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Sample records for revised universal soil

  1. Universal soil loss equation and revised universal soil loss equation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil erosion has long been recognized as a serious problem. Considerable efforts have been expended to address this problem. Thousands of plot years of data were summarized by ARS researchers in producing the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE). This technology has been used for conservation planni...

  2. Soil erosion risk in Korean watersheds, assessed using the revised universal soil loss equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Soyoung; Oh, Cheyoung; Jeon, Seongwoo; Jung, Huicheul; Choi, Chuluong

    2011-03-01

    SummarySoil erosion reduces crop productivity and water storage capacity, and, both directly and indirectly, causes water pollution. Loss of soil has become a problem worldwide, and as concerns about the environment grow, active research has begun regarding soil erosion and soil-preservation policies. This study analyzed the amount of soil loss in South Korea over a recent 20-year period and estimated future soil loss in 2020 using the revised universal soil loss equation (RUSLE). Digital elevation (DEM) data, detailed soil maps, and land cover maps were used as primary data, and geographic information system (GIS) and remote sensing (RS) techniques were applied to produce thematic maps, based on RUSLE factors. Using the frequency ratio (FR), analytic hierarchy process (AHP), and logistic regression (LR) approaches, land suitability index (LSI) maps were developed for 2020, considering the already established Environmental Conservation Value Assessment Map (ECVAM) for Korea. Assuming a similar urban growth trend and 10-, 50-, and 100-year rainfall frequencies, soil loss in 2020 was predicted by analyzing changes in the cover-management factor and rainfall-runoff erosivity factor. In the period 1985-2005, soil loss showed an increasing trend, from 17.1 Mg/ha in 1985 to 17.4 Mg/ha in 1995, and to 20.0 Mg/ha in 2005; the 2005 value represents a 2.8 Mg/ha (16.6%) increase, compared with 1985 and is attributable to the increased area of grassland and bare land. In 2020, the estimated soil loss, considering the ECVAM, was 19.2-19.3 Mg/ha for the 10-year rainfall frequency, 36.4-36.6 Mg/ha for the 50-year rainfall frequency, and 45.7-46.0 Mg/ha for the 100-year rainfall frequency. Without considering the ECVAM, the amount of soil loss was about 0.4-1.6 Mg/ha larger than estimates that did consider the ECVAM; specifically, the values were 19.6-19.9 Mg/ha for the 10-year rainfall frequency, 37.1-37.8 Mg/ha for the 50-year frequency, and 46.7-47.5 Mg/ha for the 100-year

  3. Predicting soil erosion under land-cover area and climate changes using the revised universal soil loss equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Soyoung; Jin, Cheunggil; Choi, Chuluong

    2011-11-01

    Loss of soil has become a problem worldwide, and as concerns about the environment grow, active research has begun regarding soil erosion and soil-preservation polices. This study analyzed the trend of soil loss in South Korea over the past 30-year and predicted future soil loss in 2020 using the revised universal soil loss equation. In the period 1975-2005, soil loss showed an increasing trend, the 2005 value represents a 0.59 Mg/ha (2.58%) increase. Scenario 1 assumes that urban areas have a similar trend to that between 1975 and 2005 and that precipitation amount follows scenario A1B of the IPCC. The soil loss amount for 2020 land-cover map that account for the ECVAM should increase by 25.0~26.3% compared to 1975. In the case where the ECVAM is not considered, soil loss should increase by 27.7~31.8%. In Scenario 2, in which the urban area and precipitation follow the same trend as between 1975 and 2005, soil loss for 2020 land-cover map that consider the ECVAM will increase by 6.8%~7.9% compared to 1975. When the ECVAM is not considered, soil loss will increase by 9.1~12.6%. The environmental and legislative value of preservation should be considered to minimize erosion and allow for more sustainable development.

  4. Assessing the applicability of the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) to Irish Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rymszewicz, A.; Mockler, E.; O'Sullivan, J.; Bruen, M.; Turner, J.; Conroy, E.; Kelly-Quinn, M.; Harrington, J.; Lawler, D.

    2015-03-01

    Elevated suspended sediment concentrations in fluvial environments have important implications for system ecology and even small concentrations may have serious consequences for sensitive ecosystems or organisms, such as freshwater pearl mussels (Margaritifera margaritifera). Informed decision making is therefore required for land managers to understand and control soil erosion and sediment delivery to the river network. However, given that monitoring of sediment fluxes requires financial and human resources which are often limited at a national scale, sediment mobilisation and delivery models are commonly used for sediment yield estimation and management. The Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) is the most widely used model for overland flow erosion and can, when combined with a sediment delivery ratio (SDR), provide reasonable sediment load estimations for a catchment. This paper presents RUSLE factors established from extant GIS and rainfall datasets that are incorporated into a flexible catchment modelling approach. We believe that this is the first time that results from a RUSLE application at a national scale are tested against measured sediment yield values available from Ireland. An initial assessment of RUSLE applied to Irish conditions indicates an overestimation of modelled sediment yield values for most of the selected catchments. Improved methods for model and SDR factors estimation are needed to account for Irish conditions and catchment characteristics. Nonetheless, validation and testing of the model in this study using observed values is an important step towards more effective sediment yield modelling tools for nationwide applications.

  5. The application of the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation, Version 2, to evaluate the impacts of alternative climate change scenarios on runoff and sediment yield

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation, Version 2 (RUSLE2) provides robust estimates of average annual sheet and rill erosion for one-dimensional hillslope representations. Extensive databases describing climate, soils, and management options have been developed and are widely used in the USA for...

  6. [Estimation of topographical factors in revised universal soil loss model based on maximum up-stream flow path].

    PubMed

    Luo, Hong; Ma, You-xin; Liu, Wen-jun; Li, Hong-mei

    2010-05-01

    By using maximum upstream flow path, a self-developed new method for calculating slope length value based on Arc Macro Language (AML), five groups of DEM data for different regions in Bijie Prefecture of Guizhou Province were extracted to compute the slope length and topographical factors in the Prefecture. The time cost for calculating the slope length and the values of the topographical factors were analyzed, and compared with those by iterative slope length method based on AML (ISLA) and on C++ (ISLC). The results showed that the new method was feasible to calculate the slope length and topographical factors in revised universal soil loss model, and had the same effect as iterative slope length method. Comparing with ISLA, the new method had a high computing efficiency and greatly decreased the time consumption, and could be applied to a large area to estimate the slope length and topographical factors based on AML. Comparing with ISLC, the new method had the similar computing efficiency, but its coding was easily to be written, modified, and debugged by using AML. Therefore, the new method could be more broadly used by GIS users. PMID:20707099

  7. Determination of soil erosion risk in the Mustafakemalpasa River Basin, Turkey, using the revised universal soil loss equation, geographic information system, and remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Ozsoy, Gokhan; Aksoy, Ertugrul; Dirim, M Sabri; Tumsavas, Zeynal

    2012-10-01

    Sediment transport from steep slopes and agricultural lands into the Uluabat Lake (a RAMSAR site) by the Mustafakemalpasa (MKP) River is a serious problem within the river basin. Predictive erosion models are useful tools for evaluating soil erosion and establishing soil erosion management plans. The Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) function is a commonly used erosion model for this purpose in Turkey and the rest of the world. This research integrates the RUSLE within a geographic information system environment to investigate the spatial distribution of annual soil loss potential in the MKP River Basin. The rainfall erosivity factor was developed from local annual precipitation data using a modified Fournier index: The topographic factor was developed from a digital elevation model; the K factor was determined from a combination of the soil map and the geological map; and the land cover factor was generated from Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM) images. According to the model, the total soil loss potential of the MKP River Basin from erosion by water was 11,296,063 Mg year(-1) with an average soil loss of 11.2 Mg year(-1). The RUSLE produces only local erosion values and cannot be used to estimate the sediment yield for a watershed. To estimate the sediment yield, sediment-delivery ratio equations were used and compared with the sediment-monitoring reports of the Dolluk stream gauging station on the MKP River, which collected data for >41 years (1964-2005). This station observes the overall efficiency of the sediment yield coming from the Orhaneli and Emet Rivers. The measured sediment in the Emet and Orhaneli sub-basins is 1,082,010 Mg year(-1) and was estimated to be 1,640,947 Mg year(-1) for the same two sub-basins. The measured sediment yield of the gauge station is 127.6 Mg km(-2) year(-1) but was estimated to be 170.2 Mg km(-2) year(-1). The close match between the sediment amounts estimated using the RUSLE

  8. Determination of soil erosion risk in the Mustafakemalpasa River Basin, Turkey, using the revised universal soil loss equation, geographic information system, and remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Ozsoy, Gokhan; Aksoy, Ertugrul; Dirim, M Sabri; Tumsavas, Zeynal

    2012-10-01

    Sediment transport from steep slopes and agricultural lands into the Uluabat Lake (a RAMSAR site) by the Mustafakemalpasa (MKP) River is a serious problem within the river basin. Predictive erosion models are useful tools for evaluating soil erosion and establishing soil erosion management plans. The Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) function is a commonly used erosion model for this purpose in Turkey and the rest of the world. This research integrates the RUSLE within a geographic information system environment to investigate the spatial distribution of annual soil loss potential in the MKP River Basin. The rainfall erosivity factor was developed from local annual precipitation data using a modified Fournier index: The topographic factor was developed from a digital elevation model; the K factor was determined from a combination of the soil map and the geological map; and the land cover factor was generated from Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM) images. According to the model, the total soil loss potential of the MKP River Basin from erosion by water was 11,296,063 Mg year(-1) with an average soil loss of 11.2 Mg year(-1). The RUSLE produces only local erosion values and cannot be used to estimate the sediment yield for a watershed. To estimate the sediment yield, sediment-delivery ratio equations were used and compared with the sediment-monitoring reports of the Dolluk stream gauging station on the MKP River, which collected data for >41 years (1964-2005). This station observes the overall efficiency of the sediment yield coming from the Orhaneli and Emet Rivers. The measured sediment in the Emet and Orhaneli sub-basins is 1,082,010 Mg year(-1) and was estimated to be 1,640,947 Mg year(-1) for the same two sub-basins. The measured sediment yield of the gauge station is 127.6 Mg km(-2) year(-1) but was estimated to be 170.2 Mg km(-2) year(-1). The close match between the sediment amounts estimated using the RUSLE

  9. Basic Soils. Revision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana State Univ., Bozeman. Dept. of Agricultural and Industrial Education.

    This curriculum guide is designed for use in teaching a course in basic soils that is intended for college freshmen. Addressed in the individual lessons of the unit are the following topics: the way in which soil is formed, the physical properties of soil, the chemical properties of soil, the biotic properties of soil, plant-soil-water…

  10. Conserving Soil. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soil Conservation Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    This book of enrichment materials is an interdisciplinary study of soil designed for students in grades 6-9. The materials are presented in three units. Unit 1 contains eight activities in which students investigate soil science and study the social impact of soil by examining the history of land use by local Native Americans. Unit 2 contains 10…

  11. Matrices to Revise Crop, Soil, and Environmental Sciences Undergraduate Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savin, Mary C.; Longer, David; Miller, David M.

    2005-01-01

    Undergraduate curricula for natural resource and agronomic programs have been introduced and revised during the past several decades with a desire to stay current with emerging issues and technologies relevant to constituents. For the past decade, the Department of Crop, Soil, and Environmental Sciences (CSES) faculty at the University of Arkansas…

  12. Copyright Revision and the University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boucher, Pierre-Yves

    Proposed revisions of Canada's copyright law are criticized for their failure to address some basic issues of creator's rights, and the academic community's legal responsibility in the infringement of copyrights is discussed. It is argued that the writers of the proposed changes have treated copyrights as property rights without due consideration…

  13. Using global sensitivity analysis to understand higher order interactions in complex models: an application of GSA on the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) to quantify model sensitivity and implications for ecosystem services management in Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fremier, A. K.; Estrada Carmona, N.; Harper, E.; DeClerck, F.

    2011-12-01

    Appropriate application of complex models to estimate system behavior requires understanding the influence of model structure and parameter estimates on model output. To date, most researchers perform local sensitivity analyses, rather than global, because of computational time and quantity of data produced. Local sensitivity analyses are limited in quantifying the higher order interactions among parameters, which could lead to incomplete analysis of model behavior. To address this concern, we performed a GSA on a commonly applied equation for soil loss - the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation. USLE is an empirical model built on plot-scale data from the USA and the Revised version (RUSLE) includes improved equations for wider conditions, with 25 parameters grouped into six factors to estimate long-term plot and watershed scale soil loss. Despite RUSLE's widespread application, a complete sensitivity analysis has yet to be performed. In this research, we applied a GSA to plot and watershed scale data from the US and Costa Rica to parameterize the RUSLE in an effort to understand the relative importance of model factors and parameters across wide environmental space. We analyzed the GSA results using Random Forest, a statistical approach to evaluate parameter importance accounting for the higher order interactions, and used Classification and Regression Trees to show the dominant trends in complex interactions. In all GSA calculations the management of cover crops (C factor) ranks the highest among factors (compared to rain-runoff erosivity, topography, support practices, and soil erodibility). This is counter to previous sensitivity analyses where the topographic factor was determined to be the most important. The GSA finding is consistent across multiple model runs, including data from the US, Costa Rica, and a synthetic dataset of the widest theoretical space. The three most important parameters were: Mass density of live and dead roots found in the upper inch

  14. Advancing Towards a Universal Soil Classification System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Phillip R.; Hempel, Jon; Micheli, Erika; McBratney, Alex

    2014-05-01

    Within the variability of soils across the globe, there are common soil attributes that pedologists have used to group soil within taxonomic classifications. Classification systems are necessary for the communication of information about soils. There are many national classification systems used within designated countries and two classification systems used globally, the US Soil Taxonomy and the World Reference Base. There is a great need for soil scientists to develop one common language or taxonomic system to communicate information within soil science as well as to other scientists in other disciplines. The International Union of Soil Sciences Working Group for Universal Soil Classification was officially established by an IUSS Council decision in August of 2010 at the World Congress of Soil Science in Brisbane, Australia. The charge for the Working Group includes development of common standards for methods and terminology in soil observations and investigations and the development of a universal soil classification system. The Universal Soil Classification Working Group was established and the initial meeting was held at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana USA. The Working Group has evaluated the current national systems and the two international systems to identify gaps in knowledge. Currently, it was determined that gaps in knowledge exists in cold soil, hydromorphic, salt affected, anthropengic, and tropical soil groups. Additionally, several members of the Working Group have utilized taxonomic distance calculations from large databases to determine the clusters of similar taxonomic groupings utilizing the classification. Additionally, the databases are being used to make allocations into logical groups to recognize "Great Soil Groups". The great soil groups will be equivalent to great groups level from Soil Taxonomy along with similar levels in the World Reference Base, Australian Soil Classification and other defined soil classification systems

  15. Utilizing Strategic Assessment to Support FYC Curricular Revision at Murray State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Paul; Myers, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    The first-year composition requirement at Murray State University was revised in 2008 from a 6-credit-hour, two-semester sequence to a 4-credit-hour, one-semester course. The revision overtly emphasizes critical reading, writing, and inquiry, while addressing the realities of the institution's resources for teaching first-year composition. This…

  16. Ratify, Reject or Revise: Balanced Scorecard and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sayed, Naqi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the use of the Balanced Scorecard (BSC) in universities. Initially directed toward profit-oriented businesses, the BSC has since been adopted by many non-profit organisations with seemingly diverse objectives. A number of primarily publicly-funded universities and institutions, which are part of…

  17. The University and the Urban Challenge. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cisneros, Henry G.

    Because of their concern for security, sense of responsibility as publicly supported institutions, and programs for service-learning, many universities are closely linked to their urban communities and have much to offer these centers. American colleges and universities possess a wealth of intellectual and economic resources that they can bring to…

  18. The State University System 2025 System Strategic Plan. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Board of Governors, State University System of Florida, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The State University System 2025 Strategic Plan strengthens the Board of Governors' commitment to achieving excellence in the tripartite mission of its state universities--teaching, research, and public service--for the benefit of Florida's citizens, their communities, and the state economy. The Strategic Plan is a living document that helps align…

  19. Concurrent Validity of the Universal Nonverbal Intelligence Test and the Leiter International Performance Scale-Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooper, V. Scott; Bell, Sherry Mee

    2006-01-01

    One hundred elementary- and middle-school students were administered the Universal Nonverbal Intelligence Test (UNIT; B.A. Bracken & R.S. McCallum, 1998) and the Leiter International Performance Scale-Revised (Leiter-R; G.H. Roid & L.J. Miller, 1997). Correlations between UNIT and Leiter-R scores were statistically significant ( p less than…

  20. SUCCEED (Southeastern University and College Coalition for Engineering Education) Strategic Plan Revision, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohland, Matthew W., Ed.; Anderson, Tim J., Ed.

    This document presents the Strategic Plan Revision of the Southeastern University and College Coalition for Engineering Education (SUCCEED). SUCCEED aims to institute a sustainable version of its curriculum model on each of the selected campuses. The areas of expertise in the program include faculty development, outcomes assessment,…

  1. SUCCEED (Southeastern University and College Coalition for Engineering Education) Strategic Plan Revision, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohland, Matthew W., Ed.; Anderson, Tim J., Ed.

    This document presents the Strategic Plan Revision of the Southeastern University and College Coalition for Engineering Education (SUCCEED). SUCCEED aims to institute a sustainable version of its curriculum model on each of the selected campuses. The areas of expertise in the program include faculty development, outcomes assessment,…

  2. A Guide for Teaching Conservation Education in the Schools of Louisiana; Soil and Water Section. (Revision)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ware, George; McCollum, Howard P.

    This publication is a revised edition of the teachers guide for teaching soil and water conservation in the elementary and junior high schools of Louisiana. The format of the guide includes a statement of concept, followed by discussion of the concept, suggested activities, and possible outcomes. There is a glossary of terms and a section that…

  3. Collection Development Policy: Academic Library, St. Mary's University. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sylvia, Margaret

    This guide spells out the collection development policy of the library of St. Mary's University in San Antonio, Texas. The guide is divided into the following five topic areas: (1) introduction to the community served, parameters of the collection, cooperation in collection development, and priorities of the collection; (2) considerations in…

  4. Universal Spatial Correlation Functions for Describing and Reconstructing Soil Microstructure

    PubMed Central

    Skvortsova, Elena B.; Mallants, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Structural features of porous materials such as soil define the majority of its physical properties, including water infiltration and redistribution, multi-phase flow (e.g. simultaneous water/air flow, or gas exchange between biologically active soil root zone and atmosphere) and solute transport. To characterize soil microstructure, conventional soil science uses such metrics as pore size and pore-size distributions and thin section-derived morphological indicators. However, these descriptors provide only limited amount of information about the complex arrangement of soil structure and have limited capability to reconstruct structural features or predict physical properties. We introduce three different spatial correlation functions as a comprehensive tool to characterize soil microstructure: 1) two-point probability functions, 2) linear functions, and 3) two-point cluster functions. This novel approach was tested on thin-sections (2.21×2.21 cm2) representing eight soils with different pore space configurations. The two-point probability and linear correlation functions were subsequently used as a part of simulated annealing optimization procedures to reconstruct soil structure. Comparison of original and reconstructed images was based on morphological characteristics, cluster correlation functions, total number of pores and pore-size distribution. Results showed excellent agreement for soils with isolated pores, but relatively poor correspondence for soils exhibiting dual-porosity features (i.e. superposition of pores and micro-cracks). Insufficient information content in the correlation function sets used for reconstruction may have contributed to the observed discrepancies. Improved reconstructions may be obtained by adding cluster and other correlation functions into reconstruction sets. Correlation functions and the associated stochastic reconstruction algorithms introduced here are universally applicable in soil science, such as for soil classification

  5. Validating the Thinking Styles Inventory-Revised II among Chinese University Students with Hearing Impairment through Test Accommodations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Sanyin; Zhang, Li-Fang

    2014-01-01

    The present study pioneered in adopting test accommodations to validate the Thinking Styles Inventory-Revised II (TSI-R2; Sternberg, Wagner, & Zhang, 2007) among Chinese university students with hearing impairment. A series of three studies were conducted that drew their samples from the same two universities, in which accommodating test…

  6. Daily evaporation from drying soil: Universal parameterization with similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brutsaert, Wilfried

    2014-04-01

    With supporting experimental evidence from three separate field studies of daily mean evaporation from bare soil with vastly different physical characteristics, it is shown that the process can be described as isothermal linear diffusion in a finite depth domain. The resulting solution leads directly to similarity variables and thus a universal parameterization, which should in principle be applicable to most field soils. In addition, a closed form expression is presented to estimate the weighted mean diffusivity for exponential type soil water diffusivities. In this solution, the widely used square root of inverse time proportionality of this phenomenon is its short time version, whereas the exponential decay proportionality, proposed however by several authors for vegetated surfaces, is its long time version. It appears that in many situations the soil layer contributing to evaporation is fairly shallow and only a few tens of centimeters thick.

  7. The university gardens: a natural classroom for soil study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Marañón, M.; Delgado, G.; Párraga, J.; Martín-García, J. M.; Delgado, R.

    2012-04-01

    The European Space of Superior Education and specifically The Declaration of Bolonia signed by the Ministers responsible for Higher Education in 29 European countries are boosting a renewing of the traditional teaching methods in our universities. Most disciplines have incorporated and adapted the information technologies to their study object in order to achieve a more graphic and dynamic professor-student relationship. The requirement of cutting dawn theory and enhancing practice aspects have also led to intensify the efforts to update and design experiments. The laboratory experiments may be useful tools to hook the students but in the environmental sciences, an object studied in the lab is far away of its natural reality and functioning. Soils are dynamic entities in the nature. Because soil students are in the city and do not have a regular contact with the field, our aim was to teach soils operating in full capacity in the city. Taking advantage of the gardens of our university, a patch of nature in the city, we designed an experiment to show the 'vital signs' of soil and its temporal variability in a short time. In a landscaped area at the Faculty of Science we made a soil survey and subsequently we selected several areas for the installation of soil temperature, humidity, water tension, and respiration sensors. Students arranged by groups and connected on-line through blogs and social nets should record the measurements every day. Although the experiment has just starting, by this teaching method it is expected that the students achieve an experimental knowledge about soil and the way to study it, including measuring devices. They also will learn to organize and elaborate a soil report from real data, as well as work systems and habits for their future career. Acknowledgment: Innovation Project 11-272, Agencia Nacional de Evaluación de la Calidad y Acreditación (ANECA), Spain.

  8. Developing a Foundation for Constructing New Curricula in Soil, Crop, and Turfgrass Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvis, Holly D.; Collett, Ryan; Wingenbach, Gary; Heilman, James L.; Fowler, Debra

    2012-01-01

    Some soil and crop science university programs undergo curricula revision to maintain relevancy with their profession and/or to attract the best students to such programs. The Department of Soil and Crop Sciences at Texas A&M University completed a thorough data gathering process as part of its revision of the undergraduate curriculum and degree…

  9. Validating the Thinking Styles Inventory-Revised II among Chinese university students with hearing impairment through test accommodations.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Sanyin; Zhang, Li-Fang

    2014-01-01

    The present study pioneered in adopting test accommodations to validate the Thinking Styles Inventory-Revised II (TSI-R2; Sternberg, Wagner, & Zhang, 2007) among Chinese university students with hearing impairment. A series of three studies were conducted that drew their samples from the same two universities, in which accommodating test directions (N = 213), combining test directions with language accommodations from students' perspectives (N = 366), and integrating test directions with language accommodations from teachers' perspectives (N = 129) were used. The accommodated TSI-R2 generally indicated acceptable internal scale reliabilities and factorial validity for Chinese university students with hearing loss. Limitations in relation to the study participants are discussed, as well as test accommodations and the significance and implications of the study.

  10. Hanford Site background: Part 1, Soil background for nonradioactive analytes. Revision 1, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    Volume two contains the following appendices: Description of soil sampling sites; sampling narrative; raw data soil background; background data analysis; sitewide background soil sampling plan; and use of soil background data for the detection of contamination at waste management unit on the Hanford Site.

  11. A Test and Cross-Validation of the Revised Two-Factor Study Process Questionnaire Factor Structure among Western University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Immekus, Jason C.; Imbrie, P. K.

    2010-01-01

    The Revised Two-Factor Study Process Questionnaire (R-SPQ-2F) is a measure of university students' approach to learning. Original evaluation of the scale's psychometric properties was based on a sample of Hong Kong university students' scores. The purpose of this study was to test and cross-validate the R-SPQ-2F factor structure, based on separate…

  12. Revising the Declension Narrative: Liberal Arts Colleges, Universities, and Honors Programs, 1870s-2010s

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimball, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the prominent narrative asserting that liberal arts colleges have continuously declined in number and status over the past 130 years. Bruce A. Kimball identifies problems in this declension narrative and proposes a revision positing that the decline of liberal arts colleges began only after 1970. Further, he maintains that…

  13. The Universal Design File: Designing for People of All Ages and Abilities. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Story, Molly Follette; Mueller, James L.; Mace, Ronald L.

    This book presents a guide to the concept of universal design, the design of products and environments to be usable to the greatest extent possible by people of all ages and abilities/disabilities. Chapters 1 and 2 present a brief history of universal design and examine the spectrum of human abilities. Chapter 3 addresses the seven principles of…

  14. Hanford Site background: Part 1, Soil background for nonradioactive analytes. Revision 1, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The determination of soil background is one of the most important activities supporting environmental restoration and waste management on the Hanford Site. Background compositions serve as the basis for identifying soil contamination, and also as a baseline in risk assessment processes used to determine soil cleanup and treatment levels. These uses of soil background require an understanding of the extent to which analytes of concern occur naturally in the soils. This report documents the results of sampling and analysis activities designed to characterize the composition of soil background at the Hanford Site, and to evaluate the feasibility for use as Sitewide background. The compositions of naturally occurring soils in the vadose Zone have been-determined for-nonradioactive inorganic and organic analytes and related physical properties. These results confirm that a Sitewide approach to the characterization of soil background is technically sound and is a viable alternative to the determination and use of numerous local or area backgrounds that yield inconsistent definitions of contamination. Sitewide soil background consists of several types of data and is appropriate for use in identifying contamination in all soils in the vadose zone on the Hanford Site. The natural concentrations of nearly every inorganic analyte extend to levels that exceed calculated health-based cleanup limits. The levels of most inorganic analytes, however, are well below these health-based limits. The highest measured background concentrations occur in three volumetrically minor soil types, the most important of which are topsoils adjacent to the Columbia River that are rich in organic carbon. No organic analyte levels above detection were found in any of the soil samples.

  15. Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating. Health and safety plan (Revision 2)

    SciTech Connect

    Dev, H.

    1994-12-28

    This document is the Health and Safety Plan (HASP) for the demonstration of IITRI`s EM Treatment Technology. In this process, soil is heated in situ by means of electrical energy for the removal of hazardous organic contaminants. This process will be demonstrated on a small plot of contaminated soil located in the Pit Area of Classified Burial Ground K-1070-D, K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, TN. The purpose of the demonstration is to remove organic contaminants present in the soil by heating to a temperature range of 85{degrees} to 95{degrees}C. The soil will be heated in situ by applying 60-Hz AC power to an array of electrodes placed in boreholes drilled through the soil. In this section a brief description of the process is given along with a description of the site and a listing of the contaminants found in the area.

  16. Sampling and analysis plan for Mount Plant D & D soils packages, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1991-02-01

    There are currently 682 containers of soils in storage at Mound Plant, generated between April 1 and October 31, 1990 as a result of excavation of soils containing plutonium-238 at two ongoing Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Program sites. These areas are known as Area 14, the waste transfer system (WTS) hillside, and Area 17, the Special Metallurgical (SM) Building area. The soils from these areas are part of Mound Plant waste stream number AMDM-000000010, Contaminated Soil, and are proposed for shipment to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for disposal as low-level radioactive waste. The sealed waste packages, constructed of either wood or metal, are currently being stored in Building 31 and at other locations throughout the Mound facility. At a meeting in Las Vegas, Nevada on October, 26, 1990, DOE Nevada Operations Office (DOE-NV) and NTS representatives requested that the Mound Plant D&D soils proposed for shipment to NTS be sampled for Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) constituents. On December 14, 1990, DOE-NV also requested that additional analyses be performed on the soils from one of the soils boxes for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), particle size distribution, and free liquids. The purpose of this plan is to document the proposed sampling and analyses of the packages of D&D soils produced prior to October 31, 1990. In order to provide a thorough description of the soils excavated from the WTS and SM areas, sections 1.1 and 1.2 provide historical Information concerning the D&D soils, including waste stream evaluations and past sampling data.

  17. Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating. Treatability study work plan, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Sresty, G.C.

    1994-07-07

    A Treatability Study planned for the demonstration of the in situ electromagnetic (EM) heating process to remove organic solvents is described in this Work Plan. The treatability study will be conducted by heating subsurface vadose-zone soils in an organic plume adjacent to the Classified Burial Ground K-1070-D located at K-25 Site, Oak Ridge. The test is scheduled to start during the fourth quarter of FY94 and will be completed during the first quarter of FY95. The EM heating process for soil decontamination is based on volumetric heating technologies developed during the `70s for the recovery of fuels from shale and tar sands by IIT Research Institute (IITRI) under a co-operative program with the US Department of Energy (DOE). Additional modifications of the technology developed during the mid `80s are currently used for the production of heavy oil and waste treatment. Over the last nine years, a number of Government agencies (EPA, Army, AF, and DOE) and industries sponsored further development and testing of the in situ heating and soil decontamination process for the remediation of soils containing hazardous organic contaminants. In this process the soil is heated in situ using electrical energy. The contaminants are removed from the soil due to enhanced vaporization, steam distillation and stripping. IITRI will demonstrate the EM Process for in situ soil decontamination at K-25 Site under the proposed treatability study. Most of the contaminants of concern are volatile organics which can be removed by heating the soil to a temperature range of 85 to 95 C. The efficiency of the treatment will be determined by comparing the concentration of contaminants in soil samples. Samples will be obtained before and after the demonstration for a measurement of the concentration of contaminants of concern.

  18. Universality of Preferential Flow in Field Soils across Scales: Theoretical Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, H.

    2009-12-01

    Preferential flow (PF) is a fundamentally important soil hydrologic process that directly links to hydrological connectivity across scales. Based on three connected theories and extensive published experimental evidence, this paper attempts to justify the universality of PF in natural soils--meaning that PF can potentially occur in any soil anywhere in nature. First, we examine non-equilibrium thermodynamics as applied to the open dissipative system of field soils with continuous energy inputs. This provides a theoretical foundation for explaining the genesis and evolution of ubiquitous structured heterogeneity in soils that leads to widespread potential for PF occurrence. A dual-partitioning of pedogenesis results in ΔSsoil = ΔSmatrix + ΔSstructure, where ΔSmatrix is the entropy change related to dissipative processes and soil matrix formation, while ΔSstructure is the entropy exchange with the surrounding that is associated with organizing processes and soil structure formation. Second, we explore constructal theory to explain universal dual-flow regimes in natural soils--one with high resistivity (Darcy flow) and the other with low resistivity (PF)--together, they form natural PF configuration that provides the least global resistance to flow. While limited chronologic data suggest reduction in subsoil saturated hydraulic conductivity as soil ages, constructal theory appears to partially explain some general characteristics of weathering process. Third, the theory of evolving networks sheds light on diverse flow networks in soils that increase the efficiency or effectiveness of matter or energy transfer in the subsurface, because networks are part of the organization resulting from minimum energy dissipation and far-from-equilibrium thermodynamics. All the three theories discussed support the notion that PF is universal in natural soils.

  19. Site Study Plan for laboratory soil mechanics, Deaf Smith County site, Texas: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    This Site Study Plan for laboratory soil mechanics describes the laboratory testing to be conducted on soil samples collected as part of the characterization of the Deaf Smith County site, Texas. This study provides for measurements of index, mechanical, thermal, hydrologic, chemical, and mineral properties of soils from boring throughout the site. Samples will be taken from Playa Borings/Trenching, Transportation/Utilities Foundation Borings, Repository Surface Facilities Design Foundation Borings, and Exploratory Shaft Facilities Design Foundation Borings. Data from the laboratory tests will be used for soil strata characterization, design of foundations for surface structures, design of transportation facilities and utility structures, design of impoundments, design of shaft lining, design of the shaft freeze wall, shaft permitting, performance assessment calculations, and other program requirements. A tentative testing schedule and milestone log are given. A quality assurance program will be utilized to assure that activities affecting quality are performed correctly and that appropriate documentation is maintained. 18 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. A Profile of California Community College Transfer Students at the University of California. [Revised].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baratta, Frank; Apodaca, Ed C.

    A study was conducted by the University of California (UC) to investigate trends in community college transfer rates between 1965 and 1987; institutional origins, characteristics, and first-year performance of transfer students; and student persistence and graduation rates. Study findings included the following: (1) between 1965 and the peak year…

  1. General Policies Manual for Student Assistants: Indiana State University Libraries. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Marsha; And Others

    Designed to be given to new student assistants during a formal orientation program coordinated by Indiana State University's Department of Library Instruction and Orientation, this policy manual was prepared to help student library workers understand what the library expects of them. Following a brief introduction, the manual is divided into seven…

  2. Revised fits to Δα/α in consistency with the accelerating universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yasunori

    2009-01-01

    An attempt is made for a new type of analysis of the time-variability of the fine-structure constant trying to fit the most recent result from the laboratory measurements, the Oklo constraint and the data from the QSO absorption lines all in consistency with the accelerating universe.

  3. A Good University Physical Plant Organization and What Makes It Click. Revised July 1966.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fifield, M. F.

    The organization and administration of a university or college physical plant department is dealt with specifically. The following aspects of a good physical plant department are discussed--(1) leadership, (2) organization, (3) communications, (4) budgetary support, (5) facilities and equipment, (6) skill of personnel, (7) design to serve, (8)…

  4. A taxonomic revision of the soil-feeding termite genus Anhangatermes (Isoptera: Termitidae: Nasutitermitinae).

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Danilo E; Cunha, Hélida F; Constantino, Reginaldo

    2014-10-03

    The taxonomy of Anhangatermes Constantino 1990 is revised. Four new species are described: Anhangatermes anhanguera, sp. n., Anhangatermes eurycephalus, sp. n., Anhangatermes juruena, sp. n., and Anhangatermes pilosus, sp. n. The imago of Anhangatermes is described for the first time (A. pilosus). A key to the species of the genus based on soldiers and workers is provided. The diagnosis of the genus is updated to accommodate the new species. The geographic range of the genus is expanded to the Cerrado region of Central Brazil. The gizzard armature of the worker of Anhangatermes is described in detail for the first time.

  5. Revised List of Type Specimens on Deposit in the University of California Davis Nematode Collection

    PubMed Central

    Stock, S. Patricia; Nadler, Steven A.

    1998-01-01

    The list of deposited type specimens is updated for the University of California Davis Nematode Collection, as recommended by the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature. The type collection includes 1,001 species and more than 11,000 individual specimens mounted on microscope slides. This list can be used as a reference to locate specimens but is not meant to clarify ambiguities that may exist concerning the type status of particular specimens. PMID:19274230

  6. The Explorer's Guide to the Universe: A Reading List for Planetary and Space Science. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, Bevan M. (Compiler); McDonagh, Mark S. (Compiler)

    1984-01-01

    During the last decade, both scientists and the public have been engulfed by a flood of discoveries and information from outer space. Distant worlds have become familiar landscapes. Instruments in space have shown us a different Sun by the "light" of ultraviolet radiation and X-rays. Beyond the solar system, we have detected a strange universe of unsuspected violence, unexplained objects, and unimaginable energies. We are completely remarking our picture of the universe around us, and scientists and the general public alike are curious and excited about what we see. The public has participated in this period of exploration and discovery to an extent never possible before. In real time, TV screens show moonwalks, the sands of Mars, the volcanoes of Io, and the rings of Saturn. But after the initial excitement, it is hard for the curious non-scientist to learn more details or even to stay in touch with what is going on. Each space mission or new discovery is quickly skimmed over by newspapers and TV and then preserved in technical journals that are neither accessible nor easily read by the average reader. This reading list is an attempt to bridge the gap between the people who make discoveries in space and the people who would like to read about them. The aim has been to provide to many different people--teachers, students, scientists, other professionals, and curious citizens of all kinds--a list of readings where they can find out what the universe is like and what we have learned about it. We have included sections on the objects that seem to be of general interest--the Moon, the planets, the Sun, comets, and the universe beyond. We have also included material on related subjects that people are interested in--the history of space exploration, space habitats, extraterrestrial life, and U F O ' s . The list is intended to be self-contained; it includes both general references to supply background and more specific sources for new discoveries. Although the list can

  7. SWAT - CS: Revision and testing of SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) for forested Canadian Shield watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, C.; James, A. L.; Yao, H.

    2012-12-01

    The widely-used SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) model was originally developed for agricultural landscapes but recent applications are expanding its use to new landscapes and diverse landuse (including urban, forest, grasslands). In this study, we revise the existing, publicly available SWAT (version2009.10.1 Beta3) to create SWAT-CS, a version representing hydrological and biogeochemical processes dominating Boreal Shield watersheds, where boreal forest extends over Precambrian Shield bedrock. In different parts of Canada's Boreal Shield, watersheds are under increasing pressure from various types of development (e.g. mining, increased cottagers) and changing climate. Boreal Shield watersheds are generally characterized by shallow forested soils with high infiltration rates and low bedrock infiltration, generating little overland flow and where macropore and subsurface flow are important streamflow generation processes. Large numbers of wetlands and lakes are also key physiographic features, and snow-processes are critical to watershed modeling in this climate. Very few studies applying SWAT to Boreal Shield watersheds exist (we have found one). In this study we present hydrologic simulation results using SWAT-CS as a first step towards large scale water quality modeling in Boreal watersheds. We test SWAT-CS using the Harp Lake catchment dataset, an Ontario Ministry of Environment research station located in central Ontario. Simulations are evaluated against 30 years of observational data, including streamflow from six headwater sub-catchments (0.1 to 1.9 km2), outflow from Harp Lake (5.4 km2) and five years of weekly snow water equivalent (SWE). For sub-catchment HP4 (with detailed land use and soil data) results show best daily streamflow Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE) of 0.60 and 0.65, for calibration and verification periods, respectively. Best NSE for SWE was 0.87. For this range of scales, land cover and soil properties were found to be transferable

  8. Universal sheet resistance and revised phase diagram of the cuprate high-temperature superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Barišić, Neven; Chan, Mun K.; Li, Yuan; Yu, Guichuan; Zhao, Xudong; Dressel, Martin; Smontara, Ana; Greven, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Upon introducing charge carriers into the copper–oxygen sheets of the enigmatic lamellar cuprates, the ground state evolves from an insulator to a superconductor and eventually to a seemingly conventional metal (a Fermi liquid). Much has remained elusive about the nature of this evolution and about the peculiar metallic state at intermediate hole-carrier concentrations (p). The planar resistivity of this unconventional metal exhibits a linear temperature dependence (ρ ∝ T) that is disrupted upon cooling toward the superconducting state by the opening of a partial gap (the pseudogap) on the Fermi surface. Here, we first demonstrate for the quintessential compound HgBa2CuO4+δ a dramatic switch from linear to purely quadratic (Fermi liquid-like, ρ ∝ T2) resistive behavior in the pseudogap regime. Despite the considerable variation in crystal structures and disorder among different compounds, our result together with prior work gives insight into the p-T phase diagram and reveals the fundamental resistance per copper–oxygen sheet in both linear (ρ☐ = A1☐T) and quadratic (ρ☐ = A2☐T2) regimes, with A1☐ ∝ A2☐ ∝ 1/p. Theoretical models can now be benchmarked against this remarkably simple universal behavior. Deviations from this underlying behavior can be expected to lead to new insight into the nonuniversal features exhibited by certain compounds. PMID:23836669

  9. Copper and zinc fractionation in apple orchard soil in the village of Bukevje (Croatia) using the revised four-step BCR extraction procedure.

    PubMed

    Medunić, Gordana; Juranović Cindrić, Iva; Lovrenčić Mikelić, Ivanka; Tomašić, Nenad; Balen, Dražen; Oreščanin, Višnja; Kampić, Štefica; Ivković, Ivana

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the fractionation of copper and zinc in a small apple orchard using the revised (four-step) Bureau Communautaire de Référence (BCR) sequential extraction procedure and assess their potential mobility in soil. Soil samples were collected at the depth of 10 cm to 25 cm, sixteen from the orchard and five control samples from a meadow located some 200 m away from the orchard. As the distribution of trace-element concentrations in the control samples was normal, they were used for comparison as background levels. We also determined soil mineralogical composition, carbonate content, soil pH, cation exchange capacity, and soil organic matter. The extraction yields of Cu and Zn from the control soil were lower than from the orchard soil (25% vs. 34% and 47% vs. 52%, respectively), which pointed to natural processes behind metal bonding in the control soil and greater influence of man-made activities in the orchard soil. Compared to control, the orchard soil had significantly higher concentrations of total Cu (P=0.0009), possibly due to the application of Cu-based fungicides. This assumption was further supported by greater speciation variability of Cu than of zinc, which points to different origins of the two, Cu from pesticides and Zn from the parent bedrock. Copper levels significantly better (P=0.01) correlated with the oxidisable fraction of the orchard soil than of control soil. Residual and organically bound copper and zinc constituted the most important fractions in the studied soils. However, the use of Cu-based fungicides in the apple orchard did not impose environmental and health risk from Cu exposure.

  10. The Padua Inventory: Do Revisions Need Revision?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonner, Sascha; Ecker, Willi; Leonhart, Rainer

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the psychometric properties, factorial structure, and validity of the Padua Inventory-Washington State University Revision and of the Padua Inventory-Revised in a large sample of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (n = 228) and with anxiety disorders and/or depression (n = 213). The…

  11. Footprint characteristics revised for field-scale soil moisture monitoring with cosmic-ray neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhli, M.; Schrön, M.; Zreda, M.; Schmidt, U.; Dietrich, P.; Zacharias, S.

    2015-07-01

    Cosmic-ray neutron probes are widely used to monitor environmental water content near the surface. The method averages over tens of hectares and is unrivaled in serving representative data for agriculture and hydrological models at the hectometer scale. Recent experiments, however, indicate that the sensor response to environmental heterogeneity is not fully understood. Knowledge of the support volume is a prerequisite for the proper interpretation and validation of hydrogeophysical data. In a previous study, several physical simplifications have been introduced into a neutron transport model in order to derive the characteristics of the cosmic-ray probe's footprint. We utilize a refined source and energy spectrum for cosmic-ray neutrons and simulate their response to a variety of environmental conditions. Results indicate that the method is particularly sensitive to soil moisture in the first tens of meters around the probe, whereas the radial weights are changing dynamically with ambient water. The footprint radius ranges from 130 to 240 m depending on air humidity, soil moisture, and vegetation. The moisture-dependent penetration depth of 15 to 83 cm decreases exponentially with distance to the sensor. However, the footprint circle remains almost isotropic in complex terrain with nearby rivers, roads or hill slopes. Our findings suggest that a dynamically weighted average of point measurements is essential for accurate calibration and validation. The new insights will have important impact on signal interpretation, sensor installation, data interpolation from mobile surveys, and the choice of appropriate resolutions for data assimilation into hydrological models.

  12. Empirical models based on the universal soil loss equation fail to predict sediment discharges from Chesapeake Bay catchments.

    PubMed

    Boomer, Kathleen B; Weller, Donald E; Jordan, Thomas E

    2008-01-01

    The Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) and its derivatives are widely used for identifying watersheds with a high potential for degrading stream water quality. We compared sediment yields estimated from regional application of the USLE, the automated revised RUSLE2, and five sediment delivery ratio algorithms to measured annual average sediment delivery in 78 catchments of the Chesapeake Bay watershed. We did the same comparisons for another 23 catchments monitored by the USGS. Predictions exceeded observed sediment yields by more than 100% and were highly correlated with USLE erosion predictions (Pearson r range, 0.73-0.92; p < 0.001). RUSLE2-erosion estimates were highly correlated with USLE estimates (r = 0.87; p < 001), so the method of implementing the USLE model did not change the results. In ranked comparisons between observed and predicted sediment yields, the models failed to identify catchments with higher yields (r range, -0.28-0.00; p > 0.14). In a multiple regression analysis, soil erodibility, log (stream flow), basin shape (topographic relief ratio), the square-root transformed proportion of forest, and occurrence in the Appalachian Plateau province explained 55% of the observed variance in measured suspended sediment loads, but the model performed poorly (r(2) = 0.06) at predicting loads in the 23 USGS watersheds not used in fitting the model. The use of USLE or multiple regression models to predict sediment yields is not advisable despite their present widespread application. Integrated watershed models based on the USLE may also be unsuitable for making management decisions.

  13. Tectology of soil megasystems: Universal principles of organization and analysis of data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozhkov, V. A.; Skvortsova, E. B.

