Science.gov

Sample records for review identifying issues

  1. Thermal management in heavy vehicles : a review identifying issues and research requirements.

    SciTech Connect

    Wambsganss, M. W.

    1999-01-15

    Thermal management in heavy vehicles is cross-cutting because it directly or indirectly affects engine performance, fuel economy, safety and reliability, engine/component life, driver comfort, materials selection, emissions, maintenance, and aerodynamics. It follows that thermal management is critical to the design of large (class 6-8) trucks, especially in optimizing for energy efficiency and emissions reduction. Heat rejection requirements are expected to increase, and it is industry's goal to develop new, innovative, high-performance cooling systems that occupy less space and are lightweight and cost-competitive. The state of the art in heavy vehicle thermal management is reviewed, and issues and research areas are identified.

  2. A Review of Assessment Issues in Gifted Education and Their Implications for Identifying Gifted Minority Students. Research Monograph 95204.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frasier, Mary M.; And Others

    This review of research and literature examines issues related to the identification of potentially gifted students from groups most likely to be underrepresented in gifted education programs, including racial and ethnic minority groups, economically disadvantaged students, and those with limited English proficiency. Three major reasons for…

  3. Issues in Peer Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawamura, Mark H.

    2001-01-01

    Based on concerns raised at a workshop at the Southern California College of Optometry, addresses critical issues in the process of peer review of faculty teaching and possible alternatives to these issues as applied to an optometric institution. (EV)

  4. Special Book Review Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grauer, Barbara Ellman, Ed.; And Others

    1998-01-01

    Provides reviews of books dealing with all aspects of careers, including 8 books on dealing with change, 13 on career management, 4 on entrepreneurship, 3 guides and workbooks, 2 on assessment, 4 on resumes, and 1 biography. Includes 12 short reviews of books on career development issues and information such as publishers' addresses. (JOW)

  5. Special Book Review Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grauer, Barbara Ellman, Ed.; And Others

    1999-01-01

    Offers reviews of 40 new and classic books for career counselors and career centers. Includes reviews of books on the following topics: assessment, career management, distance learning, entrepreneurship, the spirit-work connection, job-search methods, lifelong career development, as well as guides and workbooks. (JOW)

  6. Special Book Review Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grauer, Barbara Ellman, Ed.; And Others

    1999-01-01

    Offers reviews of 40 new and classic books for career counselors and career centers. Includes reviews of books on the following topics: assessment, career management, distance learning, entrepreneurship, the spirit-work connection, job-search methods, lifelong career development, as well as guides and workbooks. (JOW)

  7. Special Issue: Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohs, Perla, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    Reviews of 42 books in the following categories are provided: career counseling theory and skills, organizational development, career and life planning, adult career development, retirement, career fields, job search, job success, entrepreneurship, college and women, college and the military, life management, creativity, and reference books. (SK)

  8. PETC review: Issue 9

    SciTech Connect

    Santore, R.R.; Friedman, S.; Reiss, J.; Waehner, M.J.

    1993-12-31

    Since its beginning, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center`s (PETC) primary function has been to study and conduct research on coal and its uses and applications. PETC has also been investigating ways in which natural gas can be employed to enhance the use of coal and to convert natural gas into liquid products that can be more readily transported and stored. This review contains five articles which reflect PETC`s mission: State-of-the-Art High Performance Power Systems [HIPPS]; Unconventional Fuel Uses of Natural Gas; Micronized Magnetite -- Beneficiation and Benefits; Reburning for NO{sub x} Reduction; and An Update of PETC`s Process Research Facility.

  9. Ethical issues identified by rehabilitation clinicians.

    PubMed

    Kirschner, K L; Stocking, C; Wagner, L B; Foye, S J; Siegler, M

    2001-12-01

    To quantify systematically and to characterize the range of ethics issues affecting rehabilitation professionals' day-to-day clinical practice, and to assess the preferences of rehabilitation clinicians for ethics education. Survey of clinicians and admitting office personnel in an acute rehabilitation hospital with open-ended questions about the ethical issues they found most troubling in daily practice. A 175-bed free-standing, urban rehabilitation hospital. A total of 411 clinicians and admitting office personnel, of whom 217 responded (53%) and generated a total of 547 ethics issues. Not applicable. Ethical issues were coded by 2 independent raters into 24 different categories and a reconciliation session was used to resolve discrepancies. The largest response (24%) was categorized as pressures resulting from health care reimbursement changes. The second most common problem (17%) involved conflicts among patients, physicians, team members, or families around goal setting. Difficulty assessing decision-making capacity was third (7%). The respondents favored discussion groups or interdisciplinary in-services and lectures over self-instructional materials as formats for ethics education. Ethical issues in the rehabilitation setting are common, and reflect both the dynamic nature of the health care environment and the team model of care. Ongoing, interactive educational interventions are warranted to address these issues. Copyright 2001 by the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine

  10. Identifying Crucial Issues in Climate Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Motoyoshi; Greve, Ralf; Hara, Toshika; Watanabe, Yutaka W.; Ohmura, Atsumu; Ito, Akihiko; Kawamiya, Michio

    2009-01-01

    Drastic Change in the Earth System During Global Warming; Sapporo, Japan, 24 June 2008; The Nobel Peace Prize awarded to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and former U.S. vice president Al Gore indicates that global warming is recognized as a real phenomenon critical to human beings. However, humanity's knowledge concerning global warming is based on an uncertainty larger than 50% in the warming rate during the past century. Therefore, scientific clarification is needed to understand important mechanisms that potentially produce positive feedbacks in the Earth system-such mechanisms must be better understood before scientists can develop more reliable predictions. To plan for the future, a symposium was organized at Japan's Hokkaido University in association with the G8 Summit, where the most recent updates on the five urgent issues in climate science were discussed. These issues, considered to be crucial as severe impacts on human society continue to rise, included (1) causes and magnitude of sea level rise; (2) decay of glaciers and the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets; (3) disappearance of the summer Arctic sea ice; (4) carbon uptake or emission by the terrestrial ecosystem; and (5) marine ecosystem change resulting in carbon emissions.

  11. Obtaining subjects’ consent to publish identifying personal information: current practices and identifying potential issues

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In studies publishing identifying personal information, obtaining consent is regarded as necessary, as it is impossible to ensure complete anonymity. However, current journal practices around specific points to consider when obtaining consent, the contents of consent forms and how consent forms are managed have not yet been fully examined. This study was conducted to identify potential issues surrounding consent to publish identifying personal information. Methods Content analysis was carried out on instructions for authors and consent forms developed by academic journals in four fields (as classified by Journal Citation Reports): medicine general and internal, genetics and heredity, pediatrics, and psychiatry. An online questionnaire survey of editors working for journals that require the submission of consent forms was also conducted. Results Instructions for authors were reviewed for 491 academic journals (132 for medicine general and internal, 147 for genetics and heredity, 100 for pediatrics, and 112 for psychiatry). Approximately 40% (203: 74 for medicine general and internal, 31 for genetics and heredity, 58 for pediatrics, and 40 for psychiatry) stated that subject consent was necessary. The submission of consent forms was required by 30% (154) of the journals studied, and 10% (50) provided their own consent forms for authors to use. Two journals mentioned that the possible effects of publication on subjects should be considered. Many journal consent forms mentioned the difficulties in ensuring complete anonymity of subjects, but few addressed the study objective, the subjects’ right to refuse consent and the withdrawal of consent. The main reason for requiring the submission of consent forms was to confirm that consent had been obtained. Conclusion Approximately 40% of journals required subject consent to be obtained. However, differences were observed depending on the fields. Specific considerations were not always documented. There is a need

  12. Parameter Identifiability in Statistical Machine Learning: A Review.

    PubMed

    Ran, Zhi-Yong; Hu, Bao-Gang

    2017-02-09

    This review examines the relevance of parameter identifiability for statistical models used in machine learning. In addition to defining main concepts, we address several issues of identifiability closely related to machine learning, showing the advantages and disadvantages of state-of-the-art research and demonstrating recent progress. First, we review criteria for determining the parameter structure of models from the literature. This has three related issues: parameter identifiability, parameter redundancy, and reparameterization. Second, we review the deep influence of identifiability on various aspects of machine learning from theoretical and application viewpoints. In addition to illustrating the utility and influence of identifiability, we emphasize the interplay among identifiability theory, machine learning, mathematical statistics, information theory, optimization theory, information geometry, Riemann geometry, symbolic computation, Bayesian inference, algebraic geometry, and others. Finally, we present a new perspective together with the associated challenges.

  13. Fifth Annual EDUCAUSE Survey Identifies Current IT Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spicer, Donald Z.; DeBlois, Peter B.

    2004-01-01

    This year marks the fifth annual EDUCAUSE Current Issues Survey to identify what campus information technology leaders see as their most critical IT challenges. Thirty-five percent (571) of the 1,638 EDUCAUSE primary member representatives who were asked to participate responded to an e-mail invitation to complete the Web-based survey in December…

  14. Special Issue: Book Reviews 2002-2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grauer, Barbara Ellman, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This special issue reviews 71 books on the following topics: career management; career opportunities for people with disabilities; federal government career information; college career development/counseling; job search strategies, tools, methods; coaching; retirement issues; strategies for managers; women and careers; general career books; and…

  15. Special Issue: Book Reviews 2002-2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grauer, Barbara Ellman, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This special issue reviews 71 books on the following topics: career management; career opportunities for people with disabilities; federal government career information; college career development/counseling; job search strategies, tools, methods; coaching; retirement issues; strategies for managers; women and careers; general career books; and…

  16. Health system decentralisation in Nepal: identifying the issues.

    PubMed

    Collins, Charles; Omar, Mayeh; Adhikari, Damodar; Dhakal, Ramji; Emmel, Nick; Dhakal, Megha Raj; Chand, Padam; Thapa, Druba; Singh, Arjun B

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe and discuss policy analysis in Nepal and review the wide range of choices feasible in decentralisation decision making. In this paper an iterative qualitative method was developed and used in the research, which consisted of focus group interviews, key informant interviews, document analysis, including descriptive statistics, and analysis of the policy context. Participants in the research reflected the urban/rural mix of districts and the geography of Nepal. Analysis combined transcribed interviews with findings from document searches and analysis of the policy context. Coding was pre-determined during the training workshop and further codes were generated during and after the fieldwork. The paper finds that Nepal is in the process of decentralising public services from the central level to the local level, particularly to local bodies: District Development Committees (DDCs), Village Development Committees (VDCs) and Municipalities. Key contextual factors referred to are the overall structure of decentralisation, the social context of poverty and the political instability leading to a fluid political situation characterised by political tension, armed conflict, controversies and agreements while carrying out the research. The key issues identified and discussed in the paper are the policy process leading to decentralisation, the organisational structure and tension in the proposed system, the systems of resource generation, allocation, planning and management and lastly the forms of accountability, participation, public-private relations and collaborative strategies. The paper discusses the challenges faced in conducting such a policy analysis, the broad ranging and unremitting nature of the decentralisation process, and the contextual setting of the process of change.

  17. Proportional ethical review and the identification of ethical issues

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, D

    2007-01-01

    Presently, there is a movement in the UK research governance framework towards what is referred to as proportional ethical review. Proportional ethical review is the notion that the level of ethical review and scrutiny given to a research project ought to reflect the level of ethical risk represented by that project. Relatively innocuous research should receive relatively minimal review and relatively risky research should receive intense scrutiny. Although conceptually attractive, the notion of proportional review depends on the possibility of effectively identifying the risks and ethical issues posed by an application with some process other than a full review by a properly constituted research ethics committee. In this paper, it is argued that this cannot be achieved and that the only appropriate means of identifying risks and ethical issues is consideration by a full committee. This implies that the suggested changes to the National Health Service research ethics system presently being consulted on should be strenuously resisted. PMID:17400625

  18. RECOGNIZING AND IDENTIFYING PEOPLE: A neuropsychological review

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Jason J S; Corrow, Sherryse L

    2016-01-01

    Recognizing people is a classic example of a cognitive function that involves multiple processing stages and parallel routes of information. Neuropsychological data have provided important evidence for models of this process, particularly from case reports; however, the quality and extent of the data varies widely between studies. In this review we first discuss the requirements and logical basis of the types of neuropsychological evidence to support conclusions about the modules in this process. We then survey the adequacy of the current body of reports to address two key issues. First is the question of which cognitive operation generates a sense of familiarity: the current debate revolves around whether familiarity arises in modality-specific recognition units or later amodal processes. Key evidence on this point comes from the search for dissociations between familiarity for faces, voices and names. The second question is whether lesions can differentially affect the abilities to link diverse sources of person information (e.g. face, voice, name, biographic data). Dissociations of these linkages may favour a distributed-only model of the organization of semantic knowledge, whereas a ‘person-hub’ model would predict uniform impairments of all linkages. While we conclude that there is reasonable evidence for dissociations in name, voice and face familiarity in regards to the first question, the evidence for or against dissociated linkages between information stores in regards to the second is tenuous at best. We identify deficiencies in the current literature that should motivate and inform the design of future studies. PMID:26773237

  19. Issues in identifying germ tube positive yeasts by conventional methods.

    PubMed

    Yazdanpanah, Atta; Khaithir, Tzar Mohd Nizam

    2014-01-01

    Candida speciation is vital for epidemiology and management of candidiasis. Nonmolecular conventional methods often fail to identify closely related germ tube positive yeasts from clinical specimens. The present study was conducted to identify these yeasts and to highlight issues in conventional versus molecular methods of identification. A total of 98 germ tube positive yeasts from high vaginal swabs were studied over a 12-month period. Isolates were examined with various methods including growth at 42 °C and 45 °C on Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA), color development on CHROMagar Candida medium, chlamydospore production on corn meal agar at 25 °C, carbohydrate assimilation using ID 32C system, and polymerase chain reaction using a single pair of primers targeting the hyphal wall protein 1 (Hwp1) gene. Of all the isolates studied, 97 were molecularly confirmed as C. albicans and one isolate was identified as C. dubliniensis. No C. africana was detected in this study. The molecular method used in our study was an accurate and useful tool for discriminating C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, and C. africana. The conventional methods, however, were less accurate and riddled with many issues that will be discussed in further details.

  20. School Counselors: A Review of Contemporary Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bain, Steve F.

    2012-01-01

    This article seeks to review the topic of school counselors and the contemporary issues surrounding this profession. An introduction to the profession and overview of its history provides a comprehensive basis on which to understand today's school counseling profession. An examination of contemporary themes of school counseling will include job…

  1. PETC Review, Issue 5, Spring 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Blaustein, B D; Reiss, J; Tarquinio, M A; Brown, J; Evans, E

    1992-04-01

    This issue of PETC Review contains short discussion on the following topics: advanced coal preparation processes, new scrubbers for flue gas desulfurization, PETC's Coal Preparation Process Research Facility, and PETC's Science Outreach Program. Supplemental sections on publications, highlights, calendars, etc. are also included. (VC)

  2. PETC Review, Issue 5, Spring 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Blaustein, B.D.; Reiss, J.; Tarquinio, M.A.; Brown, J.; Evans, E.

    1992-07-01

    This issue of PETC Review contains short discussion on the following topics: advanced coal preparation processes, new scrubbers for flue gas desulfurization, PETC`s Coal Preparation Process Research Facility, and PETC`s Science Outreach Program. Supplemental sections on publications, highlights, calendars, etc. are also included. (VC)

  3. VLSI Technology: Impact and Promise. Identifying Emerging Issues and Trends in Technology for Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayoumi, Magdy

    As part of a 3-year study to identify emerging issues and trends in technology for special education, this paper addresses the implications of very large scale integrated (VLSI) technology. The first section reviews the development of educational technology, particularly microelectronics technology, from the 1950s to the present. The implications…

  4. A review of ethical issues in dementia.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rebecca A; Karlawish, Jason

    2015-10-01

    Dementia raises many ethical issues. The present review, taking note of the fact that the stages of dementia raise distinct ethical issues, focuses on three issues associated with stages of dementia's progression: (1) how the emergence of preclinical and asymptomatic but at-risk categories for dementia creates complex questions about preventive measures, risk disclosure, and protection from stigma and discrimination; (2) how despite efforts at dementia prevention, important research continues to investigate ways to alleviate clinical dementia's symptoms, and requires additional human subjects protections to ethically enroll persons with dementia; and (3) how in spite of research and prevention efforts, persons continue to need to live with dementia. This review highlights two major themes. First is how expanding the boundaries of dementias such as Alzheimer's to include asymptomatic but at-risk persons generate new ethical questions. One promising way to address these questions is to take an integrated approach to dementia ethics, which can include incorporating ethics-related data collection into the design of a dementia research study itself. Second is the interdisciplinary nature of ethical questions related to dementia, from health policy questions about insurance coverage for long-term care to political questions about voting, driving, and other civic rights and privileges to economic questions about balancing an employer's right to a safe and productive workforce with an employee's rights to avoid discrimination on the basis of their dementia risk. The review highlights these themes and emerging ethical issues in dementia.

  5. Identifying Human Factors Issues in Aircraft Maintenance Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veinott, Elizabeth S.; Kanki, Barbara G.; Shafto, Michael G. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Maintenance operations incidents submitted to the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) between 1986-1992 were systematically analyzed in order to identify issues relevant to human factors and crew coordination. This exploratory analysis involved 95 ASRS reports which represented a wide range of maintenance incidents. The reports were coded and analyzed according to the type of error (e.g, wrong part, procedural error, non-procedural error), contributing factors (e.g., individual, within-team, cross-team, procedure, tools), result of the error (e.g., aircraft damage or not) as well as the operational impact (e.g., aircraft flown to destination, air return, delay at gate). The main findings indicate that procedural errors were most common (48.4%) and that individual and team actions contributed to the errors in more than 50% of the cases. As for operational results, most errors were either corrected after landing at the destination (51.6%) or required the flight crew to stop enroute (29.5%). Interactions among these variables are also discussed. This analysis is a first step toward developing a taxonomy of crew coordination problems in maintenance. By understanding what variables are important and how they are interrelated, we may develop intervention strategies that are better tailored to the human factor issues involved.

  6. PETC Review, Issue 3, March 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Blaustein, B.; Reiss, J.; Robotti, S.; Brown, J.; Carter, C.; Evans, E.; Hammer, D.

    1991-03-01

    This issue of PETC Review presents brief discussion of the status of two DOE research program: (1)Coal Liquefaction and (2)Low-Cost Retrofit Technologies for Reducing SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and Particulates as part of the Clean Coal Technology Program. Air Toxics and the 1990 Clean Air Act are also discussed with respect to Environmental Protection Agency regulations. Supplemental sections on events, special focuses, publication listing, etc. are also included.

  7. PETC Review, Issue 2, September 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Blaustein, B.; Reiss, J.; Riehle, B.; Brown, J.; Hammer, D.

    1990-09-01

    This issue of PETC Review provides short discussion on research programs in (1) combustion technology, (2) flue gas cleanup technology, (3) coal science and chemistry. An overview of the PETC New Fuels Evaluation Facility is given, the US Clean Coal Technology Program's activities in Poland are discussed, and the NOXSO flue gas cleanup process is outlined. Supplemental sections on events, special focuses, publication listings, etc. are also included.

  8. PETC Review, Issue 2, September 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Blaustein, B.; Reiss, J.; Riehle, B.; Brown, J.; Hammer, D.

    1990-09-01

    This issue of PETC Review provides short discussion on research programs in (1) combustion technology, (2) flue gas cleanup technology, (3) coal science and chemistry. An overview of the PETC New Fuels Evaluation Facility is given, the US Clean Coal Technology Program`s activities in Poland are discussed, and the NOXSO flue gas cleanup process is outlined. Supplemental sections on events, special focuses, publication listings, etc. are also included.

  9. PETC Review, Issue 3, March 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Blaustein, B.; Reiss, J.; Robotti, S.; Brown, J.; Carter, C.; Evans, E.; Hammer, D.

    1991-03-01

    This issue of PETC Review presents brief discussion of the status of two DOE research program: (1)Coal Liquefaction and (2)Low-Cost Retrofit Technologies for Reducing SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and Particulates as part of the Clean Coal Technology Program. Air Toxics and the 1990 Clean Air Act are also discussed with respect to Environmental Protection Agency regulations. Supplemental sections on events, special focuses, publication listing, etc. are also included.

  10. Quality gaps identified through mortality review

    PubMed Central

    Kobewka, Daniel M; van Walraven, Carl; Turnbull, Jeffrey; Worthington, James; Calder, Lisa; Forster, Alan

    2017-01-01

    Background Hospital mortality rate is a common measure of healthcare quality. Morbidity and mortality meetings are common but there are few reports of hospital-wide mortality-review processes to provide understanding of quality-of-care problems associated with patient deaths. Objective To describe the implementation and results from an institution-wide mortality-review process. Design A nurse and a physician independently reviewed every death that occurred at our multisite teaching institution over a 3-month period. Deaths judged by either reviewer to be unanticipated or to have any opportunity for improvement were reviewed by a multidisciplinary committee. We report characteristics of patients with unanticipated death or opportunity for improved care and summarise the opportunities for improved care. Results Over a 3-month period, we reviewed all 427 deaths in our hospital in detail; 33 deaths (7.7%) were deemed unanticipated and 100 (23.4%) were deemed to be associated with an opportunity for improvement. We identified 97 opportunities to improve care. The most common gap in care was: ‘goals of care not discussed or the discussion was inadequate’ (n=25 (25.8%)) and ‘delay or failure to achieve a timely diagnosis’ (n=8 (8.3%)). Patients who had opportunities for improvement had longer length of stay and a lower baseline predicted risk of death in hospital. Nurse and physician reviewers spent approximately 142 h reviewing cases outside of committee meetings. Conclusions Our institution-wide mortality review found many quality gaps among decedents, in particular inadequate discussion of goals of care. PMID:26856617

  11. Mermaid health - identifying health issues related to mermaiding.

    PubMed

    Guitton, Matthieu J

    2017-01-01

    Mermaiding - swimming with a leg-covering monofin mimicking the tail of a mermaid - is an emerging aquatic activity, which has gained a marked popularity over the last few years. However, no study so far has documented the potential health issues or risks of injuries related to this practice. This study surveyed professional mermaids cumulating an estimated total of 19,147 h of in-water mermaiding, regarding their health issues and injuries. While mermaiding bears some risks, the occurrence of problematic conditions appears limited. Interestingly, the profile of health issues experienced by professional mermaids is unique and specific, and clearly different from both professional swimmers and surfers. Self-reported health issues related to mermaiding could be divided into issues specifically related to mermaiding activities (ear issues, reported by 87.5% of the respondents; sea life encounters, 50%; cold-related issues, 37.5%; compromised access to air, 25%), issues related to the tail and fins (back pain, 50%; lower limbs issues, 37.5%), and issues related to water quality (eye issues, 25%; waterborne diseases, 12.5%). Clear differences appear between professional and recreational mermaiding activities. The results presented here will help to build safer conditions for mermaiding activities and to develop adapted responses from health specialists to help this unique yet growing population of aquatic performers and athletes.

  12. THE SENSITIVITY OF THE PAEDIATRIC TRIAGE TOOL IN IDENTIFYING CARE ISSUES.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Shahad

    2016-09-01

    The paediatric triage tool was previously developed within the hospital to allow delegation to less experienced pharmacists to provide clinical pharmacist cover and allow identification and prioritisation of patients depending on pharmaceutical care requirement within a paediatric population. The paediatric triage tool triages patients via a traffic light system and identifies patients who are at high risk and who need to be reviewed first each day, rather than trying to see every patient and every drug chart. The traffic light system involves three colours. Red is highest priority and requires daily pharmacy review; amber patients do not require such intensive patient monitoring and so may be reviewed every second day; and green patients require only minimal pharmaceutical input and will not be reviewed again until discharge. The paediatric triage tool was previously implemented over 5 days on the 24 bed medical admissions ward and evaluation of the results revealed that time spent by the ward clinical pharmacist providing a daily review to patients that the triage tool coded green may have been better spent on the patients triaged in to the amber and red categories.This study intended to establish the sensitivity of the paediatric triage tool in identifying care issues as highlighted by an experienced clinical pharmacist. This study looked to highlight any areas of weakness in the tool and allow further optimisation and was agreed that the paediatric triage tool should identify 90% of care issues as identified by the experienced clinical pharmacist. The experienced clinical pharmacist was based on the 24 bed medical admission ward during the week of the study and all patients were followed up with normal pharmaceutical care; each episode requiring pharmacist action, defined as a care issue. Independent of the clinical pharmacist patients were also seen by myself during the week using the paediatric triage tool. Application of the tool was compared to the

  13. Peer review of grant applications: a simple method to identify proposals with discordant reviews.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Bruno; Leyrat, Clémence; Le Gouge, Amélie; Léger, Julie; Caille, Agnès

    2011-01-01

    Grant proposals submitted for funding are usually selected by a peer-review rating process. Some proposals may result in discordant peer-review ratings and therefore require discussion by the selection committee members. The issue is which peer-review ratings are considered as discordant. We propose a simple method to identify such proposals. Our approach is based on the intraclass correlation coefficient, which is usually used in assessing agreement in studies with continuous ratings.

  14. Technical review of externalities issues. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Niemeyer, V.

    1994-12-01

    Externalities has become the catchword for a major experiment in electric utility regulation. Together with increased competition as a means for economic regulation, this experiment represents a potential revolution in how electric utilities are regulated. It is very important for utilities and policy makers to understand the technical issues and arguments driving the externality experiment. This Technical Review presents four papers covering topics in economics that may play important roles in this revolution. The four papers are: Economic Issues in the Application of Externalities to Electricity Resource Selection; Climate Change, the Marginal Cost of Carbon Dioxide Emissions and the Implications for Carbon Dioxide Emissions Adders; Positive Externalities and Benefits from Electricity; and Socioeconomic Effects of Externality Adders for Electric Utility Emissions.

  15. PETC Review, Issue 4, Fall 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Blaustein, B.D.; Reiss, J.; Tarquinio, M.A.; Brown, J.; Evans, E.

    1991-12-31

    In this issue of PETC Review, short discussion is given on the following topics: (1) ``Combustion 2000``--a low-emission boiler system coupled to a high-performance power system; (2) ``Liquid Transportation Fuels from Coal, Part 2: Indirect Liquefaction``--outline research program; (3) ``A Computer Expert System to Reduce Power Plant Emissions``--a system being developed to predict the economic, operational, and environmental benefits of using commercially achievable cleaned coals; (4) ``PETC`s Flow Analysis Laboratory Assists Artificial Heart Research``--PETC equipment used to study the flow of blood in artificial hearts. Supplemental sections on events, special focuses, calendars, publication lists, etc. are also included.

  16. PETC Review, Issue 4, Fall 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Blaustein, B D; Reiss, J; Tarquinio, M A; Brown, J; Evans, E

    1991-10-01

    In this issue of PETC Review, short discussion is given on the following topics: (1) Combustion 2000''--a low-emission boiler system coupled to a high-performance power system; (2) Liquid Transportation Fuels from Coal, Part 2: Indirect Liquefaction''--outline research program; (3) A Computer Expert System to Reduce Power Plant Emissions''--a system being developed to predict the economic, operational, and environmental benefits of using commercially achievable cleaned coals; (4) PETC's Flow Analysis Laboratory Assists Artificial Heart Research''--PETC equipment used to study the flow of blood in artificial hearts. Supplemental sections on events, special focuses, calendars, publication lists, etc. are also included.

  17. PETC Review, Issue 1, March 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Blaustein, B.; Reiss, J.; Martin, G.; Hammer, D.; Mills, J.

    1990-03-01

    This issue of PETC Review contains short discussion on the following topics: (1) SO{sub 2} Control and Duct Injection: A Solution to Acid Rain''--research on duct injection; (2) Acid Rain Abatement and Advanced Coal Cleaning: A Precombustion Option''--research on selective agglomeration and advanced froth flotation; (3) Two-Stage Liquefaction of Coal''--PETC's efforts to further the viability of this technology; (4) Clean Coal Technology: Energy and the Environment''--the Clean Coal Technology Program is demonstrating technologies that show coal can be both efficient and environmentally acceptable. Supplemental sections on events, special focuses, calendars, publication lists, etc. are also included.

  18. PETC Review, Issue 1, March 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Blaustein, B.; Reiss, J.; Martin, G.; Hammer, D.; Mills, J.

    1990-03-01

    This issue of PETC Review contains short discussion on the following topics: (1)``SO{sub 2} Control and Duct Injection: A Solution to Acid Rain``--research on duct injection; (2)``Acid Rain Abatement and Advanced Coal Cleaning: A Precombustion Option``--research on selective agglomeration and advanced froth flotation; (3)``Two-Stage Liquefaction of Coal``--PETC`s efforts to further the viability of this technology; (4)``Clean Coal Technology: Energy and the Environment``--the Clean Coal Technology Program is demonstrating technologies that show coal can be both efficient and environmentally acceptable. Supplemental sections on events, special focuses, calendars, publication lists, etc. are also included.

  19. Ethical issues in public health surveillance: a systematic qualitative review.

    PubMed

    Klingler, Corinna; Silva, Diego Steven; Schuermann, Christopher; Reis, Andreas Alois; Saxena, Abha; Strech, Daniel

    2017-04-04

    Public health surveillance is not ethically neutral and yet, ethics guidance and training for surveillance programmes is sparse. Development of ethics guidance should be based on comprehensive and transparently derived overviews of ethical issues and arguments. However, existing overviews on surveillance ethics are limited in scope and in how transparently they derived their results. Our objective was accordingly to provide an overview of ethical issues in public health surveillance; in addition, to list the arguments put forward with regards to arguably the most contested issue in surveillance, that is whether to obtain informed consent. Ethical issues were defined based on principlism. We assumed an ethical issue to arise in surveillance when a relevant normative principle is not adequately considered or two principles come into conflict. We searched Pubmed and Google Books for relevant publications. We analysed and synthesized the data using qualitative content analysis. Our search strategy retrieved 525 references of which 83 were included in the analysis. We identified 86 distinct ethical issues arising in the different phases of the surveillance life-cycle. We further identified 20 distinct conditions that make it more or less justifiable to forego informed consent procedures. This is the first systematic qualitative review of ethical issues in public health surveillance resulting in a comprehensive ethics matrix that can inform guidelines, reports, strategy papers, and educational material and raise awareness among practitioners.

  20. Identifying emerging issues in forestry as a tool for research planning.

    Treesearch

    Hans M. Gregersen; Allen L. Lundgren; Pamela J. Jakes; David N. Bengston

    1989-01-01

    A Delphi exercise is used to identify emerging issues in National Forest management and use, the relative importance of the issues, and barriers to resolving issues. USDA Forest Service managers agree on the importance of the 11 issues identified; however, researchers and National Forest managers do not always agree on the importance of issues or barriers.

  1. Issues for clinicians training international medical graduates: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Pilotto, Louis S; Duncan, Geraldine F; Anderson-Wurf, Jane

    2007-08-20

    To ascertain the specialised communication issues clinicians need to understand when preparing international medical graduates (IMGs) for clinical practice in Australia. Systematic review. A series of searches using MEDLINE (1990-2006) was conducted with relevant keywords. Literature from countries with experience in the integration of IMGs into their medical workforces was included. All except four articles were published between 1997 and 2006. The initial search identified 748 articles, which reduced to 234 evidence-based English language articles for review. Of these, only articles relating to postgraduate medical training and overseas trained doctors were selected for inclusion. Titles and abstracts were independently reviewed by two reviewers, with a concordance rate of 0.9. Articles were included if they addressed communication needs of IMGs in training. Any disparities between reviewers about which articles to include were discussed and resolved by consensus. Key issues that emerged were the need for IMGs to adjust to a change in status; the need for clinicians to understand the high level of English language proficiency required by IMGs; the need for clinicians to develop IMGs' skills in communicating with patients; the need for clinicians to understand IMGs' expectations about teaching and learning; and the need for IMGs to be able to interact effectively with a range of people. Training organisations need to ensure that clinicians are aware of the communication issues facing IMGs and equip them with the skills and tools to deal with the problems that may arise.

  2. Analysis of Adverse Events in Identifying GPS Human Factors Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Catherine A.; Hwoschinsky, Peter V.; Adams, Richard J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze GPS related adverse events such as accidents and incidents (A/I), Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) reports and Pilots Deviations (PDs) to create a framework for developing a human factors risk awareness program. Although the occurrence of directly related GPS accidents is small the frequency of PDs and ASRS reports indicated there is a growing problem with situational awareness in terminal airspace related to different types of GPs operational issues. This paper addresses the findings of the preliminary research and a brief discussion of some of the literature on related GPS and automation issues.

  3. IDENTIFYING RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION ISSUES FOR THE NATIONAL CHILDREN'S STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recruitment and Retention Issues for the National Children's Study
    Danelle T Lobdell1, Suzanne Gilboa2, Pauline Mendola1 (1US EPA, NHEERL; 2UNC Chapel Hill)

    A better understanding of the most effective recruitment techniques and retention strategies for longitudinal, co...

  4. The IRS Work Plan: IRS Official Identifies Hot Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Marcus

    1993-01-01

    A federal tax official specializing in tax-exempt organizations discusses the relatively new use of coordinated examination audits. Significant issues being raised as the use of such audits expands are examined, including employment tax, contractors, withholding on students, unrelated business income, bond financing, the audit process, corporate…

  5. IDENTIFYING RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION ISSUES FOR THE NATIONAL CHILDREN'S STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recruitment and Retention Issues for the National Children's Study
    Danelle T Lobdell1, Suzanne Gilboa2, Pauline Mendola1 (1US EPA, NHEERL; 2UNC Chapel Hill)

    A better understanding of the most effective recruitment techniques and retention strategies for longitudinal, co...

  6. Assistive Technology Addressing Safety Issues in Dementia: A Scoping Review.

    PubMed

    Gagnon-Roy, Mireille; Bourget, Annick; Stocco, Stéphanie; Courchesne, Annie-Claude Lemieux; Kuhne, Nicolas; Provencher, Véronique

    Safety is an issue for older adults with dementia because they are at risk for various incidents. Intelligent assistive technology (IAT) may mitigate risks while promoting independence and reducing the impact on the caregiver of supporting a relative with dementia. The aim of this scoping review was to describe IATs and to identify factors to consider when selecting one. A systematic search was performed of the scientific and gray literature published between 2000 and 2015. A total of 31 sources were included. Four types of IATs were identified as addressing safety issues in dementia: monitoring technologies, tracking and tagging technologies, smart homes, and cognitive orthoses. Characteristics of the device and ethical considerations emerged as key factors to consider when selecting one. IATs yield promising results but pose various challenges, such as adapting to the evolution of dementia. Further research on their actual impact is needed. Copyright © 2017 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  7. The future of arid grasslands: identifying issues, seeking solutions

    Treesearch

    Barbara Tallman; Deborah M. Finch; Carl Edminster; Robert Hamre

    1998-01-01

    This conference was designed to provide a non-confrontational setting for a variety of people from differing viewpoints to discuss the threats facing arid grasslands of the Southwest. Participants included ranchers and other private economists, scientists, and students. The sessions were organized around the major themes of understanding grasslands, identifying...

  8. Key Issue: Identifying Professional Contexts to Support Highly Effective Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Policymakers, practitioners, and researchers have long understood that teacher quality is the most important variable for the success of students. The context in which educators work is critical to their success and satisfaction; however, identifying and addressing the conditions that teachers want and need is difficult. Assessing context is not…

  9. PETC Review, Issue 6, Summer 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Santore, R.R.; Blaustein, B.D.; Reiss, J.; Brown, J.

    1992-10-01

    This issue of the PETC Review focuses on the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. Several projects were completed recently and many more are beginning to generate data from operations, making this an ideal time to highlight this program. The program, which was initiated in 1986, now has 42 projects that represent a remarkable scope of activities ranging from the demonstration of improved retrofit components to the repowering of coal-fired electrical power plants with advanced systems. In 1986, when Congress committed the nation to this multi-billion dollar, multi-year demonstration program, the policy goals were clearly set forth and the funding was completely committed. I believe that defining and sticking to these goals and commitments has been critical to establishing substantial industry interest and investment, thereby enhancing the prospects for success. Both the public and private sectors were better able to establish priorities and to allocate resources to projects that best meet our nation`s energy and environmental needs. I believe that the Clean Coal Technology program will help fulfill the goals for coal that were recently reaffirmed in the National Energy Strategy: One Year Later-to maintain coal`s competitiveness and to create a favorable export market for US coal and coal technology.

  10. PETC Review, Issue 6, Summer 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Santore, R.R.; Blaustein, B.D.; Reiss, J.; Brown, J.

    1992-01-01

    This issue of the PETC Review focuses on the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. Several projects were completed recently and many more are beginning to generate data from operations, making this an ideal time to highlight this program. The program, which was initiated in 1986, now has 42 projects that represent a remarkable scope of activities ranging from the demonstration of improved retrofit components to the repowering of coal-fired electrical power plants with advanced systems. In 1986, when Congress committed the nation to this multi-billion dollar, multi-year demonstration program, the policy goals were clearly set forth and the funding was completely committed. I believe that defining and sticking to these goals and commitments has been critical to establishing substantial industry interest and investment, thereby enhancing the prospects for success. Both the public and private sectors were better able to establish priorities and to allocate resources to projects that best meet our nation's energy and environmental needs. I believe that the Clean Coal Technology program will help fulfill the goals for coal that were recently reaffirmed in the National Energy Strategy: One Year Later-to maintain coal's competitiveness and to create a favorable export market for US coal and coal technology.

  11. A Review of Vocational Research in the UK 2002-2006: Measurement and Accessibility Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Martin

    2006-01-01

    The UK vocational assessment landscape is changing and research has a key role in helping to identify trends and anticipate emerging issues and challenges. This review collates the messages from recently published research about specific issues that have been found to affect the measurement of vocational learning. It also highlights issues that…

  12. Identifying Issues for Long-Term Data Understandability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkstrom, B. R.

    2001-12-01

    In the past decade, we have seen a serious effort to capture and make useful a record of Earth observations. While the EOSDIS effort has had some success, the longer term prospects for preserving our knowledge of how the Earth has changed must still overcome a number of difficult challenges. The first, and most important, may be moving from the expectation that we can produce a single system that will solve all of the difficulties. Rather, we need to begin to view what we do from the perspective of a continuously evolving digital library. There are several key issues we need to deal with in trying to bring about this shift in perception: {a.}{We need a stable data referencing approach - like a URI, but one that allows us to reference individual data elements and subsets, not just files or data products.} {b.}{We need more adaptive metadata - including metadata that allows us to tie together data sets maintained in different places by scientific tribes that are linguistically in different communities of discourse.} {c.}{We need more automated approaches to ensuring the documentation of data provenance and of the web of scientific discourse that goes on mostly in scientific journals.} {d.}{We need to find ways of preserving both the data and its web of meaning even while we have to transfer it from medium to medium and system to system. The easy part of the problem is transferring the data - and that's the part that's been discussed so far. The hard part is carrying the scholarly apparatus that allows us to accumulate knowledge about what's in the data.} {e.}{We need additional approaches to visualizing the connections between various data sets and of recording objects that experts find for deeper examination.}

  13. Review of Social and Organizational Issues in Health Information Technology

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This paper reviews organizational and social issues (OSIs) in health information technology (HIT). Methods A review and synthesis of the literature on OSIs in HIT was conducted. Results Five overarching themes with respect to OSIs in HIT were identified and discussed: scope and frameworks for defining OSIs in HIT, context matters, process immaturity and complexity, trade-offs will happen and need to be discussed openly, and means of studying OSIs in HIT. Conclusions There is a wide body of literature that provides insight into OSIs in HIT, even if many of the studies are not explicitly labelled as such. The two biggest research needs are more explicit and theoretical studies of OSI in HITs and more research on integrating micro and macro perspectives of HIT use in organizations. PMID:26279951

  14. Fixed or random effects meta-analysis? Common methodological issues in systematic reviews of effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Tufanaru, Catalin; Munn, Zachary; Stephenson, Matthew; Aromataris, Edoardo

    2015-09-01

    Systematic review aims to systematically identify, critically appraise, and summarize all relevant studies that match predefined criteria and answer predefined questions. The most common type of systematic review is that assessing the effectiveness of an intervention or therapy. In this article, we discuss some of the common methodological issues that arise when conducting systematic reviews and meta-analyses of effectiveness data, including issues related to study designs, meta-analysis, and the use and interpretation of effect sizes.

  15. A review of ethical issues in transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, R

    1994-01-01

    Unavoidable and unique characteristics of the transplant surgeon's practice require difficult moral judgments. The two major areas of moral quandary are organ procurement and organ allocation. This paper outlines the key ethical issues in transplantation and draws attention to some of the recent literature that argues more specific issues in greater detail. The subjects discussed include brain death, living organ donation, procurement policies, organ sales, distributive justice, free riders (nondonators), duties and debts, and research.

  16. Virtual Reality and Its Potential Use in Special Education. Identifying Emerging Issues and Trends in Technology for Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodward, John

    As part of a 3-year study to identify emerging issues and trends in technology for special education, this paper addresses the possible contributions of virtual reality technology to educational services for students with disabilities. An example of the use of virtual reality in medical imaging introduces the paper and leads to a brief review of…

  17. Ethical Issues in Radiology Journalism, Peer Review, and Research.

    PubMed

    Katz, Douglas S; Gardner, James B; Hoffmann, Jason C; Patlas, Michael N; Bhargava, Puneet; Moshiri, Mariam; Remer, Erick M; Gould, Elaine S; Smith, Stacy

    2016-08-17

    Although some research and publication practices are clearly unethical, including fraud and plagiarism, other areas of research and publication, such as informed consent and conflicts of interest, fall into grayer areas. The purposes of this article are, therefore, to review a variety of relevant ethical issues in radiology-related journalism, peer review, and research; to review the radiology literature to date that has addressed these issues; and to present position statements and potential solutions to these problems.

  18. Regents' Review. Volume 10, Issue 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevada System of Higher Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This issue of the newsletter includes: (1) CSN's Automotive Program: Training Tomorrow's Workforce Today; (2) Chair's Corner; (3) A Nation at Risk (editorial); (4) UNHSS Moves Forward With First Private Gift; and (5) Nevada Higher Education in the News. [Document published by the Board of Regents of the Nevada System of Higher Education.

  19. Science and technology review, September 1998 issue

    SciTech Connect

    Smart, J

    1998-09-01

    This issue focuses on monitoring the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty. A feature article on the history of the Laboratory is also included. Other articles highlight X-ray laser technology and the ground testing of microsatellites that emulates the free-floating environment of actual space flight

  20. Research Review: Issues in Magazine Journalism Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Elliot

    1994-01-01

    Argues that, hobbled by an impoverished underlying model and a lack of resources, very little empirical research has explored magazine journalism education. Investigates the underlying model, reviews existing research, and offers an optimistic assessment about future research possibilities. (SR)

  1. Research Review: Issues in Magazine Journalism Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Elliot

    1994-01-01

    Argues that, hobbled by an impoverished underlying model and a lack of resources, very little empirical research has explored magazine journalism education. Investigates the underlying model, reviews existing research, and offers an optimistic assessment about future research possibilities. (SR)

  2. Review of Tax Policy and Reform Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacPhail-Wilcox, Bettye

    1982-01-01

    Summarizes the activities of the 97th Congress on taxes. Reviews 1981 enactments and 1982 proposals regarding tax cuts, tax increases, indexing of tax brackets, interest earnings, depreciation, and business incentives. Examines tax administration problems and flat-rate tax proposals and discusses the progressive income tax. (Author/RW)

  3. Lesbian Health Issues: A Ten Year Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellingson, Lyndall

    2002-01-01

    Reviews research on lesbian health risks and behavior, noting methodological difficulties, and focusing on health risks (alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use and sexually transmitted infections) and health care (early detection behavior and barriers to preventive care). Overall, there are behavioral, perceptual, and experiential differences…

  4. Scientific Review of Great Basin Wildfire Issues

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The University Nevada Reno, College of Agriculture and Resource Concepts Inc., co-sponsored a Great Basin Wildfire Forum in September 2007 to address a “Scientific Review of the Ecological and Management History of Great Basin Natural Resources and Recommendations to Achieve Ecosystem Restoration”. ...

  5. Scientific review of great basin wildfire issues

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The University Nevada Reno, College of Agriculture and Resource Concepts Inc., co-sponsored a Great Basin Wildfire Forum in September 2007 to address a “Scientific Review of the Ecological and Management History of Great Basin Natural Resources and Recommendations to Achieve Ecosystem Restoration”. ...

  6. Lesbian Health Issues: A Ten Year Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellingson, Lyndall

    2002-01-01

    Reviews research on lesbian health risks and behavior, noting methodological difficulties, and focusing on health risks (alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use and sexually transmitted infections) and health care (early detection behavior and barriers to preventive care). Overall, there are behavioral, perceptual, and experiential differences…

  7. Delphi analysis: a technique for identifying and ranking environmental and natural resource policy issues

    SciTech Connect

    Leitch, J.A.; Leistritz, F.L.

    1984-01-01

    A Delphi-type survey and a consensus-building workshop were carried out to identify the most significant natural resource issues and problems emerging in the Great Plains and Rocky Mountain states. Approximately 107 issues initially were identified through a literature search and an inquiry Delphi round. Delphi round enabled the list to be narrowed to 25 issues. While consensus was found on the top 25 issues as a group, neither the Delphi panel nor the workshop participants agreed on the top five. Specific issues related to water and energy comprised the majority of those identified as most significant. Overall, the Delphi method appears to be a powerful and flexible tool for evaluating emerging environmental issues and problems. The analysis suggests that Delphi findings are quite robust with respect to minor changes in panel composition. Delphi thus appears to be an approach that may find increasing application in environmental policy analysis. 11 references, 3 figures, 4 tables.

  8. Identifying and quantifying urban recharge: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, David N.

    2002-02-01

    The sources of and pathways for groundwater recharge in urban areas are more numerous and complex than in rural environments. Buildings, roads, and other surface infrastructure combine with man-made drainage networks to change the pathways for precipitation. Some direct recharge is lost, but additional recharge can occur from storm drainage systems. Large amounts of water are imported into most cities for supply, distributed through underground pipes, and collected again in sewers or septic tanks. The leaks from these pipe networks often provide substantial recharge. Sources of recharge in urban areas are identified through piezometry, chemical signatures, and water balances. All three approaches have problems. Recharge is quantified either by individual components (direct recharge, water-mains leakage, septic tanks, etc.) or holistically. Working with individual components requires large amounts of data, much of which is uncertain and is likely to lead to large uncertainties in the final result. Recommended holistic approaches include the use of groundwater modelling and solute balances, where various types of data are integrated. Urban recharge remains an under-researched topic, with few high-quality case studies reported in the literature.

  9. Checklists of Methodological Issues for Review Authors to Consider When Including Non-Randomized Studies in Systematic Reviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, George A.; Shea, Beverley; Higgins, Julian P. T.; Sterne, Jonathan; Tugwell, Peter; Reeves, Barnaby C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is increasing interest from review authors about including non-randomized studies (NRS) in their systematic reviews of health care interventions. This series from the Ottawa Non-Randomized Studies Workshop consists of six papers identifying methodological issues when doing this. Aim: To format the guidance from the preceding…

  10. Checklists of Methodological Issues for Review Authors to Consider When Including Non-Randomized Studies in Systematic Reviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, George A.; Shea, Beverley; Higgins, Julian P. T.; Sterne, Jonathan; Tugwell, Peter; Reeves, Barnaby C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is increasing interest from review authors about including non-randomized studies (NRS) in their systematic reviews of health care interventions. This series from the Ottawa Non-Randomized Studies Workshop consists of six papers identifying methodological issues when doing this. Aim: To format the guidance from the preceding…

  11. Gender issues in reproductive health: a review.

    PubMed

    Adinma, Echendu D; Adinma, Brian-D J I

    2011-01-01

    Gender, for its impact on virtually every contemporary life issue, can rightly be regarded as a foremost component of reproductive health. Reproductive health basically emphasises on people and their rights to sexuality, reproduction, and family planning, and the information to actualize these right, which has been inextricably linked to development at the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) held in Cairo, Egypt, in 1994. Women's sexual and reproductive rights became recognised as universal human right, violations of which occur in some reproductive health areas including gender concerns. Gender inequality and inequity encompass gender based violence as well as gender discrimination which cuts across the life cycle of the woman; attitudes, religious and cultural practices of various nations; and issues related to employment, economy, politics, and development. The redress of gender inequality is a collective responsibility of nations and supranational agencies. Nations should adopt a framework hinged on three pedestals--legal, institutional and policy, employing the three recommended approaches of equal treatment, positive action, and gender mainstreaming.

  12. Review of water quality issues associated with coal storage

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, E.C.; Boegly, W.J. Jr.

    1981-04-01

    Literature dealing with runoff from coal storage facilities is scarce and poorly documented. Most of the data reported are derived from the analysis of single grab samples taken from leaching experiments or from onsite sampling during rainfall events. There have been few investigations of the long-term environmental effects of coal pile leachate with the emphasis on changing water quality. This review identifies potential water quality issues and discusses coal storage conditions that intensify the acid drainage problem. Future research is needed in the development of a standardized laboratory leaching test, in the identification of organic compounds in the leachate, in the treatment of leachates, and in the development and verification of predictive models. These new areas of research should build on the existing literature to define a comprehensive waste management strategy providing for an environmentally acceptable method of onsite storage of large quantities of coal.

  13. The Full Spectrum of Clinical Ethical Issues in Kidney Failure. Findings of a Systematic Qualitative Review.

    PubMed

    Kahrass, Hannes; Strech, Daniel; Mertz, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    When treating patients with kidney failure, unavoidable ethical issues often arise. Current clinical practice guidelines some of them, but lack comprehensive information about the full range of relevant ethical issues in kidney failure. A systematic literature review of such ethical issues supports medical professionalism in nephrology, and offers a solid evidential base for efforts that aim to improve ethical conduct in health care. To identify the full spectrum of clinical ethical issues that can arise for patients with kidney failure in a systematic and transparent manner. A systematic review in Medline (publications in English or German between 2000 and 2014) and Google Books (with no restrictions) was conducted. Ethical issues were identified by qualitative text analysis and normative analysis. The literature review retrieved 106 references that together mentioned 27 ethical issues in clinical care of kidney failure. This set of ethical issues was structured into a matrix consisting of seven major categories and further first and second-order categories. The systematically-derived matrix helps raise awareness and understanding of the complexity of ethical issues in kidney failure. It can be used to identify ethical issues that should be addressed in specific training programs for clinicians, clinical practice guidelines, or other types of policies dealing with kidney failure.

