will summarize how direct and indirect pathways enable LDL-cholesterol to modulate cell motility. PMID:26366834

  8. New murine Niemann-Pick type C models bearing a pseudoexon-generating mutation recapitulate the main neurobehavioural and molecular features of the disease.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Grau, Marta; Albaigès, Júlia; Casas, Josefina; Auladell, Carme; Dierssen, Mara; Vilageliu, Lluïsa; Grinberg, Daniel

    2017-02-07

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) is a rare neurovisceral disease caused mainly by mutations in the NPC1 gene. This autosomal recessive lysosomal disorder is characterised by the defective lysosomal secretion of cholesterol and sphingolipids. No effective therapy exists for the disease. We previously described a deep intronic point mutation (c.1554-1009 G > A) in NPC1 that generated a pseudoexon, which could be corrected at the cellular level using antisense oligonucleotides. Here, we describe the generation of two mouse models bearing this mutation, one in homozygosity and the other in compound heterozygosity with the c.1920delG mutation. Both the homozygotes for the c.1554-1009 G > A mutation and the compound heterozygotes recapitulated the hallmarks of NPC. Lipid analysis revealed accumulation of cholesterol in the liver and sphingolipids in the brain, with both types of transgenic mice displaying tremor and ataxia at 7-8 weeks of age. Behavioural tests showed motor impairment, hyperactivity, reduced anxiety-like behaviour and impaired learning and memory performances, features consistent with those reported previously in NPC animal models and human patients. These mutant mice, the first NPC models bearing a pseudoexon-generating mutation, could be suitable for assessing the efficacy of specific splicing-targeted therapeutic strategies against NPC.

  9. Synthesis, Characterization, and Evaluation of Pluronic-Based β-Cyclodextrin Polyrotaxanes for Mobilization of Accumulated Cholesterol from Niemann-Pick Type C Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Christopher J.; McCauliff, Leslie A.; Hyun, Seok-Hee; Zhang, Zhaorui; Paul, Lake N.; Kulkarni, Aditya; Zick, Klaus; Wirth, Mary; Storch, Judith; Thompson, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) derivatives initiate the efflux of accumulated, unesterified cholesterol from the late endosomal/lysosomal compartment in Niemann Pick C (NPC) disease models. Unfortunately, repeated injections or continuous infusions of current β-CD therapies are required to sustain suppression of symptoms and prolong life. In an effort to make CD treatment a more viable option by boosting efficacy and improving pharmacokinetics, a library of Pluronic surfactant-based β-CD polyrotaxanes has been developed using biocompatible poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)–polypropylene glycol (PPG)–PEG triblock copolymers. These compounds carry multiple copies of β-CD as shown by 1H NMR, 2D nuclear Overhouser effect spectroscopy, gel permeation chromatography/multiangle light scattering, analytical ultracentrifugation analysis, matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, and diffusion-ordered spectroscopy. Analyses of free β-cyclodextrin contamination in the compounds were made by reverse phase high pressure liquid chromatography and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography. Dethreading kinetics were studied by reverse phase high pressure liquid chromatography, UV/vis, and 1H NMR analysis. Filipin staining studies using npc2−/− fibroblasts show significant reversal of cholesterol accumulation after treatment with polyrotaxane compounds. The rate and efficacy of reversal is similar to that achieved by equivalent amounts of monomeric β-CD alone. PMID:23560535

  10. Vitamin E Dietary Supplementation Improves Neurological Symptoms and Decreases c-Abl/p73 Activation in Niemann-Pick C Mice

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Tamara; Contreras, Pablo; Castro, Juan Francisco; Chamorro, David; Balboa, Elisa; Bosch-Morató, Mònica; Muñoz, Francisco J.; Alvarez, Alejandra R.; Zanlungo, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    Niemann-Pick C (NPC) disease is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the accumulation of free cholesterol in lysosomes. We have previously reported that oxidative stress is the main upstream stimulus activating the proapoptotic c-Abl/p73 pathway in NPC neurons. We have also observed accumulation of vitamin E in NPC lysosomes, which could lead to a potential decrease of its bioavailability. Our aim was to determine if dietary vitamin E supplementation could improve NPC disease in mice. NPC mice received an alpha-tocopherol (α-TOH) supplemented diet and neurological symptoms, survival, Purkinje cell loss, α-TOH and nitrotyrosine levels, astrogliosis, and the c-Abl/p73 pathway functions were evaluated. In addition, the effect of α-TOH on the c-Abl/p73 pathway was evaluated in an in vitro NPC neuron model. The α-TOH rich diet delayed loss of weight, improved coordination and locomotor function and increased the survival of NPC mice. We found increased Purkinje neurons and α-TOH levels and reduced astrogliosis, nitrotyrosine and phosphorylated p73 in cerebellum. A decrease of c-Abl/p73 activation was also observed in the in vitro NPC neurons treated with α-TOH. In conclusion, our results show that vitamin E can delay neurodegeneration in NPC mice and suggest that its supplementation in the diet could be useful for the treatment of NPC patients. PMID:25079853

  11. Recent Advances in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Niemann-Pick Disease Type C in Children: A Guide to Early Diagnosis for the General Pediatrician

    PubMed Central

    Alobaidy, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Niemann-Pick disease (NP-C) is a lysosomal storage disease in which impaired intracellular lipid transport leads to accumulation of cholesterol and glycosphingolipids in various neurovisceral tissues. It is an autosomal recessive disorder, caused by mutations in the NPC1 or NPC2 genes. The clinical spectrum is grouped by the age of onset and onset of neurological manifestation: pre/perinatal; early infantile; late infantile; and juvenile periods. The NP-C Suspicion Index (SI) screening tool was developed to identify suspected patients with this disease. It is especially good at recognizing the disease in patients older than four years of age. Biochemical tests involving genetic markers and Filipin staining of skin fibroblast are being employed to assist diagnosis. Therapy is mostly supportive and since 2009, the first specific therapy approved for use was Miglustat (Zavesca) aimed at stabilizing the rate of progression of neurological manifestation. The prognosis correlates with age at onset of neurological signs; patients with early onset form progress faster. The NP-C disease has heterogeneous neurovisceral manifestations. A SI is a screening tool that helps in diagnostic process. Filipin staining test is a specific biomarker diagnostic test. Miglustat is the first disease-specific therapy. PMID:25784942

  12. High Incidence of Unrecognized Visceral/Neurological Late-onset Niemann-Pick Disease, type C1 Predicted by Analysis of Massively Parallel Sequencing Data Sets

    PubMed Central

    Wassif, Christopher A.; Cross, Joanna L.; Iben, James; Sanchez-Pulido, Luis; Cougnoux, Antony; Platt, Frances M.; Ory, Daniel S.; Ponting, Chris P.; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; Biesecker, Leslie G.; Porter, Forbes D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Niemann-Pick disease, type C (NPC) is a recessive, neurodegenerative, lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in either NPC1 or NPC2. The diagnosis is difficult and frequently delayed. Ascertainment is likely incomplete due to both these factors and that the full phenotypic spectrum may not have been fully delineated. Given the recent development of a blood-based diagnostic test and development of potential therapies, it is important to understand the incidence of NPC and to define at risk patient populations. Method We evaluated data from four large massively parallel exome sequencing data sets. Variant sequences were identified and classified as pathogenic or non-pathogenic based on a combination of literature review and bioinformatic analysis. This methodology provided an unbiased approach to determining the allele frequency. Results Our data suggests an incidence rate for NPC1 and NPC2 of 1/92,104 and 1/2,858,998, respectively. However, evaluation of common NPC1 variants, suggests that there may be a late-onset NPC1phenotype with a markedly higher incidence on the order of 1/20,000–39,000. Conclusions We determined a combined incidence of classical NPC of 1/89,229 or 1.12 affected patients per 100,000 conceptions, but predict incomplete ascertainment of a lateonset phenotype of NPC1. This finding strongly supports the need for increased screening of potential patients. PMID:25764212

  13. Changes of calcium binding proteins, c-Fos and COX in hippocampal formation and cerebellum of Niemann-Pick, type C mouse.

    PubMed

    Byun, Kyunghee; Kim, Daesik; Bayarsaikhan, Enkhjaigal; Oh, Jeehyun; Kim, Jisun; Kwak, Grace; Jeong, Goo-Bo; Jo, Seung-Mook; Lee, Bonghee

    2013-09-01

    Niemann-Pick disease, type C (NPC) is an intractable disease that is accompanied by ataxia, dystonia, neurodegeneration, and dementia due to an NPC gene defect. Disruption of calcium homeostasis in neurons is important in patients with NPC. Thus, we used immunohistochemistry to assess the expression levels of calcium binding proteins (calbindin D28K, parvalbumin, and calretinin), c-Fos and cyclooxygenase-1,2 (COX-1,2) in the hippocampal formation and cerebellum of 4 and 8 week old NPC+/+, NPC+/-, and NPC-/- mice. General expression of these proteins decreased in the hippocampus and cerebellum of NPC-/- compared to that in both young and adult NPC+/+ or NPC+/- mice. Parvalbumin, COX-1,2 or c-Fos-immunoreactive neurons were widely detected in the CA1, CA3, and DG of the hippocampus, but the immunoreactivities were decreased sharply in all areas of hippocampus of NPC-/- compared to NPC+/+ and NPC+/- mice. Taken together, reduction of these proteins may be one of the strong phenotypes related to the neuronal degeneration in NPC-/- mice.

  14. Cholestane-3β,5α,6β-triol: high levels in Niemann-Pick type C, cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis, and lysosomal acid lipase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pajares, Sonia; Arias, Angela; García-Villoria, Judit; Macías-Vidal, Judit; Ros, Emilio; de las Heras, Javier; Girós, Marisa; Coll, Maria J; Ribes, Antonia

    2015-10-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by lysosomal/endosomal accumulation of unesterified cholesterol and glycolipids. Recent studies have shown that plasma cholestane-3β,5α,6β-triol (CT) and 7-ketocholesterol (7-KC) could be potential biomarkers for the diagnosis of NPC patients. We aimed to know the sensitivity and specificity of these biomarkers for the diagnosis of NPC compared with other diseases that can potentially lead to oxysterol alterations. We studied 107 controls and 122 patients including 16 with NPC, 3 with lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) deficiency, 8 with other lysosomal diseases, 5 with galactosemia, 11 with cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX), 3 with Smith-Lemli-Opitz, 14 with peroxisomal biogenesis disorders, 19 with unspecific hepatic diseases, 13 with familial hypercholesterolemia, and 30 with neurological involvement and no evidence of an inherited metabolic disease. CT and 7-KC were analyzed by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS as mono-dimethylglycine derivatives. Levels of 7-KC were high in most of the studied diseases, whereas those of CT were only high in NPC, LAL, and CTX patients. Consequently, although CT is a sensitive biomarker of NPC disease, including those cases with doubtful filipin staining, it is not specific. 7-KC is a very unspecific biomarker.

  15. A sensitive and specific LC-MS/MS method for rapid diagnosis of Niemann-Pick C1 disease from human plasma[S

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xuntian; Sidhu, Rohini; Porter, Forbes D.; Yanjanin, Nicole M.; Speak, Anneliese O.; te Vruchte, Danielle Taylor; Platt, Frances M.; Fujiwara, Hideji; Scherrer, David E.; Zhang, Jessie; Dietzen, Dennis J.; Schaffer, Jean E.; Ory, Daniel S.

    2011-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1) disease is a rare, progressively fatal neurodegenerative disease for which there are no FDA-approved therapies. A major barrier to developing new therapies for this disorder has been the lack of a sensitive and noninvasive diagnostic test. Recently, we demonstrated that two cholesterol oxidation products, specifically cholestane-3β,5α,6β-triol (3β,5α,6β-triol) and 7-ketocholesterol (7-KC), were markedly increased in the plasma of human NPC1 subjects, suggesting a role for these oxysterols in diagnosis of NPC1 disease and evaluation of therapeutics in clinical trials. In the present study, we describe the development of a sensitive and specific LC-MS/MS method for quantifying 3β,5α,6β-triol and 7-KC human plasma after derivatization with N,N-dimethylglycine. We show that dimethylglycine derivatization successfully enhanced the ionization and fragmentation of 3β,5α,6β-triol and 7-KC for mass spectrometric detection of the oxysterol species in human plasma. The oxysterol dimethylglycinates were resolved with high sensitivity and selectivity, and enabled accurate quantification of 3β,5α,6β-triol and 7-KC concentrations in human plasma. The LC-MS/MS assay was able to discriminate with high sensitivity and specificity between control and NPC1 subjects, and offers for the first time a noninvasive, rapid, and highly sensitive method for diagnosis of NPC1 disease. PMID:21518695

  16. New murine Niemann-Pick type C models bearing a pseudoexon-generating mutation recapitulate the main neurobehavioural and molecular features of the disease

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Grau, Marta; Albaigès, Júlia; Casas, Josefina; Auladell, Carme; Dierssen, Mara; Vilageliu, Lluïsa; Grinberg, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) is a rare neurovisceral disease caused mainly by mutations in the NPC1 gene. This autosomal recessive lysosomal disorder is characterised by the defective lysosomal secretion of cholesterol and sphingolipids. No effective therapy exists for the disease. We previously described a deep intronic point mutation (c.1554-1009 G > A) in NPC1 that generated a pseudoexon, which could be corrected at the cellular level using antisense oligonucleotides. Here, we describe the generation of two mouse models bearing this mutation, one in homozygosity and the other in compound heterozygosity with the c.1920delG mutation. Both the homozygotes for the c.1554-1009 G > A mutation and the compound heterozygotes recapitulated the hallmarks of NPC. Lipid analysis revealed accumulation of cholesterol in the liver and sphingolipids in the brain, with both types of transgenic mice displaying tremor and ataxia at 7–8 weeks of age. Behavioural tests showed motor impairment, hyperactivity, reduced anxiety-like behaviour and impaired learning and memory performances, features consistent with those reported previously in NPC animal models and human patients. These mutant mice, the first NPC models bearing a pseudoexon-generating mutation, could be suitable for assessing the efficacy of specific splicing-targeted therapeutic strategies against NPC. PMID:28167839

  17. Loss of Niemann-Pick C1 or C2 protein results in similar biochemical changes suggesting that these proteins function in a common lysosomal pathway.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Sayali S; Jadot, Michel; Sohar, Istvan; Sleat, David E; Stock, Ann M; Lobel, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Niemann-Pick Type C (NPC) disease is a lysosomal storage disorder characterized by accumulation of unesterified cholesterol and other lipids in the endolysosomal system. NPC disease results from a defect in either of two distinct cholesterol-binding proteins: a transmembrane protein, NPC1, and a small soluble protein, NPC2. NPC1 and NPC2 are thought to function closely in the export of lysosomal cholesterol with both proteins binding cholesterol in vitro but they may have unrelated lysosomal roles. To investigate this possibility, we compared biochemical consequences of the loss of either protein. Analyses of lysosome-enriched subcellular fractions from brain and liver revealed similar decreases in buoyant densities of lysosomes from NPC1 or NPC2 deficient mice compared to controls. The subcellular distribution of both proteins was similar and paralleled a lysosomal marker. In liver, absence of either NPC1 or NPC2 resulted in similar alterations in the carbohydrate processing of the lysosomal protease, tripeptidyl peptidase I. These results highlight biochemical alterations in the lysosomal system of the NPC-mutant mice that appear secondary to lipid storage. In addition, the similarity in biochemical phenotypes resulting from either NPC1 or NPC2 deficiency supports models in which the function of these two proteins within lysosomes are linked closely.

  18. Cyclodextrin alleviates neuronal storage of cholesterol in Niemann-Pick C disease without evidence of detectable blood-brain barrier permeability

    PubMed Central

    Pontikis, Charles C.; Davidson, Cristin D.; Walkley, Steven U.; Platt, Frances M.; Begley, David J

    2014-01-01

    Niemann Pick type C disease is an inherited autosomal recessive disorder characterised by the accumulation of unesterified cholesterol and sphingolipids within the endosomal/lysosomal compartments. It has been observed that the administration of hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPBCD) delays onset of clinical symptoms and reduces accumulation of cholesterol and gangliosides within neuronal cells. It was assumed that HPBCD exerts its action by readily entering the CNS and directly interacting with neurones and other brain cells to facilitate removal of stored cholesterol from the late endosomal/lysosomal compartment. Here, we present evidence that refutes this hypothesis. We use two well established techniques for accurately measuring brain uptake of solutes from blood and show that there is no significant crossing of HPBCD into the brain. The two techniques are brain in situ perfusion and intraperitoneal injection followed by multi-time-point regression analysis. Neither study demonstrates significant, time-dependent uptake of HPBCD in either adult or neonatal mice. However, the volume of distribution available to HPBCD (0.113±0.010ml/g) exceeds the accepted values for plasma and vascular volume of the brain. In fact, it is nearly three times larger than that for sucrose (0.039±0.006 ml/g). We propose that this indicates cell surface binding of HPBCD to the endothelium of the cerebral vasculature and may provide a mechanism for the mobilization and clearance of cholesterol from the CNS. PMID:23412751

  19. Efficacy of 2-Hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin in Niemann-Pick Disease Type C Model Mice and Its Pharmacokinetic Analysis in a Patient with the Disease.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuta; Yamada, Yusei; Ishitsuka, Yoichi; Matsuo, Muneaki; Shiraishi, Koki; Wada, Koki; Uchio, Yushiro; Kondo, Yuki; Takeo, Toru; Nakagata, Naomi; Higashi, Taishi; Motoyama, Keiichi; Arima, Hidetoshi; Mochinaga, Sakiko; Higaki, Katsumi; Ohno, Kousaku; Irie, Tetsumi

    2015-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C disease (NPC), an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder, is an inherited disease characterized by the accumulation of intracellular unesterified cholesterol. A solubilizing agent of lipophilic compounds, 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPBCD), is an attractive drug candidate against NPC disease. However, establishment of the optimum dosage of HPBCD remains to be determined. In this study, we evaluated the effective dosage of HPBCD in NPC model (Npc1(-/-)) mice, and determined serum HPBCD concentrations. Subcutaneous injection of 1000-4000 mg/kg HPBCD improved the lifespan of Npc1(-/-) mice. In addition, liver injury and cholesterol sequestration were significantly prevented by 4000 mg/kg HPBCD in Npc1(-/-) mice. Serum HPBCD concentrations, when treated at the effective dosages (1000-4000 mg/kg), were approximately 1200-2500 µg/mL at 0.5 h after subcutaneous injection, and blood HPBCD concentrations were immediately eliminated in Npc1(-/-) mice. Furthermore, we examined serum HPBCD concentrations when treated at 40000 mg (approximately 2500 mg/kg) in a patient with NPC. We observed that the effective concentration in the in vivo study using Npc1(-/-) mice was similar to that in the patient. In the patient, systemic clearance and the volume of distribution of HPBCD were in accordance with the glomerular filtration rate and extracellular fluid volume, respectively. These results could provide useful information for developing the optimal dosage regimen for HPBCD therapy when administered intravenously to NPC patients.

  20. Cholestane-3β,5α,6β-triol: high levels in Niemann-Pick type C, cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis, and lysosomal acid lipase deficiency[S

    PubMed Central

    Pajares, Sonia; Arias, Angela; García-Villoria, Judit; Macías-Vidal, Judit; Ros, Emilio; de las Heras, Javier; Girós, Marisa; Coll, Maria J.; Ribes, Antonia

    2015-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by lysosomal/endosomal accumulation of unesterified cholesterol and glycolipids. Recent studies have shown that plasma cholestane-3β,5α,6β-triol (CT) and 7-ketocholesterol (7-KC) could be potential biomarkers for the diagnosis of NPC patients. We aimed to know the sensitivity and specificity of these biomarkers for the diagnosis of NPC compared with other diseases that can potentially lead to oxysterol alterations. We studied 107 controls and 122 patients including 16 with NPC, 3 with lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) deficiency, 8 with other lysosomal diseases, 5 with galactosemia, 11 with cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX), 3 with Smith-Lemli-Opitz, 14 with peroxisomal biogenesis disorders, 19 with unspecific hepatic diseases, 13 with familial hypercholesterolemia, and 30 with neurological involvement and no evidence of an inherited metabolic disease. CT and 7-KC were analyzed by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS as mono-dimethylglycine derivatives. Levels of 7-KC were high in most of the studied diseases, whereas those of CT were only high in NPC, LAL, and CTX patients. Consequently, although CT is a sensitive biomarker of NPC disease, including those cases with doubtful filipin staining, it is not specific. 7-KC is a very unspecific biomarker. PMID:26239048

  1. A Murine Niemann-Pick C1 I1061T Knock-In Model Recapitulates the Pathological Features of the Most Prevalent Human Disease Allele

    PubMed Central

    Praggastis, Maria; Tortelli, Brett; Zhang, Jessie; Fujiwara, Hideji; Sidhu, Rohini; Chacko, Anita; Chen, Zhouji; Chung, Chan; Lieberman, Andrew P.; Sikora, Jakub; Davidson, Cristin; Walkley, Steven U.; Pipalia, Nina H.; Maxfield, Frederick R.; Schaffer, Jean E.

    2015-01-01

    Niemann-Pick Type C1 (NPC1) disease is a rare neurovisceral, cholesterol–sphingolipid lysosomal storage disorder characterized by ataxia, motor impairment, progressive intellectual decline, and dementia. The most prevalent mutation, NPC1I1061T, encodes a misfolded protein with a reduced half-life caused by ER-associated degradation. Therapies directed at stabilization of the mutant NPC1 protein reduce cholesterol storage in fibroblasts but have not been tested in vivo because of lack of a suitable animal model. Whereas the prominent features of human NPC1 disease are replicated in the null Npc1−/− mouse, this model is not amenable to examining proteostatic therapies. The objective of the present study was to develop an NPC1 I1061T knock-in mouse in which to test proteostatic therapies. Compared with the Npc1−/− mouse, this Npc1tm(I1061T)Dso model displays a less severe, delayed form of NPC1 disease with respect to weight loss, decreased motor coordination, Purkinje cell death, lipid storage, and premature death. The murine NPC1I1061T protein has a reduced half-life in vivo, consistent with protein misfolding and rapid ER-associated degradation, and can be stabilized by histone deacetylase inhibition. This novel mouse model faithfully recapitulates human NPC1 disease and provides a powerful tool for preclinical evaluation of therapies targeting NPC1 protein variants with compromised stability. PMID:26019327

  2. Increased Activity and Altered Subcellular Distribution of Lysosomal Enzymes Determine Neuronal Vulnerability in Niemann-Pick Type C1-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Amritraj, Asha; Peake, Kyle; Kodam, Anitha; Salio, Chiara; Merighi, Adalberto; Vance, Jean E.; Kar, Satyabrata

    2009-01-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC), caused by mutations in the Npc1 or Npc2 genes, is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by intracellular accumulation/redistribution of cholesterol in a number of tissues including the brain. This is accompanied by a severe loss of neurons in selected brain regions. In this study, we evaluated the role of lysosomal enzymes, cathepsins B and D, in determining neuronal vulnerability in NPC1-deficient (Npc1−/−) mouse brains. Our results showed that Npc1−/− mice exhibit an age-dependent degeneration of neurons in the cerebellum but not in the hippocampus. The cellular level/expression and activity of cathepsins B and D are increased more predominantly in the cerebellum than in the hippocampus of Npc1−/− mice. In addition, the cytosolic levels of cathepsins, cytochrome c, and Bax2 are higher in the cerebellum than in the hippocampus of Npc1−/− mice, suggesting a role for these enzymes in the degeneration of neurons. This suggestion is supported by our observation that degeneration of cultured cortical neurons treated with U18666A, which induces an NPC1-like phenotype at the cellular level, can be attenuated by inhibition of cathepsin B or D enzyme activity. These results suggest that the increased level/activity and altered subcellular distribution of cathepsins may be associated with the underlying cause of neuronal vulnerability in Npc1−/− brains. Therefore, their inhibitors may have therapeutic potential in attenuating NPC pathology. PMID:19893049

  3. Altered Clathrin-Independent Endocytosis in Type A Niemann-Pick Disease Cells and Rescue by ICAM-1-Targeted Enzyme Delivery.

    PubMed

    Rappaport, Jeff; Manthe, Rachel L; Garnacho, Carmen; Muro, Silvia

    2015-05-04

    Pharmaceutical intervention often requires therapeutics and/or their carriers to enter cells via endocytosis. Therefore, endocytic aberrancies resulting from disease represent a key, yet often overlooked, parameter in designing therapeutic strategies. In the case of lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs), characterized by lysosomal accumulation of undegraded substances, common clinical interventions rely on endocytosis of recombinant enzymes. However, the lysosomal defect in these diseases can affect endocytosis, as we recently demonstrated for clathrin-mediated uptake in patient fibroblasts with type A Niemann-Pick disease (NPD), a disorder characterized by acid sphingomylinase (ASM) deficiency and subsequent sphingomyelin storage. Using similar cells, we have examined if this is also the case for clathrin-independent pathways, including caveolae-mediated endocytosis and macropinocytosis. We observed impaired caveolin-1 enrichment at ligand-binding sites in NPD relative to wild type fibroblasts, corresponding with altered uptake of ligands and fluid-phase markers by both pathways. Similarly, aberrant lysosomal storage of sphingomyelin induced by pharmacological means also diminished uptake. Partial degradation of the lysosomal storage by untargeted recombinant ASM led to partial uptake enhancement, whereas both parameters were restored to wild type levels by ASM delivery using model polymer nanocarriers specifically targeted to intercellular adhesion molecule-1. Carriers also restored caveolin-1 enrichment at ligand-binding sites and uptake through the caveolar and macropinocytic routes. These results demonstrate a link between lysosomal storage in NPD and alterations in clathrin-independent endocytosis, which could apply to other LSDs. Hence, this study shall guide the design of therapeutic approaches using viable endocytic pathways.

  4. Defining natural history: assessment of the ability of college students to aid in characterizing clinical progression of Niemann-Pick disease, type C.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jenny; Epperson, Katrina; Yanjanin, Nicole M; Albus, Jennifer; Borgenheimer, Laura; Bott, Natalie; Brennan, Erin; Castellanos, Daniel; Cheng, Melissa; Clark, Michael; Devany, Margaret; Ensslin, Courtney; Farivari, Nina; Fernando, Shanik; Gabriel, Lauren; Gallardo, Rani; Castleman, Moriah; Gutierrez, Olimpia; Herschel, Allison; Hodge, Sarah; Horst, Anne; Howard, Mary; James, Evan; Jones, Lindsey; Kearns, Mary; Kelly, Mary; Kim, Christine; Kiser, Kinzie; Klazura, Gregory; Knoedler, Chris; Kolbus, Emily; Lange, Lauren; Lee, Joan; Li, Eileena; Lu, Wei; Luttrell, Andrew; Ly, Emily; McKeough, Katherine; McSorley, Brianna; Miller, Catherine; Mitchell, Sean; Moon, Abbey; Moser, Kevin; O'Brien, Shane; Olivieri, Paula; Patzwahl, Aaron; Pereira, Marie; Pymento, Craig; Ramelb, Erin; Ramos, Bryce; Raya, Teresa; Riney, Stephen; Roberts, Geoff; Robertshaw, Mark; Rudolf, Frannie; Rund, Samuel; Sansone, Stephanie; Schwartz, Lindsay; Shay, Ryan; Siu, Edwin; Spear, Timothy; Tan, Catherine; Truong, Marisa; Uddin, Mairaj; Vantrieste, Jennifer; Veloz, Omar; White, Elizabeth; Porter, Forbes D; Haldar, Kasturi

    2011-01-01

    Niemann-Pick Disease, type C (NPC) is a fatal, neurodegenerative, lysosomal storage disorder. It is a rare disease with broad phenotypic spectrum and variable age of onset. These issues make it difficult to develop a universally accepted clinical outcome measure to assess urgently needed therapies. To this end, clinical investigators have defined emerging, disease severity scales. The average time from initial symptom to diagnosis is approximately 4 years. Further, some patients may not travel to specialized clinical centers even after diagnosis. We were therefore interested in investigating whether appropriately trained, community-based assessment of patient records could assist in defining disease progression using clinical severity scores. In this study we evolved a secure, step wise process to show that pre-existing medical records may be correctly assessed by non-clinical practitioners trained to quantify disease progression. Sixty-four undergraduate students at the University of Notre Dame were expertly trained in clinical disease assessment and recognition of major and minor symptoms of NPC. Seven clinical records, randomly selected from a total of thirty seven used to establish a leading clinical severity scale, were correctly assessed to show expected characteristics of linear disease progression. Student assessment of two new records donated by NPC families to our study also revealed linear progression of disease, but both showed accelerated disease progression, relative to the current severity scale, especially at the later stages. Together, these data suggest that college students may be trained in assessment of patient records, and thus provide insight into the natural history of a disease.

  5. Cholesterol lowering effects of mono-lactose-appended β-cyclodextrin in Niemann-Pick type C disease-like HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Motoyama, Keiichi; Hirai, Yumi; Nishiyama, Rena; Maeda, Yuki; Higashi, Taishi; Ishitsuka, Yoichi; Kondo, Yuki; Irie, Tetsumi; Era, Takumi; Arima, Hidetoshi

    2015-01-01

    The Niemann-Pick type C disease (NPC) is one of inherited lysosomal storage disorders, emerges the accumulation of unesterified cholesterol in endolysosomes. Currently, 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CyD) has been applied for the treatment of NPC. HP-β-CyD improved hepatosplenomegaly in NPC patients, however, a high dose of HP-β-CyD was necessary. Therefore, the decrease in dose by actively targeted-β-CyD to hepatocytes is expected. In the present study, to deliver β-CyD selectively to hepatocytes, we newly fabricated mono-lactose-appended β-CyD (Lac-β-CyD) and evaluated its cholesterol lowering effects in NPC-like HepG2 cells, cholesterol accumulated HepG2 cells induced by treatment with U18666A. Lac-β-CyD (degree of substitution of lactose (DSL) 1) significantly decreased the intracellular cholesterol content in a concentration-dependent manner. TRITC-Lac-β-CyD was associated with NPC-like HepG2 cells higher than TRITC-β-CyD. In addition, TRITC-Lac-β-CyD was partially localized with endolysosomes after endocytosis. Thus, Lac-β-CyD entered NPC-like HepG2 cells via asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR)-mediated endocytosis and decreased the accumulation of intracellular cholesterol in NPC-like HepG2 cells. These results suggest that Lac-β-CyD may have the potential as a drug for the treatment of hepatosplenomegaly in NPC disease.

  6. Mitotic Spindle Defects and Chromosome Mis-Segregation Induced by LDL/Cholesterol—Implications for Niemann-Pick C1, Alzheimer’s Disease, and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Granic, Antoneta; Potter, Huntington

    2013-01-01

    Elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol is a risk factor for both Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Atherosclerosis (CVD), suggesting a common lipid-sensitive step in their pathogenesis. Previous results show that AD and CVD also share a cell cycle defect: chromosome instability and up to 30% aneuploidy–in neurons and other cells in AD and in smooth muscle cells in atherosclerotic plaques in CVD. Indeed, specific degeneration of aneuploid neurons accounts for 90% of neuronal loss in AD brain, indicating that aneuploidy underlies AD neurodegeneration. Cell/mouse models of AD develop similar aneuploidy through amyloid-beta (Aß) inhibition of specific microtubule motors and consequent disruption of mitotic spindles. Here we tested the hypothesis that, like upregulated Aß, elevated LDL/cholesterol and altered intracellular cholesterol homeostasis also causes chromosomal instability. Specifically we found that: 1) high dietary cholesterol induces aneuploidy in mice, satisfying the hypothesis’ first prediction, 2) Niemann-Pick C1 patients accumulate aneuploid fibroblasts, neurons, and glia, demonstrating a similar aneugenic effect of intracellular cholesterol accumulation in humans 3) oxidized LDL, LDL, and cholesterol, but not high-density lipoprotein (HDL), induce chromosome mis-segregation and aneuploidy in cultured cells, including neuronal precursors, indicating that LDL/cholesterol directly affects the cell cycle, 4) LDL-induced aneuploidy requires the LDL receptor, but not Aß, showing that LDL works differently than Aß, with the same end result, 5) cholesterol treatment disrupts the structure of the mitotic spindle, providing a cell biological mechanism for its aneugenic activity, and 6) ethanol or calcium chelation attenuates lipoprotein-induced chromosome mis-segregation, providing molecular insights into cholesterol’s aneugenic mechanism, specifically through its rigidifying effect on the cell membrane, and potentially explaining why ethanol

  7. Bean peptides have higher in silico binding affinities than ezetimibe for the N-terminal domain of cholesterol receptor Niemann-Pick C1 Like-1.

    PubMed

    Real Hernandez, Luis M; Gonzalez de Mejia, Elvira

    2017-04-01

    Niemann-Pick C1 like-1 (NPC1L1) mediates cholesterol absorption at the apical membrane of enterocytes through a yet unknown mechanism. Bean, pea, and lentil proteins are naturally hydrolyzed during digestion to produce peptides. The potential for pulse peptides to have high binding affinities for NPC1L1 has not been determined. In this study , in silico binding affinities and interactions were determined between the N-terminal domain of NPC1L1 and 14 pulse peptides (5≥ amino acids) derived through pepsin-pancreatin digestion. Peptides were docked in triplicate to the N-terminal domain using docking program AutoDock Vina, and results were compared to those of ezetimibe, a prescribed NPC1L1 inhibitor. Three black bean peptides (-7.2 to -7.0kcal/mol) and the cowpea bean dipeptide Lys-Asp (-7.0kcal/mol) had higher binding affinities than ezetimibe (-6.6kcal/mol) for the N-terminal domain of NPC1L1. Lentil and pea peptides studied did not have high binding affinities. The common bean peptide Tyr-Ala-Ala-Ala-Thr (-7.2kcal/mol), which can be produced from black or navy bean proteins, had the highest binding affinity. Ezetimibe and peptides with high binding affinities for the N-terminal domain are expected to interact at different locations of the N-terminal domain. All high affinity black bean peptides are expected to have van der Waals interactions with SER130, PHE136, and LEU236 and a conventional hydrogen bond with GLU238 of NPC1L1. Due to their high affinity for the N-terminal domain of NPC1L1, black and cowpea bean peptides produced in the digestive track have the potential to disrupt interactions between NPC1L1 and membrane proteins that lead to cholesterol absorption.

  8. The stimulation of adenosine A2A receptors ameliorates the pathological phenotype of fibroblasts from Niemann-Pick type C patients.

    PubMed

    Visentin, Sergio; De Nuccio, Chiara; Bernardo, Antonietta; Pepponi, Rita; Ferrante, Antonella; Minghetti, Luisa; Popoli, Patrizia

    2013-09-25

    Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1) disease is a rare neurovisceral disorder characterized by intracellular accumulation of unesterified cholesterol, sphingolipids, and other lipids in the lysosomal compartment. A deregulation of lysosomal calcium has been identified as one of the earliest steps of the degenerative process. Since adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) control lysosome trafficking and pH, which closely regulates lysosomal calcium, we hypothesized a role for these receptors in NPC1. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the A2AR agonist CGS21680 on human control and NPC1 fibroblasts. We show that CGS21680 raises lysosomal calcium levels and rescues mitochondrial functionality (mitochondrial inner membrane potential and expression of the complex IV of the mitochondrial respiratory chain), which is compromised in NPC1 cells. These effects are prevented by the selective blockade of A2ARs by the antagonist ZM241385. The effects of A2AR activation on lysosomal calcium are not mediated by the cAMP/PKA pathway but they appear to involve the phosphorylation of ERK1/2. Finally, CGS21680 reduces cholesterol accumulation (Filipin III staining), which is the main criterion currently used for identification of a compound or pathway that would be beneficial for NPC disease, and such an effect is prevented by the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM. Our findings strongly support the hypothesis that A2AR agonists may represent a therapeutic option for NPC1 and provide insights on their mechanisms of action.

  9. N-terminal domain of the cholesterol transporter Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1) is essential for α-tocopherol transport.

    PubMed

    Kamishikiryo, Jun; Haraguchi, Misaki; Nakashima, Shunsuke; Tasaka, Yuka; Narahara, Hiroe; Sugihara, Narumi; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Morita, Tetsuo

    2017-04-29

    Both cholesterol and α-tocopherol are essential lipophilic nutrients for humans and animals. Although cholesterol in excess causes severe problems such as coronary heart disease, it is a necessary component of cell membranes and is the precursor for the biosynthesis of steroid hormones and bile acids. Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1) is a cholesterol transporter that is highly expressed in the small intestine and liver in humans and plays an important role in cholesterol homeostasis. Cholesterol promotes NPC1L1 endocytosis, which is an early step in cholesterol uptake. Furthermore, α-tocopherol is the most active form of vitamin E, and sufficient amounts of vitamin E are critical for health. It has been reported that NPC1L1 mediates α-tocopherol absorption; however, the mechanisms underlying this process are unknown. In this study, we found that treatment of cells that stably express NPC1L1-GFP with α-tocopherol promotes NPC1L1 endocytosis, and the NPC1L1 inhibitor, ezetimibe, efficiently prevents the α-tocopherol-induced endocytosis of NPC1L1. Cholesterol binding to the N-terminal domain (NTD) of NPC1L1 (NPC1L1-NTD) is essential for NPC1L1-mediated cholesterol absorption. We found that α-tocopherol competitively binds NPC1L1-NTD with cholesterol. Furthermore, when cells stably expressed NPC1L1ΔNTD-GFP, α-tocopherol could not induce the endocytosis of NPC1L1ΔNTD. Taken together, these results demonstrate that NPC1L1 recognizes α-tocopherol via its NTD and mediates α-tocopherol uptake through the same mechanism as cholesterol absorption.

  10. Impact of the loss of caveolin-1 on lung mass and cholesterol metabolism in mice with and without the lysosomal cholesterol transporter, Niemann-Pick type C1.

    PubMed

    Mundy, Dorothy I; Lopez, Adam M; Posey, Kenneth S; Chuang, Jen-Chieh; Ramirez, Charina M; Scherer, Philipp E; Turley, Stephen D

    2014-07-01

    Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is a major structural protein in caveolae in the plasma membranes of many cell types, particularly endothelial cells and adipocytes. Loss of Cav-1 function has been implicated in multiple diseases affecting the cardiopulmonary and central nervous systems, as well as in specific aspects of sterol and lipid metabolism in the liver and intestine. Lungs contain an exceptionally high level of Cav-1. Parameters of cholesterol metabolism in the lung were measured, initially in Cav-1-deficient mice (Cav-1(-/-)), and subsequently in Cav-1(-/-) mice that also lacked the lysosomal cholesterol transporter Niemann-Pick C1 (Npc1) (Cav-1(-/-):Npc1(-/-)). In 50-day-old Cav-1(-/-) mice fed a low- or high-cholesterol chow diet, the total cholesterol concentration (mg/g) in the lungs was marginally lower than in the Cav-1(+/+) controls, but due to an expansion in their lung mass exceeding 30%, whole-lung cholesterol content (mg/organ) was moderately elevated. Lung mass (g) in the Cav-1(-/-):Npc1(-/-) mice (0.356±0.022) markedly exceeded that in their Cav-1(+/+):Npc1(+/+) controls (0.137±0.009), as well as in their Cav-1(-/-):Npc1(+/+) (0.191±0.013) and Cav-1(+/+):Npc1(-/-) (0.213±0.022) littermates. The corresponding lung total cholesterol contents (mg/organ) in mice of these genotypes were 6.74±0.17, 0.71±0.05, 0.96±0.05 and 3.12±0.43, respectively, with the extra cholesterol in the Cav-1(-/-):Npc1(-/-) and Cav-1(+/+):Npc1(-/-) mice being nearly all unesterified (UC). The exacerbation of the Npc1 lung phenotype and increase in the UC level in the Cav-1(-/-):Npc1(-/-) mice imply a regulatory role of Cav-1 in pulmonary cholesterol metabolism when lysosomal sterol transport is disrupted.

  11. Npc1 deficiency in the C57BL/6J genetic background enhances Niemann-Pick disease type C spleen pathology.

    PubMed

    Parra, Julio; Klein, Andrés D; Castro, Juan; Morales, María Gabriela; Mosqueira, Matías; Valencia, Ilse; Cortés, Victor; Rigotti, Attilio; Zanlungo, Silvana

    2011-09-30

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is an autosomal recessive neurovisceral lipid storage disorder. The affected genes are NPC1 and NPC2. Mutations in either gene lead to intracellular cholesterol accumulation. There are three forms of the disease, which are categorized based on the onset and severity of the disease: the infantile form, in which the liver and spleen are severely affected, the juvenile form, in which the liver and brain are affected, and the adult form, which affects the brain. In mice, a spontaneous mutation in the Npc1 gene originated in the BALB/c inbred strain mimics the juvenile form of the disease. To study the influence of genetic background on the expression of NPC disease in mice, we transferred the Npc1 mutation from the BALB/c to C57BL/6J inbred background. We found that C57BL/6J-Npc1(-/-) mice present with a much more aggressive form of the disease, including a shorter lifespan than BALB/c-Npc1(-/-) mice. Surprisingly, there was no difference in the amount of cholesterol in the brains of Npc1(-/-) mice of either mouse strain. However, Npc1(-/-) mice with the C57BL/6J genetic background showed striking spleen damage with a marked buildup of cholesterol and phospholipids at an early age, which correlated with large foamy cell clusters. In addition, C57BL/6J Npc1(-/-) mice presented red cell abnormalities and abundant ghost erythrocytes that correlated with a lower hemoglobin concentration. We also found abnormalities in white cells, such as cytoplasmic granulation and neutrophil hypersegmentation that included lymphopenia and atypias. In conclusion, Npc1 deficiency in the C57BL6/J background is associated with spleen, erythrocyte, and immune system abnormalities that lead to a reduced lifespan.

  12. Epidemiological, clinical and biochemical characterization of the p.(Ala359Asp) SMPD1 variant causing Niemann-Pick disease type B.

    PubMed

    Acuña, Mariana; Martínez, Pablo; Moraga, Carol; He, Xingxuan; Moraga, Mauricio; Hunter, Bessie; Nuernberg, Peter; Gutiérrez, Rodrigo A; González, Mauricio; Schuchman, Edward H; Santos, José Luis; Miquel, Juan Francisco; Mabe, Paulina; Zanlungo, Silvana

    2016-02-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type B (NPDB) is a rare, inherited lysosomal storage disorder that occurs due to variants in the sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 1 (SMPD1) gene and the resultant deficiency of acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) activity. While numerous variants causing NPDB have been described, only a small number have been studied in any detail. Herein, we describe the frequency of the p.(Ala359Asp) variant in the healthy Chilean population, and determine the haplotype background of homozygous patients to establish if this variant originated from a common founder. Genomic DNA samples from 1691 healthy individuals were analyzed for the p.(Ala359Asp) variant. The frequency of p.(Ala359Asp) was found to be 1/105.7, predicting a disease incidence of 1/44 960 in Chile, higher than the incidence estimated by the number of confirmed NPDB cases. We also describe the clinical characteristics of 13 patients homozygous for p.(Ala359Asp) and all of them had moderate to severe NPDB disease. In addition, a conserved haplotype and shared 280 Kb region around the SMPD1 gene was observed in the patients analyzed, indicating that the variant originated from a common ancestor. The haplotype frequency and mitochondrial DNA analysis suggest an Amerindian origin for the variant. To assess the effect of the p.(Ala359Asp) variant, we transfected cells with the ASM-p.(Ala359Asp) cDNA and the activity was only 4.2% compared with the wild-type cDNA, definitively demonstrating the causative effect of the variant on ASM function. Information on common variants such as p.(Ala359Asp) is essential to guide the successful implementation for future therapies and benefit to patients.

  13. Association between the rs1805081 polymorphism of Niemann-Pick type C1 gene and cardiovascular disease in a sample of an Iranian population

    PubMed Central

    Afzali, Masoumeh; Hashemi, Mohammad; Tabatabaei, Seyed Payman; Fakheri, Kourosh Tirgar; Nakhaee, Alireza

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between a genetic variation, A+644G, in the Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1) gene and the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in a Southeast Iranian population. A total of 320 individuals, including 200 patients with CVD and 120 healthy individuals, were involved in the present study. The polymorphism was determined using a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. The results indicated that the frequency of the GG genotype was markedly lower in patients with CVD compared with the control group (7 vs. 16.7%), and that the NPC1 rs1805081 polymorphism was associated with reduced risk of CVD [odds ratio (OR)=0.110; 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.017–0.715; P=0.021]. In addition, the prevalence of the minor allele (G) in patients with CVD differed from that of the control group with the frequency of 25.5 and 33.4% for the former and latter, respectively, and this difference reached statistical significance (OR=0.658; 95% CI=0.482–0.971; P=0.037). Furthermore, analysis of clinical characteristics of the individuals according to the NPC1 genotypes revealed an association between the lipid profile and NPC1 gene polymorphism. These findings demonstrated that the NPC1 A+644G variant was associated with reduced risk of CVD and serves a protective role against susceptibility to CVD in the Iranian population. PMID:28123713

  14. Neuronal gene repression in Niemann-Pick type C models is mediated by the c-Abl/HDAC2 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Pablo S.; Gonzalez-Zuñiga, Marcelo; González-Hódar, Lila; Yáñez, María José; Dulcey, Andrés; Marugan, Juan; Seto, Edward; Alvarez, Alejandra R.; Zanlungo, Silvana

    2016-01-01

    Background Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the accumulation of free cholesterol in lysosomes. There are currently no effective FDA-approved treatments for NPC, although in the last years the inhibition of Histone Deacetylases (HDACs) has emerged as a potential treatment for this disease. However, the molecular mechanisms that deregulate HDACs activity in NPC disease are unknown. Previously our group had shown that the proapoptotic tyrosine kinase c-Abl signaling is activated in NPC neurons. Here, we demonstrate that c-Abl activity increases HDAC2 levels inducing neuronal gene repression of key synaptic genes in NPC models. Results Our data show that: i) HDAC2 levels and activity are increased in NPC neuronal models and in Npc1-/- mice; ii) inhibition of c-Abl or c-Abl deficiency prevents the increase of HDAC2 protein levels and activity in NPC neuronal models; iii) c-Abl inhibition decreases the levels of HDAC2 tyrosine phosphorylation; iv) treatment with methyl-β-cyclodextrin and Vitamin E decrease the activation of the c-Abl/HDAC2 pathway in NPC neurons; v) in vivo treatment with two c-Abl inhibitors prevents the increase of HDAC2 protein levels in the brain of Npc1-/- mice and, vi) c-Abl inhibition prevents HDAC2 recruitment to the promoter of neuronal genes, triggering an increase in their expression. Conclusion our data show the involvement of the c-Abl/HDAC2 signaling pathway in the regulation of neuronal gene expression in NPC neuronal models. Thus, inhibition of c-Abl could be a pharmacological target for preventing the deleterious effects of increased HDAC2 levels in NPC disease. PMID:26603102

  15. Characterization of a Spontaneous Novel Mutation in the NPC2 Gene in a Cat Affected by Niemann Pick Type C Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zampieri, Stefania; Bianchi, Ezio; Cantile, Carlo; Saleri, Roberta; Bembi, Bruno; Dardis, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Niemann-Pick C disease (NPC) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder characterized by accumulation of unesterified cholesterol and other lipids within the lysosomes due to mutation in NPC1 or NPC2 genes. A feline model of NPC carrying a mutation in NPC1 gene has been previously described. We have identified two kittens affected by NPC disease due to a mutation in NPC2 gene. They manifested with tremors at the age of 3 months, which progressed to dystonia and severe ataxia. At 6 months of age cat 2 was unable to stand without assistance and had bilaterally reduced menace response. It died at the age of 10 months. Post-mortem histological analysis of the brain showed the presence of neurons with cytoplasmic swelling and vacuoles, gliosis of the substantia nigra and degeneration of the white matter. Spheroids with accumulation of ubiquitinated aggregates were prominent in the cerebellar cortex. Purkinje cells were markedly reduced in number and they showed prominent intracytoplasmic storage. Scattered perivascular aggregates of lymphocytes and microglial cells proliferation were present in the thalamus and midbrain. Proliferation of Bergmann glia was also observed. In the liver, hepatocytes were swollen because of accumulation of small vacuoles and foamy Kupffer cells were also detected. Foamy macrophages were observed within the pulmonary interstitium and alveoli as well. At 9 months cat 1 was unable to walk, developed seizures and it was euthanized at 21 months. Filipin staining of cultured fibroblasts showed massive storage of unesterified cholesterol. Molecular analysis of NPC1 and NPC2 genes showed the presence of a homozygous intronic mutation (c.82+5G>A) in the NPC2 gene. The subsequent analysis of the mRNA showed that the mutation causes the retention of 105 bp in the mature mRNA, which leads to the in frame insertion of 35 amino acids between residues 28 and 29 of NPC2 protein (p.G28_S29ins35). PMID:25396745

  16. Molecular basis of multiple sulfatase deficiency, mucolipidosis II/III and Niemann-Pick C1 disease - Lysosomal storage disorders caused by defects of non-lysosomal proteins.

    PubMed

    Dierks, Thomas; Schlotawa, Lars; Frese, Marc-André; Radhakrishnan, Karthikeyan; von Figura, Kurt; Schmidt, Bernhard

    2009-04-01

    Multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD), mucolipidosis (ML) II/III and Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1) disease are rare but fatal lysosomal storage disorders caused by the genetic defect of non-lysosomal proteins. The NPC1 protein mainly localizes to late endosomes and is essential for cholesterol redistribution from endocytosed LDL to cellular membranes. NPC1 deficiency leads to lysosomal accumulation of a broad range of lipids. The precise functional mechanism of this membrane protein, however, remains puzzling. ML II, also termed I cell disease, and the less severe ML III result from deficiencies of the Golgi enzyme N-acetylglucosamine 1-phosphotransferase leading to a global defect of lysosome biogenesis. In patient cells, newly synthesized lysosomal proteins are not equipped with the critical lysosomal trafficking marker mannose 6-phosphate, thus escaping from lysosomal sorting at the trans Golgi network. MSD affects the entire sulfatase family, at least seven members of which are lysosomal enzymes that are specifically involved in the degradation of sulfated glycosaminoglycans, sulfolipids or other sulfated molecules. The combined deficiencies of all sulfatases result from a defective post-translational modification by the ER-localized formylglycine-generating enzyme (FGE), which oxidizes a specific cysteine residue to formylglycine, the catalytic residue enabling a unique mechanism of sulfate ester hydrolysis. This review gives an update on the molecular bases of these enigmatic diseases, which have been challenging researchers since many decades and so far led to a number of surprising findings that give deeper insight into both the cell biology and the pathobiochemistry underlying these complex disorders. In case of MSD, considerable progress has been made in recent years towards an understanding of disease-causing FGE mutations. First approaches to link molecular parameters with clinical manifestation have been described and even therapeutical options have been

  17. Synthesis, Characterization, In Vitro Evaluation, and Preclinical Profiling of beta-Cyclodextrin Polyrotaxane Families for Use As Potential Niemann-Pick Type C Therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Christopher J.

    Niemann-Pick Disease Type C (NPC) is a rare, autosomal recessive genetic disorder featuring a loss of proteins responsible for unesterified cholesterol (UC) trafficking through the late endosomes/lysosomes (LE/LY) of every cell of the body. Disruption of this pathway leads to abnormal accumulation and storage of UC and other lipids. A broad range of visceral and neurological symptoms result from this accumulation exhibiting a variable age of onset and a disease progression that is ultimately fatal. The disease has an incidence of approximately 1 in 120,000 live births and has no known effective treatment. beta-Cyclodextrin (beta-CD) are natural small molecules macrocycles composed of glucose units with a hydrophobic inner cavity and hydrophilic outer rims. beta-CD derivatives have recently been shown to be effective therapeutics for NPC in cellular and animal models. In the mouse model of the disease, beta-CD therapy increases overall lifetime by as much as 50% and slows the progression of neurodegeneration. The progress has led to the initiation of a National Institutes of Health phase I clinical trial. A main drawback of beta-CD administration is the poor pharmacokinetic profile characterized by rapid renal clearance of the drug through the urine. Libraries of beta-CD derivative carrying high molecular weight polyrotaxane (PR) systems have been designed to prevent glomerular filtration of the injected beta-CD dose. An initial family of unmodified beta-CD PRs was synthesized, characterized, and their therapeutic efficacy was tested in NPC fibroblasts. This was followed by screening of PRs consisting of mixed beta-CD derivative threading featuring charged sulfobutylether beta-CD. Finally, we sought to define PR structure-property effects on in vivo pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, toxicity, immunogenicity, and protein hard corona composition. This was accomplished using a family of gadolinium carrying PRs composed of triblock Pluronic co-polymers of varying

  18. Niemann-Pick disease: a frequent missense mutation in the acid sphingomyelinase gene of Ashkenazi Jewish type A and B patients.

    PubMed Central

    Levran, O; Desnick, R J; Schuchman, E H

    1991-01-01

    Although the A and B subtypes of Niemann-Pick disease (NPD) both result from the deficient activity of acid sphingomyelinase (ASM; sphingomyelin cholinephosphohydrolase, EC 3.1.4.12) and the lysosomal accumulation of sphingomyelin, they have remarkably distinct phenotypes. Type A disease is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder of infancy, whereas type B disease has no neurologic manifestations and is characterized primarily by reticuloendothelial involvement and survival into adulthood. Both disorders are more frequent among individual of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry than in the general population. The recent isolation and characterization of cDNA and genomic sequences encoding ASM has facilitated investigation of the molecular lesions causing the NPD subtypes. Total RNA was reverse-transcribed, and the ASM cDNA from an Ashkenazi Jewish type A patient was specifically amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Molecular analysis of the PCR products revealed a G----T transversion of nucleotide 1487, which occurred at a CpG dinucleotide and predicted an Arg----Leu substitution in residue 496. Hybridization of PCR-amplified genomic DNA with allele-specific oligonucleotides indicated that the proband was homoallelic for the Arg----Leu substitution and that both parents and several other relatives were heterozygous. This mutation was detected in 32% (10 of 31) of the Ashkenazi Jewish NPD type A alleles studied and occurred in only 5.6% (2 of 36) of ASM alleles from non-Jewish type A patients. Of interest, the Arg----Leu substitution occurred in one of the ASM alleles from the two Ashkenazi Jewish NPD type B patients studied and in none of the ASM alleles of 15 non-Jewish type B patients. In contrast, the mutation was not present in 180 ASM alleles from normal individuals of Ashkenazi Jewish descent. These findings identify a frequent missense mutation among NPD patients of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry that results in neuronopathic type A disease when homoallelic and can

  19. Preparation of an anti-acid sphingomyelinase monoclonal antibody for the quantitative determination and polypeptide analysis of lysosomal sphingomyelinase in fibroblasts from normal and Niemann-Pick type A patients.

    PubMed

    Rousson, R; Parvaz, P; Bonnet, J; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, C; Louisot, P; Vanier, M T

    1993-04-02

    An anti-acid sphingomyelinase monoclonal antibody has been prepared using an in vitro booster technique. The antigen, acid sphingomyelinase, was purified from human placentas by sequential chromatographic steps in the presence of the non-ionic detergent Nonidet P40. This monoclonal antibody (MAB 236) precipitates specifically the enzyme activity by immunoadsorption techniques and presents the same specificity to normal and mutated sphingomyelinase in Niemann-Pick type A patients. MAB 236 is the first antibody able to precipitate the protein in the presence of detergent thereby permitting the quantitative determination of normal and mutated sphingomyelinase in tissue and cell extracts. Polypeptide analysis and quantitative determination experiments using this monoclonal antibody showed no difference between patients and normal controls.

  20. Characterization of cholesterol homeostasis in sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase-deficient fibroblasts reveals a Niemann-Pick disease type C-like phenotype with enhanced lysosomal Ca2+ storage

    PubMed Central

    Vienken, Hans; Mabrouki, Nathalie; Grabau, Katja; Claas, Ralf Frederik; Rudowski, Agnes; Schömel, Nina; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Lütjohann, Dieter; van Echten-Deckert, Gerhild; Meyer zu Heringdorf, Dagmar

    2017-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) lyase irreversibly cleaves S1P, thereby catalysing the ultimate step of sphingolipid degradation. We show here that embryonic fibroblasts from S1P lyase-deficient mice (Sgpl1−/−-MEFs), in which S1P and sphingosine accumulate, have features of Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) cells. In the presence of serum, overall cholesterol content was elevated in Sgpl1−/−-MEFs, due to upregulation of the LDL receptor and enhanced cholesterol uptake. Despite this, activation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2 was increased in Sgpl1−/−-MEFs, indicating a local lack of cholesterol at the ER. Indeed, free cholesterol was retained in NPC1-containing vesicles, which is a hallmark of NPC. Furthermore, upregulation of amyloid precursor protein in Sgpl1−/−-MEFs was mimicked by an NPC1 inhibitor in Sgpl1+/+-MEFs and reduced by overexpression of NPC1. Lysosomal pH was not altered by S1P lyase deficiency, similar to NPC. Interestingly, lysosomal Ca2+ content and bafilomycin A1-induced [Ca2+]i increases were enhanced in Sgpl1−/−-MEFs, contrary to NPC. These results show that both a primary defect in cholesterol trafficking and S1P lyase deficiency cause overlapping phenotypic alterations, and challenge the present view on the role of sphingosine in lysosomal Ca2+ homeostasis. PMID:28262793

  1. Rescue of an in vitro neuron phenotype identified in Niemann-Pick disease, type C1 induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons by modulating the WNT pathway and calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Efthymiou, Anastasia G; Steiner, Joe; Pavan, William J; Wincovitch, Stephen; Larson, Denise M; Porter, Forbes D; Rao, Mahendra S; Malik, Nasir

    2015-03-01

    Niemann-Pick disease, type C1 (NPC1) is a familial disorder that has devastating consequences on postnatal development with multisystem effects, including neurodegeneration. There is no Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment option for NPC1; however, several potentially therapeutic compounds have been identified in assays using yeast, rodent models, and NPC1 human fibroblasts. Although these discoveries were made in fibroblasts from NPC1 subjects and were in some instances validated in animal models of the disease, testing these drugs on a cell type more relevant for NPC1 neurological disease would greatly facilitate both study of the disease and identification of more relevant therapeutic compounds. Toward this goal, we have generated an induced pluripotent stem cell line from a subject homozygous for the most frequent NPC1 mutation (p.I1061T) and subsequently created a stable line of neural stem cells (NSCs). These NSCs were then used to create neurons as an appropriate disease model. NPC1 neurons display a premature cell death phenotype, and gene expression analysis of these cells suggests dysfunction of important signaling pathways, including calcium and WNT. The clear readout from these cells makes them ideal candidates for high-throughput screening and will be a valuable tool to better understand the development of NPC1 in neural cells, as well as to develop better therapeutic options for NPC1.

  2. The Clathrin Adaptor Proteins ARH, Dab2, and Numb Play Distinct Roles in Niemann-Pick C1-Like 1 Versus Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-mediated Cholesterol Uptake*

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jian; Fu, Zhen-Yan; Li, Pei-Shan; Miao, Hong-Hua; Li, Bo-Liang; Ma, Yi-Tong; Song, Bao-Liang

    2014-01-01

    The uptake of circulating low density lipoproteins (LDL) is mediated by LDL receptor (LDLR) through clathrin-dependent endocytosis. At the early stage of this process, adaptor proteins ARH and Dab2 specifically bind the endocytic signal motif in LDLR and recruit clathrin/AP2 to initiate internalization. On the other hand, intestinal cholesterol is absorbed by Niemann-Pick C1-Like 1 (NPC1L1) through clathrin-dependent endocytosis. Another adaptor protein, Numb recognizes the endocytic motif in NPC1L1 C terminus and couples NPC1L1 to endocytic machinery. The ARH, Dab2, and Numb proteins contain a homogeneous phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domain that directly binds endocytic motifs. Because ARH, Dab2, and Numb are all PTB domain family members, the emerging mystery is whether these adaptors act complementally in LDLR and NPC1L1 endocytosis. Here, we found that ARH and Dab2 did not bind NPC1L1 and were not required for NPC1L1 internalization. Similarly, Numb lacked the ability to interact with the LDLR C terminus and was dispensable for LDL uptake. Only the Numb isoforms with shorter PTB domain could facilitate NPC1L1 endocytosis. Besides the reported function in intestinal cholesterol absorption, Numb also mediated cholesterol reabsorption from bile in liver. We further identified a Numb variant with G595D substitution in humans of low blood LDL-cholesterol. The G595D substitution impaired NPC1L1 internalization and cholesterol reabsorption, due to attenuating affinity of Numb to clathrin/AP2. These results demonstrate that Numb specifically regulates NPC1L1-mediated cholesterol absorption both in human intestine and liver, distinct from ARH and Dab2, which selectively participate in LDLR-mediated LDL uptake. PMID:25331956

  3. Synthesis of multi-lactose-appended β-cyclodextrin and its cholesterol-lowering effects in Niemann-Pick type C disease-like HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Motoyama, Keiichi; Nishiyama, Rena; Maeda, Yuki; Higashi, Taishi; Ishitsuka, Yoichi; Kondo, Yuki; Irie, Tetsumi; Era, Takumi; Arima, Hidetoshi

    2017-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease, characterized by intracellular accumulation of unesterified cholesterol and other lipids owing to defects in two proteins NPC1 and NPC2, causes neurodegeneration and other fatal neurovisceral symptoms. Currently, treatment of NPC involves the use of 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD). HP-β-CD is effective in the treatment of hepatosplenomegaly in NPC disease, albeit at a very high dose. One of the methods to reduce the required dose of HP-β-CD for treatment of NPC is to actively targeting hepatocytes with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD). The aim of the present study was to synthesize a novel multi-lactose-appended β-CD (multi-Lac-β-CD) and to evaluate its cholesterol-lowering effect in U18666A-treated HepG2 (NPC-like HepG2) cells. Further, the study aimed at delivering β-CD to hepatocytes via cholesterol-accumulated HepG2 cells, and indicated that the newly synthesized multi-Lac-β-CD had an average degree of substitution of lactose (DSL) of 5.6. This newly synthesized multi-Lac-β-CD was found to significantly decrease the concentration of intracellular cholesterol with negligible cytotoxicity as compared to HP-β-CD. An increased internalization of TRITC-multi-Lac-β-CD (DSL 5.6) as compared to TRITC-HP-β-CD was observed in NPC-like HepG2 cells. Further, the dissociation constant of peanut lectin with multi-Lac-β-CD (DSL5.6) was found to be extremely low (2.5 × 10(-8) M). These results indicate that multi-Lac-β-CD (DSL5.6) diminished intracellular cholesterol levels in NPC-like HepG2 cells via asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR)-mediated endocytosis.

  4. The clathrin adaptor proteins ARH, Dab2, and numb play distinct roles in Niemann-Pick C1-Like 1 versus low density lipoprotein receptor-mediated cholesterol uptake.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jian; Fu, Zhen-Yan; Li, Pei-Shan; Miao, Hong-Hua; Li, Bo-Liang; Ma, Yi-Tong; Song, Bao-Liang

    2014-11-28

    The uptake of circulating low density lipoproteins (LDL) is mediated by LDL receptor (LDLR) through clathrin-dependent endocytosis. At the early stage of this process, adaptor proteins ARH and Dab2 specifically bind the endocytic signal motif in LDLR and recruit clathrin/AP2 to initiate internalization. On the other hand, intestinal cholesterol is absorbed by Niemann-Pick C1-Like 1 (NPC1L1) through clathrin-dependent endocytosis. Another adaptor protein, Numb recognizes the endocytic motif in NPC1L1 C terminus and couples NPC1L1 to endocytic machinery. The ARH, Dab2, and Numb proteins contain a homogeneous phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domain that directly binds endocytic motifs. Because ARH, Dab2, and Numb are all PTB domain family members, the emerging mystery is whether these adaptors act complementally in LDLR and NPC1L1 endocytosis. Here, we found that ARH and Dab2 did not bind NPC1L1 and were not required for NPC1L1 internalization. Similarly, Numb lacked the ability to interact with the LDLR C terminus and was dispensable for LDL uptake. Only the Numb isoforms with shorter PTB domain could facilitate NPC1L1 endocytosis. Besides the reported function in intestinal cholesterol absorption, Numb also mediated cholesterol reabsorption from bile in liver. We further identified a Numb variant with G595D substitution in humans of low blood LDL-cholesterol. The G595D substitution impaired NPC1L1 internalization and cholesterol reabsorption, due to attenuating affinity of Numb to clathrin/AP2. These results demonstrate that Numb specifically regulates NPC1L1-mediated cholesterol absorption both in human intestine and liver, distinct from ARH and Dab2, which selectively participate in LDLR-mediated LDL uptake.