    2009-10-01

    General concepts of tectology—the universal organization science—are discussed. It is shown that some of them can be applied for the formal analysis of visual images of soil systems obtained at different levels of their organization—from photos of thin sections to soil maps—and the corresponding attribute data. The structure of visual and attribute data at the level of thin sections and the methods of their analysis do not differ from those applied upon the analysis of soil cartographic materials. In particular, this concerns the procedures for data classification—the universal tool to analyze empirical data and to generate various hypotheses. These procedures include the methods of multivariate statistics and data convolution, the development of systems of information indices, the development of hierarchical and/or ordinate structures of soil objects, etc. Modern information technologies, including data bases and geographic information systems with solid mathematical support, make it possible to advance the ideas of tectology with the aim to improve the efficiency of theoretical and applied studies in soil science.

  14. Mapping Erosion Risk in California's Rangelands Using the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salls, W. B.; O'Geen, T. T.

    2015-12-01

    Soil loss constitutes a multi-faceted problem for agriculture: in addition to reducing soil fertility and crop yield, it compromises downstream water quality. Sediment itself is a major issue for aquatic ecosystems, but also serves as a vector for transporting nutrients, pesticides, and pathogens. Rangelands are thought to be a contributor to water quality degradation in California, particularly in the northern Coast Range. Though total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) have been imposed in some watersheds, and countless rangeland water quality outreach activities have been conducted, the connection between grazing intensity recommendations and changes in water quality is poorly understood at the state level. This disconnect gives rise to poorly informed regulations and discourages adoption of best management practices by ranchers. By applying the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) at a statewide scale, we highlighted areas most prone to erosion. We also investigated how two different grazing intensity scenarios affect modeled soil loss. Geospatial data layers representing the USLE parameters—rainfall erosivity, soil erodibility, slope length and steepness, and cover—were overlaid to model annual soil loss. Monitored suspended sediment data from a small North Coast watershed with grazing as the predominant land use was used to validate the model. Modeled soil loss values were nearly one order of magnitude higher than monitored values; average soil loss feeding the downstream-most site was modeled at 0.329 t ha-1 yr-1, whereas storm-derived sediment passing the site over two years was calculated to be 0.037 t ha-1 yr-1. This discrepancy may stem from the fact that the USLE models detached sediment, whereas stream monitoring reflects sediment detached and subsequently transported to the waterway. Preliminary findings from the statewide map support the concern that the North Coast is particularly at risk given its combination of intense rain, erodible soils, and

  15. Monitoring soil erosion processes: The erosion plots at the Geocampus, University of Trier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassu, Tamas; Rodrigo Comino, Jesús; Seeger, Manuel; Ries, Johannes B.

    2015-04-01

    Long term monitoring on erosion plots is one of the most reliable methods to quantify the actual soil erosion rates. Although the direct extrapolation of the measured data to regional scale is problematic, due to the high spatial and temporal variability of the soil erosion processes, they provide indispensable experimental data for soil erosion model conception, calibration and validation. At the University Trier in 2013 four test plots were put into practice on colluvial loess loam soil with dimension 3 x 10 m and similar properties. They are representative for the regional conditions. The plots are located 265 m above sea level and they have a general inclination of 12-13°. In 2012 on two plots subsoiling was applied in order to reduce the compaction caused by the heavy machinery used during the construction of the plots. The two other plots were not disturbed and no melioration measures were applied. In the first year of the experiment after the preparation of the parcels, they were left for a spontaneous revegetation. Total runoff and sediment removal data was collected weekly, additionally a meteorological station provides continuously data about climate conditions. The data evaluation of the first year 2013/14 revealed big difference between the single plots. Total runoff was measured between 0 and 4.76 l m-2 (m=0.8 l m-2), total eroded sediment between 0 and 3.86 g m-2 (m=0.21 g m-2) weekly. The higher rates were recorded on the plots without subsoiling. After the first year, total eroded soil was calculated. The results were between 0.03 and 0.17 t ha-1a-1. With the help of the erosion plots at the University of Trier, the impact of the different soil use management concepts and cultivation techniques on runoff and erosion dynamics can be evaluated, additionally reliable data for modeling soil erosion can be generated as well.

  16. Soil organic matter in the Moscow State University botanical garden on the Vorob'evy Hills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozanova, M. S.; Prokof'eva, T. V.; Lysak, L. V.; Rakhleeva, A. A.

    2016-09-01

    Humification conditions and humus status parameters in arboretum soils of the Moscow State University botanical garden on the Vorob'evy Hills have been studied. Although microbiological activity is reduced, the warm and mild climate in the city, the eutrophication of soils (due to atmospheric fallouts and dissolution of construction waste inclusions), the retention of plant waste on the soil surface, and the presence of abundant primary destructors (mesofauna) have resulted in the formation of organic matter with specific characteristics. During the 60 years that have elapsed since the arboretum establishment, soils with a high content (up to 10-14%) of humate humus (CHA/CFA > 1) characterized by a higher degree of humification than in the control soils under herbaceous vegetation have been developed in the area. Large reserves of organic carbon have been noted not only in the upper 30-cm-thick soil layer, but also in the 1-m-thick layer due to organic matter of buried and technogenic horizons.

  17. Conducting subsurface soil and groundwater radiological investigations: a case study from the University of Rochester.

    PubMed

    Karam, P A

    2001-08-01

    The University of Rochester performed subsurface soil and groundwater radiological assessments in the vicinity of a research building to investigate for contamination from possible past releases of licensed radioactive materials. During the course of this investigation, our contractors developed candidate well drilling and sampling plans. The University of Rochester selected one of these plans, which was subsequently modified due to unexpected costs associated with the local geology. This paper describes the factors that were considered during the development and implementation of the drilling and sampling plan, as well as other considerations and concepts that are inherent in many environmental investigations.

  18. Sampling and Analysis for Lead in Water and Soil Samples on a University Campus: A Student Research Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butala, Steven J.; Zarrabi, Kaveh

    1995-01-01

    Describes a student research project that determined concentrations of lead in water drawn from selected drinking fountains and in selected soil samples on the campus of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. (18 references) (DDR)

  19. The Final Report to the Sears Foundation Containing Proposed Revisions of the Elementary Teacher Education Program at Chicago State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chicago State Univ., IL.

    These revisions arose from two major concerns: the lack of quality education evidence among many low-income, minority group children living in urban settings and the ambiguity concerning the nature and extent of relationships between teacher training efforts and a child's learning. This proposal examines the possible relationships between…

  20. Spatial and Temporal Evaluation of Soil Erosion with RUSLE: A case Study in an Olive Orchard Microcathment in Spain

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil loss is commonly estimated using the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE). Since RUSLE is an empirically based soil loss model derived from surveys on plots, the high spatial and temporal variability of erosion in Mediterranean environments and scale effects provo...

  1. Spatial and Temporal Evaluation of Soil Erosion with RUSLE: A Case Study in an Olive Orchard Microcathment in Spain

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil loss is commonly estimated using the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE). Since RUSLE is an empirically based soil loss model derived from surveys on plots, the high spatial and temporal variability of erosion in Mediterranean environments and scale effects provoke...

  2. Guide to soil suitability and site selection for beneficial use of domestic wastewater biosolids. Manual 8. (Revised)

    SciTech Connect

    Huddleston, J.H.; Ronayne, M.P.

    1995-09-01

    This guide is designed to help the reader (1) identify the important soil and biosolids characteristics for a particular situation, (2) judge the advantages and disadvantages of using biosolids, and (3) design practices that will make optimum use of the biosolids. This guide is designed for the use of both wastewater technicians unfamiliar with soil science and soil science students unfamiliar with biosolids. The guide reviews basic soil science concepts and helps the reader (1) quantify local soil and biosolids characteristics, (2) understand the potential benefits and disadvantages of biosolids for local soil characteristics, and (3) suggests procedures for designing a biosolids application. A checklist cross-referenced to the text is also provided.

  3. Soil erosion assessment using the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) in a GIS framework: A case study of Zacatecas, México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betanzos Arroyo, L. I.; Prol Ledesma, R. M.; da Silva Pinto da Rocha, F. J. P.

    2014-12-01

    The Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE), which is considered to be a contemporary approach in soil loss assessment, was used to assess soil erosion hazard in the Zacatecas mining district. The purpose of this study is to produce erosion susceptibility maps for an area that is polluted with mining tailings which are susceptible to erosion and can disperse the particles that contain heavy metals and other toxic elements. USLE method is based in the estimation of soil loss per unit area and takes into account specific parameters such as precipitation data, topography, soil erodibility, erosivity and runoff. The R-factor (rainfall erosivity) was calculated from monthly and annual precipitation data. The K-factor (soil erodibility) was estimated using soil maps available from the CONABIO at a scale of 1:250000. The LS-factor (slope length and steepness) was determined from a 30-m digital elevation model. A raster-based Geographic Information System (GIS) was used to interactively calculate soil loss and map erosion hazard. The results show that estimated erosion rates ranged from 0 to 4770.48 t/ha year. Maximum proportion of the total area of the Zacatecas mining district have nil to very extremely slight erosion severity. Small areas in the central and south part of the study area shows the critical condition requiring sustainable land management.

  4. A GIS-based procedure for automatically calculating soil loss from the Universal Soil Loss Equation: GISus-M

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The integration of methods for calculating soil loss caused by water erosion using a geoprocessing system is important to enable investigations of soil erosion over large areas. GIS-based procedures have been used in soil erosion studies; however in most cases it is difficult to integrate the functi...

  5. Guidelines for acceptable soil concentrations in the Old F- and H-Area Retention Basins. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hamby, D.M.

    1994-04-18

    Concentration guidelines for residual radionuclides in soil at the sites of the Old F- and a Retention Basins (281-3F, 281-3H) have been calculated using a dose-based approach. The guidelines also are being applied to areas around the F-Basin`s Process Line. Estimation of these soil guidelines was completed using RESRAD 5.0 in accordance with the DOE RESRAD methodology specified in DOE/CH/8901 (Gi89). Guidelines are provided for the nuclides known to be present in the soils at each basin (Sc87). Soil and hydrologic characteristics specific to each basin are defined for the areas above, within, and beneath the contaminated zones.

  6. Technical Writing: Library Resources for Engineers. A Self-Paced Workbook for the University of Arkansas Libraries. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dew, Stephen H.

    This self-paced library workbook is a course requirement of all "technical writing" freshman English classes at the University of Arkansas. The technical writing course is required of all engineering students, and its major focus is on writing a term paper containing a bibliography produced through library research. The workbook introduces…

  7. Sound and Video Recordings--E. S. Bird Library. Syracuse University Resources for Educators of Adults, MSS 23. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charters, Alexander N., Comp.; Abbott, George, Comp.

    This document is a catalog of the adult education sound and videotape recordings available at the E. S. Bird Library at Syracuse University. The collection was gathered for use by practitioners and educators of adults who are conducting research. In the library collection, each media item has been catalogued by title, series, subject, author,…

  8. State Financial Control Practices and Public Universities: Results of a National Study. Revised. ASHE 1984 Annual Meeting Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volkwein, J. Fredericks

    Results of a national study of budgetary control imposed upon 88 Ph.D. granting public universities by 49 state governments (excluding Alaska) are presented. A comparative analysis is provided of financial control practices in each state, along with an index that places these practices along a continuum. Information is included on the nature and…

  9. Revised calibration of the MBT-CBT paleotemperature proxy based on branched tetraether membrane lipids in surface soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterse, Francien; van der Meer, Jaap; Schouten, Stefan; Weijers, Johan W. H.; Fierer, Noah; Jackson, Robert B.; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2012-11-01

    The MBT-CBT proxy for the reconstruction of paleotemperatures and past soil pH is based on the distribution of branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (brGDGT) membrane lipids. The Methylation of Branched Tetraether (MBT) and the Cyclisation of Branched Tetraether (CBT) indices were developed to quantify these distributions, and significant empirical relations between these indices and annual mean air temperature (MAT) and/or soil pH were found in a large data set of soils. In this study, we extended this soil dataset to 278 globally distributed surface soils. Of these soils, 26% contains all nine brGDGTs, while in 63% of the soils the seven most common brGDGTs were detected, and the latter were selected for calibration purposes. This resulted in new transfer functions for the reconstruction of pH based on the CBT index: pH = 7.90-1.97 × CBT (r2 = 0.70; RMSE = 0.8; n = 176), as well as for MAT based on the CBT index and methylation index based on the seven most abundant GDGTs (defined as MBT‧): MAT = 0.81-5.67 × CBT + 31.0 × MBT‧ (r2 = 0.59; RMSE = 5.0 °C; n = 176). The new transfer function for MAT has a substantially lower correlation coefficient than the original equation (r2 = 0.77). To investigate possible improvement of the correlation, we used our extended global surface soil dataset to statistically derive the indices that best describe the relations of brGDGT composition with MAT and soil pH. These new indices, however, resulted in only a relatively minor increase in correlation coefficients, while they cannot be explained straightforwardly by physiological mechanisms. The large scatter in the calibration cannot be fully explained by local factors or by seasonality, but MAT for soils from arid regions are generally substantially (up to 20 °C) underestimated, suggesting that absolute brGDGT-based temperature records for these areas should be interpreted with caution. The applicability of the new MBT‧-CBT calibration function was tested

  10. Data documentation for the bare soil experiment at the University of Arkansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waite, W. P.; Scott, H. D. (Principal Investigator); Hancock, G. D.

    1980-01-01

    The reflectivities of several controlled moisture test plots were investigated. These test plots were of a similar soil texture which was clay loam and were prepared to give a desired initial soil moisture and density profile. Measurements were conducted on the plots as the soil water redistributed for both long term and diurnal cycles. These measurements included reflectivity, gravimetric and volumetric soil moisture, soil moisture potential, and soil temperature.

  11. Improved representations of coupled soil-canopy processes in the CABLE land surface model (Subversion revision 3432)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverd, Vanessa; Cuntz, Matthias; Nieradzik, Lars P.; Harman, Ian N.

    2016-09-01

    CABLE is a global land surface model, which has been used extensively in offline and coupled simulations. While CABLE performs well in comparison with other land surface models, results are impacted by decoupling of transpiration and photosynthesis fluxes under drying soil conditions, often leading to implausibly high water use efficiencies. Here, we present a solution to this problem, ensuring that modelled transpiration is always consistent with modelled photosynthesis, while introducing a parsimonious single-parameter drought response function which is coupled to root water uptake. We further improve CABLE's simulation of coupled soil-canopy processes by introducing an alternative hydrology model with a physically accurate representation of coupled energy and water fluxes at the soil-air interface, including a more realistic formulation of transfer under atmospherically stable conditions within the canopy and in the presence of leaf litter. The effects of these model developments are assessed using data from 18 stations from the global eddy covariance FLUXNET database, selected to span a large climatic range. Marked improvements are demonstrated, with root mean squared errors for monthly latent heat fluxes and water use efficiencies being reduced by 40 %. Results highlight the important roles of deep soil moisture in mediating drought response and litter in dampening soil evaporation.

  12. The University of Michigan Dioxin Exposure Study: estimating residential soil and house dust exposures to young children.

    PubMed

    Paustenbach, Dennis J; Kerger, Brent D

    2013-04-01

    The University of Michigan Dioxin Exposure Study provides extensive data on elevated residential soil and house dust concentrations of polychlorinated dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) and adult body burdens among residents near a chemical manufacturing plant in Midland, Michigan. Recent reports found no significant contribution of residential soil/dust concentrations to serum lipid PCDD/Fs in adults. Although child body burdens were not studied by the University of Michigan, internal dose modeling that incorporates recent findings on demonstrated shorter elimination half life of PCDD/Fs in children (1-2 year half life in children vs. ~7 years in older adults) can be applied to assess this important issue. The model examines children (ages 0-7 years) with background dietary intake and exposure to residential soils at selected concentrations (10, 100 and 1000 pg/g 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin toxic equivalents, TEQ) using the congener patterns observed in Midland. Model predictions assuming 50th percentile TEQ uptake from soil/dust-related dermal and ingestion exposures indicate no measurable changes in serum lipid TEQ concentrations up to 1000 pg/g in soil/dust. Assuming 95th percentile uptake, the model shows no measurable serum lipid TEQ change up to 100 pg/g in soil/dust, but serum lipid TEQ levels rose ~2 pg/g at 1000 pg/g in soil/dust. Since the vast majority of soil/dust data were below 100 pg/g, Michigan children exposed to such soil/dust TEQ concentrations are not reasonably expected to exhibit measurable changes in serum lipid TEQ concentrations when compared to typical background dietary exposures. With adequate data, this approach can be applied to evaluate child dose and risk for other persistent chemicals.

  13. It is over three decades of graduate education in Epizootiology at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria (1975–2011): is there a need to revise the curriculum?

    PubMed Central

    Olugasa, Babasola Oluseyi; Ijagbone, Ighodalo Folorunso; Esuruoso, Gabriel Oluwole

    2012-01-01

    Epizootiology is the study of variable factors, events, forces and circumstances that contribute to the occurrence, distribution, control and prevention of ill-health, diseases and other problems in animal groups. It is a key component of veterinary medicine education at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria since 1975. It started as a Graduate Certificate in Epizootiology (GCE) in 1976. Later it was revised into M.Sc. Epizootiology in 1986. At graduate level, epizootiology curriculum has supported the M.Sc. Epizootiology programme. It compliments training in Veterinary Public Health and Preventive Medicine. This epizootiology curriculum has been operational at graduate level for more than three decades. Now in 2011, a consortium of English speaking West African Universities is committed to review the current curriculum at the University of Ibadan to strengthen health systems in an interdependent world with scope for internationalized practicum in disease investigation. Emphases are made towards skills development in molecular studies on disease causal agents and the mapping of associated geographic risk factors, including indigenous knowledge and practices. It is notable that most English-speaking West African countries including Ghana, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Gambia either lack a Veterinary School or just started some, but do not have graduate programme in Epizootiology. Thus, the curriculum at Ibadan is positioned to make impact in three key areas, namely, sub-regional ecosystem health studies, improving human-animal disease surveillance programmes, and in indigenization of bio-technology for monitoring and evaluation of trans-boundary animal disease control interventions for global health in West Africa. PMID:23024829

  14. Fuzzy Representation of Soil Erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komaki, Ch. B.; Kainz, W.; Alavi Panah, S. K.; Matinfar, H. R.

    2009-04-01

    Fuzzy representation is a productive method to explain the natural processes so that it is near to linguistic form and it is also applicable to estimate the environmental processes in where the uncertainty in information is high. As models proposed to estimate soil erosion also have uncertainties and fuzzy inference system is more flexible in describing the relationship between soil erosion and other factor, especially in managing data and model uncertainties. in the research, it is used simplified model of revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) to estimate soil erosion in dry lands of Kashan area in Central Iran . Then to discover the systematic (IF-Then) rules in soil erosion process, we used inductive reasoning method to discover rules of the causing agents of erosion such as rainfall erosivity, topography factors, soil erodibility , then highly supported rules converted to fuzzy rules. It is resulted that the application of fuzzy inference system for erosion evaluation is applicable in regional level.

  15. Rapid assessment of soil erosion in the Rio Lempa Basin, Central America, using the universal soil loss equation and geographic information systems.

    PubMed

    Kim, John B; Saunders, Peter; Finn, John T

    2005-12-01

    Soil erosion is a severe problem for many developing regions that lack adequate infrastructure to combat the problem. The authors established a first-order method for prioritizing areas to be examined and remediated using preexisting data and expert knowledge where data are lacking. The Universal Soil Loss Equation was applied to the Rio Lempa Basin in Central America using geographic information systems and remote sensing technologies, and the estimated erosion rates were compared with sediment delivery ratios. Spatial analysis indicates that agriculture on very steep slopes contributes only a small fraction to the total estimated soil erosion, whereas agriculture on gentle and moderately steep slopes contributes a large fraction of the erosion. Although much of the basin is in El Salvador, the greatest estimated amount of erosion is from Honduras. Data quality and availability were impaired by a lack of coordination among agencies and across countries. Several avenues for improving the authors' methods are described.

  16. Seismic analysis of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility: soil structure interaction analyses of the Axicell vacuum vessel. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Maslenikov, O.R.; Mraz, M.J.; Johnson, J.J.

    1986-03-01

    This report documents the seismic analyses performed by SMA for the MFTF-B Axicell vacuum vessel. In the course of this study we performed response spectrum analyses, CLASSI fixed-base analyses, and SSI analyses that included interaction effects between the vessel and vault. The response spectrum analysis served to benchmark certain modeling differences between the LLNL and SMA versions of the vessel model. The fixed-base analysis benchmarked the differences between analysis techniques. The SSI analyses provided our best estimate of vessel response to the postulated seismic excitation for the MFTF-B facility, and included consideration of uncertainties in soil properties by calculating response for a range of soil shear moduli. Our results are presented in this report as tables of comparisons of specific member forces from our analyses and the analyses performed by LLNL. Also presented are tables of maximum accelerations and relative displacements and plots of response spectra at various selected locations.

  17. Erosion modeling in 2-D with Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation--Version 2: A Tool for Conservation Planning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The availability of high-resolution topographic information has created the opportunity for the automatic determination realistic runoff flow paths. To take advantage of this capability, RUSLE2 was modified so that local slope length could be determined based on accumulated runoff, thus creating the...

  18. Games in an Introductory Soil Science Course: A Novel Approach for Increasing Student Involvement with Course Material

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sulzman, Elizabeth W.

    2004-01-01

    An optional 1-credit recitation course was developed to supplement a traditionally taught 4-credit lecture-plus-laboratory course in soil science at Oregon State University. Popular, competitive games that would be familiar to students were revised to be "soils-based" and were employed in the recitation class. These games were seen as a potential…

  19. Soil and hydrology sciences need laboratory and field experiments in the classroom. An example from the SEDER (Soil Erosion and Degradation Research Group) from the University of Valencia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdà, Artemi; González Pelayo, Óscar; García Orenes, Fuensanta; Jordán, Antonio; Pereira, Paulo; Novara, Agata; Úbeda, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    The use of experimental stations and long-term measurements in the field and in the laboratory contributed to large datasets and key information to understand the soil system and the hydrological cycle (Neal et al., 2011; García Orenes et al., 2012; López-Garrido et al., 2012; Kröpf et al., 2013; Nadal-Romero, 2013; Taguas et al., 2013; Zhao et al., 2013). However, teaching in high schools and colleagues require simple experiments to help the students to understand the soil and water resources and management. We show here the experiments and measurements we conduct within the teaching program of the Soil Erosion and Degradation Research Group at the University of Valencia to help the students in the understanding of the soil and hydrologic processes. The expereriments and measurements developed are the following: (i) Water Drop Penetration Time (WDPT) to determine the soil water repellency; (ii) Leaves water retention capacity measured in the field; (iii) soil infiltration capacity measured with simple ring infiltrometers; (iv) measurement of the soil bulk density; and (v) measurement of the soil water content. Those experiments and measurements are applied to agriculture, rangeland and fire affected soils. Acknowledgements To the "Ministerio de Economía and Competitividad" of Spanish Government for finance the POSTFIRE project (CGL2013- 47862-C2-1-R). The research projects GL2008-02879/BTE, LEDDRA 243857 and PREVENTING AND REMEDIATING DEGRADATION OF SOILS IN EUROPE THROUGH LAND CARE (RECARE)FP7-ENV-2013- supported this research. References García-Orenes, F., Roldán, A., Mataix-Solera, J., Cerdà, A., Campoy, M., Arcenegui, V., Caravaca, F. 2012 Soil structural stability and erosion rates influenced by agricultural management practices in a semi-arid Mediterranean agro-ecosystem. Soil Use and Management 28(4): 571-579. DOI: 10.1111/j.1475-2743.2012.00451.x Kröpfl, A. I., Cecchi, G. A., Villasuso, N. M., Distel, R. A. 2013. Degradation and recovery processes

  20. Soils Project Risk-Based Corrective Action Evaluation Process with ROTC 1 and ROTC 2, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Patrick; Sloop, Christina

    2012-04-01

    This document formally defines and clarifies the NDEP-approved process the NNSA/NSO Soils Activity uses to fulfill the requirements of the FFACO and state regulations. This process is used to establish FALs in accordance with the risk-based corrective action (RBCA) process stipulated in Chapter 445 of the Nevada Administrative Code (NAC) as described in the ASTM International (ASTM) Method E1739-95 (NAC, 2008; ASTM, 1995). It is designed to provide a set of consistent standards for chemical and radiological corrective actions.

  1. Barometric pumping of burial trench soil gases into the atmosphere at the 740-G Sanitary Landfill. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Wyatt, D.E.; Pirkle, R.J.; Masdea, D.J.

    1992-12-01

    In 1991, a soil gas survey was performed at the Savannah River Site Sanitary Landfill as part of the characterization efforts required under the integrated Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation and Comprehensive Environmental Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (CERCLA) Remedial Investigation (RFI/RI) program. This report details the findings of this survey, which identified several areas of the landfill that were releasing volatile organic compounds to the atmosphere at levels exceeding regulatory standards. Knowledge of the rates of VOC outgassing is necessary to protect site workers, provide input into the human health and environmental risk assessment documents and provide input into the remedial design scenario.

  2. Site-specific analysis of radiological and physical parameters for cobbly soils at the Gunnison, Colorado, processing site. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The remedial action at the Gunnison, Colorado, processing site is being performed under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978. Under UMTRCA, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is charged with the responsibility of developing appropriate and applicable standards for the cleanup of radiologically contaminated land and buildings at 24 designated sites, including the Gunnison, Colorado, inactive processing site. Section 108 of Public Law 95-604 states that the US Department of Energy (DOE) shall ``select and perform remedial actions at the designated processing sites and disposal sites in accordance with the general standards`` prescribed by the EPA. Regulations governing the required remedial action at inactive uranium processing sites were promulgated by the EPA in 1983 and are contained in 40 CFR Part 192 (1993), Health and Environmental Protection Standards for Uranium and Thorium Mill Tailings. This document describes the radiological and physical parameters for the remedial action of the soil.

  3. Data documentation for the bare soil experiment at the University of Arkansas, June - August 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadeghi, A. M.

    1984-01-01

    The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the relationships between soil moisture and reflectivity of a bare soil, using microwave techniques. A drainage experiment was conducted on a Captina silt loam in cooperation with personnel in the Electrical Engineering Department. Measurements included soil moisture pressures at various depths, neutron probe measurements, gravimetric moisture samples, and reflectivity of the soil surface at selected frequencies including 1.5 and 6.0 GHz and at the incident angle of 45 deg. All measurements were made in conjuction with that of reflectivity data.

  4. Ethical Revision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackman, Mary Kathryn

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the dilemma of how to respond to student papers advancing morally repugnant positions. Advocates conceptualizing writing as an ethical act and connecting ethics and revision. Describes briefly how three such student papers were handled. (SR)

  5. Effect of iron redistribution in soils on cesium magnetometer surveys at the Oregon State University Research Dairy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Michael Bruce

    Contamination events at Oak Creek, which runs through Oregon State University Research lands, prompted investigations into alternate transport mechanisms for moving liquid effluent from OSU Diary lands to Oak Creek. Magnetometer surveys conducted at the Diary identified magnetic signatures spatially associated with sub-surface locations of drain tiles, a 12-inch pipe, and other features. These pipes may provide alternate methods of transporting effluent to Oak Creek. Magnetometer surveys in support of the contamination study identified an interesting variability in the Earth's local magnetic field. Magnetic signatures spatially associated with drain tiles appear strong in the western portion of the site, but fade out in the eastern part of the site. The cause of this variability was investigated by examining soil iron distributions. The Field-scale soil iron distribution was determined using a colorimetric analysis of extractions obtained from soil core samples. This study shows larger concentrations of iron in the western portion of the site where the magnetic signal is strong and lower concentrations of iron where the magnetic signal is lower. Tile-scale iron distribution over the drain tiles and in control units were analyzed using the same colorimetric technique. This study identified a disturbance to the natural iron distribution over the tile in the western part of the site due to soil mixing in the back-filled tile trench resulting in a contrast in the magnetic data. In the eastern part of the site, where there is no magnetic signature associated with the tile, the iron distribution over the tile looks similar to the control unit results. Analysis of the soils determined that excavating during tile installation disturbed soil horizons, but the iron has redistributed itself to the pre-tile configuration effectively erasing the magnetic contrast that existed shortly after tile installation. This project has shown that iron redistribution can adversely affect

  6. Incorporating a Soil Science Artifact into a University ePortfolio Assessment Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikhailova, Elena; Werts, Joshua; Post, Christopher; Ring, Gail

    2014-01-01

    The ePortfolio is a useful educational tool that is utilized in many educational institutions to showcase student accomplishments and provide students with an opportunity to reflect on their educational progress. The objective of this study was to develop and test an artifact from an introductory soil science course to be included in the…

  7. Fractal features of soil properties distribution in an urban park - a case study: Bar-Ilan University campus, Ramat-Gan, Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhevelev, Helena; Sarah, Pariente

    2014-05-01

    Green open spaces in the city include campuses of various institutions. Their physical and sociological functions are similar to those of urban parks, and the present study was conducted in the campus of Bar-Ilan University. It aimed to detect the features of the distributions of several ecological properties, as affected by various land cover components and their associated microenvironments. For this purpose, three types of microenvironments, representative of the campus were chosen. They were: under the canopies of nine species of trees; lawns (disturbed and undisturbed); and paths. In each microenvironment, soil was sampled from two layers (0-2 and 5-10 cm), soil temperatures were measured at depths down to 10 cm (0, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 cm), and air temperatures were recorded at heights up to 160 cm (30, 60, 100, 160 cm). For each soil sample, soil moisture and organic matter contents were determined in December 2011 and March 2012. Before the samplings, penetration depth was measured. From December to March soil penetration depths and soil moisture contents decreased by 30-50%. In contrast, organic matter content increased from 0.5 to 1.5% in all microenvironments. In December there were no differences in soil temperatures among the microenvironments, but in March differences of 4-5 C° were found. Highest soil temperatures, at all depths, were found in the Lawn and Path microenvironments. For all the various microenvironments, at each depth, the distributions by percentiles (deciles, medians and quartiles) of all soil properties were calculated and analyzed. Highly significant linear correlations between percentiles and averages of soil properties were found for all the microenvironments and at both depths. Thus, the soil properties of the Bar-Ilan University campus exhibited a fractal structure.

  8. Exploring the Impact on Students of Western Universities on Foreign Soil: A Case Study of Qatar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakken, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The development of branch campuses in higher education is not a new phenomenon. Over the past decades, however, branch campuses have expanded throughout the world as Western universities have begun to deliver their programs and course offerings in countries that expect the West to provide educational (and, by implication, economic) success. Middle…

  9. Remote sensing as a source of land cover information utilized in the universal soil loss equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris-Jones, D. R.; Morgan, K. M.; Kiefer, R. W.; Scarpace, F. L.

    1979-01-01

    In this study, methods for gathering the land use/land cover information required by the USLE were investigated with medium altitude, multi-date color and color infrared 70-mm positive transparencies using human and computer-based interpretation techniques. Successful results, which compare favorably with traditional field study methods, were obtained within the test site watershed with airphoto data sources and human airphoto interpretation techniques. Computer-based interpretation techniques were not capable of identifying soil conservation practices but were successful to varying degrees in gathering other types of desired land use/land cover information.

  10. Collaborative Revision on a Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornell, Cynthia; Newton, Robert

    A study investigated the effects of using a computer image projected on a large screen to teach revision to college students. Subjects, 19 students at DePauw University, enrolled in a writing intensive literature course in a Writing across the Curriculum program, were divided into test and control groups. It was hypothesized that the modeling of…

  11. The Brief Classroom Interaction Observation-Revised: An Observation System to Inform and Increase Teacher Use of Universal Classroom Management Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinke, Wendy M.; Stormont, Melissa; Herman, Keith C.; Wachsmuth, Sean; Newcomer, Lori

    2015-01-01

    Schools are increasingly using multi-tiered prevention models to address the academic and behavior needs of students. The foundation of these models is the implementation of universal, or Tier 1, practices designed to support the academic and behavioral needs of the vast majority of students. To support teachers in the use of effective Tier 1…

  12. Owning the Journey: Using Collaborative Revisions of Little Red Riding Hood in Teaching Introduction to Literature at a Historically Black University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Pauline

    2012-01-01

    Design and implementation of a collaborative course project, using Little Red Riding Hood (LRRH) to teach and discuss the concepts of orality, cultural legacy, archetypes, adaptation/appropriation, and social criticism in an Introduction to Literature course at Historically Black Alabama State University in Montgomery, Alabama. The student groups…

  13. Developing Conceptual Framework for Revising Self-Learning Materials (SLMs) of the Open School (OS) of Bangladesh Open University (BOU) at a Digital Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeasmin, Sabina; Murthy, C. R. K.

    2012-01-01

    Bangladesh Open University (BOU) runs school programs as part of its academic activities through open schooling since its inception. As of today, the Open School uses the first generation self-learning materials (SLMs) written, before an era, following an in-house style and template. The concerned faculty member corrects, every year, texts before…

  14. Re-Visioning Disability and Dyslexia down the Camera Lens: Interpretations of Representations on UK University Websites and in a UK Government Guidance Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collinson, Craig; Dunne, Linda; Woolhouse, Clare

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this article is to consider visual portrayals and representations of disability. The images selected for analysis came from online university prospectuses as well as a governmental guidance framework on the tuition of dyslexic students. Greater understanding, human rights and cultural change have been characteristic of much UK…

  15. Developing Conceptual Framework for Revising Self-Learning Materials (SLMs) of the Open School (OS) of Bangladesh Open University (BOU) at a Digital Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeasmin, Sabina; Murthy, C. R. K.

    2011-01-01

    Bangladesh Open University (BOU) runs school programs as part of its academic activities through open schooling since its inception. As of today, the Open School uses the first generation self-learning materials (SLMs) written, before an era, following an in-house style and template. The concerned faculty member corrects, every year, texts before…

  16. Revision Planned for the Cambridge Latin Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sebesta, Judith Lynn

    1980-01-01

    Summarizes a discussion on the revision of the Cambridge Latin Course (CLC) held during the 1980 ACL Institute at the University of New Hampshire by CLC users and Cambridge University Press representatives. Emphasizes suggestions by users on grammar instruction strategies better suited to American students' needs. (MES)

  17. Abundance, Distribution and Cycling of Organic Carbon and Nitrogen in University Valley (McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica) Permafrost Soils with Differing Ground Thermal and Moisture Conditions: Analogue to C-N Cycle on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faucher, B. F.; Lacelle, D. L.; Davila, A. D.; Pollard, W. P.; McKay, C. P. M.

    2016-05-01

    High elevation McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica are key Mars analogue sites. Our investigation focuses on the link between ground ice origin, distribution and cycling of organic carbon and nitrogen in University Valley, and its soil habitability.

  18. Soil erosion assessment and control in Northeast Wollega, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adugna, A.; Abegaz, A.; Cerdà, A.

    2015-12-01

    Soil erosion is the main driver of land degradation in Ethiopia, and in the whole region of East Africa. This study was conducted at the Northeast Wollega in West Ethiopia to estimate the soil losses by means of the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE). The purpose of this paper is to identify erosion spot areas and target locations for appropriate development of soil and water conservation measures. Fieldwork and household survey were conducted to identify major determinants of soil erosion control. Six principal factors were used to calculate soil loss per year, such as rainfallerosivity, soil erodiblity, slope length, slope steepness, crop management and erosion-control practices. The soil losses have shown spatio-temporal variations that range from 4.5 Mg ha-1 yr-1 in forest to 65.9 Mg ha-1 yr-1 in cropland. Results from the analysis of stepwise multiple linear regression show that sustainable soil erosion control are determined byknowledge of farmers about soil conservation, land tenure security and off-farm income at community level. Thus, policy aim at keeping land productivity will need to focus on terracing, inter-cropping and improved agro-forestry practices.

  19. Anthropogenic soil erosion over the Holocene: Application of a new dynamic soils module for global vegetation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, J. O.; Vanwalleghem, T.

    2012-04-01

    Over the course of the Holocene, anthropogenic activities have transformed the surface of the Earth. In no way has human impact been more important or longer lasting than the transformation of soils, where erosion and sediment transport over the past 10,000 years have led to irreversible changes in landscapes. Soil erosion also affected global carbon and nutrient cycles, and could have amplified or attenuated ongoing changes in the Earth's climate. To quantify the role of anthropogenically induced soil development and erosion in the Earth system, we developed a new module of global soil dynamics: soil formation, erosion, and sediment transport, that is suitable for global application at 0.5° resolution. We incorporated this soil module into the LPJ-DGVM and performed a series of simulations to quantify the spatial and temporal pattern of global soil change over the Holocene. The soil formation module models bedrock-to-soil conversion rates as exponentially decreasing with soil depth. Parameters for soil formation in different geological units were extracted from a review of existing literature. Our global soil erosion formulation is based on the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE), but importantly accounts for sediment deposition and the net export of sediment out of a relatively large and geomorphologically heterogeneous gridcell. Our new module was developed by running the detailed soil erosion-deposition model WaTEM/SEDEM at 3 arc-second resolution to derive generalized topographical scaling relations that accurately represent hillslope length, slope gradient and sediment delivery ratio. We show that, at large spatial scale, sediment delivery ratio and the area affected by sediment deposition can be easily estimated from topographical parameters such as mean LS factor and wetness index. We include the feedback between soil formation and soil erosion by adjusting the soil erosion rates for soil depth and stoniness. The results of our Holocene

  20. A revised land surface parameterization (SiB2) for GCMs. Part III: The greening of the Colorado State University general circulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, D.A.; Dazlich, D.A.; Zhang, C.; Denning, A.S.

    1996-04-01

    SiB2, the second-generation land-surface parameterization developed by Sellers et al., has been incorporated into the Colorado State University general circulation model and tested in multidecade simulations. The control run uses a {open_quotes}bucket{close_quotes} hydrology but employs the same surface albedo and surface roughness distributions as the SiB2 run. Results show that SiB2 leads to a general warming of the continents, as evidenced in the ground temperature, surface air temperature, and boundary-layer-mean potential temperature. The surface sensible heat flux increases and the latent heat flux decreases. This warming occurs virtually everywhere but is most spectacular over Siberia in winter. Precipitation generally decreases over land but increases in the monsoon regions, especially the Amazon basin in January and equatorial Africa and Southeast Asia in July. Evaporation decreases considerably, especially in dry regions such as the Sahara. The excess of precipitation over evaporation increases in the monsoon regions. The precipitable water (vertically integrated water vapor content) generally decreases over land but increases in the monsoon regions. The mixing ratio of the boundary-layer air decreases over nearly all continental areas, however, including the monsoon regions. The net surface longwave cooling of the surface increases quite dramatically over land, in accordance with the increased surface temperatures and decreased cloudiness. The solar radiation absorbed at the ground also increases. SiB2 has modest effects on the simulated general circulation of the atmosphere. Its most important impacts on the model are to improve the simulations of surface temperature and snow cover and to enable the simulation of the net rate of terrestrial carbon assimilation. 39 refs., 23 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. OMB revises overhead rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzoff, Judith A.

    After pressure from university administrators, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has issued a new plan for saving money on research overhead costs, in place of a controversial proposal that was originally published in February 1986 (Eos, May 20, 1986, p. 481). The agency made the new plan more palatable to administrators and faculty by choosing to cap the rate of reimbursement for the activity that researchers say they find among the most difficult to document: the time they spend on administration of federally sponsored grants and contracts. An amendment to a bill signed by President Ronald Reagan on July 2 might force OMB to make additional concessions to colleges and universities.How much money the federal government would save under this policy is a matter of dispute. The agency's revisions to OMB Circular A-21, “Cost Principles for Educational Institutions,” call for fixing the reimbursement rate at 3% of modified total direct costs for departmental administration work done by “department heads, directors of divisions faculty, and professional staff.” The 3% figure represents about half of the current national average rate of reimbursement for these costs and would lead to federal government savings of $100 million a year, according to OMB.

  2. Modelling large-scale spatial variability of soil properties with sequential stochastic simulation conditioned by universal kriging in a Hungarian study site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szatmári, Gábor; Barta, Károly; Pásztor, László

    2015-04-01

    Modelling of large-scale spatial variability of soil properties is a promising subject in soil science, as well as in general environmental research, since the resulted model(s) can be applied to solve various problems. In addition to "purely" map an environmental element, the spatial uncertainty of the map product can deduced, specific areas could be identified and/or delineated (contaminated or endangered regions, plots for fertilization, etc.). Geostatistics, which can be regarded as a subset of statistics specialized in analysis and interpretation of geographically referenced data, offer a huge amount of tools to solve these tasks. Numerous spatial modeling methods have been developed in the past decades based on the regionalized variable theory. One of these techniques is sequential stochastic simulation, which can be conditioned with universal kriging (also referred to as regression kriging). As opposed to universal kriging (UK), sequential simulation conditioned with universal kriging (SSUK) provides not just one but several alternative and equally probable "maps", i.e. realizations. The realizations reproduce the global statistics (e.g. sample histogram, variogram), i.e. they reflect/model the reality in a certain global (and not local!) sense. In this paper we present and test SSUK developed in R-code and its utilizations in a water erosion affected study area. Furthermore, we compare the results from UK and SSUK. For this purpose, two soil variables were selected: soil organic matter (SOM) content and rooting depth (RD). SSUK approach is illustrated with a legacy soil dataset from a study area endangered by water erosion in Central Hungary. Legacy soil data was collected in the end of the 1980s in the framework of the National Land Evaluation Programme. Spatially exhaustive covariates were derived from a digital elevation model and from the land-use-map of the study area. SSUK was built upon a UK prediction system for both variables and 200 realizations

  3. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 567: Miscellaneous Soil Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, with ROTC 1 Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Patrick K.

    2013-07-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 567 is located in Areas 1, 3, 5, 20, and 25 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 567 is a grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 567, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 01-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-1 • 03-23-25, Seaweed E Contamination Area • 05-23-07, A5b RMA • 20-23-08, Colby Mud Spill • 25-23-23, J-11 Soil RMA These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the investigation report. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on May 6, 2013, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 567. The site investigation process will also be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The potential contamination sources associated with CAU 567 releases are nuclear test operations and other NNSS operations. The DQO process resulted in an assumption that total effective dose (TED) within a default contamination boundary

  4. Soil erodibility in Europe: a high-resolution dataset based on LUCAS.

    PubMed

    Panagos, Panos; Meusburger, Katrin; Ballabio, Cristiano; Borrelli, Pasqualle; Alewell, Christine

    2014-05-01

    The greatest obstacle to soil erosion modelling at larger spatial scales is the lack of data on soil characteristics. One key parameter for modelling soil erosion is the soil erodibility, expressed as the K-factor in the widely used soil erosion model, the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) and its revised version (RUSLE). The K-factor, which expresses the susceptibility of a soil to erode, is related to soil properties such as organic matter content, soil texture, soil structure and permeability. With the Land Use/Cover Area frame Survey (LUCAS) soil survey in 2009 a pan-European soil dataset is available for the first time, consisting of around 20,000 points across 25 Member States of the European Union. The aim of this study is the generation of a harmonised high-resolution soil erodibility map (with a grid cell size of 500 m) for the 25 EU Member States. Soil erodibility was calculated for the LUCAS survey points using the nomograph of Wischmeier and Smith (1978). A Cubist regression model was applied to correlate spatial data such as latitude, longitude, remotely sensed and terrain features in order to develop a high-resolution soil erodibility map. The mean K-factor for Europe was estimated at 0.032 thahha(-1)MJ(-1)mm(-1) with a standard deviation of 0.009 thahha(-1)MJ(-1)mm(-1). The yielded soil erodibility dataset compared well with the published local and regional soil erodibility data. However, the incorporation of the protective effect of surface stone cover, which is usually not considered for the soil erodibility calculations, resulted in an average 15% decrease of the K-factor. The exclusion of this effect in K-factor calculations is likely to result in an overestimation of soil erosion, particularly for the Mediterranean countries, where highest percentages of surface stone cover were observed.

  5. Diurnal soil water dynamics in the shallow vadose zone (field site of China University of Geosciences, China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yijian; Wan, Li; Su, Zhongbo; Saito, Hirotaka; Huang, Kangle; Wang, Xusheng

    2009-07-01

    Because of the relatively low soil moisture in arid or semi-arid regions, water vapour movement often predominates in the vadose zone and affects the partitioning of energy among various land surface fluxes. In an outdoor sand bunker experiment, the soil water content at 10 and 30 cm depth were measured at hourly intervals for 2.5 days during October 2004. It was found that the soil moisture reached the daily maximum value (5.9-6.1% at 10 cm and 11.9-13.1% at 30 cm) and minimum value (4.4-4.5% at 10 cm and 10.4-10.8% at 30 cm) at midday (0-1 p.m. for 10 cm and 2-3 p.m. for 30 cm) and before dawn (2-3 a.m. for 10 cm and 4-5 a.m. for 30 cm), respectively. The modified HYDRUS-1D code, which refers to the coupled water, water vapour and heat transport in soil, was used to simulate the moisture and water vapour flow in the soil. The numerical analyses provided insight into the diurnal movement of liquid water and water vapour driven by the gradients of pressure heads and temperatures in the subsurface zone. The simulated temperature and water content were in good agreement with the measured values. The spatial-temporal distribution of liquid water flux, water vapour flux and soil temperature showed a detailed diurnal pattern of soil water dynamics in relatively coarse sand.