  14. The Full Spectrum of Clinical Ethical Issues in Kidney Failure. Findings of a Systematic Qualitative Review

    PubMed Central

    Kahrass, Hannes; Strech, Daniel; Mertz, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Background When treating patients with kidney failure, unavoidable ethical issues often arise. Current clinical practice guidelines some of them, but lack comprehensive information about the full range of relevant ethical issues in kidney failure. A systematic literature review of such ethical issues supports medical professionalism in nephrology, and offers a solid evidential base for efforts that aim to improve ethical conduct in health care. Aim To identify the full spectrum of clinical ethical issues that can arise for patients with kidney failure in a systematic and transparent manner. Method A systematic review in Medline (publications in English or German between 2000 and 2014) and Google Books (with no restrictions) was conducted. Ethical issues were identified by qualitative text analysis and normative analysis. Results The literature review retrieved 106 references that together mentioned 27 ethical issues in clinical care of kidney failure. This set of ethical issues was structured into a matrix consisting of seven major categories and further first and second-order categories. Conclusions The systematically-derived matrix helps raise awareness and understanding of the complexity of ethical issues in kidney failure. It can be used to identify ethical issues that should be addressed in specific training programs for clinicians, clinical practice guidelines, or other types of policies dealing with kidney failure. PMID:26938863

  15. Technology and Interactive Multimedia. Identifying Emerging Issues and Trends in Technology for Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashton, Ray

    As part of a 3-year study to identify emerging issues and trends in technology for special education, this paper addresses the role of interactive multimedia, especially the digital, optical compact disc technologies, in providing instructional services to special education students. An overview identifies technological and economic trends,…

  16. A review of design issues specific to hypersonic flight vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sziroczak, D.; Smith, H.

    2016-07-01

    This paper provides an overview of the current technical issues and challenges associated with the design of hypersonic vehicles. Two distinct classes of vehicles are reviewed; Hypersonic Transports and Space Launchers, their common features and differences are examined. After a brief historical overview, the paper takes a multi-disciplinary approach to these vehicles, discusses various design aspects, and technical challenges. Operational issues are explored, including mission profiles, current and predicted markets, in addition to environmental effects and human factors. Technological issues are also reviewed, focusing on the three major challenge areas associated with these vehicles: aerothermodynamics, propulsion, and structures. In addition, matters of reliability and maintainability are also presented. The paper also reviews the certification and flight testing of these vehicles from a global perspective. Finally the current stakeholders in the field of hypersonic flight are presented, summarizing the active programs and promising concepts.

  17. Identifying and Resolving Issues in EnergyPlus and DOE-2 Window Heat Transfer Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Booten, C.; Kruis, N.; Christensen, C.

    2012-08-01

    Issues in building energy software accuracy are often identified by comparative, analytical, and empirical testing as delineated in the BESTEST methodology. As described in this report, window-related discrepancies in heating energy predictions were identified through comparative testing of EnergyPlus and DOE-2. Multiple causes for discrepancies were identified, and software fixes are recommended to better align the models with the intended algorithms and underlying test data.

  18. Results From a Transitional-Year Program Director Survey: Identifying Crucial Issues and Concerns

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Steven R.; Smith, Hayden L.; Short, Matthew W.

    2012-01-01

    Background Transitional Year (TY) programs meet an important need by preparing residents for specialties that accept individuals after an initial preparatory year. To our knowledge, no surveys to date have been conducted to identify attributes of TY programs and concerns of TY program directors. Purpose The purpose of this study was to review TY program characteristics and identify critical issues and concerns of TY program directors (TYPDs). Methods A web-based, 22-question survey was sent to all 114 TYPDs of programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education between January and April 2011. The survey included open-formatted and closed-formatted questions addressing program and institution demographics, program director time, administrative support, satisfaction, and future plans. Results The survey response rate was 86%. The median age of TY programs was 28 years, with few new programs. More than 80% of TY programs were conducted at community hospitals and university-affiliated community hospitals. Of the responding TYPDs, 17% had served less than 2 years, and 32% had served 10 years or more. Common sponsoring TY programs included internal medicine (88%), general surgery (42%), family medicine (25%), emergency medicine (24%), and pediatrics (18%). Overall, TYPDs were satisfied with their positions. They expressed concerns about inadequate time to complete duties, salary support, and administrative duties assigned to program coordinators. Forty-nine percent of TYPDs reported they planned to leave the position within the next 5 years. Conclusions Our survey provides useful information to assist institutions and the graduate medical education community in meeting the needs of TYPDs and strengthening TY programs. PMID:23451303

  19. Ethical issues with colorectal cancer screening-a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Bjørn

    2017-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening is widely recommended and implemented. However, sometimes CRC screening is not implemented despite good evidence, and some types of CRC screening are implemented despite lack of evidence. The objective of this article is to expose and elucidate relevant ethical issues in the literature on CRC screening that are important for open and transparent deliberation on CRC screening. An axiological question-based method is used for exposing and elucidating ethical issues relevant in HTA. A literature search in MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, PubMed Bioethics subset, ISI Web of Knowledge, Bioethics Literature Database (BELIT), Ethics in Medicine (ETHMED), SIBIL Base dati di bioetica, LEWI Bibliographic Database on Ethics in the Sciences and Humanities, and EUROETHICS identified 870 references of which 114 were found relevant according to title and abstract. The content of the included papers were subject to ethical analysis to highlight the ethical issues, concerns, and arguments. A wide range of important ethical issues were identified. The main benefits are reduced relative CRC mortality rate, and potentially incidence rate, but there is no evidence of reduced absolute mortality rate. Potential harms are bleeding, perforation, false test results, overdetection, overdiagnosis, overtreatment (including unnecessary removal of polyps), and (rarely) death. Other important issues are related to autonomy and informed choice equity, justice, medicalization, and expanding disease. A series of important ethical issues have been identified and need to be addressed in open and transparent deliberation on CRC screening. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Identifying attributes of food literacy: a scoping review.

    PubMed

    Azevedo Perry, Elsie; Thomas, Heather; Samra, H Ruby; Edmonstone, Shannon; Davidson, Lyndsay; Faulkner, Amy; Petermann, Lisa; Manafò, Elizabeth; Kirkpatrick, Sharon I

    2017-09-01

    An absence of food literacy measurement tools makes it challenging for nutrition practitioners to assess the impact of food literacy on healthy diets and to evaluate the outcomes of food literacy interventions. The objective of the present scoping review was to identify the attributes of food literacy. A scoping review of peer-reviewed and grey literature was conducted and attributes of food literacy identified. Subjects included in the search were high-risk groups. Eligible articles were limited to research from Canada, USA, the UK, Australia and New Zealand. The search identified nineteen peer-reviewed and thirty grey literature sources. Fifteen identified food literacy attributes were organized into five categories. Food and Nutrition Knowledge informs decisions about intake and distinguishing between 'healthy' and 'unhealthy' foods. Food Skills focuses on techniques of food purchasing, preparation, handling and storage. Self-Efficacy and Confidence represent one's capacity to perform successfully in specific situations. Ecologic refers to beyond self and the interaction of macro- and microsystems with food decisions and behaviours. Food Decisions reflects the application of knowledge, information and skills to make food choices. These interdependent attributes are depicted in a proposed conceptual model. The lack of evaluated tools inhibits the ability to assess and monitor food literacy; tailor, target and evaluate programmes; identify gaps in programming; engage in advocacy; and allocate resources. The present scoping review provides the foundation for the development of a food literacy measurement tool to address these gaps.

  1. Identifying veterinary students' capacity for moral behavior concerning animal ethics issues.

    PubMed

    Verrinder, Joy M; Phillips, Clive J C

    2014-01-01

    Veterinarians face unique animal ethics challenges as practitioners and policy advisors to government and industry. Changing societal attitudes, cultural diversity, and the often conflicting needs and interests of patients and clients contribute to moral distress. Yet little has been done to identify veterinarians' capacity to address these animal ethics issues. In this study, first-year and final-year veterinary students in an Australian university were surveyed to explore moral sensitivity, moral motivation, and moral character and their relationship with moral reasoning. The majority of students were concerned about animal ethics issues and had experienced moral distress in relation to the treatment of animals. Most believed that veterinarians should address the wider social issues of animal protection and that veterinary medicine should require a commitment to animals' interests over owners'/caregivers' interests. There was less agreement that the veterinary profession was sufficiently involved in addressing animal ethics issues. The principal motivators for studying veterinary medicine were, in declining importance, enjoyment in working with animals, helping sick and injured animals, and improving the way animals are treated. However, most students had taken little or no action to address animal ethics issues. These results suggest that both first- and fifth-year veterinary students are sensitive to animal ethics issues and are motivated to prioritize the interests of animals but have little experience in taking action to address these issues. Further research is needed to determine ways to identify and assess these moral behavior components in veterinary education to develop veterinarians' capacity to address animal ethics issues.

  2. A Framework for Identifying Implementation Issues Affecting Extension Human Sciences Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abell, Ellen; Cummings, Rebekah; Duke, Adrienne M.; Marshall, Jennifer Wells

    2015-01-01

    Extension programs based on identified needs, relevant theory, and solid research too often fail to realize their objectives. Program implementation is acknowledged to contribute to program effectiveness, yet systematic attention has not been paid to the array of implementation issues that can complicate achieving program goals. We developed the…

  3. A Framework for Identifying Implementation Issues Affecting Extension Human Sciences Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abell, Ellen; Cummings, Rebekah; Duke, Adrienne M.; Marshall, Jennifer Wells

    2015-01-01

    Extension programs based on identified needs, relevant theory, and solid research too often fail to realize their objectives. Program implementation is acknowledged to contribute to program effectiveness, yet systematic attention has not been paid to the array of implementation issues that can complicate achieving program goals. We developed the…

  4. Fear of Singing: Identifying and Assisting Singers with Chronic Anxiety Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barefield, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Singers are sometimes plagued by an ongoing sense of anxiety that has the potential to negatively affect their work. This article addresses the issue of chronic anxiety as distinct from the more frequently considered topic of performance anxiety. Strategies are outlined to help teachers identify and address this problem in to order to help…

  5. The Daily Readiness Huddle: a process to rapidly identify issues and foster improvement through problem-solving accountability.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Lane F; Cherian, Shirley S; Chua, Kimberly B; Thankachan, Sam; Millecker, Laura A; Koroll, Alex G; Bisset, George S

    2017-01-01

    Because of the increasing complexities of providing imaging for pediatric health care services, a more reliable process to manage the daily delivery of care is necessary. Objective We describe our Daily Readiness Huddle and the effects of the process on problem identification and improvement. Our Daily Readiness Huddle has four elements: metrics review, clinical volume review, daily readiness assessment, and problem accountability. It is attended by radiologists, directors, managers, front-line staff with concerns, representatives from support services (information technology [IT] and biomedical engineering [biomed]), and representatives who join the meeting in a virtual format from off-site locations. Data are visually displayed on erasable whiteboards. The daily readiness assessment uses queues to determine whether anyone has concerns or outlier data in regard to S-MESA (Safety, Methods, Equipment, Supplies or Associates). Through this assessment, problems are identified and categorized as quick hits (will be resolved in 24-48 h, not requiring project management) and complex issues. Complex issues are assigned an owner, quality coach and report-back date. Additionally, projects are defined as improvements that are often strategic, are anticipated to take more than 60 days, and do not necessarily arise out of identified issues during the Daily Readiness Huddle. We tracked and calculated the mean, median and range of days to resolution and completion for complex issues and for projects during the first full year of implementing this process. During the first 12 months, 91 complex issues were identified and resolved, 11 projects were in progress and 33 completed, with 23 other projects active or in planning. Time to resolution of complex issues (in days) was mean 37.5, median 34.0, and range 1-105. For projects, time to completion (in days) was mean 86.0, median 84.0, and range 5-280. The Daily Readiness Huddle process has given us a framework to rapidly identify

  6. Functional Independence Measures for Students with Disabilities: Review of Issues and Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilczenski, Felicia L.; Bontrager, Terry; Ferguson, Tammi

    This review highlights issues in functional independence measurement and describes educationally-based functional independence measures applicable to students with disabilities. Increasing inclusion of students with disabilities in general education settings has resulted in a need for assessments to identify students' capabilities to meet the…

  7. A geospatial approach to identify water quality issues for National Wildlife Refuges in Oregon and Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinck, Jo Ellen; Chojnacki, Kimberly; Finger, Susan E.; Linder, Greg; Kilbride, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Many National Wildlife Refuges (Refuges) have impaired water quality resulting from historic and current land uses, upstream sources, and aerial pollutant deposition. Competing duties limit the time available for Refuge staff to identify and evaluate potential water quality issues. As a result, water quality–related issues may not be resolved until a problem has already arisen. This study developed a geospatial approach for identifying and prioritizing water quality issues affecting natural resources (including migratory birds and federally listed species) within Refuge boundaries. We assessed the location and status of streams pursuant to the Clean Water Act in relation to individual Refuges in Oregon and Washington, United States. Although twelve Refuges in Oregon (60%) and eight Refuges in Washington (40%) were assessed under the Clean Water Act, only 12% and 3% of total Refuge stream lengths were assessed, respectively. Very few assessed Refuge streams were not designated as impaired (0% in Oregon, 1% in Washington). Despite the low proportions of stream lengths assessed, most Refuges in Oregon (70%) and Washington (65%) are located in watersheds with approved total maximum daily loads. We developed summaries of current water quality issues for individual Refuges and identified large gaps for Refuge-specific water quality data and habitat utilization by sensitive species. We conclude that monitoring is warranted on many Refuges to better characterize water quality under the Clean Water Act.

  8. Identifying Residents' Health Issues Six Weeks after the Great East Japan Earthquake.

    PubMed

    Teramoto, Chie; Nagata, Satoko; Okamoto, Reiko; Suzuki, Ruriko; Kishi, Emiko; Nomura, Michie; Jojima, Noriko; Nishida, Masumi; Koide, Keiko; Kusano, Emiko; Iwamoto, Saori; Murashima, Sachiyo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the characteristics and health issues of residents in need of assistance in a town affected by the Great East Japan Earthquake, six weeks after the disaster, through an outreach initiative. A cross-sectional qualitative design was used. Public health nurses conducted comprehensive semi-structured interviews during home visits with residents. A total of 5,082 residents from the affected town. These included demographic information, public records of the extent of the damages, and qualitative interview data to determine the urgency of the necessary interventions. A total of 281 residents needed some kind of assistance and were identified as "requiring early intervention (within two weeks)" or "requiring assistance (within 12 weeks)." The most common health issue requiring early intervention was "interruption of treatment" (25.0%), followed by "need for mental care." The most frequent health issue requiring assistance within 12 weeks was the "need for mental health care" (39.7%), followed by "interruption of treatment," and "need for nursing care." During a disaster, it is imperative to identify cases requiring early intervention. Home-visit interviews were necessary to identify existing health concerns to prevent the development of more serious health problems. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Ongoing ethical issues concerning authorship in biomedical journals: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Kornhaber, Rachel Anne; McLean, Loyola M; Baber, Rodney J

    2015-01-01

    Health professionals publishing within the field of health sciences continue to experience issues concerning appropriate authorship, which have clinical, ethical, and academic implications. This integrative review sought to explore the key issues concerning authorship from a bioethical standpoint, aiming to explore the key features of the authorship debate. Studies were identified through an electronic search, using the PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and Scopus databases of peer-reviewed research, published between 2009 and 2014, limited to English language research, with search terms developed to reflect the current issues of authorship. From among the 279 papers identified, 20 research papers met the inclusion criteria. Findings were compiled and then arranged to identify themes and relationships. The review incorporated a wide range of authorship issues encompassing equal-credited authors, honorary (guest/gift) and ghost authorship, perception/experiences of authorship, and guidelines/policies. This review suggests that the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors' (ICMJE) recommended guidelines for authorship are not reflected in current authorship practices within the domain of health sciences in both low-and high-impact-factor journals. This devaluing of the true importance of authorship has the potential to affect the validity of authorship, diminish the real contributions of the true authors, and negatively affect patient care.

  10. Ongoing ethical issues concerning authorship in biomedical journals: an integrative review

    PubMed Central

    Kornhaber, Rachel Anne; McLean, Loyola M; Baber, Rodney J

    2015-01-01

    Health professionals publishing within the field of health sciences continue to experience issues concerning appropriate authorship, which have clinical, ethical, and academic implications. This integrative review sought to explore the key issues concerning authorship from a bioethical standpoint, aiming to explore the key features of the authorship debate. Studies were identified through an electronic search, using the PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and Scopus databases of peer-reviewed research, published between 2009 and 2014, limited to English language research, with search terms developed to reflect the current issues of authorship. From among the 279 papers identified, 20 research papers met the inclusion criteria. Findings were compiled and then arranged to identify themes and relationships. The review incorporated a wide range of authorship issues encompassing equal-credited authors, honorary (guest/gift) and ghost authorship, perception/experiences of authorship, and guidelines/policies. This review suggests that the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors’ (ICMJE) recommended guidelines for authorship are not reflected in current authorship practices within the domain of health sciences in both low-and high-impact-factor journals. This devaluing of the true importance of authorship has the potential to affect the validity of authorship, diminish the real contributions of the true authors, and negatively affect patient care. PMID:26257520

  11. Identifying the Science and Technology Dimensions of Emerging Public Policy Issues through Horizon Scanning

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Miles; Acland, Andrew; Armstrong, Harry J.; Bellingham, Jim R.; Bland, Jessica; Bodmer, Helen C.; Burall, Simon; Castell, Sarah; Chilvers, Jason; Cleevely, David D.; Cope, David; Costanzo, Lucia; Dolan, James A.; Doubleday, Robert; Feng, Wai Yi; Godfray, H. Charles J.; Good, David A.; Grant, Jonathan; Green, Nick; Groen, Arnoud J.; Guilliams, Tim T.; Gupta, Sunjai; Hall, Amanda C.; Heathfield, Adam; Hotopp, Ulrike; Kass, Gary; Leeder, Tim; Lickorish, Fiona A.; Lueshi, Leila M.; Magee, Chris; Mata, Tiago; McBride, Tony; McCarthy, Natasha; Mercer, Alan; Neilson, Ross; Ouchikh, Jackie; Oughton, Edward J.; Oxenham, David; Pallett, Helen; Palmer, James; Patmore, Jeff; Petts, Judith; Pinkerton, Jan; Ploszek, Richard; Pratt, Alan; Rocks, Sophie A.; Stansfield, Neil; Surkovic, Elizabeth; Tyler, Christopher P.; Watkinson, Andrew R.; Wentworth, Jonny; Willis, Rebecca; Wollner, Patrick K. A.; Worts, Kim; Sutherland, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Public policy requires public support, which in turn implies a need to enable the public not just to understand policy but also to be engaged in its development. Where complex science and technology issues are involved in policy making, this takes time, so it is important to identify emerging issues of this type and prepare engagement plans. In our horizon scanning exercise, we used a modified Delphi technique [1]. A wide group of people with interests in the science and policy interface (drawn from policy makers, policy adviser, practitioners, the private sector and academics) elicited a long list of emergent policy issues in which science and technology would feature strongly and which would also necessitate public engagement as policies are developed. This was then refined to a short list of top priorities for policy makers. Thirty issues were identified within broad areas of business and technology; energy and environment; government, politics and education; health, healthcare, population and aging; information, communication, infrastructure and transport; and public safety and national security. PMID:24879444

  12. Identifying the science and technology dimensions of emerging public policy issues through horizon scanning.

    PubMed

    Parker, Miles; Acland, Andrew; Armstrong, Harry J; Bellingham, Jim R; Bland, Jessica; Bodmer, Helen C; Burall, Simon; Castell, Sarah; Chilvers, Jason; Cleevely, David D; Cope, David; Costanzo, Lucia; Dolan, James A; Doubleday, Robert; Feng, Wai Yi; Godfray, H Charles J; Good, David A; Grant, Jonathan; Green, Nick; Groen, Arnoud J; Guilliams, Tim T; Gupta, Sunjai; Hall, Amanda C; Heathfield, Adam; Hotopp, Ulrike; Kass, Gary; Leeder, Tim; Lickorish, Fiona A; Lueshi, Leila M; Magee, Chris; Mata, Tiago; McBride, Tony; McCarthy, Natasha; Mercer, Alan; Neilson, Ross; Ouchikh, Jackie; Oughton, Edward J; Oxenham, David; Pallett, Helen; Palmer, James; Patmore, Jeff; Petts, Judith; Pinkerton, Jan; Ploszek, Richard; Pratt, Alan; Rocks, Sophie A; Stansfield, Neil; Surkovic, Elizabeth; Tyler, Christopher P; Watkinson, Andrew R; Wentworth, Jonny; Willis, Rebecca; Wollner, Patrick K A; Worts, Kim; Sutherland, William J

    2014-01-01

    Public policy requires public support, which in turn implies a need to enable the public not just to understand policy but also to be engaged in its development. Where complex science and technology issues are involved in policy making, this takes time, so it is important to identify emerging issues of this type and prepare engagement plans. In our horizon scanning exercise, we used a modified Delphi technique. A wide group of people with interests in the science and policy interface (drawn from policy makers, policy adviser, practitioners, the private sector and academics) elicited a long list of emergent policy issues in which science and technology would feature strongly and which would also necessitate public engagement as policies are developed. This was then refined to a short list of top priorities for policy makers. Thirty issues were identified within broad areas of business and technology; energy and environment; government, politics and education; health, healthcare, population and aging; information, communication, infrastructure and transport; and public safety and national security.

  13. Usability Validation of Medical Devices: Issues in Identifying Potential Use Errors.

    PubMed

    Schiro, Jessica; Pelayo, Sylvia; Weinhold, Thomas; Del Zotto, Marzia; Marcilly, Romaric

    2017-01-01

    In order to prevent use errors with their medical devices, manufacturers have to integrate a safety-oriented usability engineering process in their product development lifecycle. A critical step of this process is the identification of potential use-errors. Standards and guidelines recommend to triangulate several sources of information e.g. scientific literature, incident reports, manufacturer's files and user's feedbacks. This paper presents lessons learned from applying these recommendations during an international project. We identify issues with (i) searching literature and databases, and (ii) interpreting collected data. Nevertheless triangulation of information sources allows to identify different types of use errors therefore providing valuable lists of potential use errors. Issuing recommendations aim at making easier this critical task.

  14. Technical issues related to NUREG 0800, Chapter 18: Human Factors Engineering/Standard Review Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, J.W.

    1982-11-05

    The revision of Chapter 18 of NUREG 0800, Human Factors Engineering Standard Review Plan (SRP) will be based on SECY 82-111 and guidance contained in NUREG 0700, NUREG 0801 and NUREG 0835, plus other references. In conducting field reviews of control rooms, the NRC has identified technical issues which can be used to enhance the development of the revised version of NUREG 0800, and to establish priorities among the list of possible Branch Technical Positions (BTP) in NUREG 0800, Rev. 0, Table 18.0-2. This report is a compilation of comments and suggestions from the people who used NUREG 0700 in the Control Room field reviews. This information was used to establish possible BTP topic priorities so that the most important BTPs could be issued first. The comments and suggestions are included for HFEB review in conjunction with the table of priorities.

  15. A Review of Breast Cancer Survivorship Issues from Survivors' Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jihyoung; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Jung Eun; Shim, Eun-Jung; Kim, Nam Hyoung; Kim, Zisun; Sohn, Guiyun; Youn, Hyun Jo; Kim, Ku Sang; Kim, Hanna; Lee, Jong Won

    2014-01-01

    Despite the fact that more breast cancer survivors are currently enjoying longer lifespans, there remains limited knowledge about the factors and issues that are of greatest significance for these survivors, particularly from their perspectives. This review was based on the concept that the topics addressed should focus on the perspectives of current survivors and should be extended to future modalities, which physicians will be able to use to gain a better understanding of the hidden needs of these patients. We intended to choose and review dimensions other than the pathology and the disease process that could have been overlooked during treatment. The eight topics upon which we focused included: delay of treatment and survival outcome; sexual well-being; concerns about childbearing; tailored follow-up; presence of a family history of breast cancer; diet and physical activity for survivors and their families; qualitative approach toward understanding of breast cancer survivorship, and; mobile health care for breast cancer survivors. Through this review, we aimed to examine the present clinical basis of the central issues noted from the survivors' perspectives and suggest a direction for future survivorship-related research. PMID:25320616

  16. A systematic review of noncommunicable health issues in mass gatherings.

    PubMed

    Alquthami, Ahmed H; Pines, Jesse M

    2014-04-01

    The review was conducted to evaluate if the field of mass-gathering medicine has evolved in addressing: (1) the lack of uniform standard measures; (2) the effectiveness of and needs for various interventions during a mass gathering; and (3) the various types of noncommunicable health issues (trauma and medical complaints) encountered and their severity during a gathering. A systematic review of papers published from 2003 through 2012 was conducted using databases of MEDLINE, Ovid, CINHAL, EBSCOHost, National Library of Medicine (NLM), Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), Elsevier, Scopus, and Proquest databases. Of 37,762 articles, 17 articles were included in this review, covering 18 mass-gathering events; 14 were multiple-day events. Across all events, the patient presentation rate (PPR) ranged from 0.13 to 20.8 patients per 1,000 attendees and the transfer to hospital rate (TTHR) ranged from 0.01 to 10.2 ambulance transports per 1,000 attendees. In four out of the seven studies, having on-site providers was associated with a lower rate of ambulance transports. The highest frequencies of noncommunicable presentations were headaches, abdominal complaints, and abrasions/lacerations. Most presentations were minor. Emergent cases requiring hospitalization (such as acute myocardial infarction) were rare. The rate of noncommunicable health issues varies across events and very serious emergencies are rare.

  17. Issues affecting the level of prosthetics research evidence: Secondary analysis of a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hafner, Brian J; Sawers, Andrew B

    2016-02-01

    Systematic reviews of scientific literature are valuable sources of synthesized knowledge. Systematic review results may also be used to inform readers about challenges inherent to an area of research, guide future research efforts, and facilitate improvements in evidence quality. To identify methodological issues that affected the overall level of scientific evidence reported in a contemporary systematic review and to offer suggestions for enhancing publications' contribution to the overall evidence. Secondary analysis of a systematic review. Publications included in a systematic review related to microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knees were analyzed with respect to established methodological quality criteria. Common issues were identified and discussed. Internal validity was commonly affected by variable comparison conditions, limited justification of accommodation time, potential fatigue and learning effects, lack of blinding, small sample sizes, limited evidence of measurement reliability, subject attrition, and limited descriptions of selection criteria. Similarly, external validity was affected by limited descriptions of the study sample, indeterminate representativeness, and suboptimal description of the interventions. Results suggest that efforts to address methodological limitations, educate evidence consumers, and improve research reporting are needed to advance the quality and use of evidence in the field of prosthetics. Critical analysis of the strengths and limitations of publications included in a systematic review can inform evidence consumers and contributors about challenges inherent to a field of research. Results of this analysis suggest that efforts to address identified limitations are needed to enhance the overall level of prosthetics evidence. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2014.

  18. Issues for the selection of wheelchair-specific activity and participation outcome measures: a review.

    PubMed

    Mortenson, William B; Miller, William C; Auger, Claudine

    2008-06-01

    To use the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health as a framework to identify and to evaluate wheelchair-specific outcome instruments that are useful for measuring activity and participation. CINHAL, PsychInfo, EMBASE, Google Scholar, Dissertation Abstracts Medline databases, and conference proceedings. Activity and participation measures that were specifically intended for adults who use wheelchairs and that were published in English in a peer-reviewed journal were included in this review. Based on electronic database searches using a variety of search terms, articles were identified by title, and appropriate abstracts were retrieved. Articles were obtained for all relevant abstracts. For peer-reviewed measures included in the review, we obtained any instruction manuals and related publications, frequently published in conference proceedings and theses or available electronically, on the development and testing of the measure. Tools included in the review were evaluated based on their conceptual coverage, reliability, validity, responsiveness, usefulness, and wheelchair contribution, which indicated how well the tool isolated the effect of the wheelchair on activity and participation outcomes. A number of conceptual, psychometric, and applicability issues were identified with the 11 wheelchair-specific measures included in the review. A majority of the measures were mobility focused. No single tool received excellent ratings in all areas of the review. Some of the most frequent issues identified included a failure to account for differences attributable to different wheelchairs and wheelchair seating, limited psychometric testing, and high administrative and respondent burden. Good reliability evidence was reported for most of the measures, but validity information was only available for 6 of the 11 measures, and responsiveness information for 3. This review suggests that these measures could be improved with

  19. Measuring persistence: A literature review focusing on methodological issues

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, A.K.; Brown, M.A.; Trumble, D.

    1995-03-01

    This literature review was conducted as part of a larger project to produce a handbook on the measurement of persistence. The past decade has marked the development of the concept of persistence and a growing recognition that the long-term impacts of demand-side management (DSM) programs warrant careful assessment. Although Increasing attention has been paid to the topic of persistence, no clear consensus has emerged either about its definition or about the methods most appropriate for its measurement and analysis. This project strives to fill that gap by reviewing the goals, terminology, and methods of past persistence studies. It was conducted from the perspective of a utility that seeks to acquire demand-side resources and is interested in their long-term durability; it was not conducted from the perspective of the individual consumer. Over 30 persistence studies, articles, and protocols were examined for this report. The review begins by discussing the underpinnings of persistence studies: namely, the definitions of persistence and the purposes of persistence studies. Then. it describes issues relevant to both the collection and analysis of data on the persistence of energy and demand savings. Findings from persistence studies also are summarized. Throughout the review, four studies are used repeatedly to illustrate different methodological and analytical approaches to persistence so that readers can track the data collection. data analysis, and findings of a set of comprehensive studies that represent alternative approaches.

  20. 42 CFR 423.2102 - Request for MAC review when ALJ issues decision or dismissal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Request for MAC review when ALJ issues decision or... Reopening, ALJ Hearings, MAC review, and Judicial Review § 423.2102 Request for MAC review when ALJ issues decision or dismissal. (a)(1) An enrollee to the ALJ hearing may request a MAC review if the enrollee files...

  1. Ethical issues identified by obstetrics and gynecology learners through a novel ethics curriculum.

    PubMed

    Mejia, Rachel B; Shinkunas, Laura A; Ryan, Ginny L

    2015-12-01

    Obstetrics and gynecology (ob/gyn) is fraught with bioethical issues, the professional significance of which may vary based on clinical experience. Our objective was to utilize our novel ethics curriculum to identify ethics and professionalism issues highlighted by ob/gyn learners and to compare responses between learner levels to further inform curricular development. We introduced an integrated and dynamic ob/gyn ethics and professionalism curriculum and mixed methods analysis of 181 resulting written reflections (case observation and assessments) from third-year medical students and from first- to fourth-year ob/gyn residents. Content was compared by learner level using basic thematic analysis and summary statistics. Within the 7 major ethics and professionalism domains, learners wrote most frequently about miscellaneous ob/gyn issues such as periviability and abortion (22% of students, 20% of residents) and problematic treatment decisions (20% of students, 19% of residents) rather than professional duty, communication, justice, student-/resident-specific issues, or quality of care. The most commonly discussed ob/gyn area by both learner groups was obstetrics rather than gynecology, gynecologic oncology, or reproductive endocrinology and infertility, although residents were more likely to discuss obstetrics-related concerns than students (65% vs 48%; P = .04) and students wrote about gynecologic oncology-related concerns more frequently than residents (25% vs 6%; P = .002). In their reflections, sources of ethical value (eg, the 4 classic ethics principles, professional guidelines, and consequentialism) were cited more frequently and in greater number by students than by residents (82% of students cited at least 1 source of ethical value vs 65% of residents; P = .01). Residents disagreed more frequently with the ethical propriety of clinical management than did students (67% vs 43%; P = .005). Our study introduces an innovative and dynamic approach to an ob

  2. Research Ethics Review: Identifying Public Policy and Program Gaps

    PubMed Central

    Strosberg, Martin A.; Gefenas, Eugenijus; Famenka, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    We present an analytical frame-work for use by fellows of the Fogarty International Center–sponsored Advanced Certificate Program in Research Ethics for Central and Eastern Europe to identify gaps in the public policies establishing research ethics review systems that impede them from doing their job of protecting human research subjects. The framework, illustrated by examples from post-Communist countries, employs a logic model based on the public policy and public management literature. This paper is part of a collection of papers analyzing the Fogarty International Center’s International Research Ethics Education and Curriculum program. PMID:24782068

  3. Women's Sexual Issues After Myocardial Infarction: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Emami Zeydi, Amir; Sharafkhani, Mohammad; Armat, Mohammad Reza; Gould, Kathleen Ahern; Soleimani, Aria; Hosseini, Seyed Javad

    2016-01-01

    Sexual activity after myocardial infarction (MI) is a concern for patients and often a challenge for health care professionals to address. It is widely recognized that most patients, of both sexes, report sexual problems or concerns after MI. However, there are reported differences between men and women. Women with sexual concerns may seek less help from health care providers and are more inclined to conceal them because of cultural barriers. The aim of the current study is to present a comprehensive review of the literature describing women's sexual issues after MI. A systematic search of the relevant literature was performed within international databases, including PubMed/Medline, Scopus, ScienceDirect, and ProQuest, as well as Google Scholar using relevant keywords. Also, Persian electronic databases such as Magiran, Scientific Information Databases, and Iran Medex were searched from the inception to October 2014. Articles focusing on the sexual issues after MI only in women, as well as articles on both sexes where women's results could be separated, were included in this review. A total of 8 articles were included in the final dataset. The main themes of women's sexual concerns after MI were "loss or decrease of sexual activity," "dissatisfaction of sexual relationship," "doubt about resumption time of sexual activity," "fear of reinfarction or sudden death during sexual activity after MI," "knowledge deficit regarding sexual activity after MI," and "poor performance of health care providers in sexual counseling." The results of this review demonstrate that women's post-MI sexual activity is affected by many concerns. The concerns may be a knowledge deficit related to not receiving necessary consultation on this topic. Nurses, as first-line care givers, can provide appropriate consultation and education for patients post-MI. As a result, breaking taboo imposed by cultural barriers, personal assumptions, or lack of confidence on giving sexual consultation may

  4. Identifying ethical issues of the Department of the Army civilian and Army Nurse Corps certified registered nurse anesthetists.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Constance L; Elliott, Aaron R; Harris, Janet R

    2006-08-01

    The purposes of this study were to identify the ethical issues Department of the Army civilian and Army Nurse Corps certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs) encountered in their anesthesia practice and how disturbed they were by these issues. This descriptive study used a secondary data analysis of a cross-sectional survey of Army Nurse Corps officers and Department of the Army civilian registered nurses (N = 5,293). The CRNA subset (n = 97) was obtained from questionnaires that indicated a primary practice setting as anesthesia. The most frequently occurring ethical issue identified was conflict in the nurse-physician relationship, whereas the most disturbing issue was working with incompetent/impaired colleagues. Unresolved ethical conflicts can negatively influence the nurses' morale, leading to avoidance of the issue and contributing to burnout. Identifying the ethical issues and disturbance level experienced by CRNAs should contribute to the development of an ethics education program that addresses issues encountered in CRNA practice.

  5. Identifying Ethical Issues in Mental Health Research with Minors Adolescents: Results of a Delphi Study.

    PubMed

    Hiriscau, Elisabeta Ioana; Stingelin-Giles, Nicola; Wasserman, Danuta; Reiter-Theil, Stella

    2016-05-11

    Research with minors, especially for preventive purposes, e.g., suicide prevention, investigating risk or self-destructive behaviors such as deviance, drug abuse, or suicidal behavior, is ethically sensitive. We present a Delphi study exploring the ethical implications of the needs formulated by researchers in an international pre-conference who would benefit from ethics support and guidance in conducting Mental Health Research with minors. The resulting List of Ethical Issues (LEI) was submitted to a 2-rounds Delphi process via the Internet, including 34 multidisciplinary experts. In the first round, the experts reviewed the LEI and completed a questionnaire. Results from this round were analyzed and grouped in nine categories comprising 40 items. In the second round, the experts had to agree/disagree with the needs expressed in the LEI leading to a final list of 25 ethical issues considered relevant for Mental Health Research with minors such as: confidentiality of the sensitive data, competence for consenting alone and risk of harm and stigma related to the methodology used in research. It was shown that studies like SEYLE (Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe) trigger among researchers wishes to obtain specific recommendations helping to comply with standards for good practice in conducting research with minors.

  6. Identifying Ethical Issues in Mental Health Research with Minors Adolescents: Results of a Delphi Study

    PubMed Central

    Hiriscau, Elisabeta Ioana; Stingelin-Giles, Nicola; Wasserman, Danuta; Reiter-Theil, Stella

    2016-01-01

    Research with minors, especially for preventive purposes, e.g., suicide prevention, investigating risk or self-destructive behaviors such as deviance, drug abuse, or suicidal behavior, is ethically sensitive. We present a Delphi study exploring the ethical implications of the needs formulated by researchers in an international pre-conference who would benefit from ethics support and guidance in conducting Mental Health Research with minors. The resulting List of Ethical Issues (LEI) was submitted to a 2-rounds Delphi process via the Internet, including 34 multidisciplinary experts. In the first round, the experts reviewed the LEI and completed a questionnaire. Results from this round were analyzed and grouped in nine categories comprising 40 items. In the second round, the experts had to agree/disagree with the needs expressed in the LEI leading to a final list of 25 ethical issues considered relevant for Mental Health Research with minors such as: confidentiality of the sensitive data, competence for consenting alone and risk of harm and stigma related to the methodology used in research. It was shown that studies like SEYLE (Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe) trigger among researchers wishes to obtain specific recommendations helping to comply with standards for good practice in conducting research with minors. PMID:27187425

  7. Summary of SMIRT20 Preconference Topical Workshop – Identifying Structural Issues in Advanced Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    William Richins; Stephen Novascone; Cheryl O'Brien

    2009-08-01

    Summary of SMIRT20 Preconference Topical Workshop – Identifying Structural Issues in Advanced Reactors William Richins1, Stephen Novascone1, and Cheryl O’Brien1 1Idaho National Laboratory, US Dept. of Energy, Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA, e-mail: William.Richins@inl.gov The Idaho National Laboratory (INL, USA) and IASMiRT sponsored an international forum Nov 5-6, 2008 in Porvoo, Finland for nuclear industry, academic, and regulatory representatives to identify structural issues in current and future advanced reactor design, especially for extreme conditions and external threats. The purpose of this Topical Workshop was to articulate research, engineering, and regulatory Code development needs. The topics addressed by the Workshop were selected to address critical industry needs specific to advanced reactor structures that have long lead times and can be the subject of future SMiRT technical sessions. The topics were; 1) structural/materials needs for extreme conditions and external threats in contemporary (Gen. III) and future (Gen. IV and NGNP) advanced reactors and 2) calibrating simulation software and methods that address topic 1 The workshop discussions and research needs identified are presented. The Workshop successfully produced interactive discussion on the two topics resulting in a list of research and technology needs. It is recommended that IASMiRT communicate the results of the discussion to industry and researchers to encourage new ideas and projects. In addition, opportunities exist to retrieve research reports and information that currently exists, and encourage more international cooperation and collaboration. It is recommended that IASMiRT continue with an off-year workshop series on select topics.

  8. Ethics and Neuropsychiatric Genetics: A Review of Major Issues

    PubMed Central

    Hoge, Steven K.; Appelbaum, Paul S.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in neuropsychiatric genetics hold great hopes for improved prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. However, the power of genetic testing to identify individuals at increased risk for disorders and to convey information about relatives creates a set of complex ethical issues. Public attitudes are inevitably affected by the shadow of eugenics, with its history of distorting scientific findings to serve socio-political ends. Nonetheless, the growing availability of genetic tests means that more patients will seek genetic information, and physicians must manage the process of informed consent to allow meaningful decisions. Patients should be helped to understand the often-limited predictive power of current knowledge, potential psychological impact, risks of stigma and discrimination, and possible implications for family members. Decisions for predictive testing of children raise additional concerns, including distortions of family dynamics and negative effects on children’s self-image; testing is best deferred until adulthood unless preventive interventions exist. Pharmacogenomic testing, part of personalized medicine, may bring collateral susceptibility information for which patients should be prepared. The implications of genetic findings for families raise the question of whether physicians have duties to inform family members of implications for their health. Finally, participation in research in neuropsychiatric genetics evokes a broad range of ethical concerns, including the contentious issue of the extent to which results should be returned to individual subjects. As genetic science becomes more widely applied, the public will become more sophisticated and will be likely to demand a greater role in determining social policy on these issues. PMID:22272758

  9. A review of issues surrounding medically elective cesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Miesnik, Susan R; Reale, Barbara J

    2007-01-01

    The rate of cesarean delivery has increased dramatically over the past decade. Medically elective cesareans are a major factor contributing to this rise. This article discusses the most recent evidence on the perinatal risks of cesarean delivery versus vaginal birth, the economic impact of elective cesarean delivery, and ethical principles related to cesareans performed without medical indication. Physicians' rationales and responses to the issues are reviewed and the recommendations and guidelines of professional organizations are summarized. Available evidence does not lend support to a current shift in clinical practice. Research is needed to adequately compare outcomes of planned cesarean delivery and planned vaginal birth. Until evidence supports medically elective cesarean as a birth option that optimizes outcomes for low-risk mothers and their infants, obstetric care providers should continue to support evidenced-based decision making that includes advocacy for vaginal delivery as the optimal mode of birth.

  10. Mobile healthcare applications: system design review, critical issues and challenges.

    PubMed

    Baig, Mirza Mansoor; GholamHosseini, Hamid; Connolly, Martin J

    2015-03-01

    Mobile phones are becoming increasingly important in monitoring and delivery of healthcare interventions. They are often considered as pocket computers, due to their advanced computing features, enhanced preferences and diverse capabilities. Their sophisticated sensors and complex software applications make the mobile healthcare (m-health) based applications more feasible and innovative. In a number of scenarios user-friendliness, convenience and effectiveness of these systems have been acknowledged by both patients as well as healthcare providers. M-health technology employs advanced concepts and techniques from multidisciplinary fields of electrical engineering, computer science, biomedical engineering and medicine which benefit the innovations of these fields towards healthcare systems. This paper deals with two important aspects of current mobile phone based sensor applications in healthcare. Firstly, critical review of advanced applications such as; vital sign monitoring, blood glucose monitoring and in-built camera based smartphone sensor applications. Secondly, investigating challenges and critical issues related to the use of smartphones in healthcare including; reliability, efficiency, mobile phone platform variability, cost effectiveness, energy usage, user interface, quality of medical data, and security and privacy. It was found that the mobile based applications have been widely developed in recent years with fast growing deployment by healthcare professionals and patients. However, despite the advantages of smartphones in patient monitoring, education, and management there are some critical issues and challenges related to security and privacy of data, acceptability, reliability and cost that need to be addressed.

  11. 42 CFR 405.1102 - Request for MAC review when ALJ issues decision or dismissal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Request for MAC review when ALJ issues decision or...) Medicare Appeals Council Review § 405.1102 Request for MAC review when ALJ issues decision or dismissal. (a)(1) A party to the ALJ hearing may request a MAC review if the party files a written request for a...

  12. Review of the studies on fundamental issues in LBE corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinsuo; Li, Ning

    2008-02-01

    Lead bismuth eutectic (LBE) technology is being developed for applications in advanced nuclear systems and high-power spallation neutron targets. In this paper, the current understanding of corrosion and the fundamental issues relevant to corrosion when using LBE as a heavy liquid metal nuclear coolant are reviewed. Corrosion mechanisms and processes in LBE are examined. Prospective methods to mitigate corrosion are briefly surveyed. We then discuss the oxygen control technique for corrosion mitigation in detail, including the range of oxygen concentrations in LBE, oxygen sensors, and the surface oxidation kinetics. Existing experimental results are summarized and reviewed. Theoretical corrosion models for non-isothermal liquid metal loops are refined and compared each other. The applications of these models to a few practical lead-alloy systems are used to illustrate the corrosion mechanisms and the parameter dependency, and to benchmark. Based on the current state of knowledge, a number of R&D tasks are proposed to fill the gaps and firmly establish the scientific underpinning before LBE nuclear coolant technology is ready for programmatic and industrial applications.

  13. Isoflavones and Prostate Cancer: A Review of Some Critical Issues

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong-Yi; Cui, Jie; Zhang, Ye; Wang, Zhen-Long; Chong, Tie; Wang, Zi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this review is to discuss some critical issues of isoflavones protective against the development of prostate cancer (PCa). Data Sources: Data cited in this review were obtained primarily from PubMed and Embase from 1975 to 2015. Study Selection: Articles were selected with the search terms “isoflavone”, “Phytoestrogen”, “soy”, “genistin”, and “PCa”. Results: Isoflavones do not play an important role on prostate-specific antigen levels reduction in PCa patients or healthy men. The effect of isoflavones on sex hormone levels and PCa risk may be determined by equol converting bacteria in the intestine, specific polymorphic variation and concentrations of isoflavones. The intake of various types of phytoestrogens with lower concentrations in the daily diet may produce synergistic effects against PCa. Moreover, prostate tissue may concentrate isoflavones to potentially anti-carcinogenic levels. In addition, it is noteworthy that isoflavones may act as an agonist in PCa. Conclusions: Isoflavones play a protective role against the development of PCa. However, careful consideration should be given when isoflavones are used in the prevention and treatment of PCa. PMID:26831238

  14. Identifying Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Search Terminology: A Systematic Review of Health Systematic Reviews.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joseph G L; Ylioja, Thomas; Lackey, Mellanye

    2016-01-01

    Research on the health of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) populations can provide important information to address existing health inequalities. Finding existing research in LGBT health can prove challenging due to the plethora of terminology used. We sought to describe existing search strategies and to identify more comprehensive LGBT search terminology. We iteratively created a search string to identify systematic reviews and meta-analyses about LGBT health and implemented it in Embase, PubMed/MEDLINE, and PsycINFO databases on May 28-29, 2015. We hand-searched the journal LGBT Health. Inclusion criteria were: systematic reviews and meta-analyses that addressed LGBT health, used systematic searching, and used independent coders for inclusion. The published search terminology in each record and search strings provided by authors on request were cross-referenced with our original search to identify additional terminology. Our search process identified 19 systematic reviews meeting inclusion criteria. The number of search terms used to identify LGBT-related records ranged from 1 to 31. From the included studies, we identified 46 new search terms related to LGBT health. We removed five search terms as inappropriate and added five search terms used in the field. The resulting search string included 82 terms. There is room to improve the quality of searching and reporting in LGBT health systematic reviews. Future work should attempt to enhance the positive predictive value of LGBT health searches. Our findings can assist LGBT health reviewers in capturing the diversity of LGBT terminology when searching.

  15. Newly identified pathogens associated with periodontitis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Chaparro, P J; Gonçalves, C; Figueiredo, L C; Faveri, M; Lobão, E; Tamashiro, N; Duarte, P; Feres, M

    2014-09-01

    There is substantial evidence supporting the role of certain oral bacteria species in the onset and progression of periodontitis. Nevertheless, results of independent-culture diagnostic methods introduced about a decade ago have pointed to the existence of new periodontal pathogens. However, the data of these studies have not been evaluated together, which may generate some misunderstanding on the actual role of these microorganisms in the etiology of periodontitis. The aim of this systematic review was to determine the current weight of evidence for newly identified periodontal pathogens based on the results of "association" studies. This review was conducted and reported in accordance with the PRISMA statement. The MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases were searched up to September 2013 for studies (1) comparing microbial data of subgingival plaque samples collected from subjects with periodontitis and periodontal health and (2) evaluating at least 1 microorganism other than the already-known periodontal pathogens. From 1,450 papers identified, 41 studies were eligible. The data were extracted and registered in predefined piloted forms. The results suggested that there is moderate evidence in the literature to support the association of 17 species or phylotypes from the phyla Bacteroidetes, Candidatus Saccharibacteria, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Spirochaetes, and Synergistetes. The phylum Candidatus Saccharibacteria and the Archaea domain also seem to have an association with disease. These data point out the importance of previously unidentified species in the etiology of periodontitis and might guide future investigations on the actual role of these suspected new pathogens in the onset and progression of this infection. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  16. [Risk factors associated with mental health issues in adolescents: a integrative review].

    PubMed

    Pinto, Agnes Caroline Souza; Luna, Izaildo Tavares; Sivla, Adna de Araújo; Pinheiro, Patrícia Neyva da Costa; Braga, Violante Augusta Batista; Souza, Angela Maria Alves E

    2014-06-01

    To identify the risk factors associated with mental health issues in adolescents. An integrative review was conducted in four databases with publications from 2007 to 2013. The terms Adolescent and Mental Health were used to search adequate articles as DeCs/MeSH bases. Publications were found in different journals in different fields of knowledge and the quantitative research was the most frequent. The mental health issues were categorized as individual factors; drug related factors, school factors, family factors, social factors and STDs/Aids related factors. The most addressed category was individual factors, with 23 publications. The integrative review allowed to point important questions to be addressed in preventive actions by the health professional, including the nurse, to create a space that works with risk conditioning factors in adolescents for mental health aggravation.

  17. Identifying the mathematics middle year students use as they address a community issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshman, Margaret

    2017-03-01

    Middle year students often do not see the mathematics in the real world whereas the Australian Curriculum: Mathematics aims for students to be "confident and creative users and communicators of mathematics" (Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority [ACARA] 2012). Using authentic and real mathematics tasks can address this situation. This paper is an account of how, working within a Knowledge Producing Schools' framework, a group of middle year students addressed a real community issue, the problem of the lack of a teenage safe space using mathematics and technology. Data were collected for this case study via journal observations and reflections, semi-structured interviews, samples of the students' work and videos of students working. The data were analysed by identifying the mathematics the students used determining the function and location of the space and focused on problem negotiation, formulation and solving through the statistical investigation cycle. The paper will identify the mathematics and statistics these students used as they addressed a real problem in their local community.

  18. Identifying priority medicines policy issues for New Zealand: a general inductive study

    PubMed Central

    Babar, Zaheer-Ud-Din; Francis, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To identify priority medicines policy issues for New Zealand. Setting Stakeholders from a broad range of healthcare and policy institutions including primary, secondary and tertiary care. Participants Exploratory, semistructured interviews were conducted with 20 stakeholders throughout New Zealand. Primary and secondary outcome measures The interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed and coded into INVIVO 10, then compared and grouped for similarity of theme. Perceptions, experiences and opinions regarding New Zealand's medicines policy issues were recorded. Results A large proportion of stakeholders appeared to be unaware of New Zealand's (NZ) medicines policy. In general, the policy was considered to offer consistency to guide decision-making. In the context of Pharmaceutical Management Agency's (PHARMAC's) fixed budget for procuring and subsidising medicines, there was reasonable satisfaction with the range of medicines available—rare disorder medicines being the clear exception. Concerns raised were by whom and how decisions are made and whether desired health outcomes are being measured. Other concerns included inconsistencies in evidence and across health technologies. Despite attempts to improve the situation, lower socioeconomic groups (including rural residents) Māori and Pacific ethnicities and people with rare disorders face challenges with regards to accessing medicines. Other barriers include, convenience to and affordability of prescribers and the increase of prescription fees from NZ$3 to NZ$5. Concerns related to the PHARMAC of New Zealand included: a constraining budget; non-transparency of in-house analysis; lack of consistency in recommendations between the Pharmacology and Therapeutics Advisory Committee. Constraints and inefficiencies also exist in the submission process to access high-cost medicines. Conclusions The results suggest reasonable satisfaction with the availability of subsidised medicines. However, some of the

  19. Hungary's petroleum refineries: A review of energy usage, environmental, and processing issues. Phase 2 final report. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) developed a program designed to assist Hungary in improving operating efficiency, energy conservation, and environmental control in its petroleum refinery sector. The volume reviews operating and planning issues in processing, energy, and environment. The primary focus of the effort was to identify changes in operating practices and equipment modifications that could be implemented in the near-term to increase the overall operating efficiency of the effort, reduce energy usage, and reduce the level of pollutants from Hungary's two largest operating refineries. In addition, it identifies areas for potential longer-term capital improvement projects. Finally, operating and planning issues were also reviewed.