  5. Respective contributions of intestinal Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 and scavenger receptor class B type I to cholesterol and tocopherol uptake: in vivo v. in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Reboul, Emmanuelle; Soayfane, Zeina; Goncalves, Aurélie; Cantiello, Michela; Bott, Romain; Nauze, Michel; Tercé, François; Collet, Xavier; Coméra, Christine

    2012-05-01

    The intestinal absorption of cholesterol and lipid micronutrients such as vitamin E has been shown to share some common pathways. The present study aims to further compare the uptake of cholesterol ([3H]cholesterol v. 22-(N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino)-23,24-bisnor-5-cholen-3-ol (NBD-cholesterol)) and tocopherol in Caco-2 TC-7 cells and in mouse intestine, with special focus on the respective roles of scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) and Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1). Conversely to NBD-cholesterol, the uptakes of [3H]cholesterol and tocopherol by Caco-2 cells were impaired by both block lipid transport-1 and ezetimibe, which inhibit SR-BI and NPC1L1, respectively. These inhibitions occurred only when cholesterol or tocopherol was delivered to cells included in micelles that contained biliary acid and at least oleic acid as a lipid. In vivo, after 2 h of digestion in mice, the uptake of the two cholesterol analogues and of tocopherol all showed distinct patterns along the duodenum-jejunum axis. [3H]Cholesterol uptake, which correlated closely to NPC1L1 mRNA expression in wild-type (wt) mice, was strongly inhibited by ezetimibe. Intestinal SR-BI overexpression did not change NPC1L1 expression and led to a significant increase in [3H]cholesterol uptake in the distal jejunum. Conversely, neither ezetimibe treatment nor SR-BI overexpression had an effect on NBD-cholesterol uptake. However, in contrast with SR-BI mRNA expression, tocopherol absorption increased strongly up to the distal jejunum in wt mice where it was specifically inhibited by ezetimibe, and was increased in the proximal intestine of intestinal SR-BI-overexpressing mice. Thus, cholesterol and tocopherol uptakes share common pathways in cell culture models, but display different in vivo absorption patterns associated with distinct contributions of SR-BI and NPC1L1.

  6. Inhibition of Intermediate-Conductance Calcium-Activated K Channel (KCa3.1) and Fibroblast Mitogenesis by α-Linolenic Acid and Alterations of Channel Expression in the Lysosomal Storage Disorders, Fabry Disease, and Niemann Pick C.

    PubMed

    Oliván-Viguera, Aida; Lozano-Gerona, Javier; López de Frutos, Laura; Cebolla, Jorge J; Irún, Pilar; Abarca-Lachen, Edgar; García-Malinis, Ana J; García-Otín, Ángel Luis; Gilaberte, Yolanda; Giraldo, Pilar; Köhler, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    The calcium/calmodulin-gated KCa3.1 channel regulates normal and abnormal mitogenesis by controlling K(+)-efflux, cell volume, and membrane hyperpolarization-driven calcium-entry. Recent studies suggest modulation of KCa3.1 by omega-3 fatty acids as negative modulators and impaired KCa3.1 functions in the inherited lysosomal storage disorder (LSD), Fabry disease (FD). In the first part of present study, we characterize KCa3.1 in murine and human fibroblasts and test the impact of omega-3 fatty acids on fibroblast proliferation. In the second, we study whether KCa3.1 is altered in the LSDs, FD, and Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC). Our patch-clamp and mRNA-expression studies on murine and human fibroblasts show functional expression of KCa3.1. KCa currents display the typical pharmacological fingerprint of KCa3.1: Ca(2+)-activation, potentiation by the positive-gating modulators, SKA-31 and SKA-121, and inhibition by TRAM-34, Senicapoc (ICA-17043), and the negative-gating modulator, 13b. Considering modulation by omega-3 fatty acids we found that α-linolenic acid (α-LA) and docosahexanenoic acid (DHA) inhibit KCa3.1 currents and strongly reduce fibroblast growth. The α-LA-rich linseed oil and γ-LA-rich borage oil at 0.5% produce channel inhibition while α-LA/γ-LA-low oils has no anti-proliferative effect. Concerning KCa3.1 in LSD, mRNA expression studies, and patch-clamp on primary fibroblasts from FD and NPC patients reveal lower KCa3.1-gene expression and membrane expression than in control fibroblasts. In conclusion, the omega-3 fatty acid, α-LA, and α-LA/γ-LA-rich plant oils, inhibit fibroblast KCa3.1 channels and mitogenesis. Reduced fibroblast KCa3.1 functions are a feature and possible biomarker of cell dysfunction in FD and NPC and supports the concept that biased lipid metabolism is capable of negatively modulating KCa3.1 expression.

  7. Inhibition of Intermediate-Conductance Calcium-Activated K Channel (KCa3.1) and Fibroblast Mitogenesis by α-Linolenic Acid and Alterations of Channel Expression in the Lysosomal Storage Disorders, Fabry Disease, and Niemann Pick C

    PubMed Central

    Oliván-Viguera, Aida; Lozano-Gerona, Javier; López de Frutos, Laura; Cebolla, Jorge J.; Irún, Pilar; Abarca-Lachen, Edgar; García-Malinis, Ana J.; García-Otín, Ángel Luis; Gilaberte, Yolanda; Giraldo, Pilar; Köhler, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    The calcium/calmodulin-gated KCa3.1 channel regulates normal and abnormal mitogenesis by controlling K+-efflux, cell volume, and membrane hyperpolarization-driven calcium-entry. Recent studies suggest modulation of KCa3.1 by omega-3 fatty acids as negative modulators and impaired KCa3.1 functions in the inherited lysosomal storage disorder (LSD), Fabry disease (FD). In the first part of present study, we characterize KCa3.1 in murine and human fibroblasts and test the impact of omega-3 fatty acids on fibroblast proliferation. In the second, we study whether KCa3.1 is altered in the LSDs, FD, and Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC). Our patch-clamp and mRNA-expression studies on murine and human fibroblasts show functional expression of KCa3.1. KCa currents display the typical pharmacological fingerprint of KCa3.1: Ca2+-activation, potentiation by the positive-gating modulators, SKA-31 and SKA-121, and inhibition by TRAM-34, Senicapoc (ICA-17043), and the negative-gating modulator, 13b. Considering modulation by omega-3 fatty acids we found that α-linolenic acid (α-LA) and docosahexanenoic acid (DHA) inhibit KCa3.1 currents and strongly reduce fibroblast growth. The α-LA-rich linseed oil and γ-LA-rich borage oil at 0.5% produce channel inhibition while α-LA/γ-LA-low oils has no anti-proliferative effect. Concerning KCa3.1 in LSD, mRNA expression studies, and patch-clamp on primary fibroblasts from FD and NPC patients reveal lower KCa3.1-gene expression and membrane expression than in control fibroblasts. In conclusion, the omega-3 fatty acid, α-LA, and α-LA/γ-LA-rich plant oils, inhibit fibroblast KCa3.1 channels and mitogenesis. Reduced fibroblast KCa3.1 functions are a feature and possible biomarker of cell dysfunction in FD and NPC and supports the concept that biased lipid metabolism is capable of negatively modulating KCa3.1 expression. PMID:28197106

  8. Lysosomal pH-inducible supramolecular dissociation of polyrotaxanes possessing acid-labile N-triphenylmethyl end groups and their therapeutic potential for Niemann-Pick type C disease

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Atsushi; Nishida, Kei; Yui, Nobuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is characterized by the accumulation of cholesterol in lysosomes. We have previously reported that biocleavable polyrotaxanes (PRXs) composed of β-cyclodextrins (β-CDs) threaded onto a linear polymer capped with bulky stopper molecules via intracellularly cleavable linkers show remarkable cholesterol reducing effects in NPC disease patient-derived fibroblasts owing to the stimuli-responsive intracellular dissociation of PRXs and subsequent β-CD release from the PRXs. Herein, we describe a series of novel acid-labile 2-(2-hydroxyethoxy)ethyl group-modified PRXs (HEE-PRXs) bearing terminal N-triphenylmethyl (N-Trt) groups as a cleavable component for the treatment of NPC disease. The N-Trt end groups of the HEE-PRXs underwent acidic pH-induced cleavage and led to the dissociation of their supramolecular structure. A kinetic study revealed that the number of HEE groups on the PRX did not affect the cleavage kinetics of the N-Trt end groups of the HEE-PRXs. The effect of the number of HEE groups of the HEE-PRXs, which was modified to impart water solubility to the PRXs, on cellular internalization efficiency, lysosomal localization efficiency, and cholesterol reduction ability in NPC disease-derived fibroblasts (NPC1 fibroblasts) was also investigated. The cellular uptake and lysosomal localization efficiency were almost equivalent for HEE-PRXs with different numbers of HEE groups. However, the cholesterol reducing ability of the HEE-PRXs in NPC1 fibroblasts was affected by the number of HEE groups, and HEE-PRXs with a high number of HEE groups were unable to reduce lysosomal cholesterol accumulation. This deficiency is most likely due to the cholesterol-solubilizing ability of HEE-modified β-CDs released from the HEE-PRXs. We conclude that the N-Trt group acts as a cleavable component to induce the lysosomal dissociation of HEE-PRXs, and acid-labile HEE-PRXs with an optimal number of HEE groups (4.1 to 5.4 HEE groups per

  9. National Niemann-Pick Disease Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Items Holding a Fundraiser NNPDF Book Store NPA Update More NNPDF November 2016 eNewsletter Posted by jbeirl ... NewsLine , Type A , Type B , Type C NPB Update More NNPDF November 2016 eNewsletter Posted by jbeirl ...

  10. American Behcet's Disease Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awareness Day May 20th is Behcet's Awareness Day Behcet's Disease Awareness Share your story and educate others about ... org/en/community/behcet-s-syndrome Upcoming Events American Behcet's Disease Association PO BOX 80576 Rochester, MI 48308 Contact ...

  11. Wilson's Disease Association International

    MedlinePlus

    ... Connect with Wilson Disease Association Send Email Physician Contacts List of Physicians and Institutions in Your Area View Contacts Support Contacts Individuals who can offer Support and Information View ...

  12. Kennedy's Disease Association

    MedlinePlus

    Kennedy's Disease Association A Public Benefit, Non-Profit Organization Register GTranslate GTranslate Javascript is required to use ... worldwide. Males generally inherit the disease symptoms and females are the carriers. Help Us Find A Cure! ...

  13. Revertant mosaicism in skin: natural gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lai-Cheong, Joey E.; McGrath, John A.; Uitto, Jouni

    2011-01-01

    Revertant mosaicism is a naturally occurring phenomenon involving spontaneous correction of a pathogenic mutation in a somatic cell. Recent studies suggest that it is not a rare event and that it could be clinically relevant to phenotypic expression and patient treatment. Indeed, revertant cell therapy represents a potential “natural gene therapy” because in vivo reversion obviates the need for further genetic correction. Revertant mosaicism has been observed in several inherited conditions, including epidermolysis bullosa, a heterogeneous group of blistering skin disorders. These diseases provide a useful model for studying revertant mosaicism because of the visual and accessible nature of skin. This overview highlights the latest developments in revertant mosaicism and the translational implications germane to heritable skin disorders. PMID:21195026

  14. [Revertant somatic mosaicism in primary immunodeficiency diseases].

    PubMed

    Wada, Taizo

    2014-01-01

    Revertant somatic mosaicism has been described in an increasing number of genetic disorders including primary immunodeficiency diseases. Both back mutations leading to restoration of wild-type sequences and second-site mutations resulting in compensatory changes have been demonstrated in mosaic individuals. Recent studies identifying revertant somatic mosaicism caused by multiple independent genetic changes further support its frequent occurrence in primary immunodeficiency diseases. Revertant mosaicism acquires a particular clinical relevance because it may lead to selective growth advantage of the corrected cells, resulting in improvement of disease symptoms or atypical clinical presentations. This phenomenon also provides us unique opportunities to evaluate the biological effects of restored gene expression in different cell lineages. Here we review the recent findings of revertant somatic mosaicism in primary immunodeficiency diseases and discuss its clinical implications.

  15. Miglustat Reverts the Impairment of Synaptic Plasticity in a Mouse Model of NPC Disease

    PubMed Central

    D'Arcangelo, G.; Grossi, D.; Racaniello, M.; Cardinale, A.; Zaratti, A.; Rufini, S.; Cutarelli, A.; Tancredi, V.; Merlo, D.; Frank, C.

    2016-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C disease is an autosomal recessive storage disorder, characterized by abnormal sequestration of unesterified cholesterol within the late endolysosomal compartment of cells and accumulation of gangliosides and other sphingolipids. Progressive neurological deterioration and insurgence of symptoms like ataxia, seizure, and cognitive decline until severe dementia are pathognomonic features of the disease. Here, we studied synaptic plasticity phenomena and evaluated ERKs activation in the hippocampus of BALB/c NPC1−/− mice, a well described animal model of the disease. Our results demonstrated an impairment of both induction and maintenance of long term synaptic potentiation in NPC1−/− mouse slices, associated with the lack of ERKs phosphorylation. We then investigated the effects of Miglustat, a recent approved drug for the treatment of NPCD. We found that in vivo Miglustat administration in NPC1−/− mice was able to rescue synaptic plasticity deficits, to restore ERKs activation and to counteract hyperexcitability. Overall, these data indicate that Miglustat may be effective for treating the neurological deficits associated with NPCD, such as seizures and dementia. PMID:26885401

  16. Diseases associated with genomic imprinting.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Jon F; Úbeda, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is the phenomenon where the expression of a locus differs between the maternally and paternally inherited alleles. Typically, this manifests as transcriptional silencing of one of the alleles, although many genes are imprinted in a tissue- or isoform-specific manner. Diseases associated with imprinted genes include various cancers, disorders of growth and metabolism, and disorders in neurodevelopment, cognition, and behavior, including certain major psychiatric disorders. In many cases, the disease phenotypes associated with dysfunction at particular imprinted loci can be understood in terms of the evolutionary processes responsible for the origin of imprinting. Imprinted gene expression represents the outcome of an intragenomic evolutionary conflict, where natural selection favors different expression strategies for maternally and paternally inherited alleles. This conflict is reasonably well understood in the context of the early growth effects of imprinted genes, where paternally inherited alleles are selected to place a greater demand on maternal resources than are maternally inherited alleles. Less well understood are the origins of imprinted gene expression in the brain, and their effects on cognition and behavior. This chapter reviews the genetic diseases that are associated with imprinted genes, framed in terms of the evolutionary pressures acting on gene expression at those loci. We begin by reviewing the phenomenon and evolutionary origins of genomic imprinting. We then discuss diseases that are associated with genetic or epigenetic defects at particular imprinted loci, many of which are associated with abnormalities in growth and/or feeding behaviors that can be understood in terms of the asymmetric pressures of natural selection on maternally and paternally inherited alleles. We next described the evidence for imprinted gene effects on adult cognition and behavior, and the possible role of imprinted genes in the etiology of certain

  17. Multiple Cationic Amphiphiles Induce a Niemann-Pick C Phenotype and Inhibit Ebola Virus Entry and Infection

    PubMed Central

    Shoemaker, Charles J.; Schornberg, Kathryn L.; Delos, Sue E.; Scully, Corinne; Pajouhesh, Hassan; Olinger, Gene G.; Johansen, Lisa M.; White, Judith M.

    2013-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) is an enveloped RNA virus that causes hemorrhagic fever in humans and non-human primates. Infection requires internalization from the cell surface and trafficking to a late endocytic compartment, where viral fusion occurs, providing a conduit for the viral genome to enter the cytoplasm and initiate replication. In a concurrent study, we identified clomiphene as a potent inhibitor of EBOV entry. Here, we screened eleven inhibitors that target the same biosynthetic pathway as clomiphene. From this screen we identified six compounds, including U18666A, that block EBOV infection (IC50 1.6 to 8.0 µM) at a late stage of entry. Intriguingly, all six are cationic amphiphiles that share additional chemical features. U18666A induces phenotypes, including cholesterol accumulation in endosomes, associated with defects in Niemann–Pick C1 protein (NPC1), a late endosomal and lysosomal protein required for EBOV entry. We tested and found that all six EBOV entry inhibitors from our screen induced cholesterol accumulation. We further showed that higher concentrations of cationic amphiphiles are required to inhibit EBOV entry into cells that overexpress NPC1 than parental cells, supporting the contention that they inhibit EBOV entry in an NPC1-dependent manner. A previously reported inhibitor, compound 3.47, inhibits EBOV entry by blocking binding of the EBOV glycoprotein to NPC1. None of the cationic amphiphiles tested had this effect. Hence, multiple cationic amphiphiles (including several FDA approved agents) inhibit EBOV entry in an NPC1-dependent fashion, but by a mechanism distinct from that of compound 3.47. Our findings suggest that there are minimally two ways of perturbing NPC1-dependent pathways that can block EBOV entry, increasing the attractiveness of NPC1 as an anti-filoviral therapeutic target. PMID:23441171

  18. Extinction Partially Reverts Structural Changes Associated with Remote Fear Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vetere, Gisella; Restivo, Leonardo; Novembre, Giovanni; Aceti, Massimiliano; Lumaca, Massimo; Ammassari-Teule, Martine

    2011-01-01

    Structural synaptic changes occur in medial prefrontal cortex circuits during remote memory formation. Whether extinction reverts or further reshapes these circuits is, however, unknown. Here we show that the number and the size of spines were enhanced in anterior cingulate (aCC) and infralimbic (ILC) cortices 36 d following contextual fear…

  19. E-SMARRT: Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology

    SciTech Connect

    2004-11-01

    This factsheet describes the Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT) program developed by Advanced Technology Institute (ATI). E-SMARRT is a balanced portfolio of projects to address energy-saving opportunities in the metalcasting industry.

  20. A vortex venturi for reverting antimisting fuel properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szetela, E. J.; Tevelde, J.

    1983-01-01

    The level of degradation of antimisting fuel polymers such as FM-9 which must be accomplished in order to use antimisting fuel in existing engines may require the use of cavitation. The hydrodynamic shear produced by the collapse of vapor bubbles is capable of producing more splitting of polymeric molecules than mechanically-induced shear. A program has been carried out to investigate the possibility of using a cavitating venturi with rotating flow as a fuel reverter. This investigation included the effects of a swirl-inducing twisted tape upstream of the throat, inlet pressure, recovery pressure ratio and a pintle for varying throat area. A correlation of the data was produced, system concepts for using the vortex venturi were investigated and problem areas were delineated.

  1. Salvaging ruins: reverting blind retinas into functional visual sensors.

    PubMed

    Mutter, Marion; Swietek, Natalia; Münch, Thomas A

    2014-01-01

    Blindness is one of the most devastating conditions affecting the quality of life. Hereditary degenerative diseases, such as retinitis pigmentosa, are characterized by the progressive loss of photoreceptors, leading to complete blindness. No treatment is known, the current state-of-the-art of restoring vision are implanted electrode arrays. As a recently discovered alternative, optical neuromodulators, such as channelrhodopsin, allow new strategies for treating these diseases by imparting light-sensitivity onto the remaining retinal neurons after photoreceptor cell death. Retinal degeneration is a heterogeneous set of diseases with diverse secondary effects on the retinal circuitry. Successful treatment strategies have to take into account this diversity, as only the existing retinal hardware can serve as substrate for optogenetic intervention. The goal is to salvage the retinal ruins and to revert the leftover tissue into a functional visual sensor that operates as optimally as possible. Here, we discuss three different successful approaches that have been applied to degenerated mouse retina.

  2. Biomedical Information Extraction: Mining Disease Associated Genes from Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Disease associated gene discovery is a critical step to realize the future of personalized medicine. However empirical and clinical validation of disease associated genes are time consuming and expensive. In silico discovery of disease associated genes from literature is therefore becoming the first essential step for biomarker discovery to…

  3. Glucocorticoid receptor antagonism reverts docetaxel resistance in human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kroon, Jan; Puhr, Martin; Buijs, Jeroen T; van der Horst, Geertje; Hemmer, Daniëlle M; Marijt, Koen A; Hwang, Ming S; Masood, Motasim; Grimm, Stefan; Storm, Gert; Metselaar, Josbert M; Meijer, Onno C; Culig, Zoran; van der Pluijm, Gabri

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to docetaxel is a major clinical problem in advanced prostate cancer (PCa). Although glucocorticoids (GCs) are frequently used in combination with docetaxel, it is unclear to what extent GCs and their receptor, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), contribute to the chemotherapy resistance. In this study, we aim to elucidate the role of the GR in docetaxel-resistant PCa in order to improve the current PCa therapies. GR expression was analyzed in a tissue microarray of primary PCa specimens from chemonaive and docetaxel-treated patients, and in cultured PCa cell lines with an acquired docetaxel resistance (PC3-DR, DU145-DR, and 22Rv1-DR). We found a robust overexpression of the GR in primary PCa from docetaxel-treated patients and enhanced GR levels in cultured docetaxel-resistant human PCa cells, indicating a key role of the GR in docetaxel resistance. The capability of the GR antagonists (RU-486 and cyproterone acetate) to revert docetaxel resistance was investigated and revealed significant resensitization of docetaxel-resistant PCa cells for docetaxel treatment in a dose- and time-dependent manner, in which a complete restoration of docetaxel sensitivity was achieved in both androgen receptor (AR)-negative and AR-positive cell lines. Mechanistically, we demonstrated down-regulation of Bcl-xL and Bcl-2 upon GR antagonism, thereby defining potential treatment targets. In conclusion, we describe the involvement of the GR in the acquisition of docetaxel resistance in human PCa. Therapeutic targeting of the GR effectively resensitizes docetaxel-resistant PCa cells. These findings warrant further investigation of the clinical utility of the GR antagonists in the management of patients with advanced and docetaxel-resistant PCa.

  4. Diagnosis of Niemann-Pick disease type C with 7-ketocholesterol screening followed by NPC1/NPC2 gene mutation confirmation in Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It has been reported that oxidation product of cholesterol, 7-ketocholesterol, increases in plasma of patients with NP-C. Previously, we established a rapid test to determine the plasma 7-ketocholesterol level and found it elevated significantly in patients with acid sphingomyelinase deficient NPD and NP-C disease. Methods Individuals randomly referred to our outpatient clinics in the past two years for hepatosplenomegaly or isolated splenomegaly, who have been excluded as acid sphingomyelinase deficient NPD or Gaucher disease, and individuals with newborn cholestasis, psychomotor regression/retardation, were screened for plasma 7-ketocholesterol level. Individuals with high 7-ketocholesterol level were then analyzed for NPC1 and NPC2 gene mutation to confirm the accuracy of NP-C diagnosis. Results By screening the plasma 7-ketocholesterol of suspect individuals, 12 out of 302 (4%) had shown remarkable high levels compared with reference. All these twelve individuals were subsequently confirmed to be NP-C by DNA analysis of NPC1 and NPC2 genes, with the early infantile form (n = 7), the late infantile form (n = 1), the juvenile form (n = 1) and the adult form (n = 1). Furthermore, two NP-C patients without observable neuropsychiatric disability were picked up through this procedure. Only one patient had NP-C due to NPC2 gene mutations, with the rest due to NPC1 gene mutations. We found that in NP-C patients AST was usually mildly elevated and ALT was in a normal range when jaundice was not present. In total, 22 mutant alleles were identified in the NPC1 gene, including six novel small deletions/insertions, e.g., c.416_417insC, c.1030delT, c.1800delC, c.2230_2231delGT, c.2302_2303insG, and c.2795dupA; seven novel exonic point mutations, c.1502A>T (p.D501V), c.1553G>A (p.R518Q), c.1832A>G (p.D611G), c.2054T>C (p.I685T), c.2128C>T(p.Q710X), c.2177G>C (p.R726T), c.2366G>A (p.R789H), and one novel intronic mutation c.2912-3C>G. Small deletions/insertions constituted nearly half of the mutant alleles (10/22, 45%), indicating a unique mutation spectrum in this cohort of Chinese NP-C patients. Conclusion Our data confirm in a clinical setting that screening plasma 7-ketocholesterol is an efficient and practical diagnostic tool to identify NP-C patients from suspect individuals. Patients without neuropsychological involvement could also be identified by this method therefore allowing an opportunity for earlier treatment. PMID:24915861

  5. Structures of revertant signal sequences of Escherichia coli ribose binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Chi, S W; Yi, G S; Suh, J Y; Choi, B S; Kim, H

    1995-01-01

    Recently we reported (Yi et al., 1994) that the alpha-helical content of the signal peptide of Escherichia coli ribose binding protein, when determined by circular dichroism (CD) and two-dimensional NMR in trifluoroethanol/water solvent, is higher than that of its nonfunctional mutant signal peptide. In the present investigation, the structures of the signal peptides of two revertant ribose binding proteins in the same solvent were also determined with CD and two-dimensional 1H NMR spectroscopy. According to the CD results, both of these revertant signal peptides showed an intermediate helicity between those of wild-type and mutant signal peptides, the helical content of the revertant peptide with higher recovery of the translocation capability being higher. On the other hand, the alpha-helix regions of the wild-type and the revertant peptides as determined by NMR were shown to be the same. This discrepancy may be due to the difference in stability between identical alpha-helical stretches in wild-type and revertant peptides. A good correlation was observed between the helical content of these four ribose binding protein signal peptides in TFE/water as studied by CD and their in vivo translocation activities. It appears, therefore, that both the proper length of the helix and the stability are of functional significance. PMID:8599676

  6. Structure and properties of carburized coatings with reverted austenite on low-carbon martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. S.; Kokovyakina, S. A.; Pertsev, A. S.

    2011-03-01

    The process of creation and subsequent hardening of a gradient carburized layer in low-carbon martensitic steel 17Kh2G2NMFTB is studied. It is shown that the structure and properties of the carburized layer can be optimized due to formation of reverted austenite hardened by quenching from the intercritical temperature range.

  7. About Reverted Austenite in Carburized Layers of Low-Carbon Martensitic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. S.; Bogdanova, M. V.; Vylezhnev, V. P.

    2015-05-01

    Processes of surface hardening in low-carbon martensitic steel 24Kh2G2NMFTB under carburizing and subsequent quenching from the intercritical temperature range are studied. Special features of formation of reverted austenite with high strength and stability are considered.

  8. Influence of reverted austenite on the texture and magnetic properties of 350 maraging steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, Hamilton F. G.; Silva, Jean J.; Silva, Manoel R.; Gomes da Silva, Marcelo J.

    2015-11-01

    The aging temperature to improve magnetic properties in Maraging-350 steel (Mar-350) is limited by the onset of austenite reversion. The traditional process of cooling after aging is to remove the piece from the oven and then to air cool it. The purpose of this research was to characterize the reverted austenite and to investigate the effect of cooling below the martensite start temperature (Ms) on the magnetic properties. The Mar350 samples aged at temperatures above 550 °C, and subsequently cooled in liquid nitrogen presented less austenite than samples cooled in air, resulting in higher magnetization saturation and a lower coercive force. A combination of optical microscopy (OM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) techniques were used to characterize the presence of reverted austenite. The crystallographic texture of both martensite and reverted austenite were analyzed. The texture of the reverted austenite coincides with the texture of the parent austenite indicating that a phenomenon of texture memory is present.

  9. Coumarin derivatives as potential antitumor agents: Growth inhibition, apoptosis induction and multidrug resistance reverting activity.

    PubMed

    Bisi, Alessandra; Cappadone, Concettina; Rampa, Angela; Farruggia, Giovanna; Sargenti, Azzurra; Belluti, Federica; Di Martino, Rita M C; Malucelli, Emil; Meluzzi, Alessia; Iotti, Stefano; Gobbi, Silvia

    2017-02-15

    A small library of coumarins, carrying butynyl-amino chains, was synthesized continuing our studies in the field of MDR reverting ageEnts and in order to obtain multipotent agents to combat malignancies. In particular, the reported anticancer and chemopreventive natural product 7-isopentenyloxycoumarin was linked to different terminal amines, selected on the basis of our previously reported results. The anticancer behaviour and the MDR reverting ability of the new compounds were evaluated on human colon cancer cells, particularly prone to develop the MDR phenotype. Some of the new derivatives showed promising effects, directly acting as cytotoxic compounds and/or counteracting MDR phenomenon. Compound 1e emerged as the most interesting of this series, showing a multipotent biological profile and suggesting that conjugation of an appropriate coumarin core with a properly selected butynyl-amino chain allows to obtain novel hybrid molecules endowed with improved in vitro antitumor activity.

  10. Sedimentary bed evolution as a mean-reverting random walk: Implications for tracer statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Raleigh L.; Purohit, Prashant K.; Jerolmack, Douglas J.

    2014-09-01

    Sediment tracers are increasingly employed to estimate bed load transport and landscape evolution rates. Tracer trajectories are dominated by periods of immobility ("waiting times") as they are buried and reexcavated in the stochastically evolving river bed. Here we model bed evolution as a random walk with mean-reverting tendency (Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process) originating from the restoring effect of erosion and deposition. The Ornstein-Uhlenbeck model contains two parameters, a and b, related to the particle feed rate and range of bed elevation fluctuations, respectively. Observations of bed evolution in flume experiments agree with model predictions; in particular, the model reproduces the asymptotic t-1 tail in the tracer waiting time exceedance probability distribution. This waiting time distribution is similar to that inferred for tracers in natural gravel streams and avalanching rice piles, indicating applicability of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck mean-reverting model to many disordered transport systems with tracer burial and excavation.

  11. Non-invasive Brain Stimulation, a Tool to Revert Maladaptive Plasticity in Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Naro, Antonino; Milardi, Demetrio; Russo, Margherita; Terranova, Carmen; Rizzo, Vincenzo; Cacciola, Alberto; Marino, Silvia; Calabro, Rocco S.; Quartarone, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Neuromodulatory effects of non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) have been extensively studied in chronic pain. A hypothetic mechanism of action would be to prevent or revert the ongoing maladaptive plasticity within the pain matrix. In this review, the authors discuss the mechanisms underlying the development of maladaptive plasticity in patients with chronic pain and the putative mechanisms of NIBS in modulating synaptic plasticity in neuropathic pain conditions. PMID:27512368

  12. Isolation and characterization of flat revertant cell lines from A-MuLV-transformed fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Glass, D J; Rees-Jones, R W; Goff, S P

    1990-01-01

    Transformation of lymphoid and fibroblastic cells by Abelson murine leukemia virus (A-MuLV) is mediated by the viral tyrosine protein kinase. We do not yet know the important target proteins in the cell, the host proteins that modulate the kinase activity, or the host proteins involved in the signal-transduction pathway ultimately leading to altered patterns of cell growth. As a first step toward identifying these host proteins, we have isolated and characterized several flat revertant cell lines from transformed lines carrying v-abl. Clonal transformed cell lines used as parental strains were prepared by infecting Rat-2 fibroblasts with A-MuLV, using M-MuLV as helper. A rhodamine dye screening procedure was used to obtain three clones of morphologically flat revertant cells. Each of the three lines was non-refractile and contact inhibited. All the lines retained a transformation-competent copy of A-MuLV; all released high titers of virus capable of inducing foci on previously uninfected Rat-2 cells. Analyses of the revertant lines suggest that diverse mechanisms can lead to loss of transformed morphology.

  13. The National Tay Sachs and Allied Diseases Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeitlin, Paula

    1986-01-01

    The National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association is involved in education, research, and prevention of Tay-Sachs, an inherited metabolic disorder which destroys the central nervous system, and over 30 related disorders. The group features a parent peer group network and a support group for carrier couples. (CL)

  14. National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association, Inc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Reviewed are the history and organization, purpose and programs, and public services of the National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association, an organization geared toward eradicating Tay-Sachs disease (a hereditary disorder affecting primarily Jewish infants which generally leads to deterioration and death by the child's fifth year). (SBH)

  15. 59 FR- Disease Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1994-02-03

    ... Vietnam era and the subsequent development of Hodgkin's disease and porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT). The... consistent with chloracne Hodgkin's disease Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma Porphyria cutanea tarda Soft-tissue... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 3 RIN 2900-AG69 Disease Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents...

  16. PBHMDA: Path-Based Human Microbe-Disease Association Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhi-An; Chen, Xing; Zhu, Zexuan; Liu, Hongsheng; Yan, Gui-Ying; You, Zhu-Hong; Wen, Zhenkun

    2017-01-01

    With the advance of sequencing technology and microbiology, the microorganisms have been found to be closely related to various important human diseases. The increasing identification of human microbe-disease associations offers important insights into the underlying disease mechanism understanding from the perspective of human microbes, which are greatly helpful for investigating pathogenesis, promoting early diagnosis and improving precision medicine. However, the current knowledge in this domain is still limited and far from complete. Here, we present the computational model of Path-Based Human Microbe-Disease Association prediction (PBHMDA) based on the integration of known microbe-disease associations and the Gaussian interaction profile kernel similarity for microbes and diseases. A special depth-first search algorithm was implemented to traverse all possible paths between microbes and diseases for inferring the most possible disease-related microbes. As a result, PBHMDA obtained a reliable prediction performance with AUCs (The area under ROC curve) of 0.9169 and 0.8767 in the frameworks of both global and local leave-one-out cross validations, respectively. Based on 5-fold cross validation, average AUCs of 0.9082 ± 0.0061 further demonstrated the efficiency of the proposed model. For the case studies of liver cirrhosis, type 1 diabetes, and asthma, 9, 7, and 9 out of predicted microbes in the top 10 have been confirmed by previously published experimental literatures, respectively. We have publicly released the prioritized microbe-disease associations, which may help to select the most potential pairs for further guiding the experimental confirmation. In conclusion, PBHMDA may have potential to boost the discovery of novel microbe-disease associations and aid future research efforts toward microbe involvement in human disease mechanism. The code and data of PBHMDA is freely available at http://www.escience.cn/system/file?fileId=85214. PMID:28275370

  17. PBHMDA: Path-Based Human Microbe-Disease Association Prediction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhi-An; Chen, Xing; Zhu, Zexuan; Liu, Hongsheng; Yan, Gui-Ying; You, Zhu-Hong; Wen, Zhenkun

    2017-01-01

    With the advance of sequencing technology and microbiology, the microorganisms have been found to be closely related to various important human diseases. The increasing identification of human microbe-disease associations offers important insights into the underlying disease mechanism understanding from the perspective of human microbes, which are greatly helpful for investigating pathogenesis, promoting early diagnosis and improving precision medicine. However, the current knowledge in this domain is still limited and far from complete. Here, we present the computational model of Path-Based Human Microbe-Disease Association prediction (PBHMDA) based on the integration of known microbe-disease associations and the Gaussian interaction profile kernel similarity for microbes and diseases. A special depth-first search algorithm was implemented to traverse all possible paths between microbes and diseases for inferring the most possible disease-related microbes. As a result, PBHMDA obtained a reliable prediction performance with AUCs (The area under ROC curve) of 0.9169 and 0.8767 in the frameworks of both global and local leave-one-out cross validations, respectively. Based on 5-fold cross validation, average AUCs of 0.9082 ± 0.0061 further demonstrated the efficiency of the proposed model. For the case studies of liver cirrhosis, type 1 diabetes, and asthma, 9, 7, and 9 out of predicted microbes in the top 10 have been confirmed by previously published experimental literatures, respectively. We have publicly released the prioritized microbe-disease associations, which may help to select the most potential pairs for further guiding the experimental confirmation. In conclusion, PBHMDA may have potential to boost the discovery of novel microbe-disease associations and aid future research efforts toward microbe involvement in human disease mechanism. The code and data of PBHMDA is freely available at http://www.escience.cn/system/file?fileId=85214.

  18. Flagellar mutants of Chlamydomonas: Studies of radial spoke-defective strains by dikaryon and revertant analysis

    PubMed Central

    Luck, David; Piperno, Gianni; Ramanis, Zenta; Huang, B.

    1977-01-01

    The motility mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii pf14 lacks radial spoke structures in its flagellar axonemes, and 12 proteins present in wild type are missing from a two-dimensional map (isoelectrofocusing/sodium dodecyl sulfate electrophoresis) of its 35S-labeled flagellar proteins. Six of these same proteins are missing in pf1, which lacks spoke-heads. To determine whether any of the missing proteins represent the mutant gene product two experimental approaches have been applied. The first makes use of the fact that gametes of either mutant strain when fused with wild-type gametes to form quadriflagellate dikaryons undergo recovery of flagellar function. Recovery at the molecular level was monitored by prelabeling the mutant proteins with 35S and allowing recovery to occur in the absence of protein synthesis. It is to be expected that the mutant gene product would not be restored as a radioactive protein and that recovery would depend on the assembly of the wild-type counterpart that is not labeled. The second technique makes use of revertants induced by UV irradiation. Dikaryon rescue in the case of pf14 leads to restoration of 11 radioactive components; only protein 3 fails to appear as a radioactive spot. For pf1 only two radioactive proteins are restored; proteins 4, 6, 9, and 10 were not radioactive. Analysis of revertants of pf1 gave evidence (altered map positions) that protein 4 is the mutant gene product. In the case of pf14, analysis of 22 revertants has not provided similar positive evidence that protein 3 is the gene product. Images PMID:269405

  19. Inferring drug-disease associations based on known protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Liang; Huang, Jianbin; Ma, Zhixin; Zhang, Jing; Zou, Yapeng; Gao, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Inferring drug-disease associations is critical in unveiling disease mechanisms, as well as discovering novel functions of available drugs, or drug repositioning. Previous work is primarily based on drug-gene-disease relationship, which throws away many important information since genes execute their functions through interacting others. To overcome this issue, we propose a novel methodology that discover the drug-disease association based on protein complexes. Firstly, the integrated heterogeneous network consisting of drugs, protein complexes, and disease are constructed, where we assign weights to the drug-disease association by using probability. Then, from the tripartite network, we get the indirect weighted relationships between drugs and diseases. The larger the weight, the higher the reliability of the correlation. We apply our method to mental disorders and hypertension, and validate the result by using comparative toxicogenomics database. Our ranked results can be directly reinforced by existing biomedical literature, suggesting that our proposed method obtains higher specificity and sensitivity. The proposed method offers new insight into drug-disease discovery. Our method is publicly available at http://1.complexdrug.sinaapp.com/Drug_Complex_Disease/Data_Download.html.

  20. Characterization of Disease-Associated Mutations in Human Transmembrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Molnár, János; Szakács, Gergely; Tusnády, Gábor E.

    2016-01-01

    Transmembrane protein coding genes are commonly associated with human diseases. We characterized disease causing mutations and natural polymorphisms in transmembrane proteins by mapping missense genetic variations from the UniProt database on the transmembrane protein topology listed in the Human Transmembrane Proteome database. We found characteristic differences in the spectrum of amino acid changes within transmembrane regions: in the case of disease associated mutations the non-polar to non-polar and non-polar to charged amino acid changes are equally frequent. In contrast, in the case of natural polymorphisms non-polar to charged amino acid changes are rare while non-polar to non-polar changes are common. The majority of disease associated mutations result in glycine to arginine and leucine to proline substitutions. Mutations to positively charged amino acids are more common in the center of the lipid bilayer, where they cause more severe structural and functional anomalies. Our analysis contributes to the better understanding of the effect of disease associated mutations in transmembrane proteins, which can help prioritize genetic variations in personal genomic investigations. PMID:26986070

  1. Inferring drug-disease associations based on known protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Inferring drug-disease associations is critical in unveiling disease mechanisms, as well as discovering novel functions of available drugs, or drug repositioning. Previous work is primarily based on drug-gene-disease relationship, which throws away many important information since genes execute their functions through interacting others. To overcome this issue, we propose a novel methodology that discover the drug-disease association based on protein complexes. Firstly, the integrated heterogeneous network consisting of drugs, protein complexes, and disease are constructed, where we assign weights to the drug-disease association by using probability. Then, from the tripartite network, we get the indirect weighted relationships between drugs and diseases. The larger the weight, the higher the reliability of the correlation. We apply our method to mental disorders and hypertension, and validate the result by using comparative toxicogenomics database. Our ranked results can be directly reinforced by existing biomedical literature, suggesting that our proposed method obtains higher specificity and sensitivity. The proposed method offers new insight into drug-disease discovery. Our method is publicly available at http://1.complexdrug.sinaapp.com/Drug_Complex_Disease/Data_Download.html. PMID:26044949

  2. Formation and Growth Kinetics of Reverted Austenite During Tempering of a High Co-Ni Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, Marina; Ressel, Gerald; Méndez Martín, Francisca; Ploberger, Sarah; Marsoner, Stefan; Ebner, Reinhold

    2016-12-01

    It is well known that high Co-Ni steels exhibit excellent toughness. Since the good toughness in these steels is supposed to be related to thin layers of austenite between martensite crystals, this work presents an experimental study corroborated with diffusional calculations to characterize the evolution of reverted austenite. Atom probe measurements were conducted for analyzing the element distribution in austenite and martensite during tempering. These results were correlated with crystallographic information, which was obtained by using transmission electron microscopy investigations. Additionally, the experimental findings were compared with kinetic calculations with DICTRA™. The investigations reveal that reverted austenite formation during tempering is connected with a redistribution of Ni, Co, Cr, and Mo atoms. The austenite undergoes a Ni and Cr enrichment and a Co depletion, while in the neighboring martensite, a zone of Ni and Cr depletion and Co enrichment is formed. The changes in the chemical composition of austenite during tempering affect the stability of the austenite against phase transformation to martensite during plastic deformation and have thus decisive influence on the toughness of the material.

  3. [Crohn's disease associated with Berger's disease. A rare complication].

    PubMed

    López Barbarín, J M; Lafuente Martínez, P; García Campos, F; Ibarra Peña, B; Díaz de Otazu, R

    1990-10-01

    We report the case of a male patient with Crohn's disease associated with IgA nephropathy. He was treated surgically for the intestinal disorder and then with corticoids and sulfasalazine. Six years after treatment the patient was asymptomatic. As the intestinal situation improved there was concomitant normalization of urinary sediment, maintaining renal function. The fact that the digestive mucosa is one of the body's major sources of secretory IgA may account for the existence of a common for Crohn's disease and certain forms of IgA nephropathy.

  4. A highly sensitive mean-reverting process in finance and the Euler-Maruyama approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fuke; Mao, Xuerong; Chen, Kan

    2008-12-01

    Empirical studies show that the most successful continuous-time models of the short-term rate in capturing the dynamics are those that allow the volatility of interest changes to be highly sensitive to the level of the rate. However, from the mathematics, the high sensitivity to the level implies that the coefficients do not satisfy the linear growth condition, so we can not examine its properties by traditional techniques. This paper overcomes the mathematical difficulties due to the nonlinear growth and examines its analytical properties and the convergence of numerical solutions in probability. The convergence result can be used to justify the method within Monte Carlo simulations that compute the expected payoff of financial productsE For illustration, we apply our results compute the value of a bond with interest rate given by the highly sensitive mean-reverting process as well as the value of a single barrier call option with the asset price governed by this process.

  5. Tenofovir-induced Fanconi syndrome in chronic hepatitis B monoinfected patients that reverted after tenofovir withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Viganò, Mauro; Brocchieri, Alessandra; Spinetti, Angiola; Zaltron, Serena; Mangia, Giampaolo; Facchetti, Floriana; Fugazza, Alessandro; Castelli, Francesco; Colombo, Massimo; Lampertico, Pietro

    2014-12-01

    Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) is a nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor widely used to treat patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Despite the excellent safety records of this regimen, a few cases of acute renal failure and Fanconi syndrome have been reported among HIV patients exposed to TDF. In the HBV monoinfection scenario, only two cases of TDF-associated Fanconi syndrome have been reported thus far. Here, we describe two additional patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) who developed a TDF-induced Fanconi syndrome that reverted after TDF withdrawal and had viral replication fully suppressed upon switching to entecavir (ETV). Though the overall risk of TDF associated severe renal toxicity in HBV patients appears to be negligible, both glomerular and tubular function should be monitored in patients exposed to TDF, especially when other renal risk factors or a history of previous exposure to adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) are present.

  6. Seminal plasma proteins interacting with sperm surface revert capacitation indicators in frozen-thawed ram sperm.

    PubMed

    Ledesma, Alba; Fernández-Alegre, Estela; Cano, Adriana; Hozbor, Federico; Martínez-Pastor, Felipe; Cesari, Andreína

    2016-10-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of interacting seminal plasma proteins (iSPP) obtained by AV or EE on frozen-thawed ram sperm in order to test the hypothesis whether this fraction could be sufficient to emulate the effect of complete seminal plasma (SP). Additionally, we evaluated whether these proteins have a differential effect between spermatozoa from high and low fertility rams and between breeding and non-breeding seasons. We assessed sperm motility, quality parameters (intracellular reactive oxygen species, membrane fluidity, plasma membrane permeability and mitochondrial activity) and capacitation status. The main findings from this work were: i) iSPP had no effect on sperm motility, whereas SP (AV or EE) addition produced the highest values of total motility (74.13±2.99 and 72.27±2.99 for AV and EE, respectively) and progressive motility (64.97±2.64 and 63.73±2.64 for AV and EE, respectively); ii) iSPP had no effect on sperm quality parameters (p>0.05), but whole SP improved all parameters evaluated. Moreover, SP collected by AV yielded significantly higher viability (44.60±2.87) and sperm with stable plasma membrane (44.56±2.49) comparing with the addition of SP collected by EE (35.80±2.47 and 36.67±1.71, respectively); iii) iSPP and SP collected by EE, but not by AV, reverted molecular signals of capacitation as protein tyrosine phosphorylation caused by freezing temperatures; iv) there were no effects of fertility or season in sperm quality parameters evaluated. This study demonstrated that, although the iSPP have a clear decapacitating effect, including the ability to revert cryo-capacitation indicators, they are not sufficient to emulate the effects of complete SP regarding sperm functional parameters.

  7. Higher risk of progression to dementia in mild cognitive impairment cases who revert to normal

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Rosebud O.; Knopman, David S.; Mielke, Michelle M.; Cha, Ruth H.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Christianson, Teresa J.H.; Geda, Yonas E.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Ivnik, Robert J.; Tangalos, Eric G.; Rocca, Walter A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To estimate rates of progression from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to dementia and of reversion from MCI to being cognitively normal (CN) in a population-based cohort. Methods: Participants (n = 534, aged 70 years and older) enrolled in the prospective Mayo Clinic Study of Aging were evaluated at baseline and every 15 months to identify incident MCI or dementia. Results: Over a median follow-up of 5.1 years, 153 of 534 participants (28.7%) with prevalent or incident MCI progressed to dementia (71.3 per 1,000 person-years). The cumulative incidence of dementia was 5.4% at 1 year, 16.1% at 2, 23.4% at 3, 31.1% at 4, and 42.5% at 5 years. The risk of dementia was elevated in MCI cases (hazard ratio [HR] 23.2, p < 0.001) compared with CN subjects. Thirty-eight percent (n = 201) of MCI participants reverted to CN (175.0/1,000 person-years), but 65% subsequently developed MCI or dementia; the HR was 6.6 (p < 0.001) compared with CN subjects. The risk of reversion was reduced in subjects with an APOE ε4 allele (HR 0.53, p < 0.001), higher Clinical Dementia Rating Scale–Sum of Boxes (HR 0.56, p < 0.001), and poorer cognitive function (HR 0.56, p < 0.001). The risk was also reduced in subjects with amnestic MCI (HR 0.70, p = 0.02) and multidomain MCI (HR 0.61, p = 0.003). Conclusions: MCI cases, including those who revert to CN, have a high risk of progressing to dementia. This suggests that diagnosis of MCI at any time has prognostic value. PMID:24353333

  8. Carbon dynamics on agricultural land reverting to woody land in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Voicu, Mihai F; Shaw, Cindy; Kurz, Werner A; Huffman, Ted; Liu, Jiangui; Fellows, Max

    2017-02-21

    The 2015 Paris Agreement reinforces the importance of the land sector and its contribution to greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions. Thus, there is growing interest in improving estimates of the GHG balance in response to land-use changes (LUCs) involving agriculture and forestry, for national-scale reporting, and for carbon (C) offsets. Large agricultural areas in Europe, Russia and North America are reverting to forest, either naturally or through planting, after abandonment of agricultural land, and this trend may have a substantial impact on carbon budgets. We report results of a pilot project in the Mixedwood Plains ecozone of eastern Canada to analyze the change in the C budget on a landscape over 15 years on abandoned cropland where woody vegetation is regenerating. Thirty-six plots (2 km × 2 km) with paired aerial photographs taken circa 1994 and circa 2008 at a scale of 1:10,000 or larger were randomly selected from the 20 km × 20 km National Forest Inventory (NFI) grid. A spatially-explicit version of the Carbon Budget Model of the Canadian Forest Sector (CBM-CFS3) was used to estimate impacts of LUC on C stocks and fluxes. Polygons identifying areas of LUC within each photo plot were delineated, classified, and evaluated to provide input data for the model. The rate of C accumulation in our study area was found to be relatively constant over the entire simulation period, at 1.07 Mg C/ha/yr. Abandoned agricultural land reverting to woody lands could play an important role in regional and national C sequestration in Canada, but more research is required to quantify the areal extent of this LUC.

  9. Collective judgment predicts disease-associated single nucleotide variants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In recent years the number of human genetic variants deposited into the publicly available databases has been increasing exponentially. The latest version of dbSNP, for example, contains ~50 million validated Single Nucleotide Variants (SNVs). SNVs make up most of human variation and are often the primary causes of disease. The non-synonymous SNVs (nsSNVs) result in single amino acid substitutions and may affect protein function, often causing disease. Although several methods for the detection of nsSNV effects have already been developed, the consistent increase in annotated data is offering the opportunity to improve prediction accuracy. Results Here we present a new approach for the detection of disease-associated nsSNVs (Meta-SNP) that integrates four existing methods: PANTHER, PhD-SNP, SIFT and SNAP. We first tested the accuracy of each method using a dataset of 35,766 disease-annotated mutations from 8,667 proteins extracted from the SwissVar database. The four methods reached overall accuracies of 64%-76% with a Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.38-0.53. We then used the outputs of these methods to develop a machine learning based approach that discriminates between disease-associated and polymorphic variants (Meta-SNP). In testing, the combined method reached 79% overall accuracy and 0.59 MCC, ~3% higher accuracy and ~0.05 higher correlation with respect to the best-performing method. Moreover, for the hardest-to-define subset of nsSNVs, i.e. variants for which half of the predictors disagreed with the other half, Meta-SNP attained 8% higher accuracy than the best predictor. Conclusions Here we find that the Meta-SNP algorithm achieves better performance than the best single predictor. This result suggests that the methods used for the prediction of variant-disease associations are orthogonal, encoding different biologically relevant relationships. Careful combination of predictions from various resources is therefore a good strategy

  10. Natural antisense transcripts of Alzheimer's disease associated genes.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jin-Hu; Cheng, Hai-Peng; Yu, Long; Zhao, Shouyuan

    2006-04-01

    Natural antisense transcripts (NATs), also named endogenous antisense transcripts, are a class of genes whose role in controlling gene expression is becoming more and more relevant. NATs might play important roles in gene expression and translation regulation. Present work investigated the presence of NATs of Alzheimer's disease associated genes including PRESENILIN1, PRESENILIN2, BACE1, BACE2, APP, APOE, TAU (MAPT), PRION, alpha-SYNUCLEIN (SNCA), NICASTRIN, PEN2, APH1A, APH1B as well as CD147 (BASIGIN), and the results revealed that APP, BACE2, APH1A, TAU, CD147 and alpha-SYNUCLEIN contain natural antisense transcripts. These NATs were characterized according to the sense-antisense overlapping information and potential functional mechanisms were proposed. Present findings provide preliminary but important information about transcription regulation of AD associated genes, which would further our understanding of the gene expression regulation of AD, and also suggest a novel potential strategy for the therapy of AD.

  11. The pathogenesis of Hirschsprung's disease-associated enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Austin, Kelly Miller

    2012-11-01

    Hirschsprung's disease-associated enterocolitis (HAEC) remains the most life-threatening complication in Hirschsprung disease (HD) patients. The pathogenesis of HAEC has not been determined and many hypotheses regarding the etiology of HAEC have been proposed. These include a possible causal relationship between the abnormal enteric nervous system development in HD and the development of enterocolitis. Based on the complex genetic causes of HD that have been discovered and the resultant heterogeneous group of patients that exists, the causes of HAEC are likely multiple. New insights regarding the relationship of the role of the enteric nervous system and its interaction between intestinal barrier function, innate host immunity, and commensal microflora have been discovered, which may shed light on this perplexing problem. This review presents current known risk factors of HAEC and the proposed theories and supporting evidence for the potential etiologies of HAEC.

  12. Neurological diseases associated with viral and Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections

    PubMed Central

    Assaad, F.; Gispen, R.; Kleemola, M.; Syrůček, L.; Esteves, K.

    1980-01-01

    In 1963 the World Health Organization established a system for the collection and dissemination of information on viral infections and by 1976, laboratories in 49 countries were participating in this scheme. The present study is in two parts: part 1 is an analysis of almost 60 000 reports on neurological disease associated with viral and Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections reported during the 10-year period 1967-76. This analysis showed a steady increase in the yearly number of reports of viral neurological diseases, which closely followed the general increase in the overall reporting of virus diseases. Likewise, the seasonal pattern was similar to that seen in general for any given virus. Over 75% of the cases were in children. Over half of all viral neurological diseases were associated with enteroviruses, while the myxoviruses accounted for almost 30%. Among the myxoviruses, mumps virus was by far the most frequently reported. The polioviruses were the agents most commonly detected in cases of paralytic disease. The other enteroviruses, mumps virus, and the herpesviruses were the most frequently reported viruses in cases of aseptic meningitis or encephalitis. On the other hand, one-third to over one-half of the reports on the myxoviruses (excluding mumps and measles) related to ill-defined clinical conditions. Part 2 of the study deals in particular with viruses whose role in neurological disease is less well documented. One laboratory reported an outbreak of adenoviral aseptic meningitis in Czechoslovakia, while another described neurological disease associated with M. pneumoniae infection in Finland. Part 2 also includes a detailed appraisal of viral infections diagnosed in the Netherlands during the period 1973-76. The results are very similar to those routinely reported. PMID:6249511

  13. Disease-associated repeat instability and mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Monika H M; Pearson, Christopher E

    2016-02-01

    Expanded tandem repeat sequences in DNA are associated with at least 40 human genetic neurological, neurodegenerative, and neuromuscular diseases. Repeat expansion can occur during parent-to-offspring transmission, and arise at variable rates in specific tissues throughout the life of an affected individual. Since the ongoing somatic repeat expansions can affect disease age-of-onset, severity, and progression, targeting somatic expansion holds potential as a therapeutic target. Thus, understanding the factors that regulate this mutation is crucial. DNA repair, in particular mismatch repair (MMR), is the major driving force of disease-associated repeat expansions. In contrast to its anti-mutagenic roles, mammalian MMR curiously drives the expansion mutations of disease-associated (CAG)·(CTG) repeats. Recent advances have broadened our knowledge of both the MMR proteins involved in disease repeat expansions, including: MSH2, MSH3, MSH6, MLH1, PMS2, and MLH3, as well as the types of repeats affected by MMR, now including: (CAG)·(CTG), (CGG)·(CCG), and (GAA)·(TTC) repeats. Mutagenic slipped-DNA structures have been detected in patient tissues, and the size of the slip-out and their junction conformation can determine the involvement of MMR. Furthermore, the formation of other unusual DNA and R-loop structures is proposed to play a key role in MMR-mediated instability. A complex correlation is emerging between tissues showing varying amounts of repeat instability and MMR expression levels. Notably, naturally occurring polymorphic variants of DNA repair genes can have dramatic effects upon the levels of repeat instability, which may explain the variation in disease age-of-onset, progression and severity. An increasing grasp of these factors holds prognostic and therapeutic potential.

  14. Frameshift deletions of exons 3-7 and revertant fibers in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: mechanisms of dystrophin production.

    PubMed Central

    Winnard, A V; Mendell, J R; Prior, T W; Florence, J; Burghes, A H

    1995-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients with mutations that disrupt the translational reading frame produce little or no dystrophin. Two exceptions are the deletion of exons 3-7 and the occurrence of rare dystrophin-positive fibers (revertant fibers) in muscle of DMD patients. Antibodies directed against the amino-terminus and the 5' end of exon 8 did not detect dystrophin in muscle from patients who have a deletion of exons 3-7. However, in all cases, dystrophin was detected with an antibody directed against the 3' end of exon 8. The most likely method of dystrophin production in these cases is initiation at a new start codon in exon 8. We also studied two patients who have revertant fibers: one had an inherited duplication of exons 5-7, which, on immunostaining, showed two types of revertant fibers; and the second patient had a 2-bp nonsense mutation in exon 51, which creates a cryptic splice site. An in-frame mRNA that uses this splice site in exon 51 was detected. Immunostaining demonstrated the presence of the 3' end of exon 51, which is in agreement with the use of this mRNA in revertant fibers. The most likely method of dystrophin production in these fibers is a second mutation that restores the reading frame. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7825572

  15. Reformation of leucyl-tRNA synthetase complexes in revertants from CHO mutant tsH1.

    PubMed

    Klekamp, M; Pahuski, E; Hampel, A

    1981-11-01

    A direct correlation was found to exist between increased thermolability of leucyl-tRNA synthetase and loss of the high-molecular-weight enzyme complexes in the CHO cell mutant tsH1 and its revertants. This was shown to occur apart from a differential thermostability between the complexes themselves and is supported by Michaelis constant determinations.

  16. [Identification of a specific protein in flat revertant cell lines derived from ras oncogene-transformed cells].

    PubMed

    Fujita, H

    1990-03-01

    Total proteins from a mouse embryo fibroblast cell line NIH/3T3, NIH/3T3 cells transformed by human activated c-Ha-ras (EJ-ras) oncogene (EJ-NIH/3T3), and the two flat revertant cell lines, R1 and R2 were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (IEF and NEPHGE). Several hundred polypeptides were resolved as seen by silver staining. Common alterations in four polypeptide spots were observed in the revertants when compared with NIH/3T3 and EJ-NIH/3T3 cells. In these alterations, a new polypeptide spot p92-5.7 (designated by molecular weight X 10(-3) and pI) was detected only in the revertants, but not in NIH/3T3 and EJ-NIH/3T3 cells. Furthermore, the expression level of p92-5.7 seemed to be associated with the flat morphology and the reduced tumorigenicity of the revertants. The polypeptide p92-5.7 was also not detected in the total proteins extracted from BALB/3T3 cells, NIH Swiss mouse primary embryo fibroblasts. Subcellular fractionation of total protein from R1 cells revealed that the p92-5.7 was present in the cytosol. The p92-5.7 was not phosphorylated in the steady state of R1 cells. Western blot analysis using an anti-gelsolin antibody demonstrated that the p92-5.7 might be a variant form of gelsolin which is thought to be an actin regulatory protein or a gelsolin-like polypeptide. The expressions of gelsolin mRNA in the revertants were higher than in the EJ-NIH/3T3 cells. These results may suggest that the expression of p92-5.7 detected only in the revertants is associated, at least in part, with the reversion. This may be the first demonstration of the specific protein expression in the flat revertants.

  17. Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Final Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    White, Thornton C

    2014-03-31

    Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT) is a balanced portfolio of R&D tasks that address energy-saving opportunities in the metalcasting industry. E-SMARRT was created to: • Improve important capabilities of castings • Reduce carbon footprint of the foundry industry • Develop new job opportunities in manufacturing • Significantly reduce metalcasting process energy consumption and includes R&D in the areas of: • Improvements in Melting Efficiency • Innovative Casting Processes for Yield Improvement/Revert Reduction • Instrumentation and Control Improvement • Material properties for Casting or Tooling Design Improvement The energy savings and process improvements developed under E-SMARRT have been made possible through the unique collaborative structure of the E-SMARRT partnership. The E-SMARRT team consisted of DOE’s Office of Industrial Technology, the three leading metalcasting technical associations in the U.S: the American Foundry Society; the North American Die Casting Association; and the Steel Founders’ Society of America; and SCRA Applied R&D, doing business as the Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), a recognized leader in distributed technology management. This team provided collaborative leadership to a complex industry composed of approximately 2,000 companies, 80% of which employ less than 100 people, and only 4% of which employ more than 250 people. Without collaboration, these new processes and technologies that enable energy efficiencies and environment-friendly improvements would have been slow to develop and had trouble obtaining a broad application. The E-SMARRT R&D tasks featured low-threshold energy efficiency improvements that are attractive to the domestic industry because they do not require major capital investment. The results of this portfolio of projects are significantly reducing metalcasting process energy consumption while improving the important capabilities of metalcastings. Through June

  18. Inductive matrix completion for predicting gene–disease associations

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Nagarajan; Dhillon, Inderjit S.

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Most existing methods for predicting causal disease genes rely on specific type of evidence, and are therefore limited in terms of applicability. More often than not, the type of evidence available for diseases varies—for example, we may know linked genes, keywords associated with the disease obtained by mining text, or co-occurrence of disease symptoms in patients. Similarly, the type of evidence available for genes varies—for example, specific microarray probes convey information only for certain sets of genes. In this article, we apply a novel matrix-completion method called Inductive Matrix Completion to the problem of predicting gene-disease associations; it combines multiple types of evidence (features) for diseases and genes to learn latent factors that explain the observed gene–disease associations. We construct features from different biological sources such as microarray expression data and disease-related textual data. A crucial advantage of the method is that it is inductive; it can be applied to diseases not seen at training time, unlike traditional matrix-completion approaches and network-based inference methods that are transductive. Results: Comparison with state-of-the-art methods on diseases from the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database shows that the proposed approach is substantially better—it has close to one-in-four chance of recovering a true association in the top 100 predictions, compared to the recently proposed Catapult method (second best) that has <15% chance. We demonstrate that the inductive method is particularly effective for a query disease with no previously known gene associations, and for predicting novel genes, i.e. genes that are previously not linked to diseases. Thus the method is capable of predicting novel genes even for well-characterized diseases. We also validate the novelty of predictions by evaluating the method on recently reported OMIM associations and on associations recently

  19. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HCT) for Inborn Errors of Metabolism

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-11-06

    Hurler's Syndrome; Maroteaux-Lamy Syndrome; Sly Syndrome; Alpha Mannosidosis; Fucosidosis; Aspartylglucosaminuria; Sphingolipidoses; Krabbe Disease; Wolman's Disease; Niemann-Pick Disease Type B; Niemann-Pick Disease, Type C

  20. Lipid Storage Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Trials Related Information Patient Organizations Ara Parseghian Medical Research Foundation [For Niemann-Pick Type C Disease] Children's ... publications Order NINDS Publications Patient Organizations Ara Parseghian Medical Research Foundation [For Niemann-Pick Type C Disease] Children's ...

  1. Pseudorabies virus glycoprotein C attachment-proficient revertants isolated through a simple, targeted mutagenesis scheme.