  6. Evaluation and Revision of an Introduction to Experiential Rotations Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dy, Eliza A.; Nisly, Sarah A.

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the perceived student value of topics taught in Butler University's Introduction to Experiential Rotations (RX500) course, implement course revisions to address any perceived weaknesses, and to reassess the course following implementation of those course revisions. Advanced Pharmacy Practice…

  7. Elementary and Secondary Masters Degree Program Revision. Progress Report I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, L. James; And Others

    This paper discusses the revision of the Elementary and Secondary Masters Degree Programs at Indiana University at South Bend. There were several reasons for revising the programs: (1) new faculty members with different orientations were eager to work on program development; (2) increasing graduate enrollments emphasized the need to take a closer…

  8. The economic impact of revision otologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Nadimi, Sahar; Leonetti, John P; Pontikis, George

    2016-03-01

    Revision otologic surgery places a significant economic burden on patients and the healthcare system. We conducted a retrospective chart analysis to estimate the economic impact of revision canal-wall-down (CWD) mastoidectomy. We reviewed the medical records of all 189 adults who had undergone CWD mastoidectomy performed by the senior author between June 2006 and August 2011 at Loyola University Medical Center in Maywood, Ill. Institutional charges and collections for all patients were extrapolated to estimate the overall healthcare cost of revision surgery in Illinois and at the national level. Of the 189 CWD mastoidectomies, 89 were primary and 100 were revision procedures. The total charge for the revision cases was $2,783,700, and the net reimbursement (collections) was $846,289 (30.4%). Using Illinois Hospital Association data, we estimated that reimbursement for 387 revision CWD mastoidectomies that had been performed in fiscal year 2011 was nearly $3.3 million. By extrapolating our data to the national level, we estimated that 9,214 patients underwent revision CWD mastoidectomy in the United States during 2011, which cost the national healthcare system roughly $76 million, not including lost wages and productivity. Known causes of failed CWD mastoidectomies that often result in revision surgery include an inadequate meatoplasty, a facial ridge that is too high, residual diseased air cells, and recurrent cholesteatoma. A better understanding of these factors can reduce the need for revision surgery, which could have a positive impact on the economic strain related to this procedure at the local, state, and national levels. PMID:26991218

  9. Revisiting classic water erosion models in drylands: The strong impact of biological soil crusts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowker, M.A.; Belnap, J.; Bala, Chaudhary V.; Johnson, N.C.

    2008-01-01

    Soil erosion and subsequent degradation has been a contributor to societal collapse in the past and is one of the major expressions of desertification in arid regions. The revised universal soil loss equation (RUSLE) models soil lost to water erosion as a function of climate erosivity (the degree to which rainfall can result in erosion), topography, soil erodibility, and land use/management. The soil erodibility factor (K) is primarily based upon inherent soil properties (those which change slowly or not at all) such as soil texture and organic matter content, while the cover/management factor (C) is based on several parameters including biological soil crust (BSC) cover. We examined the effect of two more precise indicators of BSC development, chlorophyll a and exopolysaccharides (EPS), upon soil stability, which is closely inversely related to soil loss in an erosion event. To examine the relative influence of these elements of the C factor to the K factor, we conducted our investigation across eight strongly differing soils in the 0.8 million ha Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. We found that within every soil group, chlorophyll a was a moderate to excellent predictor of soil stability (R2 = 0.21-0.75), and consistently better than EPS. Using a simple structural equation model, we explained over half of the variance in soil stability and determined that the direct effect of chlorophyll a was 3?? more important than soil group in determining soil stability. Our results suggest that, holding the intensity of erosive forces constant, the acceleration or reduction of soil erosion in arid landscapes will primarily be an outcome of management practices. This is because the factor which is most influential to soil erosion, BSC development, is also among the most manageable, implying that water erosion in drylands has a solution. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  10. ESL Curriculum Revision: Shifting Paradigms for Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewert, Doreen E.

    2011-01-01

    The early success of the revised ESL literacy development curriculum for international undergraduates at a large Midwestern university suggests that a curriculum which integrates reading and writing activity around meaning-making tasks with texts and focuses on fluency before accuracy is preferable to a skill-based curriculum. Support for this…

  11. Draft: Standards for College Libraries; 1975 Revision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Givens, Johnnie; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Prepared by the Association of College and Research Libraries Ad Hoc Committee to Revise the 1959 Standards, these standards are designed to assess the adequacy of libraries serving liberal arts programs at the bachelors and masters degree levels. They may also be applied to small university libraries. They attempt to synthesize and articulate the…

  12. Geography: A Guide to Reference Sources. [Revised].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marley, Carol

    This revised annotated bibliography about geography concentrates on reference materials located in the McLennan Library of McGill University (Montreal, Quebec), and it emphasizes human rather than physical geography. The resources are presented in nine areas: (1) guides to the literature; (2) dictionaries; (3) gazeteers and place names; (4)…

  13. Tillage, crop rotation, and organic amendment effect on changes in soil organic matter.

    PubMed

    Rickman, R; Douglas, C; Albrecht, S; Berc, J

    2002-01-01

    Carbon sequestration in agricultural soils is controlled by the balance of added organic residues and microbial oxidation of both residues and native organic matter (OM) as moderated by management and tillage. The PC-based model CQESTR predicts decomposition of residues, organic amendments and soil OM, based on cropping practices. CQESTR uses RUSLE (Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation) crop rotation and management practice, crop production, and operation databases. These data are supplemented with residue nitrogen and soil OM, bulk density, and layer thickness. CQESTR was calibrated with soil carbon data from 70-year-long experiments at the Research Center at Pendleton, OR. The calibrated model provides estimates with a 95% confidence interval of 0.33% OM. Validation at 11 independent sites resulted in a matching of observed with calculated OM with a 95% confidence interval of 0.55% OM. A 12th site, with a history of severe erosion, provided a poor match.

  14. Measurement problem in Program Universe. Revision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noyes, H. P.; Gefwert, C.; Manthey, M. J.

    1985-07-01

    The measurement problem of contemporary physics is in our view an artifact of its philosophical and mathematical underpinnings. We describe a new philosophical view of theory formation, rooted in Wittgenstein, and Bishop's and Martin-Loef's constructivity, which obviates such discussions. We present an unfinished, but very encouraging, theory which is compatible with this philosophical framework. The theory is based on the concepts of counting and combinatorics in the framework provided by the combinatorial hierarchy, a unique hierarchy of bit strings which interact by an operation called discrimination. Measurement criteria incorporate c, h-bar and m/sub p/ or (not and) G. The resulting theory is discrete throughout, contains no infinities, and, as far as we have developed it, is in agreement with quantum mechanical and cosmological fact.

  15. Measurement problem in Program Universe. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Noyes, H.P.; Gefwert, C.; Manthey, M.J.

    1985-07-01

    The ''measurement problem'' of contemporary physics is in our view an artifact of its philosophical and mathematical underpinnings. We describe a new philosophical view of theory formation, rooted in Wittgenstein, and Bishop's and Martin-Loef's constructivity, which obviates such discussions. We present an unfinished, but very encouraging, theory which is compatible with this philosophical framework. The theory is based on the concepts of counting and combinatorics in the framework provided by the combinatorial hierarchy, a unique hierarchy of bit strings which interact by an operation called discrimination. Measurement criteria incorporate c, h-bar and m/sub p/ or (not ''and'') G. The resulting theory is discrete throughout, contains no infinities, and, as far as we have developed it, is in agreement with quantum mechanical and cosmological fact. 15 refs.

  16. Evaluation of soil moisture in the Florida State University climate model-National Center for Atmospheric Research community land model (FSU-CLM) using two reanalyses (R2 and ERA40) and in situ observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisserie, M.; Shin, D. W.; Larow, T. E.; Cocke, S.

    2006-04-01

    The simulated soil moisture from the Florida State University (FSU) climate model coupled to the National Center for Atmospheric Research community land model (CLM2) is evaluated using two reanalyses (the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts 40-year Reanalysis (ERA40) and the National Centers for Environmental Prediction/Department of Energy Reanalysis 2 (R2)) and in situ observations in Illinois and China from the Global Soil Moisture Data Bank. While the soil moisture was prescribed in the previous FSU climate model, the implementation of the CLM2 within the FSU model (hereafter FSU-CLM) provides a prognostic soil moisture (both soil liquid water and soil ice) in 10 vertical layers. For the first layer (˜0-10 cm) the comparison of the soil moisture annual cycle between the FSU-CLM and the two reanalyses shows that in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) the FSU-CLM and the ERA40 are in phase but they are out of phase with the R2. While a parameterization of the soil ice process is included in both the FSU-CLM and ERA40, it is not included in the R2. In this study, we found that the soil ice plays a key role in determining the soil moisture variation over the NH. The two reanalyses and the FSU-CLM are also compared with in situ observations. The FSU-CLM turns out to follow the annual cycle of the in situ observations better than both reanalyses.

  17. Protecting off-site populations and site workers from vapor discharges during shallow soil mixing at the North Carolina State University National Priorities List Site.

    PubMed

    Schaad, David E; Halley, James M; Alaimo, Vince

    2007-09-01

    Although vapor monitoring is generally a component of remedial action activities, most sites do not have routine gaseous releases or vapor clouds erupting from the soil during implementation of the cleanup process (or during cleanup of the site). At the North Carolina State University Lot 86 National Priorities List Site, over 8410 m3 (11,000 yd3) of chemical waste was disposed at the Site, including organic solvents and shock-sensitive and air- and water-reactive compounds. During the Remedial Action, it was imperative to protect site workers and off-site populations from potential inhalation exposures. Engineering controls were incorporated into the shallow soil mixing process to limit the release of gaseous compounds. To quantify potential exposures to on-site and off-site receptors, modeling was conducted to evaluate potential exposure routes and migration pathways. To demonstrate acceptable levels of airborne constituents, a multifaceted air sampling and monitoring program was implemented. To ensure that potential exposures could be quantified, passive dosimeters, continuous real-time monitoring, time-weighted whole air sampling, and grab samples of vapor clouds were all critical components of the air monitoring program. After the successful completion of the Remedial Action, the pre-Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) chemical waste generated from the University's educational and research laboratories was entirely encapsulated and neither on-site workers nor off-site populations were exposed to analyzed compounds above any health-based action level (i.e., 15-min short-term exposure limit [STEL], 8-hr threshold limit value, or time-weighted average permissible exposure limit).

  18. Protecting off-site populations and site workers from vapor discharges during shallow soil mixing at the North Carolina State University National Priorities List Site.

    PubMed

    Schaad, David E; Halley, James M; Alaimo, Vince

    2007-09-01

    Although vapor monitoring is generally a component of remedial action activities, most sites do not have routine gaseous releases or vapor clouds erupting from the soil during implementation of the cleanup process (or during cleanup of the site). At the North Carolina State University Lot 86 National Priorities List Site, over 8410 m3 (11,000 yd3) of chemical waste was disposed at the Site, including organic solvents and shock-sensitive and air- and water-reactive compounds. During the Remedial Action, it was imperative to protect site workers and off-site populations from potential inhalation exposures. Engineering controls were incorporated into the shallow soil mixing process to limit the release of gaseous compounds. To quantify potential exposures to on-site and off-site receptors, modeling was conducted to evaluate potential exposure routes and migration pathways. To demonstrate acceptable levels of airborne constituents, a multifaceted air sampling and monitoring program was implemented. To ensure that potential exposures could be quantified, passive dosimeters, continuous real-time monitoring, time-weighted whole air sampling, and grab samples of vapor clouds were all critical components of the air monitoring program. After the successful completion of the Remedial Action, the pre-Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) chemical waste generated from the University's educational and research laboratories was entirely encapsulated and neither on-site workers nor off-site populations were exposed to analyzed compounds above any health-based action level (i.e., 15-min short-term exposure limit [STEL], 8-hr threshold limit value, or time-weighted average permissible exposure limit). PMID:17912923

  19. Land degradation assessment by geo-spatially modeling different soil erodibility equations in a semi-arid catchment.

    PubMed

    Saygın, Selen Deviren; Basaran, Mustafa; Ozcan, Ali Ugur; Dolarslan, Melda; Timur, Ozgur Burhan; Yilman, F Ebru; Erpul, Gunay

    2011-09-01

    Land degradation by soil erosion is one of the most serious problems and environmental issues in many ecosystems of arid and semi-arid regions. Especially, the disturbed areas have greater soil detachability and transportability capacity. Evaluation of land degradation in terms of soil erodibility, by using geostatistical modeling, is vital to protect and reclaim susceptible areas. Soil erodibility, described as the ability of soils to resist erosion, can be measured either directly under natural or simulated rainfall conditions, or indirectly estimated by empirical regression models. This study compares three empirical equations used to determine the soil erodibility factor of revised universal soil loss equation prediction technology based on their geospatial performances in the semi-arid catchment of the Saraykoy II Irrigation Dam located in Cankiri, Turkey. A total of 311 geo-referenced soil samples were collected with irregular intervals from the top soil layer (0-10 cm). Geostatistical analysis was performed with the point values of each equation to determine its spatial pattern. Results showed that equations that used soil organic matter in combination with the soil particle size better agreed with the variations in land use and topography of the catchment than the one using only the particle size distribution. It is recommended that the equations which dynamically integrate soil intrinsic properties with land use, topography, and its influences on the local microclimates, could be successfully used to geospatially determine sites highly susceptible to water erosion, and therefore, to select the agricultural and bio-engineering control measures needed.

  20. Adapting the RUSLE and GIS to model soil erosion risk in a mountains karst watershed, Guizhou Province, China.

    PubMed

    Yue-Qing, Xu; Xiao-Mei, Shao; Xiang-Bin, Kong; Jian, Peng; Yun-Long, Cai

    2008-06-01

    Soil erosion is a serious environmental problem in Guizhou Province, which is located in the centre of the karst areas of southwestern China. Unfortunately, Guizhou Province suffers from a lack of financial resources to research, monitor and model soil erosion at large watershed. In order to assess the soil erosion risk, soil erosion modeling at the watershed scale are urgently needed to be undertaken. This study integrated the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) with a Geographic Information System (GIS) to estimate soil loss and identify the risk erosion areas in the Maotiao River watershed, which is a typical rural watershed in Guizhou Province. All factors used in the RUSLE were calculated for the watershed using local data. It was classified into five categories ranging from minimal risk to extreme erosion risk depending on the calculated soil erosion amount. The soil erosion map was linked to land use, elevation and slope maps to explore the relationship between soil erosion and environmental factors and identify the areas of soil erosion risk. The results can be used to advice the local government in prioritizing the areas of immediate erosion mitigation. The integrated approach allows for relatively easy, fast, and cost-effective estimation of spatially distributed soil erosion. It thus indicates that RUSLE-GIS model is a useful and efficient tool for evaluating and mapping soil erosion risk at a large watershed scale in Guizhou Province.

  1. Modelling soil erosion at European scale: towards harmonization and reproducibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosco, C.; de Rigo, D.; Dewitte, O.; Poesen, J.; Panagos, P.

    2015-02-01

    Soil erosion by water is one of the most widespread forms of soil degradation. The loss of soil as a result of erosion can lead to decline in organic matter and nutrient contents, breakdown of soil structure and reduction of the water-holding capacity. Measuring soil loss across the whole landscape is impractical and thus research is needed to improve methods of estimating soil erosion with computational modelling, upon which integrated assessment and mitigation strategies may be based. Despite the efforts, the prediction value of existing models is still limited, especially at regional and continental scale, because a systematic knowledge of local climatological and soil parameters is often unavailable. A new approach for modelling soil erosion at regional scale is here proposed. It is based on the joint use of low-data-demanding models and innovative techniques for better estimating model inputs. The proposed modelling architecture has at its basis the semantic array programming paradigm and a strong effort towards computational reproducibility. An extended version of the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) has been implemented merging different empirical rainfall-erosivity equations within a climatic ensemble model and adding a new factor for a better consideration of soil stoniness within the model. Pan-European soil erosion rates by water have been estimated through the use of publicly available data sets and locally reliable empirical relationships. The accuracy of the results is corroborated by a visual plausibility check (63% of a random sample of grid cells are accurate, 83% at least moderately accurate, bootstrap p ≤ 0.05). A comparison with country-level statistics of pre-existing European soil erosion maps is also provided.

  2. Collaboration or Cooperation? Analyzing Group Dynamics and Revision Processes in Wikis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Nike; Ducate, Lara; Kost, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the online writing and revision behaviors of university language learners. In small groups, 53 intermediate German students from three classes at three different universities created wiki pages with background information about a novel read in class. All meaning- and language-related revisions were analyzed to determine whether…

  3. Computerized Word-Processing as an Aid to Revision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bean, John C.

    1983-01-01

    Describes an experiment at Montana State University in which 12 professors and four freshman composition students were trained to use the university's central computer as a word processor. Concludes that the computer can be a powerful revision aid for writing students. (FL)

  4. [Dynamics of soil erosion at upper reaches of Minjiang River based on GIS].

    PubMed

    He, Xingyuan; Hu, Zhibi; Li, Yuehui; Hu, Yuanman

    2005-12-01

    Based on TM and ETM imagines, and employing GIS technique and empirical Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) model, this paper studied the dynamics of soil erosion at the upper reaches of Minjiang River during three typical periods, with the main affecting factors analyzed. The results showed that the soil erosion area was increased by 1.28%, 1.84 % and 1.70% in 1986, 1995 and 2000, respectively. The average erosion modulus was increased from 832.64 t x km(-2) x yr(-1) in 1986 to 1048.74 t x km(-2) yr(-2) in 1995 and reached 1362.11 t x km(-2) yr(-1) in 2000, and soil loss was mainly of slight and light erosion, companying with a small quantity of middling erosion. The area of soil erosion was small, and the degree was light. There was a significant correlation between slope and soil loss, which mainly happened in the regions with a slope larger than 25 degrees, and accounted for 93.65%, 93.81% and 92.71% of the total erosion in 1986, 1995 and 2000, respectively. As for the altitude, middling, semi-high and high mountains and dry valley were liable to soil erosion, which accounted for 98.21%, 97.63% and 99.27% of the total erosion in 1986, 1995 and 2000, respectively. Different vegetation had a significant effect on soil erosion, and shrub and newly restored forest were the main erosion area. Excessive depasture not only resulted in the degradation of pasture, but also led to slight soil erosion. Land use type and soil type also contributed to soil loss, among which, dry-cinnamon soil and calcic gray-cinnamon soil were the most dangerous ones needing more protection. Soil loss was also linearly increased with increasing population and households, which suggested that the increase of population and households was the driving factor for soil loss increase in this area.

  5. Modelling soil erosion at European scale: towards harmonization and reproducibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosco, C.; de Rigo, D.; Dewitte, O.; Poesen, J.; Panagos, P.

    2014-04-01

    Soil erosion by water is one of the most widespread forms of soil degradation. The loss of soil as a result of erosion can lead to decline in organic matter and nutrient contents, breakdown of soil structure and reduction of the water holding capacity. Measuring soil loss across the whole landscape is impractical and thus research is needed to improve methods of estimating soil erosion with computational modelling, upon which integrated assessment and mitigation strategies may be based. Despite the efforts, the prediction value of existing models is still limited, especially at regional and continental scale. A new approach for modelling soil erosion at large spatial scale is here proposed. It is based on the joint use of low data demanding models and innovative techniques for better estimating model inputs. The proposed modelling architecture has at its basis the semantic array programming paradigm and a strong effort towards computational reproducibility. An extended version of the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) has been implemented merging different empirical rainfall-erosivity equations within a climatic ensemble model and adding a new factor for a better consideration of soil stoniness within the model. Pan-European soil erosion rates by water have been estimated through the use of publicly available datasets and locally reliable empirical relationships. The accuracy of the results is corroborated by a visual plausibility check (63% of a random sample of grid cells are accurate, 83% at least moderately accurate, bootstrap p ≤ 0.05). A comparison with country level statistics of pre-existing European maps of soil erosion by water is also provided.

  6. Estimation of Annual Average Soil Loss, Based on Rusle Model in Kallar Watershed, Bhavani Basin, Tamil Nadu, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahaman, S. Abdul; Aruchamy, S.; Jegankumar, R.; Ajeez, S. Abdul

    2015-10-01

    Soil erosion is a widespread environmental challenge faced in Kallar watershed nowadays. Erosion is defined as the movement of soil by water and wind, and it occurs in Kallar watershed under a wide range of land uses. Erosion by water can be dramatic during storm events, resulting in wash-outs and gullies. It can also be insidious, occurring as sheet and rill erosion during heavy rains. Most of the soil lost by water erosion is by the processes of sheet and rill erosion. Land degradation and subsequent soil erosion and sedimentation play a significant role in impairing water resources within sub watersheds, watersheds and basins. Using conventional methods to assess soil erosion risk is expensive and time consuming. A comprehensive methodology that integrates Remote sensing and Geographic Information Systems (GIS), coupled with the use of an empirical model (Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation- RUSLE) to assess risk, can identify and assess soil erosion potential and estimate the value of soil loss. GIS data layers including, rainfall erosivity (R), soil erodability (K), slope length and steepness (LS), cover management (C) and conservation practice (P) factors were computed to determine their effects on average annual soil loss in the study area. The final map of annual soil erosion shows a maximum soil loss of 398.58 t/ h-1/ y-1. Based on the result soil erosion was classified in to soil erosion severity map with five classes, very low, low, moderate, high and critical respectively. Further RUSLE factors has been broken into two categories, soil erosion susceptibility (A=RKLS), and soil erosion hazard (A=RKLSCP) have been computed. It is understood that functions of C and P are factors that can be controlled and thus can greatly reduce soil loss through management and conservational measures.

  7. Scar revision - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Surgery to revise scars is done while the patient is awake, sleeping (sedated), or deep asleep and pain-free (local anesthesia or general anesthesia). Massive injuries (such as burns) can cause loss of a large area of ...

  8. Evaluation of soil moisture in the Florida State University climate model-National Center for Atmospheric Research community land model (FSU-CLM) using two reanalyses (R2 and ERA40) and in situ observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisserie, M.

    2007-05-01

    The simulated soil moisture from the Florida State University/Center of Ocean and Atmosphere Prediction Studies (FSU/COAPS) global spectral model coupled to the National Center for Atmospheric Research community land model (CLM2) is evaluated using two reanalyses (the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts 40-year Reanalysis (ERA40) and the National Centers for Environmental Prediction/Department of Energy Reanalysis 2 (R2)) and in situ observations in Illinois and China from the Global Soil Moisture Data Bank. While the soil moisture was prescribed in the previous FSU/COAPS model, the implementation of the CLM2 within the FSU/COAPS (hereafter FSU-CLM) provides a prognostic soil moisture (both soil liquid water and soil ice) in 10 vertical layers. For the first layer (0-10 cm) the comparison of the soil moisture annual cycle between the FSU-CLM and the two reanalyses shows that in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) the FSU-CLM and the ERA40 are in phase but they are out of phase with the R2. While a parameterization of the soil ice process is included in both the FSU-CLM and ERA40, it is not included in the R2. In this study, we found that the soil ice plays a key role in determining the soil moisture variation over the NH. The two reanalyses and the FSU-CLM are also compared with in situ observations. The FSU-CLM turns out to follow the annual cycle of the in situ observations better than both reanalyses.

  9. Integration of remote sensing, RUSLE and GIS to model potential soil loss and sediment yield (SY)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamaludin, H.; Lihan, T.; Rahman, Z. Ali; Mustapha, M. A.; Idris, W. M. R.; Rahim, S. A.

    2013-04-01

    Land use activities within a basin serve as one of the contributing factors which cause deterioration of river water quality through its potential effect on erosion. Sediment yield in the form of suspended solid in the river water body which is transported to the coastal area occurs as a sign of lowering of the water quality. Hence, the aim of this study was to determine potential soil loss using the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) model and the sediment yield, in the Geographical Information Systems (GIS) environment within selected sub-catchments of Pahang River Basin. RUSLE was used to estimate potential soil losses and sediment yield by utilizing information on rainfall erosivity (R) using interpolation of rainfall data, soil erodibility (K) using field measurement and soil map, vegetation cover (C) using satellite images, topography (LS) using DEM and conservation practices (P) using satellite images. The results indicated that the rate of potential soil loss in these sub-catchments ranged from very low to extremely high. The area covered by very low to low potential soil loss was about 99%, whereas moderate to extremely high soil loss potential covered only about 1% of the study area. Sediment yield represented only 1% of the potential soil loss. The sediment yield (SY) value in Pahang River turned out to be higher closer to the river mouth because of the topographic character, climate, vegetation type and density, and land use within the drainage basin.

  10. Predicting soil erosion for alternative land uses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Erda; Xin, Chang; Williams, Jimmy R; Xu, Cheng

    2006-01-01

    The APEX (Agricultural Policy-Environmental eXtender) model developed in the United States was calibrated for northwestern China's conditions. The model was then used to investigate soil erosion effects associated with alternative land uses at the ZFG (Zi-Fang-Gully) watershed in northwestern China. The results indicated that the APEX model could be calibrated reasonably well (+/-15% errors) to fit those areas with >50% slope within the watershed. Factors being considered during calibration include runoff, RUSLE (Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation) slope length and steepness factor, channel capacity flow rate, floodplain saturated hydraulic conductivity, and RUSLE C factor coefficient. No changes were made in the APEX computer code. Predictions suggest that reforestation is the best practice among the eight alternative land uses (the status quo, all grass, all grain, all grazing, all forest, half tree and half grass, 70% tree and 30% grain, and construction of a reservoir) for control of water runoff and soil erosion. Construction of a reservoir is the most effective strategy for controlling sediment yield although it does nothing to control upland erosion. For every 1 Mg of crop yield, 11 Mg of soil were lost during the 30-yr simulation period, suggesting that expanding land use for food production should not be encouraged on the ZFG watershed. Grass species are less effective than trees in controlling runoff and erosion on steep slopes because trees generally have deeper and more stable root systems.

  11. 75 FR 19921 - Revisions to the Arizona State Implementation Plan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-16

    .... These sources may include construction sites, unpaved roads, disturbed soil in open areas, and power... SIP. Please see 47 FR 15579. The MCAQD adopted revisions to the SIP-approved version on July 13, 1988... Control Technology (RACT), in moderate PM nonattainment areas, and Best Available Control Measures...

  12. Assessing soil erosion risk using RUSLE through a GIS open source desktop and web application.

    PubMed

    Duarte, L; Teodoro, A C; Gonçalves, J A; Soares, D; Cunha, M

    2016-06-01

    Soil erosion is a serious environmental problem. An estimation of the expected soil loss by water-caused erosion can be calculated considering the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE). Geographical Information Systems (GIS) provide different tools to create categorical maps of soil erosion risk which help to study the risk assessment of soil loss. The objective of this study was to develop a GIS open source application (in QGIS), using the RUSLE methodology for estimating erosion rate at the watershed scale (desktop application) and provide the same application via web access (web application). The applications developed allow one to generate all the maps necessary to evaluate the soil erosion risk. Several libraries and algorithms from SEXTANTE were used to develop these applications. These applications were tested in Montalegre municipality (Portugal). The maps involved in RUSLE method-soil erosivity factor, soil erodibility factor, topographic factor, cover management factor, and support practices-were created. The estimated mean value of the soil loss obtained was 220 ton km(-2) year(-1) ranged from 0.27 to 1283 ton km(-2) year(-1). The results indicated that most of the study area (80 %) is characterized by very low soil erosion level (<321 ton km(-2) year(-1)) and in 4 % of the studied area the soil erosion was higher than 962 ton km(-2) year(-1). It was also concluded that areas with high slope values and bare soil are related with high level of erosion and the higher the P and C values, the higher the soil erosion percentage. The RUSLE web and the desktop application are freely available. PMID:27184749

  13. Assessing soil erosion risk using RUSLE through a GIS open source desktop and web application.

    PubMed

    Duarte, L; Teodoro, A C; Gonçalves, J A; Soares, D; Cunha, M

    2016-06-01

    Soil erosion is a serious environmental problem. An estimation of the expected soil loss by water-caused erosion can be calculated considering the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE). Geographical Information Systems (GIS) provide different tools to create categorical maps of soil erosion risk which help to study the risk assessment of soil loss. The objective of this study was to develop a GIS open source application (in QGIS), using the RUSLE methodology for estimating erosion rate at the watershed scale (desktop application) and provide the same application via web access (web application). The applications developed allow one to generate all the maps necessary to evaluate the soil erosion risk. Several libraries and algorithms from SEXTANTE were used to develop these applications. These applications were tested in Montalegre municipality (Portugal). The maps involved in RUSLE method-soil erosivity factor, soil erodibility factor, topographic factor, cover management factor, and support practices-were created. The estimated mean value of the soil loss obtained was 220 ton km(-2) year(-1) ranged from 0.27 to 1283 ton km(-2) year(-1). The results indicated that most of the study area (80 %) is characterized by very low soil erosion level (<321 ton km(-2) year(-1)) and in 4 % of the studied area the soil erosion was higher than 962 ton km(-2) year(-1). It was also concluded that areas with high slope values and bare soil are related with high level of erosion and the higher the P and C values, the higher the soil erosion percentage. The RUSLE web and the desktop application are freely available.

  14. Business Education Curriculum. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This revised curriculum gives information on the skills and knowledge students should acquire through a business education program. The competencies listed reflect the skills that employers see as necessary for success in clerical and accounting occupations. The handbook is organized in seven sections that cover the following: (1) the concept of…

  15. AGRICOLA User's Guide. [Revised].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilreath, Charles L.

    This document is the newest revision of the third manual documenting the National Agricultural Library database. Since it began in 1970, the AGRICOLA database has continued to grow and to change steadily; new subfiles have been added, database record formats have been expanded, and subject category code schemes have been modified several times.…

  16. What Research Says about Revision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentry, Larry A.

    The process, content, and effect of revision in the writing process is analyzed in light of recent writing process research. Taylor calls for an approach to English as second language composition in which students are taught how to write with an emphasis on revision. Most authorities agree that revision entails a complex set of behaviors that…

  17. 8. Photocopy of measured drawing (from the Iowa State University, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Photocopy of measured drawing (from the Iowa State University, Physical Plant) Delineator unknown 1929; revised to 1943 MAINTENANCE PLANS, BASEMENT THROUGH THIRD FLOORS - Iowa State University, Morrill Hall, Morrill Road, Ames, Story County, IA

  18. Keys to soil taxonomy by soil survey staff (sixth edition)

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    This publication, Keys to Soil Taxonomy, serves two purposes. It provides the taxonomic keys necessary for the classification of soils according to Soil Taxonomy in a form that can be used easily in the field, and it also acquaints users of Soil Taxonomy with recent changes in the classification system. This volume includes all revisions of the keys that have so far been approved, replacing the original keys in Soil Taxonomy: A Basic System of Soil Classification for Making and Interpreting Soil Surveys (1975), the work on which this abridged version, first published in 1983, is based. This publication incorporates all amendments approved to date and published in National Soil Taxonomy Handbook (NSTH) Issues 1-17.

  19. Soil loss estimation and prioritization of sub-watersheds of Kali River basin, Karnataka, India, using RUSLE and GIS.

    PubMed

    Markose, Vipin Joseph; Jayappa, K S

    2016-04-01

    Most of the mountainous regions in tropical humid climatic zone experience severe soil loss due to natural factors. In the absence of measured data, modeling techniques play a crucial role for quantitative estimation of soil loss in such regions. The objective of this research work is to estimate soil loss and prioritize the sub-watersheds of Kali River basin using Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) model. Various thematic layers of RUSLE factors such as rainfall erosivity (R), soil erodibility (K), topographic factor (LS), crop management factor (C), and support practice factor (P) have been prepared by using multiple spatial and non-spatial data sets. These layers are integrated in geographic information system (GIS) environment and estimated the soil loss. The results show that ∼42 % of the study area falls under low erosion risk and only 6.97 % area suffer from very high erosion risk. Based on the rate of soil loss, 165 sub-watersheds have been prioritized into four categories-very high, high, moderate, and low erosion risk. Anthropogenic activities such as deforestation, construction of dams, and rapid urbanization are the main reasons for high rate of soil loss in the study area. The soil erosion rate and prioritization maps help in implementation of a proper watershed management plan for the river basin. PMID:26969157

  20. Soil loss estimation and prioritization of sub-watersheds of Kali River basin, Karnataka, India, using RUSLE and GIS.

    PubMed

    Markose, Vipin Joseph; Jayappa, K S

    2016-04-01

    Most of the mountainous regions in tropical humid climatic zone experience severe soil loss due to natural factors. In the absence of measured data, modeling techniques play a crucial role for quantitative estimation of soil loss in such regions. The objective of this research work is to estimate soil loss and prioritize the sub-watersheds of Kali River basin using Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) model. Various thematic layers of RUSLE factors such as rainfall erosivity (R), soil erodibility (K), topographic factor (LS), crop management factor (C), and support practice factor (P) have been prepared by using multiple spatial and non-spatial data sets. These layers are integrated in geographic information system (GIS) environment and estimated the soil loss. The results show that ∼42 % of the study area falls under low erosion risk and only 6.97 % area suffer from very high erosion risk. Based on the rate of soil loss, 165 sub-watersheds have been prioritized into four categories-very high, high, moderate, and low erosion risk. Anthropogenic activities such as deforestation, construction of dams, and rapid urbanization are the main reasons for high rate of soil loss in the study area. The soil erosion rate and prioritization maps help in implementation of a proper watershed management plan for the river basin.

  1. Dynamics of Soil Erosion as Influenced by Watershed Management Practices: A Case Study of the Agula Watershed in the Semi-Arid Highlands of Northern Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenta, Ayele Almaw; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Katsuyuki; Haregeweyn, Nigussie; Negussie, Aklilu

    2016-11-01

    Since the past two decades, watershed management practices such as construction of stone bunds and establishment of exclosures have been widely implemented in the semi-arid highlands of northern Ethiopia to curb land degradation by soil erosion. This study assessed changes in soil erosion for the years 1990, 2000 and 2012 as a result of such watershed management practices in Agula watershed using the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation. The Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation factors were computed in a geographic information system for 30 × 30 m raster layers using spatial data obtained from different sources. The results revealed significant reduction in soil loss rates by about 55 % from about 28 to 12 t ha-1 per year in 1990-2000 and an overall 64 % reduction from 28 to 10 t ha-1 per year in 1990-2012. This change in soil loss is attributed to improvement in surface cover and stone bund practices, which resulted in the decrease in mean C and P-factors, respectively, by about 19 % and 34 % in 1990-2000 and an overall decrease in C-factor by 29 % in 1990-2012. Considerable reductions in soil loss were observed from bare land (89 %), followed by cultivated land (56 %) and shrub land (49 %). Furthermore, the reduction in soil loss was more pronounced in steeper slopes where very steep slope and steep slope classes experienced over 70 % reduction. Validation of soil erosion estimations using field observed points showed an overall accuracy of 69 %, which is fairly satisfactory. This study demonstrated the potential of watershed management efforts to bring remarkable restoration of degraded semi-arid lands that could serve as a basis for sustainable planning of future developments of areas experiencing severe land degradation due to water erosion.

  2. Quantification and site-specification of the support practice factor when mapping soil erosion risk associated with olive plantations in the Mediterranean island of Crete.

    PubMed

    Karydas, Christos G; Sekuloska, Tijana; Silleos, Georgios N

    2009-02-01

    Due to inappropriate agricultural management practices, soil erosion is becoming one of the most dangerous forms of soil degradation in many olive farming areas in the Mediterranean region, leading to significant decrease of soil fertility and yield. In order to prevent further soil degradation, proper measures are necessary to be locally implemented. In this perspective, an increase in the spatial accuracy of remote sensing datasets and advanced image analysis are significant tools necessary and efficient for mapping soil erosion risk on a fine scale. In this study, the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) was implemented in the spatial domain using GIS, while a very high resolution satellite image, namely a QuickBird image, was used for deriving cover management (C) and support practice (P) factors, in order to map the risk of soil erosion in Kolymvari, a typical olive farming area in the island of Crete, Greece. The results comprised a risk map of soil erosion when P factor was taken uniform (conventional approach) and a risk map when P factor was quantified site-specifically using object-oriented image analysis. The results showed that the QuickBird image was necessary in order to achieve site-specificity of the P factor and therefore to support fine scale mapping of soil erosion risk in an olive cultivation area, such as the one of Kolymvari in Crete. Increasing the accuracy of the QB image classification will further improve the resulted soil erosion mapping.

  3. Soil bed reactor work of the Environmental Research Lab. of the University of Arizona in support of the research and development of Biosphere 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frye, Robert

    1990-01-01

    Research at the Environmental Research Lab in support of Biosphere 2 was both basic and applied in nature. One aspect of the applied research involved the use of biological reactors for the scrubbing of trace atmospheric organic contaminants. The research involved a quantitative study of the efficiency of operation of Soil Bed Reactors (SBR) and the optimal operating conditions for contaminant removal. The basic configuration of a SBR is that air is moved through a living soil that supports a population of plants. Upon exposure to the soil, contaminants are either passively adsorbed onto the surface of soil particles, chemically transformed in the soil to usable compounds that are taken up by the plants or microbes as a metabolic energy source and converted to CO2 and water.

  4. E.H. Butler Library Disaster Preparedness Plan. Revised 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Univ. of New York, Buffalo. Coll. at Buffalo.

    The plan presented in this revised manual is designed to minimize the potential for disaster in the E. H. Butler Library at the State University of New York College at Buffalo, and to minimize damage to materials in the event of a disaster. It contains emergency instructions, evacuation procedures, a disaster contact list, and information on…

  5. Household Anthropogenic Pollutants Against Soil Respiration Erin Murphy EnvironMentors - AggieMentor -Trent Ichiuji University of California Davis / Woodland High School

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, E.; Ichiuji, T.

    2013-12-01

    Macroscopic organisms have been largely studied for carbon dioxide release rate and the effect that human development has had on these rates. However, the majority of biomass on Earth is microbes found on the Earth's surface, in the waterways and in soil. As for pollution, a single drop of weak acid is unlikely to kill on the skin of a large animal, yet this could be catastrophic to a colony of microbes. This experiment studied the effect of anthropogenic pollution on soil respiration using toxins that could easily infiltrate our soil and water systems. This project specifically examined common household chemicals in conjunction with Putah Creek soil. The tested toxins were Mobil 1 motor oil, Windex window cleaner, Ajax dish soap, and Dawn antibacterial dish soap. Six samples of Putah Creek soil were collected in jars. Four soil samples were exposed to toxins, while the remaining two were the control and glucose replicates. The control included soil damped by water, while the glucose replicate included both water and glucose. The glucose replicate was included because of its known ability to encourage respiration. A 20 mL NaCl base trap was added to each jar before being sealed. The jars were aerated once a week before titration. The 1.0 N NaCl from each jar of each week was titrated with 0.5 N HCl. The initial prediction for this experiment was that the glucose would raise the respiration levels, and that the control with no glucose would fall. Five weeks of recording the respiration levels confirmed our hypothesis that household toxins are detrimental to the soil microbial community over time. A similar experiment employed heavy metals instead of household toxins. The experiment showed that soil respiration and ATP content were strongly affected by the heavy metal content present in the soil. (Vanhala, Ahtiainen, 1994). This project will raise awareness of the negative effect of improper disposal of seemingly harmless materials. The next step of the project would

  6. Revision and Validation of the Revised Teacher Beliefs Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Jane

    This study revised the Teacher Beliefs Survey (S. Wooley and A. Wooley, 1999; TBS), an instrument to assess teachers beliefs related to constructivist and behaviorist theories of learning, and then studied the validity of the revised TBS. Drawing on a literature review, researchers added items for the existing constructs of the TBS and added a new…

  7. Soils in Schools: Embedding Soil Science in STEM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryce, Alisa

    2015-01-01

    Soil science, though relevant to a variety of subjects including science, geography, mathematics, social sciences and history, is typically perceived as a subgenre of agriculture. With a global need for soil scientists, and declining numbers in university soil courses, there's a growing gap between science needs and providers. One way to promote…

  8. Spatio-temporal assessment of soil erosion risk in different agricultural zones of the Inle Lake region, southern Shan State, Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Htwe, Thin Nwe; Brinkmann, Katja; Buerkert, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Myanmar is one of Southeast Asia's climatically most diverse countries, where sheet, rill, and gully erosion affect crop yields and subsequently livelihood strategies of many people. In the unique wetland ecosystem of Inle Lake, soil erosion in surrounding uplands lead to sedimentation and pollution of the water body. The current study uses the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) to identify soil erosion risks of the Inle Lake region in space and time and to assess the relationship between soil erosion and degradation for different agricultural zones and cropping systems. Altogether, 85% of soil losses occurred on barren land along the steep slopes. The hotspot of soil erosion risk is situated in the western uplands characterized by unsustainable land use practices combined with a steep topography. The estimated average soil losses amounted to 19.9, 10.1, and 26.2 t ha(-1) yr(-1) in 1989, 2000, and 2009, respectively. These fluctuations were mainly the results of changes in precipitation and land cover (deforestation (-19%) and expansion of annual cropland (+35%) from 1989 to 2009). Most farmers in the study area have not yet adopted effective soil protection measures to mitigate the effects of soil erosion such as land degradation and water pollution of the lake reservoir. This urgently needs to be addressed by policy makers and extension services.

  9. Spatio-temporal assessment of soil erosion risk in different agricultural zones of the Inle Lake region, southern Shan State, Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Htwe, Thin Nwe; Brinkmann, Katja; Buerkert, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Myanmar is one of Southeast Asia's climatically most diverse countries, where sheet, rill, and gully erosion affect crop yields and subsequently livelihood strategies of many people. In the unique wetland ecosystem of Inle Lake, soil erosion in surrounding uplands lead to sedimentation and pollution of the water body. The current study uses the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) to identify soil erosion risks of the Inle Lake region in space and time and to assess the relationship between soil erosion and degradation for different agricultural zones and cropping systems. Altogether, 85% of soil losses occurred on barren land along the steep slopes. The hotspot of soil erosion risk is situated in the western uplands characterized by unsustainable land use practices combined with a steep topography. The estimated average soil losses amounted to 19.9, 10.1, and 26.2 t ha(-1) yr(-1) in 1989, 2000, and 2009, respectively. These fluctuations were mainly the results of changes in precipitation and land cover (deforestation (-19%) and expansion of annual cropland (+35%) from 1989 to 2009). Most farmers in the study area have not yet adopted effective soil protection measures to mitigate the effects of soil erosion such as land degradation and water pollution of the lake reservoir. This urgently needs to be addressed by policy makers and extension services. PMID:26350794

  10. Multimodal Revision Techniques in Webtexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Cheryl E.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines how an online scholarly journal, "Kairos: Rhetoric, Technology, Pedagogy," mentors authors to revise their webtexts (interactive, digital media scholarship) for publication. Using an editorial pedagogy in which multimodal and rhetorical genre theories are merged with revision techniques found in process-based…

  11. Gendered Performances during Peer Revision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Styslinger, Mary E.

    2008-01-01

    This study explored the ways gender is accomplished in varied social contexts during the peer revision process in a secondary English classroom. Using a post-structural feminist theoretical framework, an analysis of classroom discourse provided a basis for understanding the performance of gender during peer revision, the effects of gender…

  12. Surgical Scar Revision: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Shilpa; Dahiya, Naveen; Gupta, Somesh

    2014-01-01

    Scar formation is an inevitable consequence of wound healing from either a traumatic or a surgical intervention. The aesthetic appearance of a scar is the most important criteria to judge the surgical outcome. An understanding of the anatomy and wound healing along with experience, meticulous planning and technique can reduce complications and improve the surgical outcome. Scar revision does not erase a scar but helps to make it less noticeable and more acceptable. Both surgical and non-surgical techniques, used either alone or in combination can be used for revising a scar. In planning a scar revision surgeon should decide on when to act and the type of technique to use for scar revision to get an aesthetically pleasing outcome. This review article provides overview of methods applied for facial scar revision. This predominantly covers surgical methods. PMID:24761092

  13. Genetic structure of soil population of fungus Fusarium oxysporum Schlechtend.: Fr.: Molecular reidentification of the species and genetic differentiation of isolates using polymerase chain reaction technique with universal primers (UP-PCR)

    SciTech Connect

    Bulat, S.A.; Mironenko, N.V.; Zholkevich, Yu.G.

    1995-07-01

    The genetic structure of three soil populations of fungus Fusarium oxysporum was analyzed using polymerase chain reaction with universal primers (UP-PCR). Distinct UP-PCR variants revealed by means of cross-dot hybridization of amplified DNA and restriction analysis of nuclear ribosomal DNA represent subspecies or sibling species of F. oxysporum. The remaining isolates of F. oxysporum showed moderate UP-PCR polymorphism characterized by numerous types, whose relatedness was analyzed by computer treatment of the UP-PCR patterns. The genetic distance trees based on the UP-PCR patterns, which were obtained with different universal primers, demonstrated similar topology. This suggests that evolutionarily important genome rearrangements correlatively occur within the entire genome. Isolates representing different UP-PCR polymorphisms were encountered in all populations, being distributed asymmetrically in two of these. In general, soil populations of F. oxysporum were represented by numerous genetically isolated groups with a similar genome structure. The genetic heterogeneity of the isolates within these groups is likely to be caused by the parasexual process. The usefulness of the UP-PCR technique for population studies of F. oxysporum was demonstrated. 39 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Recent Revisions to PVWATTS

    SciTech Connect

    Marion, B.; Anderberg, M.; Gray-Hann, P.