  20. 22 CFR 216.9 - Bilateral and multilateral studies and concise reviews of environmental issues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... reviews of environmental issues. 216.9 Section 216.9 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL... environmental issues. Notwithstanding anything to the contrary in these procedures, the Administrator may... United States is a member or participant; or (b) Concise reviews of the environmental issues involved...

  1. 22 CFR 216.9 - Bilateral and multilateral studies and concise reviews of environmental issues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... reviews of environmental issues. 216.9 Section 216.9 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL... environmental issues. Notwithstanding anything to the contrary in these procedures, the Administrator may... United States is a member or participant; or (b) Concise reviews of the environmental issues involved...

  2. 22 CFR 216.9 - Bilateral and multilateral studies and concise reviews of environmental issues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... reviews of environmental issues. 216.9 Section 216.9 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL... environmental issues. Notwithstanding anything to the contrary in these procedures, the Administrator may... United States is a member or participant; or (b) Concise reviews of the environmental issues involved...

  3. 22 CFR 216.9 - Bilateral and multilateral studies and concise reviews of environmental issues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... reviews of environmental issues. 216.9 Section 216.9 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL... environmental issues. Notwithstanding anything to the contrary in these procedures, the Administrator may... United States is a member or participant; or (b) Concise reviews of the environmental issues involved...

  4. 22 CFR 216.9 - Bilateral and multilateral studies and concise reviews of environmental issues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... reviews of environmental issues. 216.9 Section 216.9 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL... environmental issues. Notwithstanding anything to the contrary in these procedures, the Administrator may... United States is a member or participant; or (b) Concise reviews of the environmental issues involved...

  5. A study to identify research issues in the area of electromagnetic measurements and signal handling of remotely sensed data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Research issues in the area of electromagnetic measurements and signal handling of remotely sensed data are identified. The following seven issues are discussed; platform/sensor system position and velocity, platform/sensor attitudes and attitude rates, optics and antennas, detectors and associated electronics, sensor calibration, signal handling, and system design.

  6. Identifying Complementary and Alternative Medicine Usage Information from Internet Resources. A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vivekanand; Holmes, John H; Sarkar, Indra N

    2016-08-05

    Identify and highlight research issues and methods used in studying Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) information needs, access, and exchange over the Internet. A literature search was conducted using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis guidelines from PubMed to identify articles that have studied Internet use in the CAM context. Additional searches were conducted at Nature.com and Google Scholar. The Internet provides a major medium for attaining CAM information and can also serve as an avenue for conducting CAM related surveys. Based on the literature analyzed in this review, there seems to be significant interest in developing methodologies for identifying CAM treatments, including the analysis of search query data and social media platform discussions. Several studies have also underscored the challenges in developing approaches for identifying the reliability of CAM-related information on the Internet, which may not be supported with reliable sources. The overall findings of this review suggest that there are opportunities for developing approaches for making available accurate information and developing ways to restrict the spread and sale of potentially harmful CAM products and information. Advances in Internet research are yet to be used in context of understanding CAM prevalence and perspectives. Such approaches may provide valuable insights into the current trends and needs in context of CAM use and spread.

  7. IDENTIFYING COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE USAGE INFORMATION FROM INTERNET RESOURCES: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, V.; Holmes, J.H.; Sarkar, I.N.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective Identify and highlight research issues and methods used in studying Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) information needs, access, and exchange over the Internet. Methods A literature search was conducted using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis guidelines from PubMed to identify articles that have studied Internet use in the CAM context. Additional searches were conducted at Nature.com and Google Scholar. Results The Internet provides a major medium for attaining CAM information and can also serve as an avenue for conducting CAM related surveys. Based on the literature analyzed in this review, there seems to be significant interest in developing methodologies for identifying CAM treatments, including the analysis of search query data and social media platform discussions. Several studies have also underscored the challenges in developing approaches for identifying the reliability of CAM-related information on the Internet, which may not be supported with reliable sources. The overall findings of this review suggest that there are opportunities for developing approaches for making available accurate information and developing ways to restrict the spread and sale of potentially harmful CAM products and information. Conclusions Advances in Internet research are yet to be used in context of understanding CAM prevalence and perspectives. Such approaches may provide valuable insights into the current trends and needs in context of CAM use and spread. PMID:27352304

  8. Issues in weaning from mechanical ventilation: literature review.

    PubMed

    Rose, Louise; Nelson, Sioban

    2006-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to raise questions on the effect of skill mix and organizational structure on weaning from mechanical ventilation. Mechanical ventilation is an essential life-saving technology. There are, however, numerous associated complications that influence the morbidity and mortality of patients receiving intensive care. Therefore, it was essential to use the safest and most effective form of ventilation for the shortest possible duration. Because of the potential complications and costs of mechanical ventilation, research to date have focused on accurate weaning readiness assessment, methods and organizational aspects that influence the weaning process. In early 2005, the literature was reviewed from 1986 to 2004 by accessing the following databases: Medline, Proquest, Science Direct, CINAHL, and Blackwell Science. The keywords mechanical ventilation, weaning, protocols, critical care, nursing role, decision-making and weaning readiness were used separately and combinations. Controversy exists in weaning practices about appropriate and efficacious weaning readiness assessment indicators, the best method of weaning and the use of weaning protocols. Arguably, the implementation of weaning protocols may have little effect in an environment that favours collaboration between nursing and medical staff, autonomous nursing decision-making in relation to weaning practices, and high numbers of nurses qualified at postgraduate level. Further research is required that better quantifies critical care nurses' role in weaning practices and the contextual issues that influence both the nursing role and the process of weaning from mechanical ventilation.

  9. Pusher behaviour: a critical review of controversial issues.

    PubMed

    Paci, Matteo; Baccini, Marco; Rinaldi, Lucio A

    2009-01-01

    Despite an increasing interest by researchers and clinicians, the pusher behaviour (PB) is still a poorly understood disorder, exhibited by some stroke patients, who push with their non-affected limbs towards the contralesional side and resist attempts at correction of their tilted posture. This review is aimed at critically summarizing findings on controversial issues regarding PB, namely correlation with neglect, neural correlates and underlying mechanisms. There is a growing agreement that PB reflects some misrepresentation of verticality. According to different findings, it has been suggested that PB may result from a conflict between an intact visual and an impaired somesthetic perception of vertical, or alternatively that it might result from a high-order disruption of somesthetic information processing from the paretic hemi-body, named graviceptive neglect. Although conflicting data have been reported, the association between PB and neglect seems to be confirmed, when a comprehensive assessment of neglect-related phenomena is performed. Localization of brain lesions is also controversial. Some investigations stressed the role of posterior lateral thalamus, but other findings revealed that different lesional sites may also be present. On the basis of these data we suggest the existence of a multicomponential network reliable for upright posture control. This model might also explain some different results in this area. Clinical implications and requirements for future research are discussed.

  10. The issue of corrosion in dental implants: a review.

    PubMed

    Olmedo, Daniel G; Tasat, Déborah R; Duffó, Gustavo; Guglielmotti, Maria B; Cabrini, Rómulo L

    2009-01-01

    Pure titanium or titanium alloys, and to a lesser extent, zirconium, are metals that are often used in direct contact with host tissues. These metallic biomaterials are highly reactive, and on exposure to fluid media or air, quickly develop a layer of titanium dioxide (TiO2) or zirconium dioxide (ZrO2). This layer of dioxide forms a boundary at the interface between the biological medium and the metal structure, determining the degree of biocompatibility and the biological response of the implant. Corrosion is the deterioration a metal undergoes as a result of the surrounding medium (electrochemical attack), which causes the release of ions into the microenvironment. No metal or alloy is entirely inert in vivo. Corrosion phenomena at the interlace are particularly important in the evolution of both dental and orthopedic implants and one of the possible causes of implant failure after initial success. This paper comprises a review of literature and presents results of our laboratory experiments related to the study of corrosion, with special emphasis on dental implants. In situ degradation of a metallic implant is undesirable because it alters the structural integrity of the implant. The issue of corrosion is not limited to a local problem because the particles pmduced as a result could migrate to distant sites, whose evolution would require further studies.

  11. Review of a challenging clinical issue: Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Sebiha; Ceylan, Yasin; Ozkan, Orhan Veli; Yildirim, Sule

    2015-06-21

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is a reversible pregnancy-specific cholestatic condition characterized by pruritus, elevated liver enzymes, and increased serum bile acids. It commences usually in the late second or third trimester, and quickly resolves after delivery. The incidence is higher in South American and Scandinavian countries (9.2%-15.6% and 1.5%, respectively) than in Europe (0.1%-0.2%). The etiology is multifactorial where genetic, endocrine, and environmental factors interact. Maternal outcome is usually benign, whereas fetal complications such as preterm labor, meconium staining, fetal distress, and sudden intrauterine fetal demise not infrequently lead to considerable perinatal morbidity and mortality. Ursodeoxycholic acid is shown to be the most efficient therapeutic agent with proven safety and efficacy. Management of ICP consists of careful monitoring of maternal hepatic function tests and serum bile acid levels in addition to the assessment of fetal well-being and timely delivery after completion of fetal pulmonary maturity. This review focuses on the current concepts about ICP based on recent literature data and presents an update regarding the diagnosis and management of this challenging issue.

  12. Review of a challenging clinical issue: Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ozkan, Sebiha; Ceylan, Yasin; Ozkan, Orhan Veli; Yildirim, Sule

    2015-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is a reversible pregnancy-specific cholestatic condition characterized by pruritus, elevated liver enzymes, and increased serum bile acids. It commences usually in the late second or third trimester, and quickly resolves after delivery. The incidence is higher in South American and Scandinavian countries (9.2%-15.6% and 1.5%, respectively) than in Europe (0.1%-0.2%). The etiology is multifactorial where genetic, endocrine, and environmental factors interact. Maternal outcome is usually benign, whereas fetal complications such as preterm labor, meconium staining, fetal distress, and sudden intrauterine fetal demise not infrequently lead to considerable perinatal morbidity and mortality. Ursodeoxycholic acid is shown to be the most efficient therapeutic agent with proven safety and efficacy. Management of ICP consists of careful monitoring of maternal hepatic function tests and serum bile acid levels in addition to the assessment of fetal well-being and timely delivery after completion of fetal pulmonary maturity. This review focuses on the current concepts about ICP based on recent literature data and presents an update regarding the diagnosis and management of this challenging issue. PMID:26109799

  13. A review of fundamental coating issues for high temperature composites

    SciTech Connect

    Courtright, E.L.

    1994-04-01

    This review addresses many of the fundamental issues associated with the use of coatings in high temperature, aggressive, environments with specific emphasis on multi-component composites. A major concern is damage caused by oxygen permeation into matrix cracks causing internal oxidation and attacking along fiber/matrix interfaces. Many prospective coatings that might be used to protect composites are susceptible to hot corrosion, particularly by small vanadate concentrations which can degrade the coating and, thereby, enhance the permeation of other aggressive species. The mechanical stability of coating systems is also a major consideration in determining performance. Large differences in thermal expansion coefficients between coating and the composite substrate are not necessarily ameliorated by the practice of grading interfaces. However, the use of functionally graded coatings can be beneficial in reducing interlaminar shear and across-ply strains. Crack management, including the use of sealants, can be an essential part of a functional design, but the thermochemical stability of the glass sealant must be considered at elevated temperatures.

  14. Evolution as a Controversial Issue: A Review of Instructional Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermann, Ronald S.

    2008-01-01

    Although evolution has long been considered a controversial issue, little effort has been made to ensure that instructional approaches address the controversial nature of the issue. A framework for understanding the nature of controversy and some defining characteristics of controversial issues are provided. In light of this framework evolution is…

  15. 42 CFR 8.23 - Limitation on issues subject to review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Limitation on issues subject to review. 8.23 Section 8.23 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... Body § 8.23 Limitation on issues subject to review. The scope of review shall be limited to the facts...

  16. 42 CFR 8.23 - Limitation on issues subject to review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Limitation on issues subject to review. 8.23 Section 8.23 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... Body § 8.23 Limitation on issues subject to review. The scope of review shall be limited to the facts...

  17. 42 CFR 8.23 - Limitation on issues subject to review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Limitation on issues subject to review. 8.23 Section 8.23 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... Body § 8.23 Limitation on issues subject to review. The scope of review shall be limited to the facts...

  18. 42 CFR 8.23 - Limitation on issues subject to review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Limitation on issues subject to review. 8.23 Section 8.23 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... Body § 8.23 Limitation on issues subject to review. The scope of review shall be limited to the...

  19. 42 CFR 8.23 - Limitation on issues subject to review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Limitation on issues subject to review. 8.23 Section 8.23 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... Body § 8.23 Limitation on issues subject to review. The scope of review shall be limited to the...

  20. Equity issues were not fully addressed in Cochrane human immunodeficiency virus systematic reviews.

    PubMed

    Aves, Theresa; Kredo, Tamara; Welch, Vivian; Mursleen, Sara; Ross, Stephanie; Zani, Babalwa; Motaze, Nkengafac Villyen; Quinlan, Leah; Mbuagbaw, Lawrence

    2017-01-01

    To describe and summarize equity reporting in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) systematic reviews and explore the extent to which equity issues are addressed and reported in HIV reviews using the PROGRESS Plus framework. Application of the PROGRESS Plus framework to a bibliometric analysis of HIV reviews in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. The analysis included 103 reviews published as of March 2014, with a median of five studies per review (first quartile; Q1 = 2; third quartile; Q3 = 11). Reporting of PROGRESS Plus factors was as follows: Place of residence (low, middle, and high income; 55.3%), place of residence (urban or rural; 24.3%), race or ethnicity (20.4%), occupation (10.7%), gender (65.0%), religion (1.9%), education (7.8%), socioeconomic position (10.7%), social networks and capital (1.0%), age (1.9%), and sexual orientation (3.8%). Gaps in the reporting of relevant equity indicators were identified within Cochrane HIV systematic review indicating that research is not consistently conducted through an equity lens. There is a need to incorporate PROGRESS Plus factors into both primary and secondary studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Ethical issues in child and adolescent psychotherapy: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Avinash

    2010-01-01

    Child and adolescent psychotherapy has made great progress in recent years. With this progress, ethical issues have emerged that need to be addressed in the Indian setting. This article looks at various ethical issues in child and adolescent psychotherapy specific to Indian practitioners. The involvement of parents in psychotherapy often blurs therapeutic boundaries and issues related to confidentiality. Practitioners working in hospital and school settings are faced with similar problems. The advent of the internet and e-mail has resulted in new concerns for psychiatrists, related to communication via those media. Issues related to parenting, culture and development patterns, along with personal issues for the therapist, have been discussed.

  2. Identifying Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Search Terminology: A Systematic Review of Health Systematic Reviews

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joseph G. L.; Ylioja, Thomas; Lackey, Mellanye

    2016-01-01

    Research on the health of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) populations can provide important information to address existing health inequalities. Finding existing research in LGBT health can prove challenging due to the plethora of terminology used. We sought to describe existing search strategies and to identify more comprehensive LGBT search terminology. We iteratively created a search string to identify systematic reviews and meta-analyses about LGBT health and implemented it in Embase, PubMed/MEDLINE, and PsycINFO databases on May 28–29, 2015. We hand-searched the journal LGBT Health. Inclusion criteria were: systematic reviews and meta-analyses that addressed LGBT health, used systematic searching, and used independent coders for inclusion. The published search terminology in each record and search strings provided by authors on request were cross-referenced with our original search to identify additional terminology. Our search process identified 19 systematic reviews meeting inclusion criteria. The number of search terms used to identify LGBT-related records ranged from 1 to 31. From the included studies, we identified 46 new search terms related to LGBT health. We removed five search terms as inappropriate and added five search terms used in the field. The resulting search string included 82 terms. There is room to improve the quality of searching and reporting in LGBT health systematic reviews. Future work should attempt to enhance the positive predictive value of LGBT health searches. Our findings can assist LGBT health reviewers in capturing the diversity of LGBT terminology when searching. PMID:27219460

  3. Methodological and ethical issues in conducting qualitative research with children and young people: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Susan

    2007-09-01

    There is an increasing interest in involving children in research that has been influenced by the recognition of children's rights and by the reconceptualisation of children within the social sciences as active agents rather than as the objects of research. To review the methodological and ethical issues involved in conducting qualitative research with children and to consider the implications for nursing research in light of recent debates within the social sciences. Narrative literature review using a systematic search of computerized databases. Published papers, key texts, reports and policy documents that relate to the methodological and ethical issues in conducting qualitative research with children. There are three ethical issues in relation to conducting research with children: power relations, informed consent and confidentiality. Two key methodological issues are identifiable in relation to conducting research with children. One is epistemological and relates to the different cultures of childhood and adulthood and the second relates to the heterogenous nature of childhood itself. Novel techniques and task-based activities are being increasingly used to establish rapport and as a method of data collection. There are both differences and similarities in conducting qualitative research with children and with adults but often the similarities have been overlooked and the differences overstated. Nursing and other health-related researchers conducting research with adults could learn much from children's researchers, particularly in terms of sensitivity to ethical issues. Nursing research need to consider the methodological issues that have been debated in the social sciences and to critically reflect on the use of novel techniques in qualitative research.

  4. Review of legal and institutional issues in the use of decentralized solar energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schweitzer, M.

    1980-04-01

    The legal and institutional issues involved in the use of decentralized solar energy systems are examined for the purpose of advising government planners and policymakers, the solar industry, solar researchers, and prospective solar users of present and potential impediments and incentives to solar commercialization. This information was gathered primarily through a comprehensive literature review, with supplementary data provided through interviews with representatives of organizations active in the solar field. Five major issue areas were identified in the course of this study: (1) prohibitions on the use of solar equipment, (2) regulation of the production and placement of solar systems, (3) access to sunlight, (4) financial incentives and impediments to the use of solar technologies, and (5) the public utility-solar user interface. Each can be important in its impacts on the incidence of solar usage. The major actors involved with the issues identified above represent both the private and public sectors. Important private sector participants include solar manufacturers and installers, labor unions, lending institutions, utility companies, solar users themselves, and other community property owners. In the public sector, local, state, and federal governments are all capable of acting in ways that can influence the solar commercialization effort. Implementation options are available for all levels of government seeking to take an active role in addressing the previously mentioned legal and institutional issues. The appropriate actions will vary from federal to state to local governments, but each level can be important in removing existing barriers and creating new incentives for solar use.

  5. Health issues of female foreign domestic workers: a systematic review of the scientific and gray literature.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Rahul; Arambepola, Chandima; Tarun, Samiksha; de Silva, Vijitha; Kishore, Jugal; Østbye, Truls

    2013-01-01

    Although the number of female foreign domestic workers (FDWs) is increasing worldwide, little is known about their health issues. To systematically review the literature on health issues of female FDWs to ascertain the problems studied, identify limitations, and suggest future research and policy implications. A systematic database (PubMed, EBSCO Host, and Google Scholar) and bibliographic search identified the English-language scientific and gray literature published during 1990-2012 addressing health issues of female FDWs living with the family of the employer, using qualitative and/or quantitative research methods. Studies in which female FDWs constituted less than half of the participants were excluded. The health issues studied and identified were adverse work conditions and associated health problems (such as physical, verbal, and sexual abuse at the workplace, caregiving tasks associated with musculoskeletal strain, and chemical exposure associated with respiratory difficulty), mental health (psychotic, neurotic, and mood disorders), infectious diseases (most of the studies were on intestinal parasitic infections), and health knowledge/attitudes/practices (most of the studies were in context of sexual and reproductive health). Most of the studies were medical record reviews or questionnaire-based surveys utilizing convenience sampling or qualitative interviews/focus group discussions. Female FDWs face numerous health problems. Studies on representative, possibly longitudinal, samples of female FDWs focusing on specific health conditions are needed to better understand the epidemiology of such conditions. Concerted efforts through the governments of both labor-sending and host countries are required to improve the health, work conditions, and safety of this vulnerable group of women.

  6. The full spectrum of ethical issues in the care of patients with ALS: a systematic qualitative review.

    PubMed

    Seitzer, F; Kahrass, H; Neitzke, G; Strech, D

    2016-02-01

    Dealing systematically with ethical issues in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) care requires an unbiased awareness of all the relevant ethical issues. The aim of the study was to determine systematically and transparently the full spectrum of ethical issues in ALS care. We conducted a systematic review in Medline and Google Books (restricted to English and German literature published between 1993 and 2014). We applied qualitative text analysis and normative analysis to categorise the spectrum of ethical issues in ALS care. The literature review retrieved 56 references that together mentioned a spectrum of 103 ethical issues in ALS care. The spectrum was structured into six major categories that consist of first and second-order categories of ethical issues. The systematically derived spectrum of ethical issues in ALS care presented in this paper raises awareness and understanding of the complexity of ethical issues in ALS care. It also offers a basis for the systematic development of informational and training materials for health professionals, patients and their relatives, and society as a whole. Finally, it supports a rational and fair selection of all those ethical issues that should be addressed in health policies, position papers and clinical practice guidelines. Further research is needed to identify ways to systematically select the most relevant ethical issues not only in the clinical environment, but also for the development of clinical practice guidelines.

  7. Weighting issues in recreation research and in identifying support for resource conservation management alternatives

    Treesearch

    Amy L. Sheaffer; Jay Beaman; Joseph T. O' Leary; Rebecca L. Williams; Doran M. Mason

    2001-01-01

    Sampling for research in recreation settings in an ongoing challenge. Often certain groups of users are more likely to be sampled. It is important in measuring public support for resource conservation and in understanding use of natural resources for recreation to evaluate issues of bias in survey methodologies. Important methodological issues emerged from a statewide...

  8. Minimizing Disparities and Developing Support by Identifying Differences in Confidence and Knowledge Related to Water Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Melissa; Lamm, Alexa J.

    2016-01-01

    Extension educators face challenges as they strive to keep up with critical issues in their communities, such as those surrounding water. A growing population and a diminishing water supply necessitate that Florida residents become more knowledgeable about water issues. We conducted research to determine how confident both the general public and…

  9. Minimizing Disparities and Developing Support by Identifying Differences in Confidence and Knowledge Related to Water Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Melissa; Lamm, Alexa J.

    2016-01-01

    Extension educators face challenges as they strive to keep up with critical issues in their communities, such as those surrounding water. A growing population and a diminishing water supply necessitate that Florida residents become more knowledgeable about water issues. We conducted research to determine how confident both the general public and…

  10. Identifying the Discomfort: An Examination of Ethical Issues Encountered by MSW Students during Field Placement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodd, Sarah-Jane

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study was to determine which ethical issues graduate social work students experienced most frequently during their field placement, the resources students used to resolve these issues, and whether such resources were helpful. The results indicate that conflicts concerning beneficence versus agency policy and…

  11. PETC Review. Issue 7, Winter 1992--1993

    SciTech Connect

    Santore, R.R.; Blaustein, B.D.; Friedman, S.; Reiss, J.; Brown, J.; Price, M.M.

    1993-02-01

    This issue of the PETC Review is devoted to explaining how the private sector can do business with DOE-and with PETC in particular-and how DOE works with academia, industry, and state and local groups to accomplish objectives of mutual interest. Over the past several years, the notion of ``cost-sharing`` has been receiving increased attention. Indeed, cost-shared RD&D is becoming the norm, not only within DOE but also among other government agencies, including the Department of Defense. It may surprise some of our readership to learn that RD&D cost-sharing is not a new government policy. In fact, it has been part of the DOE Acquisition Regulations from their inception in 1977. In lay terms, cost participation, a general kind of cost-sharing, is required for RD&D efforts in which the non-Federal participant`s goal is commercialization or in situations for which it is reasonable to expect that economic benefits will accrue to the participant as a result of the work. The policy is quite flexible and states that the degree of non-DOEcost participation depends on a number of factors, including the nature of the work performed and the extent of the project risk. As competition for RD&D funds increases, it is to be expected that cost-sharing requirements for development, and even for basic research, will increase. Nevertheless, we think that Federal support of RD&D will continue to be necessary to maintain this country`s leadership in science, technology, industry, and living standards.

  12. A review of the mental health issues of diabetes conference.

    PubMed

    Ducat, Lee; Rubenstein, Arthur; Philipson, Louis H; Anderson, Barbara J

    2015-02-01

    Individuals with type 1 diabetes are at increased risk for depression, anxiety disorder, and eating disorder diagnoses. People with type 1 diabetes are also at risk for subclinical levels of diabetes distress and anxiety. These mental/behavioral health comorbidities of diabetes are associated with poor adherence to treatment and poor glycemic control, thus increasing the risk for serious short- and long-term physical complications, which can result in blindness, amputations, stroke, cognitive decline, decreased quality of life, as well as premature death. When mental health comorbidities of diabetes are not diagnosed and treated, the financial cost to society and health care systems is catastrophic, and the human suffering that results is profound. This review summarizes state-of-the-art presentations and working group scholarly reports from the Mental Health Issues of Diabetes Conference (7-8 October 2013, Philadelphia, PA), which included stakeholders from the National Institutes of Health, people living with type 1 diabetes and their families, diabetes consumer advocacy groups, the insurance industry, as well as psychologists, psychiatrists, endocrinologists, and nurse practitioners who are all nationally and internationally recognized experts in type 1 diabetes research and care. At this landmark conference current evidence for the incidence and the consequences of mental health problems in type 1 diabetes was presented, supporting the integration of mental health screening and mental health care into routine diabetes medical care. Future research directions were recommended to establish the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of paradigms of diabetes care in which physical and mental health care are both priorities.

  13. Pharmaceutical issues during the review of European Marketing Authorisation Applications in Malta().

    PubMed

    Chetcuti, Michael; Serracino-Inglott, Anthony; Flores, Gavril; Borg, John J

    2017-08-07

    The aim of this study was to identify pharmaceutical issues encountered during regulatory review in European Procedures. A database of issues from Day 70 assessment reports of 150 EU procedures was compiled; most procedures were for generics (108). Frequencies of common deficiencies have been calculated and summarised for use of all stakeholders. Out of the 150 procedures reviewed, covering 309 products, a total of 4796 concerns were identified. Of these concerns, 167 were Potential Serious Risks to Public Health, 67 were raised on drug substance and 100 on the drug product. The distribution of total concerns was as follows: 2168 concerns on drug substance and 2584 on drug product. Most concerns raised were on control of drug substance and drug product (834 & 626 for 3.2.S.4 and 3.2.P.5, respectively), followed by concerns on the manufacturing (482 & 564 for 3.2.S.2 and 3.2.P.3, respectively) and stability 147 & 398 for 3.2.S.7 and 3.2.P.8, respectively). In conclusion, the frequencies and trends of identified deficiencies together with their impact were discussed from a regulatory point of view. The main findings indicate that applicants would benefit from following published guidelines so that delays in the registration of medicines could be avoided.

  14. "Business Ethics Everywhere": An Experiential Exercise to Develop Students' Ability to Identify and Respond to Ethical Issues in Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Susan D.; Comer, Debra R.

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces an experiential exercise that enhances students' ability to identify ethical issues and to respond to them in ways that consider the relationship between organizational factors and ethical action. Students identify a required number of ethical incidents in their workplaces during a specified period. Students submit a…

  15. "Business Ethics Everywhere": An Experiential Exercise to Develop Students' Ability to Identify and Respond to Ethical Issues in Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Susan D.; Comer, Debra R.

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces an experiential exercise that enhances students' ability to identify ethical issues and to respond to them in ways that consider the relationship between organizational factors and ethical action. Students identify a required number of ethical incidents in their workplaces during a specified period. Students submit a…

  16. Ethical Issues in Patient Safety Research: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Whicher, Danielle M; Kass, Nancy E; Audera-Lopez, Carmen; Butt, Mobasher; Jauregui, Iciar Larizgoitia; Harris, Kendra; Knoche, Jonathan; Saxena, Abha

    2015-09-01

    As many as 1 in 10 patients is harmed while receiving hospital care in wealthy countries. The risk of health care-associated infection in some developing countries is as much as 20 times higher. In response, in many global regions, increased attention has turned to the implementation of a broad program of safety research, encompassing a variety of methods. Although important international ethical guidelines for research exist, literature has been emerging in the last 20 years that begins to apply such guidelines to patient safety research specifically. This paper provides a review of the literature related to ethics, oversight, and patient safety research; identifies issues highlighted in articles as being of ethical relevance; describes areas of consensus regarding how to respond to these ethical issues; and highlights areas where additional ethical analysis and discussion are needed to provide guidance to those in the field.

  17. IDENTIFYING RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION ISSUES AMONG NON-WHITE PARTICIPANTS FOR THE NATIONAL CHILDREN'S STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding potential stakeholders perspectives prior to recruitment may improve the effectiveness of a recruitment campaign as well as sustain participant retention. In early 2003, eighteen focus groups were conducted across the United States to address these issues, but non-...

  18. Double coding and mapping using Abbreviated Injury Scale 1998 and 2005: identifying issues for trauma data.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Cameron S; Niggemeyer, Louise E; Charman, Debra

    2010-09-01

    The 2005 version of the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS05) potentially represents a significant change in injury spectrum classification, due to a substantial increase in the codeset size and alterations to the agreed severity of many injuries compared to the previous version (AIS98). Whilst many trauma registries around the world are moving to adopt AIS05 or its 2008 update (AIS08), its effect on patient classification in existing registries, and the optimum method of comparing existing data collections with new AIS05 collections are unknown. The present study aimed to assess the potential impact of adopting the AIS05 codeset in an established trauma system, and to identify issues associated with this change. A current subset of consecutive major trauma patients admitted to two large hospitals in the Australian state of Victoria were double-coded in AIS98 and AIS05. Assigned codesets were also mapped to the other AIS version using code lists supplied in the AIS05 manual, giving up to four AIS codes per injury sustained. Resulting codesets were assessed for agreement in codes used, injury severity and calculated severity scores. 602 injuries sustained by 109 patients were compared. Adopting AIS05 would lead to a decrease in the number of designated major trauma patients in Victoria, estimated at 22% (95% confidence interval, 15-31%). Differences in AIS level between versions were significantly more likely to occur amongst head and chest injuries. Data mapped to a different codeset performed better in paired comparisons than raw AIS98 and AIS05 codesets, with data mapping of AIS05 codes back to AIS98 giving significantly higher levels of agreement in AIS level, ISS and NISS than other potential comparisons, and resulting in significantly fewer conversion problems than attempting to map AIS98 codes to AIS05. This study provides new insights into AIS codeset change impact. Adoption of AIS05 or AIS08 in established registries will decrease major trauma patient numbers

  19. Breastfeeding in infancy: identifying the program-relevant issues in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In Bangladesh, many programs and projects have been promoting breastfeeding since the late 1980 s. Breastfeeding practices, however, have not improved accordingly. Methods For identifying program-relevant issues to improve breastfeeding in infancy, quantitative data were collected through visits to households (n = 356) in rural Chittagong and urban slums in Dhaka, and qualitative data from sub-samples by applying semi-structured in-depth interviews (n = 42), focus group discussions (n = 28), and opportunistic observations (n = 21). Trials of Improved Practices (TIPs) (n = 26) were conducted in the above sites and rural Sylhet to determine how best to design further interventions. Our analysis focused on five breastfeeding practices recommended by the World Health Organization: putting baby to the breast within the first hour of birth, feeding colostrum and not giving fluids, food or other substances in the first days of life, breastfeeding on demand, not feeding anything by bottle, and exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months. Results The biggest gaps were found to be in putting baby to the breast within the first hour of birth (76% gap), feeding colostrum and not giving other fluids, foods or substances within the first three days (54% gap), and exclusive breastfeeding from birth through 180 days (90% gap). Lack of knowledge about dangers of delaying initiation beyond the first hour and giving other fluids, foods or substances, and the common perception of "insufficient milk" were main reasons given by mothers for these practices. Health workers had talked to only 8% of mothers about infant feeding during antenatal and immunization visits, and to 34% of mothers during sick child visits. The major providers of infant feeding information were grandmothers (28%). Conclusions The findings showed that huge gaps continue to exist in breastfeeding behaviors, mostly due to lack of awareness as to why the recommended breastfeeding practices are

  20. Open-system dynamics of entanglement: a key issues review.

    PubMed

    Aolita, Leandro; de Melo, Fernando; Davidovich, Luiz

    2015-04-01

    One of the greatest challenges in the fields of quantum information processing and quantum technologies is the detailed coherent control over each and every constituent of quantum systems with an ever increasing number of particles. Within this endeavor, harnessing of many-body entanglement against the detrimental effects of the environment is a major pressing issue. Besides being an important concept from a fundamental standpoint, entanglement has been recognized as a crucial resource for quantum speed-ups or performance enhancements over classical methods. Understanding and controlling many-body entanglement in open systems may have strong implications in quantum computing, quantum simulations of many-body systems, secure quantum communication or cryptography, quantum metrology, our understanding of the quantum-to-classical transition, and other important questions of quantum foundations.In this paper we present an overview of recent theoretical and experimental efforts to underpin the dynamics of entanglement under the influence of noise. Entanglement is thus taken as a dynamic quantity on its own, and we survey how it evolves due to the unavoidable interaction of the entangled system with its surroundings. We analyze several scenarios, corresponding to different families of states and environments, which render a very rich diversity of dynamical behaviors.In contrast to single-particle quantities, like populations and coherences, which typically vanish only asymptotically in time, entanglement may disappear at a finite time. In addition, important classes of entanglement display an exponential decay with the number of particles when subject to local noise, which poses yet another threat to the already-challenging scaling of quantum technologies. Other classes, however, turn out to be extremely robust against local noise. Theoretical results and recent experiments regarding the difference between local and global decoherence are summarized. Control and

  1. Review of performance, medical, and operational data on pilot aging issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoklosa, J. H.

    1992-01-01

    An extensive review of the literature and studies relating to performance, medical, operational, and legal data regarding pilot aging issues was performed in order to determine what evidence there is, if any, to support mandatory pilot retirement. Popular misconceptions about aging, including the failure to distinguish between the normal aging process and disease processes that occur more frequently in older individuals, continue to contribute to much of the misunderstanding and controversy that surround this issue. Results: Review of medical data related to the pilot aging issue indicate that recent improvement in medical diagnostics and treatment technology have made it possible to identify to a high degree individuals who are at risk for developing sudden incapacitating illness and for treating those with disqualifying medical conditions. Performance studies revealed that after controlling for the presence of disease states, older pilots are able to perform as well as younger pilots on many performance tasks. Review of accident data showed that older, healthy pilots do not have higher accident rates than younger pilots, and indeeed, evidence suggests that older pilots have an advantage in the cockpit due to higher experience levels. The Man-Machine-Mission-Environment interface of factors can be managed through structured, supervised, and enhanced operations, maintenance, flight reviews, and safety procedures in order to ensure safe and productive operations by reducing the margin of error and by increasing the margin of safety. Conclusions: There is no evidence indicating any specific age as an arbitrary cut-off point for pilots to perform their fight duties. A combination of regular medical screening, performance evaluation, enhanced operational maintenance, and safety procedures can most effectively ensure a safe pilot population than can a mandatory retirement policy based on arbitrary age restrictions.

  2. Buprenorphine supply by community pharmacists in Victoria, Australia: perceptions, experiences and key issues identified.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Suzanne; Dietze, Paul; Dunlop, Adrian; Muhleisen, Peter; Lee, Nicole; Taylor, David

    2007-03-01

    Buprenorphine is dispensed primarily in community pharmacies in Victoria, with buprenorphine prescribing expanding nationally. The aim of this paper was to examine issues that affect the delivery of buprenorphine in the community setting. A cross-sectional survey was conducted of 282 pharmacies participating in the methadone and buprenorphine programme across Victoria. Dispensing pharmacists completed the survey, designed to canvass issues around buprenorphine diversion and other issues related to the programme. Themes from the results indicated that there was concern from the majority of pharmacies with the issue of the supervision of buprenorphine and diversion of dispensed doses. The rate of suspected diversion was 1.5 times per 100 doses per month or 33 times per 100 clients per month. Seventy-four per cent of pharmacists indicated that this was a negative aspect of buprenorphine treatment. Frequency of suspected and confirmed diversion was associated with the number of pharmacy clients. Pharmacists' perceptions of issues related to buprenorphine appeared to affect opinions of buprenorphine clients and the buprenorphine programme more generally. Pharmacists believe that a significant level of diversion is occurring. This finding warrants serious attention, particularly in light of the increasing use of buprenorphine nationally and internationally.

  3. Methodological systematic review identifies major limitations in prioritization processes for updating.

    PubMed

    Martínez García, Laura; Pardo-Hernandez, Hector; Superchi, Cecilia; Niño de Guzman, Ena; Ballesteros, Monica; Ibargoyen Roteta, Nora; McFarlane, Emma; Posso, Margarita; Roqué I Figuls, Marta; Rotaeche Del Campo, Rafael; Sanabria, Andrea Juliana; Selva, Anna; Solà, Ivan; Vernooij, Robin W M; Alonso-Coello, Pablo

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the study was to identify and describe strategies to prioritize the updating of systematic reviews (SRs), health technology assessments (HTAs), or clinical guidelines (CGs). We conducted an SR of studies describing one or more methods to prioritize SRs, HTAs, or CGs for updating. We searched MEDLINE (PubMed, from 1966 to August 2016) and The Cochrane Methodology Register (The Cochrane Library, Issue 8 2016). We hand searched abstract books, reviewed reference lists, and contacted experts. Two reviewers independently screened the references and extracted data. We included 14 studies. Six studies were classified as descriptive (6 of 14, 42.9%) and eight as implementation studies (8 of 14, 57.1%). Six studies reported an updating strategy (6 of 14, 42.9%), six a prioritization process (6 of 14, 42.9%), and two a prioritization criterion (2 of 14, 14.2%). Eight studies focused on SRs (8 of 14, 57.1%), six studies focused on CGs (6 of 14, 42.9%), and none were about HTAs. We identified 76 prioritization criteria that can be applied when prioritizing documents for updating. The most frequently cited criteria were as follows: available evidence (19 of 76, 25.0%), clinical relevance (10 of 76; 13.2%), and users' interest (10 of 76; 13.2%). There is wide variability and suboptimal reporting of the methods used to develop and implement processes to prioritize updating of SRs, HTAs, and CGs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of speech errors in Putonghua speakers with cleft palate: a critical review of methodology issues.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chenghui; Whitehill, Tara L

    2014-04-01

    Speech errors associated with cleft palate are well established for English and several other Indo-European languages. Few articles describing the speech of Putonghua (standard Mandarin Chinese) speakers with cleft palate have been published in English language journals. Although methodological guidelines have been published for the perceptual speech evaluation of individuals with cleft palate, there has been no critical review of methodological issues in studies of Putonghua speakers with cleft palate. A literature search was conducted to identify relevant studies published over the past 30 years in Chinese language journals. Only studies incorporating perceptual analysis of speech were included. Thirty-seven articles which met inclusion criteria were analyzed and coded on a number of methodological variables. Reliability was established by having all variables recoded for all studies. This critical review identified many methodological issues. These design flaws make it difficult to draw reliable conclusions about characteristic speech errors in this group of speakers. Specific recommendations are made to improve the reliability and validity of future studies, as well to facilitate cross-center comparisons.

  5. Methodological and Theoretical Issues in Studying Nonresident Fathers: A Selective Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaeffer, Nora Cate; Seltzer, Judith A.; Dykema, Jennifer

    This paper reviews some of the principal methodological issues that arise in studying nonresident fathers using surveys, including sample frame, survey participation, and response error. The review focuses on issues involving divorced families. Results are highlighted from analyses of important national data sets and of local data sets that…

  6. Issues in Peer Review of the Scientific Basis for Regulatory Decisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Chemical Society, Washington, DC.

    This document is intended to provide a discussion of the issues that need to be addressed in the development of peer review guidelines, the options for addressing the issues, and a range of views about such options. The document focuses on peer review with regard to regulatory decisions and contains major sections which deal with: (1) what should…

  7. 10 CFR Appendix Q to Part 50 - Pre-Application Early Review of Site Suitability Issues

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pre-Application Early Review of Site Suitability Issues Q Appendix Q to Part 50 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Pt. 50, App. Q Appendix Q to Part 50—Pre-Application Early Review of Site Suitability Issues This...

  8. Thirty-Five Years of Transition Topics: A Review of CDTEI Issues from 1978 to 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madaus, Joseph W.; Gelbar, Nicholas W.; Dukes, Lyman L., III; Faggella-Luby, Michael; Lalor, Adam R.; Kowitt, Jennifer S.

    2013-01-01

    A systematic review was conducted of 581 articles published in 76 issues of "Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals" from the journal's initial issue in 1978 to the final issue of its 35th year in 2012. Articles were coded based on inclusion of original or secondary data and if not, what type of information…

  9. Contemporary Civil Rights Challenges of "Brown vs. Board of Education": School Leaders Identify Current Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Bradley

    2004-01-01

    School leaders from five states gathered recently to examine civil rights issues facing students today. The session was held by the Intercultural Development Research Association (IDRA) South Central Collaborative for Equity, which is the federally-funded equity assistance center for Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas. The…

  10. Identifying Issues and Concerns: The University of Connecticut's MAGIC--A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGlamery, Patrick

    1995-01-01

    Outlines the issues and concerns of providing spatial data that have been encountered by the Map and Geographic Information Center (MAGIC) at the University of Connecticut's library. Highlights include collecting and archiving, cataloging and indexing, networking, distribution, user education, geographic information systems, and a glossary of key…

  11. Lessons from Adult Education: Identifying and Exploring Emerging Ethical Issues in Technologically Enhanced Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mabry, Christie Knittel; O'Driscoll, Tony

    2003-01-01

    Technologically Enhanced Performance (TEP) is the application of technology to improve the performance of knowledge workers. TEP is both an intellectual and ideological complement to the field of Adult Education. As such, much can be learned about ethical issues associated with implementing TEP from the established research and literature base in…

  12. Predicting Adolescent Drug Abuse: A Review of Issues, Methods and Correlates. Research Issues 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lettieri, Dan J., Ed.

    Presented are 18 papers on predicting adolescent drug abuse. The papers have the following titles: "Current Issues in the Epidemiology of Drug Abuse as Related to Psychosocial Studies of Adolescent Drug Use"; "The Quest for Interpersonal Predictors of Marihuana Abuse in Adolescents"; "Assessing the Interpersonal Determinants of Adolescent Drug…

  13. WATER ANALYSIS: EMERGING CONTAMINANTS AND CURRENT ISSUES, 2005 REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    This biennial review covers developments in Water Analysis over the period of 2003-2004. A few significant references that appeared between January and February 2005 are also included. Analytical Chemistry's current policy is to limit reviews to include 100-200 significant refe...

  14. WATER ANALYSIS: EMERGING CONTAMINANTS AND CURRENT ISSUES: 2007 REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    This biennial review covers developments in Water Analysis over the period of 2005-2006. A few significant references that appeared between January and March 2007 are also included. Analytical Chemistry's current policy is to limit reviews to include 200-250 significant referen...

  15. WATER ANALYSIS: EMERGING CONTAMINANTS AND CURRENT ISSUES: 2007 REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    This biennial review covers developments in Water Analysis over the period of 2005-2006. A few significant references that appeared between January and March 2007 are also included. Analytical Chemistry's current policy is to limit reviews to include 200-250 significant referen...

  16. 40 CFR 155.58 - Procedures for issuing a decision on a registration review case.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS REGISTRATION STANDARDS AND REGISTRATION REVIEW Registration Review Procedures... pesticide's registration review docket the Agency's proposed decision and the bases for the decision. There... standard for registration and describe the basis for such proposed findings. (2) Identify proposed...

  17. 40 CFR 155.58 - Procedures for issuing a decision on a registration review case.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS REGISTRATION STANDARDS AND REGISTRATION REVIEW Registration Review Procedures... pesticide's registration review docket the Agency's proposed decision and the bases for the decision. There... standard for registration and describe the basis for such proposed findings. (2) Identify proposed...

  18. 40 CFR 155.58 - Procedures for issuing a decision on a registration review case.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS REGISTRATION STANDARDS AND REGISTRATION REVIEW Registration Review Procedures... pesticide's registration review docket the Agency's proposed decision and the bases for the decision. There... standard for registration and describe the basis for such proposed findings. (2) Identify proposed...

  19. 40 CFR 155.58 - Procedures for issuing a decision on a registration review case.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS REGISTRATION STANDARDS AND REGISTRATION REVIEW Registration Review Procedures... pesticide's registration review docket the Agency's proposed decision and the bases for the decision. There... standard for registration and describe the basis for such proposed findings. (2) Identify proposed...

  20. Science and technology review, July-August 1998 issue

    SciTech Connect

    Smart, J

    1998-07-01

    On the occasion of Edward Teller's 90th birthday, S&TR has the pleasure of honoring Lawrence Livermore's co-founder and most influential scientist. Teller is known for his inventive work in physics, his concepts leading to thermonuclear explosions, and his strong stands on such issues as science education, the nation's strategic defense, the needs for science in the future, and sharing scientific information. The articles in this issue also show him, as always, tirelessly moving forward with his new and changing interests.

  1. Identifying Educationally Influential Specialists: Issues Arising from the Use of "Classic" Criteria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Frances C.; Ryan, David P.; Dodge, Jason E.; Last, Linda D.; Law, Calvin H. L.; Smith, Andrew J.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Educationally influential physicians (EIPs) are identified by their colleagues as people who (1) encourage learning and enjoy sharing their knowledge, (2) are clinical experts and always seem up to date, and (3) treat others as equals. We aimed to identify surgical and pathologist EIPs for colorectal cancer (CRC) in Ontario as part…

  2. Identifying Educationally Influential Specialists: Issues Arising from the Use of "Classic" Criteria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Frances C.; Ryan, David P.; Dodge, Jason E.; Last, Linda D.; Law, Calvin H. L.; Smith, Andrew J.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Educationally influential physicians (EIPs) are identified by their colleagues as people who (1) encourage learning and enjoy sharing their knowledge, (2) are clinical experts and always seem up to date, and (3) treat others as equals. We aimed to identify surgical and pathologist EIPs for colorectal cancer (CRC) in Ontario as part…

  3. Identifying, managing and preventing skin maceration: a rapid review of the clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, F; Giampieri, S; Graham, T; Grocott, P

    2017-04-02

    To identify the clinical empirical evidence for identifying, managing and preventing skin maceration in human subjects. A rapid review of the current literature was undertaken between 5 September and 19 September 2016 using the electronic databases CINAHL, MEDLINE, PUBMED and Cochrane, with the key words: skin macerat*, wound macerat*, moisture associated skin damage, wound exudate and hyper-hydration of skin, Results: Of 526 papers found using an electronic database search, four were identified as fitting the search parameters, and a further two were retrieved from a manual search of reference lists. There were three themes that emerged: how to identify and measure maceration, how to manage and reduce maceration once it has already occurred, and how to prevent skin maceration. Hyper-hydration can reach greater skin depths than previously thought, thus engendering more extensive damage potential, which in turn can impact on treatments and healing time. Realistically, the deeper the hyper-hydration issue, the more extensive the damage and it will take longer to recover-a problem compounded if the hyper-hydration is due to incontinence and skin is also exposed to urine and/or faeces. In relation to wound management, the authors advocate the removal of moisture away from the wound or skin, either through superabsorbent dressings, or by allowing the excess moisture to evaporate through semi-permeable dressings to reduce maceration, enhance patient comfort and encourage healing. However, we found no evidence regarding the limits of hydration of the dermis and epidermis and thereby the optimal conditions for managing exuding wounds and promoting skin health. Each of the six papers in this review calls for further research to help identify, treat and prevent maceration. Maceration causes patients' discomfort and pain as well as prolonging healing time and deserves more focused research. This rapid review highlights how limited the clinical empirical research is on

  4. Review of Congressional Issues. News from Capitol Hill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinz, Ann Simeo

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on U.S. congressional issues in two categories: (1) enacted legislation, and (2) proposed legislation. Addresses topics such as the resolution related to Iraq, the Department of Homeland Security, Pledge of Allegiance, social security protection, elder justice, and women's rights. Includes learning activities. (CMK)

  5. Update on Congress: A Review of Current Issues Facing Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Update on Law-Related Education, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Addresses four issues facing Congress: (1) freedom from religious bias in the workplace; (2) campaign finance reform; (3) President Clinton's education program and the allocation of money for various proposals; and (4) Senator John McCain's legislative package for reducing smoking in the United States. (CMK)

  6. Review of Issues Facing Congress. News from Capitol Hill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinz, Ann Simeo

    2001-01-01

    Discusses various topics that have faced the 107th U.S. Congress, such as tax cuts, judicial appointments, domestic issues, patients' bill of rights, stem cell research, election law, and campaign finance reform. Includes information on U.S. Senate and federal judicial appointments. Provides ideas for student learning activities. (CMK)

  7. Review of Issues Facing Congress. News from Capitol Hill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinz, Ann Simeo

    2001-01-01

    Discusses various topics that have faced the 107th U.S. Congress, such as tax cuts, judicial appointments, domestic issues, patients' bill of rights, stem cell research, election law, and campaign finance reform. Includes information on U.S. Senate and federal judicial appointments. Provides ideas for student learning activities. (CMK)

  8. Review of Congressional Issues. News from Capitol Hill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinz, Ann Simeo

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on U.S. congressional issues in two categories: (1) enacted legislation, and (2) proposed legislation. Addresses topics such as the resolution related to Iraq, the Department of Homeland Security, Pledge of Allegiance, social security protection, elder justice, and women's rights. Includes learning activities. (CMK)

  9. In this issue of the International Reviews of Immunology.

    PubMed

    Bot, Adrian

    2012-06-01

    This issue hosts diverse topics, from myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) with their mechanism and role in cancer, the interplay between diet and emerging allergies studied in a genetically closed population, the pleiotropic anti-inflammatory effects of resveratrol, to the quest to achieve more reliable immune correlates of protection against the hepatitis C virus (HCV).