    PubMed

    Rue, Cary A; Ryan, Patrick

    2008-07-01

    Pseudorabies virus (PRV) glycoprotein C (gC) initiates virus attachment to cells by binding to heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans. The gC:HS interaction is not essential since gC null mutants still infect; however, they are more easily removed from cells during the initial stages of infection. The expendability of gC has facilitated a genetic mapping of the HS-binding domain, which is composed of three independent heparin-binding domains (HBDs) of six to eight amino acids each. Previous results suggested that at least one of the HBDs (HBD 1) functioned in a context-dependent manner. To define the context better, a reversion analysis was performed in which a defective gC containing a nonfunctional but intact HBD 1 regained HS-binding ability. To increase the reversion frequency, an efficient method for targeted, yet random mutagenesis of the gC gene was developed. The method involves random mutagenesis of a plasmid-borne copy of gC, and highly efficient recombination of the plasmid-borne genes into the virus genome at the site of a double-strand break in the viral gC locus. Revertants were recovered readily, and their gC alleles suggested that HS-binding could be restored by several different amino acid substitutions. This approach should be applicable to targeted mutagenesis of other herpesvirus genes.

  2. Triazole RGD antagonist reverts TGFβ1-induced endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition in endothelial precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Bianchini, Francesca; Peppicelli, Silvia; Fabbrizzi, Pierangelo; Biagioni, Alessio; Mazzanti, Benedetta; Menchi, Gloria; Calorini, Lido; Pupi, Alberto; Trabocchi, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Fibrosis is the dramatic consequence of a dysregulated reparative process in which activated fibroblasts (myofibroblasts) and Transforming Growth Factor β1 (TGFβ1) play a central role. When exposed to TGFβ1, fibroblast and epithelial cells differentiate in myofibroblasts; in addition, endothelial cells may undergo endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndoMT) and actively participate to the progression of fibrosis. Recently, the role of αv integrins, which recognize the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) tripeptide, in the release and signal transduction activation of TGFβ1 became evident. In this study, we present a class of triazole-derived RGD antagonists that interact with αvβ3 integrin. Above different compounds, the RGD-2 specifically interferes with integrin-dependent TGFβ1 EndoMT in Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells (ECPCs) derived from circulating Endothelial Precursor Cells (ECPCs). The RGD-2 decreases the amount of membrane-associated TGFβ1, and reduces both ALK5/TGFβ1 type I receptor expression and Smad2 phosphorylation in ECPCs. We found that RGD-2 antagonist reverts EndoMT, reducing α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and vimentin expression in differentiated ECPCs. Our results outline the critical role of integrin in fibrosis progression and account for the opportunity of using integrins as target for anti-fibrotic therapeutic treatment.

  3. Sunitinib Improves Some Clinical Aspects and Reverts DMBA-Induced Hyperplasic Lesions in Hamster Buccal Pouch

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Fernanda Lopes; Oliveira, Mariana; Nunes, Marianne Brochado; Serafim, Lucas Horstmann; Azambuja, Alan Arrieira; Braga, Luisa Maria G. de M.; Saur, Lisiani; de Souza, Maria Antonieta Lopes; Xavier, Léder Leal

    2014-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a public health problem. The hamster buccal pouch model is ideal for analyzing the development of OSCC. This research analysed the effects of sunitinib (tyrosine kinase inhibitor) in precancerous lesions induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) in this model. Thirty-four male hamsters, divided into six groups: control—C (n = 7), acetone—A (n = 12), carbamide peroxide—CP (n = 5 ), acetone and CP—A+CP (n = 8), 1% DMBA in acetone and CP—DA+CP (n = 6), and 1% DMBA in acetone and CP and 4-week treatment with sunitinib—DA+CP+S (n = 7). The aspects evaluated were anatomopathological features (peribuccal area, paws, nose, and fur), histological sections of the hamster buccal pouches (qualitatively analyzed), epithelium thickness, and the rete ridge density (estimated). Sunitinib was unable to attenuate the decrease in weight gain induced by DMBA; no increase in volume was detected in the pouch and/or ulceration, observed in 43% of the animals in the DA+CP group. DA+CP groups presented a significant increase in rete ridge density compared to the control groups (P < 0.01) which was reverted by sunitinib in the DA+CP+S group. Sunitinib seems to have important benefits in early stage carcinogenesis and may be useful in chemoprevention. PMID:24693453

  4. Keeping it simple: flowering plants tend to retain, and revert to, simple leaves.

    PubMed

    Geeta, R; Dávalos, Liliana M; Levy, André; Bohs, Lynn; Lavin, Mathew; Mummenhoff, Klaus; Sinha, Neelima; Wojciechowski, Martin F

    2012-01-01

    • A wide range of factors (developmental, physiological, ecological) with unpredictable interactions control variation in leaf form. Here, we examined the distribution of leaf morphologies (simple and complex forms) across angiosperms in a phylogenetic context to detect patterns in the directions of changes in leaf shape. • Seven datasets (diverse angiosperms and six nested clades, Sapindales, Apiales, Papaveraceae, Fabaceae, Lepidium, Solanum) were analysed using maximum likelihood and parsimony methods to estimate asymmetries in rates of change among character states. • Simple leaves are most frequent among angiosperm lineages today, were inferred to be ancestral in angiosperms and tended to be retained in evolution (stasis). Complex leaves slowly originated ('gains') and quickly reverted to simple leaves ('losses') multiple times, with a significantly greater rate of losses than gains. Lobed leaves may be a labile intermediate step between different forms. The nested clades showed mixed trends; Solanum, like the angiosperms in general, had higher rates of losses than gains, but the other clades had higher rates of gains than losses. • The angiosperm-wide pattern could be taken as a null model to test leaf evolution patterns in particular clades, in which patterns of variation suggest clade-specific processes that have yet to be investigated fully.

  5. Induction of sister chromatid exchanges and bacterial revertants by organic extracts of airborne particles. [Humans

    SciTech Connect

    Lockard, J.M.; Viau, C.J.; Lee-Stephens, C.; Caldwell, J.C.; Wojciechowski, J.P.; Enoch, H.G.; Sabharwal, P.S.

    1981-01-01

    The genotoxicities of organic extracts of airborne particles have been studied extensively in the Salmonella/mammalian microsome (Ames) test, but in few other bioassays. In these studies, we tested benzene-acetone extracts of particulate pollutants collected in Lexington, Kentucky, for capacity to induce increases in sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in human lumphocytes and V79 cells, as well as in the Ames assay. Extracts induced linear dose-related increases in SCE in human lumphocytes and in bacterial revertants.However, variable responses were observed in SCE assays in V79 cells with and without activation by rat liver S9 or feeder layers of irradiated Syrian hamster fetal cells. We conclude that the SCE assay in human lumphocytes may be a useful indicator of the potential risks to humans of airborne particulate pollutants, as it utilizes human cells recently taken from the host, is rapid and economical, and requires small quantities of test materials. However, thorough studies of the quantitative relationships between SCE induction and mutagenicity in human cells are needed.

  6. Genetic analysis of revertants isolated from the rod-fragile fliF mutant of Salmonella

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Hitomi; Hayashi, Fumio; Sasa, Masahiro; Shikata, Koji; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Namba, Keiichi; Oosawa, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    FliF is the protein comprising the MS-ring of the bacterial flagellar basal body, which is the base for the assembly of flagellar axial structures. From a fliF mutant that easily releases the rod-hook-filament in viscous environments, more than 400 revertants that recovered their swarming ability in viscous conditions, were isolated. The second-site mutations were determined for approximately 70% of them. There were three regions where the mutations were localized: two in Region I, 112 in Region II, and 71 in Region III including the true reversion. In Region I, second-site mutations were found in FlgC and FlgF of the proximal rod, suggesting that they affect the interaction between the MS-ring and the rod. In Region II, there were 69 and 42 mutations in MotA and MotB, respectively, suggesting that the second-site mutations in MotA and MotB may decrease the rotational speed of the flagellar motor to reduce the probability of releasing the rod under this condition. One exception is a mutation in FlhC that caused a down regulation of the flagellar proteins production but it may directly affect transcription or translation of motA and motB. In Region III, there were 44, 24, and 3 mutations in FliG, FliM, and FliF, respectively. There were no second-site mutations identified in FliN although it is involved in torque generation as a component of the C-ring. Many of the mutations were involved in the motor rotation, and it is suggested that such reduced speeds result in stabilizing the filament attachment to the motor. PMID:27924254

  7. Interacting genes that affect microtubule function in Drosophila melanogaster: Two classes of mutation revert the failure to complement between hay sup nc2 and mutations in tubulin genes

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, C.L.; Fuller, M.T. )

    1990-05-01

    The recessive male sterile mutation hay{sup nc2} of Drosophila melanogaster fails to complement certain {beta}{sub 2}-tubulin and {alpha}-tubulin mutations, suggesting that the haywire product plays a role in microtubule function, perhaps as a structural component of microtubules. The genetic interaction appears to require the presence of the aberrant product encoded by hay{sup nc2}, which may act as a structural poison. Based on this observation, the authors have isolated ten new mutations with EMS that revert the failure to complement between hay{sup nc2} and B2t{sup n}. The revertants tested behaved as intragenic mutations of hay in recombination tests, and feel into two phenotypic classes, suggesting two functional domains of the hay gene product. Some revertants were hemizygous viable and less severe than hay{sup nc2} in their recessive phenotype. These mutations might revert the poison by restoring the aberrant product encoded by the hay{sup nc2} allele to more wild-type function. Most of the revertants were recessive lethal mutations, indicating that the hay gene product is essential for viability. These more extreme mutations could revert the poison by destroying the ability of the aberrant haywire{sup nc2} product to interact structurally with microtubules. Flies heterozygous for the original hay{sup nc2} allele and an extreme revertant show defects in both the structure and the function of the male meiotic spindle.

  8. Interacting Genes That Affect Microtubule Function in Drosophila Melanogaster: Two Classes of Mutation Revert the Failure to Complement between Hay(nc2) and Mutations in Tubulin Genes

    PubMed Central

    Regan, C. L.; Fuller, M. T.

    1990-01-01

    The recessive male sterile mutation hay(nc2) of Drosophila melanogaster fails to complement certain β(2)-tubulin and α-tubulin mutations, suggesting that the haywire product plays a role in microtubule function, perhaps as a structural component of microtubules. The genetic interaction appears to require the presence of the aberrant product encoded by hay(nc2), which may act as a structural poison. Based on this observation, we have isolated ten new mutations that revert the failure to complement between hay(nc2) and B2t(n). The revertants tested behaved as intragenic mutations of hay in recombination tests, and fell into two phenotypic classes, suggesting two functional domains of the hay gene product. Some revertants were hemizygous viable and less severe than hay(nc2) in their recessive phenotype. These mutations might revert the poison by restoring the aberrant product encoded by the hay(nc2) allele to more wild-type function. Most of the revertants were recessive lethal mutations, indicating that the hay gene product is essential for viability. These more extreme mutations could revert the poison by destroying the ability of the aberrant haywire(nc2) product to interact structurally with microtubules. Flies heterozygous for the original hay(nc2) allele and an extreme revertant show defects in both the structure and the function of the male meiotic spindle. PMID:2111265

  9. Defective tobamovirus movement protein lacking wild-type phosphorylation sites can be complemented by substitutions found in revertants.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Shigeki; Hori, Koichi; Hosokawa, Daijiro; Okada, Yoshimi; Watanabe, Yuichiro

    2003-01-01

    We reported previously that the movement protein (MP) of tomato mosaic tobamovirus is phosphorylated, and we proposed that MP phosphorylation is important for viral pathogenesis. Experimental data indicated that phosphorylation enhances the stability of MP in vivo and enables the protein to assume the correct intracellular location to perform its function. A mutant virus designated 37A238A was constructed; this virus lacked two serine residues within the MP, which prevented its phosphorylation. In the present study, we inoculated plants with the 37A238A mutant, and as expected, it was unable to produce local lesions on the leaves. However, after an extended period, we found that lesions did occur, which were due to revertant viruses. Several revertants were isolated, and the genetic changes in their MPs were examined together with any changes in their in vivo characteristics. We found that reversion to virulence was associated first with increased MP stability in infected cells and second with a shift in MP intracellular localization over time. In one case, the revertant MP was not phosphorylated in vivo, but it was functional.

  10. Promising genomic transfectant into Xeroderma pigmentosum group A with highly amplified mouse DNA and intermediate UV resistance turns revertant

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, M.; Baumann, I.; Lohrer, H.; Rahmsdorf, H.J.; Herrlich, P.

    1989-04-28

    Following transfection of genomic mouse DNA into an SV40 transformed fibroblast cell line from a patient with Xeroderma pigmentosum (complementation group A, XPA), a single UV resistant cell clone was isolated out of a total of 10(4) independent transfectants. The recipient XPA cell line has as yet not produced spontaneous revertants among 2.2 x 10(8) cells. The isolated cell clone contains 50-70 kb of mouse sequences which are heavily amplified (500-fold), and has acquired both intermediate resistance to UV killing and intermediate unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) capacity. By continued passage without selective pressure, cells were generated, which had lost both the dominant marker gene and repetitive mouse sequences. Single colonies of these cells were still intermediately resistant to UV suggesting that either undetected unique mouse DNA had segregated from the bulk of repetitive DNA, or, more likely, that the initially isolated transfectant was a spontaneous revertant. This documents that a persuasive clone isolated can still be a false positive (spontaneous revertant) and that an extremely laborious approach may lead into a dead end.

  11. Late-Onset Combined Immunodeficiency with a Novel IL2RG Mutation and Probable Revertant Somatic Mosaicism.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Yusuke; Hoshino, Akihiro; Muramatsu, Hideki; Kawashima, Nozomu; Wang, Xinan; Yoshida, Kenichi; Wada, Taizo; Gunji, Masaharu; Toma, Tomoko; Kato, Tamaki; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Iwata, Atsuko; Hori, Toshinori; Kitoh, Toshiyuki; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Sanada, Masashi; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Ito, Masafumi; Miyano, Satoru; Ogawa, Seishi; Kojima, Seiji; Kanegane, Hirokazu

    2015-10-01

    Primary immunodeficiency disease (PID) is caused by mutations of more than two hundred immunity-related genes. In addition to the heterogeneity of the diseases, the atypical presentation of each disease caused by hypomorphic mutations or somatic mosaicism makes genetic diagnosis challenging. Next-generation sequencing tests all genes simultaneously and has proven its innovative efficacy in genomics. We describe a male PID patient without any family history of immunodeficiency. This patient suffered from recurrent infections from 1 year of age. Laboratory analysis showed hypogammaglobulinemia. T, B, and NK cells were present, but the T cell proliferative response decreased. Whole-exome sequencing analysis identified an IL2RG p.P58T missense mutation. CD8(+) and CD56(+) cells showed revertant somatic mosaicism to the wild-type allele. A late-onset and atypical presentation of the X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (X-SCID) phenotype might be associated with revertant somatic mosaicism in T and NK cells. This patient is the seventh reported case of X-SCID with revertant somatic mosaicism. His classical clinical management did not result in a molecular diagnosis because of the atypical presentation. The coverage that is provided by whole-exome sequencing of most PID genes effectively excluded differential diagnoses other than X-SCID. As next-generation sequencing becomes available in clinical practice, it will enhance our knowledge of PID and rescue currently undiagnosed patients.

  12. Inflammatory bowel disease associations with HLA Class II genes

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, R.; Yang, H.; Targan, S.

    1994-09-01

    A PCR-SSOP assay has been used to analyze HLA-Class II DRB1 and DQB1 alleles in 378 Caucasians from a population in Southern California. The data has been analyzed separately for the Ashkenasi Jews and non-Jewish patients (n=286) and controls (n=92). Two common clinical forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have been studied: ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn`s disease (CD). In CD, we observed a susceptible effect with the rare DR1 allele - DRB*0103 [O.R.=4.56; 95% CI (0.96, 42.97); p=0.03]; a trend for an increase in DRB1*0103 was also observed in UC patients. A susceptible effect with DRB1*1502 [O.R.=5.20; 95% CI (1.10, 48.99); p=0.02] was observed in non-Jewish UC patients. This susceptible effect was restricted to UC ANCA-positive (antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies) patients. In addition, a significant association with DRB1*1101-DQB1*0301 [O.R.=9.46; 95% CI (1.30, 413.87); p=0.01] was seen with UC among non-Jewish patients: this haplotype was increased with CD among non-Jewish patients. Two protective haplotypes were detected among CD non-Jewish patients: DRB1*1301-DQB1*0603 [O.R.=0.34; 95% CI (0.09, 1.09); p=0.04], and DRB*0404-DQB1*0302 [O.R.=<0.08; 95% CI (0.0, 0.84); p=0.01]. When the same data were analyzed at the serology level, we observed a positive association in UC with DR2 [O.R.6.77; 95% CI (2.47, 22.95); p=2 x 10{sup -4}], and a positive association in CD with DR1 [O.R.=2.63; 95% CI (1.14, 6.62); p=0.01] consistent with previous reports. Thus, some IBD disease associations appear to be common to both UC and CD, while some are unique to one disease.

  13. Analysis of Salmonella typhimurium hisD3052 revertants: The use of oligodeoxyribonucleotide colony hybridization, PCR, and direct sequencing in mutational analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kupchella, E.; Cebula, T.A. )

    1991-01-01

    A rapid method for determining the DNA sequences of Salmonella typhimurium hisD3052 revertants is presented. DNA colony hybridization was used to analyze revertants previously studied by Isono and Yourno. Synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotide probes (18-mers) were able to distinguish sequences that differed by a single base pair. Mutant his sequences not identified by probing analysis were amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and directly sequenced. The combined use of DNA-colony hybridization and direct sequencing offers a precise and rapid means for the molecular characterization of hisD3052 revertants.

  14. Revertant mosaicism for family mutations is not observed in BRCA1/2 phenocopies

    PubMed Central

    Azzollini, Jacopo; Pesenti, Chiara; Ferrari, Luca; Fontana, Laura; Calvello, Mariarosaria; Peissel, Bernard; Portera, Giorgio; Tabano, Silvia; Carcangiu, Maria Luisa; Riva, Paola; Manoukian, Siranoush

    2017-01-01

    In BRCA1/2 families, early-onset breast cancer (BrCa) cases may be also observed among non-carrier relatives. These women are considered phenocopies and raise difficult counselling issues concerning the selection of the index case and the residual risks estimate in negative family members. Few studies investigated the presence of potential genetic susceptibility factors in phenocopies, mainly focussing on BrCa-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms. We hypothesized that, as for other Mendelian diseases, a revertant somatic mosaicism, resulting from spontaneous correction of a pathogenic mutation, might occur also in BRCA pedigrees. A putative low-level mosaicism in phenocopies, which has never been investigated, might be the causal factor undetected by standard diagnostic testing. We selected 16 non-carriers BrCa-affected from 15 BRCA1/2 families, and investigated the presence of mosaicism through MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The analyses were performed on available tumour samples (7 cases), blood leukocytes, buccal mucosa and urine samples (2 cases) or on blood only (7 cases). In one family (n.8), real-time PCR was also performed to analyse the phenocopy and her healthy parents. On the 16 phenocopies we did not detect the family mutations neither in the tumour, expected to display the highest mutation frequency, nor in the other analysed tissues. In family 8, all the genotyping assays did not detect mosaicism in the phenocopy or her healthy parents, supporting the hypothesis of a de novo occurrence of the BRCA2 mutation identified in the proband. These results suggest that somatic mosaicism is not likely to be a common phenomenon in BRCA1/2 families. As our families fulfilled high-risk selection criteria, other genetic factors might be responsible for most of these cases and have a significant impact on risk assessment in BRCA1/2 families. Finally, we found a de novo BRCA2 mutation, suggesting that, although rare, this event should be taken into account in the

  15. 78 FR 54763 - Disease Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents: Peripheral Neuropathy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 3 RIN 2900-AO32 Disease Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents... peripheral neuropathy associated with exposure to certain herbicide agents. This amendment implements a... governing retroactive awards for certain diseases associated with herbicide exposure as required by...

  16. Plasma Cholesterol-Lowering Activity of Lard Functionalized with Mushroom Extracts Is Independent of Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 Protein and ABC Sterol Transporter Gene Expression in Hypercholesterolemic Mice.

    PubMed

    Caz, Víctor; Gil-Ramírez, Alicia; Santamaría, Mónica; Tabernero, María; Soler-Rivas, Cristina; Martín-Hernández, Roberto; Marín, Francisco R; Reglero, Guillermo; Largo, Carlota

    2016-03-02

    Interest in food matrices supplemented with mushrooms as hypocholesterolemic functional foods is increasing. This study was to (i) investigate the hypocholesterolemic activity of lard functionalized with mushroom extracts (LF) including fungal β-glucans, water-soluble polysaccharides, or ergosterol and (ii) examine the LF influence on transcriptional mechanisms involved in cholesterol metabolism. mRNA levels of 17 cholesterol-related genes were evaluated in jejunum, cecum, and liver of high cholesterol-fed mice. The four tested LFs decreased plasma cholesterol by 22-42%, HDLc by 18-40%, and LDLc by 27-51%, and two of them increased mRNA levels of jejunal Npc1l1 and Abcg5 and hepatic Npc1l1. mRNA levels of other cholesterol-related genes were unchanged. These findings suggest that LF may have potential as a dietary supplement for counteracting diet-induced hypercholesterolemia and could be a source for the development of novel cholesterol-lowering functional foods. However, the cholesterol-lowering effect was unrelated to transcriptional changes, suggesting that post-transcriptional mechanisms could be involved.

  17. User`s guide to REVERT. A CDC 7600 program for converting Spent Fuel Test - Climax data to engineering units, with corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Hage, G.

    1984-10-01

    A CDC 7600 computer program, REVERT, can revise Spent Fuel Test - Climax data files using one of several algorithms, depending on the type of data. The algorithms use coefficients from a separate file organized by data type identifiers. REVERT can also make that file of coefficients, using data from tapes made by Hewlett-Packard equipment employed for data acquisition on the spent Fuel Test - Climax at NTS. 12 references.

  18. Once a Batesian mimic, not always a Batesian mimic: mimic reverts back to ancestral phenotype when the model is absent.

    PubMed

    Prudic, Kathleen L; Oliver, Jeffrey C

    2008-05-22

    Batesian mimics gain protection from predation through the evolution of physical similarities to a model species that possesses anti-predator defences. This protection should not be effective in the absence of the model since the predator does not identify the mimic as potentially dangerous and both the model and the mimic are highly conspicuous. Thus, Batesian mimics should probably encounter strong predation pressure outside the geographical range of the model species. There are several documented examples of Batesian mimics occurring in locations without their models, but the evolutionary responses remain largely unidentified. A mimetic species has four alternative evolutionary responses to the loss of model presence. If predation is weak, it could maintain its mimetic signal. If predation is intense, it is widely presumed the mimic will go extinct. However, the mimic could also evolve a new colour pattern to mimic another model species or it could revert back to its ancestral, less conspicuous phenotype. We used molecular phylogenetic approaches to reconstruct and test the evolution of mimicry in the North American admiral butterflies (Limenitis: Nymphalidae). We confirmed that the more cryptic white-banded form is the ancestral phenotype of North American admiral butterflies. However, one species, Limenitis arthemis, evolved the black pipevine swallowtail mimetic form but later reverted to the white-banded more cryptic ancestral form. This character reversion is strongly correlated with the geographical absence of the model species and its host plant, but not the host plant distribution of L. arthemis. Our results support the prediction that a Batesian mimic does not persist in locations without its model, but it does not go extinct either. The mimic can revert back to its ancestral, less conspicuous form and persist.

  19. The Term Structure of Interest Rates Under Heath-Jarrow-Morton Models with Fast Mean-Reverting Stochastic Volatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang-Hyeon; Lee, Min-Ku; Kim, Jeong-Hoon

    2016-06-01

    This paper is a study of the term structure of interest rates based on the Heath-Jarrow-Morton (HJM) models with Hull-White volatility function. Under fast mean-reverting stochastic volatility, we obtain an analytic formula for an approximate bond price with estimated error using a Markovian transform method combined with a singular perturbation method. The stochastic volatility correction effect against time-to-maturity is revealed so that it can capture more of the complexities of the interest rate term structure.

  20. The Lifestyle Carbon Dividend: Assessment of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of Grasslands and Pasturelands Reverted to Native Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, S.; Jain, A. K.; Shu, S.

    2015-12-01

    What is the potential of a global transition to a vegan lifestyle to sequester carbon and mitigate climate change? To answer this question, we use an Earth System Model (ESM), the Integrated Science Assessment Model (ISAM). ISAM is a fully coupled biogeochemistry (carbon and nitrogen cycles) and biogeophysics (hydrology and thermal energy) ESM, which calculates carbon sources and sinks due to land cover and land use change activities, such as reforestation and afforestation. We calculate the carbon sequestration potential of grasslands and pasturelands that can be reverted to native forests as 265 GtC on 1.96E+7 km2 of land area, just 41% of the total area of such lands on Earth. The grasslands and pasturelands are assumed to revert back to native forests which existed prior to any human intervention and these include tropical, temperate and boreal forests. The results are validated with above ground regrowth measurements. Since this carbon sequestration potential is greater than the 240 GtC of that has been added to the atmosphere since the industrial era began, it shows that such global lifestyle transitions have tremendous potential to mitigate and even reverse climate change.

  1. Economic Burden of Disease-Associated Malnutrition at the State Level

    PubMed Central

    Goates, Scott; Du, Kristy; Braunschweig, Carol A.; Arensberg, Mary Beth

    2016-01-01

    Background Disease-associated malnutrition has been identified as a prevalent condition, particularly for the elderly, which has often been overlooked in the U.S. healthcare system. The state-level burden of community-based disease-associated malnutrition is unknown and there have been limited efforts by state policy makers to identify, quantify, and address malnutrition. The objective of this study was to examine and quantify the state-level economic burden of disease-associated malnutrition. Methods Direct medical costs of disease-associated malnutrition were calculated for 8 diseases: Stroke, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Coronary Heart Failure, Breast Cancer, Dementia, Musculoskeletal Disorders, Depression, and Colorectal Cancer. National disease and malnutrition prevalence rates were estimated for subgroups defined by age, race, and sex using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and the National Health Interview Survey. State prevalence of disease-associated malnutrition was estimated by combining national prevalence estimates with states’ demographic data from the U.S. Census. Direct medical cost for each state was estimated as the increased expenditures incurred as a result of malnutrition. Principal Findings Direct medical costs attributable to disease-associated malnutrition vary among states from an annual cost of $36 per capita in Utah to $65 per capita in Washington, D.C. Nationally the annual cost of disease-associated malnutrition is over $15.5 billion. The elderly bear a disproportionate share of this cost on both the state and national level. Conclusions Additional action is needed to reduce the economic impact of disease-associated malnutrition, particularly at the state level. Nutrition may be a cost-effective way to help address high health care costs. PMID:27655372

  2. IRWRLDA: improved random walk with restart for lncRNA-disease association prediction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xing; You, Zhu-Hong; Yan, Gui-Ying; Gong, Dun-Wei

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, accumulating evidences have shown that the dysregulations of lncRNAs are associated with a wide range of human diseases. It is necessary and feasible to analyze known lncRNA-disease associations, predict potential lncRNA-disease associations, and provide the most possible lncRNA-disease pairs for experimental validation. Considering the limitations of traditional Random Walk with Restart (RWR), the model of Improved Random Walk with Restart for LncRNA-Disease Association prediction (IRWRLDA) was developed to predict novel lncRNA-disease associations by integrating known lncRNA-disease associations, disease semantic similarity, and various lncRNA similarity measures. The novelty of IRWRLDA lies in the incorporation of lncRNA expression similarity and disease semantic similarity to set the initial probability vector of the RWR. Therefore, IRWRLDA could be applied to diseases without any known related lncRNAs. IRWRLDA significantly improved previous classical models with reliable AUCs of 0.7242 and 0.7872 in two known lncRNA-disease association datasets downloaded from the lncRNADisease database, respectively. Further case studies of colon cancer and leukemia were implemented for IRWRLDA and 60% of lncRNAs in the top 10 prediction lists have been confirmed by recent experimental reports. PMID:27517318

  3. Analysis of HeLa cell hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase mutants and revertants by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis: evidence for silent gene activation.

    PubMed Central

    Milman, G; Lee, E; Ghangas, G S; McLaughlin, J R; George, M

    1976-01-01

    The spot corresponding to hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT; IMP:pyrophosphate phosphoribosyltransferase, EC 2.4.2.8) has been identified in two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels of HeLa cell extracts. This spot is absent in gels of 24 HPRT dificient mutants. A missense mutant displays a new HPRT spot at the same molecular weight but different isoelectric focusing position. Five independently isolated revertants of the missense mutant display spots corresponding to both the wild-type and mutant proteins indicating that they synthesize HPRT from two separate genes. If the missense protein is synthesized from a mutated form of the initially active HPRT gene, then wild-type HPRT protein in the revertants must be snythesized from a newly activated but prevously silent wild-type gene. The newly activated gene in the revertants of the missense mutation appears unstable producing a high frequency of spontaneous HPRT mutants. Images PMID:63948

  4. Progesterone reverts LPS-reduced FAAH activity in murine peripheral blood mononuclear cells by a receptor-mediated fashion.

    PubMed

    Wolfson, Manuel L; Aisemberg, Julieta; Salazar, Ana I; Domínguez Rubio, Ana P; Vercelli, Claudia A; Franchi, Ana M

    2013-12-05

    Increased anandamide concentrations are associated with pregnancy failure. Anandamide levels are regulated by the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). The aim of the study was to investigate the role of progesterone (P) on FAAH modulation in murine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) under septic conditions. We observed that in vivo administration of LPS to non-pregnant (NP) mice decreased FAAH activity of PBMC while in pregnant mice no changes in FAAH activity were observed. NP animals administered with P had a similar response to LPS as the pregnant animals. Also, NP mice injected with P antagonist and P showed that the effect of P on LPS-reduced FAAH activity was impaired. Furthermore, LPS produced a decrease in the ratio of PR-B/PR-A in NP animals. Our results showed that, in our model the endotoxin decreased PBMC's FAAH activity and this condition was reverted by P in a receptor-mediated fashion.

  5. A specific protein, p92, detected in flat revertants derived from NIH/3T3 transformed by human activated c-Ha-ras oncogene.

    PubMed

    Fujita, H; Suzuki, H; Kuzumaki, N; Müllauer, L; Ogiso, Y; Oda, A; Ebisawa, K; Sakurai, T; Nonomura, Y; Kijimoto-Ochiai, S

    1990-01-01

    Total proteins from a mouse embryo fibroblast cell line NIH/3T3, NIH/3T3 cells transformed by human activated c-Ha-ras (EJ-ras) oncogene (EJ-NIH/3T3), and the two flat revertant cell lines, R1 and R2, were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (IEF and NEPHGE). Several hundred polypeptides were resolved as seen by silver staining. Common alterations in four polypeptide spots were observed in the revertants when compared with NIH/3T3 and EJ-NIH/3T3 cells. In these alterations, a new polypeptide spot p92-5.7 (designated by molecular weight x 10(-3) and pI) was detected only in the revertants and not in NIH/3T3 and EJ-NIH/3T3 cells. Furthermore, the expression level of p92-5.7 seemed to be associated with the flat morphology and the reduced tumorigenicity of the revertants. Polypeptide p92-5.7 was also not detected in the total proteins extracted from BALB/3T3 cells, NIH Swiss mouse primary embryo fibroblasts, NRK (normal rat kidney) cells, and L6 (rat myoblast). Subcellular fractionation of total protein from R1 cells revealed that the p92-5.7 was present in the cytosol. Western blot analysis using an anti-gelsolin antibody demonstrated that the p92-5.7 might be a variant form of gelsolin which is thought to be an actin regulatory protein or a gelsolin-like polypeptide. These results may suggest that the expression of p92-5.7 detected only in the revertants is associated, at least in part, with the reversion. This may be the first demonstration of specific protein expression in the flat revertants.

  6. Prediction of MicroRNA-Disease Associations Based on Social Network Analysis Methods.

    PubMed

    Zou, Quan; Li, Jinjin; Hong, Qingqi; Lin, Ziyu; Wu, Yun; Shi, Hua; Ju, Ying

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs constitute an important class of noncoding, single-stranded, ~22 nucleotide long RNA molecules encoded by endogenous genes. They play an important role in regulating gene transcription and the regulation of normal development. MicroRNAs can be associated with disease; however, only a few microRNA-disease associations have been confirmed by traditional experimental approaches. We introduce two methods to predict microRNA-disease association. The first method, KATZ, focuses on integrating the social network analysis method with machine learning and is based on networks derived from known microRNA-disease associations, disease-disease associations, and microRNA-microRNA associations. The other method, CATAPULT, is a supervised machine learning method. We applied the two methods to 242 known microRNA-disease associations and evaluated their performance using leave-one-out cross-validation and 3-fold cross-validation. Experiments proved that our methods outperformed the state-of-the-art methods.

  7. Prediction of MicroRNA-Disease Associations Based on Social Network Analysis Methods

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Quan; Li, Jinjin; Hong, Qingqi; Lin, Ziyu; Wu, Yun; Shi, Hua; Ju, Ying

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs constitute an important class of noncoding, single-stranded, ~22 nucleotide long RNA molecules encoded by endogenous genes. They play an important role in regulating gene transcription and the regulation of normal development. MicroRNAs can be associated with disease; however, only a few microRNA-disease associations have been confirmed by traditional experimental approaches. We introduce two methods to predict microRNA-disease association. The first method, KATZ, focuses on integrating the social network analysis method with machine learning and is based on networks derived from known microRNA-disease associations, disease-disease associations, and microRNA-microRNA associations. The other method, CATAPULT, is a supervised machine learning method. We applied the two methods to 242 known microRNA-disease associations and evaluated their performance using leave-one-out cross-validation and 3-fold cross-validation. Experiments proved that our methods outperformed the state-of-the-art methods. PMID:26273645

  8. Inferring drug-disease associations from integration of chemical, genomic and phenotype data using network propagation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background During the last few years, the knowledge of drug, disease phenotype and protein has been rapidly accumulated and more and more scientists have been drawn the attention to inferring drug-disease associations by computational method. Development of an integrated approach for systematic discovering drug-disease associations by those informational data is an important issue. Methods We combine three different networks of drug, genomic and disease phenotype and assign the weights to the edges from available experimental data and knowledge. Given a specific disease, we use our network propagation approach to infer the drug-disease associations. Results We apply prostate cancer and colorectal cancer as our test data. We use the manually curated drug-disease associations from comparative toxicogenomics database to be our benchmark. The ranked results show that our proposed method obtains higher specificity and sensitivity and clearly outperforms previous methods. Our result also show that our method with off-targets information gets higher performance than that with only primary drug targets in both test data. Conclusions We clearly demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of using network-based analyses of chemical, genomic and phenotype data to reveal drug-disease associations. The potential associations inferred by our method provide new perspectives for toxicogenomics and drug reposition evaluation. PMID:24565337

  9. Mutation and expression of the XPA gene in revertants and hybrids of a xeroderma pigmentosum cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Cleaver, J.E.; McDowell, M.; Karentz, D.; Jones, C.; Wood, R.

    1994-07-01

    A series of ultraviolet (UV)-resistant cell lines have been generated from a UV-sensitive XP group A cell line homozygous for a stop codon (TGA) in the chromosome 9 XPA gene. Three lines generated by chemical mutagenesis acquired the ability to excise (6-4) photoproducts but not cyclobutane dimers from the whole genome; two lines generated by a fusion procedure with hamster cells acquired the ability to excise both (6-4) photoproducts and cyclobutane dimers from the whole genome. A central region of the hamster XPA gene was cloned and sequenced. With the use of species-specific primers in the polymerase chain reaction, the authors found that the hybrid cell lines do not contain a hamster XPA gene. Sequence analysis showed that all of the UV-resistant cell lines contain reversions of the human stop codon, resulting in missense mutations (glycine or leucine for arginine) or wild-type sequences. The concentration of XPA protein in revertant cell lines was about one-half that in normal cells, which would be expected from heterozygous cells; there was no evidence that the mutant proteins were less stable than the wild-type proteins. These results are consistent with the idea that the XPA protein initiates repair by binding to damaged sites with various affinities, depending on the photoproduct and the transcriptional state of the region. A concentration of XPA protein near 50% is needed before repair can proceed into nontranscribed regions of the genome. The revertant cell lines represent a class of missense mutations in the XPA gene that may have altered specificity and that can be used to understand some of the regulatory differences in repair of photoproducts in various regions of the genome.

  10. Characterization of Two Segregation Distorter Revertants: Evidence That the Tandem Duplication Is Necessary for Sd Activity in Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Palopoli, M. F.; Doshi, P.; Wu, C. I.

    1994-01-01

    Segregation Distorter (SD) is a naturally occurring system of meiotic drive in Drosophila melanogaster. Males heterozygous for an SD second chromosome and a normal homolog (SD(+)) transmit predominantly SD-bearing sperm. To accomplish this, the Segregation distorter (Sd) locus induces the dysfunction of those spermatids that receive the SD(+) chromosome. Recently, P. A. Powers and B. Ganetzky isolated overlapping DNA clones spanning the region of DNA known to contain the Sd gene and identified a 5-kb tandem duplication that is present on all SD chromosomes examined, but is apparently absent from wild-type chromosomes. Here we report a molecular analysis of two spontaneous revertants from an Australian SD chromosome (SD-Arm28). Both of these revertants have lost the 5-kb tandem duplication along with the ability to distort transmission; the critical observation, however, is that they retain the DNA haplotype in the flanking regions (both proximally and distally) that is characteristic of the original SD-Arm28. We propose unequal sister chromatid exchange between the tandem repeats as the only plausible explanation for loss of a repeat while retaining flanking markers. This provides direct evidence that the tandem duplication is indeed necessary for the Sd phenotype. Further, we examined testes-specific levels of both RNA and protein for the nearby Topoisomerase 2 gene. Neither revealed a consistent difference between SD and SD(+) strains. We also measured testes-specific levels of RNA using the tandem duplication itself as probe. Our results suggest that there is strong up-regulation of one or several 2.0-2.3-kb transcripts from the duplicated region in the testes of an SD strain. Whether it is this overexpression of transcripts that causes segregation distortion remains to be investigated. PMID:8138158

  11. DiMeX: A Text Mining System for Mutation-Disease Association Extraction.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, A S M Ashique; Wu, Tsung-Jung; Mazumder, Raja; Vijay-Shanker, K

    2016-01-01

    The number of published articles describing associations between mutations and diseases is increasing at a fast pace. There is a pressing need to gather such mutation-disease associations into public knowledge bases, but manual curation slows down the growth of such databases. We have addressed this problem by developing a text-mining system (DiMeX) to extract mutation to disease associations from publication abstracts. DiMeX consists of a series of natural language processing modules that preprocess input text and apply syntactic and semantic patterns to extract mutation-disease associations. DiMeX achieves high precision and recall with F-scores of 0.88, 0.91 and 0.89 when evaluated on three different datasets for mutation-disease associations. DiMeX includes a separate component that extracts mutation mentions in text and associates them with genes. This component has been also evaluated on different datasets and shown to achieve state-of-the-art performance. The results indicate that our system outperforms the existing mutation-disease association tools, addressing the low precision problems suffered by most approaches. DiMeX was applied on a large set of abstracts from Medline to extract mutation-disease associations, as well as other relevant information including patient/cohort size and population data. The results are stored in a database that can be queried and downloaded at http://biotm.cis.udel.edu/dimex/. We conclude that this high-throughput text-mining approach has the potential to significantly assist researchers and curators to enrich mutation databases.

  12. DiMeX: A Text Mining System for Mutation-Disease Association Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, A. S. M. Ashique; Wu, Tsung-Jung; Mazumder, Raja; Vijay-Shanker, K.

    2016-01-01

    The number of published articles describing associations between mutations and diseases is increasing at a fast pace. There is a pressing need to gather such mutation-disease associations into public knowledge bases, but manual curation slows down the growth of such databases. We have addressed this problem by developing a text-mining system (DiMeX) to extract mutation to disease associations from publication abstracts. DiMeX consists of a series of natural language processing modules that preprocess input text and apply syntactic and semantic patterns to extract mutation-disease associations. DiMeX achieves high precision and recall with F-scores of 0.88, 0.91 and 0.89 when evaluated on three different datasets for mutation-disease associations. DiMeX includes a separate component that extracts mutation mentions in text and associates them with genes. This component has been also evaluated on different datasets and shown to achieve state-of-the-art performance. The results indicate that our system outperforms the existing mutation-disease association tools, addressing the low precision problems suffered by most approaches. DiMeX was applied on a large set of abstracts from Medline to extract mutation-disease associations, as well as other relevant information including patient/cohort size and population data. The results are stored in a database that can be queried and downloaded at http://biotm.cis.udel.edu/dimex/. We conclude that this high-throughput text-mining approach has the potential to significantly assist researchers and curators to enrich mutation databases. PMID:27073839

  13. Characterization of a T-antigen-negative revertant isolated from a mouse cell line which undergoes rearrangement of integrated simian virus 40 DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Bender, M A; Christensen, J; Brockman, W W

    1983-01-01

    A transformation revertant has been isolated from an unusual line of simian virus 40 (SV40)-transformed BALB/c-3T3 cells in which rearrangements of integrated viral sequences are common. The revertant produces no SV40 T antigens, yields no virus on fusion with permissive cells, and can be retransformed by SV40 virions. SV40 DNA sequences are present within the cellular DNA, but interruption of the viral early transcription region by deletion and recombination with cellular sequences precludes the synthesis of T antigens. Analysis of this revertant lends further support to the notion that large T antigen plays an essential role in the maintenance of transformation in SV40-transformed BALB/c-3T3 cells. Examination of integration of SV40 DNA in this revertant, as well as in a temperature-sensitive A transformant, after retransformation by SV40 confirms that sequence homology plays little role in the insertion of SV40 DNA into cellular chromosomes. Images PMID:6306268

  14. Large-scale prediction of microRNA-disease associations by combinatorial prioritization algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hua; Chen, Xiaojun; Lu, Lu

    2017-01-01

    Identification of the associations between microRNA molecules and human diseases from large-scale heterogeneous biological data is an important step for understanding the pathogenesis of diseases in microRNA level. However, experimental verification of microRNA-disease associations is expensive and time-consuming. To overcome the drawbacks of conventional experimental methods, we presented a combinatorial prioritization algorithm to predict the microRNA-disease associations. Importantly, our method can be used to predict microRNAs (diseases) associated with the diseases (microRNAs) without the known associated microRNAs (diseases). The predictive performance of our proposed approach was evaluated and verified by the internal cross-validations and external independent validations based on standard association datasets. The results demonstrate that our proposed method achieves the impressive performance for predicting the microRNA-disease association with the Area Under receiver operation characteristic Curve (AUC), 86.93%, which is indeed outperform the previous prediction methods. Particularly, we observed that the ensemble-based method by integrating the predictions of multiple algorithms can give more reliable and robust prediction than the single algorithm, with the AUC score improved to 92.26%. We applied our combinatorial prioritization algorithm to lung neoplasms and breast neoplasms, and revealed their top 30 microRNA candidates, which are in consistent with the published literatures and databases. PMID:28317855

  15. 77 FR 47795 - Disease Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents: Peripheral Neuropathy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-10

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 3 RIN 2900-AO32 Disease Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents... connection for acute and sub-acute peripheral neuropathy associated with exposure to certain herbicide agents... associated with exposure to certain herbicide agents. DATES: Comments must be received by VA on or...

  16. Large-scale prediction of microRNA-disease associations by combinatorial prioritization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hua; Chen, Xiaojun; Lu, Lu

    2017-03-01

    Identification of the associations between microRNA molecules and human diseases from large-scale heterogeneous biological data is an important step for understanding the pathogenesis of diseases in microRNA level. However, experimental verification of microRNA-disease associations is expensive and time-consuming. To overcome the drawbacks of conventional experimental methods, we presented a combinatorial prioritization algorithm to predict the microRNA-disease associations. Importantly, our method can be used to predict microRNAs (diseases) associated with the diseases (microRNAs) without the known associated microRNAs (diseases). The predictive performance of our proposed approach was evaluated and verified by the internal cross-validations and external independent validations based on standard association datasets. The results demonstrate that our proposed method achieves the impressive performance for predicting the microRNA-disease association with the Area Under receiver operation characteristic Curve (AUC), 86.93%, which is indeed outperform the previous prediction methods. Particularly, we observed that the ensemble-based method by integrating the predictions of multiple algorithms can give more reliable and robust prediction than the single algorithm, with the AUC score improved to 92.26%. We applied our combinatorial prioritization algorithm to lung neoplasms and breast neoplasms, and revealed their top 30 microRNA candidates, which are in consistent with the published literatures and databases.

  17. WBSMDA: Within and Between Score for MiRNA-Disease Association prediction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xing; Yan, Chenggang Clarence; Zhang, Xu; You, Zhu-Hong; Deng, Lixi; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Yongdong; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidences have indicated that microRNAs (miRNAs) are functionally associated with the development and progression of various complex human diseases. However, the roles of miRNAs in multiple biological processes or various diseases and their underlying molecular mechanisms still have not been fully understood yet. Predicting potential miRNA-disease associations by integrating various heterogeneous biological datasets is of great significance to the biomedical research. Computational methods could obtain potential miRNA-disease associations in a short time, which significantly reduce the experimental time and cost. Considering the limitations in previous computational methods, we developed the model of Within and Between Score for MiRNA-Disease Association prediction (WBSMDA) to predict potential miRNAs associated with various complex diseases. WBSMDA could be applied to the diseases without any known related miRNAs. The AUC of 0.8031 based on Leave-one-out cross validation has demonstrated its reliable performance. WBSMDA was further applied to Colon Neoplasms, Prostate Neoplasms, and Lymphoma for the identification of their potential related miRNAs. As a result, 90%, 84%, and 80% of predicted miRNA-disease pairs in the top 50 prediction list for these three diseases have been confirmed by recent experimental literatures, respectively. It is anticipated that WBSMDA would be a useful resource for potential miRNA-disease association identification. PMID:26880032

  18. Caffeine Reverts Memory But Not Mood Impairment in a Depression-Prone Mouse Strain with Up-Regulated Adenosine A2A Receptor in Hippocampal Glutamate Synapses.

    PubMed

    Machado, Nuno J; Simões, Ana Patrícia; Silva, Henrique B; Ardais, Ana Paula; Kaster, Manuella P; Garção, Pedro; Rodrigues, Diana I; Pochmann, Daniela; Santos, Ana Isabel; Araújo, Inês M; Porciúncula, Lisiane O; Tomé, Ângelo R; Köfalvi, Attila; Vaugeois, Jean-Marie; Agostinho, Paula; El Yacoubi, Malika; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Gomes, Catarina A

    2017-03-01

    Caffeine prophylactically prevents mood and memory impairments through adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) antagonism. A2AR antagonists also therapeutically revert mood and memory impairments, but it is not known if caffeine is also therapeutically or only prophylactically effective. Since depression is accompanied by mood and memory alterations, we now explored if chronic (4 weeks) caffeine consumption (0.3 g/L) reverts mood and memory impairment in helpless mice (HM, 12 weeks old), a bred-based model of depression. HM displayed higher immobility in the tail suspension and forced swimming tests, greater anxiety in the elevated plus maze, and poorer memory performance (modified Y-maze and object recognition). HM also had reduced density of synaptic (synaptophysin, SNAP-25), namely, glutamatergic (vGluT1; -22 ± 7 %) and GABAergic (vGAT; -23 ± 8 %) markers in the hippocampus. HM displayed higher A2AR density (72 ± 6 %) in hippocampal synapses, an enhanced facilitation of hippocampal glutamate release by the A2AR agonist, CGS21680 (30 nM), and a larger LTP amplitude (54 ± 8 % vs. 21 ± 5 % in controls) that was restored to control levels (30 ± 10 %) by the A2AR antagonist, SCH58261 (50 nM). Notably, caffeine intake reverted memory deficits and reverted the loss of hippocampal synaptic markers but did not affect helpless or anxiety behavior. These results reinforce the validity of HM as an animal model of depression by showing that they also display reference memory deficits. Furthermore, caffeine intake selectively reverted memory but not mood deficits displayed by HM, which are associated with an increased density and functional impact of hippocampal A2AR controlling synaptic glutamatergic function.

  19. Integration of Multiple Genomic and Phenotype Data to Infer Novel miRNA-Disease Associations

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Meng; Cheng, Liang; Yang, Haixiu; Wang, Jing; Sun, Jie; Wang, Zhenzhen

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in the development and progression of human diseases. The identification of disease-associated miRNAs will be helpful for understanding the molecular mechanisms of diseases at the post-transcriptional level. Based on different types of genomic data sources, computational methods for miRNA-disease association prediction have been proposed. However, individual source of genomic data tends to be incomplete and noisy; therefore, the integration of various types of genomic data for inferring reliable miRNA-disease associations is urgently needed. In this study, we present a computational framework, CHNmiRD, for identifying miRNA-disease associations by integrating multiple genomic and phenotype data, including protein-protein interaction data, gene ontology data, experimentally verified miRNA-target relationships, disease phenotype information and known miRNA-disease connections. The performance of CHNmiRD was evaluated by experimentally verified miRNA-disease associations, which achieved an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.834 for 5-fold cross-validation. In particular, CHNmiRD displayed excellent performance for diseases without any known related miRNAs. The results of case studies for three human diseases (glioblastoma, myocardial infarction and type 1 diabetes) showed that all of the top 10 ranked miRNAs having no known associations with these three diseases in existing miRNA-disease databases were directly or indirectly confirmed by our latest literature mining. All these results demonstrated the reliability and efficiency of CHNmiRD, and it is anticipated that CHNmiRD will serve as a powerful bioinformatics method for mining novel disease-related miRNAs and providing a new perspective into molecular mechanisms underlying human diseases at the post-transcriptional level. CHNmiRD is freely available at http://www.bio-bigdata.com/CHNmiRD. PMID:26849207

  20. Integration of Multiple Genomic and Phenotype Data to Infer Novel miRNA-Disease Associations.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hongbo; Zhang, Guangde; Zhou, Meng; Cheng, Liang; Yang, Haixiu; Wang, Jing; Sun, Jie; Wang, Zhenzhen

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in the development and progression of human diseases. The identification of disease-associated miRNAs will be helpful for understanding the molecular mechanisms of diseases at the post-transcriptional level. Based on different types of genomic data sources, computational methods for miRNA-disease association prediction have been proposed. However, individual source of genomic data tends to be incomplete and noisy; therefore, the integration of various types of genomic data for inferring reliable miRNA-disease associations is urgently needed. In this study, we present a computational framework, CHNmiRD, for identifying miRNA-disease associations by integrating multiple genomic and phenotype data, including protein-protein interaction data, gene ontology data, experimentally verified miRNA-target relationships, disease phenotype information and known miRNA-disease connections. The performance of CHNmiRD was evaluated by experimentally verified miRNA-disease associations, which achieved an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.834 for 5-fold cross-validation. In particular, CHNmiRD displayed excellent performance for diseases without any known related miRNAs. The results of case studies for three human diseases (glioblastoma, myocardial infarction and type 1 diabetes) showed that all of the top 10 ranked miRNAs having no known associations with these three diseases in existing miRNA-disease databases were directly or indirectly confirmed by our latest literature mining. All these results demonstrated the reliability and efficiency of CHNmiRD, and it is anticipated that CHNmiRD will serve as a powerful bioinformatics method for mining novel disease-related miRNAs and providing a new perspective into molecular mechanisms underlying human diseases at the post-transcriptional level. CHNmiRD is freely available at http://www.bio-bigdata.com/CHNmiRD.

  1. Caloric restriction of db/db mice reverts hepatic steatosis and body weight with divergent hepatic metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Eun; Jung, Youngae; Min, Soonki; Nam, Miso; Heo, Rok Won; Jeon, Byeong Tak; Song, Dae Hyun; Yi, Chin-ok; Jeong, Eun Ae; Kim, Hwajin; Kim, Jeonghyun; Jeong, Seon-Yong; Kwak, Woori; Ryu, Do Hyun; Horvath, Tamas L.; Roh, Gu Seob; Hwang, Geum-Sook

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most frequent causes of liver disease and its prevalence is a serious and growing clinical problem. Caloric restriction (CR) is commonly recommended for improvement of obesity-related diseases such as NAFLD. However, the effects of CR on hepatic metabolism remain unknown. We investigated the effects of CR on metabolic dysfunction in the liver of obese diabetic db/db mice. We found that CR of db/db mice reverted insulin resistance, hepatic steatosis, body weight and adiposity to those of db/m mice. 1H-NMR- and UPLC-QTOF-MS-based metabolite profiling data showed significant metabolic alterations related to lipogenesis, ketogenesis, and inflammation in db/db mice. Moreover, western blot analysis showed that lipogenesis pathway enzymes in the liver of db/db mice were reduced by CR. In addition, CR reversed ketogenesis pathway enzymes and the enhanced autophagy, mitochondrial biogenesis, collagen deposition and endoplasmic reticulum stress in db/db mice. In particular, hepatic inflammation-related proteins including lipocalin-2 in db/db mice were attenuated by CR. Hepatic metabolomic studies yielded multiple pathological mechanisms of NAFLD. Also, these findings showed that CR has a therapeutic effect by attenuating the deleterious effects of obesity and diabetes-induced multiple complications. PMID:27439777

  2. Dedifferentiated classic adamantinoma of the tibia: a report of a case with eventual complete revertant mesenchymal phenotype.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Francisco Miguel; Ramos, Luis R; Sánchez-Herráez, Sergio; Hernández, Teresa; de Alava, Enrique; Hazelbag, Hans Marten

    2010-09-01

    Adamantinomas of the long bones are low-grade malignant tumours. They seem to be related to osteofibrous dysplasia with a mesenchymal-to-epithelial transformation. We report a case of an adamantinoma with a revertant sarcomatoid transformation that showed a complete loss of epithelial differentiation. It corresponded to a 41-year-old male presented with an 8-cm multilobated lesion in the centre of the distal tibia. On the en bloc resection specimen, areas of classic adamantinoma were found but most of the tumor corresponded to a high-grade neoplasm with 2 histologic patterns: one made up by epithelial nests with a basaloid arrangement and positive for pankeratins and so-called glandular keratins, and a second sarcomatoid component, negative for these epithelial markers. Five months after surgery the patient had a massive relapse that consisted solely of the second sarcomatous component also negative for epithelial antibodies.Three cases of adamantinomas with sarcomatoid transformation of the epithelial component have been described but the tumours still preserved an epithelial immunophenotype. However, our case represents the extreme end of the sarcomatoid dedifferentiation of a classic adamantinoma with complete sarcomatoid transformation and total loss of epithelial markers. To our knowledge this has not been described previously.

  3. Resistance to oncogenic transformation in revertant R1 of human ras-transformed NIH 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzumaki, N.; Ogiso, Y.; Oda, A.; Fujita, H.; Suzuki, H.; Sato, C.; Mullauer, L.

    1989-05-01

    A flat revertant, R1, was isolated from human activated c-Ha-ras-1 (hu-ac-Ha-ras) gene-transformed NIH 3T3 cells (EJ-NIH 3T3) treated with mutagens. R1 contained unchanged transfected hu-ac-Ha-ras DNA and expressed high levels of hu-ac-Ha-ras-specific mRNA and p21 protein. Transfection experiments revealed that NIH 3T3 cells could be transformed by DNA from R1 cells but R1 cells could not be retransformed by Kirsten sarcoma virus, DNA from EJ-NIH 3T3 cells, hu-ac-Ha-ras, v-src, v-mos, simian virus 40 large T antigen, or polyomavirus middle T antigen. Somatic cell hybridization studies showed that R1 was not retransformed by fusion with NIH 3T3 cells and suppressed anchorage independence of EJ-NIH 3T3 and hu-ac-Ha-ras gene-transformed rat W31 cells in soft agar. These results suggest that the reversion and resistance to several oncogenes in R1 is due n not to cellular defects in the production of the transformed phenotype but rather to enhancement of cellular mechanisms that suppress oncogenic transformation.

  4. Impaired regenerative capacity and lower revertant fibre expansion in dystrophin-deficient mdx muscles on DBA/2 background

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Merryl; Echigoya, Yusuke; Maruyama, Rika; Lim, Kenji Rowel Q.; Fukada, So-ichiro; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy, one of the most common lethal genetic disorders, is caused by mutations in the DMD gene and a lack of dystrophin protein. In most DMD patients and animal models, sporadic dystrophin-positive muscle fibres, called revertant fibres (RFs), are observed in otherwise dystrophin-negative backgrounds. RFs are thought to arise from skeletal muscle precursor cells and clonally expand with age due to the frequent regeneration of necrotic fibres. Here we examined the effects of genetic background on muscle regeneration and RF expansion by comparing dystrophin-deficient mdx mice on the C57BL/6 background (mdx-B6) with those on the DBA/2 background (mdx-DBA), which have a more severe phenotype. Interestingly, mdx-DBA muscles had significantly lower RF expansion than mdx-B6 in all age groups, including 2, 6, 12, and 18 months. The percentage of centrally nucleated fibres was also significantly lower in mdx-DBA mice compared to mdx-B6, indicating that less muscle regeneration occurs in mdx-DBA. Our study aligns with the model that RF expansion reflects the activity of precursor cells in skeletal muscles, and it serves as an index of muscle regeneration capacity. PMID:27924830

  5. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy SMARRT): Manufacturing Advanced Engineered Components Using Lost Foam Casting Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Littleton, Harry; Griffin, John

    2011-07-31

    This project was a subtask of Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy SMARRT) Program. Through this project, technologies, such as computer modeling, pattern quality control, casting quality control and marketing tools, were developed to advance the Lost Foam Casting process application and provide greater energy savings. These technologies have improved (1) production efficiency, (2) mechanical properties, and (3) marketability of lost foam castings. All three reduce energy consumption in the metals casting industry. This report summarizes the work done on all tasks in the period of January 1, 2004 through June 30, 2011. Current (2011) annual energy saving estimates based on commercial introduction in 2011 and a market penetration of 97% by 2020 is 5.02 trillion BTU's/year and 6.46 trillion BTU's/year with 100% market penetration by 2023. Along with these energy savings, reduction of scrap and improvement in casting yield will result in a reduction of the environmental emissions associated with the melting and pouring of the metal which will be saved as a result of this technology. The average annual estimate of CO2 reduction per year through 2020 is 0.03 Million Metric Tons of Carbon Equivalent (MM TCE).

  6. Systematic localization of common disease-associated variation in regulatory DNA.

    PubMed

    Maurano, Matthew T; Humbert, Richard; Rynes, Eric; Thurman, Robert E; Haugen, Eric; Wang, Hao; Reynolds, Alex P; Sandstrom, Richard; Qu, Hongzhu; Brody, Jennifer; Shafer, Anthony; Neri, Fidencio; Lee, Kristen; Kutyavin, Tanya; Stehling-Sun, Sandra; Johnson, Audra K; Canfield, Theresa K; Giste, Erika; Diegel, Morgan; Bates, Daniel; Hansen, R Scott; Neph, Shane; Sabo, Peter J; Heimfeld, Shelly; Raubitschek, Antony; Ziegler, Steven; Cotsapas, Chris; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Glass, Ian; Sunyaev, Shamil R; Kaul, Rajinder; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A

    2012-09-07

    Genome-wide association studies have identified many noncoding variants associated with common diseases and traits. We show that these variants are concentrated in regulatory DNA marked by deoxyribonuclease I (DNase I) hypersensitive sites (DHSs). Eighty-eight percent of such DHSs are active during fetal development and are enriched in variants associated with gestational exposure-related phenotypes. We identified distant gene targets for hundreds of variant-containing DHSs that may explain phenotype associations. Disease-associated variants systematically perturb transcription factor recognition sequences, frequently alter allelic chromatin states, and form regulatory networks. We also demonstrated tissue-selective enrichment of more weakly disease-associated variants within DHSs and the de novo identification of pathogenic cell types for Crohn's disease, multiple sclerosis, and an electrocardiogram trait, without prior knowledge of physiological mechanisms. Our results suggest pervasive involvement of regulatory DNA variation in common human disease and provide pathogenic insights into diverse disorders.

  7. Necrolytic acral erythema: a rare skin disease associated with hepatitis C virus infection*

    PubMed Central

    Botelho, Luciane Francisca Fernandes; Enokihara, Milvia Maria Simões e Silva; Enokihara, Mauro Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Necrolytic acral erythema is a rare skin disease associated with hepatitis C virus infection. We report a case of a 31-year-old woman with hepatitis C virus infection and decreased zinc serum level. Physical examination revealed scaly, lichenified plaques, well-demarcated with an erythematous peripheral rim located on the lower limbs. After blood transfusion and oral zinc supplementation the patient presented an improvement of lesions. PMID:27828642

  8. Crohn's Disease Associated with Sweet's Syndrome and Sjögren's Syndrome Treated with Infliximab

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Erina N.; Nguyen, Khanh K.; Sheikh, Rafiq A.; Prindiville, Thomas P.

    2005-01-01

    The association of Crohn's disease (CD) and Sweet's syndrome is rare and the presence of Sjögren's syndrome in Crohn's disease is even rarer, with only three reports found in the literature. We describe two cases of Crohn's disease associated with Sweet's syndrome, one of which is the first case of CD and Sweet's concomitantly associated with Sjögren's syndrome. Both cases responded rapidly to Infliximab therapy with complete resolution of the skin lesions. PMID:16050146

  9. The Decay of Disease Association with Declining Linkage Disequilibrium: A Fine Mapping Theorem

    PubMed Central

    Maadooliat, Mehdi; Bansal, Naveen K.; Upadhya, Jiblal; Farazi, Manzur R.; Li, Xiang; He, Max M.; Hebbring, Scott J.; Ye, Zhan; Schrodi, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    Several important and fundamental aspects of disease genetics models have yet to be described. One such property is the relationship of disease association statistics at a marker site closely linked to a disease causing site. A complete description of this two-locus system is of particular importance to experimental efforts to fine map association signals for complex diseases. Here, we present a simple relationship between disease association statistics and the decline of linkage disequilibrium from a causal site. Specifically, the ratio of Chi-square disease association statistics at a marker site and causal site is equivalent to the standard measure of pairwise linkage disequilibrium, r2. A complete derivation of this relationship from a general disease model is shown. Quite interestingly, this relationship holds across all modes of inheritance. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations using a disease genetics model applied to chromosomes subjected to a standard model of recombination are employed to better understand the variation around this fine mapping theorem due to sampling effects. We also use this relationship to provide a framework for estimating properties of a non-interrogated causal site using data at closely linked markers. Lastly, we apply this way of examining association data from high-density genotyping in a large, publicly-available data set investigating extreme BMI. We anticipate that understanding the patterns of disease association decay with declining linkage disequilibrium from a causal site will enable more powerful fine mapping methods and provide new avenues for identifying causal sites/genes from fine-mapping studies. PMID:28018425

  10. Lombardia GENS: a collaborative registry for monogenic diseases associated with stroke.

    PubMed

    Bersano, Anna; Baron, Pierluigi; Lanfranconi, Silvia; Trobia, Nadia; Sterzi, Roberto; Motto, Cristina; Comi, Giancarlo; Sessa, Maria; Martinelli-Boneschi, Filippo; Micieli, Giuseppe; Ferrarese, Carlo; Santoro, Patrizia; Parati, Eugenio; Boncoraglio, Giorgio; Padovani, Alessandro; Pezzini, Alessandro; Candelise, Livia

    2012-01-01

    The Italian region of Lombardy, with its existing stroke centers and high-technology laboratories, provides a favorable context for studying monogenic diseases associated with stroke. The Lombardia GENS project was set up to create a regional network for the diagnosis of six monogenic diseases associated with stroke: CADASIL, Fabry disease, MELAS, familial and sporadic hemiplegic migraine, hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy and Marfan syndrome. The network comprises 36 stroke centers and seven high-technology laboratories, performing molecular analysis. In this context, all stroke/TIA patients fulfilling clinical criteria for monogenic diseases are currently being included in an ongoing study. Demographic, clinical and family data and diagnostic criteria are collected using standardized forms. On the basis of stroke incidence in Lombardy and the reported prevalence of the diseases considered, we expect, during the course of the study, to collect datasets and DNA samples from more than 200 stroke patients suspected of having monogenic diseases. This will allow evaluation of the regional burden and better phenotype characterization of monogenic diseases associated with stroke.