    2005-11-01

    PVWATTS is an Internet-accessible software program that allows the user to easily calculate the energy production and cost savings for grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems located throughout the United States. To ensure that PVWATTS continues to meet its users' needs, an online survey form was provided to users to identify areas for improvement. The results of the survey were used to prioritize improvements to PVWATTS in FY2005. PVWATTS was revised by changing the PV system specification input for system size from an AC power rating to a nameplate DC power rating; adding an input for an overall DC to AC derate factor; updating the residential electric rates; adding monthly and yearly solar radiation values for the PV array; and simplifying the user interface for Version 2.

  15. Managing the University Curriculum: Making Common Cause.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bocock, Jean, Ed.; Watson, David, Ed.

    This book discusses changes in United Kingdom universities such as, expansion, diversification and revised expectations and their impact on university organization. The key dilemma is felt to be how to recover and nurture a shared sense of purpose between those who manage and those who deliver a curriculum under social and economic pressure. The…

  16. Estimation of soil erosion risk within an important agricultural sub-watershed in Bursa, Turkey, in relation to rapid urbanization.

    PubMed

    Ozsoy, Gokhan; Aksoy, Ertugrul

    2015-07-01

    This paper integrates the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) with a GIS model to investigate the spatial distribution of annual soil loss and identify areas of soil erosion risk in the Uluabat sub-watershed, an important agricultural site in Bursa Province, Turkey. The total soil loss from water erosion was 473,274 Mg year(-1). Accordingly, 60.3% of the surveyed area was classified into a very low erosion risk class while 25.7% was found to be in high and severe erosion risk classes. Soil loss had a close relationship with land use and topography. The most severe erosion risk typically occurs on ridges and steep slopes where agriculture, degraded forest, and shrubs are the main land uses and cover types. Another goal of this study was to use GIS to reveal the multi-year urbanization status caused by rapid urbanization that constitutes another soil erosion risk in this area. Urbanization has increased by 57.7% and the most areal change was determined in class I lands at a rate of 80% over 25 years. Urbanization was identified as one of the causes of excessive soil loss in the study area. PMID:26059559

  17. Estimation of soil erosion risk within an important agricultural sub-watershed in Bursa, Turkey, in relation to rapid urbanization.

    PubMed

    Ozsoy, Gokhan; Aksoy, Ertugrul

    2015-07-01

    This paper integrates the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) with a GIS model to investigate the spatial distribution of annual soil loss and identify areas of soil erosion risk in the Uluabat sub-watershed, an important agricultural site in Bursa Province, Turkey. The total soil loss from water erosion was 473,274 Mg year(-1). Accordingly, 60.3% of the surveyed area was classified into a very low erosion risk class while 25.7% was found to be in high and severe erosion risk classes. Soil loss had a close relationship with land use and topography. The most severe erosion risk typically occurs on ridges and steep slopes where agriculture, degraded forest, and shrubs are the main land uses and cover types. Another goal of this study was to use GIS to reveal the multi-year urbanization status caused by rapid urbanization that constitutes another soil erosion risk in this area. Urbanization has increased by 57.7% and the most areal change was determined in class I lands at a rate of 80% over 25 years. Urbanization was identified as one of the causes of excessive soil loss in the study area.

  18. Remote Sensing-based Models of Soil Vulnerability to Compaction and Erosion from Off-highway Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarreal, M. L.; Webb, R. H.; Norman, L.; Psillas, J.; Rosenberg, A.; Carmichael, S.; Petrakis, R.; Sparks, P.

    2014-12-01

    Intensive off-road vehicle use for immigration, smuggling, and security of the United States-Mexico border has prompted concerns about long-term human impacts on sensitive desert ecosystems. To help managers identify areas susceptible to soil erosion from vehicle disturbances, we developed a series of erosion potential models based on factors from the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE), with particular focus on the management factor (P-factor) and vegetation cover (C-factor). To better express the vulnerability of soils to human disturbances, a soil compaction index (applied as the P-factor) was calculated as the difference in saturated hydrologic conductivity (Ks) between disturbed and undisturbed soils, which was then scaled up to remote sensing-based maps of vehicle tracks and digital soils maps. The C-factor was improved using a satellite-based vegetation index, which was better correlated with estimated ground cover (r2 = 0.77) than data derived from regional land cover maps (r2 = 0.06). RUSLE factors were normalized to give equal weight to all contributing factors, which provided more management-specific information on vulnerable areas where vehicle compaction of sensitive soils intersects with steep slopes and low vegetation cover. Resulting spatial data on vulnerability and erosion potential provide land managers with information to identify critically disturbed areas and potential restoration sites where off-road driving should be restricted to reduce further degradation.

  19. Are Gender Differences in Spatial Ability Real or an Artifact? Evaluation of Measurement Invariance on the Revised PSVT:R

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maeda, Yukiko; Yoon, So Yoon

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the extent to which the observed gender differences in mental rotation ability among the 2,468 freshmen studying engineering at a Midwest public university attributed to the gender bias of a test. The Revised Purdue Spatial Visualization Tests: Visualization of Rotations (Revised PSVT:R) is a spatial test frequently used to measure…

  20. Arrested Development: Revising Remediation at John Jay College of Criminal Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBeth, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Basic writing has played a large role in the history and institutional identity of the City University of New York (CUNY). From the Open Admissions era of Mina Shaughnessy to the present day, "remedial courses" at CUNY have been revised in response to different colleges' missions, curricular initiatives, university policies, and public opinion.…

  1. Custodial Standards. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brevard County School District, Rockledge, FL.

    The Brevard County School Board has issued this document detailing maintenance and custodial standards district wide for its schools. The document first addresses the general procedures and maintenance for the school, including universal precautions for the protection of the custodial staff. It then details maintenance and cleaning requirements…

  2. Library Resources Workbook, Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Dennis

    Intended to provide a basic overview of the facilities and resources of the library on the Allentown Campus of Pennsylvania State University, this student workbook is designed to familiarize students with what is available to them in the library; to introduce them to skills likely to be used in varying degrees throughout life, regardless of what…

  3. Collection Development Policy. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawin, Philip, Jr., Ed.

    This collection development policy paper incorporates guidelines contributed by all university academic departments, as well as by members of the Library Learning Center professional staff. An alphabetical index provides access to major subject areas and subdivisions, which are assigned one of four level designators indicating the depth of…

  4. Annotation and Classification of Argumentative Writing Revisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Fan; Litman, Diane

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the annotation and classification of students' revision behaviors in argumentative writing. A sentence-level revision schema is proposed to capture why and how students make revisions. Based on the proposed schema, a small corpus of student essays and revisions was annotated. Studies show that manual annotation is reliable with…

  5. Sexual Harassment: Development of a University's Policy and Educational Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longstreth, Catherine; And Others

    In late 1988 the University of Florida began the process of revising and updating its policy and educational programs on sexual harassment. At that time a task force was formed which reviewed the current policy and procedures and drafted a revised brochure on sexual harassment. This brochure was reviewed and redrafted and distributed to every…

  6. Soil physics: a Moroccan perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahlou, Sabah; Mrabet, Rachid; Ouadia, Mohamed

    2004-06-01

    Research on environmental pollution and degradation of soil and water resources is now of highest priority worldwide. To address these problems, soil physics should be conceived as a central core to this research. This paper objectives are to: (1) address the role and importance of soil physics, (2) demonstrate progress in this discipline, and (3) present various uses of soil physics in research, environment and industry. The study of dynamic processes at and within the soil vadose zone (flow, dispersion, transport, sedimentation, etc.), and ephemeral phenomena (deformation, compaction, etc.), form an area of particular interest in soil physics. Soil physics has changed considerably over time. These changes are due to needed precision in data collection for accurate interpretation of space and time variation of soil properties. Soil physics interacts with other disciplines and sciences such as hydro(geo)logy, agronomy, environment, micro-meteorology, pedology, mathematics, physics, water sciences, etc. These interactions prompted the emergence of advanced theories and comprehensive mechanisms of most natural processes, development of new mathematical tools (modeling and computer simulation, fractals, geostatistics, transformations), creation of high precision instrumentation (computer assisted, less time constraint, increased number of measured parameters) and the scale sharpening of physical measurements which ranges from micro to watershed. The environment industry has contributed to an enlargement of many facets of soil physics. In other words, research demand in soil physics has increased considerably to satisfy specific and environmental problems (contamination of water resources, global warming, etc.). Soil physics research is still at an embryonic stage in Morocco. Consequently, soil physicists can take advantage of developments occurring overseas, and need to build up a database of soil static and dynamic properties and to revise developed models to meet

  7. The status of soil mapping for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, G.L.; Lee, R.D.; Jeppesen, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    This report discusses the production of a revised version of the general soil map of the 2304-km{sup 2} (890-mi{sup 2}) Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) site in southeastern Idaho and the production of a geographic information system (GIS) soil map and supporting database. The revised general soil map replaces an INEL soil map produced in 1978 and incorporates the most current information on INEL soils. The general soil map delineates large soil associations based on National Resources Conservation Services [formerly the Soil Conservation Service (SCS)] principles of soil mapping. The GIS map incorporates detailed information that could not be presented on the general soil map and is linked to a database that contains the soil map unit descriptions, surficial geology codes, and other pertinent information.

  8. Evaluation of a multiple goal revision of a physics laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonham, Scott W.; Harper, Doug L.; Pauley, Lance

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the revision of the University Physics laboratory at Western Kentucky University. Multiple learning objectives were negotiated among faculty, and a curriculum was developed to address all of them. A full pilot was run in Spring 2012 with three experimental sections and two control sections. Data was collected using the Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation, a self-efficacy survey, and performance on the laboratory final. Data from the pilot shows gains in conceptual understanding on certain topics, differences in a few laboratory skills, and improvement in technical writing ability as measured by both a writing sample and student perception.

  9. Soil Eroison, T Values, and Sustainability: A Review and Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beach, Timothy; Gersmehl, Philip

    1993-01-01

    Reviews issues related to soil erosion and soil loss tolerance in the United States. Describes an instructional plan in which students estimate soil loses in three geographical regions using the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE). Recommends integrating the geography of soil erosion with broader conceptual questions in physical geography. (CFR)

  10. Soil Erosion map of Europe based on high resolution input datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagos, Panos; Borrelli, Pasquale; Meusburger, Katrin; Ballabio, Cristiano; Alewell, Christine

    2015-04-01

    Modelling soil erosion in European Union is of major importance for agro-environmental policies. Soil erosion estimates are important inputs for the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) and the implementation of the Soil Thematic Strategy. Using the findings of a recent pan-European data collection through the EIONET network, it was concluded that most Member States are applying the empirical Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) for the modelling soil erosion at National level. This model was chosen for the pan-European soil erosion risk assessment and it is based on 6 input factors. Compared to past approaches, each of the factors is modelled using the latest pan-European datasets, expertise and data from Member states and high resolution remote sensing data. The soil erodibility (K-factor) is modelled using the recently published LUCAS topsoil database with 20,000 point measurements and incorporating the surface stone cover which can reduce K-factor by 15%. The rainfall erosivity dataset (R-factor) has been implemented using high temporal resolution rainfall data from more than 1,500 precipitation stations well distributed in Europe. The cover-management (C-factor) incorporates crop statistics and management practices such as cover crops, tillage practices and plant residuals. The slope length and steepness (combined LS-factor) is based on the first ever 25m Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of Europe. Finally, the support practices (P-factor) is modelled for first time at this scale taking into account the 270,000 LUCAS earth observations and the Good Agricultural and Environmental Condition (GAEC) that farmers have to follow in Europe. The high resolution input layers produce the final soil erosion risk map at 100m resolution and allow policy makers to run future land use, management and climate change scenarios.

  11. Revision of Primary Series Maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2000-01-01

    In 1992, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) completed a 50-year effort to provide primary series map coverage of the United States. Many of these maps now need to be updated to reflect the construction of new roads and highways and other changes that have taken place over time. The USGS has formulated a graphic revision plan to help keep the primary series maps current. Primary series maps include 1:20,000-scale quadrangles of Puerto Rico, 1:24,000- or 1:25,000-scale quadrangles of the conterminous United States, Hawaii, and U.S. Territories, and 1:63,360-scale quadrangles of Alaska. The revision of primary series maps from new collection sources is accomplished using a variety of processes. The raster revision process combines the scanned content of paper maps with raster updating technologies. The vector revision process involves the automated plotting of updated vector files. Traditional processes use analog stereoplotters and manual scribing instruments on specially coated map separates. The ability to select from or combine these processes increases the efficiency of the National Mapping Division map revision program.

  12. Rayleigh's Scattering Revised

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomiets, Sergey; Gorelik, Andrey

    Mie’s waves while sounding within coincident volumes. Being sensitive to the size of scatters, Mie’s waves can give us additional information about particle size distribution. But how about using several wavelengths corresponding to Rayleigh’s diffraction on scatters only? Can any effects be detected in such a case and what performance characteristics of the equipment are required to detect them? The deceptive simplicity of the negative answer to the first part of the question posed will disappear if one collects different definitions of Rayleigh's scattering and consider them more closely than usually. Several definitions borrowed from the introductory texts and most popular textbooks and articles can be seen as one of the reasons for the research presented in the report. Hopefully, based on the comparison of them all, anyone could easily conclude that Rayleigh's scattering has been analyzed extensively, but despite this extensive analysis made fundamental ambiguities in introductory texts are not eliminated completely to date. Moreover, there may be found unreasonably many examples on how these ambiguities have already caused an error to be foreseen, published on the one article, amplified in another one, then cited with approval in the third one, before being finally corrected. Everything indicated that in the light of all the lesions learned and based on modern experimental data, it is time to address these issues again. After the discussion of ambiguities of Rayleigh's scattering concepts, the development of the corrections to original ideas looks relatively easy. In particular, there may be distinguished at least three characteristic regions of the revised models application from the point of view of the scattered field statistical averaging. The authors of the report suggest naming them Rayleigh’s region, Einstein’s region and the region with compensations of the scattering intensity. The most important fact is that the limits of applicability of all

  13. The revised classification of eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Adl, Sina M.; Simpson, Alastair. G.; Lane, Christopher E.; Lukeš, Julius; Bass, David; Bowser, Samuel S.; Brown, Matt; Burki, Fabien; Dunthorn, Micah; Hampl, Vladimir; Heiss, Aaron; Hoppenrath, Mona; Lara, Enrique; leGall, Line; Lynn, Denis H.; McManus, Hilary; Mitchell, Edward A. D.; Mozley-Stanridge, Sharon E.; Parfrey, Laura Wegener; Pawlowski, Jan; Rueckert, Sonja; Shadwick, Lora; Schoch, Conrad; Smirnov, Alexey; Spiegel, Frederick W.

    2012-01-01

    This revision of the classification of eukaryotes, which updates that of Adl et al. (2005), retains an emphasis on the protists and incorporates changes since 2005 that have resolved nodes and branches in phylogenetic trees. Whereas the previous revision was successful in re-introducing name stability to the classification, this revision provides a classification for lineages that were then still unresolved. The supergroups have withstood phylogenetic hypothesis testing with some modifications, but despite some progress, problematic nodes at the base of the eukaryotic tree still remain to be statistically resolved. Looking forward, subsequent transformations to our understanding of the diversity of life will be from the discovery of novel lineages in previously under-sampled areas and from environmental genomic information. PMID:23020233

  14. The revised classification of eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Adl, Sina M; Simpson, Alastair G B; Lane, Christopher E; Lukeš, Julius; Bass, David; Bowser, Samuel S; Brown, Matthew W; Burki, Fabien; Dunthorn, Micah; Hampl, Vladimir; Heiss, Aaron; Hoppenrath, Mona; Lara, Enrique; Le Gall, Line; Lynn, Denis H; McManus, Hilary; Mitchell, Edward A D; Mozley-Stanridge, Sharon E; Parfrey, Laura W; Pawlowski, Jan; Rueckert, Sonja; Shadwick, Laura; Shadwick, Lora; Schoch, Conrad L; Smirnov, Alexey; Spiegel, Frederick W

    2012-09-01

    This revision of the classification of eukaryotes, which updates that of Adl et al. [J. Eukaryot. Microbiol. 52 (2005) 399], retains an emphasis on the protists and incorporates changes since 2005 that have resolved nodes and branches in phylogenetic trees. Whereas the previous revision was successful in re-introducing name stability to the classification, this revision provides a classification for lineages that were then still unresolved. The supergroups have withstood phylogenetic hypothesis testing with some modifications, but despite some progress, problematic nodes at the base of the eukaryotic tree still remain to be statistically resolved. Looking forward, subsequent transformations to our understanding of the diversity of life will be from the discovery of novel lineages in previously under-sampled areas and from environmental genomic information.

  15. Failure of aseptic revision total knee arthroplasties

    PubMed Central

    Leta, Tesfaye H; Lygre, Stein Håkon L; Skredderstuen, Arne; Hallan, Geir; Furnes, Ove

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose In Norway, the proportion of revision knee arthroplasties increased from 6.9% in 1994 to 8.5% in 2011. However, there is limited information on the epidemiology and causes of subsequent failure of revision knee arthroplasty. We therefore studied survival rate and determined the modes of failure of aseptic revision total knee arthroplasties. Method This study was based on 1,016 aseptic revision total knee arthroplasties reported to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register between 1994 and 2011. Revisions done for infections were not included. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were used to assess the survival rate and the relative risk of re-revision with all causes of re-revision as endpoint. Results 145 knees failed after revision total knee arthroplasty. Deep infection was the most frequent cause of re-revision (28%), followed by instability (26%), loose tibial component (17%), and pain (10%). The cumulative survival rate for revision total knee arthroplasties was 85% at 5 years, 78% at 10 years, and 71% at 15 years. Revision total knee arthroplasties with exchange of the femoral or tibial component exclusively had a higher risk of re-revision (RR = 1.7) than those with exchange of the whole prosthesis. The risk of re-revision was higher for men (RR = 2.0) and for patients aged less than 60 years (RR = 1.6). Interpretation In terms of implant survival, revision of the whole implant was better than revision of 1 component only. Young age and male sex were risk factors for re-revision. Deep infection was the most frequent cause of failure of revision of aseptic total knee arthroplasties. PMID:25267502

  16. HEDR modeling approach: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Shipler, D.B.; Napier, B.A.

    1994-05-01

    This report is a revision of the previous Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project modeling approach report. This revised report describes the methods used in performing scoping studies and estimating final radiation doses to real and representative individuals who lived in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. The scoping studies and dose estimates pertain to various environmental pathways during various periods of time. The original report discussed the concepts under consideration in 1991. The methods for estimating dose have been refined as understanding of existing data, the scope of pathways, and the magnitudes of dose estimates were evaluated through scoping studies.

  17. Revised evaluations for ENDF/B-VI Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, R.Q.

    1993-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report on revised cross-section evaluations for 17 nuclides that have been prepared for ENDF/B-VI Revision 2. The nuclides considered include five fission products and various isotopes of cadmium and hafnium. The previous ENDF/B-VI evaluations for these 17 nuclides were carried over from ENDF/B-V and were completed in the 1974--1980 time period. By utilizing the experimental data that have become available since 1980 the revised evaluations will result in significant improvements in the evaluated nuclear data files. The primary emphasis was placed on the resolved and unresolved resonance regions, but new experimental data were also used to improve the cross sections for energies above the unresolved resonance region. Negative elastic scattering cross sections were encountered in some of the previous evaluations; since the revised evaluations use multilevel Breit-Wigner (MLBW) parameters, rather than single-level Breit-Wigner (SLBW), this problem is eliminated.

  18. The University Revisioned: An Alternative to Corporate Mis-Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lustig, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    Corporatization refers not only to the subordination of academic programs to outside business interest, but also to the more troubling intrusion of corporate forms of governance and market criteria of performance into the institution as a whole. In this paper, the author wants to show how this corporatization affects the substance, structure and…

  19. An alternative to soil taxonomy for describing key soil characteristics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duniway, Michael C.; Miller, Mark E.; Brown, Joel R.; Toevs, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    is not a simple task. Furthermore, because the US system of soil taxonomy is not applied universally, its utility as a means for effectively describing soil characteristics to readers in other countries is limited. Finally, and most importantly, even at the finest level of soil classification there are often large within-taxa variations in critical properties that can determine ecosystem responses to drivers such as climate and land-use change.

  20. Diet History Questionnaire: Database Revision History

    Cancer.gov

    The following details all additions and revisions made to the DHQ nutrient and food database. This revision history is provided as a reference for investigators who may have performed analyses with a previous release of the database.

  1. Revision Process and Practice: A Kindergarten Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Maggie

    2012-01-01

    Many educators teach students that are reluctant about the revisions process in writing. However, this longitudinal study follows a group of students from kindergarten through 8th grade who embraced the importance of the revision process. (Contains 8 figures.)

  2. Quantification of soil surface roughness evolution under simulated rainfall

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil surface roughness is commonly identified as one of the dominant factors governing runoff and interrill erosion. The objective of this study was to compare several existing soil surface roughness indices and to test the Revised Triangular Prism surface area Method (RTPM) as a new approach to cal...

  3. Automated revision of CLIPS rule-bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Patrick M.; Pazzani, Michael J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes CLIPS-R, a theory revision system for the revision of CLIPS rule-bases. CLIPS-R may be used for a variety of knowledge-base revision tasks, such as refining a prototype system, adapting an existing system to slightly different operating conditions, or improving an operational system that makes occasional errors. We present a description of how CLIPS-R revises rule-bases, and an evaluation of the system on three rule-bases.

  4. Results of Using Multimedia Case Studies and Open-Ended Hands-On Design Projects in an "Introduction to Engineering" Course at Hampton University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halyo, Nesim; Le, Qiang

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a revised freshman engineering course, "Introduction to Engineering," at Hampton University and the observations of the instructors during its implementation. The authors collaborated with Auburn University faculty in jointly implementing the same course material at both universities. The revised course…

  5. Air Pollution Primer. Revised Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corman, Rena

    This revised and updated book is written to inform the citizens on the nature, causes, and effects of air pollution. It is written in terms familiar to the layman with the purpose of providing knowledge and motivation to spur community action on clean air policies. Numerous charts and drawings are provided to support discussion of air pollution…

  6. Revised Accounting for Business Combinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Arlette C.; Key, Kimberly

    2008-01-01

    The Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) has recently issued Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 141 (Revised 2007) Business Combinations. The object of this Statement is to improve the relevance, representational faithfulness, and comparability of reported information about a business combination and its effects. This Statement…

  7. Ethical considerations in revision rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Wayne, Ivan

    2012-08-01

    The problems that arise when reviewing another surgeon's work, the financial aspects of revision surgery, and the controversies that present in marketing and advertising will be explored. The technological advances of computer imaging and the Internet have introduced new problems that require our additional consideration.

  8. Modern Indian Psychology. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryde, John F.

    Written on the basis of senior Indian verbal relatings collected over a 23-year span, this revised edition on modern Indian psychology incorporates suggestions from Indian students and their teachers, Indian and non-Indian social studies experts, and other Indian people. The book contains 6 major divisions: (1) "Culture and Indian Values" relates…

  9. Ethnic Awareness Through Curriculum Revision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giordano, Michael Joseph

    This study compared the attitudes towards ethnic groups of high school students enrolled in a standard U.S. history course with the attitudes of students enrolled in a revised U.S. history course which emphasized ethnic awareness. A review of the literature indicated a need for ethnic awareness. The experimental group consisted of 16 students; the…

  10. Guidelines for Curriculum Development. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kistler, K.; And Others

    The curriculum development process explained in this booklet was first implemented at College of the Redwoods in May 1986 and then revised in June 1989. First, information on the college's Curriculum Committee is provided, indicating that the committee was formed to plan credit/non-credit courses; evaluate and approve additions, modifications, or…

  11. Humeral windows in revision total elbow arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Amir; Stanley, David

    2016-01-01

    The use of cortical windows for revision elbow arthroplasty has not previously been widely reported. Their use aids safe revision of a well fixed humeral prosthesis and can be used in the setting of dislocation, periprosthetic fracture or aseptic loosening of the ulnar component. We describe our technique and results of cortical windows in the distal humerus for revision elbow arthroplasty surgery. PMID:27583011

  12. Humeral windows in revision total elbow arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Peach, Chris A; Salama, Amir; Stanley, David

    2016-04-01

    The use of cortical windows for revision elbow arthroplasty has not previously been widely reported. Their use aids safe revision of a well fixed humeral prosthesis and can be used in the setting of dislocation, periprosthetic fracture or aseptic loosening of the ulnar component. We describe our technique and results of cortical windows in the distal humerus for revision elbow arthroplasty surgery. PMID:27583011

  13. "SOAR" to the Stars through Revising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jan

    1995-01-01

    Explains how a teacher uses the acronym SOAR (Sentences Organized and Revised) as the core of a game designed to motivate a class to revise their work through the promise of popcorn, free time, or snacks for their revision work. Describes a worksheet that forces students to pay attention to various parts of their paper. (TB)

  14. 24 CFR 968.225 - Budget revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Budget revisions. 968.225 Section... Fewer Than 250 Units) § 968.225 Budget revisions. (a) A PHA shall not incur any modernization cost in excess of the total HUD-approved CIAP budget. A PHA shall submit a budget revision, in a form...

  15. The evolution of a manual revision.

    PubMed

    Luzinski, Craig

    2012-10-01

    This month, the director of the Magnet Recognition Program® provides an in-depth overview of the Magnet Recognition Program's Application Manual revision process. The history of the 2005 Manual revision, an evidence-based review of the literature, and revisions to the 2008 Manual are key elements of this article. PMID:22968115

  16. Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wilde, Jeffrey; Bedi, Asheesh; Altchek, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most common surgical procedures, with more than 200,000 ACL tears occurring annually. Although primary ACL reconstruction is a successful operation, success rates still range from 75% to 97%. Consequently, several thousand revision ACL reconstructions are performed annually and are unfortunately associated with inferior clinical outcomes when compared with primary reconstructions. Evidence Acquisition: Data were obtained from peer-reviewed literature through a search of the PubMed database (1988-2013) as well as from textbook chapters and surgical technique papers. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: The clinical outcomes after revision ACL reconstruction are largely based on level IV case series. Much of the existing literature is heterogenous with regard to patient populations, primary and revision surgical techniques, concomitant ligamentous injuries, and additional procedures performed at the time of the revision, which limits generalizability. Nevertheless, there is a general consensus that the outcomes for revision ACL reconstruction are inferior to primary reconstruction. Conclusion: Excellent results can be achieved with regard to graft stability, return to play, and functional knee instability but are generally inferior to primary ACL reconstruction. A staged approach with autograft reconstruction is recommended in any circumstance in which a single-stage approach results in suboptimal graft selection, tunnel position, graft fixation, or biological milieu for tendon-bone healing. Strength-of-Recommendation Taxonomy (SORT): Good results may still be achieved with regard to graft stability, return to play, and functional knee instability, but results are generally inferior to primary ACL reconstruction: Level B. PMID:25364483

  17. Universal Usability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, Sarah; Leventhal, Laura

    Universal usability of World Wide Web (Web) environments—that is, having 90% of households as successful users—requires universal access, usability, and universal design. Factors such as Web technology and user-centered design contribute to universal access and usability, but key to universal usability is a universal design methodology. Universal design principles for the Web follow from universal design principles for the built environment, and emphasize perceptibility, self-explanation, and tailorability for the user. Universally usable Web environments offer the benefit of expanded participation, as well as the unanticipated benefits that generally follow from innovative design initiatives. However, to achieve Web universal usability, Web designers need tools that facilitate the design of intuitive interfaces without sacrificing universal access.

  18. Development of a virtual tool for the quantification and the analysis of soil erosion in olive orchards based on RUSLE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marín, Víctor; Taguas, Encarnación V.; Redel, María Dolores; Gómez, Jose A.

    2013-04-01

    Erosion rates above 30 t ha-1 yr-1 have been measured in hilly agricultural regions such as Andalusia in Southern Spain, associated to orchard crops (Gómez et al., 2008). In this region, there are 1.48 Mha of olive groves (CAP, 2007), which are essential in terms of income, employment and landscape. The acquisition of training and experience in modelling soil erosion is difficult by the conventional system teaching for students as well as specific technicians. This paper presents a telematic training/analysis tool, CREO (Calculator of Rates of Erosion in Olive crops/ Calculadora RUSLE para Erosión en Olivar), to quantify erosion rates in olive grove areas based on the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE; Renard et al., 1997) and on specific information published on soil losses and soil characteristics in olive orchards in Southern Spain. The tool has been programmed with Matlab R2008a from MathWorks Inc. (USA), although it could be used as an executable program in Spanish and English language by interested users. It consists of seven menus with visual material where different sources, databases and methodologies are presented to quantify soil rates (A = R.K.LS.C.P) by the calculation of six factors.A is computed in t ha-1 yr-1; R is the rainfall erosivity factor (MJ mm ha-1.h-1 yr-1); K represents the soil erodibility (t ha h ha-1 MJ-1 mm-1); L is the slope length factor and S is the slope gradient factor (dimensionless); C is a cover management factor (dimensionless) and P is a support practice factor (dimensionless). Different equations and methodologies can be selected by the user for the calculation of each factor while recommendations and advice can be showed for the suitable use of the tool. It is expected that CREO was a valuable helpful tool in environmental studies associated to olive orchard land use and its further use allows a better understanding of the interaction among the different factors involved, and better access to available

  19. Can we adapt RUSLE to soil erosion modelling of Alpine regions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meusburger, Katrin; Panagos, Panos; Alewell, Christine

    2014-05-01

    Modelled soil erosion estimates for Alpine regions are often contradictory, not only with respect to the absolute rates but also regarding the spatial pattern. The empirical Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE), which predicts the average annual soil loss through simple multiplication of 5 soil erosion risk factors, is still most frequently used at large spatial scales. The model was chosen since its complexity meets the low data availability in Alpine regions. However, the model was originally developed for lowland arable regions and the empirical foundation of the RUSLE restricts the transferability to other environments. In this study, we evaluate the single RUSLE factors regarding their applicability for Alpine regions and future research needs will be discussed. The evaluation will be based on the comparison of modelled with measured (137Cs, sediment traps and rainfall simulation) soil erosion rates. Regarding rainfall erosivity, Alpine areas are characterised by a distinct seasonal variability with high values during the summer season. Snow-fall is not considered as an erosive force, however, subsequent snow-melt and probably more important snow-movement can increase the erosivity again. Our data shows, that a reduction of the vegetation cover exponentially increases soil loss. Consequently, the percentage of vegetation cover should be incorporated in the assessment of the RUSLE vegetation factor (C-factor), which can be achieved through high resolution satellite imagery. Further, the topography factor (LS) is of crucial importance. We propose to calculate the L-factor based on a digital elevation model with 2 m resolution and a multiple flow algorithm. Preliminary data to adapt the S-factor for steeper slopes will be presented. We conclude that the RUSLE seems to be a good starting point to assess relative differences of soil erosion risk in Alpine areas if model parameters are adapted to mountain conditions.

  20. Relativistic timescale analysis suggests lunar theory revision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deines, Steven D.; Williams, Carol A.

    1995-01-01

    The SI second of the atomic clock was calibrated to match the Ephemeris Time (ET) second in a mutual four year effort between the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) and the United States Naval Observatory (USNO). The ephemeris time is 'clocked' by observing the elapsed time it takes the Moon to cross two positions (usually occultation of stars relative to a position on Earth) and dividing that time span into the predicted seconds according to the lunar equations of motion. The last revision of the equations of motion was the Improved Lunar Ephemeris (ILE), which was based on E. W. Brown's lunar theory. Brown classically derived the lunar equations from a purely Newtonian gravity with no relativistic compensations. However, ET is very theory dependent and is affected by relativity, which was not included in the ILE. To investigate the relativistic effects, a new, noninertial metric for a gravitated, translationally accelerated and rotating reference frame has three sets of contributions, namely (1) Earth's velocity, (2) the static solar gravity field and (3) the centripetal acceleration from Earth's orbit. This last term can be characterized as a pseudogravitational acceleration. This metric predicts a time dilation calculated to be -0.787481 seconds in one year. The effect of this dilation would make the ET timescale run slower than had been originally determined. Interestingly, this value is within 2 percent of the average leap second insertion rate, which is the result of the divergence between International Atomic Time (TAI) and Earth's rotational time called Universal Time (UT or UTI). Because the predictions themselves are significant, regardless of the comparison to TAI and UT, the authors will be rederiving the lunar ephemeris model in the manner of Brown with the relativistic time dilation effects from the new metric to determine a revised, relativistic ephemeris timescale that could be used to determine UT free of leap second adjustments.

  1. The Global Soil Partnership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanarella, Luca

    2015-07-01

    The Global Soil Partnership (GSP) has been established, following an intensive preparatory work of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) in collaboration with the European Commission (EC), as a voluntary partnership coordinated by the FAO in September 2011 [1]. The GSP is open to all interested stakeholders: Governments (FAO Member States), Universities, Research Organizations, Civil Society Organizations, Industry and private companies. It is a voluntary partnership aiming towards providing a platform for active engagement in sustainable soil management and soil protection at all scales: local, national, regional and global. As a “coalition of the willing” towards soil protection, it attempts to make progress in reversing soil degradation with those partners that have a genuine will of protecting soils for our future generations. It openly aims towards creating an enabling environment, despite the resistance of a minority of national governments, for effective soil protection in the large majority of the countries that are genuinely concerned about the rapid depletion of their limited soil resources.

  2. Unit: Soils, Inspection Pack, National Trial Print.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Science Education Project, Toorak, Victoria.

    This second trial edition is a revision of ED 049 929. The core portion of the unit, which is intended for students in grades seven or eight of Australian secondary schools, provides suggestions for activities designed to lead to an understanding of the structure, composition (biotic and abiotic), and origin of soils. Keys are provided for the…

  3. Soil erosion and significance for carbon fluxes in a mountainous Mediterranean-climate watershed.

    PubMed

    Smith, S V; Bullock, S H; Hinojosa-Corona, A; Franco-Vizcaíno, E; Escoto-Rodríguez, M; Kretzschmar, T G; Farfán, L M; Salazar-Ceseña, J M

    2007-07-01

    In topographically complex terrains, downslope movement of soil organic carbon (OC) can influence local carbon balance. The primary purpose of the present analysis is to compare the magnitude of OC displacement by erosion with ecosystem metabolism in such a complex terrain. Does erosion matter in this ecosystem carbon balance? We have used the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) erosion model to estimate lateral fluxes of OC in a watershed in northwestern Mexico. The watershed (4900 km2) has an average slope of 10 degrees +/- 9 degrees (mean +/- SD); 45% is >10 degrees, and 3% is >30 degrees. Land cover is primarily shrublands (69%) and agricultural lands (22%). Estimated bulk soil erosion averages 1350 Mg x km(-2) x yr(-1). We estimate that there is insignificant erosion on slopes < 2 degrees and that 20% of the area can be considered depositional. Estimated OC erosion rates are 10 Mg x km(-2) x yr(-1) for areas steeper than 2 degrees. Over the entire area, erosion is approximately 50% higher on shrublands than on agricultural lands, but within slope classes, erosion rates are more rapid on agricultural areas. For the whole system, estimated OC erosion is approximately 2% of net primary production (NPP), increasing in high-slope areas to approximately 3% of NPP. Deposition of eroded OC in low-slope areas is approximately 10% of low-slope NPP. Soil OC movement from erosional slopes to alluvial fans alters the mosaic of OC metabolism and storage across the landscape. PMID:17708215

  4. Soil erosion and significance for carbon fluxes in a mountainous Mediterranean-climate watershed.

    PubMed

    Smith, S V; Bullock, S H; Hinojosa-Corona, A; Franco-Vizcaíno, E; Escoto-Rodríguez, M; Kretzschmar, T G; Farfán, L M; Salazar-Ceseña, J M

    2007-07-01

    In topographically complex terrains, downslope movement of soil organic carbon (OC) can influence local carbon balance. The primary purpose of the present analysis is to compare the magnitude of OC displacement by erosion with ecosystem metabolism in such a complex terrain. Does erosion matter in this ecosystem carbon balance? We have used the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) erosion model to estimate lateral fluxes of OC in a watershed in northwestern Mexico. The watershed (4900 km2) has an average slope of 10 degrees +/- 9 degrees (mean +/- SD); 45% is >10 degrees, and 3% is >30 degrees. Land cover is primarily shrublands (69%) and agricultural lands (22%). Estimated bulk soil erosion averages 1350 Mg x km(-2) x yr(-1). We estimate that there is insignificant erosion on slopes < 2 degrees and that 20% of the area can be considered depositional. Estimated OC erosion rates are 10 Mg x km(-2) x yr(-1) for areas steeper than 2 degrees. Over the entire area, erosion is approximately 50% higher on shrublands than on agricultural lands, but within slope classes, erosion rates are more rapid on agricultural areas. For the whole system, estimated OC erosion is approximately 2% of net primary production (NPP), increasing in high-slope areas to approximately 3% of NPP. Deposition of eroded OC in low-slope areas is approximately 10% of low-slope NPP. Soil OC movement from erosional slopes to alluvial fans alters the mosaic of OC metabolism and storage across the landscape.

  5. Psychometric properties of the revised UCLA Loneliness Scale and two short-form measures of loneliness in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Wilson, D; Cutts, J; Lees, I; Mapungwana, S; Maunganidze, L

    1992-08-01

    The cross-cultural reliability in Zimbabwe of the Revised University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) Loneliness Scale and two short forms of the Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale were investigated. Subjects comprised a sample of 1,354 adolescents and another sample of 754 adults. The reliability of the Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale was acceptable. The internal consistency of an eight-item short form of the Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale was adequate, but the reliability of a four-item short form was low. Factor analysis of the Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale, which yielded two factors similar to those reported in North America by Zakahi and Duran (1982) supported the construct validity of the Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale in Zimbabwe. The Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale and the eight-item short form were highly correlated, but this association was spuriously elevated by the fact the eight-item short form is part of the full scale. Factor analysis of the eight-item short form suggested that this scale does not consistently reflect the factor structure of the full scale. We concluded that the Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale possesses acceptable reliability and factorial validity in Zimbabwe and that the eight-item version is superior to the four-item form of the Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale as a short loneliness measure. However, additional refinements may be needed to further improve the eight-item short version. PMID:1512681

  6. Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Balazs, George C; Grimm, Patrick D; Donohue, Michael A; Keblish, David J; Rue, John-Paul

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to report the clinical and functional outcomes of revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in a young, active duty military population. Patients undergoing revision ACL reconstruction were enrolled in an institutional clinical database and followed prospectively. The primary outcomes were patients' scores on a timed run, as compared with recorded scores before reinjury. Secondary outcomes included scores on the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC), the International Knee Documentation Committee subjective (IKDC subjective), the Short Form - 36 health survey (SF-36) version 2, the Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE), and the Tegner activity scale. A total of 13 patients were identified who met the inclusion criteria and had complete follow-up. The mean age at revision ACL reconstruction was 20.5 years (range, 19-22 years), and mean follow-up was 40.2 months (range, 13-66 months). All patients underwent a single stage revision ACL reconstruction with ipsilateral bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft, ipsilateral hamstring autograft, or bone-tendon-bone allograft. Mean physical readiness test (PRT) score at final follow-up was not statistically different than documented preinjury PRT score (77.9 vs. 85.5, p > 0.05), nor was the mean run time (7:12 vs. 6:43/mile, p > 0.05). Significant improvements exceeding published minimal clinically important differences were seen in SANE score, SF-36 physical component summary score, KOOS sports and recreation, KOOS quality of life, WOMAC pain score, and WOMAC function score. Patients undergoing revision ACL reconstruction at our facility show good recovery of baseline physical performance as measured by the semiannual PRT and timed run test, and significant improvements in patient-reported outcome scores. Level of Evidence Level IV, case series.

  7. Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Balazs, George C; Grimm, Patrick D; Donohue, Michael A; Keblish, David J; Rue, John-Paul

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to report the clinical and functional outcomes of revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in a young, active duty military population. Patients undergoing revision ACL reconstruction were enrolled in an institutional clinical database and followed prospectively. The primary outcomes were patients' scores on a timed run, as compared with recorded scores before reinjury. Secondary outcomes included scores on the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC), the International Knee Documentation Committee subjective (IKDC subjective), the Short Form - 36 health survey (SF-36) version 2, the Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE), and the Tegner activity scale. A total of 13 patients were identified who met the inclusion criteria and had complete follow-up. The mean age at revision ACL reconstruction was 20.5 years (range, 19-22 years), and mean follow-up was 40.2 months (range, 13-66 months). All patients underwent a single stage revision ACL reconstruction with ipsilateral bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft, ipsilateral hamstring autograft, or bone-tendon-bone allograft. Mean physical readiness test (PRT) score at final follow-up was not statistically different than documented preinjury PRT score (77.9 vs. 85.5, p > 0.05), nor was the mean run time (7:12 vs. 6:43/mile, p > 0.05). Significant improvements exceeding published minimal clinically important differences were seen in SANE score, SF-36 physical component summary score, KOOS sports and recreation, KOOS quality of life, WOMAC pain score, and WOMAC function score. Patients undergoing revision ACL reconstruction at our facility show good recovery of baseline physical performance as measured by the semiannual PRT and timed run test, and significant improvements in patient-reported outcome scores. Level of Evidence Level IV, case series. PMID:26524090

  8. Assessment of spatial distribution of soil loss over the upper basin of Miyun reservoir in China based on RS and GIS techniques.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Niu, Rui-qing; Wang, Yi; Li, Ping-xiang; Zhang, Liang-pei; Du, Bo

    2011-08-01

    Soil conservation planning often requires estimates of the spatial distribution of soil erosion at a catchment or regional scale. This paper applied the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) to investigate the spatial distribution of annual soil loss over the upper basin of Miyun reservoir in China. Among the soil erosion factors, which are rainfall erosivity (R), soil erodibility (K), slope length (L), slope steepness (S), vegetation cover (C), and support practice factor (P), the vegetative cover or C factor, which represents the effects of vegetation canopy and ground covers in reducing soil loss, has been one of the most difficult to estimate over broad geographic areas. In this paper, the C factor was estimated based on back propagation neural network and the results were compared with the values measured in the field. The correlation coefficient (r) obtained was 0.929. Then the C factor and the other factors were used as the input to RUSLE model. By integrating the six factor maps in geographical information system (GIS) through pixel-based computing, the spatial distribution of soil loss over the upper basin of Miyun reservoir was obtained. The results showed that the annual average soil loss for the upper basin of Miyun reservoir was 9.86 t ha(-1) ya(-1) in 2005, and the area of 46.61 km(2) (0.3%) experiences extremely severe erosion risk, which needs suitable conservation measures to be adopted on a priority basis. The spatial distribution of erosion risk classes was 66.9% very low, 21.89% low, 6.18% moderate, 2.89% severe, and 1.84% very severe. Thus, by using RUSLE in a GIS environment, the spatial distribution of water erosion can be obtained and the regions which susceptible to water erosion and need immediate soil conservation planning and application over the upper watershed of Miyun reservoir in China can be identified.

  9. A Think-Aloud Protocols Investigation of Saudi English Major Students' Writing Revision Strategies in L1 (Arabic) and L2 (English)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alhaisoni, Eid

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the writing revision strategies used by 16 Saudi English as foreign language (EFL) students. Two research methods were employed. First, think-aloud reporting was used to gain insight into the thought processes utilized by the students, and to study the revision strategies that Saudi male university students make use of…

  10. College & University Business Administration. Fourth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welzenbach, Lanora F., Ed.

    This revised handbook sponsored by the National Association of College and University Business Officers (NACUBO) is seen as the authoritative reference for higher education administrators because it reflects the consensus of the profession, achieved through systematic and thorough review by hundreds of business officers. The book is divided into…

  11. Making University Financial Reports Informative and Meaningful.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmore, Robert B.

    1970-01-01

    The National Association of College and University Business Officers has taken major strides toward meeting the responsibility for establishing accounting and public reporting standards within the field of higher education. The need for improvement in the reporting procedures has been generally agreed on. It is imperative that revision of the…

  12. Revised seismic and geologic siting regulations for nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, A.J.; Chokshi, N.C.

    1997-02-01

    The primary regulatory basis governing the seismic design of nuclear power plants is contained in Appendix A to Part 50, General Design Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants, of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). General Design Criteria (GDC) 2 defines requirements for design bases for protection against natural phenomena. GDC 2 states the performance criterion that {open_quotes}Structures, systems, and components important to safety shall be designed to withstand the effects of natural phenomena such as earthquakes, . . . without loss of capability to perform their safety functions. . .{close_quotes}. Appendix A to Part 100, Seismic and Geologic Siting Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants, has been the principal document which provided detailed criteria to evaluate the suitability of proposed sites and suitability of the plant design basis established in consideration of the seismic and geologic characteristics of the proposed sites. Appendix A defines required seismological and geological investigations and requirements for other design conditions such as soil stability, slope stability, and seismically induced floods and water waves, and requirements for seismic instrumentation. The NRC staff is in the process of revising Appendix A. The NRC has recently revised seismic siting and design regulations for future applications. These revisions are discussed in detail in this paper.