  10. A Teacher Attitude Inventory: Identifying Teacher Positions in Relation to Educational Issues and Decisions. Research and Development Memorandum No. 118.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitmore, Joanne Rand

    This memorandum reports on the preliminary research using a 24-item inventory designed to measure teacher's positions in relation to education issues and teaching decisions. The instrument, whose development is reported, is intended to identify representatives of two dichotomous styles of teaching: traditional, teacher-centered teaching and…

  11. A review of occupational safety and health issues relevant to the environmental restoration program: Selected case histories and associated issues

    SciTech Connect

    Lesperance, A.M.; Siegel, M.R.; McKinney, M.D.

    1992-10-01

    This report describes a study conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to determine the impact of occupational safety and health (OSH) issues on the environmental restoration process at US Department of Energy sites. PNL selected three remediation projects to study: (1) the 618-9 Burial Ground Expedited Removal Action at the Hanford Site, (2) the Chemical Consolidation Interim Response Action at the Weldon Spring Site, (3) and the 200 West Area Carbon Tetrachloride Expedited Removal Action and VOC-Arid Integration Demonstration at the Hanford Site. The first two case studies involve sites where a remediation activity has been complete. The third case study involves a remediation activity in its early stages of development. This study identifies OSH issues related to actual cleanup, time, documentation, training, and technology development. These issues need to be considered by DOE before making long-term planning efforts. Section 4.0 of this report describes recommendations for addressing these issues.

  12. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 17

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  13. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 7

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  14. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 8

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  15. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 9

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  16. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 3

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  17. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 12

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  18. Environmental Mass Spectrometry: Emerging Contaminants and Current Issues (2010 Review)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This biennial review covers developments in environmental mass spectrometry for emerging environmental contaminants over the period of 2008-2009. A few significant references that appeared between January and February 2010 are also included. Analytical Chemistry’s current polic...

  19. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 29

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  20. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 5

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  1. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 1

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  2. Environmental Mass Spectrometry: Emerging Contaminants and Current Issues, 2008 Review

    EPA Science Inventory

    This biennial review covers developments in Environmental Mass Spectrometry for Emerging Environmental Contaminants over the period of 2006-2007. A few significant references that appeared between January and February 2008 are also included. Analytical Chemistry’s current polic...

  3. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 16

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  4. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 33

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  5. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 15

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  6. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 2

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  7. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 34

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  8. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 35

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  9. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 18

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  10. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 40

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  11. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 24

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  12. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 28

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  13. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 38

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  14. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 10

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  15. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 37

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  16. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 22

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  17. Environmental Mass Spectrometry: Emerging Contaminants and Current Issues (2010 Review)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This biennial review covers developments in environmental mass spectrometry for emerging environmental contaminants over the period of 2008-2009. A few significant references that appeared between January and February 2010 are also included. Analytical Chemistry’s current polic...

  18. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 23

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  19. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 20

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  20. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 25

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  1. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 11

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  2. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 43

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  3. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 27

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  4. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 21

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  5. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 41

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  6. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 13

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  7. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 32

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  8. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 26

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  9. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 39

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  10. Licensing of spent fuel dry storage and consolidated rod storage: A Review of Issues and Experiences

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, W.J.

    1990-02-01

    The results of this study, performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), respond to the nuclear industry's recommendation that a report be prepared that collects and describes the licensing issues (and their resolutions) that confront a new applicant requesting approval from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for dry storage of spent fuel or for large-scale storage of consolidated spent fuel rods in pools. The issues are identified in comments, questions, and requests from the NRC during its review of applicants' submittals. Included in the report are discussions of (1) the 18 topical reports on cask and module designs for dry storage fuel that have been submitted to the NRC, (2) the three license applications for dry storage of spent fuel at independent spent fuel storage installations (ISFSIs) that have been submitted to the NRC, and (3) the three applications (one of which was later withdrawn) for large-scale storage of consolidated fuel rods in existing spent fuel storage pools at reactors that were submitted tot he NRC. For each of the applications submitted, examples of some of the issues (and suggestions for their resolutions) are described. The issues and their resolutions are also covered in detail in an example in each of the three subject areas: (1) the application for the CASTOR V/21 dry spent fuel storage cask, (2) the application for the ISFSI for dry storage of spent fuel at Surry, and (3) the application for full-scale wet storage of consolidated spent fuel at Millstone-2. The conclusions in the report include examples of major issues that applicants have encountered. Recommendations for future applicants to follow are listed. 401 refs., 26 tabs.

  11. Review on Malaysian Rail Transit Operation and Management System: Issues and Solution in Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masirin, Mohd Idrus Mohd; Salin, Aminah Mohd; Zainorabidin, Adnan; Martin, David; Samsuddin, Norshakina

    2017-08-01

    In any context, operation and management of transportation systems are key issues which may affect both life quality and economic development. In large urban agglomerations, an efficient public transportation system may help abate the negative externalities of private car use such as congestion, air and noise pollution, accident and fuel consumption, without excessively penalizing user travel times or zone accessibility. Thus, this study is conducted to appraise the Malaysian rural rail transit operation and management system, which are considered important as there are many issues and solution in integration of the services that need to be tackled more conscientiously. The purpose of this paper is to describe some of the most important issues on integration of services and rail transit system in Malaysian and how to solve or reduce these problems and conflicts. In this paper, it consists of the historical development of rail transit construction in Malaysia. This paper also attempts to identify the important issues related to rail transit services and integration in Malaysian rural rail operation and management system. Comparison is also conducted with other countries such as UK, France, and Japan. Finally, a critical analysis is presented in this paper by looking at the possible application for future Malaysian rail transit operation system and management, especially focusing on enhancing the quality of Malaysian rural rail transit. In conclusion, this paper is expected to successfully review and appraise the existing Malaysian rural rail transit operation and management system pertaining to issues & solution in integration. It is also hoped that reformation or transformation of present service delivery quality of the rail transit operation and management will enable Malaysia to succeed in transforming Malaysian transportation system to greater heights.

  12. Ethical issues in autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) in advanced breast cancer: A systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background An effectiveness assessment on ASCT in locally advanced and metastatic breast cancer identified serious ethical issues associated with this intervention. Our objective was to systematically review these aspects by means of a literature analysis. Methods We chose the reflexive Socratic approach as the review method using Hofmann's question list, conducted a comprehensive literature search in biomedical, psychological and ethics bibliographic databases and screened the resulting hits in a 2-step selection process. Relevant arguments were assembled from the included articles, and were assessed and assigned to the question list. Hofmann's questions were addressed by synthesizing these arguments. Results Of the identified 879 documents 102 included arguments related to one or more questions from Hofmann's question list. The most important ethical issues were the implementation of ASCT in clinical practice on the basis of phase-II trials in the 1990s and the publication of falsified data in the first randomized controlled trials (Bezwoda fraud), which caused significant negative effects on recruiting patients for further clinical trials and the doctor-patient relationship. Recent meta-analyses report a marginal effect in prolonging disease-free survival, accompanied by severe harms, including death. ASCT in breast cancer remains a stigmatized technology. Reported health-related-quality-of-life data are often at high risk of bias in favor of the survivors. Furthermore little attention has been paid to those patients who were dying. Conclusions The questions were addressed in different degrees of completeness. All arguments were assignable to the questions. The central ethical dimensions of ASCT could be discussed by reviewing the published literature. PMID:21496244

  13. Identifying the Educationally Influential Physician: A Systematic Review of Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kronberger, Matthew P.; Bakken, Lori L.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Previous studies have indicated that educationally influential physicians' (EIPs) interactions with peers can lead to practice changes and improved patient outcomes. However, multiple approaches have been used to identify and investigate EIPs' informal or formal influence on practice, which creates study outcomes that are difficult…

  14. Identifying the Educationally Influential Physician: A Systematic Review of Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kronberger, Matthew P.; Bakken, Lori L.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Previous studies have indicated that educationally influential physicians' (EIPs) interactions with peers can lead to practice changes and improved patient outcomes. However, multiple approaches have been used to identify and investigate EIPs' informal or formal influence on practice, which creates study outcomes that are difficult…

  15. A screening approach for identifying environmental justice issues in environmental impact statements

    SciTech Connect

    Schexnayder, S.S.

    1995-12-01

    Executive Order 12898 and the accompanying memorandum addressed to Federal agency heads, both issued on February 11, 1994, require NEPA processes to incorporate environmental justice. The NEPA processes affected are: (1) public involvement formats, (2) analyses of potential impacts. The Executive Order clearly indicates that research strategies and mitigation measure should be developed with the input of the populations mentioned in the Executive Order, i.e., minority and low-income populations. However, an enhanced public involvement process may not occur because the NEPA activity may have been underway before the Executive Order was issued or because the agency chooses not to change traditional public participation mechanisms. It is also possible that enhanced mechanisms may not effectively elicit involvement. In either case, analysis that considers environmental justice must proceed. These analyses could be highly data-intensive--requiring new or modified methodological approaches-- and time-intensive, particularly if the process elements of the executive order are interpreted broadly, Federal agencies and NEPA project managers already have expressed concern about the potential cost of conducting exhaustive environmental justice related analyses where they may not be warranted. Also, the time and resources required to conduct a full environmental justice analysis is counter to recent trends to streamline the NEPA process. In light of this, a process to screen for indicators of the potential for environmental justice issues has been developed. The method incorporates separate screens for human health impacts, socioeconomic impacts, and social structural impacts. Positive results of any screen indicates the need for full-scale, environmental-justice-related analysis of that category of impact. The screen is intended as a useful tool in implementing environmental justice in environmental impact statements.

  16. Usability Evaluation Survey for Identifying Design Issues in Civil Flight Deck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozve Aminian, Negin; Izzuddin Romli, Fairuz; Wiriadidjaja, Surjatin

    2016-02-01

    Ergonomics assessment for cockpit in civil aircraft is important as the pilots spend most of their time during flight on the seating posture imposed by its design. The improper seat design can cause discomfort and pain, which will disturb the pilot's concentration in flight. From a conducted survey, it is found that there are some issues regarding the current cockpit design. This study aims to highlight potential mismatches between the current cockpit design and the ergonomic design recommendations for anthropometric dimensions and seat design, which could be the roots of the problems faced by the pilots in the cockpit.

  17. Which resources should be used to identify RCT/CCTs for systematic reviews: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Crumley, Ellen T; Wiebe, Natasha; Cramer, Kristie; Klassen, Terry P; Hartling, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    Background Systematic reviewers seek to comprehensively search for relevant studies and summarize these to present the most valid estimate of intervention effectiveness. The more resources searched, the higher the yield, and thus time and costs required to conduct a systematic review. While there is an abundance of evidence to suggest how extensive a search for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) should be, it is neither conclusive nor consistent. This systematic review was conducted in order to assess the value of different resources to identify trials for inclusion in systematic reviews. Methods Seven electronic databases, four journals and Cochrane Colloquia were searched. Key authors were contacted and references of relevant articles screened. Included studies compared two or more sources to find RCTs or controlled clinical trials (CCTs). A checklist was developed and applied to assess quality of reporting. Data were extracted by one reviewer and checked by a second. Medians and ranges for precision and recall were calculated; results were grouped by comparison. Meta-analysis was not performed due to large heterogeneity. Subgroup analyses were conducted for: search strategy (Cochrane, Simple, Complex, Index), expertise of the searcher (Cochrane, librarian, non-librarian), and study design (RCT and CCT). Results Sixty-four studies representing 13 electronic databases met inclusion criteria. The most common comparisons were MEDLINE vs. handsearching (n = 23), MEDLINE vs. MEDLINE+handsearching (n = 13), and MEDLINE vs. reference standard (n = 13). Quality was low, particularly for the reporting of study selection methodology. Overall, recall and precision varied substantially by comparison and ranged from 0 to 100% and 0 to 99%, respectively. The trial registries performed the best with median recall of 89% (range 84, 95) and median precision of 96.5% (96, 97), although these results are based on a small number of studies. Inadequate or inappropriate indexing was

  18. Search strategies to identify information on adverse effects: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Golder, Su; Loke, Yoon

    2009-04-01

    The review evaluated studies of electronic database search strategies designed to retrieve adverse effects data for systematic reviews. Studies of adverse effects were located in ten databases as well as by checking references, hand-searching, searching citations, and contacting experts. Two reviewers screened the retrieved records for potentially relevant papers. Five thousand three hundred thirteen citations were retrieved, yielding 19 studies designed to develop or evaluate adverse effect filters, of which 3 met the inclusion criteria. All 3 studies identified highly sensitive search strategies capable of retrieving over 95% of relevant records. However, 1 study did not evaluate precision, while the level of precision in the other 2 studies ranged from 0.8% to 2.8%. Methodological issues in these papers included the relatively small number of records, absence of a validation set of records for testing, and limited evaluation of precision. The results indicate the difficulty of achieving highly sensitive searches for information on adverse effects with a reasonable level of precision. Researchers who intend to locate studies on adverse effects should allow for the amount of resources and time required to conduct a highly sensitive search.

  19. 42 CFR 137.301 - How are project and program environmental review costs identified?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Construction Nepa Process § 137.301 How are project and program environmental review costs identified? (a) The... development to identify program and project related costs associated with carrying out environmental... foreseeable environmental review activities. (b) If unforeseen environmental review and compliance costs are...

  20. 42 CFR 137.301 - How are project and program environmental review costs identified?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Construction Nepa Process § 137.301 How are project and program environmental review costs identified? (a) The... development to identify program and project related costs associated with carrying out environmental... foreseeable environmental review activities. (b) If unforeseen environmental review and compliance costs are...

  1. 42 CFR 137.301 - How are project and program environmental review costs identified?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Construction Nepa Process § 137.301 How are project and program environmental review costs identified? (a) The... development to identify program and project related costs associated with carrying out environmental... foreseeable environmental review activities. (b) If unforeseen environmental review and compliance costs are...

  2. 42 CFR 137.301 - How are project and program environmental review costs identified?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Construction Nepa Process § 137.301 How are project and program environmental review costs identified? (a) The... development to identify program and project related costs associated with carrying out environmental... foreseeable environmental review activities. (b) If unforeseen environmental review and compliance costs are...

  3. The neurosurgical workforce in North America: a critical review of gender issues.

    PubMed

    Woodrow, Sarah I; Gilmer-Hill, Holly; Rutka, James T

    2006-10-01

    The role of women in Western society has changed dramatically in the past several decades. Despite this, many gender disparities still exist for professionals in the health care sector. In neurosurgery, a disproportionately small percentage of the workforce in the United States and Canada is female. These figures are lower than most reported in other medical specialties. This review critically examines factors that may be influencing women's ability to advance in demanding subspecialties such as neurosurgery. The literature on women in medicine, and surgery in particular, were reviewed to identify different issues facing women currently in practice in neurosurgery. In addition, the concerns of prospective trainees were examined. There remain many challenges for women entering neurosurgery, including unique lifestyle concerns, limited mentorship, out-dated career programs, and deep-seeded societal beliefs. Discrimination and harassment are also contributing factors. If neurosurgery is to continue to progress as a subspecialty, the issue of gender inequality needs to be scrutinized more closely. Innovative programs must be developed to meet the needs of current female faculty members and to ensure attracting the brightest individuals of both genders into a career in neurosurgery.

  4. Arab labour migration: a review of trends and issues.

    PubMed

    Shah, N M

    1994-01-01

    "The objectives set for this paper are to: provide an analysis of volume and trends in labour migration within the Arab region; discuss the major characteristics of the migrants, including demographic features, types of economic activity, wage levels and duration of stay in host countries; [and] outline and discuss the major issues in labour migration both from the sending and receiving countries. The time period covered by the study is from the mid 1970s to the present." (SUMMARY IN FRE AND SPA)

  5. Reviews on Security Issues and Challenges in Cloud Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Y. Z.; Zaaba, Z. F.; Samsudin, N. F.

    2016-11-01

    Cloud computing is an Internet-based computing service provided by the third party allowing share of resources and data among devices. It is widely used in many organizations nowadays and becoming more popular because it changes the way of how the Information Technology (IT) of an organization is organized and managed. It provides lots of benefits such as simplicity and lower costs, almost unlimited storage, least maintenance, easy utilization, backup and recovery, continuous availability, quality of service, automated software integration, scalability, flexibility and reliability, easy access to information, elasticity, quick deployment and lower barrier to entry. While there is increasing use of cloud computing service in this new era, the security issues of the cloud computing become a challenges. Cloud computing must be safe and secure enough to ensure the privacy of the users. This paper firstly lists out the architecture of the cloud computing, then discuss the most common security issues of using cloud and some solutions to the security issues since security is one of the most critical aspect in cloud computing due to the sensitivity of user's data.

  6. A Review Approaches to Identify Enteric Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Amani, Jafar; Mirhosseini, Seyed Ali; Imani Fooladi, Abbas Ali

    2014-01-01

    Context: Diarrhea is a common disease across the world. According to WHO, every year about two billion cases of diarrhea are reported in the world. It occurs mainly in the tropical regions and is a main cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in young children and adults. Evidence Acquisition: One of the major causes of diarrheal diseases is bacteria; detection of pathogenic bacteria is a global key to the prevention and identification of food-borne diseases and enteric infections (like diarrhea). Conclusions: Therefore, development of rapid diagnostic methods with suitable sensitivity and specificity is very important about this infectious disease. In this review, we will discuss some of the important diagnostic methods. PMID:25793091

  7. Issues in the Assessment of Social Phobia: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Letamendi, Andrea M.; Chavira, Denise A.; Stein, Murray B.

    2010-01-01

    Since the emergence of social phobia in DSM nomenclature, the mental health community has witnessed an expansion in standardized methods for the screening, diagnosis, and measurement of the disorder. This article reviews formal assessment methods for social phobia, including diagnostic interview, clinician-administered instruments, and self report questionnaires. Frequently used tools for assessing constructs related to social phobia, such as disability and quality of life, are also briefly presented. This review evaluates each method by highlighting the assessment features recommended in social phobia literature, including method of administration, item content, coverage, length of scale, type of scores generated, and time frame. PMID:19728569

  8. 2010 drug packaging review: identifying problems to prevent errors.

    PubMed

    2011-06-01

    Prescrire's analyses showed that the quality of drug packaging in 2010 still left much to be desired. Potentially dangerous packaging remains a significant problem: unclear labelling is source of medication errors; dosing devices for some psychotropic drugs create a risk of overdose; child-proof caps are often lacking; and too many patient information leaflets are misleading or difficult to understand. Everything that is needed for safe drug packaging is available; it is now up to regulatory agencies and drug companies to act responsibly. In the meantime, health professionals can help their patients by learning to identify the pitfalls of drug packaging and providing safe information to help prevent medication errors.

  9. Developing Early Warning Systems to Identify Potential High School Dropouts. Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heppen, Jessica B.; Therriault, Susan Bowles

    2008-01-01

    The high school dropout problem has been called a national crisis. Educators, researchers, and policymakers continue to work to identify effective dropout prevention approaches. One important element of such prevention efforts is the identification of students at highest risk for dropping out and then the targeting of resources to keep them in…

  10. Identifying critical issues in recreation planning and management: improving the management-research partnership

    Treesearch

    John H. Schomaker; David W. Lime

    1988-01-01

    The "nominal group" process is a proven technique to systematically arrive at a consensus about critical information needs in recreation planning and management. Using this process, 41 managers who attended a 1983 conference on river management identified 114 specific information needs grouped under 11 general questions. Clearly, some concerns of...

  11. Speaking for America's Children: Child Advocates Identify Children's Issues and 2002 State Priorities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Catherine Crystal

    Despite the ongoing devolution of policymaking from the federal to the state and local level, there remains a belief that there is a single agenda for children. In summer 2001, the National Association of Child Advocates (NACA) surveyed its membership to determine if a national agenda for children exists. This paper identifies the key issues…

  12. Organisational Issues for E-Learning: Critical Success Factors as Identified by HE Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPherson, Maggie; Nunes, Miguel Baptista

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on a research project that identified organisational critical success factors (CSFs) for e-learning implementation in higher education (HE). These CSFs can be used as a theoretical foundation upon which to base decision-making and strategic thinking about e-learning. Design/methodology/approach: The…

  13. Legal Issues in Education: A Review of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogletree, Earl J.; Garrett, Willie

    This paper reviews laws, regulations, and court rulings that teachers, educators, and school administrators should be aware of in order to assert and protect their rights. It provides information on constitutional and legal provisions affecting the day to day operations of schools as well as the rights of teachers, students, and other school…

  14. Water Analysis: Emerging Contaminants and Current Issues (2009 Review)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This biennial review covers developments in Water Analysis for Emerging Environmental Contaminants over the period of 2007-2008. A few significant references that appeared between January and February 2009 are also included. Analytical Chemistry’s current policy is to limit rev...

  15. Water Analysis: Emerging Contaminants and Current Issues (2009 Review)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This biennial review covers developments in Water Analysis for Emerging Environmental Contaminants over the period of 2007-2008. A few significant references that appeared between January and February 2009 are also included. Analytical Chemistry’s current policy is to limit rev...

  16. Review of the Literature on Asian American Mental Health Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le, Trang Ngoc

    Within the mental health treatment field there is an underutilization of services by Asian Americans. Researchers have questioned how to lessen the gap between the number of Asian Americans who need mental health services and the significantly lower number who successfully use these services. A review of current research points out that matching…

  17. High-power FEL design issues - a critical review

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Madey, J.M.J.; O`Shea, P.G.

    1995-12-31

    The high-average power capability of FELs has been much advertised but little realized. In this paper we provide a critical analysis of the technological and economic issues associated with high-average power FEL operation from the UV to near IR. The project of IR FEL for the Siberian Center of photochemical researches is described. The distinguished features of this project are the use of the race-track microtron-recuperator and the {open_quotes}electron output of radiation{close_quotes}. The building for the machine is under reconstruction now. About half of hardware has been manufactured. The assembly of installation began.

  18. Commercialization and Stem Cell Research: A Review of Emerging Issues

    PubMed Central

    Burningham, Sarah; Ollenberger, Adam; Caulfield, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Stem cell researchers face pressure to develop therapies that will reach the clinic within a short period of time. Yet, this pressure may be unrealistic, as bringing stem cell innovations to the clinic will likely require significant time and financial investment. In a variety of biomedical fields, some evidence suggests that commercialization pressures and strategies may negatively impact research. These negative impacts may also be felt in the field of stem cell research, unless the challenges and issues are addressed in the design and implementation of commercialization policies. Further inquiry into the impact of commercialization on the field of stem cell research is required. PMID:24304081

  19. Commercialization and stem cell research: a review of emerging issues.

    PubMed

    Burningham, Sarah; Ollenberger, Adam; Caulfield, Timothy

    2013-12-01

    Stem cell researchers face pressure to develop therapies that will reach the clinic within a short period of time. Yet, this pressure may be unrealistic, as bringing stem cell innovations to the clinic will likely require significant time and financial investment. In a variety of biomedical fields, some evidence suggests that commercialization pressures and strategies may negatively impact research. These negative impacts may also be felt in the field of stem cell research, unless the challenges and issues are addressed in the design and implementation of commercialization policies. Further inquiry into the impact of commercialization on the field of stem cell research is required.

  20. Aspartame. Review of safety issues. Council on Scientific Affairs.

    PubMed

    1985-07-19

    This report examines the safety issues related to the nutritive sweetener aspartame, including possible toxic effects of aspartame's component amino acids, aspartic acid and phenylalanine, and its major decomposition products, methanol and diketopiperazine, and the potential synergistic effect of aspartame and dietary carbohydrate on brain neurochemicals. Available evidence suggests that consumption of aspartame by normal humans is safe and is not associated with serious adverse health effects. Individuals who need to control their phenylalanine intake should handle aspartame like any other source of phenylalanine.

  1. Identifying experimental surrogates for Bacillus anthracis spores: a review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, is a proven biological weapon. In order to study this threat, a number of experimental surrogates have been used over the past 70 years. However, not all surrogates are appropriate for B. anthracis, especially when investigating transport, fate and survival. Although B. atrophaeus has been widely used as a B. anthracis surrogate, the two species do not always behave identically in transport and survival models. Therefore, we devised a scheme to identify a more appropriate surrogate for B. anthracis. Our selection criteria included risk of use (pathogenicity), phylogenetic relationship, morphology and comparative survivability when challenged with biocides. Although our knowledge of certain parameters remains incomplete, especially with regards to comparisons of spore longevity under natural conditions, we found that B. thuringiensis provided the best overall fit as a non-pathogenic surrogate for B. anthracis. Thus, we suggest focusing on this surrogate in future experiments of spore fate and transport modelling. PMID:21092338

  2. Issues in Benchmarking Human Reliability Analysis Methods: A Literature Review

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald L. Boring; Stacey M. L. Hendrickson; John A. Forester; Tuan Q. Tran; Erasmia Lois

    2010-06-01

    There is a diversity of human reliability analysis (HRA) methods available for use in assessing human performance within probabilistic risk assessments (PRA). Due to the significant differences in the methods, including the scope, approach, and underlying models, there is a need for an empirical comparison investigating the validity and reliability of the methods. To accomplish this empirical comparison, a benchmarking study comparing and evaluating HRA methods in assessing operator performance in simulator experiments is currently underway. In order to account for as many effects as possible in the construction of this benchmarking study, a literature review was conducted, reviewing past benchmarking studies in the areas of psychology and risk assessment. A number of lessons learned through these studies are presented in order to aid in the design of future HRA benchmarking endeavors.

  3. Issues in benchmarking human reliability analysis methods : a literature review.

    SciTech Connect

    Lois, Erasmia; Forester, John Alan; Tran, Tuan Q.; Hendrickson, Stacey M. Langfitt; Boring, Ronald L.

    2008-04-01

    There is a diversity of human reliability analysis (HRA) methods available for use in assessing human performance within probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). Due to the significant differences in the methods, including the scope, approach, and underlying models, there is a need for an empirical comparison investigating the validity and reliability of the methods. To accomplish this empirical comparison, a benchmarking study is currently underway that compares HRA methods with each other and against operator performance in simulator studies. In order to account for as many effects as possible in the construction of this benchmarking study, a literature review was conducted, reviewing past benchmarking studies in the areas of psychology and risk assessment. A number of lessons learned through these studies are presented in order to aid in the design of future HRA benchmarking endeavors.

  4. Ethical Issues Surrounding Personalized Medicine: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Salari, Pooneh; Larijani, Bagher

    2017-03-01

    More than a decade ago, personalized medicine was presented in modern medicine. Personalized medicine means that the right drug should be prescribed for the right patient based on genetic data. No doubt is developing medical sciences, and its shift into personalized medicine complicates ethical challenges more than before. In this review, we categorized all probable ethical considerations of personalized medicine in research and development and service provision. Based on our review, extensive changes in healthcare system including ethical changes are needed to overcome the ethical obstacles including knowledge gap and informed consent, privacy and confidentiality and availability of healthcare services. Furthermore social benefit versus science development and individual benefit should be balanced. Therefore guidelines and regulations should be compiled to represent the ethical framework; also ethical decision making should be day-to-day and individualized.

  5. Asking the `Right' Questions. Identifying Issues in Developing a Technological Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, Bev; Davies, Janet

    2001-02-01

    It is well established that technological education is not just about the development of technical expertise. A socially constructed view of technology aims to recognise the culture of technology. Technology education as expressed in the New Zealand curriculum provides an opportunity for societal issues to have equal space with technological capability and technological knowledge. However, when technological activities focus on solutions it is all too easy for stakeholders' positions to be ignored. There is a need for a teaching approach to engage in a liberating technological literacy discourse where values and beliefs of all participants directly and indirectly involved in the activity, are examined. This research monitored a professional development programme where identification of the values represented in a familiar object provided a model for discussion and the development of a teaching environment that promoted consideration of values during problem-solving. The data have been collected from primary school teachers who developed teaching programmes for Years 1 to 8 (5-12 years).

  6. Women's occupational health: a critical review and discussion of current issues.

    PubMed

    Messing, K

    1997-01-01

    Action to improve women's occupational health has been slowed by a notion that women's jobs are safe and that any health problems identified among women workers can be attributed to unfitness for the job or unnecessary complaining. With increasing numbers of women in the labor force, the effects of work on women's health have recently started to interest health care providers, health and safety representatives and researchers. We begin our summary of their discoveries with a discussion of women's place in the workplace and its implications for occupational health, followed by a brief review of some gender-insensitive data-gathering techniques. We have then chosen to concentrate on the following four areas: methods and data collection; directing attention to women's occupational health problems; musculoskeletal disease; mental and emotional stress. We conclude by pointing out some neglected occupational groups and health issues.

  7. 10 CFR Appendix Q to Part 50 - Pre-Application Early Review of Site Suitability Issues

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... FACILITIES Pt. 50, App. Q Appendix Q to Part 50—Pre-Application Early Review of Site Suitability Issues This... the Federal Register and shall make the report available at the NRC Web site, http://www.nrc.gov....

  8. 10 CFR Appendix Q to Part 50 - Pre-Application Early Review of Site Suitability Issues

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... FACILITIES Pt. 50, App. Q Appendix Q to Part 50—Pre-Application Early Review of Site Suitability Issues This... the Federal Register and shall make the report available at the NRC Web site, http://www.nrc.gov....

  9. 10 CFR Appendix Q to Part 50 - Pre-Application Early Review of Site Suitability Issues

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... FACILITIES Pt. 50, App. Q Appendix Q to Part 50—Pre-Application Early Review of Site Suitability Issues This... the Federal Register and shall make the report available at the NRC Web site, http://www.nrc.gov....

  10. 30 CFR 773.21 - Initial review and finding requirements for improvidently issued permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... EXPLORATION SYSTEMS UNDER REGULATORY PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PERMITS AND PERMIT PROCESSING § 773.21 Initial..., have reason to believe that we improvidently issued a permit to you, the permittee, we must review the...

  11. Psychosocial issues in the prevention of chronic low back pain--a literature review.

    PubMed

    Weiser, S; Cedraschi, C

    1992-10-01

    This chapter has reviewed research on psychological and social factors associated with the onset and progression of low back pain. From this review it can be concluded that psychosocial traits appear to be important contributors to the course of pain and disability though methodologically well-designed longitudinal studies are rare. For this reason it is difficult to assess the relative importance of, for example, psychological distress compared with work stress. Furthermore, the mechanisms by which specific variables effect back pain remain unknown. The answer, no doubt, lies in longitudinal studies which employ multicausal models. It has been noted the psychosocial treatments which have proven effective for chronic pain populations are rarely assessed with acute pain patients. Some problems are the inaccessibility of acute back pain sufferers to psychologists, the difficulty of isolating the effect of one component of a multidisciplinary programme and the lack of uniform practice of psychosocial techniques. None the less, programmes which include psychosocial interventions appear to have superior results to those which do not. Since these techniques are often simple and inexpensive to include they should be incorporated into all treatment programmes where the potential for chronic pain syndrome exists. Gaps and flaws in current research methodologies have been identified and suggestions for future investigations have been proposed. In addition we have attempted to provide some practical guidelines for health care professionals to help them identify salient psychosocial issues which may effect the course of their patient's treatment. Recommendations for assessment and referral are also provided.

  12. Review of Issues Associated with Safe Operation and Management of the Space Shuttle Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnstone, Paul M.; Blomberg, Richard D.; Gleghorn, George J.; Krone, Norris J.; Voltz, Richard A.; Dunn, Robert F.; Donlan, Charles J.; Kauderer, Bernard M.; Brill, Yvonne C.; Englar, Kenneth G.; Himmel, Seymour C.; Fitch, Dennis E.; Parmet, Norman R.; McDonald, John F.McDonald; Stewart, John G.

    1996-01-01

    At the request of the President of the United States through the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), the NASA Administrator tasked the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel with the responsibility to identify and review issues associated with the safe operation and management of the Space Shuttle program arising from ongoing efforts to improve and streamline operations. These efforts include the consolidation of operations under a single Space Flight Operations Contract (SFOC), downsizing the Space Shuttle workforce and reducing costs of operations and management. The Panel formed five teams to address the potentially significant safety impacts of the seven specific topic areas listed in the study Terms of Reference. These areas were (in the order in which they are presented in this report): Maintenance of independent safety oversight; implementation plan for the transition of Shuttle program management to the Lead Center; communications among NASA Centers and Headquarters; transition plan for downsizing to anticipated workforce levels; implementation of a phased transition to a prime contractor for operations; Shuttle flight rate for Space Station assembly; and planned safety and performance upgrades for Space Station assembly. The study teams collected information through briefings, interviews, telephone conversations and from reviewing applicable documentation. These inputs were distilled by each team into observations and recommendations which were then reviewed by the entire Panel.

  13. Transdisciplinary research for complex One Health issues: a scoping review of key concepts.

    PubMed

    Min, B; Allen-Scott, L K; Buntain, B

    2013-11-01

    In order to address the complexity inherent in researching One Health (OH) issues, we support the concept that researchers must transcend individual disciplinary and non-disciplinary boundaries, and move into the realm of transdisciplinary (TD) research approaches. For the purposes of this paper we use the term OH and the concept that OH research is conducted to solve complex health challenges at the animal-human--human-ecosystem interface. TD goes beyond interdisciplinary research to engages disciplines and communities through a unified conceptual framework. In this scoping review we investigated key concepts, definitions and themes in OH and TD based on the peer reviewed literature. We identified nine emerging themes in TD research: (1) education, (2) conflict amongst disciplines, (3) effective communication, (4) shared conceptual framework, (5) leadership, (6) perceived power differentials, (7) community-based methodologies, (8) support for TD research and (9) time and effort. This review provides a synthesized knowledge base that describes the nature, extent of evidence and challenges of engaging in TD initiatives. This knowledge base further provides a foundation for those interested in developing improved strategies for TD collaborative and cross-sectoral research in OH.

  14. Review and Prioritization of Technical Issues Related to Burnup Credit for LWR Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, C V; DeHart, M D; Wagner, John C

    2000-03-13

    This report has been prepared to review relevant background information and provide technical discussion that will help initiate a PIRT (Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables) process for use of burnup credit in light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel storage and transport cask applications. The PIRT process will be used by the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research to help prioritize and guide a coordinated program of research and as a means to obtain input/feedback from industry and other interested parties. The review and discussion in this report are based on knowledge and experience gained from work performed in the United States and other countries. Current regulatory practice and perceived industry needs are also reviewed as a background for prioritizing technical needs that will facilitate safe practice in the use of burnup credit. Relevant physics and analysis phenomenon are identified, and an assessment of their importance to burnup credit implementation is given. Finally, phenomena that need to be better understood for effective licensing, together with technical issues that require resolution, are presented and discussed in the form of a prioritization ranking and initial draft program plan.

  15. Active lower limb prosthetics: a systematic review of design issues and solutions.

    PubMed

    Windrich, Michael; Grimmer, Martin; Christ, Oliver; Rinderknecht, Stephan; Beckerle, Philipp

    2016-12-19

    This paper presents a review on design issues and solutions found in active lower limb prostheses. This review is based on a systematic literature search with a methodical search strategy. The search was carried out across four major technical databases and the retrieved records were screened for their relevance. A total of 21 different active prostheses, including 8 above-knee, 9 below-knee and 4 combined knee-ankle prostheses were identified. While an active prosthesis may help to restore the functional performance of an amputee, the requirements regarding the actuation unit as well as for the control system are high and the development becomes a challenging task. Regarding mechanical design and the actuation unit high force/torque delivery, high efficiency, low size and low weight are conflicting goals. The actuation principle and variable impedance actuators are discussed. The control system is paramount for a "natural functioning" of the prosthesis. The control system has to enable locomotion and should react to the amputee's intent. For this, multi-level control approaches are reviewed.

  16. Psychology teaching in nursing education: a review of and reflection on approaches, issues, and contemporary practice.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Jan M A; Timmins, Fiona

    2012-11-01

    This paper highlights the relevance of psychology for nurses and the issues around the inclusion of psychology as an essential part of nursing education. Considerable international variations in the extent to which psychology is incorporated in nursing education suggest a need for discussion and reflection on this topic. This paper aims to (a) examine and reflect on scholarly literature in English addressing psychology of nursing in education and (b) present and reflect on an example of psychology teaching in a school of nursing and midwifery in Ireland. A review of the literature took place, which included a search of various databases and an analysis of emerging psychology for nursing textbooks over the period 1906-2011. Findings were used as a framework for reflection on a local example. The literature review yielded numerous commentaries, discussion papers, textbook reviews and editorials but very few empirical studies. Three topics were identified as appearing most frequently in the literature: the relevance of psychology in the nursing curriculum; depth and content of coverage; and whether integrated or separate instruction of psychology should be chosen. Findings suggest that overall the relevance of psychology to nursing education is not contested, but debates have emerged regarding how best to approach and integrate psychology. The outcomes of these debates are mostly inconclusive at present. Educators are encouraged to become active in these discussions and reflections, which are hampered by lack of empirical evidence. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A Review on Potential Issues and Challenges in MR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kanakaraj, Jagannathan

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is a noninvasive technique that has been developed for its excellent depiction of soft tissue contrasts. Instruments capable of ultra-high field strengths, ≥7 Tesla, were recently engineered and have resulted in higher signal-to-noise and higher resolution images. This paper presents various subsystems of the MR imaging systems like the magnet subsystem, gradient subsystem, and also various issues which arise due to the magnet. Further, it also portrays finer details about the RF coils and transceiver and also various limitations of the RF coils and transceiver. Moreover, the concept behind the data processing system and the challenges related to it were also depicted. Finally, the various artifacts associated with the MR imaging were clearly pointed out. It also presents a brief overview about all the challenges related to MR imaging systems. PMID:24381523

  18. Evidence generation for wound care dressing selection: reviewing the issues.

    PubMed

    Pagnamenta, F

    2017-09-02

    In the UK, dressings are categorised as medical devices and manufacturers only have to provide limited evidence of effectiveness before dressings are used in clinical practice. Therefore, evidence based on clinical trial methods is scant. As a direct result, governing bodies in the UK are now recommending that decisions to select one dressing over another could mainly be made on price. Placed within the movement critiquing evidence-based practice (EBP), this paper summarises the main issues surrounding the generation of evidence in selecting dressings for wound care, which is immersed in a context that lacks resources, legislative clarity and freedom to choose methodological alternatives. Dressings are therapeutic medical devices rather than consumables and any rationalisation based on costs may have far-reaching implications for wound care clinicians through purchasing decisions and thus may limit their ability to manage wounds effectively.

  19. Identifying Key Issues and Potential Solutions for Integrated Arrival, Departure, Surface Operations by Surveying Stakeholder Preferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aponso, Bimal; Coppenbarger, Richard A.; Jung, Yoon; Quon, Leighton; Lohr, Gary; O’Connor, Neil; Engelland, Shawn

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) collaborates with the FAA and industry to provide concepts and technologies that enhance the transition to the next-generation air-traffic management system (NextGen). To facilitate this collaboration, ARMD has a series of Airspace Technology Demonstration (ATD) sub-projects that develop, demonstrate, and transitions NASA technologies and concepts for implementation in the National Airspace System (NAS). The second of these sub-projects, ATD-2, is focused on the potential benefits to NAS stakeholders of integrated arrival, departure, surface (IADS) operations. To determine the project objectives and assess the benefits of a potential solution, NASA surveyed NAS stakeholders to understand the existing issues in arrival, departure, and surface operations, and the perceived benefits of better integrating these operations. NASA surveyed a broad cross-section of stakeholders representing the airlines, airports, air-navigation service providers, and industry providers of NAS tools. The survey indicated that improving the predictability of flight times (schedules) could improve efficiency in arrival, departure, and surface operations. Stakeholders also mentioned the need for better strategic and tactical information on traffic constraints as well as better information sharing and a coupled collaborative planning process that allows stakeholders to coordinate IADS operations. To assess the impact of a potential solution, NASA sketched an initial departure scheduling concept and assessed its viability by surveying a select group of stakeholders for a second time. The objective of the departure scheduler was to enable flights to move continuously from gate to cruise with minimal interruption in a busy metroplex airspace environment using strategic and tactical scheduling enhanced by collaborative planning between airlines and service providers. The stakeholders agreed that this departure concept could improve schedule

  20. Current IT Issues, 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spicer, Donald Z.; Deblois, Peter B.

    2004-01-01

    This article features the EDUCAUSE Current Issues Survey. Administered by the EDUCAUSE Current Issues Committee, whose members review and recommend the set of issues to be presented each year, the survey identifies the issues that leaders in higher education information technology see as their most critical IT challenges. The Top-Ten current IT…

  1. Current IT Issues, 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spicer, Donald Z.; Deblois, Peter B.

    2004-01-01

    This article features the EDUCAUSE Current Issues Survey. Administered by the EDUCAUSE Current Issues Committee, whose members review and recommend the set of issues to be presented each year, the survey identifies the issues that leaders in higher education information technology see as their most critical IT challenges. The Top-Ten current IT…

  2. Issues and Directions from a Review of the Australian Apprenticeship and Traineeship Literature. Australian Apprenticeships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, S.

    This paper synthesizes issues and directions that a review of Australian apprenticeship and traineeship literature suggested. An overview discusses the paper's basis, which was a survey of 125 Australian references from 1985-99. Chapter 2 categorizes issues into seven groups, discusses them, and draws out salient themes. (The groups concerned…

  3. Controversial Issues in the Diagnosis of Narcissistic Personality Disorder: A Review of the Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivas, Luis A.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews the literature on some of the issues that have been proposed as controversial with the diagnosis of Narcissistic Personality Disorder. Discusses the issues of comorbidity that questions the validity of the diagnosis; dimensional models of classification and what constitutes a narcissistic personality disorder; and the role that culture…

  4. Review Article: Ethical Issues in the Study of Second Language Acquisition--Resources for Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    Two recent books provide varied resources for exploring ethical issues in the social sciences. Reflection on ethical issues aims to sensitize scholars to a range of consequences of their research, and to scholars' responsibilities to their discipline, their colleagues, and the public. This review article assesses the utility of these texts (and of…

  5. Controversial Issues in the Diagnosis of Narcissistic Personality Disorder: A Review of the Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivas, Luis A.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews the literature on some of the issues that have been proposed as controversial with the diagnosis of Narcissistic Personality Disorder. Discusses the issues of comorbidity that questions the validity of the diagnosis; dimensional models of classification and what constitutes a narcissistic personality disorder; and the role that culture…

  6. Issues and Challenges for Teaching Successful Online Courses in Higher Education: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kebritchi, Mansureh; Lipschuetz, Angie; Santiague, Lilia

    2017-01-01

    Online education changes all components of teaching and learning in higher education. Many empirical studies have been conducted to examine issues in delivering online courses; however, few have synthesized prior studies and provided an overview on issues in online courses. A review of literature using Cooper's framework was conducted to identify…

  7. Kosterlitz-Thouless physics: a review of key issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosterlitz, J. Michael

    2016-02-01

    This article reviews, from a very personal point of view, the origins and the early work on transitions driven by topological defects such as vortices in the two dimensional planar rotor model and in 4Helium films and dislocations and disclinations in 2D crystals. I cover the early papers with David Thouless and describe the important insights but also the errors and oversights since corrected by other workers. I then describe some of the experimental verifications of the theory and some numerical simulations. Finally applications to superconducting arrays of Josephson junctions and to recent cold atom experiments are described.

  8. Superconductor digital electronics: Scalability and energy efficiency issues (Review Article)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolpygo, Sergey K.

    2016-05-01

    Superconductor digital electronics using Josephson junctions as ultrafast switches and magnetic-flux encoding of information was proposed over 30 years ago as a sub-terahertz clock frequency alternative to semiconductor electronics based on complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) transistors. Recently, interest in developing superconductor electronics has been renewed due to a search for energy saving solutions in applications related to high-performance computing. The current state of superconductor electronics and fabrication processes are reviewed in order to evaluate whether this electronics is scalable to a very large scale integration (VLSI) required to achieve computation complexities comparable to CMOS processors. A fully planarized process at MIT Lincoln Laboratory, perhaps the most advanced process developed so far for superconductor electronics, is used as an example. The process has nine superconducting layers: eight Nb wiring layers with the minimum feature size of 350 nm, and a thin superconducting layer for making compact high-kinetic-inductance bias inductors. All circuit layers are fully planarized using chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) of SiO2 interlayer dielectric. The physical limitations imposed on the circuit density by Josephson junctions, circuit inductors, shunt and bias resistors, etc., are discussed. Energy dissipation in superconducting circuits is also reviewed in order to estimate whether this technology, which requires cryogenic refrigeration, can be energy efficient. Fabrication process development required for increasing the density of superconductor digital circuits by a factor of ten and achieving densities above 107 Josephson junctions per cm2 is described.

  9. Practitioner Review: Adolescent alcohol use disorders: assessment and treatment issues

    PubMed Central

    Perepletchikova, Francheska; Krystal, John H.; Kaufman, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Background Alcohol use disorders in adolescents are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Over the past decade, there has been a burgeoning of research on adolescent alcohol use disorders. Methods A summary of the alcohol assessment tools is provided, and randomized studies reviewed and synthesized to provide an overview of state of the art knowledge of treatment of adolescent alcohol use disorders. Animal models of addiction are also briefly reviewed, and the value of translational research approaches, using findings from basic studies to guide the design of clinical investigations, is also highlighted. Results Comorbidity is the rule, not the exception in adolescent alcohol use disorders. Comprehensive assessment of psychiatric and other substance use disorders, trauma experiences, and suicidality is indicated in this population to optimize selection of appropriate clinical interventions. In terms of available investigated treatments for adolescents with alcohol use disorders, Multidimensional Family Therapy and group administered Cognitive Behavioral Therapies have received the most empirical support to date. There is a paucity of research on pharmacological interventions in this patient population, and no firm treatment recommendations can be made in this area. Conclusions Given the high rate of relapse after treatment, evaluation of combined psychosocial and pharmacological interventions, and the development of novel intervention strategies are indi cated. PMID:19017028

  10. Ticks of Poland. Review of contemporary issues and latest research.

    PubMed

    Nowak-Chmura, Magdalena; Siuda, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents current knowledge of ticks occurring in Poland, their medical importance, and a review of recent studies implemented in the Polish research centres on ticks and their significance in the epidemiology of transmissible diseases. In the Polish fauna there are 19 species of ticks (Ixodida) recognized as existing permanently in our country: Argas reflexus, Argas polonicus, Carios vespertilionis, Ixodes trianguliceps, Ixodes arboricola, Ixodes crenulatus, Ixodes hexagonus, Ixodes lividus, Ixodes rugicollis, Ixodes caledonicus, Ixodes frontalis, Ixodes simplex, Ixodes vespertilionis, Ixodes apronophorus, Ixodes persulcatus, Ixodes ricinus, Haemaphysalis punctata, Haemaphysalis concinna, Dermacentor reticulatus. Occasionally, alien species of ticks transferred to the territory of Poland are recorded: Amblyomma sphenodonti, Amblyomma exornatum, Amblyomma flavomaculatum, Amblyomma latum, Amblyomma nuttalli, Amblyomma quadricavum, Amblyomma transversale, Amblyomma varanensis, Amblyomma spp., Dermacentor marginatus, Hyalomma aegyptium, Hyalomma marginatum, Ixodes eldaricus, Ixodes festai, Rhipicephalus rossicus, Rhipicephalus sanguineus. The most common species of the highest medical and veterinary importance in Poland is invariably Ixodes ricinus. The review also sets out information on the risks of tickborne diseases in recreational areas of large cities in Poland, ticks as the cause of occupational diseases and dangerous species of ticks attacking people outside the Polish borders. Selected problems of the biology of ticks, the spread of alien species transferred on hosts and prevention of tick attacks have also been presented. The Polish studies on ticks are a valuable contribution to global research on the Ixodida.

  11. Invited review: gender issues related to spaceflight: a NASA perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harm, D. L.; Jennings, R. T.; Meck, J. V.; Powell, M. R.; Putcha, L.; Sams, C. P.; Schneider, S. M.; Shackelford, L. C.; Smith, S. M.; Whitson, P. A.

    2001-01-01

    This minireview provides an overview of known and potential gender differences in physiological responses to spaceflight. The paper covers cardiovascular and exercise physiology, barophysiology and decompression sickness, renal stone risk, immunology, neurovestibular and sensorimotor function, nutrition, pharmacotherapeutics, and reproduction. Potential health and functional impacts associated with the various physiological changes during spaceflight are discussed, and areas needing additional research are highlighted. Historically, studies of physiological responses to microgravity have not been aimed at examining gender-specific differences in the astronaut population. Insufficient data exist in most of the discipline areas at this time to draw valid conclusions about gender-specific differences in astronauts, in part due to the small ratio of women to men. The only astronaut health issue for which a large enough data set exists to allow valid conclusions to be drawn about gender differences is orthostatic intolerance following shuttle missions, in which women have a significantly higher incidence of presyncope during stand tests than do men. The most common observation across disciplines is that individual differences in physiological responses within genders are usually as large as, or larger than, differences between genders. Individual characteristics usually outweigh gender differences per se.

  12. An integrative review of global nursing workforce issues.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Barbara L; Davis, Catherine R; Richardson, Donna R

    2010-01-01

    Migration has been a way of life since the beginning of time, with migrants seeking other lands for personal and professional betterment. Today, in an era of globalization, trade agreements and technological advances, an increase in migration is inevitable. All professions have been affected, but the migration of health professionals, particularly nurses, has been the most dramatic. However, the migration of nurses across national and international borders comes with many challenges: systematic tracking of migration flows, harmonization of standards, recognition of professional credentials, fair and equitable distribution of the global health care workforce, and the effect of migration on the health care infrastructure of both source and destination countries. The international migration of nurses to address shortages in developed countries has, in some instances, left source countries with insufficient resources to address their own health care needs. The increasing complexity of health care delivery, aging of the population and the nursing workforce, and the escalating global demand for nurses create on-going challenges for policy makers. Strategically addressing global nursing workforce issues is paramount to sustaining the health of nations.

  13. Invited review: gender issues related to spaceflight: a NASA perspective.

    PubMed

    Harm, D L; Jennings, R T; Meck, J V; Powell, M R; Putcha, L; Sams, C P; Schneider, S M; Shackelford, L C; Smith, S M; Whitson, P A

    2001-11-01

    This minireview provides an overview of known and potential gender differences in physiological responses to spaceflight. The paper covers cardiovascular and exercise physiology, barophysiology and decompression sickness, renal stone risk, immunology, neurovestibular and sensorimotor function, nutrition, pharmacotherapeutics, and reproduction. Potential health and functional impacts associated with the various physiological changes during spaceflight are discussed, and areas needing additional research are highlighted. Historically, studies of physiological responses to microgravity have not been aimed at examining gender-specific differences in the astronaut population. Insufficient data exist in most of the discipline areas at this time to draw valid conclusions about gender-specific differences in astronauts, in part due to the small ratio of women to men. The only astronaut health issue for which a large enough data set exists to allow valid conclusions to be drawn about gender differences is orthostatic intolerance following shuttle missions, in which women have a significantly higher incidence of presyncope during stand tests than do men. The most common observation across disciplines is that individual differences in physiological responses within genders are usually as large as, or larger than, differences between genders. Individual characteristics usually outweigh gender differences per se.