  11. Cell type-selective disease-association of genes under high regulatory load.

    PubMed

    Galhardo, Mafalda; Berninger, Philipp; Nguyen, Thanh-Phuong; Sauter, Thomas; Sinkkonen, Lasse

    2015-10-15

    We previously showed that disease-linked metabolic genes are often under combinatorial regulation. Using the genome-wide ChIP-Seq binding profiles for 93 transcription factors in nine different cell lines, we show that genes under high regulatory load are significantly enriched for disease-association across cell types. We find that transcription factor load correlates with the enhancer load of the genes and thereby allows the identification of genes under high regulatory load by epigenomic mapping of active enhancers. Identification of the high enhancer load genes across 139 samples from 96 different cell and tissue types reveals a consistent enrichment for disease-associated genes in a cell type-selective manner. The underlying genes are not limited to super-enhancer genes and show several types of disease-association evidence beyond genetic variation (such as biomarkers). Interestingly, the high regulatory load genes are involved in more KEGG pathways than expected by chance, exhibit increased betweenness centrality in the interaction network of liver disease genes, and carry longer 3' UTRs with more microRNA (miRNA) binding sites than genes on average, suggesting a role as hubs integrating signals within regulatory networks. In summary, epigenetic mapping of active enhancers presents a promising and unbiased approach for identification of novel disease genes in a cell type-selective manner.

  12. HGIMDA: Heterogeneous graph inference for miRNA-disease association prediction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xu; You, Zhu-Hong; Huang, Yu-An; Yan, Gui-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs) have drawn more and more attentions because accumulating experimental studies have indicated miRNA could play critical roles in multiple biological processes as well as the development and progression of human complex diseases. Using the huge number of known heterogeneous biological datasets to predict potential associations between miRNAs and diseases is an important topic in the field of biology, medicine, and bioinformatics. In this study, considering the limitations in the previous computational methods, we developed the computational model of Heterogeneous Graph Inference for MiRNA-Disease Association prediction (HGIMDA) to uncover potential miRNA-disease associations by integrating miRNA functional similarity, disease semantic similarity, Gaussian interaction profile kernel similarity, and experimentally verified miRNA-disease associations into a heterogeneous graph. HGIMDA obtained AUCs of 0.8781 and 0.8077 based on global and local leave-one-out cross validation, respectively. Furthermore, HGIMDA was applied to three important human cancers for performance evaluation. As a result, 90% (Colon Neoplasms), 88% (Esophageal Neoplasms) and 88% (Kidney Neoplasms) of top 50 predicted miRNAs are confirmed by recent experiment reports. Furthermore, HGIMDA could be effectively applied to new diseases and new miRNAs without any known associations, which overcome the important limitations of many previous computational models. PMID:27533456

  13. Cell type-selective disease-association of genes under high regulatory load

    PubMed Central

    Galhardo, Mafalda; Berninger, Philipp; Nguyen, Thanh-Phuong; Sauter, Thomas; Sinkkonen, Lasse

    2015-01-01

    We previously showed that disease-linked metabolic genes are often under combinatorial regulation. Using the genome-wide ChIP-Seq binding profiles for 93 transcription factors in nine different cell lines, we show that genes under high regulatory load are significantly enriched for disease-association across cell types. We find that transcription factor load correlates with the enhancer load of the genes and thereby allows the identification of genes under high regulatory load by epigenomic mapping of active enhancers. Identification of the high enhancer load genes across 139 samples from 96 different cell and tissue types reveals a consistent enrichment for disease-associated genes in a cell type-selective manner. The underlying genes are not limited to super-enhancer genes and show several types of disease-association evidence beyond genetic variation (such as biomarkers). Interestingly, the high regulatory load genes are involved in more KEGG pathways than expected by chance, exhibit increased betweenness centrality in the interaction network of liver disease genes, and carry longer 3′ UTRs with more microRNA (miRNA) binding sites than genes on average, suggesting a role as hubs integrating signals within regulatory networks. In summary, epigenetic mapping of active enhancers presents a promising and unbiased approach for identification of novel disease genes in a cell type-selective manner. PMID:26338775

  14. Mercury in Hair Is Inversely Related to Disease Associated Damage in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Crowe, William; Doherty, Leanne; Watson, Gene; Armstrong, David; Ball, Elisabeth; Magee, Pamela; Allsopp, Philip; Bell, Aubrey; Strain, J. J.; McSorley, Emeir

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune inflammatory disease, and environmental factors are proposed to exacerbate existing symptoms. One such environmental factor is mercury. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between exposure to mercury (Hg) and disease activity and disease associated damage in Total Hg concentrations in hair and urine were measured in 52 SLE patients. Dental amalgams were quantified. Disease activity was assessed using three indexes including the British Isles Lupus Assessment Group Index (BILAG). Disease associated damage was measured using the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology SLICC/ACR Damage Index. Pearson’s correlation identified a significant negative correlation between hair Hg and BILAG (r = −0.323, p = 0.029) and SLICC/ACR (r = −0.377, p = 0.038). Multiple regression analysis identified hair Hg as a significant predictor of disease associated damage as determined by SLICC/ACR (β = −0.366, 95% confidence interval (CI): −1.769, −0.155 p = 0.019). Urinary Hg was not related to disease activity or damage. Fish consumption is the primary route of MeHg exposure in humans and the inverse association of hair Hg with disease activity observed here might be explained by the anti-inflammatory effects of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids also found in fish. PMID:26703710

  15. ImmunemiR - a database of prioritized immune miRNA disease associations and its interactome.

    PubMed

    Prabahar, Archana; Natarajan, Jeyakumar

    2017-01-17

    MicroRNAs are the key regulators of gene expression and their abnormal expression in the immune system may be associated with several human diseases such as inflammation, cancer and autoimmune diseases. Elucidation of microRNA (miRNA) disease association through the interactome will deepen the understanding of its disease mechanisms. In this present study, miRNAs specific to immune related diseases were retrieved from curated databases and literature based on MeSH classification of immune system diseases. In total 245 immune miRNAs associated with 92 OMIM disease categories were identified and they are prioritized to specific immune diseases using random walk ranking algorithm. These data were compiled as ImmunemiR, a database of prioritized immune miRNA disease associations. This database provides both text based annotation information and network visualization of its interactome network. To our knowledge, ImmunemiR is the first available database to provide a comprehensive repository of human immune disease associated miRNAs with network visualization options of its target genes, protein-protein interactions (PPI).

  16. The reduction of oxidative stress by nanocomposite Fullerol decreases mucositis severity and reverts leukopenia induced by Irinotecan.

    PubMed

    Arifa, Raquel Duque Nascimento; Paula, Talles Prosperi de; Madeira, Mila Fernandes Moreira; Lima, Renata Lacerda; Garcia, Zélia Menezes; Ávila, Thiago Vinícius; Pinho, Vanessa; Barcelos, Lucíola Silva; Pinheiro, Maurício Veloso Brant; Ladeira, Luiz Orlando; Krambrock, Klaus; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Souza, Danielle Glória

    2016-05-01

    Irinotecan is a useful chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of several solid tumors. However, this therapy is associated with side effects, including leukopenia and mucositis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) activate inflammatory pathways and contribute to Irinotecan-induced mucositis. Fullerol is a nanocomposite with anti-oxidant properties that may reduce tissue damage after inflammatory stimuli. In this paper, the effects of Fullerol and mechanisms of protection were investigated in a model of Irinotecan-induced mucositis. Mucositis was induced by an injection of Irinotecan per 4 days in C57BL/6. Fullerol or a vehicle was injected every 12h. On day 7, the intestines were removed to evaluate histological changes, leukocyte influx, and the production of cytokines and ROS. Irinotecan therapy resulted in weight loss, an increased clinical score and intestinal injury. Treatment with Fullerol attenuated weight loss, decreased clinical score and intestinal damage. Irinotecan also induced increased ROS production in enterocytes, oxidative stress, IL-1β production, neutrophil and eosinophil influx in the ileum. Fullerol treatment decreased production of ROS in the enterocytes, oxidative stress, IL-1β production, neutrophil and eosinophil influx in the ileum. Irinotecan therapy also induced leukopenia in an ROS-dependent manner because leukopenia reverted in WT mice treated with Fullerol or Apocynin or in Gp91phox(-/-) mice. Mice treated with Irinotecan presented less melanoma tumor growth compared to the control group. Fullerol does not interfere in the anti-tumor action of Irinotecan. Fullerol has a great pharmacology potential to decreases the severity of mucositis and of leukopenia during chemotherapy treatment.

  17. Omega-3 fatty acids partially revert the metabolic gene expression profile induced by long-term calorie restriction.

    PubMed

    López-Domínguez, José Alberto; Cánovas, Ángela; Medrano, Juan F; Islas-Trejo, Alma; Kim, Kyoungmi; Taylor, Sandra L; Villalba, José Manuel; López-Lluch, Guillermo; Navas, Plácido; Ramsey, Jon J

    2016-05-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) consistently extends longevity and delays age-related diseases across several animal models. We have previously shown that different dietary fat sources can modulate life span and mitochondrial ultrastructure, function and membrane fatty acid composition in mice maintained on a 40% CR. In particular, animals consuming lard as the main fat source (CR-Lard) lived longer than CR mice consuming diets with soybean oil (CR-Soy) or fish oil (CR-Fish) as the predominant lipid source. In the present work, a transcriptomic analysis in the liver and skeletal muscle was performed in order to elucidate possible mechanisms underlying the changes in energy metabolism and longevity induced by dietary fat in CR mice. After 8 months of CR, transcription downstream of several mediators of inflammation was inhibited in liver. In contrast, proinflammatory signaling was increased in the CR-Fish versus other CR groups. Dietary fish oil induced a gene expression pattern consistent with increased transcriptional regulation by several cytokines (TNF, GM-CSF, TGF-β) and sex hormones when compared to the other CR groups. The CR-Fish also had lower expression of genes involved in fatty acid biosynthesis and increased expression of mitochondrial and peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation genes than the other CR diet groups. Our data suggest that a diet high in n-3 PUFA, partially reverts CR-related changes in gene expression of key processes, such as inflammation and steroid hormone signaling, and this may mitigate life span extension with CR in mice consuming diets high in fish oil.

  18. Construction and preliminary immunobiological characterization of a novel, non-reverting, intranasal live attenuated whooping cough vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Cornford-Nairns, Renee; Daggard, Grant; Mukkur, Trilochan

    2012-06-01

    We describe the construction and immunobiological properties of a novel whooping cough vaccine candidate, in which the aroQ gene, encoding 3-dehydroquinase, was deleted by insertional inactivation using the kanamycin resistance gene cassette and allelic exchange using a Bordetella suicide vector. The aroQ B. pertussis mutant required supplementation of media to grow but failed to grow on an unsupplemented medium. The aroQ B. pertussis mutant was undetectable in the trachea and lungs of mice at days 6 and 12 post-infection, respectively. Antigen-specific antibody isotypes IgG1 and IgG2a, were produced, and cell-mediated immunity [CMI], using interleukin-2 and interferon-gamma as indirect indicators, was induced in mice vaccinated with the aroQ B. pertussis vaccine candidate, which were substantially enhanced upon second exposure to virulent B. pertussis. Interleukin- 12 was also produced in the aroQ B. pertussis-vaccinated mice. On the other hand, neither IgG2a nor CMI-indicator cytokines were produced in DTaP-vaccinated mice, although the CMI-indicator cytokines became detectable post-challenge with virulent B. pertussis. Intranasal immunization with one dose of the aroQ B. pertussis mutant protected vaccinated mice against an intranasal challenge infection, with no pathogen being detected in the lungs of immunized mice by day 7 post-challenge. B. pertussis aroQ thus constitutes a safe, non-reverting, metabolite-deficient vaccine candidate that induces both humoral and cellmediated immune responses with potential for use as a single-dose vaccine in adolescents and adults, in the first instance, with a view to disrupting the transmission cycle of whooping cough to infants and the community.

  19. Calcium supplementation reverts central adiposity, leptin, and insulin resistance in adult offspring programed by neonatal nicotine exposure.

    PubMed

    Nobre, J L; Lisboa, P C; Santos-Silva, A P; Lima, N S; Manhães, A C; Nogueira-Neto, J F; Cabanelas, A; Pazos-Moura, C C; Moura, E G; de Oliveira, E

    2011-09-01

    Obesity is a worldwide epidemic. Calcium influences energy metabolism regulation, causing body weight loss. Because maternal nicotine exposure during lactation programs for obesity, hyperleptinemia, insulin resistance (IR), and hypothyroidism, we decided to evaluate the possible effect of dietary calcium supplementation on these endocrine dysfunctions in this experimental model. Osmotic minipumps containing nicotine solution (N: 6 mg/kg per day for 14 days) or saline (C) were s.c. implanted in lactating rats 2 days after giving birth (P2). At P120, N and C offspring were subdivided into four groups: 1) C - standard diet; 2) C with calcium supplementation (CCa, 10 g calcium carbonate/kg rat chow); 3) N - standard diet; and 4) N with calcium supplementation (NCa). Rats were killed at P180. As expected, N offspring showed higher visceral and total body fat, hyperleptinemia, lower hypothalamus leptin receptor (OB-R) content, hyperinsulinemia, and higher IR index. Also, higher tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression (+51%), catecholamine content (+37%), and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3) (+76%) were observed in N offspring. Dietary calcium supplementation reversed adiposity, hyperleptinemia, OB-R underexpression, IR, TH overexpression, and vitamin D. However, this supplementation did not reverse hypothyroidism. In NCa offspring, Sirt1 mRNA was lower in visceral fat (-37%) and higher in liver (+42%). In conclusion, dietary calcium supplementation seems to revert most of the metabolic syndrome parameters observed in adult offspring programed by maternal nicotine exposure during lactation. It is conceivable that the reduction in fat mass per se, induced by calcium therapy, is the main mechanism that leads to the increment of insulin action.

  20. Inhibiting Vimentin or beta 1-integrin Reverts Prostate Tumor Cells in IrECM and Reduces Tumor Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xueping; Fournier, Marcia V.; Ware, Joy L.; Bissell, Mina J.; Zehner, Zendra E.

    2009-07-27

    Prostate epithelial cells grown embedded in laminin-rich extracellular matrix (lrECM) undergo morphological changes that closely resemble their architecture in vivo. In this study, growth characteristics of three human prostate epithelial sublines derived from the same cellular lineage, but displaying different tumorigenic and metastatic properties in vivo, were assessed in three-dimensional (3D) lrECM gels. M12, a highly tumorigenic and metastatic subline, was derived from the parental prostate epithelial P69 cell line by selection in nude mice and found to contain a deletion of 19p-q13.1. The stable reintroduction of an intact human chromosome 19 into M12 resulted in a poorly tumorigenic subline, designated F6. When embedded in lrECM gels, the nontumorigenic P69 line produced acini with clearly defined lumena. Immunostaining with antibodies to {beta}-catenin, E-cadherin or {alpha}6-, {beta}4- and {beta}1-integrins showed polarization typical of glandular epithelium. In contrast, the metastatic M12 subline produced highly disorganized cells with no evidence of polarization. The F6 subline reverted to acini-like structures exhibiting basal polarity marked with integrins. Reducing either vimentin levels via siRNA interference or {beta}1-integrin expression by the addition of the blocking antibody, AIIB2, reorganized the M12 subline into forming polarized acini. The loss of vimentin significantly reduced M12-Vim tumor growth when assessed by subcutaneous injection in athymic mice. Thus, tumorigenicity in vivo correlated with disorganized growth in 3D lrECM gels. These studies suggest that the levels of vimentin and {beta}1-integrin play a key role in the homeostasis of the normal acini in prostate and that their dysregulation may lead to tumorigenesis.

  1. A2A Adenosine Receptor Antagonism Reverts the Blood-Brain Barrier Dysfunction Induced by Sleep Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Hurtado-Alvarado, Gabriela; Domínguez-Salazar, Emilio; Velázquez-Moctezuma, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Chronic sleep restriction induces blood-brain barrier disruption and increases pro-inflammatory mediators in rodents. Those inflammatory mediators may modulate the blood-brain barrier and constitute a link between sleep loss and blood-brain barrier physiology. We propose that adenosine action on its A2A receptor may be modulating the blood-brain barrier dynamics in sleep-restricted rats. We administrated a selective A2A adenosine receptor antagonist (SCH58261) in sleep-restricted rats at the 10th day of sleep restriction and evaluated the blood-brain barrier permeability to dextrans coupled to fluorescein (FITC-dextrans) and Evans blue. In addition, we evaluated by western blot the expression of tight junction proteins (claudin-5, occludin, ZO-1), adherens junction protein (E-cadherin), A2A adenosine receptor, adenosine-synthesizing enzyme (CD73), and neuroinflammatory markers (Iba-1 and GFAP) in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, basal nuclei and cerebellar vermis. Sleep restriction increased blood-brain barrier permeability to FITC-dextrans and Evans blue, and the effect was reverted by the administration of SCH58261 in almost all brain regions, excluding the cerebellum. Sleep restriction increased the expression of A2A adenosine receptor only in the hippocampus and basal nuclei without changing the expression of CD73 in all brain regions. Sleep restriction reduced the expression of tight junction proteins in all brain regions, except in the cerebellum; and SCH58261 restored the levels of tight junction proteins in the cortex, hippocampus and basal nuclei. Finally, sleep restriction induced GFAP and Iba-1 overexpression that was attenuated with the administration of SCH58261. These data suggest that the action of adenosine on its A2A receptor may have a crucial role in blood-brain barrier dysfunction during sleep loss probably by direct modulation of brain endothelial cell permeability or through a mechanism that involves gliosis with subsequent inflammation and

  2. Expansion of revertant fibers in dystrophic mdx muscles reflects activity of muscle precursor cells and serves as an index of muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Toshifumi; Lu, Qi-Long; Morgan, Jennifer E; Davies, Kay E; Fisher, Rosie; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Partridge, Terence A

    2006-07-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy and the mdx mouse myopathies reflect a lack of dystrophin in muscles. However, both contain sporadic clusters of revertant fibers (RFs) that express dystrophin. RF clusters expand in size with age in mdx mice. To test the hypothesis that the expansion of clusters is achieved through the process of muscle degeneration and regeneration, we analyzed muscles of mdx mice in which degeneration and regeneration were inhibited by the expression of micro-dystrophins or utrophin transgenes. Postnatal RF expansion was diminished in direct correlation to the protective effect of the transgene expression. Similarly, expansion of RFs was inhibited when muscle regeneration was blocked by irradiation. However, in irradiated muscles, irradiation-tolerant quiescent muscle precursor cells reactivated by notexin effectively restored RF expansion. Our observations demonstrate that revertant events occur initially within a subset of muscle precursor cells. The proliferation of these cells, as part of the regeneration process, leads to the expansion of RF clusters within degenerating muscles. This expansion of revertant clusters depicts the cumulative history of regeneration, thus providing a useful index for functional evaluation of therapies that counteract muscle degeneration.

  3. The Genetics of a Small Autosomal Region of DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER Containing the Structural Gene for Alcohol Dehydrogenase. VI. Induced Revertants of Scutoid

    PubMed Central

    Ashburner, M.; Detwiler, C.; Tsubota, S.; Woodruff, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-six induced revertants of Scutoid (Sco), a dominant mutation of Drosophila melanogaster, have been characterized genetically. Sco is an unusual mutation, involving two small reciprocal transpositions within the region 35A4 to 35C5 of chromosome arm 2L. One of these transpositions juxtaposes the noc and l(2)br28 loci. We suggested previously that the Sco phenotype results from the "fusion" of noc and l(2)br28. In support of this idea we now show that 23 of 26 revertants of Sco are noc-, indeed the majority are either chromosome aberrations broken between noc and l(2)br28 or deletions of these loci from the mutant chromosome. However, some revertants of Sco are rather more complex, and their properties suggest an interaction between the pu-noc and l(2)br28-l(2)br37 regions of chromosome arm 2L and also demonstrate the genetic complexity of the el-noc region. PMID:6309608

  4. Inhibition of muscle fibrosis results in increases in both utrophin levels and the number of revertant myofibers in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Oshrat; Genin, Olga; Angelini, Corrado; Halevy, Orna; Pines, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy is characterized by: near absence of dystrophin in skeletal muscles; low percentage of revertant myofibers; up-regulation of utrophin synthesis; and a high degree of muscle fibrosis. In patient quadriceps femoris biopsies (n = 6, ages between 3–9 years) an inverse correlation was observed between the levels of collagen type I – representing fibrosis – and the levels of utrophin. This correlation was independent of the patient's age and was observed in the entire muscle biopsy sections. In the mdx mice diaphragm (n = 6/group), inhibition of fibrosis by halofuginone resulted in increases in the levels of utrophin. The utrophin/fibrosis relationships were not limited to collagen type I, but also applied to other constituents of the fibrosis machinery. The inverse correlation was found also in old mdx mice with established fibrosis. In addition, inhibition of collagen type I levels was associated with increases in the numbers of revertant myofibers, both as single myofibers and in clusters in the diaphragm and the gastrocnemius. In summary, our results demonstrate an inverse correlation between the level of muscle fibrosis and the level of utrophin and that of the number of revertant myofibers. These findings may reveal common links between the fibrotic and utrophin-synthesis pathways and offer new insights into the regulation of utrophin synthesis. PMID:26015394

  5. Comparison of the Frequencies of Spontaneous and Chemically-Induced 5-Bromodeoxyuridine-Resistance Mutations in Wild-Type and Revertant Bhk-21/13 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Caboche, Michel

    1974-01-01

    5-bromodeoxyuridine resistance mutations induced by mutagenesis were studied. The average expression time for induced mutations varied with the concentration of the mutagen ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS). However, a constant number of two generation times was necessary for half maximal expression of induced mutations. Also, induced mutation rates were compared under optimal expression conditions for bromodeoxyuridine, fluorodeoxyuridine and azaguanine resistance markers. Ten independent bromodeoxy-uridine-resistant clones were tested for reversion. Two clones reverted—one spontaneously and the other after mutagenesis. The spontaneous rate of mutation to bromodeoxyuridine resistance, estimated by the fluctuation test, was high in revertant clones (4 x 10-6 / cell / generation) and low in the wild-type cells (< 3.5 x 10-8 / cell / generation). A comparison of induced mutation frequencies at variable EMS concentrations showed a single-hit curve for revertant clones and a multihit curve for the wild-type cells. Thymidine kinase activities of resistant clones were usually less than 2% of that of the wild-type clone. Inducibility, thermal stability and intracellular localization of the thymidine kinases of the wild-type cells and of a revertant clone were identical. A low, but significant (P < 0.10), Km discrepancy was observed between enzyme extracts of these lines. The genetic implications of these results are discussed. PMID:4367878

  6. Enrichment Analysis Identifies Functional MicroRNA-Disease Associations in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Dandan; Cui, Xiaomeng; Wang, Yang; Zhao, Yilei; Li, Huiying; Hu, Suangjiu; Chu, Xiaodan; Li, Yan; Li, Qiang; Liu, Qian; Zhu, Wenliang

    2015-01-01

    Substantial evidence has shown that microRNAs (miRNAs) may be causally linked to the occurrence and progression of human diseases. Herein, we conducted an enrichment analysis to identify potential functional miRNA-disease associations (MDAs) in humans by integrating currently known biological data: miRNA-target interactions (MTIs), protein-protein interactions, and gene-disease associations. Two contributing factors to functional miRNA-disease associations were quantitatively considered: the direct effects of miRNA that target disease-related genes, and indirect effects triggered by protein-protein interactions. Ninety-nine miRNAs were scanned for possible functional association with 2223 MeSH-defined human diseases. Each miRNA was experimentally validated to target ≥ 10 mRNA genes. Putative MDAs were identified when at least one MTI was confidently validated for a disease. Overall, 19648 putative MDAs were found, of which 10.0% was experimentally validated. Further results suggest that filtering for miRNAs that target a greater number of disease-related genes (n ≥ 8) can significantly enrich for true MDAs from the set of putative associations (enrichment rate = 60.7%, adjusted hypergeometric p = 2.41×10−91). Considering the indirect effects of miRNAs further elevated the enrichment rate to 72.6%. By using this method, a novel MDA between miR-24 and ovarian cancer was found. Compared with scramble miRNA overexpression of miR-24 was validated to remarkably induce ovarian cancer cells apoptosis. Our study provides novel insight into factors contributing to functional MDAs by integrating large quantities of previously generated biological data, and establishes a feasible method to identify plausible associations with high confidence. PMID:26296081

  7. Analysis of disease-associated objects at the Rat Genome Database.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shur-Jen; Laulederkind, Stanley J F; Hayman, G T; Smith, Jennifer R; Petri, Victoria; Lowry, Timothy F; Nigam, Rajni; Dwinell, Melinda R; Worthey, Elizabeth A; Munzenmaier, Diane H; Shimoyama, Mary; Jacob, Howard J

    2013-01-01

    The Rat Genome Database (RGD) is the premier resource for genetic, genomic and phenotype data for the laboratory rat, Rattus norvegicus. In addition to organizing biological data from rats, the RGD team focuses on manual curation of gene-disease associations for rat, human and mouse. In this work, we have analyzed disease-associated strains, quantitative trait loci (QTL) and genes from rats. These disease objects form the basis for seven disease portals. Among disease portals, the cardiovascular disease and obesity/metabolic syndrome portals have the highest number of rat strains and QTL. These two portals share 398 rat QTL, and these shared QTL are highly concentrated on rat chromosomes 1 and 2. For disease-associated genes, we performed gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis across portals using RatMine enrichment widgets. Fifteen GO terms, five from each GO aspect, were selected to profile enrichment patterns of each portal. Of the selected biological process (BP) terms, 'regulation of programmed cell death' was the top enriched term across all disease portals except in the obesity/metabolic syndrome portal where 'lipid metabolic process' was the most enriched term. 'Cytosol' and 'nucleus' were common cellular component (CC) annotations for disease genes, but only the cancer portal genes were highly enriched with 'nucleus' annotations. Similar enrichment patterns were observed in a parallel analysis using the DAVID functional annotation tool. The relationship between the preselected 15 GO terms and disease terms was examined reciprocally by retrieving rat genes annotated with these preselected terms. The individual GO term-annotated gene list showed enrichment in physiologically related diseases. For example, the 'regulation of blood pressure' genes were enriched with cardiovascular disease annotations, and the 'lipid metabolic process' genes with obesity annotations. Furthermore, we were able to enhance enrichment of neurological diseases by combining 'G

  8. Comparing Drug-Disease Associations in Clinical Practice Guideline Recommendations and Drug Product Label Indications.

    PubMed

    Leung, Tiffany I; Dumontier, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) and structured product labels (SPLs) are both intended to promote evidence-based medical practices and guide clinicians' prescribing decisions. However, it is unclear how well CPG recommendations about pharmacologic therapies for certain diseases match SPL indications for recommended drugs. In this study, we use publicly available data and text mining methods to examine drug-disease associations in CPG recommendations and SPL treatment indications for 15 common chronic conditions. Preliminary results suggest that there is a mismatch between guideline-recommended pharmacologic therapies and SPL indications. Conflicting or inconsistent recommendations and indications may complicate clinical decision making and implementation or measurement of best practices.

  9. Metagenomic approaches to disclose disease-associated pathogens: detection of viral pathogens in honeybees.

    PubMed

    Granberg, Fredrik; Karlsson, Oskar E; Belák, Sándor

    2015-01-01

    Metagenomic approaches have become invaluable for culture-independent and sequence-independent detection and characterization of disease-associated pathogens. Here, the sequential steps from sampling to verification of results are described for a metagenomic-based approach to detect potential pathogens in honeybees. The pre-sequencing steps are given in detail, but due to the rapid development of sequencing technologies, all platform-specific procedures, as well as subsequent bioinformatics analysis, are more generally described. It should also be noted that this approach could, with minor modifications, be adapted for other organisms and sample matrices.

  10. Excess sphingomyelin disturbs ATG9A trafficking and autophagosome closure

    PubMed Central

    Corcelle-Termeau, Elisabeth; Vindeløv, Signe Diness; Hämälistö, Saara; Mograbi, Baharia; Keldsbo, Anne; Bräsen, Jan Hinrich; Favaro, Elena; Adam, Dieter; Szyniarowski, Piotr; Hofman, Paul; Krautwald, Stefan; Farkas, Thomas; Petersen, Nikolaj H.T.; Rohde, Mikkel; Linkermann, Andreas; Jäättelä, Marja

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sphingomyelin is an essential cellular lipid that traffics between plasma membrane and intracellular organelles until directed to lysosomes for SMPD1 (sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 1)-mediated degradation. Inactivating mutations in the SMPD1 gene result in Niemann-Pick diseases type A and B characterized by sphingomyelin accumulation and severely disturbed tissue homeostasis. Here, we report that sphingomyelin overload disturbs the maturation and closure of autophagic membranes. Niemann-Pick type A patient fibroblasts and SMPD1-depleted cancer cells accumulate elongated and unclosed autophagic membranes as well as abnormally swollen autophagosomes in the absence of normal autophagosomes and autolysosomes. The immature autophagic membranes are rich in WIPI2, ATG16L1 and MAP1LC3B but display reduced association with ATG9A. Contrary to its normal trafficking between plasma membrane, intracellular organelles and autophagic membranes, ATG9A concentrates in transferrin receptor-positive juxtanuclear recycling endosomes in SMPD1-deficient cells. Supporting a causative role for ATG9A mistrafficking in the autophagy defect observed in SMPD1-deficient cells, ectopic ATG9A effectively reverts this phenotype. Exogenous C12-sphingomyelin induces a similar juxtanuclear accumulation of ATG9A and subsequent defect in the maturation of autophagic membranes in healthy cells while the main sphingomyelin metabolite, ceramide, fails to revert the autophagy defective phenotype in SMPD1-deficient cells. Juxtanuclear accumulation of ATG9A and defective autophagy are also evident in tissues of smpd1-deficient mice with a subsequent inability to cope with kidney ischemia-reperfusion stress. These data reveal sphingomyelin as an important regulator of ATG9A trafficking and maturation of early autophagic membranes. PMID:27070082

  11. Revealing disease-associated pathways by network integration of untargeted metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Pirhaji, Leila; Milani, Pamela; Leidl, Mathias; Curran, Timothy; Avila-Pacheco, Julian; Clish, Clary B; White, Forest M; Saghatelian, Alan; Fraenkel, Ernest

    2016-09-01

    Uncovering the molecular context of dysregulated metabolites is crucial to understand pathogenic pathways. However, their system-level analysis has been limited owing to challenges in global metabolite identification. Most metabolite features detected by untargeted metabolomics carried out by liquid-chromatography-mass spectrometry cannot be uniquely identified without additional, time-consuming experiments. We report a network-based approach, prize-collecting Steiner forest algorithm for integrative analysis of untargeted metabolomics (PIUMet), that infers molecular pathways and components via integrative analysis of metabolite features, without requiring their identification. We demonstrated PIUMet by analyzing changes in metabolism of sphingolipids, fatty acids and steroids in a Huntington's disease model. Additionally, PIUMet enabled us to elucidate putative identities of altered metabolite features in diseased cells, and infer experimentally undetected, disease-associated metabolites and dysregulated proteins. Finally, we established PIUMet's ability for integrative analysis of untargeted metabolomics data with proteomics data, demonstrating that this approach elicits disease-associated metabolites and proteins that cannot be inferred by individual analysis of these data.

  12. Identifying human microRNA-disease associations by a new diffusion-based method.

    PubMed

    Liao, Bo; Ding, Sumei; Chen, Haowen; Li, Zejun; Cai, Lijun

    2015-08-01

    Identifying the microRNA-disease relationship is vital for investigating the pathogenesis of various diseases. However, experimental verification of disease-related microRNAs remains considerable challenge to many researchers, particularly for the fact that numerous new microRNAs are discovered every year. As such, development of computational methods for disease-related microRNA prediction has recently gained eminent attention. In this paper, first, we construct a miRNA functional network and a disease similarity network by integrating different information sources. Then, we further introduce a new diffusion-based method (NDBM) to explore global network similarity for miRNA-disease association inference. Even though known miRNA-disease associations in the database are rare, NDBM still achieves an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 85.62% in the leave-one-out cross-validation in improving the prediction accuracy of previous methods significantly. Moreover, our method is applicable to diseases with no known related miRNAs as well as new miRNAs with unknown target diseases. Some associations who strongly predicted by our method are confirmed by public databases. These superior performances suggest that NDBM could be an effective and important tool for biomedical research.

  13. Multiple major disease-associated clones of Legionella pneumophila have emerged recently and independently.

    PubMed

    David, Sophia; Rusniok, Christophe; Mentasti, Massimo; Gomez-Valero, Laura; Harris, Simon R; Lechat, Pierre; Lees, John; Ginevra, Christophe; Glaser, Philippe; Ma, Laurence; Bouchier, Christiane; Underwood, Anthony; Jarraud, Sophie; Harrison, Timothy G; Parkhill, Julian; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2016-11-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an environmental bacterium and the leading cause of Legionnaires' disease. Just five sequence types (ST), from more than 2000 currently described, cause nearly half of disease cases in northwest Europe. Here, we report the sequence and analyses of 364 L. pneumophila genomes, including 337 from the five disease-associated STs and 27 representative of the species diversity. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the five STs have independent origins within a highly diverse species. The number of de novo mutations is extremely low with maximum pairwise single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) ranging from 19 (ST47) to 127 (ST1), which suggests emergences within the last century. Isolates sampled geographically far apart differ by only a few SNPs, demonstrating rapid dissemination. These five STs have been recombining recently, leading to a shared pool of allelic variants potentially contributing to their increased disease propensity. The oldest clone, ST1, has spread globally; between 1940 and 2000, four new clones have emerged in Europe, which show long-distance, rapid dispersal. That a large proportion of clinical cases is caused by recently emerged and internationally dispersed clones, linked by convergent evolution, is surprising for an environmental bacterium traditionally considered to be an opportunistic pathogen. To simultaneously explain recent emergence, rapid spread and increased disease association, we hypothesize that these STs have adapted to new man-made environmental niches, which may be linked by human infection and transmission.

  14. Detecting disease-associated genomic outcomes using constrained mixture of Bayesian hierarchical models for paired data

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunfeng; Morrow, Jarrett; Raby, Benjamin; Tantisira, Kelan; Weiss, Scott T.; Huang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Detecting disease-associated genomic outcomes is one of the key steps in precision medicine research. Cutting-edge high-throughput technologies enable researchers to unbiasedly test if genomic outcomes are associated with disease of interest. However, these technologies also include the challenges associated with the analysis of genome-wide data. Two big challenges are (1) how to reduce the effects of technical noise; and (2) how to handle the curse of dimensionality (i.e., number of variables are way larger than the number of samples). To tackle these challenges, we propose a constrained mixture of Bayesian hierarchical models (MBHM) for detecting disease-associated genomic outcomes for data obtained from paired/matched designs. Paired/matched designs can effectively reduce effects of confounding factors. MBHM does not involve multiple testing, hence does not have the problem of the curse of dimensionality. It also could borrow information across genes so that it can be used for whole genome data with small sample sizes. PMID:28358896

  15. Prediction of miRNA-disease associations with a vector space model

    PubMed Central

    Pasquier, Claude; Gardès, Julien

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs play critical roles in many physiological processes. Their dysregulations are also closely related to the development and progression of various human diseases, including cancer. Therefore, identifying new microRNAs that are associated with diseases contributes to a better understanding of pathogenicity mechanisms. MicroRNAs also represent a tremendous opportunity in biotechnology for early diagnosis. To date, several in silico methods have been developed to address the issue of microRNA-disease association prediction. However, these methods have various limitations. In this study, we investigate the hypothesis that information attached to miRNAs and diseases can be revealed by distributional semantics. Our basic approach is to represent distributional information on miRNAs and diseases in a high-dimensional vector space and to define associations between miRNAs and diseases in terms of their vector similarity. Cross validations performed on a dataset of known miRNA-disease associations demonstrate the excellent performance of our method. Moreover, the case study focused on breast cancer confirms the ability of our method to discover new disease-miRNA associations and to identify putative false associations reported in databases. PMID:27246786

  16. Prediction and validation of gene-disease associations using methods inspired by social network analyses.

    PubMed

    Singh-Blom, U Martin; Natarajan, Nagarajan; Tewari, Ambuj; Woods, John O; Dhillon, Inderjit S; Marcotte, Edward M

    2013-01-01

    Correctly identifying associations of genes with diseases has long been a goal in biology. With the emergence of large-scale gene-phenotype association datasets in biology, we can leverage statistical and machine learning methods to help us achieve this goal. In this paper, we present two methods for predicting gene-disease associations based on functional gene associations and gene-phenotype associations in model organisms. The first method, the Katz measure, is motivated from its success in social network link prediction, and is very closely related to some of the recent methods proposed for gene-disease association inference. The second method, called Catapult (Combining dATa Across species using Positive-Unlabeled Learning Techniques), is a supervised machine learning method that uses a biased support vector machine where the features are derived from walks in a heterogeneous gene-trait network. We study the performance of the proposed methods and related state-of-the-art methods using two different evaluation strategies, on two distinct data sets, namely OMIM phenotypes and drug-target interactions. Finally, by measuring the performance of the methods using two different evaluation strategies, we show that even though both methods perform very well, the Katz measure is better at identifying associations between traits and poorly studied genes, whereas Catapult is better suited to correctly identifying gene-trait associations overall [corrected].

  17. Many disease-associated variants of hTERT retain high telomerase enzymatic activity

    PubMed Central

    Zaug, Arthur J.; Crary, Sharon M.; Jesse Fioravanti, Matthew; Campbell, Kristina; Cech, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the gene for telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) are associated with diseases including dyskeratosis congenita, aplastic anemia, pulmonary fibrosis and cancer. Understanding the molecular basis of these telomerase-associated diseases requires dependable quantitative measurements of telomerase enzyme activity. Furthermore, recent findings that the human POT1-TPP1 chromosome end-binding protein complex stimulates telomerase activity and processivity provide incentive for testing variant telomerases in the presence of these factors. In the present work, we compare multiple disease-associated hTERT variants reconstituted with the RNA subunit hTR in two systems (rabbit reticulocyte lysates and human cell lines) with respect to telomerase enzymatic activity, processivity and activation by telomere proteins. Surprisingly, many of the previously reported disease-associated hTERT alleles give near-normal telomerase enzyme activity. It is possible that a small deficit in telomerase activity is sufficient to cause telomere shortening over many years. Alternatively, mutations may perturb functions such as the recruitment of telomerase to telomeres, which are essential in vivo but not revealed by simple enzyme assays. PMID:23901009

  18. Kinase inhibitor profiling reveals unexpected opportunities to inhibit disease-associated mutant kinases

    PubMed Central

    Duong-Ly, Krisna C.; Devarajan, Karthik; Liang, Shuguang; Horiuchi, Kurumi Y.; Wang, Yuren; Ma, Haiching; Peterson, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Small-molecule kinase inhibitors have typically been designed to inhibit wild-type kinases rather than the mutant forms that frequently arise in diseases such as cancer. Mutations can have serious clinical implications by increasing kinase catalytic activity or conferring therapeutic resistance. To identify opportunities to repurpose inhibitors against disease-associated mutant kinases, we conducted a large-scale functional screen of 183 known kinase inhibitors against 76 recombinant, mutant kinases. The results revealed lead compounds with activity against clinically important mutant kinases including ALK, LRRK2, RET, and EGFR as well as unexpected opportunities for repurposing FDA-approved kinase inhibitors as leads for additional indications. Furthermore, using T674I PDGFRα as an example, we show how single-dose screening data can provide predictive structure-activity data to guide subsequent inhibitor optimization. This study provides a resource for the development of inhibitors against numerous disease-associated mutant kinases and illustrates the potential of unbiased profiling as an approach to compound-centric inhibitor development. PMID:26776524

  19. Multiple major disease-associated clones of Legionella pneumophila have emerged recently and independently

    PubMed Central

    David, Sophia; Rusniok, Christophe; Mentasti, Massimo; Gomez-Valero, Laura; Harris, Simon R.; Lechat, Pierre; Lees, John; Ginevra, Christophe; Glaser, Philippe; Ma, Laurence; Bouchier, Christiane; Underwood, Anthony; Jarraud, Sophie; Harrison, Timothy G.; Parkhill, Julian; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an environmental bacterium and the leading cause of Legionnaires’ disease. Just five sequence types (ST), from more than 2000 currently described, cause nearly half of disease cases in northwest Europe. Here, we report the sequence and analyses of 364 L. pneumophila genomes, including 337 from the five disease-associated STs and 27 representative of the species diversity. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the five STs have independent origins within a highly diverse species. The number of de novo mutations is extremely low with maximum pairwise single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) ranging from 19 (ST47) to 127 (ST1), which suggests emergences within the last century. Isolates sampled geographically far apart differ by only a few SNPs, demonstrating rapid dissemination. These five STs have been recombining recently, leading to a shared pool of allelic variants potentially contributing to their increased disease propensity. The oldest clone, ST1, has spread globally; between 1940 and 2000, four new clones have emerged in Europe, which show long-distance, rapid dispersal. That a large proportion of clinical cases is caused by recently emerged and internationally dispersed clones, linked by convergent evolution, is surprising for an environmental bacterium traditionally considered to be an opportunistic pathogen. To simultaneously explain recent emergence, rapid spread and increased disease association, we hypothesize that these STs have adapted to new man-made environmental niches, which may be linked by human infection and transmission. PMID:27662900

  20. A review of outbreaks of foodborne disease associated with passenger ships: evidence for risk management.

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, Roisin M.; Cramer, Elaine H.; Mantha, Stacey; Nichols, Gordon; Bartram, Jamie K.; Farber, Jeffrey M.; Benembarek, Peter K.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Foodborne disease outbreaks on ships are of concern because of their potentially serious health consequences for passengers and crew and high costs to the industry. The authors conducted a review of outbreaks of foodborne diseases associated with passenger ships in the framework of a World Health Organization project on setting guidelines for ship sanitation. METHODS: The authors reviewed data on 50 outbreaks of foodborne disease associated with passenger ships. For each outbreak, data on pathogens/toxins, type of ship, factors contributing to outbreaks, mortality and morbidity, and food vehicles were collected. RESULTS: The findings of this review show that the majority of reported outbreaks were associated with cruise ships and that almost 10,000 people were affected. Salmonella spp were most frequently associated with outbreaks. Foodborne outbreaks due to enterotoxigenic E. coli spp, Shigella spp, noroviruses (formally called Norwalk-like viruses), Vibrio spp, Staphylococcus aureus, Clostridium perfringens, Cyclospora sp, and Trichinella sp also occurred on ships. Factors associated with the outbreaks reviewed include inadequate temperature control, infected food handlers, contaminated raw ingredients, cross-contamination, inadequate heat treatment, and onshore excursions. Seafood was the most common food vehicle implicated in outbreaks. CONCLUSIONS: Many ship-associated outbreaks could have been prevented if measures had been taken to ensure adequate temperature control, avoidance of cross-contamination, reliable food sources, adequate heat treatment, and exclusion of infected food handlers from work. PMID:15219800

  1. Stem Cell Transplant for Inborn Errors of Metabolism

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-11-06

    Adrenoleukodystrophy; Metachromatic Leukodystrophy; Globoid Cell Leukodystrophy; Gaucher's Disease; Fucosidosis; Wolman Disease; Niemann-Pick Disease; Batten Disease; GM1 Gangliosidosis; Tay Sachs Disease; Sandhoff Disease

  2. Study of Pulmonary Complications in Pediatric Patients With Storage Disorders Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2005-06-23

    I Cell Disease; Fucosidosis; Globoid Cell Leukodystrophy; Adrenoleukodystrophy; Mannosidosis; Niemann-Pick Disease; Pulmonary Complications; Mucopolysaccharidosis I; Mucopolysaccharidosis VI; Metachromatic Leukodystrophy; Gaucher's Disease; Wolman Disease

  3. Unrelated Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation(HSCT) for Genetic Diseases of Blood Cells

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-21

    Sickle Cell Disease; Thalassemia; Anemia; Granuloma; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Chediak Higashi Syndrome; Osteopetrosis; Neutropenia; Thrombocytopenia; Hurler Disease; Niemann-Pick Disease; Fucosidosis

  4. Repair of damaged DNA by extracts from a xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A revertant and expression of a protein absent in its parental cell line.

    PubMed

    Jones, C J; Cleaver, J E; Wood, R D

    1992-03-11

    Cells derived from individuals with mutations in the xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A gene (XP-A gene) are hypersensitive to UV light and have a severe defect in nucleotide excision repair of damaged DNA. UV-resistant revertant cell lines can arise from XP-A cells in culture. Cells of one such revertant, XP129, were previously shown to remove (6-4) photoproducts from irradiated DNA, but to have poor repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. To analyze the biochemical nature of the reversion, whole cell extracts were prepared from the SV40-immortalized fibroblast cell lines XP12RO (an XP-A cell line), the revertant XP129 (derived from XP12RO), and 1BR.3N (from a normal individual). The ability of extracts to carry out repair synthesis in UV-irradiated DNA was examined, and immunoblots were performed using antiserum that recognizes XP-A protein. XP12RO extracts exhibited a very low level of repair and no detectable XP-A protein, but repair activity could be conferred by adding purified XP-A protein to the reaction mixture. XP129 extracts have essentially normal repair synthesis consistent with the observation that most repair of UV-irradiated DNA by extracts appears to occur at (6-4) photoproducts. An XP-A polypeptide of normal size was present in XP129, but in reduced amounts. The results indicate that in XP129 a mutational event has converted the inactive XP12RO XP-A gene into a form which expresses an active XP-A protein.

  5. Brain expression genome-wide association study (eGWAS) identifies human disease-associated variants.

    PubMed

    Zou, Fanggeng; Chai, High Seng; Younkin, Curtis S; Allen, Mariet; Crook, Julia; Pankratz, V Shane; Carrasquillo, Minerva M; Rowley, Christopher N; Nair, Asha A; Middha, Sumit; Maharjan, Sooraj; Nguyen, Thuy; Ma, Li; Malphrus, Kimberly G; Palusak, Ryan; Lincoln, Sarah; Bisceglio, Gina; Georgescu, Constantin; Kouri, Naomi; Kolbert, Christopher P; Jen, Jin; Haines, Jonathan L; Mayeux, Richard; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Farrer, Lindsay A; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Petersen, Ronald C; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Dickson, Dennis W; Younkin, Steven G; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer

    2012-01-01

    Genetic variants that modify brain gene expression may also influence risk for human diseases. We measured expression levels of 24,526 transcripts in brain samples from the cerebellum and temporal cortex of autopsied subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD, cerebellar n=197, temporal cortex n=202) and with other brain pathologies (non-AD, cerebellar n=177, temporal cortex n=197). We conducted an expression genome-wide association study (eGWAS) using 213,528 cisSNPs within ± 100 kb of the tested transcripts. We identified 2,980 cerebellar cisSNP/transcript level associations (2,596 unique cisSNPs) significant in both ADs and non-ADs (q<0.05, p=7.70 × 10(-5)-1.67 × 10(-82)). Of these, 2,089 were also significant in the temporal cortex (p=1.85 × 10(-5)-1.70 × 10(-141)). The top cerebellar cisSNPs had 2.4-fold enrichment for human disease-associated variants (p<10(-6)). We identified novel cisSNP/transcript associations for human disease-associated variants, including progressive supranuclear palsy SLCO1A2/rs11568563, Parkinson's disease (PD) MMRN1/rs6532197, Paget's disease OPTN/rs1561570; and we confirmed others, including PD MAPT/rs242557, systemic lupus erythematosus and ulcerative colitis IRF5/rs4728142, and type 1 diabetes mellitus RPS26/rs1701704. In our eGWAS, there was 2.9-3.3 fold enrichment (p<10(-6)) of significant cisSNPs with suggestive AD-risk association (p<10(-3)) in the Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Consortium GWAS. These results demonstrate the significant contributions of genetic factors to human brain gene expression, which are reliably detected across different brain regions and pathologies. The significant enrichment of brain cisSNPs among disease-associated variants advocates gene expression changes as a mechanism for many central nervous system (CNS) and non-CNS diseases. Combined assessment of expression and disease GWAS may provide complementary information in discovery of human disease variants with functional implications. Our findings

  6. Brain Expression Genome-Wide Association Study (eGWAS) Identifies Human Disease-Associated Variants

    PubMed Central

    Crook, Julia; Pankratz, V. Shane; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Rowley, Christopher N.; Nair, Asha A.; Middha, Sumit; Maharjan, Sooraj; Nguyen, Thuy; Ma, Li; Malphrus, Kimberly G.; Palusak, Ryan; Lincoln, Sarah; Bisceglio, Gina; Georgescu, Constantin; Kouri, Naomi; Kolbert, Christopher P.; Jen, Jin; Haines, Jonathan L.; Mayeux, Richard; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Younkin, Steven G.; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer

    2012-01-01

    Genetic variants that modify brain gene expression may also influence risk for human diseases. We measured expression levels of 24,526 transcripts in brain samples from the cerebellum and temporal cortex of autopsied subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD, cerebellar n = 197, temporal cortex n = 202) and with other brain pathologies (non–AD, cerebellar n = 177, temporal cortex n = 197). We conducted an expression genome-wide association study (eGWAS) using 213,528 cisSNPs within ±100 kb of the tested transcripts. We identified 2,980 cerebellar cisSNP/transcript level associations (2,596 unique cisSNPs) significant in both ADs and non–ADs (q<0.05, p = 7.70×10−5–1.67×10−82). Of these, 2,089 were also significant in the temporal cortex (p = 1.85×10−5–1.70×10−141). The top cerebellar cisSNPs had 2.4-fold enrichment for human disease-associated variants (p<10−6). We identified novel cisSNP/transcript associations for human disease-associated variants, including progressive supranuclear palsy SLCO1A2/rs11568563, Parkinson's disease (PD) MMRN1/rs6532197, Paget's disease OPTN/rs1561570; and we confirmed others, including PD MAPT/rs242557, systemic lupus erythematosus and ulcerative colitis IRF5/rs4728142, and type 1 diabetes mellitus RPS26/rs1701704. In our eGWAS, there was 2.9–3.3 fold enrichment (p<10−6) of significant cisSNPs with suggestive AD–risk association (p<10−3) in the Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Consortium GWAS. These results demonstrate the significant contributions of genetic factors to human brain gene expression, which are reliably detected across different brain regions and pathologies. The significant enrichment of brain cisSNPs among disease-associated variants advocates gene expression changes as a mechanism for many central nervous system (CNS) and non–CNS diseases. Combined assessment of expression and disease GWAS may provide complementary information in discovery of human disease variants with

  7. Discovering disease-disease associations by fusing systems-level molecular data.

    PubMed

    Žitnik, Marinka; Janjić, Vuk; Larminie, Chris; Zupan, Blaž; Pržulj, Nataša

    2013-11-15

    The advent of genome-scale genetic and genomic studies allows new insight into disease classification. Recently, a shift was made from linking diseases simply based on their shared genes towards systems-level integration of molecular data. Here, we aim to find relationships between diseases based on evidence from fusing all available molecular interaction and ontology data. We propose a multi-level hierarchy of disease classes that significantly overlaps with existing disease classification. In it, we find 14 disease-disease associations currently not present in Disease Ontology and provide evidence for their relationships through comorbidity data and literature curation. Interestingly, even though the number of known human genetic interactions is currently very small, we find they are the most important predictor of a link between diseases. Finally, we show that omission of any one of the included data sources reduces prediction quality, further highlighting the importance in the paradigm shift towards systems-level data fusion.

  8. Chronic kidney disease-associated pruritus: impact on quality of life and current management challenges

    PubMed Central

    Shirazian, Shayan; Aina, Olufemi; Park, Youngjun; Chowdhury, Nawsheen; Leger, Kathleen; Hou, Linle; Miyawaki, Nobuyuki; Mathur, Vandana S

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease-associated pruritus (CKD-aP) is a distressing, often overlooked condition in patients with CKD and end-stage renal disease. It affects ~40% of patients with end-stage renal disease and has been associated with poor quality of life, poor sleep, depression, and mortality. Prevalence estimates vary based on the instruments used to diagnose CKD-aP, and standardized diagnostic instruments are sorely needed. Treatment studies have often yielded conflicting results. This is likely related to studies that are limited by small sample size, flawed designs, and nonstandardized diagnostic instruments. Several large well-designed treatment trials have recently been completed and may soon influence CKD-aP management. PMID:28176969

  9. Complete genome sequence of Colocasia bobone disease-associated virus, a putative cytorhabdovirus infecting taro.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Colleen M; Bejerman, Nicolas; Li, Ming; James, Anthony P; Dietzgen, Ralf G; Pearson, Michael N; Revill, Peter A; Harding, Robert M

    2016-03-01

    We report the first genome sequence of a Colocasia bobone disease-associated virus (CBDaV) derived from bobone-affected taro [Colocasia esculenta L. Schott] from Solomon Islands. The negative-strand RNA genome is 12,193 nt long, with six major open reading frames (ORFs) with the arrangement 3'-N-P-P3-M-G-L-5'. Typical of all rhabdoviruses, the 3' leader and 5' trailer sequences show complementarity to each other. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that CBDaV is a member of the genus Cytorhabdovirus, supporting previous reports of virus particles within the cytoplasm of bobone-infected taro cells. The availability of the CBDaV genome sequence now makes it possible to assess the role of this virus in bobone, and possibly alomae disease of taro and confirm that this sequence is that of Colocasia bobone disease virus (CBDV).

  10. An Update on the Streptococcus bovis Group: Classification, Identification, and Disease Associations

    PubMed Central

    Dekker, John P.

    2016-01-01

    The Streptococcus bovis group has undergone significant taxonomic changes over the past 2 decades with the advent of new identification methods with higher discriminatory power. Although the current classification system is not yet embraced by all researchers in the field and debate remains over the performance of molecular techniques for identification to the species level within the group, important disease associations for several members of the group have been clarified. Here, we provide a brief overview of the history of the S. bovis group, an outline of the currently accepted classification scheme, a review of associated clinical syndromes, and a summary of the performance and diagnostic accuracy of currently available identification methods. PMID:26912760

  11. The Rh protein family: gene evolution, membrane biology, and disease association.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cheng-Han; Ye, Mao

    2010-04-01

    The Rh (Rhesus) genes encode a family of conserved proteins that share a structural fold of 12 transmembrane helices with members of the major facilitator superfamily. Interest in this family has arisen from the discovery of Rh factor's involvement in hemolytic disease in the fetus and newborn, and of its homologs widely expressed in epithelial tissues. The Rh factor and Rh-associated glycoprotein (RhAG), with epithelial cousins RhBG and RhCG, form four subgroups conferring upon vertebrates a genealogical commonality. The past decade has heralded significant advances in understanding the phylogenetics, allelic diversity, crystal structure, and biological function of Rh proteins. This review describes recent progress on this family and the molecular insights gleaned from its gene evolution, membrane biology, and disease association. The focus is on its long evolutionary history and surprising structural conservation from prokaryotes to humans, pointing to the importance of its functional role, related to but distinct from ammonium transport proteins.

  12. Burden of disease associated with human cytomegalovirus and prospects for elimination by universal immunisation.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Paul D

    2012-10-01

    Cytomegalovirus is the most frequent cause of intrauterine infection and the commonest infectious agent to affect allograft recipients, yet the virus is acknowledged rarely as an occupational hazard for women of childbearing age or as a nosocomial infection. The potential role of cytomegalovirus in hastening the death of patients with AIDS, elderly people, individuals admitted to intensive-care units, and the general population is not emphasised. Development of vaccines against this important human pathogen has been delayed by reluctance to initiate proof-of-concept studies, but after recent trials, protection is a distinct possibility. Cytomegalovirus deserves to be eliminated from selected populations by means of universal immunisation as soon as suitable vaccines become licensed. This action should control disease in neonates and transplant recipients and could provide substantial additional benefits if other disease associations prove to be causal.

  13. Tight junctions in inflammatory bowel diseases and inflammatory bowel disease associated colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Landy, Jonathan; Ronde, Emma; English, Nick; Clark, Sue K; Hart, Ailsa L; Knight, Stella C; Ciclitira, Paul J; Al-Hassi, Hafid Omar

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are characterised by inflammation that compromises the integrity of the epithelial barrier. The intestinal epithelium is not only a static barrier but has evolved complex mechanisms to control and regulate bacterial interactions with the mucosal surface. Apical tight junction proteins are critical in the maintenance of epithelial barrier function and control of paracellular permeability. The characterisation of alterations in tight junction proteins as key players in epithelial barrier function in inflammatory bowel diseases is rapidly enhancing our understanding of critical mechanisms in disease pathogenesis as well as novel therapeutic opportunities. Here we give an overview of recent literature focusing on the role of tight junction proteins, in particular claudins, in inflammatory bowel diseases and inflammatory bowel disease associated colorectal cancer. PMID:27003989

  14. Ulcerative enteritis-like disease associated with Clostridium sordellii in quail.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Rocio; Franca, Monique; Shivaprasad, H L

    2013-09-01

    A natural outbreak of ulcerative enteritis-like disease associated with Clostridium sordellii was diagnosed in two commercial quail flocks. Clinical signs in the quail included anorexia, weakness, and increased mortality in the flocks. Lesions in the intestine were characterized by ulcers covered with fibrinonecrotic exudate in the small intestine and occasional hemorrhages. There were also multifocal pale areas of necrosis in the liver. Clostridium sordellii was isolated from the intestine and liver. A retrospective study of avian cases submitted to the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratories revealed that C. sordellii had been isolated in 45 avian submissions, most commonly in chickens and turkeys. In most of these cases the birds were diagnosed with necrotic enteritis, with or without hepatitis. Clostridium sordellii has occasionally been associated with gangrenous dermatitis in poultry, but this is the first report of enteritis in an avian species.

  15. Incomplete Kawasaki disease associated with complicated Streptococcus pyogenes pneumonia: A case report.

    PubMed

    Leahy, Timothy Ronan; Cohen, Eyal; Allen, Upton D

    2012-01-01

    A three-year-old boy presented with community-acquired pneumonia complicated by empyema. Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus) was identified on culture of the pleural fluid. The patient improved with antibiotic therapy and drainage of the empyema. During his convalescence, the patient developed persistent fever, lethargy and anorexia. His inflammatory markers were elevated, and repeat cultures were negative. Although the patient had none of the classical mucocutaneous features of Kawasaki disease, an echocardiogram was performed, which revealed coronary artery dilation. The patient was diagnosed with incomplete Kawasaki disease and treated with intravenous immunoglobulin and high-dose acetylsalicylic acid. The fever subsided within 48 h. To the authors' knowledge, the present report is the first report of Kawasaki disease associated with complicated S pyogenes pneumonia. It emphasizes the importance of considering incomplete Kawasaki disease among children with persistent fever, the role of echocardiography in diagnosis, and the potential link between Kawasaki disease and superantigen-producing organisms such as S pyogenes.

  16. Retinal Diseases Associated with Oxidative Stress and the Effects of a Free Radical Scavenger (Edaravone)

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Hideaki

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in developing and accelerating retinal diseases including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy (DR), and retinal vein occlusion (RVO). An excess amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can lead to functional and morphological impairments in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), endothelial cells, and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Here we demonstrate that edaravone, a free radical scavenger, decreased apoptotic cell death, oxidative damage to DNA and lipids, and angiogenesis through inhibiting JNK and p38 MAPK pathways in AMD, glaucoma, DR, and RVO animal models. These data suggest that the therapeutic strategy for targeting oxidative stress may be important for the treatment of these ocular diseases, and edaravone may be useful for treating retinal diseases associated with oxidative stress. PMID:28194256

  17. A prioritization analysis of disease association by data-mining of functional annotation of human genes.

    PubMed

    Taniya, Takayuki; Tanaka, Susumu; Yamaguchi-Kabata, Yumi; Hanaoka, Hideki; Yamasaki, Chisato; Maekawa, Harutoshi; Barrero, Roberto A; Lenhard, Boris; Datta, Milton W; Shimoyama, Mary; Bumgarner, Roger; Chakraborty, Ranajit; Hopkinson, Ian; Jia, Libin; Hide, Winston; Auffray, Charles; Minoshima, Shinsei; Imanishi, Tadashi; Gojobori, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Complex diseases result from contributions of multiple genes that act in concert through pathways. Here we present a method to prioritize novel candidates of disease-susceptibility genes depending on the biological similarities to the known disease-related genes. The extent of disease-susceptibility of a gene is prioritized by analyzing seven features of human genes captured in H-InvDB. Taking rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and prostate cancer (PC) as two examples, we evaluated the efficiency of our method. Highly scored genes obtained included TNFSF12 and OSM as candidate disease genes for RA and PC, respectively. Subsequent characterization of these genes based upon an extensive literature survey reinforced the validity of these highly scored genes as possible disease-susceptibility genes. Our approach, Prioritization ANalysis of Disease Association (PANDA), is an efficient and cost-effective method to narrow down a large set of genes into smaller subsets that are most likely to be involved in the disease pathogenesis.

  18. Effector CD4+ T cell expression signatures and immune-mediated disease associated genes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Ferguson, John; Ng, Sok Meng; Hui, Ken; Goh, Gerald; Lin, Aiping; Esplugues, Enric; Flavell, Richard A; Abraham, Clara; Zhao, Hongyu; Cho, Judy H

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in immune-mediated diseases have identified over 150 associated genomic loci. Many of these loci play a role in T cell responses, and regulation of T cell differentiation plays a critical role in immune-mediated diseases; however, the relationship between implicated disease loci and T cell differentiation is incompletely understood. To further address this relationship, we examined differential gene expression in naïve human CD4+ T cells, as well as in in vitro differentiated Th1, memory Th17-negative and Th17-enriched CD4+ T cells subsets using microarray and RNASeq. We observed a marked enrichment for increased expression in memory CD4+ compared to naïve CD4+ T cells of genes contained among immune-mediated disease loci. Within memory T cells, expression of disease-associated genes was typically increased in Th17-enriched compared to Th17-negative cells. Utilizing RNASeq and promoter methylation studies, we identified a differential regulation pattern for genes solely expressed in Th17 cells (IL17A and CCL20) compared to genes expressed in both Th17 and Th1 cells (IL23R and IL12RB2), where high levels of promoter methylation are correlated to near zero RNASeq levels for IL17A and CCL20. These findings have implications for human Th17 celI plasticity and for the regulation of Th17-Th1 expression signatures. Importantly, utilizing RNASeq we found an abundant isoform of IL23R terminating before the transmembrane domain that was enriched in Th17 cells. In addition to molecular resolution, we find that RNASeq provides significantly improved power to define differential gene expression and identify alternative gene variants relative to microarray analysis. The comprehensive integration of differential gene expression between cell subsets with disease-association signals, and functional pathways provides insight into disease pathogenesis.