  13. Bioindication in Urban Soils in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amossé, J.; Le Bayon, C.; Mitchell, E. A. D.; Gobat, J. M.

    2012-04-01

    functionality of urban soils and alluvial soils, used as a natural reference because of their regular physical perturbation by flooding and associated erosion/sedimentation, (iv) evaluation of soil bioindicators (e.g. earthworm, enchytraeid and testate amoebae) for urban soils. The application objective of my research is to introduce bioindicators and their limit values for the future revision of the legal Ordonnance on soils (OSol), and to develop guidelines to improve or to build urban soils with the aim of reaching a sustainable urban ecosystem development.

  14. Clean Air Act. Revision 5

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Air Act, as amended, and those regulations that implement the statute and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. This Reference Book has been completely revised and is current through February 15, 1994.

  15. Revision IPAA: strategies for success.

    PubMed

    Larson, David W

    2014-07-01

    The history of ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) is one of success with durable surgical and functional results. However, pouch failure, due to infection, mechanical, or functional disability, represents a challenge to both surgeon and patient. Practicing surgeons who deal with the revision pouch face a variety of challenges. Success requires a strategy, which includes critical planning, preparation, and surgical techniques in order that surgeons continue to provide solutions and hope to patients.

  16. Derivation of Soil Ecological Criteria for Copper in Chinese Soils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Wei, Dongpu; Ma, Yibing; McLaughlin, Mike J

    2015-01-01

    Considerable information on copper (Cu) ecotoxicity as affected by biological species and abiotic properties of soils has been collected from the last decade in the present study. The information on bioavailability/ecotoxicity, species sensitivity and differences in laboratory and field ecotoxicity of Cu in different soils was collated and integrated to derive soil ecological criteria for Cu in Chinese soils, which were expressed as predicted no effect concentrations (PNEC). First, all ecotoxicity data of Cu from bioassays based on Chinese soils were collected and screened with given criteria to compile a database. Second, the compiled data were corrected with leaching and aging factors to minimize the differences between laboratory and field conditions. Before Cu ecotoxicity data were entered into a species sensitivity distribution (SSD), they were normalized with Cu ecotoxicity predictive models to modify the effects of soil properties on Cu ecotoxicity. The PNEC value was set equal to the hazardous concentration for x% of the species (HCx), which could be calculated from the SSD curves, without an additional assessment factor. Finally, predictive models for HCx based on soil properties were developed. The soil properties had a significant effect on the magnitude of HCx, with HC5 varying from 13.1 mg/kg in acidic soils to 51.9 mg/kg in alkaline non-calcareous soils. The two-factor predictive models based on soil pH and cation exchange capacity could predict HCx with determination coefficients (R2) of 0.82-0.91. The three-factor predictive models--that took into account the effect of soil organic carbon--were more accurate than two-factor models, with R2 of 0.85-0.99. The predictive models obtained here could be used to calculate soil-specific criteria. All results obtained here could provide a scientific basis for revision of current Chinese soil environmental quality standards, and the approach adopted in this study could be used as a pragmatic framework for

  17. Derivation of Soil Ecological Criteria for Copper in Chinese Soils

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Wei, Dongpu; Ma, Yibing; McLaughlin, Mike J.

    2015-01-01

    Considerable information on copper (Cu) ecotoxicity as affected by biological species and abiotic properties of soils has been collected from the last decade in the present study. The information on bioavailability/ecotoxicity, species sensitivity and differences in laboratory and field ecotoxicity of Cu in different soils was collated and integrated to derive soil ecological criteria for Cu in Chinese soils, which were expressed as predicted no effect concentrations (PNEC). First, all ecotoxicity data of Cu from bioassays based on Chinese soils were collected and screened with given criteria to compile a database. Second, the compiled data were corrected with leaching and aging factors to minimize the differences between laboratory and field conditions. Before Cu ecotoxicity data were entered into a species sensitivity distribution (SSD), they were normalized with Cu ecotoxicity predictive models to modify the effects of soil properties on Cu ecotoxicity. The PNEC value was set equal to the hazardous concentration for x% of the species (HCx), which could be calculated from the SSD curves, without an additional assessment factor. Finally, predictive models for HCx based on soil properties were developed. The soil properties had a significant effect on the magnitude of HCx, with HC5 varying from 13.1 mg/kg in acidic soils to 51.9 mg/kg in alkaline non-calcareous soils. The two-factor predictive models based on soil pH and cation exchange capacity could predict HCx with determination coefficients (R2) of 0.82–0.91. The three-factor predictive models – that took into account the effect of soil organic carbon – were more accurate than two-factor models, with R2 of 0.85–0.99. The predictive models obtained here could be used to calculate soil-specific criteria. All results obtained here could provide a scientific basis for revision of current Chinese soil environmental quality standards, and the approach adopted in this study could be used as a pragmatic

  18. Derivation of Soil Ecological Criteria for Copper in Chinese Soils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Wei, Dongpu; Ma, Yibing; McLaughlin, Mike J

    2015-01-01

    Considerable information on copper (Cu) ecotoxicity as affected by biological species and abiotic properties of soils has been collected from the last decade in the present study. The information on bioavailability/ecotoxicity, species sensitivity and differences in laboratory and field ecotoxicity of Cu in different soils was collated and integrated to derive soil ecological criteria for Cu in Chinese soils, which were expressed as predicted no effect concentrations (PNEC). First, all ecotoxicity data of Cu from bioassays based on Chinese soils were collected and screened with given criteria to compile a database. Second, the compiled data were corrected with leaching and aging factors to minimize the differences between laboratory and field conditions. Before Cu ecotoxicity data were entered into a species sensitivity distribution (SSD), they were normalized with Cu ecotoxicity predictive models to modify the effects of soil properties on Cu ecotoxicity. The PNEC value was set equal to the hazardous concentration for x% of the species (HCx), which could be calculated from the SSD curves, without an additional assessment factor. Finally, predictive models for HCx based on soil properties were developed. The soil properties had a significant effect on the magnitude of HCx, with HC5 varying from 13.1 mg/kg in acidic soils to 51.9 mg/kg in alkaline non-calcareous soils. The two-factor predictive models based on soil pH and cation exchange capacity could predict HCx with determination coefficients (R2) of 0.82-0.91. The three-factor predictive models--that took into account the effect of soil organic carbon--were more accurate than two-factor models, with R2 of 0.85-0.99. The predictive models obtained here could be used to calculate soil-specific criteria. All results obtained here could provide a scientific basis for revision of current Chinese soil environmental quality standards, and the approach adopted in this study could be used as a pragmatic framework for

  19. Creating a University for the 21st Century: Strategic Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Dakota University System, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This document presents the strategic plan of the North Dakota University System, revised in November 2005, to develop a common vision and clear set of expectations for higher education in North Dakota. The strategic plan for the University System is directly linked to the Roundtable on Higher Education plan. This document presents the ten sections…

  20. How Proficiency-Pairing Affects Students' Peer-Mediated Revisions of EFL Writing: Three Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Weiqiang

    2015-01-01

    The present study reports on a teacher's classroom-based research into the influence of proficiency-pairing on students' peer-mediated draft revisions. Three students of an EFL writing course at a Chinese university, who formed into peer dyads with their classmates voluntarily, participated in the study. Throughout the EFL writing course, they…

  1. Using Multidimensional Scaling to Improve Functionality of the Revised Learning Process Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Socha, Alan; Sigler, Ellen A.

    2012-01-01

    The "Revised Learning Process Questionnaire" has been part of the development of a conceptual understanding of how students learn and what motivates them to engage in particular tasks. We obtained responses from 329 student volunteers at a mid-sized public university in the southeast USA. We first investigated whether the psychometric properties…

  2. Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling for the "Revised Two-Factor Learning Process Questionnaire"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Socha, Alan; Sigler, Ellen A.

    2011-01-01

    The "Revised Learning Process Questionnaire" has been part of the development of a conceptual understanding of how students learn and what motivates them to engage in particular tasks. We obtained responses from 329 student volunteers at a mid-sized public university in the southeast United States. While looking at the psychometric properties of…

  3. The Career Futures Inventory-Revised: Measuring Dimensions of Career Adaptability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rottinghaus, Patrick J.; Buelow, Kristine L.; Matyja, Anna; Schneider, Madalyn R.

    2012-01-01

    This study reports the development and initial validation of the "Career Futures Inventory-Revised" (CFI-R) in two large samples of university students. The 28-item CFI-R assesses aspects of career adaptability, including positive career planning attitudes, general outcome expectations, and components of Parsons' tripartite model and Bandura's…

  4. Emerging Marriage: One Story of Learning Sciences and Instructional Systems as a Possible Revisioned Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr-Chellman, Alison A.

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the potentials for symbiotic partnering between traditional Instructional Systems and Learning Sciences disciplines. This confluence is explored through a narrative discussion of the changes happening at Penn State University over the past decade leading that program toward a name change, curricular revisions, new hiring…

  5. Fund Raising. The Guide to Raising Money from Private Sources. Second Edition, Revised and Enlarged.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broce, Thomas E.

    A basic guide and reference to raising funds from private sources is presented that is designed primarily for professional personnel or the administrator employing fund-raising personnel. The first edition of the guide has also been used as a textbook for university courses in fund-raising. This revised edition includes new materials on: capital…

  6. Hierarchical Collaboration in the Revision of Text: Constructing Perceptions of Editorial Conferences in the News Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irby, Janet

    This study of editorial conferences in a university news laboratory examined the connections between dialogues about revision and the interpretations of dialogues by reporters and the editor in this journalism culture. The editorial conferences of two reporters with varying experience in publication and employment settings were analyzed, and the…

  7. Revisioning a School Administrator Preparation Program: A North Carolina Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Joy C.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides a descriptive case study of the process used at one of North Carolina's public universities to respond to a state-mandated "revisioning" directive for educational leadership preparation programs. The case provides an overview of the state educational leadership policy context, discussion of state and local…

  8. Adapting the Revised Self-Leadership Questionnaire to the Portuguese Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marques-Quinteiro, Pedro; Curral, Luis Alberto; Passos, Ana Margarida

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to adapt the Revised Self-Leadership Questionnaire (RSLQ) (Houghton and Neck in J Manag Psychol 17(8):672-691, 2002) for the Portuguese population. 720 professionals, and university and post-graduate students participated in this study. The RSLQ factorial structure was accessed through exploratory and multi group confirmatory…

  9. 75 FR 34674 - Washington: Proposed Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-18

    ...-Containing Equipment Universal Waste (70 FR 45508, 8/5/06). The State's revised mercury-containing equipment...? Washington initially received final authorization on January 30, 1986, effective January 31, 1986 (51 FR 3782... Washington's program on September 22, 1987, effective on November 23, 1987 (52 FR 35556); August 17,...

  10. Using a Problem Solving Model To Revise the Teacher Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN. Peabody Coll.

    The Department of Teaching and Learning of Peabody College of Vanderbilt University developed a project to strengthen field experiences for elementary/early childhood teacher education students. The project was designed to use current research to revise the laboratory and practica programs, incorporating technology and simulated classroom…

  11. Conserving Soil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soil Conservation Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Designed as enrichment materials for grades six through nine, this program is an interdisciplinary study of soils. As part of the program students: (1) examine soil organisms; (2) research history of local Native Americans to see how they and others have used the land and its soils; (3) investigate how soils are degraded and how they are conserved…

  12. Quantifying intrinsic and extrinsic factors affecting soil erodibility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil erodibility has traditionally been conceived as a soil dependent parameter that can be quantified from intrinsic soil properties that usually stay constant. Development of erosion prediction equations, from the empirical-based Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) to a more processed-based Water ...

  13. Forest Cover Change and Soil Erosion in Toledo's Rio Grande Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chicas, S.; Omine, K.

    2015-04-01

    Toledo, the southernmost district, is the hub of Belize's Mayan population, descendants of the ancient Mayan civilization. The Toledo District is primarily inhibited by Kekchi and Mopan Mayans whose subsistence needs are met by the Milpa slash-and-burn agricultural system and the extraction of forest resources. The poverty assessment in the country indicates that Toledo is the district with the highest percentage of household an individual indigence of 37.5 % and 49.7 % respectively. Forest cover change in the area can be attributed to rapid population growth among the Maya, together with increase in immigration from neighboring countries, logging, oil exploration and improvement and construction of roads. The forest cover change analysis show that from 2001 to 2011 there was a decrease of Lowland broad-leaved wet forest of 7.53 km sq, Shrubland of 4.66 km sq, and Wetland of 0.08 km sq. Forest cover change has resulted in soil erosion which is causing the deterioration of soils. The land cover types that are contributing the most to total erosion in the Rio Grande watershed are no-forest, lowland broad-leaved wet forest and submontane broad-leaved wet forest. In this study the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) was employed in a GIS platform to quantify and assess forest cover change and soil erosion. Soil erosion vulnerability maps in Toledo's Rio Grande watershed were also created. This study provides scientifically sound information in order to understand and respond effectively to the impacts of soil erosion in the study site.

  14. Soil experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Linton; Butler, Todd; Smith, Mike; Cline, Charles; Scruggs, Steve; Zakhia, Nadim

    1987-01-01

    An experimental procedure was devised to investigate the effects of the lunar environment on the physical properties of simulated lunar soil. The test equipment and materials used consisted of a vacuum chamber, direct shear tester, static penetrometer, and fine grained basalt as the simulant. The vacuum chamber provides a medium for applying the environmental conditions to the soil experiment with the exception of gravity. The shear strength parameters are determined by the direct shear test. Strength parameters and the resistance of soil penetration by static loading will be investigated by the use of a static cone penetrometer. In order to conduct a soil experiment without going to the moon, a suitable lunar simulant must be selected. This simulant must resemble lunar soil in both composition and particle size. The soil that most resembles actual lunar soil is basalt. The soil parameters, as determined by the testing apparatus, will be used as design criteria for lunar soil engagement equipment.

  15. Revision and product generation software

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed revision and product generation (RevPG) software for updating digital line graph (DLG) data and producing maps from such data. This software is based on ARC/INFO, a geographic information system from Environmental Systems Resource Institute (ESRI). RevPG consists of ARC/INFO Arc Macro Language (AML) programs, C routines, and interface menus that permit operators to collect vector data using aerial images, to symbolize the data on-screen, and to produce plots and color-separated files for use in printing maps.

  16. Revision and Product Generation Software

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed revision and product generation (RevPG) software for updating digital line graph (DLG) data and producing maps from such data. This software is based on ARC/INFO, a geographic information system from Environmental Systems Resource Institute (ESRI). RevPG consists of ARC/INFO Arc Macro Language (AML) programs, C routines, and interface menus that permit operators to collect vector data using aerial images, to symbolize the data onscreen, and to produce plots and color-separated files for use in printing maps.

  17. Coupling a high resolution soil erosion model with an agro-ecosystem model of SOC dynamics. An approach to assess the potential environmental effect of the new Common Agricultural Policy on soil degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrelli, Pasqualle; Paustian, Keith; Panagos, Panos; Jones, Arwyn; Schütt, Brigitta; Lugato, Emanuele

    2016-04-01

    At the European Union level, the main mechanisms to promote a more sustainable and environmentally friendly agriculture was introduced by the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) reform in 2003, through the Cross-compliance. According to this new regulation, the farmer support payments were regulated with respect to environmental, animal welfare and food safety standards. This brought to the Good Agricultural and Environmental Conditions (GAEC), firstly established by Council Regulation No. 1782/2003 and subsequently Council Regulation (EC) No 73/2009. The prevention of soil erosion and maintenance of soil organic matter were two of GAEC requirements, which each Member State was obliged to address through national standards such as: i) minimal soil cover maintenance (GAEC 4); ii) minimum land management reflecting site specific conditions to limit soil loss (GAEC 5) and iii) maintenance of soil organic matter level through appropriate practices including ban on burning arable stubbles (GAEC 6). Although Member States are required to verify whether the farmers are compliant with the regulations (Cross-compliance), the environmental effect of Good Agricultural and Environmental Conditions (GAEC) applications on erosion and carbon budgets are still little known and studied. To investigate the potential impacts of the GAEC, we coupled a high resolution erosion model based on Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) with the CENTURY biogeochemical model (Land Use Policy, 50, 408-421; 2016). The Italian arable land was selected as a study area, since it is well-known to be highly sensitive to soil erosion. Multi scenario modelling approach was undertaken, i.e., i) a baseline scenario without scenario excluding GAEC (pre 2003 period); ii) a present scenario including the current GAEC standards (post 2003 period), and iii) a technical potential scenario assuming that the GAEC standards were applied to the entire Italian arable land. The results show a 10.8% decrease, from

  18. 42 CFR 405.1889 - Effect of a revision; issue-specific nature of appeals of revised determinations and decisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Effect of a revision; issue-specific nature of appeals of revised determinations and decisions. 405.1889 Section 405.1889 Public Health CENTERS FOR... revision; issue-specific nature of appeals of revised determinations and decisions. (a) If a revision...

  19. 42 CFR 405.1889 - Effect of a revision; issue-specific nature of appeals of revised determinations and decisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Effect of a revision; issue-specific nature of appeals of revised determinations and decisions. 405.1889 Section 405.1889 Public Health CENTERS FOR... revision; issue-specific nature of appeals of revised determinations and decisions. (a) If a revision...

  20. 42 CFR 405.1889 - Effect of a revision; issue-specific nature of appeals of revised determinations and decisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Effect of a revision; issue-specific nature of appeals of revised determinations and decisions. 405.1889 Section 405.1889 Public Health CENTERS FOR... revision; issue-specific nature of appeals of revised determinations and decisions. (a) If a revision...

  1. 42 CFR 405.1889 - Effect of a revision; issue-specific nature of appeals of revised determinations and decisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Effect of a revision; issue-specific nature of appeals of revised determinations and decisions. 405.1889 Section 405.1889 Public Health CENTERS FOR... revision; issue-specific nature of appeals of revised determinations and decisions. (a) If a revision...

  2. Soil Ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killham, Ken

    1994-04-01

    Soil Ecology is designed to meet the increasing challenge faced by today's environmental scientists, ecologists, agriculturalists, and biotechnologists for an integrated approach to soil ecology. It emphasizes the interrelations among plants, animals, and microbes, by first establishing the fundamental physical and chemical properties of the soil habitat and then functionally characterizing the major components of the soil biota and some of their most important interactions. The fundamental principles underpinning soil ecology are established and this then enables an integrated approach to explore and understand the processes of soil nutrient (carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus) cycling and the ecology of extreme soil conditions such as soil-water stress. Two of the most topical aspects of applied soil ecology are then selected. First, the ecology of soil pollution is examined, focusing on acid deposition and radionuclide pollution. Second, manipulation of soil ecology through biotechnology is discussed, illustrating the use of pesticides and microbial inocula in soils and pointing toward the future by considering the impact of genetically modified inocula on soil ecology.

  3. Baby universes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strominger, Andrew

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * TOPOLOGY CHANGE AND THIRD QUANTIZATION IN 0+1 DIMENSIONS * Third Quantization of Free One-dimensional Universes * Third Quantization of Interacting One-Dimensional Universes * The Single-Universe Approximation and Dynamical Determination of Coupling Constants * The Third Quantized Uncertainty Principle * THIRD QUANTIZATION IN 3+1 DIMENSIONS * The Gauge Invariant Action * Relation to Other Formalisms * PARENT AND BABY UNIVERSES * The Hybrid Action * Baby Universe Field Operators and Spacetime Couplings * INSTANTONS-FROM QUANTUM MECHANICS TO QUANTUM GRAVITY * Quantum Mechanics * Quantum Field Theory * Quantum Gravity * Axionic Instantons * The Small Expansion Parameter * THE AXION MODEL AND THE INSTANTON APPROXIMATION * THE COSMOLOGICAL CONSTANT * The Hawking-Baum Argument * Baby Universes and Coleman's Argument * ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS * REFERENCES

  4. Weathering and soil erosion at watershed scale in St. John, US Virgin Islands.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudiño, Napoleón; Kretzschmar, Thomas; Gray, Sarah

    2015-04-01

    Human activities may increase soil erosion and the delivery of land-based sediment into coastal waters from steep sub-tropical islands. These changes may also affect water-rock interaction, which alters the geochemistry of storm-water and the clay mineralogy of eroded sediments. The purpose of this analysis is to compare storm-water, sediment geochemistry and modeled erosion rates between developed and undeveloped watersheds on Saint John, United States Virgin Islands (USVI). The saturation index was calculated by "The Geochemist's Workbench", supported by X-Ray diffraction on clay minerals. The Revised and Modified Universal Soil Loss Equations were used to estimate both annual mean (2010) and storm-event (Hurricane Otto) based erosion rates. Relative concentration of illite was higher in Coral Bay. Calculated RUSLE/MUSLE-based erosion rates were higher for the developed compared to the undeveloped watersheds. Results of this investigation suggest that rural/urban development of watersheds may increase the weathering, soil erosion and coastal sedimentation causing a negative effect on the marine ecosystem in St. John USVI.

  5. Milgrom's revision of Newton's laws - Dynamical and cosmological consequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felten, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    Milgrom's (1983) recent revision of Newtonian dynamics was introduced to eliminate the inference that large quantities of invisible mass exist in galaxies. It is shown by simple examples that a Milgrom acceleration, in the form presented so far, implies other far-reaching changes in dynamics. The momentum of an isolated system is not conserved, and the usual theorem for center-of-mass motion of any system does not hold. Naive applications require extreme caution. The model fails to provide a complete description of particle dynamics and should be thought of as a revision of Kepler's laws rather than Newton's. The Milgrom acceleration also implies fundamental changes in cosmology. A quasi-Newtonian calculation adapted from Newtonian cosmology suggests that a 'Milgrom universe' will recollapse even if the classical closure parameter Omega is much less than unity. The solution, however, fails to satisfy the cosmological principle. Reasons for the breakdown of this calculation are examined. A new theory of gravitation will be needed before the behavior of a Milgrom universe can be predicted.

  6. Milgrom's revision of cosmic dynamics: Amending Newton's laws or Keplers?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felten, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    Milgrom's recent revision of Newtonian dynamics was introduced to eliminate the inference that large quantities of invisible mass exist in galaxies. Simple examples show that a Milgrom acceleration, in the form presented so far, imply other far-reaching changes in dynamics. The momentum of an isolated system is not conserved, and the usual theorem for center-of-mass motion of any system does not hold. Naive applications require extreme caution. The model fails to provide a complete description of particle dynamics and should be thought of as a revision of Kepler's laws rather than Newton's. The Milgrom acceleration also implies fundamental changes in cosmology. A quasi-Newtonian calculation adapted from Newtonian cosmology suggests that a Milgrom universe will recollapse even if the classical closure parameter theta is less than 1. The solution, however, fails to satisfy the cosmological principle. Reasons for the breakdown of this calculation are examined. A theory of gravitation needed before the behavior of a Milgrom universe can be predicted.

  7. Milgrom's revision of cosmic dynamics: Amending Newton's laws or Keplers

    SciTech Connect

    Felten, J.E.

    1983-12-01

    Milgrom's recent revision of Newtonian dynamics was introduced to eliminate the inference that large quantities of invisible mass exist in galaxies. Simple examples show that a Milgrom acceleration, in the form presented so far, imply other far-reaching changes in dynamics. The momentum of an isolated system is not conserved, and the usual theorem for center-of-mass motion of any system does not hold. Naive applications require extreme caution. The model fails to provide a complete description of particle dynamics and should be thought of as a revision of Kepler's laws rather than Newton's. The Milgrom acceleration also implies fundamental changes in cosmology. A quasi-Newtonian calculation adapted from Newtonian cosmology suggests that a Milgrom universe will recollapse even if the classical closure parameter theta is less than 1. The solution, however, fails to satisfy the cosmological principle. Reasons for the breakdown of this calculation are examined. A theory of gravitation needed before the behavior of a Milgrom universe can be predicted.

  8. Thinking Styles and University Self-Efficacy among Deaf, Hard-of-Hearing, and Hearing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Sanyin; Zhang, Li-Fang; Hu, Xiaozhong

    2016-01-01

    This study explores how students' thinking styles are related to their university self-efficacy, by administering the Thinking Styles Inventory-Revised II and the University Self-Efficacy Scale to 366 deaf or hard-of-hearing (DHH) and 467 hearing university students in mainland China. Results showed that, among all participants, those with Type I…

  9. Universal Design in Higher Education: From Principles to Practice. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgstahler, Sheryl E., Ed.

    2015-01-01

    This second edition of the classic "Universal Design in Higher Education" is a comprehensive, up-to-the-minute guide for creating fully accessible college and university programs. The second edition has been thoroughly revised and expanded, and it addresses major recent changes in universities and colleges, the law, and technology. As…

  10. 36 CFR 219.9 - Revision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PLANNING National Forest System Land and Resource Management Planning The Framework for Planning § 219.9 Revision. (a) Application..., new or revised Forest Service policies, relevant portions of the Forest Service national...

  11. 75 FR 60485 - NRC Enforcement Policy Revision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-30

    ... On January 25, 2007 (72 FR 3429), the NRC published a notice announcing that the NRC was undertaking a major revision of its Enforcement Policy. On September 15, 2008 (73 FR 53286), the NRC published a... proposed revised Policy was published (73 FR 61442) on October 16, 2008. The public comment period for...

  12. Positive Culture Rate in Revision Shoulder Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hobgood, E. Rhett

    2009-01-01

    We recognized a trend of positive cultures taken from presumably uninfected shoulders during revision arthroplasty. Owing to the indolent nature of common shoulder pathogens such as Propionibacterium acnes, these cultures often become positive several days, even weeks, after surgery. Having concern regarding the potential importance of these positive cultures, we reviewed our revision arthroplasty population to determine the rate of positive intraoperative cultures in patients presumed to be aseptic, to characterize the isolated organisms, and to determine the subsequent development of infection. We retrospectively reviewed 27 patients (28 revisions) presumed to be uninfected between April 2005 and October 2007. Intraoperative cultures were positive in eight (29%) of the 28 revisions. Propionibacterium acnes was isolated in six. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in one patient and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in one patient. One-year followup was available on 24 of the 28 revisions. Two of the eight culture-positive revisions had a subsequent infection develop. Cultures taken at revision surgery for failed shoulder arthroplasty are often positive, and our findings document the importance of these positive cultures. Our data confirm previous reports isolating Propionibacterium acnes as a primary pathogen in revision shoulder arthroplasty. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:19434469

  13. 44 CFR 65.7 - Floodway revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... MAPPING OF SPECIAL HAZARD AREAS § 65.7 Floodway revisions. (a) General. Floodway data is developed as part... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Floodway revisions. 65.7 Section 65.7 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT...

  14. 44 CFR 65.7 - Floodway revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... MAPPING OF SPECIAL HAZARD AREAS § 65.7 Floodway revisions. (a) General. Floodway data is developed as part... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Floodway revisions. 65.7 Section 65.7 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT...

  15. 44 CFR 65.7 - Floodway revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... MAPPING OF SPECIAL HAZARD AREAS § 65.7 Floodway revisions. (a) General. Floodway data is developed as part... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Floodway revisions. 65.7 Section 65.7 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT...

  16. 44 CFR 65.7 - Floodway revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... MAPPING OF SPECIAL HAZARD AREAS § 65.7 Floodway revisions. (a) General. Floodway data is developed as part... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Floodway revisions. 65.7 Section 65.7 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT...

  17. 50 CFR 37.25 - Revision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM GEOLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION OF THE COASTAL PLAIN, ARCTIC NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE, ALASKA Exploration Plans § 37.25 Revision. (a) A permittee may request the Regional... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Revision. 37.25 Section 37.25 Wildlife...

  18. 50 CFR 37.25 - Revision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM GEOLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION OF THE COASTAL PLAIN, ARCTIC NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE, ALASKA Exploration Plans § 37.25 Revision. (a) A permittee may request the Regional... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Revision. 37.25 Section 37.25 Wildlife...

  19. 50 CFR 37.25 - Revision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM GEOLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION OF THE COASTAL PLAIN, ARCTIC NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE, ALASKA Exploration Plans § 37.25 Revision. (a) A permittee may request the Regional... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Revision. 37.25 Section 37.25 Wildlife...

  20. 50 CFR 37.25 - Revision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM GEOLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION OF THE COASTAL PLAIN, ARCTIC NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE, ALASKA Exploration Plans § 37.25 Revision. (a) A permittee may request the Regional... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Revision. 37.25 Section 37.25 Wildlife...

  1. 50 CFR 37.25 - Revision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM GEOLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION OF THE COASTAL PLAIN, ARCTIC NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE, ALASKA Exploration Plans § 37.25 Revision. (a) A permittee may request the Regional... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Revision. 37.25 Section 37.25 Wildlife...

  2. 40 CFR 51.326 - Reportable revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reportable revisions. 51.326 Section 51.326 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS... Action Reporting § 51.326 Reportable revisions. The State shall identify and describe all...

  3. 40 CFR 51.326 - Reportable revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reportable revisions. 51.326 Section 51.326 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS... Action Reporting § 51.326 Reportable revisions. The State shall identify and describe all...

  4. 40 CFR 51.326 - Reportable revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reportable revisions. 51.326 Section 51.326 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS... Action Reporting § 51.326 Reportable revisions. The State shall identify and describe all...

  5. 40 CFR 51.326 - Reportable revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reportable revisions. 51.326 Section 51.326 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS... Action Reporting § 51.326 Reportable revisions. The State shall identify and describe all...

  6. 40 CFR 51.326 - Reportable revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reportable revisions. 51.326 Section 51.326 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS... Action Reporting § 51.326 Reportable revisions. The State shall identify and describe all...

  7. How Mind Works To Revise Compositions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Deh-nan

    This study investigated cognitive processes involved in English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) students' correcting and revising drafts after receiving oral feedback from their teachers, noting factors that led to better written products and factors that did not improve student writing. The study examined what kinds of revision strategies students…

  8. Revised State Budget Sells Kids Short

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children Now, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Administration's May Revision of the 2012-2013 state budget addresses a $15.7 billion shortfall through funding shifts, cuts, and new revenue sources that place children squarely in harms way. California's kids are already grossly underserved relative to the rest of the nation's children. If the May Revise budget is passed by the Legislature,…

  9. 25 CFR 276.14 - Budget revision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Budget revision. 276.14 Section 276.14 Indians BUREAU OF... UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS § 276.14 Budget revision. Criteria and procedures to be followed by grantees in reporting deviations from grant budgets and requesting approval for...

  10. 48 CFR 2801.270-1 - Revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Revisions. 2801.270-1 Section 2801.270-1 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE General DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM Administration 2801.270-1 Revisions. In addition to...

  11. 36 CFR 219.9 - Revision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Revision. 219.9 Section 219.9 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PLANNING National Forest System Land and Resource Management Planning The Framework for Planning § 219.9 Revision. (a)...

  12. The Supervisor Emphasis Rating Form-Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanning, Wayne; Freeman, Brenda

    1994-01-01

    Discusses revision of Supervisor Emphasis Rating Form (SERF) into ipsative instrument and suggests future research that could profitably be done with new instrument. Explains rationale for choosing ipsative format and presents findings of study conducted to establish instrument reliability. SERF-Revised is appended. (Author/NB)

  13. Soil penetrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, E. A.; Hotz, G. M.; Bryson, R. P. (Inventor)

    1968-01-01

    An auger-type soil penetrometer for burrowing into soil formations is described. The auger, while initially moving along a predetermined path, may deviate from the path when encountering an obstruction in the soil. Alterations and modifications may be made in the structure so that it may be used for other purposes.

  14. African Universities Tackle the Continent's Agricultural Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindow, Megan

    2009-01-01

    Pests, population growth, and depleted soil have wreaked havoc on agriculture in Africa, so universities across the continent are rethinking how they teach the topic. Some African universities have been building their own networks and pooling their limited resources to train more agricultural scientists and improve their responsiveness to the…

  15. 77 FR 73454 - Revision of Information Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-10

    ... requirements; revise the Grant Application Narrative questions to clarify new concepts; Simplify language and... alignment between narrative sections and the performance measures work plans. The proposed revisions do...

  16. Discovering the essence of soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frink, D.

    2012-04-01

    Science, and what it can learn, is constrained by its paradigms and premises. Similarly, teaching and what topics can be addressed are constrained by the paradigms and premises of the subject matter. Modern soil science is founded on the five-factor model of Dokuchaev and Jenny. Combined with Retallack's universal definition of soil as geologic detritus affected by weathering and/or biology, modern soil science emphasizes a descriptive rather than an interpretive approach. Modern soil science however, emerged from the study of plants and the need to improve crop yields in the face of chronic and wide spread famine in Europe. In order to teach that dirt is fascinating we must first see soils in their own right, understand their behavior and expand soil science towards an interpretive approach rather than limited as a descriptive one. Following the advice of James Hutton given over two centuries ago, I look at soils from a physiological perspective. Digestive processes are mechanical and chemical weathering, the resulting constituents reformed into new soil constituents (e.g. clay and humus), translocated to different regions of the soil body to serve other physiological processes (e.g. lamellae, argillic and stone-line horizons), or eliminated as wastes (e.g. leachates and evolved gasses). Respiration is described by the ongoing and diurnal exchange of gasses between the soil and its environment. Circulatory processes are evident in soil pore space, drainage capacity and capillary capability. Reproduction of soil is evident at two different scales: the growth of clay crystals (with their capacity for mutation) and repair of disturbed areas such as result from the various pedo-perturbations. The interactions between biotic and abiotic soil components provide examples of both neurological and endocrine systems in soil physiology. Through this change in perspective, both biotic and abiotic soil processes become evident, providing insight into the possible behavior of

  17. Innovative Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barsi, Louis M.; Kaebnick, Gweneth W.

    1989-01-01

    The phenomenon of innovation within the university is examined, noting the possibility of innovation as a key to college vitality. A study was conducted using a group of institutions that demonstrated recent innovative spirit. Members of the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU), each has been recognized in an annual…

  18. Challenged Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillis, Malcolm

    1995-01-01

    Pricing and financial aid issues affecting research universities, particularly private universities, are examined, including underpricing of services, decentralization, and diversification of higher education in the United States. The growth of federal regulation is also considered, especially the State Postsecondary Review Entities (SPREs)…

  19. Universal Expansion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArdle, Heather K.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a week-long activity for general to honors-level students that addresses Hubble's law and the universal expansion theory. Uses a discrepant event-type activity to lead up to the abstract principles of the universal expansion theory. (JRH)

  20. Overseas Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inter-University Council for Higher Education Overseas, London (England).

    The following articles and reports are presented in this publication of "Overseas Universities:""Appropriate Technology and University Education," by John Twidell; "The Training of Engineering Staff for Higher Education Institutions in Developing Countries," by D. W. Daniel, C. A. Leal, J. H. Maynes and T. Wilmore; "A Case Study of an Academic…

  1. University Futures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Recent radical changes to university education in England have been discussed largely in terms of the arrangements for transferring funding from the state to the student as consumer, with little discussion of what universities are for. It is important, while challenging the economic rationale for the new system, to resist talking about higher…

  2. University Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Brian

    This book explores how universities relate their built environment to academic discourse, asserting that the character of universities is often a charming dialogue between order and disarray. It contains numerous photographs and building plans for example campuses throughout the world. In part 1, "The Campus," chapters are: (1) "Academic Mission…

  3. Radiological control manual. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kloepping, R.

    1996-05-01

    This Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Radiological Control Manual (LBNL RCM) has been prepared to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements and interpretation of the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is one methodology to implement the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835 (10 CFR 835) and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. Information given in this manual is also intended to provide demonstration of compliance to specific requirements in 10 CFR 835. The LBNL RCM (Publication 3113) and LBNL Health and Safety Manual Publication-3000 form the technical basis for the LBNL RPP and will be revised as necessary to ensure that current requirements from Rules and Orders are represented. The LBNL RCM will form the standard for excellence in the implementation of the LBNL RPP.

  4. Seasonality of soil erosion under mediterranean conditions at the Alqueva Dam watershed.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Vera; Panagopoulos, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    The Alqueva reservoir created the largest artificial lake of Western Europe in 2010. Since then, the region has faced challenges due to land-use changes that may increase the risk of erosion and shorten the lifetime of the reservoir, increasing the need to promote land management sustainability. This paper investigates the aspect of seasonality of soil erosion using a comprehensive methodology that integrates the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) approach, geographic information systems, geostatistics, and remote-sensing. An experimental agro-silvo pastoral area (typical land-use) was used for the RUSLE factors update. The study confirmed the effect of seasonality on soil erosion rates under Mediterranean conditions. The highest rainfall erosivity values occurred during the autumn season (433.6 MJ mm ha(-1) h(-1)), when vegetation cover is reduced after the long dry season. As a result, the autumn season showed the highest predicted erosion (9.9 t ha(-1)), contributing 65 % of the total annual erosion. The predicted soil erosion for winter was low (1.1 t ha(-1)) despite the high rainfall erosivity during that season (196.6 MJ mm ha(-1) h(-1)). The predicted annual soil loss was 15.1 t ha(-1), and the sediment amount delivery was 4,314 × 10(3) kg. Knowledge of seasonal variation would be essential to outline sustainable land management practices. This model will be integrated with World Overview of Conservation Approaches and Technologies methods to support decision-making in that watershed, and it will involve collaboration with both local people and governmental institutions.

  5. Our Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Alan

    2001-03-01

    The Universe in which we live is unimaginably vast and ancient, with countless star systems, galaxies, and extraordinary phenomena such as black holes, dark matter, and gamma ray bursts. What phenomena remain mysteries, even to seasoned scientists? Our Universe is a fascinating collection of essays by some of the world's foremost astrophysicists. Some are theorists, some computational modelers, some observers, but all offer their insights into the most cutting-edge, difficult, and curious aspects of astrophysics. Compiled, the essays describe more than the latest techniques and findings. Each of the ten contributors offers a more personal perspective on their work, revealing what motivates them and how their careers and lives have been shaped by their desire to understand our universe. S. Alan Stern is Director of the Department of Space Studies at Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado. He is a planetary scientist and astrophysicist with both observational and theoretical interests. Stern is an avid pilot and a principal investigator in NASA's planetary research program, and he was selected to be a NASA space shuttle mission specialist finalist. He is the author of more than 100 papers and popular articles. His most recent book is Pluto & Charon (Wiley, 1997). Contributors: Dr. John Huchra, Harvard University Dr. Esther Hu, University of Hawaii, Honolulu Dr. John Mather, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Dr. Nick Gnedin, University of Colorado, Boulder Dr. Doug Richstone, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Dr. Bohdan Paczynski, Princeton University, NJ Dr. Megan Donahue, Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD Dr. Jerry Ostriker, Princeton University, New Jersey G. Bothun, University of Oregon, Eugene

  6. Soil Delivery to Phoenix Oven

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image shows a view from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Stereo Surface Imager's left eye after delivery of soil to the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer (TEGA), taken on the 12th Martian day after landing (Sol 12, June $6, 2008).

    Soil is visible on both sides of the open doors of TEGA's #4 oven. Sensors inside the device indicate no soil passed through the screen and into the oven.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  7. Soil erosion in an avalanche release site (Valle d'Aosta: Italy): towards a winter factor for RUSLE in the Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanchi, S.; Freppaz, M.; Ceaglio, E.; Maggioni, M.; Meusburger, K.; Alewell, C.; Zanini, E.

    2014-07-01

    Soil erosion in Alpine areas is mainly related to extreme topographic and weather conditions. Although different methods of assessing soil erosion exist, the knowledge of erosive forces of the snow cover needs more investigation in order to allow soil erosion modeling in areas where the snow lays on the ground for several months. This study aims to assess whether the RUSLE (Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation) empirical prediction model, which gives an estimation of water erosion in t ha yr-1 obtained from a combination of five factors (rainfall erosivity, soil erodibility, topography, soil cover, protection practices) can be applied to mountain areas by introducing a winter factor (W), which should account for the soil erosion occurring in winter time by the snow cover. The W factor is calculated from the ratio of Ceasium-137 (137Cs) to RUSLE erosion rates. Ceasium-137 is another possible way of assessing soil erosion rates in the field. In contrast to RUSLE, it not only provides water-induced erosion but integrates all erosion agents involved. Thus, we hypothesize that in mountain areas the difference between the two approaches is related to the soil erosion by snow. In this study we compared 137Cs-based measurement of soil redistribution and soil loss estimated with RUSLE in a mountain slope affected by avalanches, in order to assess the relative importance of winter erosion processes such as snow gliding and full-depth avalanches. Three subareas were considered: DS, avalanche defense structures, RA, release area, and TA, track area, characterized by different prevalent winter processes. The RUSLE estimates and the 137Cs redistribution gave significantly different results. The resulting ranges of W evidenced relevant differences in the role of winter erosion in the considered subareas, and the application of an avalanche simulation model corroborated these findings. Thus, the higher rates obtained with the 137Cs method confirmed the relevant role of winter soil

  8. Universe Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankatsing Nava, Tibisay; Russo, Pedro

    2015-08-01

    Universe Awareness (UNAWE) is an educational programme coordinated by Leiden University that uses the beauty and grandeur of the Universe to encourage young children, particularly those from an underprivileged background, to have an interest in science and technology and foster their sense of global citizenship from the earliest age.UNAWE's twofold vision uses our Universe to inspire and motivate very young children: the excitement of the Universe provides an exciting introduction to science and technology, while the vastness and beauty of the Universe helps broaden the mind and stimulate a sense of global citizenship and tolerance. UNAWE's goals are accomplished through four main activities: the coordination of a global network of more than 1000 astronomers, teachers and educators from more than 60 countries, development of educational resources, teacher training activities and evaluation of educational activities.Between 2011 and 2013, EU-UNAWE, the European branch of UNAWE, was funded by the European Commission to implement a project in 5 EU countries and South Africa. This project has been concluded successfully. Since then, the global project Universe Awareness has continued to grow with an expanding international network, new educational resources and teacher trainings and a planned International Workshop in collaboration with ESA in October 2015, among other activities.

  9. Scar Revision Surgery: The Patient's Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Allan, Anna Y; Butler, Daniel P; Cussons, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    Background Insufficient satisfaction outcome literature exists to assist consultations for scar revision surgery; such outcomes should reflect the patient's perspective. The aim of this study was to prospectively investigate scar revision patient satisfaction outcomes, according to specified patient-selection criteria. Methods Patients (250) were randomly selected for telephone contacting regarding scar revisions undertaken between 2007-2011. Visual analogue scores were obtained for scars pre- and post-revision surgery. Surgery selection criteria were; 'presence' of sufficient time for scar maturation prior to revision, technical issues during or wound complications from the initial procedure that contributed to poor scarring, and 'absence' of site-specific or patient factors that negatively influence outcomes. Patient demographics, scar pathogenesis (elective vs. trauma), underlying issue (functional/symptomatic vs. cosmetic) and revision surgery details were also collected with the added use of a real-time, hospital database. Results Telephone contacting was achieved for 211 patients (214 scar revisions). Satisfaction outcomes were '2% worse, 16% no change, and 82% better'; a distribution maintained between body sites and despite whether surgery was functional/symptomatic vs. cosmetic. Better outcomes were reported by patients who sustained traumatic scars vs. those who sustained scars by elective procedures (91.80% vs. 77.78%, P=0.016) and by females vs. males (85.52% vs. 75.36%, P<0.05), particularly in the elective group where males (36.17%) were more likely to report no change or worse outcomes versus females (16.04%) (P<0.01). Conclusions Successful scar revision outcomes may be achieved using careful patient selection. This study provides useful information for referring general practitioners, and patient-surgeon consultations, when planning scar revision. PMID:26618120

  10. BOREAS TE-2 NSA Soil Lab Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veldhuis, Hugo; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    This data set contains the major soil properties of soil samples collected in 1994 at the tower flux sites in the Northern Study Area (NSA). The soil samples were collected by Hugo Veldhuis and his staff from the University of Manitoba. The mineral soil samples were largely analyzed by Barry Goetz, under the supervision of Dr. Harold Rostad at the University of Saskatchewan. The organic soil samples were largely analyzed by Peter Haluschak, under the supervision of Hugo Veldhuis at the Centre for Land and Biological Resources Research in Winnipeg, Manitoba. During the course of field investigation and mapping, selected surface and subsurface soil samples were collected for laboratory analysis. These samples were used as benchmark references for specific soil attributes in general soil characterization. Detailed soil sampling, description, and laboratory analysis were performed on selected modal soils to provide examples of common soil physical and chemical characteristics in the study area. The soil properties that were determined include soil horizon; dry soil color; pH; bulk density; total, organic, and inorganic carbon; electric conductivity; cation exchange capacity; exchangeable sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and hydrogen; water content at 0.01, 0.033, and 1.5 MPascals; nitrogen; phosphorus: particle size distribution; texture; pH of the mineral soil and of the organic soil; extractable acid; and sulfur. These data are stored in ASCII text files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  11. Soil Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, T. J.; Holmes, J. W.; Rose, C. W.