  14. Smoking in the workplace: review of critical issues.

    PubMed Central

    Schilling, R F; Gilchrist, L D; Schinke, S P

    1985-01-01

    The relationship among various occupations, smoking, and disease has been studied extensively, but few investigators have looked closely at smoking in the workplace, particularly among blue-collar workers. The authors discuss the phenomenon of smoking in work settings and suggest reasons why tobacco use has been accepted on the job. The fate of heavy smokers in the wake of workplace smoking bans is considered. The authors discuss the relationship between smoking and work-related stress, particularly among blue-collar workers. The influences of job tasks, workflow, and employee social networks on smoking are examined. The authors suggest that, until recently, work settings have provided little support for cutting back and many opportunities that reinforced smoking habits. Worksite cessation is reviewed briefly, followed by suggestions for improving present worksite-based cessation strategies. The authors pose an agenda for future descriptive and applied research on smoking in the workplace. PMID:3931161

  15. Stakeholders Perspectives on the Success Drivers in Ghana's National Health Insurance Scheme - Identifying Policy Translation Issues.

    PubMed

    Fusheini, Adam; Marnoch, Gordon; Gray, Ann Marie

    2016-10-01

    Ghana's National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS), established by an Act of Parliament (Act 650), in 2003 and since replaced by Act 852 of 2012 remains, in African terms, unprecedented in terms of growth and coverage. As a result, the scheme has received praise for its associated legal reforms, clinical audit mechanisms and for serving as a hub for knowledge sharing and learning within the context of South-South cooperation. The scheme continues to shape national health insurance thinking in Africa. While the success, especially in coverage and financial access has been highlighted by many authors, insufficient attention has been paid to critical and context-specific factors. This paper seeks to fill that gap. Based on an empirical qualitative case study of stakeholders' views on challenges and success factors in four mutual schemes (district offices) located in two regions of Ghana, the study uses the concept of policy translation to assess whether the Ghana scheme could provide useful lessons to other African and developing countries in their quest to implement social/NHISs. In the study, interviewees referred to both 'hard and soft' elements as driving the "success" of the Ghana scheme. The main 'hard elements' include bureaucratic and legal enforcement capacities; IT; financing; governance, administration and management; regulating membership of the scheme; and service provision and coverage capabilities. The 'soft' elements identified relate to: the background/context of the health insurance scheme; innovative ways of funding the NHIS, the hybrid nature of the Ghana scheme; political will, commitment by government, stakeholders and public cooperation; social structure of Ghana (solidarity); and ownership and participation. Other developing countries can expect to translate rather than re-assemble a national health insurance programme in an incomplete and highly modified form over a period of years, amounting to a process best conceived as germination as opposed

  16. A Content and Methodological Review of Articles Concerning Multiracial Issues in Six Major Counseling Journals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Lisa M.; Pedrotti, Jennifer Teramoto

    2008-01-01

    This study describes a comprehensive content and methodological review of articles about multiracial issues in 6 journals related to counseling up to the year 2006. The authors summarize findings about the 18 articles that emerged from this review of the "Journal of Counseling Psychology," "Journal of Counseling & Development," "The Counseling…

  17. A Content and Methodological Review of Articles Concerning Multiracial Issues in Six Major Counseling Journals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Lisa M.; Pedrotti, Jennifer Teramoto

    2008-01-01

    This study describes a comprehensive content and methodological review of articles about multiracial issues in 6 journals related to counseling up to the year 2006. The authors summarize findings about the 18 articles that emerged from this review of the "Journal of Counseling Psychology," "Journal of Counseling & Development," "The Counseling…

  18. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing for breast and ovarian cancer risk: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Pasacreta, Jeannie V

    2003-01-01

    The identification of the BRCA1/2 genes, and their possible etiologic relationship with various forms of inherited cancer, has been recognized universally as a cornerstone in the search for cancer's genetic link and has made it possible to identify specific individuals and families who harbor a mutation in one of these predisposition genes. Genetic testing for breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility may pose unanticipated psychological and social problems. Because of the recent availability of predisposition genetic testing, research efforts have begun to investigate factors that may influence an individual's intention to undergo testing and the psychosocial sequelae associated with testing. The purpose of this article is to provide an integrative review of the literature that will delineate what is currently known about the psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing for breast and ovarian cancer risk. Important generalizations from the literature include: (a) a positive test for breast cancer susceptibility may ignite a psychological response similar to the diagnosis of breast cancer itself; (b) there is likely a subset of individuals at increased risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer who are also at risk for sustained psychosocial problems; (c) available literature challenges a common notion that only individuals with a positive test result will need psychosocial services; and (d) at-risk individuals are basing health care decisions on genetic testing information, thus they are making important decisions under conditions of uncertainty. Clinical issues and directions for future research were highlighted.

  19. A Review of Medication Reconciliation Issues and Experiences with Clinical Staff and Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Porcelli, P.J.; Waitman, L.R.; Brown, S.H.

    2010-01-01

    Medication reconciliation was developed to reduce medical mistakes and injuries through a process of creating and comparing a current medication list from independent patient information sources, and resolving discrepancies. The structure and clinician assignments of medication reconciliation varies between institutions, but usually includes physicians, nurses and pharmacists. The Joint Commission has recognized the value of medication reconciliation and mandated implementation in 2006; however, a variety of issues have prevented simple, easy, and universal implementation. This review references issues related to the development and the implementation of medication reconciliation including: – the need of a system or standard for accurate drug identification to create a definitive ‘gold standard’ patient medication list, – identifying stakeholders of medication reconciliation within the institution and contrasting staff interest and participation with institutional resources, – observations and opportunities of integrating medication reconciliation with the electronic patient health record, and – summarizing a series of institutions experiences developing and implementing medication reconciliation. Last, as medication reconciliation becomes a regular process within medical centers, key concepts for effective implementation are discussed. PMID:23616853

  20. PNL technical review of pressurized thermal-shock issues. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersen, L.T.; Apley, W.J.; Bian, S.H.; Defferding, L.J.; Morgenstern, M.H.; Pelto, P.J.; Simonen, E.P.; Simonen, F.A.; Stevens, D.L.; Taylor, T.T.

    1982-07-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) was asked to develop and recommend a regulatory position that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) should adopt regarding the ability of reactor pressure vessels to withstand the effects of pressurized thermal shock (PTS). Licensees of eight pressurized water reactors provided NRC with estimates of remaining effective full power years before corrective actions would be required to prevent an unsafe operating condition. PNL reviewed these responses and the results of supporting research and concluded that none of the eight reactors would undergo vessel failure from a PTS event before several more years of operation. Operator actions, however, were often required to terminate a PTS event before it deteriorated to the point where failure could occur. Therefore, the near-term (less than one year) recommendation is to upgrade, on a site-specific basis, operational procedures, training, and control room instrumentation. Also, uniform criteria should be developed by NRC for use during future licensee analyses. Finally, it was recommended that NRC upgrade nondestructive inspection techniques used during vessel examinations and become more involved in the evaluation of annealing requirements.

  1. TOPICAL REVIEW: Prosthetic interfaces with the visual system: biological issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Ethan D.

    2007-06-01

    The design of effective visual prostheses for the blind represents a challenge for biomedical engineers and neuroscientists. Significant progress has been made in the miniaturization and processing power of prosthesis electronics; however development lags in the design and construction of effective machine brain interfaces with visual system neurons. This review summarizes what has been learned about stimulating neurons in the human and primate retina, lateral geniculate nucleus and visual cortex. Each level of the visual system presents unique challenges for neural interface design. Blind patients with the retinal degenerative disease retinitis pigmentosa (RP) are a common population in clinical trials of visual prostheses. The visual performance abilities of normals and RP patients are compared. To generate pattern vision in blind patients, the visual prosthetic interface must effectively stimulate the retinotopically organized neurons in the central visual field to elicit patterned visual percepts. The development of more biologically compatible methods of stimulating visual system neurons is critical to the development of finer spatial percepts. Prosthesis electrode arrays need to adapt to different optimal stimulus locations, stimulus patterns, and patient disease states.

  2. Gynecological and reproductive issues for women in space: a review.

    PubMed

    Jennings, R T; Baker, E S

    2000-02-01

    Women have been an integral part of United States space crews since the initial flight of Dr. Sally Ride in 1983, and a total of 40 women have been selected as U.S. astronauts. This article examines the reproductive and gynecological aspects of selecting, training, medically certifying, and flying women in space. Gynecological data from the astronaut selection cycles in 1991 to 1997 are reviewed. In addition, the reproductive implications of delaying childbearing for a career as an astronaut and the impact of new technology such as assisted reproductive techniques are examined. The reproductive outcomes of U.S. female astronauts after spaceflight are also presented. Because women have gained considerable operational experience on the Shuttle and Mir, the unique operational considerations for preflight certification, menstruation control and hygiene, contraception, and urination are discussed. Medical and surgical implications for women on long-duration missions to remote locations are still evolving, and enabling technologies for health care delivery are being developed. There has been considerable progress in the development of zero-gravity surgical techniques, including laparoscopy, thoracoscopy, and laparotomy. The concepts of prevention of illness, conversion of surgical conditions to medically treatable conditions, and surgical intervention for long-duration spaceflights are explored in detail. There currently are no operational gynecological or reproductive constraints for women that would preclude their successful participation in the exploration of our nearby solar system.

  3. Health workforce issues and the Global Fund to fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria: an analytical review

    PubMed Central

    Dräger, Sigrid; Gedik, Gulin; Dal Poz, Mario R

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies have shown evidence of a direct and positive causal link between the number of health workers and health outcomes. Several studies have identified an adequate health workforce as one of the key ingredients to achieving improved health outcomes. Global health initiatives are faced with human resources issues as a major, system-wide constraint. This article explores how the Global Fund addresses the challenges of a health workforce bottleneck to the successful implementation of priority disease programmes. Possibilities for investment in human resources in the Global Fund's policy documents and guidelines are reviewed. This is followed by an in-depth study of 35 Global Fund proposals from five African countries: Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Malawi and Tanzania. The discussion presents specific human resources interventions that can be found in proposals. Finally, the comments on human resources interventions in the Global Fund's Technical Review Panel and the budget allocation for human resources for health were examined. Policy documents and guidelines of the Global Fund foster taking account of human resources constraints in recipient countries and interventions to address them. However, the review of actual proposals clearly shows that countries do not often take advantage of their opportunities and focus mainly on short-term, in-service training in their human resources components. The comments of the Technical Review Panel on proposed health system-strengthening interventions reveal a struggle between the Global Fund's goal to fight the three targeted diseases, on the one hand, and the need to strengthen health systems as a prerequisite for success, on the other. In realizing the opportunities the Global Fund provides for human resources interventions, countries should go beyond short-term objectives and link their activities to a long-term development of their human resources for health. PMID:16930480

  4. Ethical issues of clinical trials in paediatric oncology from 2003 to 2013: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Jean-Claude K; Pritchard-Jones, Kathy; Doz, François

    2016-05-01

    A state-of-the art approach to the debates on ethical issues is key in order to gain guidance on research practices involving sick children and adolescents, as well as to identify research avenues in which it might be worth cooperating, to generate better or supplementary evidence. Based on a systematic literature search using MEDLINE, we report the main ethical developments in paediatric oncology clinical trials from 2003-13. The present knowledge about normative and empirical ethical demands in this setting is quantified and summarised in a list of 46 issues. This list primarily aims to provide readers with a comprehensive account of the main decision nodes and professional attitudes that enable families to make a safe, competent, and satisfactory decision about their child's enrolment, or non-participation, in cancer clinical trials. Our systematic Review shows how important it is for professionals to engage in a constant reflection on optimum trial designs, on the effect of offering trial participation on key family dynamics, and on the ways to understand families' needs and values accurately. In view of present scientific developments, we further emphasise the need to enhance societal awareness about research in children and adolescents, to prevent so-called research fatigue in small populations due to multiple solicitations or inadequate legal demands, and to reassess longstanding ethical certainties in the strictest view of promoting sick children's interests. This systematic Review allows a series of questions to be drawn to guide and encourage collective and individual endeavours that should lead to constant improvements in our research practices in paediatric clinical oncology research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Practice-based research network studies and institutional review boards: two new issues.

    PubMed

    Yawn, Barbara P; Graham, Deborah G; Bertram, Susan L; Kurland, Marge J; Dietrich, Allen J; Wollan, Peter C; Brandt, Elias C; Huff, Jessica M; Pace, Wilson D

    2009-01-01

    Practice-based research network (PBRN) study investigators must interface with multiple Institutional Review Boards (IRBs), many of which are unfamiliar with PBRN research. To present 2 IRB-related issues that have not appeared in the literature but occurred during the course of a large 5-year PBRN study involving 32 sites dispersed around the United States. Our study required IRB approval from a total of 19 local, hospital, academic center, and professional organization-based IRBs that reviewed a protocol of postpartum depression screening and follow-up completed in English or Spanish. Initial approval of the protocol and consent forms proceeded with only the usual barriers of submitting 19 different forms, and no protocol amendments were required. However, 2 unanticipated IRB issues provided significant additional work for the study team and the local practice sites. First, several IRBs required staff to repeat human subjects training every 1 to 2 years, resulting in 92 practicing physicians, residents, and members of the nursing staff spending time completing the exact same human subjects' training at least twice during the course of this study. Second, 17 of the 19 IRBs required that the patient be given consent forms that were newly stamped and dated each year, requiring the central site to reprint and replace consent forms yearly. Because not all IRBs returned the newly stamped and dated forms in a timely fashion, study enrollment with valid consent forms was interrupted in 4 sites for periods of 2 to 13 weeks. IRB requirements not directly responsive to federal regulations can add significant costs, frustrations, and burdens to PBRN studies. Non-federally mandated IRB requirements should be based on an identified need with evidence to support the solution.

  6. Regulatory perspectives on pharmacogenomics: a review of the literature on key issues faced by the United States Food and Drug Administration.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Kathryn A; Van Bebber, Stephanie L

    2006-06-01

    Pharmacogenomics (PGx), the use of genetic information to individualize drug therapy, is an immediate and important application of the Human Genome Project. The advent of PGx presents challenges to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in pursuing its mandate of protecting public health and safety. The authors conducted a review of academic, industry, and government literature using a technology diffusion framework to identify issues faced by the FDA relevant to the application of PGx. Two hundred and ten articles were reviewed. Key issues were categorized as rationale and structure for PGx regulation, regulation of PGx-based testing technologies, regulation of applications in clinical settings, regulation of data, and regulation of product life cycles. This review identifies issues faced by the FDA with respect to PGx, which the FDA is addressing through several initiatives. It also illustrates the complex issues involved in developing, implementing, and adopting new technologies.

  7. The story of abortion: issues, controversies and a case for the review of the Nigerian national abortion laws.

    PubMed

    Omo-Aghoja, L O; Omo-Aghoja, V W; Feyi-Waboso, P; Onowhakpor, E A

    2010-12-01

    Abortion continues to be a major public health issue that evokes social, political, legal, cultural and religious sentiments and debates in all societies. This is particularly so in countries with restrictive abortion laws. It is one of the leading causes of maternal mortality and morbidity. Despite variations in the legal status of abortions in favor of restrictiveness in developing countries compared with developed countries, overall rates are quite higher in the developing countries. This review article therefore, examines the historical perspectives of induced abortion as well as the issues and controversies associated with induced abortion. Also, a review of the Nigeria national abortion law is made. We believe that this is capable of identifying useful interventions for designing programs that will lead to a reduction in the burden of unsafe abortion in developing countries.

  8. Iatrogenic splenic injury: review of the literature and medico-legal issues

    PubMed Central

    Feola, Alessandro; Niola, Massimo; Conti, Adelaide; Delbon, Paola; Graziano, Vincenzo; Pietra, Bruno Della

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Iatrogenic splenic injury is a recognized complication in abdominal surgery. The aim of this paper is to understand the medico-legal issues of iatrogenic splenic injuries. We performed a literature review on PubMed and Scopus using iatrogenic splenic or spleen injury and iatrogenic splenic rupture as keywords. Iatrogenic splenic injury cases were identified. Most cases were related to colonoscopy, but we also identified cases related to upper gastrointestinal procedures, colonic surgery, ERCP, left nephrectomy and/or adrenalectomy, percutaneous nephrolithotomy, vascular operations involving the abdominal aorta, gynecological operation, left lung biopsy, chest drain, very rarely spinal surgery and even cardiopulmonary resuscitation. There are several surgical procedures that can lead to a splenic injury. However, from a medico-legal point of view, it is important to assess whether the cause can be attributed to a technical error of the operator rather than being an unpredictable and unpreventable complication. It is important for the medico-legal expert to have great knowledge on iatrogenic splenic injuries because it is important to evaluate every step of the first procedure performed, how a splenic injury is produced, and whether the correct treatment for the splenic injury was administered in a judgment. PMID:28352813

  9. Top 10 IT Issues, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, John S.; DeBlois, Peter B.

    2007-01-01

    The EDUCAUSE Current Issues Committee, whose members review and recommend the set of IT issues to be presented each year, conducted a Web-based survey in December 2006 to identify the five of thirty-one IT issues in each of four areas: (1) issues that are critical for strategic success; (2) issues that are expected to increase in significance; (3)…

  10. It Top-10 Issues 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewey, Barbara I.; DeBlois, Peter B.

    2006-01-01

    The EDUCAUSE Current Issues Committee, whose members review and recommend the set of IT issues to be presented each year, conducted a Web-based survey in December 2005 to identify the five of thirty-one IT issues in each of four areas: (1) issues that are critical for strategic success; (2) issues that are expected to increase in significance; (3)…

  11. It Top-10 Issues 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewey, Barbara I.; DeBlois, Peter B.

    2006-01-01

    The EDUCAUSE Current Issues Committee, whose members review and recommend the set of IT issues to be presented each year, conducted a Web-based survey in December 2005 to identify the five of thirty-one IT issues in each of four areas: (1) issues that are critical for strategic success; (2) issues that are expected to increase in significance; (3)…

  12. Top 10 IT Issues, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, John S.; DeBlois, Peter B.

    2007-01-01

    The EDUCAUSE Current Issues Committee, whose members review and recommend the set of IT issues to be presented each year, conducted a Web-based survey in December 2006 to identify the five of thirty-one IT issues in each of four areas: (1) issues that are critical for strategic success; (2) issues that are expected to increase in significance; (3)…

  13. Mining Health-Related Issues in Consumer Product Reviews by Using Scalable Text Analytics

    PubMed Central

    Torii, Manabu; Tilak, Sameer S.; Doan, Son; Zisook, Daniel S.; Fan, Jung-wei

    2016-01-01

    In an era when most of our life activities are digitized and recorded, opportunities abound to gain insights about population health. Online product reviews present a unique data source that is currently underexplored. Health-related information, although scarce, can be systematically mined in online product reviews. Leveraging natural language processing and machine learning tools, we were able to mine 1.3 million grocery product reviews for health-related information. The objectives of the study were as follows: (1) conduct quantitative and qualitative analysis on the types of health issues found in consumer product reviews; (2) develop a machine learning classifier to detect reviews that contain health-related issues; and (3) gain insights about the task characteristics and challenges for text analytics to guide future research. PMID:27375358

  14. Mining Health-Related Issues in Consumer Product Reviews by Using Scalable Text Analytics.

    PubMed

    Torii, Manabu; Tilak, Sameer S; Doan, Son; Zisook, Daniel S; Fan, Jung-Wei

    2016-01-01

    In an era when most of our life activities are digitized and recorded, opportunities abound to gain insights about population health. Online product reviews present a unique data source that is currently underexplored. Health-related information, although scarce, can be systematically mined in online product reviews. Leveraging natural language processing and machine learning tools, we were able to mine 1.3 million grocery product reviews for health-related information. The objectives of the study were as follows: (1) conduct quantitative and qualitative analysis on the types of health issues found in consumer product reviews; (2) develop a machine learning classifier to detect reviews that contain health-related issues; and (3) gain insights about the task characteristics and challenges for text analytics to guide future research.

  15. Childhood obesity and parks and playgrounds: A review of issues of equality, gender and social support.

    PubMed

    Qazi, Hammad Ali

    2011-04-01

    The childhood obesity has been a growing concern over the last decade all over the world. Built environmental characteristics such as parks and playgrounds serves as a reference point for physical activity in children. The equality issues related to ethnicity, Social Economic Status (SES), gender and social support have been related with both physical activity and presence and quality of parks and playgrounds. However, only limited studies have addressed these issues in children. The current paper is a general enumerative review that would discusses the above issues with respect to obesity in all age groups, giving particular emphasis to childhood obesity. The importance of this review is to further explore the importance and highlight the findings related to these issues, so that future original studies could be planned keeping these associations in mind.

  16. Childhood obesity and parks and playgrounds: A review of issues of equality, gender and social support

    PubMed Central

    Qazi, Hammad Ali

    2011-01-01

    The childhood obesity has been a growing concern over the last decade all over the world. Built environmental characteristics such as parks and playgrounds serves as a reference point for physical activity in children. The equality issues related to ethnicity, Social Economic Status (SES), gender and social support have been related with both physical activity and presence and quality of parks and playgrounds. However, only limited studies have addressed these issues in children. The current paper is a general enumerative review that would discusses the above issues with respect to obesity in all age groups, giving particular emphasis to childhood obesity. The importance of this review is to further explore the importance and highlight the findings related to these issues, so that future original studies could be planned keeping these associations in mind. PMID:22091273

  17. A review of five tests to identify motor coordination difficulties in young adults.

    PubMed

    Hands, Beth; Licari, Melissa; Piek, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Difficulties with low motor competence in childhood and adolescence, such as that seen in Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD), often persist into adulthood. Identification of DCD at all ages is particularly challenging and problematic because of the diversity of motor symptoms. Many tests of motor proficiency and impairment have been developed for children up to 12 years of age. Whilst identification of DCD is important during childhood, it is of equal importance to identify and monitor the impact of this impairment as an individual grows and develops. Currently there is no test specifically designed to support diagnosis and monitor change in the age range 16-30 years. In this article we review five tests that have been used to assess motor competence among young adults (Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency-2, McCarron Assessment of Neuromuscular Development, Movement Assessment Battery for Children-2, Tufts Assessment of Motor Performance and the Zurich Neuromotor Assessment). Key issues relevant to testing motor skills in older populations, such as the inclusion of age appropriate skills, are explored. While the BOT-2 provided the most evidence for valid and reliable measurement of Criterion A of the diagnostic criteria for DCD among this age group, no test adequately evaluated Criterion B. Further evaluation of motor skill assessment among the young adult population is needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A review of utility issues for the integration of wind electric generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddoch, T. W.; Barnes, P. R.

    1982-01-01

    A review of issues and concerns of the electric utility industry for the integration of wind electric generation is offered. The issues have been categorized in three major areas: planning, operations, and dynamic interaction. Representative studies have been chosen for each area to illustrate problems and to alleviate some concerns. The emphasis of this paper is on individual large wind turbines (WTs) and WT arrays for deployment at the bulk level in a utility system.

  19. Scope of Policy Issues in eHealth: Results From a Structured Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Durrani, Hammad; Nayani, Parvez; Fahim, Ammad

    2012-01-01

    Background eHealth is widely used as a tool for improving health care delivery and information. However, distinct policies and strategies are required for its proper implementation and integration at national and international levels. Objective To determine the scope of policy issues faced by individuals, institutions, or governments in implementing eHealth programs. Methods We conducted a structured review of both peer-reviewed and gray literature from 1998–2008. A Medline search for peer-reviewed articles found 40 papers focusing on different aspects of eHealth policy. In addition, a Google search found 20 national- and international-level policy papers and documents. We reviewed these articles to extract policy issues and solutions described at different levels of care. Results The literature search found 99 policy issues related to eHealth. We grouped these issues under the following themes: (1) networked care, (2) interjurisdictional practice, (3) diffusion of eHealth/digital divide, (4) eHealth integration with existing systems, (5) response to new initiatives, (6) goal-setting for eHealth policy, (7) evaluation and research, (8) investment, and (9) ethics in eHealth. Conclusions We provide a list of policy issues that should be understood and addressed by policy makers at global, jurisdictional, and institutional levels, to facilitate smooth and reliable planning of eHealth programs. PMID:22343270

  20. Postoperative issues of sacral nerve stimulation for fecal incontinence and constipation: a systematic literature review and treatment guideline.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Yasuko; Matzel, Klaus; Lundby, Lilli; Buntzen, Steen; Laurberg, Søren

    2011-11-01

    There is a lack of knowledge on the incidence and management of suboptimal therapeutic effect and the complications associated with sacral nerve stimulation for fecal incontinence and constipation. This study aimed to review current literature on postoperative issues and to propose a treatment algorithm. PubMed, MEDLINE, and EMBASE were searched using the keywords "sacral nerve stimulation," "sacral neuromodulation," "fecal incontinence," and "constipation" for English-language articles published from January 1980 to August 2010. A further search was conducted on a wider literature using the keywords "complication," "adverse effect," "treatment failure," "equipment failure," "infection," "foreign-body migration," "reoperation," "pain," and "algorithm." Four hundred sixty-one titles were identified, and after a title and abstract review, 135 were subjected to full article review; 89 were finally included in this review. Five articles were added by manual search and consensus. Forty-eight studies were identified as cohort studies reporting on postoperative issues, including 1661 patients who underwent percutaneous nerve evaluation and 1600 patients who proceeded to sacral nerve stimulation therapy. Pooled data showed that the most common problem during percutaneous nerve evaluation was lead displacement (5.3%). The incidence of suboptimal outcome, pain, and infection after implantation was 12.1%, 13.0%, and 3.9%. There was significant underreporting of untoward events, because 60% of the studies did not report complications during percutaneous nerve evaluation, and suboptimal outcome after implantation was not disclosed in 44% of the studies. The incidence of untoward events associated with sacral nerve stimulation appears to be low. However, there is a significant underreporting of the incidence. Using the information from the structured and systematic literature review, we formulated a clinically relevant guideline for reporting and managing postoperative issues

  1. Faculty Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkelstein, Martin

    Patterns that emerged from reviewing syllabi for courses on faculty issues are discussed, and four sample syllabi are presented. Few doctoral programs in higher education administration were identified that devote an entire course to the subject of American college and university faculty. For four courses that did devote an entire course to the…

  2. Mental Health Issues of Women After Release From Jail and Prison: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Ann E; Kako, Peninnah; Sawin, Kathleen J

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this review article is to gain an understanding of the mental health issues of women released from jail or prison. Thirty-six studies were synthesized using the biopsychosocial model. Results indicate that released women's mental health issues include psychiatric diagnoses, psychological trauma, substance use disorders; access to psychological medications and services; and motherhood challenges, support, access to basic needs, and criminalized behaviors. Nurses can promote released women's mental health through pre-release assessment and treatment of mental health issues and ensuring access to post-release resources.  Future research should examine released women's mental health experiences.

  3. Evaluation issues in the Swedish Two-County Trial of breast cancer screening: An historical review

    PubMed Central

    Tabar, Laszlo; Chen, Tony Hsiu-Hsi; Hsu, Chen-Yang; Wu, Wendy Yi-Ying; Yen, Amy Ming-Fang; Chen, Sam Li-Sheng; Chiu, Sherry Yueh-Hsia; Fann, Jean Ching-Yuan; Beckmann, Kerri; Smith, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To summarize debate and research in the Swedish Two-County Trial of mammographic screening on key issues of trial design, endpoint evaluation, and overdiagnosis, and from these to infer promising directions for the future. Methods A cluster-randomized controlled trial of the offer of breast cancer screening in Sweden, with a single screen of the control group at the end of the screening phase forms the setting for a historical review of investigations and debate on issues of design, analysis, and interpretation of results of the trial. Results There has been considerable commentary on the closure screen of the control group, ascertainment of cause of death, and cluster randomization. The issues raised were researched in detail and the main questions answered in publications between 1989 and 2003. Overdiagnosis issues still remain, but methods of estimation taking full account of lead time and of non-screening influences on incidence (taking place mainly before 2005) suggest that it is a minor phenomenon. Conclusion Despite resolution of issues relating to this trial in peer-reviewed publications dating from years, or even decades ago, issues that already have been addressed continue to be raised. We suggest that it would be more profitable to concentrate efforts on current research issues in breast cancer diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. PMID:27098311

  4. Background and Discussion Questions for Identifying Priority Chemicals for Review and Assessment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This discussion guide is intended to be used to help structure public input during the September 2011 webinar and discussion forum addressing the prioritization factors and data sources EPA plans to use to identify priority chemicals for review.

  5. Journal Reviewer Ratings: Issues of Particularistic Bias, Agreement, and Predictive Validity within the Manuscript Review Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vecchio, Robert P.

    2006-01-01

    Reviewer evaluations and recommendations for 853 manuscript submissions, over a span of 4 years, are analyzed for evidence of particularistic bias, reviewer agreement, and predictive validity for forecasting a published manuscript's citation impact. Attributes of the submitters, their affiliated institutions, and the reviewers have little…

  6. Systematic reviews addressing identified health policy priorities in Eastern Mediterranean countries: a situational analysis.

    PubMed

    El-Jardali, Fadi; Akl, Elie A; Karroum, Lama Bou; Kdouh, Ola; Akik, Chaza; Fadlallah, Racha; Hammoud, Rawan

    2014-08-20

    Systematic reviews can offer policymakers and stakeholders concise, transparent, and relevant evidence pertaining to pressing policy priorities to help inform the decision-making process. The production and the use of systematic reviews are specifically limited in the Eastern Mediterranean region. The extent to which published systematic reviews address policy priorities in the region is still unknown. This situational analysis exercise aims at assessing the extent to which published systematic reviews address policy priorities identified by policymakers and stakeholders in Eastern Mediterranean region countries. It also provides an overview about the state of systematic review production in the region and identifies knowledge gaps. We conducted a systematic search of the Health System Evidence database to identify published systematic reviews on policy-relevant priorities pertaining to the following themes: human resources for health, health financing, the role of the non-state sector, and access to medicine. Priorities were identified from two priority-setting exercises conducted in the region. We described the distribution of these systematic reviews across themes, sub-themes, authors' affiliations, and countries where included primary studies were conducted. Out of the 1,045 systematic reviews identified in Health System Evidence on selected themes, a total of 200 systematic reviews (19.1%) addressed the priorities from the Eastern Mediterranean region. The theme with the largest number of systematic reviews included was human resources for health (115) followed by health financing (33), access to medicine (27), and role of the non-state sector (25). Authors based in the region produced only three systematic reviews addressing regional priorities (1.5%). Furthermore, no systematic review focused on the Eastern Mediterranean region. Primary studies from the region had limited contribution to systematic reviews; 17 systematic reviews (8.5%) included primary

  7. Systematic reviews addressing identified health policy priorities in Eastern Mediterranean countries: a situational analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Systematic reviews can offer policymakers and stakeholders concise, transparent, and relevant evidence pertaining to pressing policy priorities to help inform the decision-making process. The production and the use of systematic reviews are specifically limited in the Eastern Mediterranean region. The extent to which published systematic reviews address policy priorities in the region is still unknown. This situational analysis exercise aims at assessing the extent to which published systematic reviews address policy priorities identified by policymakers and stakeholders in Eastern Mediterranean region countries. It also provides an overview about the state of systematic review production in the region and identifies knowledge gaps. Methods We conducted a systematic search of the Health System Evidence database to identify published systematic reviews on policy-relevant priorities pertaining to the following themes: human resources for health, health financing, the role of the non-state sector, and access to medicine. Priorities were identified from two priority-setting exercises conducted in the region. We described the distribution of these systematic reviews across themes, sub-themes, authors’ affiliations, and countries where included primary studies were conducted. Results Out of the 1,045 systematic reviews identified in Health System Evidence on selected themes, a total of 200 systematic reviews (19.1%) addressed the priorities from the Eastern Mediterranean region. The theme with the largest number of systematic reviews included was human resources for health (115) followed by health financing (33), access to medicine (27), and role of the non-state sector (25). Authors based in the region produced only three systematic reviews addressing regional priorities (1.5%). Furthermore, no systematic review focused on the Eastern Mediterranean region. Primary studies from the region had limited contribution to systematic reviews; 17 systematic reviews

  8. Health-equity issues related to childhood obesity: a scoping review.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Clemencia M; Stines, Elsie M; Granado, Herta S

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this scoping review was to determine the health-equity issues that relate to childhood obesity. Health-equity issues related to childhood obesity were identified by analyzing food environment, natural and built environment, and social environment. The authors searched Medline, PubMed, and Web of Science, using the keywords "children" and "obesity." Specific terms for each environment were added: "food desert," "advertising," "insecurity," "price," "processing," "trade," and "school" for food environment; "urban design," "land use," "transportation mode," "public facilities," and "market access" for natural and built environment; and "financial capacity/poverty," "living conditions," "transport access," "remoteness," "social support," "social cohesion," "working practices," "eating habits," "time," and "social norms" for social environment. Inclusion criteria were studies or reports with populations under age 12, conducted in the United States, and published in English in 2005 or later. The final search yielded 39 references (16 for food environment, 11 for built environment, and 12 for social environment). Most food-environment elements were associated with obesity, except food insecurity and food deserts. A natural and built environment that hinders access to physical activity resources and access to healthy foods increased the risk of childhood obesity. Similarly, a negative social environment was associated with childhood obesity. More research is needed on the effects of food production, living conditions, time for shopping, and exercise, as related to childhood obesity. Most elements of food, natural and built, and social-environments were associated with weight in children under age 12, except food insecurity and food deserts. © 2017 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  9. Issues, challenges and vision for the future of the nursing profession in Sri Lanka: a review.

    PubMed

    Jayasekara, R S

    2009-03-01

    Reviewing the current situation and future development of nursing profession in Sri Lanka enables one to understand not only the nature of its successes and problems, but more importantly, in what way plans for the future will impact on the profession. To explore the issues and challenges concerning nursing regulation, administration, services and education in Sri Lanka and how they will impact on developing nursing professionalism. A literature search was conducted using MEDLINE and CINAHL limited to articles in the English and Sinhala languages published between 1976 and November 2007. The reference lists of all identified reports and articles were searched for additional studies. Personal communication, unpublished reports and government records and websites were also used to obtain information on nursing service, regulation, administration and education in Sri Lanka. Hand searching of relevant Sri Lankan journals and government reports was undertaken to reveal any additional literature. The Sri Lankan nursing profession is being very tardy in asserting its professional status in the health sector. There has been minimal effort to improve the standards of nursing services and education, mainly because of inadequate and disjointed involvement of those who are responsible for improving the health services in Sri Lanka. However, nursing services and education in Sri Lanka are being scrutinized as nurses today show more concern about their professional roles, education and status.

  10. Endovenous laser ablation (EVLA): a review of mechanisms, modeling outcomes, and issues for debate.

    PubMed

    Malskat, Wendy S J; Poluektova, Anna A; van der Geld, Cees W M; Neumann, H A Martino; Weiss, Robert A; Bruijninckx, Cornelis M A; van Gemert, Martin J C

    2014-03-01

    Endovenous laser ablation (EVLA) is a commonly used and very effective minimally invasive therapy to manage leg varicosities. Yet, and despite a clinical history of 16 years, no international consensus on a best treatment protocol has been reached so far. Evidence presented in this paper supports the opinion that insufficient knowledge of the underlying physics amongst frequent users could explain this shortcoming. In this review, we will examine the possible modes of action of EVLA, hoping that better understanding of EVLA-related physics stimulates critical appraisal of claims made concerning the efficacy of EVLA devices, and may advance identifying a best possible treatment protocol. Finally, physical arguments are presented to debate on long-standing, but often unfounded, clinical opinions and habits. This includes issues such as (1) the importance of laser power versus the lack of clinical relevance of laser energy (Joule) as used in Joule per centimeter vein length, i.e., in linear endovenous energy density (LEED), and Joule per square centimeter vein wall area, (2) the predicted effectiveness of a higher power and faster pullback velocity, (3) the irrelevance of whether laser light is absorbed by hemoglobin or water, and (4) the effectiveness of reducing the vein diameter during EVLA therapy.

  11. 40 CFR 155.58 - Procedures for issuing a decision on a registration review case.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Procedures for issuing a decision on a registration review case. 155.58 Section 155.58 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... decision, the Agency will, among other things: (1) State its proposed findings with respect to the...

  12. Introduction to the Toxin Reviews Special Issue "Aspergillus, Aflatoxin, Cyclopiazonic Acid, and Biological Control"

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This special issue of Toxin Reviews, “Aspergillus, Aflatoxin, CPA and Biological Control of Aflatoxin", is different from previous publications because it focuses on solving the problem of mycotoxin contamination through the use of biological control strains of Aspergillus, which is applicable to th...

  13. Adjustment Issues of International Students Enrolled in American Colleges and Universities: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Araujo, Abrahao Andre

    2011-01-01

    This article is a review of the literature concerning the adjustment issues experienced by international students enrolled in American colleges and universities. Convergent findings indicated that English fluency, social support, length of stay in the U.S., perceived discrimination or prejudice, establishing relationships with Americans, and…

  14. "Adoption Wisdom: A Guide to the Issues and Feelings of Adoption" by Marlou Russell. Book Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Tracy

    1998-01-01

    Reviews "Adoption Wisdom: A Guide to the Issues and Feelings of Adoption" by Marlou Russell. Maintains that its narrative/comment format and accounts of those involved in adoption validate the feelings of the adoption-triad members. Suggests that the book lacks information on individuals who contributed comments and contains few narratives from…

  15. Educating Teachers on LGBTQ Issues: A Review of Research and Program Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szalacha, Laura A.

    2004-01-01

    In spite of its short history, education that is inclusive of LGBTQ issues has developed in three major paradigms: (1) safety; (2) equity; and (3) critical theory. A review of research and program evaluation of teacher education with regard to LGBTQ reveals only a limited number of studies--most of which fall within either the safety or equity…

  16. Pre-Service Teacher Cohorts: Characteristics and Issues--A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knorr, Ron

    2012-01-01

    Since their introduction to teacher education programs in the 1980s, teacher education cohorts have become a standard scheme of organization in teacher preparation programs. This literature review notes some common characteristics and issues in cohort operations. Cohorts contain a standard academic core, class scheduling, and timeline to program…

  17. Judicial Review: Issues of State Court Involvement in School Finance Litigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colwell, William Bradley

    1998-01-01

    Due to state legislatures' reluctance to initiate school-funding reform, judicial bodies are asked to provide relief from alleged inequities. Before providing judicial review, the judiciary must decide whether an issue is justiciable (does not violate separation of powers) and warrants court intervention. Children's education has not substantially…

  18. Collaborative Consultation to Support Children with Pediatric Health Issues: A Review of the Biopsychoeducational Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grier, Betsy Chesno; Bradley-Klug, Kathy L.

    2011-01-01

    Medical technology continues to improve, increasing life expectancies and capabilities of children with chronic illnesses and disabilities. Pediatric health issues have an impact on children's academic, emotional, behavioral, and social functioning. This article reviews a consultative Biopsychoeducational Model, based on a problem-solving process,…

  19. Coordinating Computer-Supported Cooperative Work: A Review of Research Issues and Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kies, Jonathan K.; Williges, Robert C.; Rosson, Mary Beth

    1998-01-01

    With respect to the design of cooperative systems, issues related to the fundamental communication channels, sociotechnical factors, and task characteristics associated with collaborative work situations are reviewed. Research strategies incorporating theory-motivated design, ethnographic methods, and controlled testing methods are discussed as a…

  20. Legal Issues inherent in space shuttle operations. [reviewed by NASA Deputy General Counsel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The legal issues inherent in NASA's proceeding into the day-to-day operations of the space shuttle and other elements of the Space Transportation System are considered in light of the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958. Based on this review, it was concluded that there is no immediate need for substantive amendments to that legislation.

  1. Legal Issues inherent in space shuttle operations. [reviewed by NASA Deputy General Counsel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The legal issues inherent in NASA's proceeding into the day-to-day operations of the space shuttle and other elements of the Space Transportation System are considered in light of the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958. Based on this review, it was concluded that there is no immediate need for substantive amendments to that legislation.

  2. American Indian Policy Review Commission Special Joint Task Force Report on Alaskan Native Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S. Washington, DC. American Indian Policy Review Commission.

    Impact of the Alaskan Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA) on Alaskan Natives, particularly at village levels, is the focus of a joint task force report on Alaskan Native issues. Prepared for the American Indian Policy Review Commission, the report is the work of representatives from task forces on tribal government, federal, state, and tribal…

  3. Ethical issues in obesity prevention for school children: a systematic qualitative review.

    PubMed

    Kahrass, Hannes; Strech, Daniel; Mertz, Marcel

    2017-08-11

    Planning and conducting preventive measures against obesity for school children is beset with ethical issues which should be known to make well-informed decisions. The goal of this study was to provide a comprehensive spectrum of these ethical issues by means of a systematic review. In this context, the study also assesses the value of different search strategies for ethical literature in public health. Literature was searched in Medline, EBSCO and others. Three different search strategies with varied scopes were applied and their output was compared. Qualitative content analysis was used for extracting and categorizing ethical issues. 109 publications (published from 1995 to 2015) were finally included. The qualitative analysis resulted in 60 potentially relevant ethical issues. The three search strategies showed substantial differences regarding their search results. The presented spectrum provides an initial evidence base for dealing with ethical issues adequately. The findings of the study further suggest that a broader scope is more fruitful for systematic reviews on ethical issues in the field of public health.

  4. Review of Technical Issues Related to Predicting Isotopic Compositions and Source Terms for High-Burnup LWR Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Gauld, I. C.; Parks, C. V.

    2000-12-11

    This report has been prepared to review the technical issues important to the prediction of isotopic compositions and source terms for high-burnup, light-water-reactor (LWR) fuel as utilized in the licensing of spent fuel transport and storage systems. The current trend towards higher initial 235U enrichments, more complex assembly designs, and more efficient fuel management schemes has resulted in higher spent fuel burnups than seen in the past. This trend has led to a situation where high-burnup assemblies from operating LWRs now extend beyond the area where available experimental data can be used to validate the computational methods employed to calculate spent fuel inventories and source terms. This report provides a brief review of currently available validation data, including isotopic assays, decay heat measurements, and shielded dose-rate measurements. Potential new sources of experimental data available in the near term are identified. A review of the background issues important to isotopic predictions and some of the perceived technical challenges that high-burnup fuel presents to the current computational methods are discussed. Based on the review, the phenomena that need to be investigated further and the technical issues that require resolution are presented. The methods and data development that may be required to address the possible shortcomings of physics and depletion methods in the high-burnup and high-enrichment regime are also discussed. Finally, a sensitivity analysis methodology is presented. This methodology is currently being investigated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a computational tool to better understand the changing relative significance of the underlying nuclear data in the different enrichment and burnup regimes and to identify the processes that are dominant in the high-burnup regime. The potential application of the sensitivity analysis methodology to help establish a range of applicability for experimental

  5. Techniques for Identifying Cross-Disciplinary and "Hard-to-Detect" Evidence for Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Mara-Eves, Alison; Brunton, Ginny; McDaid, David; Kavanagh, Josephine; Oliver, Sandy; Thomas, James

    2014-01-01

    Driven by necessity in our own complex review, we developed alternative systematic ways of identifying relevant evidence where the key concepts are generally not focal to the primary studies' aims and are found across multiple disciplines--that is, hard-to-detect evidence. Specifically, we sought to identify evidence on community engagement in…

  6. Techniques for Identifying Cross-Disciplinary and "Hard-to-Detect" Evidence for Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Mara-Eves, Alison; Brunton, Ginny; McDaid, David; Kavanagh, Josephine; Oliver, Sandy; Thomas, James

    2014-01-01

    Driven by necessity in our own complex review, we developed alternative systematic ways of identifying relevant evidence where the key concepts are generally not focal to the primary studies' aims and are found across multiple disciplines--that is, hard-to-detect evidence. Specifically, we sought to identify evidence on community engagement in…

  7. Using in-depth investigations to identify transportation safety issues for wheelchair-seated occupants of motor vehicles.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Lawrence W; Klinich, Kathleen D; Moore, Jamie L; MacWilliams, Joel B

    2010-04-01

    In-depth investigations of motor-vehicle crashes involve detailed inspection, measurement, and photodocumentation of vehicle exterior and interior damage, evidence of belt-restraint use, and evidence of occupant contacts with the vehicle interior. Results of in-depth investigations thereby provide the most objective way to identify current and emerging injury problems and issues in occupant safety and crash protection, and provide important feedback on the real-world performance of the latest restraint-system and vehicle crashworthiness technologies. To provide an objective understanding of real-world transportation safety issues for wheelchair-seated travelers, the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute (UMTRI) has been conducting and assembling data from in-depth investigations of motor-vehicle crashes and non-crash adverse moving-vehicle incidents, such as emergency vehicle braking, turning, and swerving, in which there was at least one vehicle occupant sitting in a wheelchair. The results of 39 investigations involving 42 wheelchair-seated occupants have been assembled and entered into a wheelchair-occupant crash/injury database. In addition, a biomechanical analysis of each case has been performed to identify key safety issues for wheelchair-seated travelers. The wheelchairs of 34 of the 42 occupants who were seated in wheelchairs while traveling in motor vehicles were effectively secured by either a four-point, strap-type tiedown system or a docking securement device, and all but one of these properly secured wheelchairs remained in place during the crash or non-collision event. However, 30 of the 42 occupants were improperly restrained, either because of non-use or incomplete use of available belt restraints, or because the belt restraints were improperly positioned on the occupant's body. Twenty-six of the 42 occupants sustained significant injuries and 10 of these occupants died as a direct result of injuries sustained, or from

  8. Pharmaceutical care issues identified by pharmacists in patients with diabetes, hypertension or hyperlipidaemia in primary care settings.

    PubMed

    Chua, Siew Siang; Kok, Li Ching; Yusof, Faridah Aryani Md; Tang, Guang Hui; Lee, Shaun Wen Huey; Efendie, Benny; Paraidathathu, Thomas

    2012-11-12

    The roles of pharmacists have evolved from product oriented, dispensing of medications to more patient-focused services such as the provision of pharmaceutical care. Such pharmacy service is also becoming more widely practised in Malaysia but is not well documented. Therefore, this study is warranted to fill this information gap by identifying the types of pharmaceutical care issues (PCIs) encountered by primary care patients with diabetes mellitus, hypertension or hyperlipidaemia in Malaysia. This study was part of a large controlled trial that evaluated the outcomes of multiprofessional collaboration which involved medical general practitioners, pharmacists, dietitians and nurses in managing diabetes mellitus, hypertension and hyperlipidaemia in primary care settings. A total of 477 patients were recruited by 44 general practitioners in the Klang Valley. These patients were counselled by the various healthcare professionals and followed-up for 6 months. Of the 477 participants, 53.7% had at least one PCI, with a total of 706 PCIs. These included drug-use problems (33.3%), insufficient awareness and knowledge about disease condition and medication (20.4%), adverse drug reactions (15.6%), therapeutic failure (13.9%), drug-choice problems (9.5%) and dosing problems (3.4%). Non-adherence to medications topped the list of drug-use problems, followed by incorrect administration of medications. More than half of the PCIs (52%) were classified as probably clinically insignificant, 38.9% with minimal clinical significance, 8.9% as definitely clinically significant and could cause patient harm while one issue (0.2%) was classified as life threatening. The main causes of PCIs were deterioration of disease state which led to failure of therapy, and also presentation of new symptoms or indications. Of the 338 PCIs where changes were recommended by the pharmacist, 87.3% were carried out as recommended. This study demonstrates the importance of pharmacists working in

  9. A systematic review of ethical issues in vaccine studies involving pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    Beeler, Jennifer A.; Lambach, Philipp; Fulton, T. Roice; Narayanan, Divya; Ortiz, Justin R.; Omer, Saad B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Immunization during pregnancy can provide protection for mother and child. However, there have been only a limited number of studies documenting the efficacy and safety of this strategy. Aims: To determine the extent and nature of subject matter related to ethics in maternal immunization by systematically documenting the spectrum of ethical issues in vaccine studies involving pregnant women. Method: We conducted a systematic literature review of published works pertaining to vaccine and therapeutic studies involving pregnant women through searches of PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, the Cochrane Database, and ClinicalTrials.gov. We selected literature meeting the inclusion criteria published between 1988 and June 2014. We systematically abstracted subject matter pertaining to ethical issues in immunization studies during pregnancy. Immunization-specific ethical issues were matched and grouped into major categories and subcategories. Results: Seventy-seven published articles met the inclusion criteria. Published articles reported findings on data that had been collected in 26 countries, the majority of which were classified as high-income or upper-middle-income nations according to World Bank criteria. Review of these publications produced 60 immunization-specific ethical issues, grouped into six major categories. Notably, many studies demonstrated limited acknowledgment of key ethical issues including the rights and welfare of participants. Additionally, there was no discussion pertaining to the ethics of program implementation, including integration of maternal immunization programs into existing routine immunization programs. Conclusion: This review of ethical issues in immunization studies of pregnant women can be used to help inform future vaccine trials in this important population. Consistent documentation of these ethical issues by investigators will facilitate a broader and more nuanced discussion of ethics in immunization of pregnant

  10. A systematic review of ethical issues in vaccine studies involving pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Beeler, Jennifer A; Lambach, Philipp; Fulton, T Roice; Narayanan, Divya; Ortiz, Justin R; Omer, Saad B

    2016-08-02

    Immunization during pregnancy can provide protection for mother and child. However, there have been only a limited number of studies documenting the efficacy and safety of this strategy. To determine the extent and nature of subject matter related to ethics in maternal immunization by systematically documenting the spectrum of ethical issues in vaccine studies involving pregnant women. We conducted a systematic literature review of published works pertaining to vaccine and therapeutic studies involving pregnant women through searches of PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, the Cochrane Database, and ClinicalTrials.gov. We selected literature meeting the inclusion criteria published between 1988 and June 2014. We systematically abstracted subject matter pertaining to ethical issues in immunization studies during pregnancy. Immunization-specific ethical issues were matched and grouped into major categories and subcategories. Seventy-seven published articles met the inclusion criteria. Published articles reported findings on data that had been collected in 26 countries, the majority of which were classified as high-income or upper-middle-income nations according to World Bank criteria. Review of these publications produced 60 immunization-specific ethical issues, grouped into six major categories. Notably, many studies demonstrated limited acknowledgment of key ethical issues including the rights and welfare of participants. Additionally, there was no discussion pertaining to the ethics of program implementation, including integration of maternal immunization programs into existing routine immunization programs. This review of ethical issues in immunization studies of pregnant women can be used to help inform future vaccine trials in this important population. Consistent documentation of these ethical issues by investigators will facilitate a broader and more nuanced discussion of ethics in immunization of pregnant women - offering new and valuable insights for programs

  11. Identifying the Trends and Impact of Graduate Attributes on Employability: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osmani, Mohamad; Weerakkody, Vishanth; Hindi, Nitham M.; Al-Esmail, Rajab; Eldabi, Tillal; Kapoor, Kawaljeet; Irani, Zahir

    2015-01-01

    Graduate employability has become an issue since there are broad mismatches between the acquired graduate skills from university and the required skills by employers. While previous researches have outlined the salient skills that need to be embedded in graduate education, to date no studies have attempted to methodically identify and synthesize…

  12. Identifying the Trends and Impact of Graduate Attributes on Employability: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osmani, Mohamad; Weerakkody, Vishanth; Hindi, Nitham M.; Al-Esmail, Rajab; Eldabi, Tillal; Kapoor, Kawaljeet; Irani, Zahir

    2015-01-01

    Graduate employability has become an issue since there are broad mismatches between the acquired graduate skills from university and the required skills by employers. While previous researches have outlined the salient skills that need to be embedded in graduate education, to date no studies have attempted to methodically identify and synthesize…

  13. Preliminary Review of Safety Assessment Issues at Savannah River Site, August 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, Bruce A.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Bixler, Nathan E.