  19. An Integrated Data Driven Approach to Drug Repositioning Using Gene-Disease Associations

    PubMed Central

    Mullen, Joseph; Cockell, Simon J.; Woollard, Peter; Wipat, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Drug development is both increasing in cost whilst decreasing in productivity. There is a general acceptance that the current paradigm of R&D needs to change. One alternative approach is drug repositioning. With target-based approaches utilised heavily in the field of drug discovery, it becomes increasingly necessary to have a systematic method to rank gene-disease associations. Although methods already exist to collect, integrate and score these associations, they are often not a reliable reflection of expert knowledge. Furthermore, the amount of data available in all areas covered by bioinformatics is increasing dramatically year on year. It thus makes sense to move away from more generalised hypothesis driven approaches to research to one that allows data to generate their own hypothesis. We introduce an integrated, data driven approach to drug repositioning. We first apply a Bayesian statistics approach to rank 309,885 gene-disease associations using existing knowledge. Ranked associations are then integrated with other biological data to produce a semantically-rich drug discovery network. Using this network, we show how our approach identifies diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) to be an area of interest. CNS disorders are identified due to the low numbers of such disorders that currently have marketed treatments, in comparison to other therapeutic areas. We then systematically mine our network for semantic subgraphs that allow us to infer drug-disease relations that are not captured in the network. We identify and rank 275,934 drug-disease has_indication associations after filtering those that are more likely to be side effects, whilst commenting on the top ranked associations in more detail. The dataset has been created in Neo4j and is available for download at https://bitbucket.org/ncl-intbio/genediseaserepositioning along with a Java implementation of the searching algorithm. PMID:27196054

  20. An Integrated Data Driven Approach to Drug Repositioning Using Gene-Disease Associations.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Joseph; Cockell, Simon J; Woollard, Peter; Wipat, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Drug development is both increasing in cost whilst decreasing in productivity. There is a general acceptance that the current paradigm of R&D needs to change. One alternative approach is drug repositioning. With target-based approaches utilised heavily in the field of drug discovery, it becomes increasingly necessary to have a systematic method to rank gene-disease associations. Although methods already exist to collect, integrate and score these associations, they are often not a reliable reflection of expert knowledge. Furthermore, the amount of data available in all areas covered by bioinformatics is increasing dramatically year on year. It thus makes sense to move away from more generalised hypothesis driven approaches to research to one that allows data to generate their own hypothesis. We introduce an integrated, data driven approach to drug repositioning. We first apply a Bayesian statistics approach to rank 309,885 gene-disease associations using existing knowledge. Ranked associations are then integrated with other biological data to produce a semantically-rich drug discovery network. Using this network, we show how our approach identifies diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) to be an area of interest. CNS disorders are identified due to the low numbers of such disorders that currently have marketed treatments, in comparison to other therapeutic areas. We then systematically mine our network for semantic subgraphs that allow us to infer drug-disease relations that are not captured in the network. We identify and rank 275,934 drug-disease has_indication associations after filtering those that are more likely to be side effects, whilst commenting on the top ranked associations in more detail. The dataset has been created in Neo4j and is available for download at https://bitbucket.org/ncl-intbio/genediseaserepositioning along with a Java implementation of the searching algorithm.

  1. A review of outbreaks of waterborne disease associated with ships: evidence for risk management.

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, Roisin M.; Bartram, Jamie K.; Cramer, Elaine H.; Mantha, Stacey; Nichols, Gordon; Suraj, Rohini; Todd, Ewen C. D.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The organization of water supply to and on ships differs considerably from that of water supply on land. Risks of contamination can arise from source water at the port or during loading, storage, or distribution on the ship. The purpose of this article is to review documented outbreaks of waterborne diseases associated with passenger, cargo, fishing, and naval ships to identify contributing factors so that similar outbreaks can be prevented in the future. METHODS: The authors reviewed 21 reported outbreaks of waterborne diseases associated with ships. For each outbreak, data on pathogens/toxins, type of ship, factors contributing to outbreaks, mortality and morbidity, and remedial action are presented. RESULTS: The findings of this review show that the majority of reported outbreaks were associated with passenger ships and that more than 6,400 people were affected. Waterborne outbreaks due to Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, noroviruses, Salmonella spp, Shigella sp, Cryptosporidium sp, and Giardia lamblia occurred on ships. Enterotoxigenic E. coli was the pathogen most frequently associated with outbreaks. One outbreak of chemical water poisoning also occurred on a ship. Risk factors included contaminated port water, inadequate treatment, improper loading techniques, poor design and maintenance of storage tanks, ingress of contamination during repair and maintenance, cross-connections, back siphonage, and insufficient residual disinfectant. CONCLUSIONS: Waterborne disease outbreaks on ships can be prevented. The factors contributing to outbreaks emphasize the need for hygienic handling of water along the supply chain from source to consumption. A comprehensive approach to water safety on ships is essential. This may be achieved by the adoption of Water Safety Plans that cover design, construction, operation, and routine inspection and maintenance. PMID:15219801

  2. Diseases Associated With Exposure to Contaminants in the Water Supply at Camp Lejeune. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2017-01-13

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) amends its adjudication regulations regarding presumptive service connection, adding certain diseases associated with contaminants present in the base water supply at U.S. Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune (Camp Lejeune), North Carolina, from August 1, 1953, to December 31, 1987. This final rule establishes that veterans, former reservists, and former National Guard members, who served at Camp Lejeune for no less than 30 days (consecutive or nonconsecutive) during this period, and who have been diagnosed with any of eight associated diseases, are presumed to have incurred or aggravated the disease in service for purposes of entitlement to VA benefits. In addition, this final rule establishes a presumption that these individuals were disabled during the relevant period of service for purposes of establishing active military service for benefits purposes. Under this presumption, affected former reservists and National Guard members have veteran status for purposes of entitlement to some VA benefits. This amendment implements a decision by the Secretary of Veterans Affairs that service connection on a presumptive basis is warranted for claimants who served at Camp Lejeune during the relevant period and for the requisite amount of time and later develop certain diseases.

  3. Effective diagnosis of genetic disease by computational phenotype analysis of the disease-associated genome

    PubMed Central

    Zemojtel, Tomasz; Köhler, Sebastian; Mackenroth, Luisa; Jäger, Marten; Hecht, Jochen; Krawitz, Peter; Graul-Neumann, Luitgard; Doelken, Sandra; Ehmke, Nadja; Spielmann, Malte; Øien, Nancy Christine; Schweiger, Michal R.; Krüger, Ulrike; Frommer, Götz; Fischer, Björn; Kornak, Uwe; Flöttmann, Ricarda; Ardeshirdavani, Amin; Moreau, Yves; Lewis, Suzanna E.; Haendel, Melissa; Smedley, Damian; Horn, Denise; Mundlos, Stefan; Robinson, Peter N.

    2015-01-01

    Less than half of patients with suspected genetic disease receive a molecular diagnosis. We have therefore integrated next-generation sequencing (NGS), bioinformatics, and clinical data into an effective diagnostic workflow. We used variants in the 2741 established Mendelian disease genes [the disease-associated genome (DAG)] to develop a targeted enrichment DAG panel (7.1 Mb), which achieves a coverage of 20-fold or better for 98% of bases. Furthermore, we established a computational method [Phenotypic Interpretation of eXomes (PhenIX)] that evaluated and ranked variants based on pathogenicity and semantic similarity of patients’ phenotype described by Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) terms to those of 3991 Mendelian diseases. In computer simulations, ranking genes based on the variant score put the true gene in first place less than 5% of the time; PhenIX placed the correct gene in first place more than 86% of the time. In a retrospective test of PhenIX on 52 patients with previously identified mutations and known diagnoses, the correct gene achieved a mean rank of 2.1. In a prospective study on 40 individuals without a diagnosis, PhenIX analysis enabled a diagnosis in 11 cases (28%, at a mean rank of 2.4). Thus, the NGS of the DAG followed by phenotype-driven bioinformatic analysis allows quick and effective differential diagnostics in medical genetics. PMID:25186178

  4. The Neuropsychiatric Disease-Associated Gene cacna1c Mediates Survival of Young Hippocampal Neurons123

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anni S.; Kabir, Zeeba D.; Knobbe, Whitney; Orr, Madeline; Burgdorf, Caitlin; Huntington, Paula; McDaniel, Latisha; Britt, Jeremiah K.; Hoffmann, Franz; Brat, Daniel J.; Rajadhyaksha, Anjali M.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variations in CACNA1C, which encodes the Cav1.2 subunit of L-type calcium channels (LTCCs), are associated with multiple forms of neuropsychiatric disease that manifest high anxiety in patients. In parallel, mice harboring forebrain-specific conditional knockout of cacna1c (forebrain-Cav1.2 cKO) display unusually high anxiety-like behavior. LTCCs in general, including the Cav1.3 subunit, have been shown to mediate differentiation of neural precursor cells (NPCs). However, it has not previously been determined whether Cav1.2 affects postnatal hippocampal neurogenesis in vivo. Here, we show that forebrain-Cav1.2 cKO mice exhibit enhanced cell death of young hippocampal neurons, with no change in NPC proliferation, hippocampal size, dentate gyrus thickness, or corticosterone levels compared with wild-type littermates. These mice also exhibit deficits in brain levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and Cre recombinase-mediated knockdown of adult hippocampal Cav1.2 recapitulates the deficit in young hippocampal neurons survival. Treatment of forebrain-Cav1.2 cKO mice with the neuroprotective agent P7C3-A20 restored the net magnitude of postnatal hippocampal neurogenesis to wild-type levels without ameliorating their deficit in BDNF expression. The role of Cav1.2 in young hippocampal neurons survival may provide new approaches for understanding and treating neuropsychiatric disease associated with aberrations in CACNA1C. Visual Abstract PMID:27066530

  5. Factors regulating immunoglobulin production by normal and disease-associated plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Jackson, David A; Elsawa, Sherine F

    2015-01-21

    Immunoglobulins are molecules produced by activated B cells and plasma cells in response to exposure to antigens. Upon antigen exposure, these molecules are secreted allowing the immune system to recognize and effectively respond to a myriad of pathogens. Immunoglobulin or antibody secreting cells are the mature form of B lymphocytes, which during their development undergo gene rearrangements and selection in the bone marrow ultimately leading to the generation of B cells, each expressing a single antigen-specific receptor/immunoglobulin molecule. Each individual immunoglobulin molecule has an affinity for a unique motif, or epitope, found on a given antigen. When presented with an antigen, activated B cells differentiate into either plasma cells (which secrete large amounts of antibody that is specific for the inducing antigen), or memory B cells (which are long-lived and elicit a stronger and faster response if the host is re-exposed to the same antigen). The secreted form of immunoglobulin, when bound to an antigen, serves as an effector molecule that directs other cells of the immune system to facilitate the neutralization of soluble antigen or the eradication of the antigen-expressing pathogen. This review will focus on the regulation of secreted immunoglobulin by long-lived normal or disease-associated plasma. Specifically, the focus will be on signaling and transcriptional events that regulate the development and homeostasis of long-lived immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells.

  6. Factors Regulating Immunoglobulin Production by Normal and Disease-Associated Plasma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, David A.; Elsawa, Sherine F.

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulins are molecules produced by activated B cells and plasma cells in response to exposure to antigens. Upon antigen exposure, these molecules are secreted allowing the immune system to recognize and effectively respond to a myriad of pathogens. Immunoglobulin or antibody secreting cells are the mature form of B lymphocytes, which during their development undergo gene rearrangements and selection in the bone marrow ultimately leading to the generation of B cells, each expressing a single antigen-specific receptor/immunoglobulin molecule. Each individual immunoglobulin molecule has an affinity for a unique motif, or epitope, found on a given antigen. When presented with an antigen, activated B cells differentiate into either plasma cells (which secrete large amounts of antibody that is specific for the inducing antigen), or memory B cells (which are long-lived and elicit a stronger and faster response if the host is re-exposed to the same antigen). The secreted form of immunoglobulin, when bound to an antigen, serves as an effector molecule that directs other cells of the immune system to facilitate the neutralization of soluble antigen or the eradication of the antigen-expressing pathogen. This review will focus on the regulation of secreted immunoglobulin by long-lived normal or disease-associated plasma cells. Specifically, the focus will be on signaling and transcriptional events that regulate the development and homeostasis of long-lived immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells. PMID:25615546

  7. Glomeruloid hemangioma. A distinctive cutaneous lesion of multicentric Castleman's disease associated with POEMS syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chan, J K; Fletcher, C D; Hicklin, G A; Rosai, J

    1990-11-01

    A histologically distinctive cutaneous hemangioma occurring in two patients with biopsy-proven multicentric Castleman's disease associated with POEMS (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M-protein, skin changes) syndrome are reported. The lesions were multiple, and appeared as red to purple papules over the trunk and proximal limbs. Microscopically, ecstatic dermal vascular spaces were seen filled with aggregates of capillaries, resulting in structures reminiscent of renal glomeruli. Interspersed between the blood-filled capillary loops were plump "stromal" cells possessing clear vacuoles and periodic acid-schiff-positive eosinophilic globules. These cells had the immunohistochemical profile of endothelial cells (positivity for factor VIII-related antigen, and negativity for leukocyte common antigen, macrophage marker, and muscle-specific actin), and probably represented immature elements that had accumulated immunoglobulins and other proteinaceous material from the circulation. Because vascular lesions may appear before the full-blown POEMS syndrome develops, we suggest careful evaluation and follow-up of all patients presenting with glomeruloid hemangioma or cherry-type capillary hemangioma with focal glomeruloid features for potential development of this syndrome.

  8. A case study on the identification of confounding factors for gene disease association analysis.

    PubMed

    Han, Bin; Xie, Ruifei; Wu, Shixiu; Li, Lihua; Zhu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Variation in the expression of genes arises from a variety of sources. It is important to remove sources of variation between arrays of non-biological origin. Non-biological variation, caused by lurking confounding factors, usually attracts little attention, although it may substantially influence the expression profile of genes. In this study, we proposed a method which is able to identify the potential confounding factors and highlight the non-biological variations. We also developed methods and statistical tests to study the confounding factors and their influence on the homogeneity of microarray data, gene selection, and disease classification. We explored an ovarian cancer gene expression profile and showed that data batches and arraying conditions are two confounding factors. Their influence on the homogeneity of data, gene selection, and disease classification are statistically analyzed. Experiments showed that after normalization, their influences were removed. Comparative studies further showed that the data became more homogeneous and the classification quality was improved. This research demonstrated that identifying and reducing the impact of confounding factors is paramount in making sense of gene-disease association analysis.

  9. The Neuropsychiatric Disease-Associated Gene cacna1c Mediates Survival of Young Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Anni S; De Jesús-Cortés, Héctor; Kabir, Zeeba D; Knobbe, Whitney; Orr, Madeline; Burgdorf, Caitlin; Huntington, Paula; McDaniel, Latisha; Britt, Jeremiah K; Hoffmann, Franz; Brat, Daniel J; Rajadhyaksha, Anjali M; Pieper, Andrew A

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variations in CACNA1C, which encodes the Cav1.2 subunit of L-type calcium channels (LTCCs), are associated with multiple forms of neuropsychiatric disease that manifest high anxiety in patients. In parallel, mice harboring forebrain-specific conditional knockout of cacna1c (forebrain-Cav1.2 cKO) display unusually high anxiety-like behavior. LTCCs in general, including the Cav1.3 subunit, have been shown to mediate differentiation of neural precursor cells (NPCs). However, it has not previously been determined whether Cav1.2 affects postnatal hippocampal neurogenesis in vivo. Here, we show that forebrain-Cav1.2 cKO mice exhibit enhanced cell death of young hippocampal neurons, with no change in NPC proliferation, hippocampal size, dentate gyrus thickness, or corticosterone levels compared with wild-type littermates. These mice also exhibit deficits in brain levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and Cre recombinase-mediated knockdown of adult hippocampal Cav1.2 recapitulates the deficit in young hippocampal neurons survival. Treatment of forebrain-Cav1.2 cKO mice with the neuroprotective agent P7C3-A20 restored the net magnitude of postnatal hippocampal neurogenesis to wild-type levels without ameliorating their deficit in BDNF expression. The role of Cav1.2 in young hippocampal neurons survival may provide new approaches for understanding and treating neuropsychiatric disease associated with aberrations in CACNA1C. Visual Abstract.

  10. Percutaneous Management of Occlusive Arterial Disease Associated with Vasculitis: A Single Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Both, M.; Jahnke, T.; Reinhold-Keller, E.; Reuter, M.; Grimm, J.; Biederer, J.; Brossmann, J.; Gross, W.L.; Heller, M.; Mueller-Huelsbeck, S.

    2003-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty for occlusive arterial disease associated with vasculitis. Eleven patients(10 women, 1 man; ages 35-82 years) with the diagnosis of vasculitis of the large vessels underwent interventional treatment during intraarterial angiography. The causes included giant cell arteritis(n = 8) and Takayasu arteritis (n = 3).Thirty-three occlusive lesions (including brachiocephalic and renalarteries, and arteries of upper and lower extremities) were treated with balloon angioplasty and/or stent placement. Follow-up included clinical examination, angiography, and color duplex ultrasound.Technical success was 100% (25/25) for stenoses and 50% (4/8) for occlusive lesions, representing all lesions combined from different anatomic locations. Dissection (n = 3) and arterial rupture with retroperitoneal hematoma (n = 1) was found in three patients. During follow-up (mean 12 months), restenoses(n = 8) and re-restenoses (n = 1)occurred in 8 vascular areas. Three of these lesions were treated with repeated PTA (n = 4). The cumulative primary clinical success rate was 67.6%, cumulative secondary success rate 74.4%, and cumulative tertiary success rate 75.9%. Interventional therapy in systemic vasculitis provides promising results in technical success rates and followup. Angioplasty may result in arterial injury, but the rate of complications is low.

  11. Inhaled Pollutants: The Molecular Scene behind Respiratory and Systemic Diseases Associated with Ultrafine Particulate Matter

    PubMed Central

    Traboulsi, Hussein; Guerrina, Necola; Iu, Matthew; Maysinger, Dusica; Ariya, Parisa; Baglole, Carolyn J.

    2017-01-01

    Air pollution of anthropogenic origin is largely from the combustion of biomass (e.g., wood), fossil fuels (e.g., cars and trucks), incinerators, landfills, agricultural activities and tobacco smoke. Air pollution is a complex mixture that varies in space and time, and contains hundreds of compounds including volatile organic compounds (e.g., benzene), metals, sulphur and nitrogen oxides, ozone and particulate matter (PM). PM0.1 (ultrafine particles (UFP)), those particles with a diameter less than 100 nm (includes nanoparticles (NP)) are considered especially dangerous to human health and may contribute significantly to the development of numerous respiratory and cardiovascular diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and atherosclerosis. Some of the pathogenic mechanisms through which PM0.1 may contribute to chronic disease is their ability to induce inflammation, oxidative stress and cell death by molecular mechanisms that include transcription factors such as nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2). Epigenetic mechanisms including non-coding RNA (ncRNA) may also contribute towards the development of chronic disease associated with exposure to PM0.1. This paper highlights emerging molecular concepts associated with inhalational exposure to PM0.1 and their ability to contribute to chronic respiratory and systemic disease. PMID:28125025

  12. Ribosome profiling reveals features of normal and disease-associated mitochondrial translation.

    PubMed

    Rooijers, Koos; Loayza-Puch, Fabricio; Nijtmans, Leo G; Agami, Reuven

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential cellular organelles for generation of energy and their dysfunction may cause diabetes, Parkinson's disease and multi-systemic failure marked by failure to thrive, gastrointestinal problems, lactic acidosis and early lethality. Disease-associated mitochondrial mutations often affect components of the mitochondrial translation machinery. Here we perform ribosome profiling to measure mitochondrial translation at nucleotide resolution. Using a protocol optimized for the retrieval of mitochondrial ribosome protected fragments (RPFs) we show that the size distribution of wild-type mitochondrial RPFs follows a bimodal distribution peaking at 27 and 33 nucleotides, which is distinct from the 30-nucleotide peak of nuclear RPFs. Their cross-correlation suggests generation of mitochondrial RPFs during ribosome progression. In contrast, RPFs from patient-derived mitochondria mutated in tRNA-Tryptophan are centered on tryptophan codons and reduced downstream, indicating ribosome stalling. Intriguingly, long RPFs are enriched in mutated mitochondria, suggesting they characterize stalled ribosomes. Our findings provide the first model for translation in wild-type and disease-triggering mitochondria.

  13. Ribosome profiling reveals features of normal and disease-associated mitochondrial translation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rooijers, Koos; Loayza-Puch, Fabricio; Nijtmans, Leo G.; Agami, Reuven

    2013-12-01

    Mitochondria are essential cellular organelles for generation of energy and their dysfunction may cause diabetes, Parkinson’s disease and multi-systemic failure marked by failure to thrive, gastrointestinal problems, lactic acidosis and early lethality. Disease-associated mitochondrial mutations often affect components of the mitochondrial translation machinery. Here we perform ribosome profiling to measure mitochondrial translation at nucleotide resolution. Using a protocol optimized for the retrieval of mitochondrial ribosome protected fragments (RPFs) we show that the size distribution of wild-type mitochondrial RPFs follows a bimodal distribution peaking at 27 and 33 nucleotides, which is distinct from the 30-nucleotide peak of nuclear RPFs. Their cross-correlation suggests generation of mitochondrial RPFs during ribosome progression. In contrast, RPFs from patient-derived mitochondria mutated in tRNA-Tryptophan are centered on tryptophan codons and reduced downstream, indicating ribosome stalling. Intriguingly, long RPFs are enriched in mutated mitochondria, suggesting they characterize stalled ribosomes. Our findings provide the first model for translation in wild-type and disease-triggering mitochondria.

  14. Super-enhancers delineate disease-associated regulatory nodes in T cells.

    PubMed

    Vahedi, Golnaz; Kanno, Yuka; Furumoto, Yasuko; Jiang, Kan; Parker, Stephen C J; Erdos, Michael R; Davis, Sean R; Roychoudhuri, Rahul; Restifo, Nicholas P; Gadina, Massimo; Tang, Zhonghui; Ruan, Yijun; Collins, Francis S; Sartorelli, Vittorio; O'Shea, John J

    2015-04-23

    Enhancers regulate spatiotemporal gene expression and impart cell-specific transcriptional outputs that drive cell identity. Super-enhancers (SEs), also known as stretch-enhancers, are a subset of enhancers especially important for genes associated with cell identity and genetic risk of disease. CD4(+) T cells are critical for host defence and autoimmunity. Here we analysed maps of mouse T-cell SEs as a non-biased means of identifying key regulatory nodes involved in cell specification. We found that cytokines and cytokine receptors were the dominant class of genes exhibiting SE architecture in T cells. Nonetheless, the locus encoding Bach2, a key negative regulator of effector differentiation, emerged as the most prominent T-cell SE, revealing a network in which SE-associated genes critical for T-cell biology are repressed by BACH2. Disease-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms for immune-mediated disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis, were highly enriched for T-cell SEs versus typical enhancers or SEs in other cell lineages. Intriguingly, treatment of T cells with the Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitor tofacitinib disproportionately altered the expression of rheumatoid arthritis risk genes with SE structures. Together, these results indicate that genes with SE architecture in T cells encompass a variety of cytokines and cytokine receptors but are controlled by a 'guardian' transcription factor, itself endowed with an SE. Thus, enumeration of SEs allows the unbiased determination of key regulatory nodes in T cells, which are preferentially modulated by pharmacological intervention.

  15. Recombination affects accumulation of damaging and disease-associated mutations in human populations.

    PubMed

    Hussin, Julie G; Hodgkinson, Alan; Idaghdour, Youssef; Grenier, Jean-Christophe; Goulet, Jean-Philippe; Gbeha, Elias; Hip-Ki, Elodie; Awadalla, Philip

    2015-04-01

    Many decades of theory have demonstrated that, in non-recombining systems, slightly deleterious mutations accumulate non-reversibly, potentially driving the extinction of many asexual species. Non-recombining chromosomes in sexual organisms are thought to have degenerated in a similar fashion; however, it is not clear the extent to which damaging mutations accumulate along chromosomes with highly variable rates of crossing over. Using high-coverage sequencing data from over 1,400 individuals in the 1000 Genomes and CARTaGENE projects, we show that recombination rate modulates the distribution of putatively deleterious variants across the entire human genome. Exons in regions of low recombination are significantly enriched for deleterious and disease-associated variants, a signature varying in strength across worldwide human populations with different demographic histories. Regions with low recombination rates are enriched for highly conserved genes with essential cellular functions and show an excess of mutations with demonstrated effects on health, a phenomenon likely affecting disease susceptibility in humans.

  16. Translational attenuation differentially alters the fate of disease-associated fibulin proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hulleman, John D.; Balch, William E.; Kelly, Jeffery W.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in fibulin proteins that cause cellular secretion deficiencies are linked to a variety of diseases, ranging from retinopathies to cutis laxa (CL). One secretion-deficient fibulin mutant, R345W fibulin-3, causes the macular dystrophy malattia leventinese by increased endoplasmic reticulum retention and/or extracellular misfolding. Herein, we report that small-molecule activation of the PERK arm of the unfolded protein response partially rescues R345W secretion deficiencies through translational attenuation mediated by eIF2α phosphorylation. Enhanced mutant fibulin-3 secretion can also be achieved by activation of a PERK-independent eIF2α kinase through arsenite treatment and is independent of activating transcription factor 4 signaling and protein translation. However, this translational attenuation strategy was unsuccessful for enhancing the secretion deficiencies of fibulin-5 mutants associated with age-related macular degeneration or CL. While lowered growth temperature enhanced the secretion of mutants associated with CL (C217R and S227P), these effects were not mediated through translational attenuation. In stark contrast to the situation with fibulin-3, protein translation was required for efficient wild-type and mutant fibulin-5 secretion. These data suggest that alteration of specific cellular signaling pathways and proteostasis network components can differentially influence fibulin fate, a hypothesis that could be exploited as a therapy for fibulin-related diseases.—Hulleman, J. D., Balch, W. E., Kelly, J. W. Translational attenuation differentially alters the fate of disease-associated fibulin proteins. PMID:22872678

  17. A Phalaenopsis variety with floral organs showing C class homeotic transformation and its revertant may enable Phalaenopsis as a potential molecular genetic material.

    PubMed

    Ejima, Chika; Kobayashi, Yuuki; Honda, Hiroaki; Shimizu, Noriko; Kiyohara, Shunsuke; Hamasaki, Ryota; Sawa, Shinichiro

    2011-01-01

    The Orchidaceae is one of the most famous garden plants, and improvement of the orchid is very important in horticulture field. However, molecular information is largely unknown. We found a Phalaenopsis variety harboring floral organs showing C class homeotic change. Column is composed of the anthers with the receptive stigmatic surface just underneath them in wild type. However the C class variety produced column with sepal or petal like structure at the abaxial side. This is the typical abnormality as C class mutants in plants. Further, wild type looking revertant was found from the meristem tissue cultured population. This result strongly indicates the existence of active transposable element in Phalaenopsis genome. This transposon may enable Phalaenopsis as a good material for molecular genetic analysis in Orchidaceae.

  18. INaP selective inhibition reverts precocious inter- and motorneurons hyperexcitability in the Sod1-G93R zebrafish ALS model.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Lorena; Ghilardi, Anna; Rottoli, Elsa; De Maglie, Marcella; Prosperi, Laura; Perego, Carla; Baruscotti, Mirko; Bucchi, Annalisa; Del Giacco, Luca; Francolini, Maura

    2016-04-15

    The pathogenic role of SOD1 mutations in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) was investigated using a zebrafish disease model stably expressing the ALS-linked G93R mutation. In addition to the main pathological features of ALS shown by adult fish, we found remarkably precocious alterations in the development of motor nerve circuitry and embryo behavior, and suggest that these alterations are prompted by interneuron and motor neuron hyperexcitability triggered by anomalies in the persistent pacemaker sodium current INaP. The riluzole-induced modulation of INaP reduced spinal neuron excitability, reverted the behavioral phenotypes and improved the deficits in motor nerve circuitry development, thus shedding new light on the use of riluzole in the management of ALS. Our findings provide a valid phenotype-based tool for unbiased in vivo drug screening that can be used to develop new therapies.

  19. INaP selective inhibition reverts precocious inter- and motorneurons hyperexcitability in the Sod1-G93R zebrafish ALS model

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti, Lorena; Ghilardi, Anna; Rottoli, Elsa; De Maglie, Marcella; Prosperi, Laura; Perego, Carla; Baruscotti, Mirko; Bucchi, Annalisa; Del Giacco, Luca; Francolini, Maura

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic role of SOD1 mutations in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) was investigated using a zebrafish disease model stably expressing the ALS-linked G93R mutation. In addition to the main pathological features of ALS shown by adult fish, we found remarkably precocious alterations in the development of motor nerve circuitry and embryo behavior, and suggest that these alterations are prompted by interneuron and motor neuron hyperexcitability triggered by anomalies in the persistent pacemaker sodium current INaP. The riluzole-induced modulation of INaP reduced spinal neuron excitability, reverted the behavioral phenotypes and improved the deficits in motor nerve circuitry development, thus shedding new light on the use of riluzole in the management of ALS. Our findings provide a valid phenotype-based tool for unbiased in vivo drug screening that can be used to develop new therapies. PMID:27079797

  20. Reverted glutathione S-transferase-like genes that influence flower color intensity of carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L.) originated from excision of a transposable element

    PubMed Central

    Momose, Masaki; Itoh, Yoshio; Umemoto, Naoyuki; Nakayama, Masayoshi; Ozeki, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    A glutathione S-transferase-like gene, DcGSTF2, is responsible for carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L.) flower color intensity. Two defective genes, DcGSTF2mu with a nonsense mutation and DcGSTF2-dTac1 containing a transposable element dTac1, have been characterized in detail in this report. dTac1 is an active element that produces reverted functional genes by excision of the element. A pale-pink cultivar ‘Daisy’ carries both defective genes, whereas a spontaneous deep-colored mutant ‘Daisy-VPR’ lost the element from DcGSTF2-dTac1. This finding confirmed that dTac1 is active and that the resulting reverted gene, DcGSTF2rev1, missing the element is responsible for this color change. Crosses between the pale-colored cultivar ‘06-LA’ and a deep-colored cultivar ‘Spectrum’ produced segregating progeny. Only the deep-colored progeny had DcGSTF2rev2 derived from the ‘Spectrum’ parent, whereas progeny with pale-colored flowers had defective forms from both parents, DcGSTF2mu and DcGSTF2-dTac1. Thus, DcGSTF2rev2 had functional activity and likely originated from excision of dTac1 since there was a footprint sequence at the vacated site of the dTac1 insertion. Characterizing the DcGSTF2 genes in several cultivars revealed that the two functional genes, DcGSTF2rev1 and DcGSTF2rev2, have been used for some time in carnation breeding with the latter in use for more than half a century. PMID:24399917

  1. Reverted glutathione S-transferase-like genes that influence flower color intensity of carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L.) originated from excision of a transposable element.

    PubMed

    Momose, Masaki; Itoh, Yoshio; Umemoto, Naoyuki; Nakayama, Masayoshi; Ozeki, Yoshihiro

    2013-12-01

    A glutathione S-transferase-like gene, DcGSTF2, is responsible for carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L.) flower color intensity. Two defective genes, DcGSTF2mu with a nonsense mutation and DcGSTF2-dTac1 containing a transposable element dTac1, have been characterized in detail in this report. dTac1 is an active element that produces reverted functional genes by excision of the element. A pale-pink cultivar 'Daisy' carries both defective genes, whereas a spontaneous deep-colored mutant 'Daisy-VPR' lost the element from DcGSTF2-dTac1. This finding confirmed that dTac1 is active and that the resulting reverted gene, DcGSTF2rev1, missing the element is responsible for this color change. Crosses between the pale-colored cultivar '06-LA' and a deep-colored cultivar 'Spectrum' produced segregating progeny. Only the deep-colored progeny had DcGSTF2rev2 derived from the 'Spectrum' parent, whereas progeny with pale-colored flowers had defective forms from both parents, DcGSTF2mu and DcGSTF2-dTac1. Thus, DcGSTF2rev2 had functional activity and likely originated from excision of dTac1 since there was a footprint sequence at the vacated site of the dTac1 insertion. Characterizing the DcGSTF2 genes in several cultivars revealed that the two functional genes, DcGSTF2rev1 and DcGSTF2rev2, have been used for some time in carnation breeding with the latter in use for more than half a century.

  2. The Fatty Acid Signaling Molecule cis-2-Decenoic Acid Increases Metabolic Activity and Reverts Persister Cells to an Antimicrobial-Susceptible State

    PubMed Central

    Morozov, Aleksey; Planzos, Penny; Zelaya, Hector M.

    2014-01-01

    Persister cells, which are tolerant to antimicrobials, contribute to biofilm recalcitrance to therapeutic agents. In turn, the ability to kill persister cells is believed to significantly improve efforts in eradicating biofilm-related, chronic infections. While much research has focused on elucidating the mechanism(s) by which persister cells form, little is known about the mechanism or factors that enable persister cells to revert to an active and susceptible state. Here, we demonstrate that cis-2-decenoic acid (cis-DA), a fatty acid signaling molecule, is able to change the status of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli persister cells from a dormant to a metabolically active state without an increase in cell number. This cell awakening is supported by an increase of the persister cells' respiratory activity together with changes in protein abundance and increases of the transcript expression levels of several metabolic markers, including acpP, 16S rRNA, atpH, and ppx. Given that most antimicrobials target actively growing cells, we also explored the effect of cis-DA on enhancing antibiotic efficacy in killing persister cells due to their inability to keep a persister cell state. Compared to antimicrobial treatment alone, combinational treatments of persister cell subpopulations with antimicrobials and cis-DA resulted in a significantly greater decrease in cell viability. In addition, the presence of cis-DA led to a decrease in the number of persister cells isolated. We thus demonstrate the ability of a fatty acid signaling molecule to revert bacterial cells from a tolerant phenotype to a metabolically active, antimicrobial-sensitive state. PMID:25192989

  3. Creation of Mice Bearing a Partial Duplication of HPRT Gene Marked with a GFP Gene and Detection of Revertant Cells In Situ as GFP-Positive Somatic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Noda, Asao; Suemori, Hirofumi; Hirai, Yuko; Hamasaki, Kanya; Kodama, Yoshiaki; Mitani, Hiroshi; Landes, Reid D.; Nakamura, Nori

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming clear that apparently normal somatic cells accumulate mutations. Such accumulations or propagations of mutant cells are thought to be related to certain diseases such as cancer. To better understand the nature of somatic mutations, we developed a mouse model that enables in vivo detection of rare genetically altered cells via GFP positive cells. The mouse model carries a partial duplication of 3’ portion of X-chromosomal HPRT gene and a GFP gene at the end of the last exon. In addition, although HPRT gene expression was thought ubiquitous, the expression level was found insufficient in vivo to make the revertant cells detectable by GFP positivity. To overcome the problem, we replaced the natural HPRT-gene promoter with a CAG promoter. In such animals, termed HPRT-dup-GFP mouse, losing one duplicated segment by crossover between the two sister chromatids or within a single molecule of DNA reactivates gene function, producing hybrid HPRT-GFP proteins which, in turn, cause the revertant cells to be detected as GFP-positive cells in various tissues. Frequencies of green mutant cells were measured using fixed and frozen sections (liver and pancreas), fixed whole mount (small intestine), or by means of flow cytometry (unfixed splenocytes). The results showed that the frequencies varied extensively among individuals as well as among tissues. X-ray exposure (3 Gy) increased the frequency moderately (~2 times) in the liver and small intestine. Further, in two animals out of 278 examined, some solid tissues showed too many GFP-positive cells to score (termed extreme jackpot mutation). Present results illustrated a complex nature of somatic mutations occurring in vivo. While the HPRT-dup-GFP mouse may have a potential for detecting tissue-specific environmental mutagens, large inter-individual variations of mutant cell frequency cause the results unstable and hence have to be reduced. This future challenge will likely involve lowering the background mutation

  4. HMDD v2.0: a database for experimentally supported human microRNA and disease associations.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Qiu, Chengxiang; Tu, Jian; Geng, Bin; Yang, Jichun; Jiang, Tianzi; Cui, Qinghua

    2014-01-01

    The Human microRNA Disease Database (HMDD; available via the Web site at http://cmbi.bjmu.edu.cn/hmdd and http://202.38.126.151/hmdd/tools/hmdd2.html) is a collection of experimentally supported human microRNA (miRNA) and disease associations. Here, we describe the HMDD v2.0 update that presented several novel options for users to facilitate exploration of the data in the database. In the updated database, miRNA-disease association data were annotated in more details. For example, miRNA-disease association data from genetics, epigenetics, circulating miRNAs and miRNA-target interactions were integrated into the database. In addition, HMDD v2.0 presented more data that were generated based on concepts derived from the miRNA-disease association data, including disease spectrum width of miRNAs and miRNA spectrum width of human diseases. Moreover, we provided users a link to download all the data in the HMDD v2.0 and a link to submit novel data into the database. Meanwhile, we also maintained the old version of HMDD. By keeping data sets up-to-date, HMDD should continue to serve as a valuable resource for investigating the roles of miRNAs in human disease.

  5. Disease-associated prion protein detected in lymphoid tissues from pigs challenged with the agent of chronic wasting disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aims: Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a naturally-occurring, fatal neurodegenerative disease of cervids. We previously demonstrated that disease-associated prion protein (PrPSc) can be detected in the brain and retina from pigs challenged intracranially or orally with the CWD agent. In that study,...

  6. Occluded Cigarette Smoke Causing Localized Chloracne Like Comedones (Podium) Skin Diseases Associated with Agent Orange and Other Organochlorines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-20

    This document contains an ethical review and approval, from the Department of the Air Force Air Education and Training Command, for a poster ... presentation entitled Skin Diseases Associated with Agent Orange and Other Organochlorines and a podium presentation entitled Occluded Cigarette Smoke Causing Localized Chloracne Like Comedones.

  7. Constructing lncRNA functional similarity network based on lncRNA-disease associations and disease semantic similarity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing; Yan, Chenggang Clarence; Luo, Cai; Ji, Wen; Zhang, Yongdong; Dai, Qionghai

    2015-06-10

    Increasing evidence has indicated that plenty of lncRNAs play important roles in many critical biological processes. Developing powerful computational models to construct lncRNA functional similarity network based on heterogeneous biological datasets is one of the most important and popular topics in the fields of both lncRNAs and complex diseases. Functional similarity network construction could benefit the model development for both lncRNA function inference and lncRNA-disease association identification. However, little effort has been attempted to analysis and calculate lncRNA functional similarity on a large scale. In this study, based on the assumption that functionally similar lncRNAs tend to be associated with similar diseases, we developed two novel lncRNA functional similarity calculation models (LNCSIM). LNCSIM was evaluated by introducing similarity scores into the model of Laplacian Regularized Least Squares for LncRNA-Disease Association (LRLSLDA) for lncRNA-disease association prediction. As a result, new predictive models improved the performance of LRLSLDA in the leave-one-out cross validation of various known lncRNA-disease associations datasets. Furthermore, some of the predictive results for colorectal cancer and lung cancer were verified by independent biological experimental studies. It is anticipated that LNCSIM could be a useful and important biological tool for human disease diagnosis, treatment, and prevention.

  8. Isolated Endobronchial Mycobacterium avium Disease Associated with Lobar Atelectasis in an Immunocompetent Young Adult: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye In; Kim, Ji Won; Kim, Jun Young; Kim, Young Nam; Kim, Jin Hae; Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Chung, Myung Jin; Koh, Won-Jung

    2015-10-01

    The prevalence of lung diseases caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) is increasing worldwide. Unlike pulmonary tuberculosis, endobronchial NTM diseases are very rare with the majority of cases reported in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immune deficiency syndrome. We reported a rare case of endobronchial Mycobacterium avium disease associated with lobar atelectasis in a young immunocompetent patient and reviewed the relevant iterature.

  9. Strain-Level Differences in Porphyrin Production and Regulation in Propionibacterium acnes Elucidate Disease Associations

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Tremylla; Kang, Dezhi; Barnard, Emma

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Propionibacterium acnes is an important skin commensal, but it is also considered a pathogenic factor in several diseases including acne vulgaris, the most common skin disease. While previous studies have revealed P. acnes strain-level differences in health and disease associations, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Recently, we demonstrated that vitamin B12 supplementation increases P. acnes production of porphyrins, a group of proinflammatory metabolites important in acne development (D. Kang, B. Shi, M. C. Erfe, N. Craft, and H. Li, Sci. Transl. Med. 7:293ra103, 2015, doi:10.1126/scitranslmed.aab2009). In this study, we compared the porphyrin production and regulation of multiple P. acnes strains. We revealed that acne-associated type IA-2 strains inherently produced significantly higher levels of porphyrins, which were further enhanced by vitamin B12 supplementation. On the other hand, health-associated type II strains produced low levels of porphyrins and did not respond to vitamin B12. Using a small-molecule substrate and inhibitor, we demonstrated that porphyrin biosynthesis was modulated at the metabolic level. We identified a repressor gene (deoR) of porphyrin biosynthesis that was carried in all health-associated type II strains, but not in acne-associated type IA-2 strains. The expression of deoR suggests additional regulation of porphyrin production at the transcriptional level in health-associated strains. Our findings provide one potential molecular mechanism for the different contributions of P. acnes strains to skin health and disease and support the role of vitamin B12 in acne pathogenesis. Our study emphasizes the importance of understanding the role of the commensal microbial community in health and disease at the strain level and suggests potential utility of health-associated P. acnes strains in acne treatment. IMPORTANCE Propionibacterium acnes is a dominant bacterium residing on skin, and it has been thought

  10. Degradation of the disease-associated prion protein by a serine protease from lichens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Christopher J.; Bennett, James P.; Biro, S.M.; Duque-Velasquez, J. C.; Rodriguez, Cynthia M.; Bessen, R.A.; Rocke, Tonie E.

    2011-01-01

    The disease-associated prion protein (PrPTSE), the probable etiological agent of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), is resistant to degradation and can persist in the environment. Lichens, mutualistic symbioses containing fungi, algae, bacteria and occasionally cyanobacteria, are ubiquitous in the environment and have evolved unique biological activities allowing their survival in challenging ecological niches. We investigated PrPTSE inactivation by lichens and found acetone extracts of three lichen species (Parmelia sulcata, Cladonia rangiferina and Lobaria pulmonaria) have the ability to degrade prion protein (PrP) from TSE-infected hamsters, mice and deer. Immunoblots measuring PrP levels and protein misfolding cyclic amplification indicated at least two logs of reductions in PrPTSE. Degradative activity was not found in closely related lichen species or in algae or a cyanobacterium that inhabit lichens. Degradation was blocked by Pefabloc SC, a serine protease inhibitor, but not inhibitors of other proteases or enzymes. Additionally, we found that PrP levels in PrPTSE-enriched preps or infected brain homogenates are also reduced following exposure to freshly-collected P. sulcata or an aqueous extract of the lichen. Our findings indicate that these lichen extracts efficiently degrade PrPTSE and suggest that some lichens could have potential to inactivate TSE infectivity on the landscape or be a source for agents to degrade prions. Further work to clone and characterize the protease, assess its effect on TSE infectivity and determine which organism or organisms present in lichens produce or influence the protease activity is warranted.

  11. Degradation of the disease-associated prion protein by a serine protease from lichens.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, C.J.; Bennett, J.P.; Biro, S.M.; Duque-Velasquez, J. C.; Rodriguez, C.M.; Bessen, R.A.; Rocke, T.E.

    2011-01-01

    The disease-associated prion protein (PrPTSE), the probable etiological agent of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), is resistant to degradation and can persist in the environment. Lichens, mutualistic symbioses containing fungi, algae, bacteria and occasionally cyanobacteria, are ubiquitous in the environment and have evolved unique biological activities allowing their survival in challenging ecological niches. We investigated PrPTSE inactivation by lichens and found acetone extracts of three lichen species (Parmelia sulcata, Cladonia rangiferina and Lobaria pulmonaria) have the ability to degrade prion protein (PrP) from TSE-infected hamsters, mice and deer. Immunoblots measuring PrP levels and protein misfolding cyclic amplification indicated at least two logs of reductions in PrPTSE. Degradative activity was not found in closely related lichen species or in algae or a cyanobacterium that inhabit lichens. Degradation was blocked by Pefabloc SC, a serine protease inhibitor, but not inhibitors of other proteases or enzymes. Additionally, we found that PrP levels in PrPTSE-enriched preps or infected brain homogenates are also reduced following exposure to freshly-collected P. sulcata or an aqueous extract of the lichen. Our findings indicate that these lichen extracts efficiently degrade PrPTSE and suggest that some lichens could have potential to inactivate TSE infectivity on the landscape or be a source for agents to degrade prions. Further work to clone and characterize the protease, assess its effect on TSE infectivity and determine which organism or organisms present in lichens produce or influence the protease activity is warranted.

  12. Degradation of the disease-associated prion protein by a serine protease from lichens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, C.J.; Bennett, J.P.; Biro, S.M.; Duque-Velasquez, J.C.; Rodriguez, C.M.; Bessen, R.A.; Rocke, T.E.; Bartz, Jason C.

    2011-01-01

    The disease-associated prion protein (PrP(TSE)), the probable etiological agent of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), is resistant to degradation and can persist in the environment. Lichens, mutualistic symbioses containing fungi, algae, bacteria and occasionally cyanobacteria, are ubiquitous in the environment and have evolved unique biological activities allowing their survival in challenging ecological niches. We investigated PrP(TSE) inactivation by lichens and found acetone extracts of three lichen species (Parmelia sulcata, Cladonia rangiferina and Lobaria pulmonaria) have the ability to degrade prion protein (PrP) from TSE-infected hamsters, mice and deer. Immunoblots measuring PrP levels and protein misfolding cyclic amplification indicated at least two logs of reductions in PrP(TSE). Degradative activity was not found in closely related lichen species or in algae or a cyanobacterium that inhabit lichens. Degradation was blocked by Pefabloc SC, a serine protease inhibitor, but not inhibitors of other proteases or enzymes. Additionally, we found that PrP levels in PrP(TSE)-enriched preps or infected brain homogenates are also reduced following exposure to freshly-collected P. sulcata or an aqueous extract of the lichen. Our findings indicate that these lichen extracts efficiently degrade PrP(TSE) and suggest that some lichens could have potential to inactivate TSE infectivity on the landscape or be a source for agents to degrade prions. Further work to clone and characterize the protease, assess its effect on TSE infectivity and determine which organism or organisms present in lichens produce or influence the protease activity is warranted.

  13. Disease-associated mutation in SRSF2 misregulates splicing by altering RNA-binding affinities

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Lieu, Yen K.; Ali, Abdullah M.; Penson, Alex; Reggio, Kathryn S.; Rabadan, Raul; Raza, Azra; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Manley, James L.

    2015-01-01

    Serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 2 (SRSF2) is an RNA-binding protein that plays important roles in splicing of mRNA precursors. SRSF2 mutations are frequently found in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and certain leukemias, but how these mutations affect SRSF2 function has only begun to be examined. We used clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein-9 nuclease to introduce the P95H mutation to SRSF2 in K562 leukemia cells, generating an isogenic model so that splicing alterations can be attributed solely to mutant SRSF2. We found that SRSF2 (P95H) misregulates 548 splicing events (<1% of total). Of these events, 374 involved the inclusion of cassette exons, and the inclusion was either increased (206) or decreased (168). We detected a specific motif (UCCA/UG) enriched in the more-included exons and a distinct motif (UGGA/UG) in the more-excluded exons. RNA gel shift assays showed that a mutant SRSF2 derivative bound more tightly than its wild-type counterpart to RNA sites containing UCCAG but bound less tightly to UGGAG sites. Thus in most cases the pattern of exon inclusion or exclusion correlated with stronger or weaker RNA binding, respectively. We further show that the P95H mutation does not affect other functions of SRSF2, i.e., protein–protein interactions with key splicing factors. Our results thus demonstrate that the P95H mutation positively or negatively alters the binding affinity of SRSF2 for cognate RNA sites in target transcripts, leading to misregulation of exon inclusion. Our findings shed light on the mechanism of the disease-associated SRSF2 mutation in splicing regulation and also reveal a group of misspliced mRNA isoforms for potential therapeutic targeting. PMID:26261309

  14. Neurotoxicity of the Parkinson Disease-Associated Pesticide Ziram Is Synuclein-Dependent in Zebrafish Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Lulla, Aaron; Barnhill, Lisa; Bitan, Gal; Ivanova, Magdalena I.; Nguyen, Binh; O’Donnell, Kelley; Stahl, Mark C.; Yamashiro, Chase; Klärner, Frank-Gerrit; Schrader, Thomas; Sagasti, Alvaro; Bronstein, Jeff M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Exposure to the commonly used dithiocarbamate (DTC) pesticides is associated with an increased risk of developing Parkinson disease (PD), although the mechanisms by which they exert their toxicity are not completely understood. Objective: We studied the mechanisms of ziram’s (a DTC fungicide) neurotoxicity in vivo. Methods: Zebrafish (ZF) embryos were utilized to determine ziram’s effects on behavior, neuronal toxicity, and the role of synuclein in its toxicity. Results: Nanomolar-range concentrations of ziram caused selective loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons and impaired swimming behavior. Because ziram increases α-synuclein (α-syn) concentrations in rat primary neuronal cultures, we investigated the effect of ziram on ZF γ-synuclein 1 (γ1). ZF express 3 synuclein isoforms, and ZF γ1 appears to be the closest functional homologue to α-syn. We found that recombinant ZF γ1 formed fibrils in vitro, and overexpression of ZF γ1 in ZF embryos led to the formation of neuronal aggregates and neurotoxicity in a manner similar to that of α-syn. Importantly, knockdown of ZF γ1 with morpholinos and disruption of oligomers with the molecular tweezer CLR01 prevented ziram’s DA toxicity. Conclusions: These data show that ziram is selectively toxic to DA neurons in vivo, and this toxicity is synuclein-dependent. These findings have important implications for understanding the mechanisms by which pesticides may cause PD. Citation: Lulla A, Barnhill L, Bitan G, Ivanova MI, Nguyen B, O’Donnell K, Stahl MC, Yamashiro C, Klärner FG, Schrader T, Sagasti A, Bronstein JM. 2016. Neurotoxicity of the Parkinson disease-associated pesticide ziram is synuclein-dependent in zebrafish embryos. Environ Health Perspect 124:1766–1775; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP141 PMID:27301718

  15. Degradation of the disease-associated prion protein by a serine protease from lichens.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Christopher J; Bennett, James P; Biro, Steven M; Duque-Velasquez, Juan Camilo; Rodriguez, Cynthia M; Bessen, Richard A; Rocke, Tonie E

    2011-05-11

    The disease-associated prion protein (PrP(TSE)), the probable etiological agent of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), is resistant to degradation and can persist in the environment. Lichens, mutualistic symbioses containing fungi, algae, bacteria and occasionally cyanobacteria, are ubiquitous in the environment and have evolved unique biological activities allowing their survival in challenging ecological niches. We investigated PrP(TSE) inactivation by lichens and found acetone extracts of three lichen species (Parmelia sulcata, Cladonia rangiferina and Lobaria pulmonaria) have the ability to degrade prion protein (PrP) from TSE-infected hamsters, mice and deer. Immunoblots measuring PrP levels and protein misfolding cyclic amplification indicated at least two logs of reductions in PrP(TSE). Degradative activity was not found in closely related lichen species or in algae or a cyanobacterium that inhabit lichens. Degradation was blocked by Pefabloc SC, a serine protease inhibitor, but not inhibitors of other proteases or enzymes. Additionally, we found that PrP levels in PrP(TSE)-enriched preps or infected brain homogenates are also reduced following exposure to freshly-collected P. sulcata or an aqueous extract of the lichen. Our findings indicate that these lichen extracts efficiently degrade PrP(TSE) and suggest that some lichens could have potential to inactivate TSE infectivity on the landscape or be a source for agents to degrade prions. Further work to clone and characterize the protease, assess its effect on TSE infectivity and determine which organism or organisms present in lichens produce or influence the protease activity is warranted.

  16. HDL-S1P: cardiovascular functions, disease-associated alterations, and therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Levkau, Bodo

    2015-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid contained in High-density lipoproteins (HDL) and has drawn considerable attention in the lipoprotein field as numerous studies have demonstrated its contribution to several functions inherent to HDL. Some of them are partly and some entirely due to the S1P contained in HDL (HDL-S1P). Despite the presence of over 1000 different lipids in HDL, S1P stands out as it possesses its own cell surface receptors through which it exercises key physiological functions. Most of the S1P in human plasma is associated with HDL, and the amount of HDL-S1P influences the quality and quantity of HDL-dependent functions. The main binding partner of S1P in HDL is apolipoprotein M but others may also exist particularly under conditions of acute S1P elevations. HDL not only exercise functions through their S1P content but have also an impact on genuine S1P signaling by influencing S1P bioactivity and receptor presentation. HDL-S1P content is altered in human diseases such as atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, renal insufficiency and diabetes mellitus. Low HDL-S1P has also been linked to impaired HDL functions associated with these disorders. Although the pathophysiological and molecular reasons for such disease-associated shifts in HDL-S1P are little understood, there have been successful approaches to circumvent their adverse implications by pharmacologically increasing HDL-S1P as means to improve HDL function. This mini-review will cover the current understanding of the contribution of HDL-S1P to physiological HDL function, its alteration in disease and ways for its restoration to correct HDL dysfunction.

  17. Scoring multiple features to predict drug disease associations using information fusion and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Moghadam, H; Rahgozar, M; Gharaghani, S

    2016-08-01

    Prediction of drug-disease associations is one of the current fields in drug repositioning that has turned into a challenging topic in pharmaceutical science. Several available computational methods use network-based and machine learning approaches to reposition old drugs for new indications. However, they often ignore features of drugs and diseases as well as the priority and importance of each feature, relation, or interactions between features and the degree of uncertainty. When predicting unknown drug-disease interactions there are diverse data sources and multiple features available that can provide more accurate and reliable results. This information can be collectively mined using data fusion methods and aggregation operators. Therefore, we can use the feature fusion method to make high-level features. We have proposed a computational method named scored mean kernel fusion (SMKF), which uses a new method to score the average aggregation operator called scored mean. To predict novel drug indications, this method systematically combines multiple features related to drugs or diseases at two levels: the drug-drug level and the drug-disease level. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of drug and disease features as well as data fusion to predict drug-disease interactions. The method was validated against a well-established drug-disease gold-standard dataset. When compared with the available methods, our proposed method outperformed them and competed well in performance with area under cover (AUC) of 0.91, F-measure of 84.9% and Matthews correlation coefficient of 70.31%.

  18. Decoding the disease-associated proteins encoded in the human chromosome 4.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lien-Chin; Liu, Mei-Ying; Hsiao, Yung-Chin; Choong, Wai-Kok; Wu, Hsin-Yi; Hsu, Wen-Lian; Liao, Pao-Chi; Sung, Ting-Yi; Tsai, Shih-Feng; Yu, Jau-Song; Chen, Yu-Ju

    2013-01-04

    Chromosome 4 is the fourth largest chromosome, containing approximately 191 megabases (~6.4% of the human genome) with 757 protein-coding genes. A number of marker genes for many diseases have been found in this chromosome, including genetic diseases (e.g., hepatocellular carcinoma) and biomedical research (cardiac system, aging, metabolic disorders, immune system, cancer and stem cell) related genes (e.g., oncogenes, growth factors). As a pilot study for the chromosome 4-centric human proteome project (Chr 4-HPP), we present here a systematic analysis of the disease association, protein isoforms, coding single nucleotide polymorphisms of these 757 protein-coding genes and their experimental evidence at the protein level. We also describe how the findings from the chromosome 4 project might be used to drive the biomarker discovery and validation study in disease-oriented projects, using the examples of secretomic and membrane proteomic approaches in cancer research. By integrating with cancer cell secretomes and several other existing databases in the public domain, we identified 141 chromosome 4-encoded proteins as cancer cell-secretable/shedable proteins. Additionally, we also identified 54 chromosome 4-encoded proteins that have been classified as cancer-associated proteins with successful selected or multiple reaction monitoring (SRM/MRM) assays developed. From literature annotation and topology analysis, 271 proteins were recognized as membrane proteins while 27.9% of the 757 proteins do not have any experimental evidence at the protein-level. In summary, the analysis revealed that the chromosome 4 is a rich resource for cancer-associated proteins for biomarker verification projects and for drug target discovery projects.

  19. Oligoclonal bands in the cerebrospinal fluid of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients with disease-associated mutations.

    PubMed

    Ticozzi, Nicola; Tiloca, Cinzia; Mencacci, Niccolò E; Morelli, Claudia; Doretti, Alberto; Rusconi, Daniela; Colombrita, Claudia; Sangalli, Davide; Verde, Federico; Finelli, Palma; Messina, Stefano; Ratti, Antonia; Silani, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis is usually performed to exclude inflammatory processes of the central nervous system. Although in a small subset of patients an intrathecal synthesis of IgG is detectable, usually there is no clear explanation for this evidence. This study investigates the occurrence of oligoclonal bands (OCBs) in the CSF of a large series of ALS patients, attempting a correlation with genotype data. CSF was collected from 259 ALS patients. CSF parameters were measured according to standard procedures, and detection of OCBs performed by isoelectric focusing. The patients were screened for mutations in SOD1, FUS, TARDBP, ANG, OPTN, and C9ORF72. We observed the presence of OCBs in the CSF of 9/259 ALS patients (3.5 %), and of disease-associated mutations in 12 cases. OCBs were significantly more frequent in mutation carriers compared to the remaining cohort (3/12 vs 6/247; p < 0.01). Among patients with OCBs, two patients had the TARDBP p.A382T mutation (one of which in homozygous state), and one the ANG p.P-4S variant. Both patients carrying the p.A382T mutation had an atypical phenotype, one of them manifesting signs suggestive of a cerebellar involvement, and the other presenting neuroradiological findings suggestive of an inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system. Our results suggest that ALS patients with OCBs may harbor mutations in disease-causing genes. We speculate that mutations in both TARDBP and ANG genes may disrupt the blood-brain barrier (BBB), promoting local immune responses and neuroinflammation. The role of mutant TARDBP and ANG genes on BBB integrity of ALS patients warrants further investigation.

  20. Disease-associated mutation in SRSF2 misregulates splicing by altering RNA-binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Lieu, Yen K; Ali, Abdullah M; Penson, Alex; Reggio, Kathryn S; Rabadan, Raul; Raza, Azra; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Manley, James L

    2015-08-25

    Serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 2 (SRSF2) is an RNA-binding protein that plays important roles in splicing of mRNA precursors. SRSF2 mutations are frequently found in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and certain leukemias, but how these mutations affect SRSF2 function has only begun to be examined. We used clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein-9 nuclease to introduce the P95H mutation to SRSF2 in K562 leukemia cells, generating an isogenic model so that splicing alterations can be attributed solely to mutant SRSF2. We found that SRSF2 (P95H) misregulates 548 splicing events (<1% of total). Of these events, 374 involved the inclusion of cassette exons, and the inclusion was either increased (206) or decreased (168). We detected a specific motif (UCCA/UG) enriched in the more-included exons and a distinct motif (UGGA/UG) in the more-excluded exons. RNA gel shift assays showed that a mutant SRSF2 derivative bound more tightly than its wild-type counterpart to RNA sites containing UCCAG but bound less tightly to UGGAG sites. Thus in most cases the pattern of exon inclusion or exclusion correlated with stronger or weaker RNA binding, respectively. We further show that the P95H mutation does not affect other functions of SRSF2, i.e., protein-protein interactions with key splicing factors. Our results thus demonstrate that the P95H mutation positively or negatively alters the binding affinity of SRSF2 for cognate RNA sites in target transcripts, leading to misregulation of exon inclusion. Our findings shed light on the mechanism of the disease-associated SRSF2 mutation in splicing regulation and also reveal a group of misspliced mRNA isoforms for potential therapeutic targeting.

  1. Degradation of the Disease-Associated Prion Protein by a Serine Protease from Lichens

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Christopher J.; Bennett, James P.; Biro, Steven M.; Duque-Velasquez, Juan Camilo; Rodriguez, Cynthia M.; Bessen, Richard A.; Rocke, Tonie E.

    2011-01-01

    The disease-associated prion protein (PrPTSE), the probable etiological agent of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), is resistant to degradation and can persist in the environment. Lichens, mutualistic symbioses containing fungi, algae, bacteria and occasionally cyanobacteria, are ubiquitous in the environment and have evolved unique biological activities allowing their survival in challenging ecological niches. We investigated PrPTSE inactivation by lichens and found acetone extracts of three lichen species (Parmelia sulcata, Cladonia rangiferina and Lobaria pulmonaria) have the ability to degrade prion protein (PrP) from TSE-infected hamsters, mice and deer. Immunoblots measuring PrP levels and protein misfolding cyclic amplification indicated at least two logs of reductions in PrPTSE. Degradative activity was not found in closely related lichen species or in algae or a cyanobacterium that inhabit lichens. Degradation was blocked by Pefabloc SC, a serine protease inhibitor, but not inhibitors of other proteases or enzymes. Additionally, we found that PrP levels in PrPTSE-enriched preps or infected brain homogenates are also reduced following exposure to freshly-collected P. sulcata or an aqueous extract of the lichen. Our findings indicate that these lichen extracts efficiently degrade PrPTSE and suggest that some lichens could have potential to inactivate TSE infectivity on the landscape or be a source for agents to degrade prions. Further work to clone and characterize the protease, assess its effect on TSE infectivity and determine which organism or organisms present in lichens produce or influence the protease activity is warranted. PMID:21589935

  2. PBMDA: A novel and effective path-based computational model for miRNA-disease association prediction.

    PubMed

    You, Zhu-Hong; Huang, Zhi-An; Zhu, Zexuan; Yan, Gui-Ying; Li, Zheng-Wei; Wen, Zhenkun; Chen, Xing

    2017-03-24

    In the recent few years, an increasing number of studies have shown that microRNAs (miRNAs) play critical roles in many fundamental and important biological processes. As one of pathogenetic factors, the molecular mechanisms underlying human complex diseases still have not been completely understood from the perspective of miRNA. Predicting potential miRNA-disease associations makes important contributions to understanding the pathogenesis of diseases, developing new drugs, and formulating individualized diagnosis and treatment for diverse human complex diseases. Instead of only depending on expensive and time-consuming biological experiments, computational prediction models are effective by predicting potential miRNA-disease associations, prioritizing candidate miRNAs for the investigated diseases, and selecting those miRNAs with higher association probabilities for further experimental validation. In this study, Path-Based MiRNA-Disease Association (PBMDA) prediction model was proposed by integrating known human miRNA-disease associations, miRNA functional similarity, disease semantic similarity, and Gaussian interaction profile kernel similarity for miRNAs and diseases. This model constructed a heterogeneous graph consisting of three interlinked sub-graphs and further adopted depth-first search algorithm to infer potential miRNA-disease associations. As a result, PBMDA achieved reliable performance in the frameworks of both local and global LOOCV (AUCs of 0.8341 and 0.9169, respectively) and 5-fold cross validation (average AUC of 0.9172). In the cases studies of three important human diseases, 88% (Esophageal Neoplasms), 88% (Kidney Neoplasms) and 90% (Colon Neoplasms) of top-50 predicted miRNAs have been manually confirmed by previous experimental reports from literatures. Through the comparison performance between PBMDA and other previous models in case studies, the reliable performance also demonstrates that PBMDA could serve as a powerful computational tool

  3. Insomnia and Sleepiness in Parkinson Disease: Associations with Symptoms and Comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Seockhoon; Bohnen, Nicolaas I.; Albin, Roger L.; Frey, Kirk A.; Müller, Martijn L. T. M.; Chervin, Ronald D.

    2013-01-01

    . Insomnia and sleepiness in Parkinson disease: associations with symptoms and comorbidities. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(11):1131-1137. PMID:24235893

  4. Characterization of Connective Tissue Disease-Associated Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension From REVEAL

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Juliana; Parsons, Lori; Hassoun, Paul M.; McGoon, Michael; Badesch, David B.; Miller, Dave P.; Nicolls, Mark R.; Zamanian, Roham T.