    1996-06-01

    Now in its third edition, this textbook gives a comprehensive account of soil physics with emphasis on field applications for students and research workers engaged in water resources studies, soil sciences, and plant sciences. The authors have added chapters on soil erosion, conservation, and the role of soil in affecting water quality to this new edition. The book gives an account of how water influences the structure and strength of soil; how plants absorb water from soils; how water from rain and irrigation enters the soil and flows through it to contribute to stream flow and flow in artificial drains; how soluble salts and chemical pollutants are transported; how soils are eroded by water and wind; and how the evaporation rate from the land surface is influenced by soil water supply, the nature of the plant cover and the evaporative power of the atmosphere. This book will be useful to students and research workers in environmental sciences, hydrology, agriculture, soil science, and civil engineering.

  12. Einstein's Universe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Eric; Wald, Robert

    1979-01-01

    Presents a guide to be used by students and teachers in conjunction with a television program about Einstein. Provides general information about special and general relativity, and the universe. Includes questions for discussion after each section and a bibliography. (MA)

  13. Universal Truths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horgan, John

    1990-01-01

    Described is a symposium of Nobel laureates held in the summer of 1990 to discuss cosmology. Different views on the structure and evolution of the universe are presented. Evidence for different theories of cosmology is discussed. (CW)

  14. SOIL AND FILL LABORATORY SUPPORT - 1991

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of soil analysis laboratory work by the University of Florida in Support of the Florida Radon Research Program (FRRP). Analyses were performed on soil and fill samples collected during 1991 by the FRRP Research House program and the New House Evaluation P...

  15. Regulatory guidance on soil cover systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J.D.

    1991-12-31

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in September 1991, completed revisions to 14 sections of the Standard Review Plan (SRP) for the Review of a License Application for a Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility. The major purposes of the SRP are to ensure the quality and uniformity of the NRC staff`s safety reviews, and to present a well-defined base from which to evaluate the acceptability of information and data provided in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) portion of the license application. SRP 3.2, entitled, Design Considerations for Normal and Abnormal/Accident Conditions, was one of the sections that was revised by the NRC staff. This revision was completed to provide additional regulatory guidance on the important considerations that need to be addressed for the proper design and construction of soil cover systems that are to be placed over the LLW. The cover system over the waste is acknowledged to be one of the most important engineered barriers for the long-term stable performance of the disposal facility. The guidance in revised SRP 3.2 summarizes the previous efforts and recommendations of the US Army Corps of Engineers (COE), and a peer review panel on the placement of soil cover systems. NRC published these efforts in NUREG/CR-5432. The discussions in this paper highlight selected recommendations on soil cover issues that the NRC staff considers important for ensuring the safe, long-term performance of the soil cover systems. The development phases to be discussed include: (1) cover design; (2) cover material selection; (3) laboratory and field testing; (4) field placement control and acceptance; and (5) penetrations through the constructed covers.

  16. Expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A universe that expands with time. Although the possibility had been raised earlier through theoretical work carried out by Willem de Sitter (1872-1934), Aleksandr Friedmann (1888-1925), and the Abbé Georges Lemaître (1894-1966), that our universe is expanding was first demonstrated observationally in 1929 by Edwin P Hubble (1889-1953), through his measurements of the redshifts in the spectra of ...

  17. Undulant Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Barenboim, Gabriela; Mena, Olga; Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    If the equation of state for ''dark energy'' varies periodically, the expansion of the Universe may have undergone alternating eras of acceleration and deceleration. We examine a specific form that survives existing observational tests, does not single out the present state of the Universe as exceptional, and suggests a future much like the matter-dominated past: a smooth expansion without a final inflationary epoch.

  18. Guide to Sources: Advertising. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Lucinda M.

    This guide is designed to introduce the student to some of the major sources of advertising information available in the Fogler Library at the University of Maine. A brief description and exploration of the card catalog, Library of Congress Subject Headings, Library of Congress Classification System, and the Dewey Decimal System are included. In…

  19. Guide to Sources: Music. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Melvin W.

    Designed to introduce the student to some of the bibliographic tools used to locate information on music in the Fogler Library at the University of Maine, this guide begins by listing examples of relevant Library of Congress subject headings and providing brief explanations of call numbers and classification systems (Library of Congress and Dewey…

  20. Continuous Risk Management Course. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, Theodore F.

    1999-01-01

    This document includes a course plan for Continuous Risk Management taught by the Software Assurance Technology Center along with the Continuous Risk Management Guidebook of the Software Engineering Institute of Carnegie Mellon University and a description of Continuous Risk Management at NASA.

  1. Library Binding Manual. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakhanpal, S. K.

    This procedural manual is designed to be used in bindery sections in public, university and special libraries. It briefly discusses these general matters: administrative control; selection of a binder; when and what to bind; conventional binding; routines; missing issues; schedule for shipments; temporary binding; rare books, maps and newspapers;…

  2. Introductory Business Textbook Revision Cycles: Are They Getting Shorter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zinser, Brian; Brunswick, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The rate of textbook revision cycles is examined in light of the recent trend towards more rapid revisions (and adoptions of textbooks). The authors conduct background research to better understand the context for textbook revision cycles and the environmental forces that have been influencing what appears to be more rapid textbook revisions. A…

  3. 40 CFR 142.12 - Revision of State programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... § 142.12 Revision of State programs. (a) General requirements. Either EPA or the primacy State may initiate actions that require the State to revise its approved State primacy program. To retain primary... State revises its approved primacy program to adopt new or revised Federal regulations, the State...

  4. 40 CFR 142.12 - Revision of State programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... § 142.12 Revision of State programs. (a) General requirements. Either EPA or the primacy State may initiate actions that require the State to revise its approved State primacy program. To retain primary... State revises its approved primacy program to adopt new or revised Federal regulations, the State...

  5. 40 CFR 142.12 - Revision of State programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... § 142.12 Revision of State programs. (a) General requirements. Either EPA or the primacy State may initiate actions that require the State to revise its approved State primacy program. To retain primary... State revises its approved primacy program to adopt new or revised Federal regulations, the State...

  6. 40 CFR 142.12 - Revision of State programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... § 142.12 Revision of State programs. (a) General requirements. Either EPA or the primacy State may initiate actions that require the State to revise its approved State primacy program. To retain primary... State revises its approved primacy program to adopt new or revised Federal regulations, the State...

  7. 40 CFR 142.12 - Revision of State programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... § 142.12 Revision of State programs. (a) General requirements. Either EPA or the primacy State may initiate actions that require the State to revise its approved State primacy program. To retain primary... State revises its approved primacy program to adopt new or revised Federal regulations, the State...

  8. 40 CFR 255.41 - Procedure for revision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... IDENTIFICATION OF REGIONS AND AGENCIES FOR SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT Submission and Revision of Identifications... for solid waste functions in the region. (b) Revisions or adjustments to the State plan may require... notified of such revisions by the State solid waste agency. (c) Major revisions or adjustments in...

  9. 15 CFR 923.128 - Revisions to assessments and strategies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... strategies. 923.128 Section 923.128 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign... Program § 923.128 Revisions to assessments and strategies. (a) A State, in consultation with the Assistant Administrator, may propose to revise its approved Strategy. Revision(s) to an approved Strategy must...

  10. A Comparative Study of Three Revision Methods in EFL Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srichanyachon, Napaporn

    2011-01-01

    In an attempt to explore effective instruction in the English as a Foreign Language (EFL) setting, this study investigated language errors identified by students and teachers in three different revision stages: self-revision, peer revision, and teacher revision. It gave the focus to the effects of the three different methods on learners' writing…

  11. Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2010-02-09

    This document supersedes DOE/NV/25946--801, “Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual,” Revision 0 issued in October 2009. Brief Description of Revision: A minor revision to correct oversights made during revision to incorporate the 10 CFR 835 Update; and for use as a reference document for Tenant Organization Radiological Protection Programs.

  12. Real Revision: Authors' Strategies to Share with Student Writers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messner, Kate

    2011-01-01

    How do you show students that revision is more than a classroom exercise to please the teacher? Take them into the real world of writing for publication. In Real Revision, award-winning author and teacher Kate Messner demystifies the revision process for teachers and students alike and provides tried-and-true revision strategies, field tested by…

  13. New and revised standards for coke production

    SciTech Connect

    G.A. Kotsyuba; M.I. Alpatov; Y.G. Shapoval

    2009-07-15

    The need for new and revised standards for coke production in Ukraine and Russia is outlined. Such standards should address improvements in plant operation, working conditions, environmental protection, energy conservation, fire and explosion safety, and economic indices.

  14. Facial Scar Revision: Understanding Facial Scar Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us Trust your face to a facial plastic surgeon Facial Scar Revision Understanding Facial Scar Treatment ... face like the eyes or lips. A facial plastic surgeon has many options for treating and improving ...

  15. 78 FR 59982 - Revisions to Radiation Protection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Revisions to Radiation Protection AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Standard review... Reports for Nuclear Power Plants: LWR Edition'': Section 12.1, ``Assuring that Occupational...

  16. Suggested revision for west mexican archeological sequences.

    PubMed

    Long, S V; Taylor, R E

    1966-12-16

    A review of the radiocarbon dates and published and unpublished archeological data from the West Mexican states of Sinaloa, Nayarit, Jalisco, and Colima has resulted in a revised tentative chronology for West Mexico.

  17. (Contaminated soil)

    SciTech Connect

    Siegrist, R.L.

    1991-01-08

    The traveler attended the Third International Conference on Contaminated Soil, held in Karlsruhe, Germany. The Conference was a status conference for worldwide research and practice in contaminated soil assessment and environmental restoration, with more than 1500 attendees representing over 26 countries. The traveler made an oral presentation and presented a poster. At the Federal Institute for Water, Soil and Air Hygiene, the traveler met with Dr. Z. Filip, Director and Professor, and Dr. R. Smed-Hildmann, Research Scientist. Detailed discussions were held regarding the results and conclusions of a collaborative experiment concerning humic substance formation in waste-amended soils.

  18. Revision of failed humeral head resurfacing arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Streubel, Philipp N.; Simone, Juan P.; Cofield, Robert H.; Sperling, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to assess the outcomes of a consecutive series of patients who underwent revision surgery after humeral head resurfacing (HHR). Our joint registry was queried for all patients who underwent revision arthroplasty for failed HHR at our institution from 2005 to 2010. Eleven consecutive patients (average age 54 years; range 38-69 years) that underwent revision of 11 resurfacing arthroplasties were identified. The primary indication for resurfacing had been osteoarthritis in six, glenoid dysplasia in two, a chondral lesion in two, and postinstability arthropathy in one patient. The indication for revision was pain in 10 and infection in one patient. Seven patients had undergone an average of 1.9 surgeries prior to resurfacing (range 1-3). Materials and Methods: All patients were revised to stemmed arthroplasties, including one hemiarthroplasty, two reverse, and eight anatomic total shoulder arthroplasties at a mean 33 months after primary resurfacing (range 10-131 months). A deltopectoral approach was used in seven patients; four patients required an anteromedial approach due to severe scarring. Subscapularis attenuation was found in four cases, two of which required reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. Bone grafting was required in one glenoid and three humeri. Results: At a mean follow-up of 3.5 years (range 1.6-6.9 years), modified Neer score was rated as satisfactory in five patients and unsatisfactory in six. Abduction and external rotation improved from 73° to 88° (P = 0.32) and from 23° to 32° (P = 0.28) respectively. Reoperation was required in two patients, including one hematoma and one revision for instability. Conclusion: Outcomes of revision of HHR arthroplasty in this cohort did not improve upon those reported for revision of stemmed humeral implants. A comparative study would be required to allow for definitive conclusions to be made. PMID:26980986

  19. HLW system plan - revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-14

    The projected ability of the Tank Farm to support DWPF startup and continued operation has diminished somewhat since revision 1 of this Plan. The 13 month delay in DWPF startup, which actually helps the Tank Farm condition in the near term, was more than offset by the 9 month delay in ITP startup, the delay in the Evaporator startups and the reduction to Waste Removal funding. This Plan does, however, describe a viable operating strategy for the success of the HLW System and Mission, albeit with less contingency and operating flexibility than in the past. HLWM has focused resources from within the division on five near term programs: The three evaporator restarts, DWPF melter heatup and completion of the ITP outage. The 1H Evaporator was restarted 12/28/93 after a 9 month shutdown for an extensive Conduct of Operations upgrade. The 2F and 2H Evaporators are scheduled to restart 3/94 and 4/94, respectively. The RHLWE startup remains 11/17/97.

  20. 42 CFR 405.1889 - Effect of a revision; issue-specific nature of appeals of revised determinations and decisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Effect of a revision; issue-specific nature of... MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM FEDERAL HEALTH... revision; issue-specific nature of appeals of revised determinations and decisions. (a) If a revision...

  1. Revision of the DELFIC Particle Activity Module

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, David A; Jodoin, Vincent J

    2010-09-01

    The Defense Land Fallout Interpretive Code (DELFIC) was originally released in 1968 as a tool for modeling fallout patterns and for predicting exposure rates. Despite the continual advancement of knowledge of fission yields, decay behavior of fission products, and biological dosimetry, the decay data and logic of DELFIC have remained mostly unchanged since inception. Additionally, previous code revisions caused a loss of conservation of radioactive nuclides. In this report, a new revision of the decay database and the Particle Activity Module is introduced and explained. The database upgrades discussed are replacement of the fission yields with ENDF/B-VII data as formatted in the Oak Ridge Isotope Generation (ORIGEN) code, revised decay constants, revised exposure rate multipliers, revised decay modes and branching ratios, and revised boiling point data. Included decay logic upgrades represent a correction of a flaw in the treatment of the fission yields, extension of the logic to include more complex decay modes, conservation of nuclides (including stable nuclides) at all times, and conversion of key variables to double precision for nuclide conservation. Finally, recommended future work is discussed with an emphasis on completion of the overall radiation physics upgrade, particularly for dosimetry, induced activity, decay of the actinides, and fractionation.

  2. Cosmic Accelerators: Engines of the Extreme Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, Stefan

    2009-06-23

    The universe is home to numerous exotic and beautiful phenomena, some of which can generate almost inconceivable amounts of energy. While the night sky appears calm, it is populated by colossal explosions, jets from supermassive black holes, rapidly rotating neutron stars, and shock waves of gas moving at supersonic speeds. These accelerators in the sky boost particles to energies far beyond those we can produce on earth. New types of telescopes, including the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope orbiting in space, are now discovering a host of new and more powerful accelerators. Please come and see how these observations are revising our picture of the most energetic phenomena in the universe.

  3. Use of fine resolution terrain data in soil loss equations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Dust Bowl of the 1930's focused US attention on soil erosion and land conservation. The Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) was the result of this effort and has remained one of the most widely used equations for soil erosion prediction world-wide. This empirical relationship has been incorporat...

  4. Estimating the GIS-based soil loss and sediment delivery ratio to the sea for four major basins in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, S E; Kang, S H

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a sediment delivery ratio (SDR) using the Geographic Information System (GIS)-based Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE), to calculate the soil loss and sediment rating curve (SRC) basis of measured data in the six basins of Four Rivers, South Korea. The data set for calculating SDR was prepared during 3 years from 2008 to 2010. Mean soil loss in the six basins of Four Rivers was 515-869 t km(-2) yr(-1) and mean specific sediment yield (SSY) was 20-208 t km(-2) yr(-1) with basin size. The SDR ranged from 0.03 to 0.33 in the six rivers. Most sediment flows in the monsoon period from June to September (mean Max.: >97%; mean Min.: >84%), but SDR is lower than those of similar continental river basins. This is due to environmental factors, for example rainfall characteristics and associated run-off, soil characteristics and cultivated patterns with increasing basin size. This research provides the first application of SDR based on the observed field data in South Korea.

  5. Plasma universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfven, H.

    1986-01-01

    Traditionally the views on the cosmic environent have been based on observations in the visual octave of the electromagnetic spectrum, during the last half-century supplemented by infrared and radio observations. Space research has opened the full spectrum. Of special importance are the X-ray-gamma-ray regions, in which a number of unexpected phenomena have been discovered. Radiations in these regions are likely to originate mainly from magnetised cosmic plasmas. Such a medium may also emit synchrotron radiation which is observable in the radio region. If a model of the universe is based on the plasma phenomena mentioned it is found that the plasma universe is drastically different from the traditional visual universe. Information about the plasma universe can also be obtained by extrapolation of laboratory experiments and magnetospheric in situ measurements of plasmas. This approach is possible because it is likely that the basic properties of plasmas are the same everywhere. In order to test the usefulness of the plasma universe model it is applied to cosmogony. Such an approach seems to be rather successful. For example, the complicated structure of the Saturnian C ring can be accounted for. It is possible to reconstruct certain phenomena 4 to 5 billions of years ago with an accuracy of better than 1%.

  6. Curriculum Response to a Changing National and International Information Environment: Theoretical and Methodological Paradigms on Review and Revision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ocholla, Dennis N.

    2001-01-01

    Describes use of a follow-up study and newspaper scanning techniques to collect data to review and revise the Library and Information Science curriculum at the University of Zululand (South Africa). Includes a case study of graduates that investigated whether their training was adequate and a scan of job advertisements. (Author/LRW)

  7. The Effects of Face-to-Face and Computer-Mediated Peer Review on EFL Writers' Comments and Revisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Mei-ching

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the use of face-to-face and computer-mediated peer review in an English as a Foreign Language (EFL) writing course to examine how different interaction modes affect comment categories, students' revisions, and their perceptions of peer feedback. The participants were an intact class of 13 students at a Taiwanese university.…

  8. How and Why the University of California Got Its Autonomy. Research & Occasional Paper Series: CSHE.4.15

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglass, John Aubrey

    2015-01-01

    The University of California became a "public trust" in 1879 as part of a larger revision of California's Constitution approved by California voters. The University henceforth gained the exclusive power to operate, control, and administer the University of California, becoming virtually a fourth branch of state government, a…

  9. Results of Wagner SL revision stem with impaction bone grafting in revision total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Somesh P; Bhalodiya, Haresh P

    2013-01-01

    Background: As the number of total hip arthroplasties (THAs) performed increases, so do the number of required revisions. Impaction bone grafting with Wagner SL Revision stem is a good option for managing bone deficiencies arising from aseptic osteolysis. We studied the results of cementless diaphyseal fixation in femoral revision after total hip arthroplasty and whether there was spontaneous regeneration of bone stock in the proximal femur after the use of Wagner SL Revision stem (Zimmer, Warsaw, IN, USA) with impaction bone grafting. Materials and Methods: We performed 53 hip revisions using impaction bone grafting and Wagner SL Revision stems in 48 patients; (5 cases were bilateral) for variety of indications ranging from aseptic osteolysis to preiprosthetic fractures. The average age was 59 years (range 44-68 years). There were 42 male and 6 female patients. Four patients died after surgery for reasons unrelated to surgery. 44 patients were available for complete analysis. Results: The mean Harris Hip Score was 42 before surgery and improved to 86 by the final followup evaluation at a mean point of 5.5 years. Of the 44 patients, 87% (n=39) had excellent results and 10% (n=5) had good results. The stem survival rate was 98% (n=43). Conclusion: Short term results for revision THA with impaction bone grafting and Wagner SL revision stems are encouraging. However, it is necessary to obtain long term results through periodic followup evaluation, as rate of complications may increase in future. PMID:23960279

  10. Revision Rhinoplasty: What Can We Learn from Error Patterns? An Analysis of Revision Surgery.

    PubMed

    East, Charles; Kwame, Ivor; Hannan, Saiful Alam

    2016-08-01

    Of the many challenges in rhinoplasty, achieving a satisfactory outcome at the first operation is important. There are multiple reasons for secondary surgery, and generally revisions can be broadly classified into minor (often one area of deficit) or a total redo. Understanding the common technical reasons for failure in primary surgery by analyzing the deformities has resulted in various error patterns emerging. Understanding these patterns means we can modify techniques in primary surgery to reduce the incidence of revision. This article describes our prospective revision rhinoplasty experience over 5 and then 2 years, highlighting the main error patterns encountered. We also describe a stepwise analysis of four frequently encountered key problem areas alongside techniques to address them and offer pearls to help prevent further revision. Comparison of two cohorts of patients from a teaching hospital setting and private practice with the same operating surgeon indicates an increasing tendency to the open approach for revisions. The re-revision rates for these groups are 15.7 and 9%, respectively. Revision rhinoplasty is a difficult operation to perform to the satisfaction of both the surgeon and the patient. Understanding the common technical reasons for failure in primary surgery by fully analyzing the deformities means we can modify techniques in primary surgery to reduce the incidence of revision. PMID:27494585

  11. Femoral tunnel malposition in ACL revision reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Joseph A; Dahm, Diane; Levy, Bruce; Stuart, Michael J

    2012-11-01

    The Multicenter Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Revision Study (MARS) group was formed to study a large cohort of revision ACL reconstruction patients. The purpose of this subset analysis study of the MARS database is to describe specific details of femoral tunnel malposition and subsequent management strategies that surgeons chose in the revision setting. The design of this study is a case series. The multicenter MARS database is compiled from a questionnaire regarding 460 ACL reconstruction revision cases returned by 87 surgeons. This subset analysis described technical aspects and operative findings in specifically those cases in which femoral tunnel malposition was cited as the cause of primary ACL reconstruction failure. Of the 460 revisions included for study, 276 (60%) cases cited a specific "technical cause of failure." Femoral tunnel malposition was cited in 219 (47.6%) of 460 cases. Femoral tunnel malposition was cited as the only cause of failure in 117 cases (25.4%). Surgeons judged the femoral tunnel too vertical in 42 cases (35.9%), too anterior in 35 cases (29.9%), and too vertical and anterior in 31 cases (26.5%). Revision reconstruction involved the drilling of an entirely new femoral tunnel in 91 cases (82.1%). For primary reconstruction, autograft tissue was used in 82 cases (70.1%). For revision reconstruction, autograft tissue was used in 61 cases (52.1%) and allograft tissue in 56 cases (47.9%). Femoral tunnel malposition in primary ACL reconstruction was the most commonly cited reason for graft failure in this cohort. Graft selection is widely variable among surgeons.

  12. Femoral Tunnel Malposition in ACL Revision Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Joseph A.; Dahm, Diane; Levy, Bruce; Stuart, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    The Multicenter Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Revision Study (MARS) group was formed to study a large cohort of revision ACL reconstruction patients. The purpose of this subset analysis study of the MARS database is to describe specific details of femoral tunnel malposition and subsequent management strategies that surgeons chose in the revision setting. The design of this study is a case series. The multicenter MARS database is compiled from a questionnaire regarding 460 ACL reconstruction revision cases returned by 87 surgeons. This subset analysis described technical aspects and operative findings in specifically those cases in which femoral tunnel malposition was cited as the cause of primary ACL reconstruction failure. Of the 460 revisions included for study, 276 (60%) cases cited a specific “technical cause of failure.” Femoral tunnel malposition was cited in 219 (47.6%) of 460 cases. Femoral tunnel malposition was cited as the only cause of failure in 117 cases (25.4%). Surgeons judged the femoral tunnel too vertical in 42 cases (35.9%), too anterior in 35 cases (29.9%), and too vertical and anterior in 31 cases (26.5%). Revision reconstruction involved the drilling of an entirely new femoral tunnel in 91 cases (82.1%). For primary reconstruction, autograft tissue was used in 82 cases (70.1%). For revision reconstruction, autograft tissue was used in 61 cases (52.1%) and allograft tissue in 56 cases (47.9%). Femoral tunnel malposition in primary ACL reconstruction was the most commonly cited reason for graft failure in this cohort. Graft selection is widely variable among surgeons. PMID:23150344

  13. Soil on Phoenix's MECA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image shows soil delivery to NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA). The image was taken by the lander's Surface Stereo Imager on the 131st Martian day, or sol, of the mission (Oct. 7, 2008).

    At the bottom of the image is the chute for delivering samples to MECA's microscopes. It is relatively clean due to the Phoenix team using methods such as sprinkling to minimize cross-contamination of samples. However, the cumulative effect of several sample deliveries can be seen in the soil piles on either side of the chute.

    On the right side are the four chemistry cells with soil residue piled up on exposed surfaces. The farthest cell has a large pile of material from an area of the Phoenix workspace called 'Stone Soup.' This area is deep in the trough at a polygon boundary, and its soil was so sticky it wouldn't even go through the funnel.

    One of Phoenix's solar panels is shown in the background of this image.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  14. Modeling the annual soil erosion rate in the mouth of river Pineios' sub-basin in Thessaly County, Greece.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilia, Ioanna; Loupasakis, Constantinos; Tsangaratos, Paraskevas

    2015-04-01

    Erosion is a natural - geomorphological phenomenon, active through geological time that is considered as one of the main agents that forms the earth surface. Soil erosion models estimate the rates of soil erosion and provide useful information and guidance for the development of appropriate intervention and soil conservation practices and strategies. A significant number of soil erosion models can be found in literature; however, the most extensively applied model is the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) established in 1997 by Renard KG, Foster GR, Weesies GA, McCool DK and Yoder DC. RUSLE is an empirically based model that enables the estimation of the average annual rate of soil erosion for an area of interest providing several alternative scenarios involving cropping systems, management methods and erosion control strategies. According to RUSLE model's specifications five major factors (rainfall pattern, soil type, topography, crop system, and management practices) are utilized for estimating the average annual erosion through the following equation: A=RxKxLxSxCxP, PIC where A is the computed spatial average soil loss and temporal average soil loss per unit area (tons ha-1 year-1), R the rainfall-runoff erosivity factor (MJ mm ha-1h-1 year-1), K the soil erodibility factor (tons h MJ-1 mm-1), L the slope - length factor, S the slope steepness factor, C the cover management factor and P the conservation support practice factor. L, S, C and P factors are all dimensionless. The present study aims to utilize a GIS-based RUSLE model in order to estimate the average annual soil loss rate in the sub-basin extending at the mouth of Pineios river in Thessaly County, Greece. The area covers approximate 775.9 km2 with a mean slope angle of 7.8o. The rainfall data of 39 gauge station from 1980 to 2000 where used in order to predict the rainfall-runoff erosivity factor (R). The K-factor was estimated using soil maps available from the European Soil Portal with a

  15. Articulation Agreements between High Schools, Community Colleges, and Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Community Coll. Board, Springfield.

    Designed to assist college officials in developing and revising articulation agreements, this report describes specific program articulation efforts between Illinois high schools, community colleges, and public and private universities. Data presented were drawn from a survey of 102 public and private community colleges, which resulted in 94…

  16. Investigating the Underachievement of University Students in Turkey: Exploring Subscales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baslanti, Ugur

    2008-01-01

    This study extends the work of Baslanti and McCoach (2006), which aimed to identify the characteristics of gifted underachievers at the university level and the reasons for their underachievement using the School Attitude Assessment Survey-Revised (SAAS-R). In this study, underachievement refers to a discrepancy between outstanding achievement…

  17. Accountability, Research, Staff Training: The Role of the Urban University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Adell

    Despite special programs, new technology, curriculum revisions, and compensatory education programs, there has been little improvement in the quality and results of urban education. Better accounatability, research, and staff training, all areas in which the urban university can influence public education, are central to the resolution of urban…

  18. The Federal Role in Fostering University-Industry Cooperation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    Three well-known forms of university-industry collaboration (research parks, cooperative research centers, and industrial extension services) were examined, along with the federal role of stimulating cooperation. The objective was to develop information and guidelines to help policymakers in designing new or revised federal initiatives to promote…

  19. Earthquake Preparedness 101: Guidelines for Colleges and Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Governor's Office, Los Angeles. Office of Emergency Services.

    This document presents guidelines on emergency response and business recovery for colleges and universities in the event of an earthquake. The guidelines, developed by California institutions and revised based on experience with the Northridge earthquake, are provided under the following headings: (1) "To the President or Chancellor"; (2) "To the…

  20. University Admission Models that Address Quality and Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Rolf; Shulruf, Boaz; Li, Meisong; Yuan, Johnson

    2012-01-01

    University entrance criteria can be a contentious topic, particularly in respect of equity. In this paper we discuss studies which demonstrate that revisions of entrance criteria which are designed with no explicit reference to equity issues can have a surprisingly positive impact on the fractions of disadvantaged subgroups admitted. We…

  1. Japanese Exchange Students' Writing Experiences in a Canadian University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Ling; Beckett, Gulbahar H.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated the learning experiences of 23 Japanese students in a one-year academic exchange program in a Canadian university. Participants either wrote an opinion task or a summary task at the beginning of the program using preselected source texts. Analyses of interview data and comparisons of the original and revised texts indicate that…

  2. Plant-soil feedbacks from 30-year family-specific soil cultures: phylogeny, soil chemistry and plant life stage

    PubMed Central

    Mehrabi, Zia; Bell, Thomas; Lewis, Owen T

    2015-01-01

    Intraspecific negative feedback effects, where performance is reduced on soils conditioned by conspecifics, are widely documented in plant communities. However, interspecific feedbacks are less well studied, and their direction, strength, causes, and consequences are poorly understood. If more closely related species share pathogens, or have similar soil resource requirements, plants may perform better on soils conditioned by more distant phylogenetic relatives. There have been few empirical tests of this prediction across plant life stages, and none of which attempt to account for soil chemistry. Here, we test the utility of phylogeny for predicting soil feedback effects on plant survival and performance (germination, seedling survival, growth rate, biomass). We implement a full factorial experiment growing species representing five families on five plant family-specific soil sources. Our experiments exploit soils that have been cultured for over 30 years in plant family-specific beds at Oxford University Botanic Gardens. Plant responses to soil source were idiosyncratic, and species did not perform better on soils cultured by phylogenetically more distant relatives. The magnitude and sign of feedback effects could, however, be explained by differences in the chemical properties of “home” and “away” soils. Furthermore, the direction of soil chemistry-related plant-soil feedbacks was dependent on plant life stage, with the effects of soil chemistry on germination success and accumulation of biomass inversely related. Our results (1) suggest that the phylogenetic distance between plant families cannot predict plant–soil feedbacks across multiple life stages, and (2) highlight the need to consider changes in soil chemistry as an important driver of population responses. The contrasting responses at plant life stages suggest that studies focusing on brief phases in plant demography (e.g., germination success) may not give a full picture of plant–soil

  3. Plant-soil feedbacks from 30-year family-specific soil cultures: phylogeny, soil chemistry and plant life stage.

    PubMed

    Mehrabi, Zia; Bell, Thomas; Lewis, Owen T

    2015-06-01

    Intraspecific negative feedback effects, where performance is reduced on soils conditioned by conspecifics, are widely documented in plant communities. However, interspecific feedbacks are less well studied, and their direction, strength, causes, and consequences are poorly understood. If more closely related species share pathogens, or have similar soil resource requirements, plants may perform better on soils conditioned by more distant phylogenetic relatives. There have been few empirical tests of this prediction across plant life stages, and none of which attempt to account for soil chemistry. Here, we test the utility of phylogeny for predicting soil feedback effects on plant survival and performance (germination, seedling survival, growth rate, biomass). We implement a full factorial experiment growing species representing five families on five plant family-specific soil sources. Our experiments exploit soils that have been cultured for over 30 years in plant family-specific beds at Oxford University Botanic Gardens. Plant responses to soil source were idiosyncratic, and species did not perform better on soils cultured by phylogenetically more distant relatives. The magnitude and sign of feedback effects could, however, be explained by differences in the chemical properties of "home" and "away" soils. Furthermore, the direction of soil chemistry-related plant-soil feedbacks was dependent on plant life stage, with the effects of soil chemistry on germination success and accumulation of biomass inversely related. Our results (1) suggest that the phylogenetic distance between plant families cannot predict plant-soil feedbacks across multiple life stages, and (2) highlight the need to consider changes in soil chemistry as an important driver of population responses. The contrasting responses at plant life stages suggest that studies focusing on brief phases in plant demography (e.g., germination success) may not give a full picture of plant-soil feedback effects.

  4. University Builders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearce, Martin

    This publication explores a diverse collection of new university buildings. Ranging from the design of vast new campuses, such as that by Wilford and Stirling at Temasek, Singapore, through to the relatively modest yet strategically important, such as the intervention by Allies and Morrison at Southampton, this book examines the new higher…

  5. Universities 2035

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thrift, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the future of Western higher education. Situated midway between an analysis and a polemic, it concerns itself with how we might begin to actively design the universities of the future. That will require a productionist account of higher education which is so far sadly lacking. But there are signs that such an account might be…

  6. Universal Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobryn, Nancy M.

    Universal Studies, a study program designed to help students develop emotionally, intellectually, and spiritually, is described. Development of the personality and character of the individual is emphasized, as are innovation, creativity, individualized instruction, independent learning, and realizing human potential. These goals are characterized…

  7. Widener University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valesey, Brigitte; Allen, Jo

    2009-01-01

    Founded in 1821, Widener University is a two-state (Pennsylvania and Delaware), four-campus, eight-college private institution serving approximately 6,700 students. Following arrival of the new senior vice president and provost in 2004 and subsequent reorganization of vice presidential responsibilities, Student Affairs is now led by a dean of…

  8. IMPACT OF CRITICAL ANION SOIL SOLUTION CONCENTRATION ON ALUMINUM ACTIVITY IN ALPINE TUNDRA SOIL Andrew Evans, Jr.1 , Michael B. Jacobs2, and Jason R. Janke1, (1) Metropolitan State University of Denver, Dept. of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, (2) Dept. of Chemistry, Denver, CO, United States.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, A.

    2015-12-01

    Soil solution anionic composition can impact both plant and microbial activity in alpine tundra soils by altering biochemical cycling within the soil, either through base cation leaching, or shifts in aluminum controlling solid phases. Although anions play a critical role in the aqueous speciation of metals, relatively few high altitude field studies have examined their impact on aluminum controlling solid phases and aluminum speciation in soil water. For this study, thirty sampling sites were selected on Trail Ridge Road in Rocky Mountain National Park, Estes Park, CO, and sampled during July, the middle of the growing season. Sampling elevations ranged from approximately 3560 - 3710 m. Soil samples were collected to a depth of 15.24 cm, and the anions were extracted using a 2:1 D.I. water to soil ratio. Filtered extracts were analyzed using IC and ICP-MS. Soil solution NO3- concentrations were significantly higher for sampling locations east of Iceberg Pass (EIBP) (mean = 86.94 ± 119.8 mg/L) compared to locations west of Iceberg Pass (WIBP) (mean 1.481 ± 2.444 mg/L). Both F- and PO43- soil solution concentrations, 0.533 and 0.440 mg/L, respectively, were substantially lower, for sampling sites located EIBP, while locations WIBP averaged 0.773 and 0.829 mg/L respectively, for F- and PO43-. Sulfate concentration averaged 3.869 ± 3.059 mg/L for locations EIBP, and 3.891 ± 3.1970 for locations WIBP. Geochemical modeling of Al3+ in the soil solution indicated that a suite of aluminum hydroxyl sulfate minerals controlled Al3+ activity in the alpine tundra soil, with shifts between controlling solid phases occurring in the presence of elevated F- concentrations.

  9. The changing face of public education: the process of "revisioning" elementary teacher preparation programs.

    PubMed

    Stevens-Smith, Deborah; Warner, Margaret; Padilla, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Three years ago the elementary education department at Clemson University recognized the need for curricular change in the way we prepare teachers. The current program was not reflective of the changing demographics of multilingual and multicultural students in the public/ private school population. The challenge from the university provost was to create an enhanced elementary curriculum that would be unique in training students to meet these new demands. The purpose of this article is to share the revisioning process that led to redesigning the teacher preparation program. Promoting positive conversations about the richness of viewing diversity through a new lens will provide deeper insights into these issues. PMID:25306841

  10. Soil on Phoenix's TEGA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image shows soil on the doors of the Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) onboard NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. The image was taken by the lander's Robotic Arm Camera on the 131st Martian day, or sol, of the mission (Oct. 7, 2008). This sample delivered to TEGA was named 'Rosy Red.'

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  11. Expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrödinger, E.

    2011-02-01

    Preface; Part I. The de Sitter Universe: 1. Synthetic construction; 2. The reduced model: geodesics; 3. The elliptic interpretation; 4. The static frame; 5. The determination of parallaxes; 6. The Lemaître-Robertson frame; Part II. The Theory of Geodesics: 7. On null geodesics; i. Determination of the parameter for null lines in special cases; ii. Frequency shift; 8. Free particles and light rays in general expanding spaces, flat or hyperspherical; i. Flat spaces; ii. Spherical spaces; iii. The red shift for spherical spaces; Part III. Waves in General Riemannian Space-Time: 9. The nature of our approximation; 10. The Hamilton-Jacobi theory in a gravitational field; 11. Procuring approximate solutions of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation from wave theory; Part IV. Waves in an Expanding Universe: 12. General considerations; 13. Proper vibrations and wave parcels; Bibliography.

  12. "Critical Liberal Education": An Undergraduate Pedagogy for Teacher Candidates in Socially Diverse University Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavez-Reyes, Christina

    2010-01-01

    This article addresses the lack of attention universities have given to adjusting liberal education, the undergraduate major for teachers in California, to the increase of multi-ethnic, multi-racial, and social class heterogeneity in state universities. This article argues for a revised pedagogy for undergraduate liberal arts education for teacher…

  13. "I Pay for All": The Cultural Contradictions of Learning and Labor at Illinois Industrial University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middleton, Holly

    2007-01-01

    Focusing on students' responses to an 1876 writing assignment at Illinois Industrial University (which would ultimately become the University of Illinois), the author analyzes ideological tensions that occurred as the United States found itself revising the pastoral image of the farmer in an increasingly industrial age. (Contains 9 notes.)

  14. The Investigation of Social Problem Solving Abilities of University Students in Terms of Perceived Social Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tras, Zeliha

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze of university students' perceived social support and social problem solving. The participants were 827 (474 female and 353 male) university students. Data were collected Perceived Social Support Scale-Revised (Yildirim, 2004) and Social Problem Solving (Maydeu-Olivares and D'Zurilla, 1996)…

  15. Relationship between Personality Types and Career Choices of Undergraduate Students: A Case of Moi University, Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemboi, Rebecca J. Kimongo; Kindiki, Nyaga; Misigo, Benard

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between personality types and career choices of undergraduate students of Moi University. In Kenya, students are allowed to revise their career choices at various levels of education before they settle on one course of study in the University. The process of choosing careers begins in form three where…

  16. Are Achievement Motivation and Thinking Styles Related? A Visit among Chinese University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fan, Weiqiao; Zhang, Li-Fang

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined the relationships between thinking styles and achievement motivation among Chinese university students. The Thinking Styles Inventory--Revised (TSI-R; Sternberg, Wagner, & Zhang, 2003) and the Achievement Motives Scale (AMS; Gjesme & Nygard, 1970; Ye & Hagtvet, 1988) were administered to 238 Chinese university students…

  17. Arkansas Public Higher Education Operating Recommendations: Fiscal Year 2010-11. Volume 1: Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas Department of Higher Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    At its April 25, 2008 meeting, the Arkansas Higher Education Coordinating Board approved the funding models for the two-year colleges, universities, and the technical centers (former technical institutes merged with universities). These models had been developed in conjunction with presidents and chancellors after meetings and revisions. The…

  18. Incorporating Community Engagement Language into Promotion and Tenure Policies: One University's Journey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelco, Lynn E.; Howard, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    This case study describes the campus context and process for successfully including community engagement language into promotion and tenure policies at Virginia Commonwealth University, a high research, urban public university. The paper also describes barriers our campus faced during the promotion and tenure policy revision process, especially…

  19. Metaphyseal bone loss in revision knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ponzio, Danielle Y; Austin, Matthew S

    2015-12-01

    The etiology of bone loss encountered during revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is often multifactorial and can include stress shielding, osteolysis, osteonecrosis, infection, mechanical loss due to a grossly loose implant, and iatrogenic loss at the time of implant resection. Selection of the reconstructive technique(s) to manage bone deficiency is determined by the location and magnitude of bone loss, ligament integrity, surgeon experience, and patient factors including the potential for additional revision, functional demand, and comorbidities. Smaller, contained defects are reliably managed with bone graft, cement augmented with screw fixation, or modular augments. Large metaphyseal defects require more extensive reconstruction such as impaction bone grafting with or without mesh augmentation, prosthetic augmentation, use of bulk structural allografts, or use of metaphyseal cones or sleeves. While each technique has advantages and disadvantages, the most optimal method for reconstruction of large metaphyseal bone defects during revision TKA is not clearly established. PMID:26362647

  20. University lobbying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    In the past year, an increasing number of individual academic institutions have lobbied in Congress for new science facilities funds thus circumventing the traditional peer review process of evaluating the merits of such facilities. As an attempt to stem this rising tide, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) governing council and the Association of American Universities (AAU) recently and independently issued strong statements condemning lobbying by individual universities and enthusiastically supporting the peer review system.“Informed peer judgments on the scientific merits of specific proposals, in open competition, should be a central element in the awarding of all federal funds for science,” the NAS resolution stated. AAU, meanwhile, implored “scientists, leaders of America's universities, and members of Congress” to “refrain from actions that would make scientific decisions a test of political influence rather than a judgment on the quality of the work to be done.” Roughly 50 research institutions constitute AAU; the two AAU Canadian members did not vote on the consortium's statement.

  1. Arthroscopic Hip Revision Surgery for Residual FAI

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Christopher M.; Giveans, Russell; Bedi, Asheesh; Samuelson, Kathryn M.; Stone, Rebecca M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: There is a steep surgical learning curve when managing femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and residual FAI can lead to continued pain and disability. There is very limited data reporting outcomes after revision arthroscopy for residual FAI. Methods: The records of patients that underwent arthroscopic hip revision surgery for residual FAI based on plain radiographs and 3D CT scans were reviewed. Pre and post-operative structural pathomorphology, intra-operative findings, and pre and post-operative outcomes measures using Modified Harris Hip Scoring (MHHS), SF-12 scoring, and pain on a visual analogue scale (VAS) were evaluated. Outcomes after revision arthroscopic FAI correction were compared to a cohort that underwent primary arthroscopic FAI correction. Results: 59 patients (85 hips) underwent arthroscopic revision FAI correction (mean 20.8 months follow-up). There were 98 previous arthroscopic surgeries and 4 previous surgical dislocations. There were 39 males and 46 females with a mean age of 29.5 years (range 16 - 59). 80 hips had residual cam-type FAI, and 64 hips had residual pincer-type FAI and underwent femoral and rim resections, respectively. The labrum was debrided in 27 hips, repaired in 48 hips and reconstructed with allograft in 8 hips. Adhesions were excised for 54 hips. The results of revision arthroscopic FAI correction were compared to 154 patients (169 hips) that underwent primary arthroscopic FAI correction (mean 25.2 months follow-up). The mean improvement for outcomes scores after revision FAI correction was 18.9 points (MHHS, p<.01), 13.4 points (SF-12, p<.01), and 2.2 points (VAS, p<.01) compared to 23.7 points (MHHS, p<.01), 22.3 points (SF-12, p<.01), and 4.6 points (VAS, p<.01) after primary arthroscopic FAI correction. Most recent outcomes scores and mean improvement in outcome scores were significantly better after primary (81.1% good/ excellent results) compared to revision (69.8% good/excellent results) FAI correction (MHS

  2. Recent Title V operating permit program revisions

    SciTech Connect

    Nicewander, M.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss recent EPA proposed regulations regarding required procedures to be incorporated into the state operating permit programs to accommodate permit revisions. The development and implementation of an operating permits program must balance air pollution control requirements with the ability of a source to meet changing market demands. This has been the major item of concern during the operating permits program development. Before discussing the specific procedures for revising operating permits, it is necessary to include some generic background information for familiarization with the operating permits program.

  3. Taxonomic revision of Richardiodes Hendel (Diptera, Richardiidae).

    PubMed

    Wendt, Lisiane Dilli; Ale-Rocha, Rosaly

    2016-01-01

    Richardiodes Hendel is a genus scarcely known taxonomically and two species are recognized: Richardiodes rectinervis Hendel from Brazilian Amazon and R. trimaculata Hennig from Peru. Herein, these two species are revised and illustrated. Examination of non-type specimens revealed considerable variation in the general body color, and the geographic distribution of each species has been expanded, especially of R. rectinervis. The limits of the genus are revised and better supported with the addition of new diagnostic characters. The male and female terminalia are described and illustrated for the first time. PMID:27394237

  4. Characterization of soil bacterial communities in rhizospheric and nonrhizospheric soil of Panax ginseng.

    PubMed

    Ying, Yi Xin; Ding, Wan Long; Li, Yong

    2012-12-01

    A culture-independent approach was used to evaluate the bacterial community in rhizospheric and nonrhizospheric soil in which Panax ginseng had grown for 3 years. For each sample, soil was randomly collected from multiple sampling points and mixed thoroughly before genomic DNA extraction. Universal primers 27f and 1492r were used to amplify 16S rRNA genes. Clone libraries were constructed using the amplified 16S rRNA genes, and 192 white clones were chosen for further sequencing. After digestion with restriction endonuclease, 44 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were generated for rhizospheric and 21 OTUs for nonrhizospheric soils, and the clones of each OTU were sequenced. Blast analysis showed that bacillus, acidobacteria, and proteobacteria were the dominant populations in rhizospheric soil, and proteobacteria were dominant in nonrhizospheric soil. Phylogenetic results showed that bacillus and acidobacteria were clustered into the group of uncultured bacteria in rhizospheric soil; however, proteobacteria were the unique dominant in nonrhizospheric soil.