    2011-09-19

    At the request of Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) management, a review team composed of experts in atmospheric transport modeling for environmental radiation dose assessment convened at the Savannah River Site (SRS) on August 29-30, 2011. Several issues were presented at the meeting for discussion. This is a short summary that is organized in accordance with the primary issues discussed, which is not necessarily a chronological record. Issues include: SRS Meteorological Data and its Use in MACCS2; Deposition Velocities for Particles; Deposition Velocities for Tritium; MACCS2 Dispersion Coefficients; Use of Low Surface Roughness in Open Areas; Adequacy of Meteorological Tower and Instrumentation; Displacement Height; and Validity of MACCS2 Calculations at Close-in Distances. A longer report will be issued at a later date that expands upon these topics and recommendations.

  14. Identifying national health research priorities in Timor-Leste through a scoping review of existing health data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Health research is crucial to understand a country’s needs and to improve health outcomes. We conducted a scoping review and analysis of existing health data in Timor-Leste to identify the health research priorities of the country. Published and unpublished health research in Timor-Leste from 2001 to 2011 that reported objectives, methods and results were identified. Key findings were triangulated with data from national surveys and the Health Management Information System; 114 eligible articles were included in the analysis, the leading topics of which were communicable (malaria, tuberculosis, HIV and sexually transmitted diseases and dengue) and non-communicable (eye and mental health) diseases. There were 28 papers (25%) on safe motherhood, child health and nutrition, of which 20 (71%) were unpublished. The review of national indicators showed high infant, under-five and maternal mortality rates. Burden of disease is greatest in young children, with respiratory infections, febrile illnesses and diarrheal disease predominating. There is poor access to and utilization of health care. Childhood malnutrition is an important unresolved national health issue. There are several obstacles leading to under-utilization of health services. The following topics for future health research are suggested from the review: nutrition, safe motherhood, childhood illness (in particular identifying the causes and cause-specific burden of severe respiratory, febrile and diarrheal diseases) and access to and use of health services. PMID:23452321

  15. Using a structured review of the literature to identify key factors associated with the current nursing shortage.

    PubMed

    Duvall, Judy J; Andrews, Diane Randall

    2010-01-01

    The current population of nurses is aging and rapidly approaching retirement, and graduation of new nurses is not expected to meet demand. Multiple reports have offered information regarding the pending shortage and made recommendations regarding interventions. It is important that suggested interventions be based upon current evidence. An integrated review of literature was undertaken, searching CINAHL, PubMed, Academic Search Premier, Medline, and PsychInfo. Studies were limited to those conducted in the United States and published in English between 2000 and 2007. Search terms were nursing shortage, job satisfaction in nursing, stress in nursing, nursing turnover, nursing image, nursing work environment, physical demands of nursing, and nursing faculty shortage. The identified reasons for nurses leaving hospital practice were management issues, job design, job stress, physical demands, and the failure to nurture new nurses. The education issues include a lack of qualified faculty and clinical sites to allow for more students to be accepted into the programs. These are issues that can be addressed; and changes, implemented. Steps must be taken immediately to resolve these issues in an effort to keep an adequate supply of nurses at the bedside.

  16. Child Sexual Abuse at Preschools--A Research Review of a Complex Issue for Preschool Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergström, Helena; Eidevald, Christian; Westberg-Broström, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research review is to synthesize research published between 2000 and 2015 regarding child sexual abuse, preschool and preschool teachers. The review identifies themes relevant for the preschool teacher profession: child sexual abuse at preschools, suspicions and consequences for the preschool sector, preventing techniques and…

  17. Child Sexual Abuse at Preschools--A Research Review of a Complex Issue for Preschool Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergström, Helena; Eidevald, Christian; Westberg-Broström, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research review is to synthesize research published between 2000 and 2015 regarding child sexual abuse, preschool and preschool teachers. The review identifies themes relevant for the preschool teacher profession: child sexual abuse at preschools, suspicions and consequences for the preschool sector, preventing techniques and…

  18. Integrative Review of Social Presence in Distance Education: Issues and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Xin; Fang, Youjia; Lockee, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the evolution of social presence research in the field of distance education and identified problems in investigating this construct. The researchers took an integrative review on existing social presence studies to answer three questions: (a) How definitions of social presence evolved since…

  19. Integrative Review of Social Presence in Distance Education: Issues and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Xin; Fang, Youjia; Lockee, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the evolution of social presence research in the field of distance education and identified problems in investigating this construct. The researchers took an integrative review on existing social presence studies to answer three questions: (a) How definitions of social presence evolved since…

  20. Issues of Race, Ethnicity, and Culture in Caregiving Research: A 20-Year Review (1980-2000)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dilworth-Anderson, Peggye; Williams, Ishan Canty; Gibson, Brent E.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The goals of this review are to synthesize what is known about caregiving among diverse groups and to identify gaps in knowledge to guide future research on caregiving. The review focuses on conceptual and theoretical approaches, sampling strategies, measurement techniques, and similarities and differences found among groups and across…

  1. Trichloroethylene and Cancer: Systematic and Quantitative Review of Epidemiologic Evidence for Identifying Hazards

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Cheryl Siegel; Jinot, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis focusing on studies with high potential for trichloroethylene (TCE) exposure to provide quantitative evaluations of the evidence for associations between TCE exposure and kidney, liver, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) cancers. A systematic review documenting essential design features, exposure assessment approaches, statistical analyses, and potential sources of confounding and bias identified twenty-four cohort and case-control studies on TCE and the three cancers of interest with high potential for exposure, including five recently published case-control studies of kidney cancer or NHL. Fixed- and random-effects models were fitted to the data on overall exposure and on the highest exposure group. Sensitivity analyses examined the influence of individual studies and of alternative risk estimate selections. For overall TCE exposure and kidney cancer, the summary relative risk (RRm) estimate from the random effects model was 1.27 (95% CI: 1.13, 1.43), with a higher RRm for the highest exposure groups (1.58, 95% CI: 1.28, 1.96). The RRm estimates were not overly sensitive to alternative risk estimate selections or to removal of an individual study. There was no apparent heterogeneity or publication bias. For NHL, RRm estimates for overall exposure and for the highest exposure group, respectively, were 1.23 (95% CI: 1.07, 1.42) and 1.43 (95% CI: 1.13, 1.82) and, for liver cancer, 1.29 (95% CI: 1.07, 1.56) and 1.28 (95% CI: 0.93, 1.77). Our findings provide strong support for a causal association between TCE exposure and kidney cancer. The support is strong but less robust for NHL, where issues of study heterogeneity, potential publication bias, and weaker exposure-response results contribute uncertainty, and more limited for liver cancer, where only cohort studies with small numbers of cases were available. PMID:22163205

  2. The experiences and support needs of people with intellectual disabilities who identify as LGBT: A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    McCann, Edward; Lee, Regina; Brown, Michael

    2016-10-01

    People who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) can face many challenges in society including accessing education, care and support appropriate to individual needs. However, there is a growing and evolving evidence base about the specific needs of people with intellectual disabilities (ID) in this regard. The aim of this review was to explore the experiences of people with ID who identified as LGBT through an examination of studies that addressed their views and highlighted specific issues, concerns and service responses. A comprehensive search of relevant databases from February 1995 to February 2015 was conducted. Studies were identified that met specific criteria that included: empirical peer reviewed studies, the use of recognised research methods and focused on people with ID whom identified as LGBT. The search yielded 161 papers in total. The search was narrowed and 37 papers were screened using rigorous inclusion and exclusion criteria. Finally, 14 papers were considered suitable for the review. The data were analysed and key themes identified that included accessing health services, gender and sexual identity, attitudes of people with ID regarding their LGBT status, and education, supports and therapeutic interventions. There is a need for service providers and carers to be more responsive to the concerns of people with ID who identify as LGBT to improve their health and well-being by reducing stigma and discrimination and by increasing awareness of their care and support needs. The implications are discussed in terms of policy, education, research and practice developments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Making It Clear: A Review of Language Issues in Testing with Special Reference to the National Curriculum Mathematics Tests at Key Stage 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shorrocks-Taylor, Diane; Hargreaves, Melanie

    1999-01-01

    A literature review identified issues about math tests for 11-year olds in the British National Curriculum: layout of test questions, vocabulary and language used, illustrations, and readability of text. More data are needed about how students read and process the information in test questions. (SK)

  4. Risk-rated health insurance programs: a review of designs and important issues.

    PubMed

    Kaelin, M A; Barr, J K; Golaszewski, T; Warshaw, L J

    1992-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE REVIEW. The purpose of this review is to assist those who work in the field of health promotion when considering the implementation of an individually risk-rated health insurance plan. It does so by introducing the reader to the concept of individually risk-rating health insurance; uncritically reviewing selected risk-rated health insurance plans; and exploring several issues related to plan implementation, administration, and appropriateness. SEARCH METHODS USED. The review is based on the authors' awareness of the literature in the fields of preventive medicine, health promotion, and employee benefits. The six individually risk-rated health insurance programs that are reviewed were chosen because they demonstrate how aspects of the National Association of Insurance Commissioners' Model have been implemented using various combinations of administrative procedures, verification strategies, and types of economic incentives or disincentives. This review is not intended to be a comprehensive review of the literature. SUMMARY OF IMPORTANT FINDINGS. Individually risk-rated health insurance programs have been established using a variety of administrative procedures, verification strategies, and types of economic incentives or disincentives. The frequency with which these programs are being established is increasing. As the number of risk-rated programs grows, it will be increasingly important to address the many issues that implementing such plans generate: How should lifestyle behaviors be verified? Will healthy lifestyles save money? Can employees fully control their risk factors? Is risk-rating socially responsible? MAJOR CONCLUSIONS. As risk-rating becomes more widespread, there will be a continuing need to address the business, medical, ethical, and legal issues these programs create and to refine them accordingly. The health promotion community has both an opportunity and obligation to see to it that individually risk-rated health insurance programs

  5. 42 CFR 405.1104 - Request for MAC review when an ALJ does not issue a decision timely.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Request for MAC review when an ALJ does not issue a...) Medicare Appeals Council Review § 405.1104 Request for MAC review when an ALJ does not issue a decision... under § 405.1016 may request MAC review if— (1) The appellant files a written request with the ALJ to...

  6. Research council leaders issue merit review principles, establish Global Research Council

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-05-01

    The directors of research councils from 41 countries, along with representatives from the European Commission and other organizations, issued a set of merit review principles and established a virtual Global Research Council following a 14-15 May Global Summit on Merit Review that was hosted by the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF). The merit review principles cover six key areas: expert assessment by reviewers; transparency regarding decisions; impartiality of proposal assessments; appropriateness of the review process; confidentiality in handling proposals; and integrity and ethical consideration, which was deemed paramount to the review process. According to NSF, the merit review principles statement was developed with two primary objectives. “First, the worldwide agreement on core, high-level principles will foster international cooperation between funding agencies that support the scientific research community. Second, for those countries that are developing new funding agencies, the principles provide a global consensus on the key elements necessary for a rigorous and transparent review system.”

  7. Systematic Reviews Published in the July 2016 Issue of the Cochrane Library.

    PubMed

    Wiffen, Philip J

    2016-12-01

    The Cochrane Library of Systematic Reviews is published quarterly as a DVD and monthly online ( http://www.thecochranelibrary.com ). The July 2016 issue (third DVD for 2016) contains 6963 complete reviews, 2457 protocols for reviews in production. In addition, there are citations of 945,000 randomized controlled trials, and 15,700 cited papers in the Cochrane Methodology Register. The Health Technology Assessment database contains some 16,000 citations. One hundred and twenty-one new reviews have been published in the previous three months, of which four have potential relevance for practitioners in pain and palliative medicine. The impact factor of the Cochrane Library stands at 6.1. Readers are encouraged to access the full report for any articles of interest, as only a brief commentary is provided.

  8. Systematic Reviews Published in the October 2016 Issue of the Cochrane Library.

    PubMed

    Wiffen, Philip J

    2017-03-01

    The Cochrane Library of Systematic Reviews has been published quarterly as a DVD and monthly online ( http://www.thecochranelibrary.com ). The final October 2016 issue (4th DVD for 2016) contains 7068 complete reviews and 2467 protocols for reviews in production. In addition, there are citations of 973,000 randomized controlled trials, and 15,700 cited papers in the Cochrane Methodology Register. The Health Technology Assessment database contains some 16,000 citations. One hundred and seventeen new reviews have been published in the previous 3 months, of which three have potential relevance for practitioners in pain and palliative medicine. The impact factor of the Cochrane Library stands at 6.1. Readers are encouraged to access the full report for any articles of interest, as only a brief commentary is provided. The CD version of the Cochrane Library will be discontinued and the Library will only available online in the future.

  9. Integrative Literature Review: Methods in Identifying Exemplary Performance--A Review of the Literature and Implications for HRD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Terri Freeman

    2008-01-01

    This literature review provides an analysis of relevant ASTD (American Society for Training & Development) competency studies in Workplace Learning and Performance (WLP) and other research findings related to the methodology used in identifying exemplary and average performers. These findings helped create the research model and methods used in…

  10. A review of water flooding issues in the proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Tang, Yanghua; Wang, Zhenwei; Shi, Zheng; Wu, Shaohong; Song, Datong; Zhang, Jianlu; Fatih, Khalid; Zhang, Jiujun; Wang, Haijiang; Liu, Zhongsheng; Abouatallah, Rami; Mazza, Antonio

    We have reviewed more than 100 references that are related to water management in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, with a particular focus on the issue of water flooding, its diagnosis and mitigation. It was found that extensive work has been carried out on the issues of flooding during the last two decades, including prediction through numerical modeling, detection by experimental measurements, and mitigation through the design of cell components and manipulating the operating conditions. Two classes of strategies to mitigate flooding have been developed. The first is based on system design and engineering, which is often accompanied by significant parasitic power loss. The second class is based on membrane electrode assembly (MEA) design and engineering, and involves modifying the material and structural properties of the gas diffusion layer (GDL), cathode catalyst layer (CCL) and membrane to function in the presence of liquid water. In this review, several insightful directions are also suggested for future investigation.

  11. Psycho-Socio-Economic Issues Challenging Multidrug Resistant Tuberculosis Patients: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Beena Elizabeth; Shanmugam, Poonguzhali; Malaisamy, Muniyandi; Ovung, Senthanro; Suresh, Chandra; Subbaraman, Ramnath; Adinarayanan, Srividya; Nagarajan, Karikalan

    2016-01-01

    Background Limited treatment options, long duration of treatment and associated toxicity adversely impact the physical and mental well-being of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) patients. Despite research advances in the microbiological and clinical aspects of MDR-TB, research on the psychosocial context of MDR-TB is limited and less understood. Methodology We searched the databases of PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase and Google Scholar to retrieve all published articles. The final manuscripts included in the review were those with a primary focus on psychosocial issues of MDR-TB patients. These were assessed and the information was thematically extracted on the study objective, methodology used, key findings, and their implications. Intervention studies were evaluated using components of the methodological and quality rating scale. Due to the limited number of studies and the multiple methodologies employed in the observational studies, we summarized these studies using a narrative approach, rather than conducting a formal meta-analysis. We used ‘thematic synthesis’ method for extracting qualitative evidences and systematically organised to broader descriptive themes. Results A total of 282 published articles were retrieved, of which 15 articles were chosen for full text review based on the inclusion criteria. Six were qualitative studies; one was a mixed methods study; and eight were quantitative studies. The included studies were divided into the following issues affecting MDR-TB patients: a) psychological issues b) social issues and economic issues c) psychosocial interventions. It was found that all studies have documented range of psychosocial and economic challenges experienced by MDR-TB patients. Depression, stigma, discrimination, side effects of the drugs causing psychological distress, and the financial constraints due to MDR-TB were some of the common issues reported in the studies. There were few intervention studies which addressed these

  12. Psycho-Socio-Economic Issues Challenging Multidrug Resistant Tuberculosis Patients: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Beena Elizabeth; Shanmugam, Poonguzhali; Malaisamy, Muniyandi; Ovung, Senthanro; Suresh, Chandra; Subbaraman, Ramnath; Adinarayanan, Srividya; Nagarajan, Karikalan

    2016-01-01

    Limited treatment options, long duration of treatment and associated toxicity adversely impact the physical and mental well-being of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) patients. Despite research advances in the microbiological and clinical aspects of MDR-TB, research on the psychosocial context of MDR-TB is limited and less understood. We searched the databases of PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase and Google Scholar to retrieve all published articles. The final manuscripts included in the review were those with a primary focus on psychosocial issues of MDR-TB patients. These were assessed and the information was thematically extracted on the study objective, methodology used, key findings, and their implications. Intervention studies were evaluated using components of the methodological and quality rating scale. Due to the limited number of studies and the multiple methodologies employed in the observational studies, we summarized these studies using a narrative approach, rather than conducting a formal meta-analysis. We used 'thematic synthesis' method for extracting qualitative evidences and systematically organised to broader descriptive themes. A total of 282 published articles were retrieved, of which 15 articles were chosen for full text review based on the inclusion criteria. Six were qualitative studies; one was a mixed methods study; and eight were quantitative studies. The included studies were divided into the following issues affecting MDR-TB patients: a) psychological issues b) social issues and economic issues c) psychosocial interventions. It was found that all studies have documented range of psychosocial and economic challenges experienced by MDR-TB patients. Depression, stigma, discrimination, side effects of the drugs causing psychological distress, and the financial constraints due to MDR-TB were some of the common issues reported in the studies. There were few intervention studies which addressed these psychosocial issues most of which were small

  13. A simple technique to identify key recruitment issues in randomised controlled trials: Q-QAT - Quanti-Qualitative Appointment Timing.

    PubMed

    Paramasivan, Sangeetha; Strong, Sean; Wilson, Caroline; Campbell, Bruce; Blazeby, Jane M; Donovan, Jenny L

    2015-03-11

    Recruitment to pragmatic randomised controlled trials (RCTs) is acknowledged to be difficult, and few interventions have proved to be effective. Previous qualitative research has consistently revealed that recruiters provide imbalanced information about RCT treatments. However, qualitative research can be time-consuming to apply. Within a programme of research to optimise recruitment and informed consent in challenging RCTs, we developed a simple technique, Q-QAT (Quanti-Qualitative Appointment Timing), to systematically investigate and quantify the imbalance to help identify and address recruitment difficulties. The Q-QAT technique comprised: 1) quantification of time spent discussing the RCT and its treatments using transcripts of audio-recorded recruitment appointments, 2) targeted qualitative research to understand the obstacles to recruitment and 3) feedback to recruiters on opportunities for improvement. This was applied to two RCTs with different clinical contexts and recruitment processes. Comparisons were made across clinical centres, recruiters and specialties. In both RCTs, the Q-QAT technique first identified considerable variations in the time spent by recruiters discussing the RCT and its treatments. The patterns emerging from this initial quantification of recruitment appointments then enabled targeted qualitative research to understand the issues and make suggestions to improve recruitment. In RCT1, presentation of the treatments was balanced, but little time was devoted to describing the RCT. Qualitative research revealed patients would have considered participation, but lacked awareness of the RCT. In RCT2, the balance of treatment presentation varied by specialists and centres. Qualitative research revealed difficulties with equipoise and confidence among recruiters presenting the RCT. The quantitative and qualitative findings were well-received by recruiters and opportunities to improve information provision were discussed. A blind coding

  14. Occupational therapy research on assistive technology and physical environmental issues: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Ivanoff, Synneve Dahlin; Iwarsson, Susanne; Sonn, Ulla

    2006-04-01

    To determine future directions for research in the area of assistive technology and physical environmental issues, it is important to have an understanding of prior research. This literature review examined how assistive technology and physical environmental issues have been studied in the research published in international peer-reviewed occupational therapy journals. Five recent volumes of nine journals were manually searched utilizing specific criteria. The publications were classified according to their perspective, application of the Person-Environment-Occupation (PEO) model, and the research design. Both research fields demonstrated use of different research methods and they displayed equal needs with regard to improved research methodologies. There are a lack of studies involving all three PEO components indicating a lack of research in occupational performance issues. Further research on occupational performance is important for developing occupational therapy practice in the area of assistive technology and physical environmental issues. Furthermore, study designs reflecting the societal level in all three PEO components are required. Finally, there is a strong need for conceptual and theoretical development in both fields.

  15. Treatment of biodiversity issues in impact assessment of electricity power transmission lines: A Finnish case review

    SciTech Connect

    Soederman, Tarja . E-mail: tarja.soderman@ymparisto.fi

    2006-05-15

    The Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) process concerning the route of a 400 kV power transmission line between Loviisa and Hikiae in southern Finland was reviewed in order to assess how biodiversity issues are treated and to provide suggestions on how to improve the effectiveness of treatment of biodiversity issues in impact assessment of linear development projects. The review covered the whole assessment process, including interviews of stakeholders, participation in the interest group meetings and review of all documents from the project. The baseline studies and assessment of direct impacts in the case study were detailed but the documentation, both the assessment programme and the assessment report, only gave a partial picture of the assessment process. All existing information, baseline survey and assessment methods should be addressed in the scoping phase in order to promote interaction between all stakeholders. In contrast to the assessment of the direct effects, which first emphasized impacts on the nationally important and protected flying squirrel but later expanded to deal with the assessment of impacts on ecologically important sites, the indirect and cumulative impacts of the power line were poorly addressed. The public was given the opportunity to become involved in the EIA process. However, they were more concerned with impacts on their properties and less so on biodiversity and species protection issues. This suggests that the public needs to become more informed about locally important features of biodiversity.

  16. Avoiding and identifying errors in health technology assessment models: qualitative study and methodological review.

    PubMed

    Chilcott, J; Tappenden, P; Rawdin, A; Johnson, M; Kaltenthaler, E; Paisley, S; Papaioannou, D; Shippam, A

    2010-05-01

    , stepping through skeleton models with experts, ensuring transparency in reporting, adopting standard housekeeping techniques, and ensuring that those parties involved in the model development process have sufficient and relevant training. Clarity and mutual understanding were identified as key issues. However, their current implementation is not framed within an overall strategy for structuring complex problems. Some of the questioning may have biased interviewees responses but as all interviewees were represented in the analysis no rebalancing of the report was deemed necessary. A potential weakness of the literature review was its focus on spreadsheet and program development rather than specifically on model development. It should also be noted that the identified literature concerning programming errors was very narrow despite broad searches being undertaken. Published definitions of overall model validity comprising conceptual model validation, verification of the computer model, and operational validity of the use of the model in addressing the real-world problem are consistent with the views expressed by the HTA community and are therefore recommended as the basis for further discussions of model credibility. Such discussions should focus on risks, including errors of implementation, errors in matters of judgement and violations. Discussions of modelling risks should reflect the potentially complex network of cognitive breakdowns that lead to errors in models and existing research on the cognitive basis of human error should be included in an examination of modelling errors. There is a need to develop a better understanding of the skills requirements for the development, operation and use of HTA models. Interaction between modeller and client in developing mutual understanding of a model establishes that model's significance and its warranty. This highlights that model credibility is the central concern of decision-makers using models so it is crucial that the

  17. The cost-effectiveness of identifying and treating malnutrition in hospitals: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, H; Porter, J

    2016-04-01

    Disease-related malnutrition is known to have significant clinical and economic consequences. This systematic review of recent evidence aimed to establish the cost-effectiveness of identifying and treating malnutrition in the hospital setting. A search of four electronic databases and the Internet was conducted for relevant publications from 2003 to 2013. The search strategy considered both nutritional care and healthcare costs. Hospitalised adults with, or at risk of malnutrition, were the focus of the review. Eligibility criteria included publications of original research to identify or treat malnutrition through usual care. Studies with a focus on enteral and parenteral nutrition interventions were beyond the scope of the review. Methodological quality was assessed using the Consensus on Health Economic Criteria checklist. Of the 1174 records identified through database searching, 19 full-text articles were assessed for eligibility. Three studies were included in the final review, highlighting the absence of recent high quality cost-effectiveness studies in this field. One economic modelling study and two prospective clinical trials were included of moderate to high methodological quality. Definite conclusions could not be drawn regarding the cost-effectiveness of individual interventions because of the heterogeneity of treatments, controls and populations. The present review highlights an evidence gap in the care of malnourished hospitalised adults, limiting the ability of clinicians and healthcare managers to make informed, cost-effective treatment decisions. Further economic evaluations are needed and should be considered as a routine component of future research. © 2015 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  18. Biomarkers of systemic lupus erythematosus identified using mass spectrometry-based proteomics: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Nicolaou, Orthodoxia; Kousios, Andreas; Hadjisavvas, Andreas; Lauwerys, Bernard; Sokratous, Kleitos; Kyriacou, Kyriacos

    2016-11-23

    Advances in mass spectrometry technologies have created new opportunities for discovering novel protein biomarkers in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We performed a systematic review of published reports on proteomic biomarkers identified in SLE patients using mass spectrometry-based proteomics and highlight their potential disease association and clinical utility. Two electronic databases, MEDLINE and EMBASE, were systematically searched up to July 2015. The methodological quality of studies included in the review was performed according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses guidelines. Twenty-five studies were included in the review, identifying 241 SLE candidate proteomic biomarkers related to various aspects of the disease including disease diagnosis and activity or pinpointing specific organ involvement. Furthermore, 13 of the 25 studies validated their results for a selected number of biomarkers in an independent cohort, resulting in the validation of 28 candidate biomarkers. It is noteworthy that 11 candidate biomarkers were identified in more than one study. A significant number of potential proteomic biomarkers that are related to a number of aspects of SLE have been identified using mass spectrometry proteomic approaches. However, further studies are required to assess the utility of these biomarkers in routine clinical practice.

  19. Evaluating the Validity of Systematic Reviews to Identify Empirically Supported Treatments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slocum, Timothy A.; Detrich, Ronnie; Spencer, Trina D.

    2012-01-01

    The "best available evidence" is one of the three basic inputs into evidence-based practice. This paper sets out a framework for evaluating the quality of systematic reviews that are intended to identify empirically supported interventions as a way of summarizing the best available evidence. The premise of this paper is that the process of…

  20. 25 CFR 170.501 - What happens when the review process identifies areas for improvement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What happens when the review process identifies areas for improvement? 170.501 Section 170.501 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Planning, Design, and Construction of Indian Reservation Roads...

  1. Identifying Evidence-Based Practices for Behavior: Analysis of Studies Reviewed by the What Works Clearinghouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeRoy, Adam Scott

    2017-01-01

    Prior concerns have been raised about the ability of schools to access evidence-based practices, however, these practices are instrumental for addressing behavior concerns. This is particularly true at the secondary level, where students are more likely to be disproportionately identified for school removal. This review investigates studies of…

  2. Evaluating the Validity of Systematic Reviews to Identify Empirically Supported Treatments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slocum, Timothy A.; Detrich, Ronnie; Spencer, Trina D.

    2012-01-01

    The "best available evidence" is one of the three basic inputs into evidence-based practice. This paper sets out a framework for evaluating the quality of systematic reviews that are intended to identify empirically supported interventions as a way of summarizing the best available evidence. The premise of this paper is that the process of…

  3. Identifying Barriers in Implementing Outcomes-Based Assessment Program Review: A Grounded Theory Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bresciani, Marilee J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this grounded theory study was to identify the typical barriers encountered by faculty and administrators when implementing outcomes-based assessment program review. An analysis of interviews with faculty and administrators at nine institutions revealed a theory that faculty and administrators' promotion, tenure (if applicable),…

  4. Validated methods for identifying tuberculosis patients in health administrative databases: systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ronald, L A; Ling, D I; FitzGerald, J M; Schwartzman, K; Bartlett-Esquilant, G; Boivin, J-F; Benedetti, A; Menzies, D

    2017-05-01

    An increasing number of studies are using health administrative databases for tuberculosis (TB) research. However, there are limitations to using such databases for identifying patients with TB. To summarise validated methods for identifying TB in health administrative databases. We conducted a systematic literature search in two databases (Ovid Medline and Embase, January 1980-January 2016). We limited the search to diagnostic accuracy studies assessing algorithms derived from drug prescription, International Classification of Diseases (ICD) diagnostic code and/or laboratory data for identifying patients with TB in health administrative databases. The search identified 2413 unique citations. Of the 40 full-text articles reviewed, we included 14 in our review. Algorithms and diagnostic accuracy outcomes to identify TB varied widely across studies, with positive predictive value ranging from 1.3% to 100% and sensitivity ranging from 20% to 100%. Diagnostic accuracy measures of algorithms using out-patient, in-patient and/or laboratory data to identify patients with TB in health administrative databases vary widely across studies. Use solely of ICD diagnostic codes to identify TB, particularly when using out-patient records, is likely to lead to incorrect estimates of case numbers, given the current limitations of ICD systems in coding TB.

  5. Protocol for a scoping review study to identify and classify patient-centred quality indicators

    PubMed Central

    Jolley, Rachel J; Lorenzetti, Diane L; Manalili, Kimberly; Lu, Mingshan; Santana, Maria J

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The concept of patient-centred care (PCC) is changing the way healthcare is understood, accepted and delivered. The Institute of Medicine has defined PCC as 1 of its 6 aims to improve healthcare quality. However, in Canada, there are currently no nationwide standards in place for measuring and evaluating healthcare from a patient-centred approach. In this paper, we outline our scoping review protocol to systematically review published and unpublished literature specific to patient-centred quality indicators that have been implemented and evaluated across various care settings. Methods and analysis Arksey and O'Malley's scoping review methodology framework will guide the conduct of this scoping review. We will search electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PsycINFO, Social Work Abstracts, Social Services Abstracts), grey literature sources and the reference lists of key studies to identify studies appropriate for inclusion. 2 reviewers will independently screen all abstracts and full-text studies for inclusion. We will include any study which focuses on quality indicators in the context of PCC. All bibliographic data, study characteristics and indicators will be collected and analysed using a tool developed through an iterative process by the research team. Indicators will be classified according to a predefined conceptual framework and categorised and described using qualitative content analysis. Ethics and dissemination The scoping review will synthesise patient-centred quality indicators and their characteristics as described in the literature. This review will be the first step to formally identify what quality indicators have been used to evaluate PCC across the healthcare continuum, and will be used to inform a stakeholder consensus process exploring the development of a generic set of patient-centred quality indicators applicable to multiple care settings. The

  6. Human Trafficking in Ethiopia: A Scoping Review to Identify Gaps in Service Delivery, Research, and Policy.

    PubMed

    Beck, Dana C; Choi, Kristen R; Munro-Kramer, Michelle L; Lori, Jody R

    2016-03-31

    The purpose of this review is to integrate evidence on human trafficking in Ethiopia and identify gaps and recommendations for service delivery, research and training, and policy. A scoping literature review approach was used to systematically search nursing, medical, psychological, law, and international databases and synthesize information on a complex, understudied topic. The search yielded 826 articles, and 39 met the predetermined criteria for inclusion in the review. Trafficking in Ethiopia has occurred internally and externally in the form of adult and child labor and sex trafficking. There were also some reports of organ trafficking and other closely related human rights violations, such as child marriage, child soldiering, and exploitative intercountry adoption. Risk factors for trafficking included push factors (poverty, political instability, economic problems, and gender discrimination) and pull factors (demand for cheap labor). Trafficking was associated with poor health and economic outcomes for victims. Key recommendations for service delivery, research and training, and policy are identified, including establishing comprehensive services for survivor rehabilitation and reintegration, conducting quantitative health outcomes research, and reforming policy around migration and trafficking. Implementing the recommendations identified by this review will allow policy makers, researchers, and practitioners to take meaningful steps toward confronting human trafficking in Ethiopia.

  7. The use of Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) in identifying the workload of nursing: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    da Cruz, Carla Weidle Marques; Bonfim, Daiana; Gaidzinski, Raquel Rapone; Fugulin, Fernanda Maria Togeiro; Laus, Ana Maria

    2014-10-01

    To synthesize evidence related to the use of the Nursing Interventions Classification in order to identify nursing workload. An integrative literature review was conducted in June 2013. The search strategy yielded a total of 111 references, 18 of which were retrieved, read, and evaluated for relevance. A set of 10 articles met the selection criteria. A review of papers regarding the Nursing Interventions Classification and workload revealed the following themes: the identification of nursing interventions in areas of expertise and estimated times for their completion, the distribution of interventions in direct and indirect care, and the prevalence of the type of care in a given healthcare setting. © 2014 NANDA International, Inc.

  8. Performance of a mixed filter to identify relevant studies for mixed studies reviews

    PubMed Central

    El Sherif, Reem; Pluye, Pierre; Gore, Genevieve; Granikov, Vera; Hong, Quan Nha

    2016-01-01

    Objective Mixed studies reviews include empirical studies with diverse designs. Given that identifying relevant studies for such reviews is time consuming, a mixed filter was developed. Methods The filter was used for six journals from three disciplines. For each journal, database records were coded “empirical” (relevant) when they mentioned a research question or objective, data collection, analysis, and results. We measured precision (proportion of retrieved documents being relevant), sensitivity (proportion of relevant documents retrieved), and specificity (proportion of nonrelevant documents not retrieved). Results Records were coded with and without the filter, and descriptive statistics were performed, suggesting the mixed filter has high sensitivity. PMID:26807052

  9. Identifying management competencies for health care executives: review of a series of Delphi studies.

    PubMed

    Hudak, R P; Brooke, P P; Finstuen, K

    2000-01-01

    This analysis reviews a selected body of research that identifies the essential areas of management expertise required of future health care executives. To ensure consistency, six studies are analyzed, utilizing the Delphi technique, to query a broad spectrum of experts in different fields and sites of health care management. The analysis identifies a number of management competencies, i.e., managerial capabilities, which current and aspiring health care executives, in various settings and with differing educational backgrounds, should possess to enhance the probability of their success in current and future positions of responsibility. In addition, this review identifies the skills (technical expertise), knowledge (facts and principles) and abilities (physical, mental or legal power) required to support achievement of these competencies. Leadership and resource management, including cost and finance dimensions, are the highest-rated requisite management competencies. The dominant skills, knowledge and abilities (SKAs) are related to interpersonal skills. The lowest-rated SKAs are related to job-specific, technical skills. Recommendations include the review of this research by formal and continuing education programs to determine the content of their courses and areas for future research. Similarly, current health care executives should assess this research to assist in identifying competency gaps. Lastly, this analysis recommends that the Delphi technique, as a valid and replicable methodology, be applied toward the study of non-executive health care managers, e.g., students, clinicians, mid-level managers and integrated systems administrators, to determine their requisite management competencies and SKAs.

  10. Scientific Issues Relevant to Setting Regulatory Criteria to Identify Endocrine-Disrupting Substances in the European Union

    PubMed Central

    Slama, Rémy; Bourguignon, Jean-Pierre; Demeneix, Barbara; Ivell, Richard; Panzica, Giancarlo; Kortenkamp, Andreas; Zoeller, R. Thomas

    2016-01-01

    , Kortenkamp A, Zoeller RT. 2016. Scientific issues relevant to setting regulatory criteria to identify endocrine disrupting substances in the European Union. Environ Health Perspect 124:1497–1503; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP217 PMID:27108591

  11. Scientific Issues Relevant to Setting Regulatory Criteria to Identify Endocrine-Disrupting Substances in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Slama, Rémy; Bourguignon, Jean-Pierre; Demeneix, Barbara; Ivell, Richard; Panzica, Giancarlo; Kortenkamp, Andreas; Zoeller, R Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Endocrine disruptors (EDs) are defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as exogenous compounds or mixtures that alter function(s) of the endocrine system and consequently cause adverse effects in an intact organism, or its progeny, or (sub)populations. European regulations on pesticides, biocides, cosmetics, and industrial chemicals require the European Commission to establish scientific criteria to define EDs. We address the scientific relevance of four options for the identification of EDs proposed by the European Commission. Option 1, which does not define EDs and leads to using interim criteria unrelated to the WHO definition of EDs, is not relevant. Options 2 and 3 rely on the WHO definition of EDs, which is widely accepted by the scientific community, with option 3 introducing additional categories based on the strength of evidence (suspected EDs and endocrine-active substances). Option 4 adds potency to the WHO definition, as a decision criterion. We argue that potency is dependent on the adverse effect considered and is scientifically ambiguous, and note that potency is not used as a criterion to define other particularly hazardous substances such as carcinogens and reproductive toxicants. The use of potency requires a context that goes beyond hazard identification and corresponds to risk characterization, in which potency (or, more relevantly, the dose-response function) is combined with exposure levels. There is scientific agreement regarding the adequacy of the WHO definition of EDs. The potency concept is not relevant to the identification of particularly serious hazards such as EDs. As is common practice for carcinogens, mutagens, and reproductive toxicants, a multi-level classification of ED based on the WHO definition, and not considering potency, would be relevant (corresponding to option 3 proposed by the European Commission). Slama R, Bourguignon JP, Demeneix B, Ivell R, Panzica G, Kortenkamp A, Zoeller RT. 2016. Scientific issues relevant

  12. Methodological issues and recommendations for systematic reviews of prognostic studies: an example from cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Dretzke, Janine; Ensor, Joie; Bayliss, Sue; Hodgkinson, James; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Riley, Richard D; Fitzmaurice, David; Moore, David

    2014-12-03

    Prognostic factors are associated with the risk of future health outcomes in individuals with a particular health condition. The prognostic ability of such factors is increasingly being assessed in both primary research and systematic reviews. Systematic review methodology in this area is continuing to evolve, reflected in variable approaches to key methodological aspects. The aim of this article was to (i) explore and compare the methodology of systematic reviews of prognostic factors undertaken for the same clinical question, (ii) to discuss implications for review findings, and (iii) to present recommendations on what might be considered to be 'good practice' approaches. The sample was comprised of eight systematic reviews addressing the same clinical question, namely whether 'aspirin resistance' (a potential prognostic factor) has prognostic utility relative to future vascular events in patients on aspirin therapy for secondary prevention. A detailed comparison of methods around study identification, study selection, quality assessment, approaches to analysis, and reporting of findings was undertaken and the implications discussed. These were summarised into key considerations that may be transferable to future systematic reviews of prognostic factors. Across systematic reviews addressing the same clinical question, there were considerable differences in the numbers of studies identified and overlap between included studies, which could only partially be explained by different study eligibility criteria. Incomplete reporting and differences in terminology within primary studies hampered study identification and selection process across reviews. Quality assessment was highly variable and only one systematic review considered a checklist for studies of prognostic questions. There was inconsistency between reviews in approaches towards analysis, synthesis, addressing heterogeneity and reporting of results. Different methodological approaches may ultimately affect

  13. Review of fertility preservation issues for young women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Vânia; Quinn, Gwendolyn P

    2016-09-01

    It is well documented that cancer treatment may temporarily or permanently impair childbearing potential of young women with breast cancer. Given that many patients have not initiated or completed their families when diagnosed, fertility issues are of utmost importance in this clinical population. This review addresses the importance of incorporating fertility issues into the clinical care of young breast cancer patients, focusing on recent knowledge and counselling practices about fertility-related issues and the complexity of fertility-related decisions in this population. Multiple studies report cancer-related infertility may have serious psychological consequences and reduce Quality of Life for some patients. To guide health care providers and patients regarding appropriate, safe, and cost-effective fertility care for women who desire biological children, several professional organizations have developed clinical practice guidelines. However, the extent to which health professionals use these guidelines and provide timely and appropriate fertility-related information to patients is questionable. Fertility should not be neglected by health care providers and a multidisciplinary team is needed to target fertility issues at diagnosis and into survivorship care, providing timely, clear information that includes support, resources, and appropriate referral to fertility specialists. This information will assist in making well-informed decisions about fertility after breast cancer.

  14. Scale Issues in Remote Sensing: A Review on Analysis, Processing and Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hua; Li, Zhao-Liang

    2009-01-01

    With the development of quantitative remote sensing, scale issues have attracted more and more the attention of scientists. Research is now suffering from a severe scale discrepancy between data sources and the models used. Consequently, both data interpretation and model application become difficult due to these scale issues. Therefore, effectively scaling remotely sensed information at different scales has already become one of the most important research focuses of remote sensing. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate scale issues from the points of view of analysis, processing and modeling and to provide technical assistance when facing scale issues in remote sensing. The definition of scale and relevant terminologies are given in the first part of this paper. Then, the main causes of scale effects and the scaling effects on measurements, retrieval models and products are reviewed and discussed. Ways to describe the scale threshold and scale domain are briefly discussed. Finally, the general scaling methods, in particular up-scaling methods, are compared and summarized in detail. PMID:22573986

  15. 'Failure to fail' in nursing - A catch phrase or a real issue? A systematic integrative literature review.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Lynda J; Mitchell, Marion; Johnston, Amy N B

    2016-09-01

    'Failure to fail' is the allocation of pass grades to nursing students who do not display satisfactory clinical performance. This issue can have significant implications for individual students and assessors involved, as well as for nursing professionalism and patient safety. The aim of this systematic integrative literature review was to determine what is currently known about the issue of 'failure to fail' within undergraduate nursing programs. A literature search of five databases up to May 2015 was conducted to identify primary research papers. The search yielded 169 papers of which 24 met the inclusion criteria. The majority of papers had moderate or good methodological rigour, with most of the literature originating from the Northern Hemisphere. Five main themes emerged: failing a student is difficult; an emotional experience; confidence is required; unsafe student characteristics; and university support is required to fail students. The results suggest that 'failure to fail' is a real issue in tertiary facilities, with many complex facets. Given the costs of nurse education and the potential social and professional costs of poor quality nursing graduates, further rigorous research is required in this area.

  16. One-Dimensional Oxide Nanostructures as Gas-Sensing Materials: Review and Issues

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyoung Jin; Jang, Ho Won

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we review gas sensor application of one-dimensional (1D) metal-oxide nanostructures with major emphases on the types of device structure and issues for realizing practical sensors. One of the most important steps in fabricating 1D-nanostructure devices is manipulation and making electrical contacts of the nanostructures. Gas sensors based on individual 1D nanostructure, which were usually fabricated using electron-beam lithography, have been a platform technology for fundamental research. Recently, gas sensors with practical applicability were proposed, which were fabricated with an array of 1D nanostructures using scalable micro-fabrication tools. In the second part of the paper, some critical issues are pointed out including long-term stability, gas selectivity, and room-temperature operation of 1D-nanostructure-based metal-oxide gas sensors. PMID:22319343

  17. Fitness for duty in the nuclear power industry: A review of technical issues

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, C.; Barnes, V.; Hauth, J.; Wilson, R.; Fawcett-Long, J.; Toquam, J.; Baker, K.; Wieringa, D.; Olson, J.; Christensen, J.

    1989-05-01

    This report presents information gathered and analyzed in support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) efforts to develop a rule that will ensure that workers with unescorted access to protected areas of nuclear power plants are fit for duty. This report supplements information previously published in NUREG/CR-5227, Fitness for Duty in the Nuclear Power Industry: A Review of Technical Issues (Barnes et al., 1988). The primary potential fitness-for-duty concern addressed in both of these reports is impairment caused by substance abuse, although other fitness concerns are discussed. This report addresses issues pertaining to workers' use and misuse of alcohol, prescription drugs, and over-the-counter drugs as fitness-for-duty concerns; responds to several questions raised by NRC Commissioners; discusses subversion of the chemical testing process and methods of preventing such subversion; and examines concerns about the urinalysis cutoff levels used when testing for marijuana metabolites, amphetamines, and phencyclidine (PCP).

  18. Issues deserve attention in encapsulating probiotics: Critical review of existing literature.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Wang, Qi; Liu, Cheng-Mei; Gong, Joshua

    2017-04-13

    Probiotic bacteria are being increasingly added to food for developing products with health-promoting properties. However, the efficacy of probiotics in commercial products is often questioned due to the loss of their viability during shelf storage and in human gastrointestinal tracts. Encapsulation of probiotics has been expected to provide protection to probiotics, but not many commercial products contain encapsulated and viable probiotic cells owing to various reasons. To promote the development and application of encapsulation technologies, this paper has critically reviewed previous publications with a focus on the areas where studies have fallen short, including insufficient consideration of structural effects of encapsulating material, general defects in encapsulating methods and issues in evaluation methodologies and risk assessments for application. Corresponding key issues that require further studies are highlighted. Some emerging trends in the field, such as current treads in encapsulating material and recently advanced encapsulation techniques, have also been discussed.

  19. Persons with intellectual disabilities in the criminal justice system: review of issues.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jessica

    2007-12-01

    Although the vast majority of individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) are law-abiding citizens, there is a small percentage with offending behaviour that is considered antisocial, socially inappropriate, or defined as illegal. It has long been recognised that individuals with ID or mental-health needs who break the law should be dealt with differently from the general population. There have been an increasing number of empirical studies in this area; however, these have been plagued by various definitional and methodological issues. Prevalence estimates of offenders with ID are complicated by diagnostic variations and inconsistencies in the criminal justice process. International studies have shown a large range, from 2% to 40%, depending on methodological approaches. The following review will highlight the salient issues including prevalence of offending, characteristics of offenders, vulnerabilities within the legal system, assessment, and a brief overview of intervention and treatment approaches.

  20. Non-invasive prenatal testing for fetal chromosome abnormalities: review of clinical and ethical issues

    PubMed Central

    Gekas, Jean; Langlois, Sylvie; Ravitsky, Vardit; Audibert, François; van den Berg, David Gradus; Haidar, Hazar; Rousseau, François

    2016-01-01

    Genomics-based non-invasive prenatal screening using cell-free DNA (cfDNA screening) was proposed to reduce the number of invasive procedures in current prenatal diagnosis for fetal aneuploidies. We review here the clinical and ethical issues of cfDNA screening. To date, it is not clear how cfDNA screening is going to impact the performances of clinical prenatal diagnosis and how it could be incorporated in real life. The direct marketing to users may have facilitated the early introduction of cfDNA screening into clinical practice despite limited evidence-based independent research data supporting this rapid shift. There is a need to address the most important ethical, legal, and social issues before its implementation in a mass setting. Its introduction might worsen current tendencies to neglect the reproductive autonomy of pregnant women. PMID:26893576

  1. A review of air quality issues and compliance for the asphalt paving industry in Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Courtright, B.F.; Caughlin, M.J.

    1999-07-01

    The Maryland Air and Radiation Management Administration (ARMA) conducted a Sector Initiative in order to achieve a compliance audit of the asphalt paving industry sector in Maryland. This sector is commonly referred to as the hot-mix asphalt (HMA) industry. There are 59 HMA production plants in Maryland. Each asphalt production facility was reviewed to determine their compliance status with federal NSPS requirements (stack particulate and visible emission requirements), as well as with Maryland's more comprehensive and generally more restrictive requirements including visible emission, particulate matter, air toxics, dust, nuisance, odor, and other criteria pollutant requirements. The study included reviewing past data (stack test reports, inspections, VE observations, complaint histories) and conducting new inspections and observations at all 59 of the plants. The study also included conducting new particulate stack tests (Summer of 1998) at nine HMA plants. The historic data demonstrated general compliance with stack-tested particulate emission rates. The new stack tests all demonstrated compliance with applicable particulate limits. Visible emissions observations revealed a lesser degree of compliance. Asphalt plants, if not carefully controlled, can be a major source of nuisance complaints. Complaint histories were also reviewed. This paper presents detailed results of ARMA's compliance review of the asphalt industry in Maryland. This includes test results, compliance determinations, and compliance rates. Other issues including impacts on surrounding communities, changing Department of Transportation requirements, and air toxics requirements are also reviewed.

  2. eTBLAST: a web server to identify expert reviewers, appropriate journals and similar publications.

    PubMed

    Errami, Mounir; Wren, Jonathan D; Hicks, Justin M; Garner, Harold R

    2007-07-01

    Authors, editors and reviewers alike use the biomedical literature to identify appropriate journals in which to publish, potential reviewers for papers or grants, and collaborators (or competitors) with similar interests. Traditionally, this process has either relied upon personal expertise and knowledge or upon a somewhat unsystematic and laborious process of manually searching through the literature for trends. To help with these tasks, we report three utilities that parse and summarize the results of an abstract similarity search to find appropriate journals for publication, authors with expertise in a given field, and documents similar to a submitted query. The utilities are based upon a program, eTBLAST, designed to identify similar documents within literature databases such as (but not limited to) MEDLINE. These services are freely accessible through the Internet at http://invention.swmed.edu/etblast/etblast.shtml, where users can upload a file or paste text such as an abstract into the browser interface.

  3. eTBLAST: a web server to identify expert reviewers, appropriate journals and similar publications

    PubMed Central

    Errami, Mounir; Wren, Jonathan D.; Hicks, Justin M.; Garner, Harold R.

    2007-01-01

    Authors, editors and reviewers alike use the biomedical literature to identify appropriate journals in which to publish, potential reviewers for papers or grants, and collaborators (or competitors) with similar interests. Traditionally, this process has either relied upon personal expertise and knowledge or upon a somewhat unsystematic and laborious process of manually searching through the literature for trends. To help with these tasks, we report three utilities that parse and summarize the results of an abstract similarity search to find appropriate journals for publication, authors with expertise in a given field, and documents similar to a submitted query. The utilities are based upon a program, eTBLAST, designed to identify similar documents within literature databases such as (but not limited to) MEDLINE. These services are freely accessible through the Internet at http://invention.swmed.edu/etblast/etblast.shtml, where users can upload a file or paste text such as an abstract into the browser interface. PMID:17452348

  4. Advanced manufacturing technology effectiveness: A review of literature and some issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Sanjeev; Grover, Sandeep

    2012-09-01

    Advanced manufacturing technology (AMT) provides advantages to manufacturing managers in terms of flexibility, quality, reduced delivery times, and global competitiveness. Although a large number of publications had presented the importance of this technology, only a few had delved into related literature review. Considering the importance of this technology and the recent contributions by various authors, the present paper conducts a more comprehensive review. Literature was reviewed in a way that will help researchers, academicians, and practitioners to take a closer look at the implementation, evaluation, and justification of the AMT. The authors reviewed various papers, proposed a different classification scheme, and identified certain gaps that will provide hints for further research in AMT management.