    2010-01-01

    Background: REVEAL (the Registry to Evaluate Early and Long-term Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Disease Management) is the largest US cohort of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) confirmed by right-sided heart catheterization (RHC), providing a more comprehensive subgroup characterization than previously possible. We used REVEAL to analyze the clinical features of patients with connective tissue disease-associated PAH (CTD-APAH). Methods: All newly and previously diagnosed patients with World Health Organization (WHO) group 1 PAH meeting RHC criteria at 54 US centers were consecutively enrolled. Cross-sectional and 1-year mortality and hospitalization analyses from time of enrollment compared CTD-APAH to idiopathic disease and systemic sclerosis (SSc) to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD), and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Results: Compared with patients with idiopathic disease (n = 1,251), patients with CTD-APAH (n = 641) had better hemodynamics and favorable right ventricular echocardiographic findings but a higher prevalence of pericardial effusions, lower 6-min walk distance (300.5 ± 118.0 vs 329.4 ± 134.7 m, P = .01), higher B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels (432.8 ± 789.1 vs 245.6 ± 427.2 pg/mL, P < .0001), and lower diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide (Dlco) (44.9% ± 18.0% vs 63.6% ± 22.1% predicted, P < .0001). One-year survival and freedom from hospitalization were lower in the CTD-APAH group (86% vs 93%, P < .0001; 67% vs 73%, P = .03). Compared with patients with SSc-APAH (n = 399), those with other CTDs (SLE, n = 110; MCTD, n = 52; RA, n = 28) had similar hemodynamics; however, patients with SSc-APAH had the highest BNP levels (552.2 ± 977.8 pg/mL), lowest Dlco (41.2% ± 16.3% predicted), and poorest 1-year survival (82% vs 94% in SLE-APAH, 88% in MCTD-APAH, and 96% in RA-APAH). Conclusions: Patients with SSc-APAH demonstrate a unique phenotype with the highest BNP levels, lowest Dlco

  5. 3Disease Browser: A Web server for integrating 3D genome and disease-associated chromosome rearrangement data

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruifeng; Liu, Yifang; Li, Tingting; Li, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangement (CR) events have been implicated in many tumor and non-tumor human diseases. CR events lead to their associated diseases by disrupting gene and protein structures. Also, they can lead to diseases through changes in chromosomal 3D structure and gene expression. In this study, we search for CR-associated diseases potentially caused by chromosomal 3D structure alteration by integrating Hi-C and ChIP-seq data. Our algorithm rediscovers experimentally verified disease-associated CRs (polydactyly diseases) that alter gene expression by disrupting chromosome 3D structure. Interestingly, we find that intellectual disability may be a candidate disease caused by 3D chromosome structure alteration. We also develop a Web server (3Disease Browser, http://3dgb.cbi.pku.edu.cn/disease/) for integrating and visualizing disease-associated CR events and chromosomal 3D structure. PMID:27734896

  6. Amino Acid Changes in Disease-Associated Variants Differ Radically from Variants Observed in the 1000 Genomes Project Dataset

    PubMed Central

    de Beer, Tjaart A. P.; Laskowski, Roman A.; Parks, Sarah L.; Sipos, Botond; Goldman, Nick; Thornton, Janet M.

    2013-01-01

    The 1000 Genomes Project data provides a natural background dataset for amino acid germline mutations in humans. Since the direction of mutation is known, the amino acid exchange matrix generated from the observed nucleotide variants is asymmetric and the mutabilities of the different amino acids are very different. These differences predominantly reflect preferences for nucleotide mutations in the DNA (especially the high mutation rate of the CpG dinucleotide, which makes arginine mutability very much higher than other amino acids) rather than selection imposed by protein structure constraints, although there is evidence for the latter as well. The variants occur predominantly on the surface of proteins (82%), with a slight preference for sites which are more exposed and less well conserved than random. Mutations to functional residues occur about half as often as expected by chance. The disease-associated amino acid variant distributions in OMIM are radically different from those expected on the basis of the 1000 Genomes dataset. The disease-associated variants preferentially occur in more conserved sites, compared to 1000 Genomes mutations. Many of the amino acid exchange profiles appear to exhibit an anti-correlation, with common exchanges in one dataset being rare in the other. Disease-associated variants exhibit more extreme differences in amino acid size and hydrophobicity. More modelling of the mutational processes at the nucleotide level is needed, but these observations should contribute to an improved prediction of the effects of specific variants in humans. PMID:24348229

  7. Functional Assessment of Disease-Associated Regulatory Variants In Vivo Using a Versatile Dual Colour Transgenesis Strategy in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Shipra; Gordon, Christopher T.; Foster, Robert G.; Melin, Lucie; Abadie, Véronique; Baujat, Geneviève; Vazquez, Marie-Paule; Amiel, Jeanne; Lyonnet, Stanislas; van Heyningen, Veronica; Kleinjan, Dirk A.

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of gene regulation by sequence variation in non-coding regions of the genome is now recognised as a significant cause of human disease and disease susceptibility. Sequence variants in cis-regulatory elements (CREs), the primary determinants of spatio-temporal gene regulation, can alter transcription factor binding sites. While technological advances have led to easy identification of disease-associated CRE variants, robust methods for discerning functional CRE variants from background variation are lacking. Here we describe an efficient dual-colour reporter transgenesis approach in zebrafish, simultaneously allowing detailed in vivo comparison of spatio-temporal differences in regulatory activity between putative CRE variants and assessment of altered transcription factor binding potential of the variant. We validate the method on known disease-associated elements regulating SHH, PAX6 and IRF6 and subsequently characterise novel, ultra-long-range SOX9 enhancers implicated in the craniofacial abnormality Pierre Robin Sequence. The method provides a highly cost-effective, fast and robust approach for simultaneously unravelling in a single assay whether, where and when in embryonic development a disease-associated CRE-variant is affecting its regulatory function. PMID:26030420

  8. Phthalocyanines as Molecular Scaffolds to Block Disease-Associated Protein Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Valiente-Gabioud, Ariel A; Miotto, Marco C; Chesta, María E; Lombardo, Verónica; Binolfi, Andres; Fernández, Claudio O

    2016-05-17

    amyloidogenic proteins. Analysis of the structure-activity relationship in phthalocyanines revealed that their anti-amyloid activity is highly dependent on the type of metal ion coordinated to the tetrapyrrolic system but is not sensitive to the number of peripheral charged substituents. The tendency of phthalocyanines to oligomerize (self-association) via aromatic-aromatic stacking interactions correlates precisely with their binding capabilities to target proteins and, more importantly, determines their efficiency as anti-amyloid agents. The ability to block different types of disease-associated protein aggregation raises the possibility that these cyclic tetrapyrrole compounds have a common mechanism of action to impair the formation of a variety of pathological aggregates. Because the structural and molecular basis for the anti-amyloid effects of these molecules is starting to emerge, combined efforts from the fields of structural, cellular, and animal biology will result critical for the rational design and discovery of new drugs for the treatment of amyloid related neurological disorders.

  9. Diseases associated with hidranitis suppurativa: part 2 of a series on hidradenitis.

    PubMed

    Scheinfeld, Noah

    2013-06-15

    diseases is likely underreported. Pyoderma vegetans has been noted in 2 cases of HS and 4 cases of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) and is likely a clue to the linkage of the pathology of IBD and HS. Pityriasis rubra pilaris, in particular Type VI related to HIV, has a relationship more commonly with acne conglobata, but with HS also. Single case reports of diseases associated with HS include systemic lupus erythematosus, acromegaly, Down syndrome, Bazex-Dupre´-Christol, and prurtis ani, but these might be coincidences. Pyogenic Arthritis, Pyoderma gangrenosum, and Acne (PAPA Syndrome) and Pyoderma gangrenosum, Acne, and Suppurative Hidradenitis (PASH Syndrome) are pyodermic-arthritic syndromes that are associated with HS. Erythema nodosum and granulomatous lobular mastitis have been reported with HS but the significance of these reports is uncertain. Because of scarring, HS can result in lymphedema including scrotal elephantiasis and verrucous lymphedema. HS is sometimes accompanied by obesity, hypertension, and anemia and can be considered a disease in the spectrum of metabolic syndrome, a skin disease with systemic consequences. HS, like other types of chronic inflammation when long standing in the perianal and perineal areas, can result in squamous cell cancer. A variety of drugs can induce HS. These include lithium, sirolimus, cyclosporine, vemurafenib, and oral contraceptives. Inverse psoriasis or psoriasis vulgaris as a side effect of infliximab therapy may be associated with HS. These associations aside, most cases of HS occur in isolation without coincident morbidity.

  10. A network-based classification model for deriving novel drug-disease associations and assessing their molecular actions.

    PubMed

    Oh, Min; Ahn, Jaegyoon; Yoon, Youngmi

    2014-01-01

    The growing number and variety of genetic network datasets increases the feasibility of understanding how drugs and diseases are associated at the molecular level. Properly selected features of the network representations of existing drug-disease associations can be used to infer novel indications of existing drugs. To find new drug-disease associations, we generated an integrative genetic network using combinations of interactions, including protein-protein interactions and gene regulatory network datasets. Within this network, network adjacencies of drug-drug and disease-disease were quantified using a scored path between target sets of them. Furthermore, the common topological module of drugs or diseases was extracted, and thereby the distance between topological drug-module and disease (or disease-module and drug) was quantified. These quantified scores were used as features for the prediction of novel drug-disease associations. Our classifiers using Random Forest, Multilayer Perceptron and C4.5 showed a high specificity and sensitivity (AUC score of 0.855, 0.828 and 0.797 respectively) in predicting novel drug indications, and displayed a better performance than other methods with limited drug and disease properties. Our predictions and current clinical trials overlap significantly across the different phases of drug development. We also identified and visualized the topological modules of predicted drug indications for certain types of cancers, and for Alzheimer's disease. Within the network, those modules show potential pathways that illustrate the mechanisms of new drug indications, including propranolol as a potential anticancer agent and telmisartan as treatment for Alzheimer's disease.

  11. Brilliant Blue-G but not Fenofibrate Treatment Reverts Hemiparkinsonian Behavior and Restores Dopamine Levels in an Animal Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ferrazoli, Enéas G; de Souza, Héllio D N; Nascimento, Isis C; Oliveira-Giacomelli, Ágatha; Schwindt, Telma T; Britto, Luiz R; Ulrich, Henning

    2017-03-03

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and their projections to the striatum. Several processes have been described as potential inducers of the dopaminergic neuron death, such as inflammation, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. However, the death of dopaminergic neurons seems to be multifactorial and its cause remains unclear. ATP activating purinergic receptors influence various physiological functions in the CNS, including neurotransmission. Purinergic signaling is also involved in pathological scenarios, where ATP is extensively released and promotes sustained purinergic P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) activation and consequent induction of cell death. This effect occurs, among other factors, by oxidative stress and during the inflammatory response. On the other hand, peroxisome proliferatoractivated receptor-γ co-activator 1α (PGC-1α) is involved in energy metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis. Expression and activity upregulation of this protein has been related with reduction of oxidative stress and neuroprotection. Therefore, P2X7R and PGC-1α are potential targets in the treatment of PD. Here, hemiparkinsonism was induced by unilateral stereotactic injection of 6OHDA in a rat model. After seven days, the establishment of PD was confirmed and followed by treatment with the P2X7R antagonist Brilliant Blue-G (BBG) or PGC-1α agonist fenofibrate. BBG, but not fenofibrate, reverted hemiparkinsonian behavior accompanied by an increase of TH-immunoreactivity in the substantia nigra. Our results suggest that the P2X7R may be a therapeutic target in Parkinson's disease.

  12. Enhancing NAD+ Salvage Pathway Reverts the Toxicity of Primary Astrocytes Expressing Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis-linked Mutant Superoxide Dismutase 1 (SOD1).

    PubMed

    Harlan, Benjamin A; Pehar, Mariana; Sharma, Deep R; Beeson, Gyda; Beeson, Craig C; Vargas, Marcelo R

    2016-05-13

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) participates in redox reactions and NAD(+)-dependent signaling pathways. Although the redox reactions are critical for efficient mitochondrial metabolism, they are not accompanied by any net consumption of the nucleotide. On the contrary, NAD(+)-dependent signaling processes lead to its degradation. Three distinct families of enzymes consume NAD(+) as substrate: poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases, ADP-ribosyl cyclases (CD38 and CD157), and sirtuins (SIRT1-7). Because all of the above enzymes generate nicotinamide as a byproduct, mammalian cells have evolved an NAD(+) salvage pathway capable of resynthesizing NAD(+) from nicotinamide. Overexpression of the rate-limiting enzyme in this pathway, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, increases total and mitochondrial NAD(+) levels in astrocytes. Moreover, targeting nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase to the mitochondria also enhances NAD(+) salvage pathway in astrocytes. Supplementation with the NAD(+) precursors nicotinamide mononucleotide and nicotinamide riboside also increases NAD(+) levels in astrocytes. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is caused by the progressive degeneration of motor neurons in the spinal cord, brain stem, and motor cortex. Superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mutations account for up to 20% of familial ALS and 1-2% of apparently sporadic ALS cases. Primary astrocytes isolated from mutant human superoxide dismutase 1-overexpressing mice as well as human post-mortem ALS spinal cord-derived astrocytes induce motor neuron death in co-culture. Increasing total and mitochondrial NAD(+) content in ALS astrocytes increases oxidative stress resistance and reverts their toxicity toward co-cultured motor neurons. Taken together, our results suggest that enhancing the NAD(+) salvage pathway in astrocytes could be a potential therapeutic target to prevent astrocyte-mediated motor neuron death in ALS.

  13. Inhibition of vimentin or B1 integrin reverts morphology of prostate tumor cells grown in laminin-rich extracellular matrix gels and reduces tumor growth in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xueping; Fournier, Marcia V; Ware, Joy L; Bissell, Mina J; Yacoub, Adly; Zehner, Zendra E

    2008-06-12

    Prostate epithelial cells grown embedded in laminin-rich extracellular matrix (lrECM) undergo morphologic changes that closely resemble their architecture in vivo. In this study, growth characteristics of three human prostate epithelial sublines derived from the same cellular lineage, but displaying different tumorigenic and metastatic properties in vivo, were assessed in three-dimensional lrECM gels. M12, a highly tumorigenic and metastatic subline, was derived from the immortalized, prostate epithelial P69 cell line by selection in athymic, nude mice and found to contain a deletion of 19p-q13.1. The stable reintroduction of an intact human chromosome 19 into M12 resulted in a poorly tumorigenic subline, designated F6. When embedded in lrECM gels, the parental, nontumorigenic P69 line produced acini with clearly defined lumena. Immunostaining with antibodies to {beta}-catenin, E-cadherin, or {alpha}6 and {beta}1 integrins showed polarization typical of glandular epithelium. In contrast, the metastatic M12 subline produced highly disorganized cells with no evidence of polarization. The F6 subline reverted to acini-like structures exhibiting basal polarity marked with integrins. Reducing either vimentin levels via small interfering RNA interference or the expression of {alpha}6 and {beta}1 integrins by the addition of blocking antibodies, reorganized the M12 subline into forming polarized acini. The loss of vimentin significantly reduced M12-Vim tumor growth when assessed by s.c. injection in athymic mice. Thus, tumorigenicity in vivo correlated with disorganized growth in three-dimensional lrECM gels. These studies suggest that the levels of vimentin and {beta}1 integrin play a key role in the homeostasis of the normal acinus in prostate and that their dysregulation may lead to tumorigenesis. [Mol Cancer Ther 2009;8(3):499-508].

  14. 3β-Acetyl tormentic acid reverts MRP1/ABCC1 mediated cancer resistance through modulation of intracellular levels of GSH and inhibition of GST activity.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Gleice da Graça; Oliveira, Rodrigo Rodrigues; Kaplan, Maria Auxiliadora Coelho; Gattass, Cerli Rocha

    2014-10-15

    ABC transporter overexpression is an important mechanism of multidrug resistance (MDR) and one of the main obstacles to successful cancer treatment. As these proteins actively remove chemotherapeutics from the tumor cells, the pharmacological inhibition of their activity is a possible strategy to revert drug resistance. Moreover, the ability of MDR inhibitors to sensitize resistant cells to conventional drugs is important for their clinical use. Evidence has shown that the multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1) is a negative prognostic marker in patients with lung, gastric, or breast cancers or neuroblastoma. Previous data have shown that 3β-acetyl tormentic acid (3ATA) inhibits the transport activity of the protein MRP1/ABCC1. In this study, we evaluated the ability of 3ATA to sensitize an MDR cell line (GLC4/ADR), which overexpresses MRP1, and investigated the anti-MRP1 mechanisms activated by 3ATA. The results showed that 3ATA is able to reverse the resistance of the MDR cell line to doxorubicin and vincristine, two drugs that are commonly used in cancer chemotherapy. Regarding the sensitizing mechanism induced by 3ATA, this work shows that the triterpene does not modulate the expression of MRP1/ABCC1 but is able to reduce total intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels and decrease the activity of glutathione-s-transferase (GST), the enzyme responsible for the glutathione conjugation of xenobiotics. Together, these results show that 3ATA sensitizes the MDR cell line overexpressing MRP1/ABCC1 to antineoplastic drugs and that this effect is mediated by the modulation of intracellular levels of GSH and GST activity.

  15. Analysis of disease-associated protein expression using quantitative proteomics—fibulin-5 is expressed in association with hepatic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bracht, Thilo; Schweinsberg, Vincent; Trippler, Martin; Kohl, Michael; Ahrens, Maike; Padden, Juliet; Naboulsi, Wael; Barkovits, Katalin; Megger, Dominik A; Eisenacher, Martin; Borchers, Christoph H; Schlaak, Jörg F; Hoffmann, Andreas-Claudius; Weber, Frank; Baba, Hideo A; Meyer, Helmut E; Sitek, Barbara

    2015-05-01

    Hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis are major health problems worldwide. Until now, highly invasive biopsy remains the diagnostic gold standard despite many disadvantages. To develop noninvasive diagnostic assays for the assessment of liver fibrosis, it is urgently necessary to identify molecules that are robustly expressed in association with the disease. We analyzed biopsied tissue samples from 95 patients with HBV/HCV-associated hepatic fibrosis using three different quantification methods. We performed a label-free proteomics discovery study to identify novel disease-associated proteins using a subset of the cohort (n = 27). Subsequently, gene expression data from all available clinical samples were analyzed (n = 77). Finally, we performed a targeted proteomics approach, multiple reaction monitoring (MRM), to verify the disease-associated expression in samples independent from the discovery approach (n = 68). We identified fibulin-5 (FBLN5) as a novel protein expressed in relation to hepatic fibrosis. Furthermore, we confirmed the altered expression of microfibril-associated glycoprotein 4 (MFAP4), lumican (LUM), and collagen alpha-1(XIV) chain (COL14A1) in association to hepatic fibrosis. To our knowledge, no tissue-based quantitative proteomics study for hepatic fibrosis has been performed using a cohort of comparable size. By this means, we add substantial evidence for the disease-related expression of the proteins examined in this study.

  16. Early Onset of Atypical Proliferative Lesions in the Lungs of a Libby Amphibole (LA) Exposed Rat Model of Cardiovascular Disease-Associated Iron Overlo

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Miners and residents of Libby, Montana have increased incidences of asbestos-related diseases associated with exposure to amphibole contaminated vermiculite. Amphiboles have been shown to bind endogenous iron and modulate fiber induced inflammatory response. We hypoth...

  17. Partial Revertants of the Transposable Element-Associated Suppressible Allele White-Apricot in Drosophila Melanogaster: Structures and Responsiveness to Genetic Modifiers

    PubMed Central

    Mount, S. M.; Green, M. M.; Rubin, G. M.

    1988-01-01

    The eye color phenotype of white-apricot (w(a)), a mutant allele of the white locus caused by the insertion of the transposable element copia into a small intron, is suppressed by the extragenic suppressor suppressor-of-white-apricot (su(w(a))) and enhanced by the extragenic enhancers suppressor-of-forked su(f)) and Enhancer-of-white-apricot (E(w(a))). Derivatives of w(a) have been analyzed molecularly and genetically in order to correlate the structure of these derivatives with their response to modifiers. Derivatives in which the copia element is replaced precisely by a solo long terminal repeat (sLTR) were generated in vitro and returned to the germline by P-element mediated transformation; flies carrying this allele within a P transposon show a nearly wild-type phenotype and no response to either su(f) or su(w(a)). In addition, eleven partial phenotypic revertants of w(a) were analyzed. Of these, one appears to be a duplication of a large region which includes w(a), three are new alleles of su(w(a)), two are sLTR derivatives whose properties confirm results obtained using transformation, and five are secondary insertions into the copia element within w(a). One of these, w(aR84h), differs from w(a) by the insertion of the most 3' 83 nucleotides of the I factor. The five insertion derivatives show a variety of phenotypes and modes of interaction with su((f) and su(w(a)). The eye pigmentation of w(aR84h) is affected by su(f) and E(w(a)), but not su(w(a)). These results demonstrate that copia (as opposed to the interruption of white sequences) is essential for the w(a) phenotype and its response to genetic modifiers, and that there are multiple mechanisms for the alteration of the w(a) phenotype by modifiers. PMID:2834265

  18. Drug-disease association and drug-repositioning predictions in complex diseases using causal inference-probabilistic matrix factorization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jihong; Li, Zheng; Fan, Xiaohui; Cheng, Yiyu

    2014-09-22

    The high incidence of complex diseases has become a worldwide threat to human health. Multiple targets and pathways are perturbed during the pathological process of complex diseases. Systematic investigation of complex relationship between drugs and diseases is necessary for new association discovery and drug repurposing. For this purpose, three causal networks were constructed herein for cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, and neoplasms, respectively. A causal inference-probabilistic matrix factorization (CI-PMF) approach was proposed to predict and classify drug-disease associations, and further used for drug-repositioning predictions. First, multilevel systematic relations between drugs and diseases were integrated from heterogeneous databases to construct causal networks connecting drug-target-pathway-gene-disease. Then, the association scores between drugs and diseases were assessed by evaluating a drug's effects on multiple targets and pathways. Furthermore, PMF models were learned based on known interactions, and associations were then classified into three types by trained models. Finally, therapeutic associations were predicted based upon the ranking of association scores and predicted association types. In terms of drug-disease association prediction, modified causal inference included in CI-PMF outperformed existing causal inference with a higher AUC (area under receiver operating characteristic curve) score and greater precision. Moreover, CI-PMF performed better than single modified causal inference in predicting therapeutic drug-disease associations. In the top 30% of predicted associations, 58.6% (136/232), 50.8% (31/61), and 39.8% (140/352) hit known therapeutic associations, while precisions obtained by the latter were only 10.2% (231/2264), 8.8% (36/411), and 9.7% (189/1948). Clinical verifications were further conducted for the top 100 newly predicted therapeutic associations. As a result, 21, 12, and 32 associations have been studied and

  19. The presence of disease-associated prion protein in skeletal muscle of cattle infected with classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Okada, Hiroyuki; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Fukuda, Shigeo; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Imamura, Morikazu; Masujin, Kentaro; Matsuura, Yuichi; Fujii, Takashi; Fujii, Kei; Kageyama, Soichi; Yoshioka, Miyako; Murayama, Yuichi; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)) in the skeletal muscle of cattle infected with classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (C-BSE). The study was carried out systematically in 12 different muscle samples from 43 (3 field and 40 experimental) cases of C-BSE; however, muscle spindles were not available in many of these cases. Therefore, analysis became restricted to a total of 31 muscles in 23 cattle. Even after this restriction, low levels of PrP(Sc) were detected in the muscle spindles of the masseter, intercostal, triceps brachii, psoas major, quadriceps femoris and semitendinosus muscles from 3 field and 6 experimental clinical-stage cases. The present data indicate that small amounts of PrP(Sc) are detectable by immunohistochemistry in the skeletal muscles of animals terminally affected with C-BSE.

  20. Role of albumin in diseases associated with severe systemic inflammation: Pathophysiologic and clinical evidence in sepsis and in decompensated cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Artigas, Antonio; Wernerman, Jan; Arroyo, Vicente; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Levy, Mitchell

    2016-06-01

    The metabolism of albumin in inflammatory states such as sepsis or major surgery is complex and still not well characterized. Nevertheless, in inflammatory states, albumin synthesis has been observed to increase. By contrast, in decompensated cirrhosis, a disease characterized by systemic inflammation, albumin synthesis by the liver may decrease to 30% to 50% of normal values. Furthermore, in these conditions, there are high capillary leakage and altered albumin kinetics. The discussion regarding the effect of exogenous albumin administration on intravascular volume in inflammatory states should therefore address albumin turnover. To add complexity to our understanding of the effects of albumin, there are many data indicating that the therapeutic action of albumin is mediated not only through the impact on plasma volume expansion but also through a modulatory effect on inflammation and oxidative stress. All these characteristics are relevant to diseases associated with systemic inflammation including sepsis and decompensated cirrhosis.

  1. A path-based measurement for human miRNA functional similarities using miRNA-disease associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Pingjian; Luo, Jiawei; Xiao, Qiu; Chen, Xiangtao

    2016-09-01

    Compared with the sequence and expression similarity, miRNA functional similarity is so important for biology researches and many applications such as miRNA clustering, miRNA function prediction, miRNA synergism identification and disease miRNA prioritization. However, the existing methods always utilized the predicted miRNA target which has high false positive and false negative to calculate the miRNA functional similarity. Meanwhile, it is difficult to achieve high reliability of miRNA functional similarity with miRNA-disease associations. Therefore, it is increasingly needed to improve the measurement of miRNA functional similarity. In this study, we develop a novel path-based calculation method of miRNA functional similarity based on miRNA-disease associations, called MFSP. Compared with other methods, our method obtains higher average functional similarity of intra-family and intra-cluster selected groups. Meanwhile, the lower average functional similarity of inter-family and inter-cluster miRNA pair is obtained. In addition, the smaller p-value is achieved, while applying Wilcoxon rank-sum test and Kruskal-Wallis test to different miRNA groups. The relationship between miRNA functional similarity and other information sources is exhibited. Furthermore, the constructed miRNA functional network based on MFSP is a scale-free and small-world network. Moreover, the higher AUC for miRNA-disease prediction indicates the ability of MFSP uncovering miRNA functional similarity.

  2. A Bayesian Approach for Analysis of Whole-Genome Bisulphite Sequencing Data Identifies Disease-Associated Changes in DNA Methylation.

    PubMed

    Rackham, Owen J L; Langley, Sarah R; Oates, Thomas; Vradi, Eleni; Harmston, Nathan; Srivastava, Prashant K; Behmoaras, Jacques; Dellaportas, Petros; Bottolo, Leonardo; Petretto, Enrico

    2017-02-17

    DNA methylation is a key epigenetic modification involved in gene regulation whose contribution to disease susceptibility remains to be fully understood. Here, we present a novel Bayesian smoothing approach (called ABBA) to detect differentially methylated regions (DMRs) from whole-genome bisulphite sequencing (WGBS). We also show how this approach can be leveraged to identify disease-associated changes in DNA methylation, suggesting mechanisms through which these alterations might affect disease. From a data modeling perspective, ABBA has the distinctive feature of automatically adapting to different correlation structures in CpG methylation levels across the genome whilst taking into account the distance between CpG sites as a covariate. Our simulation study shows that ABBA has greater power to detect DMRs than existing methods, providing an accurate identification of DMRs in the large majority of simulated cases. To empirically demonstrate the method's efficacy in generating biological hypotheses, we performed WGBS of primary macrophages derived from an experimental rat system of glomerulonephritis and used ABBA to identify >1,000 disease-associated DMRs. Investigation of these DMRs revealed differential DNA methylation localized to a 600bp region in the promoter of the Ifitm3 gene. This was confirmed by ChIP-seq and RNA-seq analyses, showing differential transcription factor binding at the Ifitm3 promoter by JunD (an established determinant of glomerulonephritis) and a consistent change in Ifitm3 expression. Our ABBA analysis allowed us to propose a new role for Ifitm3 in the pathogenesis of glomerulonephritis via a mechanism involving promoter hypermethylation that is associated with Ifitm3 repression in the rat strain susceptible to glomerulonephritis.

  3. A Bayesian Approach for Analysis of Whole-Genome Bisulfite Sequencing Data Identifies Disease-Associated Changes in DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Rackham, Owen J. L.; Langley, Sarah R.; Oates, Thomas; Vradi, Eleni; Harmston, Nathan; Srivastava, Prashant K.; Behmoaras, Jacques; Dellaportas, Petros; Bottolo, Leonardo; Petretto, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    DNA methylation is a key epigenetic modification involved in gene regulation whose contribution to disease susceptibility remains to be fully understood. Here, we present a novel Bayesian smoothing approach (called ABBA) to detect differentially methylated regions (DMRs) from whole-genome bisulfite sequencing (WGBS). We also show how this approach can be leveraged to identify disease-associated changes in DNA methylation, suggesting mechanisms through which these alterations might affect disease. From a data modeling perspective, ABBA has the distinctive feature of automatically adapting to different correlation structures in CpG methylation levels across the genome while taking into account the distance between CpG sites as a covariate. Our simulation study shows that ABBA has greater power to detect DMRs than existing methods, providing an accurate identification of DMRs in the large majority of simulated cases. To empirically demonstrate the method’s efficacy in generating biological hypotheses, we performed WGBS of primary macrophages derived from an experimental rat system of glomerulonephritis and used ABBA to identify >1000 disease-associated DMRs. Investigation of these DMRs revealed differential DNA methylation localized to a 600 bp region in the promoter of the Ifitm3 gene. This was confirmed by ChIP-seq and RNA-seq analyses, showing differential transcription factor binding at the Ifitm3 promoter by JunD (an established determinant of glomerulonephritis), and a consistent change in Ifitm3 expression. Our ABBA analysis allowed us to propose a new role for Ifitm3 in the pathogenesis of glomerulonephritis via a mechanism involving promoter hypermethylation that is associated with Ifitm3 repression in the rat strain susceptible to glomerulonephritis. PMID:28213474

  4. NO-Synthase Activity in Patients with Coronary Heart Disease Associated with Hypertension of Different Age Groups

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Hypertension is a major independent risk factor for the development of CHD. Abnormalities in NO generation or activity have been proposed as a major mechanism of CHD. The purpose of this article is to determine the activity of eNOS and iNOS in patients with isolated CHD and CHD associated with HT of different age groups. Methods Fifty patients with isolated CHD and 42 patients with CHD associated with HT were enrolled in this study. NOS activity was determined by nitrite anion formed in the reaction. Results A statistically significant increase in iNOS activity is observed in elderly donors. In patients with isolated coronary heart disease cNOS activity is statistically significantly reduced with respect to the control group. The reduction of enzymatic activity of cNOS is more expressed in elderly patients than in middle-aged patients with coronary heart disease. Alterations in eNOS activity are more expressed in patients with coronary heart disease associated with hypertension than in patients with isolated coronary heart disease. Against the background of cNOS inhibition in the patients, a sharp increase in iNOS activity is observed. Conclusions It has been shown that disturbance of endothelial function in patients with coronary heart disease associated with hypertension is characterized by reduced endothelial NO synthesis by cNOS and increased systemic NO synthesis due to increased iNOS activity. It has been found that the lack of endothelial NO and hyperproduction of »harmful« NO by iNOS are more expressed in elderly patients. PMID:28356863

  5. Geographic differences and the role of cagA gene in gastroduodenal diseases associated with Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Valmaseda Pérez, T; Gisbert, J P; Pajares García, J M

    2001-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the major causal agent of gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric cancer. Several bacterium genes seem to be involved in the pathogenicity mechanism. One of them, the cagA gene, has been extensively studied and characterized. In this article we have carried out a study of characteristics and genetic variability of cagA gene in different geographic areas of the world. At the same time, we have summarized several studies that evaluate possible relation of cagA with gastroduodenal diseases associated by H. pylori infection. In our study we found that the presence of the cagA gene has been confirmed in more than 60% H. pylori strains distributed throughout the world. The prevalence of cagA genotype is of 65.4% in gastritis patients, 84.2% in patients with peptic ulcer and 86.5% in those with gastric cancer. It shows a high genetic variability of cagA associated with gastroduodenal diseases that could serve as a virulence marker in H. pylori infected subjects. However, the high prevalence of H. pylori cagA positive strains in some geographic areas does not confirm the strong association between cagA and virulence of strains as described in other countries. Nowadays, cagA gene is considered as a marker for the presence of cag pathogenicity island (cag-PAI) in H. pylori genoma. This region contains several genes that has been involved with the production of cytokines that results in an increased inflammation of host gastric mucosa, but its function is unknown. Probably, others bacterium factors, such as susceptibility host and environmental cofactors could influence in the risk of developing different gastroduodenal diseases associated with H. pylori infection.

  6. Inferring novel lncRNA-disease associations based on a random walk model of a lncRNA functional similarity network.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jie; Shi, Hongbo; Wang, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Changjian; Liu, Lin; Wang, Letian; He, Weiwei; Hao, Dapeng; Liu, Shulin; Zhou, Meng

    2014-08-01

    Accumulating evidence demonstrates that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play important roles in the development and progression of complex human diseases, and predicting novel human lncRNA-disease associations is a challenging and urgently needed task, especially at a time when increasing amounts of lncRNA-related biological data are available. In this study, we proposed a global network-based computational framework, RWRlncD, to infer potential human lncRNA-disease associations by implementing the random walk with restart method on a lncRNA functional similarity network. The performance of RWRlncD was evaluated by experimentally verified lncRNA-disease associations, based on leave-one-out cross-validation. We achieved an area under the ROC curve of 0.822, demonstrating the excellent performance of RWRlncD. Significantly, the performance of RWRlncD is robust to different parameter selections. Predictively highly-ranked lncRNA-disease associations in case studies of prostate cancer and Alzheimer's disease were manually confirmed by literature mining, providing evidence of the good performance and potential value of the RWRlncD method in predicting lncRNA-disease associations.

  7. Sporadic inclusion-body myositis: A degenerative muscle disease associated with aging, impaired muscle protein homeostasis and abnormal mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Askanas, Valerie; Engel, W King; Nogalska, Anna

    2015-04-01

    Sporadic inclusion-body myositis (s-IBM) is the most common degenerative muscle disease in which aging appears to be a key risk factor. In this review we focus on several cellular molecular mechanisms responsible for multiprotein aggregation and accumulations within s-IBM muscle fibers, and their possible consequences. Those include mechanisms leading to: a) accumulation in the form of aggregates within the muscle fibers, of several proteins, including amyloid-β42 and its oligomers, and phosphorylated tau in the form of paired helical filaments, and we consider their putative detrimental influence; and b) protein misfolding and aggregation, including evidence of abnormal myoproteostasis, such as increased protein transcription, inadequate protein disposal, and abnormal posttranslational modifications of proteins. Pathogenic importance of our recently demonstrated abnormal mitophagy is also discussed. The intriguing phenotypic similarities between s-IBM muscle fibers and the brains of Alzheimer and Parkinson's disease patients, the two most common neurodegenerative diseases associated with aging, are also discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuromuscular Diseases: Pathology and Molecular Pathogenesis.

  8. Orthologs of Human Disease Associated Genes and RNAi Analysis of Silencing Insulin Receptor Gene in Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zan; Teng, Xiaolu; Chen, Maohua; Li, Fei

    2014-01-01

    The silkworm, Bombyx mori L., is an important economic insect that has been domesticated for thousands of years to produce silk. It is our great interest to investigate the possibility of developing the B. mori as human disease model. We searched the orthologs of human disease associated genes in the B. mori by bi-directional best hits of BLAST and confirmed by searching the OrthoDB. In total, 5006 genes corresponding to 1612 kinds of human diseases had orthologs in the B. mori, among which, there are 25 genes associated with diabetes mellitus. Of these, we selected the insulin receptor gene of the B. mori (Bm-INSR) to study its expression in different tissues and at different developmental stages and tissues. Quantitative PCR showed that Bm-INSR was highly expressed in the Malpighian tubules but expressed at low levels in the testis. It was highly expressed in the 3rd and 4th instar larvae, and adult. We knocked down Bm-INSR expression using RNA interference. The abundance of Bm-INSR transcripts were dramatically reduced to ~4% of the control level at 6 days after dsRNA injection and the RNAi-treated B. mori individuals showed apparent growth inhibition and malformation such as abnormal body color in black, which is the typical symptom of diabetic patients. Our results demonstrate that B. mori has potential use as an animal model for diabetic mellitus research. PMID:25302617

  9. Functional Analysis of Retinitis Pigmentosa 2 (RP2) Protein Reveals Variable Pathogenic Potential of Disease-Associated Missense Variants

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Suresh B.; Hurd, Toby W.; Ghosh, Amiya K.; Murga-Zamalloa, Carlos A.; Khanna, Hemant

    2011-01-01

    Genetic mutations are frequently associated with diverse phenotypic consequences, which limits the interpretation of the consequence of a variation in patients. Mutations in the retinitis pigmentosa 2 (RP2) gene are associated with X-linked RP, which is a phenotypically heterogenic form of retinal degeneration. The purpose of this study was to assess the functional consequence of disease-associated mutations in the RP2 gene using an in vivo assay. Morpholino-mediated depletion of rp2 in zebrafish resulted in perturbations in photoreceptor development and microphthalmia (small eye). Ultrastructural and immunofluorescence analyses revealed defective photoreceptor outer segment development and lack of expression of photoreceptor-specific proteins. The retinopathy phenotype could be rescued by expressing the wild-type human RP2 protein. Notably, the tested RP2 mutants exhibited variable degrees of rescue of rod versus cone photoreceptor development as well as microphthalmia. Our results suggest that RP2 plays a key role in photoreceptor development and maintenance in zebrafish and that the clinical heterogeneity associated with RP2 mutations may, in part, result from its potentially distinct functional relevance in rod versus cone photoreceptors. PMID:21738648

  10. Concordance of randomized and nonrandomized studies was unrelated to translational patterns of two nutrient-disease associations

    PubMed Central

    Trikalinos, Thomas A.; Moorthy, Denish; Chung, Mei; Yu, Winifred W.; Lee, Jounghee; Lichtenstein, Alice H.; Lau, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Objective There are several examples in nutrition of discordance between the results of observational studies and randomized controlled trials (RCTs). We hypothesized that this discordance is attributable to differences in the translational paths of nutrient–disease associations. Translational paths can be assessed using citation analysis. Study Design and Setting We compared the characteristics of citation networks using examples, where RCTs and observational studies agreed (long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids [n-3 PUFA]) or disagreed (vitamin E). We performed systematic reviews in each example, constructed citation networks, and compared them with respect to the number of articles and citation relationships between them, as well as the distribution of articles’ hub and authority scores. Results For n-3 PUFA, meta-analyses of 14 RCTs and 10 observational studies both suggested that higher intake was associated with lower cardiovascular mortality. For vitamin E, the meta-analysis of 14 RCTs excluded a clinically significant effect, whereas 14 observational studies reported a significant inverse association. The respective citation networks consisted of 392 (n-3 PUFA) and 351 (vitamin E) articles. No differences between the characteristics of the two networks were identified. There was no evidence that the observational studies predated RCTs in the translational process in either example. Conclusion In the two examples, citation network characteristics do not predict concordance in the results of observational studies and RCTs. PMID:22047889

  11. Neuroanatomical distribution of disease-associated prion protein in experimental bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cattle after intracerebral inoculation.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Shigeo; Onoe, Sadao; Nikaido, Satoshi; Fujii, Kei; Kageyama, Soichi; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Imamura, Morikazu; Masujin, Kentaro; Matsuura, Yuichi; Shimizu, Yoshihisa; Kasai, Kazuo; Yoshioka, Miyako; Murayama, Yuichi; Mohri, Shirou; Yokoyama, Takashi; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    The pathologic disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)) has been shown to be expressed in the central nervous system of Holstein cattle inoculated intracerebrally with 3 sources of classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) isolates. Several regions of the brain and spinal cord were analyzed for PrP(Sc) expression by immunohistochemical and Western blotting analyses. Animals euthanized at 10 months post-inoculation (mpi) showed PrP(Sc) deposits in the brainstem and thalamus, but no vacuolation; this suggested that the BSE agent might exhibit area-dependent tropism in the brain. At 16 and 18 mpi, a small amount of vacuolation was detected in the brainstem and thalamus, but not in the cerebral cortices. At 20 to 24 mpi, when clinical symptoms were apparent, heavy PrP(Sc) deposits were evident throughout the brain and spinal cord. The mean time to the appearance of clinical symptoms was 19.7 mpi, and the mean survival time was 22.7 mpi. These findings show that PrP(Sc) accumulation was detected approximately 10 months before the clinical symptoms of BSE became apparent. In addition, the 3 sources of BSE prion induced no detectable differences in the clinical signs, incubation periods, neuroanatomical location of vacuoles, or distribution and pattern of PrP(Sc) depositions in the brain.

  12. Disease Associations With Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance: A Population-Based Study of 17,398 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bida, John P.; Kyle, Robert A.; Therneau, Terry M.; Melton, L. Joseph; Plevak, Matthew F.; Larson, Dirk R.; Dispenzieri, Angela; Katzmann, Jerry A.; Rajkumar, S. Vincent

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To systematically study the association of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) with all diseases in a population-based cohort of 17,398 patients, all of whom were uniformly tested for the presence or absence of MGUS. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Serum samples were obtained from 77% (21,463) of the 28,038 enumerated residents in Olmsted County, Minnesota. Informed consent was obtained from patients to study 17,398 samples. Among 17,398 samples tested, 605 cases of MGUS and 16,793 negative controls were identified. The computerized Mayo Medical Index was used to obtain information on all diagnoses entered between January 1, 1975, and May 31, 2006, for a total of 422,663 person-years of observations. To identify and confirm previously reported associations, these diagnostic codes were analyzed using stratified Poisson regression, adjusting for age, sex, and total person-years of observation. RESULTS: We confirmed a significant association in 14 (19%) of 75 previously reported disease associations with MGUS, including vertebral and hip fractures and osteoporosis. Systematic analysis of all 16,062 diagnostic disease codes found additional previously unreported associations, including mycobacterium infection and superficial thrombophlebitis. CONCLUSION: These results have major implications both for confirmed associations and for 61 diseases in which the association with MGUS is likely coincidental. PMID:19648385

  13. Relationship of disease-associated gene expression to cardiac phenotype is buffered by genetic diversity and chromatin regulation.

    PubMed

    Karbassi, Elaheh; Monte, Emma; Chapski, Douglas J; Lopez, Rachel; Rosa Garrido, Manuel; Kim, Joseph; Wisniewski, Nicholas; Rau, Christoph D; Wang, Jessica J; Weiss, James N; Wang, Yibin; Lusis, Aldons J; Vondriska, Thomas M

    2016-08-01

    Expression of a cohort of disease-associated genes, some of which are active in fetal myocardium, is considered a hallmark of transcriptional change in cardiac hypertrophy models. How this transcriptome remodeling is affected by the common genetic variation present in populations is unknown. We examined the role of genetics, as well as contributions of chromatin proteins, to regulate cardiac gene expression and heart failure susceptibility. We examined gene expression in 84 genetically distinct inbred strains of control and isoproterenol-treated mice, which exhibited varying degrees of disease. Unexpectedly, fetal gene expression was not correlated with hypertrophic phenotypes. Unbiased modeling identified 74 predictors of heart mass after isoproterenol-induced stress, but these predictors did not enrich for any cardiac pathways. However, expanded analysis of fetal genes and chromatin remodelers as groups correlated significantly with individual systemic phenotypes. Yet, cardiac transcription factors and genes shown by gain-/loss-of-function studies to contribute to hypertrophic signaling did not correlate with cardiac mass or function in disease. Because the relationship between gene expression and phenotype was strain specific, we examined genetic contribution to expression. Strikingly, strains with similar transcriptomes in the basal heart did not cluster together in the isoproterenol state, providing comprehensive evidence that there are different genetic contributors to physiological and pathological gene expression. Furthermore, the divergence in transcriptome similarity versus genetic similarity between strains is organ specific and genome-wide, suggesting chromatin is a critical buffer between genetics and gene expression.

  14. Hepatic and Splenic Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Shear Wave Velocity Elastography in Children with Liver Disease Associated with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Cañas, Teresa; Maciá, Araceli; Muñoz-Codoceo, Rosa Ana; Fontanilla, Teresa; González-Rios, Patricia; Miralles, María; Gómez-Mardones, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Background. Liver disease associated with cystic fibrosis (CFLD) is the second cause of mortality in these patients. The diagnosis is difficult because none of the available tests are specific enough. Noninvasive elastographic techniques have been proven to be useful to diagnose hepatic fibrosis. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging is an elastography imaging system. The purpose of the work was to study the utility of liver and spleen ARFI Imaging in the detection of CFLD. Method. 72 patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) were studied and received ARFI imaging in the liver and in the spleen. SWV values were compared with the values of 60 healthy controls. Results. Comparing the SWV values of CFLD with the control healthy group, values in the right lobe were higher in patients with CFLD. We found a SWV RHL cut-off value to detect CFLD of 1.27 m/s with a sensitivity of 56.5% and a specificity of 90.5%. CF patients were found to have higher SWC spleen values than the control group. Conclusions. ARFI shear wave elastography in the right hepatic lobe is a noninvasive technique useful to detect CFLD in our sample of patients. Splenic SWV values are higher in CF patients, without any clinical consequence. PMID:26609528

  15. Autoimmune disease-associated variants of extracellular endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 induce altered innate immune responses by human immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Aldhamen, Yasser A.; Pepelyayeva, Yuliya; Rastall, David P.W.; Seregin, Sergey S.; Zervoudi, Efthalia; Koumantou, Despoina; Aylsworth, Charles F.; Quiroga, Dionisia; Godbehere, Sarah; Georgiadis, Dimitris; Stratikos, Efstratios; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    ERAP1 gene polymorphisms have been linked to several autoimmune diseases; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying these associations are not well understood. Recently, we have demonstrated that ERAP1 regulates key aspects of the innate immune response. Moreover, previous studies show ERAP1 to be ER-localized and secreted during inflammation. Herein, we investigate the possible roles that ERAP1 polymorphic variants may have in modulating innate immune responses of human PBMCs using two experimental methods: extracellular exposure of hPBMCs to ERAP1 variants and adenovirus-based ERAP1 expression. We found that exposure of hPBMCs to ERAP1 variant proteins as well as ERAP1 overexpression by Ad vectors increased inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production, and enhanced immune cell activation. Investigating the molecular mechanisms behind these responses revealed that ERAP1 is able to activate innate immunity via multiple pathways, including the NLRP3 inflammasome. Importantly, these responses varied if autoimmune-disease-associated variants of ERAP1 were examined in the assay systems. Unexpectedly, blocking ERAP1 cellular internalization augmented IL-1β production. To our knowledge, this is the first report identifying ERAP1 as being involved in modulating innate responses of human immune cells, a finding that may explain why ERAP1 has been genetically associated with several autoimmune diseases. PMID:25591727

  16. [Chronic liver disease associated with cystic fibrosis in the Hospital Alberto Sabogal Sologuren, Lima, Peru: report of a case].

    PubMed

    Ormeño J, Alexis; García D, Cesar; Sumire U, Julia; Asato H, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most frequent recessive genetic disorder in the caucasian population and is produced by the alteration of electrolyte and water transport in the epithelial cell membrane. Liver disease is a frequent complication towards the end of the first decade of life, being weird its onset, except in patients with a history of meconium ileus. The characteristic liver injury in CF is focal biliary cirrhosis, but fatty infiltration can also be found. The diagnosis is made considering the clinical, laboratory and imaging results having in consideration that the normal liver function tests do not rule out the disease. Ultrasound is the most widely used and can detect the presence of steatosis, stones, fibrosis, cirrhosis, portal hypertension or abnormalities of the biliary tree. There is an also available technique such as computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, which allows a morphological study. Important aspects in the treatment are nutritional management, administration of soluble vitamins and the use of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). In cases of advanced cirrhosis, transplantation, isolated or combined with the lung, is an option to consider, with acceptable survival rates. We report the case of an 11 year old patient with a diagnosis of chronic liver disease associated with cystic fibrosis.

  17. Inferring haplotype/disease association by joint use of case-parents trios and case-parent pairs.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue-Qing; Zhou, Ji-Yuan

    2010-05-01

    Recently interest has been increasing in genetic association studies using several closely linked loci. The HAP-TDT method, which uses case-parents trios is powerful for such a task. However, it is not uncommon in practice that one parent is missing for some reason, such as late onset. The case-parents trios are thus reduced to case-parent pairs. Discarding such data could lead to a severe loss of power. In this paper, we propose the HAP-1-TDT method based on case-parent pairs to detect haplotype/disease association. A permutation-based randomisation technique is devised to assess the significance of the test statistic. Furthermore, the combined statistic HAP-C-TDT is developed to use jointly case-parents trios and case-parent pairs. These test statistics can be applied to either phase-known or phase-unknown data. A number of simulation studies are conducted to investigate the validity of the proposed tests; these studies show that the statistics are robust to population structure. Using several disease genes from the literature, we illustrate that incorporating case-parent pairs into an association study leads to noticeable power gain. Moreover, our simulation results suggest that our method has better size and power than UNPHASED. Finally, in simulated scenarios where there are only a few SNPs and risk is determined by two haplotypes that are complementary or near-complementary, our method has better power than TRIMM.

  18. Measures of Chronic Conditions and Diseases Associated With Aging in the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project

    PubMed Central

    Pham-Kanter, Genevieve; Leitsch, Sara A.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives This paper presents a description of the methods used in the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project to detect the presence of chronic conditions and diseases associated with aging. It also discusses the validity and distribution of these measures. Methods Markers associated with common chronic diseases and conditions of aging were collected from 3,005 community-dwelling older adults living in the United States, aged 57–85 years, during 2006. Dried blood spots, physical function tests, anthropometric measurements, self-reported history, and self-rated assessments were used to detect the presence of chronic conditions associated with aging or of risk factors associated with the development of chronic diseases. Results The distribution of each measure, disaggregated by age group and gender, is presented. Conclusions This paper describes the methodology used as well as the distribution of each of these measures. In addition, we discuss how the measures used in the study relate to specific chronic diseases and conditions associated with aging and how these measures might be used in social science analyses. PMID:19204070

  19. LincSNP 2.0: an updated database for linking disease-associated SNPs to human long non-coding RNAs and their TFBSs

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Shangwei; Yue, Ming; Wang, Peng; Liu, Yue; Zhi, Hui; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Jizhou; Gao, Yue; Guo, Maoni; Zhou, Dianshuang; Li, Xin; Li, Xia

    2017-01-01

    We describe LincSNP 2.0 (http://bioinfo.hrbmu.edu.cn/LincSNP), an updated database that is used specifically to store and annotate disease-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in human long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and their transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs). In LincSNP 2.0, we have updated the database with more data and several new features, including (i) expanding disease-associated SNPs in human lncRNAs; (ii) identifying disease-associated SNPs in lncRNA TFBSs; (iii) updating LD-SNPs from the 1000 Genomes Project; and (iv) collecting more experimentally supported SNP-lncRNA-disease associations. Furthermore, we developed three flexible online tools to retrieve and analyze the data. Linc-Mart is a convenient way for users to customize their own data. Linc-Browse is a tool for all data visualization. Linc-Score predicts the associations between lncRNA and disease. In addition, we provided users a newly designed, user-friendly interface to search and download all the data in LincSNP 2.0 and we also provided an interface to submit novel data into the database. LincSNP 2.0 is a continually updated database and will serve as an important resource for investigating the functions and mechanisms of lncRNAs in human diseases. PMID:27924020

  20. [Scientific and methodological approaches to the organization of the preventive care for children with respiratory diseases associated with the exposure to chemical factors].

    PubMed

    Zaĭtseva, N V; Ustinova, O Iu; Maklakova, O A

    2014-01-01

    There are presented directions of the improvement of strategic approaches to the prevention of respiratory diseases associated with exposure to chemical environmental factors in children. There were substantiated principles of construction of health-preventive technologies, target groups, hygienic and clinical criteria for their formation, volumes and forms of implementation, targeted indices of efficacy.

  1. Clinical exome sequencing for cerebellar ataxia and spastic paraplegia uncovers novel gene–disease associations and unanticipated rare disorders

    PubMed Central

    van de Warrenburg, Bart P; Schouten, Meyke I; de Bot, Susanne T; Vermeer, Sascha; Meijer, Rowdy; Pennings, Maartje; Gilissen, Christian; Willemsen, Michèl AAP; Scheffer, Hans; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxia (CA) and hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are two of the most prevalent motor disorders with extensive locus and allelic heterogeneity. We implemented clinical exome sequencing, followed by filtering data for a ‘movement disorders' gene panel, as a generic test to increase variant detection in 76 patients with these disorders. Segregation analysis or phenotypic re-evaluation was utilized to substantiate findings. Disease-causing variants were identified in 9 of 28 CA patients, and 8 of 48 HSP patients. In addition, possibly disease-causing variants were identified in 1 and 8 of the remaining CA and HSP patients, respectively. In 10 patients with CA, the total disease-causing or possibly disease-causing variants were detected in 8 different genes, whereas 16 HSP patients had such variants in 12 different genes. In the majority of cases, the identified variants were compatible with the patient phenotype. Interestingly, in some patients variants were identified in genes hitherto related to other movement disorders, such as TH variants in two siblings with HSP. In addition, rare disorders were uncovered, for example, a second case of HSP caused by a VCP variant. For some patients, exome sequencing results had implications for treatment, exemplified by the favorable L-DOPA treatment in a patient with HSP due to ATP13A2 variants (Parkinson type 9). Thus, clinical exome sequencing in this cohort of CA and HSP patients suggests broadening of disease spectra, revealed novel gene–disease associations, and uncovered unanticipated rare disorders. In addition, clinical exome sequencing results have shown their value in guiding practical patient management. PMID:27165006

  2. In utero transmission and tissue distribution of chronic wasting disease-associated prions in free-ranging Rocky Mountain elk.

    PubMed

    Selariu, Anca; Powers, Jenny G; Nalls, Amy; Brandhuber, Monica; Mayfield, Amber; Fullaway, Stephenie; Wyckoff, Christy A; Goldmann, Wilfred; Zabel, Mark M; Wild, Margaret A; Hoover, Edward A; Mathiason, Candace K

    2015-11-01

    The presence of disease-associated prions in tissues and bodily fluids of chronic wasting disease (CWD)-infected cervids has received much investigation, yet little is known about mother-to-offspring transmission of CWD. Our previous work demonstrated that mother-to-offspring transmission is efficient in an experimental setting. To address the question of relevance in a naturally exposed free-ranging population, we assessed maternal and fetal tissues derived from 19 elk dam-calf pairs collected from free-ranging Rocky Mountain elk from north-central Colorado, a known CWD endemic region. Conventional immunohistochemistry identified three of 19 CWD-positive dams, whereas a more sensitive assay [serial protein misfolding cyclic amplification (sPMCA)] detected CWD prion seeding activity (PrPCWD) in 15 of 19 dams. PrPCWD distribution in tissues was widespread, and included the central nervous system (CNS), lymphoreticular system, and reproductive, secretory, excretory and adipose tissues. Interestingly, five of 15 sPMCA-positive dams showed no evidence of PrPCWD in either CNS or lymphoreticular system, sites typically assessed in diagnosing CWD. Analysis of fetal tissues harvested from the 15 sPMCA-positive dams revealed PrPCWD in 80 % of fetuses (12 of 15), regardless of gestational stage. These findings demonstrated that PrPCWD is more abundant in peripheral tissues of CWD-exposed elk than current diagnostic methods suggest, and that transmission of prions from mother to offspring may contribute to the efficient transmission of CWD in naturally exposed cervid populations.

  3. Detecting tissue-specific alternative splicing and disease-associated aberrant splicing of the PTCH gene with exon junction microarrays.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Kazuaki; Togawa, Naoyuki; Fujii, Katsunori; Uchikawa, Hideki; Kohno, Yoichi; Yamada, Masao; Miyashita, Toshiyuki

    2005-11-15

    Mutations in the human ortholog of Drosophila patched (PTCH) have been identified in patients with autosomal dominant nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), characterized by minor developmental anomalies and an increased incidence of cancers such as medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma. We identified many isoforms of PTCH mRNA involving exons 1-5, exon 10 and a novel exon, 12b, generated by alternative splicing (AS), most of which have not been deposited in GenBank nor discussed earlier. To monitor splicing events of the PTCH gene, we designed oligonucleotide arrays on which exon probes and exon-exon junction probes as well as a couple of intron probes for the PTCH gene were placed in duplicate. Probe intensities were normalized on the basis of the total expression of PTCH and probe sensitivity. Tissue-specific regulation of AS identified with the microarrays closely correlated with the results obtained by RT-PCR. Of note, the novel exon, exon 12b, was specifically expressed in the brain and heart, especially in the cerebellum. Additionally, using these microarrays, we were able to detect disease-associated aberrant splicings of the PTCH gene in two patients with NBCCS. In both cases, cryptic splice donor sites located either in an exon or in an intron were activated because of the partial disruption of the consensus sequence for the authentic splice donor sites due to point mutations. Taken together, oligonucleotide microarrays containing exon junction probes are demonstrated to be a powerful tool to investigate tissue-specific regulation of AS and aberrant splicing taking place in genetic disorders.

  4. Whole Genome Re-Sequencing and Characterization of Powdery Mildew Disease-Associated Allelic Variation in Melon

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Sathishkumar; Kim, Hoy-Taek; Thamilarasan, Senthil Kumar; Veerappan, Karpagam; Park, Jong-In; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Powdery mildew is one of the most common fungal diseases in the world. This disease frequently affects melon (Cucumis melo L.) and other Cucurbitaceous family crops in both open field and greenhouse cultivation. One of the goals of genomics is to identify the polymorphic loci responsible for variation in phenotypic traits. In this study, powdery mildew disease assessment scores were calculated for four melon accessions, ‘SCNU1154’, ‘Edisto47’, ‘MR-1’, and ‘PMR5’. To investigate the genetic variation of these accessions, whole genome re-sequencing using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform was performed. A total of 754,759,704 quality-filtered reads were generated, with an average of 82.64% coverage relative to the reference genome. Comparisons of the sequences for the melon accessions revealed around 7.4 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 1.9 million InDels, and 182,398 putative structural variations (SVs). Functional enrichment analysis of detected variations classified them into biological process, cellular component and molecular function categories. Further, a disease-associated QTL map was constructed for 390 SNPs and 45 InDels identified as related to defense-response genes. Among them 112 SNPs and 12 InDels were observed in powdery mildew responsive chromosomes. Accordingly, this whole genome re-sequencing study identified SNPs and InDels associated with defense genes that will serve as candidate polymorphisms in the search for sources of resistance against powdery mildew disease and could accelerate marker-assisted breeding in melon. PMID:27311063

  5. KRAS and TP53 mutations in inflammatory bowel disease-associated colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Du, Lijun; Kim, John J; Shen, Jinhua; Chen, Binrui; Dai, Ning

    2017-01-07

    Although KRAS and TP53 mutations are common in both inflammatory bowel disease-associated colorectal cancer (IBD-CRC) and sporadic colorectal cancer (S-CRC), molecular events leading to carcinogenesis may be different. Previous studies comparing the frequency of KRAS and TP53 mutations in IBD-CRC and S-CRC were inconsistent. We performed a meta-analysis to compare the presence of KRAS and TP53 mutations among patients with IBD-CRC, S-CRC, and IBD without dysplasia. A total of 19 publications (482 patients with IBD-CRC, 4,222 with S-CRC, 281 with IBD without dysplasia) met the study inclusion criteria. KRAS mutation was less frequent (RR=0.71, 95%CI 0.56-0.90; P=0.004) while TP53 mutation was more common (RR=1.24, 95%CI 1.10-1.39; P<0.001) in patients with IBD-CRC compared to S-CRC. Both KRAS (RR=3.09, 95%CI 1.47-6.51; P=0.003) and TP53 (RR=2.15, 95%CI 1.07-4.31 P=0.03) mutations were more prevalent in patients with IBD-CRC compared to IBD without dysplasia. In conclusion, IBD-CRC and S-CRC appear to have biologically different molecular pathways. TP53 appears to be more important than KRAS in IBD-CRC compared to S-CRC. Our findings suggest possible roles of TP53 and KRAS as biomarkers for cancer and dysplasia screening among patients with IBD and may also provide targeted therapy in patients with IBD-CRC.

  6. Whole Genome Re-Sequencing and Characterization of Powdery Mildew Disease-Associated Allelic Variation in Melon.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Sathishkumar; Kim, Hoy-Taek; Thamilarasan, Senthil Kumar; Veerappan, Karpagam; Park, Jong-In; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Powdery mildew is one of the most common fungal diseases in the world. This disease frequently affects melon (Cucumis melo L.) and other Cucurbitaceous family crops in both open field and greenhouse cultivation. One of the goals of genomics is to identify the polymorphic loci responsible for variation in phenotypic traits. In this study, powdery mildew disease assessment scores were calculated for four melon accessions, 'SCNU1154', 'Edisto47', 'MR-1', and 'PMR5'. To investigate the genetic variation of these accessions, whole genome re-sequencing using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform was performed. A total of 754,759,704 quality-filtered reads were generated, with an average of 82.64% coverage relative to the reference genome. Comparisons of the sequences for the melon accessions revealed around 7.4 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 1.9 million InDels, and 182,398 putative structural variations (SVs). Functional enrichment analysis of detected variations classified them into biological process, cellular component and molecular function categories. Further, a disease-associated QTL map was constructed for 390 SNPs and 45 InDels identified as related to defense-response genes. Among them 112 SNPs and 12 InDels were observed in powdery mildew responsive chromosomes. Accordingly, this whole genome re-sequencing study identified SNPs and InDels associated with defense genes that will serve as candidate polymorphisms in the search for sources of resistance against powdery mildew disease and could accelerate marker-assisted breeding in melon.

  7. Human Placental-Derived Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-04

    Mucopolysaccharidosis I; Mucopolysaccharidosis VI; Adrenoleukodystrophy; Niemann-Pick Disease; Metachromatic Leukodystrophy; Wolman Disease; Krabbe's Disease; Gaucher's Disease; Fucosidosis; Batten Disease; Severe Aplastic Anemia; Diamond-Blackfan Anemia; Amegakaryocytic Thrombocytopenia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

  8. SNPranker 2.0: a gene-centric data mining tool for diseases associated SNP prioritization in GWAS

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    . Conclusions Different databases and resources are already available for SNPs annotation, but they do not prioritize or re-score SNPs relying on a-priori biomolecular knowledge. SNPranker 2.0 attempts to fill this gap through a user-friendly integrated web resource. End users, such as researchers in medical genetics and epidemiology, may find in SNPranker 2.0 a new tool for data mining and interpretation able to support SNPs analysis. Possible scenarios are GWAS data re-scoring, SNPs selection for custom genotyping arrays and SNPs/diseases association studies. PMID:23369106

  9. CDH1/E-cadherin and solid tumors. An updated gene-disease association analysis using bioinformatics tools.

    PubMed

    Abascal, María Florencia; Besso, María José; Rosso, Marina; Mencucci, María Victoria; Aparicio, Evangelina; Szapiro, Gala; Furlong, Laura Inés; Vazquez-Levin, Mónica Hebe

    2016-02-01

    Cancer is a group of diseases that causes millions of deaths worldwide. Among cancers, Solid Tumors (ST) stand-out due to their high incidence and mortality rates. Disruption of cell-cell adhesion is highly relevant during tumor progression. Epithelial-cadherin (protein: E-cadherin, gene: CDH1) is a key molecule in cell-cell adhesion and an abnormal expression or/and function(s) contributes to tumor progression and is altered in ST. A systematic study was carried out to gather and summarize current knowledge on CDH1/E-cadherin and ST using bioinformatics resources. The DisGeNET database was exploited to survey CDH1-associated diseases. Reported mutations in specific ST were obtained by interrogating COSMIC and IntOGen tools. CDH1 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNP) were retrieved from the dbSNP database. DisGeNET analysis identified 609 genes annotated to ST, among which CDH1 was listed. Using CDH1 as query term, 26 disease concepts were found, 21 of which were neoplasms-related terms. Using DisGeNET ALL Databases, 172 disease concepts were identified. Of those, 80 ST disease-related terms were subjected to manual curation and 75/80 (93.75%) associations were validated. On selected ST, 489 CDH1 somatic mutations were listed in COSMIC and IntOGen databases. Breast neoplasms had the highest CDH1-mutation rate. CDH1 was positioned among the 20 genes with highest mutation frequency and was confirmed as driver gene in breast cancer. Over 14,000 SNP for CDH1 were found in the dbSNP database. This report used DisGeNET to gather/compile current knowledge on gene-disease association for CDH1/E-cadherin and ST; data curation expanded the number of terms that relate them. An updated list of CDH1 somatic mutations was obtained with COSMIC and IntOGen databases and of SNP from dbSNP. This information can be used to further understand the role of CDH1/E-cadherin in health and disease.