  5. Joint Line Reconstruction in Navigated Total Knee Arthroplasty Revision

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-05-16

    Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty Because of; Loosening; Instability; Impingement; or Other Reasons Accepted as Indications for TKA Exchange.; The Focus is to Determine the Precision of Joint Line Restoration in Navigated vs. Conventional Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty

  6. 78 FR 2675 - Revised Jurisdictional Thresholds of the Clayton Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION Revised Jurisdictional Thresholds of the Clayton Act AGENCY: Federal Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Federal Trade Commission announces the revised thresholds for interlocking...

  7. Open University

    SciTech Connect

    2006-01-18

    Michel Pentz est née en Afrique du Sud et venu au Cern en 1957 comme physicien et président de l'associaion du personnel. Il est également fondateur du mouvement Antiapartheid de Genève et a participé à la fondation de l'Open University en Grande-Bretagne. Il nous parle des contextes pédagogiques, culturels et nationaux dans lesquels la méthode peut s'appliquer.

  8. Open University

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Michel Pentz est née en Afrique du Sud et venu au Cern en 1957 comme physicien et président de l'associaion du personnel. Il est également fondateur du mouvement Antiapartheid de Genève et a participé à la fondation de l'Open University en Grande-Bretagne. Il nous parle des contextes pédagogiques, culturels et nationaux dans lesquels la méthode peut s'appliquer.

  9. Case studies: Soil mapping using multiple methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Hauke; Wunderlich, Tina; Hagrey, Said A. Al; Rabbel, Wolfgang; Stümpel, Harald

    2010-05-01

    Soil is a non-renewable resource with fundamental functions like filtering (e.g. water), storing (e.g. carbon), transforming (e.g. nutrients) and buffering (e.g. contamination). Degradation of soils is meanwhile not only to scientists a well known fact, also decision makers in politics have accepted this as a serious problem for several environmental aspects. National and international authorities have already worked out preservation and restoration strategies for soil degradation, though it is still work of active research how to put these strategies into real practice. But common to all strategies the description of soil state and dynamics is required as a base step. This includes collecting information from soils with methods ranging from direct soil sampling to remote applications. In an intermediate scale mobile geophysical methods are applied with the advantage of fast working progress but disadvantage of site specific calibration and interpretation issues. In the framework of the iSOIL project we present here some case studies for soil mapping performed using multiple geophysical methods. We will present examples of combined field measurements with EMI-, GPR-, magnetic and gammaspectrometric techniques carried out with the mobile multi-sensor-system of Kiel University (GER). Depending on soil type and actual environmental conditions, different methods show a different quality of information. With application of diverse methods we want to figure out, which methods or combination of methods will give the most reliable information concerning soil state and properties. To investigate the influence of varying material we performed mapping campaigns on field sites with sandy, loamy and loessy soils. Classification of measured or derived attributes show not only the lateral variability but also gives hints to a variation in the vertical distribution of soil material. For all soils of course soil water content can be a critical factor concerning a succesful

  10. 7 CFR 3015.115 - Budget revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Budget revisions. 3015.115 Section 3015.115 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF THE CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE UNIFORM FEDERAL ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS Programmatic Changes and Budget...

  11. The Copyright Revision Act of 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kintner, Earl W.; And Others

    Though not exhaustive, this report explains the substantive aspects of the Copyright Revision Act of 1976 that would be of interest to copyright proprietors and/or users of copyrightable works. The major part of the report deals with the subject matter and scope of copyright; topics discussed include fair use, reproduction by libraries and…

  12. Revising the White Racial Consciousness Development Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sang Min; Puig, Ana; Pasquarella-Daley, Lauren; Denny, George; Rai, Ann Allen; Dallape, Aprille; Parker, Woodrow Max

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the revision of the White Racial Consciousness Development Scale (D. Claney & W. M. Parker, 1989). A multistage approach including item generation, item refinement and selection, and evaluation of score validity and reliability was used to test construction and validation. Implications for theory, practice, and future…

  13. More Than A Native Speaker, Revised Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, Don, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    This revised edition includes an expanded discussion of student-directed language learning, workbook activities for volunteer teachers enrolled in courses or studying the book individually, and a full array of culture-based discussion topics for use as supplementary activities or core material for an English course. The book includes 16 chapters.…

  14. 77 FR 33786 - NRC Enforcement Policy Revision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-07

    ..., 2010 (75 FR 60485), announcing a revision to the Policy. The Commission also directed the NRC staff to reevaluate the portions of the Policy associated with construction activities (e.g., reactor or uranium... notice (FRN) published on August 9, 2011 (76 FR 48919), the NRC solicited written comments...

  15. 78 FR 48667 - Revised Company Registration System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Revised Company Registration System AGENCY: Federal Energy Regulatory... Registration System. The Commission issued a previous notice in the Federal Register, 78 FR 44559 (July...

  16. Revised Recommendation Concerning Technical and Vocational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    The UNESCO (United Nations Education, Scientific, and Cultural Organization) revised recommendation setting forth general principles, goals, and guidelines concerning technical and vocational education (adopted by the General Conference at its 18th session in Paris, 19 November 1974) is presented under the following headings: (1) Technical and…

  17. Anomalies of Nuclear Criticality, Revision 6

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, E. D.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Durst, Bonita E.; Erickson, David; Puigh, Raymond J.

    2010-02-19

    This report is revision 6 of the Anomalies of Nuclear Criticality. This report is required reading for the training of criticality professionals in many organizations both nationally and internationally. This report describes many different classes of nuclear criticality anomalies that are different than expected.

  18. New Ways of Classroom Assessment. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, J. D., Ed.

    2013-01-01

    In this revised edition in the popular New Ways Series, teachers have once again been given an opportunity to show how they do assessment in their classrooms on an everyday basis. Often feeling helpless when confronted with large-scale standardized testing practices, teachers here offer classroom testing created with the direct aim of helping…

  19. Revision of Benedictus Scherer (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The alpine flea beetle genus Benedictus Scherer (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae) is revised. Twenty new species, namely B. chilalla, B. dochula, B. ha, B. nobding, B. thumsila and B. yatongla from Bhutan, B. belousovi, B. cangshanicus, B. kabaki, B. kurbatovi, B. nigrinus, B. sichuanensis a...

  20. Relating Revision Skills to Teacher Commentary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, Marilyn Ruth

    1999-01-01

    Considers how the revising skills of basic writing students improve when they receive both inductive and deductive teacher feedback. Finds that students who received inductive feedback changed their largest percent of errors when given oral conferences and students who received deductive feedback changed their smallest number of errors when given…

  1. 76 FR 2291 - TRICARE Reimbursement Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-13

    ... assistants and assistant-at-surgery claims; and this rule revises the regulation by removing references to... Assistant-at-Surgery The current regulatory language references specific reimbursement percentages for assistant-at-surgery reimbursement. Rather than including these specific percentage amounts, which...

  2. Surgical revision of the upper eyelid fold.

    PubMed

    Cies, W A; Baylis, H I

    1975-12-01

    We performed surgery on 107 patients primarily with blepharoptosis and eyelid fold abnormalities, between 1973 and 1974. Production of an eyelid fold at the time of an initial blepharoptosis procedure should be a primary goal. Lack of a distinct symmetrical upper eyelid fold constituted a cosmetic blemish and necessitated revision.

  3. Needs Assessment for Continuous Curriculum Revision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weddington, Doris

    Continuous curriculum revision in community/junior colleges can be provided by treating the curriculum as a self-correcting set of systems with feedback loops and marginal sensors which supply information needed for constant system evaluation. This curriculum-related set of sub-systems is comprised of the institution, the curriculum, programs, and…

  4. 43 CFR 1610.5-6 - Revision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Revision. 1610.5-6 Section 1610.5-6 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL MANAGEMENT (1000) PLANNING, PROGRAMMING, BUDGETING Resource...

  5. 78 FR 35812 - Revisions to Procedural Rules

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-14

    ... substantially nationwide) change in the nature of service. The proposed revisions are intended to expedite... Counsel, at 202-789-6820. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Regulatory history: 77 FR 23176 (April 18, 2012... series of orders addressing the need for more timely completion of nature of service proceedings....

  6. Migrant Education Administration Handbook. [Revised 1972].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Y. A.

    The purpose of this revised handbook is to supply information and provide answers to many of the questions pertaining to the administration of migrant education projects in North Carolina. The Federal program is described in terms of legislation affecting migrants, definition of a migratory child, and contracts for studies and surveys. Also…

  7. Early Screening Inventory. Revised. Examiner's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meisels, Samuel J.; Marsden, Dorothea B.; Wiske, Martha Stone; Henderson, Laura W.

    The Early Screening Inventory-Revised (ESI-R) is a brief developmental screening instrument that is individually administered to children from 3 to 6 years of age. It is designed to identify children who may need special education services in order to perform successfully in school. The ESI-R is intended to assess the child's ability to acquire…

  8. CO2 laser in revision stapes surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovic, Sergije; Schoenfeld, Uwe; Scherer, Hans H.

    1997-05-01

    Successful restoration of audition in revision stapedotomies involves precise identification and correction of the pathological condition without traumatizing the inner ear. Conventional surgical procedures often lead to unsatisfactory audition results and inner ear damages. In revision stapedotomy, the carbon-dioxide laser provides the ear surgeon with three important advantages over the conventional technique: (1) improved diagnostic and therapeutic precision, (2) better stabilization of the new prosthesis in the oval niche, and (3) reduction of inner ear trauma through non- contact atraumatic management. The surgical procedure of revision stapedotomies with the carbon dioxide laser is discussed, and case examples are used to illustrate the diversity of pathological conditions that can be treated by carbon-dioxide laser surgery. Our experience with revision carbon-dioxide laser stapedotomy suggests an improvement of postoperative audition compared to the conventional technique and demonstrates a significant elimination of sensorineural deafness. The carbon-dioxide laser enables the ear surgeon to precisely and reliably correct conduction deafness recurring after stapedotomy.

  9. Personalisation: The Emerging "Revised" Code of Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, David

    2007-01-01

    In England, a "revised" educational code appears to be emerging. It centres upon the concept of "personalisation". Its basis is less in educational theory, more in contemporary marketing theory. Personalisation can be regarded in two ways. First, it provides the rationale for a new mode of public-service delivery, one which seeks to enable "users"…

  10. GROUP THINKING AND CONFERENCE LEADERSHIP. REVISED EDITION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    UTTERBACK, WILLIAM E.

    REVISED TO INCLUDE UP-TO-DATE MATERIALS, THIS BOOK IS CONCERNED WITH COOPERATIVE THINKING AS A DEMOCRATIC PROCEDURE. IT IS ADDRESSED TO ALL WHO PARTICIPATE IN OR LEAD INFORMAL DISCUSSION IN SMALL GROUPS--COMMITTEES, STAFF MEETINGS, BOARDS, AND COUNCILS--AND TREATS IN DETAIL DISCUSSION IN THE CLASSROOM, RADIO AND TELEVISION, THE BUSINESS…

  11. 76 FR 57012 - Progress Reports Rules Revision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-15

    ... of Prisons 28 CFR Part 524 RIN 1120-AB60 Progress Reports Rules Revision AGENCY: Bureau of Prisons, Justice. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: In this document, the Bureau of Prisons (Bureau) proposes to..., Office of General Counsel, Bureau of Prisons, 320 First Street, NW., Washington, DC 20534. You may...

  12. Distributive Education: Secondary, Course Outline. Revised 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Coordinating Council for Occupational Education, Olympia.

    The document is a revision of earlier units, updated to include behavioral or performance objectives. Divided into 22 units of instruction, the course outline for distributive education presents suggested length of time for each part of a unit, prerequisites, a description of the part, objectives, sources, outline for the section, activities,…

  13. Schools without Drugs. What Works. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education, Washington, DC.

    This revised edition focuses on the prevention of drug use among school students, with increased attention to alcohol, tobacco, and steroids. The handbook, which begins with an introduction by Secretary of Education, Lauro F. Cavazos, provides new information about the effects of alcohol on young people; statistics on the harm it causes; and…

  14. 22 CFR 214.14 - Charter revision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT Establishment of Advisory...) Charter revision requires clearances by the advisory committee, the A.I.D. Advisory Committee Management... notification of the change to the Federal Register, Congressional committees, and the Library of Congress....

  15. 30 CFR 774.13 - Permit revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permit revisions. 774.13 Section 774.13 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SURFACE COAL...; RENEWAL; TRANSFER, ASSIGNMENT, OR SALE OF PERMIT RIGHTS; POST-PERMIT ISSUANCE REQUIREMENTS; AND...

  16. Revision of species inventory checklists for Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, Bernalillo County, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, N.T. )

    1990-10-01

    This report revises and updates the 1974 report by W. C. Martin and W. L. Wagner, Biological Survey of Kirtland Air Force Base (East). The biological communities of Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB) are described with respect to the Biome classification system of Brown (1982), and a standardized system of habitat types is proposed based on biome and soil type. The potential occurrence of state or federally endangered species is discussed. No species listed as endangered or threatened is known to occur on KAFB, although five are identified as potentially occurring. Updated lists of amphibians, reptiles, breeding birds, mammals, and plants are presented. 18 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  17. Remote sensing as a tool for estimating soil erosion potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris-Jones, D. R.; Morgan, K. M.; Kiefer, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    The Universal Soil Loss Equation is a frequently used methodology for estimating soil erosion potential. The Universal Soil Loss Equation requires a variety of types of geographic information (e.g. topographic slope, soil erodibility, land use, crop type, and soil conservation practice) in order to function. This information is traditionally gathered from topographic maps, soil surveys, field surveys, and interviews with farmers. Remote sensing data sources and interpretation techniques provide an alternative method for collecting information regarding land use, crop type, and soil conservation practice. Airphoto interpretation techniques and medium altitude, multi-date color and color infrared positive transparencies (70mm) were utilized in this study to determine their effectiveness for gathering the desired land use/land cover data. Successful results were obtained within the test site, a 6136 hectare watershed in Dane County, Wisconsin.

  18. Code of Fair Testing Practices in Education (Revised)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Measurement: Issues and Practice, 2005

    2005-01-01

    A note from the Working Group of the Joint Committee on Testing Practices: The "Code of Fair Testing Practices in Education (Code)" prepared by the Joint Committee on Testing Practices (JCTP) has just been revised for the first time since its initial introduction in 1988. The revision of the Code was inspired primarily by the revision of the…

  19. Understanding Taxes. Teacher's Resource Kit. 1995 Annual Revision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Internal Revenue Service (Dept. of Treasury), Washington, DC.

    This packet contains revisions of the following sections of the "Understanding Taxes" teacher's resource kit: complete revisions of lessons 3 and 4; updated student handouts for lessons 2, 9, and 11; new glossary; and revised software user's guide. Lesson 3, "From W-4 to 1040A," is designed to acquaint students with the basic tax-related forms…

  20. A National Survey of Revising Practices in the Primary Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saddler, Bruce; Saddler, Kristie; Befoorhooz, Bita; Cuccio-Slichko, Julie

    2014-01-01

    A random national sampling of primary grade teachers in the United States were surveyed to determine how they teach revising to writers in the elementary grades. Our findings suggest that in our sample of teachers, little time is dedicated in the school day to writing and especially revising. The teachers believed that more time spent revising did…

  1. 48 CFR 252.247-7002 - Revision of prices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Revision of prices. 252... Provisions And Clauses 252.247-7002 Revision of prices. As prescribed in 247.270-4(c), use the following clause: Revision of Prices (DEC 1991) (a) Definition. Wage adjustment, as used in this clause, means...

  2. 46 CFR 8.550 - Plan review and revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... revisions. The CAP and VAP(s) must be reviewed and revised as follows: (1) Every 2 years after the plan... the VAP. (3) If a reportable casualty occurs, the cognizant OCMI will review the portions of the VAP... revisions to the VAP are appropriate. (4) When statutes or regulations change, the appropriate sections...

  3. 46 CFR 8.550 - Plan review and revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... revisions. The CAP and VAP(s) must be reviewed and revised as follows: (1) Every 2 years after the plan... the VAP. (3) If a reportable casualty occurs, the cognizant OCMI will review the portions of the VAP... revisions to the VAP are appropriate. (4) When statutes or regulations change, the appropriate sections...

  4. 46 CFR 8.550 - Plan review and revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... revisions. The CAP and VAP(s) must be reviewed and revised as follows: (1) Every 2 years after the plan... the VAP. (3) If a reportable casualty occurs, the cognizant OCMI will review the portions of the VAP... revisions to the VAP are appropriate. (4) When statutes or regulations change, the appropriate sections...

  5. 46 CFR 8.550 - Plan review and revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... revisions. The CAP and VAP(s) must be reviewed and revised as follows: (1) Every 2 years after the plan... the VAP. (3) If a reportable casualty occurs, the cognizant OCMI will review the portions of the VAP... revisions to the VAP are appropriate. (4) When statutes or regulations change, the appropriate sections...

  6. 46 CFR 8.550 - Plan review and revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... revisions. The CAP and VAP(s) must be reviewed and revised as follows: (1) Every 2 years after the plan... the VAP. (3) If a reportable casualty occurs, the cognizant OCMI will review the portions of the VAP... revisions to the VAP are appropriate. (4) When statutes or regulations change, the appropriate sections...

  7. 75 FR 81126 - Revisions to Lead Ambient Air Monitoring Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ..., that revised the NAAQS for lead and associated ambient air lead monitoring requirements (73 FR 66964... revisions to the requirements for both source-oriented and non-source-oriented monitoring for lead (74 FR... 1.0 tpy as part of the October 2008 lead NAAQS revisions (73 FR 66964, codified at 40 CFR part...

  8. Assessing the Impact of Peer Revision on L2 Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villamil, Olga S.; de Guerrero, Maria C. M.

    1998-01-01

    A study investigated the impact of peer revision on writers' final drafts in two rhetorical modes, narration and persuasion, among 14 Spanish-speaking college students of English-as-a-Second-Language. Results revealed 74% of revisions made in peer sessions were incorporated into final drafts, and writers made many further self-revisions,…

  9. 50 CFR 660.717 - Framework for revising regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Framework for revising regulations. 660... Migratory Fisheries § 660.717 Framework for revising regulations. (a) General. NMFS will establish and..., removed, or revised. Any such action will be made according to the framework measures in section 8.3.4...

  10. 50 CFR 660.717 - Framework for revising regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Framework for revising regulations. 660... Migratory Fisheries § 660.717 Framework for revising regulations. (a) General. NMFS will establish and..., removed, or revised. Any such action will be made according to the framework measures in section 8.3.4...

  11. 50 CFR 660.717 - Framework for revising regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Framework for revising regulations. 660... Migratory Fisheries § 660.717 Framework for revising regulations. (a) General. NMFS will establish and..., removed, or revised. Any such action will be made according to the framework measures in section 8.3.4...

  12. 50 CFR 660.717 - Framework for revising regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Framework for revising regulations. 660... Migratory Fisheries § 660.717 Framework for revising regulations. (a) General. NMFS will establish and..., removed, or revised. Any such action will be made according to the framework measures in section 8.3.4...

  13. 50 CFR 660.717 - Framework for revising regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Framework for revising regulations. 660... Migratory Fisheries § 660.717 Framework for revising regulations. (a) General. NMFS will establish and..., removed, or revised. Any such action will be made according to the framework measures in section 8.3.4...

  14. Uncovering Substance: Teaching Revision in High School Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Early, Jessica Singer; Saidy, Christina

    2014-01-01

    This article shares the process and outcomes from a three-day revision workshop designed and implemented in a diverse high school language arts classroom. The revision workshop included: direct instruction, self-reflection, and peer feedback to provide struggling writers with opportunities to take part in substantive revision. The authors examine…

  15. 78 FR 44596 - Minor Boundary Revision at Yosemite National Park

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... National Park Service Minor Boundary Revision at Yosemite National Park AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notification of Boundary Revision. SUMMARY: The boundary of Yosemite National Park is... boundary of Yosemite National Park. DATES: The effective date of this boundary revision is July 24,...

  16. Belief revision and way-finding.

    PubMed

    Bucher, Leandra; Röser, Florian; Nejasmic, Jelica; Hamburger, Kai

    2014-02-01

    Belief revision is required when veridical information surfaces that contradicts what was previously thought to be the case. In way-finding, belief revision frequently occurs, for example, when the travelled route has led one astray, instead of to one's chosen destination. In past cognitive research, the topics of belief revision and way-finding have been treated in isolation. Here, we introduce an approach for linking the two fields and assess belief revision as it occurs in the process of way-finding. We report the results of two experiments that put participants in (virtual) situations where elements of a previously learned route description do not match the actual environment (thereby requiring the revision of a previously held belief). Experiment 1 puts participants in a highly artificial virtual environment where the landmarks to be used in navigation have a low degree of semantic salience (houses of various color). Experiment 2 puts subjects in a photorealistic environment where the objects to be used in navigation are well-known landmarks (such as the Eiffel Tower) and thus have a high degree of semantic salience. In both experiments, participants are confronted with T-junctions, where a landmark that was expected to indicate the correct route is discovered to be in an unexpected location. The results of the experiments show that a participant's choice of route, in such cases, is affected by differences in the structure of the relevant initial instruction. More precisely, the route chosen by participants is affected by whether the relevant landmark was described as being on the same side of the path as they were instructed to turn (congruent case) or as located on the opposite side of the path as they were instructed to turn (incongruent case).

  17. [Effect of soil moisture on prediction of soil total nitrogen using NIR spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    An, Xiao-Fei; Li, Min-Zan; Zheng, Li-Hua; Liu, Yu-Meng; Sun, Hong

    2013-03-01

    As one of the most important components of soil liutrient, it is necessary to obtain the soil total nitrogen(STN)content in precision agriculture. It is a feasible method to predict soil total nitrogen content based on NIRS. However, the effect of soil moisture content (SMC) on the prediction of STN is very serious. In the present research, the effect of SMC was discussed from qualitative analysis and quantitative analysis by the Fourier spectrum analyzer MATRIX_I. Firstly, sixty soil samples with different STN and SMC were scanned by the MATRIX_I. It was found that the reflectince of soil samples in near infrared region decreased with the increase in SMC. Subsequently, Moisture absorbance index (MAI) was proposed by the diffuse of absorbance at the wavelengths of 1 450 and 1 940 nm to classify soil properties and then correction factor was present Finally, the STN forecasting model with BP NN method was established by the revised absorbance data at the six wavelengths of 940, 1 050, 1,100, 1,200, 1,300 and 1,550 nm. The model was evaluated by correlation coefficient of Rc, correlation coefficient of Rv, root mean square error of calibration (RMSEC), root mean square error of validation (RMSEP) and residual prediction deviation (RPD). Compared with the model obtained from original spectral data, both the accuracy and the stability were improved. The new model was with Rc of 0.86, Rv of 0.81, RMSEC of 0.06, RMSEP of 0.05, and RPD of 2.75. With the first derivative of the revised absorbance, the RPD became 2.90. The experiments indicated that the method could eliminate the effect of SMC on the prediction of STN efficiently.

  18. [Effect of soil moisture on prediction of soil total nitrogen using NIR spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    An, Xiao-Fei; Li, Min-Zan; Zheng, Li-Hua; Liu, Yu-Meng; Sun, Hong

    2013-03-01

    As one of the most important components of soil liutrient, it is necessary to obtain the soil total nitrogen(STN)content in precision agriculture. It is a feasible method to predict soil total nitrogen content based on NIRS. However, the effect of soil moisture content (SMC) on the prediction of STN is very serious. In the present research, the effect of SMC was discussed from qualitative analysis and quantitative analysis by the Fourier spectrum analyzer MATRIX_I. Firstly, sixty soil samples with different STN and SMC were scanned by the MATRIX_I. It was found that the reflectince of soil samples in near infrared region decreased with the increase in SMC. Subsequently, Moisture absorbance index (MAI) was proposed by the diffuse of absorbance at the wavelengths of 1 450 and 1 940 nm to classify soil properties and then correction factor was present Finally, the STN forecasting model with BP NN method was established by the revised absorbance data at the six wavelengths of 940, 1 050, 1,100, 1,200, 1,300 and 1,550 nm. The model was evaluated by correlation coefficient of Rc, correlation coefficient of Rv, root mean square error of calibration (RMSEC), root mean square error of validation (RMSEP) and residual prediction deviation (RPD). Compared with the model obtained from original spectral data, both the accuracy and the stability were improved. The new model was with Rc of 0.86, Rv of 0.81, RMSEC of 0.06, RMSEP of 0.05, and RPD of 2.75. With the first derivative of the revised absorbance, the RPD became 2.90. The experiments indicated that the method could eliminate the effect of SMC on the prediction of STN efficiently. PMID:23705431

  19. Remote sensing techniques for the detection of soil erosion and the identification of soil conservation practices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelletier, R. E.; Griffin, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The following paper is a summary of a number of techniques initiated under the AgRISTARS (Agriculture and Resources Inventory Surveys Through Aerospace Remote Sensing) project for the detection of soil degradation caused by water erosion and the identification of soil conservation practices for resource inventories. Discussed are methods to utilize a geographic information system to determine potential soil erosion through a USLE (Universal Soil Loss Equation) model; application of the Kauth-Thomas Transform to detect present erosional status; and the identification of conservation practices through visual interpretation and a variety of enhancement procedures applied to digital remotely sensed data.

  20. Role of soil health in maintaining environmental sustainability of surface coal mining.

    PubMed

    Acton, Peter M; Fox, James F; Campbell, J Elliott; Jones, Alice L; Rowe, Harold; Martin, Darren; Bryson, Sebastian

    2011-12-01

    Mountaintop coal mining (MCM) in the Southern Appalachian forest region greatly impacts both soil and aquatic ecosystems. Policy and practice currently in place emphasize water quality and soil stability but do not consider upland soil health. Here we report soil organic carbon (SOC) measurements and other soil quality indicators for reclaimed soils in the Southern Appalachian forest region to quantify the health of the soil ecosystem. The SOC sequestration rate of the MCM soils was 1.3 MgC ha(-1) yr(-1) and stocks ranged from 1.3 ± 0.9 to 20.9 ± 5.9 Mg ha(-1) and contained only 11% of the SOC of surrounding forest soils. Comparable reclaimed mining soils reported in the literature that are supportive of soil ecosystem health had SOC stocks 2.5-5 times greater than the MCM soils and sequestration rates were also 1.6-3 times greater. The high compaction associated with reclamation in this region greatly reduces both the vegetative rooting depth and infiltration of the soil and increases surface runoff, thus bypassing the ability of soil to naturally filter groundwater. In the context of environmental sustainability of MCM, it is proposed that the entire watershed ecosystem be assessed and that a revision of current policy be conducted to reflect the health of both water and soil.

  1. 30 CFR 585.617 - What activities require a revision to my SAP, and when will BOEM approve the revision?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What activities require a revision to my SAP... FACILITIES ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Plans and Information Requirements Activities Under An Approved Sap § 585.617 What activities require a revision to my SAP, and when will BOEM approve the revision? (a)...

  2. 30 CFR 585.617 - What activities require a revision to my SAP, and when will BOEM approve the revision?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What activities require a revision to my SAP... FACILITIES ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Plans and Information Requirements Activities Under An Approved Sap § 585.617 What activities require a revision to my SAP, and when will BOEM approve the revision? (a)...

  3. 30 CFR 585.617 - What activities require a revision to my SAP, and when will BOEM approve the revision?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What activities require a revision to my SAP... FACILITIES ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Plans and Information Requirements Activities Under An Approved Sap § 585.617 What activities require a revision to my SAP, and when will BOEM approve the revision? (a)...

  4. 30 CFR 285.617 - What activities require a revision to my SAP, and when will MMS approve the revision?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What activities require a revision to my SAP... OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Plans and Information Requirements Activities Under An Approved Sap § 285.617 What activities require a revision to my SAP, and when will MMS approve the revision? (a) You...

  5. 30 CFR 585.634 - What activities require a revision to my COP, and when will BOEM approve the revision?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What activities require a revision to my COP... FACILITIES ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Plans and Information Requirements Activities Under An Approved Cop § 585.634 What activities require a revision to my COP, and when will BOEM approve the revision? (a)...

  6. 30 CFR 285.634 - What activities require a revision to my COP, and when will MMS approve the revision?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What activities require a revision to my COP... OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Plans and Information Requirements Activities Under An Approved Cop § 285.634 What activities require a revision to my COP, and when will MMS approve the revision? (a) You...

  7. 30 CFR 585.634 - What activities require a revision to my COP, and when will BOEM approve the revision?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What activities require a revision to my COP... FACILITIES ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Plans and Information Requirements Activities Under An Approved Cop § 585.634 What activities require a revision to my COP, and when will BOEM approve the revision? (a)...

  8. 30 CFR 585.634 - What activities require a revision to my COP, and when will BOEM approve the revision?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What activities require a revision to my COP... FACILITIES ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Plans and Information Requirements Activities Under An Approved Cop § 585.634 What activities require a revision to my COP, and when will BOEM approve the revision? (a)...

  9. Use RUSLE2 model to assess the impact of soil erosion on playa inundation and hydrophyte conditions in the Rainwater Basin, Nebraska.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhenghong; Gu, Yue; Jiang, Weiguo; Xue, Yuan; Bishop, Andy; LaGrange, Ted; Nugent, Eleanor

    2016-06-01

    Playas in the Rainwater Basin region in Nebraska are globally important wetlands that are continuously threatened by culturally accelerated sedimentation. Using annual habitat survey data and wetland vegetation inventories, inundation and hydrophyte community distributions were evaluated for properties under different types of conservation status. Annual soil erosion rates from surrounding watersheds were calculated to estimate sediment accumulated rates using the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation 2 (RUSLE2). The slope-length component of the RUSLE2 was derived from 2009 light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data after the methods described by Van Remortel (Computers & Geosciences 30:1043-1053, 2004). Wetlands enrolled in conservation programs were inundated more and were dominated to a greater degree by hydrophytes than wetlands not enrolled in these programs. The mean estimated soil erosion rate at the Rainwater Basin landscape level was 4.67 tons/ha/year, and the mean estimated sediment accumulation depth for public watersheds was estimated as 0.19 cm/year. Without appropriate conservation actions, the current inundated acres and wetland acres growing hydrophytes would be further reduced by sediment accumulation. The results illustrated the importance of conservation programs to protect wetlands. PMID:27138004

  10. Use RUSLE2 model to assess the impact of soil erosion on playa inundation and hydrophyte conditions in the Rainwater Basin, Nebraska.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhenghong; Gu, Yue; Jiang, Weiguo; Xue, Yuan; Bishop, Andy; LaGrange, Ted; Nugent, Eleanor

    2016-06-01

    Playas in the Rainwater Basin region in Nebraska are globally important wetlands that are continuously threatened by culturally accelerated sedimentation. Using annual habitat survey data and wetland vegetation inventories, inundation and hydrophyte community distributions were evaluated for properties under different types of conservation status. Annual soil erosion rates from surrounding watersheds were calculated to estimate sediment accumulated rates using the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation 2 (RUSLE2). The slope-length component of the RUSLE2 was derived from 2009 light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data after the methods described by Van Remortel (Computers & Geosciences 30:1043-1053, 2004). Wetlands enrolled in conservation programs were inundated more and were dominated to a greater degree by hydrophytes than wetlands not enrolled in these programs. The mean estimated soil erosion rate at the Rainwater Basin landscape level was 4.67 tons/ha/year, and the mean estimated sediment accumulation depth for public watersheds was estimated as 0.19 cm/year. Without appropriate conservation actions, the current inundated acres and wetland acres growing hydrophytes would be further reduced by sediment accumulation. The results illustrated the importance of conservation programs to protect wetlands.

  11. Schoolground Soil Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Charles

    1978-01-01

    Outlined are simple activities for studying soil, which can be conducted in the schoolyard. Concepts include soil profiles, topsoil, soil sizes, making soil, erosion, slope, and water absorption. (SJL)

  12. Purdue University

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, P.; Grabowski, Z.; Mayer, R.H.

    1995-08-01

    The Purdue University group, including several thesis students, is working on a measurement of high-spin nuclear states at ATLAS. They use in-beam gamma-ray techniques to investigate several aspects of nuclear structure at high spin, testing the validity of shell-model calculations for high-spin-yrast states near Z = 50. The nuclei are produced via deep inelastic reactions, rather than with the more conventional fusion reactions. This technique allows the study of neutron-rich nuclei that cannot be studied by other means. The group is studying proton-rich nuclei with N{approximately}82 using the FMA and an electron spectrometer. Furthermore, D. Nisius is a Ph.D. student, resident at ANL, performing his thesis work under the supervision of R.V.F. Janssens.

  13. Estimation of Soil Erosion Dynamics in the Koshi Basin Using GIS and Remote Sensing to Assess Priority Areas for Conservation.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Kabir; Murthy, M S R; Wahid, Shahriar M; Matin, Mir A

    2016-01-01

    High levels of water-induced erosion in the transboundary Himalayan river basins are contributing to substantial changes in basin hydrology and inundation. Basin-wide information on erosion dynamics is needed for conservation planning, but field-based studies are limited. This study used remote sensing (RS) data and a geographic information system (GIS) to estimate the spatial distribution of soil erosion across the entire Koshi basin, to identify changes between 1990 and 2010, and to develop a conservation priority map. The revised universal soil loss equation (RUSLE) was used in an ArcGIS environment with rainfall erosivity, soil erodibility, slope length and steepness, cover-management, and support practice factors as primary parameters. The estimated annual erosion from the basin was around 40 million tonnes (40 million tonnes in 1990 and 42 million tonnes in 2010). The results were within the range of reported levels derived from isolated plot measurements and model estimates. Erosion risk was divided into eight classes from very low to extremely high and mapped to show the spatial pattern of soil erosion risk in the basin in 1990 and 2010. The erosion risk class remained unchanged between 1990 and 2010 in close to 87% of the study area, but increased over 9.0% of the area and decreased over 3.8%, indicating an overall worsening of the situation. Areas with a high and increasing risk of erosion were identified as priority areas for conservation. The study provides the first assessment of erosion dynamics at the basin level and provides a basis for identifying conservation priorities across the Koshi basin. The model has a good potential for application in similar river basins in the Himalayan region. PMID:26964039

  14. Estimation of Soil Erosion Dynamics in the Koshi Basin Using GIS and Remote Sensing to Assess Priority Areas for Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Kabir; Murthy, M. S. R.; Wahid, Shahriar M.; Matin, Mir A.

    2016-01-01

    High levels of water-induced erosion in the transboundary Himalayan river basins are contributing to substantial changes in basin hydrology and inundation. Basin-wide information on erosion dynamics is needed for conservation planning, but field-based studies are limited. This study used remote sensing (RS) data and a geographic information system (GIS) to estimate the spatial distribution of soil erosion across the entire Koshi basin, to identify changes between 1990 and 2010, and to develop a conservation priority map. The revised universal soil loss equation (RUSLE) was used in an ArcGIS environment with rainfall erosivity, soil erodibility, slope length and steepness, cover-management, and support practice factors as primary parameters. The estimated annual erosion from the basin was around 40 million tonnes (40 million tonnes in 1990 and 42 million tonnes in 2010). The results were within the range of reported levels derived from isolated plot measurements and model estimates. Erosion risk was divided into eight classes from very low to extremely high and mapped to show the spatial pattern of soil erosion risk in the basin in 1990 and 2010. The erosion risk class remained unchanged between 1990 and 2010 in close to 87% of the study area, but increased over 9.0% of the area and decreased over 3.8%, indicating an overall worsening of the situation. Areas with a high and increasing risk of erosion were identified as priority areas for conservation. The study provides the first assessment of erosion dynamics at the basin level and provides a basis for identifying conservation priorities across the Koshi basin. The model has a good potential for application in similar river basins in the Himalayan region. PMID:26964039

  15. Spatial analysis of soil erosion and sediment fluxes: a paired watershed study of two Rappahannock River tributaries, Stafford County, Virginia.

    PubMed

    Ricker, Matthew C; Odhiambo, Ben K; Church, Joseph M

    2008-05-01

    Soil erosion is a serious problem in areas with expanding construction, agricultural production, and improper storm water management. It is important to understand the major processes affecting sediment delivery to surficial water bodies in order to tailor effective mitigation and outreach activities. This study analyzes how naturally occurring and anthropogenic influences, such as urbanization and soil disturbance on steep slopes, are reflected in the amount of soil erosion and sediment delivery within sub-watershed-sized areas. In this study, two sub-watersheds of the Rappahannock River, Horsepen Run and Little Falls Run, were analyzed using the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) and a sediment delivery ratio (SDR) to estimate annual sediment flux rates. The RUSLE/SDR analyses for Horsepen Run and Little Falls Run predicted 298 Mg/y and 234 Mg/y, respectively, but nearly identical per-unit-area sediment flux rates of 0.15 Mg/ha/y and 0.18 Mg/ha/y. Suspended sediment sampling indicated greater amounts of sediment in Little Falls Run, which is most likely due to anthropogenic influences. Field analyses also suggest that all-terrain vehicle crossings represent the majority of sediment flux derived from forested areas of Horsepen Run. The combined RUSLE/SDR and field sampling data indicate that small-scale anthropogenic disturbances (ATV trails and construction sites) play a major role in overall sediment flux rates for both basins and that these sites must be properly accounted for when evaluating sediment flux rates at a sub-watershed scale.

  16. Estimation of Soil Erosion Dynamics in the Koshi Basin Using GIS and Remote Sensing to Assess Priority Areas for Conservation.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Kabir; Murthy, M S R; Wahid, Shahriar M; Matin, Mir A

    2016-01-01

    High levels of water-induced erosion in the transboundary Himalayan river basins are contributing to substantial changes in basin hydrology and inundation. Basin-wide information on erosion dynamics is needed for conservation planning, but field-based studies are limited. This study used remote sensing (RS) data and a geographic information system (GIS) to estimate the spatial distribution of soil erosion across the entire Koshi basin, to identify changes between 1990 and 2010, and to develop a conservation priority map. The revised universal soil loss equation (RUSLE) was used in an ArcGIS environment with rainfall erosivity, soil erodibility, slope length and steepness, cover-management, and support practice factors as primary parameters. The estimated annual erosion from the basin was around 40 million tonnes (40 million tonnes in 1990 and 42 million tonnes in 2010). The results were within the range of reported levels derived from isolated plot measurements and model estimates. Erosion risk was divided into eight classes from very low to extremely high and mapped to show the spatial pattern of soil erosion risk in the basin in 1990 and 2010. The erosion risk class remained unchanged between 1990 and 2010 in close to 87% of the study area, but increased over 9.0% of the area and decreased over 3.8%, indicating an overall worsening of the situation. Areas with a high and increasing risk of erosion were identified as priority areas for conservation. The study provides the first assessment of erosion dynamics at the basin level and provides a basis for identifying conservation priorities across the Koshi basin. The model has a good potential for application in similar river basins in the Himalayan region.

  17. Soil erosion and sediment fluxes analysis: a watershed study of the Ni Reservoir, Spotsylvania County, VA, USA.

    PubMed

    Pope, Ian C; Odhiambo, Ben K

    2014-03-01

    Anthropogenic forces that alter the physical landscape are known to cause significant soil erosion, which has negative impact on surface water bodies, such as rivers, lakes/reservoirs, and coastal zones, and thus sediment control has become one of the central aspects of catchment management planning. The revised universal soil loss equation empirical model, erosion pins, and isotopic sediment core analyses were used to evaluate watershed erosion, stream bank erosion, and reservoir sediment accumulation rates for Ni Reservoir, in central Virginia. Land-use and land cover seems to be dominant control in watershed soil erosion, with barren land and human-disturbed areas contributing the most sediment, and forest and herbaceous areas contributing the least. Results show a 7 % increase in human development from 2001 (14 %) to 2009 (21.6 %), corresponding to an increase in soil loss of 0.82 Mg ha(-1) year(-1) in the same time period. (210)Pb-based sediment accumulation rates at three locations in Ni Reservoir were 1.020, 0.364, and 0.543 g cm(-2) year(-1) respectively, indicating that sediment accumulation and distribution in the reservoir is influenced by reservoir configuration and significant contributions from bedload. All three locations indicate an increase in modern sediment accumulation rates. Erosion pin results show variability in stream bank erosion with values ranging from 4.7 to 11.3 cm year(-1). These results indicate that urban growth and the decline in vegetative cover has increased sediment fluxes from the watershed and poses a significant threat to the long-term sustainability of the Ni Reservoir as urbanization continues to increase.

  18. The World Soil Museum: education and advocacy on soils of the world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantel, Stephan; Land, Hiske

    2013-04-01

    The World Soil Museum (WSM) in Wageningen, is part of ISRIC World Soil Information and was founded in 1966 on request of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and the International Soil Science Society. The World Soil Museum has a collection of over 1100 soil profiles from more than 70 countries. This soil profiles are vertical sections and show the composition, layering and structure of the soil. The collection is unique in the world and includes a significant number of soil profiles from the Netherlands. The Dutch soil collection is important for serving broader visitor groups, as some visitors, such as secondary school classes, are specifically interested in the Dutch landscape and soils. Broadly speaking, the World Soil Museum has five functions: (i) education and courses, (ii) research, (iii) information and edutainment, (iv) social function, and (v) a real museum function (Art). The World Soil Museum (World Soil Museum) is well known in national and international circles soil and the English name has almost 1,000 references on the Internet. The World Soil Museum is visited by about 1000 people a year, mainly university and college students from Western Europe. Other visitor groups that have found their way to the museum are students from disciplines broader then soil science, such as geography and rural development. Secondary school classes visit the museum for geography classes. The uniqueness and the value of the collection of soil profiles (soil monoliths) and associated collections, such as soil samples, hand pieces, thin sections, slides, is emphasized by the fact ISRIC is the only World Data Centre for Soils (WDC-Soils) within the World Data System of the International Council of Science (ICSU). The collection provides an insight in and overview of the diversity of soils in the world, their properties and their limitations and possibilities for use. A new building is under construction for the WSM, which is

  19. Guidance document for revision of DOE Order 5820.2A, Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kudera, D.E.; McMurtrey, C.D.; Meagher, B.G.

    1993-04-01

    This document provides guidance for the revision of DOE Order 5820.2A, ``Radioactive Waste Management.`` Technical Working Groups have been established and are responsible for writing the revised order. The Technical Working Groups will use this document as a reference for polices and procedures that have been established for the revision process. The overall intent of this guidance is to outline how the order will be revised and how the revision process will be managed. In addition, this document outlines technical issues considered for inclusion by a Department of Energy Steering Committee.

  20. Simulation of soil loss processes based on rainfall runoff and the time factor of governance in the Jialing River Watershed, China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Long, Tian-Yu; Liu, Xia; Mmereki, Daniel

    2012-06-01

    Jialing River is the largest tributary in the catchment area of Three Gorges Reservoir, and it is also one of the important areas of sediment yield in the upper reaches of the Yangtze River. In recent years, significant changes of water and sediment characteristics have taken place. The "Long Control" Project implemented since 1989 had greatly changed the surface appearance of the Jialing River Watershed (JRW), and it had made the environments of the watershed sediment yield and sediment transport change significantly. In this research, the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation was selected and used to predict the annual average amount of soil erosion for the special water and sediment environments in the JRW after the implementation of the "Long Control" Project, and then the rainfall-runoff modulus and the time factor of governance were both considered as dynamic factors, the dynamic sediment transport model was built for soil erosion monitoring and forecasting based on the average sediment yield model. According to the dynamic model, the spatial and temporal distribution of soil erosion amount and sediment transport amount of the JRW from 1990 to 2007 was simulated using geographic information system (GIS) technology and space-grid algorithm. Simulation results showed that the average relative error of sediment transport was less than 10% except for the extreme hydrological year. The relationship between water and sediment from 1990 to 2007 showed that sediment interception effects of the soil and water conservation projects were obvious: the annual average sediment discharge reduced from 145.3 to 35 million tons, the decrement of sediment amount was about 111 million tons, and decreasing amplitude was 76%; the sediment concentration was also decreased from 2.01 to 0.578 kg/m(3). These data are of great significance for the prediction and estimation of the future changing trends of sediment storage in the Three Gorges Reservoir and the particulate non

  1. Investigation of Hydraulic Conductivity Coefficient for different Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifan, H.; Komaki, B.; Davari, K.