  5. To twist or poke? A method for identifying usability issues with the rotary controller and touch screen for control of in-vehicle information systems.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Catherine; Stanton, Neville A; Pickering, Carl A; McDonald, Mike; Zheng, Pengjun

    2011-07-01

    In-vehicle information systems (IVIS) can be controlled by the user via direct or indirect input devices. In order to develop the next generation of usable IVIS, designers need to be able to evaluate and understand the usability issues associated with these two input types. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a set of empirical usability evaluation methods for identifying important usability issues and distinguishing between the IVIS input devices. A number of usability issues were identified and their causal factors have been explored. These were related to the input type, the structure of the menu/tasks and hardware issues. In particular, the translation between inputs and on-screen actions and a lack of visual feedback for menu navigation resulted in lower levels of usability for the indirect device. This information will be useful in informing the design of new IVIS, with improved usability. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: This paper examines the use of empirical methods for distinguishing between direct and indirect IVIS input devices and identifying usability issues. Results have shown that the characteristics of indirect input devices produce more serious usability issues, compared with direct devices and can have a negative effect on the driver-vehicle interaction.

  6. A review of potable water accessibility and sustainability issues in developing countries - case study of Uganda.

    PubMed

    Nayebare, Shedrack R; Wilson, Lloyd R; Carpenter, David O; Dziewulski, David M; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2014-01-01

    Providing sources of sustainable and quality potable water in Uganda is a significant public health issue. This project aimed at identifying and prioritizing possible actions on how sustainable high quality potable water in Uganda's water supply systems could be achieved. In that respect, a review of both the current water supply systems and government programs on drinking water in Uganda was completed. Aspects of quantity, quality, treatment methods, infrastructure, storage and distribution of water for different water systems were evaluated and compared with the existing water supply systems in the U.S., Latin America and the Caribbean, for purposes of generating feasible recommendations and opportunities for improvement. Uganda utilizes surface water, groundwater, and rainwater sources for consumption. Surface water covers 15.4% of the land area and serves both urban and rural populations. Lake Victoria contributes about 85% of the total fresh surface water. Potable water quality is negatively affected by the following factors: disposal of sewage and industrial effluents, agricultural pesticides and fertilizers, and surface run-offs during heavy rains. The total renewable groundwater resources in Uganda are estimated to be 29 million m3/year with about 20,000 boreholes, 3000 shallow-wells and 200,000 springs, serving more than 80% of the rural and slum communities. Mean annual rainfall in Uganda ranges from 500 mm to 2500 mm. Groundwater and rainwater quality is mainly affected by poor sanitation and unhygienic practices. There are significant regional variations in the accessibility of potable water, with the Northeastern region having the least amount of potable water from all sources. Uganda still lags behind in potable water resource development. Priorities should be placed mainly on measures available for improvement of groundwater and rainwater resource utilization, protection of watersheds, health education, improved water treatment methods and

  7. A review of nuclear thermal propulsion carbide fuel corrosion and key issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelaccio, Dennis G.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    1994-01-01

    Corrosion (mass loss) of carbide nuclear fuels due to their exposure to hot hydrogen in nuclear thermal propulsion engine systems greatly impacts the performance, thrust-to-weight and life of such systems. This report provides an overview of key issues and processes associated with the corrosion of carbide materials. Additionally, past pertinent development reactor test observations, as well as related experimental work and analysis modeling efforts are reviewed. At the conclusion, recommendations are presented, which provide the foundation for future corrosion modeling and verification efforts.

  8. Palliative Care Issues in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: An Evidenced-Based Review

    PubMed Central

    Karam, Chafic Y.; Paganoni, Sabrina; Joyce, Nanette; Carter, Gregory T.; Bedlack, Richard

    2015-01-01

    As palliative care physicians become increasingly involved in the care of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), they will be asked to provide guidance regarding the use of supplements, diet, exercise, and other common preventive medicine interventions. Moreover, palliative care physicians have a crucial role assisting patients with ALS in addressing health care decisions to maximize quality of life and cope with a rapidly disabling disease. It is therefore important for palliative care physicians to be familiar with commonly encountered palliative care issues in ALS. This article provides an evidenced-based review of palliative care options not usually addressed in national and international ALS guidelines. PMID:25202033

  9. Final Review of Safety Assessment Issues at Savannah River Site, August 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, Bruce A.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Bixler, Nathan E.

    2011-12-15

    At the request of Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) management, a review team composed of experts in atmospheric transport modeling for environmental radiation dose assessment convened at the Savannah River Site (SRS) on August 29-30, 2011. Though the meeting was prompted initially by suspected issues related to the treatment of surface roughness inherent in the SRS meteorological dataset and its treatment in the MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System Version 2 (MACCS2), various topical areas were discussed that are relevant to performing safety assessments at SRS; this final report addresses these topical areas.

  10. A review of some of the health issues of captive black rhinoceroses (Diceros bicornis).

    PubMed

    Dennis, Patricia M; Funk, Julie A; Rajala-Schultz, Paivi J; Blumer, Evan S; Miller, R Eric; Wittum, Thomas E; Saville, William J A

    2007-12-01

    In captivity, black rhinoceroses (Diceros bicornis) are beset by many disease syndromes not described in black rhinoceroses in the wild. Hemolytic anemia, hepatopathy, and ulcerative dermatopathy that lead to increased morbidity and mortality characterize these syndromes. It is uncertain whether these are separate disease syndromes with different etiologies or the same disease with different manifestations. This article offers a brief review of some of the health issues of concern for the captive black rhinoceros population and proposes some possible avenues of research for consideration.

  11. Formation of a Federal Advisory Committee Act Subcommittee for New Source Review (NSR) Issues

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  12. Palliative Care Issues in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: An Evidenced-Based Review.

    PubMed

    Karam, Chafic Y; Paganoni, Sabrina; Joyce, Nanette; Carter, Gregory T; Bedlack, Richard

    2016-02-01

    As palliative care physicians become increasingly involved in the care of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), they will be asked to provide guidance regarding the use of supplements, diet, exercise, and other common preventive medicine interventions. Moreover, palliative care physicians have a crucial role assisting patients with ALS in addressing health care decisions to maximize quality of life and cope with a rapidly disabling disease. It is therefore important for palliative care physicians to be familiar with commonly encountered palliative care issues in ALS. This article provides an evidenced-based review of palliative care options not usually addressed in national and international ALS guidelines.

  13. A review of nuclear thermal propulsion carbide fuel corrosion and key issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelaccio, Dennis G.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    1994-11-01

    Corrosion (mass loss) of carbide nuclear fuels due to their exposure to hot hydrogen in nuclear thermal propulsion engine systems greatly impacts the performance, thrust-to-weight and life of such systems. This report provides an overview of key issues and processes associated with the corrosion of carbide materials. Additionally, past pertinent development reactor test observations, as well as related experimental work and analysis modeling efforts are reviewed. At the conclusion, recommendations are presented, which provide the foundation for future corrosion modeling and verification efforts.

  14. Administrator's Decision on PSD Issue -- Review of New Source's Ability to Meet BACT

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  15. [Resource activation in clinical psychology and psychotherapy: review of theoretical issues and current research].

    PubMed

    Groß, L J; Stemmler, M; de Zwaan, M

    2012-08-01

    This review summarises theoretical issues and current research on working with clients' resources and strengths in clinical psychology and psychotherapy. Resource activation is considered as an important common factor in psychotherapy. In general, resource activation means an explicit focus on resources, strengths and potentials of the clients. After defining the term resources, considerations with regard to therapeutic attitude, principles of resource activation, approaches to resource diagnostics and different research strategies are presented. Current research focuses especially on the relation between resource activation and process variables in out-patient treatment. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Mental health issues among migrant workers in Gulf Cooperation Council countries: literature review and case illustrations.

    PubMed

    Kronfol, Ziad; Saleh, Marwa; Al-Ghafry, Maha

    2014-08-01

    More than 15 million non-nationals are currently living and working in Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) states. The majority are blue-collar or domestic workers coming from the Indian Subcontinent or South East Asia. They often work under very harsh conditions. There are reports of a high rate of psychosis and suicide among these people but no reliable data are available. To address this issue we conducted a literature search both in English and in Arabic to review the available articles on the psychological well-being of this population. Very few articles were found. We hereby review the available literature and contribute by presenting several brief vignettes to illustrate the various clinical aspects of this at risk population. We also discuss possible reasons for underreporting and underscore the need for more research in this area.

  17. PETC review: A global role for energy. Issue 10, Summer 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, K.H.; Friedman, S.; Eastman, M.L.; Finseth, D.H.; Ruth, L.A.; Reiss, J.

    1994-10-01

    This issue contains five feature articles. `Build It and They Will Come` describes the international reputation of the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center which prompts professionals from around the world to come to PETC for training, technical expertise, and collaboration on research projects. `PETC`s Overseas Activities` reviews international projects with which PETC staff have helped. The most prestigious of all conferences dedicated solely to the timely international exchange of basic scientific information on coal is described in `The 7th International Conference on Coal Science`. `What is Coal?` attempts to present a true picture of the nature and complexity of coal. `NOx Reduction by SCR/SNCR` reviews technologies which may be required to meet new NOx compliance standards.

  18. Mountain bikes and metropolitan park districts: issues and trends identified by state parks and state park districts in Ohio

    Treesearch

    Eric L. Longsdorf; Ruthie Kucharewski

    2007-01-01

    This study explored selected issues and trends related to mountain biking within Ohio State Parks and Park Districts. A convenience sample of 21 State Parks and 26 Park Districts completed a 24-item survey assessing mountain bike: (a) access, (b) activity levels, (c) planning, and (d) management. Results indicated that 86 percent of State Parks participating in the...

  19. A review of return to play issues and sports-related concussion.

    PubMed

    Doolan, Amy W; Day, Daniel D; Maerlender, Arthur C; Goforth, Michael; Gunnar Brolinson, P

    2012-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury in sports has become a significant public health concern which has not only received the general public's attention through multiple news media stories involving athletic concussions, but has also resulted in local, state, and national legislative efforts to improve recognition and management. The purpose of this article is to review the current literature for return to play (RTP) guidelines. State, regional, national, and professional legislation on sport-related concussion RTP management issues will be reviewed. This article will be helpful in developing a generalized systematic approach to concussion management and highlight specific RTP guidelines. The article will also touch upon specific contraindications to RTP, the role of neuropsychological testing in RTP, and other considerations and complications that affect an athlete's ability to return to competition. Finally, considerations for terminating an athlete's competitive season or ending a career after sustaining a concussion resulting in prolonged and protracted symptomatology or repeated concussions will be reviewed. PubMed and Google were searched using the key terms mentioned below. In addition, the author's library of concussion-related articles was reviewed for the relevant literature.

  20. A composite screening tool for medication reviews of outpatients: general issues with specific examples.

    PubMed

    De Smet, Peter A G M; Denneboom, Wilma; Kramers, Cees; Grol, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Regular performance of medication reviews is prominent among methods that have been advocated to reduce the extent and seriousness of drug-related problems, such as adverse drug reactions, drug-disease interactions, drug-drug interactions, drug ineffectiveness and cost ineffectiveness. Several screening tools have been developed to guide practising healthcare professionals and researchers in reviewing the medication patterns of elderly patients; however, each of these tools has its own limitations. This review discusses a wide range of general prescription-, treatment- and patient-related issues that should be taken into account when reviewing medication patterns by implicit screening. These include generic and therapeutic substitution; potentially superfluous or inappropriate medications; potentially inappropriate dosages or duration of treatment; drug-disease and drug-drug interactions; under-treatment; making use of laboratory test results; patient adherence, experiences and habits; appropriate dosage forms and packaging. A broad selection of specific examples and references that can be used as a basis for explicit screening of medication patterns in outpatients is also offered.

  1. Falls in critical care: a local review to identify incidence and risk.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Annette; Carter, Rachel

    2017-09-01

    Patient falls are the most common adverse event in hospitals, resulting in devastating physical, psychological and financial consequences. Therefore the emphasis on falls assessment and prevention is a key priority. Within hospitals those reported at greatest risk of falls are older patients with little known about the factors within critical care. At a local level, a practice development project was identified to review risk factors contributing to falls in critical care. To identify the incidence of falls within adult critical care and the risk factors most likely to contribute to a fall. Reported falls incidents were reviewed retrospectively using a local incident reporting system, over a 2-year period from four critical care units. Forty-two incidents were reviewed indicating a low rate of injury and low rate of occurrence (0·99 falls/1000 bed days). The median age of fallers was 58 years and the most common risk factor for falls was confusion or agitation, followed by patients attempting to mobilize against advice. Critically ill patients were less likely to fall and were more likely to be younger than patients falling on an acute care ward. Neuroscience/trauma critically ill patients were more likely to fall than general critically ill patients; this was expected to be because of the increased presence of confusion or agitation in this group. The local system used to report falls produced difficulties in identifying risk factors in a consistent way. Although limitations exist, this review has enabled the development of more suitable local critical care falls risk factor assessment and interventions to minimize the risk of falling. Fall rates, related injuries and circumstances of falls vary considerably among acute care and critical care specialities. Future work should concentrate on better falls reporting systems and further research should include validating risk factors for critical care falls. © 2015 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  2. A review of equity issues in quantitative studies on health inequalities: the case of asthma in adults

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The term 'inequities' refers to avoidable differences rooted in injustice. This review examined whether or not, and how, quantitative studies identifying inequalities in risk factors and health service utilization for asthma explicitly addressed underlying inequities. Asthma was chosen because recent decades have seen strong increases in asthma prevalence in many international settings, and inequalities in risk factors and related outcomes. Methods A review was conducted of studies that identified social inequalities in asthma-related outcomes or health service use in adult populations. Data were extracted on use of equity terms (objective evidence), and discussion of equity issues without using the exact terms (subjective evidence). Results Of the 219 unique articles retrieved, 21 were eligible for inclusion. None used the terms equity/inequity. While all but one article traced at least partial pathways to inequity, only 52% proposed any intervention and 55% of these interventions focused exclusively on the more proximal, clinical level. Conclusions Without more in-depth and systematic examination of inequities underlying asthma prevalence, quantitative studies may fail to provide the evidence required to inform equity-oriented interventions to address underlying circumstances restricting opportunities for health. PMID:21749720

  3. A systematic review of validated methods for identifying Bell's palsy using administrative or claims data.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christopher D; Carnahan, Ryan M; McPheeters, Melissa L

    2013-12-30

    To identify and assess billing, procedural, or diagnosis code, or pharmacy claims-based algorithms used to identify Bell's palsy in administrative and claims databases. We searched the MEDLINE database via PubMed from 1991 to September 2012 using controlled vocabulary and key terms related to Bell's palsy. We also searched the reference lists of included studies. Two investigators independently assessed the full text of studies against pre-determined inclusion criteria. Two reviewers independently extracted data regarding participant and algorithm characteristics and assessed a study's methodologic rigor. One study identified Bell's palsy using an algorithm that included ICD-9 code 351.x and H-ICDA code 350.x, and two other studies analyzed a dataset for ICD-9 code 351.0. The positive predictive values of these studies were 0.81 and 0.88, based on case adjudication of ICD-9 matches. Two further studies calculated incidence rates without validation of their methods, also including ICD-9 code 351.0. No study reported the sensitivity of algorithms to identify Bell's palsy. Few publications used rigorous methods to identify a validated algorithm that could identify cases of Bell's palsy from an administrative database. The best evidence from two different datasets in the literature addressed in this review used ICD-9 code 351.0 or a collection of ICD-9 codes 351.x for facial nerve disorders including Bell's palsy, along with other ICD-9 and H-ICDA codes for facial weakness. Each study had acceptable PPV, suggesting that ICD-9 based-algorithms have some utility in detecting Bell's palsy cases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Current status of coastal zone issues and management in China: a review.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wenzhi; Wong, Ming H

    2007-10-01

    This paper identifies and examines social-economic and environmental issues recently emerged in China's coastal zone. Evaluation of management scheme and progress in perspectives of coordinated legislation, institutional arrangement, public participation, capacity building, and scientific research (mainly coastal planning and functional zoning) in China's coastal zone are made. The Chinese government has made a significant effort in developing legislation for the coastal zone. Jurisdictional and zoning boundaries, and allocating use rights for coastal and marine resources have been established. State Oceanic Administration is the leading agency responsible for China's ocean policymaking and overall management of ocean and coastal affairs. A demonstrated project for integrated coastal management in Xiamen has been implemented, and is characterized as "decentralization" approach in decision-making process. In view of the above, comprehensive coastal management in China is a big challenge, facing with many difficulties. Finally, recommendations are raised for tackling these issues for China's coastal zone management.

  5. Methods uncovering usability issues in medication-related alerting functions: results from a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Marcilly, Romaric; Vasseur, Francis; Ammenwerth, Elske; Beuscart-Zephir, Marie-Catherine

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims at listing the methods used to evaluate the usability of medication-related alerting functions and at knowing what type of usability issues those methods allow to detect. A sub-analysis of data from this systematic review has been performed. Methods applied in the included papers were collected. Then, included papers were sorted in four types of evaluation: "expert evaluation", "user- testing/simulation", "on site observation" and "impact studies". The types of usability issues (usability flaws, usage problems and negative outcomes) uncovered by those evaluations were analyzed. Results show that a large set of methods are used. The largest proportion of papers uses "on site observation" evaluation. This is the only evaluation type for which every kind of usability flaws, usage problems and outcomes are detected. It is somehow surprising that, in a usability systematic review, most of the papers included use a method that is not often presented as a usability method. Results are discussed about the opportunity to provide usability information collected after the implementation of the technology during their design process, i.e. before their implementation.

  6. Communicating the risk of violent and offending behavior: review and introduction to this special issue.

    PubMed

    Hilton, N Zoe; Scurich, Nicholas; Helmus, Leslie-Maaike

    2015-02-01

    How to communicate risk of recidivism in correctional and forensic contexts has been a subject of scholarly discussion for two decades. This emerging literature, however, is sparse compared with studies on the assessment of risk for violent and offending behavior. In this special issue of Behavioral Sciences and the Law, we have gathered together empirical and review papers exemplifying promising directions and methodologies. We begin with a review of the state of the field, and lessons that can be drawn from research into medical risk assessment and risk communication, finding that many of the same principles apply to the forensic context. How risks are framed, and how numerate assessors are, affects how risk information is understood and applied. We discuss the existing research bearing on these issues, as well as the conceptual, practical, empirical, and legal implications of communicating risk using numerical or categorical risk terms. Along with the seven articles in this volume, we suggest directions for future research on measuring and communicating change, understanding and managing the statistical literacy of those who use and communicate risk assessments, and developing a theoretical framework for forensic risk communication research. We hope this volume will help integrate and invigorate research into forensic risk communication. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Chemical Functionalization of Plasmonic Surface Biosensors: A Tutorial Review on Issues, Strategies, and Costs

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    In an ideal plasmonic surface sensor, the bioactive area, where analytes are recognized by specific biomolecules, is surrounded by an area that is generally composed of a different material. The latter, often the surface of the supporting chip, is generally hard to be selectively functionalized, with respect to the active area. As a result, cross talks between the active area and the surrounding one may occur. In designing a plasmonic sensor, various issues must be addressed: the specificity of analyte recognition, the orientation of the immobilized biomolecule that acts as the analyte receptor, and the selectivity of surface coverage. The objective of this tutorial review is to introduce the main rational tools required for a correct and complete approach to chemically functionalize plasmonic surface biosensors. After a short introduction, the review discusses, in detail, the most common strategies for achieving effective surface functionalization. The most important issues, such as the orientation of active molecules and spatial and chemical selectivity, are considered. A list of well-defined protocols is suggested for the most common practical situations. Importantly, for the reported protocols, we also present direct comparisons in term of costs, labor demand, and risk vs benefit balance. In addition, a survey of the most used characterization techniques necessary to validate the chemical protocols is reported. PMID:28796479

  8. The quantitative genetics of indirect genetic effects: a selective review of modelling issues.

    PubMed

    Bijma, P

    2014-01-01

    Indirect genetic effects (IGE) occur when the genotype of an individual affects the phenotypic trait value of another conspecific individual. IGEs can have profound effects on both the magnitude and the direction of response to selection. Models of inheritance and response to selection in traits subject to IGEs have been developed within two frameworks; a trait-based framework in which IGEs are specified as a direct consequence of individual trait values, and a variance-component framework in which phenotypic variance is decomposed into a direct and an indirect additive genetic component. This work is a selective review of the quantitative genetics of traits affected by IGEs, with a focus on modelling, estimation and interpretation issues. It includes a discussion on variance-component vs trait-based models of IGEs, a review of issues related to the estimation of IGEs from field data, including the estimation of the interaction coefficient Ψ (psi), and a discussion on the relevance of IGEs for response to selection in cases where the strength of interaction varies among pairs of individuals. An investigation of the trait-based model shows that the interaction coefficient Ψ may deviate considerably from the corresponding regression coefficient when feedback occurs. The increasing research effort devoted to IGEs suggests that they are a widespread phenomenon, probably particularly in natural populations and plants. Further work in this field should considerably broaden our understanding of the quantitative genetics of inheritance and response to selection in relation to the social organisation of populations.

  9. Chemical Functionalization of Plasmonic Surface Biosensors: A Tutorial Review on Issues, Strategies, and Costs.

    PubMed

    Oliverio, Manuela; Perotto, Sara; Messina, Gabriele C; Lovato, Laura; De Angelis, Francesco

    2017-09-06

    In an ideal plasmonic surface sensor, the bioactive area, where analytes are recognized by specific biomolecules, is surrounded by an area that is generally composed of a different material. The latter, often the surface of the supporting chip, is generally hard to be selectively functionalized, with respect to the active area. As a result, cross talks between the active area and the surrounding one may occur. In designing a plasmonic sensor, various issues must be addressed: the specificity of analyte recognition, the orientation of the immobilized biomolecule that acts as the analyte receptor, and the selectivity of surface coverage. The objective of this tutorial review is to introduce the main rational tools required for a correct and complete approach to chemically functionalize plasmonic surface biosensors. After a short introduction, the review discusses, in detail, the most common strategies for achieving effective surface functionalization. The most important issues, such as the orientation of active molecules and spatial and chemical selectivity, are considered. A list of well-defined protocols is suggested for the most common practical situations. Importantly, for the reported protocols, we also present direct comparisons in term of costs, labor demand, and risk vs benefit balance. In addition, a survey of the most used characterization techniques necessary to validate the chemical protocols is reported.

  10. The quantitative genetics of indirect genetic effects: a selective review of modelling issues

    PubMed Central

    Bijma, P

    2014-01-01

    Indirect genetic effects (IGE) occur when the genotype of an individual affects the phenotypic trait value of another conspecific individual. IGEs can have profound effects on both the magnitude and the direction of response to selection. Models of inheritance and response to selection in traits subject to IGEs have been developed within two frameworks; a trait-based framework in which IGEs are specified as a direct consequence of individual trait values, and a variance-component framework in which phenotypic variance is decomposed into a direct and an indirect additive genetic component. This work is a selective review of the quantitative genetics of traits affected by IGEs, with a focus on modelling, estimation and interpretation issues. It includes a discussion on variance-component vs trait-based models of IGEs, a review of issues related to the estimation of IGEs from field data, including the estimation of the interaction coefficient Ψ (psi), and a discussion on the relevance of IGEs for response to selection in cases where the strength of interaction varies among pairs of individuals. An investigation of the trait-based model shows that the interaction coefficient Ψ may deviate considerably from the corresponding regression coefficient when feedback occurs. The increasing research effort devoted to IGEs suggests that they are a widespread phenomenon, probably particularly in natural populations and plants. Further work in this field should considerably broaden our understanding of the quantitative genetics of inheritance and response to selection in relation to the social organisation of populations. PMID:23512010

  11. Enhancing chronic disease management: a review of key issues and strategies.

    PubMed

    Willison, Kevin D; Williams, Paul; Andrews, Gavin J

    2007-11-01

    This paper highlights three selected issues and potential strategies towards meeting chronic disease management needs. First, the orientation of the biomedical science model often gives insufficient attention to chronic health care needs. A second issue is that the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) may offer for some an opportunity to enhance their chronic disease management efforts. A third issue is that our understanding of this potential is limited, as many who use CAM do not disclose such use. With reference to proposed solutions/strategies, first, an improved focus to respect patient/client values and goals may encourage people to disclose their use of CAM. Second, a community-based participatory approach shows promise in enhancing communication plus helps integrate CAM within new models of chronic disease management. Lastly, those in public health could help facilitate such an approach plus be a monitor of CAM practices. Overall, this review provides a springboard for further research and practice in CAM and the management of chronic diseases.

  12. Review of environmental studies and issues on compressed-air energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-03-01

    This report is a summary of the environmental and regulatory issues associated with Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) technology. It reviews from an environmental perspective the progress and results of extensive engineering research and technology development directed at commercial development of CAES technology. A comprehensive analysis of the legal and regulatory issues associated with CAES is also summarized. Significant conclusions are: the environmental impacts associated with construction and operation of CAES facilities are generally similar to or less severe than those associated with construction of conventional electrical generating facilities; adverse subsurface and surface environmental impacts can be largely avoided by thorough geological characterization of subsurface conditions, careful evaluation of surface environmental factors, and avoidance of unsuitable sites; the US has a large number of suitable sites; siting flexibility for CAES facilities is much greater than for other energy storage technologies; land use requirements are generally significantly less than for conventional generating facilities of similar genrating capacity; petroleum fuel use is much less than for conventional peak power generating facilities; CAES technology offers the potential for increased efficiency of utilization of utility system generating capacity which results in reduced overall resources commitment and reduced environmental impacts; and, due to lack of implementation experience, uncertainty still surrounds the legal and regulatory issues associated with CAES.

  13. A scoping review identifies multiple emerging knowledge synthesis methods, but few studies operationalize the method.

    PubMed

    Tricco, Andrea C; Soobiah, Charlene; Antony, Jesmin; Cogo, Elise; MacDonald, Heather; Lillie, Erin; Tran, Judy; D'Souza, Jennifer; Hui, Wing; Perrier, Laure; Welch, Vivian; Horsley, Tanya; Straus, Sharon E; Kastner, Monika

    2016-05-01

    To systematically identify, define, and classify emerging knowledge synthesis methods through a scoping review. MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, PsycINFO, the Cochrane Methodology Register, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Social Sciences Abstracts, Library and Information Science Abstracts, Philosopher's Index, and Education Resources Information Center were searched to identify articles reporting emerging knowledge synthesis methods across the disciplines of health, education, sociology, and philosophy. Two reviewers independently selected studies and abstracted data for each article. In total, 409 articles reporting on 25 knowledge synthesis methods were included after screening of 17,962 titles and abstracts and 1,010 potentially relevant full-text articles. Most of the included articles were an application of the method (83.9%); only 3.7% were seminal articles that fully described the method (i.e., operationalized the steps). Most of the included articles were published after 2005. The methods were most commonly used across the fields of nursing, health care science and services, and health policy. We found a lack of guidance on how to select a knowledge synthesis method. We propose convening an international group of leaders in the knowledge synthesis field to help clarify emerging approaches to knowledge synthesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Workgroup report: review of fish bioaccumulation databases used to identify persistent, bioaccumulative, toxic substances.

    PubMed

    Weisbrod, Anne V; Burkhard, Lawrence P; Arnot, Jon; Mekenyan, Ovanes; Howard, Philip H; Russom, Christine; Boethling, Robert; Sakuratani, Yuki; Traas, Theo; Bridges, Todd; Lutz, Charles; Bonnell, Mark; Woodburn, Kent; Parkerton, Thomas

    2007-02-01

    Chemical management programs strive to protect human health and the environment by accurately identifying persistent, bioaccumulative, toxic substances and restricting their use in commerce. The advance of these programs is challenged by the reality that few empirical data are available for the tens of thousands of commercial substances that require evaluation. Therefore, most preliminary assessments rely on model predictions and data extrapolation. In November 2005, a workshop was held for experts from governments, industry, and academia to examine the availability and quality of in vivo fish bioconcentration and bioaccumulation data, and to propose steps to improve its prediction. The workshop focused on fish data because regulatory assessments predominantly focus on the bioconcentration of substances from water into fish, as measured using in vivo tests or predicted using computer models. In this article we review of the quantity, features, and public availability of bioconcentration, bioaccumulation, and biota-sediment accumulation data. The workshop revealed that there is significant overlap in the data contained within the various fish bioaccumulation data sources reviewed, and further, that no database contained all of the available fish bioaccumulation data. We believe that a majority of the available bioaccumulation data have been used in the development and testing of quantitative structure-activity relationships and computer models currently in use. Workshop recommendations included the publication of guidance on bioconcentration study quality, the combination of data from various sources to permit better access for modelers and assessors, and the review of chemical domains of existing models to identify areas for expansion.

  15. Workgroup Report: Review of Fish Bioaccumulation Databases Used to Identify Persistent, Bioaccumulative, Toxic Substances

    PubMed Central

    Weisbrod, Anne V.; Burkhard, Lawrence P.; Arnot, Jon; Mekenyan, Ovanes; Howard, Philip H.; Russom, Christine; Boethling, Robert; Sakuratani, Yuki; Traas, Theo; Bridges, Todd; Lutz, Charles; Bonnell, Mark; Woodburn, Kent; Parkerton, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Chemical management programs strive to protect human health and the environment by accurately identifying persistent, bioaccumulative, toxic substances and restricting their use in commerce. The advance of these programs is challenged by the reality that few empirical data are available for the tens of thousands of commercial substances that require evaluation. Therefore, most preliminary assessments rely on model predictions and data extrapolation. In November 2005, a workshop was held for experts from governments, industry, and academia to examine the availability and quality of in vivo fish bioconcentration and bioaccumulation data, and to propose steps to improve its prediction. The workshop focused on fish data because regulatory assessments predominantly focus on the bioconcentration of substances from water into fish, as measured using in vivo tests or predicted using computer models. In this article we review of the quantity, features, and public availability of bioconcentration, bioaccumulation, and biota–sediment accumulation data. The workshop revealed that there is significant overlap in the data contained within the various fish bioaccumulation data sources reviewed, and further, that no database contained all of the available fish bioaccumulation data. We believe that a majority of the available bioaccumulation data have been used in the development and testing of quantitative structure–activity relationships and computer models currently in use. Workshop recommendations included the publication of guidance on bioconcentration study quality, the combination of data from various sources to permit better access for modelers and assessors, and the review of chemical domains of existing models to identify areas for expansion. PMID:17384774

  16. Identifying and Responding to Ethical and Methodological Issues in After-Death Interviews with Next-of-Kin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Beverly R.; Woodby, Lesa L.; Bailey, F. Amos; Burgio, Kathryn L.

    2008-01-01

    After-death research with next-of-kin can enhance our understanding of end-of-life care and translate into better services for dying persons and their survivors. This article describes ethical and methodological issues that emerged in a pilot of a face-to-face interview guide designed to elicit next-of-kin's perceptions of end-of-life care. The…

  17. Identifying and Responding to Ethical and Methodological Issues in After-Death Interviews with Next-of-Kin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Beverly R.; Woodby, Lesa L.; Bailey, F. Amos; Burgio, Kathryn L.

    2008-01-01

    After-death research with next-of-kin can enhance our understanding of end-of-life care and translate into better services for dying persons and their survivors. This article describes ethical and methodological issues that emerged in a pilot of a face-to-face interview guide designed to elicit next-of-kin's perceptions of end-of-life care. The…

  18. Mental health issues amongst medical students in Asia: a systematic review [2000-2015].

    PubMed

    Cuttilan, Amit Nirmal; Sayampanathan, Andrew Arjun; Ho, Roger Chun-Man

    2016-02-01

    Studies have shown that the stress experienced by medical students is far greater than that experienced by other university students. In this study, we aim to understand the consequent mental health issues that are experienced by medical students, particularly in Asia, via a systematic review of the current literature. Initial searches on MEDLINE, Embase and SpringerLink came up with a total of 1,033 unique articles. Studies not focusing on medical students alone, not mentioning mental health issues or not containing prevalence values were excluded. We included 14 articles in our analysis. ADs had a prevalence of 7.04% (100/1,420). Depression was prevalent in 11.0% (1,115/10,147) of students. A total of 12.9% (54/420) and 12.9% (41/319) of male and female medical students respectively were screened for depression. Preclinical students were also 1.63 times more likely to be depressed compared to clinical students, with 98.0% (48/49) pre-clinical students having screened for depression, compared to 60% (27/45) clinical students. Home staying medical students are 1.33 times more likely to be depressed compared to hostel-stayers, with 12.1% (29/239) of home stayers being depressed compared to 9.2% (37/402) of hostel stayers. We found that mental health issues affect a significant proportion of medical students and they are more prevalent in certain subpopulations of medical students. Our data revealed that preclinical and home staying students can be more susceptible to depression. More research should be done regarding this issue. With such information, it is hoped that appropriate interventions can be designed to improve the mental health of medical students.

  19. Mental health issues amongst medical students in Asia: a systematic review [2000–2015

    PubMed Central

    Sayampanathan, Andrew Arjun; Ho, Roger Chun-Man

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies have shown that the stress experienced by medical students is far greater than that experienced by other university students. In this study, we aim to understand the consequent mental health issues that are experienced by medical students, particularly in Asia, via a systematic review of the current literature. Methods Initial searches on MEDLINE, Embase and SpringerLink came up with a total of 1,033 unique articles. Studies not focusing on medical students alone, not mentioning mental health issues or not containing prevalence values were excluded. Results We included 14 articles in our analysis. ADs had a prevalence of 7.04% (100/1,420). Depression was prevalent in 11.0% (1,115/10,147) of students. A total of 12.9% (54/420) and 12.9% (41/319) of male and female medical students respectively were screened for depression. Preclinical students were also 1.63 times more likely to be depressed compared to clinical students, with 98.0% (48/49) pre-clinical students having screened for depression, compared to 60% (27/45) clinical students. Home staying medical students are 1.33 times more likely to be depressed compared to hostel-stayers, with 12.1% (29/239) of home stayers being depressed compared to 9.2% (37/402) of hostel stayers. Conclusions We found that mental health issues affect a significant proportion of medical students and they are more prevalent in certain subpopulations of medical students. Our data revealed that preclinical and home staying students can be more susceptible to depression. More research should be done regarding this issue. With such information, it is hoped that appropriate interventions can be designed to improve the mental health of medical students. PMID:27004219

  20. Reviewing outcomes of psychological interventions with torture survivors: Conceptual, methodological and ethical Issues.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nimisha; C de C Williams, Amanda; Kellezi, Blerina

    2016-01-01

    Torture survivors face multiple problems, including psychological difficulties, whether they are refugees or remain in the country where they were tortured. Provision of rehabilitation varies not only with the needs of survivors and resources available, but also with service models, service provider preferences and the local and country context. Despite increasing efforts in research on effectiveness of psychological interventions with torture survivors, results are inconclusive. We undertook a Cochrane systematic review of psychological, social and welfare provision, with meta-analysis to best estimate efficacy. The process raised conceptual, methodological and ethical issues of relevance to the wider field. We searched very widely, but rejected hundreds of papers which recommended treatment without providing evidence. We found nine randomised controlled trials, from developed and under-resourced settings. All conceptualised survivors' problems in psychiatric terms, using outcomes of post-traumatic stress symptoms, distress, and quality of life, by self-report, with or without translation or unstandardised interpretation, and with little mention of cultural or language issues. None used social or welfare interventions. Four related studies used narrative exposure therapy (NET) in a brief form, and without ensuring a safe setting as recommended. Five used mixed methods, including exposure, cognitive behavioural therapy, and eye movement desensitisation. Combined, the studies showed no immediate improvement in PTSD, distress, or quality of life; at six months follow-up, a minority showed some improvement in PTSD and distress, although participants remained severely affected. While applauding researchers' commitment in running these trials, we raise ethical issues about exposure in particular, and about the effects of shortcomings in methodology, particularly around assessment using unfamiliar cultural frameworks and language, and the lack of concern about dropout

  1. Breast Cancer Survivorship: A Comprehensive Review of Long-Term Medical Issues and Lifestyle Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Bodai, Balazs I; Tuso, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    Long-term survival rates after a diagnosis of breast cancer are steadily rising. This is good news, but clinicians must also recognize that this brings new challenges to the medical community. As breast cancer becomes a chronic condition rather than a life-threatening illness owing to advances in early diagnosis and more effective treatments, health care practitioners must recognize and manage the long-term sequelae of the constellation of therapeutic modalities. Survivors of breast cancer represent a unique and extremely complex group of patients; not only do they have the challenge of dealing with multiple long-term side effects of treatment protocols, but many are also forced to address the preexisting comorbidities of their therapies, which often include multiple other issues. Therapies have additional and/or additive side effects that may interfere with treatments directed toward the new primary diagnosis of breast cancer. Our mandate is to establish a smooth transition from patient with breast cancer to survivor of breast cancer while providing ongoing and future guidance. Certainly, the information and resources to accomplish this transition are readily available; however, they are scattered throughout the literature and therefore are not easily accessible or available to the primary care physician. It is imperative that the information available regarding survivorship issues be accessible in an organized and useful format. This article is a modest attempt to provide a comprehensive review of the long-term medical issues relevant to survivorship after the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. A predicted shortage of oncologists by 2020 is well-recognized. Therefore, the bulk of long-term care will become dependent on the primary care physician. This shift of care means that these physicians will need to be well educated in the long-term medical issues related to breast cancer treatment. PMID:25902343

  2. Workplace-based assessment: a review of user perceptions and strategies to address the identified shortcomings.

    PubMed

    Massie, Jonathan; Ali, Jason M

    2016-05-01

    Workplace based assessments (WBAs) are now commonplace in postgraduate medical training. User acceptability and engagement is essential to the success of any medical education innovation. To this end, possessing an insight into trainee and trainer perceptions towards WBAs will help identify the major problems, permitting strategies to be introduced to improve WBA implementation. A review of literature was performed to identify studies examining trainee and trainer perceptions towards WBAs. Studies were excluded if non-English or sampling a non-medical/dental population. The identified literature was synthesised for the purpose of this critical narrative review. It is clear that there is widespread negativity towards WBAs in the workplace. This has negatively impacted on the effectiveness of WBA tools as learning aids. This negativity exists in trainees but also to an extent in their trainers. Insight gained from the literature reveals three dominant problems with WBA implementation: poor understanding as to the purpose of WBAs; insufficient time available for undertaking these assessments; and inadequate training of trainers. Approaches to addressing these three problems with WBA implementation are discussed. It is likely that a variety of solutions will be required. The prevalence of negativity towards WBAs is substantial in both trainees and trainers, eroding the effectiveness of learning that is consequent upon them. The educational community must now listen to the concerns being raised by the users and consider the range of strategies being proposed to improve the experiences of trainees, and their trainers.

  3. A psychometric systematic review of self-report instruments to identify anxiety in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Evans, Kerry; Spiby, Helen; Morrell, C Jane

    2015-09-01

    To report a systematic review of the psychometric properties of self-report instruments to identify the symptoms of anxiety in pregnancy to help clinicians and researchers select the most suitable instrument. Excessive anxiety in pregnancy is associated with adverse birth outcomes, developmental and behavioural problems in infants and postnatal depression. Despite recommendations for routine psychological assessment in pregnancy, the optimal methods to identify anxiety in pregnancy have not been confirmed. Psychometric systematic review. A systematic literature search of the multiple databases (1990-September 2014). Identification of self-report instruments to measure anxiety in pregnancy using COSMIN guidelines to assess studies reporting a psychometric evaluation of validity and reliability. Thirty-two studies were included. Studies took place in the UK, Australia, Belgium, Canada, Germany, Italy, Scandinavia, Spain and the Netherlands. Seventeen different instruments were identified. Measures of validity were reported in 19 papers and reliability in 16. The overall quality of the papers was rated as fair to excellent using the COSMIN checklist. Only one paper scored excellent in more than one category. Many instruments have been adapted for use in different populations to those for which they were designed. The State Trait Anxiety Inventory, Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale have been tested more frequently than other instruments, yet require further assessment to confirm their value for use in pregnancy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. A protocol for identifying suitable biomarkers to assess fish health: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background Biomarkers have been used extensively to provide the connection between external levels of contaminant exposure, internal levels of tissue contamination, and early adverse effects in organisms. Objectives To present a three-step protocol for identifying suitable biomarkers to assess fish health in coastal and marine ecosystems, using Gladstone Harbour (Australia) as a case study. Methods Prior to applying our protocol, clear working definitions for biomarkers were developed to ensure consistency with the global literature on fish health assessment. First, contaminants of concern were identified based on the presence of point and diffuse sources of pollution and available monitoring data for the ecosystem of interest. Second, suitable fish species were identified using fisheries dependent and independent data, and prioritised based on potential pathways of exposure to the contaminants of concern. Finally, a systematic and critical literature review was conducted on the use of biomarkers to assess the health of fish exposed to the contaminants of concern. Results/Discussion We present clear working definitions for bioaccumulation markers, biomarkers of exposure, biomarkers of effect and biomarkers of susceptibility. Based on emission and concentration information, seven metals were identified as contaminants of concern for Gladstone Harbour. Twenty out of 232 fish species were abundant enough to be potentially suitable for biomarker studies; five of these were prioritised based on potential pathways of exposure and susceptibility to metals. The literature search on biomarkers yielded 5,035 articles, of which 151met the inclusion criteria. Based on our review, the most suitable biomarkers include bioaccumulation markers, biomarkers of exposure (CYP1A, EROD, SOD, LPOX, HSP, MT, DNA strand breaks, micronuclei, apoptosis), and biomarkers of effect (histopathology, TAG:ST). Conclusion Our protocol outlines a clear pathway to identify suitable biomarkers to

  5. The challenge of identifying non-intentionally added substances from food packaging materials: a review.

    PubMed

    Nerin, C; Alfaro, P; Aznar, M; Domeño, C

    2013-05-02

    Packaged food can contain non-intentionally added substances (NIAS) as a result of reaction and degradation processes or the presence of impurities in the raw materials used for the packaging production. This manuscript reviews the evidence of NIAS and their possible origin. One of the most challenging and difficult tasks when a sample of packaging materials arrives at the laboratory is knowing the procedure to apply for identifying the unknown compounds. This work proposes an analytical procedure for sample treatment, applicable to polymers as well as to migration samples, and for NIAS identification. The identification protocol comprises the determination of both volatile and non-volatile compounds. A review is presented of the most novel analytical techniques used for identification purposes, particularly high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Updated systematic review identifies substantial number of retention strategies: Using more strategies retains more study participants

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Karen A.; Dinglas, Victor D.; Sukrithan, Vineeth; Yalamanchilli, Ramakrishna; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro A.; Dennison-Himmelfarb, Cheryl; Needham, Dale M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective The retention of participants in studies is important for the validity of research. We updated our prior systematic review (2005) to assess retention strategies for in-person follow-up in healthcare studies. Methods We searched PubMed, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (CENTRAL), Cochrane Methodology Register, and Embase (August 2013) for English-language reports of studies that described retention strategies for in-person follow-up in healthcare studies. We abstracted each retention strategy and two authors independently classified each retention strategy with one of the themes developed in our prior review. Results We identified 88 studies (67 newly identified studies), six of which were designed to compare retention strategies while the remainder described retention strategies and retention rates. There were 985 strategies abstracted from the descriptive studies (617 from new studies), with a median (interquartile range) number of strategies per study of 10 (7 to 17) and a median (interquartile range) number of themes per study of 6 (4 to 7). Financial incentives were used in 47 (57%) of the descriptive studies. We classified 28% of the strategies under the theme of ‘Contact and Scheduling Methods,’ with 83% of the identified studies using at least one strategy within this theme. The number of strategies used was positively correlated with retention rate (P=0.027), but the number of themes was not associated with retention rate (P=0.469). Conclusions The number of studies describing retention strategies has substantially increased since our prior review. However, the lack of comparative studies and the heterogeneity in the types of strategies, participant population and study designs, prohibits synthesis to determine the types of cohort retention strategies that were most effective. However, using a larger number of retention strategies, across 5 or 6 different

  7. Updated systematic review identifies substantial number of retention strategies: using more strategies retains more study participants.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Karen A; Dinglas, Victor D; Sukrithan, Vineeth; Yalamanchilli, Ramakrishna; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro A; Dennison-Himmelfarb, Cheryl; Needham, Dale M

    2015-12-01

    The retention of participants in studies is important for the validity of research. We updated our prior systematic review (2005) to assess retention strategies for in-person follow-up in health care studies. We searched PubMed, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, Cochrane Methodology Register, and Embase (August 2013) for English-language reports of studies that described retention strategies for in-person follow-up in health care studies. We abstracted each retention strategy, and two authors independently classified each retention strategy with one of the themes developed in our prior review. We identified 88 studies (67 newly identified studies), six of which were designed to compare retention strategies, whereas the remainder described retention strategies and retention rates. There were 985 strategies abstracted from the descriptive studies (617 from new studies), with a median (interquartile range) number of strategies per study of 10 (7 to 17) and a median (interquartile range) number of themes per study of 6 (4 to 7). Financial incentives were used in 47 (57%) of the descriptive studies. We classified 28% of the strategies under the theme of "contact and scheduling methods," with 83% of the identified studies using at least one strategy within this theme. The number of strategies used was positively correlated with retention rate (P = 0.027), but the number of themes was not associated with retention rate (P = 0.469). The number of studies describing retention strategies has substantially increased since our prior review. However, the lack of comparative studies and the heterogeneity in the types of strategies, participant population and study designs, prohibits synthesis to determine the types of cohort retention strategies that were most effective. However, using a larger number of retention strategies, across five or six different themes, appears to retain more study participants. Copyright

  8. Identifying and tracking disaster victims: state-of-the-art technology review.

    PubMed

    Pate, Barbara L

    2008-01-01

    The failure of our nation to adequately track victims of Hurricane Katrina has been identified as a major weakness of national and local disaster preparedness plans. This weakness has prompted government and private industries to acknowledge that existing paper-based tracking systems are incapable of managing information during a large-scale disaster. In response to this need, efforts are under way to develop new technologies that allow instant access to identity and location information during emergency situations. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of state-of-the-art technologies, with implications and limitations for use during mass casualty incidents.

  9. They did not start the fire: reviewing and resolving the issue of physician stress and burnout.

    PubMed

    Babyar, Julie Christine

    2017-06-19

    Purpose Physician stress and burnout is a serious and common concern in healthcare, with over half of physicians in the USA meeting at least one criterion for burnout. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach A review on current state of physician stress and burnout research, from 2008 to 2016, was undertaken. A subsequent perspective paper was shaped around these reviews. Findings Findings reveal research strength in prevalence and incidence with opportunities for stronger intervention studies. While descriptive studies on causes and consequences of physician burnout are available, studies on interventions and prevention of physician burnout are lacking. Future research on physician stress and burnout should incorporate intervention studies and take care to avoid limitations found in current research. Accountability and prevention of physician burnout is the responsibility of the healthcare industry as a whole, and organizational strategies must be emphasized in future research. Originality/value The value of this research comes in the original comprehensive review, international inclusion and succinct summary of physician burnout research and strategies.

  10. Independent technical review of Savannah River Site Defense Waste Processing Facility technical issues

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will vitrify high-level radioactive waste that is presently stored as liquid, salt-cake, and sludge in 51 waste-storage tanks. Construction of the DWPF began in 1984, and the Westinghouse Savannah Company (WSRC) considers the plant to be 100% turned over from construction and 91% complete. Cold-chemical runs are scheduled to begin in November 1992, and hot start up is projected for June 1994. It is estimated that the plant lifetime must exceed 15 years to complete the vitrification of the current, high-level tank waste. In a memo to the Assistant Secretary for Defense Programs (DP-1), the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Restoration and Waste management (EM-1) established the need for an Independent Technical Review (ITR), or the Red Team, to review process technology issues preventing start up of the DWPF.'' This report documents the findings of an Independent Technical Review (ITR) conducted by the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM), at the request of the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, of specified aspects of Defense Waste Process Facility (DWPF) process technology. Information for the assessment was drawn from documents provided to the ITR Team by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), and presentations, discussions, interviews, and tours held at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during the weeks of February and March 9, 1992.

  11. Independent technical review of Savannah River Site Defense Waste Processing Facility technical issues

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will vitrify high-level radioactive waste that is presently stored as liquid, salt-cake, and sludge in 51 waste-storage tanks. Construction of the DWPF began in 1984, and the Westinghouse Savannah Company (WSRC) considers the plant to be 100% turned over from construction and 91% complete. Cold-chemical runs are scheduled to begin in November 1992, and hot start up is projected for June 1994. It is estimated that the plant lifetime must exceed 15 years to complete the vitrification of the current, high-level tank waste. In a memo to the Assistant Secretary for Defense Programs (DP-1), the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Restoration and Waste management (EM-1) established the need for an Independent Technical Review (ITR), or the Red Team, to ``review process technology issues preventing start up of the DWPF.`` This report documents the findings of an Independent Technical Review (ITR) conducted by the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM), at the request of the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, of specified aspects of Defense Waste Process Facility (DWPF) process technology. Information for the assessment was drawn from documents provided to the ITR Team by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), and presentations, discussions, interviews, and tours held at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during the weeks of February and March 9, 1992.

  12. Hyperprolactinemia and medications for bipolar disorder: systematic review of a neglected issue in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Pacchiarotti, Isabella; Murru, Andrea; Kotzalidis, Georgios D; Bonnin, C Mar; Mazzarini, Lorenzo; Colom, Francesc; Vieta, Eduard

    2015-08-01

    Drug-induced changes in serum prolactin (sPrl) levels constitute a relevant issue due to the potentially severe consequences on physical health of psychiatric patients such as sexual dysfunctions, osteoporosis and Prl-sensitive tumors. Several drugs have been associated to sPrl changes. Only antipsychotics have been extensively studied as sPrl-elevating agents in schizophrenia, but the extent to which bipolar disorder (BD) treatments affect sPrl levels is much less known. The objective of this systematic review is to summarize the evidence of the effects of drugs used in BD on Prl. This review followed the PRISMA statement. The MEDLINE/PubMed/Index Medicus, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were systematically searched for articles in English appearing from any time to May 30, 2014. Twenty-six studies were included. These suggest that treatments for BD are less likely to be associated with Prl elevations, with valproate, quetiapine, lurasidone, mirtazapine, and bupropion reported not to change PRL levels significantly and lithium and aripiprazole to lower them in some studies. Taking into account the effects of the different classes of drugs on Prl may improve the care of BD patients requiring long-term pharmacotherapy. Based on the results of this review, lithium and valproate appear to be safer due to their low potential to elevate sPrL; among antipsychotics, quetiapine, lurasidone and aripiprazole appear to be similarly safe.

  13. An integrative review of the impact of indirect trauma exposure in health professionals and potential issues of salience for midwives.