  10. MT2013-31: Allo HCT for Metabolic Disorders and Severe Osteopetrosis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-22

    Mucopolysaccharidosis Disorders; Hurler Syndrome; Hunter Syndrome; Maroteaux Lamy Syndrome; Sly Syndrome; Alpha-Mannosidosis; Fucosidosis; Aspartylglucosaminuria; Glycoprotein Metabolic Disorders; Sphingolipidoses; Recessive Leukodystrophies; Globoid Cell Leukodystrophy; Metachromatic Leukodystrophy; Niemann-Pick B; Niemann-Pick C Subtype 2; Sphingomyelin Deficiency; Peroxisomal Disorders; Adrenoleukodystrophy With Cerebral Involvement; Zellweger Syndrome; Neonatal Adrenoleukodystrophy; Infantile Refsum Disease; Acyl-CoA Oxidase Deficiency; D-Bifunctional Enzyme Deficiency; Multifunctional Enzyme Deficiency; Alpha-methylacyl-CoA Racmase Deficiency; Mitochondrial Neurogastrointestingal Encephalopathy; Severe Osteopetrosis; Hereditary Leukoencephalopathy; Inherited Metabolic Disorders

  11. During readaptation in vivo, a tissue culture-adapted strain of feline immunodeficiency virus reverts to broad neutralization resistance at different times in individual hosts but through changes at the same position of the surface glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Bendinelli, M; Pistello, M; Del Mauro, D; Cammarota, G; Maggi, F; Leonildi, A; Giannecchini, S; Bergamini, C; Matteucci, D

    2001-05-01

    The broad resistance to antibody-mediated neutralization of lentiviruses recently isolated from infected hosts is a poorly understood feature which might contribute to the ability of these viruses to persist and to the failure of experimental vaccines to protect against virulent viruses. We studied the underlying molecular mechanisms by examining the evolution of a neutralization-sensitive, tissue culture-adapted strain of feline immunodeficiency virus upon reinoculation into specific-pathogen-free cats. Reversion to broad neutralization resistance was observed in seven of seven inoculated animals and, in individual hosts, started to develop between less than 4 and more than 15 months from infection. After comparison of the envelope sequences of the inoculum virus, of an additional 4 neutralization-sensitive in vitro variants, and of 14 ex vivo-derived variants (6 neutralization sensitive, 5 resistant, and 3 with intermediate phenotype), a Lys-->Asn or -->Glu change at position 481 in the V4 region of the surface glycoprotein appeared as a key player in the reversion. This conclusion was confirmed by mutagenesis of molecularly cloned virus. Analysis of viral quasispecies and biological clones showed that the intermediate phenotype was due to transient coexistence of neutralization-sensitive and -resistant variants. Since the amino acid position involved was the same in four of four recent revertants, it is suggested that the number of residues that control reversion to broad neutralization resistance in FIV might be very limited. Amino acid 481 was found to be changed only in one of three putative long-term revertants. These variants shared a Ser-->Asn change at position 557 in region V5, which probably collaborated with other mutations in long-term maintenance of neutralization resistance, as suggested by the study of mutagenized virus.

  12. Amoxicillin functionalized gold nanoparticles reverts MRSA resistance.

    PubMed

    Kalita, Sanjeeb; Kandimalla, Raghuram; Sharma, Kaustav Kalyan; Kataki, Amal Chandra; Deka, Manab; Kotoky, Jibon

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we have described the biosynthesis of biocompatible gold nanoparticles (GNPs) from aqueous extract of the aerial parts of a pteridophyte, "Adiantum philippense" by microwave irradiation and its surface functionalization with broad spectrum beta lactam antibiotic, amoxicillin (Amox). The functionalization of amoxicillin on GNPs (GNP-Amox) was carried out via electrostatic interaction of protonated amino group and thioether moiety mediated attractive forces. The synthesized GNPs and GNP-Amox were physicochemically characterized. UV-Vis spectroscopy, Zeta potential, XRD, FTIR and SERS (surface enhanced raman spectra) results confirmed the loading of Amox into GNPs. Loading of Amox to GNPs reduce amoxicillin cytotoxicity, whereas GNPs were found to be nontoxic to mouse fibroblast cell line (L929) as evident from MTT and acridine orange/ethidium bromide (AO/EtBr) live/dead cell assays. The GNP-Amox conjugates demonstrated enhanced broad-spectrum bactericidal activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Furthermore, in-vitro and in-vivo assays of GNP-Amox revealed potent anti-MRSA activity and improved the survival rate. This indicates the subversion of antibiotic resistance mechanism by overcoming the effect of high levels of β-lactamase produced by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Taken together, this study demonstrates the positive attributes from GNP-Amox conjugates as a promising antibacterial therapeutic agent against MRSA as well as other pathogens.

  13. Dedifferentiated adamantinoma with revertant mesenchymal phenotype.

    PubMed

    Hazelbag, Hans Marten; Laforga, Juan B; Roels, Hendrik J L; Hogendoorn, Pancras C W

    2003-12-01

    In adamantinoma of long bones, an osteofibrous dysplasia-like form with scattered epithelial elements and a classic form with abundant epithelium are distinguished. Osteofibrous dysplasia-like adamantinomas occur in children and adolescents and behave relatively benign, whereas classic adamantinomas predominate in adults and have a more aggressive clinical course. Because some osteofibrous dysplasia-like tumors have progressed to classic adamantinomas, it is hypothesized that the former is a potential precursor of the latter, showing mesenchymal-to-epithelial transformation. We report a new morphologic variant of adamantinoma in three patients with sarcomatoid transformation of the epithelial component: one in a primary tumor and two in local recurrences. One patient died of metastatic disease. Histologically, the tumors showed loss of the original characteristic epithelial differentiation with transition to fields of highly pleomorphic cells without epithelial features, high mitotic count, and deposition of osteoid and chondroid matrix. These dedifferentiated areas showed pankeratin positivity as well, although there were some changes in keratin subclass profile compared with other classic adamantinomas. This peculiar variant of long bone adamantinoma shows that in addition to mesenchymal-to-epithelial transformation in the early stage of development, progression to an aggressive subtype may be associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition ("sarcomatoid dedifferentiation"), in which the epithelial immunophenotype is conserved. Thereby it may serve as an example of the plasticity of the mesenchymal phenotype. When confronted with a biopsy of a cortical tumor of the tibia showing sarcomatoid morphology and keratin positivity, adamantinoma should be included in the differential diagnosis, as its distinction has important implications for treatment and prognosis.

  14. [Therapeutical targets for revert liver fibrosis].

    PubMed

    García B, Leonel; Gálvez G, Javier; Armendáriz B, Juan

    2007-06-01

    Liver fibrosis is the common response to chronic liver injury, ultimately leading to cirrhosis and its complications: portal hypertension, liver failure, hepatic encephalopathy, and hepatocellular carcinoma and others. Efficient and well-tolerated antifibrotic drugs are still lacking, and current treatment of hepatic fibrosis is limited to withdrawal of the noxious agent. Efforts over the past decade have mainly focused on fibrogenic cells generating the scarring response, although promising data on inhibition of parenchymal injury or reduction of liver inflammation have also been obtained. A large number of approaches have been validated in culture studies and in animal models, and several clinical trials are underway or anticipated for a growing number of molecules. This review highlight recent advances in the molecular mechanisms of liver fibrosis and discusses mechanistically based strategies that have recently emerged.

  15. Somatic mosaicism caused by monoallelic reversion of a mutation in T cells of a patient with ADA-SCID and the effects of enzyme replacement therapy on the revertant phenotype.

    PubMed

    Moncada-Vélez, M; Vélez-Ortega, A; Orrego, J; Santisteban, I; Jagadeesh, J; Olivares, M; Olaya, N; Hershfield, M; Candotti, F; Franco, J

    2011-11-01

    Patients with adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency exhibit spontaneous and partial clinical remission associated with somatic reversion of inherited mutations. We report a child with severe combined immunodeficiency (T-B- SCID) due to ADA deficiency diagnosed at the age of 1 month, whose lymphocyte counts including CD4+ and CD8+ T and NK cells began to improve after several months with normalization of ADA activity in Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), as a result of somatic mosaicism caused by monoallelic reversion of the causative mutation in the ADA gene. He was not eligible for haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) or gene therapy (GT); therefore he was placed on enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with bovine PEG-ADA. The follow-up of metabolic and immunologic responses to ERT included gradual improvement in ADA activity in erythrocytes and transient expansion of most lymphocyte subsets, followed by gradual stabilization of CD4+ and CD8+ T (with naïve phenotype) and NK cells, and sustained expansion of TCRγδ+ T cells. This was accompanied by the disappearance of the revertant T cells as shown by DNA sequencing from PBL. Although the patient's clinical condition improved marginally, he later developed a germinal cell tumour and eventually died at the age of 67 months from sepsis. This case adds to our current knowledge of spontaneous reversion of mutations in ADA deficiency and shows that the effects of the ERT may vary among these patients, suggesting that it could depend on the cell and type in which the somatic mosaicism is established upon reversion.

  16. Mitochondria-targeted catalase reverts the neurotoxicity of hSOD1G⁹³A astrocytes without extending the survival of ALS-linked mutant hSOD1 mice.

    PubMed

    Pehar, Mariana; Beeson, Gyda; Beeson, Craig C; Johnson, Jeffrey A; Vargas, Marcelo R

    2014-01-01

    Dominant mutations in the Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) cause familial forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal disorder characterized by the progressive loss of motor neurons. The molecular mechanism underlying the toxic gain-of-function of mutant hSOD1s remains uncertain. Several lines of evidence suggest that toxicity to motor neurons requires damage to non-neuronal cells. In line with this observation, primary astrocytes isolated from mutant hSOD1 over-expressing rodents induce motor neuron death in co-culture. Mitochondrial alterations have been documented in both neuronal and glial cells from ALS patients as well as in ALS-animal models. In addition, mitochondrial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress have been linked to the toxicity of mutant hSOD1 in astrocytes and neurons. In mutant SOD1-linked ALS, mitochondrial alterations may be partially due to the increased association of mutant SOD1 with the outer membrane and intermembrane space of the mitochondria, where it can affect several critical aspects of mitochondrial function. We have previously shown that decreasing glutathione levels, which is crucial for peroxide detoxification in the mitochondria, significantly accelerates motor neuron death in hSOD1G93A mice. Here we employed a catalase targeted to the mitochondria to investigate the effect of increased mitochondrial peroxide detoxification capacity in models of mutant hSOD1-mediated motor neuron death. The over-expression of mitochondria-targeted catalase improved mitochondrial antioxidant defenses and mitochondrial function in hSOD1G93A astrocyte cultures. It also reverted the toxicity of hSOD1G93A-expressing astrocytes towards co-cultured motor neurons, however ALS-animals did not develop the disease later or survive longer. Hence, while increased oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction have been extensively documented in ALS, these results suggest that preventing peroxide-mediated mitochondrial damage alone is not

  17. Coexistence of two forms of disease-associated prion protein in extracerebral tissues of cattle infected with H-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Okada, Hiroyuki; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Masujin, Kentaro; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    H-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy (H-BSE) is an atypical form of BSE in aged cattle. H-BSE is characterized by the presence of two proteinase K-resistant forms of disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)), identified as PrP(Sc) #1 and PrP(Sc) #2, in the brain. To investigate the coexistence of different PrP(Sc) forms in the extracerebral tissues of cattle experimentally infected with H-BSE, immunohistochemical and molecular analyses were performed by using N-terminal-, core-region- and C-terminal-specific anti-prion protein antibodies. Our results demonstrated that two distinct forms of PrP(Sc) coexisted in the various extracerebral tissues.

  18. REM sleep behavior disorder: Updated review of the core features, the REM sleep behavior disorder-neurodegenerative disease association, evolving concepts, controversies, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Boeve, Bradley F

    2010-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a parasomnia manifested by vivid, often frightening dreams associated with simple or complex motor behavior during REM sleep. The polysomnographic features of RBD include increased electromyographic tone +/- dream enactment behavior during REM sleep. Management with counseling and pharmacologic measures is usually straightforward and effective. In this review, the terminology, clinical and polysomnographic features, demographic and epidemiologic features, diagnostic criteria, differential diagnosis, and management strategies are discussed. Recent data on the suspected pathophysiologic mechanisms of RBD are also reviewed. The literature and our institutional experience on RBD are next discussed, with an emphasis on the RBD-neurodegenerative disease association and particularly the RBD-synucleinopathy association. Several issues relating to evolving concepts, controversies, and future directions are then reviewed, with an emphasis on idiopathic RBD representing an early feature of a neurodegenerative disease and particularly an evolving synucleinopathy. Planning for future therapies that impact patients with idiopathic RBD is reviewed in detail.

  19. Differences in Genome Content among Helicobacter pylori Isolates from Patients with Gastritis, Duodenal Ulcer, or Gastric Cancer Reveal Novel Disease-Associated Genes▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Romo-González, Carolina; Salama, Nina R.; Burgeño-Ferreira, Juan; Ponce-Castañeda, Veronica; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Torres, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori establishes a chronic infection in the human stomach, causing gastritis, peptic ulcer, or gastric cancer, and more severe diseases are associated with virulence genes such as the cag pathogenicity island (PAI). The aim of this work was to study gene content differences among H. pylori strains isolated from patients with different gastroduodenal diseases in a Mexican-Mestizo patient population. H. pylori isolates from 10 patients with nonatrophic gastritis, 10 patients with duodenal ulcer, and 9 patients with gastric cancer were studied. Multiple isolates from the same patient were analyzed by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis, and strains with unique patterns were tested using whole-genome microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). We studied 42 isolates and found 1,319 genes present in all isolates, while 341 (20.5%) were variable genes. Among the variable genes, 127 (37%) were distributed within plasticity zones (PZs). The overall number of variable genes present in a given isolate was significantly lower for gastric cancer isolates. Thirty genes were significantly associated with nonatrophic gastritis, duodenal ulcer, or gastric cancer, 14 (46.6%) of which were within PZs and the cag PAI. Two genes (HP0674 and JHP0940) were absent in all gastric cancer isolates. Many of the disease-associated genes outside the PZs formed clusters, and some of these genes are regulated in response to acid or other environmental conditions. Validation of candidate genes identified by aCGH in a second patient cohort allowed the identification of novel H. pylori genes associated with gastric cancer or duodenal ulcer. These disease-associated genes may serve as biomarkers of the risk for severe gastroduodenal diseases. PMID:19237517

  20. Treadmill exercise ameliorates Alzheimer disease-associated memory loss through the Wnt signaling pathway in the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Young; Jung, Sun-Young; Kim, Kijeong; Kim, Chang-Ju

    2016-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus is considered as a risk factor for Alzheimer disease. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possibility whether treadmill exercise ameliorates Alzheimer disease-associated memory loss in the diabetes mellitus. For this study, the effects of treadmill exercise on short-term memory and spatial learning ability in relation with Wnt signaling pathway were evaluated using the streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal injection of STZ. Step-down avoidance task and 8-arm radial maze test were performed for the memory function. Immunohistochemistry for 5-bro-mo-2'-deoxyridine (BrdU) and doublecortin (DCX) and Western blot for Wnt3 and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) were conducted. The rats in the exercise groups were made to run on the treadmill for 30 min per one day, 5 times a week, during 12 weeks. In the present results, short-term memory and spatial learning ability were deteriorated by induction of diabetes. Treadmill exercise improved short-term memory and spatial learning ability in the diabetic rats. The numbers of BrdU-positive and DCX-positive cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus were decreased by induction of diabetes. Treadmill exercise increased these numbers in the diabetic rats. Wnt3 expression in the hippocampus was decreased and GSK-3β expression in the hippocampus was increased by induction of diabetes. Treadmill exercise increased Wnt3 expression and suppressed GSK-3β expression in the diabetic rats. The present study suggests that treadmill exercise alleviates Alzheimer disease-associated memory loss by increasing neurogenesis through activating Wnt signaling pathway in the diabetic rats.

  1. Treadmill exercise ameliorates Alzheimer disease-associated memory loss through the Wnt signaling pathway in the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae-Young; Jung, Sun-Young; Kim, Kijeong; Kim, Chang-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is considered as a risk factor for Alzheimer disease. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possibility whether treadmill exercise ameliorates Alzheimer disease-associated memory loss in the diabetes mellitus. For this study, the effects of treadmill exercise on short-term memory and spatial learning ability in relation with Wnt signaling pathway were evaluated using the streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal injection of STZ. Step-down avoidance task and 8-arm radial maze test were performed for the memory function. Immunohistochemistry for 5-bro-mo-2′-deoxyridine (BrdU) and doublecortin (DCX) and Western blot for Wnt3 and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) were conducted. The rats in the exercise groups were made to run on the treadmill for 30 min per one day, 5 times a week, during 12 weeks. In the present results, short-term memory and spatial learning ability were deteriorated by induction of diabetes. Treadmill exercise improved short-term memory and spatial learning ability in the diabetic rats. The numbers of BrdU-positive and DCX-positive cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus were decreased by induction of diabetes. Treadmill exercise increased these numbers in the diabetic rats. Wnt3 expression in the hippocampus was decreased and GSK-3β expression in the hippocampus was increased by induction of diabetes. Treadmill exercise increased Wnt3 expression and suppressed GSK-3β expression in the diabetic rats. The present study suggests that treadmill exercise alleviates Alzheimer disease-associated memory loss by increasing neurogenesis through activating Wnt signaling pathway in the diabetic rats. PMID:27656623

  2. Disease-associated changes in the expression of ion channels, ion receptors, ion exchangers and Ca{sup 2+}-handling proteins in heart hypertrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Zwadlo, Carolin; Borlak, Juergen . E-mail: borlak@item.fraunhofer.de

    2005-09-15

    The molecular pathology of cardiac hypertrophy is multifactorial with transcript regulation of ion channels, ion exchangers and Ca{sup 2+}-handling proteins being speculative. We therefore investigated disease-associated changes in gene expression of various ion channels and their receptors as well as ion exchangers, cytoskeletal proteins and Ca{sup 2+}-handling proteins in normotensive and spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats. We also compared experimental findings with results from hypertrophic human hearts, previously published (Borlak, J., and Thum, T., 2003. Hallmarks of ion channel gene expression in end-stage heart failure. FASEB J. 17, 1592-1608). We observed significant (P < 0.05) induction in transcript level of ATP-driven ion exchangers (Atp1A1, NCX-1, SERCA2a), ion channels (L-type Ca{sup 2+}-channel, K{sub ir}3.4, Na{sub v}1.5) and RyR-2 in hypertrophic hearts, while gene expression was repressed in diseased human hearts. Further, the genes coding for calreticulin and calmodulin, PMCA 1 and 4 as well as {alpha}-skeletal actin were significantly (P < 0.05) changed in hypertrophic human heart, but were unchanged in hypertrophic left ventricles of the rat heart. Notably, transcript level of {alpha}- and {beta}-MHC, calsequestrin, K{sub ir}6.1 (in the right ventricle only), phospholamban as well as troponin T were repressed in both diseased human and rat hearts. Our study enabled an identification of disease-associated candidate genes. Their regulation is likely to be the result of an imbalance between pressure load/stretch force and vascular tonus and the observed changes may provide a rational for the rhythm disturbances observed in patients with cardiac hypertrophy.

  3. Disease-associated changes in the expression of ion channels, ion receptors, ion exchangers and Ca(2+)-handling proteins in heart hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Zwadlo, Carolin; Borlak, Jürgen

    2005-09-15

    The molecular pathology of cardiac hypertrophy is multifactorial with transcript regulation of ion channels, ion exchangers and Ca(2+)-handling proteins being speculative. We therefore investigated disease-associated changes in gene expression of various ion channels and their receptors as well as ion exchangers, cytoskeletal proteins and Ca(2+)-handling proteins in normotensive and spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats. We also compared experimental findings with results from hypertrophic human hearts, previously published (Borlak, J., and Thum, T., 2003. Hallmarks of ion channel gene expression in end-stage heart failure. FASEB J. 17, 1592-1608). We observed significant (P < 0.05) induction in transcript level of ATP-driven ion exchangers (Atp1A1, NCX-1, SERCA2a), ion channels (L-type Ca(2+)-channel, K(ir)3.4, Na(v)1.5) and RyR-2 in hypertrophic hearts, while gene expression was repressed in diseased human hearts. Further, the genes coding for calreticulin and calmodulin, PMCA 1 and 4 as well as alpha-skeletal actin were significantly (P < 0.05) changed in hypertrophic human heart, but were unchanged in hypertrophic left ventricles of the rat heart. Notably, transcript level of alpha- and beta-MHC, calsequestrin, K(ir)6.1 (in the right ventricle only), phospholamban as well as troponin T were repressed in both diseased human and rat hearts. Our study enabled an identification of disease-associated candidate genes. Their regulation is likely to be the result of an imbalance between pressure load/stretch force and vascular tonus and the observed changes may provide a rational for the rhythm disturbances observed in patients with cardiac hypertrophy.

  4. Structural Basis for the Disruption of the Cerebral Cavernous Malformations 2 (CCM2) Interaction with Krev Interaction Trapped 1 (KRIT1) by Disease-associated Mutations*

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Oriana S.; Liu, Weizhi; Zhang, Rong; Stiegler, Amy L.; Ghedia, Sondhya; Weber, James L.; Boggon, Titus J.

    2015-01-01

    Familial cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are predominantly neurovascular lesions and are associated with mutations within the KRIT1, CCM2, and PDCD10 genes. The protein products of KRIT1 and CCM2 (Krev interaction trapped 1 (KRIT1) and cerebral cavernous malformations 2 (CCM2), respectively) directly interact with each other. Disease-associated mutations in KRIT1 and CCM2 mostly result in loss of their protein products, although rare missense point mutations can also occur. From gene sequencing of patients known or suspected to have one or more CCMs, we discover a series of missense point mutations in KRIT1 and CCM2 that result in missense mutations in the CCM2 and KRIT1 proteins. To place these mutations in the context of the molecular level interactions of CCM2 and KRIT1, we map the interaction of KRIT1 and CCM2 and find that the CCM2 phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domain displays a preference toward the third of the three KRIT1 NPX(Y/F) motifs. We determine the 2.75 Å co-crystal structure of the CCM2 PTB domain with a peptide corresponding to KRIT1NPX(Y/F)3, revealing a Dab-like PTB fold for CCM2 and its interaction with KRIT1NPX(Y/F)3. We find that several disease-associated missense mutations in CCM2 have the potential to interrupt the KRIT1-CCM2 interaction by destabilizing the CCM2 PTB domain and that a KRIT1 mutation also disrupts this interaction. We therefore provide new insights into the architecture of CCM2 and how the CCM complex is disrupted in CCM disease. PMID:25525273

  5. Structural basis for the disruption of the cerebral cavernous malformations 2 (CCM2) interaction with Krev interaction trapped 1 (KRIT1) by disease-associated mutations.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Oriana S; Liu, Weizhi; Zhang, Rong; Stiegler, Amy L; Ghedia, Sondhya; Weber, James L; Boggon, Titus J

    2015-01-30

    Familial cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are predominantly neurovascular lesions and are associated with mutations within the KRIT1, CCM2, and PDCD10 genes. The protein products of KRIT1 and CCM2 (Krev interaction trapped 1 (KRIT1) and cerebral cavernous malformations 2 (CCM2), respectively) directly interact with each other. Disease-associated mutations in KRIT1 and CCM2 mostly result in loss of their protein products, although rare missense point mutations can also occur. From gene sequencing of patients known or suspected to have one or more CCMs, we discover a series of missense point mutations in KRIT1 and CCM2 that result in missense mutations in the CCM2 and KRIT1 proteins. To place these mutations in the context of the molecular level interactions of CCM2 and KRIT1, we map the interaction of KRIT1 and CCM2 and find that the CCM2 phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domain displays a preference toward the third of the three KRIT1 NPX(Y/F) motifs. We determine the 2.75 Å co-crystal structure of the CCM2 PTB domain with a peptide corresponding to KRIT1(NPX(Y/F)3), revealing a Dab-like PTB fold for CCM2 and its interaction with KRIT1(NPX(Y/F)3). We find that several disease-associated missense mutations in CCM2 have the potential to interrupt the KRIT1-CCM2 interaction by destabilizing the CCM2 PTB domain and that a KRIT1 mutation also disrupts this interaction. We therefore provide new insights into the architecture of CCM2 and how the CCM complex is disrupted in CCM disease.

  6. Gene transfer to the CNS is efficacious in immune-primed mice harboring physiologically relevant titers of anti-AAV antibodies.

    PubMed

    Treleaven, Christopher M; Tamsett, Thomas J; Bu, Jie; Fidler, Jonathan A; Sardi, S Pablo; Hurlbut, Gregory D; Woodworth, Lisa A; Cheng, Seng H; Passini, Marco A; Shihabuddin, Lamya S; Dodge, James C

    2012-09-01

    Central nervous system (CNS)-directed gene therapy with recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors has been used effectively to slow disease course in mouse models of several neurodegenerative diseases. However, these vectors were typically tested in mice without prior exposure to the virus, an immunological scenario unlikely to be duplicated in human patients. Here, we examined the impact of pre-existing immunity on AAV-mediated gene delivery to the CNS of normal and diseased mice. Antibody levels in brain tissue were determined to be 0.6% of the levels found in systemic circulation. As expected, transgene expression in brains of mice with relatively high serum antibody titers was reduced by 59-95%. However, transduction activity was unaffected in mice that harbored more clinically relevant antibody levels. Moreover, we also showed that markers of neuroinflammation (GFAP, Iba1, and CD3) and histopathology (hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)) were not enhanced in immune-primed mice (regardless of pre-existing antibody levels). Importantly, we also demonstrated in a mouse model of Niemann Pick Type A (NPA) disease that pre-existing immunity did not preclude either gene transfer to the CNS or alleviation of disease-associated neuropathology. These findings support the continued development of AAV-based therapies for the treatment of neurological disorders.

  7. American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... com AARDA Celebrates 25th Anniversary in New York City An anonymous donor feted AARDA’s 25th Anniversary at ... gala held at Bouley Botanical in New York City! AARDA thanks Chef David Bouley, Kyle Marcelli, the ...

  8. Diseases associated with leaky hemichannels

    PubMed Central

    Retamal, Mauricio A.; Reyes, Edison P.; García, Isaac E.; Pinto, Bernardo; Martínez, Agustín D.; González, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Hemichannels (HCs) and gap junction channels (GJCs) formed by protein subunits called connexins (Cxs) are major pathways for intercellular communication. While HCs connect the intracellular compartment with the extracellular milieu, GJCs allow the interchange of molecules between cytoplasm of two contacting cells. Under physiological conditions, HCs are mostly closed, but they can open under certain stimuli allowing the release of autocrine and paracrine molecules. Moreover, some pathological conditions, like ischemia or other inflammation conditions, significantly increase HCs activity. In addition, some mutations in Cx genes associated with human diseases, such as deafness or cataracts, lead to the formation of more active HCs or “leaky HCs.” In this article we will revise cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the appearance of leaky HCs, and the consequences of their expression in different cellular systems and animal models, in seeking a common pattern or pathological mechanism of disease. PMID:26283912

  9. MMS Exposure Promotes Increased MtDNA Mutagenesis in the Presence of Replication-Defective Disease-Associated DNA Polymerase γ Variants

    PubMed Central

    Stumpf, Jeffrey D.; Copeland, William C.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes proteins essential for ATP production. Mutant variants of the mtDNA polymerase cause mutagenesis that contributes to aging, genetic diseases, and sensitivity to environmental agents. We interrogated mtDNA replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with disease-associated mutations affecting conserved regions of the mtDNA polymerase, Mip1, in the presence of the wild type Mip1. Mutant frequency arising from mtDNA base substitutions that confer erythromycin resistance and deletions between 21-nucleotide direct repeats was determined. Previously, increased mutagenesis was observed in strains encoding mutant variants that were insufficient to maintain mtDNA and that were not expected to reduce polymerase fidelity or exonuclease proofreading. Increased mutagenesis could be explained by mutant variants stalling the replication fork, thereby predisposing the template DNA to irreparable damage that is bypassed with poor fidelity. This hypothesis suggests that the exogenous base-alkylating agent, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), would further increase mtDNA mutagenesis. Mitochondrial mutagenesis associated with MMS exposure was increased up to 30-fold in mip1 mutants containing disease-associated alterations that affect polymerase activity. Disrupting exonuclease activity of mutant variants was not associated with increased spontaneous mutagenesis compared with exonuclease-proficient alleles, suggesting that most or all of the mtDNA was replicated by wild type Mip1. A novel subset of C to G transversions was responsible for about half of the mutants arising after MMS exposure implicating error-prone bypass of methylated cytosines as the predominant mutational mechanism. Exposure to MMS does not disrupt exonuclease activity that suppresses deletions between 21-nucleotide direct repeats, suggesting the MMS-induce mutagenesis is not explained by inactivated exonuclease activity. Further, trace amounts of CdCl2 inhibit mtDNA replication but

  10. MMS exposure promotes increased MtDNA mutagenesis in the presence of replication-defective disease-associated DNA polymerase γ variants.

    PubMed

    Stumpf, Jeffrey D; Copeland, William C

    2014-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes proteins essential for ATP production. Mutant variants of the mtDNA polymerase cause mutagenesis that contributes to aging, genetic diseases, and sensitivity to environmental agents. We interrogated mtDNA replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with disease-associated mutations affecting conserved regions of the mtDNA polymerase, Mip1, in the presence of the wild type Mip1. Mutant frequency arising from mtDNA base substitutions that confer erythromycin resistance and deletions between 21-nucleotide direct repeats was determined. Previously, increased mutagenesis was observed in strains encoding mutant variants that were insufficient to maintain mtDNA and that were not expected to reduce polymerase fidelity or exonuclease proofreading. Increased mutagenesis could be explained by mutant variants stalling the replication fork, thereby predisposing the template DNA to irreparable damage that is bypassed with poor fidelity. This hypothesis suggests that the exogenous base-alkylating agent, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), would further increase mtDNA mutagenesis. Mitochondrial mutagenesis associated with MMS exposure was increased up to 30-fold in mip1 mutants containing disease-associated alterations that affect polymerase activity. Disrupting exonuclease activity of mutant variants was not associated with increased spontaneous mutagenesis compared with exonuclease-proficient alleles, suggesting that most or all of the mtDNA was replicated by wild type Mip1. A novel subset of C to G transversions was responsible for about half of the mutants arising after MMS exposure implicating error-prone bypass of methylated cytosines as the predominant mutational mechanism. Exposure to MMS does not disrupt exonuclease activity that suppresses deletions between 21-nucleotide direct repeats, suggesting the MMS-induce mutagenesis is not explained by inactivated exonuclease activity. Further, trace amounts of CdCl2 inhibit mtDNA replication but

  11. Bidirectional Glenn shunt as an adjunct to surgical repair of congenital heart disease associated with pulmonary outflow obstruction: relevance of the fluid pressure drop-flow relationship.

    PubMed

    Ascuitto, Robert; Ross-Ascuitto, Nancy; Wiesman, Joshua; Deleon, Serafin

    2008-09-01

    A bidirectional Glenn shunt (BGS) was successfully incorporated into a two-ventricle repair for 10 patients (age, 3-17 years) who had congenital heart disease associated with severe pulmonary outflow obstruction. The BGS was used to volume-unload the pulmonary ventricle faced with residual outflow obstruction, thereby avoiding the need for insertion of a ventricle-to-pulmonary artery conduit. Transthoracic Doppler flow velocity analysis was used to determine transpulmonary peak systolic pressure drops as a measure of obstruction. Preoperative values ranged from 70 to 100 mmHg, and postoperative values ranged from less than 10 to 16 mmHg. At this writing, all patients are doing well 15 to 52 months after surgery. To gain further insight into the reduced pressure drop that may be achieved by decreasing flow rate across obstruction, a computer-based description of fluid flow was used to simulate blood traversing circumferentially narrowed passages. Overall pressure drops and associated flow energy losses were determined from numeric solutions (using finite-element analysis) to the Navier-Stokes equations for the proposed fluid reactions. Pressure drops and flow energy losses were found to decrease dramatically as flow rate was progressively reduced. For selected patients, a BGS can be an effective adjunct to the surgical treatment of pulmonary outflow obstruction. This approach avoids the use of a ventricle-to-pulmonary artery conduit, and thus the inevitable need in most patients for reoperations because of somatic growth, conduit failure, or both.

  12. Immunohistochemical detection of disease-associated prion protein in the peripheral nervous system in experimental H-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Okada, H; Iwamaru, Y; Yokoyama, T; Mohri, S

    2013-07-01

    H-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) has been identified in aged cattle in Europe and North America. To determine the localization of disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)) in the peripheral nerve tissues of cattle affected with H-type BSE, we employed highly sensitive immunohistochemical and immunofluorescence techniques with the tyramide signal amplification (TSA) system. PrP(Sc) deposition was detected in the inferior ganglia, sympathetic nerve trunk, vagus nerve, spinal nerves, cauda equina, and adrenal medulla, using this system. Notably, granular PrP(Sc) deposits were present mainly in the Schwann cells and fibroblast-like cells and occasionally along certain nerve fibers at the surface of the axons. In the adrenal gland, PrP(Sc) immunolabeling was observed within the sympathetic nerve fibers and nerve endings in the adrenal medulla. Although our results were limited to only 3 experimental cases, these results suggest that the TSA system, a highly sensitive immunohistochemical procedure, may help in elucidating the peripheral pathogenesis of H-type BSE.

  13. Detection of disease-associated prion protein in the optic nerve and the adrenal gland of cattle with bovine spongiform encephalopathy by using highly sensitive immunolabeling procedures.

    PubMed

    Okada, Hiroyuki; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Fukuda, Shigeo; Yokoyama, Takashi; Mohri, Shirou

    2012-04-01

    A sensitive immunohistochemical procedure, the tyramide signal amplification (TSA) system, was applied to detect the localization of immunolabeled disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)) in cattle affected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). In this procedure, immunolabeling could be visualized in the optic nerve and the adrenal medulla. In the optic nerve, the dual immunofluorescent technique showed that the granular PrP(Sc) was occasionally detected in the astrocytes, microglia, and myelin sheath adjacent to the axon. Clustered PrP(Sc) was also scattered in association with microglial cells and astrocytes of the optic nerve. In the adrenal gland, PrP(Sc) immunolabeling was confined within the sympathetic nerve fibers and endings. The results suggest that (1) PrP(Sc) might centrifugally spread within and between glial cells and/or the non-axonal (also known as ad-axonal) region of nerve fibers, rather than the axonal and/or extracellular space pathway in the optic nerve, and (2) the sympathetic innervations might be important for the trafficking of BSE agent in the adrenal glands of cattle. This study also suggests that tyramide-based immunochemical analysis should be performed to detect immunolabeled PrP(Sc) in the extracerebral tissues of BSE-affected cattle.

  14. The Fabry disease-associated lipid Lyso-Gb3 enhances voltage-gated calcium currents in sensory neurons and causes pain.

    PubMed

    Choi, L; Vernon, J; Kopach, O; Minett, M S; Mills, K; Clayton, P T; Meert, T; Wood, J N

    2015-05-06

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder characterised by accumulation of glycosphingolipids, and accompanied by clinical manifestations, such as cardiac disorders, renal failure, pain and peripheral neuropathy. Globotriaosylsphingosine (lyso-Gb3), a deacylated form of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), has emerged as a marker of Fabry disease. We investigated the link between Gb3, lyso-Gb3 and pain. Plantar administration of lyso-Gb3 or Gb3 caused mechanical allodynia in healthy mice. In vitro application of 100nM lyso-Gb3 caused uptake of extracellular calcium in 10% of sensory neurons expressing nociceptor markers, rising to 40% of neurons at 1μM, a concentration that may occur in Fabry disease patients. Peak current densities of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels were substantially enhanced by application of 1μM lyso-Gb3. These studies suggest a direct role for lyso-Gb3 in the sensitisation of peripheral nociceptive neurons that may provide an opportunity for therapeutic intervention in the treatment of Fabry disease-associated pain.

  15. Disease-Associated Neisseria meningitidis Isolates Inhibit Wound Repair in Respiratory Epithelial Cells in a Type IV Pilus-Independent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xiaoyun

    2014-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is the causative agent of meningococcal disease. Onset of meningococcal disease can be extremely rapid and can kill within a matter of hours. However, although a much-feared pathogen, Neisseria meningitidis is frequently found in the nasopharyngeal mucosae of healthy carriers. The bacterial factors that distinguish disease- from carriage-associated meningococci are incompletely understood. Evidence suggesting that disruptions to the nasopharynx may increase the risk of acquiring meningococcal disease led us to evaluate the ability of disease- and carriage-associated meningococcal isolates to inhibit cell migration, using an in vitro assay for wound repair. We found that disease-associated isolates in our collection inhibited wound closure, while carriage-associated isolates were more variable, with many isolates not inhibiting wound repair at all. For isolates selected for further study, we found that actin morphology, such as presence of lamellipodia, correlated with cell migration. We demonstrated that multiple meningococcal virulence factors, including the type IV pili, are dispensable for inhibition of wound repair. Inhibition of wound repair was also shown to be an active process, i.e., requiring live bacteria undergoing active protein synthesis. PMID:25225250

  16. Trypanosoma cruzi in Brazilian Amazonia: Lineages TCI and TCIIa in wild primates, Rhodnius spp. and in humans with Chagas disease associated with oral transmission.

    PubMed

    Marcili, Arlei; Valente, Vera C; Valente, Sebastião A; Junqueira, Angela C V; da Silva, Flávia Maia; Pinto, Ana Yecê das Neves; Naiff, Roberto D; Campaner, Marta; Coura, José R; Camargo, Erney P; Miles, Michael A; Teixeira, Marta M G

    2009-04-01

    In this study, we provide phylogenetic and biogeographic evidence that the Trypanosoma cruzi lineages T. cruzi I (TCI) and T. cruzi IIa (TCIIa) circulate amongst non-human primates in Brazilian Amazonia, and are transmitted by Rhodnius species in overlapping arboreal transmission cycles, sporadically infecting humans. TCI presented higher prevalence rates, and no lineages other than TCI and TCIIa were found in this study in wild monkeys and Rhodnius from the Amazonian region. We characterised TCI and TCIIa from wild primates (16 TCI and five TCIIa), Rhodnius spp. (13 TCI and nine TCIIa), and humans with Chagas disease associated with oral transmission (14 TCI and five TCIIa) in Brazilian Amazonia. To our knowledge, TCIIa had not been associated with wild monkeys until now. Polymorphisms of ssrDNA, cytochrome b gene sequences and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) patterns clearly separated TCIIa from TCIIb-e and TCI lineages, and disclosed small intra-lineage polymorphisms amongst isolates from Amazonia. These data are important in understanding the complexity of the transmission cycles, genetic structure, and evolutionary history of T. cruzi populations circulating in Amazonia, and they contribute to both the unravelling of human infection routes and the pathological peculiarities of Chagas disease in this region.

  17. The location of a disease-associated polymorphism and genomic structure of the human 52-kDa Ro/SSA locus (SSA1)

    SciTech Connect

    Tsugu, H.; Horowitz, R.; Gibson, N.

    1994-12-01

    Sera from approximately 30% of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) contain high titers of autoantibodies that bind to the 52-kDa Ro/SSA protein. We previously detected polymorphisms in the 52-kDa Ro/SSA gene (SSA1) with restriction enzymes, one of which is strongly associated with the presence of SLE (P < 0.0005) in African Americans. A higher disease frequency and more severe forms of the disease are commonly noted among these female patients. To determine the location and nature of this polymorphism, we obtained two clones that span 8.5 kb of the 52-kDa Ro/SSA locus including its upstream regulatory region. Six exons were identified, and their nucleotide sequences plus adjacent noncoding regions were determined. No differences were found between these exons and the coding region of one of the reported cDNAs. The disease-associated polymorphic site suggested by a restriction enzyme map and confirmed by DNA amplification and nucleotide sequencing was present upstream of exon 1. This polymorphism may be a genetic marker for a disease-related variation in the coding region for the protein or in the upstream regulatory region of this gene. Although this RFLP is present in Japanese, it is not associated with lupus in this race. 41 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Why human disease-associated residues appear as the wild-type in other species: genome-scale structural evidence for the compensation hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinrui; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2014-07-01

    Many human-disease associated amino acid residues (DARs) appear as the wild-type in other species. This phenomenon is commonly explained by the presence of compensatory residues in these other species that alleviate the deleterious effects of the DARs. The general validity of this hypothesis, however, is unclear, because few compensatory residues have been identified. Here we test the compensation hypothesis by assembling and analyzing 1,077 DARs located in 177 proteins of known crystal structures. Because destabilizing protein structures is a primary reason why DARs are deleterious, we focus on protein stability in this analysis. We discover that, in species where a DAR represents the wild-type, the destabilizing effect of the DAR is generally lessened by the observed amino acid substitutions in the spatial proximity of the DAR. This and other findings provide genome-scale evidence for the compensation hypothesis and have important implications for understanding epistasis in protein evolution and for using animal models of human diseases.

  19. Disease-associated glycosylated molecular variants of human C-reactive protein activate complement-mediated hemolysis of erythrocytes in tuberculosis and Indian visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Ansar, Waliza; Mukhopadhyay, Sumi; Habib, S K Hasan; Basu, Shyamasree; Saha, Bibhuti; Sen, Asish Kumar; Mandal, C N; Mandal, Chitra

    2009-12-01

    Human C-reactive protein (CRP), as a mediator of innate immunity, removed damaged cells by activating the classical complement pathway. Previous studies have successfully demonstrated that CRPs are differentially induced as glycosylated molecular variants in certain pathological conditions. Affinity-purified CRPs from two most prevalent diseases in India viz. tuberculosis (TB) and visceral leishmaniasis (VL) have differential glycosylation in their sugar composition and linkages. As anemia is a common manifestation in TB and VL, we assessed the contributory role of glycosylated CRPs to influence hemolysis via CRP-complement-pathway as compared to healthy control subjects. Accordingly, the specific binding of glycosylated CRPs with erythrocytes was established by flow-cytometry and ELISA. Significantly, deglycosylated CRPs showed a 7-8-fold reduced binding with erythrocytes confirming the role of glycosylated moieties. Scatchard analysis revealed striking differences in the apparent binding constants (10(4)-10(5) M(-1)) and number of binding sites (10(6)-10(7)sites/erythrocyte) for CRP on patients' erythrocytes as compared to normal. Western blotting along with immunoprecipitation analysis revealed the presence of distinct molecular determinants on TB and VL erythrocytes specific to disease-associated CRP. Increased fragility, hydrophobicity and decreased rigidity of diseased-erythrocytes upon binding with glycosylated CRP suggested membrane damage. Finally, the erythrocyte-CRP binding was shown to activate the CRP-complement-cascade causing hemolysis, even at physiological concentration of CRP (10 microg/ml). Thus, it may be postulated that CRP have a protective role towards the clearance of damaged-erythrocytes in these two diseases.

  20. dbSNO 2.0: a resource for exploring structural environment, functional and disease association and regulatory network of protein S-nitrosylation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Ju; Lu, Cheng-Tsung; Su, Min-Gang; Huang, Kai-Yao; Ching, Wei-Chieh; Yang, Hsiao-Hsiang; Liao, Yen-Chen; Chen, Yu-Ju; Lee, Tzong-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Given the increasing number of proteins reported to be regulated by S-nitrosylation (SNO), it is considered to act, in a manner analogous to phosphorylation, as a pleiotropic regulator that elicits dual effects to regulate diverse pathophysiological processes by altering protein function, stability, and conformation change in various cancers and human disorders. Due to its importance in regulating protein functions and cell signaling, dbSNO (http://dbSNO.mbc.nctu.edu.tw) is extended as a resource for exploring structural environment of SNO substrate sites and regulatory networks of S-nitrosylated proteins. An increasing interest in the structural environment of PTM substrate sites motivated us to map all manually curated SNO peptides (4165 SNO sites within 2277 proteins) to PDB protein entries by sequence identity, which provides the information of spatial amino acid composition, solvent-accessible surface area, spatially neighboring amino acids, and side chain orientation for 298 substrate cysteine residues. Additionally, the annotations of protein molecular functions, biological processes, functional domains and human diseases are integrated to explore the functional and disease associations for S-nitrosoproteome. In this update, users are allowed to search a group of interested proteins/genes and the system reconstructs the SNO regulatory network based on the information of metabolic pathways and protein-protein interactions. Most importantly, an endogenous yet pathophysiological S-nitrosoproteomic dataset from colorectal cancer patients was adopted to demonstrate that dbSNO could discover potential SNO proteins involving in the regulation of NO signaling for cancer pathways. PMID:25399423

  1. An attempt to correlate cattle breed origins and diseases associated with or transmitted by the tick Amblyomma variegatum in the French West Indies.

    PubMed

    Maillard, J C; Kemp, S J; Naves, M; Palin, C; Demangel, C; Accipe, A; Maillard, N; Bensaid, A

    1993-01-01

    By using biological data and historical research, we have tried to explain the difference between resistance and susceptibility to the diseases transmitted (cowdriosis) or associated (dermatophilosis) with the tick Amblyomma variegatum, in two cattle breeds of the French West Indies: the Creole crossbred cattle of Guadeloupe and the Brahman zebu cattle of Martinique. Have been studied the polymorphisms of 5 independent genetic systems (erythrocytic haemoglobin, serum albumin and transferrin, the class I region of the BoLA complex and the gamma S crystallin gene) in different breeds comprising Bos taurus cattle of Europe and Africa, Bos indicus of West and East Africa, as well as the Brahman of Martinique and the Creole crossbred of Guadeloupe. By comparing the different allele frequencies of these 5 non related polymorphic loci and by using the two different mathematical matrices of NEI and of CAVALLI-SFORZA, have been established the genetic distances between these breeds. It appears clearly that the Creole cattle of Guadeloupe are in an intermediate position between the Bos taurus N'Dama breed of West Africa and two Bos indicus zebu breeds, namely the West African Sudan zebu and the Brahman. Thanks to studies of different archieves in the Caribbean and in Europe, historical evidence have been accumulated on the geographical origins and on the chronology of the establishment of Creole and Brahman cattle in the French West Indies. The high resistance of the Creole cattle of Guadeloupe to diseases associated with or transmitted by the "Senegalese" tick Amblyomma variegatum seems to be due to the inheritance of a pool of genes from West African cattle and more particularly from the N'Dama breed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Crystal structure of type I ryanodine receptor amino-terminal [beta]-trefoil domain reveals a disease-associated mutation 'hot spot' loop

    SciTech Connect

    Amador, Fernando J.; Liu, Shuang; Ishiyama, Noboru; Plevin, Michael J.; Wilson, Aaron; MacLennan, David H.; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2009-12-01

    Muscle contraction and relaxation is regulated by transient elevations of myoplasmic Ca{sup 2+}. Ca{sup 2+} is released from stores in the lumen of the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum (SER) to initiate formation of the Ca{sup 2+} transient by activation of a class of Ca{sup 2+} release channels referred to as ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and is pumped back into the SER lumen by Ca{sup 2+}-ATPases (SERCAs) to terminate the Ca{sup 2+} transient. Mutations in the type 1 ryanodine receptor gene, RYR1, are associated with 2 skeletal muscle disorders, malignant hyperthermia (MH), and central core disease (CCD). The evaluation of proposed mechanisms by which RyR1 mutations cause MH and CCD is hindered by the lack of high-resolution structural information. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal 210 residues of RyR1 (RyR{sub NTD}) at 2.5 {angstrom}. The RyR{sub NTD} structure is similar to that of the suppressor domain of type 1 inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3Rsup), but lacks most of the long helix-turn-helix segment of the 'arm' domain in IP3Rsup. The N-terminal {beta}-trefoil fold, found in both RyR and IP{sub 3}R, is likely to play a critical role in regulatory mechanisms in this channel family. A disease-associated mutation 'hot spot' loop was identified between strands 8 and 9 in a highly basic region of RyR1. Biophysical studies showed that 3 MH-associated mutations (C36R, R164C, and R178C) do not adversely affect the global stability or fold of RyRNTD, supporting previously described mechanisms whereby mutations perturb protein-protein interactions.

  3. Prevalence of bovine dermatophilosis and disease-associated alleles in zebu Goudali cattle and their Italian Simmental crosses ranching in the western highland plateau savannah of Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Ojong, Bessong Willington; Saccà, Elena; Bessong, Pascal; Piasentier, Edi

    2016-10-01

    Abundance of native pastures makes Cameroon's western highland savannah (WHS) a hotspot for low-input beef-type cattle. Dumbo Ranch is central to cattle seed stock multiplication in WHS and holds that Dermatophilus congolensis infection undermines production. The bovine BoLA-DRB3 has been variously demonstrated as the principal gene of the major histocompatibility locus associated with immunity and resistance to dermatophilosis in cattle. We studied the profile of dermatophilosis prevalence in zebu Goudali (G) and its Simmental composite, SimGoud (SG), at Dumbo Ranch and determined the distribution of a dermatophilosis-associated susceptibility allele of the BoLA-DRB3 gene by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We recorded a 42 % prevalence of dermatophilosis in the studied cohort (337 animals). Dermatophilosis was more common in older cattle than in cattle ≤36 months (p ≤ 0.05). G was more affected compared to SG, because of the prevalence of the disease in the oldest animals and the age distribution of the experimental subjects. No susceptible homozygote was observed. About 85 and 15 % of the cohort carried the homozygous resistant and heterozygous condition, respectively. This genotype distribution was not affected by cattle type. The study confirms the presence of dermatophilosis among G and SG cattle in WHS. However, there was no correlation between the presence of the disease-associated susceptible allele considered and clinical manifestation. Screening for this dermatophilosis resistance-associated allele of BoLA-DRB3 gene appeared not useful for selection of G and SG in WHS.

  4. [A Japanese family with familial Alzheimer's disease associated with presenilin 1 mutation: relationship between younger age of onset and ApoE gene polymorphism].

    PubMed

    Marui, Wami; Iseki, Eizo; Sugiyama, Naoya; Matsumura, Takehiko; Suzuki, Kyoko; Odawara, Toshinari; Hino, Hiroaki; Kosaka, Kenji

    2003-04-01

    We previously reported a Japanese family with early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease associated with G 209 R presenilin 1(PS 1) mutation. There have been six patients across three generations in this family. In the present report, we described the clinical course, findings with neuroimaging and results of genetic examination of PS 1 and apolipoprotein E(ApoE) in three of six patients(II-1, III-1 and 2). The clinical course was common to all three patients. Memory disturbance, disorientation, amnestic aphasia, personality changes and perseveration appeared at early stages, whereas Gerstmann's syndrome, myoclonus and general convulsion were recognized at advanced stages. CT disclosed mild brain atrophy in the temporal lobes at early stages and diffuse brain atrophy predominantly in the fronto--temporal lobes at advanced stages. SPECT exhibited hypoperfusion in the fronto-temporal areas at early stages and hypoperfusion in the fronto-temporal and parieto-occipital areas at advanced stages. The age of onset in six patients demonstrated two clusters at age 53-55(I-1, II-1, 2 and 5) and age 46-48(III-1 and 2). PS 1 genotyping demonstrated that the heterozygous exonic missense mutation G 209 R was confirmed in all three patients. Regarding the ApoE genotyping, II-1(mother) was epsilon 3/epsilon 3, whereas III-1 and 2(children) were epsilon 3/epsilon 4. These findings suggest the possibility that there might be a gene dose effect, since the age of onset ranged from 5 to 7 years younger in patients who received epsilon 4 alleles from the father.

  5. Disease-associated pathophysiologic structures in pediatric rheumatic diseases show characteristics of scale-free networks seen in physiologic systems: implications for pathogenesis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Mark Barton; Wang, Shirley; Aggarwal, Amita; Knowlton, Nicholas; Jiang, Kaiyu; Chen, Yanmin; McKee, Ryan; Chaser, Brad; McGhee, Timothy; Osban, Jeanette; Jarvis, James N

    2009-01-01

    Background While standard reductionist approaches have provided some insights into specific gene polymorphisms and molecular pathways involved in disease pathogenesis, our understanding of complex traits such as atherosclerosis or type 2 diabetes remains incomplete. Gene expression profiling provides an unprecedented opportunity to understand complex human diseases by providing a global view of the multiple interactions across the genome that are likely to contribute to disease pathogenesis. Thus, the goal of gene expression profiling is not to generate lists of differentially expressed genes, but to identify the physiologic or pathogenic processes and structures represented in the expression profile. Methods RNA was separately extracted from peripheral blood neutrophils and mononuclear leukocytes, labeled, and hybridized to genome level microarrays to generate expression profiles of children with polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, juvenile dermatomyositis relative to childhood controls. Statistically significantly differentially expressed genes were identified from samples of each disease relative to controls. Functional network analysis identified interactions between products of these differentially expressed genes. Results In silico models of both diseases demonstrated similar features with properties of scale-free networks previously described in physiologic systems. These networks were observable in both cells of the innate immune system (neutrophils) and cells of the adaptive immune system (peripheral blood mononuclear cells). Conclusion Genome-level transcriptional profiling from childhood onset rheumatic diseases suggested complex interactions in two arms of the immune system in both diseases. The disease associated networks showed scale-free network patterns similar to those reported in normal physiology. We postulate that these features have important implications for therapy as such networks are relatively resistant to perturbation. PMID

  6. Short communication: Plasma levels of vitamin D in HIV patients initiating antiretroviral therapy do not predict immune restoration disease associated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Price, Patricia; Haddow, Lewis J; Affandi, Jacquita; Agarwal, Upasna; Easterbrook, Philippa J; Elliott, Julian; French, Martyn; Kumar, Manoj; Moosa, Mahomed-Yunus S; Oliver, Benjamin; Singh, Sarman; Sola, Marcelo; Saphonn, Vonthanak; Vun, Mean Chhi

    2012-10-01

    Immune restoration disease associated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB IRD) is clinically important among HIV patients commencing antiretroviral therapy in countries where tuberculosis is endemic. Vitamin D affects dendritic cell and T cell function and the antimicrobial activity of monocytes. Plasma levels of vitamin D and polymorphisms in the vitamin D receptor may affect tuberculosis, and HIV infection associates with vitamin D deficiency. Here we assess whether plasma vitamin D levels may predict TB IRD. Samples were available from prospective studies of TB IRD in Cambodia (26 cases), India (19 cases), and South Africa (29 cases). IRD cases and controls from each site were similar in age and baseline CD4(+) T cell count. Plasma samples were assessed using 25(OH) vitamin D immunoassay plates. DNA samples were available from a subset of patients and were genotyped for the VDR FokI (F/f) [C/T, rs10735810] SNP. When data from each cohort were pooled to assess ethnic/geographic differences, 25(OH)D levels were higher in Cambodian than Indian or South African patients (p<0.0001) and higher in South African than Indian patients (p<0.0001). TB IRD was not associated with differences in levels of 25(OH)D in any cohort (p=0.36-0.82), irrespective of the patients' prior TB diagnoses/treatment. Carriage of the minor allele of VDR FokI (F/f) was marginally associated with TB IRD in Indian patients (p=0.06) with no association in Cambodians. Neither plasma levels of vitamin D nor the vitamin D allele will usefully predict TB IRD in diverse populations from TB endemic regions.

  7. Global Analysis of DNA Methylation Variation in Adipose Tissue from Twins Reveals Links to Disease-Associated Variants in Distal Regulatory Elements

    PubMed Central

    Grundberg, Elin; Meduri, Eshwar; Sandling, Johanna K.; Hedman, Åsa K.; Keildson, Sarah; Buil, Alfonso; Busche, Stephan; Yuan, Wei; Nisbet, James; Sekowska, Magdalena; Wilk, Alicja; Barrett, Amy; Small, Kerrin S.; Ge, Bing; Caron, Maxime; Shin, So-Youn; Ahmadi, Kourosh R.; Ainali, Chrysanthi; Barrett, Amy; Bataille, Veronique; Bell, Jordana T.; Buil, Alfonso; Deloukas, Panos; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Dimas, Antigone S.; Durbin, Richard; Glass, Daniel; Grundberg, Elin; Hassanali, Neelam; Hedman, Åsa K.; Ingle, Catherine; Knowles, David; Krestyaninova, Maria; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Lowe, Christopher E.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Meduri, Eshwar; di Meglio, Paola; Min, Josine L.; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Nestle, Frank O.; Nica, Alexandra C.; Nisbet, James; O’Rahilly, Stephen; Parts, Leopold; Potter, Simon; Sandling, Johanna; Sekowska, Magdalena; Shin, So-Youn; Small, Kerrin S.; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Tim D.; Surdulescu, Gabriela; Travers, Mary E.; Tsaprouni, Loukia; Tsoka, Sophia; Wilk, Alicja; Yang, Tsun-Po; Zondervan, Krina T.; Lathrop, Mark; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Spector, Timothy D.; Bell, Jordana T.; Deloukas, Panos

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation play a key role in gene regulation and disease susceptibility. However, little is known about the genome-wide frequency, localization, and function of methylation variation and how it is regulated by genetic and environmental factors. We utilized the Multiple Tissue Human Expression Resource (MuTHER) and generated Illumina 450K adipose methylome data from 648 twins. We found that individual CpGs had low variance and that variability was suppressed in promoters. We noted that DNA methylation variation was highly heritable (h2median = 0.34) and that shared environmental effects correlated with metabolic phenotype-associated CpGs. Analysis of methylation quantitative-trait loci (metQTL) revealed that 28% of CpGs were associated with nearby SNPs, and when overlapping them with adipose expression quantitative-trait loci (eQTL) from the same individuals, we found that 6% of the loci played a role in regulating both gene expression and DNA methylation. These associations were bidirectional, but there were pronounced negative associations for promoter CpGs. Integration of metQTL with adipose reference epigenomes and disease associations revealed significant enrichment of metQTL overlapping metabolic-trait or disease loci in enhancers (the strongest effects were for high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and body mass index [BMI]). We followed up with the BMI SNP rs713586, a cg01884057 metQTL that overlaps an enhancer upstream of ADCY3, and used bisulphite sequencing to refine this region. Our results showed widespread population invariability yet sequence dependence on adipose DNA methylation but that incorporating maps of regulatory elements aid in linking CpG variation to gene regulation and disease risk in a tissue-dependent manner. PMID:24183450

  8. The Role of Adverse Event Reporting in the FDA Response to a Multistate Outbreak of Liver Disease Associated with a Dietary Supplement

    PubMed Central

    DeBeck, Heidi J.; LeBlanc, Pamela; Mogen, Kathryn M.; Wolpert, Beverly J.; Sabo, Jonathan L.; Salter, Monique; Seelman, Sharon L.; Lance, Susan E.; Monahan, Caitlin; Steigman, David S.; Gensheimer, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Objective Liver disease is a potential complication from using dietary supplements. This study investigated an outbreak of non-viral liver disease associated with the use of OxyELITE ProTM, a dietary supplement used for weight loss and/or muscle building. Methods Illness details were ascertained from MedWatch reports submitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) describing consumers who ingested OxyELITE Pro alone or in combination with other dietary supplements. FDA's Forensic Chemistry Center analyzed samples of OxyELITE Pro. Results From February 2012 to February 2014, FDA received 114 reports of adverse events of all kinds involving consumers who ingested OxyELITE Pro. The onset of illness for the first report was December 2010 and for the last report was January 2014. Thirty-three states, two foreign nations, and Puerto Rico submitted reports. Fifty-five of the reports (48%) described liver disease in the absence of viral infection, gallbladder disease, autoimmune disease, or other known causes of liver damage. A total of 33 (60%) of these patients were hospitalized, and three underwent liver transplantation. In early 2013, OxyELITE Pro products entered the market with a formulation distinct from products sold previously. The new formulation replaced 1,3-dimethylamylamine with aegeline. However, the manufacturer failed to submit to FDA a required “new dietary ingredient” notice for the use of aegeline in OxyELITE Pro products. Laboratory analysis identified no drugs, poisons, pharmaceuticals, toxic metals, usnic acid, N-Nitroso-fenfluramine, pyrrolizidine alkaloids, aristocholic acid, or phenethylamines in the products. Conclusions Vigilant surveillance is required for adverse events linked to the use of dietary supplements. PMID:26327730

  9. The immunodominant T helper 2 (Th2) response elicited in BALB/c mice by the Leishmania LiP2a and LiP2b acidic ribosomal proteins cannot be reverted by strong Th1 inducers.

    PubMed

    Iborra, S; Abánades, D R; Parody, N; Carrión, J; Risueño, R M; Pineda, M A; Bonay, P; Alonso, C; Soto, M

    2007-11-01

    The search for disease-associated T helper 2 (Th2) Leishmania antigens and the induction of a Th1 immune response to them using defined vaccination protocols is a potential strategy to induce protection against Leishmania infection. Leishmania infantum LiP2a and LiP2b acidic ribosomal protein (P proteins) have been described as prominent antigens during human and canine visceral leishmaniasis. In this study we demonstrate that BALB/c mice infected with Leishmania major develop a Th2-like humoral response against Leishmania LiP2a and LiP2b proteins and that the same response is induced in BALB/c mice when the parasite P proteins are immunized as recombinant molecules without adjuvant. The genetic immunization of BALB/c mice with eukaryotic expression plasmids coding for these proteins was unable to redirect the Th2-like response induced by these antigens, and only the co-administration of the recombinant P proteins with CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODN) promoted a mixed Th1/Th2 immune response. According to the preponderance of a Th2 or mixed Th1/Th2 responses elicited by the different regimens of immunization tested, no evidence of protection was observed in mice after challenge with L. major. Although alterations of the clinical outcome were not detected in mice presensitized with the P proteins, the enhanced IgG1 and interleukin (IL)-4 response against total Leishmania antigens in these mice may indicate an exacerbation of the disease.

  10. Seten: A tool for systematic identification and comparison of processes, phenotypes and diseases associated with RNA-binding proteins from condition-specific CLIP-seq profiles.