    2009-04-01

    Hydraulic conductivity is ability of water movement into saturation soil This parameter is used by irrigation and drainage projects. Parameters of soil texture, soil structure, salts, kind of fluid, soil temperature effect on hydraulic conductivity. This coefficient is measured by inverted auger hole, Guelph permeameter, falling head methods in over water table. This research was performed in research farms of Gorgan university. Soil texture was sandy loam, loam, clay loam. Hydraulic conductivity was between 0.5- 1.8 m/day. Keyword : Hydraulic conductivity, Inverted auger hole, Guelph, Fallin head, Gorgan

  2. Standards for vision science libraries: 2014 revision

    PubMed Central

    Motte, Kristin; Caldwell, C. Brooke; Lamson, Karen S.; Ferimer, Suzanne; Nims, J. Chris

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This Association of Vision Science Librarians revision of the “Standards for Vision Science Libraries” aspires to provide benchmarks to address the needs for the services and resources of modern vision science libraries (academic, medical or hospital, pharmaceutical, and so on), which share a core mission, are varied by type, and are located throughout the world. Methods: Through multiple meeting discussions, member surveys, and a collaborative revision process, the standards have been updated for the first time in over a decade. Results: While the range of types of libraries supporting vision science services, education, and research is wide, all libraries, regardless of type, share core attributes, which the standards address. Conclusions: The current standards can and should be used to help develop new vision science libraries or to expand the growth of existing libraries, as well as to support vision science librarians in their work to better provide services and resources to their respective users. PMID:25349547

  3. Clean Air Act: Senate mulls revision bill

    SciTech Connect

    Fairley, P.

    1995-12-13

    Senator Lauch Faircloth (R., NC) has circulated a draft summary of possible revisions of the Clean Air Act (CAA). Chemical industry sources say the proposal would provide some regulatory relief but fear that supporting Faircloth could jeopardize their relationship with EPA. Faircloth`s proposal addresses various controversial aspect of CAA`s Title V permit program including the monitoring and permit modification provisions. The proposal would also define a facility`s {open_quotes}potential to emit,{close_quotes} upon which Title V permits are based. In the past year EPA has substantially revised its Title V program to address complaints from industry, the states, and Congress that the monitoring and modification provisions were too burdensome.

  4. Soil Samplers: New Techniques for Subsurface Sampling for Volatile Organic Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Susan Sorini; John Schabron; Joseph Rovani; Mark Sanderson

    2009-03-31

    Soil sampling techniques for volatile organic analysis must be designed to minimize loss of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the soil that is being sampled. Preventing VOC loss from soil cores that are collected from the subsurface and brought to the surface for subsampling is often difficult. Subsurface bulk sample retrieval systems are designed to obtain intact cylindrical cores of soil ranging anywhere from one to four inches in diameter, and one to several feet in length. The current technique that is used to subsample these soil cores for VOC analysis is to expose a horizontal section of the soil core to the atmosphere; screen the exposed soil using a photoionization detector (PID) or other appropriate device to locate contamination in the soil core; and use a hand-operated coring tool to collect samples from the exposed soil for analysis. Because the soil core can be exposed to the atmosphere for a considerable length of time during screening and sample collection, the current sub-sampling technique provides opportunity for VOCs to be lost from the soil. This report describes three alternative techniques from the current technique for screening and collecting soil samples from subsurface soil cores for VOC analysis and field testing that has been done to evaluate the techniques. Based on the results of the field testing, ASTM D4547, Standard Guide for Sampling Waste and Soils for Volatile Organic Compounds, was revised to include information about the new techniques.

  5. Friability and aggregate stability of loamy soil after 5 years of biochar application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utomo, Wani; Ganika, Shaory; Wisnubroto, Erwin; Islami, Titiek

    2016-04-01

    The effect of biochar application on soil friability and aggregate stability of loamy soil was studied at Brawijaya University field experimental station, Jatikerto, Malang, Indonesia. The soil has been planted with cassava for 4 years continuously and 1 year planted with maiz. The biochar applied was made from cassava stem and farm yard manure. It was found that biochar application, either made from cassava stem or farm yard manure improved soil qualities. Soil applied with biochar was more friable compared to that of the no biochar soil, although biochar application did not influence Atterberg limits. It seems that the higher friability of biochar applied soil was associated with the higher soil organic matter. It was found that until 5 years application, the biochar treated soil had a higher soil organic matter content. Soil applied with biochar possessed a better soil aggregate stability, both dry and wet stability. This was shown by the higher aggregate mean weight diameter (MWD) of biochar applied soil. The cassava biochar applied soil had MWD of 2.22 mm (dry stability) and 1.56 mm (wet stability), whereas the control soil had MWD of 1.45 mm (dry stability) and 1.25 (wet stability). There was a significant positive correlation between soil friability and dry aggregate stability. The biochar applied soils also had higher soil permeability. Key words: soil qualities, soil physical properties, Atterberg limits, hydraulic conductivity

  6. Revision of ISO 15859 Aerospace Fluid Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Benjamin; McClure, Mark B.

    2012-01-01

    A detailed review of ISO 15859 "Space Systems - Fluid Characteristics, Sampling and Test Methods" was performed An approach to revising Parts 1-9 and 11-13 was developed and concurred by the NASA Technical Standards Program Office. The approach was to align them with the highest level source documents, and not to program-specific requirements. The updated documents were prepared and presented.

  7. Revised Unfilling Procedure for Solid Lithium Lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Leveling, A.; /Fermilab

    2003-06-03

    A procedure for unfilling used lithium lenses to has been described in Pbar Note 664. To date, the procedure has been used to disassemble lenses 20, 21, 17, 18, and 16. As a result of this work, some parts of the original procedure were found to be time consuming and ineffective. Modifications to the original procedure have been made to streamline the process and are discussed in this note. The revised procedure is included in this note.

  8. Heel pain-plantar fasciitis: revision 2014.

    PubMed

    Martin, Robroy L; Davenport, Todd E; Reischl, Stephen F; McPoil, Thomas G; Matheson, James W; Wukich, Dane K; McDonough, Christine M

    2014-11-01

    The Orthopaedic Section of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) has an ongoing effort to create evidence-based practice guidelines for orthopaedic physical therapy management of patients with musculoskeletal impairments described in the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF). The purpose of these revised clinical practice guidelines is to review recent peer-reviewed literature and make recommendations related to nonarthritic heel pain.

  9. Coal within a revised energy perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Darmstadter, J.

    2006-07-15

    The author considers the use of coal within a revised energy perspective, focusing on the factors that will drive which fuels are used to generate electricity going forward. He looks at the world markets for fossil fuels and the difficulties of predicting oil and natural gas supply and prices, as demonstrated by the variability in projections from one year to another in the EIA's Annual Energy Outlook. 4 refs., 1 tab.

  10. Soil Science in Space: Thinking Way Outside the Box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, D. W.

    2016-01-01

    Mars is a perfect laboratory to reconsider the future of pedology across the universe. By investigating the soils and geology through our Curiosity and further endeavors, we find ourselves able to learn about the past, present, and possibly the future. Imagine what we could learn about the early Earth if we could have explored it without vegetation and clouds in the way. The tools and techniques that are used to probe the Martian soil can teach us about exploring the soils on Earth. Although many may feel that soil science has learned all that it can about the soils on Earth, we know differently. Deciding what the most important things to know about Martian soils can help us focus on the fundamentals of soil science on Earth. Our soil science knowledge and experience on Earth can help us learn more about the angry red planet. Why is it so angry with so many fascinating secrets it can tell?

  11. Rett Syndrome: Revised Diagnostic Criteria and Nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    Neul, Jeffrey L.; Kaufmann, Walter E.; Glaze, Daniel G.; Christodoulou, John; Clarke, Angus J.; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Leonard, Helen; Bailey, Mark E. S.; Schanen, N. Carolyn; Zappella, Michele; Renieri, Alessandra; Huppke, Peter; Percy, Alan K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe neurodevelopmental disease that affects approximately 1 in 10,000 live female births and is often caused by mutations in Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2). Despite distinct clinical features, the accumulation of clinical and molecular information in recent years has generated considerable confusion regarding the diagnosis of RTT. The purpose of this work was revise and clarify 2002 consensus criteria for the diagnosis of RTT in anticipation of treatment trials. Method RettSearch members, representing the majority of the international clinical RTT specialists, participated in an iterative process to come to a consensus on a revised and simplified clinical diagnostic criteria for RTT. Results The clinical criteria required for the diagnosis of classic and atypical RTT were clarified and simplified. Guidelines for the diagnosis and molecular evaluation of specific variant forms of RTT were developed. Interpretation These revised criteria provide clarity regarding the key features required for the diagnosis of RTT and reinforce the concept that RTT is a clinical diagnosis based on distinct clinical criteria, independent of molecular findings. We recommend that these criteria and guidelines be utilized in any proposed clinical research. PMID:21154482

  12. A Revised Earthquake Catalogue for South Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzera, Francesco; Zechar, J. Douglas; Vogfjörd, Kristín S.; Eberhard, David A. J.

    2016-01-01

    In 1991, a new seismic monitoring network named SIL was started in Iceland with a digital seismic system and automatic operation. The system is equipped with software that reports the automatic location and magnitude of earthquakes, usually within 1-2 min of their occurrence. Normally, automatic locations are manually checked and re-estimated with corrected phase picks, but locations are subject to random errors and systematic biases. In this article, we consider the quality of the catalogue and produce a revised catalogue for South Iceland, the area with the highest seismic risk in Iceland. We explore the effects of filtering events using some common recommendations based on network geometry and station spacing and, as an alternative, filtering based on a multivariate analysis that identifies outliers in the hypocentre error distribution. We identify and remove quarry blasts, and we re-estimate the magnitude of many events. This revised catalogue which we consider to be filtered, cleaned, and corrected should be valuable for building future seismicity models and for assessing seismic hazard and risk. We present a comparative seismicity analysis using the original and revised catalogues: we report characteristics of South Iceland seismicity in terms of b value and magnitude of completeness. Our work demonstrates the importance of carefully checking an earthquake catalogue before proceeding with seismicity analysis.

  13. Total hip arthroplasty revision in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Gasbarra, Elena; Perrone, Fabio Luigi; Celi, Monica; Rao, Cecilia; Feola, Maurizio; Cuozzo, Nicola; Tarantino, Umberto

    2013-10-01

    In the last years, the number of total hip arthroplasty is increased both in young patients and elderly with a poor bone quality due to extension of surgical indications. According to this trend, also revision surgery showed a growth of its number, especially in elderly patients, because of implant loosening, failed osseointegration of prosthetic components, errors in biomechanical restoration and infections. The aim of this study is to analyze life quality improvement through evaluation of articular functionality and postoperative pain, and to examine osseointegration of implant components with periprosthetic bone. During total hip arthroplasty revision, the orthopedic surgeon often has to face complex cases, especially in elderly patients with a preexisting status of poor bone quality and sarcopenia. In these cases, a correct planning and a surgical procedure well-executed are able to ensure a good outcome that led to pain relief and functional recovery. Furthermore anti-osteoporotic therapy surely represents a useful resource both in primary total hip arthroplasty and in revisions, mainly for elderly patients with a poor bone quality. PMID:24046034

  14. Lunar soil properties and soil mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J. K.; Houston, W. N.; Hovland, H. J.

    1972-01-01

    The study to identify and define recognizable fabrics in lunar soil in order to determine the history of the lunar regolith in different locations is reported. The fabric of simulated lunar soil, and lunar soil samples are discussed along with the behavior of simulated lunar soil under dynamic and static loading. The planned research is also included.

  15. Long-term toxicity assessment of soils in a recovered area affected by a mining spill.

    PubMed

    Romero-Freire, A; García Fernández, I; Simón Torres, M; Martínez Garzón, F J; Martín Peinado, F J

    2016-01-01

    Residual pollution in the Guadiamar Green Corridor still remains after Aználcollar mine spill in 1998. The polluted areas are identified by the absence of vegetation, soil acidic pH and high concentrations of As, Pb, Zn and Cu. Soil toxicity was assessed by lettuce root elongation and induced soil respiration bioassays. In bare soils, total As and Pb concentrations and water-extractable levels for As, Zn and Cu exceeded the toxicity guidelines. Pollutants responsible for toxicity were different depending on the tested organism, with arsenic being most toxic for lettuce and the metal mixture to soil respiration. Soil properties, such as pH or organic carbon content, are key factors to control metal availability and toxicity in the area. According to our results, there is a risk of pollution to living organisms and the soil quality criteria established in the area should be revised to reduce the risk of toxicity.

  16. Soil Organic Carbon dynamics in agricultural soils of Veneto Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bampa, F. B.; Morari, F. M.; Hiederer, R. H.; Toth, G. T.; Giandon, P. G.; Vinci, I. V.; Montanarella, L. M.; Nocita, M.

    2012-04-01

    management of the EU territory by field observations of geo-referenced points. In 2009, a topsoil (0-30 cm) module was included to the survey and a subset of around 21,000 sites was sampled in 23 Member States. The second source is a soil survey monitoring pilot campaign carried in Veneto Region last year. The pilot campaign has been organized with the collaboration between JRC, University of Padova and ARPAV Veneto. The scope was to apply the LUCAS methodology to an experimental soil survey of 40 samples. The selection of the points to survey has been done on the basis of the LUCAS project related to Veneto Region, pedo-climatic and management unit conditions and the database on soils belonging to ARPAV Soil Unit, collected ante 2000. Data started to be investigated and permit to show changes in SOC content in a decade for different land use/cover and climatic areas. Through the bulk density data collected and the data already available from ARPAV library, it's possible to evaluate the Carbon stocks of Veneto region. Possible changes in Carbon can be related to land use changes and different strategies of management practices adopted over time.

  17. Forum on Proposed Revisions to ABET Engineering Accreditation Commission General Criteria on Student Outcomes and Curriculum (Criteria 3 and 5): A Workshop Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pool, Robert

    2016-01-01

    On February 16, 2016, the National Academy of Engineering held a forum to discuss proposed changes to criteria used by ABET (formerly the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology) to accredit engineering programs in colleges and universities around the world. The Forum on Proposed Revisions to ABET Engineering Accreditation Commission…

  18. Modeling the soil water retention curves of soil-gravel mixtures with regression method on the Loess Plateau of China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huifang; Xiao, Bo; Wang, Mingyu; Shao, Ming'an

    2013-01-01

    Soil water retention parameters are critical to quantify flow and solute transport in vadose zone, while the presence of rock fragments remarkably increases their variability. Therefore a novel method for determining water retention parameters of soil-gravel mixtures is required. The procedure to generate such a model is based firstly on the determination of the quantitative relationship between the content of rock fragments and the effective saturation of soil-gravel mixtures, and then on the integration of this relationship with former analytical equations of water retention curves (WRCs). In order to find such relationships, laboratory experiments were conducted to determine WRCs of soil-gravel mixtures obtained with a clay loam soil mixed with shale clasts or pebbles in three size groups with various gravel contents. Data showed that the effective saturation of the soil-gravel mixtures with the same kind of gravels within one size group had a linear relation with gravel contents, and had a power relation with the bulk density of samples at any pressure head. Revised formulas for water retention properties of the soil-gravel mixtures are proposed to establish the water retention curved surface models of the power-linear functions and power functions. The analysis of the parameters obtained by regression and validation of the empirical models showed that they were acceptable by using either the measured data of separate gravel size group or those of all the three gravel size groups having a large size range. Furthermore, the regression parameters of the curved surfaces for the soil-gravel mixtures with a large range of gravel content could be determined from the water retention data of the soil-gravel mixtures with two representative gravel contents or bulk densities. Such revised water retention models are potentially applicable in regional or large scale field investigations of significantly heterogeneous media, where various gravel sizes and different gravel

  19. Clinical Outcomes Following Revision Anterior Shoulder Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Rachel M.; Mellano, Chris; Shin, Jason J.; Feldheim, Terrence F.; Mascarenhas, Randhir; Yanke, Adam Blair; Cole, Brian J.; Nicholson, Gregory P.; Romeo, Anthony A.; Verma, Nikhil N.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical outcomes following revision anterior shoulder stabilization performed either via all-arthroscopic soft tissue repair or via Latarjet coracoid transfer. Methods: A retrospective review of prospectively collected data on 91 shoulders undergoing revision anterior shoulder stabilization was performed. All patients underwent prior soft tissue stabilization; those with prior open bone grafting procedures were excluded. For patients with 25% glenoid bone loss, Latarjet was performed (n=28). Patients were queried regarding recurrent instability (subluxation or dislocation). Clinical outcomes were evaluated using validated patient reported outcome questionnaires including the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, Simple Shoulder Test (SST), visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, and Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index (WOSI). Results: A total of 63 shoulders in 62 patients (46 males, 16 females) with an average age of 23.2 ± 6.9 years were included in the revision arthroscopy group. At an average follow-up of 46.9 ± 16.8 months (range, 15 to 78), the mean WOSI score was 80.1 (range, 15.0 to 100), and there were significant improvements (p<0.001) in ASES (63.7 to 85.1), SST (6.2 to 9.1), and VAS pain scores (2.89 to 0.81). Recurrent instability occurred in 12 of 63 shoulders (19%); the number of prior surgeries and baseline hyperlaxity were significant risk factors for failure (p<0.001 and p=0.04, respectively). No patients developed clinical or radiographic evidence of arthritis. A total of 28 shoulders in 28 patients (21 male, 7 female) with an average age of 27.5 years (range 14 to 45) were included in the Latarjet group. Thirteen (46%) had more than one previous stabilization attempt. ), the average WOSI score was 71.9, and there were significant improvements (p<0.001) in ASES (65.7 to 87.0), SST (7.2 to 10.3), and VAS (3.1 to 1.1). Recurrent instability occurred in 2 of 28 shoulders

  20. Influence of soil moisture on soil respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fer, Miroslav; Kodesova, Radka; Nikodem, Antonin; Klement, Ales; Jelenova, Klara

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this work was to describe an impact of soil moisture on soil respiration. Study was performed on soil samples from morphologically diverse study site in loess region of Southern Moravia, Czech Republic. The original soil type is Haplic Chernozem, which was due to erosion changed into Regosol (steep parts) and Colluvial soil (base slope and the tributary valley). Soil samples were collected from topsoils at 5 points of the selected elevation transect and also from the parent material (loess). Grab soil samples, undisturbed soil samples (small - 100 cm3, and large - 713 cm3) and undisturbed soil blocks were taken. Basic soil properties were determined on grab soil samples. Small undisturbed soil samples were used to determine the soil water retention curves and the hydraulic conductivity functions using the multiple outflow tests in Tempe cells and a numerical inversion with HYDRUS 1-D. During experiments performed in greenhouse dry large undisturbed soil samples were wetted from below using a kaolin tank and cumulative water inflow due to capillary rise was measured. Simultaneously net CO2 exchange rate and net H2O exchange rate were measured using LCi-SD portable photosynthesis system with Soil Respiration Chamber. Numerical inversion of the measured cumulative capillary rise data using the HYDRUS-1D program was applied to modify selected soil hydraulic parameters for particular conditions and to simulate actual soil water distribution within each soil column in selected times. Undisturbed soil blocks were used to prepare thin soil sections to study soil-pore structure. Results for all soil samples showed that at the beginning of soil samples wetting the CO2 emission increased because of improving condition for microbes' activity. The maximum values were reached for soil column average soil water content between 0.10 and 0.15 cm3/cm3. Next CO2 emission decreased since the pore system starts filling by water (i.e. aggravated conditions for microbes

  1. Neutron Physics. A Revision of I. Halpern's notes on E. Fermi's lectures in 1945

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Beckerley, J.G.

    1951-10-16

    In the Fall of 1945 a course in Neutron Physics was given by Professor Fermi as part of the program of the Los Alamos University. The course consisted of thirty lectures most of which were given by Fermi. In his absence R.F. Christy and E. Segre gave several lectures. The present revision is based upon class notes prepared by I. Halpern with some assistance by B.T. Feld and issued first as document LADC 255 and later with wider circulation as MDDC 320.

  2. Single application of Sewage Sludge to an Alluvial Agricultural Soil - impacts on Soil Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhadolc, M.; Graham, D. B.; Hagn, A.; Doerfler, U.; Schloter, M.; Schroll, R.; Munch, J. C.; Lobnik, F.

    2009-04-01

    Limited information exists on the effects of sewage sludge on soil quality with regard to their ability to maintain soil functions. We studied effects of sewage sludge amendment on soil chemical properties, microbial community structure and microbial degradation of the herbicide glyphosate. Three months soil column leaching experiment has been conducted using alluvial soils (Eutric Fluvisol) with no prior history of sludge application. The soil was loamy with pH 7,4 and organic matter content of 3,5%. Soil material in the upper 2 cm of columns was mixed with dehydrated sewage sludge which was applied in amounts corresponding to the standards governing the use of sewage sludge for agricultural land. Sludge did increase some nutrients (total N, NH4+, available P and K, organic carbon) and some heavy metals contents (Zn, Cu, Pb) in soil. However, upper limits for heavy metals in agricultural soils were not exceeded. Results of heavy metal availability in soil determined by sequential extraction will be also presented. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analyses of 16s/18s rDNA, using universal fungal and bacterial primers, revealed clear shifts in bacterial and fungal community structure in the upper 2 cm of soils after amendment. Fungal fingerprints showed greater short term effects of sewage sludge, whereas sewage sludge seems to have prolonged effects on soil bacteria. Furthermore, sewage sludge amendment significantly increased glyphosate degradation from 21.6±1% to 33.6±1% over a 2 months period. The most probable reasons for shifts in microbial community structure and increased degradation of glyphosate are beneficial alterations to the physical-chemical characteristics of the soil. Negative effects of potentially toxic substances present in the sewage sludge on soil microbial community functioning were not observed with the methods used in our study.

  3. Crossword Puzzles as Learning Tools in Introductory Soil Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbarick, K. A.

    2010-01-01

    Students in introductory courses generally respond favorably to novel approaches to learning. To this end, I developed and used three crossword puzzles in spring and fall 2009 semesters in Introductory Soil Science Laboratory at Colorado State University. The first hypothesis was that crossword puzzles would improve introductory soil science…

  4. Soil Erosion Study through Simulation: An Educational Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Thomas P.; Falkenmayer, Karen

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the need for education about soil erosion and advocates the use of the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) to show the impacts of human and natural action on the land. Describes the use of a computer simulated version of the USLE in several environmental and farming situations. (TW)

  5. Using Inquiry to Learn about Soil: A Fourth Grade Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magee, Paula A.; Wingate, Elisha

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we describe a fourth-grade inquiry unit on soil. The unit was designed and taught by preservice elementary teachers as part of a university science methods course. Using a student-driven inquiry approach to designing curriculum, the unit engaged fourth graders in learning about the physical properties soil, erosion, worms, and…

  6. Biogeochemistry of hydrothermally and adjacent non-altered soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a field/lab project, students in the Soil Biogeochemistry class of the University of Nevada, Reno described and characterized seven pedons, developed in hydrothermally and adjacent non-hydrothermally altered andesitic parent material near Reno, NV. Hydrothermally altered soils had considerably lo...

  7. Soil on Phoenix Deck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image, taken by the Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) of NASA's Phoenix Lander, shows Martian soil piled on top of the spacecraft's deck and some of its instruments. Visible in the upper-left portion of the image are several wet chemistry cells of the lander's Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA). The instrument on the lower right of the image is the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer. The excess sample delivered to the MECA's sample stage can be seen on the deck in the lower left portion of the image.

    This image was taken on Martian day, or sol, 142, on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2008. Phoenix landed on Mars' northern plains on May 25, 2008.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  8. A Single Counterexample Leads to Moral Belief Revision.

    PubMed

    Horne, Zachary; Powell, Derek; Hummel, John

    2015-11-01

    What kind of evidence will lead people to revise their moral beliefs? Moral beliefs are often strongly held convictions, and existing research has shown that morality is rooted in emotion and socialization rather than deliberative reasoning. In addition, more general issues-such as confirmation bias-further impede coherent belief revision. Here, we explored a unique means for inducing belief revision. In two experiments, participants considered a moral dilemma in which an overwhelming majority of people judged that it was inappropriate to take action to maximize utility. Their judgments contradicted a utilitarian principle they otherwise strongly endorsed. Exposure to this scenario led participants to revise their belief in the utilitarian principle, and this revision persisted over several hours. This method provides a new avenue for inducing belief revision. PMID:25810137

  9. A Single Counterexample Leads to Moral Belief Revision.

    PubMed

    Horne, Zachary; Powell, Derek; Hummel, John

    2015-11-01

    What kind of evidence will lead people to revise their moral beliefs? Moral beliefs are often strongly held convictions, and existing research has shown that morality is rooted in emotion and socialization rather than deliberative reasoning. In addition, more general issues-such as confirmation bias-further impede coherent belief revision. Here, we explored a unique means for inducing belief revision. In two experiments, participants considered a moral dilemma in which an overwhelming majority of people judged that it was inappropriate to take action to maximize utility. Their judgments contradicted a utilitarian principle they otherwise strongly endorsed. Exposure to this scenario led participants to revise their belief in the utilitarian principle, and this revision persisted over several hours. This method provides a new avenue for inducing belief revision.

  10. Soil spectral characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoner, E. R.; Baumgardner, M. F.

    1981-01-01

    The spectral characterization of soils is discussed with particular reference to the bidirectional reflectance factor as a quantitative measure of soil spectral properties, the role of soil color, soil parameters affecting soil reflectance, and field characteristics of soil reflectance. Comparisons between laboratory-measured soil spectra and Landsat MSS data have shown good agreement, especially in discriminating relative drainage conditions and organic matter levels in unvegetated soils. The capacity to measure both visible and infrared soil reflectance provides information on other soil characteristics and makes it possible to predict soil response to different management conditions. Field and laboratory soil spectral characterization helps define the extent to which intrinsic spectral information is available from soils as a consequence of their composition and field characteristics.

  11. Revision and update of the stratigraphic nomenclature of Netherlands

    SciTech Connect

    Van Adrichem Boogaert, A. ); Kouwe, W. )

    1993-09-01

    In 1991, the Geological Survey of the Netherlands started a project for revision and updating of the pre-Quaternary lithostratigraphy of Netherlands. This had not been done systematically since 1980. Main objective of the study are (1) to bring the lithostratigraphic ideas into agreement with new findings and increased knowledge of Dutch subsurface geology (lithostratigraphy was extended into the Lower Carboniferous and Devonian), (2) expansion and standardization of the definitions and descriptions of existing lithostratigraphic units, (3) application of modern concepts (e.g. sequence stratigraphy) in order to describe better the distribution of reservoir-prone sediments, and (4) to reach consensus on a number of stratigraphy-related subjects, such as a chronological time frame, application of biozonations, and the designation of the behavior of main structural elements through time. Eight working groups were formed, each working on a specific aspect or stratigraphic interval, under the supervision of a steering committee. Both working groups and steering committee were composed of persons from the Geological Survey, several leading oil companies and, in some cases, universities. Several working groups have completed their tasks, and updates of these stratigraphic intervals are available at the conference. Posters will display stratigraphic updates of lithostratigraphy for the Carboniferous, Zechstein, Lower Triassic, and Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous.

  12. Comparison of soil erodibility factors in USLE, RUSLE2, EPIC and Dg models based on a Chinese soil erodibiity database.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil erodibility (K-value) is a key parameter in erosion prediction and is important for conservation planning in the face of a rising need for protecting the limited land resources. This study investigated the predictive capability of the K-value estimated by Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE), Re...

  13. Revised Medical Criteria for Evaluating Respiratory System Disorders. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    We are revising the criteria in the Listing of Impairments (listings) that we use to evaluate claims involving respiratory disorders in adults and children under titles II and XVI of the Social Security Act (Act). The revisions reflect our program experience and advances in medical knowledge since we last comprehensively revised this body system in 1993, as well as comments we received from medical experts and the public. PMID:27295734

  14. Revised Medical Criteria for Evaluating Respiratory System Disorders. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    We are revising the criteria in the Listing of Impairments (listings) that we use to evaluate claims involving respiratory disorders in adults and children under titles II and XVI of the Social Security Act (Act). The revisions reflect our program experience and advances in medical knowledge since we last comprehensively revised this body system in 1993, as well as comments we received from medical experts and the public.

  15. University Handbook. University of Wisconsin, Whitewater.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ., Whitewater.

    The University of Wisconsin-Whitewater's handbook is divided into major sections dealing with: the university; business services; university services; student matters; curricular matters; and personnel matters. Various topics are covered, including: tuition for senior citizens, medical insurance, risk management, degree requirements, student…

  16. Understanding the soil underfoot: building a national postgraduate soils cohort through participative learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinton, John; Haygarth, Phil; Black, Helaina; Allton, Kathryn

    2015-04-01

    Many of the PhD students starting Soil Science PhDs have only a limited understanding of the wider importance of soils, the state -of-art in other sub disciplines, and have often never seen a soil profile in the field. As the number of students nationally in the UK is also small compared to some other disciplines there is also a need to build a cohort of early career researchers. To address these issues, Lancaster University and the James Hutton Institute together with support from the British Society of Soil Science and the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), ran a 5 day residential foundation soil science 'Summer School' in March 2015. The training school was an intense programme for ambitious and energetic post-graduate students. The course was specifically designed for students who were keen to develop skills in the development of inter-disciplinary research ideas and proposals. Specifically the course addressed: • the different functions in land uses and across landscapes • novel approaches for investigating how soils function • the basics of making a soil description and soil sampling in the field; • the current key challenges in soil science research • the requirements of, and approaches to, soil science research that requires multi-disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches • the essentials of developing and planning a research project Our approach was to provide a space for the students to both learn from, but also work with some of the leading UK Soil Science experts. We used workshop style lectures, including some delivered via the internet, combined with student research teams working alongside research mentors to produce research proposals to be 'pitched' to a panel at the end of the course. These proposals formed the focus for engagement with the 'experts' making the time the students spent with them concentrated and productive. Feedback from the students was excellent and a variant of the course will be repeated by Cranfield

  17. Creative revision - From rough draft to published paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M. F.

    1976-01-01

    The process of revising a technical or scientific paper can be performed more efficiently by the people involved (author, co-author, supervisor, editor) when the revision is controlled by breaking it into a series of steps. The revision process recommended here is based on the levels-of-edit concept that resulted from a study of the technical editorial function at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory of the California Institute of Technology. Types of revision discussed are Substantive, Policy, Language, Mechanical Style, Format, Integrity, and Copy Clarification.

  18. Perioperative complications in revision hip surgery.

    PubMed

    Thomasson, E; Guingand, O; Terracher, R; Mazel, C

    2001-01-01

    Revision hip surgery now constitutes 10-30% of all joint procedures. The morbidity and associated with this demanding operation are not well established. The goal of this paper is to determine these rates and to identify some predictive factors.
    The complication rate ranges from 31,5 to more than 77% in the literature. Life threatening complications represent 1,8 to 8% of these, leading to death in about 1,6%. ASA score and age above 75 appear to be correlated with medical complications. The injection rate varies from 1 to 5,8%, and may be as high as 14% in cases with a past history of infection. Heterotopic ossification occurred in 13 to 65%, reaching severity in 3,3 to 8,3%.
    Surgical complications include dislocation and femoral injuries. Dislocations occur in almost 10%, leading to revision in1-4,2%. Age and the number of previous surgical operations appear to be significant risk factors. Femoral injuries (perforations or femoral fractures) occur in 6-37%, especially in impaction grafting technique and when uncemented implants are used. Age over 75 years and femoral defects appear to be significant risk factors for femoral fractures.
    The rate of complications in revision hip surgery continues to be high, but successful clinical outcome can be attained even in elderly patients. Attentive preoperative exams, good prevention of technical pitfalls, the experience of the surgeon and the use of specific tools may decrease these complications and make this demanding procedure safer.

  19. Free and Inexpensive Materials Available for Teaching Conservation Education: Soil and Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cousins, Genevieve; Smith, Bonnie Mae

    This publication was prepared to accompany the revised "Soil and Water Section" of "Guides for Teacher Conservation in the Schools of Louisiana." Its purpose is to provide teachers with information about possible sources of teaching materials that can be obtained free or with only a small expenditure of funds. Each item listed is annotated for the…

  20. Soil erosion: 20th century equations with 21st century data?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Dust Bowl of the 1930's focused the attention of the US on soil erosion and land conservation. The Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) was the result of this effort and has remained one of the most widely used equations for soil erosion prediction world-wide. This empirical relationship has been...

  1. Microgravity science and applications bibliography, 1989 revision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This edition of the Microgravity Science and Applications (MSA) Bibliography is a compilation of government reports, contractor reports, conference proceedings, and journal articles dealing with flight experiments utilizing a low gravity environment to elucidate and control various processes, or with ground based activities that provide supported research. It encompasses literature published but not cited in the 1988 Revision and that literature which has been published in the past year. Subdivisions of the Bibliography include: electronic materials, metals, alloys, and composites; fluids, interfaces, and transport; glasses and ceramics; biotechnology; combustion science; experimental technology, facilities, and instrumentation. Also included are publications from the European, Soviet, and Japanese programs.

  2. Microgravity science and applications bibliography, 1990 revision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This edition of the Microgravity Science and Applications (MSA) Bibliography is a compilation of government reports, contractor reports, conference proceedings, and journal articles dealing with flight experiments utilizing a low gravity environment to elucidate and control various processes, or with ground based activities that provide supporting research. It encompasses literature published but not cited in the 1989 Revision and that literature which has been published in the past year. Subdivisions of the bibliography include: electronic materials; metals, alloys, and composites; fluids, interfaces, and transport; glasses and ceramics; biotechnology; combustion science; and experimental technology, facilities, and instrumentation. Also included are publications from the European, Soviet, and Japanese programs.

  3. FFTF reactor immersion heaters. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Romrell, D.M.

    1994-08-26

    This specification establishes requirements for design, testing, and quality assurance for electric heaters that will be used to maintain primary Sodium temperature in the Fast Test Facility (FFTF) reactor vessel. The Test Specification (WHC-SD-FF-SDS-003) has been revised to Rev. 1. This change modifies the fabrication of approximately 25 feet of the subject heater using ceramic insulators over the heater lead wire rather than compressed magnesium oxide. Also, 304 or 316 stainless steel can be used for the heater sheath. This change should simplify fabrication and improve the heater operational reliability.

  4. Basic petroleum geology, 2nd ed. , revised

    SciTech Connect

    Link.

    1990-01-01

    This book contains revised and updated material, including approximately 200 additional illustrations and an extensive glossary of terms. A valuable reference for geology students and petroleum professionals, the text presents fundamental concepts of geology in terms of sedimentary deposition, petroleum occurrence, exploration, and recovery. This book contains information on geologic time, historical geology and stratigraphy; Minerals and rocks; Weathering erosion, and deposition; Marine erosion and deposition; Depositional basins; Lacustrine, desert and glacial environments; Subsurface water and diagenesis; Structural geology; petroleum traps; Petroleum and reservoirs; Geological considerations and engineering practices; Rocks, reservoirs, and recovery techniques; Exploration techniques for petroleum; Bibliography Glossary; Index.

  5. Revision endoscopic ethmoidectomy for chronic rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Corey, J P; Bumsted, R M

    1989-08-01

    In summary, revision endoscopic surgery for chronic rhinosinusitis can be performed safely by using the middle turbinate (or portion thereof) or the anterior wall of the sphenoid as a landmark. These cases are more difficult and may be more prone to bleeding and scarring. The surgeon should be thoroughly familiar with and not hesitate to switch to conventional techniques in the event of excessive bleeding, proptosis, or a loss of landmarks. Aggressive postoperative care and follow-up, including office endoscopic "touch-up" procedures, may be necessary to maintain control of aggressive disease, along with continued medical management and any indicated immunotherapy.

  6. Microgravity science and applications bibliography, 1991 revision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This edition of the Microgravity Science and Applications (MSA) Bibliography is a compilation of government reports, contractor reports, conference proceedings, and journal articles dealing with flight experiments using a low gravity environment to elucidate and control various processes, or with ground based activities that provide supporting research. It encompasses literature published but not cited in the 1990 Revision and that literature which has been published in the past year. Subdivisions of the bibliography include: Electronic materials; Metals, alloys, and composites; Fluids, interfaces and transport; Glasses and ceramics; Biotechnology; Combustion science; and Experimental technology, instrumentation, and facilities. Also included are a limited number of publications from the European, Soviet, and Japanese programs.

  7. Actitud Hacia las Matematicas: Revision Bibliografica (Attitudes Toward Mathematics: Revised Bibliography). Publication No. 39.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez Feijoo, Nelida

    Investigations about attitudes toward mathematics carried out in the past decade were revised. The instruments used to measure attitudes toward mathematics were analysed as well as the attitudes toward different aspects of mathematics, their relation with other school subjects and their stability through time. Opinions about the influence of…

  8. Actitudes Haci la Enfermedad Mental: Revision Bibliografica (Attitudes toward Mental Illness: Revised Bibliography). Publication No. 40.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stefani, Dorina

    In this work, some of the most important instruments used to measure attitudes toward mental illness were analysed. A revision of different experimental investigations which studied attitudes toward mental illness among general public, mental health professionals and patients and their relatives was made. Some of the strategies applied to change…

  9. 76 FR 71707 - Revising Underground Storage Tank Regulations-Revisions to Existing Requirements and New...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-18

    ...EPA is proposing to make certain revisions to the 1988 underground storage tank (UST) technical, financial responsibility, and state program approval regulations. These changes establish federal requirements that are similar to key portions of the Energy Policy Act of 2005; they also update certain 1988 UST regulations. Proposed changes include: Adding secondary containment requirements for......

  10. Revised Administrative Rules for Special Education. (Including Revisions Effective October 15, 1996, and April 9, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Dept. of Education, Lansing. Special Education Services.

    This document presents the State of Michigan's administrative rules for special education including 1996 and 1997 revisions. The specific regulations are organized into 9 sections: (1) general provisions (definitions and determination standards); (2) evaluation, eligibility, student assignment, and due process procedures (e.g., individualized…

  11. System Accountability Report 2013-14. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Board of Governors, State University System of Florida, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Information Resource Management - State University System of Florida (IRM-SUS) is the primary collector and provider of data concerning state universities that is used to make sound education policy decisions. The office provides technical assistance to those using the information, state and federal reporting support, those supplying information,…

  12. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: HYDRAULIC FRACTURING OF CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydraulic fracturing is a physical process that creates fractures in silty clay soil to enhance its permeability. The technology, developed by the Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory (RREL) and the University of Cincinnati, creates sand-filled horizontal fractures up to 1 in. i...

  13. An Integrated Learning Project in Introductory Soils.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, C. A.; Schafer, J.

    1993-01-01

    Describes a problem-solving teaching method used in the Introductory Soils course at Iowa State University whereby students are assigned to groups and asked to serve as an advisor to a landowner. Using a computerized database for most data acquisition, students recommend farm usage and urban/alternate development plans. Includes the program…

  14. Quantifying soil erosion with GIS-based RUSLE in La Baells Reservoir (Llobregat River Basin), SE Pyrenees, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catari, G.; Gallart, F.; Josa, R.

    2009-04-01

    Sediment yield in mountain areas is a matter of concern not only because of the loss of the fertile topsoil but also due to its off-site effects such as sediment deposition in reservoirs and damage to aquatic life. There are few soil erosion estimates at the river basin for non agricultural areas, and the uncertainty of estimates is scarcely assessed. This research was conducted in the Llobregat river basin at the headwaters of La Baells Reservoir which supplies water to Barcelona city. This basin (504km2) is located in the South Eastern Pyrenees, land cover is mainly coniferous forest and pastures with some intensely eroded areas (bad lands). Annual average soil erosion was quantitatively estimated with an integration of geographic information system (IDRISI) and the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE). Maps for each of the factors involved where obtained with a 20 m resolution. Rainfall dataset from eight weather stations and spanning 14 years, soil properties, land cover inventory, land management features and digital elevation model were used as resource datasets to generate each of the RUSLE factor maps. Annual average sediment yield was computed by applying a sediment delivery ratio to the results obtained by RUSLE, and this result was compared with existing bathymetric survey results for the same reservoir. Uncertainty and sensitivity analyses were undertaken for each of the RUSLE factors, in order to assess its magnitude and determine which of the factors influences the most the soil loss estimate. Results show that the annual average sediment yield was 2.9 Mg km-2y-1 and its confidence interval lied between 1.1 Mg km-2y-1 and 7.5 Mg km-2y-1 with 90% confidence. These results are in agreement with results from reservoir bathymetric survey (4.3 Mg km-2y-1). Additional comparisons of estimated sediment yield were done with empirical methods such as PSIAC, Factorial Scoring Model and Drainage Area; the results of these methods are within the

  15. A Submission on Proposed Bill C-60: "An Act To Amend the Copyright Act and To Amend Other Acts in Consequence Thereof" from the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada to the Legislative Committee on Bill C-60.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada, Ottawa (Ontario).

    The Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada's comments on proposed changes in Canadian copyright law, and further changes implied by or caused by those revisions, are presented. The association argues first that since the proposed revisions are being revealed in stages, legislative committee work should be suspended until all of the…

  16. An Examination of the Indiana State University Aerospace Administration Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwab, Gregory L.

    2005-01-01

    Declining enrollments in the Indiana State University (ISU) aerospace administration program prompted this case study. which evaluates the program in comparison with parallel programs at other universities, industry standards, and an independent audit. Survey instruments were administered to graduates, faculty, and employers for their views on competencies of an excellent aerospace administration program Results show the deficiency of the ISU program. Graduates, faculty, and employers rated all competencies-from moderate to considerable importance-similarly for an excellent program. Recommendations for program improvement were made, and suggestions for further research include studies to evaluate the effectiveness of a revised aerospace administration program.

  17. Three Principles to REVISE People's Unethical Behavior.

    PubMed

    Ayal, Shahar; Gino, Francesca; Barkan, Rachel; Ariely, Dan

    2015-11-01

    Dishonesty and unethical behavior are widespread in the public and private sectors and cause immense annual losses. For instance, estimates of U.S. annual losses indicate $1 trillion paid in bribes, $270 billion lost due to unreported income, and $42 billion lost in retail due to shoplifting and employee theft. In this article, we draw on insights from the growing fields of moral psychology and behavioral ethics to present a three-principle framework we call REVISE. This framework classifies forces that affect dishonesty into three main categories and then redirects those forces to encourage moral behavior. The first principle, reminding, emphasizes the effectiveness of subtle cues that increase the salience of morality and decrease people's ability to justify dishonesty. The second principle, visibility, aims to restrict anonymity, prompt peer monitoring, and elicit responsible norms. The third principle, self-engagement, increases people's motivation to maintain a positive self-perception as a moral person and helps bridge the gap between moral values and actual behavior. The REVISE framework can guide the design of policy interventions to defeat dishonesty.

  18. The JFK Coma Recovery Scale--Revised.

    PubMed

    Kalmar, Kathleen; Giacino, Joseph T

    2005-01-01

    The JFK Coma Recovery Scale (CRS) was developed to help characterise and monitor patients functioning at Rancho Levels I-IV and has been used widely in both clinical and research settings within the US and Europe. The CRS was recently revised to address a number of concerns emanating from our own clinical experience with the scale, feedback from users and researchers as well as the results of Rasch analyses. Additionally, the CRS did not include all of the behavioural criteria necessary to diagnose the minimally conscious state (MCS), thereby limiting diagnostic utility. The revised JFK Coma Recovery Scale (CRS-R) includes addition of new items, merging of items found to be statistically similar, deletion or modification of items showing poor fit with the scale's underlying construct, renaming of items, more stringent scoring criteria, and quantification of elicited behaviours to improve accuracy of rating. Psychometric properties of the CRS-R appear to meet standards for measurement and evaluation tools for use in clinical and research settings, and diagnostic application suggests that the scale is capable of discriminating patients in the minimally conscious state from those in the vegetative state.

  19. Curriculum revision: product innovation for quality outcomes.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Georgianna; Carroll, V Susan

    2006-01-01

    The education of any professional discipline rests on a curricular foundation that reflects the discipline's theory and knowledge bases, practice patterns, and unique skills. In addition, professional health care education must respond to and reflect changes in technology, societal definitions of health and wellness, and broad social issues such as access to care, health care funding, and changing patient demographics. These issues are interwoven with efforts to also provide high-quality education with positive learning outcomes. In this article, the authors describe a school of nursing's efforts to revise its curriculum to reflect a professional shift in focus to community-based nursing practice and the goals of the federal health goals outlined in Healthy People 2010. The revision also served as the starting point for a change in the process through which the college will seek accreditation in the future; this process-Academic Quality Improvement Program-requires institutions of higher learning to use a continuous quality model as its base.

  20. [Revision of the drinking water regulations].

    PubMed

    Hauswirth, S

    2011-11-01

    The revision the Drinking Water Regulations will come into effect on 01.11.2011. Surveillance authorities and owners of drinking water supply systems had hoped for simplifications and reductions because of the new arrangements. According to the official statement for the revision the legislature intended to create more clarity, consider new scientific findings, to change regulations that have not been proved to close regulatory gaps, to deregulate and to increase the high quality standards. A detailed examination of the regulation text, however, raises doubts. The new classification of water supply systems requires different modalities of registration, water analyses and official observation, which will complicate the work of the authorities. In particular, the implementation of requirements of registration and examination for the owners of commercial and publicly-operated large hot-water systems in accordance with DVGW Worksheet W 551 requires more effort. According to the estimated 30 000 cases of legionellosis in Germany the need for a check of such systems for Legionella, however, is not called into question. Furthermore, the development of sampling plans and the monitoring of mobile water supply systems requires more work for the health authorities.