    PubMed

    Sheen, Kayleigh; Slade, Pauline; Spiby, Helen

    2014-04-01

    To explore responses to indirect trauma reported by health professionals and to identify issues of potential salience for midwives. Indirect exposure to a traumatic event can lead to the development of distressing and potentially enduring responses. Little is understood about the impact that perinatal trauma exposure could have on midwives. An integrative review design was used. PsychInfo, Medline, PsychArticles, Web of Knowledge, CINAHL, MIDIRS and Scopus databases were search for papers published between 1980-November 2012. Studies providing quantitative or qualitative exploration of healthcare professionals' responses to indirectly experienced traumatic events were selected. Forty-two papers fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Four of these studies included professionals engaged in maternity care or exposed to traumatic perinatal events. Findings indicate evidence of intrusion, avoidance and arousal in healthcare professionals, with differing degrees of frequency. Empathy, work-related stress and the extent of professional experience were identified as associated with traumatic stress responses. Evidence derived from healthcare professionals suggests that indirect exposure to the traumatic events of recipients of care can sometimes elicit traumatic stress responses. Factors increasing risk for traumatic stress were identified as empathy and organizational stress. These factors hold specific salience in midwifery. Responding to trauma in a midwifery context, as informed by findings from other healthcare professionals, could adversely affect midwives' well-being, care provided to women and contribute to an adverse organizational climate. Large-scale research considering the experiences of midwives is recommended. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Identifying and solving lead issues from water systems with materials/device replacement in drinking water system configurations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identifying and assessing lead contamination and exposure potentialin single-family residences is difficult enough, but doing the samekind of assessment and remediation in buildings, schools, and daycare centers is even more challenging. It is of particular importancebecause of t...

  15. Identifying and solving lead issues from water systems with materials/device replacement in drinking water system configurations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identifying and assessing lead contamination and exposure potentialin single-family residences is difficult enough, but doing the samekind of assessment and remediation in buildings, schools, and daycare centers is even more challenging. It is of particular importancebecause of t...

  16. Structural and Practical Identifiability Issues of Immuno-Epidemiological Vector-Host Models with Application to Rift Valley Fever.

    PubMed

    Tuncer, Necibe; Gulbudak, Hayriye; Cannataro, Vincent L; Martcheva, Maia

    2016-09-01

    In this article, we discuss the structural and practical identifiability of a nested immuno-epidemiological model of arbovirus diseases, where host-vector transmission rate, host recovery, and disease-induced death rates are governed by the within-host immune system. We incorporate the newest ideas and the most up-to-date features of numerical methods to fit multi-scale models to multi-scale data. For an immunological model, we use Rift Valley Fever Virus (RVFV) time-series data obtained from livestock under laboratory experiments, and for an epidemiological model we incorporate a human compartment to the nested model and use the number of human RVFV cases reported by the CDC during the 2006-2007 Kenya outbreak. We show that the immunological model is not structurally identifiable for the measurements of time-series viremia concentrations in the host. Thus, we study the non-dimensionalized and scaled versions of the immunological model and prove that both are structurally globally identifiable. After fixing estimated parameter values for the immunological model derived from the scaled model, we develop a numerical method to fit observable RVFV epidemiological data to the nested model for the remaining parameter values of the multi-scale system. For the given (CDC) data set, Monte Carlo simulations indicate that only three parameters of the epidemiological model are practically identifiable when the immune model parameters are fixed. Alternatively, we fit the multi-scale data to the multi-scale model simultaneously. Monte Carlo simulations for the simultaneous fitting suggest that the parameters of the immunological model and the parameters of the immuno-epidemiological model are practically identifiable. We suggest that analytic approaches for studying the structural identifiability of nested models are a necessity, so that identifiable parameter combinations can be derived to reparameterize the nested model to obtain an identifiable one. This is a crucial step in

  17. Minor's rights versus parental rights: review of legal issues in adolescent health care.

    PubMed

    Maradiegue, Ann

    2003-01-01

    The right of adolescents to access confidential health care is sensitive and controversial. Recent challenges in the court system to adolescents' right to access abortion and contraception are eroding current law, including the Roe v Wade decision. The prospect of more than a million pregnancies in individuals under the age of 20 years in the United States with increasingly fewer alternatives to pregnancy is concerning. New regulations under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act are adding yet another layer of complexity to the care of adolescents. Understanding legal issues surrounding adolescent rights to care can help the health care provider make appropriate care available to this age group. Keywords previously identified in CINAHL and MEDLINE were used to perform the literature search. LexisNexis was the search engine used to identify the laws and statutes.

  18. A systematic review of validated methods for identifying Kawasaki disease using administrative or claims data.

    PubMed

    Williams, Candice L; Sathe, Nila A; Krishnaswami, Shanthi; McPheeters, Melissa L

    2013-12-30

    To identify and assess algorithms used to identify Kawasaki syndrome/Kawasaki disease in administrative and claims databases. We searched the MEDLINE database from 1991 to September 2012 using controlled vocabulary and key terms related to Kawasaki disease. We also searched the reference lists of included studies. Two investigators independently assessed the full text of studies against pre-determined inclusion criteria. Two reviewers independently extracted data regarding participant and algorithm characteristics. Our searches identified 177 citations of which 22 met our inclusion criteria. All studies used algorithms including International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) code 446.1 either alone, or with evidence of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) administration, or with ICD-10 code M30.3. Six studies confirmed diagnoses by medical chart review. Three of these six studies reported validation statistics, with positive predictive values of 74%, 84%, and 86%, respectively. All studies that reported algorithms used either the ICD-9 code 446.1 either alone, with evidence of IVIG administration or with ICD-10 code M30.3. The ICD-9 code 446.1 alone produced positive predictive values of 74%, 84%, and 86% in separate studies in Georgia and California. The sensitivity of these codes to detect Kawasaki disease is unknown, as no sampling of medical records for missed true cases of Kawasaki disease was done. Further research would be helpful to determine whether the relatively high positive predictive values found in southern California are seen elsewhere and also to evaluate the performance of other codes to identify cases of Kawasaki disease and the sensitivity of the narrow algorithms that have been used to date. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. School consultation: a review of research on issues unique to the school environment.

    PubMed

    Mattison, R E

    2000-04-01

    To provide clinicians with current information to assist in their consultations to schools on 4 major topics that are unique to the school environment and of serious concern to educators: absenteeism, disciplinary referrals, retention (non-promotion), and dropping out. Computer literature searches and the major journals of the various school disciplines were used to identify empirically based articles with sound methodology. Information on each of the 4 issues is presented as general characteristics, characteristics of psychopathology, prevention and treatment, and implications for consultation. Findings are largely general, with little specific information on level of intelligence, learning disorders, psychopathology, or family stressors. Students under each topic have varied presentations. However, many pupils with absenteeism, disciplinary referrals, or retention appear to be characterized by chronic and serious academic and/or behavior problems, all of which can predate dropping out. Considerable research is still needed on all 4 school issues, especially psychopathology. Nevertheless, consultants can reasonably first help schools to identify students at risk for the 4 outcomes, followed by appropriate screening/evaluation to indicate more clearly their true intervention needs. The ongoing process can further educate school staff about psychiatric disorders in their most problematic students.

  20. Identifying Potential Types of Guidance for Supporting Student Inquiry When Using Virtual and Remote Labs in Science: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zacharia, Zacharias C.; Manoli, Constantinos; Xenofontos, Nikoletta; de Jong, Ton; Pedaste, Margus; van Riesen, Siswa A.; Kamp, Ellen T.; Mäeots, Mario; Siiman, Leo; Tsourlidaki, Eleftheria

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review is to identify specific types of guidance for supporting student use of online labs, that is, virtual and remote labs, in an inquiry context. To do so, we reviewed the literature on providing guidance within computer supported inquiry learning (CoSIL) environments in science education and classified all identified guidance…

  1. Identifying Potential Types of Guidance for Supporting Student Inquiry When Using Virtual and Remote Labs in Science: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zacharia, Zacharias C.; Manoli, Constantinos; Xenofontos, Nikoletta; de Jong, Ton; Pedaste, Margus; van Riesen, Siswa A.; Kamp, Ellen T.; Mäeots, Mario; Siiman, Leo; Tsourlidaki, Eleftheria

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review is to identify specific types of guidance for supporting student use of online labs, that is, virtual and remote labs, in an inquiry context. To do so, we reviewed the literature on providing guidance within computer supported inquiry learning (CoSIL) environments in science education and classified all identified guidance…

  2. A review of approaches to identifying patient phenotype cohorts using electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    Shivade, Chaitanya; Raghavan, Preethi; Fosler-Lussier, Eric; Embi, Peter J; Elhadad, Noemie; Johnson, Stephen B; Lai, Albert M

    2014-01-01

    Objective To summarize literature describing approaches aimed at automatically identifying patients with a common phenotype. Materials and methods We performed a review of studies describing systems or reporting techniques developed for identifying cohorts of patients with specific phenotypes. Every full text article published in (1) Journal of American Medical Informatics Association, (2) Journal of Biomedical Informatics, (3) Proceedings of the Annual American Medical Informatics Association Symposium, and (4) Proceedings of Clinical Research Informatics Conference within the past 3 years was assessed for inclusion in the review. Only articles using automated techniques were included. Results Ninety-seven articles met our inclusion criteria. Forty-six used natural language processing (NLP)-based techniques, 24 described rule-based systems, 41 used statistical analyses, data mining, or machine learning techniques, while 22 described hybrid systems. Nine articles described the architecture of large-scale systems developed for determining cohort eligibility of patients. Discussion We observe that there is a rise in the number of studies associated with cohort identification using electronic medical records. Statistical analyses or machine learning, followed by NLP techniques, are gaining popularity over the years in comparison with rule-based systems. Conclusions There are a variety of approaches for classifying patients into a particular phenotype. Different techniques and data sources are used, and good performance is reported on datasets at respective institutions. However, no system makes comprehensive use of electronic medical records addressing all of their known weaknesses. PMID:24201027

  3. The utility of peripheral blood smear review for identifying specimens for flow cytometric immunophenotyping.

    PubMed

    Craig, F E

    2017-05-01

    Laboratory professionals are in an ideal situation to identify CBC and peripheral blood smear findings that raise the possibility of a hematolymphoid neoplasm, and based on this information make recommendations for additional studies, such as flow cytometric immunophenotyping. In some circumstances a definitive diagnosis can be established from the combined peripheral blood morphologic and immunophenotypic findings obviating the need for bone marrow evaluation, such as for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Occasionally flow cytometric studies are superior to morphologic assessment, such as in screening for hairy cell leukemia or identifying lymphocytic-variant hypereosinophilia. However, there is increasing recognition of small immunophenotypically unusual or abnormal populations of peripheral blood cells, particularly in older patients, which are of uncertain clinical significance, such as monoclonal B lymphocytosis and T-cell clonopathy. Therefore, it is important to integrate peripheral blood smear review findings with the clinical and other information before recommending flow cytometry. In addition, it is important to recognize situations where the results of peripheral blood smear review and flow cytometric immunophenotyping do not explain the clinical findings. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Identifying primary care quality indicators for people with serious mental illness: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Christoph; Doran, Tim; Goddard, Maria; Kendrick, Tony; Gilbody, Simon; Dare, Ceri R; Aylott, Lauren; Jacobs, Rowena

    2017-08-01

    Serious mental illness (SMI) - which comprises long-term conditions such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and other psychoses - has enormous costs for patients and society. In many countries, people with SMI are treated solely in primary care, and have particular needs for physical care. The objective of this study was to systematically review the literature to create a list of quality indicators relevant to patients with SMI that could be captured using routine data, and which could be used to monitor or incentivise better-quality primary care. A systematic literature review, combined with a search of quality indicator databases and guidelines. The authors assessed whether indicators could be measured from routine data and the quality of the evidence. Out of 1847 papers and quality indicator databases identified, 27 were included, from which 59 quality indicators were identified, covering six domains. Of the 59 indicators, 52 could be assessed using routine data. The evidence base underpinning these indicators was relatively weak, and was primarily based on expert opinion rather than trial evidence. With appropriate adaptation for different contexts, and in line with the relative responsibilities of primary and secondary care, use of the quality indicators has the potential to improve care and to improve the physical and mental health of people with SMI. However, before the indicators can be used to monitor or incentivise primary care quality, more robust links need to be established, with improved patient outcomes. © British Journal of General Practice 2017.

  5. A review of approaches to identifying patient phenotype cohorts using electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Shivade, Chaitanya; Raghavan, Preethi; Fosler-Lussier, Eric; Embi, Peter J; Elhadad, Noemie; Johnson, Stephen B; Lai, Albert M

    2014-01-01

    To summarize literature describing approaches aimed at automatically identifying patients with a common phenotype. We performed a review of studies describing systems or reporting techniques developed for identifying cohorts of patients with specific phenotypes. Every full text article published in (1) Journal of American Medical Informatics Association, (2) Journal of Biomedical Informatics, (3) Proceedings of the Annual American Medical Informatics Association Symposium, and (4) Proceedings of Clinical Research Informatics Conference within the past 3 years was assessed for inclusion in the review. Only articles using automated techniques were included. Ninety-seven articles met our inclusion criteria. Forty-six used natural language processing (NLP)-based techniques, 24 described rule-based systems, 41 used statistical analyses, data mining, or machine learning techniques, while 22 described hybrid systems. Nine articles described the architecture of large-scale systems developed for determining cohort eligibility of patients. We observe that there is a rise in the number of studies associated with cohort identification using electronic medical records. Statistical analyses or machine learning, followed by NLP techniques, are gaining popularity over the years in comparison with rule-based systems. There are a variety of approaches for classifying patients into a particular phenotype. Different techniques and data sources are used, and good performance is reported on datasets at respective institutions. However, no system makes comprehensive use of electronic medical records addressing all of their known weaknesses.

  6. Identifying primary care quality indicators for people with serious mental illness: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Kronenberg, Christoph; Doran, Tim; Goddard, Maria; Kendrick, Tony; Gilbody, Simon; Dare, Ceri R; Aylott, Lauren; Jacobs, Rowena

    2017-01-01

    Background Serious mental illness (SMI) — which comprises long-term conditions such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and other psychoses — has enormous costs for patients and society. In many countries, people with SMI are treated solely in primary care, and have particular needs for physical care. Aim The objective of this study was to systematically review the literature to create a list of quality indicators relevant to patients with SMI that could be captured using routine data, and which could be used to monitor or incentivise better-quality primary care. Design and setting A systematic literature review, combined with a search of quality indicator databases and guidelines. Method The authors assessed whether indicators could be measured from routine data and the quality of the evidence. Results Out of 1847 papers and quality indicator databases identified, 27 were included, from which 59 quality indicators were identified, covering six domains. Of the 59 indicators, 52 could be assessed using routine data. The evidence base underpinning these indicators was relatively weak, and was primarily based on expert opinion rather than trial evidence. Conclusion With appropriate adaptation for different contexts, and in line with the relative responsibilities of primary and secondary care, use of the quality indicators has the potential to improve care and to improve the physical and mental health of people with SMI. However, before the indicators can be used to monitor or incentivise primary care quality, more robust links need to be established, with improved patient outcomes. PMID:28673958

  7. A review of progress in identifying and characterizing biocrusts using proximal and remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenstein, Offer; Adamowski, Jan

    2017-05-01

    Biocrusts are critical components of desert ecosystems, significantly modifying the surfaces they occupy. The mixture of biological components and soil particles that form the crust, in conjunction with moisture, determines the biocrusts' spectral signatures. Proximal and remote sensing in complementary spectral regions, namely the reflective region, and the thermal region, have been used to study biocrusts in a non-destructive manner, in the laboratory, in the field, and from space. The objectives of this review paper are to present the spectral characteristics of biocrusts across the optical domain, and to discuss significant developments in the application of proximal and remote sensing for biocrust studies in the last few years. The motivation for using proximal and remote sensing in biocrust studies is discussed. Next, the application of reflectance spectroscopy to the study of biocrusts is presented followed by a review of the emergence of high spectral resolution thermal remote sensing, which facilitates the application of thermal spectroscopy for biocrust studies. Four specific topics at the forefront of proximal and remote sensing of biocrusts are discussed: (1) The use of remote sensing in determining the role of biocrusts in global biogeochemical cycles; (2) Monitoring the inceptive establishment of biocrusts; (3) Identifying and characterizing biocrusts using Longwave infrared spectroscopy; and (4) Diurnal emissivity dynamics of biocrusts in a sand dune environment. The paper concludes by identifying innovative technologies such as low altitude and high resolution imagery that are increasingly used in remote sensing science, and are expected to be used in future biocrusts studies.

  8. Identifying Resilience Resources for HIV Prevention Among Sexual Minority Men: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Eva N; Banks, Regina J; Marks, Amy K; Pantalone, David W

    2016-12-15

    Most HIV prevention for sexual minority men and men who have sex with men targets risk behaviors (e.g., condom use) and helps <50% of participants. Bolstering resilience might increase HIV prevention's effectiveness. This systematic review identified resilience resources (protective factors) in high-risk, HIV-negative, sexual minority men. We reviewed PsycINFO, PsycARTICLES, MEDLINE, references, and Listservs for studies including sexual minority men with 1+ HIV risk factor (syndemics): childhood sexual abuse, partner abuse, substance abuse, or mental health symptoms. From 1356 articles screened, 20 articles met inclusion criteria. Across the articles, we identified and codified 31 resilience resources: socioeconomic (e.g., employment), behavioral coping strategies (e.g., mental health treatment), cognitions/emotions (e.g., acceptance), and relationships. Resilience resources were generally associated with lower HIV risk; there were 18 low-risk associations, 4 high-risk associations, 8 non-significant associations). We generated a set of empirically based resilience variables and a hypothesis to be evaluated further to improve HIV prevention.

  9. A review of occupational safety and health issues relevant to the Environmental Restoration Program: Selected case histories and associated issues

    SciTech Connect

    Lesperance, A.M.; Siegel, M.R.; McKinney, M.C.

    1994-08-01

    Since the 1940s, US Department of Energy (DOE) sites have been used for nuclear materials processing and production, warhead testing, and weapons research and development. These activities have resulted in extensive environmental contamination. DOE has established a goal to cleanup and restore the groundwater, soils, sediments, and surface water at its facilities across the nation. To achieve this goal, many workers will be needed to conduct the cleanup. These workers will need training and will be required to follow occupational safety and health (OSH) regulations and guidelines. Compliance with the OSH regulations and guidelines will have an anomous influence on the schedule, money, and technology needed for environmental restoration. Therefore, one area that must be considered in the early stages of long-term planning is the impact of OSH issues on the environmental restoration process. The DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management has requested that the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) investigate the impact of these issues on the environmental restoration process.

  10. Capability of CBCT to identify patients with low bone mineral density: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Eliete N S; Almeida, Fabiana T; Bezerra, Fernanda V; Figueiredo, Paulo T D S; Silva, Maria A G; De Luca Canto, Graziela; Pachêco-Pereira, Camila; Leite, André F

    2017-07-03

    The aim of this study was to systematically review the literature about the capability of CBCT images to identify individuals with low bone mineral density (BMD). As the literature is scarce regarding this topic, the purpose of this systematic review is also to guide future research in this area. A detailed search was performed in five databases without restrictions of time or languages. Additionally, a grey literature search was conducted. The Quality Assessment Tool for Diagnostic Accuracy Studies-2 was applied to evaluate the methodological design of selected studies. With the inclusion of only six studies, the evidence is limited to endorse the use of CBCT assertively as a diagnostic tool for low BMD. All of the three studies that analyzed radiomorphometric indices found that the linear measurements of the mandibular inferior cortex were lower in osteoporotic individuals. CBCT-derived radiographic density vertebral and mandibular measurements were also capable for differentiating individuals with osteoporosis from individuals with normal BMD. The analysis of the cervical vertebrae showed high accuracy measurements. This systematic review indicates a scarcity of studies regarding the potential of CBCT for screening individuals with low BMD. However, the studies indicate that radiomorphometric indices and CBCT-derived radiographic density should be promising tools for differentiating individuals with osteoporosis from individuals with normal BMD.

  11. Epistemic uncertainties and natural hazard risk assessment - Part 1: A review of the issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beven, K. J.; Aspinall, W. P.; Bates, P. D.; Borgomeo, E.; Goda, K.; Hall, J. W.; Page, T.; Phillips, J. C.; Rougier, J. T.; Simpson, M.; Stephenson, D. B.; Smith, P. J.; Wagener, T.; Watson, M.

    2015-12-01

    Uncertainties in natural hazard risk assessment are generally dominated by the sources arising from lack of knowledge or understanding of the processes involved. There is a lack of knowledge about frequencies, process representations, parameters, present and future boundary conditions, consequences and impacts, and the meaning of observations in evaluating simulation models. These are the epistemic uncertainties that can be difficult to constrain, especially in terms of event or scenario probabilities, even as elicited probabilities rationalized on the basis of expert judgements. This paper reviews the issues raised by trying to quantify the effects of epistemic uncertainties. Such scientific uncertainties might have significant influence on decisions that are made for risk management, so it is important to communicate the meaning of an uncertainty estimate and to provide an audit trail of the assumptions on which it is based. Some suggestions for good practice in doing so are made.

  12. Municipal solid waste incineration in China and the issue of acidification: A review.

    PubMed

    Ji, Longjie; Lu, Shengyong; Yang, Jie; Du, Cuicui; Chen, Zhiliang; Buekens, Alfons; Yan, Jianhua

    2016-04-01

    In China, incineration is essential for reducing the volume of municipal solid waste arising in its numerous megacities. The evolution of incinerator capacity has been huge, yet it creates strong opposition from a small, but vocal part of the population. The characteristics of Chinese municipal solid waste are analysed and data presented on its calorific value and composition. These are not so favourable for incineration, since the sustained use of auxiliary fuel is necessary for ensuring adequate combustion temperatures. Also, the emission standard for acid gases is more lenient in China than in the European Union, so special attention should be paid to the issue of acidification arising from flue gas. Next, the techniques used in flue gas cleaning in China are reviewed and the acidification potential by cleaned flue gas is estimated. Still, acidification induced by municipal solid waste incinerators remains marginal compared with the effects of coal-fired power plants.

  13. Obesity Educational Interventions in U.S. Medical Schools: A Systematic Review and Identified Gaps

    PubMed Central

    Vitolins, Mara Z.; Crandall, Sonia; Miller, Davis; Ip, Eddie; Marion, Gail; Spangler, John G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Obesity is the second leading cause of preventable death in the U.S. However, physicians feel poorly trained to address the obesity epidemic. This review examines effective training methods for overweight and obesity intervention in undergraduate medical education. Data Sources Using indexing terms related to overweight, obesity and medical student education, we conducted a literature searched PubMed PsychInfo, Cochrane and ERIC for relevant articles in English. References from articles identified were also reviewed to located additional articles. Review Methods We included all studies that incorporated processor outcome evaluations of obesity educational interventions for US medical students. Of an initial 168 citations, 40 abstracts were retrieved; 11 studies were found to be pertinent to medical student obesity education, but only 5 included intervention and evaluation elements. Quality criteria for inclusion consisted of explicit evaluation of the educational methods used. Data extraction identified participants (e.g., year of medical students), interventions, evaluations and results. Results These five studies successfully used a variety of teaching methods including hands on training, didactic lectures, role playing and standardized patient interaction to increase medical students’ knowledge, attitudes and skills regarding overweight and obesity intervention. Two studies addressed medical student bias towards overweight and obese patients. No studies addressed health disparities in the epidemiology and bias of obesity. Conclusions Despite the commonly cited “obesity epidemic,” there are very few published studies that report the effectiveness of medical school obesity educational programs. Gaps still exist within undergraduate medical education including specific training that addresses obesity and long-term studies showing that such training is retained. PMID:22775792

  14. Identifying the decision to be supported: a review of papers from environmental modelling and software

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sojda, Richard S.; Chen, Serena H.; El Sawah, Sondoss; Guillaume, Joseph H.A.; Jakeman, A.J.; Lautenbach, Sven; McIntosh, Brian S.; Rizzoli, A.E.; Seppelt, Ralf; Struss, Peter; Voinov, Alexey; Volk, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Two of the basic tenets of decision support system efforts are to help identify and structure the decisions to be supported, and to then provide analysis in how those decisions might be best made. One example from wetland management would be that wildlife biologists must decide when to draw down water levels to optimise aquatic invertebrates as food for breeding ducks. Once such a decision is identified, a system or tool to help them make that decision in the face of current and projected climate conditions could be developed. We examined a random sample of 100 papers published from 2001-2011 in Environmental Modelling and Software that used the phrase “decision support system” or “decision support tool”, and which are characteristic of different sectors. In our review, 41% of the systems and tools related to the water resources sector, 34% were related to agriculture, and 22% to the conservation of fish, wildlife, and protected area management. Only 60% of the papers were deemed to be reporting on DSS. This was based on the papers reviewed not having directly identified a specific decision to be supported. We also report on the techniques that were used to identify the decisions, such as formal survey, focus group, expert opinion, or sole judgment of the author(s). The primary underlying modelling system, e.g., expert system, agent based model, Bayesian belief network, geographical information system (GIS), and the like was categorised next. Finally, since decision support typically should target some aspect of unstructured decisions, we subjectively determined to what degree this was the case. In only 23% of the papers reviewed, did the system appear to tackle unstructured decisions. This knowledge should be useful in helping workers in the field develop more effective systems and tools, especially by being exposed to the approaches in different, but related, disciplines. We propose that a standard blueprint for reporting on DSS be developed for

  15. A review of psychosocial issues in patients with chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Modabbernia, Amirhossein; Ashrafi, Mandana; Malekzadeh, Reza; Poustchi, Hossein

    2013-02-01

    Psychosocial issues and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) are important components of care in patients diagnosed with chronic hepatitis B (CHBV). In this review, we searched Medline, ISI Web of Knowledge, Google Scholar and the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) website (until January 2012) using relevant terms and we categorized the retrieved content into three areas: HRQOL, mental health, and psychosocial issues such as stigma and coping.  Increasing severity of CHBV leads to a decline in HRQOL. Cirrhosis worsens HRQOL, whereas treatment and psycho-education improves it. Frequency of mood disorders seems to be increased in patients with CHBV, although not all studies have shown this trend. Some factors such as alcohol consumption and low social support negatively impact patients' mental health. Those with CHBV generally have better HRQOL and mental health than their hepatitis C (HCV) counterparts. Patients with psychiatric disorders, particularly those with prolonged institutionalization, have a generally higher risk of acquiring CHBV infection compared to the general population. Robust studies regarding the stigma in patients with CHBV are lacking, although some studies have suggested a higher degree of perceived stigma in these patients.   HRQOL and mental health are significantly affected in CHBV patients, particularly in those with more severe forms of the disease. There are few studies that addressed the effects of intervention in CHBV patients with psychosocial problems. Other subjects necessitating additional research include stigma, coping mechanisms, and other less common, yet important psychosomatic disorders.

  16. The criminalization of HIV transmission in England and Wales: a brief review of the issues arising.

    PubMed

    Mears, Alison

    2007-02-01

    The HIV virus has been present in our society for more than two decades. Although there was originally much academic interest in the possibility of prosecuting for the reckless transmission of HIV in England and Wales, it was thought impossible by many (including the government) under existing legislation. The first prosecution in England in 2003 (following the first UK prosecution in 2001, in Scotland) provoked a great deal of surprise not least in the HIV voluntary sector, which has since been campaigning for the cessation of such prosecutions. This review examines the law in this area and provides an understanding of the development of the ethical and other issues involved. Since 2003 there have been seven further convictions for the reckless transmission of HIV in England and Wales. These prosecutions have led to several responses that are discussed here and the current developments in this area outlined. Whether it is right to prosecute the reckless transmission of HIV remains a controversial, pressing question. This brief article aims to dissect and question the relevant issues and help inform this debate.

  17. Sensory processing issues in young children presenting to an outpatient feeding clinic: A retrospective chart review

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Ann M.; Bruce, Amanda S.; Khasawneh, Rima; Schulz, Trina; Fox, Catherine; Dunn, Winifred

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To describe the relationship between sensory issues and medical complexity in a series of patients presenting to an outpatient multidisciplinary feeding team for evaluation, by a standardized measure of sensory processing abilities. Methods A retrospective chart review of all patients seen from 2004–2009 on two key variables; medical diagnostic category and Short Sensory Profile (SSP) score. Results On the SSP, 67.6% of children scored in the clinical (“Definite difference”) range. The most common diagnostic categories were Developmental (n=23), Gastrointestinal (n=16) and Neurological (n=13). Behavioral and Cardiorespiratory medical diagnostic categories were significantly related to SSP total score and SSP definite difference score. Conclusions Children who present for feeding evaluation do indeed tend to have clinically elevated scores regarding sensory processing, and these elevated scores are significantly related to certain medical diagnostic categories. Future research is needed to determine why these significant relationships exist as well as their implications for treatment of feeding related issues. PMID:22986370

  18. Issues concerning possible cobalt-chromium carcinogenicity: a literature review and discussion.

    PubMed

    Berkenstock, O L

    1992-03-01

    Recently, questions have been raised concerning the stability and biocompatibility of metallic orthopaedic implants. Concerns have been expressed regarding cobalt-based alloys and the possibility of a future realization of a gross carcinogenic reaction from chrome-cobalt alloy implants. In this report, selected issues are reviewed and categorized for independent analysis to stimulate more comprehensive future research and theory formulation. Issues examined include those relating to metallic corrosion and potential local and systemic carcinogenic effects. The ionic valences of constituent materials, the electrochemical properties of the implant, and the proposed pathophysiological pathway of ions reportedly released from implants are traced. Tables listing 20 cases of primary neoplasia associated with total joint arthroplasty and seven cases reported in a 1975 study are discussed, compared, and contrasted. Finally, a selected bibliography is provided as a foundation for future study and research. In the author's opinion, the 50-year clinical experience and history of the use of cobalt-chromium as an implant material in orthopaedics, dentistry, and plastic surgery more than adequately establish its safety and effectiveness.

  19. +Ophitoxaemia and myocardial infarction--the issues during primary angioplasty: a review.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Prabha Nini; Thomas, Jinesh; Francis, Preetham Kumar; Shylaja, Sajith Vamadevan

    2014-10-23

    'The Big four' are the most poisonous snakes in India, and especially in Kerala. These include the cobra, the viper, the krait and the sea snake. Most of the poisonous snakebites in India occur in Kerala. We believe there are only a few reports of myocardial infarction after snakebites and most of these are viper bites. We believe this is the second case of primary angioplasty for a snakebite. There are at least a few potential issues in performing a primary angioplasty in a snakebite case, namely (1) Is it a thrombus or a spasm? (2) Are the bleeding parameters deranged? Will the patient tolerate tirofiban and other glycoprotein (GB) 2b3a inhibitors? Will he develop dangerous bleeding due to the high dose of heparin needed? Further, would we save the patient from myocardial infarction only to lose him to renal failure, both due to the nephrotoxicity of the venom, the kidney being further damaged by the contrast media used for the angioplasty? We discuss all these issues as they crossed our mind, and hope it will help further treatment in others. We would like to review the available literature on these points and describe a recent case of ours. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  20. +Ophitoxaemia and myocardial infarction—the issues during primary angioplasty: a review

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Prabha Nini; Thomas, Jinesh; Francis, Preetham Kumar; Shylaja, Sajith Vamadevan

    2014-01-01

    ‘The Big four’ are the most poisonous snakes in India, and especially in Kerala. These include the cobra, the viper, the krait and the sea snake. Most of the poisonous snakebites in India occur in Kerala. We believe there are only a few reports of myocardial infarction after snakebites and most of these are viper bites. We believe this is the second case of primary angioplasty for a snakebite. There are at least a few potential issues in performing a primary angioplasty in a snakebite case, namely (1) Is it a thrombus or a spasm? (2) Are the bleeding parameters deranged? Will the patient tolerate tirofiban and other glycoprotein (GB) 2b3a inhibitors? Will he develop dangerous bleeding due to the high dose of heparin needed? Further, would we save the patient from myocardial infarction only to lose him to renal failure, both due to the nephrotoxicity of the venom, the kidney being further damaged by the contrast media used for the angioplasty? We discuss all these issues as they crossed our mind, and hope it will help further treatment in others. We would like to review the available literature on these points and describe a recent case of ours. PMID:25342187

  1. Review of cross-cultural issues related to quality of life after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Tate, Denise; Forchheimer, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Quality of life (QOL) is a dynamic concept that means different things to different people, both in the general public and within the research community. Because of this, a common definition of QOL has been hard to achieve. This article reviews cross-cultural issues related to QOL research in spinal cord injury (SCI). Many factors influence QOL for persons with SCI, including observable and objective indicators and subjective self-report ones. The World Health Organization's International Classification of Function, Disability and Health is used in this article as a framework to better understand how these factors may influence QOL. A number of important steps are summarized with respect to measurement issues in QOL. A comparison between data from 2 countries (United States and Brazil) using the International SCI QOL Basic Data Set shows similarities in scores and good reliability in the Brazilian sample. Substantial, significant correlations were observed among the SCI QOL Basic Data Set items and the WHOQOL-BREF within the US sample. The article ends with a set of recommendations for the development of cross-cultural measures of QOL for use in the SCI population.

  2. Corrosion issues in joining lightweight materials: A review of the latest achievements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montemor, M. F.

    2016-02-01

    Multimaterials assemblies and, in particular, assemblies made of lightweight components are of utmost relevance in many technical applications. These assemblies include multimetal, metal-polymer, metal-adhesive, and metal-composites combinations, among others. Presently, the transportation sector is looking for lighter materials that allow for reducing fuel consumption and the environmental footprint. Aluminum and magnesium alloys, as well as composites and polymers, are considered strategic for such purposes, and their joining in metal-metal or hybrid assemblies has been explored to develop lightweight components. These multimaterial assemblies are often exposed to aggressive environments in which moisture and aggressive species are present. Under these conditions corrosion phenomena are a major source of material failures. Depending on the nature of the metals and nonmetals and of the joining process, the mechanism and extent of corrosion can vary significantly. Thus, it is essential to understand the impact of corrosion in joined materials and to know which counter-measures can be adopted to mitigate corrosion events in the system of concern. This chapter aims at reviewing the latest results of studies focused in corrosion issues in the joining of lightweight materials. It describes the most common corrosion phenomena observed in joined materials, and it emphasizes corrosion issues in assemblies that combine different metals and that combine metals with nonmetals. Moreover, it overviews the state-of-the-art in corrosion protection strategies that can be applied and, finally, it overlooks the future trends.

  3. Review of Cross-Cultural Issues Related to Quality of Life After Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tate, Denise

    2014-01-01

    Quality of life (QOL) is a dynamic concept that means different things to different people, both in the general public and within the research community. Because of this, a common definition of QOL has been hard to achieve. This article reviews cross-cultural issues related to QOL research in spinal cord injury (SCI). Many factors influence QOL for persons with SCI, including observable and objective indicators and subjective self-report ones. The World Health Organization’s International Classification of Function, Disability and Health is used in this article as a framework to better understand how these factors may influence QOL. A number of important steps are summarized with respect to measurement issues in QOL. A comparison between data from 2 countries (United States and Brazil) using the International SCI QOL Basic Data Set shows similarities in scores and good reliability in the Brazilian sample. Substantial, significant correlations were observed among the SCI QOL Basic Data Set items and the WHOQOL-BREF within the US sample. The article ends with a set of recommendations for the development of cross-cultural measures of QOL for use in the SCI population. PMID:25484564

  4. Identifying and Solving Lead Issues from Water Systems with Materials/Device Replacement in Schools and other Buildings - slides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identifying and assessing lead contamination and exposure potential in single-family residences is difficult enough, but doing the same kind of assessment and remediation in buildings, schools, and day care centers is even more challenging. It is of particular importance because ...

  5. Identifying and Solving Lead Issues from Water Systems with Materials/Device Replacement in Schools and other Buildings

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identifying and assessing lead contamination and exposure potential in single-family residences is difficult enough, but doing the same kind of assessment and remediation in buildings, schools, and day care centers is even more challenging. It is of particular importance because ...

  6. Professional Development in International Schools; Issues of Inclusion Identified by a Group of International School Teaching Assistants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarry, Estelle; Cox, Anna

    2014-01-01

    With the growth in numbers of teaching assistants (TAs) in the UK, it has been identified through research carried out on behalf of the Council of British International Schools (COBIS) research that TAs in British international schools have specific and unmet training needs. Following the development of a course for TAs in international contexts,…

  7. Identifying and Solving Lead Issues from Water Systems with Materials/Device Replacement in Schools and other Buildings

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identifying and assessing lead contamination and exposure potential in single-family residences is difficult enough, but doing the same kind of assessment and remediation in buildings, schools, and day care centers is even more challenging. It is of particular importance because ...

  8. Identifying and Solving Lead Issues from Water Systems with Materials/Device Replacement in Schools and other Buildings - slides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identifying and assessing lead contamination and exposure potential in single-family residences is difficult enough, but doing the same kind of assessment and remediation in buildings, schools, and day care centers is even more challenging. It is of particular importance because ...

  9. Professional Development in International Schools; Issues of Inclusion Identified by a Group of International School Teaching Assistants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarry, Estelle; Cox, Anna

    2014-01-01

    With the growth in numbers of teaching assistants (TAs) in the UK, it has been identified through research carried out on behalf of the Council of British International Schools (COBIS) research that TAs in British international schools have specific and unmet training needs. Following the development of a course for TAs in international contexts,…

  10. Human–environment interactions in urban green spaces — A systematic review of contemporary issues and prospects for future research

    SciTech Connect

    Kabisch, Nadja; Qureshi, Salman; Haase, Dagmar

    2015-01-15

    Scientific papers on landscape planning underline the importance of maintaining and developing green spaces because of their multiple environmental and social benefits for city residents. However, a general understanding of contemporary human–environment interaction issues in urban green space is still incomplete and lacks orientation for urban planners. This review examines 219 publications to (1) provide an overview of the current state of research on the relationship between humans and urban green space, (2) group the different research approaches by identifying the main research areas, methods, and target groups, and (3) highlight important future prospects in urban green space research. - Highlights: • Reviewed literature on urban green pins down a dearth of comparative studies. • Case studies in Africa and Russia are marginalized – the Europe and US dominate. • Questionnaires are used as major tool followed by GIS and quantitative approaches. • Developing countries should contribute in building an urban green space agenda. • Interdisciplinary, adaptable and pluralistic approaches can satiate a knowledge gap.

  11. Ethical Issues Raised by Private Practice Physiotherapy Are More Diverse than First Meets the Eye: Recommendations from a Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Drolet, Marie-Josée; Williams-Jones, Bryn

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: Physiotherapy in private practice differs from physiotherapy practised in a public setting in several ways, the most evident of which is the for-profit nature of private physiotherapy clinics; these differences can generate distinct and challenging ethical issues. The objectives of this article are to identify ethical issues encountered by physiotherapists in private practice settings and to identify potential solutions and recommendations to address these issues. Method: After a literature search of eight databases, 39 studies addressing ethical issues in a private practice context were analyzed. Results: A total of 25 ethical issues emerging from the included studies were classified into three main categories: (1) business and economic issues (e.g., conflicts of interests, inequity in a managed care context, lack of time affecting quality of care); (2) professional issues (e.g., professional autonomy, clinical judgment, treatment effectiveness, professional conduct); and (3) patients' rights and welfare issues (e.g., confidentiality, power asymmetries, paternalism vs. patient autonomy, informed consent). Recommendations as to how physiotherapists could better manage these issues were then identified and categorized. Conclusions: The physiotherapy community should reflect on the challenges raised by private practice so that professionals can be supported—through education, research, and good governance—in providing the best possible care for their patients. PMID:25931663

  12. Ethical issues raised by private practice physiotherapy are more diverse than first meets the eye: recommendations from a literature review.

    PubMed

    Hudon, Anne; Drolet, Marie-Josée; Williams-Jones, Bryn

    2015-01-01

    Physiotherapy in private practice differs from physiotherapy practised in a public setting in several ways, the most evident of which is the for-profit nature of private physiotherapy clinics; these differences can generate distinct and challenging ethical issues. The objectives of this article are to identify ethical issues encountered by physiotherapists in private practice settings and to identify potential solutions and recommendations to address these issues. After a literature search of eight databases, 39 studies addressing ethical issues in a private practice context were analyzed. A total of 25 ethical issues emerging from the included studies were classified into three main categories: (1) business and economic issues (e.g., conflicts of interests, inequity in a managed care context, lack of time affecting quality of care); (2) professional issues (e.g., professional autonomy, clinical judgment, treatment effectiveness, professional conduct); and (3) patients' rights and welfare issues (e.g., confidentiality, power asymmetries, paternalism vs. patient autonomy, informed consent). Recommendations as to how physiotherapists could better manage these issues were then identified and categorized. The physiotherapy community should reflect on the challenges raised by private practice so that professionals can be supported-through education, research, and good governance-in providing the best possible care for their patients.

  13. Systematic review and meta-analyses of risk factors for childhood overweight identifiable during infancy

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Stephen Franklin; Redsell, Sarah A; Swift, Judy A; Yang, Min; Glazebrook, Cristine P

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine risk factors for childhood overweight that can be identified during the first year of life to facilitate early identification and targeted intervention. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Search strategy Electronic database search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed and CAB Abstracts. Eligibility criteria Prospective observational studies following up children from birth for at least 2 years. Results Thirty prospective studies were identified. Significant and strong independent associations with childhood overweight were identified for maternal pre-pregnancy overweight, high infant birth weight and rapid weight gain during the first year of life. Meta-analysis comparing breastfed with non-breastfed infants found a 15% decrease (95% CI 0.74 to 0.99; I2=73.3%; n=10) in the odds of childhood overweight. For children of mothers smoking during pregnancy there was a 47% increase (95% CI 1.26 to 1.73; I2=47.5%; n=7) in the odds of childhood overweight. There was some evidence associating early introduction of solid foods and childhood overweight. There was conflicting evidence for duration of breastfeeding, socioeconomic status at birth, parity and maternal marital status at birth. No association with childhood overweight was found for maternal age or education at birth, maternal depression or infant ethnicity. There was inconclusive evidence for delivery type, gestational weight gain, maternal postpartum weight loss and ‘fussy’ infant temperament due to the limited number of studies. Conclusions Several risk factors for both overweight and obesity in childhood are identifiable during infancy. Future research needs to focus on whether it is clinically feasible for healthcare professionals to identify infants at greatest risk. PMID:23109090

  14. Water resources and environmental input-output analysis and its key study issues: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YANG, Z.; Xu, X.

    2013-12-01

    Used to study the material and energy flow in socioeconomic system, Input-Output Analysis(IOA) had been an effective analysis tool since its appearance. The research fields of Input-Output Analysis were increasingly expanded and studied in depth with the development of fundamental theory. In this paper, starting with introduction of theory development, the water resources input-output analysis and environmental input-output analysis had been specifically reviewed, and two key study issues mentioned as well. Input-Occupancy-Output Analysis and Grey Input-Output Analysis whose proposal and development were introduced firstly could be regard as the effective complements of traditional IOA theory. Because of the hypotheses of homogeneity, stability and proportionality, Input-Occupancy-Output Analysis and Grey Input-Output Analysis always had been restricted in practical application inevitably. In the applied study aspect, with investigation of abundant literatures, research of water resources input-output analysis and environmental input-output analysis had been comprehensively reviewed and analyzed. The regional water resources flow between different economic sectors had been systematically analyzed and stated, and several types of environmental input-output analysis models combined with other effective analysis tools concluded. In two perspectives in terms of external and inland aspect, the development of water resources and environmental input-output analysis model had been explained, and several typical study cases in recent years listed respectively. By the aid of sufficient literature analysis, the internal development tendency and study hotspot had also been summarized. In recent years, Chinese literatures reporting water resources consumption analysis and virtue water study had occupied a large share. Water resources consumption analysis had always been the emphasis of inland water resources IOA. Virtue water study had been considered as the new hotspot of

  15. Appropriateness of using a symbol to identify dementia and/or delirium: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hines, Sonia; Abbey, Jenny; Wilson, Jacinda; Sacre, Sandy

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer's Australia contracted the Dementia Collaborative Research Centre - Consumers, Carers and Social Research to conduct a systematic review to explore the appropriateness of a symbol for dementia.The concept of a symbol for people with dementia was an outcome of the Alzheimer's Australia National Consumer Summit on Dementia held in Canberra in October 2005. People living with dementia and their carers identified that a national symbol would be helpful in order to encourage appropriate treatment of people with dementia.Funding was provided as part of the Australian Government's Dementia Initiative to Alzheimer's Australia to work in collaboration with the Queensland University of Technology and Catholic Health Australia to explore, through research, the viability and potential impact of such a symbol in a range of care settings. The main objective of this systematic review was to evaluate any published and unpublished evidence regarding the appropriateness of developing a symbol for dementia and/or delirium, which could be used in a variety of settings to indicate that a person has dementia and/or delirium. A literature search was performed using the following databases: Ageline, APAIS Health, CINAHL, Dissertations and Theses Abstracts, Embase, MEDLINE, PsycEXTRAS, PsycINFO, PsycArticles, Current Contents, LegalTrac, Health and Society, Sociological Abstracts, Family and Society, CINCH, and Hein Online databases. The reference lists of articles retrieved were hand searched, as well as a range of literature from health, legal, ethical and emergency services. Grey literature was searched for using a number of Internet sites, and personal email communication with authors of relevant studies and known researchers in the field was initiated. Papers were retrieved if they provided information about attitudes or perceptions towards the appropriateness of symbols, identifiers or alerts used to inform others that someone has dementia, delirium and/or another medical

  16. Use of technology assessment databases to identify the issues associated with adoption of structural health monitoring practices.

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, Dennis Patrick; Smith, Bryce; Neidigk, Stephen

    2010-09-01

    The goal is to create a systematic method and structure to compile, organize, and summarize SHM related data to identify the level of maturity and rate of evolution and have a quick and ongoing evaluation of the current state of SHM among research institutions and industry. Hundreds of technical publication and conference proceedings were read and analyzed to compile the database. Microsoft Excel was used to create a useable interface that could be filtered to compare any of the entered data fields.

  17. Prevalence of physical health issues of youth with school identified disabilities in residential settings: a brief report.

    PubMed

    Trout, Alexandra L; Lambert, Matthew C; Nelson, Timothy D; Epstein, Michael H; Thompson, Ronald W

    2015-01-01

    Each year a number of youth with a school identified disability are placed in residential care. It has been well documented that these youth enter with elevated rates of behavioral, emotional, educational, mental health, and familial challenges. However, the physical and medical condition of these youth remains unstudied. The purpose of the present study was to determine the prevalence of health and medical problems among a group of youth with school identified disabilities at entrance to a residential care center. Archival medical, demographic, and disability status data were obtained for 346 youth served in a large residential care center in the Midwest. Chi-square and correlation tests, and relative risk ratio estimates, were used to evaluate the relationship between medical condition and hypothesized correlates. Findings revealed that over one-third of the sample had at least one medical condition, with asthma being the most prevalent (15.6%). Rates of medical condition differed by disability type and prevalence of asthma differed by race/ethnicity. Youth with a school identified disability in care demonstrate health care needs that need to be addressed while in care and following community reintegration. Intervention programs and targeted curriculum are needed to teach youth how to manage their health specific needs and how to independently navigate the health care system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical coding of prospectively identified paediatric adverse drug reactions--a retrospective review of patient records.

    PubMed

    Bellis, Jennifer R; Kirkham, Jamie J; Nunn, Anthony J; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2014-12-17

    National Health Service (NHS) hospitals in the UK use a system of coding for patient episodes. The coding system used is the International Classification of Disease (ICD-10). There are ICD-10 codes which may be associated with adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and there is a possibility of using these codes for ADR surveillance. This study aimed to determine whether ADRs prospectively identified in children admitted to a paediatric hospital were coded appropriately using ICD-10. The electronic admission abstract for each patient with at least one ADR was reviewed. A record was made of whether the ADR(s) had been coded using ICD-10. Of 241 ADRs, 76 (31.5%) were coded using at least one ICD-10 ADR code. Of the oncology ADRs, 70/115 (61%) were coded using an ICD-10 ADR code compared with 6/126 (4.8%) non-oncology ADRs (difference in proportions 56%, 95% CI 46.2% to 65.8%; p < 0.001). The majority of ADRs detected in a prospective study at a paediatric centre would not have been identified if the study had relied on ICD-10 codes as a single means of detection. Data derived from administrative healthcare databases are not reliable for identifying ADRs by themselves, but may complement other methods of detection.

  19. Microalgae biofuels: A critical review of issues, problems and the way forward.

    PubMed

    Lam, Man Kee; Lee, Keat Teong

    2012-01-01

    Culturing of microalgae as an alternative feedstock for biofuel production has received a lot of attention in recent years due to their fast growth rate and ability to accumulate high quantity of lipid and carbohydrate inside their cells for biodiesel and bioethanol production, respectively. In addition, this superior feedstock offers several environmental benefits, such as effective land utilization, CO(2) sequestration, self-purification if coupled with wastewater treatment and does not trigger food versus fuel feud. Despite having all these 'theoretical' advantages, review on problems and issues related to energy balance in microalgae biofuel are not clearly addressed until now. Base on the maturity of current technology, the true potential of microalgae biofuel towards energy security and its feasibility for commercialization are still questionable. Thus, this review is aimed to depict the practical problems that are facing the microalgae biofuel industry, covering upstream to downstream activities by accessing the latest research reports and critical data analysis. Apart from that, several interlink solutions to the problems will be suggested with the purpose to bring current microalgae biofuel research into a new dimension and consequently, to revolutionize the entire microalgae biofuel industry towards long-term sustainability.

  20. Mental health issues among pregnant women in correctional facilities: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Soumyadeep; Pierre-Victor, Dudith; Bahelah, Raed; Madhivanan, Purnima

    2014-01-01

    Incarceration-induced stress makes pregnant women in correctional facilities a high-risk group for mental health problems, resulting in adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. A systematic review was conducted to examine the prevalence and correlates of mental health issues among pregnant inmates. Databases searched included PubMed, Medline, CINAHL Plus, PsycINFO, National Criminal Justice Reference System, Social Work Abstracts, Cochrane and Campbell libraries, which were searched for studies published in English from 1950 till July 2013. Eleven studies were included of pregnant women in correctional facilities and addressed at least one mental illness. Quality score was assigned to these eligible articles. Due to heterogeneity, a narrative review was performed. All of the studies were conducted in the United States, with quality scores ranging from 7 to 10 out of 10. Only one of these studies used mixed methods, the rest were quantitative. Tobacco use among pregnant inmates exceeded 50%, with some studies reporting as high as 84%. Alcohol use was common; 36% of the inmates used illicit drugs in one study. Depression and anxiety levels were high-some studies reported depression among 80% of inmates. Findings suggest that mental health among pregnant prisoners is a huge concern that has not been adequately addressed.