    PubMed

    Budak, Gungor; Srivastava, Rajneesh; Janga, Sarath Chandra

    2017-03-23

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) control the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotic genomes at post-transcriptional level by binding to their cognate RNAs. Although several variants of CLIP (crosslinking and immunoprecipitation) protocols are currently available to study the global protein-RNA interaction landscape at single nucleotide resolution in a cell, currently there are very few tools which can facilitate understanding and dissecting the functional associations of RBPs from the resulting binding maps. Here, we present Seten, a web-based and a command line tool, which can identify and compare processes, phenotypes and diseases associated with RBPs from condition-specific CLIP-seq profiles. Seten uses BED files resulting from most peak calling algorithms which include scores reflecting the extent of binding of an RBP on the target transcript, to provide both traditional functional enrichment as well as gene set enrichment results for a number of gene set collections including BioCarta, KEGG, Reactome, Gene Ontology (GO), Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) and MalaCards Disease Ontology for several organisms including fruit fly, human, mouse, rat, worm, and yeast. It also provides an option to dynamically compare the associated gene sets across datasets as bubble charts, to facilitate comparative analysis. Benchmarking of Seten using eCLIP data for IGF2BP1, SRSF7 and PTBP1 against their corresponding CRISPR RNA-seq in K562 cells as well as randomized negative controls, demonstrated that its gene set enrichment method outperforms functional enrichment, with scores significantly contributing to the discovery of true annotations. Comparative performance analysis using these CRISPR control datasets revealed significantly higher precision and comparable recall to that observed using ChIP-Enrich. Seten's web interface currently provides precomputed results for about 200 CLIP-seq datasets and both command line as well as web interfaces can be used to analyze CLIP

  11. Infection with a Mouse-Adapted Strain of the 2009 Pandemic Virus Causes a Highly Severe Disease Associated with an Impaired T Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Meunier, Isabelle; Morisseau, Olivier; Garneau, Émilie; Marois, Isabelle; Cloutier, Alexandre; Richter, Martin V.

    2015-01-01

    Despite a relatively low fatality rate, the 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus differed from other seasonal viruses in that it caused mortality and severe pneumonia in the young and middle-aged population (18–59 years old). The mechanisms underlying this increased disease severity are still poorly understood. In this study, a human isolate of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus was adapted to the mouse (MAp2009). The pathogenicity of the MAp2009 virus and the host immune responses were evaluated in the mouse model and compared to the laboratory H1N1 strain A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (PR8). The MAp2009 virus reached consistently higher titers in the lungs over 14 days compared to the PR8 virus, and caused severe disease associated with high morbidity and 85% mortality rate, contrasting with the 0% death rate in the PR8 group. During the early phase of infection, both viruses induced similar pathology in the lungs. However, MAp2009-induced lung inflammation was sustained until the end of the study (day 14), while there was no sign of inflammation in the PR8-infected group by day 10. Furthermore, at day 3 post-infection, MAp2009 induced up to 10- to 40-fold more cytokine and chemokine gene expression, respectively. More importantly, the numbers of CD4+ T cells and virus-specific CD8+ T cells were significantly lower in the lungs of MAp2009-infected mice compared to PR8-infected mice. Interestingly, there was no difference in the number of dendritic cells in the lung and in the draining lymph node. Moreover, mice infected with PR8 or MAp2009 had similar numbers of CCR5 and CXCR3-expressing T cells, suggesting that the impaired T cell response was not due to a lack of chemokine responsiveness or priming of T cells. This study demonstrates that a mouse-adapted virus from an isolate of the 2009 pandemic virus interferes with the adaptive immune response leading to a more severe disease. PMID:26381265

  12. Prognostic Factors in Interstitial Lung Disease Associated with Primary Sjögren’s Syndrome: A Retrospective Analysis of 33 Pathologically–Proven Cases

    PubMed Central

    Enomoto, Yasunori; Takemura, Tamiko; Hagiwara, Eri; Iwasawa, Tae; Fukuda, Yuh; Yanagawa, Noriyo; Sakai, Fumikazu; Baba, Tomohisa; Nagaoka, Shouhei; Ogura, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Interstitial lung disease associated with primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS–ILD) shows several patterns such as nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) and usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP). Although UIP is a well–recognized prognostic determinant in idiopathic interstitial pneumonias, whether this is also the case in pSS–ILD is unclear. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the prognostic effect of UIP, and to identify the prognostic factors in pSS–ILD. Methods A retrospective review of medical records identified 33 consecutive patients with pathologically–proven pSS–ILD. Each patient was classified into each ILD pattern by multidisciplinary analysis. Baseline clinical–radiologic–pathologic characteristics and survival rates were compared between the ILD patterns. Finally, the prognostic factors in pSS–ILD were assessed by univariate and subsequent multivariate analyses using Cox’s proportional hazards regression model. Results pSS–ILD patients were diagnosed with NSIP (n = 22) or UIP (n = 11). The median follow–up period was 110 months, and five-year survival rate was 87.3% in the total patient population. The prognosis of the UIP patients was not significantly different from that of the NSIP patients (NSIP to UIP, hazard ratio [HR]: 0.77, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.18–3.36, P = 0.73). Multivariate analysis identified PaCO2 (HR: 1.68 per 1 Torr increase, 95% CI: 1.24–2.28, P < 0.01), extent of reticular abnormality on high–resolution CT (HR: 4.17 per 1-grade increment, 95% CI: 1.18–14.73, P = 0.03), and severity of fibroblastic foci (HR: 9.26 per 1-grade increment, 95% CI: 1.74–49.35, P < 0.01) as prognostic factors in pSS–ILD. Conclusions UIP in pSS–ILD was not related to poorer prognosis than NSIP. Assessment of detailed clinical–radiologic–pathologic findings is more important than distinguishing UIP to evaluate prognosis in this disease. PMID:24040065

  13. [The influence of carbon dioxide baths differing in the total mineralization levels on the functional state of the cardiovascular system of the patients presenting with hypertensive disease associated with coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    L'vova, N V; Tupitsyna, Iu Iu; Badalov, N G; Krasnikov, V E; Lebedeva, O D

    2013-01-01

    The results of the study on the influence of carbon dioxide baths differing in the total mineralization levels on the clinical course of hypertensive disease associated with coronary heart disease and on various functional systems of the body. The data obtained provide an insight into the role of salt concentrations (10 and 20 g/l) in carbon dioxide bath water (1.2 g/l) applied for the traditional treatment of the patients with hypertensive disease associated with concomitant coronary heart disease and musculoskeletal pathology. Highly mineralized bath water has a greater influence on the functional state of the cardiovascular system by causing a more pronounced decrease in peripheral vascular resistance and hypotensive effect. Baths with a salt concentration of 20 g/l markedly reduced pain and had anti-inflammatory effect in the patients with pathology of support and locomotor organs.

  14. Transfer of cholesterol by the NPC team.

    PubMed

    Vance, Jean E

    2010-08-04

    The mechanisms of intracellular cholesterol transport are largely unknown. In this issue of Cell Metabolism, Wang et al. (2010) identify amino acid residues on the lumenal lysosomal protein Niemann-Pick C2 (NPC2) that are required for intralysosomal transfer of endocytosed cholesterol to membrane-bound NPC1 via a process that avoids movement of hydrophobic cholesterol through the aqueous phase.

  15. Genetic Characterization of Movement Disorders and Dementias

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-24

    Ataxia; Dystonia; Parkinson's Disease; Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis; Corticobasal Degeneration; Multiple System Atrophy; Alzheimer's Disease; Lewy Body Dementia; Parkinson Disease-Dementia; Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian Atrophy; Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease and Fatal Familial Insomnia; Fragile X-associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome; Krabbe's Disease; Niemann-Pick Disease, Type C; Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis

  16. Phase I/II Pilot Study of Mixed Chimerism to Treat Inherited Metabolic Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-30

    Hurler Syndrome (MPS I); Hurler-Scheie Syndrome With Early Neurologic Involvement and/or Sensitization to Enzyme Replacement Therapy (ERT); Hunter Syndrome (MPS II); Sanfilippo Syndrome (MPS III); Krabbe Disease (Globoid Leukodystrophy); Metachromatic Leukodystrophy (MLD); Adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD and AMN); Sandhoff Disease; Tay Sachs Disease; Pelizaeus Merzbacher (PMD); Niemann-Pick Disease; Alpha-mannosidosis

  17. Immunohistochemical detection of disease-associated prion protein in the intestine of cattle naturally affected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy by using an alkaline-based chemical antigen retrieval method.

    PubMed

    Okada, Hiroyuki; Iwamaru, Yoshihumi; Imamura, Morikazu; Masujin, Kentaro; Yokoyama, Takashi; Mohri, Shirou

    2010-11-01

    An alkaline-based chemical antigen retrieval pretreatment step was used to enhance immunolabeling of disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)) in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue sections from cattle naturally affected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). The modified chemical method used in this study amplified the PrP(Sc) signal by unmasking PrP(Sc) compared with the normal cellular prion protein. In addition, this method reduced nonspecific background immunolabeling that resulted from the destruction of the residual normal cellular form of prion protein, and reduced the treatment time compared with the usual autoclave pretreatment step. Immunolabeled PrP(Sc) was thereby clearly detected in the myenteric plexus of the ileum in naturally occurring BSE cattle.

  18. Celiac Disease-Associated Autoimmune Endocrinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vijay; Rajadhyaksha, Manoj; Wortsman, Jacobo

    2001-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune disorder induced by gluten intake in genetically susceptible individuals. It is characterized by the presence of serum antibodies to endomysium, reticulin, gliadin, and tissue transglutaminase. The incidence of CD in various autoimmune disorders is increased 10- to 30-fold in comparison to the general population, although in many cases CD is clinically asymptomatic or silent. The identification of such cases with CD is important since it may help in the control of type I diabetes or endocrine functions in general, as well as in the prevention of long-term complications of CD, such as lymphoma. It is believed that CD may predispose an individual to other autoimmune disorders such as type I diabetes, autoimmune thyroid, and other endocrine diseases and that gluten may be a possible trigger. The onset of type I diabetes at an early age in patients with CD, compared to non-CD, and the prevention or delay in onset of diabetes by gluten-free diet in genetically predisposed individuals substantiates this antigen trigger hypothesis. Early identification of CD patients in highly susceptible population may result in the treatment of subclinical CD and improved control of associated disorders. PMID:11427410

  19. Coeliac Disease-Associated Antibodies in Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Akbulut, Sabiye; Gür, Günes; Topal, Firdevs; Topal, Fatih Esad; Alli, Nuran; Saritas, Ülkü

    2013-01-01

    Background The possible relationship between psoriasis and coeliac disease (CD) has been attributed to the common pathogenic mechanisms of the two diseases and the presence of antigliadin antibodies in patients has been reported to increase the incidence of CD. Objective The aim of this report was to study CD-associated antibodies serum antigliadin antibody immunoglobulin (Ig)A, IgG, anti-endomysial antibody IgA and anti-transglutaminase antibody IgA and to demonstrate whether there is an increase in the frequency of those markers of CD in patients with psoriasis. Methods Serum antigliadin antibody IgG and IgA, antiendomysial antibody IgA and anti-transglutaminase antibody IgA were studied in 37 (19 males) patients with psoriasis and 50 (23 males) healthy controls. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and duodenal biopsies were performed in patients with at least one positive marker. Results Antigliadin IgA was statistically higher in the psoriasis group than in the controls (p<0.05). Serological markers were found positive in 6 patients with psoriasis and 1 person from the control group. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed in all these persons, with biopsies collected from the duodenum. The diagnosis of CD was reported in only one patient with psoriasis following the pathological examination of the biopsies. Whereas one person of the control group was found to be positive for antigliadin antibody IgA, pathological examination of the duodenal biopsies obtain from this patient were found to be normal. Conclusion Antigliadin IgA prominently increases in patients diagnosed with psoriasis. Patients with psoriasis should be investigated for latent CD and should be followed up. PMID:24003271

  20. Human papillomavirus molecular biology and disease association

    PubMed Central

    Egawa, Nagayasu; Griffin, Heather; Kranjec, Christian; Murakami, Isao

    2015-01-01

    Summary Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) have evolved over millions of years to propagate themselves in a range of different animal species including humans. Viruses that have co‐evolved slowly in this way typically cause chronic inapparent infections, with virion production in the absence of apparent disease. This is the case for many Beta and Gamma HPV types. The Alpha papillomavirus types have however evolved immunoevasion strategies that allow them to cause persistent visible papillomas. These viruses activate the cell cycle as the infected epithelial cell differentiates in order to create a replication competent environment that allows viral genome amplification and packaging into infectious particles. This is mediated by the viral E6, E7, and E5 proteins. High‐risk E6 and E7 proteins differ from their low‐risk counterparts however in being able to drive cell cycle entry in the upper epithelial layers and also to stimulate cell proliferation in the basal and parabasal layers. Deregulated expression of these cell cycle regulators underlies neoplasia and the eventual progression to cancer in individuals who cannot resolve high‐risk HPV infection. Most work to date has focused on the study of high‐risk HPV types such as HPV 16 and 18, which has led to an understanding of the molecular pathways subverted by these viruses. Such approaches will lead to the development of better strategies for disease treatment, including targeted antivirals and immunotherapeutics. Priorities are now focused toward understanding HPV neoplasias at sites other than the cervix (e.g. tonsils, other transformation zones) and toward understanding the mechanisms by which low‐risk HPV types can sometimes give rise to papillomatosis and under certain situations even cancers. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25752814

  1. Infectious diseases associated with complement deficiencies.

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, J E; Densen, P

    1991-01-01

    The complement system consists of both plasma and membrane proteins. The former influence the inflammatory response, immune modulation, and host defense. The latter are complement receptors, which mediate the cellular effects of complement activation, and regulatory proteins, which protect host cells from complement-mediated injury. Complement activation occurs via either the classical or the alternative pathway, which converge at the level of C3 and share a sequence of terminal components. Four aspects of the complement cascade are critical to its function and regulation: (i) activation of the classical pathway, (ii) activation of the alternative pathway, (iii) C3 convertase formation and C3 deposition, and (iv) membrane attack complex assembly and insertion. In general, mechanisms evolved by pathogenic microbes to resist the effects of complement are targeted to these four steps. Because individual complement proteins subserve unique functional activities and are activated in a sequential manner, complement deficiency states are associated with predictable defects in complement-dependent functions. These deficiency states can be grouped by which of the above four mechanisms they disrupt. They are distinguished by unique epidemiologic, clinical, and microbiologic features and are most prevalent in patients with certain rheumatologic and infectious diseases. Ethnic background and the incidence of infection are important cofactors determining this prevalence. Although complement undoubtedly plays a role in host defense against many microbial pathogens, it appears most important in protection against encapsulated bacteria, especially Neisseria meningitidis but also Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and, to a lesser extent, Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The availability of effective polysaccharide vaccines and antibiotics provides an immunologic and chemotherapeutic rationale for preventing and treating infection in patients with these deficiencies. PMID:1889047

  2. [Crohn's disease associated with focal pulmonare lesion].

    PubMed

    Tagle, Martín; Barriga, José; Piñeiro, Andrés

    2003-01-01

    40 year-old male recently diagnosed with Crohn's disease. A routine chest X ray showed a round, well defined opacity in right lung field. A chest CT scan confirmed the finding and also described bronchiectasis. Patient had no respiratory symptoms. He was prescribed with oral sulfasalazine and corticosteroids with rapid improvement of intestinal symptoms as well as resolution of the pulmonary opacity. We describe the clinical presentation of a male newly diagnosed with Crohn's disease who was found to have an asymptomatic pulmonary lesion on imaging studies. Pulmonary complications have been previously described in inflamatory bowel disease being more common in ulcerative colitis than in Crohn's disease; these can involve the lung parenchyma, the tracheobronchial tree, and the pleura. The true prevalence and etiology of these lesions is currently unknown and are not necessarily associated with bowel disease activity. Abnormal pulmonary functions test have been reported during inflammatory bowel disease exacerbations, and although pulmonary findings can present with a variety of symptoms, subclinical presentations have also been described. Pulmonary manifestations are usually steoid-responsive, as was the case in our patients.

  3. [Celiac disease associated with Helicobacter pylori infection].

    PubMed

    Cârdei, E; Moraru, D; Trandafir, Laura; Bozomitu, Laura; Mihăilă, Doina

    2003-01-01

    Celiac disease, also known as gluten-sensitive enteropathy, is an autoimmune enteropathy caused by the ingestion of gluten-containing grains in susceptible subjects. The authors present a 3 years and 5 months old girl diagnosed with celiac disease at 1 year and 5 months old. Initially, the evolution after gluten-free diet was favorable. After 2 years the child presented abdominal pain and anorexia. The IgA antigliadin antibodies had normal values. The gastric biopsy found Helicobacter pylori gastritis. After treatment for Helicobacter pylori eradication the symptoms disappeared.

  4. Infectious diseases associated with molluscan shellfish consumption.

    PubMed Central

    Rippey, S R

    1994-01-01

    A history of shellfish-vectored illnesses (i.e., those associated with consumption of clams, oysters, mussels, and scallops) occurring in the past nine decades is presented. Typhoid fever was a significant public health problem among consumers of raw molluscan shellfish earlier in this century. The development of more effective sewage treatment procedures and the institution of a national program following these outbreaks led to a series of measures which eventually eliminated shellfish-associated typhoid fever. Present-day problems associated with this food source still involve some wastewaterborne bacterial illnesses. However, the principal public health concerns are with wastewater-derived viral pathogens and with bacterial agents of an environmental origin. The nature, occurrence, and magnitude of these public health problems are described. PMID:7834599

  5. Lyme disease associated neuroretinitis - Case report.

    PubMed

    Vanya, Melinda; Fejes, Imre; Jako, Maria; Tula, Areta; Terhes, Gabriella; Janaky, Marta; Bartfai, Gyorgy

    2015-12-01

    We describe a rare case of Lyme disease complicated by unilateral neuroretinitis in the right eye. We report a case of a 27-year-old woman with blurred vision on her right eye. Because of the suspicion of optic neuritis (multiplex sclerosis) neurological examination was ordered. Surprisingly, computer tomography of the brain revealed incomplete empty sella, which generally results not monocular, but bilateral optic nerve swelling. Opthalmological examination (ophthalmoscopy and optical coherence tomography) indicated not only monocular optic nerve, but retinal oedema next to the temporal part of the right optic disk. Visual evoked potentials (VEP) demonstrated no P100 latency delay and mild differences between the amplitudes of the responses of the left and right eye. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) demonstrated the swelling of the optic nerve head and oedematous retina at the temporal part of the disk. Suspicion of an inflammatory cause of visual disturbance blood tests was ordered. Doxycycline treatment was ordered till the result of the blood test arrived. The Western blot and ELISA test were positive for Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato. Following one week corticosteroide and ceftriaxone treatments, the patient displayed a clinical improvement. Unilateral neuroretinitis with optic disk swelling due to neuroborreliosis is a rare complication and in many cases it is difficult to distinguish between inflammatory and ischemic lesions. Further difficulty in the diagnosis can occur when intracranial alterations such as empty sella is demonstrated by CT examination.

  6. Periodontal disease associated to systemic genetic disorders.

    PubMed

    Nualart Grollmus, Zacy Carola; Morales Chávez, Mariana Carolina; Silvestre Donat, Francisco Javier

    2007-05-01

    A number of systemic disorders increase patient susceptibility to periodontal disease, which moreover evolves more rapidly and more aggressively. The underlying factors are mainly related to alterations in immune, endocrine and connective tissue status. These alterations are associated with different pathologies and syndromes that generate periodontal disease either as a primary manifestation or by aggravating a pre-existing condition attributable to local factors. This is where the role of bacterial plaque is subject to debate. In the presence of qualitative or quantitative cellular immune alterations, periodontal disease may manifest early on a severe localized or generalized basis--in some cases related to the presence of plaque and/or specific bacteria (severe congenital neutropenia or infantile genetic agranulocytosis, Chediak-Higiashi syndrome, Down syndrome and Papillon-Lefévre syndrome). In the presence of humoral immune alterations, periodontal damage may result indirectly as a consequence of alterations in other systems. In connective tissue disorders, bacterial plaque and alterations of the periodontal tissues increase patient susceptibility to gingival inflammation and alveolar resorption (Marfan syndrome and Ehler-Danlos syndrome). The management of periodontal disease focuses on the control of infection and bacterial plaque by means of mechanical and chemical methods. Periodontal surgery and even extraction of the most seriously affected teeth have also been suggested. There are variable degrees of consensus regarding the background systemic disorder, as in the case of Chediak-Higiashi syndrome, where antibiotic treatment proves ineffective; in severe congenital neutropenia or infantile genetic agranulocytosis, where antibiotic prophylaxis is suggested; and in Papillon-Lefévre syndrome, where an established treatment protocol is available.

  7. Autoimmune diseases associated with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Arti

    2008-01-01

    Associations of autoimmune diseases with neurofibromatosis type 1 have been rarely described. In the present report, we describe two patients of neurofibromatosis type 1 having an association with vitiligo in one, and alopecia areata and autoimmune thyroiditis in another. The associations of neurofibromatosis type 1 with vitiligo, alopecia areata, and autoimmune thyroiditis have not been reported earlier. Whether these associations reflect a causal relationship with neurofibromatosis type 1 or are coincidental needs to be settled.

  8. Neuromuscular Diseases Associated with HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Robinson-Papp, Jessica; Simpson, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Neuromuscular disorders are common in HIV, occurring at all stages of disease and affecting all parts of the peripheral nervous system. These disorders have diverse etiologies including HIV itself, immune suppression and dysregulation, co-morbid illnesses and infections, and side effects of medications. In this article, we review the following HIV-associated conditions: distal symmetric polyneuropathy, inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, mononeuropathy, mononeuropathy multiplex, autonomic neuropathy, progressive polyradiculopathy due to cytomegalovirus, herpes zoster, myopathy and other rarer disorders. PMID:19771594

  9. Small and Innovative Molecules as New Strategy to Revert MDR.

    PubMed

    Zinzi, Laura; Capparelli, Elena; Cantore, Mariangela; Contino, Marialessandra; Leopoldo, Marcello; Colabufo, Nicola Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a complex phenomenon principally due to the overexpression of some transmembrane proteins belonging to the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter family. Among these transporters, P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is mostly involved in MDR and its overexpression is the major cause of cancer therapy failure. The classical approach used to overcome MDR is the co-administration of a P-gp inhibitor and the classic antineoplastic drugs, although the results were often unsatisfactory. Different classes of P-gp ligands have been developed and, among them, Tariquidar has been extensively studied both in vitro and in vivo. Although Tariquidar has been considered for several years as the lead compound for the development of P-gp inhibitors, recent studies demonstrated it to be a substrate and inhibitor, in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, Tariquidar structure-activity relationship studies were difficult to carry out because of the complexity of the structure that does not allow establishing the role of each moiety for P-gp activity. For this purpose, SMALL molecules bearing different scaffolds such as tetralin, biphenyl, arylthiazole, furoxane, furazan have been developed. Many of these ligands have been tested both in in vitro assays and in in vivo PET studies. These preliminary evaluations lead to obtain a library of P-gp interacting agents useful to conjugate chemotherapeutic agents displaying reduced pharmacological activity and appropriate small molecules. These molecules could get over the limits due to the antineoplastic-P-gp inhibitor co-administration since pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles are related to a dual innovative drug.

  10. An antibody to the aggregated synthetic prion protein peptide (PrP106-126) selectively recognizes disease-associated prion protein (PrP) from human brain specimens.

    PubMed

    Jones, Michael; Wight, Darren; McLoughlin, Victoria; Norrby, Katherine; Ironside, James W; Connolly, John G; Farquhar, Christine F; MacGregor, Ian R; Head, Mark W

    2009-04-01

    Human prion diseases are characterized by the conversion of the normal host cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into an abnormal misfolded form [disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc))]. Antibodies that are capable of distinguishing between PrP(C) and PrP(Sc) may prove to be useful, not only for the diagnosis of these diseases, but also for a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in disease pathogenesis. In an attempt to produce such antibodies, we immunized mice with an aggregated peptide spanning amino acid residues 106 to 126 of human PrP (PrP106-126). We were able to isolate and single cell clone a hybridoma cell line (P1:1) which secreted an IgM isotype antibody [monoclonal antibody (mAb P1:1)] that recognized the aggregated, but not the monomeric form of the immunogen. When used in immunoprecipitation assays, the antibody did not recognize normal PrP(C) from non-prion disease brain specimens, but did selectively immunoprecipitate full-length PrP(Sc) from cases of variant and sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker disease. These results suggest that P1:1 recognizes an epitope formed during the structural rearrangement or aggregation of the PrP that is common to the major PrP(Sc) types found in the most common forms of human prion disease.

  11. Role of cholesterol and lipid organization in disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxfield, Frederick R.; Tabas, Ira

    2005-12-01

    Membrane lipids are essential for biological functions ranging from membrane trafficking to signal transduction. The composition of lipid membranes influences their organization and properties, so it is not surprising that disorders in lipid metabolism and transport have a role in human disease. Significant recent progress has enhanced our understanding of the molecular and cellular basis of lipid-associated disorders such as Tangier disease, Niemann-Pick disease type C and atherosclerosis. These insights have also led to improved understanding of normal physiology.

  12. NPC2 — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    NPC2, a secreted protein containing a lipid recognition domain, may function in regulating the transport of cholesterol through the late endosomal/lysosomal system. NPC2 may be involved in the regulation of the lipid composition of sperm membranes during the maturation in the epididymis. Mutations in this gene have been associated with Niemann-Pick disease, type C2 and frontal lobe atrophy.

  13. Genetic variation at the NPC1L1 gene locus, plasma lipoproteins, and heart disease risk in the elderly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 protein (NPC1L1) plays a critical role in intestinal cholesterol absorption. Our objective was to examine whether five variants (-133A>G, -18A>C, L272L, V1296V, and U3_28650A>G) at the NPC1L1 gene have effects on lipid levels, prevalence, and incidence of coronary heart diseas...

  14. Cutaneous and neurologic disease associated with HTLV-I infection.

    PubMed

    Sharata, H H; Colvin, J H; Fujiwara, K; Goldman, B; Hashimoto, K

    1997-05-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) is the etiologic agent of HTLV-I associated myelopathy (HAM)/tropical spastic paresis (TSP), and adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). ATLL has been associated with HTLV-I in the southeastern United States. However, to our knowledge, no case reports of HAM/TSP in association with ATLL occurring in the United States have been described. We describe a 40-year-old black woman with a 10-year history of recalcitrant psoriasiform eruption and erythrodermic flares. Medical history is additionally significant for a 2-year history of HTLV-I-associated myelopathy and lower extremity spastic paresis. Polymerase chain reaction with Southern blot analysis was used to detect HTLV-I proviral genome from frozen skin biopsy specimens and peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

  15. Selective hyposmia in Parkinson disease: association with hippocampal dopamine activity.

    PubMed

    Bohnen, Nicolaas I; Gedela, Satyanarayana; Herath, Priyantha; Constantine, Gregory M; Moore, Robert Y

    2008-12-05

    Olfactory dysfunction is common in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) and has been attributed to early pathological deposition of Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites in primary olfactory centers. However, olfactory deficits do not always worsen over time despite progression of disease raising the possibility of additional pathobiological mechanisms contributing to olfactory functions in PD, such as changes in olfactory neurotransmitter functions. Neurotransmitter changes, such as altered dopaminergic status, may also better explain the selective nature of odor identification deficits in PD. Proper odor identification depends on higher order structures, such as the hippocampus, for olfactory cognitive or memory processing. Using the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT), we previously identified three odors (banana, licorice, dill pickle, labeled as UPSIT-3) that PD subjects most frequently failed to recognize compared to age- and gender-matched controls. We also identified six odors that were equally successfully identified by controls and PD subjects (NPD-Olf6). A ratio of UPSIT-3 divided by NPD-Olf6 scores provides another descriptor of selective hyposmia in PD ("olfactory ratio"). In this study we investigated the pathophysiology of hyposmia in PD using dopamine transporter (DAT) PET. Twenty-nine PD patients (Hoehn and Yahr stages I-III; 7f/22m; age 60.2+/-10.8) underwent olfactory testing using the UPSIT and [(11)C]beta-CFT DAT PET. DAT binding potentials (BP) were assessed in the hippocampus, amygdala, ventral and dorsal striatum. We found that correlation coefficients between total UPSIT scores and regional brain DAT BP were highest for the hippocampus (Rs=0.54, P=0.002) and lower for the amygdala (Rs=0.44, P=0.02), ventral (Rs=0.48, P=0.008) and dorsal striatum (Rs=0.39, P=0.03). Correlations were most significant for the selective hyposmia measures and hippocampal DAT: UPSIT-3 (Rs=0.65, P=0.0001) and the olfactory ratio (Rs=0.74, P<0.0001). We conclude that selective hyposmia in PD is more robustly correlated with hippocampal rather than amygdala, ventral or dorsal striatal dopamine innervation as shown by DAT binding. These findings indicate that mesolimbic dopamine innervation of the hippocampus may be a determinant of selective hyposmia in PD.

  16. Inflammatory bowel disease associated neoplasia: A surgeon’s perspective

    PubMed Central

    Althumairi, Azah A; Lazarev, Mark G; Gearhart, Susan L

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). The risk is known to increase with longer duration of the disease, family history of CRC, and history of primary sclerosing cholangitis. The diagnosis of the neoplastic changes associated with IBD is difficult owing to the heterogeneous endoscopic appearance and inter-observer variability of the pathological diagnosis. Screening and surveillance guidelines have been established which aim for early detection of neoplasia. Several surgical options are available for the treatment of IBD-associated neoplasia. Patients’ morbidities, risk factors for CRC, degree and the extent of neoplasia must be considered in choosing the surgical treatment. A multidisciplinary team including the surgeon, gastroenterologist, pathologist, and the patient who has a clear understanding of the nature of their disease is needed to optimize outcomes. PMID:26811640

  17. Fluoride-related bone disease associated with habitual tea consumption.

    PubMed

    Hallanger Johnson, Julie E; Kearns, Ann E; Doran, Patric M; Khoo, Teck Kim; Wermers, Robert A

    2007-06-01

    Acquired osteosclerosis is a rare disorder of bone formation but an important consideration in adults with sclerotic bones or elevated bone density results. In such patients, malignancy, hepatitis C, and fluorosis should all be considered when making a diagnosis. We describe 4 patients evaluated at our Metabolic Bone Disease Clinic from May 1, 1997, to July 1, 2006, whose bone disorders resulted from chronic fluoride exposure due to excessive tea intake. Three of these patients had toxic serum fluoride levels (> 15 micromol/L). Although the clinical presentation of the patients varied, all 4 had an unexpectedly elevated spine bone mineral density that was proportionately higher than the bone mineral density at the hip. Other clinical features included gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, and weight loss; lower extremity pain sometimes associated with stress fractures of the lower extremities; renal insufficiency; and elevated alkaline phosphatase levels. Readily available, tea often contains high levels of fluoride. Obsessive-compulsive drinking behaviors and renal insufficiency may predispose to excessive fluoride consumption and accumulation. The current cases show that fluoride-related bone disease is an important clinical consideration in patients with dense bones or gastrointestinal symptoms and a history of excessive tea consumption. Furthermore, fluoride excess should be considered in all patients with a history of excessive tea consumption, especially due to its insidious nature and nonspecific clinical presentation.

  18. SLC6 Transporters: Structure, Function, Regulation, Disease Association and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Bala, Pramod Akula; Foster, James; Carvelli, Lucia; Henry, L. Keith

    2012-01-01

    The SLC6 family of secondary active transporters are integral membrane solute carrier proteins characterized by the Na+-dependent translocation of small amino acid or amino acid-like substrates. SLC6 transporters, which include the serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, GABA, taurine, creatine, as well as amino acid transporters, are associated with a number of human diseases and disorders making this family a critical target for therapeutic development. In addition, several members of this family are directly involved in the action of drugs of abuse such as cocaine, amphetamines, and ecstasy. Recent advances providing structural insight into this family have vastly accelerated our ability to study these proteins and their involvement in complex biological processes. PMID:23506866

  19. Focal epithelial hyperplasia (Heck disease) associated with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Viraben, R; Aquilina, C; Brousset, P; Bazex, J

    1996-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) of the oral mucosa occurring in a HIV-infected man is described. Molecular biology disclosed an HPV-32 type in oral lesions. The association of FEH and AIDS is uncommon although many HPV subtypes may manifest during HIV infection.

  20. Chronic granulomatous disease associated with atypical Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki-Nakashimada, M A; Ramírez-Vargas, N; De Rubens-Figueroa, J

    2008-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an infrequent inherited disorder characterized by recurrent infections and abnormal granuloma formation. Patients with CGD have an exuberant inflammatory response and an increased risk of developing autoimmunity. We present the case of a 1-year-old boy with CGD who developed several of the characteristic clinical features of Kawasaki Disease. His illness responded to intravenous immunoglobulin, aspirin, and corticosteroids.

  1. Parsing the Interferon Transcriptional Network and Its Disease Associations.

    PubMed

    Mostafavi, Sara; Yoshida, Hideyuki; Moodley, Devapregasan; LeBoité, Hugo; Rothamel, Katherine; Raj, Towfique; Ye, Chun Jimmie; Chevrier, Nicolas; Zhang, Shen-Ying; Feng, Ting; Lee, Mark; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Clark, James D; Hegen, Martin; Telliez, Jean-Baptiste; Hacohen, Nir; De Jager, Philip L; Regev, Aviv; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe

    2016-01-28

    Type 1 interferon (IFN) is a key mediator of organismal responses to pathogens, eliciting prototypical "interferon signature genes" that encode antiviral and inflammatory mediators. For a global view of IFN signatures and regulatory pathways, we performed gene expression and chromatin analyses of the IFN-induced response across a range of immunocyte lineages. These distinguished ISGs by cell-type specificity, kinetics, and sensitivity to tonic IFN and revealed underlying changes in chromatin configuration. We combined 1,398 human and mouse datasets to computationally infer ISG modules and their regulators, validated by genetic analysis in both species. Some ISGs are controlled by Stat1/2 and Irf9 and the ISRE DNA motif, but others appeared dependent on non-canonical factors. This regulatory framework helped to interpret JAK1 blockade pharmacology, different clusters being affected under tonic or IFN-stimulated conditions, and the IFN signatures previously associated with human diseases, revealing unrecognized subtleties in disease footprints, as affected by human ancestry.

  2. Jacob's disease associated with temporomandibular joint dysfunction: a case report.

    PubMed

    Capote, Ana; Rodríguez, Francisco J; Blasco, Ana; Muñoz, Mario F

    2005-01-01

    Jacob's disease is regarded a rare condition in which a joint formation is established between an enlarged mandibular coronoid process and the inner aspect of the zygomatic body. Chronic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disk displacement has been proposed as etiological factor of coronoid process enlargement. We present a 23-year-old woman with long-standing TMJ dysfunction and restricted interincisal opening, who developed a progressive zygomatic asymmetry. The patient underwent treatment by intraoral coronoidectomy and homolateral TMJ arthroscopy in the same surgery. The histopathological diagnosis of the coronoid sample was cartilage-capped exostoses with presence of articular fibrous cartilage. Although the low prevalence of this entity, it should be considered as a possible diagnosis in patients with progressive limitation of mouth opening, although a TMJ syndrome may be present as a cause of this entity.

  3. Cerebrovascular disease associated with Aarskog-Scott syndrome.

    PubMed

    Diluna, Michael L; Amankulor, Nduka M; Johnson, Michele H; Gunel, Murat

    2007-05-01

    Faciogenital dysplasia, also known as Aarskog-Scott syndrome (AAS), is an X-linked dominant congenital disorder characterized by multiple facial, musculoskeletal, dental, neurological and urogenital abnormalities, ocular manifestations, congenital heart defects, low IQ and behavioral problems. Here we describe an unusual presentation of dysplastic carotid artery, basilar artery malformation or occlusion and posterior circulation aneurysm in a 13-year-old male with AAS.

  4. [Liver disease associated with hereditary defects of hepatobiliary transporters].

    PubMed

    Wendum, Dominique

    2010-12-01

    The identification of biliary tranporters has enhanced our understanding of bile formation and some liver diseases. In this review, we first describe the main hepatobiliary transporters and their function. Then, some liver diseases related to mutations of biliary tranporters (FIC1/ATP8B1, BSEP/ABCB11, MDR3 /ABCB4 and MRP2/ABCC2) will be described with a focus on the pathological aspects. These diseases include progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC), benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis (BRIC), intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy, Dubin-Johnson's syndrome and low phospholipid associated cholelithiasis (LPAC).

  5. Gender Differences in Behçet's Disease Associated Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Ucar-Comlekoglu, Didar; Sen, H. Nida

    2014-01-01

    Behçet's disease is a systemic vasculitis of unknown etiology, characterized by oral and genital ulceration, skin lesions, and uveitis as well as vascular, central nervous system, and gastrointestinal system involvement. It is prevalent in the Middle East, Mediterranean, and Eastern Asia. The aim of this review is to evaluate the gender differences in clinical manifestations of Behçet's disease, treatment responses, mortality, and morbidity. Behçet's disease has been reported to be more prevalent in males from certain geographic regions and particular ethnic groups; however, recent reports indicate more even gender distribution across the world. There are gender differences in clinical manifestations and severity of the disease. Ocular manifestations, vascular involvement, and neurologic symptoms are more frequently reported in male patients whereas oral and genital ulcers, skin lesions, and arthritis occur more frequently in female patients. The disease can have a more severe course in males, and overall mortality rate is significantly higher among young male patients. PMID:24864195

  6. Skin diseases associated with Agent Orange and other organochlorine exposures.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Andrew T; Kaffenberger, Benjamin H; Keller, Richard A; Elston, Dirk M

    2016-01-01

    Organochlorine exposure is an important cause of cutaneous and systemic toxicity. Exposure has been associated with industrial accidents, intentional poisoning, and the use of defoliants, such as Agent Orange in the Vietnam War. Although long-term health effects are systematically reviewed by the Institute of Medicine, skin diseases are not comprehensively assessed. This represents an important practice gap as patients can present with cutaneous findings. This article provides a systematic review of the cutaneous manifestations of known mass organochlorine exposures in military and industrial settings with the goal of providing clinically useful recommendations for dermatologists seeing patients inquiring about organochlorine effects. Patients with a new diagnosis of chloracne, porphyria cutanea tarda, cutaneous lymphomas (non-Hodgkin lymphoma), and soft-tissue sarcomas including dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans and leiomyosarcomas should be screened for a history of Vietnam service or industrial exposure. Inconclusive evidence exists for an increased risk of other skin diseases in Vietnam veterans exposed to Agent Orange including benign fatty tumors, melanomas, nonmelanoma skin cancers, milia, eczema, dyschromias, disturbance of skin sensation, and rashes not otherwise specified. Affected veterans should be informed of the uncertain data in those cases. Referral to Department of Veterans Affairs for disability assessment is indicated for conditions with established associations.

  7. Arthropod-borne diseases associated with political and social disorder.

    PubMed

    Brouqui, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    The living conditions and the crowded situations of the homeless, war refugees, or victims of a natural disaster provide ideal conditions for the spread of lice, fleas, ticks, flies and mites. The consequence of arthropod infestation in these situations is underestimated. Along with louse-borne infections such as typhus, trench fever, and relapsing fever, the relationship between Acinetobacter spp.-infected lice and bacteremia in the homeless is not clear. Murine typhus, tungiasis, and myiasis are likely underestimated, and there has been a reemergence of bed bugs. Attempted eradication of the body louse, despite specific measures, has been disappointing, and infections with Bartonella quintana continue to be reported. The efficacy of ivermectin in eradicating the human body louse, although the effect is not sustained, might provide new therapeutic approaches. Arthropod-borne diseases continue to emerge within the deprived population. Public health programs should be engaged rapidly to control these pests and reduce the incidence of these transmissible diseases.

  8. Predicting Gene-Disease Associations Using Multiple Species Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-20

    regulatory networks from only positive and unlabeled data. BMC Bioinformatics, 11, 2010. [4] Ernesto Estrada and Desmond J. Higham. Network properties revealed...David Warde-Farley, Chris Grouios, and Quaid Morris . GeneMANIA: a real-time multiple association network integration algorithm for predicting gene

  9. Diseases Associated with Defective Responses to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    O’Driscoll, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Within the last decade, multiple novel congenital human disorders have been described with genetic defects in known and/or novel components of several well-known DNA repair and damage response pathways. Examples include disorders of impaired nucleotide excision repair, DNA double-strand and single-strand break repair, as well as compromised DNA damage-induced signal transduction including phosphorylation and ubiquitination. These conditions further reinforce the importance of multiple genome stability pathways for health and development in humans. Furthermore, these conditions inform our knowledge of the biology of the mechanics of genome stability and in some cases provide potential routes to help exploit these pathways therapeutically. Here, I will review a selection of these exciting findings from the perspective of the disorders themselves, describing how they were identified, how genotype informs phenotype, and how these defects contribute to our growing understanding of genome stability pathways. PMID:23209155

  10. Mitochondrial dysfunction in neurodegenerative diseases associated with copper imbalance.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Luisa; Lombardo, Marco F; Ciriolo, Maria R; Rotilio, Giuseppe

    2004-03-01

    Copper is an essential transition metal ion for the function of key metabolic enzymes, but its uncontrolled redox reactivity is source of reactive oxygen species. Therefore a network of transporters strictly controls the trafficking of copper in living systems. Deficit, excess, or aberrant coordination of copper are conditions that may be detrimental, especially for neuronal cells, which are particularly sensitive to oxidative stress. Indeed, the genetic disturbances of copper homeostasis, Menkes' and Wilson's diseases, are associated with neurodegeneration. Furthermore, copper interacts with the proteins that are the hallmarks of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, prion diseases, and familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In all cases, copper-mediated oxidative stress is linked to mitochondrial dysfunction, which is a common feature of neurodegeneration. In particular we recently demonstrated that in copper deficiency, mitochondrial function is impaired due to decreased activity of cytochrome c oxidase, leading to production of reactive oxygen species, which in turn triggers mitochondria-mediated apoptotic neurodegeneration.

  11. Target SNP selection in complex disease association studies

    PubMed Central

    Wjst, Matthias

    2004-01-01

    Background The massive amount of SNP data stored at public internet sites provides unprecedented access to human genetic variation. Selecting target SNP for disease-gene association studies is currently done more or less randomly as decision rules for the selection of functional relevant SNPs are not available. Results We implemented a computational pipeline that retrieves the genomic sequence of target genes, collects information about sequence variation and selects functional motifs containing SNPs. Motifs being considered are gene promoter, exon-intron structure, AU-rich mRNA elements, transcription factor binding motifs, cryptic and enhancer splice sites together with expression in target tissue. As a case study, 396 genes on chromosome 6p21 in the extended HLA region were selected that contributed nearly 20,000 SNPs. By computer annotation ~2,500 SNPs in functional motifs could be identified. Most of these SNPs are disrupting transcription factor binding sites but only those introducing new sites had a significant depressing effect on SNP allele frequency. Other decision rules concern position within motifs, the validity of SNP database entries, the unique occurrence in the genome and conserved sequence context in other mammalian genomes. Conclusion Only 10% of all gene-based SNPs have sequence-predicted functional relevance making them a primary target for genotyping in association studies. PMID:15248903

  12. Diseases associated with asbestos exposure. Diagnostic perspectives in forensic pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrenreich, T.; Selikoff, I.J.

    1983-03-01

    Asbestos, a fibrous mineral, has unique physical and chemical properties, including resistance to heat, acids, and other chemicals; flexibility; and great tensile strength. The fibers subdivide into unit fibrils of molecular dimensions, resulting in a vast mineral surface area which has a direct bearing on its unusual features and its numerous applications. Its biological effects, which include fibrogenesis and carcinogenesis, may be related to the cellular reaction, to its large specific surface, or to the size and shape of the fibers. Its oncogenic action may be multiplied by other carcinogens, principally cigarette smoking. There is clinical, pathologic, and epidemiologic evidence that exposure to asbestos, following a long latent period, constitutes an important health hazard. Direct occupational exposure, followed by a long lapsed period after the initial exposure, is associated with pleural plaques and pleural effusion, pulmonary parenchymal fibrosis (asbestosis), pulmonary carcinoma, pleural and peritoneal mesothelioma, and other neoplasms. Indirect exposure may also entail an increased risk of lung disease or mesothelioma or both. Medicolegal investigation of suspected cases includes a lifetime occupational history, clinical history including smoking habits, radiological findings, clinical evidence of asbestosis, and may require detection of asbestos tissue burden.

  13. Atypical Ormond's disease associated with bile duct stricture mimicking cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Quante, Michael; Appenrodt, Beate; Randerath, Simone; Wolff, Martin; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Sauerbruch, Tilman

    2009-01-01

    A 55-year-old woman with suspected hilar cholangiocarcinoma presented with jaundice and dilated intrahepatic bile ducts owing to high-grade hepatic duct confluence stenosis. The suspected tumour and the entire extrahepatic bile duct system were resected and Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy was performed. Histological investigations showed perihepatic fibrosis but no signs of malignancy. One year later the patient developed bilateral hydronephrosis caused by ureteral obstruction. Since the patient had a gynaecological history of widespread inflammation, she was referred for transabdominal operative ureterolysis combined with hysterectomy and adnexectomy. Histological investigations as well as fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and computed tomography (CT) findings were compatible with retroperitoneal fibrosis (Ormond's disease). Treatment with tamoxifen was initiated. To the best of our knowledge, only a few cases of intraperitoneal fibroses mimicking cholangiocarcinoma followed by the typical symptoms of retroperitoneal Ormond's disease have been reported.

  14. A new causal model of dental diseases associated with endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Drangsholt, M T

    1998-07-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a serious disease that is associated with dental diseases and treatment. The objective of this study was to summarize the epidemiological information about IE and reevaluate previous causal models in light of this evidence. The world biomedical literature was searched from 1930 to 1996 for descriptive and analytic epidemiological studies of IE. Multiple searching strategies were performed on 9 databases, including MEDLINE, CATLINE, and WORLDCAT. Results show that: 1) the incidence of IE varies between 0.70 to 6.8 per 100,000 person-years: 2) the incidence of IE increases 20 fold with advancing age: 3) over 50% of all IE cases are not associated with either an obvious procedural or infectious event 3 months prior to developing symptoms; 4) about 8% of all IE cases are associated with periodontal or dental disease without a dental procedure: 5) the time from the diagnosis of heart valve deformities to the development of IE approaches 20 years: 6) the median time from identifiable procedures to the onset of IE symptoms is about 2 to 4 weeks: 7) the risk of IE after a dental procedure is probably in the range of 1 per 3,000 to 5,000 procedures: and 8) over 80% of all IE cases are acquired in the community, and the bacteria are part of the host's endogenous flora. The synthesis of these data demonstrates that IE is a disorder with the epidemiological picture of a chronic disease such as cancer, instead of an acute infectious disease, with a long latent period and possibly several definable intermediates or stages. A new causal model is proposed that includes early bacteremias that may "prime" the endothelial surface of the heart valves over many years, and a late bacteremia over days to weeks that allows adherence and colonization of the valve, resulting in the characteristic fulminant infection.

  15. Biology and disease associations of Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, D H

    2001-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human herpesvirus which infects almost all of the world's population subclinically during childhood and thereafter remains in the body for life. The virus colonizes antibody-producing (B) cells, which, as relatively long-lived resting cells, are an ideal site for long-term residence. Here EBV evades recognition and destruction by cytotoxic T cells. EBV is passed to naive hosts in saliva, but how the virus gains access to this route of transmission is not entirely clear. EBV carries a set of latent genes that, when expressed in resting B cells, induce cell proliferation and thereby increase the chances of successful virus colonization of the B-cell system during primary infection and the establishment of persistence. However, if this cell proliferation is not controlled, or if it is accompanied by additional genetic events within the infected cell, it can lead to malignancy. Thus EBV acts as a step in the evolution of an ever-increasing list of malignancies which are broadly of lymphoid or epithelial cell origin. In some of these, such as B-lymphoproliferative disease in the immunocompromised host, the role of the virus is central and well defined; in others, such as Burkitt's lymphoma, essential cofactors have been identified which act in concert with EBV in the evolution of the malignant clone. However, in several diseases in which the presence of EBV has more recently been discovered, the role of the virus is unclear. This review describes recent views on the EBV life cycle and its interlinks with normal B-cell biology, and discusses how this interrelationship may be upset and result in EBV-associated disease. PMID:11313005

  16. SLC6 transporters: structure, function, regulation, disease association and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Pramod, Akula Bala; Foster, James; Carvelli, Lucia; Henry, L Keith

    2013-01-01

    The SLC6 family of secondary active transporters are integral membrane solute carrier proteins characterized by the Na(+)-dependent translocation of small amino acid or amino acid-like substrates. SLC6 transporters, which include the serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, GABA, taurine, creatine, as well as amino acid transporters, are associated with a number of human diseases and disorders making this family a critical target for therapeutic development. In addition, several members of this family are directly involved in the action of drugs of abuse such as cocaine, amphetamines, and ecstasy. Recent advances providing structural insight into this family have vastly accelerated our ability to study these proteins and their involvement in complex biological processes.

  17. Characterization of Antibody Specific for Disease Associated Prion Protein

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-01

    Distribution Unlimited 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 Words) Prion diseases are characterized by the presence of the abnormal scrapie isoform of prion protein...areas of Task 2. Our main research findings have been published recently (Zou W, Zheng J, Gray D, Gambetti P, Chen SG. Antibody to DNA detects scrapie ...chemiluminescence. (B) Immunocapture of PrP by OCD4 following incubation with nuclease and salmon DNA. 2 1 I Scrapie -infected hamster BH (2 pi each) was either

  18. Liver disease associated with occupational exposure to the solvent dimethylformamide

    SciTech Connect

    Redlich, C.A.; Beckett, W.S.; Sparer, J.; Barwick, K.W.; Riely, C.A.; Miller, H.; Sigal, S.L.; Shalat, S.L.; Cullen, M.R.

    1988-05-01

    An attempt is made to characterize an outbreak of liver disease among workers in a fabric coating factory; and to determine the outbreak's cause and natural history and strategies for clinical recognition, treatment, and prevention. Fifty-eight of sixty-six workers participated in the study. All had standard liver function tests at least once. Forty-six workers completed a questionnaire; 27 had more extensive clinical evaluation for recognized liver abnormalities. A plant-wide outbreak of liver disease was recognized after a new employee presented with signs and symptoms of hepatitis. Evaluation of the worksite showed that dimethylformamide, a widely used industrial solvent and known hepatotoxin, was being used to coat fabric in poorly ventilated areas without appropriate skin protection. No other major hepatotoxic exposure was identified. Overall, 36 of 58 (62%) workers tested had elevations of either aspartate aminotransferase (AST) or alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels. Enzyme abnormalities occurred almost exclusively in production workers (35 of 46 were abnormal), whereas only 1 of 12 nonproduction workers showed any elevations in enzyme levels (P less than 0.0001). Serologic tests excluded known infectious causes of hepatitis in all but 2 workers and changes characteristic of toxic liver injury were confirmed by histologic examinations of biopsy specimens from 4 workers. The ratio of AST to ALT levels was one or less in all but 1 worker. After modification of work practices and removal of workers most severely affected from exposure, improvement in liver enzyme abnormalities and symptoms in most patients were seen, although some patients showed persistent elevations of enzyme levels.

  19. Zoonotic diseases associated with reptiles and amphibians: an update.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Mark A

    2011-09-01

    Reptiles and amphibians are popular as pets. There are increased concerns among public health officials because of the zoonotic potential associated with these animals. Encounters with reptiles and amphibians are also on the rise in the laboratory setting and with wild animals; in both of these practices, there is also an increased likelihood for exposure to zoonotic pathogens. It is important that veterinarians remain current with the literature as it relates to emerging and reemerging zoonotic diseases attributed to reptiles and amphibians so that they can protect themselves, their staff, and their clients from potential problems.

  20. End-stage renal disease associated with prophylactic lithium treatment.

    PubMed

    Aiff, Harald; Attman, Per-Ola; Aurell, Mattias; Bendz, Hans; Schön, Staffan; Svedlund, Jan

    2014-04-01

    The primary aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of lithium associated end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and to compare the relative risk of ESRD in lithium users versus non-lithium users. Second, the role of lithium in the pathogenesis of ESRD was evaluated. We used the Swedish Renal Registry to search for lithium-treated patients with ESRD among 2644 patients with chronic renal replacement therapy (RRT)-either dialysis or transplantation, within two defined geographical areas in Sweden with 2.8 million inhabitants. The prevalence date was December 31, 2010. We found 30 ESRD patients with a history of lithium treatment. ESRD with RRT was significantly more prevalent among lithium users than among non-lithium users (p<0.001). The prevalence of ESRD with RRT in the lithium user population was 15.0‰ (95% CI 9.7-20.3), and close to two percent of the RRT population were lithium users. The relative risk of ESRD with RRT in the lithium user population compared with the general population was 7.8 (95% CI 5.4-11.1). Out of those 30 patients, lithium use was classified, based on chart reviews, as being the sole (n=14) or main (n=10) cause of ESRD in 24 cases. Their mean age at the start of RRT was 66 years (46-82), their mean time on lithium 27 years (12-39), and 22 of them had been on lithium for 15 years or more. We conclude that lithium-associated ESRD is an uncommon but not rare complication of lithium treatment.

  1. [Celiac disease associated with major thalassemia. A case report].

    PubMed

    Mangiagli, A; Campisi, S

    1996-09-01

    The spectrum of clinical manifestations of coeliac disease, the most common chronic intestinal disorder in children, has widened considerably over the past years and new associations with other diseases, both immunological and non-immunological, have been described. AGA and EMA have proved to be an efficient screening method both in populations with gastrointestinal pathologies and in groups of pauci- or even asymptomatic subjects. The clinical picture of beta-thalassemia has gradually altered over the years owing to improved treatment. However, growth is still affected in a considerable proportion of thalassemic patients. A number of hormonal and other causes, combined in varying ways, contribute to determining this clinical condition. The authors report a case of coeliac disease in an adolescent with thalassemia major characterised by anorexia, arrest of weight gain and low stature. The identification of a new association between coeliac disease and thalassemia major highlights the need to search for this pathology in all thalassemic patients who present scarce growth in stature and weight.

  2. Laparoscopic Ileocolic Resection for Crohn's Disease Associated With Midgut Malrotation

    PubMed Central

    Biancone, Livia; Tema, Giorgia; Porokhnavets, Kristina; Tesauro, Manfredi; Gaspari, Achille L.; Sica, Giuseppe S.

    2014-01-01

    Midgut malrotation is an anomaly of fetal intestinal rotation. Its incidence in adults is rare. A case of midgut malrotation in a 51-year-old man with complicated Crohn's disease of the terminal ileum is presented. Symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment are reviewed. Preoperative workup led to correct surgical planning that ultimately allowed a successful laparoscopic resection. PMID:25419109

  3. Connective Tissue Disease-Associated Interstitial Lung Diseases: Unresolved Issues.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Irene Jarana; Lee, Joyce S

    2016-06-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) complicating connective tissue disorders, such as scleroderma and rheumatoid arthritis, is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Progress has been made in our understanding of these collective diseases; however, there are still many unanswered questions. In this review, we describe the current views on epidemiology, clinical presentation, treatment, and prognosis in patients with connective tissue disease (CTD)-associated ILD. We also highlight several areas that remain unresolved and in need of further investigation, including interstitial pneumonia with autoimmune features, histopathologic phenotype, and pharmacologic management. A multidisciplinary and multidimensional approach to diagnosis, management, and investigation of CTD-associated ILD patients is essential to advance our understanding of the epidemiology and pathobiology of this challenging group of diseases.

  4. Genetic Susceptibility to Interstitial Lung Disease Associated with Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Tochimoto, Akiko; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Yamanaka, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a connective tissue disease that is characterized by tissue fibrosis, microvasculopathy, and autoimmunity. Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a common complication of SSc and is one of the frequent causes of mortality in SSc. Although the exact etiology of SSc remains unknown, clinical and experimental investigations have suggested that genetic and environmental factors are relevant to the pathogenesis of SSc and SSc-ILD. More than 30 genes have been identified as susceptibility loci for SSc, most of which are involved in immune regulation and inflammation. It is thought that the key pathogenesis of SSc-ILD is caused by the release of profibrotic mediators such as transforming growth factor β1 and connective tissue growth factor from lung cells induced by a persistent damage. This review presents the genetic susceptibility to SSc-ILD, including human leukocyte antigen and non-human leukocyte antigen genes, especially focusing on connective tissue growth factor. PMID:26997879

  5. Cardiovascular disease associated with human immunodeficiency virus: a review.

    PubMed

    Costa, Luísa Amado; Almeida, Ana G

    2015-01-01

    The cardiovascular manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection have changed significantly following the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimens. On one hand, HAART has altered the course of HIV disease, with longer survival of HIV-infected patients, and cardiovascular complications of HIV infection such as myocarditis have been reduced. On the other hand, HAART is associated with an increase in the prevalence of both peripheral and coronary arterial disease. As longevity increases in HIV-infected individuals, long-term effects, such as cardiovascular disease, are emerging as leading health issues in this population. In the present review article, we discuss HIV-associated cardiovascular disease, focusing on epidemiology, etiopathogenesis, diagnosis, prognosis, management and therapy. Cardiovascular involvement in treatment-naive patients is still important in situations such as non-adherence to treatment, late initiation of treatment, and/or limited access to HAART in developing countries. We therefore describe the cardiovascular consequences in treatment-naive patients and the potential effect of antiretroviral treatment on their regression, as well as the metabolic and cardiovascular implications of HAART regimens in HIV-infected individuals.

  6. Advances in paediatric pulmonary vascular disease associated with bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Rossor, Thomas; Greenough, Anne

    2015-02-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a common finding in infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). The aim of this review is to describe recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of PH and discuss whether they will benefit infants and children with BPD related PH. Echocardiography remains the mainstay of diagnosis but has limitations, further developments in diagnostic techniques and identification of biomarkers are required. There are many potential therapies for PH associated with BPD. Inhaled nitric oxide has been shown to improve short term outcomes only. Sidenafil in resource limited settings was shown in three randomized trials to significantly reduce mortality. The efficacy of other therapies including prostacyclin, PDE3 inhibitors and endothelin receptor blockers has only been reported in case reports or case series. Randomized controlled trials with long term follow up are required to appropriately assess the efficacy of therapies aimed at improving the outcome of children with PH.

  7. Hirschsprung disease, associated syndromes, and genetics: a review

    PubMed Central

    Amiel, J.; Lyonnet, S.

    2001-01-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR, aganglionic megacolon) is the main genetic cause of functional intestinal obstruction with an incidence of 1/5000 live births. This developmental disorder is a neurocristopathy and is characterised by the absence of the enteric ganglia along a variable length of the intestine. In the last decades, the development of surgical approaches has dramatically decreased mortality and morbidity, which has allowed the emergence of familial cases. HSCR appeared to be a multifactorial malformation with low, sex dependent penetrance and variable expression according to the length of the aganglionic segment, suggesting the involvement of one or more gene(s) with low penetrance. So far, eight genes have been found to be involved in HSCR. This frequent congenital malformation now stands as a model for genetic disorders with complex patterns of inheritance.


Keywords: Hirschsprung disease; aganglionic megacolon; genetics PMID:11694544

  8. Characterization of disease-associated N-linked glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuan; Zhang, Hui

    2013-02-01

    N-linked glycoproteins play important roles in biological processes, including cell-to-cell recognition, growth, differentiation, and programmed cell death. Specific N-linked glycoprotein changes are associated with disease progression and identification of these N-linked glycoproteins has potential for use in disease diagnosis, prognosis, and prediction of treatments. In this review, we summarize common strategies for N-linked glycoprotein characterization and applications of these strategies to identification of glycoprotein changes associated with disease states. We also review the N-linked glycoproteins altered in diseases such as breast cancer, lung cancer, and prostate cancer. Although assays for these glycoproteins have potential clinical utility, research is needed to translate these glycoproteins to clinical biomarkers.

  9. Connective Tissue Disease-associated Interstitial Lung Disease: A review

    PubMed Central

    Gutsche, Markus; Rosen, Glenn D.; Swigris, Jeffrey J.

    2012-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is commonly encountered in patients with connective tissue diseases (CTD). Besides the lung parenchyma, the airways, pulmonary vasculature and structures of the chest wall may all be involved, depending on the type of CTD. As a result of this so-called multi-compartment involvement, airflow limitation, pulmonary hypertension, vasculitis and extrapulmonary restriction can occur alongside fibro-inflammatory parenchymal abnormalities in CTD. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic sclerosis (SSc), poly-/dermatomyositis (PM/DM), Sjögren’s syndrome (SjS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and undifferentiated (UCTD) as well as mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) can all be associated with the development of ILD. Non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) is the most commonly observed histopathological pattern in CTD-ILD, but other patterns including usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP), organizing pneumonia (OP), diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) and lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia (LIP) may occur. Although the majority of patients with CTD-ILD experience stable or slowly advancing ILD, a small yet significant group exhibits a more severe and progressive course. Randomized placebo-controlled trials evaluating the efficacy of immunomodulatory treatments have been conducted only in SSc-associated ILD. However, clinical experience suggests that a handful of immunosuppressive medications are potentially effective in a sizeable portion of patients with ILD caused by other CTDs. In this manuscript, we review the clinical characteristics and management of the most common CTD-ILDs. PMID:23125954

  10. Updated Mechanisms of Sickle Cell Disease-Associated Chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Brianna; Meiler, Steffen E.; Bekker, Alex; Tao, Yuan-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD), a hemoglobinopathy, causes sickling of red blood cells, resulting in vessel blockage, stroke, anemia, inflammation, and extreme pain. A vast majority of SCD patients experience pain on a chronic basis, and many turn to opioids to provide limited relief. The side effects that come with chronic opioid use push for research into understanding the specific mechanisms of SCD-associated chronic pain. Current advances in SCD-associated pain have focused on alterations in the pain pathway including nociceptor sensitization and endogenous pain inducers. This article reviews the underlying pathophysiology of SCD, potential pain mechanisms, current treatments and their mechanism of action, and future directions of SCD-associated pain management. The information provided could help propel research in SCD-associated chronic pain and uncover novel treatment options for clinicians. PMID:26301256

  11. Yeast HXK2 gene reverts glucose regulation mutation of penicillin biosynthesis in P. chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Edmundo A; Fernández, Francisco J; Fierro, Francisco; Mejía, Armando; Marcos, Ana T; Martín, Juan F; Barrios-González, Javier

    2014-01-01

    The mutant Penicillium chrysogenum strain dogR5, derived from strain AS-P-78, does not respond to glucose regulation of penicillin biosynthesis and β-galactosidase, and is partially deficient in D-glucose phosphorilating activity. We have transformed strain dogR5 with the (hexokinase) hxk2 gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Transformants recovered glucose control of penicillin biosynthesis in different degrees, and acquired a hexokinase (fructose phosphorylating) activity absent in strains AS- P-78 and dogR5. Interestingly, they also recovered glucose regulation of β-galactosidase. On the other hand, glucokinase activity was affected in different ways in the transformants; one of which showed a lower activity than the parental dogR5, but normal glucose regulation of penicillin biosynthesis. Our results show that Penicillium chrysogenum AS-P-78 and dogR5 strains lack hexokinase, and suggest that an enzyme with glucokinase activity is involved in glucose regulation of penicillin biosynthesis and β-galactosidase, thus signaling glucose in both primary and secondary metabolism; however, catalytic and signaling activities seem to be independent.

  12. Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction (E-SMARRT): Energy Efficiency Instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Frank; Frank, Matthew

    2013-12-31

    As with any manufacturing operation, the metalcasting processes have several sources of variation. Additionally, the metalcasting industry routinely produces a wide variety of complex shaped components, which often exacerbates the problem of determining the source of variation. The goals of this project were to develop better tools and strategies to collect and manage process and product information. Based on industry feedback, five areas were selected based on the amount of variation caused by this source or the potential for improvement in terms of energy, emissions and competitiveness. These five areas were: 1. Heat Treatment Control Strategies 2. Semi-Automated Grinding 3. Surface Mapping Software 4. Study of Impact of Repairs via Weld Gouges 5. Rapid Pattern Making Machine This project collectively looked at areas of the steel casting production process which could help reduce the rework, scrap and energy consumption required. Through these efforts, casting producers are better equipped to control their processes and specify processes that better meet their customers’ needs.

  13. Reverting p53 activation after recovery of cellular stress to resume with cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Lazo, Pedro A

    2017-05-01

    The activation of p53 in response